WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon concentrating mechanisms

  1. Impacts of CO2 concentration on growth, lipid accumulation, and carbon-concentrating-mechanism-related gene expression in oleaginous Chlorella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jianhua; Xu, Hui; Luo, Yuanchan; Wan, Minxi; Huang, Jianke; Wang, Weiliang; Li, Yuanguang

    2015-03-01

    Biodiesel production by microalgae with photosynthetic CO2 biofixation is thought to be a feasible way in the field of bioenergy and carbon emission reduction. Knowledge of the carbon-concentrating mechanism plays an important role in improving microalgae carbon fixation efficiency. However, little information is available regarding the dramatic changes of cells suffered upon different environmental factors, such as CO2 concentration. The aim of this study was to investigate the growth, lipid accumulation, carbon fixation rate, and carbon metabolism gene expression under different CO2 concentrations in oleaginous Chlorella. It was found that Chlorella pyrenoidosa grew well under CO2 concentrations ranging from 1 to 20 %. The highest biomass and lipid productivity were 4.3 g/L and 107 mg/L/day under 5 % CO2 condition. Switch from high (5 %) to low (0.03 %, air) CO2 concentration showed significant inhibitory effect on growth and CO2 fixation rate. The amount of the saturated fatty acids was increased obviously along with the transition. Low CO2 concentration (0.03 %) was suitable for the accumulation of saturated fatty acids. Reducing the CO2 concentration could significantly decrease the polyunsaturated degree in fatty acids. Moreover, the carbon-concentrating mechanism-related gene expression revealed that most of them, especially CAH2, LCIB, and HLA3, had remarkable change after 1, 4, and 24 h of the transition, which suggests that Chlorella has similar carbon-concentrating mechanism with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The findings of the present study revealed that C. pyrenoidosa is an ideal candidate for mitigating CO2 and biodiesel production and is appropriate as a model for mechanism research of carbon sequestration.

  2. Photorespiration and carbon concentrating mechanisms: two adaptations to high O2, low CO2 conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroney, James V; Jungnick, Nadine; Dimario, Robert J; Longstreth, David J

    2013-11-01

    This review presents an overview of the two ways that cyanobacteria, algae, and plants have adapted to high O2 and low CO2 concentrations in the environment. First, the process of photorespiration enables photosynthetic organisms to recycle phosphoglycolate formed by the oxygenase reaction catalyzed by ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). Second, there are a number of carbon concentrating mechanisms that increase the CO2 concentration around Rubisco which increases the carboxylase reaction enhancing CO2 fixation. This review also presents possibilities for the beneficial modification of these processes with the goal of improving future crop yields.

  3. Predicting Effects of Ocean Acidification and Warming on Algae Lacking Carbon Concentrating Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet E Kübler

    Full Text Available Seaweeds that lack carbon-concentrating mechanisms are potentially inorganic carbon-limited under current air equilibrium conditions. To estimate effects of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and ocean acidification on photosynthetic rates, we modeled rates of photosynthesis in response to pCO2, temperature, and their interaction under limiting and saturating photon flux densities. We synthesized the available data for photosynthetic responses of red seaweeds lacking carbon-concentrating mechanisms to light and temperature. The model was parameterized with published data and known carbonate system dynamics. The model predicts that direction and magnitude of response to pCO2 and temperature, depend on photon flux density. At sub-saturating light intensities, photosynthetic rates are predicted to be low and respond positively to increasing pCO2, and negatively to increasing temperature. Consequently, pCO2 and temperature are predicted to interact antagonistically to influence photosynthetic rates at low PFD. The model predicts that pCO2 will have a much larger effect than temperature at sub-saturating light intensities. However, photosynthetic rates under low light will not increase proportionately as pCO2 in seawater continues to rise. In the range of light saturation (Ik, both CO2 and temperature have positive effects on photosynthetic rate and correspondingly strong predicted synergistic effects. At saturating light intensities, the response of photosynthetic rates to increasing pCO2 approaches linearity, but the model also predicts increased importance of thermal over pCO2 effects, with effects acting additively. Increasing boundary layer thickness decreased the effect of added pCO2 and, for very thick boundary layers, overwhelmed the effect of temperature on photosynthetic rates. The maximum photosynthetic rates of strictly CO2-using algae are low, so even large percentage increases in rates with climate change will not

  4. Carbon Concentration of Austenite

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    Z. Ławrynowicz

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The investigation was carried out to examine the influence of temperature and times of austempering process on the maximum extend towhich the bainite reaction can proceed and the carbon content in retained austenite. It should be noted that a small percentage change in theaustenite carbon content can have a significant effect on the subsequent austempering reaction changing the volume fraction of the phasespresent and hence, the resulting mechanical properties. Specimens were prepared from an unalloyed ductile cast iron, austenitised at 950oCfor 60 minutes and austempered by the conventional single-step austempering process at four temperatures between BS and MS, eg., 250,300, 350 and 400oC. The samples were austempered at these temperatures for 15, 30, 60, 120 and 240 minutes and finally quenched toambient temperature. Volume fractions of retained austenite and carbon concentration in the residual austenite have been observed byusing X-ray diffraction. Additionally, carbon concentration in the residual austenite was calculated using volume fraction data of austeniteand a model developed by Bhadeshia based on the McLellan and Dunn quasi-chemical thermodynamic model. The comparison ofexperimental data with the T0, T0' and Ae3' phase boundaries suggests the likely mechanism of bainite reaction in cast iron is displacive rather than diffusional. The carbon concentration in retained austenite demonstrates that at the end of bainite reaction the microstructure must consist of not only ausferrite but additionally precipitated carbides.

  5. Interrelated modules in cyanobacterial photosynthesis: the carbon-concentrating mechanism, photorespiration, and light perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Beronda L; Lechno-Yossef, Sigal; Kerfeld, Cheryl A

    2016-05-01

    Here we consider the cyanobacterial carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) and photorespiration in the context of the regulation of light harvesting, using a conceptual framework borrowed from engineering: modularity. Broadly speaking, biological 'modules' are semi-autonomous functional units such as protein domains, operons, metabolic pathways, and (sub)cellular compartments. They are increasingly recognized as units of both evolution and engineering. Modules may be connected by metabolites, such as NADPH, ATP, and 2PG. While the Calvin-Benson-Bassham Cycle and photorespiratory salvage pathways can be considered as metabolic modules, the carboxysome, the core of the cyanobacterial CCM, is both a structural and a metabolic module. In photosynthetic organisms, which use light cues to adapt to the external environment and which tune the photosystems to provide the ATP and reducing power for carbon fixation, light-regulated modules are critical. The primary enzyme of carbon fixation, RuBisCO, uses CO2 as a substrate, which is accumulated via the CCM. However RuBisCO also has a secondary reaction in which it utilizes O2, a by-product of the photochemical modules, which leads to photorespiration. A complete understanding of the interplay among CCM and photorespiration is predicated on uncovering their connections to the light reactions and the regulatory factors and pathways that tune these modules to external cues. We probe this connection by investigating light inputs into the CCM and photorespiratory pathways in the chromatically acclimating cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon.

  6. Whitings as a Potential Mechanism for Controlling Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Concentrations – Final Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady D. Lee; William A. Apel; Michelle R. Walton

    2006-03-01

    Species of cyanobacteria in the genera Synechococcus and Synechocystis are known to be the catalysts of a phenomenon called "whitings", which is the formation and precipitation of fine-grained CaCO3 particles. Whitings occur when the cyanobacteria fix atmospheric CO2 through the formation of CaCO3 on their cell surfaces which leads to precipitation to the ocean floor and subsequent entombment in mud. Whitings represent one potential mechanism for CO2 sequestration. Research was performed to determine the ability of various strains of Synechocystis and Synechococcus to calcify when grown in microcosms amended with 2.5 mM HCO3- and 3.4 mM Ca2+. Results indicated that while all strains tested have the ability to calcify, only two, Synechococcus species, strains PCC 8806 and PCC 8807, were able to calcify to the extent that CaCO3 was precipitated. Enumeration of the cyanobacterial cultures during testing indicated that cell density did not appear to have an effect on calcification. Factors that had the greatest effect on calcification were CO2 removal and subsequent generation of alkaline pH. As CO2 was removed, growth medium pH increased and soluble Ca2+ was removed from solution. The largest increases in growth medium pH occurred when CO2 levels dropped below 400 ppmv. Precipitation of CaCO3 catalyzed by the growth and physiology of cyanobacteria in the Genus Synechococcus represents a potential mechanism for sequestration of atmospheric CO2 produced during the burning of coal for power generation. Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8806 and Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8807 were tested in microcosm experiments for their ability to calcify when exposed to a fixed calcium concentration of 3.4 mM and dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations of 0.5, 1.25 and 2.5 mM. Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8806 removed calcium continuously over the duration of the experiment producing approximately 18.6 mg of solid-phase calcium. Calcium removal occurred over a two-day time period when

  7. Carbon allocation and element composition in four Chlamydomonas mutants defective in genes related to the CO2 concentrating mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memmola, Francesco; Mukherjee, Bratati; Moroney, James V; Giordano, Mario

    2014-09-01

    Four mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with defects in different components of the CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM) or in Rubisco activase were grown autotrophically at high pCO2 and then transferred to low pCO2, in order to study the role of different components of the CCM on carbon allocation and elemental composition. To study carbon allocation, we measured the relative size of the main organic pools by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence was used to analyze the elemental composition of algal cells. Our data show that although the organic pools increased their size at high CO2 in all strains, their stoichiometry was highly homeostatic, i.e., the ratios between carbohydrates and proteins, lipid and proteins, and carbohydrates and lipids, did not change significantly. The only exception was the wild-type 137c, in which proteins decreased relative to carbohydrates and lipids, when the cells were transferred to low CO2. It is noticeable that the two wild types used in this study responded differently to the transition from high to low CO2. Malfunctions of the CCM influenced the concentration of several elements, somewhat altering cell elemental stoichiometry: especially the C/P and N/P ratios changed appreciably in almost all strains as a function of the growth CO2 concentration, except in 137c and the Rubisco activase mutant rca1. In strain cia3, defective in the lumenal carbonic anhydrase (CA), the cell quotas of P, S, Ca, Mn, Fe, and Zn were about 5-fold higher at low CO2 than at high CO2. A Principle Components Analysis showed that, mostly because of its elemental composition, cia3 behaved in a substantially different way from all other strains, at low CO2. The lumenal CA thus plays a crucial role, not only for the correct functioning of the CCM, but also for element utilization. Not surprisingly, growth at high CO2 attenuated differences among strains.

  8. Effects of Stress Concentration on the Mechanical Properties of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Naito

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical properties of conventional CFRP plates with small holes were investigated systematically. Those artificial holes are considered to be rivet connection between CFRP and other materials. The machining holes were employed with different number (n=0-5 and different mode, e.g., parallel (Sample A, 45 degree (Sample B and perpendicular (Sample C against the loading direction. To understand the mechanical properties of the CFRP plates clearly, tensile tests and failure analysis were conducted experimentally. Excellent mechanical properties were obtained for Sample A, compared to the other ones. This is due to the different size of the cross-section area in the specimen. With increasing the number of rivet hole, the mechanical properties were lineally decreasing. Such mechanical properties were analyzed by direct observation using a high speed camera, i.e., in-situ measurement of deformation during the tensile loading was carried

  9. Engineering the Cyanobacterial Carbon Concentrating Mechanism for Enhanced CO2 Capture and Fixation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandh, Gustaf; Cai, Fei; Shih, Patrick; Kinney, James; Axen, Seth; Salmeen, Annette; Zarzycki, Jan; Sutter, Markus; Kerfeld, Cheryl

    2011-06-02

    In cyanobacteria CO2 fixation is localized in a special proteinaceous organelle, the carboxysome. The CO2 fixation enzymes are encapsulated by a selectively permeable protein shell. By structurally and functionally characterizing subunits of the carboxysome shell and the encapsulated proteins, we hope to understand what regulates the shape, assembly and permeability of the shell, as well as the targeting mechanism and organization of the encapsulated proteins. This knowledge will be used to enhance CO2 fixation in both cyanobacteria and plants through synthetic biology. The same strategy can also serve as a template for the production of modular synthetic bacterial organelles. Our research is conducted using a variety of techniques such as genomic sequencing and analysis, transcriptional regulation, DNA synthesis, synthetic biology, protein crystallization, Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS), protein-protein interaction assays and phenotypic characterization using various types of cellular imaging, e.g. fluorescence microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and Soft X-ray Tomography (SXT).

  10. Effect of Sodium Carbonate Concentrations on the Formation and Mechanism of Regenerated Silk Fibroin Nanofibers by Electrospinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Dou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Degumming is the first process for the preparation of all silk-based products. In this paper, effect of sodium carbonate concentrations for silk degumming on the formation of electrospun silk fibroin nanofibers was investigated and the reason for the silk electrospinning process was explained for the first time by differences from the microstructure of regenerated silk fibroin. With increasing the sodium carbonate concentration, microstructure both in the aqueous solutions and in the electrospinning solutions transformed from nanofibrils to nanoparticles, leading to obvious changes on rheological property; electrospinning solutions with nanofibrils behaved like the native silk dope and owned remarkably higher viscosity than the solutions with nanoparticles showing very low viscosity. More interestingly, nanofibrils favored the formation of silk nanofibers with ease, and even nanofibers could be electrospun at concentration 2%. However, nanoparticles were completely unable to generate nanofibers at high spinning concentration 8%. Importance of sodium carbonate concentrations is heavily emphasized for impacting the microstructure types and further influencing the electrospinning performance of regenerated silk. Hence, sodium carbonate concentrations provide a controllable choice for the preparation of silk-based electrospun biomaterials with desired properties.

  11. A carboxysomal carbon-concentrating mechanism in the cyanelles of the 'coelacanth' of the algal world, Cyanophora paradoxa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathinejad, Sara; Steiner, Jürgen M; Reipert, Siegfried; Marchetti, Martina; Allmaier, Günter; Burey, Suzanne C; Ohnishi, Norikazu; Fukuzawa, Hideya; Löffelhardt, Wolfgang; Bohnert, Hans J

    2008-05-01

    Cyanelles are the peculiar plastids of glaucocystophyte algae that retained a peptidoglycan wall from the ancestral cyanobacterial endosymbiont. All cyanobacteria and most algae possess an inorganic carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) that involves a microcompartment--carboxysomes in prokaryotes and pyrenoids in eukaryotes--harboring the bulk of cellular (plastidic) Rubisco. In the case of the living fossil, Cyanophora paradoxa, the existence of a CCM was a matter of debate. Microarray data revealing 142 CO(2)-responsive genes (induced or repressed through a shift from high to low CO(2) conditions), gas exchange measurements and measurements of photosynthetic affinity provided strong support for a CCM. We favor a recent hypothesis that glaucocystophyte cyanelles as the closest cousins to cyanobacteria among plastids contain 'eukaryotic carboxysomes': bicarbonate enrichment within cyanelles should be considerably higher than in chloroplasts with their pyrenoid-based CCM. Thus, the stress-bearing function of the peptidoglycan layer, the other unique heritage, would be indispensable. An isolation method for cyanelle 'carboxysomes' was developed and the protein components other than Rubisco analyzed by MS. Rubisco activase was identified and corroborated by western blotting. The well-established cyanelle in vitro import system allows to use them as 'honorary cyanobacteria': assembly processes of supramolecular structures as phycobilisomes and carboxysomes thus can be studied after import of nucleus-encoded precursor proteins and subsequent fractionation. Even minor components can easily be tracked and a surprisingly dynamic view is obtained. Labeled pre-activase was imported into isolated cyanelles and 30% of the mature protein was found to be incorporated into the carboxysome fraction. A final decision between carboxysome or pyrenoid must await the identification of cyanelle carbonic anhydrase and, especially, the demonstration of shell proteins.

  12. Evolution of photorespiration from cyanobacteria to land plants, considering protein phylogenies and acquisition of carbon concentrating mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, Martin; Kern, Ramona; Maurino, Veronica G; Hanson, David T; Weber, Andreas P M; Sage, Rowan F; Bauwe, Hermann

    2016-05-01

    Photorespiration and oxygenic photosynthesis are intimately linked processes. It has been shown that under the present day atmospheric conditions cyanobacteria and all eukaryotic phototrophs need functional photorespiration to grow autotrophically. The question arises as to when this essential partnership evolved, i.e. can we assume a coevolution of both processes from the beginning or did photorespiration evolve later to compensate for the generation of 2-phosphoglycolate (2PG) due to Rubisco's oxygenase reaction? This question is mainly discussed here using phylogenetic analysis of proteins involved in the 2PG metabolism and the acquisition of different carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs). The phylogenies revealed that the enzymes involved in the photorespiration of vascular plants have diverse origins, with some proteins acquired from cyanobacteria as ancestors of the chloroplasts and others from heterotrophic bacteria as ancestors of mitochondria in the plant cell. Only phosphoglycolate phosphatase was found to originate from Archaea. Notably glaucophyte algae, the earliest branching lineage of Archaeplastida, contain more photorespiratory enzymes of cyanobacterial origin than other algal lineages or land plants indicating a larger initial contribution of cyanobacterial-derived proteins to eukaryotic photorespiration. The acquisition of CCMs is discussed as a proxy for assessing the timing of periods when photorespiratory activity may have been enhanced. The existence of CCMs also had marked influence on the structure and function of photorespiration. Here, we discuss evidence for an early and continuous coevolution of photorespiration, CCMs and photosynthesis starting from cyanobacteria via algae, to land plants.

  13. Transcriptome-Wide Changes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Gene Expression Regulated by Carbon Dioxide and the CO2-Concentrating Mechanism Regulator CIA5/CCM1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wei; Si, Yaqing; Douglass, Stephen; Casero, David; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Ladunga, Istvan; Liu, Peng; Spalding, Martin H.

    2012-01-01

    We used RNA sequencing to query the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii transcriptome for regulation by CO2 and by the transcription regulator CIA5 (CCM1). Both CO2 and CIA5 are known to play roles in acclimation to low CO2 and in induction of an essential CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM), but less is known about their interaction and impact on the whole transcriptome. Our comparison of the transcriptome of a wild type versus a cia5 mutant strain under three different CO2 conditions, high CO2 (5%), low CO2 (0.03 to 0.05%), and very low CO2 (<0.02%), provided an entry into global changes in the gene expression patterns occurring in response to the interaction between CO2 and CIA5. We observed a massive impact of CIA5 and CO2 on the transcriptome, affecting almost 25% of all Chlamydomonas genes, and we discovered an array of gene clusters with distinctive expression patterns that provide insight into the regulatory interaction between CIA5 and CO2. Several individual clusters respond primarily to either CIA5 or CO2, providing access to genes regulated by one factor but decoupled from the other. Three distinct clusters clearly associated with CCM-related genes may represent a rich source of candidates for new CCM components, including a small cluster of genes encoding putative inorganic carbon transporters. PMID:22634760

  14. Transcriptome-Wide Changes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Gene Expression Regulated by Carbon Dioxide and the CO2-Concentrating Mechanism Regulator CIA5/CCM1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, W; Si, YQ; Douglass, S; Casero, D; Merchant, SS; Pellegrini, M; Ladunga, I; Liu, P; Spalding, MH

    2012-06-26

    We used RNA sequencing to query the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii transcriptome for regulation by CO2 and by the transcription regulator CIA5 (CCM1). Both CO2 and CIA5 are known to play roles in acclimation to low CO2 and in induction of an essential CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM), but less is known about their interaction and impact on the whole transcriptome. Our comparison of the transcriptome of a wild type versus a cia5 mutant strain under three different CO2 conditions, high CO2 (5%), low CO2 (0.03 to 0.05%), and very low CO2 (< 0.02%), provided an entry into global changes in the gene expression patterns occurring in response to the interaction between CO2 and CIA5. We observed a massive impact of CIA5 and CO2 on the transcriptome, affecting almost 25% of all Chlamydomonas genes, and we discovered an array of gene clusters with distinctive expression patterns that provide insight into the regulatory interaction between CIA5 and CO2. Several individual clusters respond primarily to either CIA5 or CO2, providing access to genes regulated by one factor but decoupled from the other. Three distinct clusters clearly associated with CCM-related genes may represent a rich source of candidates for new CCM components, including a small cluster of genes encoding putative inorganic carbon transporters.

  15. Mechanisms of Soil Carbon Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Rattan

    2015-04-01

    Carbon (C) sequestration in soil is one of the several strategies of reducing the net emission of CO2 into the atmosphere. Of the two components, soil organic C (SOC) and soil inorganic C (SIC), SOC is an important control of edaphic properties and processes. In addition to off-setting part of the anthropogenic emissions, enhancing SOC concentration to above the threshold level (~1.5-2.0%) in the root zone has numerous ancillary benefits including food and nutritional security, biodiversity, water quality, among others. Because of its critical importance in human wellbeing and nature conservancy, scientific processes must be sufficiently understood with regards to: i) the potential attainable, and actual sink capacity of SOC and SIC, ii) permanence of the C sequestered its turnover and mean residence time, iii) the amount of biomass C needed (Mg/ha/yr) to maintain and enhance SOC pool, and to create a positive C budget, iv) factors governing the depth distribution of SOC, v) physical, chemical and biological mechanisms affecting the rate of decomposition by biotic and abiotic processes, vi) role of soil aggregation in sequestration and protection of SOC and SIC pool, vii) the importance of root system and its exudates in transfer of biomass-C into the SOC pools, viii) significance of biogenic processes in formation of secondary carbonates, ix) the role of dissolved organic C (DOC) in sequestration of SOC and SIC, and x) importance of weathering of alumino-silicates (e.g., powered olivine) in SIC sequestration. Lack of understanding of these and other basic processes leads to misunderstanding, inconsistencies in interpretation of empirical data, and futile debates. Identification of site-specific management practices is also facilitated by understanding of the basic processes of sequestration of SOC and SIC. Sustainable intensification of agroecosystems -- producing more from less by enhancing the use efficiency and reducing losses of inputs, necessitates thorough

  16. Activation of the Carbon Concentrating Mechanism by CO2 Deprivation Coincides with Massive Transcriptional Restructuring in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueggeman, Andrew J.; Gangadharaiah, Dayananda S.; Cserhati, Matyas F.; Casero, David; Weeks, Donald P.; Ladunga, Istvan

    2012-01-01

    A CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM) is essential for the growth of most eukaryotic algae under ambient (392 ppm) and very low (<100 ppm) CO2 concentrations. In this study, we used replicated deep mRNA sequencing and regulatory network reconstruction to capture a remarkable scope of changes in gene expression that occurs when Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells are shifted from high to very low levels of CO2 (≤100 ppm). CCM induction 30 to 180 min post-CO2 deprivation coincides with statistically significant changes in the expression of an astonishing 38% (5884) of the 15,501 nonoverlapping C. reinhardtii genes. Of these genes, 1088 genes were induced and 3828 genes were downregulated by a log2 factor of 2. The latter indicate a global reduction in photosynthesis, protein synthesis, and energy-related biochemical pathways. The magnitude of transcriptional rearrangement and its major patterns are robust as analyzed by three different statistical methods. De novo DNA motif discovery revealed new putative binding sites for Myeloid oncogene family transcription factors potentially involved in activating low CO2–induced genes. The (CA)n repeat (9 ≤ n ≤ 25) is present in 29% of upregulated genes but almost absent from promoters of downregulated genes. These discoveries open many avenues for new research. PMID:22634764

  17. The carbon-nitrogen balance of the nodule and its regulation under elevated carbon dioxide concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libault, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Legumes have developed a unique way to interact with bacteria: in addition to preventing infection from pathogenic bacteria like any other plant, legumes also developed a mutualistic symbiotic relationship with one gender of soil bacteria: rhizobium. This interaction leads to the development of a new root organ, the nodule, where the differentiated bacteria fix for the plant the atmospheric dinitrogen (atmN2). In exchange, the symbiont will benefit from a permanent source of carbon compounds, products of the photosynthesis. The substantial amounts of fixed carbon dioxide dedicated to the symbiont imposed to the plant a tight regulation of the nodulation process to balance carbon and nitrogen incomes and outcomes. Climate change including the increase of the concentration of the atmospheric carbon dioxide is going to modify the rates of plant photosynthesis, the balance between nitrogen and carbon, and, as a consequence, the regulatory mechanisms of the nodulation process. This review focuses on the regulatory mechanisms controlling carbon/nitrogen balances in the context of legume nodulation and discusses how the change in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration could affect nodulation efficiency.

  18. Mechanics of filled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Monteiro, A.O.

    2014-04-01

    The benefits of filling carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with assorted molecular and crystalline substances have been investigated for the past two decades. Amongst the study of new structural phases, defects, chemical reactions and varied types of host-guest interactions, there is one fundamental characterisation aspect of these systems that continues to be overlooked: the mechanical behaviour of filled CNTs. In contrast to their empty counterparts, the mechanics of filled CNTs is a subject where reports appear far and apart, this despite being key to the application of these materials in technological devices. In the following paragraphs, we review the work that has been carried out up to the present on the mechanics of filled CNTs. The studies discussed range from experimental resonant frequency essays performed within electron microscopes to modelling, via molecular dynamics, of three-point bending of nanotubes filled with gases. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Mechanism design problems in carbon economics

    OpenAIRE

    Arava, Radhika; Narahari, Y.; Bagchi, Deepak; Suresh, P.; Subrahmanya, SV

    2010-01-01

    Reduction of carbon emissions is of paramount importance in the context of global warming and climate change. Countries and global companies are now engaged in understanding systematic ways of solving carbon economics problems, aimed ultimately at achieving well defined emission targets. This paper proposes mechanism design as an approach to solving carbon economics problems. The paper first introduces carbon economics issues in the world today and next focuses on carbon economics problems...

  20. Mechanism of SO2 removal by carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizzio, Anthony A.; DeBarr, Joseph A.

    1997-01-01

    The reaction of SO2 with carbon (C) in the presence of O2 and H2O involves a series of reactions that leads to the formation of sulfuric acid as the final product. The rate-determining step in the overall process is the oxidation of SO2 to SO3. Three SO2 oxidation reactions are possible. Adsorbed SO2 (C−SO2) can react either with gas phase O2 or with adsorbed oxygen (C−O complex) to form sulfur trioxide (SO3), or gas phase SO2 can react directly with the C−O complex. In optimizing the SO2 removal capabilities of carbon, most studies only assume a given mechanism for SO2 adsorption and conversion to H2SO4 to be operable. The appropriate SO2 oxidation step and role of the C−O complex in this mechanism remain to be determined. The ultimate goal of this study was to prepare activated char from Illinois coal with optimal properties for low-temperature (80−150°C) removal of sulfur dioxide from coal combustion flue gas. The SO2 adsorption capacity of activated char was found to be inversely proportional to the amount of oxygen adsorbed on its surface. A temperature-programmed desorption technique was developed to titrate those sites responsible for adsorption of SO2 and conversion to H2SO4. On the basis of these results, a mechanism for SO2 removal by carbon was proposed. The derived rate expression showed SO2 adsorption to be dependent only on the fundamental rate constant and concentration of carbon atoms designated as free sites. Recent studies indicate a similar relationship exists between the rate of carbon gasification (in CO2 or H2O) and the number of reactive sites as determined by transient kinetics experiments. Utilizing the concept of active or free sites, it was possible to produce a char from Illinois coal having an SO2 adsorption capacity surpassing that of a commercial catalytic activated carbon.

  1. Changes in plasma potassium concentration during carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Bugge, K; Lyng, K M

    1999-01-01

    Hyperkalaemia with ECG changes had been noted during prolonged carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum in pigs. We have compared plasma potassium concentrations during surgery in 11 patients allocated randomly to undergo either laparoscopic or open appendectomy and in another 17 patients allocated randomly...... to either carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum or abdominal wall lifting for laparoscopic colectomy. Despite an increasing metabolic acidosis, prolonged carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum resulted in only a slight increase in plasma potassium concentrations, which was both statistically and clinically insignificant....... Thus hyperkalaemia is unlikely to develop in patients with normal renal function undergoing carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopic surgery....

  2. Classroom Carbon Dioxide Concentration, School Attendance, and Educational Attainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaihre, Santosh; Semple, Sean; Miller, Janice; Fielding, Shona; Turner, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Background: We tested the hypothesis that classroom carbon dioxide (CO[subscript 2]) concentration is inversely related to child school attendance and educational attainment. Methods: Concentrations of CO[subscript 2] were measured over a 3-5?day period in 60 naturally ventilated classrooms of primary school children in Scotland. Concentrations of…

  3. Structure and multiscale mechanics of carbon nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book aims at providing a broad overview on the relationship between structure and mechanical properties of carbon nanomaterials from world-leading scientists in the field. The main aim is to get an in-depth understanding of the broad range of mechanical properties of carbon materials based on their unique nanostructure and on defects of several types and at different length scales. Besides experimental work mainly based on the use of (in-situ) Raman and X-ray scattering and on nanoindentation, the book also covers some aspects of multiscale modeling of the mechanics of carbon nanomaterials.

  4. Mechanically stacked concentrator tandem solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, V. M.; Rumyantsev, V. D.; Karlina, L. B.; Kazantsev, A. B.; Khvostikov, V. P.; Shvarts, M. Z.; Sorokina, S. V.

    1995-01-01

    Four-terminal mechanically stacked solar cells were developed for advanced space arrays with line-focus reflective concentrators. The top cells are based on AlGaAs/GaAs multilayer heterostructures prepared by low temperature liquid phase epitaxy. The bottom cells are based on heteroepitaxial InP/InGaAs liquid phase epitaxy or on homo-junction GaSb, Zn-diffused structures. The sum of the highest reached efficiencies of the top and bottom cells is 29.4 percent. The best four-terminal tandems have an efficiency of 27 to 28 percent. Solar cells were irradiated with 1 MeV electrons and their performances were determined as a function of fluence up to 10(exp 16) cm(exp-2). It was shown that the radiation resistance of developed tandem cells is similar to the most radiative stable AlGaAs/GaAs cells with a thin p-GaAs photoactive layer.

  5. Changes in plasma potassium concentration during carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Bugge, K; Lyng, K M

    1999-01-01

    Hyperkalaemia with ECG changes had been noted during prolonged carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum in pigs. We have compared plasma potassium concentrations during surgery in 11 patients allocated randomly to undergo either laparoscopic or open appendectomy and in another 17 patients allocated randomly....... Thus hyperkalaemia is unlikely to develop in patients with normal renal function undergoing carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopic surgery....

  6. Influence of the carbon dioxide concentration on the resistance to carbonation of concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, J.H.M.

    2013-01-01

    Carbonation of concrete at ambient CO2 concentration is a slow process. This makes the testing of the resistance of concrete against carbonation often too slow to be applicable for service life assessments of new structures. Raising the CO2-concentration will accelerate the test but the validity of

  7. [CO2-Concentrating Mechanism and Its Traits in Haloalkaliphilic Cyanobacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupriyanova, E V; Samylina, O S

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are a group of oxygenic phototrophs existing for at least 3.5 Ga. Photosynthetic CO2 assimilation by cyanobacteria occurs via the Calvin cycle, with RuBisCO, its key enzyme, having very low affinity to CO2. This is due to the fact that atmospheric CO2 concentration in Archaean, when the photosynthetic apparatus evolved, was several orders higher than now. Later, in the epoch of Precambrian microbial communities, CO2 content in the atmosphere decreased drastically. Thus, present-day phototrophs, including cyanobacteria, require adaptive mechanisms for efficient photosynthesis. In cyanobacterial cells, this function is performed by the CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM), which creates elevated CO2 concentrations in the vicinity of RuBisCO active centers, thus significantly increasing the rate of CO2 fixation in the Calvin cycle. CCM has been previously studied only for freshwater and marine cyanobacteria. We were the first to investigate CCM in haloalkaliphilic cyanobacteria from soda lakes. Extremophilic haloalkaliphilic cyanobacteria were shown to possess a well-developed CCM with the structure and functional principles similar to those of freshwater and marine strains. Analysis of available data suggests that regulation of the amount of inorganic carbon transported into the cell is probably the general CCM function under these conditions.

  8. Fast readout of carbon nanotube mechanical resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerwaldt, Harold; Singh, Vibhor; Schneider, Ben; Schouten, Raymond; van der Zant, Herre; Steele, Gary

    2013-03-01

    We perform fast readout measurements of carbon nanotube mechanical resonators. Using an electronic mixing scheme, we can detect the amplitude of the mechanical motion with an intermediate frequency (IF) of 46 MHz and a timeconstant of 1 us, up to 5 orders of magnitude faster than before. Previous measurements suffered from a low bandwidth due to the combination of the high resistance of the carbon nanotube and a large stray capacitance. We have increased the bandwidth significantly by using a high-impedance, close-proximity HEMT amplifier. The increased bandwidth should allow us to observe the nanotube's thermal motion and its transient response, approaching the regime of real-time detection of the carbon nanotube's mechanical motion.

  9. Thermodynamic Mechanism Analysis of Calcification Roasting Process of Bastnaesite Concentrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Peng; Wu, Wenyuan; Bian, Xue

    2017-03-01

    A novel calcification roasting decomposition method for bastnaesite concentrates has been proposed previously. In this work, the thermodynamic mechanism was investigated via simultaneous measurements of thermogravimetry and differential thermal analyses, combined with X-ray diffraction analyses. Rare earth oxides and calcium fluorides were generated after bastnaesite and calcium hydroxide broke down, respectively. The generation and decomposition of calcium carbonate occurred at the same time. Considering the difficulties in obtaining pure substances, theoretical calculations were applied to determine the standard enthalpy of formation (Δf H 298), Gibbs free energies of formation (Δf G 298), and heat capacities at constant pressure (C p) of some rare earth minerals (CeFCO3 and CeOF). Based on these results, the standard Gibbs energy of reaction at different temperatures (Δr G T) was ascertained, and the major reactions were verified to be thermodynamically reasonable.

  10. Mechanical Design of Carbon Ion Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Carbon Ion Optics are expected to provide much longer thruster life due to their resistance to sputter erosion. There are a number of different forms of carbon that have been used for fabricating ion thruster optics. The mechanical behavior of carbon is much different than that of most metals, and poses unique design challenges. In order to minimize mission risk, the behavior of carbon must be well understood, and components designed within material limitations. Thermal expansion of the thruster structure must be compatible with thermal expansion of the carbon ion optics. Specially designed interfaces may be needed so that grid gap and aperture alignment are not adversely affected by dissimilar material properties within the thruster. The assembled thruster must be robust and tolerant of launch vibration. The following paper lists some of the characteristics of various carbon materials. Several past ion optics designs are discussed, identifying strengths and weaknesses. Electrostatics and material science are not emphasized so much as the mechanical behavior and integration of grid electrodes into an ion thruster.

  11. Quantum mechanical studies of carbon structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartelt, Norman Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Ward, Donald [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhou, Xiaowang [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Foster, Michael E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Schultz, Peter A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Wang, Bryan M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); McCarty, Kevin F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Carbon nanostructures, such as nanotubes and graphene, are of considerable interest due to their unique mechanical and electrical properties. The materials exhibit extremely high strength and conductivity when defects created during synthesis are minimized. Atomistic modeling is one technique for high resolution studies of defect formation and mitigation. To enable simulations of the mechanical behavior and growth mechanisms of C nanostructures, a high-fidelity analytical bond-order potential for the C is needed. To generate inputs for developing such a potential, we performed quantum mechanical calculations of various C structures.

  12. Study on Behavior of Carbon Reduction of Monazite Concentrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The behavior of monazite concentrate reduced by carbon, especially the decomposed procedure of rare earth phosphates, was investigated by X-ray diffraction , electron probe, TG method and chemical analysis. The results show that rare earth phosphates in monazite concentrate can be reduced to their oxides, among them the decomposition processes of cerium phosphate are not in step with lanthanum phosphate, neodymium phosphate and so on, and the phosphorus was volatilized into air in simple form.

  13. Mechanical properties of functionalized carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z Q; Liu, B; Chen, Y L; Hwang, K C [FML, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Jiang, H [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Huang, Y [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)], E-mail: liubin@tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: y-huang@northwestern.edu

    2008-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) used to reinforce polymer matrix composites are functionalized to form covalent bonds with the polymer in order to enhance the CNT/polymer interfaces. These bonds destroy the perfect atomic structures of a CNT and degrade its mechanical properties. We use atomistic simulations to study the effect of hydrogenization on the mechanical properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes. The elastic modulus of CNTs gradually decreases with the increasing functionalization (percentage of C-H bonds). However, both the strength and ductility drop sharply at a small percentage of functionalization, reflecting their sensitivity to C-H bonds. The cluster C-H bonds forming two rings leads to a significant reduction in the strength and ductility. The effect of carbonization has essentially the same effect as hydrogenization.

  14. A new mechanism for carbon nanotube evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Key discoveries on the growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes(CNTs) have recently been achieved by CAS researcher ZHU Zhenping and his research group at the State Key Laboratory of Coal Conversion,the Institute of Coal Chemistry of CAS, funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China and the CAS Bairen Program.

  15. Carbon dioxide concentration in Mediterranean greenhouses : how much lost production?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanghellini, C.; Incrocci, L.; Gazquez, J.C.; Dimauro, B.

    2008-01-01

    In the absence of artificial supply of carbon dioxide in the greenhouse environment, the CO2 absorbed in the process of photosynthesis must ultimately come from the external ambient through the ventilation openings. This requires that the CO2 concentration within the house must be lower than the ext

  16. Mechanical and Electrical Properties of Organogels with Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniruzzaman, Mohammad; Winey, Karen

    2008-03-01

    Organogels are fascinating thermally reversible viscoelastic materials that are comprised of an organic liquid and low concentrations (typically organogel/carbon nanotube composites using 12-hydroxystearic acid (HSA) as the gelator molecule and pristine and carboxylated multi-wall carbon nanotubes as the nanofillers and 1,2-dichlorobenzene as the organic solvent. We have achieved significant improvements in the mechanical and electrical properties of organogels by incorporating these carbon nanotubes. For example, the linear viscoelastic regime of the HSA organogel, an indicator of the strength of the gel, extends by a factor of 4 with the incorporation of 0.2 wt% of the carboxylated nanotubes. Also, the carbon nanotubes (specially the pristine tubes) improve the electrical conductivity of the organogels, e.g. six orders of magnitude enhancement in electrical conductivity with 0.2 wt% of pristine tubes. Differential scanning calorimetry experiments indicate that the nanotubes do not affect the thermoreversibility of the organogels.

  17. Regulation of CO2 Concentrating Mechanism in Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Burnap

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this chapter, we mainly focus on the acclimation of cyanobacteria to the changing ambient CO2 and discuss mechanisms of inorganic carbon (Ci uptake, photorespiration, and the regulation among the metabolic fluxes involved in photoautotrophic, photomixotrophic and heterotrophic growth. The structural components for several of the transport and uptake mechanisms are described and the progress towards elucidating their regulation is discussed in the context of studies, which have documented metabolomic changes in response to changes in Ci availability. Genes for several of the transport and uptake mechanisms are regulated by transcriptional regulators that are in the LysR-transcriptional regulator family and are known to act in concert with small molecule effectors, which appear to be well-known metabolites. Signals that trigger changes in gene expression and enzyme activity correspond to specific “regulatory metabolites” whose concentrations depend on the ambient Ci availability. Finally, emerging evidence for an additional layer of regulatory complexity involving small non-coding RNAs is discussed.

  18. High Black Carbon (BC) Concentrations along Indian National Highways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S.; Singh, A. K.; Singh, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract:Black carbon (BC), the optically absorbing component of carbonaceous aerosol, has direct influence on radiation budget and global warming. Vehicular pollution is one of the main sources for poor air quality and also atmospheric pollution. The number of diesel vehicles has increased on the Indian National Highways during day and night; these vehicles are used for the transport of goods from one city to another city and also used for public transport. A smoke plume from the vehicles is a common feature on the highways. We have made measurements of BC mass concentrations along the Indian National Highways using a potable Aethalometer installed in a moving car. We have carried out measurements along Varanasi to Kanpur (NH-2), Varanasi to Durgapur (NH-2), Varanasi to Singrauli (SH-5A) and Varanasi to Ghazipur (NH-29). We have found high concentration of BC along highways, the average BC mass concentrations vary in the range 20 - 40 µg/m3 and found high BC mass concentrations up to 600 μg/m3. Along the highways high BC concentrations were characteristics of the presence of industrial area, power plants, brick kilns and slow or standing vehicles. The effect of increasing BC concentrations along the National Highways and its impact on the vegetation and human health will be presented. Key Words: Black Carbon; Aethalometer; mass concentration; Indian National Highways.

  19. Mechanical dissipation at elevated temperatures in tetrahedral amorphous carbon.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, John P.; Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Czaplewski, David A.; Wendt, Joel Robert

    2005-05-01

    We have measured the temperature dependence of mechanical dissipation in tetrahedral amorphous carbon flexural and torsional resonators over the temperature range from 300 to 1023 K. The mechanical dissipation was found to be controlled by defects within the material, and the magnitude and temperature dependence of the dissipation were found to depend on whether flexural or torsional vibrational modes were excited. The defects that were active under flexural stresses have a relatively flat concentration from 0.4 to 0.7 eV with an ever increasing defect concentration up to 1.9 eV. Under shear stresses (torsion), the defect activation energies increase immediately beginning at 0.4 eV, with increasing defect concentration at higher energies.

  20. Mechanism of phenol adsorption onto electro-activated carbon granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lounici, H; Aioueche, F; Belhocine, D; Drouiche, M; Pauss, A; Mameri, N

    2004-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to determine the mechanisms which govern the adsorption of the phenol onto electro-activated carbon granules. This new activation technique allowed an increase of the performance of the adsorbent. Two models were utilised to understand the improvement in the performance of electroactivated carbon granules. The first, a simple external resistance model based on film resistance, gave acceptable predictions, with an error of less than 15%, between the theoretical results and experimental data independent of the activation potential and phenol initial concentration. The second linear model, based on diffusion phenomena, was more representative in describing the experiment than the first model. It was observed that the electro-activation method did not change the mechanism which governs phenol adsorption onto granular carbon. Indeed, the same mathematical model based on diffusion phenomena made it possible to predict with a very low error (less than 5%) the experimental data obtained for the favourable activation potential, without activation potential and with an unfavourable activation potential. The electro-activation technique makes it possible to increase the number of active sites that improve the performance of the electro-activated granular carbon compared with conventional granular activated carbon.

  1. Morphological Investigation of Calcium Carbonate during Ammonification-Carbonization Process of Low Concentration Calcium Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaigang Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafine calcium carbonate is a widely used cheap additive. The research is conducted in low degree supersaturation solution in order to study the polymorphic phases’ change and its factors of the calcium carbonate precipitate in the ammonification-carbonization process of the solution with calcium. Fine particles of calcium carbonate are made in the solution containing 0.015 mol/L of Ca2+. Over 98% of the calcium carbonate precipitate without ammonification resembles the morphology of calcite, while the introduction of ammonia can benefit the formation of vaterite. It was inferred that the main cause should be serious partial oversaturation or steric effects. Ammonia also helps to form the twin spherical calcium carbonate. However, particles formed in the process of ammonification-carbonization in solution with low concentration degree of calcium are not even with a scale of the particle diameter from 5 to 12 μm. Inorganic salts, alcohol, or organic acid salts have significant controlling effect on the particle diameter of calcium carbonate and can help to decrease the particle diameter to about 3 μm. Anionic surfactants can prevent the conglobation of calcium carbonate particles and shrink its diameter to 500 nm–1 μm.

  2. Atmospheric black carbon and sulfate concentrations in Northeast Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Massling

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of Black Carbon (BC in aerosols at the high Arctic field site Villum Research Station (VRS at Station Nord in North Greenland showed a seasonal variation in BC concentrations with a maximum in winter and spring at ground level. The data was obtained using a Multi Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP. A similar seasonal pattern was found for sulfate concentrations with a maximum level during winter and spring analyzed by ion chromatography. A correlation between BC and sulfate concentrations was observed over the years 2011 to 2013. This finding gives the hint that most likely transport of primary emitted BC particles to the Arctic was accompanied by aging of the aerosols through condensational processes. This process may have led to the formation of secondary inorganic matter and further transport of BC particles as cloud processing and further washout of particles is less likely based on the typically observed transport patterns of air masses arriving at VRS. Additionally, concentrations of EC (elemental carbon based on a thermo-optical method were determined and compared to BC measurements. Model estimates of the climate forcing due to BC in the Arctic are based on contributions of long-range transported BC during spring and summer. The measured concentrations were here compared with model results obtained by the Danish Hemispheric Model, DEHM. Good agreement between measured and modeled concentrations of both BC and sulfate was observed. The dominant source is found to be combustion of fossil fuel with biomass burning as a minor though significant source. During winter and spring the Arctic atmosphere is known to be impacted by long-range transport of BC and associated with the Arctic haze phenomenon.

  3. Mechanical Properties of Single-Walled (5,5) Carbon Nanotubes with Vacancy Defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Shi-Jun; KONG Yong; LI Fa-Shen

    2007-01-01

    First-principles simulation is used to investigate the structural and mechanical properties of vacancy defective single-walled (5,5) carbon nanotubes. The relations of the defect concentration, distribution and characteristic of defects to Young's modulus of nanotubes are quantitatively studied. It is found that each dangling-bond structure (per supercell) decreases Young's modulus of nanotube by 6.1% for symmetrical distribution cases. However the concentrative vacancy structure with saturated atoms has less influence on carbon nanotubes. It is suggested that the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes depend strongly upon the structure and relative position of vacancies in a certain defect concentration.

  4. Mechanisms of toxicity by carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Yañez, Yury; Muñoz, Balam; Albores, Arnulfo

    2013-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) consist of a family of carbon built nanoparticles, whose biological effects depend on their physical characteristics and other constitutive chemicals (impurities and functions attached). CNTs are considered the twenty first century material due to their unique physicochemical characteristics and applicability to industrial product. The use of these materials steadily increases worldwide and toxic outcomes need to be studied for each nanomaterial in depth to prevent adverse effects to humans and the environment. Entrance into the body is physical, and usually few nanoparticles enter the body; however, once there, they are persistent due to their limited metabolisms, so their removal is slow, and chronic cumulative health effects are studied. Oxidative stress is the main mechanism of toxicity but size, agglomeration, chirality as well as impurities and functionalization are some of the structural and chemical characteristic contributing to the CNTs toxicity outcomes. Among the many toxicity pathways, interference with cytoskeleton and fibrous mechanisms, cell signaling, membrane perturbations and the production of cytokines, chemokines and inflammation are some of the effects resulting from exposure to CNTs. The aim of this review is to offer an up-to-date scope of the effects of CNTs on biological systems with attention to mechanisms of toxicity.

  5. Sewage sludge composting simulation as carbon/nitrogen concentration change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nassereldeen Kabbashi

    2011-01-01

    Available composting models do not describe accurately the dynamics of composting processes.Difficulty in modeling composting processes is attributed mainly to the unpredicted change in process rate caused by change in activation energy value (E).This article presented the results of an attempt made to utilize patterns of change in carbon,nitrogen and temperature profiles to model sewage sludge composting process as a multi-stage process.Results of controlled sewage sludge composting experiments were used in th estudy.All the experiments were carried out as batch experiments in a 300-liter Horizontal Drum Bioreactor (HDB).Analysis of the profiles of carbon,nitrogen and temperature has indicated that there were clear patterns that could be used to develop simple models of the process,the initial C/N ratio was between 7-8 and the final C/N ratio of the compost in most experiments were found to be around 15.0,indicating the compost was fully matured and could be used safely for agricultural purpose.Electrical conductivity of composting material decreased from 1.83 to 1.67 dS/m,after a period,it increased gradually from 2.01 to 2.23 dS/m and remained at around 2.33 dS/m till the end of composting.It is found that change in the concentration of total carbon can reasonably be described by three constant process rate coefficients (k1,k2,k3).It is found that the process starts with a certain process rate coefficient (k1) and continues until peak temperature is reached,then it reaches lower process (k2) in the declining phase of the thermophilic stage,and finally it proceeds with a faster process rate (k3) when maturation is reached.Change in the concentration of total nitrogen has shown to have the same patterns of change as carbon.

  6. Concentration-mediated multicolor fluorescence polymer carbon dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Chan Jin; Lee, Gibaek; In, Insik; Park, Sung Young

    2016-05-01

    Polymer dots (PDs) showing concentration-mediated multicolor fluorescence were first prepared from sulfuric acid-treated dehydration of Pluronic® F-127 in a single step. Pluronic-based PDs (P-PDs) showed high dispersion stability in solvent media and exhibited a fluorescence emission that was widely tunable from red to blue by adjusting both the excitation wavelengths and the P-PD concentration in an aqueous solution. This unique fluorescence behavior of P-PDs might be a result of cross-talk in the fluorophores of the poly(propylene glycol)-rich core inside the P-PD through either energy transfer or charge transfer. Reconstruction of the surface energy traps of the P-PDs mediated through aggregation may lead to a new generation of carbon-based nanomaterials possessing a fluorescence emission and tunable by adjusting the concentration. These structures may be useful in the design of multifunctional carbon nanomaterials with tunable emission properties according to a variety of internal or external stimuli.

  7. Atmospheric black carbon and sulfate concentrations in Northeast Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massling, A.; Nielsen, I. E.; Kristensen, D.; Christensen, J. H.; Sørensen, L. L.; Jensen, B.; Nguyen, Q. T.; Nøjgaard, J. K.; Glasius, M.; Skov, H.

    2015-08-01

    Measurements of equivalent black carbon (EBC) in aerosols at the high Arctic field site Villum Research Station (VRS) at Station Nord in North Greenland showed a seasonal variation in EBC concentrations with a maximum in winter and spring at ground level. Average measured concentrations were about 0.067 ± 0.071 for the winter and 0.011 ± 0.009 for the summer period. These data were obtained using a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP). A similar seasonal pattern was found for sulfate concentrations with a maximum level during winter and spring analyzed by ion chromatography. Here, measured average concentrations were about 0.485 ± 0.397 for the winter and 0.112 ± 0.072 for the summer period. A correlation between EBC and sulfate concentrations was observed over the years 2011 to 2013 stating a correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.72. This finding gives the hint that most likely transport of primary emitted BC particles to the Arctic was accompanied by aging of the aerosols through condensational processes. BC and sulfate are known to have only partly similar sources with respect to their transport pathways when reaching the high Arctic. Aging processes may have led to the formation of secondary inorganic matter and further transport of BC particles as cloud processing and further washout of particles is less likely based on the typically observed transport patterns of air masses arriving at VRS. Additionally, concentrations of EC (elemental carbon) based on a thermo-optical method were determined and compared to EBC measurements. EBC measurements were generally higher, but a correlation between EC and EBC resulted in a correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.64. Model estimates of the climate forcing due to BC in the Arctic are based on contributions of long-range transported BC during spring and summer. The measured concentrations were here compared with model results obtained by the Danish Eulerian Hemispheric Model, DEHM. Good agreement between measured and

  8. Crack branching in carbon steel. Fracture mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syromyatnikova, A. S.; Alekseev, A. A.; Levin, A. I.; Lyglaev, A. V.

    2010-04-01

    The fracture surfaces of pressure vessels made of carbon steel that form during crack branching propagation are examined by fractography. Crack branching is found to occur at a crack velocity higher than a certain critical value V > V c . In this case, the material volume that is involved in fracture and depends on the elastoplastic properties of the material and the sample width has no time to dissipate the energy released upon crack motion via the damage mechanisms intrinsic in the material under given deformation conditions (in our case, via cracking according to intragranular cleavage).

  9. Organic carbon concentrations and stocks in Romanian mineral forest soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian C. Dincă

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Estimating soils organic carbon stock and its change in time is an actual concern for scientists and climate change policy makers. The present article firstly focus on determination of C stocks in Romania on forest soil types, as well as development of the spatial distribution mapping using a Geographic Information System (GIS and also the secondly on the quantification of uncertainty associated with currently available data on C concentration on forest soils geometrical layers. Determination of C stock was done based on forest management plans database created over 2000-2006. Unlike original database, the data for this study was harmonized on following depths: 0-10 cm, 10-20 cm, 20-40 cm, and > 40 cm. Then, the obtained values were grouped by soil types, resulting average values for the main forest soils from Romania. A soil area weighted average value of 137 t/ha is calculated for Romania, in the range of estimations for other European geographic and climatic areas. The soils that have the largest amount of organic carbon are andosols, vertisols, entic and haplic podzols, whereas the ones that have the smallest values of organic carbon are solonetz and solonchaks. Although current assessment relies on very large number of samples from the forest management planning database, the variability of C concentration remains very large, ~40-50% for coefficient the variation and ~100% of the average, when defining the range of 95% of entire soil population, rather showing the variability than uncertainty of the average estimated. Best fit for C concentration on geometric layers in any forest soil is asymmetric, associated with log-normal distributions.

  10. Carbon acquisition by Cyanobacteria: Mechanisms, Comparative Genomics and Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Aaron; Hagemann, Martin; Bauwe, Hermann; Kahlon, Shira; Ogawa, Teruo

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter we mainly focus on the mechanisms of inorganic carbon uptake, photorespiration, and the regulation between the metabolic fluxes involved in photoautotrophic, photomixotrophic and heterotrophic growth. We identify the genes involved, their regulation and phylogeny. Living in an environment where the CO₂ concentration is considerably lower than required to saturate their carboxylating enzyme, ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), cyanobacteria acquired the CO₂ concentrating mechanism (CCM) that enables them to accumulate CO₂ at the carboxylation site. All the cyanobacteria examined to date are able to fix CO₂ into carbohydrates. However, in addition to variance in the range of physical growth conditions, cyanobacteria also vary substantially in their ability to consume organic carbon from their surroundings. Many strains are obligate photoautotrophs where the sole carbon source is CO₂, while others are able to perform photomixotrophic or even heterotrophic growth using a wide variety of organic substances (c.f. Rippka et al., 1979; Stal and Moezelaar, 1997b). Cyanobacteria constitute a unique case where the anabolic and catabolic carbohydrate metabolisms function in the same cellular compartment. In addition, the photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport pathways share components in the thylakoid membranes. Despite its importance to our understanding of cyanobacterial metabolism, little is known about the mechanisms involved in the shifts between photoautotrophic, heterotrophic and photomixotrophic modes of growth, and their regulation; between the different pathways of carbohydrate breakdown- glycolysis, fermentation, the oxidative pentose phosphate, the Krebs cycle and the photorespiratory pathways. In this chapter we shall briefly focus on recent advances in our understanding of the CCM and carbon metabolism in cyanobacteria.

  11. Carbon Acquisition by Cyanobacteria: Mechanisms, Comparative Genomics, and Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Aaron; Hagemann, Martin; Bauwe, Hermann; Kahlon, Shira; Ogawa, Teruo

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter we mainly focus on the mechanisms of inorganic carbon uptake, photorespiration, and the regulation between the metabolic fluxes involved in photoautotrophic, photomixotrophic and heterotrophic growth. We identify the genes involved, their regulation and phylogeny. Living in an environment where the CO₂ concentration is considerably lower than required to saturate their carboxylating enzyme, ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), cyanobacteria acquired the CO₂ concentrating mechanism (CCM) that enables them to accumulate CO₂ at the carboxylation site. All the cyanobacteria examined to date are able to fix CO₂ into carbohydrates. However, in addition to variance in the range of physical growth conditions, cyanobacteria also vary substantially in their ability to consume organic carbon from their surroundings. Many strains are obligate photoautotrophs where the sole carbon source is CO₂, while others are able to perform photomixotrophic or even heterotrophic growth using a wide variety of organic substances (c.f. Rippka et al., 1979; Stal and Moezelaar, 1997b). Cyanobacteria constitute a unique case where the anabolic and catabolic carbohydrate metabolisms function in the same cellular compartment. In addition, the photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport pathways share components in the thylakoid membranes. Despite its importance to our understanding of cyanobacterial metabolism, little is known about the mechanisms involved in the shifts between photoautotrophic, heterotrophic and photomixotrophic modes of growth, and their regulation; between the different pathways of carbohydrate breakdown- glycolysis, fermentation, the oxidative pentose phosphate, the Krebs cycle and the photorespiratory pathways. In this chapter we shall briefly focus on recent advances in our understanding of the CCM and carbon metabolism in cyanobacteria.

  12. Mechanical Resonances of Helically Coiled Carbon Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, D.; Behlow, H.; Podila, R.; Dickel, D.; Pillai, B.; Skove, M. J.; Serkiz, S. M.; Rao, A. M.

    2014-07-01

    Despite their wide spread applications, the mechanical behavior of helically coiled structures has evaded an accurate understanding at any length scale (nano to macro) mainly due to their geometrical complexity. The advent of helically coiled micro/nanoscale structures in nano-robotics, nano-inductors, and impact protection coatings has necessitated the development of new methodologies for determining their shear and tensile properties. Accordingly, we developed a synergistic protocol which (i) integrates analytical, numerical (i.e., finite element using COMSOL®) and experimental (harmonic detection of resonance; HDR) methods to obtain an empirically validated closed form expression for the shear modulus and resonance frequency of a singly clamped helically coiled carbon nanowire (HCNW), and (ii) circumvents the need for solving 12th order differential equations. From the experimental standpoint, a visual detection of resonances (using in situ scanning electron microscopy) combined with HDR revealed intriguing non-planar resonance modes at much lower driving forces relative to those needed for linear carbon nanotube cantilevers. Interestingly, despite the presence of mechanical and geometrical nonlinearities in the HCNW resonance behavior the ratio of the first two transverse modes f2/f1 was found to be similar to the ratio predicted by the Euler-Bernoulli theorem for linear cantilevers.

  13. Natural variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Lovenduski

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration ([CO32−] on the basis of a~long control simulation with an Earth System Model. The simulation is run with a prescribed, pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 concentration for 1000 years, permitting investigation of natural [CO32−] variability on interannual to multi-decadal timescales. We find high interannual variability in surface [CO32−] in the tropical Pacific and at the boundaries between the subtropical and subpolar gyres in the Northern Hemisphere, and relatively low interannual variability in the centers of the subtropical gyres and in the Southern Ocean. Statistical analysis of modeled [CO32−] variance and autocorrelation suggests that significant anthropogenic trends in the saturation state of aragonite (Ωaragonite are already or nearly detectable at the sustained, open-ocean time series sites, whereas several decades of observations are required to detect anthropogenic trends in Ωaragonite in the tropical Pacific, North Pacific, and North Atlantic. The detection timescale for anthropogenic trends in pH is shorter than that for Ωaragonite, due to smaller noise-to-signal ratios and lower autocorrelation in pH. In the tropical Pacific, the leading mode of surface [CO32−] variability is primarily driven by variations in the vertical advection of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC in association with El Niño–Southern Oscillation. In the North Pacific, surface [CO32−] variability is caused by circulation-driven variations in surface DIC and strongly correlated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, with peak spectral power at 20–30-year periods. North Atlantic [CO32−] variability is also driven by variations in surface DIC, and exhibits weak correlations with both the North Atlantic Oscillation and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. As the scientific community seeks to detect the anthropogenic influence on ocean carbonate chemistry, these results

  14. Elevated Carbon Dioxide Concentration Reduces Alarm Signaling in Aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boullis, Antoine; Fassotte, Bérénice; Sarles, Landry; Lognay, Georges; Heuskin, Stéphanie; Vanderplanck, Maryse; Bartram, Stefan; Haubruge, Eric; Francis, Frédéric; Verheggen, François J

    2017-02-01

    Insects often rely on olfaction to communicate with conspecifics. While the chemical language of insects has been deciphered in recent decades, few studies have assessed how changes in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations might impact pheromonal communication in insects. Here, we hypothesize that changes in the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide affect the whole dynamics of alarm signaling in aphids, including: (1) the production of the active compound (E)-β-farnesene (Eβf), (2) emission behavior when under attack, (3) perception by the olfactory apparatus, and (4) the escape response. We reared two strains of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, under ambient and elevated CO2 concentrations over several generations. We found that an increase in CO2 concentration reduced the production (i.e., individual content) and emission (released under predation events) of Eβf. While no difference in Eβf neuronal perception was observed, we found that an increase in CO2 strongly reduced the escape behavior expressed by an aphid colony following exposure to natural doses of alarm pheromone. In conclusion, our results confirm that changes to greenhouse gases impact chemical communication in the pea aphid, and could potentially have a cascade effect on interactions with higher trophic levels.

  15. Black carbon concentrations and mixing state in the Finnish Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raatikainen, T.; Brus, D.; Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Svensson, J.; Asmi, E.; Lihavainen, H.

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric aerosol composition was measured using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) in the Finnish Arctic during winter 2011-2012. The Sammaltunturi measurement site at the Pallas GAW (Global Atmosphere Watch) station receives air masses from different source regions including the Arctic Ocean and continental Europe. The SP2 provides detailed information about mass distributions and mixing state of refractory black carbon (rBC). The measurements showed widely varying rBC mass concentrations (0-120 ng m-3), which were related to varying contributions of different source regions and aerosol removal processes. The rBC mass was log-normally distributed showing a relatively constant rBC core mass mean diameter with an average of 194 nm (75-655 nm sizing range). On average, the number fraction of particles containing rBC was 0.24 (integrated over 350-450 nm particle diameter range) and the average particle diameter to rBC core volume equivalent diameter ratio was 2.0 (averaged over particles with 150-200 nm rBC core volume equivalent diameters). These average numbers mean that the observed rBC core mass mean diameter is similar to those of aged particles, but the observed particles seem to have unusually high particle to rBC core diameter ratios. Comparison of the measured rBC mass concentration with that of the optically detected equivalent black carbon (eBC) using an Aethalometer and a MAAP showed that eBC was larger by a factor of five. The difference could not be fully explained without assuming that only a part of the optically detected light absorbing material is refractory and absorbs light at the wavelength used by the SP2. Finally, climate implications of five different black carbon mixing state representations were compared using the Mie approximation and simple direct radiative forcing efficiency calculations. These calculations showed that the observed mixing state means significantly lower warming effect or even a net cooling effect when compared with

  16. The Adsorption Mechanism of Modified Activated Carbon on Phenol

    OpenAIRE

    Lin J. Q.; Yang S. E.; Duan J. M.; Wu J.J.; Jin L. Y.; Lin J. M.; Deng Q. L.

    2016-01-01

    Modified activated carbon was prepared by thermal treatment at high temperature under nitrogen flow. The surface properties of the activated carbon were characterized by Boehm titration, BET and point of zero charge determination. The adsorption mechanism of phenol on modified activated carbon was explained and the adsorption capacity of modified activated carbon for phenol when compared to plain activated carbon was evaluated through the analysis of adsorption isotherms, thermodynamic and ki...

  17. Corals concentrate dissolved inorganic carbon to facilitate calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Nicola; Cohen, Itay; Finch, Adrian A; Erez, Jonathan; Tudhope, Alexander W

    2014-01-01

    The sources of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) used to produce scleractinian coral skeletons are not understood. Yet this knowledge is essential for understanding coral biomineralization and assessing the potential impacts of ocean acidification on coral reefs. Here we use skeletal boron geochemistry to reconstruct the DIC chemistry of the fluid used for coral calcification. We show that corals concentrate DIC at the calcification site substantially above seawater values and that bicarbonate contributes a significant amount of the DIC pool used to build the skeleton. Corals actively increase the pH of the calcification fluid, decreasing the proportion of DIC present as CO2 and creating a diffusion gradient favouring the transport of molecular CO2 from the overlying coral tissue into the calcification site. Coupling the increases in calcification fluid pH and [DIC] yields high calcification fluid [CO3(2-)] and induces high aragonite saturation states, favourable to the precipitation of the skeleton.

  18. Relation between coal aromatic carbon concentration and proximate analysis fixed carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, P.R.

    1981-01-01

    Good agreement has been obtained between measured proximate analysis values for fixed carbon (FC) and the predictions of a thermal decomposition model. The model provides a basis for understanding the relation between FC and coal structure and between FC measured under proximate analysis conditions and coke or char measured in other thermal decomposition experiments. The key parameters in the model are the aromatic carbon concentration (C/sub ar/) and the tar yield. C/sub ar/ has been determined for 43 coals using quantitative infrared analysis. The aliphatic hydrogen concentration is measured from the absorption near 2900 cm/sub -1/ and the aliphatic carbon concentration is computed assuming a stoichiometry of CH/sub 1/./sub 8/. C/sub ar/ is then computed by difference. The results verify the good correlation between C/sub ar/ and FC discussed by van Krevelen. To explain this correlation, use has been made of a coal thermal decomposition model which has been successful in simulating the quantity and composition of volatile components yielded under vacuum pyrolysis conditions. To apply the model to proximate analysis, it was necessary to estimate the tar yields obtained with thick beds and the amounts of O, N, H, and S which remain with the FC. The tar yields for proximate analysis conditions have been estimated to be 1/3 to 1/4 the yields for thin beds in vacuum. To determine the composition of the FC, measurements were made on a lignite and a bituminous char produced in a thin bed heated by a wire grid for the time (7 min) and temperature (950 C) used in the proximate analysis, and on the FC residues from a proximate analysis volatile matter determination. Both residues give similar results, showing that approximately 10% of the 'fixed carbon' is not carbon. Values of FC computed with the model adjusted for the above conditions are in good agreement with the measured values. 25 refs.

  19. Natural variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Lovenduski

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigate variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration ([CO32−] on the basis of a long control simulation with a fully-coupled Earth System Model. The simulation is run with a prescribed, pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 concentration for 1000 years, permitting investigation of natural [CO32−] variability on interannual to multi-decadal timescales. We find high interannual variability in surface [CO32−] in the tropical Pacific and at the boundaries between the subtropical and subpolar gyres in the Northern Hemisphere, and relatively low interannual variability in the centers of the subtropical gyres and in the Southern Ocean. Statistical analysis of modeled [CO32−] variance and autocorrelation suggests that significant anthropogenic trends in the saturation state of aragonite (Ωaragonite are already or nearly detectable at the sustained, open-ocean timeseries sites, whereas several decades of observations are required to detect anthropogenic trends in Ωaragonite in the tropical Pacific, North Pacific, and North Atlantic. The detection timescale for anthropogenic trends in pH is shorter than that for Ωaragonite, due to smaller noise-to-signal ratios and lower autocorrelation in pH. In the tropical Pacific, the leading mode of surface [CO32−] variability is primarily driven by variations in the vertical advection of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC in association with El Niño–Southern Oscillation. In the North Pacific, surface [CO32−] variability is caused by circulation-driven variations in surface DIC and strongly correlated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, with peak spectral power at 20–30 year periods. North Atlantic [CO32−] variability is also driven by variations in surface DIC, and exhibits weak correlations with both the North Atlantic Oscillation and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. As the scientific community seeks to detect the anthropogenic influence on ocean carbonate chemistry, these

  20. Toughness of carbon nanotubes conforms to classic fracture mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lin; Greenfeld, Israel; Wagner, H Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Defects in crystalline structure are commonly believed to degrade the ideal strength of carbon nanotubes. However, the fracture mechanisms induced by such defects, as well as the validity of solid mechanics theories at the nanoscale, are still under debate. We show that the fracture toughness of single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) conforms to the classic theory of fracture mechanics, even for the smallest possible vacancy defect (~2 Å). By simulating tension of SWNTs containing common types of defects, we demonstrate how stress concentration at the defect boundary leads to brittle (unstable) fracturing at a relatively low strain, degrading the ideal strength of SWNTs by up to 60%. We find that, owing to the SWNT's truss-like structure, defects at this scale are not sharp and stress concentrations are finite and low. Moreover, stress concentration, a geometric property at the macroscale, is interrelated with the SWNT fracture toughness, a material property. The resulting SWNT fracture toughness is 2.7 MPa m(0.5), typical of moderately brittle materials and applicable also to graphene.

  1. Basis and therapeutical rationale of the urinary concentrating mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rittig, S; Frøkiaer, J

    2007-01-01

    The urine-concentrating mechanism performs one of the most essential functions in water and electrolyte metabolism and serves primarily to maintain extracellular osmolality within a very narrow range. The history of anti-diuresis dates back more than 100 years and includes the discovery of antidi......The urine-concentrating mechanism performs one of the most essential functions in water and electrolyte metabolism and serves primarily to maintain extracellular osmolality within a very narrow range. The history of anti-diuresis dates back more than 100 years and includes the discovery...

  2. Influence of Carbonation on Mechanical Properties of Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁发云; 陈龙珠; 李检保

    2003-01-01

    As one of the most important factors that determine the lifespan of a reinforced concrete structure, car-bonation not only corrodes the reinforcing steel, but also changes the mechanical properties of concrete. For betterunderstanding the performance of carbonated concrete structure, it is necessary to study the mechanical propertiesof carbonated concrete. The strees-strain relationship of carbonated concrete was analyzed on the basis of experi-ments. The specimens were made by means of accelerated carbonation and then compressed on the testing ma-chine. Some very important characteristics of carbonated concrete were revealed by the testing results. In addition,a useful constitutive model of carbonated concrete, which proved to be suitable for analyzing carbonated concretemembers, was established in this research.

  3. Solid catalytic growth mechanism of micro-coiled carbon fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Micro-coiled carbon fibers were prepared by catalytic pyrolysisof acetylene with nano-sized nickel powder catalyst using the substrate method. The morphology of micro-coiled carbon fibers was observed through field emission scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the fiber and coil diameter of the obtained micro-coiled carbon fibers is about 500—600 nm and 4—5 μm, respectively. Most of the micro-coiled carbon fibers obtained were regular double carbon coils, but a few irregular ones were also observed. On the basis of the experimental observation, a solid catalytic growth mechanism of micro-coiled carbon fibers was proposed.

  4. A statistical mechanics model of carbon nanotube macro-films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotube macro-films are two-dimensional films with micrometer thickness and centimeter by centimeter in-plane dimension.These carbon nanotube macroscopic assemblies have attracted significant attention from the material and mechanics communities recently because they can be easily handled and tailored to meet specific engineering needs.This paper reports the experimental methods on the preparation and characterization of single-walled carbon nanotube macro-films,and a statistical mechanics model on ...

  5. Capillarity ion concentration polarization as spontaneous desalting mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungmin; Jung, Yeonsu; Son, Seok Young; Cho, Inhee; Cho, Youngrok; Lee, Hyomin; Kim, Ho-Young; Kim, Sung Jae

    2016-04-01

    To overcome a world-wide water shortage problem, numerous desalination methods have been developed with state-of-the-art power efficiency. Here we propose a spontaneous desalting mechanism referred to as the capillarity ion concentration polarization. An ion-depletion zone is spontaneously formed near a nanoporous material by the permselective ion transportation driven by the capillarity of the material, in contrast to electrokinetic ion concentration polarization which achieves the same ion-depletion zone by an external d.c. bias. This capillarity ion concentration polarization device is shown to be capable of desalting an ambient electrolyte more than 90% without any external electrical power sources. Theoretical analysis for both static and transient conditions are conducted to characterize this phenomenon. These results indicate that the capillarity ion concentration polarization system can offer unique and economical approaches for a power-free water purification system.

  6. Capillarity ion concentration polarization as spontaneous desalting mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungmin; Jung, Yeonsu; Son, Seok Young; Cho, Inhee; Cho, Youngrok; Lee, Hyomin; Kim, Ho-Young; Kim, Sung Jae

    2016-04-01

    To overcome a world-wide water shortage problem, numerous desalination methods have been developed with state-of-the-art power efficiency. Here we propose a spontaneous desalting mechanism referred to as the capillarity ion concentration polarization. An ion-depletion zone is spontaneously formed near a nanoporous material by the permselective ion transportation driven by the capillarity of the material, in contrast to electrokinetic ion concentration polarization which achieves the same ion-depletion zone by an external d.c. bias. This capillarity ion concentration polarization device is shown to be capable of desalting an ambient electrolyte more than 90% without any external electrical power sources. Theoretical analysis for both static and transient conditions are conducted to characterize this phenomenon. These results indicate that the capillarity ion concentration polarization system can offer unique and economical approaches for a power-free water purification system.

  7. Elucidating Geochemical Controls on the Concentration and Composition of Organic Carbon in Deep Pelagic Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, E. R.; Hansel, C. M.; Anderson, C. H.; Murray, R. W.; Dyar, M. D.; Nordlund, D.; Wankel, S. D.; Johnson, D.; Spivack, A. J.; Sauvage, J.; McKinley, C. C.; Homola, K.; Present, T. M.; Pockalny, R. A.; D'Hondt, S.

    2015-12-01

    In marine sediments, total organic carbon (OC) content correlates strongly with mineral surface area as well as the abundance of specific mineral classes such as clays and metal oxides. Adsorption to mineral surfaces and the formation of mineral-organic matter aggregates are thought to provide protection against remineralization, yet the extent and mechanism(s) of this protection are unknown. Accordingly, the goal of this research is to elucidate the role of minerals in preserving carbon and the potential for this reservoir of mineral-hosted carbon to support heterotrophic metabolisms in the otherwise carbon-poor subseafloor. Here, we characterize the composition of OC in oxic and suboxic sediments collected during R/V Knorr expedition 223 to the subtropical western North Atlantic in November 2014. We find that OC concentrations decrease linearly over ~25 meters burial depth, from ~0.15 to 0.075 mol OC/kg solid. Organic C/N varies but is consistently less than Redfield values of ~6. Relative contributions of functional groups quantified using bulk-scale Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy change with depth and site lithology/geochemistry. We further observe microscale heterogeneity, including discrete carbonate particles amid disperse aromatic and amide/carboxylic-rich organic carbon, using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) coupled to NEXAFS. In the suboxic sediments, there is a transition from Mn(III/IV) phases toward more reduced phases shown by X-ray absorption spectroscopy between ~3-11 meters below core top, approximately between the interstitial water nitrate and nitrite maxima. Conversely, Fe(III)-bearing minerals are present throughout the core and may contribute to stabilization of OC. By further coupling micro- and macro-scale analysis, the role of minerals in OC sequestration in the marine subsurface will come to light.

  8. Mechanism of intracellular detection of glucose through nonenzymatic and boronic acid functionalized carbon dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran, S; Misra, R D K

    2015-09-01

    The objective of the research described here is to elucidate the fundamental mechanism by which the new class of "inert" non-enzymatic and boronic acid functionalized carbon dots-based sensors facilitate intracellular detection of glucose. The study suggests that the mechanism of detection of glucose involved selective assembly and fluorescence quenching of the carbon dots with excellent dynamic response to varying concentration of glucose within the biological range (1-100 mM). The strong dynamic response was related to high selectivity to biomolecules and inertness of carbon dots. Furthermore, the functionalization of carbon dots with boronic acid was the governing factor response for the passive character of the carbon dots. The study lays the foundation for the new field of carbon-based nanochemosensors.

  9. Barrier, mechanical and optical properties of whey protein concentrate films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Machado Azevedo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Whey is recognized as a valuable source of high quality protein and, when processed as protein concentrate, may be used in the production of biodegradable films. The objective of the study was to develop films of whey protein concentrate 80% (WPC at concentrations of 6, 8, 10 and 12% and evaluate the influence of this factor in the barrier, mechanical and optical properties of the films. Treatments showed moisture content with a mean value of 22.10% ± 0.76and high solubility values between 56.67 to 62.42%. Thus, there is little or no influence of varying the concentration of WPC in these properties and high hydrophilicity of the films. With increasing concentration of WPC, increases the water vapor permeability of the films (7.42 x 10-13 to 3.49 x 10-12 g.m-1.s-1.Pa-1. The treatment at the concentration of 6% of WPC showed a higher modulus of elasticity (287.90 ± 41.79 MPa. Thegreater rigidity in films with higher concentrations is possibly due to the greater number of bonds between molecules of the polymeric matrix. The films have the same puncture resistance. The increased concentration of WPC promotes resistance to the action of a localized force. In general, films of whey protein concentrate in the tested concentrations exhibited slightly yellowish color and transparency, and can be used in food packaging that requiring intermediate permeability to water vapor, to keep moisture and texture desired.

  10. Carbon concentration in species of the araucaria forest and effect of the ecological group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Farinha Watzlawick

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in Boa Ventura do São Roque, Paraná State, Brazil, aiming to evaluate the carbon concentration in components of 12 arboreal species from the Araucaria Forest, as well as the performance of the 0.5 conversion factor and the influence of trees ecological groups in their carbon concentration. Carbon concentration averages were obtained from the tree components, and compared among them, among the species and the conversion factor, to assess the interspecific differences and the reliability of the conversion factor. To analyze the influence of ecological groups over the carbon concentration of the species, cluster analyzes were performed. It was not found significant difference among the carbon concentration in the components of the trees. However, comparing the 12 species, Luehea divaricata, Albizia polycephala and Cestrum sp. differed significantly, presenting lower carbon concentration. Comparison between carbon concentration average of the species and the 0.5 conversion factor indicated that the latter overestimates the carbon concentration in the trees at an average rate of 14.27%. No correlation was found between the ecological groups of the species and their carbon concentration, since groups were formed by species with distinct ecological traits.

  11. Monitoring carbon dioxide in mechanically ventilated patients during hyperbaric treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregård, Asger; Jansen, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of the arterial carbon dioxide (P(a)CO(2)) is an established part of the monitoring of mechanically ventilated patients. Other ways to get information about carbon dioxide in the patient are measurement of end-tidal carbon dioxide (P(ET)CO(2)) and transcutaneous carbon dioxide (PTCCO2......). Carbon dioxide in the blood and cerebral tissue has great influence on vasoactivity and thereby blood volume of the brain. We have found no studies on the correlation between P(ET)CO(2) or P(TC)CO(2), and P(a)CO(2) during hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT)....

  12. pH determines the energetic efficiency of the cyanobacterial CO2 concentrating mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Niall M; Flamholz, Avi; Hood, Rachel D; Milo, Ron; Savage, David F

    2016-09-06

    Many carbon-fixing bacteria rely on a CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM) to elevate the CO2 concentration around the carboxylating enzyme ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO). The CCM is postulated to simultaneously enhance the rate of carboxylation and minimize oxygenation, a competitive reaction with O2 also catalyzed by RuBisCO. To achieve this effect, the CCM combines two features: active transport of inorganic carbon into the cell and colocalization of carbonic anhydrase and RuBisCO inside proteinaceous microcompartments called carboxysomes. Understanding the significance of the various CCM components requires reconciling biochemical intuition with a quantitative description of the system. To this end, we have developed a mathematical model of the CCM to analyze its energetic costs and the inherent intertwining of physiology and pH. We find that intracellular pH greatly affects the cost of inorganic carbon accumulation. At low pH the inorganic carbon pool contains more of the highly cell-permeable H2CO3, necessitating a substantial expenditure of energy on transport to maintain internal inorganic carbon levels. An intracellular pH ≈8 reduces leakage, making the CCM significantly more energetically efficient. This pH prediction coincides well with our measurement of intracellular pH in a model cyanobacterium. We also demonstrate that CO2 retention in the carboxysome is necessary, whereas selective uptake of HCO3 (-) into the carboxysome would not appreciably enhance energetic efficiency. Altogether, integration of pH produces a model that is quantitatively consistent with cyanobacterial physiology, emphasizing that pH cannot be neglected when describing biological systems interacting with inorganic carbon pools.

  13. Mechanism of Concentration Dependence of Water Diffusivity in Polyacrylate Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Sriramvignesh; Khabaz, Fardin; Khare, Rajesh

    Membrane based separation processes offer an energy efficient alternative to traditional distillation based separation processes. In this work, we focus on the molecular mechanisms underlying the process of separation of dilute ethanol-water mixture using polyacrylate gels as pervaporation membranes. The diffusivities of the components in swollen gels exhibit concentration dependence. We have used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the correlation between the dynamics of solvent (water and ethanol) molecules, polymer dynamics and solvent structure in the swollen gel systems as a function of solvent concentration. Three different polyacrylate gels were studied: (1) poly n-butyl acrylate (PBA), (2) copolymer of butyl acrylate and 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate P(BA50-HEA50), and (3) poly 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate (PHEA). Simulation results show that solvent concentration has a significant effect on local structure of the solvent molecules and chain dynamics; these factors (local structure and chain dynamics), in turn, affect the diffusivity of these molecules. At low concentration, solvent molecules are well dispersed in the gel matrix and form hydrogen bonds with the polymer. Solvent mobility is correlated with polymer mobility in this configuration and consequently water and ethanol molecules exhibit slower dynamics, this effect is especially significant in PHEA gel. At high solvent concentration, water molecules form large clusters in the system accompanied by enhancement in mobility of both the gel network and the solvent molecules.

  14. Estimating Terrestrial Wood Biomass from Observed Concentrations of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaefer, K. M.; Peters, W.; Carvalhais, N.; van der Werf, G.; Miller, J.

    2008-01-01

    We estimate terrestrial disequilibrium state and wood biomass from observed concentrations of atmospheric CO2 using the CarbonTracker system coupled to the SiBCASA biophysical model. Starting with a priori estimates of carbon flux from the land, ocean, and fossil fuels, CarbonTracker estimates net c

  15. Microbial Carbon Pump ---A New Mechanism for Long-Term Carbon Storage in the Global Ocean (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, N.; Azam, F.; McP Working Group; Scor Wg134

    2010-12-01

    to a recalcitrant carbon reservoir, pumping organic carbon from low concentrations of labile DOM to high concentrations of recalcitrant DOM, building up a huge reservoir for carbon storage over time. Meanwhile the MCP transfers more carbon relative to nitrogen and phosphorus from the reactive organic matter pool into recalcitrant organic matter pool. Compared with the solubility pump, an abiotic mechanism for carbon storage in the ocean which has ocean acidification impacts on marine organisms and biogeochemical cycles, the MCP-driven recalcitrant DOM carbon storage does not appreciably alter the buffering capacity of seawater and has no known negative impact on marine organisms. Furthermore, in the ocean warming scenario, the partitioning of biogenic carbon flow will change, with the flow to POM diminishing and that to DOM increasing, and thus the role of the MCP in carbon storage will most likely enhanced. A working group joined by 26 scientists from 12 countries has been formed under the Scientific Committee for Oceanic Research (SCOR-WG134) to address this multi-faceted biogeochemical issue related to carbon cycling in the ocean and global climate changes.

  16. The Effect of Carbon Source and Fluoride Concentrations in the "Streptococcus Mutans" Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulino, Tony P.; Andrade, Ricardo O.; Bruschi-Thedei, Giuliana C. M.; Thedei, Geraldo, Jr.; Ciancaglini, Pietro

    2004-01-01

    The main objective of this class experiment is to show the influence of carbon source and of different fluoride concentrations on the biofilm formation by the bacterium "Streptococcus mutans." The observation of different biofilm morphology as a function of carbon source and fluoride concentration allows an interesting discussion regarding the…

  17. New Adsorption Cycles for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Ritter; Armin Ebner; Steven Reynolds Hai Du; Amal Mehrotra

    2008-07-31

    tested successfully against several cycle schedules taken from the literature, including a 2-bed 4-step Skarstrom cycle, a 4-bed 9-step process with 2 equalization steps, a 9-bed 11-step process with 3 equalization steps, and a 6-bed 13-step process with 4 equalization steps and 4 idle steps. With respect to CO{sub 2} capture and concentration by PSA, this new approach is now providing a very straightforward way to determine all the viable 3-bed, 4-bed, 5-bed, n-bed, etc. HR PSA cycle schedules to explore using both simulation and experimentation. This program also touted the use of K-promoted HTlc as a high temperature, reversible adsorbent for CO{sub 2} capture by PSA. This program not only showed how to use this material in HR PSA cycles, but it also proposed a new CO{sub 2} interaction mechanism in conjunction with a non-equilibrium kinetic model that adequately describes the uptake and release of CO{sub 2} in this material, and some preliminary fixed bed adsorption breakthrough and desorption elution experiments were carried out to demonstrate complete reversibility on a larger scale. This information was essentially missing from the literature and deemed invaluable toward promoting the use of K-promoted HTlc as a high temperature, reversible adsorbent for CO{sub 2} capture by PSA. Overall, the objectives of this project were met. It showed the feasibility of using K-promoted hydrotalcite (HTlc) as a high temperature, reversible adsorbent for CO{sub 2} capture by PSA. It discovered some novel HR PSA cycles that might be useful for this purpose. Finally, it revealed a mechanistic understanding of the interaction of CO{sub 2} with K-promoted HTlc.

  18. Biobased carbon content of resin extracted from polyethylene composite by carbon-14 concentration measurements using accelerator mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Taguchi, Kazuhiro; Kunioka, Masao; Funabashi, Masahiro; Ninomiya, Fumi

    2014-01-01

    An estimation procedure for biobased carbon content of polyethylene composite was studied using carbon-14 (14C) concentration ratios as measured by accelerated mass spectrometry (AMS). Prior to the measurement, additives and fillers in composites should be removed because they often contain a large amount of biobased carbon and may shift the estimation. Samples of resin with purity suitable for measurement were isolated from composites with a Soxhlet extractor using heated cyclohexanone. Afte...

  19. Carbon Footprint Management of Road Freight Transport under the Carbon Emission Trading Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Growing concern over environmental issues has considerably increased the number of regulations and legislation that aim to curb carbon emissions. Carbon emission trading mechanism, which is one of the most effective means, has been broadly adopted by several countries. This paper presents a road truck routing problem under the carbon emission trading mechanism. By introducing a calculation method of carbon emissions that considers the load and speed of the vehicle among other factors, a road truck routing optimizing model under the cap and trade mechanism based on the Travelling Salesman Problem (TSP is described. Compared with the classical TSP model that only considers the economic cost, this model suggests that the truck routing decision under the cap and trade mechanism is more effective in reducing carbon emissions. A modified tabu search algorithm is also proposed to obtain solutions within a reasonable amount of computation time. We theoretically and numerically examine the impacts of carbon trading, carbon cap, and carbon price on truck routing decision, carbon emissions, and total cost. From the results of numerical experiments, we derive interesting observations about how to control the total cost and reduce carbon emissions.

  20. Laser metrology in fluid mechanics granulometry, temperature and concentration measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Boutier, Alain

    2013-01-01

    In fluid mechanics, non-intrusive measurements are fundamental in order to improve knowledge of the behavior and main physical phenomena of flows in order to further validate codes.The principles and characteristics of the different techniques available in laser metrology are described in detail in this book.Velocity, temperature and concentration measurements by spectroscopic techniques based on light scattered by molecules are achieved by different techniques: laser-induced fluorescence, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering using lasers and parametric sources, and absorption sp

  1. New study on the correlation between carbon dioxide concentration in the environment and radon monitor devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrokhi, A; Burghele, B D; Fábián, F; Kovács, T

    2015-12-01

    The influence of high geogenic carbon dioxide concentrations on monitoring devices might present a significant challenge to the measurement of radon concentrations in environments with a high level of carbon dioxide concentration such as volcano sites, mofettes, caves, etc. In this study, the influence of carbon dioxide concentration on several different types of radon monitor devices - including Alpha Spectrometry (Sarad RTM 2200, EQF 3220, RAD7), Ionizing Chamber (AlphaGUARD PQ2000 PRO) and Active Cell (Active scintillation cell, Pylon 300A) - was examined to represent new aspects of radon measuring in environments with carbon dioxide. In light of the results, all measuring devices were exposed to variable conditions affected by carbon dioxide concentration, except for the AlphaGUARD, which was kept in a steady state throughout the experiment. It was observed that alpha spectroscopy devices were affected by carbon dioxide, since measured radon concentrations decreased in the presence of 70% and 90% carbon dioxide concentrations by 26.5 ± 2% and 14.5 ± 2.5% for EQF 3220, and 32 ± 2% and 35.5 ± 2% for RTM 2200. However, the ionizing chamber instrument was unaffected by changes in carbon dioxide concentration. It was determined that the RAD7 performed relatively inefficiently in the presence of carbon dioxide concentrations higher than 67% by an overall efficiency factor of approximately 0.52, confirming that it is not an admissible radon monitor instrument in environments with high carbon dioxide concentrations.

  2. Continuous nanoscale carbon fibers with superior mechanical strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Yue, Zhongren; Fong, Hao

    2009-03-01

    Continuous nanoscale carbon fibers can be developed by stabilization and carbonization of highly aligned and extensively stretched electrospun polyacrylonitrile copolymer nanofiber precursor under optimal tension. These carbon fibers, with diameters of tens of nanometers, are expected to possess a superior mechanical strength that is unlikely to be achieved through conventional approaches. This is because i) the innovative precursor, with a fiber diameter approximately 100 times smaller than that of conventional counterparts, possesses an extremely high degree of macromolecular orientation and a significantly reduced amount of structural imperfections, and ii) the ultrasmall fiber diameter also effectively prevents the formation of structural inhomogeneity, particularly sheath/core structures during stabilization and carbonization.

  3. Growth limit of carbon onions – A continuum mechanical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Todt, Melanie; Bitsche, Robert; Hartmann, Markus A.

    2014-01-01

    The growth of carbon onions is simulated using continuum mechanical shell models. With this models it is shown that, if a carbon onion has grown to a critical size, the formation of an additional layer leads to the occurrence of a structural instability. This instability inhibits further growth...... of carbon onions and, thus, can be a reason for the limited size of such particles. The loss of stability is mainly evoked by van der Waals interactions between misfitting neighboring layers leading to self-equilibrating stress states in the layers due to mutual accommodation. The influence of the curvature...... model gives insight into mechanisms which are assumed to limit the size of carbon onions and can serve as basis for further investigations, e.g., of the formation of nanodiamonds in the center of carbon onions. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  4. Forsterite Carbonation in Wet-scCO2: Dependence on Adsorbed Water Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loring, J.; Benezeth, P.; Qafoku, O.; Thompson, C.; Schaef, T.; Bonneville, A.; McGrail, P.; Felmy, A.; Rosso, K.

    2013-12-01

    showed no change with time, and the spectra indicated only the presence of a highly structured water and bicarbonate film. From our cumulative experiments, we conclude that the reactivity of forsterite with wet-scCO2 can be divided into three adsorbed water concentration threshold regimes: (1) Up to ~2 monolayers, only a highly structured and low mobility chemisorbed water and bicarbonate film is present. (2) Between ~2 to ~5 monolayers, limited carbonation occurs then nearly stops. (3) Above ~5 monolayers, continuous carbonation occurs, and magnesite is the dominant product. The results of these studies provide important insights into metal silicate carbonation mechanisms in low water scCO2 environments. They reinforced the concept of a water threshold for carbonation to occur, which has also been demonstrated for steel corrosion in the presence of wet scCO2. These results will also constrain thermodynamic models and molecular dynamic simulations used to predict mineral trapping extent in basaltic host rocks.

  5. Computation of carbon concentration curves in vacuum carburizing of steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, M. Yu.; Smirnov, A. E.; Ryzhova, M. Yu.

    2013-05-01

    The boundary conditions of the diffusion problem in parametric form are determined on the basis of an experimental study of formation of carbon-saturated layers in vacuum carburizing. The boundary conditions are applied in a model of a process with cyclic modes of carburizing. Adequacy of the developed model is confirmed.

  6. Transcriptome profiling of the microalga Chlorella pyrenoidosa in response to different carbon dioxide concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xue; Shen, Jia; Bai, Fengwei; Xu, Nianjun

    2016-10-01

    To enrich our knowledge of carbon dioxide (CO2)-concentrating mechanism (CCM) in eukaryotic algae, we used high-throughput sequencing to investigate the transcriptome profiling of the microalga Chlorella pyrenoidosa (Chlorophyta) response to different CO2 levels. Altogether, 53.86 million (M) and 62.10M clean short reads of 100 nucleotides (nt) were generated from this microalga cultured at 4-fold air CO2 (control) and air CO2 concentrations by Illumina sequencing. A total of 32,662 unigenes were assembled from the two pooled samples. With an E-value cut-off of 1e-5, 9590, 6782, 5954, and 9092 unigenes were annotated in NR, Gene Ontology (GO), Eukaryotic Cluster of Orthologous Groups of proteins (KOG), and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases, respectively. After screening, 51 differentially expressed unigenes were up-regulated and 8 were down-regulated in the air CO2 group, relative to the control. The transcript levels of eight differentially expressed unigenes were validated by real-time quantitative PCR, which manifested that thioredoxin-like protein, laminin subunit beta-1, and chlorophyll a/b binding protein might be associated with the utilization of inorganic carbon at low CO2 levels.

  7. Heliox Improves Carbon Dioxide Removal during Lung Protective Mechanical Ventilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurskens, Charlotte J; Brevoord, Daniel; Lagrand, Wim K; van den Bergh, Walter M; Vroom, Margreeth B; Preckel, Benedikt; Horn, Janneke; Juffermans, Nicole P

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Helium is a noble gas with low density and increased carbon dioxide (CO2) diffusion capacity. This allows lower driving pressures in mechanical ventilation and increased CO2 diffusion. We hypothesized that heliox facilitates ventilation in patients during lung-protective mechanical ven

  8. High-resolution carbon dioxide concentration record 650,000-800,000 years before present

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luthi, D.; Bereiter, B.; Blunier, T.; Siegenthaler, U.; Kawamura, K.; Stocker, T.F. [Climate and Environm. Physics, Physics Inst., Univ. Bern, CH-3012 Bern, (Switzerland); Luthi, D.; Bereiter, B.; Blunier, T.; Siegenthaler, U.; Kawamura, K.; Stocker, T.F. [Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, Univ. Bern, CH-3012 Bern, (Switzerland); Le Floch, M.; Barnola, J.M.; Raynaud, D. [LGGE, CNRS-Univ. Grenoble 1, F-38402 Saint Martin d' Heres, (France); Jouzel, J. [Inst. Pierre Simon Laplace, LSCE, CEA-CNRS-Universite Versailles-Saint Quentin, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Fischer, H. [Alfred Wegener Inst. for Polar and Maine Research, D-27568 Bremerhaven, (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Changes in past atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations can be determined by measuring the composition of air trapped in ice cores from Antarctica. So far, the Antarctic Vostok and EPICA Dome C ice cores have provided a composite record of atmospheric carbon dioxide levels over the past 650,000 years. Here we present results of the lowest 200 m of the Dome C ice core, extending the record of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration by two complete glacial cycles to 800,000 yr before present. From previously published data and the present work, we find that atmospheric carbon dioxide is strongly correlated with Antarctic temperature throughout eight glacial cycles but with significantly lower concentrations between 650,000 and 750,000 yr before present. Carbon dioxide levels are below 180 parts per million by volume (p.p.m.v.) for a period of 3,000 yr during Marine Isotope Stage 16, possibly reflecting more pronounced oceanic carbon storage. We report the lowest carbon dioxide concentration measured in an ice core, which extends the pre-industrial range of carbon dioxide concentrations during the late Quaternary by about 10 p.p.m.v. to 172-300 p.p.m.v. (authors)

  9. Life support system cost study: Addendum to cost analysis of carbon dioxide concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakut, M. M.

    1973-01-01

    New cost data are presented for the Hydrogen-Depolarized Carbon Dioxide Concentrator (HDC), based on modifying the concentrator to delete the quick disconnect valves and filters included in the system model defined in MDC-G4631. System description, cost data and a comparison between CO2 concentrator costs are presented.

  10. The Adsorption Mechanism of Modified Activated Carbon on Phenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin J. Q.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modified activated carbon was prepared by thermal treatment at high temperature under nitrogen flow. The surface properties of the activated carbon were characterized by Boehm titration, BET and point of zero charge determination. The adsorption mechanism of phenol on modified activated carbon was explained and the adsorption capacity of modified activated carbon for phenol when compared to plain activated carbon was evaluated through the analysis of adsorption isotherms, thermodynamic and kinetic properties. Results shows that after modification the surface alkaline property and pHpzc value of the activated carbon increase and the surface oxygen-containing functional groups decrease. The adsorption processes of the plain and modified carbon fit with Langmuir isotherm equation well, and the maximum adsorption capacity increase from 123.46, 111.11, 103.09mg/g to 192.31, 178.57, 163,93mg/g under 15, 25 and 35°C after modification, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters show that the adsorption of phenol on activated carbon is a spontaneously exothermic process of entropy reduction, implying that the adsorption is a physical adsorption. The adsorption of phenol on activated carbon follows the pseudo-second-order kinetics (R2>0.99. The optimum pH of adsorption is 6~8.

  11. High-resolution carbon dioxide concentration record 650,000-800,000 years before present

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüthi, Dieter; Le Floch, Martine; Bereiter, Bernhard

    2008-01-01

    Changes in past atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations can be determined by measuring the composition of air trapped in ice cores from Antarctica. So far, the Antarctic Vostok and EPICA Dome C ice cores have provided a composite record of atmospheric carbon dioxide levels over the past 650......,000 years. Here we present results of the lowest 200 m of the Dome C ice core, extending the record of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration by two complete glacial cycles to 800,000 yr before present. From previously published data and the present work, we find that atmospheric carbon dioxide...... is strongly correlated with Antarctic temperature throughout eight glacial cycles but with significantly lower concentrations between 650,000 and 750,000 yr before present. Carbon dioxide levels are below 180 parts per million by volume (p.p.m.v.) for a period of 3,000 yr during Marine Isotope Stage 16...

  12. Effects of carbon dioxide concentration and nutrition on photosynthetic functions of white birch seedlings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S. [Lakehead Univ., Thunder Bay, ON (Canada). Faculty of Forestry and the Forest Environment; Dang, Q.L. [Lakehead Univ., Thunder Bay, ON (Canada). Faculty of Forest and the Forest Environment; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Inst. of Botany, Laboratory of Quantitative Vegetation Ecology

    2006-11-15

    Increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) can impact photosynthesis and dry mass production of plants. This study investigated the physiological responses of white birch seedlings to elevated carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) at low and high supplies of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K). A 2-way factorial experiment was carried out with birch seedlings grown for 4 months in environment-controlled greenhouses. Elevated CO{sub 2} enhanced maximal carboxylation rate and photosynthetically active radiation-saturated electron transport rates were measured after 2.5 and 3.5 months of treatment, as well as actual photochemical efficiency and photosynthetic linear electron transport to carboxylation. Net photosynthetic rate increases were observed as well as increases in photosynthetic water use efficiency (WUE); photosynthetic N efficiency and P efficiency. Stomatal conductance, transpiration rate and the fraction of total photosynthetic linear electron transport partitioned to oxygenation were reduced. Low nutrient availability decreased net photosynthetic rates, WUE, and triose phosphate utilization. However, photosynthetic linear electron transport and N use efficiency increased. There were significant interactive effects of CO{sub 2} and nutrition over time, with evidence of photosynthetic up-regulation in response to elevated CO{sub 2} in seedlings receiving high nutrition. Photosynthetic depression in response to low nutrient availability was attributed to biochemical limitation rather than stomatal limitation. Elevated CO{sub 2} reduced leaf N concentration in seedlings receiving low nutrition, but had no significant effect on leaf P or K concentrations. High nutrient availability generally increased area-based leaf N, P and K concentrations but had negligible effects on K after 2.5 months of treatment. Results suggested that increases in electron partitioning to photorespiration in response to low nutrient availability may be related to

  13. Weathering controls on mechanisms of carbon storage in grassland soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masiello, C.A.; Chadwick, O.A.; Southon, J.; Torn, M.S.; Harden, J.W.

    2004-09-01

    On a sequence of soils developed under similar vegetation, temperature, and precipitation conditions, but with variations in mineralogical properties, we use organic carbon and 14C inventories to examine mineral protection of soil organic carbon. In these soils, 14C data indicate that the creation of slow-cycling carbon can be modeled as occurring through reaction of organic ligands with Al3+ and Fe3+ cations in the upper horizons, followed by sorption to amorphous inorganic Al compounds at depth. Only one of these processes, the chelation of Al3+ and Fe3+ by organic ligands, is linked to large carbon stocks. Organic ligands stabilized by this process traverse the soil column as dissolved organic carbon (both from surface horizons and root exudates). At our moist grassland site, this chelation and transport process is very strongly correlated with the storage and long-term stabilization of soil organic carbon. Our 14C results show that the mechanisms of organic carbon transport and storage at this site follow a classic model previously believed to only be significant in a single soil order (Spodosols), and closely related to the presence of forests. The presence of this process in the grassland Alfisol, Inceptisol, and Mollisol soils of this chronosequence suggests that this process is a more significant control on organic carbon storage than previously thought.

  14. Effect of carbon concentration on changing the morphology of titanium carbide nanoparticles from cubic to cuboctahedron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, David E; Gupta, Ujjwal; Castleman, A W

    2010-01-26

    Titanium carbide nanoparticles were synthesized by flowing methane through a plasma generated from an arc discharge between two titanium electrodes. Different methane concentrations were employed in studies made to investigate the effects of carbon concentration on particle morphology. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to investigate the synthesized TiC nanopowders, whereupon it was found that nanocrystalline TiC nanoparticles prefer a cubic morphology at low concentrations of methane and a cuboctahedron morphology at high concentration of methane. The change in particle morphology is attributed to carbon affecting the relative growth rates of the {111} and {100} facets on a TiC seed crystal.

  15. Inorganic carbon dominates total dissolved carbon concentrations and fluxes in British rivers: Application of the THINCARB model - Thermodynamic modelling of inorganic carbon in freshwaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvie, Helen P; King, Stephen M; Neal, Colin

    2017-01-01

    River water-quality studies rarely measure dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) routinely, and there is a gap in our knowledge of the contributions of DIC to aquatic carbon fluxes and cycling processes. Here, we present the THINCARB model (THermodynamic modelling of INorganic CARBon), which uses widely-measured determinands (pH, alkalinity and temperature) to calculate DIC concentrations, speciation (bicarbonate, HCO3(-); carbonate, CO3(2-); and dissolved carbon dioxide, H2CO3(⁎)) and excess partial pressures of carbon dioxide (EpCO2) in freshwaters. If calcium concentration measurements are available, THINCARB also calculates calcite saturation. THINCARB was applied to the 39-year Harmonised Monitoring Scheme (HMS) dataset, encompassing all the major British rivers discharging to the coastal zone. Model outputs were combined with the HMS dissolved organic carbon (DOC) datasets, and with spatial land use, geology, digital elevation and hydrological datasets. We provide a first national-scale evaluation of: the spatial and temporal variability in DIC concentrations and fluxes in British rivers; the contributions of DIC and DOC to total dissolved carbon (TDC); and the contributions to DIC from HCO3(-) and CO3(2-) from weathering sources and H2CO3(⁎) from microbial respiration. DIC accounted for >50% of TDC concentrations in 87% of the HMS samples. In the seven largest British rivers, DIC accounted for an average of 80% of the TDC flux (ranging from 57% in the upland River Tay, to 91% in the lowland River Thames). DIC fluxes exceeded DOC fluxes, even under high-flow conditions, including in the Rivers Tay and Tweed, draining upland peaty catchments. Given that particulate organic carbon fluxes from UK rivers are consistently lower than DOC fluxes, DIC fluxes are therefore also the major source of total carbon fluxes to the coastal zone. These results demonstrate the importance of accounting for DIC concentrations and fluxes for quantifying carbon transfers from land

  16. Mechanism of Carbon Nanotubes Aligning along Applied Electric Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Shao-Jie; GUO Wan-Lin

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTS)aligning in the direction of external electric field is studied by quantum mechanics calculations.The rotational torque on the carbon nanotubes is proportional to the difference between the longitudinal and transverse polarizabilities and varies with the angle of SWCNTs to the external electric field.The longitudinal polarizability increases with second power of length,while the transverse polarizability increases linearly with length.A zigzag SWCNT has larger longitudinal and transverse polarizabilities than an armchair SWCNT with the same diameter and the discrepancy becomes larger for longer tubes.

  17. Damage Mechanisms/Failure Mechanics of Carbon-Carbon Composite Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-01

    cutting method was used to minimize material waste, not because * carbon-carbon is difficult to machine . 2.2 Tension Testing 2.2.1 Specimen Configuration...was made to bond the strain gages to fiber bundles if possible rather than to a layer of matrix material. Ex- tensometers were also employed to measure

  18. Assessment of the Impact of Climate Change and Land Management Change on Soil Organic Carbon Content, Leached Carbon Rates and Dissolved Organic Carbon Concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stergiadi, Maria; de Nijs, Ton; van der Perk, Marcel; Bonten, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is projected to significantly affect the concentrations and mobility of contaminants, such as metals and pathogens, in soil, groundwater and surface water. Climate- and land management-induced changes in soil organic carbon and dissolved organic carbon levels may promote the transport

  19. Carbon dioxide production during mechanical ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, S; Söderberg, D; Groth, T;

    1987-01-01

    studied CO2 production (VCO2) and oxygen consumption (VO2) in mechanically ventilated ICU patients, where CO2 stores were altered by: a) changing minute ventilation by 15%, b) reducing body temperature, and c) changing the level of sedation. Expired gases went through a mixing chamber and were analyzed...... continuously by a mass spectrometer. Signals from this instrument, together with gas-volume signals from the ventilator, were fed to a computer for calculation of VO2 and VCO2. Twenty to 120 min were required to reach a stable level, depending on the patient's size and circulatory response. Similar results...... were obtained by computer simulation using a five-compartment model of CO2 stores. These experiments indicate that measuring VO2 (for calculation of metabolic respiratory quotient [RQ]) in ventilated patients should occur after the patients maintain a 60-min period of stable body temperature...

  20. Dynamics of Intracellular Polymers in Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal Processes under Different Organic Carbon Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizhen Xing

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR may deteriorate or fail during low organic carbon loading periods. Polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs in EBPR were acclimated under both high and low organic carbon conditions, and then dynamics of polymers in typical cycles, anaerobic conditions with excess organic carbons, and endogenous respiration conditions were examined. After long-term acclimation, it was found that organic loading rates did not affect the yield of PAOs and the applied low organic carbon concentrations were advantageous for the enrichment of PAOs. A low influent organic carbon concentration induced a high production of extracellular carbohydrate. During both anaerobic and aerobic endogenous respirations, when glycogen decreased to around 80 ± 10 mg C per gram of volatile suspended solids, PAOs began to utilize polyphosphate significantly. Regressed by the first-order reaction model, glycogen possessed the highest degradation rate and then was followed by polyphosphate, while biomass decay had the lowest degradation rate.

  1. Mechanical Reinforcement of Diopside Bone Scaffolds with Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cijun Shuai

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes are ideal candidates for the mechanical reinforcement of ceramic due to their excellent mechanical properties, high aspect ratio and nanometer scale diameter. In this study, the effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs on the mechanical properties of diopside (Di scaffolds fabricated by selective laser sintering were investigated. Results showed that compressive strength and fracture toughness improved significantly with increasing MWCNTs from 0.5 to 2 wt %, and then declined with increasing MWCNTs to 5 wt %. Compressive strength and fracture toughness were enhanced by 106% and 21%, respectively. The reinforcing mechanisms were identified as crack deflection, MWCNTs crack bridging and pull-out. Further, the scaffolds exhibited good apatite-formation ability and supported adhesion and proliferation of cells in vitro.

  2. Physiology of Aspergillus niger in Oxygen-Limited Continuous Cultures: Influence of Aeration, Carbon Source Concentration and Dilution Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diano, Audrey; Peeters, J.; Dynesen, Jens Østergaard

    2009-01-01

    In industrial production of enzymes using the filamentous fungus Aspergilhis niger supply of sufficient oxygen is often a limitation, resulting in the formation of by-products such as polyols. In order to identify the mechanisms behind formation of the different by-products we studied the effect...... of low oxygen availability, at different carbon source concentrations and at different specific growth rates, on the metabolism of A. niger, using continuous cultures. The results show that there is an increase in the production of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates at low oxygen concentrations...

  3. How low can you go? Assessing minimum concentrations of NSC in carbon limited tree saplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Guenter; Hartmann, Henrik; Schwendener, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Tissue concentrations of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) are frequently used to determine the carbon balance of plants. Over the last years, an increasing number of studies have inferred carbon starvation in trees under environmental stress like drought from low tissue NSC concentrations. However, such inferences are limited by the fact that minimum concentrations of NSC required for survival are not known. So far, it was hypothesized that even under lethal carbon starvation, starch and low molecular sugar concentrations cannot be completely depleted and that minimum NSC concentrations at death vary across tissues and species. Here we present results of an experiment that aimed to determine minimum NSC concentrations in different tissues of saplings of two broad-leaved tree species (Acer pseudoplatanus and Quercus petratea) exposed to lethal carbon starvation via continuous darkening. In addition, we investigated recovery rates of NSC concentrations in saplings that had been darkened for different periods of time and were then re-exposed to light. Both species survived continuous darkening for about 12 weeks (confirmed by testing the ability to re-sprout after darkness). In all investigated tissues, starch concentrations declined close to zero within three to six weeks of darkness. Low molecular sugars also decreased strongly within the first weeks of darkness, but seemed to stabilize at low concentrations of 0.5 to 2 % dry matter (depending on tissue and species) almost until death. NSC concentrations recovered surprisingly fast in saplings that were re-exposed to light. After 3 weeks of continuous darkness, tissue NSC concentrations recovered within 6 weeks to levels of unshaded control saplings in all tissues and in both species. To our knowledge, this study represents the first experimental attempt to quantify minimum tissue NSC concentrations at lethal carbon starvation. Most importantly, our results suggest that carbon-starved tree saplings are able to

  4. Observation of decoherence in a carbon nanotube mechanical resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Ben H.; Singh, Vibhor; Venstra, Warner J.; Meerwaldt, Harold B.; Steele, Gary A.

    2014-12-01

    In physical systems, decoherence can arise from both dissipative and dephasing processes. In mechanical resonators, the driven frequency response measures a combination of both, whereas time-domain techniques such as ringdown measurements can separate the two. Here we report the first observation of the mechanical ringdown of a carbon nanotube mechanical resonator. Comparing the mechanical quality factor obtained from frequency- and time-domain measurements, we find a spectral quality factor four times smaller than that measured in ringdown, demonstrating dephasing-induced decoherence of the nanomechanical motion. This decoherence is seen to arise at high driving amplitudes, pointing to a nonlinear dephasing mechanism. Our results highlight the importance of time-domain techniques for understanding dissipation in nanomechanical resonators, and the relevance of decoherence mechanisms in nanotube mechanics.

  5. Observation of decoherence in a carbon nanotube mechanical resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Ben H; Singh, Vibhor; Venstra, Warner J; Meerwaldt, Harold B; Steele, Gary A

    2014-12-19

    In physical systems, decoherence can arise from both dissipative and dephasing processes. In mechanical resonators, the driven frequency response measures a combination of both, whereas time-domain techniques such as ringdown measurements can separate the two. Here we report the first observation of the mechanical ringdown of a carbon nanotube mechanical resonator. Comparing the mechanical quality factor obtained from frequency- and time-domain measurements, we find a spectral quality factor four times smaller than that measured in ringdown, demonstrating dephasing-induced decoherence of the nanomechanical motion. This decoherence is seen to arise at high driving amplitudes, pointing to a nonlinear dephasing mechanism. Our results highlight the importance of time-domain techniques for understanding dissipation in nanomechanical resonators, and the relevance of decoherence mechanisms in nanotube mechanics.

  6. Submicrosecond-timescale readout of carbon nanotube mechanical motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerwaldt, H.B.; Johnston, S.R.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.; Steele, G.A.

    2013-01-01

    We report fast readout of the motion of a carbon nanotube mechanical resonator. A close-proximity high electron mobility transistor amplifier is used to increase the bandwidth of the measurement of nanotube displacements from the kHz to the MHz regime. Using an electrical detection scheme with the n

  7. Selective carboxylate production by controlling hydrogen, carbon dioxide and substrate concentrations in mixed culture fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arslan, D.; Steinbusch, K.J.J.; Diels, L.; Wever, de H.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2013-01-01

    This research demonstrated the selective production of n-butyrate from mixed culture by applying 2 bar carbon dioxide into the headspace of batch fermenters or by increasing the initial substrate concentration. The effect of increasing initial substrate concentration was investigated at 8, 13.5 and

  8. Estimation of mechanical properties of single wall carbon nanotubes using molecular mechanics approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Subba Rao; Sunil Anandatheertha; G Narayana Naik; G Gopalakrishnan

    2015-06-01

    Molecular mechanics based finite element analysis is adopted in the current work to evaluate the mechanical properties of Zigzag, Armchair and Chiral Single wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNT) of different diameters and chiralities. Three different types of atomic bonds, that is Carbon–Carbon covalent bond and two types of Carbon–Carbon van der Waals bonds are considered in the carbon nanotube system. The stiffness values of these bonds are calculated using the molecular potentials, namely Morse potential function and Lennard-Jones interaction potential function respectively and these stiffness’s are assigned to spring elements in the finite element model of the CNT. The geometry of CNT is built using a macro that is developed for the finite element analysis software. The finite element model of the CNT is constructed, appropriate boundary conditions are applied and the behavior of mechanical properties of CNT is studied.

  9. PREDICTION OF CARBON CONCENTRATION AND FERRITE VOLUME FRACTION OF HOT-ROLLED STEEL STRIP DURING LAMINAR COOLING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A phase transformation model was presented for predicting the phase fraction transformed and the carbon concentration in austenite for austenite to ferrite transformation during laminar cooling on run-out table in hot rolling strip mill. In this model, the parameter k in Avrami equation was developed for carbon steels. The wide range of chemical composition, the primary austenite grain size, and the retained strain were taken into account. It can be used to predict the ferrite volume fraction and the carbon concentration in austenite of hot-rolled steel strip during laminar cooling on run-out table. The coiling temperature controlling model was also presented to calculate the temperature of steel strip. The transformation kinetics of austenite to ferrite and the evolution of carbon concentration in austenite at different temperatures during cooling were investigated in the hot rolled Q235B strip for thickness of 9.35, 6.4, and 3.2mm. The ferrite volume fraction along the length of the strip was also calculated. The calculated ferrite volume fraction was compared with the log data from hot strip mill and the calculated results were in agreement with the experimental ones. The present study is a part of the prediction of the mechanical properties of hot-rolled steel strip, and it has already been used on-line and off-line in the hot strip mill.

  10. Influence of Nitric Acid Concentration on Characteristics of Olive Stone Based Activated Carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nouha Soudani; Souad Souissi-najar; Abdelmottaleb Ouederni

    2013-01-01

    In this work we investigated the effect of nitric acid concentration on the pore structure, surface chemis-try and liquid phase adsorption of olive stone based activated carbon prepared by mixing process using phosphoric acid and steam as activating agents. Chemicals and textural characterization show that the increase of HNO3 con-centration increases considerably the total acidic groups but decreases specific surface area and pore volume. The study of adsorption in aqueous solutions of two organics, phenol and methylene blue, on raw and oxidized activated carbon indicates that the treatment of mixed activated carbon with different concentrations of nitric acid improves the adsorbent capacity for methylene blue at HNO3 concentrations less or equal to 2 mol·L-1, while it has a negative effect on phenol adsorption.

  11. Multiscale experimental mechanics of hierarchical carbon-based materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Horacio D; Filleter, Tobin; Naraghi, Mohammad

    2012-06-05

    Investigation of the mechanics of natural materials, such as spider silk, abalone shells, and bone, has provided great insight into the design of materials that can simultaneously achieve high specific strength and toughness. Research has shown that their emergent mechanical properties are owed in part to their specific self-organization in hierarchical molecular structures, from nanoscale to macroscale, as well as their mixing and bonding. To apply these findings to manmade materials, researchers have devoted significant efforts in developing a fundamental understanding of multiscale mechanics of materials and its application to the design of novel materials with superior mechanical performance. These efforts included the utilization of some of the most promising carbon-based nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes, carbon nanofibers, and graphene, together with a variety of matrix materials. At the core of these efforts lies the need to characterize material mechanical behavior across multiple length scales starting from nanoscale characterization of constituents and their interactions to emerging micro- and macroscale properties. In this report, progress made in experimental tools and methods currently used for material characterization across multiple length scales is reviewed, as well as a discussion of how they have impacted our current understanding of the mechanics of hierarchical carbon-based materials. In addition, insight is provided into strategies for bridging experiments across length scales, which are essential in establishing a multiscale characterization approach. While the focus of this progress report is in experimental methods, their concerted use with theoretical-computational approaches towards the establishment of a robust material by design methodology is also discussed, which can pave the way for the development of novel materials possessing unprecedented mechanical properties.

  12. Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration: effects of increased carbon input in a Lolium perenne soil on microorganisms and decomposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, van J.H.; Gorissen, A.; Polci, D.

    2000-01-01

    Effects of ambient and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (350 and 700 μl l-1) on net carbon input into soil, the production of root-derived material and the subsequent microbial transformation were investigated. Perennial ryegrass plants (L. perenne L.) were labelled in a continuously labelled

  13. Effect of tooth-bleaching on the carbonate concentration in dental enamel by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Koudriavtsev, Tatiana; Herrera-Sancho, Óscar-Andrey

    2017-01-01

    Background There are not many studies evaluating the effects of surface treatments at the molecular level. The aim of this in vitro study was to analyze the concentration of carbonate molecules in dental enamel by Raman spectroscopy after the application of in-office and home whitening agents. Material and Methods Sixty human teeth were randomly divided into six groups and exposed to three different home bleaching gels (Day White) and three in-office whitening agents (Zoom! Whitespeed and PolaOffice) according to the manufacturer´s instructions. The concentration of carbonate molecules in enamel was measured prior to and during the treatment by means of Raman spectroscopy. Statistical analysis included repeated measures analysis of variance (p≤0.05) and Bonferroni pairwise comparisons. Results At home bleaching agents depicted a decrease in the carbonate molecule. This decrease was statistically significant for the bleaching gel with the highest hydrogen peroxide concentration (p≤0,05). In-office whitening agents caused an increase in carbonate, which was significant for all three groups (p≤0,05). Conclusions In-office bleaching gels seem to cause a gain in carbonate of the enamel structure, whilst at-home whitening gels caused a loss in carbonate. Key words:Bleaching, whitening, hydrogen peroxide, carbamide peroxide, Raman spectroscopy, carbonate.

  14. Physiological characteristics of the primitive CO2 concentrating mechanism in PEPC transgenic rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦德茂; 匡廷云; 李霞; 戈巧英; 黄雪清; 郝乃斌; 白克智

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between carbon assimilation and high-level expression of the maize PEPC in PEPC transgenic rice was studied by comparison to that in the untransformed rice, japonica kitaake. Stomatal conductance and photosynthetic rates in PEPC transgenic rice were higher than those of untransformed rice, but the increase of stomatal conductance had no statistical correlation with that of photosynthetic rate. Under high levels of light intensity, the protein contents of PEPC and CA were increased significantly. Therefore the photosynthetic capacity was increased greatly (50%) with atmospheric CO2 supply. While CO2 release in leaf was reduced and the compensation point was lowered correspondingly under CO2 free conditions. Treatment of the rice with the PEPC-specific inhibitor DCDP showed that overexpression of PEPC and enhancement of carbon assimilation were related to the stability of Fv/Fm. Labeling with 14CO2 for 20 s showed more 14C was distributed to C4 primary photosynthate asperate in PEPC transgenic rice, suggesting that there exists a limiting C4 photosynthetic mechanism in leaves. These results suggest that the primitive CO2 concentrating mechanism found in rice could be reproduced through metabolic engineering, and shed light on the physiological basis for transgenic breeding with high photosynthetic efficiency.

  15. Corrosion by concentrated sulfuric acid in carbon steel pipes and tanks: state of the art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panossian, Zehbour; Almeida, Neusvaldo Lira de; Sousa, Raquel Maria Ferreira de [Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas (IPT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pimenta, Gutemberg de Souza [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas e Desenvolvimento (CENPES); Marques, Leandro Bordalo Schmidt [PETROBRAS Engenharia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    PETROBRAS, allied to the policy of reduction of emission of pollutants, has been adjusting the processes of the new refineries to obtain products with lower sulfur content. Thus, the sulfur dioxide, extracted from the process gases of a new refinery to be built in the Northeast, will be used to produce sulfuric acid with concentration between (94-96) %. This acid will be stored in carbon steel tanks and transported through a buried 8-km carbon steel pipe from the refinery to a pier, where it will be loaded onto ships and sent to the consumer markets. Therefore, the corrosion resistance of carbon steel by concentrated acid will become a great concern for the mentioned storage and transportation. When the carbon steel comes into contact with concentrated sulfuric acid, there is an immediate acid attack with the formation of hydrogen gas and ferrous ions which, in turn, forms a protective layer of FeSO{sub 4} on the metallic surface. The durability of the tanks and pipes made of carbon steel will depend on the preservation of this protective layer. This work presents a review of the carbon steel corrosion in concentrated sulfuric acid and discusses the preventive methods against this corrosion, including anodic protection. (author)

  16. Proteomic analysis of carbon concentrating chemolithotrophic bacteria Serratia sp. for sequestration of carbon dioxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randhir K Bharti

    Full Text Available A chemolithotrophic bacterium enriched in the chemostat in presence of sodium bicarbonate as sole carbon source was identified as Serratia sp. by 16S rRNA sequencing. Carbon dioxide sequestering capacity of bacterium was detected by carbonic anhydrase enzyme and ribulose-1, 5- bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO. The purified carbonic anhydrase showed molecular weight of 29 kDa. Molecular weight of RuBisCO was 550 kDa as determined by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC, however, sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE showed presence of two subunits whose molecular weights were 56 and 14 kDa. The Western blot analysis of the crude protein and purified sample cross reacted with RuBisCO large-subunit polypeptides antibodies showed strong band pattern at molecular weight around 56 kDa regions. Whole cell soluble proteins of Serratia sp. grown under autotrophic and heterotrophic conditions were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/MS for differential expression of proteins. In proteomic analysis of 63 protein spots, 48 spots were significantly up-regulated in the autotrophically grown cells; seven enzymes showed its utilization in autotrophic carbon fixation pathways and other metabolic activities of bacterium including lipid metabolisms indicated sequestration potency of carbon dioxide and production of biomaterials.

  17. Proteomic analysis of carbon concentrating chemolithotrophic bacteria Serratia sp. for sequestration of carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Randhir K; Srivastava, Shaili; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2014-01-01

    A chemolithotrophic bacterium enriched in the chemostat in presence of sodium bicarbonate as sole carbon source was identified as Serratia sp. by 16S rRNA sequencing. Carbon dioxide sequestering capacity of bacterium was detected by carbonic anhydrase enzyme and ribulose-1, 5- bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO). The purified carbonic anhydrase showed molecular weight of 29 kDa. Molecular weight of RuBisCO was 550 kDa as determined by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC), however, sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed presence of two subunits whose molecular weights were 56 and 14 kDa. The Western blot analysis of the crude protein and purified sample cross reacted with RuBisCO large-subunit polypeptides antibodies showed strong band pattern at molecular weight around 56 kDa regions. Whole cell soluble proteins of Serratia sp. grown under autotrophic and heterotrophic conditions were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/MS for differential expression of proteins. In proteomic analysis of 63 protein spots, 48 spots were significantly up-regulated in the autotrophically grown cells; seven enzymes showed its utilization in autotrophic carbon fixation pathways and other metabolic activities of bacterium including lipid metabolisms indicated sequestration potency of carbon dioxide and production of biomaterials.

  18. Concentrations and characteristics of organic carbon in surface water in Arizona: Influence of urbanization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhoff, P.; Anning, D.

    2000-01-01

    Dissolved (DOC) and total (TOC) organic carbon concentrations and compositions were studied for several river systems in Arizona, USA. DOC composition was characterized by ultraviolet and visible absorption and fluorescence emission (excitation wavelength of 370 nm) spectra characteristics. Ephemeral sites had the highest DOC concentrations, and unregulated perennial sites had lower concentrations than unregulated intermittent sites, regulated sites, and sites downstream from wastewater-treatment plants (p wastewater-treatment plant effluent were higher in DOC concentration (p wastewater-treatment plants) was found to affect temporal variability in DOC concentration and composition. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.Dissolved (DOC) and total (TOC) organic carbon concentrations and compositions were studied for several river systems in Arizona, USA. DOC composition was characterized by ultraviolet and visible absorption and fluorescence emission (excitation wavelength of 370 nm) spectra characteristics. Ephemeral sites had the highest DOC concentrations, and unregulated perennial sites had lower concentrations than unregulated intermittent sites, regulated sites, and sites downstream from wastewater-treatment plants (pwastewater-treatment plant effluent were higher in DOC concentration (pwastewater-treatment plants) was found to affect temporal variability in DOC concentration and composition.The influence of urbanization, becoming increasingly common in arid regions, on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in surface water resources was studied. DOC concentration and composition, seasonal watershed runoff events, streamflow variations, water management practices, and urban infrastructure in several Arizona watersheds were monitored. Ephemeral sites had the highest DOC levels, and unregulated perennial sites and lower concentrations than unregulated intermittent sites, regulated sites, and sites downstream from wastewater treatment plants. Reservoir outflows

  19. A Pareto Optimal Auction Mechanism for Carbon Emission Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxi Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The carbon emission rights do not fit well into the framework of existing multi-item auction mechanisms because of their own unique features. This paper proposes a new auction mechanism which converges to a unique Pareto optimal equilibrium in a finite number of periods. In the proposed auction mechanism, the assignment outcome is Pareto efficient and the carbon emission rights’ resources are efficiently used. For commercial application and theoretical completeness, both discrete and continuous markets—represented by discrete and continuous bid prices, respectively—are examined, and the results show the existence of a Pareto optimal equilibrium under the constraint of individual rationality. With no ties, the Pareto optimal equilibrium can be further proven to be unique.

  20. Parametric strong mode-coupling in carbon nanotube mechanical resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu-Xiao; Zhu, Dong; Wang, Xin-He; Wang, Jiang-Tao; Deng, Guang-Wei; Li, Hai-Ou; Cao, Gang; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guang-Can; Jiang, Kai-Li; Dai, Xing-Can; Guo, Guo-Ping

    2016-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted much attention for use in nanomechanical devices because of their exceptional properties, such as large resonant frequencies, low mass, and high quality factors. Here, we report the first experimental realization of parametric strong coupling between two mechanical modes on a single CNT nanomechanical resonator, by applying an extra microwave pump. This parametric pump method can be used to couple mechanical modes with arbitrary frequency differences. The properties of the mechanical resonator are detected by single-electron tunneling at low temperature, which is found to be strongly coupled to both modes. The coupling strength between the two modes can be tuned by the pump power, setting the coupling regime from weak to strong. This tunability may be useful in further phonon manipulations in carbon nanotubes.Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted much attention for use in nanomechanical devices because of their exceptional properties, such as large resonant frequencies, low mass, and high quality factors. Here, we report the first experimental realization of parametric strong coupling between two mechanical modes on a single CNT nanomechanical resonator, by applying an extra microwave pump. This parametric pump method can be used to couple mechanical modes with arbitrary frequency differences. The properties of the mechanical resonator are detected by single-electron tunneling at low temperature, which is found to be strongly coupled to both modes. The coupling strength between the two modes can be tuned by the pump power, setting the coupling regime from weak to strong. This tunability may be useful in further phonon manipulations in carbon nanotubes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fit of the quality factor and similar results in more devices. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02853e

  1. The mechanism of selective molecular capture in carbon nanotube networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yu; Guan, Jun; Yang, Xudong; Zheng, Quanshui; Xu, Zhiping

    2014-07-28

    Recently, air pollution issues have drawn significant attention to the development of efficient air filters, and one of the most promising materials for this purpose is nanofibers. We explore here the mechanism of selective molecular capture of volatile organic compounds in carbon nanotube networks by performing atomistic simulations. The results are discussed with respect to the two key parameters that define the performance of nanofiltration, i.e. the capture efficiency and flow resistance, which demonstrate the advantages of carbon nanotube networks with high surface-to-volume ratio and atomistically smooth surfaces. We also reveal the important roles of interfacial adhesion and diffusion that govern selective gas transport through the network.

  2. Molecular mechanics methods for individual carbon nanotubes and nanotube assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, Oliver; Wallmersperger, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Since many years, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been considered for a wide range of applications due to their outstanding mechanical properties. CNTs are tubular structures, showing a graphene like hexagonal lattice. Our interest in the calculation of the mechanical properties is motivated by several applications which demand the knowledge of the material behavior. One application in which the knowledge of the material behavior is vital is the CNT based fiber. Due to the excellent stiffness and strength of the individual CNTs, these fibers are expected to be a promising successor for state of the art carbon fibers. However, the mechanical properties of the fibers fall back behind the properties of individual CNTs. It is assumed that this gap in the properties is a result of the van-der-Waals interactions of the individual CNTs within the fiber. In order to understand the mechanical behavior of the fibers we apply a molecular mechanics approach. The mechanical properties of the individual CNTs are investigated by using a modified structural molecular mechanics approach. This is done by calculating the properties of a truss-beam element framework representing the CNT with the help of a chemical force field. Furthermore, we also investigate the interactions of CNTs arranged in basic CNT assemblies, mimicking the ones in a simple CNT fiber. We consider the van-der-Waals interactions in the structure and calculate the potential surface of the CNT assemblies.

  3. Synergetic Effects of Mechanical Properties on Graphene Nanoplatelet and Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Hybrids Reinforced Epoxy/Carbon Fiber Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Pin-Ning Wang; Tsung-Han Hsieh; Chin-Lung Chiang; Ming-Yuan Shen

    2015-01-01

    Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are novel nanofillers possessing attractive characteristics, including robust compatibility with most polymers, high absolute strength, and cost effectiveness. In this study, an outstanding synergetic effect on the grapheme nanoplatelets (GNPs) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) hybrids were used to reinforce epoxy composite and epoxy/carbon fiber composite laminates to enhance their mechanical properties. The mechanical propertie...

  4. Trends in nanoscale mechanics mechanics of carbon nanotubes, graphene, nanocomposites and molecular dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book contains a collection of the state-of-the-art reviews written by the leading researchers in the areas of nanoscale mechanics, molecular dynamics, nanoscale modeling of nanocomposites and mechanics of carbon nanotubes. No other book has reviews of the recent discoveries such as a nanoscale analog of the Pauli’s principle, i.e., effect of the spatial exclusion of electrons or the SEE effect, a new Registry Matrix Analysis for the nanoscale interfacial sliding and new data on the effective viscosity of interfacial electrons in nanoscale stiction at the interfaces. This volume is also an exceptional resource on the well tested nanoscale modeling of carbon nanotubes and nanocomposites, new nanoscale effects, unique evaluations of the effective thickness of carbon nanotubes under different loads, new data on which size of carbon nanotubes is safer and many other topics. Extensive bibliography concerning all these topics is included along with the lucid short reviews. Numerous illustrations are provided...

  5. A possible CO2 conducting and concentrating mechanism in plant stomata SLAC1 channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-Shi Du

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The plant SLAC1 is a slow anion channel in the membrane of stomatal guard cells, which controls the turgor pressure in the aperture-defining guard cells, thereby regulating the exchange of water vapour and photosynthetic gases in response to environmental signals such as drought, high levels of carbon dioxide, and bacterial invasion. Recent study demonstrated that bicarbonate is a small-molecule activator of SLAC1. Higher CO(2 and HCO(3(- concentration activates S-type anion channel currents in wild-type Arabidopsis guard cells. Based on the SLAC1 structure a theoretical model is derived to illustrate the activation of bicarbonate to SLAC1 channel. Meanwhile a possible CO(2 conducting and concentrating mechanism of the SLAC1 is proposed. METHODOLOGY: The homology structure of Arabidopsis thaliana SLAC1 (AtSLAC1 provides the structural basis for study of the conducting and concentrating mechanism of carbon dioxide in SLAC1 channels. The pK(a values of ionizable amino acid side chains in AtSLAC1 are calculated using software PROPKA3.0, and the concentration of CO(2 and anion HCO(3(- are computed based on the chemical equilibrium theory. CONCLUSIONS: The AtSLAC1 is modeled as a five-region channel with different pH values. The top and bottom layers of channel are the alkaline residue-dominated regions, and in the middle of channel there is the acidic region surrounding acidic residues His332. The CO(2 concentration is enhanced around 10(4 times by the pH difference between these regions, and CO(2 is stored in the hydrophobic region, which is a CO(2 pool. The pH driven CO(2 conduction from outside to inside balances the back electromotive force and maintain the influx of anions (e.g. Cl(- and NO(3(- from inside to outside. SLAC1 may be a pathway providing CO(2 for photosynthesis in the guard cells.

  6. Mechanical properties of short carbon/glass fiber reinforced high mechanical performance epoxy resins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张竞; 黄培

    2009-01-01

    To research the relationship between epoxy and fiber inherent property and mechanical properties of composite,we prepared a series of composites using three kinds of high mechanical performance epoxy resins as matrices and reinforced by the same volume fraction(5%)of short carbon and glass fiber.Their mechanical properties were investigated from the perspective of chemical structure and volume shrinkage ratio of epoxy.We analyzed their tensile strength and modulus based on the mixing rule and Halpin-Tsai eq...

  7. Dispersion and reinforcing mechanism of carbon nanotubes in epoxy nanocomposites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Smrutisikha Bal

    2010-02-01

    Carbon nanotube based epoxy composites have been fabricated at room temperature and refrigeration process using sonication principle. Flexural moduli, electrical conductivity, glass transition temperature of epoxy resin as well as nanocomposite samples have been determined. Distribution behaviour of carbon nanotubes in the epoxy matrix was examined through scanning electron microscopy. Composite samples showed better properties than resin samples due to strengthening effect of the filled nanotubes. Refrigerated nanocomposites obtained increasing mechanical property because of better dispersion due to low temperature settlement of polymers. Improvement of electrical conductivity was due to the fact that aggregated phases form a conductive three-dimensional network throughout the whole sample. The increasing glass transition temperature was indicative of restricting movement of polymer chains that ascribe strong interaction presented between carbon nanotubes and epoxy chains that was again supplemented by Raman study and SEM.

  8. Carbonic anhydrase levels and internal lacunar CO/sub 2/ concentrations in aquatic macrophytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, C.I.

    1979-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase levels were examined in a variety of aquatic macrophytes from different habitats. In general, carbonic anhydrase levels increased across the habitat gradient such that activities were low in submersed aquatic macrophytes and high in emergent macrophytes with floating-leaved and free-floating plants exhibiting intermediate activities. Internal lacunar CO/sub 2/ concentrations were analyzed in relation to carbonic anhydrase activities. There was no correlation between these two parameters. Internal CO/sub 2/ concentrations ranged from low to high in submersed macrophytes, but were low in floating-leaved and emergent macrophytes. The observed internal CO/sub 2/ concentrations are discussed in relation to the individual morphologies of the plants and the environments in which they occurred.

  9. A method for monitoring mass concentration of black carbon particulate matter using photothermal interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baosheng; Wang, Yicheng; Li, Zhengqiang

    2016-03-01

    A method for measurements of mass concentration of black carbon particulate matter (PM) is proposed based on photothermal interferometry (PTI). A folded Jamin photothermal interferometer was used with a laser irradiation of particles deposited on a filter paper. The black carbon PM deposited on the filter paper was regarded as a film while the quartz filter paper was regarded as a substrate to establish a mathematical model for measuring the mass concentration of PM using a photothermal method. The photothermal interferometry system was calibrated and used to measure the atmospheric PM concentration corresponding to different dust-treated filter paper. The measurements were compared to those obtained using β ray method and were found consistent. This method can be particularly relevant to polluted atmospheres where PM is dominated by black carbon.

  10. Effects of Temperature and Catalyst Concentration on the Growth of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Xiaodong; LI Dan; WANG Ye; LIANG Ji

    2005-01-01

    The effects of preheating and pyrolysis temperatures and catalyst concentration on the synthesis of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using ferrocene as the catalyst and xylene as the carbon source in chemical vapor deposition were experimentally studied. The as-grown aligned CNTs were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electronic microscopy, high-resolution transmission electronic microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The growth rate, the diameters, and the degree of crystal structure of the aligned CNTs were all found to depend on the preheating and pyrolysis temperatures and the catalyst concentration. The optimized conditions for the growth of aligned CNTs resulted in a rapid growth rate of 20.4 μm/min, with the CNTs having a good, uniform crystal structure, and clean surfaces with little amorphous carbon. The results also show that higher preheating temperatures and lower ferrocene concentrations favor the growth of single-walled CNTs.

  11. Use of Genetic Models to Study the Urinary Concentrating Mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Emma Tina Bisgaard; Kortenoeven, Marleen L.A.; Fenton, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of body water homeostasis is a fundamental homeostatic mechanism in mammals. Understanding the basic mechanisms of how water balance is maintained, or dysfunctional in certain diseases is thus of clinical importance. In recent years, application of transgenic and knockout mouse techno...

  12. Dynamic responses of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration to global temperature changes between 1850 and 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weile; Nemani, Ramakrishna

    2016-02-01

    Changes in Earth's temperature have significant impacts on the global carbon cycle that vary at different time scales, yet to quantify such impacts with a simple scheme is traditionally deemed difficult. Here, we show that, by incorporating a temperature sensitivity parameter (1.64 ppm yr-1 °C-1) into a simple linear carbon-cycle model, we can accurately characterize the dynamic responses of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration to anthropogenic carbon emissions and global temperature changes between 1850 and 2010 ( r 2 > 0.96 and the root-mean-square error reservoir (~12 year) approximates the long-term temperature sensitivity of global atmospheric CO2 concentration (~15 ppm °C-1), generally consistent with previous estimates based on reconstructed CO2 and climate records over the Little Ice Age. Our results suggest that recent increases in global surface temperatures, which accelerate the release of carbon from the surface reservoirs into the atmosphere, have partially offset surface carbon uptakes enhanced by the elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration and slowed the net rate of atmospheric CO2 sequestration by global land and oceans by ~30% since the 1960s. The linear modeling framework outlined in this paper thus provides a useful tool to diagnose the observed atmospheric CO2 dynamics and monitor their future changes.

  13. Carbon assimilation in Eucalyptus urophylla grown under high atmospheric CO2 concentrations: A proteomics perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Bruna Marques Dos; Balbuena, Tiago Santana

    2017-01-06

    Photosynthetic organisms may be drastically affected by the future climate projections of a considerable increase in CO2 concentrations. Growth under a high concentration of CO2 could stimulate carbon assimilation-especially in C3-type plants. We used a proteomics approach to test the hypothesis of an increase in the abundance of the enzymes involved in carbon assimilation in Eucalyptus urophylla plants grown under conditions of high atmospheric CO2. Our strategy allowed the profiling of all Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes and associated protein species. Among the 816 isolated proteins, those involved in carbon fixation were found to be the most abundant ones. An increase in the abundance of six key enzymes out of the eleven core enzymes involved in carbon fixation was detected in plants grown at a high CO2 concentration. Proteome changes were corroborated by the detection of a decrease in the stomatal aperture and in the vascular bundle area in Eucalyptus urophylla plantlets grown in an environment of high atmospheric CO2. Our proteomics approach indicates a positive metabolic response regarding carbon fixation in a CO2-enriched atmosphere. The slight but significant increase in the abundance of the Calvin enzymes suggests that stomatal closure did not prevent an increase in the carbon assimilation rates.

  14. Adsorption of ultra-low concentration malodorous substances using coal-derived granular activated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urano, K.; Maeda, T.; Yamashita, H.; Hagio, S.; Arioka, A.

    1986-01-01

    The experimental adsorption is reported of diosmin and 2-methylisoborneol using two types of coal-derived granular activated carbon and one derived from coconut husk. It was discovered that carbons with more pores below 15 angstroms in size gave a higher equilibrium adsorption of malodorous substances at mg/l concentrations. It was also found that the coal-derived materials, which contained more pores larger than 15 angstroms, gave faster adsorption. Given that the coal-derived carbons have a longer service life, it is concluded that they are suitable for use in full-scale adsorption plant where contact times are short. 3 references, 5 figures, 5 tables.

  15. A method for quantitative analysis of aquatic humic substances in clear water based on carbon concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Kumiko; Takata, Akihiro; Shirai, Hidekado; Kozaki, Katsutoshi; Fujitake, Nobuhide

    2012-01-01

    Aquatic humic substances (AHSs) are major constituents of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in freshwater, where they perform a number of important ecological and geochemical functions, yet no method exists for quantifying all AHSs. We have developed a method for the quantitative analysis of AHSs based on their carbon concentration. Our approach includes: (1) the development of techniques for clear-water samples with low AHS concentrations, which normally complicate quantification; (2) avoiding carbon contamination in the laboratory; and (3) optimizing the AHS adsorption conditions.

  16. Effects of Citric Acid Concentration and Activation Temperature on the Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengyi Li; Minwei Wang; Rongbin Zhang; Renzhong Wei; Niancai Peng

    2004-01-01

    A series of Ni-La-Mg catalyst samples were prepared by citric acid complex method, and carbon nanotubes were synthesized by catalytic decomposition of CH4 on these catalysts. The effects of the citric acid concentration and the activation temperature on catalytic activity were investigated by CO adsorption,TEM and XRD techniques. The experimental results showed that the particle size of the catalysts prepared through gel auto-combustion varied with the concentration of citric acid. Therefore carbon nanotubes with different diameters were obtained correspondingly. The effect of activation temperature on the activity of catalyst was negligible from 500 to 700 ℃, but it became pronounced at lower or higher temperatures.

  17. A century of human-driven changes in the carbon dioxide concentration of lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perga, Marie-Elodie; Maberly, Stephen C.; Jenny, Jean-Philippe; Alric, Benjamin; Pignol, Cécile; Naffrechoux, Emmanuel

    2016-02-01

    Now that evasion of carbon dioxide (CO2) from inland waters is accounted for in global carbon models, it is crucial to quantify how these fluxes have changed in the past and forecast how they may alter in the future in response to local and global change. Here we developed a sediment proxy for the concentration of summer surface dissolved CO2 concentration and used it to reconstruct changes over the past 150 years for three large lakes that have been affected by climate warming, changes in nutrient load, and detrital terrigenous supplies. Initially CO2 neutral to the atmosphere, all three lakes subsequently fluctuated between near equilibrium and supersaturation. Although catchment inputs have supplied CO2 to the lakes, internal processes and reallocation have ultimately regulated decadal changes in lake surface CO2 concentration. Nutrient concentration has been the dominant driver of CO2 variability for a century although the reproducible, nonmonotonic relationship of CO2 to nutrient concentration suggests an interplay between metabolic and chemical processes. Yet for two of these lakes, climatic control of CO2 concentrations has been important over the last 30 years, promoting higher surface CO2 concentrations, likely by decreasing hypolimnetic carbon storage. This new approach offers the unique opportunity to scale, a posteriori, the long-term impact of human activities on lake CO2.

  18. Carbon-based nano-electro-mechanical systems

    OpenAIRE

    Kaul, A. B.; A. R. Khan; Megerian, K. G.; Epp, L.; Leduc, H. G.; Bagge, L.; Jennings, A. T.; Jang, D.; Greer, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    We provide an overview of our work where carbon-based nanostructures have been applied to twodimensional (2D) planar and three-dimensional (3D) vertically-oriented nano-electro-mechanical (NEM) switches. In the first configuration, laterally oriented single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) synthesized using thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) were implemented for forming bridge-type 2D NEMS switches, where switching voltages were on the order of a few volts. In the second configuration, verticall...

  19. Effect of Interface Modified by Graphene on the Mechanical and Frictional Properties of Carbon/Graphene/Carbon Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Yang; Ruiying Luo; Zhenhua Hou

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we developed an interface modified by graphene to simultaneously improve the mechanical and frictional properties of carbon/graphene/carbon (C/G/C) composite. Results indicated that the C/G/C composite exhibits remarkably improved interfacial bonding mode, static and dynamic mechanical performance, thermal conductivity, and frictional properties in comparison with those of the C/C composite. The weight contents of carbon fibers, graphene and pyrolytic carbon are 31.6, 0.3 and 68...

  20. Influence of temperature and solvent concentration on the kinetics of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase in carbon capture technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gladis, Arne; Deslauriers, Maria Gundersen; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2017-01-01

    In this study the effect of carbonic anhydrase addition on the absorption of CO2 was investigated in a wetted wall column apparatus. Four different solvents: the primary amine monoethanolamine (MEA), the sterically hindered primary amine 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP), the tertiary amine N......-methyl-diethanolamine (MDEA) and the carbonate salt solution K2CO3 were compared in concentrations from 5 to 50 wt% in a temperature range of 298–328 K with and without enzyme. Necessary mass transfer parameters such as liquid side mass transfer coefficient and solvent and enzyme reaction rates were determined...... and benchmarked to a 30 wt% MEA solution. The study reveals that the addition of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) dramatically increases the liquid side mass transfer coefficient for MDEA, and K2CO3; AMP has a moderate increase whereas MEA was unchanged. The results confirm that just bicarbonate forming systems...

  1. Effect of Carbon Nanofiber on Mechanical Behavior of Asphalt Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Ghaffarpour Jahromi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Uses of fibers to improve material properties have a scientific background in recent years in civil engineering. Use of Nanofiber reinforcement of materials refers to incorporating materials with desired properties within some other materials lacking those properties. Use of fibers for improvement is not a new phenomenon as the technique of fiber-reinforced bitumen began as early as 1950, but using nanofiber is a new idea. In this research the mechanical properties of asphalt mixture that have been modified with carbon nanofiber were investigated using mechanical tests, which can improve the performance of flexible pavements. To evaluate the effect of nanofiber contents on bituminous mixtures, laboratory investigations were carried out on the samples with and without nanofibers. During the course of this study, various tests were undertaken applying the Marshall test, indirect tensile test, resistance to fatigue cracking by using repeated load indirect tensile test and creep test. Carbon nanofiber exhibited consistency in results and it was observed that the addition of nanofiber can change the properties of bituminous mixtures, increase its stability and decrease the flow value. Results indicate that nanofiber have the potential to resist structural distress in the pavement and thus improve fatigue by increasing resistance to cracks or permanent deformation, when growing traffic loads. On the whole, the results show that the addition of carbon nanofiber will improve some of the mechanical properties such as fatigue and deformation in the flexible pavement.

  2. Mechanical properties of carbon fiber composites for applications in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hana, P.; Inneman, A.; Daniel, V.; Sieger, L.; Petru, M.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes method of measurement mechanical properties of carbon fiber composites in space. New material structures are specifically designed for use on space satellites. Composite structures will be exposed to cosmic radiation in Earth orbit on board of a '2U CubeSat' satellite. Piezoelectric ceramic sensors are used for detection mechanical vibrations of composite test strip. A great deal of attention is paid to signal processing using 8-bit microcontroler. Fast Fourier Transformation is used. Fundamental harmonic frequencies and damping from on-board measurements will serve as the input data for terrestrial data processing. The other step of elaboration data is creation of the physical model for evaluating mechanical properties of Carbon composite - Piezoelectric ceramic system. Evaluation of anisotropic mechanical properties of piezoelectric ceramics is an interesting secondary outcome of the investigation. Extreme changes in temperature and the effect of cosmic rays will affect the mechanical properties and durability of the material used for the external construction of satellites. Comparative terrestrial measurements will be performed.

  3. Submicrosecond-timescale readout of carbon nanotube mechanical motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerwaldt, H. B.; Johnston, S. R.; van der Zant, H. S. J.; Steele, G. A.

    2013-07-01

    We report fast readout of the motion of a carbon nanotube mechanical resonator. A close-proximity high electron mobility transistor amplifier is used to increase the bandwidth of the measurement of nanotube displacements from the kHz to the MHz regime. Using an electrical detection scheme with the nanotube acting as a mixer, we detect the amplitude of its mechanical motion at room temperature with an intermediate frequency of 6 MHz and a timeconstant of 780 ns, both up to five orders of magnitude faster than achieved before. The transient response of the mechanical motion indicates a ring-down time faster than our enhanced time resolution, placing an upper bound on the contribution of energy relaxation processes to the room temperature mechanical quality factor.

  4. Prediction of soil organic carbon concentration and soil bulk density of mineral soils for soil organic carbon stock estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putku, Elsa; Astover, Alar; Ritz, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Soil monitoring networks provide a powerful base for estimating and predicting nation's soil status in many aspects. The datasets of soil monitoring are often hierarchically structured demanding sophisticated data analyzing methods. The National Soil Monitoring of Estonia was based on a hierarchical data sampling scheme as each of the monitoring site was divided into four transects with 10 sampling points on each transect. We hypothesized that the hierarchical structure in Estonian Soil Monitoring network data requires a multi-level mixed model approach to achieve good prediction accuracy of soil properties. We used this database to predict soil bulk density and soil organic carbon concentration of mineral soils in arable land using different statistical methods: median approach, linear regression and mixed model; additionally, random forests for SOC concentration. We compared the prediction results and selected the model with the best prediction accuracy to estimate soil organic carbon stock. The mixed model approach achieved the best prediction accuracy in both soil organic carbon (RMSE 0.22%) and bulk density (RMSE 0.09 g cm-3) prediction. Other considered methods under- or overestimated higher and lower values of soil parameters. Thus, using these predictions we calculated the soil organic carbon stock of mineral arable soils and applied the model to a specific case of Tartu County in Estonia. Average estimated SOC stock of Tartu County is 54.8 t C ha-1 and total topsoil SOC stock 1.8 Tg in humus horizon.

  5. Biobased carbon content of resin extracted from polyethylene composite by carbon-14 concentration measurements using accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Kazuhiro; Kunioka, Masao; Funabashi, Masahiro; Ninomiya, Fumi

    2014-01-01

    An estimation procedure for biobased carbon content of polyethylene composite was studied using carbon-14 ((14)C) concentration ratios as measured by accelerated mass spectrometry (AMS). Prior to the measurement, additives and fillers in composites should be removed because they often contain a large amount of biobased carbon and may shift the estimation. Samples of resin with purity suitable for measurement were isolated from composites with a Soxhlet extractor using heated cyclohexanone. After cooling of extraction solutions, the resin was recovered as a fine semi-crystalline precipitate, which was easily filtered. Recovery rates were almost identical (99%), even for low-density polyethylene and linear low-density polyethylene, which may have lower crystallinity. This procedure could provide a suitable approach for estimation of biobased carbon content by AMS on the basis of the standard ASTM D 6866. The biobased carbon content for resin extracted from polyethylene composites allow for the calculation of biosynthetic polymer content, which is an indicator of mass percentage of the biobased plastic resin in the composite.

  6. Handspinning Enabled Highly Concentrated Carbon Nanotubes with Controlled Orientation in Nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hoik; Watanabe, Kei; Kim, Myungwoong; Gopiraman, Mayakrishnan; Song, Kyung-Hun; Lee, Jung Soon; Kim, Ick Soo

    2016-11-01

    The novel method, handspinning (HS), was invented by mimicking commonly observed methods in our daily lives. The use of HS allows us to fabricate carbon nanotube-reinforced nanofibers (CNT-reinforced nanofibers) by addressing three significant challenges: (i) the difficulty of forming nanofibers at high concentrations of CNTs, (ii) aggregation of the CNTs, and (iii) control of the orientation of the CNTs. The handspun nanofibers showed better physical properties than fibers fabricated by conventional methods, such as electrospinning. Handspun nanofibers retain a larger amount of CNTs than electrospun nanofibers, and the CNTs are easily aligned uniaxially. We attributed these improvements provided by the HS process to simple mechanical stretching force, which allows for orienting the nanofillers along with the force direction without agglomeration, leading to increased contact area between the CNTs and the polymer matrix, thereby providing enhanced interactions. HS is a simple and straightforward method as it does not require an electric field, and, hence, any kinds of polymers and solvents can be applicable. Furthermore, it is feasible to retain a large amount of various nanofillers in the fibers to enhance their physical and chemical properties. Therefore, HS provides an effective pathway to create new types of reinforced nanofibers with outstanding properties.

  7. Electric anisotropy in high density polyethylene + carbon black composites induced by mechanical deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigueras-Santiago, E; Hernandez-Lopez, S; Camacho-Lopez, M A; Lara-Sanjuan, O, E-mail: eviguerass@uaemex.m [Laboratorio de Investigacion y Desarrollo de Materiales Avanzados (LIDMA), Facultad de Quimica, UAEM. Paseo Colon esq. con Paseo Tollocan, s/n. C.P. 50000, Toluca (Mexico)

    2009-05-01

    High density polyethylene + carbon black composites with electrical anisotropy was studied. Electrical anisotropy was induced by uniaxial mechanical deformation and injection moulding. We show that anisotropy depends on the carbon black concentration and percentage deformation. Resistivity had the highest anisotropy resistivity around the percolation threshold. Perpendicular resistivity showed two magnitude orders higher than parallel resistivity for injected samples, whereas resistivity showed an inverse behaviour for 100% tensile samples. Both directions were set respect to the deformation axe. Anisotropy could be explained in terms of the molecular deformation (alignment) of the polymer chains as a response of the deformation process originating a redistribution of the carbon black particles in both directions. Alignment of the polymer chains was evidenced by polarized Raman spectroscopy.

  8. Effect of carbon nanofibre addition on the mechanical properties of different f carbon-epoxy composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I Srikanth; Suresh Kumar; Vajinder Singh; B Rangababu; Partha Ghosal; Ch Subrahmanyam

    2015-04-01

    Carbon-epoxy (C-epoxy) laminated composites having different fibre volume fractions (40, 50, 60 and 70) were fabricated with and without the addition of aminofunctionalized carbon nanofibres (A-CNF). Flexural strength, interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) and tensile strength of the composite laminates were determined. It was observed that, the ability of A-CNF to enhance the mechanical properties of C-epoxy diminished significantly as the fibre volume fraction (f) of the C-epoxy increased from 40 to 60. At 70f, the mechanical properties of the A-CNF reinforced C-epoxy were found to be lower compared to the C-epoxy composite made without the addition of A-CNF. In this paper suitable mechanisms for the observed trends are proposed on the basis of the fracture modes of the composite.

  9. Temporal Variation of Carbon Monoxide Concentration at Congested Urban Roadways Intersection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanshyam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The carbon monoxide (CO is dominant among major traffic emitted pollutants such as respirable suspended particulate matter (RSPM, oxides of nitrogen (NOx, volatile organic carbons(VOCs and ozone (O3 etc. It is generated by automobiles due to incomplete combustion of the fuel. The vehicles that queue up at an intersection spend more time in idle driving mode generating more pollutant leading to higher pollutant concentrations. Therefore, the trends of average hourly CO concentrations at various locations of congested roadways intersection have been investigated. The four approach roads making intersection have been selected for the present study. CO monitoring has been carried out at 2 selected locations of each approach road. The CO concentration has been monitored from 8:00 AM to 8:00 PM at each location using portable online CO monitor. The average hourly CO concentrations data have been analyzed using MS excel spread sheet for each approach road. The average hourly concentration of monitored CO concentration at all receptors locations shows two peak CO concentration values (i.e., the morning peak and evening peak throughout the monitoring programme (March to May, 2011. The comparison of monitored values of average 1 hourly CO concentration levels as well as 8 hourly average concentration levels of CO showed non compliance with the prescribed standards (4000 µg/m3 average hourly and 2000 µg/m3 average 8 hourly CO concentration. The temporal CO concentration at various approach roads making roadway intersection shows non-uniform. The highest CO concentration has been observed to be towards high rise building and vice-versa. The least CO concentration has been observed towards either low rise building or open area.

  10. Adsorption of Crystal Violet on Activated Carbon Prepared from Coal Flotation Concentrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogmus, Ramazan; Depci, Tolga; Sarikaya, Musa; Riza Kul, Ali; Onal, Yunus

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study is firstly to investigate the floatability properties of Zilan- Van coal after microwave irradiation and secondly to produce activated carbon from flotation concentrate in order to remove Crystal Violet (CV) from waste water. The flotation experiments showed that microwave heating at 0.9 kW power level for 60 sec exposure time enhanced the hydrophobicity and increased the flotation yield. The activated carbon with remarkable surface area (696 m2/g) was produced from the flotation concentrate and used to adsorb CV from aqueous solution in a batch reactor at different temperature. The adsorption properties of CV onto the activated carbon are discussed in terms of the adsorption isotherms (Langmuir and Freundlich) and found that the experimental results best fitted by the Langmuir model.

  11. Measurement of low concentration and nano-quantity hydrogen sulfide in sera using unfunctionalized carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, X. C.; Zhang, W. J.; Sammynaiken, R.; Meng, Q. H.; Wu, D. Q.; Yang, Q.; Yang, W.; Zhang, Edwin M.; Wang, R.

    2009-10-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is produced in small amounts by certain cells in the mammalian body and has a number of biological functions. H2S gas naturally produced by the body is not simply a toxic gas; it could be a vascular dilator and play a physiological role in regulating cardiovascular functions. In order to know the effects of H2S, it is necessary to accurately know its concentrations in the body. Conventional measurement methods have their limitations concerning the small amount and low concentration of H2S in the body. A new paradigm of using carbon nanotubes in H2S measurement expresses its potential. However, the influence of proteins in the mammalian body must be studied in the measurement of H2S by carbon nanotubes. In this paper, we demonstrate a successful measurement of low concentration (20 µM) and nano-quantity (0.5 µg) H2S in the serum by using carbon nanotubes and further with the fluorescence of confocal laser scanning microscopy and the luminescence of Raman microscopy. Statistical analysis of the experimental data shows that the relationship between concentrations and intensities is linear, which thus makes the carbon nanotube sensor highly promising for the measurement of H2S in sera.

  12. Incorporation of uranium in benthic foraminiferal calcite reflects seawater carbonate ion concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keul, N.; Langer, G.; de Nooijer, L.J.; Nehrke, G.; Reichart, G.-J.; Bijma, J.

    2013-01-01

    The chemical and isotopic composition of foraminiferal shells (so-called proxies) reflects the physicochemical properties of the seawater. In current day paleoclimate research, the reconstruction of past seawater carbonate system to infer atmospheric CO2 concentrations is one of the most pressing ch

  13. Low powdered activated carbon concentrations to improve MBR sludge filterability at high salinity and low temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remy, M.J.J.; Temmink, B.G.; Brink, van den P.; Rulkens, W.H.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that powdered activated carbon (PAC), when applied at very low dosages and long SRTs, reduces membrane fouling in membrane bioreactor (MBRs). This effect was related to stronger flocs which are less sensitive to shear. Low temperature and high salt concentration ar

  14. The determination of hydroxide and carbonate in concentrated sodium chloride solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roolvink, W.B.; Bos, M.

    1980-01-01

    A computer method for the determination of carbonate and hydroxide in concentrated (2.89 M) sodium chloride solutions is described. The method is based on multiparametric curve-fitting and can also be applied to salts of dibasic acids with unknown equilibrium constants. The systematic error is not m

  15. Effects of increasing seawater carbon dioxide concentrations on chain formation of the diatom Asterionellopsis glacialis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Barcelos e Ramos

    Full Text Available Diatoms can occur as single cells or as chain-forming aggregates. These two strategies affect buoyancy, predator evasion, light absorption and nutrient uptake. Adjacent cells in chains establish connections through various processes that determine strength and flexibility of the bonds, and at distinct cellular locations defining colony structure. Chain length has been found to vary with temperature and nutrient availability as well as being positively correlated with growth rate. However, the potential effect of enhanced carbon dioxide (CO2 concentrations and consequent changes in seawater carbonate chemistry on chain formation is virtually unknown. Here we report on experiments with semi-continuous cultures of the freshly isolated diatom Asterionellopsis glacialis grown under increasing CO2 levels ranging from 320 to 3400 µatm. We show that the number of cells comprising a chain, and therefore chain length, increases with rising CO2 concentrations. We also demonstrate that while cell division rate changes with CO2 concentrations, carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cellular quotas vary proportionally, evident by unchanged organic matter ratios. Finally, beyond the optimum CO2 concentration for growth, carbon allocation changes from cellular storage to increased exudation of dissolved organic carbon. The observed structural adjustment in colony size could enable growth at high CO2 levels, since longer, spiral-shaped chains are likely to create microclimates with higher pH during the light period. Moreover increased chain length of Asterionellopsis glacialis may influence buoyancy and, consequently, affect competitive fitness as well as sinking rates. This would potentially impact the delicate balance between the microbial loop and export of organic matter, with consequences for atmospheric carbon dioxide.

  16. Reduction mechanism of stainless steelmaking dust and carbon pellets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Bing; SONG Hai-chen; CHAI Li-yuan; WANG Ja; WANG Yun-yan; MIN Xiao-bo; HE De-wen

    2005-01-01

    The reduction mechanism of stainless steelmaking dust and carbon pellets was investigated. The metal oxides present in the dust were reduced by carbon with a new direct reduction technology. The direct reduction parameters were determined by measuring the rates of dust melting and reduction. The results show that the rate of reduction is faster than that of the melting. Both melting and reduction processes are accelerated by the direct transfer of heat from the smelting slag. The recovery of metals is improved while the pellets were added to argon oxygen decarburization(AOD) or vacuum oxygen decarburization(VOD) vessels in the late period of the first smelting stage. More carbon travels to the slag instead of to the steel because the diffusion coefficient of carbon, impacted by the viscosity of slag and surface tension between slag and melted steel, is larger in the slag than in the steel. The viscosity of slag is about 2.54Pa·s and the surface tension between slag and steel is about 490mN/m.

  17. Mechanical testing and modelling of carbon-carbon composites for aircraft disc brakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Luke R.

    The objective of this study is to improve the understanding of the stress distributions and failure mechanisms experienced by carbon-carbon composite aircraft brake discs using finite element (FE) analyses. The project has been carried out in association with Dunlop Aerospace as an EPSRC CASE studentship. It therefore focuses on the carbon-carbon composite brake disc material produced by Dunlop Aerospace, although it is envisaged that the approach will have broader applications for modelling and mechanical testing of carbon-carbon composites in general. The disc brake material is a laminated carbon-carbon composite comprised of poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) derived carbon fibres in a chemical vapour infiltration (CVI) deposited matrix, in which the reinforcement is present in both continuous fibre and chopped fibre forms. To pave the way for the finite element analysis, a comprehensive study of the mechanical properties of the carbon-carbon composite material was carried out. This focused largely, but not entirely, on model composite materials formulated using structural elements of the disc brake material. The strengths and moduli of these materials were measured in tension, compression and shear in several orientations. It was found that the stress-strain behaviour of the materials were linear in directions where there was some continuous fibre reinforcement, but non-linear when this was not the case. In all orientations, some degree of non-linearity was observed in the shear stress-strain response of the materials. However, this non-linearity was generally not large enough to pose a problem for the estimation of elastic moduli. Evidence was found for negative Poisson's ratio behaviour in some orientations of the material in tension. Additionally, the through-thickness properties of the composite, including interlaminar shear strength, were shown to be positively related to bulk density. The in-plane properties were mostly unrelated to bulk density over the range of

  18. Satellite observations of seasonal and regional variability of particulate organic carbon concentration in the Barents Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stramska, Malgorzata; Białogrodzka, Jagoda

    2016-04-01

    The Nordic and Barents Seas are of special interest for research on climate change, since they are located on the main pathway of the heat transported from low to high latitudes. Barents Sea is known to be an important area for formation of deep water and significant uptake from the atmosphere and sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). This region is characterized by supreme phytoplankton blooms and large amount of carbon is sequestered here due to biological processes. It is important to monitor the biological variability in this region in order to derive in depth understanding whether the size of carbon reservoirs and fluxes may vary as a result of climate change. In this presentation we analyze the 17 years (1998-2014) of particulate organic carbon (POC) concentration derived from remotely sensed ocean color. POC concentrations in the Barents Sea are among the highest observed in the global ocean with monthly mean concentrations in May exceeding 300 mg m-3. The seasonal amplitude of POC concentration in this region is larger when compared to other regions in the global ocean. Our results indicate that the seasonal increase in POC concentration is observed earlier in the year and higher concentrations are reached in the southeastern part of the Barents Sea in comparison to the southwestern part. Satellite data indicate that POC concentrations in the southern part of the Barents Sea tend to decrease in recent years, but longer time series of data are needed to confirm this observation. This work was funded by the Norway Grants (NCBR contract No. 201985, project NORDFLUX). Partial support for MS comes from the Institute of Oceanology (IO PAN).

  19. Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Behavior of Low Carbon Steel Weldments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mahdy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This research involves studying the mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of “low carbon steel” (0.077wt% C before and after welding using Arc, MIG and TIG welding. The mechanical properties include testing of microhardness, tensile strength, the results indicate that microhardness of TIG, MIG welding is more than arc welding, while tensile strength in arc welding more than TIG and MIG.The corrosion behavior of low carbon weldments was performed by potentiostat at scan rate 3mV.sec-1 in 3.5% NaCl to show the polarization resistance and calculate the corrosion rate from data of linear polarization by “Tafel extrapolation method”. The results indicate that the TIG welding increase the corrosion current density and anodic Tafel slop, while decrease the polarization resistance compared with unwelded low carbon steel. Cyclic polarization were measured to show resistance of specimens to pitting corrosion and to calculate the forward and reveres potentials. The results show shifting the forward, reverse and pitting potentials toward active direction for weldments samples compared with unwelded sample.

  20. Probing Mechanical Resonances in Cantilevered Coiled Carbon Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Deepika; Dickel, Doyl; Behlow, Herbert; Pillai, Balu; Yang, Keqin; Skove, Malcolm; Serkiz, Steven; Rao, Apparao; Clemson University Team; Savannah River National Laboratory Team

    2013-03-01

    Helically coiled carbon nanowires (CCNW) and nanotubes are promising elements for use in MEMS/NEMS devices and nanorobotics, as nano-inductors and sensors, and for impact protection (e.g. Bell et al. 2007 IEEE International Conference, J. Appl. Phys. 100, 064309 (2006)). Understanding and characterizing their mechanical resonance behavior is essential for the reliability in applications. In this study, we have electrically actuated an individual CCNW in a diving-board cantilever configuration inside a scanning electron microscope, and electrically detected its mechanical resonance modes. By oscillation at low frequency we confirmed the induced-charge actuation mechanism. Among the modes we observed, some appeared to have both axial and lateral components. We also observed closely spaced resonance modes which we attribute to the splitting of degenerate modes, consistent with our COMSOL simulations. We suggest that the helical morphology facilitates inter-mode coupling that results in the observed complex resonance behavior.

  1. Chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes: a review on growth mechanism and mass production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mukul; Ando, Yoshinori

    2010-06-01

    This review article deals with the growth mechanism and mass production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Different aspects of CNT synthesis and growth mechanism are reviewed in the light of latest progresses and understandings in the field. Materials aspects such as the roles of hydrocarbon, catalyst and catalyst support are discussed. Many new catalysts and new carbon sources are described. Growth-control aspects such as the effects of temperature, vapor pressure and catalyst concentration on CNT diameter distribution and single- or multi-wall formation are explained. Latest reports of metal-catalyst-free CNT growth are considered. The mass-production aspect is discussed from the perspective of a sustainable CNT technology. Existing problems and challenges of the process are addressed with future directions.

  2. Kinetic modelling and mechanism of dye adsorption on unburned carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S.B.; Li, H.T. [Curtin University of Technology, Perth, WA (Australia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    Textile dyeing processes are among the most environmentally unfriendly industrial processes by producing coloured wastewaters. The adsorption method using unburned carbon from coal combustion residue was studied for the decolourisation of typical acidic and basic dyes. It was discovered that the unburned carbon showed high adsorption capacity at 1.97 x 10{sup -4} and 5.27 x 10{sup -4} mol/g for Basic Violet 3 and Acid Black 1, respectively. The solution pH, particle size and temperature significantly influenced the adsorption capacity. Higher solution pH favoured the adsorption of basic dye while reduced the adsorption of acid dye. The adsorption of dye increased with increasing temperature but decreased with increasing particle size. Sorption kinetic data indicated that the adsorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption mechanism consisted of two processes, external diffusion and intraparticle diffusion, and the external diffusion was the dominating process.

  3. Mechanical properties of carbon fiber composites for environmental applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, R.; Grulke, E. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Activated carbon fiber composites show great promise as fixed-bed catalytic reactors for use in environmental applications such as flue gas clean-up and ground water decontamination. A novel manufacturing process produces low density composites from chopped carbon fibers and binders. These composites have high permeability, can be activated to have high surface area, and have many potential environmental applications. This paper reports the mechanical and flow properties of these low density composites. Three point flexural strength tests were used to measure composite yield strength and flexural moduli. Composites containing over 10 pph binder had an adequate yield strength of about 200 psi at activations up to 40% weight loss. The composites were anisotropic, having along-fiber to cross-fiber yield strength ratios between 1.2 and 2.0. The friction factor for flow through the composites can be correlated using the fiber Reynolds number, and is affected by the composite bulk density.

  4. Mechanical properties of carbon fiber composites for environmental applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, R.; Grulke, E.; Kimber, G. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Activated carbon fiber composites show great promise as fixed-bed catalytic reactors for use in environmental applications such as flue gas clean-up and ground water decontamination. A novel manufacturing process produces low density composites from chopped carbon fibers and binders. These composites have high permeability, can be activated to have high surface area, and have many potential environmental applications. This paper reports the mechanical and flow properties of these low density composites. Three point flexural strength tests were used to measure composite yield strength and flexural moduli. Composites containing over 10 pph binder had an adequate yield strength of about 200 psi at activations up to 40% weight loss. The composites were anisotropic, having along-fiber to cross-fiber yield strength ratios between 1.2 and 2.0. The pressure drop of air through the composites correlated with the gas velocity, and showed a dependence on sample density.

  5. Carbon stabilization mechanisms in soils in the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Boris; Cammeraat, Erik

    2015-04-01

    The volcanic ash soils of the Andes contain very large stocks of soil organic matter (SOM) per unit area. Consequently, they constitute significant potential sources or sinks of the greenhouse gas CO2. Climate and/or land use change potentially have a strong effect on these large SOM stocks. To clarify the role of chemical and physical stabilisation mechanisms in volcanic ash soils in the montane tropics, we investigated carbon stocks and stabilization mechanisms in the top- and subsoil along an altitudinal transect in the Ecuadorian Andes. The transect encompassed a sequence of paleosols under forest and grassland (páramo), including a site where vegetation cover changed in the last century. We applied selective extraction techniques, performed X-ray diffraction analyses of the clay fraction and estimated pore size distributions at various depths in the top- and subsoil along the transect. In addition, from several soils the molecular composition of SOM was further characterized with depth in the current soil as well as the entire first and the top of the second paleosol using GC/MS analyses of extractable lipids and Pyrolysis-GC/MS analyses of bulk organic matter. Our results show that organic carbon stocks in the mineral soil under forest a páramo vegetation were roughly twice as large as global averages for volcanic ash soils, regardless of whether the first 30cm, 100cm or 200cm were considered. We found the carbon stabilization mechanisms involved to be: i) direct stabilization of SOM in organo-metallic (Al-OM) complexes; ii) indirect protection of SOM through low soil pH and toxic levels of Al; and iii) physical protection of SOM due to a very high microporosity of the soil (Tonneijck et al., 2010; Jansen et al. 2011). When examining the organic carbon at a molecular level, interestingly we found extensive degradation of lignin in the topsoil while extractable lipids were preferentially preserved in the subsoil (Nierop and Jansen, 2009). Both vegetation

  6. Effects of Thickness and Amount of Carbon Nanofiber Coated Carbon Fiber on Improving the Mechanical Properties of Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferial Ghaemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, carbon nanofibers (CNFs were grown on a carbon fiber (CF surface by using the chemical vapor deposition method (CVD and the influences of some parameters of the CVD method on improving the mechanical properties of a polypropylene (PP composite were investigated. To obtain an optimum surface area, thickness, and yield of the CNFs, the parameters of the chemical vapor deposition (CVD method, such as catalyst concentration, reaction temperature, reaction time, and hydrocarbon flow rate, were optimized. It was observed that the optimal surface area, thickness, and yield of the CNFs caused more adhesion of the fibers with the PP matrix, which enhanced the composite properties. Besides this, the effectiveness of reinforcement of fillers was fitted with a mathematical model obtaining good agreement between the experimental result and the theoretical prediction. By applying scanning electronic microscope (SEM, transmission electron microscope (TEM, and Raman spectroscopy, the surface morphology and structural information of the resultant CF-CNF were analyzed. Additionally, SEM images and a mechanical test of the composite with a proper layer of CNFs on the CF revealed not only a compactness effect but also the thickness and surface area roles of the CNF layers in improving the mechanical properties of the composites.

  7. Mechanical behavior of carbon nanotube and graphene junction as a building block for 3D carbon nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Moradi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The incorporation of defects in junction area of 1D and 2D carbon nanostructures has a major impact on properties of their 3D structures. In the present study, molecular dynamics simulation is utilized to examine the mechanical behavior of graphene sheet (GS in carbon nanotube (CNT-GS junctions. The tensile load was applied along the GS in connection with CNTs of different chiralities. The adaptive intermolecular reactive empirical bond order potential was chosen to model C-C interactions. It provided a reliable model for CNT, GS and their junctions. The results revealed that the connection of CNT to the GS with a hole could improve the mechanical properties of defective GS, which appeared to be independent of CNT type. It was found that the high strength C-C bonds postpone the crack propagation and motivates new crack nucleation. When a hole or CNT placed on the GS, it caused stress concentration, exactly along a line on its side. The lower mechanical properties were consequently associated with crack nucleation and propagation on both sides in a way that cracks encountered each other during the failure; while, the cracks in pristine GS propagate parallel to each other and could not encounter each other.

  8. Acute toxicity when concentration varies with time: A case study with carbon monoxide inhalation by rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Lisa M; Sommerville, Douglas R; Goodwin, Michelle R; James, R Arden; Channel, Stephen R

    2016-10-01

    Exposure to time-varying concentrations of toxic compounds is the norm in both occupational settings and daily human life, but little has been done to investigate the impact of variations in concentration on toxic outcomes; this case study with carbon monoxide helps fill that gap. Median acute lethality of 10-, 20-, 40-, and 60-min continuous exposures of rats to carbon monoxide was well described by the toxic load model (k = C(n) × t; k is constant, C = test concentration, n = toxic load exponent, and t = exposure duration) with n = 1.74. Dose response-relationships for 1-h exposures including a recovery period between 10- or 20-min pulses showed greater similarity (in both median lethality and steepness of dose-response curve) to continuous exposures with equivalent pulse duration and concentration, rather than a 60-min exposure with equivalent time-weighted average concentrations or toxic load. When pulses were of unequal concentration (3:1 ratio), only the high concentration pulse contributed to lethality. These findings show that fluctuations or interruptions in exposure over a short time scale (60 min or less) can have a substantial impact on outcomes (when n > 1), and thus high-resolution monitoring data are needed to aid interpretation of resulting outcomes.

  9. Fracture Mechanics Analyses of Subsurface Defects in Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Joggles Subjected to Thermo-Mechanical Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Raju, Ivatury S.; Song, Kyongchan

    2011-01-01

    Coating spallation events have been observed along the slip-side joggle region of the Space Shuttle Orbiter wing-leading-edge panels. One potential contributor to the spallation event is a pressure build up within subsurface voids or defects due to volatiles or water vapor entrapped during fabrication, refurbishment, or normal operational use. The influence of entrapped pressure on the thermo-mechanical fracture-mechanics response of reinforced carbon-carbon with subsurface defects is studied. Plane-strain simulations with embedded subsurface defects are performed to characterize the fracture mechanics response for a given defect length when subjected to combined elevated-temperature and subsurface-defect pressure loadings to simulate the unvented defect condition. Various subsurface defect locations of a fixed-length substrate defect are examined for elevated temperature conditions. Fracture mechanics results suggest that entrapped pressure combined with local elevated temperatures have the potential to cause subsurface defect growth and possibly contribute to further material separation or even spallation. For this anomaly to occur, several unusual circumstances would be required making such an outcome unlikely but plausible.

  10. A Study on Mechanical Properties of CNT-Reinforced Carbon/Carbon Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Luen Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon/carbon composites (C/C composites possess superior characteristics of low density, high strength, extremely low coefficient of thermal expansion, and high fatigue resistance. In carbonization process, the high-temperature pyrolysis made of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and other elements results in a lot of voids and cavities generated in the interior of C/C composites. Therefore, the C/C composites are densified to fill the voids by using repeated impregnation. But densification is a time-wasting and complex process, which increases production costs in the manufacturing process. In this study, the multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs were adopted as a reinforcement material for C/C composites to reduce the existence of voids or cavities and enhance the mechanical properties of C/C composites. According to the experimental results, the CNT-added C/C composite containing 1.2 wt% CNT possesses the greatest flexure strength, flexure modulus, and interlaminar shearing strength. Plus, the above-mentioned strength and modulus are increased by 23%, 19.2%, and 30%, respectively.

  11. Carbon substituting for oxygen in silicates: A novel mechanism for carbon incorporation in the deep Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armentrout, M. M.; Tavakoli, A.; Ionescu, E.; Mera, G.; Riedel, R.; Navrotsky, A.

    2013-12-01

    Traditionally, carbon in the deep Earth has been thought of in terms of either carbonate at high oxygen fugacities or graphite or diamond under more reducing conditions. However, material science studies of amorphous Si-O-C polymer derived ceramics have demonstrated that carbon can be accommodated as an anion substituting for oxygen in mixed silica tetrahedra. Furthermore these structures are energetically favorable relative to a mixture of crystalline silica, silicon carbide, and graphite by ten or more kJ/g.atom. Thermodynamic stability suggests that these nano-structured composites are a potentially important storage mechanism for carbon under moderately reducing conditions. Here we expand the scope of the previous work by examining the compositional effect of geologically relevant cations (calcium and magnesium) on the thermodynamic stability, nanostructure, and ability to accommodate carbon of these composites. Silicon oxy-carbides doped with magnesium, magnesium and calcium or undoped resisted crystallization at 1100 C under inert atmosphere. 29Si NMR of the samples shows a similar distribution of silicon between end-member and mixed sites (Table 1). Results are presented from studies utilizing NMR, high temperature solution calorimetry, and microprobe. Table 1. Percentages of Si species in each material as determined by 29Si NMR.

  12. What are the mechanisms controlling carbon flux from peat soils across slopes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothroyd, I.; Worrall, F.; Allott, T.

    2012-04-01

    Peatlands are a globally important terrestrial carbon stock but carbon budget models need further improvement. The use of empirical observations to increase the accuracy of process based models has helped to constrain the error involved in accounting for peatland carbon balances, yet our understanding of peatland function needs to improve still further. Hydrology and topography are important controls on the carbon balance of peatlands. The hydrology of hillslopes has been studied, with runoff mechanisms and flow pathways dependent upon the topographic position. Topslope plateau areas have been observed to promote a large degree of surface runoff, acting as a shedding area delivering water downslope. Midslopes may experience fewer saturation runoff events due to the greater hydraulic gradient, with lower water tables likely to cause subsurface throughflow that is delivered downslope at the accumulation area at the bottom of the slope. This can help to maintain higher water tables at the foot of the slope and attenuate saturation runoff events (Holden and Burt 2003). The different hydrological mechanisms studied across the hillslope have not until recently been studied in the context of carbon cycling as well. The author has presented results elsewhere on the role that hillslope position has on carbon flux, finding that with water table drawdown observed on the midslopes, there is a concurrent increase in the rates of ecosystem respiration dependent upon the changing depth of the water table. There is also a decrease in the concentration of dissolved organic carbon concentration downslope. This poster presents preliminary results looking to constrain the explanations for the changing levels of respiration and dissolved organic carbon content across the slope. One metre deep soil cores were taken from an intact and an eroded hillslope in the Peak District, UK, across four hillslope positions: topslope, upper midslope, lower midslope and bottomslope. The cores were

  13. The influences of cultivation setting on inflorescence lipid distributions, concentrations, and carbon isotope ratios of Cannabis sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipple, Brett J; Hambach, Bastian; Barnette, Janet E; Chesson, Lesley A; Ehleringer, James R

    2016-05-01

    While much is known about how the growth environment influences many aspects of floral morphology and physiology, little is known about how the growth setting influences floral lipid composition. We explored variations in paraffin wax composition in Cannabis sp., a cash crop grown both indoors and outdoors across the United States today. Given an increased focus on regulation of this crop, there are additional incentives to certify the setting of Cannabis cultivation. To understand the impacts of the growth environment, we studied distributions, concentrations, and carbon isotope ratios of n-alkanes isolated from Cannabis sp. inflorescences to assess if variations within these lipid parameters were related to known growth settings of specimens seized by federal agents. We found that Cannabis plants cultivated under open-field settings had increased inflorescence paraffin wax abundances and greater production of lower molecular weight n-alkanes relative to plants grown in enclosed environments. Further, the carbon isotope ratios of n-C29 from Cannabis plants grown in enclosed environments had relatively lower carbon isotope (δ(13)C) values compared to plants from open-field environments. While this set of observations on seized plant specimens cannot address the particular driver behind these observations, we posit that (a) variations in irradiance and/or photoperiod may influence the distribution and concentration of inflorescence lipids, and (b) the δ(13)C value of source CO2 and lipid concentration regulates the δ(13)C values of inflorescence n-C29 and bulk Cannabis plant materials. Nonetheless, by using a cultivation model based on δ(13)C values of n-C29, the model correctly identified the growth environment 90% of time. We suggest that these lipid markers may be used to trace cultivation methods of Cannabis sp. now and become a more powerful marker in the future, once the mechanism(s) behind these patterns is uncovered.

  14. In-vehicle carbon dioxide concentration in commuting cars in Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luangprasert, Maytat; Vasithamrong, Chainarin; Pongratananukul, Suphasit; Chantranuwathana, Sunhapos; Pumrin, Suree; De Silva, I P D

    2016-12-14

    It is known that in-vehicle carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration tends to increase due to occupant exhalation when the HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) air is in recirculation mode. Field experiments were conducted to measure CO2 concentration during typical commute in Bangkok, Thailand. The measured concentrations agreed with the concentration predicted using first-order mass balance equation, in both recirculating and outside air modes. The long-term transient decay of the concentration when the vehicle was parked and the HVAC system was turned off was also studied. This decay was found to follow Fickian diffusion process. The paper also provides useful operational details of the automotive HVAC system and fresh air ventilation exchange between cabin interior and exterior.

  15. Spatio-temporal variations of black carbon concentrations in the Megacity Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, Nina; Norra, Stefan; Fricker, Mathieu; Kaminski, Uwe; Chen, Yizhen; Chai, Fahe; Wang, Shulan; Yu, Yang; Cen, Kuang

    2013-11-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution and the flux of black carbon (BC) concentration in Beijing were continuously investigated over a two-year period at five sites to highlight the relative influence of contributing sources. The results demonstrate firstly that there is significant spatio-temporal variability of BC in Beijing. Highest concentrations occurred during winter primarily due to stagnant meteorological conditions, and seasonal BC sources, such as coal combustion for heating purposes. Biomass burning was identified as a minor seasonal source during the summer months. BC also varied spatially with higher concentrations in the SE of Beijing and lower concentrations in the NW, due to the differing emission intensity of various local BC sources such as traffic and industry. Frequently, overnight BC concentrations were higher due to specific meteorological conditions, such as the lower urban mixing layer height and various anthropogenic activities, such as exclusive night-time heavy duty vehicle traffic in the inner-city.

  16. Mechanical design of a low cost parabolic solar dish concentrator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Hijazi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to design a low cost parabolic solar dish concentrator with small-to moderate size for direct electricity generation. Such model can be installed in rural areas which are not connected to governmental grid. Three diameters of the dish; 5, 10 and 20 m are investigated and the focal point to dish diameter ratio is set to be 0.3 in all studied cases. Special attention is given to the selection of the appropriate dimensions of the reflecting surfaces to be cut from the available sheets in the market aiming to reduce both cutting cost and sheets cost. The dimensions of the ribs and rings which support the reflecting surface are optimized in order to minimize the entire weight of the dish while providing the minimum possible total deflection and stresses in the beams. The study applies full stress analysis of the frame of the dish using Autodesk Inventor. The study recommends to use landscape orientation for the reflective facets and increase the ribs angle and the distance between the connecting rings. The methodology presented is robust and can be extended to larger dish diameters.

  17. Mechanisms of Carbon Nanotube Production by Laser Ablation Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Carl D.; Arepalli, Sivaram; Nikolaev, Pavel; Smalley, Richard E.; Nocholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We will present possible mechanisms for nanotube production by laser oven process. Spectral emission of excited species during laser ablation of a composite graphite target is compared with that of laser irradiated C60 vapor. The similarities in the transient and spectral data suggest that fullerenes are intermediate precursors for nanotube formation. The confinement of the ablation products by means of a 25-mm diameter tube placed upstream of the target seems to improve the production and purity of nanotubes. Repeated laser pulses vaporize the amorphous/graphitic carbon and possibly catalyst particles, and dissociate fullerenes yielding additional feedstock for SWNT growth.

  18. Mechanism underlying carbon tetrachloride-inhibited protein synthesis in liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study the mechanism underlying carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced alterations of protein synthesis in liver. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given CCl4 (1 mL/100 g body weight) and 3H-leucine incorporation. Malondialdehyde (MDA) level in the liver, in vitro response of hepatocyte nuclei nucleotide triphosphatase (NTPase) to free radicals, and nuclear export of total mRNA with 3'-poly A+ were measured respectively. Survival response of HepG2 cells to CCl4 treatment was assessed by methyl thia...

  19. Distribution and fractionation mechanism of stable carbon isotope of coalbed methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Shengfei; TANG Xiuyi; SONG Yan; WANG Hongyan

    2006-01-01

    The stable carbon isotope values of coalbed methane range widely,and also are generally lighter than that of gases in normal coal-formed gas fields with similar coal rank.There exists strong carbon isotope fractionation in coalbed methane and it makes the carbon isotope value lighter.The correlation between the carbon isotope value and Ro in coalbed methane is less obvious.The coaly source rock maturity cannot be judged by coalbed methane carbon isotope value.The carbon isotopes of coalbed methane become lighter in much different degree due to the hydrodynamics.The stronger the hydrodynamics is,the lighter the CBM carbon isotopic value becomes.Many previous investigations indicated that the desorption-diffusion effects make the carbon isotope value of coalbed methane lighter.However,the explanation has encountered many problems.The authors of this article suggest that the flowing groundwater dissolution to free methane in coal seams and the free methane exchange with absorbed one is the carbon isotope fractionation mechanism in coalbed methane.The flowing groundwater in coal can easily take more 13CH4 away from free gas and comparatively leave more 12CH4.This will make 12CH4 density in free gas comparatively higher than that in absorbed gas.The remaining 12CH4 in free gas then exchanges with the adsorbed methane in coal matrix.Some absorbed 13CH4 can be replaced and become free gas.Some free 12CH4 can be absorbed again into coal matrix and become absorbed gas.Part of the newly replaced 13CH4 in free gas will also be taken away by water,leaving preferentially more 12CH4.The remaining 12CH4 in free gas will exchange again with adsorbed methane in the coal matrix.These processes occur all the time.Through accumulative effect,the 12CH4 will be greatly concentrated in coal.Thus,the stable carbon isotope of coalbed methane becomes dramatically lighter.Through simulation experiment on water-dissolved methane,it had been proved that the flowing water could fractionate the

  20. Copper induced hollow carbon nanospheres by arc discharge method: controlled synthesis and formation mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Rui; Alexandru Ciolan, Mihai; Wang, Xiangke; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2016-08-01

    Hollow carbon nanospheres with controlled morphologies were synthesized via the copper-carbon direct current arc discharge method by alternating the concentrations of methane in the reactant gas mixture. A self-healing process to keep the structural integrity of encapsulated graphitic shells was evolved gradually by adding methane gas from 0% to 20%. The outer part of the coated layers expanded and hollow nanospheres grew to be large fluffy ones with high methane concentrations from 30% to 50%. A self-repairing function by the reattachment of broken graphitic layers initiated from near-electrode space to distance was also distinctly exhibited. By comparing several comparable metals (e.g. copper, silver, gold, zinc, iron and nickel)-carbon arc discharge products, a catalytic carbon-encapsulation mechanism combined with a core-escaping process has been proposed. Specifically, on the basis of the experimental results, copper could be applied as a unique model for both the catalysis of graphitic encapsulation and as an adequate template for the formation of hollow nanostructures.

  1. Mechanical, thermal and decomposition behavior of poly(epsilon-caprolactone) nanocomposites with clay-supported carbon nanotube hybrids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terzopoulou, Zoe; Bikiaris, Dimitrios N.; Triantafyllidis, Konstantinos S.; Potsi, Georgia; Gournis, Dimitrios; Papageorgiou, George Z.; Rudolf, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) nanocomposites with hybrid clay-supported carbon nanotubes (Clay-CNT) in concentrations 0.5, 1.0 and 2.5 wt% were prepared by melt mixing. Mechanical, structural and thermal properties of the nanocomposites were studied. All nanocomposites exhibited similar stress-st

  2. [Carbon isotope (13C/12C) effect of photorespiration in photosynthetic organisms. Evidence for existence, probable mechanism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivlev, A A

    2002-01-01

    Experimental evidence in favor of the new phenomenon predicted for photosynthesizing organisms, the fractionation of carbon isotopes in photorespiration is presented. A possible mechanism of this process is discussed. The fractionation of carbon in isotopes photorespiration occurs in the oxygenase phase of the functioning of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco), the key enzyme of photosynthesis, which is capable to act as carboxylase and oxygenase. Which function of the enzyme is active depends on CO2/O2 concentration ratio, which periodically changes in a cell. The key reaction in the mechanism of carbon isotope fractionation in photorespiration is glycine decarboxylation, which results in the splitting and removal from the cell of CO2 enriched with 12C and the accumulation of 13C photorespiratory carbon flow. The coupling of photorespiration and CO2 photoassimilation gives rise to two isotopically different carbon flows, which fill up separate carbohydrate pools, which are the sources of carbon in the following syntheses in the dark phase of photosynthesis. This enables one to identify, from the carbon isotope ratio of metabolites, their involvement in the photorespiratory and assimilatory carbon flows, to investigate the pathways of carbon metabolism, and to estimate more thoroughly the biosynthetic role of photorespiration.

  3. Mechanical properties of polypropylene/calcium carbonate nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Eiras

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the influence of calcium carbonate nanoparticles in both tensile and impact mechanical properties of a polypropylene homopolymer. Four compositions of PP/CaCO3 nanocomposites were prepared in a co-rotational twin screw extruder machine with calcium carbonate content of 3, 5, 7 and 10 wt. (% The tests included SEM analyzes together with EDS analyzer and FTIR spectroscopy for calcium carbonate, tensile and impact tests for PP and the nanocomposites. The results showed an increase in PP elastic modulus and a little increase in yield stress. Brittle-to-ductile transition temperature was reduced and the impact resistance increased with the addition of nanoparticles. From the stress-strain curves we determined the occurrence of debonding process before yielding leading to stress softening. Debonding stress was determined from stress-strain curves corresponding to stress in 1% strain. We concluded that the tensile properties depend on the surface contact area of nanoparticles and on their dispersion. Finally we believe that the toughening was due to the formation of diffuse shear because of debonding process.

  4. [Mechanism of catalytic ozonation for the degradation of paracetamol by activated carbon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia-Yu; Dai, Qi-Zhou; Yu, Jie; Yan, Yi-Zhou; Chen, Jian-Meng

    2013-04-01

    The degradation of paracetamol (APAP) in aqueous solution was studied with ozonation integrated with activated carbon (AC). The synergistic effect of ozonation/AC process was explored by comparing the degradation efficiency of APAP in three processes (ozonation alone, activated carbon alone and ozonation integrated with activated carbon). The operational parameters that affected the reaction rate were carefully optimized. Based on the intermediates detected, the possible pathway for catalytic degradation was discussed and the reaction mechanism was also investigated. The results showed that the TOC removal reached 55.11% at 60 min in the AC/O3 system, and was significantly better than the sum of ozonation alone (20.22%) and activated carbon alone (27.39%), showing the great synergistic effect. And the BOD5/COD ratio increased from 0.086 (before reaction) to 0.543 (after reaction), indicating that the biodegradability was also greatly improved. The effects of the initial concentration of APAP, pH value, ozone dosage and AC dosage on the variation of reaction rate were carefully discussed. The catalytic reaction mechanism was different at different pH values: the organic pollutions were removed by adsorption and direct ozone oxidation at acidic pH, and mainly by catalytic ozonation at alkaline pH.

  5. Mechanisms controlling the carbon stable isotope composition of phytoplankton in karst reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoli Wang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to systematically understand the mechanisms controlling the carbon stable isotope composition of phytoplankton (δ13CPHYin freshwater ecosystems, seasonal changes in δ13CPHY and related environmental factors were determined in karst reservoirs from the Wujiang river basin, China. Substantial and systematic differences within seasons and reservoirs were observed for δ13CPHY, which ranged from -39.2‰ to -15.1‰. An increase in water temperature triggered fast growth of phytoplankton which assimilated more dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC, resulting in the increase of δ13CPHY, δ13CDIC and pH. When the concentration of dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2 was less than 10 mmol L–1, phytoplankton shifted to using HCO3– as a carbon source. This resulted in the sharp increase of δ13CPHY. The carbon stable isotope composition of phytoplankton tended to decrease with the increase of Bacillariophyta, which dominated in January and April, but tended to increase with the increase of Chlorophyta and Dinophyta, which dominated in July. Multiple regression equations suggested that the influence of biological factors such as taxonomic difference on δ13CPHY could be equal or more important than that of physical and chemical factors. Thus, the effect of taxonomic differences on δ13CPHY must be considered when explaining the δ13C of organic matter in lacustrine ecosystem.

  6. Carbonization of α-Fe upon mechanical alloying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barinov, V. A.; Tsurin, V. A.; Kazantsev, V. A.; Surikov, V. T.

    2014-01-01

    Methods of thermomagnetic analysis (TMA) and Mössbauer spectrometry (57Fe) have been used to study the processes of the carburizing of α-Fe under the conditions of mechanical milling in a medium of liquid hydrocarbons. It has been established that, under the chosen conditions of the mechanical synthesis of carbides, the process of carbonization at T c C(ɛ) > c C(ɛ'). The boundary of the temperature stability of cementite has been established. The effect of the decomposition of the θ phase (Fe3C) upon thermal cycling θ ⇔ γ in the temperature range of 300 < T < 1075 K has been revealed. Based on the results obtained, a scheme of the sequence of phase transformations that occur in the Fe-C system under the conditions of low-temperature mechanosynthesis has been derived.

  7. Mechanical characterization of carbon nanomembranes from self-assembled monolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianghui Zhang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the mechanical characterization of carbon nanomembranes (CNMs with a thickness of 1 nm that are fabricated by electron-induced crosslinking of aromatic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs. A novel type of in situ bulge test employing an atomic force microscope (AFM is utilized to investigate their mechanical properties. A series of biphenyl-based molecules with different types of terminal and/or anchor groups were used to prepare the CNMs, such as 4'-[(3-trimethoxysilylpropoxy]-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-carbonitrile (CBPS, 1,1'-biphenyl-4-thiol (BPT and 4-nitro-1,1'-biphenyl-4-thiol (NBPT. The elastic properties, viscoelastic behaviors and ultimate tensile strength of these biphenyl-based CNMs are investigated and discussed.

  8. Ambient concentrations and insights on organic and elemental carbon dynamics in São Paulo, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro dos Santos, Djacinto A.; Brito, Joel F.; Godoy, José Marcus; Artaxo, Paulo

    2016-11-01

    The São Paulo Metropolitan Area (SPMA) is a megacity with about 20 million people and about 8 million vehicles, most of which are fueled with a significant fraction of ethanol - making it a unique case worldwide. This study presents organic and elemental carbon measurements using thermal-optical analysis from quartz filters collected in four sampling sites within the SPMA. Overall Organic Carbon (OC) concentration was comparable at all sites, where Street Canyon had the highest concentration (3.37 μg m-3) and Park site the lowest (2.65 μg m-3). Elemental Carbon (EC), emitted as result of incomplete combustion, has been significantly higher at the Street Canyon site (6.11 μg m-3) in contrast to all other three sites, ranging from 2.25 μg m-3 (Downtown) to 1.50 μg m-3 (Park). For all sampling sites, the average OC:EC ratio are found on the lower bound (urban site. An approach for apportionment between primary and secondary organic carbon based on primary OC:EC ratio was evaluated. The secondary OC was estimated to be 30-40% of total OC concentrations throughout the various sampling sites. The organic carbon dynamics has been further studied using each of the thermally-derived organic carbon fractions. Each of these has been studied regarding their correlation with EC and the correlation between different sites. The analyses have identified that the OC3 and OC4, i.e., the carbon fraction which evolves from the filter at temperatures above 450 °C, presents a regional behavior, with high correlation among all sites. Conversely, OC1, the first fraction to evolve, has depicted a more local characteristic. Furthermore, the fraction of OC which becomes char during the temperature increase under inert atmosphere (the Pyrolytic Carbon-PC) has been the only fraction not to present a significant correlation with EC. Since that EC is assumed to be a primary emission marker, it indicates that PC is not significant in traffic emissions. This study provided innovative

  9. Controllable synthesis and formation mechanism of carbon micro/nano-structural materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chang'an; Lv, Meijiao; Wang, Xianbao; Li, Jing; Yang, Xuyu; Yang, Jia; Hu, Hao

    2013-10-01

    Three different structures of carbon materials, including carbon spheres, bamboo-like carbon nanotubes and straight carbon nanotubes, were obtained by pyrolysis of iron(II) phthalocyanine with different flow rates of H2 at 1000 °C. The suitable mechanism for formation process of the carbon nanomaterials from spheres to straight nanotubes was suggested. The competing processes between the catalyst forward and the shell growth have been used to explain the formation mechanism of three materials. The controllable synthesis of carbon materials was achieved only by changing the H2 flow rates, and it is important to explore applications of carbon materials with different shapes.

  10. Mechanism of field electron emission from carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi-bing; DENG Shao-zhi; XU Ning-sheng

    2006-01-01

    Field electron emission (FE) is a quantum tunneling process in which electrons are injected from materials (usually metals) into a vacuum under the influence of an applied electric field.In order to obtain usable electron current,the conventional way is to increase the local field at the surface of an emitter.For a plane metal emitter with a typical work function of 5 eV,an applied field of over 1000V/μm is needed to obtain a significant current.The high working field (and/or the voltage between the electrodes)has been the bottleneck for many applications of the FE technique.Since the 1960s,enormous effort has been devoted to reduce the working macroscopic field (voltage).A widely adopted idea is to sharpen the emitters to get a large surface field enhancement.The materials of emitters should have good electronic conductivity,high melting points,good chemical inertness,and high mechanical stiffness.Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are built with such needed properties.As a quasi-one-dimensional material,the CNT is expected to have a large surface field enhancement factor.The experiments have proved the excellent FE performance of CNTs.The turn-on field (the macroscopic field for obtaining a density of 10 μA/cm2 ) of CNT based emitters can be as low as 1 V/μm.However,this turn-on field is too good to be explained by conventional theory.There are other observations,such as the non-linear Fowler-Nordheim plot and multi-peaks field emission energy distribution spectra,indicating that the field enhancement is not the only story in the FE of CNTs.Since the discovery of CNTs,people have employed more serious quantum mechanical methods,including the electronic band theory,tight-binding theory,scattering theory and density function theory,to investigate FE of CNTs.A few theoretical models have been developed at the same time.The multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)should be assembled with a sharp metal needle of nano-scale radius,for which the FE mechanism is more or less clear

  11. Effects of pH and carbonate concentration on dissolution rates of the lead corrosion product PbO(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yanjiao; Wang, Yin; Singhal, Vidhi; Giammar, Daniel E

    2010-02-01

    Lead(IV) oxide is a corrosion product that can develop on lead pipes and affect lead concentrations in drinking water. Continuously stirred flow-though reactors were used to quantify the dissolution rates of plattnerite (beta-PbO(2)) at different pH values and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentrations. Organic pH buffers were not used, because several were found to be reductants for PbO(2) that accelerated its dissolution. Most plattnerite dissolution rates were on the order of 10(-10) mol/min-m(2). The rate of dissolution increased with decreasing pH and with increasing DIC. The effect of DIC is consistent with a reductive dissolution mechanism that involves the reduction of Pb(IV) to Pb(II) at the plattnerite surface followed by the formation of soluble Pb(II)-carbonate complexes that accelerate Pb(II) release from the surface. Under the experimental conditions, dissolved lead concentrations were controlled by the dissolution rate of plattnerite and not by its equilibrium solubility. A dissolution rate model was developed and can be used to predict dissolution rates of plattnerite as a function of pH and DIC.

  12. Sulfuric acid leaching of mechanically activated manganese carbonate ore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Yıldız

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Acidic leaching of mechanically activated manganese ore from Denizli – Tavas was investigated. The ore was activated mechanically in a planetary mill and the amorphisation in manganese structure was analyzed with X-ray diffraction. The parameters in acidic leaching of the ore were milling time, acid concentration and time. All experiments were performed at 25°C with solid to liquid ratio: 1/10. The activation procedure led to amorphization and structural disordering in manganese ore and accelerated the dissolution of manganese in acidic media.

  13. Biophysical controls over concentration and depth distribution of soil organic carbon and nitrogen in desert playas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Owen P.; Sala, Osvaldo E.

    2016-12-01

    Playa wetlands are important areas of soil organic carbon and nutrient storage in drylands. We conducted this study to assess how catchment biophysical variables control soil organic carbon and nitrogen in playas and how playas function differently than upland ecosystems. We found that playa organic carbon and nitrogen corresponded primarily with catchment vegetation cover and secondarily with catchment area, slope, and soil texture. The effect of increased organic matter production associated with high catchment vegetation cover overshadowed the potential effect of reduced run-on. We also found soil carbon and nitrogen profiles to be significantly shallower in playas than uplands. This trend is correlated with evidence of sedimentation and shallow-rooted plants in playas. Upland soils had a deeper carbon and nitrogen profile, which correlated with organic matter being generated by deeply rooted vegetation. In playas, C:N ratios remained constant through depth but in uplands, C:N ratios increased through depth. We found evidence that differences in rooting depth distributions and soil texture may explain these C:N variations between uplands and playas. In uplands, clay concentration increased with depth, whereas in playas, clay concentration did not change with depth, which highlighted the important role of sedimentation in these ecosystems. Our results suggest that small changes in playa catchment vegetation cover in response to climate change or grazing intensity would greatly impact playa soil organic carbon and nitrogen stocks. This effect would be due to the playa soils dependence on allochthonous organic matter and the large upland area that drains into playas.

  14. Carbon-Based Nano-Electro-Mechanical-Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, A. B.; Khan, A. R.; Megerian, K. G.; Epp, L.; LeDuc, G.; Bagge, L.; Jennings, A. T.; Jang, D.; Greer, J. R.

    2011-01-01

    We provide an overview of our work where carbon-based nanostructures have been applied to two-dimensional (2D) planar and three-dimensional (3D) vertically-oriented nano-electro-mechanical (NEM) switches. In the first configuration, laterally oriented single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) synthesized using thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) were implemented for forming bridge-type 2D NEMS switches, where switching voltages were on the order of a few volts. In the second configuration, vertically oriented carbon nanofibers (CNFs) synthesized using plasma-enhanced (PE) CVD have been explored for their potential application in 3D NEMS. We have performed nanomechanical measurements on such vertically oriented tubes using nanoindentation to determine the mechanical properties of the CNFs. Electrostatic switching was demonstrated in the CNFs synthesized on refractory metallic nitride substrates, where a nanoprobe was used as the actuating electrode inside a scanning-electron-microscope. The switching voltages were determined to be in the tens of volts range and van der Waals interactions at these length scales appeared significant, suggesting such structures are promising for nonvolatile memory applications. A finite element model was also developed to determine a theoretical pull-in voltage which was compared to experimental results.

  15. Carbon-based nano-electro-mechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, A. B.; Khan, A. R.; Megerian, K. G.; Epp, L.; LeDuc, H. G.; Bagge, L.; Jennings, A. T.; Jang, D.; Greer, J. R.

    2010-04-01

    We provide an overview of our work where carbon-based nanostructures have been applied to twodimensional (2D) planar and three-dimensional (3D) vertically-oriented nano-electro-mechanical (NEM) switches. In the first configuration, laterally oriented single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) synthesized using thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) were implemented for forming bridge-type 2D NEMS switches, where switching voltages were on the order of a few volts. In the second configuration, vertically oriented carbon nanofibers (CNFs) synthesized using plasma-enhanced (PE) CVD have been explored for their potential application in 3D NEMS. We have performed nanomechanical measurements on such vertically oriented tubes using nanoindentation to determine the mechanical properties of the CNFs. Electrostatic switching was demonstrated in the CNFs synthesized on refractory metallic nitride substrates, where a nanoprobe was used as the actuating electrode inside a scanning-electron-microscope. The switching voltages were determined to be in the tens of volts range and van der Waals interactions at these length scales appeared significant, suggesting such structures are promising for nonvolatile memory applications. A finite element model was also developed to determine a theoretical pull-in voltage which was compared to experimental results.

  16. Facile synthesis of magnetic mesoporous hollow carbon microspheres for rapid capture of low-concentration peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Gong; Zhou, Ming-Da; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2014-08-13

    Mesoporous and hollow carbon microspheres embedded with magnetic nanoparticles (denoted as MHM) were prepared via a facile self-sacrificial method for rapid capture of low-abundant peptides from complex biological samples. The morphology, structure, surface property, and magnetism were well-characterized. The hollow magnetic carbon microspheres have a saturation magnetization value of 130.2 emu g(-1) at room temperature and a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller specific surface area of 48.8 m(2) g(-1) with an average pore size of 9.2 nm for the mesoporous carbon shell. The effectiveness of these MHM affinity microspheres for capture of low-concentration peptides was evaluated by standard peptides, complex protein digests, and real biological samples. These multifunctional hollow carbon microspheres can realize rapid capture and convenient separation of low-concentration peptides. They were validated to have better performance than magnetic mesoporous silica and commercial peptide-enrichment products. In addition, they can be easily recycled and present excellent reusability. Therefore, it is expected that this work may provide a promising tool for high-throughput discovery of peptide biomarkers from biological samples for disease diagnosis and other biomedical applications.

  17. Carbon Nanofibers Modified Graphite Felt for High Performance Anode in High Substrate Concentration Microbial Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youliang Shen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanofibers modified graphite fibers (CNFs/GF composite electrode was prepared for anode in high substrate concentration microbial fuel cells. Electrochemical tests showed that the CNFs/GF anode generated a peak current density of 2.42 mA cm−2 at a low acetate concentration of 20 mM, which was 54% higher than that from bare GF. Increase of the acetate concentration to 80 mM, in which the peak current density of the CNFs/GF anode greatly increased and was up to 3.57 mA cm−2, was seven times as that of GF anode. Morphology characterization revealed that the biofilms in the CNFs/GF anode were much denser than those in the bare GF. This result revealed that the nanostructure in the anode not only enhanced current generation but also could tolerate high substrate concentration.

  18. Effect of Varying Inert Gas and Acetylene Concentration on the Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin, Rahat; Abbas, Syed Mustansar; Shah, Nazar Abbas; Mustafa, Muhammad Farooq; Ali, Zulfiqar; Ahmad, Nisar

    2016-03-01

    The multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with small diameter and high purity were achieved by chemical vapor deposition technique using silicon substrate. The introduction of specific concentration of inert gas with hydrocarbon played a key role in controlling morphology and diameter of MWCNTs. Nickel mixed ferrite nanoparticles were used as a catalyst for the growth of MWCNTs. Growth parameters like concentration of hydrocarbon source and inert gas flow, composition of catalyst particles and growth temperature were studied. In this work smaller diameter and twisted MWCNTs were formed by dilution of acetylene with argon gas. Electrical properties suggest a semimetallic behavior of synthesized MWCNTs.

  19. Effect of surface treatment of carbon nanotubes on mechanical properties of cement composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KONDAKOV Alexander Igorevich

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to explore the influence of the carbon nanotubes functionalized by oxygen groups on the physical and mechanical properties of cement composites. Advantages and disadvantages of the main methods for the homogeneous distribution of carbon nanotubes (CNTs in solution are discussed. A method for covalent functionalization of CNTs is described. An acid-base titration and dispersion analysis of solutions containing functionalized carbon nanotubes (f-CNTs was performed. The research data made it possible to propose new technology of preparation of modified concrete. The results of the work can be used for designing of the additives commonly used in the construction industry, as well as for further studies of the effects of CNTs on the physical and mechanical and structural properties of building materials. Efficient modification of cement composite with f-CNTs was achieved at the concentration of f-CNTs ranging from 0.0004% to 0.0008% by weight of the binder. The observed increase of the concrete mechanical properties is explained by the fact that the CNTs act as nucleation centers for the cement hydration products.

  20. Mechanisms of granular activated carbon anaerobic fluidized-bed process for treating phenols wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) anaerobic fluidized-bed reactor was applied to treating phenols wastewater. When influent phenol concentration was 1000 mg/L, volume loadings of phenol and CODCr were 0.39 kg/(m3*d) and 0.98 kg/(m3*d), their removal rates were 99.9% and 96.4% respectively. From analyzing above results, the main mechanisms of the process are that through fluidizing GAC, its adsorption is combined with biodegradation, both activities are brought into full play, and phenol in wastewater is effectively decomposed. Meanwhile problems concerning gas-liquid separation and medium plugging are well solved.

  1. Aerosol mass and black carbon concentrations, two year-round observations at NCO-P (5079 m, Southern Himalayas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Marinoni

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol mass and the absorbing fraction are important variables, needed to constrain the role of atmospheric particles in the Earth radiation budget, both directly and indirectly through CCN activation. In particular, their monitoring in remote areas and mountain sites is essential for determining source regions, elucidating the mechanisms of long range transport of anthropogenic pollutants, and validating regional and global models. Since March 2006, aerosol mass and black carbon concentration have been monitored at the Nepal Climate Observatory-Pyramid, a permanent high-altitude research station located in the Khumbu valley at 5079 m a.s.l. below Mt. Everest. The first two-year averages of PM1 and PM1-10 mass were 1.94 μg m−3 and 1.88 μg m−3, with standard deviations of 3.90 μg m−3 and 4.45 μg m−3, respectively, while the black carbon concentration average is 160.5 ng m−3, with a standard deviation of 296.1 ng m−3. Both aerosol mass and black carbon show well defined annual cycles, with a maximum during the pre-monsoon season and a minimum during the monsoon. They also display a typical diurnal cycle during all the seasons, with the lowest particle concentration recorded during the night, and a considerable increase during the afternoon, revealing the major role played by thermal winds in influencing the behaviour of atmospheric compounds over the high Himalayas. The aerosol concentration is subject to high variability: in fact, as well as frequent "background conditions" (55% of the time when BC concentrations are mainly below 100 ng m−3, concentrations up to 5 μg m−3 are reached during some episodes (a few days every year in the pre-monsoon seasons. The variability of PM and BC is the result of both short-term changes due to thermal wind development in the valley, and long-range transport/synoptic circulation. At

  2. Aerosol mass and black carbon concentrations, a two year record at NCO-P (5079 m, Southern Himalayas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Marinoni

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol mass and the absorbing fraction are important variables, needed to constrain the role of atmospheric particles in the Earth radiation budget, both directly and indirectly through CCN activation. In particular, their monitoring in remote areas and mountain sites is essential for determining source regions, elucidating the mechanisms of long range transport of anthropogenic pollutants, and validating regional and global models. Since March 2006, aerosol mass and black carbon concentration have been monitored at the Nepal Climate Observatory-Pyramid, a permanent high-altitude research station located in the Khumbu valley at 5079 m a.s.l. below Mt. Everest. The first two-year averages of PM1 and PM1−10 mass were 1.94 μg m−3 and 1.88 μg m−3, with standard deviations of 3.90 μg m−3 and 4.45 μg m−3, respectively, while the black carbon concentration average is 160.5 ng m−3, with a standard deviation of 296.1 ng m−3. Both aerosol mass and black carbon show well defined annual cycles, with a maximum during the pre-monsoon season and a minimum during the monsoon. They also display a typical diurnal cycle during all the seasons, with the lowest particle concentration recorded during the night, and a considerable increase during the afternoon, revealing the major role played by thermal winds in influencing the behaviour of atmospheric compounds over the high Himalayas. The aerosol concentration is subject to high variability: in fact, as well as frequent "background conditions" (55% of the time when BC concentrations are mainly below 100 ng m−3, concentrations up to 5 μg m−3 are reached during some episodes (a few days every year in the pre-monsoon seasons. The variability of PM and BC is the result of both short-term changes due to thermal wind development in the valley, and long-range transport/synoptic circulation

  3. N2O production by ammonia oxidizing bacteria in an enriched nitrifying sludge linearly depends on inorganic carbon concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lai; Ni, Bing-Jie; Ye, Liu; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-05-01

    The effect of inorganic carbon (IC) on nitrous oxide (N2O) production by ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) was investigated over a concentration range of 0-12 mmol C/L, encompassing typical IC levels in a wastewater treatment reactors. The AOB culture was enriched along with nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) to perform complete nitrification. Batch experiments were conducted with continuous carbon dioxide (CO2) stripping or at controlled IC concentrations. The results revealed a linear relationship between N2O production rate (N2OR) and IC concentration (R(2) = 0.97) within the IC range studied, suggesting a substantial effect of IC on N2O production by AOB. Similar results were also obtained with an AOB culture treating anaerobic sludge digestion liquor. The fundamental mechanism responsible for this dependency is unclear; however, in agreement with previous studies, it was observed that the ammonia oxidation rate (AOR) was also influenced by the IC concentration, which could be well described by the Monod kinetics. These resulted in an exponential relationship between N2OR and AOR, as previously observed in experiments where AOR was altered by varying dissolved oxygen and ammonia concentrations. It is therefore possible that IC indirectly affected N2OR by causing a change in AOR. The observation in this study indicates that alkalinity (mostly contributed by IC) could be a significant factor influencing N2O production and should be taken into consideration in estimating and mitigating N2O emissions in wastewater treatment systems.

  4. Seasonal variations in concentration and composition of dissolved organic carbon in Tokyo Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kubo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Concentrations of recalcitrant and bioavailable dissolved organic carbon (DOC and their seasonal variations were investigated at three stations in Tokyo Bay, Japan, and in two freshwater sources flowing into the bay to evaluate the significance of DOC degradation for the carbon budget in coastal waters and carbon export to the open ocean. Recalcitrant DOC (RDOC was differentiated from bioavailable DOC (BDOC as a remnant of DOC after 150 days of bottle incubation. On average, RDOC accounted for 78% of the total DOC in Shibaura sewage treatment plant (STP effluent, 67% in the upper Arakawa River water, 66% in the lower Arakawa River water, and 78% in surface bay water. RDOC concentrations were higher than BDOC at all stations. In freshwater environments, RDOC concentrations were almost constant throughout the year. In the bay, RDOC was higher during spring and summer than during autumn and winter. The relative abundance of RDOC in the bay derived from phytoplankton, terrestrial, and open oceanic waters was estimated to be 9%, 33%, and 58%, respectively, by multiple regression analysis of RDOC, salinity, and chl a. In addition, comparison with previous data from 1972 revealed that concentrations of RDOC and BDOC have decreased by 33% and 74% at freshwater sites and 39% and 76% at Tokyo Bay, while the ratio of RDOC to DOC has increased. The change in DOC concentration and composition was probably due to increased amounts of sewage treatment plant effluent entering the system. Tokyo Bay exported DOC, mostly RDOC, to the open ocean because of remineralization of BDOC.

  5. Balancing the carbon market. Analysing the international carbon market and abatement costs in 2020 for low-concentration targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Den Elzen, M.G.J.; Mendoza-Beltran, M.A.; Piris-Cabezas, P.; Van Vuuren, D.P.

    2009-08-15

    This report describes our analysis of the impact of various policy choices and scientific uncertainties on the price of tradable emission units on the global carbon market in 2020 and the associated abatement costs. Our analysis was done under the assumption that the overall goal is to stabilise long-term greenhouse gas concentrations at 450 ppm CO2-eq. To meet these stabilisation targets on the long-term, Annex I countries as a group need to reduce by 25-40% below 1990 levels by 2020, and non-Annex I countries as a group need to keep emissions substantially below baseline (about 15 to 30%). The integrated modelling framework FAIR 2.2 is used for our analysis. The main findings of this study are: the degree of ambition for reductions of Annex I and non-Annex I countries is the most important policy choice influencing the price and abatement costs. Other less important policy choices include the ambition of US climate policy and the participation of the developing countries in the global carbon market. By allowing the use of forest-based options - including avoiding deforestation - for compliance in a well-designed carbon trading system, the global abatement costs could be reduced by between 25% and 65%. This would also make ambitious mitigation targets more feasible. In addition to the policy choices, important scientific uncertainties, in particular the baseline emissions (i.e. emissions in the absence of climate policy) and the assumed marginal abatement costs, strongly influence the carbon market.

  6. Insights on the molecular mechanism for the recalcitrance of biochars: interactive effects of carbon and silicon components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jianhua; Chen, Baoliang

    2014-08-19

    Few studies have investigated the effects of structural heterogeneity (particularly the interactions of silicon and carbon) on the mechanisms for the recalcitrance of biochar. In this study, the molecular mechanisms for the recalcitrance of biochars derived from rice straw at 300, 500, and 700 °C (named RS300, RS500, and RS700, respectively) were elucidated. Short-term (24 h) and long-term (240 h) oxidation kinetics experiments were conducted under different concentrations of H2O2 to distinguish the stable carbon pools in the biochars. We discovered that the stabilities of the biochars were influenced not only by their aromaticity but also through possible protection by silicon encapsulation, which is regulated by pyrolysis temperatures. The aromatic components and recalcitrance of the biochars increased with increasing pyrolysis temperatures. The morphologies of the carbon forms in all of the biochars were also greatly associated with those of silica. Silica-encapsulation protection only occurred for RS500, not for RS300 and RS700. In RS300, carbon and silica were both amorphous, and they were easily decomposed by H2O2. The separation of crystalline silica from condensed aromatic carbon in RS700 eliminated the protective role of silicon on carbon. The effect of the biochar particle size on the stability of the biochar was greatly influenced by C-Si interactions and by the oxidation intensities. A novel silicon-and-carbon-coupled framework model was proposed to guide biochar carbon sequestration.

  7. Microstructure and mechanical performance of modified mortar using hemp fibres and carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Hamzaoui, Rabah

    2014-04-01

    Mechanical performance of modified mortar using hemp fibres is studied following various processing conditions. Hemp fibres combined with carbon nanotubes (CNT) are introduced in mortar and their effect is studied as function of curing time. The cement phase is replaced by different percentages of dry or wet hemp fibres ranging from 1.1. wt% up to 3.1. wt% whereas carbon nanotubes are dispersed in the aqueous solution. Our experimental results show that compressive and flexural strengths of wet fibres modified mortar are higher than those for dry hemp-mortar material. The achieved optimal percentage of wet hemp fibres is 2.1. wt% allowing a flexural strength higher than that of reference mortar. The addition of an optimal CNT concentration (0.01. wt%) combined with wet hemp has a reinforcing effect which turns to be related to an improvement of compressive and flexural strengths by 10% and 24%, respectively, in comparison with reference condition. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Actuation mechanisms of carbon nanotube-based architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, Sebastian; Mahrholz, Thorsten; Wierach, Peter; Sinapius, Michael

    2016-04-01

    State of the art smart materials such as piezo ceramics or electroactive polymers cannot feature both, mechanical stiffness and high active strain. Moreover, properties like low density, high mechanical stiffness and high strain at the same time driven by low energy play an increasingly important role for their future application. Carbon nanotubes (CNT), show this behavior. Their active behavior was observed 1999 the first time using paper-like mats made of CNT. Therefore the CNT-papers are electrical charged within an electrolyte thus forming a double- layer. The measured deflection of CNT material is based on the interaction between the charged high surface area formed by carbon nanotubes and ions provided by the electrolyte. Although CNT-papers have been extensively analyzed as well at the macro-scale as nano-scale there is still no generally accepted theory for the actuation mechanism. This paper focuses on investigations of the actuation mechanisms of CNT-papers in comparison to vertically aligned CNT-arrays. One reason of divergent results found in literature might be attributed to different types of CNT samples. While CNT-papers represent architectures of short CNTs which need to bridge each other to form the dimensions of the sample, the continuous CNTs of the array feature a length of almost 3 mm, along which the experiments are carried out. Both sample types are tested within an actuated tensile test set-up under different conditions. While the CNT-papers are tested in water-based electrolytes with comparably small redox-windows the hydrophobic CNT-arrays are tested in ionic liquids with comparatively larger redox-ranges. Furthermore an in-situ micro tensile test within an SEM is carried out to prove the optimized orientation of the MWCNTs as result of external load. It was found that the performance of CNT-papers strongly depends on the test conditions. However, the CNT-arrays are almost unaffected by the conditions showing active response at negative

  9. Theoretical analysis of hydrogen spillover mechanism on carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalba eJuarez Mosqueda

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The spillover mechanism of molecular hydrogen on carbon nanotubes in the presence of catalytically active platinum clusters was critically and systematically investigated by using density-functional theory. Our simulation model includes a Pt4 cluster for the catalyst nanoparticle and curved and planar circumcoronene for two exemplary single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT, the (10,10 CNT and one of large diameter, respectively. Our results show that the H2 molecule dissociates spontaneously on the Pt4 cluster. However, the dissociated H atoms have to overcome a barrier of more than 2 eV to migrate from the catalyst to the CNT, even if the Pt4 cluster is at full saturation with six adsorbed and dissociated hydrogen molecules. Previous investigations have shown that the mobility of hydrogen atoms on the CNT surface is hindered by a barrier. We find that instead the Pt4 catalyst may move along the outer surface of the CNT with activation energy of only 0.16 eV, and that this effect offers the possibility of full hydrogenation of the CNT. Thus, although we have not found a low-energy pathway to spillover onto the CNT, we suggest, based on our calculations and calculated data reported in the literature, that in the hydrogen-spillover process the observed saturation of the CNT at hydrogen background pressure occurs through mobile Pt nanoclusters, which move on the substrate more easily than the substrate-chemisorbed hydrogens, and deposit or reattach hydrogens in the process. Initial hydrogenation of the carbon substrate, however, is thermodynamically unfavoured, suggesting that defects should play a significant role.

  10. Effect of carbon source and nitrate concentration on denitrifying phosphorus removal by DPB sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ya-yi; PENG Yong-zhen; Wang Shu-ying; PAN Mian-li

    2004-01-01

    Effect of added carbon source and nitrate concentration on the denitrifying phosphorus removal by DPB sludge was systematically studied using batch experiments, at the same time the variation of ORP was investigated.Results showed that the denitrifying and phosphorus uptake rate in anoxic phase increased with the high initial anaerobic carbon source addition. However once the initial COD concentration reached a certain level, which was in excess to the PHB saturation of poly-P bacteria, residual COD carried over to anoxic phase inhibited the subsequent denitrifying phosphorus uptake. Simultaneously, phosphate uptake continued until all nitrate was removed, following a slow endogenous release of phosphate. High nitrate concentration in anoxic phase increased the initial denitrifying phosphorus rate. Once the nitrate was exhausted, phosphate uptake changed to release. Moreover, the time of this turning point occurred later with the higher nitrate addition. On the other hand, through on-line monitoring the variation of the ORP with different initial COD concentration , it was found ORP could be used as a control parameter for phosphorus release, but it is impossible to utilize ORP for controlling the denitrificaion and anoxic phosphorus uptake operations.

  11. Water-soluble organic carbon in urban aerosol: concentrations, size distributions and contribution to particulate matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timonen, H. J.; Saarikoski, S. K.; Aurela, M. A.; Saarnio, K. M.; Hillamo, R. E. (Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (Finland))

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the concentrations and particle mass size distributions of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in urban aerosols. The sample collection was carried out in spring 2006 at the SMEAR III station in Helsinki, Finland, by using a size-segregating method (MOUDI) and by collecting sub-micrometer fraction of aerosols on the filter. During the three-month measurement period, a major 12-day biomass burning pollution episode was observed. Concentrations of WSOC, organic carbon, monosaccharide anhydrides, inorganic ions and some organic acids (oxalic, succinic and malonic acid) were analyzed from the PM{sub 1} samples. The measured OC and WSOC concentrations varied in ranges 0.67-15.7 mug m-3 and 0.26-10.7 mug m3, respectively. The WSOC/OC concentration ratio was between 0.30 and 0.89 with an average of 0.54. Size distributions of WSOC, inorganic ions and total mass were determined from the MOUDI samples. WSOC had bimodal size distributions with a clear accumulation mode below 1 mum of particle aerodynamic diameter and minor coarse mode at sizes > 1 mum. (orig.)

  12. Heliox Improves Carbon Dioxide Removal during Lung Protective Mechanical Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte J. Beurskens

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Helium is a noble gas with low density and increased carbon dioxide (CO2 diffusion capacity. This allows lower driving pressures in mechanical ventilation and increased CO2 diffusion. We hypothesized that heliox facilitates ventilation in patients during lung-protective mechanical ventilation using low tidal volumes. Methods. This is an observational cohort substudy of a single arm intervention study. Twenty-four ICU patients were included, who were admitted after a cardiac arrest and mechanically ventilated for 3 hours with heliox (50% helium; 50% oxygen. A fixed protective ventilation protocol (6 mL/kg was used, with prospective observation for changes in lung mechanics and gas exchange. Statistics was by Bonferroni post-hoc correction with statistical significance set at P<0.017. Results. During heliox ventilation, respiratory rate decreased (25±4 versus 23±5 breaths min−1, P=0.010. Minute volume ventilation showed a trend to decrease compared to baseline (11.1±1.9 versus 9.9±2.1 L min−1, P=0.026, while reducing PaCO2 levels (5.0±0.6 versus 4.5±0.6 kPa, P=0.011 and peak pressures (21.1±3.3 versus 19.8±3.2 cm H2O, P=0.024. Conclusions. Heliox improved CO2 elimination while allowing reduced minute volume ventilation in adult patients during protective mechanical ventilation.

  13. Bulk Mechanical Properties of Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giarra, Matthew; Landi, Brian; Cress, Cory; Raffaelle, Ryne

    2007-03-01

    The unique properties of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) make them especially well suited for use as electrodes in power devices such as lithium ion batteries, hydrogen fuel cells, solar cells, and supercapacitors. The performances of such devices are expected to be influenced, at least in part, by the mechanical properties of the SWNTs used in composites or in stand alone ``papers.'' Therefore, the elastic moduli and ultimate tensile strengths of SWNT papers were measured as functions of temperature, SWNT purity, SWNT length, and SWNT bundling. The SWNTs used to produce the papers were synthesized in an alexandrite laser vaporization reactor at 1100^oC and purified using conventional acid-reflux conditions. Characterization of the SWNTs was performed using SEM, BET, TGA, and optical and Raman spectroscopy. The purified material was filtered and dried to yield papers of bundled SWNTs which were analyzed using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). It was observed that the mechanical properties of acid-refluxed SWNT papers were significantly improved by controlled thermal oxidation and strain-hardening. Elastic moduli of SWNT papers were measured between 3 and 6 GPa. Ultimate (breaking) tensile stresses were measured between 45 and 90 MPa at 1-3% strain. These results and their implications in regard to potential applications in power devices will be discussed.

  14. Extraction of oxidized and reduced forms of uranium from contaminated soils: effects of carbonate concentration and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ping; Gu, Baohua

    2005-06-15

    Uranium may present in soil as precipitated, sorbed, complexed, and reduced forms, which impact its mobility and fate in the subsurface soil environment. In this study, a uranium-contaminated soil was extracted with carbonate/ bicarbonate at varying concentrations (0-1 M), pHs, and redox conditions in an attempt to evaluate their effects on the extraction efficiency and selectivity for various forms of uranium in the soil. Results indicate that at least three differentforms of uranium existed in the contaminated soil: uranium(VI) phosphate minerals, reduced U(IV) phases, and U(VI) complexed with soil organic matter. A small fraction of U(VI) could be sorbed onto soil minerals. The mechanism involved in the leaching of U(VI) by carbonates appears to involve three processes which may act concurrently or independently: the dissolution of uranium(VI) phosphate and other mineral phases, the oxidation-complexation of U(IV) under oxic conditions, and the desorption of U(VI)-organic matter complexes at elevated pH conditions. This study suggests that, depending on site-specific geochemical conditions, the presence of small quantities of carbonate/bicarbonate could result in a rapid and greatly increased leaching and the mobilization of U(VI) from the contaminated soil. Even the reduced U(IV) phases (only sparingly soluble in water) are subjected to rapid oxidation and therefore potential leaching into the environment.

  15. Mechanical behavior of ultralong multiwalled carbon nanotube mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deck, Christian P.; Flowers, Jason; McKee, Gregg S. B.; Vecchio, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been a subject of great interest partially due to their potential for exceptional material properties. Improvements in synthesis methods have facilitated the production of ultralong CNT mats, with lengths in the millimeter range. The increased length of these ultralong mats has, in return, opened the way to greater flexibility to probe their mechanical response. In this work, mats of dense, well-aligned, multiwalled carbon nanotubes were grown with a vapor-phase chemical vapor deposition technique using ferrocene and benzene as reactants, and subsequently tested in both tension and compression using two methods, in a thermomechanical analyzer and in situ inside a scanning electron microscope. In compression, measured stiffness was very low, due to buckling of the nanotubes. In tension, the nanotube mats behaved considerably stiffer; however, they were still more compliant than expected for nanotubes (˜1TPa). Analysis of both the growth method used and the nanotube mat fracture surface suggests that the mats grown in this method are not composed of continuous nanotubes and their strengths actually closely match those of woven nanotube yarns and ropes.

  16. Comparative Mechanisms of Photosynthetic Carbon Acquisitionin Hizikiafusiforme Under Submersed and Emersed Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOUDing-Hui; GAOKun-Shan

    2004-01-01

    The economic seaweed Hizikia fusiforme (Harv.) Okamura (Sargassaceae, Phaeophyta) usually experiences periodical exposures to air at low tide. Photosynthetic carbon acquisition mechanisms were comparatively studied under submersed and emersed conditions in order to establish a general understanding of its photosynthetic characteristics associated with tidal cycles. When submersed in seawater, H.fusiforme was capable of acquiring HCO3- as a source of inorganic carbon (Ci) to drive photosynthesis, while emersed and exposed to air, it used atmospheric 002 for photosynthesis. The pH changes surroundingthe H.fusiforme fronds had less influence on the photosynthetic rates under emersed condition than under submersed condition. When the pH was as high as 10.0, emersed H.fusiforme could photosynthesize efficiently, but the submersed alga exhibited very poor photosynthesis. Extracellular carbonic anhydrase (CA) played an important role in the photosynthetic acquisitions of exogenous Ci in water as well as in air. Both the concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon in general seawater and CO2 in air were demonstrated to limit the photosynthesis of H.fusiforme, which was sensitive to O2. It appeared that the exogenous carbon acquisition system, being dependent of external CA activity, operates in a way not enough to raise intracellular CO2 level to prevent photorespiration. The inability of H.fusiforme to achieve its maximum photosynthetic rate at the current ambient Ci levels under both submersed and emersed conditions suggested that the yield of aquaculture for this economic species would respond profitably to future increases in CO2 concentration in the sea and air.

  17. Crystallization and mechanical properties of functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes/polyvinylidene fluoride composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Jing; Iftekharul Haque, Rubaiyet; Larsen, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes were purified and functionalized by nitric acid and octadecylamine. Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the functionalization of the single-walled carbon nanotubes. Polyvinylidene flouride nanocomposites containing 1 wt......% purified or functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes were prepared by solution blending and injection molding. The dispersion of different carbon nanotubes in dimethylformamide and in polyvinylidene flouride has been investigated. Mechanical properties show that adding single-walled carbon nanotubes...

  18. Mechanical and Tribological Properties of Carbon-Based Graded Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kot

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents research on coatings with advanced architecture, composed of a Cr/Cr2N ceramic/metal multilayer and graded carbon layers with varying properties from Cr/a-C:H to a-C:N. The microstructure of the coatings was analysed using transmission electron microscopy and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy, the mechanical properties were tested by nanoindentation, spherical indentation, and scratch testing, and tribological tests were also conducted. The proper selection of subsequent layers in graded coatings allowed high hardness and fracture resistance to be obtained as well as good adhesion to multilayers. Moreover, these coatings have higher wear resistance than single coatings and a friction coefficient equal to 0.25.

  19. Modelling soil organic carbon concentration of mineral soils in arable lands using legacy soil data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suuster, E; Ritz, Christian; Roostalu, H

    2012-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) concentration is an essential factor in biomass production and soil functioning. SOC concentration values are often obtained by prediction but the prediction accuracy depends much on the method used. Currently, there is a lack of evidence in the soil science literature...... as to the advantages and shortcomings of the different commonly used prediction methods. Therefore, we compared and evaluated the merits of the median approach, analysis of covariance, mixed models and random forests in the context of prediction of SOC concentrations of mineral soils under arable management in the A......-horizon. Three soil properties were used in all of the developed models: soil type, physical clay content (particle size

  20. Gas phase tricholoethylene removal at low concentration using activated carbon fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jun; HUANG Zheng-hong; WANG Zhan-sheng; KANG Fei-yu

    2004-01-01

    The breakthrough adsorption behaviors of gas phase trichloroethylene in a packed bed of activated carbon fibers(ACF) were investigated. The specific surface area of the ACF was 600 m2/g, 1400 m2/g and 1600 m2/g, respectively, and the concentration of trichioroethylene ranged from 270 mg/m3 to 2700 mg/m3 . Results showed that the capacity of adsorption increased with increasing specific surface area, the relationship between the logarithms of 10% breakthrough time and concentration was approximately linear over the experimental range, the breakthrough time decreased with increasing temperature and humidity. The breakthrough curves at different inlet concentration or different temperature can be predicted by several simple theoretical models with good agreements.

  1. Effects of elevated carbon dioxide and sucrose concentrations on Arabidopsis thaliana root architecture and anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee-Ho, E.; Walton, L.J.; Reid, D.M.; Yeung, E.C.; Kurepin, L.V. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Biology

    2007-03-15

    Plant root growth is known to be influenced by higher levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). Roots of some species grown in hydroponics under elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations may be more competitive sinks for photosynthetic assimilates than roots grown under lower CO{sub 2} conditions. Root branching patterns may also be influenced by elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations. Studies have also shown that factors such as soil compaction, salinity and the availability of nitrate, phosphorous, oxygen and water also influence root growth, and the effects of higher CO{sub 2} on roots can be confounded by such environmental factors. This study evaluated the effects of elevated carbon dioxide and sucrose concentrations on Arabidopsis thaliana root growth, morphology, and architecture. Both ambient and elevated CO{sub 2} levels were used along with various sucrose concentrations. The study revealed that A. thaliana plants grown on a phytagar medium in small chambers with elevated CO{sub 2} had longer roots, more lateral root growth than plants grown in ambient CO{sub 2}. Roots in elevated CO{sub 2} were found to have wider root diameters, and more secondary growth. The addition of sucrose to the media closely resembled the effects of elevated CO{sub 2}. In addition, the increase in sucrose concentration had a bigger effect on root morphology under ambient, than elevated CO{sub 2}. Therefore, both elevated CO{sub 2} and increased sucrose concentrations promote root growth by increasing their number, length, and diameter. The dichotomy branching index (DBI) also dropped resulting in a more dichotomous branching pattern. 34 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Structure, Mechanics and Synthesis of Nanoscale Carbon and Boron Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldo, Steven G.

    This thesis is divided into two parts. In Part I, we examine the properties of thin sheets of carbon and boron nitride. We begin with an introduction to the theory of elastic sheets, where the stretching and bending modes are considered in detail. The coupling between stretching and bending modes is thought to play a crucial role in the thermodynamic stability of atomically-thin 2D sheets such as graphene. In Chapter 2, we begin by looking at the fabrication of suspended, atomically thin sheets of graphene. We then study their mechanical resonances which are read via an optical transduction technique. The frequency of the resonators was found to depend on their temperature, as was their quality factor. We conclude by offering some interpretations of the data in terms of the stretching and bending modes of graphene. In Chapter 3, we look briefly at the fabrication of thin sheets of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes. We examine the structure of the sheets using transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM, respectively). We then show a technique by which one can make sheets suspended over a trench with adjustable supports. Finally, DC measurements of the resistivity of the sheets in the temperature range 600 -- 1400 C are presented. In Chapter 4, we study the folding of few-layer graphene oxide, graphene and boron nitride into 3D aerogel monoliths. The properties of graphene oxide are first considered, after which the structure of graphene and boron nitride aerogels is examined using TEM and SEM. Some models for their structure are proposed. In Part II, we look at synthesis techniques for boron nitride (BN). In Chapter 5, we study the conversion of carbon structures of boron nitride via the application of carbothermal reduction of boron oxide followed by nitridation. We apply the conversion to a wide variety of morphologies, including aerogels, carbon fibers and nanotubes, and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. In the latter chapters, we look at the

  3. Carbonate Hydroxyapatite and Silicon-Substituted Carbonate Hydroxyapatite: Synthesis, Mechanical Properties, and Solubility Evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. T. Bang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the chemical composition, solubility, and physical and mechanical properties of carbonate hydroxyapatite (CO3Ap and silicon-substituted carbonate hydroxyapatite (Si-CO3Ap which have been prepared by a simple precipitation method. X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray fluorescence (XRF spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma (ICP techniques were used to characterize the formation of CO3Ap and Si-CO3Ap. The results revealed that the silicate (SiO44- and carbonate (CO32- ions competed to occupy the phosphate (PO43- site and also entered simultaneously into the hydroxyapatite structure. The Si-substituted CO3Ap reduced the powder crystallinity and promoted ion release which resulted in a better solubility compared to that of Si-free CO3Ap. The mean particle size of Si-CO3Ap was much finer than that of CO3Ap. At 750°C heat-treatment temperature, the diametral tensile strengths (DTS of Si-CO3Ap and CO3Ap were about 10.8±0.3 and 11.8±0.4 MPa, respectively.

  4. Estimation of local concentration from measurements of stochastic adsorption dynamics using carbon nanotube-based sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Hong; Lee, Jay H. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Braatz, Richard D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge (United States)

    2016-01-15

    This paper proposes a maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) method for estimating time varying local concentration of the target molecule proximate to the sensor from the time profile of monomolecular adsorption and desorption on the surface of the sensor at nanoscale. Recently, several carbon nanotube sensors have been developed that can selectively detect target molecules at a trace concentration level. These sensors use light intensity changes mediated by adsorption or desorption phenomena on their surfaces. The molecular events occurring at trace concentration levels are inherently stochastic, posing a challenge for optimal estimation. The stochastic behavior is modeled by the chemical master equation (CME), composed of a set of ordinary differential equations describing the time evolution of probabilities for the possible adsorption states. Given the significant stochastic nature of the underlying phenomena, rigorous stochastic estimation based on the CME should lead to an improved accuracy over than deterministic estimation formulated based on the continuum model. Motivated by this expectation, we formulate the MLE based on an analytical solution of the relevant CME, both for the constant and the time-varying local concentrations, with the objective of estimating the analyte concentration field in real time from the adsorption readings of the sensor array. The performances of the MLE and the deterministic least squares are compared using data generated by kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations of the stochastic process. Some future challenges are described for estimating and controlling the concentration field in a distributed domain using the sensor technology.

  5. Concentrations of fine, ultrafine, and black carbon particles in auto-rickshaws in New Delhi, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apte, Joshua, S.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Reich, Alexander, H.; Deshpande, Shyam J.; Kaushik, Geetanjali; Chel, Arvind; Marshall, Julian D.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2011-08-01

    Concentrations of air pollutants from vehicles are elevated along roadways, indicating that human exposure in transportation microenvironments may not be adequately characterized by centrally located monitors. We report results from ˜180 h of real-time measurements of fine particle and black carbon mass concentration (PM 2.5, BC) and ultrafine particle number concentration (PN) inside a common vehicle, the auto-rickshaw, in New Delhi, India. Measured exposure concentrations are much higher in this study (geometric mean for ˜60 trip-averaged concentrations: 190 μg m -3 PM 2.5, 42 μg m -3 BC, 280 × 10 3 particles cm -3; GSD ˜1.3 for all three pollutants) than reported for transportation microenvironments in other megacities. In-vehicle concentrations exceeded simultaneously measured ambient levels by 1.5× for PM 2.5, 3.6× for BC, and 8.4× for PN. Short-duration peak concentrations (averaging time: 10 s), attributable to exhaust plumes of nearby vehicles, were greater than 300 μg m -3 for PM 2.5, 85 μg m -3 for BC, and 650 × 10 3 particles cm -3 for PN. The incremental increase of within-vehicle concentration above ambient levels—which we attribute to in- and near-roadway emission sources—accounted for 30%, 68% and 86% of time-averaged in-vehicle PM 2.5, BC and PN concentrations, respectively. Based on these results, we estimate that one's exposure during a daily commute by auto-rickshaw in Delhi is as least as large as full-day exposures experienced by urban residents of many high-income countries. This study illuminates an environmental health concern that may be common in many populous, low-income cities.

  6. Spatial variability of aerosol and black carbon concentrations in the troposphere of the Russian Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, Valerii S.; Panchenko, Mikhail V.; Paris, Jean D.; Nédéléc, Philippe; Chernov, Dmitry G.; Shmargunov, Vladimir P.

    2015-11-01

    A cycle of flights of the Optik TU-134 Flying Laboratory of IAO SB RAS over regions of Western Siberia and the Russian Arctic (55.0-74.8°N, 61.3-82.9°E) was carried out on October 15-17 of 2014 within the framework of the YAK-AEROSIB Russian—French Project. The mass concentrations of submicron aerosol and Black Carbon (BC) in the troposphere up to a height of 8.5 km were measured in the flights. The ranges of variability were 0.3-20 μg/m3 for the aerosol concentration and 0.02-1 μg/m3 for the BC concentration. In the subpolar latitudes of 71-74.8°N, the lower levels of aerosol (0.8-6 μg/m3) and BC (0.02-0.3 μg/m3) were observed. The comparison of the results of airborne sensing in 2008 and 2014 has shown that in the Western Subartic the aerosol and BC concentrations in the vertical profiles up to six times exceeded those observed in the Eastern Subarctic (0.3-1 μg/m3 and 10-50 ng/m3). The excess of the mean integral BC concentrations and the aerosol optical depth was, on average, 2-2.5 times (0.16 mg/m2; 0.02). In the region of the Kara Sea at heights of 0.5-2 and 4-6 km, the excess of the aerosol content in the western sector in comparison with the eastern one was, on average, 2 times, while for the black carbon the excess achieved 7 times at heights of 1-2 km (0.25- 0.035 μg/m3). The mean integral concentrations of aerosol and black carbon ˜ 1.3 times exceeded those in the clearer eastern region of the sea (0.31 mg/m2; 0.049). The obtained estimates indicate the decrease of the aerosol and BC concentrations in the subpolar latitudes of the Russian Federation from the west to the east.

  7. ANALYSIS OF MATERIAL MECHANICAL PROPERTIES FOR SINGLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Yiming; Xu Xiaoxian

    2005-01-01

    Abstract The carbon-carbon bond between two nearest-neighboring atoms is modeled as a beam and the single-walled carbon nanotubes are treated as the space frame structures in order to analyze the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes. Based on the theory of TersoffBrenner force field, the energy relationships between the carbon-carbon bond and the beam model are obtained, and the stiffness parameters of the beam are determined. By applying the present model, the Young's moduli of the single-walled carbon nanotubes with different tube diameters are determined. And the present results are compared with available data.

  8. Contribution of various carbon sources toward isoprene synthesis mediated by altered atmospheric CO2 concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, A. M.; Asensio, D.; Eller, A. S.; Wilkinson, M. J.; Schnitzler, J.; Jackson, R. B.; Monson, R. K.

    2010-12-01

    Biogenically released isoprene is abundant in the troposphere, and has an essential function in determining atmospheric chemistry and important implications for plant metabolism. As a result, considerable effort has been made to understand the underlying mechanisms driving isoprene synthesis, particularly in the context of a rapidly changing environment. Recently, a number of studies have focused on the contribution of recently assimilated carbon as opposed to stored/alternative intracellular or extracellular carbon sources in the context of environmental stress. Results from these studies can offer clues about the importance of various carbon pools for isoprene production and elucidate the corresponding physiological changes that are responsible for these dynamic shifts in carbon allocation. We performed a 13CO2-labeling study using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) to examine the kinetics of the incorporation of recently assimilated photosynthate into isoprene emitted from poplar (Poplar x canescens) under sub-ambient, ambient, and elevated CO2 growth conditions. We also monitored the importance of pyruvate-derived carbon for isoprene biosynthesis and obtained a detailed account of where individual carbons are derived from by analyzing the ratio of the 3C subunit of isoprene (M41+) (a fragment which contains two carbons from pyruvate) to the ratio of the parent isoprene molecule (M69+). Dynamics in the M41+:M69+ ratio indicate that recently assimilated carbon is incorporated into the pyruvate carbon pool slowly across all CO2 treatments and is therefore accessible for isoprene synthesis at a slower rate when compared to substrates derived directly from photosynthesis. Analysis of the rates of change for individual masses indicated that the carbon pools in trees grown in sub-ambient CO2 (200 ppm) are labeled ~2 times faster than those of trees grown in ambient or elevated CO2. Analysis of the total isoprene emission rates between treatments

  9. Modeling of Carbon Concentration Profile Development During Both Atmosphere and Low Pressure Carburizing Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Y.; Zhang, L.; Sisson, R. D.

    2013-07-01

    Heat treaters need an effective simulation tool to predict the carburization performance of a variety of steels. The tool is needed to not only predict the carbon profile but also optimize the process in terms of the cycle time and the total cost. CarbToolhas been developed to meet these needs for gas and vacuum carburization. In this article, CarbToolpredictions were compared with industrial experimental results for three types of steels (AISI 8620, 5120, and 4320), heat treated by both gas and vacuum carburizing processes. Based on the agreement of model predictions and experimental results, it is found that CarbToolcould be used to predict the carbon concentration profile for a variety of alloys in both gas and vacuum carburizing processes.

  10. Determination of Concentration Dependent Diffusion Coefficients of Carbon in Expanded Austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo; Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract. In the present paper various experimental procedures to experimentally determine the concentration dependent diffusion coefficient of carbon in expanded austenite are evaluated. To this end thermogravimetric carburization was simulated for various experimental conditions and the evaluated...... composition dependent diffusivity of carbon derived from the simulated experiments was compared with the input data. The most promising procedure for an accurate determination is shown to be stepwise gaseous carburizing of thin foils in a gaseous atmosphere; the finer the stepsize, the more accurate...... the approximation of the diffusivity. Thermogravimetry was applied to continuously monitor the weight change of thin foils of AISI 316 during carburizing in CO-H2 gas mixtures for one of the simulated experimental procedures....

  11. Hydrogen depolarized carbon dioxide concentrator performance improvements and cell pair structural tests. [for manned space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddleston, J. D.; Aylward, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The investigations and testing associated with the CO2 removal efficiency and voltage degradation of a hydrogen depolarized carbon oxide concentrator are reported. Also discussed is the vibration testing of a water vapor electrolysis cell pair. Performance testing of various HDC cell pairs with Cs2CO3 electrolyte provided sufficient parametric and endurance data to size a six man space station prototype CO2 removal system as having 36 HDC cell pairs, and to verify a life capability exceeding six moths. Testing also demonstrated that tetramethylammonium carbonate is an acceptable HDC electrolyte for operating over the relative humidity range of 30 to 90 percent and over a temperature range of 50 to 80 F.

  12. Effect of Sulfur Concentration on the Morphology of Carbon Nanofibers Produced from a Botanical Hydrocarbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Kaushik

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractCarbon nanofibers (CNF with diameters of 20–130 nm with different morphologies were obtained from a botanical hydrocarbon: Turpentine oil, using ferrocene as catalyst source and sulfur as a promoter by simple spray pyrolysis method at 1,000 °C. The influence of sulfur concentration on the morphology of the carbon nanofibers was investigated. SEM, TEM, Raman, TGA/DTA, and BET surface area were employed to characterize the as-prepared samples. TEM analysis confirms that as-prepared CNFs have a very sharp tip, bamboo shape, open end, hemispherical cap, pipe like morphology, and metal particle trapped inside the wide hollow core. It is observed that sulfur plays an important role to promote or inhibit the CNF growth. Addition of sulfur to the solution of ferrocene and turpentine oil mixture was found to be very effective in promoting the growth of CNF. Without addition of sulfur, carbonaceous product was very less and mainly soot was formed. At high concentration of sulfur inhibit the growth of CNFs. Hence the yield of CNFs was optimized for a given sulfur concentration.

  13. Operation Mechanism of Farmers’ Professional Cooperatives from the Point of Low-Carbon Agricultural Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    We firstly take a look at internal logic of cluster development of low-carbon agricultural products.In combination with operation features of farmers’ professional cooperatives and actual requirements for cluster development of low-carbon agricultural products;we elaborate establishing benefit allocation mechanism,bearing education and training functions,forming low-carbon value,building low-carbon identification system,as well as realizing low-carbon value.According to these situations,we systematically analyze operation mechanism of farmers’ professional cooperatives suitable for cluster development of low-carbon agricultural products.To promote cluster development of low-carbon agricultural products,we put forward following suggestions,including government guidance and encouragement,social acceptance and active cooperation,and integration into global low-carbon development system to share benefit of low-carbon development.

  14. How Does Host Carbon Concentration Modulate the Lifestyle of Postharvest Pathogens during Colonization?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dov B. Prusky

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Postharvest pathogens can penetrate fruit by breaching the cuticle or directly through wounds, remain quiescent and they show disease symptoms only long after infection. During ripening and senescence, the fruit undergo physiological processes accompanied by a decline in antifungal compounds, which allows the pathogen to activate a mechanism of secretion of small effector molecules that modulate host environmental pH. This results in the transcript activation of fungal genes under their optimal pH conditions, enabling the fungus to use a specific group of pathogenicity factors at each particular pH. New research suggests that carbon availability in the environment of the activating pathogen is a key factor triggering the production and secretion of small pH-modulating molecules: ammonia and organic acid. Ammonia is secreted under limited carbon and gluconic acid under excess carbon. This mini review describes our most recent knowledge on the mechanism of activation of the biosynthesis and secretion of fungal molecules that modulate the host pH, and their contribution to the transition from quiescence to necrotrophic lifestyle by the postharvest pathogens.

  15. How Does Host Carbon Concentration Modulate the Lifestyle of Postharvest Pathogens during Colonization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prusky, Dov B.; Bi, Fangcheng; Moral, Juan; Barad, Shiri

    2016-01-01

    Postharvest pathogens can penetrate fruit by breaching the cuticle or directly through wounds, and they show disease symptoms only long after infection. During ripening and senescence, the fruit undergo physiological processes accompanied by a decline in antifungal compounds, which allows the pathogen to activate a mechanism of secretion of small effector molecules that modulate host environmental pH. These result in the activation of genes under their optimal pH conditions, enabling the fungus to use a specific group of pathogenicity factors at each particular pH. New research suggests that carbon availability in the environment is a key factor triggering the production and secretion of small pH-modulating molecules: ammonia and organic acids. Ammonia is secreted under limited carbon and gluconic acid under excess carbon. This mini review describes our most recent knowledge of the mechanism of activation of pH-secreted molecules and their contribution to colonization by postharvest pathogens to facilitate the transition from quiescence to necrotrophic lifestyle. PMID:27635125

  16. Integrated Experimental and Modeling Studies of Mineral Carbonation as a Mechanism for Permanent Carbon Sequestration in Mafic/Ultramafic Rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhengrong [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Qiu, Lin [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Zhang, Shuang [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Bolton, Edward [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Bercovici, David [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Ague, Jay [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Karato, Shun-Ichiro [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Oristaglio, Michael [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Zhu, Wen-Iu [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Lisabeth, Harry [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Johnson, Kevin [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2014-09-30

    A program of laboratory experiments, modeling and fieldwork was carried out at Yale University, University of Maryland, and University of Hawai‘i, under a DOE Award (DE-FE0004375) to study mineral carbonation as a practical method of geologic carbon sequestration. Mineral carbonation, also called carbon mineralization, is the conversion of (fluid) carbon dioxide into (solid) carbonate minerals in rocks, by way of naturally occurring chemical reactions. Mafic and ultramafic rocks, such as volcanic basalt, are natural candidates for carbonation, because the magnesium and iron silicate minerals in these rocks react with brines of dissolved carbon dioxide to form carbonate minerals. By trapping carbon dioxide (CO2) underground as a constituent of solid rock, carbonation of natural basalt formations would be a secure method of sequestering CO2 captured at power plants in efforts to mitigate climate change. Geochemical laboratory experiments at Yale, carried out in a batch reactor at 200°C and 150 bar (15 MPa), studied carbonation of the olivine mineral forsterite (Mg2SiO4) reacting with CO2 brines in the form of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) solutions. The main carbonation product in these reactions is the carbonate mineral magnesite (MgCO3). A series of 32 runs varied the reaction time, the reactive surface area of olivine grains and powders, the concentration of the reacting fluid, and the starting ratio of fluid to olivine mass. These experiments were the first to study the rate of olivine carbonation under passive conditions approaching equilibrium. The results show that, in a simple batch reaction, olivine carbonation is fastest during the first 24 hours and then slows significantly and even reverses. A natural measure of the extent of carbonation is a quantity called the carbonation fraction, which compares the amount of carbon removed from solution, during a run, to the maximum amount

  17. Complete reaction mechanisms of mercury oxidation on halogenated activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rungnim, Chompoonut; Promarak, Vinich; Hannongbua, Supa; Kungwan, Nawee; Namuangruk, Supawadee

    2016-06-05

    The reaction mechanisms of mercury (Hg) adsorption and oxidation on halogenated activated carbon (AC) have been completely studied for the first time using density functional theory (DFT) method. Two different halogenated AC models, namely X-AC and X-AC-X (X=Cl, Br, I), were adopted. The results revealed that HgX is found to be stable-state on the AC edge since its further desorption from the AC as HgX, or further oxidation to HgX2, are energetically unfavorable. Remarkably, the halide type does not significantly affect the Hg adsorption energy but it strongly affects the activation energy barrier of HgX formation, which obviously increases in the order HgIBr-AC>Cl-AC. Thus, the study of the complete reaction mechanism is essential because the adsorption energy can not be used as a guideline for the rational material design in the halide impregnated AC systems. The activation energy is an important descriptor for the predictions of sorbent reactivity to the Hg oxidation process.

  18. The Carbon Isotopic Content and Concentration of Ambient Formic and Acetic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bryan Jay

    A direct method for source determination of atmospheric formic and acetic acid, through carbon isotopic analysis of the ambient acids and their potential sources, has been successfully developed and tested. These first carbon isotopic measurements of formic acid in the atmosphere were found to be fairly constant, regardless of location. This is consistent with a single dominating source of formic acid, with vegetation emissions being the most likely controlling source. Collection of relatively large quantities (0.3 -3.0 mg) of the organic acids, which was necessary for carbon isotopic measurements, was effectively accomplished by a new method using calcium hydroxide-treated filters with a high-volume sampler. Samples were collected on a regular basis at Mount Lemmon, Arizona (elevation = 9200 feet A.S.L.). Atmospheric concentrations showed a well-defined seasonal pattern, with the lowest concentrations (about 0.2 ppbv) occurring in the middle of the winter, which steadily increased to a maximum of nearly 2 ppbv in the summer. The ^{13}C content (delta ^{13}C) of HCOOH averaged -20.9 +/- 2.5 ^0/_{00 } during the growing season (April-September) and -23.2 +/- 3.5 ^0/_{00} during the non-growing season at Mount Lemmon. Isotopic measurements of formic acid from several other locations included two west coast marine sites ( delta ^{13} C range of -19.1 to -24.6 ^0/_{00} ), three Colorado Rocky Mountain samples averaging -23.2 +/- 1.0 ^0/_{00}, two from the prairie of North Dakota (-23.5 +/- 1.0 ^0/ _{00}) and three samples collected in the urban Tucson, Arizona area (- 20.8 +/- 3.4 ^0 /_{00}). Source measurements included HCOOH emissions from two species of formicine ants (-18.8 +/- 1.7 ^0/_ {00}), and HCOOH in automobile exhaust (-28 ^0/ _{00} from leaded gasoline, and -48.6 ^0/ _{00} from unleaded). Further support for a biogenic source of atmospheric HCOOH came from the carbon-14 analysis of six Mount Lemmon HCOOH samples (93-113% modern carbon), using accelerator

  19. A comparison of atmospheric composition using the Carbon Bond and Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sarwar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We incorporate the recently developed Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (version 2, RACM2 into the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system for comparison with the existing 2005 Carbon Bond mechanism with updated toluene chemistry (CB05TU. Compared to CB05TU, RACM2 enhances the domain-wide monthly mean hydroxyl radical concentrations by 46% and nitric acid by 26%. However, it reduces hydrogen peroxide by 2%, peroxyacetic acid by 94%, methyl hydrogen peroxide by 19%, peroxyacetyl nitrate by 40%, and organic nitrate by 41%. RACM2 enhances ozone compared to CB05TU at all ambient levels. Although it exhibited greater overestimates at lower observed concentrations, it displayed an improved performance at higher observed concentrations. The RACM2 ozone predictions are also supported by increased ozone production efficiency that agrees better with observations. Compared to CB05TU, RACM2 enhances the domain-wide monthly mean sulfate by 10%, nitrate by 6%, ammonium by 10%, anthropogenic secondary organic aerosols by 42%, biogenic secondary organic aerosols by 5%, and in-cloud secondary organic aerosols by 7%. Increased inorganic and organic aerosols with RACM2 agree better with observed data. Any air pollution control strategies developed using the two mechanisms do not differ appreciably.

  20. Theoretical constraints on oxygen and carbon dioxide concentrations in the Precambrian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasting, J. F.

    1987-01-01

    Simple (one-dimensional) climate models suggest that carbon dioxide concentrations during the Archean must have been at least 100-1000 times the present level to keep the Earth's surface temperature above freezing in the face of decreased solar luminosity. Such models provide only lower bounds on CO2, so it is possible that CO2 levels were substantially higher than this and that the Archean climate was much warmer than today. Periods of extensive glaciation during the early and late Proterozoic, on the other hand, indicate that the climate at these times was relatively cool. To be consistent with climate models CO2 partial pressures must have declined from approximately 0.03 to 0.3 bar around 2.5 Ga ago to between 10(-3) and 10(-2) bar at 0.8 Ga ago. This steep decrease in carbon dioxide concentrations may be inconsistent with paleosol data, which implies that pCO2 did not change appreciably during that time. Oxygen was essentially absent from the Earth's atmosphere and oceans prior to the emergence of a photosynthetic source, probably during the late Archean. During the early Proterozoic the atmosphere and surface ocean were apparently oxidizing, while the deep ocean remained reducing. An upper limit of 6 x 10(-3) bar for pO2 at this time can be derived by balancing the burial rate of organic carbon with the rate of oxidation of ferrous iron in the deep ocean. The establishment of oxidizing conditions in the deep ocean, marked by the disappearance of banded iron formations approximately 1.7 Ga ago, permitted atmospheric oxygen to climb to its present level. O2 concentrations may have remained substantially lower than today, however, until well into the Phanerozoic.

  1. Mechanisms of urine concentration and dilution (1961); Les mecanismes de concentration et de dilution de l'urine (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morel, F.; Guinnebault, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    This paper is devoted to the analysis of a problem in the field of renal physiology which has shown many new developments during the course of the last few years. The following are treated successively: a) the data obtained from measurements of free water clearance and their interpretation; b) the data provided by nephron morphology and the comparative anatomy of the kidney ; c) the data relative to the existence of an intrarenal osmotic gradient; d) the principle of concentration multiplication by a counter current technique; e) the present day theory of counter current concentration of urine, and f) the physiological check on dilution and concentration mechanisms in urine. Lastly, the advantages of the modern theory and the unknown factors which remain are discussed. (authors) [French] Cette revue de question est consacree l'analyse d'un probleme de physiologie renale qui, au cours des dernieres annees, a subi un developpement et un renouveau remarquables. Sont successivement exposes: a) les donnees fournies par les mesures de clearance de l'eau libre et leur interpretation; b) les donnees fournies par la morphologie des nephrons et l'anatomie comparee du rein; c) les donnees concernant l'existence d'un gradient osmotique intrarenal; d) le principe de multiplication de concentration par contrecourant; e) la theorie actuelle de concentration de l'urine par contre-courant, et f) le controle physiologique des mecanismes de dilution et de concentration de l'urine. Les avantages de la theorie moderne et les obscurites qui subsistent sont enfin discutes. (auteurs)

  2. Electrical and mechanical characterisation of single wall carbon nanotubes based composites for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whulanza, Yudan; Battini, Elena; Vannozzi, Lorenzo; Vomero, Maria; Ahluwalia, Arti; Vozzi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the realisation of conductive matrices for application to tissue engineering research. We used poly(L-lactide (PLLA)), poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL), and poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) as polymer matrix, because they are biocompatible and biodegradable. The conductive property was integrated to them by adding single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) into the polymer matrix. Several SWNTs concentrations were introduced aiming to understand how they influence and modulate mechanical properties, impedance features and electric percolation threshold of polymer matrix. It was observed that a concentration of 0.3% was able to transform insulating matrix into conductive one. Furthermore, a conductive model of the SWNT/polymer was developed by applying power law of percolation threshold.

  3. [Seagrass ecosystems: contributions to and mechanisms of carbon sequestration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Guang-Long; Lin, Hsing-Juh; Li, Zong-Shan; Fan, Hang-Qing; Zhou, Hao-Lang; Liu, Guo-Hua

    2014-06-01

    The ocean's vegetated habitats, in particular seagrasses, mangroves and salt marshes, each capture and store a comparable amount of carbon per year, forming the Earth's blue carbon sinks, the most intense carbon sinks on the planet. Seagrass meadows, characterized by high primary productivity, efficient water column filtration and sediment stability, have a pronounced capacity for carbon sequestration. This is enhanced by low decomposition rates in anaerobic seagrass sediments. The carbon captured by seagrass meadows contributes significantly to the total blue carbon. At a global scale, seagrass ecosystems are carbon sink hot spots and have profound influences on the global carbon cycle. This importance combined with the many other functions of seagrass meadows places them among the most valuable ecosystems in the world. Unfortunately, seagrasses are declining globally at an alarming rate owing to anthropogenic disturbances and climate change, making them also among the most threatened ecosystems on the Earth. The role of coastal systems in carbon sequestration has received far too little attention and thus there are still many uncertainties in evaluating carbon sequestration of global seagrass meadows accurately. To better assess the carbon sequestration of global seagrass ecosystems, a number of scientific issues should be considered with high priorities: 1) more accurate measurements of seagrass coverage at national and global levels; 2) more comprehensive research into species- and location-specific carbon sequestration efficiencies; 3) in-depth exploration of the effects of human disturbance and global climate change on carbon capture and storage by seagrass ecosystems.

  4. Strength of briquettes made of Cu concentrate and carbon-bearing materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Oleksiak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, results of the research on application of residual fine-grained, carbon-bearing materials as coke substitutes in the shaft process of copper matter smelting are discussed. The addition was introduced into the charge as a component of concentrate-made briquettes, then, its effects on properties of the obtained briquettes were analysed for their compressive and drop strengths. The results of investigations confirmed the potential use of proposed alternative fuels (as briquette components in the process of copper matte smelting.

  5. Carbon Solubility and Mass Action Concentrations of Fe-Cr-C Melts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An empirical equation of carbon solubility in Fe-Cr-C melts is regressed based on the experimental data from references. A calculating model of mass action concentrations for these melts is formulated on the basis of the coexistence theory of metallic melts involving compound formation, the phase diagram of Cr-C system as well as thermodynamic data of Fe-Cr-C melts. According to the model, the standard Gibbs free energies of formation of CrC and Cr3C2 are obtained. Satisfactory agreement between the calculated and measured values shows that the model can reflect the structural characteristics of Fe-Cr-C melts.

  6. Carbon dioxide consumption of the microalga Scenedesmus obtusiusculus under transient inlet CO2 concentration variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello, Juan; Morales, Marcia; Revah, Sergio

    2017-02-07

    The extensive microalgae diversity offers considerable versatility for a wide range of biotechnological applications in environmental and production processes. Microalgal cultivation is based on CO2 fixation via photosynthesis and, consequently, it is necessary to evaluate, in a short time and reliable way, the effect of the CO2 gas concentration on the consumption rate and establish the tolerance range of different strains and the amount of inorganic carbon that can be incorporated into biomass in order to establish the potential for industrial scale application. Dynamic experiments allow calculating the short-term microalgal photosynthetic activity of strains in photobioreactors. In this paper, the effect of step-changes in CO2 concentration fed to a 20L bubble column photobioreactor on the CO2 consumption rate of Scenedesmus obtusiusculus was evaluated at different operation times. The highest apparent CO2 consumption rate (336μmolm(-2)s(-1) and 5.6% of CO2) was 6530mgCO2gb(-1)d(-1) and it decreased to 222mgCO2gb(-1)d(-1) when biomass concentration increased of 0.5 to 3.1gbL(-1) and 5.6% of CO2 was fed. For low CO2 concentrations (CO2 consumption rates show that S. obtusiusculus was not limited by CO2 availability for concentrations above of 3.8%. The CO2 mass balance showed that 90% of the C-CO2 transferred was used for S. obtusiusculus growth.

  7. Assessing recent measurement techniques for quantifying black carbon concentration in snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Schwarz

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate the performance of the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2 and the Integrating Sphere/Integrating Sandwich Spectrophotometer (ISSW in quantifying the concentration of refractory black carbon (BC in snow samples. We find that the SP2 can be used to measure BC mass concentration in snow with substantially larger uncertainty (60% than for atmospheric sampling (<30%. Achieving this level of accuracy requires careful assessment of nebulizer performance and SP2 calibration with consideration of the fact that BC in snow tends to larger sizes than typically observed in the atmosphere. Once these issues are addressed, the SP2 is able to measure the size distribution and mass concentration of BC in the snow. Laboratory comparison of the SP2 and the Integrating Sphere/Integrating Sandwich Spectrophotometer (ISSW revealed significant biases in the estimate of BC concentration from the ISSW when test samples contained dust or non-absorbing particulates. These results suggest that current estimates of BC mass concentration in snow and ice using either the SP2 or the ISSW may be associated with significant underestimates of uncertainty.

  8. Whey protein particles modulate mechanical properties of gels at high protein concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saglam, D.; Venema, P.; Vries, de R.J.; Berg, van den L.; Linden, van der E.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the influence of dense whey protein particles on the mechanical properties of whey protein isolate (WPI) gels at high protein concentrations (16–22% (w/w)). Incorporation of dense whey protein particles in the gel, while keeping the total protein concentration constant, leads to a co

  9. Carbon dioxide as working fluid for medium and high-temperature concentrated solar thermal systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Duong

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the benefits and drawbacks of using carbon dioxide in solar thermal systems at medium and high operating temperatures. For medium temperatures, application of CO2 in non-imaging-optics based compound parabolic concentrators (CPC combined with evacuated-tube collectors is studied. These collectors have been shown to obtain efficiencies higher than 40% operating at around 200℃ without the need of tracking. Validated numerical models of external compound parabolic concentrators (XCPCs are used to simulate their performance using CO2 as working fluid. For higher temperatures, a mathematical model is implemented to analyze the operating performance of a parabolic trough solar collector (PTC using CO2 at temperatures between 100℃ and 600℃.

  10. MECHANICAL AND THERMO–MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF BI-DIRECTIONAL AND SHORT CARBON FIBER REINFORCED EPOXY COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. AGARWAL

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper based on bidirectional and short carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites reports the effect of fiber loading on physical, mechanical and thermo-mechanical properties respectively. The five different fiber loading, i.e., 10wt. %, 20wt. %, 30wt. %, 40wt. % and 50wt. % were taken for evaluating the above said properties. The physical and mechanical properties, i.e., hardness, tensile strength, flexural strength, inter-laminar shear strength and impact strength are determined to represent the behaviour of composite structures with that of fiber loading. Thermo-mechanical properties of the material are measured with the help of Dynamic Mechanical Analyser to measure the damping capacity of the material that is used to reduce the vibrations. The effect of storage modulus, loss modulus and tan delta with temperature are determined. Finally, Cole–Cole analysis is performed on both bidirectional and short carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites to distinguish the material properties of either homogeneous or heterogeneous materials. The results show that with the increase in fiber loading the mechanical properties of bidirectional carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites increases as compared to short carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites except in case of hardness, short carbon fiber reinforced composites shows better results. Similarly, as far as Loss modulus, storage modulus is concerned bidirectional carbon fiber shows better damping behaviour than short carbon fiber reinforced composites.

  11. High Frequency Measurements of Methane Concentrations and Carbon Isotopes at a Marsh and Landfill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, B.; Wilson, B.; Chanton, J.; Eller, K.; Dong, F.; Baer, D. S.; Gupta, M.; Dzwonkowski, B.

    2012-12-01

    High frequency measurements of methane concentrations and carbon isotopes can help constrain the source strengths of methane emitted to the atmosphere. We report here methane concentrations and 13C values measured at 0.5 Hz with cavity enhanced laser absorption spectrometers (Los Gatos Research) deployed at a saltmarsh in Alabama and a landfill in Florida. Methane concentrations and 13C at the saltmarsh were monitored over a 2.5 day time period at 2 m, 0.5 m above the ground as well as from the outflow of a flow-through (2 L) chamber placed on the Spartina alterniflora dominated marsh. A typical measurement cycle included regular samples from two tanks of known methane concentrations and isotopic values and from ambient air samples. Over the 2.5-day measurement period methane concentrations and isotopic ratios at 2 m averaged 1.85 ppm and -43.57‰ (±0.34, 1 SE), respectively. The concentration and isotopic values from the chamber outflow varied from 1.92 to 5.81 ppm and -38.5 to -59.3‰, respectively. Methane flux from the marsh ranged from undetectable to 3.6 mgC m-2hr-1, with high fluxes measured during low tide. The 13δCH4 of the emitted CH4 from the marsh, determined from a mass balance equation using the chamber inflow and outflow concentration and isotopic values ranged from -62.1 to -93.9‰ and averaged -77‰ (±1.25, 1SE). At the landfill ambient methane concentrations and 13C ratios measured over multiple days varied from 4.25 to 11.91 ppm and from -58.81 to -45.12‰, respectively. At higher methane concentrations the δ13C of CH4 was more depleted consistent with previously observed relationship at this site made by more traditional techniques. Over a 30-minute measurement period CH4 concentrations at the landfill could vary by as much as 15 ppm. The high frequency continuous optical measurements with field-deployed instruments provide us with an unprecedented temporal resolution of CH4 concentrations and isotopic ratios. These measurements will

  12. The Effect of Excess Carbon on the Crystallographic, Microstructural, and Mechanical Properties of CVD Silicon Carbide Fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzik, J V; Croft, W J; Staples, R J; MoberlyChan, W J

    2006-12-05

    Silicon carbide (SiC) fibers made by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are of interest for organic, ceramic, and metal matrix composite materials due their high strength, high elastic modulus, and retention of mechanical properties at elevated processing and operating temperatures. The properties of SCS-6{trademark} silicon carbide fibers, which are made by a commercial process and consist largely of stoichiometric SiC, were compared with an experimental carbon-rich CVD SiC fiber, to which excess carbon was added during the CVD process. The concentration, homogeneity, and distribution of carbon were measured using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). The effect of excess carbon on the tensile strength, elastic modulus, and the crystallographic and microstructural properties of CVD silicon carbide fibers was investigated using tensile testing, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  13. Variation in the concentration and age of nonstructural carbon stored in different tree tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Andrew; Carbone, Mariah; Huggett, Brett; Furze, Morgan; Czimczik, Claudia I.; Xu, Xiaomei

    2014-05-01

    Trees store nonstructural carbon (NSC), in the form of sugars and starch, in the ray parenchyma cells of woody tissues. These reserves provide a carbon buffer when demand (growth, protection, or metabolism) exceeds supply (photosynthesis). This is particularly important in the context of resilience to stress and disturbance, such as might be associated with various global change factors. However, storage allocation processes and the availability of stored reserves remain poorly understood in woody plants. To better understand how NSC reserves are distributed throughout the tree, and the degree to which NSC reserves mix across ring boundaries and tissue types, we destructively sampled two 30-year-old trees (one red oak, Quercus rubra L., and one white pine, Pinus strobus L.) growing at Harvard Forest, an oak-dominated temperate forest in the northeastern United States. We analyzed stemwood samples (divided into individual rings, bark, and phloem), coarse and fine branches, and coarse (separated into three depths) and fine roots for concentrations of total sugars and starch. For a subset of samples we used the radiocarbon (14C) "bomb spike" method to estimate the mean age of extracted sugars and starch. In oak, stemwood sugar and starch concentrations were highest (50 mg/g) in the youngest (most recently-formed) rings, and dropped off rapidly (to 10 mg/g or less) across the 10 most recent rings. In oak phloem tissue, sugar concentrations were high (90 mg/g) compared to starch (10 mg/g). In pine, sugar concentrations dropped off rapidly across the three most recent rings (from 30 mg/g to 10 mg/g) whereas starch concentrations were low even for the youngest rings (10 mg/g or less). In pine, phloem concentrations of both sugar (190 mg/g) and starch (20 mg/g) were both substantially higher than in oak. Such strong radial trends must be accounted for when scaling up to whole-tree budgets, as whole increment cores cannot properly integrate (on a ring-area basis) across the

  14. Large reductions in urban black carbon concentrations in the United States between 1965 and 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Preble, Chelsea V.; Hadley, Odelle L.; Bond, Tami C.; Apte, Joshua S.

    2017-02-01

    Long-term pollutant concentration trends can be useful for evaluating air quality effects of emission controls and historical transitions in energy sources. We employed archival records of coefficient of haze (COH), a now-retired measure of light-absorbing particulate matter, to re-construct historical black carbon (BC) concentrations at urban locations in the United States (U.S.). The following relationship between COH and BC was determined by reinstating into service COH monitors beside aethalometers for two years in Vallejo and one year in San Jose, California: BC (μg m-3) = 6.7COH + 0.1, R2 = 0.9. Estimated BC concentrations in ten states stretching from the East to West Coast decreased markedly between 1965 and 1980: 5-fold in Illinois, Ohio, and Virginia, 4-fold in Missouri, and 2.5-fold in Pennsylvania. Over the period from the mid-1960s to the early 2000s, annual average BC concentrations in New Jersey and California decreased from 13 to 2 μg m-3 and 4 to 1 μg m-3, respectively, despite concurrent increases in fossil fuel consumption from 1.6 to 2.1 EJ (EJ = 1018 J) in New Jersey and 4.2 to 6.4 EJ in California. New Jersey's greater reliance on BC-producing heavy fuel oils and coal in the 1960s and early 1970s and subsequent transition to cleaner fuels explains why the decrease was larger in New Jersey than California. Patterns in seasonal and weekly BC concentrations and energy consumption trends together indicate that reducing wintertime emissions - namely substituting natural gas and electricity for heavy fuel oil in the residential sector - and decreasing emissions from diesel vehicles contributed to lower ambient BC concentrations. Over the period of study, declining concentrations of BC, a potent and short-lived climate warming pollutant, contrast increasing fossil fuel carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in the U.S. Declining BC emissions may have had the benefit of mitigating some atmospheric warming driven by increased CO2 emissions with

  15. Estimating dissolved organic carbon concentration in turbid coastal waters using optical remote sensing observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherukuru, Nagur; Ford, Phillip W.; Matear, Richard J.; Oubelkheir, Kadija; Clementson, Lesley A.; Suber, Ken; Steven, Andrew D. L.

    2016-10-01

    Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) is an important component in the global carbon cycle. It also plays an important role in influencing the coastal ocean biogeochemical (BGC) cycles and light environment. Studies focussing on DOC dynamics in coastal waters are data constrained due to the high costs associated with in situ water sampling campaigns. Satellite optical remote sensing has the potential to provide continuous, cost-effective DOC estimates. In this study we used a bio-optics dataset collected in turbid coastal waters of Moreton Bay (MB), Australia, during 2011 to develop a remote sensing algorithm to estimate DOC. This dataset includes data from flood and non-flood conditions. In MB, DOC concentration varied over a wide range (20-520 μM C) and had a good correlation (R2 = 0.78) with absorption due to coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and remote sensing reflectance. Using this data set we developed an empirical algorithm to derive DOC concentrations from the ratio of Rrs(412)/Rrs(488) and tested it with independent datasets. In this study, we demonstrate the ability to estimate DOC using remotely sensed optical observations in turbid coastal waters.

  16. [Carbon emissions and low-carbon regulation countermeasures of land use change in the city and town concentrated area of central Liaoning Province, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Feng-ming; Liang, Wen-juan; Niu, Ming-fen; Wang, Jiao-yue

    2016-02-01

    Carbon emissions due to land use change have an important impact on global climate change. Adjustment of regional land use patterns has a great scientific significance to adaptation to a changing climate. Based on carbon emission/absorption parameters suitable for Liaoning Province, this paper estimated the carbon emission of land use change in the city and town concentrated area of central Liaoning Province. The results showed that the carbon emission and absorption were separately 308.51 Tg C and 11.64 Tg C from 1997 to 2010. It meant 3.8% of carbon emission. was offset by carbon absorption. Among the 296.87 Tg C net carbon emission of land use change, carbon emission of remaining land use type was 182.24 Tg C, accounting for 61.4% of the net carbon emission, while the carbon emission of land use transformation was 114.63 Tg C, occupying the rest 38.6% of net carbon emission. Through quantifying the mapping relationship between land use change and carbon emission, it was shown that during 1997-2004 the contributions of remaining construction land (40.9%) and cropland transform ation to construction land (40.6%) to carbon emission were larger, but the greater contributions to carbon absorption came from cropland transformation to forest land (38.6%) and remaining forest land (37.5%). During 2004-2010, the land use types for carbon emission and absorption were the same to the period of 1997-2004, but the contribution of remaining construction land to carbon emission increased to 80.6%, and the contribution of remaining forest land to carbon absorption increased to 71.7%. Based on the carbon emission intensity in different land use types, we put forward the low-carbon regulation countermeasures of land use in two aspects. In carbon emission reduction, we should strict control land transformation to construction land, increase the energy efficiency of construction land, and avoid excessive development of forest land and water. In carbon sink increase, we should

  17. Establishment of the carbon label mechanism of coal chemical products based oncarbon footprint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Bishan

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT After redefining the carbon footprint and carbon label, the paper analyzesthe significance of the carbon labels under the background of the low carbon economy development, and establishes the concept of model of the carbon labels mechanism to chemical products. At the same time, the paper quantitatively studies carbon label data sourceof three kinds of coal chemical industry power products, which are fromhaving not CCS technologies of supercritical boiler of coal, using CCS technologies of supercritical boiler of coal and adopting CCS and IGCC technologies to power generation in CCI. Based on the three kinds of differences, the paper puts forward of establishing the carbon labels mechanism of chemical products under the low carbon consumption.

  18. AMBIENT CARBONATION of MINING RESIDUES: Understanding the Mechanisms and Optimization of Direct Carbon Dioxide Mineral Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assima, G. P.; Larachi, F.; Molson, J. W.; Beaudoin, G.

    2013-12-01

    The huge amounts (GTs) of ultramafic mining residues (UMRs) produced by mining activities around the world and accumulated in multi-square-kilometer stockpiles are stimulating a vivid interest regarding their possible use as a stable and permanent sink for CO2. Virtually costless and often found crushed and / or ground, UMRs are being considered as ideal candidates for atmospheric CO2 mitigation. The present work, therefore, explores the potential of several UMRs available in Quebec (Thetford Mines, Asbestos, Nunavik, Amos, Otish Mountains), for carbonation under ambient conditions, as a cost-effective alternative to remove low-concentration CO2 from the atmosphere and alleviate global warming. Several experimental reactors have been built to specifically simulate various climatic changes at the laboratory scale. The impact of various environmental conditions to which the residues are subjected to in their storage location, including temperature variations, precipitation, flooding, drought, changing water saturation, oxygen gradient and CO2 diffusion have been thoroughly studied. Dry and heavy-rain periods are unsuitable for efficient CO2 sequestration. Low liquid saturation within UMRs pores favors carbonation by combining fast percolation of gaseous CO2, rapid dissemination of CO2 dissolved species and creation of highly reactive sites throughout the mining residue pile. Partly saturated samples were also found to exhibit lower gaseous CO2 breakthrough times across the mining residues. Warm periods significantly accelerate the rate of CO2 uptake as compared to cold periods, which, in contrast are characterized by heat generation levels that could possibly be exploited by low temperature geothermal systems. A temperature rise from 10 to 40 °C was accompanied by a ten-fold increase in initial reaction rate. The carbonation reaction caused a rise in UMRs temperature up to 4.9°C during experiments at a 10°C. The presence of oxygen in the reaction medium induces

  19. Effect of temperature and concentration on thermal conductivity and viscosity of ferrofluid loaded with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahsavar, A.; Saghafian, M.; Salimpour, M. R.; Shafii, M. B.

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the thermal conductivity and viscosity of a hybrid nanofluid containing tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles and gum arabic (GA) coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs), experimentally. The magnetic nanoparticles and CNTs are physically attached as the result of interaction between the TMAH and GA molecules. The morphology and structure of the samples are characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The experiments are carried out in the magnetic nanoparticles volume concentration range of 0.1-0.9 %, CNT volume concentration range of 0.05-1.35 % and the temperature range of 25-55 °C. The viscosity of the hybrid nanofluid increases with the increase of volume concentration, while it decreases with the increase of temperature. Besides, results show that hybrid nanofluid behaves as a shear thinning fluid. Furthermore, it is observed that the thermal conductivity of the hybrid nanofluid enhances with temperature and volume concentration.

  20. Relating urban airborne particle concentrations to shipping using carbon based elemental emission ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Graham R.; Juwono, Alamsyah M.; Friend, Adrian J.; Cheung, Hing-Cho; Stelcer, Eduard; Cohen, David; Ayoko, Godwin A.; Morawska, Lidia

    2014-10-01

    This study demonstrates a novel method for testing the hypothesis that variations in primary and secondary particle number concentration (PNC) in urban air are related to residual fuel oil combustion at a coastal port lying 30 km upwind, by examining the correlation between PNC and airborne particle composition signatures chosen for their sensitivity to the elemental contaminants present in residual fuel oil. Residual fuel oil combustion indicators were chosen by comparing the sensitivity of a range of concentration ratios to airborne emissions originating from the port. The most responsive were combinations of vanadium and sulphur concentration ([S], [V]) expressed as ratios with respect to black carbon concentration ([BC]). These correlated significantly with ship activity at the port and with the fraction of time during which the wind blew from the port. The average [V] when the wind was predominantly from the port was 0.52 ng m-3 (87%) higher than the average for all wind directions and 0.83 ng m-3 (280%) higher than that for the lowest vanadium yielding wind direction considered to approximate the natural background. Shipping was found to be the main source of V impacting urban air quality in Brisbane. However, contrary to the stated hypothesis, increases in PNC related measures did not correlate with ship emission indicators or ship traffic. Hence at this site ship emissions were not found to be a major contributor to PNC compared to other fossil fuel combustion sources such as road traffic, airport and refinery emissions.

  1. Physiological responses of Pinus sylvestris to changing carbon dioxide and ozone concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holopainen, T. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Science; Palomaeki, V. [Joensuu Univ. (Finland). Faculty of Forestry; Helmisaari, H.S. [Finnish Forest Research Inst., Helsinki (Finland)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The objective of this research is to study the effects of elevated ozone, carbon dioxide and their combination on ultrastructural, physiological and biochemical responses of Scots pine needles and how these effects are reflected to photosynthesis, carbohydrate and nutrient allocation and finally to shoot and root growth of trees. In addition the interactions of the studied trees and mycorrhizal fungi as well as insect herbivores are studied. The exposures have been running only for two growing periods and it seems necessary to continue the experiment over the third growing season in 1996. Since the analyses are partially incomplete, only preliminary conclusions are possible at the moment. The slightly increased shoot growth and needle width and increased amount of starch in chloroplasts point to the slight stimulating effect of elevated CO{sub 2} among the chamber treatments. Altogether the growth of the seedlings was best in the chamberless treatment indicating a negative chamber effect. The elevated ozone significantly increased the chlorotic mottling and overall yellowing of second year needles as well as caused increased density of chloroplast stroma and declined photosynthesis, all these responses being often related to ozone exposures. The ozone related responses appeared at both CO{sub 2} levels indicating no clear protection due to elevated CO{sub 2}. The ozone or carbon dioxide treatments were not able to significantly change nutrient concentrations, insect herbivory or carbon allocation among the secondary compounds of needles. A tendency of increased carbon allocation to fine roots due to ozone but not so clearly to CO{sub 2} was observed

  2. The concentration and isotopic composition of carbon in basaltic glasses from the Juan de Fuca Ridge, Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Jennifer G.; Delaney, John R.; Des Marais, David J.

    1993-01-01

    The abundance and C-13/C-12 ratios of carbon were analyzed in basaltic glass from twenty locations along the Juan de Fuca Ridge using a 3-step combustion/extraction technique. Carbon released during the first two combustion steps at 400-500 C and 600-650 C is interpreted to be secondary, and only the carbon recovered during a final combustion step at about 1200 C is thought to be indigenous to the samples. For carbon released at about 1200 C, glasses analyzed as 1-2 mm chips contained 23-146 ppm C with delta C-13 values of -4.8 to -9.3 per mil, whereas samples crushed to 38-63 microns or 63-90 microns yielded 56-103 ppm C with delta C-13 values of -6.1 to -9.2 per mil. The concentrations and isotopic compositions of the primary carbon dissolved in the glasses and present in the vesicles are similar to those previously reported for other ocean-ridge basalts. The Juan de Fuca basaltic magmas were not in equilibrium with respect to carbon when they erupted and quenched on the sea floor. Evidence of disequilibrium includes (1) a large range of carbon contents among glasses collected at similar depths, (2) a highly variable calculated carbon isotopic fractionation between melt and vapor determined by comparing crushed and uncrushed splits of the same sample, and (3) a lack of correlation between vesicle abundance, carbon concentration, and depth of eruption. Variations in carbon concentration and delta C-13 ratios along the ridge do not correlate with major element chemistry. The observed relationship between carbon concentrations and delta C-13 values may be explained by late-stage, variable degrees of open-system (Rayleigh-like) degassing.

  3. Elucidation of mechanism wear carbon steel with structure of martensite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Vakulenko

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of the paper is an estimation of degree of metal hardness change for the railway wheel with martensite structure during rolling. Methodology. As strength characteristic the Rockwell hardness is used. Wear tests were conducted in the conditions of normal loading with (10% and without sliding on the test equipment SMTs-2. Parameters of the fine crystalline structure (tetragonality degree of the crystalline grid, dislocation density, scale of coherent scattering regions, and disturbance value of the crystalline grid of second kind are determined by the methods of X-ray structural analysis. Findings. During operation of the railway wheels with different strength level, origin of defects on the wheel thread is caused by simultaneous action of both the friction forces and the cyclically changing loadings. Considering that formation of damage centers is largely determined by the state of metal volumes near the wheel thread, one should expect the differences in friction processes development at high contact stress for the wheels with different strength level and structural state. Originality. During the wear tests softening effect of carbon steel with martensite quenching structure is obtained. Softening effect equaled 3.5–7% from the level of quenched metal hardness. The softening effect is accompanied by the reduction of tetragonality degree of the crystalline structure of martensite, reduction of coherent scattering regions, dislocation density increase and crystalline grid disturbance of the second kind. Practical value. The results point out the necessity for further studies to clarify the resulted softening effect mechanism.

  4. Vibrational modes of ultrathin carbon nanomembrane mechanical resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xianghui, E-mail: zhang@physik.uni-bielefeld.de, E-mail: elke.scheer@uni-konstanz.de; Angelova, Polina; Gölzhäuser, Armin [Fakultät für Physik, Universität Bielefeld, 33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Waitz, Reimar; Yang, Fan; Lutz, Carolin; Scheer, Elke, E-mail: zhang@physik.uni-bielefeld.de, E-mail: elke.scheer@uni-konstanz.de [Fachbereich Physik, Universität Konstanz, 78457 Konstanz (Germany)

    2015-02-09

    We report measurements of vibrational mode shapes of mechanical resonators made from ultrathin carbon nanomembranes (CNMs) with a thickness of approximately 1 nm. CNMs are prepared from electron irradiation induced cross-linking of aromatic self-assembled monolayers and the variation of membrane thickness and/or density can be achieved by varying the precursor molecule. Single- and triple-layer freestanding CNMs were made by transferring them onto Si substrates with square/rectangular orifices. The vibration of the membrane was actuated by applying a sinusoidal voltage to a piezoelectric disk on which the sample was glued. The vibrational mode shapes were visualized with an imaging Mirau interferometer using a stroboscopic light source. Several mode shapes of a square membrane can be readily identified and their dynamic behavior can be well described by linear response theory of a membrane with negligible bending rigidity. By applying Fourier transformations to the time-dependent surface profiles, the dispersion relation of the transverse membrane waves can be obtained and its linear behavior verifies the membrane model. By comparing the dispersion relation to an analytical model, the static stress of the membranes was determined and found to be caused by the fabrication process.

  5. DTAF dye concentrations commonly used to measure microscale deformations in biological tissues alter tissue mechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spencer E Szczesny

    Full Text Available Identification of the deformation mechanisms and specific components underlying the mechanical function of biological tissues requires mechanical testing at multiple levels within the tissue hierarchical structure. Dichlorotriazinylaminofluorescein (DTAF is a fluorescent dye that is used to visualize microscale deformations of the extracellular matrix in soft collagenous tissues. However, the DTAF concentrations commonly employed in previous multiscale experiments (≥2000 µg/ml may alter tissue mechanics. The objective of this study was to determine whether DTAF affects tendon fascicle mechanics and if a concentration threshold exists below which any observed effects are negligible. This information is valuable for guiding the continued use of this fluorescent dye in future experiments and for interpreting the results of previous work. Incremental strain testing demonstrated that high DTAF concentrations (≥100 µg/ml increase the quasi-static modulus and yield strength of rat tail tendon fascicles while reducing their viscoelastic behavior. Subsequent multiscale testing and modeling suggests that these effects are due to a stiffening of the collagen fibrils and strengthening of the interfibrillar matrix. Despite these changes in tissue behavior, the fundamental deformation mechanisms underlying fascicle mechanics appear to remain intact, which suggests that conclusions from previous multiscale investigations of strain transfer are still valid. The effects of lower DTAF concentrations (≤10 µg/ml on tendon mechanics were substantially smaller and potentially negligible; nevertheless, no concentration was found that did not at least slightly alter the tissue behavior. Therefore, future studies should either reduce DTAF concentrations as much as possible or use other dyes/techniques for measuring microscale deformations.

  6. Influence of carbon nanotubes on mechanical properties and structure of rigid polyurethane foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciecierska, E.; Jurczyk-Kowalska, M.; Bazarnik, P.; Kulesza, M.; Lewandowska, M.; Kowalski, M.; Krauze, S.

    2014-08-01

    In this work, the influence of carbon nanotubes addition on foam structure and mechanical properties of rigid polyurethane foam/nanotube composites was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy was performed to reveal the foam porous structure and distribution of carbon nanotubes. To determine the mechanical properties, three point bending tests were carried out.

  7. Carbon materials with quasi-graphene layers: The dielectric, percolation properties and the electronic transport mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Ming-Ming; Yuan Jie; Wen Bo; Liu Jia; Cao Wen-Qiang; Cao Mao-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the dielectric properties of muhi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and graphite filling in SiO2 with the filling concentration of 2-20 wt.% in the frequency range of 102-107 Hz.M WCNTs and graphite have general electrical properties and percolation phenomena owing to their quasi-structure made up of graphene layers.Both permittivity ε and conductivity σ exhibit jumps around the percolation threshold.Variations of dielectric properties of the composites are in agreement with the percolation theory.All the percolation phenomena are determined by hopping and migrating electrons,which are attributed to the special electronic transport mechanism of the fillers in the composites.However,the twin-percolation phenomenon exists when the concentration of MWCNTs is between 5-10 wt.% and 15-20 wt.% in the MWCNTs/SiO2 composites,while in the graphite/SiO2 composites,there is only one percolation phenomenon in the graphite concentration of 10-15 wt.%.The unique twin-percolation phenomenon of MWCNTs/SiO2 is described and attributed to the electronic transfer mechanism,especially the network effect of MWCNTs in the composites.The network formation plays an essential role in determining the second percolation threshold of MWCNTs/SiO2.

  8. The effects of secular calcium and magnesium concentration changes on the thermodynamics of seawater acid/base chemistry: Implications for Eocene and Cretaceous ocean carbon chemistry and buffering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hain, Mathis P.; Sigman, Daniel M.; Higgins, John A.; Haug, Gerald H.

    2015-05-01

    Reconstructed changes in seawater calcium and magnesium concentration ([Ca2+], [Mg2+]) predictably affect the ocean's acid/base and carbon chemistry. Yet inaccurate formulations of chemical equilibrium "constants" are currently in use to account for these changes. Here we develop an efficient implementation of the MIAMI Ionic Interaction Model to predict all chemical equilibrium constants required for carbon chemistry calculations under variable [Ca2+] and [Mg2+]. We investigate the impact of [Ca2+] and [Mg2+] on the relationships among the ocean's pH, CO2, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), saturation state of CaCO3 (Ω), and buffer capacity. Increasing [Ca2+] and/or [Mg2+] enhances "ion pairing," which increases seawater buffering by increasing the concentration ratio of total to "free" (uncomplexed) carbonate ion. An increase in [Ca2+], however, also causes a decline in carbonate ion to maintain a given Ω, thereby overwhelming the ion pairing effect and decreasing seawater buffering. Given the reconstructions of Eocene [Ca2+] and [Mg2+] ([Ca2+]~20 mM; [Mg2+]~30 mM), Eocene seawater would have required essentially the same DIC as today to simultaneously explain a similar-to-modern Ω and the estimated Eocene atmospheric CO2 of ~1000 ppm. During the Cretaceous, at ~4 times modern [Ca2+], ocean buffering would have been at a minimum. Overall, during times of high seawater [Ca2+], CaCO3 saturation, pH, and atmospheric CO2 were more susceptible to perturbations of the global carbon cycle. For example, given both Eocene and Cretaceous seawater [Ca2+] and [Mg2+], a doubling of atmospheric CO2 would require less carbon addition to the ocean/atmosphere system than under modern seawater composition. Moreover, increasing seawater buffering since the Cretaceous may have been a driver of evolution by raising energetic demands of biologically controlled calcification and CO2 concentration mechanisms that aid photosynthesis.

  9. Characterization of Carbon Mat Thermoplastic Composites: Flow and Mechanical Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Caba, Aaron C.

    2005-01-01

    Carbon mat thermoplastics (CMT) consisting of 12.7 mm or 25.4 mm long, 7.2 micrometer diameter, chopped carbon fibers in a polypropylene (PP) or poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) thermoplastic matrix were manufactured using the wetlay technique. This produces a porous mat with the carbon fibers well dispersed and randomly oriented in a plane. CMT composites offer substantial cost and weight savings over typical steel construction in new automotive applications. In production vehicles, aut...

  10. A comparison of atmospheric composition using the Carbon Bond and Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sarwar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We incorporate the recently developed Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (version 2, RACM2 into the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system for comparison with the existing 2005 Carbon Bond mechanism with updated toluene chemistry (CB05TU. Compared to CB05TU, RACM2 enhances the domain-wide monthly mean hydroxyl radical concentrations by 46% and nitric acid by 26%. However, it reduces hydrogen peroxide by 2%, peroxyacetic acid by 94%, methyl hydrogen peroxide by 19%, peroxyacetyl nitrate by 40%, and organic nitrate by 41%. RACM2 predictions generally agree better with the observed data than the CB05TU predictions. RACM2 enhances ozone for all ambient levels leading to higher bias at low (70 ppbv concentrations. The RACM2 ozone predictions are also supported by increased ozone production efficiency that agrees better with observations. Compared to CB05TU, RACM2 enhances the domain-wide monthly mean sulfate by 10%, nitrate by 6%, ammonium by 10%, anthropogenic secondary organic aerosols by 42%, biogenic secondary organic aerosols by 5%, and in-cloud secondary organic aerosols by 7%. Increased inorganic and organic aerosols with RACM2 agree better with observed data. While RACM2 enhances ozone and secondary aerosols by relatively large margins, control strategies developed for ozone or fine particles using the two mechanisms do not differ appreciably.

  11. Optimization of interfacial microstructure and mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composites via carbon nanotube sizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Hongwei; Sui, Xianhang; Zhao, Zhongbo; Xu, Zhiwei; Chen, Lei, E-mail: chenlei@tjpu.edu.cn; Deng, Hui; Liu, Ya; Qian, Xiaoming, E-mail: qianxiaoming@tjpu.edu.cn

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • Multiple sizing treatments were used to modify the surface of carbon fiber with carbon nanotubes. • The distribution state of carbon nanotubes in interface had a great effect on the performance of carbon fiber composites. • Interfacial microstructure changes brought by sizing treatment were detected by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atomic force microscope. • Gradient interphase composed of carbon nanotubes and epoxy was favorable to improve the mechanical properties of carbon composites. - Abstract: Repetitious sizing treatment was used to modify the carbon fiber (CF) surface with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for improving interfacial properties of CF/epoxy composites. Interlaminar shear and flexural results showed that mechanical properties of composites were significantly depended on the dispersion state and contents of CNTs in interfacial regions. Increases of 13.45% in interlaminar shear strength and 20.31% in flexural strength were achieved in quintuple sized-CF/epoxy composites, whereas excessive CNTs led to decrease of interfacial performance due to defects induced by agglomerated CNTs. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and force modulation atomic force microscope were used to detect the structure of interfacial phase and results indicated that gradient interfacial structure with various thicknesses was formed due to CNT incorporation. This means that such a simple and efficient method to improve interfacial performance of composites via regulating the fiber–matrix interphase structure was developed and showed great commercial application potential.

  12. Observation of vertical variability of black carbon concentration in lower troposphere on campaigns in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilinski, M. T.; Markowicz, K. M.; Markowicz, J.

    2016-07-01

    This study presents two methods for observation of black carbon (BC) vertical profiles in lower troposphere based on the micro-aethalometer AE-51. In the first method micro-aethalometer was carried by observer along trail on slope of mountain valley. Second method uses unmanned aerial vehicle as a platform for collecting data up to 1500 m above ground. Our study presents vertical profiles collected in and above Subcarphatian Wislok valley. Profiles measured on trial on slopes of Wislok valley, were collected during strong smog conditions during autumn/winter season, when BC concentration reached values above 60 μg/m3. The smog intensive layer is usually close to the surface (up to 100 m) as a results of surface inversion and the mountain breeze circulation, which during the night transports air pollution emitted from houses toward the valley's bottom. Usually the vertical profiles of BC concentration show significant reduction with the altitude, however, some multilayered structures are also observed during night time inversion conditions. It has found that smog condition can develop in clean air mass, and in those cases local pollution has significant impact on the columnar aerosol properties. During such conditions the aerosol optical depth shows diurnal cycle which is rather not observed in the long-term data. UAV flights in the lower troposphere were conducted during two sessions, one with clean polar air masses (BC concentration < 1 μg/m3) and second with moderate aerosol conditions (BC concentration 1-5 μg/m3). Profile of BC concentration shows stratification of absorbing aerosols in a shape of multi-layer structures similarly to the lidar/ceilometer signals.

  13. An analysis of continuous black carbon concentrations in proximity to an airport and major roadways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, Robin E.; Andres Houseman, E.; Morin, Barbara; Levy, Jonathan I.

    Black carbon (BC), a constituent of particulate matter, is emitted from multiple combustion sources, complicating determination of contributions from individual sources or source categories from monitoring data. In close proximity to an airport, this may include aircraft emissions, other emissions on the airport grounds, and nearby major roadways, and it would be valuable to determine the factors most strongly related to measured BC concentrations. In this study, continuous BC concentrations were measured at five monitoring sites in proximity to a small regional airport in Warwick, Rhode Island from July 2005 to August 2006. Regression was used to model the relative contributions of aircraft and related sources, using real-time flight activity (departures and arrivals) and meteorological data, including mixing height, wind speed and direction. The latter two were included as a nonparametric smooth spatial term using thin-plate splines applied to wind velocity vectors and fit in a linear mixed model framework. Standard errors were computed using a moving-block bootstrap to account for temporal autocorrelation. Results suggest significant positive associations between hourly departures and arrivals at the airport and BC concentrations within the community, with departures having a more substantial impact. Generalized Additive Models for wind speed and direction were consistent with significant contributions from the airport, major highway, and multiple local roads. Additionally, inverse mixing height, temperature, precipitation, and at one location relative humidity, were associated with BC concentrations. Median contribution estimates indicate that aircraft departures and arrivals (and other sources coincident in space and time) contribute to approximately 24-28% of the BC concentrations at the monitoring sites in the community. Our analysis demonstrated that a regression-based approach with detailed meteorological and source characterization can provide insights

  14. Arsenic Adsorption Equilibrium Concentration and Adsorption Rate of Activated Carbon Coated with Ferric-Aluminum Hydroxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M.; Sugita, H.; Oguma, T.; Hara, J.; Takahashi, S.

    2015-12-01

    In some areas of developing countries, ground or well water contaminated with arsenic has been reluctantly used as drinking water. It is highly desirable that effective and inexpensive arsenic removal agents should be developed and provided to reduce the potential health risk. Previous studies demonstrated that activated carbon coated with ferric-aluminum hydroxides (Fe-Al-C) has high adsorptive potential for removal of arsenic. In this study, a series of experiments using Fe-Al-C were carried to discuss adsorption equilibrium time, adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorption rate of arsenic for Fe-Al-C. Fe-Al-C used in this study was provided by Astec Co., Ltd. Powder reagent of disodium hydrogen arsenate heptahydrate was dissolved into ion-exchanged water. The solution was then further diluted with ion-exchanged water to be 1 and 10 mg/L as arsenic concentration. The pH of the solution was adjusted to be around 7 by adding HCl and/or NaOH. The solution was used as artificial arsenic contaminated water in two types of experiments (arsenic adsorption equilibrium and arsenic adsorption rate tests). The results of the arsenic equilibrium tests were showed that a time period of about 3 days to reach apparent adsorption equilibrium for arsenic. The apparent adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorbed amount of arsenic on Fe-Al-C adsorbent could be estimated by application of various adsorption isotherms, but the distribution coefficient of arsenic between solid and liquid varies with experimental conditions such as initial concentration of arsenic and addition concentration of adsorbent. An adsorption rate equation that takes into account the reduction in the number of effective adsorption sites on the adsorbent caused by the arsenic adsorption reaction was derived based on the data obtained from the arsenic adsorption rate tests.

  15. Comparison of black carbon (BC) aerosols in two urban areas - concentrations and size distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitzenberger, R.; Tohno, S.

    In this study, the BC aerosol measured at two very different urban sites is compared in terms of concentration, seasonal variation, and size distribution. During a 14 month study, one impactor sample was performed each month on a day with typical meteorological conditions. One (Vienna) or three (Uji) filter samples were obtained during the sampling time of the impactors. BC concentration in both the filter and impactor samples was analyzed with an optical technique (integrating sphere technique), where a calibration curve obtained from commercial carbon black is used to convert the optical signal to BC mass. Gravimetric mass concentration was measured at both sites. The gravimetric mass size distribution was measured only in Vienna. At both sites, the yearly average of the BC concentration on the sampling days was around 5 μg m -3. In Vienna, some seasonal trend with high concentrations during the cold season was observed, while in Uji, no pronounced seasonal trend was found. The BC size distribution in Uji was distinctly bimodal in the submicron size range. Log-normal distributions were fitted through the impactor data. The average BC mass median diameters (MMD) of the two submicron modes were 0.15 and 0.39 μm. Each mode contained about the same amount of BC mass. In Vienna only one submicron BC mode (average MMD 0.3 μm) was found because of the low size resolution of the impactor. An analysis of humidity effects on the MMDs of BC (both sites) and gravimetric mass (Vienna only) indicates that the Vienna aerosol is partly mixed internally with respect to BC, while the Uji aerosol seems to be externally mixed.

  16. Black carbon concentrations across the tropical Atlantic boundary layer using three methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, K.; Lohmann, R.; Cantwell, M.; Herckes, P.

    2012-12-01

    24 particulate black carbon (BC) samples were quantified using three methods: a chemo-thermal oxidation at 375°C (CTO-375), a thermal optical transition method (Sunset Method), and pyrene fluorescence loss (PFL). BC samples were taken using a high-volume air sampler aboard the R/V Endeavor during the summer of 2010 in the Equatorial Atlantic Ocean in order to sample the aeolian "hotspot" plume of aerosols that extend from the African continent. Models have shown that annual elemental carbon (EC) deposition fluxes in this area could be as high as 25μg cm-2 a-1, which may be a significant contribution to the overall carbon budget as well as climate forcing simulations. Expected BC concentrations for this area, based on a global BC inventory using the MOGUNTIA global transport model, range between 0.01-1μg/m3 depending on season. The CTO-375 processed samples were run on an IRMS to get the total organic carbon (TOC), BC concentrations, and δ13C isotope ratios. BC was detected in every sample and concentrations ranged between 0.16-9.97μg/m3. BC concentrations were highest off the coast of the US and Caribbean islands but were lower (0.16-0.26μg/m3) in the African plume sampled between 1-5°N and 21-29°W. BC comprised between 13-81% of the TOC pool and δ13C isotopes between the TOC and BC for each sample differed by no more than 3‰. The TOC and BC pools average was -28.9‰ and -28.1‰ respectively, suggesting a C4 plant origin. A different isotope trend was evident for samples 16-19 (African plume). Their δ13C average was -23.1‰ for TOC, suggesting a mostly marine origin of the organic carbon or a mix of marine with C3 and C4 plants. This supports the observed lower BC/TOC ratio in these samples (13-50%). EC concentrations determined by the Sunset Method ranged between 0-0.32μg/m3, with EC being detected in only 8 of the 24 samples. In general, EC was found above the detection limit near the United States coastline or in the "hotspot" plume off Africa

  17. DFT Thermodynamic Research of the Pyrolysis Mechanism of the Carbon Matrix Precursor Toluene for Carbon Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Based on the experiments, the standard enthalpy △H of the possible pyrolysis reactions of the carbon matrix precursor toluene was investigated by means of DFT method UB3LYP/ 3-21G* (based on semi-empirical method UAM1 and ab initio method UHF/3-21G* ). The com putation results with UB3LYP/3-21G* coincide with the experimental values well. Then, the mechanism for all types of the pyrolysis reactions of toluene was studied by UB3LYP/3-2lG*. The geometries of the reactant and the product radicals were optimized, meanwhile, the standard thermodynamic parameters of the pyrolysis reaction at different temperatures (298, 773, 843, 963 and 1 073 K) were calculated. The thermodynamic computation result shows that when the pyrolysis temperature of toluene is lower than 963 K, the reaction path supported by thermody namics is that the C-H bond of the methyl on the benzene ring breaks and bitoluene form, while the temperature increases (about 1 073 K), the thermodynamic calculation result turns to sup port the reaction path producing phenyl radicals and methyl radicals. This mechanism is in accord with the experiments.

  18. Towards understanding the carbon trapping mechanism in copper by investigating the carbon-vacancy interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Hong-Bo; Jin Shuo

    2013-01-01

    We propose a vacancy trapping mechanism for carbon-vacancy (C-V) complex formation in copper (Cu) according to the first-principles calculations of the energetics and kinetics of C-V interaction.Vacancy reduces charge density in its vicinity to induce C nucleation.A monovacancy is capable of trapping as many as four C atoms to form CnV (n =1,2,3,4)complexes.A single C atom prefers to interact with neighboring Cu at a vacancy with a trapping energy of-0.21 eV.With multiple C atoms added,they are preferred to bind with each other to form covalent-like bonds despite of the metallic Cu environment.For the CnV complexes,C2V is the major one due to its lowest average trapping energy (1.31 eV).Kinetically,the formation of the CnV complexes can be ascribed to the vacancy mechanism due to the lower activation energy barrier and the larger diffusion coefficient of vacancy than those of the interstitial C.

  19. Consequences of brief exposure to high concentrations of carbon monoxide in conscious rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zengfa; Januszkiewicz, Adolph J; Mayorga, Maria A; Coleman, Gary D; Morrissette, Craig R

    2005-12-01

    Exposure to high-concentration carbon monoxide (CO) is of concern in military operations. Experimentally, the physiologic manifestations of a brief exposure to elevated levels of CO have not been fully described. This study investigated the development of acute CO poisoning in conscious male Sprague-Dawley rats (220-380 g). Animals were randomly grouped (n = 6) and exposed to either air or 1 of 6 CO concentrations (1000, 3000, 6000, 10,000, 12,000, or 24,000 ppm) in a continuous air/CO dynamic exposure chamber for 5 min. Respiration was recorded prior to and during exposures. Mixed blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) and pH were measured before and immediately after exposure. Before exposure the mean baselines of respiratory minute volumes (RMVs) were 312.6 +/- 43.9, 275.2 +/- 40.8, and 302.3 +/- 39.1 ml/min for the 10,000, 12,000 and 24,000 ppm groups, respectively. In the last minute of exposure RMVs were 118.9 +/- 23.7, 62.1 +/- 10.4, and 22.0 +/- 15.1% (p 82%. Blood pH was unaltered and no death occurred in rats exposed to CO at concentrations 10,000 ppm for brief periods as short as 5 min may change RMV, resulting in acute respiratory failure, acidemia, and even death.

  20. Using ANN and EPR models to predict carbon monoxide concentrations in urban area of Tabriz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Shakerkhatibi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Forecasting of air pollutants has become a popular topic of environmental research today. For this purpose, the artificial neural network (AAN technique is widely used as a reliable method for forecasting air pollutants in urban areas. On the other hand, the evolutionary polynomial regression (EPR model has recently been used as a forecasting tool in some environmental issues. In this research, we compared the ability of these models to forecast carbon monoxide (CO concentrations in the urban area of Tabriz city. Methods: The dataset of CO concentrations measured at the fixed stations operated by the East Azerbaijan Environmental Office along with meteorological data obtained from the East Azerbaijan Meteorological Bureau from March 2007 to March 2013, were used as input for the ANN and EPR models. Results: Based on the results, the performance of ANN is more reliable in comparison with EPR. Using the ANN model, the correlation coefficient values at all monitoring stations were calculated above 0.85. Conversely, the R2 values for these stations were obtained <0.41 using the EPR model. Conclusion: The EPR model could not overcome the nonlinearities of input data. However, the ANN model displayed more accurate results compared to the EPR. Hence, the ANN models are robust tools for predicting air pollutant concentrations.

  1. Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Schuller; Frank Little; Darren Malik; Matt Betts; Qian Shao; Jun Luo; Wan Zhong; Sandhya Shankar; Ashwin Padmanaban

    2012-03-30

    We demonstrated that adding nanoparticles to a molten salt would increase its utility as a thermal energy storage medium for a concentrating solar power system. Specifically, we demonstrated that we could increase the specific heat of nitrate and carbonate salts containing 1% or less of alumina nanoparticles. We fabricated the composite materials using both evaporative and air drying methods. We tested several thermophysical properties of the composite materials, including the specific heat, thermal conductivity, latent heat, and melting point. We also assessed the stability of the composite material with repeated thermal cycling and the effects of adding the nanoparticles on the corrosion of stainless steel by the composite salt. Our results indicate that stable, repeatable 25-50% improvements in specific heat are possible for these materials. We found that using these composite salts as the thermal energy storage material for a concentrating solar thermal power system can reduce the levelized cost of electricity by 10-20%. We conclude that these materials are worth further development and inclusion in future concentrating solar power systems.

  2. Concentration Effect of Reducing Agents on Green Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles: Size, Morphology, and Growth Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-seok; Seo, Yu Seon; Kim, Kyeounghak; Han, Jeong Woo; Park, Youmie; Cho, Seonho

    2016-04-01

    Under various concentration conditions of reducing agents during the green synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), we obtain the various geometry (morphology and size) of AuNPs that play a crucial role in their catalytic properties. Through both theoretical and experimental approaches, we studied the relationship between the concentration of reducing agent (caffeic acid) and the geometry of AuNPs. As the concentration of caffeic acid increases, the sizes of AuNPs were decreased due to the adsorption and stabilizing effect of oxidized caffeic acids (OXCAs). Thus, it turns out that optimal concentration exists for the desired geometry of AuNPs. Furthermore, we investigated the growth mechanism for the green synthesis of AuNPs. As the caffeic acid is added and adsorbed on the surface of AuNPs, the aggregation mechanism and surface free energy are changed and consequently resulted in the AuNPs of various geometry.

  3. Carbon nanotubes reinforced chitosan films: mechanical properties and cell response of a novel biomaterial for cardiovascular tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroustalli, A; Zisimopoulou, A E; Koch, S; Rongen, L; Deligianni, D; Diamantouros, S; Athanassiou, G; Kokozidou, M; Mavrilas, D; Jockenhoevel, S

    2013-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been proposed as fillers to reinforce polymeric biomaterials for the strengthening of their structural integrity to achieve better biomechanical properties. In this study, a new polymeric composite material was introduced by incorporating various low concentrations of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into chitosan (CS), aiming at achieving a novel composite biomaterial with superior mechanical and biological properties compared to neat CS, in order to be used in cardiovascular tissue engineering applications. Both mechanical and biological characteristics in contact with the two relevant cell types (endothelial cells and vascular myofibroblasts) were studied. Regarding the mechanical behavior of MWCNT reinforced CS (MWCNT/CS), 5 and 10 % concentrations of MWCNTs enhanced the mechanical behavior of CS, with that of 5 % exhibiting a superior mechanical strength compared to 10 % concentration and neat CS. Regarding biological properties, MWCNT/CS best supported proliferation of endothelial and myofibroblast cells, MWCNTs and MWCNT/CS caused no apoptosis and were not toxic of the examined cell types. Conclusively, the new material could be suitable for tissue engineering (TE) and particularly for cardiovascular TE applications.

  4. The effect of atmospheric CO2 concentration on carbon isotope fractionation in C3 land plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Brian A.; Jahren, A. Hope

    2012-11-01

    Because atmospheric carbon dioxide is the ultimate source of all land-plant carbon, workers have suggested that pCO2 level may exert control over the amount of 13C incorporated into plant tissues. However, experiments growing plants under elevated pCO2 in both chamber and field settings, as well as meta-analyses of ecological and agricultural data, have yielded a wide range of estimates for the effect of pCO2 on the net isotopic discrimination (Δδ13Cp) between plant tissue (δ13Cp) and atmospheric CO2 (δ13CCO2). Because plant stomata respond sensitively to plant water status and simultaneously alter the concentration of pCO2 inside the plant (ci) relative to outside the plant (ca), any experiment that lacks environmental control over water availability across treatments could result in additional isotopic variation sufficient to mask or cancel the direct influence of pCO2 on Δδ13Cp. We present new data from plant growth chambers featuring enhanced dynamic stabilization of moisture availability and relative humidity, in addition to providing constant light, nutrient, δ13CCO2, and pCO2 level for up to four weeks of plant growth. Within these chambers, we grew a total of 191 C3 plants (128 Raphanus sativus plants and 63 Arabidopsis thaliana) across fifteen levels of pCO2 ranging from 370 to 4200 ppm. Three types of plant tissue were harvested and analyzed for carbon isotope value: above-ground tissues, below-ground tissues, and leaf-extracted nC31-alkanes. We observed strong hyperbolic correlations (R ⩾ 0.94) between the pCO2 level and Δδ13Cp for each type of plant tissue analyzed; furthermore the linear relationships previously suggested by experiments across small (10-350 ppm) changes in pCO2 (e.g., 300-310 ppm or 350-700 ppm) closely agree with the amount of fractionation per ppm increase in pCO2 calculated from our hyperbolic relationship. In this way, our work is consistent with, and provides a unifying relationship for, previous work on carbon isotopes

  5. Hybrid direct carbon fuel cells and their reaction mechanisms - a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleebeeck, Lisa; Kammer Hansen, Kent

    2014-01-01

    with carbon capture and storage (CCS) due to the high purity of CO2 emitted in the exhaust gas. Direct carbon (or coal) fuel cells (DCFCs) are directly fed with solid carbon to the anode chamber. The fuel cell converts the carbon at the anode and the oxygen at the cathode into electricity, heat and reaction...... is discussed on the fuel cell stack and system levels. The range of DCFC types can be roughly broken down into four fuel cell types: aqueous hydroxide, molten hydroxide, molten carbonate and solid oxide fuel cells. Emphasis is placed on the electrochemical reactions occurring at the anode and the proposed...... mechanism(s) of these reactions for molten carbonate, solid oxide and hybrid direct carbon fuel cells. Additionally, the criteria of choosing the ‘best’ DCFC technology is explored, including system design (continuous supply of solid fuel), performance (power density, efficiency), environmental burden...

  6. Carbon Nanotube Based Nano-Electro-Mechanical Systems (NEMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie; Dai, Hongjie; Saini, Subhash

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) enable nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) because of their inherent nanostructure, intrinsic electric conductivity and mechanical resilience. The collaborative work between Stanford (experiment) and NASA Ames (theory and simulation) has made progress in two types of CNT based NEMS for nanoelectronics and sensor applications. The CNT tipped scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is a NEMS in which CNT tips are used for nanoscale probing, imaging and manipulating. It showed great improvement in probing surfaces and biological systems over conventional tips. We have recently applied it to write (lithography) and read (image) uniform SiO2 lines on large Si surface area at speed up to 0.5 mm per s. Preliminary work using approximately 10 nm multiwall nanotube tips produced approximately 10 nm structures and showed that the CNT tips didn't wear down when crashed as conventional tips often do. This presents a solution to the long standing tip-wear problem in SPM nanolithography. We have also explored potential of CNT tips in imaging DNA in water. Preliminary experiment using 10 nm CNT tips reached 5 nm resolution. The 1 nm nanolithography and 1 nm DNA imaging can be expected by using approximately 1 nm CNT tips. In contrast to CNT tipped SPM, we also fabricated CNT devices on silicon wafer in which CNTs connect patterned metallic lines on SiO2/Si by a simple chemical vapor deposition process. Using conventional lithography for silicon wafer, we have been able to obtain CNT based transistors and sensors. Investigations of the CNT NEMS as physical, biological and chemical sensors are in progress and will be discussed.

  7. Densification mechanism of chemical vapor infiltration technology for carbon/carbon composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian-xun; XIONG Xiang; HUANG Qi-zhong; YI Mao-zhong; HUANG Bai-yun

    2007-01-01

    Carbon/carbon composites were fabricated using pressure-gradient chemical vapor infiltration(CVI) technology with propane (C3H6) as the carbon precursor gas and nitrogen (N2) as the carrier gas. The chemical process of deposition of pyrolytic carbon was deduced by analyzing the component of molecules in gas phase and observing the microstructure of deposition carbon. The results show that the process of deposition starts from the breakdown of C-C single bond of propene (C3H6), and forms two kinds of active groups in the heterogeneous gas phase reaction. Afterwards, these active groups form many stable bigger molecules and deposit on carbon fiber surface. At the same time, hydrogen atoms of the bigger molecules absorbed on carbon fiber surface are eliminated and the solid pyrolytic carbon matrix is formed in the heterogeneous reaction process.

  8. Contribution of picoplankton to the total particulate organic carbon (POC concentration in the eastern South Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Grob

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus, picophytoeukaryotes and bacterioplankton abundances and contributions to the total particulate organic carbon concentration (POC, derived from the total particle beam attenuation coefficient (cp, were determined across the eastern South Pacific between the Marquesas Islands and the coast of Chile. All flow cytometrically derived abundances decreased towards the hyper-oligotrophic centre of the gyre and were highest at the coast, except for Prochlorococcus, which is not detected under eutrophic conditions. Temperature and nutrient availability appeared important in modulating picophytoplankton abundance, according to the prevailing trophic conditions. Although the non-vegetal particles tended to dominate the cp signal everywhere along the transect (50 to 83%, this dominance seemed to weaken from oligo- to eutrophic conditions, the contributions by vegetal and non-vegetal particles being about equal under mature upwelling conditions. Spatial variability in the vegetal compartment was more important than the non-vegetal one in shaping the water column particulate attenuation coefficient. Spatial variability in picophytoplankton biomass could be traced by changes in both Tchla and cp. Finally, picophytoeukaryotes contributed with ~38% on average to the total integrated phytoplankton carbon biomass or vegetal attenuation signal along the transect, as determined by direct size measurements on cells sorted by flow cytometry and optical theory. The role of picophytoeukaryotes in carbon and energy flow would therefore be very important, even under hyper-oligotrophic conditions.

  9. Effect of Phosphoric Acid Concentration on the Characteristics of Sugarcane Bagasse Activated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib, M. R. M.; Suraya, W. M. S. W.; Rafidah, H.; Amirza, A. R. M.; Attahirah, M. H. M. N.; Hani, M. S. N. Q.; Adnan, M. S.

    2016-07-01

    Impregnation method is one of the crucial steps involved in producing activated carbon using chemical activation process. Chemicals employed in this step is effective at decomposing the structure of material and forming micropores that helps in adsorption of contaminants. This paper explains thorough procedures that have been involved in producing sugarcane bagasse activated carbon (SBAC) by using 5%, 10%, 20%, 30% phosphoric acid (H3PO4) during the impregnation step. Concentration of H3PO4 used in the process of producing SBAC was optimized through several tests including bulk density, ash content, iodine adsorption and pore size diameter and the charactesristic of optimum SBAC produced has been compared with commercial activated carbon (CAC). Batch study has been carried out by using the SBAC produced from optimum condition to investigate the performance of SBAC in removal of turbidity and chemical oxygen demand (COD) from textile wastewater. From characteristic study, SBAC with 30% H3PO4 has shown the optimum value of bulk density, ash content, iodine adsorption and pore size diameter of 0.3023 g cm-3, 4.35%, 974.96 mg/g and 0.21-0.41 µm, respectively. These values are comparable to the characteristics of CAC. Experimental result from the batch study has been concluded that the SBAC has a promising potential in removing turbidity and COD of 75.5% and 66.3%, respectively which was a slightly lower than CAC which were able to remove 82.8% of turbidity and 70% of COD. As a conclusion, the SBAC is comparable with CAC in terms of their characteristics and the capability of removing contaminants from textile wastewater. Therefore, it has a commercial value to be used as an alternative of low-cost material in producing CAC.

  10. Particle concentration and flux dynamics in the atmospheric boundary layer as the indicator of formation mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauros, J.; Sogachev, Andrey; Smolander, S.;

    2011-01-01

    vertical profile of particle number concentration does not correspond to observations. Instead organic induced nucleation leads to good agreement confirming the relevance of the aerosol formation mechanism including organic compounds emitted by the biosphere. The simulation of aerosol concentration within......We carried out column model simulations to study particle fluxes and deposition and to evaluate different particle formation mechanisms at a boreal forest site in Finland. We show that kinetic nucleation of sulphuric acid cannot be responsible for new particle formation alone as the simulated...

  11. Numerical Study on the Acetylene Concentration in the Hydrogen-Carbon System in a Hydrogen Plasma Torch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Longwei; SHEN Jie; SHU Xingsheng; FANG Shidong; ZHANG Lipeng; MENG Yuedong

    2009-01-01

    Effects of the hydrogen/carbon mole ratio and pyrolysis gas pressure on the acetylene concentration in the hydrogen-carbon system in a plasma torch were numerically calculated by using the chemical thermodynamic equilibrium method of Gibbs free energy. The calculated results indicate that the hydrogen concentration and the pyrolysis gas pressure play crucial roles in acetylene formation. Appropriately abundant hydrogen, with a mole ratio of hydrogen to carbon about 1 or 2, and a relatively high pyrolysis gas pressure can enhance the acetylene concentration. In the experiment, a compromised project consisting of an appropriate hydrogen flow rate and a feasible high pyrolysis gas pressure needs to be carried out to increase the acetylene concentration from coal pyrolysis in the hydrogen plasma torch.

  12. Effect of initial glucose concentrations on carbon material and energy balances in hydrogen-producing Clostridium tyrobutyricum JM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Ji Hye; Lee, Dae Sung; Kim, Junhoon; Park, Jong Moon

    2009-03-01

    The carbon metabolism of newly isolated Clostridium tyrobutyricum JM1 was investigated at varying initial glucose concentrations (27.8-333.6mM). Because an understanding of metabolic regulations was required to provide guidance for further effective metabolic design or optimization, in this case, maximizing hydrogen production, carbon material, and energy balances by C. tyrobutyricum JM1 were determined and applied in anaerobic glucose metabolism. The overall carbon distribution suggested that initial glucose concentrations had strong influence on the stoichiometric coefficients of products and the molar production of ATP on the formation of biomass. C. tyrobutyricum JM1 had a high capacity for hydrogen production at the initial glucose concentration of 222.4 mM with high concentrations of acetate and butyrate.

  13. Mechanical properties and failure mechanisms of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy laminated composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thissell, W.R.; Zurek, A.K.; Addessio, F.

    1995-09-01

    The mechanical behavior of quasi-isotropic and unidirectional epoxy-matrix carbon-fiber laminated composites subjected compressive loading at strain rates of 10{sup {minus}3} and 2000 s{sup {minus}1} are described. Failure in the studied composites was dominated by delamination which proceeded by brittle fracture of the epoxy-matrix. The matrix-fiber bonding in these composites is very strong and prevented the occurrence of significant fiber-pullout. The mode I delamination strain energy release rate of the unidirectional composites was determined using the double cantilever beam and hole in plate compression method. The DCB method indicated a significant R curve effect attributed to fiber bridging while the presently available hole in plate analytical methods show questionable validity for highly anisotropic materials.

  14. Mechanical properties, microscopy, and failure mechanisms of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy laminated composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thissell, W.R.; Zurek, A.K.; Addessio, F.

    1995-12-31

    The mechanical behavior of quasi-isotropic and unidirectional epoxy- matrix carbon-fiber laminated composites subjected to compressive loading at strain rates of 10{sup {minus}3} and 2000 s{sup {minus}1} are described. Failure in the studied composites was dominated by delamination which proceeded by brittle fracture of the epoxy matrix. The matrix-fiber bonding in these composites is very strong and prevented the occurrence of significant fiber-pullout. The mode I delamination strain energy release rate of the unidirectional composites was determined using the double cantilever beam and hole in plate compression methods. The DCB method indicated a significant R curve effect attributed to fiber bridging while the presently available hole in plate analytical methods show questionable validity for highly anisotropic materials.

  15. Observations of the uptake of carbonyl sulfide (COS by trees under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sandoval-Soto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Global change affects ecosystems to adapt to elevated atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2. We understand that carbonyl sulfide (COS, a trace gas which is involved in building up the stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer, is taken up by vegetation with the same triad of the enzmyes which are metabolizing the CO2, i.e. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylase-Oxygenase (Rubisco, Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase (PEP-Co and carbonic anhydrase (CA. Therefore, we discuss a physiological/biochemical adaptation of these enzymes to affect the sink strength of vegetation for COS. We investigated the adaption of two European tree species, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus ilex, grown inside chambers under elevated CO2 and determined the exchange characteristics and the content of CA after a 1–2 yr period of adaption from 350 ppm to 800 ppm CO2. We could demonstrate that the COS compensation point, the CA activity and the deposition velocities may change and cause a decrease of the COS uptake by plant ecosystems. As a consequence, the atmospheric COS level may rise leading to higher input of this trace gas into the stratosphere and causing a higher energy reflection by the stratospheric sulfur aerosol into space, thus counteracting the direct radiative forcing by the tropospheric COS.

  16. Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations before 2.2 billion years ago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rye, R.; Kuo, P. H.; Holland, H. D.

    1995-01-01

    The composition of the Earth's early atmosphere is a subject of continuing debate. In particular, it has been suggested that elevated concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide would have been necessary to maintain normal surface temperatures in the face of lower solar luminosity in early Earth history. Fossil weathering profiles, known as palaeosols, have provided semi-quantitative constraints on atmospheric oxygen partial pressure (pO2) before 2.2 Gyr ago. Here we use the same well studied palaeosols to constrain atmospheric pCO2 between 2.75 and 2.2 Gyr ago. The observation that iron lost from the tops of these profiles was reprecipitated lower down as iron silicate minerals, rather than as iron carbonate, indicates that atmospheric pCO2 must have been less than 10(-1.4) atm--about 100 times today's level of 360 p.p.m., and at least five times lower than that required in one-dimensional climate models to compensate for lower solar luminosity at 2.75 Gyr. Our results suggest that either the Earth's early climate was much more sensitive to increases in pCO2 than has been thought, or that one or more greenhouse gases other than CO2 contributed significantly to the atmosphere's radiative balance during the late Archaean and early Proterozoic eons.

  17. Possible source of ancient carbon in phytolith concentrates from harvested grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, G. M.; Alexandre, A.; Southon, J. R.; Treseder, K. K.; Corbineau, R.; Reyerson, P. E.

    2012-05-01

    Plants absorb and transport silicon (Si) from soil, and precipitation of Si within the living plants results in micrometric amorphous biosilica particles known as phytoliths. During phytolith formation, a small amount of carbon (<2%) can become occluded in the silica structure (phytC) and therefore protected from degradation by the environment after plant tissue decomposition. Since the major C source within plants is from atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) via photosynthesis, the current understanding is that the radiocarbon (14C) content of phytC should reflect the 14C content of atmospheric CO2 at the time the plant is growing. This assumption was recently challenged by 14C data from phytoliths extracted from living grasses that yielded ages of several thousand years (2-8 kyr BP; in radiocarbon years "Before Present" (BP), "Present" being defined as 1950). Because plants can take up small amounts of C of varying ages from soils (e.g., during nutrient acquisition), we hypothesized that this transported C within the plant tissue could be attached to or even embedded in phytoliths. In this work, we explore this hypothesis by reviewing previously published data on biosilica mineralization and plant nutrient acquisition as well as by evaluating the efficiency of phytolith extraction protocols from scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) analyses from harvested grasses phytolith concentrates. We show that current extraction protocols are inefficient since they do not entirely remove recalcitrant forms of C from plant tissue. Consequently, material previously measured as "phytC" may contain at least some fraction of soil-derived C (likely radiocarbon-old) taken up by roots. We also suggest a novel interpretation for at least some of the phytC - which enters via the root pathway during nutrient acquisition - that may help to explain the old ages previously obtained from phytolith concentrates.

  18. Photosynthetic responses to understory shade and elevated carbon dioxide concentration in 4 northern hardwood tree species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sefcik, L.T.; Zak, D.R.; Ellsworth, D.S. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). School of Natural Resources and Environment

    2006-12-15

    Stimulation of photosynthesis in response to elevated carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) varies among tree species and species groups. In this study, seedling responses to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) concentrations and solar irradiance over 2 growing seasons were investigated for shade tolerant Acer saccharum Marsh.; Fagus grandifolia J.F. Ehrh; and shade-intolerant Prunus serotina. Seedlings were exposed to a combination of elevated and ambient concentrations of CO{sub 2} and understory shade in open-top chambers placed in a forest understory. It was observed that the elevated CO{sub 2} treatment increased mean light-saturated net photosynthetic rates by 63 per cent in the shade-tolerant species and 67 per cent in the shade-intolerant species. When measured at the elevated CO{sub 2}, long-term enhancement of photosynthesis was 10 per cent lower than the instantaneous enhancement observed in ambient-CO{sub 2}-grown plants. As the growth irradiance increased, proportional enhancement due to elevated CO{sub 2} decreased from 97 per cent for plants grown in deep shade to 47 per cent for plants grown in moderate shade. Results indicated that in nitrogen (N) limited northern temperate forests, trees grown in deep shade may display greater photosynthetic gains from a CO{sub 2} enriched atmosphere than trees growing in more moderate shade, due to greater down-regulation. It was concluded that if elevated CO{sub 2} levels promote the survival of shade-intolerant species in dim understory light, the future composition and dynamics of successional forest communities may be altered. 70 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  19. Possible source of ancient carbon in phytolith concentrates from harvested grasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Santos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants absorb and transport silicon (Si from soil, and precipitation of Si within the living plants results in micrometric amorphous biosilica particles known as phytoliths. During phytolith formation, a small amount of carbon (< 2 % can become occluded in the silica structure (phytC and therefore protected from degradation by the environment after plant tissue decomposition. Since the major C source within plants is from atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 via photosynthesis, the current understanding is that the radiocarbon (14C content of phytC should reflect the 14C content of atmospheric CO2 at the time the plant is growing. This assumption was recently challenged by 14C data from phytoliths extracted from living grasses that yielded ages of several thousand years (2–8 kyr BP; in radiocarbon years "Before Present" (BP, "Present" being defined as 1950. Because plants can take up small amounts of C of varying ages from soils (e.g. during nutrient acquisition, we hypothesized that this transported C within the plant tissue could be attached to or even embedded in phytoliths. In this work, we explore this hypothesis by reviewing previously published data on biosilica mineralization and plant nutrient acquisition as well as by evaluating the efficiency of phytolith extraction protocols from Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM images and Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS analyses from harvested grasses phytolith concentrates. We show that current extraction protocols are inefficient since they do not entirely remove recalcitrant forms of C from plant tissue. Consequently, material previously measured as "phytC" may contain at least some fraction of soil-derived C (likely radiocarbon-old taken up by roots. We also suggest a novel interpretation for at least some of the phytC – enters via the root pathway during nutrient acquisition – that may help to explain the old ages previously obtained

  20. Indoor carbon monoxide and PM{sub 2.5} concentrations by cooking fuels in Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqui, A.R. (Aga Khan Univ., Dept. Community Health Sciences, Karachi (Pakistan)); Lee, K. (Seoul National Univ., Graduate School of Public Health (Korea)); Bennett, D.; Yang, X.; Gold, E.B. (Univ. California at Davis, Dept. of Public Health, CA (United States)); Brown, K.H. (Univ. California at Davis, Program in Int. Nutrition, CA (United States)); Bhutta, Z.A. (Aga Khan Univ., Dep. of Pediatrics, Karachi (Pakistan))

    2009-02-15

    In developing countries biomass combustion is a frequently used source of domestic energy and may cause indoor air pollution. Carbon monoxide (CO) and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 mum or less (PM{sub 2.5}) were measured in kitchens using wood or natural gas (NG) in a semi-rural community in Pakistan. Daytime CO and PM{sub 2.5} levels were measured for eight continuous hours in 51 wood and 44 NG users from December 2005 to April 2006. The laser photometer PM{sub 2.5} (Dustrak, TSI) was calibrated for field conditions and PM{sub 2.5} measurements were reduced by a factor of 2.77. CO was measured by an electrochemical monitor (Model T15v, Langan). The arithmetic mean for daytime CO concentration was 29.4 ppm in wood users; significantly higher than 7.5 ppm in NG users (P < 0.001). The arithmetic mean for daytime PM{sub 2.5} concentrations was 2.74 mg/m3 in wood users; significantly higher than 0.38 mg/m3 in NG users (P < 0.001). Higher peak levels of CO and PM{sub 2.5} were also observed in wood users. Time spent in the kitchen during fuel burning was significantly related to increasing CO and PM{sub 2.5} concentrations in wood users. These findings suggest that cooking with wood fuel may lead to hazardous concentrations of CO and PM{sub 2.5}. (au)

  1. The CarbonSat candidate mission: imaging greenhouse gas concentrations from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierk, Bernd; Caron, Jerôme; Löscher, Armin; Meijer, Yasjka; Bézy, Jean-Loup; Buchwitz, Michael; Bovensmann, H.

    2014-09-01

    CarbonSat is a proposed Earth observation mission, which was selected in 2010 as one of two candidates for becoming the European Space Agency's (ESA) eighth Earth Explorer (EE8). It is currently undergoing parallel feasibility studies (phase A) performed by two industrial consortia. CarbonSat aims at a better understanding of the natural and anthropogenic sources and sinks of the two most important anthropogenic greenhouse gases CO2 and CH4, which will contribute to a better understanding of climate feedback and forcing mechanisms. To achieve these objectives the instrument will quantify and monitor the spatial distribution of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). It will deliver global data sets of dry air column-averaged mixing ratios of these gases with high precision (1 - 3 ppm for CO2 and 6 - 12 ppb for CH4) and accuracy (0.5 ppm for CO2 and 5 ppb for CH4). The measurements will provide global coverage every 12 days above 40 degrees latitude at a spatial resolution of 2 x 3 km2. The retrieval products are inferred from observations of Earth radiance and solar irradiance at high to medium spectral resolution (0.1-0.55 nm) in the Near Infrared (747-773 nm) and Short Wave Infrared (1590- 1675 nm and 1925-2095 nm) spectral regions. The combination of high spatial resolution and global coverage requires a swath width larger than 180 km for three spatially co-aligned push-broom imaging spectrometers. The targeted product accuracy translates into stringent radiometric, spectral and geometric requirements for the instrument. This paper presents the system requirements derived from the demanding mission objectives and reports preliminary results of the feasibility studies. It highlights the key components of the instrument, focusing on the optical conceptual design, and addresses the identified critical performance aspects.

  2. Growth hormone stimulation of serum insulin concentration in cattle: nutritional dependency and potential mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, J; Gu, Z; Wu, M; Gwazdauskas, F C; Jiang, H

    2009-08-01

    Previous studies on the effect of growth hormone (GH) on serum insulin concentration in cattle had generated seemingly conflicting results, and little was known about the mechanism by which GH affects serum insulin concentration in cattle, if it does. In this study, we determined whether the effect of GH on serum insulin concentration in cattle could be affected by the nutritional levels of the animal and whether GH increased serum insulin concentration in cattle by directly stimulating insulin release or insulin gene expression in the pancreatic islets. Administration of recombinant bovine GH increased serum insulin concentration in nonlactating, nonpregnant beef cows fed a daily concentrate meal in addition to ad libitum hay, but it had no effect in those cows fed hay only. Both GH treatments for 1 and 24h increased insulin concentrations in cultures of pancreatic islets isolated from growing cattle. Growth hormone treatment for 24h increased insulin mRNA expression in cultured bovine pancreatic islets. Growth hormone treatment for 16h increased reporter gene expression directed by a approximately 1,500-bp bovine insulin gene promoter in a rat insulin-producing beta cell line. Taken together, these results suggest that exogenous GH can increase serum insulin concentration in cattle, but this effect depends on the nutritional levels of fed cattle, and that GH increases serum insulin concentration in cattle by stimulating both insulin release and insulin gene expression in the pancreatic islets.

  3. LITERATURE SURVEY OF GASEOUS HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CARBON AND LOW ALLOY STEELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, P; Robert Sindelar, R; Thad Adams, T

    2007-04-18

    Literature survey has been performed for a compendium of mechanical properties of carbon and low alloy steels following hydrogen exposure. The property sets include yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, uniform elongation, reduction of area, threshold stress intensity factor, fracture toughness, and fatigue crack growth. These properties are drawn from literature sources under a variety of test methods and conditions. However, the collection of literature data is by no means complete, but the diversity of data and dependency of results in test method is sufficient to warrant a design and implementation of a thorough test program. The program would be needed to enable a defensible demonstration of structural integrity of a pressurized hydrogen system. It is essential that the environmental variables be well-defined (e.g., the applicable hydrogen gas pressure range and the test strain rate) and the specimen preparation be realistically consistent (such as the techniques to charge hydrogen and to maintain the hydrogen concentration in the specimens).

  4. LITERATURE SURVEY OF GASEOUS HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CARBON AND LOW ALLOY STEELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, P; Andrew Duncan, A; Robert Sindelar, R; Thad Adams, T

    2009-04-27

    Literature survey has been performed for a compendium of mechanical properties of carbon and low alloy steels following hydrogen exposure. The property sets include yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, uniform elongation, reduction of area, threshold stress intensity factor, fracture toughness, and fatigue crack growth. These properties are drawn from literature sources under a variety of test methods and conditions. However, the collection of literature data is by no means complete, but the diversity of data and dependency of results in test method is sufficient to warrant a design and implementation of a thorough test program. The program would be needed to enable a defensible demonstration of structural integrity of a pressurized hydrogen system. It is essential that the environmental variables be well-defined (e.g., the applicable hydrogen gas pressure range and the test strain rate) and the specimen preparation be realistically consistent (such as the techniques to charge hydrogen and to maintain the hydrogen concentration in the specimens).

  5. Response of oxidative enzyme activities to nitrogen deposition affects soil concentrations of dissolved organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, M.P.; Zak, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that atmospheric nitrate (NO3- ) deposition can alter soil carbon (C) storage by directly affecting the activity of lignin-degrading soil fungi. In a laboratory experiment, we studied the direct influence of increasing soil NO 3- concentration on microbial C cycling in three different ecosystems: black oak-white oak (BOWO), sugar maple-red oak (SMRO), and sugar maple-basswood (SMBW). These ecosystems span a broad range of litter biochemistry and recalcitrance; the BOWO ecosystem contains the highest litter lignin content, SMRO had intermediate lignin content, and SMBW leaf litter has the lowest lignin content. We hypothesized that increasing soil solution NO 3- would reduce lignolytic activity in the BOWO ecosystem, due to a high abundance of white-rot fungi and lignin-rich leaf litter. Due to the low lignin content of litter in the SMBW, we further reasoned that the NO3- repression of lignolytic activity would be less dramatic due to a lower relative abundance of white-rot basidiomycetes; the response in the SMRO ecosystem should be intermediate. We increased soil solution NO3- concentrations in a 73-day laboratory incubation and measured microbial respiration and soil solution dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and phenolics concentrations. At the end of the incubation, we measured the activity of ??-glucosidase, N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, phenol oxidase, and peroxidase, which are extracellular enzymes involved with cellulose and lignin degradation. We quantified the fungal biomass, and we also used fungal ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA) to gain insight into fungal community composition. In the BOWO ecosystem, increasing NO 3- significantly decreased oxidative enzyme activities (-30% to -54%) and increased DOC (+32% upper limit) and phenolic (+77% upper limit) concentrations. In the SMRO ecosystem, we observed a significant decrease in phenol oxidase activity (-73% lower limit) and an increase in soluble phenolic concentrations

  6. Source sector and region contributions to concentration and direct radiative forcing of black carbon in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Liao, Hong; Mao, Yuhao; Ridley, David A.

    2016-01-01

    We quantify the contributions from five domestic emission sectors (residential, industry, transportation, energy, and biomass burning) and emissions outside of China (non-China) to concentration and direct radiative forcing (DRF) of black carbon (BC) in China for year 2010 using a nested-grid version of the global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) coupled with a radiative transfer model. The Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (HTAP) anthropogenic emissions of BC for year 2010 are used in this study. Simulated surface-layer BC concentrations in China have strong seasonal variations, which exceed 9 μg m-3 in winter and are about 1-5 μg m-3 in summer in the North China Plain and the Sichuan Basin. Residential sector is simulated to have the largest contribution to surface BC concentrations, by 5-7 μg m-3 in winter and by 1-3 μg m-3 in summer, reflecting the large emissions from winter heating and the enhanced wet deposition during summer monsoon. The contribution from industry sector is the second largest and shows relatively small seasonal variations; the emissions from industry sector contribute 1-3 μg m-3 to BC concentrations in the North China Plain and the Sichuan Basin. The contribution from transportation sector is the third largest, followed by that from biomass burning and energy sectors. The non-China emissions mainly influence the surface-layer concentrations of BC in western China; about 70% of surface-layer BC concentration in the Tibet Plateau is attributed to transboundary transport. Averaged over all of China, the all-sky DRF of BC at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) is simulated to be 1.22 W m-2. Sensitivity simulations show that the TOA BC direct radiative forcings from the five domestic emission sectors of residential, industry, energy, transportation, biomass burning, and non-China emissions are 0.44, 0.27, 0.01, 0.12, 0.04, and 0.30 W m-2, respectively. The domestic and non-China emissions contribute 75% and 25% to BC DRF in China

  7. Mechanisms of Microwave Absorption in Carbon Compounds from Shungite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Emelyanov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available According to SEM, X-ray phase analysis, Raman scattering data features of nanostructural changes in shungite carbon structure were found when processing shungite in 52 % hydrofluoric acid. It is found that conductivity increases up to the values of electrical graphite and absorption of microwave radiation also increases at frequencies up to 40 GHz, which, along with dielectric losses, is due to intense processes of both scattering at laminar carbon structures and absorption of electromagnetic energy.

  8. Mechanisms of Microwave Absorption in Carbon Compounds from Shungite

    OpenAIRE

    S. Emelyanov; A. Kuzmenko; V. Rodionov; M. Dobromyslov

    2013-01-01

    According to SEM, X-ray phase analysis, Raman scattering data features of nanostructural changes in shungite carbon structure were found when processing shungite in 52 % hydrofluoric acid. It is found that conductivity increases up to the values of electrical graphite and absorption of microwave radiation also increases at frequencies up to 40 GHz, which, along with dielectric losses, is due to intense processes of both scattering at laminar carbon structures and absorption of electromagnetic...

  9. Electron transport mechanisms in polymer-carbon sphere composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves, Cesar A.; Ramos, Idalia; Pinto, Nicholas J.; Zimbovskaya, Natalya A.

    2016-07-01

    A set of uniform carbon microspheres (CSs) whose diameters have the order of 0.125 μm to 10 μm was prepared from aqueous sucrose solution by means of hydrothermal carbonization of sugar molecules. A pressed pellet was composed by mixing CSs with polyethylene oxide (PEO). Electrical characterization of the pellet was carried out showing Ohmic current-voltage characteristics and temperature-dependent conductivity in the range of 80 K PEO composites.

  10. Subalpine grassland carbon dioxide fluxes indicate substantial carbon losses under increased nitrogen deposition, but not at elevated ozone concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Matthias; Obrist, Daniel; Novak, Kris; Giger, Robin; Bassin, Seraina; Fuhrer, Jürg

    2010-05-01

    Ozone (O3) and nitrogen (N) deposition affect plant carbon (C) dynamics and may thus change ecosystem C-sink/-source properties. We studied effects of increased background O3 concentrations (up to ambient x 2) and increased N deposition (up to +50 kg ha-1 a-1) on mature, subalpine grassland during the third treatment year. During ten days and 13 nights, covering the vegetation period of 2006, we measured ecosystem-level CO2 exchange using a steady state cuvette. Light dependency of gross primary production (GPP) and temperature dependency of ecosystem respiration rates (Reco) were established. Soil temperature, soil water content, and solar radiation were monitored. Using Reco and GPP values, we calculated seasonal net ecosystem production (NEP), based on hourly averages of global radiation and soil temperature. Differences in NEP were compared to differences in soil organic C after five years of treatment. Under high O3 and with unchanged aboveground biomass, both mean Reco and GPP decreased throughout the season. Thus, NEP indicated an unaltered growing season CO2-C balance. Under high N treatment, with a +31% increase in aboveground productivity, mean Reco, but not GPP increased. Consequently, seasonal NEP yielded a 53.9 g C m-2 (± 22.05) C loss compared to control. Independent of treatment, we observed a negative NEP of 146.4 g C m-2 (±15.3). This C loss was likely due to a transient management effect, equivalent to a shift from pasture to hay meadow and a drought effect, specific to the 2006 summer climate. We argue that this resulted from strongly intensified soil microbial respiration, following mitigation of nutrient limitation. There was no interaction between O3 and N treatments. Thus, during the 2006 growing season, the subalpine grassland lost >2% of total topsoil organic C as respired CO2, with increased N deposition responsible for one-third of that loss.

  11. Impact of Wetland Decline on Decreasing Dissolved Organic Carbon Concentrations along the Mississippi River Continuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Shuiwang; He, Yuxiang; Kaushal, Sujay S.; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Ward, Nicholas D.; Guo, Laodong

    2017-01-09

    Prior to discharging to the ocean, large rivers constantly receive inputs of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from tributaries or fringing floodplains and lose DOC via continuous in situ processing along distances that span thousands of kilometers. Current concepts predicting longitudinal changes in DOC mainly focus on in situ processing or exchange with fringing floodplain wetlands, while effects of heterogeneous watershed characteristics are generally ignored. We analyzed results from a 17-year time-series of DOC measurements made at seven sites and three expeditions along the entire Mississippi River main channel with DOC measurements made every 17 km. The results show a clear downstream decrease in DOC concentrations that was consistent throughout the entire study period. Downstream DOC decreases were primarily (~63–71%) a result of constant dilutions by low-DOC tributary water controlled by watershed wetland distribution, while in situ processing played a secondary role. We estimate that from 1780 to 1980 wetland loss due to land-use alterations caused a ca. 58% decrease in in DOC concentrations in the tributaries of the Mississippi River. DOC reductions caused by watershed wetland loss likely impacted the capacity for the river to effectively remove nitrogen via denitrification, which can further exacerbate coastal hypoxia. These findings highlight the importance of watershed wetlands in regulating DOC longitudinally along the headland to ocean continuum of major rivers.

  12. Global warming preceded by increasing carbon dioxide concentrations during the last deglaciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakun, Jeremy D; Clark, Peter U; He, Feng; Marcott, Shaun A; Mix, Alan C; Liu, Zhengyu; Otto-Bliesner, Bette; Schmittner, Andreas; Bard, Edouard

    2012-04-04

    The covariation of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) concentration and temperature in Antarctic ice-core records suggests a close link between CO(2) and climate during the Pleistocene ice ages. The role and relative importance of CO(2) in producing these climate changes remains unclear, however, in part because the ice-core deuterium record reflects local rather than global temperature. Here we construct a record of global surface temperature from 80 proxy records and show that temperature is correlated with and generally lags CO(2) during the last (that is, the most recent) deglaciation. Differences between the respective temperature changes of the Northern Hemisphere and Southern Hemisphere parallel variations in the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation recorded in marine sediments. These observations, together with transient global climate model simulations, support the conclusion that an antiphased hemispheric temperature response to ocean circulation changes superimposed on globally in-phase warming driven by increasing CO(2) concentrations is an explanation for much of the temperature change at the end of the most recent ice age.

  13. Concentration, sources and flux of dissolved organic carbon of precipitation at Lhasa city, the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) plays important role in climate system, but few data are available on the Tibetan Plateau (TP). In this study 89 precipitation samples were collected at Lhasa, the largest city of southern Tibet, from March to December 2013. The average concentration and wet deposition fluxes of DOC was 1.10 mg C/L and 0.62 g C m-2.yr-1, respectively. Seasonally, low DOC concentration and high flux appeared during monsoon period, which were in line with heavy precipitation amount, reflecting dilution effect of precipitation for the DOC. Compared to other regions, the values of Lhasa were lower than those of large cites (e.g. Beijing and Seoul) mainly because of less air pollution of Lhasa. The relationship between DOC and ion analysis showed that DOC of Lhasa was derived mainly from the natural sources, followed by burning activities. Furthermore, △14C value of DOC indicated that fossil combustion contributed around 20% of the precipitation DOC of Lhasa, indicating that the atmosphere of Lhasa has been influenced by vehicle emissions. Therefore, although atmosphere of Lhasa is relatively clean, pollutants emitted from local sources cannot be ignored.

  14. Physical, Physicochemical, Mechanical, and Structural Characterization of Films Based on Gelatin/Glycerol and Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel Sifuentes-Nieves

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method to prepare glycerol/gelatin based films, by doping the film with carbon nanotubes (CNTs and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, was proposed. SDS was used to disperse CNTs in gelatin/glycerol films as follows: gelatin/glycerol (GG incubated with equal concentrations of CNT and SDS; GG with 0.001% w/w CNT/SDS; GG with 0.002% CNT/SDS and GG with 0.004% CNT/SDS. Diffractograms of CNT/SDS /glycerol films showed an amorphous structure, being consistent with thermograms involving temperature and fusion enthalpy. Mechanical tests showed 30% increase in elongation at break of GG with 0.004% CNT/SDS, with respect to gelatin/glycerol/SDS control. Samples with CNT had increased water vapor permeability (WVP. The film fractal dimension indicated that, with the addition of the highest concentration of CNT, films with a homogeneous surface were obtained, with probable nanotube inclusion in the protein matrix. According to the results, the easy method used to prepare gelatin composite materials gave place to films with better physical, mechanical, and thermal properties.

  15. Mechanically durable and highly conductive elastomeric composites from long single-walled carbon nanotubes mimicking the chain structure of polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ata, Seisuke; Kobashi, Kazufumi; Yumura, Motoo; Hata, Kenji

    2012-06-13

    By using long single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as a filler possessing the highest aspect ratio and small diameter, we mimicked the chain structure of polymers in the matrix and realized a highly conductive elastomeric composite (30 S/cm) with an excellent mechanical durability (4500 strain cycles until failure), far superior to any other reported conductive elastomers. This exceptional mechanical durability was explained by the ability of long and traversing SWNTs to deform in concert with the elastomer with minimum stress concentration at their interfaces. The conductivity was sufficient to operate many active electronics components, and thus this material would be useful for practical stretchable electronic devices.

  16. A structural insight into mechanical strength of graphene-like carbon and carbon nitride networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Obaidur; Mortazavi, Bohayra; Dianat, Arezoo; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Rabczuk, Timon

    2017-02-01

    Graphene, one of the strongest materials ever discovered, triggered the exploration of many 2D materials in the last decade. However, the successful synthesis of a stable nanomaterial requires a rudimentary understanding of the relationship between its structure and strength. In the present study, we investigate the mechanical properties of eight different carbon-based 2D nanomaterials by performing extensive density functional theory calculations. The considered structures were just recently either experimentally synthesized or theoretically predicted. The corresponding stress-strain curves and elastic moduli are reported. They can be useful in training force field parameters for large scale simulations. A comparative analysis of these results revealed a direct relationship between atomic density per area and elastic modulus. Furthermore, for the networks that have an armchair and a zigzag orientation, we observed that they were more stretchable in the zigzag direction than the armchair direction. A critical analysis of the angular distributions and radial distribution functions suggested that it could be due to the higher ability of the networks to suppress the elongations of the bonds in the zigzag direction by deforming the bond angles. The structural interpretations provided in this work not only improve the general understanding of a 2D material’s strength but also enables us to rationally design them for higher qualities.

  17. Mechanisms and ecological role of carbon transfer within coastal seascapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyndes, Glenn A; Nagelkerken, Ivan; McLeod, Rebecca J; Connolly, Rod M; Lavery, Paul S; Vanderklift, Mathew A

    2014-02-01

    Worldwide, coastal systems provide some of the most productive habitats, which potentially influence a range of marine and terrestrial ecosystems through the transfer of nutrients and energy. Several reviews have examined aspects of connectivity within coastal seascapes, but the scope of those reviews has been limited to single systems or single vectors. We use the transfer of carbon to examine the processes of connectivity through multiple vectors in multiple ecosystems using four coastal seascapes as case studies. We discuss and compare the main vectors of carbon connecting different ecosystems, and then the natural and human-induced factors that influence the magnitude of effect for those vectors on recipient systems. Vectors of carbon transfer can be grouped into two main categories: detrital particulate organic carbon (POC) and its associated dissolved organic and inorganic carbon (DOC/DIC) that are transported passively; and mobile consumers that transport carbon actively. High proportions of net primary production can be exported over meters to hundreds of kilometers from seagrass beds, algal reefs and mangroves as POC, with its export dependent on wind-generated currents in the first two of these systems and tidal currents for the last. By contrast, saltmarshes export large quantities of DOC through tidal movement, while land run-off plays a critical role in the transport of terrestrial POC and DOC into temperate fjords. Nekton actively transfers carbon across ecosystem boundaries through foraging movements, ontogenetic migrations, or 'trophic relays', into and out of seagrass beds, mangroves or saltmarshes. The magnitude of these vectors is influenced by: the hydrodynamics and geomorphology of the region; the characteristics of the carbon vector, such as their particle size and buoyancy; and for nekton, the extent and frequency of migrations between ecosystems. Through a risk-assessment process, we have identified the most significant human disturbances

  18. Effect of low concentrations of carbon nanotubes on electric dipole relaxation in a polyurethane elastomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabenok, E. V.; Novikov, G. F.; Estrin, Ya. I.; Badamshina, E. R.

    2015-03-01

    The effect of small (up to 0.018 wt %) additions of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on the complex electric modulus M*= M' - jM″ and the spectrum of the relaxation times G(τ) of a cross-linked polyurethane elastomer containing ˜10 vol % of polyamide-6 dispersed in the polyurethane matrix and incompatible with it was studied. The measurements were conducted in the range of electric field frequencies 10-3-105 Hz at temperatures from 133 to 413 K. Based on the shape analysis of the M″( M') diagrams, the contributions of electric conductivity and dielectric relaxation to complex dielectric permittivity ɛ* = ɛ' - jɛ″ were separated and the effect of additions on α and β relaxation for both polyurethane and polyamide phases was analyzed in accordance with the peculiarities of phase-separated systems. The introduction of SWNTs in the composite affected the dielectric properties of the material; the maximum effect was observed at concentrations of 0.002-0.008 wt %; at higher SWNT concentrations, the scatter of data increased and did not allow us to evaluate the effect. The effect of SWNTs on G(τ) in the main phase was opposite to that in the polyamide phase. In the temperature range of α relaxation of the polyurethane phase, the relaxation times increased after the introduction of SWNTs evidently because of the decrease in the free volume that determines the α relaxation times of polyurethane. In contrast, for the polyamide phase in the range of α relaxation, the relaxation times decreased after the introduction of SWNTs. The results agree with the literature data on the effect of ultrasmall SWNT concentrations on the physicomechanical characteristics of the polyurethane elastomer and its electric conductivity.

  19. MECHANICAL AND THERMO–MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF BI-DIRECTIONAL AND SHORT CARBON FIBER REINFORCED EPOXY COMPOSITES

    OpenAIRE

    Agarwal, G; A. Patnaik; Sharma, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    This paper based on bidirectional and short carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites reports the effect of fiber loading on physical, mechanical and thermo-mechanical properties respectively. The five different fiber loading, i.e., 10wt. %, 20wt. %, 30wt. %, 40wt. % and 50wt. % were taken for evaluating the above said properties. The physical and mechanical properties, i.e., hardness, tensile strength, flexural strength, inter-laminar shear strength and impact strength are determined to re...

  20. Synthesis of Boron-doped Diamond/Porous Ti Composite Materials——Effect of Carbon Concentration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Ming; CHANG Ming; LI Xiaowei

    2012-01-01

    Highly boron-doped diamond films were deposited on porous titanium substrates by hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique.The morphology variation of highly boron-doped diamond films grown on porous titanium substrates was investigated,and the effects of carbon concentration on nucleation density and diamond growth were also studied.The continuous change of surface morphology and structure of diamond film were characterized by scanning electron microscopy.The structures of diamond film and interlayer were analyzed by X-ray diffraction.The quality of boron-doped diamond film was confirmed by visible Raman spectroscopy.The experimental results reveal that surface morphology and quality of boron-doped diamond films are various due to the change of carbon concentration.The thickness of intermediate layer decreases with the carbon concentration increasing.

  1. Mechanically robust, electrically conductive ultralow-density carbon nanotube-based aerogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr, Joe H.

    2016-07-05

    A method of making a mechanically robust, electrically conductive ultralow-density carbon nanotube-based aerogel, including the steps of dispersing nanotubes in an aqueous media or other media to form a suspension, adding reactants and catalyst to the suspension to create a reaction mixture, curing the reaction mixture to form a wet gel, drying the wet gel to produce a dry gel, and pyrolyzing the dry gel to produce the mechanically robust, electrically conductive ultralow-density carbon nanotube-based aerogel. The aerogel is mechanically robust, electrically conductive, and ultralow-density, and is made of a porous carbon material having 5 to 95% by weight carbon nanotubes and 5 to 95% carbon binder.

  2. Integrated Experimental and Modeling Studies of Mineral Carbonation as a Mechanism for Permanent Carbon Sequestration in Mafic/Ultramafic Rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhengrong [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Qiu, Lin [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Zhang, Shuang [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Bolton, Edward [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Bercovici, David [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Ague, Jay [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Karato, Shun-Ichiro [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Oristaglio, Michael [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Zhu, Wen-Iu [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Lisabeth, Harry [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Johnson, Kevin [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2014-09-30

    A program of laboratory experiments, modeling and fieldwork was carried out at Yale University, University of Maryland, and University of Hawai‘i, under a DOE Award (DE-FE0004375) to study mineral carbonation as a practical method of geologic carbon sequestration. Mineral carbonation, also called carbon mineralization, is the conversion of (fluid) carbon dioxide into (solid) carbonate minerals in rocks, by way of naturally occurring chemical reactions. Mafic and ultramafic rocks, such as volcanic basalt, are natural candidates for carbonation, because the magnesium and iron silicate minerals in these rocks react with brines of dissolved carbon dioxide to form carbonate minerals. By trapping carbon dioxide (CO2) underground as a constituent of solid rock, carbonation of natural basalt formations would be a secure method of sequestering CO2 captured at power plants in efforts to mitigate climate change. Geochemical laboratory experiments at Yale, carried out in a batch reactor at 200°C and 150 bar (15 MPa), studied carbonation of the olivine mineral forsterite (Mg2SiO4) reacting with CO2 brines in the form of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) solutions. The main carbonation product in these reactions is the carbonate mineral magnesite (MgCO3). A series of 32 runs varied the reaction time, the reactive surface area of olivine grains and powders, the concentration of the reacting fluid, and the starting ratio of fluid to olivine mass. These experiments were the first to study the rate of olivine carbonation under passive conditions approaching equilibrium. The results show that, in a simple batch reaction, olivine carbonation is fastest during the first 24 hours and then slows significantly and even reverses. A natural measure of the extent of carbonation is a quantity called the carbonation fraction, which compares the amount of carbon removed from solution, during a run, to the maximum amount

  3. Observations of the uptake of carbonyl sulfide (COS by trees under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sandoval-Soto

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Global change forces ecosystems to adapt to elevated atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2. We understand that carbonyl sulfide (COS, a trace gas which is involved in building up the stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer, is taken up by vegetation with the same triad of the enzymes which are metabolizing CO2, i.e. ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEP-Co and carbonic anhydrase (CA. Therefore, we discuss a physiological/biochemical acclimation of these enzymes affecting the sink strength of vegetation for COS. We investigated the acclimation of two European tree species, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus ilex, grown inside chambers under elevated CO2, and determined the exchange characteristics and the content of CA after a 1–2 yr period of acclimation from 350 ppm to 800 ppm CO2. We demonstrate that a compensation point, by definition, does not exist. Instead, we propose to discuss a point of uptake affinity (PUA. The results indicate that such a PUA, the CA activity and the deposition velocities may change and may cause a decrease of the COS uptake by plant ecosystems, at least as long as the enzyme acclimation to CO2 is not surpassed by an increase of atmospheric COS. As a consequence, the atmospheric COS level may rise causing an increase of the radiative forcing in the troposphere. However, this increase is counterbalanced by the stronger input of this trace gas into the stratosphere causing a stronger energy reflection by the stratospheric sulfur aerosol into space (Brühl et al., 2012. These data are very preliminary but may trigger a discussion on COS uptake acclimation to foster measurements with modern analytical instruments.

  4. Concentrations of suspended particulate organic carbon in the tidal Yorkshire Ouse River and Humber Estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uncles, R J; Frickers, P E; Easton, A E; Griffiths, M L; Harris, C; Howland, R J; King, R S; Morris, A W; Plummer, D H; Tappin, A D

    2000-05-05

    Data are presented for particulate organic carbon (POC) and particulate nitrogen (PN) concentrations in the Humber Estuary and tidal River Ouse Estuary. The POC data were derived from approximately monthly surveys and are consistent with data reported for suspended particulate matter (SPM) in the non-tidal River Ouse (the freshwater river) and with SPM, or bed sediments, in estuarine ecosystems such as the Mississippi, Delaware, San Francisco Bay, Tolo Harbour, the Vellar Estuary and Cochin Backwater, as well as the Loire, Gironde, Ems and Tamar Estuaries. Relative to the dry weight of SPM, the Humber-averaged organic carbon and nitrogen percentages during the year February 1995-March 1996 were 2.6 +/- 0.6% (mean and S.D.) and 0.21 +/- 0.04%, respectively. The ratio of Humber-averaged POC to Humber-averaged PN was 13 +/- 3. Higher POC levels were observed near the Humber's mouth and in the adjacent coastal zone during 'bloom' conditions, and in the upper estuarine reaches during large, winter and springtime freshwater inflows. At these times of high runoff, the POC content of SPM increased progressively up-estuary from the coastal zone to the tidal River Ouse. When inflows became very low, during late spring to early autumn of 1995, both the freshwater-saltwater interface (FSI) and the strengthening turbidity maximum (TM) moved further up-estuary and the POC content of SPM in the upper reaches of the Ouse became lower compared with that immediately down-estuary. This led to a poorly defined POC maximum near the confluence of the Humber, Ouse and Trent, before POC eventually decreased again towards the coastal zone. The lower POC contents in the upper estuarine reaches of the tidal Ouse may have been partly due to POC respiration by heterotrophic bacteria attached to SPM within the TM, consistent with the severe oxygen depletion observed there during high turbidity, summertime spring tides.

  5. Calcium carbonate scaling in seawater desalination by ammonia-carbon dioxide forward osmosis: Mechanism and implications

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Zhenyu

    2015-02-07

    Forward osmosis (FO) is an osmotically driven membrane process, where the membrane separates a draw solution (DS) with high salinity from a feed solution (FS) with low salinity. There can be a counter direction flow of salt (i.e., salt leakage) that may interact with the water flux through the FO membrane. For the first time reported, this study describes a new calcium carbonate scaling phenomenon in the seawater FO desalination process using ammonium bicarbonate as the DS. The scaling on the membrane surface at the feed side is caused by the interaction between an anion reversely diffused from the DS and a cation present in the FS, causing a significant decline of the water flux. The composition of the scaling layer is dominated by the solubility (represented as solubility product constant, Ksp) of salt formed by the paired anion and cation. Membrane surface morphology plays a crucial role in the reversibility of the scaling. If the scaling occurs on the active layer of the FO membrane, hydraulic cleaning (increasing crossflow velocity) efficiency to restore the water flux is up to 82%. When scaling occurs on the support layer of the FO membrane, the hydraulic cleaning efficiency is strongly reduced, with only 36% of the water flux recovered. The present study reveals the risk of scaling induced by the interaction of feed solute and draw solute, which is different from the scaling caused by the supersaturation in reverse osmosis and other FO studies reported. The scaling investigated in this study can occur with a very low solute concentration at an early stage of the FO process. This finding provides an important implication for selection of draw solution and development of new membranes in the FO process.

  6. Carbon material distribution and flux analysis under varying glucose concentrations in hydrogen-producing Clostridium tyrobutyricum JM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Ji Hye; Kim, Woong

    2016-06-20

    Anaerobic glucose metabolism in hydrogen-producing Clostridium tyrobutyricum was investigated in batch culture with varying initial glucose concentrations (27.8-333.6mM). To understand the regulation of metabolism, the carbon material and reduction balances were applied to estimate the carbon flux distribution for the first time, and metabolic flux analysis (MFA) was used to provide qualitative information and guidance for effective metabolic design. The overall flux distribution suggested that C. tyrobutyricum metabolism has a high capacity for the production of butyrate and hydrogen at an initial glucose concentration of 222.4mM, with balanced activities of NADH and ATP.

  7. Mechanical Properties of Heat-treated Carbon Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effinger, Michael R.; Patel, Bhavesh; Koenig, John; Cuneo, Jaques; Neveux, Michael G.; Demos, Chrystoph G.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon fibers are selected for ceramic matrix composites (CMC) are based on their as-fabricated properties or on "that is what we have always done" technical culture while citing cost and availability when there are others with similar cost and availability. However, the information is not available for proper selection of carbon fibers since heat-treated properties are not known for the fibers on the market currently. Heat-treating changes the fiber's properties. Therefore, an effort was undertaken to establish fiber properties on 19 different types of fibers from six different manufactures for both PAN and pitch fibers. Heat-treating has been done at three different temperatures.

  8. Occurrence mechanism of silicate and aluminosilicate minerals in Sarcheshmeh copper flotation concentrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.R. Barkhordari; E. Jorjani; A. Eslami; M. Noaparast

    2009-01-01

    The Sarcheshmeh copper flotation circuit is producing 5×10~4 t copper concentrate per month with an averaging grade of 28% Cu in rougher, cleaner and reeleaner stages. In recent years, with the increase in the open pit depth, the content of aluminosili- cate minerals increased in plant feed and subsequently in flotation concentrate. It can motivate some problems, such as unwanted consumption of reagents, decreasing of the copper concentrate grade, increasing of Al_2O_3 and SiO_2 in the copper concentrate, and needing a higher temperature in the smelting process. The evaluation of the composite samples related to the most critical working period of the plant shows that quartz, illite, biotite, chlorite, orthoclase, albeit, muscovite, and kaolinite are the major Al_2O_3 and SiO_2 beating minerals that accompany chalcopyrite, chalcoeite, and covellite minerals in the plant feed. The severe alteration to clay min-erals was a general rule in all thin sections that were prepared from the plant feed. Sieve analysis of the flotation concentrate shows that Al_2O_3 and SiO_2 bearing minerals in the flotation concentrate can be decreased by promoting the size reduction from 53 to 38 μm. Interlocking of the Al_2O_3 and SiO_2 beating minerals with ehalcopyrite and ehalcocite is the occurrence mechanism of silicate and aluminosilicate minerals in the flotation concentrate. The dispersed form of interlocking is predominant.

  9. Control on Crystal Forms of Ultrafine Barium Carbonate Particles and Study on its Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Barium carbonate particles were prepared by using homogeneous precipitation method and co-precipitation method respectively. Through adding different crystalline controlling modifiers, Barium carbonate particles in five different shapes including linear, needle-like, pillarlike, sphere-like and dumbbell-like were synthesized. These particles were characterized by SEM and XRD, and their synthetic mechanism was discussed in this paper.

  10. Mechanism of Water Infiltration and Defiltration through ZSM-5 Zeolite: Heating and Sodium Chloride Concentration Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueting Sun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrophobic nanoporous material and wetting liquid together comprise a system with promising energy related applications. The mechanism of the interaction between liquid and solid phase is not fully explored. In this paper, based on the quasistatic compression experiments on investigating the mechanical behavior of ZSM-5 zeolite/NaCl solution system, the effects of two key parameters, that is, the pretreatment temperature of ZSM-5 zeolite and NaCl concentration, are parametrically and quantitatively investigated based on Laplace-Washburn equation. Results show that both pretreatment temperature and NaCl concentration raise the infiltration pressure and NaCl can also promote defiltration. The advancing contact and receding contact angle of zeolite-NaCl-air system increase with both pretreatment temperature and NaCl concentration, and the contact angle hysteresis decreases with NaCl concentration. Results may provide fundamental explanation to the nanoconfined liquid behavior and liquid-solid interaction, thus, to smartly control the mechanical properties of the liquid spring and bumpers for energy dissipation function.

  11. Parametric uncertainties in global model simulations of black carbon column mass concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Hana; Lee, Lindsay; Reddington, Carly; Carslaw, Ken; Mann, Graham

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies have deduced that the annual mean direct radiative forcing from black carbon (BC) aerosol may regionally be up to 5 W m-2 larger than expected due to underestimation of global atmospheric BC absorption in models. We have identified the magnitude and important sources of parametric uncertainty in simulations of BC column mass concentration from a global aerosol microphysics model (GLOMAP-Mode). A variance-based uncertainty analysis of 28 parameters has been performed, based on statistical emulators trained on model output from GLOMAP-Mode. This is the largest number of uncertain model parameters to be considered in a BC uncertainty analysis to date and covers primary aerosol emissions, microphysical processes and structural parameters related to the aerosol size distribution. We will present several recommendations for further research to improve the fidelity of simulated BC. In brief, we find that the standard deviation around the simulated mean annual BC column mass concentration varies globally between 2.5 x 10-9 g cm-2 in remote marine regions and 1.25 x 10-6 g cm-2 near emission sources due to parameter uncertainty Between 60 and 90% of the variance over source regions is due to uncertainty associated with primary BC emission fluxes, including biomass burning, fossil fuel and biofuel emissions. While the contributions to BC column uncertainty from microphysical processes, for example those related to dry and wet deposition, are increased over remote regions, we find that emissions still make an important contribution in these areas. It is likely, however, that the importance of structural model error, i.e. differences between models, is greater than parametric uncertainty. We have extended our analysis to emulate vertical BC profiles at several locations in the mid-Pacific Ocean and identify the parameters contributing to uncertainty in the vertical distribution of black carbon at these locations. We will present preliminary comparisons of

  12. Air exchanges and indoor carbon dioxide concentration in Australian pig buildings: Effect of housing and management factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banhazi, T. M.; Stott, P.; Rutley, D.

    2011-01-01

    factors on the concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and air exchange rates in 160 representative Australian pig buildings. CO(2) concentrations were measured, air changes per hour (ACH) were estimated using a CO(2) balance method, and structural and management parameters were recorded. The mean CO(2......) concentration measured was 858 ppm and a mean air exchange rate of 22.8 ACH was estimated. The analysis showed that CO(2) concentrations were affected by the type of building, season, control of the wall and ridge vents, ceiling height, size of the wall vents and height of the ridge vents. Weaner buildings had...

  13. Trends in soil solution dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations across European forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camino-Serrano, Marta; Graf Pannatier, Elisabeth; Vicca, Sara; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan; Jonard, Mathieu; Ciais, Philippe; Guenet, Bertrand; Gielen, Bert; Peñuelas, Josep; Sardans, Jordi; Waldner, Peter; Etzold, Sophia; Cecchini, Guia; Clarke, Nicholas; Galić, Zoran; Gandois, Laure; Hansen, Karin; Johnson, Jim; Klinck, Uwe; Lachmanová, Zora; Lindroos, Antti-Jussi; Meesenburg, Henning; Nieminen, Tiina M.; Sanders, Tanja G. M.; Sawicka, Kasia; Seidling, Walter; Thimonier, Anne; Vanguelova, Elena; Verstraeten, Arne; Vesterdal, Lars; Janssens, Ivan A.

    2016-10-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in surface waters is connected to DOC in soil solution through hydrological pathways. Therefore, it is expected that long-term dynamics of DOC in surface waters reflect DOC trends in soil solution. However, a multitude of site studies have failed so far to establish consistent trends in soil solution DOC, whereas increasing concentrations in European surface waters over the past decades appear to be the norm, possibly as a result of recovery from acidification. The objectives of this study were therefore to understand the long-term trends of soil solution DOC from a large number of European forests (ICP Forests Level II plots) and determine their main physico-chemical and biological controls. We applied trend analysis at two levels: (1) to the entire European dataset and (2) to the individual time series and related trends with plot characteristics, i.e., soil and vegetation properties, soil solution chemistry and atmospheric deposition loads. Analyses of the entire dataset showed an overall increasing trend in DOC concentrations in the organic layers, but, at individual plots and depths, there was no clear overall trend in soil solution DOC. The rate change in soil solution DOC ranged between -16.8 and +23 % yr-1 (median = +0.4 % yr-1) across Europe. The non-significant trends (40 %) outnumbered the increasing (35 %) and decreasing trends (25 %) across the 97 ICP Forests Level II sites. By means of multivariate statistics, we found increasing trends in DOC concentrations with increasing mean nitrate (NO3-) deposition and increasing trends in DOC concentrations with decreasing mean sulfate (SO42-) deposition, with the magnitude of these relationships depending on plot deposition history. While the attribution of increasing trends in DOC to the reduction of SO42- deposition could be confirmed in low to medium N deposition areas, in agreement with observations in surface waters, this was not the case in high N deposition areas. In

  14. The effect of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations on the performance of the mangrove Avicennia germinans over a range of salinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reef, Ruth; Winter, Klaus; Morales, Jorge; Adame, Maria Fernanda; Reef, Dana L; Lovelock, Catherine E

    2015-07-01

    By increasing water use efficiency and carbon assimilation, increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations could potentially improve plant productivity and growth at high salinities. To assess the effect of elevated CO2 on the salinity response of a woody halophyte, we grew seedlings of the mangrove Avicennia germinans under a combination of five salinity treatments [from 5 to 65 parts per thousand (ppt)] and three CO2 concentrations (280, 400 and 800 ppm). We measured survivorship, growth rate, photosynthetic gas exchange, root architecture and foliar nutrient and ion concentrations. The salinity optima for growth shifted higher with increasing concentrations of CO2 , from 0 ppt at 280 ppm to 35 ppt at 800 ppm. At optimal salinity conditions, carbon assimilation rates were significantly higher under elevated CO2 concentrations. However, at salinities above the salinity optima, salinity had an expected negative effect on mangrove growth and carbon assimilation, which was not alleviated by elevated CO2 , despite a significant improvement in photosynthetic water use efficiency. This is likely due to non-stomatal limitations to growth at high salinities, as indicated by our measurements of foliar ion concentrations that show a displacement of K(+) by Na(+) at elevated salinities that is not affected by CO2 . The observed shift in the optimal salinity for growth with increasing CO2 concentrations changes the fundamental niche of this species and could have significant effects on future mangrove distribution patterns and interspecific interactions.

  15. Mechanically stiff, electrically conductive composites of polymers and carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Kucheyev, Sergei O.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Hamza, Alex V.

    2015-07-21

    Using SWNT-CA as scaffolds to fabricate stiff, highly conductive polymer (PDMS) composites. The SWNT-CA is immersing in a polymer resin to produce a SWNT-CA infiltrated with a polymer resin. The SWNT-CA infiltrated with a polymer resin is cured to produce the stiff and electrically conductive composite of carbon nanotube aerogel and polymer.

  16. Genomics Mechanisms of Carbon Allocation and Partitioning in Poplar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirst, Matias; Peter, Gary; Martin, Timothy

    2009-07-30

    The genetic control of carbon allocation and partitioning in woody perennial plants is poorly understood despite its importance for carbon sequestration. It is also unclear how environmental cues such as nitrogen availability impact the genes that regulate growth, and biomass allocation and wood composition in trees. To address these questions we phenotyped 396 clonally replicated genotypes of an interspecific pseudo-backcross pedigree of Populus for wood composition and biomass traits in above and below ground organs. The loci that regulate growth, carbon allocation and partitioning under two nitrogen conditions were identified, defining the contribution of environmental cues to their genetic control. Fifty-seven quantitative trait loci (QTL) were identified for twenty traits analyzed. The majority of QTL are specific to one of the two nitrogen treatments, demonstrating significant nitrogen-dependent genetic control. A highly significant genetic correlation was observed between plant growth and lignin/cellulose composition, and QTL co-localization identified the genomic position of potential pleiotropic regulators. Gene expression analysis of all poplar genes was also characterized in differentiating xylem, whole-roots and developing leaves of 192 of the segregating population. By integrating the QTL and gene expression information we identified genes that regulate carbon partitioning and several biomass growth related properties. The work developed in this project resulted in the publication of three book chapters, four scientific articles (three others currently in preparation), 17 presentations in international conferences and two provisional patent applications.

  17. Catalytic conversion reactions in nanoporous systems with concentration-dependent selectivity: Statistical mechanical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Andrés; Wang, Jing; Windus, Theresa L.; Sadow, Aaron D.; Evans, James W.

    2016-05-01

    Statistical mechanical modeling is developed to describe a catalytic conversion reaction A →Bc or Bt with concentration-dependent selectivity of the products, Bc or Bt, where reaction occurs inside catalytic particles traversed by narrow linear nanopores. The associated restricted diffusive transport, which in the extreme case is described by single-file diffusion, naturally induces strong concentration gradients. Furthermore, by comparing kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results with analytic treatments, selectivity is shown to be impacted by strong spatial correlations induced by restricted diffusivity in the presence of reaction and also by a subtle clustering of reactants, A .

  18. Modeling Study of the Contribution of Wildfires to Ambient Black Carbon Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, S. H.; Gonzalez-Abraham, R.; Lamb, B. K.; Larkin, N. K.; Strand, T.; O'Neill, S.

    2013-12-01

    Wildland fires are a major source of particulate emissions, including black carbon (BC). In combination with other emissions, these BC and particulate emissions can directly lead to air quality degradation, both locally and more regionally. BC and other particulate matter (PM) can also affect climate in various ways, including by scattering and absorbing radiation, modifying cloud formation and properties, and changing snow albedo. BC emissions reduction is a potential strategy for mitigating global warming because it is emitted in large quantities and has a relatively short lifetime in the atmosphere in comparison to long-live greenhouse gases. Due to the highly variable nature of wildland fires, both in terms of fire occurrences on the landscape and the high spatial and temporal variability of fuels, consumption, and emissions, the impact of wildfire emissions varies significantly over the period of the wildfire season as well as inter-annually. In the U.S., while anthropogenic emissions are projected to decrease, as the climate warms wildfire activity is predicted to increase along with the contribution of fire emissions. Thus, a robust analysis of the effects of BC from fire emissions on air quality and climate necessitates a comprehensive, multi-scale study of all fire-related pollutants and other emission sources spanning multiple years of fire data and weather conditions. In this study we apply the WRF-BlueSky-SMOKE-CMAQ regional air-quality modeling system for multi-year (1997-2005) summertime simulations to evaluate the contribution of fire emissions to atmospheric BC and total PM2.5 concentrations. Historical fire records from the Bureau of Land Management are used by the BlueSky framework to calculate fire emissions. Plume rise is calculated by the SMOKE emission processor, taking into account meteorology from the WRF model. These emissions are combined with anthropogenic emissions from the NEI 2002 and biogenic emissions from the MEGAN model. CMAQ is

  19. Influence of Mechanical Activation on Acid Leaching Dephosphorization of High-phosphorus Iron Ore Concentrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-qing ZHU; Hao WANG; Jian PAN; Cong-cong YANG

    2016-01-01

    High pressure roll grinding (HPRG)and ball milling were compared to investigate the influence of me-chanical activation on the acid leaching dephosphorization of a high-phosphorus iron ore concentrate,which was man-ufactured through magnetizing roasting-magnetic separation of high-phosphorus oolitic iron ores.The results indica-ted that when high-phosphorus iron ore concentrates containing 54·92 mass% iron and 0·76 mass% phosphorus were directly processed through acid leaching,iron ore concentrates containing 55·74 mass% iron and 0·33 mass%phosphorus with an iron recovery of 84·64% and dephosphorization of 63·79% were obtained.When high-phosphor-us iron ore concentrates activated by ball milling were processed by acid leaching,iron ore concentrates containing 56·03 mass% iron and 0·21 mass% phosphorus with an iron recovery of 85·65% and dephosphorization of 77·49%were obtained.Meanwhile,when high-phosphorus iron ore concentrates activated by HPRG were processed by acid leaching,iron ore concentrates containing 58·02 mass% iron and 0·10 mass% phosphorus were obtained,with the iron recovery reaching 88·42% and the dephosphorization rate reaching 88·99%.Mechanistic studies demonstrated that ball milling can reduce the particle size,demonstrating a prominent reunion phenomenon.In contrast,HPRG pretreatment contributes to the formation of more cracks within the particles and selective dissociation of iron and P bearing minerals,which can provide the favorable kinetic conditions to accelerate the solid-liquid reaction rate.As such,the crystal structure is destroyed and the surface energy of mineral particles is strengthened by mechanical ac-tivation,further strengthening the dephosphorization.

  20. Particle concentration and flux dynamics in the atmospheric boundary layer as the indicator of formation mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauros, J.; Sogachev, Andrey; Smolander, S.;

    2010-01-01

    profile of particle number distribution does not correspond to observations. Instead organic induced nucleation leads to good agreement confirming the relevance of the aerosol formation mechanism including organic compounds emitted by biosphere. Simulation of aerosol concentration inside the atmospheric......We carried out column model simulations to study particle fluxes and deposition and to evaluate different particle formation mechanisms at a boreal forest site in Finland. We show that kinetic nucleation of sulphuric acid cannot be responsible for new particle formation alone as the vertical...

  1. Characterization of long-term and seasonal variations of black carbon (BC concentrations at Neumayer, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Weller

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Continuous black carbon (BC observations were conducted from 1999 through 2009 by an Aethalometer (AE10 and from 2006 through 2011 by a Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP at Neumayer Station (NM under stringent contamination control. Considering the respective observation period, BC concentrations measured by the MAAP were somewhat higher (median ± standard deviation: 2.1 ± 2.0 ng m−3 compared to the AE10 results (1.6 ± 2.1 ng m−3. Neither for the AE10 nor for the MAAP data set a significant long-term trend could be detected. Consistently a pronounced seasonality was observed with both instruments showing a primary annual maximum between October and November and a minimum in April with a maximum/minimum ratio of 4.5/1.6 = 3.8 and 2.7/0.64 = 4.2 for the MAAP and AE10 data, respectively. Occasionally a secondary summer maximum in January/February was visible. With the aim to assess the impact of BC on optical properties of the aerosol at NM, we evaluated the BC data along with particle scattering coefficients measured by an integrating nephelometer. We found the mean single scattering albedo of ω550 = 0.992 ± 0.0090 (median: 0.994 at a wavelength of 550 nm with a range of values from 0.95 to 1.0.

  2. Characterization of long-term and seasonal variations of black carbon (BC) concentrations at Neumayer, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, R.; Minikin, A.; Petzold, A.; Wagenbach, D.; König-Langlo, G.

    2013-02-01

    Continuous black carbon (BC) observations were conducted from 1999 through 2009 by an Aethalometer (AE10) and from 2006 through 2011 by a Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP) at Neumayer Station (NM) under stringent contamination control. Considering the respective observation period, BC concentrations measured by the MAAP were somewhat higher (median ± standard deviation: 2.1 ± 2.0 ng m-3) compared to the AE10 results (1.6 ± 2.1 ng m-3). Neither for the AE10 nor for the MAAP data set a significant long-term trend could be detected. Consistently a pronounced seasonality was observed with both instruments showing a primary annual maximum between October and November and a minimum in April with a maximum/minimum ratio of 4.5/1.6 = 3.8 and 2.7/0.64 = 4.2 for the MAAP and AE10 data, respectively. Occasionally a secondary summer maximum in January/February was visible. With the aim to assess the impact of BC on optical properties of the aerosol at NM, we evaluated the BC data along with particle scattering coefficients measured by an integrating nephelometer. We found the mean single scattering albedo of ω550 = 0.992 ± 0.0090 (median: 0.994) at a wavelength of 550 nm with a range of values from 0.95 to 1.0.

  3. Characterization of long-term and seasonal variations of black carbon (BC concentrations at Neumayer, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Weller

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Continuous black carbon (BC observations were conducted from 1999 through 2009 by an Aethalometer (AE10 and from 2006 through 2011 by a Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP at Neumayer Station (NM under stringent contamination control. Considering the respective observation period, BC concentrations measured by the MAAP were somewhat higher (median ± standard deviation: 2.1 ± 2.0 ng m−3 compared to the AE10 results (1.6 ± 2.1 ng m−3. Neither for the AE10 nor for the MAAP data set a significant long-term trend could be detected. Consistently a pronounced seasonality was observed with both instruments showing a primary annual maximum between October and November and a minimum in April with a maximum/minimum ratio of 4.5/1.6 = 3.8 and 2.7/0.64 = 4.2 for the MAAP and AE10 data, respectively. Occasionally a secondary summer maximum in January/February was visible. With the aim to assess the impact of BC on optical properties of the aerosol at NM, we evaluated the BC data along with particle scattering coefficients measured by an integrating nephelometer. We found the mean single scattering albedo of ω550 = 0.992 ± 0.0090 (median: 0.994 at a wavelength of 550 nm with a range of values from 0.95 to 1.0.

  4. Effect of L (+) ascorbic acid and monosodium glutamate concentration on the morphology of calcium carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraya, Mohamed El-shahte Ismaiel

    2015-11-01

    In this study, monosodium glutamate and ascorbic acid were used as crystal and growth modifiers to control the crystallization of CaCO3. Calcium carbonate prepared by reacting a mixed solution of Na2CO3 with CaCl2 at ambient temperature, (25 °C), constant Ca++/ CO3- - molar ratio and pH with stirring. The polymorph and morphology of the crystals were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results indicate that rhombohedral calcite was only formed in water without organic additives, and both calcite and spherical vaterite with various morphologies were produced in the presence of monosodium glutamate. The content of vaterite increased as the monosodium glutamate increased. In addition, spherical vaterite was obtained in the presence of different concentrations of ascorbic acid. The spherical vaterite posses an aggregate shape composed of nano-particles, ranging from 30 to 50 nm as demonstrated by the SEM and TEM analyses. Therefore, the ascorbic stabilizes vaterite and result in nano-particles compared to monosodium glutamate.

  5. SWNT nucleation from carbon-coated SiO2 nanoparticles via a vapor-solid-solid mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Alister J; Chandrakumar, K R S; Irle, Stephan; Morokuma, Keiji

    2011-01-26

    Since the discovery of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in the early 1990s, the most commonly accepted model of SWNT growth on traditional catalysts (i.e., transition metals including Fe, Co, Ni, etc.) is the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. In more recent years, the synthesis of SWNTs on nontraditional catalysts, such as SiO(2), has also been reported. The precise atomistic mechanism explaining SWNT growth on nontraditional catalysts, however, remains unknown. In this work, CH(4) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) nucleation on SiO(2) nanoparticles have been investigated using quantum-chemical molecular dynamics (QM/MD) methods. Upon supply of CH(x) species to the surface of a model SiO(2) nanoparticle, CO was produced as the main chemical product of the CH(4) CVD process, in agreement with a recent experimental investigation [Bachmatiuk et al., ACS Nano 2009, 3, 4098]. The production of CO occurred simultaneously with the carbothermal reduction of the SiO(2) nanoparticle. However, this reduction, and the formation of amorphous SiC, was restricted to the nanoparticle surface, with the core of the SiO(2) nanoparticle remaining oxygen-rich. In cases of high carbon concentration, SWNT nucleation then followed, and was driven by the formation of isolated sp(2)-carbon networks via the gradual coalescence of adjacent polyyne chains. These simulations indicate that the carbon saturation of the SiO(2) surface was a necessary prerequisite for SWNT nucleation. These simulations also indicate that a vapor-solid-solid mechanism, rather than a VLS mechanism, is responsible for SWNT nucleation on SiO(2). Fundamental differences between SWNT nucleation on nontraditional and traditional catalysts are therefore observed.

  6. On the mechanism of reactive adsorption of dibenzothiophene on organic waste derived carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ania, C. O.; Parra, J. B.; Arenillas, A.; Rubiera, F.; Bandosz, T. J.; Pis, J. J.

    2007-04-01

    The mechanism of reactive adsorption of dibenzothiophene (DBT) on a series of modified carbons derived from the recycled PET was investigated. The influence of the oxygen functionalities of the adsorbent on the DBT adsorption capacity was explored. The results revealed that adsorption of DBT on activated carbons is governed by two types of contributions: physisorption on the microporous network of the carbons and chemisorption. Introduction of surface acidic groups enhanced the performance of the carbons as a result of their specific interactions with DBT. The nature of the acidic groups is a decisive factor in the selectivity of the reactive adsorption process.

  7. On the structural and mechanical properties of Fe-filled carbon nanotubes: a computer simulation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldano, G; Mariscal, M M

    2009-04-22

    The structural and mechanical properties of single-and multi-walled carbon nanotubes filled with iron nanowires are studied using a recent parameterization of the modified embedded atom model. We have analyzed the effect of different crystal structures of iron (bcc and fcc) inside carbon nanotubes of different topographies. We have computed strain energy versus strain curves for pure systems: Fe nanowires, carbon and Fe-filled carbon nanotubes. A noticeable difference is found when these monatomic systems are joined to form iron-capped nanowires and where multi-layers of graphite are added to the nanotubes.

  8. Effect of milling time and CNT concentration on hardness of CNT/Al{sub 2024} composites produced by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Bustamante, R. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnologia, Miguel de Cervantes No.120, C.P. 31109, Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico); Perez-Bustamante, F. [Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua (UACH), Facultad de Ingenieria, Circuito No. 1 Nuevo Campus Universitario, C.P. 31125, Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico); Estrada-Guel, I. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnologia, Miguel de Cervantes No.120, C.P. 31109, Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico); Licea-Jimenez, L. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados S.C. (CIMAV), Unidad Mty, Autopista Monterrey-Aeropuerto Km 10, A. P. 43, C.P. 66600, Apodaca, N.L. (Mexico); Miki-Yoshida, M. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnologia, Miguel de Cervantes No.120, C.P. 31109, Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico); Martinez-Sanchez, R., E-mail: roberto.martiez@cimav.edu.mx [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnologia, Miguel de Cervantes No.120, C.P. 31109, Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico)

    2013-01-15

    Carbon nanotube/2024 aluminum alloy (CNT/Al{sub 2024}) composites were fabricated with a combination of mechanical alloying (MA) and powder metallurgy routes. Composites were microstructurally and mechanically evaluated at sintering condition. A homogeneous dispersion of CNTs in the Al matrix was observed by a field emission scanning electron microscopy. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy confirmed not only the presence of well dispersed CNTs but also needle-like shape aluminum carbide (Al{sub 4}C{sub 3}) crystals in the Al matrix. The formation of Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} was suggested as the interaction between the outer shells of CNTs and the Al matrix during MA process in which crystallization took place after the sintering process. The mechanical behavior of composites was evaluated by Vickers microhardness measurements indicating a significant improvement in hardness as function of the CNT content. This improvement was associated to a homogeneous dispersion of CNTs and the presence of Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} in the aluminum alloy matrix. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The 2024 aluminum alloy was reinforced by CNTs by mechanical alloying process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Composites were microstructural and mechanically evaluated after sintering condition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The greater the CNT concentration, the greater the hardness of the composites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher hardness in composites is achieved at 20 h of milling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} does not present a direct relationship with the milling time.

  9. Fluorophotometric determination of critical micelle concentration (CMC) of ionic and non-ionic surfactants with carbon dots via Stokes shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavkush Bhaisare, Mukesh; Pandey, Sunil; Shahnawaz Khan, M; Talib, Abou; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2015-01-01

    A new and facile method for the determination of critical micelle concentration (CMC) of ionic and non-ionic surfactants is proposed in this article. Carbon dots exhibited substantial fluorescence and therefore enhanced the sensitivity of this evaluation. Understanding the formation of surfactant micelles is vital for the applications of biomedicine such as drug fabrication and smart molecular vehicles in delivering therapeutic dosage to various molecular sites. The fluorescence property of carbon dots was utilized for the first time to estimate the critical micelle concentration of surfactants. The central concept of the approach is based on the Stokes shift determination of a system composed of constant amount of carbon dots with varying concentrations of ionic and non-ionic surfactants. The synthesized carbon dots were characterized by FTIR, TEM, XRD, Raman, UV, and fluorescence spectroscope. The carbon dots were excited at 280 nm so as to obtain maximum emission for the Stokes shift measurement. The CMC value of cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Triton X-100, dodecyldimethyl(3-sulfopropyl)ammonium hydroxide (SB-12) evaluated by this approach was found to be 0.98, 7.3, 0.19, and 3.5mM, respectively. The signals of spectra were assigned and explained in terms of both electron transitions between specific molecular orbital and the interaction with solvent.

  10. Mechanical stability model of progradational carbonate platform margins under tectonic loads: Deformation of Cretaceous carbonate platforms in the Sierra Madre Oriental fold-thrust belt (east central Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Juan; Suter, Max

    2015-02-01

    Shortening in the Sierra Madre Oriental fold-thrust belt (east central Mexico) is localized along the margins of Cretaceous carbonate platforms and controlled by mechanical stratigraphy. The platform margins are deformed by imbricate series of thrust ramps, whereas the coeval basins and platform interiors are deformed by map-scale detachment folds. Here we present a finite element model to evaluate the influence of the boundary geometry and boundary conditions on the style of deformation observed at these basinward progradational platform margins. We calculate the stress distribution in a linearly elastic platform-basin transition zone under the action of horizontal tectonic stress, taking into account changes of rock mechanical properties across the platform margin, as well as their dependence on direction, and infer the resulting fracture patterns based on the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion. Stress concentrations are predicted at the contacts between the massive rocks of the platform margin and the well-layered rocks of both, the platform interior and the adjacent basin. Brittle failure of the platform border can be mostly attributed to three effects: mechanical coupling between the carbonate platform and a substratum of moderate to low viscosity, variations in layering and texture that governed the mechanical properties of the involved carbonates as well as their dependence on direction, and the development of sharp domain boundary corners associated with progradational facies changes. In contrast, the dip of the basement and a possible taper of the overlying Upper Cretaceous shale toward the basin appear to have little influence on the mechanical failure of the platform margin.

  11. Sublethal concentrations of silver nanoparticles affect the mechanical stability of biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grün, Alexandra Y; Meier, Jutta; Metreveli, George; Schaumann, Gabriele E; Manz, Werner

    2016-12-01

    Bacterial biofilms are most likely confronted with silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) as a pollutant stressor in aquatic systems. In this study, biofilms of Aquabacterium citratiphilum were exposed for 20 h to 30 and 70 nm citrate stabilized Ag NPs in low-dose concentrations ranging from 600 to 2400 μg l(-1), and the Ag NP-mediated effects on descriptive, structural, and functional biofilm characteristics, including viability, protein content, architecture, and mechanical stability, were investigated. Viability, based on the bacterial cell membrane integrity of A. citratiphilum, as determined by epifluorescence microscopy, remained unaffected after Ag NP exposure. Moreover, in contrast to information in the current literature, protein contents of cells and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and biofilm architecture, including dry mass, thickness, and density, were not significantly impacted by exposure to Ag NPs. However, the biofilms themselves served as effective sinks for Ag NPs, exhibiting enrichment factors from 5 to 8. Biofilms showed a greater capacity to accumulate 30 nm sized Ag NPs than 70 nm Ag NPs. Furthermore, Ag NPs significantly threatened the mechanical stability of biofilms, as determined by a newly developed assay. For 30 nm Ag NPs, the mechanical stability of biofilms decreased as the Ag NP concentrations applied to them increased. In contrast, 70 nm Ag NPs produced a similar decrease in mechanical stability for each applied concentration. Overall, this finding demonstrates that exposure to Ag NPs triggers remarkable changes in biofilm adhesion and/or cohesiveness. Because of biofilm-mediated ecological services, this response raises environmental concerns regarding Ag NP release into freshwater systems, even in sublethal concentrations.

  12. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in UK soils and the influence of soil, vegetation type and seasonality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Leon J L; Shotbolt, Laura; Ashmore, Mike R

    2012-06-15

    Given the lack of studies which measured dissolved organic carbon (DOC) over long periods, especially in non-forest habitat, the aim of this study was to expand the existing datasets with data of mainly non-forest sites that were representative of the major soil and habitat types in the UK. A further aim was to predict DOC concentrations from a number of biotic and abiotic explanatory variables such as rainfall, temperature, vegetation type and soil type in a multivariate way. Pore water was sampled using Rhizon or Prenart samplers at two to three week intervals for 1 year. DOC, pH, organic carbon, carbon/nitrogen (C:N) ratios of soils and slope were measured and data on vegetation, soil type, temperature and precipitation were obtained. The majority of the variation in DOC concentrations between the UK sites could be explained by simple empirical models that included annual precipitation, and soil C:N ratio with precipitation being negatively related to DOC concentrations and C:N ratio being positively related to DOC concentrations. Our study adds significantly to the data reporting DOC concentrations in soils, especially in grasslands, heathlands and moorlands. Broad climatic and site factors have been identified as key factors influencing DOC concentrations.

  13. Charge-carrier transport mechanisms in composites containing carbon-nanotube inclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usanov, D. A., E-mail: UsanovDA@info.sgu.ru; Skripal’, A. V.; Romanov, A. V. [Saratov State University (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    From the microwave-radiation transmittance and reflectance spectra, the temperature dependence of the complex permittivity of carbon nanotubes, subjected to high-temperature annealing, and composite materials produced on their basis is determined. The electron transport mechanisms in composites with inclusions of unannealed carbon nanotubes and nanotubes subjected to high-temperature annealing are determined. The influence of the annealing temperature on the parameters that are characteristic of these mechanisms and control the temperature dependence of the conductivity of multiwall carbon nanotubes is established.

  14. Investigation of Effect of Carbon Fibres on the Mechanical Properties of the Hybrid Composite Laminate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidyashankar B V

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work Fabric made of woven carbon, glass along with epoxy resins are used to make composite laminate. Average resin fraction on weight basis after curing was 45%. The different types of specimens are prepared with variable percentage of carbon fibres. The mechanical tests such as Tensile test, compression test, flexural test and impact tests are conducted over the specimens and the results are evaluated which indicates that the increase in carbon content increases the mechanical properties of the composite laminate .

  15. Elemental carbon, organic carbon, and dust concentrations in snow measured with thermal optical and gravimetric methods: Variations during the 2007-2013 winters at Sapporo, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchiki, Katsuyuki; Aoki, Teruo; Niwano, Masashi; Matoba, Sumito; Kodama, Yuji; Adachi, Kouji

    2015-01-01

    mass concentrations of light-absorbing snow impurities at Sapporo, Japan, were measured during six winters from 2007 to 2013. Elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) concentrations were measured with the thermal optical method, and dust concentration was determined by filter gravimetric measurement. The measurement results using the different filters were compared to assess the filtration efficiency. Adding NH4H2PO4 coagulant to melted snow samples improved the collection efficiency for EC particles by a factor of 1.45. The mass concentrations of EC, OC, and dust in the top 2 cm layer ranged in 0.007-2.8, 0.01-13, and 0.14-260 ppmw, respectively, during the six winters. The mass concentrations and their short-term variations were larger in the surface than in the subsurface. The snow impurity concentrations varied seasonally; that is, they remained relatively low during the accumulation season and gradually increased during the melting season. Although the surface snow impurities showed no discernible trend over the six winters, they varied from year to year, with a negative correlation between the snow impurity concentrations and the amount of snowfall. The surface snow impurities generally increased with the number of days elapsed since snowfall and showed a different rate for EC (1.44), OC (9.96), and dust (6.81). The possible processes causing an increase in surface snow impurities were dry deposition of atmospheric aerosols, melting of surface snow, and sublimation/evaporation of surface snow.

  16. Mechanical desorption of immobilized proteins using carbon dioxide aerosols for reusable biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Renu; Hong, Seongkyeol [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jaesung, E-mail: jjang@unist.ac.kr [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Immobilized proteins were removed using carbon dioxide aerosols. • We observed high removal efficiencies due to the aerosol treatment. • We confirmed the removal with FTIR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. • This CO{sub 2} aerosol treatment did not undermine re-functionalization. • This technique is a fast and damage-free method to reuse a sensor surface. - Abstract: Reusability of a biosensor has recently received considerable attention, and it is closely related with the effective desorption of probe molecules. We present a novel mechanical desorption technique to reuse biosensors by using periodic jets of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) aerosols (a mixture of solid and gaseous CO{sub 2}), and demonstrate its feasibility by removing physically adsorbed and covalently bonded fluorescent proteins i.e., Escherichia coli fluorescein isothiocyanate antibody and bovine serum albumin (E. coli FITC–Ab and FITC–BSA) from silicon chips. The proteins on the chip surfaces were measured by fluorescent images before and after applying the aerosols. The removal efficiency of the aerosol treatment was measured for various concentrations (1–20 μg mL{sup −1}) of E. coli FITC–Ab and FITC–BSA with two different removal cycles (5 and 11 cycles; each cycle: 8 s). We observed high removal efficiencies (>93.5% for physically adsorbed Ab and >84.6% for covalently bonded Ab) at 11 cycle aerosol treatment. This CO{sub 2} aerosol treatment did not undermine re-functionalization, which was confirmed by the fluorescent images of FITC–Abs for fresh and reused chips. Desorption of the immobilized layers was validated by Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analyses. We also conducted an experiment on the regeneration of E. coli sensing chips using this aerosol treatment, and the chips were re-used 5 times successfully. This mechanical desorption technique is a highly effective and novel strategy for reusable biosensors.

  17. Fabrication of a Mechanically Robust Carbon Nanofiber Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    seal. 8 Both mold inlet and outlet connections were created using Swagelok brand 1/4th inch fittings. The fittings were arranged to enable the...piece of stainless steel shim (Trinity Brand Industries, Inc., Part No. 6316–4) that ran the length of the main chamber inlets and is shown in Figure...2006. [10] W. Hung et al., “Rapid prototyping of three-dimensional microstructures from multiwalled carbon nanotubes,” Appl . Phys. Lett., vol. 91, p

  18. Agricultural mechanization, erosion and carbon emission: A review

    OpenAIRE

    VURARAK, Yasemin; Bilgili, Mehmet Emin

    2015-01-01

    It is essential to develop and application of different strategies for irrigated and dry agricultural areas because of global warming and climate change. Dry farming areas in Turkey is more than irrigated area. The slope of this areas is generally more than 9-12%. It can be observed mild erosion, moderate erosion , severe and more severe erosion in this respectively 14%, 20%, 63%. Increasing irreversible soil and carbon loss, erosion causes land degradation, infertile soil and climate change...

  19. Molecular and Metabolic Mechanisms of Carbon Sequestration in Marine Thrombolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobberley, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    The overall goal of my dissertation project has been to examine the molecular processes underlying carbon sequestration in lithifying microbial ecosystems, known as thrombolitic mats, and assess their feasibility for use in bioregenerative life support systems. The results of my research and education efforts funded by the Graduate Student Researchers Program can be summarized in four peer-reviewed research publication, one educational publication, two papers in preparation, and six research presentations at local and national science meetings (see below for specific details).

  20. High concentration nitrogen doped carbon nanotube anodes with superior Li+ storage performance for lithium rechargeable battery application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xifei; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Yong; Li, Yongliang; Liu, Hao; Meng, Xiangbo; Yang, Jinli; Geng, Dongsheng; Wang, Dongniu; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang

    2012-01-01

    A floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition method has been developed to synthesize carbon nanotubes doped with a high concentration of nitrogen. Their electrochemical performance as anodes for lithium ion batteries (LIBs) in comparison to pristine carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicated that the nitrogen content reaches as high as 16.4 at.%. Bamboo-like compartments were fabricated as shown by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. High concentration nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes (HN-CNTs) show approximately double reversible capacity of CNTs: 494 mAh g-1 vs. 260 mAh g-1, and present a much better rate capability than CNTs. The significantly superior electrochemical performance could be related to the high electrical conductivity and the larger number of defect sites in HN-CNTs for anodes of LIBs.

  1. Leaching Mechanism of Complicated Antimony-Lead Concentrate and Sulfur Formation in Slurry Electrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangChengyan; QiuDingfan; JiangPeihai

    2004-01-01

    Anodic reaction mechanism of complicated antimony-lead concentrate in slurry electrolysis was investigated by the anodic polarization curves determined under various conditions. The main reactions on the anode are the oxidations of FeCln(2-n) . Though the oxidation of jamesonite particle on the anode can occur during the whole process, it is less. With the help of mineralogy studies and relevant tests, the leaching reaction mechanism of jameson[to and gudmundite during slurry electrolysis was ascertained. Because of the oxidation reaction of FeCl3 produced by antimony-lead concentrate itself, the non-oxidation complex acid dissolution of jameson[re, the oxidation complex acid dissolution of gudmundite, and the oxidation of air carried by stirring, the leaching ratio of antimony reaches about 35% when HCl-NH4Cl solution is used to leach antimony-lead concentrate directly. So when the theoretical electric quantity is given to oxidation of antimony in slurry electrolysis, all of antimony, lead and iron containing in antimony-lead concentrate, are leached. The formation of sulfur is through the directly redox reaction of Fe3+ and jameson[re. The S2- in jamesonite is oxidized into S0 , and forms the crystals of sulfur again on the spot. The redox reaction of Fe3+ and H2S formed by non-oxidative acid dissolution of jamesonite is less.

  2. Photosynthetic photon flux density, carbon dioxide concentration, and vapor pressure deficit effects on photosynthesis in cacao seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacao (Theobroma cacao) is a shade plant, native to the under-story of the evergreen rain forest of the Amazon basin and adapted to low levels of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD). The influence of PPFD, leaf to air water vapor pressure deficit (VPD) and external carbon dioxide concentration...

  3. Effect of electrolyte concentration on performance of supercapacitor carbon electrode from fibers of oil palm empty fruit bunches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farma, R.; Deraman, M.; Talib, I. A.; Awitdrus, Omar, R.; Ishak, M. M.; Taer, E.; Basri, N. H.; Dolah, B. N. M.

    2015-04-01

    Fibers of oil palm empty fruit bunches were used to produce self-adhesive carbon grains (SACG). The SACG green monoliths were carbonized in N2 environment at 800°C to produce carbon monoliths (CM) and the CM was CO2 activated at 800°C for 4 hour to produce activated carbon monolith electrodes (ACM). The physical properties of the CMs and ACMs were investigated using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption-desorption. ACMs were used as electrode to fabricate symmetry supercapacitor cells and the cells which used H2SO4 electrolyte at 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 M were investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge standard techniques. In this paper we report the physical properties of the ACM electrodes and the effect of electrolyte concentration on the electrochemical properties the ACM electrodes.

  4. Physiological responses of coastal and oceanic diatoms to diurnal fluctuations in seawater carbonate chemistry under two CO2 concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Futian; Wu, Yaping; Hutchins, David A.; Fu, Feixue; Gao, Kunshan

    2016-11-01

    Diel and seasonal fluctuations in seawater carbonate chemistry are common in coastal waters, while in the open-ocean carbonate chemistry is much less variable. In both of these environments, ongoing ocean acidification is being superimposed on the natural dynamics of the carbonate buffer system to influence the physiology of phytoplankton. Here, we show that a coastal Thalassiosira weissflogii isolate and an oceanic diatom, Thalassiosira oceanica, respond differentially to diurnal fluctuating carbonate chemistry in current and ocean acidification (OA) scenarios. A fluctuating carbonate chemistry regime showed positive or negligible effects on physiological performance of the coastal species. In contrast, the oceanic species was significantly negatively affected. The fluctuating regime reduced photosynthetic oxygen evolution rates and enhanced dark respiration rates of T. oceanica under ambient CO2 concentration, while in the OA scenario the fluctuating regime depressed its growth rate, chlorophyll a content, and elemental production rates. These contrasting physiological performances of coastal and oceanic diatoms indicate that they differ in the ability to cope with dynamic pCO2. We propose that, in addition to the ability to cope with light, nutrient, and predation pressure, the ability to acclimate to dynamic carbonate chemistry may act as one determinant of the spatial distribution of diatom species. Habitat-relevant diurnal changes in seawater carbonate chemistry can interact with OA to differentially affect diatoms in coastal and pelagic waters.

  5. Cluster analysis of particulate matter (PM10) and black carbon (BC) concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žibert, Janez; Pražnikar, Jure

    2012-09-01

    The monitoring of air-pollution constituents like particulate matter (PM10) and black carbon (BC) can provide information about air quality and the dynamics of emissions. Air quality depends on natural and anthropogenic sources of emissions as well as the weather conditions. For a one-year period the diurnal concentrations of PM10 and BC in the Port of Koper were analysed by clustering days into similar groups according to the similarity of the BC and PM10 hourly derived day-profiles without any prior assumptions about working and non-working days, weather conditions or hot and cold seasons. The analysis was performed by using k-means clustering with the squared Euclidean distance as the similarity measure. The analysis showed that 10 clusters in the BC case produced 3 clusters with just one member day and 7 clusters that encompasses more than one day with similar BC profiles. Similar results were found in the PM10 case, where one cluster has a single-member day, while 7 clusters contain several member days. The clustering analysis revealed that the clusters with less pronounced bimodal patterns and low hourly and average daily concentrations for both types of measurements include the most days in the one-year analysis. A typical day profile of the BC measurements includes a bimodal pattern with morning and evening peaks, while the PM10 measurements reveal a less pronounced bimodality. There are also clusters with single-peak day-profiles. The BC data in such cases exhibit morning peaks, while the PM10 data consist of noon or afternoon single peaks. Single pronounced peaks can be explained by appropriate cluster wind speed profiles. The analysis also revealed some special day-profiles. The BC cluster with a high midnight peak at 30/04/2010 and the PM10 cluster with the highest observed concentration of PM10 at 01/05/2010 (208.0 μg m-3) coincide with 1 May, which is a national holiday in Slovenia and has very strong tradition of bonfire parties. The clustering of

  6. Low carbon steel: Metallurgical structure vs. mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shull, Robert D.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to provide a low cost, simple experiment for either demonstration purposes or as a laboratory experiment that will teach the student the importance of the thermal-mechanical history of a metallic alloy in determining that material's mechanical behavior. Hairpins are subjected to various treatments. The experimental equipment and procedures are discussed.

  7. Low concentrations of bisphenol a suppress thyroid hormone receptor transcription through a nongenomic mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Zhi-Guo [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085 (China); Tang, Yuan [Department of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, Third Military Medical University, 30 Yanzheng Street, Chongqing 400038 (China); Liu, Yu-Xiang [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085 (China); Yuan, Ye; Zhao, Bao-Quan [Beijing Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, 27 Taiping Road, Beijing 100850 (China); Chao, Xi-Juan [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085 (China); Zhu, Ben-Zhan, E-mail: bzhu@rcees.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2012-02-15

    Bisphenol (BPA) is one of the highest-volume chemicals produced worldwide, and human exposure to BPA is thought to be ubiquitous. Various rodent and in vitro studies have shown that thyroid hormone (TH) function can be impaired by BPA. However, it is still unknown if low concentrations of BPA can suppress the thyroid hormone receptor (TR) transcription. The present study aims to investigate the possible suppressing effects of low concentrations of BPA on TR transcription and the involved mechanism(s) in CV-1 cells derived from cercopithecus aethiops monkey kidneys. Using gene reporter assays, BPA at concentrations as low as 10{sup −9} M suppresses TR or steroid receptor coactivator-1(SRC-1)-enhanced TR transcription, but not reducing TR/SRC-1 interaction in mammalian two-hybrid and glutathione S-transferase pull-down studies. It has been further shown that both nuclear receptor co-repressor (N-CoR) and silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT) are recruited to the TR-β1 by BPA in the presence of physiologic concentrations of T3 or T4. However, the overexpression of β3 integrin or c-Src significantly reduces BPA-induced recruitment of N-CoR/SMRT to TR or suppression of TR transcription. Furthermore, BPA inhibits the T3/T4-mediated interassociation of the β3 integrin/c-Src/MAPK/TR-β1 pathways by the co-immunoprecipitation. These results indicate that low concentrations of BPA suppress the TR transcription by disrupting physiologic concentrations of T3/T4-mediated β3 integrin/c-Src/MAPK/TR-β1 pathways, followed by recruiting N-CoR/SMRT to TR-β1, providing a novel insight regarding the TH disruption effects of low concentration BPA. -- Highlights: ► Environmentally relevant concentrations of BPA suppress TR transcription. ► BPA recruits the N-CoR/SMRT to TR under the physiologic concentrations of T3/T4. ► BPA disrupts T3/T4-mediated β3 integrin/c-Src/MAPK/TR-β1 pathways.

  8. Quantum Chemical Study on a New Mechanism of One-carbon Unit Transfer Reaction:The Water-assisted Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO,Qing-An(乔青安); CAI,Zheng-Ting(蔡政亭); FENG,Da-Cheng(冯大诚)

    2004-01-01

    It is a theoretical study on the water-assisted mechanism of one-carbon unit transfer reaction, in which the energy barrier for each transition state lowered by about 80-100 kJ/mol when compared with the one in no-water-involved mechanism. The water-assisted path 4 is the favorite reaction way. Our results well explained the presumption from experiments.

  9. Concentration gradients at the mineral-solution interface: implications for understanding dissolution mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; Patiño-López, Luis David; Putnis, Christine V.; Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos; Putnis, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Dissolution is a key process in fluid-rock interactions, such as in chemical weathering, CO2 carbonation reactions, metasomatism, and metamorphism. Many multicomponent rock-forming minerals are reported to dissolve incongruently, because the elemental molar ratios, measured in the fluid during dissolution experiments, that differ from those in the solid. This frequently results in the formation of chemically and structurally altered zones at the fluid-solid interface of varying thickness that are depleted in some elements relative to the bulk mineral composition. Although the mechanisms of the formation of these altered layers is still a matter of debate (see e.g. Ruiz-Agudo et al. 2012 and Schott et al. 2012), recent AFM studies on the dissolution of two multicomponent minerals, dolomite, Ca0.5Mg0.5CO3 (Urosevic et al. 2012), and wollastonite, CaSiO3 (Ruiz-Agudo et al. 2012), provide experimental evidence showing that these layers are formed in a two-step process: (i) stoichiometric dissolution of the pristine mineral surfaces and (ii) precipitation of a secondary phase. This occurs despite the fact that the bulk solution is undersaturated with respect to such a phase. It has been suggested that after stoichiometric dissolution of the mineral, a boundary layer of fluid in contact with the surface becomes supersaturated with respect to a secondary phase that then precipitates. Here we present in situ observations of the evolution of the fluid composition at the interface during dissolution in acidic solutions (pH 1.5) of dolomite and wollastonite using real-time phase-shift interferometry. We show that immediately when the sparingly soluble dolomite or wollastonite crystals are in contact with the solution, the refractive index of the solution at the crystal surface sharply increases. A steep refractive index gradient (i.e., concentration gradient) develops as a consequence of mineral dissolution producing an interfacial fluid with a different composition to the

  10. On the relationship between the non-local clustering mechanism and preferential concentration

    CERN Document Server

    Bragg, Andrew D; Collins, Lance R

    2015-01-01

    `Preferential concentration' (\\emph{Phys. Fluids} \\textbf{A3}:1169--78, 1991) refers to the clustering of inertial particles in the high-strain, low-rotation regions of turbulence. The `centrifuge mechanism' of Maxey (\\emph{J. Fluid Mech.} \\textbf{174}:441--65, 1987) appears to explain this phenomenon. In a recent paper, Bragg \\& Collins (\\emph{New J. Phys.} \\textbf{16}:055013, 2014) showed that the centrifuge mechanism is dominant only in the regime ${St\\ll1}$, where $St$ is the Stokes number based on the Kolmogorov time scale. Outside this regime, the centrifuge mechanism gives way to a non-local, path-history symmetry breaking mechanism. However, despite the change in the clustering mechanism, the instantaneous particle positions continue to correlate with high-strain, low-rotation regions of the turbulence. In this paper, we analyze the exact equation governing the radial distribution function and show how the non-local clustering mechanism is influenced by, but not dependent upon, the preferential sa...

  11. DFT Thermodynamic Research of the Pyrolysis Mechanism of the Carbon Matrix Precursor Toluene for Carbon Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Hui

    2001-01-01

    [1]Deutsch S. , Keieger K. A. , J. Phy. Chem, 66(19), 1 569(1962)[2]Ooya sugirou, Kobayashi Hiroshi. , Inoue Masahide, et al. , Chem. Technology, 72, 1 300(1969)[3]Ruden A. P. , Vestnik Ko. , Moskov Univ. Ser, 15(5), 69(1969)[4]WANG Yi-Gui, SUN Chang-Jun, DENG Cong-Hao. Science in China (Series B), 28(5), 431(1998)[5]YANG Ming-Li, SUN Ze-Min, YAN Guo-Sen. Chemical Journal of Chinese Universities, 20(3). 450(1999)[6]WANG Hui, ZHAI Gao-hong, YANG Hai-feng, et al. , Chem. J. of Chinese Universities, 22(5), 800(2001)[7]WANG Hui, LUO Rui-Ying, YANG Yan-Qing, et al. , Chinese Journal of Materials Research, 18(4), 10(2000)[8]ZHAI Gao-Hong, WANG Hui, RAN Xing-Quan, et al. , Materials Science and Engineering, (2000)[9]WANG Hui, ZHAI Gao-Hong, RAN Xing-Quan, et al., Chinese Journal of Inorganic Chemistry, 16(6), 879(2000)[10]Ljubisa R. R. , Murthy Karra., Kristina Skokova. , et al. , Carbon. , 36(12), 1 841(1998)[11]Becke D., Density-functional Thermochemistry. Ⅲ. The Role of Exact Exchange, J. Chem. Phys. , 98, 5 648(1993)[12]Bicout D. , Field M. , Quantum Mechanical Simulation Method For Studing Biological System(Les Houches Workship). Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1 (1995)[13]Frisch M. J.,Trucks G. W. , Schlegel H. B., et al. , Gaussian 98, Revision A. 6, Gaussian, Inc., Pittsburgh PA, 1998[14]Eugene S., Domalski and Elizalzeth D. H. , J. Phys. Chem. , 17, 1 637 (1988)[15]Sharon G. L. , Joel F. L. and Rhoda D. L. , J. Phys. Chem. , 13, 695(1984)[16]Cleveland, David, R. L. (Editor-in-Chief), CRC. Handbook of Chem. and Phy. , (77th Edition), CEC Press INC, 1996-1997:9-27[17]FU Xian-Cai, CHEN Rui-Hua. Physical Chemistry, People Education Press, Beijing, a. 132; b. 191; c. 366(1982)[18]WANG Hui, YANG Hai-fegng, ZHAI Gao-hong, et al. , Acta Chemica Sinca, (1), 17(2001)

  12. Effect of composition on mechanical behaviour of diamond-like carbon coatings modified with titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caschera, D., E-mail: daniela.caschera@ismn.cnr.i [Institute for the Study of Nanostructured Materials, ISMN - CNR, P.O. Box 10, 00015 Monterotondo Stazione (Italy); Federici, F.; Pandolfi, L.; Kaciulis, S. [Institute for the Study of Nanostructured Materials, ISMN - CNR, P.O. Box 10, 00015 Monterotondo Stazione (Italy); Sebastiani, M.; Bemporad, E. [Dip.to di Ingegneria Industriale e Meccanica, Universita di Roma Tre, Via Vasca Navale 84, 00146 Roma (Italy); Padeletti, G. [Institute for the Study of Nanostructured Materials, ISMN - CNR, P.O. Box 10, 00015 Monterotondo Stazione (Italy)

    2011-03-01

    In this study, diamond-like carbon (DLC) films modified with titanium were deposited by plasma decomposition of metallorganic precursor, titanium isopropoxide in CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar gas atmosphere. The obtained films were composed of amorphous titanium oxide and nanocrystalline titanium carbide, embedded in an amorphous hydrogenated (a-C:H) matrix. The TiC/TiO{sub 2} ratio in the DLC matrix was found to be dependent on the deposition parameters. The dependence of the films chemical composition on gas mixture and substrate temperature was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, whereas the crystallinity of TiC nanoparticles and their dimension were evaluated by X-ray diffraction. The size of TiC crystallites varied from 10 to 35 nm, depending on the process parameters. The intrinsic hardness of 10-13 GPa, elastic modulus of 170-200 GPa and hardness-to-modulus ratio of obtained coatings were measured by the nanoindentation technique. Obtained results demonstrated a correlation of mechanical properties with the chemical composition and the ratio of amorphous/crystalline phases in the films. In particular, the formation of nanocrystalline TiC with atomic concentration not exceeding 10% and with grain size between 10 nm and 15 nm resulted in significantly enhanced mechanical properties of composite material in comparison with ordinary DLC films.

  13. Mechanical agitation induces counterintuitive aggregation of pre-dispersed carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ricardo M F; Buzaglo, Matat; Regev, Oren; Furó, István; Marques, Eduardo F

    2017-05-01

    Mechanical agitation is commonly used to fragment and disperse insoluble materials in liquids. However, here we show that when pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes pre-dispersed in water are subject to vortex-shaking for very short periods (typically 10-60s, power density ∼0.002WmL(-1)), re-aggregation counterintuitively occurs. The initial dispersions are produced using surfactants as dispersants and powerful tip sonication (∼1WmL(-1)) followed by centrifugation. Detailed imaging by light and electron microscopies shows that the vortex-induced aggregates consist of loose networks (1-10(2)μm in size) of intertwined tubes and thin bundles. The average aggregate size increases with vortexing time in an apparently logarithmic manner and depends on the dispersant used, initial concentration of nanotubes and size distribution of bundles. The aggregation is, nonetheless, reversible: if the vortex-shaken dispersions are mildly bath-sonicated (∼0.03WmL(-1)), the flocs break down and re-dispersal occurs. Molecular insight for the mechanism behind this surprising phenomenon is put forth.

  14. Characterization of the Mechanical and Electromechanical Properties of Carbon Nanotube-Latex Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Long

    The safe, reliable, and efficient operation of structural systems can be undermined by various damage modes. To identify and respond to structural damage in a timely fashion, technologies for structural health monitoring (SHM) have been extensively studied and widely applied in practice. In this context, strain sensors play a crucial role in evaluating structural performance, as they can provide insights about internal stresses within structural components. As compared to conventional rigid and locally implemented strain sensors, piezoresistive nanostructured materials provide considerable opportunities for developing flexible, light-weight, and densely distributed sensors or "sensing skins." Although many types of nanomaterial-based strain sensors have been fabricated, most of them rely on complicated and expensive manufacturing procedures, which hinder their large-scale applications. To address the aforementioned limitations, this thesis proposes the development, optimization, and characterization of a type of spray-fabricated carbon nanotube (CNT)-based thin film strain sensor. By using spray coating or airbrushing, thin films can be coated and readily applied onto large structural surfaces. It was found that the mechanical and electrical properties of the nanocomposite films could be optimized by modifying CNT concentrations and conducting post-fabrication annealing. Overall, the CNT nanocomposite films possess favorable mechanical properties as well as stable and reversible electromechanical properties, rendering them promising candidates as strain sensors suitable for SHM applications.

  15. Removal Mechanism of Aqueous Lead by a Novel Eco-material:Carbonate Hydroxyapatite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huanyan XU; Lei YANG; Peng WANG; Yu LIU; Mingsheng PENG

    2007-01-01

    Kinetics and mechanisms on the removal of aqueous lead ion by carbonate hydroxyapatite (CHap) are investigated in the present work. Experimental results show that, in the whole pH range, the lead removal percentage increases with decreasing pH values and reaches a maximum at pH=2-3. Under some conditions,the lead residual concentration is below national integrated wastewater discharge standard, even drinking water standard. The removal behavior is a complicated non-homogeneous solid/liquid reaction, which can be described by two stages from kinetic point of view. At the earlier stage, reaction rate is so fast that its kinetic course is intricate, which requires further study. At the latter stage, the rate of reaction becomes slow and the process of reaction accords with one order reaction kinetic equation. Experimental results show that the relationship between reaction rate constant k1 and temperature T accords to Arrhenius Equation, and the activation energy of sorption (Ea) is 11.93 k J/mol and frequency factor (A) is 2.51 s-1. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive X-ray fluoresence spectrometer (SEM-EDS) and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) test were conducted in this work. It is indicated that the main mechanism is dissolution-precipitation, accompanying with superficial sorption.

  16. Evaluation of Cu Ion Concentration Effects on Cu Etching Rate in Chemical-Mechanical Polishing Slurry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Hideaki; Sugiura, Osamu; Matsumura, Yoshiyuki; Kinoshita, Masaharu

    2007-04-01

    The effects of Cu ion concentration of the different solutions on Cu etching rate were investigated. From the dipping experiment of Cu substrates in different solutions of malic acid, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), benzotriazole (BTA), and Cu ions, it was revealed that Cu etching rate is increased if the concentration of Cu(II) ions added in the solution is high. This is considered to be caused by the effect of Cu(II) ions on H2O2 molecules. In the solution of pH 7, the Cu etching rate increased markedly between 1.7× 10-4 and 3.4× 10-4 M Cu(II) ion concentrations. The maximum increase in the etching rate was from 990 to 2200 nm/min at a H2O2 concentration of 2 wt %. In the solution of pH 3, a marked change in the etching rate was not observed. Our results show that the concentration of Cu ions on the polishing pad in chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) process is very important.

  17. Infiltration Effects on Residential Pollutant Concentrations for Continuous and Intermittent Mechanical Ventilation Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, Max; Logue, Jennifer; Singer, Brett

    2010-06-01

    The prevailing residential ventilation standard in North America, American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62.2, specifies volumetric airflow requirements as a function of the overall size of the home and the number of bedrooms, assumes a fixed, minimal amount of infiltration, and requires mechanical ventilation to achieve the remainder. The standard allows for infiltration credits and intermittent ventilation patterns that can be shown to provide comparable performance. Whole-house ventilation methods have a substantial effect on time-varying indoor pollutant concentrations. If alternatives specified by Standard 62.2, such as intermittent ventilation, are used, short-term pollutant concentrations could exceed acute health standards even if chronic health standards are met.The authors present a methodology for comparing ASHRAE- and non-ASHRAE-specified ventilation scenarios on relative indoor pollutant concentrations. We use numerical modeling to compare the maximum time-averaged concentrations for acute exposure relevant (1-hour, 8-hour, 24-hour ) and chronic exposure relevant (1-year) time periods for four different ventilation scenarios in six climates with a range of normalized leakage values. The results suggest that long-term concentrations are the most important metric for assessing the effectiveness of whole-house ventilation systems in meeting exposure standards and that, if chronic health exposure standards are met, acute standards will also be met.

  18. Geomorphic and climate influences on soil organic carbon concentration at large catchment scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, G. R.; Martinez, C.; Wells, T.; Dever, C.; Willgoose, G. R.; Bissett, A.

    2013-12-01

    Soils represent the largest terrestrial sink of carbon on Earth. Managing the soil organic carbon (SOC) pool is becoming increasingly important in light of growing concerns over global food security and the climatic effects of anthropogenic CO2 emissions. The development of accurate predictive SOC models are an important step for both land resource managers and policy makers alike. Presently, a number of SOC models are available which incorporate environmental data to produce SOC estimates. The accuracy of these models varies significantly over a range of landscapes due to the highly complex nature of SOC dynamics. Fundamental gaps exist in our understanding of SOC controls. To date, studies of SOC controls, and the subsequent models derived from their findings have focussed mainly on North American and European landscapes. Additionally, SOC studies often focus on the paddock to small catchment scale. Consequently, information about SOC in Australian landscapes and at the larger scale is limited. This study examines controls over SOC across a large catchment of approximately 600 km2 in the Upper Hunter Valley, New South Wales, Australia. The aim was to develop a predictive model for use across a range of catchment sizes and climate. Here it was found that elevation (derived from DEMs) and vegetation (above ground biomass quantified by remote sensing were the primary controls of SOC. SOC was seen to increase with elevation and NDVI. This relationship is believed to be a reflection of rainfall patterns across the study area and plant growth potential. Further, a relationship was observed between SOC and the environmental tracer 137Cs which suggests that SOC and 137Cs move through catchment via similar sediment transport mechanisms. Therefore loss of SOC by erosion and gain by deposition may be necessary to be accounted for in any SOC budget. Model validation indicated that the use of simple linear relationships could predict SOC based on rainfall and vegetation

  19. Mechanisms controlling soil carbon sequestration under atmospheric nitrogen deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.L. Sinsabaugh; D.R. Zak; D.L. Moorhead

    2008-02-19

    Increased atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition can alter the processing and storage of organic carbon in soils. In 2000, we began studying the effects of simulated atmospheric N deposition on soil carbon dynamics in three types of northern temperate forest that occur across a wide geographic range in the Upper Great Lakes region. These ecosystems range from 100% oak in the overstory (black oak-white oak ecosystem; BOWO) to 0% overstory oak (sugar maple-basswood; SMBW) and include the sugar maple-red oak ecosystem (SMRO) that has intermediate oak abundance. The leaf litter biochemistry of these ecosystems range from highly lignified litter (BOWO) to litter of low lignin content (SMBW). We selected three replicate stands of each ecosystem type and established three plots in each stand. Each plot was randomly assigned one of three levels of N deposition (0, 30 & 80 kg N ha-1 y-1) imposed by adding NaNO3 in six equal increments applied over the growing season. Through experiments ranging from the molecular to the ecosystem scales, we produced a conceptual framework that describes the biogeochemistry of soil carbon storage in N-saturated ecosystems as the product of interactions between the composition of plant litter, the composition of the soil microbial community and the expression of extracellular enzyme activities. A key finding is that atmospheric N deposition can increase or decrease the soil C storage by modifying the expression of extracellular enzymes by soil microbial communities. The critical interactions within this conceptual framework have been incorporated into a new class of simulations called guild decomposition models.

  20. An assessment of geochemical preparation methods prior to organic carbon concentration and carbon isotope ratio analyses of fine-grained sedimentary rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    KöNitzer, Sven F.; Leng, Melanie J.; Davies, Sarah J.; Stephenson, Michael H.

    2012-09-01

    This study summarizes organic carbon isotope (δ13C) and total organic carbon (TOC) data from a series of tests undertaken to provide an appropriate methodology for pre-analysis treatment of mudstones from an Upper Carboniferous sedimentary succession, in order to develop a consistent preparation procedure. The main treatments involved removing both inorganic carbonate and hydrocarbons (which might be extraneous) before δ13C and TOC analysis. The results show that decarbonating using hydrochloric acid causes significant reduction in δ13C and total carbon (TC) of the bulk material due to the removal of inorganic carbonate. These changes are most pronounced where soluble calcium carbonate (rather than Ca-Mg-Fe carbonate) is present. Deoiled samples show only slightly higher mean δ13C where visible bitumen was extracted from the bulk sample. Moreover, the isotopic signatures of the extracts are closely correlated to those of their respective bulk samples, suggesting that small yields of hydrocarbons were generated in situ with no isotopic fractionation. In addition, further δ13C and TC analyses were performed on samples where mixing of oil-based drilling mud with brecciated core material had been undertaken. Brecciated mudstone material did not display distinct isotopic signals compared to the surrounding fine-grained material. Overall we show that the most accurate assessment of bulk organic carbon isotopes and concentration in these samples can be achieved through decarbonating the material prior to measurement via the `rinse method'. However, our results support recent findings that pre-analysis acid treatments can cause variable and unpredictable errors in δ13C and TOC values. We believe that, despite these uncertainties, the findings presented here can be applied to paleoenvironmental studies on organic matter contained within sedimentary rocks over a range of geological ages and compositions.

  1. Organic phosphorus mineralisation in a temperate grassland soil under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosch, Klaus A.; Andresen, Louise; Gorenflo, André D.; Müller, Christoph; Frossard, Emmanuel; Bünemann, Else K.

    2016-04-01

    Background: Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient for all biota and significant proportions of P in soil are present in organic form. Increased atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide ([CO2]) have been shown to influence plant P uptake traits, resulting in plant-mediated changes in soil P pools. However, little is known on the effect of elevated [CO2] on organic P mineralisation rates in soil. Study design & hypotheses: A 33P isotopic dilution experiment was performed with soils of the 17-year-old Giessen free air carbon dioxide enrichment (GiFACE) - trial. At the GiFACE, three plots are treated with 20 % elevated [CO2] while three control plots receive ambient air. We hypothesised that i) the observed positive effect of elevated [CO2] on plant growth translates into differences in soil organic P mineralisation rates between treated and untreated plots, resulting in ii) differences in soil organic P pools. Methods: Fresh soil (0-8 cm) was sampled from each plot, labelled with a carrier free 33P solution and incubated for 36 days at 19° C in the dark. On six time points, inorganic P and 33P in soil filtrates, soil microorganisms (by liquid fumigation) and resin extractable P were quantified. The baseline of 33P isotopic dilution was assessed from a short term batch experiment and extrapolated for 36 days. Gross organic P mineralisation rates were determined as the difference between isotopic dilution in the incubated soils (physicochemical + biological processes) minus extrapolated values (physicochemical processes only). Additionally, enzyme addition assays on alkaline soil extracts were performed to quantify different soil organic P classes, using enzymes with a known substrate specificity. Results & Discussion: Gross organic P mineralisation rates were high during the first three days (5.5 - 34.3 mg P kg-1 d-1), possibly due to the soil disturbance at labelling soils with 33P. However, gross organic P mineralisation decreased rapidly to rates between 0

  2. Iridium concentration driving the mechanical properties of iridium–aluminum compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Y. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Chengdu 610500 (China); Wen, M. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies for Comprehensive Utilization of Platinum Metals, Kunming 650106 (China); Wang, L.; Wang, X. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Chengdu 610500 (China); Lin, Y.H., E-mail: yhlin28@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Chengdu 610500 (China); Guan, W.M., E-mail: gwm@ipm.com.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies for Comprehensive Utilization of Platinum Metals, Kunming 650106 (China)

    2015-11-05

    Using first-principles density functional theory approach, we systematically investigate the formation enthalpy, mechanical stability, elastic modulus, brittle or ductile behavior and electronic structure of Ir–Al compounds with different Ir concentrations. The calculated convex hull indicates that IrAl with CsCl-type structure is more stability than that of other Ir–Al compounds at ground state. We found that the resistance to volume deformation is related to the Ir concentration in Ir–Al compounds, while the bulk modulus of these compounds increases with increasing Ir concentrations. However, the Ir{sub 5}Al{sub 3} has the strongest shear deformation resistance and has the highest elastic stiffness in these Ir–Al compounds. The calculated theoretical hardness of Ir{sub 2}Al{sub 9} is bigger than other Ir–Al compounds. Ir{sub 2}Al{sub 3} and Ir{sub 2}Al{sub 9} exhibit brittle behavior in contrast to other Ir–Al compounds exhibit ductile behavior. This discrepancy is originated from the structural feature and localized hybridization between Ir and Al atoms. Finally, we conclude that alloying can change brittle behavior of metal Ir. - Highlights: • The correlation between Ir concentration and mechanical properties is studied. • The convex hull indicates that IrAl is the most stable structure. • We found that alloying can weaken the brittle behavior of metal Ir. • We found that the bulk modulus of Ir–Al compound is related to Ir concentration. • The theoretical hardness of Ir{sub 2}Al{sub 9} is higher than other Ir–Al compounds.

  3. Carbon concentrations of components of trees in 10-year-old Populus davidiana stands within the Desertification Combating Program of Northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Huitao; Zhang, Wanjun; Cao, Jiansheng; Zhang, Xiang; Xu, Quanhong; Yang, Xue; Xiao, Dengpan; Zhao, Yanxia

    2016-12-01

    Most studies do not consider the potential variation in carbon concentration among the different tree components of the same species in regional scale. This study examined the carbon concentrations of the components (i.e., foliage, branch, stem, and root) in a 10-year-old poplar species ( Populus davidiana Dode) from the Desertification Combating Program of Northern China. The highest and lowest carbon concentrations were found in the stem and foliage, respectively. There was a significant difference in carbon concentrations among the different tree components. All of the observed carbon concentrations of tree components were lower than those predicted using the conversion factor of 0.5 applied to component biomass. Stem carbon made up 59.7% of the total tree biomass carbon. The power equation estimating proportion of tree biomass carbon against the independent variable of diameter at breast height explained more than 90% of the variability in allocation of carbon among tree components. Tree height, as a second independent variable is also discussed. Our results suggest that the difference in organic carbon concentration among tree components should be incorporated into accurately develop forest carbon budget. Moreover, further investigations on how the diameter at breast height equation developed in the present study performs across broader scales are required.

  4. Carbon concentrations of components of trees in 10-year-old Populus davidiana stands within the Desertification Combating Program of Northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Huitao; Zhang, Wanjun; Cao, Jiansheng; Zhang, Xiang; Xu, Quanhong; Yang, Xue; Xiao, Dengpan; Zhao, Yanxia

    2016-03-01

    Most studies do not consider the potential variation in carbon concentration among the different tree components of the same species in regional scale. This study examined the carbon concentrations of the components (i.e., foliage, branch, stem, and root) in a 10-year-old poplar species (Populus davidiana Dode) from the Desertification Combating Program of Northern China. The highest and lowest carbon concentrations were found in the stem and foliage, respectively. There was a significant difference in carbon concentrations among the different tree components. All of the observed carbon concentrations of tree components were lower than those predicted using the conversion factor of 0.5 applied to component biomass. Stem carbon made up 59.7% of the total tree biomass carbon. The power equation estimating proportion of tree biomass carbon against the independent variable of diameter at breast height explained more than 90% of the variability in allocation of carbon among tree components. Tree height, as a second independent variable is also discussed. Our results suggest that the difference in organic carbon concentration among tree components should be incorporated into accurately develop forest carbon budget. Moreover, further investigations on how the diameter at breast height equation developed in the present study performs across broader scales are required.

  5. Degradation and healing mechanisms of carbon fibers during the catalytic growth of carbon nanotubes on their surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung Ju; Yu, Woong-Ryeol; Youk, Ji Ho; Lee, Jinyong

    2012-04-01

    This study reports on the main cause of the reduced tensile strength of carbon fibers (CFs) by investigating the microstructural changes in the CFs that are undergoing mainly two processes: catalyst nanoparticle formation and chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Interestingly, the two processes oppositely influenced the tensile strength of the CFs: the former negatively and the latter positively. The catalysts coating and nanoparticle formation degraded the CF surface by inducing amorphous carbons and severing graphitic layers, while those defects were healed by both the injected carbons and interfaced CNTs during the CVD process. The revealed degradation and healing mechanisms can serve as a fundamental engineering basis for exploring optimized processes in the manufacturing of hierarchical reinforcements without sacrificing the tensile strength of the substrate CFs.

  6. INFLUENCE OF BAINITE STRUCTURE ON MECHANICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF HIGH-CARBON WIRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ju. Borisenko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Influence of structure of beynit is explored on mechanical properties after thermal treatment of wire from the steel 80. The structural state of beynit, providing the high complex of mechanical properties of high-carbon wire, is definite.

  7. Study on the Mechanical Properties of Carbon Nanotube/Polyacrylonitrile Composite Fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建梅; 王彪; 张玉梅; 王华平; 杨崇倡

    2003-01-01

    The method of preparing the multi-walled carbon nanotubes(MWNTs)-polyacrylonitrile (PAN) composite fibers is described and the effects of draw ratio on the mechanical properties of CNT/PAN fibers have also been discussed.The results show that the degrees of MWNTs dispersion in the polymer matrix have much effect on the mechanical properties.

  8. Beyond pure offsetting: Assessing options to generate Net-Mitigation-Effects in carbon market mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warnecke, C.; Wartmann, S.; Hoehne, N.E.; Blok, K.

    2014-01-01

    The current project-based carbon market mechanisms such as the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) and the Joint Implementation (JI) do not have a direct impact on global greenhouse gas emission levels, because they only replace or offset emissions. Nor do they contribute to host country¿s national gr

  9. Beyond pure offsetting: Assessing options to generate Net-Mitigation-Effects in carbon market mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warnecke, C.; Wartmann, S.; Hohne, N.; Blok, Kornelis

    2014-01-01

    The current project-based carbon market mechanisms such as the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) and the Joint Implementation (JI) do not have a direct impact on global greenhouse gas emission levels, because they only replace or offset emissions. Nor do they contribute to host country׳s national gr

  10. Experimental whole-lake increase of dissolved organic carbon concentration produces unexpected increase in crustacean zooplankton density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Patrick T.; Craig, Nicola; Solomon, Christopher T.; Weidel, Brian C.; Zwart, Jacob A.; Jones, Stuart E.

    2016-01-01

    The observed pattern of lake browning, or increased terrestrial dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration, across the northern hemisphere has amplified the importance of understanding how consumer productivity varies with DOC concentration. Results from comparative studies suggest these increased DOC concentrations may reduce crustacean zooplankton productivity due to reductions in resource quality and volume of suitable habitat. Although these spatial comparisons provide an expectation for the response of zooplankton productivity as DOC concentration increases, we still have an incomplete understanding of how zooplankton respond to temporal increases in DOC concentration within a single system. As such, we used a whole-lake manipulation, in which DOC concentration was increased from 8 to 11 mg L−1 in one basin of a manipulated lake, to test the hypothesis that crustacean zooplankton production should subsequently decrease. In contrast to the spatially derived expectation of sharp DOC-mediated decline, we observed a small increase in zooplankton densities in response to our experimental increase in DOC concentration of the treatment basin. This was due to significant increases in gross primary production and resource quality (lower seston carbon-to-phosphorus ratio; C:P). These results demonstrate that temporal changes in lake characteristics due to increased DOC may impact zooplankton in ways that differ from those observed in spatial surveys. We also identified significant interannual variability across our study region, which highlights potential difficulty in detecting temporal responses of organism abundances to gradual environmental change (e.g., browning).

  11. Mechanical, thermal and morphological characterization of polycarbonate/oxidized carbon nanofiber composites produced with a lean 2-step manufacturing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lively, Brooks; Kumar, Sandeep; Tian, Liu; Li, Bin; Zhong, Wei-Hong

    2011-05-01

    In this study we report the advantages of a 2-step method that incorporates an additional process pre-conditioning step for rapid and precise blending of the constituents prior to the commonly used melt compounding method for preparing polycarbonate/oxidized carbon nanofiber composites. This additional step (equivalent to a manufacturing cell) involves the formation of a highly concentrated solid nano-nectar of polycarbonate/carbon nanofiber composite using a solution mixing process followed by melt mixing with pure polycarbonate. This combined method yields excellent dispersion and improved mechanical and thermal properties as compared to the 1-step melt mixing method. The test results indicated that inclusion of carbon nanofibers into composites via the 2-step method resulted in dramatically reduced ( 48% lower) coefficient of thermal expansion compared to that of pure polycarbonate and 30% lower than that from the 1-step processing, at the same loading of 1.0 wt%. Improvements were also found in dynamic mechanical analysis and flexural mechanical properties. The 2-step approach is more precise and leads to better dispersion, higher quality, consistency, and improved performance in critical application areas. It is also consistent with Lean Manufacturing principles in which manufacturing cells are linked together using less of the key resources and creates a smoother production flow. Therefore, this 2-step process can be more attractive for industry.

  12. Study of the effect of magnesium concentration on the deposit of allotropic forms of calcium carbonate and related carbon steel interface behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Amor, Y., E-mail: yasser_ben@yahoo.f [Institut Superieur des Sciences et Technologies de l' Environnement de Borj-Cedria, B.P 1003, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia); Bousselmi, L. [Laboratoire Traitement et Recyclage des Eaux, B.P 273, Hammam-Lif, Technopole de Borj-Cedria, 8020 Soliman (Tunisia); Tribollet, B. [UPR 15 CNRS - Physique des liquides et Electrochimie, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie - Tour 22, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Triki, E. [Unite de recherche Corrosion et Protection des metalliques, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Tunis, P.B. 37, 1002 Tunis, Belvedere (Tunisia)

    2010-06-30

    Different allotropic forms of calcium carbonate scales were electrochemically deposited on a carbon steel surface in artificial underground Tunisian water at -0.95 V{sub SCE} and various Mg{sup 2+} concentrations. Because of the importance of the diffusion process, the rotating disk electrode was used. The deposition kinetics were analyzed by chronoamperometry measurements and the calcareous layers were characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The physical model proposed by Gabrielli was used to analyze the EIS measurements. Independent of the deposited allotropic form of calcium carbonate, the measurements showed that the oxygen reduction occurs in the pores formed between the CaCO{sub 3} crystals and the metallic surface.

  13. Effect of Cu concentration on morphology of Sn-Ag-Cu solders by mechanical alloying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Szu-Tsung; Duh, Jenq-Gong

    2004-12-01

    The mechanical alloying (MA) process is considered an alternative approach to produce solder materials. In this study, the effect of Cu concentration in the ternary Sn-3.5Ag-xCu (x=0.2, 0.7, and 1) solder by MA was investigated. The (Cu,Sn) solid solution was precipitated as the Cu6Sn5 intermetallic compound (IMC), which was distributed nonuniformly through the microstructure. The Cu6Sn5 IMC, which was present in the SnAgCu solder with high Cu composition, causes the as-milled MA particle to fracture to a smaller size. Appreciable distinction on morphology of as-milled MA powders with different Cu content was revealed. When the Cu concentration was low (x=0.2), MA particle aggregated to a spherical ingot with large particle size. For higher Cu concentration (x=0.7 and x=1), the MA particle turned to flakes with smaller particle size. The distinction of the milling mechanism of Sn-3.5Ag-xCu (x=0.2, 0.7, and 1) solder by the MA process was discussed. An effective approach was developed to reduce the particle size of the SnAgCu solder from 1 mm down to 10-100 µm by doping the Cu6Sn5 nanoparticle during the MA process. In addition, the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results also ensure the compatibility to apply the solder material for the reflow process.

  14. Black carbon concentration and deposition estimations in Finland by the regional aerosol–climate model REMO-HAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Hienola

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The prediction skill of the regional aerosol–climate model REMO-HAM was assessed against the black carbon (BC concentration measurements from five locations in Finland, with focus on Hyytiälä station for the year 2005. We examined to what extent the model is able to reproduce the measurements using several statistical tools: median comparison, overlap coefficient (OVL; the common area under two probability distributions curves and Z score (a measure of standard deviation, shape and spread of the distributions. The results of the statistics showed that the model is biased low. The local and regional emissions of BC have a significant contribution, and the model tendency to flatten the observed BC is most likely dominated by the lack of domestic burning of biofuel in the emission inventories. A further examination of the precipitation data from both measurements and model showed that there is no correlation between REMO's excessive precipitation and BC underestimation. This suggests that the excessive wet removal is not the main cause of the low black carbon concentration output. In addition, a comparison of wind directions in relation with high black carbon concentrations shows that REMO-HAM is able to predict the BC source directions relatively well. Cumulative black carbon deposition fluxes over Finland were estimated, including the deposition on snow.

  15. Effect of electropolymer sizing of carbon fiber on mechanical properties of phenolic resin composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jin; FAN Qun; CHEN Zhen-hua; HUANG Kai-bing; CHENG Ying-liang

    2006-01-01

    Carbon fiber/phenolic resin composites were reinforced by the carbon fiber sized with the polymer films of phenol,m-phenylenediamine or acrylic acid,which was electropolymerized by cyclic voltammetry or chronopotentiometry. The contact angles of the sized carbon fibers with deionized water and diiodomethane were measured by the wicking method based on the modified Washburn equation,to show the effects of the different electropolymer film on the surface free energy of the carbon fiber after sizing by the electropolymerization. Compared with the unsized carbon fiber,which has 85.6°of contact angle of water,52.2° of contact angle of diiodomethane,and 33.1 mJ/m2 of surface free energy with 29.3 mJ/m2 of dispersive components (γL) and 3.8 mJ/m2 of polar components (γsp),respectively. It is found that the electropolymer sized carbon fiber tends to reduce the surface energy due to the decrease of dispersive γL with the increase of the polymer film on the surface of the carbon fiber that plays an important role in improving the mechanical properties of carbon/phenolic resin composites. Compared with the phenolic resin composites reinforced by the unsized carbon fiber,the impact,flexural and interlaminar shear strength of the phenolic resin composites were improved by 44 %,68% and 87% when reinforced with the carbon fiber sized by the electropolymer of m-phenylenediamine,66%,100%,and 112% by the electropolymer of phenol,and 20%,80 %,100% by the electropolymer of acrylic acid. The results indicate the skills of electropolymerization may provide a feasible method for the sizing of carbon fiber in a composite system,so as to improve the interfacial performance between the reinforce materials and the matrix and to increase the mechanical properties of the composites.

  16. Recent advances in understanding the reinforcing ability and mechanism of carbon nanotubes in ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estili, Mehdi; Sakka, Yoshio

    2014-12-01

    Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), commonly referred to as ultimate reinforcement, the main purpose for fabricating CNT-ceramic matrix composites has been mainly to improve the fracture toughness and strength of the ceramic matrix materials. However, there have been many studies reporting marginal improvements or even the degradation of mechanical properties. On the other hand, those studies claiming noticeable toughening measured using indentation, which is an indirect/unreliable characterization method, have not demonstrated the responsible mechanisms applicable to the nanoscale, flexible CNTs; instead, those studies proposed those classical methods applicable to microscale fiber/whisker reinforced ceramics without showing any convincing evidence of load transfer to the CNTs. Therefore, the ability of CNTs to directly improve the macroscopic mechanical properties of structural ceramics has been strongly questioned and debated in the last ten years. In order to properly discuss the reinforcing ability (and possible mechanisms) of CNTs in a ceramic host material, there are three fundamental questions to our knowledge at both the nanoscale and macroscale levels that need to be addressed: (1) does the intrinsic load-bearing ability of CNTs change when embedded in a ceramic host matrix?; (2) when there is an intimate atomic-level interface without any chemical reaction with the matrix, could one expect any load transfer to the CNTs along with effective load bearing by them during crack propagation?; and (3) considering their nanometer-scale dimensions, flexibility and radial softness, are the CNTs able to improve the mechanical properties of the host ceramic matrix at the macroscale when individually, intimately and uniformly dispersed? If so, how? Also, what is the effect of CNT concentration in such a defect-free composite system? Here, we briefly review the recent studies addressing the above fundamental questions. In particular, we discuss the new

  17. Estimating particulate black carbon concentrations using two offline light absorption methods applied to four types of filter media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, Pamela M.; Tremper, Anja H.; Nicolosi, Eleonora M. G.; Quincey, Paul; Fuller, Gary W.

    2017-03-01

    Atmospheric particulate black carbon has been linked to adverse health outcomes. Additional black carbon measurements would aid a better understanding of population exposure in epidemiological studies as well as the success, or otherwise, of relevant abatement technologies and policies. Two light absorption measurement methods of particles collected on filters have been applied to four different types of filters to provide estimations of particulate black carbon concentrations. The ratio of transmittance (lnI0/I) to reflectance (lnR0/R) varied by filter type and ranged from close to 0.5 (as expected from simple theory) to 1.35 between the four filter types tested. The relationship between light absorption and black carbon, measured by the thermal EC(TOT) method, was nonlinear and differed between filter type and measurement method. This is particularly relevant to epidemiological studies that use light absorption as an exposure metric. An extensive archive of filters was used to derive loading factors and mass extinction coefficients for each filter type. Particulate black carbon time series were then calculated at locations where such measurements were not previously available. When applied to two roads in London, black carbon concentrations were found to have increased between 2011 and 2013, by 0.3 (CI: -0.1, 0.5) and 0.4 (CI: 0.1, 0.9) μg m-3 year-1, in contrast to the expectation from exhaust abatement policies. New opportunities using archived or bespoke filter collections for studies on the health effects of black carbon and the efficacy of abatement strategies are created.

  18. Assessment of the Carbon Footprint, Social Benefit of Carbon Reduction, and Energy Payback Time of a High-Concentration Photovoltaic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen H. Hu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Depleting fossil fuel sources and worsening global warming are two of the most serious world problems. Many renewable energy technologies are continuously being developed to overcome these challenges. Among these technologies, high-concentration photovoltaics (HCPV is a promising technology that reduces the use of expensive photovoltaic materials to achieve highly efficient energy conversion. This reduction process is achieved by adopting concentrating and tracking technologies. This study intends to understand and assess the carbon footprint and energy payback time (EPBT of HCPV modules during their entire life cycles. The social benefit of carbon reduction is also evaluated as another indicator to assess the energy alternatives. An HCPV module and a tracker from the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER were applied, and SimaPro 8.0.2 was used for the assessment. The functional unit used in this study was 1 kWh, which is produced by HCPV, and inventory data was sourced from Ecoinvent 3.0 and the Taiwan carbon footprint calculation database. The carbon footprint, EPBT, and social benefit of carbon reduction were evaluated as 107.69 g CO2eq/kWh, 2.61 years, and 0.022 USD/kWh, respectively. Direct normal irradiation (DNI, life expectancy, and the degradation rate of HCPV system were subjected to sensitivity analysis. Results show that the influence of lifetime assumption under a low DNI value is greater than those under high DNI values. Degradation rate is also another important factor when assessing the carbon footprint of HCPV under a low DNI value and a long lifetime assumption. The findings of this study can provide several insights for the development of the Taiwanese solar industry.

  19. ABOUT MECHANISM OF STRUCTURE FORMATION OF PARTICULAR SOLID CARBONIC PHASE IN NANOCOMPOSITE ON THE BASIS OF IRON AND NANO-DISPERSE CARBON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Kuis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of structure formation in super-solid carbon phase in nanocomposite on the basis of iron and nano-disperse carbon, which can be used at development of technology and composition of creation of new materials using inexpensive nano-carbon materials is offered.

  20. Mechanical Testing of Carbon Based Woven Thermal Protection Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, John; Agrawal, Parul; Arnold, James O.; Peterson, Keith; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2013-01-01

    Three Dimensional Woven thermal protection system (TPS) materials are one of the enabling technologies for mechanically deployable hypersonic decelerator systems. These materials have been shown capable of serving a dual purpose as TPS and as structural load bearing members during entry and descent operations. In order to ensure successful structural performance, it is important to characterize the mechanical properties of these materials prior to and post exposure to entry-like heating conditions. This research focuses on the changes in load bearing capacity of woven TPS materials after being subjected to arcjet simulations of entry heating. Preliminary testing of arcjet tested materials [1] has shown a mechanical degradation. However, their residual strength is significantly more than the requirements for a mission to Venus [2]. A systematic investigation at the macro and microstructural scales is reported here to explore the potential causes of this degradation. The effects of heating on the sizing (an epoxy resin coating used to reduce friction and wear during fiber handling) are discussed as one of the possible causes for the decrease in mechanical properties. This investigation also provides valuable guidelines for margin policies for future mechanically deployable entry systems.

  1. Detection of lead ions in picomolar concentration range using underpotential deposition on silver nanoparticles-deposited glassy carbon electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasubramanian, R; Sangaranarayanan, M V

    2011-09-30

    The efficacy of silver-deposited glassy carbon electrode for the determination of lead ions at the sub-nanomolar concentration ranges is investigated. The silver nanoparticles are electrodeposited on glassy carbon electrode using chronoamperometry and the electrode surface is characterized using SEM. Lead ions are detected in the region of underpotential deposition. The analysis is performed in square wave mode in the stripping voltammetry without the removal of oxygen. The detection limit of 10 pM has been obtained with a constant potential of -0.7 V during the electrodeposition step for a period of 50s. The interference of surfactants in the detection of lead ions is also studied.

  2. Characteristics of black carbon concentration at a metropolitan city located near land-ocean boundary in Eastern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Shamitaksha; Jana, Soumyajyoti; Maitra, Animesh; Gogoi, Mukunda M.

    2015-02-01

    Near surface aerosol black carbon (BC) concentration data were collected using a seven channel Aethalometer (AE31) during June 2012-May 2013 in Kolkata (22° 34‧E, 88° 22‧N), a metropolitan city located near the land-ocean boundary in Eastern India. BC concentration shows a prominent seasonal and diurnal variation associated with the meteorological parameters. The mean BC concentration varied from 5 μg/m3 to 27 μg/m3 seasonally. The variation of BC mass concentration and its significant association with atmospheric parameters such as temperature profile, relative humidity and wind speed have been studied. Moreover, the influence of the transported air masses on BC concentration at different seasons has also been discussed. An estimation of Angstrom exponent discloses that fossil fuel combustion is a major source of BC at this location.

  3. Mechanical Properties Of Calcium Carbonate Crystallization Of Chitin Reinforced Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ikpi Ofem

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Chitin whiskers and CaCO3 were reinforced with Polyacrylic acid. Mechanical and thermal properties were characterised. The effect of CaCO3 growth on the mechanical properties of chitin whiskers reinforced Polyacrylic acid indicated that better mechanical properties can be achieved at chitin content of 3 wt when compared with neat PAA. The growth of CaCO3 on CHWPAA composite increased the melting endotherm of CHWPAACaCO3 composite when compared with CHWPAA composite. As an indication of increase in thermal stability the final weight loss at the end of decomposition for all composites was between 20 and 37 far below the 78 for the CHWPAA composite and 84 for the pure PAA .

  4. Influence of Thermal Shock on the Mechanical Behavior of Si-SiC Coated Carbon/Carbon Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiangang Fu; Hejun Li; Yongjie Wang; Kezhi Li; Lu Wei

    2009-01-01

    Si-SiC coating was prepared on the surface of carbon/carbon (C/C) composites by a two-step technique of pack cementation, and the influences of thermal shock between 1773 K and room temperature in air on the mechanical property and fracture behavior of the coated C/C were studied. The results show that, after thermal shock between 1773 K and room temperature for 5, 10 and 15 times, the flexural strength of coated composites increases by 4.29%, 15.00% and 24.20%, respectively. The toughness of the coated C/C enhances gradually during the thermal shock test. The improvement of the mechanical property after the thermal shock test is primarily caused by the weakening of the fiber-matrix interface and the reduction of residual thermal stresses by thermal shock.

  5. Effects of catalyst concentration and ultraviolet intensity on chemical mechanical polishing of GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Wang, Tongqing; Pan, Guoshun; Lu, Xinchun

    2016-08-01

    Effects of catalyst concentration and ultraviolet intensity on chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of GaN were deeply investigated in this paper. Working as an ideal homogeneous substrate material in LED industry, GaN ought to be equipped with a smooth and flat surface. Taking the strong chemical stability of GaN into account, photocatalytic oxidation technology was adopted in GaN CMP process to realize efficient removal. It was found that, because of the improved reaction rate of photocatalytic oxidation, GaN material removal rate (MRR) increases by a certain extent with catalyst concentration increasing. Cross single line analysis on the surface after polishing by Phase Shift MicroXAM-3D was carried out to prove the better removal effect with higher catalyst concentration. Ultraviolet intensity field in H2O2-SiO2-based polishing system was established and simulated, revealing the variation trend of ultraviolet intensity around the outlet of the slurry. It could be concluded that, owing to the higher planarization efficiency and lower energy damage, the UV lamp of 125 W is the most appropriate lamp in this system. Based on the analysis, defects removal model of this work was proposed to describe the effects of higher catalyst concentration and higher power of UV lamp.

  6. Plastic mechanism analysis of T-joints in RHS under concentrated force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiao-Ling; Hancock, Gregory J.

    1991-11-01

    A new plastic mechanism is developed for T-joints in rectangular hollow sections (RHS) under concentrated loads. This model includes the plastic hinges in the web, the membrane force in the flange and the strain hardening of the material. It can predict the yield load, the post-yield response, and the ultimate load of a T-joint under concentrated force. The model developed is compared with the CIDECT model, the Kato model, and the modified Kato model. The yield load, the post-yield response, and the ultimate load determined from the present model are compared with 6 T-joint tests performed by Zhao and Hancock (1991) and 20 T-joint tests performed by Kato and Nishiyama (1979). The ratio (beta) of the T-joints tested varied from 0.291 to 0.890.

  7. Low temperature mechanical properties of steels containing high concentrations of helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullmaier, H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Festkoerperforschung; Camus, E. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin GmbH, Glienicker Strasse 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

    1997-11-01

    Results of tensile tests and hardness measurements in the temperature range 25-400 C are reported for ferritic-martensitic steels and s.a. 316 L austenitic steel. Helium concentrations up to 1 at.% have beenintroduced into these materials by {alpha}-particle (0-25 MeV) implantation and He/Fe dual-beam (15/300 keV) irradiation, respectively. In the latter case displacement damage up to 50 dpa was produced simultaneously with the introduction of He. From a preliminary analysis of the results and a comparison with earlier data it may be concluded that for temperatures up to at least 400 C the observed hardening is dominated by displacement damage. Only for very high helium concentrations around 1 at.% a moderate further increase of hardness is found, indicating that helium does not have a drastic effect on the mechanical properties of the investigated alloys. (orig.). 31 refs.

  8. Mechanical design of a low concentration ratio solar array for a space station application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biss, M. S.; Hsu, L.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a preliminary study and conceptual design of a low concentration ratio solar array for a space station application with approximately a 100 kW power requirement. The baseline design calls for a multiple series of inverted, truncated, pyramidal optical elements with a geometric concentration ratio (GCR) of 6. It also calls for low life cycle cost, simple on-orbit maintainability, 1984 technology readiness date, and gallium arsenide (GaAs) of silicon (Si) solar cell interchangeability. Due to the large area needed to produce the amount of power required for the baseline space station, a symmetrical wing design, making maximum use of the commonality of parts approach, was taken. This paper will describe the mechanical and structural design of a mass-producible solar array that is very easy to tailor to the needs of the individual user requirement.

  9. Mechanisms of astrocytic K(+) clearance and swelling under high extracellular K(+) concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Shingo; Kurachi, Yoshihisa

    2016-03-01

    In response to the elevation of extracellular K(+) concentration ([K(+)]out), astrocytes clear excessive K(+) to maintain conditions necessary for neural activity. K(+) clearance in astrocytes occurs via two processes: K(+) uptake and K(+) spatial buffering. High [K(+)]out also induces swelling in astrocytes, leading to edema and cell death in the brain. Despite the importance of astrocytic K(+) clearance and swelling, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we report results from a simulation analysis of astrocytic K(+) clearance and swelling. Astrocyte models were constructed by incorporating various mechanisms such as intra/extracellular ion concentrations of Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-), cell volume, and models of Na,K-ATPase, Na-K-Cl cotransporter (NKCC), K-Cl cotransporter, inwardly-rectifying K(+) (KIR) channel, passive Cl(-) current, and aquaporin channel. The simulated response of astrocyte models under the uniform distribution of high [K(+)]out revealed significant contributions of NKCC and Na,K-ATPase to increases of intracellular K(+) and Cl(-) concentrations, and swelling. Moreover, we found that, under the non-uniform distribution of high [K(+)]out, KIR channels localized at synaptic clefts absorbed excess K(+) by depolarizing the equivalent potential of K(+) (E K) above membrane potential, while K(+) released through perivascular KIR channels was enhanced by hyperpolarizing E K and depolarizing membrane potential. Further analysis of simulated drug effects revealed that astrocyte swelling was modulated by blocking each of the ion channels and transporters. Our simulation analysis revealed controversial mechanisms of astrocytic K(+) clearance and swelling resulting from complex interactions among ion channels and transporters.

  10. Effects of exercise intensity on plasma concentrations of appetite-regulating hormones: Potential mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazell, Tom J; Islam, Hashim; Townsend, Logan K; Schmale, Matt S; Copeland, Jennifer L

    2016-03-01

    The physiological control of appetite regulation involves circulating hormones with orexigenic (appetite-stimulating) and anorexigenic (appetite-inhibiting) properties that induce alterations in energy intake via perceptions of hunger and satiety. As the effectiveness of exercise to induce weight loss is a controversial topic, there is considerable interest in the effect of exercise on the appetite-regulating hormones such as acylated ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and pancreatic polypeptide (PP). Research to date suggests short-term appetite regulation following a single exercise session is likely affected by decreases in acylated ghrelin and increases in PYY, GLP-1, and PP. Further, this exercise-induced response may be intensity-dependent. In an effort to guide future research, it is important to consider how exercise alters the circulating concentrations of these appetite-regulating hormones. Potential mechanisms include blood redistribution, sympathetic nervous system activity, gastrointestinal motility, cytokine release, free fatty acid concentrations, lactate production, and changes in plasma glucose and insulin concentrations. This review of relevant research suggests blood redistribution during exercise may be important for suppressing ghrelin, while other mechanisms involving cytokine release, changes in plasma glucose and insulin concentrations, SNS activity, and muscle metabolism likely mediate changes in the anorexigenic signals PYY and GLP-1. Overall, changes in appetite-regulating hormones following acute exercise appear to be intensity-dependent, with increasing intensity leading to a greater suppression of orexigenic signals and greater stimulation of anorexigenic signals. However, there is less research on how exercise-induced responses in appetite-regulating hormones differ between sexes or different age groups. A better understanding of how exercise intensity and workload affect appetite across the sexes and life

  11. Detection and characterization of nanomaterials released in low concentrations during multi-walled carbon nanotube spraying process in a cleanroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jun Ho; Woo, Daekwang; Lee, Seung-Bok; Kim, Taesung; Kim, Duckjong; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Bae, Gwi-Nam

    2013-12-01

    Release of nanomaterials was assessed in a cleanroom workplace designed for the handling of multi-walled carbon nanotubes. During the process, the nanotubes were sprayed in a chamber fitted with an exhaust duct system. The front door of the spraying chamber was completely closed, but rear end of the chamber was partially open. Throughout a series of spray processes, three detectors - an optical particle counter, a nanoparticle aerosol monitor, and an aethalometer - counted and characterized particles escaping the chamber. Concentrations of particle surface area and black carbon emitted by the spraying were assessed assuming zero background aerosol concentration in the cleanroom. Very low concentrations of black carbon, 0.4 μg/m(3), were observed. In conclusion, in a cleanroom, low concentrations of nanomaterials were detected to be emitted from a spraying chamber into the workplace. The level of particles reaching the workplace was sufficiently low to have made their detection difficult in a normal environment. Both target nanomaterial and non-intended incidental nanomaterials were released during spraying. Despite the use of exhaust duct system in the process chamber, workers would be exposed to some particles if the chamber were partially open. The exhaust duct system was not enough to remove all the particles released in the chamber.

  12. Carbon monoxide transfer in pig lungs during mechanical ventilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.C.A.M. te Nijenhuis (Frances)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis comprises studies of gas transfer in the lungs during mechanical ventilation, which have been obtained in healthy pigs. The objectives of this thesis were: I) to adapt the breath-holding teclmique, as used during spontaneous breathing for estimation of gas transfer, to condit

  13. Mechanical properties of Cu-based composites reinforced by carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Cu-based composites reinforced by 0 % ~25 % (volume fraction) carbon nanotubes were prepared. The fracture behaviors and the rolling properties of the composites and the effects of the volume fraction of the carbon nanotubes were studied. The experimental results show that the fracture toughness of the composites is related to the pulling-out and bridging of the carbon nanotubes in the fracture process. With the volume fraction of the carbon nanotubes increasing, the Vicker' s hardness and the compactness of the composites increase first and then decrease. The peaks of the hardness and the compactness occur at 12 % ~15 % of volume fraction of carbon nanotubes. Some proper ratio of rolling reduction benefits to the comprehensive mechanical properties of the composites.

  14. Nitrogen-doped carbons in Li-S batteries: materials design and electrochemical mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia eLi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Li-S batteries have been considered as next generation Li batteries due to their high theoretical energy density. Over the past few years, researchers have made significant efforts in breaking through critical bottlenecks which impede the commercialization of Li-S batteries. Beginning with a basic introduction to Li-S systems and their associated mechanism, this review will highlight the application of one specific carbon family, nitrogen-doped carbon materials in sulfur based cathodes. These materials will include nitrogen doped porous carbon, carbon nanotubes, nanofibers and graphene. The article will conclude with a summary of recent research efforts in this field as well as the future prospects for the use of nitrogen-doped carbon materials in Li-S batteries.

  15. Effects of carbon source, phosphorus concentration, and several micronutrients on biomass and geosmin production by Streptomyces halstedii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, K K; Blevins, W T

    2001-04-01

    The effects of various carbon sources, phosphorus concentration, and different concentrations of the micronutrients calcium, cobalt, copper, iron, manganese, potassium, and zinc were determined on biomass dry weight production, geosmin production, and geosmin/biomass (G/B) values for Streptomyces halstedii, a geosmin-producing actinomycete isolated from the sediment of an aquaculture pond. Of the substrates tested, maltose as a sole carbon source promoted maximal growth by S. halstedii while mannitol promoted maximal geosmin production, and galactose yielded the highest G/B values. Fish-food pellets and galactose were poor substrates for growth. Increasing phosphorus concentrations enhanced geosmin production and G/B values. Of the seven micronutrients tested, zinc, iron, and copper had the most profound effects on biomass and geosmin production. Increasing zinc concentrations promoted biomass production while inhibiting geosmin production and G/B values; increasing concentrations of copper and iron inhibited biomass and geosmin production. Increased copper concentrations had the greatest effect in preventing growth and geosmin production by S. halstedii.

  16. Understanding and modelling the variability in Dissolved Organic Carbon concentrations in catchment drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Martin; Waldron, Susan; Scott, Marian; Drew, Simon

    2013-04-01

    Our knowledge of dynamic natural habitats could be improved through the deployment of automated sensor technology. Dissolved organic carbon concentrations, [DOC], are of interest to water companies as purification removes this pool and currently in environmental science, due in part to rising DOC levels and also as respiration of this C pool can lead to an increased CO2 efflux. Manual sampling of catchment drainage systems has revealed seasonal patterns in DOC (Williams, P.J.L., 1995) and that hydrological events export most DOC(Raymond, P.A. and J.E. Saiers, 2010). However, manual sampling precludes detailed characterisation of the dynamic fluctuation of DOC over shorter but important time periods e.g. immediately prior to an event; the transition from base flow to a surface run-off dominated system as surface flow pathways defrost. Such insight is only gained through deployment of continuous-monitoring equipment. Since autumn 2010 we have deployed an S::CAN Spectrolyser (which from absorbance gives a measurement of [DOC]) in a 7.5 kilometre squared peaty catchment draining Europe's largest windfarm, Whitelee. Since autumn 2011, we have an almost complete time series of [DOC] every 30. Here [DOC] has ranged from 12.2 to 58.4 mg/l C and during event flow DOC had a maximum variation of 23.5 mg/l within a single day. Simultaneously with the Spectrolyser, we have logged stage height, pH and conductivity using an In-Situ Inc MD Troll 9000. Generally there is an inverse relationship between [DOC] and both pH and conductivity, but a positive relationship (albeit with seasonal differences) with [DOC] and stage height, from which we can infer hydrological changes in the source of the DOC. Here, in addition to presenting the time series of the data, and a more accurate export budget estimate, I will explore statistical methods for the handling of large datasets. Trends in the data of such large and dynamic data sets are challenging to model. Simple relationships with stage

  17. Particle concentration and flux dynamics in the atmospheric boundary layer as the indicator of formation mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lauros

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We carried out column model simulations to study particle fluxes and deposition and to evaluate different particle formation mechanisms at a boreal forest site in Finland. We show that kinetic nucleation of sulphuric acid cannot be responsible for new particle formation alone as the vertical profile of particle number distribution does not correspond to observations. Instead organic induced nucleation leads to good agreement confirming the relevance of the aerosol formation mechanism including organic compounds emitted by biosphere.

    Simulation of aerosol concentration inside the atmospheric boundary layer during nucleation days shows highly dynamical picture, where particle formation is coupled with chemistry and turbulent transport. We have demonstrated suitability of our turbulent mixing scheme in reproducing most important characteristics of particle dynamics inside the atmospheric boundary layer. Deposition and particle flux simulations show that deposition affects noticeably only the smallest particles at the lowest part of the atmospheric boundary layer.

  18. Study on the Reaction Mechanism for Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane over supported Nickel Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling QIAN; Zi Feng YAN

    2003-01-01

    The adsorption and dissociation of methane and carbon dioxide for reforming on nickelcatalyst were extensively investigated by TPSR and TPD experiments. It showed that thedecomposition of methane results in the formation of at least three kinds of surface carbon specieson supported nickel catalyst, while CO2 adsorbed on the catalyst weakly and only existed in onekind of adsorption state. Then the mechanism of interaction between the species dissociatedfrom CH4 and CO2 during reforming was proposed.

  19. Mechanical properties of carbon fiber/cellulose composite papers modified by hot-melting fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Yunzhou Shi; Biao Wang

    2014-01-01

    Carbon fiber (CF)/cellulose (CLS) composite papers were prepared by papermaking techniques and hot-melting fibers were used for modification. The mechanical properties of the obtained composite papers with different CF, CLS and hot-melting fiber ratios were studied and further discussed. It is observed that, for both CF/CLS composite papers and those modified by hot-melting fibers, the normal stress firstly increases and then declines with the addition of carbon fibers. The results also show ...

  20. Governing the Clean Development Mechanism: global rhetoric versus local realities in carbon sequestration projects

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Global agreements have proliferated in the past ten years. One of these is the Kyoto Protocol, which contains provisions for emissions reductions by trading carbon through the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM). The CDM is a market-based instrument that allows companies in Annex I countries to offset their greenhouse gas emissions through energy and tree offset projects in the global South. I set out to examine the governance challenges posed by the institutional design of carbon sequestration...

  1. Local anthropogenic impact on particulate elemental carbon concentrations at Summit, Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. W. Hagler

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Summit, Greenland is a remote Arctic research station allowing for field measurements at the highest point of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Due to the current reliance on diesel generators for electricity at Summit, unavoidable local emissions are a potential contamination threat to the measurement of combustion-related species in the air and snow. The effect of fossil-fuel combustion on particulate elemental carbon (EC is assessed by a combination of ambient measurements (~1 km from the main camp, a series of snow pits, and Gaussian plume modeling. Ambient measurements indicate that the air directly downwind of the research station generators experiences particulate absorption coefficient (closely related to EC values that are up to a factor of 200 higher than the summer 2006 non-camp-impacted ambient average. Local anthropogenic influence on snow EC content is also evident. The average EC concentration in 1-m snow pits in the "clean air" sector of Summit Camp are a factor of 1.8–2.4 higher than in snow pits located 10 km and 20 km to the north ("downwind" and south ("upwind" of the research site. Gaussian plume modeling performed using meteorological data from years 2003–2006 suggests a strong angular dependence of anthropogenic impact, with highest risk to the northwest of Summit Camp and lowest to the southeast. Along a transect to the southeast (5 degree angle bin, the modeled frequency of significant camp contribution to atmospheric EC (i.e. camp-produced EC>summer 2006 average EC at a distance of 0.5 km, 10 km, and 20 km is 1%, 0.2%, and 0.05%, respectively. According to both the snow pit and model results, a distance exceeding 10 km towards the southeast is expected to minimize risk of contamination. These results also suggest that other remote Arctic monitoring stations powered by local fuel combustion may need to account for local air and snow contamination in field sampling design and data interpretation.

  2. Carbon dioxide capture and nutrients removal utilizing treated sewage by concentrated microalgae cultivation in a membrane photobioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Ryo; Boonnorat, Jarungwit; Chiemchaisri, Chart; Chiemchaisri, Wilai; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2012-12-01

    A highly efficient microalgae cultivation process was developed for carbon dioxide capture using nutrients from treated sewage. A submerged-membrane filtration system was installed in a photobioreactor to achieve high nutrient loading and to maintain a high concentration and production of microalgae. Chlorella vulgaris, Botryococcus braunii and Spirulina platensis were continuously cultivated with simulated treated sewage and 1%-CO(2) gas. The optimum hydraulic retention time (HRT) and solids retention time (SRT) were explored to achieve the maximum CO(2) capture rate, nutrient removal rate and microalgae biomass productivity. The carbon dioxide capture rate and volumetric microalgae productivity were high when the reactor was operated under 1-day (HRT) and 18-days (SRT) conditions. The independent control of HRT and SRT is effective for efficient microalgae cultivation and carbon dioxide capture using treated sewage.

  3. Operation Mechanism of Farmers’ Professional Cooperatives from the Point of Low-Carbon Agricultural Products

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We firstly take a look at internal logic of cluster development of low-carbon agricultural products. In combination with operation features of farmers’ professional cooperatives and actual requirements for cluster development of low-carbon agricultural products; we elaborate establishing benefit allocation mechanism, bearing education and training functions, forming low-carbon value, building low-carbon identification system, as well as realizing low-carbon value. According to these situati...

  4. Mechanical properties of polymeric composites with carbon dioxide particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskalyuk, O. A.; Samsonov, A. M.; Semenova, I. V.; Smirnova, V. E.; Yudin, V. E.

    2017-02-01

    Nanocomposites consisting of a polymethylmethacrylate or polystyrene matrix with embedded silicon dioxide nanoparticles surface-modified by silazanes have been prepared by melting technology. The influence of particles on viscoelastic properties of the nanocomposites has been studied using dynamic mechanical analysis. It has been revealed that the addition of 20 wt % of SiO2 raises the flexural modulus of the nanocomposites by 30%.

  5. Comparison of various concentrations of tricalcium phosphate nanoparticles on mechanical properties and remineralization of fissure sealants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Tavassoli-Hojjati

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanical properties (flexural strength, micro-shear bond strength and remineralizing potential of fissure sealants by adding various concentrations of β-tricalcium phosphate nanoparticles.This in-vitro study consisted of five experimental groups containing prepared nano-fisssure sealants (1-5 wt.% β-TCP nanoparticles and two control groups containing a prepared and a commercial fissure sealant. Flexural/micro-shear bond strength values were measured using Zwick test machine. Cavities on sixty healthy premolar teeth were filled with the fissure sealants containing 0-5 wt.% of nano β-TCP. The samples were assessed for remineralization under scanning electron microscopy (SEM and EDAX. Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, One-way ANOVA and Tukey's Post Hoc analysis/HSD were used to analyze the data.There was no significant difference between the flexural strengths/elastic modulus of the 0-5 wt.% nano β-TCP groups (p>0.05. The average flexural strength/elastic modulus of the prepared fissure sealant group (0% was significantly higher than the commercial fissure sealant group (Clinpro (p0.05. Examining the samples under SEM showed a significant increase in thickness of the intermediate layer with increasing concentrations of β-TCP nanoparticles (p<0.05.Addition of 1-5 wt.% β-TCP nanoparticles to the fissure sealants significantly increased the remineralization potential without affecting the mechanical properties.

  6. Influence of carbon nanoparticles/epoxy matrix interaction on mechanical, electrical and transport properties of structural advanced materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadagno, Liberata; Naddeo, Carlo; Raimondo, Marialuigia; Barra, Giuseppina; Vertuccio, Luigi; Russo, Salvatore; Lafdi, Khalid; Tucci, Vincenzo; Spinelli, Giovanni; Lamberti, Patrizia

    2017-03-01

    The focus of this study is to design new nano-modified epoxy formulations using carbon nanofillers, such as carbon nanotubes, carbon nanofibers and graphene-based nanoparticles (CpEG), that reduce the moisture content and provide additional functional performance. The chemical structure of epoxy mixture, using a non-stoichiometric amount of hardener, exhibits unique properties in regard to the water sorption for which the equilibrium concentration of water (C eq) is reduced up to a maximum of 30%. This result, which is very relevant for several industrial applications (aeronautical, shipbuilding industries, wind turbine blades, etc), is due to a strong reduction of the polar groups and/or sites responsible to bond water molecules. All nanofillers are responsible of a second phase at lower glass transition temperature (Tg). Compared with other carbon nanofillers, functionalized graphene-based nanoparticles exhibit the best performance in the multifunctionality. The lowest moisture content, the high performance in the mechanical properties, the low electrical percolation threshold (EPT) have been all ascribed to particular arrangements of the functionalized graphene sheets embedded in the polymeric matrix. Exfoliation degree and edge carboxylated groups are responsible of self-assembled architectures which entrap part of the resin fraction hindering the interaction of water molecules with the polar sites of the resin, also favouring the EPT paths and the attractive/covalent interactions with the matrix.

  7. Influence of carbon nanoparticles/epoxy matrix interaction on mechanical, electrical and transport properties of structural advanced materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadagno, Liberata; Naddeo, Carlo; Raimondo, Marialuigia; Barra, Giuseppina; Vertuccio, Luigi; Russo, Salvatore; Lafdi, Khalid; Tucci, Vincenzo; Spinelli, Giovanni; Lamberti, Patrizia

    2017-03-03

    The focus of this study is to design new nano-modified epoxy formulations using carbon nanofillers, such as carbon nanotubes, carbon nanofibers and graphene-based nanoparticles (CpEG), that reduce the moisture content and provide additional functional performance. The chemical structure of epoxy mixture, using a non-stoichiometric amount of hardener, exhibits unique properties in regard to the water sorption for which the equilibrium concentration of water (C eq) is reduced up to a maximum of 30%. This result, which is very relevant for several industrial applications (aeronautical, shipbuilding industries, wind turbine blades, etc), is due to a strong reduction of the polar groups and/or sites responsible to bond water molecules. All nanofillers are responsible of a second phase at lower glass transition temperature (Tg). Compared with other carbon nanofillers, functionalized graphene-based nanoparticles exhibit the best performance in the multifunctionality. The lowest moisture content, the high performance in the mechanical properties, the low electrical percolation threshold (EPT) have been all ascribed to particular arrangements of the functionalized graphene sheets embedded in the polymeric matrix. Exfoliation degree and edge carboxylated groups are responsible of self-assembled architectures which entrap part of the resin fraction hindering the interaction of water molecules with the polar sites of the resin, also favouring the EPT paths and the attractive/covalent interactions with the matrix.

  8. Mechanical synthesis of copper-carbon nanocomposites: Structural changes, strengthening and thermal stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunes, D., E-mail: daniela.nunes@ist.utl.pt [Associacao Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear - Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); LNEG, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal); ICEMS, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Livramento, V. [Associacao Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear - Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); LNEG, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal); Mateus, R. [Associacao Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear - Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Correia, J.B. [LNEG, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal); Alves, L.C. [ITN, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Vilarigues, M. [Departamento de Conservacao e Restauro e R and D Unit Vidro e da Ceramica Para as Artes, FCT-UNL, Quinta da Torre, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Carvalho, P.A. [ICEMS, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Departamento de Bioengenharia, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} The study characterized Cu-nanodiamond (Cu-nD) and Cu-graphite (Cu-G) composites. {yields} Preservation of nD crystalline structure during high-energy milling was demonstrated. {yields} Higher refinement of matrix in Cu-nD comparing to Cu-G is due to a milling mechanism. {yields} Remarkable thermal stability and microhardness have been achieved in Cu-nD and Cu-G. {yields} Strengthening resulted mainly from grain refinement and second-phase reinforcement. - Abstract: Processing of copper-carbon nanocomposites by mechanical synthesis poses specific challenges as carbon phases are prone to amorphization and exhibit an intrinsically difficult bonding with copper. The present work investigates Cu-nanodiamond (Cu-nD) and Cu-graphite (Cu-G) composites produced by mechanical synthesis and subsequent heat treatments. Transmission electron microscopy observations showed homogeneous particle distributions and intimate bonding between the metallic matrix and the carbon phases. Ring diffraction patterns of chemically extracted carbon phases demonstrated that milled nanodiamond preserved crystallinity, while an essentially amorphous nature could be inferred for milled graphite. Raman spectra confirmed that nanodiamond particles remained essentially unaffected by the mechanical synthesis, whereas the bands of milled graphite were significantly changed into the typical amorphous carbon fingerprint. Particle-induced X-ray emission spectroscopy showed that the total contamination originating from the milling media remained below 0.7 wt.%. The Cu-nanodiamond composite exhibited remarkable microhardness and microstructural thermal stability when compared with pure nanostructured copper.

  9. Mechanical Properties of Graphene Nanoplatelet/Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Hybrid Composites: Multiscale Modeling and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, C. M.; Klimek-McDonald, D. R.; Pineda, E. J.; King, J. A.; Reichanadter, A. M.; Miskioglu, I.; Gowtham, S.; Odegard, G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the relatively high specific mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composite materials, they are often used as structural components in aerospace applications. Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) can be added to the epoxy matrix to improve the overall mechanical properties of the composite. The resulting GNP/carbon fiber/epoxy hybrid composites have been studied using multiscale modeling to determine the influence of GNP volume fraction, epoxy crosslink density, and GNP dispersion on the mechanical performance. The hierarchical multiscale modeling approach developed herein includes Molecular Dynamics (MD) and micromechanical modeling, and it is validated with experimental testing of the same hybrid composite material system. The results indicate that the multiscale modeling approach is accurate and provides physical insight into the composite mechanical behavior. Also, the results quantify the substantial impact of GNP volume fraction and dispersion on the transverse mechanical properties of the hybrid composite, while the effect on the axial properties is shown to be insignificant.

  10. Mechanical Properties of Graphene Nanoplatelet Carbon Fiber Epoxy Hybrid Composites: Multiscale Modeling and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, Cameron M.; Klimek-McDonald, Danielle R.; Pineda, Evan J.; King, Julie A.; Reichanadter, Alex M.; Miskioglu, Ibrahim; Gowtham, S.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the relatively high specific mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composite materials, they are often used as structural components in aerospace applications. Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) can be added to the epoxy matrix to improve the overall mechanical properties of the composite. The resulting GNP/carbon fiber/epoxy hybrid composites have been studied using multiscale modeling to determine the influence of GNP volume fraction, epoxy crosslink density, and GNP dispersion on the mechanical performance. The hierarchical multiscale modeling approach developed herein includes Molecular Dynamics (MD) and micromechanical modeling, and it is validated with experimental testing of the same hybrid composite material system. The results indicate that the multiscale modeling approach is accurate and provides physical insight into the composite mechanical behavior. Also, the results quantify the substantial impact of GNP volume fraction and dispersion on the transverse mechanical properties of the hybrid composite, while the effect on the axial properties is shown to be insignificant.

  11. Effect of Interface Modified by Graphene on the Mechanical and Frictional Properties of Carbon/Graphene/Carbon Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we developed an interface modified by graphene to simultaneously improve the mechanical and frictional properties of carbon/graphene/carbon (C/G/C composite. Results indicated that the C/G/C composite exhibits remarkably improved interfacial bonding mode, static and dynamic mechanical performance, thermal conductivity, and frictional properties in comparison with those of the C/C composite. The weight contents of carbon fibers, graphene and pyrolytic carbon are 31.6, 0.3 and 68.1 wt %, respectively. The matrix of the C/G/C composite was mainly composed of rough laminar (RL pyrocarbon. The average hardness by nanoindentation of the C/G/C and C/C composite matrices were 0.473 and 0.751 GPa, respectively. The flexural strength (three point bending, interlaminar shear strength (ILSS, interfacial debonding strength (IDS, internal friction and storage modulus of the C/C composite were 106, 10.3, 7.6, 0.038 and 12.7 GPa, respectively. Those properties of the C/G/C composite increased by 76.4%, 44.6%, 168.4% and 22.8%, respectively, and their internal friction decreased by 42.1% in comparison with those of the C/C composite. Owing to the lower hardness of the matrix, improved fiber/matrix interface bonding strength, and self-lubricating properties of graphene, a complete friction film was easily formed on the friction surface of the modified composite. Compared with the C/C composite, the C/G/C composite exhibited stable friction coefficients and lower wear losses at simulating air-plane normal landing (NL and rejected take-off (RTO. The method appears to be a competitive approach to improve the mechanical and frictional properties of C/C composites simultaneously.

  12. Black carbon concentrations and sources in the marine boundary layer of the tropical Atlantic Ocean using four methodologies

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Combustion-derived aerosols in the marine boundary layer have been poorly studied, especially in remote environments such as the open Atlantic Ocean. The tropical Atlantic has the potential to contain a high concentration of aerosols, such as black carbon, due to the African emission plume of biomass and agricultural burning products. Atmospheric particulate matter samples across the tropical Atlantic boundary layer were collected in the summer of 2010 during the southern he...

  13. Effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy on whole blood cyanide concentrations in carbon monoxide intoxicated patients from fire accidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawson-Smith, Pia; Jansen, Erik C; Hilsted, Linda;

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and carbon monoxide (CO) may be important components of smoke from fire accidents. Accordingly, patients admitted to hospital from fire accidents may have been exposed to both HCN and CO. Cyanide (CN) intoxication results in cytotoxic hypoxia leading to organ dysfunction...... and animal experiments have shown that in rats exposed to CN intoxication, HBO can increase the concentration of CN in whole blood....

  14. GASEOUS HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CARBON AND LOW ALLOY STEELS (U)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, P

    2006-06-08

    This report is a compendium of sets of mechanical properties of carbon and low alloy steels following the short-term effects of hydrogen exposure. The property sets include the following: Yield Strength; Ultimate Tensile Strength; Uniform Elongation; Reduction of Area; Threshold Cracking, K{sub H} or K{sub th}; Fracture Toughness (K{sub IC}, J{sub IC}, and/or J-R Curve); and Fatigue Crack Growth (da/dN). These properties are drawn from literature sources under a variety of test methods and conditions. However, the collection of literature data is by no means complete, but the diversity of data and dependency of results in test method is sufficient to warrant a design and implementation of a thorough test program. The program would be needed to enable a defensible demonstration of structural integrity of a pressurized hydrogen system. It is essential that the environmental variables be well-defined (e.g., the applicable hydrogen gas pressure range and the test strain rate) and the specimen preparation be realistically consistent (such as the techniques to charge hydrogen and to maintain the hydrogen concentration in the specimens).

  15. Kinetics and yields of pesticide biodegradation at low substrate concentrations and under conditions restricting assimilable organic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbling, Damian E; Hammes, Frederik; Egli, Thomas; Kohler, Hans-Peter E

    2014-02-01

    The fundamentals of growth-linked biodegradation occurring at low substrate concentrations are poorly understood. Substrate utilization kinetics and microbial growth yields are two critically important process parameters that can be influenced by low substrate concentrations. Standard biodegradation tests aimed at measuring these parameters generally ignore the ubiquitous occurrence of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) in experimental systems which can be present at concentrations exceeding the concentration of the target substrate. The occurrence of AOC effectively makes biodegradation assays conducted at low substrate concentrations mixed-substrate assays, which can have profound effects on observed substrate utilization kinetics and microbial growth yields. In this work, we introduce a novel methodology for investigating biodegradation at low concentrations by restricting AOC in our experiments. We modified an existing method designed to measure trace concentrations of AOC in water samples and applied it to systems in which pure bacterial strains were growing on pesticide substrates between 0.01 and 50 mg liter(-1). We simultaneously measured substrate concentrations by means of high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection (HPLC-UV) or mass spectrometry (MS) and cell densities by means of flow cytometry. Our data demonstrate that substrate utilization kinetic parameters estimated from high-concentration experiments can be used to predict substrate utilization at low concentrations under AOC-restricted conditions. Further, restricting AOC in our experiments enabled accurate and direct measurement of microbial growth yields at environmentally relevant concentrations for the first time. These are critical measurements for evaluating the degradation potential of natural or engineered remediation systems. Our work provides novel insights into the kinetics of biodegradation processes and growth yields at low substrate concentrations.

  16. Effect of ocean acidification on the benthic foraminifera Ammonia sp. is caused by a decrease in carbonate ion concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bijma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available About 30% of the anthropogenically released CO2 is taken up by the oceans, which causes surface ocean pH to decrease and is commonly referred to as Ocean Acidification (OA. Foraminifera are one of the most abundant groups of marine calcifiers, estimated to precipitate ca. 50% of biogenic calcium carbonate in the open oceans. We have compiled the state of the art of OA effects on foraminifera, because the majority of OA research on this group was published within the last 3 yr. Disparate responses of this important group of marine calcifiers to OA were reported, highlighting the importance of a process based understanding of OA effects on foraminifera. The benthic foraminifer Ammonia sp. was cultured using two carbonate chemistry manipulation approaches: While pH and carbonate ions where varied in one, pH was kept constant in the other while carbonate ion concentration varied. This allows the identification of teh parameter of the parameter of the carbonate system causing observed effects. This parameter identification is the first step towards a process based understanding. We argue that [CO32−] is the parameter affecting foraminiferal size normalized weights (SNW and growth rates and based on the presented data we can confirm the strong potential of foraminiferal SNW as a [CO32−] proxy.

  17. Adsorption/desorption of low concentration of carbonyl sulfide by impregnated activated carbon under micro-oxygen conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueqian; Qiu, Juan; Ning, Ping; Ren, Xiaoguang; Li, Ziyan; Yin, Zaifei; Chen, Wei; Liu, Wei

    2012-08-30

    Activated carbon modified with different impregnants has been studied for COS removal efficiency under micro-oxygen conditions. Activated carbon modified with Cu(NO(3))(2)-CoPcS-KOH (denoted as Cu-Co-KW) is found to have markedly enhanced adsorption purification ability. In the adsorption purification process, the reaction temperature, oxygen concentration, and relative humidity of the gas are determined to be three crucial factors. A breakthrough of 43.34 mg COS/g adsorbent at 60°С and 30% relative humidity with 1.0% oxygen is shown in Cu-Co-KW for removing COS. The structures of the activated carbon samples are characterized using nitrogen adsorption, and their surface chemical structures are analyzed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Modification of Cu(NO(3))(2)-CoPcS-KOH appears to improve the COS removal capacity significantly, during which, SO(4)(2-) is presumably formed, strongly adsorbed, and present in the micropores ranging from 0.7 to 1.5 nm. TPD is used to identify the products containing sulfur species on the carbon surface, where SO(2) and COS are detected in the effluent gas generated from exhausted Cu-Co-KW (denoted Cu-Co-KWE). According to the current study results, the activated carbon impregnated with Cu(NO(3))(2)-CoPcS-KOH promises a good candidate for COS adsorbent, with the purified gas meeting requirements for desirable chemical feed stocks.

  18. Validation and application of cavity-enhanced, near-infrared tunable diode laser absorption spectrometry for measurements of methane carbon isotopes at ambient concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Behzad; Wilson, Benjamin J; Dong, Feng; Gupta, Manish; Baer, Doug

    2013-10-15

    Methane is an effective greenhouse gas but has a short residence time in the atmosphere, and therefore, reductions in emissions can alleviate its greenhouse gas warming effect within a decadal time frame. Continuous and high temporal resolution measurements of methane concentrations and carbon isotopic ratios (δ(13)CH4) can inform on mechanisms of formation, provide constraints on emissions sources, and guide future mitigation efforts. We describe the development, validation, and deployment of a cavity-enhanced, near-infrared tunable diode laser absorption spectrometry system capable of quantifying δ(13)CH4 at ambient methane concentrations. Laboratory validation and testing show that the instrument is capable of operating over a wide dynamic range of methane concentration and provides a measurement precision for δ(13)CH4 of better than ± 0.5 ‰ (1σ) over 1000 s of data averaging at ambient methane concentrations. The analyzer is accurate to better than ± 0.5 ‰, as demonstrated by measurements of characterized methane/air samples with minimal dependence (methane concentration. Deployment of the instrument at a marsh over multiple days demonstrated how methane fluxes varied by an order of magnitude over 2 day deployment periods, and showed a 17 ‰ variability in δ(13)CH4 of the emitted methane during the growing season.

  19. Evidence for the Mechanism Behind the Biasing of Organic Matter's Isotopic Carbon Signal during Pre-preparation Removal of Inorganic Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casford, J. S.; Brodie, C.; Casford, M. T.

    2012-12-01

    We investigate the potential mechanisms behind the known and significant biasing of the organic matter carbon (and nitrogen) isotopic signal during the pre-preparation removal of inorganic carbonates. This effect was quantified by Brodie et al (2012 Chemical Geology) and shown to be both significant and non-linear. Using a combination of IR-spectroscopy, 13C NMR and GC-MS, we compare before and after treatment samples of 2 known standards (an total organic plant sample BROC and a soil standard -SOILB) and one 'real' sediment core sample (from a Lake in southern China - TYC). These were subjected to the most commonly used pre-preparation acidification, using differing concentrations of HCL, to provide a first look at the potential mechanisms behind this bias. Provisional results suggest at least 3 factors in play during the pre-preparation; 1. The loss of n-alkanes compounds because of the acidification. 2. A potential increase in the proportion of Carbonyl groups 3. And an increase in clay mineral hydration (in TYC and possibly in Soil B). We also note a potential change in particle size distribution after treatment that may also effect the hominization of the samples. This provide the first clear evidence for the nature of the widely observed but poorly understood biasing effect

  20. Quantum mechanics based force field for carbon (QMFF-Cx) validated to reproduce the mechanical and thermodynamics properties of graphite

    OpenAIRE

    Pascal, Tod A.; Karasawa, Naoki; Goddard, William A

    2010-01-01

    As assemblies of graphene sheets, carbon nanotubes, and fullerenes become components of new nanotechnologies, it is important to be able to predict the structures and properties of these systems. A problem has been that the level of quantum mechanics practical for such systems (density functional theory at the PBE level) cannot describe the London dispersion forces responsible for interaction of the graphene planes (thus graphite falls apart into graphene sheets). To provide a basis for descr...

  1. Integrated network modelling for identifying microbial mechanisms of particulate organic carbon accumulation in coastal marine systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Karlie; Turk, Valentina; Mozetič, Patricija; Tinta, Tinkara; Malfatti, Francesca; Hannah, David; Krause, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Accumulation of particulate organic carbon (POC) has the potential to change the structure and function of marine ecosystems. High abidance of POC can develop into aggregates, known as marine snow or mucus aggregates that can impair essential marine ecosystem functioning and services. Currently marine POC formation, accumulation and sedimentation processes are being explored as potential pathways to remove CO2 from the atmosphere by CO2 sequestration via fixation into biomass by phytoplankton. However, the current ability of scientists, environmental managers and regulators to analyse and predict high POC concentrations is restricted by the limited understanding of the dynamic nature of the microbial mechanisms regulating POC accumulation events in marine environments. We present a proof of concept study that applies a novel Bayesian Networks (BN) approach to integrate relevant biological and physical-chemical variables across spatial and temporal scales in order to identify the interactions of the main contributing microbial mechanisms regulating POC accumulation in the northern Adriatic Sea. Where previous models have characterised only the POC formed, the BN approach provides a probabilistic framework for predicting the occurrence of POC accumulation by linking biotic factors with prevailing environmental conditions. In this paper the BN was used to test three scenarios (diatom, nanoflagellate, and dinoflagellate blooms). The scenarios predicted diatom blooms to produce high chlorophyll a at the water surface while nanoflagellate blooms were predicted to occur at lower depths (> 6m) in the water column and produce lower chlorophyll a concentrations. A sensitivity analysis identified the variables with the greatest influence on POC accumulation being the enzymes protease and alkaline phosphatase, which highlights the importance of microbial community interactions. The developed proof of concept BN model allows for the first time to quantify the impacts of

  2. Relationship between silver concentration with microstructural and mechanical properties of rolled AlZn alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdez, S., E-mail: svaldez@fis.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Fisicas-Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Av. Universidad S/N, Col. Chamilpa, 062210 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Perez, R.; Rodriguez-Diaz, R.A. [Instituto de Ciencias Fisicas-Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Av. Universidad S/N, Col. Chamilpa, 062210 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Angeles-Chavez, C. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje central Lazaro Cardenas 152, Mexico D.F. 07730 (Mexico); Casolco, S.R. [Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Campus Puebla, Via Atlixcayotl 2301. Puebla, Pue. 2800 (Mexico)

    2010-05-25

    The relationship of Ag addition on microstructural and mechanical properties of rolled AlZn alloy was investigated. AlZn alloys were prepared by metal mould casting method and the Ag addition was done by Vortex technique. Microstructural characterization of AlZnAg specimens was analyzed by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Results show that the phases of the as-cast state alloy are solid solution zinc-rich hexagonal close-packed (hcp) crystal structure, named {eta}-phase and {alpha}-Al solid solution with Zn dissolved into the matrix. The silver concentration in AlZn alloy influences the volume of AgZn{sub 3} precipitates. The mechanical properties, especially the flow stress and elongation of the alloy were improved by the Ag addition. The Vortex method was used in order to diminish the process cost, generating an alloy with homogenous microstructure, less casting porosity and better mechanical properties.

  3. Design and evaluation of a high temperature/pressure supercritical carbon dioxide direct tubular receiver for concentrating solar power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Jesus Daniel

    This work focuses on the development of a solar power thermal receiver for a supercritical-carbon dioxide (sCO2), Brayton power-cycle to produce ~1 MWe. Closed-loop sCO2 Brayton cycles are being evaluated in combination with concentrating solar power to provide higher thermal-to-electric conversion efficiencies relative to conventional steam Rankine cycles. High temperatures (923--973 K) and pressures (20--25 MPa) are required in the solar receiver to achieve thermal efficiencies of ~50%, making concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies a competitive alternative to current power generation methods. In this study, the CSP receiver is required to achieve an outlet temperature of 923 K at 25 MPa or 973 K at 20 MPa to meet the operating needs. To obtain compatible receiver tube material, an extensive material review was performed based the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, ASME B31.1 and ASME B313.3 codes respectively. Subsequently, a thermal-structural model was developed using a commercial computational fluid (CFD) dynamics and structural mechanics software for designing and analyzing the tubular receiver that could provide the heat input for a ~2 MWth plant. These results were used to perform an analytical cumulative damage creep-fatigue analysis to estimate the work-life of the tubes. In sequence, an optical-thermal-fluid model was developed to evaluate the resulting thermal efficiency of the tubular receiver from the NSTTF heliostat field. The ray-tracing tool SolTrace was used to obtain the heat-flux distribution on the surfaces of the receiver. The K-ω SST turbulence model and P-1 radiation model used in Fluent were coupled with SolTrace to provide the heat flux distribution on the receiver surface. The creep-fatigue analysis displays the damage accumulated due to the cycling and the permanent deformation of the tubes. Nonetheless, they are able to support the required lifetime. The receiver surface temperatures were found to be within the safe

  4. Investigation The Mechanical Properties of Carburized Low Carbon Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Mohammed Abdulraoof Abdulrazzaq

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available microstructure, mechanical properties; hardness and wear resistance has been investigated taken different temperatures; (850, 900, and 950 ˚C with constant time (2 hr of carburizing process. The experimental work shows that at carburizing temperature (850 ˚C, the hardness was increases from the inside to outside of specimen from ( 102 to HV 250., while increases for temperatures (900 and 950 ˚C from (105 to 272 HV, and (115 to 192 HV respectively. This experiment also been conducted for wear resistance for harder specimen which was at 950 ˚C carburized sample for three times (2, 4 and, 6 hr and the wear rate was (9.99*10-6 g/m at (2 hr, and for (4 hr it was (12.7*10-6 g/m and at (6 hr it was (15.13*10-6 g/m.

  5. Carboxyl-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile-toughened epoxy/carboxyl-modified carbon nanotube nanocomposites: Thermal and mechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. F. Xie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Carboxyl-modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT–COOHs as nanofillers were incorporated into diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA toughened with carboxyl-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile (CTBN. The carboxyl functional carbon nanotubes were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. Furthermore, cure kinetics, glass transition temperature (Tg, mechanical properties, thermal stability and morphology of DGEBA/CTBN/MWCNT–COOHs nanocomposites were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA, universal test machine, thermogravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. DSC kinetic studies showed that the addition of MWCNT–COOHs accelerated the curing reaction of the rubber-toughened epoxy resin. DMA results revealed that Tg of rubber-toughened epoxy nanocomposites lowered with MWCNT–COOH contents. The tensile strength, elongation at break, flexural strength and flexural modulus of DGEBA/CTBN/MWCNT-COOHs nanocomposites were increased at lower MWCNT-COOH concentration. A homogenous dispersion of nanocomposites at lower MWCNT–COOH concentration was observed by SEM.

  6. High Temperature Mechanical Testing of a Cylindrical Weave Carbon-Carbon Composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    S. Los Angeles CA 90009 AEROSPACE CORPORATION Feldman L. Los Angeles CA 90009 AEROSPACE CORPORATION Meyer Robert A. Los Angeles CA 90009 AEROSPACE...and Feldman found no appreciable creep w i th the same specimens before reach i nq a temperature of 22:0 C,:. ref 7) The in-house axial specimens...Materials" , Technical report AFrL-TR-77-94, June 1977. (8) L.A. Feldman , "High Temperature Creep of Carbon Yarns: First Annual Report", ONR Annual Report

  7. Effects of elevated CO2 concentration and nitrogen supply on biomass and active carbon of freshwater marsh after two growing seasons in Sanjiang plain, Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Guangying; LIU Jingshuang; WANG Yang; DOU Jingxin; DONG Xiaoyong

    2009-01-01

    An experiment was carried out with treatments differing in nitrogen supply (0, 5 and 15 g N/m2) and CO2 level (350 and 700 μmol/mol) using OTC (open top chamber) equipment to investigate the biomass of Calamagrostis angustifolia and soil active carbon contents after two years. The results showed that elevated CO2 concentration increased the biomass of C. angustifolia and the magnitude of response varied with each growth period. Elevated CO2 concentration has increased aboveground biomass by 16.7% and 17.6% during the jointing and heading periods and only 3.5% and 9.4% during dough and maturity periods. The increases in belowground biomass due to CO2 elevation was 26.5%, 34.0% and 28.7% during the heading, dough and maturity periods, respectively. The response of biomass to enhanced CO2 concentration differed in N levels. Both the increase of aboveground biomass and belowground biomass were greater under high level of N supply (15 g N/m2). Elevated CO2 concentration also increased the allocation of biomass and carbon in root. Under elevated CO2 concentration, the average values of active carbon tended to increase. The increases of soil active soil contents followed the sequence of Microbial biomass carbon (10.6%) > dissolved organic carbon (7.5%) > oxidable labile carbon (6.6%) > carbohydrate carbon (4.1%). Stepwise regressions indicated there were significant correlations between the soil active carbon contents and plant biomass. Particularly, microbial carbon, oxidable labile carbon and carbohydrate carbon were found to be correlated with belowground biomass, while dissolved organic carbon has correlation with aboveground biomass. Therefore, increased biomass was regarded as the main driving force for the increase in soil active organic carbon under elevated CO2 concentration.

  8. Influence of Fabric Parameters on Microstructure, Mechanical Properties and Failure Mechanisms in Carbon-Fibre Reinforced Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.Wielage; D.Richter; H.Mucha; Th.Lampke

    2008-01-01

    The effects of fibre/matrix bonding,fabric density,fibre volume fraction and bundle size on microstructure,mechanical properties and failure mechanisms in carbon fibre reinforced composites (plastic and carbon matrix) have been investigated.The microstructure of unloaded and cracked samples was studied by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM),respectively whereas the mechanical behaviour was examined by 3-point bending experiments.Exclusively one type of experimental resole type phenolic resin was applied.A strong fibre/matrix bonding,which is needed for high strength of carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) materials leads to severe composite damages during the pyrolysis resulting in low strength,brittle failure and a very low utilisation of the fibres strain to failure in C/C composites.Inherent fabric parameters such as an increasing fabric density or bundle size or a reduced fibre volume fraction introduce inhomogenities to the CFRP's microstructure.Results are lower strength and stiffness whereas the strain to failure increases or remains unchanged.Toughness is almost not affected.In C/C composites inhomogenities due to a reduced bundle size reduce strain to failure,strength,stiffness and toughness.Vice versa a declining fibre volume fraction leads to exactly the opposite behaviour.Increasing the fabric density (weight per unit area) causes similar effects as in CFRPs.

  9. Investigation of Structure and Physico-Mechanical Properties of Composite Materials Based on Copper - Carbon Nanoparticles Powder Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovtun V.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Physico-mechanical and structural properties of electrocontact sintered copper matrix- carbon nanoparticles composite powder materials are presented. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the influence of preliminary mechanical activation of the powder system on distribution of carbon nanoparticles in the metal matrix. Mechanical activation ensures mechanical bonding of nanoparticles to the surface of metal particles, thus giving a possibility for manufacture of a composite with high physico-mechanical properties.

  10. Effect of cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide concentration on structure, morphology and carbon dioxide adsorption capacity of calcium hydroxide based sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hlaing, Nwe Ni, E-mail: nwenihlaing76@gmail.com [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Department of International Development Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Physics, University of Yangon, 11041 Kamayut, Yangon (Myanmar); Vignesh, K., E-mail: vignesh134@gmail.com [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Anano Sphere Sdn Bhd, Lorong Industri 11, Kawasan Industri Bukit Panchor, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Sreekantan, Srimala, E-mail: srimala@usm.my [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Pung, Swee-Yong [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Hinode, Hirofumi; Kurniawan, Winarto [Department of International Development Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Othman, Radzali [Faculty of Manufacturing Engineering, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka, Hang Tuah Jaya, 76100 Durian Tunggal, Malacca (Malaysia); Thant, Aye Aye [Department of Physics, University of Yangon, 11041 Kamayut, Yangon (Myanmar); Mohamed, Abdul Rahman [Low Carbon Economy (LCE) Research Group, School of Chemical Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Salim, Chris [Department of Environmental Engineering, Surya University, Tangerang 15810, Banten (Indonesia)

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Carbonation conversions of (a) CC, (b) CH-2, (c) CH-4, (d) CH-6, (e) CH-8 precursor adsorbents for 10 cycles. - Highlights: • Ca(OH){sub 2} precursor was synthesized using precipitation method. • The effect of CTAB concentration on the synthesis of Ca(OH){sub 2} was studied. • The sorbent synthesized using 0.8 M of CTAB showed good CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity. • The cyclic stability of Ca(OH){sub 2} was increased with increase of CTAB concentration. - Abstract: Calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH){sub 2}) has been proposed as an important material for industrial, architectural, and environmental applications. In this study, calcium acetate was used as a precursor and cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) was used as a surfactant to synthesize Ca(OH){sub 2} based adsorbents for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture. The effect of CTAB concentration (0.2–0.8 M) on the structure, morphology and CO{sub 2} adsorption performance of Ca(OH){sub 2} was studied in detail. The synthesized samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), BET surfaced area and thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG–DTA) techniques. The phase purity, crystallite size, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area and CO{sub 2} adsorption performance of Ca(OH){sub 2} precursor adsorbents were significantly increased when the concentration of CTAB was increased. XRD results showed that pure Ca(OH){sub 2} phase was obtained at the CTAB concentration of 0.8 M. TGA results exhibited that 0.8 M of CTAB-assisted Ca(OH){sub 2} precursor adsorbent possessed a residual carbonation conversion of ∼56% after 10 cycles.

  11. Transduction mechanism of carbon nanotubes in solid-contact ion-selective electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Gastón A; Macho, Santiago; Bobacka, Johan; Rius, F Xavier

    2009-01-15

    Porous carbon materials and carbon nanotubes were recently used as solid contacts in ion-selective electrodes (ISE), and the signal transduction mechanism of these carbon-based materials is therefore of great interest. In this work the ion-to-electron transduction mechanism of carbon nanotubes is studied by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) are deposited on glassy carbon (GC) disk electrodes by repetitive spraying, resulting in SWCNT layers with thicknesses of 10, 35, and 50 mum. The impedance spectra of these GC/SWCNT electrodes in contact with aqueous electrolyte solution show a very small resistance and a large bulk capacitance that is related to a large effective double layer at the SWCNT/electrolyte interface. Interestingly, the impedance response of GC/SWCNT is very similar to that of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) film electrodes studied earlier under the same experimental conditions. The same equivalent circuit is valid for both types of materials. The reason is that both materials can be described schematically as an asymmetric capacitor where one side is formed by electronic charge (electrons/holes) in the SWCNT wall or along the conjugated polymer chain of PEDOT and the other side is formed by ions (anions/cations) in the solution (or in the ion-selective membrane when used as a solid contact in ISE).

  12. Mechanical Behavior of Carbon Nanotubes Filled With Metal Nanowires By Atomistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danailov, Daniel; Keblinski, Pawel; Pulickel, Ajayan; Nayak, Saroj

    2002-03-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations we studied mechanical behavior of (10,10) carbon nanotubes filled with a crystalline fcc metal wires. The interatomic interactions were described by a combination of Terfoff’s bond-order potential for carbon, embedded atom method (EAM) potential for metal and pair potential for carbon-metal interactions. The elastic properties, as well as failure mechanism were determined by simulating three point bending test, by pressing the center and the ends of relatively long tube in determined relatively small ring areas. We observed that following elastic response, at larger deformation, the metal wire yields well before the carbon bonding is affected. The behavior of filled tubes was compared with that of hollow tubes. Interesting is thet the hollow carbon (10,10) nanotube is more strong elastically than the same tube filled with Au-metal nanowire. We also simulated indentation of filled tubes residing on a hard flat surface. Similarly as in the bending test, metal wire yields first, is cut in between hard cylinder and hard plane and pushed away from under the indenter. Upon further increase of the indentation force, carbon tube is broken and forms two open ends that are rapidly zipped around the cut metal wire. Remarkably, the shape of the zipped tube ends strong depend of the speed of the punching of the tube. This result imply a possibility of designing tubes with various closed end shapes with applicationusing in the nanoscale manipulation procedures used for production.

  13. Optimization of interfacial microstructure and mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composites via carbon nanotube sizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hongwei; Sui, Xianhang; Zhao, Zhongbo; Xu, Zhiwei; Chen, Lei; Deng, Hui; Liu, Ya; Qian, Xiaoming

    2015-08-01

    Repetitious sizing treatment was used to modify the carbon fiber (CF) surface with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for improving interfacial properties of CF/epoxy composites. Interlaminar shear and flexural results showed that mechanical properties of composites were significantly depended on the dispersion state and contents of CNTs in interfacial regions. Increases of 13.45% in interlaminar shear strength and 20.31% in flexural strength were achieved in quintuple sized-CF/epoxy composites, whereas excessive CNTs led to decrease of interfacial performance due to defects induced by agglomerated CNTs. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and force modulation atomic force microscope were used to detect the structure of interfacial phase and results indicated that gradient interfacial structure with various thicknesses was formed due to CNT incorporation. This means that such a simple and efficient method to improve interfacial performance of composites via regulating the fiber-matrix interphase structure was developed and showed great commercial application potential.

  14. Variability of levels of PM, black carbon and particle number concentration in selected European cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Reche

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In many large cities of Europe standard air quality limit values of particulate matter (PM are exceeded. Emissions from road traffic and biomass burning are frequently reported to be the major causes. As a consequence of these exceedances a large number of air quality plans, most of them focusing on traffic emissions reductions, have been implemented in the last decade. In spite of this implementation, a number of cities did not record a decrease of PM levels. Thus, is the efficiency of air quality plans overestimated? Or do we need a more specific metric to evaluate the impact of the above emissions on the levels of urban aerosols?

    This study shows the results of the interpretation of the 2009 variability of levels of PM, black carbon (BC, aerosol number concentration (N and a number of gaseous pollutants in seven selected urban areas covering road traffic, urban background, urban-industrial, and urban-shipping environments from southern, central and northern Europe.

    The results showed that variations of PM and N levels do not always reflect the variation of the impact of road traffic emissions on urban aerosols. However, BC levels vary proportionally with those of traffic related gaseous pollutants, such as CO, NO2 and NO. Due to this high correlation, one may suppose that monitoring the levels of these gaseous pollutants would be enough to extrapolate exposure to traffic-derived BC levels. However, the BC/CO, BC/NO2 and BC/NO ratios vary widely among the cities studied, as a function of distance to traffic emissions, vehicle fleet composition and the influence of other emission sources such as biomass burning. Thus, levels of BC should be measured at air quality monitoring sites.

    During traffic rush hours, a narrow variation in the N/BC ratio was evidenced, but a wide variation of this ratio was determined for the noon period. Although in central and northern Europe N and BC levels tend to vary

  15. Scaling up the Fabrication of Mechanically-Robust Carbon Nanofiber Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Curtin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to identify and address the main challenges associated with fabricating large samples of carbon foams composed of interwoven networks of carbon nanofibers. Solutions to two difficulties related with the process of fabricating carbon foams, maximum foam size and catalyst cost, were developed. First, a simple physical method was invented to scale-up the constrained formation of fibrous nanostructures process (CoFFiN to fabricate relatively large foams. Specifically, a gas deflector system capable of maintaining conditions supportive of carbon nanofiber foam growth throughout a relatively large mold was developed. ANSYS CFX models were used to simulate the gas flow paths with and without deflectors; the data generated proved to be a very useful tool for the deflector design. Second, a simple method for selectively leaching the Pd catalyst material trapped in the foam during growth was successfully tested. Multiple techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, surface area measurements, and mechanical testing, were employed to characterize the foams generated in this study. All results confirmed that the larger foam samples preserve the basic characteristics: their interwoven nanofiber microstructure forms a low-density tridimensional solid with viscoelastic behavior. Fiber growth mechanisms are also discussed. Larger samples of mechanically-robust carbon nanofiber foams will enable the use of these materials as strain sensors, shock absorbers, selective absorbents for environmental remediation and electrodes for energy storage devices, among other applications.

  16. A pilot study to assess ground-level ambient air concentrations of fine particles and carbon monoxide in urban Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shendell, Derek G; Naeher, Luke P

    2002-11-01

    Ambient concentrations and the elemental composition of particles less than 2.5 microm in diameter (PM2.5), as well as carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations, were measured at ground-level in three Guatemalan cities in summer 1997: Guatemala City, Quetzaltenango, and Antigua. This pilot study also included quantitative and qualitative characterizations of microenvironment conditions, e.g., local meteorology, reported elsewhere. The nondestructive X-ray fluorescence elemental analysis (XRF) of Teflon filters was conducted. The highest integrated average PM2.5. concentrations in an area (zona) of Guatemala City and Quetzaltenango were 150 microg m(-3) (zona 12) and 120 microg m(-3) (zona 2), respectively. The reported integrated average PM2.5 concentration for Antigua was 5 microg m(-3). The highest observed half-hour and monitoring period average CO concentrations in Guatemala City were 10.9 ppm (zona 8) and 7.2 ppm (zonas 8 and 10), respectively. The average monitoring period CO concentration in Antigua was 2.6 ppm. Lead and bromine concentrations were negligible, indicative of the transition to unleaded fuel use in cars and motorcycles. The XRF results suggested sources of air pollution in Guatemala, where relative rankings varied by city and by zonas within each city, were fossil fuel combustion emitting hydrocarbons, combustion of sulfurous conventional fuels, soil/roadway dust, farm/agricultural dust, and vehicles (evaportion of gas, parts' wear).

  17. Basic failure mechanisms in advanced composites. [composed of epoxy resins reinforced with carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzio, V. F.; Mehan, R. L.; Mullin, J. V.

    1973-01-01

    The fundamental failure mechanisms which result from the interaction of thermal cycling and mechanical loading of carbon-epoxy composites were studied. This work was confined to epoxy resin uniderictionally reinforced with HTS carbon fibers, and consists of first identifying local fiber, matrix and interface failure mechanisms using the model composite specimen containing a small number of fibers so that optical techniques can be used for characterization. After the local fracture process has been established for both mechanical loading and thermal cycling, engineering composite properties and gross fracture modes are then examined to determine how the local events contribute to real composite performance. Flexural strength in high fiber content specimens shows an increase in strength with increased thermal cycling. Similar behavior is noted for 25 v/o material up to 200 cycles; however, there is a drastic reduction after 200 cycles indicating a major loss of integrity probably through the accumulation of local cleavage cracks in the tensile region.

  18. Metasomatic Mechanism of Weathering-Pedogenesis of Carbonate Rocks: I. Mineralogical and Micro-Textural Evidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱立军; 李景阳

    2002-01-01

    On the basis of mineralogical, geochemical and micro-textural studies of the typical sections of the red weathering crust of carbonate rocks in the subtropical karst areas of Guizhou Province and Guangxi Autonomous Region, we have found, either on a microscopic or on a macroscopical scale and in different positions of the sections, the most direct and most important mineralogical and micro-textural evidence for the development of metasomatism in the process of weathering-pedogenesis of numerous carbonate rocks. This paper also has expounded for the first time and systematically the mechanism of metasomatism involved in the process of weathering pedogenesis of carbonate rocks and proposed the sequence of mineral metasomatic evolution in the process of weathering-pedogenesis of carbonate rocks.

  19. The hydrocarbon generation mechanism and the threestage type model of hydrocarbon generation for carbonate source rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兆云; 程克明

    1997-01-01

    The diagenetic mechanism and process of carbonate rocks, which is different to that of clastic rocks, decides the existence of different existing state organic matters in carbonate rocks. This has been verified by both the microscopic observation of organic petrology and the analysis of organic geochemistry of many samples. Based on the hydrous pyrolysis simulation experiment of the low-mature carbonate rocks, the contrasting study on the yield and their geochemistry characteristics of different existing state soluble organic matters of a series of various maturity samples shows that the different existing state organic matters make different contributions to hydrocarbon generation during every evolution state. So that, the hydrocarbon generation process of carbonate rocks can be summarized as the following three stages; the first is the direct degradation of biogenic bitumen macromolecules during the immature stage, the second is the thermal degradation of a large amount of kerogen at the mature stage,

  20. Mechanical Properties with High Temperature and the Microstructure of Carbon/Phenolic Ablative Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Tianbo; ZHOU Changsheng; JU Yutao; CHEN Xiong

    2012-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced phenolic based composites were prepared by laminating molding.The variation in mechanical characteristics of composites was evaluated with heating temperature and procedure.The microstructures of composites at different temperatures were observed by optical microscope and scanning electron microscope,respectively.The results showed that the main weight loss range of carbon/phenolic is from 300 to 800 ℃,before 700 ℃ the weight loss was resulted from pyrolysis and after that the weight loss was mainly by oxidation in the fiber phase; with the heat treatment temperature rising,the bonding at the interface of carbon fibers and resin matrix weakened; in the pyrolysis temperature range,the interlaminar shear strength(ILSS) of carbon/phenolic showed a rapid drop with temperature rising,and then decrease in the rate of ILSS became relatively slower; the fiber oxidation had little influence on the ILSS.

  1. Using Mechanical Alloying to Create Bimetallic Catalysts for Vapor-Phase Carbon Nanofiber Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Guevara

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanofibers were generated over bimetallic catalysts in an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD reactor. Catalyst compositions of Fe 30 at%, Cu and Ni 30 at% and Cu were mechanically alloyed using high-energy ball milling over durations of 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 h. The catalyst powders were then used to produce carbon nanofibers in ethylene and hydrogen (4:1 at temperatures of 500, 550, and 600 °C. The microstructures of the catalysts were characterized as a function of milling time as well as at deposition temperature. The corresponding carbon deposition rates were assessed and are correlated to the microstructural features of each catalyst. The milling process directly determines the performance of each catalyst toward carbon deposition, and both catalysts performed comparably to those made by traditional co-precipitation methods. Considerations in miscible and immiscible nanostructured alloy systems are discussed.

  2. Source Material and Concentration of Wildfire-Produced Pyrogenic Carbon Influence Post-Fire Soil Nutrient Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas A. Michelotti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pyrogenic carbon (PyC is produced by the thermal decomposition of organic matter in the absence of oxygen (O. PyC affects nutrient availability, may enhance post-fire nitrogen (N mineralization rates, and can be a significant carbon (C pool in fire-prone ecosystems. Our objectives were to characterize PyC produced by wildfires and examine the influence that contrasting types of PyC have on C and N mineralization rates. We determined C, N, O, and hydrogen (H concentrations and atomic ratios of charred bark (BK, charred pine cones (PC, and charred woody debris (WD using elemental analysis. We also incubated soil amended with BK, PC, and WD at two concentrations for 60 days to measure C and N mineralization rates. PC had greater H/C and O/C ratios than BK and WD, suggesting that PC may have a lesser aromatic component than BK and WD. C and N mineralization rates decreased with increasing PyC concentrations, and control samples produced more CO2 than soils amended with PyC. Soils with PC produced greater CO2 and had lower N mineralization rates than soils with BK or WD. These results demonstrate that PyC type and concentration have potential to impact nutrient dynamics and C flux to the atmosphere in post-fire forest soils.

  3. Aggregation Kinetics and Transport of Single-Walled CarbonNanotubes at Low Surfactant Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known about how low levels of surfactants can affect the colloidal stability of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and how surfactant-wrapping of SWNTs can impact ecological exposures in aqueous systems. In this study, SWNTs were suspended in water with sodium ...

  4. Origin of mechanical modifications in poly (ether ether ketone)/carbon nanotube composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlenko, Ekaterina; Puech, Pascal; Bacsa, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.bacsa@cemes.fr [CEMES-CNRS and University of Toulouse, 29 Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France); Boyer, François; Olivier, Philippe [Université de Toulouse, Institut Clément Ader, I.U.T. Université Paul Sabatier - 133C Avenue de Rangueil - B.P. 67701, 31077 Toulouse CEDEX 4 (France); Sapelkin, Andrei [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, E1 4NS London (United Kingdom); King, Stephen; Heenan, Richard [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, OX11 0QX Didcot (United Kingdom); Pons, François; Gauthier, Bénédicte; Cadaux, Pierre-Henri [AIRBUS FRANCE (B.E. M and P Toulouse), 316 Route de Bayonne, 31060 Toulouse (France)

    2014-06-21

    Variations in the hardness of a poly (ether ether ketone) beam electrically modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT, 0.5%-3%) are investigated. It is shown that both rupture and hardness variations correlate with the changes in carbon nanotube concentration when using micro indentation and extended Raman imaging. Statistical analysis of the relative spectral intensities in the Raman image is used to estimate local tube concentration and polymer crystallinity. We show that the histogram of the Raman D band across the image provides information about the amount of MWCNTs and the dispersion of MWCNTs in the composite. We speculate that we have observed a local modification of the ordering between pure and modified polymer. This is partially supported by small angle neutron scattering measurements, which indicate that the agglomeration state of the MWCNTs is the same at the concentrations studied.

  5. Mechanical behavior of confined self-compacting reinforced concrete circular columns under concentric axial loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouad Khairallah

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available While there is abundant research information on ordinary confined concrete, there are little data on the behavior of Self-Compacting Concrete (SCC under such condition. Due to higher shrinkage and lower coarse aggregate content of SCC compared to that of Normal Concrete (NC, its composite performance under confined conditions needs more investigation. This paper has been devoted to investigate and compare the mechanical behavior of confined concrete circular columns cast with SCC and NC under concentric axial loading. The parameters affecting are including concrete compressive strength and confinement configuration. Twenty column specimens were casted and confined using four confinement techniques, CFRP wrap, FRP tube, GFRP wrap, and spiral steel hoops. The performance of the tested column specimens is evaluated based on mode of failure, load–displacement curve, stress–strain characteristics, ultimate strength, ductility, and degree of confinement.

  6. Scale dependence of mechanics and dynamics of active gels with increasing motor concentration

    CERN Document Server

    Sonn-Segev, Adar; Roichman, Yael

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton protein actin assembles into large bundles when supporting stresses in the cell, but grows into a fine branched network to induce cell motion. Such self-organization processes are studied in artificial networks of cytoskeleton proteins with thick actin bundles and large motor protein aggregates to enable optical observation. The effect of motor aggregate size on the cytoskeleton mechanical properties is studied here in networks comprised of much smaller motor assemblies. Large motor protein clusters are known to increase the stiffness of actin based networks by introducing tension and additional cross-linking cites. We find that these effects are universal to actin gels regardless of actin bundle thickness and motor aggregate size and are relevant, therefore, to a wide range of cytoskeleton based cellular processes. In contrast, motor induced active fluctuations depend significantly on motor assembly size, featuring unique non-Gaussian statistics at high concentrations of small assemblies.

  7. Monte-Carlo simulations of methane/carbon dioxide and ethane/carbon dioxide mixture adsorption in zeolites and comparison with matrix treatment of statistical mechanical lattice model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Lawrence J.; Furgani, Akrem; Jalili, Sayed; Manos, George

    2009-05-01

    Adsorption isotherms have been computed by Monte-Carlo simulation for methane/carbon dioxide and ethane/carbon dioxide mixtures adsorbed in the zeolite silicalite. These isotherms show remarkable differences with the ethane/carbon dioxide mixtures displaying strong adsorption preference reversal at high coverage. To explain the differences in the Monte-Carlo mixture isotherms an exact matrix calculation of the statistical mechanics of a lattice model of mixture adsorption in zeolites has been made. The lattice model reproduces the essential features of the Monte-Carlo isotherms, enabling us to understand the differing adsorption behaviour of methane/carbon dioxide and ethane/carbon dioxide mixtures in zeolites.

  8. Carbon Nanotubes in Biomedical Applications: Factors, Mechanisms, and Remedies of Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshehri, Reem; Ilyas, Asad Muhammad; Hasan, Anwarul; Arnaout, Adnan; Ahmed, Farid; Memic, Adnan

    2016-09-22

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) represent one of the most studied allotropes of carbon. The unique physicochemical properties of CNTs make them among prime candidates for numerous applications in biomedical fields including drug delivery, gene therapy, biosensors, and tissue engineering applications. However, toxicity of CNTs has been a major concern for their use in biomedical applications. In this review, we present an overview of carbon nanotubes in biomedical applications; we particularly focus on various factors and mechanisms affecting their toxicity. We have discussed various parameters including the size, length, agglomeration, and impurities of CNTs that may cause oxidative stress, which is often the main mechanism of CNTs' toxicity. Other toxic pathways are also examined, and possible ways to overcome these challenges have been discussed.

  9. Sub-Surface Carbon Dioxide Concentration Measurement Using a Fiber Based Sensor in a Call/Return Geometry for Carbon Sequestration Site Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, G. R.; Soukup, B.; Repasky, K. S.; Carlsten, J.; Barr, J. L.; Dobeck, L.

    2010-12-01

    Geologic carbon sequestration is a means to mitigate the increasing atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) by capturing the CO2 at a source such as a power generation facility and storing the captured CO2 in geologic formations. Many technologic advances will need to occur for successful carbon sequestration including near surface monitoring tools and techniques to ensure site integrity and public safety. Researchers at Montana State University (MSU) are developing a scalable fiber sensor array in a call/return configuration for monitoring near sub-surface CO2 concentrations. The low cost fiber sensor array being developed at MSU for sub-surface CO2 detection for monitoring carbon sequestration sites will utilize a series of fiber probes connected to a two detectors and a 1 x N fiber switch that can direct the light to one of N fiber probes. The fiber sensor array will utilize a single tunable distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser with a center wavelength of 2.004 μm to access CO2 absorption features. The output from the DFB laser is incident on an inline fiber splitter that directs part of the light to a reference detector while the remaining light is directed to a fiber probe where the laser light interacts with the CO2. The light from the fiber probe is directed back through the switch and is incident on a transmission detector. The transmission as a function of wavelength is measured and a CO2 concentration is calculated. The fiber sensor array can easily be reconfigured by simply moving the fiber probes. Low cost is achieved by using inexpensive passive components in the fiber probes while limiting the number of the more expensive components including the DFB laser, the two detectors, and the single fiber switch. The fiber sensor was tested over a thirty day period at the Zero Emission Research Technology (ZERT) facility that was developed for testing surface and near surface carbon sequestration monitoring instrumentation using a controlled

  10. MECHANICAL STRENGTH ENHANCEMENT OF OPEN-CELL ALUMINA FOAMS USING OPTIMUM CONCENTRATION OF DEFLOCCULANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hadi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Open-cell alumina foams were prepared using the appropriate alumina slurry and polyurethane sponge with linear pore density of approximately 14 pores per inch (ppi as a template by the replica method. The rheological studies showed that the optimum solid content for the slurries without deflocculants was 60 wt. %. In order to increase the slurry solid content, Tiron (1,2-dihydroxy-3,5-benzene disulfonic acid disodium salt was used as dispersant. To determine the optimum concentration of dispersant, the viscosity curves of alumina slurries containing different values of Tiron from 0 to 1.2 wt. % (based on dry material weight were studied. The optimum concentration of Tiron obtained for lowest viscosity was 0.8 wt. %. Thus, the solid content in the slurry could be increased from 60 to 66 wt. %. The effect of increase in the slurry solid content and the way it affects the foam structure and the mechanical strength were investigated. Microstructural observations of the foams show a significant reduction in macroscopic and microscopic defects in the foam struts when the slurry solid content is increased. Total porosity of the produced alumina foams prepared using slurries containing 60 and 66 wt. % solid are 83.3 and 80.4 %, respectively, while the compressive strength of the foams has increased from 1.33 to 3.24 MPa.

  11. Effects of Silicon at Different Concentrations on Morphology and Photosynthetic Physiological Mechanism of Japonica Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang CHEN; Liping CAI; Bin ZHOU; Yan SHI; Meng RAO

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to explore effects of silicon at different concentrations on morphology and photosynthetic physiological mechanism of japonica rice. [Method] Seedlings of japonica rice were treated with silicon at different concentrations (0, 30, 80, 130 and 180 mg/L of sodium silicate); silicon contents were measured with Molybdenum blue spectrophotometric method in root, stem and leaf; plant height, root length and number in different treatment groups were measured with tools; chlorophyll a and b, and a/b in leaf and stem of rice in different groups were measured. [Result] Silicon contents in vegetative organs were as follows: stem〉leaf〉 root; when silicon was 80 mg/L, japonica ecotype was shortest; when silicon was 30 mg/L, root length of the rice was shortest and root number was least; when silicon was 30 mg/L, contents of chlorophyll a and b were highest and chlorophyll a/b achieved the peak when silicon was 80 mg/L. [Conclusion] Silicon at proper concen- tration would improve lodging-resistance and efficiency of photosynthesis, further enhancing yield of japonica rice.

  12. The Role of Nitric Oxide in the Dysregulation of the Urine Concentration Mechanism in Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope eCipriani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Uncontrolled diabetes mellitus results in osmotic diuresis. Diabetic patients have lowered nitric oxide (NO which may exacerbate polyuria. We examined how lack of NO affects the transporters involved in urine concentration in diabetic animals. Diabetes was induced in rats by streptozotocin. Control and diabetic rats were given L-NAME for 3 weeks. Urine osmolality, urine output, and expression of urea and water transporters and the Na-K-2Cl cotransporter were examined. Predictably, diabetic rats presented with polyuria (increased urine volume and decreased urine osmolality. Although metabolic parameters of control rats were unaffected by L-NAME, treated diabetic rats produced 30% less urine and osmolality was restored. UT-A1 and UT-A3 were significantly increased in diabetic-rat inner medulla. While L-NAME treatment alone did not alter UT-A1 or UT-A3 abundance, absence of NO prevented the upregulation of both transporters in diabetic rats. Similarly, AQP2 and NKCC2 abundance was increased in diabetic animals however, expression of these transporters were unchanged by L-NAME treatment of diabetes. Increased expression of the concentrating transporters observed in diabetic rats provides a compensatory mechanism to decrease solute loss despite persistent glycosuria. Our studies found that although diabetic-induced glycosylation remained increased, total protein expression was decreased to control levels in diabetic rats treated with L-NAME. While the role of NO in urine concentration remains unclear, lowered NO associated with diabetes may be deleterious to the transporters’ response to the subsequent osmotic diuresis.

  13. The formation of filamentous carbon on iron and nickel catalysts : II. Mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kock, A.J.H.M.; Bokx, P.K. de; Boellaard, E.; Klop, W.; Geus, John W.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanism of filamentous carbon growth on iron and nickel catalysts has been studied using a combination of magnetic techniques and temperature-programmed hydrogenation. CO and CH4 were used as carburizing agents. It is concluded that high carbide contents are a prerequisite for the nucleation o

  14. Competing Photocurrent Mechanisms in Quasi-Metallic Carbon Nanotube pn Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Moh R; Chang, Shun-Wen; Cronin, Stephen B

    2015-07-01

    Photodetectors based on quasi-metallic carbon nanotubes exhibit unique optoelectronic properties. Due to their small bandgap, photocurrent generation is possible at room temperature. The origin of this photocurrent is investigated to determine the underlying mechanism, which can be photothermoelectric effect or photovoltaic effect, depending on the bandgap magnitude of the quasi-metallic nanotube.

  15. Mechanisms for catalytic carbon nanofiber growth studied by ab initio density functional theory calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Rostrup-Nielsen, Jens;

    2006-01-01

    Mechanisms and energetics of graphene growth catalyzed by nickel nanoclusters were studied using ab initio density functional theory calculations. It is demonstrated that nickel step-edge sites act as the preferential growth centers for graphene layers on the nickel surface. Carbon is transported...

  16. Comparation of Organic and Elemental carbon concentrations in PM2.5 in five Mexican cities: Potencial Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera Murillo, J.; Cardenas, B.; Campos-Ramos, A.; Blanco-Jimenez, S.; Angeles-Garcia, F.

    2011-12-01

    During 2006-2010 the National Center for Environmental Research and Training of the National Institute of Ecology of Mexico, carried out several short field studies in the cities of Salamanca, Gto, Tula, Hgo; Guadalajara, Jal; Toluca, Edo Mex; and Tijuana, BC to determine concentration and chemical compositions of PM2.5. These cities, although different in size population have all important industrial and area sources that contribute to high PM2.5 concentrations and therefore potential health impacts. Chemical analyses included organic and elemental carbon for which DRI Model 2001 Thermal/Optical Carbon Analyzer (Atmoslytic Inc, Calabasas, CA, USA) was used. Highest PM2.5 mass mean concentrations were obtained in Salamanca (46 μg/m3), followed by Toluca (43 μg/m3), Guadalajara (37 μg/m3), Tula (20 μg/m3) and Tijuana (18 μg/m3). For Salamanca and Tula, annual levels exceeded the Mexican PM2.5 annual standard of 15 μg/m3. Total carbonaceous aerosol accounted for 41.4%, 41.1%, 32.3%, 29.5% and 29.1% of PM2.5 mass in Tula, Toluca, Guadalajara, Salamanca and Tijuana, respectively. Higher OC2, OC3 and OC4 carbon fractions were observed in Guadalajara, Tijuana and Toluca, indicating an important contribution of gasoline and diesel vehicles emissions in these cities. As for Tula and Salamanca, cities in which refineries and power plants are present, OC3, OC4, EC1 and EC2 represent the higher fractions which could be attributed to stationary sources that use heavy fuels for their combustion process. UNMIX and PMF analyses were used in order to identify the most important sources that contributes to OC and EC concentrations.

  17. Fracture Mechanics Analyses of Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Wing-Leading-Edge Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Phillips, Dawn R.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Song, Kyongchan

    2010-01-01

    Fracture mechanics analyses of subsurface defects within the joggle regions of the Space Shuttle wing-leading-edge RCC panels are performed. A 2D plane strain idealized joggle finite element model is developed to study the fracture behavior of the panels for three distinct loading conditions - lift-off and ascent, on-orbit, and entry. For lift-off and ascent, an estimated bounding aerodynamic pressure load is used for the analyses, while for on-orbit and entry, thermo-mechanical analyses are performed using the extreme cold and hot temperatures experienced by the panels. In addition, a best estimate for the material stress-free temperature is used in the thermo-mechanical analyses. In the finite element models, the substrate and coating are modeled separately as two distinct materials. Subsurface defects are introduced at the coating-substrate interface and within the substrate. The objective of the fracture mechanics analyses is to evaluate the defect driving forces, which are characterized by the strain energy release rates, and determine if defects can become unstable for each of the loading conditions.

  18. Processing Effects on the Mechanical Behavior of Polyarylacetylene- Derived Carbon-Carbon Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-30

    Mechanics and Materials Technology Center. Paul M. Propp was the project officer for the Mi