WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon composite material

  1. Epoxide composite materials with carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods of formation and physical properties of epoxide composite materials reinforced with carbon nanotubes are considered. An analogy is made between the relaxation properties of carbon nanotubes and macromolecules. The concentration dependences of the electrical conductivity of the epoxy polymers filled with single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes are discussed. Modern views on the mechanism of reinforcement of polymers with nanotubes are outlined. The bibliography includes 143 references.

  2. Irradiation behavior of carbon-based composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consideration is given to the data on radiation changes of sizes and some properties of different carbon-based composite materials (carbon-graphite and graphite-graphite compositions; carbon-carbon composite materials with carbon reinforcing fibers; carbon-silicon compositions), irradiated by neutrons at 320-1700 k. It is shown that change of sizes is dictated by the type and the ratio of components, forming (or not forming) the reinforcing uniform frame. 22 refs.; 10 figs

  3. Polymer composite material structures comprising carbon based conductive loads

    OpenAIRE

    Jérôme, Robert; Pagnoulle, Christophe; Detrembleur, Christophe; Thomassin, Jean-Michel; Huynen, Isabelle; Bailly, Christian; Bednarz, Luikasz; Daussin, Raphaël; Saib, Aimad; Baudouin, Anne-Christine; Laloyaux, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    The present invention provides a polymer composite material structure comprising at least one layer of a foamed polymer composite material comprising a foamed polymer matrix and 0.1 wt % to 6 wt % carbon based conductive loads, such as e.g. carbon nanotubes, dispersed in the foamed polymer matrix. The polymer composite material structure according to embodiments of the present invention shows good shielding and absorbing properties notwithstanding the low amount of carbon based conductive loa...

  4. Polymer composite material structures comprising carbon based conductive loads

    OpenAIRE

    Jérôme, Robert; Pagnoulle, Christophe; Detrembleur, Christophe; Thomassin, Jean-Michel; Huynen, Isabelle; Bailly, Christian; Bednarz, Lucasz; Daussin, Raphaël; Saib, Aimad

    2006-01-01

    The present invention provides a polymer composite material structure comprising at least one layer of a foamed polymer composite material comprising a foamed polymer matrix and 0.1 to 6 wt% carbon based conductive loads, such as e.g. carbon nanotubes, dispersed in the foamed polymer matrix. The polymer composite material structure according to embodiments of the present invention shows good shielding and absorbing properties notwithstanding the low amount of carbon based conductive loads. Th...

  5. Carbon Cryogel Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. 10 One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nano-foams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. 1-4,9 Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  6. Carbon materials as fillers for polymer matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Stabik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Paper presents different types of carbon materials used as modifiers for polymer matrix composites. The article contains summary description of the available varieties of carbon materials from brown and hard coal to the carbon nanotubes and fullerenes.Design/methodology/approach: The aim of the publication is to present different forms of carbon materials, their origins and ways of creation. Paper summarizes also basic properties and possible applications of carbon materials as components of engineering polymeric composites.Findings: Paper especially focuses on types of hard coal (mine coal as potential fillers for polymers. These materials and their properties and applications were studied in detail by the authors in previous researches.Research limitations/implications: Analysis of the literature and authors’ own research results indicate that carbon materials as fillers can essentially improve many different properties of polymer matrix composites but still have to be extensively searched to fully evaluate their characteristics and possible applications.Practical implications: Particular attention should be directed to the use of mined coal as a properties modifier of polymers because of its interesting properties, low prize and availability in Poland.Originality/value: New types of carbon materials as polymer fillers, their properties and application possibilities are presented.

  7. Highly thermal conductive carbon fiber/boron carbide composite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a composite member for use in walls of a thermonuclear reactor, if carbon fibers and boron carbide are mixed, since they are brought into contact with each other directly, boron is reacted with the carbon fibers to form boron carbide to lower thermal conductivity of the carbon fibers. Then, in the present invention, graphite or amorphous carbon is filled between the carbon fibers to provide a fiber bundle of not less than 500 carbon fibers. Further, the surface of the fiber bundle is coated with graphite or amorphous carbon to suppress diffusion or solid solubilization of boron to carbon fibers or reaction of them. Then, lowering of thermal conductivity of the carbon fibers is prevented, as well as the mixing amount of the carbon fiber bundles with boron carbide, a sintering temperature and orientation of carbon fiber bundles are optimized to provide a highly thermal conductive carbon fiber/boron carbide composite material. In addition, carbide or boride type short fibers, spherical graphite, and amorphous carbon are mixed in the boron carbide to prevent development of cracks. Diffusion or solid solubilization of boron to carbon fibers is reduced or reaction of them if the carbon fibers are bundled. (N.H.)

  8. Improved Composites Using Crosslinked, Surface-Modified Carbon Nanotube Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, James Stewart

    2014-01-01

    Individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit exceptional tensile strength and stiffness; however, these properties have not translated well to the macroscopic scale. Premature failure of bulk CNT materials under tensile loading occurs due to the relatively weak frictional forces between adjacent CNTs, leading to poor load transfer through the material. When used in polymer matrix composites (PMCs), the weak nanotube-matrix interaction leads to the CNTs providing less than optimal reinforcement.Our group is examining the use of covalent crosslinking and surface modification as a means to improve the tensile properties of PMCs containing carbon nanotubes. Sheet material comprised of unaligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) was used as a drop-in replacement for carbon fiber in the composites. A variety of post-processing methods have been examined for covalently crosslinking the CNTs to overcome the weak inter-nanotube shear interactions, resulting in improved tensile strength and modulus for the bulk sheet material. Residual functional groups from the crosslinking chemistry may have the added benefit of improving the nanotube-matrix interaction. Composites prepared using these crosslinked, surface-modified nanotube sheet materials exhibit superior tensile properties to composites using the as received CNT sheet material.

  9. Multilayer Electroactive Polymer Composite Material Comprising Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. (Inventor); Draughon, Gregory K. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An electroactive material comprises multiple layers of electroactive composite with each layer having unique dielectric, electrical and mechanical properties that define an electromechanical operation thereof when affected by an external stimulus. For example, each layer can be (i) a 2-phase composite made from a polymer with polarizable moieties and an effective amount of carbon nanotubes incorporated in the polymer for a predetermined electromechanical operation, or (ii) a 3-phase composite having the elements of the 2-phase composite and further including a third component of micro-sized to nano-sized particles of an electroactive ceramic incorporated in the polymer matrix.

  10. The effect of neutron irradiation on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-based materials are an attractive choice for fusion reactor plasma facing components (PFCs) because of their low atomic number, superior thermal shock resistance, and low neutron activation. Next generation plasma fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will require advanced carbon-carbon composite materials possessing extremely high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated severe heat loads. Moreover, ignition machines such as ITER will produce high neutron fluxes. Consequently, the influence of neutron damage on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials must be evaluated. Data from an irradiation experiment are reported and discussed here. Fusion relevant graphite and carbon-carbon composites were irradiated in a target capsule in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A peak damage dose of 1.59 dpa at 600 degrees C was attained. The carbon materials irradiated included nuclear graphite grade H-451 and one-, two-, and three-directional carbon-carbon composite materials. Dimensional changes, thermal conductivity and strength are reported for the materials examined. The influence of fiber type, architecture, and heat treatment temperature on properties and irradiation behavior are reported. Carbon-Carbon composite dimensional changes are interpreted in terms of simple microstructural models

  11. Hybrid Aluminum Composite Materials Based on Carbon Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana S. Koltsova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated formation of carbon nanofibers grown by chemical deposition (CVD method using an acetylene-hydrogen mixture on the surface of micron-sized aluminum powder particles. To obtain uniform distribution of the carbon nanostructures on the particles we deposited nickel catalyst on the surface by spraying from the aqueous solution of nickel nitrate. It was found that increasing the time of the synthesis lowers the rate of growth of carbon nanostructures due to the deactivation of the catalyst. The Raman spectroscopy measurements confirm the presence of disordered carbon corresponding to CNFs in the specimen. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed the presence of aluminum carbide in the hot pressed samples. An aluminum composite material prepared using 1 wt.% CNFs obtained by uniaxial cold pressing and sintering showed 30% increase in the hardness compared to pure aluminum, whereas the composites prepared by hot pressing showed 80% increase in the hardness. Composite materials have satisfactory ductility. Thus, the aluminum based material reinforced with carbon nanostructures should be appropriate for creating high-strength and light compacts for aerospace and automotive applications and power engineering.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.3.7355

  12. Strengthening of building structures using carbon composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Paranicheva

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the question of ensuring the reliability of various building structures both at the stage of their construction and during operation is very urgent. There are a lot of different ways and constructive methods of structures strengthening. Аt the same time, traditional ways of concrete structures strengthening with steel reinforcement are such expensive, time consuming and in some cases require to interrupt the building operation. As an alternative, it is proposed to use composite materials based on high-strength carbon fibers.The authors consider the properties, advantages, disadvantages and the methods of application of these materials. This article presents results of a technical survey carried out in a public building in 2009. In this building the CFRP was used to strengthen concrete slabs, resting on the crossbar consoles. The calculation of the strength is adduced and the section selection is made. The authors demonstrate their conclusions about the feasibility of using carbon composite materials.

  13. Carbon Cryogel and Carbon Paper-Based Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. 6 One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nano-foams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. 1-5 Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  14. Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries Based on Carbon Cryogels and Carbon Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nanofoams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  15. Boron carbide composite carbon material, method of manufacturing the same and plasma facing material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A boron carbide composite material of the present invention is formed by compositing boron carbide, which is a material suitable as a plasma facing material especially for a thermonuclear reactor. Boron carbide is filled in open cells of a carbon fiber-carbon composite material containing carbon fibers and a carbon matrix. In addition, a boron carbide film is formed on the surface of the composite material. A CVD method and a plasma flaming method are generally known, but they involve problems of occurrence of cracks and peeling of coating film due to thermal stresses. Then, a boron compound is chemically reacted with the surface of a carbon material to convert the carbon on the surface to boron carbide. The composite material contains carbon fibers oriented in one direction, and a boron carbide coating film is formed on the plasma facing surface. With such a constitution, there can be obtained a useful plasma facing material which has excellent strength especially in the direction of the fibers and having heat resistance, chemical stability and ware resistance even after the boron carbide coating film is exhausted and the base material is exposed. (T.M.)

  16. Composite Materials with Magnetically Aligned Carbon Nanoparticles Having Enhanced Electrical Properties and Methods of Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Haiping (Inventor); Peterson, G.P. (Bud) (Inventor); Salem, David R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Magnetically aligned carbon nanoparticle composites have enhanced electrical properties. The composites comprise carbon nanoparticles, a host material, magnetically sensitive nanoparticles and a surfactant. In addition to enhanced electrical properties, the composites can have enhanced mechanical and thermal properties.

  17. Hot extruded carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum matrix composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hansang; Leparoux, Marc

    2012-10-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced aluminum (Al) matrix composite materials were successfully fabricated by mechanical ball milling followed by powder hot extrusion processes. Microstructural analysis revealed that the CNTs were well dispersed at the boundaries and were aligned with the extrusion direction in the composites obtained. Although only a small quantity of CNTs were added to the composite (1 vol%), the Vickers hardness and the tensile strength were significantly enhanced, with an up to three-fold increase relative to that of pure Al. From the fractography of the extruded Al-CNT composite, several shapes were observed in the fracture surface, and this unique morphology is discussed based on the strengthening mechanism. The damage in the CNTs was investigated with Raman spectroscopy. However, the Al-CNT composite materials were not only strengthened by the addition of CNTs but also enhanced by several synergistic effects. The nanoindentation stress-strain curve was successfully constructed by setting the effective zero-load and zero-displacement points and was compared with the tensile stress-strain curve. The yield strengths of the Al-CNT composites from the nanoindentation and tensile tests were compared and discussed. We believe that the yield strength can be predicted using a simple nanoindentation stress/strain curve and that this method will be useful for materials that are difficult to machine, such as complex ceramics.

  18. Hot extruded carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum matrix composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced aluminum (Al) matrix composite materials were successfully fabricated by mechanical ball milling followed by powder hot extrusion processes. Microstructural analysis revealed that the CNTs were well dispersed at the boundaries and were aligned with the extrusion direction in the composites obtained. Although only a small quantity of CNTs were added to the composite (1 vol%), the Vickers hardness and the tensile strength were significantly enhanced, with an up to three-fold increase relative to that of pure Al. From the fractography of the extruded Al–CNT composite, several shapes were observed in the fracture surface, and this unique morphology is discussed based on the strengthening mechanism. The damage in the CNTs was investigated with Raman spectroscopy. However, the Al–CNT composite materials were not only strengthened by the addition of CNTs but also enhanced by several synergistic effects. The nanoindentation stress–strain curve was successfully constructed by setting the effective zero-load and zero-displacement points and was compared with the tensile stress–strain curve. The yield strengths of the Al–CNT composites from the nanoindentation and tensile tests were compared and discussed. We believe that the yield strength can be predicted using a simple nanoindentation stress/strain curve and that this method will be useful for materials that are difficult to machine, such as complex ceramics. (paper)

  19. A carbon-carbon composite materials development program for fusion energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-carbon composites increasingly are being used for plasma-facing component (PFC) applications in magnetic-confinement plasma-fusion devices. They offer substantial advantages such as enhanced physical and mechanical properties and superior thermal shock resistance compared to the previously favored bulk graphite. Next-generation plasma-fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the Burning Plasma Experiment (BPX), will require advanced carbon-carbon composites possessing extremely high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated extreme thermal heat loads. This report outlines a program that will facilitate the development of advanced carbon-carbon composites specifically tailored to meet the requirements of ITER and BPX. A strategy for developing the necessary associated design data base is described. Materials property needs, i.e., high thermal conductivity, radiation stability, tritium retention, etc., are assessed and prioritized through a systems analysis of the functional, operational, and component requirements for plasma-facing applications. The current Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fusion Energy Program on carbon-carbon composites is summarized. Realistic property goals are set based upon our current understanding. The architectures of candidate PFC carbon-carbon composite materials are outlined, and architectural features considered desirable for maximum irradiation stability are described. The European and Japanese carbon-carbon composite development and irradiation programs are described. The Working Group conclusions and recommendations are listed. It is recommended that developmental carbon-carbon composite materials from the commercial sector be procured via request for proposal/request for quotation (RFP/RFQ) as soon as possible

  20. Boron carbide/carbon composite material and production process therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The boron carbide/carbon composite material of the present invention comprises from 15 to 40% by volume of graphite and the balance of two kinds of powdery boron carbides X and Y having different average grain sizes. The average grain size of the powdery boron carbide X is less than 1/2 of the average grain size of the boron carbide Y, and the composite material comprises more than 10% by volume of the powdery boron carbide X and more than 30% by volume of the powdery boron carbide Y. They are press-molded under heating at a temperature range of 480 to 600degC, followed by sintering. A binder pitch of less evaporation ingredient melting upon heating is used as a binder. Since the pitch of satisfactory melting property is used, there is no worry that binding property lacks to reduce the lowering of the strength even if a great amount of powdery boron carbide is added. Further, since a carbonization yield is improved due to less evaporation content, density and strength of the composite material can be increased. (T.M.)

  1. Carbon Carbon Composites: An Overview .

    OpenAIRE

    G. Rohini Devi; K. Rama Rao

    1993-01-01

    Carbon carbon composites are a new class of engineering materials that are ceramic in nature but exhibit brittle to pseudoplastic behaviour. Carbon-carbon is a unique all-carbon composite with carbon fibre embeded in carbon matrix and is known as an inverse composite. Due to their excellent thermo-structural properties, carbon-carbon composites are used in specialised application like re-entry nose-tips, leading edges, rocket nozzles, and aircraft brake discs apart from several indust...

  2. Single-walled carbon nanotube networks in conductive composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bârsan, Oana A; Hoffmann, Günter G; van der Ven, Leo G J; de With, G Bert

    2014-01-01

    Electrically conductive composite materials can be used for a wide range of applications because they combine the advantages of a specific polymeric material (e.g., thermal and mechanical properties) with the electrical properties of conductive filler particles. However, the overall electrical behaviour of these composite materials is usually much below the potential of the conductive fillers, mainly because by mixing two different components, new interfaces and interphases are created, changing the properties and behaviours of both. Our goal is to characterize and understand the nature and influence of these interfaces on the electrical properties of composite materials. We have improved a technique based on the use of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) to disperse single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in water, followed by coating glass substrates, and drying and removing the CMC with a nitric acid treatment. We used electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy techniques to characterize the SWCNT films, and developed an in situ resistance measurement technique to analyse the influence of both the individual components and the mixture of an epoxy/amine system on the electrical behaviour of the SWCNTs. The results showed that impregnating a SWCNT network with a polymer is not the only factor that affects the film resistance; air exposure, temperature, physical and chemical properties of the individual polymer components, and also the formation of a polymeric network, can all have an influence on the macroscopic electrical properties of the initial SWCNT network. These results emphasize the importance of understanding the effects that each of the components can have on each other before trying to prepare an efficient polymer composite material. PMID:25430670

  3. 21 CFR 878.3500 - Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... composite implant material. 878.3500 Section 878.3500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Prosthetic Devices § 878.3500 Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material. (a) Identification. A polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material is a porous...

  4. Thermal Energy in Carbon Nanotube and Graphene Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffres, Scott N.

    Low-dimensional materials, like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene, possess extraordinary properties---higher thermal conductivity than any bulk material, mechanical strength 10-100 times greater than steel on a mass basis, and electrical current capacity 1000 times greater than copper. While composites incorporating these low-dimensional materials promise solutions to global sustainability challenges, significant transport barriers exist at the matrix interface that influence the composite properties. My PhD research sought to address this knowledge gap. I've experimentally explored how CNTs and graphene impact thermal conductivity when added in small volume fractions to gases, liquids and solids through the study of CNT aerogels (ultra lightweight, 8 kg/m3, 99.6% void space), and phase change nanocomposites (hexadecane-graphene). I measured the thermal conductivity of the CNT aerogel with various filling gases versus pressure using a novel technique that targeted ultralow thermal conductivity materials, called metal-coated 3o. I observed amplified energy transport length scales resulting from low gas accommodation, which is a general feature of carbon based nanoporous materials. Our evidence also shows that despite the high thermal conductivity of CNTs, thermal conduction through the CNT network is limited by the high thermal boundary resistance at van der Waals bonded CNT junctions. In the second system, I studied thermal and electrical conductivity of hexadecane- multi-layered-graphene (MLG) phase change nanocomposites to understand how morphology of the MLG network impacts transport. By adjusting the freezing rate, the electrical conductivity in the solid phase can be tuned between 1 and 5 orders-of-magnitude and the solid-liquid thermal conductivity ratio can be varied between 2.6 to 3.0. This research has yielded interesting insights into the tunability of nanocomposites and the physics underlying it, including evidence to indicate that the presence of

  5. Carbon-Carbon Composites as Recuperator Materials for Direct Gas Brayton Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of the numerous energy conversion options available for a space nuclear power plant (SNPP), one that shows promise in attaining reliable operation and high efficiency is the direct gas Brayton (GB) system. In order to increase efficiency, the GB system incorporates a recuperator that accounts for nearly half the weight of the energy conversion system (ECS). Therefore, development of a recuperator that is lighter and provides better performance than current heat exchangers could prove to be advantageous. The feasibility of a carbon-carbon (C/C) composite recuperator core has been assessed and a mass savings of 60% and volume penalty of 20% were projected. The excellent thermal properties, high-temperature capabilities, and low density of carbon-carbon materials make them attractive in the GB system, but development issues such as material compatibility with other structural materials in the system, such as refractory metals and superalloys, permeability, corrosion, joining, and fabrication must be addressed

  6. Carbon-Carbon Composites as Recuperator Material for Direct Gas Brayton Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RA Wolf

    2006-07-19

    Of the numerous energy conversion options available for a space nuclear power plant (SNPP), one that shows promise in attaining reliable operation and high efficiency is the direct gas Brayton (GB) system. In order to increase efficiency, the GB system incorporates a recuperator that accounts for nearly half the weight of the energy conversion system (ECS). Therefore, development of a recuperator that is lighter and provides better performance than current heat exchangers could prove to be advantageous. The feasibility of a carbon-carbon (C/C) composite recuperator core has been assessed and a mass savings of 60% and volume penalty of 20% were projected. The excellent thermal properties, high-temperature capabilities, and low density of carbon-carbon materials make them attractive in the GB system, but development issues such as material compatibility with other structural materials in the system, such as refractory metals and superalloys, permeability, corrosion, joining, and fabrication must be addressed.

  7. Research of carbon composite material for nonlinear finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Ho; Garg, Mohit; Kim, Ji Hoon

    2012-04-01

    Works on the absorption of collision energy in the structural members are carried out widely with various material and cross-sections. And, with ever increasing safety concerns, they are presently applied in various fields including railroad trains, air crafts and automobiles. In addition to this, problem of lighting structural members became important subject by control of exhaust gas emission, fuel economy and energy efficiency. CFRP(Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics) usually is applying the two primary structural members because of different result each design parameter as like stacking thickness, stacking angle, moisture absorption ect. We have to secure the data for applying primary structural members. But it always happens to test design parameters each for securing the data. So, it has much more money and time. We can reduce the money and the time, if can ensure the CFRP material properties each design parameters. In this study, we experiment the coupon test each tension, compression and shear using CFRP prepreg sheet and simulate non-linear analyze at the sources - test result, Caron longitudinal modulus and matrix poisson's ratio using GENOAMQC is specialized at Composite analysis. And then we predict the result that specimen manufacture changing stacking angle and experiment in such a way of test method using GENOA-MCQ.

  8. Comparison of Properties of Polymer Composite Materials Reinforced with Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zygoń P.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes because of their high mechanical, optical or electrical properties, have found use as semiconducting materials constituting the reinforcing phase in composite materials. The paper presents the results of the studies on the mechanical properties of polymer composites reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNT. Three-point bending tests were carried out on the composites. The density of each obtained composite was determined as well as the surface roughness and the resistivity at room temperature.

  9. Enhancement of Electrochemical Stability about Silicon/Carbon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Xiao; Chang Miao; Xuemin Yan; Qing Sun; Ping Mei

    2015-01-01

    Silicon/carbon (Si/C) composite anode materials are successfully synthesized by mechanical ball milling followed by pyrolysis method. The structure and morphology of the composite are characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope, respectively. The results show that the composite is composed of Si, flake graphite, and phenolic resin-pyrolyzed carbon, and Si and flake graphite are enwrapped by phenolic resin-pyrolyzed carbon, which can...

  10. Prospects in using carbon-carbon composite materials based on viscose carbon fibers for the space technology needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the unique combination of low density, high mechanical strength under elevated temperatures, high resistance to thermal shock loads and ablation resistance, carbon-carbon composite materials (CCCM) are widely used for manufacturing of highly thermally loaded structural components. The important scientific and technical difficulty is to increase and stabilize CCCM properties, reduce cost and leads to searching for new raw materials and engineering solutions. The article describes the prospects of replacing carbon fiber fills based on PAN-precursors which are traditionally used for producing CCCM by carbon fillers on the basis of viscose raw material; shows the advantages of using viscose-based carbon fibers when forming products of complex shape as well as the possibility of obtaining products with high functional characteristics. The creation of CCCM of layered reinforcement structure, in which carbon fabric layers interleave with layers of discontinuous carbon fibers, enabled to increase the overall density of carbon composites, to ensure sufficiently high level of mechanical characteristics and resistance to ablation

  11. Carbon Nanotube Enhanced Aerospace Composite Materials A New Generation of Multifunctional Hybrid Structural Composites

    CERN Document Server

    Kostopoulos, V

    2013-01-01

    The well documented increase in the use of high performance composites as structural materials in aerospace components is continuously raising the demands in terms of dynamic performance, structural integrity, reliable life monitoring systems and adaptive actuating abilities. Current technologies address the above issues separately; material property tailoring and custom design practices aim to the enhancement of dynamic and damage tolerance characteristics, whereas life monitoring and actuation is performed with embedded sensors that may be detrimental to the structural integrity of the component. This publication explores the unique properties of carbon nanotubes (CNT) as an additive in the matrix of Fibre Reinforced Plastics (FRP), for producing structural composites with improved mechanical performance as well as sensing/actuating capabilities. The successful combination of the CNT properties and existing sensing actuating technologies leads to the realization of a multifunctional FRP structure. The curre...

  12. Fabrication of carbon-based composite materials with sp2-sp3 hybridizations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Varga, Marián; Vretenár, V.; Artemenko, Anna; Skákalová, V.; Kromka, Alexander

    Nantes: French Association for Composite Materials, 2013 - (Drissi-Habti, M.; Renard, J.) [Euro- Japanese Symposium on Composite Materials /13./. 04.11.2013-06.11.2013, Nantes] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0794 Grant ostatní: FP7 Electrograph(XE) 266391 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : carbon * nanocomposite * CNTs Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials

  13. Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    This book deals with the mechanical and physical behavior of composites as influenced by composite geometry. "Composite Materials" provides a comprehensive introduction for researchers and students to modern composite materials research with a special emphasis on the significance of phase geometry....... The book enables the reader to a better understanding of the behavior of natural composites, improvement of such materials, and design of new materials with prescribed properties. A number of examples are presented: Special composite properties considered are stiffness, shrinkage, hygro...

  14. Conditions for forming composite carbon nanotube-diamond like carbon material that retain the good properties of both materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Wei, E-mail: wei.ren@helsinki.fi; Avchaciov, Konstantin; Nordlund, Kai [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Iyer, Ajai; Koskinen, Jari [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16200, 00076 Espoo (Finland); Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I. [NanoMaterials Group, Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 15100, 00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2015-11-21

    Carbon nanotubes are of wide interest due to their excellent properties such as tensile strength and electrical and thermal conductivity, but are not, when placed alone on a substrate, well resistant to mechanical wear. Diamond-like carbon (DLC), on the other hand, is widely used in applications due to its very good wear resistance. Combining the two materials could provide a very durable pure carbon nanomaterial enabling to benefit from the best properties of both carbon allotropes. However, the synthesis of high-quality diamond-like carbon uses energetic plasmas, which can damage the nanotubes. From previous works it is neither clear whether the quality of the tubes remains good after DLC deposition, nor whether the DLC above the tubes retains the high sp{sup 3} bonding fraction. In this work, we use experiments and classical molecular dynamics simulations to study the mechanisms of DLC formation on various carbon nanotube compositions. The results show that high-sp{sup 3}-content DLC can be formed provided the deposition conditions allow for sidewards pressure to form from a substrate close beneath the tubes. Under optimal DLC formation energies of around 40–70 eV, the top two nanotube atom layers are fully destroyed by the plasma deposition, but layers below this can retain their structural integrity.

  15. Conditions for forming composite carbon nanotube-diamond like carbon material that retain the good properties of both materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wei; Iyer, Ajai; Koskinen, Jari; Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Avchaciov, Konstantin; Nordlund, Kai

    2015-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes are of wide interest due to their excellent properties such as tensile strength and electrical and thermal conductivity, but are not, when placed alone on a substrate, well resistant to mechanical wear. Diamond-like carbon (DLC), on the other hand, is widely used in applications due to its very good wear resistance. Combining the two materials could provide a very durable pure carbon nanomaterial enabling to benefit from the best properties of both carbon allotropes. However, the synthesis of high-quality diamond-like carbon uses energetic plasmas, which can damage the nanotubes. From previous works it is neither clear whether the quality of the tubes remains good after DLC deposition, nor whether the DLC above the tubes retains the high sp3 bonding fraction. In this work, we use experiments and classical molecular dynamics simulations to study the mechanisms of DLC formation on various carbon nanotube compositions. The results show that high-sp3-content DLC can be formed provided the deposition conditions allow for sidewards pressure to form from a substrate close beneath the tubes. Under optimal DLC formation energies of around 40-70 eV, the top two nanotube atom layers are fully destroyed by the plasma deposition, but layers below this can retain their structural integrity.

  16. Conditions for forming composite carbon nanotube-diamond like carbon material that retain the good properties of both materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotubes are of wide interest due to their excellent properties such as tensile strength and electrical and thermal conductivity, but are not, when placed alone on a substrate, well resistant to mechanical wear. Diamond-like carbon (DLC), on the other hand, is widely used in applications due to its very good wear resistance. Combining the two materials could provide a very durable pure carbon nanomaterial enabling to benefit from the best properties of both carbon allotropes. However, the synthesis of high-quality diamond-like carbon uses energetic plasmas, which can damage the nanotubes. From previous works it is neither clear whether the quality of the tubes remains good after DLC deposition, nor whether the DLC above the tubes retains the high sp3 bonding fraction. In this work, we use experiments and classical molecular dynamics simulations to study the mechanisms of DLC formation on various carbon nanotube compositions. The results show that high-sp3-content DLC can be formed provided the deposition conditions allow for sidewards pressure to form from a substrate close beneath the tubes. Under optimal DLC formation energies of around 40–70 eV, the top two nanotube atom layers are fully destroyed by the plasma deposition, but layers below this can retain their structural integrity

  17. Structural Characterization and Property Study on the Activated Alumina-activated Carbon Composite Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yan-Qing; WU Ren-Ping; YE Xian-Feng

    2012-01-01

    AlCl3,NH3·H2O,HNO3 and activated carbon were used as raw materials to prepare one new type of activated alumina-activated carbon composite material.The influence of heat treatment conditions on the structure and property of this material was discussed;The microstructures of the composite material were characterized by XRD,SEM,BET techniques;and its formaldehyde adsorption characteristic was also tested.The results showed that the optimal heat treatment temperature of the activated alumina-activated carbon composite material was 450 ℃,iodine adsorption value was 441.40 mg/g,compressive strength was 44 N,specific surface area was 360.07 m2/g,average pore size was 2.91 nm,and pore volume was 0.26 m3/g.According to the BET pore size distribution diagram,the composite material has dual-pore size distribution structure,the micro-pore distributes in the range of 0.6-1.7 nm,and the meso-pore in the range of 3.0-8.0 nm.The formaldehyde adsorption effect of the activated alumina-activated carbon composite material was excellent,much better than that of the pure activated carbon or activated alumina,and its saturated adsorption capacity was 284.19 mg/g.

  18. V2O5/Mesoporous Carbon Composite as a Cathode Material for Lithium-ion Batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABSTRACT: V2O5/mesoporous carbon composite has been prepared by an ultrasonically assisted method followed by a sintering process. The as-prepared V2O5/mesoporous carbon material containing 90 wt% V2O5 shows better electrochemical performance, with capacity of 163 mA h g−1 after 100 cycles at the current density of 500 mA g−1, as well as better charge/discharge rate capability for lithium storage than V2O5 nanoparticles. The improved electrochemical performance indicates that the V2O5/mesoporous carbon composite could be used as a promising cathode material for lithium ion batteries

  19. Preparation of mesoporous carbon/polypyrrole composite materials and their supercapacitive properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WU-JUN ZOU

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We synthesized mesoporous carbons/polypyrrole composites, using a chemical oxidative polymerization and calcium carbonate as a sacrificial template. N2 adsorption-desorption method, Fourier infrared spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the structure and morphology of the composites. The measurement results indicated that as-synthesized carbon with the disordered mesoporous structure and a pore size of approximately 5 nm was uniformly coated by polypyrrole. The electrochemical behavior of the resulting composite was examined by cyclic voltammetry and cycle life measurements, and the obtained results showed that the specific capacitance of the resulting composite electrode was as high as 313 F g−1, nearly twice the capacitance of pure mesoporous carbon electrode (163 F g–1. This reveals that the electrochemical performance of these materials is governed by a combination of the electric double layer capacitance of mesoporous carbon and pseudocapacitance of polypyrrole.

  20. Evaluation for cell affinity of the composite material containing carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Shizhao; WAN Yuqing; YAN Huijuan; BEI Jianzhong; WANG Chen; WANG Shenguo; WANG Chunru; WAN Lijun; BAI Chunli

    2004-01-01

    The composite material of poly-(L-lactide) (PLLA) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared. Its surface morphologies and property were worked out by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle measurement. Moreover, the prime cytocompatibility was used to investigate the biocompatibility of the composite material containing CNTs and the effects of CNTs on one aspect of cell function, cell affinity. The results obtained indicate that the composite material of PLLA and CNTs possesses good biocompatibility for both the 3T3 fibroblasts and Oct-1 osteoblast-like cells. The addition of CNTs will greatly affect cell affinity of the material, which may be disadvantage for the cell adhesion.

  1. Advanced carbon materials/olivine LiFePO4 composites cathode for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chunli; Xue, Zhigang; Wen, Sheng; Ye, Yunsheng; Xie, Xiaolin

    2016-06-01

    In the past two decades, LiFePO4 has undoubtly become a competitive candidate for the cathode material of the next-generation LIBs due to its abundant resources, low toxicity and excellent thermal stability, etc. However, the poor electronic conductivity as well as low lithium ion diffusion rate are the two major drawbacks for the commercial applications of LiFePO4 especially in the power energy field. The introduction of highly graphitized advanced carbon materials, which also possess high electronic conductivity, superior specific surface area and excellent structural stability, into LiFePO4 offers a better way to resolve the issue of limited rate performance caused by the two obstacles when compared with traditional carbon materials. In this review, we focus on advanced carbon materials such as one-dimensional (1D) carbon (carbon nanotubes and carbon fibers), two-dimensional (2D) carbon (graphene, graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide) and three-dimensional (3D) carbon (carbon nanotubes array and 3D graphene skeleton), modified LiFePO4 for high power lithium ion batteries. The preparation strategies, structure, and electrochemical performance of advanced carbon/LiFePO4 composite are summarized and discussed in detail. The problems encountered in its application and the future development of this composite are also discussed.

  2. Friction Behaviour of Polymeric Composite Materials Mixed with Carbon Fibers Having Different Orientations Layout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliman, R.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a study of the friction properties of polymeric composite materials reinforced with unidirectional carbon fibers having different stratified structure. So, the composites are complex and versatile materials but their behaviour in practice is not fully studied. For instance, these polymeric composite materials mixed with carbon fibers after being investigated in terms of wear, did not elucidate the effect of fiber orientation on wear properties. Is therefore necessary to investigate the effect of carbon fibers orientation on the friction-wear properties of the reinforced composite materials tested to abrasive and adhesive friction. Research work has been done with unidirectional composite materials having overlap 18 successive layers made from a polymeric resine and 60% of carbon fibers. The stratified structure was obtained by compressing multiple pre-impregnated strips, positioned manually. During this experimental work, three types of test samples were investigated: parallel, normal and anti-parallel, taking in consideration the carbon fibre orientation with respect to the sliding direction. The friction coefficient is computed function to the friction load and loading value. Also, the specific wear rate was calculated according to: the mass loss, density, the normal contact surface, the sliding distance and load rating.

  3. Properties of the chalcogenide–carbon nano tubes and graphene composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Abhay Kumar, E-mail: abhaysngh@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Department of Electronics Engineering, Incheon National University, Incheon 406-772 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Incheon National University, Incheon 406-772 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, JunHo [Department of Physics, Incheon National University, Incheon 406-772 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong Tae [Department of Electronics Engineering, Incheon National University, Incheon 406-772 (Korea, Republic of); Sangunni, K.S. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2015-04-05

    Highlights: • Chalcogenides. • Melt quenched. • Composite materials. • Multi walled carbon nano tubes. • Bilayer graphene. - Abstract: Composite can deliver more than the individual elemental property of the material. Specifically chalcogenide- multi walled carbon nano tubes and chalcogenide- bilayer graphene composite materials could be interesting for the investigation, which have been less covered by the investigators. We describe micro structural properties of Se{sub 55}Te{sub 25}Ge{sub 20,} Se{sub 55}Te{sub 25}Ge{sub 20} + 0.025% multi walled carbon nano tubes and Se{sub 55}Te{sub 25}Ge{sub 20} + 0.025% bilayer graphene materials. This gives realization of the alloying constituents inclusion/or diffusion inside the multi walled carbon nano tubes and bilayer graphene under the homogeneous parent alloy configuration. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV/Visible spectroscopy and Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy have also been carried out under the discussion. A considerable core energy levels peak shifts have been noticed for the composite materials by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The optical energy band gaps are measured to be varied in between 1.2 and 1.3 eV. In comparison to parent (Se{sub 55}Te{sub 25}Ge{sub 20}) alloy a higher infrared transmission has been observed for the composite materials. Subsequently, variation in physical properties has been explained on the basis of bond formation in solids.

  4. Regularities of ion-electron emission of one-dimensional carbon-based composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature dependence of ion-electron emission yield, γ(T), developed topography and surface crystalline structure of carbon-based composite material KUP- VM under high-fluence 30 keV N2+ ion irradiation has been studied. Complex two-stage nature of γ(T) dependence is formed due to the process of dynamic annealing of the radiation damage in structural components of composite material

  5. Carbon Fiber Composite Materials in Modern Day Automotive Production Lines – A Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Petersson, Håkan; Motte, Damien; Bjärnemo, Robert

    2014-01-01

    New and innovative production equipment can be developed by introducing lightweight materials in modern day automotive industry production lines. The properties of these new materials are expected to result in improved ergonomics, energy savings, increased flexibility and more robust equipment, which in the end will result in enhanced productivity. Carbon composite materials are one such alternative that has excellent material properties. These properties are well documented, and the market f...

  6. Method of Making an Electroactive Sensing/Actuating Material for Carbon Nanotube Polymer Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. (Inventor); Draughon, Gregory K. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An electroactive sensing or actuating material comprises a composite made from a polymer with polarizable moieties and an effective amount of carbon nanotubes incorporated in the polymer for a predetermined electromechanical operation of the composite when such composite is affected by an external stimulus. In another embodiment, the composite comprises a, third component of micro -sized to nano-sized particles of an electroactive ceramic that is also incorporated in the polymer matrix. The method for making the three-phase composite comprises either incorporating the carbon nanotubes in the polymer matrix before incorporation of the particles of ceramic or mixing the carbon nanotubes and particles of ceramic together in a solution before incorporation in the polymer matrix.

  7. Sensing/actuating materials made from carbon nanotube polymer composites and methods for making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. (Inventor); Draughon, Gregory K. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An electroactive sensing or actuating material comprises a composite made from a polymer with polarizable moieties and an effective amount of carbon nanotubes incorporated in the polymer for a predetermined electromechanical operation of the composite when such composite is affected by an external stimulus. In another embodiment, the composite comprises a third component of micro-sized to nano-sized particles of an electroactive ceramic that is also incorporated in the polymer matrix. The method for making the three-phase composite comprises either incorporating the carbon nanotubes in the polymer matrix before incorporation of the particles of ceramic or mixing the carbon nanotubes and particles of ceramic together in a solution before incorporation in the polymer matrix.

  8. Nanostructured composites based on carbon nanotubes and epoxy resin for use as radar absorbing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Valdirene Aparecida [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Folgueras, Luiza de Castro; Candido, Geraldo Mauricio; Paula, Adriano Luiz de; Rezende, Mirabel Cerqueira, E-mail: mirabelmcr@iae.cta.br [Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco (IAE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Materiais; Costa, Michelle Leali [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (DMT/UNESP), Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Materiais e Tecnologia

    2013-07-01

    Nanostructured polymer composites have opened up new perspectives for multifunctional materials. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) present potential applications in order to improve mechanical and electrical performance in composites with aerospace application. The combination of epoxy resin with multi walled carbon nanotubes results in a new functional material with enhanced electromagnetic properties. The objective of this work was the processing of radar absorbing materials based on formulations containing different quantities of carbon nanotubes in an epoxy resin matrix. To reach this objective the adequate concentration of CNTs in the resin matrix was determined. The processed structures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, rheology, thermal and reflectivity in the frequency range of 8.2 to 12.4 GHz analyses. The microwave attenuation was up to 99.7%, using only 0.5% (w/w) of CNT, showing that these materials present advantages in performance associated with low additive concentrations (author)

  9. Potential of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Cement Composites as Concrete Repair Material

    OpenAIRE

    Tanvir Manzur; Nur Yazdani; Md. Abul Bashar Emon

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a virtually ideal reinforcing agent due to extremely high aspect ratios and ultra high strengths. It is evident from contemporary research that utilization of CNT in producing new cement-based composite materials has a great potential. Consequently, possible practical application of CNT reinforced cementitious composites has immense prospect in the field of applied nanotechnology within construction industry. Several repair, retrofit, and strengthening techniques a...

  10. Composite carbon foam electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1997-05-06

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granulated materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

  11. Size Classification of Chopped Carbon Fibers in the Composite Materials Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.S. Dovbysh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Information synthesis of the learning decision support system for automation of the chopped carbon fibers size control used for the matrix filling within the manufacturing of composite materials based on polytetrafluoroethylene is considered. To improve the reliability of recognition learning algorithm with the optimization of the precision control is proposed.

  12. Size Classification of Chopped Carbon Fibers in the Composite Materials Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    А.S. Dovbysh; А.F. Budnik; N.І. Andriienko

    2010-01-01

    Information synthesis of the learning decision support system for automation of the chopped carbon fibers size control used for the matrix filling within the manufacturing of composite materials based on polytetrafluoroethylene is considered. To improve the reliability of recognition learning algorithm with the optimization of the precision control is proposed.

  13. Stress evaluation by hyperfine hardness test for proton-irradiated carbon composit materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, the nuclear fusion reactors being proposed are based on tokamak type D-T nuclear fusion reaction, and the effect that the irradiation of the 14 MeV neutrons formed in this reaction exerts to plasma-facing equipment such as first wall, divertor and limiter is extremely large. In particular, the conditions of use is severest in the divertor. The material for divertor armor tiles is expected to be carbon-fiber reinforced carbon composite material, of which the thermal conductivity is high, and the resistance to thermal shock is excellent. The present status of the studies on the neutron irradiation damage of carbon materials is explained. It was decided to begin the proton irradiation by using the cyclotron of azimuthally varying field of the Takasaki ion accelerator for advanced radiation application, in order to experimentally examine the sutability as the simulated irradiation of 14 MeV neutrons. As the methods of irradiation, the irradiation of protons, helium or carbon ions individually, the irradiation of multiple ions successively and the irradiation of protons were tested. The method of stress evaluation and the hyperfine hardness test on the carbon composite materials of various grades are reported. The damage peaks of the composites were determined, and the application to the stress evaluation was done. (K.I.)

  14. Dual-carbon enhanced silicon-based composite as superior anode material for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Liu, Dai-Huo; Wang, Ying-Ying; Hou, Bao-Hua; Zhang, Jing-Ping; Wang, Rong-Shun; Wu, Xing-Long

    2016-03-01

    Dual-carbon enhanced Si-based composite (Si/C/G) has been prepared via employing the widely distributed, low-cost and environmentally friendly Diatomite mineral as silicon raw material. The preparation processes are very simple, non-toxic and easy to scale up. Electrochemical tests as anode material for lithium ion batteries (LIBs) demonstrate that this Si/C/G composite exhibits much improved Li-storage properties in terms of superior high-rate capabilities and excellent cycle stability compared to the pristine Si material as well as both single-carbon modified composites. Specifically for the Si/C/G composite, it can still deliver a high specific capacity of about 470 mAh g-1 at an ultrahigh current density of 5 A g-1, and exhibit a high capacity of 938 mAh g-1 at 0.1 A g-1 with excellent capacity retention in the following 300 cycles. The significantly enhanced Li-storage properties should be attributed to the co-existence of both highly conductive graphite and amorphous carbon in the Si/C/G composite. While the former can enhance the electrical conductivity of the obtained composite, the latter acts as the adhesives to connect the porous Si particulates and conductive graphite flakes to form robust and stable conductive network.

  15. Crosslinked Carbon Nanotubes/Polyaniline Composites as a Pseudocapacitive Material with High Cycling Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Liu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The poor cycling stability of polyaniline (PANI limits its practical application as a pseudocapacitive material due to the volume change during the charge-discharge procedure. Herein, crosslinked carbon nanotubes/polyaniline (C-CNTs/PANI composites had been designed by the in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline in the presence of crosslinked carbon nanotubes (C-CNTs, which were obtained by coupling of the functionalized carbon nanotubes with 1,4-benzoquinone. The composite showed a specific capacitance of 294 F/g at the scan rate of 10 mV/s, and could retain 95% of its initial specific capacitance after 1000 CV cycles. Such high electrochemical cycling stability resulting from the crosslinked skeleton of the C-CNTs makes them potential electrode materials for a supercapacitor.

  16. Enhancement of Electrochemical Stability about Silicon/Carbon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon/carbon (Si/C composite anode materials are successfully synthesized by mechanical ball milling followed by pyrolysis method. The structure and morphology of the composite are characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope, respectively. The results show that the composite is composed of Si, flake graphite, and phenolic resin-pyrolyzed carbon, and Si and flake graphite are enwrapped by phenolic resin-pyrolyzed carbon, which can provide not only a good buffering matrix but also a conductive network. The Si/C composite also shows good electrochemical stability, in which the composite anode material exhibits a high initial charge capacity of 805.3 mAh g−1 at 100 mA g−1 and it can still deliver a high charge capacity of 791.7 mAh g−1 when the current density increases to 500 mA g−1. The results indicate that it could be used as a promising anode material for lithium ion batteries.

  17. Electrospun carbon-cobalt composite nanofiber as an anode material for lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-cobalt (C/Co) composite nanofibers with diameters from 100 to 300 nm were prepared by electrospinning and subsequent heat treatment. They were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, galvanostatic cell cycling and impedance spectroscopy. As a lithium storage material, these fibers exhibit excellent electrochemical properties with high reversible capacity (>750 mA h g-1) and good rate capability (578 mA h g-1 at 1 C rate). These composite fibers are a promising anode material for high-power Li-ion batteries

  18. Study of Lignocellulose/Epoxy Composites for Carbon-neutral Insulation Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiya, Gen; Hayami, Tokusuke; Murayama, Kiyoko; Sato, Junichi; Kinoshita, Susumu; Todo, Yoko; Amano, Yoshihiko

    Carbon-neutral materials, which do not affect the density of CO2 in the atmosphere even if they burn, have attracted much attention form the viewpoint of environmental friendliness. In this study, lignocellulose/epoxy composites were newly prepared as carbon-neutral insulation materials, and their properties were evaluated. Hydrothermal reaction lignocellulose, which is composed of lignin and crystalline cellulose, was prepared by a treatment of corncob under high-pressure hot water at 190°C, 1.8 MPa for 10min. The 13C-NMR spectra showed that the amounts of non-crystalline cellulose in the hydrothermal reaction lignocellulose were less than those of non-hydrothermal reaction lignocellulose. Moreover, hydrothermal reaction and oligoesterification lignocellulose was obtained by a reaction of maleic anhydride and glycidyl ether with the hydrothermal reaction lignocellulose. The epoxy resin containing the hydrothermal reaction and oligoesterification lignocellulose had lower water absorption and viscosity than those of the epoxy resin containing the non-hydrothermal reaction lignocellulose. The epoxy resin containing the hydrothermal reaction and oligoesterification lignocellulose with SiO2 fillers showed an insulation breakdown strength as same as conventional material (an epoxy resin containing SiO2 fillers). In addition, mechanical and thermal properties of the epoxy-based composite were also comparable with a conventional material. Therefore, the epoxy-based composite seems to be a candidate as practical carbon neutral insulation materials.

  19. Carbon nanotube-reinforced composites as structural materials for microactuators in microelectromechanical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanocomposites are a promising new class of structural materials for the mechanical components of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). This paper presents a detailed theoretical investigation of the utility of carbon nanotube-reinforced composites for designing actuators with low stiffness and high natural frequencies of vibration. The actuators are modelled as beams of solid rectangular cross-section consisting of an isotropic matrix reinforced with transversely isotropic carbon nanotubes. Three different types of nanotube reinforcements are considered: single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and arrays of SWNTs. The effects of nanotube aspect ratio, dispersion, alignment and volume fraction on the elastic modulus and longitudinal wave velocity are analysed by recourse to the Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka theory. The calculated bounds on Young's modulus and wave velocity capture the trend of the experimental results reported in the literature. Polymer-matrix nanocomposites reinforced with aligned, dispersed SWNTs are identified as excellent candidates for microactuators and microresonators, with properties rivalling those of monolithic metallic and ceramic structures used in the current generation of MEMS. A qualitative comparison between the state-of-the-art in nanocomposite manufacturing technology and the predicted upper bound on Young's modulus and longitudinal wave velocity highlights the enormous improvements needed in materials processing and micromachining to harness the full potential of carbon nanotube-reinforced composites for microactuator applications. These results have immediate and significant implications for the use of nanotube composites in MEMS

  20. Multiscale Modeling of Carbon/Phenolic Composite Thermal Protection Materials: Atomistic to Effective Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Murthy, Pappu L.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Lawson, John W.; Monk, Joshua D.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    Next generation ablative thermal protection systems are expected to consist of 3D woven composite architectures. It is well known that composites can be tailored to achieve desired mechanical and thermal properties in various directions and thus can be made fit-for-purpose if the proper combination of constituent materials and microstructures can be realized. In the present work, the first, multiscale, atomistically-informed, computational analysis of mechanical and thermal properties of a present day - Carbon/Phenolic composite Thermal Protection System (TPS) material is conducted. Model results are compared to measured in-plane and out-of-plane mechanical and thermal properties to validate the computational approach. Results indicate that given sufficient microstructural fidelity, along with lowerscale, constituent properties derived from molecular dynamics simulations, accurate composite level (effective) thermo-elastic properties can be obtained. This suggests that next generation TPS properties can be accurately estimated via atomistically informed multiscale analysis.

  1. Composite material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchens, Stacy A. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Solihull, GB); Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN); O' Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-02-07

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  2. Composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchens, Stacy A.; Woodward, Jonathan; Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.

    2012-02-07

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  3. Polyaniline nanofiber/large mesoporous carbon composites as electrode materials for supercapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The composites of polyaniline nanofiber and large mesoporous carbon were prepared for supercapacitors. • The large mesoporous carbons were simply prepared by nano-CaCO3 template method. • The composites exhibit high capacitance and good rate capability and cycle stability. - Abstract: A composite of polyaniline nanofiber/large mesoporous carbon (PANI-F/LMC) hybrid was prepared by an in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline monomer with nano-CaCO3 templated LMC as host matrix for supercapacitors. The morphology, composition and electronic structure of the composites (PANI-F/LMC) together with pure PANI nanofibers and the LMC were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), FT-IR, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It is found that the PANI nanofibers were incorporated into the large mesochannels of LMC with interpenetrating framework formed. Such unique structure endows the PANI-F/LMC composite with a high capacitance of 473 F g−1 at a current load of 0.1 A g−1 with good rate performance and cycling stability, suggesting its potential application in the electrode material for supercapacitors

  4. Polyaniline nanofiber/large mesoporous carbon composites as electrode materials for supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Huan; Xu, Bin; Jia, Mengqiu, E-mail: jiamq@mail.buct.edu.cn; Zhang, Mei; Cao, Bin; Zhao, Xiaonan; Wang, Yu

    2015-03-30

    Highlights: • The composites of polyaniline nanofiber and large mesoporous carbon were prepared for supercapacitors. • The large mesoporous carbons were simply prepared by nano-CaCO{sub 3} template method. • The composites exhibit high capacitance and good rate capability and cycle stability. - Abstract: A composite of polyaniline nanofiber/large mesoporous carbon (PANI-F/LMC) hybrid was prepared by an in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline monomer with nano-CaCO{sub 3} templated LMC as host matrix for supercapacitors. The morphology, composition and electronic structure of the composites (PANI-F/LMC) together with pure PANI nanofibers and the LMC were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), FT-IR, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It is found that the PANI nanofibers were incorporated into the large mesochannels of LMC with interpenetrating framework formed. Such unique structure endows the PANI-F/LMC composite with a high capacitance of 473 F g{sup −1} at a current load of 0.1 A g{sup −1} with good rate performance and cycling stability, suggesting its potential application in the electrode material for supercapacitors.

  5. Electrochemical properties of SnO2/carbon composite materials as anode material for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → SnO2/carbon powders with a cauliflower-like particle structure were synthesized. → Post-annealing can improve the electrochemical properties of SnO2/C composite. → The 500 deg. C-annealed SnO2/C shows the best electrochemical performance. → The lithium ion diffusion coefficients of the SnO2/C electrodes were calculated. - Abstract: SnO2/carbon composite anode materials were synthesized from SnCl4.5H2O and sucrose via a hydrothermal route and a post heat-treatment. The synthesized spherical SnO2/carbon powders show a cauliflower-like micro-sized structure. High annealing temperature results in partial reduction of SnO2. Metallic Sn starts to emerge at 500 deg. C. High Sn content in SnO2/carbon composite is favorable for the increase of initial coulombic efficiency but not for the cycling stability. The SnO2/carbon annealed at 500 deg. C exhibits high specific capacity (∼400 mAh g-1), stable cycling performance and good rate capability. The generation of Li2O in the first lithiation process can prevent the aggregation of active Sn, while the carbon component can buffer the big volume change caused by lithiation/delithiation of active Sn. Both of them make contribution to the better cycle stability.

  6. Optical properties of carbon materials filled HDPE composites in THz region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiliang; MA Mingwang; YANG Xiaomin; YANG Kang; LIU Dan; JI Te; WU Shengwei; ZHU Zhiyong

    2009-01-01

    The optical and electrical properties of several composites,formed by filling the high density polyethylene (HDPE) with similar amount of carbon black (CB),multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) and fullerene (C60),respectively,were characterized using a THz-TDS setup.It was found that the optical parameters and the details of their variation with frequency differ significantly for different kinds of carbon materials.The results are analyzed by using Cole-Cole formula of dipole relaxation under the assumption that carbon particles dispersed in the matrix behave like dipoles and contribute mainly to the dielectric loss in the THz frequency range.Fitting results indicate that MWNT and CB filled composites have a broader distribution of the relaxation time compared with C60 which possesses a nearly single relaxation time.Compared with CB and C60,MWNT filled composite possesses the larger relaxation strength due to its higher electron density and larger conductive clusters.The real part of conductivity for three kinds of composites all follows power law behavior with respect to frequency but the exponents are quite different.These phenomena may be related to the special properties of the fillers as well as their particulate structures,such as aspect ratio,particle size,and aggregate structure,etc.

  7. Polyaniline nanofiber/large mesoporous carbon composites as electrode materials for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huan; Xu, Bin; Jia, Mengqiu; Zhang, Mei; Cao, Bin; Zhao, Xiaonan; Wang, Yu

    2015-03-01

    A composite of polyaniline nanofiber/large mesoporous carbon (PANI-F/LMC) hybrid was prepared by an in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline monomer with nano-CaCO3 templated LMC as host matrix for supercapacitors. The morphology, composition and electronic structure of the composites (PANI-F/LMC) together with pure PANI nanofibers and the LMC were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), FT-IR, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It is found that the PANI nanofibers were incorporated into the large mesochannels of LMC with interpenetrating framework formed. Such unique structure endows the PANI-F/LMC composite with a high capacitance of 473 F g-1 at a current load of 0.1 A g-1 with good rate performance and cycling stability, suggesting its potential application in the electrode material for supercapacitors.

  8. The electrochemical performance of ordered mesoporous carbon/nickel compounds composite material for supercapacitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of high performance ordered mesoporous carbon/nickel compounds composites have been synthesized by a combination of incipient wetness impregnation and hydrothermal method for the first time. X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are used to characterize the composites derived at the hydrothermal temperature of 125, 150, 175, 200, 250, 275 and 300 oC. The formation of nanosized nickel compounds, fully inside the mesopore system, was confirmed with XRD and TEM. An N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms measurements still revealed mesoporosity for the host/guest compounds. It is noteworthy that an OMC/nickel nitrate hydroxide hydrate composite (OMCN-150) exhibits more excellent performance. Based on the various hydrothermal temperatures of the composite, the capacitance of an OMCN-150 delivering the best electrochemical performance is about 2.4 (5 mV s-1) and 1.5 (50 mV s-1) times of the pristine OMC. The capacitance retention of an OMCN-150 is 96.1%, which indicates that the electrochemical performance of the supercapacitor is improved greatly, and represents novel research and significant advances in the field of electrode composite materials for supercapacitor. -- Graphical abstract: A series of high performance nickel compound/ordered mesoporous carbon composites were synthesized by a combination of incipient wetness impregnation and hydrothermal method for the first time. Display Omitted

  9. Damage threshold study of sonic IR imaging on carbon-fiber reinforced laminated composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaoyan; He, Qi; Zhang, Ding; Ashbaugh, Mike; Favro, Lawrence D.; Newaz, Golam; Thomas, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Sonic Infrared Imaging, as a young NDE technology, has drawn a lot of attentions due to it's fast, wide-area evaluation capability, and due to its broad applications in different materials such as metal/metal alloy, composites and detection of various types of defects: surface, subsurface, cracks, delaminations/disbonds. Sonic IR Imaging combines pulsed ultrasound excitation and infrared imaging to detect defects in materials. The sound pulse causes rubbing due to non-unison motion between faces of defects, and infrared sensors image the temperature map over the target to identify defects. However, concerns have also been brought up about possible damages which might occur at the contact spots between the ultrasound transducer from the external excitation source and the target materials. In this paper, we present our results from a series of systematically designed experiments on carbon-fiber reinforced laminated composite panels to address the concerns.

  10. Nano-engineered Multiwall Carbon Nanotube-copper Composite Thermal Interface Material for Efficient Heat Conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Quoc; Cruden, Brett A.; Cassell, Alan M.; Sims, Gerard; Li, Jun; Meyyappa, M.; Yang, Cary Y.

    2005-01-01

    Efforts in integrated circuit (IC) packaging technologies have recently been focused on management of increasing heat density associated with high frequency and high density circuit designs. While current flip-chip package designs can accommodate relatively high amounts of heat density, new materials need to be developed to manage thermal effects of next-generation integrated circuits. Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNT) have been shown to significantly enhance thermal conduction in the axial direction and thus can be considered to be a candidate for future thermal interface materials by facilitating efficient thermal transport. This work focuses on fabrication and characterization of a robust MWNT-copper composite material as an element in IC package designs. We show that using vertically aligned MWNT arrays reduces interfacial thermal resistance by increasing conduction surface area, and furthermore, the embedded copper acts as a lateral heat spreader to efficiently disperse heat, a necessary function for packaging materials. In addition, we demonstrate reusability of the material, and the absence of residue on the contacting material, both novel features of the MWNT-copper composite that are not found in most state-of-the-art thermal interface materials. Electrochemical methods such as metal deposition and etch are discussed for the creation of the MWNT-Cu composite, detailing issues and observations with using such methods. We show that precise engineering of the composite surface affects the ability of this material to act as an efficient thermal interface material. A thermal contact resistance measurement has been designed to obtain a value of thermal contact resistance for a variety of different thermal contact materials.

  11. Fabrication of porous carbon composite material from leaves waste as lightweight expanded carbon aggregate (LECA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulhadi, Rosita, N.; Susanto, Nisa', K.; Wiguna, P. A.; Marwoto, P.; Aji, M. P.

    2016-04-01

    Leaves waste has been used as Lightweight Expanded Carbon Aggregates (LECA) because of its high carbon material. LECA can be used as a water storage media. LECA is low in density so thatits massis very light. Due to its use as a water storage medium, it is important to find out the absorption which occurs in LECA.The LECA's absorption and evaporation rate is affected by the pores. The pores serves to increase water storage ability from LECA. LECA with PEG (pore-forming agent) mass percent variation of 5%, 10%, 15%, 20% and 25% is the focus of this study. LECA fabrication was conducted by mixing the carbon resulting from leaves waste pyrolysis and PEG and PVAc. The characterization of LECA was found out by calculating the porosity, the pore size distribution, absorption rate and evaporation rate. The result of the calculation shows that the higher PEG mass percentage, the higher LECA's porosity, the pore size distribution, absorption rate and evaporation rate. However, the porosity, the pore size distributionand absorption rate will be saturated by 25% PEG mass percent addition.

  12. Enhanced rate performance of multiwalled carbon nanotube encrusted olivine type composite cathode material using polyol technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muruganantham, R.; Sivakumar, M.; Subadevi, R.

    2015-12-01

    Olivine type multi-walled carbon nanotube encrusted LiFePO4/C composites have been prepared using economic and energy efficient simple polyol technique without any subsequent heat treatment. The prepared material has an olivine type orthorhombic phase. Also, the iron oxidation state is 2+, which is identified by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is possible to attain the discharge capacity almost close to theoretical capacity of LiFePO4 as in high temperature methods with ∼100% coulombic efficiency. The specific surface area has been increased upon encrusting multi walled carbon nano tube on LiFePO4/C, which results in enhanced reversible capacity upto 166 mAh g-1 at C/10. Also, it exhibits 89 mAh g-1 even at 30 C rate. This is due to the formation of conductive networks by carbon nanotube, and excellent attachment of LiFePO4/C composite particles on multi-walled carbon nanotube, which induced the kinetics during intercalation/deintercalation process. Multi-walled carbon nanotube acts as the electro-conductive filler on the LiFePO4 surface. The direct addition of MWCNT would result better performances than blending the MWCNT with LiFePO4/C.

  13. STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF COMPOSITE MATERIAL BASED ON GYPSUM BINDER AND CARBON NANOTUBES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHUMAK Anastasia Gennadievna

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to carry out a number of studies in the area of nanomodi­fication of gypsum binder matrix and to investigate the influence of multilayer carbon nanotubes on the structure, physical and mechanical properties of obtained compos­ites. The study of the gypsum binders structure formation mechanisms with the use of nanoadditives makes it possible to control the production processes of gypsum materi­als and articles with the given set of properties. The main tasks of the binder nanomodification are: even distribution of carbon nanostructures over the whole volume of material and provision of stability for the nanodimensional modifier during production process of the construction composite.

  14. Influence of boron doped carbon nanotubes on electric and electromagnetic properties of phosphate composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work presents a study of the possibility to develop the multifunctional composite materials based on the electromagnetically absorbing nonfired, mechanically strong and heat-resistant phosphate ceramics. The potentialities of using pure and boron doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs and B-MWCNTs, respectively) as functional additives to the phosphate matrix were investigated. It was found that a length of MWCNT is the determining factor for the electrical conductivity and high-frequency conductivity of the composite. Growth of the intrinsic conductivity of boron-containing MWCNTs, compared to their undoped counterparts, has no significant influence on the possible resistance decrease of the composite on their basis in the static mode and also on its ability to electromagnetic shielding. This is due to a small length of B-MWCNTs and hence much greater concentrations required to achieve the percolation threshold than those studied (up to 1,5 wt. %). On the contrary, the use of long pure MWCNTs in small concentrations has a tremendous impact on the electromagnetic properties of the phosphate composite: on introduction of 1,5 wt. % of MWCNTs one can observe increase in the conductivity by 13 orders of magnitude, and the composite MWCNTs/phosphate 1 mm thick is opaque to microwave radiation. Taking into account the interest in using the boron-doped MWNT also as neutron-absorbing materials, it is essential to improve the synthesis methods of B-MWCNTs with the aim of increasing their length. (authors)

  15. Preparation and Properties of Metal Organic Framework/Activated Carbon Composite Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleker, Ohad; Borenstein, Arie; Lavi, Ronit; Benisvy, Laurent; Ruthstein, Sharon; Aurbach, Doron

    2016-05-17

    Metal organic frameworks (MOFs) have unique properties that make them excellent candidates for many high-tech applications. Nevertheless, their nonconducting character is an obstacle to their practical utilization in electronic and energy systems. Using the familiar HKUST-1 MOF as a model, we present a new method of imparting electrical conductivity to otherwise nonconducting MOFs by preparing MOF nanoparticles within the conducting matrix of mesoporous activated carbon (AC). This composite material was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), gas adsorption measurements, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. We show that MOF nanoparticles grown within the carbon matrix maintain their crystalline characteristics and their surface area. Surprisingly, as a result of the composition process, EPR measurements revealed a copper signal that had not yet been achieved. For the first time, we could analyze the complex EPR response of HKUST-1. We demonstrate the high conductivity of the MOF composite and discuss various factors that are responsible for these results. Finally, we present an optional application for using the conductive MOF composite as a high-performance electrode for pseudocapacitors. PMID:27104367

  16. Application of carbon fiber composite materials for the collision sections of particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Components made of carbon fiber composite material (CFCM) with Epoxy or BMI matrix were designed for various applications such as vacuum tubes, vertex chambers or support structures. The outstanding properties of CFCM which in many aspects are superior to metal structures especially qualify CFCM components for use in the collision sections of particle accelerators. A total of some 50 m of CFCM beam-tubes and of around 20 different CFCM structures and support elements of various configurations were produced following the specific needs and requirements of high energy particle physics at CERN, DESY and several other research institutes

  17. Lyocell Based Carbon Carbon Composite for Use as a Large Exit Cone Material Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) has identified a "carbon-carbon nozzle (domestic source)" as a "Top Technical Challenge" in the 2011-2016 timeframe...

  18. MnO-carbon hybrid nanofiber composites as superior anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MnO-carbon hybrid nanofiber composites are fabricated by electrospinning polyimide/manganese acetylacetonate precursor and a subsequent carbonization process. The composition, phase structure and morphology of the composites are characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis. The results indicate that the composites exhibit good nanofibrous morphology with MnO nanoparticles uniformly encapsulated by carbon nanofibers. The hybrid nanofiber composites are used directly as freestanding anodes for lithium-ion batteries to evaluate their electrochemical properties. It is found that the optimized MnO-carbon nanofiber composite can deliver a high reversible capacity of 663 mAh g−1, along with excellent cycling stability and good rate capability. The superior performance enables the composites to be promising candidates as an anode alternative for high-performance lithium-ion batteries

  19. Radiation resistance of the carbon fiber reinforced composite material with PEEK as the matrix resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the fast breeder reactor etc. the structural materials are exposed to various environment, i.e., repeated high and low temperature, stress, etc. Irradiation effect (electron radiation) in the mechanical characteristic at low and high temperature has been studied in the PEEK-CF, polyarylether · ether · ketone - carbon fiber composite. Following are the results. (1) Radiation resistance of PEEK-CF is higher than that of PEEK-PES-CF, PEEK - polyethersulfone surface treated CF composite. In PEEK-PES-CF, PES is deteriorated by irradiation so the adhesive power lowers. (2) In the unirradiated PEEK-CF, its mechanical characteristic decreases beyond 140 deg C. With increase of the radiation dose, however, the characteristic rises. (3) Mechanical characteristic of PEEK-CF thus little drops by the heat treatment after the irradiation. (Mori, K.)

  20. Preparation and characterization of flake graphite/silicon/carbon spherical composite as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Flake graphite/silicon/carbon composite is synthesized via spray drying. ► Flake graphite of ∼0.5 μm and glucose are used to prepare the composite. ► The as-prepared composite shows spherical and porous appearance. ► The composite shows nearly the same cycleability as commercial graphite in 20 cycles. ► The composite shows a reversible capacity of 552 mAh/g at the 20th cycle. - Abstract: Using nano-Si, glucose and flake graphite of ∼0.5 μm as raw materials, flake graphite/silicon/carbon composite is successfully synthesized via spray drying and subsequent pyrolysis. The samples are characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM and electrochemical measurements. The composite is composed of flake graphite, nano-Si and amorphous glucose-pyrolyzed carbon and presents good spherical appearance. Some micron pores arising from the decomposition of glucose exist on the surface of the composite particles. The composite has a high reversible capacity of 602.7 mAh/g with an initial coulombic efficiency of 69.71%, and shows nearly the same cycleability as the commercial graphite in 20 cycles. Both the glucose-pyrolyzed carbon and the micron pores play important roles in improving the cycleability of the composite. The flake graphite/silicon/carbon composite electrode is a potential alternative to graphite for high energy-density lithium ion batteries.

  1. Liquid Phase Plasma Synthesis of Iron Oxide/Carbon Composite as Dielectric Material for Capacitor

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Iron oxide/carbon composite was synthesized using a liquid phase plasma process to be used as the electrode of supercapacitor. Spherical iron oxide nanoparticles with the size of 5~10 nm were dispersed uniformly on carbon powder surface. The specific capacitance of the composite increased with increasing quantity of iron oxide precipitate on the carbon powder up to a certain quantity. When the quantity of the iron oxide precipitate exceeds the threshold, however, the specific capacitance was ...

  2. An orthotropic magnesium-carbon composite as a lightweight heat-guide material with high specific stiffness and radiation transparency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaucher, S.; Beffort, O. [Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research (EMPA), CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland); Kuebler, J. [Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research (EMPA), Duebendorf (Switzerland); Lehner, F. [Department of Physics, University of Zurich, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2003-09-01

    A metal matrix composite with spectacular properties has been synthesized: high thermal conductivity, stiffness, good machinability, low toxicity and high radiation transparency are the outstanding features that characterize the orthotropic magnesium-carbon composite presented in this article. The Figure shows a cross-sectional optical image of the material. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  3. Investigation of Structure and Physico-Mechanical Properties of Composite Materials Based on Copper - Carbon Nanoparticles Powder Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovtun V.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Physico-mechanical and structural properties of electrocontact sintered copper matrix- carbon nanoparticles composite powder materials are presented. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the influence of preliminary mechanical activation of the powder system on distribution of carbon nanoparticles in the metal matrix. Mechanical activation ensures mechanical bonding of nanoparticles to the surface of metal particles, thus giving a possibility for manufacture of a composite with high physico-mechanical properties.

  4. Graphene-encapsulated porous carbon-ZnO composites as high-performance anode materials for Li-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As novel anode materials for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), ZnO-loaded porous carbons (CMK-3 or CMK-8) are prepared by a two-step method and exhibit better electrochemical properties than pure ZnO particles. ZnO nanoparticles are separated inside the pores of porous carbons, which limit the growth of ZnO crystals and accommodate their volume variation during cycles. Moreover, to further improve their electrochemical performances, these composites are further wrapped by graphene nanosheets through a stepwise heterocoagulation method. Compared to uncoated porous carbon-ZnO, graphene-encapsulated porous carbon-ZnO composites exhibit higher reversible capacities, better cycle performances and rate capabilities. The superior performances of graphene-encapsulated composites may be attributed to graphene encapsulation, which enhances the electrical conductivity of the overall electrode, avoids the aggregation of porous carbon-ZnO particles and even stabilizes the mesostructure of porous carbon during cycles

  5. Production and characterization of composite material based on ablative phenolic resin and carbon fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimisation of technology for production of moulding compound based on short carbon fibers and ablative phenolic resin is carried out. The characterisation of the starting raw materials is performed and moulding compounds With different fiber/matrix ratios and different fiber lengths are prepared. From the different samples, mouldings are produced by thermal compression. All physical, mechanical and thermal properties of the composites are tested. From the obtained results the optimal fiber/matrix ratio, for high temperature moulding compounds production are determined. Also, in order to meet the request for high thermal and mechanics properties of the composite, optimization is carded out on the moulding process itself. The optimization is fulfilled by a planned experiment. The full factorial experimental design is applied in which the following parameters are varied: fiber length, temperature and time of the press cycle. Regression equations for the influence of the parameters to the impact resistance, compression strength, flexural strength and the modulus of elasticity of the molding, are obtained. The obtained mechanical properties of the composite rate this material for potential application in the automotive, leisure, military and other industries.(Author)

  6. Synthesis and characterization of SnO-carbon nanotube composite as anode material for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SnO-carbon nanotube composite was synthesized by a sol-gel method. The electrochemical behavior of the composite using an anode active material in lithium-ion batteries was investigated. It was found that the composite showed enhanced anode performance compared with the unsupported SnO or carbon nanotube (CNT). The capacity fade of the composite electrode was reduced over unsupported SnO or CNT. We attribute the results to the conductivity and ductility of the CNT matrix, and the high dispersion of SnO

  7. Use of magnetic carbon composites from renewable resource materials for oil spill clean up and recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Tito

    2015-10-27

    A method of separating a liquid hydrocarbon material from a body of water, includes: (a) mixing magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites with a liquid hydrocarbon material dispersed in a body of water to allow the magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites each to be adhered by the liquid hydrocarbon material to form a mixture; (b) applying a magnetic force to the mixture to attract the magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites each adhered by the liquid hydrocarbon material; and (c) removing the body of water from the magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites each adhered by the liquid hydrocarbon material while maintaining the applied magnetic force. The magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites is formed by subjecting one or more metal lignosulfonates or metal salts to microwave radiation, in presence of lignin/derivatives either in presence of alkali or a microwave absorbing material, for a period of time effective to allow the carbon-metal nanocomposites to be formed.

  8. Development of carbon/carbon composite control rod for HTTR. 2. Concept, specifications and mechanical test of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A concept and specifications of carbon/carbon composite (C/C) control rod were proposed, aiming at the application of the material to the HTTR. The outer diameter and length of the control rod were kept as the same as those of the present control rod, i.e., 113 mm and 3094 mm, respectively. According to the concept, the rod consists of ten units which are connected in series using bolts. Then, the stresses generated by dead loads in the control rod elements were estimated and compared with the design strengths which were derived from the results of measurements of tensile, compressive, bending and shear strengths of two candidate materials, AC250 (Across Co.) and CX-270 (Toyo Tanso Co.). Design strength was preliminarily determined as one-third or one-fifth of the mean strength. Ratio of the design strength to generated stress for the AC250 (2D) was : Tensile stress in the outer sleeve tube, 66, tensile and shear stresses in the M16 bolt, 8.8 and 8.5, shear stress in the plug support bolt M8, 2.43. These results are believed to indicate the mechanical integrity of the control rod structure. Data available on the candidate materials were also compiled in the Appendix. (author)

  9. Influence of Terahertz Waves on Unidirectional Carbon Fibers in CFRP Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Hee IM

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz TDS system based on the reflective and through-transmission modes was utilized. Influence of terahertz waves (T-ray on the fiber surface layups in the CFRP solid composites was studied. It was found that the value of electrical conductivity in the carbon fibers varies by the layup directions of carbon fibers based on E-field (Electrical field. T-ray optimized scanning data could be obtained at the 90° angle normal to the E-field direction. GFRP (Glass-fiber reinforced plastics composite laminates were scanned with two saw cuts using a T-ray THz TDS system and the terahertz optimized scanning images were obtained at the angles normal to the E-field direction on the nonconducting materials. Also, by use of 2-dimensional spatial Fourier transform, interface C-scan images were transformed into quantitative angular distribution plots in order to show the fiber orientation information therein and to make the orientation of the ply predictable. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.4.6440

  10. Preparation of carbon nanotube composite material with metal matrix by electroplating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN Bai-gang; LI Li-xiang; Li Hong-xi

    2005-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the nickel can be deposited directly on the surface of carbon nanotubes without pre-sensitization by Sn2+ and Pd2+ in a watt bath containing suspended nanotubes by electroplating. The nickel is deposited as spherical nanoparticle on the nanotubes. By increasing reaction time, the carbon nanotube is fully coated with nickel. A probable model, which represents the formation process of carbon nanotube-nickel composites by electroplating, is presented. The results show that this method is efficient and simple for preparing carbon nanotube-metal composite.

  11. The influence of carbon fibre content on the tribological properties of polyarylate based composites materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Burya; A.I.; Chigvintseva; O.P

    2001-01-01

    The analysis of scientific-technical literature has shown the prospectiveness of applyinghigh-temperature thermoplastic polymers - among which there are complex aromatic polyesters -as constructive materials. Mixed polyarylates of DV mark based on diphenilolpropane and themixture of iso- and terephtale acid are mentioned to make the most valuable practical interest. Forimproving technological and exploitation properties the authors of the article have suggested toreinforce the polymer linking element with uglen-9 mark. Combination of the composition compo-nents was realized within the rotating electromagnetic field with the help of non-equiaxial ferro-magnetic elements. The study of tribotechnical characteristics (coefficient of friction, intensity oflinear wear, temperature in the contact zone "polymer specimen - counterbody" of elaborated car-bon plastics) has been made at the disc machine of friction. Investigation of exploitation regimes’(specific pressure and slip velocity) influence on the mentioned properties of the initial polymer hasshown that polyarylate can be recommended for work at values of PV criterion not greater than 1.2MPa · m/s. Hardening the exploitation regimes is accompanied by the catastrophic wear of plastic.Reinforcement of polyarylate with carbon fibre is noted to enable significant improvement (to de-crease the coefficient of friction, to increase resistance to wear) of tribotechnical characteristics ofcarbon plastics. The most optimal is the content of carbon fibre in polyarylate in amount of 25mass.%.

  12. Nanotube composite carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, R.; Jacques, D.; Rao, A. M.; Rantell, T.; Derbyshire, F.; Chen, Y.; Chen, J.; Haddon, R. C.

    1999-08-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were dispersed in isotropic petroleum pitch matrices to form nanotube composite carbon fibers with enhanced mechanical and electrical properties. We find that the tensile strength, modulus, and electrical conductivity of a pitch composite fiber with 5 wt % loading of purified SWNTs are enhanced by ˜90%, ˜150%, and 340% respectively, as compared to the corresponding values in unmodified isotropic pitch fibers. These results serve to highlight the potential that exits for developing a spectrum of material properties through the selection of the matrix, nanotube dispersion, alignment, and interfacial bonding.

  13. Multiscale Modeling of Novel Carbon Nanotube/Copper-Composite Material Used in Microelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Ibrahim; Ladani, Leila

    2016-06-01

    Current carrying capacity is one of the elements that hinders further miniaturization of Copper (Cu) interconnects. Therefore, there is a need to propose new materials with higher ampacity (current carrying capacity) that have the potential to replace Cu. Experimental observations have shown that Carbon Nanotube (CNT)/Cu-composite material has a hundredfold ampacity of Cu, which makes it a good candidate to replace Cu. However, sufficient information about the mechanical behavior of the novel CNT/Cu-composite is not available. In the current paper, the CNT/Cu-composite is utilized to construct Through Silicon Via (TSV). The mechanical behavior, specifically the fatigue life, of the CNT/Cu-TSV is evaluated by applying a multiscale modeling approach. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are conducted to evaluate the tensile strength and the coefficient of thermal expansion of CNTs. MD simulation is also used to determine the interface behavior between CNTs and Cu. MD simulation results are integrated into Finite Element analysis at the micro-level to estimate the fatigue life of the CNT/Cu-TSV. A comparison is made with base material; Cu. CNTs addition has redistributed the plastic deformation in Cu to occur at two different locations (Si/Cu interface and Cu/CNT interface) instead of only one location (Si/Cu interface) in the case of Cu-only-TSV. Thus, the maximum equivalent plastic strain has been alleviated in the CNT/Cu-TSV. Accordingly, CNT/Cu-TSV has shown a threefold increase in the fatigue life. This is a solid indication of the improvement in the fatigue life that is attributed to the addition of CNTs.

  14. Properties of carbon-carbon composition materials of the type of syntactic foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study has been made of the properties of carbon syntactic foam samples differing in their volume weight. The binding and compression strength properties, elasticity modulus, electric resistance, thermal expansion coefficient have been found to be exponentially dependent on the general sample porosity; in the case of the low-temperature neutron irradiation the strength properties show an increase, the electric resistance characteristics remain unaffected; radiation deformation whose magnitude is proportional to the thermal expansion coefficient shows up through sample compression

  15. Electromagnetic properties of texture composite materials based on hexagonal ferrites/multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotsenko, O. A.; Frolov, K. O.; Wagner, D. V.

    2016-02-01

    In this article, the frequency dependence of the absorption coefficient and electromagnetic losses of the composite based on ferrite powder and / or multi-walled carbon nanotubes are presented. The dielectric and magnetic losses in the composite were measured in the range of 0.01 - 20 GHz. It has been found to increase the absorption of electromagnetic radiation and increased losses in the samples containing multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

  16. Aspergillus flavus Conidia-derived Carbon/Sulfur Composite as a Cathode Material for High Performance Lithium–Sulfur Battery

    OpenAIRE

    Maowen Xu; Min Jia; Cuiping Mao; Sangui Liu; Shujuan Bao; Jian Jiang; Yang Liu; Zhisong Lu

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach was developed to prepare porous carbon materials with an extremely high surface area of 2459.6 m2g−1 by using Aspergillus flavus conidia as precursors. The porous carbon serves as a superior cathode material to anchor sulfur due to its uniform and tortuous morphology, enabling high capacity and good cycle lifetime in lithium sulfur-batteries. Under a current rate of 0.2 C, the carbon-sulfur composites with 56.7 wt% sulfur loading deliver an initial capacity of 1625 mAh g−1, w...

  17. Impedance spectroscopic analysis of composite electrode from activated carbon/conductive materials/ruthenium oxide for supercapacitor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activated carbon powders (ACP) were produced from the KOH treated pre-carbonized rubber wood sawdust. Different conductive materials (graphite, carbon black and carbon nanotubes (CNTs)) were added with a binder (polivinylidene fluoride (PVDF)) into ACP to improve the supercapacitive performance of the activated carbon (AC) electrodes. Symmetric supercapacitor cells, fabricated using these AC electrodes and 1 molar H2SO4 electrolyte, were analyzed using a standard electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique. The addition of graphite, carbon black and CNTs was found effective in reducing the cell resistance from 165 to 68, 23 and 49 Ohm respectively, and increasing the specific capacitance of the AC electrodes from 3 to 7, 17, 32 F g−1 respectively. Since the addition of CNTs can produce the highest specific capacitance, CNTs were chosen as a conductive material to produce AC composite electrodes that were added with 2.5 %, 5 % and 10 % (by weight) electro-active material namely ruthenium oxide; PVDF binder and CNTs contents were kept at 5 % by weight in each AC composite produced. The highest specific capacitance of the cells obtained in this study was 86 F g−1, i.e. for the cell with the resistance of 15 Ohm and composite electrode consists of 5 % ruthenium oxide

  18. Impedance spectroscopic analysis of composite electrode from activated carbon/conductive materials/ruthenium oxide for supercapacitor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taer, E.; Awitdrus,; Farma, R. [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Riau, 28293 Pekanbaru, Riau (Indonesia); Deraman, M., E-mail: madra@ukm.my; Talib, I. A.; Ishak, M. M.; Omar, R.; Dolah, B. N. M.; Basri, N. H.; Othman, M. A. R. [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Kanwal, S. [ICCBS, H.E.J. Research Institute of Chemistry, University of Karachi, 75270 Karachi (Pakistan)

    2015-04-16

    Activated carbon powders (ACP) were produced from the KOH treated pre-carbonized rubber wood sawdust. Different conductive materials (graphite, carbon black and carbon nanotubes (CNTs)) were added with a binder (polivinylidene fluoride (PVDF)) into ACP to improve the supercapacitive performance of the activated carbon (AC) electrodes. Symmetric supercapacitor cells, fabricated using these AC electrodes and 1 molar H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} electrolyte, were analyzed using a standard electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique. The addition of graphite, carbon black and CNTs was found effective in reducing the cell resistance from 165 to 68, 23 and 49 Ohm respectively, and increasing the specific capacitance of the AC electrodes from 3 to 7, 17, 32 F g{sup −1} respectively. Since the addition of CNTs can produce the highest specific capacitance, CNTs were chosen as a conductive material to produce AC composite electrodes that were added with 2.5 %, 5 % and 10 % (by weight) electro-active material namely ruthenium oxide; PVDF binder and CNTs contents were kept at 5 % by weight in each AC composite produced. The highest specific capacitance of the cells obtained in this study was 86 F g{sup −1}, i.e. for the cell with the resistance of 15 Ohm and composite electrode consists of 5 % ruthenium oxide.

  19. Impedance spectroscopic analysis of composite electrode from activated carbon/conductive materials/ruthenium oxide for supercapacitor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taer, E.; Deraman, M.; Talib, I. A.; Awitdrus, Farma, R.; Ishak, M. M.; Omar, R.; Dolah, B. N. M.; Basri, N. H.; Othman, M. A. R.; Kanwal, S.

    2015-04-01

    Activated carbon powders (ACP) were produced from the KOH treated pre-carbonized rubber wood sawdust. Different conductive materials (graphite, carbon black and carbon nanotubes (CNTs)) were added with a binder (polivinylidene fluoride (PVDF)) into ACP to improve the supercapacitive performance of the activated carbon (AC) electrodes. Symmetric supercapacitor cells, fabricated using these AC electrodes and 1 molar H2SO4 electrolyte, were analyzed using a standard electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique. The addition of graphite, carbon black and CNTs was found effective in reducing the cell resistance from 165 to 68, 23 and 49 Ohm respectively, and increasing the specific capacitance of the AC electrodes from 3 to 7, 17, 32 F g-1 respectively. Since the addition of CNTs can produce the highest specific capacitance, CNTs were chosen as a conductive material to produce AC composite electrodes that were added with 2.5 %, 5 % and 10 % (by weight) electro-active material namely ruthenium oxide; PVDF binder and CNTs contents were kept at 5 % by weight in each AC composite produced. The highest specific capacitance of the cells obtained in this study was 86 F g-1, i.e. for the cell with the resistance of 15 Ohm and composite electrode consists of 5 % ruthenium oxide.

  20. Interconnected sandwich structure carbon/Si-SiO2/carbon nanospheres composite as high performance anode material for lithium-ion batteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanjin Du; Mengyan Hou; Dandan Zhou; Yonggang Wang; Congxiao Wang; Yongyao Xia

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, an interconnected sandwich carbon/Si-SiO2/carbon nanospheres composite was prepared by template method and carbon thermal vapor deposition (TVD). The carbon conductive layer can not only efficiently improve the electronic conductivity of Si-based anode, but also play a key role in alleviating the negative effect from huge volume expansion over discharge/charge of Si-based anode. The resulting material delivered a reversible capacity of 1094 mAh/g, and exhibited excellent cycling stability. It kept a reversible capacity of 1050 mAh/g over 200 cycles with a capacity retention of 96%.

  1. Modelling of fracture phenomenon in case of composite materials reinforced with short carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliman, R.

    2015-11-01

    The research work presented in this paper describes the composite materials in terms of formation and propagation of cracks using an algorithm that imposes disproportional loads to composite samples. The required parameters that describe the composites fracture demand inputs as: load intensity, geometry features and relative loading direction. In order to obtain reliable results, it should be a good correlation between the model which describes the facture propagation, the composition of the material and the structural homogeneity. The presented study is using a Functionally Graded Material with local homogeneity in fracture area, and a numerical model based on integration of interactions (Mori - Tanaka method). The parameters that describes the fracture behaviour, includes a factor of stress intensity which is important for establish the fracture direction. The model used in simulations is considering a composite sample with rectangular shape and 6 mm thickness. The sample is loaded with predefined stress σct (MPa) above and under the fracture line. σct represents the critical stress able to lead to fracture propagation. The main objective of this research work it was to generate a numerical model which describes the fracture behaviour of a composite material. The obtained model and its accuracy to describe the fracture behaviour of a composite material is presented in the final part of this paper.

  2. Preparation of Ni(OH)2-graphene sheet-carbon nanotube composite as electrode material for supercapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • CNT is introduced into graphene to prevent restacking by solvothermal reaction. • Ethanol as a low cost and green solvent is used in solvothermal reaction. • Ni(OH)2 nanosheets were chemically precipitated into GS-CNT to increase the capacitance. - Abstract: Ni(OH)2-graphene sheet-carbon nanotube composite was prepared for supercapacitance materials through a simple two-step process involving solvothermal synthesis of graphene sheet-carbon nanotube composite in ethanol and chemical precipitation of Ni(OH)2. According to N2 adsorption/desorption analysis, the Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area of graphene sheet-carbon nanotube composite (109.07 m2 g−1) was larger than that of pure graphene sheets (32.06 m2 g−1), indicating that the added carbon nanotubes (15 wt.%) could prevent graphene sheets from restacking in the solvothermal reaction. The results of field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy showed that Ni(OH)2 nanosheets were uniformly loaded into the three-dimensional interconnected network of graphene sheet-carbon nanotube composite. The microstructure enhanced the rate capability and utilization of Ni(OH)2. The specific capacitance of Ni(OH)2-graphene sheet-carbon nanotube composite was 1170.38 F g−1 at a current density of 0.2 A g−1 in the 6 mol L−1 KOH solution, higher than those provided by pure Ni(OH)2 (953.67 Fg−1) and graphene sheets (178.25 F g−1). After 20 cycles at each current density (0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0 and 1.2 A g−1), the capacitance of Ni(OH)2-graphene sheet-carbon nanotube composite decreased 26.96% of initial capacitance compared to 74.52% for pure Ni(OH)2

  3. Hydrothermal synthesis of manganese oxides/carbon nanotubes composites as anode materials for lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Carbon nanotubes in the composites not only accommodate the volume change during charge/discharge processes, but also provide a good electron conducting network at high power rates, resulting in high reversible capacity of the electrodes. - Highlights: • MnO/CNTs composites are obtained by heating Mn3O4/CNTs at 500 °C for 3 h in flowing Ar/H2. • MnO/CNTs electrode exhibits higher specific capacity at the current density of 100 mAh g−1 and a better cycle performance. • Enhancement of cyclability of MnO/CNTs electrode can be attributed to the presence of CNTs in the composites. - Abstract: Mn3O4 nanoparticles and Mn3O4/carbon nanotubes (CNTs) composites are prepared via a hydrothermal synthesis method. MnO and MnO/CNTs composites are obtained by heating Mn3O4 and Mn3O4/CNTs at 500 for 3 h in flowing Ar/H2. The phase structure, composition and morphology of the composites are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The electrochemical properties of the composite electrodes are studied by performing cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge and discharge tests. The results reveal that the Mn3O4/CNTs and MnO/CNTs electrodes exhibit higher specific capacity at the current density of 100 mAh g−1 and a better cycle performance than pure Mn3O4 and MnO electrodes. The excellent electrochemical properties of Mn3O4/CNTs and MnO/CNTs electrodes can be attributed to the presence of CNTs in the composites offering an electron conducting network and suppressing the volume expansion of Mn3O4 and MnO particles efficiently during the charge and discharge processes

  4. Micromechanics model for predicting anisotropic electrical conductivity of carbon fiber composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Mohammad Faisal; Haider, Md. Mushfique; Yasmeen, Farzana

    2016-07-01

    Heterogeneous materials, such as composites consist of clearly distinguishable constituents (or phases) that show different electrical properties. Multifunctional composites have anisotropic electrical properties that can be tailored for a particular application. The effective anisotropic electrical conductivity of composites is strongly affected by many parameters including volume fractions, distributions, and orientations of constituents. Given the electrical properties of the constituents, one important goal of micromechanics of materials consists of predicting electrical response of the heterogeneous material on the basis of the geometries and properties of the individual phases, a task known as homogenization. The benefit of homogenization is that the behavior of a heterogeneous material can be determined without resorting or testing it. Furthermore, continuum micromechanics can predict the full multi-axial properties and responses of inhomogeneous materials, which are anisotropic in nature. Effective electrical conductivity estimation is performed by using classical micromechanics techniques (composite cylinder assemblage method) that investigates the effect of the fiber/matrix electrical properties and their volume fractions on the micro scale composite response. The composite cylinder assemblage method (CCM) is an analytical theory that is based on the assumption that composites are in a state of periodic structure. The CCM was developed to extend capabilities variable fiber shape/array availability with same volume fraction, interphase analysis, etc. The CCM is a continuum-based micromechanics model that provides closed form expressions for upper level length scales such as macro-scale composite responses in terms of the properties, shapes, orientations and constituent distributions at lower length levels such as the micro-scale.

  5. Development of a Taste Sensor Based on a Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Composite Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Takamichi; Takagi, Keisuke; Akiya, Masahiro

    2007-04-01

    A taste sensor consisting of a back-gate type field effect transistor (FET) chip based on carbon nanotube compound materials [poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-grafted single-walled carbon nanotubes (PEG-SWNTs)] was developed. The results of impedance measurements for five tastes (sourness, saltiness, bitterness, sweetness, and umami), are shown much difference for specific tastes which are difficult to identify by using Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) film. Moreover, the sensor is able to distinguish most of the experimental taste materials with a short response time (˜60 s).

  6. The Investigation on the Potential of Coconut Shell Powder Composite in Term of Carbon Composition, Surface Porosity and Dielectric Properties as a Microwave Absorbing Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yew Been Seok

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural wastes are renewable resources that are potentially useful as microwave absorbing materials. This paper presents the investigation on the carbon composition, surface porosity of the raw coconut shell powder particles and the dielectric properties of coconut shell powder with epoxy resin matrix composites. From CHNS elemental analysis, it was found that the carbon composition of coconut shell powder is 46.700%. Presences of macropores (≈ 2μm were detected in the SEM analysis of the coconut shell powder particles. Measurement on dielectric properties of the coconut shell powder composites was performed by using open-ended coaxial probe method over microwave frequency range of 1-8 GHz. The overall dielectric constant (εr’ and dielectric loss factor (εr” of the composite with ratio 50:50 were 3.56 and 0.26, ranging from 3.35-3.76 and 0.21-0.30 respectively; whereas for composite ratio 40:60, the overall dielectric constant (εr’ and dielectric loss factor (εr” were 2.97 and 0.21, ranging from 2.74-3.17 and 0.16-0.27 respectively. The electrical conductivity calculated based on measured εr” was 0.067 and 0.054 for composite ratio 50:50 and 40:60 respectively. The dielectric properties and electrical conductivity of the coconut shell powder composites were influenced by the greater presence of high dielectric material (coconut shell powder. This experimental investigation on the potential of the coconut shell powder with epoxy resin composites indicates that the ability of the composite to absorb and convert microwave signals is dependent on the carbonaceous materials of the composite. This result offers a great opportunity to diversify the use of coconut shell powder as microwave absorbing material.

  7. Carbon fiber/reaction-bonded carbide matrix for composite materials - Manufacture and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The processing of self-healing ceramic matrix composites by a short time and low cost process was studied. This process is based on the deposition of fiber dual inter-phases by chemical vapor infiltration and on the densification of the matrix by reactive melt infiltration of silicon. To prevent fibers (ex-PAN carbon fibers) from oxidation in service, a self-healing matrix made of reaction bonded silicon carbide and reaction bonded boron carbide was used. Boron carbide is introduced inside the fiber preform from ceramic suspension whereas silicon carbide is formed by the reaction of liquid silicon with a porous carbon xerogel in the preform. The ceramic matrix composites obtained are near net shape, have a bending stress at failure at room temperature around 300 MPa and have shown their ability to self-healing in oxidizing conditions. (authors)

  8. Hybrid nanostructured microporous carbon-mesoporous carbon doped titanium dioxide/sulfur composite positive electrode materials for rechargeable lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegeye, Tilahun Awoke; Kuo, Chung-Feng Jeffrey; Wotango, Aselefech Sorsa; Pan, Chun-Jern; Chen, Hung-Ming; Haregewoin, Atetegeb Meazah; Cheng, Ju-Hsiang; Su, Wei-Nien; Hwang, Bing-Joe

    2016-08-01

    Herein, we design hybrid nanostructured microporous carbon-mesoporous carbon doped titanium dioxide/sulfur composite (MC-Meso C-doped TiO2/S) as a positive electrode material for lithium-sulfur batteries. The hybrid MC-Meso C-doped TiO2 host material is produced by a low-cost, hydrothermal and annealing process. The resulting conductive material shows dual microporous and mesoporous behavior which enhances the effective trapping of sulfur and polysulfides. The hybrid MC-Meso C-doped TiO2/S composite material possesses rutile TiO2 nanotube structure with successful carbon doping while sulfur is uniformly distributed in the hybrid MC-Meso C-doped TiO2 composite materials after the melt-infusion process. The electrochemical measurement of the hybrid material also shows improved cycle stability and rate performance with high sulfur loading (61.04%). The material delivers an initial discharge capacity of 802 mAh g-1 and maintains it at 578 mAh g-1 with a columbic efficiency greater than 97.1% after 140 cycles at 0.1 C. This improvement is thought to be attributed to the unique hybrid nanostructure of the MC-Meso C-doped TiO2 host and the good dispersion of sulfur in the narrow pores of the MC spheres and the mesoporous C-doped TiO2 support.

  9. Cyclophosphazene based conductive polymer-carbon nanotube composite as novel supporting material for methanol fuel cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanna, Dakshinamoorthy; Selvaraj, Vaithilingam

    2016-06-15

    This present study reports the development of novel catalyst support of amine terminated cyclophosphazene/cyclophosphazene/hexafluoroisopropylidenedianiline-carbon nanotube (ATCP/CP/HFPA-CNT) composite. The ATCP/CP/HFPA-CNT composite has been used as a catalyst support for platinum (Pt) and platinum-gold (Pt-Au) nanoparticles towards electrooxidation of methanol in alkaline medium. The obtained anode materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Electrocatalytic performances of Pt/ATCP/CP/HFPA-CNT and Pt-Au/ATCP/CP/HFPA-CNT catalysts were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, CO stripping and chronoamperometric techniques. The electrooxidation of methanol and CO stripping results conclude that the metal nanocatalyst embedded with ATCP/CP/HFPA-CNT composite shows significantly higher anodic oxidation current, more CO tolerance and lower onset potential when compared to that of the Pt/CNT and Pt/C (Vulcan carbon) catalysts. PMID:27016917

  10. In-situ change and repairing method of armour tile made of carbon fiber composite material in divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A joint portion of a damaged armour tile of a carbon fiber composite material and a divertor substrate is locally heated spontaneously to re-melt the soldering. Then, the damaged tile is removed and the portion where the tile is removed is heated again to melt the soldering, then a tile for exchange is joined. Alternatively, a thermosetting type adhesive is coated on the surface of the damaged armour tile made of carbon fiber composite material on the divertor, and a tile for repairing is adhered thereon then the joint surface is locally heated to cure the adhesive. For local heating, for example, high frequency heating or dielectric heating is used. It is preferably conducted by remote handling by using robot arms under vacuum in an vacuum vessel of the thermonuclear device. The operations of the heating and pressurization for the joint surface are preferably repeated for several times. (N.H.)

  11. Hydrothermal synthesis of manganese oxides/carbon nanotubes composites as anode materials for lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Shou-Dong [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221116 (China); Lithium-ion Batteries Laboratory, School of Materials Science and Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221116 (China); Zhu, Ya-Bo, E-mail: zhuyabo@163.com [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221116 (China); Zhuang, Quan-Chao [Lithium-ion Batteries Laboratory, School of Materials Science and Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221116 (China); Wu, Chao [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221116 (China); Lithium-ion Batteries Laboratory, School of Materials Science and Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221116 (China)

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: Carbon nanotubes in the composites not only accommodate the volume change during charge/discharge processes, but also provide a good electron conducting network at high power rates, resulting in high reversible capacity of the electrodes. - Highlights: • MnO/CNTs composites are obtained by heating Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}/CNTs at 500 °C for 3 h in flowing Ar/H{sub 2}. • MnO/CNTs electrode exhibits higher specific capacity at the current density of 100 mAh g{sup −1} and a better cycle performance. • Enhancement of cyclability of MnO/CNTs electrode can be attributed to the presence of CNTs in the composites. - Abstract: Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles and Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}/carbon nanotubes (CNTs) composites are prepared via a hydrothermal synthesis method. MnO and MnO/CNTs composites are obtained by heating Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}/CNTs at 500 for 3 h in flowing Ar/H{sub 2}. The phase structure, composition and morphology of the composites are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The electrochemical properties of the composite electrodes are studied by performing cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge and discharge tests. The results reveal that the Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}/CNTs and MnO/CNTs electrodes exhibit higher specific capacity at the current density of 100 mAh g{sup −1} and a better cycle performance than pure Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} and MnO electrodes. The excellent electrochemical properties of Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}/CNTs and MnO/CNTs electrodes can be attributed to the presence of CNTs in the composites offering an electron conducting network and suppressing the volume expansion of Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} and MnO particles efficiently during the charge and discharge processes.

  12. Microwave Absorption and Shielding, Property of Composites with FeSiA1 and Carbonous Materials as Filler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenqiang Zhang; Yonggang Xu; Liming Yuan; Jun Cai; Deyuan Zhangt

    2012-01-01

    Silicone rubber composites filled with FeSiAI alloys and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT)/graphite have been prepared for the first time by a coating process. The complex permittivity and permeability of the composites were measured with a vector network analyzer in a 1-4 GHz frequency range, and the DC electric conductivity was measured by a standard four-point contact method. These parameters were then used to calculate the reflection loss (RL) and shielding effectiveness (SE) of the composites. The results showed that the added MWCNT increased the permittivity and permeability of composites in the L-band, while the added graphite increased only the permittivity. The variation lies in the interactions between two carbonous absorbents. Addition of 1 wt% MWCNT enhanced the RL in the L-band (minimum -5.7 dB at 1 ram, -7.3 dB at 1.5 ram), while the addition of graphite did not. Addition of MWCNT as well as graphite reinforced the shielding property of the composites (maximum SE 13.3 dB at 1 ram, 18.3 dB at 1.5 ram) owing to the increase of conductivity. The addition of these carbonous materials could hold the promise of enforcing the absorption and shielding property of the absorbers.

  13. Preparation of Al-MCM-41 materials and PS/Al-MCM-41 composite using supercritical carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC CO2) was used as carriers/solvent for 'dry' alumination of mesoporous silica to prepare Al-MCM-41. The effect of aluminum on the structure and crystallinity of the materials was studied. Further, styrene monomer was impregnated into MCM-41 and Al-MCM-41 with the assistance of SC CO2, and then was polymerized in the substrates to prepare the composite of PS/MCM-41 and PS/Al-MCM-41. The experimental results indicate crystallinity and the pore volume of the composites both decreased with the addition of PS

  14. Preparation and electrochemical characterization of polyaniline/activated carbon composites as an electrode material for supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Misoon; Kim, Seok

    2012-01-01

    Polyaniline (PANI)/activated carbon (AC) composites were prepared by a chemical oxidation polymerization. To find an optimum ratio between PANI and AC which shows superior electrochemical properties, the preparation was carried out in changing the amount of added aniline monomers. The morphology of prepared composites was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The structural and thermal properties were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. The electrochemical properties were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV). Composites showed a summation of capacitances that consisted of two origins. One is double-layer capacitance by ACs and the other is faradic capacitance by redox reaction of PANI. Fiber-like PANIs are coated on the surface of ACs and they contribute to the large surface for redox reaction. The vacancy among fibers provided the better diffusion and accessibility of ion. High capacitances of composites were originated from the network structure having vacancy made by PANI fibers. It was found that the composite prepared with 5 ml of aniline monomer and 0.25 g of AC showed the highest capacitance. Capacitance of 771 F/g was obtained at a scan rate of 5 mV/s. PMID:22524013

  15. X-ray micro-tomography studies on carbon based composite materials for porosity network characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative characterization of the porosity structure of the carbon reinforced carbon fibre (CFC) materials is carried out by high resolution cone-beam X-ray micro-tomography (CBμCT). It is shown that CBμCT provides useful information pertaining to the in-depth fuel migration into carbon tiles function of the CFC material structure. The investigated materials comprised two types of non-irradiated CFC samples (former ITER reference CFC NB31 and JET CFC DMS780) and a series of CFC N11 samples in the frame of the Deuterium Inventory in Tore Supra (DITS) post-mortem analysis. A procedure for the quantitative evaluation of the CFC porosity factor has been introduced and tested. Useful information about the pores connectivity as well as the metal impregnation inside the CFC macroscopic pores, in case of heat sink region of the TS CFC, can be retrieved. The method can be used for the quality control monitoring of the new CFC ITER reference materials.

  16. Thermo-mechanical characterisation of low density carbon foams and composite materials for the ATLAS upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Isaac, Bonad

    As a result of the need to increase the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN-Geneva by 2020, the ATLAS detector requires an upgraded inner tracker. Up- grading the ATLAS experiment is essential due to higher radiation levels and high particle occupancies. The design of this improved inner tracker detector involves development of silicon sensors and their support structures. These support structures need to have well un- derstood thermal properties and be dimensionally stable in order to allow efficient cooling of the silicon and accurate track reconstruction. The work presented in this thesis is an in- vestigation which aims to qualitatively characterise the thermal and mechanical properties of the materials involved in the design of the inner tracker of the ATLAS upgrade. These materials are silicon carbide foam (SiC foam), low density carbon foams such as PocoFoam and Allcomp foam, Thermal Pyrolytic Graphite (TPG), carbon/carbon and Carbon Fibre Re- inforced Polymer (CFRP). The work involve...

  17. Obtaining and characterization of composite material base on ablative phenolic resin and carbon fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Srebrenkoska, Vineta

    2002-01-01

    In this master paper is optimized a technological treatment for production of a molding compound based on short carbon fibers and ablative phenol- formaldehyde resin for high temperature application. The characterization of the starting raw materials is performed and molding compounds with different fiber/matrix ratio and different fiber length are obtained. From the different lab-samples molded parts are made by thermocompression. All physical, mechanical and thermal properties of the co...

  18. Synthesis of LiFePO_4/C Composite Cathode Materials Using High Surface Area Carbon as Carbon Sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    George; Ting-kuo; Fey; Kai-Lun; Chiang

    2007-01-01

    1 Results The pyrolyzed product of peanut shells was utilized as a carbon source to synthesize a LiFePO4/C composite.The advantages of using agricultural wastes such as peanut shells are low costs,easy processing,and environmentally benigness.Peanut shell was first treated with a porogenic agent to produce a precursor with high porosity and surface area (>2 000 m2·g-1).A small amount of precursor was mixed with LiFePO4 fine powders and heated.The optimum calcination process for synthesizing LiFePO4/C co...

  19. Composite of single walled carbon nanotube and sulfosalicylic acid doped polyaniline: a thermoelectric material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana Chatterjee, Mukulika; Banerjee, Dipali; Chatterjee, Krishanu

    2016-08-01

    Nanocomposites containing single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and highly ordered polyaniline (PANI) have been synthesized employing an in situ polymerization using different weight percentages of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) as template and aniline as a reactant. The composites show homogeneously dispersed SWCNTs which are uniformly coated with PANI through a strong interface interaction. Structural characterization shows that the PANI cultivated along the surface of the SWCNTs in an ordered manner during the SWCNT-directed polymerization process. Measurements at room temperature displayed a significant enhancement in both the electrical conductivity and thermoelectric power which could be attributed to the more ordered chain structures of the PANI on SWCNT. As a result, the power factor of the composite is improved which increases with temperature. At the same time, the measured value of thermal conductivity at room temperature being lowest among the reported values, has resulted in best ZT at room temperature. The lowest value of thermal conductivity is attributed to the large phonon scattering due to the introduction of nanointerfaces.

  20. Preparation of Ni(OH){sub 2}-graphene sheet-carbon nanotube composite as electrode material for supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y.F. [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); College of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Heilongjiang University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150022 (China); Yuan, G.H., E-mail: ygh@hit.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Jiang, Z.H., E-mail: jiangzhaohua@hit.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Yao, Z.P. [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Yue, M. [Shenzhen BTR New Energy Materials INC., Shenzhen 528206 (China)

    2015-01-05

    Highlights: • CNT is introduced into graphene to prevent restacking by solvothermal reaction. • Ethanol as a low cost and green solvent is used in solvothermal reaction. • Ni(OH){sub 2} nanosheets were chemically precipitated into GS-CNT to increase the capacitance. - Abstract: Ni(OH){sub 2}-graphene sheet-carbon nanotube composite was prepared for supercapacitance materials through a simple two-step process involving solvothermal synthesis of graphene sheet-carbon nanotube composite in ethanol and chemical precipitation of Ni(OH){sub 2}. According to N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption analysis, the Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area of graphene sheet-carbon nanotube composite (109.07 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}) was larger than that of pure graphene sheets (32.06 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}), indicating that the added carbon nanotubes (15 wt.%) could prevent graphene sheets from restacking in the solvothermal reaction. The results of field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy showed that Ni(OH){sub 2} nanosheets were uniformly loaded into the three-dimensional interconnected network of graphene sheet-carbon nanotube composite. The microstructure enhanced the rate capability and utilization of Ni(OH){sub 2}. The specific capacitance of Ni(OH){sub 2}-graphene sheet-carbon nanotube composite was 1170.38 F g{sup −1} at a current density of 0.2 A g{sup −1} in the 6 mol L{sup −1} KOH solution, higher than those provided by pure Ni(OH){sub 2} (953.67 Fg{sup −1}) and graphene sheets (178.25 F g{sup −1}). After 20 cycles at each current density (0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0 and 1.2 A g{sup −1}), the capacitance of Ni(OH){sub 2}-graphene sheet-carbon nanotube composite decreased 26.96% of initial capacitance compared to 74.52% for pure Ni(OH){sub 2}.

  1. Carbon/PEEK composite materials as an alternative for stainless steel/titanium hip prosthesis: a finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Farshid; Hassani, Kamran; Solhjoei, Nosratollah; Karimi, Alireza

    2015-12-01

    Total hip replacement (THR) has been ranked within the most typical surgical processes in the world. The durability of the prosthesis and loosening of prosthesis are the main concerns that mostly reported after THR surgeries. In THR, the femoral prosthesis can be fixed by either cement or cementless methods in the patient's bones. In both procedures, the stability of the prosthesis in the hosted bone has a key asset in its long-term durability and performance. This study aimed to execute a comparative finite element simulation to assess the load transfer between the prosthesis, which is made of carbon/PEEK composite and stainless steel/titanium, and the femur bone. The mechanical behavior of the cortical bone was assumed as a linear transverse isotropic while the spongy bone was modeled like a linear isotropic material. The implants were made of stainless steel (316L) and titanium alloy as they are common materials for implants. The results showed that the carbon/PEEK composites provide a flatter load transfer from the upper body to the leg compared to the stainless steel/titanium prosthesis. Furthermore, the results showed that the von Mises stress, principal stress, and the strain in the carbon/PEEK composites prosthesis were significantly lower than that made of the stainless steel/titanium. The results also imply that the carbon/PEEK composites can be applied to introduce a new optimum design for femoral prosthesis with adjustable stiffness, which can decrease the stress shielding and interface stress. These findings will help clinicians and biomedical experts to increase their knowledge about the hip replacement. PMID:26462678

  2. Carbon nanostructure composite for electromagnetic interference shielding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anupama Joshi; Suwarna Datar

    2015-06-01

    This communication reviews current developments in carbon nanostructure-based composite materials for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding. With more and more electronic gadgets being used at different frequencies, there is a need for shielding them from one another to avoid interference. Conventionally, metal-based shielding materials have been used. But due to the requirement of light weight, corrosion resistive materials, lot of work is being done on composite materials. In this research the forerunner is the nanocarbon-based composite material whose different forms add different characteristics to the composite. The article focusses on composites based on graphene, graphene oxide, carbon nanotubes, and several other novel forms of carbon.

  3. Aspergillus flavus Conidia-derived Carbon/Sulfur Composite as a Cathode Material for High Performance Lithium-Sulfur Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Maowen; Jia, Min; Mao, Cuiping; Liu, Sangui; Bao, Shujuan; Jiang, Jian; Liu, Yang; Lu, Zhisong

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach was developed to prepare porous carbon materials with an extremely high surface area of 2459.6 m2g-1 by using Aspergillus flavus conidia as precursors. The porous carbon serves as a superior cathode material to anchor sulfur due to its uniform and tortuous morphology, enabling high capacity and good cycle lifetime in lithium sulfur-batteries. Under a current rate of 0.2 C, the carbon-sulfur composites with 56.7 wt% sulfur loading deliver an initial capacity of 1625 mAh g-1, which is almost equal to the theoretical capacity of sulfur. The good performance may be ascribed to excellent electronic networks constructed by the high-surface-area carbon species. Moreover, the semi-closed architecture of derived carbons can effectively retard the polysulfides dissolution during charge/discharge, resulting in a capacity of 940 mAh g-1 after 120 charge/discharge cycles.

  4. In vitro degradation and cell response of calcium carbonate composite ceramic in comparison with other synthetic bone substitute materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The robust calcium carbonate composite ceramics (CC/PG) can be acquired by fast sintering calcium carbonate at a low temperature (650 °C) using a biocompatible, degradable phosphate-based glass (PG) as sintering agent. In the present study, the in vitro degradation and cell response of CC/PG were assessed and compared with 4 synthetic bone substitute materials, calcium carbonate ceramic (CC), PG, hydroxyapatite (HA) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) ceramics. The degradation rates in decreasing order were as follows: PG, CC, CC/PG, β-TCP, and HA. The proliferation of rat bone mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) cultured on the CC/PG was comparable with that on CC and PG, but inferior to HA and β-TCP. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of rMSCs on CC/PG was lower than PG, comparable with β-TCP, but higher than HA. The rMSCs on CC/PG and PG had enhanced gene expression in specific osteogenic markers, respectively. Compared to HA and β-TCP, the rMSCs on the CC/PG expressed relatively lower level of collagen I and runt-related transcription factor 2, but showed more considerable expression of osteopontin. Although CC, PG, HA, and β-TCP possessed impressive performances in some specific aspects, they faced extant intrinsic drawbacks in either degradation rate or mechanical strength. Based on considerable compressive strength, moderate degradation rate, good cell response, and being free of obvious shortcoming, the CC/PG is promising as another choice for bone substitute materials. - Highlights: • A calcium carbonate composite ceramic (CC/PG) was acquired. • The in vitro degradation and cell response of CC/PG were compared to 4 materials. • The CC/PG showed moderate degradation rate. • The CC/PG exhibited good cell response. • The CC/PG was free of obvious drawback compared to other materials

  5. In vitro degradation and cell response of calcium carbonate composite ceramic in comparison with other synthetic bone substitute materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Fupo [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Basic Sciences, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510182 (China); Zhang, Jing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Yang, Fanwen; Zhu, Jixiang; Tian, Xiumei [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Basic Sciences, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510182 (China); Chen, Xiaoming, E-mail: xmchenw@126.com [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Basic Sciences, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510182 (China)

    2015-05-01

    The robust calcium carbonate composite ceramics (CC/PG) can be acquired by fast sintering calcium carbonate at a low temperature (650 °C) using a biocompatible, degradable phosphate-based glass (PG) as sintering agent. In the present study, the in vitro degradation and cell response of CC/PG were assessed and compared with 4 synthetic bone substitute materials, calcium carbonate ceramic (CC), PG, hydroxyapatite (HA) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) ceramics. The degradation rates in decreasing order were as follows: PG, CC, CC/PG, β-TCP, and HA. The proliferation of rat bone mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) cultured on the CC/PG was comparable with that on CC and PG, but inferior to HA and β-TCP. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of rMSCs on CC/PG was lower than PG, comparable with β-TCP, but higher than HA. The rMSCs on CC/PG and PG had enhanced gene expression in specific osteogenic markers, respectively. Compared to HA and β-TCP, the rMSCs on the CC/PG expressed relatively lower level of collagen I and runt-related transcription factor 2, but showed more considerable expression of osteopontin. Although CC, PG, HA, and β-TCP possessed impressive performances in some specific aspects, they faced extant intrinsic drawbacks in either degradation rate or mechanical strength. Based on considerable compressive strength, moderate degradation rate, good cell response, and being free of obvious shortcoming, the CC/PG is promising as another choice for bone substitute materials. - Highlights: • A calcium carbonate composite ceramic (CC/PG) was acquired. • The in vitro degradation and cell response of CC/PG were compared to 4 materials. • The CC/PG showed moderate degradation rate. • The CC/PG exhibited good cell response. • The CC/PG was free of obvious drawback compared to other materials.

  6. Controlling the Electrostatic Discharge Ignition Sensitivity of Composite Energetic Materials Using Carbon Nanotube Additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kade H. Poper; Eric S. Collins; Michelle L. Pantoya; Michael Daniels

    2014-10-01

    Powder energetic materials are highly sensitive to electrostatic discharge (ESD) ignition. This study shows that small concentrations of carbon nanotubes (CNT) added to the highly reactive mixture of aluminum and copper oxide (Al + CuO) significantly reduces ESD ignition sensitivity. CNT act as a conduit for electric energy, bypassing energy buildup and desensitizing the mixture to ESD ignition. The lowest CNT concentration needed to desensitize ignition is 3.8 vol.% corresponding to percolation corresponding to an electrical conductivity of 0.04 S/cm. Conversely, added CNT increased Al + CuO thermal ignition sensitivity to a hot wire igniter.

  7. Fatigue testing of a carbon fibre composite wind turbine blade with associated material characterisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, G.A.; Richardson, D.J. [Univ. of the West of England, Faculty of Engineering, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    1996-09-01

    Within the EC project JOULE 2, the University of the West of England (UWE) tested a carbon fibre reinforced epoxy (CFRE) full scale wind turbine blade together with an associated material test coupon programme. All the work was closely linked with the manufacturer Polymarine BV of the Netherlands, who designed and manufactured the blade and provided test specimens, the UWE carried out the research into the validation of the design calculations together with a check of the strength and fatigue life of the blade. (au)

  8. The preparation and performance of calcium carbide-derived carbon/polyaniline composite electrode material for supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Liping; Wang, Xianyou; Li, Na; An, Hongfang; Chen, Huajie [School of Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Environmentally Friendly Chemistry and Applications of Minister of Education, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Wang, Ying; Guo, Jia [School of Chemical Engineering and Pharmacy, Wuhan Institute of Technology, Hubei 430073 (China)

    2010-03-15

    Calcium carbide (CaC{sub 2})-derived carbon (CCDC)/polyaniline (PANI) composite materials are prepared by in situ chemical oxidation polymerization of an aniline solution containing well-dispersed CCDC. The structure and morphology of CCDC/PANI composite are characterized by Fourier infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and N{sub 2} sorption isotherms. It has been found that PANI was uniformly deposited on the surface and the inner pores of CCDC. The supercapacitive behaviors of the CCDC/PANI composite materials are investigated with cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge/discharge and cycle life measurements. The results show that the CCDC/PANI composite electrodes have higher specific capacitances than the as grown CCDC electrodes and higher stability than the conducting polymers. The capacitance of CCDC/PANI composite electrode is as high as 713.4 F g{sup -1} measured by cyclic voltammetry at 1 mV s{sup -1}. Besides, the capacitance retention of coin supercapacitor remained 80.1% after 1000 cycles. (author)

  9. The preparation and performance of calcium carbide-derived carbon/polyaniline composite electrode material for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Liping; Wang, Ying; Wang, Xianyou; Li, Na; An, Hongfang; Chen, Huajie; Guo, Jia

    Calcium carbide (CaC 2)-derived carbon (CCDC)/polyaniline (PANI) composite materials are prepared by in situ chemical oxidation polymerization of an aniline solution containing well-dispersed CCDC. The structure and morphology of CCDC/PANI composite are characterized by Fourier infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and N 2 sorption isotherms. It has been found that PANI was uniformly deposited on the surface and the inner pores of CCDC. The supercapacitive behaviors of the CCDC/PANI composite materials are investigated with cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge/discharge and cycle life measurements. The results show that the CCDC/PANI composite electrodes have higher specific capacitances than the as grown CCDC electrodes and higher stability than the conducting polymers. The capacitance of CCDC/PANI composite electrode is as high as 713.4 F g -1 measured by cyclic voltammetry at 1 mV s -1. Besides, the capacitance retention of coin supercapacitor remained 80.1% after 1000 cycles.

  10. Nano-structured composite of Si/(S-doped-carbon nanowire network) as anode material for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Dan; Tang, Daoping; Yang, Jianwen; Li, Yanwei; Zhang, Lingzhi

    2015-11-01

    Novel nanostructured silicon composites, Si/Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) nanowire network (Si/PNW) and Si/(S-doped-carbon nanowire network) (Si/S-CNW), are prepared by a soft-template polymerization of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) using sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as surfactant with the presence of Si nanoparticles and a subsequent carbonization of Si/PNW, respectively. The presence of Si nanoparticles in the soft-template polymerization of EDOT plays a critical role in the formation of PEDOT nanowire network instead of 1D nanowire. After the carbonization of PEDOT, the S-doped-carbon nanowire network matrix shows higher electrical conductivity than PNW counterpart, which facilitates to construct robust conductive bridges between Si nanoparticles and provide large electrode/electrolyte interfaces for rapid charge transfer reactions. Thus, Si/S-CNW composite exhibits excellent cycling stability and rate capability as anode material, retaining a specific capacity of 820 mAh g-1 after 400 cycles with a very small capacity fade of 0.09% per cycle.

  11. Development of capacities in cathode olivine/carbon nano-composite materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bouša, Milan; Frank, Otakar; Kavan, Ladislav

    Praha : Ústav fyzikální chemie J. Heyrovského AV ČR, v.v.i, 2011 - (Mansfeldová, V.; Tarábková, H.). s. 49-49 ISBN 978-80-87351-17-8. [Heyrovský Discussion. Nanostructures on Electrodes /44./. 26.06.2011-30.06.2011, Třešť] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : nano-composite materials * lithium-ion batteries Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry

  12. Pitch carbon microsphere composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, H. L.; Nelson, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    Petroleum pitch carbon microspheres were prepared by flash heating emulsified pitch and carbonizing the resulting microspheres in an inert atmosphere. Microsphere composites were obtained from a mixture of microspheres and tetraester precursor pyrrone powder. Scanning electron micrographs of the composite showed that it was an aggregate of microspheres bonded together by the pyrrone at the sphere contact points, with voids in and among the microspheres. Physical, thermal, and sorption properties of the composite are described. Composite applications could include use as a honeycomb filler in elevated-temperature load-bearing sandwich boards or in patient-treatment tables for radiation treatment of tumors.

  13. Low temperature synthesis of diamond-based nano-carbon composite materials with high electron field emission properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diamond-based nano-carbon composite (d/NCC) material, which contains needle-like diamond grains encased with the nano-graphite layers, was synthesized at low substrate temperature via a bias enhanced growth process using CH4/N2 plasma. Such a unique granular structure renders the d/NCC material very conductive (σ = 714.8 S/cm), along with superior electron field emission (EFE) properties (E0 = 4.06 V/μm and Je = 3.18 mA/cm2) and long lifetime (τ = 842 min at 2.41 mA/cm2). Moreover, the electrical conductivity and EFE behavior of d/NCC material can be tuned in a wide range that is especially useful for different kind of applications

  14. Low temperature synthesis of diamond-based nano-carbon composite materials with high electron field emission properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saravanan, A.; Huang, B. R. [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering and Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Yeh, C. J.; Leou, K. C. [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Lin, I. N., E-mail: inanlin@mail.tku.edu.tw [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui 251, Taiwan (China)

    2015-06-08

    A diamond-based nano-carbon composite (d/NCC) material, which contains needle-like diamond grains encased with the nano-graphite layers, was synthesized at low substrate temperature via a bias enhanced growth process using CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} plasma. Such a unique granular structure renders the d/NCC material very conductive (σ = 714.8 S/cm), along with superior electron field emission (EFE) properties (E{sub 0} = 4.06 V/μm and J{sub e} = 3.18 mA/cm{sup 2}) and long lifetime (τ = 842 min at 2.41 mA/cm{sup 2}). Moreover, the electrical conductivity and EFE behavior of d/NCC material can be tuned in a wide range that is especially useful for different kind of applications.

  15. Nickel Sulfide/Graphene/Carbon Nanotube Composites as Electrode Material for the Supercapacitor Application in the Sea Flashing Signal System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hailong Chen; Ji Li; Conglai Long; Tong Wei; Guoqing Ning; Jun Yan; Zhuangjun Fan

    2014-01-01

    This work presents NiS/graphene/carbon nanotube (NiS/GNS/CNT) composites as electrode material for the supercapacitor application in sea flashing signal systems. NiS nanosheets were closely anchored on the conductive GNS-CNT networks. As a result, the NiS/GNS/CNT electrode showed a high specific capacitance of 2 377 F·g-1 at 2 mV·s-1 and good cycling stability compared with the pure NiS (1 599 F·g-1 ). The enhanced electrochemical performances are attributed to the synergetic effect between the conductive carbon and the pseudo-capacitive NiS. The high performance supercapacitor may provide application in the sea flashing signal system.

  16. Direct electrochemistry and electrocatalysis of hemoglobin with carbon nanotube-ionic liquid-chitosan composite materials modified carbon ionic liquid electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel composite biomaterial was prepared by combining chitosan, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), hemoglobin (Hb) and ionic liquid (IL) 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bromide together, which was further modified on the surface of a carbon ionic liquid electrode (CILE) with another ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulphate as the binder. Ultraviolet-visible and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic results indicated that Hb molecules in the composite film retained the native structure. Cyclic voltammetric results showed that a pair of well-defined redox peaks appeared in 0.1 mol/L phosphate buffer solution, indicating that the direct electron transfer of Hb in the composite film with the underlying electrode was realized. The results were attributed to the synergistic effect of MWCNTs and IL in the composite film, which promoted the electron transfer rate of Hb. The composite material modified electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic ability towards the reduction of different substrates such as trichloroacetic acid and NaNO2 with good stability and reproducibility.

  17. Aerosol assisted synthesis of hierarchical tin–carbon composites and their application as lithium battery anode materials

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Juchen

    2013-01-01

    We report a method for synthesizing hierarchically structured tin-carbon (Sn-C) composites via aerosol spray pyrolysis. In this method, an aqueous precursor solution containing tin(ii) chloride and sucrose is atomized, and the resultant aerosol droplets carried by an inert gas are pyrolyzed in a high-temperature tubular furnace. Owing to the unique combination of high reaction temperature and short reaction time, this method is able to achieve a hetero-structure in which small Sn particles (15 nm) are uniformly embedded in a secondary carbon particle. This procedure allows the size and size distribution of the primary Sn particles to be tuned, as well as control over the size of the secondary carbon particles by addition of polymeric surfactant in the precursor solution. When evaluated as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries, the resultant Sn-C composites demonstrate attractive electrochemical performance in terms of overall capacity, electrochemical stability, and coulombic efficiency. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  18. A Ternary Polyaniline/Active Carbon/Lithium Iron Phosphate Composite as Cathode Material for Lithium Ion Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Zhang, Wuxing; Huang, Yunhui; Xia, Tian; Lian, Yongfu

    2016-06-01

    Lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) has been evaluated as the most promising cathode material for the next generation lithium-ion batteries because of its high operating voltage, good cycle performance, low cost, and environmentally friendly safety. However, pure LiFePO4 shows poor reversible capacity and charge/discharge performance at high current density. Many methods including optimization of particle size, introduction of coating carbon and conductive polymer, and the doping of metal and halogen ions have been developed to improve its electrochemical performance. In this study, conductive polymer polyaniline (PANI), active carbon and LiFePO4 (C-LFP/PANI) composite cathodes were successfully prepared by chemical oxidation method. Electrochemical performance shows that a remarkable improvement in capacity and rate performance can be achieved in the C-LFP/PANI composite cathodes with an addition of HCI. In comparison with C-LFP cathode, the C-LFP/PANI doped with HCl composite exhibits ca. 15% and 26% capacity enhancement at 0.2 C and 10 C, respectively. PMID:27427742

  19. Surface Modification of Carbon Nanotubes with Conjugated Polyelectrolytes: Fundamental Interactions and Applications in Composite Materials, Nanofibers, Electronics, and Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Ezzeddine, Alaa

    2015-10-01

    Ever since their discovery, Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been renowned to be potential candidates for a variety of applications. Nevertheless, the difficulties accompanied with their dispersion and poor solubility in various solvents have hindered CNTs potential applications. As a result, studies have been developed to address the dispersion problem. The solution is in modifying the surfaces of the nanotubes covalently or non-covalently with a desired dispersant. Various materials have been employed for this purpose out of which polymers are the most common. Non-covalent functionalization of CNTs via polymer wrapping represents an attractive method to obtain a stable and homogenous CNTs dispersion. This method is able to change the surface properties of the nanotubes without destroying their intrinsic structure and preserving their properties. This thesis explores and studies the surface modification and solublization of pristine single and multiwalled carbon nanotubes via a simple solution mixing technique through non-covalent interactions of CNTs with various anionic and cationic conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs). The work includes studying the interaction of various poly(phenylene ethynylene) electrolytes with MWCNTs and an imidazolium functionalized poly(3-hexylthiophene) with SWCNTs. Our work here focuses on the noncovalent modifications of carbon nanotubes using novel CPEs in order to use these resulting CPE/CNT complexes in various applications. Upon modifying the CNTs with the CPEs, the resulting CPE/CNT complex has been proven to be easily dispersed in various organic and aqueous solution with excellent homogeneity and stability for several months. This complex was then used as a nanofiller and was dispersed in another polymer matrix (poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA). The PMMA/CPE/CNT composite materials were cast or electrospun depending on their desired application. The presence of the CPE modified CNTs in the polymer matrix has been proven to enhance

  20. Potentiometric urea biosensor based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/silica composite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel potentiometric urea biosensor has been fabricated with urease (Urs) immobilized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) embedded in silica matrix deposited on the surface of indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass plate. The enzyme Urs was covalently linked with the exposed free -COOH groups of functionalized MWCNTs (F-MWCNTs), which are subsequently incorporated within the silica matrix by sol-gel method. The Urs/MWCNTs/SiO2/ITO composite modified electrode was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and UV-visible spectroscopy. The morphologies and electrochemical performance of the modified Urs/MWCNTs/SiO2/ITO electrode have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and potentiometric method, respectively. The synergistic effect of silica matrix, F-MWCNTs and biocompatibility of Urs/MWCNTs/SiO2 made the biosensor to have the excellent electro catalytic activity and high stability. The resulting biosensor exhibits a good response performance to urea detection with a wide linear range from 2.18 x 10-5 to 1.07 x 10-3 M urea. The biosensor shows a short response time of 10-25 s and a high sensitivity of 23 mV/decade/cm2.

  1. Potentiometric urea biosensor based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/silica composite material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahuja, Tarushee [National Physical Laboratory (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110012 (India); Department of Applied Chemistry, Delhi College of Engineering, University of Delhi, Bawana Road, Delhi-110042 (India); Kumar, D. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Delhi College of Engineering, University of Delhi, Bawana Road, Delhi-110042 (India); Singh, Nahar; Biradar, A.M. [National Physical Laboratory (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110012 (India); Rajesh, E-mail: rajesh_csir@yahoo.com [National Physical Laboratory (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110012 (India)

    2011-03-12

    A novel potentiometric urea biosensor has been fabricated with urease (Urs) immobilized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) embedded in silica matrix deposited on the surface of indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass plate. The enzyme Urs was covalently linked with the exposed free -COOH groups of functionalized MWCNTs (F-MWCNTs), which are subsequently incorporated within the silica matrix by sol-gel method. The Urs/MWCNTs/SiO{sub 2}/ITO composite modified electrode was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and UV-visible spectroscopy. The morphologies and electrochemical performance of the modified Urs/MWCNTs/SiO{sub 2}/ITO electrode have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and potentiometric method, respectively. The synergistic effect of silica matrix, F-MWCNTs and biocompatibility of Urs/MWCNTs/SiO{sub 2} made the biosensor to have the excellent electro catalytic activity and high stability. The resulting biosensor exhibits a good response performance to urea detection with a wide linear range from 2.18 x 10{sup -5} to 1.07 x 10{sup -3} M urea. The biosensor shows a short response time of 10-25 s and a high sensitivity of 23 mV/decade/cm{sup 2}.

  2. Carbon-Confined SnO2-Electrodeposited Porous Carbon Nanofiber Composite as High-Capacity Sodium-Ion Battery Anode Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirican, Mahmut; Lu, Yao; Ge, Yeqian; Yildiz, Ozkan; Zhang, Xiangwu

    2015-08-26

    Sodium resources are inexpensive and abundant, and hence, sodium-ion batteries are promising alternative to lithium-ion batteries. However, lower energy density and poor cycling stability of current sodium-ion batteries prevent their practical implementation for future smart power grid and stationary storage applications. Tin oxides (SnO2) can be potentially used as a high-capacity anode material for future sodium-ion batteries, and they have the advantages of high sodium storage capacity, high abundance, and low toxicity. However, SnO2-based anodes still cannot be used in practical sodium-ion batteries because they experience large volume changes during repetitive charge and discharge cycles. Such large volume changes lead to severe pulverization of the active material and loss of electrical contact between the SnO2 and carbon conductor, which in turn result in rapid capacity loss during cycling. Here, we introduce a new amorphous carbon-coated SnO2-electrodeposited porous carbon nanofiber (PCNF@SnO2@C) composite that not only has high sodium storage capability, but also maintains its structural integrity while ongoing repetitive cycles. Electrochemical results revealed that this SnO2-containing nanofiber composite anode had excellent electrochemical performance including high-capacity (374 mAh g(-1)), good capacity retention (82.7%), and large Coulombic efficiency (98.9% after 100th cycle). PMID:26252051

  3. Hydrogen Storage in Iron/Carbon Nano powder Composite Materials: Effect of Varying Spiked Iron Content on Hydrogen Adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigates the effects of varying the spiked iron content of iron/carbon nano powder (Fe/CNP) composite materials on hydrogen storage capacity. Among four such samples, a maximum hydrogen uptake of approximately 0.48 wt % was obtained with 14 wt % of spiked iron under 37 atm and 300 K. This higher hydrogen uptake capacity was believed to be closely related to the physisorption mechanism rather than chemisorption. In this case, the formation of maghemite catalyzed the attraction of hydrogen molecules and the CNP skeleton was the principal absorbent material for hydrogen storage. However, as the iron content exceeded 14 wt %, the formation of larger and poorly dispersed maghemite grains reduced the available surface areas of CNP for the storage of hydrogen molecules, leading to decreased uptake. Our study shows that hydrogen uptake capacities can be improved by appropriately adjusting the surface polarities of the CNP with well dispersed iron oxides crystals.

  4. A study on damage and fatigue characteristics of plain woven carbon fiber reinforced composite material(I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of damage and fatigue subjected to tensile fatigue loading in plain woven carbon fiber reinforced composite material were studied. Constant amplitude load of 90% stress of notch strength was applied to each specimen, which had different initial notch length, and crack dectectvie compliance curve was determined form load-displacement data. The effective crack length(aeff) was obtained form this compliance curve and the effective crack growth could be divided to three-steps and explained separately. After cycling the shape of fatigue crack was observed by S.E.M.. Change of elastic modulus(EN) during fatigue cycle was explained by repeated sudden-death medel. The material constant determined by Jen-Hsu model was more useful to evaluate damage than Wang-Chim model. (Author)

  5. Facile synthesis and stable cycling ability of hollow submicron silicon oxide–carbon composite anode material for Li-ion battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Hollow submicron SiO2–carbon composite material was synthesized using Si4+-citrate chelation. • Composite material possessed a homogeneous distribution of SiO2 and carbon. • Composite electrode delivered ⩾600 mAh/g with a stable cycling stability. • This materials design and synthesis provides a useful platform for scalable production. - Abstract: Advanced SiO2–carbon composite anode active material for lithium-ion battery has been synthesized through a simple chelation of silicon cation with citrate in a glyme-based solvent. The resultant composite material demonstrates a homogeneous distribution of constituents over the submicron particles and a unique hollow spherical microstructure, which provides an enhanced electrical conductivity and better accommodation of volume change of silicon during electrochemical charge–discharge cycling, respectively. As a result, the composite electrode exhibits a high cycling stability delivering the capacity retention of 91% at the 100th cycle and discharge capacities of 662–602 mAh/g and coulombic efficiencies of 99.8%. This material synthesis is scalable and cost-effective in preparing various submicron or micron composite electrode materials

  6. Facile synthesis and stable cycling ability of hollow submicron silicon oxide–carbon composite anode material for Li-ion battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joong-Yeon; Nguyen, Dan Thien [Department of Fine Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Joon-Sup [Department of Energy Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Seung-Wan, E-mail: swsong@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Fine Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Energy Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-05

    Highlights: • Hollow submicron SiO{sub 2}–carbon composite material was synthesized using Si{sup 4+}-citrate chelation. • Composite material possessed a homogeneous distribution of SiO{sub 2} and carbon. • Composite electrode delivered ⩾600 mAh/g with a stable cycling stability. • This materials design and synthesis provides a useful platform for scalable production. - Abstract: Advanced SiO{sub 2}–carbon composite anode active material for lithium-ion battery has been synthesized through a simple chelation of silicon cation with citrate in a glyme-based solvent. The resultant composite material demonstrates a homogeneous distribution of constituents over the submicron particles and a unique hollow spherical microstructure, which provides an enhanced electrical conductivity and better accommodation of volume change of silicon during electrochemical charge–discharge cycling, respectively. As a result, the composite electrode exhibits a high cycling stability delivering the capacity retention of 91% at the 100th cycle and discharge capacities of 662–602 mAh/g and coulombic efficiencies of 99.8%. This material synthesis is scalable and cost-effective in preparing various submicron or micron composite electrode materials.

  7. Nano-composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, J. Roland

    2010-05-25

    Nano-composite materials are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a nano-composite material may comprise co-sputtering a transition metal and a refractory metal in a reactive atmosphere. The method may also comprise co-depositing a transition metal and a refractory metal composite structure on a substrate. The method may further comprise thermally annealing the deposited transition metal and refractory metal composite structure in a reactive atmosphere.

  8. The development, fabrication, and material characterization of polypropylene composites reinforced with carbon nanofiber and hydroxyapatite nanorod hybrid fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao CZ

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cheng Zhu Liao,1,2 Hoi Man Wong,3 Kelvin Wai Kwok Yeung,3 Sie Chin Tjong2 1Department of Materials Science and Engineering, South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, 3Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Abstract: This study focuses on the design, fabrication, microstructural and property characterization, and biocompatibility evaluation of polypropylene (PP reinforced with carbon nanofiber (CNF and hydroxyapatite nanorod (HANR fillers. The purpose is to develop advanced PP/CNF–HANR hybrids with good mechanical behavior, thermal stability, and excellent biocompatibility for use as craniofacial implants in orthopedics. Several material-examination techniques, including X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, tensile tests, and impact measurement are used to characterize the microstructural, mechanical, and thermal properties of the hybrids. Furthermore, osteoblastic cell cultivation and colorimetric assay are also employed for assessing their viability on the composites. The CNF and HANR filler hybridization yields an improvement in Young's modulus, impact strength, thermal stability, and biocompatibility of PP. The PP/2% CNF–20% HANR hybrid composite is found to exhibit the highest elastic modulus, tensile strength, thermal stability, and biocompatibility. Keywords: nanocomposite, implant, cellular viability, mechanical behavior

  9. Multilayer Electroactive Polymer Composite Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. (Inventor); Draughon, Gregory K. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An electroactive material comprises multiple layers of electroactive composite with each layer having unique dielectric, electrical and mechanical properties that define an electromechanical operation thereof when affected by an external stimulus. For example, each layer can be (i) a 2-phase composite made from a polymer with polarizable moieties and an effective amount of carbon nanotubes incorporated in the polymer for a predetermined electromechanical operation, or (ii) a 3-phase composite having the elements of the 2-phase composite and further including a third component of micro-sized to nano-sized particles of an electroactive ceramic incorporated in the polymer matrix.

  10. Multifunctional Composite Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Polymeric composite materials that are currently utilized in aircraft structures are susceptible to significant damage from lightning strikes. Enhanced electrical...

  11. High performance carbon-carbon composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lalit M Manocha

    2003-02-01

    Carbon-carbon composites rank first among ceramic composite materials with a spectrum of properties and applications in various sectors. These composites are made of fibres in various directions and carbonaceous polymers and hydrocarbons as matrix precursors. Their density and properties depend on the type and volume fraction of reinforcement, matrix precursor used and end heat treatment temperature. Composites made with thermosetting resins as matrix precursors possess low densities (1.55–1.75 g/cm3) and well-distributed microporosity whereas those made with pitch as the matrix precursor, after densification exhibit densities of 1.8–2.0 g/cm3 with some mesopores, and those made by the CVD technique with hydrocarbon gases, possess intermediate densities and matrices with close porosities. The former (resin-based) composites exhibit high flexural strength, low toughness and low thermal conductivity, whereas the latter (pitch- and CVD-based) can be made with very high thermal conductivity (400–700 W/MK) in the fibre direction. Carbon-carbon composites are used in a variety of sectors requiring high mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, good frictional properties for brake pads in high speed vehicles or high thermal conductivity for thermal management applications. However, for extended life applications, these composites need to be protected against oxidation either through matrix modification with Si, Zr, Hf etc. or by multilayer oxidation protection coatings consisting of SiC, silica, zircon etc.

  12. Study the Effect of Carbon Fiber Volume Fraction and their Orientations on the Thermal Conductivity of the Polymer Composite Materials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Sellab Hamza

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of fiber volume fraction of the carbon fiber on the thermal conductivity of the polymer composite material was studied. Different percentages of carbon fibers were used (5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25%. Specimens were made in two groups for unsaturated polyester as a matrix and carbon fibers, first group has parallel arrangement of fibers and the second group has perpendicular arrangement of fibers on the thermal flow, Lee's disk method was used for testing the specimens. This study showed that the values of the of thermal conductivity of the specimens when the fibers arranged in parallel direction was higher than that when the fibers arranged in the perpendicular direction The results indicated that the thermal conductivity increases with the increasing the fiber volume fraction. Minimum value was (0.64 W/m.?C for parallel arrangement and (0.1715 W/m.?C for perpendicular arrangement at (Vf = 5% .Maximum value for parallel and perpendicular were (2.65 W/m. ?C and (0.215 W/m.?C at (Vf = 25% respectively.

  13. Effects of activated carbon characteristics on the electrosorption capacity of titanium dioxide/activated carbon composite electrode materials prepared by a microwave-assisted ionothermal synthesis method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Po-I; Chung, Li-Ching; Ho, Chia-Hua; Shao, Hsin; Liang, Teh-Ming; Horng, Ren-Yang; Chang, Min-Chao; Ma, Chen-Chi M

    2015-05-15

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2)/ activated carbon (AC) composite materials, as capacitive deionization electrodes, were prepared by a two-step microwave-assisted ionothermal synthesis method. The electrosorption capacity of the composite electrodes was studied and the effects of AC characteristics were explored. These effects were investigated by multiple analytical techniques, including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermogravimetry analysis and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, etc. The experimental results indicated that the electrosorption capacity of the TiO2/AC composite electrode is dependent on the characteristics of AC including the pore structure and the surface property. An enhancement in electrosorption capacity was observed for the TiO2/AC composite electrode prepared from the AC with higher mesopore content and less hydrophilic surface. This enhancement is due to the deposition of anatase TiO2 with suitable amount of Ti-OH. On the other hand, a decline in electrosorption capacity was observed for the TiO2/AC composite electrode prepared from the AC with higher micropore content and highly hydrophilic surface. High content of hydrogen bond complex formed between the functional group on hydrophilic surface with H2O, which will slow down the TiO2 precursor-H2O reaction. In such situation, the effect of TiO2 becomes unfavorable as the loading amount of TiO2 is less and the micropore can also be blocked. PMID:25576198

  14. Method for fabricating composite carbon foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy.

  15. Capacitor with a composite carbon foam electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1999-04-27

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

  16. Capacitor with a composite carbon foam electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1999-01-01

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid partides being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy.

  17. Nanostructured Black Phosphorus/Ketjenblack-Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Composite as High Performance Anode Material for Sodium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gui-Liang; Chen, Zonghai; Zhong, Gui-Ming; Liu, Yuzi; Yang, Yong; Ma, Tianyuan; Ren, Yang; Zuo, Xiaobing; Wu, Xue-Hang; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Amine, Khalil

    2016-06-01

    Sodium-ion batteries are promising alternatives to lithium-ion batteries for large-scale applications. However, the low capacity and poor rate capability of existing anodes for sodium-ion batteries are bottlenecks for future developments. Here, we report a high performance nanostructured anode material for sodium-ion batteries that is fabricated by high energy ball milling to form black phosphorus/Ketjenblack-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (BPC) composite. With this strategy, the BPC composite with a high phosphorus content (70 wt %) could deliver a very high initial Coulombic efficiency (>90%) and high specific capacity with excellent cyclability at high rate of charge/discharge (∼1700 mAh g(-1) after 100 cycles at 1.3 A g(-1) based on the mass of P). In situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, synchrotron high energy X-ray diffraction, ex situ small/wide-angle X-ray scattering, high resolution transmission electronic microscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance were further used to unravel its superior sodium storage performance. The scientific findings gained in this work are expected to serve as a guide for future design on high performance anode material for sodium-ion batteries. PMID:27222911

  18. Fabrication of free-standing pure carbon-based composite material with the combination of sp{sup 2}–sp{sup 3} hybridizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga, M., E-mail: varga@fzu.cz [Institute of Physics of the ASCR, v.v.i., Cukrovarnicka 10, Prague 6 16253 (Czech Republic); Institute of Electronics and Photonics, FEI STU, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Vretenar, V. [Danubia NanoTech, s.r.o., Ilkovicova 3, 841 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Institute of Physics of the SAS, Dubravska cesta 9, 845 11 Bratislava (Slovakia); Kotlar, M. [Institute of Electronics and Photonics, FEI STU, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Skakalova, V. [Danubia NanoTech, s.r.o., Ilkovicova 3, 841 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Physics of Nanostructured Materials, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Kromka, A. [Institute of Physics of the ASCR, v.v.i., Cukrovarnicka 10, Prague 6 16253 (Czech Republic)

    2014-07-01

    Composite structures have been in a center of interest for many decades. Carbon–carbon composites combine different carbon-based allotropes. Combining different carbon structures each with its unique property results in a new composite material with designed properties. In this contribution we present a technological procedure for preparation of a new flexible material consisting of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and nanocrystalline diamond (NCD). The fabrication process starts from the preparation of a paper made of SWNTs bundles followed by the CVD-growth of NCD in the interior of the SWNT paper. Keeping balance between the two competing processes during the CVD, i.e. growth of diamond particles versus etching SWNTs, is found as a key factor for the formation of a compact SWNT/NCD composite material. From a technological point of view, both processes are influenced mainly by the CVD conditions (temperature, gas composition, etc.) and/or substrate pretreatment. The essential idea of the diamond integration into the SWNT paper is demonstrated and discussed in more details. The morphology and structural aspects of the prepared composite material are further characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy.

  19. Carbon fibre material for tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As science and technology continue to cross boundaries of known practices, materials and manufacturing techniques and into the frontiers of new materials, environment and applications, the opportunities for research in materials in general will inevitably increase. The unique properties of carbon fibre which combines low weight and high stiffness, makes it in ever greater demand as substitutes for traditional materials. This is due to the rising costs of raw materials and energy and the necessity to reduce carbon dioxide emission. The carbon fibres produced are particularly of high standard in terms of quality and processing characteristics especially when it is designed in structural components in the aerospace and defence industries. This results in a well structured organisation in producing the fibre starting from its raw material to the final composite products. In achieving this effort, research and communication of the progress takes a fundamental role. (author)

  20. Preparation of a lead sensor based on porous multiwalled carbon nanotubes/thiolated chitosan composite materials

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Jun; XING, Ling; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Thiolated chitosan (CS--TGA) was prepared using chitosan (CS) and thioglycolic acid (TGA). Then MWCNTs were added to the mixture of CS--TGA and CS to prepare the CS/CS--TGA/MWCNs porous composite by freeze-drying method and this composite was used to modify an indium tin oxide glass electrode. The electrode was used as a sensor for Pb2+. The morphology and structure of the composite were characterized by infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope, and their electrochemical b...

  1. Friction Material Composites Materials Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Sundarkrishnaa, K L

    2012-01-01

    Friction Material Composites is the first of the five volumes which strongly educates and updates engineers and other professionals in braking industries, research and test labs. It explains besides the formulation of design processes and its complete manufacturing input. This book gives an idea of mechanisms of friction and how to control them by designing .The book is  useful for designers  of automotive, rail and aero industries for designing the brake systems effectively with the integration of friction material composite design which is critical. It clearly  emphasizes the driving  safety and how serious designers should  select the design input. The significance of friction material component like brake pad or a liner as an integral part of the brake system of vehicles is explained. AFM pictures at nanolevel illustrate broadly the explanations given.

  2. Influence of carbon fibres on the surface properties of composite materials for medical applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stodolak, E.; Blazewicz, M.; Grausová, Ľubica

    Krakow : Wydawnictwo Naukowe Akapit, 2007. s. 224-224. ISBN 978-83-89541-95-6. [International Conference CESEP´07 - Carbon for Energy Storage and Environment Protection /2./. 02.09.2007-06.09.2007, Krakow] Keywords : spo2 * biomaterials * surface topography * wettability Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics

  3. Lightweight, Thermally Conductive Composite Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, G. Richard; Loftin, Timothy A.

    1990-01-01

    Aluminum reinforced with carbon fibers superior to copper in some respects. Lightweight composite material has high thermal conductivity. Consists of aluminum matrix containing graphite fibers, all oriented in same direction. Available as sheets, tubes, and bars. Thermal conductivity of composite along fibers rises above that of pure copper over substantial range of temperatures. Graphite/aluminum composite useful in variety of heat-transfer applications in which reduction of weight critical. Used to conduct heat in high-density, high-speed integrated-circuit packages for computers and in base plates for electronic equipment. Also used to carry heat away from leading edges of wings in high-speed airplanes.

  4. Summary of the Effects of Two Years of Hygro-Thermal Cycling on a Carbon/Epoxy Composite Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlman, Lee W.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Roberts, Gary D.; Miller, Sandi G.; Pereira, J. Michael; Bail, Justin L.

    2011-01-01

    Composite materials are beginning to be used for structures in the fan section of commercial gas turbine engines. This paper explores the type of damage that could occur within one type of composite material after exposure to hygrothermal cycles (temperature/humidity cycles) that are representative of the environment in the fan section of an engine. The effect of this damage on composite material properties is measured. Chemical changes in the matrix material were limited to the exposed surface. Microcrack formation was identified in the composite material. This damage did not cause a significant reduction in tensile strength or impact penetration resistance of the composite material. Additional data is needed to assess the effect of damage on compressive strength.

  5. Modeling the Energy Dependent Cathodoluminescent Intensity of a Carbon Composite Material

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Justin; Peterson, Kelby T.; Dekany, Justin; Dennison, JR

    2014-01-01

    When highly disordered insulating materials are subjected to energetic electron bombardment they can emit photons. This process is termed “cathodoluminescence.” This occurs in the space plasma environment and is an important phenomenon to understand when designing any object to be put into space. Light emitted from spacecraft materials can affect optical detection, and can cause stray-light contamination in space-based observatories. The Materials Physics Group at Utah State University uses a...

  6. Synthesis of Silica-Carbon Nanotube Composite Materials and Their Application for Laser Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, fabrication of CNT and polymer composites for saturable absorbers is very popular. But due to nature of organic polymer matrix, these composites are unstable on higher temperatures or in high energy light exposition. Therefore a sol-gel process for the fabrication for inorganic (i.e. silica) or semi-organic (organic-modified silica) matrix can be a promising way to produce photo-chemically and thermally stable CNT composites. In this work we investigated SWCNT's solubility in ethanol using different surfactants - Triton, polyvinylpyrrolidone, and Poly(4-vinylpyridine). Most stable colloidal solution was obtained using a P4VP as surfactant - solutions were stable up to 6 weeks. Therefore this surfactant was used for the fabrication of SWCNT/Silica composite coatings. SWCNT's was directly dispensed in a colloidal silica sol and coatings made by spin-coating technique. Samples were investigated under optical, atomic force microscopy methods, and optical non-linearity was measured. Thermal stability was investigated using Raman spectroscopy.

  7. Evaluation of carbon fiber composites modified by in situ incorporation of carbon nanofibers

    OpenAIRE

    André Navarro de Miranda; Luiz Claudio Pardini; Carlos Alberto Moreira dos Santos; Ricardo Vieira

    2011-01-01

    Nano-carbon materials, such as carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers, are being thought to be used as multifunctional reinforcement in composites. The growing of carbon nanofiber at the carbon fiber/epoxy interface results in composites having better electrical properties than conventional carbon fiber/epoxy composites. In this work, carbon nanofibers were grown in situ over the surface of a carbon fiber fabric by chemical vapor deposition. Specimens of carbon fiber/nanofiber/epoxy (CF/CNF/e...

  8. Self-Consistent Physical Properties of Carbon Nanotubes in Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipes, R. B.; Frankland, S. J. V.; Hubert, P.; Saether, E.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A set of relationships is developed for selected physical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCN) and their hexagonal arrays as a function of nanotube size in terms of the chiral vector integer pair, (n,m). Properties include density, principal Young's modulus, and specific Young's modulus. Relationships between weight fraction and volume fraction of SWCN and their arrays are developed for polymeric mixtures.

  9. Enhanced field emission from cerium hexaboride coated multiwalled carbon nanotube composite films: A potential material for next generation electron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patra, Rajkumar; Ghosh, S., E-mail: santanu1@physics.iitd.ac.in [Nanostech Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi-16 (India); Sheremet, E.; Rodriguez, R. D.; Lehmann, D.; Gordan, O. D.; Zahn, D. R. T. [Semiconductor Physics, Technische Universität Chemnitz, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Jha, M.; Ganguli, A. K. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi-16 (India); Schmidt, H. [Material Systems for Nanoelectronics, Technische Universität Chemnitz, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Schulze, S. [Solid Surfaces Analysis, Technische Universität Chemnitz, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Schmidt, O. G. [Material Systems for Nanoelectronics, Technische Universität Chemnitz, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, IFW Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-03-07

    Intensified field emission (FE) current from temporally stable cerium hexaboride (CeB{sub 6}) coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on Si substrate is reported aiming to propose the new composite material as a potential candidate for future generation electron sources. The film was synthesized by a combination of chemical and physical deposition processes. A remarkable increase in maximum current density, field enhancement factor, and a reduction in turn-on field and threshold field with comparable temporal current stability are observed in CeB{sub 6}-coated CNT film when compared to pristine CeB{sub 6} film. The elemental composition and surface morphology of the films, as examined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray measurements, show decoration of CeB{sub 6} nanoparticles on top and walls of CNTs. Chemical functionalization of CNTs by the incorporation of CeB{sub 6} nanoparticles is evident by a remarkable increase in intensity of the 2D band in Raman spectrum of coated films as compared to pristine CeB{sub 6} films. The enhanced FE properties of the CeB{sub 6} coated CNT films are correlated to the microstructure of the films.

  10. Enhanced field emission from cerium hexaboride coated multiwalled carbon nanotube composite films: A potential material for next generation electron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intensified field emission (FE) current from temporally stable cerium hexaboride (CeB6) coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on Si substrate is reported aiming to propose the new composite material as a potential candidate for future generation electron sources. The film was synthesized by a combination of chemical and physical deposition processes. A remarkable increase in maximum current density, field enhancement factor, and a reduction in turn-on field and threshold field with comparable temporal current stability are observed in CeB6-coated CNT film when compared to pristine CeB6 film. The elemental composition and surface morphology of the films, as examined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray measurements, show decoration of CeB6 nanoparticles on top and walls of CNTs. Chemical functionalization of CNTs by the incorporation of CeB6 nanoparticles is evident by a remarkable increase in intensity of the 2D band in Raman spectrum of coated films as compared to pristine CeB6 films. The enhanced FE properties of the CeB6 coated CNT films are correlated to the microstructure of the films

  11. Development of carbon composite iron ore micropellets by using the microfines of iron ore and carbon-bearing materials in iron making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Jagannath; Ghorai, Satadal; Das, Avimanyu

    2015-02-01

    Iron ore microfines and concentrate have very limited uses in sintering processes. They are used in pelletization; however, this process is cost intensive. Furthermore, the microfines of non-coking coal and other carbon-bearing materials, e.g., blast-furnace flue dust (BFD) and coke fines, are not used extensively in the metallurgical industry because of operational difficulties and handling problems. In the present work, to utilize these microfines, coal composite iron oxide micropellets (2-6 mm in size) were produced through an innovative technique in which lime and molasses were used as binding materials in the micropellets. The micropellets were subsequently treated with CO2 or the industrial waste gas to induce the chemical bond formation. The results show that, at a very high carbon level of 22wt% (38wt% coal), the cold crushing strength and abrasion index of the micropellets are 2.5-3 kg/cm2 and 5wt%-9wt%, respectively; these values indicate that the pellets are suitable for cold handling. The developed micropellets have strong potential as a heat source in smelting reduction in iron making and sintering to reduce coke breeze. The micropellets produced with BFD and coke fines (8wt%-12wt%) were used in iron ore sintering and were observed to reduce the coke breeze consumption by 3%-4%. The quality of the produced sinter was at par with that of the conventional blast-furnace sinter.

  12. Carbon Fiber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    HyComp(R), Inc. development a line of high temperature carbon fiber composite products to solve wear problems in the harsh environment of steel and aluminum mills. WearComp(R), self-lubricating composite wear liners and bushings, combines carbon graphite fibers with a polyimide binder. The binder, in conjunction with the fibers, provides the slippery surface, one that demands no lubrication, yet wears at a very slow rate. WearComp(R) typically lasts six to ten times longer than aluminum bronze. Unlike bronze, WearComp polishes the same surface and imparts a self-lube film for years of service. It is designed for continuous operation at temperatures of 550 degrees Fahrenheit and can operate under high compressive loads.

  13. Characteristics and Electrochemical Performance of Si-Carbon Nanofibers Composite as Anode Material for Binder-Free Lithium Secondary Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Yura; Park, Heai-Ku; Park, Ho-Seon; Lee, Chang-Seop

    2015-11-01

    The carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and Si-CNFs composite were synthesized using a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method with an iron-copper catalyst and silicon-covered Ni foam. Acetylene as a carbon source was flowed into the quartz reactor of a tubular furnace heated to 600 degrees C. This temperature was maintained for 10 min to synthesize the CNFs. The morphologies, compositions, and crystal quality of the prepared CNFs were characterized by Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The electrochemical characteristics of the Si-CNFs composite as an anode of the Li secondary batteries were investigated using a three-electrode cell. The as-deposited Si-CNF composite on the Ni foam was directly employed as an working electrode without any binder, and lithium foil was used as the counter and reference electrode. A glass fiber separator was used as the separator membrane. Two kinds of electrolytes were employed; 1) 1 M LiPF6 was dissolved in a mixture of EC (ethylene carbonate): PC (propylene carbonate): EMC (Ethyl methyl carbonate) in a 1:1:1 volume ratio and 2) 1 M LiClO4 was dissolved in a mixture of propylene carbonate (PC): ethylene carbonate (EC) in a 1:1 volume ratio. The galvanostatic charge-discharge cycling and cyclic voltammetry measurements were carried out at room temperature by using a battery tester. The resulting Si-CNFs composite achieved the large discharge capacity of 613 mAh/g and much improved cycle-ability with the retention rate of 87% after 20 cycles. PMID:26726625

  14. Mechanical Properties of Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuhiro Okayasu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available An examination has been made of the mechanical and failure properties of several composite materials, such as a short and a long carbon fiber reinforced plastic (short- and long-CFRP and metal based composite material. The short CFRP materials were used for a recycled CFRP which fabricated by the following process: the CFRP, consisting of epoxy resin with carbon fiber, is injected to a rectangular plate cavity after mixing with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene resin with different weight fractions of CFRP. The fatigue and ultimate tensile strength (UTS increased with increasing CFRP content. These correlations, however, break down, especially for tensile strength, as the CFPR content becomes more than 70%. Influence of sample temperature on the bending strength of the long-CFRP was investigated, and it appears that the strength slightly decreases with increasing the temperature, due to the weakness in the matrix. Broken fiber and pull-out or debonding between the fiber and matrix were related to the main failure of the short- and long-CFRP samples. Mechanical properties of metal based composite materials have been also investigated, where fiber-like high hardness CuAl2 structure is formed in aluminum matrix. Excellent mechanical properties were obtained in this alloy, e.g., the higher strength and the higher ductility, compared tothe same alloy without the fiber-like structure. There are strong anisotropic effects on the mechanical properties due to the fiber-like metal composite in a soft Al based matrix.

  15. Synthesis and Application of Si/Carbon Nanofiber Composites Based on Ni and Mo Catalysts for Anode Material of Lithium Secondary Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Eunyi; Park, Heal-Ku; Lee, Chang-Seop

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and Si/carbon nanofiber composites were synthesized for use as the anode material of lithium secondary batteries. Catalysts were prepared based on Ni and Mo metals and CNFs were grown through chemical vapor deposition (CVD). In addition, the grown CNFs were mixed with silicon particles to synthesize Si/carbon nanofibers composites. The physiochemical characteristics of the synthesized CNFs and Si/carbon nanofiber composites were analyzed by SEM, EDS, XRD, Raman, BET and XPS. The electrochemical characteristics were investigated by using cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge. Using CNFs and Si/carbon nanofiber composites as the anode material, three electrode cells were assembled and the electrochemical characteristics were measured using LiPF6 and LiClO4 as electrolytes. As a result of the galvanostatic charge-discharge of CNFs that were grown through catalysts with Ni and Mo concentration ratio of 6:4, the initial discharge capacity when using LiPF6 as the electrolyte was 570 mAh/g and the retention rate was 15.05%. In the case of using LiClO4 as the electrolyte, the initial discharge capacity was 263 mAh/g and the retention rate was 67.23%. PMID:27483824

  16. Superconducting composites materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new superconductor materials with a high critical current own a large importance as well in the electronic components or in the electrotechnical devices fields. The deposit of such materials with the thick films technology is to be more and more developed in the years to come. Therefore, we tried to realize such thick films screen printed on alumina, and composed mainly of the YBa2Cu3O7-δ material. We first realized a composite material glass/YBa2Cu3O7-δ, by analogy with the classical screen-printed inks where the glass ensures the bonding with the substrate. We thus realized different materials by using some different classes of glass. These materials owned a superconducting transition close to the one of the pure YBa2Cu3O7-δ material. We made a slurry with the most significant composite materials and binders, and screen-printed them on an alumina substrate preliminary or not coated with a diffusion barrier layer. After firing, we studied the thick films adhesion, the alumina/glass/composite material interfaces, and their superconducting properties. 8 refs.; 14 figs.; 9 tabs

  17. Carbon dioxide adsorption on micro-mesoporous composite materials of ZSM-12/MCM-48 type: The role of the contents of zeolite and functionalized amine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Synthesis of the micro-mesoporous composite materials of ZSM-12/MCM-48 type. • Application of these adsorbents in the carbon dioxide adsorption. • Effects of the contents of zeolite and amino group in the material surface on the CO2 capture efficiency. - Abstract: In this study ZSM-12/MCM-48 adsorbents have been synthesized at three ZSM-12 content, and also were functionalizated with amine groups by grafting. All the adsorbents synthesized were evaluated for CO2 capture. The X-ray diffraction analysis of the ZSM-12/MCM-48 composite showed the main characteristic peaks of ZSM-12 and MCM-48, and after the functionalization, the structure of MCM-48 on the composite impregnated was affected due amine presence. For the composites without amine, the ZSM-12 content was the factor determining in the adsorption capacity of CO2 and for the composites with amine the amount of amine was that influenced in the adsorption capacity

  18. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D.; Ripley, Edward B.; Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  19. Effect of thermal treatment on the properties of electrospun LiFePO4–carbon nanofiber composite cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: The composites prepared with the thermal treatment process of stabilization at 280 °C for 4 h with a heating rate of 2 °C min−1 in air followed by carbonization at 800 °C for 14 h with a heating rate of 2 °C min−1 in argon exhibit the optimal electrochemical properties. - Highlights: • Binder-free LiFePO4–CNF composite cathode materials are prepared. • The conductive carbon and LiFePO4 formation take place simultaneously during thermal treatment. • The reaction behavior of the LiFePO4 precursors during thermal treatment are investigated. • Different thermal treatment processes would generate different electrochemical performance. • Cycling performance and rate capability are improved with a suitable thermal treatment condition. - Abstract: Binder-free LiFePO4–carbon nanofiber (LiFePO4–CNF) composites as lithium-ion battery cathode materials are fabricated by electrospinning and subsequent thermal treatments. The thermal decomposition behavior of the electrospun LiFePO4 precursor–polyacrylonitrile (LiFePO4 precursor–PAN) nanofiber composites and the reaction of the LiFePO4 precursors during thermal treatment are investigated. The effects of thermal treatment parameters such as heating rate, temperature, and duration for stabilization and carbonization on the microstructure, morphology, carbon content, crystal structure of the composites, and electrochemical performance of the resultant half-cell are also studied. When the electrospun LiFePO4 precursor–PAN nanofiber composites are first stabilized in air at 280 °C for 4 h with a heating rate of 2 °C min−1 and then carbonized in argon at 800 °C for 14 h with a heating rate of 2 °C min−1, the obtained LiFePO4–CNF composites exhibit optimal electrochemical properties in terms of a higher initial discharge capacity, more stable charge–discharge cycle behavior, and better rate performance. The initial discharge capacity of the composites is 146.3 mA h g−1 at

  20. Nitrogen-doped porous carbon nanofiber webs/sulfur composites as cathode materials for lithium-sulfur batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrogen-doped porous carbon nanofiber webs-sulfur composites (N-CNFWs/S) were synthesized for the first time with sulfur (S) encapsulated into nitrogen-doped porous carbon nanofiber webs (N-CNFWs) via a modified oxidative template route, carbonization-activation and thermal treatment. The composites were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and thermogravimetry (TG) measurements. The results show that sulfur is well dispersed and immobilized homogeneously in the micropores of nitrogen-doped porous carbon nanofiber webs (N-CNFWs) with high electrical conductivity, surface area and large pore volume. The electrochemical tests show that the N-CNFWs/S composites with 60 wt. % of S have a high initial discharge capacity of 1564 mA h g−1, a good cycling stability at the current density of 175 mA g−1, and excellent rate capability (reversible discharging capacity of above 400 mA h g−1 at 1600 mA g−1)

  1. Synthesis and Electrochemical Characterization of Li2FeSiO4/Carbon Nanofiber Composite Cathode Material for Li Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay; Nazri, Gholam Abbas; Naik, Ratna; Naik, Vaman M.

    2014-03-01

    Lithium transition metal silicates (Li2MSiO4) , where, M =Ni, Mn, Fe, and Co with a theoretical capacity of ~ 330 mAh/g have attracted great interest as possible replacements for cathode material in rechargeable batteries. However, this class of materials exhibit very low electronic conductivity and low lithium diffusivity. In order to enhance the electronic conductivity and reduce the diffusion length for lithium ion, we have synthesized Li2FeSiO4/carbon nanofiber (15 % wt) composites by sol-gel method. The composite materials were characterized by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The XRD data confirmed the formation of Li2FeSiO4 crystallites with size ~ 25 nm for composites annealed at 600 °C under argon atmosphere. The composite material was used as positive electrode in a coin cell configuration and the cells were characterized by AC impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and galvanostatic charge/discharge cycling. The cells showed a discharge capacity of ~ 230 mAh/g in the initial cycles, which suggests that more than one Li ion is extracted from the electrode. The effect of annealing at higher temperature on the electrochemical performance of Li2FeSiO4/carbon nanofiber composites will be presented.

  2. Synthesis of honeycomb MnO2 nanospheres/carbon nanoparticles/graphene composites as electrode materials for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yachao; Zhou, Min; Chen, Hao; Feng, Lei; Wang, Zhao; Yan, Xinzhu; Guan, Shiyou

    2015-12-01

    Improving the electrochemical performance of manganese dioxide (MnO2) electrodes is of great significance for supercapacitors. In this study, a novel honeycomb MnO2 nanospheres/carbon nanoparticles/graphene composites has been fabricated through freeze-drying method. The honeycomb MnO2 nanospheres are well inserted and dispersed on the graphene. Carbon nanoparticles in the composites act as spacers to effectively prevent graphene from restacking and agglomeration, construct efficient 3D conducting architecture with graphene for honeycomb MnO2 nanospheres, and alleviate the aggregation of honeycomb MnO2 nanospheres by separating them from each other. As a result, such honeycomb MnO2 nanospheres/carbon nanoparticles/graphene composites display much improved electrochemical capacitive performance of 255 F g-1 at a current density of 0.5 A g-1, outstanding rate capability (150 F g-1 remained at a current density of 20 A g-1) and good cycling stability (83% of the initial capacitance retained after 1000 charge/discharge cycles). The strategy for the synthesis of these composites is very effective.

  3. Li4Ti5O12/C composite electrode material synthesized involving conductive carbon precursor for Li-ion battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li4Ti5O12/C composite was synthesized via a simple solid-state reaction using Super-P-Li conductive carbon black as reaction precursor. The prepared samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, TG and granularity analysis and their electrochemical performance was also investigated in this work. The results showed that the Li4Ti5O12/C composite had a spinel crystal structure and the particle size of the powder was uniformly distributed with an average particle size of 480 nm. The conductive carbon was embedded in the Li4Ti5O12 particles without incorporation in the Li4Ti5O12 crystal lattice during the sintering process. The added Super-P-Li carbon played an important role in improving the electronic conductivity and electrochemical performance of the Li4Ti5O12/C electrode. Compared with raw Li4Ti5O12, the Li4Ti5O12/C composite exhibited higher rate capability and excellent reversibility. The initial discharge capacity of Li4Ti5O12/C composite was 174.5 mAh g-1 at 0.5C and 169.3 mAh g-1 at 1C.

  4. High performance amorphous-Si@SiOx/C composite anode materials for Li-ion batteries derived from ball-milling and in situ carbonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dingsheng; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge; Wang, Junhua; Liu, Yongfeng

    2014-06-01

    Amorphous-Si@SiOx/C composites with amorphous Si particles as core and coated with a double layer of SiOx and carbon are prepared by ball-milling crystal micron-sized silicon powders and carbonization of the citric acid intruded in the ball-milled Si. Different ratios of Si to citric acid are used in order to optimize the electrochemical performance. It is found that SiOx exists naturally at the surfaces of raw Si particles and its content increases to ca. 24 wt.% after ball-milling. With an optimized Si to citric acid weight ratio of 1/2.5, corresponding to 8.4 wt.% C in the composite, a thin carbon layer is coated on the surfaces of a-Si@SiOx particles, moreover, floc-like carbon also forms and connects the carbon coated a-Si@SiOx particles. The composite provides a capacity of 1450 mA h g-1 after 100 cycles at a current density of 100 mA g1, and a capacity of 1230 mA h g-1 after 100 cycles at 500 mA g1 as anode material for lithium-ion batteries. Effects of ball-milling and the addition of citric acid on the microstructure and electrochemical properties of the composites are revealed and the mechanism of the improvement in electrochemical properties is discussed.

  5. Influences of carbon content and coating carbon thickness on properties of amorphous CoSnO3@C composites as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The thickness of carbon coating layers can be successfully controlled through varying molar concentration of aqueous glucose solution. • Coating carbon thickness and carbon content are two important factors on the electrochemical performances of CoSnO3@C. • CoSnO3@C under optimized conditions exhibits the optimal balance between the volume buffering effect and reversible capacity. • As-prepared CoSnO3@C under optimized conditions shows excellent electrochemical performances, whose reversible capacity could reach 491 mA h g−1 after 100 cycles. - Abstract: A series of core–shell carbon coated amorphous CoSnO3 (CoSnO3@C) with different carbon content are synthesized. Effects of carbon content and coating carbon thickness on the physical and electrochemical performances of the samples were studied in detail. The samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), galvanostatic charge–discharge and AC impedance spectroscopy, respectively. The results indicate that controlling the concentration of aqueous glucose solution influences the generation of in-situ carbon layer thickness. The optimal concentration of aqueous glucose solution, carbon content and carbon layer thickness are suggested as 0.25 M, 35.1% and 20 nm, respectively. CoSnO3@C composite prepared under the optimal conditions exhibits excellent cycling performance, whose reversible capacity could reach 491 mA h g−1 after 100 cycles

  6. Micromechanics of Composite Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Dvorak, George

    2013-01-01

    This book presents a broad exposition of analytical and numerical methods for modeling composite materials, laminates, polycrystals and other heterogeneous solids, with emphasis on connections between material properties and responses on several length scales, ranging from the nano and microscales to the macroscale. Many new results and methods developed by the author are incorporated into a rich fabric of the subject, which has been explored by several researchers over the last 40 years.   The first  part of the book reviews anisotropic elasticity theory, and then it describes the frequently used procedures and theorems for bounding and estimating overall properties, local fields and energy changes in elastic inhomogeneities, heterogeneous media, fiber composites and functionally graded materials.  Those are caused by mechanical loads and by phase eigenstrains, such as thermal, transformation and inelastic strains, and also by cavities and cracks.    Worked examples show that the eigendeformations may...

  7. Carbon-carbon composite and copper-composite bond damages for high flux component controlled fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma facing components constitute the first wall in contact with plasma in fusion machines such as Tore Supra and ITER. These components have to sustain high heat flux and consequently elevated temperatures. They are made up of an armour material, the carbon-carbon composite, a heat sink structure material, the copper chromium zirconium, and a material, the OFHC copper, which is used as a compliant layer between the carbon-carbon composite and the copper chromium zirconium. Using different materials leads to the apparition of strong residual stresses during manufacturing, because of the thermal expansion mismatch between the materials, and compromises the lasting operation of fusion machines as damage which appeared during manufacturing may propagate. The objective of this study is to understand the damage mechanisms of the carbon-carbon composite and the composite-copper bond under solicitations that plasma facing components may suffer during their life. The mechanical behaviours of carbon-carbon composite and composite-copper bond were studied in order to define the most suitable models to describe these behaviours. With these models, thermomechanical calculations were performed on plasma facing components with the finite element code Cast3M. The manufacturing of the components induces high stresses which damage the carbon-carbon composite and the composite-copper bond. The damage propagates during the cooling down to room temperature and not under heat flux. Alternative geometries for the plasma facing components were studied to reduce damage. The relation between the damage of the carbon-carbon composite and its thermal conductivity was also demonstrated. (author)

  8. Thermodynamic aspects of production of composites by sintering powder metal materials modified with nano-sized carbon additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the thermodynamic principles it is shown that nano-sized additives with high surface energy have a significant influence on the processes of surface and bulk diffusion in the powder system accelerating the sintering and the compaction of the powder composition. During heating of the metal powder composition of iron-based and nano-sized diamond-graphite particles, there occur the restoration of metal oxides due to their interaction with the carbon diamond-graphite additives and the dissolution of graphite layers in iron followed by diffusion of carbon atoms in the surface layers of metal powder particles. The particles of nano-sized diamond-graphite additives may be additional crystallization centers of molten matrix volumes ensuring the formation of a more dispersed and homogeneous structure.(authors)

  9. Preparation of a Binder-Free Three-Dimensional Carbon Foam/Silicon Composite as Potential Material for Lithium Ion Battery Anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Amit K; Zhong, Mingjie; Schwab, Matthias Georg; Binder, Axel; Venkataraman, Shyam S; Tomović, Željko

    2016-03-23

    We report a novel three-dimensional nitrogen containing carbon foam/silicon (CFS) composite as potential material for lithium ion battery anodes. Carbon foams were prepared by direct carbonization of low cost, commercially available melamine formaldehyde (MF, Basotect) foam precursors. The carbon foams thus obtained display a three-dimensional interconnected macroporous network structure with good electrical conductivity (0.07 S/cm). Binder free CFS composites used for electrodes were prepared by immersing the as-fabricated carbon foam into silicon nanoparticles dispersed in ethanol followed by solvent evaporation and secondary pyrolysis. In order to substantiate this new approach, preliminary electrochemical testing has been done. The first results on CFS electrodes demonstrated initial capacity of 1668 mAh/g with 75% capacity retention after 30 cycles of subsequent charging and discharging. In order to further enhance the electrochemical performance, silicon nanoparticles were additionally coated with a nitrogen containing carbon layer derived from codeposited poly(acrylonitrile). These carbon coated CFS electrodes demonstrated even higher performance with an initial capacity of 2100 mAh/g with 92% capacity retention after 30 cycles of subsequent charging and discharging. PMID:26909748

  10. FE-modeling of damage of twill carbon/epoxy composite on meso-scale, materials characterization and experimental verification

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Jian; Lomov, Stepan; Verpoest, Ignaas; Daggumati, Subbareddy; Van Paepegem, Wim; Degrieck, Joris; Olave, M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim of this work is to evaluate the damage in twill carbon/epoxy composites on meso-scale level (fabric unit cell level). Averaged stiffness, Poisson ratios of pre- and post damage phase are calculated based on numerical homogenization technique with periodic boundary conditions (PBCs). The static strengths and initiation of the damage are calculated and validated by experiments. The anisotropic stiffness degradation model is implemented into Abaqus (R) UMAT. The algorithm of quasi-static dam...

  11. Intermediate Temperature Carbon - Carbon Composite Structures. CRADA Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC (the "Contractor") and Synterials, Inc. (the "Participant") was to demonstrate promising processing methods, which can lead to producing Carbon-Carbon Composites (CCC), with tensile and interlaminar properties comparable to those of organic matrix composites and environmental stability at 1200 F for long periods of time. The participant synthesized carbon-carbon composites with two different fiber coatings and three different matrices. Both parties evaluated the tensile and interlaminar properties of these materials and characterized the microstructure of the matrices and interfaces. It was found that fiber coatings of carbon and boron carbide provided the best environmental protection and resulted in composites with high tensile strength.

  12. X-ray microtomography, ultrasound and thermography for the characterization of defects in fiberglass and carbon fiber composite materials and elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass and carbon fiber reinforced plastics (GRP or CFRP composites) may have different defects that arise on the one hand in the manufacturing process and on the other hand occur or propagate under quasi-static or oscillating mechanical load. The characterization of the nature, location and size of defects is important among other things for optimization of manufacturing processes, modeling of material or component behavior and for the estimation of the useful life of components or structures from GFK or CFK composites. The contribution shows selected examples of the application of X-ray microtomography, ultrasound and thermography for the characterization of defects in fiberglass or carbon fiber composite components. In ''thick'' laminates and complex shapes the X-ray method is particularly suitable.

  13. Aerogel/polymer composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Martha K. (Inventor); Smith, Trent M. (Inventor); Fesmire, James E. (Inventor); Roberson, Luke B. (Inventor); Clayton, LaNetra M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The invention provides new composite materials containing aerogels blended with thermoplastic polymer materials at a weight ratio of aerogel to thermoplastic polymer of less than 20:100. The composite materials have improved thermal insulation ability. The composite materials also have better flexibility and less brittleness at low temperatures than the parent thermoplastic polymer materials.

  14. Composite materials having thiol groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A composite material having thiol groups comprises a rigid support material. The composite material may comprise a deformable gel (eg agarose) having thiol groups retained within the pore structure of a porous rigid support material (e.g. Kieselghur). The particles of composite material are used to prepare a radioactive gold isotope from a mercury 'parent' isotope. (author)

  15. An experimental investigation of using carbon foam-PCM-MWCNTs composite materials for thermal management of electronic devices under pulsed power modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshaer, W. G.; Rady, M. A.; Nada, S. A.; Palomo Del Barrio, Elena; Sommier, Alain

    2016-05-01

    The present article reports on a detailed experimental investigation of using carbon foam-PCM-MWCNTs composite materials for thermal management (TM) of electronic devices subjected to pulsed power. The TM module was fabricated by infiltrating paraffin wax (RT65) as a phase change material (PCM) and multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as a thermal conductivity enhancer in a carbon foam as a base structure. Two carbon foam materials of low and high values of thermal conductivities, CF20 and KL1-250 (3.1 and 40 W/m K), were tested as a base structure for the TM modules. Tests were conducted at different power intensities and power cycling/loading modes. Results showed that for all power varying modes and all carbon foams, the infiltration of RT65 into carbon foam reduces the temperature of TM module and results in damping the temperature spikes height. Infiltration of MWCNTS into RT65 further improves the effectiveness of TM module. Temperature damping was more pronounced in stand-alone pulsed power cycles as compared to pulsed power spikes modes. The effectiveness of inclusion of RT65 and RT65/MWCNTs in damping the temperature spikes height is remarkable in TM modules based on KL1-250 as compared to CF-20.

  16. Effects of temperature and humidity cycling on the strengths of textile reinforced carbon/epoxy composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Roberto J.; Furrow, Keith W.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented from an experimental evaluation of the combined effects of temperature and humidity cycling on AS4/3501-6 composites (unstitched, Kevlar 29 stitched, and S-2 glass stitched uniweave fabric) and AS4/E905L composites (2-D, S-2 glass stitched 2-D, and 3-D braided fabric). The AS4/3501-6 uniweave material had a quasi-isotropic layup, whereas the AS4/E905L materials were braided in a (+/-30 deg/0 deg)(sub s) orientation. Data presented include compression strengths and compression-compression fatigue results for uncycled composites and cycled composites (160, 480, 720, and 1280 cycles from 140 deg F at 95 percent relative humidity to -67 deg F). To observe the presence of microcracking within the laminates, photomicrographs were taken of each material type at the end of each cycling period. Microcracks were found to be more prevalent within stitched laminates, predominantly around individual stitches. The glass stitched laminates showed significant microcracking even before cycling. Less microcracking was evident in the Kevlar stitched materials, whereas the unstitched uniweave material developed microcracks only after cycling. The 3-D braid did not develop microcracks. The static compression strengths of the unstitched and Kevlar stitched uniweave materials were degraded by about 10 percent after 1280 temperature/humidity cycles, whereas the reduction in compression strength for the glass stitched uniweave was less than 3 percent. The reduction in compression strength for the glass stitched 2-D braid was less than 8 percent. The unstitched 2-D and 3-D braids did not lose strength from temperature/humidity cycling. The compression-compression fatigue properties of all six material types were not affected by temperature/humidity cycling.

  17. Carbon Fiber Foam Composites and Methods for Making the Same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leseman, Zayd Chad (Inventor); Atwater, Mark Andrew (Inventor); Phillips, Jonathan (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Exemplary embodiments provide methods and apparatus of forming fibrous carbon foams (FCFs). In one embodiment, FCFs can be formed by flowing a fuel rich gas mixture over a catalytic material and components to be encapsulated in a mold to form composite carbon fibers, each composite carbon fiber having a carbon phase grown to encapsulate the component in situ. The composite carbon fibers can be intertwined with one another to form FCFs having a geometry according to the mold.

  18. Continuous Carbon Nanotube-Ultrathin Graphite Hybrid Foams for Increased Thermal Conductivity and Suppressed Subcooling in Composite Phase Change Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholmanov, Iskandar; Kim, Jaehyun; Ou, Eric; Ruoff, Rodney S; Shi, Li

    2015-12-22

    Continuous ultrathin graphite foams (UGFs) have been actively researched recently to obtain composite materials with increased thermal conductivities. However, the large pore size of these graphitic foams has resulted in large thermal resistance values for heat conduction from inside the pore to the high thermal conductivity graphitic struts. Here, we demonstrate that the effective thermal conductivity of these UGF composites can be increased further by growing long CNT networks directly from the graphite struts of UGFs into the pore space. When erythritol, a phase change material for thermal energy storage, is used to fill the pores of UGF-CNT hybrids, the thermal conductivity of the UGF-CNT/erythritol composite was found to increase by as much as a factor of 1.8 compared to that of a UGF/erythritol composite, whereas breaking the UGF-CNT bonding in the hybrid composite resulted in a drop in the effective room-temperature thermal conductivity from about 4.1 ± 0.3 W m(-1) K(-1) to about 2.9 ± 0.2 W m(-1) K(-1) for the same UGF and CNT loadings of about 1.8 and 0.8 wt %, respectively. Moreover, we discovered that the hybrid structure strongly suppresses subcooling of erythritol due to the heterogeneous nucleation of erythritol at interfaces with the graphitic structures. PMID:26529570

  19. An in situ method of creating metal oxide–carbon composites and their application as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Zichao

    2011-01-01

    Transition metal oxides are actively investigated as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), and their nanocomposites with carbon frequently show better performance in galvanostatic cycling studies, compared to the pristine metal oxide. An in situ, scalable method for creating a variety of transition metal oxide-carbon nanocomposites has been developed based on free-radical polymerization and cross-linking of poly(acrylonitrile) in the presence of the metal oxide precursor containing vinyl groups. The approach yields a cross-linked polymer network, which uniformly incorporates nanometre-sized transition metal oxide particles. Thermal treatment of the organic-inorganic hybrid material produces nearly monodisperse metal oxide nanoparticles uniformly embedded in a porous carbon matrix. Cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic cycling electrochemical measurements in a lithium half-cell are used to evaluate the electrochemical properties of a Fe3O 4-carbon composite created using this approach. These measurements reveal that when used as the anode in a lithium battery, the material exhibits stable cycling performance at both low and high current densities. We further show that the polymer/nanoparticle copolymerization approach can be readily adapted to synthesize metal oxide/carbon nanocomposites based on different particle chemistries for applications in both the anode and cathode of LIBs. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  20. Simulations of carbon fiber composite delamination tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay, G

    2007-10-25

    Simulations of mode I interlaminar fracture toughness tests of a carbon-reinforced composite material (BMS 8-212) were conducted with LSDYNA. The fracture toughness tests were performed by U.C. Berkeley. The simulations were performed to investigate the validity and practicality of employing decohesive elements to represent interlaminar bond failures that are prevalent in carbon-fiber composite structure penetration events. The simulations employed a decohesive element formulation that was verified on a simple two element model before being employed to perform the full model simulations. Care was required during the simulations to ensure that the explicit time integration of LSDYNA duplicate the near steady-state testing conditions. In general, this study validated the use of employing decohesive elements to represent the interlaminar bond failures seen in carbon-fiber composite structures, but the practicality of employing the elements to represent the bond failures seen in carbon-fiber composite structures during penetration events was not established.

  1. Multiwalled Carbon nanotube - Strength to polymer composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravin, Jagdale; Khan, Aamer. A.; Massimo, Rovere; Carlo, Rosso; Alberto, Tagliaferro

    2016-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a rather fascinating material, are among the pillars of nanotechnology. CNTs exhibit unique electrical, mechanical, adsorption, and thermal properties with high aspect ratio, exceptional stiffness, excellent strength, and low density, which can be exploited in the manufacturing of revolutionary smart nano composite materials. The demand for lighter and stronger polymer composite material in various applications is increasing every day. Among all the possibilities to research and exploit the exceptional properties of CNTs in polymer composites we focused on the reinforcement of epoxy resin with different types of multiwalled carbon nano tubes (MWCNTs). We studied mechanical properties such as stress, strain, ultimate tensile strength, yield point, modulus and fracture toughness, and Young's modulus by plotting and calculating by means of the off-set method. The mechanical strength of epoxy composite is increased intensely with 1 and 3 wt.% of filler.

  2. Application of carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite to nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon fiber reinforced carbon matrix composite (C/C composite) is thought to be one of promising structural materials with high temperature resistivity in the nuclear engineering field. In the high temperature gas-cooled reactors with gas outlet temperature maximum around 1000degC, high performance core internal structures, such as control rod sheath, core restraint mechanism, will be expected to achieve by the C/C composite application. Moreover, in the fusion reactors, plasma facing structures having high temperature with high neutron irradiation and particle collision will be expected to achieve by the C/C composite application. In this paper, current research and development studies of the C/C composite application on both reactors are reviewed and vista of the future on the C/C composite application is mentioned. (author)

  3. Effect of thermal treatment on the properties of electrospun LiFePO{sub 4}–carbon nanofiber composite cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Changhuan; Liang, Yinzheng; Yao, Lan; Qiu, Yiping, E-mail: ypqiu@dhu.edu.cn

    2015-04-05

    Graphical abstract: The composites prepared with the thermal treatment process of stabilization at 280 °C for 4 h with a heating rate of 2 °C min{sup −1} in air followed by carbonization at 800 °C for 14 h with a heating rate of 2 °C min{sup −1} in argon exhibit the optimal electrochemical properties. - Highlights: • Binder-free LiFePO{sub 4}–CNF composite cathode materials are prepared. • The conductive carbon and LiFePO{sub 4} formation take place simultaneously during thermal treatment. • The reaction behavior of the LiFePO{sub 4} precursors during thermal treatment are investigated. • Different thermal treatment processes would generate different electrochemical performance. • Cycling performance and rate capability are improved with a suitable thermal treatment condition. - Abstract: Binder-free LiFePO{sub 4}–carbon nanofiber (LiFePO{sub 4}–CNF) composites as lithium-ion battery cathode materials are fabricated by electrospinning and subsequent thermal treatments. The thermal decomposition behavior of the electrospun LiFePO{sub 4} precursor–polyacrylonitrile (LiFePO{sub 4} precursor–PAN) nanofiber composites and the reaction of the LiFePO{sub 4} precursors during thermal treatment are investigated. The effects of thermal treatment parameters such as heating rate, temperature, and duration for stabilization and carbonization on the microstructure, morphology, carbon content, crystal structure of the composites, and electrochemical performance of the resultant half-cell are also studied. When the electrospun LiFePO{sub 4} precursor–PAN nanofiber composites are first stabilized in air at 280 °C for 4 h with a heating rate of 2 °C min{sup −1} and then carbonized in argon at 800 °C for 14 h with a heating rate of 2 °C min{sup −1}, the obtained LiFePO{sub 4}–CNF composites exhibit optimal electrochemical properties in terms of a higher initial discharge capacity, more stable charge–discharge cycle behavior, and better rate

  4. Carbon dioxide adsorption on micro-mesoporous composite materials of ZSM-12/MCM-48 type: The role of the contents of zeolite and functionalized amine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, S.C.G. [Federal University of Sergipe, Materials Science and Engineering Postgraduate Program P" 2CEM, São Cristovão/SE (Brazil); Pedrosa, A.M.Garrido [Federal University of Sergipe, Departament of Chemistry (DQI), São Cristovão/SE (Brazil); Souza, M.J.B., E-mail: mjbsufs@gmail.com [Federal University of Sergipe, Department of Chemical Engineering (DEQ), Av. Marechal Rondon S/N, 49100-000, São Cristovão/SE (Brazil); Cecilia, J.A.; Rodríguez-Castellón, E. [University of Málaga, Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Crystallography and Mineralogy, Faculty of Sciences, 29071, Málaga (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Synthesis of the micro-mesoporous composite materials of ZSM-12/MCM-48 type. • Application of these adsorbents in the carbon dioxide adsorption. • Effects of the contents of zeolite and amino group in the material surface on the CO{sub 2} capture efficiency. - Abstract: In this study ZSM-12/MCM-48 adsorbents have been synthesized at three ZSM-12 content, and also were functionalizated with amine groups by grafting. All the adsorbents synthesized were evaluated for CO{sub 2} capture. The X-ray diffraction analysis of the ZSM-12/MCM-48 composite showed the main characteristic peaks of ZSM-12 and MCM-48, and after the functionalization, the structure of MCM-48 on the composite impregnated was affected due amine presence. For the composites without amine, the ZSM-12 content was the factor determining in the adsorption capacity of CO{sub 2} and for the composites with amine the amount of amine was that influenced in the adsorption capacity.

  5. One-pot synthesis of a composite of monodispersed CuO nanospheres on carbon nanotubes as anode material for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Composite of functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with CuO nanospheres is prepared. •Monodispersity, shape and size of CuO particles is specifically controlled to achieve high electrochemical performance. •The co-existence of CNTs and CuO matrix is clearly seen from TEM image. •High discharge capacity of 638 mAh/g after 50 cycles. •76% coulombic efficiency after 50 cycles with a very small loss of charge capacity. -- Abstract: Nanospheres of CuO are synthesized by a facile solution reaction of CuCl2 in the presence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), yielding a composite material. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirms the uniform dispersion of CuO nanospheres on the CNTs surface. The functional groups are determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and elemental composition is confirmed by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), while the structure and morphology of the deposited electrodes are investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. Electrochemical characterization by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and galvanostatic charge/discharge tests demonstrate high rate capability and superior cycling stability for CuO/CNT composite with a high specific capacity of 638 mAh/g for up to 50 cycles. It is anticipated that this high efficiency is due to the high dispersion of CuO nanospheres and excellent conductivity of CNTs mesh

  6. Vibrational Damping of Composite Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Biggerstaff, Janet M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop new methods of vibrational damping in polymeric composite materials along with expanding the knowledge of currently used vibrational damping methods. A new barrier layer technique that dramatically increased damping in viscoelastic damping materials that interacted with the composite resin was created. A method for testing the shear strength of damping materials cocured in composites was developed. Directional damping materials, where the loss facto...

  7. High temperature neutron irradiation of carbon materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation change in dimensions and certain properties of carbon structural materials, irradiated at 2100-2300 K by fluence up to 3x1020 neutr/cm2 (E >= 0.18 MeV) is considered. It is established that crystal structure of composite materials and carbon fibers improves as the result of high-temperature irradiation. The crystal lattice parameter decreases, whereas the dimensions of crystals and texture index grow

  8. CARBON FIBER COMPOSITES IN HIGH VOLUME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Charles David [ORNL; Das, Sujit [ORNL; Jeon, Dr. Saeil [Volvo Trucks North America

    2014-01-01

    Vehicle lightweighting represents one of several design approaches that automotive and heavy truck manufacturers are currently evaluating to improve fuel economy, lower emissions, and improve freight efficiency (tons-miles per gallon of fuel). With changes in fuel efficiency and environmental regulations in the area of transportation, the next decade will likely see considerable vehicle lightweighting throughout the ground transportation industry. Greater use of carbon fiber composites and light metals is a key component of that strategy. This paper examines the competition between candidate materials for lightweighting of heavy vehicles and passenger cars. A 53-component, 25 % mass reduction, body-in-white cost analysis is presented for each material class, highlighting the potential cost penalty for each kilogram of mass reduction and then comparing the various material options. Lastly, as the cost of carbon fiber is a major component of the elevated cost of carbon fiber composites, a brief look at the factors that influence that cost is presented.

  9. Carbon-carbon composites based on a polyimide matrix ITA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yudin, V. E.; Goikhman, M. Y.; Gribanov, A. V.; Gubanova, G. N.; Kudryavtsev, V. V.; Balík, Karel; Glogar, Petr

    Singapore : World Scientific, 1996 - (Palmer, K.; Marx , D.; Wright, M.), s. 187-197 ISBN 981-02-2801-5. [Carbon and Carbonaceous Composite Materials: Structure-Property Relationships. Malenovice (CZ), 10.10.1995-13.10.1995] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/94/1789

  10. Pores and Cracks Analysis of Carbon-Carbon Composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weishauptová, Zuzana; Balík, Karel; Medek, Jiří

    Illinois : World Scientific Publishing Go.Pte.Ltd., 1996 - (Palmer, K.; Marx , D.; Wright, M.), s. 364-370 ISBN 981-02-2801-5. [International Conference on Carbon and Carbonaceous Composite Materials. Malenovice (CZ), 10.10.1995-13.10.1995] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/94/1789

  11. Epoxy based photoresist/carbon nanoparticle composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillemose, Michael; Gammelgaard, Lauge; Richter, Jacob;

    2008-01-01

    We have fabricated composites of SU-8 polymer and three different types of carbon nanoparticles (NPs) using ultrasonic mixing. Structures of composite thin films have been patterned on a characterization chip with standard UV photolithography. Using a four-point bending probe, a well defined stress...... is applied to the composite thin film and we have demonstrated that the composites are piezoresistive. Stable gauge factors of 5-9 have been measured, but we have also observed piezoresistive responses with gauge factors as high as 50. As SU-8 is much softer than silicon and the gauge factor of the...... composite material is relatively high, carbon nanoparticle doped SU-8 is a valid candidate for the piezoresistive readout in polymer based cantilever sensors, with potentially higher sensitivity than silicon based cantilevers....

  12. Irradiation-induced structure and property changes in tokamak plasma-facing, carbon-carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-carbon composites are an attractive choice for fusion reactor plasma-facing components because of their low atomic number, superior thermal shock resistance, and low neutron activation. Next generation plasma fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will require advanced carbon-carbon composite materials possessing high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated severe heat loads. Moreover, ignition machines such as ITER will produce large neutron fluxes. Consequently, the influence of neutron damage on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials must be evaluated. Data from two irradiation experiments are reported and discussed here. Carbon-carbon composite materials were irradiated in target capsules in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A peak damage dose of 4.7 displacements per atom (dpa) at 600 degree C was attained. The carbon materials irradiated included uni-directional, two-directional, and three-directional carbon-carbon composites. Dimensional changes are reported for the composite materials and are related to single crystal dimensional changes through fiber and composite structural models. Moreover, the irradiation-induced dimensional changes are reported and discussed in terms of their architecture, fiber type, and graphitization temperature. The effect of neutron irradiation on thermal conductivity of two three-directional, carbon-carbon composites is reported and the recovery of thermal conductivity due to thermal annealing is discussed

  13. Carbon composition with hierarchical porosity, and methods of preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayes, Richard T; Dai, Sheng

    2014-10-21

    A method for fabricating a porous carbon material possessing a hierarchical porosity, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic component, (iii) a dione component in which carbonyl groups are adjacent, and (iv) an acidic component, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a carbon material possessing a hierarchical porosity comprised of mesopores and macropores. Also described are the resulting hierarchical porous carbon material, a capacitive deionization device in which the porous carbon material is incorporated, as well as methods for desalinating water by use of said capacitive deionization device.

  14. Failure behaviour of carbon/carbon composite under compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tushtev, K.; Grathwohl, G. [Universitaet Bremen, Advanced Ceramics, Bremen (Germany); Koch, D. [Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt, Institut fuer Bauweisen- und Konstruktionsforschung, Keramische Verbundstrukturen, Stuttgart (Germany); Horvath, J.

    2012-11-15

    In this work the properties of Carbon/Carbon-material are investigated under quasi-static compression and model-like characterized. The investigated material was produced by pyrolysis of a Carbon/Carbon - composite of bidirectionally reinforced fabric layers. For the compression tests, a device to prevent additional bending stress was made. The stress-strain behaviour of this material has been reproduced in various publications. This will be discussed on the fracture behaviour and compared the experimental results from the compression tests with the characteristics of tensile and shear tests. The different compression and tensile properties of stiffness, poisson and strength were assessed. Differences between the tensile and compression behaviour resulting from on-axis tests by micro buckling and crack closure and off-axis experiments by superimposed pressure normal stresses that lead to increased shear friction. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Composite materials design and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gay, Daniel; Tsai, Stephen W

    2002-01-01

    PART ONE. PRINCIPLES OF CONSTRUCTIONCOMPOSITE MATERIALS, INTEREST AND PROPERTIESWhat is Composite Material Fibers and MatrixWhat can be Made Using Composite Materials?Typical Examples of Interest on the Use of Composite MaterialsExamples on Replacing Conventional Solutions with CompositesPrincipal Physical PropertiesFABRICATION PROCESSESMolding ProcessesOther Forming ProcessesPractical Hints in the Manufacturing ProcessesPLY PROPERTIESIsotropy and AnisotropyCharacteristics of the Reinforcement-Matrix MixtureUnidirectional PlyWoven FabricsMats and Reinforced MatricesMultidimensional FabricsMetal Matrix CompositesTestsSANDWICH STRUCTURES:What is a Sandwich Structure?Simplified FlexureA Few Special AspectsFabrication and Design ProblemsNondestructive Quality ControlCONCEPTION AND DESIGNDesign of a Composite PieceThe LaminateFailure of LaminatesSizing of LaminatesJOINING AND ASSEMBLYRiveting and BoltingBondingInsertsCOMPOSITE MATERIALS AND AEROSPACE CONSTRUCTIONAircraftHelicoptersPropeller Blades for AirplanesTur...

  16. Composite material and method for production of improved composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Gary L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A laminated composite material with improved interlaminar strength and damage tolerance having short rods distributed evenly throughout the composite material perpendicular to the laminae. Each rod is shorter than the thickness of the finished laminate, but several times as long as the thickness of each lamina. The laminate is made by inserting short rods in layers of prepreg material, and then stacking and curing prepreg material with rods inserted therethrough.

  17. Carbon nanotube suspensions, dispersions, & composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Trevor John

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) are amazing structures that hold the potential to revolutionize many areas of scientific research. CNTs can be behave both as semiconductors and metals, can be grown in highly ordered arrays and patterns or in random orientation, and can be comprised of one graphene cylinder (single wall nanotube, SWNT) or several concentric graphene cylinders (multi-wall nanotube, MWNT). Although these structures are usually only a few nanometers wide, they can be grown up to centimeter lengths, and in massive quantities. CNTs can be produced in a variety of processes ranging from repeated combustion of organic material such as dried grass, arc-discharge with graphite electrodes, laser ablation of a graphitic target, to sophisticated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. CNTs are stronger than steel but lighter than aluminum, and can be more conductive than copper or semiconducting like silicon. This variety of properties has been matched by the wide variety of applications that have been developed for CNTs. Many of these applications have been limited by the inability of researchers to tame these structures, and incorporating CNTs into existing technologies can be exceedingly difficult and prohibitively expensive. It is therefore the aim of the current study to develop strategies for the solution processing and deposition of CNTs and CNT-composites, which will enable the use of CNTs in existing and emerging technologies. CNTs are not easily suspended in polar solvents and are extremely hydrophobic materials, which has limited much of the solution processing to organic solvents, which also cannot afford high quality dispersions of CNTs. The current study has developed a variety of aqueous CNT solutions that employ surfactants, water-soluble polymers, or both to create suspensions of CNTs. These CNT 'ink' solutions were deposited with a variety of techniques that have afforded many interesting structures, both randomly oriented as well as highly

  18. Multi-wall carbon nanotubes/epoxy resin composites characterization of the starting materials and evaluation of thermal and electrical conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study we investigate the electrical and thermal properties of I) composite materials fabricated with O, I, 0,5 and I wt% of concentric multi-wall carbon nanotubes/epoxy resin (MWNT) dispersed randomly in the resin; 2) MWNT buckypaper/resin composite materials; 3) and neat MWNT buckypaper. Initially, we use the techniques of thermogravimetry, infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, energy dispersive spectroscopy, x-ray fluorescence, scanning and transmission electron microscopy for a broadening characterization of the starting materials, to evaluate its morphology, purity, chemical composition and structure, in order to optimize the properties of crosslinked resin and, consequently, of the composite systems. Important parameters such as the average molecular mass and the equivalent weight of epoxy resin (DGEBA) were determined by 1H-NMR analysis and, after that, resin/curing agent relations with Phr 10, 15, 20 and 53,2 were elaborated and investigated by thermogravimetry, the resin/curing agent relation with Phr 10 showed to be the most thermally stable. This stoichiometric relation was used to elaborate the composites. We have evaluated that the effect of adding 10 wt% of the solvent acetone to the epoxy resin preparation does not alter its properties so we have adopted two routes to fabricate the composites. In the first route we used 10 wt% of acetone and, in the second the MWNT were dispersed in the matrix without using the solvent. However, no significant difference was observed for the dispersion of the bundle tubes in both systems. The electrical conductivity of the composites and buckypapers was evaluated by impedance spectroscopy and the thermal conductivity by the flash laser flash method. Only the buckypapers presented high values for electrical conductivity (103 S.m-1). The composite systems presented values of 10-3 S.m-1, only a bit different from the value of the crosslinked resin. For thermal conductivity, the values for the

  19. Fermentation based carbon nanotube multifunctional bionic composites

    OpenAIRE

    Luca Valentini; Silvia Bittolo Bon; Stefano Signetti; Manoj Tripathi; Erica Iacob; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-01-01

    The exploitation of the processes used by microorganisms to digest nutrients for their growth can be a viable method for the formation of a wide range of so called biogenic materials that have unique properties that are not produced by abiotic processes. Here we produced living hybrid materials by giving to unicellular organisms the nutrient to grow. Based on bread fermentation, a bionic composite made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and a single-cell fungi, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast extr...

  20. Carbon Nanotube Composites for Electronic Packaging Applications: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Lavanya Aryasomayajula; Klaus-Juergen Wolter

    2013-01-01

    Composite engineering comprises of metal matrix composites. They have high strength-weight ratio, better stiffness, economical production, and ease of availability of raw materials. The discovery of carbon nanotubes has opened new possibilities to face challenges better. Carbon Nanotubes are known for their high mechanical strength, excellent thermal and electrical properties. Recent research has made progress in fabricating carbon nanotube metal matrix and polymer-based composites. The metho...

  1. Composite Materials in Overhead Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Kjærsgaard; Holbøll, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    The use of composite materials, e.g. fibreglass materials, in overhead transmission line systems is nothing new. Composite based insulators have been applied to transmission lines for over 30 years, mainly as suspension and post insulators and often as an option for special applications. Also...... respect to solved and persisting known failures/problems of both mechanical and electrical nature. Major challenges related to extensive use of composite materials in an overhead line system are identified, as are possible benefits - both when using standard as well as customised composite components, e...... towers and recently conductors based on composite materials are available at transmission levels. In this paper it is investigated which composite based solutions are available in connection with complete overhead line systems including insulators, towers and conductors. The components are reviewed with...

  2. Development of carbon composites cured by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    -Developments of the new process in the manufacture of composites - Developments of a necessary technics for the manufacture of an export embargo components - Developments of the green process in the manufacture of composites - Developments and applications of the radiation curing technics in the manufacture of various composites - Developments of the manufacturing process for carbon/carbon(carbon/silicon carbide) composites

  3. Adhesive bonding of discontinuous carbon fibre composites: an experimental investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholls, Tristan Kit

    2013-01-01

    The excellent specific stiffness and strength of carbon fibre reinforced polymer composites means that the automotive sector has been investigating methods of implementing these materials into structurally demanding applications. The work detailed within this thesis supports ongoing research at the University of Nottingham into the automated manufacture of discontinuous carbon fibre reinforced polymer composite materials. Advances in the automation of composites manufacturing has meant that m...

  4. Carbon nanotube-chalcogenide composite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stehlík, Š.; Orava, J.; Kohoutek, T.; Wágner, T.; Frumar, M.; Zima, Vítězslav; Hara, T.; Matsui, Y.; Ueda, K.; Pumera, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 183, č. 1 (2010), s. 144-149. ISSN 0022-4596 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0208 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : carbon nanotubes * chalcogenide glasses * composites Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.261, year: 2010

  5. Radiation processing for PTFE composite reinforced with carbon fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work is an attempt to evaluate the performance of crosslinked PTFE as a polymer matrix for carbon fiber-reinforced composite materials. The carbon fiber-reinforced PTFE pre-composite, which is laminated with PTFE fine powder, is crosslinked by electron beam irradiation. Mechanical and frictional properties of the crosslinked PTFE composite obtained are higher than those of PTFE resin. The crosslinked PTFE composite with high mechanical and radiation resistant performance is obtained by radiation crosslinking process

  6. Carbon-Rich Silicon Oxycarbide (SiOC) and Silicon Oxycarbide/Element (SiOC/X, X= Si, Sn) Nano-Composites as New Anode Materials for Li-Ion Battery Application

    OpenAIRE

    Kaspar, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Carbon-rich silicon oxycarbide (SiOC) and silicon oxycarbide/element nano-composites (SiOC/X, X=Si, Sn) are prepared via thermal conversion of polyorganosiloxanes and studied as potential anode material for Li-ion battery application. The obtained materials are characterized by various chemical, structural, electrochemical and electro-analytical methods. The chemical composition and microstructure of the samples is analyzed and correlated with their electrochemical properties and performance....

  7. Fatigue in Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The deformation and failure behavior of graphite/epoxy tubes under biaxial loading was investigated. The increase of basic understanding of and provide design information for the bi-axial response of graphite/epoxy composites to fatigue loads are considered.

  8. Electrochemical horseradish peroxidase biosensor based on dextran-ionic liquid-V2O5 nanobelt composite material modified carbon ionic liquid electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct electrochemistry of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was realized in a dextran (De), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulphate ([EMIM]EtOSO3) and V2O5 nanobelt composite material modified carbon ionic liquid electrode (CILE). Spectroscopic results indicated that HRP retained its native structure in the composite. A pair of well-defined redox peaks of HRP appeared in pH 3.0 phosphate buffer solution with the formal potential of -0.213 V (vs. SCE), which was the characteristic of HRP heme Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox couple. The result was attributed to the specific characteristics of De-IL-V2O5 nanocomposite and CILE, which promoted the direct electron transfer rate of HRP with electrode. The electrochemical parameters of HRP on the composite modified electrode were calculated and the electrocatalysis of HRP to the reduction of trichloroacetic acid (TCA) was examined. Under the optimal conditions the reduction peak current increased with TCA concentration in the range from 0.4 to 16.0 mmol L-1. The proposed electrode is valuable for the third-generation electrochemical biosensor.

  9. Functionalization of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes by Solution Plasma Processing in Ammonia Aqueous Solution and Preparation of Composite Material with Polyamide 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirafuji, Tatsuru; Noguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Taibou; Hieda, Junko; Saito, Nagahiro; Takai, Osamu; Tsuchimoto, Akiharu; Nojima, Kazuhiro; Okabe, Youji

    2013-12-01

    Solution plasma processing (SPP) has been performed on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in ammonia aqueous solution. The MWCNTs, which do not disperse in aqueous solution, uniformly dispersed after the SPP. Only 2 h was required to obtain 10 g of the dispersed MWCNTs, while 7 days and additional chemicals were required for 185 mg in a previous study. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy of the SPP-treated MWCNTs revealed that nitrogen- and oxygen-containing groups are formed on the MWCNTs. Serious damage to the MWCNT structure was not observed in the Raman spectrum or transmission electron microscopy images of the SPP-treated MWCNTs. The composite materials prepared using polyamide 6 with the SPP-treated MWCNTs showed better tensile, bending, and impact strength than those prepared with nontreated MWCNTs.

  10. Advanced biomaterials from renewable resources: An investigation on cellulose nanocrystal composites and carbon dioxide extraction of rendered materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, Jose Luis

    The annual global consumption of petroleum-based plastics is approximately 280 million tons and is impacting the sustainability of our planet and prosperity of future generations. One solution is the development of bio-based polymer materials with advanced properties for commercial applications. Therefore, the ultimate goal of this dissertation is to investigate the properties of new bio-based materials for broader applications. This dissertation includes two research areas: cellulose nanocomposites, and CO2 extractions of rendered fat. In the first half, cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), which exhibit excellent mechanical and optical properties, were investigated for the reinforcement of a biodegradable polymer. The properties of these nanocomposites were studied to intellectually contribute to the understanding of the reinforcement mechanisms of CNC nanocomposites. In the second half, a more efficient and greener extraction of fat from rendered materials (RMs) was explored to broaden their potential applications, which include protein-based polymers and biofuels. Since CNCs are hydrophilic, surface modification with various surfactants was first accomplished in this research, increasing the dispersion stability in non-polar solvents by at least a month. Only 1 wt.% of surfactant with respect to CNCs was needed to afford a significant increase in the CNC stability, representing a much lower percentage than the values reported in the literature. Moreover, these CNCs showed the ability to selfassemble into local liquid crystal structures, a potential advantage for polymer reinforcement. CNCs were subsequently investigated as an additive for polylactic acid (PLA), which is the most widely used synthetic biopolymer in the market. CNC addition yielded a 61% increase in toughness at 1 wt.% CNC load. The tensile strength and modulus were not affected by the CNC addition, addressing one of the most frequent issues in the toughening of polymers. In addition, polarized

  11. Fermentation based carbon nanotube bionic functional composites

    OpenAIRE

    Valentini, Luca; Bon, Silvia Bittolo; Signetti, Stefano; Tripathi, Manoj; Iacob, Erica; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-01-01

    The exploitation of the processes used by microorganisms to digest nutrients for their growth can be a viable method for the formation of a wide range of so called biogenic materials that have unique mechanical and physical properties that are not produced by abiotic processes. Based on grape must and bread fermentation, a bionic composite made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and single-cell fungi, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast extract, was prepared by fermentation of such microorganisms at r...

  12. Advanced thermoplastic carbon fibre reinforced pultruded composites

    OpenAIRE

    Novo, P. J.; Silva, J F; Nunes, J. P.; MARQUES, A. T.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is to optimize the production of new continuous carbon fibers reinforced thermoplastic matrix pre-impregnated materials (towpregs) continuously processed by dry deposition of polymer powders in a new equipment developed by the Institute for Polymers and Composites (IPC). The processing of the produced towpregs by pultrusion, in a developed prototype equipment existing in the Engineering School of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto (ISEP), was also optimized. Two differ...

  13. Heat Treated Carbon Fiber Material Selection Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effinger, M.; Patel, B.; Koenig, J.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon fibers are used in a variety high temperature applications and materials. However, one limiting factor in their transition into additional applications is an understanding of their functional properties during component processing and function. The requirements on the fibers are governed by the nature of the materials and the environments in which they will be used. The current carbon fiber vendor literature is geared toward the polymeric composite industry and not the ceramic composite industry. Thus, selection of carbon fibers is difficult, since their properties change as a function of heat treatment, processing or component operational temperature, which ever is greatest. To enable proper decisions to be made, a program was established wherein multiple fibers were selected and heat treated at different temperatures. The fibers were then examined for their physical and mechanical properties which are reported herein.

  14. Preparation of ZrN-Si_3N_4 composite powder with zircon and carbon black as raw materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Bei-yue; YU Jing-kun

    2009-01-01

    ZrN-Si_3N_4 composite powder with low cost from zircon was prepared by carbothermal reduction-nitridation process. The influence of mass ratio of C to ZrSiO_4 (m(C)/m(ZrSiO_4)) and soaking time on phase composition and microstructure of the products was studied by means of XRD and SEM-EDS. The formation process of ZrN-Si_3N_4 composite powder was also analyzed in detail. The results show that with the increase of m(C)/m(ZrSiO_4) and soaking time, the formation of Si_3N_4 and ZrN can be promoted obviously. The ZrN-Si_3N_4 composite powder with size of 1-2 μm can be obtained at 1 773 K for 12 h when m(C)/m(ZrSiO_4) is 0.4.

  15. Synthesis of SiO2/3D porous carbon composite as anode material with enhanced lithium storage performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhinan; Zhao, Naiqin; Shi, Chunsheng; Liu, Enzuo; He, Chunnian; He, Fang

    2016-05-01

    A SiO2/porous carbon nanocomposite was synthesized by a facile combined heat and acid treatments method. The nanocomposite featured a 3D porous carbon structure with amorphous SiO2 nanoparticles embedded in the wall of the pores. The microstructure improved the electrical conductivity, shortened the diffusion distance of lithium ions, and alleviated the volume expansion of SiO2 during Li intercalation. Accordingly, the SiO2/porous carbon nanocomposite displayed excellent cyclic performance with a high reversible capacity of 434 mAh g-1 after 50 cycles at 0.1 A g-1 and rate capability delivering a capacity of 187.4 mAh g-1 even at 5 A g-1.

  16. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composite Valve for an Internal Combustion Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite valve for internal combustion engines and the like formed of continuous carbon fibers throughout the valve's stem and head is disclosed. The valve includes braided carbon fiber material over axially aligned unidirectional carbon fibers forming a valve stem; the braided and unidirectional carbon fibers being broomed out at one end of the valve stem forming the shape of the valve head; the valve-shaped structure being densified and rigidized with a matrix of carbon containing discontinuous carbon fibers: and the finished valve being treated to resist oxidation. Also disclosed is a carbon matrix plug containing continuous and discontinuous carbon fibers and forming a net-shape valve head acting as a mandrel over which the unidirectional and braided carbon fibers are formed according to textile processes. Also disclosed are various preform valves and processes for making finished and preform carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite valves.

  17. Cages based on carbon-carbon composite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sochor, M.; Balík, Karel; Tichý, P.; Šídlo, P.; Španiel, M.; Vtípil, J.; Beneš, J.

    Dublin : Dublin Royal Academy of Medicine in Ireland , 2000 - (Prendergast, P.; Lee, T.; Carr, A.), s. 373 ISBN 0-9538809-0-7. [Conference of the European Society of Biomaterials /12./. Dublin (IE), 28.08.2000-30.08.2000] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/00/1407 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3046908 Keywords : C-C composite * mechanical testing * biocompatibility Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  18. Titanium dioxide, single-walled carbon nanotube composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Yuan; Li, Gonghu; Gray, Kimberly; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2015-07-14

    The present invention provides titanium dioxide/single-walled carbon nanotube composites (TiO.sub.2/SWCNTs), articles of manufacture, and methods of making and using such composites. In certain embodiments, the present invention provides membrane filters and ceramic articles that are coated with TiO.sub.2/SWCNT composite material. In other embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using TiO.sub.2/SWCNT composite material to purify a sample, such as a water or air sample.

  19. Coating material composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A polyester composition is provided for forming a hard and weather-proof coating easily hardened by irradiation with active energy, particularly electron beams, using a mixture of a polyester component containing a dimer of methacrylate as an acid group with an oligomer having at least two vinyl radicals in one molecule. The composition consists of 10%-90% by weight of at least one (a) methacrylic dimer or unsaturated polyester containing its methyl ester as an acid group, (b) telomerized diacrylpolyester or (c) telomerized fiberous polyester having at its distal end a dimer of methacrylate residue, and 90%-10% of a low molecular weight compound having at least two polymerizable unsaturated radicals. The low molecular weight compound is produced by reacting at first saturated cyclic carboxylic anhydride and/or alpha-, beta-ethylenic unsaturated carboxylic anhydride and secondarily a vinyl monomer containing epoxy-radicals with hydroxyl radical-containing vinyl monomer and/or polyhydric alcohol. The aforesaid methacrylic acid dimer dimethyl ester is a byproduct of methyl methacrylate synthesis. This produces monoester monocarboxylic acid or dicarboxylic acid by hydrolysis. In one example, a polyester (a-1) was produced by reacting 0.5 moles of methacrylic acid dimer, 0.5 mol of adipic acid, 1,25 mole of ethylene glycol and 0.005 mol of hydroquinone monomethyl ether. On the other hand, an orgomer (d) is obtained from 1 mol of 2-hydroxyl ethyl methacrylate, 1 mol of maleic anhydride, 0.005 mol of hydroquinon monomethyl ether and 1 mol of glycidyl methacrylate. Next, 80 parts of (a-1) and 20 parts of (d) were mixed. (Iwakiri, K.)

  20. Electron emission from nano-structured carbon composite materials and fabrication of high-quality electron emitters by using plasma technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many trials have been done to fabricate high-quality electron-emitters from nano-composite carbon materials (such as nano-diamond, carbon nano tubes and others) by means of a variety of plasma chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) techniques. Based upon the mechanism of electron emission, we have proposed several strategic guide lines for the fabrication of good emitters. Then, following these lines, several types of emitters were tried. One of the emitters has shown a worldclass, top ranking for fabricating very bright lamps: namely, a low turn-on voltage (0.5 ∼ 1 V/μm to induce 10 μA/cm2 emission current) to emit a 1 mA/cm2 current at 3 V/μm and 100 mA/cm2 current at a slightly higher applied voltage. The bright lamps are Mercury-free fluorescence lamps to exhibit brightness of ∼105 cd/m2 with high efficiency of ∼100 lm/w.

  1. Determination of U-isotope composition of silicate and carbonate reference materials for in-situ LA-ICPMS analysis by high precision MC-ICPMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, D.; Krause, J.; Jochum, K. P.; Andreae, M. O.

    2010-12-01

    U-series isotope analyses are frequently used in order to constrain the timing and duration of geological and environmental processes during the past 600 ka. This includes paleoclimate reconstruction and timescales of magma generation and ascent. In addition to the commonly applied TIMS and MC-ICPMS techniques, in-situ methods such as LA-ICPMS have recently been developed (e.g. Mertz-Kraus et al. 2010) in order to resolve spatial variability in the U-isotope composition of carbonate and silicate materials. A prerequisite for application of LA-ICPMS for U-isotope measurements is the availability of matrix matched homogeneous reference materials with known U-isotope composition. These are for instance required in order to control instrumental and matrix induced biases occurring during analysis. Here we report high-precision MC-ICPMS U-isotope ratios for various solid reference materials especially produced for in-situ microanalysis (e.g. KL2-G, BCR-2G, ATHO-G, GSD-1G, MACS-3). The analyses were performed with the NU plasma MC-ICP-MS at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry. Samples were dissolved in an HCl-HF mixture. U was separated following traditional chemical separation and purification. The analytical protocol for the MC-ICPMS analysis utilizes a common standard-bracketing procedure in order to derive correction factors for mass fractionation and Faraday-cup-to-SEM gain. Analyses of three splits of GSD1-G yielded 238U/235U and 234U/238U ratios in agreement within uncertainty, demonstrating the homogeneity of the material (mean value 271.40 ± 0.13 and 0.000017980 ± 31 respectively). The 238U/235U and 234U/238U ratios of the naturally sourced KL2-G (140.96 ± 0.28 and 0.00005322 ± 51, respectively) are significantly different from the ratios determined for the original KL2 rock (137.306 ± 0.070 and 0.00005486 ± 10), which is assumed to be caused by U contamination during glass preparation. BCR-2G and ATHO-G have natural 238U/235U within error. The ratios

  2. Multicore-shell carbon-coated lithium manganese phosphate and lithium vanadium phosphate composite material with high capacity and cycling performance for lithium-ion battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy crisis and energy security leads a great attention to Li-ion batteries (LIB) as the excellent power candidates. We successfully synthesized LiMnPO4·Li3V2(PO4)3/C composite cathode material with high capacity and excellent cycling performance from prickly MnV2O6·2H2O precursor, following chemical reduction and lithiation with double carbon sources. The LiMnPO4·Li3V2(PO4)3/C sample has a special multicore-shell structure, whose inner stuffing are LiMnPO4 and Li3V2(PO4)3 in the range of 5-25nm. The initial discharge capacity of LiMnPO4·Li3V2(PO4)3/C composite delivers 221.4 mAh g−1, 202.3 mAh g−1 and 152.9 mAh g−1 at the rate of 0.1C, 1C and 5C in the range of 1.5-4.5 V, and retains 99.5%, 99.1% and 94.3% of its initial discharge capacity after 50 cycles, respectively

  3. Aerogel and xerogel composites for use as carbon anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2008-08-12

    Disclosed herein are aerogel and xerogel composite materials suitable for use as anodes in fuel cells and batteries. Precursors to the aerogel and xerogel compounds are infused with inorganic polymeric materials or carbon particles and then gelled. The gels are then pyrolyzed to form composites with internal structural support.

  4. Fiber Length and Orientation in Long Carbon Fiber Thermoplastic Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Hanhan, Imad; Sullivan, Connor; Sharma, Bhisham; Sangid, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Carbon fiber composites have become popular in aerospace applications because of their lightweight yet strong material properties. The injection molding process can be used to produce discontinuous fiber composites using less time and resources than traditional methods, thereby broadening carbon fiber composites’ applications in different industries. Utilization of longer fibers offers more load carrying capability and superior strength properties for injected molded composites. Since the fib...

  5. Carbon-fiber composite molecular sieves for gas separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.; Fei, Y.Q. [Univ. of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1995-08-01

    The progress of research in the development of novel, rigid, monolithic adsorbent carbon fiber composites is described. Carbon fiber composites are produced at ORNL and activated at the CAER using steam or CO{sub 2} under different conditions, with the aims of producing a uniform degree of activation through the material, and of closely controlling pore structure and adsorptive properties The principal focus of the work to date has been to produce materials with narrow porosity for use in gas separations.

  6. Electrochemical properties of tin oxide flake/reduced graphene oxide/carbon composite powders as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su Min; Choi, Seung Ho; Kang, Yun Chan

    2014-11-10

    Hierarchically structured tin oxide/reduced graphene oxide (RGO)/carbon composite powders are prepared through a one-pot spray pyrolysis process. SnO nanoflakes of several hundred nanometers in diameter and a few nanometers in thickness are uniformly distributed over the micrometer-sized spherical powder particles. The initial discharge and charge capacities of the tin oxide/RGO/carbon composite powders at a current density of 1000 mA g(-1) are 1543 and 1060 mA h g(-1), respectively. The discharge capacity of the tin oxide/RGO/carbon composite powders after 175 cycles is 844 mA h g(-1), and the capacity retention measured from the second cycle is 80%. The transformation during cycling of SnO nanoflakes, uniformly dispersed in the tin oxide/RGO/carbon composite powder, into ultrafine nanocrystals results in hollow nanovoids that act as buffers for the large volume changes that occur during cycling, thereby improving the cycling and rate performances of the tin oxide/RGO/carbon composite powders. PMID:25266199

  7. CARBON-CONTAINING COMPOSITES BASED ON METALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VAGANOV V. E.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement Among the developed technologies metal-composites production,a special place takes powder metallurgy, having fundamental differences from conventionally used foundry technologies. The main advantages of this technology are: the possibility of sensitive control, the structure and phase composition of the starting components, and ultimately the possibility of obtaining of bulk material in nanostructured state with a minimum of processing steps. The potential reinforcers metals include micro and nano-sized oxides, carbides, nitrides, whiskers. The special position is occupied with carbon nanostructures (CNS: С60 fullerenes, single-layer and multi-layer nanotubes, onions (spherical "bulbs", nano-diamonds and graphite,their properties are being intensively studied in recent years. These objects have a high thermal and electrical conductivity values, superelasticity, and have a strength approximate to the theoretical value, which can provide an obtaining composite nanomaterial with a unique set of physical and mechanical properties. In creation of a metal matrix composite nanomaterials (CM, reinforced by various CNS, a special attention should be given to mechanical activation processes (MA already at the stage of preparation of the starting components affecting the structure, phase composition and properties of aluminum-matrix composites. Purpose. To investigate the influence of mechanical activation on the structure and phase composition of aluminum-matrix composites. Conclusion. The results of the study of the structure and phase composition of the initial and mechanically activated powders and bulk-modified metal-composites are shown, depending on the type and concentration of modifying varieties CNS, regimes of MA and parameters of compaction. The study is conducted of tribological properties of Al-CNS OF nanostructured materials.

  8. 碳-碳复合材料气管重建的实验研究%Carbon-carbon materials and composites for experimental tracheal reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘鑫; 姜召阳; 秦永

    2010-01-01

    Objective The Carbon fiber reinforced carbon matrix composites were employed for reconstruction of large circumferential defect of the cervical trachea. The biocompatibility and biofunctionality of the new type carbonaceous tracheal prosthesis were evaluated, and the feasibility for cervical tracheal reconstruction discussed. Methods Two types of carbonaceous tracheal prosthesis with different weaving methods of carbon fiber were used on eight healthy canines. Three to six tracheal cartilage rings were resected circumferentially. The 2 cm long tracheal prosthesis was transplanted into canines and the anastomosis was completed by end-to-end, tracheal-into-prosthesis and prosthesis-into-tracheal method. The function of breathing, eating and infection was observed after surgery. Four months later, the five survival canines were sacrificed and the prosthesis with surrounding tissues was removed for observation by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Results All dogs had cough symptom in different degree lasted 1 -4 weeks after surgery. Two dogs with tracheal-into-prosthesis anastomosis showed eating disorders in different degree. One canine died due to airway obstruction caused by dislocation of prosthesis within three weeks after operation. Another two deaths in 11th week and 12th week were attributed to suffocation because of hypergranulation and scar formation. Prosthesis was surrounded by connective tissues and anchored firmly to the neighboring tissues. Most part of the luminal surface of tracheal prosthesis was not covered by respiratory mucosa. However, the inner layer showed scant re-epithelialization beyond the anastomosis.Conclusions The implantation of the carbonaceous tracheal prosthesis can maintain the normal respiratory function of the experimental canines, but hypergranulation and scar formation around the end of the tracheal prosthesis and repithelium on the luminal surface of the prosthesis are questions still remained to be solved

  9. Genetic Homogenization of Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tobola

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on numerical studies of electromagnetic properties of composite materials used for the construction of small airplanes. Discussions concentrate on the genetic homogenization of composite layers and composite layers with a slot. The homogenization is aimed to reduce CPU-time demands of EMC computational models of electrically large airplanes. First, a methodology of creating a 3-dimensional numerical model of a composite material in CST Microwave Studio is proposed focusing on a sufficient accuracy of the model. Second, a proper implementation of a genetic optimization in Matlab is discussed. Third, an association of the optimization script and a simplified 2-dimensional model of the homogeneous equivalent model in Comsol Multiphysics is proposed considering EMC issues. Results of computations are experimentally verified.

  10. Sintered composite gradient tool materials

    OpenAIRE

    J. Mikuła; G. Matula; K. Gołombek; L.A. Dobrzański

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Development of a new generation of the composite gradient tool materials with the core sintered withthe matrix obtained using the powder metallurgy of the chemical composition corresponding to the HS6-5-2 highspeedsteel reinforced with the WC and TiC type hard carbide phases with the growing portions of these phases inthe outward direction from the core to the surface.Design/methodology/approach: Powder Metallurgy, SEM, X-Ray Microanalysis.Findings: Powder metallurgy processes were u...

  11. Materials for carbon dioxide separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CO2 adsorption capacities at room temperature have been investigated by comparing carbon nanotubes, fullerene, graphenes, graphite and granular activated carbons. It turned out that the amount of the micropore surface area was dominating the CO2 adsorption ability. Another promising class of materials for CO2 capture and separation are CaO derived from the eggshells. Two aspects were studied in present work: a new hybrid materials synthesized by doping the CaTiO3 and the relationship between physisorption and chemisorption properties of CaO-based materials.

  12. Fracture problems in composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, F.

    1972-01-01

    A series of fracture problems in composite materials are identified, their methods of solution are briefly discussed, and some sample results are presented. The main problem of interest is the determination of the stress state in the neighborhood of localized imperfections such as cracks and inclusions which may exist in the composite. Particular emphasis is placed on the evaluation of quantities such as the stress intensity factors, the power of the stress singularity, and the strain energy release rate, which may be used directly or indirectly in connection with an appropriate fracture criterion for the prediction of fracture initiation and propagation load levels. The topics discussed include a crack in layered composites, a crack terminating at and going through a bi-material interface, a penny-shaped crack in a filament-reinforced elastic matrix, and inclusion problems in bonded materials.

  13. Microwave plasma CVD of NANO structured tin/carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinek, Marek; Kostecki, Robert

    2012-07-17

    A method for forming a graphitic tin-carbon composite at low temperatures is described. The method involves using microwave radiation to produce a neutral gas plasma in a reactor cell. At least one organo tin precursor material in the reactor cell forms a tin-carbon film on a supporting substrate disposed in the cell under influence of the plasma. The three dimensional carbon matrix material with embedded tin nanoparticles can be used as an electrode in lithium-ion batteries.

  14. Processing and Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Roberto J.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Czabaj, Michael W.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Hull, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the synthesis of large-scale quantities of carbon nanotubes (CNT) have provided the opportunity to study the mechanical properties of polymer matrix composites using these novel materials as reinforcement. Nanocomp Technologies, Inc. currently supplies large sheets with dimensions up to 122 cm x 244 cm containing both single-wall and few-wall CNTs. The tubes are approximately 1 mm in length with diameters ranging from 8 to 12 nm. In the present study being conducted at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), single and multiple layers of CNT sheets were infused or coated with various polymer solutions that included commercial toughened-epoxies and bismaleimides, as well as a LaRC developed polyimide. The resulting CNT composites were tested in tension using a modified version of ASTM D882-12 to determine their strength and modulus values. The effects of solvent treatment and mechanical elongation/alignment of the CNT sheets on the tensile performance of the composite were determined. Thin composites (around 50 wt% CNT) fabricated from acetone condensed and elongated CNT sheets with either a BMI or polyimide resin solution exhibited specific tensile moduli approaching that of toughened epoxy/ IM7 carbon fiber unidirectional composites.

  15. Conductive Carbon Coatings for Electrode Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple method for optimizing the carbon coatings on non-conductive battery cathode material powders has been developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The enhancement of the electronic conductivity of carbon coating enables minimization of the amount of carbon in the composites, allowing improvements in battery rate capability without compromising energy density. The invention is applicable to LiFePO4 and other cathode materials used in lithium ion or lithium metal batteries for high power applications such as power tools and hybrid or plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. The market for lithium ion batteries in consumer applications is currently $5 billion/year. Additionally, lithium ion battery sales for vehicular applications are projected to capture 5% of the hybrid and electric vehicle market by 2010, and 36% by 2015 (http://www.greencarcongress.com). LiFePO4 suffers from low intrinsic rate capability, which has been ascribed to the low electronic conductivity (10-9 S cm-1). One of the most promising approaches to overcome this problem is the addition of conductive carbon. Co-synthesis methods are generally the most practical route for carbon coating particles. At the relatively low temperatures (4, however, only poorly conductive disordered carbons are produced from organic precursors. Thus, the carbon content has to be high to produce the desired enhancement in rate capability, which decreases the cathode energy density

  16. Preparation and characterization of carbon nanotube-hybridized carbon fiber to reinforce epoxy composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → CNTs were uniformly grown onto the carbon fibers. → No obvious mechanical properties of carbon fiber were observed after CNT growth. → The IFSS of multiscale epoxy composite was measured by single fiber pull-out tests. → Observing fractography of composite, the fracture modes of CNTs were discussed. -- Abstract: The multiscale carbon nanotube-hybridized carbon fiber was prepared by a newly developed aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope were carried out to characterize this multiscale material. Compared with the original carbon fibers, the fabrication of this hybrid fiber resulted in an almost threefold increase of BET surface area to reach 2.22 m2/g. Meanwhile, there was a slight degradation of fiber tensile strength within 10%, while the fiber modulus was not significantly affected. The interfacial shearing strength of a carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composite with carbon nanotube-hybridized carbon fiber and an epoxy matrix was determined from the single fiber pull-out tests of microdroplet composite. Due to an efficient increase of load transfer at the fiber/matrix interfaces, the interracial shear strength of composite reinforced by carbon nanotube-hybridized carbon fiber is almost 94% higher than that of one reinforced by the original carbon fiber. Based on the fractured morphologies of the composites, the interfacial reinforcing mechanisms were discussed through proposing different types of carbon nanotube fracture modes along with fiber pulling out from epoxy composites.

  17. Production process for boron carbide coated carbon material and boron carbide coated carbon material obtained by the production process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A boron carbide coated carbon material is used for a plasma facing material of a thermonuclear reactor. The surface of a carbon material is chemically reacted with boron oxide to convert it into boron carbide. Then, it is subjected to heat treatment at a temperature of not lower than 1600degC in highly evacuated or inactive atmosphere to attain a boron carbide coated carbon material. The carbon material used is an artificial graphite or a carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite material. In the heat treatment, when the atmosphere is in vacuum, it is highly evacuated to less than 10Pa. Alternatively, in a case of inactive atmosphere, argon or helium gas each having oxygen and nitrogen content of not more than 20ppm is used. With such procedures, there can be obtained a boron carbide-coated carbon material with low content of oxygen and nitrogen impurities contained in the boron carbide coating membrane thereby hardly releasing gases. (I.N.)

  18. Joining of polymer composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magness, F.H.

    1990-11-01

    Under ideal conditions load bearing structures would be designed without joints, thus eliminating a source of added weight, complexity and weakness. In reality the need for accessibility, repair, and inspectability, added to the size limitations imposed by the manufacturing process and transportation/assembly requirements mean that some minimum number of joints will be required in most structures. The designer generally has two methods for joining fiber composite materials, adhesive bonding and mechanical fastening. As the use of thermoplastic materials increases, a third joining technique -- welding -- will become more common. It is the purpose of this document to provide a review of the available sources pertinent to the design of joints in fiber composites. The primary emphasis is given to adhesive bonding and mechanical fastening with information coming from documentary sources as old as 1961 and as recent as 1989. A third, shorter section on composite welding is included in order to provide a relatively comprehensive treatment of the subject.

  19. Composite Materials: An Educational Need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, Tony E.; Snide, James A.

    1990-01-01

    Described is the need to incorporate the concepts and applications of advanced composite materials into existing chemical engineering programs. Discussed are the justification for, and implementation of topics including transport phenomena, kinetics and reactor design, unit operations, and product and process design. (CW)

  20. Radiation curing of carbon fibre composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epoxy/carbon fibre reinforced composites were produced by means of e-beam irradiation through a pulsed 10 MeV electron beam accelerator. The matrix consisted of a difunctional epoxy monomer (DGEBA) and an initiator of cationic polymerisation, while the reinforcement was a unidirectional high modulus carbon fibre fabric. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis was carried out in order to determine the cross-linking degree. The analysis pointed out a nonuniformity in the cross-linking degree of the e-beam cured panels, with the formation of clusters at low Tg (glass transition temperature) and clusters at high Tg. An out-of-mould post irradiation thermal treatment on e-beam cured samples provides a higher uniformity in the network although some slight degradation effects. Mode I delamination fracture toughness and Interlaminar Shear Strength (ISS) were also investigated by means of Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) and Short Beam Shear tests, respectively. Results from this mechanical characterisation allowed to correlate fracture toughness of the bulk matrix resin, cross-linking density and fibre/matrix interaction to the delamination fracture behaviour of the fibre reinforced material. - Highligths: • Epoxy/carbon fibre composites were produced by means of e-beam irradiation. • DMTA analysis pointed out a nonuniformity in the cross-linking degree of the material. • An out-of-mould post irradiation thermal treatment allows a higher uniformity. • Mechanical tests were interpreted on the basis of the cross-linking density and fibre/matrix interaction

  1. New developments of carbon materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 117th Committee on Carbon Materials in the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) started in March 1948. The committee will have 60th anniversary in March 2008. As memorial of this, the title publication was published for informing about new developments of carbon materials to many people. The publication is divided into 3 chapters. A theme of the 1st chapter is 'Synthesis' which includes 17 papers, a theme of the 2nd chapter is 'Analysis' which includes 11 papers, a theme of the 3rd chapter is Application' which includes 15 papers. The publication also includes historical review of the committee. (J.P.N.)

  2. Fermentation based carbon nanotube multifunctional bionic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Luca; Bon, Silvia Bittolo; Signetti, Stefano; Tripathi, Manoj; Iacob, Erica; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-06-01

    The exploitation of the processes used by microorganisms to digest nutrients for their growth can be a viable method for the formation of a wide range of so called biogenic materials that have unique properties that are not produced by abiotic processes. Here we produced living hybrid materials by giving to unicellular organisms the nutrient to grow. Based on bread fermentation, a bionic composite made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and a single-cell fungi, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast extract, was prepared by fermentation of such microorganisms at room temperature. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that the CNTs were internalized by the cell after fermentation bridging the cells. Tensile tests on dried composite films have been rationalized in terms of a CNT cell bridging mechanism where the strongly enhanced strength of the composite is governed by the adhesion energy between the bridging carbon nanotubes and the matrix. The addition of CNTs also significantly improved the electrical conductivity along with a higher photoconductive activity. The proposed process could lead to the development of more complex and interactive structures programmed to self-assemble into specific patterns, such as those on strain or light sensors that could sense damage or convert light stimulus in an electrical signal.

  3. Fermentation based carbon nanotube multifunctional bionic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Luca; Bon, Silvia Bittolo; Signetti, Stefano; Tripathi, Manoj; Iacob, Erica; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-01-01

    The exploitation of the processes used by microorganisms to digest nutrients for their growth can be a viable method for the formation of a wide range of so called biogenic materials that have unique properties that are not produced by abiotic processes. Here we produced living hybrid materials by giving to unicellular organisms the nutrient to grow. Based on bread fermentation, a bionic composite made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and a single-cell fungi, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast extract, was prepared by fermentation of such microorganisms at room temperature. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that the CNTs were internalized by the cell after fermentation bridging the cells. Tensile tests on dried composite films have been rationalized in terms of a CNT cell bridging mechanism where the strongly enhanced strength of the composite is governed by the adhesion energy between the bridging carbon nanotubes and the matrix. The addition of CNTs also significantly improved the electrical conductivity along with a higher photoconductive activity. The proposed process could lead to the development of more complex and interactive structures programmed to self-assemble into specific patterns, such as those on strain or light sensors that could sense damage or convert light stimulus in an electrical signal. PMID:27279425

  4. Hansen solubility parameters for a carbon fiber/epoxy composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Launay, Helene; Hansen, Charles M.; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the physical affinity between an epoxy matrix and oxidized, unsized carbon fibers has been evaluated using Hansen solubility (cohesion) parameters (HSP). A strong physical compatibility has been shown, since their respective HSP are close. The use of a glassy carbon substrate as a...... model for unsized carbon fiber has been demonstrated as appropriate for the study of interactions between the materials in composite carbon fiber-epoxy systems. The HSP of glassy carbon are similar to those of carbon fibers and epoxy matrix. (C) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  5. Nanocellulose Composite Materials Synthesizes with Ultrasonic Agitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Timothy; Folken, Andrew; Fritch, Byron; Bradley, Derek

    We have extended current techniques in forming nanocellulose composite solids, suspensions and aerogels to enhance the breakdown of cellulose into its molecular components. Using only mechanical processing which includes ball milling, using a simple mortar and pestle, and ultrasonic agitation, we are able to create very low concentration uniform nanocellulose suspensions in water, as well as incorporate other materials such as graphite, carbon nanotubes, and magnetic materials. Of interest is that no chemical processing is necessary, nor is the use of nanoparticles, necessary for composite formation. Using both graphite and carbon nanotubes, we are able to achieve conducting nanocellulose solids and aerogels. Standard magnetic powder can also be incorporated to create magnetic solids. The technique also allows for the creation of an extremely fine nanocellulose suspension in water. Using extremely low concentrations, less than 1% cellulose by mass, along with careful control over processing parameters, we are able to achieve highly dilute, yet homogenous nanocellulose suspensions. When air dried, these suspensions have similar hardness and strength properties to those created with more typical starting cellulose concentrations (2-10%). However, when freeze-dried, these dilute suspensions form aerogels with a new morphology with much higher surface area than those with higher starting concentrations. We are currently examining the effect of this higher surface area on the properties of nanocellulose aerogel composites and how it influences the impact of incorporating nanocellulose into other polymer materials.

  6. Hybrid Composites Based on Carbon Fiber/Carbon Nanofilament Reinforcement

    OpenAIRE

    Mehran Tehrani; Ayoub Yari Boroujeni; Claudia Luhrs; Jonathan Phillips; Al-Haik, Marwan S.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanofilament and nanotubes (CNTs) have shown promise for enhancing the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced composites (FRPs) and imparting multi-functionalities to them. While direct mixing of carbon nanofilaments with the polymer matrix in FRPs has several drawbacks, a high volume of uniform nanofilaments can be directly grown on fiber surfaces prior to composite fabrication. This study demonstrates the ability to create carbon nanofilaments on the surface of carbon fibers emplo...

  7. Fiber-reinforced composites materials, manufacturing, and design

    CERN Document Server

    Mallick, P K

    2007-01-01

    The newly expanded and revised edition of Fiber-Reinforced Composites: Materials, Manufacturing, and Design presents the most up-to-date resource available on state-of-the-art composite materials. This book is unique in that it not only offers a current analysis of mechanics and properties, but also examines the latest advances in test methods, applications, manufacturing processes, and design aspects involving composites. This third edition presents thorough coverage of newly developed materials including nanocomposites. It also adds more emphasis on underlying theories, practical methods, and problem-solving skills employed in real-world applications of composite materials. Each chapter contains new examples drawn from diverse applications and additional problems to reinforce the practical relevance of key concepts. New in The Third Edition: Contains new sections on material substitution, cost analysis, nano- and natural fibers, fiber architecture, and carbon-carbon composites Provides a new chapter on poly...

  8. Creep of fibrous composite materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilholt, Hans

    1985-01-01

    Models are presented for the creep behaviour of fibrous composite materials with aligned fibres. The models comprise both cases where the fibres remain rigid in a creeping matrix and cases where the fibres are creeping in a creeping matrix. The treatment allows for several contributions to the...... creep strength of composites. The advantage of combined analyses of several data sets is emphasized and illustrated for some experimental data. The analyses show that it is possible to derive creep equations for the (in situ) properties of the fibres. The experiments treated include model systems such...

  9. Amperometric biosensors based on carbon composite transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fang

    1998-12-01

    Much current work in analytical chemistry is devoted to design of biosensors. One particular area in this field is the development of enzyme-based amperometric biosensors for the quantitative determination of a series of substrates in clinical, environmental, industrial and agricultural significance. This dissertation focuses on the design of improved amperometric biosensors based on carbon composite transducers. The use of metallized carbons as transducer materials results in remarkably selective amperometric biosensors. Such enzyme-based transducers eliminate major electroactive interferences, and hence circumvent the need for mediators or membrane barriers. The remarkable selectivity of metal-dispersed carbons is attributed to their strong, preferential, electrocatalytic capacity towards the reductive detection of biologically-generated hydrogen peroxide. Such electrocatalytic activity allows metal-dispersed biosensors to be operated at the optimal potential region between +0.1 and -0.2 V, where the unwanted reactions are neglected resulting in the lowest noise level. Several new materials (e.g., ruthenium on carbon, rhodium on carbon, etc.) and constructions (e.g., carbon fiber, electrochemical co-deposition transducer, etc.) were applied in the development of novel enzyme-based transducers in order to improve the selectivity and applicability of amperometric biosensors. The susceptibility of first-generation oxidase amperometric biosensing to oxygen fluctuations can be improved by using oxygen-rich fluorocarbons as the pasting binders in carbon paste enzyme transducers. Such binders provide an internal supply of oxygen resulting in efficient detection in oxygen-deficit conditions. In particular, the use of poly-chlorotrifluorethylene (Kel-F) oil as carbon paste binder results in a well-defined response and an identical signal up to 40 mM glucose in both the presence and absence of oxygen. Comparing with mediated or wired enzyme-based transducers, such internal

  10. Bonding between Carbon Fiver/Carbon composite and copper alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to develop material for Divertor of Nuclear Fusion Reactor, we investigated bonding method between C-C material (Carbon Fiber/Carbon composite) and three kinds of heat sink materials, the microstructure of the bonding layer, shearing strength, thermal shock resistance temperature and analysis of thermal stress. C-C material was manufactured with carbon fiber oriented in one direction. Thermal conductivity of C-C is 570 W/m·k along this orientation. For heat sink material, three kinds of material, Cu, Cr-Cu alloy and W-Cu alloy were used. Results are summarized below; (1) As a brazing filler metal for bonding between C-C and copper alloy, ten kinds of brazing filler metals were investigated. As a result 2Ti-AgCu paste filler metal was selected. The brazing filler metal is excellent in wettability and as high shearing strength as a bonding layer. (2) Shearing strengths of the C-C/copper and copper alloy joints with 2Ti-AgCu paste brazing filler metal decrease in the order of C-C/Cu, C-C/Cr-Cu, C-C/W-Cu. Hardness of the bonding layer decrease in the order of C-C/W-Cu, C-C/Cr-Cu and C-C/Cu. Therefore, the shearing strength of the bonding layer increase with decreasing hardness. (3) By using a copper plate of 2-5 mm in thickness as a bonding layer between of C-C/Cr-Cu and C-C/W-Cu joints, shearing strength and thermal shock resistance temperature are improved to those of the C-C/Cu joint. Through thermal stress analysis, the thermal stress relief of the copper plate was confirmed. (author)

  11. INTELLIGENT MATERIALS BASED ON CERAMIC COMPOSITES

    OpenAIRE

    Maximov, Y.; Merzlikin, V.; Sidorov, O.; Suttugin, V.

    2010-01-01

    The paper examines the possibility to design intellectual materials based on film composites. Ferroelectric composites are offered to use as the film composites. The authors discuss ferroelectric composites of different structures. Sensors and intellectual materials on the basis of the obtained composites are considered.

  12. Novel apparatus for joining of carbon-carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jeremiah D. E.; Mukasyan, Alexander S.; La Forest, Mark L.; Simpson, Allen H.

    2007-01-01

    A novel apparatus for joining carbon-carbon (C-C) composites is presented. This device was designed and built based on the concept of self-sustained oxygen-free high-temperature reactions. A layer of reactive mixture is contained between two disks of C-C composite that are to be joined. The stack is held in place between two electrodes, which are connected to a dc power supply. dc current is used to uniformly initiate the reaction in the reactive layer. The electrodes are also part of the pneumatic system, which applies a load to the stack. The designed hydraulic system is effective, lending to low cost and simplified, rapid, accurate operation. It provides a very short response time (˜10ms), which is important for the considered applications. All operational parameters such as initial and final loads, applied current, delay time between ignition and final load application, duration of Joule heating, and safety interlocks are controlled by a programable logic controller system. These features make it an efficient, user-friendly and safe machine to join refractory materials. The entire joining process takes place on the order of seconds, rather than hours as required for solid-state joining methods. The mechanical properties of the obtained joints are higher than those for the C-C composites.

  13. Carbon materials for supercapacitor application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frackowiak, Elzbieta

    2007-04-21

    The most commonly used electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors are activated carbons, because they are commercially available and cheap, and they can be produced with large specific surface area. However, only the electrochemically available surface area is useful for charging the electrical double layer (EDL). The EDL formation is especially efficient in carbon pores of size below 1 nm because of the lack of space charge and a good attraction of ions along the pore walls. The pore size should ideally match the size of the ions. However, for good dynamic charge propagation, some small mesopores are useful. An asymmetric configuration, where the positive and negative electrodes are constructed from different materials, e.g., activated carbon, transition metal oxide or conducting polymer, is of great interest because of an important extension of the operating voltage. In such a case, the energy as well as power is greatly increased. It appears that nanotubes are a perfect conducting additive and/or support for materials with pseudocapacitance properties, e.g. MnO(2), conducting polymers. Substitutional heteroatoms in the carbon network (nitrogen, oxygen) are a promising way to enhance the capacitance. Carbons obtained by one-step pyrolysis of organic precursors rich in heteroatoms (nitrogen and/or oxygen) are very interesting, because they are denser than activated carbons. The application of a novel type of electrolyte with a broad voltage window (ionic liquids) is considered, but the stability of this new generation of electrolyte during long term cycling of capacitors is not yet confirmed. PMID:17415488

  14. Composite Materials for Thermal Energy Storage: Enhancing Performance through Microstructures

    OpenAIRE

    Ge, Zhiwei; YE, Feng; Ding, Yulong

    2014-01-01

    Chemical incompatibility and low thermal conductivity issues of molten-salt-based thermal energy storage materials can be addressed by using microstructured composites. Using a eutectic mixture of lithium and sodium carbonates as molten salt, magnesium oxide as supporting material, and graphite as thermal conductivity enhancer, the microstructural development, chemical compatibility, thermal stability, thermal conductivity, and thermal energy storage performance of composite materials are inv...

  15. Thermomechanical response of inhibited carbon-carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytical models to capture the additional inhomogeneities such as boron carbide particulates added to enhance the oxidation resistance of carbon-carbon composites are developed. In parallel, the test results of laminates subjected to static and fatigue loading at ambient and high temperature (900 C) are monitored so that an interactive numerical simulation and observation procedure can be developed. The material system studied is HITCO 2D CC137EH, highly inhibited, eight harness satin weave, RT42 CVD SiC coated, carbon-carbon laminate. The static testing to date focuses on generating the upper bound loads to be used in the thermomechanical fatigue tests. The stress-strain response obtained from the static tension tests reveal a region of nonlinearity which is attributed to the presence of the porosity, the microcracking and the inhibitors. The significant number of oxidation tests of coated as well as partially uncoated specimens clearly indicate the preferential oxidation along the fiber bundles perpendicular to the exposed edges

  16. Improved Silica Aerogel Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Jong-Ah; Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Jones, Steven

    2008-01-01

    A family of aerogel-matrix composite materials having thermal-stability and mechanical- integrity properties better than those of neat aerogels has been developed. Aerogels are known to be excellent thermal- and acoustic-insulation materials because of their molecular-scale porosity, but heretofore, the use of aerogels has been inhibited by two factors: (1) Their brittleness makes processing and handling difficult. (2) They shrink during production and shrink more when heated to high temperatures during use. The shrinkage and the consequent cracking make it difficult to use them to encapsulate objects in thermal-insulation materials. The underlying concept of aerogel-matrix composites is not new; the novelty of the present family of materials lies in formulations and processes that result in superior properties, which include (1) much less shrinkage during a supercritical-drying process employed in producing a typical aerogel, (2) much less shrinkage during exposure to high temperatures, and (3) as a result of the reduction in shrinkage, much less or even no cracking.

  17. Multi-material Preforming of Structural Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, Robert E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eberle, Cliff C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pastore, Christopher M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sudbury, Thomas Z. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Xiong, Fue [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hartman, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites offer significant weight reduction potential, with glass fiber composites already widely adopted. Carbon fiber composites deliver the greatest performance benefits, but their high cost has inhibited widespread adoption. This project demonstrates that hybrid carbon-glass solutions can realize most of the benefits of carbon fiber composites at much lower cost. ORNL and Owens Corning Reinforcements along with program participants at the ORISE collaborated to demonstrate methods for produce hybrid composites along with techniques to predict performance and economic tradeoffs. These predictions were then verified in testing coupons and more complex demonstration articles.

  18. Small-angle scattering, contrast variation and the study of complex composite materials: A study of the structure of carbon black

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed studies are presented on the structure and aggregation of an experimental high surface area carbon black (HSA) using small-angle neutron scattering and the method of contrast variation. We find that the approximately 27 mn HSA particle form small, linear aggregates of average aggregation number 5 when suspended in cyclohexane. There is considerable density fluctuation in the interior of these particles, with the denser regions being toward the outer part of the spherically-averaged structure. This information would not have been obtained from studies of carbon black without solvent. The results will be applied to similar scattering studies on solvent-swollen bound rubber gels made from HSA-polyisoprene. These result show, however, that the strong internal fluctuations of the carbon black will limit the information that can be obtained on the structure and conformation of the elastomer in the gel. There are additional limitation from compositional heterogeneity of the sample

  19. Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Composites for Biomedical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Wang(College of William and Mary); Yuhe Zhu; Susan Liao; Jiajia Li

    2014-01-01

    This review paper reported carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications. Several studies have found enhancement in the mechanical properties of CNTs-based reinforced composites by the addition of CNTs. CNTs reinforced composites have been intensively investigated for many aspects of life, especially being made for biomedical applications. The review introduced fabrication of CNTs reinforced composites (CNTs reinforced metal matrix composites, CNTs reinforced polymer matr...

  20. Functionalized Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Composites and Interactions with Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Enrique V. (Inventor); Wilkins, Richard (Inventor); Shofner, Meisha (Inventor); Pulikkathara, Merlyn X. (Inventor); Vaidyanathan, Ranjii (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention involves the interaction of radiation with functionalized carbon nanotubes that have been incorporated into various host materials, particularly polymeric ones. The present invention is directed to chemistries, methods, and apparatuses which exploit this type of radiation interaction, and to the materials which result from such interactions. The present invention is also directed toward the time dependent behavior of functionalized carbon nanotubes in such composite systems.

  1. Silicon Whisker and Carbon Nanofiber Composite Anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junqing (Inventor); Newman, Aron (Inventor); Lennhoff, John (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A carbon nanofiber can have a surface and include at least one crystalline whisker extending from the surface of the carbon nanofiber. A battery anode composition can be formed from a plurality of carbon nanofibers each including a plurality of crystalline whiskers.

  2. Hybrid Composite of Polyaniline Containing Carbon Nanotube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotube-polyaniline hybrid material was synthesized by emulsion polymerization in-situ. The morphology of hybrid material was studied by TEM and X-ray diffraction. The conductivity of nanocomposite increases with the increasing of carbon nanotube content because of the new conductivity passageways formed by carbon nanotubes.

  3. Hydrogen adsorption in carbon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, P.; Piquero, T.; Metenier, K.; Pierre, Y. [CEA Centre d' Etudes du Ripault, 37 - Tours (France); Demoment, J.; Lecas-Hardit, A. [CEA Valduc, 21 - Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2003-09-01

    The development of new technologies for energy is a necessity for both economic and environmental aspects. Hydrogen is expected to be, in the future, an important energy vector. However its storage, for mobile applications (fuel cell for automotive for example), represents a major difficulty. Several solutions have been used for demonstration (liquid hydrogen, high pressure vessel, hydride) but do not meet the requirements. Hydrogen adsorption in carbon materials also represents a potential solution which is currently discussed. (O.M.)

  4. Graphene-based Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiee, Mohammad Ali

    We investigated the mechanical properties, such as fracture toughness (KIc), fracture energy (GIc), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), Young¡¦s modulus (E), and fatigue crack propagation rate (FCPR) of epoxy-matrix composites with different weight fractions of carbon-based fillers, including graphene platelets (GPL), graphene nanoribbons (GNR), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT), and fullerenes (C60). Only ˜0.125 wt.% GPL was found to increase the KIc of the pure epoxy by ˜65% and the GIc by ˜115%. To get similar improvement, CNT and nanoparticle epoxy composites required one to two orders of magnitude greater weight fraction of nanofillers. Moreover, ˜0.125% wt.% GPL also decreased the fatigue crack propagation rate in the epoxy by ˜30-fold. The E value of 0.1 wt.% GPL/epoxy nanocomposite was ˜31% larger than the pure epoxy while there was only an increase of ˜3% for the SWNT composites. The UTS of the pristine epoxy was improved by ˜40% with GPLs in comparison with ˜14% enhancement for the MWNTs. The KIc of the GPL nanocomposite enhanced by ˜53% over the pristine epoxy compared to a ˜20% increase for the MWNT-reinforced composites. The results of the FCPR tests for the GPL nanocomposites showed a different trend. While the CNT nanocomposites were not effective enough to suppress the crack growth at high values of the stress intensity factor (DeltaK), the reverse behavior is observed for the GPL nanocomposites. The advantage of the GPLs over CNTs in terms of mechanical properties enhancement is due to their enormous specific surface area, enhanced adhesion at filler/epoxy interface (because of the wrinkled surfaces of GPLs), as well as the planar structure of the GPLs. We also show that unzipping of MWNTs into graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) enhances the load transfer effectiveness in epoxy nanocomposites. For instance, at ˜0.3 wt.% of fillers, the Young's modulus (E) of the epoxy nanocomposite with GNRs increased

  5. A three-dimensional LiFePO{sub 4}/carbon nanotubes/graphene composite as a cathode material for lithium-ion batteries with superior high-rate performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Xingling [School of Materials and Energy, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zhang, Haiyan, E-mail: hyzhang@gdut.edu.cn [School of Materials and Energy, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Functional Soft Condensed Matter, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Chen, Yiming, E-mail: chenym@gdut.edu.cn [School of Materials and Energy, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Functional Soft Condensed Matter, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang, Wenguang [School of Materials and Energy, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Functional Soft Condensed Matter, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Ye, Yipeng; Zheng, Chuchun; Deng, Peng [School of Materials and Energy, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Shi, Zhicong [School of Materials and Energy, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Functional Soft Condensed Matter, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2015-03-25

    Graphical abstract: The excellent electrochemical performances can be attributed to the synergistic effect of CNTs and graphene. - Highlights: • The LFP–CNT–G composite was successfully prepared by solid station method. • The interlaced CNTs reduced the crumple of graphene and improved tap density of the composite. • The LFP–CNT–G electrode exhibited superior electrochemical performance. - Abstract: A three-dimensional lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO{sub 4})/carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/graphene composite was successfully synthesized via solid-state reaction. The LiFePO{sub 4}/carbon nanotubes/graphene (LFP–CNT–G) composite used as Li-ions battery cathode material exhibits superior high-rate capability and favorable charge–discharge cycle performance under relative high current density compared with that of LiFePO{sub 4}/carbon nanotubes (LFP–CNT) composite and LiFePO{sub 4}/graphene (LFP–G) composite. Graphene nanosheets and CNTs construct 3D conducting networks are favor for faster electron transfer, higher Li-ions diffusion coefficient and lower resistance during the Li-ions reversible reaction. The synergistic effect of graphene nanosheets and CNTs improves the rate capability and cycling stability of LiFePO{sub 4}-based cathodes. The LFP–CNT–G electrode shows reversible capacity of 168.9 mA h g{sup −1} at 0.2 C and 115.8 mA h g{sup −1} at 20 C. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy demonstrate that the LFP–CNT–G electrode has the smallest charge-transfer resistance, indicating that the fast electron transfer from the electrolyte to the LFP–CNT–G active materials in the Li-ions intercalation/deintercalation reactions owing to the three-dimensional networks of graphene and carbon nanotubes.

  6. A three-dimensional LiFePO4/carbon nanotubes/graphene composite as a cathode material for lithium-ion batteries with superior high-rate performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: The excellent electrochemical performances can be attributed to the synergistic effect of CNTs and graphene. - Highlights: • The LFP–CNT–G composite was successfully prepared by solid station method. • The interlaced CNTs reduced the crumple of graphene and improved tap density of the composite. • The LFP–CNT–G electrode exhibited superior electrochemical performance. - Abstract: A three-dimensional lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4)/carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/graphene composite was successfully synthesized via solid-state reaction. The LiFePO4/carbon nanotubes/graphene (LFP–CNT–G) composite used as Li-ions battery cathode material exhibits superior high-rate capability and favorable charge–discharge cycle performance under relative high current density compared with that of LiFePO4/carbon nanotubes (LFP–CNT) composite and LiFePO4/graphene (LFP–G) composite. Graphene nanosheets and CNTs construct 3D conducting networks are favor for faster electron transfer, higher Li-ions diffusion coefficient and lower resistance during the Li-ions reversible reaction. The synergistic effect of graphene nanosheets and CNTs improves the rate capability and cycling stability of LiFePO4-based cathodes. The LFP–CNT–G electrode shows reversible capacity of 168.9 mA h g−1 at 0.2 C and 115.8 mA h g−1 at 20 C. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy demonstrate that the LFP–CNT–G electrode has the smallest charge-transfer resistance, indicating that the fast electron transfer from the electrolyte to the LFP–CNT–G active materials in the Li-ions intercalation/deintercalation reactions owing to the three-dimensional networks of graphene and carbon nanotubes

  7. Lignin-Derived Advanced Carbon Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-12-01

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. By applying specific pretreatments and manufacturing methods, lignin can be converted into a variety of value-added carbon materials. However, the physical and chemical heterogeneities of lignin complicate its use as a feedstock. Herein lignin manufacturing process, the effects of pretreatments and manufacturing methods on the properties of product lignin, and structure-property relationships in various applications of lignin-derived carbon materials, such as carbon fibers, carbon mats, activated carbons, carbon films, and templated carbon, are discussed. PMID:26568373

  8. Processable Conducting Polyaniline, Carbon Nanotubes, Graphene and Their Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Kan

    2014-01-01

    Good processability is often required for applications of conducting materials like polyaniline (PANI), carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene. This can be achieved by either physical stabilization or chemical functionalization. Functionalization usually expands the possible applications for the conducting materials depending on the properties of the functional groups. Processable conducting materials can also be combined with other co-dissolving materials to prepare composites with desired che...

  9. High Volume Fraction Carbon Nanotube Composites for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siochi, E. J.; Kim, J.-W.; Sauti, G.; Cano, R. J.; Wincheski, R. A.; Ratcliffe, J. G.; Czabaj, M.

    2016-01-01

    Reported mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at the nanoscale suggest their potential to enable significantly lighter structures of interest for space applications. However, their utility depends on the retention of these properties in bulk material formats that permit practical fabrication of large structures. This presentation summarizes recent progress made to produce carbon nanotube composites with specific tensile properties that begin to rival those of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. CNT content in these nanocomposites was greater than 70% by weight. Tested nanocomposite specimens were fabricated from kilometers or tens of square meters of CNT, depending on the starting material format. Processing methods to yield these results, and characterization and testing to evaluate the performance of these composites will be discussed. The final objective is the demonstration of a CNT composite overwrapped pressure vessel to be flight tested in the Fall of 2016.

  10. Sustainable carbon materials from hydrothermal processes

    CERN Document Server

    Titirici, Maria-Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    The production of low cost and environmentally friendly high performing carbon materials is crucial for a sustainable future. Sustainable Carbon Materials from Hydrothermal Processes describes a sustainable and alternative technique to produce carbon from biomass in water at low temperatures, a process known as Hydrothermal Carbonization (HTC). Sustainable Carbon Materials from Hydrothermal Processes presents an overview of this new and rapidly developing field, discussing various synthetic approaches, characterization of the final products, and modern fields of application fo

  11. A Review of Biomedical Composite Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴珊珊

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses the review of the biomedical composite materials.It introduces the operational definition,the classification of biomedical composite materials,and its constituents within itself.In this thesis,the last part presents the application of this kind of material.By writing this paper,I hope that people will get a comprehensive knowledge of the biomedical composite material and make further and deeper research in this material by which way to animate the material science industry.

  12. Carbon nanotube-polymer composite actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Landi, Brian J.; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-04-22

    The present invention discloses a carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composite actuator and method to make such actuator. A series of uniform composites was prepared by dispersing purified single wall nanotubes with varying weight percents into a polymer matrix, followed by solution casting. The resulting nanotube-polymer composite was then successfully used to form a nanotube polymer actuator.

  13. Prospects for using carbon-carbon composites for EMI shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.

    1990-01-01

    Since pyrolyzed carbon has a higher electrical conductivity than most polymers, carbon-carbon composites would be expected to have higher electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding ability than polymeric resin composites. A rule of mixtures model of composite conductivity was used to calculate the effect on EMI shielding of substituting a pyrolyzed carbon matrix for a polymeric matrix. It was found that the improvements were small, no more than about 2 percent for the lowest conductivity fibers (ex-rayon) and less than 0.2 percent for the highest conductivity fibers (vapor grown carbon fibers). The structure of the rule of mixtures is such that the matrix conductivity would only be important in those cases where it is much higher than the fiber conductivity, as in metal matrix composites.

  14. Soil Surface Composition Effects on the Wettability of Aquifer Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, J. L.; Demond, A. H.

    2004-05-01

    The wettability of subsurface porous media is critical for determining the distribution of non-aqueous phase liquids. Variations in the wettability of subsurface materials are generally attributed to sorption of hydrophobic contaminants. However, naturally occurring carbonaceous materials may influence the wettability as well. A series of seven soil materials were selected to determine the effect of organic carbon surfaces on soil wetting behavior. The materials represent organic carbon containing surfaces that may be found in soils from young humic matter to mature coal and shale kerogen. Measurements of organic liquid-water contact angle against cut rock faces reveal that surface composition alters the contact angle from the completely water wetted condition of quartz in the case of the mature carbon materials (Lachine Shale, Garfield Shale, Waynesburg Coal, and Plumbago Mineral Carbon). An examination of the soil elemental composition confirms that the bulk elemental composition of each material is separated on a plot of hydrogen to carbon versus oxygen to carbon ratios. The functional groups present at the surface of the soil materials were obtained with Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis and indicate that the presence of oxygen containing surface functional groups is positively correlated with increased organic-liquid wetting. This study demonstrates that even in the absence of sorbing contaminants the subsurface is fractionally water-wet. This finding may help explain why subsurface distributions of non aqueous phase liquids can vary from those determined with laboratory sands.

  15. Computational Nanomechanics of Carbon Nanotubes and Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Wei, Chenyu; Cho, Kyeongjae; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Nanomechanics of individual carbon and boron-nitride nanotubes and their application as reinforcing fibers in polymer composites has been reviewed with interplay of theoretical modeling, computer simulations and experimental observations. The emphasis in this work is on elucidating the multi-length scales of the problems involved, and of different simulation techniques that are needed to address specific characteristics of individual nanotubes and nanotube polymer-matrix interfaces. Classical molecular dynamics simulations are shown to be sufficient to describe the generic behavior such as strength and stiffness modulus but are inadequate to describe elastic limit and nature of plastic buckling at large strength. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations are shown to bring out explicit atomic nature dependent behavior of these nanoscale materials objects that are not accessible either via continuum mechanics based descriptions or through classical molecular dynamics based simulations. As examples, we discus local plastic collapse of carbon nanotubes under axial compression and anisotropic plastic buckling of boron-nitride nanotubes. Dependence of the yield strain on the strain rate is addressed through temperature dependent simulations, a transition-state-theory based model of the strain as a function of strain rate and simulation temperature is presented, and in all cases extensive comparisons are made with experimental observations. Mechanical properties of nanotube-polymer composite materials are simulated with diverse nanotube-polymer interface structures (with van der Waals interaction). The atomistic mechanisms of the interface toughening for optimal load transfer through recycling, high-thermal expansion and diffusion coefficient composite formation above glass transition temperature, and enhancement of Young's modulus on addition of nanotubes to polymer are discussed and compared with experimental observations.

  16. Emissivity Results on High Temperature Coatings for Refractory Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlhorst, Craig W.; Vaughn, Wallace L.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Lewis, Ronald K.; Rodriguez, Alvaro C.; Milhoan, James D.; Koenig, John R.

    2007-01-01

    The directional emissivity of various refractory composite materials considered for application for reentry and hypersonic vehicles was investigated. The directional emissivity was measured at elevated temperatures of up to 3400 F using a directional spectral radiometric technique during arc-jet test runs. A laboratory-based relative total radiance method was also used to measure total normal emissivity of some of the refractory composite materials. The data from the two techniques are compared. The paper will also compare the historical database of Reinforced Carbon-Carbon emissivity measurements with emissivity values generated recently on the material using the two techniques described in the paper.

  17. Carbon fiber composite molecular sieves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, T.D.; Rogers, M.R.; Williams, A.M.

    1996-06-01

    The removal of CO{sub 2} is of significance in several energy applications. The combustion of fossil fuels, such as coal or natural gas, releases large volumes of CO{sub 2} to the environment. Several options exist to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions, including substitution of nuclear power for fossil fuels, increasing the efficiency of fossil plants and capturing the CO{sub 2} prior to emission to the environment. All of these techniques have the attractive feature of limiting the amount of CO{sub 2} emitted to the atmosphere, but each has economic, technical, or societal limitations. In the production of natural gas, the feed stream from the well frequently contains contaminants and diluents which must be removed before the gas can enter the pipeline distribution system. Notable amongst these diluent gasses is CO{sub 2}, which has no calorific value. Currently, the pipeline specification calls for <2 mol % CO{sub 2} in the gas. Gas separation is thus a relevant technology in the field of energy production. A novel separation system based on a parametric swing process has been developed that utilizes the unique combination of properties exhibited by our carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS).

  18. Using Composite Materials in a Cryogenic Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batton, William D.; Dillard, James E.; Rottmund, Matthew E.; Tupper, Michael L.; Mallick, Kaushik; Francis, William H.

    2008-01-01

    Several modifications have been made to the design and operation of an extended-shaft cryogenic pump to increase the efficiency of pumping. In general, the efficiency of pumping a cryogenic fluid is limited by thermal losses which is itself caused by pump inefficiency and leakage of heat through the pump structure. A typical cryogenic pump includes a drive shaft and two main concentric static components (an outer pressure containment tube and an intermediate static support tube) made from stainless steel. The modifications made include replacement of the stainless-steel drive shaft and the concentric static stainless-steel components with components made of a glass/epoxy composite. The leakage of heat is thus reduced because the thermal conductivity of the composite is an order of magnitude below that of stainless steel. Taking advantage of the margin afforded by the decrease in thermal conductivity, the drive shaft could be shortened to increase its effective stiffness, thereby increasing the rotordynamic critical speeds, thereby further making it possible to operate the pump at a higher speed to increase pumping efficiency. During the modification effort, an analysis revealed that substitution of the shorter glass/epoxy shaft for the longer stainless-steel shaft was not, by itself, sufficient to satisfy the rotordynamic requirements at the desired increased speed. Hence, it became necessary to increase the stiffness of the composite shaft. This stiffening was accomplished by means of a carbon-fiber-composite overwrap along most of the length of the shaft. Concomitantly with the modifications described thus far, it was necessary to provide for joining the composite-material components with metallic components required by different aspects of the pump design. An adhesive material formulated specially to bond the composite and metal components was chosen as a means to satisfy these requirements.

  19. Template-free fabrication and morphology regulation of Ag@carbon composite structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wenyan, E-mail: zhangwenyan8531@gmail.com [College of Material Engineering, Jinling Institute of Technology, Nanjing (China); Hao, Lingyun; Lin, Qin [College of Material Engineering, Jinling Institute of Technology, Nanjing (China); Lu, Chunhua; Xu, Zhongzi [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing Technology University, Nanjing (China); Chen, Xiaoyu [College of Material Engineering, Jinling Institute of Technology, Nanjing (China)

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A simple and low-cost method to prepare Ag@C composite material. • AgNO{sub 3} plays an important role in tuning size and functional groups of products. • HTC reaction time is also a key factor for regulating the Ag@C structure. - Abstract: Ag–carbon composite materials were prepared without any template by hydrothermal carbonization of solvable starch. The composite materials are composed of Ag cores and carbonaceous shell to form a core–shell (Ag@carbon) structure. During the hydrothermal carbonization process, the aromatization and carbonization of solvable starch endowed the Ag@carbon composite structure with abundant aromatic, hydroxyl and carbonyl groups. The AgNO{sub 3} concentration and HTC reaction time are two important factors for regulating the size, morphology and functional groups of the composite material. With the increasing of AgNO{sub 3} concentration, morphologies of the composite material turned from spheres to wires.

  20. Multiscale damage modeling of advanced composite materials

    OpenAIRE

    Menna, Costantino

    2013-01-01

    The use of composite materials has spread over the years throughout the engineering areas of structures. The technological progress in this field has recently expanded, resulting in the design of new composite configurations, including multilayered composite materials and multifunctional nanostructured materials. Even though traditional and emerging composite materials offer wide potentialities for engineering, a significant challenge is still open with respect to damage phenomena. Driven by ...

  1. Electromagnetic interference shielding characteristics of carbon nanofiber-polymer composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yonglai; Guptal, Mool C; Dudley, Kenneth L; Lawrence, Roland W

    2007-02-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding characteristics of carbon nanofiber-polystyrene composites were investigated in the frequency range of 12.4-18 GHz (Ku-band). It was observed that the shielding effectiveness of such composites was frequency independent, and increased with increasing carbon nanofiber loading within Ku-band. The experimental data exhibited that the shielding effectiveness of the polymer composite containing 20 wt% carbon nanofibers could reach more than 36 dB in the measured frequency region, indicating such composites can be applied to the potential EMI shielding materials. In addition, the results showed that the contribution of reflection to the EMI shielding effectiveness was much larger than that of absorption, implying the primary EMI shielding mechanism of such composites was reflection of electromagnetic radiation within Ku-band. PMID:17450793

  2. Carbon nanotube-polymer composites manufacture, properties, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Grady, Brian P

    2011-01-01

    The accessible compendium of polymers in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) Carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-extremely thin tubes only a few nanometers in diameter but able to attain lengths thousands of times greater-are prime candidates for use in the development of polymer composite materials. Bringing together thousands of disparate research works, Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Composites: Manufacture, Properties, and Applications covers CNT-polymers from synthesis to potential applications, presenting the basic science and engineering of this dynamic and complex area in an accessible, readable way. Desi

  3. Sintered composite gradient tool materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mikuła

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Development of a new generation of the composite gradient tool materials with the core sintered withthe matrix obtained using the powder metallurgy of the chemical composition corresponding to the HS6-5-2 highspeedsteel reinforced with the WC and TiC type hard carbide phases with the growing portions of these phases inthe outward direction from the core to the surface.Design/methodology/approach: Powder Metallurgy, SEM, X-Ray Microanalysis.Findings: Powder metallurgy processes were used to fabricate the proposed gradient materials, i.e., compacting inthe closed die and sintering. The method of sequential pouring of the successive portions of the powder mixes intothe die was used to ensure a high ductility of the fabricated material core with the HS6-5-2 steel matrix reinforcedwith the hard WC and TiC carbides phases, so that portions of powder with the high percentage of the hard carbidesphases would form the outer layers of the prepreg.Practical implications: Employment of powder metallurgy for fabricating the steel based tool materials givesthe possibility to preserve properties characteristic of the traditional cemented carbides and with the high ductilitycharacteristic of steel, yet better than the traditional sintered high-speed steels obtained with the ASP method.Originality/value: Providing of high properties characteristic of cemented carbides with the high ductilitycharacteristic of steel can be mostly because of the possibility of ensuring the gradients of the chemicalcomposition and properties, cutting simultaneously fabrication costs thanks to savings made on the hard carbidephase, used in the tool surface layer only.

  4. Thermal and electrical conductivities of carbon fibers and carbon nanotubes incorporated polyurethanes composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single filler polyurethane composites with carbon fibers (CFs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were prepared by melt mixing methods and its thermal as well as electrical resistivity characteristics were investigated. The influences of fillers and mixing methods on thermal and electrical conductivity of CF/- and MWNT/polyurethane composites were investigated and the result shows that the addition of carbon fillers improved the thermal conductivity of the polyurethane composites. Higher filler concentration results in better thermal conductivity because better formation of thermally conductive networks along polymer matrix to ensure the thermal was conducted through the matrix and the network along the polymer composites. The presence of carbon additives improves the electrical resistivity of the materials as well. The present study revealed the potential of carbon as agent for better thermal and electrical conductivities and their properties depend strongly on the dispersion and distribution of the fillers in the polymer matrix. (author)

  5. Composite materials for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceramic matrix composites, CMCs, are being considered for advanced first-wall and blanket structural applications because of their high-temperature properties, low neutron activation, low density and low coefficient of expansion coupled with good thermal conductivity and corrosion behavior. This paper presents a review and analysis of the hermetic, thermal conductivity, corrosion, crack growth and radiation damage properties of CMCs. It was concluded that the leak rates of a gaseous coolant into the plasma chamber or tritium out of the blanket could exceed design criteria if matrix microcracking causes existing porosity to become interconnected. Thermal conductivities of unirradiated SiC/SiC and C/SiC materials are about 1/2 to 2/3 that of Type 316 SS whereas the thermal conductivity for C/C composites is seven times larger. The thermal stress figure-of-merit value for CMCs exceeds that of Type 316 SS for a single thermal cycle. SiC/SiC composites are very resistant to corrosion and are expected to be compatible with He or Li coolants if the O2 concentrations are maintained at the appropriate levels. CMCs exhibit subcritical crack growth at elevated temperatures and the crack velocity is a function of the corrosion conditions. The radiation stability of CMCs will depend on the stability of the fiber, microcracking of the matrix, and the effects of gaseous transmutation products on properties. 23 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab

  6. Electroadsorption Desalination with Carbon Nanotube/PAN-Based Carbon Fiber Felt Composites as Electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition method is used to prepare CNT (carbon nanotube)/PCF (PAN-based carbon fiber felt) composite electrodes in this paper, with the surface morphology of CNT/PCF composites and electroadsorption desalination performance being studied. Results show such electrode materials with three-dimensional network nanostructures having a larger specific surface area and narrower micropore distribution, with a huge number of reactive groups covering the surface. Compared with PCF ...

  7. A comparative study of EMI shielding properties of carbon nanofiber and multi-walled carbon nanotube filled polymer composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yonglai; Gupta, Mool C; Dudley, Kenneth L; Lawrence, Roland W

    2005-06-01

    Electromagnetic interference shielding properties of carbon nanofiber- and multi-walled carbon nanotube-filled polystyrene composites were investigated in the frequency range of 8.2-12.4 GHz (X-band). It was observed that the shielding effectiveness of composites was frequency independent, and increased with the increase of carbon nanofiber or nanotube loading. At the same filler loading, multi-walled carbon nanotube-filled polystyrene composites exhibited higher shielding effectiveness compared to those filled with carbon nanofibers. In particular, carbon nanotubes were more effective than nanofibers in providing high EMI shielding at low filler loadings. The experimental data showed that the shielding effectiveness of the composite containing 7 wt% carbon nanotubes could reach more than 26 dB, implying that such a composite can be used as a potential electromagnetic interference shielding material. The dominant shielding mechanism of carbon nanotube-filled polystyrene composites was also discussed. PMID:16060155

  8. Friction and wear behavior of carbon fiber reinforced brake materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Du-qing CHENG; Xue-tao WANG; Jian ZHU; Dong-bua QIU; Xiu-wei CHENG; Qing-feng GUAN

    2009-01-01

    A new composite brake material was fabri-cated with metallic powders, barium sulphate and modified phenolic resin as the matrix and carbon fiber as the reinforced material. The friction, wear and fade character-istics of this composite were determined using a D-MS friction material testing machine. The surface structure of carbon fiber reinforced friction materials was analyzed by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). Glass fiber-reinforced and asbestos fiber-reinforced composites with the same matrix were also fabricated for comparison. The carbon fiber-reinforced friction materials (CFRFM) shows lower wear rate than those of glass fiber- and asbestos fiber-reinforced composites in the temperature range of 100℃-300℃. It is interesting that the frictional coefficient of the carbon fiber-reinforced friction materials increases as frictional temperature increases from 100℃ to 300℃, while the frictional coefficients of the other two composites decrease during the increasing temperatures. Based on the SEM observation, the wear mechanism of CFRFM at low temperatures included fiber thinning and pull-out. At high temperature, the phenolic matrix was degraded and more pull-out enhanced fiber was demonstrated. The properties of carbon fiber may be the main reason that the CFRFM possess excellent tribological performances.

  9. Tough carbon fiber composites by hybridization with self-reinforced composites

    OpenAIRE

    Swolfs, Yentl; Gorbatikh, Larissa; Hine, Peter; Ward, Ian; Verpoest, Ignace

    2014-01-01

    While the interest in carbon fiber composites for automotive applications is rapidly increasing, their high cost and low failure strain or toughness continue to impede their widespread use. Both factors can be improved by hybridizing carbon fibers with a material that offers both ductility and reduced cost. In this work, the hybridization with highly oriented polypropylene tapes was investigated. Hybrid co-woven cloths of carbon fiber/polypropylene (PP) prepregs and oriented PP tapes were use...

  10. Material optimization of fiber reinforced composites applying a damage formulation

    OpenAIRE

    Kato, Junji

    2010-01-01

    The present thesis proposes material optimization schemes for fiber reinforced composites, specifically for a new composite material, denoted as Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC) or Textile Reinforced Concrete (TRC); here a reinforcement mesh of long carbon or glass fibers is embedded in a fine grained concrete (mortar) matrix. Unlike conventional steel reinforcement, these textile fibers are corrosion free; this holds also for AR-glass due to its high alkali-proof. This favorable property allo...

  11. Activated Carbon Composites for Air Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Frederick S [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    Coal-derived synthesis gas is a potential major source of hydrogen for fuel cells. Oxygen-blown coal gasification is an efficient approach to achieving the goal of producing hydrogen from coal, but a cost-effective means of enriching O2 concentration in air is required. A key objective of this project is to assess the utility of a system that exploits porous carbon materials and electrical swing adsorption to produce an O2-enriched air stream for coal gasification. As a complement to O2 and N2 adsorption measurements, CO2 was used as a more sensitive probe molecule for the characterization of molecular sieving effects. To further enhance the potential of activated carbon composite materials for air separation, work was implemented on incorporating a novel twist into the system; namely the addition of a magnetic field to influence O2 adsorption, which is accompanied by a transition between the paramagnetic and diamagnetic states. The preliminary findings in this respect are discussed.

  12. Field emission from hybrid diamond-like carbon and carbon nanotube composite structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, H; May, P W; Hamanaka, M H M O; Corat, E J

    2013-12-11

    A thin diamond-like carbon (DLC) film was deposited onto a densely packed "forest" of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (VACNT). DLC deposition caused the tips of the CNTs to clump together to form a microstructured surface. Field-emission tests of this new composite material show the typical low threshold voltages for carbon nanotube structures (2 V μm(-1)) but with greatly increased emission current, better stability, and longer lifetime. PMID:24224845

  13. Process Optimization of Bismaleimide (BMI) Resin Infused Carbon Fiber Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Joshua W.; Tate, LaNetra C.; Cox, Sarah B.; Taylor, Brian J.; Wright, M. Clara; Faughnan, Patrick D.; Batterson, Lawrence M.; Caraccio, Anne J.; Sampson, Jeffery W.

    2013-01-01

    Engineers today are presented with the opportunity to design and build the next generation of space vehicles out of the lightest, strongest, and most durable materials available. Composites offer excellent structural characteristics and outstanding reliability in many forms that will be utilized in future aerospace applications including the Commercial Crew and Cargo Program and the Orion space capsule. NASA's Composites for Exploration (CoEx) project researches the various methods of manufacturing composite materials of different fiber characteristics while using proven infusion methods of different resin compositions. Development and testing on these different material combinations will provide engineers the opportunity to produce optimal material compounds for multidisciplinary applications. Through the CoEx project, engineers pursue the opportunity to research and develop repair patch procedures for damaged spacecraft. Working in conjunction with Raptor Resins Inc., NASA engineers are utilizing high flow liquid infusion molding practices to manufacture high-temperature composite parts comprised of intermediate modulus 7 (IM7) carbon fiber material. IM7 is a continuous, high-tensile strength composite with outstanding structural qualities such as high shear strength, tensile strength and modulus as well as excellent corrosion, creep, and fatigue resistance. IM7 carbon fiber, combined with existing thermoset and thermoplastic resin systems, can provide improvements in material strength reinforcement and deformation-resistant properties for high-temperature applications. Void analysis of the different layups of the IM7 material discovered the largest total void composition within the [ +45 , 90 , 90 , -45 ] composite panel. Tensile and compressional testing proved the highest mechanical strength was found in the [0 4] layup. This paper further investigates the infusion procedure of a low-cost/high-performance BMI resin into an IM7 carbon fiber material and the

  14. Radiation swelling of carbon materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swelling rates of domestic carbon structural materials were studied, the results are presented. At T > 750-850 K and fluence of ∼ 1022 neutron/cm2 anisotropic secondary swelling is observed in them. 3 stages of swelling were singled out: incubation, transient and settled ones. The start of the transient stage with the temperature growth in the course of irradiation shifts to the side of lower fluences of neutrons. The swelling rate at the third stage is constant and has the maximum at 950-1300 K, the value of which is determined by structural arrangement of graphite and increases with an increase in its density

  15. Dynamic damage in carbon-fibre composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, N K; Parry, S; Townsend, D; Withers, P J; Soutis, C; Frias, C

    2016-07-13

    The Taylor test is used to determine damage evolution in carbon-fibre composites across a range of strain rates. The hierarchy of damage across the scales is key in determining the suite of operating mechanisms and high-speed diagnostics are used to determine states during dynamic loading. Experiments record the test response as a function of the orientation of the cylinder cut from the engineered multi-ply composite with high-speed photography and post-mortem target examination. The ensuing damage occurs during the shock compression phase but three other tensile loading modes operate during the test and these are explored. Experiment has shown that ply orientations respond to two components of release; longitudinal and radial as well as the hoop stresses generated in inelastic flow at the impact surface. The test is a discriminant not only of damage thresholds but of local failure modes and their kinetics. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'. PMID:27242311

  16. Effect of slag composition on iron nuggets formation from carbon composite pellets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Eloy Anduze Nogueira

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Iron-carbon nuggets can be obtained by high temperature reduction of iron ore by carbonaceous material when both are agglomerated together as a carbon composite pellet. During this process, the stable oxides contained in the materials will form a slag. This work investigates the effect of this slag composition on iron nugget formation. Pellets were prepared with iron ore and two different carbonaceous materials. Through the addition of Portland® cement, silica and alumina the slag composition was varied to adjust the expected liquidus temperature to 1573 and 2273 K. It has been shown that the formation of iron nuggets is favored for slags presenting low liquidus temperature. In order to further investigate this phenomenon, pellets containing iron powder and carbonaceous material, together with previously prepared slags, were also submitted to high temperature, and it has been shown that iron carburization depends on slag composition.

  17. Trial manufacturing of copper-carbon steel composite overpack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the results of design analysis and trial manufacturing of copper-carbon steel composite overpacks. The overpack is one of the key components of the engineered barrier system, hence, it is necessary to confirm the applicability of current technique in their manufacture. The copper-carbon steel composite overpack consists of a double container, an outer vessel made of oxygen-free, high-purity copper as the corrosion allowance material, and an inner vessel made of carbon steel as the pressure-resistant material. The trial manufacturing in this time, only the copper outer vessel has been fabricated. Both oxygen-free copper and oxygen-free phosphorus copper were used as materials for the outer vessel. For the shell and bottom portion, these materials were formed integrally by a backward extrusion method. For sealing the top cover plate to the main body, an electron-beam welding method was applied. After manufacturing, mechanical testing of specimens from the copper vessels were carried out. It was confirmed that current technique has sufficient feasibility to manufacture outer vessel. In addition, potential for irradiation embrittlement of the inner carbon-steel vessel by irradiation from vitrified waste over the life time of the overpack has been analyzed. It was shown that the small degree of irradiation embrittlement gives no significant impact on the pressure resistance of the carbon-steel vessel. Future research and development items regarding copper-carbon steel composite overpacks are also discussed. (author)

  18. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composites Rotary Valves for Internal Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite rotary, sleeve, and disc valves for internal combustion engines and the like are disclosed. The valves are formed from knitted or braided or warp-locked carbon fiber shapes. Also disclosed are valves fabricated from woven carbon fibers and from molded carbon matrix material. The valves of the present invention with their very low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent thermal and self-lubrication properties, do not present the sealing and lubrication problems that have prevented rotary, sleeve, and disc valves from operating efficiently and reliably in the past. Also disclosed are a sealing tang to further improve sealing capabilities and anti-oxidation treatments.

  19. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composite Rotary Valve for an Internal Combustion Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, G.Burton (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite rotary sleeve, and disc valves for internal combustion engines and the like are disclosed. The valves are formed from knitted or braided or wrap-locked carbon fiber shapes. Also disclosed are valves fabricated from woven carbon fibers and from molded carbon matrix material. The valves of the present invention with their very low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent thermal and self-lubrication properties do not present the sealing and lubrication problems that have prevented rotary sleeve and disc valves from operating efficiently and reliably in the past. Also disclosed are a sealing tang to further improve sealing capabilities and anti-oxidation treatments.

  20. Puncture-Healing Thermoplastic Resin Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Keith L. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Grimsley, Brian W. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Czabaj, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A composite comprising a combination of a self-healing polymer matrix and a carbon fiber reinforcement is described. In one embodiment, the matrix is a polybutadiene graft copolymer matrix, such as polybutadiene graft copolymer comprising poly(butadiene)-graft-poly(methyl acrylate-co-acrylonitrile). A method of fabricating the composite is also described, comprising the steps of manufacturing a pre-impregnated unidirectional carbon fiber preform by wetting a plurality of carbon fibers with a solution, the solution comprising a self-healing polymer and a solvent, and curing the preform. A method of repairing a structure made from the composite of the invention is described. A novel prepreg material used to manufacture the composite of the invention is described.

  1. Appreciating the role of carbon nanotube composites in preventing biofouling and promoting biofilms on material surfaces in environmental engineering: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyayula, Venkata K K; Gadhamshetty, Venkataramana

    2010-01-01

    The ability of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to undergo surface modification allows them to form nanocomposites (NCs) with materials such as polymers, metal nanoparticles, biomolecules, and metal oxides. The biocidal nature, protein fouling resistance, and fouling release properties of CNT-NCs render them the perfect material for biofouling prevention. At the same time, the cytotoxicity of CNT-NCs can be reduced before applying them as substrates to promote biofilm formation in environmental biotechnology applications. This paper reviews the potential prospects of CNT-NCs to accomplish two widely varying objectives in environmental engineering applications: (i) preventing biofouling, and (ii) promoting the formation of desirable biofilms on materials surface. This paper addresses practical issues such as costs, risks to human health, and ecological impacts that are associated with the application, development and commercialization of CNT-NC technology. PMID:20599491

  2. Composites materials: the technology of future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composite materials have a long history of usage. Their precise beginnings are not known; however all recorded history contains references to some form of composite material. e.g. straw was used by man to strengthen mud bricks thousands of years ago. This article presents the use of advanced composites materials in aircraft and space industry. Its brief history, use in military and civil aviation, use in space program, future usage, advantages in terms of cost, weight and strength. Use of composites in unmanned aerial vehicles and problems associated with usage of composites materials are also discussed. (author)

  3. Synthesizing Smart Polymeric and Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chaokun

    Smart materials have been widely investigated to explore new functionalities unavailable to traditional materials or to mimic the multifunctionality of biological systems. Synthetic polymers are particularly attractive as they already possess some of the attributes required for smart materials, and there are vast room to further enhance the existing properties or impart new properties by polymer synthesis or composite formulation. In this work, three types of smart polymer and composites have been investigated with important new applications: (1) healable polymer composites for structural application and healable composite conductor for electronic device application; (2) conducting polymer polypyrrole actuator for implantable medical device application; and (3) ferroelectric polymer and ceramic nanoparticles composites for electrocaloric effect based solid state refrigeration application. These application entail highly challenging materials innovation, and my work has led to significant progress in all three areas. For the healable polymer composites, well known intrinsically healable polymer 2MEP4F (a Diels-Alder crosslinked polymer formed from a monomer with four furan groups and another monomer with two maleimide groups) was first chosen as the matrix reinforced with fiber. Glass fibers were successfully functionalized with maleimide functional groups on their surface. Composites from functionalized glass fibers and 2MEP4F healable polymer were made to compare with composites made from commercial carbon fibers and 2MEP4F polymer. Dramatically improved short beam shear strength was obtained from composite of functionalized glass fibers and 2MEP4F polymer. The high cost of 2MEP4F polymer can potentially limit the large-scale application of the developed healable composite, we further developed a new healable polymer with much lower cost. This new polymer was formed through the Diels-Alder crosslinking of poly(furfuryl alcohol) (PFA) and 1,1'-(Methylenedi-4

  4. Surface-functionalized mesoporous carbon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Sheng; Gorka, Joanna; Mayes, Richard T.

    2016-02-02

    A functionalized mesoporous carbon composition comprising a mesoporous carbon scaffold having mesopores in which polyvinyl polymer grafts are covalently attached, wherein said mesopores have a size of at least 2 nm and up to 50 nm. Also described is a method for producing the functionalized mesoporous composition, wherein a reaction medium comprising a precursor mesoporous carbon, vinyl monomer, initiator, and solvent is subjected to sonication of sufficient power to result in grafting and polymerization of the vinyl monomer into mesopores of the precursor mesoporous carbon. Also described are methods for using the functionalized mesoporous carbon, particularly in extracting metal ions from metal-containing solutions.

  5. Carbon fiber content measurement in composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiushi

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) have been widely used in various structural applications in industries such as aerospace and automotive because of their high specific stiffness and specific strength. Their mechanical properties are strongly influenced by the carbon fiber content in the composites. Measurement of the carbon fiber content in CFRPs is essential for product quality control and process optimization. In this work, a novel carbonization-in-nitrogen method (CIN) is developed to characterize the fiber content in carbon fiber reinforced thermoset and thermoplastic composites. In this method, a carbon fiber composite sample is carbonized in a nitrogen environment at elevated temperatures, alongside a neat resin sample. The carbon fibers are protected from oxidization while the resin (the neat resin and the resin matrix in the composite sample) is carbonized under the nitrogen environment. The residue of the carbonized neat resin sample is used to calibrate the resin carbonization rate and calculate the amount of the resin matrix in the composite sample. The new method has been validated on several thermoset and thermoplastic resin systems and found to yield an accurate measurement of fiber content in carbon fiber polymer composites. In order to further understand the thermal degradation behavior of the high temperature thermoplastic polymer during the carbonization process, the mechanism and the kinetic model of thermal degradation behavior of carbon fiber reinforced poly (phenylene sulfide) (CPPS) are studied using thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). The CPPS is subjected to TGA in an air and nitrogen atmosphere at heating rates from 5 to 40°C min--1. The TGA curves obtained in air are different from those in nitrogen. This demonstrates that weight loss occurs in a single stage in nitrogen but in two stages in air. To elucidate this difference, thermal decomposition kinetics is analyzed by applying the Kissinger, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa, Coat-Redfern and

  6. Engineered Molecular Chain Ordering in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes/Polyaniline Composite Films for High-Performance Organic Thermoelectric Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liming; Yao, Qin; Xiao, Juanxiu; Zeng, Kaiyang; Qu, Sanyin; Shi, Wei; Wang, Qun; Chen, Lidong

    2016-06-21

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)/polyaniline (PANI) composite films with enhanced thermoelectric properties were prepared by combining in situ polymerization and solution processing. Conductive atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements confirmed that solution processing and strong π-π interactions between the PANI and SWNTs induced the PANI molecules to form a highly ordered structure. The improved degree of order of the PANI molecular arrangement increased the carrier mobility and thereby enhanced the electrical transport properties of PANI. The maximum in-plane electrical conductivity and power factor of the SWNTs/PANI composite films reached 1.44×10(3)  S cm(-1) and 217 μW m(-1)  K(-2) , respectively, at room temperature. Furthermore, a thermoelectric generator fabricated with the SWNTs/PANI composite films showed good electric generation ability and stability. A high power density of 10.4 μW cm(-2)  K(-1) was obtained, which is superior to most reported results obtained in organic thermoelectric modules. PMID:27123885

  7. Composite materials: Fatigue and fracture. Vol. 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, T. K. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present volume discusses topics in the fields of matrix cracking and delamination, interlaminar fracture toughness, delamination analysis, strength and impact characteristics, and fatigue and fracture behavior. Attention is given to cooling rate effects in carbon-reinforced PEEK, the effect of porosity on flange-web corner strength, mode II delamination in toughened composites, the combined effect of matrix cracking and free edge delamination, and a 3D stress analysis of plain weave composites. Also discussed are the compression behavior of composites, damage-based notched-strength modeling, fatigue failure processes in aligned carbon-epoxy laminates, and the thermomechanical fatigue of a quasi-isotropic metal-matrix composite.

  8. Ablation properties of carbon/carbon composites with tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ablation properties and morphologies of carbon/carbon (C/C) composites with tungsten carbide (WC) filaments were investigated by ablation test on an arc heater and scanning electron microscopy. And the results were compared with those without tungsten carbide (WC) filaments tested under the same conditions. It shows that there is a big difference between C/C composites with and without WC filaments on both macroscopic and microscopic ablation morphologies and the ablation rates of the former are higher than the latter. It is found that the ablation process of C/C composites with WC filaments includes oxidation of carbon fibers, carbon matrices and WC, melting of WC and WO3, and denudation of WC, WO3 and C/C composites. Oxidation and melting of WC leads to the formation of holes in z directional carbon fiber bundles, which increases the coarseness of the ablation surfaces of the composites, speeds up ablation and leads to the higher ablation rate. Moreover, it is further found that the molten WC and WO3 cannot form a continuous film on the ablation surface to prevent further ablation of C/C composites.

  9. Fabrication of laminated carbon-carbon materials and investigating their properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of obtaining laminated composite materials is developed and their physical-mechanical properties are investigated. The essence of the method consists in the fact that using a special tool the carbon felt surface is bristled up forming ''a brass''. In the process of preform making the ''brass'' fibers penetrate between the carbon cloth fibers (of another layer) and reinforce heavily the interlaminar composite strength. As a result, the laminated composite obtained has, in fact, a 3D reinforcement structure. The experimental data on the physical-mechanical properties of the material confirm its isotropy

  10. Stiffness analysis of the sarafix external fixator of composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedim Pervan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a structural analysis of the CAD model three versions fixators Sarafix which to explore the possibility of introducing composite materials in the construction of the connecting rod fixators comparing values of displacement and stiffness at characteristic points structure. Namely, we investigated constructional performance of fixators Sarafix with a connecting rod formed from three different composite materials, the same matrix (epoxy resin with three different types of fibers (E glass, kevlar 49 and carbon M55J. Results of structural analysis fixators Sarafix with a connecting rod made of composite materials are compared with the results of tubular connecting rod fixators made of stainless steel. After comparing the results, from the aspect of stiffness, we gave the final considerations about composite material which provides an adequate substitution for the existing material.

  11. Analysis of composition and microstructural uniformity of hybrid glass/carbon fibre composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beauson, Justine; Markussen, Christen Malte; Madsen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    level are investigated. The different levels of compositions in the composites are defined and experimentally determined. The composite volume fractions are determined using an image analysis based procedure. The global fibre volume fractions are determined using a gravimetrical based method. The local......In hybrid fibre composites, the intermixing of the two types of fibres imposes challenges to obtain materials with a well-defined and uniform microstructure. In the present paper, the composition and the microstructural uniformity of hybrid glass/carbon fibre composites mixed at the fibre bundle...... fibre volume fractions are determined using volumetric calculations. A model is presented to predict the interrelation of volume fractions in hybrid fibre composites. The microstructural uniformity of the composites is analysed by the determined variation in composite volume fractions. Two analytical...

  12. Radiation resistance of carbon composites (carbon-carbon type)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Active (in-channel) and passive (post-irradiation) methods have been used to study how the dimensions and electrical resistance of the composites KUP-VM, Termar-TD, and carboxylar change at temperatures up to 2100-2300 K and a fluence of up to 3·1021 n/cm2. The change in the size and resistivity, determined by both methods, are almost the same, i.e., there are no dynamic effects. The dimensions of the samples depend in an involved way on the irradiation temperature, neutron fluence, and structure of the material. The samples retained their integrity under the irradiation conditions of the tests. 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  13. Structural and biological properties of carbon nanotube composite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, Roger J. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245 (United States)]. E-mail: roger.narayan@mse.gatech.edu; Berry, C.J. [Environmental Biotechnology Section, Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Brigmon, R.L. [Environmental Biotechnology Section, Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2005-11-20

    Carbon nanotube composite films have been developed that exhibit unusual structural and biological properties. These novel materials have been created by pulsed laser ablation of graphite and bombardment of nitrogen ions at temperatures between 600 and 700 deg. C. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and radial distribution function analysis demonstrate that this material consists of sp{sup 2}-bonded concentric ribbons that are wrapped approximately 15 deg. normal to the silicon substrate. The interlayer order in this material extends to approximately 15-30 A. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy data suggest that this material is predominantly trigonally coordinated. The carbon nanotube composite structure results from the use of energetic ions, which allow for non-equilibrium growth of graphitic planes. In vitro testing has revealed significant antimicrobial activity of carbon nanotube composite films against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus warneri colonization. Carbon nanotube composite films may be useful for inhibiting microorganism attachment and biofilm formation in hemodialysis catheters and other medical devices.

  14. Neutron scattering investigation of carbon/carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Carbon/Carbon (C/C) composites, built up from bi-directionally woven fabrics from PAN based carbon fibers, pre-impregnated with phenolic resin followed by pressure curing and carbonization at 1000oC and a final heat treatment at either 1800oC or 2400oC, were investigated by means of small-angle as well as wideangle elastic neutron scattering. Sample orientations arranging the carbon fibers parallel and perpendicular to the incoming beam were examined. Structural features of the composites, i.e. of the fibers as well as the inherently existing pores, are presented and the influence of the heat treatment on the structural properties is discussed. (author)

  15. Piezoelectric Nanoparticle-Polymer Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, William Ray

    Herein we demonstrate that efficient piezoelectric nanoparticle-polymer composite materials can be synthesized and fabricated into complex microstructures using sugar-templating methods or optical printing techniques. Stretchable foams with excellent tunable piezoelectric properties are created by incorporating sugar grains directly into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mixtures containing barium titanate (BaTiO3 -- BTO) nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), followed by removal of the sugar after polymer curing. Porosities and elasticity are tuned by simply adjusting the sugar/polymer mass ratio and the electrical performance of the foams showed a direct relationship between porosity and the piezoelectric outputs. User defined 2D and 3D optically printed piezoelectric microstructures are also fabricated by incorporating BTO nanoparticles into photoliable polymer solutions such as polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) and exposing to digital optical masks that can be dynamically altered. Mechanical-to-electrical conversion efficiency of the optically printed composite is enhanced by chemically altering the surface of the BTO nanoparticles with acrylate groups which form direct covalent linkages with the polymer matrix under light exposure. Both of these novel materials should find exciting uses in a variety of applications including energy scavenging platforms, nano- and microelectromechanical systems (NEMS/MEMS), sensors, and acoustic actuators.

  16. Carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating for carbon/carbon composites: Microstructure and biocompatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To improve the surface biocompatibility of carbon/carbon composites, a carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating was applied using a combination method of slurry procedure and ultrasound-assisted electrochemical deposition procedure. The morphology, microstructure and chemical composition of the coating were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The biocompatibility of the carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating was investigated by osteoblast-like MG63 cell culture tests. The results showed that the carbon foam could provide a large number of pores on the surface of carbon/carbon composites. The hydroxyapatite crystals could infiltrate into the pores and form the carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating. The coating covered the carbon/carbon composites fully and uniformly with slice morphology. The cell response tests showed that the MG63 cells on carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating had a better cell adhesion and cell proliferation than those on uncoated carbon/carbon composites. The carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coatings were cytocompatible and were beneficial to improve the biocompatibility. The approach presented here may be exploited for fabrication of carbon/carbon composite implant surfaces.

  17. Flywheel materials technology: design data manual for composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, H.T.; Hwang, D.G.; Cheng, H.C.; Lo, S.Y.

    1981-07-01

    Compiled in this manual are data on thermomechanical properties of unidirectional composites. The data were taken from open literature and government reports. The primary objective of this manual is to provide the material property data necessary for design of flywheels using modern composite materials. However, the manual will be helpful for any design with composites where structural performance is a major concern. Some preliminary information necessary for an effective use of this manual is given. The characterization of strength and fatigue properties and the hygrothermal properties of composite materials are described briefly. Material properties according to the type of composite are presented. Listed for each composite system is information on constituent materials, cure cycle, preconditioning, test environment, sources of data, and test methods used. The material properties include elastic moduli, strengths, fatigue properties, and hygrothermal properties.

  18. Electrochemical performance of polyaniline nanofibres and polyaniline/multi-walled carbon nanotube composite as an electrode material for aqueous redox supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivakkumar, S.R.; Kim, Wan Ju; Choi, Ji-Ae; Kim, Dong-Won [Department of Applied Chemistry, Hanbat National University, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon 305-719 (Korea); MacFarlane, Douglas R. [School of Chemistry, Monash University, Wellington Road, Clayton, Vic. 3800 (Australia); Forsyth, Maria [Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Wellington Road, Clayton, Vic. 3800 (Australia)

    2007-09-27

    Polyaniline (PANI) nanofibres are synthesized by interfacial polymerization and their electrochemical performance is evaluated in an aqueous redox supercapacitor constituted as a two-electrode cell. The initial specific capacitance of the cell is 554 F g{sup -1} at a constant current of 1.0 A g{sup -1}, but this value rapidly decreases on continuous cycling. In order to improve the cycleability of the supercapacitor, a composite of polyaniline with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is synthesized by in situ chemical polymerization. Its capacitive behaviour is evaluated in a similar cell configuration. A high initial specific capacitance of 606 F g{sup -1} is obtained with good retention on cycling. In both supercapacitors, the effect of charging potential on cycling performances is investigated. (author)

  19. Effectiveness of Electromagnetic-Wave Shielding by Composites of Carbon Nanotubes and Carbon Microcoils in Polyurethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Gi-Hwan; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Yun, Wan Soo

    2015-11-01

    Carbon microcoils (CMCs) were deposited on Al2O3 substrates using C2H2 and H2 as source gases and SF6 as an additive gas in a thermal chemical vapor deposition system. Composites of carbon nanotubes in polyurethane (CNT@PU), carbon microcoils in polyurethane (CMC@PU), and carbon nanotubes plus carbon microcoils in polyurethane (CNT + CMC@PU) were fabricated. The electromagnetic-wave-shielding properties of the CNT + CMC@PU composites were examined and compared with those of CNT@PU and CMC@PU in the measurement-frequency range of 0.25-3.5 GHz. By the incorporation of CNTs, the CNT + CMC@PU composite had the reduced volume resistivity compared with that of CMC@PU composite. Consequently it gives rise to the enhanced shielding effectiveness through the reflection-based EMI-shielding mechanism. Meanwhile, the CNT + CMC@PU composite showed increasing shielding effectiveness with increasing measuring frequency in the range of 2.0-3.5 GHz. In addition, the CNT+CMC@PU composite's SE increased with increasing coated-layer thickness. These results indicate the role of the absorption as an EMI-shielding mechanism in CNT + CMC@PU composite. Based on these results, we suggest that the CNT + CMC@PU composite is a promising EMI-shielding material that can be applicable in a wide frequency range through the reflection and absorption shielding mechanism. PMID:26726656

  20. Carbon Nanotube Composites for Electronic Packaging Applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavanya Aryasomayajula

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite engineering comprises of metal matrix composites. They have high strength-weight ratio, better stiffness, economical production, and ease of availability of raw materials. The discovery of carbon nanotubes has opened new possibilities to face challenges better. Carbon Nanotubes are known for their high mechanical strength, excellent thermal and electrical properties. Recent research has made progress in fabricating carbon nanotube metal matrix and polymer-based composites. The methods of fabrication of these composites, their properties and possible applications restricted to the field of electronic packaging have been discussed in this paper. Experimental and theoretical calculations have shown improved mechanical and physical properties like tensile stress, toughness, and improved electrical and thermal properties. They have also demonstrated the ease of production of the composites and their adaptability as one can tailor their properties as per the requirement. This paper reviews work reported on fabricating and characterizing carbon- nanotube-based metal matrix and polymer composites. The focus of this paper is mainly to review the importance of these composites in the field of electronics packaging.

  1. Multifunctional Hybrid Carbon Nanotube/Carbon Fiber Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Cano, Roberto J.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Luong, Hoa; Grimsley, Brian W.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2016-01-01

    For aircraft primary structures, carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites possess many advantages over conventional aluminum alloys due to their light weight, higher strengthand stiffness-to-weight ratio, and low life-cycle maintenance costs. However, the relatively low electrical and thermal conductivities of CFRP composites fail to provide structural safety in certain operational conditions such as lightning strikes. Despite several attempts to solve these issues with the addition of carbon nanotubes (CNT) into polymer matrices, and/or by interleaving CNT sheets between conventional carbon fiber (CF) composite layers, there are still interfacial problems that exist between CNTs (or CF) and the resin. In this study, hybrid CNT/CF polymer composites were fabricated by interleaving layers of CNT sheets with Hexcel® IM7/8852 prepreg. Resin concentrations from 1 wt% to 50 wt% were used to infuse the CNT sheets prior to composite fabrication. The interlaminar properties of the resulting hybrid composites were characterized by mode I and II fracture toughness testing (double cantilever beam and end-notched flexure test). Fractographical analysis was performed to study the effect of resin concentration. In addition, multi-directional physical properties like thermal conductivity of the orthotropic hybrid polymer composite were evaluated. Interleaving CNT sheets significantly improved the in-plane (axial and perpendicular direction of CF alignment) thermal conductivity of the hybrid composite laminates by 50 - 400%.

  2. Plasma exposure tests of a carbon fiber/epoxy composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experiment was conducted to test the exposure of a vacuum chamber made of a carbon fiber/epoxy composite to a plasma environment. In previous tests this material(CE 339, made by Ferro Corp.) has shown good vacuum properties and has also demonstrated the capability to withstand high energy electron beams in tests at the Naval Research Laboratory. Based on these promising results, the Torsatron Group at Auburn University conducted plasma exposure tests on a section of carbon fiber/epoxy composite pipe furnished by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. 1 ref, 2 figs

  3. Highly strong and conductive carbon nanotube/cellulose composite paper

    OpenAIRE

    Imai, Masanori; Akiyama, Kousuke; Tanaka, Tomo; Sano, Eiichi

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)/cellulose composite materials were fabricated in a paper making process optimized for a CNT network to form on the cellulose fibers. The measured electric conductivity was from 0.05-671 S/m for 0.5-16.7-wt% CNT content, higher than that for other polymer composites. The real permittivities were the highest in the microwave region. The unique CNT network structure is thought to be the reason for these high conductivity and permittivity values. Compared to other carbon mat...

  4. Smart Behavior of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Cement-based Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The electrical characteristics of cement-based material can be remarkably improved by the addition of short carbon fibers.Carbon fiber reinforced cement composite (CFRC) is an intrinsically smart material that can sense not only the stress andstrain, but also the temperature. In this paper, variations of electrical resistivity with external applied load, and relationof thermoelectric force and temperature were investigated. Test results indicated that the electrical signal is related to theincrease in the material volume resistivity during crack generation or propagation and the decrease in the resistivity duringcrack closure. Moreover, it was found that the fiber addition increased the linearity and reversibility of the Seebeck effect inthe cement-based materials. The change of electrical characteristics reflects large amount of information of inner damage andtemperature differential of composite, which can be used for stress-strain or thermal self-monitoring by embedding it in theconcrete structures.

  5. Sulfur-carbon nanocomposites and their application as cathode materials in lithium-sulfur batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Chengdu; Dudney, Nancy J; Howe, Jane Y

    2015-05-05

    The invention is directed in a first aspect to a sulfur-carbon composite material comprising: (i) a bimodal porous carbon component containing therein a first mode of pores which are mesopores, and a second mode of pores which are micropores; and (ii) elemental sulfur contained in at least a portion of said micropores. The invention is also directed to the aforesaid sulfur-carbon composite as a layer on a current collector material; a lithium ion battery containing the sulfur-carbon composite in a cathode therein; as well as a method for preparing the sulfur-composite material.

  6. Carbon nanotube materials for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, A.C.; Parilla, P.A.; Jones, K.M.; Riker, G.; Heben, M.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) are essentially elongated pores of molecular dimensions and are capable of adsorbing hydrogen at relatively high temperatures and low pressures. This behavior is unique to these materials and indicates that SWNTs are the ideal building block for constructing safe, efficient, and high energy density adsorbents for hydrogen storage applications. In past work the authors developed methods for preparing and opening SWNTs, discovered the unique adsorption properties of these new materials, confirmed that hydrogen is stabilized by physical rather than chemical interactions, measured the strength of interaction to be {approximately} 5 times higher than for adsorption on planar graphite, and performed infrared absorption spectroscopy to determine the chemical nature of the surface terminations before, during, and after oxidation. This year the authors have made significant advances in synthesis and characterization of SWNT materials so that they can now prepare gram quantities of high-purity SWNT samples and measure and control the diameter distribution of the tubes by varying key parameters during synthesis. They have also developed methods which purify nanotubes and cut nanotubes into shorter segments. These capabilities provide a means for opening the tubes which were unreactive to the oxidation methods that successfully opened tubes, and offer a path towards organizing nanotube segments to enable high volumetric hydrogen storage densities. They also performed temperature programmed desorption spectroscopy on high purity carbon nanotube material obtained from collaborator Prof. Patrick Bernier and finished construction of a high precision Seivert`s apparatus which will allow the hydrogen pressure-temperature-composition phase diagrams to be evaluated for SWNT materials.

  7. Composite materials for thermal energy storage: enhancing performance through microstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhiwei; Ye, Feng; Ding, Yulong

    2014-05-01

    Chemical incompatibility and low thermal conductivity issues of molten-salt-based thermal energy storage materials can be addressed by using microstructured composites. Using a eutectic mixture of lithium and sodium carbonates as molten salt, magnesium oxide as supporting material, and graphite as thermal conductivity enhancer, the microstructural development, chemical compatibility, thermal stability, thermal conductivity, and thermal energy storage performance of composite materials are investigated. The ceramic supporting material is essential for preventing salt leakage and hence provides a solution to the chemical incompatibility issue. The use of graphite gives a significant enhancement on the thermal conductivity of the composite. Analyses suggest that the experimentally observed microstructural development of the composite is associated with the wettability of the salt on the ceramic substrate and that on the thermal conduction enhancer. PMID:24591286

  8. Advances in thermoplastic matrix composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newaz, G.M.

    1989-01-01

    Accounts are given of the development status of thermoplastic composite processing methods, as well as their current thermal and mechanical behavior and delamination properties. Attention is given to the thermoplastic coating of carbon fibers, pultrusion-process modeling, the high temperature behavior of graphite/PEEK, the thermal conductivity of composites for electronic packaging, a FEM analysis of mode I and II thermoplastic-matrix specimens, and reinforcements' resin-impregnation behavior during thermoplastic composite manufacture. Also discussed are the mechanical properties of carbon fiber/PEEK for structural applications, moisture-content mechanical property effects in PPS-matrix composites, the interlaminar fracture toughness of thermoplastic composites, and thermoplastic composite delamination growth under elevated temperature cyclic loading.

  9. NON DESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS USING ULTRASONIC SPECTROSCOPY

    OpenAIRE

    Ourak, M.; Nongaillard, B.; Rouvaen, J.; Imouloudene, N.

    1990-01-01

    The non destructive evaluation of the carbon epoxy composite materials (often used in aeronautics) is a difficult matter. The classical control methods prove unsatisfactory for the detection of distributed defects (like delaminations and porosities), which affect severely the mechanical properties of composite parts. Ultrasonic echography (A scan mode) allows for the detection of some kinds of delaminations, but the interpretation of the echographic signal remains difficult in the case of por...

  10. Processing of thermo-structural carbon-fiber reinforced carbon composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Cláudio Pardini

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes the processes used to obtain thermostructural Carbon/Carbon composites. The processing of these materials begins with the definition of the architecture of the carbon fiber reinforcement, in the form of stacked plies or in the form of fabrics or multidirectional reinforcement. Incorporating fiber reinforcement into the carbon matrix, by filling the voids and interstices, leads to the densification of the material and a continuous increase in density. There are two principal processing routes for obtaining these materials: liquid phase processing and gas phase processing. In both cases, thermal processes lead to the formation of a carbon matrix with specific properties related to their precursor. These processes also differ in terms of yield. With liquid phase impregnation the yield is around 45 per cent, while gas phase processing yields around 15 per cent.

  11. DOE Automotive Composite Materials Research: Present and Future Efforts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, C.D.

    1999-08-10

    One method of increasing automotive energy efficiency is through mass reduction of structural components by the incorporation of composite materials. Significant use of glass reinforced polymers as structural components could yield a 20--30% reduction in vehicle weight while the use of carbon fiber reinforced materials could yield a 40--60% reduction in mass. Specific areas of research for lightweighting automotive components are listed, along with research needs for each of these categories: (1) low mass metals; (2) polymer composites; and (3) ceramic materials.

  12. Computer-Aided Process Model For Carbon/Phenolic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letson, Mischell A.; Bunker, Robert C.

    1996-01-01

    Computer program implements thermochemical model of processing of carbon-fiber/phenolic-matrix composite materials into molded parts of various sizes and shapes. Directed toward improving fabrication of rocket-engine-nozzle parts, also used to optimize fabrication of other structural components, and material-property parameters changed to apply to other materials. Reduces costs by reducing amount of laboratory trial and error needed to optimize curing processes and to predict properties of cured parts.

  13. Mechanical testing and modelling of carbon-carbon composites for aircraft disc brakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Luke R.

    The objective of this study is to improve the understanding of the stress distributions and failure mechanisms experienced by carbon-carbon composite aircraft brake discs using finite element (FE) analyses. The project has been carried out in association with Dunlop Aerospace as an EPSRC CASE studentship. It therefore focuses on the carbon-carbon composite brake disc material produced by Dunlop Aerospace, although it is envisaged that the approach will have broader applications for modelling and mechanical testing of carbon-carbon composites in general. The disc brake material is a laminated carbon-carbon composite comprised of poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) derived carbon fibres in a chemical vapour infiltration (CVI) deposited matrix, in which the reinforcement is present in both continuous fibre and chopped fibre forms. To pave the way for the finite element analysis, a comprehensive study of the mechanical properties of the carbon-carbon composite material was carried out. This focused largely, but not entirely, on model composite materials formulated using structural elements of the disc brake material. The strengths and moduli of these materials were measured in tension, compression and shear in several orientations. It was found that the stress-strain behaviour of the materials were linear in directions where there was some continuous fibre reinforcement, but non-linear when this was not the case. In all orientations, some degree of non-linearity was observed in the shear stress-strain response of the materials. However, this non-linearity was generally not large enough to pose a problem for the estimation of elastic moduli. Evidence was found for negative Poisson's ratio behaviour in some orientations of the material in tension. Additionally, the through-thickness properties of the composite, including interlaminar shear strength, were shown to be positively related to bulk density. The in-plane properties were mostly unrelated to bulk density over the range of

  14. Carbon-carbon composites for orthopedic prosthesis and implants. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, T D; Klett, J W; Strizak, J P [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Baker, C [FMI, Biddeford, ME (United States)

    1998-01-21

    The prosthetic implant market is extensive. For example, because of arthritic degeneration of hip and knee cartilage and osteoporotic fractures of the hip, over 200,000 total joint replacements (TJRs) are performed in the United States each year. Current TJR devices are typically metallic (stainless steel, cobalt, or titanium alloy) and are fixed in the bone with polymethylacrylate (PMMA) cement. Carbon-carbon composite materials offer several distinct advantages over metals for TJR prosthesis. Their mechanical properties can be tailored to match more closely the mechanical properties of human bone, and the composite may have up to 25% porosity, the size and distribution of which may be controlled through processing. The porous nature of carbon-carbon composites will allow for the ingrowth of bone, achieving biological fixation, and eliminating the need for PMMA cement fixation.

  15. Si-doped composite carbon as anode of lithium ion batteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭华军; 李新海; 王志兴; 彭文杰; 郭永兴

    2003-01-01

    Si-doped composite material was prepared by coating artificial graphite with the mixture of phenol resin and polysilicone and following with heat-treatment at 1 050 ℃ in an argon gas atmosphere. The structure and characteristics of the composite carbon were determined by means of XRD, SEM, BET surface area and electrochemical measurements. The new carbon material has a disordered carbon/graphite composite structure, with silicon doped in the disordered carbon. Compared with the pristine graphite, the electrochemical performance is improved for the Si-doped composite carbon with large reversible capacity of 312.6 mAh/g, high initial charge/discharge efficiency of 88.61%, and excellent cycle stability. The prototype batteries using the composite carbon as anode material have large discharge capacity of 845 mAh and high capacity retention ratio of 95.80% at the 200th cycle.

  16. Carbon Nanotubes - Polymer Composites with Enhanced Conductivity using Functionalized Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasubramaniam, Rajagopal; Chen, Jian; Gupta, Rishi

    2003-03-01

    Individual carbon nanotubes show superior electrical, mechanical and thermal properties [1]. Composite materials using carbon nanotubes as fillers are predicted to show similar superior properties. However, realization of such composites has been plagued by poor dispersion of carbon nanotubes in solvents and in polymer matrices. We have developed a method to homogenously disperse carbon nanotubes in polymer matrices using functionalized nanotubes [2]. Thin films of functionalized single walled nanotubes (SWNT) - polystyrene composites and functionalized SWNT - polycarbonate composites were prepared using solution evaporation and spin coating. Both of the composites show several orders of magnitude increase in conductivity for less than 1 wt thresholds of the composites are less than 0.2 wt nanotubes. We attribute the enhanced conduction to the superior dispersion of the functionalized nanotubes in the polymer matrix and to the reduced nanotube waviness resulting from the rigid backbone of the conjugated polymer. References: [1]. R. H. Baughman, A. A. Zakhidov and W. A. de Heer, Science v297, p787 (2002); [2]. J. Chen, H. Liu, W. A. Weimer, M. D. Halls, D. H. Waldeck and G. C. Walker, J. Am. Chem. Soc. v124, p9034 (2002).

  17. Advanced Carbon Materials for Environmental and Energy Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Dua, Rubal

    2014-05-01

    Carbon based materials, including porous carbons and carbon layer composites, are finding increased usage in latest environmental and energy related research. Among porous carbon materials, hierarchical porous carbons with multi-modal porosity are proving out to be an effective solution for applications where the traditional activated carbons fail. Thus, there has been a lot of recent interest in developing low-cost, facile, easy to scale-up, synthesis techniques for producing such multi-modal porous carbons. This dissertation offers two novel synthesis techniques: (i) ice templating integrated with hard templating, and (ii) salt templating coupled with hard templating, for producing such hierarchically porous carbons. The techniques offer tight control and tunability of porosity (macro- meso- and microscale) in terms of both size and extent. The synthesized multi-modal porous carbons are shown to be an effective solution for three important environment related applications – (i) Carbon dioxide capture using amine supported hierarchical porous carbons, (ii) Reduction in irreversible fouling of membranes used for wastewater reuse through a deposition of a layer of hierarchical porous carbons on the membrane surface, (iii) Electrode materials for electrosorptive applications. Finally, because of their tunability, the synthesized multi-modal porous carbons serve as excellent model systems for understanding the effect of different types of porosity on the performance of porous carbons for these applications. Also, recently, there has been a lot of interest in developing protective layer coatings for preventing photo-corrosion of semiconductor structures (in particular Cu2O) used for photoelectrochemical water splitting. Most of the developed protective strategies to date involve the use of metals or co-catalyst in the protective layer. Thus there is a big need for developing low-cost, facile and easy to scale protective coating strategies. Based on the expertise

  18. Thermal and Mechanical Performance of a Carbon/Carbon Composite Spacecraft Radiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Jonathan; Benner, Steve; Butler, Dan; Silk, Eric

    1999-01-01

    Carbon-carbon composite materials offer greater thermal efficiency, stiffness to weight ratio, tailorability, and dimensional stability than aluminum. These lightweight thermal materials could significantly reduce the overall costs associated with satellite thermal control and weight. However, the high cost and long lead-time for carbon-carbon manufacture have limited their widespread usage. Consequently, an informal partnership between government and industrial personnel called the Carbon-Carbon Spacecraft Radiator Partnership (CSRP) was created to foster carbon-carbon composite use for thermally and structurally demanding space radiator applications. The first CSRP flight opportunity is on the New Millennium Program (NMP) Earth Orbiter-1 (EO-1) spacecraft, scheduled for launch in late 1999. For EO-1, the CSRP designed and fabricated a Carbon-Carbon Radiator (CCR) with carbon-carbon facesheets and aluminum honeycomb core, which will also serve as a structural shear panel. While carbon-carbon is an ideal thermal candidate for spacecraft radiators, in practice there are technical challenges that may compromise performance. In this work, the thermal and mechanical performance of the EO-1 CCR is assessed by analysis and testing. Both then-nal and mechanical analyses were conducted to predict the radiator response to anticipated launch and on-orbit loads. The thermal model developed was based on thermal balance test conditions. The thermal analysis was performed using SINDA version 4.0. Structural finite element modeling and analysis were performed using SDRC/1-DEAS and UAI/NASTRAN, respectively. In addition, the CCR was subjected to flight qualification thermal/vacuum and vibration tests. The panel meets or exceeds the requirements for space flight and demonstrates promise for future satellite missions.

  19. Modification of the Interfacial Interaction between Carbon Fiber and Epoxy with Carbon Hybrid Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kejing Yu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of the hybrid materials and epoxy and carbon fiber (CF composites were improved significantly as compared to the CF composites made from unmodified epoxy. The reasons could be attributed to the strong interfacial interaction between the CF and the epoxy composites for the existence of carbon nanomaterials. The microstructure and dispersion of carbon nanomaterials were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and optical microscopy (OM. The results showed that the dispersion of the hybrid materials in the polymer was superior to other carbon nanomaterials. The high viscosity and shear stress characterized by a rheometer and the high interfacial friction and damping behavior characterized by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA indicated that the strong interfacial interaction was greatly improved between fibers and epoxy composites. Remarkably, the tensile tests presented that the CF composites with hybrid materials and epoxy composites have a better reinforcing and toughening effect on CF, which further verified the strong interfacial interaction between epoxy and CF for special structural hybrid materials.

  20. Mechanical Properties of Low-Density SiC-Coated Carbon-Bonded Carbon Fiber Composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ahmed, A. S.; Chlup, Zdeněk; Dlouhý, Ivo; Rawlings, R. D.; Boccaccini, A. R.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 2 (2012), s. 401-412. ISSN 1546-542X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1821 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : SiC coating * Carbon bonded * Carbon Fiber Composites * Fracture Toughness Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.153, year: 2012

  1. Three-dimensional structure-based tin disulfide/vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays composites as high-performance anode materials for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Weina; Chen, Xiaohua; Liu, Zheng; Hu, Aiping; Tang, Qunli; Li, Zhe; Xiong, Yina

    2015-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) structure-based tin disulfide/vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays (VACNTs) composites have been successfully fabricated via a facile hydrothermal method for self-assembly with the help of nebulization-assisted infiltration. The SnS2 particles are anchored on the surface of the VACNTs and the number of these nanoparticles increases as the nebulization time increase. The novel 3D structure-based SnS2/VACNTs sample with the SnS2 content of 67 wt% exhibits excellent electrochemical performance, including high capacity (738 mA h g-1 at 50 mA g-1 after 1st cycle), good cycle stability (551 mA h g-1 at 100 mA g-1after 100 cycles), and excellent rate capability (223 mA h g-1 at 2000 mA g-1) when used as an anode in lithium ion batteries. The high electrochemical performance can be attributed to the synergistic effect of SnS2 and the unique microstructure of VACNTs, which provide the rapid pathways for ionic and electronic transport ascribing to their well-directed 1D conductive electron paths and well defined regular pore structures. The VACNTs serve as not only conductive additives to improve the conductivity of SnS2 in the composites, but also as buffer matrix to restrain the volume change of SnS2 and stabilize the electrode structure during the alloying/dealloying process.

  2. Composite materials with integrated embedded sensing networks

    OpenAIRE

    Schaaf, Kristin Leigh

    2008-01-01

    The increasing demand for in-service structural health monitoring has stimulated efforts to integrate self and environmental sensing capabilities into materials and structures. The present work is directed towards the development of a new means of fabricating composites that allows for integrating a high density of small, advanced sensors into a laminated composite in a way that enables sensing without compromising the structural integrity of the host composite material. This work presents ef...

  3. Flame-retardant composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.

    1991-01-01

    The properties of eight different graphite composite panels fabricated using four different resin matrices and two types of graphite reinforcement are described. The resin matrices included: VPSP/BMI, a blend of vinylpolystyryl pyridine and bismaleimide; BMI, a bismaleimide; and phenolic and PSP, a polystyryl pyridine. The graphite fiber used was AS-4 in the form of either tape or fabric. The properties of these composites were compared with epoxy composites. It was determined that VPSP/BMI with the graphite tape was the optimum design giving the lowest heat release rate.

  4. High temperature phase change materials based on inorganic salts and carbon nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Tao; Zeng, Liang; Zhou, Cunyu [Tongji Univ., Shanghai (China). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    2010-07-01

    High temperature phase change material is useful for solar thermal power generation, industrial process heat and waste heat recovery. In this paper, inorganic salts and carbon nanomaterials, such as expanded graphite (EG) carbon nanotube and graphene, are used to prepare high temperature phase change material. Inorganic salt/EG/7carbon nanotube/Graphene composites as phase change materials are prepared by aqueous solution method. The influence of EG, carbon nanotube and graphene on the termal conductivity of composites is studied by MDSC. Results show that expanded graphite, carbon nanotube and graphene can significantly increase the thermal conductivity of high temperature phase change materials. (orig.)

  5. Vibrations of carbon nanotube-reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formica, Giovanni; Lacarbonara, Walter; Alessi, Roberto

    2010-05-01

    This work deals with a study of the vibrational properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced composites by employing an equivalent continuum model based on the Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka approach. The theory allows the calculation of the effective constitutive law of the elastic isotropic medium (matrix) with dispersed elastic inhomogeneities (carbon nanotubes). The devised computational approach is shown to yield predictions in good agreement with the experimentally obtained elastic moduli of composites reinforced with uniformly aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The primary contribution of the present work deals with the global elastic modal properties of nano-structured composite plates. The investigated composite plates are made of a purely isotropic elastic hosting matrix of three different types (epoxy, rubber, and concrete) with embedded single-walled CNTs. The computations are carried out via a finite element (FE) discretization of the composite plates. The effects of the CNT alignment and volume fraction are studied in depth to assess how the modal properties are influenced both globally and locally. As a major outcome, the lowest natural frequencies of CNT-reinforced rubber composites are shown to increase up to 500 percent.

  6. Composites and blends from biobased materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, S.S. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The program is focused on the development of composites and blends from biobased materials to use as membranes, high value plastics, and lightweight composites. Biobased materials include: cellulose derivative microporous materials, cellulose derivative copolymers, and cellulose derivative blends. This year`s research focused on developing an improved understanding of the molecular features that cellulose based materials with improved properties for gas separation applications. Novel cellulose ester membrane composites have been developed and are being evaluated under a collaborative research agreement with Dow Chemicals Company.

  7. Copper-Carbon and Aluminum-Carbon Composites Fabricated by Powder Metallurgy Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvain, Jean-François; Veillère, Amélie; Lu, Yongfeng

    2014-07-01

    The increase in both power and packing densities in power electronic devices has led to an increase in the market demand for effective heat-dissipating materials, with high thermal conductivity and thermal- expansion coefficient compatible with chip materials still ensuring the reliability of the power modules. In this context, metal matrix composites: carbon fibers and diamond-reinforced copper and aluminum matrix composites among them are considered very promising as a next generation of thermal-management materials in power electronic packages. These composites exhibit enhanced thermal properties compared to pure copper combined with lower density. This article presents the fabrication techniques of copper/carbon fibers and copper/diamond and aluminum/carbon fibers composite films by powder metallurgy and hot pressing. The thermal analyses clearly indicate that interfacial treatments are required in these composites to achieve high thermomechanical properties. Interfaces (through novel chemical and processing methods), when selected carefully and processed properly will form the right chemical/mechanical link between metal and carbon, enhancing all the desired thermal properties while minimizing the deleterious effect.

  8. Copper-carbon and aluminum-carbon composites fabricated by powder metallurgy processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increase in both power and packing densities in power electronic devices has led to an increase in the market demand for effective heat-dissipating materials, with high thermal conductivity and thermal- expansion coefficient compatible with chip materials still ensuring the reliability of the power modules. In this context, metal matrix composites: carbon fibers and diamond-reinforced copper and aluminum matrix composites among them are considered very promising as a next generation of thermal-management materials in power electronic packages. These composites exhibit enhanced thermal properties compared to pure copper combined with lower density. This article presents the fabrication techniques of copper/carbon fibers and copper/diamond and aluminum/carbon fibers composite films by powder metallurgy and hot pressing. The thermal analyses clearly indicate that interfacial treatments are required in these composites to achieve high thermomechanical properties. Interfaces (through novel chemical and processing methods), when selected carefully and processed properly will form the right chemical/mechanical link between metal and carbon, enhancing all the desired thermal properties while minimizing the deleterious effect.

  9. X-ray microtomography, ultrasound and thermography for the characterization of defects in fiberglass and carbon fiber composite materials and elements; Roentgen-Mikrotomografie, Ultraschall und Thermographie fuer die Charakterisierung von Defekten in GFK- und CFK-Verbundwerkstoffen und -Elementen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, Andreas J.; Jerjen, Iwan; Plamondon, Mathieu; Furrer, Roman; Neuenschwander, Juerg [EMPA Eidgenoessische Materialpruefungs- und Forschungsanstalt, Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2015-07-01

    Glass and carbon fiber reinforced plastics (GRP or CFRP composites) may have different defects that arise on the one hand in the manufacturing process and on the other hand occur or propagate under quasi-static or oscillating mechanical load. The characterization of the nature, location and size of defects is important among other things for optimization of manufacturing processes, modeling of material or component behavior and for the estimation of the useful life of components or structures from GFK or CFK composites. The contribution shows selected examples of the application of X-ray microtomography, ultrasound and thermography for the characterization of defects in fiberglass or carbon fiber composite components. In ''thick'' laminates and complex shapes the X-ray method is particularly suitable. [German] Glas- und Kohlenstoff-faserverstaerkte Kunststoffe (GFK- bzw. CFK-Verbundwerkstoffe) koennen unterschiedliche Defekte ausweisen, die einerseits im Herstellungsprozess entstehen und sich andererseits bei der Nutzung unter quasistatischer oder schwingender mechanischer Belastung ausbilden oder sich ausbreiten. Die Charakterisierung der Art, der Lage und der Groesse der Defekte ist u.a. fuer Optimierung der Herstellungsprozesse, Modellierung des Werkstoff- oder Bauteilverhaltens sowie der Abschaetzung der Nutzungsdauer von Komponenten oder Strukturen aus GFK- oder CFK-Verbundwerkstoffen wichtig. Der Beitrag zeigt ausgewaehlte Beispiele der Anwendung von Roentgen-Mikrotomografie, Ultraschall und Thermographie zur Charakterisierung von Defekten in GFK- oder CFK-Verbundwerkstoff-Bauteilen. Bei ''dicken'' Laminaten und komplexen Geometrien ist das Roentgenverfahren besonders geeignet.

  10. Dynamic Mechanical Behavior of a Novel Polymeric Composite Damping Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng ZHANG; Jiang Feng SHENG; Chun An MA

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic mechanical behavior of a novel polymeric composite damping material has been investigated in this article. The composite consists of chlorinated polyethylene (CPE),N,N-dicyclohexyl-2-benzothiazolylsufenamide (DZ), 4,4'-thio-bis(3-methyl-6-tert-buthylphenol)(BPSR) and vapor-grown carbon fiber (VGCF). It is found that either the position or the intensity of damping peak can be controlled by changing the composition of CPE/DZ/BPSR composite. Within a certain composition region, damping peak maximum depends on CPE/DZ ratio, whereas damping peak position is controlled by BPSR content. Moreover, the improvement of storage modulus can be achieved by incorporation of VGCF. These results may imply that a damping material possessing both good damping properties and high strength can be designed and obtained.

  11. Friction material composites copper-metal-free material design perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Sundarkrishnaa, K L

    2015-01-01

    This book examines material composites used in connection with brake friction, their design and safety. To aid in understanding, the essentials of friction are explained. This second edition was extended to include friction material composites without copper, as they offer an environmentally friendlier option. The second edition is intended to support beginners by offering insights into the essentials of friction material composites, helping them to develop a broader understanding of brake friction materials. Friction materials find wide-ranging applications in household and industrial appliances, brake pads for automotive applications, rail brake friction pads and composition brake blocks. This second edition is an introductory volume to a set of related books, and is based on the author’s experience and expertise with various material manufacturers, brake manufacturers, vehicle manufacturers, researchers and testing labs around the world with which the author has been associated for the past 28 years.

  12. Modeling of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube-polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, G.; Kumar, S.

    2016-01-01

    In order to meet stringent environmental, safety and performance requirements from respective regulatory bodies, various technology-based industries are promoting the use of advanced carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced lightweight and high strength polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) as a substitute to conventional materials both in structural and non-structural applications. The superior mechanical properties of PNCs made up of CNTs or bundles of CNTs can be attributed to the interfacial interaction between the CNTs and matrix, CNT's morphologies and to their uniform dispersion in the matrix. In PNCs, CNTs physically bond with polymeric matrix at a level where the assumption of continuum level interactions is not applicable. Modeling and prediction of mechanical response and failure behavior of CNTs and their composites becomes a complex task and is dealt with the help of up-scale modeling strategies involving multiple spatial and temporal scales in hierarchical or concurrent manner. Firstly, the article offers an insight into various modeling techniques in studying the mechanical response of CNTs; namely, equivalent continuum approach, quasi-continuum approach and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. In the subsequent steps, these approaches are combined with analytical and numerical micromechanics models in a multiscale framework to predict the average macroscopic response of PNCs. The review also discusses the implementation aspects of these computational approaches, their current status and associated challenges with a future outlook.

  13. Mechanical Properties of Resin-Based Carbon-Carbon Composites Modified with Needle Coke

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balík, Karel; Gregor, Jiří; Černý, Martin; Klučáková, Martina

    Singapore : World Scientific, 1996 - (Palmer, K.; Marx , D.; Wright, M.), s. 371-379 ISBN 981-02-2801-5. [Carbon and Carbonaceous Composite Materials: Structure-Property Relationships. Malenovice (CZ), 10.10.1995-13.10.1995] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/94/1789

  14. Variational Asymptotic Micromechanics Modeling of Composite Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Tian

    2008-01-01

    The issue of accurately determining the effective properties of composite materials has received the attention of numerous researchers in the last few decades and continues to be in the forefront of material research. Micromechanics models have been proven to be very useful tools for design and analysis of composite materials. In the present work, a versatile micromechanics modeling framework, namely, the Variational Asymptotic Method for Unit Cell Homogenization (VAMUCH), has been invented a...

  15. Composite Materials for Low-Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Composite materials with improved thermal conductivity and good mechanical strength properties should allow for the design and construction of more thermally efficient components (such as pipes and valves) for use in fluid-processing systems. These materials should have wide application in any number of systems, including ground support equipment (GSE), lunar systems, and flight hardware that need reduced heat transfer. Researchers from the Polymer Science and Technology Laboratory and the Cryogenics Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center were able to develop a new series of composite materials that can meet NASA's needs for lightweight materials/composites for use in fluid systems and also expand the plastic-additive markets. With respect to thermal conductivity and physical properties, these materials are excellent alternatives to prior composite materials and can be used in the aerospace, automotive, military, electronics, food-packaging, and textile markets. One specific application of the polymeric composition is for use in tanks, pipes, valves, structural supports, and components for hot or cold fluid-processing systems where heat flow through materials is a problem to be avoided. These materials can also substitute for metals in cryogenic and other low-temperature applications. These organic/inorganic polymeric composite materials were invented with significant reduction in heat transfer properties. Decreases of 20 to 50 percent in thermal conductivity versus that of the unmodified polymer matrix were measured. These novel composite materials also maintain mechanical properties of the unmodified polymer matrix. These composite materials consist of an inorganic additive combined with a thermoplastic polymer material. The intrinsic, low thermal conductivity of the additive is imparted into the thermoplastic, resulting in a significant reduction in heat transfer over that of the base polymer itself, yet maintaining most of the polymer's original properties. Normal

  16. Moisture effect on mechanical properties of polymeric composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airale, A. G.; Carello, M.; Ferraris, A.; Sisca, L.

    2016-05-01

    The influence of moisture on the mechanical properties of fibre-reinforced polymer matrix composites (PMCs) was investigated. Four materials had been take into account considering: both 2×2-Twill woven carbon fibre or glass fibre, thermosetting matrix (Epoxy Resin) or thermoplastic matrix (Polyphenylene Sulfide). The specimens were submitted for 1800 hours to a hygrothermic test to evaluate moisture absorption on the basis of the Fick's law and finally tested to verify the mechanical properties (ultimate tensile strength). The results showed that the absorbed moisture decreases those properties of composites which were dominated by the matrix or the interface, while was not detectable the influence of water on the considered fibre. An important result is that the diffusion coefficient is highest for glass/PPS and lowest for carbon/epoxy composite material. The results give useful suggestions for the design of vehicle components that are exposed to environmental conditions (rain, snow and humidity).

  17. NARloy-Z-Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: (1) NARloy-Z (Cu-3%Ag-0.5%Zr) is the state of the art, high thermal conductivity structural alloy used for making liquid rocket engine main combustion chamber liner. It has a Thermal conductivity approx 80% of pure copper. (2) Improving the thermal conductivity of NARloy-Z will help to improve the heat transfer efficiency of combustion chamber. (3)Will also help to reduce the propulsion system mass and increase performance. It will also increases thrust to weight ratio. (4) Improving heat transfer helps to design and build better thermal management systems for nuclear propulsion and other applications. Can Carbon nanotubes (CNT) help to improve the thermal conductivity (TC)of NARloy-Z? (1)CNT's have TC of approx 20X that of copper (2) 5vol% CNT could potentially double the TC of NARloy-Z if properly aligned (3) Improvement will be less if CNT s are randomly distributed, provided there is a good thermal bond between CNT and matrix. Prior research has shown poor results (1) No TC improvement in the copper-CNT composite reported (2)Reported values are typically lower (3) Attributed to high contact thermal resistance between CNT and Cu matrix (4)Results suggest that a bonding material between CNT and copper matrix is required to lower the contact thermal resistance It is hypothesized that Zr in NARloy-Z could act as a bonding agent to lower the contact thermal resistance between CNT and matrix.

  18. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotube (CNT Composite Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Losic

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes are attractive approach for designing of new membranes for advanced molecular separation because of their unique transport properties and ability to mimic biological protein channels. In this work the synthetic approach for fabrication of carbon nanotubes (CNTs composite membranes is presented. The method is based on growth of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT using chemical vapour deposition (CVD on the template of nanoporous alumina (PA membranes. The influence of experimental conditions including carbon precursor, temperature, deposition time, and PA template on CNT growth process and quality of fabricated membranes was investigated. The synthesis of CNT/PA composites with controllable nanotube dimensions such as diameters (30–150 nm, and thickness (5–100 µm, was demonstrated. The chemical composition and morphological characteristics of fabricated CNT/PA composite membranes were investigated by various characterisation techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDXS, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM and x-ray diffraction (XRD. Transport properties of prepared membranes were explored by diffusion of dye (Rose Bengal used as model of hydrophilic transport molecule.

  19. Energy Absorption in Chopped Carbon Fiber Compression Molded Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starbuck, J.M.

    2001-07-20

    In passenger vehicles the ability to absorb energy due to impact and be survivable for the occupant is called the ''crashworthiness'' of the structure. To identify and quantify the energy absorbing mechanisms in candidate automotive composite materials, test methodologies were developed for conducting progressive crush tests on composite plate specimens. The test method development and experimental set-up focused on isolating the damage modes associated with the frond formation that occurs in dynamic testing of composite tubes. Quasi-static progressive crush tests were performed on composite plates manufactured from chopped carbon fiber with an epoxy resin system using compression molding techniques. The carbon fiber was Toray T700 and the epoxy resin was YLA RS-35. The effect of various material and test parameters on energy absorption was evaluated by varying the following parameters during testing: fiber volume fraction, fiber length, fiber tow size, specimen width, profile radius, and profile constraint condition. It was demonstrated during testing that the use of a roller constraint directed the crushing process and the load deflection curves were similar to progressive crushing of tubes. Of all the parameters evaluated, the fiber length appeared to be the most critical material parameter, with shorter fibers having a higher specific energy absorption than longer fibers. The combination of material parameters that yielded the highest energy absorbing material was identified.

  20. Energy Absorption in Chopped Carbon Fiber Compression Molded Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In passenger vehicles the ability to absorb energy due to impact and be survivable for the occupant is called the ''crashworthiness'' of the structure. To identify and quantify the energy absorbing mechanisms in candidate automotive composite materials, test methodologies were developed for conducting progressive crush tests on composite plate specimens. The test method development and experimental set-up focused on isolating the damage modes associated with the frond formation that occurs in dynamic testing of composite tubes. Quasi-static progressive crush tests were performed on composite plates manufactured from chopped carbon fiber with an epoxy resin system using compression molding techniques. The carbon fiber was Toray T700 and the epoxy resin was YLA RS-35. The effect of various material and test parameters on energy absorption was evaluated by varying the following parameters during testing: fiber volume fraction, fiber length, fiber tow size, specimen width, profile radius, and profile constraint condition. It was demonstrated during testing that the use of a roller constraint directed the crushing process and the load deflection curves were similar to progressive crushing of tubes. Of all the parameters evaluated, the fiber length appeared to be the most critical material parameter, with shorter fibers having a higher specific energy absorption than longer fibers. The combination of material parameters that yielded the highest energy absorbing material was identified

  1. Fabrication of nylon-6/carbon nanotube composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C.; Jia, Z.; Wu, D.; Han, Q.; Meek, T.

    2006-05-01

    A new technique to fabricate nylon-6/carbon nanotube (PA6/CNT) composites is presented. The method involves a pretreatment of carbon nanotubes synthesized by catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbon and an improved in-situ process for mixing nanotubes with the nylon 6 matrix. A good bond between carbon nanotubes and the nylon-6 matrix is obtained. Mechanical property measurements indicate that the tensile strength of PA6/CNT composites is improved significantly while the toughness and elongation are somewhat compromised. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of the fractured tensile specimens reveals cracking initiated at the wrapping of the CNTs PA6 layer/PA6 matrix interface rather than at the PA6/CNT interface.

  2. Mechanical Testing of Carbon-Carbon Composite for Applications in Human Spine Surgery in the Form of Intervertebral Cages

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sochor, M.; Balík, Karel; Suchý, Tomáš; Sedláček, R.; Tichý, P.

    Praha : Ústav struktury a mechaniky hornin AV ČR, 2003 - (Kolář, F.), s. - [Czech-Polish Workshop on Testing of Composite Materials. Praha (CZ), 11.09.2003-12.09.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/00/1407 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3046908 Keywords : carbon-carbon composite * mechanical testing * biocompatibility Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  3. Carbon fiber composite molecular sieves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, T.D.; Rogers, M.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Monolithic adsorbents based on isotropic pitch fibers have been developed jointly by ORNL and the University of Kentucky, Center for Applied Energy Research. The monoliths are attractive for gas separation and storage applications because of their unique combination of physical properties and microporous structure. Currently at ORNL the monoliths are produced in billets that are 10 cm in diameter and 25 cm in length. The monolithic adsorbent material is being considered for guard bed applications on a natural gas (NG) powered device. In order for the material to be successful in this application, one must attain a uniform activation to modest micropore volumes throughout the large monoliths currently being produced. Here the authors report the results of a study directed toward attaining uniform activation in these billets.

  4. Preparation of composite electroheat carbon film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Jin-tong; TU Chuan-jun; LI Yan; HU Li-min; DENG Jiu-hua

    2005-01-01

    A kind of conductive and heating unit, which can reach a high surface electroheat temperature at a low voltage, was developed in view of the traditional electroheat coating which has a low surface electroheat temperature and an insufficient heat resistance of its binder. The coating molded electroheat carbon film(CMECF) was prepared by carbonizing the coating which was prepared by adding modified resin into flake graphite and carbon fiber, coating molded onto the surface of the heat resisting matrix after dried, while the hot pressing molded electroheat thick carbon film(HPMETCF) was prepared by carbonizing the bodies whose powders were hot pressing molded directly.The surface and inner microstructure of the carbon film was characterized and analyzed by SEM and DSC/TG, while electroheat property was tested by voltage-current volume resistivity tester and electrical parameter tester. The results show that, close-packed carbon network configuration is formed within the composite electroheat carbon film film after anti-oxidizable treatment reaches a higher surface electroheat temperature than that of the existing electroheat coatings at a low voltage, and has excellent electroheat property, high thermal efficiency as well as stable physicochemical property. It is found that, at room temperature(19± 2 ℃) and 22 V for 5 min, the surface electroheat temperature of the self-produced CMECF (mfiller/mresin = 1. 8/1) reaches 112 ℃ while HPMETCF (mfiller/mresin = 3. 6/1) reaches 265 ℃.

  5. Development of oxidation resistant SiC/C compositionally gradient materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the evaluation of oxidation characteristic for the trial production of SiC/C compositionally gradient carbon and SiC/C compositionally gradient carbon fiber reinforced carbon (CFRC) materials, which are composed of a surface SiC coating layer, an intermediate SiC/C layer and substrate material, the oxidation test in air at 800degC for up to 100 h was performed compared with each other three kinds version, i.e., substrate material, one with intermediate SiC/C layer and one coated by SiC layer. It was shown that SiC/C compositionally gradient material exhibited the best oxidation resistance among each substrate series, and the conception of SiC/C compositionally gradient material could be applied to carbon and CFRC materials as well as graphite material. (author)

  6. Low density bismaleimide-carbon microballoon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A process is described for the preparation of composite laminate.structures of glass cloth preimpregnated with polybismaleimide resin and adhered to a polybismaleimide glass or aromatic polyamide paper honeycomb cell structure that is filled or partially filled with a syntactic foam consisting of a mixture of bismaleimide resin and carbon microballoons. The carbon microballoons are prepared by pyrolyzing phenolic microballoons and subsequently bonded using a 2% bismaleimide solution. The laminate structures are cured for two hours at 477 deg K and are adhered to the honeycomb bismaleimide adhesive using a pressure of 700 KN/sq m pressure at 450 deg K. The laminate composite is then post-cured for two hours at 527 deg K to produce a composite laminate having a density in the range from about 95 kilograms per cubic meter to 130 kilograms per cubic meter.

  7. Rapid Fabrication of Carbide Matrix/Carbon Fiber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brian E.; Bernander, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    Composites of zirconium carbide matrix material reinforced with carbon fibers can be fabricated relatively rapidly in a process that includes a melt infiltration step. Heretofore, these and other ceramic matrix composites have been made in a chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process that takes months. The finished products of the CVI process are highly porous and cannot withstand temperatures above 3,000 F (approx.1,600 C). In contrast, the melt-infiltration-based process takes only a few days, and the composite products are more nearly fully dense and have withstood temperatures as high as 4,350 F (approx.2,400 C) in a highly oxidizing thrust chamber environment. Moreover, because the melt- infiltration-based process takes much less time, the finished products are expected to cost much less. Fabrication begins with the preparation of a carbon fiber preform that, typically, is of the size and shape of a part to be fabricated. By use of low-temperature ultraviolet-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, the carbon fibers in the preform are coated with one or more interfacial material(s), which could include oxides. The interfacial material helps to protect the fibers against chemical attack during the remainder of the fabrication process and against oxidation during subsequent use; it also enables slippage between the fibers and the matrix material, thereby helping to deflect cracks and distribute loads. Once the fibers have been coated with the interfacial material, the fiber preform is further infiltrated with a controlled amount of additional carbon, which serves as a reactant for the formation of the carbide matrix material. The next step is melt infiltration. The preform is exposed to molten zirconium, which wicks into the preform, drawn by capillary action. The molten metal fills most of the interstices of the preform and reacts with the added carbon to form the zirconium carbide matrix material. The zirconium does not react with the underlying fibers because they

  8. Environment Friendly Composite Materials: Biocomposites and Green Composites

    OpenAIRE

    B. C. Mitra

    2014-01-01

    Biocomposites can supplement and eventually replace petroleum-based composite materials in several applications. Several critical issues related to bio-fiber surface treatments is to make it a more suitable matrix for composite application and promising techniques need to be solved to design biocomposite of interest. The main motivation for developing biocomposites has been and still is to create a new generation of fiber reinforced plastics material competitive with glass fiber reinforced on...

  9. Biomedical composites materials, manufacturing and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Davim, J Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Composite materials are engineered materials, made from two or more constituents with significantly different physical or chemical properties which remain separate on a macroscopic level within the finished structure. Due to their special mechanical and physical properties they have the potential to replace conventional materials in various fields such as the biomedical industry.

  10. Fracture morphology of carbon fiber reinforced plastic composite laminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Srinivasa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP composites have been extensively used in fabrication of primary structures for aerospace, automobile and other engineering applications. With continuous and widespread use of these composites in several advanced technology, the frequency of failures is likely to increase. Therefore, to establish the reasons for failures, the fracture modes should be understood thoroughly and unambiguously. In this paper, CFRP composite have been tested in tension, compression and flexural loadings; and microscopic study with the aid of Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM has been performed on failed (fractured composite surfaces to identify the principle features of failure. Efforts have been made in correlating the fracture surface characteristics to the failure mode. The micro-mechanics analysis of failure serves as a useful guide in selecting constituent materials and designing composites from the failure behavior point of view. Also, the local failure initiation results obtained here has been reliably extended to global failure prediction.

  11. Recent advances in research on carbon nanotube-polymer composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Michele T; Gun'ko, Yurii K

    2010-04-18

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) demonstrate remarkable electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties, which allow a number of exciting potential applications. In this article, we review the most recent progress in research on the development of CNT-polymer composites, with particular attention to their mechanical and electrical (conductive) properties. Various functionalization and fabrication approaches and their role in the preparation of CNT-polymer composites with improved mechanical and electrical properties are discussed. We tabulate the most recent values of Young's modulus and electrical conductivities for various CNT-polymer composites and compare the effectiveness of different processing techniques. Finally, we give a future outlook for the development of CNT-polymer composites as potential alternative materials for various applications, including flexible electrodes in displays, electronic paper, antistatic coatings, bullet-proof vests, protective clothing, and high-performance composites for aircraft and automotive industries. PMID:20496401

  12. Fabrication of aluminum matrix composite reinforced with carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    1.0 wt.% carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced 2024A1 matrix composite was fabricated by cold isostatic press and subsequent hot extrusion techniques. The mechanical properties of the composite were measured by a tensile test. Meanwhile, the fracture surfaces were examined using field emission scanning electron microscopy. The experimental results show that CNTs are dispersed homogeneously in the composite and that the interfaces of the Al matrix and the CNT bond well. Although the tensile strength and the Young's modulus of the composite are enhanced markedly, the elongation does not decrease when compared with the matrix material fabricated under the same process. The reasons for the increments may be the extraordinary mechanical properties of CNTs, and the bridging and pulling-out role of CNTs in the Al matrix composite.

  13. Materials research at Stanford University. [composite materials, crystal structure, acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Research activity related to the science of materials is described. The following areas are included: elastic and thermal properties of composite materials, acoustic waves and devices, amorphous materials, crystal structure, synthesis of metal-metal bonds, interactions of solids with solutions, electrochemistry, fatigue damage, superconductivity and molecular physics and phase transition kinetics.

  14. Radiation Processing of Advanced Composite Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced composites, such as carbon-fiber-reinforced plastics, are being used widely for many applications. Carbon fiber/epoxies composites have attracted special attention from the aircraft, aerospace, marine engineering, sporting goods and transportation industries, because they have useful mechanical properties including high strength-to-weight and stiffness-to-weight ratios, a corrosion resistant, impact and damage tolerance characteristics and wear properties. Thermal curing has been the dominant industrial process for advanced composites until now, however, a radiation curing process using UV, microwave x-ray, electron-beam(E-beam) and γ-ray has emerged as a better alternative in recent years. These processes are compatible with the manufacturing of composites using traditional fabrication methods including a filament/tape winding, pultrusion, resin transfer moulding and hand lay-up. In this study, E-beam curable carbon fiber/epoxy composites were manufactured, and their mechanical properties were investigated. Two epoxy resins (bisphenol-A, bisphenol-F) containing photo-initiators (tri aryl sulfonium hexafluorophosphate, tri aryl sulfonium hexafluoroantimonate) were used as a matrix and a 4H-satin carbon woven fabric was used as a reinforcement. And then an electron beam irradiated the composites up to 200 kGy in a vacuum and an inert atmosphere. The cure cycle was optimized and the properties of composites were evaluated and analyzed via a differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, sol-gel extractions, FT-NIR, universal test machine, and an impact tester. The gel content, glass transition temperature and mechanical strength of the irradiated composites were increased with an increasing radiation dose

  15. Carbon fibre composite for ventilation air methane (VAM) capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coal mine methane (CMM) is not only a hazardous greenhouse gas but is also a wasted energy resource, if not utilised. This paper evaluates a novel adsorbent material developed for capturing methane from ventilation air methane (VAM) gas in underground coal mines. The adsorbent material is a honeycomb monolithic carbon fibre composite (HMCFC) consisting of multiple parallel flow-through channels and the material exhibits unique features including low pressure drop, good mechanical properties, ability to handle dust-containing gas streams, good thermal and electrical conductivity and selective adsorption of gases. During this study, a series of HMCFC adsorbents (using different types of carbon fibres) were successfully fabricated. Experimental data demonstrated the proof-of-concept of using the HMCFC adsorbent to capture methane from VAM gas. The adsorption capacity of the HMCFC adsorbent was twice that of commercial activated carbon. Methane concentration of 0.56% in the inlet VAM gas stream is reduced to about 0.011% after it passes through the novel carbon fibre composite adsorbent material at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure. This amounts to a maximum capture efficiency of 98%. These encouraging laboratory scale studies have prompted further large scale trials and economic assessment.

  16. Slurry Molding Technologies for Novel Carbon and Graphite Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, T.D.

    2004-06-30

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a slurry molding technology for the manufacture of porous, high surface area, carbon fiber composites molecular sieves, and carbon-carbon composite preforms. Potentially, this technology could be applied to the manufacture of a host of novel carbon materials including porous adsorbent carbons, low-pressure drop adsorbent carbon composites, ultra-fine-grained graphite, and carbon fiber reinforced graphite. New opportunities for high surface carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS) materials are now emerging. Many of these opportunities are driven by increasingly harsh environmental pressures. Traditional granular activated carbon (GAC) is not suitable for many of these applications because of the difficulties encountered with attrition and in forming ''structures'' which have the necessary mechanical and physical properties. In addition, the electrical desorption of adsorbed species is not possible with GAC due to its low bulk electrical conductivity. Activated carbon fibers have been found to be useful in some applications. Work by ORNL has shown, for example, that CFCMS materials are capable of adsorbing various gases and desorbing them under electrical stimulation. For some applications these fibers have to be formed into a structure that can offer the desired mechanical integrity and pressure drop characteristics. To date, the work by ORNL has focused on the use of a single manufacturer's isotropic pitch fibers which, when activated, may be cost prohibitive for many applications. Fine-grained graphite is attractive for many applications including the chemical processing industry where their unique combination of properties--including high strength and chemical inertness, are particularly attractive. However, a lack of toughness can limit their utility in certain applications. The use of ultra-fine powders in conjunction with slurry molding and hot pressing offers the

  17. Progress in Studies on Carbon and Silicon Carbide Nanocomposite Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon carbide nanofiber and carbon nanotubes are introduced. The structure and application of nanotubers (nanofibers) in carbon/carbon composites are emphatically presented. Due to the unique structure of nanotubers (nanofibers), they can modify the microstructure of pyrocarbon and induce the deposition of pyrocarbon with high text in carbon/carbon composites. So the carbon/carbon composites modified by CNT/CNF have more excellent properties.

  18. Progress in Studies on Carbon and Silicon Carbide Nanocomposite Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Peng Xiao; Jie Chen; Xian-feng Xu

    2010-01-01

    Silicon carbide nanofiber and carbon nanotubes are introduced. The structure and application of nanotubers (nanofibers) in carbon/carbon composites are emphatically presented. Due to the unique structure of nanotubers (nanofibers), they can modify the microstructure of pyrocarbon and induce the deposition of pyrocarbon with high text in carbon/carbon composites. So the carbon/carbon composites modified by CNT/CNF have more excellent properties.

  19. Trial manufacturing of titanium-carbon steel composite overpack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honma, Nobuyuki; Chiba, Takahiko; Tanai, Kenji [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Waste Management and Fuel Cycle Research Center, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-11-01

    This paper reports the results of design analysis and trial manufacturing of full-scale titanium-carbon steel composite overpacks. The overpack is one of the key components of the engineered barrier system, hence, it is necessary to confirm the applicability of current technique in their manufacture. The required thickness was calculated according to mechanical resistance analysis, based on models used in current nuclear facilities. The Adequacy of the calculated dimensions was confirmed by finite-element methods. To investigate the necessity of a radiation shielding function of the overpack, the irradiation from vitrified waste has been calculated. As a result, it was shown that shielding on handling and transport equipment is a more reasonable and practical approach than to increase thickness of overpack to attain a self-shielding capability. After the above investigation, trial manufacturing of full-scale model of titanium-carbon steel composite overpack has been carried out. For corrosion-resistant material, ASTM Grade-2 titanium was selected. The titanium layer was bonded individually to a cylindrical shell and fiat cover plates (top and bottom) made of carbon steel. For the cylindrical shell portion, a cylindrically formed titanium layer was fitted to the inner carbon steel vessel by shrinkage. For the flat cover plates (top and bottom), titanium plate material was coated by explosive bonding. Electron beam welding and gas metal arc welding were combined to weld of the cover plates to the body. No significant failure was evident from inspections of the fabrication process, and the applicability of current technology for manufacturing titanium-carbon steel composite overpack was confirmed. Future research and development items regarding titanium-carbon steel composite overpacks are also discussed. (author)

  20. Trial manufacturing of titanium-carbon steel composite overpack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the results of design analysis and trial manufacturing of full-scale titanium-carbon steel composite overpacks. The overpack is one of the key components of the engineered barrier system, hence, it is necessary to confirm the applicability of current technique in their manufacture. The required thickness was calculated according to mechanical resistance analysis, based on models used in current nuclear facilities. The Adequacy of the calculated dimensions was confirmed by finite-element methods. To investigate the necessity of a radiation shielding function of the overpack, the irradiation from vitrified waste has been calculated. As a result, it was shown that shielding on handling and transport equipment is a more reasonable and practical approach than to increase thickness of overpack to attain a self-shielding capability. After the above investigation, trial manufacturing of full-scale model of titanium-carbon steel composite overpack has been carried out. For corrosion-resistant material, ASTM Grade-2 titanium was selected. The titanium layer was bonded individually to a cylindrical shell and fiat cover plates (top and bottom) made of carbon steel. For the cylindrical shell portion, a cylindrically formed titanium layer was fitted to the inner carbon steel vessel by shrinkage. For the flat cover plates (top and bottom), titanium plate material was coated by explosive bonding. Electron beam welding and gas metal arc welding were combined to weld of the cover plates to the body. No significant failure was evident from inspections of the fabrication process, and the applicability of current technology for manufacturing titanium-carbon steel composite overpack was confirmed. Future research and development items regarding titanium-carbon steel composite overpacks are also discussed. (author)

  1. Fibrous and textile materials for composite applications

    CERN Document Server

    Fangueiro, Raul

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on the fibers and textiles used in composite materials. It presents both existing technologies currently used in commercial applications and the latest advanced research and developments. It also discusses the different fiber forms and architectures, such as short fibers, unidirectional tows, directionally oriented structures or advanced 2D- and 3D-textile structures that are used in composite materials. In addition, it examines various synthetic, natural and metallic fibers that are used to reinforce polymeric, cementitious and metallic matrices, as well as fiber properties, special functionalities, manufacturing processes, and composite processing and properties. Two entire chapters are dedicated to advanced nanofiber and nanotube reinforced composite materials. The book goes on to highlight different surface treatments and finishes that are applied to improve fiber/matrix interfaces and other essential composite properties. Although a great deal of information about fibers and textile str...

  2. Behavior of pure and modified carbon/carbon composites in atomic oxygen environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-chong Liu; Lai-fei Cheng; Li-tong Zhang; Xin-gang Luan; Hui Mei

    2014-01-01

    Atomic oxygen (AO) is considered the most erosive particle to spacecraft materials in low earth orbit (LEO). Carbon fiber, car-bon/carbon (C/C), and some modified C/C composites were exposed to a simulated AO environment to investigate their behaviors in LEO. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), AO erosion rate calculation, and mechanical property testing were used to characterize the material properties. Results show that the carbon fiber and C/C specimens undergo significant degradation under the AO bombing. According to the effects of AO on C/C-SiC and CVD-SiC-coated C/C, a condensed CVD-SiC coat is a feasible approach to protect C/C composites from AO degradation.

  3. New composite materials to metal sorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complexing-active polymers are promising substances for detoxication of radioactive elements from the polluted soils and natural waters. Tis work is devoted to searching of new polymeric compositions for detoxication of soils and waters from heavy metals. Three systems (azole-carboxylic polyampholytes, polymer-polymer complexes of poly(1-vinylimidazole) (PVI), Ai- and Al-based organo/inorganic composites) were discussed. Sorption properties of new composites were studied using Cu2+ ions as an example. The sorption equilibrium range time is equals to 20-60 min, sorption capacity attains 280 mg/g. The most effective sorbents are composites on the basis of PVI, poly(4-vinylpyridine) decrease sorption capacity due to hydrophobia of this polymer. Thus, composites on the basis of nitrogen-containing polymers are promising systems for heavy materials sorption. Introduction of Si-, Al-hydroxides into composites allows to decrease cost of the materials and increase their nature-compatibility

  4. 复合材料LiMn2O4/活性炭的电化学行为%Electrochemical performance of LiMn2O4/activated carbon composite material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马婷婷; 王志兴; 李新海; 郭华军; 方杰; 彭文杰; 胡启阳; 张云河

    2012-01-01

    The electrochemical performances of the composite material based on activated carbon and LiMn2O4 were characterized by rate charge-discharge, cyclic voltammograms and electrochemical impedance spectra. It is demonstrated that the composite material has advantages of both the high power density of the supercapacitor and the high energy density of the lithium ion battery. Moreover, the electrochemical measurements also show that the composite material has good cycle life performance. At IOC rate, the discharge capacity of the composite material (80% LiMn2O4+20% activated carbon, mass fraction) is 76.4 mA-h/g, which is greatly improved compared with that of LiMn2O4. The capacity loss in constant current-constant voltage mode is no more than 0.01% after 100 cycles.%利用充放电测试、循环伏安和交流阻抗等方法研究LiMn2O4/活性炭复合材料在1 mol/L LiPF6-EC/EMC/DMC有机电解液中的电化学性能.研究结果表明:复合材料同时具备超级电容器高功率密度和锂离子电池高能量密度的特点;复合材料的容量包含活性炭的双电层电容和LiMn2O4电化学反应的容量;当活性炭的质量分数为20%时,10C倍率下复合材料的首次放电容量高达76.4 mA.h/g,100次循环后容量几乎没有衰减(0.01%),与纯LiMn2O4电极相比有很大提高.

  5. Composite materials with improved phyllosilicate dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiko, David J.

    2004-09-14

    The present invention provides phyllosilicates edge modified with anionic surfactants, composite materials made from the edge modified phyllosilicates, and methods for making the same. In various embodiments the phyllosilicates are also surface-modified with hydrophilic lipophilic balance (HLB) modifying agents, polymeric hydrotropes, and antioxidants. The invention also provides blends of edge modified phyllosilicates and semicrystalline waxes. The composite materials are made by dispersing the edge modified phyllosilicates with polymers, particularly polyolefins and elastomers.

  6. Composite, ordered material having sharp surface features

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Urso, Brian R.; Simpson, John T.

    2006-12-19

    A composite material having sharp surface features includes a recessive phase and a protrusive phase, the recessive phase having a higher susceptibility to a preselected etchant than the protrusive phase, the composite material having an etched surface wherein the protrusive phase protrudes from the surface to form a sharp surface feature. The sharp surface features can be coated to make the surface super-hydrophobic.

  7. Fatigue and fracture research in composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrien, T. K.

    1982-01-01

    The fatigue, fracture, and impact behavior of composite materials are investigated. Bolted and bonded joints are included. The solutions developed are generic in scope and are useful for a wide variety of structural applications. The analytical tools developed are used to demonstrate the damage tolerance, impact resistance, and useful fatigue life of structural composite components. Standard tests for screening improvements in materials and constituents are developed.

  8. HPC in Computational Micromechanics of Composite Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Blaheta, R. (Radim); Kolcun, A. (Alexej); Jakl, O. (Ondřej); Souček, K; Starý, J. (Jiří); Georgiev, J.

    2015-01-01

    By micromechanics we understand analysis of the macroscale response of materials through investigation of processes in their microstructure. Here by the macroscale, we mean the scale of applications, where we solve engineering problems involving materials. Examples could be analysis of aircraft constructions with different composite materials and analysis of rock behaviour and concrete properties in geo- and civil engineering applications. Analysis of bio-materials with many medicine...

  9. Supercapacitors based on carbon nanotube fuzzy fabric structural composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alresheedi, Bakheet Awad

    Supercapacitors used in conjunction with batteries offer a solution to energy storage and delivery problems in systems where high power output is required, such as in fully electric cars. This project aimed to enhance current supercapacitor technology by fabricating activated carbon on a substrate consisting of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown on a carbon fiber fabric (fuzzy fabric). The fuzzy surface of CNTs lowers electrical resistance and increases porosity, resulting in a flexible fabric with high specific capacitance. Experimental results confirm that the capacitance of activated carbon fabricated on the fuzzy fiber composite is significantly higher than when activated carbon is formed simply on a bare carbon fiber substrate, indicating the usefulness of CNTs in supercapacitor technology. The fabrication of the fuzzy fiber based carbon electrode was fairly complex. The processing steps included composite curing, stabilization, carbonization and activation. Ratios of the three basic ingredients for the supercapacitor (fiber, CNT and polymer matrix) were investigated through experimentation and Grey relational analysis. The aim of Grey relational analysis was to examine factors that affect the overall performance of the supercapacitor. It is based on finding relationships in both independent and interrelated data series (parameters). Using this approach, it was determined that the amount of CNTs on the fiber surface plays a major role in the capacitor properties. An increased amount of CNTs increases the surface area and electrical conductivity of the substrate, while also reducing the required time of activation. Technical advances in the field of Materials and Structures are usually focused on attaining superior performance while reducing weight and cost. To achieve such combinations, multi-functionality has become essential; namely, to reduce weight by imparting additional functions simultaneously to a single material. In this study, a structural composite with

  10. and Carbon Fiber Reinforced 2024 Aluminum Alloy Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmar, Jacek W.; Naplocha, Krzysztof; Morgiel, Jerzy

    2014-08-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of 2024 aluminum alloy composite materials strengthened with Al2O3 Saffil fibers or together with addition of carbon fibers were investigated. The fibers were stabilized in the preform with silica binder strengthened by further heat treatment. The preforms with 80-90% porosity were infiltrated by direct squeeze casting method. The microstructure of the as-cast specimens consisted mainly of α-dendrites with intermetallic compounds precipitated at their boundaries. The homogenization treatment of the composite materials substituted silica binder with a mixture of the Θ phase and silicon precipitates distributed in the remnants of SiO2 amorphous phase. Outside of this area at the binder/matrix interface, fine MgO precipitates were also present. At surface of C fibers, a small amount of fine Al3C4 carbides were formed. During pressure infiltration of preforms containing carbon fibers under oxygen carrying atmosphere, C fibers can burn releasing gasses and causing cracks initiated by thermal stress. The examination of tensile and bending strength showed that reinforcing of aluminum matrix with 10-20% fibers improved investigated properties in the entire temperature range. The largest increase in relation to unreinforced alloy was observed for composite materials examined at the temperature of 300 °C. Substituting Al2O3 Saffil fibers with carbon fibers leads to better wear resistance at dry condition with no relevant effect on strength properties.

  11. Ultrastrong, Stiff and Multifunctional Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin [North Carolina State University; Yong, Zhenzhong [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics; Li, Qingwen [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics; Bradford, Philip D. [North Carolina State University; Liu, Wei [Donghua University, Shanghai, China; Tucker, Dennis S. [Tucker Technical Solutions; Cai, Wei [ORNL; Wang, Hsin [ORNL; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo [North Carolina State University; Zhu, Yuntian [North Carolina State University

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are an order of magnitude stronger than any current engineering fiber. However, for the past two decades it has been a challenge to utilize their reinforcement potential in composites. Here we report CNT composites with unprecedented multifunctionalities, including record high strength (3.8 GPa), Young s modulus (293 GPa), electrical conductivity (1230 S cm-1) and thermal conductivity (41 W m-1 K-1). These superior properties are derived from the long length, high volume fraction, good alignment and reduced waviness of the CNTs, which were produced by a novel processing approach that can be easily scaled up for industrial production.

  12. Silver nanowire array-polymer composite as thermal interface material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ju; Munari, Alessio; Dalton, Eric; Mathewson, Alan; Razeeb, Kafil M.

    2009-12-01

    Silver nanowire arrays embedded inside polycarbonate templates are investigated as a viable thermal interface material for electronic cooling applications. The composite shows an average thermal diffusivity value of 1.89×10-5 m2 s-1, which resulted in an intrinsic thermal conductivity of 30.3 W m-1 K-1. The nanowires' protrusion from the film surface enables it to conform to the surface roughness to make a better thermal contact. This resulted in a 61% reduction in thermal impedance when compared with blank polymer. An ˜30 nm Au film on the top of the composite was found to act as a heat spreader, reducing the thermal impedance further by 35%. A contact impedance model was employed to compare the contact impedance of aligned silver nanowire-polymer composites with that of aligned carbon nanotubes, which showed that the Young's modulus of the composite is the defining factor in the overall thermal impedance of these composites.

  13. Carbon-based composite electrocatalysts for low temperature fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popov, Branko N. (Columbia, SC); Lee, Jog-Won (Columbia, SC); Subramanian, Nalini P. (Kennesaw, GA); Kumaraguru, Swaminatha P. (Honeoye Falls, NY); Colon-Mercado, Hector R. (Columbia, SC); Nallathambi, Vijayadurga (T-Nagar, IN); Li, Xuguang (Columbia, SC); Wu, Gang (West Columbia, SC)

    2009-12-08

    A process for synthesis of a catalyst is provided. The process includes providing a carbon precursor material, oxidizing the carbon precursor material whereby an oxygen functional group is introduced into the carbon precursor material, and adding a nitrogen functional group into the oxidized carbon precursor material.

  14. Development of radiation resistant organic composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation resistant composite material has been developed. Stress analysis and the matrix choice were made carefully. The stress analysis reveals that the intrinsic radiation induced degradation was brought by the degradation of interlaminar shear strength. It means the preventing the degradation of interlaminar shear strength is important to develop the radiation resistant composite materials. To prevent the degradation of the interlaminar shear strength the three dimensional fabrics are used as the reinforcement and the boron free glass fibers were chosen. The possible method to develop the radiation resistant organic composites are discussed. (author)

  15. Novel Nanosized Adsorbing Composite Cathode Materials for the Next Generational Lithium Battery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yong; ZHENG Wei; ZHANG Ping; WANG Lizhen; XIA Tongchi; HU Xinguo; YU Zhenxing

    2007-01-01

    A novel carbon-sulfur nano-composite material was synthesized by heating sublimed sulfur and high surface area activated carbon (HSAAC) under certain conditions. The physical and chemical performances of the novel carbon-sulfur nano-composite were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The electrochemical performances of nano-composite were characterized by charge-discharge characteristic, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impendence spectroscopy (EIS). The experimental results indicate that the electrochemical capability of nanocomposite material was superior to that of traditional S-containing composite material. The cathode made by carbon-sulfur nano-composite material shows a good cycle ability and a high specific charge-discharge capacity. The HSAAC shows a vital role in adsorbing sublimed sulfur and the polysulfides within the cathode and is an excellent electric conductor for a sulfur cathode and prevents the shuttle behavior of the lithium-sulfur battery.

  16. Hybrid Matrices Layer of Carbon Fiber Composites

    OpenAIRE

    J. Dhanraj Pamar; Dr. B. Balu Naik

    2013-01-01

    Polymeric composites have gone through a level of maturity beyond the laboratory stage with the development of all composite aircraft structures. Yet the basic understanding of the material used in its primary structure has not been extensively investigated. Although this may be attributed in part to the proprietary nature of the system, we believe that it is because of lack of specific tools required for its analysis. Specifically, micromechanical models always as...

  17. Breakthroughs in Mesoporous Composite Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Mesoporous materials have attracted a great deal of attention due to their extremely high surface area, uniform and tunable pore structure (2-50nm in diameter), and have been investigated extensively since its invention. Unfortunately,their catalytic properties are far away from the expectation due to their amorphous and inert framework and poor stability. This research project is aimed at the design and synthesis of mesoporous-

  18. Detection of Carbon Monoxide Using Polymer-Carbon Composite Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, Margie L.; Ryan, Margaret A.; Lara, Liana M.

    2011-01-01

    A carbon monoxide (CO) sensor was developed that can be incorporated into an existing sensing array architecture. The CO sensor is a low-power chemiresistor that operates at room temperature, and the sensor fabrication techniques are compatible with ceramic substrates. Sensors made from four different polymers were tested: poly (4-vinylpryridine), ethylene-propylene-diene-terpolymer, polyepichlorohydrin, and polyethylene oxide (PEO). The carbon black used for the composite films was Black Pearls 2000, a furnace black made by the Cabot Corporation. Polymers and carbon black were used as received. In fact, only two of these sensors showed a good response to CO. The poly (4-vinylpryridine) sensor is noisy, but it does respond to the CO above 200 ppm. The polyepichlorohydrin sensor is less noisy and shows good response down to 100 ppm.

  19. Composites with polymer-grafted carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Paiva, M. C.; Novais, R. M.; Covas, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)/polymer composites exhibit the processability advantages of plastics, while conveying electrical conductivity characteristics suitable for electric transport, or for sensing functionalities. The success of their application depends on the ability to homogeneously disperse the CNT in the polymer matrices to form a stable conductive network. The structural strength of the nanocomposite is also desirable, and may be a requirement. The chemical functionalization of the CNT i...

  20. Carbon fiber composite characterization in adverse thermal environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Vasquez, Sylvia; Brown, Alexander L.; Hubbard, Joshua A.; Ramirez, Ciro J.; Dodd, Amanda B.

    2011-05-01

    The behavior of carbon fiber aircraft composites was studied in adverse thermal environments. The effects of resin composition and fiber orientation were measured in two test configurations: 102 by 127 millimeter (mm) test coupons were irradiated at approximately 22.5 kW/m{sup 2} to measure thermal response, and 102 by 254 mm test coupons were irradiated at approximately 30.7 kW/m{sup 2} to characterize piloted flame spread in the vertically upward direction. Carbon-fiber composite materials with epoxy and bismaleimide resins, and uni-directional and woven fiber orientations, were tested. Bismaleimide samples produced less smoke, and were more resistant to flame spread, as expected for high temperature thermoset resins with characteristically lower heat release rates. All materials lost approximately 20-25% of their mass regardless of resin type, fiber orientation, or test configuration. Woven fiber composites displayed localized smoke jetting whereas uni-directional composites developed cracks parallel to the fibers from which smoke and flames emanated. Swelling and delamination were observed with volumetric expansion on the order of 100% to 200%. The purpose of this work was to provide validation data for SNL's foundational thermal and combustion modeling capabilities.

  1. Carbon-fiber composite molecular sieves for gas separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1996-08-01

    This report describes continuing work on the activation and characterization of formed carbon fiber composites. The composites are produced at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and activated at the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) using steam, CO{sub 2}, or O{sub 2} at different conditions of temperature and time, and with different furnace configurations. The general aims of the project are to produce uniformly activated samples with controlled pore structures for specialist applications such as gas separation and water treatment. In previous work the authors reported that composites produced from isotropic pitch fibers weighing up to 25g can be uniformly activated through the appropriate choice of reaction conditions and furnace configurations. They have now succeeded in uniformly activating composites of dimensions up to 12 x 7 x 6 cm, or up to about 166 gram - a scale-up factor of about six. Part of the work has involved the installation of a new furnace that can accommodate larger composites. Efforts were made to achieve uniform activation in both steam and CO{sub 2}. The authors have also succeeded in producing materials with very uniform and narrow pore size distributions by using a novel method involving low temperature oxygen chemisorption in combination with heat treatment in N{sub 2} at high temperatures. Work has also started on the activation of PAN based carbon fibers and fiber composites with the aim of producing composites with wide pore structures for use as catalyst supports. So far activation of the PAN fiber composites supplied by ORNL has been difficult which is attributed to the low reactivity of the PAN fibers. As a result, studies are now being made of the activation of the PAN fibers to investigate the optimum carbonization and activation conditions for PAN based fibers.

  2. Electron spectroscopy of rubber and resin-based composites containing 2D carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composite materials with 2D carbon (graphene and/or single wall carbon nanotubes) are very promising due to their extraordinary electrical and mechanical properties. Graphene and natural rubber composites, which may be used for the gaskets or sealants, were prepared by ultrasonically assisted latex-mixing exfoliation and in-situ reduction process, with two vulcanization approaches: roll-mixing and hot-pressing. Also the resin-based composites, filled with micro-particles of Ag and graphene or carbon nanotubes, have been studied. The standards for the compositional characterization of these materials still are not established. In addition to the mostly used techniques, such as Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy, also Auger electron spectroscopy can be employed for the identification of graphene. In this study, the shape of C KVV peak, excited by electron beam and X-ray photons, has been investigated in different composite materials containing graphene and carbon nanotubes. A spectroscopic method for 2D carbon recognition, based on the Dx parameter which is determined from C KVV signal excited by X-ray photons, was proposed and verified. Even a small content of graphene in different types of composites was sufficient for this recognition due to the dominating presence of graphene on the surface of composites. - Highlights: • Chemical composition of the rubber composites was determined by XPS. • Auger spectrum of carbon was used for graphene identification in composites. • Small content of graphene was sufficient for its recognition from the D parameter

  3. Electron spectroscopy of rubber and resin-based composites containing 2D carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaciulis, S., E-mail: saulius.kaciulis@ismn.cnr.it [Institute for the Study of Nanostructured Materials, ISMN-CNR, P.O. Box 10, Monterotondo Stazione, 00015 Roma (Italy); Mezzi, A.; Balijepalli, S.K. [Institute for the Study of Nanostructured Materials, ISMN-CNR, P.O. Box 10, Monterotondo Stazione, 00015 Roma (Italy); Lavorgna, M. [Institute of Polymers, Composites and Biomaterials, IPCB-CNR, P.le Fermi, 80055 Napoli (Italy); Xia, H.S. [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610065 Sichuan (China)

    2015-04-30

    Composite materials with 2D carbon (graphene and/or single wall carbon nanotubes) are very promising due to their extraordinary electrical and mechanical properties. Graphene and natural rubber composites, which may be used for the gaskets or sealants, were prepared by ultrasonically assisted latex-mixing exfoliation and in-situ reduction process, with two vulcanization approaches: roll-mixing and hot-pressing. Also the resin-based composites, filled with micro-particles of Ag and graphene or carbon nanotubes, have been studied. The standards for the compositional characterization of these materials still are not established. In addition to the mostly used techniques, such as Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy, also Auger electron spectroscopy can be employed for the identification of graphene. In this study, the shape of C KVV peak, excited by electron beam and X-ray photons, has been investigated in different composite materials containing graphene and carbon nanotubes. A spectroscopic method for 2D carbon recognition, based on the D{sub x} parameter which is determined from C KVV signal excited by X-ray photons, was proposed and verified. Even a small content of graphene in different types of composites was sufficient for this recognition due to the dominating presence of graphene on the surface of composites. - Highlights: • Chemical composition of the rubber composites was determined by XPS. • Auger spectrum of carbon was used for graphene identification in composites. • Small content of graphene was sufficient for its recognition from the D parameter.

  4. Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube - Chromium Carbide Composite Through Laser Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ze; Gao, Yibo; Liang, Fei; Wu, Benxin; Gou, Jihua; Detrois, Martin; Tin, Sammy; Yin, Ming; Nash, Philip; Tang, Xiaoduan; Wang, Xinwei

    2016-03-01

    Ceramics often have high hardness and strength, and good wear and corrosion resistance, and hence have many important applications, which, however, are often limited by their poor fracture toughness. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may enhance ceramic fracture toughness, but hot pressing (which is one typical approach of fabricating CNT-ceramic composites) is difficult to apply for applications that require localized heat input, such as fabricating composites as surface coatings. Laser beam may realize localized material sintering with little thermal effect on the surrounding regions. However, for the typical ceramics for hard coating applications (as listed in Ref.[1]), previous work on laser sintering of CNT-ceramic composites with mechanical property characterizations has been very limited. In this paper, research work has been reported on the fabrication and characterization of CNT-ceramic composites through laser sintering of mixtures of CNTs and chromium carbide powders. Under the studied conditions, it has been found that laser-sintered composites have a much higher hardness than that for plasma-sprayed composites reported in the literature. It has also been found that the composites obtained by laser sintering of CNTs and chromium carbide powder mixtures have a fracture toughness that is ~23 % higher than the material obtained by laser sintering of chromium carbide powders without CNTs.

  5. Advanced materials based on carbon nanotube arrays, yarns and papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Phlip David

    Carbon nanotubes have hundreds of potential applications but require innovative processing techniques to manipulate the microscopic carbon dust into useful devices and products. This thesis describes efforts to process carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using novel methods with the goals of: (1) improving the properties of energy absorbing and composite carbon nanotube materials and (2) increasing understanding of fundamental structure-property relationships within these materials. Millimeter long CNTs, in the form of arrays, yarns and papers, were used to produce energy absorbing foams and high volume fraction CNT composites. Vertically aligned CNT arrays were grown on silicon substrates using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of ethylene gas over iron nano-particles. The low density, millimeter thick arrays were tested under compression as energy absorbing foams. With additional CVD processing steps, it was possible to tune the compressive properties of the arrays. After the longest treatment, the compressive strength of the arrays was increased by a factor of 35 with a density increase of only six fold, while also imparting recovery from compression to the array. Microscopy revealed that the post-synthesis CVD treatment increased the number of CNT walls through an epitaxial type radial growth on the surface of the as-grown tubes. The increase in tube radius and mutual support between nanotubes explained the increases in compressive strength while an increase in nanotube roughness was proposed as the morphological change responsible for recovery in the array. Carbon nanotube yarns were used as the raw material for macroscopic textile preforms with a multi-level hierarchical carbon nanotube (CNT) structure: nanotubes, bundles, spun single yarns, plied yarns and 3-D braids. In prior tensile tests, composites produced from the 3-D braids exhibited unusual mechanical behavior effects. The proposed physical hypotheses explained those effects by molecular level interactions and

  6. Microfiber devices based on carbon materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gengzhi Sun

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Microfiber devices are able to extend the micro/nano functionalities of materials or devices to the macroscopic scale with excellent flexibility and weavability, promising a variety of unique applications and, sometimes, also improved performance as compared with bulk counterparts. The fiber electrodes in these devices are often made of carbon materials (e.g. carbon nanotubes and graphene because of their exceptional electrical, mechanical, and structural properties. Covering the latest developments and aiming to stimulate more exciting applications, we comprehensively review the preparation and applications of carbon-microfiber devices on energy conversion and storage, electronics, sensors and actuators.

  7. Failure and fatigue mechanisms in composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, B. W.; Kulkarni, S. V.; Mclaughlin, P. V., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A phenomenological description of microfailure under monotonic and cyclic loading is presented, emphasizing the significance of material inhomogeneity for the analysis. Failure in unnotched unidirectional laminates is reviewed for the cases of tension, compression, shear, transverse normal, and combined loads. The failure of notched composite laminates is then studied, with particular attention paid to the effect of material heterogeneity on load concentration factors in circular holes in such laminates, and a 'materials engineering' shear-lay type model is presented. The fatigue of notched composites is discussed with the application of 'mechanistic wearout' model for determining crack propagation as a function of the number of fatigue cycles.-

  8. Structural disorder in ion irradiated carbon materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of ion irradiation on carbon based materials are reviewed laying emphasis on the well known ability of carbon to have different kinds of bonding configuration with the surrounding atoms. It was found that two kinds of bonding configuration of the carbon atoms are allowed in solid amorphous carbon phases. These rearrange the four valence electrons of carbon into sp2 (trigonal bond) and sp3 (tetrahedral bond) hybridizations. Driving the trigonal carbon fraction (x), the physical and chemical nature of solid carbon materials can change in a dramatic way ranging from metallic (x∼100%) to insulating (x∼0%) through semiconductor properties. The amount of the tetrahedral (or trigonal) carbon atoms can be controlled by ion beam irradiation, using suitable conditions and/or introducing foreign species such as hydrogen or silicon by the implantation technique. In hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon-carbon alloys (a-Si1-xCx:H), the ion beam effects are able to produce stable and reproducible compounds, achieved by tuning the hydrogen (silicon) concentration with well defined equilibrium curves between the trigonal carbon fraction and hydrogen (silicon) content. Raman spectroscopy and temperature dependent conductivity experiments performed on these alloys suggest clustering effects in samples with high carbon content (x∼0.5) due to the strong binding energy of the C-C double bond with respect to C-Si and Si-Si. Several models and theoretical studies such as the 'random covalent network' (RCN) and molecular dynamics calculations have been used to fit the experimental results. It is shown that, while RCN models are highly inaccurate because of the clustering effects, molecular dynamics calculation data are very close to the experimental measured physical properties and confirm the ability of the trigonal carbon to cluster in graphite-like aggregate

  9. Modeling of carbon nanotubes, graphene and their composites

    CERN Document Server

    Silvestre, Nuno

    2014-01-01

    This book contains ten chapters, authored by world experts in the field of simulation at nano-scale and aims to demonstrate the potentialities of computational techniques to model the mechanical behavior of nano-materials, such as carbon nanotubes, graphene and their composites. A large part of the research currently being conducted in the fields of materials science and engineering mechanics is devoted to carbon nanotubes, graphene and their applications. In this process, computational modeling is a very attractive research tool due to the difficulties in manufacturing and testing of nano-materials. Both atomistic modeling methods, such as molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics, and continuum modeling methods are being intensively used. Continuum modeling offers significant advantages over atomistic modeling such as the reduced computational effort, the capability of modeling complex structures and bridging different analysis scales, thus enabling modeling from the nano- to the macro-scale. On the oth...

  10. Extremely High Thermal Conductivity of Aligned Carbon Nanotube-Polyethylene Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Quanwen; Liu, Zhichun; Liu, Wei; Deng, Chengcheng; Yang, Nuo

    2015-11-01

    The ultra-low thermal conductivity of bulk polymers may be enhanced by combining them with high thermal conductivity materials such as carbon nanotubes. Different from random doping, we find that the aligned carbon nanotube-polyethylene composites has a high thermal conductivity by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The analyses indicate that the aligned composite not only take advantage of the high thermal conduction of carbon nanotubes, but enhance thermal conduction of polyethylene chains.

  11. BASIC PROPERTIES OF REFERENCE CROSSPLY CARBON-FIBER COMPOSITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corum, J.M.

    2001-01-11

    This report provides basic in-air property data and correlations-tensile, compressive, shear, tensile fatigue, and tensile creep-for a reference carbon-fiber composite being characterized as a part of the Durability of Carbon-Fiber Composites Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The overall goal of the project, which is sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Advanced Automotive Materials and is closely coordinated with the Advanced Composites Consortium, is to develop durability-based design guidance for polymeric composites for automotive structural applications. The composite addressed here is a {+-}45{degree} crossply consisting of continuous Thornel T300 fibers in a Baydur 420 IMR urethane matrix. Basic tensile, compressive, and shear properties are tabulated for the temperature range from {minus}40 to 120 C. Fatigue response at room-temperature and 120 C are presented, and creep and creep rupture at room temperature only are reported. In all cases, two fiber orientations--0/90{degree} and {+-}45{degree}--relative to the specimen axes are addressed. The properties and correlations presented are interim in nature. They are intended as a baseline for planning a full durability test program on this reference composite.

  12. Nondestructive evaluation of critical composite material structural elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, John C., Jr.; Lesko, John J.; Weyers, R.

    1996-11-01

    A small span bridge that has suffered corrosive deterioration of a number of the steel structural members is in the process of being rehabilitated with glass and carbon fiber reinforced, pultruded polymer structural beams. As part of a comprehensive research program to develop methods for modeling long term durability of the composite material, nondestructive evaluation if being used to provide a preliminary assessment of the initial condition of the beams as well as to monitor the deterioration of the beams during service.

  13. Hierarchical Porous Carbon Materials Derived from Sheep Manure for High-Capacity Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Caiyun; Zhu, Xiaohong; Cao, Min; Li, Menglin; Li, Na; Lai, Liuqin; Zhu, Jiliang; Wei, Dacheng

    2016-05-10

    3 D capacitance: Hierarchical porous carbon-based electrode materials with a composite structure are prepared from a biomass waste by a facile carbonization and activation process without using any additional templates. Benefiting from the composite structure, the ions experience a variety of environments, which contribute significantly to the excellent electrochemical properties of supercapacitors. PMID:27059168

  14. Poly(methyl methacrylate)/multi-wall carbon nanotubes composites prepared by solvent cast technique: Composites electrical percolation threshold

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slobodian, P.; Lengálová, A.; Sáha, P.; Šlouf, Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 16 (2007), s. 1705-1712. ISSN 0731-6844 Grant ostatní: GA ČR(CZ) GP106/05/P189 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : carbon nanotubes * MWNT * polymer composites Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 0.417, year: 2007

  15. Pseudo-ductility in intermingled carbon/glass hybrid composites with highly aligned discontinuous fibres

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Hana; Longana, Marco L; Jalalvand, Meisam; WISNOM, Michael R.; Potter, Kevin D

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to manufacture intermingled hybrid composites using aligned discontinuous fibres to achieve pseudo-ductility. Hybrid composites, made with different types of fibres that provide a balanced suite of modulus, strength and ductility, allow avoiding catastrophic failure that is a key limitation of composites. Two different material combinations of high strength carbon/E-glass and high modulus carbon/E-glass were selected. Several highly aligned and well dispersed short...

  16. Hybrid Carbon Fiber/ZnO Nanowires Polymeric Composite for Stuctural and Energy Harvesting Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Masghouni, Nejib

    2014-01-01

    Despite the many attractive features of carbon fiber reinforced polymers (FRPs) composites, they are prone to failure due to delamination. The ability to tailor the fiber/matrix interface FRPs is crucial to the development of composite materials with enhanced structural performance. In this dissertation, ZnO nanowires (NWs) were grown on the surface of carbon fibers utilizing low temperature hydrothermal synthesis technique prior to the hybrid composite fabrication. The scanning electron micr...

  17. Development of a Novel, Reactive Extrusion Process for Continuous Production of Long, Pure Carbon Nanotubes for Application in Lightweight Composite Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — According to the NASA A2-01 topic description titled Materials and Structures for Future Aircraft, "advanced materials and structures technologies are needed in all...

  18. Preparation and characterization of morph-genetic aluminum nitride/carbon composites from filter paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morph-genetic aluminum nitride/carbon composites with cablelike structure were prepared from filter paper template through the surface sol-gel process and carbothermal nitridation reaction. The resulting materials have a hierarchical structure originating from the morphology of cellulose paper. The aluminum nitride/carbon composites have the core-shell microstructure, the core is graphitic carbon, and the shell is aluminum nitride nanocoating formed by carbothermal nitridation reduction of alumina with the interfacial carbon in nitrogen atmosphere. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscope were employed to characterize the structural morphology and phase compositions of the final products

  19. Validation of the numerical model of single-layer composites reinforced with carbon fiber and aramid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sava, Mihaela; Hadǎr, Anton; Pǎrǎuşanu, Ioan; Petrescu, Horia-Alexandru; Baciu, Florin; Marinel, Stǎnescu Marius

    2016-06-01

    In this work we studied the experimental validation of the model and finite element analysis for a single layer of composite materials reinforced with carbon (denoted as C), aramid (K) and carbon-aramid (C-K) fibers. In the literature there are not many details about the differences that arise between transversal and longitudinal characteristics of composite materials reinforced with fabric, compared to those with unidirectional fibers. In order to achieve carbon and aramid composites we used twill fabric and for carbon-aramid plain fabric, as shown in Figure 1. In order to observe the static behavior of the considered specimens, numerical simulations were carried out in addition to the experimental determination of the characteristics of these materials. Layered composites are obviously the most widespread formula for getting advanced composite structures. It allows a unique variety of material and structural combinations leading to optimal design in a wide range of applications [1,2]. To design and verify the material composites it is necessary to know the basic mechanical constants of the materials. Almost all the layered composites consider that the every layer is an orthotropic material, so there are nine independent constants of material corresponding to the three principal directions: Young modulus E1, E2 and E3, shear modulus G12, G23 and G13, and major poison ratios ν12, ν23, ν13. Experimental determinations were performed using traction tests and strain gauges. For each of the three above mentioned materials, five samples were manufactured.

  20. An investigation on physical properties of polyethylene composite with bentonite, kaolin and calcium carbonate additives

    OpenAIRE

    Karabeyoğlu, Sencer S.; , Nurşen Öntürk

    2014-01-01

    Bentonite, Kaolin, Calcium carbonate easily obtained in nature as mineral products are widely used in plastics industry for additive materials. In this study, Bentonite, Kaolin, and Calcium carbonate minerals were compounded with polyethylene matrix used in specific rates. Prepared compounds melted in sheet metal molds and cooled down under appropriate conditions. Thus, production of composite material was achieved. Hardness, water absorption, and physical properties of manufactured composite...

  1. Modeling of gas-phase compression of carbon composites in thermogradient conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Скачков, Віктор Олексійович; Іванов, Віктор Ілліч; Нестеренко, Тетяна Миколаївна; Мосейко, Юрій Вікторович

    2013-01-01

    Properties of carbon-based composites depend on the structure of material, which is characterized by the arrangement of reinforcement filaments, their volume and porosity of material. Reduction of composites porosity is achieved by filling their porous structure with carbon using a method for the isothermal compression (thermal-gradient method). Isothermal methods are usually applied for compressing thin-walled articles in flow reactors under two-sided admission of reagent gas. The thermal-gr...

  2. Fabrication of carbon/SiO2 composites from the hydrothermal carbonization process of polysaccharide and their adsorption performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinhui; Li, Kunyu; Su, Min; Ren, Yanmei; Li, Ying; Chen, Jianxin; Li, Liang

    2016-11-20

    In this work, carbon/SiO2 composites, using amylose and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as raw materials, were successfully prepared by a facial hydrothermal carbonization process. The carbon/SiO2 composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), N2 adsorption and Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. The composites, which were made up of amorphous SiO2 and amorphous carbon, were found to have hierarchical porous structures. The mass ratios of amylose and SiO2 and the hydrothermal carbonization time had significant effects on the morphology of the composites, which had three shapes including monodispersed spheres, porous pieces and the nano-fibers combined with nano-spheres structures. The adsorption performance of the composites was studied using Pb(2+) as simulated contaminants from water. When the mass ratio of amylose and SiO2 was 9/1, the hydrothermal time was 30h and the hydrothermal temperature was 180°C, the adsorption capacity of the composites achieved to 52mg/g. Experimental data show that adsorption kinetics of the carbon/SiO2 composites can be fitted well by the Elovich model, while the isothermal data can be perfectly described by the Langmuir adsorption model and Freundlich adsorption model. The maximum adsorption capacity of the carbon/SiO2 composites is 56.18mgg(-1). PMID:27561502

  3. Synthesis, characterization and application of functional carbon nano materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Jin

    The synthesis, characterizations and applications of carbon nanomaterials, including carbon nanorods, carbon nanosheets, carbon nanohoneycombs and carbon nanotubes were demonstrated. Different growth techniques such as pulsed laser deposition, DC/RF sputtering, hot filament physical vapour deposition, evaporative casting and vacuum filtration methods were introduced or applied for synthesizing carbon nanomaterials. The morphology, chemical compositions, bond structures, electronic, mechanical and sensing properties of the obtained samples were investigated. Tilted well-aligned carbon micro- and nano- hybrid rods were fabricated on Si at different substrate temperatures and incident angles of carbon source beam using the hot filament physical vapour deposition technique. The morphologic surfaces and bond structures of the oblique carbon rod-like structures were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron diffraction and Raman scattering spectroscopy. The field emission behaviour of the fabricated samples was also tested. Carbon nanosheets and nanohoneycombs were also synthesized on Si substrates using a hot filament physical vapor deposition technique under methane ambient and vacuum, respectively. The four-point Au electrodes are then sputtered on the surface of the nanostructured carbon films to form prototypical humidity sensors. The sensing properties of prototypical sensors at different temperature, humidity, direct current, and alternative current voltage were characterized. Linear sensing response of sensors to relative humidity ranging from 11% to 95% is observed at room temperature. Experimental data indicate that the carbon nanosheets based sensors exhibit an excellent reversible behavior and long-term stability. It also has higher response than that of the humidity sensor with carbon nanohoneycombs materials. Conducting composite films containing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared in

  4. Evolution of Electronic Circuits using Carbon Nanotube Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, M K; Kotsialos, A; Volpati, D; Vissol-Gaudin, E; Pearson, C; Bowen, L; Obara, B; Zeze, D A; Groves, C; Petty, M C

    2016-01-01

    Evolution-in-materio concerns the computer controlled manipulation of material systems using external stimuli to train or evolve the material to perform a useful function. In this paper we demonstrate the evolution of a disordered composite material, using voltages as the external stimuli, into a form where a simple computational problem can be solved. The material consists of single-walled carbon nanotubes suspended in liquid crystal; the nanotubes act as a conductive network, with the liquid crystal providing a host medium to allow the conductive network to reorganise when voltages are applied. We show that the application of electric fields under computer control results in a significant change in the material morphology, favouring the solution to a classification task. PMID:27558444

  5. Direct Electrochemistry of Glucose Oxidase on Novel Free-Standing Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanospheres@Carbon Nanofibers Composite Film

    OpenAIRE

    Xueping Zhang; Dong Liu; Libo Li; Tianyan You

    2015-01-01

    We have proposed a novel free-standing nitrogen-doped carbon nanospheres@carbon nanofibers (NCNSs@CNFs) composite film with high processability for the investigation of the direct electron transfer (DET) of glucose oxidase (GOx) and the DET-based glucose biosensing. The composites were simply prepared by controlled thermal treatment of electrospun polypyrrole nanospheres doped polyacrylonitrile nanofibers (PPyNSs@PAN NFs). Without any pretreatment, the as-prepared material can directly serve ...

  6. Adhesion, differentiation and immune activation of human osteogenic cells in cultures on carbon-fibre reinforced carbon composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bačáková, Lucie; Starý, V.; Glogar, Petr; Lisá, Věra

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 6, - (2003), s. 8-9. ISSN 1429-7248. [Konferencja Naukowa "Biomaterialy w medycynie i weterynarii" /13./. Rytro, 09.10.2003-12.10.2003] R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 527.130 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3046908; CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : carbon-carbon composites * surface properties * bone tissue engineering Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials

  7. Preparation of PAN/phenolic-based carbon/carbon composites with flexible towpreg carbon fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon/carbon composites made with flexible towpreg carbon fiber as reinforcement and phenolic resins as matrix precursor were impregnated with pitch during re-carbonization process. The structural characteristics of the composites were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), three-point bending tests, Archimedes' method and water adsorption. Results showed that the density of the carbon/carbon composites increases from 1.45 to 1.54 g/cm3 with the cycles of pitch impregnated and re-carbonization. Open porosity measurement indicated that the increase of porosity resulted from the decomposition of phenolic resin matrix, and the open porosity of the composite gradually decreased after the impregnation and re-carbonization process. These composites also exhibited an improvement in flexural strength with increasing number of densification cycles. From SEM morphological observation, it was concluded that few cracks appeared in the surfaces and a few smaller pores with a diameter <1 μm could be observed

  8. Nondestructive characterization of advanced composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive review of nondestructive characterization (NDC) techniques and their application to metal-matrix, polymer-matrix and ceramic-matrix composites is presented. Particular attention is given to the identification of critical materials properties and defects in these advanced composites. NDC is required: (i) to detect discrete defects, such as delaminations and cracking, and (ii) to measure distributed material properties, such as density, resistivity and elastic constants. Ultrasonic and eddy-current characterization are described in detail, along with new NDC results obtained at the Aeronautical and Maritime Research Laboratory. These include a method for the determination of fibre volume fraction in continuous fibre reinforced metal-matrix composites using eddy-current NDC, and the use of eddy-current methods to complement ultrasonic testing for characterization of impact damage in graphite-epoxy laminates. Future problem areas and possible solutions in NDC of advanced composites are also discussed. 90 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs

  9. Processes for fabricating composite reinforced material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seals, Roland D.; Ripley, Edward B.; Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2015-11-24

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  10. Use of Carbon Fiber Composite Molecular Sieves for Air Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Frederick S [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

    2005-09-01

    A novel adsorbent material, 'carbon fiber composite molecular sieve' (CFCMS), has been developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Its features include high surface area, large pore volume, and a rigid, permeable carbon structure that exhibits significant electrical conductivity. The unique combination of high adsorptive capacity, permeability, good mechanical properties, and electrical conductivity represents an enabling technology for the development of novel gas separation and purification systems. In this context, it is proposed that a fast-cycle air separation process that exploits a kinetic separation of oxygen and nitrogen should be possible using a CFCMS material coupled with electrical swing adsorption (ESA). The adsorption of O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2} on activated carbon fibers was investigated using static and dynamic techniques. Molecular sieving effects in the activated carbon fiber were highlighted by the adsorption of CO{sub 2}, a more sensitive probe molecule for the presence of microporosity in adsorbents. The kinetic studies revealed that O2 was more rapidly adsorbed on the carbon fiber than N{sub 2}, and with higher uptake under equilibrium conditions, providing the fiber contained a high proportion of very narrow micropores. The work indicated that CFCMS is capable of separating O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} from air on the basis of the different diffusion rates of the two molecules in the micropore network of the activated carbon fibers comprising the composite material. In response to recent enquires from several potential users of CFCMS materials, attention has been given to the development of a viable continuous process for the commercial production of CFCMS material. As part of this effort, work was implemented on characterizing the performance of lignin-based activated carbon fiber, a potentially lower cost fiber than the pitch-based fibers used for CFCMS production to date. Similarly, to address engineering issues

  11. Numerical simulation of isothermal chemical vapor infiltration process in fabrication of carbon-carbon composites by finite element method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李克智; 李贺军; 姜开宇

    2000-01-01

    The chemical vapor infiltration process in fabrication of carbon-carbon composites is highly inefficient and requires long processing time. These limitations add considerably to the cost of fabrication and restrict the application of this material. Efforts have been made to study the CVI process in fabrication of carbon-carbon composites by computer simulation and predict the process parameters, density, porosity, etc. According to the characteristics of CVI process, the basic principle of FEM and mass transport, the finite element model has been established. Incremental finite element equations and the elemental stiffness matrices have been derived for the first time. The finite element program developed by the authors has been used to simulate the ICVI process in fabrication of carbon-carbon composites. Computer color display of simulated results can express the densification and distributions of density and porosity in preform clearly. The influence of process parameters on the densification of prefo

  12. Carbon Fiber as Anode Material for Cathodic Prevention in Cementitious Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Emma Qingnan; Tang, Luping; Zack, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Cathodic prevention (CPre) technique is a promising method and has been used for the past two decades to prevent steel from corrosion in concrete structures. However, wide application of this technique has been restricted due to high costs of anode materials. In order to lower the cost and further improve this technique, carbon fiber composite anode has been introduced as an alternative anode material with affordable price and other outstanding properties. This paper presents the study of usi...

  13. Carbon storage potential in natural fiber composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental performance of hemp based natural fiber mat thermoplastic (NMT) has been evaluated in this study by quantifying carbon storage potential and CO2 emissions and comparing the results with commercially available glass fiber composites. Non-woven mats of hemp fiber and polypropylene matrix were used to make NMT samples by film-stacking method without using any binder aid. The results showed that hemp based NMT have compatible or even better strength properties as compared to conventional flax based thermoplastics. A value of 63 MPa for flexural strength is achieved at 64% fiber content by weight. Similarly, impact energy values (84-154 J/m) are also promising. The carbon sequestration and storage by hemp crop through photosynthesis is estimated by quantifying dry biomass of fibers based on one metric ton of NMT. A value of 325 kg carbon per metric ton of hemp based composite is estimated which can be stored by the product during its useful life. An extra 22% carbon storage can be achieved by increasing the compression ratio by 13% while maintaining same flexural strength. Further, net carbon sequestration by industrial hemp crop is estimated as 0.67 ton/h/year, which is compatible to all USA urban trees and very close to naturally, regenerated forests. A comparative life cycle analysis focused on non-renewable energy consumption of natural and glass fiber composites shows that a net saving of 50 000 MJ (3 ton CO2 emissions) per ton of thermoplastic can be achieved by replacing 30% glass fiber reinforcement with 65% hemp fiber. It is further estimated that 3.07 million ton CO2 emissions (4.3% of total USA industrial emissions) and 1.19 million m3 crude oil (1.0% of total Canadian oil consumption) can be saved by substituting 50% fiber glass plastics with natural fiber composites in North American auto applications. However, to compete with glass fiber effectively, further research is needed to improve natural fiber processing, interfacial bonding and

  14. Health monitoring method for composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Jr., Kenneth S.; Morris, Shelby J.

    2011-04-12

    An in-situ method for monitoring the health of a composite component utilizes a condition sensor made of electrically conductive particles dispersed in a polymeric matrix. The sensor is bonded or otherwise formed on the matrix surface of the composite material. Age-related shrinkage of the sensor matrix results in a decrease in the resistivity of the condition sensor. Correlation of measured sensor resistivity with data from aged specimens allows indirect determination of mechanical damage and remaining age of the composite component.

  15. Special Polymer/Carbon Composite Films for Detecting SO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, Margie; Ryan, Margaret; Yen, Shiao-Pin; Kisor, Adam; Jewell, April; Shevade, Abhijit; Manatt, Kenneth; Taylor, Charles; Blanco, Mario; Goddard, William

    2008-01-01

    A family of polymer/carbon films has been developed for use as sensory films in electronic noses for detecting SO2 gas at concentrations as low as 1 part per million (ppm). Most previously reported SO2 sensors cannot detect SO2 at concentrations below tens of ppm; only a few can detect SO2 at 1 ppm. Most of the sensory materials used in those sensors (especially inorganic ones that include solid oxide electrolytes, metal oxides, and cadmium sulfide) must be used under relatively harsh conditions that include operation and regeneration at temperatures greater than 100 C. In contrast, the present films can be used to detect 1 ppm of SO2 at typical opening temperatures between 28 and 32 C and can be regenerated at temperatures between 36 and 40 C. The basic concept of making sensing films from polymer/carbon composites is not new. The novelty of the present family of polymer/carbon composites lies in formulating the polymer components of these composites specifically to optimize their properties for detecting SO2. First-principles quantum-mechanical calculations of the energies of binding of SO2 molecules to various polymer functionalities are used as a guide for selecting polymers and understanding the role of polymer functionalities in sensing. The polymer used in the polymer-carbon composite is a copolymer of styrene derivative units with vinyl pyridine or substituted vinyl pyridine derivative units. To make a substituted vinyl pyridine for use in synthesizing such a polymer, poly(2-vinyl pyridine) that has been dissolved in methanol is reacted with 3-chloropropylamine that has been dissolved in a solution of methanol. The methanol is then removed to obtain the copolymer. Later, the copolymer can be dissolved in an appropriate solvent with a suspension of carbon black to obtain a mixture that can be cast and then dried to obtain a sensory film.

  16. Rheological analysis of the phenolic and furfuryl resins used in the carbon materials processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Cocchieri Botelho

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbon materials processing is an advanced technology due to its aerospace and medical applications. In the aerospace area one can mention the carbon/carbon composites used in rockets and aeronautical brakes; in the medical area one can mention the intrabody implant tools such as heart and hydrocephalic valves and pacemaker electrode tips. The highly sophisticated purpose of its application requires a very tight processing control, which defines the microstructure the mechanical, thermal and electrical characteristics of the final material. The objective of this study is to correlate rheological, chromatographic and thermal analysis of phenolic and furfuryl resins, aiming their use as raw materials in carbon/carbon composite and glassy carbon processing. The obtained results are correlated and used directly in the establishment of the adequate parameters for carbon reinforcement impregnation and to prepare glassy carbon samples with controlled porosity.

  17. Covalent Crosslinking of Carbon Nanotube Materials for Improved Tensile Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, James S.; Miller, Sandi G.; Williams, Tiffany A.; Meador, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have attracted much interest in recent years due to their exceptional mechanical properties. Currently, the tensile properties of bulk carbon nanotube-based materials (yarns, sheets, etc.) fall far short of those of the individual nanotube elements. The premature failure in these materials under tensile load has been attributed to inter-tube sliding, which requires far less force than that needed to fracture individual nanotubes.1,2 In order for nanotube materials to achieve their full potential, methods are needed to restrict this tube-tube shear and increase inter-tube forces.Our group is examining covalent crosslinking between the nanotubes as a means to increase the tensile properties of carbon nanotube materials. We are working with multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) sheet and yarn materials obtained from commercial sources. Several routes to functionalize the nanotubes have been examined including nitrene, aryl diazonium, and epoxide chemistries. The functional nanotubes were crosslinked through small molecule or polymeric bridges. Additionally, electron beam irradiation induced crosslinking of the non-functional and functional nanotube materials was conducted. For example, a nanotube sheet material containing approximately 3.5 mol amine functional groups exhibited a tensile strength of 75 MPa and a tensile modulus of 1.16 GPa, compared to 49 MPa and 0.57 GPa, respectively, for the as-received material. Electron beam irradiation (2.2x 1017 ecm2) of the same amine-functional sheet material further increased the tensile strength to 120 MPa and the modulus to 2.61 GPa. This represents approximately a 150 increase in tensile strength and a 360 increase in tensile modulus over the as-received material with only a 25 increase in material mass. Once we have optimized the nanotube crosslinking methods, the performance of these materials in polymer matrix composites will be evaluated.

  18. Effect of carbon nanotubes upon emissions from cutting and sanding carbon fiber-epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being incorporated into structural composites to enhance material strength. During fabrication or repair activities, machining nanocomposites may release CNTs into the workplace air. An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the emissions generated by cutting and sanding on three types of epoxy-composite panels: Panel A containing graphite fibers, Panel B containing graphite fibers and carbon-based mat, and Panel C containing graphite fibers, carbon-based mat, and multi-walled CNTs. Aerosol sampling was conducted with direct-reading instruments, and filter samples were collected for measuring elemental carbon (EC) and fiber concentrations. Our study results showed that cutting Panel C with a band saw did not generate detectable emissions of fibers inspected by transmission electron microscopy but did increase the particle mass, number, and EC emission concentrations by 20–80 % compared to Panels A and B. Sanding operation performed on two Panel C resulted in fiber emission rates of 1.9 × 108 and 2.8 × 106 fibers per second (f/s), while no free aerosol fibers were detected from sanding Panels A and B containing no CNTs. These free CNT fibers may be a health concern. However, the analysis of particle and EC concentrations from these same samples cannot clearly indicate the presence of CNTs, because extraneous aerosol generation from machining the composite epoxy material increased the mass concentrations of the EC

  19. Effect of carbon nanotubes upon emissions from cutting and sanding carbon fiber-epoxy composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heitbrink, William A. [LMK OSH Consulting LLC (United States); Lo, Li-Ming, E-mail: LLo@cdc.gov [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Division of Applied Research and Technology, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being incorporated into structural composites to enhance material strength. During fabrication or repair activities, machining nanocomposites may release CNTs into the workplace air. An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the emissions generated by cutting and sanding on three types of epoxy-composite panels: Panel A containing graphite fibers, Panel B containing graphite fibers and carbon-based mat, and Panel C containing graphite fibers, carbon-based mat, and multi-walled CNTs. Aerosol sampling was conducted with direct-reading instruments, and filter samples were collected for measuring elemental carbon (EC) and fiber concentrations. Our study results showed that cutting Panel C with a band saw did not generate detectable emissions of fibers inspected by transmission electron microscopy but did increase the particle mass, number, and EC emission concentrations by 20–80 % compared to Panels A and B. Sanding operation performed on two Panel C resulted in fiber emission rates of 1.9 × 10{sup 8} and 2.8 × 10{sup 6} fibers per second (f/s), while no free aerosol fibers were detected from sanding Panels A and B containing no CNTs. These free CNT fibers may be a health concern. However, the analysis of particle and EC concentrations from these same samples cannot clearly indicate the presence of CNTs, because extraneous aerosol generation from machining the composite epoxy material increased the mass concentrations of the EC.

  20. Growth of Carbon Nanostructure Materials Using Laser Vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehozeky, S.

    2000-01-01

    Since the potential applications of carbon nanotubes (CNT) was discovered in many fields, such as non-structure electronics, lightweight composite structure, and drug delivery, CNT has been grown by many techniques in which high yield single wall CNT has been produced by physical processes including arc vaporization and laser vaporization. In this presentation, the growth mechanism of the carbon nanostructure materials by laser vaporization is to be discussed. Carbon nanoparticles and nanotubes have been synthesized using pulsed laser vaporization on Si substrates in various temperatures and pressures. Two kinds of targets were used to grow the nanostructure materials. One was a pure graphite target and the other one contained Ni and Co catalysts. The growth temperatures were 600-1000 C and the pressures varied from several torr to 500 torr. Carbon nanoparticles were observed when a graphite target was used, although catalysts were deposited on substrates before growing carbon films. When the target contains catalysts, carbon nanotubes (CNT) are obtained. The CNT were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, optical absorption and transmission, and Raman spectroscopy. The temperature-and pressure-dependencies of carbon nanotubes' growth rate and size were investigated.

  1. Thermal shock characteristics of C-B-Ti composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C-B-Ti composite ceramic materials have some preferable properties including high melting point as the inner wall materials of nuclear fusion devices, but their thermal shock resistances are not well known. In this experiment, those materials were fabricated by sintering carbon, boron and titanium powders, and then characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray micro-analysis, scanning electron microscopy and density measurement. Thermal shock tests of these samples were performed using a hollow-cathode type electron-beam apparatus. Thermal-stress fracture was more infrequent in samples containing higher carbon and lower titanium contents. The investigation of relations between the microstructures and the atomic concentration ratios revealed that samples with high titanium and low carbon concentrations had polycrystals of TiC and TiB2, while those containing high carbon and low titanium consisted of TiC, TiB2 and graphite polycrystals, and exhibited complex microstructures of the ceramics and the graphite. Higher resistance to thermal-stress fracture of samples with high carbon and low titanium contents may be highly related to the constituent graphite for it has high thermal-shock resistance and complex microstructures with high crack-propagation resistances. (author)

  2. Fabrication of free-standing pure carbon-based composite material with the combination of sp.sup.2./sup.-sp.sup.3./sup. hybridizations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Varga, Marián; Vretenár, V.; Kotlár, M.; Skakalová, V.; Kromka, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 308, JUL (2014), s. 211-215. ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : SWNT buckypaper * diamond * composite structures * MWCVD Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.711, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169433214009118

  3. Characterization of carbon/carbon composites prepared by different processing routes including liquid pitch densification process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon/carbon composites with an apparent density higher than 1.80 g/cm3 were prepared using a multi-step densification process. This consists of a pre-densification step followed by pitch impregnation/pyrolysis (I/P) cycles carried out under moderate pressure. Three pre-densification methods were investigated to significantly increase the apparent density of a raw preform to about 1.4 g/cm3. These were:(i) impregnation by carbonaceous powder slurry, (ii) film boiling chemical vapor infiltration, (iii) impregnation with a combination of synthetic pitch I/P and carbonaceous powder slurry. Composites were prepared from each of these three pre-densified materials, using a liquid pitch processing route with four I/P cycles with M50 petroleum pitch, under moderate pressures (10 MPa). As a reference a carbon/carbon composite was prepared using four I/P cycles with pitch. All four composites had different microstructural characteristics and different thermal properties. The influence of processing on thermal properties is discussed in relation to the microstructural characteristics. (authors)

  4. Controlled degradation pattern of hydroxyapatite/calcium carbonate composite microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ning; Zhong, Qiwei; Zhou, Ying; Kundu, Subhas C; Yao, Juming; Cai, Yurong

    2016-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) is widely used in clinic due to its good biocompatibility and osteoconductivity except for its slow degradation speed. In the present study, spherical calcium carbonate (CaCO3 ) is fabricated in the presence of silk protein sericin, which is transmuted into HAP microsphere in phosphate solution with the assistance of microwave irradiation. The effect of reaction conditions on the conversion of CaCO3 is investigated including reaction time, chemical composition of phosphate solution, and microwave power to get a series of HAP/CaCO3 composites. The degradation property of the composites is evaluated in vitro. Results show the degradation speed of the composite with higher HAP content is slower. The degradation rate of the composite could be changed effectively by modulating the proportion of HAP and CaCO3 . This work provides a feasible method for the preparation of spherical HAP/CaCO3 composite with controllable degradability. The composite thus obtained may be an ideal material for bone tissue engineering application. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:518-524, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27037606

  5. Fibrous composites comprising carbon nanotubes and silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Huisheng; Zhu, Yuntian Theodore; Peterson, Dean E.; Jia, Quanxi

    2011-10-11

    Fibrous composite comprising a plurality of carbon nanotubes; and a silica-containing moiety having one of the structures: (SiO).sub.3Si--(CH.sub.2).sub.n--NR.sub.1R.sub.2) or (SiO).sub.3Si--(CH.sub.2).sub.n--NCO; where n is from 1 to 6, and R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are each independently H, CH.sub.3, or C.sub.2H.sub.5.

  6. Quasi-Carbon Fibers and the Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@The aim of this report is to study the properties of quasi-carbon fibers (QCF) prepared from the PAN fiber precursor by pyrolysis at a temperature between 400℃ and 1200℃. The resistivity of QCF with different heat-treated temperature (HTT) was investigated by a Hall-35 testing system,and the flexural properties of the result composites (QCFC) are also discussed. In addition, the scanning electronic microscope (SEM) was utilized to observe the surface morphology of QCF and the fracture section of QCFC obtained from flexural testing.

  7. Electrical properties of foamed polypropylene/carbon black composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliev, M.; Kotzev, G.; Vulchev, V.

    2016-02-01

    Polypropylene composites containing carbon black fillers were produced by vibration assisted extrusion process. Solid (unfoamed) composite samples were molded by conventional injection molding method, while structural foams were molded by a low pressure process. The foamed samples were evidenced to have a solid skin-foamed core structure which main parameters were found to depend on the quantity of material injected in the mold. The average bubbles' sizes and their distribution were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. It is established that the conductivity of the foamed samples gradually decreases when reducing the sample density. Nevertheless, the conductivity is found to be lower than the conductivity of the unfoamed samples both being of the same order. The flexural properties of the composites were studied and the results were discussed in the context of the structure parameters of the foamed samples.

  8. Fiber reinforced composite material and method of manufacturing the same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mother material resin is impregnated to a base material comprising an assembly of continuous fibers, and then the mother material resin is cured. The mother material resin contains a main agent comprising diglycidylether of bisphenol A alone or together with tetrafunctional-type epoxy resin. The mother resin further contains a curing agent comprising diaminodiphenylmethane alone or a mixture thereof with methaphenylene diamine, and a reactive diluent for an epoxy resin. The continuous fibers are preferably comprise glass fibers, carbon fibers or aromatic polyamidetype fibers. As the tetrafunctional-type epoxy resin, tetraglycidylamino-diphenyl methane is preferable. As the reactive diluent for epoxy resin, a styrene oxide, glycidylmethacrylate or the like is preferable. Thus, a composite material capable of keeping high strength at a circumstance to be exposed to radiation rays can be obtained. (I.N.)

  9. Composite materials for rail transit systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, O. Hayden, Jr.; Guerdal, Zafer; Herakovich, Carl T.

    1987-01-01

    The potential is explored for using composite materials in urban mass transit systems. The emphasis was to identify specific advantages of composite materials in order to determine their actual and potential usage for carbody and guideway structure applications. The literature was reviewed, contacts were made with major domestic system operators, designers, and builders, and an analysis was made of potential composite application to railcar construction. Composites were found to be in use throughout the transit industry, usually in secondary or auxiliary applications such as car interior and nonstructural exterior panels. More recently, considerable activity has been initiated in the area of using composites in the load bearing elements of civil engineering structures such as highway bridges. It is believed that new and improved manufacturing refinements in pultrusion and filament winding will permit the production of beam sections which can be used in guideway structures. The inherent corrosion resistance and low maintenance characteristics of composites should result in lowered maintenance costs over a prolonged life of the structure.

  10. MNi4.8Sn0.2(M=La,Nd)-supported multi-walled carbon nanotube composites as hydrogen storase materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN JianWei; LIAO ShiJun; LIU JunMin

    2007-01-01

    Two composites LaNi4.8Sn0.2/CNTs and NdNi4.8Sn0.2/CNTs were prepared by an impregnation-reduction method.Their hydrogen storage capacity could reach up to 2.96 wt% and 2.88 wt% respectively at room temperature and 1.0 MPa pressure.These values,which might result from the synergetic effect between the alloy nanoparticles and the pretreated CNTs,were three times higher than those of the unsupported MNi4.8Sn0.2(M=La,Nd)alloys under the same conditions.XRD and TEM revealed that the alloy particles were uniformly dispersed on the CNTs and the average particle size was ca.30 nm.The composites also showed good stability and the hydrogen storage capacity decreased by less than 6% after 100 adsorption-desorption cycles.Moreover,no noticeable change in crystalline structure was bserved for the composites.

  11. Nonlinear numerical modelling of lightning strike effect on composite panels with temperature dependent material properties

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelal, G.; Murphy, A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a physics based modelling procedure to predict the thermal damage of composite material when struck by lightning. The procedure uses the Finite Element Method with non-linear material models to represent the extreme thermal material behaviour of the composite material (carbon/epoxy) and an embedded copper mesh protection system. Simulation predictions are compared against published experimental data, illustrating the potential accuracy and computational cost of virtual lig...

  12. Hybrid Matrices Layer of Carbon Fiber Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. B. Balu Naik

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric composites have gone through a level of maturity beyond the laboratory stage with the development of all composite aircraft structures. Yet the basic understanding of the material used in its primary structure has not been extensively investigated. Although this may be attributed in part to the proprietary nature of the system, we believe that it is because of lack of specific tools required for its analysis.Specifically, micromechanical models always assume an evenly distributed homogeneous matrix while lamination theory assumes constant stress through the laminate thickness. Specifically, this work focuses on the development of model systems that can be studied without concerns of proprietary and/or export control requirements. Consequently, the amount of toughness improvement must be balanced between interlaminar and intralaminar fracture toughness. Finally, this work has demonstrated that even though the multilayer structured laminates provide Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness improvements, their mechanical testing behavior is extremely different than conventional composite structures.

  13. Composite materials for wind power turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndsted, P.; Lilholt, H.; Lystrup, Aa.

    2005-01-01

    Renewable energy resources, of which wind energy is prominent, are part of the solution to the global energy problem. Wind turbine and the rotorblade concepts are reviewed, and loadings by wind and gravity as important factors for the fatigue performance of the materials are considered. Wood and...... composites are discussed as candidates for rotorblades. The fibers and matrices for composites are described, and their high stiffness, low density, and good fatigue performance are emphasized. Manufacturing technologies for composites are presented and evaluated with respect to advantages, problems, and...... procedures for documentation of properties are reviewed, and fatigue loading histories are discussed, together with methods for data handling and statistical analysis of (large) amounts of test data. Future challenges for materials in the field of wind turbines are presented, with a focus on thermoplastic...

  14. Porphyrin Composite Materials for Fullerene Separation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šabata, Stanislav; Kuncová, Gabriela; Hetflejš, Jiří; Lhoták, P.; Slavíček, J.

    - : -, 2011, 64 /P9/. ISBN N. [Zing Nanomaterials Conference 2011. Xcaret (MX), 28.11.2011-02.12.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0691 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : silica gel * composite materials * porphyrin Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  15. Carbon nanotube reinforced hybrid composites: Computational modeling of environmental fatigue and usability for wind blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dai, Gaoming; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2015-01-01

    The potential of advanced carbon/glass hybrid reinforced composites with secondary carbon nanotube reinforcement for wind energy applications is investigated here with the use of computational experiments. Fatigue behavior of hybrid as well as glass and carbon fiber reinforced composites with and...... automatically using the Python based code. 3D computational studies of environment and fatigue analyses of multiscale composites with secondary nano-scale reinforcement in different material phases and different CNTs arrangements are carried out systematically in this paper. It was demonstrated that composites...... with the secondary CNT reinforcements (especially, aligned tubes) present superior fatigue performances than those without reinforcements, also under combined environmental and cyclic mechanical loading. This effect is stronger for carbon composites, than for hybrid and glass composites....

  16. On the elastic properties of carbon nanotube-based composites: modelling and characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Thostenson, E T

    2003-01-01

    The exceptional mechanical and physical properties observed for carbon nanotubes has stimulated the development of nanotube-based composite materials, but critical challenges exist before we can exploit these extraordinary nanoscale properties in a macroscopic composite. At the nanoscale, the structure of the carbon nanotube strongly influences the overall properties of the composite. The focus of this research is to develop a fundamental understanding of the structure/size influence of carbon nanotubes on the elastic properties of nanotube-based composites. Towards this end, the nanoscale structure and elastic properties of a model composite system of aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in a polystyrene matrix were characterized, and a micromechanical approach for modelling of short fibre composites was modified to account for the structure of the nanotube reinforcement to predict the elastic modulus of the nanocomposite as a function of the constituent properties, reinforcement geometry and nanot...

  17. The application of transient thermography for the thermal characterisation of carbon fibre/epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wróbel

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Primary purpose of the present experimental study was to evaluate the local fibre content in carbon fibre/epoxy composites using transient thermography.Design/methodology/approach: The experiments have been performed using transient thermography to obtain the thermograms for carbon/epoxy specimens with different carbon fibre content. From obtained thermograms the thermal diffusivity values were determined and compared for each specimen and correlated with carbon content. The composites were two times tested using two different heating conditions to check the conformity of determined diffusivity values.Findings: It was found from obtained results that composites with different carbon fibre content had different values of thermal diffusivity, indicating that transient thermography can be considered as a non-destructive testing method for fiber content evaluation in CFRP composites.Research limitations/implications: Developed empirical formula is not universal for any other fibre reinforced polymer composite, so different relationships should be determined for different composites.Practical implications: The results obtained from present experiment would be of great importance in the industrial applications to obtain first estimate of carbon fibre content in fibre reinforced composite materials.Originality/value: The originality of present investigation is in application of transient thermography for local fibre content evaluation in polymer composite materials. The method should be of interest for the industrial quality control applications and is of great importance for composite products with high failure-free requirements.

  18. High Volume Fraction Carbon Nanotube Composites for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siochi, Emilie J.; Kim, Jae-Woo; Sauti, Godfrey; Cano, Roberto J.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Czabaj, Michael; Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.

    2015-01-01

    Reported nanoscale mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) suggest that their use may enable the fabrication of significantly lighter structures for use in space applications. To be useful in the fabrication of large structures, however, their attractive nanoscale properties must be retained as they are scaled up to bulk materials and converted into practically useful forms. Advances in CNT production have significantly increased the quantities available for use in manufacturing processes, but challenges remain with the retention of nanoscale properties in larger assemblies of CNTs. This work summarizes recent progress in producing carbon nanotube composites with tensile properties approaching those of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. These advances were achieved in nanocomposites with CNT content of 70% by weight. The processing methods explored to yield these CNT composite properties will be discussed, as will the characterization and test methods that were developed to provide insight into the factors that contribute to the enhanced tensile properties. Technology maturation was guided by parallel advancements in computational modeling tools that aided in the interpretation of experimental data.

  19. Composite material pedestrian bridge for the Port of Bilbao

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composite materials in comparison to traditional ones, steel and concrete, present advantages in civil works construction: lower weight, higher corrosion resistance (especially in the marine environment), and ease of installation. On the other hand, fabrication costs are generally higher. This is the reason why this technology is not widely used. This work illustrates the process followed for the design, fabrication and installation of a composite material pedestrian bridge in the Port of Bilbao (Northern Spain). In order to reduce the price of the bridge, the use of low cost materials was considered, therefore polyester resin was selected as the polymeric matrix, and glass fibres as reinforcement. Two material choices were studied. Currently in the market there is high availability of carbon nanoparticles: carbon nanotubes (CNT) and carbon nanofibres (CNF), so it was decided to add this kind of nanoparticles to the reference material with the objective of improving its mechanical properties. The main challenge was to transfer the CNT and CNF excellent properties to the polymeric matrix. This requires dispersing the nanoreinforcements as individual particles in the polymeric matrix to avoid agglomerates. For this reason, an advanced high shear forces dispersion technique (called 'three roll mills') was studied and implemented. Also surface functionalization of the nanoreinforcements by chemical treatment was carried out. Herein, a comparison is performed between both materials studied, the explanation of the employment of the reference material (without nanoreinforcement) as the one used in the fabrication of the pedestrian bridge is justified and, finally, the main characteristics of the final design of the structural element are described.

  20. Metal matrix composites reinforced with SiC long fibers and carbon nanomaterials produced by electrodeposition

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul Karim, Muhammad Ramzan

    2015-01-01

    The research work of this PhD thesis was done on the study, production and characterization of two types of metal matrix composites: 1) fiber reinforced metal matrix composites and, 2) carbon nanomaterials reinforced metal matrix composites. In fiber reinforced metal matrix composites, a metal or an alloy is reinforced with continuous or discontinuous fibers in order to improve the specific strength and stiffness at high temperatures. For example superalloys are the typical materials for the ...

  1. Functional Carbon Materials for Electrochemical Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huihui

    The ability to harvest and convert solar energy has been associated with the evolution of human civilization. The increasing consumption of fossil fuels since the industrial revolution, however, has brought to concerns in ecological deterioration and depletion of the fossil fuels. Facing these challenges, humankind is forced to seek for clean, sustainable and renewable energy resources, such as biofuels, hydraulic power, wind power, geothermal energy and other kinds of alternative energies. However, most alternative energy sources, generally in the form of electrical energy, could not be made available on a continuous basis. It is, therefore, essential to store such energy into chemical energy, which are portable and various applications. In this context, electrochemical energy-storage devices hold great promises towards this goal. The most common electrochemical energy-storage devices are electrochemical capacitors (ECs, also called supercapacitors) and batteries. In comparison to batteries, ECs posses high power density, high efficiency, long cycling life and low cost. ECs commonly utilize carbon as both (symmetric) or one of the electrodes (asymmetric), of which their performance is generally limited by the capacitance of the carbon electrodes. Therefore, developing better carbon materials with high energy density has been emerging as one the most essential challenges in the field. The primary objective of this dissertation is to design and synthesize functional carbon materials with high energy density at both aqueous and organic electrolyte systems. The energy density (E) of ECs are governed by E = CV 2/2, where C is the total capacitance and V is the voltage of the devices. Carbon electrodes with high capacitance and high working voltage should lead to high energy density. In the first part of this thesis, a new class of nanoporous carbons were synthesized for symmetric supercapacitors using aqueous Li2SO4 as the electrolyte. A unique precursor was adopted to

  2. Carbon nanotube materials from hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, A.C.; Bekkedahl, T.A.; Cahill, A.F. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The lack of convenient and cost-effective hydrogen storage is a major impediment to wide scale use of hydrogen in the United States energy economy. Improvements in the energy densities of hydrogen storage systems, reductions in cost, and increased compatibility with available and forecasted systems are required before viable hydrogen energy use pathways can be established. Carbon-based hydrogen adsorption materials hold particular promise for meeting and exceeding the U.S. Department of Energy hydrogen storage energy density targets for transportation if concurrent increases in hydrogen storage capacity and carbon density can be achieved. These two goals are normally in conflict for conventional porous materials, but may be reconciled by the design and synthesis of new adsorbent materials with tailored pore size distributions and minimal macroporosity. Carbon nanotubes offer the possibility to explore new designs for adsorbents because they can be fabricated with small size distributions, and naturally tend to self-assemble by van der Waals forces. This year we report heats of adsorption for hydrogen on nanotube materials that are 2 and 3 times greater than for hydrogen on activated carbon. The hydrogen which is most strongly bound to these materials remains on the carbon surface to temperatures greater than 285 K. These results suggest that nanocapillary forces are active in stabilizing hydrogen on the surfaces of carbon nanotubes, and that optimization of the adsorbent will lead to effective storage at higher temperatures. In this paper we will also report on our activities which are targeted at understanding and optimizing the nucleation and growth of single wall nanotubes. These experiments were made possible by the development of a unique feedback control circuit which stabilized the plasma-arc during a synthesis run.

  3. Flexural Properties of Activated Carbon Filled Epoxy Nano composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activated carbon (AC) filled epoxy nano composites obtained by mixing the desired amount of nano AC viz., bamboo stem, oil palm empty fruit bunch, and coconut shell from agricultural biomass with the epoxy resin. Flexural properties of activated carbons filled epoxy nano composites with 1 %, and 5 % filler loading were measured. In terms of flexural strength and modulus, a significant increment was observed with addition of 1 % vol and 5 % vol nano-activated carbon as compared to neat epoxy. The effect of activated carbon treated by two chemical agents (potassium hydroxide and phosphoric acid) on the flexural properties of epoxy nano composites were also investigated. Flexural strength of activated carbon-bamboo stem, activated carbon-oil palm, and activated carbon-coconut shell reinforced epoxy nano composites showed almost same value in case of 5 % potassium hydroxide activated carbon. Flexural strength of potassium hydroxide activated carbon-based epoxy nano composites was higher than phosphoric acid activated carbon. The flexural toughness of both the potassium hydroxide and phosphoric acid activated carbon reinforced composites range between 0.79 - 0.92 J. It attributed that developed activated carbon filled epoxy nano composites can be used in different applications. (author)

  4. The mechanics and biocompatibility characteristics of carbon nanotubes-polyurethane composite membranes:a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To discuss the mechanics and biocompatibility characteristics of carbon nanotubes-polyurethane composite membranes. Methods: The mechanics property of carbon nanotubes-polyurethane composite membranes with different carbon nanotubes contents were tested by universal material testing machine. The surface of the membranes was observed by electron microscope when the stent was bent 90 degree. And its cytotoxicity was tested by cultivating study with 7721 cell. The metallic stent that was covered with carbon nanotubes-polyurethane composite membrane by using dip-coating method was inserted in rabbit esophagus in order to evaluate its biocompatibility in vivo. Results: Composite membranes tensile strength (MPa) and elongation at break (%) were 4.62/900, 6.05/730, 8.26/704 and 5.7/450 when the carbon nanotubes contents were 0%, 0.1%, 0.3% and 0.5%, respectively. If the stent was bent at 90 degree, its surface was still smooth without any fractures when it was scanned by electron microscope.Composite membranes had critical cytotoxicity when its carbon nanotubes content was up to 0.5% and 1.0%. No fissure nor degradation of composite membranes occurred at 30 days after composite membrane covered metallic stent was inserted in rabbit esophagus. Conclusion: When moderate carbon nanotubes are added into polyurethane composite membrane, the mechanics and biocompatibility characteristics of the polyurethane composite membrane can be much improved. (authors)

  5. Study of the damaging mechanisms of a carbon - carbon composite bonded to copper under thermomechanical loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to understand and to identify the damaging mechanisms of Carbon-Carbon composite bonded to copper under thermomechanical loading. The study of the composite allowed the development of non-linear models. These ones have been introduced in the finite elements analysis code named CASTEM 2000. They have been validated according to a correlation between simulation and mechanical tests on multi-material samples. These tests have also permitted us to better understand the behaviour of the bonding between composite and copper (damaging and fracture modes for different temperatures) under shear and tensile loadings. The damaging mechanisms of the bond under thermomechanical loading have been studied and identified according to microscopic observations on mock-ups which have sustained thermal cycling tests: some cracks appear in the composite, near the bond between the composite and the copper. The correlation between numerical and experimental results have been improved because of the reliability of the composite modelization, the use of residual stresses and the results of the bond mechanical characterisation. (author)

  6. Study of the damaging mechanisms of a copper / carbon - carbon composite under thermomechanical loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to understand and to identify the damaging mechanisms of Carbon-Carbon composite bonded to copper under thermomechanical loading. The study of the composite allowed the development of non-linear models. These ones have been introduced in the finite elements analysis code named CASTEM2000. They have been validated according to a correlation between simulation and mechanical tests on multi-material samples. These tests have also permitted us to better understand the behaviour of the bonding between composite and copper (damaging and fracture modes for different temperatures) under shear and tensile loadings. The damaging mechanisms of the bond under thermomechanical loading have been studied and identified according to microscopic observations on mock-ups which have sustained thermal cycling tests: some cracks appear in the composite, near the bond between the composite and the copper. The correlation between numerical and experimental results have been improved because of the reliability of the composite modelization, the use of residual stresses and the results of the bond mechanical characterization. (author)

  7. Effect of Metal Additives on Performance of Low-Carbon Magnesia-Carbon Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Xiaoyan; LI Lin; HE Zhiyong; LIU Kaiqi; WANG Bingjun

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, both oxidation and corrosion resistance of low-carbon magnesia-carbon materials containing 4.0wt% graphite with metallic Al and Mg-Al alloy powders as antioxidants were investigated. Meanwhile,the microstructures of samples corroded by slag were observed with optical microscope as well. The test results revealed the properties of oxidation and corrosion resistance of low-carbon magnesia-carbon materials could be improved obviously by adding metal Al powder and Mg-Al alloy powder. The rule of improving oxidation resistance was illegibility when metal Al powder and Mg-Al alloy powder were added together. It was harmful to corrosion resistance by mixed adding metal Al powder and Mg-Al alloy powder into the materials, at the same time, the corrosion resistance would decreased with the increasing of Mg-Al alloy content. The corrosion resistance of samples with 0.5wt% or 3.0wt% Mg-Al alloy was better. The oxidation resistance and corrosion resistance of materials with metal Al or Mg-Al alloy respectively were better than that with mixed metal Al and Mg-Al alloy. As a result, Mg-Al alloy was more suitable for low-carbon composite materials than metal Al as additives.

  8. Medium density polyethylene composites with functionalized carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulikkathara, Merlyn X.; Kuznetsov, Oleksandr V.; Peralta, Ivana R. G.; Wei, Xin; Khabashesku, Valery N.

    2009-05-01

    A strong interface between the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and polymer matrix is necessary to achieve enhanced mechanical properties of composites. In this work a series of sidewall-functionalized SWNTs have been investigated in order to evaluate the effect of functionalization on SWNT aspect ratio and composite interfacial chemistry and their role on mechanical properties of a medium density polyethylene (MDPE) matrix. Fluorinated nanotubes (F-SWNTs) were used as precursors for subsequent sidewall functionalization with long chain alkyl groups to produce an F-SWNT- C11H23 derivative. The latter was refluorinated to yield a new perfluorinated derivative, F-SWNT- C11FxHy. The functionalized SWNTs as well as the pristine SWNTs were integrated into an MDPE matrix at a 1 wt% loading. The nanotubes and composite materials were characterized with FTIR, Raman spectroscopy, NMR, XPS, AFM, SEM, TGA, DSC and tensile tests. When incorporated into polyethylene, the new perfluorinated derivative, F-SWNT- C11FxHy, yielded the highest tensile strength value among all nanotube/MDPE composite samples, showing a 52% enhancement in comparison with the neat MDPE. The 1 wt% SWNT/MDPE composite contained nanotubes with a larger aspect ratio but, due to a lack of interfacial chemistry, it resulted in less improvement in mechanical properties compared to the composites made with the fluorinated SWNT derivatives.

  9. Medium density polyethylene composites with functionalized carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A strong interface between the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and polymer matrix is necessary to achieve enhanced mechanical properties of composites. In this work a series of sidewall-functionalized SWNTs have been investigated in order to evaluate the effect of functionalization on SWNT aspect ratio and composite interfacial chemistry and their role on mechanical properties of a medium density polyethylene (MDPE) matrix. Fluorinated nanotubes (F-SWNTs) were used as precursors for subsequent sidewall functionalization with long chain alkyl groups to produce an F-SWNT- C11H23 derivative. The latter was refluorinated to yield a new perfluorinated derivative, F-SWNT- C11FxHy. The functionalized SWNTs as well as the pristine SWNTs were integrated into an MDPE matrix at a 1 wt% loading. The nanotubes and composite materials were characterized with FTIR, Raman spectroscopy, NMR, XPS, AFM, SEM, TGA, DSC and tensile tests. When incorporated into polyethylene, the new perfluorinated derivative, F-SWNT- C11FxHy, yielded the highest tensile strength value among all nanotube/MDPE composite samples, showing a 52% enhancement in comparison with the neat MDPE. The 1 wt% SWNT/MDPE composite contained nanotubes with a larger aspect ratio but, due to a lack of interfacial chemistry, it resulted in less improvement in mechanical properties compared to the composites made with the fluorinated SWNT derivatives.

  10. Preparation and characterization of carbon/SiC nanowire/Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite multilayer coating for carbon/carbon composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leilei, Zhang, E-mail: zhangleilei1121@aliyun.com; Hejun, Li; Kezhi, Li; Shouyang, Zhang; Qiangang, Fu; Yulei, Zhang; Jinhua, Lu; Wei, Li

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • CSH coatings were prepared by combination of magnetron sputter ion plating, CVD and UECD. • Na{sup +} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} were developed to co-substitute hydroxyapatite. • SiC nanowires were introduced into Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite. • CSH coatings showed excellent cell activity and cell proliferation behavior. - Abstract: A carbon/SiC nanowire/Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite multilayer coating (CSH coating) was prepared on carbon/carbon composites using a combination method of magnetron sputter ion plating, chemical vapor deposition and ultrasound-assisted electrochemical deposition procedure. The morphology, microstructure and chemical composition of the coating were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results showed that the CSH coating was consisted of three components: carbon layer, SiC nanowires and Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite. The carbon layer provided a dense and uniform surface structure for the growth of SiC nanowires. The SiC nanowires exhibited a porous structure, favoring the infiltration of Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite crystals. The Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite could infiltrate into the pores of SiC nanowires and finally cover the SiC nanowires entirely with a needle shape. The osteoblast-like MG63 cells were employed to assess the in vitro biocompatibility of the CSH coating. The MG63 cells favorably spread and grew well across the CSH coating surface with plenty of filopods and microvilli, exhibiting excellent cell activity. Moreover, the CSH coating elicited higher cell proliferation as compared to bare carbon/carbon composites. In conclusion, the CSH offers great potential as a coating material for future medical application in hard tissue replacement.

  11. Preparation and characterization of carbon/SiC nanowire/Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite multilayer coating for carbon/carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • CSH coatings were prepared by combination of magnetron sputter ion plating, CVD and UECD. • Na+ and CO32− were developed to co-substitute hydroxyapatite. • SiC nanowires were introduced into Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite. • CSH coatings showed excellent cell activity and cell proliferation behavior. - Abstract: A carbon/SiC nanowire/Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite multilayer coating (CSH coating) was prepared on carbon/carbon composites using a combination method of magnetron sputter ion plating, chemical vapor deposition and ultrasound-assisted electrochemical deposition procedure. The morphology, microstructure and chemical composition of the coating were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results showed that the CSH coating was consisted of three components: carbon layer, SiC nanowires and Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite. The carbon layer provided a dense and uniform surface structure for the growth of SiC nanowires. The SiC nanowires exhibited a porous structure, favoring the infiltration of Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite crystals. The Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite could infiltrate into the pores of SiC nanowires and finally cover the SiC nanowires entirely with a needle shape. The osteoblast-like MG63 cells were employed to assess the in vitro biocompatibility of the CSH coating. The MG63 cells favorably spread and grew well across the CSH coating surface with plenty of filopods and microvilli, exhibiting excellent cell activity. Moreover, the CSH coating elicited higher cell proliferation as compared to bare carbon/carbon composites. In conclusion, the CSH offers great potential as a coating material for future medical application in hard tissue replacement

  12. Thermal neutron absorbing composite organic fiber material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To obtain clothing materials easy to put on by plasma spray of inorganic material containing elements with a large thermal neutron absorption cross section on a fiberous structure mainly composed of organic fibers. Constitution: The composite organic fiber material comprises flame-spray molding products containing elements with a large thermal neutron absorbing cross section and fiberous structure mainly composed of organic fibers having a melting point lower than that for the flame-spray molding products and they are integrated as a multilayered structure. The flame-spray fabrication is applied by melting and pulverizing starting materials in plasmas and then forming in the shape of a film, sponge or flake on a sheet-like product while carrying them on a plasma stream etc. The binder layer can be saved or reduced significantly by constituting the neutron absorbing material with the flame-spray molding products. (Takahashi, M.)

  13. Manufacturing of Nanocomposite Carbon Fibers and Composite Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Seng; Zhou, Jian-guo

    2013-01-01

    Pitch-based nanocomposite carbon fibers were prepared with various percentages of carbon nanofibers (CNFs), and the fibers were used for manufacturing composite structures. Experimental results show that these nanocomposite carbon fibers exhibit improved structural and electrical conductivity properties as compared to unreinforced carbon fibers. Composite panels fabricated from these nanocomposite carbon fibers and an epoxy system also show the same properties transformed from the fibers. Single-fiber testing per ASTM C1557 standard indicates that the nanocomposite carbon fiber has a tensile modulus of 110% higher, and a tensile strength 17.7% times higher, than the conventional carbon fiber manufactured from pitch. Also, the electrical resistance of the carbon fiber carbonized at 900 C was reduced from 4.8 to 2.2 ohm/cm. The manufacturing of the nanocomposite carbon fiber was based on an extrusion, non-solvent process. The precursor fibers were then carbonized and graphitized. The resultant fibers are continuous.

  14. Nano-engineered composites: interlayer carbon nanotubes effect

    OpenAIRE

    Glaucio Carley; Viviany Geraldo; Sergio Oliveira; Antonio Ferreira Avila

    2013-01-01

    The concept of carbon nanotube interlayer was successfully introduced to carbon fiber/epoxy composites. This new hybrid laminated composites was characterized by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and tensile tests. An increase on peak stress close to 85% was witnessed when CNTs interlayer with 206.30 mg was placed to carbon fiber/epoxy laminates. The failure mechanisms are associated to CNTs distribution between and around carbon fibers. These CNTs are also r...

  15. Aligning carbon fibers in micro-extruded composite ink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Chaitanya G.

    Direct write processes include a wide range of additive manufacturing techniques with the ability to fabricate structures directly onto planar and non-planar surfaces. Most additive manufacturing techniques use unreinforced polymers to produce parts. By adding carbon fiber as a reinforcing material, properties such as mechanical strength, electrical conductivity, and thermal conductivity can be enhanced. Carbon fibers can be long and continuous, or short and discontinuous. The strength of carbon fiber composite parts is greatly increased when the fibers are preferentially aligned. This research focuses on increasing the strength of additively manufactured parts reinforced using discontinuous carbon fibers that have been aligned during the micro extrusion process. A design of experiments (DOE) approach was used to identify significant process parameters affecting fiber alignment. Factors such as the length of carbon fibers, nozzle diameter, fiber loading fraction, air pressure, translational speed and standoff distance were considered. A two dimensional Fast Fourier Transform (2D FFT) was used to quantify the degree of fiber alignment in the extruded composite inks. ImageJ software supported by an oval profile plugin was used with micrographs of printed samples to obtain the carbon fiber alignment values. The optimal value for the factors was derived by identifying the significant main and interaction effects. Based on the results of the DOE, tensile test samples were printed with fibers aligned parallel and perpendicular to the tensile axis. A standard test method for tensile properties of plastic revealed that the extruded parts with fibers aligned along the tensile axis were better in tensile strength and modulus.

  16. Carbide Coatings for Nickel Alloys, Graphite and Carbon/Carbon Composites to be used in Fluoride Salt Valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagle, Denis [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Zhang, Dajie [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-10-22

    The focus of this research was concerned with developing materials technology that supports the evolution of Generation IV Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) concepts. Specifically, we investigate refractory carbide coatings for 1) nickel alloys, and 2) commercial carbon-carbon composites (CCCs). Numerous compelling reasons have driven us to focus on carbon and carbide materials. First, unlike metals, the strength and modulus of CCCs increase with rising temperature. Secondly, graphite and carbon composites have been proven effective for resisting highly corrosive fluoride melts such as molten cryolite [Na₃AlF₆] at ~1000°C in aluminum reduction cells. Thirdly, graphite and carbide materials exhibit extraordinary radiation damage tolerance and stability up to 2000°C. Finally, carbides are thermodynamically more stable in liquid fluoride salt than the corresponding metals (i.e. Cr and Zr) found in nickel based alloys.

  17. The dynamic response of carbon fiber-filled polymer composites

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson B.; Orler E.B.; Furmanski J.; Rigg P.A.; Scharff R.J.; Stahl D.B.; Sheffield S.A.; Gustavsen R.L.; Dattelbaum D.M.; Coe J.D.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic (shock) responses of two carbon fiber-filled polymer composites have been quantified using gas gun-driven plate impact experimentation. The first composite is a filament-wound, highly unidirectional carbon fiber-filled epoxy with a high degree of porosity. The second composite is a chopped carbon fiber- and graphite-filled phenolic resin with little-to-no porosity. Hugoniot data are presented for the carbon fiber-epoxy (CE) composite to 18.6 GPa in the through-thickness direction,...

  18. Effect of fibre coating and geometry on the tensile properties of hybrid carbon nanotube coated carbon fibre reinforced composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Growth of CNT on carbon fibre (CF) was conducted via floating catalyst CVD process. • CNT-coated CF reinforced polypropylene composites were fabricated and characterized. • Theoretical prediction of composite tensile properties was conducted via mathematical approach. • Acceptable validation was found between experimental and estimated tensile properties. - Abstract: Hierarchically structured hybrid composites are ideal engineered materials to carry loads and stresses due to their high in-plane specific mechanical properties. Growing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the surface of high performance carbon fibres (CFs) provides a means to tailor the mechanical properties of the fibre–resin interface of a composite. The growth of CNT on CF was conducted via floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The mechanical properties of the resultant fibres, carbon nanotube (CNT) density and alignment morphology were shown to depend on the CNT growth temperature, growth time, carrier gas flow rate, catalyst amount, and atmospheric conditions within the CVD chamber. Carbon nanotube coated carbon fibre reinforced polypropylene (CNT-CF/PP) composites were fabricated and characterized. A combination of Halpin–Tsai equations, Voigt–Reuss model, rule of mixture and Krenchel approach were used in hierarchy to predict the mechanical properties of randomly oriented short fibre reinforced composite. A fractographic analysis was carried out in which the fibre orientation distribution has been analyzed on the composite fracture surfaces with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and image processing software. Finally, the discrepancies between the predicted and experimental values are explained

  19. Optimization of resin infusion processing for composite materials : simulation and characterization strategies

    OpenAIRE

    George, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Composite materials, especially those made with carbon fiber, have better specific properties than many traditional materials. But despite their promised advantages, industry has been slow to apply composites as they wait to see if an automatable composites manufacturing solution with high properties will become available. Resin infusion processing is being developed in many laboratories in an attempt to find this suitable process. Qualification of an optimized resin infusion process will req...

  20. Formation of a Composite Based on Polyurethane with Carbon Nanotubes and Shungite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarov, F. F.; Krivosheev, R. M.; Ksenofontov, M. A.; Koltunovich, T.; Abdullin, Kh. A.; Ostrovskaya, L. E.; Togambaeva, A. K.

    2015-03-01

    Physicomechanical and electrophysical characteristics of a polyurethane composite doped with carbon-containing materials have been investigated. It has been found that the roughness of the sample's surface and also the porosity increase with the concentration of the dopant. Volt-ampere characteristics of composite materials point to the activated type of conductivity in these materials; however, at a temperature of nearly 340 K, the type of conductivity is changed. Also, the frequency dependence of the conductivity has been established.