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Sample records for carbon deposition part

  1. Distribution and Orientation of Carbon Fibers in Polylactic Acid Parts Produced by Fused Deposition Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofstätter, Thomas; W. Gutmann, Ingomar; Koch, Thomas;

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is the understanding of the fiber orientation by investigations in respect to the inner configuration of a polylactic acid matrix reinforced with short carbon fibers after a fused deposition modeling extrusion process. The final parts were analyzed by X-ray, tomography, and ...... magnetic resonance imaging allowing a resolved orientation of the fibers and distribution within the part. The research contributes to the understanding of the fiber orientation and fiber reinforcement of fused deposition modeling parts in additive manufacturing....

  2. Corrosion Control by Deposition of Calcium Carbonate Films: Part 2, A Practical Approach for Operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Douglas; Sanks, Robert L.

    1977-01-01

    This article is part two in a series. It builds upon the first article and demonstrates, in a step-by-step fashion, the simplicity of using Caldwell-Lawrence diagrams to determine the amount of conditioning chemicals required to produce protective waters. (Author/MA)

  3. Deposition of carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Norway, there is currently a debate about whether or not to build gas power stations. To meet the possibility of reduced emission quotas for carbon dioxide in the future, current interest focuses on the incorporation of large-scale separation and deposition of carbon dioxide when such plants are planned. A group of experts concludes that this technology will become self-financing by means of environmental taxes. From the environmental point of view, taxes upon production are to be preferred over taxes on consumption

  4. Decomposition of benzene in the RF plasma environment - Part I. Formation of gaseous products and carbon depositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study employed radio-frequency (RF) plasma for decomposing benzene (C6H6) gas, and examined both gaseous products and solid depositions after reaction. The reactants and products were analyzed mainly by using both an on-line Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer and a gas chromatography. The analyses for solid deposition included electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA), element analysis and heat value analysis. The C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, CH4, CO2 and CO were detected and discussed. The analytical results demonstrate that in the C6H6/Ar plasma, C2H2 is the sole gaseous product being detected. The fraction of total carbon input converted into C2H2 (YC2H2) increased with increasing C6H6 feed concentration, but decreased with increasing input power. In the C6H6/H2/Ar system, besides C2H2, CH4, C2H4 and C2H6 were also detected, and their yields increased with increasing H2/C6H6 ratio. The above results indicated that the addition of H2 (auxiliary gas) achieves the benefit of creating hydrogen-rich species like CH4, C2H4 and C2H6. In the C6H6/O2/Ar system, C6H6 could be totally oxidized into CO2, CO and H2O, and no measurable phenol was found. Analyses of solid depositions revealed that the carbon depositions were similar to those of Anthracite. The carbon deposition has a heat value of 7000kcal/kg. Additionally, the possible reaction pathways were also built up and discussed

  5. Characterization of reactive flow-induced evolution of carbonate rocks using digital core analysis- part 1: Assessment of pore-scale mineral dissolution and deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qajar, Jafar; Arns, Christoph H.

    2016-09-01

    The application of X-ray micro-computed tomography (μ-CT) for quantitatively characterizing reactive-flow induced pore structure evolution including local particle detachment, displacement and deposition in carbonate rocks is investigated. In the studies conducted in this field of research, the experimental procedure has involved alternating steps of imaging and ex-situ core sample alteration. Practically, it is impossible to return the sample, with micron precision, to the same position and orientation. Furthermore, successive images of a sample in pre- and post-alteration states are usually taken at different conditions such as different scales, resolutions and signal-to-noise ratios. These conditions accompanying with subresolution features in the images make voxel-by-voxel comparisons of successive images problematic. In this paper, we first address the respective challenges in voxel-wise interpretation of successive images of carbonate rocks subject to reactive flow. Reactive coreflood in two carbonate cores with different rock types are considered. For the first rock, we used the experimental and imaging results published by Qajar et al. (2013) which showed a quasi-uniform dissolution regime. A similar reactive core flood was conducted in the second rock which resulted in wormhole-like dissolution regime. We particularly examine the major image processing operations such as transformation of images to the same grey-scale, noise filtering and segmentation thresholding and propose quantitative methods to evaluate the effectiveness of these operations in voxel-wise analysis of successive images of a sample. In the second part, we generalize the methodology based on the three-phase segmentation of normalized images, microporosity assignment and 2D histogram of image intensities to estimate grey-scale changes of individual image voxels for a general case where the greyscale images are segmented into arbitrary number of phases. The results show that local (voxel

  6. Characterization of reactive flow-induced evolution of carbonate rocks using digital core analysis- part 1: Assessment of pore-scale mineral dissolution and deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qajar, Jafar; Arns, Christoph H

    2016-09-01

    The application of X-ray micro-computed tomography (μ-CT) for quantitatively characterizing reactive-flow induced pore structure evolution including local particle detachment, displacement and deposition in carbonate rocks is investigated. In the studies conducted in this field of research, the experimental procedure has involved alternating steps of imaging and ex-situ core sample alteration. Practically, it is impossible to return the sample, with micron precision, to the same position and orientation. Furthermore, successive images of a sample in pre- and post-alteration states are usually taken at different conditions such as different scales, resolutions and signal-to-noise ratios. These conditions accompanying with subresolution features in the images make voxel-by-voxel comparisons of successive images problematic. In this paper, we first address the respective challenges in voxel-wise interpretation of successive images of carbonate rocks subject to reactive flow. Reactive coreflood in two carbonate cores with different rock types are considered. For the first rock, we used the experimental and imaging results published by Qajar et al. (2013) which showed a quasi-uniform dissolution regime. A similar reactive core flood was conducted in the second rock which resulted in wormhole-like dissolution regime. We particularly examine the major image processing operations such as transformation of images to the same grey-scale, noise filtering and segmentation thresholding and propose quantitative methods to evaluate the effectiveness of these operations in voxel-wise analysis of successive images of a sample. In the second part, we generalize the methodology based on the three-phase segmentation of normalized images, microporosity assignment and 2D histogram of image intensities to estimate grey-scale changes of individual image voxels for a general case where the greyscale images are segmented into arbitrary number of phases. The results show that local (voxel

  7. Cathodoluminescence in Quaternary carbonate deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, Colin J. R.

    2016-05-01

    The cathodoluminescent oscillatory and sectoral growth zones common in crystals formed in ancient limestone successions in a variety of putative environments appear to be rare or absent from Recent and Pleistocene marine carbonate sequences. The factors controlling cathodoluminescence and reasons for this disparity are examined. The cathodoluminescent zones in the cements of ancient rocks have been interpreted as responses to variations in the redox potential of formative pore waters during crystal growth; although similar cathodoluminescent behaviour is recorded from some deposits, including travertines and Quaternary speleothems, formed in what are thought to have been strongly oxidizing environments. The apparent absence of cathodoluminescence in the most Recent and Pleistocene marine deposits, that presumably reflect deposition and diagenesis in environments that are also characteristically oxidized, therefore seems anomalous. The controlling influences on cathodoluminescence are reviewed, together with evidence relating to observations of Pleistocene marine deposits and likely conditions of formation but, where it is present, the mechanism(s) for its development remain elusive.

  8. Deposition of diamondlike carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Sovey, J. S.; Banks, B. A. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A diamondlike carbon film is deposited in the surface of a substrate by exposing the surface to an argon ion beam containing a hydrocarbon. The current density in the ion beam is low during initial deposition of the film. Subsequent to this initial low current condition, the ion beam is increased to full power. At the same time, a second argon ion beam is directed toward the surface of the substrate. The second ion beam has an energy level much greater than that of the ion beam containing the hydrocarbon. This addition of energy to the system increases mobility of the condensing atoms and serves to remove lesser bound atoms.

  9. Carbonate Deposition on Antarctic Shelves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, T. D.; James, N. P.; Malcolm, I.

    2011-12-01

    Limestones associated with glaciomarine deposits occur throughout the geologic record but remain poorly understood. The best-described examples formed during major ice ages of the Neoproterozoic and Late Paleozoic. Quaternary analogs on Antarctic shelves have received comparatively little study. Here, we report on the composition, spatial distribution, and stratigraphic context of carbonate sediments contained in piston cores from the Ross Sea. The goals of this work are to (1) document the nature and distribution of carbonate sediments on the Ross Sea continental shelf and (2) examine temporal relationships to Quaternary glaciation. Results will be used to develop criteria that will improve understanding of analogous deposits in the ancient record. All carbonate-rich intervals in piston cores from the Ross Rea, now housed at the Antarctic Marine Geology Research Facility at Florida State University, were examined and described in detail. Sediment samples were disaggregated and sieved into size fractions before description with paleontological analysis carried out on the coarsest size fraction (>250 microns). Carbonate-rich sediments are concentrated in the northwestern Ross Sea, along the distal margins of Mawson and Pennell Banks. Calcareous facies include a spectrum of lithologies that range from fossiliferous mud, sand, and gravel to skeletal floatstone-rudstone and bafflestone. Floatstone-rudstone and bafflestone is most abundant along western-facing slopes in areas protected from the Antarctic Coastal Current. Sand-prone facies dominate the tops of banks and mud-prone, often spicultic, facies occur in deeper areas. The carbonate factory is characterized by a low-diversity, heterozoan assemblage that is dominated by stylasterine hydrocorals, barnacles, and bryozoans. Molluscs and echinoids are present but not abundant. Planktic and benthic foraminifera are ubiquitous components of the sediment matrix, which is locally very rich in sponge spicules. Biota rarely

  10. Deposition and microstructure of pyrolytic carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two kinds of experiment concerning pyrolytic carbon deposition have been carried out. In one experiment, an attempt was made to coat alumina particles as well as buffer-coated UO2 particle with pyrolytic carbon of laminar structure by means of a fluidized bed technique. Benzene was used as the carbon source and the temperature was 10000C. In the other experiment, carbon deposition was made on graphite surface. Possibility was tested to obtain uniform coating along the direction of gas stream. Carbon source, in this case, was mainly n-hexane and the temperature ranged 750 -- 8500C. Microstructure of the deposit was studied in both experiments. (author)

  11. Rocky Mountain Carbonate Spring Deposit development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainey, Dustin Kyle

    Relict Holocene carbonate spring deposits containing diverse biotic and abiotic depositional textures are present at Fall Creek cold sulphur springs, Alberta, Fairmont Hot Springs, British Columbia, and Hot Creek cold springs, British Columbia. The relict deposits are formed mainly of low-magnesium crystalline calcite contained in laterally continuous strata. Paleo-flow regimes were characterized by extensive sheet flow that increased the surface area of spring water exposed to the atmosphere. Calcite precipitated inorganically from spring water that attained CaCO3 supersaturation through agitation-induced CO2 degassing that was facilitated by elevated flow rates and a large surface area as spring water flowed down-slope. Thus, the deposits contain only minor amounts of detrital, mechanically deposited, and biogenic carbonate. Evaporation was only a minor contributor to CaCO3 supersaturation, mainly in quiescent environments. Photosynthetic CO2 removal did not measurably contribute to CaCO3 supersaturation. Calcite crystals precipitated in biotic facies formed from low to moderately supersaturated spring water, whereas abiotic dendrite crystals formed rapidly from highly supersaturated spring water. Calcite passively nucleated on cyanobacteria, bryophytes and macrophytes, and was probably facilitated by cyanobacterial extracellular polymeric substances. Cyanobacterial filaments and stromatolites are integral parts of all three deposits, whereas bryophytes were restricted to the Fall Creek and Hot Creek deposits. Diagenetic microbial degradation of crystalline calcite was common to all three deposits, but recrystallization was limited to the Fall Creek deposit. The amount and location of calcite precipitation relative to the vents was controlled by the concentrations of Ca2+ and HCO3- in solution, and discharge volume fluctuations. Spring water with high [Ca2+] and [HCO 3-] precipitated large amounts of calcite proximal to the vents (e.g. Fairmont), whereas spring

  12. Environment of ore deposition in the Creede mining district, San Juan Mountains, Colorado; Part IV, source of fluids, from oxygen, hydrogen, and carbon isotope studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethke, P.M.; Rye, R.O.

    1979-01-01

    The hydrogen isotopic composition of fluids responsible for formation of the near-surface silver-base metal vein deposits at Creede was measured by direct analysis of inclusion fluids in sphalerite, quartz, and rhodochrosite and was estimated from analyses of illite and chlorite. The oxygen isotopic composition was determined directly on inclusion fluids in sphalerite and was estimated from analyses of quartz, illite, rhodochrosite, siderite, and adularia. The carbon isotopic composition was estimated from analyses of rhodochrosite and siderite. The ranges in isotopic composition for water and CO2 in the fluids associated with the formation of each of the minerals is given below (number of determinations given in parentheses):Mineral delta D (sub H2) O ppm delta 18 O (sub H2) O ppm delta 13 C (sub CO2) ppmSphalerite -81 to -54 (4) -10.1 to -4.5 (4)Quartz -97 to -86 (4) -5.9 to 1.8 (18)Illite -62 to -50 (8) -1.6 to 1.2(7)Chlorite -64 to -55 (10) -2.2 to 0.8 (10)Adularia 4.2 (1)Rhodochrosite -82 to -78 (2) 4.2 to 9.4 (9) -5.7 to -4.2 (9)Siderite 4.9 to 9.9 (6) -6.9 to -2.7 (6)The delta D (sub H2) O and delta 18 O (sub H2) O values of fluids associated with the formation of sphalerite, quartz, illite/chlorite, and carbonate minerals differ substantially from one another, and these differences appear to have been maintained throughout the depositional history, regardless of the positions of the minerals in the paragenetic sequence.The data suggest that waters from three coexisting reservoirs fed the vein system alternately and episodically during vein formation, and apparently there was little mixing of the fluids from the different reservoirs. The hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon isotope data suggest that the carbonate waters were deep seated, probably dominantly magmatic, in origin. The sphalerite and illite/chlorite waters must have been dominantly meteoric in origin and substantially oxygen shifted by exchange with the volcanic country rocks. The quartz waters were

  13. Friction and Wear Properties of Selected Solid Lubricating Films. Part 3; Magnetron-Sputtered and Plasma-Assisted, Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Diamondlike Carbon Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Iwaki, Masanori; Gotoh, Kenichi; Obara, Shingo; Imagawa, Kichiro

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate commercially developed dry solid film lubricants for aerospace bearing applications, an investigation was conducted to examine the friction and wear behavior of magnetron-sputtered diamondlike carbon (MS DLC) and plasma-assisted, chemical-vapor-deposited diamondlike carbon (PACVD DLC) films in sliding contact with 6-mm-diameter American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) 440C stainless steel balls. Unidirectional sliding friction experiments were conducted with a load of 5.9 N (600 g), a mean Hertzian contact pressure of 0.79 GPa (maximum Hertzian contact pressure of L-2 GPa), and a sliding velocity of 0.2 m/s. The experiments were conducted at room temperature in three environments: ultrahigh vacuum (vacuum pressure, 7x10(exp -7) Pa), humid air (relative humidity, approx.20 percent), and dry nitrogen (relative humidity, films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and surface profilometry. Marked differences in the friction and wear of the DLC films investigated herein resulted from the environmental conditions. The main criteria for judging the performance of the DLC films were coefficient of friction and wear rate, which had to be less than 0.3 and on the order of 10(exp -6) cu mm/N-m or less, respectively. MS DLC films and PACVD DLC films met the criteria in humid air and dry nitrogen but failed in ultrahigh vacuum, where the coefficients of friction were greater than the criterion, 0.3. In sliding contact with 440C stainless steel balls in all three environments the PACVD DLC films exhibited better tribological performance (i.e., lower friction and wear) than the MS DLC films. All sliding involved adhesive transfer of wear materials: transfer of DLC wear debris to the counterpart 440C stainless steel and transfer of 440C stainless steel wear debris to the counterpart DLC film.

  14. Characterization of Carbon Deposits Formed During Plasma Pyrolysis of Xinjiang Candle Coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guilin; Meng, Yuedong; Shu, Xingsheng; Fang, Shidong

    2009-08-01

    Carbon deposits were formed on the reactor wall during plasma pyrolysis of the Xinjiang candle coal in our V-style plasma pyrolysis pilot-plant. The carbon deposits were studied using a scanning electronic microscope (SEM) and the X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. It was found that carbon deposits located at different parts in the reactor exhibited different microscopic patterns. The formation mechanism of the carbon deposits was deduced. The downward increase in the graphitization degree of the carbon deposits was found and interpreted.

  15. Catalytic carbon deposition on 3-dimensional carbon fibre supports

    OpenAIRE

    Thornton, Matthew James

    2005-01-01

    Catalytic carbon deposition reactions, using methane, ethane or synthetic natural gas (1.8 vol. % propane, 6.7 vol. % ethane and balance methane) as the carbon-containing gas feedstock with or without the addition of hydrogen, have been investigated over nickel, cobalt and iron catalysts supported on 3-dimensional carbon fibre supports, using both a horizontal tube furnace and an isothermal, isobaric induction furnace. The transition metal catalysts were prepared by impregnating 3-dimens...

  16. Controlled Deposition and Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Patry, JoAnne L. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) attraction material is deposited on a substrate in the gap region between two electrodes on the substrate. An electric potential is applied to the two electrodes. The CNT attraction material is wetted with a solution defined by a carrier liquid having carbon nanotubes (CNTs) suspended therein. A portion of the CNTs align with the electric field and adhere to the CNT attraction material. The carrier liquid and any CNTs not adhered to the CNT attraction material are then removed.

  17. Deuterium trapping in carbon films formed in different deposition conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the results of investigations on hydrogen trapping in the carbon films deposited in the plasma of four experimental devices (two laboratory stands, plasma accelerator QSPA-T and tokamak Tore Supra) covering a wide range of deposition conditions. The features of hydrogen trapping common for these devices are evaluated. It is shown that the trapping in the films of the certain device increases with the decrease of the deposition rate. Hydrogen from residual gas constitutes nearly half, or bigger part of the whole retention in the deposited films. It is trapped through inelastic interaction of the particles with the surface (“potential” mechanism of trapping). Ion irradiation and oxygen impurities activate the “potential” trapping. In conclusion some implications from the presented data are drawn

  18. Responses of Carbon Dynamics to Nitrogen Deposition in Typical Freshwater Wetland of Sanjiang Plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of nitrogen deposition (N-deposition on the carbon dynamics in typical Calamagrostis angustifolia wetland of Sanjiang Plain were studied by a pot-culture experiment during two continuous plant growing seasons. Elevated atmospheric N-deposition caused significant increases in the aboveground net primary production and root biomass; moreover, a preferential partition of carbon to root was also observed. Different soil carbon fractions gained due to elevated N-deposition and their response intensities followed the sequence of labile carbon > dissolved organic carbon > microbial biomass carbon, and the interaction between N-deposition and flooded condition facilitated the release of different carbon fractions. Positive correlations were found between CO2 and CH4 fluxes and liable carbon contents with N-deposition, and flooded condition also tended to facilitate CH4 fluxes and to inhibit the CO2 fluxes with N-deposition. The increases in soil carbon fractions occurring in the nitrogen treatments were significantly correlated with increases in root, aboveground parts, total biomass, and their carbon uptake. Our results suggested that N-deposition could enhance the contents of active carbon fractions in soil system and carbon accumulation in plant of the freshwater wetlands.

  19. Wet deposition of elemental carbon and sulfate in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Ogren, J.A.; R. J. Charlson

    2011-01-01

    Elemental carbon and sulfate were measured in monthly precipitation samples at 12 rural sites inSweden from April to August, 1981. Wet deposition of excess sulfate was significantly correlatedwith elemental carbon deposition, and no systematic spatial or temporal variations in the ratio ofexcess sulfate to elemental carbon were observed. Comparision of these results with sulfur andelemental carbon emissions in Western Europe suggests that elemental carbon is removed at aslower rate than sulfu...

  20. Deposition of the platinum crystals on the carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new technique and the affecting factors for depositing platinum on the carbon nanotubes were investigated. The results show that the deposited platinum crystals in the atmosphere of hydrogen or nitrogen have a small size and a homogeneous distribution on the surface of the carbon nanotubes. The pretreatment would decrease the platinum particles on the carbon nanotubes significantly.

  1. Source Molecular Effect on Amorphous Carbon Film Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Kawazoe, Hiroki; Inayoshi, Takanori; Shinohara, Masanori; Matsuda, Yoshinobu; Fujiyama, Hiroshi; Nitta, Yuki; Nakatani, Tatsuyuki

    2009-01-01

    We investigated deposition process of amorphous carbon films using acetylene and methane as a source molecule, by using infrared spectroscopy in multiple internal reflection geometry (MIR-IRAS). We found that deposited film structures were different due to source molecules.

  2. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Deposition on Model Environmental Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deposition of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) on model environmental surfaces was investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Deposition behaviors of MWNTs on positively and negatively charged surfaces were in good agreement with Der...

  3. Coaxial carbon plasma gun deposition of amorphous carbon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A unique plasma gun employing coaxial carbon electrodes was used in an attempt to deposit thin films of amorphous diamond-like carbon. A number of different structural, compositional, and electrical characterization techniques were used to characterize these films. These included scanning electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, X ray diffraction and absorption, spectrographic analysis, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and selected area electron diffraction. Optical absorption and electrical resistivity measurements were also performed. The films were determined to be primarily amorphous, with poor adhesion to fused silica substrates. Many inclusions of particulates were found to be present as well. Analysis of these particulates revealed the presence of trace impurities, such as Fe and Cu, which were also found in the graphite electrode material. The electrodes were the source of these impurities. No evidence of diamond-like crystallite structure was found in any of the film samples. Details of the apparatus, experimental procedure, and film characteristics are presented

  4. Coaxial carbon plasma gun deposition of amorphous carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sater, D. M.; Gulino, D. A.; Rutledge, S. K.

    1984-01-01

    A unique plasma gun employing coaxial carbon electrodes was used in an attempt to deposit thin films of amorphous diamond-like carbon. A number of different structural, compositional, and electrical characterization techniques were used to characterize these films. These included scanning electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, X ray diffraction and absorption, spectrographic analysis, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and selected area electron diffraction. Optical absorption and electrical resistivity measurements were also performed. The films were determined to be primarily amorphous, with poor adhesion to fused silica substrates. Many inclusions of particulates were found to be present as well. Analysis of these particulates revealed the presence of trace impurities, such as Fe and Cu, which were also found in the graphite electrode material. The electrodes were the source of these impurities. No evidence of diamond-like crystallite structure was found in any of the film samples. Details of the apparatus, experimental procedure, and film characteristics are presented.

  5. Designing carbon markets, Part II: Carbon markets in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper analyses the design of carbon markets in space (i.e., geographically). It is part of a twin set of papers that, starting from first principles, ask what an optimal global carbon market would look like by around 2030. Our focus is on firm-level cap-and-trade systems, although much of what we say would also apply to government-level trading and carbon offset schemes. We examine the 'first principles' of spatial design to maximise flexibility and to minimise costs, including key design issues in linking national and regional carbon markets together to create a global carbon market.

  6. Littoral dripstone and flowstone-non spelean carbonate secondary deposits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taborosi Danko

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Speleothem-like dripstone and flowstone deposits can form in the non-spelean environments of marine notches on tropical carbonate coastlines. Hereby termed “littoral dripstone” and “littoral flowstone” to distinguish them from genuine cave deposits, they reflect the basic speleothem types: draperies, stalactites, stalagmites, and columns. Nevertheless, these formations lack the luster and crystallinity of cave analogues, and are not nearly as well-developed, dense, and massive. They are composed of layered microcrystalline aragonite and calcite, are generally highly porous, and invariably overlie dissolutional and bioerosional karren. Because true speleothems, often found in the remnants of solution voids breached by coastal erosion, are also commonly present in the modern littoral environments on tropical carbonate islands, they could be confused with littoral dripstone and flowstone deposits. The distinction between the two is crucial, because the true speleothems are indicators of karst cave paleoenvironments, while littoral dripstone and flowstone are contemporary parts of the modern coastal landscape.

  7. Metallization on FDM Parts Using the Chemical Deposition Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azhar Equbal

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Metallization of ABS (acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene parts has been studied on flat part surfaces. These parts are fabricated on an FDM (fused deposition modeling machine using the layer-wise deposition principle using ABS as a part material. Electroless copper deposition on ABS parts was performed using two different surface preparation processes, namely ABS parts prepared using chromic acid for etching and ABS parts prepared using a solution mixture of sulphuric acid and hydrogen peroxide (H2SO4/H2O2 for etching. After surface preparations using these routes, copper (Cu is deposited electrolessly using four different acidic baths. The acidic baths used are 5 wt% CuSO4 (copper sulfate with 15 wt% of individual acids, namely HF (hydrofluoric acid, H2SO4 (sulphuric acid, H3PO4 (phosphoric acid and CH3COOH (acetic acid. Cu deposition under different acidic baths used for both the routes is presented and compared based on their electrical performance, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS. The result shows that chromic acid etched samples show better electrical performance and Cu deposition in comparison to samples etched via H2SO4/H2O2.

  8. Carbon deposition with LOX/RP-1 propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lausten, M. F.; Rousar, D. C.; Buccella, S.

    1985-01-01

    The generation and deposition of carbon were studied using subscale hardware with LOX/RP-1 propellants. Deposition on a turbine simulator at preburner or gas generator conditions was evaluated at mixture ratios of 0.25 to 1.0 and chamber pressures of 750 to 1500 psia. Deposition on the combustion chamber wall was investigated at mixture ratios of 2.0 to 4.0 and chamber pressures of 1000 to 1500 psia. Significant carbon buildup was observed on the turbine simulator at low mixture ratios but no carbon deposition on the chamber walls was detected at the higher mixture ratios.

  9. DEPOSITION OF NICKEL ON CARBON FIBRES BY GALVANIC METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavol Štefánik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of coating parameters in quasi-static coating of Ni layer on carbon fibre tow by galvanic method is presented. The tow of fibres was immersed in typical galvanic bath based on NiSO4, NiCl2, Na2SO4 and H3BO3 and current to carbon fibres was supplied by two leading metal rolls which are parts of continuous coating apparatus. The main parameters were current of 1 A, electrolyte temperature of 50 °C and the distance from power contacts to level of galvanic bath (8 or 13 cm. The amount and structure of deposited Ni layer at coating time 15 and 90 seconds of exposure in electrolyte and depth of immersion of tow into bath were discussed.

  10. Carbon deposition and deuterium inventory in ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon erosion and deposition in the ASDEX Upgrade divertor was investigated using a poloidal section of marked divertor tiles and silicon samples below the divertor structure. The whole inner divertor is a net carbon deposition area, while a large fraction of the outer divertor is erosion dominated and the roof baffle tiles show a complicated distribution of erosion and deposition areas. In total, 43.7 g B+C were redeposited, of which 88% were deposited on tiles and 9% in remote areas (below roof baffle, on vessel wall structures). Identified carbon sources in the main chamber are too low by a factor of ten to explain the observed carbon divertor deposition, but carbon erosion is observed at the outer divertor tiles. Deuterium is trapped mainly on the surfaces of the inner divertor tiles. The long term retention in codeposited hydrocarbon layers is about 3% of the total deuterium fuel input. (author)

  11. Designing carbon markets. Part I: Carbon markets in time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper analyses the design of carbon markets in time (i.e., intertemporally). It is part of a twin set of papers that ask, starting from first principles, what an optimal global carbon market would look like by around 2030. Our focus is on firm-level cap-and-trade systems, although much of what we say would also apply to government-level trading and carbon offset schemes. We examine the 'first principles' of temporal design that would help to maximise flexibility and to minimise costs, including banking and borrowing and other mechanisms to provide greater carbon price predictability and credibility over time.

  12. Production of carbon molecular sieves from palm shell through carbon deposition from methane

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadi Maedeh; Najafpour Ghasem D.; Mohamed Abdul Rahman

    2011-01-01

    The possibility of production of carbon molecular sieve (CMS) from palm shell as a waste lignocellulosic biomass was investigated. CMS samples were prepared through heat treatment processes including carbonization, physiochemical activation and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from methane. Methane was pyrolyzed to deposit fine carbon on the pore mouth of palm shell-based activated carbon to yield CMS. All the deposition experiments were performed at 800 ºC, while the methane flow rate (...

  13. Alternate slicing and deposition strategies for fused deposition modelling of light curved parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Huang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Fused deposition modeling (FDM, as one of the additive manufacturing (AM techniques, has been widely used in the manufacturing industry from the 1990s. It is relatively cheaper than other AM methods and there are other advantages such as being able to process a variety of other polymers. Currently, FDM is more likely to be suitable for direct production of the terminal-use parts, in some cases challenging traditional process such as injection molding. Research evidences indicate that change of road and layer structure would have significant influence on the meso-structure and thus impact the mechanical properties of the resulting polymer parts. Adaptive flat layer deposition and curved layer deposition have been introduced to improve the mechanical properties of terminal-use product. It is necessary that an appropriate deposition scheme is essential to ensure the best interroad and inter-layer connectivity. Uninterrupted connections are likely to result in a continuous network of polymer chains, as in the case of the conventional processes. The current research proposes conventional flat layer deposition, adaptive flat layer deposition and curved layer deposition for FDM. In particular for curved parts, curved layer deposition in expected to ensure fiber continuity and better meso-structure. Mathematical models are developed for curved slicing, practically implemented to print physical parts and test results suggest marked improvement in the mechanical characteristics of curved parts.

  14. High Energy Radial Deposition of Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Konrad Suschke; René Hübner; Peter Paul Murmu; Prasanth Gupta; John Futter; Andreas Markwitz

    2015-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings were deposited with a new direct ion deposition system using a novel 360 degree ion source operating at acceleration voltage between 4 and 8 kV. Cross-sectional TEM images show that the coatings have a three layered structure which originates from changes in the deposition parameters taking into account ion source condition, ion current density, deposition angles, ion sputtering and ion source movement. Varying structural growth conditions can be achieved by...

  15. Preparation and physical properties of vapour-deposited carbon-carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In its first part, this research thesis reports a bibliographical study on methods of preparation of various types of vapour-deposited (CVD) carbons, and the author notices that only structure and texture properties of these macroscopically homogeneous pyro-carbons have been studied in detail. For a better understanding of the behaviour of carbon-carbon composites, this thesis thus reports the study of the relationships between physical properties, macroscopic texture and microscopic structure. A densification installation and methods of characterisation have been developed. The fabrication process and its installation are presented (oven with its temperature and gas rate controls, study of its thermal gradient, substrate, heat treatments), and the study and characterisation of carbon-carbon composites are reported: structure and texture properties (studied by optic and scanning electronic microscopy, density measurements, and X-ray diffraction), physical properties (electronic paramagnetic resonance, static magnetism, electric and thermal conductivity). In the last part, the author comments and discusses the obtained results: conditions of preparation, existence, physical properties of the different observed microstructures

  16. Carbon nanostructures and networks produced by chemical vapor deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Kowlgi, N.K.K.; Koper, G.J.M.; Raalten, R.A.D.

    2012-01-01

    The invention pertains to a method for manufacturing crystalline carbon nanostructures and/or a network of crystalline carbon nanostructures, comprising: (i) providing a bicontinuous micro-emulsion containing metal nanoparticles having an average particle size between 1and 100nm; (ii) bringing said bicontinuous micro-emulsion into contact with a substrate; and (iii) subjecting said metal nanoparticles and a gaseous carbon source to chemical vapor deposition, thus forming carbon nanostructures...

  17. Carbon deposition characteristics of LO2/HC propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Rosemary; Mercer, Steve D.

    1987-01-01

    The generation and deposition of carbon have been studied using subscale hardware with LO2/RP-1, LO2/propane, and LO2/methane at low mixture ratio conditions. The deposition of carbon on the turbine simulator tubes was evaluated at mixture ratios of 0.20 to 0.60, and at chamber pressures from 720 to 1650 psia. The carbon-deposition rate is a strong function of mixture ratio and a weak function of chamber pressure. There is a mixture ratio that will minimize deposition for LO2/RP-1; a threshold mixture ratio for LO2/propane; and no deposition for LO2/methane at any mixture ratio tested. The turbine drive operating limits were defined for each fuel tested.

  18. High Energy Radial Deposition of Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Suschke

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Diamond-like carbon (DLC coatings were deposited with a new direct ion deposition system using a novel 360 degree ion source operating at acceleration voltage between 4 and 8 kV. Cross-sectional TEM images show that the coatings have a three layered structure which originates from changes in the deposition parameters taking into account ion source condition, ion current density, deposition angles, ion sputtering and ion source movement. Varying structural growth conditions can be achieved by tailoring the deposition parameters. The coatings show good promise for industrial use due to their high hardness, low friction and excellent adhesion to the surface of the samples.

  19. Carbon deposition on nickel ferrites and nickel-magnetite surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon deposition on Commercial Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (CAGR) fuel cladding and heat exchanger surfaces lowers heat transfer efficiency and increases fuel pin temperatures. Several types of deposit have been identified including both thin dense layers and also low density columnar deposits with filamentary or convoluted laminar structure. The low-density types are often associated with particles containing iron, nickel or manganese. To identify the role of nickel in the deposition process surfaces composed of nickel-iron spinels or metallic nickel/magnetite mixtures have been exposed to γ radiation in a gas environment simulating that in the reactor. Examination of these surfaces by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) have shown that while metallic nickel (Ni(O)) catalyses the formation of filamentary low density carbon deposits, the presence of divalent nickel (Ni(II)) sites in spinel type oxides is associated only with dense deposits. (author)

  20. Carbon Deposition Model for Oxygen-Hydrocarbon Combustion, Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, R.; Ito, J. I.; Niiya, K. Y.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are details of the design, fabrication, and testing of subscale hardware used in the evaluation of carbon deposition characteristics of liquid oxygen and three hydrocarbon fuels for both main chamber and preburner/gas generator operating conditions. In main chamber conditions, the deposition of carbon on the combustion chamber wall was investigated at mixture ratios of 2.0 to 4.0 and at chamber pressures of 1000 to 1500 psia. No carbon deposition on chamber walls was detected at these main chamber mixture ratios. In preburner/gas generator operating conditions, the deposition of carbon on the turbine simulator tubes was evaluated at mixture ratios of 0.20 to 0.60 and at chamber pressures of 720 to 1650 psia. The results of the tests showed carbon deposition rate to be a strong function of mixture ratio and a weak function of chamber pressure. Further analyses evaluated the operational concequences of carbon deposition on preburner/gas generator performance. This is Volume 2 of the report, which contains data plots of all the test programs.

  1. Carbon deposition model for oxygen-hydrocarbon combustion, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, R.; Ito, J. I.; Niiya, K. Y.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are details of the design, fabrication, and testing of subscale hardware used in the evaluation of carbon deposition characteristics of liquid oxygen and three hydrocarbon fuels for both main chamber and preburner/gas generator operating conditions. In main chamber conditions, the deposition of carbon on the combustion chamber wall was investigated at mixture ratios of 2.0 to 4.0 and at pressures of 1000 to 1500 psia. No carbon deposition on the chamber walls was detected at these main chamber mixture ratios. In preburner/gas generator operating conditions, the deposition of carbon on the turbine simulator tubes was evaluated at mixture ratios of 0.20 to 0.60 and at chamber pressures of 720 to 1650 psia. The results of the tests showed carbon deposition rate to be a strong function of mixture ratio and a weak function of chamber pressure. Further analyses evaluated the operational consequences of carbon deposition on preburner/gas generator performance. The report is in two volumes, of which this is Volume 1 covering the main body of the report plus Appendixes A through D.

  2. Self-Assembled Monolayers deposition in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    Rabbia, Laurent; Perrut, Vincent; Pons, Patrick; Lellouchi, Djemel

    2009-01-01

    Self-Assembled Monolayers of organic molecules have been successfully deposited onto wafer surface in supercritical carbon dioxide. Deposition method and apparatus are described. The layers are characterized by AFM and water droplet contact angle. Interest of this technique compared to liquid and vapor phase is discussed and studied for surface conversion from hydrophilic to hydrophobic for different materials.

  3. Carbonate deposition, Pyramid Lake subbasin, Nevada: 1. Sequence of formation and elevational distribution of carbonate deposits (Tufas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, L.

    1994-01-01

    During the late Quarternary, the elevation of terrace cutting and carbonate deposition in the Pyramid Lake subbasin were controlled by constancy of lake level imposed by spill to adjoining subbasins. Sill elevations are 1177-1183 m (Mud Lake Slough Sill), 1207 m (Emerson Pass Sill), and 1265 m (Darwin Pass Sill). Carbonate deposition was favored by: (1) hydrologic closure, (2) proximity to a source of calcium, (3) elevated water temperature, and (4) a solid substrate. The thickness and aspect of tufa are a function oflake-level dynamics. Relatively thin sheets and pendant sheets were deposited during a rising or falling lake. The upper parts of thick reef-form tufas have a horizontal aspect and were deposited in a lake which was stabilized by spill to the Carson Desert subbasin. The lower parts of the reef-form tufas are thinner and their outer surface has a vertical aspect, indicating that the lower part formed in a receding lake. The thickest and most complete sequences of tufa are mounds that border the Pyramid Lake shore. The tops of the tallest mounds reach the elevation of the Darwin Pass Sill and many mounds have been eroded to the elevations of the Mud Lake Slough Sill of the Emerson Pass Sill. The sequence of tufa formation (from oldest to youngest) displayed in these mounds is: (1) a beachrock containing carbonate-cemented volcanic cobbles, (2) broken and eroded old spheroids that contain thinolitic tufa and an outer rind of dense laminated tufa, (3) large cylindrical (tubular) tufas capped by (4) coatings of old dense tufas, and (5) several generations of old branching tufa commonly associated with thin, platy tufas and coatings of thinolitic tufa, (6) young spheroids that contain poorly oriented young thinolitic tufa in the center and several generations of radially oriented young thinolitic tufas near the outer edge, (7) a transitional thinolite-to-branching tufa, (8) two or more layers of young branching tufa, (9) a 0.5-cm-thick layer of fine

  4. Catalyst deposition for the preparation of carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    covered nano patterned surface is configured to ensure that no more than a single island of catalyst is formed on each plateau, so that a sub sequent growth of carbon nanotubes from the deposited islands result in that no more than a single carbon nanotube is grown from each plateau....

  5. Hard carbon films: Deposition and diagnostics

    OpenAIRE

    Frgala Zdeněk; Kudrle Vít; Janča Jan; Meško Marcel; Eliáš Marek; Buršík Jiří

    2003-01-01

    We studied the growth of microcrystalline diamond films on pre-treated Si and WC-Co substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition (MPCVD). The pre-treatment was varied and its effect on diamond film was studied.

  6. Physical properties of chemical vapour deposited nanostructured carbon thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahadik, D.B.; Shinde, S.S.; Bhosale, C.H. [Electrochemical Materials Laboratory, Department of Physics, Shivaji University, Kolhapur, Maharashtra 416004 (India); Rajpure, K.Y., E-mail: rajpure@yahoo.com [Electrochemical Materials Laboratory, Department of Physics, Shivaji University, Kolhapur, Maharashtra 416004 (India)

    2011-02-03

    Research highlights: In the present paper, nanostructured carbon films are grown using a natural precursor 'turpentine oil (C{sub 10}H{sub 16})' as a carbon source in the simple thermal chemical vapour deposition method. The influence of substrate surface topography (viz. stainless steel, fluorine doped tin oxide coated quartz) and temperature on the evolution of carbon allotropes surfaces topography/microstructural and structural properties are investigated and discussed. - Abstract: A simple thermal chemical vapour deposition technique is employed for the deposition of carbon films by pyrolysing the natural precursor 'turpentine oil' on to the stainless steel (SS) and FTO coated quartz substrates at higher temperatures (700-1100 deg. C). In this work, we have studied the influence of substrate and deposition temperature on the evolution of structural and morphological properties of nanostructured carbon films. The films were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), contact angle measurements, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy techniques. XRD study reveals that the films are polycrystalline exhibiting hexagonal and face-centered cubic structures on SS and FTO coated glass substrates respectively. SEM images show the porous and agglomerated surface of the films. Deposited carbon films show the hydrophobic nature. FTIR study displays C-H and O-H stretching vibration modes in the films. Raman analysis shows that, high ID/IG for FTO substrate confirms the dominance of sp{sup 3} bonds with diamond phase and less for SS shows graphitization effect with dominant sp{sup 2} bonds. It reveals the difference in local microstructure of carbon deposits leading to variation in contact angle and hardness, which is ascribed to difference in the packing density of carbon films, as observed also by Raman.

  7. Fossil organic carbon in Siberian Yedoma and thermokarst deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, J.; Schirrmeister, L.; Wetterich, S.

    2011-12-01

    During the late Quaternary, a large pool of organic carbon accumulated in the ice-rich syngenetic frozen deposits and soils preserved in the arctic and subarctic permafrost zone. Because of the potential release of organic carbon from degrading permafrost, the organic-matter (OM) inventory in Yedoma deposits and its degradation features are relevant to current concerns about the effects of global warming. In this context, it is essential to improve the understanding permafrost-stored OM composition and availability. The objective of this study is to develop an approach of OM quantification in frozen deposits including OM quality estimation. We analyzed OM characteristics like total organic carbon content, stable carbon isotopes and carbon-nitrogen ratios. Moreover, lipid biomarkers (alkanes, fatty acids and glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether) and sediment parameters like grain size and bulk density of Yedoma and thermokarst deposits exposed at Duvanny Yar (lower Kolyma River, Siberia) and the west coast of Buor Khaya Peninsula (Laptev Sea, Siberia) were studied. With the biomarker approach it is possible to distinguish deposits which were accumulated and frozen during the Pleistocene and Holocene. Biomarker indices, like the compound specific index, average chain length and tetraether characteristics supply feasible results for past permafrost environments. Late Pleistocene biomarker records indicate cold conditions during the growth/summer period for the late Pleistocene and generally low degradation of the stored OM. In contrast, Holocene thermokarst deposits indicate warmer conditions. The averaged volumetric OM content of the studied Yedoma and thermokarst deposits are greater than 10 kg/m^3 and do not exceed 30 kg/m^3. Given that Yedoma deposits accumulated at relatively fast rates and at low temperatures, the OM underwent a short time of decomposition before it was incorporated into a permanently-frozen state. Consequently, such deposits contain a labile

  8. Carbonate hosted gold deposit in Tasmania, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This study uses elemental and isotopic composition of carbonates associated with gold from Henty and Beaconsfield in Tasmania, Australia, to illustrate source of gold-bearing fluids, salinity, temperature and dissolution and reprecipitation of carbonate. The Beaconsfield and Henty gold mines are located in northern and western Tasmania respectively. Gold mineralisation in Beaconsfield occurs within the quartz-carbonate Tasmania Reef (Lower to Middle Palaeozoic sequence, Hills, 1998). The Henty gold mine is located at the base of the Cambrian Tyndall Group (volcano-sedimentary succession, White and McPhie, 1996) close to Henty Fault. Gold in carbonate samples from Henty ranges from 7.7 to 9360 ppm and in Beaconsfield ranges from 0.01 to 434 ppm. The amount of carbonate in samples from Henty and Beaconsfield gold mines varies from approximately 24 to 99.8%. Bivariate plot of Ca relative to total amounts of Mg, Fe and Mn illustrates that the major carbonate minerals at Beaconsfield and Henty gold mines are magnesian ankerite and calcite. The difference in carbonate mineralogy, at Henty and Beaconsfield gold mines, is attributed to the composition of fluids responsible for carbonate alteration. Gold and magnesium in Beaconsfield ankerite are derived from the leaching of Cambrian ultramafic rocks during the Devonian by the passage of meteoric fluids through tectonically affected Ordovician carbonates (Rao and Adabi, 1999). The total concentration of Fe and Mn are low (0.5 to 2%) in Henty and high (1 to 17.5%) in Beaconsfield ankerite, possibly due to oxidising conditions at Henty and reducing conditions at Beaconsfield gold mines during gold mineralisation. Variation of Sr values between Beaconsfield ankerite and Henty calcite is related to dissolution of limestone that increase Sr concentrations in gold mineralising fluids. Na values in both Beaconsfield (20 to 1100 ppm) and Henty carbonates (25 to 1650 ppm) suggest low salinity fluids responsible for gold

  9. Influence of variable rates of neritic carbonate deposition on atmospheric carbon dioxide and pelagic sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, J. C.; Opdyke, B. C.

    1995-01-01

    Short-term imbalances in the global cycle of shallow water calcium carbonate deposition and dissolution may be responsible for much of the observed Pleistocene change in atmospheric carbon dioxide content. However, any proposed changes in the alkalinity balance of the ocean must be reconciled with the sedimentary record of deep-sea carbonates. The possible magnitude of the effect of shallow water carbonate deposition on the dissolution of pelagic carbonate can be tested using numerical simulations of the global carbon cycle. Boundary conditions can be defined by using extant shallow water carbonate accumulation data and pelagic carbonate deposition/dissolution data. On timescales of thousands of years carbonate deposition versus dissolution is rarely out of equilibrium by more than 1.5 x 10(13) mole yr-1. Results indicate that the carbonate chemistry of the ocean is rarely at equilibrium on timescales less than 10 ka. This disequilibrium is probably due to sea level-induced changes in shallow water calcium carbonate deposition/dissolution, an interpretation that does not conflict with pelagic sedimentary data from the central Pacific.

  10. Electrochemical Metal Deposition on Carbon Nanotubes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dunsch, L.; Janda, Pavel; Mukhopadhyay, K.; Shinohara, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 6 (2001), s. 427-435. ISSN 1344-9931 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : carbon nanotubes * electrodeposition * cyclic voltammetry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 0.800, year: 2001

  11. Carbon nanotube forests growth using catalysts from atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Bingan; Zhang, Can; Esconjauregui, Santiago; Xie, Rongsi; Zhong, Guofang; Robertson, John [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Bhardwaj, Sunil [Istituto Officina dei Materiali-CNR Laboratorio TASC, s.s. 14, km 163.4, I-34012 Trieste (Italy); Sincrotone Trieste S.C.p.A., s.s. 14, km 163.4, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Cepek, Cinzia [Istituto Officina dei Materiali-CNR Laboratorio TASC, s.s. 14, km 163.4, I-34012 Trieste (Italy)

    2014-04-14

    We have grown carbon nanotubes using Fe and Ni catalyst films deposited by atomic layer deposition. Both metals lead to catalytically active nanoparticles for growing vertically aligned nanotube forests or carbon fibres, depending on the growth conditions and whether the substrate is alumina or silica. The resulting nanotubes have narrow diameter and wall number distributions that are as narrow as those grown from sputtered catalysts. The state of the catalyst is studied by in-situ and ex-situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. We demonstrate multi-directional nanotube growth on a porous alumina foam coated with Fe prepared by atomic layer deposition. This deposition technique can be useful for nanotube applications in microelectronics, filter technology, and energy storage.

  12. Ni-YSZ Substrate Degradation during Carbon Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Carbon deposition on various Ni-YSZ catalytic composites with average Ni particle size from 0.44 mm to 0.98 mm was studied under dry CH4-Ar and humidified CH4-Ar conditions. The change in the catalytic activity was monitored both as a mass gain due to carbon deposition and hydrogen evolution due to CH4 dehydrogenation on Ni-YSZ. Regarding the start of methane decomposition and subsequent catalyst deactivation rate, composites with smaller Ni-grains were much more active in compari...

  13. Plasma Processes : Microwave plasma deposition of diamond like carbon coatings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D S Patil; K Ramachandran; N Venkatramani; M Pandey; R D'Cunha

    2000-11-01

    The promising applications of the microwave plasmas have been appearing in the fields of chemical processes and semiconductor manufacturing. Applications include surface deposition of all types including diamond/diamond like carbon (DLC) coatings, etching of semiconductors, promotion of organic reactions, etching of polymers to improve bonding of the other materials etc. With a 2.45 GHz, 700 W, microwave induced plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system set up in our laboratory we have deposited diamond like carbon coatings. The microwave plasma generation was effected using a wave guide single mode applicator. We have deposited DLC coatings on the substrates like stainless steel, Cu–Be, Cu and Si. The deposited coatings have been characterized by FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and ellipsometric techniques. The results show that we have achieved depositing ∼ 95% sp3 bonded carbon in the films. The films are uniform with golden yellow color. The films are found to be excellent insulators. The ellipsometric measurements of optical constant on silicon substrates indicate that the films are transparent above 900 nm.

  14. Ni-YSZ Substrate Degradation during Carbon Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinsek, M.

    2011-07-01

    Carbon deposition on various Ni-YSZ catalytic composites with average Ni particle size from 0.44 {mu}m to 0.98 mm was studied under dry CH{sub 4}-Ar and humidified CH{sub 4}-Ar conditions. The change in the catalytic activity was monitored both as a mass gain due to carbon deposition and hydrogen evolution due to CH{sub 4} dehydrogenation on Ni-YSZ. Regarding the start of methane decomposition and subsequent catalyst deactivation rate, composites with smaller Ni-grains were much more active in comparison to those with relatively large grains. Dry methane conditions always caused coking of the catalyst substrate with substantial activity loss. In contrast, under humidified methane atmosphere conditions with a steam to carbon (S/C) ratio of 0.82, catalytic activity of the Ni-YSZ composites remained nearly undiminished after 2,000 minutes at chosen deposition temperatures (600-800 degree centigrade). On the catalyst surface, some encapsulation of Ni with the deposited carbon was noticed while carbon filaments grew inside the treated samples. The dimensions of C-filaments were influenced by treatment conditions and Ni-YSZ substrate morphology. (Author) 42 refs.

  15. Synthesis of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gang; ZHOU Ming; MA Weiwei; CAI Lan

    2009-01-01

    Single crystal silicon was found to be very beneficial to the growth of aligned carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition with C2H2 as carbon source. A thin film of Ni served as catalyst was deposited on the Si substrate by the K575X Peltier Cooled High Resolution Sputter Coater before growth. The growth properties of carbon nanotubes were studied as a function of the Ni catalyst layer thickness. The diameter, growth rate and areal density of the carbon nanotubes were controlled by the initial thickness of the catalyst layer. Steric hindrance between nanotubes forces them to grow in well-aligned manner at an initial stage of growth. Transmission electron microscope analysis revealed that nanotubes grew by a tip growth mechanism.

  16. Theoretical modelling of carbon deposition processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work based on capsule experiments in the BNL Gamma Facility, aimed at elucidating the chemistry involved in the formation of carbonaceous deposit on CAGR fuel pin surfaces is described. Using a data-base derived from capsule experiments together with literature values for the kinetics of the fundamental reactions, a chemical model of the gas-phase processes has been developed. This model successfully reproduces the capsule results, whilst preliminary application to the WAGR coolant circuit indicates the likely concentration profiles of various radical species within the fuel channels. (author)

  17. Nucleation and electrolytic deposition of lead on model carbon electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cericola, D.; Spahr, M.

    2016-08-01

    There is a general consensus in the lead acid battery industry for the use of carbon additives as a functional component in the negative paste to boost the battery performance with regards to charge acceptance and cycle life especially for upcoming automotive and energy storage applications. Several mechanisms are discussed in the scientific literature and the affinity of the carbon surfaces to lead species seems to play a key role. With a set of experiments on model carbon electrodes we gave evidence to the fact that some carbon materials promote spontaneous nucleation of lead crystals. We propose a mechanism such that the carbon, as soon as in a lead containing environment, immobilizes some lead on its surface. Such immobilized lead acts as nucleation seed for the deposition of lead when a current is passed through the material. It is therefore possible to differentiate and select the carbon materials based on their ability to form nucleation seeds.

  18. Optical Microscopy and SEM Study of Pyrolytic Carbon Deposits from Coke Ovens

    OpenAIRE

    Barranco, Richelieu; Patrick, John W.; Snape, Colin E.; Wu, Tao; Poultney, Ruth M.; Barriocanal Rueda, Carmen; Díez Díaz-Estébanez, M.ª Antonia

    2007-01-01

    The presence of pyrolytic carbon deposits can cause a number of serious problems in the operation of a coke oven. The main objective of the investigation was to study the nature and characteristics of pyrolytic carbon deposits in industrial coke ovens, with particular emphasis on the nature of the carbon deposited adjacent to the oven walls. Study of the carbon deposits by optical microscopy and SEM showed a variable concentration of carbon entities as well as differences in packing density.

  19. Electron energy deposition in carbon monoxide gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weihong; Victor, G. A.

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive set of electron impact cross sections for carbon monoxide molecules is presented on the basis of the most recent experimental measurements and theoretical calculations. The processes by which energetic electrons lose energy in CO gas are analyzed with these input cross sections. The efficiencies are computed of vibrational and electronic excitation, dissociation, ionization, and heating for CO gas with fractional ionization ranging from 0% to 10%. The calculated mean energy per ion pair for neutral CO gas is 32.3 eV, which is in excellent agreement with the experimental value of 32.2 eV. It increases to 35.6 eV at a fractional ionization of 1%, typical of supernovae ejecta.

  20. Electrophoretic Deposition of Carbon Nitride Layers for Photoelectrochemical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingsan; Shalom, Menny

    2016-05-25

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) is used for the growth of carbon nitride (C3N4) layers on conductive substrates. EPD is fast, environmentally friendly, and allows the deposition of negatively charged C3N4 with different compositions and chemical properties. In this method, C3N4 can be deposited on various conductive substrates ranging from conductive glass and carbon paper to nickel foam possessing complex 3D geometries. The high flexibility of this approach enables us to readily tune the photophysical and photoelectronic properties of the C3N4 electrodes. The advantage of this method was further illustrated by the tailored construction of a heterostructure between two complementary C3N4, with marked photoelectrochemical activity. PMID:27148889

  1. Deposition of carbon nanostructures on metal substrates at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Zh; Nikovski, M.; Kiss'ovski, Zh

    2016-03-01

    The microwave-plasma-enhanced CVD of carbon nanostructures at atmospheric pressure allows shorter deposition times and reduces the complexity of the experimental set-up. In our study, the substrate temperature was varied in a wide range (300 – 700 C) using microwave plasma heating, as well as an additional heater. The distance between the substrate and the plasma flame was also varied in order to establish the conditions for an efficient deposition process, the latter being carried out at specific argon/hydrogen/methane gas mixtures. Optical measurements of the plasma flame spectrum were conducted to obtain the gas temperature and the plasma density and to analyze the existence of reactive species. The carbon nanostructures deposited on the metal samples were investigated by SEM. The relation between the morphology and the gas-discharge conditions is discussed.

  2. Soil Organic Carbon Stocks in Depositional Landscapes of Bavaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegs, Stefanie; Schwindt, Daniel; Völkel, Jörg; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid

    2016-04-01

    Erosion leads to redistribution and accumulation of soil organic matter (SOM) within agricultural landscapes. These fluvic and colluvic deposits are characterized by a highly diverse vertical structure and can contain high amounts of soil organic carbon (SOC) over the whole soil profile. Depositional landscapes are therefore not only productive sites for agricultural use but also influence carbon dynamics which is of great interest with regard on the recent climate change debate. The aim of our study is to elucidate the spatial distribution of organic carbon stocks, as well as its depth function and the role of these landscapes as a reservoir for SOM. Therefore we compare two representative depositional landscapes in Bavaria composed of different parent materials (carbonate vs. granitic). We hypothesize that the soils associated with different depositional processes (fluvial vs. colluvial) differ in SOC contents and stocks, also because of different hydromorphic regimes in fluvic versus colluvic soil profiles. Sampling sites are located in the Alpine Foreland (quaternary moraines with carbonatic parent material) and the foothills of the Bavarian Forest (Granite with Loess) with the main soil types Fluvisols, Gleysols and Luvisols. At both sites we sampled twelve soil profiles up to 150 cm depth, six in the floodplain and six along a vertical slope transect. We took undisturbed soil samples from each horizon and analyzed them for bulk density, total Carbon (OC and IC) and total Nitrogen (N) concentrations. This approach allows to calculate total OC contents and OC stocks and to investigate vertical and horizontal distribution of OC stocks. It will also reveal differences in OC stocks due to the location of the soil profile in fluvic or colluvic deposition scenarios.

  3. Tilting of carbon encapsulated metallic nanocolumns in carbon-nickel nanocomposite films by ion beam assisted deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Matthias [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PF-510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Muecklich, Arndt; Zschornak, Matthias; Wintz, Sebastian; Gemming, Sibylle; Abrasonis, Gintautas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PF-510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Oates, Thomas W. H. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaft, ISAS e.V., Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Luis Endrino, Jose [Surfaces and Coatings Department, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, c/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Baehtz, Carsten; Shalimov, Artem [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PF-510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Rossendorf Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, F-38043 Grenoble (France)

    2012-07-30

    The influence of assisting low-energy ({approx}50-100 eV) ion irradiation effects on the morphology of C:Ni ({approx}15 at. %) nanocomposite films during ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) is investigated. It is shown that IBAD promotes the columnar growth of carbon encapsulated metallic nanoparticles. The momentum transfer from assisting ions results in tilting of the columns in relation to the growing film surface. Complex secondary structures are obtained, in which a significant part of the columns grows under local epitaxy via the junction of sequentially deposited thin film fractions. The influence of such anisotropic film morphology on the optical properties is highlighted.

  4. Kinetics of ion beam deposition of carbon at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growth rates of carbon films grown by ion beam deposition using methane gas were measured in situ as a function of deposition conditions. The methane pressure dependence of the growth rate was used to measure the cross-section for charge exchange. Variations in deposition rate per incident energetic particle found for each ion energy were related to ion current density. It was found that rates of growth per incident energetic specie were (i) largest for the smallest current densities, (ii) decreased monotonically with increasing current density, and (iii) were consistently larger than can be explained by deposition directly from the energetic flux alone. These observations were interpreted in terms of irradiation-induced surface interactions which promote chemisorption of methane physisorbed from the ambient atmosphere. (orig.)

  5. Chromium-doped diamond-like carbon films deposited by dual-pulsed laser deposition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Písařík, Petr; Jelínek, Miroslav; Kocourek, Tomáš; Zezulová, M.; Remsa, Jan; Jurek, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 1 (2014), s. 83-88. ISSN 0947-8396 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD12069 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : diamond like carbon * chromium * contact angle * surface free energy * dual laser deposition * zeta potential Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.704, year: 2014

  6. Ironstone deposits hosted in Eocene carbonates from Bahariya (Egypt)-New perspective on cherty ironstone occurrences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afify, A. M.; Sanz-Montero, M. E.; Calvo, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    This paper gives new insight into the genesis of cherty ironstone deposits. The research was centered on well-exposed, unique cherty ironstone mineralization associated with Eocene carbonates from the northern part of the Bahariya Depression (Egypt). The economically important ironstones occur in the Naqb Formation (Early Eocene), which is mainly formed of shallow marine carbonate deposits. Periods of lowstand sea-level caused extensive early dissolution (karstification) of the depositional carbonates and dolomitization associated with mixing zones of fresh and marine pore-water. In faulted areas, the Eocene carbonate deposits were transformed into cherty ironstone with preservation of the precursor carbonate sedimentary features, i.e. skeletal and non-skeletal grain types, thickness, bedding, lateral and vertical sequential arrangement, and karst profiles. The ore deposits are composed of iron oxyhydroxides, mainly hematite and goethite, chert in the form of micro- to macro-quartz and chalcedony, various manganese minerals, barite, and a number of subordinate sulfate and clay minerals. Detailed petrographic analysis shows that quartz and iron oxides were coetaneous and selectively replaced carbonates, the coarse dolomite crystals having been preferentially transformed into quartz whereas the micro-crystalline carbonates were replaced by the iron oxyhydroxides. A number of petrographic, sedimentological and structural features including the presence of hydrothermal-mediated minerals (e.g., jacobsite), the geochemistry of the ore minerals as well as the structure-controlled location of the mineralization suggest a hydrothermal source for the ore-bearing fluids circulating through major faults and reflect their proximity to centers of magmatism. The proposed formation model can contribute to better understanding of the genetic mechanisms of formation of banded iron formations (BIFs) that were abundant during the Precambrian.

  7. Multi-wall carbon nanotubes supported on carbon fiber paper synthesized by simple chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We deposited multi-wall carbon nanotubes on carbon fiber paper with a simple CVD. • We investigated the inherent mechanism of Ni particle's self-dispersion. • The MWCNTs/CFP composite possesses wonderful electrical conductivity. - Abstract: Aiming at developing a novel carbon/carbon composite as an electrode in the electrochemical capacitor applications, multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/carbon fiber paper (CFP) composite has been synthesized using a simple chemical vapor deposition, in which different metal catalysts such as Fe, Ni and Cu are used. However, randomly oriented MWCNTs were only obtained on Ni particles. The mechanism for this unique phenomenon is investigated in this article. The physical and electrochemical properties of as-prepared MWCNTs/CFP composite are characterized and the results show that the as-prepared composite is a promising substrate for electrochemical capacitor applications

  8. Relative influence of deposition and diagenesis on carbonate reservoir layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poli, Emmanuelle [Total E and P, Courbevoie (France); Javaux, Catherine [Total E and P, Pointe Noire (Congo)

    2008-07-01

    The architecture heterogeneities and petrophysical properties of carbonate reservoirs result from a combination of platform morphology, related depositional environments, relative sea level changes and diagenetic events. The reservoir layering built for static and dynamic modelling purposes should reflect the key heterogeneities (depositional or diagenetic) which govern the fluid flow patterns. The layering needs to be adapted to the goal of the modelling, ranging from full field computations of hydrocarbon volumes, to sector-based fine-scale simulations to test the recovery improvement. This paper illustrates various reservoir layering types, including schemes dominated by depositional architecture, and those more driven by the diagenetic overprint. The examples include carbonate platform reservoirs from different stratigraphic settings (Tertiary, Cretaceous, Jurassic and Permian) and different regions (Europe, Africa and Middle East areas). This review shows how significant stratigraphic surfaces (such as sequence boundaries or maximum flooding) with their associated facies shifts, can be often considered as key markers to constrain the reservoir layering. Conversely, how diagenesis (dolomitization and karst development), resulting in units with particular poroperm characteristics, may significantly overprint the primary reservoir architecture by generating flow units which cross-cut depositional sequences. To demonstrate how diagenetic processes can create reservoir bodies with geometries that cross-cut the depositional fabric, different types of dolomitization and karst development are illustrated. (author)

  9. Atomic Layer Deposition of Zirconium Oxide on Carbon Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report we describe preparation of structures containing carbon nanoparticles for potential applications in nonvolatile memories. The carbon nanoparticles were synthesized from 5-methylresorcinol and formaldehyde via base catalysed polycondensation reaction, and were distributed over substrates by dip-coating the substrates into an organic solution. Before deposition of nanoparticles the substrates were covered with 2 nm thick Al2O3 layer grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) from Al(CH3)3 and O3. After deposition of nanoparticles the samples were coated with ZrO2 films grown from C5H5Zr[N(CH3)2]3 and H2O. Both dielectrics were grown in two-temperature ALD processes starting deposition of Al2O3 at 25 °C and ZrO2 at 200 °C, thereafter completing both processes at a substrate temperature of 300 °C. Deposition of ZrO2 changed the structure of C-nanoparticles, which still remained in a Si/Al2O3/C/ZrO2 structure as a separate layer. Electrical characterization of nanostructures containing Al2O3 as tunnel oxide, C-nanoparticles as charge traps and ZrO2 as control oxide showed hysteretic flat-band voltage shift of about 1V

  10. Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, J. C.; Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Since the superior properties of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) could improve numerous devices such as electronics and sensors, many efforts have been made in investigating the growth mechanism of MWCNT to synthesize high quality MWCNT. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is widely used for MWCNT synthesis, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) are useful methods for analyzing the structure, morphology and composition of MWCNT. Temperature and pressure are two important growth parameters for fabricating carbon nanotubes. In MWCNT growth by CVD, the plasma assisted method is normally used for low temperature growth. However a high temperature environment is required for thermal CVD. A systematic study of temperature and pressure-dependence is very helpful to understanding MWCNT growth. Transition metal particles are commonly used as catalysis in carbon nanotube growth. It is also interesting to know how temperature and pressure affect the interface of carbon species and catalyst particles

  11. Nitrogen Deposition Effects on Soil Carbon Dynamics in Temperate Forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ginzburg Ozeri, Shimon

    Soils contain the largest fraction of terrestrial carbon (C). Understanding the factors regulating the decomposition and storage of soil organic matter (SOM) is essential for predictions of the C sink strength of the terrestrial environment in the light of global change. Elevated long-term nitrogen...... (N) deposition into forest ecosystems has been increasing globally and was hypothesized to raise soil organic C (SOC) stocks by increasing forest productivity and by reducing SOM decomposition. Yet, these effects of N deposition on forest SOC stocks are uncertain and largely based on observations...... edges were used to study the effects of varying N deposition load on SOC stocks and fluxes as well as on the temperature sensitivity of SOM respiration. In a third study, the effects of 20 years of continuous experimental N addition (35 kg N ha-1 year-1) on soil C budget were investigated. Our general...

  12. Production of carbon molecular sieves from palm shell through carbon deposition from methane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi Maedeh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of production of carbon molecular sieve (CMS from palm shell as a waste lignocellulosic biomass was investigated. CMS samples were prepared through heat treatment processes including carbonization, physiochemical activation and chemical vapor deposition (CVD from methane. Methane was pyrolyzed to deposit fine carbon on the pore mouth of palm shell-based activated carbon to yield CMS. All the deposition experiments were performed at 800 ºC, while the methane flow rate (100, 200, 300 mL min-1 CH4 diluted in 500 mL min-1 N2 and deposition time (30 to 60 min were the investigated parameters. The textural characteristics of the CMSs were assessed by N2 adsorption. The largest BET surface area (752 m2 g-1, micropore surface area (902.2 m2 g-1 and micropore volume (0.3466 cm3 g-1 was obtained at the CH4 flow rate of 200 mL min-1 and deposition time of 30 min. However, prolonging the deposition time to 45 min yielded in a micropouros CMS with a narrow pore size distribution.

  13. Processing of diamondlike carbon using plasma immersion ion deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma immersion ion deposition (PIID) has been used to synthesize hard amorphous hydrogenated carbon or diamondlike carbon (DLC) thin films on Si substrates with rf inductive plasmas of various Ar and C2H2 gas mixtures. The surface hardness and stress of the films were highly dependent on the magnitude of the total rf power and the pulse-bias duty factor. The ratios of the ion flux and the film deposition flux, Ji/Jd, were estimated and correlated with DLC film stress, hardness, and the amount of argon and hydrogen content retained. The DLC properties (hardness and film stress) were maximal when the Ji/Jd value ranged between 0.6 and 0.8. The balance between ion-energy transfer and relaxation in the surface and subsurface carbon atoms may explain the DLC growth in this work. The role of ion-current flux in the PIID process was found to be as important as it is in conventional ion beam assisted deposition processing. copyright 1999 American Vacuum Society

  14. Raman spectroscopic studies of thin film carbon nanostructures deposited using electro deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Saurabh; Sasi, Arshali; Jhariya, Sapna; Sasikumar, C.

    2016-05-01

    In the present work our focus is to synthesize carbon nanostructures (CNS) by electro deposition technique without using any surface pretreatment or catalyst preparation before CNS formation. The process were carried out at significantly low voltage and at low temperature as reported elsewhere. Further the samples were characterized using different characterization tools such as SEM and Raman spectroscopy. The SEM results showed the fibres or tubular like morphology. Raman spectra shows strong finger print at 1600 cm-1 (G peak), 1350 cm-1 (D peak) along with the radial breathing mode (RBM) between 150cm-1 to 300 cm-1. This confirms the formation of tubular carbon nanostructures.

  15. Plasma-enhanced Deposition of Nano-Structured Carbon Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Qiaoqin (杨巧勤); Xiao Chijin (肖持进); A. Hirose

    2005-01-01

    By pre-treating substrate with different methods and patterning the catalyst, selective and patterned growth of diamond and graphitic nano-structured carbon films have been realized through DC Plasma-Enhanced Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition (PE-HFCVD).Through two-step processing in an HFCVD reactor, novel nano-structured composite diamond films containing a nanocrystalline diamond layer on the top of a nanocone diamond layer have been synthesized. Well-aligned carbon nanotubes, diamond and graphitic carbon nanocones with controllable alignment orientations have been synthesized by using PE-HFCVD. The orientation of the nanostructures can be controlled by adjusting the working pressure. In a Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (MW-PECVD) reactor, high-quality diamond films have been synthesized at low temperatures (310 ℃~550 ℃) without adding oxygen or halogen gas in a newly developed processing technique. In this process, carbon source originates from graphite etching, instead of hydrocarbon. The lowest growth temperature for the growth of nanocrystalline diamond films with a reasonable growth rate without addition of oxygen or halogen is 260 ℃.

  16. Factors Controlling Black Carbon Deposition in Snow in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, L.; Li, Q.; He, C.; Li, Y.

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluates the sensitivity of black carbon (BC) concentration in snow in the Arctic to BC emissions, dry deposition and wet scavenging efficiency using a 3D global chemical transport model GEOS-Chem driven by meteorological field GEOS-5. With all improvements, simulated median BC concentration in snow agrees with observation (19.2 ng g-1) within 10%, down from -40% in the default GEOS-Chem. When the previously missed gas flaring emissions (mainly located in Russia) are included, the total BC emission in the Arctic increases by 70%. The simulated BC in snow increases by 1-7 ng g-1, with the largest improvement in Russia. The discrepancy of median BC in snow in the whole Arctic reduces from -40% to -20%. In addition, recent measurements of BC dry deposition velocity suggest that the constant deposition velocity of 0.03 cm s-1 over snow and ice used in the GEOS-Chem is too low. So we apply resistance-in-series method to calculate the dry deposition velocity over snow and ice and the resulted dry deposition velocity ranges from 0.03 to 0.24 cm s-1. However, the simulated total BC deposition flux in the Arctic and BC in snow does not change, because the increased dry deposition flux has been compensated by decreased wet deposition flux. However, the fraction of dry deposition to total deposition increases from 16% to 25%. This may affect the mixing of BC and snow particles and further affect the radative forcing of BC deposited in snow. Finally, we reduced the scavenging efficiency of BC in mixed-phase clouds to account for the effect of Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) process based on recent observations. The simulated BC concentration in snow increases by 10-100%, with the largest increase in Greenland (100%), Tromsø (50%), Alaska (40%), and Canadian Arctic (30%). Annual BC loading in the Arctic increases from 0.25 to 0.43 mg m-2 and the lifetime of BC increases from 9.2 to 16.3 days. This indicates that BC simulation in the Arctic is really sensitive to

  17. Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition of Horizontally Aligned Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew T. Cole

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition reactor has been developed to synthesis horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes. The width of the aligning sheath was modelled based on a collisionless, quasi-neutral, Child’s law ion sheath where these estimates were empirically validated by direct Langmuir probe measurements, thereby confirming the proposed reactors ability to extend the existing sheath fields by up to 7 mm. A 7 mbar growth atmosphere combined with a 25 W plasma permitted the concurrent growth and alignment of carbon nanotubes with electric fields of the order of 0.04 V μm−1 with linear packing densities of up to ~5 × 104 cm−1. These results open up the potential for multi-directional in situ alignment of carbon nanotubes providing one viable route to the fabrication of many novel optoelectronic devices.

  18. Strontium isotopes in carbonate deposits at Crater Flat, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strontium isotope studies of carbonates from soils, veins, eolian dust and Paleozoic basement samples near Crater Flat, southwest of Yucca Mountain, provide evidence for the origins of these materials. Vein and soil carbonates have nearly identical ranges of 87Sr/86Sr ratios at the lower end of the pedogenic range. The average 87Sr/86Sr of Paleozoic basement from Black Marble Hill is similar to the 87Sr/86Sr in the eolian dust, perhaps indicating a local source for this material. Possible spring deposits have generally higher 87Sr/86Sr than the other carbonates. These data are compared with similar data from areas east of Yucca Mountain. 7 refs., 5 figs

  19. A distal part of the bed oxidation zone of exogeneous epigenetic uranium deposits is a source of local evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Processes of gas formation appearing owing to the oxidation of scattered organic substance with oxygenous waters in a distal part of the bed oxidation zone of exogenous epigenetic uranium deposits have been investigated. Gas sampling was performed using drill cores of four prospecting boreholes. Extracted gas was analyzed by LKhM-8MD chromatographs for determining contents of hydrocarbons, hydrogen, carbon dioxide. A local region of intense multi-component anomalous gas formation accompanying exogenetic uranium deposition in a distal part of the bed oxygen zone has been experimentally established. Halos of gas scattering can be used in searches

  20. Deposition of carbon nanotubes in commonly used sample filter media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.D. Smith

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available There is no single standard technique or methodology to characterize the size, structure, number, and chemical composition of airborne carbon nanotubes.  Existing analytical instruments and analytical techniques for evaluating nanoparticle concentrations cannot simultaneously provide morphology, state of agglomeration, surface area, mass, size distribution and chemical composition data critical to making occupational health assessments.  This research utilized scanning electron microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis to assess the morphology and mass of carbon nanotubes collected using various commercial sample filters.  It illustrated carbon nanotube agglomeration, deposition and distribution in commonly used sample filter media.  It also illustrated that a sufficient mass for carbon nanotube analysis by thermogravimetric analysis is uncommon under most current research and production uses of carbon nanotubes.  Individual carbon nanotubes were found to readily agglomerate with diameters ranging from 1 – 63 µm. They were collected at the face of or within the filter.  They were not evenly distributed across the face of the filters.

  1. Deposition And Characterization Of Ultra Thin Diamond Like Carbon Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomcik, B.

    2010-07-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated and/or nitrogenated carbon films, a-C:H/a-C:N, in overall thickness up to 2 nm are materials of choice as a mechanical and corrosion protection layer of the magnetic media in modern hard disk drive disks. In order to obtain high density and void-free films the sputtering technology has been replaced by different plasma and ion beam deposition techniques. Hydrocarbon gas precursors, like C2H2 or CH4 with H2 and N2 as reactive gases are commonly used in Kaufman DC ion and RF plasma beam sources. Optimum incident energy of carbon ions, C+, is up to 100 eV while the typical ion current densities during the film formation are in the mA/cm2 range. Other carbon deposition techniques, like filtered cathodic arc, still suffer from co-deposition of fine nanosized carbon clusters (nano dust) and their improvements are moving toward arc excitation in the kHz and MHz frequency range. Non-destructive film analysis like μ-Raman optical spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, FTIR and optical surface analysis are mainly used in the carbon film characterization. Due to extreme low film thicknesses the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) with pre-deposited layer of Au can reduce the signal collection time and minimize photon-induced damage during the spectra acquisition. Standard approach in the μ-Raman film evaluation is the measurement of the position (shift) and area of D and G-peaks under the deconvoluted overall carbon spectrum. Also, a slope of the carbon spectrum in the 1000-2000 cm-1 wavenumber range is used as a measure of the hydrogen intake within a film. Diamond like carbon (DLC) film should possess elasticity and self-healing properties during the occasional crash of the read-write head flying only couple of nanometers above the spinning film. Film corrosion protection capabilities are mostly evaluated by electrochemical tests, potentio-dynamic and linear polarization method and by business environmental method. Corrosion mechanism

  2. Mineral deposits research in Uruguay. Technical economic part

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technical researches, mineralogical and chemical analysis were carried out in Zapucay and Iman deposit located in Uruguay south America, as a result of that, researchers was described the mineral adherences of the deposits.

  3. Nanoscale carbon tubules deposited in anodic aluminium oxide template:a study of soft x-ray transmission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Li-Feng; Zhou Zhen-Ping; Yuan Hua-Jun; Ci Li-Jie; Liu Dong-Fang; Gao Yan; Wang Jian-Xiong; Wang Gang; Zhou Wei-Ya; Zhu Pei-Ping; Cui Ming-Qi; Zheng Lei; Zhu Jie; Zhao Yi-Dong; Song Li; Yan Xiao-Qin

    2004-01-01

    Well-aligned, catalyst-free nanoscale carbon tubules array was prepared by organic compound vapour deposition method using anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) as a template. The experiment of soft x-ray channelling in such carbon tubules array deposited in AAO template was performed at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The transmission of x-rays in carbon tubules array with AAO template support was found even higher than that in bare AAO template at high-energy part of energy spectrum though the porous area of the former was smaller than that of the latter. A qualitative explanation is presented to interpret our results.

  4. Mechanisms controlling soil carbon sequestration under atmospheric nitrogen deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.L. Sinsabaugh; D.R. Zak; D.L. Moorhead

    2008-02-19

    Increased atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition can alter the processing and storage of organic carbon in soils. In 2000, we began studying the effects of simulated atmospheric N deposition on soil carbon dynamics in three types of northern temperate forest that occur across a wide geographic range in the Upper Great Lakes region. These ecosystems range from 100% oak in the overstory (black oak-white oak ecosystem; BOWO) to 0% overstory oak (sugar maple-basswood; SMBW) and include the sugar maple-red oak ecosystem (SMRO) that has intermediate oak abundance. The leaf litter biochemistry of these ecosystems range from highly lignified litter (BOWO) to litter of low lignin content (SMBW). We selected three replicate stands of each ecosystem type and established three plots in each stand. Each plot was randomly assigned one of three levels of N deposition (0, 30 & 80 kg N ha-1 y-1) imposed by adding NaNO3 in six equal increments applied over the growing season. Through experiments ranging from the molecular to the ecosystem scales, we produced a conceptual framework that describes the biogeochemistry of soil carbon storage in N-saturated ecosystems as the product of interactions between the composition of plant litter, the composition of the soil microbial community and the expression of extracellular enzyme activities. A key finding is that atmospheric N deposition can increase or decrease the soil C storage by modifying the expression of extracellular enzymes by soil microbial communities. The critical interactions within this conceptual framework have been incorporated into a new class of simulations called guild decomposition models.

  5. Plasma modification of medical implants by carbon coatings depositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Grabarczyk

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main goal was to work out the technology of deposition of carbon layers onto surface of medical implants made of the AISI316L medical steel. So far the results of carried investigations have proved that layers synthesized in RF PACVD process noticeably improve the biotolerance of the medical steel. Positive experimental results concerning the implementation of carbon layers conducted in the Institute of Materials Science and Engineering of the Technical University of Lodz were the basis for attempt of industrial application of the worked out technology.Design/methodology/approach: Carbon layers were manufactured using radio frequency plasma RF PACVD method. The technology was worked out for the surfaces of the intramedullary nails. The investigations were carried out in order to compare obtained synthesis results with the layers deposited under the laboratory conditions. In this work the following are presented: the surface topography investigation, results of nanohardness and adhesion measurements as well as the raman spectra. Medical examination results were presented in our earlier publications. In the description of obtained investigation results are also presented the preliminary results of the medical treatment effects with the use of intramedullary nails covered with the carbon layer.Findings: Carbon layers manufactured onto intramedullary nails presented good mechanical properties. Applied synthesis parameters made it possible to manufacture uniform film onto whole implant surface. Thickness of the layer was varied in the range of 200 – 400 nm, however total modification area contained 3.5 micrometers. Nails covered with the carbon layer positively passed the tests and were admitted into medical trade turnover. Positive medical treatment results were observed especially in case of patients with affirmed allergies onto alloying components contained in medical steels like chromium and nickel.Research limitations

  6. Responses of Carbon Dynamics to Nitrogen Deposition in Typical Freshwater Wetland of Sanjiang Plain

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The effects of nitrogen deposition (N-deposition) on the carbon dynamics in typical Calamagrostis angustifolia wetland of Sanjiang Plain were studied by a pot-culture experiment during two continuous plant growing seasons. Elevated atmospheric N-deposition caused significant increases in the aboveground net primary production and root biomass; moreover, a preferential partition of carbon to root was also observed. Different soil carbon fractions gained due to elevated N-deposition and their r...

  7. Properties of electrophoretically deposited single wall carbon nanotube films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Junyoung; Jalali, Maryam; Campbell, Stephen A., E-mail: campb001@umn.edu

    2015-08-31

    This paper describes techniques for rapidly producing a carbon nanotube thin film by electrophoretic deposition at room temperature and determines the film mass density and electrical/mechanical properties of such films. The mechanism of electrophoretic deposition of thin layers is explained with experimental data. Also, film thickness is measured as a function of time, electrical field and suspension concentration. We use Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy to determine the film mass density. Films created in this manner have a resistivity of 2.14 × 10{sup −3} Ω·cm, a mass density that varies with thickness from 0.12 to 0.54 g/cm{sup 3}, and a Young's modulus between 4.72 and 5.67 GPa. The latter was found to be independent of thickness from 77 to 134 nm. We also report on fabricating free-standing films by removing the metal seed layer under the CNT film, and selectively etching a sacrificial layer. This method could be extended to flexible photovoltaic devices or high frequency RF MEMS devices. - Highlights: • We explain the electrophoretic deposition process and mechanism of thin SWCNT film deposition. • Characterization of the SWCNT film properties including density, resistivity, transmittance, and Young's modulus. • The film density and resistivity are found to be a function of the film thickness. • Techniques developed to create free standing layers of SW-CNTs for flexible electronics and mechanical actuators.

  8. Properties of electrophoretically deposited single wall carbon nanotube films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes techniques for rapidly producing a carbon nanotube thin film by electrophoretic deposition at room temperature and determines the film mass density and electrical/mechanical properties of such films. The mechanism of electrophoretic deposition of thin layers is explained with experimental data. Also, film thickness is measured as a function of time, electrical field and suspension concentration. We use Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy to determine the film mass density. Films created in this manner have a resistivity of 2.14 × 10−3 Ω·cm, a mass density that varies with thickness from 0.12 to 0.54 g/cm3, and a Young's modulus between 4.72 and 5.67 GPa. The latter was found to be independent of thickness from 77 to 134 nm. We also report on fabricating free-standing films by removing the metal seed layer under the CNT film, and selectively etching a sacrificial layer. This method could be extended to flexible photovoltaic devices or high frequency RF MEMS devices. - Highlights: • We explain the electrophoretic deposition process and mechanism of thin SWCNT film deposition. • Characterization of the SWCNT film properties including density, resistivity, transmittance, and Young's modulus. • The film density and resistivity are found to be a function of the film thickness. • Techniques developed to create free standing layers of SW-CNTs for flexible electronics and mechanical actuators

  9. Turnover of eroded soil organic carbon after deposition in terrestrial and aquatic environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkels, Frédérique; Cammeraat, Erik; Kalbitz, Karsten;

    The fate of eroded soil organic carbon (SOC) after deposition is a large uncertainty in assessing the impact of soil erosion on C budgets. Globally, large amounts of SOC are transported by erosion and a substantial part is transferred into adjacent inland waters, linking terrestrial and aquatic C...... cycling. However, the net effect on C fluxes between soils, inland waters and atmosphere remains uncertain. In this study, we determined SOC turnover in terrestrial and aquatic environments and indentified its major controls. A European gradient of agricultural sites was sampled, spanning a wide range...... (soils vs. inland waters) play a crucial role in determining C turnover. Erosion measures preventing deposition in aquatic environments could therefore be an important carbon saving strategy. We envisage that these quantitative results can be used to parameterize biogeochemical models and contribute to...

  10. Carbon deposition model for oxygen-hydrocarbon combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossard, John A.

    1988-01-01

    The objectives are to use existing hardware to verify and extend the database generated on the original test programs. The data to be obtained are the carbon deposition characteristics when methane is used at injection densities comparable to full scale values. The database will be extended to include liquid natural gas (LNG) testing at low injection densities for gas generator/preburner conditions. The testing will be performed at mixture ratios between 0.25 and 0.60, and at chamber pressures between 750 and 1500 psi.

  11. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of multiwalled carbon nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Kristopher; Cruden, Brett A.; Chen, Bin; Meyyappan, M.; Delzeit, Lance

    2002-01-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition is used to grow vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanofibers (MWNFs). The graphite basal planes in these nanofibers are not parallel as in nanotubes; instead they exhibit a small angle resembling a stacked cone arrangement. A parametric study with varying process parameters such as growth temperature, feedstock composition, and substrate power has been conducted, and these parameters are found to influence the growth rate, diameter, and morphology. The well-aligned MWNFs are suitable for fabricating electrode systems in sensor and device development.

  12. Dielectric properties of 'diamondlike' carbon prepared by RF plasma deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, J. D.; Woollam, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Metal-carbon-metal structures were fabricated using either gold or aluminum evaporated electrodes and RF plasma (methane) deposited 'diamondlike' carbon films. Alternating-current conductance and capacitance versus voltage and frequency (10 Hz to 13 MHz) data were taken to determine the dielectric properties of these films. Conductance versus frequency data fit a generalized power law, consistent with both dc and hopping conduction components. The capacitance versus frequency data are well matched to the conductance versus frequency data, as predicted by a Kramers-Kronig analysis. The dielectric loss tangent is nearly constant at 0.5 to 1.0 percent over the frequency range from 1 to 100 kHz. The dc resistivity is above 10 to the 13th ohm cm, and the dc breakdown strength is above 8 x 10 to the 6th V/cm is properly prepared samples.

  13. Intercomparison of Carbonate Deposits on Mars: VNIR Spectral Character and Geologic Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, S.; Mustard, J. F.; Ehlmann, B. L.

    2012-12-01

    Carbonate-bearing deposits were identified on Mars at multiple locations using CRISM VNIR spectral data [1,2,3,4,5]. Carbonates exhibit distinctive C-O related absorption features near 2300, 2500, 3400 and 3900nm that can be used to identify specific carbonate phases (e.g., Mg-carbonates have band minima at 2300/2500nm and Fe-carbonates have minima at 2330/2530nm [6]). The features at 2300 and 2500nm are the focus of most CRISM analyses because this part of the spectral range is well calibrated, lacks strong contributions from thermal emission, and is not impacted by strong water-related absorptions near 3000nm (e.g., in Fe/Mg phyllosilicates). However, multiple other phases also exhibit features near 2300 and 2500nm.For carbonates, the depth of the 2500nm feature is stronger than at 2300nm as opposed to most Fe/Mg phyllosilicates. Mixing of the carbonate with other phases in CRISM pixels impacts the band centers and strengths of the 2300 and 2500nm features and therefore complicates identification of the carbonate phase(s) responsible for observed CRISM spectral features. In this study we analyze CRISM data fully corrected for the atmosphere using DISORT radiative transfer modeling [7,8] to evaluate CRISM spectra of multiple carbonate-bearing deposits. Rigorous intercomparison of CRISM spectra extracted from different images is affected by variable aerosol, CO2 and water vapor features left by the standard volcano scan empirical atmospheric correction [9]. While residual gas absorptions are commonly suppressed by ratioing, the appearance of spectral features in ratio spectra is impacted by spectral features in the dominator spectrum compromising detailed assessments of ratio spectra derived from different images. Atmospheric correction is particularly important for interpreting carbonate deposits because the 2500nm carbonate feature overlaps with atmospheric water vapor absorptions. In Nili Fossae, carbonates occur in association with olivine, smectite, serpentine

  14. Argon-hydrogen rf plasma study for carbon film deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the effect of hydrogen addition on the physical properties and the sputtering efficiency of an radio-frequency (rf) (13.56 MHz) Ar plasma was investigated. The discharges in Ar-H2 were used to sputter-deposit carbon films from a graphite cathode, with a hydrogen concentration in the feed gas ranging from 0 to 100% (the useful range for film growth was however limited to 0-85%). The physical plasma parameters were determined using a Langmuir probe, which, coupled with a chemical modelling of the ion-molecule and electron-molecule reactions in gas phase, enabled us to define the energy flux conditions at the cathode. The results show that hydrogen exerts a positive effect on the film deposition rate at the lowest end of the hydrogen concentration range, an enhancing deposition effect correlated with a high density of ArH+ ions in the plasma and a high energy flux carried by the ions to the cathode. Nonetheless, an analysis of the processes at the cathode indicates that the sputtering mechanism was essentially physical in the low [H2] range (3-20%) but that a chemical assistance of the process should be considered too for the remaining [H2] range. Besides, even in the physical sputtering regime, the target material removal occurred with a reactive sputtering mechanism, which implies a chemical modification of the target surface layers and surface binding energy

  15. Argon-hydrogen rf plasma study for carbon film deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laidani, N [ITC-Irst, Divisione Fisica-Chimica delle Superfici ed Interfacce, Via Sommarive 18, Povo 38050, Trento (Italy); Bartali, R [ITC-Irst, Divisione Fisica-Chimica delle Superfici ed Interfacce, Via Sommarive 18, Povo 38050, Trento (Italy); Tosi, P [Dipartimento di Fisica, Laboratorio Fasci Molecolari, Universita degli Studi di Trento, Via Sommarive 15, Povo 38050, Trento (Italy); Anderle, M [ITC-Irst, Divisione Fisica-Chimica delle Superfici ed Interfacce, Via Sommarive 18, Povo 38050, Trento (Italy)

    2004-09-21

    In this work the effect of hydrogen addition on the physical properties and the sputtering efficiency of an radio-frequency (rf) (13.56 MHz) Ar plasma was investigated. The discharges in Ar-H{sub 2} were used to sputter-deposit carbon films from a graphite cathode, with a hydrogen concentration in the feed gas ranging from 0 to 100% (the useful range for film growth was however limited to 0-85%). The physical plasma parameters were determined using a Langmuir probe, which, coupled with a chemical modelling of the ion-molecule and electron-molecule reactions in gas phase, enabled us to define the energy flux conditions at the cathode. The results show that hydrogen exerts a positive effect on the film deposition rate at the lowest end of the hydrogen concentration range, an enhancing deposition effect correlated with a high density of ArH{sup +} ions in the plasma and a high energy flux carried by the ions to the cathode. Nonetheless, an analysis of the processes at the cathode indicates that the sputtering mechanism was essentially physical in the low [H{sub 2}] range (3-20%) but that a chemical assistance of the process should be considered too for the remaining [H{sub 2}] range. Besides, even in the physical sputtering regime, the target material removal occurred with a reactive sputtering mechanism, which implies a chemical modification of the target surface layers and surface binding energy.

  16. Methods of Boron-carbon Deposited Film Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetov, A.; Terentiev, V.; Voituk, A.; Zakharov, A.

    Boron carbide was proposed as a material for in-situ renewable protecting coating for tungsten tiles of the ITER divertor. It is necessary to develop a method of gasification of boron-carbon film which deposits during B4C sputtering. In this paper the results of the first stage investigation of gasification methods of boron-carbon films are presented. Two gasification methods of films are investigated: interaction with the ozone-oxygen mixture and irradiation in plasma with the working gas composed of oxygen, ethanol, and, in some cases, helium. The gasification rate in the ozone-oxygen mixture at 250 °C for B/C films with different B/C ratio and carbon fiber composite (CFC), was measured. For B/C films the gasification rate decreased with increasing B/C ratio (from 45 nm/h at B/C=0.7 to 4 nm/h at B/C=2.1; for CFC - 15 μm/h). Films gasification rates were measured under ion irradiation from ethanol-oxygen-helium plasma at different temperatures, with different ion energies and different gas mixtures. The maximum obtained removal rate was near 230 nm/h in case of ethanol-oxygen plasma and at 150°C of the sample temperature.

  17. 12 CFR Appendix G to Part 360 - Deposit-Customer Join File Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Deposit-Customer Join File Structure G Appendix... GENERAL POLICY RESOLUTION AND RECEIVERSHIP RULES Pt. 360, App. G Appendix G to Part 360—Deposit-Customer... to link the records in the deposit and customer files. If data or information are not maintained...

  18. Early Stages of the Chemical Vapor Deposition of Pyrolytic Carbon Investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Pfrang, Andreas; WAN Yong-Zhong; Schimmel, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The early stages of chemical vapor deposition of pyrolytic carbon on planar silicon substrates were studied by the atomic force microscopy-based technique of chemical contrast imaging. Short deposition times were chosen to focus on the early stages of the deposition process, and three different types of nucleation were found: random nucleation of single islands, nucleation of carbon islands along lines and secondary nucleation which corresponds to the nucleation of carbon islands at the edges...

  19. CARBON DIOXIDE DEPOSITION AND AIR POLLUTION MONITORING SYSTEM BY ADABAS AND NATURAL SOFTWARE

    OpenAIRE

    Chasovskykh, V.; Usoltsev, V.; Voronov, M.

    2011-01-01

    A system of spatial analysis of carbon deposition on forest cover using ADABAS and NATURAL software is suggested. The system gives a possibility for automatic actualization of data of forest biomass plots and of data of National Forest Inventory System (NFIS) that is synchronized with the interactive map-scheme of territorial arrangement of forest cover carbon. The value of carbon emanating or sink from atmosphere is determined as difference between the value of deposited carbon change and th...

  20. Carbon-atom wires produced by nanosecond pulsed laser deposition in a background gas

    OpenAIRE

    Casari, C. S.; Giannuzzi, C. S.; V. Russo

    2016-01-01

    Wires of sp-hybridized carbon atoms are attracting interest for both fundamental aspects of carbon science and for their appealing functional properties. The synthesis by physical vapor deposition has been reported to provide sp-rich carbon films but still needs to be further developed and understood in detail. Here the synthesis of carbon-atom wires (CAWs) has been achieved by nanosecond pulsed laser deposition (PLD) expoliting the strong out-of-equilibrium conditions occurring when the abla...

  1. Pulsed laser deposition of amorphous carbon/silver nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metal/amorphous carbon (a-C:M) composite films are emerging as a category of very important engineering materials for surface protection. We implement pulsed laser deposition (PLD) to grow pure a-C and a-C:Ag nanocomposites. Our PLD process is assisted by a static electric field. We investigate the structural features of the a-C:Ag nanocomposites and the bonding configuration of the a-C matrix with respect to the electric field and the composition of the PLD target. For this study we use Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). We show that the Ag mean grain size and the sp2 content of the a-C matrix are increasing with increasing Ag content in the films

  2. Pulsed laser deposition of amorphous carbon/silver nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matenoglou, G.; Evangelakis, G. A.; Kosmidis, C.; Foulias, S.; Papadimitriou, D.; Patsalas, P.

    2007-07-01

    Metal/amorphous carbon (a-C:M) composite films are emerging as a category of very important engineering materials for surface protection. We implement pulsed laser deposition (PLD) to grow pure a-C and a-C:Ag nanocomposites. Our PLD process is assisted by a static electric field. We investigate the structural features of the a-C:Ag nanocomposites and the bonding configuration of the a-C matrix with respect to the electric field and the composition of the PLD target. For this study we use Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). We show that the Ag mean grain size and the sp 2 content of the a-C matrix are increasing with increasing Ag content in the films.

  3. Pulsed laser deposition of amorphous carbon/silver nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matenoglou, G. [University of Ioannina, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); Evangelakis, G.A. [University of Ioannina, Department of Physics, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); Kosmidis, C. [University of Ioannina, Department of Physics, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); Foulias, S. [University of Ioannina, Department of Physics, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); Papadimitriou, D. [University of Ioannina, Department of Physics, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); Patsalas, P. [University of Ioannina, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece)]. E-mail: ppats@cc.uoi.gr

    2007-07-31

    Metal/amorphous carbon (a-C:M) composite films are emerging as a category of very important engineering materials for surface protection. We implement pulsed laser deposition (PLD) to grow pure a-C and a-C:Ag nanocomposites. Our PLD process is assisted by a static electric field. We investigate the structural features of the a-C:Ag nanocomposites and the bonding configuration of the a-C matrix with respect to the electric field and the composition of the PLD target. For this study we use Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). We show that the Ag mean grain size and the sp{sup 2} content of the a-C matrix are increasing with increasing Ag content in the films.

  4. Atmospheric Mg2+ wet deposition within the continental United States and implications for soil inorganic carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Megan A.; Mikhailova, Elena A.; Post, Christopher J.; Schlautman, Mark A.

    2007-02-01

    Little is known about atmospheric magnesium ion (Mg2+) wet deposition in relation to soil inorganic carbon sequestration. Understanding the conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) or organic carbon to a form having a long residence time within the soil (e.g., dolomite, magnesian calcite) will greatly benefit agriculture, industry, and society on a global scale. This preliminary study was conducted to analyze atmospheric Mg2+ wet deposition within the continental United States (U.S.) and to rank the twelve major soil orders in terms of average annual atmospheric Mg2+ wet deposition. The total average annual Mg2+ wet deposition for each soil order was estimated with geographic information systems (GIS) using the following data layers: (1) atmospheric Mg2+ wet deposition data layers covering the continental U.S. for a 10-yr period (1994-2003) and (2) a soil order data layer derived from a national soils database. A map of average annual Mg2+ wet deposition for 1994-2003 reveals that the highest deposition (0.75-1.41 kg ha-1) occurred in Oregon, Washington, parts of California, and the coastal areas of East Coast states due to magnesium enrichment of atmospheric deposition from sea salt. The Midwestern region of the U.S. received about 0.25-0.75 kg ha-1 Mg2+ wet deposition annually, which was associated with loess derived soils, occurrence of dust storms and possibly fertilization. The soil orders receiving the highest average annual atmospheric Mg2+ wet deposition from 1994 to 2003 were: (1) Mollisols (3.7 × 107 kg), (2) Alfisols (3.6 × 107 kg) and (3) Ultisols (2.8 × 107 kg). In terms of potential soil carbon sequestration, the average annual atmospheric Mg2+ wet deposition was equivalent to formation of the following theoretical amounts of dolomite: (1) Mollisols (2.8 × 108 kg of CaMg(CO3)2), (2) Alfisols (2.7 × 108 kg of CaMg(CO3)2) and (3) Ultisols (2.1 × 108 kg of CaMg(CO3)2). The soil orders receiving the lowest average annual atmospheric Mg2+ wet deposition

  5. Atmospheric Mg2+ wet deposition within the continental United States and implications for soil inorganic carbon sequestration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little is known about atmospheric magnesium ion (Mg2+) wet deposition in relation to soil inorganic carbon sequestration. Understanding the conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) or organic carbon to a form having a long residence time within the soil (e.g., dolomite, magnesian calcite) will greatly benefit agriculture, industry, and society on a global scale. This preliminary study was conducted to analyze atmospheric Mg2+ wet deposition within the continental United States (U.S.) and to rank the twelve major soil orders in terms of average annual atmospheric Mg2+ wet deposition. The total average annual Mg2+ wet deposition for each soil order was estimated with geographic information systems (GIS) using the following data layers: (1) atmospheric Mg2+ wet deposition data layers covering the continental U.S. for a 10-yr period (1994-2003) and (2) a soil order data layer derived from a national soils database. A map of average annual Mg2+ wet deposition for 1994-2003 reveals that the highest deposition (0.75-1.41 kg/ha) occurred in Oregon, Washington, parts of California, and the coastal areas of East Coast states due to magnesium enrichment of atmospheric deposition from sea salt. The Midwestern region of the U.S. received about 0.25-0.75 kg/ha Mg2+ wet deposition annually, which was associated with loess derived soils, occurrence of dust storms and possibly fertilization. The soil orders receiving the highest average annual atmospheric Mg2+ wet deposition from 1994 to 2003 were: (1) Mollisols (3.7 x 107 kg), (2) Alfisols (3.6 x 107 kg) and (3) Ultisols (2.8 x 107 kg). In terms of potential soil carbon sequestration, the average annual atmospheric Mg2+ wet deposition was equivalent to formation of the following theoretical amounts of dolomite: (1) Mollisols (2.8 x 108 kg of CaMg(CO3)2), (2) Alfisols (2.7 x 108 kg of CaMg(CO3)2) and (3) Ultisols (2.1 x 108 kg of CaMg(CO3)2). The soil orders receiving the lowest average annual atmospheric Mg2+ wet deposition were: (1

  6. Atmospheric Mg{sup 2+} wet deposition within the continental United States and implications for soil inorganic carbon sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goddard, Megan A. [Google Earth, Mountain View, CA (United States); Mikhailova, Elena A.; Post, Christopher J. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Forestry and Natural Resources; Schlautman, Mark A. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). School of the Environment

    2007-02-15

    Little is known about atmospheric magnesium ion (Mg{sup 2+}) wet deposition in relation to soil inorganic carbon sequestration. Understanding the conversion of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) or organic carbon to a form having a long residence time within the soil (e.g., dolomite, magnesian calcite) will greatly benefit agriculture, industry, and society on a global scale. This preliminary study was conducted to analyze atmospheric Mg{sup 2+} wet deposition within the continental United States (U.S.) and to rank the twelve major soil orders in terms of average annual atmospheric Mg{sup 2+} wet deposition. The total average annual Mg{sup 2+} wet deposition for each soil order was estimated with geographic information systems (GIS) using the following data layers: (1) atmospheric Mg{sup 2+} wet deposition data layers covering the continental U.S. for a 10-yr period (1994-2003) and (2) a soil order data layer derived from a national soils database. A map of average annual Mg{sup 2+} wet deposition for 1994-2003 reveals that the highest deposition (0.75-1.41 kg/ha) occurred in Oregon, Washington, parts of California, and the coastal areas of East Coast states due to magnesium enrichment of atmospheric deposition from sea salt. The Midwestern region of the U.S. received about 0.25-0.75 kg/ha Mg{sup 2+} wet deposition annually, which was associated with loess derived soils, occurrence of dust storms and possibly fertilization. The soil orders receiving the highest average annual atmospheric Mg{sup 2+} wet deposition from 1994 to 2003 were: (1) Mollisols (3.7 x 107 kg), (2) Alfisols (3.6 x 107 kg) and (3) Ultisols (2.8 x 107 kg). In terms of potential soil carbon sequestration, the average annual atmospheric Mg{sup 2+} wet deposition was equivalent to formation of the following theoretical amounts of dolomite: (1) Mollisols (2.8 x 108 kg of CaMg(CO3)2), (2) Alfisols (2.7 x 108 kg of CaMg(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}) and (3) Ultisols (2.1 x 108 kg of CaMg(CO3)2). The soil orders

  7. Cross-sectional STEM study of cathodic arc deposited amorphous carbon and carbon-nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The VG601 high resolution dedicated Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (STEM) located at the University of Sydney has the capability of providing structural information with a spatial resolution of less than one nanometre. Compositional information can be obtained using either Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) or Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy. Each characteristic absorption edge in EELS also exhibits structure which provides information on the atomic environment of the absorbing atom. The combination of EELS and STEM therefore provides a powerful tool for analysing structure at the nanometre scale. In this work we investigate the structure of cathodic arc deposited carbon and carbon-nitride films using this EELS/STEM combination. By preparing the films in cross-section and collecting a number of spectra in a line through the film thickness (line profile), it is possible to investigate the deposition process in great detail since variations in structure with depth in the film provide information on the 'history' of film growth. In the case of carbon based materials, this technique provides a direct measure of the variations in both density and proportion of diamond-like bonding. These measurements will be used to help understand the mechanisms of film growth by cathodic arc deposition

  8. Dual ion beam deposition of carbon films with diamondlike properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Swec, D. M.; Angus, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    A single and dual ion beam system was used to generate amorphous carbon films with diamond like properties. A methane/argon mixture at a molar ratio of 0.28 was ionized in the low pressure discharge chamber of a 30-cm-diameter ion source. A second ion source, 8 cm in diameter was used to direct a beam of 600 eV Argon ions on the substrates (fused silica or silicon) while the deposition from the 30-cm ion source was taking place. Nuclear reaction and combustion analysis indicate H/C ratios for the films to be 1.00. This high value of H/C, it is felt, allowed the films to have good transmittance. The films were impervious to reagents which dissolve graphitic and polymeric carbon structures. Although the measured density of the films was approximately 1.8 gm/cu cm, a value lower than diamond, the films exhibited other properties that were relatively close to diamond. These films were compared with diamondlike films generated by sputtering a graphite target.

  9. Properties of carbon deposits on tungsten nano-structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C deposition characteristics on W nano-structure by two different deposition methods are investigated to study C deposition mechanisms on W nano-structure and its characteristics. The two methods were as follows: irradiation by mixed D and C ion beam, and deposition by magnetron sputtering. Differences on deposition condition such as deposition temperature, incident species and energy affected properties of C deposits. Structure of C deposits was investigated by SEM and Raman spectroscopy. D retention properties were investigated by thermal desorption spectroscopy. It was found that C deposits on nano-structured surface have low internal stress and porous structure compared with C deposits on flat surfaces. Increase of CD4 release from C deposition layers on nano-structured surface was investigated by TDS. These results showed the effects of nano-structure on structure and thermal desorption properties of C deposits

  10. Effect of deposition temperature on boron-doped carbon coatings deposited from a BCl3-C3H6-H2 mixture using low pressure chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mixture of propylene, hydrogen and boron trichloride was used to fabricate boron-doped carbon coatings by using low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) technique. Effect of deposition temperature on deposition rate, morphologies, compositions and bonding states of boron-doped carbon coatings was investigated. Below 1273 K, the deposition rate is controlled by reaction dynamics. The deposition rate increases with increasing deposition temperature. The activation energy is 208.74 kJ/mol. Above 1273 K, the deposition rate decreases due to smaller critical radius rc and higher nuclei formation rate J with increasing temperature. Scanning electron microscopy shows that the structure changes from glass-like to nano-laminates with increasing deposition temperature. The boron concentration decreases with increasing deposition temperature, corresponding with increasing carbon concentration. The five types of bonding states are B-C, B-sub-C, BC2O, BCO2 and B-O. B-sub-C and BC2O are the main bonding states. The reactions are dominant at all temperatures, in which the B-sub-C and PyC are formed.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulation on the initial stage of 1 eV carbon deposition on silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deposition process of 1 eV carbon on silicon has been investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations up to a fluence of 5.3   ×   1014 atoms cm−2 which corresponds more or less to monolayer coverage. At such low impact energies, atoms are expected to stay on the sample surface, which is also observed up to a fluence of 2   ×   1014 atoms cm−2. For higher fluence, carbon atoms start mixing into the silicon substrate. This process seems to get initiated by the increasing strain caused by the carbon atoms deposited on the silicon surface, and which leads to some gradual distortions. The latter are important for the migration of carbon atoms into the silicon lattice. During the whole process the top part of the silicon sample gets amorphized and the coordination of the carbon atoms increases from 1 or 2 to mostly 4-fold coordinated carbon atoms. The process can be considered as the starting point of silicon carbide formation and allows to explain how nm thick films can be formed from 1 eV deposition energies. The low carbon concentration of about 7% in the modified layer is, however, too low to observe a transition towards the latter. (paper)

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation on the initial stage of 1 eV carbon deposition on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, Patrick; Jana, Arindam; Briquet, Ludovic G. V.; Wirtz, Tom; Henrion, Gérard

    2015-07-01

    The deposition process of 1 eV carbon on silicon has been investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations up to a fluence of 5.3   ×   1014 atoms cm-2 which corresponds more or less to monolayer coverage. At such low impact energies, atoms are expected to stay on the sample surface, which is also observed up to a fluence of 2   ×   1014 atoms cm-2. For higher fluence, carbon atoms start mixing into the silicon substrate. This process seems to get initiated by the increasing strain caused by the carbon atoms deposited on the silicon surface, and which leads to some gradual distortions. The latter are important for the migration of carbon atoms into the silicon lattice. During the whole process the top part of the silicon sample gets amorphized and the coordination of the carbon atoms increases from 1 or 2 to mostly 4-fold coordinated carbon atoms. The process can be considered as the starting point of silicon carbide formation and allows to explain how nm thick films can be formed from 1 eV deposition energies. The low carbon concentration of about 7% in the modified layer is, however, too low to observe a transition towards the latter.

  13. Improvement on the electrochemical characteristics of graphite anodes by coating of the pyrolytic carbon using tumbling chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrochemical characteristics of graphite coated with pyrolytic carbon materials using tumbling chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process have been studied for the active material of anodes in lithium ion secondary batteries. Coating of pyrolytic carbons on the surface of graphite particles, which tumble in a rotating reactor tube, was performed through the pyrolysis of liquid propane gas (LPG). The surface morphology of these graphite particles coated with pyrolytic carbon has been observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The surface of graphite particles can well be covered with pyrolytic carbon by tumbling CVD. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) image of these carbon particles shows that the core part is highly ordered carbon, while the shell part is disordered carbon. We have found that the new-type carbon obtained from tumbling CVD has a uniform core (graphite)-shell (pyrolytic carbon) structure. The electrochemical property of the new-type carbons has been examined using a charge-discharge cycler. The coating of pyrolytic carbon on the surface of graphite can effectively reduce the initial irreversible capacity by 47.5%. Cyclability and rate-capability of theses carbons with the core-shell structure are much better than those of bare graphite. From electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) spectra, it is found that the coating of pyrolytic carbon on the surface of graphite causes the decrease of the contact resistance in the carbon electrodes, which means the formation of solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer is suppressed. We suggest that coating of pyrolytic carbon by the tumbling CVD is an effective method in improving the electrochemical properties of graphite electrodes for lithium ion secondary batteries

  14. Electro-Optical Properties of Carbon Nanotubes Obtained by High Density Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Paula Mousinho; Ronaldo D. Mansano

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we studied the electro-optical properties of high-aligned carbon nanotubes deposited at room temperature. For this, we used the High Density Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition system. This system uses a new concept of plasma generation: a planar coil is coupled to an RF system for plasma generation. This was used together with an electrostatic shield, for plasma densification, thereby obtaining high-density plasmas. The carbon nanotubes were deposited using pure methane plasmas. T...

  15. Carbon Nanotubes/Nanofibers by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, K. B. K.; Hash, D. B.; Bell, M. S.; Chhowalla, M.; Cruden, B. A.; Amaratunga, G. A. J.; Meyyappan, M.; Milne, W. I.

    2005-01-01

    Plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) has been recently used for the production of vertically aligned carbon nanotubedfibers (CN) directly on substrates. These structures are potentially important technologically as electron field emitters (e.g. microguns, microwave amplifiers, displays), nanoelectrodes for sensors, filter media, superhydrophobic surfaces and thermal interface materials for microelectronics. A parametric study on the growth of CN grown by glow discharge dc-PECVD is presented. In this technique, a substrate containing thin film Ni catalyst is exposed to C2H2 and NH3 gases at 700 C. Without plasma, this process is essentially thermal CVD which produces curly spaghetti-like CN as seen in Fig. 1 (a). With the plasma generated by biasing the substrate at -6OOV, we observed that the CN align vertically during growth as shown in Fig. l(b), and that the magnitude of the applied substrate bias affects the degree of alignment. The thickness of the thin film Ni catalyst was found to determine the average diameter and inversely the length of the CN. The yield and density of the CN were controlled by the use of different diffusion barrier materials under the Ni catalyst. Patterned CN growth [Fig. l(c)], with la variation in CN diameter of 4.1% and 6.3% respectively, is achieved by lithographically defining the Ni thin film prior to growth. The shape of the structures could be varied from very straight nanotube-like to conical tip-like nanofibers by increasing the ratio of C2H2 in the gas flow. Due to the plasma decomposition of C2H2, amorphous carbon (a-C) is an undesirable byproduct which could coat the substrate during CN growth. Using a combination of depth profiled Auger electron spectroscopy to study the substrate and in-situ mass spectroscopy to examine gas phase neutrals and ions, the optimal conditions for a-C free growth of CN is determined.

  16. Spray-gun deposition of catalyst for large area and versatile synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Gohier, Aurelien; Kim, Ki Hwan; Norman, Evgeny; Gorintin, Louis; Bondavalli, Paolo; Cojocaru, Costel Sorin

    2012-01-01

    Spray gun deposition technique was investigated for large area deposition of nano-catalysts. In particular, we studied iron chloride salts solutions as catalyst precursor for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Iron chloride salts are shown to decompose upon thermal annealing into Fe(III) oxide based species that make it suitable for further growth of various carbon nanotube structures. Depending on the spraying process, versatile synthesis of 2-D single-walled carbon nanotube network a...

  17. SYNTHESIS OF CARBON NANOSTRUCTURES BY PLASMA ENHANCED CHEMICAL VAPOUR DEPOSITION AT ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE

    OpenAIRE

    Jašek Ondřej; Synek Petr; Zajíčková Lenka; Eliáš Marek; Kudrle Vít

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanostructures present leading field in nanotechnology research. Wide range of chemical and physical methods was used for carbon nanostructures synthesis including arc discharges, laser ablation and chemical vapour deposition. Plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) with its application in modern microelectronics industry became soon target of research in carbon nanostructures synthesis. The selection of the ideal growth process depends on the application. Most of PECVD tech...

  18. Nitrogen deposition: how important is it for global terrestrial carbon uptake?

    OpenAIRE

    Bala, G.; N. Devaraju; R. K. Chaturvedi; K. Caldeira; R. Nemani

    2013-01-01

    Global carbon budget studies indicate that the terrestrial ecosystems have remained a large sink for carbon despite widespread deforestation activities. CO2 fertilization, N deposition and re-growth of mid-latitude forests are believed to be key drivers for land carbon uptake. In this study, we assess the importance of N deposition by performing idealized near-equilibrium simulations using the Community Land Model 4.0 (CLM4). In our equilibrium simulations, only 12–17% of th...

  19. Effect of Different Catalyst Deposition Technique on Aligned Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Grown by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed Saheed; Norani Muti Mohamed; Zainal Arif Burhanudin

    2014-01-01

    The paper reported the investigation of the substrate preparation technique involving deposition of iron catalyst by electron beam evaporation and ferrocene vaporization in order to produce vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes array needed for fabrication of tailored devices. Prior to the growth at 700°C in ethylene, silicon dioxide coated silicon substrate was prepared by depositing alumina followed by iron using two different methods as described earlier. Characterization analysi...

  20. Preparation of Dispersed Platinum Nanoparticles on a Carbon Nanostructured Surface Using Supercritical Fluid Chemical Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mineo Hiramatsu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a method of forming platinum (Pt nanoparticles using a metal organic chemical fluid deposition (MOCFD process employing a supercritical fluid (SCF, and have demonstrated the synthesis of dispersed Pt nanoparticles on the surfaces of carbon nanowalls (CNWs, two-dimensional carbon nanostructures, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs. By using SCF-MOCFD with supercritical carbon dioxide as a solvent of metal-organic compounds, highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles of 2 nm diameter were deposited on the entire surface of CNWs and CNTs. The SCF-MOCFD process proved to be effective for the synthesis of Pt nanoparticles on the entire surface of intricate carbon nanostructures with narrow interspaces.

  1. Development of supercapacitor active composites by electrochemical deposition of polypyrrole on carbon nanofibres

    OpenAIRE

    Dumanlı, Ahu Gümrah; Dumanli, Ahu Gumrah; Erden, Ayça; Erden, Ayca; YÜRÜM, YUDA; Yurum, Yuda

    2012-01-01

    In this study, pyrrole monomer is polymerized on carbon nanofibres (CNFs) via electropolymerization. This is a new technique to produce a chemically bonded CNF–polypyrrole composite. Deposition of the polypyrrole (PPy) on the nanofibres was optimized by varying the degree of deposition and deposition speed. Optimization studies have proven that the high deposition amounts result in blocks of polymers, which can be overcome through tuning the degree of polymerization by means number of c...

  2. Microscopical examination of carbon deposits formed in the Windscale advanced gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods are described of sampling and examining carbon deposits on fuel cladding in the Windscale advanced gas-cooled reactor. Deposition is observed on fuel cladding in both the reactor core and experimental loops in carbon dioxide coolants containing various amounts of carbon monoxide and methane. Deposit distribution over the cladding surface indicated that nucleation is dependent on local surface conditions. Microscopical examination showed that deposit thickness increases by carbon filament growth into the coolant gas stream and that the process can be markedly influenced by metallic impurities. There is evidence that nickel can play a particularly significant role in deposition in loop experiments but similar effects have not been observed in the reactor core. (author)

  3. Microstructural and optical properties of nanocrystalline ZnO deposited onto vertically aligned carbon nanotubes by physical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanocrystalline ZnO films with thicknesses of 5 nm, 10 nm, 20 nm, and 50 nm were deposited via magnetron sputtering onto the surface of vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The ZnO/CNTs heterostructures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction studies. No structural degradation of the CNTs was observed and photoluminescence (PL) measurements of the nanostructured ZnO layers show that the optical properties of these films are typical of ZnO deposited at low temperatures. The results indicate that magnetron sputtering is a viable technique for growing heterostructures and depositing functional layers onto CNTs.

  4. Numerical study on carbon deposition of SOFC with unsteady state variation of porosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Unsteady two-dimensional SOFC model considering carbon deposition is presented. ► Gas phase chemical reaction kinetics is used to predict carbon deposition molar mass. ► Unsteady variation of anodic porosity and electrical conductivity is considered. ► It is necessary to consider the variation of anodic porosity for SOFCs. -- Abstract: In order to research the failure mechanism of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC), an unsteady state two-dimensional model that considers the carbon deposition is presented. Navier–Stokes (N–S) equations, heat transfer equation, mass transfer equation, electron and ion transport equation are solved by COMSOL 3.5. In the numerical model, with the operating temperature at 800 °C, gas phase chemical reaction kinetics is used to predict the carbon deposition molar mass. Furthermore, the unsteady state variation of anodic porosity and the electrical conductivity that caused by carbon deposition is taken into account. From the numerical results, it can be found that the effect of the variation of anodic porosity on SOFC electronic performance is about 7%. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the variation of anodic porosity when come up against carbon deposition problems of SOFC. The increased inlet water/methane ratio could eliminate carbon deposition, but the current density would decline dramatically.

  5. Nitrogen deposition: how important is it for global terrestrial carbon uptake?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, G.; Devaraju, N.; Chaturvedi, R. K.; Caldeira, K.; Nemani, R.

    2013-11-01

    Global carbon budget studies indicate that the terrestrial ecosystems have remained a large sink for carbon despite widespread deforestation activities. CO2 fertilization, N deposition and re-growth of mid-latitude forests are believed to be key drivers for land carbon uptake. In this study, we assess the importance of N deposition by performing idealized near-equilibrium simulations using the Community Land Model 4.0 (CLM4). In our equilibrium simulations, only 12-17% of the deposited nitrogen is assimilated into the ecosystem and the corresponding carbon uptake can be inferred from a C : N ratio of 20 : 1. We calculate the sensitivity of the terrestrial biosphere for CO2 fertilization, climate warming and N deposition as changes in total ecosystem carbon for unit changes in global mean atmospheric CO2 concentration, global mean temperature and Tera grams of nitrogen deposition per year, respectively. Based on these sensitivities, it is estimated that about 242 PgC could have been taken up by land due to the CO2 fertilization effect and an additional 175 PgC taken up as a result of the increased N deposition since the pre-industrial period. Because of climate warming, the terrestrial ecosystem could have lost about 152 PgC during the same period. Therefore, since pre-industrial times terrestrial carbon losses due to warming may have been more or less compensated by effects of increased N deposition, whereas the effect of CO2 fertilization is approximately indicative of the current increase in terrestrial carbon stock. Our simulations also suggest that the sensitivity of carbon storage to increased N deposition decreases beyond current levels, indicating that climate warming effects on carbon storage may overwhelm N deposition effects in the future.

  6. Modeling carbon dynamics in vegetation and soil under the impact of soil erosion and deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S.; Bliss, N.; Sundquist, E.; Huntington, T.G.

    2003-01-01

    Soil erosion and deposition may play important roles in balancing the global atmospheric carbon budget through their impacts on the net exchange of carbon between terrestrial ecosystem and the atmosphere. Few models and studies have been designed to assess these impacts. In this study, we developed a general ecosystem model, Erosion-Deposition-Carbon-Model (EDCM), to dynamically simulate the influences of rainfall-induced soil erosion and deposition on soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics in soil profiles. EDCM was applied to several landscape positions in the Nelson Farm watershed in Mississippi, including ridge top (without erosion or deposition), eroding hillslopes, and depositional sites that had been converted from native forests to croplands in 1870. Erosion reduced the SOC storage at the eroding sites and deposition increased the SOC storage at the depositional areas compared with the site without erosion or deposition. Results indicated that soils were consistently carbon sources to the atmosphere at all landscape positions from 1870 to 1950, with lowest source strength at the eroding sites (13 to 24 gC m-2 yr-1), intermediate at the ridge top (34 gC m-2 yr-1), and highest at the depositional sites (42 to 49 gC m-2 yr-1). During this period, erosion reduced carbon emissions via dynamically replacing surface soil with subsurface soil that had lower SOC contents (quantity change) and higher passive SOC fractions (quality change). Soils at all landscape positions became carbon sinks from 1950 to 1997 due to changes in management practices (e.g., intensification of fertilization and crop genetic improvement). The sink strengths were highest at the eroding sites (42 to 44 gC m-2 yr-1 , intermediate at the ridge top (35 gC m-2 yr-1), and lowest at the depositional sites (26 to 29 gC m-2 yr-1). During this period, erosion enhanced carbon uptake at the eroding sites by continuously taking away a fraction of SOC that can be replenished with enhanced plant residue

  7. Amorphous carbon film deposition on inner surface of tubes using atmospheric pressure pulsed filamentary plasma source

    OpenAIRE

    Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Bibinov, Nikita; Awakowicz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Uniform amorphous carbon film is deposited on the inner surface of quartz tube having the inner diameter of 6 mm and the outer diameter of 8 mm. A pulsed filamentary plasma source is used for the deposition. Long plasma filaments (~ 140 mm) as a positive discharge are generated inside the tube in argon with methane admixture. FTIR-ATR, XRD, SEM, LSM and XPS analyses give the conclusion that deposited film is amorphous composed of non-hydrogenated sp2 carbon and hydrogenated sp3 carbon. Plasma...

  8. Carbonate deposition on tail feathers of ruddy ducks using evaporation ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euliss, N.H., Jr.; Jarvis, R.L.; Gilmer, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    Substantial carbonate deposits were observed on rectrices of Ruddy Ducks (Oxyura jamaicensis) collected during 1982-1984 on evaporation ponds in the San Joaquin Valley, California. Carbonate deposits were composed of about 75% aragonite and 25% calcite, both polymorphous forms of CaCO3. Significantly more carbonate deposits were observed on Ruddy Ducks as length of exposure to agricultural drain water increased, during the 1983-1984 field season when salt concentrations in the ponds were higher, and in certain evaporation-pond systems.

  9. Fast deposition of diamond-like carbon films by radio frequency hollow cathode method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films were deposited on p-type Si (100) substrates by RF hollow cathode method under different RF power and pressure, using ethane as the precursor gas. The deposition rate of 45 nm/min was achieved, almost 4 times higher than by conventional radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The mechanism of fast DLC films deposition is attributed to high plasma density in RF hollow cathode method, discussed in this paper. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used to investigate the microstructure of DLC films. The film hardness and Young's modulus were measured by nanoindentation. - Highlights: • Diamond-like carbon thin films were deposited by RF hollow cathode method. • The deposition rate of 45 nm/min was achieved. • A higher plasma density results in a higher deposition rate

  10. Synthesis and Growth Mechanism of Carbon Filaments by Chemical Vapor Deposition without Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuhe Liu; Feng Li; Shuo Bai

    2009-01-01

    Carbon filaments with diameter from several to hundreds micrometers were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition of methane without catalyst. The morphology, microstructure and mechanical properties of the carbon filament were investigated by scanning electronic microscopy, optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and mechanical testing. The results show that the carbon filament is inverted cone shape and grows up along the gas flow direction. The stem of it is formed of annular carbon layers arranged in a tree ring structure while the head is made up of concentrical layers. The tensile strength of the carbon filament is increased after graphitization for the restructuring and growing large of graphene. The growth mechanism of carbon filament was proposed according to the results of two series of experiments with different deposition time and intermittent deposition cycles.

  11. Effect of Different Catalyst Deposition Technique on Aligned Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Grown by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed Saheed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reported the investigation of the substrate preparation technique involving deposition of iron catalyst by electron beam evaporation and ferrocene vaporization in order to produce vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes array needed for fabrication of tailored devices. Prior to the growth at 700°C in ethylene, silicon dioxide coated silicon substrate was prepared by depositing alumina followed by iron using two different methods as described earlier. Characterization analysis revealed that aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes array of 107.9 µm thickness grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition technique can only be achieved for the sample with iron deposited using ferrocene vaporization. The thick layer of partially oxidized iron film can prevent the deactivation of catalyst and thus is able to sustain the growth. It also increases the rate of permeation of the hydrocarbon gas into the catalyst particles and prevents agglomeration at the growth temperature. Combination of alumina-iron layer provides an efficient growth of high density multiwalled carbon nanotubes array with the steady growth rate of 3.6 µm per minute for the first 12 minutes and dropped by half after 40 minutes. Thicker and uniform iron catalyst film obtained from ferrocene vaporization is attributed to the multidirectional deposition of particles in the gaseous form.

  12. Surface transformations of carbon (graphene, graphite, diamond, carbide), deposited on polycrystalline nickel by hot filaments chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deposition of carbon has been studied at high temperature on polycrystalline nickel by hot filaments activated chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD). The sequences of carbon deposition are studied by surface analyses: Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), electron loss spectroscopy (ELS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in a chamber directly connected to the growth chamber. A general scale law of the (C/Ni) intensity lines is obtained with a reduced time. Both, shape analysis of the AES C KVV line and the C1s relative intensity suggest a three-step process: first formation of graphene and a highly graphitic layer, then multiphase formation with graphitic, carbidic and diamond-like carbon and finally at a critical temperature that strongly depends on the pretreatment of the polycrystalline nickel surface, a rapid transition to diamond island formation. Whatever the substrate diamond is always the final product and some graphene layers the initial product. Moreover it is possible to stabilize a few graphene layers at the initial sequences of carbon deposition. The duration of this stabilization step is strongly depending however on the pre-treatment of the Ni surface.

  13. Ion beam deposition of amorphous carbon films with diamond like properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, John C.; Mirtich, Michael J.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    1982-01-01

    Carbon films were deposited on silicon, quartz, and potassium bromide substrates from an ion beam. Growth rates were approximately 0.3 micron/hour. The films were featureless and amorphous and contained only carbon and hydrogen in significant amounts. The density and carbon/hydrogen ratio indicate the film is a hydrogen deficient polymer. One possible structure, consistent with the data, is a random network of methylene linkages and tetrahedrally coordinated carbon atoms.

  14. Turnover of eroded soil organic carbon after deposition in terrestrial and aquatic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkels, Frédérique; Cammeraat, Erik; Kalbitz, Karsten; van Oost, Kristof; Ellerbrock, Ruth; Follain, Stéphane; Fuchslueger, Lucia; Gerke, Horst; Heckrath, Goswin; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Kuhn, Nikolaus; van Loon, Emiel; Quinton, John; Richter, Andreas; Salvador-Blanes, Sébastien; Sommer, Michael; Steffens, Markus

    2015-04-01

    The fate of eroded soil organic carbon (SOC) after deposition is a large uncertainty in assessing the impact of soil erosion on C budgets. Globally, large amounts of SOC are transported by erosion and a substantial part is transferred into adjacent inland waters, linking terrestrial and aquatic C cycling. However, the net effect on C fluxes between soils, inland waters and atmosphere remains uncertain. In this study, we determined SOC turnover in terrestrial and aquatic environments and indentified its major controls. A European gradient of agricultural sites was sampled, spanning a wide range soil properties (e.g. texture, aggregation, etc.), SOC quantity and quality. In a 16-week incubation experiment, SOC turnover was determined for conditions reflecting downslope soils or inland waters. Moreover, we studied the impact of labile C inputs ('priming') on SOC stability using 13C labeled cellulose. Physical and chemical soil properties and SOC molecular composition were assessed as potential controls on C turnover. SOC deposition in aquatic environments resulted in upto 3.5 times higher C turnover than deposition on downslope soils. Labile C inputs enlarged total CO2 emissions, with the largest increase for aquatic conditions. Solid-state 13C NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy showed broad similarities in SOC molecular composition. Soil and SOC properties could not (yet) fully explain variation in SOC turnover between the sites. However, temporal trends in CO2 emissions clearly differed between downslope soils and inland waters. We established a quantitative model, based on the ten sites of the European gradient, that is capable to describe CO2 emissions for SOC deposited on soils and in inland waters and upon different levels of labile C inputs. Our findings indicate that deposition conditions (soils vs. inland waters) play a crucial role in determining C turnover. Erosion measures preventing deposition in aquatic environments could therefore be an important carbon saving

  15. Characteristics of Diamond-Like Carbon Films Deposited on Polymer Dental Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtake, Naoto; Uchi, Tomio; Yasuhara, Toshiyuki; Takashima, Mai

    2012-09-01

    Characterizations of diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposited on a polymer artificial tooth were performed. DLC films were deposited on dental parts made of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) resin by dc-pulse plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from methane. Wear resistance test results revealed that a DLC-coated resin tooth has a very high wear resistance against tooth brushing, and endures 24 h brushing without a marked weight decrease. Cell cultivation test results show that DLC plays an important role in preventing cell death. Moreover, a biocompatibility test using a rabbit revealed that a connective tissue in the vicinity of DLC-coated PMMA is significantly thinner than that of noncoated PMMA. The numbers of inflammatory cells in the vicinity of DLC-coated and noncoated surfaces are 0 and 508 cells/mm2, respectively. These results led us to conclude that DLC films are an excellent material for use as the coating of a polymer artificial tooth in terms of not only high wear resistance but also biocompatibility.

  16. Investigations of the origins of deposited carbon species in gaps between divertor tiles using a kinetic code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We model deposition of eroded carbon species in gaps using a kinetic code system. ► The deposited carbon species are mainly from top surface at low plasma temperature. ► At high plasma temperature the deposited carbon species are mainly from side surface. ► The deposition features for physical sputtering and chemical erosion are different. - Abstract: In order to investigate the origins of deposited carbon species in gaps, the simulations have been performed using a kinetic code system. At low plasma temperatures, the deposited carbon species mainly originate from top surfaces of the tile, while at high plasma temperatures the deposited carbon species are basically derived from side surfaces of the tile. A substantial variation of the deposition rate of carbon species originating from side surfaces is obtained due to physical sputtering and topography advantage. The deposited carbon species derived from top surfaces and side surfaces demonstrate different deposition characteristics for physical sputtering and chemical erosion: (i) for deposited carbon species from top surfaces, the deposition ratio for physical sputtering increases evidently and deposition rate virtually increases by one order of magnitude with increasing plasma temperature; and the deposition ratio for chemical erosion reduces correspondingly and deposition rate decreases gradually; (ii) for deposited carbon species from side surfaces, the deposited carbon species principally arise from physical sputtering; the deposition rates for chemical erosion are of the order of magnitude of 1015 m−2 s−1 for all studied plasma temperatures, and the deposition rates for physical sputtering can be two to three orders of magnitude greater than that for chemical erosion.

  17. Black Carbon Deposition on Glaciers and in the Seasonal Snowpack in Western Washington's Mountainous Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, I.; Kaspari, S.; Larrabee, M.

    2012-12-01

    Black carbon deposition on snow and ice darkens the surface of glaciers and snowpack, reducing albedo. Radiation absorbed by black carbon in snow can accelerate snowmelt and change the timing of runoff. This is particularly important in Washington State, as glaciers and seasonal snowpack have shrunk considerably in recent years and are integral to the region's water resources. However, little data exists regarding the concentration of black carbon in Washington snow, which is necessary to determine if enough black carbon is present to substantially accelerate snowmelt. From the winter through the summer of 2012, we collected snow samples from the snow surface, snow pits and snow cores (glaciers on Mt. Rainier, Blewett Pass in the central Cascades, N. Klawatti, Noisy and Sandalee glaciers in the North Cascades and Blue Glacier on Mt. Olympus. Samples were analyzed for black carbon using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), and select samples were also analyzed for black carbon using a Sunset Lab OC-EC Aerosol Analyzer to compare with the SP2 method. We use the resultant data set to examine how snow accumulation, dry deposition, and proximity to emission sources (such as the Puget Sound metropolitan area) affect black carbon concentration in snow and ice. The results of this research provide insight in to 1) regional scale variation in black carbon deposition, 2) temporal trends in black carbon deposition, and 3) the persistence of black carbon in the snowpack throughout the season.

  18. Lung deposition predictions of airborne particles and the emergence of contemporary diseases Part-I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Inhaled particles can cause a variety of pulmonary illnesses such as asthma, bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD and even secondary organismic diseases. Thus, predictions of inhaled aerosol deposition in the respiratory tract are essential not only to assess their possible consequences but also to optimize drug delivery using pharmaceutical aerosols. Deposition of inhaled aerosols is a complex phenomenon that depends on the physico-chemical properties of the particles, lung anatomy, and respiratory patterns of the subject. Hence, the prediction of particle deposition for an individual person poses real challenges. Different conceptual particle deposition models are employed for the estimation of deposition fraction in different region of the lung. However, these deposition fractions vary with the above mentioned parameters in addition to the modeling and computational technique. Part-I of this review article briefly describes the deposition behaviour of inhaled particulate matter and the currently available approaches for the prediction of aerosol deposition in the respiratory tract. Part-II continues this thread and provides a broad view of the health-related issues of particle exposure.

  19. Geology of uranium deposits in the southern part of the Rocky Mountain province of Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the geology of uranium deposits in the southern part of the Rocky Mountains of Colorado, an area of about 20,000 square miles. In January 1966, combined ore reserves and ore production at 28 uranium deposits were about 685,000 tons of ore averaging 0.24 percent U3O8 (3.32 million pounds U3O8). About half of these deposits each contain <1,000 tons of ore. The two largest deposits, the Pitch in the Marshall Pass locality southwest of Salida and the T-1 in the Cochetopa locality southeast of Gunnison, account for about 90 percent of all production and available reserves. The probability in excellent for major expansion of reserves in Marshall Pass and is favorable at a few other vein localities. There are six types of uranium deposits, and there were at least four ages of emplacement of these deposits in the southern part of the Colorado Rockies. There are eight types of host rocks of eight different ages. Veins and stratiform deposits each account for about 40 percent of the total number of deposits, but the veins of early and middle Tertiary age account for nearly all of the total reserves plus production. The remaining 20 percent of the deposits include uraniferous pegmatites, irregular disseminations in porphyry, and other less important types. The wall rocks at the large Tertiary vein deposits in the southern part of the Rocky Mountains of Colorado are Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary rocks, whereas Precambrian metamorphic wall rocks predominate at the large veins in the Front Range of the northern Colorado Rockies. Metallogenetic considerations and tectonic influences affecting the distribution of uranium in Colorado and in adjacent portions of the western United States are analyzed

  20. Friction and Wear of Ion-Beam-Deposited Diamondlike Carbon on Chemical-Vapor-Deposited, Fine-Grain Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Wu, Richard L. C.; Lanter, William C.

    1996-01-01

    Friction and wear behavior of ion-beam-deposited diamondlike carbon (DLC) films coated on chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD), fine-grain diamond coatings were examined in ultrahigh vacuum, dry nitrogen, and humid air environments. The DLC films were produced by the direct impact of an ion beam (composed of a 3:17 mixture of Ar and CH4) at ion energies of 1500 and 700 eV and an RF power of 99 W. Sliding friction experiments were conducted with hemispherical CVD diamond pins sliding on four different carbon-base coating systems: DLC films on CVD diamond; DLC films on silicon; as-deposited, fine-grain CVD diamond; and carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain CVD diamond on silicon. Results indicate that in ultrahigh vacuum the ion-beam-deposited DLC films on fine-grain CVD diamond (similar to the ion-implanted CVD diamond) greatly decrease both the friction and wear of fine-grain CVD diamond films and provide solid lubrication. In dry nitrogen and in humid air, ion-beam-deposited DLC films on fine-grain CVD diamond films also had a low steady-state coefficient of friction and a low wear rate. These tribological performance benefits, coupled with a wider range of coating thicknesses, led to longer endurance life and improved wear resistance for the DLC deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond in comparison to the ion-implanted diamond films. Thus, DLC deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond films can be an effective wear-resistant, lubricating coating regardless of environment.

  1. Opto-electrical properties of amorphous carbon thin film deposited from natural precursor camphor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradhan, Debabrata [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400 076 (India)]. E-mail: dpradhan@sciborg.uwaterloo.ca; Sharon, Maheshwar [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400 076 (India)

    2007-06-30

    A simple thermal chemical vapor deposition technique is employed for the pyrolysis of a natural precursor 'camphor' and deposition of carbon films on alumina substrate at higher temperatures (600-900 deg. C). X-ray diffraction measurement reveals the amorphous structure of these films. The carbon films properties are found to significantly vary with the deposition temperatures. At higher deposition temperature, films have shown predominately sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon and therefore, higher conductivity and lower optical band gap (Tauc gap). These amorphous carbon (a-C) films are also characterized with Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In addition, electrical and optical properties are measured. The thermoelectric measurement shows these as-grown a-C films are p-type in nature.

  2. Investigations into the effect of spinel oxide composition on rate of carbon deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deposition of carbon on fuel cladding and other steels results in a reduction in heat transfer efficiency. Methane and carbon monoxide are added to the gaseous coolant in the Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (AGR) to reduce the radiolytic oxidation of the graphite moderator and this is known to increase the rate of carbon deposition. However, the composition of oxides formed on steel surfaces within the reactor may also influence deposition. In this investigation carefully characterised spinel type oxides of varying composition have been subjected to γ radiation under conditions of temperature, pressure and atmosphere similar to those experienced in the reactor. The rate of carbon deposition has been studied using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDX). (U.K.)

  3. Nanoscale Soldering of Positioned Carbon Nanotubes using Highly Conductive Electron Beam Induced Gold Deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Dorte Nørgaard; Mølhave, Kristian; Mateiu, Ramona Valentina; Bøggild, Peter; Rasmussen, A.M.; Appel, C.C.; Brorson, M; Jacobsen, C.J.H.

    2003-01-01

    We have developed an in-situ method for controlled positioning of carbon nanotubes followed by highly conductive contacting of the nanotubes, using electron beam assisted deposition of gold. The positioning and soldering process takes place inside an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (E...... embedded in a carbon matrix. Nanoscale soldering of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) onto microelectrodes was achieved by deposition of a conducting gold line across a contact point between nanotube and electrode. The solderings were found to be mechanically stronger than the carbon nanotubes. We have......-SEM) in the presence of a source of gold-organic precursor gas. Bridges deposited between suspended microelectrodes show resistivities down to 10-4 Ωcm and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) of the deposits reveals a dense core of gold particles surrounded by a crust of small gold nanoparticles...

  4. Growth of crystals of several boron-carbon compositions by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevill, D. N.; Rissmann, T. J.; Brewe, D.; Wood, C.

    1986-01-01

    Boron-carbon compounds have been deposited by the flow of carbon tetrachloride and boron trichloride, in the presence of a large excess of hydrogen, over a graphite surface maintained at 1000-1300 C. Deposits were formed on either an RF-heated disc or a tube or insert heated by a resistance furnace. Crystalline materials ranging in composition from B2C to B17C have been obtained.

  5. Electrophoretic Deposition of Carbon Nanotubes on 3-Amino-Propyl-Triethoxysilane (APTES) Surface Functionalized Silicon Substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Theda Daniels-Race; Anirban Sarkar

    2013-01-01

    Fabrication of uniform thin coatings of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) on semiconductor (silicon) substrates with 3-aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTES) surface functionalization has been studied extensively in this report. The gradual deposition and eventual film formation of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is greatly assisted by the Coulombic force of attraction existing between the positively charged –NH2 surface groups of APTES and the acid treated, ...

  6. The electrolytic deposition of carbon from molten Li2CO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrodeposition of carbon on an nickel electrode in molten salt has been investigated with the aid of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cyclic voltammetry, using molten LiCl, as a base electrolyte with adding of 1 and 5 % of Li2CO3. Commercial nickel wire was used as a cathode and graphite crucible as the anode electrode. A cyclic voltammograms for an nickel electrode indicates that the deposition or discharge of carbon at the cathode occurs at potential range of - 0.8 to -1.7 V. Further, SEM observations showed that morphology of the carbon at the cathode is in the form of a fairly hard black deposit. It was found that the quality of the deposit depends by the cathode surface, applied overpotential, content of lithium carbonate and the thickness of the carbon film. (Original)

  7. Hall Measurements on Carbon Nanotube Paper Modified With Electroless Deposited Platinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwuoha Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Carbon nanotube paper, sometimes referred to as bucky paper, is a random arrangement of carbon nanotubes meshed into a single robust structure, which can be manipulated with relative ease. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes were used to make the nanotube paper, and were subsequently modified with platinum using an electroless deposition method based on substrate enhanced electroless deposition. This involves the use of a sacrificial metal substrate that undergoes electro-dissolution while the platinum metal deposits out of solution onto the nanotube paper via a galvanic displacement reaction. The samples were characterized using SEM/EDS, and Hall-effect measurements. The SEM/EDS analysis clearly revealed deposits of platinum (Pt distributed over the nanotube paper surface, and the qualitative elemental analysis revealed co-deposition of other elements from the metal substrates used. When stainless steel was used as sacrificial metal a large degree of Pt contamination with various other metals was observed. Whereas when pure sacrificial metals were used bimetallic Pt clusters resulted. The co-deposition of a bimetallic system upon carbon nanotubes was a function of the metal type and the time of exposure. Hall-effect measurements revealed some interesting fluctuations in sheet carrier density and the dominant carrier switched from N- to P-type when Pt was deposited onto the nanotube paper. Perspectives on the use of the nanotube paper as a replacement to traditional carbon cloth in water electrolysis systems are also discussed.

  8. Carbon deposition at the bottom of gaps in TEXTOR experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of a new dedicated experiment addressing the problem of impurity deposition at the bottom in gaps are presented along with modelling. A test limiter with an isolated gap was exposed to the scrape-off layer plasma in TEXTOR. The exposure was accompanied by injection of 13C-marked methane in the vicinity of the gap. Deposition at the bottom of the gap was monitored in situ with Quartz-Microbalance diagnostics. The 13C deposition efficiency of about 2.6 × 10−5 was measured. Post mortem analysis of resulting deposited layers performed with SIMS and EPMA techniques yields about a factor 2 smaller value corresponding to approximately 10% contribution of the gap bottom to the total 13C deposition in the gap. This measured contribution is effectively much smaller than observed earlier in TEXTOR, taking the difference in geometry into account, and is in reasonable agreement with modelling performed with ERO and 3D-GAPS codes

  9. Electrocatalytic activity of atomic layer deposited Pt–Ru catalysts onto N-doped carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Anne-Charlotte Elisabeth Birgitta; Larsen, Jackie Vincent; Verheijen, Marcel A.;

    2014-01-01

    Pt–Ru catalysts of various compositions, between 0 and 100at.% of Ru, were deposited onto N-doped multi-walled carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at 250°C. The Pt and Ru precursors were trimethyl(methylcyclopentadienyl)platinum (MeCpPtMe3) and bis...

  10. Interlaminar improvement of carbon fiber/epoxy composites via depositing mixture of carbon nanotubes and sizing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • COOH-CNTs can react with sizing agent, and the optimum reaction ratio was 1:20. • Carbon fibers were dipped into the mixture bath of CNTs and sizing agent. • SEM results indicate that fibers surfaces were coated with CNTs and sizing agent. • ILSS was increased by 67.01% for the composites after the mixture coating process. • Single fibers tensile strength was maintained after the deposited process. - Abstract: The effects of deposition to carbon fibers surfaces with mixture of functionalized multi-walled carbon fibers (MWCNTs) and sizing agent were investigated. Relationships between CNTs and sizing agent were studied with Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Ubbelohde viscometer. The results revealed that CNTs could react with sizing agent at 120 °C, and optimal reaction occurs when mass ratio was about 1:20. Then, carbon fibers were immersed in mixed aqueous suspension of CNTs and sizing agent with the above ratio dispersed by ultrasonication. According to scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations, fibers surfaces were coated with CNTs and sizing agent. The static contact angle tests indicated wetting performance between fibers and epoxy resin were improved after deposited procedures. Interlaminar shear strength was increased by 67.01% for fibers/epoxy resin composites after mixture deposited process. Moreover, the tensile strength of single fibers after depositing showed a slightly increase compared with that of fibers without depositing layer

  11. Pure-Nickel-Coated Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Prepared by Electroless Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Arai, Susumu; Kobayashi, Mitsuhiro; Yamamoto, Tohru; Endo, Morinobu

    2010-01-01

    Pure-nickel-coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been prepared by electroless deposition. Gluconic acid and hydrazine were respectively used as the complexing and reducing agents for nickel ions. The deposits were heat-treated. The microstructures and magnetic properties of the deposits were examined. The MWCNTs were homogeneously coated with pure nickel and their surfaces were relatively bumpy. These pure-nickel-coated MWCNTs exhibited ferromagnetism and had higher magnetization...

  12. Chemical vapour deposition of very thin coatings on carbon fibre bundles

    OpenAIRE

    Stumm, T.; Fitzer, E.; Wahl, G

    1992-01-01

    The continuous deposition of thin coatings of refractory materials on carbon fibre rovings is considered as the impregnation of a endless cylinder with slit-like pores in the direction parallel with the cylinder axis. From such a model, the limits of process parameters for the simultaneous coating of all individual monofilaments are derived. In detail a correlation between the deposition parameters and the resulting layer thickness is discussed for a deposition with high and low conversion re...

  13. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy on nanostructured carbon electrodes grown by supersonic cluster beam deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettini, Luca Giacomo; Bardizza, Giorgio; Podesta, Alessandro; Milani, Paolo; Piseri, Paolo, E-mail: piseri@mi.infn.it [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica and CIMaINa (Italy)

    2013-02-15

    Nanostructured porous films of carbon with density of about 0.5 g/cm{sup 3} and 200 nm thickness were deposited at room temperature by supersonic cluster beam deposition (SCBD) from carbon clusters formed in the gas phase. Carbon film surface topography, determined by atomic force microscopy, reveals a surface roughness of 16 nm and a granular morphology arising from the low kinetic energy ballistic deposition regime. The material is characterized by a highly disordered carbon structure with predominant sp2 hybridization as evidenced by Raman spectroscopy. The interface properties of nanostructured carbon electrodes were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy employing KOH 1 M solution as aqueous electrolyte. An increase of the double layer capacitance is observed when the electrodes are heat treated in air or when a nanostructured nickel layer deposited by SCBD on top of a sputter deposited film of the same metal is employed as a current collector instead of a plain metallic film. This enhancement is consistent with an improved charge injection in the active material and is ascribed to the modification of the electrical contact at the interface between the carbon and the metal current collector. Specific capacitance values up to 120 F/g have been measured for the electrodes with nanostructured metal/carbon interface.

  14. Deuterium retention in the carbon co-deposition layers deposited by magnetron sputtering in D2/He atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon was deposited on Si and W substrates using a D2/He plasma in a radio frequency magnetron sputtering system. The deposited layers were examined with ion beam analysis (IBA), Raman spectra analysis (RS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The growth rate of the layers deposited at 2.5 Pa total pressure and 300 K decreased with increasing He fraction in the D2/He gas mixture. The deuterium concentration in the layers deposited on the Si substrate increased from 14% to 28% when the flow rate of the He gas relative to the D2 gas was varied from 0.125 to 0.5, but the deuterium concentration in the layers on a W substrate decreased from 24% to 14%. Deuterium or helium retention and the layer thickness all significantly decreased when the substrate temperature was increased from 423 K to 773 K. Raman analysis showed that the deposited layers were amorphous deuterated-carbon layers (named a-C: D layer) and the extent of bond disorder increased dramatically with the increasing helium content in the film. Blisters and bubbles occurred in the films for high helium content in the films, and surface cracking and exfoliation were also observed

  15. Carbon Deposition during CO2 Electrolysis in Ni-Based Solid-Oxide-Cell Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skafte, Theis Løye; Graves, Christopher R.; Blennow, P.;

    2015-01-01

    . Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in both H2/H2O and CO/CO2 revealed an increase in resistance of the fuel electrode after each CO2 electrolysis current-voltage curve, indicating possible carbon deposition. The difference in partial oxygen pressure between inlet and outlet was analyzed to verify carbon...

  16. Atmospheric nitrogen deposition promotes carbon loss from peat bogs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bragazza, L.; Freeman, Ch.; Jones, T.; Rydin, H.; Limpens, J.; Fenner, N.; Ellis, T.; Gerdol, R.; Hájek, Michal; Hájek, Tomáš; Iacumin, P.; Kutnar, L.; Tahvanainen, T.; Toberman, H.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 51 (2006), s. 19386-19389. ISSN 0027-8424 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : peatlands * nitrogen * deposition Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 9.643, year: 2006

  17. Detailed Carbon Isotopic Characterization of Aerosol-Derived Organic Carbon Deposited to two Temperate Watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, A. S.; Bauer, J. E.; Keesee, E. E.; McNichol, A. P.; Xu, L.; Dickhut, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition of carbonaceous aerosols can be a quantitatively significant flux in the carbon budgets of temperate watersheds. Characterizing the sources and fates of this material is therefore critical for assessing its role in carbon and organic matter cycling in these systems. Aerosol samples were collected in the Hudson and York River watersheds throughout 2006-2007 and analyzed for quantities and isotopic signatures (δ13C, Δ14C) of total and water-soluble organic carbon (TOC, WSOC, respectively). On average ~2.4 and 2.1 mg m-2 d-1 of aerosol TOC were deposited to the Hudson and York River watersheds, respectively, and nearly half of this material was water-soluble. δ13C analyses indicated that both the TOC and the WSOC were primarily terrestrial in nature. TOC Δ14C signatures covered a broad range for both watersheds, with calculated contributions from fossil sources (e.g., anthropogenic combustion of petroleum, coal, etc.) ranging from 0% for samples collected during the summer of 2007 to approximately 50% for samples collected in the winter of 2007. Aerosol-derived WSOC Δ14C values were less variable and were nearly always enriched in 14C with respect to the corresponding TOC, indicating that contemporary aerosol material tends to partition into the aqueous phase, while fossil-derived aerosol OC is more likely to remain insoluble. However, WSOC still often showed considerable contributions from fossil OC (up to 20%). Thus, some portion of the anthropogenic fossil-derived aerosol OC is relatively soluble and may be transported hydrologically through watersheds and aquatic systems. A subset of aerosol samples from each watershed was selected for more thorough isotopic analysis of operationally-defined components of the carbonaceous material. Isotopic signatures were obtained for TOC, WSOC, total solvent-extract, and the aliphatic, aromatic, and polar components. Isotopic information on these fractions allows us to determine which components

  18. Evaluation of chemical and structural properties of germanium-carbon coatings deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamali, Hossein, E-mail: h.jamali@mut-es.ac.ir; Mozafarinia, Reza; Eshaghi, Akbar

    2015-10-15

    Germanium-carbon coatings were deposited on silicon and glass substrates by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using three different flow ratios of GeH{sub 4} and CH{sub 4} precursors. Elemental analysis, structural evaluation and microscopic investigation of coatings were performed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. Based on the results, the coatings exhibited a homogeneous and dense structure free of pores with a very good adhesion to substrate. The structural evaluation revealed that the germanium-carbon coatings were a kind of a Ge-rich composite material containing the amorphous and crystalline germanium and amorphous carbon with the mixture of Ge–Ge, Ge–C, C–C, Ge–H and C–H bonds. The result suggested that the amorphisation of the coatings could be increased with raising CH{sub 4}:GeH{sub 4} flow rate ratio and subsequently increasing C amount incorporated into the coating. - Highlights: • Germanium-carbon coatings were prepared by PECVD technique. • The germanium-carbon coatings were a kind of composite material. • The amorphisation of the coatings were increased with raising CH{sub 4}:GeH{sub 4} flow ratio.

  19. Evaluation of chemical and structural properties of germanium-carbon coatings deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germanium-carbon coatings were deposited on silicon and glass substrates by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using three different flow ratios of GeH4 and CH4 precursors. Elemental analysis, structural evaluation and microscopic investigation of coatings were performed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. Based on the results, the coatings exhibited a homogeneous and dense structure free of pores with a very good adhesion to substrate. The structural evaluation revealed that the germanium-carbon coatings were a kind of a Ge-rich composite material containing the amorphous and crystalline germanium and amorphous carbon with the mixture of Ge–Ge, Ge–C, C–C, Ge–H and C–H bonds. The result suggested that the amorphisation of the coatings could be increased with raising CH4:GeH4 flow rate ratio and subsequently increasing C amount incorporated into the coating. - Highlights: • Germanium-carbon coatings were prepared by PECVD technique. • The germanium-carbon coatings were a kind of composite material. • The amorphisation of the coatings were increased with raising CH4:GeH4 flow ratio

  20. Carbon nanostructures and networks produced by chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kowlgi, N.K.K.; Koper, G.J.M.; Van Raalten, R.A.D.

    2012-01-01

    The invention pertains to a method for manufacturing crystalline carbon nanostructures and/or a network of crystalline carbon nanostructures, comprising: (i) providing a bicontinuous micro-emulsion containing metal nanoparticles having an average particle size between 1and 100nm; (ii) bringing said

  1. Fabrication of Pt deposited on carbon nanotubes and performance of its polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new method of depositing nano-sized Pt particles on the surface of the carbon nano-tubes was introduced, and the performance of Pt/carbon nanotube compound on polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells was measured. The experimental results show that the fine platinum particles (about 3 nm) were well dispersed on carbon nanotubes, which demonstrates the excellent catalytic properties of the Pt/CNTs compound in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

  2. Amorphous carbon film deposition on inner surface of tubes using atmospheric pressure pulsed filamentary plasma source

    CERN Document Server

    Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Awakowicz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Uniform amorphous carbon film is deposited on the inner surface of quartz tube having the inner diameter of 6 mm and the outer diameter of 8 mm. A pulsed filamentary plasma source is used for the deposition. Long plasma filaments (~ 140 mm) as a positive discharge are generated inside the tube in argon with methane admixture. FTIR-ATR, XRD, SEM, LSM and XPS analyses give the conclusion that deposited film is amorphous composed of non-hydrogenated sp2 carbon and hydrogenated sp3 carbon. Plasma is characterized using optical emission spectroscopy, voltage-current measurement, microphotography and numerical simulation. On the basis of observed plasma parameters, the kinetics of the film deposition process is discussed.

  3. Physical properties of nitrogen-doped diamond-like amorphous carbon films deposited by supermagnetron plasma chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond-like amorphous carbon films doped with nitrogen (DAC:N) were deposited on Si and glass wafers intermittently using i-C4H10/N2 repetitive supermagnetron plasma chemical vapor deposition. Deposition duration, which is equal to a plasma heating time of wafer, was selected to be 40 or 60 s, and several layers were deposited repetitively to form one thick film. DAC:N films were deposited at a lower-electrode temperature of 100 deg. C as a function of upper- and lower-electrode rf powers (200 W/200 W-1 kW/1 kW) and N2 concentration (0%-80%). With an increase in N2 concentration and rf power, the resistivity and the optical band gap decreased monotonously. With increase of the deposition duration from 40 to 60 s, resistivity decreased to 0.03Ω cm and optical band gap decreased to 0.02 eV (substantially equal to 0 eV within the range of experimental error), at an N2 concentration of 80% and rf power of 1 kW(/1 kW)

  4. Green synthesis of carbon-supported nanoparticle catalysts by physical vapor deposition on soluble powder substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Hee-Young Park; Injoon Jang; Namgee Jung; Young-Hoon Chung; Jae Yoon Ryu; In Young Cha; Hyung Juhn Kim; Jong Hyung Jang; Sung Jong Yoo

    2015-01-01

    Metal and metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) supported on high surface area carbon (NP/Cs) were prepared by the physical vapor deposition of bulk materials on an α-D-glucose (Glu) substrate, followed by the deposition of the NPs on carbon supports. Using Glu as a carrier for the transport of NPs from the bulk materials to the carbon support surfaces, ultrafine NPs were obtained, exhibiting a stabilizing effect through OH moieties on the Glu surfaces. This stabilizing effect was strong enough to ...

  5. Crystal structure of diamondlike carbon films prepared by ionized deposition from methane gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamondlike carbon films have been prepared by ionized deposition from methane gas. The film structures were examined by transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis techniques. It was found that the structure of the carbon films could be classified into three types: (i) amorphous, (ii) graphite, and (iii) cubic. These types depended mainly on the deposition conditions. Usually crystalline carbon films were diamond mixed with graphite showing an average grain size of several hundred angstroms. Very hard films were composed of diamond crystallites distributed in amorphous matrix

  6. Basic study of the rate of combustion of carbon deposited in a coke oven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, S.; Nishioka, K.; Takase, S.; Yamamoto, B.

    1984-01-01

    Using experimental apparatus, the authors have quantified the effect of O/sub 2/ concentration, gas flow velocity, temperature, etc. on the rate of combustion of samples of the carbon deposited on the walls of a coke oven. Such carbon deposits are one cause of difficulty in pushing the coke. The results obtained have enabled an equation for combustion rate to be formulated. Carbon combustion tests carried out in an empty coke oven chamber immediately after pushing the coke have confirmed the validity of this rate equation. 1 reference.

  7. A study on hydrogen, oxygen, carbon, sulfur and lead isotopes in the rich uranium deposit No.201

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranium deposit No.201 located in Indonesian granite is one of the richest uranium deposits of granite type in China. An attempt is made to investigate the sources of ore-forming solutions and ore-forming materials, and to presume the environment of ore formation in the light of the study on composition of stable isotopes such as hydrogen, oxygen, carbon, sulfur and lead. The research results indicate that the ore-forming fluids in the deposit is mainly composed of meteoric water, the ore-forming materials principally came from pre-Yanshanian granite Massif and possibly, partly from the lower crust, and metallogenesis was undertaken under relatively stable physicochemical conditions

  8. Dust deposition in an oligotrophic marine environment: impact on the carbon budget

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Guieu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By bringing new nutrients and particles to the surface ocean, atmospheric deposition impacts biogeochemical cycles. The extent to which those changes are modifying the carbon balance in oligotrophic environments such as the Mediterranean Sea that receives important Saharan dust fluxes is unknown. DUNE project provides the first attempt to evaluate the changes induced in the carbon budget of an oligotrophic system after simulated Saharan dust wet and dry deposition events. Here we report the results for the 3 distinct artificial dust seeding experiments in large mesocosms that were conducted in the oligotrophic waters of the Mediterranean Sea in summer 2008 and 2010. Simultaneous measurements of the metabolic rates (C fixation, C respiration in the water column have shown that the dust deposition did not change drastically the metabolic balance as the tested waters remained net heterotroph (i.e. net primary production to bacteria respiration ratio < 1 and in some cases the net heterotrophy was even enhanced by the dust deposition. Considering the different terms of the carbon budget, we estimate that it was balanced with a dissolved organic carbon (DOC consumption of at least 10% of the initial stock. This corresponds to a fraction of the DOC stock of the surface mixed layer that consequently will not be exported during the winter mixing. Although heterotrophic bacteria were found to be the key players in the response to dust deposition, net primary production increased about twice in case of simulated wet deposition (that includes anthropogenic nitrogen and a small fraction of particulate organic carbon was still exported. Our estimated carbon budgets are an important step forward in the way we understand dust deposition and associated impacts on the oceanic cycles. They are providing knowledge about the key processes (i.e. bacteria respiration, aggregation that need to be considered for an integration of atmospheric deposition in marine

  9. Field Emission from Amorphous carbon Nitride Films Deposited on silicon Tip Arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊杰; 郑伟涛; 孙龙; 卞海蛟; 金曾孙; 赵海峰; 宋航; 孟松鹤; 赫晓东; 韩杰才

    2003-01-01

    Amorphous carbon nitride films (a-CNx) were deposited on silicon tip arrays by rf magnetron sputtering in pure nitrogen atmosphere. The field emission property of carbon nitride films on Si tips was compared with that of carbon nitride on silicon wafer. The results show that field emission property of carbon nitride films deposited on silicon tips can be improved significantly in contrast with that on wafer. It can be explained that field emission is sensitive to the local curvature and geometry, thus silicon tips can effectively promote field emission property of a-CNx films. In addition, the films deposited on silicon tips have a smaller effective work function ( F = 0.024 eV)of electron field emission than that on silicon wafer ( F = 0.060 e V), which indicates a significant enhancement of the ability of electron field emission from a-CNx films.

  10. Surface and corrosion characteristics of carbon plasma implanted and deposited nickel-titanium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, R. W. Y.; Liu, X. Y.; Chung, C. Y.; Chu, P. K.; Yeung, K. W. K.; Lu, W. W.; Cheung, K. M. C.

    2005-05-01

    Nickel-titanium shape memory alloys (NiTi) are potentially useful in orthopedic implants on account of their super-elastic and shape memory properties. However, the materials are prone to surface corrosion and the most common problem is out-diffusion of harmful Ni ions from the substrate into body tissues and fluids. In order to improve the corrosion resistance and related surface properties, we used the technique of plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition to deposit an amorphous hydrogenated carbon coating onto NiTi and implant carbon into NiTi. Both the deposited amorphous carbon film and carbon plasma implanted samples exhibit much improved corrosion resistances and surface mechanical properties and possible mechanisms are suggested.

  11. Rapid Carbonate Depositional Changes Following the Permian-Triassic Mass Extinction:Sedimentary Evidence from South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Tian; Jinnan Tong; David Bottjer; Daoliang Chu; Lei Liang; Huyue Song; Haijun Song

    2015-01-01

    Various environmental changes were associated with the Permian-Triassic mass extinc-tion at 252.2 Ma. Diverse unusual sediments and depositional phenomena have been uncovered as re-sponses to environmental and biotic changes. Lithological and detailed conodont biostratigraphic cor-relations within six Permian-Triassic boundary sections in South China indicate rapid fluctuations in carbonate deposition. Four distinct depositional phases can be recognized:(1) normal carbonate depo-sition on the platform and slope during the latest Permian;(2) reduced carbonate deposition at the on-set of the main extinction horizon; (3) expanded areas of carbonate deposition during the Hindeodus changxingsensis Zone to the H. parvus Zone;and (4) persistent mud-enriched carbonate deposition in the aftermath of the Permian-Triassic transition. Although availability of skeletal carbonate was sig-nificantly reduced during the mass extinction, the increase in carbonate deposition did not behave the same way. The rapid carbonate depositional changes, presented in this study, suggest that diverse envi-ronmental changes played key roles in the carbonate deposition of the Permian-Triassic mass extinction and onset of its aftermath. An overview of hypotheses to explain these changes implies enhanced terres-trial input, abnormal ocean circulation and various geobiological processes contributed to carbonate saturation fluctuations, as the sedimentary response to large volcanic eruptions.

  12. Effects of nitrogen deposition on carbon cycle in terrestrial ecosystems of China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Hao; Li, Dejun; Gurmesa, Geshere Abdisa;

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition in China has increased greatly, but the general impact of elevated N deposition on carbon (C) dynamics in Chinese terrestrial ecosystems is not well documented. In this study we used a meta-analysis method to compile 88 studies on the effects of N deposition C cycling on...... rate of N addition. Overall, our findings suggest that 1) decreased below-ground plant C pool may limit long-term soil C sequestration; and 2) it is better to treat N-rich and N-limited ecosystems differently in modeling effects of N deposition on ecosystem C cycle....

  13. Growth mechanisms of carbon nanotrees with branched carbon nanofibers synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    OpenAIRE

    He, Zhanbing; Maurice, Jean-Luc; Lee, Chang Seok; Cojocaru, Costel Sorin; Pribat, D.

    2014-01-01

    Y- and comb-type carbon nanotrees formed from branched carbon nanofibres grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition were studied by transmission electron microscopy. Different growth mechanisms are proposed for the two types of nanotrees based on the observed and reconstituted dynamic transformations of the catalyst particles during synthesis. However, the splitting of the larger catalyst particles is required for both kinds of nanotrees, whatever the involved growth mechanism. The c...

  14. A COMPARISON OF THE TENSILE STRENGTH OF PLASTIC PARTS PRODUCED BY A FUSED DEPOSITION MODELING DEVICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juraj Beniak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid Prototyping systems are nowadays increasingly used in many areas of industry, not only for producing design models but also for producing parts for final use. We need to know the properties of these parts. When we talk about the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM technique and FDM devices, there are many possible settings for devices and models which could influence the properties of a final part. In addition, devices based on the same principle may use different operational software for calculating the tool path, and this may have a major impact. The aim of this paper is to show the tensile strength value for parts produced from different materials on the Fused Deposition Modeling device when the horizontal orientation of the specimens is changed.

  15. Production of carbon monoxide by charged particle deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, A. E. S.; Sawada, T.; Edgar, B. C.; Uman, M. A.

    1973-01-01

    Recent studies of electron energy deposition in CO2 and CO based upon a large set of electron impact cross sections are utilized to estimate the telluric CO directly produced by various charged-particle deposition mechanisms. The mechanisms considered are (1) lightning, (2) cloud coronal discharges, (3) background radioactivity, (4) natural electrostatic discharges, (5) photoelectrons in the ionosphere, (6) auroral electrons, (7) auroral protons, (8) cosmic rays, and (9) solar wind. 'Ball park' estimates of the global CO production by each of these mechanisms are given. Apart from mechanisms 1, 2, and 5, all CO production mechanisms are estimated to be small compared to artificial sources. If, as appears to be the case, the hot oxygen atoms and ions and other atomic species immediately produced by these three charged-particle deposition mechanisms react rapidly with CO2 to produce CO, these mechanisms can readily lead to CO production levels in the multimegaton-per-year range.

  16. Chemical vapor deposition of pyrolytic carbon on polished substrates

    OpenAIRE

    DesprÉs, J.-F.; Vahlas, C.; Oberlin, A.

    1993-01-01

    Pyrolytic carbon thin (4-100 nm) films were obtained from méthane in a hot wall reactor on optically polished inert substrates by varying the déposition time and temperature. They were characterized by all modes of TEM. They are composed in majority of lamellar pyrocarbon whose thickness and disorder increases with increasing temperature. Isotropic carbon islands are also observed at the upper surface of the film.

  17. Physical vapor deposition synthesis of tungsten monocarbide (WC) thin films on different carbon substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synthesis of tungsten monocarbide (WC) thin films has been performed by physical vapor deposition on various substrates including glassy carbon, carbon fiber sheet, carbon foam, and carbon cloth. The WC and W2C phase contents of these films have been evaluated with bulk and surface analysis techniques such as x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. These characterization techniques were also used to determine the effects of synthesis by nonreactive and reactive sputtering. The synthesis of WC particles supported on the carbon fiber substrate has also been accomplished using the temperature programmed reaction method. Overall, the results demonstrate that the phase purity of tungsten carbides can be controlled by the deposition environment and annealing temperatures

  18. Deuterium retention and desorption behavior of co-deposited carbon film produced in gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Co-deposition of deuterium with carbon in an opening on a plasma-facing surface, a so-called 'gap', was simulated by using a deuterium arc discharge with carbon electrodes. The carbon deposition distribution and deuterium retention/desorption behavior of the carbon film were investigated. The amount of deposited carbon decreased exponentially with an increase of the distance from the gap entrance and more rapidly decreased with an increase in discharge gas pressure. The deuterium concentration in the carbon film increased with discharge gas pressure. At a high discharge gas pressure of 36 Pa, the atomic ratio of D/C in the carbon film reached as high as 0.9. Deuterium retained in the film desorbed mainly in the forms of D2, HD, CD4 and C2D4. The desorption behavior of retained deuterium depended on D/C. In a film with a high D/C ratio, desorption of D2 started at lower temperatures. The amount of desorbed hydrocarbons (CD4 and C2D4) increased with D/C. Carbon film with high D/C tended to contain a polymer-like structure, which could be related to the desorption behavior of the retained deuterium. (author)

  19. Ruthenium catalyst on carbon nanofiber support layers for use in silicon-based structured microreactors, Part I: Preparation and characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thakur, D.B.; Tiggelaar, R.M.; Hoang, T.M.C.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Lefferts, L.; Seshan, K.

    2011-01-01

    The preparation and characterization of ruthenium catalytic nanoparticles on carbon nanofiber (CNF) support layers via homogeneous deposition precipitation (HDP) and pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is presented. Prior to ruthenium deposition the CNF layers were functionalized via liquid phase oxidatio

  20. Effect of nitrogen deposition reduction on biodiversity and carbon sequestration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wamelink, G.W.W.; Dobben, van H.F.; Mol-Dijkstra, J.P.; Schouwenberg, E.P.A.G.; Kros, J.; Vries, de W.; Berendse, F.

    2009-01-01

    Global warming and loss of biodiversity are among the most prominent environmental issues of our time. Large sums are spent to reduce their causes, the emission of CO2 and nitrogen compounds. However, the results of such measures are potentially conflicting, as the reduction of nitrogen deposition m

  1. Depositional and diagenetic variability within the Cambrian Mount Simon Sandstone: Implications for carbon dioxide sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, B.B.; Ochoa, R.I.; Wilkens, N.D.; Brophy, J.; Lovell, T.R.; Fischietto, N.; Medina, C.R.; Rupp, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    The Cambrian Mount Simon Sandstone is the major target reservoir for ongoing geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration demonstrations throughout the midwest United States. The potential CO2 reservoir capacity, reactivity, and ultimate fate of injected CO2 depend on textural and compositional properties determined by depositional and diagenetic histories that vary vertically and laterally across the formation. Effective and efficient prediction and use of the available pore space requires detailed knowledge of the depositional and diagenetic textures and mineralogy, how these variables control the petrophysical character of the reservoir, and how they vary spatially. Here, we summarize the reservoir characteristics of the Mount Simon Sandstone based on examination of geophysical logs, cores, cuttings, and analysis of more than 150 thin sections. These samples represent different parts of the formation and depth ranges of more than 9000 ft (>2743 m) across the Illinois Basin and surrounding areas. This work demonstrates that overall reservoir quality and, specifically, porosity do not exhibit a simple relationship with depth, but vary both laterally and with depth because of changes in the primary depositional facies, framework composition (i.e., feldspar concentration), and diverse diagenetic modifications. Diagenetic processes that have been significant in modifying the reservoir include formation of iron oxide grain coatings, chemical compaction, feldspar precipitation and dissolution, multiple generations of quartz overgrowth cementation, clay mineral precipitation, and iron oxide cementation. These variables provide important inputs for calculating CO2 capacity potential, modeling reactivity, and are also an important baseline for comparisons after CO2 injection. Copyright ??2011. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Division of Environmental Geosciences. All rights reserved.

  2. Production of thin carbon stripper foils using heated-substrates in a cathodic arc deposition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lifetime of carbon stripper foil can have a marked impact on the successful running of a beam line. Standard techniques for production of carbon stripper foils include evaporation of carbon (ec) and laser-pulsed ablation (Ipa). Recent work by a using Ipa has been successful in substantially increasing the lifetime of a very thin foil. The suspected mechanism for the increased lifetime of the foil is that the amorphous carbon foil is density-matched to that of graphite (around 2.26g/cc). In this work, we attempt to reproduce this result by producing carbon stripper foils with a mass-density similar to graphite using a cathodic arc deposition system. The cathodic arc is well known for the production of tetrahedral amorphous carbon: a high density, high stress form of carbon with over 90% sp3-like bonds; to reduce the density of the carbon and promote more graphitic structure, a high bias was initially attempted but this proved unsuccessful. Another method is to use a heated-substrate holder to reduce compressive stress within the deposited film. The performance of the density-matched carbon stripper foils and the implications for future production of high-quality carbon stripper foils in our laboratory will be discussed. (authors)

  3. Retention of hydrogen isotopes (H, D, T) and carbon erosion/deposition in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper summarizes recent studies on retention of hydrogen isotopes (H, D, T) and erosion/deposition in plasma facing carbon materials as well as dust sampling in JT-60U and the results are compared with those of JET. As observed in JET, H+D retention profiles in the divertor region are well correlated with carbon deposition profiles and the deposition dominated inner tiles show high retention, while the erosion dominated outer divertor tiles show low retention on. Nevertheless the retained amount in the deposited layers is much less than those observed in JET, which is attributed to temperature rise of the deposited layers probably owing to their poor thermal contact to the substrate. Carbon deposition on the plasma shadowed area and remote area like pumping ducts is very small and only small amount of dust is collected. Low deposition in the remote area in JT-60U could be attributed to the precise alignment of divertor tiles both toroidally and poloidally. (author)

  4. Hydrogen retention and carbon deposition in plasma facing wall and shadowed area of JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Evaluation of fuel inventory and its retention process are critical issues for a next-step fusion device, especially with carbon-based wall. In order to resolve the issues, the hydrogen retention and carbon deposition for the plasma facing surfaces and plasma shadowed areas of JT-60U have been performed. In JT-60U, erosion/deposition analyses for the plasma facing wall and carbon thirteen methane gas puffing experiment have shown that carbon impurity produced by erosion in the outer divertor can be transported to the inner divertor through the private region as well as the SOL plasma, and deposited in the inner divertor. For the plasma shadowed area, local carbon transport to the inboard direction was appreciable in addition to long-path transports. The amount of hydrogen isotopes in the inner divertor (deposition dominant) was larger than that of the outer divertor (erosion dominant). The highest hydrogen isotope retention was observed in the redeposition layers at the bottom of the outer dome wing tile. This is probably because the bottom of the outer dome wing tile was facing to the outer divertor and its surface temperature was kept rather low, and neutral pressure at the pumping slot was high. This indicates that carbon eroded at the outer divertor was directly transported to the outer dome wing and deposited with large amount of hydrogen retention. This local carbon transport is also very important in carbon deposition and hydrogen retention. Nevertheless, the amount of the hydrogen isotope retention in such area (0.13 in a ratio of hydrogen isotopes over carbon) is still smaller than those observed in JET, because of high baking temperature (600K) and high surface temperature during NB heated discharges. The local carbon redeposition and the hydrogen retention seem strongly dependent on the divertor geometry and the position of the pumping slots as well as the surface temperature. In other words, a divertor structure with pumping slots in the

  5. Hydorgen sputtering of carbon thin films deposited on platinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon has been suggested as a suitable low Z element for the lining of the first walls of controlled thermonuclear reactors in order to reduce radiative plasma losses due to sputtering. In this paper the measurement of sputtering of carbon thin films by protons in the energy range 0.6-10.0 keV, is described. H2+ or H3+ ions were used as bombarding ions to obtain equivalent H+ sputtering yields at energies below that at which the ion source provides sufficient proton current. The sputter yield was found to range from 7x10-3-1.5x10-2 atoms/proton with a broad maximum in the 2.0 keV region with the carbon film kept near ambient temperature. (B.D.)

  6. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Forest Grown via Chemical Vapor Deposition from Iron Catalyst Nanoparticles, by XPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, David S.; Kanyal, Supriya S.; Madaan, Nitesh; Vail, Michael A.; Dadson, Andrew; Engelhard, Mark H.; Linford, Matthew R.

    2013-09-25

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have unique chemical and physical properties. Herein, we report an XPS analysis of a forest of multiwalled CNTs using monochromatic Al Kα radiation. Survey scans show only one element: carbon. The carbon 1s peak is centered 284.5 eV. The C 1s envelope also shows the expected π → π* shake-up peak at ca. 291 eV. The valence band and carbon KVV Auger signals are presented. When patterned, the CNT forests can be used as a template for subsequent deposition of metal oxides to make thin layer chromatography plates.1-3

  7. High specific surface area carbon nanotubes from catalytic chemical vapor deposition process

    OpenAIRE

    Bacsa, Revathi; Laurent, Christophe; Peigney, Alain; Bacsa, Wolfgang; Vaugien, Thibaud; Rousset, Abel

    2000-01-01

    A carbon nanotube specimen with a carbon content of 83 wt.% (95 vol.%) and a specific surface area equal to 790 m2/g (corresponding to 948 m2/g of carbon) is prepared by a catalytic chemical vapor deposition method. The nanotubes, 90% of which are single- and double-walled, are individual rather than in bundles. High-resolution electron microscopy shows a diameter distribution in the range 0.8-5 nm and Raman spectroscopy shows a high proportion of tubular carbon. Both techniques reveal a maxi...

  8. Radioactivity measurements in Europe after the Chernobyl accident. Part II: Fallout and deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collection of deposition measurements, presented in this report and included in the floppy disk in the back cover has been put together as part of the REM programme (Radioactivity environmental Monitoring). This follows the compilation of air measurements (part 1) published previously (Raes, 1989). The objective of these compilations is to promote the integration of Chernobyl data on a European-wide basis to make them widely available in a coherent form for scientific study. Deposition measurements come in many forms (fallout, rain, soil) but all reflect the phenomena by which radionuclides in the air reach the surface. Depending on the manner of sampling, measurements can reflect integral values (e.g. from surface soil) or some fraction of the deposition (e.g. daily deposition using fallout or rain collectors). The latter can also be expressed as wet or dry according to the sampling apparatus used. The original sources of information from which this compilation was made vary widely : some of the data were obtained directly from floppy disks or tapes; others were copied manually from tables found in reports or papers in the scientific literature. The sets of measurements presented in this report were selected from this large patrimony of data in the REM data bank. Specific criteria were used to make this selection. Overall, only those data were used which had fully defined records. For daily deposition data actually sampled over 24 hourly periods were selected. With cumulative deposition care was taken to select data which covered the whole period of deposition marked by the passage of the cloud. The resulting data are presented on a unified format and as far as possible keep to individual measured values. In this manner the greatest flexibility is given to the user of this data

  9. Origin and palaeo-environmental significance of the Berrazales carbonate spring deposit, North of Gran Canaria Island, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camuera, Jon; Alonso-Zarza, Ana M.; Rodríguez-Berriguete, Álvaro; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Alejandro

    2014-07-01

    The Berrazales carbonate spring deposit is a small outcrop constituted mainly by cascade-like geometries. Four main facies have been identified: fibrous dense macrocrystalline formed by rapid degassing under high-flow conditions; framestones of coated plant moulds formed in moderate energy flow favoured by the presence of biogenic support; micrite/microsparite are primary precipitates in which crystalline aggregates nucleated on organic filaments and/or EPS; banded micrite-coarse crystalline were the result of alternating physically, chemically and biologically induced precipitation in areas of varying flow-velocities. Most facies underwent different degrees of micritization processes. Micrite is distributed as thin lines penetrating the crystals, as irregular patches or as micrite layers. In the first case organic filaments penetrate crystals, suggesting that micritization is mainly biogenically driven. In the latter cases micritization is caused mostly by partial dissolution. Microbe participation in micrite formation increased micrite MgCO3 content in comparison with coarse crystalline facies. Isotopic analyses show positive δ13C values (+ 2.63 and + 4.29‰ VPDB) and negative δ18O (- 5.65 and - 4.48‰ VPDB) values. Positive δ13C values clearly indicate "deep-sourced" fluids. The Berrazales spring deposit studied here very probably is a small part of a larger carbonate building that was largely eroded by fluvial incision. Calculations of spring water temperature give a range from 20 °C to 35 °C, characteristic of a cold to warm spring favouring precipitation of calcite and important biogenic activity (framestones). Although the study deposit has textural characteristics of tufas, proving that the CO2 sourced from deep fluids, it should be considered as thermogene travertine, being one more example of the difficulty of using those terms for ancient sedimentary deposits. Carbonate spring deposits, very rare in the Canary Islands, are good archives of recent

  10. Deposition of carbon nanostructures by surfatron generated discharge

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Davydova, Marina; Šmíd, Jiří; Hubička, Zdeněk; Kromka, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 6 (2014), s. 389-393. ISSN 1210-2709 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01011740; GA ČR(CZ) GP14-06054P Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : carbon nanostructures * microwave plasma * PECVD * surfatron Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  11. Tribological properties of ion beam deposited diamond-like carbon film on silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present article reports on the physical characterization and tribological properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films deposited on structural Si3N4 substrates. The films were deposited by the direct ion beam deposition technique. The ion beam was produced by plasma discharge of pre-mixed methane and hydrogen gas in a Kaufman-type ion source. The deposited films were found to be amorphous and contained about 70% carbon and 30% hydrogen. The friction coefficient of an uncoated Si3N4 ball on a DLC coated Si3N4 disc starts at about 0.2, then decreases rapidly to 0.1-0.15 with increasing sliding distance. Increasing humidity results in a slight increase in friction coefficient, but a significant decrease in wear factor. The wear factor for the tests at ≅60% rh (relative humidity) are about an order of magnitude smaller than the tests at 3% rh. (orig.)

  12. Nanostructured Diamond-Like Carbon Films Grown by Off-Axis Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Shan Yap

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured diamond-like carbon (DLC films instead of the ultrasmooth film were obtained by pulsed laser ablation of pyrolytic graphite. Deposition was performed at room temperature in vacuum with substrates placed at off-axis position. The configuration utilized high density plasma plume arriving at low effective angle for the formation of nanostructured DLC. Nanostructures with maximum size of 50 nm were deposited as compared to the ultrasmooth DLC films obtained in a conventional deposition. The Raman spectra of the films confirmed that the films were diamond-like/amorphous in nature. Although grown at an angle, ion energy of >35 eV was obtained at the off-axis position. This was proposed to be responsible for subplantation growth of sp3 hybridized carbon. The condensation of energetic clusters and oblique angle deposition correspondingly gave rise to the formation of nanostructured DLC in this study.

  13. Growth and morphology of carbon nanostructures on nickel oxide nanoparticles in catalytic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, M.; Sil, A.; Ray, S.

    2014-07-01

    The present study explores the conditions favorable for the growth of cylindrical carbon nanostructures such as multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) and carbon nanofiber by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) method using nickel oxide-based catalyst nanoparticles of different average sizes as well as different levels of doping by copper oxide. The role of doping and the average size have been related to the observed melting behavior of nanoparticles of nickel oxide by thermal and diffraction analysis, and the importance of melting has been highlighted in the context of growth of cylindrical nanostructures. In the reducing environment prevailing in the CCVD chamber due to decomposition of flowing acetylene gas at elevated temperature, there is extensive reduction of oxide nanoparticles. Lack of melting and faster flow of carbon-bearing gases favor the formation of a carbon deposit cover over the catalyst nanoparticles giving rise to the formation of nanobeads. Melting allows rapid diffusion of carbon from the surface to inside catalyst particles, and reduced flow of gas lowers the rate of carbon deposit, both creating conditions favorable for the formation of cylindrical nanostructures, which grows around the catalyst particles. Smaller particle size and lower doping favor growth of MWCNT, while growth of fiber is commonly observed on larger particles having relatively higher level of doping.

  14. Multi scale study of carbon deposits collected in Tore-Supra and TEXTOR tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokamaks are devices aimed at studying magnetic fusion. They operate with high temperature plasmas containing hydrogen, deuterium or tritium. One of the major issue is to control the plasma-wall interaction. The plasma facing components are most often in carbon. The major drawback of carbon is the existence of carbon deposits and dust, due to erosion. Dust is potentially reactive in case of an accidental opening of the device. These deposits also contain H, D or T and induce major safety problems when tritium is used, which will be the case in ITER. Therefore, the understanding of the deposit formation and structure has become a main issue for fusion researches. To clarify the role of the deposits in the retention phenomenon, we have done different complementary characterizations for deposits collected on similar places (neutralizers) in tokamaks Tore Supra (France) and TEXTOR (Germany). Accessible microporous volume and pore size distribution of deposits has been determined with the analysis of nitrogen and methane adsorption isotherms using the BET, Dubinin-Radushkevich and αs methods and the Density Functional Theory (DFT). To understand growth mechanisms, we have studied the deposit structure and morphology. We have shown using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Raman micro-spectrometry that these deposits are non amorphous and disordered. We have also shown the presence of nano-particles (diameter between 4 and 70 nm) which are similar to carbon blacks: nano-particle growth occurs in homogeneous phase in the edge plasma. We have emphasised a dual growth process: a homogenous and a heterogeneous one. (author)

  15. Electronic state modification in laser deposited amorphous carbon films by the inclusion of nitrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Miyajima; Adamopoulos, G; Henley, SJ; V.Stolojan; Tison, Y; Garcia-Caurel, E; Drevillon, B.; Shannon, JM; Silva, SRP

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of the inclusion of nitrogen in amorphous carbon thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition, which results in stress induced modifications to the band structure and the concomitant changes to the electronic transport properties. The microstructural changes due to nitrogen incorporation were examined using electron energy-loss spectroscopy and Raman scattering. The band structure was investigated using spectroscopic ellipsometry data in the range o...

  16. Structure and composition of plasma deposited boron-containing carbon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deposition of boron-carbon films on silicon, nickel, graphite, Kh18N10T steel from gas discharge plasma, the film chemical composition and erosion resistance to ion-plasma effects are studied. Conclusion is made on possibility of such film application as well coating for discharge chambers of thermonuclear facilities. Method of deposition from plasma makes it possible to avoid application of the previously used high-toxic and dangerously explosive B2H6

  17. Current understanding of the growth of carbon nanotubes in catalytic chemical vapour deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Jourdain, Vincent; Bichara, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Due to its higher degree of control and its scalability, catalytic chemical vapour deposition is now the prevailing synthesis method of carbon nanotubes. Catalytic chemical vapour deposition implies the catalytic conversion of a gaseous precursor into a solid material at the surface of reactive particles or of a continuous catalyst film acting as a template for the growing material. Significant progress has been made in the field of nanotube synthesis by this method although nanotube samples ...

  18. Effect of nickel introduced by electroplating on pyrocarbon deposition of carbon-fiber preforms

    OpenAIRE

    Ren Yancai; Shi Xiaohong; Li Hejun; Li Kezhi; Zhang Xin

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the deposition rate and microstructure of pyrocarbon, nickel was introduced by electroplating on carbon fibers and used as a catalyst during the deposition of pyrocarbon at 1000 °C using methane as a precursor gas. The distribution of nickel catalyst and the microstructure of pyrocarbon were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Raman micro-spectrometry. Results show that nano-sized nickel pa...

  19. Nanostructured Diamond-Like Carbon Films Grown by Off-Axis Pulsed Laser Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Seong Shan Yap; Chen Hon Nee; Seong Ling Yap; Teck Yong Tou

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured diamond-like carbon (DLC) films instead of the ultrasmooth film were obtained by pulsed laser ablation of pyrolytic graphite. Deposition was performed at room temperature in vacuum with substrates placed at off-axis position. The configuration utilized high density plasma plume arriving at low effective angle for the formation of nanostructured DLC. Nanostructures with maximum size of 50 nm were deposited as compared to the ultrasmooth DLC films obtained in a conventional depos...

  20. Functionalization and Area-Selective Deposition of Magnetic Carbon-Coated Iron Nanoparticles from Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Erika Widenkvist; Oscar Alm; Mats Boman; Ulf Jansson; Helena Grennberg

    2011-01-01

    A route to area-selective deposition of carbon-coated iron nanoparticles, involving chemical modification of the surface of the particles, is described. Partial oxidative etching of the coating introduces carboxylic groups, which then are esterified. The functionalized particles can be selectively deposited on the Si areas of Si/SiO2 substrates by a simple dipping procedure. Nanoparticles and nanoassemblies have been analyzed using SEM, TEM, and XPS.

  1. Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition of Ruthenium-Doped Diamond like Carbon Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkara, M. K.; Ueno, M.; Lian, G.; Dickey, E. C.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated metalorganic precursor deposition using a Microwave Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) plasma for depositing metal-doped diamondlike carbon films. Specifically, the deposition of ruthenium doped diamondlike carbon films was investigated using the decomposition of a novel ruthenium precursor, Bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)-ruthenium (Ru(C5H4C2H5)2). The ruthenium precursor was introduced close to the substrate stage. The substrate was independently biased using an applied RF power. Films were characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Four Point Probe. The conductivity of the films deposited using ruthenium precursor showed strong dependency on the deposition parameters such as pressure. Ruthenium doped sample showed the presence of diamond crystallites with an average size of approx. 3 nm while un-doped diamondlike carbon sample showed the presence of diamond crystallites with an average size of 11 nm. TEM results showed that ruthenium was atomically dispersed within the amorphous carbon network in the films.

  2. Distribution regularities and prospecting of carbonate-siliceous-argillitic rock type uranium deposit in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbonate-siliceous-argillitic rock type uranium deposit is one of the important types of uranium deposits in China. Exogenic permeability type and hydrothermal type are dominated in genetic type. Four mineralization zones, two independent mineralization districts, two potential mineralization zones can be classified in China, uranium mineralization districts can be classified further. They are classified as four levels through the potential metallogenic evaluation on the mineralization districts, an important prospective area in the near future. In order to develop and make use of carbonate-siliceous-argillitic rock type uranium resources, exploration and study should be listed in the development planning on uranium geology. (authors)

  3. The Effect of Deposition Rate on Morphology and Structural Properties of Carbon-Nickel Composite Films

    OpenAIRE

    Smohammad Elahi; Vali Dalouji; Shahoo Valedbagi

    2013-01-01

    Carbon-nickel films were grown by radio frequency magnetron cosputtering on glass substrates. The films were deposited under different deposition times, from 50 to 600 sec, at room temperature. We noticed that up to 180 sec the sputtering occurs in more metal content mode and in greater than 180 sec it occurs in more nonmetal content mode. It is shown that the structural and morphological properties of carbon-nickel films were strongly influenced by this behavior.

  4. Carbon Deposition during CO2 Electrolysis in Ni-Based Solid-Oxide-Cell Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skafte, Theis Løye; Graves, Christopher R.; Blennow, P.;

    2015-01-01

    The carbon formation threshold in an operating cell was investigated during electrolysis of an idealized reactant atmosphere of CO and CO2. The electrolysis current was gradually increased in steps until the cell voltage spontaneously increased, thereby indicating cell degradation and possibly the...... onset of carbon deposition. The outlet gas composition at each current step was estimated based on the inlet gas composition and the reactant conversion using Faraday's law. The increase in voltage was observed at lower outlet pCO/pCO2 ratios than that corresponding to the expected thermodynamic...... threshold for carbon formation. The degradation observed was related to the fuel electrode, as confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Mitigation of the degradation mechanism was attempted by infiltrating gadolinium doped ceria. The onset of carbon deposition was largely unaffected, but the...

  5. Amorphous carbon thin films deposited on Si and PET: Study of interface states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin carbon films with various thickness, deposited on different substrates (Si and poly-ethylene-terephthalate) at the same operating conditions in a ratio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system were characterized by Doppler broadening spectroscopy. The films and the substrates were depth profiled by a slow positron beam. The aim od these measurements was to study the open volume structure and the interface of the films. It was found that, independently from the substrate, the films were homogeneous and exhibited to some open volume distribution. On the contrary, the effective positron diffusion length in the Si substrate was found to change with the thickness of the carbon films. This behaviour was found to change with the thickness of the carbon films. This behaviour was interpreted as a change in the electric field at the carbon/silicon interface. (author)

  6. Carbon nitride deposition onto steel substrates by radio frequency plasma assisted pulsed laser deposition with substrate heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nitride (CNx) films are promising candidates for tribological application due to its low friction coefficient. However, the adhesion strength of the film on steel substrate was poor at elevated temperature during deposition. In this study, CNx film was fabricated on bearing steel (SUJ2) and austenitic stainless steel (AISI304) substrates with radio frequency (RF) plasma assisted pulsed laser deposition in nitrogen gas atmosphere. Adhesion strength of the film on the steel substrates was improved by blasting or polishing of the substrate surface before deposition. Thick CNx film was deposited on the steel substrates by substrate heating and substrate pretreatment. The atomic composition ratio of N/C and the bonding ratio of sp3 / (sp2 + sp3) increased with substrate temperature. Maximum atomic composition ratio of N/C was 0.155 on SUJ2 substrate and 0.171 on AISI304 substrate at 40 W of RF power and 673 K of substrate temperature. The maximum adhesion strength of 14.8 MPa was obtained at blasted SUJ2 substrate. The maximum knoop hardness of 8.94 GPa and the lowest friction coefficient of 0.072 were obtained on SUJ2 substrate with polished no. 150 at 40 W of RF power and 673 K of substrate temperature.

  7. Carbon nitride deposition onto steel substrates by radio frequency plasma assisted pulsed laser deposition with substrate heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasui, Toshiaki, E-mail: yasui@me.tut.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tempaku, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Kimura, Shingo [Department of Production Systems Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tempaku, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Nishikawa, Ryutaro; Fukumoto, Masahiro [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tempaku, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    Carbon nitride (CNx) films are promising candidates for tribological application due to its low friction coefficient. However, the adhesion strength of the film on steel substrate was poor at elevated temperature during deposition. In this study, CNx film was fabricated on bearing steel (SUJ2) and austenitic stainless steel (AISI304) substrates with radio frequency (RF) plasma assisted pulsed laser deposition in nitrogen gas atmosphere. Adhesion strength of the film on the steel substrates was improved by blasting or polishing of the substrate surface before deposition. Thick CNx film was deposited on the steel substrates by substrate heating and substrate pretreatment. The atomic composition ratio of N/C and the bonding ratio of sp{sup 3} / (sp{sup 2} + sp{sup 3}) increased with substrate temperature. Maximum atomic composition ratio of N/C was 0.155 on SUJ2 substrate and 0.171 on AISI304 substrate at 40 W of RF power and 673 K of substrate temperature. The maximum adhesion strength of 14.8 MPa was obtained at blasted SUJ2 substrate. The maximum knoop hardness of 8.94 GPa and the lowest friction coefficient of 0.072 were obtained on SUJ2 substrate with polished no. 150 at 40 W of RF power and 673 K of substrate temperature.

  8. Formation of nanoclusters on silicon from carbon deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in the structure of silicon surfaces can be induced by adsorption of carbon-containing molecules followed by thermal treatments. Clean Si(111) surfaces, prepared in vacuum and exposed to different adsorbants such as methanol or carbon monoxide, change their structures with the formation of self-organised nanostructures (15-50 nm diameter) after suitable UHV annealing procedures. Evolution of the size and density per unit area over different heating periods indicates that the structures are nucleated by carbon atoms present on the surface while their growth derives from mobile surface silicon atoms during the annealing process. Methanol adsorbs dissociatively on silicon at room temperature thus leading to a high density of nucleation centres, but when the process is applied to partially oxide-masked silicon surfaces using CO as adsorbant the nanostructures form preferentially at the Si/SiO2 interface around the mask border thus offering the possibility to grow more ordered self-organised nanoscale patterns. Monte Carlo simulations of this process correlate well with STM measurements

  9. Carbonate petrography, kerogen distribution, and carbon and oxygen isotope variations in an early Proterozoic transition from limestone to iron-formation deposition, Transvaal Supergroup, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beukes, N. J.; Klein, C.; Kaufman, A. J.; Hayes, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    The transition zone comprises Campbellrand microbialaminated (replacing "cryptalgalaminate") limestone and shale, with minor dolomite, conformably overlain by the Kuruman Iron Formation of which the basal part is characterized by siderite-rich microbanded iron-formation with minor magnetite and some hematite-containing units. The iron-formation contains subordinate intraclastic and microbialaminated siderite mesobands and was deposited in deeper water than the limestones. The sequence is virtually unaltered with diagenetic mineral assemblages reflecting a temperature interval of about 110 degrees to 170 degrees C and pressures of 2 kbars. Carbonate minerals in the different rock types are represented by primary micritic precipitates (now recrystallized to microsparite), early precompactional sparry cements and concretions, deep burial limpid euhedral sparites, and spar cements precipitated from metamorphic fluids in close contact with diabase sills. Paragenetic pathways of the carbonate minerals are broadly similar in all lithofacies with kerogen intimately associated with them. Kerogen occurs as pigmentation in carbonate crystals, as reworked organic detritus in clastic-textured carbonate units, and as segregations of kerogen pigment around late diagenetic carbonate crystals. Locally kerogen may also be replaced by carbonate spar. Carbon isotope compositions of the carbonate minerals and kerogen are dependent on their mode of occurrence and on the composition of the dominant carbonate species in a specific lithofacies. Integration of sedimentary, petrographic, geochemical, and isotopic results makes it possible to distinguish between depositional, early diagenetic, deep burial, and metamorphic effects on the isotopic compositions of the carbonate minerals and the kerogen in the sequence. Major conclusions are that deep burial thermal decarboxylation led to 13C depletion in euhedral ferroan sparites and 13C enrichment in kerogen (organic carbon). Metamorphic

  10. Microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition growth of carbon nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivan R. Singh

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of various input parameters on the production of carbon nanostructures using a simple microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique has been investigated. The technique utilises a conventional microwave oven as the microwave energy source. The developed apparatus is inexpensive and easy to install and is suitable for use as a carbon nanostructure source for potential laboratory-based research of the bulk properties of carbon nanostructures. A result of this investigation is the reproducibility of specific nanostructures with the variation of input parameters, such as carbon-containing precursor and support gas flow rate. It was shown that the yield and quality of the carbon products is directly controlled by input parameters. Transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to analyse the carbon products; these were found to be amorphous, nanotubes and onion-like nanostructures.

  11. Influence of dc bias on amorphous carbon deposited by pulse laser ablation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Amorphous carbon films were deposited on single-crystalline silicon and K9 glass by pulse laser ablation using different negative substrate bias. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to observe morphology of the surface. Thickness and refractive index of the film deposited on K9 glass were measured by ellipsometry. Micro-hardness of films was measured relatively to single crystal silicon. All films deposited on silicon were analyzed by Raman spectra. All spectra were deconvoluted to three peaks. Line-width ratios varied similarly with bias voltage when the laser energy was kept invariant.

  12. Subalpine grassland carbon balance during 7 years of increased atmospheric N deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Volk, Matthias; Enderle, Jan; Bassin, Seraina

    2016-01-01

    Air pollution agents interact when affecting biological sinks for atmospheric CO2, e.g., the soil organic carbon (SOC) content of grassland ecosystems. Factors favoring plant productivity, like atmospheric N deposition, are usually considered to favor SOC storage. In a 7-year experiment in subalpine grassland under N- and O3-deposition treatment, we examined C fluxes and pools. Total N deposition was 4, 9, 14, 29 and 54 kg N ha−1 yr−1 (N4, N9, etc.); annual mean phytotoxic ...

  13. Changes in carbon and nitrogen dynamics in Sphagnum capillifolium under enhanced nitrogen deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Kivimäki, Sanna Katariina

    2011-01-01

    Peatland ecosystems only cover 2-3 % of the Earth‟s surface but they represent significant carbon stores, holding approximately one third of the global soil carbon (C). The major peat forming genera Sphagnum appears to be highly sensitive to increased N availability. Many studies have shown decreased productivity of Sphagnum which could lead to a decrease in the amount of C stored, especially as many studies also show an increase in the decomposition rate with higher N deposition. However, th...

  14. Purification of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes Grown by a Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A procedure for purification of single-walled carbon nanotubes(SWNTs) grown by the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of carbon monooxide has been developed. Based on the result from TGA/DTA of as-prepared sample, the oxidation temperature was determined. The process included sonication, oxidation and acid washing steps. The purity and yield after purification were determined and estimated by TEM. Moreover, for the first time, a loop structure for CVD SWNTs has been observed.

  15. Spectroscopy of Individual Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and their Synthesis via Chemical Vapor Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Kiowski, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor was designed, built and used to grow vertically and horizontally aligned carbon nanotube arrays. The as-grown nanotubes were investigated on a single tube level using nearinfrared photoluminescence (PL) microscopy as well as Raman, atomic force and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectroscopy of individual, semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), a specialized PL set-up was constructed.

  16. Gravity Effects in Carbon Nanotube Growth by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, S.; Su, C. H.; Cochrane, J. C.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Cui, Y.; Burger, A.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are synthesized using thermal chemical vapor deposition. The sizes of these carbon nanotubes (CNT) are quite uniform and the length of the tube is up to several tens of micrometers. With the substrate surface normal either along or against the gravity vector, different growth orientations of CNT are observed by scanning electron microscopy although the Raman spectra are similar for samples synthesized at different locations. These results suggest the gravitation effects in the growth of long and small diameter CNT.

  17. Impact of dust deposition on carbon budget: a tentative assessment from a mesocosm approach

    OpenAIRE

    C. Guieu; Ridame, C.; E. Pulido-Villena; Bressac, M.; Desboeufs, K.; Dulac, F.

    2014-01-01

    By bringing new nutrients and particles to the surface ocean, atmospheric deposition impacts biogeochemical cycles. The extent to which those changes are modifying the carbon balance in oligotrophic environments such as the Mediterranean Sea that receives important Saharan dust fluxes is unknown. The DUNE (DUst experiment in a low Nutrient, low chlorophyll Ecosystem) project provides the first attempt to evaluate the changes induced in the carbon budget of a large body of oligo...

  18. Hydrogen Storage in High Surface Area Carbon Nanotubes Produced by Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Bacsa, Revathi; Laurent, Christophe; Morishima, Ryuta; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Le Lay, Mikako

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes, mostly single- and double-walled, are prepared by a catalytic chemical vapor deposition method using H2-CH4 atmospheres with different CH4 contents. The maximum hydrogen storage at room temperatures and 10 MPa is 0.5 wt %. Contrary to expectations, purification of the carbon nanotube specimens by oxidative acid treatments or by heating in inert gas decreases the hydrogen storage. Decreasing the residual catalyst content does not necessarily lead to an increase in ASH. Moreov...

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of Carbon nanofibers on Co and Cu Catalysts by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Eunsil; Kim, Jongwon; Lee, Changseop [Keimyung Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    This study reports on the synthesis of carbon nanofibers via chemical vapor deposition using Co and Cu as catalysts. In order to investigate the suitability of their catalytic activity for the growth of nanofibers, we prepared catalysts for the synthesis of carbon nanofibers with Cobalt nitrate and Copper nitrate, and found the optimum concentration of each respective catalyst. Then we made them react with Aluminum nitrate and Ammonium Molybdate to form precipitates. The precipitates were dried at a temperature of 110 .deg. C in order to be prepared into catalyst powder. The catalyst was sparsely and thinly spread on a quartz tube boat to grow carbon nanofibers via thermal chemical vapor deposition. The characteristics of the synthesized carbon nanofibers were analyzed through SEM, EDS, XRD, Raman, XPS, and TG/DTA, and the specific surface area was measured via BET. Consequently, the characteristics of the synthesized carbon nanofibers were greatly influenced by the concentration ratio of metal catalysts. In particular, uniform carbon nanofibers of 27 nm in diameter grew when the concentration ratio of Co and Cu was 6:4 at 700 .deg. C of calcination temperature; carbon nanofibers synthesized under such conditions showed the best crystallizability, compared to carbon nanofibers synthesized with metal catalysts under different concentration ratios, and revealed 1.26 high amorphicity as well as 292 m{sup 2}g{sup -1} high specific surface area.

  20. Experimental measurements of the thermal conductivity of ash deposits: Part 2. Effects of sintering and deposit microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. L. Robinson; S. G. Buckley; N. Yang; L. L. Baxter

    2000-04-01

    The authors report results from an experimental study that examines the influence of sintering and microstructure on ash deposit thermal conductivity. The measurements are made using a technique developed to make in situ, time-resolved measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of ash deposits formed under conditions that closely replicate those found in the convective pass of a commercial boiler. The technique is designed to minimize the disturbance of the natural deposit microstructure. The initial stages of sintering and densification are accompanied by an increase in deposit thermal conductivity. Subsequent sintering continues to densify the deposit, but has little effect on deposit thermal conductivity. SEM analyses indicates that sintering creates a layered deposit structure with a relatively unsintered innermost layer. They hypothesize that this unsintered layer largely determines the overall deposit thermal conductivity. A theoretical model that treats a deposit as a two-layered material predicts the observed trends in thermal conductivity.

  1. Radiation detectors based on Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes deposited by a spray technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melisi, D., E-mail: domenico.melisi@ba.infn.it [INFN – Sezione di Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70126 (Italy); Nitti, M.A. [Department of Physics, University of Bari “A. Moro”, Via Orabona 4, 70126 (Italy); Valentini, M. [INFN – Sezione di Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70126 (Italy); Valentini, A. [INFN – Sezione di Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70126 (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Bari “A. Moro”, Via Orabona 4, 70126 (Italy); Ditaranto, N.; Cioffi, N. [Department of Chemistry, University of Bari “A. Moro”, Via Orabona 4, 70126 (Italy); Di Franco, C. [CNR-IFN Bari, Via Amendola 173, 70126 (Italy)

    2013-09-30

    In this paper a study of Multi Wall Carbon Nanotube films deposited at low temperature by means of a spray technique on different substrates is presented. Nanodispersion of nanotube powder in a non-polar 1,2-dichloroethane solvent was used as starting solution. Electron Microscopy in Scanning and Transmission modes were used in order to verify the morphological properties of the deposited films. Visible light detectors were prepared spraying Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes on silicon substrates with different layouts. In some detectors the nanotubes were covered by an Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) layer. Electrical measurements, both in dark and under light irradiation, were performed and Current-Voltage characteristics are reported. The Indium Tin Oxide coating effect on the photoconductivity yield is presented and discussed along with device ageing test, resulting in a very good photoconduction and stability over four months. - Highlights: • Carbon nanotubes were deposited at low temperature using a spray technique. • Visible photodetectors based on carbon nanotubes films were produced. • Contribution of carbon nanotubes to the quantum efficiency is shown. • Charge collection from the devices increases with an indium tin oxide contact. • Time stability of photodetectors based on carbon nanotubes is demonstrated.

  2. Carbon film deposition from high velocity rarefied flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presented study is based on the idea of the activation of a gas-precursor high velocity flow by hot wire. The wire forms the channel for flow before expansion to substrate. The construction allows change of the specific flow rate, velocity, composition and temperature of a gas mixture by studying the film synthesis in conditions from free molecular to continuum flow at velocities from hundreds to thousands of m/s. At a high pressure, the film has typical and unusual hexagonal incorporations for diamond tetragonal particles. Raman spectrum with the pronounced diamond peak is typical for diamond-like film. X-ray diffraction points in the presence of lonsdaleite. Conditions of deposition were simulated by Monte Carlo method. Collisions with hot surfaces and chemical transformations were taken into consideration as well

  3. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes using the cobalt nanocatalyst by thermal chemical vapor deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madani, S.S. [Department of Chemistry, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zare, K. [Department of Chemistry, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghoranneviss, M. [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salar Elahi, A., E-mail: Salari_phy@yahoo.com [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-05

    The three main synthesis methods of Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are the arc discharge, the laser ablation and the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) with a special regard to the latter one. CNTs were produced on a silicon wafer by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (TCVD) using acetylene as a carbon source, cobalt as a catalyst and ammonia as a reactive gas. The DC-sputtering system was used to prepare cobalt thin films on Si substrates. A series of experiments was carried out to investigate the effects of reaction temperature and deposition time on the synthesis of the nanotubes. The deposition time was selected as 15 and 25 min for all growth temperatures. Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) measurements were used to investigate the elemental composition of the Co nanocatalyst deposited on Si substrates. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the surface topography of the Co nanocatalyst deposited on Si substrates. The as-grown CNTs were characterized under Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) to study the morphological properties of CNTs. Also, the grown CNTs have been investigated by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results demonstrated that increasing the temperature leads to increasing the diameter of CNTs. The ideal reaction temperature was 850 °C and the deposition time was 15 min. - Graphical abstract: FESEM images of CNTs grown on the cobalt catalyst at growth temperatures of (a) 850 °C, (b) 900 °C, (c) 950 °C and (d) 1000 °C during the deposition time of 15 min. - Highlights: • Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were produced on a silicon wafer by TCVD technique. • EDX and AFM were used to investigate the elemental composition and surface topography. • FESEM was used to study the morphological properties of CNTs. • The grown CNTs have been investigated by HRTEM and Raman spectroscopy.

  4. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes using the cobalt nanocatalyst by thermal chemical vapor deposition technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three main synthesis methods of Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are the arc discharge, the laser ablation and the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) with a special regard to the latter one. CNTs were produced on a silicon wafer by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (TCVD) using acetylene as a carbon source, cobalt as a catalyst and ammonia as a reactive gas. The DC-sputtering system was used to prepare cobalt thin films on Si substrates. A series of experiments was carried out to investigate the effects of reaction temperature and deposition time on the synthesis of the nanotubes. The deposition time was selected as 15 and 25 min for all growth temperatures. Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) measurements were used to investigate the elemental composition of the Co nanocatalyst deposited on Si substrates. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the surface topography of the Co nanocatalyst deposited on Si substrates. The as-grown CNTs were characterized under Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) to study the morphological properties of CNTs. Also, the grown CNTs have been investigated by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results demonstrated that increasing the temperature leads to increasing the diameter of CNTs. The ideal reaction temperature was 850 °C and the deposition time was 15 min. - Graphical abstract: FESEM images of CNTs grown on the cobalt catalyst at growth temperatures of (a) 850 °C, (b) 900 °C, (c) 950 °C and (d) 1000 °C during the deposition time of 15 min. - Highlights: • Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were produced on a silicon wafer by TCVD technique. • EDX and AFM were used to investigate the elemental composition and surface topography. • FESEM was used to study the morphological properties of CNTs. • The grown CNTs have been investigated by HRTEM and Raman spectroscopy

  5. Synthesis of carbon nanotube array using corona discharge plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A corona discharge plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition with the features of atmospheric pressure and low temperature has been developed to synthesize the carbon nanotube array. The array was synthesized from methane and hydrogen mixture in anodic aluminum oxide template channels in that cobalt was electrodeposited at the bottom. The characterization results by the scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy indicate that the array consists of carbon nanotubes with the diameter of about 40 nm and the length of more than 4 -m, and the carbon nanotubes are mainly restrained within the channels of templates.

  6. Growth of straight carbon nanotubes by simple thermal chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Xiao-ping; H. ABE; T. SHIMIZU; A. ANDO; H. TOKUMOTO; ZHU Shen-ming; ZHOU Hao-shen

    2006-01-01

    Straight carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were achieved by simple thermal chemical vapor deposition(STCVD) catalyzed by Mo-Fe alloy catalyst on silica supporting substrate at 700 ℃. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images show that the straight CNTs are well graphitized with no attached amorphous carbon. Mo-Fe alloy catalyst particles play a very crucial role in the growth of straight CNTs. The straight carbon nanotubes contain much less defects than the curved nanotubes and might have potential applications for nanoelectrical devices in the future. The simple synthesis of straight CNTs may have benefit for large-scale productions.

  7. Mineral deposits related to tertiary magmatism in the southern part of the Balkan Peninsula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neogene volcanism in the southern parts of the Balkan Peninsula is distributed in wide area, mainly in the terraines of the Vardar zone and Serbo-Macedonian massif. They are, mostly volcano-intrusive complexes, partly with emphasized extrusive-effusive character manifested in area of almost 1200 km2 (Kratovo-Zletovo volcanic area, eastern Macedonia). From the geo tectonic point of view they are part of Vardar zone and Serbo-Macedonian massif, often they are located at the contact parts between these two geo tectonic units. With these volcano-intrusive magmatic complexes with Tertiary age, there are connected numerous deposits and occurrences of Pb-Zn, Cu, Mo, Au, Ag, Sb±W, Sn etc. (Original)

  8. Incorporation of nitrogen into amorphous carbon films produced by surface-wave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study the influence of nitrogen incorporated into amorphous carbon films, nitrogenated amorphous carbon films have been deposited by using surface wave plasma chemical vapor deposition under various ratios of N2/CH4 gas flow. Optical emission spectroscopy has been used to monitor plasma features near the deposition zone. After deposition, the samples are checked by Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photo spectroscopy (XPS). Optical emission intensities of CH and N atom in the plasma are found to be enhanced with the increase in the N2/CH4 gas flow ratio, and then reach their maximums when the N2/CH4 gas flow ratio is 5%. A contrary variation is found in Raman spectra of deposited films. The intensity ratio of the D band to the G band (ID/IG) and the peak positions of the G and D bands all reach their minimums when the N2/CH4 gas flow ratio is 5%. These show that the structure of amorphous carbon films has been significantly modified by introduction of nitrogen

  9. Analysis of carbon deposition on the first wall of LHD by Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deposition of impurities on surfaces of plasma confinement devices is one of essential issues in present devices and also future fusion devices. In the Large Helical Device (LHD), it is necessary to reveal fundamental characteristics of impurity transport and deposition by simulation studies along with experimental studies. In the present paper, simulation scheme of carbon deposition on the first wall of LHD and results are discussed. The geometry of the LHD divertor and the configuration of the plasma are newly implemented to the Monte Carlo code ERO. The profiles of the background plasma is calculated numerically by a 1D two-fluid model along a magnetic field line. Spatial distributions of the carbon impurities are investigated for a typical set of plasma parameters in LHD. The simulation results indicate that the deposition is caused by neutral carbon particles from two facing divertor plates. The divertor opposite to the first wall makes less contributions than the adjacent one because of the ionization in the divertor plasma. Chemically sputtered impurities cause more deposition near the divertor than physical ones because atomic processes of methane molecules lead to isotropic particle velocities (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Characterization and cytocompatibility of carbon layers prepared by photo-induced chemical vapor deposition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubová, O.; Švorčík, V.; Heitz, J.; Moritz, S.; Romanin, C.; Matějka, P.; Macková, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 515, č. 17 (2007), s. 6765-6772. ISSN 0040-6090 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06041 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Polytetrafluoroethylene * Carbon layer * CVD deposition * Layer properties * Cell proliferation Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials Impact factor: 1.693, year: 2007

  11. Interfacial electrical properties of ion-beam sputter deposited amorphous carbon on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A. A.; Woollam, J. A.; Chung, Y.; Banks, B.

    1983-01-01

    Amorphous, 'diamond-like' carbon films have been deposited on Si substrates, using ion-beam sputtering. The interfacial properties are studied using capacitance and conductance measurements. Data are analyzed using existing theories for interfacial electrical properties. The density of electronic states at the interface, along with corresponding time constants are determined.

  12. Industrial Scale Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes Via Fluidized Bed Chemical Vapor Deposition: A Senior Design Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, York R.; Fuchs, Alan; Meyyappan, M.

    2010-01-01

    Senior year chemical engineering students designed a process to produce 10 000 tonnes per annum of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and also conducted bench-top experiments to synthesize SWNTs via fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition techniques. This was an excellent pedagogical experience because it related to the type of real world design…

  13. Deuterium inventory in Tore Supra: Contribution of carbon deposits outgassing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panayotis, S., E-mail: stephanie.panayotis@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Pégourié, B.; Caprin, E.; Douai, D.; Hatchressian, J.-C.; Negrier, V.; Pascal, J.-Y.; Vartanian, S.; Bucalossi, J.; Monier-Garbet, P. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2013-07-15

    In carbon dominated devices, the in vessel D inventory obtained from post-mortem analyses of plasma facing component samples is generally smaller by a factor of ∼4 than that estimated from gas balance measurements. However, for an accurate evaluation of the wall inventory, gas balance measurements must be done not only during discharges and conditioning procedures, but also in between discharges and during vents. From the analysis of the whole Tore Supra database for the 2002–2007 period, we show that long term outgassing during nights, weekends and vents is essential for evaluating the deuterium release. Taking these contributions into account reconciles the gas balance and post-mortem estimations of fuel retention.

  14. Deuterium inventory in Tore Supra: Contribution of carbon deposits outgassing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In carbon dominated devices, the in vessel D inventory obtained from post-mortem analyses of plasma facing component samples is generally smaller by a factor of ∼4 than that estimated from gas balance measurements. However, for an accurate evaluation of the wall inventory, gas balance measurements must be done not only during discharges and conditioning procedures, but also in between discharges and during vents. From the analysis of the whole Tore Supra database for the 2002–2007 period, we show that long term outgassing during nights, weekends and vents is essential for evaluating the deuterium release. Taking these contributions into account reconciles the gas balance and post-mortem estimations of fuel retention

  15. Turbostratic-like carbon nitride coatings deposited by industrial-scale direct current magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nitride thin films were deposited by direct current magnetron sputtering in an industrial-scale equipment at different deposition temperatures and substrate bias voltages. The films had N/(N + C) atomic fractions between 0.2 and 0.3 as determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Raman spectroscopy provided insight into the ordering and extension of the graphite-like clusters, whereas nanoindentation revealed information on the mechanical properties of the films. The internal compressive film stress was evaluated from the substrate bending method. At low deposition temperatures the films were amorphous, whereas the film deposited at approximately 380 °C had a turbostratic-like structure as confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images. The turbostratic-like film had a highly elastic response when subjected to nanoindentation. When a CrN interlayer was deposited between the film and the substrate, XPS and Raman spectroscopy indicated that the turbostratic-like structure was maintained. However, it was inconclusive whether the film still exhibited an extraordinary elastic recovery. An increased substrate bias voltage, without additional heating and without deposition of an interlayer, resulted in a structural ordering, although not to the extent of a turbostratic-like structure. - Highlights: • Carbon nitride films were deposited by industrial-scale magnetron sputtering. • The deposition temperature and the substrate bias voltage were varied. • A turbostratic-like structure was obtained at an elevated deposition temperature. • The turbostratic-like film exhibited a very high elastic recovery. • The influence of a CrN interlayer on the film properties was investigated

  16. The Synthesized of Carbon Nano tubes from Palm Oil by Topas Atomizer Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper focused on preparation of Carbon Nano tubes (CNTs) based on palm oil as a natural resource precursor. The Topas Atomizer was utilized to vapor up the carbon gas into the reaction chamber of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) to yield the CNTs in powder form at the inner wall of the Quartz tube. The purpose of this work was to investigate the effects of deposition temperature from 650 - 850 degree Celsius. The samples characteristics were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. The results revealed that the increasing of the deposition temperature, the ID/IG ratio decreased from 650 - 850 degree Celsius. The results of Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) are also presented. (author)

  17. Synthesis and characterization of thin films of nitrided amorphous carbon deposited by laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work is the synthesis and characterization of thin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) and thin films of nitrided amorphous carbon (a-C-N) using the laser ablation technique for their deposit. For this purpose, the physical properties of the obtained films were studied as function of diverse parameters of deposit such as: nitrogen pressure, power density, substrate temperature and substrate-target distance. For the characterization of the properties of the deposited thin films the following techniques were used: a) Raman spectroscopy which has demonstrated being a sensitive technique to the sp2 and sp3 bonds content, b) Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy which allows to know semi-quantitatively way the presence of the elements which make up the deposited films, c) Spectrophotometry, for obtaining the absorption spectra and subsequently the optical energy gap of the deposited material, d) Ellipsometry for determining the refraction index, e) Scanning Electron Microscopy for studying the surface morphology of thin films and, f) Profilemetry, which allows the determination the thickness of the deposited thin films. (Author)

  18. Synthesis and characterization of well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotubes by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马旭村; 徐贵昌; 王恩哥

    2000-01-01

    Well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotube films have been synthesized successfully on meso-porous silica substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MWPCVD) method. Studies on their morphology, structure, and composition by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), respectively, indicate that these nanotubes consist of linearly polymerized carbon nitrogen nanobells, and the nitrogen atoms have been doped into carbon netweork to form a new structure C1-xNx( x = 0.16±0.01). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results of the samples further demonstrate that carbon bonds cova-lently with nitrogen in all the carbon nitrogen nanotube films.

  19. Interposition fixing structure of TiO2 film deposited on activated carbon fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Ping-feng; LUAN Yong; DAI Xue-gang

    2006-01-01

    The immobilized photocatalyst, TiO2 film supported on activated carbon fibers (TiO2/ACFs) prepared with molecular adsorption-deposition (MAD), exhibits high stability in cyclic photodegradation runs. The interposition fixing structure between TiO2 film and carbon fiber was investigated by means of SEM-EDX, XRD, XPS and FTIR, and a model was proposed to explain this structure. With SEM examination of carbon fiber surface after removing the deposited TiO2 film, a residual TiO2 super-thin film was found to exist still. By determining surface groups on ACFs, titanium sulfate (Ti2(SO4)3) in burnt remainders of the TiO2/ACFs was thought to be formed with an interfacial reaction between TiO2 film and carbon fibers. These provide some evidence of firm attachment of TiO2 film to carbon fiber surface. In the consideration of characteristics of the MAD, the deposition mechanism of TiO2 film on ACFs was proposed, and the interposition fixing structure was inferred to intercrossedly form between TiO2 film and ACFs' surface. This structure leaded to firm attachment and high stability of the TiO2 film.

  20. Carbon Management In the Post-Cap-and-Trade Carbon Economy-Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGroff, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    This is the second installment in our search for a comprehensive economic model to mitigate climate change due to anthropogenic activity. Last year we presented how the unique features of our economic model measure changes in carbon flux due to anthropogenic activity, referred to as carbon quality or CQ, and how the model is used to value such changes in the climate system. This year, our paper focuses on how carbon quality can be implemented to capture the effect of economic activity and international trade on the climate system, thus allowing us to calculate a Return on Climate System (RoCS) for all economic assets and activity. The result is that the RoCS for each public and private economic activity and entity can be calculated by summing up the RoCS for each individual economic asset and activity in which an entity is engaged. Such a macro-level scale is used to rank public and private entities including corporations, governments, and even entire nations, as well as human adaptation and carbon storage activities, providing status and trending insights to evaluate policies on both a micro- and macro-economic level. With international trade, RoCS measures the embodied effects on climate change that will be needed to assess border fees to insure carbon parity on all imports and exports. At the core of our vision is a comprehensive, 'open-source' construct of which our carbon quality metric is the first element. One goal is to recognize each country's endemic resources and infrastructure that affect their ability to manage carbon, while preventing spatial and temporal shifting of carbon emissions that reduce or reverse efforts to mitigate climate change. The standards for calculating the RoCS can be promulgated as part of the Generally Accepted Accounted Principles (GAAP) and the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) to ensure standard and consistent reporting. The value of such insights on the climate system at all levels will be crucial to managing

  1. Self-organized formation of metal-carbon nanostructures by hyperthermal ion deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannstein, I.K.

    2006-04-26

    The quasi-simultaneous deposition of mass-selected hyperthermal carbon and metal ions results in a variety of interesting film morphologies, depending on the metal used and the deposition conditions. The observed features are of the order of a few nanometres and are therefore interesting for future potential applications in the various fields of nanotechnology. The present study focuses on the structural analysis of amorphous carbon films containing either copper, silver, gold, or iron using amongst others Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy. The film morphologies found are as follows: copper-containing films consist of copper nanoclusters with sizes ranging from about 3 to 9 nm uniformly distributed throughout the amorphous carbon matrix. The cluster size hereby rises with the copper content of the films. The silver containing films decompose into a pure amorphous carbon film with silver agglomerates at the surface. Both, the gold- and the iron-containing films show a multilayer structure of metal-rich layers with higher cluster density separated by metal-depleted amorphous carbon layers. The layer distances are of the order of up to 15 nm in the case of gold-carbon films and 7 nm in the case of iron-carbon films. The formation of theses different structures cannot be treated in the context of conventional self-organization mechanisms basing upon thermal diffusion and equilibrium thermodynamics. Instead, an ion-induced atomic transport, sputtering effects, and the stability of small metal clusters were taken into account in order to model the structure formation processes. A similar multilayer morphology was recently also reported in the literature for metal-carbon films grown by magnetron sputtering techniques. In order to investigate, whether the mechanisms are the same as in the case of the ion beam deposited films described above, first experiments were conducted

  2. Effect of Propellant Flowrate and Purity on Carbon Deposition in LO2/Methane Gas Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossard, J. A.; Burkhardt, W. M.; Niiya, K. Y.; Braam, F.

    1989-01-01

    The generation and deposition of carbon was studied in the Carbon Deposition Program using subscale hardware with LO2/Liquid Natural Gas (LNG) and LO2/Methane propellants at low mixture ratios. The purpose of the testing was to evaluate the effect of methane purity and full scale injection density on carbon deposition. The LO2/LNG gas generator/preburner testing was performed at mixture ratios between 0.24 and 0.58 and chamber pressures from 5.8 to 9.4 MPa (840 to 1370 psia). A total of seven 200 second duration tests were performed. The LNG testing occurred at low injection densities, similar to the previous LO2/RP-1, LO2/propane, and LO2/methane testing performed on the carbon deposition program. The current LO2/methane test series occurred at an injection density factor of approximately 10 times higher than the previous testing. The high injection density LO2/methane testing was performed at mixture ratios between from 0.23 to 0.81 and chamber pressures from 6.4 to 15.2 MPa (925 to 2210 psia). A total of nine high injection density tests were performed. The testing performed demonstrated that low purity methane (LNG) did not produce any detectable change in carbon deposition when compared to pure methane. In addition, the C* performance and the combustion gas temperatures measured were similar to those obtained for pure methane. Similar results were obtained testing pure methane at higher propellant injection densities with coarse injector elements.

  3. Green synthesis of carbon-supported nanoparticle catalysts by physical vapor deposition on soluble powder substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee-Young; Jang, Injoon; Jung, Namgee; Chung, Young-Hoon; Ryu, Jae Yoon; Cha, In Young; Kim, Hyung Juhn; Jang, Jong Hyung; Yoo, Sung Jong

    2015-09-01

    Metal and metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) supported on high surface area carbon (NP/Cs) were prepared by the physical vapor deposition of bulk materials on an α-D-glucose (Glu) substrate, followed by the deposition of the NPs on carbon supports. Using Glu as a carrier for the transport of NPs from the bulk materials to the carbon support surfaces, ultrafine NPs were obtained, exhibiting a stabilizing effect through OH moieties on the Glu surfaces. This stabilizing effect was strong enough to stabilize the NPs, but weak enough to not significantly block the metal surfaces. As only the target materials and Glu are required in our procedure, it can be considered environmentally friendly, with the NPs being devoid of hazardous chemicals. Furthermore, the resulting NP/Cs exhibited an improvement in activity for various electrochemical reactions, mainly attributed to their high surface area.

  4. A Precious Metal-Free Electroless Technique for the Deposition of Copper on Carbon Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Dehui; Yao, Guangchun; Cao, Zhuokun

    2012-11-01

    This article introduces a new technique of electroless copper deposition on carbon fibers in the absence of precious metal as the catalyst. Copper layers were electrolessly deposited on the surface of carbon fiber without using the conventional palladium or silver catalyst to initiate redox reactions leading to metallization. This new technique shows that nickel seeds can serve as excellent catalysts to expedite the redox reactions. By performing experiments, parameters such as activation temperature, nickel ion concentration, and pH value were optimized, and an orbicular copper plating layer of carbon fiber was obtained in the copper sulfate salt-based conventional electroless solution. The surface morphology of copper coating was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results indicate that uniform and smooth copper coating could be obtained by the new precious-metal free activation process. The resulting copper coating thickness is about 1 μm.

  5. Texture and depositional history of near-surface alluvial deposits in the central part of the western San Joaquin Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudon, Julie; Belitz, Kenneth

    1989-01-01

    Saline conditions and associated high levels of selenium and other soluble trace elements in soil, shallow ground water, and agricultural drain water of the western San Joaquin Valley, California, have prompted a study of the texture of near-surface alluvial deposits in the central part of the western valley. Texture is characterized by the percentage of coarse-grained sediment present within a specified subsurface depth interval and is used as a basis for mapping the upper 50 feet of deposits. Resulting quantitative descriptions of the deposits are used to interpret the late Quaternary history of the area. Three hydrogeologic units--Coast Range alluvium, flood-basin deposits, and Sierran sand--can be recognized in the upper 50 feet of deposits in the central part of the western San Joaquin Valley. The upper 30 feet of Coast Range alluvium and the adjacent 5 to 35 feet of flood-basin deposits are predominantly fine grained. These fine-grained Coast Range deposits are underlain by coarse-grained channel deposits. The fine-grained flood basin deposits are underlain by coarse-grained Sierran sand. The extent and orientation of channel deposits below 20 feet in the Coast Range alluvium indicate that streams draining the Coast Range may have been tributary to the axial stream that deposited the Sierran sand and that streamflow may have been to the southeast. The fining-upward stratigraphic sequence in the upper 50 feet of deposits and the headward retreat of tributary stream channels from the valley trough with time support a recent hypothesis of climatic control of alluviation in the western San Joaquin Valley.

  6. Carbonate deposition, Pyramid Lake subbasin, Nevada: 2. Lake levels and polar jet stream positions reconstructed from radiocarbon ages and elevations of carbonates (tufas) deposited in the Lahontan basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, L.; Kashgarian, Michaele; Rubin, M.

    1995-01-01

    Most of the tufas in the Pyramid Lake subbasin were deposited within the last 35 000 yr, including most of the mound tufas that border the existing lake. Many of the older tufas (>21 000 yr BP) contained in the mounds were formed in association with groundwater discharge. Lake Lahontan experienced large and abrupt rises in level that are believed to indicate the passage of the polar jet stream over the Lahontan basin. During expansion of the Laurentide Ice Sheet, the jet stream moved south across the basin, and during the contraction of the Ice Sheet, the jet stream moved north across the basin. The bulk of the carbonate contained in the mound tufas was deposited during the last major lake cycle (~23 500-12 000 yr BP), indicating that ground- and surface-water discharges increased at ~23 500 and decreased at ~ 12 000 yr BP. -from Authors

  7. Improved adhesion and tribological properties of fast-deposited hard graphite-like hydrogenated amorphous carbon films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaharia, T.; Kudlacek, P.; Creatore, M.; Groenen, R.; Persoone, P.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,

    2011-01-01

    Graphite-like hard hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) was deposited using an Ar-C(2)H(2) expanding thermal plasma chemical vapour deposition (ETP-CVD) process. The relatively high hardness of the fast deposited a-C:H material leads to high compressive stress resulting in poor adhesion between the

  8. Spontaneous Deposition of Prussian Blue on Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and the Application in an Amperometric Biosensor

    OpenAIRE

    Kwok-Keung Shiu; Xiaoyun Bai; Yanli Yao

    2012-01-01

    A simple method has been developed for the spontaneous deposition of Prussian blue (PB) particles from a solution containing only ferricyanide ions onto conducting substrates such as indium tin oxide glass, glassy carbon disk and carbon nanotube (CNT) materials. Formation of PB deposits was confirmed by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectrometry and electrochemical techniques. The surface morphology of the PB particles deposited on the substrates was examined by atomic force microscopy and s...

  9. Synthesis and tribological properties of diamond-like carbon films by electrochemical anode deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Zhang, GuiFeng; Hou, XiaoDuo; Deng, DeWei

    2012-06-01

    Diamond-like carbon films (DLC) are deposited on Ti substrate by electrochemical anodic deposition at room temperature in pure methanol solution using a pulsed DC voltage at a range from 200 V to 2000 V. Raman spectroscopy analysis of the films reveals two broaden characteristic absorption peaks centred at ˜1350 cm-1 and 1580 cm-1, relating to D- and G-band of typical DLC films, respectively. A broad peak centred at 1325-1330 cm-1 is observed when an applied potential is 1200 V, which can confirm that the deposited films contained diamond structure phase. Tribological properties of the coated Ti substrates have been measured by means of a ball-on-plate wear test machine. A related growth mechanism of DLC films by the anodic deposition mode has also been discussed.

  10. Hydrogenated diamond-like carbon film deposited on UHMWPE by RF-PECVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, investigations were conducted to analyze the properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) film deposited on ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) by radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) at a low temperature of 50 deg. C. Composition and structure of the films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. Hardness and wettability of the film were tested. Tribological characterizations were carried out on a universal micro-tribometer, and reciprocating friction against ZrO2 ball was adopted with 25% bovine serum as lubrication. Results show that DLC film was successfully deposited on UHMWPE surface by RF-PECVD and the sp3 content was about 20% in the film. The film increased the macrohardness of the substrate by about 42% and the wettability was improved too. Tribology test showed a higher friction coefficient but a much smaller wear volume after the deposition due to the surface roughening and strengthening.

  11. Carbon dioxide stripping in aquaculture. part 1: terminology and reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colt, John; Watten, Barnaby; Pfeiffer, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The removal of carbon dioxide gas in aquacultural systems is much more complex than for oxygen or nitrogen gas because of liquid reactions of carbon dioxide and their kinetics. Almost all published carbon dioxide removal information for aquaculture is based on the apparent removal value after the CO2(aq) + HOH ⇔ H2CO3 reaction has reached equilibrium. The true carbon dioxide removal is larger than the apparent value, especially for high alkalinities and seawater. For low alkalinity freshwaters (carbon dioxide removal.

  12. TXRF study of electrochemical deposition of metals on glass-ceramic carbon electrode surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays the methods of solid surface analysis are widely used to study the thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of joint electrochemical deposition of metals on solid substrates. In this work the surfaces of some binary and ternary metal electrodeposits on disc glass-ceramic carbon electrodes were studied by total-reflection x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (TXRF). Metal alloys were obtained as a result of electrochemical co-deposition of copper, cadmium and lead from n x 10-4 M (Cu, Cd, Pb)(NO3)2 + 0.01 M HNO3 solutions under mixing. TXRF measurements were performed with an ATOMIKA EXTRA II A spectrometer using Mo Kα and W (Brems) primary excitation. The serious advantage of TXRF as a method of near-surface analysis is very high element sensitivity. Apart from main elements (Cu, Cd, Pb) we have detected trace elements (Cl, Ag, Pt, Hg) which are present in working solution and has an effect to the electrodeposit formation. The comparison of TXRF data with information obtained by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and electron-probe x-ray microanalysis permits to realize depth profiling electrochemical alloys. In particular it was found that in binary systems Cu-Pb and Cu-Cd the relative lead and cadmium content on the electrodeposit surface is considerably greater than in the bulk. These phenomena are due to the features of metal nucleation and growth mechanisms. High sensitivity of TXRF to surface morphology and the correlation of TXRF and scanning electron microscopy data allow to determine the area of prevailing location of metal in the heterogeneous alloy surface. So we have established that in Cu-Pb and Cu-Cd-Pb systems solid solution of copper and lead is formed: significant part of lead is deposited not only in specific 3D-clusters but also in copper thin film. It was demonstrated that the near-surface TXRF analysis of metal electrodeposits on solid electrodes is highly effective to study the mechanisms of metal nucleation, metal cluster and thin film growth

  13. STRENGTH OF ABS PARTS PRODUCED BY FUSED DEPOSITION MODELLING TECHNOLOGY – A CRITICAL ORIENTATION PROBLEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Górski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Numerous experimental studies, including experiments performed by the authors, have shown that the part orientation during layer deposition has a very strong influence on final strength of a product manufactured by additive Fused Deposition Technology. The paper presents the results of tensile, bending and impact strength tests performed on samples of various orientations, made out of ABS material using FDM technology. The results of these tests allowed discovering a unique phenomenon – with the changing orientation, not only the values of strength indexes change, but macroscopic material behavior under load as well. The transition between a “yield point” and “brittle” material usually happens in a certain range of orientation values, named a critical orientation by the authors. The paper indicates supposed ranges of critical orientation for various types of loads.

  14. Chronic nitrogen deposition alters tree allometric relationships: implications for biomass production and carbon storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, Inés; Zak, Donald R; Burton, Andrew J; Pregitzer, Kurt S

    2016-04-01

    As increasing levels of nitrogen (N) deposition impact many terrestrial ecosystems, understanding the potential effects of higher N availability is critical for forecasting tree carbon allocation patterns and thus future forest productivity. Most regional estimates of forest biomass apply allometric equations, with parameters estimated from a limited number of studies, to forest inventory data (i.e., tree diameter). However most of these allometric equations cannot account for potential effects of increased N availability on biomass allocation patterns. Using 18 yr of tree diameter, height, and mortality data collected for a dominant tree species (Acer saccharum) in an atmospheric N deposition experiment, we evaluated how greater N availability affects allometric relationships in this species. After taking into account site and individual variability, our results reveal significant differences in allometric parameters between ambient and experimental N deposition treatments. Large trees under experimental N deposition reached greater heights at a given diameter; moreover, their estimated maximum height (mean ± standard deviation: 33.7 ± 0.38 m) was significantly higher than that estimated under the ambient condition (31.3 ± 0.31 m). Within small tree sizes (5-10 cm diameter) there was greater mortality under experimental N deposition, whereas the relative growth rates of small trees were greater under experimental N deposition. Calculations of stemwood biomass using our parameter estimates for the diameter-height relationship indicated the potential for significant biases in these estimates (~2.5%), with under predictions of stemwood biomass averaging 4 Mg/ha lower if ambient parameters were to be used to estimate stem biomass of trees in the experimental N deposition treatment. As atmospheric N deposition continues to increase into the future, ignoring changes in tree allometry will contribute to the uncertainty associated with aboveground carbon storage

  15. Chemical vapor deposition of high quality graphene films from carbon dioxide atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strudwick, Andrew James; Weber, Nils Eike; Schwab, Matthias Georg; Kettner, Michel; Weitz, R Thomas; Wünsch, Josef R; Müllen, Klaus; Sachdev, Hermann

    2015-01-27

    The realization of graphene-based, next-generation electronic applications essentially depends on a reproducible, large-scale production of graphene films via chemical vapor deposition (CVD). We demonstrate how key challenges such as uniformity and homogeneity of the copper metal substrate as well as the growth chemistry can be improved by the use of carbon dioxide and carbon dioxide enriched gas atmospheres. Our approach enables graphene film production protocols free of elemental hydrogen and provides graphene layers of superior quality compared to samples produced by conventional hydrogen/methane based CVD processes. The substrates and resulting graphene films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Raman microscopy, sheet resistance and transport measurements. The superior quality of the as-grown graphene films on copper is indicated by Raman maps revealing average G band widths as low as 18 ± 8 cm(-1) at 514.5 nm excitation. In addition, high charge carrier mobilities of up to 1975 cm(2)/(V s) were observed for electrons in transferred films obtained from a carbon dioxide based growth protocol. The enhanced graphene film quality can be explained by the mild oxidation properties of carbon dioxide, which at high temperatures enables an uniform conditioning of the substrates by an efficient removal of pre-existing and emerging carbon impurities and a continuous suppression and in situ etching of carbon of lesser quality being co-deposited during the CVD growth. PMID:25398132

  16. Unraveling the growth of vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction between the main operational variables during the growth of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (VA-MWCNTs) by catalytic chemical vapor deposition is studied. In this contribution, we report the influence of the carbon source (i.e. acetylene, ethylene and propylene), the reaction/activation temperature, the rate of heating, the reaction time, the metal loading, and the metallic nanoparticle size and distribution on the growth and alignment of carbon nanotubes. Fe/Al thin films deposited onto silicon samples by electron-beam evaporation are used as catalyst. A phenomenological growth mechanism is proposed to explain the interaction between these multiple factors. Three different outcomes of the synthesis process are found: i) formation of forests of non-aligned, randomly oriented multi-walled carbon nanotubes, ii) growth of vertically aligned tubes with a thin and homogeneous carbonaceous layer on the top, and iii) formation of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. This carbonaceous layer (ii) has not been reported before. The main requirements to promote vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth are determined. (paper)

  17. Atmospheric Mg2+ wet deposition within the continental United States and implications for soil inorganic carbon sequestration

    OpenAIRE

    Goddard, Megan A.; Mikhailova, Elena A.; Post, Christopher J.; Schlautman, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about atmospheric magnesium ion (Mg2+) wet deposition in relation to soil inorganic carbon sequestration. Understanding the conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) or organic carbon to a form having a long residence time within the soil (e.g., dolomite, magnesian calcite) will greatly benefit agriculture, industry, and society on a global scale. This preliminary study was conducted to analyze atmospheric Mg2+ wet deposition within the continental United States (U.S.) and to rank th...

  18. Optical and mechanical properties of diamond like carbon films deposited by microwave ECR plasma CVD

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S B Singh; M Pandey; N Chand; A Biswas; D Bhattacharya; S Dash; A K Tyagi; R M Dey; S K Kulkarni; D S Patil

    2008-10-01

    Diamond like carbon (DLC) films were deposited on Si (111) substrates by microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process using plasma of argon and methane gases. During deposition, a d.c. self-bias was applied to the substrates by application of 13.56 MHz rf power. DLC films deposited at three different bias voltages (–60 V, –100 V and –150 V) were characterized by FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry to study the variation in the bonding and optical properties of the deposited coatings with process parameters. The mechanical properties such as hardness and elastic modulus were measured by load depth sensing indentation technique. The DLC film deposited at –100 V bias exhibit high hardness (∼ 19 GPa), high elastic modulus (∼ 160 GPa) and high refractive index (∼ 2.16–2.26) as compared to films deposited at –60 V and –150 V substrate bias. This study clearly shows the significance of substrate bias in controlling the optical and mechanical properties of DLC films.

  19. Incidence Angle Effect of Energetic Carbon Ions on Deposition Rate, Topography, and Structure of Ultrathin Amorphous Carbon Films Deposited by Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, N.

    2012-07-01

    The effect of the incidence angle of energetic carbon ions on the thickness, topography, and structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon (a-C) films synthesized by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) was examined in the context of numerical and experimental results. The thickness of a-C films deposited at different incidence angles was investigated in the light of Monte Carlo simulations, and the calculated depth profiles were compared with those obtained from high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The topography and structure of the a-C films were studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The film thickness decreased with the increase of the incidence angle, while the surface roughness increased and the content of tetrahedral carbon hybridization (sp 3) decreased significantly with the increase of the incidence angle above 45° , measured from the surface normal. TEM, AFM, and XPS results indicate that the smoothest and thinnest a-C films with the highest content of sp 3 carbon bonding were produced for an incidence angle of 45°. The findings of this study have direct implications in ultrahigh-density magnetic recording, where ultrathin and smooth a-C films with high sp 3 contents are of critical importance. © 2012 IEEE.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation of the deposition process of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG YuJun; DONG GuangNeng; MAO JunHong; XIE YouBai

    2008-01-01

    The deposition process of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) film greatly affects its frictional properties. In this study, CH3 radicals are selected as source species to deposit hydrogenated DLC films for molecular dynamics simulation. The growth and structural properties of hydrogenated DLC films are investigated and elucidated in detail. By comparison and statistical analysis, the authors find that the ratio of carbon to hydrogen in the films generally shows a monotonously increasing trend with the increase of impact energy. Carbon atoms are more reactive during deposition and more liable to bond with substrate atoms than hydrogen atoms. In addition, there exists a peak value of the number of hydrogen atoms deposited in hydrogenated DLC films. The trends of the variation are opposite on the two sides of this peak point, and itbecomes stable when impact energy is greater than 80 eV. The average relative density also indicates a rising trend along with the increment of impact energy, while it does not reach the saturation value until impact energy comes to 50 eV. The hydrogen content in source species is a key factor to determine the hydrogen content in hydrogenated DLC films. When the hydrogen content in source species is high, the hydrogen content in hydrogenated DLC films is accordingly high.

  1. Deposition and electrocatalytic properties of platinum nanoparticals on carbon nanotubes for methanol electrooxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrochemical deposition and the electrocatalytic properties of platinum (Pt) nanoparticles on carbon nanotube electrode have been investigated in this paper. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) used in this paper are grown directly on graphite disk by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The Pt nanoparticles are synthesized by potentiostatic method from 1.3 mM chloroplatinic acid + 0.5 M sulfuric acid aqueous solution at -0.25 V. The micrographs of Pt/CNTs/graphite electrode are characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The electrocatalytic properties of Pt/CNTs/graphite electrodes for methanol oxidation have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) in 1.0 M CH3OH+0.5 M H2SO4 aqueous solutions and the excellent electrocatalytic activity (AQ, defined by peak current density per unit of Pt deposition charge) can be observed even at low platinum deposition charge (Q=1.24x10-4 C cm-2). At Q=3.72x10-3 C cm-2, the highest electrocatalytical activity of Pt/CNTs/graphite electrode reaches 4.62 A C-1 and is about 2.3 times as high as that of Pt/graphite electrode. This may be attributed to the unique structure and high surface area of carbon nanotubes and also suggests that CNTs have good potential applications as catalyst supports in direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). On the other hand, the long-term stability of Pt/CNTs/graphite electrode has also been investigated

  2. Electrospray deposition of carbon nanotube thin films for flexible transparent electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yinan; Xin, Guoqing; Nam, Jaewook; Cho, Sung Min; Chae, Heeyeop

    2013-09-01

    Flexible transparent carbon nanotube (CNT) electrodes were fabricated by electrospray deposition, a large-area scalable and cost-effective process. The carbon nanotubes were dispersed in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and deposited on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates by electrospray deposition process at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Major process variables were characterized and optimized for the electrospray process development such as electric field between nozzle and substrates, CNT solution flowrate, gap between nozzle and substrates, solution concentration, solvent properties and surface temperature. The sheet resistance of the electrospray deposited CNT films were reduced by HNO3 doping process. 169 Omega/sq sheet resistance and 86% optical transmittance was achieved with low surface roughness of 1.2 nm. The films showed high flexibility and transparency, making them potential replacements of ITO or ZnO in such as solid state lighting, touch panels, and solar cells. Electrospray process is a scalable process and we believe that this process can be applied for large area carbon nanotube film formation. PMID:24205613

  3. Effects of deposited pyrolytic carbon on some mechanical properties of zircaloy-4 tubes. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zircaloy cladding tubes are not compatible with the uranium fuel pellets as they suffer from failure due to pelletclad interaction (PCI). A carbon coating, as used in the canadian CANLUB fuel elements, is thought to improve the cladding performance with respect to the PCI problem. In this paper pyrolytic carbon coating was deposited on zircaloy-4 cladding tubes by the thermal cracking of commercial butant gas at the temperature range 250-450 degree C. In order to evaluate the effect of gaseous species on the mechanical properties of the tubes tensile and microhardness testing measurements were performed on samples prepared from the coated tubes. The fractured surface of the tensile zircaloy tubes and the deposited carbon coating, both, were examined by the SEM. The results of the tensile tests of zircaloy-4 tubes indicated that the coating process has insignificant effect on the ultimate strength of the tubes tested. The values of Vickers hardness numbers were not significantly changed across the tubes thickness. The microstructure of deposited carbon, due to the cracking process, was granular in all the temperature range (250-450 degree C) studied. 9 figs., 1 tab

  4. Chitosan Derivatives/Calcium Carbonate Composite Capsules Prepared by the Layer-by-Layer Deposition Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kensuke Sakurai

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Core/shell capsules composed of calcium carbonate whisker core (rod-like shape and chitosan/chitosansulfate shell were prepared by the layer-by-layer deposition technique. Two chitosan samples of different molecular weights (Mw=9.7×104 and 1.09×106g·mol-1 were used as original materials. Hollow capsules were also obtained by dissolution of the core in hydrochloric acid. Electron microscopy revealed that the surface of the shell is rather ragged associated with some agglomerates. The shell thickness l obeys a linear relation with respect to the number of deposited layers m as l=md+a(a>0. The values of d (thickness per layer were 4.0 and 1.0 nm for the higher and lower Mw chitosan materials, respectively, both of which are greater than the thickness of the monolayer. The results suggest that the feature of the deposition does not obey an ideal homogeneous monolayer-by-monolayer deposition mechanism. Shell crosslinked capsules were also prepared via photodimerization reaction of cinnamoyl groups after a deposition of cinnamoyl chitosan to the calcium carbonate whisker core. The degree of crosslink was not enough to stabilize the shell structure, and hollow capsule was not obtained.

  5. Carbon materials as new nanovehicles in hot-melt drug deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of commercially available carbon materials (nanotubes and porous carbons) for the preparation of drug delivery systems is studied. We used two types of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and two activated carbons as potential materials in so-called hot-melt drug deposition (HMDD). The materials were first studied using Raman spectroscopy. Paracetamol was chosen as a model drug. The performed thermal analysis, kinetics, and adsorption–desorption studies revealed that nanoaggregates are formed between carbon nanotubes. In contrast, in pores of activated carbon we do not observe this process and the drug adsorption phenomenon mechanism is simply the filling of small pores. The formation of nanoaggregates was confirmed by the results of GCMC (grand canonical Monte Carlo) simulations and the study of the surface area on nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms. The application of carbon nanotubes in HMDD offers the possibility of controlling the rate of drug delivery. Performed MTT tests of nanotubes and drug-loaded nanotubes show that the observed decrease in cell viability number is caused by the influence of the cytostatic properties of nanotubes—they inhibit the proliferation of cells. The carbon nanotubes studied in this paper are essentially nontoxic. (paper)

  6. Carbon materials as new nanovehicles in hot-melt drug deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielicka, Agnieszka; Wiśniewski, Marek; Terzyk, Artur P.; Gauden, Piotr A.; Furmaniak, Sylwester; Roszek, Katarzyna; Kowalczyk, Piotr; Bieniek, A.

    2013-09-01

    The application of commercially available carbon materials (nanotubes and porous carbons) for the preparation of drug delivery systems is studied. We used two types of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and two activated carbons as potential materials in so-called hot-melt drug deposition (HMDD). The materials were first studied using Raman spectroscopy. Paracetamol was chosen as a model drug. The performed thermal analysis, kinetics, and adsorption-desorption studies revealed that nanoaggregates are formed between carbon nanotubes. In contrast, in pores of activated carbon we do not observe this process and the drug adsorption phenomenon mechanism is simply the filling of small pores. The formation of nanoaggregates was confirmed by the results of GCMC (grand canonical Monte Carlo) simulations and the study of the surface area on nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms. The application of carbon nanotubes in HMDD offers the possibility of controlling the rate of drug delivery. Performed MTT tests of nanotubes and drug-loaded nanotubes show that the observed decrease in cell viability number is caused by the influence of the cytostatic properties of nanotubes—they inhibit the proliferation of cells. The carbon nanotubes studied in this paper are essentially nontoxic.

  7. Control of carbon content in amorphous GeTe films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-MOCVD) for phase-change random access memory applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous and smooth GeTe thin films are deposited on 200 mm silicon substrates by plasma enhanced—metal organic chemical vapor deposition (PE–MOCVD) using the commercial organometallic precursors TDMAGe and DIPTe as Ge and Te precursors, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements show a stoichiometric composition of the deposited GeTe films but with high carbon contamination. Using information collected by Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES) and XPS, the origin of carbon contamination is determined and the dissociation mechanisms of Ge and Te precursors in H2 + Ar plasma are proposed. As a result, carbon level is properly controlled by varying operating parameters such as plasma radio frequency power, pressure and H2 rate. Finally, GeTe films with carbon level as low as 5 at. % are obtained. (paper)

  8. Control of carbon content in amorphous GeTe films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-MOCVD) for phase-change random access memory applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoukar, M.; Szkutnik, P. D.; Jourde, D.; Pelissier, B.; Michallon, P.; Noé, P.; Vallée, C.

    2015-07-01

    Amorphous and smooth GeTe thin films are deposited on 200 mm silicon substrates by plasma enhanced—metal organic chemical vapor deposition (PE-MOCVD) using the commercial organometallic precursors TDMAGe and DIPTe as Ge and Te precursors, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements show a stoichiometric composition of the deposited GeTe films but with high carbon contamination. Using information collected by Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES) and XPS, the origin of carbon contamination is determined and the dissociation mechanisms of Ge and Te precursors in H2 + Ar plasma are proposed. As a result, carbon level is properly controlled by varying operating parameters such as plasma radio frequency power, pressure and H2 rate. Finally, GeTe films with carbon level as low as 5 at. % are obtained.

  9. Transparent Conductive Coating Based on Carbon Nanotubes Using Electric Field Deposition Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transparent conductive coating based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) had been fabricated using the electric field deposition method. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) results show a quite uniform CNTs on Corning glass substrates. Moreover the X-ray Diffraction (XRD) results shows the peak at around 25 deg. which proves the existence of CNT materials. The CNT thin films obtained with different deposition times have different transmittance coefficients at wavelength of 550 nm. I-V measurement results shows higher sheet resistance value which relates with bigger transmittance coefficients and vice versa.

  10. Soil Degradation and Global Change: Role of Soil Erosion and Deposition in Carbon Sequestration

    OpenAIRE

    Berhe, Asmeret Asefaw; Harden, Jennifer W.; Harte, John; Torn, Margaret S.

    2005-01-01

    Soil erosion and terrestrial sedimentation are important variables in global change science. Erosion is estimated to transport more than 100 Gt soil yr-1; 70 to 90-percent of which is deposited in depositional basins within the same or adjacent toposequence. Terrestrial sedimentation may constitute a sink of up to 1 Gt C yr-1 (missing Carbon (C)-sink = 1.8 (+/- 1.2) Gt C yr-1), which would offset up to 15-percent of global fossil fuel emissions. Our study characterized the rates of input, st...

  11. Optical and Scratch Resistant Properties of Diamondlike Carbon Films Deposited with Single and Dual Ion Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kussmaul, Michael T.; Bogdanski, Michael S.; Banks, Bruce A.; Mirtich, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    Amorphous diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited using both single and dual ion beam techniques utilizing filament and hollow cathode ion sources. Continuous DLC films up to 3000 A thick were deposited on fused quartz plates. Ion beam process parameters were varied in an effort to create hard, clear films. Total DLC film absorption over visible wavelengths was obtained using a Perkin-Elmer spectrophotometer. An ellipsometer, with an Ar-He laser (wavelength 6328 A) was used to determine index of refraction for the DLC films. Scratch resistance, frictional, and adherence properties were determined for select films. Applications for these films range from military to the ophthalmic industries.

  12. 'Diamondlike' carbon films - Optical absorption, dielectric properties, and hardness dependence on deposition parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, V.; Lamb, J. D.; Woollam, J. A.; Liu, D. C.; Gulino, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    An RF plasma deposition system was used to prepare amorphous 'diamondlike' carbon films. The source gases for the RF system include methane, ethylene, propane, and propylene, and the parameters varied were power, dc substrate bias, and postdeposition anneal temperature. Films were deposited on various substrates. The main diagnostics were optical absorption in the visible and in the infrared, admittance as a function of frequency, hardness, and Auger and ESCA spectroscopy. Band gap is found to depend strongly on RF power level and band gaps up to 2.7 eV and hardness up to 7 Mohs were found. There appears to be an inverse relationship between hardness and optical band gap.

  13. Crystalline and amorphous carbon nitride films produced by high-energy shock plasma deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-energy shock plasma deposition techniques are used to produce carbon-nitride films containing both crystalline and amorphous components. The structures are examined by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, parallel-electron-energy loss spectroscopy and electron diffraction. The crystalline phase appears to be face-centered cubic with unit cell parameter approx. a=0.63nm and it may be stabilized by calcium and oxygen at about 1-2 at % levels. The carbon atoms appear to have both trigonal and tetrahedral bonding for the crystalline phase. There is PEELS evidence that a significant fraction of the nitrogen atoms have sp2 trigonal bonds in the crystalline phase. The amorphous carbon-nitride film component varies from essentially graphite, containing virtually no nitrogen, to amorphous carbon-nitride containing up to 10 at % N, where the fraction of sp3 bonds is significant. 15 refs., 5 figs

  14. Tufa in Northern England: depositional facies, carbonate mineral fabrics, and role of biomineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, E.; Mawson, M.; Perri, E.; Tucker, M. E.

    2009-04-01

    Tufas are widely scattered in northern England, being concentrated in areas of limestone (Carboniferous and Permian), where there are springs, seepages, streams and waterfalls with waters supersatured in respect of calcite. Some deposits are clearly related to faults. Tufas have been examined in Gordale and Malham (SW Yorkshire), Teesdale and Weardale (Co. Durham), Sunderland (Tyne & Wear) and Great Asby Fell (Cumbria). A variety of tufa types are developed: spring-related pisoids and moss tufa, fluviatile barrage and waterfall tufa, and seepage and spring tufa with microbial oncoids in a paludal setting. We present preliminary data and observations on tufa in the Teesdale area, which forms along the valley-side adjacent to the River Tees. Locally here, a tiny stream draining agricultural land runs over a sandstone outcrop at the top of a 30 metre high slope; water descends the 30-60 degrees slope, creating tiny waterfalls and pools across an area reaching 10 metres wide, on the way down towards the river. Three main facies are recognizable in the tufa deposits: carbonate crusts, moss tufa and pisoids. In the upper part of the slope tufa occurs as sub-vertical 0.5-5 cm thick carbonate crusts forming "sheets" with a bulbous external surface covered by a green biofilm, with some insect larvae. Encrustations form upon surfaces of rock exposures and pebbles, and coat plant fragments (leaves, twigs, pine cones). Tufa precipitation, particularly on mosses, liverworts and leaves (moss tufa), creates a series of rimmed pools, a few decimetres across and centimetres deep. Apart from the presence of moss, which gives the tufa has a vacuolar texture, the main constituents are cyanobacteria and diatoms. The moss tufa deposit may reach a metre or more in height and several metres in width, notably towards the base of the slope, adjacent to the river. Within the small pools on the slope, pisoids and partially calcified plant remains accumulate. They also occur abundantly in the

  15. Cathodic electrodeposition of cerium based oxides on carbon steel from concentrated cerium nitrate. Part II: Influence of electrodeposition parameters and of the addition of PEG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlaoui, Y. [Laboratoire d' Etudes des Materiaux en Milieux Agressifs (LEMMA), Pole Sciences et Technologie, Universite de La Rochelle, Avenue Michel Crepeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex 1 (France); Institut des Sciences et Sciences de l' Ingenieur, Centre Universitaire de Souk-Ahras, BP 1553, 41000 Souk-Ahras (Algeria); Tifouti, L. [Laboratoire de Genie de l' Environnement, Universite Badji Mokhtar, BP 1223, 23020, El Hadjar-Annaba (Algeria); Remazeilles, C. [Laboratoire d' Etudes des Materiaux en Milieux Agressifs (LEMMA), Pole Sciences et Technologie, Universite de La Rochelle, Avenue Michel Crepeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex 1 (France); Pedraza, F., E-mail: fpedraza@univ-lr.fr [Laboratoire d' Etudes des Materiaux en Milieux Agressifs (LEMMA), Pole Sciences et Technologie, Universite de La Rochelle, Avenue Michel Crepeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex 1 (France)

    2010-03-15

    The mechanisms of formation of cerium based oxides on carbon steel by cathodic electrodeposition from relatively concentrated cerium nitrate solutions were investigated in a previous work (Part I). It was shown that some corrosion products developed on the steel upon and soon after coating, thereby suggesting the films were not protective. This work (Part II) focuses on the influence of various elaboration parameters on the composition and morphology of the deposits likely to improve the corrosion resistance of carbon steel. It will be shown that an increase of the precursor concentration increases the Ce(OH){sub 3} content of the deposits and brings about larger crystallite sizes at low to moderate applied current densities. As a result, the formation of the carbonated green rust corrosion product is not hindered. The kinetics of formation of the film follows a polynomial law in which concurrent deposition and dissolution steps are combined. However, an increase of the deposition time results in a reduced content of Ce(OH){sub 3} in the layers, hence in an evolution of the colour of the deposits. Similarly, the increase of the temperature of the bath brings about significant modifications of the surface morphology, of the crystallite size and of the content of oxygen vacancies that are suspected not to confer adequate protection. In contrast, the addition of 10 g L{sup -1} of PEG to the 0.1 M cerium nitrate solutions will be shown to inhibit the development of the carbonated green rust.

  16. Cathodic electrodeposition of cerium based oxides on carbon steel from concentrated cerium nitrate. Part II: Influence of electrodeposition parameters and of the addition of PEG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanisms of formation of cerium based oxides on carbon steel by cathodic electrodeposition from relatively concentrated cerium nitrate solutions were investigated in a previous work (Part I). It was shown that some corrosion products developed on the steel upon and soon after coating, thereby suggesting the films were not protective. This work (Part II) focuses on the influence of various elaboration parameters on the composition and morphology of the deposits likely to improve the corrosion resistance of carbon steel. It will be shown that an increase of the precursor concentration increases the Ce(OH)3 content of the deposits and brings about larger crystallite sizes at low to moderate applied current densities. As a result, the formation of the carbonated green rust corrosion product is not hindered. The kinetics of formation of the film follows a polynomial law in which concurrent deposition and dissolution steps are combined. However, an increase of the deposition time results in a reduced content of Ce(OH)3 in the layers, hence in an evolution of the colour of the deposits. Similarly, the increase of the temperature of the bath brings about significant modifications of the surface morphology, of the crystallite size and of the content of oxygen vacancies that are suspected not to confer adequate protection. In contrast, the addition of 10 g L-1 of PEG to the 0.1 M cerium nitrate solutions will be shown to inhibit the development of the carbonated green rust.

  17. Counting carbon in the marketplace: Part 1 - overview paper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolwig, Simon; Gibbon, Peter

    are often referred to as ―product carbon footprints‖ (PCFs), where ―carbon footprint‖ is the total amount of GHGs produced for a given activity and ―product‖ is any good or service that is marketed. PCFs are thus distinct from GHG assessments performed at the level of projects, corporations, supply...

  18. Enhancement of neutral beam deposition in hydrogen discharge using carbon pellet injection in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The central ion temperature in the large helical device (LHD), as measured by charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy, has been improved to a record 5.6 keV by combining 21 MW of neutral beam heating with the injection of a carbon pellet. The intensity of the neutral beam emission of the hydrogen Balmer line (Hα: n=3 → 2) was observed to weaken along the beam injection axis following the carbon pellet injection due to the increased beam attenuation. The beam-emission intensity was reconstructed by calculating the density distribution, and the beam-stopping coefficients, along a beam injection axis and was found to fit well to the measured beam-emission for a mixed hydrogen and carbon target plasma. The dynamics of the neutral beam deposition power and the carbon fraction were estimated from the beam-emission measurements using data from ADAS. We conclude that the beam deposition power in a carbon pellet discharge is enhanced over that of a pure hydrogen discharge. (author)

  19. Carbon deposition and phase transformations in red mud on exposure to methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A characterization study detailing the phase transformations and microstructural nature of the carbon deposited during methane decomposition over red mud has been undertaken. In situ XRD was carried out to study the phase transformation sequences of red mud during the reaction. Scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, BET surface area determination and CHN analysis were carried out to investigate the properties of the post-reaction samples. Exposure to methane with increasing temperature caused a stepwise reduction of iron oxides in red mud and promoted methane cracking leading to carbon deposition. The presence of carbon nanostructures was confirmed by HRTEM observations. The carbon formed was graphitic in nature and the spent red mud, rich in Fe and Fe3C formed as a result of the reduction of the iron oxide, was magnetic in nature. The surface area of the material was enhanced upon reaction. In addition, reactivity comparisons between goethite and red mud were carried out to study the formation of carbon oxides during reaction.

  20. Carbon deposition and phase transformations in red mud on exposure to methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushil, S; Alabdulrahman, A M; Balakrishnan, M; Batra, V S; Blackley, R A; Clapp, J; Hargreaves, J S J; Monaghan, A; Pulford, I D; Rico, J L; Zhou, W

    2010-08-15

    A characterization study detailing the phase transformations and microstructural nature of the carbon deposited during methane decomposition over red mud has been undertaken. In situ XRD was carried out to study the phase transformation sequences of red mud during the reaction. Scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, BET surface area determination and CHN analysis were carried out to investigate the properties of the post-reaction samples. Exposure to methane with increasing temperature caused a stepwise reduction of iron oxides in red mud and promoted methane cracking leading to carbon deposition. The presence of carbon nanostructures was confirmed by HRTEM observations. The carbon formed was graphitic in nature and the spent red mud, rich in Fe and Fe(3)C formed as a result of the reduction of the iron oxide, was magnetic in nature. The surface area of the material was enhanced upon reaction. In addition, reactivity comparisons between goethite and red mud were carried out to study the formation of carbon oxides during reaction. PMID:20462696

  1. Carbon nanosheets by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition in CH4-Ar system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We employ a new gas mixture of CH4-Ar to fabricate carbon nanosheets by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition at the growth temperature of less than 500 deg. C. The catalyst-free nanosheets possess flower-like structures with a large amount of sharp edges, which consist of a few layers of graphene sheets according to the observation by transmission electron microscopy. These high-quality carbon nanosheets demonstrated a faster electron transfer between the electrolyte and the nanosheet surface, due to their edge defects and graphene structures.

  2. Synthesis and oxidation behavior of boron-substituted carbon powders by hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Boron-substituted carbon powder, BxC1-x with x up to 0.17, has been successfully synthesized by hot filament chemical vapor deposition. The boron concentration in prepared BxC1-x samples can be controlled by varying the relative proportions of methane and diborane. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy loss spectrum confirm the successful synthesis of an amorphous BC5 compound, which consists of 10―20 nm particles with disk-like morphology. Thermogravimetry measurement shows that BC5 compound starts to oxidize ap-proximately at 620℃ and has a higher oxidation resistance than carbon.

  3. Studies on non-oxide coating on carbon fibers using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, R. H.; Sharma, S.; Prajapati, K. K.; Vyas, M. M.; Batra, N. M.

    2016-05-01

    A new way of improving the oxidative behavior of carbon fibers coated with SiC through Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition technique. The complete study includes coating of SiC on glass slab and Stainless steel specimen as a starting test subjects but the major focus was to increase the oxidation temperature of carbon fibers by PECVD technique. This method uses relatively lower substrate temperature and guarantees better stoichiometry than other coating methods and hence the substrate shows higher resistance towards mechanical and thermal stresses along with increase in oxidation temperature.

  4. Canopy uptake of atmospheric N deposition at a conifer forest: part I -canopy N budget, photosynthetic efficiency and net ecosystem exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sievering, H. E-mail: Herman.Sievering@cudenver.edu; Tomaszewski, T.; Torizzo, J. [Dept. of Geography and Environmental Science, Univ. of Colorado-Denver, Denver, CO 80217 (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Global carbon cycle assessments of anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition influences on carbon sequestration often assume enhanced sequestration results. This assumption was evaluated at a Rocky Mountains spruce-fir forest. Forest canopy N uptake (CNU) of atmospheric N deposition was estimated by combining event wet and throughfall N fluxes with gradient measured HNO{sub 3} and NH{sub 3} as well as inferred (NO{sub x} and particulate N) dry fluxes. Approximately 80% of the growing-season 3 kg N/ha total deposition is retained in canopy foliage and branches. This CNU constitutes {approx}1/3 of canopy growing season new N supply at this conifer forest site. Daytime net ecosystem exchange (NEE) significantly (P = 0.006) and negatively (CO{sub 2} uptake) correlated with CNU. Multiple regression indicates {approx}20% of daytime NEE may be attributed to CNU (P < 0.02); more than soil water content. A wet deposition N-amendment study (Tomaszewski and Sievering), at canopy spruce branches, increased their growing-season CNU by 40-50% above ambient. Fluorometry and gas exchange results show N-amended spruce branches had greater photosynthetic efficiency and higher carboxylation rates than control and untreated branches. N-amended branches had 25% less photoinhibition, with a 5-9% greater proportion of foliar-N-in-Rubisco. The combined results provide, partly, a mechanistic explanation for the NEE dependence on CNU.

  5. Modeling and simulation of NiO dissolution and Ni deposition in molten carbonate fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Suk Woo; Choi, Hyung-Joon; Lim, Tae Hoon [Korea Institute of Science & Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Dissolution of NiO cathode into the electrolyte matrix is an important phenomena limiting the lifetime of molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). The dissolved nickel diffuses into the matrix and is reduced by dissolved hydrogen leading to the formation of metallic nickel films in the pores of the matrix. The growth of Ni films in the electrolyte matrix during the continuous cell operation results eventually in shorting between cathode and anode. Various mathematical and empirical models have been developed to describe the NiO dissolution and Ni deposition processes, and these models have some success in estimating the lifetime of MCFC by correlating the amount of Ni deposited in the matrix with shorting time. Since the exact mechanism of Ni deposition was not well understood, deposition reaction was assumed to be very fast in most of the models and the Ni deposition region was limited around a point in the matrix. In fact, formation of Ni films takes place in a rather broad region in the matrix, the location and thickness of the film depending on operating conditions as well as matrix properties. In this study, we assumed simple reaction kinetics for Ni deposition and developed a mathematical model to get the distribution of nickel in the matrix.

  6. Novel electroless copper deposition on carbon fibers with environmentally friendly processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Jang-Woo

    2010-08-15

    A novel electroless deposition (ELD) of copper (Cu) on carbon fibers (CFs) with environmentally friendly processes, silver (Ag) aerosol activation and subsequent nonformaldehyde Cu ELD, was developed. Spark-generated Ag aerosol nanoparticles (approximately 10 nm in mode diameter) were deposited (48.4 microg Ag/g CF in activation intensity) onto the surfaces of CFs. After annealing (at 220 degrees C in a nitrogen atmosphere), the catalytically activated CFs were placed into a solution for Cu ELD (at 82 degrees C). Homogeneous Cu coating (approximately 5.1 nm/min) on CFs was achieved with 90 min of deposition and the corresponding mass deposition rate and Cu grain size for 30-90 min of deposition had ranges of 0.25-1.14 mg Cu/g CF-min and 14.8-37.2 nm, respectively. The porosity of CFs decreased by depositing the Cu for 30-90 min, and the specific surface area and pore volume of CFs decreased from 1536 to 1399 m(2)/g and from 0.65 to 0.57 cm(3)/g, respectively. PMID:20621827

  7. Electrophoretic deposition of carbon nanotubes-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites on titanium substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotubes-hydroxyapatite (CNTs-HA) composites were synthesized, using an in situ chemical method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). HA particles were uniformly absorbed on the CNTs, with strong interfacial bonding. The CNTs-HA composites behaved like single composites when deposited on a titanium substrate by electrophoretic deposition (EPD). EPD was carried out at 10, 20 and 40 V, for 0.5 to 8 min at each voltage. Coating efficiency and weight increased with increasing deposition time, while the slope of the curves decreased, indicating a decrease in deposition rate. The CNTs-HA coating morphology was analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results revealed that decreasing the voltage used for deposition coatings could reduce cracking frequency. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies showed that the deposition coatings protected the titanium substrate from corroding in simulated body fluid (SBF). In addition, in vitro cellular responses to the CNTs-HA coatings were assessed to investigate the proliferation and morphology of osteoblast cell line.

  8. Silicon carbon alloy thin film depositions using electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shing, Y. H.; Pool, F. S.

    1990-01-01

    Amorphous and microcrystalline silicon carbon films (a-SiC:H, micro-c-SiC:H) have been deposited using SiH4, CH4 and H2 mixed gas ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) plasmas. The optical bandgap of a-SiC:H films is not dependent on the hydrogen dilution in the ECR plasma. The deposition rate of a-SiC:H films is found to be strongly dependent on the ECR magnetic field and the hydrogen dilution. The hydrogen dilution effect on the deposition rate indicates that the etching in ECR hydrogen plasmas plays an important role in the deposition of a-SiC:H films. The optical constants n and k of ECR-deposited a-SiC:H films in the wavelength region of 0.4 to 1.0 micron are determined to be 2.03-1.90 and 0.04-0.00, respectively. The microstructures of ECR-deposited micro-c-SiC:H films are shown by X-ray diffraction and SEM (scanning electron microscopy) to be composed of 1000-A alpha-SiC microcrystallites and amorphous network structures.

  9. Catalyst Deactivation Simulation Through Carbon Deposition in Carbon Dioxide Reforming over Ni/CaO-Al2O3 Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istadi Istadi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Major problem in CO2 reforming of methane (CORM process is coke formation which is a carbonaceous residue that can physically cover active sites of a catalyst surface and leads to catalyst deactivation. A key to develop a more coke-resistant catalyst lies in a better understanding of the methane reforming mechanism at a molecular level. Therefore, this paper is aimed to simulate a micro-kinetic approach in order to calculate coking rate in CORM reaction. Rates of encapsulating and filamentous carbon formation are also included. The simulation results show that the studied catalyst has a high activity, and the rate of carbon formation is relatively low. This micro-kinetic modeling approach can be used as a tool to better understand the catalyst deactivation phenomena in reaction via carbon deposition. Copyright © 2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.(Received: 10th May 2011; Revised: 16th August 2011; Accepted: 27th August 2011[How to Cite: I. Istadi, D.D. Anggoro, N.A.S. Amin, and D.H.W. Ling. (2011. Catalyst Deactivation Simulation Through Carbon Deposition in Carbon Dioxide Reforming over Ni/CaO-Al2O3 Catalyst. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 6 (2: 129-136. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.2.1213.129-136][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.2.1213.129-136 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/1213 ] | View in  |  

  10. Diamond-Like Carbon Film Deposition Using DC Ion Source with Cold Hollow Cathode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. F. Shevchenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon diamond-like thin films on a silicon substrate were deposited by direct reactive ion beam method with an ion source based on Penning direct-current discharge system with cold hollow cathode. Deposition was performed under various conditions. The pressure (12–200 mPa and the plasma-forming gas composition consisting of different organic compounds and hydrogen (C3H8, CH4, Si(CH32Cl2, H2, the voltage of accelerating gap in the range 0.5–5 kV, and the substrate temperature in the range 20–850°C were varied. Synthesized films were researched using nanoindentation, Raman, and FTIR spectroscopy methods. Analysis of the experimental results was made in accordance with a developed model describing processes of growth of the amorphous and crystalline carbon materials.

  11. Pulsed laser deposition of thin carbon films in a neutral gas background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied carbon film deposition using a laser-produced plasma, in argon and helium background gas, at pressures between 0.5 and 700 mTorr. A Nd : YAG, 370 mJ, 3.5 ns, at 1.06 µm, operating at 10 Hz, with a fluence of 6.7 J cm−2 was used. The laser plasma was characterized using space resolved OES and a fast response Faraday cup. The resulting carbon films were analysed using AFM, Raman spectroscopy, XPS and SIMS. The structural properties of the carbon films were found to be strongly correlated with the laser carbon plasma composition. Films with a relatively high content of sp3, characteristic of DLC, were obtained at pressures below 200 mTorr. For these conditions the characteristic carbon ion energies in the expanding laser plasma were of the order of 100 eV. At higher pressures sp2 bonds, associated with amorphous carbon, were dominant, which coincides with a high content of C2 molecules in the laser plasma, and a characteristic carbon ion energy around 20 eV. (paper)

  12. Support effect on carbon nanotube growth by methane chemical vapor deposition on cobalt catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of the support on carbon nanotube production by methane chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on cobalt catalysts was investigated. N2 physisorption, X-ray diffractometry (XRD), temperature programmed reduction (TPR) and H2 and CO chemisorption techniques were used to characterize the structure of cobalt catalysts supported on different metal oxides (Al2O3, SiO2, Nb2O5 and TiO2). Raman spectroscopy, temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used for the characterization and quantification of produced carbon species. On carbon nanotube growth, the catalyst produced three main carbon species: amorphous carbon, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT). The characterization techniques showed that the catalyst selectivity to each kind of nanotube depended on the cobalt particle size distribution, which was influenced by the textural properties of the support. Co/TiO2 showed the highest selectivity towards single wall nanotube formation. This high selectivity results from the narrow size distribution of cobalt particles on TiO2. (author)

  13. Optical visualization of individual ultralong carbon nanotubes by chemical vapour deposition of titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rufan; Zhang, Yingying; Zhang, Qiang; Xie, Huanhuan; Wang, Haidong; Nie, Jingqi; Wen, Qian; Wei, Fei

    2013-01-01

    Direct visualization and manipulation of individual carbon nanotubes in ambient conditions is of great significance for their characterizations and applications. However, the observation of individual carbon nanotubes usually requires electron microscopes under high vacuum. Optical microscopes are much more convenient to be used, yet their resolution is low. Here we realize the visualization and manipulation of individual ultralong carbon nanotubes under optical microscopes by deposition of TiO2 nanoparticles on them. The strong scattering of TiO2 nanoparticles to visible light renders them visible by optical microscopes. Micro-Raman-spectroscopy measurement of individual carbon nanotubes is greatly facilitated by their optical visualization. With the assistance of TiO2 nanoparticles, individual carbon nanotubes can be easily manipulated under an optical microscope at macroscopic scale and in ambient conditions. Based on our approach, various manipulation of ultralong carbon nanotubes, including cutting, transfer, fabrication of structures/devices and pulling out inner shells of multiwalled carbon nanotubes, are demonstrated. PMID:23591894

  14. Major changes in forest carbon and nitrogen cycling caused by declining sulphur deposition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oulehle, F.; Evans, C. D.; Hofmeister, J.; Krejci, R.; Tahovská, K.; Persson, T.; Cudlín, Pavel; Hruška, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 10 (2011), 3115–3129. ISSN 1354-1013 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC10022 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : acidification * carbon * deposition * DOC * forest floor * leaching * nitrogen * nitrogen saturation * soil * sulphur Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 6.862, year: 2011 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2486.2011.02468.x/pdf

  15. Growth of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes through Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王升高; 汪建华; 马志斌; 王传新; 满卫东

    2005-01-01

    Aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were synthesized on glass by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MWPCVD) with a mixture of methane and hydrogen gases at the low temperature of 550 ℃. The experimental results show that both the self-bias potential and the density of the catalyst particles are responsible for the alignment of CNTs. When the catalyst particle density is high enough, strong interactions among the CNTs can inhibit CNTs from growing randomly and result in parallel alignment.

  16. PROPERTIES OF DIAMOND-LIKE CARBON COATINGS DEPOSITED ON CoCrMo ALLOYS

    OpenAIRE

    Madej, Monika; Ozimina, Dariusz; Kurzydłowski, Krzysztof; Płociński, Tomasz; Wieciński, Piotr; Styp-Rekowski, Michał; Matuszewski, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents results of the structure analysis and tribological testing of a-C:H type diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings produced by the Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition (PACVD) technology on CoCrMo specimens. The DLC coating structure was studied by observing the surface topography using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) in the SE and STEM modes and a profilometer. Raman spectroscopy provided information on hybridized covalent bonds. The structural analysis involved obser...

  17. Humidity Sensitivity of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Networks Deposited by Dielectrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Tianhong Cui; Zhaoying Zhou; Rui Han; Litao Liu; Xiongying Ye; Kang Wu

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the humidity sensitivity of deposited multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) networks using ac dielectrophoresis (DEP) between interdigitated electrodes (IDEs). MWCNTs dispersed in ethanol were trapped and enriched between IDEs on a Si/SiO2 substrate under a positive DEP force. After the DEP process, the ethanol was evaporated and the MWCNT network on a substrate with IDEs was put into a furnace for repeated thermal annealing. It was found that the resist...

  18. Nitrogen deposition and its effect on carbon storage in Chinese forests during 1981-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Fengxue; Zhang, Yuandong; Huang, Mei; Tao, Bo; Yan, Huimin; Guo, Rui; Li, Jie

    2015-12-01

    Human activities have resulted in dramatically increased nitrogen (N) deposition worldwide, which is closely linked to the carbon (C)-cycle processes and is considered to facilitate terrestrial C sinks. In this study, we firstly estimated the spatial and temporal variations of N deposition during 1981-2010 based on a new algorithm; then we used a newly improved process-based ecosystem model, CEVSA2, to examine the effects of N deposition on C storage in Chinese forests. The results show that the rate of N deposition increased by 0.058 g N m-2 yr-1 between 1981 and 2010. The N deposition rate in 2010 was 2.32 g N m-2 yr-1, representing a large spatial variation from 0 to 0.25 g N m-2 yr-1 on the northwestern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau to over 4.5 g N m-2 yr-1 in the southeastern China. The model simulations suggest that N deposition induced a 4.78% increase in the total C storage in Chinese forests, most of which accumulated in vegetation. C storage increased together with the increase in N deposition, in both space and time. However, N use efficiency was highest when N deposition was 0.4-1.0 g N m-2 yr-1. We suggest conducting more manipulation experiments and observations in different vegetation types, which will be greatly helpful to incorporate additional processes and mechanisms into the ecosystem modeling. Further development of ecosystem models and identification of C-N interactions will be important for determining the effects of N input on C cycles on both regional and global scales.

  19. Thermal behaviour of deposited carbon layers on the Tore Supra neutralizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature measured on the surface of the neutralizers of Tore Supra, which are the target plates under the toroidal pump limiter, that channel the particles into the pumping ducts, is significantly higher than expected because of thick carbon deposits forming on them. With growing deposits their temperature and cooling time constants increase. Lower hybrid current drive heating and gas puffing seem to enhance the growth. The deposits form at first isolated hillocks giving rise to spectral deformations in the near infra-red range. Later on they may form continuous films with black body like spectra to end up flaking of, again creating distorted spectra. The thermal behaviour of the thick continuous films can be described by a radiative model. The conducted power to the neutralizers for which this model is in accordance with the measurements is of the order of 0.1 MW in ohmic discharges, which requires characteristic SOL(scrape-off layer) decay-lengths of 7 - 8 mm as deep as 5 cm in the SOL. The thermal diffusivities deduced with this model from observations in Tore Supra and from laboratory experiments both show values 2 - 3 orders below the values of CFC (carbon fiber reinforced carbon). (authors)

  20. Thermal behaviour of deposited carbon layers on the Tore Supra neutralizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichle, R.; Vallet, J.C.; Delchambre, E.; Martin, G. [and others

    2003-07-01

    The temperature measured on the surface of the neutralizers of Tore Supra, which are the target plates under the toroidal pump limiter, that channel the particles into the pumping ducts, is significantly higher than expected because of thick carbon deposits forming on them. With growing deposits their temperature and cooling time constants increase. Lower hybrid current drive heating and gas puffing seem to enhance the growth. The deposits form at first isolated hillocks giving rise to spectral deformations in the near infra-red range. Later on they may form continuous films with black body like spectra to end up flaking of, again creating distorted spectra. The thermal behaviour of the thick continuous films can be described by a radiative model. The conducted power to the neutralizers for which this model is in accordance with the measurements is of the order of 0.1 MW in ohmic discharges, which requires characteristic SOL(scrape-off layer) decay-lengths of 7 - 8 mm as deep as 5 cm in the SOL. The thermal diffusivities deduced with this model from observations in Tore Supra and from laboratory experiments both show values 2 - 3 orders below the values of CFC (carbon fiber reinforced carbon). (authors)

  1. Assisted deposition of nano-hydroxyapatite onto exfoliated carbon nanotube oxide scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, H; Rosa, C M R; Eliaz, N; May, P W; Marciano, F R; Lobo, A O

    2015-06-14

    Electrodeposited nano-hydroxyapatite (nHAp) is more similar to biological apatite in terms of microstructure and dimension than apatites prepared by other processes. Reinforcement with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) enhances its mechanical properties and increases adhesion of osteoblasts. Here, we carefully studied nHAp deposited onto vertically aligned multi-walled CNT (VAMWCNT) scaffolds by electrodeposition and soaking in a simulated body fluid (SBF). VAMWCNTs are porous biocompatible scaffolds with nanometric porosity and exceptional mechanical and chemical properties. The VAMWCNT films were prepared on a Ti substrate by a microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition method, and then oxidized and exfoliated by oxygen plasma etching (OPE) to produce graphene oxide (GO) at the VAMWCNT tips. The attachment of oxygen functional groups was found to be crucial for nHAp nucleation during electrodeposition. A thin layer of plate-like and needle-like nHAp with high crystallinity was formed without any need for thermal treatment. This composite (henceforth referred to as nHAp-VAMWCNT-GO) served as the scaffold for in vitro biomineralization when soaked in the SBF, resulting in the formation of both carbonate-rich and carbonate-poor globular-like nHAp. Different steps in the deposition of biological apatite onto VAMWCNT-GO and during the short-term biomineralization process were analysed. Due to their unique structure and properties, such nano-bio-composites may become useful in accelerating in vivo bone regeneration processes. PMID:25990927

  2. Characterization and antibacterial performance of ZrCN/amorphous carbon coatings deposited on titanium implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titanium (Ti)-based materials have been used for dental/orthopedic implants due to their excellent biological compatibility, superior mechanical strength and high corrosion resistance. The osseointegration of Ti implants is related to their composition and surface treatment. Better biocompatibility and anti-bacterial performances of Ti implant are beneficial for the osseointegration and for avoiding the infection after implantation surgery. In this study, nanocomposite ZrCN/amorphous carbon (a-C) coatings with different carbon contents were deposited on a bio-grade pure Ti implant material. A cathodic-arc evaporation system with plasma enhanced duct equipment was used for the deposition of ZrCN/a-C coatings. Reactive gas (N2) and C2H2 activated by the zirconium plasma in the evaporation process were used to deposit the ZrCN/a-C coatings. To verify the susceptibility of implant surface to bacterial adhesion, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans), one of the major pathogen frequently found in the dental implant-associated infections, was chosen for in vitro anti-bacterial analyses. In addition, the biocompatibility of human gingival fibroblast (HGF) cells on coatings was also evaluated by a cell proliferation assay. The results suggested that the ZrCN/a-C coatings with carbon content higher than 12.7 at.% can improve antibacterial performance with excellent HGF cell compatibility as well.

  3. Characterization and antibacterial performance of ZrCN/amorphous carbon coatings deposited on titanium implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Chih-Ho [School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, 404 Taiwan (China); Chang, Yin-Yu, E-mail: yinyu@mail2000.com.tw [Department of Mechanical and Computer-Aided Engineering, National Formosa University, Yunlin, Taiwan (China); Huang, Heng-Li [School of Dentistry, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Kao, Ho-Yi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Mingdao University, Changhua, Taiwan (China)

    2011-12-30

    Titanium (Ti)-based materials have been used for dental/orthopedic implants due to their excellent biological compatibility, superior mechanical strength and high corrosion resistance. The osseointegration of Ti implants is related to their composition and surface treatment. Better biocompatibility and anti-bacterial performances of Ti implant are beneficial for the osseointegration and for avoiding the infection after implantation surgery. In this study, nanocomposite ZrCN/amorphous carbon (a-C) coatings with different carbon contents were deposited on a bio-grade pure Ti implant material. A cathodic-arc evaporation system with plasma enhanced duct equipment was used for the deposition of ZrCN/a-C coatings. Reactive gas (N{sub 2}) and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} activated by the zirconium plasma in the evaporation process were used to deposit the ZrCN/a-C coatings. To verify the susceptibility of implant surface to bacterial adhesion, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans), one of the major pathogen frequently found in the dental implant-associated infections, was chosen for in vitro anti-bacterial analyses. In addition, the biocompatibility of human gingival fibroblast (HGF) cells on coatings was also evaluated by a cell proliferation assay. The results suggested that the ZrCN/a-C coatings with carbon content higher than 12.7 at.% can improve antibacterial performance with excellent HGF cell compatibility as well.

  4. Assisted deposition of nano-hydroxyapatite onto exfoliated carbon nanotube oxide scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, H.; Rosa, C. M. R.; Eliaz, N.; May, P. W.; Marciano, F. R.; Lobo, A. O.

    2015-05-01

    Electrodeposited nano-hydroxyapatite (nHAp) is more similar to biological apatite in terms of microstructure and dimension than apatites prepared by other processes. Reinforcement with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) enhances its mechanical properties and increases adhesion of osteoblasts. Here, we carefully studied nHAp deposited onto vertically aligned multi-walled CNT (VAMWCNT) scaffolds by electrodeposition and soaking in a simulated body fluid (SBF). VAMWCNTs are porous biocompatible scaffolds with nanometric porosity and exceptional mechanical and chemical properties. The VAMWCNT films were prepared on a Ti substrate by a microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition method, and then oxidized and exfoliated by oxygen plasma etching (OPE) to produce graphene oxide (GO) at the VAMWCNT tips. The attachment of oxygen functional groups was found to be crucial for nHAp nucleation during electrodeposition. A thin layer of plate-like and needle-like nHAp with high crystallinity was formed without any need for thermal treatment. This composite (henceforth referred to as nHAp-VAMWCNT-GO) served as the scaffold for in vitro biomineralization when soaked in the SBF, resulting in the formation of both carbonate-rich and carbonate-poor globular-like nHAp. Different steps in the deposition of biological apatite onto VAMWCNT-GO and during the short-term biomineralization process were analysed. Due to their unique structure and properties, such nano-bio-composites may become useful in accelerating in vivo bone regeneration processes.

  5. Diamondlike carbon deposition on plastic films by plasma source ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of pulsed high negative voltage (∼10 μs pulse width, 300-900 pulses per second) to a substrate is found to induce discharge, thereby increasing ion current with an inductively coupled plasma source. This plasma source ion beam implantation (PSII) technique is investigated for the pretreatment and deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin layer on polyethylene terepthalate (PET) film. Pretreatment of PET with N2 and Ar plasma is expected to provide added barrier effects when coupled with DLC deposition, with possible application to fabrication of PET beverage bottles. PSII treatment using N2 and Ar in separate stages is found to change the color of the PET film, effectively increasing near-ultraviolet absorption. The effects of this pretreatment on the chemical bonding of C, H, and O are examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). DLC thin film was successfully deposited on the PET film. The surface of the DLC thin layer is observed to be smooth by scanning electron microscopy, and its structure characteristics are examined by XPS and laser Raman spectroscopy. Subsequent processing using acetylene or acetylene and Ar (20%) produced thin carbon layers that are confirmed to be graphite-dominated DLC. Also, this PSII method is employed in order to deposit the DLC layer on the inside surface of the PET bottle and to reduce oxygen permeation rate by 40%

  6. Diamondlike carbon deposition on plastic films by plasma source ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, T.; Yoshida, M.; Shinohara, M.; Takagi, T.

    2002-05-01

    Application of pulsed high negative voltage (~10 μs pulse width, 300-900 pulses per second) to a substrate is found to induce discharge, thereby increasing ion current with an inductively coupled plasma source. This plasma source ion beam implantation (PSII) technique is investigated for the pretreatment and deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin layer on polyethylene terepthalate (PET) film. Pretreatment of PET with N2 and Ar plasma is expected to provide added barrier effects when coupled with DLC deposition, with possible application to fabrication of PET beverage bottles. PSII treatment using N2 and Ar in separate stages is found to change the color of the PET film, effectively increasing near-ultraviolet absorption. The effects of this pretreatment on the chemical bonding of C, H, and O are examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). DLC thin film was successfully deposited on the PET film. The surface of the DLC thin layer is observed to be smooth by scanning electron microscopy, and its structure characteristics are examined by XPS and laser Raman spectroscopy. Subsequent processing using acetylene or acetylene and Ar (20%) produced thin carbon layers that are confirmed to be graphite-dominated DLC. Also, this PSII method is employed in order to deposit the DLC layer on the inside surface of the PET bottle and to reduce oxygen permeation rate by 40%.

  7. Microstructural evolution in laser deposited nickel-titanium-carbon in situ metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Laser deposition of Ni-TiC composites with a relatively low volume fraction of refined homogeneously distributed carbide precipitates resulting from an in situ reaction between elemental titanium and carbon (graphite) within the molten nickel pool. → Detailed characterization of the Ni/TiC interface using high resolution TEM. → Evaluation of the microhardness and tribological properties of this novel in situ composite with comparisons to laser deposited pure Ni. - Abstract: Laser deposition of a mixture of elemental nickel, titanium, and carbon (graphite) powders via the laser engineered net shaping (LENS) process results in an in situ titanium carbide reinforced nickel metal matrix composites. The composites have been characterized in detail using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (including energy dispersive spectroscopy mapping), Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission (including high resolution) electron microscopy. Both primary and eutectic titanium carbides, observed in this composite, exhibited the FCC-TiC structure (NaCl-type). Detailed characterization of the nickel/titanium carbide interface was carried out using high resolution TEM with the orientation relationship between the phases being TiC// Ni and (0 0 2) TiC//(1-bar 11) Ni. Mechanical and tribological testing determined that the composites exhibited a relatively high hardness of 370 VHN and a steady-state friction coefficient of ∼0.5, both improvements in comparison to LENS deposited pure Ni.

  8. Properties of Coatings Deposited Using a Filtered Vacuum Arc Carbon Plasma Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A filtered vacuum arc plasma source with an adjustable cathode-anode gap was used to produce a carbon plasma for deposition of coatings on various substrates. The deposition apparatus consisted of a plasma gun, a toroidal plasma duct, a deposition chamber, and a cooled substrate holder. The plasma gun consisted of a cylindrical graphite cathode, an annular graphite anode, and a mechanism providing axial movement of the cathode to the anode. The arc was ignited in vacuum by momentarily contacting the cathode with the anode, while applying a D.C. current of 100 A between the cathode and the anode, and then withdrawing the cathode away from the anode in the axial direction, forming a cathode-anode gap of 12 mm. A carbon plasma jet passed through the anode into the toroidal duct and then to the substrate. The substrates were stainless steel and polycarbonate coupons, glass slides, and glass and polycarbonate substrates with a SnO2 coating. It was shown that the structure of the coatings deposited on stainless steel substrates depended on the negative bias voltage (Vbias) applied to the substrate. With Vbias=0, the coatings were not adherent, at Vbias =-10 V the coatings were porous, but the pore density decreased with increasing negative Vbias. At Vbias =-20-25 V the adhesion of the coating was good, and dense, hard (HV-34-60 GPa) DLC coatings were formed. At Vbias 235 V, the formation of graphite phase was observed whose area increased with increasing Vbias. Coatings deposited on polycarbonate surfaces were adherent without applying bias. However, the substrate surface was damaged due to heat flux to the substrate produced by the plasma, after a deposition duration which depended on the magnetic field strength

  9. 60Co deposition on carbon-steel structural materials after seawater infiltration in BWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seawater infiltration occurred during shutdown of the Hamaoka Unit 5 (H-5). Chloride ion (Cl-) is known to affect the corrosion behavior of carbon steel, and it may change the properties of the oxide film formed on the surface. 60Co deposition in high-temperature water is strongly related to the oxide film properties, and any change in the properties may affect the 60Co deposition after the plant is restarted. This paper shows the results of 60Co deposition tests of carbon steels under simulated H-5 water conditions. Specimens for the 60Co deposition tests were prepared in three steps, which simulated the conditions of normal plant operation, seawater infiltration, and chemical decontamination after the infiltration. The first step was a prefilming step under Normal Water Condition (NWC). The second step included two different conditions: seawater infiltration and keeping after infiltration. Prefilmed specimens were immersed in 450 ppm Cl- diluted artificial seawater at 513 K for 24 hours. Following that, the specimens were immersed in 50 ppm Cl- diluted artificial seawater at 323 K for 100-500 hours. During the second step, the prefilming oxide (NiFe2O4) flaked off in spots. In the third step, the oxide remaining on some specimens after the second step was removed chemically. The three types of prepared specimens, that is, a prefilmed specimen, an exposed specimen, and an oxide-removed specimen, were used for the 60Co deposition tests using 0.015 Bq/cm3 60Co solution for 500 or 1000 hours under NWC conditions. After the deposition tests, the 60Co activity was measured with a Ge detector. From the results of the deposition test, at the spots where flaking occurred in the second step, only loose hematite was formed, and generation of a new protective film was not observed. The amount of 60Co deposited on the exposed specimen was more than that on the prefilmed and oxide-removed specimens. The simulated infiltrating conditions inhibited the regeneration of a

  10. Simulation of Arctic Black Carbon using Hemispheric CMAQ: Role of Russia's BC Emissions, Transport, and Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, K.; Fu, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon plays a unique role in the Arctic climate system due to its multiple effects. It causes Arctic warming by directly absorbing sunlight from space and by darkening the surface albedo of snow and ice, which indirectly leads to further warming and melting, thus inducing an Arctic amplification effect. BC depositions over the Arctic are more sensitive to regions in close proximity. In this study, we reconstruct BC emissions for Russian Federation, which is the country that occupies the largest area in the Arctic Circle. Local Russia information such as activity data, emission factors and other emission source data are used. In 2010, total anthropogenic BC emission of Russia is estimated to be around 254 Gg. Gas flaring, a commonly ignored black carbon source, contributes a dominant 43.9% of Russia's total anthropogenic BC emissions. Other sectors, i.e., residential, transportation, industry, and power plants, contribute 22.0%, 17.8%, 11.5%, and 4.8%, respectively. BC simulations were conducted using the hemispheric version of CMAQ with polar projection. Emission inputs are from a global emissions database EDGAR (Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research)-HTAPv2 (Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution) and EDGAR-HTAPv2 with its Russian part replaced by the newly developed Russian BC emissions, respectively. The simulations using the new Russian BC emission inventory could improve 46 - 61% of the Absorption Aerosol Optical Depth (AAOD) measured at the AERONET sites in Russia throughout the whole year as compared to that using the default HTAPv2 emissions. At the four air monitoring sites (Zeppelin, Barrow, Alert, and Tiksi) in the Arctic Circle, surface BC simulations are improved the most during the Arctic haze periods (October - March). Emission perturbation studies show that Russia's BC emissions contribute over 50% of the surface BC concentrations over the Arctic during the cold seasons. This study demonstrates the good capability of H-CMAQ in

  11. Scanning electron microscopy characterisation of carbon deposited layers in Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For long discharges in Tore-Supra, an infra-red safety system has been installed to survey surface temperature of the target plates located below the toroidal pump limiter. A shift in temperature is attributed to the growth of a carbon layer at the surface of the neutralizer and has been estimated to a temperature increase of 400 Celsius degrees between virgin and layered surfaces. For temperature safety analysis, target plates have been cleaned and carbon layers were sampled for scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) study. SEM micrographs have allowed to measure the deposited layer thickness and to study the specific fractal and stratified structure. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis has permitted to distinguish carbon layers corresponding to boronization and then to deduce an average growth rate of about 20 nm/s. The growth rate is not constant and is likely to depend on plasma operation parameters. These analyses completed by time of flight secondary ions mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) have shown a beneficial effect of the boronization on metallic contamination of the plasma, confirming the in situ optical spectroscopic measurements. These analyses have also shown an increase of hydrogen storage in carbon layer due to boronization. Although the measurements performed on deposited layer are very local, the results reflect the history of the 2002 campaign. (A.C.)

  12. Transport and deposition of carbon at catchment scale: stabilization mechanisms approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Mena, María; Almagro, María; Díaz-Pereira, Elvira; García-Franco, Noelia; Boix-Fayos, Carolina

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial sedimentation buries large amounts of organic carbon (OC) annually, contributing to the terrestrial carbon sink. The temporal significance of this sink will strongly depend on the attributes of the depositional environment, but also on the characteristics of the OC reaching these sites and its stability upon deposition. The fate of the redistributed OC will ultimately depend on the mechanisms of its physical and chemical protection against decomposition, its turnover rates and the conditions under which the OC is stored in sedimentary settings. This framework is more complex in Mediterranean river basins where sediments are often redistributed under a range of environmental conditions in ephemeral, intermittent and perennial fluvial courses, sometimes within the same catchment. The OC stabilization mechanisms and their relations with aggregation at different transport and sedimentary deposits is under those conditions highly uncertain. The main objective of this work was to characterize the stabilization and mineralization of OC in sediments in transit (suspended load), at a range of depositional settings (alluvial bars, reservoir sediments) and soils from the source areas in a sub-catchment (111 km2) at the headwaters of the Segura catchment in South East Spain. In order to obtain a deeper knowledge on the predominant stabilization mechanism corresponding to each erosional phase, the following organic carbon fractionation method was carried out: Four aggregate size classes were distinguished by sieving (large and small macroaggregates, free microaggregates, and free silt plus clay fraction), and the microaggregates occluded within macroaggregates (SMm) were isolated. As a further step, an oxidation of the OC occluded in silt plus clay fraction and that of the free silt plus clay fraction was performed to estimate the oxidant resistant OC pool. Measured OC in these fractions can be related to three functional pools: active (free particulate organic

  13. Nanocomposite metal amorphous-carbon thin films deposited by hybrid PVD and PECVD technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, V; Soares, P; Martins, A J; Carneiro, J; Cerqueira, F

    2009-07-01

    Carbon based films can combine the properties of solid lubricating graphite structure and hard diamond crystal structure, i.e., high hardness, chemical inertness, high thermal conductivity and optical transparency without the crystalline structure of diamond. Issues of fundamental importance associated with nanocarbon coatings are reducing stress, improving adhesion and compatibility with substrates. In this work new nanocomposite coatings with improved toughness based in nanocrystalline phases of metals and ceramics embedded in amorphous carbon matrix are being developed within the frame of a research project: nc-MeNxCy/a-C(Me) with Me = Mo, Si, Al, Ti, etc. Carbide forming metal/carbon (Me/C) composite films with Me = Mo, W or Ti possess appropriate properties to overcome the limitation of pure DLC films. These novel coating architectures will be adopted with the objective to decrease residual stress, improve adherence and fracture toughness, obtain low friction coefficient and high wear-resistance. Nanocomposite DLC's films were deposited by hybrid technique using a PVD-Physically Vapor Deposition (magnetron sputtering) and Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD), by the use of CH4 gas. The parameters varied were: deposition time, substrate temperature (180 degrees C) and dopant (Si + Mo) of the amorphous carbon matrix. All the depositions were made on silicon wafers and steel substrates precoated with a silicon inter-layer. The characterisation of the film's physico-mechanical properties will be presented in order to understand the influence of the deposition parameters and metal content used within the a-C matrix in the thin film properties. Film microstructure and film hybridization state was characterized by Raman Spectroscopy. In order to characterize morphology SEM and AFM will be used. Film composition was measured by Energy-Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS) and by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The contact angle for the produced DLC's on

  14. Electron emission from nano-structured carbon films fabricated by hot-filament chemical-vapor deposition and microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Park, K H; Lee, K M; Oh, S G; Lee, S I; Koh, K H

    2000-01-01

    The electron-emission characteristics of nano-structured carbon films fabricated by using the HFCVD (hot- filament chemical-vapor deposition) and the MPECVD (microwave plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition) methods with a metal catalyst are presented. According to our observation, neither the formation nor the alignment of nano tubes is absolutely necessary to realize carbon-based electron emitters. However, utilization of chrome as an interlayer between Si substrates and metal catalyst particles results in a great improvement in the emission characteristics and the mechanical stability. Also, fabrication of good electron-emitting carbon films on glass substrates, with sputter-deposited chrome electrodes,at a nominal temperature approx 615 .deg. C was demonstrated.

  15. Kinetics of structuring of submonolayer carbon coatings on silicon (100) crystals during microwave vacuum-plasma deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yafarov, R. K.; Shanygin, V. Ya.

    2015-06-01

    The kinetics of self-organization of nanodomains during the deposition of submonolayer carbon coatings on (100) silicon in the microwave plasma of low-pressure ethanol vapors is studied by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The laws of influence of the substrate temperature and the kinetic energy of carbon-containing ions on the mechanisms of formation and structuring of the forming silicon-carbon surface phases are established. It is shown that the deposited carbon-containing nanodomains can be used as nonlithographic mask coatings for the formation of spatial low-dimensional systems on single-crystal silicon upon selective highly anisotropic plasma-chemical etching.

  16. In situ electron spectroscopic identification of carbon species deposited by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samano, E.C.; Gamietea, A.; Cota, L. [IFUNAM, Ensenada (Mexico). Lab. de Ensenada; Soto, G. [IFUNAM, Ensenada (Mexico). Lab. de Ensenada]|[Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada (Mexico). Programa de Posgrado en Fisica de Materiales

    1997-05-01

    Thin carbon films were grown on Si (111) substrates by ablating a graphite target utilizing an excimer pulsed laser in a UHV Riber {copyright} LDM-32 system. Two kinds of films were produced, a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) type and a diamond-like carbon (DLC) type. A relationship of the films microstructure with laser power density and substrate conditions was observed. The HOPG films were homogeneous but the DLC films were heterogeneous, as shown by micrographs. The thin films are monitored and analyzed in situ during the first stages of the deposition process. The monitoring was done by RHEED and the characterization by several surface spectroscopic techniques, AES, XPS and EELS. The formation of a SiC interface was observed for both films due to the reaction of the first carbon species with the substrate surface.

  17. Deposit of thin films of nitrided amorphous carbon using the laser ablation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is reported the synthesis and characterization of thin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) nitrided, deposited by laser ablation in a nitrogen atmosphere at pressures which are from 4.5 x 10 -4 Torr until 7.5 x 10 -2 Torr. The structural properties of the films are studied by Raman spectroscopy obtaining similar spectra at the reported for carbon films type diamond. The study of behavior of the energy gap and the ratio nitrogen/carbon (N/C) in the films, shows that the energy gap is reduced when the nitrogen incorporation is increased. It is showed that the refraction index of the thin films diminish as nitrogen pressure is increased, indicating the formation of graphitic material. (Author)

  18. Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition Synthesis of Carbon Aerogels of High-Surface Area and Porosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Peña

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work carbon aerogels were synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition method (CCVD. Ferrocene were employed as a source both of catalytic material (Fe and of carbon. Gaseous hydrogen and argon were used as reductant and carrier gas, respectively. The products of reaction were collected over alumina. The morphology and textural properties of the soot produced in the reaction chamber were investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy, High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and N2 physisorption (BET and BHJ methods. After the evaluation of the porous structure of the synthesized products, 780 ± 20 m2/g of SBET and 0.55 ± 0.02 cm3/g of VBJH were found. The presence of iron carbide and the partial oxidation of carbon nanostructures were revealed by XPS.

  19. Metal-doped diamond-like carbon films synthesized by filter-arc deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films are extensively utilized in the semiconductor, electric and cutting machine industries owing to their high hardness, high elastic modulus, low friction coefficients and high chemical stability. DLC films are prepared by ion beam-assisted deposition (BAD), sputter deposition, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), cathodic arc evaporation (CAE), and filter arc deposition (FAD). The major drawbacks of these methods are the degraded hardness associated with the low sp3/sp2 bonding ratio, the rough surface and poor adhesion caused by the presence of particles. In this study, a self-developed filter arc deposition (FAD) system was employed to prepare metal-containing DLC films with a low particle density. The relationships between the DLC film properties, such as film structure, surface morphology and mechanical behavior, with variation of substrate bias and target current, are examined. Experimental results demonstrate that FAD-DLC films have a lower ratio, suggesting that FAD-DLC films have a greater sp3 bonding than the CAE-DLC films. FAD-DLC films also exhibit a low friction coefficient of 0.14 and half of the number of surface particles as in the CAE-DLC films. Introducing a CrN interfacial layer between the substrate and the DLC films enables the magnetic field strength of the filter to be controlled to improve the adhesion and effectively eliminate the contaminating particles. Accordingly, the FAD system improves the tribological properties of the DLC films

  20. Study of electrospray assisted electrophoretic deposition of carbon nanotubes on insulator substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakamedala, Kalyan; DeSoto, Jared; Sarkar, Anirban; Race, Theda Daniels

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, electrophoretic deposition (EPD) has been adopted as a cost-effective and reliable single-step solution-based room temperature coating method for carbon nanotubes (CNTs), predominantly on conducting surfaces. Contrary to this general pre-requisite of conductive target substrates, in this work we have explored a fabrication strategy for the scalable deposition of CNTs on insulating glass surfaces by the sequential combination of electrospraying and the EPD technique. This combined process flow has been referred to as "electrospray-assisted EPD", where an initial CNT coating on glass substrates is obtained by electrospraying which, in turn, further assists CNT film growth by EPD. The successful integration of the electrospray technique in the EPD process flow also eliminates the need for surface functionalization of the insulator substrates prior to the deposition step. Electrospray-assisted EPD has resulted in the successful fabrication of uniform, homogenous, and thick CNT deposits (˜4.5 - 5 μm) with precise thickness control. A detailed investigation of the effect of the initial electrosprayed coating on the final CNT film growth and thickness is also presented in this report. This research endeavor presents a significant opportunity for the integration of this deposition model into a wider platform of materials research and technology, chemical sensing, and applications based upon printable and flexible electronics. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Electrophoretic deposition of manganese dioxide-multiwalled carbon nanotube composites for electrochemical supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaohui; Zhitomirsky, Igor

    2009-09-01

    The cathodic electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method has been developed for the deposition of composite manganese dioxide-multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) films. Dopamine (DA) was shown to be an effective charging additive, which provides stabilization of manganese dioxide nanoparticles and MWCNTs in the suspensions. The influence of DA concentration on the deposition efficiency has been studied. EPD has been utilized for the fabrication of porous nanostructured films for application in electrochemical supercapacitors (ES). Obtained films were studied using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential thermal analysis (DTA), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and impedance spectroscopy. CV data for the films tested in the 0.5 M Na(2)SO(4) solutions showed capacitive behavior in the voltage window of 0-0.9 V. The highest specific capacitance (SC) of approximately 650 F g(-1) was obtained at a scan rate of 2 mV s(-1). The SC decreased with an increasing scan rate in the range of 2-100 mV s(-1). The deposition mechanism, kinetics of deposition, and charge storage properties of the films are discussed. PMID:19449813

  2. Development of a carbon-nanoparticle-coated stirrer for stir bar sorptive extraction by a simple carbon deposition in flame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Juanjuan; Sun, Min; Bu, Yanan; Luo, Chuannan

    2016-03-01

    Stir bar sorptive extraction is an environmentally friendly microextraction technique based on a stir bar with various sorbents. A commercial stirrer is a good support, but it has not been used in stir bar sorptive extraction due to difficult modification. A stirrer was modified with carbon nanoparticles by a simple carbon deposition process in flame and characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. A three-dimensional porous coating was formed with carbon nanoparticles. In combination with high-performance liquid chromatography, the stir bar was evaluated using five polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as model analytes. Conditions including extraction time and temperature, ionic strength, and desorption solvent were investigated by a factor-by-factor optimization method. The established method exhibited good linearity (0.01-10 μg/L) and low limits of quantification (0.01 μg/L). It was applied to detect model analytes in environmental water samples. No analyte was detected in river water, and five analytes were quantified in rain water. The recoveries of five analytes in two samples with spiked at 2 μg/L were in the range of 92.2-106% and 93.4-108%, respectively. The results indicated that the carbon nanoparticle-coated stirrer was an efficient stir bar for extraction analysis of some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. PMID:26663510

  3. Isotopic characteristics of two kinds of hydrothermal carbonation in the Maria Lazara gold deposit. Goias Estate of Central Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the hydrothermal halo of the Maria Lazara gold deposit, two kinds of carbonation were identified: pervasive carbonation, which corresponds to the disseminations of calcite in the hydrothermal halo represented by the biotite-sulfide and carbonate-chlorite zones and, venular carbonation expressed by quartz and calcite veins inserted in the inner biotite-sulfide zone show an organic carbon component depleted in C. In the carbonate-chlorite zone the calcite isotopic behavior reflects the Co2 derived from the metamorphism o the basic host-rocks. (author)

  4. Effects of sulfate deposition on pore water dissolved organic carbon, nutrients, and microbial enzyme activities in a northern peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Export of dissolved organic carbon from lakes and streams has increased throughout Europe and North America over the past several decades. One possible cause is altered deposition chemistry; specifically, decreasing sulfate inputs leading to changes in ionic strength and dissolve...

  5. Hydrogen concentration of co-deposited carbon films produced in the vicinity of local island divertor in Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is quite important to evaluate hydrogen concentration of co-deposited carbon film/dust to estimate in-vessel tritium inventory in ITER. The co-deposited carbon films were prepared at the wall of pumping duct in Local Island Divertor experiments of LHD. The hydrogen concentration of the co-deposited carbon film at the wall not facing to the plasma with a low temperature was extremely high, 1.3 in the atomic ratio of H/C. This value is triple times higher than the previous value obtained by hydrogen ion irradiation to graphite. The crystal structure of the co-deposited carbon film observed by Raman spectroscopy showed very unique structure (polymeric a-C:H), which is well consistent with the high hydrogen concentration. The accumulation of in-vessel tritium inventory is also discussed. (author)

  6. Mechanical and tribological properties of carbon thin film with tungsten interlayer prepared by Ion beam assisted deposition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlčák, P.; Černý, F.; Tolde, Z.; Sepitka, J.; Gregora, Ivan; Daniš, S.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 2013, FEB (2013). ISSN 2314-4874 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : carbon coatings * ion beam deposition * XRD * nanoindentation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/630156

  7. Subalpine grassland carbon balance during 7 years of increased atmospheric N deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Matthias; Enderle, Jan; Bassin, Seraina

    2016-07-01

    Air pollution agents interact when affecting biological sinks for atmospheric CO2, e.g., the soil organic carbon (SOC) content of grassland ecosystems. Factors favoring plant productivity, like atmospheric N deposition, are usually considered to favor SOC storage. In a 7-year experiment in subalpine grassland under N- and O3-deposition treatment, we examined C fluxes and pools. Total N deposition was 4, 9, 14, 29 and 54 kg N ha-1 yr-1 (N4, N9, etc.); annual mean phytotoxic O3 dose was 49, 65 and 89 mmol m-2 projected leaf area. We hypothesized that between years SOC of this mature ecosystem would not change in control treatments and that effects of air pollutants are similar for plant yield, net ecosystem productivity (NEP) and SOC content, leading to SOC content increasing with N deposition. Cumulative plant yield showed a significant N and N × N effect (+38 % in N54) but no O3 effect. In the control treatment SOC increased significantly by 9 % in 7 years. Cumulative NEP did show a strong, hump-shaped response pattern to N deposition with a +62 % increase in N14 and only +39 % increase in N54 (N effect statistically not significant, N × N interaction not testable). SOC had a similar but not significant response to N, with highest C gains at intermediate N deposition rates, suggesting a unimodal response with a marginal (P = 0.09) N × N interaction. We assume the strong, pollutant-independent soil C sink developed as a consequence of the management change from grazing to cutting. The non-parallel response of SOC and NEP compared to plant yield under N deposition is likely the result of increased respiratory SOC losses, following mitigated microbial N-limitation or priming effects, and a shift in plant C allocation leading to smaller C input from roots.

  8. Wetting behaviour of carbon nitride nanostructures grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Carbon nitride films were prepared by using radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition system by altering the electrode distance. • The effect of electrode distance on surface morphology, surface roughness, chemical bonding and hydrophobic behaviour has been studied. • Hydrophobic behaviour were studied by measuring contact angle and calculating surface energy. • CNx nanostructures show super-hydrophobic behaviour. • We report a tunable transition of hydrophilic to super-hydrophobic behaviour of film as electrode distance is reduced. - Abstract: Tuning the wettability of various coating materials by simply controlling the deposition parameters is essential for various specific applications. In this work, carbon nitride (CNx) films were deposited on silicon (1 1 1) substrates using radio-frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition employing parallel plate electrode configuration. Effects of varying the electrode distance (DE) on the films’ structure and bonding properties were investigated using Field emission scanning electron microscopy, Atomic force microscopy, Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. The wettability of the films was analyzed using water contact angle measurements. At high DE, the CNx films’ surface was smooth and uniform. This changed into fibrous nanostructures when DE was decreased. Surface roughness of the films increased with this morphological transformation. Nitrogen incorporation increased with decrease in DE which manifested the increase in both relative intensities of C=N to C=C and N−H to O−H bonds. sp2-C to sp3-C ratio increased as DE decreased due to greater deformation of sp2 bonded carbon at lower DE. The films’ characteristics changed from hydrophilic to super-hydrophobic with the decrease in DE. Roughness ratio, surface porosity and surface energy calculated from contact angle measurements were strongly dependent on the morphology, surface

  9. Deposition of carbon nanotubes by a marine suspension feeder revealed by chemical and isotopic tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanna, Shannon K., E-mail: hanna.shannonk@gmail.com [Bren School of Environmental Science and Management, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Miller, Robert J. [Marine Science Institute, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Lenihan, Hunter S. [Bren School of Environmental Science and Management, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2014-08-30

    Highlights: • CNTs decrease the filtration rate of mussels by as much as 24%. • Metals in CNTs and their δ{sup 13}C can be used to quantify CNTs in biological samples. • Mussels exposed to CNTs deposit high concentrations of them in biodeposits. • CNTs accumulate mainly in gut tissue of mussels during exposure. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are one of the few truly novel nanomaterials and are being incorporated into a wide range of products, which will lead to environmental release and potential ecological impacts. We examined the toxicity of CNTs to marine mussels and the effect of mussels on CNT fate and transport by exposing mussels to 1, 2, or 3 mg CNTs l{sup −1} for four weeks and measuring mussel clearance rate, shell growth, and CNT accumulation in tissues and deposition in biodeposits. We used metal impurities and carbon stable isotope ratios of the CNTs as tracers of CNT accumulation. Mussels decreased clearance rate of phytoplankton by 24% compared with control animals when exposed to CNTs. However, mussel growth rate was unaffected by CNT concentrations up to 3 mg l{sup −1}. Based on metal concentrations and carbon stable isotope values, mussels deposited most CNTs in biodeposits, which contained >110 mg CNTs g{sup −1} dry weight, and accumulated about 1 mg CNTs g{sup −1} dry weight of tissue. We conclude that extremely high concentrations of CNTs are needed to illicit a toxic response in mussels but the ability of mussels to concentrate and deposit CNTs in feces and pseudofeces may impact infaunal organisms living in and around mussel beds.

  10. Characterization and Optimization of Mechanical Properties of ABS Parts Manufactured by the Fused Deposition Modelling Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfrey C. Onwubolu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available While fused deposition modelling (FDM is one of the most used additive manufacturing (AM techniques today due to its ability to manufacture very complex geometries, the major research issues have been to balance ability to produce aesthetically appealing looking products with functionality. In this study, five important process parameters such as layer thickness, part orientation, raster angle, raster width, and air gap have been considered to study their effects on tensile strength of test specimen, using design of experiment (DOE. Using group method of data handling (GMDH, mathematical models relating the response with the process parameters have been developed. Using differential evolution (DE, optimal process parameters have been found to achieve good strength simultaneously for the response. The optimization of the mathematical model realized results in maximized tensile strength. Consequently, the additive manufacturing part produced is improved by optimizing the process parameters. The predicted models obtained show good correlation with the measured values and can be used to generalize prediction for process conditions outside the current study. Results obtained are very promising and hence the approach presented in this paper has practical applications for design and manufacture of parts using additive manufacturing technologies.

  11. Improving Correlated SERS Measurements with Scanning Electron Microscopy: An Assessment of the Problem Arising from the Deposition of Amorphous Carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Moran, Christine H.; Xia, Xiaohu; Xia, Younan

    2013-01-01

    For surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates with nonspherical symmetry, it is critical to correlate spectroscopy measurements with imaging by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). However, the deposition of carbon resulting from e-beam exposure during SEM imaging contaminates the surface of nanoparticles, potentially preventing their further functionalization with Raman probe molecules. In addition, the deposited carbon leads to unwanted background SERS signals. In this study, we sy...

  12. Structural changes of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films deposited on steel rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Junho; Hatta, Tetsuya

    2015-12-01

    In this study, hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films were deposited on steel rods of various radii by using bipolar-type plasma based ion implantation and deposition, and the film structure and mechanical properties have been investigated. Furthermore, the behavior of plasma surrounding the steel rods (i.e., flux and energy of incident ions and electrons) was investigated using the particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) method to examine the mechanism behind the structural changes of the a-C:H films. Three kinds of amorphous carbon films with different microstructures were prepared by changing the negative pulse voltages from -1 kV to -5 kV: one polymer-like carbon film and two diamond-like carbon films that possess the maximum FWHM(G) (full width at half maximum of Raman G-peak) and maximum hardness. The structure of the a-C:H films was evaluated through Raman spectroscopy, and the hardness of the films was measured using nanoindentation. It was found that the structures of a-C:H films deposited on the steel-rod surfaces are quite different from those on flat surfaces, and the film structures are directly affected by the curvature of the rod. It was also determined from the plasma simulation that the incident electron flux and ion flux become more intense as the curvature increases, resulting in the structural changes of the a-C:H films due to hydrogen evolution and thermal relaxation in the films.

  13. On the Strain Rate Sensitivity of Abs and Abs Plus Fused Deposition Modeling Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vairis, A.; Petousis, M.; Vidakis, N.; Savvakis, K.

    2016-06-01

    In this work the effect of strain rate on the tensile strength of fused deposition modeling parts built with Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and ABS plus material is presented. ASTM D638-02a specimens were built with ABS and ABS plus and they were tested on a Schenck Trebel Co. tensile test machine at three different test speeds, equal, lower, and higher to the test speed required by the ASTM D638-02a standard. The experimental tensile strength results were compared and evaluated. The fracture surfaces of selected specimens were examined with a scanning electron microscope, to determine failure mode of the filament strands. It was found that, as the test speed increases, specimens develop higher tensile strength and have higher elastic modulus. Specimens tested in the highest speed of the experiment had on average about 10% higher elastic modulus and developed on average about 11% higher tensile strength.

  14. ERDA characterization of carbon nitride films deposited by hollow cathode discharge process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interest in carbon nitride (CN) thin films stems from the theoretical work of Liu and Cohen predicting the extreme hardness of this material, comparable to or greater than that of diamond. The growth of CN thin films employing various deposition techniques such as plasma chemical vapor deposition, sputtering, laser ablation, ion assisted dynamic mixing and low energy ion implantation has been reported. This contribution presents some results about the characterization of CNx films using elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) technique. CN films were deposited on silicon substrates by electron beam evaporation of pure graphite in a nitrogen environment. A hollow cathode discharge in arc regime was used both for evaporating a graphite target and for generating a high density plasma in the vicinity of the substrate. The main deposition parameters were as follows: gas (N2) pressure, 10-2 - 5.10-2 mbar; hollow cathode discharge power, 2.5 - 5 kW; substrate negative bias voltage, 0-150 V; graphite evaporation rate, 0.08 - 0.2 g/min; deposition duration, 15-60 min. The ERDA measurements were carried out at the Tandem accelerator of IFIN-HH using a 63Cu10+ beam at 80 MeV. The samples were mounted in a scattering target chamber with a vacuum higher than 5 x 10-5 Torr. The detector consisted in a compact ΔE(gas)-E(solid) telescope, placed at 30 angle with respect to the beam. The elements of the main interests were C and N. The measured Δ E -E spectra for two samples prepared in different conditions are presented. A quantitative analysis of the C and N energy spectra using our program SURFAN have been carried out for the these samples. It shows that the nitrogen to carbon atomic concentration ratio is close to 0.3. The nitrogen content is lower than that expected for the ideal β - C3N4 solid. (authors)

  15. Cold spray deposition of a WC-25Co cermet onto Al7075-T6 and carbon steel substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work focussed on the deposition of wear-resistant and corrosion-resistant WC-25Co cermet powders on carbon steel and aluminium (Al7075-T6) substrates by cold gas spraying (CGS). The unique combination of mechanical, physical and chemical properties of WC-Co cermets has led to their widespread use for the manufacture of wear-resistant parts. X-ray diffraction tests were run on the powder and coatings to determine possible phase changes during the spraying process. The bonding strength of the coatings was measured by adhesion tests (ASTM C633-08). The sliding (ASTM G99-04) and abrasive (ASTM G65-00) wear resistance of the coatings were also studied. Corrosion resistance was determined by electrochemical measurements and salt fog spray tests (ASTM B117-03). CGS achieved thick, dense and hard WC-25Co coatings on both aluminium alloy Al7075-T6 and carbon steel substrates, with excellent tribological and electrochemical properties. We thus conclude that this method is very competitive compared with conventional thermal spraying techniques, giving thick, dense and hard coatings on both aluminium alloy Al7075-T6 and carbon steel substrates, with excellent tribological and electrochemical properties.

  16. Substrate and material transfer effects on the surface chemistry and texture of diamond-like carbon deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Benjamin; Ojeda, J. J.

    2012-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC), a thin amorphous carbon film, has many uses in tribological systems. Exploiting alternative substrates and interlayers can enable the control of the hardness and modulus of the multilayer system and improve wear or friction properties. We used XPS and atomic force microscopy to examine DLC that had been concurrently coated on an epoxy interlayer and a steel substrate by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition. sp2/sp3 ratios were calculated both by the deconvolut...

  17. Retention of hydrogen isotopes (H, D, T) and carbon erosion/deposition in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In JT-60U, quite recently, PMI and PFM studies have started under the joint research between Japanese universities and JAERI. The present paper summarizes recent results relating tritium issues of ITER, in particular retention of hydrogen isotopes (H, D, T) in plasma facing carbon materials and erosion/deposition including dust formation. In the operation periods from June 1997 to October 1998, about 4300 discharge (3600 D-D discharge) experiments were made with W-shaped divertor configurations with (or without) inner private flux pumping through a full toroidal inner slot. More than 300 shots were with neutral beam injection (NBI) heating with power of 14-23 MW. During this period, total amount of 18 GBq of tritium was produced and distributed in the vacuum vessel and/or exhausted. In December 1998, a poloidal set of CFC divertor tiles were sampled from P5 section. The first wall graphite sample tiles (exposed to plasma from Mar. 1991 to Oct. 1998) were also removed for the measurements of hydrogen isotopes retention and erosion/deposition measurements. Before air ventilation, 700 shots of hydrogen discharge were carried out to remove tritium from PFM. All removed tiles were analyzed by IP, TDS, SIMS, XPS and SEM to observe tritium retention, H and D retention, depth profiling of H and D, surface characterization, and erosion/deposition measurements, respectively. During summer break of JT-60U in 2003, the inside of the vacuum vessel and pumping ducts was inspected carefully to observe the deposition of carbon and other impurities on plasma shadowed area and dust/flakes were collected. Probably owing to higher temperature divertor operation, hydrogen retention (H,D,T) in redeposited layers in JT-60U was much less than those observed in JET. Moreover, no clear correlation between the redeposition and hydrogen retention was observed. Carbon deposition on the plasma shadowed area and remote area like pumping duct was very small and only small amount of

  18. Atmospheric deposition as a source of carbon and nutrients to barren, alpine soils of the Colorado Rocky Mountains

    OpenAIRE

    N. Mladenov; Williams, M. W.; Schmidt, S K; Cawley, K.

    2012-01-01

    Many alpine areas are experiencing intense deglaciation, biogeochemical changes driven by temperature rise, and changes in atmospheric deposition. There is mounting evidence that the water quality of alpine streams may be related to these changes, including rising atmospheric deposition of carbon (C) and nutrients. Given that barren alpine soils can be severely C limited, we evaluated the magnitude and chemical quality of atmospheric deposition of C and nutrients to an alpine site, the Green ...

  19. Selective Deposition and Alignment of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Assisted by Dielectrophoresis: From Thin Films to Individual Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Li Pengfei; Xue Wei

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Dielectrophoresis has been used in the controlled deposition of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with the focus on the alignment of nanotube thin films and their applications in the last decade. In this paper, we extend the research from the selective deposition of SWNT thin films to the alignment of small nanotube bundles and individual nanotubes. Electrodes with “teeth”-like patterns are fabricated to study the influence of the electrode width on the deposition an...

  20. Controlled fluoridation of amorphous carbon films deposited at reactive plasma conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoffe Alexander

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A study of the correlations between plasma parameters, gas ratios, and deposited amorphous carbon film properties is presented. The injection of a C4F8/Ar/N2 mixture of gases was successfully used in an inductively coupled plasma system for the preparation of amorphous carbon films with different fluoride doping at room-temperature, using silicon as a substrate. This coating was formed at low-pressure and low-energy using an inductively coupled plasma process. A strong dependence between the ratios of gases during deposition and the composition of the substrate compounds was shown. The values of ratios between Ar (or Ar+N2 and C4F8 - 1:1 and between N2 and Ar - 1:2 in the N2/Ar/C4F8 mixture were found as the best for low fluoridated coatings. In addition, an example of improving the etch-passivation in the Bosch procedure was described. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy options, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray reflectivity were used for quantitative analysis of the deposited films.

  1. Preferential soft-tissue preservation in the Hot Creek carbonate spring deposit, British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainey, Dustin K.; Jones, Brian

    2010-05-01

    The relict Holocene Hot Creek carbonate spring deposit in southeast British Columbia is characterized by excellent preservation of soft-tissue organisms (e.g. cyanobacteria), but poor preservation of organisms with hard-tissue (e.g. wood, diatoms). The deposit is formed mainly of calcified cyanobacteria, with fewer mineralized macrophytes (plants), bryophytes (mosses), wood, and diatoms. Cyanobacteria grew as solitary filaments ( Lyngbya) and as radiating hemispherical colonies ( Rivularia). Both were preserved by encrustation and encapsulation while alive, and as casts after filament death and decay. Sheath impregnation was rare to absent. Filament encrustation, whereby calcite crystals nucleated on, and grew away from the sheath exterior, produced moulds that replicated external filament morphology, but hastened filament decay. Filament encapsulation, whereby calcite nucleated in the vicinity of, and grew towards the encapsulated filament, promoted sheath preservation even after trichome decay. Subsequent calcite precipitation inside the hollow sheath generated sheath casts. The inability of mineralizing spring water to penetrate durable cell walls meant that bryophytes, macrophytes, and most wood was preserved by encrustation. Some wood resisted complete decay for several thousand years, and its lignified cell walls allowed rare permineralizations. Diatoms were not preserved in the relict deposit because the frustules were dissolved by the basic spring water. Amorphous calcium carbonate produced by photosynthetic CO 2 removal may have acted as nucleation sites for physicochemically precipitated calcite. Thus, metabolic activities of floral organisms probably initiated biotic mineralization, but continuous inorganic calcite precipitation on and in flora ensured that soft tissues were preserved.

  2. Deposition of Fluorinated Diamond-Like-Carbon Films by Exposure of Electrothermal Pulsed Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Takashi; Iida, Masayasu

    2011-08-01

    Thin amorphous carbon films are deposited on silicon substrates by exposure to pulsed plasmas where the feed gas is mainly generated from the ablation of an insulator. An electrothermal pulsed plasma thruster with a discharge room in an insulator rod is used as the pulsed plasma for the ablation of the insulator, and the material of the insulator rod is poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE). The pulsed plasma, in which the estimated electron density is on the order of 1022-1023 m-3, is generated by the stored energy in the capacitor. The deposition rate, which depends on the stored energy, is lower than 1 nm per pulse in our experiment. The maximum hardness measured using a nanoindenter is about 7 GPa at a stored energy of about 2.7 J, beyond which the hardness of the films decreases with the increase in stored energy. Raman spectroscopy is also carried out to examine the formation of fluorinated diamond-like carbon films. In addition, the influence of dilution gas on the properties of the deposited films is also investigated.

  3. Measured Black Carbon Deposition on the Sierra Nevada Snow Pack and Implication for Snow Pack Retreat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadley, O.L.; Corrigan, C.E.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Cliff, S.S.; Ramanathan, V.

    2010-01-12

    Modeling studies show that the darkening of snow and ice by black carbon deposition is a major factor for the rapid disappearance of arctic sea ice, mountain glaciers and snow packs. This study provides one of the first direct measurements for the efficient removal of black carbon from the atmosphere by snow and its subsequent deposition to the snow packs of California. The early melting of the snow packs in the Sierras is one of the contributing factors to the severe water problems in California. BC concentrations in falling snow were measured at two mountain locations and in rain at a coastal site. All three stations reveal large BC concentrations in precipitation, ranging from 1.7 ng/g to 12.9 ng/g. The BC concentrations in the air after the snow fall were negligible suggesting an extremely efficient removal of BC by snow. The data suggest that below cloud scavenging, rather than ice nuclei, was the dominant source of BC in the snow. A five-year comparison of BC, dust, and total fine aerosol mass concentrations at multiple sites reveals that the measurements made at the sampling sites were representative of large scale deposition in the Sierra Nevada. The relative concentration of iron and calcium in the mountain aerosol indicates that one-quarter to one-third of the BC may have been transported from Asia.

  4. Oxygen and carbon isotopes in ore deposits in sedimentary rocks, ch. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter some aspects of the distribution and processes controlling the abundance of 18O and 13C in hydrothermal systems are discussed. The term hydrothermal refers to hot, mineralized fluids which, in this specific case, deposited economic amounts of ore minerals in sedimentary rocks. Such ore minerals contain, only in exceptional cases, significant amounts of oxygen and carbon but both are normally very abundant in the associated gangue minerals: carbonates and silicates. Therefore, most stable isotope investigations which use 18O or 13C are based on the distribution of these isotopes in these gangue minerals and it is evident that the paragenetic relationships between gangue and ore must be fully understood if such data are to yield information about the formation of ore minerals and the origin of fluids and metals. A more detailed discussion concentrates on four genetically different deposits: the Providencia mines in Mexico; the Bluebell Mine in British Columbia (Canada), the Pine Point deposits in the Northwest Territories (Canada), and the Eldorado Mines in the Beaverlodge district in Saskatchewan (Canada)

  5. Deposition, characterization, and tribological applications of near-frictionless carbon films on glass and ceramic substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an element, carbon is rather unique and offers a range of rare opportunities for the design and fabrication of zero-, one-, two-, and three-dimensional nanostructured novel materials and coatings such as fullerenes, nanotubes, thin films, and free-standing nano-to-macroscale structures. Among these, carbon-based two-dimensional thin films (such as diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC)) have attracted an overwhelming interest in recent years, mainly because of their exceptional physical, chemical, mechanical, electrical, and tribological properties. In particular, certain DLC films were found to provide extremely low friction and wear coefficients to sliding metallic and ceramic surfaces. Since the early 1990s, carbon has been used at Argonne National Laboratory to synthesize a class of novel DLC films that now provide friction and wear coefficients as low as 0.001 and 10-11-10-10 mm3 N-1 m-1, respectively, when tested in inert or vacuum test environments. Over the years, we have optimized these films and applied them successfully to all kinds of metallic and ceramic substrates and evaluated their friction and wear properties under a wide range of sliding conditions. In this paper, we will provide details of our recent work on the deposition, characterization, and tribological applications of near-frictionless carbon films on glass and ceramic substrates. We will also provide chemical and structural information about these films and describe the fundamental tribological mechanisms that control their unusual friction and wear behaviour

  6. Process of Energetic Carbon Atom Deposition on Si (001) Substrate by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于威; 滕晓云; 李晓苇; 傅广生

    2002-01-01

    The process of energetic C atom deposition on Si (001)-(2×1) is studied by the molecular dynamics method using the semi-empirical many-bond Tersoff potential. It is found that the incident energy of the carbon atom has an important effect on the collision process and its diffusion process on the substrate. Most of the incident energy of the carbon atom is transferred to the substrate atoms within the initial two vibration periods of substrate atoms and its value increases with the incident energy. The spreading distance and penetration depth of the incident atom increasing with the incident energy are also identified. The simulated results imply that an important effect of energy of incident carbon on the film growth at Iow substrate temperature provides activation energy for silicon carbide formation through the vibration enhancement of local substrate atoms. In addition, suppressing carbon atom inhomogeneous collection and dispensing with the silicon diffusion process may be effectively promoted by the spreading and penetration of the energetic carbon atom in the silicon substrate.

  7. Hydrogen-free spray pyrolysis chemical vapor deposition method for the carbon nanotube growth: Parametric studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spray pyrolysis chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in the absence of hydrogen at low carrier gas flow rates has been used for the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A parametric study of the carbon nanotube growth has been conducted by optimizing various parameters such as temperature, injection speed, precursor volume, and catalyst concentration. Experimental observations and characterizations reveal that the growth rate, size and quality of the carbon nanotubes are significantly dependent on the reaction parameters. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy techniques were employed to characterize the morphology, structure and crystallinity of the carbon nanotubes. The synthesis process can be applied to both semiconducting silicon wafer and conducting substrates such as carbon microfibers and stainless steel plates. This approach promises great potential in building various nanodevices with different electron conducting requirements. In addition, the absence of hydrogen as a carrier gas and the relatively low synthesis temperature (typically 750 deg. C) qualify the spray pyrolysis CVD method as a safe and easy way to scale up the CNT growth, which is applicable in industrial production.

  8. Irreversible membrane fouling abatement through pre-deposited layer of hierarchical porous carbons

    KAUST Repository

    Hamad, Juma

    2014-11-01

    In this work, dual-templated hierarchical porous carbons (HPCs), produced from a coupled ice-hard templating approach, are shown to be a highly effective solution to the commonly occurring problem of irreversible fouling of low-pressure membranes used for pre-treatment in wastewater reuse. For the first time, dual-templated HPCs, along with their respective counterparts - single-templated meso-porous carbon (MPCs) (without macropores) - are tested in terms of their fouling reduction capacity and ability to remove different effluent organic matter fractions present in wastewater and compared with a commercially available powdered activated carbon (PAC). The synthesized HPCs provided exceptional fouling abatement, a 4-fold higher fouling reduction as compared to the previously reported best performing commercial PAC and ~2.5-fold better fouling reduction than their respective mesoporous counterpart. Thus, it is shown that not only mesoporosity, but macroporosity is also necessary to achieve high fouling reduction, thus emphasizing the need for dual templating. In the case of HPCs, the pre-deposition technique is also found to outperform the traditional sorbent-feed mixing approach, mainly in terms of removal of fouling components. Based on their superior performance, a high permeability (ultra-low-pressure) membrane consisting of the synthesized HPC pre-deposited on a large pore size membrane support (0.45μm membrane), is shown to give excellent pre-treatment performance for wastewater reuse application. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Deposition, burial and sequestration of carbon in an oligotrophic, tropical lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Alcocer

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The amount of biogenic carbon that may be deposited, buried and eventually preserved (sequestered in the sediments of a tropical, oligotrophic lake, was evaluated based on i the temporal variation of the particulate organic carbon (POC concentration in the superficial sediments in the deep zone of lake Alchichica, Puebla, Mexico; and ii the POC accumulation and preservation in a 210Pb-dated sediment core from the lake. In lake Alchichica the POC concentration in the surficial sediments ranged between 12 and 60 mg POC g-1 (25 ± 12 mg POC g-1 dry weight. The magnitude of the sedimented POC in Alchichica was high and mostly of autochthonous origin. The POC concentrations recorded in the sediment core (16.6 to 31.6 mg g-1 dry weight were comparable to the concentration range observed in the surface sediment samples collected during the study period, which signaled a high POC preservation capacity in the sedimentary column of lake Alchichica. The POC fluxes, estimated from the 210Pb-dated sediment core, varied between 14.9 and 35.3 g m-2 year-1 within the past century; and the maximum POC losses through diagenesis during this period were estimated to be lower than 25%. This study concludes that deep tropical lakes, exemplified by lake Alchichica, accumulate and preserve most of the POC deposited, playing an important role in regional carbon balances.

  10. Characterization of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films electrochemically deposited on a silicon substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited on a Si substrate by electrolysis in a methanol solution at ambient pressure and low temperature. The morphology and microstructure of the resulting DLC films were analysed using atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transformation infrared spectrometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and x-ray excited Auger electron spectroscopy (XAES). The surface energy and mechanical properties of the DLC films were examined, and the growth mechanism of the DLC films in liquid phase electro-deposition is discussed as well. The results of the study show that the hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films are smooth and compact. The percentage of sp3 carbon in the DLC films is determined as 55-60%, based on the corresponding XPS and first-derivative XAES spectra of graphite, diamond, and the tested films. The DLC films show low surface free energy, good mechanical properties, excellent friction-reduction and wear-resistance. It is suggested that methanol dissociates to generate the active species of CH3+ and C2H4 at high voltage applied to the electrode, followed by the generation of the alkyl chain [-CH2-CH2-]n whose C-C and C-H bond lengths and C-C-C and H-C-H bond angles are close to that of diamond. Subsequently, a diamond-like structure was formed by the ordered dehydrogenation of a short-chain [-CH2-CH2-]n in the electrolysis process

  11. Irreversible membrane fouling abatement through pre-deposited layer of hierarchical porous carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Juma Z; Dua, Rubal; Kurniasari, Novita; Kennedy, Maria D; Wang, Peng; Amy, Gary L

    2014-11-15

    In this work, dual-templated hierarchical porous carbons (HPCs), produced from a coupled ice-hard templating approach, are shown to be a highly effective solution to the commonly occurring problem of irreversible fouling of low-pressure membranes used for pre-treatment in wastewater reuse. For the first time, dual-templated HPCs, along with their respective counterparts - single-templated meso-porous carbon (MPCs) (without macropores) - are tested in terms of their fouling reduction capacity and ability to remove different effluent organic matter fractions present in wastewater and compared with a commercially available powdered activated carbon (PAC). The synthesized HPCs provided exceptional fouling abatement, a 4-fold higher fouling reduction as compared to the previously reported best performing commercial PAC and ∼2.5-fold better fouling reduction than their respective mesoporous counterpart. Thus, it is shown that not only mesoporosity, but macroporosity is also necessary to achieve high fouling reduction, thus emphasizing the need for dual templating. In the case of HPCs, the pre-deposition technique is also found to outperform the traditional sorbent-feed mixing approach, mainly in terms of removal of fouling components. Based on their superior performance, a high permeability (ultra-low-pressure) membrane consisting of the synthesized HPC pre-deposited on a large pore size membrane support (0.45 μm membrane), is shown to give excellent pre-treatment performance for wastewater reuse application. PMID:25128660

  12. Arctic Deposition of Black Carbon from Fires in Northern Eurasia from 2002 to 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, W. M.; Evangeliou, N.; Balkanski, Y.; Urbanski, S. P.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) in smoke plumes from fires in Northern Eurasia can be transported and deposited on Arctic ice and accelerate ice melting. Thus, we developed daily BC emissions from fires in this region at a 500 m x 500 m resolution from 2002 to 2013 and modeled the BC transport and deposition in the Arctic. BC emissions were estimated based on MODIS land cover maps and detected burned areas, the Forest Inventory Survey of the Russian Federation, and biomass specific BC emission factors. An average of 250,000 km2 were burned annually in Northern Eurasia. Grassland dominates the total burned area (61%), followed by forest (27%). For grassland fires, about three-quarters of the area burned occurred in Central and Western Asia and about 17% in Russia. More than 90% of the forest burned area was in Russia. Annual BC emissions from Northern Eurasian fires varied enormously with an average of 0.82±0.50 Tg. In contrast to burned area, forest fires dominated BC emissions and accounted for about two-thirds of the emissions, followed by grassland fires (15%). More than 90% of the BC emissions from forest fires occurred in Russia. Overall, Russia contributed 83% of the total BC emissions from fires in Northern Eurasia. The transport and deposition of BC on Arctic ice from all the global sources was estimated using the LMDz-OR-INCA global chemistry-aerosol-climate model. About 7.9% of emitted BC from fires were deposited on the Arctic ice, accounting for 45-78% of the BC deposited from all sources. However, about 20% of the BC emitted from fires were deposited on Arctic in spring which is the most effective period for acceleration of melting of ice. The simulated BC concentrations are consistent with obserations at the Arctic monitoring stations of Albert, Barrow, Nord, Zeppelin, and Tiksi.

  13. A high-resolution geochronological and geochemical study on Aegean carbonate deposits, SW Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal-İmer, Ezgi; Uysal, I. Tonguç; Işık, Veysel; Zhao, Jian-Xin; Shulmeister, James

    2014-05-01

    Vein and breccia carbonates precipitated in highly fractured/faulted carbonate bedrock were investigated using high-resolution U-series geochronology, as well as through microstructural and geochemical studies including Sr-O-C isotope and REE element analyses. The study area (Kumlubük and Amos vein systems), located south of the town of Marmaris in SW Turkey, is a part of an active large-scale extensional system. Field studies show that the calcite veins generally occur sub-vertically and strike mostly NW and EW, in agreement with the regional N-S extensional stress regime. Microscopic observations indicate that the calcite veins formed through crack-seal mechanism, typically accompanied/initiated by intensive hydraulic fracturing of wall-rock evidenced by the presence of widespread breccia deposits. Vein textures are dominated by elongated, fibrous, and blocky calcites. Successive fracturing and layering of calcite with sharp contacts are traceable along the fluid inclusion bands occurring parallel to the wall rock boundary. In particular, inclusion trails aligned perpendicular to the wall-rock and calcite crystal elongation give information about the vein dilation (crack opening) vector and growth direction. High-resolution U-series dating (11-272 ka BP) and geochemical compositions of the vein and breccia samples were used to investigate the long-term behaviour as well as the general identity of the CO2-bearing fluids within deformed crust. The seismic nature of calcite veining is further assessed by stable isotopic ratio (δ18O and δ13C) plots against vein depths (distance from the wall-rock). The average δ18OPDBvalue for Kumlubük veins is -3.79o, while Amos has an average value of -4.05o. Similarly, average carbon isotope ratio (-8.30o) of the Kumlubük veins is slightly higher than that is observed for the Amos veins (-9.66o). Isotopic compositions are interpreted to reflect cyclic (or episodic) CO2 variations. This suggests the presence of several fluid

  14. Pulsed DC deposition of near-frictionless carbon. Final CRADA report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenske, G.; Energy Systems

    2005-06-30

    Near-Frictionless Carbon (NFC) coatings, CemeCon, Inc. arranged for the loan of a Pinnacle Plus pulsed DC power supply with ancillary support equipment and appropriate sputter targets for the deposition of CemeCon's graded Cr-based bond coat. A process engineer from CemeCon AG also came to Argonne to install and operate the new power supply, and work with ANL scientists on process development. By any measure, these results are extremely encouraging. It has now been established that NFC coatings can be deposited in the CemeCon CC800/9sx unit using pulsed DC to generate the plasma, and further that the DLC3000 bond coat technology can be used with PACVD coatings. In terms of process variables, it should be possible to increase the deposition rate by increasing either or both the deposition pressure and/or the pulsed bias voltage without adversely affecting the coating quality. Other structural characterization may be performed on the coatings, including fluctuation microscopy, ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy, and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

  15. Hydrogenated diamond-like carbon film deposited on UHMWPE by RF-PECVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Xingling, E-mail: shixingling1985@hotmail.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, South Road of Third Cycle, Xuzhou, 221116 (China); Wang Qingliang; Xu Lingli; Ge Shirong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, South Road of Third Cycle, Xuzhou, 221116 (China); Wang Chao [Test and Analysis Center of China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou, 221116 (China)

    2009-07-15

    In this work, investigations were conducted to analyze the properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) film deposited on ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) by radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) at a low temperature of 50 deg. C. Composition and structure of the films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. Hardness and wettability of the film were tested. Tribological characterizations were carried out on a universal micro-tribometer, and reciprocating friction against ZrO{sub 2} ball was adopted with 25% bovine serum as lubrication. Results show that DLC film was successfully deposited on UHMWPE surface by RF-PECVD and the sp{sup 3} content was about 20% in the film. The film increased the macrohardness of the substrate by about 42% and the wettability was improved too. Tribology test showed a higher friction coefficient but a much smaller wear volume after the deposition due to the surface roughening and strengthening.

  16. Structure and mechanical properties of diamondlike carbon films produced by hollow-cathode plasma deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamondlike carbon (DLC) films are deposited on AISI 304 stainless-steel substrates using hollow-cathode chemical vapor deposition. The effects of the substrate bias on the structural and mechanical properties of the films are studied. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals the existence of C=C (sp2) and C-C (sp3) functional groups in the films, and Raman spectra show that the ratio of the G (graphite) peak to the D (disorder) peak depends on the sample bias. The DLC film deposited at -50 V bias has the highest sp3 content, and this is consistent with the G-band position and D-band full width at half maximum as a result of substrate biasing. The sample bias also has a critical influence on the thickness and hardness of the deposited films. The largest thickness (1700 nm) and highest hardness (HV1099) are achieved at a bias voltage of -50 V. All the films show low friction coefficients, and the sample treated at -200 V gives rise to the lowest friction coefficient

  17. Synthesis and Characteristics of Diamond-like Carbon Films Deposited on Quartz Substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄卫东; 丁鼎; 詹如娟

    2004-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are deposited on quartz substrate using pure CH4 in the surface wave plasma equipment. A direct current negative bias up to -90 V is applied to the substrate to investigate the bias effect on the film characteristics. Deposited films are characterized by Raman spectroscopy, infrared (IR) and ultraviolet-visible absorption techniques.There are two broad Raman peaks around 1340 cm-1 and 1600 cm-1 and the first one has a greater sp3 component with an increased bias. Infrared spectroscopy has three sp3 C-H modes at 2852 cm-1, 2926 cm- 1 and 2962 cm-1, respectively and also shows an intensity increase with the negative bias. Optical band gap is calculated from the ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy and the increased values with negative bias and deposition time are obtained. After a thermal anneal at about 500 ℃ for an hour to the film deposited under the bias of-90 V, we get an almost unchanged Raman spectrum and a peak intensity-reduced IR signal, which indicates a reduced H-content in the film. Meanwhile the optical band gap changed from 0.85 eV to 1.5 eV.

  18. Multi-Directional Growth of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Over Catalyst Film Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Kai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The structure of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs severely depends on the properties of pre-prepared catalyst films. Aiming for the preparation of precisely controlled catalyst film, atomic layer deposition (ALD was employed to deposit uniform Fe2O3 film for the growth of CNT arrays on planar substrate surfaces as well as the curved ones. Iron acetylacetonate and ozone were introduced into the reactor alternately as precursors to realize the formation of catalyst films. By varying the deposition cycles, uniform and smooth Fe2O3 catalyst films with different thicknesses were obtained on Si/SiO2 substrate, which supported the growth of highly oriented few-walled CNT arrays. Utilizing the advantage of ALD process in coating non-planar surfaces, uniform catalyst films can also be successfully deposited onto quartz fibers. Aligned few-walled CNTs can be grafted on the quartz fibers, and they self-organized into a leaf-shaped structure due to the curved surface morphology. The growth of aligned CNTs on non-planar surfaces holds promise in constructing hierarchical CNT architectures in future.

  19. Reading carbonate deposits from ancient water installations: why are they useful for geoarchaeology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sürmelihindi, Gül; Passchier, Cees

    2016-04-01

    Water has always been a basic need of life, to remain alive and clean, and to irrigate fertile land, which provides food to people. While looking for a source of water suitable for their requirements, ancient civilizations considered three important factors: to have a reliable supply of water; in sufficient amount and quality; and at affordable costs to transport it to where it was needed. Water lifting and distribution devices were therefore selected and improved with these essential factors in mind. Our understanding of the development of water technology in ancient cultures is mainly based on archaeology and textural sources, focusing on details of the construction of water works and water machines, and on their location in individual settlements. However, the geographic distribution of water technology in Mediterranean and Middle East is poorly understood: both the local economical basis and palaeo-environmental conditions may have played a role in the choice of certain water technologies. As a consequence, some water-lifting devices, e.g. the bucket-chain and Archimedean screw, were only used where favorable conditions prevailed. The use of ancient water installations, however, cannot easily be studied from architectural remains alone: carbonate deposits in and around such installations can provide information, not only on their use but also on palaeo-environmental conditions during their functioning and on local economical conditions. This applies mostly to water installations of Roman or Medieval age. Since the Romans maintained their water technologies routinely, any thick carbonate deposit may give information on periods of economical hardship, too. Carbonate deposits (calcareous sinter) are presently mainly used to study palaeo-environmental changes from Roman aqueducts, but water lifting machines and water mills, which are commonly build of wood, can also be studied in this way. The Romans were the first to apply waterpower to several industrial

  20. Electrophoretically deposited multiwalled carbon nanotube based amperometric genosensor for E.coli detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Hema; Solanki, Shipra; Sumana, Gajjala

    2016-04-01

    This work reports on a sensitive and selective genosensor fabrication method for Escherichia coli (E.coli) detection. The functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) synthesized via chemical vapour deposition have been deposited electrophoretically onto indium tin oxide coated glass surface and have been utilized as matrices for the covalent immobilization of E.coli specific probe oligonucleotide that was identified from the 16s rRNA coding region of the E.coli genome. This fabricated functionalized MWCNT based platform sought to provide improved fundamental characteristics to electrode interface in terms of electro-active surface area and diffusion coefficient. Electrochemical cyclic voltammetry revealed that this genosensor exhibits a linear response to complementary DNA in the concentration range of 10-7 to 10-12 M with a detection limit of 1×10-12 M.

  1. Diamond like carbon coatings deposited by microwave plasma CVD: XPS and ellipsometric studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R M Dey; M Pandey; D Bhattacharyya; D S Patil; S K Kulkarni

    2007-12-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited by microwave assisted chemical vapour deposition system using d.c. bias voltage ranging from –100 V to –300 V. These films were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and spectroscopic ellipsometry techniques for estimating 3/2 ratio. The 3/2 ratio obtained by XPS is found to have an opposite trend to that obtained by spectroscopic ellipsometry. These results are explained using sub-plantation picture of DLC growth. Our results clearly indicate that the film is composed of two different layers, having entirely different properties in terms of void percentage and 3/2 ratio. The upper layer is relatively thinner as compared to the bottom layer.

  2. An inferred relationship between some uranium deposits and calcium carbonate cement in southern Black Hills, South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gott, Garland B.

    1956-01-01

    Evidence resulting from geologic mapping in the southern Black Hills indicates that the areas marginal to some of the larger carbonate-cemented sandstones constitute favorable geochemical environments for the localization of uranium deposits. To determine whether these favorable environments are predictable a limited experimental core-drilling program was carried out. An extensive deposit was discovered in an area marginal to a sandstone well-cemented with calcium carbonate. The deposit has not yet been developed, but from the available data it appears that there is a significant quantity of mineralized rock present containing as much as 3.0 percent eU3O8.

  3. Experimental measurements of the thermal conductivity of ash deposits: Part 1. Measurement technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. L. Robinson; S. G. Buckley; N. Yang; L. L. Baxter

    2000-04-01

    This paper describes a technique developed to make in situ, time-resolved measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of ash deposits formed under conditions that closely replicate those found in the convective pass of a commercial boiler. Since ash deposit thermal conductivity is thought to be strongly dependent on deposit microstructure, the technique is designed to minimize the disturbance of the natural deposit microstructure. Traditional techniques for measuring deposit thermal conductivity generally do not preserve the sample microstructure. Experiments are described that demonstrate the technique, quantify experimental uncertainty, and determine the thermal conductivity of highly porous, unsintered deposits. The average measured conductivity of loose, unsintered deposits is 0.14 {+-} 0.03 W/(m K), approximately midway between rational theoretical limits for deposit thermal conductivity.

  4. Compound specific radiocarbon analyses to apportion sources of combustion products in sedimentary pyrogenic carbon deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, Ulrich M.; Schmidt, Michael W. I.; McIntyre, Cameron P.; Reddy, Christopher M.; Wacker, Lukas; Eglinton, Timothy I.

    2016-04-01

    Pyrogenic carbon (PyC) is a collective term for carbon-rich residues comprised of a continuum of products generated during biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion. PyC is a key component of the global carbon cycle due to its slow intrinsic decomposition rate and its ubiquity in the environment. It can originate from natural or anthropogenic vegetation fires, coal mining, energy production, industry and transport. Subsequently, PyC can be transported over long distances by wind and water and can eventually be buried in sediments. Information about the origin of PyC (biomass burning vs. fossil fuel combustion) deposited in estuarine sediments is scarce. We studied the highly anoxic estuarine sediments of the Pettaquamscutt River (Rhode Island, U.S.) in high temporal resolution over 250 years and found different combustion proxies reflect local and regional sources of PyC (Hanke et al. in review; Lima et al. 2003). The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) originate from long-range atmospheric transport, whereas bulk PyC, detected as benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCA), mainly stems from local catchment run-off. However, to unambiguously apportion PyC sources, we need additional information, such as compound specific radiocarbon (14C) measurements. We report 14C data for individual BPCA including error analysis and for combustion-related PAH. First results indicate that biomass burning is the main source of PyC deposits, with additional minor contributions from fossil fuel combustion. References Hanke U.M., T.I. Eglinton, A.L.L. Braun, C. Reddy, D.B. Wiedemeier, M.W.I. Schmidt. Decoupled sedimentary records of combustion: causes and implications. In review. Lima, A. L.; Eglinton, T. I.; Reddy, C. M., High-resolution record of pyrogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon deposition during the 20th century. ES&T, 2003, 37 (1), 53-61.

  5. Deposition of vertically oriented carbon nanofibers in atmospheric pressure radio frequency discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deposition of vertically oriented carbon nanofibers (CNFs) has been studied in an atmospheric pressure radio frequency discharge without dielectric barrier covering the metallic electrodes. When the frequency is sufficiently high so that ions reside in the gap for more than one rf cycle ('trapped ions'), the operating voltage decreases remarkably and the transition from a uniform glow discharge to an arc discharge is suppressed even without dielectric barriers. More importantly, the trapped ions are able to build up a cathodic ion sheath. A large potential drop is created in the sheath between the bulk plasma and the electrode, which is essential for aligning growing CNFs. At the same time, the damage to CNFs due to ion bombardment can be minimized at atmospheric pressure. The primary interest of the present work is in identifying the cathodic ion sheath and investigating how it influences the alignment of growing CNFs in atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition. Spectral emission profiles of He (706 nm), Hα (656 nm), and CH (432 nm) clearly showed that a dark space is formed between the cathode layer and the heated bottom electrode. However, increasing the rf power induced the transition to a nonuniform γ-mode discharge which creates intense plasma spots in the dark space. Aligned CNFs can be grown at moderate input power during the initial stage of the deposition process. Catalyst particles were heavily contaminated by precipitated carbon in less than 5 min. Alignment deteriorates as CNFs grow and deposition was virtually terminated by the deactivation of catalyst particles

  6. Deposition of diamond like carbon films by using a single ion gun with varying beam source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Jin-qiu; Chen Zhu-ping

    2001-01-01

    Diamond like carbon films have been successfully deposited on the steel substrate, by using a single ion gun with varying beam source. The films may appear blue, yellow and transparent in color, which was found related to contaminants from the sample holder and could be avoided. The thickness of the films ranges from tens up to 200 nanometers, and the hardness is in the range 20 to 30 GPa. Raman analytical results reveal the films are in amorphous structure. The effects of different beam source on the films structure are further discussed.

  7. Fabrication of Ni-B alloy coated vapor-grown carbon nanofibers by electroless deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Arai, Susumu; Imoto, Yuzo; Suzuki, Yosuke; Endo, Morinobu

    2011-01-01

    Ni-B alloy coated vapor-grown carbon nanofibers (VGCNFs) were fabricated by electroless deposition and their microstructures were investigated. The effects of heat treatment on the coated VGCNFs were also studied. VGCNFs could be coated with a homogeneous Ni-B alloy film using a plating bath containing dimethylaminoborane (DMAB) as a reducing agent. The boron content of the Ni-B alloy film could be varied from 14 to 24 atom% B by varying the DMAB concentration of the plating bath. The VGCNFs ...

  8. An Investigation on the Formation of Carbon Nanotubes by Two-Stage Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Shamsudin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available High density of carbon nanotubes (CNTs has been synthesized from agricultural hydrocarbon: camphor oil using a one-hour synthesis time and a titanium dioxide sol gel catalyst. The pyrolysis temperature is studied in the range of 700–900°C at increments of 50°C. The synthesis process is done using a custom-made two-stage catalytic chemical vapor deposition apparatus. The CNT characteristics are investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that structural properties of CNT are highly dependent on pyrolysis temperature changes.

  9. Decorated carbon nanotubes by silicon deposition in fluidized bed for Li-ion battery anodes

    OpenAIRE

    Coppey, Nicolas; Noé, Laure; Monthioux, Marc; Caussat, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes Graphistrength® were decorated with silicon by Fluidized Bed Chemical Vapor Deposition. The ability to fluidize of these nanotubes forming ball-shaped jumbles of several hundreds of microns in diameter and that of the final CNT-Si balls was first studied. These balls reveal to fluidize with characteristics of Geldart’s group A particles, i.e. without bubbles and with high bed expansion. Coating experiments from silane SiH4 were performed at 500°C in the 30 60 wt....

  10. A Novel Catalyst Deposition Technique for the Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzeit, Lance; Cassell, A.; Stevens, R.; Nguyen, C.; Meyyappan, M.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the development of a technique at NASA's Ames Research Center by which carbon nanotubes (NT) can be grown. The project had several goals which included: 1) scaleability, 2) ability to control single wall nanotube (SWNT) and multiwall nanotube (MWNT) formation, 3) ability to control the density of nanotubes as they grow, 4) ability to apply standard masking techniques for NT patterning. Information regarding the growth technique includes its use of a catalyst deposition process. SWNTs of varying thicknesses can be grown by changing the catalyst composition. Demonstrations are given of various methods of masking including the use of transmission electron microscopic (TEM) grids.

  11. Development of SOFC anodes resistant to sulfur poisoning and carbon deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Song Ho

    The advantages of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) over other types of fuel cells include high energy efficiency and excellent fuel flexibility. In particular, the possibility of direct utilization of fossil fuels and renewable fuels (e.g., bio-fuels) may significantly reduce the cost of SOFC technologies. However, it is known that these types of fuels contain many contaminants that may be detrimental to SOFC performance. Among the contaminants commonly encountered in readily available fuels, sulfur-containing compounds could dramatically reduce the catalytic activity of Ni-based anodes under SOFC operating conditions. While various desulphurization processes have been developed for the removal of sulfur species to different levels, the process becomes another source of high cost and system complexity in order to achieve low concentration of sulfur species. Thus, the design of sulfur tolerant anode materials is essential to durability and commercialization of SOFCs. Another technical challenge to overcome for direct utilization of hydrocarbon fuels is carbon deposition. Carbon formation on Ni significantly degrades fuel cell performance by covering the electrochemically active sites at the anode. Therefore, the prevention of the carbon deposition is a key technical issue for the direct use of hydrocarbon fuels in a SOFC. In this research, the surface of a dense Ni-YSZ anode was modified with a thin-film coating of niobium oxide (Nb2O5) in order to understand the mechanism of sulfur tolerance and the behavior of carbon deposition. Results suggest that the niobium oxide was reduced to NbO 2 under operating conditions, which has high electrical conductivity. The NbOx coated dense Ni-YSZ showed sulfur tolerance when exposed to 50 ppm H2S at 700°C over 12 h. Raman spectroscopy and XRD analysis suggest that different phases of NbSx formed on the surface. Further, the DOS (density of state) analysis of NbO2, NbS, and NbS2 indicates that niobium sulfides can be considered

  12. Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition of Methane to Carbon Nanotubes: Copper Promoted Effect of Ni/MgO Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Wen Yang; Yanyan Feng; Wei Chu

    2014-01-01

    The Ni/MgO and Ni-Cu/MgO catalysts were prepared by sol-gel method and used as the catalysts for synthesis of carbon nanotubes by thermal chemical vapor deposition. The effect of Cu on the carbon yield and structure was investigated, and the effects of calcination temperature and reaction temperature were also investigated. The catalysts and synthesized carbon materials were characterized by temperature programmed reduction (TPR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and scanning electron micros...

  13. Cold seep deposits of Beauvoisin (Oxfordian southeastern France) and Marmorito (Miocene northern Italy) Microbially induced authigenic carbonates

    OpenAIRE

    Peckmann, J.; V. Thiel; Michaelis, W; Clari, P.; Gaillard, C.; Martire, L.; Reitner, Joachim

    1999-01-01

    The relation of two well-known ancient carbonate deposits to hydrocarbon seepage was confirmed by this study. Archaea are found to be associated with the formation of Oxfordian seep carbonates from Beauvoisin and with a Miocene limestone from Marmorito ("tube-worm limestone"). Carbonates formed due to a mediation by archaea exhibit extremely positive or extremely negative 813Ccarbonate values, respectively. Highly positive values (+ 15%0) reflect the use of 13C-enri...

  14. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Chemical Vapor Deposition of Amorphous Carbon: Dependence on H/C Ratio of Source Gas

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Atsushi M.; Takayama, Arimichi; Saito, Seiki; Ohno, Noriyasu; Kajita, Shin; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2010-01-01

    By molecular dynamics simulation, the chemical vapor deposition of amorphous carbon onto graphite and diamond surfaces was studied. In particular, we investigated the effect of source H/C ratio, which is the ratio of the number of hydrogen atoms to the number of carbon atoms in a source gas, on the deposition process. In the present simulation, the following two source gas conditions were tested: one was that the source gas was injected as isolated carbon and hydrogen atoms, and the other was...

  15. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies of some deposited carbon layers in Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roubin, P.; Martin, C.; Arnas, C. [Universite de Provence, PIIM-UMR 6633, 13 - Marseille (France); Colomban, Ph. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, LADIR-UMR 7075, 75 - Paris (France); Pegourie, B.; Brosset, C. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee

    2004-07-01

    Carbon deposited layers collected in Tore Supra on the neutralizers, on the toroidal pumped limiter and on the vertical outboard limiter have been analyzed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Both techniques show that are highly disordered, mainly consisting in graphite-like nano-particles. They are not similar to amorphous or hydrogenated amorphous carbons: this is consistent with the low amount of deuterium found trapped inside. Their structure can be related to their vicinity to plasma, particle bombardment inducing high temperature and preventing full amorphization. Samples exposed to the highest fluence in the machine show the largest degree of disorder, with probably a minor contribution of three-dimensional disorder which may be due to the formation of bonds with deuterium. (authors)

  16. An operando surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) study of carbon deposition on SOFC anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaxi; Liu, Mingfei; Lee, Jung-pil; Ding, Dong; Bottomley, Lawrence A; Park, Soojin; Liu, Meilin

    2015-09-01

    Thermally robust and chemically inert Ag@SiO2 nanoprobes are employed to provide the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect for an in situ/operando study of the early stage of carbon deposition on nickel-based solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anodes. The enhanced sensitivity to carbon enables the detection of different stages of coking, offering insights into intrinsic coking tolerance of material surfaces. Application of a thin coating of gadolinium doped ceria (GDC) enhances the resistance to coking of nickel surfaces. The electrochemically active Ni-YSZ interface appears to be more active for hydrocarbon reforming, resulting in the accumulation of different hydrocarbon molecules, which can be readily removed upon the application of an anodic current. Operando SERS is a powerful tool for the mechanistic study of coking in SOFC systems. It is also applicable to the study of other catalytic and electrochemical processes in a wide range of conditions. PMID:25599129

  17. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies of some deposited carbon layers in Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon deposited layers collected in Tore Supra on the neutralizers, on the toroidal pumped limiter and on the vertical outboard limiter have been analyzed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Both techniques show that are highly disordered, mainly consisting in graphite-like nano-particles. They are not similar to amorphous or hydrogenated amorphous carbons: this is consistent with the low amount of deuterium found trapped inside. Their structure can be related to their vicinity to plasma, particle bombardment inducing high temperature and preventing full amorphization. Samples exposed to the highest fluence in the machine show the largest degree of disorder, with probably a minor contribution of three-dimensional disorder which may be due to the formation of bonds with deuterium. (authors)

  18. Properties and local structure of plasma-deposited amorphous silicon-carbon alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon-carbon alloy films were plasma-deposited from methane and silane, varying gas ratio, R.F. power and substrate temperature. Carbon addition increases the optical gap, but also raises the dangling bond density while decreasing conductivity. Low C alloys can be gas-phase doped both p and n type. In the IR spectra the various Si-C stretching modes observed between 650 and 780 cm/sup -1/ are explained by back bonding variations. A tentative method of assigning this shift to back bonding of C to the Si is given. A distribution of modes is observed for all alloys, with each mode appearing even at 2% C. The distribution is sensitive to substrate temperature, but is stable after vacuum annealing to 4000C

  19. Mesozoic authigenic carbonate deposition in the Arctic: Do glendonites record gas hydrate destabilization during the Jurassic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Chloe; Suan, Guillaume; Wierzbowski, Hubert; Rogov, Mikhail; Teichert, Barbara; Kienhuis, Michiel V. M.; Polerecky, Lubos; Middelburg, Jack B. M.; Reichart, Gert-Jan; van de Schootbrugge, Bas

    2015-04-01

    Glendonites are calcite pseudomorphs after ikaite, an unstable hydrated calcium carbonate mineral. Because present-day ikaite occurs predominantly in sub-polar environments and is unstable at warm temperatures, glendonites have been used as an indicator of near-freezing conditions throughout Earth history. Ikaite has also been observed in cold deep-sea environments like the Gulf of Mexico, the Japan Trench, and the Zaire Fan where their formation is possibly governed by other parameters. The description of glendonites in Paleocene-Eocene sediments of Svalbard, and Early Jurassic (Pliensbachian) deposits of northern Germany, however questions the role of temperature on ikaite precipitation (Spielhagen and Tripati, 2009; Teichert and Luppold, 2013). Anomalously low carbon isotope values of Jurassic glendonites point to the involvement of methane as a possible carbon source for ikaite/glendonite formation. Terrestrial organic matter degradation is also frequently evoked as a potential source of carbon. The involved bio- and geochemical processes remains thus not well constrained. Here we present new geochemical data of a large number of glendonites specimens from the Lower and Middle Jurassic of northern Siberia and the Lena river middle flows (Bajocian, Bathonian, Pliensbachian). Carbon and oxygen isotopic values show comparable trends between the different sections. Bulk glendonites δ13C and δ18O values vary from 0.0 to -44.5o and -15.0 to -0.8 respectively and show a negative correlation. Some samples display similar low δ13C values as the Pliensbachian glendonites of Germany (Teichert and Luppold, 2013), suggesting thermogenic and/or biogenic methane sources. The range of carbon isotope values is comparable to those observed at other methane seeps deposits. Further investigations are needed to better constrain the carbon cycle in these particular environmental conditions. The role of microbial communities into ikaite/glendonite formation equally needs to be

  20. The structure of nano-palladium deposited on carbon-based supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nano-palladium catalysts, prepared using the same procedure with the same metal content (3 wt%) and two different supports, activated carbon (Pd/C) and activated carbon—multiwalled carbon nanotubes (Pd/C/CNT), are discussed. The simple technique of deposition reduction was applied in the preparation of these two types of Pd catalysts. TEM, XRD analysis, EXAFS signal analysis, and XANES were used for sample characterization. In both samples, transmission electron microscopy identified nanosized Pd particles with nearly spherical morphology but different sizes. The mean diameters of the particles on Pd/C and Pd/C/CNT were estimated to be 5.4 nm and 7.8 nm, respectively. The EXAFS signal analysis showed that Pd atoms on the particle surfaces were coordinated by 4 oxygens to form a PdO monolayer covering a metallic core. The XANES signal analysis indicated a smaller particle size for Pd/C (∅ 5 nm) than for Pd/C/CNT (∅ 10 nm), in good agreement with the TEM observations. - Graphical abstract: Visualization of metallic core (left), oxide monolayer (middle) and nanoparticle of diameter 5 nm (right). - Highlights: • Pd catalysts were prepared on two types of supports: carbon and carbon nanotubes. • BET, TEM, XRD characterization of prepared catalysts. • XAFS: Concentration of Pd in samples Pd/C and Pd/C/CNT. • EXAFS and XANES signal analysis of catalysts. • Visualisation of atoms arrangement at the Pd nanoparticle surface

  1. Lab-Scale Study of the Calcium Carbonate Dissolution and Deposition by Marine Cyanobacterium Phormidium subcapitatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakis, S. G.; Dragoeva, E. G.; Lavrenyuk, T. I.; Rogochiy, A.; Gerasimenko, L. M.; McKay, D. S.; Brown, I. I.

    2006-01-01

    Suggestions that calcification in marine organisms changes in response to global variations in seawater chemistry continue to be advanced (Wilkinson, 1979; Degens et al. 1985; Kazmierczak et al. 1986; R. Riding 1992). However, the effect of [Na+] on calcification in marine cyanobacteria has not been discussed in detail although [Na+] fluctuations reflect both temperature and sea-level fluctuations. The goal of these lab-scale studies therefore was to study the effect of environmental pH and [Na+] on CaCO3 deposition and dissolution by marine cyanobacterium Phormidium subcapitatum. Marine cyanobacterium P. subcapitatum has been cultivated in ASN-III medium. [Ca2+] fluctuations were monitored with Ca(2+) probe. Na(+) concentrations were determined by the initial solution chemistry. It was found that the balance between CaCO3 dissolution and precipitation induced by P. subcapitatum grown in neutral ASN III medium is very close to zero. No CaCO3 precipitation induced by cyanobacterial growth occurred. Growth of P. subcapitatum in alkaline ASN III medium, however, was accompanied by significant oscillations in free Ca(2+) concentration within a Na(+) concentration range of 50-400 mM. Calcium carbonate precipitation occurred during the log phase of P. subcapitatum growth while carbonate dissolution was typical for the stationary phase of P. subcapitatum growth. The highest CaCO3 deposition was observed in the range of Na(+) concentrations between 200-400 mM. Alkaline pH also induced the clamping of P. subcapitatum filaments, which appeared to have a strong affinity to envelop particles of chemically deposited CaCO3 followed by enlargement of those particles size. EDS analysis revealed the presence of Mg-rich carbonate (or magnesium calcite) in the solution containing 10-100 mM Na(+); calcite in the solution containing 200 mM Na(+); and aragonite in the solution containing with 400 mM Na(+). Typical present-day seawater contains xxmM Na(+). Early (Archean) seawater was

  2. Deposition and characterization of carbon nanotubes (CNTS) based films for sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayake, Amila C.

    The advent of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has opened up lot of novel applications because of their unique electrical and mechanical properties. CNTs are well known material for its exceptional electrical, mechanical, optical, thermal and chemical properties. A single-wall nanotube (SWNT) can be either semiconducting, metallic or semi-metallic, based on its chirality and diameter. SWNTs can be used in transistor device as active channels due to high electron mobility (~10000 cm2/(V s), electrical interconnects, nano-scale circuits, field-emission displays, light-emitting devices and thermal heat sinks due to low resistivity, high current density (~109A cm-2 ) and high thermal conductivity (~3500 W m-1). Further, their high Young's modulus and fracture stress is suitable for various sensing applications such as strain/pressure and use in chemical/biological sensors. This work mainly involves the deposition of CNT-based films following two different methods via a conventional microwave chemical vapor deposition (MWCVD) and spinning CNT-composites, and explored the possibility of using CNT-based films in strain gauge applications. Deposited films are characterized and analyzed for their structure, microstructure, composition and electrical properties. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), X-ray Reflectivity (XRR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and electrical impedance measurement techniques are used to characterize the films prepared by both the above mentioned methods. The synthesis/deposition process is improved based on the observed films properties. A carbon nanotube forest grown on the Si (100) substrate with Ni as a catalyst using CVD system shows an amorphous nature due to loss of catalytic activity of Ni nano-islands. XPS and RBS data show Ni nano-particles diffused into the Si substrate and surface layer of Ni particles turns out to nickel silicide. The

  3. Carbon dioxide stripping in aquaculture -- part III: model verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colt, John; Watten, Barnaby; Pfeiffer, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Based on conventional mass transfer models developed for oxygen, the use of the non-linear ASCE method, 2-point method, and one parameter linear-regression method were evaluated for carbon dioxide stripping data. For values of KLaCO2 < approximately 1.5/h, the 2-point or ASCE method are a good fit to experimental data, but the fit breaks down at higher values of KLaCO2. How to correct KLaCO2 for gas phase enrichment remains to be determined. The one-parameter linear regression model was used to vary the C*CO2 over the test, but it did not result in a better fit to the experimental data when compared to the ASCE or fixed C*CO2 assumptions.

  4. Bacterial adherence on fluorinated carbon based coatings deposited on polyethylene surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terriza, A; Del Prado, G; Perez, A Ortiz; Martinez, M J; Puertolas, J A; Manso, D Molina; Gonzalez-Elipe, A R; Yubero, F; Barrena, E Gomez; Esteban, J, E-mail: antonia.terriza@icmse.csic.es

    2010-11-01

    Development of intrinsically antibacterial surfaces is of key importance in the context of prostheses used in orthopaedic surgery. In this work we present a thorough study of several plasma based coatings that may be used with this functionality: diamond like carbon (DLC), fluorine doped DLC (F-DLC) and a high fluorine content carbon-fluor polymer (CF{sub X}). The study correlates the surface chemistry and hydrophobicity of the coating surfaces with their antibacterial performance. The coatings were deposited by RF-plasma assisted deposition at room temperature on ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) samples. Fluorine content and relative amount of C-C and C-F bond types was monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and hydrophobicity by water contact angle measurements. Adherence of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis to non-coated and coated UHMWPE samples was evaluated. Comparisons of the adherence performance were evaluated using a paired t test (two materials) and a Kruskall Wallis test (all the materials). S. aureus was statistically significant (p< 0.001) less adherent to DLC and F-DLC surfaces than S. epidermidis. Both bacteria showed reduction of adherence on DLC/UHMWPE. For S. aureus, reduction of bacterial adherence on F-DLC/UHMWPE was statistically significant respect to all other materials.

  5. Growth characteristics of graphene synthesized via chemical vapor deposition using carbon tetrabromide precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Carbon tetrabromide (CBr4) precursor and Cu foil can be used for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of graphene. • High yield and controllable growth are possible via CVD used with a CBr4 precursor. • CBr4 precursor is a new alternative for use in the mass production of graphene. • Low bond dissociation energy of CBr4 allows lower temperature growth (800 °C) of high-quality graphene film, compared to that (1000 °C) of methane used CVD. - Abstract: A carbon tetrabromide (CBr4) precursor was employed for the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of graphene, and the graphene growth characteristics as functions of the following key factors were then investigated: growth time, growth temperature, and the partial pressure of the precursor. The graphene was transferred onto a SiO2/Si substrate and characterized using transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the electrical properties were measured through the fabrication of field-effect transistors. Our results show that high yield and controllable growth are possible via CVD used with a CBr4 precursor. Thus, CBr4 precursor is a new alternative candidate for use in the mass production of graphene

  6. RIR MAPLE procedure for deposition of carbon rich Si/C/H films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We applied the resonant infrared matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (RIR MAPLE) technique to demonstrate a new approach to a controlled deposition of carbon rich amorphous Si/C/H film. In absence of radicals and accelerated species commonly generated in PECVD and sputtering setups, the RIR MAPLE method does not decompose precursor molecules. Moreover, unlike the standard MAPLE procedure, in which solvent molecules absorb laser energy from excimer or near infrared lasers, we applied the pulsed TEA CO2 laser to excite the dendrimer precursor molecules in a frozen target. In this manner we achieved just cross-linking of the starting precursor on substrates and the deposition of carbon rich Si/C/H film. The film was analyzed by Fourier Transformed Infrared (FTIR), UV/VIS, Raman and X-ray Photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) technique. According to analyses the film retained the precursor elemental composition free of graphitic (sp2) clusters. In course of reaction only the peripheral allyl groups containing C=C bonds were opened to achieve cross-linking. Whereas annealing to 300 °C was necessary for the elimination of =C–H1, 2 bonds in the films prepared at 200 °C, those bonds vanished completely for the films prepared at substrate temperature 255 °C. The film posseses a smooth surface with root mean square (RMS) parameter up to 10 nm within scanned distance 2.5 μm.

  7. Growth characteristics of graphene synthesized via chemical vapor deposition using carbon tetrabromide precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Taejin; Jung, Hanearl; Lee, Chang Wan [Nanodevice Laboratory, School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Yonsei University, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Mun, Ki-Yeung; Kim, Soo-Hyun [Nano-Devices and Process Laboratory, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yeungnam University, Dae-Dong, Gyeongsan-Si 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jusang [Nanodevice Laboratory, School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Yonsei University, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyungjun, E-mail: hyungjun@yonsei.ac.kr [Nanodevice Laboratory, School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Yonsei University, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Carbon tetrabromide (CBr{sub 4}) precursor and Cu foil can be used for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of graphene. • High yield and controllable growth are possible via CVD used with a CBr{sub 4} precursor. • CBr{sub 4} precursor is a new alternative for use in the mass production of graphene. • Low bond dissociation energy of CBr{sub 4} allows lower temperature growth (800 °C) of high-quality graphene film, compared to that (1000 °C) of methane used CVD. - Abstract: A carbon tetrabromide (CBr{sub 4}) precursor was employed for the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of graphene, and the graphene growth characteristics as functions of the following key factors were then investigated: growth time, growth temperature, and the partial pressure of the precursor. The graphene was transferred onto a SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate and characterized using transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the electrical properties were measured through the fabrication of field-effect transistors. Our results show that high yield and controllable growth are possible via CVD used with a CBr{sub 4} precursor. Thus, CBr{sub 4} precursor is a new alternative candidate for use in the mass production of graphene.

  8. FROM ZERO-DIMENSIONAL TO 2-DIMENSIONAL CARBON NANOMATERIALS - part II: GRAPHENE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălin IANCU

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available As was presented in the first part of this review paper, lately, many theoretical and experimental studies have been carried out to develop one of the most interesting aspects of the science and nanotechnology which is called carbon-related nanomaterials. In this review paper are presented some of the most exciting and important developments in the synthesis, properties, and applications of low-dimensional carbon nanomaterials. In this part of the paper are presented the synthesis techniques used to produce the two-dimensional carbon nanomaterials (including graphene, and also the most important properties and potential applications of graphene.

  9. Oil spill sorption using carbonized pith bagasse. Part 1. Preparation and characterization of carbonized pith bagasse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment of oil spills remains a challenge to environmental scientists and technologists. Among all the existing techniques used for oil treatment, sorption is a popular technique because it is cheap, simple and effective. Among the various sorbents used pith bagasse appears to be the most attractive material in terms of cost, versatility and abundance. In the present work, the efficiency of surface modification of pith bagasse by carbonization is demonstrated. Pith bagasse was carbonized in a stainless steel tube for different temperatures ranging from 200 to 600C and for different heating periods from 1 to 3 h. The carbonized pith bagasse was tested using gas oil; 1- and 7-day weathered heavy Arabian crude oil. It was found that carbonization of pith bagasse improves the oleophilic and hydrophobic properties. The best carbonization conditions were established at 300 C for 2 h. (author)

  10. Effect of photochemically oxidized carbon nanotubes on the deposition of platinum nanoparticles for fuel cell catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, In Young; Lee, Sun Hyung; Park, Ki Chul; Wongwiriyapan, Winadda; Teshima, Katsuya [Faculty of Engineering, Shinshu University, 4-17-1 Wakasato, Nagano 380-8553 (Japan); Kim, Chan [Department of Oral Biochemistry, Collage of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea); Oishi, Shuji; Endo, Morinobu [Faculty of Engineering, Shinshu University, 4-17-1 Wakasato, Nagano 380-8553 (Japan); Institute of Carbon Science and Technology, Shinshu University, 4-17-1 Wakasato, Nagano 380-8553 (Japan); Kim, Yong Jung [Institute of Carbon Science and Technology, Shinshu University, 4-17-1 Wakasato, Nagano 380-8553 (Japan)

    2009-07-15

    The applicability of photochemically oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to support materials for fuel cell catalysts has been examined in comparison with the MWCNTs treated and untreated by nitric acid. The photochemical oxidation of MWCNTs under vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, {lambda} = 172 nm) irradiation introduces oxygen functional groups onto the surface of the nanotubes with generating new defects on their structure. The VUV-induced photochemical oxidation more preferentially introduces carbonyl and carboxyl groups, compared with nitric acid oxidation. The deposition manner of platinum (Pt) nanoparticles from their precursor ions (PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}) is positively correlated with the proportion of surface oxygen groups. This implies that the anchoring sites for the PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2-} are not the {pi} electron regions of the basal plane but the surface oxygen groups. For the electrochemical evaluation of Pt-deposited MWCNT catalysts, the photochemically oxidized MWCNTs have enhanced the active surface area and the performance of methanol oxidation, which is due to the high dispersion and dense deposition of Pt nanoparticles on the oxygen groups-rich surface. (author)

  11. Diamondlike carbon deposition on plastic films by plasma source ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, T; Shinohara, M; Takagi, T

    2002-01-01

    Application of pulsed high negative voltage (approx 10 mu s pulse width, 300-900 pulses per second) to a substrate is found to induce discharge, thereby increasing ion current with an inductively coupled plasma source. This plasma source ion beam implantation (PSII) technique is investigated for the pretreatment and deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin layer on polyethylene terepthalate (PET) film. Pretreatment of PET with N sub 2 and Ar plasma is expected to provide added barrier effects when coupled with DLC deposition, with possible application to fabrication of PET beverage bottles. PSII treatment using N sub 2 and Ar in separate stages is found to change the color of the PET film, effectively increasing near-ultraviolet absorption. The effects of this pretreatment on the chemical bonding of C, H, and O are examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). DLC thin film was successfully deposited on the PET film. The surface of the DLC thin layer is observed to be smooth by scanning electron mic...

  12. An overview of black carbon deposition in High Asia glaciers and its impacts on radiation balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Jing; Xiao, Cunde; Du, Zhencai; Yang, Xingguo

    2013-05-01

    Since 2000, 18 High Asia glaciers have been surveyed for black carbon (BC) deposition 22 times, and numerous snow samples and ice cores have been collected by researchers. However, most of the results were interpreted individually in papers. Here, we assemble the data and discuss the distribution of BC deposition and its impacts on the melting of the glaciers through radiative forcing. We find that BC distribution on the surfaces of High Asia glaciers primarily depends upon their elevations (i.e., higher sites have lower concentrations) and then upon regional BC emissions and surface melting conditions. BC concentrations in High Asia glaciers are similar to the Arctic and western American mountains but are significantly less than heavy industrialized areas such as northern China. Although Himalayan glaciers, which are important due to their water resources, are directly facing the strong emissions from South Asia, their mean BC is the lowest due to high elevations. A new finding indicated by ice core records suggested that great valleys in the eastern Himalayan section are effective pathways for BC entering the Tibetan Plateau and make increasing BC trends in the local glaciers. On average, BC deposition causes a mean forcing of ˜6 W m-2 (roughly estimated 5% of the total forcing) in High Asia glaciers and therefore may not be a major factor impacting the melting of most glaciers.

  13. Electrodeposition of Cu-Pd alloys onto electrophoretic deposited carbon nanotubes for nitrate electroreduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copper-palladium (Cu-Pd) alloys have been electrodeposited onto carbon nanotubes, which were uniformly and stably deposited on Ti plates via electrophoretic deposition. Electrodes with a wide range of Cu/Pd atomic ratios were fabricated by potentiostatic coelectrodeposition of Cu and Pd onto Ti/CNTs. They were characterized by energy-dispersive X-ray analyzer, X-ray diffraction and tested for nitrate electroreduction. The electrode deposited in bath with 5 mM Cu2+ and 5 mM Pd2+ (Ti/CNTs/Cu5-Pd5) possessed outstanding stability as well as the highest electrocatalytic activity with the best nitrate conversion yield and proper N2 selectivity, indicating a synergistic effect of Cu and Pd. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy analysis of Ti/CNTs/Cu5-Pd5 and Ti/Cu5-Pd5 revealed that CNTs played a remarkable role in the homogeneous formation of the bimetal, significantly improving the alloy's electrocatalytic activity and stability. The fabricated Ti/CNTs/Cu5-Pd5 was proved to be a promising electrode for nitrate electroreduction.

  14. Carbon monoxide: silent killer and expert imitator (Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Petrolini

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide is still the most common unintentional poisoning in the Western Countries, and it may often produce potentially serious or lethal acute and delayed clinical manifestations. The considerable variety of symptoms of presentation is the principal reason of the non infrequent diagnostic errors at admission. In emergency medicine it is essential to consider this diagnosis every time a patient is found in state of unconsciousness in an environment with possible exposure to CO, as well as in patients presenting with non-specific syndromes. The prompt identification of the intoxication is essential in order to plan a correct therapy at the proper time, and for prevention of risks of a late neurologic syndrome. Nowadays the diagnosis may be performed through determination of COHb in a fast and non-invasive way, both outside and inside hospitals, thanks to a new generation of specific pulsoxymetrers. After confirmation the patient has to be classified with a grading score for severity depending on clinical presentation, that may be useful also for the choice between normobaric or hyperbaric oxygen treatments. Eventually, it is essential to plan the follow up for the patient during the months following the acute event.

  15. Gradient titanium and silver based carbon coatings deposited on AISI316L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batory, Damian; Reczulska, Malgorzata Czerniak-; Kolodziejczyk, Lukasz; Szymanski, Witold

    2013-06-01

    The constantly growing market for medical implants and devices caused mainly due to a lack of proper attention attached to the physical condition as well as extreme sports and increased elderly population creates the need of new biocompatible biomaterials with controlled bioactivity and certain useful properties. According to many literature reports, regarding the modifications of variety of different biomaterials using the surface engineering techniques and their biological and physicochemical examination results, the most promising material for great spectra of medical applications seem to be carbon layers. Another issue is the interaction between the implant material and surrounding tissue. In particular cases this interface area is directly exposed to air. Abovementioned concern occurs mainly in case of the external fixations, thus they are more vulnerable to infection. Therefore a crucial role has the inhibition of bacterial adhesion that may prevent implant-associated infections, occurrence of other numerous complications and in particular cases rejection of the implant. For this reason additional features of carbon coatings like antibacterial properties seem to be desired and justified. Silver doped diamond-like carbon coatings with different Ag concentrations were prepared by hybrid RF PACVD/MS (Radio Frequency Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition/Magnetron Sputtering) deposition technique. Physicochemical parameters like chemical composition, morphology and surface topography, hardness and adhesion were determined. Examined layers showed a uniform distribution of silver in the amorphous DLC matrix, high value of H/E ratio, good adhesion and beneficial topography which make them a perfect material for medical applications e.g. modification of implants for the external fixations.

  16. Surface modification of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes by ozone via atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of ozone as an oxidizing agent for atomic layer deposition (ALD) processes is rapidly growing due to its strong oxidizing capabilities. However, the effect of ozone on nanostructured substrates such as nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) and pristine multiwalled carbon nanotubes (PCNTs) are not very well understood and may provide an avenue toward functionalizing the carbon nanotube surface prior to deposition. The effects of ALD ozone treatment on NCNTs and PCNTs using 10 wt. % ozone at temperatures of 150, 250, and 300 °C are studied. The effect of ozone pulse time and ALD cycle number on NCNTs and PCNTs was also investigated. Morphological changes to the substrate were observed by scanning electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurements were also conducted to determine surface area, pore size, and pore size distribution following ozone treatment. The graphitic nature of both NCNTs and PCNTs was determined using Raman analysis while x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to probe the chemical nature of NCNTs. It was found that O3 attack occurs preferentially to the outermost geometric surface of NCNTs. Our research also revealed that the deleterious effects of ozone are found only on NCNTs while little or no damage occurs on PCNTs. Furthermore, XPS analysis indicated that ALD ozone treatment on NCNTs, at elevated temperatures, results in loss of nitrogen content. Our studies demonstrate that ALD ozone treatment is an effective avenue toward creating low nitrogen content, defect rich substrates for use in electrochemical applications and ALD of various metal/metal oxides

  17. Mechanical and tribological properties of amorphous carbon films deposited on implanted steel substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen-free amorphous carbon (a-C) films were deposited using unbalanced magnetron sputtering technique from graphite targets on AISI 440C steel substrates implanted with (1) carbon (C), (2) titanium (Ti), and (3) titanium followed by carbon (Ti+C), respectively. After deposition, the adhesion strength of the films was examined by scratch test and Rockwell-C indentation test. The tribological performance of the films was evaluated by a typical ball-on-disk tribometer and a reciprocating wear tester. A dynamic impact tester was also carried out to study the fatigue strength of the films. In order to study the effect of the pre-treatment of steel substrates by means of ion implantation on the actual performance of a-C films, the implanted substrates were investigated by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and nano-indentation, from which the composition depth profile as well as the hardness (H) and elastic modulus (E) depth profiles could be accurately obtained. As a result, due to higher contents of carbide bonds appeared at the outmost surface of the C and Ti+C implanted substrates, a critical load over 65 N was obtained, indicating good scratch resistance of the films. The combination of high interfacial strength and high plastic deformation resistance (H3/E2) of the Ti+C implanted substrates led to a higher load-carrying capacity and longer duration lifetime in the sliding wear test. In the dynamic impact test, the good adhesion strength and high toughness of C and Ti+C implanted substrates improved the impact resistance of the films

  18. Budgets of soil erosion and deposition for sediments and sedimentary organic carbon across the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S.V.; Renwick, W.H.; Buddemeier, R.W.; Crossland, C.J.

    2001-01-01

    The fate of soil organic matter during erosion and sedimentation has been difficult to assess because of the large size and complex turnover characteristics of the soil carbon reservoir. It has been assumed that most of the carbon released during erosion is lost to oxidation. Budgets of bulk soil and soil organic carbon erosion and deposition suggest that the primary fates of eroded soil carbon across the conterminous United States are trapping in impoundments and other redeposition. The total amount of soil carbon eroded and redeposited across the United States is ???0.04 Gt yr-1. Applying this revision to the U. S. carbon budget by Houghton et al. [1999] raises their net sequestration estimate by 20-47 %. If comparable rates of erosion and redeposition occur globally, net carbon sequestration would be ???1 Gt yr-1.

  19. DEMONSTRATION OF A LIQUID CARBON DIOXIDE PROCESS FOR CLEANING METAL PARTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of a demonstration of liquid carbon dioxide (LCO2) as an alternative to chlorinated solvents for cleaning metal parts. It describes the LCO2 process, the parts tested, the contaminants removed, and results from preliminary laboratory testing and on-site d...

  20. Fabrication of metal-coated carbon nanowalls synthesized by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangjoon; Choi, Won Seok; Yoo, Jinsu; Lim, Dong-Gun; Kim, Hyung Jin; Lee, Hyeoung-Jae; Hong, Byungyou

    2014-12-01

    In this study, the coating of synthesized carbon nanowalls (CNWs) with various metal layers (Ni, Cu, and W) was investigated. CNWs were synthesized by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) with a methane (CH4) and hydrogen (H2) gas mixture on a p-type Si wafer, and then coated with metal films (Ni, Cu, and W) using an RF magnetron sputtering system with four-inch targets. Different sputtering times (5, 10, 20, and 30 min) were established to obtain different thicknesses of the metal layers with which the CNWs were coated. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) was used to examine the cross-sectional and planar conditions of the CNWs, and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was used to analyze the CNW elements. The FE-SEM analysis of the cross-sectional and planar images confirmed that the metal layers were synthesized to a depth of 0.5 μm from the surfaces of the CNWs, and to a greater depth at the ends of the CNWs, irrespective of the deposition time and the metal species. The resistivity of the as-deposited CNWs appeared as 4.18 x 10(-3) Ω cm; that of the metal-coated CNWs was slightly lower; and that of the Ni-coated CNWs was the lowest (1.74 x 10(-3) Ω cm). The mobility of the metal-coated CNWs was almost unchanged, and that of the as-deposited CNWs was 1.23 x 10(3) cm2 V(-1) s(-1). PMID:25971035

  1. Electrochemical study of calcium carbonate deposition on iron. Effect of the anion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakitin, A.R. [PermNIPIneft LLC, ul. Sovetskoy Armii 29, Perm 614066 (Russian Federation); Kichigin, V.I. [Natural Sciences Institute, Perm State University, ul. Bukireva 15, Perm 614990 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: kichigin@psu.ru

    2009-03-30

    Deposition of calcium carbonate on iron from supersaturated solutions containing 1 M sodium chloride, bromide, iodide, or nitrate as supporting electrolyte was studied at 60 deg. C under open-circuit conditions using impedance spectroscopy, chronopotentiometry, voltammetry, and scanning electron microscopy. The anions were found to fall into two groups with respect to their effect on scaling. On the one hand, chloride and, especially, nitrate favor faster scaling kinetics and lead to compact carbonate films composed of entangled aragonite crystals. On the other hand, in the presence of bromide and iodide the scaling rate is lower and the resulting films feature aragonite crystals more or less freely scattered on what appears to be a uniform sublayer of unknown structure. The experimental data are adequately described using quasi-uniform film model accounting for the cathodic and anodic electrode reactions. As deduced from the electrochemical measurements, the barrier properties of the carbonate films formed in different supporting electrolytes increase in the order of Cl{sup -} < NO{sub 3}{sup -} {approx} Br{sup -} < I{sup -}.

  2. Electrochemical study of calcium carbonate deposition on iron. Effect of the anion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deposition of calcium carbonate on iron from supersaturated solutions containing 1 M sodium chloride, bromide, iodide, or nitrate as supporting electrolyte was studied at 60 deg. C under open-circuit conditions using impedance spectroscopy, chronopotentiometry, voltammetry, and scanning electron microscopy. The anions were found to fall into two groups with respect to their effect on scaling. On the one hand, chloride and, especially, nitrate favor faster scaling kinetics and lead to compact carbonate films composed of entangled aragonite crystals. On the other hand, in the presence of bromide and iodide the scaling rate is lower and the resulting films feature aragonite crystals more or less freely scattered on what appears to be a uniform sublayer of unknown structure. The experimental data are adequately described using quasi-uniform film model accounting for the cathodic and anodic electrode reactions. As deduced from the electrochemical measurements, the barrier properties of the carbonate films formed in different supporting electrolytes increase in the order of Cl- 3- ∼ Br- -

  3. Electroless deposition of conformal nanoscale iron oxide on carbon nanoarchitectures for electrochemical charge storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassin, Megan B; Mansour, Azzam N; Pettigrew, Katherine A; Rolison, Debra R; Long, Jeffrey W

    2010-08-24

    We describe a simple self-limiting electroless deposition process whereby conformal, nanoscale iron oxide (FeO(x)) coatings are generated at the interior and exterior surfaces of macroscopically thick ( approximately 90 microm) carbon nanofoam paper substrates via redox reaction with aqueous K(2)FeO(4). The resulting FeO(x)-carbon nanofoams are characterized as device-ready electrode structures for aqueous electrochemical capacitors and they demonstrate a 3-to-7 fold increase in charge-storage capacity relative to the native carbon nanofoam when cycled in a mild aqueous electrolyte (2.5 M Li(2)SO(4)), yielding mass-, volume-, and footprint-normalized capacitances of 84 F g(-1), 121 F cm(-3), and 0.85 F cm(-2), respectively, even at modest FeO(x) loadings (27 wt %). The additional charge-storage capacity arises from faradaic pseudocapacitance of the FeO(x) coating, delivering specific capacitance >300 F g(-1) normalized to the content of FeO(x) as FeOOH, as verified by electrochemical measurements and in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The additional capacitance is electrochemically addressable within tens of seconds, a time scale of relevance for high-rate electrochemical charge storage. We also demonstrate that the addition of borate to buffer the Li(2)SO(4) electrolyte effectively suppresses the electrochemical dissolution of the FeO(x) coating, resulting in <20% capacitance fade over 1000 consecutive cycles. PMID:20731433

  4. Natural reducing agents for electroless nanoparticle deposition: Mild synthesis of metal/carbon nanostructured microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composite materials are of interest because they can potentially combine the properties of their respective components in a manner that is useful for specific applications. Here, we report on the use of coffee as a low-cost, green reductant for the room temperature formation of catalytically active, supported metal nanoparticles. Specifically, we have leveraged the reduction potential of coffee in order to grow Pd and Ag nanoparticles at the surface of porous carbon microspheres synthesized via ultraspray pyrolysis. The metal nanoparticle-on-carbon microsphere composites were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). To demonstrate the catalytic activity of Pd/C and Ag/C materials, Suzuki coupling reactions and nitroaromatic reduction reactions were employed, respectively. - Highlights: • Natural reductants were used as green electroless deposition reagents. • Room temperature synthesis of supported Ag and Pd nanoparticles was achieved. • Carbon porous microspheres were used as supports. • Synthesis via natural reductants yielded catalytically active nanoparticles.

  5. Natural reducing agents for electroless nanoparticle deposition: Mild synthesis of metal/carbon nanostructured microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffy, Paul [School of Chemistry, University of Dublin Trinity College, College Green, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Reynolds, Lyndsey A.; Sanders, Stephanie E. [Department of Chemistry, Albion College, 611 E. Porter St., Albion, MI 49224 (United States); Metz, Kevin M., E-mail: kmetz@albion.edu [Department of Chemistry, Albion College, 611 E. Porter St., Albion, MI 49224 (United States); Colavita, Paula E., E-mail: colavitp@tcd.ie [School of Chemistry, University of Dublin Trinity College, College Green, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2013-06-15

    Composite materials are of interest because they can potentially combine the properties of their respective components in a manner that is useful for specific applications. Here, we report on the use of coffee as a low-cost, green reductant for the room temperature formation of catalytically active, supported metal nanoparticles. Specifically, we have leveraged the reduction potential of coffee in order to grow Pd and Ag nanoparticles at the surface of porous carbon microspheres synthesized via ultraspray pyrolysis. The metal nanoparticle-on-carbon microsphere composites were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). To demonstrate the catalytic activity of Pd/C and Ag/C materials, Suzuki coupling reactions and nitroaromatic reduction reactions were employed, respectively. - Highlights: • Natural reductants were used as green electroless deposition reagents. • Room temperature synthesis of supported Ag and Pd nanoparticles was achieved. • Carbon porous microspheres were used as supports. • Synthesis via natural reductants yielded catalytically active nanoparticles.

  6. Synthesis of acid-functionalized composite via surface deposition of acid-containing amorphous carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Bin; Zhang, Xuan; Lou, Lan-Lan; Dong, Yanling; Liu, Gaixia; Liu, Shuangxi

    2012-07-01

    A synthetic procedure, including two steps: a hydrothermal treatment using H2SO4 solution and a thermal treatment with concentrated H2SO4 in Teflon-lined stainless autoclaves was developed to synthesize acid-functionalized composite. In this process, the carbonization of glucose which contributed to the formation of carbon species with acid functional groups occurred on the silica surface. The resultant composite, investigated by powder XRD, low temperature N2 sorption and TEM, possessed well-defined mesostructure. And it was determined by XPS that amorphous carbon was deposited at the silica surface of SBA-15. The presence of multi-functional groups in the composite was confirmed by FT-IR results. Furthermore, carboxylic and sulfonic groups could be incorporated into the composite material via the covalent bond. The composite was employed as the catalyst for the acetalization of carbonyl compounds. It was suggested that acid sites were well dispersed, which was responsible for the good performance in the catalytic test. According to these facts, a synthesis route for mesostructured composite with acid functional groups has been proposed.

  7. Chemical vapor deposition synthesis of carbon nanospheres over Fe-based glassy alloy particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A mass of carbon nanospheres have been synthesized. • The Fe76Si9B10P5 particles were employed as both the catalyst and support. • Carbon nanospheres with amorphous walls have uniform size distribution (50–150 nm). - Abstract: A mass of carbon nanospheres (CNSs) have been synthesized by chemical vapor deposition of C2H2 directly over Fe-based glassy alloy particles (Fe76Si9B10P5) without the addition of an external catalyst. The morphology and microstructure as well as the growth mechanism of the CNSs have been investigated by using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that the obtained products consist of hollow CNSs and CNSs with Fe nanoparticles encapsulated. The CNSs with amorphous walls have high purity (>95%) and uniform size distribution (50–150 nm). The possible formation and growth mechanism of the CNSs were discussed on the basis of the investigation on their initial growth stages

  8. Influence of thin film nickel pretreatment on catalytic thermal chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanofibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel and other metal nanoparticles are known to be active as catalysts in the synthesis of carbon nanofibers. In this paper we investigate how dewetting and break-up of nickel thin films depends on film thickness, film–substrate interaction and pretreatment conditions. This is evaluated for films evaporated on oxidized silicon and fused silica substrates with or without tantalum coating, which were subsequently exposed to different pretreatment atmospheres (vacuum, nitrogen, air and hydrogen; 1 h, 650 °C). Atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis were used to characterize the films. Pretreated Ni films were subjected to a thermal catalytic chemical vapor deposition procedure with brief ethylene exposures (0.5–3 min, 635 °C). It was found that only on the spherical nanoparticles originating from a hydrogen pretreatment of a Ni film with Ta adhesion layer, homogeneously distributed, randomly-oriented, well-attached, and semi-crystalline carbon nanofibers be synthesized. - Highlights: • On the formation of nanoparticles required for carbon nanofiber (CNF) synthesis • Various evaporated thin films on oxidized silicon and fused silica: Ni and Ni/Ta • Pretreatment of nickel-based thin films in vacuum, nitrogen, air and hydrogen • Only on reduced Ni/Ta fast – within 3 min – initiation of CNF nucleation and growth

  9. Multi scale study of carbon deposits collected in Tore-Supra and TEXTOR tokamaks; Etude multi echelle des depots carbones collectes dans les tokamaks Tore Supra et TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richou, M

    2007-06-15

    Tokamaks are devices aimed at studying magnetic fusion. They operate with high temperature plasmas containing hydrogen, deuterium or tritium. One of the major issue is to control the plasma-wall interaction. The plasma facing components are most often in carbon. The major drawback of carbon is the existence of carbon deposits and dust, due to erosion. Dust is potentially reactive in case of an accidental opening of the device. These deposits also contain H, D or T and induce major safety problems when tritium is used, which will be the case in ITER. Therefore, the understanding of the deposit formation and structure has become a main issue for fusion researches. To clarify the role of the deposits in the retention phenomenon, we have done different complementary characterizations for deposits collected on similar places (neutralizers) in tokamaks Tore Supra (France) and TEXTOR (Germany). Accessible microporous volume and pore size distribution of deposits has been determined with the analysis of nitrogen and methane adsorption isotherms using the BET, Dubinin-Radushkevich and {alpha}{sub s} methods and the Density Functional Theory (DFT). To understand growth mechanisms, we have studied the deposit structure and morphology. We have shown using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Raman micro-spectrometry that these deposits are non amorphous and disordered. We have also shown the presence of nano-particles (diameter between 4 and 70 nm) which are similar to carbon blacks: nano-particle growth occurs in homogeneous phase in the edge plasma. We have emphasised a dual growth process: a homogenous and a heterogeneous one. (author)

  10. Atomic layer deposition of Co3O4 on carbon nanotubes/carbon cloth for high-capacitance and ultrastable supercapacitor electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Co3O4 nanolayers have been successfully deposited on a flexible carbon nanotubes/carbon cloth (CC) substrate by atomic layer deposition. Much improved capacitance and ultra-long cycling life are achieved when the CNTs@Co3O4/CC is tested as a supercapacitor electrode. The improvement can be from the mechanically robust CC/CNTs substrate, the uniform coated high capacitance materials of Co3O4 nanoparticles, and the unique hierarchical structure. The flexible electrode of CNTs@Co3O4/CC with high areal capacitance and excellent cycling ability promises great potential for developing high-performance flexible supercapacitors. (paper)

  11. Studies of diamond-like carbon and diamond-like carbon polymer hybrid coatings deposited with filtered pulsed arc discharge method for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Soininen, Antti

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen free diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings have been the subject of investigation all around the world for the last 30 years. One of the major problems in producing of thick high-quality DLC coatings has been the inadequate adhesion of the deposited film to the substrate. This obstacle is finally overcome by depositing an intermediate adhesion layer produced with high energy (>2 keV) carbon plasma before application of a high-quality coating produced with a low energy unit. To the best ...

  12. Oxygen vacancy induced carbon deposition at the triple phase boundary of the nickel/yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanxing; Fu, Zhaoming; Wang, Mingyang; Yang, Zongxian

    2014-09-01

    The carbon deposition at the Triple Phase Boundary (TPB) of the Nickel/Yttrium-Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) interface is studied using the first-principles method based on density functional theory, with consideration of the interface oxygen vacancy. It is found that the CH fragment (the most stable dissociation products of CH4 on Ni catalyst) can easily diffuse and be trapped at the O vacancy. The trapped CH can dissociate to C and H with a much lower dissociation barrier (0.74 eV) as compared with that (1.39 eV) on the pure Ni (111) surface. Therefore, we propose that the carbon deposition may form easily at the interface oxygen vacancy of TPB as compared with that on the pure Ni (111) surface, which offers new understanding on the carbon deposition of the Ni/YSZ anode of solid oxide fuel cell.

  13. Carbon deposition model for oxygen-hydrocarbon combustion. Task 6: Data analysis and formulation of an empirical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makel, Darby B.; Rosenberg, Sanders D.

    1990-01-01

    The formation and deposition of carbon (soot) was studied in the Carbon Deposition Model for Oxygen-Hydrocarbon Combustion Program. An empirical, 1-D model for predicting soot formation and deposition in LO2/hydrocarbon gas generators/preburners was derived. The experimental data required to anchor the model were identified and a test program to obtain the data was defined. In support of the model development, cold flow mixing experiments using a high injection density injector were performed. The purpose of this investigation was to advance the state-of-the-art in LO2/hydrocarbon gas generator design by developing a reliable engineering model of gas generator operation. The model was formulated to account for the influences of fluid dynamics, chemical kinetics, and gas generator hardware design on soot formation and deposition.

  14. The fate of eroded soil organic carbon along a European transect – controls after deposition in terrestrial and aquatic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkels, Frédérique; Cammeraat, Erik; Kalbitz, Karsten;

    The potential fate of eroded soil organic carbon (SOC) after deposition is key to understand carbon cycling in eroding landscapes. Globally, large quantities of sediments and SOC are redistributed by soil erosion on agricul-tural land, particularly after heavy precipitation events. Deposition of...... turnover of deposited C is significantly affected by soil and organic matter properties, and whether deposition occurs in terrestrial or aquatic environments. We sampled topsoils from 10 agricultural sites along a European transect, spanning a wide range of SOC and soil characteristics (e.g. texture...... fate of SOC such as amounts and composition of soil organic matter (SOM), distribution of SOC in density fractions and aggregates as well as soil physical and chemical properties. NMR analysis provided an in-depth characterization of SOM quality, showing large similarities in chemical composition among...

  15. Late Quaternary sea level and environmental changes from relic carbonate deposits of the western margin of India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Purnachandra Rao; G Rajagopalan; K H Vora; F Almeida

    2003-03-01

    Relic carbonate deposits along the western margin of India occur as dolomite crusts, aragonite sands (pelletal / oolitic) and aragonite-cemented limestones, oyster shells, corals, encrusted coralline algal and foraminiferal-dominated nodules. The petrology and mineralogy of the deposits indicate that except for aragonite sands and foraminiferal nodules, the others were formed in shallow marine conditions and serve as sea level indicators. Radiocarbon dates were measured for 62 relic deposits covering the entire margin. The age of these deposits on the continental shelf off Cape Comorin and Mangalore, between 110 and 18m depth, ranges between 12, 610 14C yr BP and 6,390 14C yr BP. On the northwestern margin of India, especially on the carbonate platform (between 64 and 100 m), the age ranges from 17,250 to 6,730 14C yr BP. The relic deposits of the Gulf of Kachchh at depths between 35 and 25m are dated at 12,550-9,630 14C yr BP. The age vs. depth plot of the relic deposits further indicates that the Gulf of Kachchh was inundated much early, atleast by 15 ka, after the Last Glacial Maximum, and was subjected to uplift and subsidence during the Holocene. The carbonate platform subsided during the early Holocene. Some of the relic deposits between Cape Comorin and Mangalore plot on or, closely follow the glacio-eustatic sea level curve. Despite abundant siliciclastic flux discharged by the Narmada and Tapti during the early Holocene, the platform off these rivers is largely devoid of this flux and carbonate sedimentation continued until 6,700 14C yr BP. We suggest that the river-derived ediment flux diverted southwards under the influence of the SW monsoon current and, thereby, increased the turbidity on the shelf and slope southeast of the carbonate platform and facilitated the formation of deeper water foraminiferal nodules off Vengurla-Goa.

  16. Synthesis of carbon-13 labelled carbonaceous deposits and their evaluation for potential use as surrogates to better understand the behaviour of the carbon-14-containing deposit present in irradiated PGA graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, L.; Walker, S.; Bond, G.; Eccles, H.; Heard, P. J.; Scott, T. B.; Williams, S. J.

    2016-03-01

    The present work has used microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition to generate suitable isotopically labelled carbonaceous deposits on the surface of Pile Grade A graphite for use as surrogates for studying the behaviour of the deposits observed on irradiated graphite extracted from UK Magnox reactors. These deposits have been shown elsewhere to contain an enhanced concentration of 14C compared to the bulk graphite. A combination of Raman spectroscopy, ion beam milling with scanning electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry were used to determine topography and internal morphology in the formed deposits. Direct comparison was made against deposits found on irradiated graphite samples trepanned from a Magnox reactor core and showed a good similarity in appearance. This work suggests that the microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition technique is of value in producing simulant carbon deposits, being of sufficiently representative morphology for use in non-radioactive surrogate studies of post-disposal behaviour of 14C-containing deposits on some irradiated Magnox reactor graphite.

  17. In situ deposition of Prussian blue on mesoporous carbon nanosphere for sensitive electrochemical immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Guosong; Zhang, Haili; Yu, Aimin; Ju, Huangxian

    2015-12-15

    A Prussian blue (PB) functionalized mesoporous carbon nanosphere (MCN) composite was prepared for loading signal antibody and high-content glucose oxidase (GOD) to obtain a new nanoprobe for sensitive electrochemical immunoassay. The MCN nanocarrier with an average diameter of 180 nm was synthesized by using mesoporous silica nanosphere as a hard template in combination with a hydrothermal carbonization method. This hydrophilic carbon nanomaterial provided an ideal platform for in situ deposition of high-content PB to form the MCN-PB nanocomposite. Based on the step-wise assembly of polyelectrolyte and gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) on the negative-charged nanocomposite, signal antibody and high-content GOD were loaded on this nanocarrier to obtain the nanoprobe. After a sandwich immunoreaction at an Au NPs-modified screen-printed carbon electrode based immunosensor, the nanoprobes were quantitatively captured on the electrode surface to produce sensitive electrochemical response with a PB-mediated GOD catalytic reaction for immunoassay. The high loading of PB and GOD on the nanoprobe greatly amplified the electrochemical signal, leading to the development of a new immunoassay method with high sensitivity. Using human immunoglobulin G as a model analyte, excellent analytical performance including a wide linear range from 0.01 to 100 ng/mL and a low detection limit down to 7.8 pg/mL was obtained. Additionally, the immunosensor showed high specificity, satisfactory stability and repeatability as well as acceptable reliability. The PB-mediated GOD electrochemical system well excluded the conventional interference from the dissolved oxygen. Thus this immunoassay method provides great potentials for practical applications. PMID:26201983

  18. Graphene coated with controllable N-doped carbon layer by molecular layer deposition as electrode materials for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao; Gao, Zhe; Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Shichao; Qin, Yong

    2016-05-01

    In this work, graphene is coated with nitrogen-doped carbon layer, which is produced by a carbonization process of aromatic polyimide (PI) films deposited on the surfaces of graphene by molecular layer deposition (MLD). The utilization of MLD not only allows uniform coating of PI layers on the surfaces of pristine graphene without any surface treatment, but also enables homogenous dispersion of doped nitrogen atoms in the carbonized products. The as-prepared N-doped carbon layer coated graphene (NC-G) exhibited remarkable capacitance performance as electrode materials for supercapacitor, showing a high specific capacitance of 290.2 F g-1 at current density of 1 A g-1 in 6 M KOH aqueous electrolyte, meanwhile maintaining good rate performance and stable cycle capability. The NC-G synthesized by this way represents an alternative promising candidate as electrode material for supercapacitors.

  19. Co-assembly of functional graphene and multiwall carbon nanotubes for supercapacitors by a vertical deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanhong; Cao, Xiaojian; Li, Zhenwei; Zhao, Dongmei

    2016-06-01

    Graphene and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are nanosized carbon materials with large specific surface areas, outstanding electrical conductivities, excellent mechanical properties, and other remarkable characteristics. Preparation of graphene oxide is by a redox method, followed by vertical deposition to prepare graphene oxide/carbon nanotube GO/CNT) composites. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to characterize the morphology and microstructure of the materials. Electrodes were made by deposition of graphene oxide/carbon nanotube composites on an indium tin oxide glass slide, and its electrical properties were characterized by cyclic voltammetry. The GO/CNT composites exhibit excellent energy and power densities and are ideal materials for the preparation of supercapacitor electrodes.

  20. Co-sputter deposited nickel-copper bimetallic nanoalloy embedded carbon films for electrocatalytic biomarker detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Shunsuke; Kato, Dai; Kamata, Tomoyuki; Niwa, Osamu

    2016-06-01

    -mannitol, which should be detected with a low detection limit in urine samples for the diagnosis of severe intestinal diseases. With a Ni/Cu ratio of around 64/36, the electrocatalytic current per metal area was 3.4 times larger than that of an alloy film electrode with a similar composition (~70/30). This improved electrocatalytic activity realized higher stability (n = 60, relative standard deviation (RSD): 4.6%) than the alloy film (RSD: 32.2%) as demonstrated by continuous measurements of d-mannitol. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The concept of UBM co-sputtering for fabricating nanoalloy embedded carbon films. HRTEM images of the NiNP and Ni32Cu68 nanoalloy embedded carbon films. The experimental conditions for sputter deposition, HRTEM, HAADF-STEM, STEM-EDS measurements and continuous flow injection analysis. XPS analysis of the nanoalloy embedded carbon film. Repeated CVs of both the nanoalloy embedded carbon film and the alloy film. Amperometric detection of d-mannitol in the presence of chloride ions. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02287a

  1. Deposition of calcium carbonate films by a polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gower, Laurie B.; Odom, Damian J.

    2000-03-01

    A polypeptide additive has been used to transform the solution crystallization of calcium carbonate to a solidification process of a liquid-phase mineral precursor. In situ observations reveal that polyaspartate induces liquid-liquid phase separation of droplets of a mineral precursor. The droplets deposit on the substrate and coalesce to form a coating, which then solidifies into calcitic tablets and films. Transition bars form during the amorphous to crystalline transition, leading to sectorization of calcite tablets, and the defect textures and crystal morphologies are atypical of solution grown crystals. The formation of nonequilibrium crystal morphologies using an acidic polypeptide may have implications in the field of biomineralization, and the environmentally friendly aspects of this polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process may offer new techniques for aqueous-based processing of ceramic films, coatings, and particulates.

  2. Characteristics of copper meshes coated with carbon nanotubes via electrophoretic deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bu-Jong; Park, Jong-Seol; Hwang, Young-Jin; Park, Jin-Seok

    2016-09-01

    This study demonstrates the characteristics of a hybrid-type transparent electrode for touch screen panels, which was fabricated by coating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) via electrophoretic deposition (EPD) on copper (Cu)-meshes. The surface morphologies, visible-range transmittance and reflectance, and chromatic properties, such as yellowness and redness, of the fabricated CNTs-coated Cu mesh electrodes were characterized as functions of their dimensions (line-to-line spacing, line width, and electrode thickness) and compared with those of the Cu-mesh electrodes without coating of CNTs. The experimental results showed that the coating of CNTs substantially reduced the reflectance of the Cu-mesh electrodes and also improved their chromatic properties with their transmittance and sheet resistance only slightly changed, subsequently indicating that the CNTs-coated Cu-mesh electrodes possessed desirable characteristics for touch screen panels.

  3. Diameter control and emission properties of carbon nanotubes grown using chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We grow multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) via thermal chemical vapor deposition from a sputtered 4-nm-thick nickel catalyst film on a tungsten-coated silicon substrate. CNTs grow from a mixture of nitrogen and acetylene gases at temperatures ranging from 630 to 790 deg. C, resulting in CNT outer diameters of 5-350 nm. CNT diameters increase exponentially with temperature. These results define regimes for template growth fabricated in catalytically active anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) with controlled pinhole sizes ranging from 10 to 50 nm. We measure a threshold electron emission field of 3 V/μm and a field enhancement factor β=5230 on randomly oriented 10-nm diameter CNTs

  4. Selective deposition of catalyst nanoparticles using the gravitational force for carbon nanotubes interconnect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Do-Yoon; Lee, Hyun-Chul; Lee, Jong-Hak; Park, Jae-Hong; Alegaonkar, Prashant S. [Center for Nanotubes and Nanostructured Composites, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Chunchun-dong, Jangan-Gu, Suwon, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Ji-Beom [Center for Nanotubes and Nanostructured Composites, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Chunchun-dong, Jangan-Gu, Suwon, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: jbyoo@skku.ac.kr; Han, In-Taek; Kim, Ha-Jin; Jin, Yong-Wan; Kim, Jong-Min [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Mt. 14-1, Nongseo-dong, Giheung-gu, Younggin-si Gyunggi-do, 449-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Kee-Won [Department of Semiconducting System, Sungkyunkwan University (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-01

    The photolithography process has generally been used for the making of catalyst layers used for the synthesis of CNTs due to its comparative ease. However, this method results in the formation of undesirable catalyst particles, which deteriorate the quality of the devices. Therefore, we tried to form a catalyst layer without using any lift-off or wet etching process, especially for the formation of carbon nanotube interconnects. After spin coating the samples, which were previously fabricated with several vias, with an iron-acetate solution, the catalyst layer was pulled down into the bottom of the holes through the force of gravity. We were able to remove the catalyst layer which was coated over undesirable areas, by TMAH (tetramethylammonium hydroxide, N(CH{sub 3}){sub 4}OH) treatment. After the catalyst deposition process, we synthesized CNTs and observed them by scanning electron microscopy (SEM)

  5. Selective deposition of catalyst nanoparticles using the gravitational force for carbon nanotubes interconnect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photolithography process has generally been used for the making of catalyst layers used for the synthesis of CNTs due to its comparative ease. However, this method results in the formation of undesirable catalyst particles, which deteriorate the quality of the devices. Therefore, we tried to form a catalyst layer without using any lift-off or wet etching process, especially for the formation of carbon nanotube interconnects. After spin coating the samples, which were previously fabricated with several vias, with an iron-acetate solution, the catalyst layer was pulled down into the bottom of the holes through the force of gravity. We were able to remove the catalyst layer which was coated over undesirable areas, by TMAH (tetramethylammonium hydroxide, N(CH3)4OH) treatment. After the catalyst deposition process, we synthesized CNTs and observed them by scanning electron microscopy (SEM)

  6. Cathodic arc deposition of nitrogen doped tetrahedral amorphous carbon for computer memories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Much interest has been shown in the use of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) deposited by filtered cathodic arc as an inexpensive, easily produced, wide band-gap semiconductor in the fabrication of electronic devices. Around the world much of this interest has been in its potential use as a low electron-affinity field emitter for flat-screen displays. Recent observations of a nonvolatile memory effect in nitrogen doped ta-C at the University of Sydney suggest that new possibilities may exist for its use as a means of non-volatile digital information storage. Devices with switching times of 100 μs, read times of 100 ns, and effective memory retention times of the order of months have been fabricated. Nonvolatile memory phenomena observed in the electrical characteristics of nitrogen doped ta-C thin films suggests such traps may be useful as a means of digital information storage

  7. Supercritical fluid deposition of vanadium oxide on multi-walled carbon nanotube buckypaper for supercapacitor electrode application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composite electrodes were fabricated for supercapacitor applications by depositing vanadium oxide onto multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) buckypaper using supercritical fluid deposition (SFD). The deposited thin vanadium oxide layer showed amorphous structure with excellent uniformity. In aqueous KCl electrolyte, the vanadium oxide exhibited a constant pseudo-capacitance of ∼ 1024 F g-1, which was independent of the oxide material loading (up to 6.92 wt%) and voltage scan rate (up to 100 mV s-1). The highest specific electrode capacitance achieved was ∼ 85 F g-1, which was almost four times that of the pristine buckypaper electrode.

  8. Hierarchical composite structures prepared by electrophoretic deposition of carbon nanotubes onto glass fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Rider, Andrew N; Thostenson, Erik T

    2013-03-01

    Carbon nanotube/glass fiber hierarchical composite structures have been produced using an electrophoretic deposition (EPD) approach for integrating the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into unidirectional E-glass fabric, followed by infusion of an epoxy polymer matrix. The resulting composites show a hierarchical structure, where the structural glass fibers, which have diameters in micrometer range, are coated with CNTs having diameters around 10-20 nm. The stable aqueous dispersions of CNTs were produced using a novel ozonolysis and ultrasonication technique that results in dispersion and functionalization in a single step. Ozone-oxidized CNTs were then chemically reacted with a polyethyleneimine (PEI) dendrimer to enable cathodic EPD and promote adhesion between the CNTs and the glass-fiber substrate. Deposition onto the fabric was accomplished by placing the fabric in front of the cathode and applying a direct current (DC) field. Microscopic characterization shows the integration of CNTs throughout the thickness of the glass fabric, where individual fibers are coated with CNTs and a thin film of CNTs also forms on the fabric surfaces. Within the composite, networks of CNTs span between adjacent fibers, and the resulting composites exhibit good electrical conductivity and considerable increases in the interlaminar shear strength, relative to fiber composites without integrated CNTs. Mechanical, chemical and morphological characterization of the coated fiber surfaces reveal interface/interphase modification resulting from the coating is responsible for the improved mechanical and electrical properties. The CNT-coated glass-fiber laminates also exhibited clear changes in electrical resistance as a function of applied shear strain and enables self-sensing of the transition between elastic and plastic load regions. PMID:23379418

  9. Interface study between nanostructured tantalum nitride films and carbon nanotubes grown by chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Our paper deals with the understanding of the carbon nanotubes growth parameters following the use of specific thin nitride buffer films. • For a large choice of buffer, we use ultra thin films elaborated by the very new method: high power pulsed magnetron sputtering; it allows a larger nitrogen incorporation in the films and lead to out of equilibrium phase formation. • Then by a multiscale investigation, developing a structural, a chemical and a morphology approach, we lead to some conclusion on the correlation between the phase transition for the buffer and morphology transition for the CNTs. • That is a new and deep approach. - Abstract: We present the role of nitrogen content in tantalum nitride ultra-thin buffers, on the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) growth by chemical vapour deposition at 850 °C, assisted by ferrocene as catalyst source. Tantalum nitride (TaNx) films with a very large range of concentration x = [0, 1.8] and various nanostructures, from amorphous Ta(N) to Ta3N5, were deposited by Highly Pulsed Plasma Magnetron Sputtering. The buffer films are characterized after heat treatment at 850 °C, and after the CNT growth, by wide angle X-ray scattering in grazing incidence and scanning electron microscopy. The CNT diameter explored by transition electron microscopy shows an all-out value for under stoichiometric thin films (Ta1-N1−δ, Ta3-N5−δ) and a minimum value just above the stoichiometric phases (Ta1-N1+δ, Ta3-N5+δ). Firstly one shows that the buffer films under the heat treatment present surface modification highly dependent on their initial state, which influences the catalyst particles diffusion. Secondly at the stoichiometric TaN phase we show that a specific ternary phase FeTa2O6 is formed at the interface CNT/buffer, not present in the other cases, leading to a special CNT growth condition

  10. Effects of Feed Gas Composition and Catalyst Thickness on Carbon Nanotube and Nanofiber Synthesis by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    R K Garg; Kim, S. S.; Hash, D. B; Gore, Jay P.; Fisher, Timothy

    2008-01-01

    Many engineering applications require carbon nanotubes with specific characteristics such as wall structure, chirality and alignment. However, precise control of nanotube properties grown to application specifications remains a significant challenge. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) offers a variety of advantages in the synthesis of carbon nanotubes in that several important synthesis parameters can be controlled independently. This paper reports an experimental study of the ...

  11. Chemical Bath Deposition of Aluminum Oxide Buffer on Curved Surfaces for Growing Aligned Carbon Nanotube Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haitao; Na, Chongzheng

    2015-07-01

    Direct growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays on substrates requires the deposition of an aluminum oxide buffer (AOB) layer to prevent the diffusion and coalescence of catalyst nanoparticles. Although AOB layers can be readily created on flat substrates using a variety of physical and chemical methods, the preparation of AOB layers on substrates with highly curved surfaces remains challenging. Here, we report a new solution-based method for preparing uniform layers of AOB on highly curved surfaces by the chemical bath deposition of basic aluminum sulfate and annealing. We show that the thickness of AOB layer can be increased by extending the immersion time of a substrate in the chemical bath, following the classical Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov crystallization kinetics. The increase of AOB thickness in turn leads to the increase of CNT length and the reduction of CNT curviness. Using this method, we have successfully synthesized dense aligned CNT arrays of micrometers in length on substrates with highly curved surfaces including glass fibers, stainless steel mesh, and porous ceramic foam. PMID:26053766

  12. The multilayered structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon films synthesized by filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Na

    2013-08-01

    The structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon (a-C) films synthesized by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) deposition was investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results of the plasmon excitation energy shift and through-thickness elemental concentration show a multilayered a-C film structure comprising an interface layer consisting of C, Si, and, possibly, SiC, a buffer layer with continuously increasing sp 3 fraction, a relatively thicker layer (bulk film) of constant sp 3 content, and an ultrathin surface layer rich in sp 2 hybridization. A detailed study of the C K-edge spectrum indicates that the buffer layer between the interface layer and the bulk film is due to the partial backscattering of C+ ions interacting with the heavy atoms of the silicon substrate. The results of this study provide insight into the minimum thickness of a-C films deposited by FCVA under optimum substrate bias conditions. Copyright © 2013 Materials Research Society.

  13. Tailoring Interfacial Properties by Controlling Carbon Nanotube Coating Thickness on Glass Fibers Using Electrophoretic Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamrakar, Sandeep; An, Qi; Thostenson, Erik T; Rider, Andrew N; Haque, Bazle Z Gama; Gillespie, John W

    2016-01-20

    The electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method was used to deposit polyethylenimine (PEI) functionalized multiwall carbon nanotube (CNT) films onto the surface of individual S-2 glass fibers. By varying the processing parameters of EPD following Hamaker's equation, the thickness of the CNT film was controlled over a wide range from 200 nm to 2 μm. The films exhibited low electrical resistance, providing evidence of coating uniformity and consolidation. The effect of the CNT coating on fiber matrix interfacial properties was investigated through microdroplet experiments. Changes in interfacial properties due to application of CNT coatings onto the fiber surface with and without a CNT-modified matrix were studied. A glass fiber with a 2 μm thick CNT coating and the unmodified epoxy matrix showed the highest increase (58%) in interfacial shear strength (IFSS) compared to the baseline. The increase in the IFSS was proportional to CNT film thickness. Failure analysis of the microdroplet specimens indicated higher IFSS was related to fracture morphologies with higher levels of surface roughness. EPD enables the thickness of the CNT coating to be adjusted, facilitating control of fiber/matrix interfacial resistivity. The electrical sensitivity provides the opportunity to fabricate a new class of sizing with tailored interfacial properties and the ability to detect damage initiation. PMID:26699906

  14. High-Performance Carbon Nanotube/Polymer Composite Fiber from Layer-by-Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min Le; Chen, Yun; Zhang, Liang; Zhan, Hang; Qiang, Lei; Wang, Jian Nong

    2016-03-30

    So far, preparation of high-performance carbon nanotube (CNT)/polymer composites still faces big challenges mainly due to the limited control of CNT dispersion, fraction, and alignment in polymers. Here, a new "layer-by-layer deposition" method is put forward for preparing CNT/polymer composite fibers using poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) as an exemplary polymer. This is based on the continuous production of a hollow cylindrical CNT assembly from a high temperature reactor and its shrinking by a PVA-containing solution and deposition on a removable substrate wire. The in situ mixing of the two composite components at the molecular level allows CNTs to disperse and PVA to infiltrate into the fiber efficiently. As a result, remarkable effects of the CNT reinforcement on the PVA matrix are observed, including a strength improvement from ∼50 to 1255 MPa and electrical conductivity from ∼0 to 1948 S cm(-1). The new method offers good controllability of CNT dispersion and fraction in the polymer matrix, variability for making composite fibers using different polymers, and suitability for scaled up production. This study thus provides a new research direction for preparing CNT-reinforced composites and future performance maximization. PMID:26959406

  15. Investigating the antifungal activity of TiO2 nanoparticles deposited on branched carbon nanotube arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branched carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays were synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition on a silicon substrate. Ni was used as the catalyst and played an important role in the realization of branches in vertically aligned nanotubes. TiO2 nanoparticles on the branched CNTs were produced by atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition followed by a 500 0C annealing step. Transmission and scanning electron microscopic techniques were used to study the morphology of the TiO2/branched CNT structures while x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were used to verify the characteristics of the prepared nanostructures. Their antifungal effect on Candida albicans biofilms under visible light was investigated and compared with the activity of TiO2/CNT arrays and thin films of TiO2. The TiO2/branched CNTs showed a highly improved photocatalytic antifungal activity in comparison with the TiO2/CNTs and TiO2 film. The excellent visible light-induced photocatalytic antifungal activity of the TiO2/branched CNTs was attributed to the generation of electron-hole pairs by visible light excitation with a low recombination rate, in addition to the high surface area provided for the interaction between the cells and the nanostructures. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the resulting morphological changes in the cell body of the biofilms existing on the antifungal samples.

  16. Microstructure and tribological performance of diamond-like carbon films deposited on hydrogenated rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the microstructure and tribological performance of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films prepared by plasma chemical vapor deposition on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubbers (HNBR) are studied. Different negative variations of temperature during film growth were selected by proper changes of the bias voltage. Raman measurements show a similar bonding regardless of the voltages used. A columnar growth and a tile-like microstructure of the DLC films were identified by scanning electron microscopy. Patch sizes can be correlated with the deposition conditions. The coefficient of friction (CoF) of DLC film coated HNBR was found to be much lower than that of the unprotected rubber, and more reduced for the DLC films with smaller patch sizes, which is explained by a better flexibility and conformity of the film during testing. In one of the samples, unexpected low CoF was observed, which was attributed to a modification of the mechanical properties of the rubber during the plasma treatment at high voltage. This issue was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which indicated a modification of the cross linking in the rubber. - Highlights: ► Bias voltage does not vary the chemical bonding and surface morphology of films. ► Film structure is patched, whose size depends on the etching and deposition voltages. ► The frictional behavior can be correlated with the patch size of the films. ► Surface analysis showed that rubber x-linking is modified by etching at high voltage. ► Modification of rubber x-linking leads to a different frictional behavior.

  17. Experimental investigation and numerical modeling of carbonation process in reinforced concrete structures Part II. Practical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mathematical-numerical method developed by the authors to predict the corrosion initiation time of reinforced concrete structures due to carbonation process, recalled in Part I of this work, is here applied to some real cases. The final aim is to develop and test a practical method for determining the durability characteristics of existing buildings liable to carbonation, as well as estimating the corrosion initiation time of a building at the design stage. Two industrial sheds with different ages and located in different areas have been analyzed performing both experimental tests and numerical analyses. Finally, a case of carbonation-induced failure in a prestressed r.c. beam is presented

  18. Effect of pressure on the deposition of hydrogen-free amorphous carbon and carbon nitride films by the pulsed cathodic arc discharge method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen-free amorphous carbon (a-C) and carbon nitride (a-C:N) films were deposited using the pulsed cathodic arc discharge at different argon and nitrogen pressures. The surface and mechanical properties of these films were found to strongly depend on the gas pressure. The tetrahedral amorphous carbon and hard a-C:N films with smooth surfaces (rms roughness: 0.15 nm) were prepared at lower gas pressures (-2 Pa). Incorporation of an increasing amount of nitrogen in a-C:N films caused a decrease in film hardness. All the films were covered with the thin (0.3-2 nm) graphite-like surface layers. The film hardness was correlated to the soft surface layer thickness, and the films with thinner surface layers exhibit higher hardness. The mean energies of pulsed plasma beams were measured as the functions of argon and nitrogen pressures. The mean energies of plasma beams decrease in an exponential fashion with increasing gas pressure due to the carbon ion collisions with the neutral gas species. The effects of mean energies of deposited species on the film deposition were explained in terms of the thermal spike migration of surface atoms. The formation of graphite-like surface layers is associated with the low-energy deposition process. The low-energy (10 eV) species may produce the strong thermal spike at film surface, and contribute to the formation of sp3 bonded structure at a sp3 bonded matrix

  19. Platinum-based electrocatalysts synthesized by depositing contiguous adlayers on carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adzic, Radoslav; Harris, Alexander

    2013-03-26

    High-surface-area carbon nanostructures coated with a smooth and conformal submonolayer-to-multilayer thin metal films and their method of manufacture are described. The preferred manufacturing process involves the initial oxidation of the carbon nanostructures followed by immersion in a solution with the desired pH to create negative surface dipoles. The nanostructures are subsequently immersed in an alkaline solution containing non-noble metal ions which adsorb at surface reaction sites. The metal ions are then reduced via chemical or electrical means and the nanostructures are exposed to a solution containing a salt of one or more noble metals which replace adsorbed non-noble surface metal atoms by galvanic displacement. Subsequent film growth may be performed via the initial quasi-underpotential deposition of a non-noble metal followed by immersion in a solution comprising a more noble metal. The resulting coated nanostructures may be used, for example, as high-performance electrodes in supercapacitors, batteries, or other electric storage devices.

  20. Corrosion and deposition during the exposure of carbon steel to hydrogen sulphide-water solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complex multi-phase corrosion films develop on rotating carbon steel discs exposed to aqueous hydrogen sulphide solutions; their structure and morphology can have a profound effect on the corrosion process. Iron sulphide corrosion products formed on corroding carbon steel discs in titanium autoclaves have been characterized after exposure periods ranging from 1 to 840 h at temperatures of 308, 373 and 433 K and a total initial pressure of 1.5 MPa. These reaction conditions pertain to the Girdler-Sulphide process for separating heavy water. In oxygen-free solutions, the evolution of corrosion products on the discs progresses from iron-rich to sulphur-rich phases according to the sequence, mackinawite (tetragonal FeSsub(1-x)) → ferrous sulphide (cubic FeS) → troilite (hexagonal FeS) → pyrrhotite (hexagonal Fesub(1-x)S) → pyrite (cubic FeS2), the latter phase being thermodynamically favoured. All phases except mackinawite appear as characteristic microcrystals of regular geometry, indicating relatively slow solution growth at low supersaturation. Higher temperatures accelerate the sequential transformations while higher speeds of rotation of the disc retard it. Edge turbulence induced at high rotation frequencies prevents the formation of solution-grown phases. Added oxidants promote the formation of the disulphide ion required for FeS2 formation. Fe2+ ions released to the bulk solution by dissolution of the base metal and metastable sulphides are deposited as pyrrhotite or pyrite on the titanium vessel. (author)

  1. Platinum-based electrocatalysts synthesized by depositing contiguous adlayers on carbon nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adzic, Radoslav R.; Harris, Alexander

    2015-10-06

    High-surface-area carbon nanostructures coated with a smooth and conformal submonolayer-to-multilayer thin metal films and their method of manufacture are described. The manufacturing process may involve initial oxidation of the carbon nanostructures followed by immersion in a solution with the desired pH to create negative surface dipoles. The nanostructures are subsequently immersed in an alkaline solution containing non-noble metal ions which adsorb at surface reaction sites. The metal ions are then reduced via chemical or electrical means and the nanostructures are exposed to a solution containing a salt of one or more noble metals which replace adsorbed non-noble surface metal atoms by galvanic displacement. Subsequent film growth may be performed via the initial quasi-underpotential deposition of a non-noble metal followed by immersion in a solution comprising a more noble metal. The resulting coated nanostructures may be used, for example, as high-performance electrodes in supercapacitors, batteries, or other electric storage devices.

  2. Adsorption properties of carbonized polyacrylonitrile deposited on γ-alumina and silica gel by precipitation polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The precipitation polymerization method was used for the deposition of various contents of polyacrylonitrile on two oxide-type supports (γ-alumina and silica gel). The synthesized materials were characterized by thermal analysis performed in inert and oxidizing atmospheres. The mechanism of polyacrylonitrile decomposition was proposed. In order to gain effective adsorbents of volatile organic compounds the polyacrylonitrile/support composites were carbonized at elevated temperatures. The texture and morphology of the calcined materials were examined by low-temperature sorption of N2 and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. An influence of thermal treatment conditions and carbonaceous species loading on adsorption capacity of methyl-ethyl ketone vapour was also determined. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements revealed that the ladder-type polyacrylonitrile species formed above 250 oC and stable up to about 350-400 oC are the most effective sites for methyl-ethyl ketone sorption. The carbonaceous species dispersion was found to be an additional factor influencing the adsorption capacity of the carbonized polyacrylonitrile/support composites.

  3. Further development of chemical vapor deposition process for production of large diameter carbon-base monofilaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, R. L.; Richmond, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    The development of large diameter carbon-base monofilament in the 50 micron to 250 micron diameter range using the chemical vapor deposition process is described. The object of this program was to determine the critical process variables which control monofilament strength, monofilament modulus, and monofilament diameter. It was confirmed that wide scatter in the carbon substrate strength is primarily responsible for the scatter in the monofilament strength. It was also shown through etching experiments that defective substrate surface conditions which can induce low strength modular growth in the monofilament layers are best controlled by processing improvements during the synthesis of the substrate. Modulus was found to be linearily proportional to monofilament boron content. Filament modulus was increased to above 27.8MN/sq cm but only by a considerable increase in monofilament boron content to 60 wt. % or more. Monofilament diameter depended upon dwell time in the synthesis apparatus. A monofilament was prepared using these findings which had the combined properties of a mean U.T.S. of 398,000 N/sq cm, a modulus of 18.9 MN/sq cm (24,000,000 psi), and a diameter of 145 microns. Highest measured strength for this fiber was 451,000 N/sq cm (645,000 psi).

  4. Modeling of Sheath Ion-Molecule Reactions in Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hash, David B.; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    In many plasma simulations, ion-molecule reactions are modeled using ion energy independent reaction rate coefficients that are taken from low temperature selected-ion flow tube experiments. Only exothermic or nearly thermoneutral reactions are considered. This is appropriate for plasma applications such as high-density plasma sources in which sheaths are collisionless and ion temperatures 111 the bulk p!asma do not deviate significantly from the gas temperature. However, for applications at high pressure and large sheath voltages, this assumption does not hold as the sheaths are collisional and ions gain significant energy in the sheaths from Joule heating. Ion temperatures and thus reaction rates vary significantly across the discharge, and endothermic reactions become important in the sheaths. One such application is plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes in which dc discharges are struck at pressures between 1-20 Torr with applied voltages in the range of 500-700 V. The present work investigates The importance of the inclusion of ion energy dependent ion-molecule reaction rates and the role of collision induced dissociation in generating radicals from the feedstock used in carbon nanotube growth.

  5. Dual-ion-beam deposition of carbon films with diamond-like properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Swec, D. M.; Angus, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    A single and dual ion beam system was used to generate amorphous carbon films with diamond like properties. A methane/argon mixture at a molar ratio of 0.28 was ionized in the low pressure discharge chamber of a 30-cm-diameter ion source. A second ion source, 8 cm in diameter was used to direct a beam of 600 eV Argon ions on the substrates (fused silica or silicon) while the deposition from the 30-cm ion source was taking place. Nuclear reaction and combustion analysis indicate H/C ratios for the films to be 1.00. This high value of H/C, it is felt, allowed the films to have good transmittance. The films were impervious to reagents which dissolve graphitic and polymeric carbon structures. Although the measured density of the films was approximately 1.8 gm/cu cm, a value lower than diamond, the films exhibited other properties that were relatively close to diamond. These films were compared with diamond like films generated by sputtering a graphite target.

  6. Performance of metallic and carbon-based materials under the influence of intense transient energy deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intense energy is deposited on localized areas of the plasma facing materials under transient thermal loads such as edge localized modes (ELMS), plasma disruptions or vertical displacement events (VDEs) in a magnetic confined fusion reactor. Crack formation, thermal erosion and redeposition mainly take place under these conditions and may cause catastrophic damage in the materials. Dust formation associated with evaporation and liquid or solid particles emission are also serious issues to influence plasma contamination. In order to estimate the lifetime of the components during above mentioned events (ELMS, disruptions, VDEs), the thermal erosion mechanisms and performance of carbon-based and high Z materials have been investigated using energetic electron beam facilities. Moreover, a thorough calibration of an electron beam in the high heat flux facility JUDITH was done. For the evaluation of erosion data obtained in different test facilities several factors have to be taken into account. Different material erosion processes at identical heat loads induced by different facilities take place due to different beam generation and beam modes (static/scanned beam). The different degradation processes were created by different surface tensions and vapor recoil pressures at local spots in the loaded area. Molten and re-solidified material remained within the loaded area by fast scanning of the electron beam in JUDITH, which leaded to a rippling surface. Erosion scenarios have been elucidated on pure W and carbon-based materials. For W, the thermal erosion is initiated by convection of melt, strong evaporation or boiling processes. Moreover the formation of a vapor cloud was observed in the simulation experiments indicating vapor shielding on the surface. From screening tests on different high Z materials, pure W was found to show the highest resistance against thermal shock under plasma disruption conditions and are suitable for the components in Tokamak fusion reactors

  7. Growth of Few-Layer Graphene on Sapphire Substrates by Directly Depositing Carbon Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Chao-Yang; TANG Jun; LIU Zhong-Liang; LI Li-Min; YAN Wen-Sheng; WEI Shi-Qiang; XU Peng-Shou

    2011-01-01

    Few-layer graphene (FLG) is successfully grown on sapphire substrates by directly depositing carbon atoms at the substrate temperature of 1300℃ in a molecular beam epitaxy chamber.The reflection high energy diffraction,Raman spectroscopy and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure are used to characterize the sample,which confirm the formation of graphene layers.The mean domain size of FLG is around 29.2 nm and the layer number is about 2-3.The results demonstrate that the grown FLG displays a turbostratic stacking structure similar to that of the FLG produced by annealing C-terminated a-SiC surface.Graphene,a monolayer of sp2-bonded carbon atoms,is a quasi two-dimensional (2D) material.It has attracted great interest because of its distinctive band structure and physical properties.[1] Graphene can now be obtained by several different approaches including micromechanical[1] and chemical[2] exfoliation of graphite,epitaxial growth on hexagonal SiC substrates by Si sublimation in vacuum,[3] and CVD growth on metal substrates.[4] However,these preparation methods need special substrates,otherwise,in order to design microelectronic devices,the prepared graphene should be transferred to other appropriate substrates.Thus the growth of graphene on the suitable substrates is motivated.%Few-layer graphene (FLG) is successfully grown on sapphire substrates by directly depositing carbon atoms at the substrate temperature of 1300℃ in a molecular beam epitaxy chamber. The reflection high energy diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure are used to characterize the sample, which confirm the formation of graphene layers. The mean domain size of FLG is around 29.2nm and the layer number is about 2-3. The results demonstrate that the grown FLG displays a turbostratic stacking structure similar to that of the FLG produced by annealing C-terminated α-SiC surface.

  8. Displaced/re-worked rhodolith deposits infilling parts of a complex Miocene multistorey submarine channel: A case history from the Sassari area (Sardinia, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murru, Marco; Bassi, Davide; Simone, Lucia

    2015-08-01

    In the Sassari area (north-western Sardinia, Italy), the Miocene Porto Torres sub-basin sequences represent the complex multistorey mixed carbonate-siliciclastic submarine feature called the Sassari Channel. During the late Burdigalian-early Serravallian, repeated terrigenous supplies from uplifted Paleozoic crystalline substrata fed the Sassari Channel system by means of turbidity and locally hyper-concentrated turbidity flows. Shelfal areas were the source of terrigenous clasts, but open shelf rhodalgal/foramol carbonate areas were very productive and largely also contributed to the channel infilling. Re-worked sands and skeletal debris were discontinuously re-sedimented offshore as pure terrigenous, mixed and/or carbonate deposits. Major sediment supply was introduced between the latest Burdigalian and the start of the middle Langhian, during which a large amount of carbonate, mixed and siliciclastic sediments reached the Porto Torres Basin (Sassari Channel I). Contributions from shallow proximal source areas typify the lower intervals (Unit A) in marginal sectors of the channel. Upward, these evolve into autochthonous rhodolith deposits, winnowed by strong currents in relatively shallow well lit settings within a complex network of narrow tidally-controlled channels (Unit D) locally bearing coral assemblages. Conversely, re-sedimented rhodoliths from the Units B and C accumulated under conditions of higher turbidity. In deeper parts of the channel taxonomically diversified rhodoliths point to the mixing of re-deposited skeletal components from different relatively deep bathmetric settings. In the latest early Langhian, major re-sedimentation episodes, resulting in large prograding bodies (Unit D), triggered by repeated regression pulses in a frame of persistent still stand. During these episodes photophile assemblages dwelled in the elevated margin sectors of the channel. A significant latest early Langhian drop in relative sea-level resulted in impressive mass

  9. Synthesis of Ag-doped hydrogenated carbon thin films by a hybrid PVD–PECVD deposition process

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Majji Venkatesh; Sukru Taktak; Efstathios I Meletis

    2014-12-01

    Silver-doped hydrogenated amorphous carbon (Ag-DLC) films were deposited on Si substrates using a hybrid plasma vapour deposition–plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PVD–PECVD) process combining Ag target magnetron sputtering and PECVD in an Ar–CH4 plasma. Processing parameters (working pressure, CH4/Ar ratio and magnetron current) were varied to obtain good deposition rate and a wide variety of Ag films. Structure and bonding environment of the films were obtained from transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy studies. Variation of processing parameters was found to produce Ag-doped amorphous carbon or diamond-like carbon (DLC) films with a range of characteristics with CH4/Ar ratio exercising a dominant effect. It was pointed out that Ag concentration and deposition rate of the film increased with the increase in d.c. magnetron current. At higher Ar concentration in plasma, Ag content increased whereas deposition rate of the film decreased. FTIR study showed that the films contained a significant amount of hydrogen and, as a result of an increase in the Ag content in the hydrogenated DLC film, $sp^{2}$ bond content also increased. The TEM cross sectional studies revealed that crystalline Ag particles were formed with a size in the range of 2–4 nm throughout an amorphous DLC matrix.

  10. Unsteady state heat flow in the exhaust valve in turbocharged Diesel engine covered by the layer of the carbon deposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hornik

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The determination of the temperature distribution, temperature gradients and thermal stresses in the exhaust valve with using the layer of the carbon deposit in initial phase of the work of turbocharged Diesel engine.Design/methodology/approach: The results of calculations of the temperature distribution, temperature gradients and thermal stresses in the exhaust valve of turbocharged Diesel engine with using the layer of the carbon deposit on the different surfaces of the valve were received by means of the two – zone combustion model and the finite element method.Findings: The computations presented the possibility of use of the geometrical models of the layer of carbon deposit on the different surfaces of the exhaust valve and heat transfer on individual surfaces of the exhaust valve used by the variable values of the boundary conditions and temperature of working medium in initial time of the working engine.Research limitations/implications: The modelling of thermal loads were carried out by analysing the temperature distribution, temperature gradients and thermal stresses in the exhaust valve in initial phase of the work of turbocharged Diesel engine.Originality/value: The layer of the carbon deposit was used for modelling of thermal loads in the exhaust valve as the geometric model with the use of material properties. The results obtained allow to analyse distribution of temperature, temperature gradients and thermal stresses in the exhaust valve.

  11. Friction properties of amorphous carbon ultrathin films deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc and radio-frequency sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The friction properties of ultrathin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) deposited on Si(100) substrates by filtered cathodic vacuum arc and radio-frequency sputtering were investigated by surface force microscopy. Deposition parameters yielding a-C films with high sp3 content were used to deposit films of thickness between 5 and 35 nm. The coefficient of friction of both types of a-C films was measured with a 1-μm-radius conical diamond tip and normal loads in the range of 20–640 μN. The results show a strong dependence of the friction properties on the surface roughness, thickness, and structure of the a-C films, which are influenced by the intricacies of the deposition method. The dependence of the coefficient of friction on normal load and the dominance of adhesion and plowing friction mechanisms are interpreted in terms of the through-thickness variation of carbon atom hybridization of the a-C films. - Highlights: • Comparison of nanoscale friction properties of ultrathin amorphous carbon films. • Friction dependence on film roughness, thickness, and structure (hybridization). • Effect of through-thickness changes in carbon atom hybridization on film friction. • Explanation of film friction trends in terms of competing friction mechanisms

  12. Friction properties of amorphous carbon ultrathin films deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc and radio-frequency sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlak, J.; Komvopoulos, K., E-mail: kyriakos@me.berkeley.edu

    2015-03-31

    The friction properties of ultrathin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) deposited on Si(100) substrates by filtered cathodic vacuum arc and radio-frequency sputtering were investigated by surface force microscopy. Deposition parameters yielding a-C films with high sp{sup 3} content were used to deposit films of thickness between 5 and 35 nm. The coefficient of friction of both types of a-C films was measured with a 1-μm-radius conical diamond tip and normal loads in the range of 20–640 μN. The results show a strong dependence of the friction properties on the surface roughness, thickness, and structure of the a-C films, which are influenced by the intricacies of the deposition method. The dependence of the coefficient of friction on normal load and the dominance of adhesion and plowing friction mechanisms are interpreted in terms of the through-thickness variation of carbon atom hybridization of the a-C films. - Highlights: • Comparison of nanoscale friction properties of ultrathin amorphous carbon films. • Friction dependence on film roughness, thickness, and structure (hybridization). • Effect of through-thickness changes in carbon atom hybridization on film friction. • Explanation of film friction trends in terms of competing friction mechanisms.

  13. Exhaust circulation into dry gas desulfurization process to prevent carbon deposition in an Oxy-fuel IGCC power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Power plant with semi-closed gas turbine and O2–CO2 coal gasifier was studied. • We adopt dry gas sulfur removal process to establish the system. • The exhaust gas circulation remarkably prevented carbon deposition. • Efficiency loss for exhaust gas circulation is quite small. • Appropriate operating condition of sulfur removal process is revealed. - Abstract: Semi-closed cycle operation of gas turbine fueled by oxygen–CO2 blown coal gasification provides efficient power generation with CO2 separation feature by excluding pre-combustion type CO2 capture that usually brings large efficiency loss. The plant efficiency at transmission end is estimated as 44% at lower heating value (LHV) providing compressed CO2 with concentration of 93 vol%. This power generation system will solve the contradiction between economical resource utilization and reduction of CO2 emission from coal-fired power plant. The system requires appropriate sulfur reduction process to protect gas turbine from corrosion and environment from sulfur emission. We adopt dry gas sulfur removal process to establish the system where apprehension about the detrimental carbon deposition from coal gas. The effect of circulation of a portion of exhaust gas to the process on the retardation of carbon deposition was examined at various gas compositions. The circulation remarkably prevented carbon deposition in the sulfur removal sorbent. The impact of the circulation on the thermal efficiency is smaller than the other auxiliary power consumption. Thus, the circulation is appropriate operation for the power generation

  14. Influence of deposition parameters on surface roughness and mechanical properties of boron carbon nitride coatings synthesized by ion beam assisted deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbon nitride (BCN) coatings were deposited on Si(100) wafers and Si3N4 disks by using ion beam assisted deposition from a boron carbide target. The BCN coatings were synthesized by the reaction between boron and carbon vapor as well as nitrogen ion simultaneously. The influence of deposition parameters such as ion acceleration voltage, ion acceleration current density and deposition ratio on the surface roughness and mechanical properties of the BCN coatings was investigated. The surface roughness was determined by using atomic force microscopy and the mechanical properties of the BCN coatings were evaluated by nano-indentation tests and friction tests in N2 gas. The composition and chemical bonding of the BCN coatings were analyzed by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results showed that the lower deposition rate, the smaller surface roughness and higher nano-hardness the BCN coatings were. The BCN coating with the smoothest surface (R a = 0.25 nm and R P-V = 2.8 nm) and the highest nanohardness of 33 GPa as well as excellent friction property were obtained at 0.5 nm/s and the nitrogen ions were generated at 2.0 kV and 60 μA/cm2, and the chemical composition of this BCN coating was 49 at.% B, 42 at.% C and 9 at.% N. Moreover, there were several bonding states such as B-N, B-C and C-N with B-C-N hybridization in this BCN coating

  15. Preparation of ZrC nano-particles reinforced amorphous carbon composite coating by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To eliminate cracks caused by thermal expansion mismatch between ZrC coating and carbon-carbon composites, a kind of ZrC/C composite coating was designed as an interlayer. The atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition was used as a method to achieve co-deposition of ZrC and C from ZrCl4-C3H6-H2-Ar source. Zirconium tetrachloride (ZrCl4) powder carrier was especially made to control accurately the flow rate. The microstructure of ZrC/C composite coating was studied using analytical techniques. ZrC/C coating shows same morphology as pyrolytic carbon. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows ZrC grains with size of 10-50 nm embed in turbostratic carbon. The formation mechanism is that the growth of ZrC crystals was inhibited by surrounding pyrolytic carbon and kept as nano-particles. Fracture morphologies imply good combination between coating and substrate. The ZrC crystals have stoichiometric proportion near 1, with good crystalline but no clear preferred orientation while pyrolytic carbon is amorphous. The heating-up oxidation of ZrC/C coating shows 11.58 wt.% loss. It can be calculated that the coating consists of 74.04 wt.% ZrC and 25.96 wt.% pyrolytic carbon. The average density of the composite coating is 5.892 g/cm3 by Archimedes' principle.

  16. Synergistic electro-co-deposition and molecular mixing for reinforcement of multi-walled carbon nanotube in copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belgamwar, Sachin U.; Sharma, Niti Nipun, E-mail: nitinipun@gmail.com

    2013-12-01

    Highlights: • Engineered new method for producing MWCNTs reinforced Copper powder. • Mixing happens by synergism of electro-deposition and molecular mixing. • MWCNTs are appropriately dispersed in the copper powder. • Promising methods for bulk production of metal composite in powder form. -- Abstract: Carbon nanotube-reinforced copper composite powder was prepared by a modified electro-co-deposition method that was carried out on small diameter (3 mm) tip of the cathode. The deposition was done at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Samples were prepared under constant stirring by a magnetic stirrer. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy confirms the dispersion of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) in the copper matrix. Dispersion of MWCNTs in copper matrix by this method is very easy and the set up can be easily scaled up for the bulk production of MWCNT reinforced copper powder. The method for the fabrication of MWCNT reinforced copper powder; microstructure and morphology of the powder formed are reported.

  17. Synergistic electro-co-deposition and molecular mixing for reinforcement of multi-walled carbon nanotube in copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Engineered new method for producing MWCNTs reinforced Copper powder. • Mixing happens by synergism of electro-deposition and molecular mixing. • MWCNTs are appropriately dispersed in the copper powder. • Promising methods for bulk production of metal composite in powder form. -- Abstract: Carbon nanotube-reinforced copper composite powder was prepared by a modified electro-co-deposition method that was carried out on small diameter (3 mm) tip of the cathode. The deposition was done at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Samples were prepared under constant stirring by a magnetic stirrer. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy confirms the dispersion of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) in the copper matrix. Dispersion of MWCNTs in copper matrix by this method is very easy and the set up can be easily scaled up for the bulk production of MWCNT reinforced copper powder. The method for the fabrication of MWCNT reinforced copper powder; microstructure and morphology of the powder formed are reported

  18. Diamond-like carbon films deposited on three-dimensional shape substrate model by liquid electrochemical technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Y.Y. [Institute of Nano-photonics, School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, 116600 Dalian (China); Zhang, G.F. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, 116024, Dalian China (China); Zhao, Y.; Liu, D.D. [Institute of Nano-photonics, School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, 116600 Dalian (China); Cong, Y., E-mail: congyan@ciomp.ac.cn [Institute of Nano-photonics, School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, 116600 Dalian (China); Buck, V. [Thin Film Technology Group, Faculty of Physics, University Duisburg-Essen and CeNIDE, 47057 Duisburg (Germany)

    2015-09-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited on three-dimensional (3D) shape substrate model by electrolysis of 2-propanol solution at low temperature (60 °C). This 3D shape model was composed of a horizontally aligned stainless steel wafer and vertically aligned stainless steel rods. Morphology and microstructure of the films were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. The results suggested there were only differences in film uniformity and thickness for two kinds of samples. The hydrogenated amorphous carbon films deposited on horizontally aligned substrate were smooth and homogeneous. And the film thickness of DLC films gained on the vertical substrates decreased along vertical direction. It is believed that bubble formation could enhance nucleation on the wetted capillary area. This experiment shows that deposition of DLC films by liquid phase deposition on 3D shape conductive substrates is possible. - Highlights: • DLC film is expected to be deposited on complex surface/shape substrate. • DLC film is deposited on 3D shape substrate by liquid electrochemical method. • Horizontal substrate is covered by smooth and homogeneous DLC films. • Film thickness decreases along vertical direction due to boiling effect.

  19. Mechanical properties of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films fabricated on polyethylene terephthalate foils by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) films have been deposited on polyethylene terephthalate by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition. The influence of deposition parameters such as gas pressure, bias voltage, and nitrogen incorporation on the mechanical properties of the a-C:H films are investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that the ratio of sp3 to sp2 is 0.24 indicating that the film is mainly composed of graphitelike carbon. Nanoindentation tests disclose enhanced surface hardness of ∼6 GPa. The friction coefficient of the film deposited at higher gas pressure, for instance, 2.0 Pa, is lower than that of the film deposited at a lower pressure such as 0.5 Pa. The films deposited using a low bias voltage tend to fail easily in the friction tests and nitrogen incorporation into the a-C:H films decreases the friction coefficient. Mechanical folding tests show that deformation failure is worse on a thinner a-C:H film

  20. Structural changes of electron and ion beam-deposited contacts in annealed carbon-based electrical devices

    KAUST Repository

    Batra, Nitin M

    2015-10-09

    The use of electron and ion beam deposition to make devices containing discrete nanostructures as interconnectors is a well-known nanofabrication process. Classically, one-dimensional materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been electrically characterized by resorting to these beam deposition methods. While much attention has been given to the interconnectors, less is known about the contacting electrodes (or leads). In particular, the structure and chemistry of the electrode–interconnector interface is a topic that deserves more attention, as it is critical to understand the device behavior. Here, the structure and chemistry of Pt electrodes, deposited either with electron or ion beams and contacted to a CNT, are analyzed before and after thermally annealing the device in a vacuum. Free-standing Pt nanorods, acting as beam-deposited electrode models, are also characterized pre- and post-annealing. Overall, the as-deposited leads contain a non-negligible amount of amorphous carbon that is consolidated, upon heating, as a partially graphitized outer shell enveloping a Pt core. This observation raises pertinent questions regarding the definition of electrode–nanostructure interfaces in electrical devices, in particular long-standing assumptions of metal-CNT contacts fabricated by direct beam deposition methods.

  1. Structural changes of electron and ion beam-deposited contacts in annealed carbon-based electrical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Nitin M.; Patole, Shashikant P.; Abdelkader, Ahmed; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Deepak, Francis L.; Costa, Pedro M. F. J.

    2015-11-01

    The use of electron and ion beam deposition to make devices containing discrete nanostructures as interconnectors is a well-known nanofabrication process. Classically, one-dimensional materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been electrically characterized by resorting to these beam deposition methods. While much attention has been given to the interconnectors, less is known about the contacting electrodes (or leads). In particular, the structure and chemistry of the electrode-interconnector interface is a topic that deserves more attention, as it is critical to understand the device behavior. Here, the structure and chemistry of Pt electrodes, deposited either with electron or ion beams and contacted to a CNT, are analyzed before and after thermally annealing the device in a vacuum. Free-standing Pt nanorods, acting as beam-deposited electrode models, are also characterized pre- and post-annealing. Overall, the as-deposited leads contain a non-negligible amount of amorphous carbon that is consolidated, upon heating, as a partially graphitized outer shell enveloping a Pt core. This observation raises pertinent questions regarding the definition of electrode-nanostructure interfaces in electrical devices, in particular long-standing assumptions of metal-CNT contacts fabricated by direct beam deposition methods.

  2. Study on the carbonate ocelli-bearing lamprophyre dykes in the Ailaoshan gold deposit zone, Yunnan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG; Zhilong(黄智龙); LIU; Congqiang(刘丛强); XIAO; Huayun(肖化云); HAN; Runsheng(韩润生); XU; Cheng(许成); LI; Wenbo(李文博); ZHONG; Kunming(钟昆明)

    2002-01-01

    Three carbonate ocelli-bearing lamprophyre dykes have been found in the Laowangzhai and Beiya gold orefields in the northern sector of the Ailaoshan gold deposit zone, Yunnan Province. Ocelli in the lamprophyre dykes are carbonates composed mainly of dolomite and calcite. Their trace elements, REE and C isotopic compositions are characteristic of carbonatite and the main mineral assemblages, major elements, trace elements and REE in the matrix are similar to those in the carbonate ocelli-barren lamprophyre dykes in the orefields, which are calc-alkaline lamprophyres that derived from the fertile mantle. The results indicate that the carbonate ocelli-bearing lamprophyre dykes in this area were produced at the time when the Himalayan lamprophyre magma evolved to a relatively late stage of silicate-carbonate liquid immiscibility. In the process of magmatic evolution there took place magmatic degassing with CO2 and H2O as the dominant released gases.

  3. Emission, Dispersion, Transformation, and Deposition of Asian Particulates Over the Western Pacific Ocean. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this project we developed and applied a coupled three-dimensional meteorology/chemistry/microphysics model to study the patterns of aerosol dispersion and deposition in the western Pacific area; carried out a series of detailed regional aerosol simulations to test the ability of models to treat emission, dispersion and removal processes prior to long-range transport; calculated and analyzed trajectories that originate in Asian dust source regions and reach the Pacific Basin; performed detailed simulations of regional and trans-Pacific transport, as well as the microphysical and chemical properties, of aerosols in the Asia-Pacific region to quantify processes that control the emission, dispersion and removal of particles; and assessed the contributions of regional-scale Asian particulate sources to the deposition of pollutants onto surface waters. The transport and deposition of aerosols and vapors were found to be strongly controlled by large and synoptic scale meteorology, convection, turbulence, and precipitation, as well as strong interactions between surface conditions and topographical features. The present analysis suggests that accurate representations of aerosol sources, transport and deposition can be obtained using a comprehensive modeling approach

  4. Spray deposition of steam treated and functionalized single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotube films for supercapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steam purified, carboxylic and ester functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) films with homogeneous distribution and flexible control of thickness and area were fabricated on polymeric and metallic substrates using a modified spray deposition technique. By employing a pre-sprayed polyelectrolyte, the adhesion of the carbon nanotube (CNT) films to the substrates was significantly enhanced by electrostatic interaction. Carboxylic and ester functionalization improved electrochemical performance when immersed in 0.1 M H2SO4 and the specific capacitance reached 155 and 77 F g-1 for carboxylic functionalized SWNT and MWNT films respectively. Compared with existing techniques such as hot pressing, vacuum filtration and dip coating, the ambient pressure spray deposition technique is suggested as particularly well suited for preparing CNT films at large scale for applications including providing electrodes for electrochemical supercapacitors and paper batteries.

  5. Raman Spectroscopic Study of Carbon Nanotubes Prepared Using Fe/ZnO-Palm Olein-Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syazwan Afif Mohd Zobir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were synthesized using Fe/ZnO catalyst by a dual-furnace thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD method at 800–1000°C using nitrogen gas with a constant flow rate of 150 sccm/min as a gas carrier. Palm olein (PO, ferrocene in the presence of 0.05 M zinc nitrate, and a p-type silicon wafer were used as carbon source, catalyst precursor, and sample target, respectively. D, G, and G′ bands were observed at 1336–1364, 1559–1680, and 2667–2682 cm-1, respectively. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs with the highest degree of crystallinity were obtained at around 8000°C, and the smallest diameter of about 2 nm was deposited on the silicon substrate at 1000°C.

  6. Parallel measurements of organic and elemental carbon dry (PM1, PM2.5) and wet (rain, snow, mixed) deposition into the Baltic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowska, Agnieszka; Lewandowska, Anita; Falkowska, Lucyna M

    2016-03-15

    Parallel studies on organic and elemental carbon in PM1 and PM2.5 aerosols and in wet deposition in various forms of its occurrence were conducted in the urbanised coastal zone of the Baltic Sea. The carbon load introduced into the sea water was mainly affected by the form of precipitation. Dry deposition load of carbon was on average a few orders of magnitude smaller than wet deposition. The suspended organic carbon was more effectively removed from the air with rain than snow, while an inverse relationship was found for elemental carbon. However the highest flux of water insoluble organic carbon was recorded in precipitation of a mixed nature. The atmospheric cleaning of highly dissolved organic carbon was observed to be the most effective on the first day of precipitation, while the hydrophobic elemental carbon was removed more efficiently when the precipitation lasted longer than a day. PMID:26778500

  7. Effect of part replacement of silica sand with carbon black on composite properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have reported the properties of natural rubber filled with locally available materials (Adu et al 2000). The effect of local clay, limestone, silica sand and charcoal on the properties of natural rubber has been examined. Results have shown detrimental effects of silica sand on the properties of natural rubber compound. It has been reported that when silica is used as a part for part replacement of carbon black, the heat build up the composite decreased whilst tear resistance improved. Results revealed that within the filler content range used in the present work, the hardness, modulus, and tensile strength of composites loaded with silica sand/carbon black showed enhanced magnitude over the composite loaded singly with silica sand. These parameters generally increased with increasing carbon black content in the composite. New area of use requiring moderate level of tensile strength, hardness and modulus (as in soles of shoes and engine mounts) is therefore opened up for silica sand.(author)

  8. Electrochemical deposition of carbon films on titanium in molten LiCl-KCl-K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Qiushi; Xu, Qian, E-mail: Qianxu201@mail.neu.edu.cn; Wang, Yang; Shang, Xujing; Li, Zaiyuan

    2012-09-30

    Electrodeposition of carbon films on the oxide-scale-coated titanium has been performed in a LiCl-KCl-K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} melt, which are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The electrochemical process of carbon deposition is investigated by cyclic voltammetry on the graphite, titanium and oxide-scale-coated titanium electrodes. The particle-size-gradient carbon films over the oxide-scale-coated titanium can be achieved by electrodeposition under the controlled potentials for avoiding codeposition of lithium carbide. The deposited carbon films are comprised of micron-sized 'quasi-spherical' carbon particles with graphitized and amorphous phases. The cyclic voltammetry behavior on the graphite, titanium and oxide-scale-coated titanium electrodes shows that CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} ions are reduced most favorably on the graphite for the three electrodes. Lithium ions can discharge under the less negative potential on the electrode containing carbon compared with titanium electrode because of the formation of lithium carbide from the reaction between lithium and carbon. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon films are prepared on oxide-scale-coated titanium in a LiCl-KCl-K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} melt. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The films comprise micron-size 'quasi-spherical' carbon particles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The films present particle-size-gradient. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The particles contain graphitized and amorphous phases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The prepared carbon films are more electrochemically active than graphite.

  9. Carbon and sulfur relationships in Devonian shales from the Appalachian Basin as an indicator of environment of deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Interprets the covariance of organic carbon and sulfide sulfur in core samples. This covariance results from the catabolism of organic carbon and concomitant reduction of sulfate by sulfate reducing bacteria to form aqueous sulfide which reacts with iron. Defines a central basin area that was the most anoxic-sulfidic (euxinic). This part of the basin is similar to the area of thickest, most organic carbon-rich sediments and has the greatest source-rock potential for petroleum. -from Author

  10. Ru-decorated Pt nanoparticles on N-doped multi-walled carbon nanotubes by atomic layer deposition for direct methanol fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Anne-Charlotte Elisabeth Birgitta; Yang, R.B.; Haugshøj, K.B.;

    2013-01-01

    We present atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a new method for the preparation of highly dispersed Ru-decorated Pt nanoparticles for use as catalyst in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). The nanoparticles were deposited onto N-doped multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) at 250 °C using trimethyl...... controlled size and composition can be deposited, with up-scaling prospects....

  11. Defect effect on tribological behavior of diamond-like carbon films deposited with hydrogen diluted benzene gas in aqueous environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jin Woo; Park, Se Jun; Moon, Myoung-Woon; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol; Kim, Seock-Sam

    2009-05-01

    This study examined the friction and wear behavior of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films deposited from a radio frequency glow discharge using a hydrogen diluted benzene gas mixture. The DLC films were deposited on Si (1 0 0) and polished stainless steel substrates by radio frequency plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (r.f.-PACVD) at hydrogen to benzene ratios, or the hydrogen dilution ratio, ranging from 0 to 2.0. The wear test was carried out in both ambient and aqueous environments using a homemade ball-on-disk type wear rig. The stability of the DLC coating in an aqueous environment was improved by diluting the benzene precursor gas with hydrogen, suggesting that hydrogen dilution during the deposition of DLC films suppressed the initiation of defects in the film and improved the adhesion of the coating to the interface.

  12. Thermal effects on structure and photoluminescence properties of diamond-like carbon films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Da; LI Qing-shan; WANG Jing-jing; ZHENG Xue-gang

    2006-01-01

    Un-hydrogenated Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) films were prepared by pulsed laser deposition technique at different substrate temperature.The Raman spectra,the absorption and the photoluminescence spectra were measured.The dependence of structure and photoluminescence properties on deposition temperature were studied in detail.The experimental results indicate that the sp2 sites form small clusters that consist of both olefinic chains and aromatic ring groups within the sp3 matrix.With raising deposition temperature,the optical band gaps increase from 1.87 to 2.85 eV.The main band of photoluminescence centered at around 700nm shifts to short wavelength,and the intensity of this band increases.The photoluminescence can be attributed to carrier localization within an increasing sp2 clusters.It was clarified that the DLC films are ordered with increasing deposition temperature.

  13. Effects of experimental nitrogen deposition on peatland carbon pools and fluxes: a modelling analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Blodau, C.; Moore, T. R.; Bubier, J.; Juutinen, S.; Larmola, T.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) pollution of peatlands alters their carbon (C) balances, yet long-term effects and controls are poorly understood. We applied the model PEATBOG to explore impacts of long-term nitrogen (N) fertilization on C cycling in an ombrotrophic bog. Simulations of summer gross ecosystem production (GEP), ecosystem respiration (ER) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) were evaluated against 8 years of observations and extrapolated for 80 years to identify potential effects of N fertilization and factors influencing model behaviour. The model successfully simulated moss decline and raised GEP, ER and NEE on fertilized plots. GEP was systematically overestimated in the model compared to the field data due to factors that can be related to differences in vegetation distribution (e.g. shrubs vs. graminoid vegetation) and to high tolerance of vascular plants to N deposition in the model. Model performance regarding the 8-year response of GEP and NEE to N input was improved by introducing an N content threshold shifting the response of photosynthetic capacity (GEPmax) to N content in shrubs and graminoids from positive to negative at high N contents. Such changes also eliminated the competitive advantages of vascular species and led to resilience of mosses in the long-term. Regardless of the large changes of C fluxes over the short-term, the simulated GEP, ER and NEE after 80 years depended on whether a graminoid- or shrub-dominated system evolved. When the peatland remained shrub-Sphagnum-dominated, it shifted to a C source after only 10 years of fertilization at 6.4 g N m-2 yr-1, whereas this was not the case when it became graminoid-dominated. The modelling results thus highlight the importance of ecosystem adaptation and reaction of plant functional types to N deposition, when predicting the future C balance of N-polluted cool temperate bogs.

  14. Effects of experimental nitrogen deposition on peatland carbon pools and fluxes: a modeling analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Wu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N pollution of peatlands alters their carbon (C balances, yet long-term effects and controls are poorly understood. We applied the model PEATBOG to analyze impacts of long-term nitrogen (N fertilization on C cycling in an ombrotrophic bog. Simulations of summer gross ecosystem production (GEP, ecosystem respiration (ER and net ecosystem exchange (NEE were evaluated against 8 years of observations and extrapolated for 80 years to identify potential effects of N fertilization and factors influencing model behavior. The model successfully simulated moss decline and raised GEP, ER and NEE on fertilized plots. GEP was systematically overestimated in the model compared to the field data due to high tolerance of Sphagnum to N deposition in the model. Model performance regarding the 8 year response of GEP and NEE to N was improved by introducing an N content threshold shifting the response of photosynthesis capacity to N content in shrubs and graminoids from positive to negative at high N contents. Such changes also eliminated the competitive advantages of vascular species and led to resilience of mosses in the long-term. Regardless of the large changes of C fluxes over the short-term, the simulated GEP, ER and NEE after 80 years depended on whether a graminoid- or shrub-dominated system evolved. When the peatland remained shrub-Sphagnum dominated, it shifted to a C source after only 10 years of fertilization at 6.4 g N m−2 yr−1, whereas this was not the case when it became graminoid-dominated. The modeling results thus highlight the importance of ecosystem adaptation and reaction of plant functional types to N deposition, when predicting the future C balance of N-polluted cool temperate bogs.

  15. Effects of acid deposition on dissolution of carbonate stone during summer storms in the Adirondack Mountains, New York, 1987-89

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Paul F.; Reddy, Michael M.; Sherwood, S.I.

    1994-01-01

    This study is part of a long-term research program designed to identify and quantify acid rain damage to carbonate stone. Acidic deposition accelerates the dissolution of carbonate-stone monuments and building materials. Sequential sampling of runoff from carbonate-stone (marble) and glass (reference) microcatchments in the Adirondack Mountains in New York State provided a detailed record of the episodic fluctuations in rain rate and runoff chemistry during individual summer storms. Rain rate and chemical concentrations from carbonate-stone and glass runoff fluctuated three to tenfold during storms. Net calcium-ion concentrations from the carbonatestone runoff, a measure of stone dissolution, typically fluctuated twofold during these storms. High net sulfate and net calcium concentrations in the first effective runoff at the start of a storm indicated that atmospheric pollutants deposited on the stone surface during dry periods formed calcium sulfate minerals, an important process in carbonate stone dissolution. Dissolution of the carbonate stone generally increased up to twofold during coincident episodes of low rain rate (less than 5 millimeters per hour) and decreased rainfall (glass runoff) pH (less than 4.0); episodes of high rain rate (cloudbursts) were coincident with a rapid increase in rainfall pH and also a rapid decrease in the dissolution of carbonate-stone. During a storm, it seems the most important factors causing increased dissolution of carbonate stone are coincident periods of low rain rate and decreased rainfall pH. Dissolution of the carbonate stone decreased slightly as the rain rate exceeded about 5 millimeters per hour, probably in response to rapidly increasing rainfall pH during episodes of high rain rate and shorter contact time between the runoff and the stone surface. High runoff rates resulting from cloudbursts remove calcium sulfate minerals formed during dry periods prior to storms and also remove dissolution products formed in large

  16. Genesis of Pb-Zn-Cu-Ag Deposits within Permian Carboniferous-Carbonate Rocks in Madina Regency, North Sumatra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhakti Hamonangan Harahap

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Strong mineralized carbonate rock-bearing Pb-Zn-Cu-Ag-(Au ores are well exposed on the Latong River area, Madina Regency, North Sumatra Province. The ore deposit is hosted within the carbonate rocks of the Permian to Carboniferous Tapanuli Group. It is mainly accumulated in hollows replacing limestone in the forms of lensoidal, colloform, veins, veinlets, cavity filling, breccia, and dissemination. The ores dominantly consist of galena (126 000 ppm Pb and sphalerite (2347 ppm Zn. The other minerals are silver, azurite, covellite, pyrite, marcasite, and chalcopyrite. This deposit was formed by at least three phases of mineralization, i.e. pyrite and then galena replaced pyrite, sphalerite replaced galena, and pyrite. The last phase is the deposition of chalcopyrite that replaced sphalerite. The Latong sulfide ore deposits posses Pb isotope ratio of 206Pb/204Pb = 19.16 - 20.72, 207Pb/204Pb = 16.16 - 17.29, and 208Pb/204Pb = 42.92 - 40.78. The characteristic feature of the deposit indicates that it is formed by a sedimentary process rather than an igneous activity in origin. This leads to an interpretation that the Latong deposit belongs to the Sedimentary Hosted Massive Sulfide (SHMS of Mississippi Valley-Type (MVT. The presence of SHMS in the island arc such as Sumatra has become controversial. For a long time, ore deposits in the Indonesian Island Arc are always identical with the porphyry and hydrothermal processes related to arc magmatism. This paper is dealing with the geology of Latong and its base metal deposits. This work is also to interpret their genesis as well as general relationship to the regional geology and tectonic setting of Sumatra.

  17. How relevant is the deposition of mercury onto snowpacks? – Part 2: A modeling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Durnford

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available An unknown fraction of mercury that is deposited onto snowpacks is revolatilized to the atmosphere. Determining the revolatilized fraction is important since mercury that enters the snowpack meltwater may be converted to highly toxic bioaccumulating methylmercury. In this study, we present a new dynamic physically-based snowpack/meltwater model for mercury that is suitable for large-scale atmospheric models for mercury. It represents the primary physical and chemical processes that determine the fate of mercury deposited onto snowpacks. The snowpack/meltwater model was implemented in Environment Canada's atmospheric mercury model GRAHM. For the first time, observed snowpack-related mercury concentrations are used to evaluate and constrain an atmospheric mercury model. We find that simulated concentrations of mercury in both snowpacks and the atmosphere's surface layer agree closely with observations. The simulated concentration of mercury in both in the top 30 cm and the top 150 cm of the snowpack, averaged over 2005–2009, is predominantly below 6 ng L−1 over land south of 66.5° N but exceeds 18 ng L−1 over sea ice in extensive areas of the Arctic Ocean and Hudson Bay. The average simulated concentration of mercury in snowpack meltwater runoff tends to be higher on the Russian/European side (>20 ng L−1 of the Arctic Ocean than on the Canadian side (<10 ng L−1. The correlation coefficient between observed and simulated monthly mean atmospheric surface-level gaseous elemental mercury (GEM concentrations increased significantly with the inclusion of the new snowpack/meltwater model at two of the three stations (midlatitude, subarctic studied and remained constant at the third (arctic. Oceanic emissions are postulated to produce the observed summertime maximum in concentrations of surface-level atmospheric GEM at Alert in the Canadian Arctic and to generate the summertime volatility observed in

  18. Effects of wet deposition on the abundance and size distribution of black carbon in East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Y.; Moteki, N.; Oshima, N.; Ohata, S.; Koike, M.; Shibano, Y.; Takegawa, N.; Kita, K.

    2016-05-01

    An improved understanding of the variations in the mass concentration and size distribution of black carbon (BC) in the free troposphere (FT) over East Asia, where BC emissions are very high, is needed to reliably estimate the radiative forcing of BC in climate models. We measured these parameters and the carbon monoxide (CO) concentration by conducting the Aerosol Radiative Forcing in East Asia (A-FORCE) 2013W aircraft campaign in East Asia in winter 2013 and compared these data with measurements made in the same region in spring 2009. The median BC concentrations in the FT originating from North China (NC) and South China (SC) showed different seasonal variations, which were primarily caused by variations in meteorological conditions. CO concentrations above the background were much higher in SC than in NC in both seasons, suggesting a more active upward transport of CO. In SC, precipitation greatly increased from winter to spring, leading to an increased wet deposition of BC. As a result, the median BC concentration in the FT was highest in SC air in winter. This season and region were optimal for the effective transport of BC from the planetary boundary layer to the FT. The count median diameters of the BC size distributions generally decreased with altitude via wet removal during upward transport. The altitude dependence of the BC size distributions was similar in winter and spring, in accord with the similarity in the BC mixing state. The observed BC concentrations and microphysical properties will be useful for evaluating the performance of climate models.

  19. Structure and gas-barrier properties of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films deposited on inner walls of cylindrical polyethylene terephthalate by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Gong, Chunzhi; Tian, Xiubo; Yang, Shiqin; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of radio-frequency (RF) power on the structure and gas permeation through amorphous hydrogenated carbon films deposited on cylindrical polyethylene terephthalate (PET) samples is investigated. The results show that a higher radio-frequency power leads to a smaller sp 3/sp 2 value but produces fewer defects with smaller size. The permeability of PET samples decreases significantly after a-C:H deposition and the RF only exerts a small influence. However, the coating uniformity, color, and wettability of the surface are affected by the RF power. A higher RF power results in to better uniformity and it may be attributed to the combination of the high-density plasma and sample heating.

  20. Structure and gas-barrier properties of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films deposited on inner walls of cylindrical polyethylene terephthalate by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of radio-frequency (RF) power on the structure and gas permeation through amorphous hydrogenated carbon films deposited on cylindrical polyethylene terephthalate (PET) samples is investigated. The results show that a higher radio-frequency power leads to a smaller sp3/sp2 value but produces fewer defects with smaller size. The permeability of PET samples decreases significantly after a-C:H deposition and the RF only exerts a small influence. However, the coating uniformity, color, and wettability of the surface are affected by the RF power. A higher RF power results in to better uniformity and it may be attributed to the combination of the high-density plasma and sample heating.

  1. Morphology and crystallinity control of ultrathin TiO2 layers deposited on carbon nanotubes by temperature-step atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Nuñez, Carlos; Zhang, Yucheng; Li, Meng; Chawla, Vipin; Erni, Rolf; Michler, Johann; Park, Hyung Gyu; Utke, Ivo

    2015-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with titanium oxide (TiO2) have generated considerable interest over the last decade and become a promising nanomaterial for a wide range of energy applications. The efficient use of the outstanding electrical properties of this nanostructure relies heavily on the quality of the interface and the thickness and morphology of the TiO2 layer. However, complete surface coverage of the chemically inert CNTs and appropriate control of the morphology of the TiO2 layer have not been achieved so far. Here, we report a new strategy to obtain ultrathin TiO2 coatings deposited by ``Temperature-step'' Atomic Layer Deposition (TS-ALD) with complete surface coverage of non-functionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and controlled morphology and crystallinity of the TiO2 film. This strategy consists of adjusting the temperature during the ALD deposition to obtain the desired morphology. Complete coverage of long non-functionalized MWCNTs with conformal anatase layers was obtained by using a low temperature of 60 °C during the nucleation stage followed by an increase to 220 °C during the growth stage. This resulted in a continuous and amorphous TiO2 layer, covered with a conformal anatase coating. Starting with the deposition at 220 °C and reducing to 60 °C resulted in sporadic crystal grains at the CNT/TiO2 interface covered with an amorphous TiO2 layer. The results were accomplished through an extensive study of nucleation and growth of titanium oxide films on MWCNTs, of which a detailed characterization is presented in this work.Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with titanium oxide (TiO2) have generated considerable interest over the last decade and become a promising nanomaterial for a wide range of energy applications. The efficient use of the outstanding electrical properties of this nanostructure relies heavily on the quality of the interface and the thickness and morphology of the TiO2 layer. However, complete surface coverage of the

  2. Geochemistry and hydrology of a small catchment: fogs as an important part of the wet deposition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tesař, Miroslav; Fottová, D.; Šír, Miloslav; Fišák, Jaroslav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 39, 1-2 (2010), s. 389-390. ISSN 0324-0894. [Congress of the Carpathian-Balkan Geological Association /19./. 23.09.2010-26.09.2010, Thessaloniki] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/09/1918 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510; CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : fog water deposition * chemistry * fog water sampler Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology

  3. Reserve estimation of central part of Choghart north anomaly iron ore deposit through ordinary kriging method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali Akbar Daya

    2012-01-01

    This paper is devoted to application of ordinary kriging method in Choghart north anomaly iron ore deposit in Yazd province,Iran.In order to estimate the deposit,2329 input data gained from 26 boreholes were used.Fe grade was selected as the major regional variable on which the present research has focused.All of the available data were changed to 12.5 m composites so that statistical regularization could be reached.Studies indicated that iron grade input data had single-population characteristics.To carry out ordinary kriging,a spherical model was fitted over empirical variogram.Then the model was verified through cross validation method and proved to be valid with a coherence coefficient of 0.773between the estimated and real data.Plotting the empirical variogram in different directions showed no geometric anisotropy for the deposit.To estimate the Iron grade,ordinary kriging method was used according to which,all of the exploitable blocks with dimensions 20 m × 20 m × 12.5 m were block estimated within the estimation space.Finally tonnage-grade curve has been drawn and reserve classified into measured,indicated and inferred.

  4. Mineral Occurrence, Translocation, and Weathering in Soils Developed on Four Types of Carbonate and Non-carbonate Alluvial Fan Deposits in Mojave Desert, Southeastern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Y.; McDonald, E. V.

    2007-12-01

    Soil geomorphology and mineralogy can reveal important clues about Quaternary climate change and geochemical process occurring in desert soils. We investigated (1) the mineral transformation in desert soils developed on four types of alluvial fans (carbonate and non-carbonate) under the same conditions of climate and landscape evolution; and (2) the effects of age, parent materials, and eolian processes on the transformation and translocation of the minerals. Four types of alluvial-fan deposits along the Providence Mountains piedmonts, Mojave Desert, southeastern California, USA were studied: (1) carbonate rocks, primarily limestone and marble (LS), (2) fine-grained rhyodacite and rhyolitic tuff mixed with plutonic and carbonate rocks (VX), (3) fine- to coarse- grained mixed plutonic (PM) rocks, and (4) coarse-grained quartz monzonite (QM). These juxtaposed fan deposits are physically correlated in a small area (about 20 km by 15 km) and experienced the same climatic changes in the late Pleistocene and Holocene. The soils show characteristic mineral compositions of arid/semiarid soils: calcite is present in nearly all of the samples, and a few of the oldest soils contain gypsum and soluble salts. Parent material has profound influence on clay mineral composition of the soils: (1) talc were observed only in soils developed on the volcanic mixture fan deposits, and talc occurs in all horizons; (2) palygorskite occur mainly in the petrocalcic (Bkm) of old soils developed on the LS and VX fan deposits, indicating pedogenic origin; (3) chlorite was observed mainly in soils developed on VX fan deposits (all ages) and on some LS deposits, but it is absent in soils developed on PM and QM fan deposits; and (4) vermiculite was common throughout soils developed on plutonic rock fan deposits. These mineralogical differences suggest that minerals in the soils are primarily inherited from their parent materials and that mineral weathering in this area was weak. Except the

  5. Synthesis of CNTs via chemical vapor deposition of carbon dioxide as a carbon source in the presence of NiMgO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotubes were synthesized via the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, using Ni/MgO as a catalyst and CO2 as a nontoxic, abundant, and economical carbon source. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), along with the results from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopy, confirmed the successful formation of CNTs. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) was performed to investigate the weight percentage of the present elements in the synthesized powder, and a significant yield of 27.38% was confirmed. The reaction mechanism was discussed, and the role of the carbon source, catalyst support, and presence of H2 in the reaction environment was elaborated. - Highlights: • CO2 was used as a nontoxic and economical carbon source for CNT production. • A novel Ni supported MgO has been synthesized and employed in the CVD process. • CNTs were produced with a significant yield of 27.38%

  6. Field Emission Properties of Ball-Like Nano-Carbon Thin Films Deposited on Mo Films with Accidented Topography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball-like nano-carhon thin films (BNCTs) are grown on Mo layers by microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition (MPCVD) system. The Mo layers are deposited on ceramic substrates by electron beam deposition method and are pretreated by ultrasonically scratching. The optimization effects of ultrasonically scratching pretreat-ment on the surface micro-structures of carbon films are studied. It is found from field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) images and Raman spectra that the surface structures of the carbon films deposited on Mo pretreated are improved, which are composed of highly uniform nano-structured carbon balls with considerable disorder structures. Field emission (FE) measurements are carried out using a diode structure. The experimental results indicate that the BNCTs exhibit good FE properties, which have the turn on field of 1.56 V/μm, and the current density of 1.0mA/cm2 at electric field of 4.0 V/μm, the uniformly distributed emission site density from a broad well-proportioned emission area of 4 cm2 are also obtained. Linearity is observed in Fowler–Nordheim (F–N) plots in higher Geld region, and the possible emission mechanism of BNCTs is discussed. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  7. Spatial variation of salt-marsh organic and inorganic deposition and organic carbon accumulation: Inferences from the Venice lagoon, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roner, M.; D'Alpaos, A.; Ghinassi, M.; Marani, M.; Silvestri, S.; Franceschinis, E.; Realdon, N.

    2016-07-01

    inorganic soil content near the edge is due to the preferential deposition of inorganic sediment from the adjacent creek, and to the rapid decomposition of the relatively large biomass production. The higher organic matter content in the inner part of the marsh results from the small amounts of suspended sediment that makes it to the inner marsh, and to the low decomposition rate which more than compensates for the lower biomass productivity in the low-lying inner zones. Finally, the average soil organic carbon density from the LOI measurements is estimated to be 0.044 g C cm-3. The corresponding average carbon accumulation rate for the San Felice and Rigà salt marshes, 132 g C m-2 yr-1, highlights the considerable carbon stock and sequestration rate associated with coastal salt marshes.

  8. Effects of elevated CO2 and nitrogen deposition on ecosystem carbon fluxes on the Sanjiang plain wetland in Northeast China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbo Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Increasing atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen (N deposition across the globe may affect ecosystem CO2 exchanges and ecosystem carbon cycles. Additionally, it remains unknown how increased N deposition and N addition will alter the effects of elevated CO2 on wetland ecosystem carbon fluxes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Beginning in 2010, a paired, nested manipulative experimental design was used in a temperate wetland of northeastern China. The primary factor was elevated CO2, accomplished using Open Top Chambers, and N supplied as NH4NO3 was the secondary factor. Gross primary productivity (GPP was higher than ecosystem respiration (ER, leading to net carbon uptake (measured by net ecosystem CO2 exchange, or NEE in all four treatments over the growing season. However, their magnitude had interannual variations, which coincided with air temperature in the early growing season, with the soil temperature and with the vegetation cover. Elevated CO2 significantly enhanced GPP and ER but overall reduced NEE because the stimulation caused by the elevated CO2 had a greater impact on ER than on GPP. The addition of N stimulated ecosystem C fluxes in both years and ameliorated the negative impact of elevated CO2 on NEE. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: In this ecosystem, future elevated CO2 may favor carbon sequestration when coupled with increasing nitrogen deposition.

  9. Very high temperature chemical vapor deposition of new carbon thin films using organic semiconductor molecular beam sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguchi, Takuya [Department of Chemistry, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033 (Japan); Shimada, Toshihiro, E-mail: shimada@chem.s.u-tokyo.ac.j [Department of Chemistry, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033 (Japan); Hanzawa, Akinori; Hasegawa, Tetsuya [Department of Chemistry, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033 (Japan)

    2009-11-30

    We carried out the preparation and characterization of new carbon films deposited using an organic molecular beam deposition apparatus with very high substrate temperature (from room temperature to 2670 K), which we newly developed. When we irradiated molecular beam of organic semiconductor perylene tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (PTCDA) on Y{sub 0.07}Zr{sub 0.93}O{sub 2} (111) at 2170 K, a new carbon material was formed via decomposition and fusing of the molecules. The films were characterized with an atomic force microscope (AFM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Zirconium carbide (ZrC) films were identified beneath the topmost carbon layer by XRD and XPS analyses, which results from chemical reactions of the substrate and the molecules. Partially graphitized aromatic rings of PTCDA were observed from Raman spectroscopy. The present technique - very high temperature chemical vapor deposition using organic semiconductor sources - will be useful to study a vast unexplored field of covalent carbon solids.

  10. Study of modification methods of probes for critical-dimension atomic-force microscopy by the deposition of carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of an experimental study of the modification of probes for critical-dimension atomicforce microscopy (CD-AFM) by the deposition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to improve the accuracy with which the surface roughness of vertical walls is determined in submicrometer structures are presented. Methods of the deposition of an individual CNT onto the tip of an AFM probe via mechanical and electrostatic interaction between the probe and an array of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) are studied. It is shown that, when the distance between the AFM tip and a VACNT array is 1 nm and the applied voltage is within the range 20–30 V, an individual carbon nanotube is deposited onto the tip. On the basis of the results obtained in the study, a probe with a carbon nanotube on its tip (CNT probe) with a radius of 7 nm and an aspect ratio of 1:15 is formed. Analysis of the CNT probe demonstrates that its use improves the resolution and accuracy of AFM measurements, compared with the commercial probe, and also makes it possible to determine the roughness of the vertical walls of high-aspect structures by CD-AFM. The results obtained can be used to develop technological processes for the fabrication and reconditioning of special AFM probes, including those for CD-AFM, and procedures for the interoperational express monitoring of technological process parameters in the manufacturing of elements for micro- and nanoelectronics and micro- and nanosystem engineering

  11. Study of modification methods of probes for critical-dimension atomic-force microscopy by the deposition of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ageev, O. A., E-mail: ageev@sfedu.ru [Southern Federal University, Institute for Nanotechnologies, Electronics, and Electronic Equipment Engineering (Russian Federation); Bykov, Al. V. [NT-MDT (Russian Federation); Kolomiitsev, A. S.; Konoplev, B. G.; Rubashkina, M. V.; Smirnov, V. A.; Tsukanova, O. G. [Southern Federal University, Institute for Nanotechnologies, Electronics, and Electronic Equipment Engineering (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The results of an experimental study of the modification of probes for critical-dimension atomicforce microscopy (CD-AFM) by the deposition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to improve the accuracy with which the surface roughness of vertical walls is determined in submicrometer structures are presented. Methods of the deposition of an individual CNT onto the tip of an AFM probe via mechanical and electrostatic interaction between the probe and an array of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) are studied. It is shown that, when the distance between the AFM tip and a VACNT array is 1 nm and the applied voltage is within the range 20–30 V, an individual carbon nanotube is deposited onto the tip. On the basis of the results obtained in the study, a probe with a carbon nanotube on its tip (CNT probe) with a radius of 7 nm and an aspect ratio of 1:15 is formed. Analysis of the CNT probe demonstrates that its use improves the resolution and accuracy of AFM measurements, compared with the commercial probe, and also makes it possible to determine the roughness of the vertical walls of high-aspect structures by CD-AFM. The results obtained can be used to develop technological processes for the fabrication and reconditioning of special AFM probes, including those for CD-AFM, and procedures for the interoperational express monitoring of technological process parameters in the manufacturing of elements for micro- and nanoelectronics and micro- and nanosystem engineering.

  12. Synthesis of thin films in boron-carbon-nitrogen ternary system by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukreja, Ratandeep Singh

    The Boron Carbon Nitorgen (B-C-N) ternary system includes materials with exceptional properties such as wide band gap, excellent thermal conductivity, high bulk modulus, extreme hardness and transparency in the optical and UV range that find application in most fields ranging from micro-electronics, bio-sensors, and cutting tools to materials for space age technology. Interesting materials that belong to the B-C-N ternary system include Carbon nano-tubes, Boron Carbide, Boron Carbon Nitride (B-CN), hexagonal Boron Nitride ( h-BN), cubic Boron Nitride (c-BN), Diamond and beta Carbon Nitride (beta-C3N4). Synthesis of these materials requires precisely controlled and energetically favorable conditions. Chemical vapor deposition is widely used technique for deposition of thin films of ceramics, metals and metal-organic compounds. Microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) is especially interesting because of its ability to deposit materials that are meta-stable under the deposition conditions, for e.g. diamond. In the present study, attempt has been made to synthesize beta-carbon nitride (beta-C3N4) and cubic-Boron Nitride (c-BN) thin films by MPECVD. Also included is the investigation of dependence of residual stress and thermal conductivity of the diamond thin films, deposited by MPECVD, on substrate pre-treatment and deposition temperature. Si incorporated CNx thin films are synthesized and characterized while attempting to deposit beta-C3N4 thin films on Si substrates using Methane (CH4), Nitrogen (N2), and Hydrogen (H2). It is shown that the composition and morphology of Si incorporated CNx thin film can be tailored by controlling the sequence of introduction of the precursor gases in the plasma chamber. Greater than 100mum size hexagonal crystals of N-Si-C are deposited when Nitrogen precursor is introduced first while agglomerates of nano-meter range graphitic needles of C-Si-N are deposited when Carbon precursor is introduced first in the

  13. Deodorisation effect of diamond-like carbon/titanium dioxide multilayer thin films deposited onto polypropylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeki, K.; Hirakuri, K. K.; Masuzawa, T.

    2011-04-01

    Many types of plastic containers have been used for the storage of food. In the present study, diamond-like carbon (DLC)/titanium oxide (TiO2) multilayer thin films were deposited on polypropylene (PP) to prevent flavour retention and to remove flavour in plastic containers. For the flavour removal test, two types of multilayer films were prepared, DLC/TiO2 films and DLC/TiO2/DLC films. The residual gas concentration of acetaldehyde, ethylene, and turmeric compounds in bottle including the DLC/TiO2-coated and the DLC/TiO2/DLC-coated PP plates were measured after UV radiation, and the amount of adsorbed compounds to the plates was determined. The percentages of residual gas for acetaldehyde, ethylene, and turmeric with the DLC/TiO2 coated plates were 0.8%, 65.2% and 75.0% after 40 h of UV radiation, respectively. For the DLC/TiO2/DLC film, the percentages of residual gas for acetaldehyde, ethylene and turmeric decreased to 34.9%, 76.0% and 85.3% after 40 h of UV radiation, respectively. The DLC/TiO2/DLC film had a photocatalytic effect even though the TiO2 film was covered with the DLC film.

  14. Deodorisation effect of diamond-like carbon/titanium dioxide multilayer thin films deposited onto polypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many types of plastic containers have been used for the storage of food. In the present study, diamond-like carbon (DLC)/titanium oxide (TiO2) multilayer thin films were deposited on polypropylene (PP) to prevent flavour retention and to remove flavour in plastic containers. For the flavour removal test, two types of multilayer films were prepared, DLC/TiO2 films and DLC/TiO2/DLC films. The residual gas concentration of acetaldehyde, ethylene, and turmeric compounds in bottle including the DLC/TiO2-coated and the DLC/TiO2/DLC-coated PP plates were measured after UV radiation, and the amount of adsorbed compounds to the plates was determined. The percentages of residual gas for acetaldehyde, ethylene, and turmeric with the DLC/TiO2 coated plates were 0.8%, 65.2% and 75.0% after 40 h of UV radiation, respectively. For the DLC/TiO2/DLC film, the percentages of residual gas for acetaldehyde, ethylene and turmeric decreased to 34.9%, 76.0% and 85.3% after 40 h of UV radiation, respectively. The DLC/TiO2/DLC film had a photocatalytic effect even though the TiO2 film was covered with the DLC film.

  15. Characterization of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films deposited by MFPUMST at different ratios of mixed gases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Haiyang Dai; Changyong Zhan; Hui Jiang; Ningkang Huang

    2012-12-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon films (-C:H) on -type (100) silicon wafers were prepared with a middle frequency pulsed unbalanced magnetron sputtering technique (MFPUMST) at different ratios of methane–argon gases. The band characteristics, mechanical properties as well as refractive index were measured by Raman spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nano-indentation tests and spectroscopic ellipsometry. It is found that the 3 fraction increases with increasing Ar concentration in the range of 17–50%, and then decreases when Ar concentration exceeds 50%. The nano-indentation tests reveal that nano-hardness and elastic modulus of the films increase with increasing Ar concentration in the range of 17–50%, while decreases with increasing Ar concentration from 50% to 86%. The variations in the nano-hardness and the elastic modulus could be interpreted due to different 3 fractions in the prepared -C:H films. The variation of refractive index with wavelength have the same tendency for the -C:H films prepared at different Ar concentrations, they decrease with increasing wavelength from 600 to 1700 nm. For certain wavelengths within 600–1700 nm, refractive index has the highest value at the Ar concentration of 50%, and it is smaller at the Ar concentration of 86% than at 17%. The results given above indicate that ratio of mixed gases has a strong influence on bonding configuration and properties of -C:H films during deposition. The related mechanism is discussed in this paper.

  16. Etching characteristics and application of physical-vapor-deposited amorphous carbon for multilevel resist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the fabrication of a multilevel resist (MLR) based on a very thin, physical-vapor-deposited (PVD) amorphous carbon (a-C) layer, the etching characteristics of the PVD a-C layer with a SiOx hard mask were investigated in a dual-frequency superimposed capacitively coupled plasma etcher by varying the following process parameters in O2/N2/Ar plasmas: high-frequency/low-frequency combination (fHF/fLF), HF/LF power ratio (PHF/PLF), and O2 and N2 flow rates. The very thin nature of the a-C layer helps to keep the aspect ratio of the etched features low. The etch rate of the PVD a-C layer increased with decreasing fHF/fLF combination and increasing PLF and was initially increased but then decreased with increasing N2 flow rate in O2/N2/Ar plasmas. The application of a 30 nm PVD a-C layer in the MLR structure of ArF PR/BARC/SiOx/PVD a-C/TEOS oxide supported the possibility of using a very thin PVD a-C layer as an etch-mask layer for the TEOS-oxide layer

  17. Deodorisation effect of diamond-like carbon/titanium dioxide multilayer thin films deposited onto polypropylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozeki, K., E-mail: ozeki@mx.ibaraki.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ibaraki University, 4-12-1, Nakanarusawa, Hitachi, Ibaraki 316-8511 (Japan); Frontier Research Center for Applied Atomic Sciences, 162-1 Shirakata, Toukai, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Hirakuri, K.K. [Applied Systems Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Denki University, Ishizaka, Hatoyama, Hiki, Saitama 350-0394 (Japan); Masuzawa, T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ibaraki University, 4-12-1, Nakanarusawa, Hitachi, Ibaraki 316-8511 (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    Many types of plastic containers have been used for the storage of food. In the present study, diamond-like carbon (DLC)/titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) multilayer thin films were deposited on polypropylene (PP) to prevent flavour retention and to remove flavour in plastic containers. For the flavour removal test, two types of multilayer films were prepared, DLC/TiO{sub 2} films and DLC/TiO{sub 2}/DLC films. The residual gas concentration of acetaldehyde, ethylene, and turmeric compounds in bottle including the DLC/TiO{sub 2}-coated and the DLC/TiO{sub 2}/DLC-coated PP plates were measured after UV radiation, and the amount of adsorbed compounds to the plates was determined. The percentages of residual gas for acetaldehyde, ethylene, and turmeric with the DLC/TiO{sub 2} coated plates were 0.8%, 65.2% and 75.0% after 40 h of UV radiation, respectively. For the DLC/TiO{sub 2}/DLC film, the percentages of residual gas for acetaldehyde, ethylene and turmeric decreased to 34.9%, 76.0% and 85.3% after 40 h of UV radiation, respectively. The DLC/TiO{sub 2}/DLC film had a photocatalytic effect even though the TiO{sub 2} film was covered with the DLC film.

  18. The impact of nitrogen deposition on carbon sequestration in European forests and forest soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Vries, Wim; Reinds, Gert Jan; Gundersen, Per;

    2006-01-01

    An estimate of net carbon (C) pool changes and long-term C sequestration in trees and soils was made at more than 100 intensively monitored forest plots (level II plots) and scaled up to Europe based on data for more than 6000 forested plots in a systematic 16 km x 16 km grid (level I plots). C...... CO2 emissions because of harvest and forest fires, was assumed 33% of the overall C pool changes by growth. C sequestration in the soil were based on calculated nitrogen (N) retention (N deposition minus net N uptake minus N leaching) rates in soils, multiplied by the C/N ratio of the forest soils......, using measured data only (level II plots) or a combination of measurements and model calculations (level I plots). Net C sequestration by forests in Europe (both trees and soil) was estimated at 0.117 Gton yr(-1), with the C sequestration in stem wood being approximately four times as high (0.094 Gton...

  19. Humidity Sensitivity of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Networks Deposited by Dielectrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianhong Cui

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an investigation on the humidity sensitivity of deposited multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT networks using ac dielectrophoresis (DEP between interdigitated electrodes (IDEs. MWCNTs dispersed in ethanol were trapped and enriched between IDEs on a Si/SiO2 substrate under a positive DEP force. After the DEP process, the ethanol was evaporated and the MWCNT network on a substrate with IDEs was put into a furnace for repeated thermal annealing. It was found that the resistance stability of the network was effectively improved through thermal annealing. The humidity sensitivity was obtained by measuring the resistance of the MWCNT network with different relative humidity at room temperature. The experimental results show the resistance increases linearly with increasing the relative humidity from 25% to 95% RH with a sensitivity of 0.5%/%RH. The MWCNT networks have a reversible humidity sensing capacity with response time and recovery time of about 3 s and 25 s, respectively. The resistance is dependent on temperature with a negative coefficient of about -0.33%/K in a temperature range from 293 K to 393 K.

  20. Optical properties of ion-beam-deposited ion-modified diamondlike (a-C:H) carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamondlike carbon (DLC) is a hard, semitransparent material usually containing varying amounts of hydrogen. These materials have numerous potential applications, including use as coatings for infrared optics, and as such, the effects of damaging irradiation is of practical interest. In this paper we present results of variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometric (VASE) studies of ion-beam-deposited DLC films. These films have been further modified by directing 1-MeV gold ions, as well as 6.4-MeV fluorine ions, through the DLC and into the underlying silicon substrates, and the percentage of hydrogen in the film was measured versus fluence using proton recoil analysis. Optical analysis was performed assuming the Lorentz oscillator model. Three versions were used: one oscillator, two oscillator (with one fixed in energy), and two oscillator with all parameter variable. The latter model fits the VASE data extremely well, and the two oscillators can be interpreted as involving π to π* and σ to σ* band transitions. With ion modification the oscillators shift to lower photon energy, consistent with reduction in hydrogen concentration and possible increased graphitization