WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon complexes

  1. Evidence for Carbonate Surface Complexation during Forsterite Carbonation in Wet Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loring, John S.; Chen, Jeffrey; Benezeth Ep Gisquet, Pascale; Qafoku, Odeta; Ilton, Eugene S.; Washton, Nancy M.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2015-07-14

    Continental flood basalts are attractive formations for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide because of their reactive divalent-cation containing silicates, such as forsterite (Mg2SiO4), suitable for long-term trapping of CO2 mineralized as metal carbonates. The goal of this study was to investigate at a molecular level the carbonation products formed during the reaction of forsterite with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) as a function of the concentration of H2O adsorbed to the forsterite surface. Experiments were performed at 50 °C and 90 bar using an in situ IR titration capability, and post-reaction samples were examined by ex situ techniques, including SEM, XPS, FIB-TEM, TGA-MS, and MAS-NMR. Carbonation products and reaction extents varied greatly with adsorbed H2O. We show for the first time evidence of Mg-carbonate surface complexation under wet scCO2 conditions. Carbonate is found to be coordinated to Mg at the forsterite surface in a predominately bidentate fashion at adsorbed H2O concentrations below 27 µmol/m2. Above this concentration and up to 76 µmol/m2, monodentate coordinated complexes become dominant. Beyond a threshold adsorbed H2O concentration of 76 µmol/m2, crystalline carbonates continuously precipitate as magnesite, and the particles that form are hundreds of times larger than the estimated thicknesses of the adsorbed water films of about 7 to 15 Å. At an applied level, these results suggest that mineral carbonation in scCO2 dominated fluids near the wellbore and adjacent to caprocks will be insignificant and limited to surface complexation, unless adsorbed H2O concentrations are high enough to promote crystalline carbonate formation. At a fundamental level, the surface complexes and their dependence on adsorbed H2O concentration give insights regarding forsterite dissolution processes and magnesite nucleation and growth.

  2. Study of new complexes of uranium and comba radical. I.- Complexes defective in sodium carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some complexes formed in presence of defect of sodium carbonate with respect to the stoichiometric ratio (U): (C03) = 1:3 are studied. This ratio corresponds to the main complex which is responsible for the uranium extraction with CDMBAC organic solutions and from U(VI) aqueous solutions with an excess of sodium carbonate. (Author) 10 refs

  3. Complexity of carbon market from multi-scale entropy analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xinghua; Li, Shasha; Tian, Lixin

    2016-06-01

    Complexity of carbon market is the consequence of economic dynamics and extreme social political events in global carbon markets. The multi-scale entropy can measure the long-term structures in the daily price return time series. By using multi-scale entropy analysis, we explore the complexity of carbon market and mean reversion trend of daily price return. The logarithmic difference of data Dec16 from August 6, 2010 to May 22, 2015 is selected as the sample. The entropy is higher in small time scale, while lower in large. The dependence of the entropy on the time scale reveals the mean reversion of carbon prices return in the long run. A relatively great fluctuation over some short time period indicates that the complexity of carbon market evolves consistently with economic development track and the events of international climate conferences.

  4. Carbon footprint of building products and assembled constructional complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Petrović, Klemen

    2015-01-01

    Greenhouse gases are becoming bigger and bigger polluter of our planet. Carbon dioxide represents the largest part of greenhouse gases (70 %), because of that we represent carbon footprint with CO2 equivalent (CO2-e). We will compare assembled construction complexes and their carbon footprint in this graduation thesis. At first we will explain what greenhouse gases are and how they are formed. Then we will present some of the studies that research field of materials in constructio...

  5. Adsorptive preconcentration of rareearth oxine complexes onto activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a method for the determination of traces of rare earth using energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF) after preconcentration of their oxine complexes onto activated carbon. Various parameters that influence adsorptive preconcentration of rare earth onto activated carbon viz. pH, amounts of activated carbon and oxine, time of stirring and aqueous phase volume were systematically studied. A numerical method based on simple least square procedure using fifth order polynomial with 25 consecutive values was developed for smoothing and differentiation of EDXRF data which was previously digitized and averaged. First order derivative EDXRF in conjunction with adsorptive preconcentration on activated carbon enables one to determine as low as 10 ppb of each individual rare earth elements

  6. Excitation transfer and luminescence in porphyrin-carbon nanotube complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Magadur, G; Alain-Rizzo, V; Voisin, C; Roussignol, Ph; Deleporte, E; Delaire, J A

    2007-01-01

    Functionalization of carbon nanotubes with hydrosoluble porphyrins (TPPS) is achieved by "$\\pi$-stacking". The porphyrin/nanotube interaction is studied by means of optical absorption, photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopies. The main absorption line of the porphyrins adsorbed on nanotubes exhibits a 120 meV red shift, which we ascribe to a flattening of the molecule in order to optimize $\\pi-\\pi$ interactions. The porphyrin-nanotube complex shows a strong quenching of the TPPS emission while the photoluminescence intensity of the nanotubes is enhanced when the excitation laser is in resonance with the porphyrin absorption band. This reveals an efficient excitation transfer from the TPPS to the carbon nanotube.

  7. Excitation transfer and luminescence in porphyrin-carbon nanotube complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Magadur, Gurvan; Lauret, Jean-Sébastien; Alain-Rizzo, Valérie; C. Voisin; Roussignol, Ph.; Deleporte, Emmanuelle; Delaire, Jacques,

    2007-01-01

    Functionalization of carbon nanotubes with hydrosoluble porphyrins (TPPS) is achieved by "$\\pi$-stacking". The porphyrin/nanotube interaction is studied by means of optical absorption, photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopies. The main absorption line of the porphyrins adsorbed on nanotubes exhibits a 120 meV red shift, which we ascribe to a flattening of the molecule in order to optimize $\\pi-\\pi$ interactions. The porphyrin-nanotube complex shows a strong quenching ...

  8. Building complex carbon skeletons with ethynyl[2.2]paracyclophanes

    OpenAIRE

    Ina Dix; Lidija Bondarenko; Jones, Peter G; Thomas Oeser; Henning Hopf

    2014-01-01

    Ethynyl[2.2]paracyclophanes are shown to be useful substrates for the preparation of complex, highly unsaturated carbon frameworks. Thus both the pseudo-geminal- 2 and the pseudo-ortho-diethynylcyclophane 4 can be dimerized by Glaser coupling to the respective dimers 9/10 and 11/12. Whereas the former isomer pair could not be separated so far, the latter provided the pure diastereomers after extensive column chromatography/recrystallization. Isomer 11 is chiral and could be separated on a col...

  9. Spontaneous Resolution and Carbonation of Chiral Benzyllithium Complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lennartson, Anders; Sundberg, Jonas; Wiklund, Tove;

    2010-01-01

    was indeed found: [Li(phet)(tmpda)], α-2, (tmpda = N,N,N′,N′-tetramethylpropylenediamine) crystallises as a conglomerate. Although concomitant polymorphism was not observed, a racemic phase (β-2) could also be isolated. Chiral crystals of α-2 gave 2-phenylpropionic acid in high yield on reaction with gaseous...... CO2, but the bulk product was racemic. It is unclear whether the lack of selectivity originates during crystallisation or carbonation. In order to investigate this, similar complexes displaying Si or S atoms in the α-position were prepared and structurally characterized: [Li(tmsb)(tmpda)] (tmsb = 1...

  10. Carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of the carbonates from the Jacupiranga and Catalao I carbonatite complexes, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morikiyo, Toshiro (Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). Faculty of Science); Hirano, Hideo; Matsuhisa, Yukihiro

    1990-11-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotope compositions were measured for carbonates from the Jacupiranga and Catalao I carbonatite complexes in Brazil. The {delta}{sup 13}C values of the Jacupiranga carbonates are uniform, ranging from -6.4 to -5.6 per mille with the average of -6.07 per mille. Except for one sample, the {delta}{sup 18}O values of the carbonates are between 7.1 and 8.1 per mille, and the average value is 7.6 per mille. The isotopic compositions of the Jacupiranga carbonates represent the value of primary igneous carbonatite. The {delta}{sup 13}C values of dolomites are about 0.5 per mille higher than those of calcites. The {delta}{sup 13}C values of carbonates from the Catalao I complex range from -6.8 to -5.2 per mille with the average of -5.83 per mille. Those values are similar to the values of the Jacupiranga carbonates. However, oxygen isotopic compositions of the Catalao I carbonates show a wide range of 8.4 to 22.3 per mille. Carbonates with the lowest {delta}{sup 18}O values in the complex are considered to represent the igneous stage. Carbonates with extremely high {delta}{sup 18}O values of about 22 per mille are considered to have precipitated from low-temperature hydrothermal fluids. The group of intermediate {delta}{sup 18}O values indicates a variable degree of contamination by the {delta}{sup 18}O-rich hydrothermal carbonates. The contribution of secondary stage hydrothermal carbonates seems to be significant in the Catalao I complex as compared with the Jacupiranga complex. The development of a network structure in the Catalao I complex may have enhanced the circulation of the later stage hydrothermal fluids. (author).

  11. Cryogenic Origin for Mars Analog Carbonates in the Bockfjord Volcanic Complex Svalbard (Norway)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundsen, H. E. F.; Benning, L.; Blake, D. F.; Fogel, M.; Ming, D.; Skidmore, M.; Steele, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Sverrefjell and Sigurdfjell eruptive centers in the Bockfjord Volcanic Complex (BVC) on Svalbard (Norway) formed by subglacial eruptions ca. 1 Ma ago. These eruptive centers carry ubiquitous magnesian carbonate deposits including dolomitemagnesite globules similar to those in the Martian meteorite ALH84001. Carbonates in mantle xenoliths are dominated by ALH84001 type carbonate globules that formed during quenching of CO2-rich mantle fluids. Lava hosted carbonates include ALH84001 type carbonate globules occurring throughout lava vesicles and microfractures and massive carbonate deposits associated with vertical volcanic vents. Massive carbonates include cemented lava breccias associated with volcanic vents. Carbonate cements comprise layered deposits of calcite, dolomite, huntite, magnesite and aragonite associated with ALH84001 type carbonate globules lining lava vesicles. Combined Mossbauer, XRD and VNIR data show that breccia carbonate cements at Sverrefjell are analog to Comanche carbonates at Gusev crater.

  12. Soil carbon sensitivity to temperature and carbon use efficiency compared across microbial-ecosystem models of varying complexity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jianwei [University of Oklahoma; Wang, Gangsheng [ORNL; Allison, Steven D. [University of California, Irvine; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL; Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma

    2014-01-01

    Global ecosystem models may require microbial components to accurately predict feedbacks between climate warming and soil decomposition, but it is unclear what parameters and levels of complexity are ideal for scaling up to the globe. Here we conducted a model comparison using a conventional model with first-order decay and three microbial models of increasing complexity that simulate short- to long-term soil carbon dynamics. We focused on soil carbon responses to microbial carbon use efficiency (CUE) and temperature. Three scenarios were implemented in all models: constant CUE (held at 0.31), varied CUE ( 0.016 C 1), and 50 % acclimated CUE ( 0.008 C 1). Whereas the conventional model always showed soil carbon losses with increasing temperature, the microbial models each predicted a temperature threshold above which warming led to soil carbon gain. The location of this threshold depended on CUE scenario, with higher temperature thresholds under the acclimated and constant scenarios. This result suggests that the temperature sensitivity of CUE and the structure of the soil carbon model together regulate the long-term soil carbon response to warming. Equilibrium soil carbon stocks predicted by the microbial models were much less sensitive to changing inputs compared to the conventional model. Although many soil carbon dynamics were similar across microbial models, the most complex model showed less pronounced oscillations. Thus, adding model complexity (i.e. including enzyme pools) could improve the mechanistic representation of soil carbon dynamics during the transient phase in certain ecosystems. This study suggests that model structure and CUE parameterization should be carefully evaluated when scaling up microbial models to ecosystems and the globe.

  13. Thermodynamic and electrochemical properties of some rare earth cryptates and related complexes in propylene carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stability of trivalent lanthanide complexes with [1]-cryptand 22 and [2]-cryptands 222 and 211 and also tris (3.6- dioxa heptyl) amine (TDHA) is studied in propylene carbonate solution by potentiometry with Ag+ as an auxiliary cation. Complexation enthalpies and entropies are determined for other complexes of some trivalent lanthanides (La, Er, Pr and Eu) with ligands 222, 221, 211, 22, 21, 18C6 and TDHA. [1]- and [2]- crytands are complexing agents more powerful than TDHA and crown-ethers 15C6 and 18C6. For ligands containing nitrogen complexe stability increase with RE atomic number but decrease for crown-ethers. In propylene carbonate complexes are stabilized by enthalpic effects, entropic contribution is variable. Polarographic reduction of samarium cryptate with ligand 222, 221 and 22 in propylene carbonate is reversible as in more solvating solvents water and methanol. Mixed complexes are formed with chlorides and this cryptate system is more difficult to reduce

  14. Multiphase carbon and its properties in complex mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Thiel, M.; Ree, F.H.

    1990-09-01

    We describe some key features of a carbon three-phase equation of state and a high-pressure high temperature mixture model in which it is used. Electronic terms in the carbon model have been investigated with INFERNO (atom in a cell model). The Lindeman criterion for melting is rederived for the anisotropic structure of the graphite lattice. The curvature of the graphite melting line is constrained by the evidence for the positive slope of the diamond melting line. The importance of carbon is apparent from various experiments on shock generated mixtures. The model allows us to estimate the energy of carbon clusters produced in a detonating mixture. A cluster model with specific surface structure is used to predict this energy. 41 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Interaction of carbon-vacancy complex with minor alloying elements of ferritic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakaev, A.; Terentyev, D.; He, X.; Zhurkin, E. E.; Van Neck, D.

    2014-08-01

    Interstitial carbon, dissolved in bcc matrix of ferritic steels, plays an important role in the evolution of radiation-induced microstructure since it exhibits strong interaction with vacancies. Frequent formation and break-up of carbon-vacancy pairs, occurring in the course of irradiation, affect both kinetics of the accumulation of point defect clusters and carbon spatial distribution. The interaction of typical alloying elements (Mn, Ni, Cu, Si, Cr and P) in ferritic steels used as structural materials in nuclear reactors with a carbon-vacancy complex is analyzed using ab initio techniques. It is found that all the considered solutes form stable triple clusters resulting in the increase of the total binding energy by 0.2-0.3 eV. As a result of the formation of energetically favourable solute-carbon-vacancy triplets, the dissociation energy for vacancy/carbon emission is also increased by ∼0.2-0.3 eV, suggesting that the solutes enhance thermal stability of carbon-vacancy complex. Association of carbon-vacancy pairs with multiple solute clusters is found to be favorable for Ni, Cu and P. The energetic stability of solute(s)-carbon-vacancy complexes was rationalized on the basis of pairwise interaction data and by analyzing the variation of local magnetic moments on atoms constituting the clusters.

  16. Anoxic carbon degradation in Arctic sediments: Microbial transformations of complex substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnosti, Carol; Finke, Niko; Larsen, Ole;

    2005-01-01

    Complex substrates are degraded in anoxic sediments by the concerted activities of diverse microbial communities. To explore the effects of substrate complexity on carbon transformations in permanently cold anoxic sediments, four substrates—Spirulina cells, Isochrysis cells, and soluble high...... of carbon degradation diverged, with an additional 43%, 32%, 33%, and 8% of Isochrysis, Iso-Ex, Spirulina, and Spir-Ex carbon respired to CO2 over the next 750 h of incubation. Somewhat surprisingly, the soluble, carbohydrate-rich extracts did not prove to be more labile substrates than the whole cells from...

  17. Preliminary results on the hydrolysis and carbonate complexation of dioxoplutonium(V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrolysis and carbonate complexation reactions of dioxoplutonium (V) were studied in near neutral aqueous systems. These experiments involved the addition of hydroxide or carbonate to Pu(V) in a perchorate medium. Change in the electronic adsorption spectra provided information about the chemical properties of Pu(V). The results indicate the Pu(V) does not hydrolyze below pH 7.15. In the carbonate complexation studies, log β11 was measured to be 4.4 +- 0.7. 5 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Measurement of solubilities for rhodium complexes and phosphine ligands in supercritical carbon dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    Shimoyama, Yusuke; Sonoda, Masanori; Miyazaki, Kaoru; Higashi, Hidenori; Iwai, Yoshio; ARAI, Yasuhiko

    2008-01-01

    The solubilities of phosphine ligands and rhodium (Rh) complexes in supercritical carbon dioxide were measured with Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy at 320 and 333 K and several pressures. Triphenylphosphine (TPP) and tris(p-trifluoromethylphenyl)-phosphine (TTFMPP) were selected as ligands for the Rh complex. The solubilities of the fluorinated ligands and complexes were compared with those of the non-fluorinated compounds. The solubilities of ligand increased up to 10 times b...

  19. Treatment of metal-containing wastewater by adsorption of metal-chelate complexes onto activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shay, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    To eliminate difficulties associated with interference of chelating or complexing agents on precipitation of heavy metals from wastewaters, the feasibility of a process which utilized chelating agents in the removal of the heavy metals was investigated. Heavy metal ions were removed from simulated metal plating wastewater by sorption of a heavy metal chelate complex onto activated carbon. In this process, a chelate which might be present in a wastewater could be used in removal of a heavy metal, rather than interfere with its removal. System development of a continuous flow process consisted of bench scale column tests to answer questions about key adsorption column operating parameters. The metals investigated were Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II). Hydrogen ion concentration had the largest effect on removal of heavy metalchelate complexes, but contact time and heavy metal:chelate ratio were important. The normal contact time for activated carbon columns of 30 to 60 minutes was found adequate to achieve heavy metal-chelate removals of at least 90% for citrate or EDTA complexes. For citrate complexes better removals were achieved at heavy metal:chelate ratios greater than 1:1. For EDTA, there was no advantage to ratios greater than 1:1. Increasing pH, at least to pH 9.0, increased the heavy metal chelate removal; however, for EDTA, removals greater than 90% could be achieved at a pH as low as 3.0. The maximum amount of Cu(II)-citrate complex that could be removed was 2.8 mg per gram of carbon, the maximum amount for Zn(II)citrate complex was 1.2 mg per gram of carbon, and for Ni(II)-citrate, the maximum was 1.3 mg per gram of carbon. For the EDTA complexes, the maximum removal was 2.1 mg of Cu(II)-EDTA complex per gram of carbon, 6.9 mg of Zn(II)-EDTA complex per gram of carbon, and 3.2 mg of Ni(II)-EDTA complex per gram of carbon.

  20. Ultrasonic tomography of complex shaped carbon fiber composites

    OpenAIRE

    Zhvyrblya Vadim; Filippov German; Sedanova Elizaveta; Salchak Yana

    2016-01-01

    Non-destructive quality assurance of complex shaped objects is one of the major challenges in the variety of industrial areas. Robot-assisted ultrasound tomography is one of the common methods used for this purpose. This study proposes a tomography based on the preliminary received 3-D reconstruction results. The obtained experimental details represent the applicability of the suggested method to ensure effective quality control.

  1. Ultrasonic tomography of complex shaped carbon fiber composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhvyrblya Vadim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-destructive quality assurance of complex shaped objects is one of the major challenges in the variety of industrial areas. Robot-assisted ultrasound tomography is one of the common methods used for this purpose. This study proposes a tomography based on the preliminary received 3-D reconstruction results. The obtained experimental details represent the applicability of the suggested method to ensure effective quality control.

  2. Immobilisation of Alkylamine-Functionalised Osmium Redox Complex on Glassy Carbon using Electrochemical Oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrochemical oxidation of alkylamines provides a method for modification of carbon, and other surfaces via formation of a radical amine that reacts with the surface. Direct electrochemical oxidation of an alkylamine functional group of a redox complex provides a simple route to preparation of a redox active layer on carbon surfaces. Here we report on oxidation of an osmium redox complex, containing an alkylamine ligand distal to the metal co-ordination site, on carbon electrodes to directly produce a redox active film on the surface. The presence of the redox-active layer of osmium complexes is confirmed by cyclic voltammetry and X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The average surface coverage of the attached film upon electrolysis of an [Os(2,2′-bipyridine)2(4-aminomethylpyridine)Cl].PF6 complex is 0.84 (± 0.3) × 10−10 moles cm−2, demonstrating that coverages close to that predicted for a close-packed monolayer of complex is attained. The bioelectrocatalytic activity of the modified electrode was evaluated for oxidation of glucose in presence of glucose oxidase in solution. Hence, electrochemical coupling of alkylamine functionalised osmium redox complexes provides a simple and efficient methodology for obtaining redox active monolayers on carbon surfaces with potential applications to biosensor and biofuel cell device development

  3. COMPLEX COMPOST AND CIRCULATION OF NITROGEN AND CARBON AT THE AGROLANDSCAPE SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belyuchenko I. S.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Complex compost includes all elements of the periodic table and is valuable due to the complexity of its system. Among the elements forming a chemical composition of the complex compost we can identify two most important, which are distinguishing a specific character of the interaction with each other and defining the basic processes to ensure vegetation of living system - nitrogen and carbon. Nitrogen determines the rate of energy and connects with living forms of organic matter; it is included as the part of protein and is a major element in determining the productivity of ecosystems. At the cycle of carbon its organic forms and carbon dioxide take a part, presenting the main factors of the processes of respiration and photosynthesis

  4. Transient carbon isotope changes in complex systems: Finding the global signal, embracing the local signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, G. J.; Schneider-Mor, A.; Filley, T. R.

    2008-12-01

    Global, transient carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) in the geological record are increasingly invoked as evidence of short-lived changes in carbon fluxes to/from the ocean-atmosphere-biosphere (exogenic) system. Reconstructing the dynamics of carbon cycle perturbation and response during such events requires that the global extent, magnitude, and temporal pattern of carbon isotope change are well understood. Unfortunately, no simple, globally integrated measure of exogenic δ13C change exists in the geological record: during major global perturbations even the best-case candidates such as deep-ocean carbonate δ13C values likely respond to a complex of factors including ocean carbonate chemistry and circulation. Here we consider the utility of organic carbon isotope records from two complex depositional systems common in the geological record, fossil soils and continental margin sediments, which are of interest in terms of their relationship to organic carbon cycling and records of past ecological change. Within both systems changes in ecology, climate, carbon source, residence time, and molecular composition have clear potential to modulate the preserved record of global exogenic δ13C change, compromising 1st-order interpretations of bulk or compound-specific isotopic records. Process-explicit eco- geochemical models, ideally combined with multi-substrate data, provide one approach to the isolation of global δ13C change and identification of local or regional processes reflected in such records. Examples from both systems drawn from ongoing work on the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum illustrate the potential pitfalls, as well as opportunities, afforded by coupled data/model assessment of transient δ13C changes in complex systems.

  5. Evidence of different stoichiometries for the limiting carbonate complexes of lanthanides(3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two stoichiometries have been proposed by different laboratories to interpret measurements on the limiting carbonate complexes of An3+ and Ln3+ cations. The study of the solubility of double carbonates (AlkLn(CO3)2,xH2O) in concentrated carbonate solutions at room temperature and high ionic strengths has shown that on the one hand the lightest lanthanides (La and Nd) form Ln(CO3)45- whereas the heaviest (Eu and Dy) form Ln(CO3)33- in the studied chemical conditions, and on the other hand, that the kinetics of precipitation of double carbonates depends on the alkali metal and the lanthanide ions. The existence of two stoichiometries for the limiting carbonate complexes was confirmed by capillary electrophoresis hyphenated to an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (CE-ICP-MS), used to extend the study to the whole series of lanthanides (except Ce, Pm and Yb). Two behaviours have been put forward comparing the electrophoretic mobilities: La to Tb form Ln(CO3)45- while Dy to Lu form Ln(CO3)33-. Measurements by time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) on Eu(III) indicate small variations of the geometry of Eu(CO3)33- complex, specially with Cs+. Although analogies are currently used among the 4f-block trivalent elements, different aqueous speciations are evidenced in concentrated carbonate solutions across the lanthanide series. (author)

  6. ATR-FTIR spectroscopic characterization of coexisting carbonate surface complexes on hematite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargar, J.R.; Kubicki, J.D.; Reitmeyer, R.; Davis, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    The speciation of carbonate adsorbed to hematite in air-equilibrated aqueous solutions has been studied using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Samples were measured over a range of pH conditions, at 0.1 M NaCl and at low ionic strength, and in H2O and D2O solutions to permit a multispecies analysis of the data. Second-derivative analyses and fits to the spectra indicate the presence of two major and two minor surface-bound carbonate species. The two major complexes coexist at near-neutral pH and low ionic strength. One of these two complexes is relatively sensitive to ionic strength, being displaced at 0.1 M NaCl, whereas the other is not. Comparison of experimental to DFT/MO-calculated frequencies suggest these two major species to be (a) a monodentate binuclear inner-sphere carbonate surface complex, and (b) a fully or partially solvated carbonate (CO32-) species that is symmetry broken and appears to reside in the structured vicinal water layers at the hematite-water interface, retained by hydrogen bonding and/or other forces. Minor carbonate complexes include diffuse layer CO32- and an unidentified inner-sphere species. Both of the dominant species observed here are likely to be significant controls of the surface charge and sorptive properties of Fe-oxides. Copyright ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Chemical behaviour of Pu and Am: Hydrolysis reaction in brine solutions, carbonate complexation, α-radiolysis, humate complexation and speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical behaviour of transuranic elements (Pu and Am) has been investigated in saline solution of different NaCl concentrations in the near neutral pH range. Important reactions considered are hydrolysis, carbonate complexation, redox reaction, alpha-radiolysis, colloid generation and humate complexation. Hydrolysis reactions are studied for Pu(VI) in 3.6 M NaCl and for Am(III) in 0.1 M and 0.6 M NaCl solution, whereas carbonate complexation of Pu(IV) and Am(III) is investigated in HCO3-/CO32- solution of varying pH. Consequences of alpha-radiolysis in NaCl solution are thoroughly analysed as for the Eh change due to Cl- oxidation and the oxidation of Pu(IV) and Am(III). In groundwaters colloid generation of Am(III), particularly pseudocolloids, is characterized and correlated with the concentration of humic substances. Humate complexation under discussion deals mainly with the stabilization of Am(III) in a given groundwater through its colloid generation. (orig.)

  8. Fabrication of carbon nanotube films from alkyne-transition metal complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Vivekanantan S.; Vollhardt, K. Peter C.

    2007-08-28

    A simple method for the production or synthesis of carbon nanotubes as free-standing films or nanotube mats by the thermal decomposition of transition metal complexed alkynes with aryl, alkyl, alkenyl, or alkynyl substituents. In particular, transition metal (e.g. Co, Ni, Fe, Mo) complexes of diarylacetylenes, e.g. diphenylacetylene, and solid mixtures of these complexes with suitable, additional carbon sources are heated in a vessel. More specifically, the heating of the transition metal complex is completed at a temperature between 400-800.degree. C. and more particularly 550-700.degree. C. for between 0.1 to 24 hours and more particularly 0.5-3 hours in a sealed vessel under a partial pressure of argon or helium.

  9. Complexes of carbon nanotubes with oligonucleotides in thin Langmuir-Blodgett films to detect electrochemically hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, A. S.; Egorova, V. P.; Krylova, H. V.; Lipnevich, I. V.; Orekhovskaya, T. I.; Veligura, A. A.; Govorov, M. I.; Shulitsky, B. G.

    2014-10-01

    Self-assembled complexes consisting of thin multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and DNA-oligonucleotides which are able to a cooperative binding to complementary oligonucleotides have been investigated. It was establised a high-performance charge transport in nanostructured Langmuir-Blodgett complexes thin MWCNTs/DNA. A method to electrochemically detect DNA hybridization on the self-organized structures has been proposed.

  10. Carbon nanotubes dispersed in aqueous solution by ruthenium(ii) polypyridyl complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kewei; Saha, Avishek; Dirian, Konstantin; Jiang, Chengmin; Chu, Pin-Lei E; Tour, James M; Guldi, Dirk M; Martí, Angel A

    2016-07-21

    Cationic ruthenium(ii) polypyridyl complexes with appended pyrene groups have been synthesized and used to disperse single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) in aqueous solutions. To this end, planar pyrene groups enable association by means of π-stacking onto carbon nanotubes and, in turn, the attachment of the cationic ruthenium complexes. Importantly, the ionic nature of the ruthenium complexes allows the formation of stable dispersions featuring individualized SWCNTs in water as confirmed in a number of spectroscopic and microscopic assays. In addition, steady-state photoluminescence spectroscopy was used to probe the excited state interactions between the ruthenium complexes and SWCNTs. These studies show that the photoluminescence of both, that is, of the ruthenium complexes and of SWCNTs, are quenched when they interact with each other. Pump-probe transient absorption experiments were performed to shed light onto the nature of the photoluminescence quenching, showing carbon nanotube-based bands with picosecond lifetimes, but no new bands which could be unambigously assigned to photoinduced charge transfer process. Thus, from the spectroscopic data, we conclude that quenching of the photoluminescence of the ruthenium complexes is due to energy transfer to proximal SWCNTs. PMID:27353007

  11. Anoxic carbon degradation in Arctic sediments: Microbial transformations of complex substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnosti, C.; Finke, N.; Larsen, O.; Ghobrial, S.

    2005-05-01

    Complex substrates are degraded in anoxic sediments by the concerted activities of diverse microbial communities. To explore the effects of substrate complexity on carbon transformations in permanently cold anoxic sediments, four substrates— Spirulina cells, Isochrysis cells, and soluble high molecular weight carbohydrate-rich extracts of these cells (Spir-Ex and Iso-Ex)—were added to sediments collected from Svalbard. The sediments were homogenized, incubated anaerobically in gas-tight bags at 0°C, and enzyme activities, fermentation, and terminal respiration were monitored over a 1134 h time course. All substrate additions yielded a fraction (8%-13%) of carbon that was metabolized to CO 2 over the first 384 h of incubation. The timecourse of VFA (volatile fatty acid) production and consumption, as well as the suite of VFAs produced, was similar for all substrates. After this phase, pathways of carbon degradation diverged, with an additional 43%, 32%, 33%, and 8% of Isochrysis, Iso-Ex, Spirulina, and Spir-Ex carbon respired to CO 2 over the next 750 h of incubation. Somewhat surprisingly, the soluble, carbohydrate-rich extracts did not prove to be more labile substrates than the whole cells from which they were derived. Although Spirulina and Iso-Ex differed in physical and chemical characteristics (solid/soluble, C/N ratio, lipid and carbohydrate content), nearly identical quantities of carbon were respired to CO 2. In contrast, only 15% of Spir-Ex carbon was respired, despite the initial burst of activity that it fueled, its soluble nature, and its relatively high (50%) carbohydrate content. The microbial community in these cold anoxic sediments clearly has the capacity to react rapidly to carbon input; extent and timecourse of remineralization of added carbon is similar to observations made at much higher temperatures in temperate sediments. The extent of carbon remineralization from these specific substrates, however, would not likely have been predicted

  12. Formation of oxygen complexes in controlled atmosphere at surface of doped glassy carbon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aleksandra A Perić-Grujić; Tatjana M Vasiljević; Olivera M Nešković; Miomir V Veljković; Zoran V Laušević; Mila D Laušević

    2006-10-01

    The effects of boron and phosphorus incorporation in phenolic resin precursor to the oxidation resistance of glassy carbon have been studied. In order to reveal the nature and composition of the oxygen complexes formed at the surface of doped glassy carbon, under controlled atmosphere, the surface of the samples was cleaned under vacuum up to 1273 K. Specific functional groups, subsequently formed under dry CO2 or O2 atmosphere on the surface of boron-doped and phosphorus-doped glassy carbon samples, were examined using the temperature-programmed desorption method combined with mass spectrometric analysis. Characterization of surface properties of undoped and doped samples has shown that in the presence of either boron or phosphorus heteroatoms, a lower amount of oxygen complexes formed after CO2 exposure, while, typically, higher amount of oxygen complexes formed after O2 exposure. It has been concluded that the surface of undoped glassy carbon has a greater affinity towards CO2, while in the presence of either boron or phosphorus heteroatoms, the glassy carbon surface affinity becomes greater towards O2, under experimental conditions.

  13. Human carbonic anhydrase II as a host for piano-stool complexes bearing a sulfonamide anchor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnard, Fabien W; Heinisch, Tillmann; Nogueira, Elisa S; Schirmer, Tilman; Ward, Thomas R

    2011-08-01

    d(6)-piano-stool complexes bearing an arylsulfonamide anchor display sub-micromolar affinity towards human Carbonic Anhydrase II (hCA II). The 1.3 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of [(η(6)-C(6)Me(6))Ru(bispy 3)Cl](+)⊂ hCA II highlights the nature of the host-guest interactions. PMID:21706094

  14. Fe(III) mobilisation by carbonate in low temperature environments: Study of the solubility of ferrihydrite in carbonate media and the formation of Fe(III) carbonate complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We have determined thermodynamic stabilities of Fe(III)-carbonate species. • We have determined the effect of those species on the solubility of ferrihydrite. • Results. • Highlight the importance of two Fe(III)-carbonate: FeOHCO3 and Fe(CO3)33−. - Abstract: The linkage between the iron and the carbon cycles is of paramount importance to understand and quantify the effect of increased CO2 concentrations in natural waters on the mobility of iron and associated trace elements. In this context, we have quantified the thermodynamic stability of mixed Fe(III) hydroxo-carbonate complexes and their effect on the solubility of Fe(III) oxihydroxides. We present the results of carefully performed solubility measurements of 2-line ferrihydrite in the slightly acidic to neutral–alkaline pH ranges (3.8–8.7) under constant pCO2 varying between (0.982–98.154 kPa) at 25 °C. The outcome of the work indicates the predominance of two Fe(III) hydroxo carbonate complexes FeOHCO3 and Fe(CO3)33−, with formation constants log*β°1,1,1 = 10.76 ± 0.38 and log β°1,0,3 = 24.24 ± 0.42, respectively. The solubility constant for the ferrihydrite used in this study was determined in acid conditions (pH: 1.8–3.2) in the absence of CO2 and at T = (25 ± 1) °C, as log*Ks,0 = 1.19 ± 0.41. The relative stability of the Fe(III)-carbonate complexes in alkaline pH conditions has implications for the solubility of Fe(III) in CO2-rich environments and the subsequent mobilisation of associated trace metals that will be explored in subsequent papers

  15. PALADYN, a comprehensive land surface-vegetation-carbon cycle model of intermediate complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willeit, Matteo; Ganopolski, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    PALADYN is presented, a new comprehensive and computationally efficient land surface-vegetation-carbon cycle model designed to be used in Earth system models of intermediate complexity for long-term simulations and paleoclimate studies. The model treats in a consistent manner the interaction between atmosphere, terrestrial vegetation and soil through the fluxes of energy, water and carbon. Energy, water and carbon are conserved. The model explicitly treats permafrost, both in physical processes and as important carbon pool. The model distinguishes 9 surface types of which 5 are different vegetation types, bare soil, land ice, lake and ocean shelf. Including the ocean shelf allows to treat continuous changes in sea level and shelf area associated with glacial cycles. Over each surface type the model solves the surface energy balance and computes the fluxes of sensible, latent and ground heat and upward shortwave and longwave radiation. It includes a single snow layer. The soil model distinguishes between three different macro surface types which have their own soil column: vegetation and bare soil, ice sheet and ocean shelf. The soil is vertically discretized into 5 layers where prognostic equations for temperature, water and carbon are consistently solved. Phase changes of water in the soil are explicitly considered. A surface hydrology module computes precipitation interception by vegetation, surface runoff and soil infiltration. The soil water equation is based on Darcy's law. Given soil water content, the wetland fraction is computed based on a topographic index. Photosynthesis is computed using a light use efficiency model. Carbon assimilation by vegetation is coupled to the transpiration of water through stomatal conductance. The model includes a dynamic vegetation module with 5 plant functional types competing for the gridcell share with their respective net primary productivity. Each macro surface type has its own carbon pools represented by a litter, a fast

  16. Talc-carbonate alteration of ultramafic rocks within the Leka Ophiolite Complex, Central Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerga, A.; Konopásek, J.; Pedersen, R. B.

    2015-06-01

    Petrographic and geochemical analyses of partly and completely serpentinized and carbonated peridotites within the ultramafic section of the Leka Ophiolite Complex have been used to elucidate the evolution of alterations and identify possible fluid sources. The alterations show no evidence for any major deformation and are located along low-angle structures that were formed in a late stage of the structural evolution of the ophiolite complex. Modeling of mineral equilibria in the SiO2-MgO-FeO-Fe2O3-CaO-H2O ± CO2 system has been utilized to constrain the conditions during serpentinization and carbonation. The partly altered peridotites consist of the mineral assemblage olivine-clinopyroxene-serpentine-magnetite-brucite and formed at temperatures isotope values determined for dolomite from crosscutting carbonate lenses within the talc-carbonate rock yield δ13C values of ~- 5 indicative of a mantle source for the carbon required for the carbonation. Oxygen isotope values δSMOW18O of ~ 10.8-11.3‰ together with initial 87Sr/86Sri = 400Ma values of 0.7029 and 0.7063, suggest dehydration of rocks with mantle affinity as a source for the fluids. Based on analytical results and field observations we propose that the formation of the talc- and carbonate-bearing alteration zones is caused by the focused infiltration of fluids that originated at the bottom of already partly serpentinized ophiolite complex during extension-driven burial at the late stage of the Caledonian orogeny.

  17. Capture of unstable protein complex on the streptavidin-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Zunfeng, E-mail: liuz2@chem.leidenuniv.nl; Voskamp, Patrick [Cell Observatory, Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden Institute of Chemistry (Netherlands); Zhang Yue; Chu Fuqiang [Changzhou University, School of Pharmaceutical Engineering and Life Science (China); Abrahams, Jan Pieter, E-mail: abrahams@chem.leidenuniv.nl [Cell Observatory, Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden Institute of Chemistry (Netherlands)

    2013-04-15

    Purification of unstable protein complexes is a bottleneck for investigation of their 3D structure and in protein-protein interaction studies. In this paper, we demonstrate that streptavidin-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes (Strep Bullet SWNT) can be used to capture the biotinylated DNA-EcoRI complexes on a 2D surface and in solution using atomic force microscopy and electrophoresis analysis, respectively. The restriction enzyme EcoRI forms unstable complexes with DNA in the absence of Mg{sup 2+}. Capturing the EcoRI-DNA complexes on the Strep Bullet SWNT succeeded in the absence of Mg{sup 2+}, demonstrating that the Strep Bullet SWNT can be used for purifying unstable protein complexes.

  18. Complex formation during dissolution of metal oxides in molten alkali carbonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qingfeng; Borup, Flemming; Petrushina, Irina;

    1999-01-01

    as the partial pressure of carbon dioxide varies. By combination of solubility and electromotive force measurements, a model is constructed assuming the dissolution involves complex formation. The possible species for lead are proposed to be [Pb(CO3)(2)](-2) and/or [Pb(CO3)(3)](-4). A similar complex......Dissolution of metal oxides in molten carbonates relates directly to the stability of materials for electrodes and construction of molten carbonate fuel cells. In the present work the solubilities of PbO, NiO, Fe2O3,and Bi2O3 in molten Li/K carbonates have been measured at 650 degrees C under...... carbon dioxide atmosphere. It is found that the solubilities of NiO and PbO decrease while those of Fe2O3 and Bi2O3 remain approximately constant as the lithium mole fraction increases from 0.43 to 0.62 in the melt. At a fixed composition of the melt, NiO and PbO display both acidic and basic dissolution...

  19. Probing the complex ion structure in liquid carbon at 100 GPa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, D; Vorberger, J; Gericke, D O; Bagnoud, V; Blažević, A; Cayzac, W; Frank, A; Gregori, G; Ortner, A; Otten, A; Roth, F; Schaumann, G; Schumacher, D; Siegenthaler, K; Wagner, F; Wünsch, K; Roth, M

    2013-12-20

    We present the first direct experimental test of the complex ion structure in liquid carbon at pressures around 100 GPa, using spectrally resolved x-ray scattering from shock-compressed graphite samples. Our results confirm the structure predicted by ab initio quantum simulations and demonstrate the importance of chemical bonds at extreme conditions similar to those found in the interiors of giant planets. The evidence presented here thus provides a firmer ground for modeling the evolution and current structure of carbon-bearing icy giants like Neptune, Uranus, and a number of extrasolar planets. PMID:24483747

  20. Quantum mechanical calculation of aqueuous uranium complexes: carbonate, phosphate, organic and biomolecular species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jha Prashant

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantum mechanical calculations were performed on a variety of uranium species representing U(VI, U(V, U(IV, U-carbonates, U-phosphates, U-oxalates, U-catecholates, U-phosphodiesters, U-phosphorylated N-acetyl-glucosamine (NAG, and U-2-Keto-3-doxyoctanoate (KDO with explicit solvation by H2O molecules. These models represent major U species in natural waters and complexes on bacterial surfaces. The model results are compared to observed EXAFS, IR, Raman and NMR spectra. Results Agreement between experiment and theory is acceptable in most cases, and the reasons for discrepancies are discussed. Calculated Gibbs free energies are used to constrain which configurations are most likely to be stable under circumneutral pH conditions. Reduction of U(VI to U(IV is examined for the U-carbonate and U-catechol complexes. Conclusion Results on the potential energy differences between U(V- and U(IV-carbonate complexes suggest that the cause of slower disproportionation in this system is electrostatic repulsion between UO2 [CO3]35- ions that must approach one another to form U(VI and U(IV rather than a change in thermodynamic stability. Calculations on U-catechol species are consistent with the observation that UO22+ can oxidize catechol and form quinone-like species. In addition, outer-sphere complexation is predicted to be the most stable for U-catechol interactions based on calculated energies and comparison to 13C NMR spectra. Outer-sphere complexes (i.e., ion pairs bridged by water molecules are predicted to be comparable in Gibbs free energy to inner-sphere complexes for a model carboxylic acid. Complexation of uranyl to phosphorus-containing groups in extracellular polymeric substances is predicted to favor phosphonate groups, such as that found in phosphorylated NAG, rather than phosphodiesters, such as those in nucleic acids.

  1. Transformation of Graphitic and Amorphous Carbon Dust to Complex Organic Molecules in a Massive Carbon Cycle in Protostellar Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Johnson, Natasha M.

    2012-01-01

    relatively inert carbonaceous dust from the ISM into the vital organic precursors to life such as amino acids and sugars intimately mixed with dust and ice in primitive planetesimals. Since the number of carbon atoms entering the Solar Nebula as dust exceeds the number of atoms entering the nebula as oxide grains. the formation of large quantities of complex organic molecules may represent the largest single chemical cycle in the nebula.

  2. Studies of reductive elimination reactions to form carbon-oxygen bonds from Pt(IV) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, B S; Goldberg, K I

    2001-03-21

    The platinum(IV) complexes fac-L(2)PtMe(3)(OR) (L(2) = bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane, o-bis(diphenylphosphino)benzene, R = carboxyl, aryl; L = PMe(3), R = aryl) undergo reductive elimination reactions to form carbon-oxygen bonds and/or carbon-carbon bonds. The carbon-oxygen reductive elimination reaction produces either methyl esters or methyl aryl ethers (anisoles) and L(2)PtMe(2), while the carbon-carbon reductive elimination reaction affords ethane and L(2)PtMe(OR). Choice of reaction conditions allows the selection of either type of coupling over the other. A detailed mechanistic study of the reductive elimination reactions supports dissociation of the OR(-) ligand as the initial step for the C-O bond formation reaction. This is followed by a nucleophilic attack of OR(-) upon a methyl group bound to the Pt(IV) cation to produce the products MeOR and L(2)PtMe(2). C-C reductive elimination proceeds from L(2)PtMe(3)(OR) by initial L (L = PMe(3)) or OR(-) (L(2) = dppe, dppbz) dissociation, followed by C-C coupling from the resulting five-coordinate intermediate. Our studies demonstrate that both C-C and C-O reductive elimination reactions from Pt(IV) are more facile in polar solvents, in the presence of Lewis acids, and for OR(-) groups that contain electron withdrawing substituents. PMID:11456927

  3. Joint Optimal Production Planning for Complex Supply Chains Constrained by Carbon Emission Abatement Policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longfei He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We focus on the joint production planning of complex supply chains facing stochastic demands and being constrained by carbon emission reduction policies. We pick two typical carbon emission reduction policies to research how emission regulation influences the profit and carbon footprint of a typical supply chain. We use the input-output model to capture the interrelated demand link between an arbitrary pair of two nodes in scenarios without or with carbon emission constraints. We design optimization algorithm to obtain joint optimal production quantities combination for maximizing overall profit under regulatory policies, respectively. Furthermore, numerical studies by featuring exponentially distributed demand compare systemwide performances in various scenarios. We build the “carbon emission elasticity of profit (CEEP” index as a metric to evaluate the impact of regulatory policies on both chainwide emissions and profit. Our results manifest that by facilitating the mandatory emission cap in proper installation within the network one can balance well effective emission reduction and associated acceptable profit loss. The outcome that CEEP index when implementing Carbon emission tax is elastic implies that the scale of profit loss is greater than that of emission reduction, which shows that this policy is less effective than mandatory cap from industry standpoint at least.

  4. Carbon nanotubes dispersed in aqueous solution by ruthenium(ii) polypyridyl complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kewei; Saha, Avishek; Dirian, Konstantin; Jiang, Chengmin; Chu, Pin-Lei E.; Tour, James M.; Guldi, Dirk M.; Martí, Angel A.

    2016-07-01

    Cationic ruthenium(ii) polypyridyl complexes with appended pyrene groups have been synthesized and used to disperse single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) in aqueous solutions. To this end, planar pyrene groups enable association by means of π-stacking onto carbon nanotubes and, in turn, the attachment of the cationic ruthenium complexes. Importantly, the ionic nature of the ruthenium complexes allows the formation of stable dispersions featuring individualized SWCNTs in water as confirmed in a number of spectroscopic and microscopic assays. In addition, steady-state photoluminescence spectroscopy was used to probe the excited state interactions between the ruthenium complexes and SWCNTs. These studies show that the photoluminescence of both, that is, of the ruthenium complexes and of SWCNTs, are quenched when they interact with each other. Pump-probe transient absorption experiments were performed to shed light onto the nature of the photoluminescence quenching, showing carbon nanotube-based bands with picosecond lifetimes, but no new bands which could be unambigously assigned to photoinduced charge transfer process. Thus, from the spectroscopic data, we conclude that quenching of the photoluminescence of the ruthenium complexes is due to energy transfer to proximal SWCNTs.Cationic ruthenium(ii) polypyridyl complexes with appended pyrene groups have been synthesized and used to disperse single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) in aqueous solutions. To this end, planar pyrene groups enable association by means of π-stacking onto carbon nanotubes and, in turn, the attachment of the cationic ruthenium complexes. Importantly, the ionic nature of the ruthenium complexes allows the formation of stable dispersions featuring individualized SWCNTs in water as confirmed in a number of spectroscopic and microscopic assays. In addition, steady-state photoluminescence spectroscopy was used to probe the excited state interactions between the ruthenium complexes and SWCNTs

  5. Hydroxyl, water, ammonia, carbon monoxide and neutral carbon towards the Sgr A complex

    CERN Document Server

    Karlsson, Roland; Hjalmarson, Åke; Winnberg, Anders; Fathi, Kambiz; Frisk, Urban; Olberg, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We observed OH, H$_2$O, HN$_3$, C$^{18}$O, and C$_I$ towards the +50 km/s cloud (M-0.02-0.07), the CND and the +20 km/s (M-0.13-0.08) cloud in the Sgr A complex with the VLA, Odin and SEST. Strong OH absorption, H$_2$O emission and absorption lines were seen at all three positions. Strong C$^{18}$O emissions were seen towards the +50 and +20 km/s clouds. The CND is rich in H$_2$O and OH, and these abundances are considerably higher than in the surrounding clouds, indicating that shocks, star formation and clump collisions prevail in those objects. A comparison with the literature reveals that it is likely that PDR chemistry including grain surface reactions, and perhaps also the influences of shocks has led to the observed abundances of the observed molecular species studied here. In the redward high-velocity line wings of both the +50 and +20 km/s clouds and the CND, the very high H$_2$O abundances are suggested to be caused by the combined action of shock desorption from icy grain mantles and high-temperatu...

  6. Heterologous Production of an Energy-Conserving Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase Complex in the Hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit Jan Schut

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO is an important intermediate in anaerobic carbon fixation pathways in acetogenesis and methanogenesis. In addition, some anaerobes can utilize CO as an energy source. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus, which grows optimally at 80°C, CO oxidation and energy conservation is accomplished by a respiratory complex encoded by a 16-gene cluster containing a carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, a membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase and a Na+/H+ antiporter module. This complex oxidizes CO, evolves CO2 and H2, and generates a Na+ motive force that is used to conserve energy by a Na+-dependent ATP synthase. Herein we used a bacterial artificial chromosome to insert the 13.2 kb gene cluster encoding the CO-oxidizing respiratory complex of T. onnurineus into the genome of the heterotrophic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally at 100°C. P. furiosus is normally unable to utilize CO, however, the recombinant strain readily oxidized CO and generated H2 at 80°C. Moreover, CO also served as an energy source and allowed the P. furiosus strain to grow with a limiting concentration of sugar or with peptides as the carbon source. Moreover, CO oxidation by P. furiosus was also coupled to the re-utilization, presumably for biosynthesis, of acetate generated by fermentation. The functional transfer of CO utilization between Thermococcus and Pyrococcus species demonstrated herein is representative of the horizontal gene transfer of an environmentally-relevant metabolic capability. The transfer of CO utilizing, hydrogen-producing genetic modules also has applications for biohydrogen production and a CO-based industrial platform for various thermophilic organisms.

  7. Highly fluorous complexes of ruthenium and osmium and their solubility in supercritical carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berven, Bradley M; Koutsantonis, George A; Skelton, Brian W; Trengove, Robert D; White, Allan H

    2009-12-21

    A series of ruthenium and osmium complexes containing highly fluorous diphosphine ligands (F)P(wedge)P(F) = (F(13)C(6)C(6)H(4)-p)(2)P(CH(2))(2)P(p-C(6)H(4)C(6)F(13))(2) (dfppe) and (F(13)C(6)C(6)H(4)-p)(2)P(CH(2))(3)P(p-C(6)H(4)C(6)F(13))(2) (dfppp) has been prepared. The fluorous diphosphine ligands incorporate four C(6)F(13) "fluoro-ponytails", and these have been effective in solubilizing the complexes in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO(2)). Precise solubility measurements in scCO(2) were performed for some of the complexes. The new complexes [MX(2)((F)P(wedge)P(F))(2)] and [MX((F)P(wedge)P(F))(eta-C(5)H(5))], M = Ru, Os, X = Cl, Br, have been characterized by a number of spectroscopic techniques and their electrochemical properties measured, three of the ruthenium complexes also being characterized by single-crystal X-ray studies. The noncovalent interactions observed in the X-ray structures have been analyzed by the Hirshfeld surface approach, putting them on a more solid footing. The fluorinated complexes show significantly different solvation properties from those of the analogous unfluorinated compounds, particularly with respect to their behavior in common organic solvents and their good scCO(2) solubility. PMID:19938863

  8. Complex resistivity spectra in relation to multiscale pore geometry in carbonates and mixed-siliciclastic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbisrath, Jan Henrik

    Carbonate rocks are known to have complex and heterogeneous pore structures, which result from their biogenic origin and strong affinity for diagenetic processes that change their pore structure after burial. The combination of sheer endless variations of precursor biogenic material, depositional environments, and diagenetic effects results in rocks that are interesting to study but intricate to understand. Many schemes to categorize the diversity of carbonate rocks are in use today; most are based on the macropore structure and qualitative thin-section analysis. Many studies, however, acknowledge that micropores have a significant influence on the macroscopic petrophysical rock properties, which are essential to determine reservoir quality. Micropores are, by definition, smaller than the thickness of a thin-section (cementation factors (m) in rocks with such microporosity type. The BIB-SEM method is also used on a dataset of mixed carbonate-siliciclastic (mudrock) samples with high kerogen and pyrite content. Results show that the nanopore geometry here has little influence on cementation factors, and instead porosity is the main control on m in mudrocks. Cementation factors are crucial for estimates of oil-in-place and water saturation in a wireline application, and a slight change of (assumed) cementation factor can change the interpreter's evaluation from dry hole to discovery. Therefore, accurate determination of cementation factors is a critical task in formation evaluation, similar to accurate estimates of permeability. To achieve this goal, this dissertation utilizes a new approach of using complex resistivity spectra (CRS) to assess the pore geometry and its resulting electrical and fluid flow properties. Specifically, frequency dispersion of complex resistivity in the kHz range is used as input for a new model to predict cementation factor and permeability in a wide variety of core plug samples. The underlying concept that relates CRS to flow properties

  9. CARBON DIOXIDE INFLUENCE ON THE THERMAL FORMATION OF COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES IN INTERSTELLAR ICE ANALOGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinogradoff, V.; Fray, N.; Bouilloud, M.; Cottin, H. [LISA Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systèmes Atmosphériques, UMR CNRS 7583, Université Paris Est Créteil (UPEC), Université Paris Diderot (UPD), Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, Labex ESEP, Paris (France); Duvernay, F.; Chiavassa, T., E-mail: vvinogradoff@mnhn.fr [PIIM, Laboratoire de Physique des Interactions Ioniques et Moléculaires, Université Aix-Marseille, UMR CNRS 7345, Marseille (France)

    2015-08-20

    Interstellar ices are submitted to energetic processes (thermal, UV, and cosmic-ray radiations) producing complex organic molecules. Laboratory experiments aim to reproduce the evolution of interstellar ices to better understand the chemical changes leading to the reaction, formation, and desorption of molecules. In this context, the thermal evolution of an interstellar ice analogue composed of water, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and formaldehyde is investigated. The ice evolution during the warming has been monitored by IR spectroscopy. The formation of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) and polymethylenimine (PMI) are observed in the organic refractory residue left after ice sublimation. A better understanding of this result is realized with the study of another ice mixture containing methylenimine (a precursor of HMT) with carbon dioxide and ammonia. It appears that carbamic acid, a reaction product of carbon dioxide and ammonia, plays the role of catalyst, allowing the reactions toward HMT and PMI formation. This is the first time that such complex organic molecules (HMT, PMI) are produced from the warming (without VUV photolysis or irradiation with energetic particles) of abundant molecules observed in interstellar ices (H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}CO). This result strengthens the importance of thermal reactions in the ices’ evolution. HMT and PMI, likely components of interstellar ices, should be searched for in the pristine objects of our solar system, such as comets and carbonaceous chondrites.

  10. Adsorption of some metal complexes derived from acetyl acetone on activated carbon and purolite S-930

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salam A.H. Al-Ameri

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A new Schiff base (HL derived from condensation of p-anisidine and acetyl acetone has been prepared and used as a chelating ligand to prepare Cr(III, Mn(II, Co(II, Ni(II and Cu(II complexes. The study of the nature of these complexes formed in ethanol solution following the mole ratio method (2:1, L:M gave results which were compared successfully with these obtained from isolated solid state studies. These studies revealed that the complexes having square planner geometry of the type (ML2, M = Co(II, Ni(II and Cu(II, and octahedral geometry of the type [CrIIIL2(H2O2]Cl and [MNIIL2(H2O2]. The adsorption studies of three complexes Cr(III, Mn(II, and Co(II on activated carbon, H and Na-forms of purolite S-930 resin show high adsorption percentage for Cr(III on purolite S-930 due to ion exchange interaction compared with high adsorption of neutral Mn(II, Co(II complexes on activated charcoal. Linear plot of log Qe versus log Ce showed that the adsorption isotherm of these three complexes on activated carbon, H and Na-forms of purolite S-930 surface obeys Freundlich isotherm and was similar to S-curve type according to Giles classification which investigates heterogeneous adsorption. The regression values indicate that the adsorption data for these complexes fitted well within the Freundlich isothermal plots for the concentration studied. The accuracy and precision of the concentration measurements of these complexes were determined by preparing standard laboratory samples, the results show relative error ranging from ±1.08 to 5.31, ±1.04 to 4.82 and ±0.28 to 3.09 and the relative standard deviation did not exceed ±6.23, ±2.77 and ±4.38% for A1, A2 and A3 complexes, respectively.

  11. Preparation of Carbon Nanotubes by the Catalysis of Polymer Metal Complex on Porous Al203 Matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI; YanLi

    2001-01-01

    At present, synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is normally conducted on a vapor-to-solid interface at ca. 500-3500℃ via various vapor phase methods, such as are discharge, laser ablation, catalytic pyrolysis and chemical vapor deposition, etc.1-2 Recently, channel materials (such as channels of alumina and of AlPO4-5 zeolite) 3 have been utilized as solid-state templates to grow CNTs inside the channel. Here we described a novel method to prepare the carbon nanotubes based on the decomposition of C2H2 gas on the Co-Ni catalyst anchored by polymer complex on the porous A12O3 matrix. The degree of graphitization of synthesized CNTs and catalysts are of great interest.  ……

  12. Preparation of Carbon Nanotubes by the Catalysis of Polymer Metal Complex on Porous Al203 Matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI YanLi; ZHANG XiaoGang; LI HuLin

    2001-01-01

    @@ At present, synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is normally conducted on a vapor-to-solid interface at ca. 500-3500℃ via various vapor phase methods, such as are discharge, laser ablation, catalytic pyrolysis and chemical vapor deposition, etc.1-2 Recently, channel materials (such as channels of alumina and of AlPO4-5 zeolite) 3 have been utilized as solid-state templates to grow CNTs inside the channel. Here we described a novel method to prepare the carbon nanotubes based on the decomposition of C2H2 gas on the Co-Ni catalyst anchored by polymer complex on the porous A12O3 matrix. The degree of graphitization of synthesized CNTs and catalysts are of great interest.

  13. A Ni-Fe Layered Double Hydroxide-Carbon Nanotube Complex for Water Oxidation

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Ming; Wang, Hailiang; Liang, Yongye; Wu, Justin Zachary; Zhou, Jigang; Wang, Jian; Regier, Tom; Wei, Fei; Dai, Hongjie

    2013-01-01

    Highly active, durable and cost-effective electrocatalysts for water oxidation to evolve oxygen gas hold a key to a range of renewable energy solutions including water splitting and rechargeable metal-air batteries. Here, we report the synthesis of ultrathin nickel iron layered double hydroxide nanoplates on mildly oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Incorporation of Fe into the nickel hydroxide induced the formation of NiFe-layered double hydroxide. The nanoplates were covalently attached to a network of nanotubes, affording excellent electrical wiring to the nanoplates. The ultra-thin Ni-Fe layered double hydroxide nanoplates/carbon nanotube complex was found to exhibit unusually high electro-catalytic activity and stability for oxygen evolution and outperformed commercial precious metal Ir catalysts.

  14. Synergistic strengthening of polyelectrolyte complex membranes by functionalized carbon nanotubes and metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; An, Quan-Fu; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Jia-Kai; Song, Yi-Hu; Zhu, Bao-Ku; Gao, Cong-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Hydrophilic polymers have garnered much attention due to their critical roles in various applications such as molecular separation membranes, bio-interfaces, and surface engineering. However, a long-standing problem is that their mechanical properties usually deteriorate at high relative humidity (RH). Through the simultaneous incorporation of functionalized carbon nanotubes and copper ions (Cu(2+)), this study introduces a facile method to fabricate high strength polyelectrolyte complex nanohybrid membranes resistant to high RH (90%). For example, the tensile strength of the nanohybrid membranes is 55 MPa at 90% RH (80% of the original value at 30% RH). These results are explained by copper ions depressing the swelling degree of the membrane, and functionalized carbon nanotubes promoting stress transfer between the polymer matrix and them. The nanohybrid membranes are efficient in separating water/alcohol mixtures containing relatively high water content (up to 30 wt%), whereas common hydrophilic polymer membranes usually suffer from excessive swelling under this condition. PMID:25586650

  15. Heterologous Production of an Energy-Conserving Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase Complex in the Hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schut, Gerrit J.; Lipscomb, Gina L.; Nguyen, Diep M. N.; Kelly, Robert M.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an important intermediate in anaerobic carbon fixation pathways in acetogenesis and methanogenesis. In addition, some anaerobes can utilize CO as an energy source. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus, which grows optimally at 80°C, CO oxidation and energy conservation is accomplished by a respiratory complex encoded by a 16-gene cluster containing a CO dehydrogenase, a membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase and a Na+/H+ antiporter module. This complex oxidizes CO, evolves CO2 and H2, and generates a Na+ motive force that is used to conserve energy by a Na+-dependent ATP synthase. Herein we used a bacterial artificial chromosome to insert the 13.2 kb gene cluster encoding the CO-oxidizing respiratory complex of T. onnurineus into the genome of the heterotrophic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally at 100°C. P. furiosus is normally unable to utilize CO, however, the recombinant strain readily oxidized CO and generated H2 at 80°C. Moreover, CO also served as an energy source and allowed the P. furiosus strain to grow with a limiting concentration of sugar or with peptides as the carbon source. Moreover, CO oxidation by P. furiosus was also coupled to the re-utilization, presumably for biosynthesis, of acetate generated by fermentation. The functional transfer of CO utilization between Thermococcus and Pyrococcus species demonstrated herein is representative of the horizontal gene transfer of an environmentally relevant metabolic capability. The transfer of CO utilizing, hydrogen-producing genetic modules also has applications for biohydrogen production and a CO-based industrial platform for various thermophilic organisms. PMID:26858706

  16. Laser-induced synthesis of a nanostructured polymer-like metal-carbon complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakelian, S.; Kutrovskaya, S.; Kucherik, A.; Osipov, A.; Povolotckaia, A.; Povolotskiy, A.; Manshina, A.

    2016-04-01

    Synthesis of nanotructured metal-carbon materials by laser irradiation is an actual branch of laser physics and nanotechnology. Laser sources with different pulse duration allow changing the heating rate with realization of different transition scenarios and synthesis materials with various physical properties. We study the process of the formation of nanostructured metal-clusters and complexes using laser irradiation of colloidal systems which were consisted of carbon micro- nanoparticles and nanoparticles of noble metals. For carbon nanoparticles synthesis we use the method of laser ablation in liquid. For the realization of different regimes of laser surface modification of the target (glassycarbon and shungite) and the formation of micro- nanoparticles in a liquid the YAG:Nd laser with a pulse duration from 0.5 ms up to 20 ms (pulse energy up to 50J) was applied. We have used the CW-laser with moderate intensity in liquid (water or ethanol) for nanoparticle of noble metals synthesis. Thus, colloidal systems were obtained by using CW-laser with λ = 1.06 μm, I ~ 105-6 W/cm2, and t = 10 min. The average size of resulting particles was approximately about 10 to 100 nm. The nanoparticle obtaining was provided in the colloidal solution with different laser parameters. In this work we have investigated the mechanism of the metal-carbon cluster formation during the process of irradiation of colloidal system which were consisted of separate carbon, silver and gold nanoparticles. This system was irradiated by nanosecond laser (100 ns) with average power up to 50W.

  17. Synthesis of the Multinuclear Cobaloxime Complexes via Click Chemistry as Catalysts for the Formation of Cyclic Carbonates from Carbon Dioxide and Epoxides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ahmet Kilic; Armagan Keles; Emine Aytar; Mustafa Durgun; Mahmut Ulusoy

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the structurally similar multinuclear cobaloxime complexes based on dioxime ligands were synthesized and characterized as trinuclear complexes with respect to varied axial groups. The multinuclear cobaloxime complexes were characterized by 1H, 13C-NMR, FT-IR, UV-Vis, LC-MS spectra, melting point and magnetic susceptibility measurements. These multinuclear cobaloxime complexes have been successfully applied to the synthesis of cyclic carbonates from CO2 and epoxides under optimized conditions and with-out using any solvent. All multinuclear cobaloxime complexes obtained by click chemistry are good catalysts for the cycloaddition of CO2 to different epoxides in the presence of pyridine as a co-catalyst. Additionally, the effects of epoxides, bases, temperature, pressure, and time on the yield of cyclic carbonates were investigated.

  18. Immobilization and electrochemical properties of ruthenium and iridium complexes on carbon electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ayush; Blakemore, James D.; Brunschwig, Bruce S.; Gray, Harry B.

    2016-03-01

    We report the synthesis and surface immobilization of two new pyrene-appended molecular metal complexes: a ruthenium tris(bipyridyl) complex (1) and a bipyridyl complex of [Cp*Ir] (2) (Cp*  =  pentamethylcyclopentadienyl). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed successful immobilization on high surface area carbon electrodes, with the expected elemental ratios for the desired compounds. Electrochemical data collected in acetonitrile solution revealed a reversible reduction of 1 near  -1.4 V, and reduction of 2 near  -0.75 V. The noncovalent immobilization, driven by association of the appended pyrene groups with the surface, was sufficiently stable to enable studies of the molecular electrochemistry. Electroactive surface coverage of 1 was diminished by only 27% over three hours soaking in electrolyte solution as measured by cyclic voltammetry. The electrochemical response of 2 resembled its soluble analogues, and suggested that ligand exchange occurred on the surface. Together, the results demonstrate that noncovalent immobilization routes are suitable for obtaining fundamental understanding of immobilized metal complexes and their reductive electrochemical properties.

  19. Immobilization and electrochemical properties of ruthenium and iridium complexes on carbon electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the synthesis and surface immobilization of two new pyrene-appended molecular metal complexes: a ruthenium tris(bipyridyl) complex (1) and a bipyridyl complex of [Cp*Ir] (2) (Cp*  =  pentamethylcyclopentadienyl). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed successful immobilization on high surface area carbon electrodes, with the expected elemental ratios for the desired compounds. Electrochemical data collected in acetonitrile solution revealed a reversible reduction of 1 near  −1.4 V, and reduction of 2 near  −0.75 V. The noncovalent immobilization, driven by association of the appended pyrene groups with the surface, was sufficiently stable to enable studies of the molecular electrochemistry. Electroactive surface coverage of 1 was diminished by only 27% over three hours soaking in electrolyte solution as measured by cyclic voltammetry. The electrochemical response of 2 resembled its soluble analogues, and suggested that ligand exchange occurred on the surface. Together, the results demonstrate that noncovalent immobilization routes are suitable for obtaining fundamental understanding of immobilized metal complexes and their reductive electrochemical properties. (paper)

  20. Complex formation in the ternary U(VI)-F-L system (L = carbonate, oxalate and picolinate)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of ternary complexes and their equilibrium constants, in the system U(VI)-F--L, where L is one of the ligands picolinate, oxalate or carbonate have been investigated by potentiometric titrations using both F- and H- selective electrodes. The experimental results indicated that very stable ternary complexes are formed with the composition UO2LFq, q = 1 to 3, and UO2L2F for L = picolinate and oxalate. These complexes have a pentagonal bipyramid coordination geometry, with the five exchangeable donor atoms in a plane perpendicular to the linear UO2-group. The equilibrium constants have been determined at 25 C in a 1.00 M NaClO4 ionic medium. The equilibrium constants for the stepwise addition of F- to UO2L to form UO2LFq, q = 1 to 3, and to UO2L2 to form UO2L2F indicates that the prior coordination of L to U(VI) has a fairly small effect on the subsequent bonding of fluoride, except for a statistical effect determined by the number of available coordination sites. These results indicates that ternary complexes might be important for the speciation and transport of hexavalent actinides in ground and surface water systems. (orig.)

  1. Comparison of complex permittivities of isotonic colloids containing single-wall carbon nanotubes of varying chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Tejas; Symanowski, James T; Gach, H Michael

    2012-02-01

    The application of bio-compatible, conductive nanoparticles in combination with radiofrequency (RF) irradiation to raise tissue temperatures between 40 and 60 °C for hyperthermia and ablation spurred interest in the complex permittivities of isotonic nanoparticle-based colloids. Nanoparticles with large aspect ratios and high permittivities increase the bulk permittivity of the colloid and RF losses at the macroscopic scale. The complex permittivities of isotonic colloids with and without single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) containing either metallic, semiconducting, or mixed chiralities were measured from 20 MHz to 1 GHz at room temperature. The colloids were made with one of three different isotonic solvents: phosphate buffered saline (PBS), and Dulbecco's modified eagle medium (DMEM) with and without 0.5% weight/volume bovine serum albumin to simulate cytosol and blood, respectively. The concentration of elemental carbon from the SWCNTs in the colloids ranged from 16 to 17 mM. The permittivities were corrected for electrode polarization effects by fitting the data to the Cole-Cole relaxation model with a constant phase angle element. The presence of SWCNTs increased both the real and imaginary components of the permittivities of the colloids. For all three solvents, the direct current (DC) components of the real and imaginary permittivities were greatest for the colloids containing the mixed chirality SWCNTs, followed by the colloids with semiconducting SWCNTs, and then metallic SWCNTs.

  2. The complex ion structure of warm dense carbon measured by spectrally resolved x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, D.; Barbrel, B.; Falcone, R. W. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Vorberger, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik komplexer Systeme, Nöthnitzer Straße 38, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Helfrich, J.; Frydrych, S.; Ortner, A.; Otten, A.; Roth, F.; Schaumann, G.; Schumacher, D.; Siegenthaler, K.; Wagner, F.; Roth, M. [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstraße 9, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Gericke, D. O.; Wünsch, K. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Bachmann, B.; Döppner, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Bagnoud, V.; Blažević, A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); and others

    2015-05-15

    We present measurements of the complex ion structure of warm dense carbon close to the melting line at pressures around 100 GPa. High-pressure samples were created by laser-driven shock compression of graphite and probed by intense laser-generated x-ray sources with photon energies of 4.75 keV and 4.95 keV. High-efficiency crystal spectrometers allow for spectrally resolving the scattered radiation. Comparing the ratio of elastically and inelastically scattered radiation, we find evidence for a complex bonded liquid that is predicted by ab-initio quantum simulations showing the influence of chemical bonds under these conditions. Using graphite samples of different initial densities we demonstrate the capability of spectrally resolved x-ray scattering to monitor the carbon solid-liquid transition at relatively constant pressure of 150 GPa. Showing first single-pulse scattering spectra from cold graphite of unprecedented quality recorded at the Linac Coherent Light Source, we demonstrate the outstanding possibilities for future high-precision measurements at 4th Generation Light Sources.

  3. Asynchronous Reductive Release of Iron and Organic Carbon from Hematite-Humic Acid Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, D.; Poulson, S.; Sumaila, S.; Dynes, J.; McBeth, J. M.; Yang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Association with solid-phase iron plays an important role in the accumulation and stabilization of soil organic matter (SOM). Ferric minerals are subject to redox reactions, which can compromise the stability of iron-bound SOM. To date, there is limited information available concerning the fate of iron-bound SOM during redox reactions. In this study, we investigated the release kinetics of hematite-bound organic carbon (OC) during the abiotic reduction of hematite-humic acid (HA) complexes by dithionite, as an analog for the fate of iron-bound SOM in natural redox reactions. Carbon 1s near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy was used to examine the ratio of the aromatic, phenolic and carboxylic/imide functional groups of the adsorbed OC before and after reduction. Our results indicate that the reductive release of iron obeyed first-order kinetics with release rate constants of 6.67×10-3 to 13.0×10-3 min-1. The iron-bound OC was released rapidly during the initial stage with release rate constants of 0.011 to 1.49 min-1, and then became stable with residual fractions of 4.6% to 58.2% between 120 and 240 min. The release rate of aromatic OC was much faster than for the non-aromatic fraction of HA, and 90% of aromatic OC was released within the first hour for most samples. The more rapid release of aromatic OC was attributed to its potential distribution on the outer layer because of steric effects and the possible reduction of quinoids. Our findings show that in the reductive reaction the mobilization of iron-bound organic carbon was asynchronous with the reduction of iron, and aromatic carbon was released more readily than other organic components. This study illustrates the importance of evaluating the stability of iron-bound SOM, especially under aerobic-anaerobic transition conditions.

  4. Hydrogen bonded complexes of cyanuric acid with pyridine and guanidinium carbonate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Sivashankar

    2000-12-01

    Hydrogen bonded complexes of cyanuric acid (CA) with pyridine, [C3N3H3O3:C5H5N], 1, and guanidinium carbonate [C3H2N3][C(NH2)3], 2, have been prepared at room temperature and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Structure of 1 shows pyridine molecules substituting the inter-tape hydrogen bond in CA by N-H…N and C-H…O hydrogen bonds. The structure reveals CA-pyridine hydrogen-bonded single helices held together by dimeric N-H…O hydrogen bonding between CA molecules. In 2, the CA tapes, resembling a sine wave interact with the guanidinium cations through N-H…O and N-H…N hydrogen bonds forming guanidinium cyanurate sheets.

  5. Thermal decomposition and Moessbauer analysis of two iron hydroxy-carbonate complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text:The two iron hydroxy carbonate complexes (NH4)2Fe2(OH)4(CO3)2.H2O and (NH4)4Fe2(OH)4(CO3)3.3H2O were prepared by the method of Dvoak and Feitknecht. Moessbauer spectra of the first sample at room temperature and 81K showed principally a ferric doublet with a small quadrupole splitting while spectra of the second sample showed a broad ferric doublet with a large mean quadrupole splitting of 1mm/s. Parameters for both spectra were characteristic of distorted octahedral coordination to oxygens. Thermal gravimetric analysis of both samples up to 750 K showed several fractions corresponding to the loss of the more volatile components

  6. Asteroseismology of GD358 with complex core carbon and oxygen abundance profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Agnes; Provencal, Judith

    2015-08-01

    GD358 is the brightest (mv = 13.7) and best studied helium atmosphere white dwarf pulsator. We present an analysis based on over 1000 hours of observations spanning 2007-2014 as well as archival data going back to 1982. Each modern season of observations was obtained as part of multisite Whole Earth Telescope campaigns (WET). The WET allows continuous coverage of targets over the course of days to weeks. From the complete data set, we identify a total of 27 independent frequencies and fit 15 of them as m=0 modes in our asteroseismic analysis of GD358. As an upgrade to previous analyses of the star, we include complex carbon and oxygen core abundance profiles derived and parameterized from stellar evolution calculations.

  7. Organometallic Complexes Anchored to Conductive Carbon for Electrocatalytic Oxidation of Methane at Low Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joglekar, Madhura; Nguyen, Vinh; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Ngo, Chilan; Li, Quanning; O'Reilly, Matthew E; Gray, Tristan S; Hubbard, William A; Gunnoe, T Brent; Herring, Andrew M; Trewyn, Brian G

    2016-01-13

    Low-temperature direct methane fuel cells (DMEFCs) offer the opportunity to substantially improve the efficiency of energy production from natural gas. This study focuses on the development of well-defined platinum organometallic complexes covalently anchored to ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) for electrochemical oxidation of methane in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell at 80 °C. A maximum normalized power of 403 μW/mg Pt was obtained, which was 5 times higher than the power obtained from a modern commercial catalyst and 2 orders of magnitude greater than that from a Pt black catalyst. The observed differences in catalytic activities for oxidation of methane are linked to the chemistry of the tethered catalysts, determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The chemistry/activity relationships demonstrate a tangible path for the design of electrocatalytic systems for C-H bond activation that afford superior performance in DMEFC for potential commercial applications. PMID:26492385

  8. Modification of multiwall carbon nanotubes with ruthenium(II) terpyridine complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Huayang [Clark Atlanta University, Chemistry Department (United States); Wu Jie [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering (United States); Jeilani, Yassin A. [Spelman College, Department of Chemistry (United States); Ingram, Conrad W.; Harruna, Issifu I., E-mail: iharruna@cau.edu [Clark Atlanta University, Chemistry Department (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, 1-3 {mu}M in length and 20-25 nm in diameter) were initially functionalized with a 2,2 Prime :6 Prime 2 Double-Prime -terpyridine-chelated ruthenium(II) complex by covalent amidation. The resulting functionalized ruthenium MWCNTs (RuMWCNTs, 1-2 {mu}M in length and 10-20 nm in diameter) were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectronic spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Thermogravimetric experiments of RuMWCNTs show that the functional group coverage of terpyridine-rutheniun-terpyridine (tpy-Ru-tpy) is 0.7036 mmol/1.0 g carbon. The XPS results show N1s and Ru3d{sup 5/5} signals, confirming the presence of tpy-Ru-tpy groups on the surface of MWCNTs. The FTIR spectra of the RuMWCNTs display the typical stretching mode of the carboxyl group (amide I) and a combination of amide N-H and C-N stretching mode (amide II). The Raman D- and G-line peak intensity ratio of RuMWCNTs (ID/IG 2.21) exceeds that of pristine MWCNTs (ID/IG 1.93), suggesting covalent bonding of tpy-Ru-tpy to MWCNTs and supporting the disruption of the graphitic integrity due to the proposed covalent functionalization. High-resolution SEM images confirm that tpy-Ru-tpy moieties are interconnected or attached as aggregated structures (100-200-nm range) on the surfaces of the carbon nanotubes after functionalization. The electrical property of RuMWCNTs depicts higher resistance (10.10 M Ohm-Sign ) than that of OX-MWCNTs (15.38 k Ohm-Sign ).

  9. Cationic organobismuth complex as an effective catalyst for conversion of CO2 into cyclic carbonates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaowen ZHANG; Weili DAI; Shuangfeng YIN; Shenglian LUO; Chak-Tong AU

    2009-01-01

    In order to achieve high-efficiency conversion of CO2 into valuable chemicals, and to exploit new appli-cations of organobismuth compounds, cationic organo-bismuth complex with 5,6,7,12-tetrahydrodibenz[c,f] [ 1,5 ]azabismocine framework was examined for the first time for the coupling of CO2 into cyclic carbonates, using ter-minal epoxides as substrates and tetrabutylammonium halide as co-catalyst in a solvent-free environment under mild conditions. It is shown that the catalyst exhibited high activity and selectivity for the coupling reaction of CO2 with a wide range of terminal epoxide. The selectivity of propylene carbonates could reach 100%, and the max-imum turnover frequency was up to 10740 h-1 at 120℃ and 3 MPa CO2 pressure when tetrabutylammonium iod-ide was used as co-catalyst. Moreover, the catalyst is environment friendly, resistant to air and water, and can be readily reused and recycled without any loss of activity,demonstrating a potential in industrial application.

  10. Nitrogen-doped carbon nanofoam derived from amino acid chelate complex for supercapacitor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Prakash; Shanmugam, Sangaraju

    2016-06-01

    We report a novel strategy to fabricate the nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon nanofoam structures (N-MCNF), derived from magnesium amino acid chelate complex (Mg-acc-complex) for its application towards high performance supercapacitor (SCs) system. A series of N-MCNF with well-connected carbon nanofoam structure have been developed by varying the synthesis temperature. The fabricated N-MCNF material possesses a high surface area (1564 m2 g-1) and pore volume (1.767 cm3 g-1) with nitrogen content of 3.42 wt%. A prototypical coin cell type symmetric N-MCNF SC device has been assembled with 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate [EMIMBF4] ionic liquid electrolyte, and evaluated for SCs studies. The N-MCNF with high textural properties delivers unprecedented SC performance, such as high specific capacitance (204 Fg-1 at 0.25 Ag-1, 25 °C), high energy density (63.4 Wh kg-1), high power density (35.9 kW kg-1) and long-term cycle life (32,500 cycles). Significantly, N-MCNF materials exhibited high power rate performance, at 500 mV-1 (115 Fg-1) and 25 Ag-1 (166 Fg-1) owing to the uniform mesopore size distribution (∼4 nm). The N-MCNF SC device delivered maximum energy densities of 83.4 and 93.3 Wh kg-1 at 60 °C and 90 °C, respectively. Such outstanding N-MCNF SC device is successfully demonstrated in solar energy harvester applications.

  11. Unique chemical properties of metal-carbon bonds in metal-carboranyl and metal-carboryne complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU ZaoZao; XIE ZuoWei

    2009-01-01

    The metal-carbon bonds in metal-carboranyl and metal-carboryne complexes behave very differently from those in classical organometallic complexes. The unique electronic and steric properties of icosahedral carboranyl moiety make the M-C bond in metal-carboranyl complexes inert toward unsaturated molecules, and on the other hand, the sterically demanding carborane cage can induce unexpected C-C coupling reactions. The M-C bonds in metal-carboryne complexes are, however, active toward various kinds of unsaturated molecules and the reactivity patterns are dependent upon the electronic configurations of the metal ions. This account provides an overview of our recent work in this area.

  12. Unique chemical properties of metal-carbon bonds in metal-carboranyl and metal-carboryne complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The metal-carbon bonds in metal-carboranyl and metal-carboryne complexes behave very differently from those in classical organometallic complexes. The unique electronic and steric properties of ico-sahedral carboranyl moiety make the M-C bond in metal-carboranyl complexes inert toward unsaturated molecules, and on the other hand, the sterically demanding carborane cage can induce unexpected C-C coupling reactions. The M-C bonds in metal-carboryne complexes are, however, active toward various kinds of unsaturated molecules and the reactivity patterns are dependent upon the electronic configurations of the metal ions. This account provides an overview of our recent work in this area.

  13. Complexes of Imidazole with Poly(ethylene glycol) as a Corrosion Inhibitor for Carbon Steel in Sulphuric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimi, Saeed; Nasr-Esfahani, Mojtaba; Umoren, Saviour A.; Saebnoori, Ehsan

    2015-12-01

    The inhibiting action of polyethylene glycol and imidazole (PEG/IMZ)) complexes prepared by a simple deprotonation procedure on carbon steel corrosion in 0.5 mol/L sulphuric acid was evaluated using the weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques complemented by surface analysis using scanning electron microscopy. The inhibiting effect of the PEG/IMZ complexes on carbon steel corrosion was compared with the non-complex forms. Results obtained show that PEG/IMZ complex is a very effective corrosion inhibitor of carbon steel in the acid environment. The inhibition efficiency increased with the increase in the temperature and also with increasing percentage of imidazole in the complex. Corrosion inhibition occurs by virtue of adsorption of PEG/IMZ complexes on the steel surface which was found to follow the Temkin adsorption isotherm model. The PEG/IMZ complexes function as a mixed-type inhibitor. Results from all the methods employed are in a reasonably good agreement.

  14. "Drawing with nanotubes": creating nanowires with complex geometries by pulsed electrodeposition on self-organized carbon nanotube patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarden, Tohar S; Joselevich, Ernesto

    2010-11-10

    We present a new approach for the creation of nanowires with well-defined complex geometries by electrodeposition onto self-organized single-walled carbon nanotubes. The concept is demonstrated by generation of continuous Au nanowires with various geometries, including parallel arrays, serpentines, and coils. The generality of this approach is further illustrated by synthesizing Bi(2)Te(3) nanowires. Our concept of "drawing with nanotubes" offers to combine different material properties with complex geometries on the route to new functional nanosystems.

  15. THE INFLUENCE OF THE COMPLEX CHEMICAL ADDITIVE CONTAINING THE STRUCTURED CARBON NANOMATERIAL ON PROPERTIES OF CEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Yu. Sheyda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of investigations on influence of domestic complex chemical additive containing structured carbon nanomaterial and characterized by a combination effect (curing acceleration and plasticizing on cement and cement stone properties. The purpose of the investigations, on the one hand, has been to confirm efficacy of УКД-1additive from the perspective for increasing the rate of gain, strength growth of cement concrete and additive influence on setting time with the purpose to preserve molding properties of concrete mixes in time, and on the other hand, that is to assess “mechanism” of the УКД-1 additive action in the cement concrete. The research results have revealed regularities in changes due to the additive of water requirements and time period of the cement setting. The reqularities are considered as a pre-requisite for relevant changes in molding properties of the concrete mixes. The paper also experimentally substantiates the possibility to decrease temperature of cement concrete heating with the УДК-1 additive. It has been done with the purpose to save energy resources under production conditions. In addition to this the paper proves the efficiency of the additive which is expressed in strength increase of cement stone up to 20–40 % in the rated age (28 days that is considered as a basis for strength growth of cement concrete. The paper confirms a hypothesis on physical nature of this phenomenon because the X-ray phase analysis method has shown that there are no changes in morphology of portland cement hydration products under the action of the additive agent containing a structured carbon nanomaterial. Results of theoretical and experimental investigations on УКД-1 additive efficiency have been proved by industrial approbation while fabricating precast concrete products and construction of monolithic structures under plant industrial conditions (Minsk, SS “Stroyprogress” JSC MAPID and on

  16. Characterization of complex (B + C) diffusion layers formed on chromium and nickel-based low-carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pertek, A.; Kulka, M

    2002-12-30

    Combined surface hardening with boron and carbon was used for low-carbon chromium and nickel-based steels. The microstructure, boron contents, carbon profiles and chosen properties of borided layers produced on the carburized steels have been examined. These complex (B+C) layers are termed borburized layers. The microhardness profiles and wear resistance of these layers have been studied. In the microstructure of the borocarburized layer two zones have been observed: iron borides (FeB+Fe{sub 2}B) and a carburized layer. The depth (70-125 {mu}m) and microhardness (1500-1800 HV) of iron borides zone have been found. The carbon content (1.2-1.94 wt.%) and microhardness (700-950 HV) beneath iron borides zone have been determined. The microhardness gradient in borocarburized layer has been reduced in comparison with the only borided layer. An increase of distance from the surface is accompanied by a decrease of carbon content and microhardness in the carburized zone. The carbon and microhardness profiles of borided, carburized and borocarburized layers have been presented. A positive influence of complex layers (B+C) on the wear resistance was determined. The wear resistance of the borocarburized layer was determined to be greater in comparison with that for only borided or only carburized layers.

  17. Degraded tropical rain forests possess valuable carbon storage opportunities in a complex, forested landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamgir, Mohammed; Campbell, Mason J; Turton, Stephen M; Pert, Petina L; Edwards, Will; Laurance, William F

    2016-01-01

    Tropical forests are major contributors to the terrestrial global carbon pool, but this pool is being reduced via deforestation and forest degradation. Relatively few studies have assessed carbon storage in degraded tropical forests. We sampled 37,000 m(2) of intact rainforest, degraded rainforest and sclerophyll forest across the greater Wet Tropics bioregion of northeast Australia. We compared aboveground biomass and carbon storage of the three forest types, and the effects of forest structural attributes and environmental factors that influence carbon storage. Some degraded forests were found to store much less aboveground carbon than intact rainforests, whereas others sites had similar carbon storage to primary forest. Sclerophyll forests had lower carbon storage, comparable to the most heavily degraded rainforests. Our findings indicate that under certain situations, degraded forest may store as much carbon as intact rainforests. Strategic rehabilitation of degraded forests could enhance regional carbon storage and have positive benefits for tropical biodiversity. PMID:27435389

  18. Degraded tropical rain forests possess valuable carbon storage opportunities in a complex, forested landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamgir, Mohammed; Campbell, Mason J.; Turton, Stephen M.; Pert, Petina L.; Edwards, Will; Laurance, William F.

    2016-07-01

    Tropical forests are major contributors to the terrestrial global carbon pool, but this pool is being reduced via deforestation and forest degradation. Relatively few studies have assessed carbon storage in degraded tropical forests. We sampled 37,000 m2 of intact rainforest, degraded rainforest and sclerophyll forest across the greater Wet Tropics bioregion of northeast Australia. We compared aboveground biomass and carbon storage of the three forest types, and the effects of forest structural attributes and environmental factors that influence carbon storage. Some degraded forests were found to store much less aboveground carbon than intact rainforests, whereas others sites had similar carbon storage to primary forest. Sclerophyll forests had lower carbon storage, comparable to the most heavily degraded rainforests. Our findings indicate that under certain situations, degraded forest may store as much carbon as intact rainforests. Strategic rehabilitation of degraded forests could enhance regional carbon storage and have positive benefits for tropical biodiversity.

  19. Degraded tropical rain forests possess valuable carbon storage opportunities in a complex, forested landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamgir, Mohammed; Campbell, Mason J.; Turton, Stephen M.; Pert, Petina L.; Edwards, Will; Laurance, William F.

    2016-01-01

    Tropical forests are major contributors to the terrestrial global carbon pool, but this pool is being reduced via deforestation and forest degradation. Relatively few studies have assessed carbon storage in degraded tropical forests. We sampled 37,000 m2 of intact rainforest, degraded rainforest and sclerophyll forest across the greater Wet Tropics bioregion of northeast Australia. We compared aboveground biomass and carbon storage of the three forest types, and the effects of forest structural attributes and environmental factors that influence carbon storage. Some degraded forests were found to store much less aboveground carbon than intact rainforests, whereas others sites had similar carbon storage to primary forest. Sclerophyll forests had lower carbon storage, comparable to the most heavily degraded rainforests. Our findings indicate that under certain situations, degraded forest may store as much carbon as intact rainforests. Strategic rehabilitation of degraded forests could enhance regional carbon storage and have positive benefits for tropical biodiversity. PMID:27435389

  20. Degraded tropical rain forests possess valuable carbon storage opportunities in a complex, forested landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamgir, Mohammed; Campbell, Mason J; Turton, Stephen M; Pert, Petina L; Edwards, Will; Laurance, William F

    2016-07-20

    Tropical forests are major contributors to the terrestrial global carbon pool, but this pool is being reduced via deforestation and forest degradation. Relatively few studies have assessed carbon storage in degraded tropical forests. We sampled 37,000 m(2) of intact rainforest, degraded rainforest and sclerophyll forest across the greater Wet Tropics bioregion of northeast Australia. We compared aboveground biomass and carbon storage of the three forest types, and the effects of forest structural attributes and environmental factors that influence carbon storage. Some degraded forests were found to store much less aboveground carbon than intact rainforests, whereas others sites had similar carbon storage to primary forest. Sclerophyll forests had lower carbon storage, comparable to the most heavily degraded rainforests. Our findings indicate that under certain situations, degraded forest may store as much carbon as intact rainforests. Strategic rehabilitation of degraded forests could enhance regional carbon storage and have positive benefits for tropical biodiversity.

  1. Trace element geochemistry of Amba Dongar carbonatite complex, India: Evidence for fractional crystallization and silicate-carbonate melt immiscibility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jyotiranjan S Ray; P N Shukla

    2004-12-01

    Carbonatites are believed to have crystallized either from mantle-derived primary carbonate magmas or from secondary melts derived from carbonated silicate magmas through liquid immiscibility or from residual melts of fractional crystallization of silicate magmas. Although the observed coexistence of carbonatites and alkaline silicate rocks in most complexes, their coeval emplacement in many, and overlapping initial 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd ratios are supportive of their cogenesis; there have been few efforts to devise a quantitative method to identify the magmatic processes. In the present study we have made an attempt to accomplish this by modeling the trace element contents of carbonatites and coeval alkaline silicate rocks of Amba Dongar complex, India. Trace element data suggest that the carbonatites and alkaline silicate rocks of this complex are products of fractional crystallization of two separate parental melts. Using the available silicate melt-carbonate melt partition coefficients for various trace elements, and the observed data from carbonatites, we have tried to simulate trace element distribution pattern for the parental silicate melt. The results of the modeling not only support the hypothesis of silicate-carbonate melt immiscibility for the evolution of Amba Dongar but also establish a procedure to test the above hypothesis in such complexes.

  2. Further evidence for charge transfer complexes in brown carbon aerosols from excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Sabrina M; Smith, Geoffrey D

    2015-05-14

    The light-absorbing fraction of organic molecules in ambient aerosols, known as "brown carbon," is an important yet poorly characterized component. Despite the fact that brown carbon could alter the radiative forcing of aerosols significantly, identification of specific chromophores has remained challenging. We recently demonstrated that charge transfer (CT) complexes formed in organic molecules could be responsible for a large fraction of absorption observed in water-extracted ambient particulate matter.1 In the present study, we use excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy to further corroborate the importance of CT complexes in defining aerosol optical properties. Monotonically increasing and decreasing quantum yields, decreasing Stokes shifts, and red-shifting emission maxima are observed from ambient particulate matter collected in Athens, Georgia, strongly suggesting that a superposition of independent chromophores is not sufficient to explain brown carbon absorption and fluorescence. Instead, we show that a model in which such chromophores are energetically coupled to a dense manifold of CT complexes is consistent with all of the observations. Further, we suggest that a significant fraction of the observed fluorescence originates from CT complexes and that their contribution to brown carbon absorption is likely greater than we reported previously.

  3. Formation and annealing of metastable (interstitial oxygen)-(interstitial carbon) complexes in n- and p-type silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Makarenko, L F; Lastovskii, S B; Murin, L I; Moll, M; Pintilie, I

    2014-01-01

    It is shown experimentally that, in contrast to the stable configuration of (interstitial carbon)-(interstitial oxygen) complexes (CiOi), the corresponding metastable configuration (CiOi{*}) cannot be found in n-Si based structures by the method of capacitance spectroscopy. The rates of transformation CiOi{*} -> CiOi are practically the same for both n- and p-Si with a concentration of charge carriers of no higher than 10(13) cm(-3). It is established that the probabilities of the simultaneous formation of stable and metastable configurations of the complex under study in the case of the addition of an atom of interstitial carbon to an atom of interstitial oxygen is close to 50\\%. This is caused by the orientation dependence of the interaction potential of an atom of interstitial oxygen with an interstitial carbon atom, which diffuses to this oxygen atom.

  4. Evolution of multi-mineral formation evaluation using LWD data in complex carbonates offshore Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraris, Paolo; Borovskaya, Irina [Schlumberger, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Petrophysical Formation Evaluation using Logging While Drilling (LWD) measurements is a new requisite when drilling in carbonates reservoirs offshore Brazil. These reservoirs are difficult to characterize due to an unusual mixture of the minerals constituting the matrix and affecting rock texture. As wells are getting deeper and more expensive, an early identification of the drilled targets potential is necessary for valuable decisions. Brazil operators have been especially demanding towards service providers, pushing for development of suitable services able to positively identify and quantify not only the presence of hydrocarbons but also their flowing capability. In addition to the standard gamma ray / resistivity / porosity and density measurements, three new measurements have proven to be critical to evaluate complex carbonate formations: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), Spectroscopy and Capture Cross-Section (sigma). Under appropriate logging conditions, NMR data provides lithology independent porosity, bound and free fluids fractions, reservoir texture and permeability. Capture Spectroscopy allows assessment of mineral composition in terms of calcite, dolomite, quartz and clay fractions, and in addition highlights presence of other heavier minerals. Finally, sigma allows performing a volumetric formation evaluation without requiring custom optimization of the classical exponents used in all forms of resistivity saturation equations. All these new measurements are inherently statistical and if provided by wireline after drilling the well they may result in significant usage of rig time. When acquired simultaneously while drilling they have three very clear advantages: 1) no extra rig time, 2) improved statistics due to long formation exposure (drilling these carbonates is a slow process and rate of penetration (ROP) rarely exceeds 10 m/hr), 3) less invasion effect and better hole condition. This paper describes the development of two LWD tools performing the

  5. Study of new complexes of uranium and comba radical. I.- Complexes defective in sodium carbonate; Estudio de nuevos complejos entre el uranio y el radical CDMBA. I. Complejos con defectos de carbonato sodico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vera Palomino, J.; Galiano Sedano, J. A.; Parellada Bellod, R.; Bellido Gonzalez, A.

    1975-07-01

    Some complexes formed in presence of defect of sodium carbonate with respect to the stoichiometric ratio (U): (C0{sub 3}) = 1:3 are studied. This ratio corresponds to the main complex which is responsible for the uranium extraction with CDMBAC organic solutions and from U(VI) aqueous solutions with an excess of sodium carbonate. (Author) 10 refs.

  6. Simplifying the complexity of a coupled carbon turnover and pesticide degradation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschmann, Gianna; Erhardt, André H.; Pagel, Holger; Kügler, Philipp; Streck, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    The mechanistic one-dimensional model PECCAD (PEsticide degradation Coupled to CArbon turnover in the Detritusphere; Pagel et al. 2014, Biogeochemistry 117, 185-204) has been developed as a tool to elucidate regulation mechanisms of pesticide degradation in soil. A feature of this model is that it integrates functional traits of microorganisms, identifiable by molecular tools, and physicochemical processes such as transport and sorption that control substrate availability. Predicting the behavior of microbially active interfaces demands a fundamental understanding of factors controlling their dynamics. Concepts from dynamical systems theory allow us to study general properties of the model such as its qualitative behavior, intrinsic timescales and dynamic stability: Using a Latin hypercube method we sampled the parameter space for physically realistic steady states of the PECCAD ODE system and set up a numerical continuation and bifurcation problem with the open-source toolbox MatCont in order to obtain a complete classification of the dynamical system's behaviour. Bifurcation analysis reveals an equilibrium state of the system entirely controlled by fungal kinetic parameters. The equilibrium is generally unstable in response to small perturbations except for a small band in parameter space where the pesticide pool is stable. Time scale separation is a phenomenon that occurs in almost every complex open physical system. Motivated by the notion of "initial-stage" and "late-stage" decomposers and the concept of r-, K- or L-selected microbial life strategies, we test the applicability of geometric singular perturbation theory to identify fast and slow time scales of PECCAD. Revealing a generic fast-slow structure would greatly simplify the analysis of complex models of organic matter turnover by reducing the number of unknowns and parameters and providing a systematic mathematical framework for studying their properties.

  7. Evidence of different stoichiometries for the limiting carbonate complexes of lanthanides(3); Mise en evidence d'un changement de stoechiometrie du complexe carbonate limite au sein de la serie des lanthanides(3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philippini, V

    2007-12-15

    Two stoichiometries have been proposed by different laboratories to interpret measurements on the limiting carbonate complexes of An{sup 3+} and Ln{sup 3+} cations. The study of the solubility of double carbonates (AlkLn(CO{sub 3}){sub 2},xH{sub 2}O) in concentrated carbonate solutions at room temperature and high ionic strengths has shown that on the one hand the lightest lanthanides (La and Nd) form Ln(CO{sub 3}){sub 4}{sup 5-} whereas the heaviest (Eu and Dy) form Ln(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 3-} in the studied chemical conditions, and on the other hand, that the kinetics of precipitation of double carbonates depends on the alkali metal and the lanthanide ions. The existence of two stoichiometries for the limiting carbonate complexes was confirmed by capillary electrophoresis hyphenated to an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (CE-ICP-MS), used to extend the study to the whole series of lanthanides (except Ce, Pm and Yb). Two behaviours have been put forward comparing the electrophoretic mobilities: La to Tb form Ln(CO{sub 3}){sub 4}{sup 5-} while Dy to Lu form Ln(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 3-}. Measurements by time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) on Eu(III) indicate small variations of the geometry of Eu(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 3-} complex, specially with Cs{sup +}. Although analogies are currently used among the 4f-block trivalent elements, different aqueous speciations are evidenced in concentrated carbonate solutions across the lanthanide series. (author)

  8. Structures of murine carbonic anhydrase IV and human carbonic anhydrase II complexed with brinzolamide: molecular basis of isozyme-drug discrimination.

    OpenAIRE

    Stams, T.; Y. Chen; Boriack-Sjodin, P. A.; Hurt, J. D.; Liao, J; May, J. A.; Dean, T.; Laipis, P; Silverman, D. N.; Christianson, D. W.

    1998-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IV (CAIV) is a membrane-associated enzyme anchored to plasma membrane surfaces by a phosphatidylinositol glycan linkage. We have determined the 2.8-angstroms resolution crystal structure of a truncated, soluble form of recombinant murine CAIV. We have also determined the structure of its complex with a drug used for glaucoma therapy, the sulfonamide inhibitor brinzolamide (Azopt). The overall structure of murine CAIV is generally similar to that of human CAIV; however, some...

  9. Unexpected carbon-oxygen bond cleavage of THF promoted by guanidinate titanium complex/lithium diisopropylamide: Synthesis and crystal structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yong; WANG Mei; YAO Yingming; SHEN Qi

    2005-01-01

    An unexpected carbon-oxygen bond cleavage of THF (THF = tetrahydrofuran) promoted by guanidinate titanium complex was described. Guanidinate lithium [Pr2iNC(NCy)2]Li (Cy = cyclohexyl) formed in situ reacted with TiCl4(THF)2 in a 2:1 molar ratio to produce the guanidinate titanium chloride [Pr2iNC(NCy)2]2TiCl2 (1) in good yield. The reaction of [Pr2iNC(NCy)2]2TiCl2 with lithium diisopropylamide in THF afforded an unexpected [Pr2iNC(NCy)2]2Ti(OBun)2 (2), which was formed by the cleavage of carbon-oxygen bond of THF. Complexes 1 and 2 were fully characterized by elemental analysis, NMR and IR spectroscopies, and X-ray crystal structure determination for complex 2.

  10. Preparation, characterization and cytotoxicity of carbon nanotube-chitosan-phycocyanin complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Xuewu

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) or photothermal therapy (PTT) using nanomaterials has shown great prospect for cancer treatment. Phycocyanin (PC) is a photoharvesting pigment and is also an attractive candidate for PDT. The multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) is a potent candidate for PTT due to its extraordinary photo-to-thermal energy conversion efficiency upon excitation with near-infrared (NIR) light. To date, although MWNT-CS complexes have been well studied, no report about the reconjugation of MWNT-CS with phycocyanin is available in the literature. Here, by using water-soluble chitosan (CS), we prepared and characterized a novel biomaterial, MWNT-CS-PC, with the potential for PDT and PTT. The cytotoxicity experiments found that MWNT-CS-PC exhibited cell growth inhibition activity. Moreover, with irradiation of NIR light (808 nm) or visible light (532 nm), the photoinduced cytotoxicity was indeed enhanced. These results suggest that MWNT-CS-PC may potentially serve as a future photodynamic and photothermal therapy for cancer.

  11. Preparation, characterization and cytotoxicity of carbon nanotube–chitosan–phycocyanin complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) or photothermal therapy (PTT) using nanomaterials has shown great prospect for cancer treatment. Phycocyanin (PC) is a photoharvesting pigment and is also an attractive candidate for PDT. The multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) is a potent candidate for PTT due to its extraordinary photo-to-thermal energy conversion efficiency upon excitation with near-infrared (NIR) light. To date, although MWNT–CS complexes have been well studied, no report about the reconjugation of MWNT–CS with phycocyanin is available in the literature. Here, by using water-soluble chitosan (CS), we prepared and characterized a novel biomaterial, MWNT–CS–PC, with the potential for PDT and PTT. The cytotoxicity experiments found that MWNT–CS–PC exhibited cell growth inhibition activity. Moreover, with irradiation of NIR light (808 nm) or visible light (532 nm), the photoinduced cytotoxicity was indeed enhanced. These results suggest that MWNT–CS–PC may potentially serve as a future photodynamic and photothermal therapy for cancer. (paper)

  12. Thermodynamic Complexing of Monocyclopentadienylferrum (II) Intercalates with Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Мykhailenko, О V; Prylutskyy, Yu I; Кomarov, І V; Strungar, А V

    2016-12-01

    By employing the methods of molecular mechanics, semi-empirical quantum-chemical РМ3 and Monte-Carlo, the positioning of monocyclopentadienylferrum (II) molecules in double-walled (5,5)@(10,10) carbon nanotubes (CNT) depending on their concentration and temperature has been studied. The molecules have been found out to form stable bonds with CNT walls, with a tendency between intercalate stability and the CNT structure. The temperature growth (over ~500 K) causes gradual bond ruining followed by extrusion of interwall intercalate. Further temperature increase up to 600-700 K is characterised with intercalate external surface desorption, stabilising the whole system and keeping the interwall intercalate only. The CNT's UV-spectrum (5,5)@(10,10) depending on the intercalate concentration and association constant of the "double-walled CNT-intercalate" system have been calculated. A combination of unique optical, electrical and magnetic behaviour of cyclopentadienyl complexes with their ability to form high-stable intercalate with CNT opens a prospect of their applying in nanotechnology. PMID:26951128

  13. Vegetation sensitivity to global anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions in a topographically complex region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffenbaugh, N.S.; Sloan, L.C.; Snyder, M.A.; Bell, J.L.; Kaplan, J.; Shafer, S.L.; Bartlein, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    Anthropogenic increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations may affect vegetation distribution both directly through changes in photosynthesis and water-use efficiency, and indirectly through CO2-induced climate change. Using an equilibrium vegetation model (BIOME4) driven by a regional climate model (RegCM2.5), we tested the sensitivity of vegetation in the western United States, a topographically complex region, to the direct, indirect, and combined effects of doubled preindustrial atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Those sensitivities were quantified using the kappa statistic. Simulated vegetation in the western United States was sensitive to changes in atmospheric CO2 concentrations, with woody biome types replacing less woody types throughout the domain. The simulated vegetation was also sensitive to climatic effects, particularly at high elevations, due to both warming throughout the domain and decreased precipitation in key mountain regions such as the Sierra Nevada of California and the Cascade and Blue Mountains of Oregon. Significantly, when the direct effects of CO2 on vegetation were tested in combination with the indirect effects of CO2-induced climate change, new vegetation patterns were created that were not seen in either of the individual cases. This result indicates that climatic and nonclimatic effects must be considered in tandem when assessing the potential impacts of elevated CO2 levels.

  14. Clay:organic-carbon and organic carbon as determinants of the soil physical properties: reassessment of the Complexed Organic Carbon concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter, Adrien; Johannes, Alice; Boivin, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) is well known to largely determine the soil physical properties and fertility. Total porosity, structural porosity, aeration, structural stability among others are reported to increase linearly with increasing SOC in most studies. Is there an optimal SOC content as target in soil management, or is there no limit in physical fertility improvement with SOC? Dexter et al. (2008) investigated the relation between clay:SOC ratio and the physical properties of soils from different databases. They observed that the R2 of the relation between SOC and the physical properties were maximized when considering the SOC fraction limited to a clay:SOC ratio of 10. They concluded that this fraction of the SOC was complexed, and that the additional SOC was not influencing the physical properties as strongly as the complexed one. In this study, we reassessed this approach, on a database of 180 undisturbed soil samples collected from cambiluvisols of the Swiss Plateau, on an area of 2400 km2, and from different soil uses. The physical properties were obtained with Shrinkage Analysis, which involved the parameters used in Dexter et al., 2008. We used the same method, but detected biases in the statistical approach, which was, therefore, adapted. We showed that the relation between the bulk density and SOC was changing with the score of visual evaluation of the structure (VESS) (Ball et al., 2007). Therefore, we also worked only on the "good" structures according to VESS. All shrinkage parameters were linearly correlated to SOC regardless of the clay:SOC ratio, with R2 ranging from 0.45 to 0.8. Contrarily to Dexter et al. (2008), we did not observed an optimum in the R2 of the relation when considering a SOC fraction based on the clay:SOC ratio. R2 was increasing until a Clay:SOC of about 7, where it reached, and kept, its maximum value. The land use factor was not significant. The major difference with the former study is that we worked on the same soil group

  15. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Dynamics in Simple and Complex Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, Nikta

    Understanding the dynamics of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in simple and complex environments is crucial for establishing potential application of nanotube architectures for materials and biosciences. In this thesis we employ the visualization and analysis tools to image and quantify and the Brownian bending and diffusion of SWNTs in different media in order to understand and eventually to tailor nanotube mobility in confined environments. We image Brownian bending dynamics of SWNTs in water using Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence microscopy. The bending stiffness of each chirality-assigned SWNT is extracted from the variance of the curvature fluctuations. Relaxation times of the bending fluctuations are measured from the autocorrelation of SWNT shapes. We find that the bending stiffness scales as the cube of the nanotube diameter, in agreement with an elastic continuum model. The measured shape relaxation times are in excellent agreement with the semiflexible chain model, showing that SWNTs may truly be considered as the ideal model semiflexible filaments. The motion of stiff objects in crowded environments has been investigated for more than three decades in polymer science and biophysics; yet, theory and experiments have not established whether a minute amount of flexibility affects the mobility of stiff slender filaments. We image the Brownian motion of SWNTs in a network by NIR fluorescence microscopy. We show direct evidence of SWNTs reptating in the network, and confirm that their small flexibility enhances significantly their rotational diffusion. Our results establish the reptation dynamics of stiff filaments and provide a framework to tailor SWNTs mobility in confined media. By varying SWNT surface modifications, we can selectively tune the sensitivity of the carbon nanotubes to the different physical properties of the porous media for sensing applications, We introduce a simple procedure for dispersion of SWNTs in aqueous solutions using

  16. Ruthenium-bipyridine complexes bearing fullerene or carbon nanotubes: synthesis and impact of different carbon-based ligands on the resulting products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhen-yi; Huang, Rong-bin; Xie, Su-yuan; Zheng, Lan-sun

    2011-09-01

    This paper discusses the synthesis of two carbon-based pyridine ligands of fullerene pyrrolidine pyridine (C(60)-py) and multi-walled carbon nanotube pyrrolidine pyridine (MWCNT-py) via 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. The two complexes, C(60)-Ru and MWCNT-Ru, were synthesized by ligand substitution in the presence of NH(4)PF(6), and Ru(II)(bpy)(2)Cl(2) was used as a reaction precursor. Both complexes were characterized by mass spectroscopy (MS), elemental analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy (IR), ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy (UV-VIS) spectrometry, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The results showed that the substitution way of C(60)-py is different from that of MWCNT-py. The C(60)-py and a NH(3) replaced a Cl(-) and a bipyridine in Ru(II)(bpy)(2)Cl(2) to produce a five-coordinate complex of [Ru(bpy)(NH(3))(C(60)-py)Cl]PF(6), whereas MWCNT-py replaced a Cl(-) to generate a six-coordinate complex of [Ru(bpy)(2)(MWCNT-py)Cl]PF(6). The cyclic voltammetry study showed that the electron-withdrawing ability was different for C(60) and MWCNT. The C(60) showed a relatively stronger electron-withdrawing effect with respect to MWCNT. PMID:21769337

  17. A novel non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor based on single walled carbon nanotubes-manganese complex modified glassy carbon electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salimi, Abdollah, E-mail: absalimi@uok.ac.i [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Nanotechnology, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdioun, Monierosadat; Noorbakhsh, Abdollah [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdolmaleki, Amir [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156/83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghavami, Raoof [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-03-30

    A simple procedure was developed to prepare a glassy carbon (GC) electrode modified with single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and phenazine derivative of Mn-complex. With immersing the GC/CNTs modified electrode into Mn-complex solution for a short period of time 20-100 s, a stable thin layer of the complex was immobilized onto electrode surface. Modified electrode showed a well defined redox couples at wide pH range (1-12). The surface coverages and heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants (k{sub s}) of immobilized Mn-complex were approximately 1.58 x 10{sup -10} mole cm{sup -2} and 48.84 s{sup -1}. The modified electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity toward H{sub 2}O{sub 2} reduction. Detection limit, sensitivity, linear concentration range and k{sub cat} for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} were, 0.2 {mu}M and 692 nA {mu}M{sup -1} cm{sup -2}, 1 {mu}M to 1.5 mM and 7.96({+-}0.2) x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. Compared to other modified electrodes, this electrode has many advantageous such as remarkable catalytic activity, good reproducibility, simple preparation procedure and long term stability.

  18. Serum albumin forms a lactoferrin-like soluble iron-binding complex in presence of hydrogen carbonate ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Hiroshi M; Urazono, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Toshiya

    2014-02-15

    The iron-lactoferrin complex is a common food ingredient because of its iron-solubilizing capability in the presence of hydrogen carbonate ions. However, it is unclear whether the formation of a stable iron-binding complex is limited to lactoferrin. In this study, we investigated the effects of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on iron solubility and iron-catalyzed lipid oxidation in the presence of hydrogen carbonate ions. BSA could solubilize >100-fold molar equivalents of iron at neutral pH, exceeding the specific metal-binding property of BSA. This iron-solubilizing capability of BSA was impaired by thermally denaturing BSA at ≥ 70 °C for 10 min at pH 8.5. The resulting iron-BSA complex inhibited iron-catalyzed oxidation of soybean oil in a water-in-oil emulsion measured using the Rancimat test. Our study is the first to show that BSA, like lactoferrin, forms a soluble iron-binding complex in the presence of hydrogen carbonate ions. PMID:24128453

  19. Highly microporous carbons derived from a complex of glutamic acid and zinc chloride for use in supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiao-Ling; Lu, An-Hui; He, Bin; Li, Wen-Cui

    2016-09-01

    The selection of carbon precursor is an important factor when designing carbon materials. In this study, a complex derived from L-glutamic acid and zinc chloride was used to prepare highly microporous carbons via facile pyrolysis. L-glutamic acid, a new carbon precursor with nitrogen functionality, coordinated with zinc chloride resulted in a homogeneous distribution of Zn2+ on the molecular level. During pyrolysis, the evaporation of the in situ formed zinc species creates an abundance of micropores together with the inert gases. The obtained carbons exhibit high specific surface area (SBET: 1203 m2 g-1) and a rich nitrogen content (4.52 wt%). In excess of 89% of the pore volume consists of micropores with pore size ranging from 0.5 to 1.2 nm. These carbons have been shown to be suitable for use as supercapacitor electrodes, and have been tested in 6 M KOH where a capacitance of 217 F g-1 was achieved at a current density of 0.5 A g-1. A long cycling life of 30 000 cycles was achieved at a current density of 1 A g-1, with only a 9% loss in capacity. The leakage current through a two-electrode device was measured as 2.3 μA per mg of electrode and the self-discharge characteristics were minimal.

  20. Enhancing anaerobic digestion of complex organic waste with carbon-based conductive materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Yan; Holmes, Dawn E; Zhao, Zhiqiang; Woodard, Trevor L; Zhang, Yaobin; Sun, Dezhi; Wang, Li-Ying; Nevin, Kelly P; Lovley, Derek R

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work was to study the methanogenic metabolism of dog food, a food waste surrogate, in laboratory-scale reactors with different carbon-based conductive materials. Carbon cloth, carbon felt, and granular activated carbon all permitted higher organic loading rates and promoted faster recovery of soured reactors than the control reactors. Microbial community analysis revealed that specific and substantial enrichments of Sporanaerobacter and Methanosarcina were present on the carbon cloth surface. These results, and the known ability of Sporanaerobacter species to transfer electrons to elemental sulfur, suggest that Sporanaerobacter species can participate in direct interspecies electron transfer with Methanosarcina species when carbon cloth is available as an electron transfer mediator. PMID:27611035

  1. Reconstruction of Holocene carbon dynamics in a large boreal peatland complex, southern Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathijssen, Paul J. H.; Väliranta, Minna; Korrensalo, Aino; Alekseychik, Pavel; Vesala, Timo; Rinne, Janne; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina

    2016-06-01

    Holocene peatland development and associated carbon (C) dynamics were reconstructed for a southern boreal Finnish peatland complex with fen and bog areas. In order to assess the role of local factors and long-term allogenic climate forcing in peatland development patterns, we studied a total of 18 peat cores and reconstructed vertical peat growth and lateral peat area expansion rates, the C accumulation rate (CAR), past vegetation composition and past methane (CH4) fluxes. We combined fossil plant data with measured contemporary CH4 flux - vegetation relationship data to reconstruct CH4 fluxes over time. When these reconstructions were added to the CAR estimations, a more complete picture of Holocene-scale C dynamics was achieved. Basal peat ages showed that expansion of the peat area was rapid between 11,000 and 8000 cal. BP, but decreased during the dry mid-Holocene and is probably currently limited by basal topography. A similar pattern was observed for peat growth and CAR in the fen core, whereas in the bog core CAR increased after ombrotrophication, i.e. after 4400 cal. BP. The effect of fire on vegetation and CAR was more conspicuous at the bog site than at the fen site. The CH4 flux reconstructions showed that during the Holocene CH4 emissions at the fen site decreased from 19 ± 15 to 16 ± 8 g CH4 m-2 yr-1 and at the bog site from 20 ± 15 to 14 ± 8 g CH4 m-2 yr-1. Our results suggest that a combination of changing climate, fire events and local conditions have modified the autogenic peatland development and C dynamics.

  2. Complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenson, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The term complexity derives etymologically from the Latin plexus, which means interwoven. Intuitively, this implies that something complex is composed by elements that are difficult to separate. This difficulty arises from the relevant interactions that take place between components. This lack of separability is at odds with the classical scientific method - which has been used since the times of Galileo, Newton, Descartes, and Laplace - and has also influenced philosophy and engineering. In recent decades, the scientific study of complexity and complex systems has proposed a paradigm shift in science and philosophy, proposing novel methods that take into account relevant interactions.

  3. Thermodynamics and speciation: Carbonate complexation of Am(III) and speciation of actinides by pulsed laser spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report includes the carbonate complexation of Am(III) and speciation of actinides by pulsed laser spectroscopies. Part A describes the carbonate complexation behaviour of Am3+ in aqueous solution under 1% CO2 partial pressure, investigated by solubility and spectroscopic experiments. The average constants determined by the two methods are: log Ksp (Am2(CO3)3)=-29.7 ± 0.6, log β1=6.3 ± 0.3 and log β2 = 9.7 ± 0.6. Part B presents speciation capabilities of three different pulsed laser spectroscopies: laser-induced photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS), time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and photoacoustic detection of light scattering (PALS). Examples for the speciation of Am(III) and Cm(III) in different aquatic media are presented. (orig.)

  4. Electrosorption of Os(III)-complex at single-wall carbon nanotubes immobilized on a glassy carbon electrode: Application to nanomolar detection of bromate, periodate and iodate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salimi, Abdollah [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Nanotechnology, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: absalimi@uok.ac.ir; Kavosi, Begard [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Arak University, P.O. Box, 38156-879 Arak (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Babaei, Ali [Department of Chemistry, Arak University, P.O. Box, 38156-879 Arak (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hallaj, Rahman [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-06-16

    A simple procedure was developed to prepare a glassy carbon electrode modified with single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and Os(III)-complex. The glassy carbon (GC) electrode modified with CNTs was immersed into Os(III)-complex solution (direct deposition) for a short period of time (60 s). 1,4,8,12-Tetraazacyclotetradecane osmium(III) chloride, (Os(III)LCl{sub 2}).ClO{sub 4}, irreversibly and strongly adsorbed on SWCNTs immobilized on the surface of GC electrode. Cyclic voltammograms of the Os(III)-complex-incorporated-SWCNTs indicate a pair of well defined and nearly reversible redox couple with surface confined characteristic at wide pH range (1-8). The surface coverage ({gamma}) and charge transfer rate constant (k{sub s}) of the immobilized Os-complex on SWCNTs were 3.07 x 10{sup -9} mol cm{sup -2}, 5.5 ({+-}0.2) s{sup -1}, 2.94 x 10{sup -9} mol cm{sup -2}, 7.3 ({+-}0.3) s{sup -1} at buffer solution with pH 2 and 7, respectively, indicate high loading ability of SWCNTs for Os(III) complex and great facilitation of the electron transfer between electroactive redox center and carbon nanotubes immobilized on the electrode surface. Modified electrodes showed higher electrocatalytic activity toward reduction of BrO{sub 3}{sup -}, IO{sub 3}{sup -} and IO{sub 4}{sup -} in acidic solutions. The catalytic rate constants for catalytic reduction bromate, periodate and iodate were 3.79 ({+-}0.2) x 10{sup 3}, 7.32 ({+-}0.2) x 10{sup 3} and 1.75 ({+-}0.2) x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s {sup -1}, respectively. The hydrodynamic amperometry of rotating modified electrode at constant potential (0.3 V) was used for nanomolar detection of selected analytes. Excellent electrochemical reversibility of the redox couple, good reproducibility, high stability, low detection limit, long life time, fast amperometric response time, wide linear concentration range, technical simplicity and possibility of rapid preparation are great advantage of this sensor.

  5. Carbon-13 magnetic relaxation rates or iron (III) complexes of some biogenic amines and parent compounds in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spin-lattice relaxation rates (R1) from naturally occuring C-13 F.T. N.M.R. spectra of some catecholamines and parent compounds with Iron(III) at pD = 4 were determined in order to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying their association in aqueous solutions. Complexation was observed only for catecholic ligands. The R1 values were used to calculate iron-carbon scaled distances, and two complexation models were proposed where the catecholic function binds Fe(III) in the first and second coordination spheres respectively. The latter case was shown to be the consistent with the molecular geometries. (orig.)

  6. CALCIUM CARBONATE REDUCES IRON ABSORPTION FROM IRON SULFATE, BUT NOT WHEN IRON IS PRESENTED AS AN ORGANIC COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. CONCEI�O

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Experimental and epidemiological evidences have demonstrated that calcium inhibits iron absorption; calcium carbonate being one of the most effective calcium sources to reduce iron absorption from dietary origin or from iron sulfate. In the present work, the short-term effect of calcium from calcium carbonate on iron absorption was studied in rats, using different iron compounds (monosodium ferric EDTA, iron-bys-glicine, iron peptide complex with iron sulfate as a control. Eighty (80 animals were divided into groups of 10 animals each with homogeneous weight. After 18h fast, the animals received by gavage 5 mL of a dispersion containing one of the iron compounds (1mg Fe/kg body weight, concomitantly or not with calcium carbonate at a molar ratio of 150:1 (Ca/Fe. Two hours after the administration, the animals were sacrificed and blood was collected for serum iron determination (iron transfer rate from intestinal lumen to blood compartment. Additionally, the intestines were collected for soluble iron determination (available iron. The results demonstrated that calcium ion from calcium carbonate inhibits the iron absorption from iron sulfate, but not from organic iron (di- or trivalent complexes.

  7. DIFFERENTIAL INHIBITION OF MITOCHONDRIAL RESPIRATORY COMPLEXES BY INHALATION OF COMBUSTION SMOKE AND CARBON MONOXIDE, IN VIVO, IN THE RAT BRAIN

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Heung M; Hallberg, Lance M.; Greeley, George H.; Englander, Ella W.

    2010-01-01

    Combustion smoke contains gases and particulates, which act via hypoxia and cytotoxicity producing mechanisms to injure cells and tissues. While carbon monoxide (CO) is the major toxicant in smoke, its toxicity is exacerbated in presence of other compounds. Here, we examined modulations of mitochondrial and cytosolic energy metabolism by inhalation of combustion smoke versus CO, in vivo, in the rat brain. Measurements revealed reduced activities of respiratory complexes, with greater inhibiti...

  8. Carbonate-coordinated metal complexes precede the formation of liquid amorphous mineral emulsions of divalent metal carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Stephan E.; Müller, Lars; Barrea, Raul; Kampf, Christopher J.; Leiterer, Jork; Panne, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Emmerling, Franziska; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2011-03-01

    During the mineralisation of metal carbonates MCO3 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Cd, Pb) liquid-like amorphous intermediates emerge. These intermediates that form via a liquid/liquid phase separation behave like a classical emulsion and are stabilized electrostatically. The occurrence of these intermediates is attributed to the formation of highly hydrated networks whose stability is mainly based on weak interactions and the variability of the metal-containing pre-critical clusters. Their existence and compositional freedom are evidenced by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Liquid intermediates in non-classical crystallisation pathways seem to be more common than assumed.During the mineralisation of metal carbonates MCO3 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Cd, Pb) liquid-like amorphous intermediates emerge. These intermediates that form via a liquid/liquid phase separation behave like a classical emulsion and are stabilized electrostatically. The occurrence of these intermediates is attributed to the formation of highly hydrated networks whose stability is mainly based on weak interactions and the variability of the metal-containing pre-critical clusters. Their existence and compositional freedom are evidenced by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Liquid intermediates in non-classical crystallisation pathways seem to be more common than assumed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: (S1 and S5) TEM at higher magnifications and of crystallizations conducted at pH = 6.0, 9.0 and 11.3; (S2) sketch of a spreading liquid particle on a TEM grid; (S3) wide-angle scattering of BaCO3 and CdCO3; (S4 and S6-S9) ESI-MS spectra of a solution of carbon dioxide and of bicarbonates of Sr, Ba, Pb, Mn and Cd. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00761g

  9. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of intact polar lipids reveal complex carbon flow patterns among hydrocarbon degrading microbial communities at the Chapopote asphalt volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubotz, Florence; Lipp, Julius S.; Elvert, Marcus; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2011-08-01

    Seepage of asphalt forms the basis of a cold seep system at 3000 m water depth at the Chapopote Knoll in the southern Gulf of Mexico. Anaerobic microbial communities are stimulated in the oil-impregnated sediments as evidenced by the presence of intact polar membrane lipids (IPLs) derived from archaea and Bacteria at depths up to 7 m below the seafloor. Detailed investigation of stable carbon isotope composition (δ 13C) of alkyl and acyl moieties derived from a range of IPL precursors with distinct polar head groups resolved the complexity of carbon metabolisms and utilization of diverse carbon sources by uncultured microbial communities. In surface sediments most of the polar lipid-derived fatty acids with phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG) head groups could be tentatively assigned to autotrophic sulfate-reducing bacteria, with a relatively small proportion involved in the anaerobic oxidation of methane. Derivatives of phosphatidyl-( N)-methylethanolamine (PME) were abundant and could be predominantly assigned to heterotrophic oil-degrading bacteria. Archaeal IPLs with phosphate-based hydroxyarchaeols and diglycosidic glyceroldibiphytanylglyceroltetraethers (GDGTs) were assigned to methanotrophic archaea of the ANME-2 and ANME-1 cluster, respectively, whereas δ 13C values of phosphate-based archaeols and mixed phosphate-based and diglycosidic GDGTs point to methanogenic archaea. At a 7 m deep sulfate-methane transition zone that is linked to the upward movement of gas-laden petroleum, a distinct increase in abundance of archaeal IPLs such as phosphate-based hydroxyarchaeols and diglycosidic archaeol and GDGTs is observed; their δ 13C values are consistent with their origin from both methanotrophic and methanogenic archaea. This study reveals previously hidden, highly complex patterns in the carbon-flow of versatile microbial communities involved in the degradation of heavy oil including hydrocarbon gases

  10. Novel in situ multiharmonic EQCM-D approach to characterize complex carbon pore architectures for capacitive deionization of brackish water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpigel, Netanel; Levi, Mikhael D; Sigalov, Sergey; Aurbach, Doron; Daikhin, Leonid; Presser, Volker

    2016-03-23

    Multiharmonic analysis by electrochemical quartz-crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (EQCM-D) is introduced as an excellent tool for quantitative studying electrosorption of ions from aqueous solution in mesoporous (BP-880) or mixed micro-mesoporous (BP-2000) carbon electrodes. Finding the optimal conditions for gravimetric analysis of the ionic content in the charged carbon electrodes, we propose a novel approach to modeling the charge-dependent gravimetric characteristics by incorporation of Gouy-Chapman-Stern electric double layer model for ions electrosorption into meso- and micro-mesoporous carbon electrodes. All three parameters of the gravimetric equation evaluated by fitting it to the experimental mass changes curves were validated using supplementary nitrogen gas sorption analysis and complementing atomic force microscopy. Important overlap between gravimetric EQCM-D analysis of the ionic content of porous carbon electrodes and the classical capacitive deionization models has been established. The necessity and usefulness of non-gravimetric EQCM-D characterizations of complex carbon architectures, providing insight into their unique viscoelastic behavior and porous structure changes, have been discussed in detail. PMID:26902741

  11. Novel in situ multiharmonic EQCM-D approach to characterize complex carbon pore architectures for capacitive deionization of brackish water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiharmonic analysis by electrochemical quartz-crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (EQCM-D) is introduced as an excellent tool for quantitative studying electrosorption of ions from aqueous solution in mesoporous (BP-880) or mixed micro-mesoporous (BP-2000) carbon electrodes. Finding the optimal conditions for gravimetric analysis of the ionic content in the charged carbon electrodes, we propose a novel approach to modeling the charge-dependent gravimetric characteristics by incorporation of Gouy-Chapman-Stern electric double layer model for ions electrosorption into meso- and micro-mesoporous carbon electrodes. All three parameters of the gravimetric equation evaluated by fitting it to the experimental mass changes curves were validated using supplementary nitrogen gas sorption analysis and complementing atomic force microscopy. Important overlap between gravimetric EQCM-D analysis of the ionic content of porous carbon electrodes and the classical capacitive deionization models has been established. The necessity and usefulness of non-gravimetric EQCM-D characterizations of complex carbon architectures, providing insight into their unique viscoelastic behavior and porous structure changes, have been discussed in detail. (paper)

  12. Conformations of dimethyl carbonate and its complexes with water: A matrix isolation infrared and ab initio study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Bishnu Prasad; Ramanathan, N.; Sundararajan, K.; Viswanathan, K. S.

    2012-09-01

    Conformations of dimethyl carbonate (DMC) were studied using matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy. Infrared spectra of DMC trapped in inert gas matrixes, using an effusive source at 298 and 423 K, showed evidence of both the ground state (cis-cis), and higher energy (cis-trans) conformers. Experiments were also performed using a supersonic jet source to deposit the matrix, to look for conformational cooling in the expansion process. The structures and vibrational frequencies of these conformers were computed at the B3LYP/6-31++G** level of theory. Natural bond orbital analyses were performed to understand the role of the delocalization interactions in conformational preferences. Complexes of DMC with H2O were also studied. A 1:1 DMC-H2O complex was identified in the matrix isolation experiments, where the carbonyl oxygen of DMC served as the proton acceptor for the hydrogen bonded complex. This observation was corroborated by computations performed on the complex at the B3LYP/6-31++G** level. Our computations also indicated another minimum, corresponding to an alkoxy bonded DMC-H2O complex, which was less exothermic; however, this complex was not identified in our experiments. Atoms-in-molecules theory was also performed to understand the nature of the intermolecular interaction in the DMC-H2O complex.

  13. Carbon-water Cycling in the Critical Zone: Understanding Ecosystem Process Variability Across Complex Terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, Holly [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Brooks, Paul [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2016-06-16

    One of the largest knowledge gaps in environmental science is the ability to understand and predict how ecosystems will respond to future climate variability. The links between vegetation, hydrology, and climate that control carbon sequestration in plant biomass and soils remain poorly understood. Soil respiration is the second largest carbon flux of terrestrial ecosystems, yet there is no consensus on how respiration will change as water availability and temperature co-vary. To address this knowledge gap, we use the variation in soil development and topography across an elevation and climate gradient on the Front Range of Colorado to conduct a natural experiment that enables us to examine the co-evolution of soil carbon, vegetation, hydrology, and climate in an accessible field laboratory. The goal of this project is to further our ability to combine plant water availability, carbon flux and storage, and topographically driven hydrometrics into a watershed scale predictive model of carbon balance. We hypothesize: (i) landscape structure and hydrology are important controls on soil respiration as a result of spatial variability in both physical and biological drivers: (ii) variation in rates of soil respiration during the growing season is due to corresponding shifts in belowground carbon inputs from vegetation; and (iii) aboveground carbon storage (biomass) and species composition are directly correlated with soil moisture and therefore, can be directly related to subsurface drainage patterns.

  14. Carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen isotope studies of the regional metamorphic complex at Naxos, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rye, R.O.; Schuiling, R.D.; Rye, D.M.; Jansen, J.B.H.

    1976-01-01

    At Naxos, Greece, a migmatite dome is surrounded by schists and marbles of decreasing metamorphic grade. Sillimanite, kyanite, biotite, chlorite, and glaucophane zones are recognized at successively greater distances from the migmatite dome. Quartz-muscovite and quartz-biotite oxygen isotope and mineralogie temperatures range from 350 to 700??C. The metamorphic complex can be divided into multiple schist-rich (including migmatites) and marblerich zones. The ??18O values of silicate minerals in migmatite and schist units and quartz segregations in the schist-rich zones decrease with increase in metamorphic grades. The calculated ??18OH2O values of the metamorphic fluids in the schist-rich zones decrease from about 15??? in the lower grades to an average of about 8.5??? in the migmatite. The ??D values of OH-minerals (muscovite, biotite, chlorite, and glaucophane) in the schist-rich zones also decrease with increase in grade. The calculated ??DH2O values for the metamorphic fluid decrease from -5??? in the glaucophane zone to an average of about -70??? in the migmatite. The ??D values of water in fluid inclusions in quartz segregations in the higher grade rocks are consistent with this trend. The??18O values of silicate minerals and quartz segregations in marble-rich zones are usually very large and were controlled by exchange with the adjacent marbles. The ??D values of the OH minerals in some marble-rich zones may reflect the value of water contained in the rocks prior to metamorphism. Detailed data on 20 marble units show systematic variations of ??18O values which depend upon metamorphic grade. Below the 540??C isograd very steep ??18O gradients at the margins and large ??18O values in the interior of the marbles indicate that oxygen isotope exchange with the adjacent schist units was usually limited to the margins of the marbles with more exchange occurring in the stratigraphic bottom than in the top margins. Above the 540??C isograd lower ??18O values occur in

  15. Two different carbon-hydrogen complexes in silicon with closely spaced energy levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An acceptor and a single donor state of carbon-hydrogen defects (CHA and CHB) are observed by Laplace deep level transient spectroscopy at 90 K. CHA appears directly after hydrogenation by wet chemical etching or hydrogen plasma treatment, whereas CHB can be observed only after a successive annealing under reverse bias at about 320 K. The activation enthalpies of these states are 0.16 eV for CHA and 0.14 eV for CHB. Our results reconcile previous controversial experimental results. We attribute CHA to the configuration where substitutional carbon binds a hydrogen atom on a bond centered position between carbon and the neighboring silicon and CHB to another carbon-hydrogen defect

  16. Stability constants important to the understanding of plutonium in environmental waters, hydroxy and carbonate complexation of PuO2+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation constants for the reactions PuO2+ + H2O = PuO2(OH) + H+ and PuO2+ + CO32 = PuO2(CO3)- were determined in aqueous sodium perchlorate solutions by laser-induced photoacoustic spectroscopy. The molar absorptivity of the PuO2+ band at 569 nm decreased with increasing hydroxide concentration. Similarly, spectral changes occurred between 540 and 580 nm as the carbonate concentration was increased. The absorption data were analyzed by the non-linear least-squares program SQUAD to yield complexation constants. Using the specific ion interaction theory, both complexation constants were extrapolated to zero ionic strength. These thermodynamic complexation constants were combined with the oxidation-reduction potentials of Pu to obtain Eh versus pH diagrams. 120 refs., 35 figs., 12 tabs

  17. The distribution and amount of carbon in the largest peatland complex in Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Frederick C.; Roucoux, Katherine H.; Lawson, Ian T.; Mitchard, Edward T. A.; Honorio Coronado, Euridice N.; Lähteenoja, Outi; Torres Montenegro, Luis; Valderrama Sandoval, Elvis; Zaráte, Ricardo; Baker, Timothy R.

    2014-12-01

    Peatlands in Amazonian Peru are known to store large quantities of carbon, but there is high uncertainty in the spatial extent and total carbon stocks of these ecosystems. Here, we use a multi-sensor (Landsat, ALOS PALSAR and SRTM) remote sensing approach, together with field data including 24 forest census plots and 218 peat thickness measurements, to map the distribution of peatland vegetation types and calculate the combined above- and below-ground carbon stock of peatland ecosystems in the Pastaza-Marañon foreland basin in Peru. We find that peatlands cover 35 600 ± 2133 km2 and contain 3.14 (0.44-8.15) Pg C. Variation in peat thickness and bulk density are the most important sources of uncertainty in these values. One particular ecosystem type, peatland pole forest, is found to be the most carbon-dense ecosystem yet identified in Amazonia (1391 ± 710 Mg C ha-1). The novel approach of combining optical and radar remote sensing with above- and below-ground carbon inventories is recommended for developing regional carbon estimates for tropical peatlands globally. Finally, we suggest that Amazonian peatlands should be a priority for research and conservation before the developing regional infrastructure causes an acceleration in the exploitation and degradation of these ecosystems.

  18. The distribution and amount of carbon in the largest peatland complex in Amazonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peatlands in Amazonian Peru are known to store large quantities of carbon, but there is high uncertainty in the spatial extent and total carbon stocks of these ecosystems. Here, we use a multi-sensor (Landsat, ALOS PALSAR and SRTM) remote sensing approach, together with field data including 24 forest census plots and 218 peat thickness measurements, to map the distribution of peatland vegetation types and calculate the combined above- and below-ground carbon stock of peatland ecosystems in the Pastaza-Marañon foreland basin in Peru. We find that peatlands cover 35 600 ± 2133 km2 and contain 3.14 (0.44–8.15) Pg C. Variation in peat thickness and bulk density are the most important sources of uncertainty in these values. One particular ecosystem type, peatland pole forest, is found to be the most carbon-dense ecosystem yet identified in Amazonia (1391 ± 710 Mg C ha−1). The novel approach of combining optical and radar remote sensing with above- and below-ground carbon inventories is recommended for developing regional carbon estimates for tropical peatlands globally. Finally, we suggest that Amazonian peatlands should be a priority for research and conservation before the developing regional infrastructure causes an acceleration in the exploitation and degradation of these ecosystems. (letter)

  19. Removal of amoxicillin and cefuroxime axetil by advanced membranes technology, activated carbon and micelle-clay complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awwad, Mohammad; Al-Rimawi, Fuad; Dajani, Khuloud Jamal Khayyat; Khamis, Mustafa; Nir, Shlomo; Karaman, Rafik

    2015-01-01

    Two antibacterials, amoxicillin trihydrate and cefuroxime axetil spiked into wastewater were completely removed by sequential wastewater treatment plant's membranes, which included activated sludge, ultrafiltration (hollow fibre and spiral wound membranes with 100 and 20 kDa cut-offs), activated carbon column and reverse osmosis. Adsorption isotherms in synthetic water which employed activated carbon and micelle-clay complex (octadecyltrimethylammonium-montmorillonite) as adsorbents fitted the Langmuir equation. Qmax of 100 and 90.9 mg g(-1), and K values of 0.158 and 0.229 L mg(-1) were obtained for amoxicillin trihydrate using activated carbon and micelle-clay complex, respectively. Filtration of antibacterials in the ppm range, which yielded variable degrees of removal depending on the volumes passed and flow rates, was simulated and capacities for the ppb range were estimated. Stability study in pure water and wastewater revealed that amoxicillin was totally stable for one month when kept at 37°C, whereas cefuroxime axetil underwent slow hydrolysis to cefuroxime.

  20. Electrocatalytic and simultaneous determination of isoproterenol, uric acid and folic acid at molybdenum (VI) complex-carbon nanotube paste electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beitollahi, Hadi, E-mail: h.beitollahi@yahoo.com [Environment Department, Research Institute of Environmental Sciences, International Center for Science, High Technology and Environmental Sciences, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sheikhshoaie, Iran [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman 76175-133 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-30

    Highlights: > A molybdenum (VI) complex-carbon nanotube paste electrode have been fabricated. > This electrode reduced the oxidation potential of isoproterenol by about 175 mV. > It resolved the voltammetric waves of isoproterenol, uric acid and folic acid. - Abstract: This paper describes the development, electrochemical characterization and utilization of a novel modified molybdenum (VI) complex-carbon nanotube paste electrode for the electrocatalytic determination of isoproterenol (IP). The electrochemical profile of the proposed modified electrode was analyzed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) that showed a shift of the oxidation peak potential of IP at 175 mV to less positive value, compared with an unmodified carbon paste electrode. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) in 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution (PBS) at pH 7.0 was performed to determine IP in the range from 0.7 to 600.0 {mu}M, with a detection limit of 35.0 nM. Then the modified electrode was used to determine IP in an excess of uric acid (UA) and folic acid (FA) by DPV. Finally, this method was used for the determination of IP in some real samples.

  1. Synthesis and evaluation of multi-wall carbon nanotube–paclitaxel complex as an anti-cancer agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemvand, Fariba; Biazar, Esmaeil; Tavakolifard, Sara; Khaledian, Mohammad; Rahmanzadeh, Saeid; Momenzadeh, Daruosh; Afroosheh, Roshanak; Zarkalami, Faezeh; Shabannezhad, Marjan; Hesami Tackallou, Saeed; Massoudi, Nilofar; Heidari Keshel, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to design multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) loaded with paclitaxel (PTX) anti-cancer drug and investigate its anti-cancerous efficacy of human gastric cancer. Background: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) represent a novel nano-materials applied in various fields such as drug delivery due to their unique chemical properties and high drug loading. Patients and methods: In this study, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) pre-functionalized covalently with a paclitaxel (PTX) as an anti-cancer drug and evaluated by different analyses including, scanning electron microscope (SEM), particle size analyzer and cellular analyses. Results: A well conjugated of anti-cancer drug on the carbon nanotube surfaces was shown. This study demonstrates that the MWCN-PTX complex is a potentially useful system for delivery of anti-cancer drugs. The flow cytometry, CFU and MTT assay results have disclosed that MWCNT/PTXs might promote apoptosis in MKN-45 gastric adenocarcinoma cell line. Conclusion: According to results, our simple method can be designed a candidate material for chemotherapy. It has presented a few bio-related applications including, their successful use as a nano-carriers for drug transport. PMID:27458512

  2. Theory of complex fluids in the warm-dense-matter regime, and application to phase-transitions in liquid carbon

    CERN Document Server

    Dharma-wardana, M W C

    2016-01-01

    Using data from recent laser-shock experiments and related density-functional molecular-dynamics simulations on carbon, we demonstrate that the ionic structures predicted within the neutral-pseudo-atom approach for a complex liquid in the warm-dense matter regime are in good agreement with available data, even where transient covalent bonding dominates ionic correlations. Evidence for an unusual phase transition of a liquid $\\to$ vapor with an abrupt decrease in ionization occurring simultaneously is presented. Here a covalently-bonded metallic-liquid, i.e., carbon of density 1.0 g/cm$^3$, transits to a disordered mono-atomic fluid at 7 eV. Other transitions where the mean ionization $Z$ drops abruptly are also uncovered

  3. Hydration properties of lanthanoid(III) carbonate complexes in liquid water determined by polarizable molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Fausto; Jeanvoine, Yannick; Vercouter, Thomas; Beuchat, César; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Spezia, Riccardo

    2014-02-28

    In this work we have studied the structure and dynamics of complexes formed by three and four carbonates and a central lanthanoid(III) ion in liquid water by means of polarizable molecular dynamics simulations. With this aim we have developed a force field employing an extrapolation procedure that was previously developed for lanthanoid(III) aqua ions and then we have validated it against DFT-based data. In this way we were able to shed light on properties of the whole series, finding some similarities and differences across the series, and to help in interpreting experiments on those systems. We found that the bi-dentate tri-carbonate complexes are the most stable for all the atoms, but a variation of the number of water molecules in the first ion shell, and the associated exchange dynamics, is observed from lighter to heavier elements. On the other hand, for four-carbonate systems only one water molecule is observed in the first shell, with 10-20% probability, for La(III) and Ce(III), while for the rest of the series it seems impossible for a water molecule to enter the first ion shell in the presence of such an excess of carbonate ligands. Finally, the good performance of our extrapolation procedure, based on ionic radii, makes us confident in extending such approaches to study the structure and dynamics of other systems in solution containing Ln(III) and An(III) ions. This parametrization method results particularly useful since it does not need expensive quantum chemistry calculations for all the atoms in the series.

  4. Bimetallic nickel complexes for selective CO2 carbon capture and sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, F; Merz, K; Herrmann, C; Apfel, U-P

    2016-01-21

    Herein we report a dinickel azacryptand complex that enables fast, selective, and tight CO2 binding from air. Exploiting the affinity of the cavitand towards azides, CO2 release was observed. Despite the stability of the azido complex, UV irradiation under atmospheric conditions proved to be a suitable pathway for N3(-) replacement by CO2. PMID:26666316

  5. Carbon as a source for yellow luminescence in GaN: Isolated C{sub N} defect or its complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christenson, Sayre G.; Xie, Weiyu; Sun, Y. Y., E-mail: suny4@rpi.edu; Zhang, S. B., E-mail: zhangs9@rpi.edu [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2015-10-07

    We study three carbon defects in GaN, isolated C{sub N} and its two complexes with donors C{sub N}–O{sub N}, and C{sub N}–Si{sub Ga}, as a cause of the yellow luminescence using accurate hybrid density functional calculation, which includes the semi-core Ga 3d electrons as valence electrons and uses a larger 300-atom supercell. We show that the isolated C{sub N} defect yields good agreement with experiment on the photoluminescence (PL) peak position, zero-phonon line, and thermodynamic defect transition level. We find that the defect state of the complexes that is involved in the PL process is the same as that of the C{sub N} defect. The role of the positively charged donors (O{sub N} or Si{sub Ga}) next to C{sub N} is to blue-shift the PL peak. Therefore, the complexes cannot be responsible for the same PL peak as isolated C{sub N}. Our detailed balance analysis further suggests that under thermal equilibrium at typical growth temperature, the concentration of isolated C{sub N} defect is orders of magnitude higher than the defect complexes, which is a result of the small binding energy in these complexes.

  6. Carbon as a source for yellow luminescence in GaN: Isolated CN defect or its complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study three carbon defects in GaN, isolated CN and its two complexes with donors CN–ON, and CN–SiGa, as a cause of the yellow luminescence using accurate hybrid density functional calculation, which includes the semi-core Ga 3d electrons as valence electrons and uses a larger 300-atom supercell. We show that the isolated CN defect yields good agreement with experiment on the photoluminescence (PL) peak position, zero-phonon line, and thermodynamic defect transition level. We find that the defect state of the complexes that is involved in the PL process is the same as that of the CN defect. The role of the positively charged donors (ON or SiGa) next to CN is to blue-shift the PL peak. Therefore, the complexes cannot be responsible for the same PL peak as isolated CN. Our detailed balance analysis further suggests that under thermal equilibrium at typical growth temperature, the concentration of isolated CN defect is orders of magnitude higher than the defect complexes, which is a result of the small binding energy in these complexes

  7. Building complex hybrid carbon architectures by covalent interconnections: graphene-nanotube hybrids and more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Ruitao; Cruz-Silva, Eduardo; Terrones, Mauricio

    2014-05-27

    Graphene is theoretically a robust two-dimensional (2D) sp(2)-hybridized carbon material with high electrical conductivity and optical transparency. However, due to the existence of grain boundaries and defects, experimentally synthesized large-area polycrystalline graphene sheets are easily broken and can exhibit high sheet resistances; thus, they are not suitable as flexible transparent conductors. As described in this issue of ACS Nano, Tour et al. circumvented this problem by proposing and synthesizing a novel hybrid structure that they have named "rebar graphene", which is composed of covalently interconnected carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with graphene sheets. In this particular configuration, CNTs act as "reinforcing bars" that not only improve the mechanical strength of polycrystalline graphene sheets but also bridge different crystalline domains so as to enhance the electrical conductivity. This report seems to be only the tip of the iceberg since it is also possible to construct novel and unprecedented hybrid carbon architectures by establishing covalent interconnections between CNTs with graphene, thus yielding graphene-CNT hybrids, three-dimensional (3D) covalent CNT networks, 3D graphene networks, etc. In this Perspective, we review the progress of these carbon hybrid systems and describe the challenges that need to be overcome in the near future.

  8. Fundamental reactivity of the Metal-Carbon bond in cyclometalated PNC-complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.S. Jongbloed

    2016-01-01

    The activation of C-H bonds by transition metals and the reactivity of the corresponding metal-carbon bond are interesting research topics form different point of views. Catalytic C-H bond functionalization has emerged as a highly active research area for the development of green construction of Car

  9. Kinetics of the Removal of Chromium Complex Dye from Aqueous Solutions Using Activated Carbons and Polymeric Adsorbent

    OpenAIRE

    Eglė Kazlauskienė; Danutė Kaušpėdienė

    2011-01-01

    The kinetics of the removal of chromium complex dye (Lanasyn Navy M-DNL) from aqueous solutions using polymeric adsorbent Macronet MN 200 (MN 200) as an alternative option for activated carbon Norit RB 0.8 CC (AC) was studied in the batch system. The residual colour of dye solution treated with AC or MN 200 strongly depends on solution pH with lower values at acidic pH when a positively charged surface net is favourable for the adsorption of the dye anion. The removal of dye using MN 200 was ...

  10. Electro-Thermal and Semiconductivity Behaviour of Natural Sintered Complex Carbonate Ore for Thermo-Technological Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Loutfy H. Madkour

    2014-01-01

    The polymetal (Zn, Pb, Fe, Ca, Mg, Cd, Ba, Ni, Ti, and SiO2) complex Umm-Gheig carbonate ore is subjected to sintering treatment at 573, 773, 973 and 1273 K respectively for four hours. Chemical, spectral, X-ray and differential thermal analyses are applied for the native ore as well as for the samples preheated and sintered. The current versus applied DC voltage (I–V) characteristics, bulk density (Db), percent shrinkage (%S), activation energy (Ea) and energy gap (Eg) are established for th...

  11. From simple to complex prebiotic chemistry in a carbon-rich universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lage, C.; Janot-Pacheco, E.; Domiciano de Souza, A.; Suárez, O.; Bendjoya, P.; Gadotti, D. A.

    2012-09-01

    It is well known that the main components of important biomolecules are quite common not only in the Solar System, but also in other planetary systems and in the Galactic ISM. The ubiquitous presence of C in the Universe and the unique carbon chemical properties and carbon bonding thermodynamics supports the spontaneous self-replication of monomers into larger polymers, yielding the formation of large molecules. The detection of an ever increasing number of organic molecules in the interstellar medium (ISM) by radio-telescopes and chemical analysis of meteorites boosted astrochemical theories on radiation-induced chemistry, supported by laboratory experiments. In this scenario of exogenous origin of carbon compounds, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) may represent a resilient way of accumulating carbon as a robust cosmic reservoir. Consisting of a family of compounds with fused aromatic rings, the abundances of its larger members (50-100 carbon atoms) were estimated to be on top scores just after H2 and CO. PAHs have been detected in the ISM, in star-forming regions, ~14% of low-mass premainsequence stars, and, remarkably, in some 54% of intermediate mass stars. They have also been detected by SPITZER in distant galaxies up to z = 3. PAHs were promptly photolysed into a family of radicals if exposed to UV and oxygen-bearing molecules in laboratory. The presence of oxygenbearing molecules was shown in the laboratory to bring aromatic rings into an unstable chemistry leading to the production of e.g. alcohols, ketones and ether radicals. It has already been observed that carbon-and oxygen-rich stellar envelopes give rise to richer carbon chemistry. It appears very tempting to think that key prebiotic fragments should appear along planetary formation as C-O reaction byproducts such as methanol (CH3OH), formaldehyde (H2CO) and also simpler hydrocarbons as methyl acetylene (CH3CCH). Under an Astrobiology perspective it is plausible to map PAHs and oxygen compounds

  12. METALLOPROTEINS. A tethered niacin-derived pincer complex with a nickel-carbon bond in lactate racemase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desguin, Benoît; Zhang, Tuo; Soumillion, Patrice; Hols, Pascal; Hu, Jian; Hausinger, Robert P

    2015-07-01

    Lactic acid racemization is involved in lactate metabolism and cell wall assembly of many microorganisms. Lactate racemase (Lar) requires nickel, but the nickel-binding site and the role of three accessory proteins required for its activation remain enigmatic. We combined mass spectrometry and x-ray crystallography to show that Lar from Lactobacillus plantarum possesses an organometallic nickel-containing prosthetic group. A nicotinic acid mononucleotide derivative is tethered to Lys(184) and forms a tridentate pincer complex that coordinates nickel through one metal-carbon and two metal-sulfur bonds, with His(200) as another ligand. Although similar complexes have been previously synthesized, there was no prior evidence for the existence of pincer cofactors in enzymes. The wide distribution of the accessory proteins without Lar suggests that it may play a role in other enzymes.

  13. Carbon Nanotube Container: Complexes of C50H10 with Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodziuk, Helena; Korona, Tatiana; Lomba, Enrique; Bores, Cecilia

    2012-11-13

    The stability of complexes of a recently synthetized (Scott et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2011, 134, 107) opened nanocontainer C50H10 with several guest molecules, H2, N2, CO, HCN, H2O, CO2, CS2, H2S, C2H2, NH3, CH4, CH3CN, CH3OH, CH3CCH, 2-butyne, methyl halides, and with noble gas atoms, has been examined by means of symmetry-adapted perturbation theory of intermolecular interactions, which fully incorporates all important energy components, including a difficult dispersion term. All complexes under scrutiny have been found stable for all studied guests at 0 K, but entropic effects cause many of them to dissociate into constituent molecules under standard conditions. The estimation of temperature at which the Gibbs free energy ΔG = 0 revealed that the recently observed (Scott et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2011, 134, 107) complex CS2@C50H10 is the most stable at room temperature while the corresponding complexes with HCN and Xe guests should decompose at ca. 310 K and that with CO2 at room temperature (ca. 300 K). In agreement with the ΔG estimation, molecular dynamics simulations performed in vacuum for the CS2@C50H10 complex predicted that the complex is stable but decomposes at ca. 350 K. The MD simulations in CHCl3 solution showed that the presence of solvent stabilizes the CS2@C50H10 complex in comparison to vacuum. Thus, for the complexes obtained in solution the CO2 gas responsible for the greenhouse effect could be stored in the C50H10 nanotube.

  14. THE ACTIVATION OF CARBON OXIDES BY LOW VALENT GROUP IV AND THORIUM COMPLEXES

    OpenAIRE

    Zoe Button

    2012-01-01

    Following discoveries in our laboratory that mixed-ring uranium(III) complexes reductively couple CO to produce new C-C bonds and transform this small molecule into potentially useful small organic things, further research has taken place into the synthesis, characterisation and reactivity of the zirconium, hafnium and thorium analogues. The first part of this thesis describes the preparation of the novel zirconium(IV) and hafnium(IV) mixed-sandwich chloride complexes using sterically demandi...

  15. Complex forest dynamics indicate potential for slowing carbon accumulation in the southeastern United States

    OpenAIRE

    John W. Coulston; Wear, David N.; Vose, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past century forest regrowth in Europe and North America expanded forest carbon (C) sinks and offset C emissions but future C accumulation is uncertain. Policy makers need insights into forest C dynamics as they anticipate emissions futures and goals. We used land use and forest inventory data to estimate how forest C dynamics have changed in the southeastern United States and attribute changes to land use, management, and disturbance causes. From 2007-2012, forests yielded a net sin...

  16. Closo-Carborane-metal complexes containing metal-carbon and metal-boron sigma-bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines the metal derivatives of the closo-carboranes formed through carborane carbon-metal and carborane boron-metal bonds. In order to provide a better perspective of the closo-carborane-metal compounds the authors include derivatives containing carboranyl groups bonded to boron and silicon, which are normally classified as nonmetals. The structures, nomenclature system, and general preparative methods of the closo-carboranes are examined

  17. Electrocatalytic Study of Carbon Dioxide Reduction By Co(TPPCl Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalaf Alenezi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide (CO2 is notorious for being a greenhouse gas and is the most important cause of global warming. However, it can be converted into useful products as it is a source of carbon. Reduction of CO2 is therefore an attractive research topic for many chemists. Different methods of electrocatalytic reduction of CO2 have been reported previously. Since CO2 is very stable, the direct electroreduction of CO2 into CO requires high potential at −2.2 V versus Ag/AgCl. In this work, CO2 reduction was carried out by the photoelectrocatalysis of CO2 in the presence of cobalt(IIItetraphenylporphyrin [Co(TPPCl] at −1.85 V with a current efficiency of 71%. At illuminated p-type silicon photocathode, the reduction of CO2 into CO was performed at a potential of 300 mV which is positive. However, at the same conditions, potential of −1.55 V with a current efficiency of ca 65% is required for the carbon electrode.

  18. Structural studies of β-carbonic anhydrase from the green alga Coccomyxa: inhibitor complexes with anions and acetazolamide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenghua Huang

    Full Text Available The β-class carbonic anhydrases (β-CAs are widely distributed among lower eukaryotes, prokaryotes, archaea, and plants. Like all CAs, the β-enzymes catalyze an important physiological reaction, namely the interconversion between carbon dioxide and bicarbonate. In plants the enzyme plays an important role in carbon fixation and metabolism. To further explore the structure-function relationship of β-CA, we have determined the crystal structures of the photoautotroph unicellular green alga Coccomyxa β-CA in complex with five different inhibitors: acetazolamide, thiocyanate, azide, iodide, and phosphate ions. The tetrameric Coccomyxa β-CA structure is similar to other β-CAs but it has a 15 amino acid extension in the C-terminal end, which stabilizes the tetramer by strengthening the interface. Four of the five inhibitors bind in a manner similar to what is found in complexes with α-type CAs. Iodide ions, however, make contact to the zinc ion via a zinc-bound water molecule or hydroxide ion--a type of binding mode not previously observed in any CA. Binding of inhibitors to Coccomyxa β-CA is mediated by side-chain movements of the conserved residue Tyr-88, extending the width of the active site cavity with 1.5-1.8 Å. Structural analysis and comparisons with other α- and β-class members suggest a catalytic mechanism in which the movements of Tyr-88 are important for the CO(2-HCO(3(- interconversion, whereas a structurally conserved water molecule that bridges residues Tyr-88 and Gln-38, seems important for proton transfer, linking water molecules from the zinc-bound water to His-92 and buffer molecules.

  19. Structural studies of β-carbonic anhydrase from the green alga Coccomyxa: inhibitor complexes with anions and acetazolamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shenghua; Hainzl, Tobias; Grundström, Christin; Forsman, Cecilia; Samuelsson, Göran; Sauer-Eriksson, A Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    The β-class carbonic anhydrases (β-CAs) are widely distributed among lower eukaryotes, prokaryotes, archaea, and plants. Like all CAs, the β-enzymes catalyze an important physiological reaction, namely the interconversion between carbon dioxide and bicarbonate. In plants the enzyme plays an important role in carbon fixation and metabolism. To further explore the structure-function relationship of β-CA, we have determined the crystal structures of the photoautotroph unicellular green alga Coccomyxa β-CA in complex with five different inhibitors: acetazolamide, thiocyanate, azide, iodide, and phosphate ions. The tetrameric Coccomyxa β-CA structure is similar to other β-CAs but it has a 15 amino acid extension in the C-terminal end, which stabilizes the tetramer by strengthening the interface. Four of the five inhibitors bind in a manner similar to what is found in complexes with α-type CAs. Iodide ions, however, make contact to the zinc ion via a zinc-bound water molecule or hydroxide ion--a type of binding mode not previously observed in any CA. Binding of inhibitors to Coccomyxa β-CA is mediated by side-chain movements of the conserved residue Tyr-88, extending the width of the active site cavity with 1.5-1.8 Å. Structural analysis and comparisons with other α- and β-class members suggest a catalytic mechanism in which the movements of Tyr-88 are important for the CO(2)-HCO(3)(-) interconversion, whereas a structurally conserved water molecule that bridges residues Tyr-88 and Gln-38, seems important for proton transfer, linking water molecules from the zinc-bound water to His-92 and buffer molecules. PMID:22162771

  20. Dinuclear and Trinuclear Nickel Complexes as Effective Catalysts for Alternating Copolymerization on Carbon Dioxide and Cyclohexene Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chen-Yen; Cheng, Fu-Yin; Lu, Kuan-Yeh; Wu, Jung-Tsu; Huang, Bor-Hunn; Chen, Wei-An; Lin, Chu-Chieh; Ko, Bao-Tsan

    2016-08-15

    A series of novel nickel complexes 1-9 supported by NNO-tridentate Schiff-base derivatives have been synthesized and characterized. Treatment of the pro-ligands [L(1)-H = 2,4-di-tert-butyl-6-(((2-(dimethylamino)ethyl)imino)methyl)phenol, L(2)-H = 2-(((2-(dimethylamino)ethyl)imino)methyl)-4,6-bis(2-phenylpropan-2-yl)phenol, L(3)-H = 2-(((2-(dimethylamino)ethyl)imino)methyl)phenol] with Ni(OAc)2·4H2O in refluxing ethanol afforded mono- or bimetallic nickel complexes {[(L(1))Ni(OAc)] (1); (L(2))Ni(OAc)] (2); (L(3))2Ni2(OAc)2(H2O)] (3)}. Alcohol-solvated trimetallic nickel acetate complexes {[(L(3))2Ni3(OAc)4(MeOH)2] (4); (L(3))2Ni3(OAc)4(EtOH)2] (5)} could be generated from the reaction of L(3)-H and anhydrous nickel(II) acetate with a ratio of 2:3 in refluxing anhydrous MeOH or EtOH. The reaction of nickel acetate tetrahydrate and L(4)-H to L(6)-H [L(4)-H = 2-(((2-(dimethylamino)ethyl)imino)methyl)-5-methoxyphenol, L(5)-H = 2-(((2-(dimethylamino)ethyl)imino)methyl)-4-methoxy-phenol, L(6)-H = 2-(((2-(dimethylamino)ethyl)imino)(phenyl)methyl)phenol] produced, respectively, the alcohol-free trinuclear nickel complexes {[(L(4))2Ni3(OAc)4] (7); [(L(5))2Ni3(OAc)4] (8); [(L(6))2Ni3(OAc)4] (9)} with the same ratio in refluxing EtOH under the atmospheric environment. Interestingly, recrystallization of [(L(3))2Ni3(OAc)4(MeOH)] (4) or [(L(3))2Ni3(OAc)4(EtOH)] (5) in the mixed solvent of CH2Cl2/hexane gives [(L(3))2Ni3(OAc)4] (6), which is isostructural with analogues 7-9. All bi- and trimetallic nickel complexes exhibit efficient activity and good selectivity for copolymerization of CO2 with cyclohexene oxide, resulting in copolymers with a high alternating microstructure possessing ≥99% carbonate-linkage content. This is the first example to apply well-defined trinuclear nickel complexes as efficient catalysts for the production of perfectly alternating poly(cyclohexene carbonate). PMID:27479795

  1. Lanthanide Complexes with Multidentate Oxime Ligands as Single-Molecule Magnets and Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Fixation Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hołyńska, Małgorzata; Clérac, Rodolphe; Rouzières, Mathieu

    2015-09-14

    The synthesis, structure, and magnetic properties of five lanthanide complexes with multidentate oxime ligands are described. Complexes 1 and 2 (1: [La2 (pop)2 (acac)4 (CH3 OH)], 2: [Dy2 (pop)(acac)5 ]) are synthesized from the 2-hydroxyimino-N-[1-(2-pyridyl)ethylidene]propanohydrazone (Hpop) ligand, while 3, 4, and 5 (3: [Dy2 (naphthsaoH)2 (acac)4 H(OH)]⋅0.85 CH3 CN⋅1.58 H2 O; 4: [Tb2 (naphthsaoH)2 (acac)4 H(OH)]⋅0.52 CH3 CN⋅1.71 H2 O; 5: [La6 (CO3 )2 (naphthsao)5 (naphthsaoH)0.5 (acac)8 (CO3 )0.5 (CH3 OH)2.76 H5.5 (H2 O)1.24 ]⋅2.39 CH3 CN⋅0.12 H2 O) contain 1-(1-hydroxynaphthalen-2-yl)-ethanone oxime (naphthsaoH2 ). In 1-4, dinuclear [Ln2 ] complexes crystallize, whereas hexanuclear La(III) complex 5 is formed after fixation of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Dy(III) -based complexes 2 and 3 display single-molecule-magnet properties with energy barriers of 27 and 98 K, respectively. The presence of a broad and unsymmetrical relaxation mode observed in the ac susceptibility data for 3 suggest two different dynamics of the magnetization which might be a consequence of independent relaxation processes of the two different Dy(3+) ions.

  2. Compositions of magmas and carbonate silicate liquid immiscibility in the Vulture alkaline igneous complex, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovova, I. P.; Girnis, A. V.; Kogarko, L. N.; Kononkova, N. N.; Stoppa, F.; Rosatelli, G.

    2005-11-01

    This paper presents a study of melt and fluid inclusions in minerals of an olivine-leucite phonolitic nephelinite bomb from the Monticchio Lake Formation, Vulture. The rock contains 50 vol.% clinopyroxene, 12% leucite, 10% alkali feldspars, 8% hauyne/sodalite, 7.5% nepheline, 4.5% apatite, 3.2% olivine, 2% opaques, 2.6% plagioclase, and < 1% amphibole. We distinguished three generations of clinopyroxene differing in composition and morphology. All the phenocrysts bear primary and secondary melt and fluid inclusions, which recorded successive stages of melt evolution. The most primitive melts were found in the most magnesian olivine and the earliest clinopyroxene phenocrysts. The melts are near primary mantle liquids and are rich in Ca, Mg and incompatible and volatile elements. Thermometric experiments with the melt inclusions suggested that melt crystallization began at temperatures of about 1200 °C. Because of the partial leakage of all primary fluid inclusions, the pressure of crystallization is constrained only to minimum of 3.5 kbar. Combined silicate-carbonate melt inclusions were found in apatite phenocrysts. They are indicative of carbonate-silicate liquid immiscibility, which occurred during magma evolution. Large hydrous secondary melt inclusions were found in olivine and clinopyroxene. The inclusions in the phenocrysts recorded an open-system magma evolution during its rise towards the surface including crystallization, degassing, oxidation, and liquid immiscibility processes.

  3. COMPARATIVE EFFECT BETWEEN CHITOSAN AND CHITOSAN-Cu COMPLEX ON CARBON-TETRACHLORIDE (CCL4 INDUCED LIVER DAMAGE IN RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Habibi, E.M.; Sirag, H.M. and Edrees, G.M.

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 is a toxic material known to induce lipid peroxidation and liver damage. The possible protective roles that involved by chitosan or chitosan-Cu complex against CCl4 induced liver intoxication were investigated in male rats. RESULTS: CCl4 administred at dose 20 mg/kg body weight i.p., exceed malondialdehyde (MDA and protein carbonyle (PC, depleted superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione (GSH, in concomitant with marked increase in investigated liver function parameters , alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase (ALT, AST, impaired serum and liver total protein , albumin and globulin. An elevation in serum and hepatic total lipids, total cholesterol, triglycerides and serum LDL and VLDL levels as well as a low level of HDL were recorded. In the same time, there was a significant increase in sodium and iron contents in the serum while a significant decrease in potassium and zinc contents were recorded. Animals pretreated with chitosan (200 mg /kg body weight orally by stomach tube for 21 consecutive days prior to CCl4 challenge significantly attenuated most of the tested parameters, strengthen antioxidant defense system, ameliorated liver function effectively. Chitosan-Cu complex has a protective effect by a higher degree than that of chitosan only. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that pretreatment with chitosan-Cu complex has higher hepato-protective effects than that of only chitosan against CCl4 induced toxicity in rat.

  4. Enhancing Carbon Fixation by Metabolic Engineering: A Model System of Complex Network Modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Gregory Stephanopoulos

    2008-04-10

    In the first two years of this research we focused on the development of a DNA microarray for transcriptional studies in the photosynthetic organism Synechocystis and the elucidation of the metabolic pathway for biopolymer synthesis in this organism. In addition we also advanced the molecular biological tools for metabolic engineering of biopolymer synthesis in Synechocystis and initiated a series of physiological studies for the elucidation of the carbon fixing pathways and basic central carbon metabolism of these organisms. During the last two-year period we focused our attention on the continuation and completion of the last task, namely, the development of tools for basic investigations of the physiology of these cells through, primarily, the determination of their metabolic fluxes. The reason for this decision lies in the importance of fluxes as key indicators of physiology and the high level of information content they carry in terms of identifying rate limiting steps in a metabolic pathway. While flux determination is a well-advanced subject for heterotrophic organisms, for the case of autotrophic bacteria, like Synechocystis, some special challenges had to be overcome. These challenges stem mostly from the fact that if one uses {sup 13}C labeled CO{sub 2} for flux determination, the {sup 13}C label will mark, at steady state, all carbon atoms of all cellular metabolites, thus eliminating the necessary differentiation required for flux determination. This peculiarity of autotrophic organisms makes it imperative to carry out flux determination under transient conditions, something that had not been accomplished before. We are pleased to report that we have solved this problem and we are now able to determine fluxes in photosynthetic organisms from stable isotope labeling experiments followed by measurements of label enrichment in cellular metabolites using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry. We have conducted extensive simulations to test the method and

  5. Adatom complexes and self-healing mechanisms on graphene and single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsetseris, Leonidas [ORNL; Pantelides, Sokrates T [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Point defects play a role in the functionalization, chemical activation, carrier transport, and nano-engineering of graphitic systems. Here, we use first-principles calculations to describe several processes that alter the properties of graphene and single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in the presence of self-interstitials (SI's). We find that, while two or four SI's are stabilized in hillock-like structures that stay idle unless the system is heated to very high temperatures, clustering of three C adatoms leads to the formation of mobile protrusions on graphene and large enough SWCNTs. For different SI concentrations and SWCNT size, the interplay between mobile and immobile species may favor one of the two competing processes, self-healing or formation of adatom superstructures.

  6. Visible-Light Photoredox Catalysis: Selective Reduction of Carbon Dioxide to Carbon Monoxide by a Nickel N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Isoquinoline Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoi, VanSara; Kornienko, Nick; Margarit, C; Yang, Peidong; Chang, Christopher

    2013-06-07

    The solar-driven reduction of carbon dioxide to value-added chemical fuels is a longstanding challenge in the fields of catalysis, energy science, and green chemistry. In order to develop effective CO2 fixation, several key considerations must be balanced, including (1) catalyst selectivity for promoting CO2 reduction over competing hydrogen generation from proton reduction, (2) visible-light harvesting that matches the solar spectrum, and (3) the use of cheap and earth-abundant catalytic components. In this report, we present the synthesis and characterization of a new family of earth-abundant nickel complexes supported by N-heterocyclic carbene amine ligands that exhibit high selectivity and activity for the electrocatalytic and photocatalytic conversion of CO2 to CO. Systematic changes in the carbene and amine donors of the ligand have been surveyed, and [Ni(Prbimiq1)]2+ (1c, where Prbimiq1 = bis(3-(imidazolyl)isoquinolinyl)propane) emerges as a catalyst for electrochemical reduction of CO2 with the lowest cathodic onset potential (Ecat = 1.2 V vs SCE). Using this earth-abundant catalyst with Ir(ppy)3 (where ppy = 2-phenylpyridine) and an electron donor, we have developed a visible-light photoredox system for the catalytic conversion of CO2 to CO that proceeds with high selectivity and activity and achieves turnover numbers and turnover frequencies reaching 98,000 and 3.9 s1, respectively. Further studies reveal that the overall efficiency of this solar-to-fuel cycle may be limited by the formation of the active Ni catalyst and/or the chemical reduction of CO2 to CO at the reduced nickel center and provide a starting point for improved photoredox systems for sustainable carbon-neutral energy conversion.

  7. Chiral Cobalt(III) Complexes as Bifunctional Brønsted Acid-Lewis Base Catalysts for the Preparation of Cyclic Organic Carbonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulev, Yuri A; Larionov, Vladimir A; Lokutova, Anastasia V; Moskalenko, Margarita A; Lependina, Ol'ga L; Maleev, Victor I; North, Michael; Belokon, Yuri N

    2016-01-01

    Stereochemically inert cationic cobalt(III) complexes were shown to be one-component catalysts for the synthesis of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and carbon dioxide at 50 °C and 5 MPa carbon dioxide pressure. The optimal catalyst possessed an iodide counter anion and could be recycled. A catalytic cycle is proposed in which the ligand of the cobalt complexes acts as a hydrogen-bond donor, activating the epoxide towards ring opening by the halide anion and activating the carbon dioxide for subsequent reaction with the halo-alkoxide. No kinetic resolution was observed when terminal epoxides were used as substrates, but chalcone oxide underwent kinetic resolution. PMID:26663897

  8. Kinetics of the Removal of Chromium Complex Dye from Aqueous Solutions Using Activated Carbons and Polymeric Adsorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eglė Kazlauskienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of the removal of chromium complex dye (Lanasyn Navy M-DNL from aqueous solutions using polymeric adsorbent Macronet MN 200 (MN 200 as an alternative option for activated carbon Norit RB 0.8 CC (AC was studied in the batch system. The residual colour of dye solution treated with AC or MN 200 strongly depends on solution pH with lower values at acidic pH when a positively charged surface net is favourable for the adsorption of the dye anion. The removal of dye using MN 200 was found relatively higher than that using AC. The pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion models agreed well with experimental data. The parameters of these models were studied as a function of temperature and adsorbent nature.Article in Lithuanian

  9. Actinide-to-carbon bonds in Cp2An(alkyl)2, -(butadiene), -(metallacyclopentadiene), and -(cyclobutadiene) complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electronic structure of actinide bis(cyclopentadienyl)dialkyl, -butadiene, -metallacyclopentadiene, and -cyclobutadiene complexes is examined. Some Cp*2Th(alkyl)2 complexes display an interesting structural deformation in which a Th-C-C(alkyl) angle (α) opens up considerably. A molecular orbital analysis of Cp2Th(C2H5)2 traces the deformation to the characteristic shape of the d/sub σ/ fragment orbital of Cp2Th(C2H5)+. The potential energy curve for the ethyl pivoting was found to be very soft, with a shallow minimum at α ∼ 1600. Nonrigidity of the ethyl orientation indicates that not only an α hydrogen but also a β hydrogen can come close to Th without a loss of Th-C bond strength; the discussion should provide a theoretical basis for understanding important aspects of C-H activation chemistry involving actinide centers. The Cp2An(s-cis-C4H6) complex was calculated to be 0.74 eV (Th) or 0.42 eV (U) more stable than its s-trans-C4H6 isomer, in contrast to the analogous Cp2Zr(C4H6) complex where the stability of the two geometrical isomers was well-balanced. The σ2,π character of the s-cis-C4H6 coordination to An is somewhat less pronounced than that in the Zr congener, in harmony with the X-ray structures, while highly negative charges are accumulated on the s-cis-C4H6 terminal carbons

  10. Sedimentology of a Mid-Late Ordovician carbonate mud-mound complex from the Kathmandu nappe in Central Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pas, Damien; Da Silva, Anne-Christine; Dhital, Megh Raj; Boulvain, Frédéric

    2011-08-01

    This sedimentological study of the Godavari quarry is the first relating to the Palaeozoic Tethyan sedimentary rocks of the Katmandu nappe (Central Nepal). Sedimentological analyses led to the identification of six microfacies belonging to a large carbonate mud-mound complex, which can be divided into mound, flank and off-mound main depositional settings. Identification of two dasycladaceans ( Dasyporell a cf. silurica ( Stolley, 1893) and Vermiporella sp.) in the mound facies gives a Mid-Late Ordovician age to this newly discovered Godavari carbonate mud-mound, which makes this mound one of the oldest ever described in the Asian continent. The mound microfacies are characterized by a high micritic content, the presence of stromatactis and the prevalence of red coloured sediments (the red pigmentation probably being related to organic precipitation of iron). The flank microfacies are characterized by a higher crinoid and argillaceous content and the presence of bio- and lithoclasts concentrated in argillaceous lenses. Finally, the off-mound microfacies show very few bioclasts and a high argillaceous content. Palaeoenvionmental interpretation of microfacies, in terms of bathymetry, leads us to infer that the Godavari mud-mound started to grow in a deep environment setting below the photic and wave action zones and that it evolved to occupy a location below the fair weather wave base. Cementation of cavities within the mound facies underlines a typical transition from a marine to a burial diagenetic environment characterized by: (1) a radiaxial non luminescent feroan calcite cement (marine) showing a bright orange luminescent band in its middle part; (2) a bright zoned orange fringe of automorphic feroan calcite (meteoric phreatic); (3) a dull orange xenomorphic feroan calcite cement in the centre of cavities (burial) and (4) a saddle dolomite within the centre of larger cavities. The faunal assemblage (diversity and relative proportion) of the Godavari mound facies

  11. Hierarchically-Porous Carbon Derived from a Large-Scale Iron-based Organometallic Complex for Versatile Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chao-Ying; Li, Huan-Huan; Wang, Hai-Feng; Sun, Hai-Zhu; Wu, Xing-Long; Zhang, Jing-Ping

    2016-06-22

    Inspired by the preparation of the hierarchically-porous carbon (HPC) derived from metal organic frameworks (MOFs) for energy storage, in this work, a simple iron-based metal- organic complex (MOC), which was simpler and cheaper compared with the MOF, was selected to achieve versatile energy storage. The intertwined 1 D nanospindles and enriched-oxygen doping of the HPC was obtained after one-step carbonization of the MOC. When employed in lithium-ion batteries, the HPC exhibited reversible capacity of 778 mA h g(-1) after 60 cycles at 50 mA g(-1) . Moreover, the HPC maintained a capacity of 188 mA h g(-1) after 400 cycles at 100 mA g(-1) as the anode material in a sodium-ion battery. In addition, the HPC served as the cathode matrix for evaluation of a lithium-sulfur battery. The general preparation process of the HPC is commercial, which is responsible for the large-scale production for its practical application.

  12. Hierarchically-Porous Carbon Derived from a Large-Scale Iron-based Organometallic Complex for Versatile Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chao-Ying; Li, Huan-Huan; Wang, Hai-Feng; Sun, Hai-Zhu; Wu, Xing-Long; Zhang, Jing-Ping

    2016-06-22

    Inspired by the preparation of the hierarchically-porous carbon (HPC) derived from metal organic frameworks (MOFs) for energy storage, in this work, a simple iron-based metal- organic complex (MOC), which was simpler and cheaper compared with the MOF, was selected to achieve versatile energy storage. The intertwined 1 D nanospindles and enriched-oxygen doping of the HPC was obtained after one-step carbonization of the MOC. When employed in lithium-ion batteries, the HPC exhibited reversible capacity of 778 mA h g(-1) after 60 cycles at 50 mA g(-1) . Moreover, the HPC maintained a capacity of 188 mA h g(-1) after 400 cycles at 100 mA g(-1) as the anode material in a sodium-ion battery. In addition, the HPC served as the cathode matrix for evaluation of a lithium-sulfur battery. The general preparation process of the HPC is commercial, which is responsible for the large-scale production for its practical application. PMID:27219476

  13. Luminescent blooming of dendronic carbon nanotubes through ion-pairing interactions with an Eu(III) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggini, Laura; Toma, Francesca Maria; Feruglio, Luigi; Malicka, Joanna M; Da Ros, Tatiana; Armaroli, Nicola; Prato, Maurizio; Bonifazi, Davide

    2012-05-01

    A multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) scaffold was covalently functionalized with a second-generation polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendron, presenting four terminal amino groups per grafted aryl moiety. These reactive functions were alkylated to obtain a positively charged polycationic dendron/carbon nanotube system (d-MWCNTs⋅Cl), which eventually underwent anion exchange reaction with a negatively charged and highly luminescent Eu(III) complex ([EuL(4)]⋅NEt(4), in which L = (2-naphtoyltrifluoroacetonate)). This process afforded the target material d-MWCNTs⋅[EuL(4)], in which MWCNTs are combined with red-emitting Eu(III) centers through electrostatic interactions with the dendronic branches. Characterization of the novel MWCNT materials was accomplished by means of TGA and TEM, whereas d-MWCNTs⋅Cl and d-MWCNTs⋅ [EuL(4)] further underwent XPS, SEM and Raman analyses. These studies demonstrate the integrity of the luminescent [EuL(4)](-) center in the luminescent hybrid, the massive load of the cationic binding sites, and the virtually complete anion-exchange into the final hybrid material. The occurrence of the ion-pairing interaction with MWCNTs was unambiguously demonstrated through DOSY NMR diffusion studies. Photophysical investigations show that MWCNTs⋅[EuL(4)] is a highly soluble and brightly luminescent red hybrid material in which MWCNTs act as photochemically inert scaffolds with negligible UV/Vis absorption, compared with the grafted Eu complex, and with no quenching activity. The high dispersibility of MWCNTs⋅[EuL(4)] in a polymer matrix makes it a promising luminophore for applications in material science. PMID:22488679

  14. Conformational Mobility of GOx Coenzyme Complex on Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Kang

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A critical issue in bioelectrochemical applications that use electrodes modified by Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs is to ensure high activity of the catalytic site of an immobilized enzyme protein interacting with nanomaterials. Since Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide (FAD, a coenzyme of glucose oxidase (GOx, is the active center of the catalytic site, conformation of which could determine the activity of enzyme, it is important to understand the dynamic mechanism of its conformational mobility while GOx is adsorbed on SWCNTs with multiple orientations. However, this dynamic mechanism still remains unclear at the atomic level due to the coenzyme being embedded in the apo-GOx and the limitations of appropriate experimental methods. In this study, a molecular dynamics (MD simulation was performed to investigate the conformational mobility mechanism of the coenzyme. The trajectory and the interaction energy clearly indicate that the adsorption of GOx onto SWCNTs plays an important role in the conformational mobility of the coenzyme, and its mobility is greatly affected by the distribution of water molecules due to it being hydrophobic.

  15. Electrocatalytic oxidation of some amino acids on a nickel-curcumin complex modified glassy carbon electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the electrocatalytic oxidation of alanine, L-arginine, L-phenylalanine, L-lysine and glycine on poly-Ni(II)-curcumin film (curcumin: 1,7-bis [4-hydroxy-3-methoxy phenyl]-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione) electrodeposited on a glassy carbon electrode in alkaline solution. The process of oxidation and its kinetics were established by using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. Voltammetric studies indicated that in the presence of amino acids the anodic peak current of low valence nickel species increased, followed by a decrease in the corresponding cathodic current. This indicates that amino acids were oxidized on the redox mediator which was immobilized on the electrode surface via an electrocatalytic mechanism. Using Laviron's equation, the values of α and k s for the immobilized redox species were determined as 0.43 ± 0.03 and 2.47 ± 0.02 x 106 s-1, respectively. The rate constant, the electron transfer coefficient and the diffusion coefficients involved in the electrocatalytic oxidation of amino acids were determined

  16. Electrocatalytic oxidation of some amino acids on a nickel-curcumin complex modified glassy carbon electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majdi, S. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, P.O. Box 16315-1618, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jabbari, A. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, P.O. Box 16315-1618, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: jabbari@kntu.ac.ir; Heli, H. [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moosavi-Movahedi, A.A. [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-04-01

    This study investigated the electrocatalytic oxidation of alanine, L-arginine, L-phenylalanine, L-lysine and glycine on poly-Ni(II)-curcumin film (curcumin: 1,7-bis [4-hydroxy-3-methoxy phenyl]-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione) electrodeposited on a glassy carbon electrode in alkaline solution. The process of oxidation and its kinetics were established by using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. Voltammetric studies indicated that in the presence of amino acids the anodic peak current of low valence nickel species increased, followed by a decrease in the corresponding cathodic current. This indicates that amino acids were oxidized on the redox mediator which was immobilized on the electrode surface via an electrocatalytic mechanism. Using Laviron's equation, the values of {alpha} and k {sub s} for the immobilized redox species were determined as 0.43 {+-} 0.03 and 2.47 {+-} 0.02 x 10{sup 6} s{sup -1}, respectively. The rate constant, the electron transfer coefficient and the diffusion coefficients involved in the electrocatalytic oxidation of amino acids were determined.

  17. The complex environment of the bright carbon star TX Psc as probed by spectro-astrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Hron, J; Aringer, B; Klotz, D; Lebzelter, T; Paladini, C; Wiedemann, G

    2015-01-01

    Context: Stars on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) show broad evidence of inhomogeneous atmospheres and circumstellar envelopes. These have been studied by a variety of methods on various angular scales. In this paper we explore the envelope of the well-studied carbon star TX Psc by the technique of spectro-astrometry. Aims: We explore the potential of this method for detecting asymmetries around AGB stars. Methods:We obtained CRIRES observations of several CO $\\Delta$v=1 lines near 4.6 $\\mu$m and HCN lines near 3 $\\mu$m in 2010 and 2013. These were then searched for spectro-astrometric signatures. For the interpretation of the results, we used simple simulated observations. Results: Several lines show significant photocentre shifts with a clear dependence on position angle. In all cases, tilde-shaped signatures are found where the positive and negative shifts (at PA 0deg) are associated with blue and weaker red components of the lines. The shifts can be modelled with a bright blob 70 mas to 210 mas south of...

  18. Suzuki-Miyaura, Mizoroki-Heck carbon-carbon coupling and hydrogenation reactions catalysed by PdII and RhI complexes containing cyclodiphosphazane cis-{tBuNP(OC6H4OMe-)}2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sasmita Mohanty; Maravanji S Balakrishna

    2010-03-01

    The catalytic activity of the palladium complex cis-[PdCl2{(tBuNP(OC6H4OMe-))2- }2] (2) containing cis-{tBuNP(OC6H4OMe-)}2 (1) in Suzuki-Miyaura and Mizoroki-Heck carbon-carbon cross coupling reactions is described. The compound 2 also displays very high activity in Mizoroki-Heck coupling reactions. The rhodium(I) complex [RhCl(COD){(tBuNP(OC6H4OMe-))2- }] (3) acts as an excellent catalyst for the hydrogenation of several terminal olefins.

  19. Electro-oxidation of chlorophenols at glassy carbon electrodes modified with polyNi(II)complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the ligand macrocycle (phenylporphyrin (PP) or phthalocyanine (Pc)) and of the ligand substituent (-NH2 or -SO3-) on the catalytic activity for the electro-oxidation in a pH 11 buffer electrolyte of 2- and 4-chlorophenol (2-CP and 4-CP), 2,4- and 2,6-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP and 2,6-DCP), 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP), and pentachlorophenol (PCP) at glassy carbon electrodes modified with electropolymerized Ni(II) macrocycles was studied. The polyphenolic residue deposited at the electrode surface was characterized by cyclic voltammetry, impedance measurements, ex situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). A band of aliphatic C=O stretching in the IR spectrum of the fouling film produced by potential cycling in 2,4,6-TCP indicated that the aromatic ring had been broken, yielding ketones, aldehydes and/or carboxylic acids. The sulphonated Ni(II) polymers, which showed the Ni(III)/Ni(II) process in the CV, had XP spectra typical of paramagnetic Ni(II), indicating that they contained Ni(OH)2 clusters. On the contrary, the CVs of the amino Ni(II) did not show the Ni(III)/Ni(II) process at all, this process appearing only after previous activation by potential cycling, and only to a small extent. As was to be expected, the XP spectra of activated amino films corresponded to diamagnetic Ni(II), showing that the concentration of Ni(OH)2 clusters was very small. The amino films were less active than the sulpho films for the oxidation of chlorophenols, in agreement with the lower concentration of Ni(OH)2 clusters in the former films. For all electrodes the highest activity was observed for 2,4,6-TCP, since its oxidation yields a phenolic residue which is much more porous than those produced by the other CPs.

  20. Liposome encapsulation of lipophilic N-alkyl-propanediamine platinum complexes: impact on their cytotoxic activity and influence of the carbon chain length

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Heveline; Fontes, Ana Paula S. [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFJF), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Lopes, Miriam Teresa P. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Farmacologia; Frezard, Frederic, E-mail: frezard@icb.ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Fisiologia e Biofisica

    2010-07-01

    Antitumor platinum(II) complexes derived from N-alkyl-propanediamine differing in the length of their carbon chain (C8, C10, C12 and C14) were incorporated in liposomes and the cytotoxic activity of these formulations was evaluated against tumor (A{sub 549}, MDA-MB-231, B16-F1 and B16-F10) and non-tumor (BHK-21 and CHO) cell lines. Stable and monodisperse liposome suspensions incorporating the platinum complexes were obtained from the lipid composition consisting of distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, cholesterol and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero- 3-phosphoethanolamine-N-(methoxy(polyethylene glycol)-2000) at 5:3:0.3 molar ratio. The entrapment efficiency (EE%) of the platinum complexes in liposomes increased with the carbon chain length. EE% was higher than 80% in C12- and C14-derivatives. The effect of liposome encapsulation on the cytotoxic activity of the complexes was found to depend on the carbon chain length. These data indicate that the highest drug bioavailability from liposome formulations was achieved with the complex showing intermediate carbon chain length and partition between the liposome membrane and aqueous phase. (author)

  1. Unique Solvent Effects on Visible-Light CO2 Reduction over Ruthenium(II)-Complex/Carbon Nitride Hybrid Photocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriki, Ryo; Ishitani, Osamu; Maeda, Kazuhiko

    2016-03-01

    Photocatalytic CO2 reduction using hybrids of carbon nitride (C3N4) and a Ru(II) complex under visible light was studied with respect to reaction solvent. Three different Ru(II) complexes, trans(Cl)-[Ru(X2bpy) (CO)2Cl2] (X2bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine with substituents X in the 4-positions, X = COOH, PO3H2, or CH2PO3H2), were employed as promoters and will be abbreviated as RuC (X = COOH), RuP (X = PO3H2), and RuCP (X = CH2PO3H2). When C3N4 modified with a larger amount of RuCP (>7.8 μmol g(-1)) was employed as a photocatalyst in a solvent having a relatively high donor number (e.g., N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA), N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)) with the aid of triethanolamine (TEOA) as an electron donor, the hybrid photocatalyst exhibited high performance for CO2 reduction, producing CO and HCOOH with relatively high CO selectivity (40-70%). On the other hand, HCOOH was the major product when RuC/C3N4 or RuP/C3N4 was employed regardless of the loading amount of the Ru(II) complex and the reaction solvent. Results of photocatalytic reactions and UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy indicated that polymeric Ru species, which were formed in situ from RuCP on C3N4 under irradiation in a solvent having a high donor number, were active catalysts for CO formation. Nonsacrificial CO2 reduction using RuP/C3N4 was accomplished in a DMA solution containing methanol as an electron donor, which means that visible light energy was stored as chemical energy in the form of CO and formaldehyde (ΔG° = +67.6 kJ mol(-1)). This study demonstrated the first successful example of an energy conversion scheme using carbon nitride through photocatalytic CO2 reduction.

  2. Hydrogen and carbon abundances and isotopic ratios in apatite from alkaline intrusive complexes, with a focus on carbonatites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadeau, S.L.; Epstein, S.; Stolper, E. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Div. of Geological and Planetary Sciences

    1999-06-01

    The authors report H and C contents and {delta}D and {delta}{sup 13}C values of apatites from 15 alkaline intrusive complexes ranging in age from 110 Ma to 2.6 Ga. Sampling focused on carbonatites, but included silicate rocks as well. Heating temperatures up to 1,500 C is needed to extract fully H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} from these apatites. Apatites from carbonatite-rich intrusive complexes contain 0.2--1.1 wt% H{sub 2}O and 0.05--0.70 wt% CO{sub 2}; apatites from two silicate-rich alkaline complexes with little or no carbonatite are generally poorer in both volatile components (0.1--0.2% H{sub 2}O and 0.01--0.11% CO{sub 2}). D/H ratios in apatites from these rocks are bimodally distributed. The authors suggest that the {delta}D values of group I apatites represent primitive, mantle-derived values and that the group II apatites crystallized from degassed magmas, resulting in lower H{sub 2}O contents and {delta}D values. In contrast to H{sub 2}O contents and {delta}D values, CO{sub 2} contents and {delta}{sup 13}C values of gas released at high temperatures from multiple aliquots of these apatite samples are variable. This suggests the presence of more than one C-bearing component in these apatites, one of which is proposed to be dissolved carbonate; the other could be associated with hydrocarbons.

  3. Electro-oxidation of chlorophenols at glassy carbon electrodes modified with polyNi(II)complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrios, Cristhian [Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Departamento de Ciencias del Ambiente, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACh), casilla 40, correo 33, Santiago (Chile); Marco, Jose F.; Gutierrez, Claudio [Instituto de Quimica Fisica ' Rocasolano' , CSIC, C. Serrano, 119, 28006, Madrid (Spain); Ureta-Zanartu, Maria Soledad [Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Departamento de Ciencias del Ambiente, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACh), casilla 40, correo 33, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: soledad.ureta@usach.cl

    2009-11-01

    The effect of the ligand macrocycle (phenylporphyrin (PP) or phthalocyanine (Pc)) and of the ligand substituent (-NH{sub 2} or -SO{sub 3}{sup -}) on the catalytic activity for the electro-oxidation in a pH 11 buffer electrolyte of 2- and 4-chlorophenol (2-CP and 4-CP), 2,4- and 2,6-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP and 2,6-DCP), 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP), and pentachlorophenol (PCP) at glassy carbon electrodes modified with electropolymerized Ni(II) macrocycles was studied. The polyphenolic residue deposited at the electrode surface was characterized by cyclic voltammetry, impedance measurements, ex situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). A band of aliphatic C=O stretching in the IR spectrum of the fouling film produced by potential cycling in 2,4,6-TCP indicated that the aromatic ring had been broken, yielding ketones, aldehydes and/or carboxylic acids. The sulphonated Ni(II) polymers, which showed the Ni(III)/Ni(II) process in the CV, had XP spectra typical of paramagnetic Ni(II), indicating that they contained Ni(OH){sub 2} clusters. On the contrary, the CVs of the amino Ni(II) did not show the Ni(III)/Ni(II) process at all, this process appearing only after previous activation by potential cycling, and only to a small extent. As was to be expected, the XP spectra of activated amino films corresponded to diamagnetic Ni(II), showing that the concentration of Ni(OH){sub 2} clusters was very small. The amino films were less active than the sulpho films for the oxidation of chlorophenols, in agreement with the lower concentration of Ni(OH){sub 2} clusters in the former films. For all electrodes the highest activity was observed for 2,4,6-TCP, since its oxidation yields a phenolic residue which is much more porous than those produced by the other CPs.

  4. Complexes With Biologically Active Ligands. Part 4. Coordination Compounds of Chlorothiazide With Transition Metal Ions Behave as Strong Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Supuran, Claudiu T.

    1996-01-01

    Complexes of the diuretic benzothiadiazine derivative chlorothiazide (6-chloro-7-sulfamoyl- 1,2,4-benzothiadiazine-1,1-dioxide) with V(IV); Fe(II); Co(II); Ni(II); Cu(II), Ag(I) and U(VI) were prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, spectroscopic, thermogravimetric, magnetic and conductimetric measurements. The complexes behave as effective inhibitors for two isozymes (I and II) of carbonic anhydrase (CA).

  5. Complexes With Biologically Active Ligands. Part 111. Synthesis and Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitory Activity of Metal Complexes of 4,5-Disubstituted-3-Mercapto-1,2,4-Triazole Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scozzafava, Andrea; Cavazza, Christine; Saramet, Ioana; Briganti, Fabrizio; Banciu, Mircea D.

    1998-01-01

    Complexes containing five 4,5-disubstituted-3-mercapto-1,2,4-triazoles and Zn(II), Hg(II) and Cu(I) were synthesized and characterized by standard procedures (elemental analysis; IR, electronic and NMR spectroscopy, conductimetry and TG analysis). Both the thione as well as the thiolate forms of the ligands were evidenced to interact with the metal ions in the prepared complexes. The original mercaptans and their metal complexes behave as inhibitors of three carbonic anhydrase (CA) isozymes, CA I, II and IV, but did not lower intraocular pressure in rabbits in animal models of glaucoma. PMID:18475819

  6. Complexes with biologically active ligands. Part 11. Synthesis and carbonic anhydrase inhibitory activity of metal complexes of 4,5-disubstituted-3-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scozzafava, A; Cavazza, C; Supuran, C T; Saramet, I; Briganti, F; Banciu, M D

    1998-01-01

    Complexes containing five 4,5-disubstituted-3-mercapto-1,2,4-triazoles and Zn(II), Hg(II) and Cu(I) were synthesized and characterized by standard procedures (elemental analysis; IR, electronic and NMR spectroscopy, conductimetry and TG analysis). Both the thione as well as the thiolate forms of the ligands were evidenced to interact with the metal ions in the prepared complexes. The original mercaptans and their metal complexes behave as inhibitors of three carbonic anhydrase (CA) isozymes, CA I, II and IV, but did not lower intraocular pressure in rabbits in animal models of glaucoma.

  7. Amazon Rainforest Exchange of Carbon and Subcanopy Air Flow: Manaus LBA Site—A Complex Terrain Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Tóta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available On the moderately complex terrain covered by dense tropical Amazon Rainforest (Reserva Biologica do Cuieiras—ZF2—02°36′17.1′′ S, 60°12′24.4′′ W, subcanopy horizontal and vertical gradients of the air temperature, CO2 concentration and wind field were measured for the dry and wet periods in 2006. We tested the hypothesis that horizontal drainage flow over this study area is significant and can affect the interpretation of the high carbon uptake rates reported by previous works at this site. A similar experimental design as the one by Tóta et al. (2008 was used with a network of wind, air temperature, and CO2 sensors above and below the forest canopy. A persistent and systematic subcanopy nighttime upslope (positive buoyancy and daytime downslope (negative buoyancy flow pattern on a moderately inclined slope (12% was observed. The microcirculations observed above the canopy (38 m over the sloping area during nighttime presents a downward motion indicating vertical convergence and correspondent horizontal divergence toward the valley area. During the daytime an inverse pattern was observed. The micro-circulations above the canopy were driven mainly by buoyancy balancing the pressure gradient forces. In the subcanopy space the microcirculations were also driven by the same physical mechanisms but probably with the stress forcing contribution. The results also indicated that the horizontal and vertical scalar gradients (e.g., CO2 were modulated by these micro-circulations above and below the canopy, suggesting that estimates of advection using previous experimental approaches are not appropriate due to the tridimensional nature of the vertical and horizontal transport locally. This work also indicates that carbon budget from tower-based measurement is not enough to close the system, and one needs to include horizontal and vertical advection transport of CO2 into those estimates.

  8. Complex effects of fertilization on plant and herbivore performance in the presence of a plant competitor and activated carbon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafiseh Mahdavi-Arab

    Full Text Available Plant-herbivore interactions are influenced by host plant quality which in turn is affected by plant growth conditions. Competition is the major biotic and nutrient availability a major abiotic component of a plant's growth environment. Yet, surprisingly few studies have investigated impacts of competition and nutrient availability on herbivore performance and reciprocal herbivore effects on plants. We studied growth of the specialist aphid, Macrosiphoniella tanacetaria, and its host plant tansy, Tanacetum vulgare, under experimental addition of inorganic and organic fertilizer crossed with competition by goldenrod, Solidago canadensis. Because of evidence that competition by goldenrod is mediated by allelopathic compounds, we also added a treatment with activated carbon. Results showed that fertilization increased, and competition with goldenrod decreased, plant biomass, but this was likely mediated by resource competition. There was no evidence from the activated carbon treatment that allelopathy played a role which instead had a fertilizing effect. Aphid performance increased with higher plant biomass and depended on plant growth conditions, with fertilization and AC increasing, and plant competition decreasing aphid numbers. Feedbacks of aphids on plant performance interacted with plant growth conditions in complex ways depending on the relative magnitude of the effects on plant biomass and aphid numbers. In the basic fertilization treatment, tansy plants profited from increased nutrient availability by accumulating more biomass than they lost due to an increased number of aphids under fertilization. When adding additional fertilizer, aphid numbers increased so high that tansy plants suffered and showed reduced biomass compared with controls without aphids. Thus, the ecological cost of an infestation with aphids depends on the balance of effects of growth conditions on plant and herbivore performance. These results emphasize the importance

  9. Complex effects of fertilization on plant and herbivore performance in the presence of a plant competitor and activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi-Arab, Nafiseh; Meyer, Sebastian T; Mehrparvar, Mohsen; Weisser, Wolfgang W

    2014-01-01

    Plant-herbivore interactions are influenced by host plant quality which in turn is affected by plant growth conditions. Competition is the major biotic and nutrient availability a major abiotic component of a plant's growth environment. Yet, surprisingly few studies have investigated impacts of competition and nutrient availability on herbivore performance and reciprocal herbivore effects on plants. We studied growth of the specialist aphid, Macrosiphoniella tanacetaria, and its host plant tansy, Tanacetum vulgare, under experimental addition of inorganic and organic fertilizer crossed with competition by goldenrod, Solidago canadensis. Because of evidence that competition by goldenrod is mediated by allelopathic compounds, we also added a treatment with activated carbon. Results showed that fertilization increased, and competition with goldenrod decreased, plant biomass, but this was likely mediated by resource competition. There was no evidence from the activated carbon treatment that allelopathy played a role which instead had a fertilizing effect. Aphid performance increased with higher plant biomass and depended on plant growth conditions, with fertilization and AC increasing, and plant competition decreasing aphid numbers. Feedbacks of aphids on plant performance interacted with plant growth conditions in complex ways depending on the relative magnitude of the effects on plant biomass and aphid numbers. In the basic fertilization treatment, tansy plants profited from increased nutrient availability by accumulating more biomass than they lost due to an increased number of aphids under fertilization. When adding additional fertilizer, aphid numbers increased so high that tansy plants suffered and showed reduced biomass compared with controls without aphids. Thus, the ecological cost of an infestation with aphids depends on the balance of effects of growth conditions on plant and herbivore performance. These results emphasize the importance to investigate both

  10. Genesis of supported carbon-coated Co nanoparticles with controlled magnetic properties, prepared by decomposition of chelate complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarasov, Konstantin; Beaunier, Patricia; Che, Michel; Marceau, Eric, E-mail: eric.marceau@upmc.fr [Laboratoire de Reactivite de Surface (UMR 7197, CNRS), UPMC (Universite Pierre et Marie Curie) (France); Li Yanling [CNRS (France)

    2011-05-15

    Following procedures formerly developed for the preparation of supported heterogeneous catalysts, carbon-coated cobalt nanoparticles dispersed on porous alumina have been prepared by impregnation of {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}[Co(EDTA)] and thermal decomposition in inert atmosphere. Below 350 Degree-Sign C, Co(II) ions are complexed in a hexa-coordinated way by the EDTA ligand. The thermal treatment at 400-900 Degree-Sign C leads to the EDTA ligand decomposition and recovering of the support porosity, initially clogged by the impregnated salt. According to X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and due to in situ redox reactions between the organic ligand and Co(II), both oxidic and metallic cobalt phases are formed. Characterisation by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and magnetic measurements reveals that an increase in the treatment temperature leads to an increase of the degree of cobalt reduction as well as to a growth of the cobalt metal particles. As a consequence, the samples prepared at 400-700 Degree-Sign C exhibit superparamagnetism and a saturation magnetisation of 1.7-6.5 emu g{sup -1} at room temperature, whilst the sample prepared at 900 Degree-Sign C has a weak coercivity (0.1 kOe) and a saturation magnetisation of 12 emu g{sup -1}. Metal particles are homogeneously dispersed on the support and appear to be protected by carbon; its elimination by a heating in H{sub 2} at 400 Degree-Sign C is demonstrated to cause sintering of the metal particles. The route investigated here can be of interest for obtaining porous magnetic adsorbents or carriers with high magnetic moments and low coercivities, in which the magnetic nanoparticles are protected from chemical aggression and sintering by their coating.

  11. Creep-resistant porous structures based on stereo-complex forming triblock copolymers of 1,3-trimethylene carbonate and lactides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Zheng; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Feijen, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Stereo-complexes (poly(ST–TMC–ST)) of enantiomeric triblock copolymers based on 1,3-trimethylene carbonate (TMC) and L- or D-lactide (poly(LLA–TMC–LLA) and poly(DLA–TMC–DLA)) were prepared. Films of poly(ST–TMC–ST) could be prepared by solvent casting mixtures of equal amounts of poly(LLA–TMC–LLA) a

  12. Reservoir Modeling of Carbonate on Fika Field: The Challenge to Capture the Complexity of Rock and Oil Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erawati Fitriyani Adji

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v1i2.181The carbonate on Fika Field has a special character, because it grew above a basement high with the thickness and internal character variation. To develop the field, a proper geological model which can be used in reservoir simulation was needed. This model has to represent the complexity of the rock type and the variety of oil types among the clusters. Creating this model was challenging due to the heterogeneity of the Baturaja Formation (BRF: Early Miocene reef, carbonate platform, and breccia conglomerate grew up above the basement with a variety of thickness and quality distributions. The reservoir thickness varies between 23 - 600 ft and 3D seismic frequency ranges from 1 - 80 Hz with 25 Hz dominant frequency. Structurally, the Fika Field has a high basement slope, which has an impact on the flow unit layering slope. Based on production data, each area shows different characteristics and performance: some areas have high water cut and low cumulative production. Oil properties from several clusters also vary in wax content. The wax content can potentially build up a deposit inside tubing and flow-line, resulted in a possible disturbance to the operation. Five well cores were analyzed, including thin section and XRD. Seven check-shot data and 3D seismic Pre-Stack Time Migration (PSTM were available with limited seismic resolution. A seismic analysis was done after well seismic tie was completed. This analysis included paleogeography, depth structure map, and distribution of reservoir and basement. Core and log data generated facies carbonate distribution and rock typing, defining properties for log analysis and permeability prediction for each zone. An Sw prediction for each well was created by J-function analysis. This elaborates capillary pressure from core data, so it is very similar to the real conditions. Different stages of the initial model were done i.e. scale-up properties, data analysis, variogram modeling

  13. Electrocatalytic oxidation of 2-mercaptoethanol using modified glassy carbon electrode by MWCNT in combination with unsymmetrical manganese (II) Schiff base complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohebbi, Sajjad, E-mail: smohebbi@uok.ac.ir; Eslami, Saadat

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • High electocatalytic efficiency and stability of modified hybrid electrode GC/MWCNTs/MnSaloph. • Direct reflection of catalytic activity of manganese complexes on electrocatalytic oxidation of 2-ME. • Decreasing overpotential and increasing catalytic peak current toward oxidation of 2-ME. • Deposition of range of novel substituted N{sub 2}O{sub 2} Saloph complexes of manganese(II) on GCE/MWCNT. • Enhancement of electrocatalytic oxidation activity upon electron donating substitutions on the Saloph. - Abstract: The performance of modified hybrid glassy carbon electrode with composite of carbon nanotubes and manganese complexes for the electrocatalytic oxidation of 2-mercaptoethanol is developed. GC electrode was modified using MWCNT and new N{sub 2}O{sub 2} unsymmetrical tetradentate Schiff base complexes of manganese namely Manganese Saloph complexes 1-5, with general formula Mn[(5-x-4-y-Sal)(5-x′-4-y′-Sal) Ph], where x, x′ = H, Br, NO{sub 2} and y, y′ = H, MeO. Direct immobilization of CNT on the surface of GCE is performed by abrasive immobilization, and then modified by manganese(II) complexes via direct deposition method. These novel modified electrodes clearly demonstrate the necessity of modifying bare carbon electrodes to endow them with the desired behavior and were identified by HRTEM. Also complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, MS, UV–vis and IR spectroscopy. Modified hybrid GC/MWCNT/MnSaloph electrode exhibits strong and stable electrocatalytic activity towards the electrooxidation of 2-mercaptoethanol molecules in comparison with bare glassy carbon electrode with advantages of very low over potential and high catalytic current. Such ability promotes the thiol’s electron transfer reaction. Also, electron withdrawing substituent on the Saloph was enhanced electrocatalytic oxidation activity.

  14. Cooperative effect by monopodal silica-supported niobium com-plexes pairs enhancing catalytic cyclic carbonate production

    KAUST Repository

    D'Elia, Valerio

    2015-05-07

    Recent discoveries highlighted the activity and the intriguing mechanistic features of NbCl5 as a molecular catalyst for the cycloaddition of CO2 and epoxides under ambient conditions. This has inspired the preparation of novel silica supported Nb-species by reacting a molecular niobium precursor [NbCl5•OEt2] with silica dehydroxylated at 700 °C (SiO2-700) or at 200 oC (SiO2-200) to generate diverse surface complexes. The product of the reaction between SiO2-700 and [NbCl5•OEt2] was identified as a monopodal supported surface species [≡SiONbCl4•OEt2] (1a). The reactions of SiO2-200 with the niobium precursor, according to two different protocols, generated surface complexes 2a and 3a presenting significant, but different, populations of the monopodal surface complex along with bipodal [(≡SiO)2NbCl3•OEt2]. 93Nb SSNMR spectra of 1a-3a and 31P SSNMR on their PMe3 derivatives (1b-3b) led to the unambiguous assignment of 1a as a single site, monopodal Nb-species while 2a and 3a were found to present two distinct surface-supported components, with 2a being mostly monopodal [≡SiONbCl4•OEt2] and 3a being mostly bipodal [≡S ONbCl3•OEt2]. Double-quantum/single-quantum 31P NMR correlation experiment carried out on 2b supported the existence of vicinal Nb centers on the silica surface for this species. 1a-3a were active heterogeneous catalysts for the synthesis of propylene carbonate from CO2 and propylene oxide under mild catalytic conditions; the performance of 2a was found to significantly surpass that of 1a and 3a. With the support of a systematic DFT study carried out on model silica surfaces, the observed differences in catalytic efficiency were correlated with an unprece-dented cooperative effect between two neighboring Nb centers on the surface of 2a. This is in an excellent agreement with our previous discoveries regarding the mechanism of the NbCl5 catalyzed cycloaddition in the homogeneous phase.

  15. Assignment of hyperfine shifted haem methyl carbon resonances in paramagnetic low-spin met-cyano complex of sperm whale myoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hyperfine shifted resonances arising from all four individual haem carbons of the paramagnetic low-spin met-cyano complex of sperm whale myoglobin have been clearly identified and assigned for the first time with the aid of 1H-13C heteronuclear chemical shift correlated spectroscopy. Alteration of the in-plane symmetry of the electronic structure of haem induced by the ligation of proximal histidyl imidazole spreads the haem carbon resonances to 32 ppm at 220C, indicating the sensitivity of those resonances to the haem electronic/molecular structure. Those resonances are potentially powerful probes in characterizing the nature of haem electronic structure. 25 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 table

  16. Platform margins, reef facies, and microbial carbonates; a comparison of Devonian reef complexes in the Canning Basin, Western Australia, and the Guilin region, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jian-Wei; Webb, Gregory E.; Jell, John S.

    2008-05-01

    Devonian reef complexes were well developed in Western Australia and South China, but no detailed direct comparison has been made between reef building in the two regions. The regions differ in several respects, including tectonic, stratigraphic and palaeoceanographic-palaeogeographic settings, and the reef building styles reflect minor differences in reef builders and reef facies. Similarities and differences between the two reef complexes provide insights into the characteristics of platform margins, reef facies and microbial carbonates of both regions. Here we present a comparison of platform margin types from different stratigraphic positions in the Late Devonian reef complex of the Canning Basin, Western Australia and Middle and Late Devonian margin to marginal slope successions in Guilin, South China. Comparisons are integrated into a review of the reefal stratigraphy of both regions. Reef facies, reef complex architecture, temporal reef builder associations, 2nd order stratigraphy and platform cyclicity in the two regions were generally similar where the successions overlap temporally. However, carbonate deposition began earlier in South China. Carbonate complexes were also more widespread in South China and represent a thicker succession overall. Platforms in the Canning Basin grew directly on Precambrian crystalline basement or early Palaeozoic sedimentary rocks, but in South China, carbonate complexes developed conformably on older Devonian siliciclastic strata. Pre-Frasnian reef facies in South China had more abundant skeletal frameworks than in Canning Basin reefs of equivalent age, and Famennian shoaling margins containing various microbial reefs may have been more common and probably more diverse in South China. However, Late Devonian platform margin types have been documented more completely in the Canning Basin. Deep intra-platform troughs (deep depressions containing non-carbonate pelagic sediments — Nandan-type successions) that developed along

  17. MEDUSA-2.0: an intermediate complexity biogeochemical model of the marine carbon cycle for climate change and ocean acidification studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yool

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available MEDUSA-1.0 (Model of Ecosystem Dynamics, nutrient Utilisation, Sequestration and Acidification was developed as an "intermediate complexity" plankton ecosystem model to study the biogeochemical response, and especially that of the so-called "biological pump", to anthropogenically-driven change in the World Ocean (Yool et al., 2011. The base currency in this model was nitrogen from which fluxes of organic carbon, including export to the deep ocean, were calculated by invoking fixed C:N ratios in phytoplankton, zooplankton and detritus. Since the beginning of the industrial era, the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2 has significantly increased above its natural, inter-glacial background concentration. Simulating and predicting the carbon cycle in the ocean in its entirety, including ventilation of CO2 with the atmosphere and the resulting impact of ocean acidification on marine ecosystems, therefore requires that both organic and inorganic carbon be afforded a full representation in the model specification. Here, we introduce MEDUSA-2.0, an expanded successor model which includes additional state variables for dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, dissolved oxygen and detritus carbon (permitting variable C:N in exported organic matter, as well as a simple benthic formulation and extended parameterisations of phytoplankton growth, calcification and detritus remineralisation. A full description of MEDUSA-2.0, including its additional functionality, is provided and a multi-decadal hindcast simulation described (1860–2005, to evaluate the biogeochemical performance of the model.

  18. Les trifluoro(organo)borates de potassium : nouvelles perspectives pour la formation de liaisons carbone-carbone à l'aide de complexes du rhodium

    OpenAIRE

    Pucheault, Mathieu

    2004-01-01

    This manuscript describes the use of potassium trifluoro(organo)borates in rhodiumcatalyzed carbon-carbon bond forming reactions. These easy to purify and very stable reagents turned out to constitute a valuable alternative to other boron reagents commonly used in transition metal catalyzed reactions. Asymmetric rhodium-catalyzed 1,4-additions of trifluoroborates were developed with the use of a chiral diphosphine which allowed a good control of the enantioselectivity. Under neutral condition...

  19. Synthesis of superparamagnetic carbon nanotubes immobilized Pt and Pd pincer complexes: highly active and selective catalysts towards cyclohexane oxidation with dioxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Kelly; Mishra, Jaya; Suzuki, Shinzo; Mishra, Gopal S

    2014-12-14

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with Ni/Co have been prepared using an arc discharge technique and Ni/Co-carbon composite rods in an inert atmosphere and were surface modified using 3-aminophenyl trimethoxysilane. These NH2-functionalized magnetic carbon nanotubes have been used as a novel support for Pd((II)) and Pt((II)) pincer complexes immobilized as magnetic nano-catalysts. The morphology of the support and the catalysts have been characterized by IR, EPR, SEM, TGA, TEM, XRD, AAS and EDS analysis. These magnetic nano-catalysts have been tested on the industrially important cyclohexane (Cy-hx) oxidation with O2 and significantly high TONs of 1678 to 1946 were achieved under solvent free and relatively mild conditions. The SWNTs/Pd catalyst provided the best conversion, 22.7%, but the SWNTs/Pt system also provided a good conversion of 20.7%. PMID:25340475

  20. Low temperature in situ synthesis and the formation mechanism of various carbon-encapsulated nanocrystals by the electrophilic oxidation of metallocene complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Boyang; Fan, Chunhua; Chen, Jianwei; Wang, Junhua; Lu, Zepeng; Ren, Jiayuan; Yu, Shuaiqin; Dong, Lihua; Li, Wenge

    2016-02-01

    The core-shell nanostructures have the advantages of combining distinctive properties of varied materials and improved properties over their single-component counterparts. Synthesis approaches for this class of nanostructures have been intensively explored, generally involving multiple steps. Here, a general and convenient strategy is developed for one-step in situ synthesis of various carbon-encapsulated nanocrystals with a core-shell structure via a solid-state reaction of metallocene complexes with (NH4)2S2O8 in an autoclave at 200 °C. A variety of near-spherical and equiaxed nanocrystals with a small median size ranging from 6.5 to 50.6 nm are prepared as inner cores, including Fe7S8, Ni3S4 and NiS, CoS, TiO2, TiO2 and S8, ZrO2, (NH4)3V(SO4)3 and VO2, Fe7S8 and Fe3O4, MoS2 and MoO2. The worm-like carbon shell provides exclusive room for hundreds of nanocrystals separated from each other, preventing nanocrystal aggregation. The synergistic effect of ammonium and a strong oxidizing anion on the electrophilic oxidation of metallocene complexes containing a metal-ligand π bond contributes to the carbon formation at low temperature. It is considered that the cyclopentadienyl ligand in a metallocene complex will decompose into highly reactive straight chain olefinic pieces and the metal-olefin π interaction enables an ordered self-assembly of olefinic pieces on nanocrystals to partially form graphitizable carbon and a core-shell structure. The high capacity, good cycling behavior and rate capability of Fe7S8@C and Ni3S4 and NiS@C electrodes are attributed to the good protection and electrical conductivity of the carbon shell.

  1. Kinetics and mechanism studies on scandium calix[6]arene complex initiating ring-opening polymerization of 2,2-dimethyltrimethylene carbonate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Scandium p-tert-butylcalix[6]arene complex has been synthesized from scandium isopropoxide and p-tert-butylcalix[6]arene and used as a single component initiator for the first time. The polymerization of 2,2-dimethyltrimethylene carbonate (DTC) using this complex can proceed under mild conditions. Poly (2,2-dimethyltrimethylene carbonate) (PolyDTC) with weight-average molecular weight of 33700 and molecular weight distribution of 1.21 can be prepared. Kinetics study indicates that the polymerization rate is first order with respect to both monomer and initiator concentrations, and the apparent activation energy of the polymerization is 22.7 kJ/mol. 1H NMR spectrum of the polymer reveals that the monomer ring opens via acyl-oxygen bond cleavage leading to an active center of Sc-O.

  2. Recyclability of water-soluble ruthenium–phosphine complex catalysts in multiphase selective hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde using toluene and pressurized carbon dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    Fujita, Shin-ichiro; Akihara, Shuji; Arai, Masahiko

    2006-01-01

    The recyclability of water-soluble ruthenium–phosphine complex catalysts was investigated in water–toluene and in water–pressurized carbon dioxide systems for selective hydrogenation of trans-cinnamaldehyde (CAL). For the first hydrogenation run, the selectivity for cinnamyl alcohol (COL) is high for both toluene and dense CO2, because of interfacial catalysis in which the reaction mainly occurs at the interface between the aqueous phase and the other toluene or dense CO2 phase. The total CAL...

  3. The electrochemical behavior of Co(TPTZ){sub 2} complex on different carbon based electrodes modified with TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortaboy, Sinem, E-mail: ortaboy@istanbul.edu.tr; Atun, Gülten, E-mail: gatun@istanbul.edu.tr

    2015-04-15

    Electrochemical behavior of cobalt (II) complex with the N-donor ligand 2,2′-bipyridyl-1,3,5-tripyridyl-s-triazine (TPTZ) was investigated to elucidate the electron-proton transfer mechanisms. The electrochemical response of the complex was studied using square-wave voltammetry (SWV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. A conventional three-electrode system, consisting of glassy carbon (GCE), TiO{sub 2} modified glassy carbon (T/GCE), carbon paste (CPE) and TiO{sub 2} modified carbon paste (T/CPE) working electrodes were employed. The ligand/metal ratio and stability constant of the complex as well as the mechanisms of the electrode processes were elucidated by examining the effects of pH, ligand concentration and frequency on the voltammograms. The EIS results indicated that the samples modified with TiO{sub 2} had the higher charge transfer resistance than that of the bare electrodes and also suggested that the electroactivity of the electrode surfaces increased in the following order, T/CPE > CPE > T/GCE > GCE. The surface morphology of the working electrodes was also characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The values of surface roughness parameters were found to be consistent with the results obtained by EIS experiments. - Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of the experimental process. - Highlights: • Electrochemical behavior of Co(TPTZ){sub 2} complex studied by SWV and EIS techniques. • GCE, CPE T/GCE and T/CPE were used as working electrodes for comparative studies. • The surface morphologies of the electrodes were characterized by AFM. • Mechanisms were proposed from the effects of pH, ligand concentration and frequency. • EIS and morphologic relationships of the surfaces were established successfully.

  4. Evolution of chemical and isotopic composition of inorganic carbon in a complex semi-arid zone environment: Consequences for groundwater dating using radiocarbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, K. T.; Han, L. F.; Hollins, S. E.; Cendón, D. I.; Jacobsen, G. E.; Baker, A.

    2016-09-01

    Estimating groundwater age is important for any groundwater resource assessment and radiocarbon (14C) dating of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) can provide this information. In semi-arid zone (i.e. water-limited environments), there are a multitude of reasons why 14C dating of groundwater and traditional correction models may not be directly transferable. Some include; (1) the complex hydrological responses of these systems that lead to a mixture of different ages in the aquifer(s), (2) the varied sources, origins and ages of organic matter in the unsaturated zone and (3) high evaporation rates. These all influence the evolution of DIC and are not easily accounted for in traditional correction models. In this study, we determined carbon isotope data for; DIC in water, carbonate minerals in the sediments, sediment organic matter, soil gas CO2 from the unsaturated zone, and vegetation samples. The samples were collected after an extended drought, and again after a flood event, to capture the evolution of DIC after varying hydrological regimes. A graphical method (Han et al., 2012) was applied for interpretation of the carbon geochemical and isotopic data. Simple forward mass-balance modelling was carried out on key geochemical processes involving carbon and agreed well with observed data. High values of DIC and δ13CDIC, and low 14CDIC could not be explained by a simple carbonate mineral-CO2 gas dissolution process. Instead it is suggested that during extended drought, water-sediment interaction leads to ion exchange processes within the top ∼10-20 m of the aquifer which promotes greater calcite dissolution in saline groundwater. This process was found to contribute more than half of the DIC, which is from a mostly 'dead' carbon source. DIC is also influenced by carbon exchange between DIC in water and carbonate minerals found in the top 2 m of the unsaturated zone. This process occurs because of repeated dissolution/precipitation of carbonate that is dependent on

  5. Cobalt(III) complexes of [3(5)]adamanzane, 1,5,9,13-tetraazabicyclo[7.7.3]nonadecane. Report of an inert, chelate hydrogen carbonate ion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broge, Louise; Søtofte, Inger; Olsen, Carl Erik;

    2001-01-01

    .H2O (3a). The coordination geometry around the cobalt(III) ion is a distorted octahedron with the inorganic ligands at cis-positions. Complex 2 is the second example of a cobalt(III) complex for which the X-ray structure,sfiows a chelate binding mode of the hydrogen carbonate entity. The pK(a) value...... of the [Co([3(5)]adz)(HCO3)](2+) ion (2) was determined spectrophotometrically to be 0.27 (25 degreesC, I = 5.0 M). The protonation appears to occur at the noncoordinated carbonyl oxygen atom of the carbonate group, with hydrogen bonding to the crystal water molecule. Evidence is presented for this oxygen......-atom as the site of protonation in solution as well. In 5.0 M CF3SO3H a slow reaction of the carbonate complex, quantitatively yielding the [Co([3(5)]adz)(H2O)(2)](3+) ion, was observed. k(obs) 7.9(1) x 10(-6) s(-1) at 25 degreesC....

  6. The influence of dissolved H2O content in supercritical carbon dioxide to the inclusion complexes formation of ketoprofen/β-cyclodextrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goenawan, Joshua; Trisanti, P. N.; Sumarno

    2015-12-01

    This work studies the relation between dissolved H2O content in supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) with the formation of ketoprofen (KP)/β-cyclodextrin(CD) inclusion complexes. The process involves a physical mixture of these two compounds into contact with the supercritical carbon dioxide which had been previously saturated with H2O over a certain duration. The pressure used for saturation process is 130 bar and saturation temperature was ranged between 30 °C to 50 °C. The inclusion process was achieved by keeping it for 2 hours at 160 bar and 200 bar with inclusion temperature of 50 °C. The results enable us to suggest explanations for the inclusion formation. The inclusion complexes can be formed by contacting the dissolved H2O in SC-CO2 to the physical mixture of KP and CD. An increase in the temperature of saturation process resulted in an increase of dissolved H2O content in the supercritical carbon dioxide. The increasing levels of this water soluble resulted an increase in the inclusion complexes that has been formed. The formation of inclusion complexes includes the water molecules enhancing the emptying of the CD cavities and being replaced by KP, towards a more stable energy state. The drug release used for analyzing the dissolution rate of the KP/CD complexes. The results vary from 79,85% to 99,98% after 45 minutes which is above the rate that has been assigned by Farmakope Indonesia at 70% dissolution rate for KP. The use of SC-CO2 offers a new methods for increasing the rate of dissolution of drugs that are hydrophobic such as KP. CO2 used as a supercritical fluid because of its relatively low cost, easily obtainable supercritical conditions, and lack of toxicity. The material samples were characterized by DSC and Spectrophotometer UV-vis technique.

  7. Deposition of new thia-containing Schiff-base iron (III) complexes onto carbon nanotube-modified glassy carbon electrodes as a biosensor for electrooxidation and determination of amino acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saghatforoush, Lotfali [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Payame Noor University (PNU), P.O. Box 58168-45164, Khoy (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hasanzadeh, Mohammad, E-mail: mhmmd_hasanzadeh@yahoo.co [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Payame Noor University (PNU), P.O. Box 58168-45164, Khoy (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, K.N. Toosi University of Technology (KNTU), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shadjou, Nasrin [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Payame Noor University (PNU), P.O. Box 58168-45164, Khoy (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, K.N. Toosi University of Technology (KNTU), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khalilzadeh, Balal [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Arak University, Arak (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-01-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were used as an immobilization matrix to incorporate an Fe (III)-Schiff base complex as an electron-transfer mediator onto a glassy carbon electrode surface. First, the preheated glassy carbon was subjected to abrasive immobilization of MWCNTs by gently rubbing the electrode surface on filter paper supporting the carbon nanotubes. Second, the electrode surface was modified by casting 100 {mu}L of an Fe (III)-complex solution (0.01 M in ACN). The cyclic voltammograms of the modified electrode in an aqueous solution displayed a pair of well-defined, stable and nearly reversible reductive oxidation redox systems with surface confined characteristics. Combinations of unique electronic and electrocatalytic properties of MWCNTs and Fe (III)-Schiff base complexes resulted in a remarkable synergistic augmentation of the response. The electrochemical behavior and stability of the modified electrode in aqueous solutions at pH 1-9 were characterized by cyclic voltammetry. The apparent electron transfer rate constant (K{sub s}) and transfer coefficient (a) were determined by cyclic voltammetry and were approximately 7 s{sup -1} and 0.55, respectively. The modified electrodes showed excellent catalytic activity towards the oxidation of amino acids at an unusually positive potential in acidic solution. They also displayed inherent stability at a wide pH range, fast response time, high sensitivity, low detection limit and had a remarkably positive potential oxidation of amino acids that decreased the effect of interferences in analysis. The linear concentration range, limits of detection (LOD), limits of quantization (LOQ) and relative standard deviation of the proposed sensor for the amino acid detection were 1-55,000, 1.10-13.70, 2.79-27.14 and 1.30-5.11, respectively.

  8. Free Energy Minimization Calculation of Complex Chemical Equilibria. Reduction of Silicon Dioxide with Carbon at High Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai, C. M.; Hutchinson, S. G.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the calculation of free energy in reactions between silicon dioxide and carbon. Describes several computer programs for calculating the free energy minimization and their uses in chemistry classrooms. Lists 16 references. (YP)

  9. Stability constants important to the understanding of plutonium in environmental waters, hydroxy and carbonate complexation of PuO{sub 2}{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, D A [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Chemistry

    1990-04-20

    The formation constants for the reactions PuO{sub 2}{sup +} + H{sub 2}O = PuO{sub 2}(OH) + H{sup +} and PuO{sub 2}{sup +} + CO{sub 3}{sup 2} = PuO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sup {minus}} were determined in aqueous sodium perchlorate solutions by laser-induced photoacoustic spectroscopy. The molar absorptivity of the PuO{sub 2}{sup +} band at 569 nm decreased with increasing hydroxide concentration. Similarly, spectral changes occurred between 540 and 580 nm as the carbonate concentration was increased. The absorption data were analyzed by the non-linear least-squares program SQUAD to yield complexation constants. Using the specific ion interaction theory, both complexation constants were extrapolated to zero ionic strength. These thermodynamic complexation constants were combined with the oxidation-reduction potentials of Pu to obtain Eh versus pH diagrams. 120 refs., 35 figs., 12 tabs.

  10. MEDUSA-2.0: an intermediate complexity biogeochemical model of the marine carbon cycle for climate change and ocean acidification studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yool, A.; Popova, E. E.; Anderson, T. R.

    2013-10-01

    MEDUSA-1.0 (Model of Ecosystem Dynamics, nutrient Utilisation, Sequestration and Acidification) was developed as an "intermediate complexity" plankton ecosystem model to study the biogeochemical response, and especially that of the so-called "biological pump", to anthropogenically driven change in the World Ocean (Yool et al., 2011). The base currency in this model was nitrogen from which fluxes of organic carbon, including export to the deep ocean, were calculated by invoking fixed C:N ratios in phytoplankton, zooplankton and detritus. However, due to anthropogenic activity, the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) has significantly increased above its natural, inter-glacial background. As such, simulating and predicting the carbon cycle in the ocean in its entirety, including ventilation of CO2 with the atmosphere and the resulting impact of ocean acidification on marine ecosystems, requires that both organic and inorganic carbon be afforded a more complete representation in the model specification. Here, we introduce MEDUSA-2.0, an expanded successor model which includes additional state variables for dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, dissolved oxygen and detritus carbon (permitting variable C:N in exported organic matter), as well as a simple benthic formulation and extended parameterizations of phytoplankton growth, calcification and detritus remineralisation. A full description of MEDUSA-2.0, including its additional functionality, is provided and a multi-decadal spin-up simulation (1860-2005) is performed. The biogeochemical performance of the model is evaluated using a diverse range of observational data, and MEDUSA-2.0 is assessed relative to comparable models using output from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5).

  11. MEDUSA-2.0: an intermediate complexity biogeochemical model of the marine carbon cycle for climate change and ocean acidification studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yool

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available MEDUSA-1.0 (Model of Ecosystem Dynamics, nutrient Utilisation, Sequestration and Acidification was developed as an "intermediate complexity" plankton ecosystem model to study the biogeochemical response, and especially that of the so-called "biological pump", to anthropogenically driven change in the World Ocean (Yool et al., 2011. The base currency in this model was nitrogen from which fluxes of organic carbon, including export to the deep ocean, were calculated by invoking fixed C:N ratios in phytoplankton, zooplankton and detritus. However, due to anthropogenic activity, the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2 has significantly increased above its natural, inter-glacial background. As such, simulating and predicting the carbon cycle in the ocean in its entirety, including ventilation of CO2 with the atmosphere and the resulting impact of ocean acidification on marine ecosystems, requires that both organic and inorganic carbon be afforded a more complete representation in the model specification. Here, we introduce MEDUSA-2.0, an expanded successor model which includes additional state variables for dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, dissolved oxygen and detritus carbon (permitting variable C:N in exported organic matter, as well as a simple benthic formulation and extended parameterizations of phytoplankton growth, calcification and detritus remineralisation. A full description of MEDUSA-2.0, including its additional functionality, is provided and a multi-decadal spin-up simulation (1860–2005 is performed. The biogeochemical performance of the model is evaluated using a diverse range of observational data, and MEDUSA-2.0 is assessed relative to comparable models using output from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5.

  12. Determination of porosity and facies trends in a complex carbonate reservoir, by using 3-D seismic, borehole tools, and outcrop geology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacharakis, T.G. Jr.; Comet, J.N.; Murillo, A.A. [Respol Exploracion, S.A., Madrid (Spain)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    Mesozoic carbonate reservoirs are found in the Mediterranean Sea, off the east coast of Spain. A wide variation of porosities are found in the core samples and logs: vuggy, breccia, fractures, and cavern porosity. In addition, complex Tertiary carbonate geometries include olistostromes, breccia bodies, and reef buildups, which are found on top of Mesozoic carbonates. Predicting the porosity trends within these oil productive reservoirs requires an understanding of how primary porosity was further enhanced by secondary processes, including fractures, karstification, and dolomitization in burial conditions. Through an extensive investigation of field histories, outcrop geology, and seismic data, a series of basic reservoir styles have been identified and characterized by well log signature and seismic response. The distribution pattern of the different reservoirs styles is highly heterogeneous, but by integrating subsurface data and outcrop analogs, it is possible to distinguish field-scale and local patterns of both vertical and local variations in reservoir properties. Finally, it is important to quantify these reservoir properties through the study of seismic attributes, such as amplitude variations, and log responses at the reservoir interval. By incorporating 3-D seismic data, through the use of seismic inversion, it is possible to predict porosity trends. Further, the use of geostatistics can lead to the prediction of reservoir development within the carbonate facies.

  13. Carbon-carbon cross-coupling reactions catalyzed by a two-coordinate nickel(II)-bis(amido) complex via observable Ni(I) , Ni(II) , and Ni(III) intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipschutz, Michael I; Tilley, T Don

    2014-07-01

    Recently, the development of more sustainable catalytic systems based on abundant first-row metals, especially nickel, for cross-coupling reactions has attracted significant interest. One of the key intermediates invoked in these reactions is a Ni(III) -alkyl species, but no such species that is part of a competent catalytic cycle has yet been isolated. Herein, we report a carbon-carbon cross-coupling system based on a two-coordinate Ni(II) -bis(amido) complex in which a Ni(III) -alkyl species can be isolated and fully characterized. This study details compelling experimental evidence of the role played by this Ni(III) -alkyl species as well as those of other key Ni(I) and Ni(II) intermediates. The catalytic cycle described herein is also one of the first examples of a two-coordinate complex that competently catalyzes an organic transformation, potentially leading to a new class of catalysts based on the unique ability of first-row transition metals to accommodate two-coordinate complexes.

  14. A stability comparison of redox-active layers produced by chemical coupling of an osmium redox complex to pre-functionalized gold and carbon electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of stable redox active layers on electrode surfaces is a key factor for the development of practical electronic and electrochemical devices. Here, we report on a comparison of the stability of redox layers formed by covalently coupling an osmium redox complex to pre-functionalized gold and graphite electrode surfaces. Pre-treatment of gold and graphite electrodes to provide surface carboxylic acid groups is achieved via classical thiolate self-assembled monolayer formation on gold surfaces and the electro-reduction of an in situ generated aryldiazonium salt from 4-aminobenzoic acid on gold, glassy carbon and graphite surfaces. These surfaces have been characterized by AFM and electrochemical blocking studies. The surface carboxylate is then used to tether an osmium complex, [Os(2,2'-bipyridyl)2(4-aminomethylpyridine)Cl]PF6, to provide a covalently bound redox active layer, E0'' of 0.29 V (vs. Ag/AgCl in phosphate buffer, pH 7.4), on the pre-treated electrodes. The aryldiazonium salt-treated carbon-based surfaces showed the greatest stability, represented by a decrease of <5% in the peak current for the Os(II/III) redox transition of the immobilized complex over a 3-day period, compared to a decrease of 19% and 14% for the aryldiazonium salt treated and thiolate treated gold surfaces, respectively, over the same period

  15. A stability comparison of redox-active layers produced by chemical coupling of an osmium redox complex to pre-functionalized gold and carbon electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boland, Susan; Foster, Kevin [School of Chemistry, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); Leech, Donal [School of Chemistry, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)], E-mail: donal.leech@nuigalway.ie

    2009-02-28

    The production of stable redox active layers on electrode surfaces is a key factor for the development of practical electronic and electrochemical devices. Here, we report on a comparison of the stability of redox layers formed by covalently coupling an osmium redox complex to pre-functionalized gold and graphite electrode surfaces. Pre-treatment of gold and graphite electrodes to provide surface carboxylic acid groups is achieved via classical thiolate self-assembled monolayer formation on gold surfaces and the electro-reduction of an in situ generated aryldiazonium salt from 4-aminobenzoic acid on gold, glassy carbon and graphite surfaces. These surfaces have been characterized by AFM and electrochemical blocking studies. The surface carboxylate is then used to tether an osmium complex, [Os(2,2'-bipyridyl){sub 2}(4-aminomethylpyridine)Cl]PF{sub 6}, to provide a covalently bound redox active layer, E{sup 0}'' of 0.29 V (vs. Ag/AgCl in phosphate buffer, pH 7.4), on the pre-treated electrodes. The aryldiazonium salt-treated carbon-based surfaces showed the greatest stability, represented by a decrease of <5% in the peak current for the Os(II/III) redox transition of the immobilized complex over a 3-day period, compared to a decrease of 19% and 14% for the aryldiazonium salt treated and thiolate treated gold surfaces, respectively, over the same period.

  16. Mild formation of cyclic carbonates using Zn(II) complexes based on N2S2-chelating ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Anselmo; V. Bocokic; A. Decortes; E.C. Escudero-Adan; J. Benet-Buchholz; J.N.H. Reek; A.W. Kleij

    2012-01-01

    We have prepared a series of Zn(II) complexes (1-3) based on a versatile N2S2-chelating ligand abbreviated as btsc [btsc = bis-(thiosemicarbazonato)] derived from simple and accessible building blocks. These complexes comprise a Lewis acidic Zn(II) center useful for substrate activation, and we have

  17. Five phosphonate operon gene products as components of a multi-subunit complex of the carbon-phosphorus lyase pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochimsen, Bjarne; Lolle, Signe; McSorley, Fern R.;

    2011-01-01

    Organophosphonate utilization by Escherichia coli requires the 14 cistrons of the phnCDEFGHIJKLMNOP operon, of which the carbon-phosphorus lyase has been postulated to consist of the seven polypeptides specified by phnG to phnM. A 5,660-bp DNA fragment encompassing phnGHIJKLM is cloned, followed ...

  18. XAFS study on the sulfidation mechanisms of Co-Mo catalysts supported on activated carbon and alumina: effect of complexing agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, K; Umeki, T; Yokoyama, Y; Kitada, T; Iwanami, Y; Nonaka, O; Shimada, H; Matsubayashi, N; Nishijima, A; Nomura, M

    2001-03-01

    The effect of nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) as a complexing agent on the sulfidation mechanisms of Co-Mo catalysts supported on activated carbon and alumina was examined by the XAFS technique. The XAFS results revealed that NTA interacted with Co atoms and formed the Co-NTA interaction, while it showed almost no influence on the local structures around Mo atoms. The Co-NTA interaction suppressed the aggregation of cobalt atoms and the interaction between cobalt and alumina during sulfiding, and consequently promoted the formation of the Co-Mo-S phase.

  19. Metal Complexes of 1,3,4-Thiadiazole-2,5-Disulfonamide are Strong Dual Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors, although the Ligand Possesses very Weak such Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supuran, Claudiu T.

    1995-01-01

    Coordination compounds of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II) with 1,3,4-thiadiazole-2,5-disulfonamide as ligand were synthesized and characterized by IR and UV spectroscopy, conductimetry and thermogravimetry. The parent ligand is a very weak carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitor, although it constituted the lead for developing important classes of diuretics. The complex derivatives behave as much stronger CA inhibitors, with IC50 values around 10−8M against isozyme CA II, and 10−7 M against isozyme CAI. PMID:18472784

  20. Metal Complexes of 1,3,4-Thiadiazole-2,5-Disulfonamide are Strong Dual Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors, although the Ligand Possesses very Weak such Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supuran, C T

    1995-01-01

    Coordination compounds of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II) with 1,3,4-thiadiazole-2,5-disulfonamide as ligand were synthesized and characterized by IR and UV spectroscopy, conductimetry and thermogravimetry. The parent ligand is a very weak carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitor, although it constituted the lead for developing important classes of diuretics. The complex derivatives behave as much stronger CA inhibitors, with IC(50) values around 10(-8)M against isozyme CA II, and 10(-7) M against isozyme CAI.

  1. Controlling the Direction of the Molecular Axis of Rod-Shaped Binuclear Ruthenium Complexes on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Hiroaki; Kosaka, Kazuma; Kita, Tomomi; Yoshikawa, Kai; Haga, Masa-aki

    2016-05-01

    We report the synthesis of a mixed-valence ruthenium complex, bearing pyrene moieties on one side of the ligands as anchor groups. Composites consisting of mixed-valence ruthenium complexes and SWNTs were prepared by noncovalent π-π interactions between the SWNT surface and the pyrene anchors of the Ru complex. In these composites, the long axis of the Ru complexes was aligned in parallel to the principal direction of the SWNT. The optimized conformation of these complexes on the SWNT surface was calculated by molecular mechanics. The composites were examined by UV/Vis absorption and FT-IR spectroscopy, XPS, and SEM analysis. Furthermore, their electrochemical properties were evaluated. Cyclic voltammograms of the composites showed reversible oxidation waves at peak oxidation potentials (Epox ) = 0.86 and 1.08 V versus Fc(+) /Fc, which were assigned to the Ru(II) -Ru(II) /Ru(II) -Ru(III) and the Ru(II) -Ru(III) /Ru(III) -Ru(III) oxidation events of the dinuclear ruthenium complex, respectively. Based on these observations, we concluded that the electrochemical properties and mixed-valence state of the dinuclear ruthenium complexes were preserved upon attachment to the SWNT surface. PMID:27010865

  2. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic oxidation properties of multi-wall carbon nanotubes with a covalently attached copper(II) salen complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salavati-Niasari, Masoud, E-mail: salavati@kashanu.ac.ir [Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317-51167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317-51167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bazarganipour, Mehdi [Department of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317-51167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    Hydroxyl functionalized copper(II) Schiff-base, N,N'-bis(4-hydroxysalicylidene)-ethylene-1,2-diaminecopper(II), [Cu((OH){sub 2}-salen)], has been covalently anchored on modified MWCNTs. The new modified MWCNTs ([Cu((OH){sub 2}-salen)]-MWCNTs) have been characterized by TEM, thermal analysis, XRD, XPS, UV-vis, DRS, FT-IR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The modified copper(II) MWCNTs solid was used to affect the catalytic oxidation of ethylbenzene with tert-butylhydroperoxide as the oxidant at 333 K. The system is truly heterogeneous (no leaching observed) and reusable (no decrease in activity) in three consecutive runs. Acetophenone was the major product though small amounts of o- and p-hydroxyacetophenones were also formed revealing that C-H bond activation takes place both at benzylic and aromatic ring carbon atoms. Ring hydroxylation was more over the 'neat' complexes than over the encapsulated complexes.

  3. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic oxidation properties of multi-wall carbon nanotubes with a covalently attached copper(II) salen complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydroxyl functionalized copper(II) Schiff-base, N,N'-bis(4-hydroxysalicylidene)-ethylene-1,2-diaminecopper(II), [Cu((OH)2-salen)], has been covalently anchored on modified MWCNTs. The new modified MWCNTs ([Cu((OH)2-salen)]-MWCNTs) have been characterized by TEM, thermal analysis, XRD, XPS, UV-vis, DRS, FT-IR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The modified copper(II) MWCNTs solid was used to affect the catalytic oxidation of ethylbenzene with tert-butylhydroperoxide as the oxidant at 333 K. The system is truly heterogeneous (no leaching observed) and reusable (no decrease in activity) in three consecutive runs. Acetophenone was the major product though small amounts of o- and p-hydroxyacetophenones were also formed revealing that C-H bond activation takes place both at benzylic and aromatic ring carbon atoms. Ring hydroxylation was more over the 'neat' complexes than over the encapsulated complexes.

  4. Actinide metals with multiple bonds to carbon: synthesis, characterization, and reactivity of U(IV) and Th(IV) bis(iminophosphorano)methandiide pincer carbene complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Guibin; Ferguson, Michael J; McDonald, Robert; Cavell, Ronald G

    2011-07-18

    Treatment of ThCl(4)(DME)(2) or UCl(4) with 1 equiv of dilithiumbis(iminophosphorano) methandiide, [Li(2)C(Ph(2)P═NSiMe(3))(2)] (1), afforded the chloro actinide carbene complexes [Cl(2)M(C(Ph(2)P═NSiMe(3))(2))] (2 (M = Th) and 3 (M = U)) in situ. Stable PCP metal-carbene complexes [Cp(2)Th(C(Ph(2)P═NSiMe(3))(2))] (4), [Cp(2)U(C(Ph(2)P═NSiMe(3))(2))] (5), [TpTh(C(Ph(2)P═NSiMe(3))(2))Cl] (6), and [TpU(C(Ph(2)P═NSiMe(3))(2))Cl] (7) were generated from 2 or 3 by further reaction with 2 equiv of thallium(I) cyclopentadienide (CpTl) in THF to yield 4 or 5 or with 1 equiv of potassium hydrotris(pyrazol-1-yl) borate (TpK) also in THF to give 6 or 7, respectively. The derivative complexes were isolated, and their crystal structures were determined by X-ray diffraction. All of these U (or Th)-carbene complexes (4-7) possess a very short M (Th or U)═carbene bond with evidence for multiple bond character. Gaussian 03 DFT calculations indicate that the M═C double bond is constructed by interaction of the 5f and 6d orbitals of the actinide metal with carbene 2p orbitals of both π and σ character. Complex 3 reacted with acetonitrile or benzonitrile to cyclo-add C≡N to the U═carbon double bond, thereby forming a new C-C bond in a new chelated quadridentate ligand in the bridged dimetallic complexes (9 and 10). A single carbon-U bond is retained. The newly coordinated uranium complex dimerizes with one equivalent of unconverted 3 using two chlorides and the newly formed imine derived from the nitrile as three connecting bridges. In addition, a new crystal structure of [CpUCl(3)(THF)(2)] (8) was determined by X-ray diffraction.

  5. Real-time imaging of complex nanoscale mechanical responses of carbon nanotubes in highly compressible porous monoliths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitby, Raymond L D; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V [Brighton Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Group, PABS, University of Brighton, Lewes Road, Brighton, BN2 4GJ (United Kingdom); Fukuda, Takahiro; Maekawa, Toru [Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe Saitama 350-8585 (Japan); Cundy, Andrew B, E-mail: r.whitby@brighton.ac.uk [School of Environment and Technology, University of Brighton, Lewes Road, Brighton, BN2 4GJ (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-19

    A facile and rapid assembly of powdered carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into compressible, porous, macroscale monoliths is reported. Despite a Poisson's ratio just above zero, we found that the sample under compression inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM) revealed CNT regions behaving in auxetic and vortex-like rotational modes as well as standard collapse responses. This method is crucial in understanding the macroscale behaviour based on the accumulation of nanoscale responses to an applied force.

  6. The integrative segment of the quail Coturnix coturnix japonica. Occurrence and distribution of carbonic anhydrase and complex carbohydrates.

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriella, M G; Menghi, G

    1994-01-01

    As part of a more extensive study into the involvement of carbonic anhydrase in avian excretory function, the occurrence and distribution of this enzyme was investigated in the quail integrative segment. The integrative segment represents, in birds, that part of the intestinal tract where ureteral urine undergoes postrenal modification to form definitive urine. To define the structural peculiarities within the intestinal epithelium, the constituent parts, namely cloaca, rectum and caecum, as ...

  7. Effects of germanium doping on the behavior of oxygen and carbon impurities and impurity-related complexes in Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Londos, C.A., E-mail: hlontos@phys.uoa.g [University of Athens, Solid State Physics Section, Panepistimiopolis Zografos, Athens 157 84 (Greece); Andrianakis, A. [University of Athens, Solid State Physics Section, Panepistimiopolis Zografos, Athens 157 84 (Greece); Emtsev, V.V.; Oganesyan, G.A. [Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Politeknicheskaya ul. 26, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Ohyama, H. [Kumamoto National College of Technology, 26592, Nishigoshi, Kumamoto 861-1102 (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    The production and annealing of oxygen and carbon related defects in electron-irradiated Ge-doped Czochralski silicon have been studied by means of IR spectroscopy. The results demonstrate that the role of Ge changes with increasing Ge content. At low Ge concentrations, much less than 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}, Ge atoms act as temporary traps for vacancies preventing their annihilation with self-interstitials. At high Ge concentrations, Ge atoms form clusters which tend to attract vacancies and self-interstitials, enhancing their mutual annihilation. As a result, for low Ge concentrations the production of oxygen-related defects (VO) and carbon-related defects (C{sub i}O{sub i}, C{sub i}O{sub i}(Si{sub I}), C{sub i}C{sub s}) tend to increase as a function of Ge content, while for high Ge concentrations tend to decrease. The annealing of the oxygen-related defects VO{sub n} (1<=n<=6) is also affected by the Ge presence. The ratio of the VO defects that convert to VO{sub 2} is reduced in Ge doped material. However, this ratio increases for the conversions VO{sub n}->VO{sub n+1} (3<=n<=5), respectively. The annealing temperature of VO defect and the growth temperature of VO{sub 2} defect decrease versus Ge content. On the other hand, the thermal stability of the carbon-related defects was found to be insensitive to the presence of Ge. It was also found that the carbon precipitation process shows some marked differences in irradiated Ge-doped Si, in comparison with the undoped material.

  8. Determination of formation constants of hydroxo carbonate complexes of Pr3+ in 2M NaCl at 303 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrolysis of Praseodymium III in 2M sodium chloride at 303 K was studied. Two methods were used: pH titration followed by a computational refinement and solvent extraction in the presence of a competitive ligand. The hydrolysis constants obtained by pH titration were: log β1,H = -7.68 ± 0.07, log β1,2H = -15.10 ± 0.03, and β1,3H -23.8 ± 0.04. The stability constants of Praseodymium carbonates were determined by pH titration as well and were: log β1,CO32- = 5.94 ± 0.08 and log β1,2CO32- = 11.15 ± 0.15. Praseodymium carbonate species were taken into consideration for calculating the first hydrolysis constants by the solvent extraction method and the value obtained was: log β1,H = -7.69 ± 0.27. The values for log β1,H attained by both methods are the same. The species-distribution diagram was obtained from the stability constants of Praseodymium carbonates and hydrolysis products in the conditions of the present work. (Author)

  9. Trace Determination of Scandium Using Adsorption Voltammetry of Mix-Polynuclear Complex of Scandium-Calcium-Alizarin Red S at Carbon Paste Electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎拒难; 张军; 邓培红; 费俊杰

    2004-01-01

    A novel method was described for the determination of ultra trace amount of scandium based on the cathodic adsorptive voltammetry of the mix-polynuclear complex of scandium-calcium-alizarin red S at a carbon paste electrode (CPE).The 2nd-order derivative linear scan voltammograms of the adsorbed complex were recorded by model JP-303 polarographic analyzer from 0.0 to -1.0 V (vs.SCE).The experimental conditions of the working procedure were optimized.The results show that the complex can be adsorbed on the surface of the CPE,yielding one peak at -0.61 V,corresponding to the reduction of the alizarin red S in the mix-polynuclear complex at the electrode.The detection limit of Sc3+ is 1.0×10-10 mol·L-1 for 3 min of accumulation time.The procedure was successfully applied to the determination of trace amount of scandium in the sample ores.

  10. Application of solid state silicon-29 and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to the characterization of inorganic matter-humic complexes in Athabasca oil sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Athabasca oil sands there is a fraction of non-crystalline solids tightly bound to humic matter. It is believed, that the presence of this fraction, which resists subsequent wetting by water, introduces serious problems in bitumen recovery when using water based processes. In the present work, 29Si and 13C solid state magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR techniques were applied to characterize these solids which were isolated from Athabasca oil sands of estuarine and marine origin. On the basis of 29Si results it is suggested that there is a short-range disorder in these samples. It is also shown that aluminum is present in the nearest-neighbor environment of the silicon atoms, thus demonstrating that these solids are comprised of disordered alumino-silicates (allophanes). 13C CP/MAS NMR spectra of demineralized inorganic matter-humic complexes derived from both estuarine and marine oil sands indicate that the distribution of carbon types in each region of the spectra is similar, with aromatic carbon being the predominant type of carbon

  11. Complexing Agents on Carbon Content and Lithium Storage Capacity of LiFePO4/C Cathode Synthesized via Sol-Gel Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Guan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Olivine-structured LiFePO4 faces its intrinsic challenges in terms of poor electrical conductivity and lithium-ion diffusion capability for application to lithium-ion batteries. Cost-effective sol-gel approach is advantageous to in situ synthesize carbon-coated LiFePO4 (LiFePO4/C which can not only improve electronic conductivity but also constrain particle size to nanometer scale. In this study, the key parameter is focused on the choice and amount of chelating agents in this synthesis route. It was found that stability of complexing compounds has significant impacts on the carbon contents and electrochemical properties of the products. At the favorable choice of precursors, composition, and synthesis conditions, nanocrystalline LiFePO4/C materials with appropriate amount of carbon coating were successfully obtained. A reversible capacity of 162 mAh/g was achieved at 0.2C rate, in addition to good discharge rate capability.

  12. The loading of coordination complex modified polyoxometalate nanobelts on activated carbon fiber: a feasible strategy to obtain visible light active and highly efficient polyoxometalate based photocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tingting; Xu, Xinxin; Li, Huili; Li, Zhenyu; Zhang, Xia; Ou, Jinzhao; Mei, Mingliang

    2015-02-01

    To enhance the photocatalytic properties of coordination complex modified polyoxometalates (CC/POMs) in the visible light region, its nanobelts (CC/POMNBs) were loaded on activated carbon fiber (ACF) through a simple colloidal blending process. The resulting coordination complex modified polyoxometalate nanobelts loaded activated carbon fiber composite materials (CC/POMNBs/ACF) exhibited dramatic photocatalytic activity for the degradation of rhodamine B (RhB) under visible light irradiation. Optical and electrochemical methods illustrated the enhanced photocatalytic activity of CC/POMNBs/ACF, which originates from the high separation efficiency of the photogenerated electrons and holes on the interface of the CC/POMNBs and ACF, which results from the synergistic effects between them. In the composite material, the role of ACF could be described as a photosensitizer and a good electron transporter. Furthermore, the influence of the mass ratio between the CC/POMNBs and ACF on the photocatalytic performance of the resulting composite material was discussed, and an ideal value to obtain highly efficient photocatalysts was obtained. The results suggested that the loading of CC/POMNBs on the surface of ACF would be a feasible strategy to enhance their photocatalytic activity.

  13. Carbon dioxide is tightly bound in the [Co(Pyridine)(CO{sub 2})]{sup −} anionic complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, Jacob D.; Buytendyk, Allyson M.; Zhang, Xinxing; Bowen, Kit H., E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Kim, Seong K. [Department of Chemistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-14

    The [Co(Pyridine)(CO{sub 2})]{sup −} anionic complex was studied through the combination of photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. This complex was envisioned as a primitive model system for studying CO{sub 2} binding to negatively charged sites in metal organic frameworks. The vertical detachment energy (VDE) measured via the photoelectron spectrum is 2.7 eV. Our calculations imply a structure for [Co(Pyridine)(CO{sub 2})]{sup −} in which a central cobalt atom is bound to pyridine and CO{sub 2} moieties on either sides. This structure was validated by acceptable agreement between the calculated and measured VDE values. Based on our calculations, we found CO{sub 2} to be bound within the anionic complex by 1.4 eV.

  14. Late Norian δ13Corg record in the Tethyan realm: New clues on the complex Late Triassic carbon cycle from the Lagonegro Basin (southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaffani, Mariachiara; Agnini, Claudia; Concheri, Giuseppe; Godfrey, Linda; Katz, Miriam; Maron, Matteo; Rigo, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    The Late Triassic (ca. 237-201 Ma) is characterized by complex and extreme environmental, climatic and biotic changes (e.g.: the break-up of the supercontinent Pangaea; the humid event known as the Carnian Pluvial Event; the End-Triassic mass extinction; the emplacement of the CAMP volcanism). A global δ13Corg curve for the Late Triassic would provide new clues on this perturbed time interval and would have the potential for global correlations. In particular, the few available data from North American successions define the late Norian (ca. 220-206 Ma) as a "chaotic carbon interval", with rapid vacillations of the carbon isotope values paired with low faunal diversity. Our goal is to reconstruct a global δ13Corg profile for the late Norian, as a contribution to the construction of a more complete global carbon isotope curve for the Late Triassic. For this purpose, we analyzed three sections from the Lagonegro Basin (southern Italy), originally located in the western Tethys, on the other side of the supercontinent Pangaea respect to the North America. The obtained δ13Corg profiles show four negative shifts correlatable with those of the North American record, suggesting that these carbon cycle perturbations have a widespread occurrence. These perturbations are associated with negative shifts of the 87Sr/86Sr, indicating that these global δ13Corg and 87Sr/86Sr negative excursions were possibly caused by emplacement of a Large Igneous Province (LIP). The input of volcanogenic CO2 to the atmosphere-ocean system is supported also by the 12C enrichment observed, as well as by the increase of atmospheric pCO2 inferred by different models for the Norian- Rhaetian interval. This Norian magmatic activity may be ascribed to the Angayucham province (Alaska, North America), a large oceanic plateau active ca. 214 Ma ±7 Myr, with an estimated volume comparable to other two Late Triassic LIPs: the Wrangellia and the CAMP.

  15. Carbonate-coordinated metal complexes precede the formation of liquid amorphous mineral emulsions of divalent metal carbonates†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Stephan E.; Müller, Lars; Barrea, Raul; Kampf, Christopher J.; Leiterer, Jork; Panne, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    During the mineralisation of metal carbonates MCO3 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Cd, Pb) liquid-like amorphous intermediates emerge. These intermediates that form via a liquid/liquid phase separation behave like a classical emulsion and are stabilized electrostatically. The occurrence of these intermediates is attributed to the formation of highly hydrated networks whose stability is mainly based on weak interactions and the variability of the metal-containing pre-critical clusters. Their existence and compositional freedom are evidenced by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Liquid intermediates in non-classical crystallisation pathways seem to be more common than assumed. PMID:21218241

  16. Complex Physiological Response of Norway Spruce to Atmospheric Pollution - Decreased Carbon Isotope Discrimination and Unchanged Tree Biomass Increment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čada, Vojtěch; Šantrůčková, Hana; Šantrůček, Jiří; Kubištová, Lenka; Seedre, Meelis; Svoboda, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric pollution critically affects forest ecosystems around the world by directly impacting the assimilation apparatus of trees and indirectly by altering soil conditions, which subsequently also leads to changes in carbon cycling. To evaluate the extent of the physiological effect of moderate level sulfate and reactive nitrogen acidic deposition, we performed a retrospective dendrochronological analysis of several physiological parameters derived from periodic measurements of carbon stable isotope composition ((13)C discrimination, intercellular CO2 concentration and intrinsic water use efficiency) and annual diameter increments (tree biomass increment, its inter-annual variability and correlation with temperature, cloud cover, precipitation and Palmer drought severity index). The analysis was performed in two mountain Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands of the Bohemian Forest (Czech Republic, central Europe), where moderate levels of pollution peaked in the 1970s and 1980s and no evident impact on tree growth or link to mortality has been reported. The significant influence of pollution on trees was expressed most sensitively by a 1.88‰ reduction of carbon isotope discrimination (Δ(13)C). The effects of atmospheric pollution interacted with increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration and temperature. As a result, we observed no change in intercellular CO2 concentrations (Ci), an abrupt increase in water use efficiency (iWUE) and no change in biomass increment, which could also partly result from changes in carbon partitioning (e.g., from below- to above-ground). The biomass increment was significantly related to Δ(13)C on an individual tree level, but the relationship was lost during the pollution period. We suggest that this was caused by a shift from the dominant influence of the photosynthetic rate to stomatal conductance on Δ(13)C during the pollution period. Using biomass increment-climate correlation analyses, we did not identify any clear pollution

  17. A fluorescence-Raman dual-imaging platform based on complexes of conjugated polymers and carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Huang, Jun; Sun, Min-Jie; Yu, Ji-Cheng; Chen, Yu-Lei; Zhang, Yu-Qi; Jiang, Shao-Jun; Shen, Qun-Dong

    2014-01-01

    The present study describes a flexible nanoplatform based on electrostatic assembly of conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs) and carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (cMWNTs). It is demonstrated that the obtained nanocomposites inherit intrinsic optical properties of CPEs and characteristic Raman vibration modes of MWNTs, providing a fluorescence-Raman dual-imaging method for intracellular tracking and locating of MWNTs. We suggest that the cellular internalization of the CPE-cMWNT nanocomposites is a surface charge-dependent process. The strengths of this nanoplatform include satisfying biocompatibility, enhanced protein-repellent property, and ease of implementation, making it available for both in vitro and in vivo applications.

  18. Complex Physiological Response of Norway Spruce to Atmospheric Pollution – Decreased Carbon Isotope Discrimination and Unchanged Tree Biomass Increment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čada, Vojtěch; Šantrůčková, Hana; Šantrůček, Jiří; Kubištová, Lenka; Seedre, Meelis; Svoboda, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric pollution critically affects forest ecosystems around the world by directly impacting the assimilation apparatus of trees and indirectly by altering soil conditions, which subsequently also leads to changes in carbon cycling. To evaluate the extent of the physiological effect of moderate level sulfate and reactive nitrogen acidic deposition, we performed a retrospective dendrochronological analysis of several physiological parameters derived from periodic measurements of carbon stable isotope composition (13C discrimination, intercellular CO2 concentration and intrinsic water use efficiency) and annual diameter increments (tree biomass increment, its inter-annual variability and correlation with temperature, cloud cover, precipitation and Palmer drought severity index). The analysis was performed in two mountain Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands of the Bohemian Forest (Czech Republic, central Europe), where moderate levels of pollution peaked in the 1970s and 1980s and no evident impact on tree growth or link to mortality has been reported. The significant influence of pollution on trees was expressed most sensitively by a 1.88‰ reduction of carbon isotope discrimination (Δ13C). The effects of atmospheric pollution interacted with increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration and temperature. As a result, we observed no change in intercellular CO2 concentrations (Ci), an abrupt increase in water use efficiency (iWUE) and no change in biomass increment, which could also partly result from changes in carbon partitioning (e.g., from below- to above-ground). The biomass increment was significantly related to Δ13C on an individual tree level, but the relationship was lost during the pollution period. We suggest that this was caused by a shift from the dominant influence of the photosynthetic rate to stomatal conductance on Δ13C during the pollution period. Using biomass increment-climate correlation analyses, we did not identify any clear pollution

  19. Carbon isotopic evidence for biodegradation of organic contaminants in the shallow vadose zone of the radioactive waste management complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waste material buried in drums in the shallow subsurface at the Radioactive Waste Management Facility (RWMC) of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) contained significant amounts of organic compounds including lubricating oils and chlorinated solvents. CO2 concentrations in pore gas samples from monitoring wells in the vicinity of the disposal pits are 3 to 5 times higher than the concentrations in nearby background wells. The stable carbon isotope ratios ((delta)13C values) of CO2 from the disposal pits averaged 2.4. less than CO2 from the background wells, indicating that the elevated CO2 concentrations around the pits were derived from source materials with (delta)13C values in the range of -24(perthousand) to -29(perthousand). These (delta)13C values are typical of lubricating oils, but higher than most solvents. The radiocarbon (14C) contents of CO2 across most of the site were significantly elevated above modern concentrations due to reactor blocks buried in a subsurface vault at the site. However, several samples collected from the high-CO2 zone on the far side of the RWMC from the reactor blocks had very low 14C contents (less than 0.13 times modern), confirming production from lubricating oils manufactured from fossil hydrocarbons. The magnitude of the CO2 anomaly observed at the site is consistent with intrinsic biodegradation rates on the order of 0.5 to 3.0 metric tons of carbon per year

  20. Dissolved organic carbon reduces uranium bioavailability and toxicity. 1. Characterization of an aquatic fulvic acid and its complexation with uranium[VI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenfield, Melanie A; McDonald, Suzanne; Kovacs, Krisztina; Lesher, Emily K; Pringle, Jennifer M; Markich, Scott J; Ng, Jack C; Noller, Barry; Brown, Paul L; van Dam, Rick A

    2011-04-01

    Fulvic acid (FA) from a tropical Australian billabong (lagoon) was isolated with XAD-8 resin and characterized using size exclusion chromatography, solid state cross-polarization magic angle spinning, 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and potentiometric acid-base titration. Physicochemical characteristics of the billabong FA were comparable with those of the Suwannee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA) standard. The greater negative charge density of the billabong FA suggested it contained protons that were more weakly bound than those of SRFA, with the potential for billabong water to complex less metal contaminants, such as uranium (U). This may subsequently influence the toxicity of metal contaminants to resident freshwater organisms. The complexation of U with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) (10 mg L(-1)) in billabong water was calculated using the HARPHRQ geochemical speciation model and also measured using flow field-flow fractionation combined with inductively coupled plasma mass-spectroscopy. Agreement between both methods was very good (within 4% as U-DOC). The results suggest that in billabong water at pH 6.0, containing an average DOC of 10 mg L(-1) and a U concentration of 90 μg L(-1), around 10% of U is complexed with DOC. PMID:21351802

  1. Development and evaluation of pH-responsive single-walled carbon nanotube-doxorubicin complexes in cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu YJ

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Yan-Juan Gu1,2,*, Jinping Cheng2,*, Jiefu Jin3, Shuk Han Cheng2, Wing-Tak Wong11Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, 2Department of Biology and Chemistry, The City University of Hong Kong, 3Department of Chemistry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs have been identified as an efficient drug carrier. Here a controlled drug-delivery system based on SWNTs coated with doxorubicin (DOX through hydrazone bonds was developed, because the hydrazone bond is more sensitive to tumor microenvironments than other covalent linkers. The SWNTs were firstly stabilized with polyethylene glycol (H2N-PEG-NH2. Hydrazinobenzoic acid (HBA was then covalently attached on SWNTs via carbodiimide-activated coupling reaction to form hydrazine-modified SWNTs. The anticancer drug DOX was conjugated to the HBA segments of SWNT using hydrazine as the linker. The resulting hydrazone bonds formed between the DOX molecules and the HBA segments of SWNTs are acid cleavable, thereby providing a strong pH-responsive drug release, which may facilitate effective DOX release near the acidic tumor microenvironment and thus reduce its overall systemic toxicity. The DOX-loaded SWNTs were efficiently taken up by HepG2 tumor cells, and DOX was released intracellularly, as revealed by MTT assay and confocal microscope observations. Compared with SWNT-DOX conjugate formed by supramolecular interaction, the SWNT-HBA-DOX featured high weight loading and prolonged release of DOX, and thus improved its cytotoxicity against cancer cells. This study suggests that while SWNTs have great potential as a drug carrier, the efficient formulation strategy requires further study.Keywords: carbon nanotubes, drug delivery, controlled release, SWNTs

  2. Carbon isotopic evidence for biodegradation of organic contaminants in the shallow vadose zone of the radioactive waste management complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrad, Mark E.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2003-09-04

    Waste material buried in drums in the shallow subsurface at the Radioactive Waste Management Facility (RWMC) of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) contained significant amounts of organic compounds including lubricating oils and chlorinated solvents. CO{sub 2} concentrations in pore gas samples from monitoring wells in the vicinity of the disposal pits are 3 to 5 times higher than the concentrations in nearby background wells. The stable carbon isotope ratios ({delta}{sup 13}C values) of CO{sub 2} from the disposal pits averaged 2.4. less than CO{sub 2} from the background wells, indicating that the elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations around the pits were derived from source materials with {delta}{sup 13}C values in the range of -24{per_thousand} to -29{per_thousand}. These {delta}{sup 13}C values are typical of lubricating oils, but higher than most solvents. The radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) contents of CO{sub 2} across most of the site were significantly elevated above modern concentrations due to reactor blocks buried in a subsurface vault at the site. However, several samples collected from the high-CO{sub 2} zone on the far side of the RWMC from the reactor blocks had very low {sup 14}C contents (less than 0.13 times modern), confirming production from lubricating oils manufactured from fossil hydrocarbons. The magnitude of the CO{sub 2} anomaly observed at the site is consistent with intrinsic biodegradation rates on the order of 0.5 to 3.0 metric tons of carbon per year.

  3. Extraction of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and carbonic anhydrase from stroma-free red blood cell hemolysate for the preparation of the nanobiotechnological complex of polyhemoglobin-superoxide dismutase-catalase-carbonic anhydrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, C; Gynn, M; Chang, T M S

    2015-06-01

    We report a novel method to simultaneously extract superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and carbonic anhydrase (CA) from the same sample of red blood cells (RBCs). This avoids the need to use expensive commercial enzymes, thus enabling a cost-effective process for large-scale production of a nanobiotechnological polyHb-SOD-CAT-CA complex, with enhancement of all three red blood cell functions. An optimal concentration of phosphate buffer for ethanol-chloroform treatment results in good recovery of CAT, SOD, and CA after extraction. Different concentrations of the enzymes can be used to enhance the activity of polyHb-SOD-CAT-CA to 2, 4, or 6 times that of RBC.

  4. Improving the Spatial Prediction of Soil Organic Carbon Stocks in a Complex Tropical Mountain Landscape by Methodological Specifications in Machine Learning Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ließ, Mareike; Schmidt, Johannes; Glaser, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Tropical forests are significant carbon sinks and their soils' carbon storage potential is immense. However, little is known about the soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks of tropical mountain areas whose complex soil-landscape and difficult accessibility pose a challenge to spatial analysis. The choice of methodology for spatial prediction is of high importance to improve the expected poor model results in case of low predictor-response correlations. Four aspects were considered to improve model performance in predicting SOC stocks of the organic layer of a tropical mountain forest landscape: Different spatial predictor settings, predictor selection strategies, various machine learning algorithms and model tuning. Five machine learning algorithms: random forests, artificial neural networks, multivariate adaptive regression splines, boosted regression trees and support vector machines were trained and tuned to predict SOC stocks from predictors derived from a digital elevation model and satellite image. Topographical predictors were calculated with a GIS search radius of 45 to 615 m. Finally, three predictor selection strategies were applied to the total set of 236 predictors. All machine learning algorithms-including the model tuning and predictor selection-were compared via five repetitions of a tenfold cross-validation. The boosted regression tree algorithm resulted in the overall best model. SOC stocks ranged between 0.2 to 17.7 kg m-2, displaying a huge variability with diffuse insolation and curvatures of different scale guiding the spatial pattern. Predictor selection and model tuning improved the models' predictive performance in all five machine learning algorithms. The rather low number of selected predictors favours forward compared to backward selection procedures. Choosing predictors due to their indiviual performance was vanquished by the two procedures which accounted for predictor interaction. PMID:27128736

  5. Lithium insertion into boron containing carbons prepared by co-pyrolysis of coal-tar pitch and borane-pyridine complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machnikowski, J.; Frackowiak, E.; Kierzek, K.; Waszak, D.; Benoit, R.; Beguin, F. [Wroclaw University of Technology, Wroclaw (Poland)

    2004-03-01

    Carbon materials of boron content ranging from 0.6 to 4 wt.% were synthesized by co-pyrolysis of QI-free coal-tar pitch with the borane-pyridine complex. The growing amount of boron introduced into the carbonaceous material is associated with an increase in nitrogen content and a progressive degradation of structural and textural ordering. The structural variations of the boron-doped materials on heat treatment up to 2500{sup o}C were monitored using X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The intrinsic boron acts effectively as a catalyst of graphitization above 2100{sup o}C. The carbonaceous material with boron content of about 1.5 wt% shows the highest degree of structural ordering after thermal treatment. A high amount of oxygen was found in the graphitized boronated carbons, proving that the incorporated boron induces a strong chemisorption activity of the material when exposed to air. For a series of cokes calcined at 1000 {sup o}C, the most striking effect of increasing the boron content is an increase of irreversible capacity X-irr from 0.2 to 0.7. The reversible capacity (X-rev) amounts to about 1, with a slight tendency to decrease with the boron content. Upon increasing the temperature up to 2500{sup o}C, X-irr decreases to about 0.1 in the graphitic carbons, while X-rev reaches a minimum of 0.4-0.5 at 1700{sup o}C and next increases to a value close to 1 at 2500{sup o}C. In the boron doped graphite, X-irr has a slight tendency to increase with the boron content, due to the simultaneous presence of nitrogen in these materials and their strong affinity for oxygen from the atmosphere.

  6. Improving the Spatial Prediction of Soil Organic Carbon Stocks in a Complex Tropical Mountain Landscape by Methodological Specifications in Machine Learning Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ließ, Mareike; Schmidt, Johannes; Glaser, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Tropical forests are significant carbon sinks and their soils' carbon storage potential is immense. However, little is known about the soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks of tropical mountain areas whose complex soil-landscape and difficult accessibility pose a challenge to spatial analysis. The choice of methodology for spatial prediction is of high importance to improve the expected poor model results in case of low predictor-response correlations. Four aspects were considered to improve model performance in predicting SOC stocks of the organic layer of a tropical mountain forest landscape: Different spatial predictor settings, predictor selection strategies, various machine learning algorithms and model tuning. Five machine learning algorithms: random forests, artificial neural networks, multivariate adaptive regression splines, boosted regression trees and support vector machines were trained and tuned to predict SOC stocks from predictors derived from a digital elevation model and satellite image. Topographical predictors were calculated with a GIS search radius of 45 to 615 m. Finally, three predictor selection strategies were applied to the total set of 236 predictors. All machine learning algorithms-including the model tuning and predictor selection-were compared via five repetitions of a tenfold cross-validation. The boosted regression tree algorithm resulted in the overall best model. SOC stocks ranged between 0.2 to 17.7 kg m-2, displaying a huge variability with diffuse insolation and curvatures of different scale guiding the spatial pattern. Predictor selection and model tuning improved the models' predictive performance in all five machine learning algorithms. The rather low number of selected predictors favours forward compared to backward selection procedures. Choosing predictors due to their indiviual performance was vanquished by the two procedures which accounted for predictor interaction.

  7. Improving the Spatial Prediction of Soil Organic Carbon Stocks in a Complex Tropical Mountain Landscape by Methodological Specifications in Machine Learning Approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mareike Ließ

    Full Text Available Tropical forests are significant carbon sinks and their soils' carbon storage potential is immense. However, little is known about the soil organic carbon (SOC stocks of tropical mountain areas whose complex soil-landscape and difficult accessibility pose a challenge to spatial analysis. The choice of methodology for spatial prediction is of high importance to improve the expected poor model results in case of low predictor-response correlations. Four aspects were considered to improve model performance in predicting SOC stocks of the organic layer of a tropical mountain forest landscape: Different spatial predictor settings, predictor selection strategies, various machine learning algorithms and model tuning. Five machine learning algorithms: random forests, artificial neural networks, multivariate adaptive regression splines, boosted regression trees and support vector machines were trained and tuned to predict SOC stocks from predictors derived from a digital elevation model and satellite image. Topographical predictors were calculated with a GIS search radius of 45 to 615 m. Finally, three predictor selection strategies were applied to the total set of 236 predictors. All machine learning algorithms-including the model tuning and predictor selection-were compared via five repetitions of a tenfold cross-validation. The boosted regression tree algorithm resulted in the overall best model. SOC stocks ranged between 0.2 to 17.7 kg m-2, displaying a huge variability with diffuse insolation and curvatures of different scale guiding the spatial pattern. Predictor selection and model tuning improved the models' predictive performance in all five machine learning algorithms. The rather low number of selected predictors favours forward compared to backward selection procedures. Choosing predictors due to their indiviual performance was vanquished by the two procedures which accounted for predictor interaction.

  8. Nickel-phendione complex covalently attached onto carbon nanotube/cross linked glucose dehydrogenase as bioanode for glucose/oxygen compartment-less biofuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korani, Aazam; Salimi, Abdollah; Hadadzadeh, Hasan

    2015-05-01

    Here, [Ni(phendion) (phen)]Cl2 complex, (phendion and phen are 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione and 5-amino-1, 10-phenanthrolin) covalently attached onto carboxyl functionalized multi walls carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE/MWCNTs-COOH) using solid phase interactions and combinatorial approaches.The attached [Ni(phendion) (phen)]Cl2 complex displays a surface controlled electrode process and it acts as an effective redox mediator for electrocatalytic oxidation of dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) at reduced overpotentials. With co-immobilization of glucose dehydrogenase enzyme (GDH) by crosslinking an effective biocatalyst for glucose oxidation designed. The onset potential and current density are -0.1 V versus Ag/AgCl electrode and 0.550 mA cm-2, which indicate the applicability of the proposed system as an efficient bioanode for biofuel cell (BFC) design. A GCE/MWCNTs modified with electrodeposited gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as a platform for immobilization of bilirubin oxidase (BOD) and the prepared GCE/MWCNTs/AuNPs/BOD biocathode exhibits an onset potential of 0.56 V versus Ag/AgCl. The performance of the fabricated bioanode and biocathode in a membraneless enzyme based glucose/O2 biofuel cell is evaluated. The open circuit voltage of the cell and maximum current density are 520 mV and 0.233 mA cm-2, respectively, while maximum power density of 40 μWcm-2 achieves at voltage of 280 mV with stable output power after 24 h continues operation.

  9. C-H Bond Activation of Bisimines by Palladium (Ⅱ) and Platinum (Ⅱ).Synthesis,Characterization of Bis (imino) aryl-palladium (Ⅱ) Pincer Complexes and Their Application in Carbon-Carbon Cross Coupling Reactions%C-H Bond Activation of Bisimines by Palladium (Ⅱ) and Platinum (Ⅱ).Synthesis, Characterization of Bis (imino) aryl-palladium (Ⅱ) Pincer Complexes and Their Application in Carbon-Carbon Cross Coupling Reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Rong; CHEN Ying; LIU Fang; LI Ping; HU Zhao-xia; WANG Hong-xing

    2013-01-01

    Abstract:The reactions of a variety of 4,6-dimethyl-1,3-bis (imino) benzenes 2a-g derived from 4,6-dimethylisophthalaldehyde and anilines or benzylamine with palladium (Ⅱ) acetate in anhydrous acetic acid under nitrogen were investigated.Experiment results demonstrate that cyclopalladations in such condition are applicable not only to the present system under study but also to the 5-substituted bis(imino)benzenes 6,7.The molecular structure of 3 b was further confirmed by X-Ray single-crystal diffraction.3b Crystallizes in orthorhombic,space groupP2 (1) 2 (1) 2 (1) with a =0.734 53 (8),b =1.683 8 (3),c =1.691 7(2) nm,α =β =γ =90°.Treatment of 2b with K2PtCl4 in anhydrous acetic acid affords the corresponding NCN-platinum pincer.Carbon-carbon cross coupling reactions catalyzed with 3b were investigated.These palladium complexes have been proved to be high effective catalysts for Suzuki coupling reaction.

  10. Structure, stability, and nature of bonding in carbon monoxide bound EX3+ complexes (E = group 14 element; X = H, F, Cl, Br, I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghara, Manas; Pan, Sudip; Kumar, Anand; Merino, Gabriel; Chattaraj, Pratim K

    2016-09-15

    A density functional theory study is performed to predict the structures and stability of carbon monoxide (CO) bound EX3+ (E = C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb; X = H, F, Cl, Br, I) complexes. The possibility of bonding through both C- and O-sides of CO is considered. Thermochemical analysis reveals that all the dissociation processes producing CO and EX3+ are endothermic in nature whereas most of the dissociation reactions are endergonic in nature at room temperature. The nature of bonding in EC/O bonds is analyzed via Wiberg bond index, natural population analysis, electron density, and energy decomposition analyses in conjunction with natural orbitals for chemical valence scheme. In comparison to CO stretching frequency ( ν∼CO) in free CO, while a red shift is noted in O-side binding, the C-side binding results in a blue shift in ν∼CO. The relative change in ν∼CO values in CO bound EX3+ complexes on changing either E or X is scrutinized and possible explanation is provided in terms of polarization in the σ- and π-orbitals and the relative strength of C→E or O→E σ-donation and E→C or E→O π-back-donation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27425405

  11. Formation of molecular complexes of salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid, and methyl salicylate in a mixture of supercritical carbon dioxide with a polar cosolvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, V. E.; Antipova, M. L.; Gurina, D. L.; Odintsova, E. G.

    2015-08-01

    The solvate structures formed by salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid, and methyl salicylate in supercritical (SC) carbon dioxide with a polar cosolvent (methanol, 0.03 mole fractions) at a density of 0.7 g/cm3 and a temperature of 318 K were studied by the molecular dynamics method. Salicylic and acetylsalicylic acids were found to form highly stable hydrogen-bonded complexes with methanol via the hydrogen atom of the carboxyl group. For methyl salicylate in which the carboxyl hydrogen is substituted by a methyl radical, the formation of stable hydrogen bonds with methanol was not revealed. The contribution of other functional groups of the solute to the interactions with the cosolvent was much smaller. An analysis of correlations between the obtained data and the literature data on the cosolvent effect on the solubility of the compounds in SC CO2 showed that the dissolving ability of SC CO2 with respect to a polar organic substance in the presence of a cosolvent increased only when stable hydrogen-bonded complexes are formed between this substance and the cosolvent.

  12. Influence of domestic pets on soil concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus under turfgrass in apartment complexes of Central Texas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, M.; Aitkenhead-Peterson, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    High nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) watershed loading rates increases the concentration and loads present in urban streams and rivers, resulting in eutrophication and degradation of surface water quality. Domestic pet animal feed may represent a significant proportion of nitrogen loading in urban watersheds, and because it is deposited directly on the watershed surface may have a large effect on N loads in urban surface waters (Baker et al. 2001). Animal manure has long been used to increase soil N and phosphorus concentrations for the purpose of growing agricultural crops; however, little is known about unintentional urban manuring resulting from a high density of domesticated pets. The purpose of this study is to determine if the presence of domesticated animals in high density urban developments results in increased concentrations of soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC), N, and P and the potential to contribute to loading of urban streams. Composite soil samples from the 0 to 5 cm and 5 to 10 cm soil depth were collected from apartment complexes in Bryan/College Station (BCS) and San Antonio, Texas during August, 2009. Apartment complexes were randomly located around the city and were chosen based on their rules regarding pet ownership. Four apartment complexes that allowed all domestic pets were compared to four that did not allow any domestic pets on the property. A 10:1 water extraction of field moist soil was conducted immediately after sampling. Soil water extracts were analyzed for DOC, total dissolved nitrogen (TDN), nitrate-N, ammonium-N, dissolved organic N, and orthophosphate-P. Results indicated significantly increased concentrations of DOC and N species at both depths in BCS apartments that allowed pets compared to those that did not; however, opposite trends were found in San Antonio. There is a trend for increased concentrations of orthophosphate-P at both locations. Baker, L.A., D. Hope, Y. Xu, et al. 2001. Nitrogen balance for the central Arizona

  13. Development of quercetin-phospholipid complex to improve the bioavailability and protection effects against carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity in SD rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kexia; Zhang, Meiyu; Liu, Ziying; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Gu, Liqiang; Hu, Gaosheng; Chen, Xiaohui; Jia, Jingming

    2016-09-01

    Quercetin (QT) is a natural flavonoid with various biological activities and pharmacological actions. However, the bioavailability of QT is relatively low due to its low solubility which severely limits its use. In this study, we intended to improve the bioavailability of QT by preparing quercetin-phospholipid complex (QT-PC) and investigate the protective effect of QT-PC against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) induced acute liver damage in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The physicochemical properties of QT-PC were characterized in terms of infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (XRPD) and water/n-octanol solubility. FTIR, DSC and XRPD data confirmed the formation of QT-PC. The water solubility of QT was improved significantly in the prepared complex, indicating its increased hydrophilicity. Oral bioavailability of QT and QT-PC was evaluated in SD rats, and the plasma QT was estimated by HPLC-MS. QT-PC exhibited higher Cmax (1.58±0.11 vs. 0.67±0.08μg/mL), increased AUC0-∞ (8.60±1.25 vs. 2.41±0.51mg/Lh) and t1/2z (7.76±1.09 vs. 4.81±0.87h) when compared to free QT. The greater absorption of QT-PC group suggested the improved bioavailability. Moreover, biochemical changes and histopathological observations revealed that QT-PC provided better protection to rat liver than free QT at the same dose. Thus, phospholipid complexation might be one of the suitable approaches to improve the oral bioavailability of QT and obtain better protective effects against CCl4 induced acute liver damage in SD rats than free QT at the same dose level. PMID:27431774

  14. Accumulation and δ 13C Composition of Soil Carbon Across a Chronosequence of Dune Complexes at Mono Lake, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aanderud, Z. T.; Shuldman, M. I.; Richards, J. H.

    2004-12-01

    The amount of C sequestered and its permanence in some deserts could be higher than normally appreciated. Limited soil water availability and slow decomposition rates in desert soils may induce the long-term accumulation of soil organic C and coarse woody litter. We inventoried C in soils along a chronosequence of Sarcobatus vermiculatus shrub islands and interspaces at the Mono Basin Ecosystem Research Site, CA. Such shrub-island/interspace dune systems are widespread in basin habitats across the Great Basin Desert. We hypothesized that organic C stores would increase across the chronosequence (48, 84, ˜300, and 1800-3000 years since exposure by lake recession) and that δ 13C values of soil organic C (SOC) would become enriched over time due to isotopic fractionation associated with C mineralization of leaf and root litter. C stores quantified in 0-50 cm soils included: SOC, soil inorganic C (SIC; i.e. carbonates removed by 12 M HCl fumigation), and C in partially decomposed woody and fine litter. The youngest dune system contains at least 13.6 Mg C ha-1 and the oldest contains at least 37.9 Mg C ha-1. Our data suggest slow turnover rates of SOC (C:N ratios ˜10) and substantial accumulation of organic C (coarse litter, fine litter, and SOC) in shrub islands across the chronosequence (islands at the youngest site = 8.0 g kg-1 and islands at the oldest site = 24.0 g kg-1. Large pools of SOC and C in woody debris are potentially protected in this shrub-dominated desert, especially in shrub islands of "old-growth" dune systems. Most of the C in the soil is SIC (94% in youngest dunes to 83% at the oldest dunes). The decrease in SIC proportion as the dune systems age is correlated with a decrease in pH across the chronosequence (10.6 at the youngest site and 9.7 at the oldest site). As dunes age, total soil C isotopic composition shifts from positive δ 13C values (2.8 to 3.6 ‰ ), indicative inorganic processes, to slightly negative values (-1.2 to -3.7 ‰ ) as a

  15. Planting increases the abundance and structure complexity of soil core functional genes relevant to carbon and nitrogen cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Liang, Yuting; Jiang, Yuji; Yang, Yunfeng; Xue, Kai; Xiong, Jinbo; Zhou, Jizhong; Sun, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Plants have an important impact on soil microbial communities and their functions. However, how plants determine the microbial composition and network interactions is still poorly understood. During a four-year field experiment, we investigated the functional gene composition of three types of soils (Phaeozem, Cambisols and Acrisol) under maize planting and bare fallow regimes located in cold temperate, warm temperate and subtropical regions, respectively. The core genes were identified using high-throughput functional gene microarray (GeoChip 3.0), and functional molecular ecological networks (fMENs) were subsequently developed with the random matrix theory (RMT)-based conceptual framework. Our results demonstrated that planting significantly (P soils and 83.5% of microbial alpha-diversity can be explained by the plant factor. Moreover, planting had significant impacts on the microbial community structure and the network interactions of the microbial communities. The calculated network complexity was higher under maize planting than under bare fallow regimes. The increase of the functional genes led to an increase in both soil respiration and nitrification potential with maize planting, indicating that changes in the soil microbial communities and network interactions influenced ecological functioning.

  16. 碳纳米管-苯胺电荷转移复合物中的胺荧光淬灭效应%Quenching Effects of Amine on Fluorescence of Carbon Nanotube-Aniline Charge Transfer Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Xu-feng; WANG Yu; JIN Wei-jun

    2005-01-01

    Under refluxing, carbon nanotube (CNT) and aniline (An) can form the charge transfer complex (CTC) of CNT-An.The corresponding fluorescence emission peaks lied at 564nm and 606nm, respectively, with the excitation wavelength of 516nm in the acetone solution. The quenching effects of various amines on CNT- An CTC fluorescence were investigated in detail.

  17. Toxicity of cobalt-complexed cyanide to Oncorhynchus mykiss, Daphnia magna, and Ceriodaphnia dubia: Potentiation by ultraviolet radiation and attenuation by dissolved organic carbon and adaptive UV tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, E.E.; Calfee, R.D.; Theodorakos, P.; Brown, Z.A.; Johnson, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    Background. Cobalt cyanide complexes often result when ore is treated with cyanide solutions to extract gold and other metals. These have recently been discovered in low but significant concentrations in effluents from gold leach operations. This study was conducted to determine the potential toxicity of cobalt-cyanide complexes to freshwater organisms and the extent to which ultraviolet radiation (UV) potentiates this toxicity. Tests were also conducted to determine if humic acids or if adaptation to UV influenced sensitivity to the cyanide complexes. Methods. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), Daphnia magna, and Ceriodaphnia dubia were exposed to potassium hexacyanocobaltate in the presence and absence of UV radiation, in the presence and absence of humic acids. Cyano-cobalt exposures were also conducted with C. dubia from cultures adapted to elevated UV. Results. With an LC50 concentration of 0.38 mg/L, cyanocobalt was over a 1000 times more toxic to rainbow trout in the presence of UV at a low, environmentally relevant irradiance level (4 ??W/cm2 as UVB) than exposure to this compound in the absence of UV with an LC50 of 112.9 mg/L. Toxicity was immediately apparent, with mortality occurring within an hour of the onset of exposure at the highest concentration. Fish were unaffected by exposure to UV alone. Weak-acid dissociable cyanide concentrations were observed in irradiated aqueous solutions of cyanocobaltate within hours of UV exposure and persisted in the presence of UV for at least 96 hours, whereas negligible concentrations were observed in the absence of UV. The presence of humic acids significantly diminished cyanocobalt toxicity to D. magna and reduced mortality from UV exposure. Humic acids did not significantly influence survival among C. dubia. C. dubia from UV-adapted populations were less sensitive to metallocyanide compounds than organisms from unadapted populations. Conclusions. The results indicate that metallocyanide complexes may pose a

  18. Complex terrain in the Critical Zone: How topography drives ecohydrological patterns of soil and plant carbon exchange in a semiarid mountainous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron-Gafford, G.; Minor, R. L.; Heard, M. M.; Sutter, L. F.; Yang, J.; Potts, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    The southwestern U.S. is predicted to experience increasing temperatures and longer periods of inter-storm drought. High temperature and water deficit restrict plant productivity and ecosystem functioning, but the influence of future climate is predicted to be highly heterogeneous because of the complex terrain characteristic of much of the Critical Zone (CZ). Within our Critical Zone Observatory (CZO) in the Southwestern US, we monitor ecosystem-scale carbon and water fluxes using eddy covariance. This whole-ecosystem metric is a powerful integrating measure of ecosystem function over time, but details on spatial heterogeneity resulting from topographic features of the landscape are not captured, nor are interactions among below- and aboveground processes. We supplement eddy covariance monitoring with distributed measures of carbon flux from soil and vegetation across different aspects to quantify the causes and consequences of spatial heterogeneity through time. Given that (i) aspect influences how incoming energy drives evaporative water loss and (ii) seasonality drives temporal patterns of soil moisture recharge, we were able to examine the influence of these processes on CO2 efflux by investigating variation across aspect. We found that aspect was a significant source of spatial heterogeneity in soil CO2 efflux, but the influence varied across seasonal periods. Snow on South-facing aspects melted earlier and yielded higher efflux rates in the spring. However, during summer, North- and South-facing aspects had similar amounts of soil moisture, but soil temperatures were warmer on the North-facing aspect, yielding greater rates of CO2 efflux. Interestingly, aspect did not influence photosynthetic rates. Taken together, we found that physical features of the landscape yielded predictable patterns of levels and phenologies of soil moisture and temperature, but these drivers differentially influenced below- and aboveground sources of carbon exchange. Conducting

  19. Preparation and binding study of a complex made of DNA-treated single-walled carbon nanotubes and antibody for specific delivery of a “molecular heater” platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawaguchi M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Minoru Kawaguchi,1,2 Jun Yamazaki,2,3 Jun Ohno,2,4 Tadao Fukushima2,51Department of Dental Engineering, Biomaterials Section, Fukuoka Dental College, Sawara-ku, Fukuoka; 2Japan Science and Technology Agency, Core Research of Evolutional Science and Technology, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo; 3Department of Physiological Science and Molecular Biology, Section of Cellular and Molecular Regulation, 4Department of Morphological Biology, Pathology Section, 5Center for Regenerative Medicine, Fukuoka Dental College, Sawara-ku, Fukuoka, JapanAbstract: Carbon nanotubes have been explored as heat-delivery vehicles for thermal ablation of tumors. To use single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT as a “molecular heater” for hyperthermia therapy in cancer, stable dispersibility and smart-delivery potential will be needed, as well as lack of toxicity. This paper reports the preparation of a model complex comprising DNA-treated SWNT and anti-human IgG antibody and the specific binding ability of this model complex with the targeted protein, ie, human IgG. Treatment with double-stranded DNA enabled stable dispersibility of a complex composed of SWNT and the antibody under physiological conditions. Quartz crystal microbalance results suggest that there was one immobilized IgG molecule to every 21,700 carbon atoms in the complex containing DNA-treated SWNT and the antibody. The DNA-SWNT antibody complex showed good selectivity for binding to the targeted protein. Binding analysis revealed that treatment with DNA did not interfere with binding affinity or capacity between the immobilized antibody and the targeted protein. The results of this study demonstrate that the DNA-SWNT antibody complex is a useful tool for use as a smart “molecular heater” platform applicable to various types of antibodies targeting a specific antigen.Keywords: carbon nanotubes, DNA functionalization, complex, antibody, binding ability

  20. Alkali-metal ion coordination in uranyl(VI) poly-peroxo complexes in solution, inorganic analogues to crown-ethers. Part 2. Complex formation in the tetramethyl ammonium-, Li(+)-, Na(+)- and K(+)-uranyl(VI)-peroxide-carbonate systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanonato, Pier Luigi; Szabó, Zoltán; Vallet, Valerie; Di Bernardo, Plinio; Grenthe, Ingmar

    2015-10-01

    The constitution and equilibrium constants of ternary uranyl(vi) peroxide carbonate complexes [(UO2)p(O2)q(CO3)r](2(p-q-r)) have been determined at 0 °C in 0.50 M MNO3, M = Li, K, and TMA (tetramethyl ammonium), ionic media using potentiometric and spectrophotometric data; (17)O NMR data were used to determine the number of complexes present. The formation of cyclic oligomers, "[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]n", n = 4, 5, 6, with different stoichiometries depending on the ionic medium used, suggests that Li(+), Na(+), K(+) and TMA ions act as templates for the formation of uranyl peroxide rings where the uranyl-units are linked by μ-η(2)-η(2) bridged peroxide-ions. The templating effect is due to the coordination of the M(+)-ions to the uranyl oxygen atoms, where the coordination of Li(+) results in the formation of Li[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]4(7-), Na(+) and K(+) in the formation of Na/K[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]5(9-) complexes, while the large tetramethyl ammonium ion promotes the formation of two oligomers, TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]5(9-) and TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-). The NMR spectra demonstrate that the coordination of Na(+) in the five- and six-membered oligomers is significantly stronger than that of TMA(+); these observations suggest that the templating effect is similar to the one observed in the synthesis of crown-ethers. The NMR experiments also demonstrate that the exchange between TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]5(9-) and TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-) is slow on the (17)O chemical shift time-scale, while the exchange between TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-) and Na[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-) is fast. There was no indication of the presence of large clusters of the type identified by Burns and Nyman (M. Nyman and P. C. Burns, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2012, 41, 7314-7367) and possible reasons for this and the implications for the synthesis of large clusters are briefly discussed.

  1. REE: Alkaline intensive and carbonates complexes at Fuerteventura (Canary Islands). Mineralizaciones de tierras raras: los complejos de rocas plutonicas alcalinas y carbonatitas del complejo basal de Fuerteventura (Islas Canarias)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangas Viuela, J.; Perez Torrado, F.J.

    1993-01-01

    Alkaline intrusive complexes at Fuerteventura have been explored as potential source of REE. Two main complexes constituted by ultramafic to salic rocks and carbonatitas are present in the island: the Puerto de la Pea-Cueva de Lobos (= 60 Ma) in the western centerpoint and the Esquinzo (=30 Ma) in the northern zone. The calciocarbonatites (sovites and alwikites), formed in the last crystallization phases of these complexes, show the highest values of REE (511-7,372 ppm) and these elements mainly are associated with carbonates (synchysite), phosphates (REE apatite), silicates (allanite). (Author) 17 refs.

  2. Novel carbon-supported Fe-N electrocatalysts synthesized through heat treatment of iron tripyridyl triazine complexes for the PEM fuel cell oxygen reduction reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2,4,6-Tris(2-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine (TPTZ) was used as a ligand to prepare iron-TPTZ (Fe-TPTZ) complexes for the development of a new oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst. The prepared Fe-TPTZ complexes were then heat-treated at temperatures ranging from 400 deg. C to 1100 deg. C to obtain carbon-supported Fe-N catalysts (Fe-N/C). These catalysts were characterized in terms of catalyst composition, structure, and morphology by several instrumental methods such as energy dispersive X-ray, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. With respect to the ORR activity, the Fe-N/C catalysts were also evaluated by cyclic voltammetry, as well as rotating disk and ring-disk electrodes. The results showed that among the heat-treated catalysts, that obtained at a heat-treatment temperature of 800 deg. C is the most active ORR catalyst. The overall electron transfer number for the catalyzed ORR was determined to be between 3.5 and 3.8, with 10-30% H2O2 production. The ORR catalytic activity of this catalyst was also tested in a hydrogen-air proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. At a cell voltage of 0.30 V, this fuel cell can give a current density of 0.23 A cm-2 with a maximum MEA power density of 0.070 W cm-2 indicating that this catalyst has potential to be used as a non-noble catalyst in PEM fuel cells

  3. Immobilized organoruthenium(II) complexes onto polyethyleneimine-wrapped carbon nanotubes/in situ formed gold nanoparticles as a novel electrochemical sensing platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azadbakht, Azadeh, E-mail: Azadbakht.a@gmail.com; Abbasi, Amir Reza; Derikvand, Zohreh; Amraei, Shiba

    2015-03-01

    The polyethyleneimine (PEI) wrapped multi-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with a carboxylic acid group (CNTs–COOH) gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-modified gold (Au) electrode has been utilized as a platform to immobilize organoruthenium(II) complexes (ORC). The surface structure and composition of the sensor were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Electrocatalytic reduction of iodate and nitrite on the surface of modified electrode was investigated with cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and hydrodynamic voltammetry methods. The cyclic voltammetric results indicated the ability of AuNPs/PEI/CNT–COOH/ORC modified Au electrode to catalyze the reduction of this compound. AuNPs/PEI/CNTs–COOH nanocomposite combined the advantages of PEI-well dispersed CNTs–COOH and in situ formed AuNPs. - Highlights: • We prepared composite containing polyethyleneimine (PEI), CNTs and AuNPs. • AuNPs were in situ formed on the surface of CNTs–PEI. • When the AuNPs were in situ formed the stability would be improved. • Nanocomposite combined the advantages of PEI–CNTs and in situ formed AuNPs. • Modified nanocomposite Au electrode catalyzes the reduction of iodate and nitrite.

  4. Ni(II)-quercetin complex modified multiwall carbon nanotube ionic liquid paste electrode and its electrocatalytic activity toward the oxidation of glucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Li [Institute of Analytical Science, Northwest University, Xi' an, 710069 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xi' an Shiyou University, Xi' an, 710065 (China); Zhang Jiaoqiang [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an, 710072 (China); Song Junfeng [Institute of Analytical Science, Northwest University, Xi' an, 710069 (China)], E-mail: songjunf@nwu.edu.cn

    2009-07-30

    A modified electrode Ni(II)-Qu-MWCNT-IL-PE has been fabricated by electrodepositing Ni(II)-quercetin [Ni(II)-Qu] complex on the surface of multi-wall carbon nanotube ionic liquid paste electrode (MWCNT-IL-PE) in alkaline solution. The Ni(II)-Qu-MWCNT-IL-PE exhibits the characteristic of improved reversibility and enhanced current responses of the Ni(III)/Ni(II) couple compared with Ni(II)-Qu-MWCNT-PE. It also shows good electrocatalytic activity toward the oxidation of glucose. Kinetic parameters such as the electron transfer coefficient {alpha}, rate constant k{sub s} of the electrode reaction and the catalytic rate constant k{sub cat} of the catalytic reaction are determined. Moreover, the catalytic current presents linear dependence on the concentration of glucose from 5.0 {mu}M to 2.8 mM, with a detection limit of 1.0 {mu}M by amperometry. The modified electrode for glucose determination is of the property of simple preparation, good stability, fast response and high sensitivity.

  5. RING-OPENING POLYMERIZAION OF 2,2-DIMETHYLTRIMETHYLENE CARBONATE INITIATED BY IN SITU GENERATED, TETRAHYDROSALEN STABLIZED YTTRIUM BOROHYDRIDE COMPLEX AND RANDOM COPOLYMERIZATION WITH ε-CAPROLACTONE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Huang; Jian-fang Yu; Han-jian Yu; Wei-lin Sun; Zhi-quan Shen

    2011-01-01

    The poly(2,2-dimethyltrimethylene carbonate) (PDTC) with one hydroxyl and one formate tenninal fimctions was synthesized by in situ generated, tetrahydrosalen stabilized yttrium borohydride complex. The influences of monomer/initiator molar ratio, temperature and reaction time on polymerization of DTC were investigated. Under the condition: [DTC]/[I] = 500, 55℃, toluene: 0.5 mL, DTC: 0.6 g, PDTC with Mn = 15600 and PDI = 2.15 was obtained.Through 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR analyses, the structure of PDTC was characterized and a coordination-insertion mechanism was proposed. In addition, the random copolymerization of DTC and caprolactone (CL) initiated by rare-earth borohydride compound was studied. The microstructure of PDTC-co-PCL includes four diads: DTC-CL, CL-CL, DTC-DTC and CLDTC, which were determined by the specific signals in 1H-NMR spectra. Based on the typical signals of the formate (δ=8.08) and hydroxyl (δ = 3.34) end groups of PDTC-co-PCL, a mechanism involving DTC monomer inserts before CL during the initiation process was presumed. Furthermore, the thermal properties of amorphous copolymer were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results support the random structure of PDTC-co-PCL.

  6. Warm ISM in the Sagittarius A Complex. I. Mid-J CO, atomic carbon, ionized atomic carbon, and ionized nitrogen sub-mm/FIR line observations with the Herschel-HIFI and NANTEN2/SMART telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, P.; Simon, R.; Stutzki, J.; Güsten, R.; Requena-Torres, M. A.; Higgins, R.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We investigate the spatial and spectral distribution of the local standard of rest (LSR) velocity resolved submillimetre emission from the warm (25-90 K) gas in the Sgr A Complex, located in the Galactic centre. Methods: We present large-scale submillimetre heterodyne observations towards the Sgr A Complex covering ~300 arcmin2. These data were obtained in the frame of the Herschel EXtraGALactic guaranteed time key program (HEXGAL) with the Herschel-HIFI satellite and are complemented with submillimetre observations obtained with the NANTEN2/SMART telescope as part of the NANTEN2/SMART Central Nuclear Zone Survey. The observed species are CO(J = 4-3) at 461.0 GHz observed with the NANTEN2/SMART telescope, and [CI] 3P1-3P0 at 492.2 GHz, [CI] 3P2-3P1 at 809.3 GHz, [NII] 3P1-3P0 at 1461.1 GHz, and [CII] 2P3/2-2P1/2 at 1900.5 GHz observed with the Herschel-HIFI satellite. The observations are presented in a 1 km s-1 spectral resolution and a spatial resolution ranging from 46 arcsec to 28 arcsec. The spectral coverage of the three lower frequency lines is ±200 km s-1, while in the two high frequency lines, the upper LSR velocity limit is +94 km s-1 and +145 km s-1 for the [NII] and [CII] lines, respectively. Results: The spatial distribution of the emission in all lines is very widespread. The bulk of the carbon monoxide emission is found towards Galactic latitudes below the Galactic plane, and all the known molecular clouds are identified. Both neutral atomic carbon lines have their brightest emission associated with the +50 km s-1 cloud. Their spatial distribution at this LSR velocity describes a crescent-shape structure, which is probably the result of interaction with the energetic event (one or several supernovae explosions) that gave origin to the non-thermal Sgr A-East source. The [CII] and [NII] emissions have most of their flux associated with the thermal arched-filaments and the H region and bright spots in [CII] emission towards the central nuclear

  7. Neutron structure of human carbonic anhydrase II in complex with methazolamide: mapping the solvent and hydrogen-bonding patterns of an effective clinical drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayank Aggarwal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrases (CAs; EC 4.2.1.1 catalyze the interconversion of CO2 and HCO3−, and their inhibitors have long been used as diuretics and as a therapeutic treatment for many disorders such as glaucoma and epilepsy. Acetazolamide (AZM and methazolamide (MZM, a methyl derivative of AZM are two of the classical CA inhibitory drugs that have been used clinically for decades. The jointly refined X-ray/neutron structure of MZM in complex with human CA isoform II (hCA II has been determined to a resolution of 2.2 Å with an Rcryst of ∼16.0%. Presented in this article, along with only the second neutron structure of a clinical drug-bound hCA, is an in-depth structural comparison and analyses of differences in hydrogen-bonding network, water-molecule orientation and solvent displacement that take place upon the binding of AZM and MZM in the active site of hCA II. Even though MZM is slightly more hydrophobic and displaces more waters than AZM, the overall binding affinity (Ki for both of the drugs against hCA II is similar (∼10 nM. The plausible reasons behind this finding have also been discussed using molecular dynamics and X-ray crystal structures of hCA II–MZM determined at cryotemperature and room temperature. This study not only allows a direct comparison of the hydrogen bonding, protonation states and solvent orientation/displacement of AZM and MZM, but also shows the significant effect that the methyl derivative has on the solvent organization in the hCA II active site.

  8. σ-Aromatic cyclic M3(+) (M = Cu, Ag, Au) clusters and their complexation with dimethyl imidazol-2-ylidene, pyridine, isoxazole, furan, noble gases and carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Sudip; Saha, Ranajit; Mandal, Subhajit; Chattaraj, Pratim K

    2016-04-28

    The σ-aromaticity of M3(+) (M = Cu, Ag, Au) is analyzed and compared with that of Li3(+) and a prototype σ-aromatic system, H3(+). Ligands (L) like dimethyl imidazol-2-ylidene, pyridine, isoxazole and furan are employed to stabilize these monocationic M3(+) clusters. They all bind M3(+) with favorable interaction energy. Dimethyl imidazol-2-ylidene forms the strongest bond with M3(+) followed by pyridine, isoxazole and furan. Electrostatic contribution is considerably more than that of orbital contribution in these M-L bonds. The orbital interaction arises from both L → M σ donation and L ← M back donation. M3(+) clusters also bind noble gas atoms and carbon monoxide effectively. In general, among the studied systems Au3(+) binds a given L most strongly followed by Cu3(+) and Ag3(+). Computation of the nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) and its different extensions like the NICS-rate and NICS in-plane component vs. NICS out-of-plane component shows that the σ-aromaticity in L bound M3(+) increases compared to that of bare clusters. The aromaticity in pyridine, isoxazole and furan bound Au3(+) complexes is quite comparable with that in the recently synthesized Zn3(C5(CH3)5)3(+). The energy gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital also increases upon binding with L. The blue-shift and red-shift in the C-O stretching frequency of M3(CO)3(+) and M3(OC)3(+), respectively, are analyzed through reverse polarization of the σ- and π-orbitals of CO as well as the relative amount of OC → M σ donation and M → CO π back donation. The electron density analysis is also performed to gain further insight into the nature of interaction. PMID:26624276

  9. Fixation of carbon dioxide by macrocyclic lanthanide(III) complexes under neutral conditions producing self-assembled trimeric carbonato-bridged compounds with μ3-η2:η2:η2 bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, Pradip; Dutta, Supriya; Biswas, Papu; Maji, Swarup Kumar; Flörke, Ulrich; Nag, Kamalaksha

    2012-03-28

    A series of mononuclear lanthanide(III) complexes [Ln(LH(2))(H(2)O)(3)Cl](ClO(4))(2) (Ln = La, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Lu) of the tetraiminodiphenolate macrocyclic ligand (LH(2)) in 95 : 5 (v/v) methanol-water solution fix atmospheric carbon dioxide to produce the carbonato-bridged trinuclear complexes [{Ln(LH(2))(H(2)O)Cl}(3)(μ(3)-CO(3))](ClO(4))(4)·nH(2)O. Under similar conditions, the mononuclear Y(III) complex forms the dimeric compound [{Y(LH(2))(H(2)O)Cl}(μ(2)-CO(3)){Y(LH(2))(H(2)O)(2)}](ClO(4))(3)·4H(2)O. These complexes have been characterized by their IR and NMR ((1)H, (13)C) spectra. The X-ray crystal structures have been determined for the trinuclear carbonato-bridged compounds of Nd(III), Gd(III) and Tb(III) and the dinuclear compound of Y(III). In all cases, each of the metal centers are 8-coordinate involving two imine nitrogens and two phenolate oxygens of the macrocyclic ligand (LH(2)) whose two other imines are protonated and intramolecularly hydrogen-bonded with the phenolate oxygens. The oxygen atoms of the carbonate anion in the trinuclear complexes are bonded to the metal ions in tris-bidentate μ(3)-η(2):η(2):η(2) fashion, while they are in bis-bidentate μ(2)-η(2):η(2) mode in the Y(III) complex. The magnetic properties of the Gd(III) complex have been studied over the temperature range 2 to 300 K and the magnetic susceptibility data indicate a very weak antiferromagnetic exchange interaction (J = -0.042 cm(-1)) between the Gd(III) centers (S = 7/2) in the metal triangle through the carbonate bridge. The luminescence spectral behaviors of the complexes of Sm(III), Eu(III), and Tb(III) have been studied. The ligand LH(2) acts as a sensitizer for the metal ions in an acetonitrile-toluene glassy matrix (at 77 K) and luminescence intensities of the complexes decrease in the order Eu(3+) > Sm(3+) > Tb(3+).

  10. Studies on the sorption of thoron - metal complexes on activated carbon - extension of work for determination of chromium in water and effluents at PPB levels by flame AAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of indicator trace elements like Cr, Ni, Cu, Pb, Co, Cd, Mn in hydrogeochemical samples assumes significance from the point of view of application in geochemical exploration of uranium. The direct determination of these trace elements in water and effluents is beyond the scope of Flame AAS and ICP-OES as their concentration in these samples are at ppb and sub ppb levels. Hence an enrichment factor of 200 is very essential to have quantifiable data for meaningful interpretation in uranium exploration studies and elsewhere. Hence systematic pre concentration studies have been carried out based on sorption of Metal-Thoron (2- (2-hydroxy-3,6-disulfo-1-naphthylazo) benzenearsonic acid)) complexes on powdered activated carbon (PAC) in the pH range of 1 to 9. It was found experimentally that >90% sorption obtained for Cr, Cu, Pb, and Ni in the pH range of 3-7; 4-9; 4-9 and 5-9 respectively whereas for Co, Cd and Mn sorption increases gradually from pH-4 onwards and reaches up to 90% at pH-9. An interesting experimental factor was observed wherein at pH∼3.5±0.5 only chromium was sorbed on PAC quantitatively (∼95%) and sorption of Cd, Co, Mn is negligible (<5%). Based on experimental studies the optimal conditions for Cr are fixed with respect to sample volume (2000 ml),Thoron concentration (20 ml of 0.1%), pH (3.5±0.5), amount of AC (0.2 g), contact time (4 h) and desorption (1 M HNO3). The Cr is desorbed from activated carbon simply by treating AC with 1 M nitric acid, thus avoiding tedious and time consuming operation of ashing of AC. An enrichment factor 200 is easily achievable based on preconcentration of Cr present in one litre water (effluent) sample to 5 ml. The % RSD of the method is 10 at the practical determination limit of 5 ppb for Cr with an enrichment factor of 200. Thus based on said studies a simple, rapid and field oriented pre-concentrated method is described for the determination of chromium in ground water and effluent samples

  11. Nanoparticle complex fluids

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis concerns the study of complex nanofluids. The interaction of particles in dispersions under the influence of electric and magnetic fields has been studied. The main focus has been the investigation of the behavior of carbon particle dispersions. A novel type of carbon material, namely carbon cone (CC) material, has been characterized using atomic force microscope, scanning tunnelling microscope and scanning electron microscope. The CC material is a mixed powd...

  12. Preparation and electrochemical properties of core-shell carbon coated Mn–Sn complex metal oxide as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we synthesized a carbon coated Mn–Sn metal oxide composite with core-shell structure (MTO@C) via a simple glucose hydrothermal reaction and subsequent carbonization approach. When the MTO@C composite was applied as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries, it maintained a reversible capacity of 409 mA h g−1 after 200 cycles at a current density of 100 mA g−1. The uniformed and continuous carbon layer formed on the MTO nanoparticles, effectively buffered the volumetric change of the active material and increased electronic conductivity, which thus prolonged the cycling performance of the MTO@C electrode.

  13. Simultaneous determination of hydrazine and phenyl hydrazine using 4′-(4-carboxyphenyl)-2,2′:6′,2″ terpyridine diacetonitrile triphenylphosphine ruthenium(II) tetrafluoroborate complex functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes modified electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, Ida, E-mail: idatiwari_2001@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry (Center of Advanced Study), Faculty of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (India); Gupta, Mandakini; Sinha, Preeti [Department of Chemistry (Center of Advanced Study), Faculty of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (India); Banks, Craig E. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Science and the Environment, Division of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, Chester Street, Manchester M1 5GD (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • A nanocomposite of ruthenium(II) terpyridine, triphenylphosphine based complex and multiwalled carbon nanotubes have been used first time for simultaneous detection of hydrazine and phenyl hydrazine. • The detection limit reported is lower as compared to other reported works. • The paper also focuses towards effect of ligand variation attached to ruthenium(II) terpyridine based complexes complex for the hydrazine and phenyl hydrazine detection. • Nanocomposite does not involve any biological entity hence high stability. - Abstract: A nanocomposite based on the incorporation of the complex 4′-(4-carboxyphenyl)-2,2′:6′,2″ terpyridine triphenylphosphine diacetonitrile ruthenium(II) tetrafluoroborate with multiwalled carbon nanotubes and ionomer supported upon a glassy carbon electrode substrate is reported and characterized with scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. The electrochemical behavior and stability of the composite electrode was investigated via cyclic voltammetry. The modified electrode exhibits an electro-catalytic activity towards the oxidation of both hydrazine and phenyl hydrazine in 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution (PBS, pH 7.4). The oxidation of hydrazine and phenyl hydrazine occurs at 0.81 V and 0.32 V with limit of detection found to be 3.7 × 10{sup −7} M and 1.15 × 10{sup −7} M and having a linear range from 5 × 10{sup −6} M to 6.5 × 10{sup −3} M, and 5 × 10{sup −6} M to 0.2 × 10{sup −3} M, respectively.

  14. 预氧化时间对中空多孔炭纤维介电常数的影响%Effect of oxidation time on the complex permittivity of hollow, porous carbon fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢炜; 陈朝辉; 程海峰; 楚增勇; 匡加才

    2011-01-01

    Polyacrylonitrile-based hollow, porous carbon fibers (PAN-HPCFs) as lightweight radar wave absorbers were prepared by the oxidation of PAN hollow fibers in air followed by carbonization in nitrogen. The effects of oxidation time and carbonization temperature on the microstructure, composition, electrical conductivity and complex permittivity of the resulting PAN-HPCFs were investigated. Results indicated that heat-treatment parameters had no obvious effect on the microstructure of the PAN-HPCFs. The carbon content of the PAN-HPCF decreased, the nitrogen content increased and the electrical conductivity decreased with oxidation time. The real and imaginary parts of the complex permittivity (ε' and ε") decreased with oxidation time. The electrical conductivity and complex permittivity of the PAN-HPCFs can be adjusted by changing the heat-treatment parameters. The values of ε' and ε" of PAN-PHCFs were 17. 20 and 11. 90 respectively and the electrical conductivity was 564.50Ω-1m·-1 when oxidation time was 60 min and carbonization temperature was 800℃.%以中空多孔聚丙烯腈( polyacrylonitrile,PAN)原丝为原料,通过预氧化和炭化工艺制备了中空多孔炭纤维(Hollow-porous carbon fibres,HPCFs).研究了预氧化时间对其微观结构、元素组成、电导率和介电常数的影响.结果表明:预氧化时间对所获HPCFs微观结构的影响不大;HPCFs的碳含量随预氧化时间增加而减少,而氮含量则随预氧化时间增加而增加.随着预氧化时间增加,所得HPCFs电导率和介电常数依次降低.预氧化时间60 min、炭化温度800℃条件下所制HPCFs在2GHz处的介电常数实部和虚部分别为17.20和11.90,对应的电导率为564.50Ω1·m-1.可通过热处理工艺调节HPCFs的电导率和介电常数.

  15. Immobilization of [Cu(bpy){sub 2}]Br{sub 2} complex onto a glassy carbon electrode modified with {alpha}-SiMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}{sup 4-} and single walled carbon nanotubes: Application to nanomolar detection of hydrogen peroxide and bromate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salimi, Abdollah [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Nanotechnology, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: absalimi@uok.ac.ir; Korani, Aazam; Hallaj, Rahman; Khoshnavazi, Roshan [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hadadzadeh, Hasan [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-03-02

    A simple procedure has been used for preparation of modified glassy carbon electrode with carbon nanotubes and copper complex. Copper complex [Cu(bpy){sub 2}]Br{sub 2} was immobilized onto glassy carbon (GC) electrode modified with silicomolybdate, {alpha}-SiMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}{sup 4-} and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs){sub .} Copper complex and silicomolybdate irreversibly and strongly adsorbed onto GC electrode modified with CNTs. Electrostatic interactions between polyoxometalates (POMs) anions and Cu-complex, cations mentioned as an effective method for fabrication of three-dimensional structures. The modified electrode shows three reversible redox couples for polyoxometalate and one redox couple for Cu-complex at wide range of pH values. The electrochemical behavior, stability and electron transfer kinetics of the adsorbed redox couples were investigated using cyclic voltammetry. Due to electrostatic interaction, copper complex immobilized onto GC/CNTs/{alpha}-SiMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}{sup 4-} electrode shows more stable voltammetric response compared to GC/CNTs/Cu-complex modified electrode. In comparison to GC/CNTs/Cu-complex the GC/CNTs/{alpha}-SiMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}{sup 4-} modified electrodes shows excellent electrocatalytic activity toward reduction H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and BrO{sub 3}{sup -} at more reduced overpotential. The catalytic rate constants for catalytic reduction hydrogen peroxide and bromate were 4.5({+-}0.2) x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} and 3.0({+-}0.10) x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. The hydrodynamic amperommetry technique at 0.08 V was used for detection of nanomolar concentration of hydrogen peroxide and bromate. Detection limit, sensitivity and linear concentration range proposed sensor for bromate and hydrogen peroxide detection were 1.1 nM and 6.7 nA nM{sup -1}, 10 nM-20 {mu}M, 1 nM, 5.5 nA nM{sup -1} and 10 nM-18 {mu}M, respectively.

  16. Mechanistic studies of the copolymerization reaction of oxetane and carbon dioxide to provide aliphatic polycarbonates catalyzed by (Salen)CrX complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darensbourg, Donald J; Moncada, Adriana I; Choi, Wonsook; Reibenspies, Joseph H

    2008-05-21

    Chromium salen derivatives in the presence of anionic initiators have been shown to be very effective catalytic systems for the selective coupling of oxetane and carbon dioxide to provide the corresponding polycarbonate with a minimal amount of ether linkages. Optimization of the chromium(III) system was achieved utilizing a salen ligand with tert-butyl groups in the 3,5-positions of the phenolate rings and a cyclohexylene backbone for the diimine along with an azide ion initiator. The mechanism for the coupling reaction of oxetane and carbon dioxide has been studied. Based on binding studies done by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, kinetic data, end group analysis done by (1)H NMR, and infrared spectroscopy, a mechanism of the copolymerization reaction is proposed. The formation of the copolymer is shown to proceed in part by way of the intermediacy of trimethylene carbonate, which was observed as a minor product of the coupling reaction, and by the direct enchainment of oxetane and CO 2. The parity of the determined free energies of activation for these two processes, namely 101.9 kJ x mol (-1) for ring-opening polymerization of trimethylene carbonate and 107.6 kJ x mol (-1) for copolymerization of oxetane and carbon dioxide supports this conclusion.

  17. Small-angle scattering, contrast variation and the study of complex composite materials: A study of the structure of carbon black

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed studies are presented on the structure and aggregation of an experimental high surface area carbon black (HSA) using small-angle neutron scattering and the method of contrast variation. We find that the approximately 27 mn HSA particle form small, linear aggregates of average aggregation number 5 when suspended in cyclohexane. There is considerable density fluctuation in the interior of these particles, with the denser regions being toward the outer part of the spherically-averaged structure. This information would not have been obtained from studies of carbon black without solvent. The results will be applied to similar scattering studies on solvent-swollen bound rubber gels made from HSA-polyisoprene. These result show, however, that the strong internal fluctuations of the carbon black will limit the information that can be obtained on the structure and conformation of the elastomer in the gel. There are additional limitation from compositional heterogeneity of the sample

  18. Efficient biological conversion of carbon monoxide (CO) to carbon dioxide (CO2) and for utilization in bioplastic production by Ralstonia eutropha through the display of an enzyme complex on the cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyeon, Jeong Eun; Kim, Seung Wook; Park, Chulhwan; Han, Sung Ok

    2015-06-25

    An enzyme complex for biological conversion of CO to CO2 was anchored on the cell surface of the CO2-utilizing Ralstonia eutropha and successfully resulted in a 3.3-fold increase in conversion efficiency. These results suggest that this complexed system may be a promising strategy for CO2 utilization as a biological tool for the production of bioplastics. PMID:26017299

  19. Efficient biological conversion of carbon monoxide (CO) to carbon dioxide (CO2) and for utilization in bioplastic production by Ralstonia eutropha through the display of an enzyme complex on the cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyeon, Jeong Eun; Kim, Seung Wook; Park, Chulhwan; Han, Sung Ok

    2015-06-25

    An enzyme complex for biological conversion of CO to CO2 was anchored on the cell surface of the CO2-utilizing Ralstonia eutropha and successfully resulted in a 3.3-fold increase in conversion efficiency. These results suggest that this complexed system may be a promising strategy for CO2 utilization as a biological tool for the production of bioplastics.

  20. Self-assembly of a chiral carbonate- and cytidine-containing dodecanuclear copper(II) complex: a multiarm-supplied globular capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armentano, Donatella; Marino, Nadia; Mastropietro, Teresa F; Martínez-Lillo, José; Cano, Joan; Julve, Miguel; Lloret, Francesc; De Munno, Giovanni

    2008-11-17

    A dodecanuclear copper(II) globular-shaped structure has been obtained with the cytidine nucleoside and the templating carbonate anion. It shows receptor properties through anion-cation and multiple anion-pi interactions toward ClO 4 (-) as well as an overall antiferromagnetic coupling.

  1. Effect the conditions of the acid-thermal modification of clinoptilolite have on the catalytic properties of palladium-copper complexes anchored on it in the reaction of carbon monoxide oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakitskaya, T. L.; Kiose, T. A.; Ennan, A. A.; Golubchik, K. O.; Oleksenko, L. P.; Gerasiova, V. G.

    2016-06-01

    The dependence of the physicochemical and structural-adsorption properties of natural and acid-thermal modified clinoptilolite, and of Pd(II)-Cu(II) catalysts based on them, on the duration of acid-thermal modification is investigated. The samples under study are described via XRD and thermal gravimetric (DTG and DTA) analysis, IR, DR UV-Vis, EPR spectroscopy, and water vapor adsorption. Values of both the specific surface area ( S sp) and pH of aqueous suspensions are determined. The resulting catalysts are tested in the reaction of low-temperature carbon monoxide oxidation with air oxygen. A conclusion is drawn about the nature of surface bimetallic Pd(II)-Cu(II) complexes. The greatest catalytic activity is shown by complexes based on clinoptilolite and modified with 3 M HNO3 for 0.5 and 1 h.

  2. Silica-grafted diethylzinc and a silsesquioxane-based zinc alkyl complex as catalysts for the alternating oxirane-carbon dioxide copolymerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duchateau, Robbert; van Meerendonkt, Wouter J.; Huijser, Saskia; Staal, Bastiaan B. P.; van Schilt, Marcus A.; Gerritsen, Gijsbert; Meetsma, Auke; Koning, Cor E.; Kemmere, Maartje F.; Keurentjes, Jos T. F.

    2007-01-01

    A novel zinc silsesquioxane complex ([(c-C5H9)(7)Si7O11(OSiMePh2)](2)Zn4Me4 (1)) has been used as a model compound for silica-grafted zinc catalysts in the copolymerization of cyclohexene oxide and CO2. Complex 1 exists as a dimer in the solid state and is moderately active in the copolymerization,

  3. Textural analyses of carbon fiber materials by 2D-FFT of complex images obtained by high frequency eddy current imaging (HF-ECI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Martin H.; Heuer, Henning

    2012-04-01

    Carbon fiber based materials are used in many lightweight applications in aeronautical, automotive, machine and civil engineering application. By the increasing automation in the production process of CFRP laminates a manual optical inspection of each resin transfer molding (RTM) layer is not practicable. Due to the limitation to surface inspection, the quality parameters of multilayer 3 dimensional materials cannot be observed by optical systems. The Imaging Eddy- Current (EC) NDT is the only suitable inspection method for non-resin materials in the textile state that allows an inspection of surface and hidden layers in parallel. The HF-ECI method has the capability to measure layer displacements (misaligned angle orientations) and gap sizes in a multilayer carbon fiber structure. EC technique uses the variation of the electrical conductivity of carbon based materials to obtain material properties. Beside the determination of textural parameters like layer orientation and gap sizes between rovings, the detection of foreign polymer particles, fuzzy balls or visualization of undulations can be done by the method. For all of these typical parameters an imaging classification process chain based on a high resolving directional ECimaging device named EddyCus® MPECS and a 2D-FFT with adapted preprocessing algorithms are developed.

  4. Structural Characterisation of Complex Layered Double Hydroxides and TGA-GC-MS Study on Thermal Response and Carbonate Contamination in Nitrate- and Organic-Exchanged Hydrotalcites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conterosito, Eleonora; Palin, Luca; Antonioli, Diego; Viterbo, Davide; Mugnaioli, Enrico; Kolb, Ute; Perioli, Luana; Milanesio, Marco; Gianotti, Valentina

    2015-10-12

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) are versatile materials used for intercalating bioactive molecules in the fields of pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals and cosmetics, with the purpose of protecting them from degradation, enhancing their water solubility to increase bioavailability and improving their pharmacokinetic properties and formulation stability. Moreover, LDHs are used in various technological applications to improve stability and processability. The crystal chemistry of hydrotalcite-like compounds was investigated by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), automated electron diffraction tomography (ADT) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)-GC-MS to shed light on the mechanisms involved in ion exchange and absorption of contaminants, mainly carbonate anions. For the first time, ADT allowed a structural model of LDH_NO3 to be obtained from experiment, shedding light on the conformation of nitrate inside LDH and on the loss of crystallinity due to the layer morphology. The ADT analysis of a hybrid LDH sample (LDH_EUS) clearly revealed an increase in defectivity in this material. XRPD demonstrated that the presence of carbonate can influence the intercalation of organic molecules into LDH, since CO3 -contaminated samples tend to adopt d spacings that are approximate multiples of the d spacing of LDH_CO3 . TGA-GC-MS allowed intercalated and surface- adsorbed organic molecules to be distinguished and quantified, the presence and amount of carbonate to be confirmed, especially at low concentrations (<2 wt %), and the different types and strengths of adsorption to be classified with respect to the temperature of elimination. PMID:26269963

  5. Electrochemical quantification of the thermodynamic equilibrium constant of the tenoxicam-β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex formed on the surface of a poly-β cyclodextrin-modified carbon paste electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A carbon paste electrode (CPE) was modified with a β-CD polymer. • Tenoxicam oxidation on the CPE/poly-β-CD was adsorption controlled. • Influence of pH, scan rate, angular velocity and concentration was evaluated. • Fittings of i-E plots were done considering an irreversible surface reaction. • Electrochemical evaluation of the surface inclusion constant is presented. - Abstract: In this work it is shown that when a carbon paste electrode, CPE, is modified with a β-cyclodextrin polymer, the tenoxicam oxidation becomes an adsorption controlled process due to formation of a surface inclusion complex with the β-CD molecules comprising the surface of the polymer. It was found that such surface inclusion complex can be formed independently of the tenoxicam predominant species, Tenox’, in the aqueous solution namely: H2Tenox+, HTenox or Tenox−, depending on the solution pH. The electrochemical quantification of the thermodynamic constant of the equilibrium Tenox’ + β-CD (polymer) = Tenox’-β-CD (polymer) was estimated as log Kincl. = 4.26 ± 0.01. Furthermore, from the analyses of the experimental voltammograms according with Laviron's equation for an irreversible surface reaction [E. Laviron, J. Electroanal. Chem. 52 (1974) 355-393] it is shown that the surface concentration, ΓR, of tenoxicam increases as its concentration in solution does, reaching a maximum value of 1.51 × 10−10 mol cm−2 at 64 μM

  6. Renewable-surface sol-gel derived carbon ceramic-modified electrode fabricated by a newly synthesized polypyridil and phosphine Ru (II) complex and its application as an amperometric sensor for hydrazine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbaspour, Abdolkarim [Department of Chemistry, College of Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Fars 7145685464 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: abbaspour@chem.susc.ac.ir; Shamsipur, Mojtaba [Department of Chemistry, College of Sciences, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Siroueinejad, Arash [Department of Chemistry, College of Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Fars 7145685464 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kia, Reza; Raithby, Paul R. [Department of Chemistry, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-01

    A chemically modified carbon ceramic composite electrode (CCE) containing Dichloro{l_brace}(8, 9-dimethyl-dipyridio [2,3-a;2',3'-c] phenazine-{kappa}{sup 2}-N,N') bis(triphenylphosphine-{kappa}-P){r_brace}ruthenium (II) complex which synthesized newly was constructed by the sol-gel technique. Electrochemical behavior and stability of modified CCE were investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The electrocatalytic activity of CCE was investigated and showed a good effect for oxidation of hydrazine in phosphate buffer solution (PBS). A linear concentration range of 6 {mu}M to 1.2 mM of hydrazine with an experimental detection limit of 1 {mu}M of hydrazine was obtained. The diffusion coefficient of hydrazine and its catalytic rate constant for electrocatalytic reaction along with the apparent electron transfer rate constant (k{sub s}) and transfer coefficient ({alpha}) were also determined. The modified carbon ceramic electrode doped with this new Ru-complex showed good reproducibility, short response time (t < 2 s), remarkable long-term stability (>3 month) and especially good surface renewability by simple mechanical polishing. The results showed that this electrode could be used as an electrochemical sensor for determination of hydrazine in real water samples used in Fars Power Plant Station, including its heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) water (at different operational condition), cooling system and clean waste water.

  7. Single-walled Carbon Nanotube/DNAzyme Complex-based Elctrochemical Biosensors%基于单壁碳纳米管-DNA酶复合结构的电化学生物传感器

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    封科军; 姚艳玲; 沈国励; 俞汝勤

    2012-01-01

    Taking advantage of the excellent catalytic redox activity andthe electrochemical property of DNAzyme and carbon nanotubes, a novel nano-complex of single-walled carbon nanotubes ( SWNTs)/ DNAzyme was prepared, and the obtained nano-complex was finally immobilized on the surface of glass carbon electrode (GCE) with the assistance of chitosan to fabricate electrochemical biosensing interface. The catalytic property of the SWNTs/DNAzyme complex was explored, and a glucose oxidase biosensor was then prepared based on the fabricated electrochemical biosensing platform. The SWNTs/DNAzyme complex-based biosensing platform can direct response to hydrogen peroxide at low potential of -0. 24 V with high sensitivity (the detection limit is 1×10-6 mol/L) and wide linear range(5×10-6 —1×10-2 mol/L) , and the prepared glucose oxidase biosensor was used to fast and sensitive detection of glucose.%结合DNA酶优异的氧化还原催化特性和碳纳米管的电化学特性,制备了单壁碳纳米管-DNA酶复合材料,并通过壳聚糖将其固定到玻碳电极表面构建了电化学生物传感界面.研究了单壁碳纳米管-DNA酶复合结构的氧化还原反应催化特性,并以此为传感平台构建了葡萄糖氧化酶电化学生物传感器.结果表明,单壁碳纳米管-DNA酶复合材料修饰的电极对过氧化氢的响应具有较宽的线性范围(5×10-6~1×10-2 mol/L)和良好的检测灵敏度(检出限为1×10-6mol/L).采用制备的葡萄糖氧化酶传感器实现了对葡萄糖的快速灵敏检测.

  8. Carbon Carbon Composites: An Overview .

    OpenAIRE

    G. Rohini Devi; K. Rama Rao

    1993-01-01

    Carbon carbon composites are a new class of engineering materials that are ceramic in nature but exhibit brittle to pseudoplastic behaviour. Carbon-carbon is a unique all-carbon composite with carbon fibre embeded in carbon matrix and is known as an inverse composite. Due to their excellent thermo-structural properties, carbon-carbon composites are used in specialised application like re-entry nose-tips, leading edges, rocket nozzles, and aircraft brake discs apart from several indust...

  9. Influence of the nature of the oxidizing agents on the mechanism of the oxidation of carbon monoxide in the presence of an aqua complex of palladium (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of the oxidation of CO in the presence of an aqua complex of Pd(II) by VO+2 and Fe(III) ions and by heteropolyacids (HPA) viz., H3PMo12O40,H4PMo11 VO40, and H4PW11VO40, was studied. A comparison of the data obtained with the results of the oxidation of CO by strong oxidizing agents - Cr2O72- and Ce(IV) ions - made it possible to conclude that rapid occurrence of the reaction requires an optimum potential of the oxidizing agent 0.7 < E < 1 V. This confirms the assumption that the intermediate carbonyl complexes of partially reduced palladium are the most active in this reaction

  10. Trace enrichment with activated carbon and determination of Ni, Hg, Sn and Cd using diethyldithiocarbamate as complexant by atomic emission spectrography (AES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methods has been developed for the preconcentration and determination of trace amounts of Hg, Ni, Sn and Cd in aqueous solutions. The complexes of these elements with sodium diethyl dithiocarbamate were adsorbed on activated charcoal and determined by atomic emission spectrography d-c arc technique. Factors which affect the quantitative recovery of the microamounts of the elements were optimised. Pd was used as an internal standard. The detection limits ranged from 0.01 to 0.05 ppm. (author)

  11. Carbon Carbon Composites: An Overview .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rohini Devi

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon carbon composites are a new class of engineering materials that are ceramic in nature but exhibit brittle to pseudoplastic behaviour. Carbon-carbon is a unique all-carbon composite with carbon fibre embeded in carbon matrix and is known as an inverse composite. Due to their excellent thermo-structural properties, carbon-carbon composites are used in specialised application like re-entry nose-tips, leading edges, rocket nozzles, and aircraft brake discs apart from several industrial and biomedical applications. The multidirectional carbon-carbon product technology is versatile and offers design flexibility. This paper describes the multidirectional preform and carbon-carbon process technology and research and development activities within the country. Carbon-carbon product experience at DRDL has also been discussed. Development of carbon-carbon brake discs process technology using the liquid impregnation process is described. Further the test results on material characterisation, thermal, mechanical and tribological properties are presented.

  12. Carbon Nanomembranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchanin, Andrey; Gölzhäuser, Armin

    2016-08-01

    Carbon nanomembranes (CNMs) are synthetic 2D carbon sheets with tailored physical or chemical properties. These depend on the structure, molecular composition, and surroundings on either side. Due to their molecular thickness, they can be regarded as "interfaces without bulk" separating regions of different gaseous, liquid, or solid components and controlling the materials exchange between them. Here, a universal scheme for the fabrication of 1 nm-thick, mechanically stable, functional CNMs is presented. CNMs can be further modified, for example perforated by ion bombardment or chemically functionalized by the binding of other molecules onto the surfaces. The underlying physical and chemical mechanisms are described, and examples are presented for the engineering of complex surface architectures, e.g., nanopatterns of proteins, fluorescent dyes, or polymer brushes. A simple transfer procedure allows CNMs to be placed on various support structures, which makes them available for diverse applications: supports for electron and X-ray microscopy, nanolithography, nanosieves, Janus nanomembranes, polymer carpets, complex layered structures, functionalization of graphene, novel nanoelectronic and nanomechanical devices. To close, the potential of CNMs in filtration and sensorics is discussed. Based on tests for the separation of gas molecules, it is argued that ballistic membranes may play a prominent role in future efforts of materials separation. PMID:27281234

  13. Scientific Opinion on the efficacy of Lenziaren (iron, aqua carbonate hydroxyl oxo starch sucrose complex) as a feed additive for cats

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP)

    2014-01-01

    Lenziaren is a polynuclear Fe(III) starch–saccharose complex intended to be used in food for adult cats to reduce phosphate absorption in the gastrointestinal tract in order to prevent chronic kidney disease. The recommended minimum and maximum levels are 0.25 and 1.0 g/cat per day, equivalent to 5 000 and 20 000 mg/kg complete feed, respectively. In a previous opinion, the Panel concluded that the minimum effective dose was 1 g/cat per day based on three studies which showed either a signifi...

  14. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of Lenziaren (iron, aqua carbonate hydroxyl oxo starch sucrose complex) as a feed additive for cats

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP)

    2013-01-01

    The additive Lenziaren is a polynuclear Fe(III) starch/saccharose complex intended to be used in food for adult cats to reduce phosphate absorption in the gastrointestinal tract in order to prevent chronic kidney disease. The recommended minimum and maximum levels are 0.25 g and 1.0 g per cat per day, equivalent to 5 000 and 20 000 mg/kg feed, respectively. The FEEDAP Panel considers that Lenziaren is safe for adult cats at the maximum recommended dose. However, the consequences of chronic ex...

  15. Including Complexity, Heterogeneity and Vegetation Response Characteristics into Carbon Balance Assessments at Continental Scale: Stepwise Development of a Simulation Framework with the Bottom-Up Core Model PIXGRO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenhunen, J.; Geyer, R.; Owen, K.; Falge, E.; Reichstein, M.

    2005-12-01

    The cultural landscapes of the European continent are characterized by highly fragmented land cover, distributed along the gradient from extremely sparse, dry Mediterranean shrublands to sub-arctic wetlands and forests. In addition, several mountain systems, in particular the Alps, modify vegetation and land surface exchange characteristics. In the recently begun CARBOEUROPE project, energy, water and CO2 exchanges of selected ecosystem types are monitored via eddy covariance methods. The model PIXGRO is being developed to help relate measurements at flux tower sites to measurements carried out at larger scale and to CO2 exchange estimates obtained with atmospheric inversion techniques. The main question addressed in this modelling effort is how to efficiently include a spectrum of vegetation characteristics into carbon balance assessments at large scale and in such a way that the influence of local response on regional fluxes may be visualized and analyzed. Furthermore, the modelling attempts to demonstrate both strengths and weaknesses in existing ecosystem process information required to understand carbon balances. The model PIXGRO attempts to define continental distribution and controls on net ecosystem CO2 exchange for ca. 12 ecosystem types, including coniferous forest, deciduous forest, grassland, cropland (assumed dominated by grain crops), northern boreal mixed forest, tundra, wetlands, alpine forest, evergreen forest, evergreen shrubland, and Mediterranean oak woodland. The model uses a single layer canopy with two leaf classes (sun and shade) and a three layered rooting zone to estimate GPP, ecosystem respiration and overall ecosystem gas exchange. Maximum LAI is determined during each year from the MODIS LAI-product. In the case of grassland, crops, tundra and wetlands, classical growth routines estimate dynamic changes in the vegetation canopy. Soil/canopy coupling in response to drought reflects a root system hormonal signalling and is calibrated with

  16. Can the financialized atmosphere be effectively regulated? A critical analysis of the proposed Australian carbon pollution reduction scheme as a complex market solution to global warming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windsor, C. [Bond Univ. (Australia); McNicholas, P. [Monash Univ. (Australia)

    2009-07-01

    A large body of scientific evidence indicates that global warming from human induced greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions is producing harmful climate change that will lead to global environmental and economic catastrophe within 10 years. The threat of human induced global warming has been on the international and public policy agenda for several years; for example on 11 December 1998, government representatives of 108 countries signed the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) an international agreement to reduce global warming or the Kyoto Protocol, with the then exception of the Australian and the United States (U.S.) governments. International action on GHG emissions reduction was thwarted by U.S. and Australian goverments. The then Australian government (1996-2007) surreptitiously funding by vested interests such as the coal industry, had no intention to act even though scientific evidence reported that Australia had begun to experience the detrimental effects of global warming. To fulfil an electoral promise, the center left Labor government signed the Kyoto Protocol on 3 December 2007. To deal with the global warming crisis, the Australian government has proposed an emissions trading scheme now officially called the 'Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme' or CPRS. The proposed scheme is a cap and trade market mechanism that purportedly encourages businesses to operate more efficiently, thus reducing GHG emissions through price signalling in a government instigated market. Hence credible, transparent and efficient information underpins such a market in a post-Keynes deregulated world. The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the integrity of using current financial and reporting regulation that will oversee and monitor the veracity of newly commoditized carbon financial products, particularly since the global financial crisis has exposed significant financial regulatory weaknesses. Further we contend that current corporate

  17. Carbon dioxide gasification of carbon black: isotope study of carbonate catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temperature-programmed reaction was used with labeled isotopes (13C and 18O) to study interactions between carbon black and potassium carbonate in pure He and 10% CO2/90% He atmospheres. Catalytic gasification precursor complexes were observed. Carbon and oxygen-bearing carbon surface groups interacted with the carbonate above 500 K to form surface complexes. Between 500 and 950 K, and in the presence of gaseous CO2, the complexes participated in C and O exchange with the gas phase while oxygen atoms within the complexes also exchanged with those on the carbon surface. As the temperature rose, the complexes decomposed, with CO2 the initial product. Decomposition started around 500 K in pure He, and around 950 K in CO2/He. Catalytic gasification began only after decomposition of significant portions of the complexes. Elemental potassium formed, and the active catalyst appears to alternate between being potassium metal and a potassium-oxygen-carbon complex. Potassium carbonate is not part of the catalytic cycle. 20 references, 10 figures

  18. Differential Pulse Anodic Stripping Voltammetry Determination Of Copper (II) At Glassy Carbon Electrode In The Presence Of Bis(Benzylidene)Ethylenediamine As A Novel Complexing Agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the application of synthesized Schiff base bis(benzylidene)ethylenediamine (BBE) to increase the detection sensitivity of copper (II) at 0.01 V vs Ag/ AgCl using glassy carbon electrode. Aliquot of 2.0x10-3 M of BBE in DMF solution containing BR buffer pH 6 was introduced into the voltammetric cell followed by the addition of Cu(II) ions and then further proceeded to differential pulse anodic-stripping scan from -1.4 V to +0.3 V vs Ag/ AgCl. The optimum parameters obtained were; scan rate; 25 mV/ s, accumulation time; 200 sec and accumulation potential; -0.6 V. Under the optimal conditions, the detection limit of 0.4 μgL-1 and a linear response in the range of 1-10 μgL-1 were obtained. The effects of interfering ions such as Cd(II), Cr(III), Fe(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) were also investigated. The practical applicability of this technique was illustrated by the determination of Cu(II) ions at 3 μgL-1 concentration level in tap water with 94.43 % of recovery. (author)

  19. Method for the preparation of carbon fiber from polyolefin fiber precursor, and carbon fibers made thereby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naskar, Amit Kumar; Hunt, Marcus Andrew; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-08-04

    Methods for the preparation of carbon fiber from polyolefin fiber precursor, wherein the polyolefin fiber precursor is partially sulfonated and then carbonized to produce carbon fiber. Methods for producing hollow carbon fibers, wherein the hollow core is circular- or complex-shaped, are also described. Methods for producing carbon fibers possessing a circular- or complex-shaped outer surface, which may be solid or hollow, are also described.

  20. Anodic Oxidation and Amperometric Sensing of Hydrazine at a Glassy Carbon Electrode Modified with Cobalt (II Phthalocyanine–cobalt (II Tetraphenylporphyrin (CoPc- (CoTPP4 Supramolecular Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth I. Ozoemena

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the electrocatalytic behaviour of a glassy carbon electrode (GCEmodified with cobalt(IIphthalocyanine (CoPc complex peripherally tetrasubstituted withcobalt(IItetraphenylporphyrin (CoTPP complexes via ether linkages (i.e., CoPc-(CoTPP4. Thefeatures of the immobilised pentamer were interrogated with cyclic voltammetry andelectrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS using [Fe(CN6]3-/4- as redox probe revealedenhanced electron transfer properties with kapp ≈ 18 x 10-6 cms-1 compared to that of the bareGCE (4.7 x 10-6 cms-1. The viability of this supramolecular complex as a redox mediator for theanodic oxidation and sensitive amperometric determination of hydrazine in alkaline conditions isdescribed. The electrocatalytic oxidation of hydrazine by GCE-CoPc-(CoTPP4 was characterisedwith satisfactory catalytic current response with low non-Faradaic current (ca. 30 times lowerthan the bare GCE and at much lower oxidation potential (ca. 300 mV lower than the bareGCE. A mechanism for the studied electrocatalytic reaction was proposed based on thespectrophotometric evidence that revealed the major involvement of the Co(III/Co(II redox coupleof the central CoPc species rather than the CoTPP component of the pentamer. Rate constant forthe anodic oxidation of hydrazine was estimated from chronoamperometry as ~ 3x103 M-1s-1. Theproposed amperometric sensor displayed excellent charateristics towards the determination ofhydrazine in 0.2 M NaOH ; such as low overpotentials ( 100 mV vs Ag|AgCl, very fastamperometric response time (1 s, linear concentration range of up to 230 μM, with micromolardetection limit, high sensitivity and stability.

  1. Warm ISM in the Sgr A Complex. I: Mid-J CO, atomic carbon, ionized atomic carbon,and ionized nitrogen sub-mm/FIR line observations with the Herschel-HIFI and NANTEN2/SMART telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    García, P; Stutzki, J; Güsten, R; Requena-Torres, M A; Higgins, R

    2016-01-01

    We present large-scale submm observations towards the Sgr A Complex covering ~300 arcmin2. These data were obtained in the frame of the HEXGAL Program with the Herschel-HIFI satellite and are complemented with submm observations obtained with the NANTEN2/SMART telescope as part of the NANTEN2/SMART Central Nuclear Zone Survey. The observed species are CO(4-3) observed with the NANTEN2/SMART telescope, and [CI](1-0), [CI](2-1), [NII](1-0), and [CII](3/2-1/2) observed with the Herschel-HIFI satellite. The observations are presented in a 1 km/s spectral resolution and a spatial resolution ranging from 46" to 28". The spectral coverage of the three lower frequency lines is +-200 km/s, while in the two high frequency lines, the upper LSR velocity limit is +94 km/s and +145 km/s for the [NII] and [CII] lines, respectively. The spatial distribution of the emission in all lines is very widespread. The bulk of the CO emission is found towards Galactic latitudes below the Galactic plane, and all the known molecular clo...

  2. Complex Beauty

    OpenAIRE

    Franceschet, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Complex systems and their underlying convoluted networks are ubiquitous, all we need is an eye for them. They pose problems of organized complexity which cannot be approached with a reductionist method. Complexity science and its emergent sister network science both come to grips with the inherent complexity of complex systems with an holistic strategy. The relevance of complexity, however, transcends the sciences. Complex systems and networks are the focal point of a philosophical, cultural ...

  3. Scientific Opinion on the efficacy of Lenziaren (iron, aqua carbonate hydroxyl oxo starch sucrose complex as a feed additive for cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Lenziaren is a polynuclear Fe(III starch–saccharose complex intended to be used in food for adult cats to reduce phosphate absorption in the gastrointestinal tract in order to prevent chronic kidney disease. The recommended minimum and maximum levels are 0.25 and 1.0 g/cat per day, equivalent to 5 000 and 20 000 mg/kg complete feed, respectively. In a previous opinion, the Panel concluded that the minimum effective dose was 1 g/cat per day based on three studies which showed either a significant reduction in serum phosphorus or a reduction in urinary phosphate. Two of these studies showed an effect at 0.25 g/cat per day, while the third one only showed an effect at a level of 1 g/cat per day. The results of a new study submitted in this application showed that overall urine inorganic phosphorus concentrations significantly decreased in cats receiving Lenziaren at 0.25 g/day compared with the control group. Therefore, considering the two previous studies, which showed an effect at 0.25 g/cat per day, and the results of the new study, the FEEDAP Panel considers that Lenziaren has the potential to be efficacious in binding intestinal phosphorus at the minimum recommended dose of 0.25 g/cat per day (equivalent to 5 g/kg complete feed. On balance, the Panel considers that the sex difference seen in the new study is an anomaly, possibly owing, as the applicant suggests, to selective feed intake. However, the Panel notes that sex differences were not explored in the remaining efficacy studies. The Panel still has the reservations expressed in the previous opinion regarding the value of the long-term use of the additive in healthy cats.

  4. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of Lenziaren (iron, aqua carbonate hydroxyl oxo starch sucrose complex as a feed additive for cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The additive Lenziaren is a polynuclear Fe(III starch/saccharose complex intended to be used in food for adult cats to reduce phosphate absorption in the gastrointestinal tract in order to prevent chronic kidney disease. The recommended minimum and maximum levels are 0.25 g and 1.0 g per cat per day, equivalent to 5 000 and 20 000 mg/kg feed, respectively. The FEEDAP Panel considers that Lenziaren is safe for adult cats at the maximum recommended dose. However, the consequences of chronic exposure have not been investigated. The additive is not genotoxic. No adverse effects were seen in a repeat-dose toxicity study in mice. Lenziaren had no adverse effects on reproduction and development at dose levels that were not toxic to the mother. A no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL of 500 mg/kg body weight (bw per day was identified for Lenziaren on the basis of maternal toxicity (diarrhoea and reduced body weight gain, which was seen in rabbits at an oral dose of 1 000 mg/kg bw per day or greater. Similar effects were seen in rats, dogs and monkeys at higher doses in repeat-dose toxicity studies. No NOAELs were identified in these studies. Lenziaren is not regarded as an irritant to skin or eyes or as a skin sensitiser. Although some inhalation exposure is possible, it is not expected to be harmful to those exposed as a result of handling the additive. Based on the results of three in vivo efficacy studies, the FEEDAP Panel concludes that Lenziaren has the potential to be efficacious in cats at the highest recommended dose of 1 g/cat per day (equivalent to 20 000 mg/kg feed. However, the FEEDAP Panel has some reservations regarding the value of its long-term use in healthy cats. The Panel concludes that there is a need for a post-market monitoring plan.

  5. Eustatic and far-field tectonic control on the development of an intra-platform carbonate-shoal complex: upper tongue of the Tanglewood Member, Upper Ordovician Lexington Limestone, central Kentucky, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koirala, Dibya Raj; Ettensohn, Frank R.; Clepper, Marta L.

    2016-11-01

    The Lexington or Trenton Limestone is an Upper Ordovician (Chatfieldian-Edenian; upper Sandbian-lower Katian), temperate-water unit, averaging about 60-m thick, that was deposited in relatively shallow waters across the Lexington Platform in east-central United States during the Taconian Orogeny. Lexington/Trenton shallow-water deposition ended across most of the platform in late Chatfieldian time and from that point deepened upward into the more shale-rich Clays Ferry, Point Pleasant and Kope formations due to apparent sea-level rise. In central Kentucky, however, deposition of the Lexington Limestone continued into early Edenian time and includes up to 50 m of additional coarse calcarenites and calcirudites at the top, which form the Tanglewood buildup and reflect locally regressive conditions, apparently related to local structural uplift. Consequently, in central Kentucky, the Lexington is more than 100-m thick, and Lexington deposition on the buildup continued into early Edenian time as an intra-platform shoal complex that tongues out into deeper-water units in all directions. In an attempt to understand how this shoal complex developed, we examined the last major body of coarse skeletal sands in the central Kentucky Lexington Limestone, the upper tongue of the Tanglewood Member, a 12-m-thick succession of fossiliferous calcarenite and calcirudite that occurs across an area of 5200 km2 near the center of the Lexington Platform. Although relatively homogeneous, the upper Tanglewood is divisible into five, small-scale, fining-upward, sequence-like cycles, which contain prominent, widespread deformed horizons. Facies analysis indicates that four lithofacies, which reflect distinct depositional environments, comprise the sequences across the shoal complex. Lithofacies were correlated across the shoal complex by integrating cyclicity and widespread deformed horizons in order to delineate the locations of major depositional environments. Facies analysis shows that

  6. Direct Electrochemistry of Glucose Oxidase on A Nano Complex Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode%葡萄糖氧化酶在修饰玻碳电极上的直接电化学

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    耿方勇; 李迪; 张钰帅; 杨晓璐; 肖宝林; 洪军

    2016-01-01

    Direct electrochemistry of glucose oxidase was realized when it was immobilized on a nano-complex modified glassy carbon electrode, and the nano-complex was composed of graphene and multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The outermost layer covered with chitosan. Using cyclic voltammetry ( CV ) to measure electrochemical and electro-catalyzed reaction of glucose oxidase that modified electrode, the electron transfer rate constant (ks) was evaluated to be 0. 87 s-1, and electroactive surface density was 1. 54í10-10 mol/cm-2. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Kappm ) was 1. 32í103 μmol/L, linear detection range was 40 ~1000 μmol/L, and the modified electrode had better stability, and modified electrode had good anti-interference ability when detected the substrate. Therefore, the modified electrode can be used to detect glucose, as the third generation biosensors.%将葡萄糖氧化酶( Glucose oxidase, GOD)固定在由多壁碳纳米管( MWCNTS)和石墨烯( Graphene)构成的纳米复合材料修饰的玻碳电极上,最外层用壳聚糖( Chitosan)进行覆盖,利用循环伏安法( Cyclic Voltammetry, CV)来测量葡萄糖氧化酶在修饰电极上的电化学和电催化反应,测得电子传递速率常数ks 为0.87 s-1,电活性物质表面密度Г为1.54×10-10 mol/cm-2,动力学表观米氏常数Km 为1.32×103μmol/L,线性检测范围为:40~1000μmol/L,修饰电极有较好的稳定性,而且修饰电极在检测底物时有较好的抗干扰能力,因此,该体系修饰的电极有希望构建第三代葡萄糖生物传感器。

  7. Carbon isotopes in mollusk shell carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnaughey, Ted A.; Gillikin, David Paul

    2008-10-01

    Mollusk shells contain many isotopic clues about calcification physiology and environmental conditions at the time of shell formation. In this review, we use both published and unpublished data to discuss carbon isotopes in both bivalve and gastropod shell carbonates. Land snails construct their shells mainly from respired CO2, and shell δ13C reflects the local mix of C3 and C4 plants consumed. Shell δ13C is typically >10‰ heavier than diet, probably because respiratory gas exchange discards CO2, and retains the isotopically heavier HCO3 -. Respired CO2 contributes less to the shells of aquatic mollusks, because CO2/O2 ratios are usually higher in water than in air, leading to more replacement of respired CO2 by environmental CO2. Fluid exchange with the environment also brings additional dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) into the calcification site. Shell δ13C is typically a few ‰ lower than ambient DIC, and often decreases with age. Shell δ13C retains clues about processes such as ecosystem metabolism and estuarine mixing. Ca2+ ATPase-based models of calcification physiology developed for corals and algae likely apply to mollusks, too, but lower pH and carbonic anhydrase at the calcification site probably suppress kinetic isotope effects. Carbon isotopes in biogenic carbonates are clearly complex, but cautious interpretation can provide a wealth of information, especially after vital effects are better understood.

  8. Bucolic Complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Brešar, Bostjan; Chepoi, Victor; Gologranc, Tanja; Osajda, Damian

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we introduce and investigate bucolic complexes, a common generalization of systolic complexes and of CAT(0) cubical complexes. This class of complexes is closed under Cartesian products and amalgamations over some convex subcomplexes. We study various approaches to bucolic complexes: from graph-theoretic and topological viewpoints, as well as from the point of view of geometric group theory. Bucolic complexes can be defined as locally-finite simply connected prism complexes satisfying some local combinatorial conditions. We show that bucolic complexes are contractible, and satisfy some nonpositive-curvature-like properties. In particular, we prove a version of the Cartan-Hadamard theorem, the fixed point theorem for finite group actions, and establish some results on groups acting geometrically on such complexes. We also characterize the 1-skeletons (which we call bucolic graphs) and the 2-skeletons of bucolic complexes. In particular, we prove that bucolic graphs are precisely retracts of Ca...

  9. Complex Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Talha Khan; Rose Amy Franco

    2014-01-01

    Complex sleep apnea is the term used to describe a form of sleep disordered breathing in which repeated central apneas (>5/hour) persist or emerge when obstructive events are extinguished with positive airway pressure (PAP) and for which there is not a clear cause for the central apneas such as narcotics or systolic heart failure. The driving forces in the pathophysiology are felt to be ventilator instability associated oscillation in PaCO2 arterial partial pressure of Carbon Dioxide, continu...

  10. Organic Mineral Complex Component and Distribution Character of Organic Carbon for High Yield Soil of the Corn Belt of the Songliao Plain%松辽平原玉米带高产土壤有机无机复合体组成及有机碳分布的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周雅娟; 赵兰坡; 张志丹; 姜亦梅

    2012-01-01

    The paper studied the organic mineral complex component and distribution character of organic carbon of black soil under various cultivation pattern by means of ultrasonic dispersion and particle assortment method, in order to discuss the different fertilizer and farming methods of soil organic inorganic compound composition and distribution of organic carbon impact. The high yield soil of Songliao Plain was used as the object of study. The results showed that, organic mineral complex in black soil the finesand size complex was protagonist, about 40%-70% of the total quality. The clay size complex and the silty size complex were marginalia. The result after comparing with the control group soil showed that, the storage of clay size complex is lower than control group soil, the mean difference was 5.05% and 7.60%. The comparing with particle size distribution showed that the silty size complex decreased about 0.1%-3.7%, the finesand size complex and the clay size complex creased about 0.1%-5%. The organic carbon primarily consisted in the small granule diameter of organic mineral complex. There was a accumulation tendency for organic carbon to the small granule diameter of organic mineral complex (A1>A2>A3). The result after comparing with the control group soil showed that, the content of organic carbon in organic mineral complexes was higher than control group soil (No.l>No.6, No.l0>No.l4), and the reserves of organic carbon of clay size complex was lower than control group soil (No.lNo.6, No.l0>No.l4).%为了探讨不同施肥和耕作方式对土壤有机无机复合体组成及有机碳分布的影响,采用超声波分散、颗粒大小分组法对松辽平原玉米高产土壤进行研究.结果表明,土壤中有机无机复合体以细砂复合体为主,约占40%~70%,粘粒、粉粒复合体次之;与对照相比,高产土壤粘粒复合体含量较小,平均差值为5.05%和7.60%;结合无机颗粒对比,粉粒、细砂复

  11. Aqueous complexes of lanthanides(III) and actinides(III) with the carbonate and sulphate ions. Thermodynamic study by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and electro-spray-ionisation mass spectrometry; Complexes aqueux de lanthanides (3) et actinides (3) avec les ions carbonate et sulfate. Etude thermodynamique par spectrofluorimetrie laser resolue en temps et spectrometrie de masse a ionisation electrospray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vercouter, Th

    2005-03-15

    The prediction of the environmental impact of a possible geological disposal of radioactive wastes is supported by the thermodynamic modelling of the radionuclides behaviour in the groundwater. In this framework, the analogy between lanthanides and actinides(III) is confirmed by a critical analysis of the literature and the comparison with experimental results obtained here. The limiting complex, Eu(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 3-}, is identified by solubility measurements in Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solutions. Then the formation constants of the complexes Eu(CO{sub 3}){sub i}{sup 3-2i} (i=1-3) and Eu(SO{sub 4}){sub i}{sup 3-2i} (i=1-2) are measured by TRLFS. The formation of aqueous LaSO{sub 4}{sup +} is studied by ESI-MS and is in good agreement with the expected speciation. The enthalpy and entropy of the reaction Cm(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup -} + CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} {r_reversible} Cm(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 3-} are deduced from TRLFS measurements of the equilibrium constant between 10 and 70 C. The ionic strength effect is calculated using the SIT formula. (author)

  12. Carbon isotope anomalies in carbonates of the Karelian series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iudovich, Ia. E.; Makarikhin, V. V.; Medvedev, P. V.; Sukhanov, N. V.

    1990-07-01

    Results are presented on carbon isotope distributions in carbonates of the Karelian complex. A highly anomalous isotopic composition was found in carbonate rocks aged from 2.6 to 1.9 b.y. In the stromatolitic carbonates of the Onega water table, delta-(C-13) reaches a value of +18 percent, while the shungite layer of the Zaonega horizon is characterized by a wide dispersion (from +7.9 to -11.8 percent). These data are in good agreement with the known geochemical boundary (about 2.2 b.y. ago) in the history of the earth.

  13. Dispersions of Carbon nanotubes in Polymer Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Kristopher Eric (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Dispersions of carbon nanotubes exhibiting long term stability are based on a polymer matrix having moieties therein which are capable of a donor-acceptor complexation with carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes are introduced into the polymer matrix and separated therein by standard means. Nanocomposites produced from these dispersions are useful in the fabrication of structures, e.g., lightweight aerospace structures.

  14. 城市复合生态系统碳氧平衡分析——以沿海城市厦门为例%Analysis of the carbon and oxygen balance of a complex urban ecosystem:A case study in the coastal city of Xiamen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马巾英; 尹锴; 吝涛

    2011-01-01

    通过综合城市复合生态系统内社会经济活动的主要排碳、耗氧行为,以及城市区域内湿地、淡水、海洋、森林和农田5种遗留自然生态系统的固碳释氧功能,构建了城市碳氧平衡分析模型(UCOB),并估算了城市社会经济活动和城市中自然生态系统的碳氧收支,对城市生态系统平衡状况进行定量化指征.最后,以中国东南沿海城市厦门为例进行研究.结果显示:厦门市2007年碳平衡系数为9.03,即二氧化碳释放量是其所能吸收能力的9.03倍;氧平衡系数为5.78,即社会经济活动消耗的氧气是当地自然生态系统所能提供氧气量的5.78倍.如果不考虑%Through combining the major oxygen consumption and carbon emission of socioeconomic activities and the carbon sequestration and oxygen emission of five remnant natural ecosystems in a complex urban ecosystem,we built an urban carbon and oxygen balance model(UCOB) to estimate the input and output of carbon and oxygen and to quantitatively indicate the ecological balance of an urban ecosystem.The results from a case study of Xiamen,a coastal city in southeastern China,showed:In 2007,the carbon balance index and oxygen balance index of the city were 9.03 and 5.78 respectively,which means the total amount of oxygen consumption and carbon emission from urban socioeconomic activities were 9.03 and 5.78 times greater than the amount of natural oxygen emission and carbon sequestration in Xiamen,respectively.Without considering the indirect oxygen consumption and carbon emission from electricity consumption,the balance indices of carbon and oxygen of Xiamen City were 5.26 and 1.47 respectively.Carbon and oxygen balance indices showed a significant variation among the six administrative districts of Xiamen,because of differences in their socioeconomic functions and distribution of natural ecosystems.As an old industrial zone,Huli district suffered the highest imbalance of carbon and

  15. An unprecedented up-field shift in the 13C NMR spectrum of the carboxyl carbons of the lantern-type dinuclear complex TBA[Ru2(O2CCH3)4Cl2] (TBA+ = tetra(n-butyl)ammonium cation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraoka, Yuya; Ikeue, Takahisa; Sakiyama, Hiroshi; Guégan, Frédéric; Luneau, Dominique; Gillon, Béatrice; Hiromitsu, Ichiro; Yoshioka, Daisuke; Mikuriya, Masahiro; Kataoka, Yusuke; Handa, Makoto

    2015-08-14

    A large up-field shift (-763 ppm) has been observed for the carboxyl carbons of the dichlorido complex TBA[Ru(2)(O(2)CCH(3))(4)Cl(2)] (TBA(+) = tetra(n-butyl)ammonium cation) in the (13)C NMR spectrum (CD(2)Cl(2) at 25 °C). The DFT calculations showed spin delocalization from the paramagnetic Ru(2)(5+) core to the ligands, in agreement with the large up-field shift.

  16. Complexity Plots

    KAUST Repository

    Thiyagalingam, Jeyarajan

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present a novel visualization technique for assisting the observation and analysis of algorithmic complexity. In comparison with conventional line graphs, this new technique is not sensitive to the units of measurement, allowing multivariate data series of different physical qualities (e.g., time, space and energy) to be juxtaposed together conveniently and consistently. It supports multivariate visualization as well as uncertainty visualization. It enables users to focus on algorithm categorization by complexity classes, while reducing visual impact caused by constants and algorithmic components that are insignificant to complexity analysis. It provides an effective means for observing the algorithmic complexity of programs with a mixture of algorithms and black-box software through visualization. Through two case studies, we demonstrate the effectiveness of complexity plots in complexity analysis in research, education and application. © 2013 The Author(s) Computer Graphics Forum © 2013 The Eurographics Association and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Engaging complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gys M. Loubser

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I discuss studies in complexity and its epistemological implications for systematic and practical theology. I argue that engagement with complexity does not necessarily assurea non-reductionist approach. However, if complexity is engaged transversally, it becomes possible to transcend reductionist approaches. Moreover, systematic and practical the ologians can draw on complexity in developing new ways of understanding and, therefore, new ways of describing the focus, epistemic scope and heuristic structures of systematic and practical theology. Firstly, Edgar Morin draws a distinction between restricted and general complexity based on the epistemology drawn upon in studies in complexity. Moving away from foundationalist approaches to epistemology, Morin argues for a paradigm of systems. Secondly,I discuss Kees van Kooten Niekerk�s distinction between epistemology, methodology andontology in studies in complexity and offer an example of a theological argument that drawson complexity. Thirdly, I argue for the importance of transversality in engaging complexity by drawing on the work of Wentzel van Huyssteen and Paul Cilliers. In conclusion, I argue that theologians have to be conscious of the epistemic foundations of each study in complexity, and these studies illuminate the heart of Reformed theology.Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: Therefore, this article has both intradisciplinary and interdisciplinary implications. When theologians engage studies incomplexity, the epistemological roots of these studies need to be considered seeing thatresearchers in complexity draw on different epistemologies. Drawing on transversality wouldenhance such considerations. Furthermore, Edgar Morin�s and Paul Cilliers� approach tocomplexity will inform practical and theoretical considerations in church polity and unity.

  18. Two-point versus multiple-point geostatistics: the ability of geostatistical methods to capture complex geobodies and their facies associations—an application to a channelized carbonate reservoir, southwest Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facies models try to explain facies architectures which have a primary control on the subsurface heterogeneities and the fluid flow characteristics of a given reservoir. In the process of facies modeling, geostatistical methods are implemented to integrate different sources of data into a consistent model. The facies models should describe facies interactions; the shape and geometry of the geobodies as they occur in reality. Two distinct categories of geostatistical techniques are two-point and multiple-point (geo) statistics (MPS). In this study, both of the aforementioned categories were applied to generate facies models. A sequential indicator simulation (SIS) and a truncated Gaussian simulation (TGS) represented two-point geostatistical methods, and a single normal equation simulation (SNESIM) selected as an MPS simulation representative. The dataset from an extremely channelized carbonate reservoir located in southwest Iran was applied to these algorithms to analyze their performance in reproducing complex curvilinear geobodies. The SNESIM algorithm needs consistent training images (TI) in which all possible facies architectures that are present in the area are included. The TI model was founded on the data acquired from modern occurrences. These analogies delivered vital information about the possible channel geometries and facies classes that are typically present in those similar environments. The MPS results were conditioned to both soft and hard data. Soft facies probabilities were acquired from a neural network workflow. In this workflow, seismic-derived attributes were implemented as the input data. Furthermore, MPS realizations were conditioned to hard data to guarantee the exact positioning and continuity of the channel bodies. A geobody extraction workflow was implemented to extract the most certain parts of the channel bodies from the seismic data. These extracted parts of the channel bodies were applied to the simulation workflow as hard data

  19. Simplifying complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemput, van de I.A.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis I use mathematical models to explore the properties of complex systems ranging from microbial nitrogen pathways and coral reefs to the human state of mind. All are examples of complex systems, defined as systems composed of a number of interconnected parts, where the systemic behavior

  20. Carney Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Carney complex are Cushing’s syndrome and multiple thyroid nodules (tumors). Cushing’s syndrome features a combination of weight gain, ... with Carney complex include adrenocortical carcinoma , pituitary gland tumors , thyroid , colorectal , liver and pancreatic cancers . Ovarian cancer in ...

  1. Managing Complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maylath, Bruce; Vandepitte, Sonia; Minacori, Patricia;

    2013-01-01

    and into French. The complexity of the undertaking proved to be a central element in the students' learning, as the collaboration closely resembles the complexity of international documentation workplaces of language service providers. © Association of Teachers of Technical Writing.......This article discusses the largest and most complex international learning-by-doing project to date- a project involving translation from Danish and Dutch into English and editing into American English alongside a project involving writing, usability testing, and translation from English into Dutch...

  2. Complex variables

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, Stephen D

    1999-01-01

    The most important topics in the theory and application of complex variables receive a thorough, coherent treatment in this introductory text. Intended for undergraduates or graduate students in science, mathematics, and engineering, this volume features hundreds of solved examples, exercises, and applications designed to foster a complete understanding of complex variables as well as an appreciation of their mathematical beauty and elegance. Prerequisites are minimal; a three-semester course in calculus will suffice to prepare students for discussions of these topics: the complex plane, basic

  3. Complex Covariance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frieder Kleefeld

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available According to some generalized correspondence principle the classical limit of a non-Hermitian quantum theory describing quantum degrees of freedom is expected to be the well known classical mechanics of classical degrees of freedom in the complex phase space, i.e., some phase space spanned by complex-valued space and momentum coordinates. As special relativity was developed by Einstein merely for real-valued space-time and four-momentum, we will try to understand how special relativity and covariance can be extended to complex-valued space-time and four-momentum. Our considerations will lead us not only to some unconventional derivation of Lorentz transformations for complex-valued velocities, but also to the non-Hermitian Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations, which are to lay the foundations of a non-Hermitian quantum theory.

  4. Simplifying complexity

    OpenAIRE

    Leemput, van de, J.C.H.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis I use mathematical models to explore the properties of complex systems ranging from microbial nitrogen pathways and coral reefs to the human state of mind. All are examples of complex systems, defined as systems composed of a number of interconnected parts, where the systemic behavior leads to the emergence of properties that would not be expected from behavior or properties of the individual parts of the system. Although the full behavior of the systems I address will probably...

  5. Porous carbons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Satish M Manocha

    2003-02-01

    Carbon in dense as well as porous solid form is used in a variety of applications. Activated porous carbons are made through pyrolysis and activation of carbonaceous natural as well as synthetic precursors. Pyrolysed woods replicate the structure of original wood but as such possess very low surface areas and poor adsorption capacities. On activation, these exhibit increased adsorption volumes of 0.5–0.8 cm3 /gm and surface areas of 700–1800 m2 /gm depending on activation conditions, whether physical or chemical. Former carbons possess mixed pore size distribution while chemically activated carbons predominantly possess micropores. Thus, these carbons can be used for adsorption of wide distributions of molecules from gas to liquid. The molecular adsorption within the pores is due to single layer or multilayer molecule deposition at the pore walls and hence results in different types of adsorption isotherm. On the other hand, activated carbon fibres with controlled microporous structure and surface area in the range of 2500 m2 /gm can be developed by controlled pyrolysis and physical activation of amorphous carbon fibres. Active carbon fibres with unmatchable pore structure and surface characteristics are present and futuristic porous materials for a number of applications from pollution control to energy storage.

  6. 基于碳纳米管复合物的电化学生物传感器研究进展%Research progress of electrochemical biosensor based on carbon nanotubes complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩莉; 陶菡; 张义明; 张学俊

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, development of novel carbon nanotubes composite and their applications in electrochem-istry biosensor are the research focuses in materials and analytical chemistry field, the research process of electrochemical biosensor based on carbon nanotubes composite was previewed. Sensor based on carbon nanotubes-nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes-polymer and carbon nanotubes-ionic liquid composite were focused on.%新型碳纳米管复合物的开发及其在电化学生物传感器中的应用是近年来材料学和分析领域的研究热点.介绍了碳纳米管复合物在电化学生物传感领域的研究发展,重点对碳纳米管与纳米颗粒、聚合物及离子液体复合材料在电化学生物传感中的应用进行了论述.

  7. Carbon price volatility: Evidence from EU ETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines carbon price volatility using data from the European Union Emission Trading Scheme from a nonlinear dynamics point of view. First, we use a random walk model, including serial correlation and variance ratio tests, to determine whether carbon price history information is fully reflected in current carbon price. The empirical research results show that carbon price is not a random walk: the price history information is not fully reflected in current carbon price. Second, use R/S, modified R/S and ARFIMA to analyse the memory of carbon price history. For the period April 2005-December 2008, the modified Hurst index of the carbon price is 0.4859 and the d value of ARFIMA is -0.1191, indicating short-term memory of the carbon price. Third, we use chaos theory to analyse the influence of the carbon market internal mechanism on carbon price, i.e., the market's positive and negative feedback mechanism and the heterogeneous environment. Chaos theory proves that the correlation dimension of carbon price increases. The maximal Lyapunov exponent is positive and large. There is no obvious complex endogenous phenomenon of nonlinear dynamics the carbon price fluctuation. The carbon market is mildly chaotic, showing both market and fractal market characteristics. Price fluctuation is not only influenced by the internal market mechanism, but is also impacted by the heterogeneous environment. Finally, we provide suggestions for regulation and development of carbon market.

  8. Complex networks: Patterns of complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2010-07-01

    The Turing mechanism provides a paradigm for the spontaneous generation of patterns in reaction-diffusion systems. A framework that describes Turing-pattern formation in the context of complex networks should provide a new basis for studying the phenomenon.

  9. The Bio-accessibility of Synthetic Fe-Organo Complexes in Subsurface Soil with Elevated Temperature: a Proxy for the Vulnerability of Mineral Associated Carbon to Warming Rachel C. Porras, Peter S. Nico, and Margaret Torn Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras, R. C.; Hicks Pries, C.

    2015-12-01

    Globally, subsurface soils (>30 cm) represent an important reservoir of soil organic carbon (SOC). However, the vulnerability of this deep SOC and, in particular mineral-associated SOC, to warming, and its potential to amplify the effects of climate change is highly uncertain. To gain insight into the bio-accessibility and temperature sensitivity of mineral-associated organic C, we conducted a series of incubations using soils collected from three depths (0-10, 50-60, and 80-90 cm) under coniferous forest. The soils are moderately acidic (mean pH=6.5) sandy, mixed, mesic Ultic Haploxeralfs. To understand how mechanisms controlling SOC bio-accessibilty or temperature sensitivity differ with depth and with the properties of Fe-organo complexes (i.e.,degree of crystallinity, amount of reactive surface area, or surface saturation), we used a 13C labeled glucose substrate to prepare synthetic Fe-organo complexes spanning a range of crystallinity and mineral surface saturation. The synthetic Fe-organo complexes were then added to soil from three depths. The soils containing the 13C labeled Fe-organo adduct were incubated at two temperatures (ambient and +4°C) and respired 13CO2 was measured and used to estimate flux rates. Differences in measured 13CO2 fluxes as a function of depth, surface loading, and mineral properties are discussed in terms of their implications for the temperature sensitivity of mineral protected organic carbon in subsurface soils.

  10. Complex analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Freitag, Eberhard

    2005-01-01

    The guiding principle of this presentation of ``Classical Complex Analysis'' is to proceed as quickly as possible to the central results while using a small number of notions and concepts from other fields. Thus the prerequisites for understanding this book are minimal; only elementary facts of calculus and algebra are required. The first four chapters cover the essential core of complex analysis: - differentiation in C (including elementary facts about conformal mappings) - integration in C (including complex line integrals, Cauchy's Integral Theorem, and the Integral Formulas) - sequences and series of analytic functions, (isolated) singularities, Laurent series, calculus of residues - construction of analytic functions: the gamma function, Weierstrass' Factorization Theorem, Mittag-Leffler Partial Fraction Decomposition, and -as a particular highlight- the Riemann Mapping Theorem, which characterizes the simply connected domains in C. Further topics included are: - the theory of elliptic functions based on...

  11. Organometallic Complexes of Graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkar, Santanu; Bekyarova, Elena; Haddon, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the organometallic hexahapto complexation of chromium with graphene, graphite and carbon nanotubes. All of these extended periodic pi-electron systems exhibit some degree of reactivity toward the reagents CrCO)6 and (eta6-benzene)Cr(CO)3, and we are able to demonstrate the formation of (eta6-rene)Cr(CO)3 or (eta6-arene)2Cr, where arene = single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), exfoliated graphene (XG), epitaxial graphene (EG) and highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). We find that the SWNTs are the least reactive presumably as a result of the effect of curvature on the formation of the hexahapto bond; in the case of HOPG, (eta6-HOPG)Cr(CO)3 was isolated while the exfoliated graphene samples were found to give both (eta6-graphene)2Cr, and (eta6-graphene)Cr(CO)3 structures. We report simple and efficient routes for the mild decomplexation of the graphene-chromium complexes which appears to restore the original pristine graphene state. This study represents the first example of the use of graph...

  12. High-Melt Carbon-Carbon Coating for Nozzle Extensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, James

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-Carbon Advanced Technologies, Inc. (C-CAT), has developed a high-melt coating for use in nozzle extensions in next-generation spacecraft. The coating is composed primarily of carbon-carbon, a carbon-fiber and carbon-matrix composite material that has gained a spaceworthy reputation due to its ability to withstand ultrahigh temperatures. C-CAT's high-melt coating embeds hafnium carbide (HfC) and zirconium diboride (ZrB2) within the outer layers of a carbon-carbon structure. The coating demonstrated enhanced high-temperature durability and suffered no erosion during a test in NASA's Arc Jet Complex. (Test parameters: stagnation heat flux=198 BTD/sq ft-sec; pressure=.265 atm; temperature=3,100 F; four cycles totaling 28 minutes) In Phase I of the project, C-CAT successfully demonstrated large-scale manufacturability with a 40-inch cylinder representing the end of a nozzle extension and a 16-inch flanged cylinder representing the attach flange of a nozzle extension. These demonstrators were manufactured without spalling or delaminations. In Phase II, C-CAT worked with engine designers to develop a nozzle extension stub skirt interfaced with an Aerojet Rocketdyne RL10 engine. All objectives for Phase II were successfully met. Additional nonengine applications for the coating include thermal protection systems (TPS) for next-generation spacecraft and hypersonic aircraft.

  13. Isotherm And Kinetic Studies On The Electrosorption Of Uranyl Tricarbonate Complex [UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}]{sup 4-} From Aqueous Solutions By Activated Carbon Electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, Aznan Fazli; Yim, Man Sung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Many types of adsorbent materials have been developed over the past 50 years, and the most recognizable is amidoxime based materials which is known to have high affinity in in chelating uranyl ions from seawater. However, the fabrication cost of amidoxime based materials was high which lead to high uranium extraction cost. In recent studies, use of porous carbon materials combined with the electrosorption technique was shown to have high selectivity for uranium separation from seawater. It is clear that the electrosorption capacity increase with the increasing of electrolyte concentration. The investigated activated carbon electrode still not reach the maximum adsorption capacity in the test condition. The morphology analysis confirmed that the fabricated activated carbon electrode has a porous structure, where BET analysis has revealed that the size of the pores can be categorized in mesopores region which is the optimum condition for electrosorption purposes. Other than that, the FT-IR analysis has enough evident that the molecular interaction of the activated carbon electrode involves the intermolecular interaction (physical crosslink/bonding) and stable for electrosorption application.

  14. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... before being swallowed; do not swallow them whole. Drink a full glass of water after taking either the regular or chewable tablets or capsules. Some liquid forms of calcium carbonate must be shaken well before use.Do not ...

  15. Carbon Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T. Lloyd Evans

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, the present state of knowledge of the carbon stars is discussed. Particular attention is given to issues of classification, evolution, variability, populations in our own and other galaxies, and circumstellar material.

  16. Complex Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Evsukoff, Alexandre; González, Marta

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade we have seen the emergence of a new inter-disciplinary field focusing on the understanding of networks which are dynamic, large, open, and have a structure sometimes called random-biased. The field of Complex Networks is helping us better understand many complex phenomena such as the spread of  deseases, protein interactions, social relationships, to name but a few. Studies in Complex Networks are gaining attention due to some major scientific breakthroughs proposed by network scientists helping us understand and model interactions contained in large datasets. In fact, if we could point to one event leading to the widespread use of complex network analysis is the availability of online databases. Theories of Random Graphs from Erdös and Rényi from the late 1950s led us to believe that most networks had random characteristics. The work on large online datasets told us otherwise. Starting with the work of Barabási and Albert as well as Watts and Strogatz in the late 1990s, we now know th...

  17. Binding of calcium and carbonate to polyacrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribello, Gareth A; Liew, CheeChin; Parrinello, Michele

    2009-05-21

    Polyacrylate molecules can be used to slow the growth of calcium carbonate. However, little is known about the mechanism by which the molecules impede the growth rate. A recent computational study (Bulo et al. Macromolecules 2007, 40, 3437) used metadynamics to investigate the binding of calcium to polyacrylate chains and has thrown some light on the coiling and precipitation of these polymers. We extend these simulations to examine the binding of calcium and carbonate to polyacrylate chains. We show that calcium complexed with both carbonate and polyacrylate is a very stable species. The free energies of calcium-carbonate-polyacrylate complexes, with different polymer configurations, are calculated, and differences in the free energy of the binding of carbonate are shown to be due to differences in the amount of steric hindrance about the calcium, which prevents the approach of the carbonate ion. PMID:19400592

  18. Carbon dioxide and methane emissions from estuaries

    OpenAIRE

    Abril, G.; Borges, Alberto

    2005-01-01

    Carbon dioxide and methane emissions from estuaries are reviewed in relationwith biogeochemical processes and carbon cycling. In estuaries, carbondioxide and methane emissions show a large spatial and temporalvariability, which results from a complex interaction of river carbon inputs,sedimentation and resuspension processes, microbial processes in watersand sediments, tidal exchanges with marshes and flats and gas exchangewith the atmosphere. The net mineralization of land-derived organic ca...

  19. Simulating Carbon cycle and phenology in complex forests using a multi-layer process based ecosystem model; evaluation and use of 3D-CMCC-Forest Ecosystem Model in a deciduous and an evergreen neighboring forests, within the area of Brasschaat (Be)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, S.; Collalti, A.; Santini, M.; Valentini, R.

    2013-12-01

    3D-CMCC-Forest Ecosystem Model is a process based model formerly developed for complex forest ecosystems to estimate growth, water and carbon cycles, phenology and competition processes on a daily/monthly time scale. The Model integrates some characteristics of the functional-structural tree models with the robustness of the light use efficiency approach. It treats different heights, ages and species as discrete classes, in competition for light (vertical structure) and space (horizontal structure). The present work evaluates the results of the recently developed daily version of 3D-CMCC-FEM for two neighboring different even aged and mono specific study cases. The former is a heterogeneous Pedunculate oak forest (Quercus robur L. ), the latter a more homogeneous Scot pine forest (Pinus sylvestris L.). The multi-layer approach has been evaluated against a series of simplified versions to determine whether the improved model complexity in canopy structure definition increases its predictive ability. Results show that a more complex structure (three height layers) should be preferable to simulate heterogeneous scenarios (Pedunculate oak stand), where heights distribution within the canopy justify the distinction in dominant, dominated and sub-dominated layers. On the contrary, it seems that using a multi-layer approach for more homogeneous stands (Scot pine stand) may be disadvantageous. Forcing the structure of an homogeneous stand to a multi-layer approach may in fact increase sources of uncertainty. On the other hand forcing complex forests to a mono layer simplified model, may cause an increase in mortality and a reduction in average DBH and Height. Compared with measured CO2 flux data, model results show good ability in estimating carbon sequestration trends, on both a monthly/seasonal and daily time scales. Moreover the model simulates quite well leaf phenology and the combined effects of the two different forest stands on CO2 fluxes.

  20. Managing Complexity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chassin, David P.; Posse, Christian; Malard, Joel M.

    2004-08-01

    Physical analogs have shown considerable promise for understanding the behavior of complex adaptive systems, including macroeconomics, biological systems, social networks, and electric power markets. Many of today’s most challenging technical and policy questions can be reduced to a distributed economic control problem. Indeed, economically-based control of large-scale systems is founded on the conjecture that the price-based regulation (e.g., auctions, markets) results in an optimal allocation of resources and emergent optimal system control. This paper explores the state of the art in the use physical analogs for understanding the behavior of some econophysical systems and to deriving stable and robust control strategies for them. In particular we review and discussion applications of some analytic methods based on the thermodynamic metaphor according to which the interplay between system entropy and conservation laws gives rise to intuitive and governing global properties of complex systems that cannot be otherwise understood.

  1. Cocatalyzed oxidation of carbon monoxide and triphenylphosphine using complexes derived from hexarhodium hexadecacarbonyl as homogeneous catalyst. Characterization of rhodium carbonyl intermediates, oxygen-18 labeling to identify oxygen atom sources, and observation of catalyzed oxygen atom exchange between carbon dioxide and water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, M.K.; Dixit, N.S.; Roundhill, D.M.

    1983-10-01

    Hexarhodium hexadecacarbonyl, Rh/sub 6/(CO)/sub 16/, will cocatalyze a reaction with molecular oxygen involving the conversion both of carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide and of triphenylphosphine (PPh/sub 3/) to triphenylphosphine oxide (OPPh/sub 3/). Solution infrared spectroscopy in the carbonyl region in benzene solvent shows that the catalytic cycle passes through the red Rh/sub 2/(CO)/sub 2/-(PPh/sub 3/)/sub 4/(C/sub 6/H/sub 6/)/sub 2/, the yellow Rh/sub 2/(CO)/sub 6/(PPh/sub 3/)/sub 2/, and the red Rh/sub 4/(CO)/sub 10/(PPh/sub 3/)/sub 2/. Final return to Rh/sub 6/(CO)/sub 16/ does not occur under the ambient temperature and pressure conditions used but can be achieved by elevating these conditions. Addition of carbon dioxide to a mixture of Rh/sub 6/(CO)/sub 16/, CO, and PPh/sub 3/ in the presence of added /sup 18/OH/sub 2/ shows that the rhodium compounds will catalyze oxygen exchange between carbon dioxide and the oxygen atom of water. A pathway for equilibration of oxygen isotope in the catalyzed conversion of coordinated carbonyl to carbon dioxide via metallocarboxylate intermediates is proposed. The equilibration of oxygen isotope from water into carbon dioxide catalyzed by rhodium carbonyl clusters is suggested to proceed via hydroxyrhodium intermediates. 3 figures, 3 tables

  2. PS complex

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    A view of the present PS complex taken at the end of 1972. The earth embankment covering the Ring is clearly visible; in the foreground are the North and South Experimental Halls; to the right is the East Hall, and to the left the Booster surface buildings. The West Hall is too far to the left to seen, and also invisible is the SPS being constructed.

  3. The series of carbon-chain complexes {Ru(dppe)Cp*}₂{μ-(C≡C)x} (x = 4–8, 11): Synthesis, structures, properties and some reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce, Michael I. [Univ. of Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Cole, Marcus L. [Univ. of Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Ellis, Benjamin G. [Univ. of Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Gaudio, Maryka [Univ. of Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Nicholson, Brian K. [Univ. of Waikato, Hamilton (New Zealand); Parker, Christian R. [Univ. of Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Skelton, Brian W. [Univ. of Western Australia, Crawley (Western Australia); White, Allan H. [Univ. of Western Australia, Crawley (Western Australia)

    2015-01-28

    The construction of a series of compounds {Ru(dppe)Cp*}2(μ-C2x) (Ru*-C2x-Ru*, x = 4–8, 11)) is described. A direct reaction between RuCl(dppe)Cp* and Me3Si(Ctriple bond; length of mdashC)4SiMe3 afforded Ru*-C8-Ru* in 89% yield. The Pd(0)/Cu(I)-catalysed coupling of Ru{Ctriple bond; length of mdashCCtriple bond; length of mdashCAu(PPh3)}(dppe)Cp*Ru*-C4-Au (2 equiv.) with diiodoethyne gave Ru*-C10-Ru* (64%), or of 1 equiv. with I(Ctriple bond; length of mdashC)3I gave Ru*-C14-Ru* (36%); similarly, Ru{(Ctriple bond; length of mdashC)4Au(PPh3)}(dppe)Cp*Ru*-C8-Au and I(Ctriple bond; length of mdashC)3I gave Ru*-C22-Ru* (12%). Desilylation (TBAF) of Ru{(Ctriple bond; length of mdashC)xSiMe3}(dppe)Cp*Ru*-C2x-Si (x = 3, 4) followed by oxidative coupling [Cu(OAc)2/py] gave Ru*-C12-Ru* (82%) and Ru*-C16-Ru* (58%), respectively. Similar oxidative coupling of Ru(Ctriple bond; length of mdashCCtriple bond; length of mdashCH)(dppe)Cp* was a second route to Ru*-C8-Ru* (82%). Appropriate precursors are already known, or obtained by coupling of Ru*-C2x-Si (x = 2, 4) with AuCl(PPh3)/NaOMe [Ru*-C4-Au, 95%; Ru*-C8-Au, 74%] or from Pd(0)/Cu(I) catalysed coupling of Ru*-C2x-Au (x = 2, 3) with I(Ctriple bond; length of mdashC)2SiMe3 (Ru*-C8-Si, 64%; Ru*-C10-Si, 2%). Reactions between Ru*-C2x-Ru* (x = 3, 4) and Fe2(CO)9 gave {Fe3(CO)9}{μ3-CCtriple bond; length of mdashC[Ru(dppe)Cp*]}2Fe(C3-Ru*)2 and {Fe3(CO)9}{μ3-CCtriple bond; length of mdashC[Ru(dppe)Cp*]}{μ3-C(Ctriple bond; length of mdashC)2[Ru(dppe)Cp*]} Fe(C3-Ru*)(C5-Ru*), respectively. The redox properties of the series of complexes with 2x = 2–16 were measured and showed a diminution of the

  4. Nanoparticle complex fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svaasand, Eldrid

    2008-04-15

    The work presented in this thesis concerns the study of complex nano fluids. The interaction of particles in dispersions under the influence of electric and magnetic fields has been studied. The main focus has been the investigation of the behavior of carbon particle dispersions. A novel type of carbon material, namely carbon cone (CC) material, has been characterized using atomic force microscope, scanning tunneling microscope and scanning electron microscope. The CC material is a mixed powder consisting of carbon particles with the shape of disks and cones and a small amount of amorphous carbon particles. The length or diameter of the particles vary between 0.5-5 mum with thickness varying between 10-50 nm. The results confirm the cone angles as predicted by theory. The various microscopy images show that the surfaces of the particles seem corrugated. It should be noted that it is the mixed particle powder which it is referred to when it is written 'carbon cone particles' or 'CC particles'. The dispersion of CC particles in silicon oil was studied under the influence of an electric field. The particles were found to align in an ac electric field and structure formation was observed at very low electric fields. The growth rate was found to vary exponentially with the electric field. The structure formations were permanent (under zero shear rate), not dissolving when the electric field was turned off. This was attributed to the strong Van der Waals forces associated with carbon particles. Electrorheological measurements were carried out for dispersions with varying CC particle concentrations. All samples showed a Bingham fluid behavior with a finite yield stress. The yield stress was found to depend only weakly on the electric field. The results showed that the ER efficiency as measured by the relative increase in viscosity compared to the zero field viscosity, increases with decreasing concentration with a maximum factor of approx10 for the

  5. Complex dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Carleson, Lennart

    1993-01-01

    Complex dynamics is today very much a focus of interest. Though several fine expository articles were available, by P. Blanchard and by M. Yu. Lyubich in particular, until recently there was no single source where students could find the material with proofs. For anyone in our position, gathering and organizing the material required a great deal of work going through preprints and papers and in some cases even finding a proof. We hope that the results of our efforts will be of help to others who plan to learn about complex dynamics and perhaps even lecture. Meanwhile books in the field a. re beginning to appear. The Stony Brook course notes of J. Milnor were particularly welcome and useful. Still we hope that our special emphasis on the analytic side will satisfy a need. This book is a revised and expanded version of notes based on lectures of the first author at UCLA over several \\Vinter Quarters, particularly 1986 and 1990. We owe Chris Bishop a great deal of gratitude for supervising the production of cour...

  6. Complex Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum instanton (QI approximation is recently proposed for the evaluations of the chemical reaction rate constants with use of full dimensional potential energy surfaces. Its strategy is to use the instanton mechanism and to approximate time-dependent quantum dynamics to the imaginary time propagation of the quantities of partition function. It thus incorporates the properties of the instanton idea and the quantum effect of partition function and can be applied to chemical reactions of complex systems. In this paper, we present the QI approach and its applications to several complex systems mainly done by us. The concrete systems include, (1 the reaction of H+CH4→H2+CH3, (2 the reaction of H+SiH4→H2+SiH3, (3 H diffusion on Ni(100 surface; and (4 surface-subsurface transport and interior migration for H/Ni. Available experimental and other theoretical data are also presented for the purpose of comparison.

  7. Huella del Carbono. Parte 1: Conceptos, Métodos de Estimación y Complejidades Metodológicas Carbon Footprint. Part 1: Concepts, Estimation Methods and Methodological Complexities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Espíndola

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta y analiza el concepto de huella del carbono, su origen, su relación con los gases efecto invernadero, y sobre los procedimientos para cuantificarla. El efecto invernadero provoca que la energía que llega a la Tierra sea devuelta más lentamente, por lo que es mantenida más tiempo junto a la superficie elevando la temperatura. Es aceptado hoy en día que este efecto es producido por algunos gases liberados en forma natural o por las acciones humanas. La Huella de Carbono es considerada una de las más importantes herramientas para cuantificar las emisiones de gases efecto invernadero y en forma muy general, representa la cantidad de gases efecto invernadero emitidos a la atmósfera derivados de las actividades de producción o consumo de bienes y servicios. Al no existir consenso en cuanto a la definición y menos en la cuantificación de la huella del carbono, la primera parte de este trabajo analiza las principales corrientes y enfoques actuales.The concept of Carbon Footprint, its origin, its relation with greenhouse gases and the methods to quantify it are presented and analyzed. The so-called greenhouse effect causes that the energy that reaches the earth at a certain rate is returned to a slower rate, increasing the temperature of the earth surface. Additionally, it is nowadays accepted that this effect is produced by some gases that are naturally emitted or produced by human actions. The Carbon Footprint is considered to be one of the most important tools for quantifying greenhouse emissions and in a general form it represents the quantity of gases emitted to the atmosphere and that is produced by human activities, and by goods and service consumption. Since there is no consensus about the definition of Carbon Footprint or the forms of quantifying it, this first part of the paper series analyzes the main concept and the main present views on the Carbon Footprint.

  8. Complex Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Talha Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex sleep apnea is the term used to describe a form of sleep disordered breathing in which repeated central apneas (>5/hour persist or emerge when obstructive events are extinguished with positive airway pressure (PAP and for which there is not a clear cause for the central apneas such as narcotics or systolic heart failure. The driving forces in the pathophysiology are felt to be ventilator instability associated oscillation in PaCO2 arterial partial pressure of Carbon Dioxide, continuous cositive airway pressure (CPAP related increased CO2 carbon dioxide elimination, and activation of airway and pulmonary stretch receptors triggering these central apneas. The prevalence ranges from 0.56% to 18% with no clear predictive characteristics as compared to simple obstructive sleep apnea. Prognosis is similar to obstructive sleep apnea. The central apnea component in most patients on followup using CPAP therap, has resolved. For those with continued central apneas on simple CPAP therapy, other treatment options include bilevel PAP, adaptive servoventilation, permissive flow limitation and/or drugs.

  9. Cosmic Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    What explains the extraordinary complexity of the observed universe, on all scales from quarks to the accelerating universe? My favorite explanation (which I certainty did not invent) ls that the fundamental laws of physics produce natural instability, energy flows, and chaos. Some call the result the Life Force, some note that the Earth is a living system itself (Gaia, a "tough bitch" according to Margulis), and some conclude that the observed complexity requires a supernatural explanation (of which we have many). But my dad was a statistician (of dairy cows) and he told me about cells and genes and evolution and chance when I was very small. So a scientist must look for me explanation of how nature's laws and statistics brought us into conscious existence. And how is that seemll"!gly Improbable events are actually happening a!1 the time? Well, the physicists have countless examples of natural instability, in which energy is released to power change from simplicity to complexity. One of the most common to see is that cooling water vapor below the freezing point produces snowflakes, no two alike, and all complex and beautiful. We see it often so we are not amazed. But physlc!sts have observed so many kinds of these changes from one structure to another (we call them phase transitions) that the Nobel Prize in 1992 could be awarded for understanding the mathematics of their common features. Now for a few examples of how the laws of nature produce the instabilities that lead to our own existence. First, the Big Bang (what an insufficient name!) apparently came from an instability, in which the "false vacuum" eventually decayed into the ordinary vacuum we have today, plus the most fundamental particles we know, the quarks and leptons. So the universe as a whole started with an instability. Then, a great expansion and cooling happened, and the loose quarks, finding themselves unstable too, bound themselves together into today's less elementary particles like protons and

  10. Cosmic Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    What explains the extraordinary complexity of the observed universe, on all scales from quarks to the accelerating universe? My favorite explanation (which I certainty did not invent) ls that the fundamental laws of physics produce natural instability, energy flows, and chaos. Some call the result the Life Force, some note that the Earth is a living system itself (Gaia, a "tough bitch" according to Margulis), and some conclude that the observed complexity requires a supernatural explanation (of which we have many). But my dad was a statistician (of dairy cows) and he told me about cells and genes and evolution and chance when I was very small. So a scientist must look for me explanation of how nature's laws and statistics brought us into conscious existence. And how is that seemll"!gly Improbable events are actually happening a!1 the time? Well, the physicists have countless examples of natural instability, in which energy is released to power change from simplicity to complexity. One of the most common to see is that cooling water vapor below the freezing point produces snowflakes, no two alike, and all complex and beautiful. We see it often so we are not amazed. But physlc!sts have observed so many kinds of these changes from one structure to another (we call them phase transitions) that the Nobel Prize in 1992 could be awarded for understanding the mathematics of their common features. Now for a few examples of how the laws of nature produce the instabilities that lead to our own existence. First, the Big Bang (what an insufficient name!) apparently came from an instability, in which the "false vacuum" eventually decayed into the ordinary vacuum we have today, plus the most fundamental particles we know, the quarks and leptons. So the universe as a whole started with an instability. Then, a great expansion and cooling happened, and the loose quarks, finding themselves unstable too, bound themselves together into today's less elementary particles like protons and

  11. Complex silumins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The study presents the results of investigations carried out on silumins with additions of Mg, Ni, Cu, Cr, Mo and W. The silumins containing Mg, Cu and Ni are well-known and commonly used in construction of machines and equipment.Design/methodology/approach: Additions of Cr, Mo and W have not been thoroughly investigated yet. They are considered a new family of innovative cast aluminium alloys.Findings: In Al-Si systems they form silicides, like Cr3Si, Mo3Si, W3Si and intermetallic phases of Al13Cr4Si4, Al12Mo, Al12W and AlWSi. The silicides crystallise in cubic lattice of parameters similar to aluminium and silicon.Research limitations/implications: Therefore they can act as crystallisation substrates and occur as separate phases. The examinations under the microscope and X-ray microanalysis of the linear and point distribution of elements confirmed the presence of the above mentioned phases. A combination of two elements, e.g. Cr and Mo, or Cr and W, was observed to cause the formation of complex silicide layers of Mo3Si and (Cr, Mo3Si, or Cr3Si as well as (W, Cr3Si.Originality/value: The presence of the silicides has been indicated as a possible source of the refinement of α(Al and β(Si phases. The precipitations of these phases and of the intermetallic phases favour a high degree of the silumins hardening. A characteristic feature is the fact that nucleation and crystallisation of the successive phases takes place at the phase boundaries formed between the previously precipitated phase and solid solution α. The studies carried out so far have indicated that in complex silumins at high temperatures crystallise the silicides and peritectic phases of Al12W, AlWSi, Al12Mo and Al13Cr4Si4. Phases α or β are the next ones to crystallise, followed by complex eutectic α + β +Al(Si, Cr, Mo, W, Fe. Further crystallise the phases of Mg2Si, Al3Ni and Al2Cu. The silumins presented here are characterised by high mechanical properties: Rp0

  12. An Organocobalt–Carbon Nanotube Chemiresistive Carbon Monoxide Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Sophie F.; Lin, Sibo; Swager, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    A chemiresistive detector for carbon monoxide was created from single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by noncovalent modification with diiodo(η5: η1-1-[2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethyl]-2,3,4,5-tetramethylcyclopentadienyl)-cobalt(III) ([Cp^CoI2]), an organocobalt complex with an intramolecular amino ligand coordinated to the metal center that is displaced upon CO binding. The unbound amino group can subsequently be transduced chemiresistively by the SWCNT network. The resulting device was shown to...

  13. The long-term carbon cycle, fossil fuels and atmospheric composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Robert A

    2003-11-20

    The long-term carbon cycle operates over millions of years and involves the exchange of carbon between rocks and the Earth's surface. There are many complex feedback pathways between carbon burial, nutrient cycling, atmospheric carbon dioxide and oxygen, and climate. New calculations of carbon fluxes during the Phanerozoic eon (the past 550 million years) illustrate how the long-term carbon cycle has affected the burial of organic matter and fossil-fuel formation, as well as the evolution of atmospheric composition.

  14. Zirconium sulfate interaction with sodium carbonate in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirconium sulfate interaction with sodium carbonate is studied in aqueous solution. By pH-metry and infrared spectroscopy it is stated that depending on the carbonate concentration Zr(OH)2x(CO3)22-, ZrOH(CO3)33- and Zr(CO3)44- compounds can be formed in sulfatocarbonate solutions. pH range in which soluble carbonate complexes exist also depends on the concentration of sodium carbonate. Calculated is the fourth stability constant

  15. From detached to attached buildup complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafaelsen, B.; Elvebakk, G.; Andreassen, K.;

    2008-01-01

    deposition and buildup growth bridged the detached platform with the attached platform. In the Bjarmeland Group (Lower Permian) 0.35-4.8 km wide, 1.5-27 km long and 60-420 m thick cool-water bryozoan-dominated straight, sinuous and continuous carbonate ridges or atoll-like ridges are located on top......Carbonate buildups were abundant during the Palaeozoic. Three-dimensional seismic data from the Finnmark Platform, Barents Sea, has been used to reconstruct the evolution of laterally extensive carbonate buildup complexes in space and time. The results suggest that the location of Upper Palaeozoic...

  16. Solid-state Synthesis of Carbon-nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.Wilhelm; A.Winkel; D.Jain

    2007-01-01

    1 Results In addition to single wall and multiwall carbon nanotubes[1], several structures,which are more or less related to fullerenes,including carbon nanohorns[2a], carbon nanospheres[2b] and onion like carbon structures[2c] have been reported.A new simple straight forward method to access some of these structures is the solid-state pyrolysis of different organometallic complexes in a sealed vessel,which led so far to carbon nanotubes[3a,b], carbon nanocables[3c] and onions[3d].

  17. Quantification of carbon nanomaterials in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haifang; Yang, Sheng-Tao; Cao, Aoneng; Liu, Yuanfang

    2013-03-19

    A diverse array of carbon nanomaterials (NMs), including fullerene, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene, nanodiamonds, and carbon nanoparticles, have been discovered and widely applied in a variety of industries. Carbon NMs have been detected in the environment and have a strong possibility of entering the human body. The safety of carbon NMs has thus become a serious concern in academia and society. To achieve strict biosafety assessments, researchers need to fully understand the effects and fates of NMs in the human body, including information about absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADME/T). To acquire the ADME data, researchers must quantify NMs, but carbon NMs are very difficult to quantify in vivo. The carbon background in a typical biological system is high, particularly compared with the much lower concentration of carbon NMs. Moreover, carbon NMs lack a specific detection signal. Therefore, isotopic labeling, with its high sensitivity and specificity, is the first choice to quantify carbon NMs in vivo. Previously, researchers have used many isotopes, including ¹³C, ¹⁴C, ¹²⁵I, ¹³¹I, ³H, ⁶⁴Cu, ¹¹¹In, ⁸⁶Y, 99mTc, and ⁶⁷Ga, to label carbon NMs. We used these isotopic labeling methods to study the ADME of carbon NMs via different exposure pathways in animal models. Except for the metabolism of carbon NMs, which has seldom been investigated, significant amounts of data have been reported on the in vivo absorption, distribution, excretion, and toxicity of carbon NMs, which have revealed characteristic behaviors of carbon NMs, such as reticuloendothelial system (RES) capture. However, the complexity of the biological systems and diverse preparation and functionalization of the same carbon NMs have led to inconsistent results across different studies. Therefore, the data obtained so far have not provided a compatible and systematic profile of biosafety. Further efforts are needed to address these problems. In

  18. Digital carbonate rock physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenger, Erik H.; Vialle, Stephanie; Lebedev, Maxim; Uribe, David; Osorno, Maria; Duda, Mandy; Steeb, Holger

    2016-08-01

    Modern estimation of rock properties combines imaging with advanced numerical simulations, an approach known as digital rock physics (DRP). In this paper we suggest a specific segmentation procedure of X-ray micro-computed tomography data with two different resolutions in the µm range for two sets of carbonate rock samples. These carbonates were already characterized in detail in a previous laboratory study which we complement with nanoindentation experiments (for local elastic properties). In a first step a non-local mean filter is applied to the raw image data. We then apply different thresholds to identify pores and solid phases. Because of a non-neglectable amount of unresolved microporosity (micritic phase) we also define intermediate threshold values for distinct phases. Based on this segmentation we determine porosity-dependent values for effective P- and S-wave velocities as well as for the intrinsic permeability. For effective velocities we confirm an observed two-phase trend reported in another study using a different carbonate data set. As an upscaling approach we use this two-phase trend as an effective medium approach to estimate the porosity-dependent elastic properties of the micritic phase for the low-resolution images. The porosity measured in the laboratory is then used to predict the effective rock properties from the observed trends for a comparison with experimental data. The two-phase trend can be regarded as an upper bound for elastic properties; the use of the two-phase trend for low-resolution images led to a good estimate for a lower bound of effective elastic properties. Anisotropy is observed for some of the considered subvolumes, but seems to be insignificant for the analysed rocks at the DRP scale. Because of the complexity of carbonates we suggest using DRP as a complementary tool for rock characterization in addition to classical experimental methods.

  19. Developing a Carbon Observing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, B., III

    2015-12-01

    There is a clear need to better understand and predict future climate change, so that science can more confidently inform climate policy, including adaptation planning and future mitigation strategies. Understanding carbon cycle feedbacks, and the relationship between emissions (fossil and land use) and the resulting atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) concentrations in a changing climate has been recognized as an important goal by the IPCC. The existing surface greenhouse gas observing networks provide accurate and precise measurements of background values, but they are not configured to target the extended, complex and dynamic regions of the carbon budget. Space Agencies around the globe are committed to CO2 and CH4 observations: GOSAT-1/2, OCO-2/3, MERLin, TanSat, and CarbonSat. In addition to these Low Earth Orbit (LEO) missions, a new mission in Geostationary Orbit (GEO), geoCARB, which would provide mapping-like measurements of carbon dioxide, methane, and carbon monoxide concentrations over major land areas, has been recently proposed to the NASA Venture Program. These pioneering missions do not provide the spatial/temporal coverage to answer the key carbon-climate questions at process relevant scales nor do they address the distribution and quantification of anthropogenic sources at urban scales. They do demonstrate, however, that a well-planned future system of system integrating space-based LEO and GEO missions with extensive in situ observations could provide the accuracy, spatial resolution, and coverage needed to address critical open issues in the carbon-climate system. Dr. Diana Wickland devoted enormous energy in developing a comprehensive apprioach to understand the global carbon cycle; she understood well that an integrated, coordinated, international approach is needed. This shines through in her recent contribution in co-chairing the team that produced the "CEOS Strategy for Carbon Observations from Space." A NASA-funded community

  20. Preparation of hollow spherical carbon nanocages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, C.-K.; Kang, H. Y.; Hong, C.-I; Huang, C.-H.; Chang, F.-C.; Wang, H. Paul, E-mail: wanghp@mail.ncku.edu.tw [National Cheng Kung University, Department of Environmental Engineering, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-15

    This study presents a new and simple method for the synthesis of hollow carbon spheres possessing nanocage sizes of 7.1, 14, and 20 nm in diameter. The core-shell (i.e., Cu-C) nanoparticles prepared by carbonization of the Cu{sup 2+}-cyclodextrin (CD) complexes at 573 K for 2 h was etched with HCl (6N) to yield the hollow carbon spheres. The carbon-shell of the hollow carbon nanospheres, which consisted of mainly diamond-like and graphite carbons, is not perturbed during etching. In addition to the nanocages, the hollow carbon nanospheres also possess micropores with an opening of 0.45 nm, allowing small molecules to diffuse in and out through the carbon-shell. Many elements (such as Zn{sup 2+} or Cu{sup 2+}) can therefore be filled into the nanocages of the hollow carbon nanospheres. With these unique properties, for instance, designable active species such as Cu and ZnO encapsulated in the carbon-shell can act as Cu-ZnO-C yolk-shell nanoreactors which are found very effective in the catalytic decomposition of methanol.

  1. Belowground carbon trade among tall forest trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Tamir; Siegwolf, Rolf; Koerner, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Just imagine one tree could hand over large quantities of carbon to another tree. How would that change our thinking about carbon relations of forests, the single biggest biological C reservoir on earth? If such a tree-to-tree C shuttle would exist, it required a demand-supply gradient and a pipeline. Here we show that exactly this unthinkable does occur in overlapping root spheres of tall trees in a mixed temperate forest. Using canopy scale stable carbon isotope labelling applied from a construction crane, we demonstrate that carbon assimilated by spruce is traded over to neighbouring beech, larch, and pine in amounts so large that fine roots almost equilibrate the carbon source signature. The isotope mixing ratio indicated that the interspecific transfer accounted for 40% of the fine root carbon, which is ca. 280 kg ha-1 a-1. This is the first forest scale evidence of a large flux of carbon among mature trees from evolutionary distant taxa. Carbon transfer most likely occurred through common ectomycorrhiza networks, which also exhibited the labelled carbon signal. These observations indicate that while competition for resources (e.g. light, water, nutrients) is often considered the dominant tree-tree interaction in a forest, trees actually interact in more complex pathways including a massive carbon exchange.

  2. Carbon classified?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Ingmar

    2012-01-01

    . Using an actor- network theory (ANT) framework, the aim is to investigate the actors who bring together the elements needed to classify their carbon emission sources and unpack the heterogeneous relations drawn on. Based on an ethnographic study of corporate agents of ecological modernisation over...... a period of 13 months, this paper provides an exploration of three cases of enacting classification. Drawing on ANT, we problematise the silencing of a range of possible modalities of consumption facts and point to the ontological ethics involved in such performances. In a context of global warming...

  3. Reconstructing Late Ordovician carbon cycle variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancost, Richard D.; Freeman, Katherine H.; Herrmann, Achim D.; Patzkowsky, Mark E.; Ainsaar, Leho; Martma, Tõnu

    2013-03-01

    The role of carbon dioxide in regulating climate during the early Paleozoic, when severe glaciations occurred during a putative greenhouse world, remains unclear. Here, we present the first molecular carbon isotope proxy-based estimates for Late Ordovician (early Katian) pCO2 levels, and explore the limitations of applying this approach to the reconstruction of Paleozoic pCO2. Carbon isotope profiles from three sites in Laurentia (Iowa, Ontario and Pennsylvania) and one site in Baltica (Estonia) exhibit overall low isotope fractionation between organic and inorganic carbon during photosynthesis (ɛp) and these values declined during the early Katian carbonate carbon isotope excursion (or Guttenberg Carbon Isotope Excursion, GICE). Algal ɛp values are sensitive to changes in CO2 concentrations, algae cell morphologies, and cell growth rates. To constrain these factors, we present molecular evidence that a decrease in the relative abundance of cyanobacteria and a change in the eukaryotic algae community co-occurred with the GICE. Regardless of local biotic or oceanographic influences, a decline in ɛp values indicates photosynthesis was sensitive to carbon concentrations, and via analogy with modern taxa, constrains pCO2 to below ˜8× pre-industrial levels (PIL), or about half of previous estimates. In addition, the global, positive carbon isotope excursions expressed in a wide variety of sedimentary materials (carbonate, bulk organic matter, n-alkanes, acyclic and cyclic isoprenoid hydrocarbons), provide compelling evidence for perturbation of the global carbon cycle, and this was likely associated with a decrease in pCO2 approximately 10 million years prior to the Hirnantian glaciations. Isotopic records from deeper water settings suggest a complex interplay of carbon sources and sinks, with pCO2 increasing prior to and during the early stages of the GICE and then decreasing when organic carbon burial outpaced increased volcanic inputs.

  4. Trading forest carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nature of carbon in forests is discussed from the perspective of carbon trading. Carbon inventories, specifically in the area of land use and forestry are reviewed for the Pacific Northwest. Carbon turnover in forests is discussed as it relates to carbon sequestration. Scient...

  5. Merging allylic carbon-hydrogen and selective carbon-carbon bond activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masarwa, Ahmad; Didier, Dorian; Zabrodski, Tamar; Schinkel, Marvin; Ackermann, Lutz; Marek, Ilan

    2014-01-01

    Since the nineteenth century, many synthetic organic chemists have focused on developing new strategies to regio-, diastereo- and enantioselectively build carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds in a predictable and efficient manner. Ideal syntheses should use the least number of synthetic steps, with few or no functional group transformations and by-products, and maximum atom efficiency. One potentially attractive method for the synthesis of molecular skeletons that are difficult to prepare would be through the selective activation of C-H and C-C bonds, instead of the conventional construction of new C-C bonds. Here we present an approach that exploits the multifold reactivity of easily accessible substrates with a single organometallic species to furnish complex molecular scaffolds through the merging of otherwise difficult transformations: allylic C-H and selective C-C bond activations. The resulting bifunctional nucleophilic species, all of which have an all-carbon quaternary stereogenic centre, can then be selectively derivatized by the addition of two different electrophiles to obtain more complex molecular architecture from these easily available starting materials.

  6. Optimal Carbon Capture and Storage Policies

    OpenAIRE

    Ayong Le Kama, Alain; Mouez FODHA; Lafforgue, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Following the IPCC's report (2005), which recommended the development and the use of carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies in order to achieve the environmental goals, defined by the Kyoto Protocol, the issue addressed in this paper concerns the optimal strategy regarding the long-term use of CCS technologies. The aim of this paper is to study the optimal carbon capture and sequestration policy. The CCS technologies has motivated a number of empirical studies, via complex int...

  7. Carbon Farming as a Carbon Negative Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, C.; Laird, D.; Hayes, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon farms have a pivotal role in national and international efforts to mitigate and adapt to climate change. A carbon farm in its broadest sense is one that reduces greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions or captures and holds carbon in vegetation and soils. Their capacity to remove carbon from the air and store it safely and permanently, while providing additional human and ecosystem benefits, means they could contribute significantly to national efforts to stabilize or reduce GHGs. We examine carbon farms in the context of corn and soybean production agriculture. We illustrate, using Iowa data but with relevance across United States corn and soybean production, the potential for carbon farms to reduce human GHG emissions and sequester carbon permanently at a rate that has meaningful impact on global greenhouse gas concentration. Carbon has been viewed as a next generation cash crop in Iowa for over a decade. The carbon farm perspective, however, goes beyond carbon as cash crop to make carbon the center of an entire farm enterprise. The transformation is possible through slight adjustment crop practices mixed with advances in technology to sequester carbon through biochar. We examine carbon balance of Iowa agriculture given only the combination of slight reduction in fertilizer and sequestration by biochar. We find the following. Iowa carbon farms could turn Iowa agriculture into a carbon sink. The estimated range of GHG reduction by statewide implementation of carbon farms is 19.46 to 90.27 MMt CO2-equivalent (CO2-e), while the current agricultural CO2-e emission estimate is 35.38 MMt CO2-e. Iowa carbon farm GHG reduction would exceed Iowa GHG reduction by wind energy (8.7 MMt CO2-e) and could exceed combined reductions from wind energy and corn grain ethanol (10.7 MMt CO2-e; 19.4 MMt CO2-e combined). In fact, Iowa carbon farms alone could exceed GHG reduction from national corn grain ethanol production (39.6 MMt CO2-e). A carbon price accessible to agricultural

  8. Geomorphic control of landscape carbon accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbloom, N.A.; Harden, J.W.; Neff, J.C.; Schimel, D.S.

    2006-01-01

    We use the CREEP process-response model to simulate soil organic carbon accumulation in an undisturbed prairie site in Iowa. Our primary objectives are to identify spatial patterns of carbon accumulation, and explore the effect of erosion on basin-scale C accumulation. Our results point to two general findings. First, redistribution of soil carbon by erosion results in a net increase in basin-wide carbon storage relative to a noneroding environment. Landscape-average mean residence times are increased in an eroding landscape owing to the burial/preservation of otherwise labile C. Second, field observations taken along a slope transect may overlook significant intraslope variations in carbon accumulation. Spatial patterns of modeled deep C accumulation are complex. While surface carbon with its relatively short equilibration time is predictable from surface properties, deep carbon is strongly influenced by the landscape's geomorphic and climatic history, resulting in wide spatial variability. Convergence and divergence associated with upland swales and interfluves result in bimodal carbon distributions in upper and mid slopes; variability in carbon storage within modeled mid slopes was as high as simulated differences between erosional shoulders and depositional valley bottoms. The bimodality of mid-slope C variability in the model suggests that a three-dimensional sampling strategy is preferable over the traditional two-dimensional analog or "catena" approach. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux is defined as the year-over-year change in Total Ecosystem Carbon Stock, or the net rate of carbon exchange between an ecosystem and the...

  10. Carbon Monoxide (CO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IAQ) » Carbon Monoxide's Impact on Indoor Air Quality Carbon Monoxide's Impact on Indoor Air Quality On this ... length of exposure. Top of Page Sources of Carbon Monoxide Sources of CO include: unvented kerosene and ...

  11. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir What is Carbon Monoxide? Carbon monoxide, or “CO,” is an odorless, colorless gas that can kill you. Carbon monoxide detector Where is CO found? CO is ...

  12. Carbon ion radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) is the world's first heavy ion accelerator complex dedicated to medical use in a hospital environment. Carbon ion therapy offers the potential advantages of improved dose localization and enhanced biological effects. It has been suggested that carbon ion therapy is effective against radioresistant pancreatic cancer. In April 2000, clinical studies examining the treatment of pancreatic cancer with carbon ions were begun at the HIMAC. As of February 2010, 48 patients treated with preoperative carbon ion radiotherapy and 89 patients treated for locally advanced pancreatic cancer were enrolled into the clinical trials. Both protocols are still ongoing. The interim results of these clinical trials suggest that carbon ion radiotherapy provides good local control and offers a survival advantage for patients with otherwise hard to cure pancreatic cancer, without unacceptable morbidity. (author)

  13. Nonequilibrium Thermodynamic Model of Manganese Carbonate Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝瑞霞; 彭省临

    1999-01-01

    Manganese carbonate can be converted to many kinds of manganese oxides when it is aerated in air and oxygen.Pure manganese carbonate can be changed into Mn3O4 and γ-MnOOH,and manganese carbonate ore can be converted to MnO2 under the air-aerating and oxygen-aerating circumstances.The oxidation process of manganese carbonate is a changing process of mineral association,and is also a converting process of valence of manganese itself.Not only equilibrium stat,but also nonequilibrium state are involved in this whole process,This process is an irreversible heterogeneous complex reaction,and oberys the nonequilibrium thermodynamic model,The oxidation rate of manganese cabonate is controlled by many factors,especially nonmanganese metallic ions which play an important role in the oxidation process of manganese carbonate.

  14. Carbon nanotube computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulaker, Max M; Hills, Gage; Patil, Nishant; Wei, Hai; Chen, Hong-Yu; Wong, H-S Philip; Mitra, Subhasish

    2013-09-26

    The miniaturization of electronic devices has been the principal driving force behind the semiconductor industry, and has brought about major improvements in computational power and energy efficiency. Although advances with silicon-based electronics continue to be made, alternative technologies are being explored. Digital circuits based on transistors fabricated from carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have the potential to outperform silicon by improving the energy-delay product, a metric of energy efficiency, by more than an order of magnitude. Hence, CNTs are an exciting complement to existing semiconductor technologies. Owing to substantial fundamental imperfections inherent in CNTs, however, only very basic circuit blocks have been demonstrated. Here we show how these imperfections can be overcome, and demonstrate the first computer built entirely using CNT-based transistors. The CNT computer runs an operating system that is capable of multitasking: as a demonstration, we perform counting and integer-sorting simultaneously. In addition, we implement 20 different instructions from the commercial MIPS instruction set to demonstrate the generality of our CNT computer. This experimental demonstration is the most complex carbon-based electronic system yet realized. It is a considerable advance because CNTs are prominent among a variety of emerging technologies that are being considered for the next generation of highly energy-efficient electronic systems.

  15. Carbon nanofillers for machining insulating ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Malek

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of ceramics in emerging applications is principally limited by the final machining process necessary for producing microcomponents with complex geometries. The addition of carbon nanotubes greatly enhances the electrical properties of insulating ceramics allowing electrical discharge machining to be used to manufacture intricate parts. Meanwhile other properties of the ceramic may be either preserved or even improved. For the first time, a silicon nitride/carbon nanotubes microgear is electrically discharge machined with a remarkably high material removal rate, low surface roughness, and low tool wear. This offers unprecedented opportunities for the manufacture of complicated ceramic parts by adding carbon nanotubes for new engineering and biomedical applications.

  16. Integral Ring Carbon-Carbon Piston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An improved structure for a reciprocating internal combustion engine or compressor piston fabricate from carbon-carbon composite materials is disclosed. An integral ring carbon-carbon composite piston, disclosed herein, reduces the need for piston rings and for small clearances by providing a small flexible, integral component around the piston that allows for variation in clearance due to manufacturing tolerances, distortion due to pressure and thermal loads, and variations in thermal expansion differences between the piston and cylinder liner.

  17. Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation

    OpenAIRE

    Huijgen, W.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    The increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, mainly caused by fossil fuel combustion, has lead to concerns about global warming. A possible technology that can contribute to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions is CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. The basic concept behind mineral CO2 sequestration is the mimicking of natural weathering processes in which calcium or magnesium containing minerals react with gaseous CO2 and form solid calcium or magnesium carbonate...

  18. Research on Welding Test of Grey Cast Iron and Low-Carbon Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Grey cast iron's welding itself is a complex proble m.So proper welding materials must be selected,complex welding techniques such as preheating before weldingslow cooling after welding etc,should be taken. However the carbon component in low-carbon steel is comparatively low,the carbo n of welded joint will diffuse to the low-carbon steel when it is welded with gr ey cast iron,which will cause the component of carbon greatly increased at the low-carbon steel side in HAZ,high carbon martensite and cracks ...

  19. Measuring Tax Complexity

    OpenAIRE

    David Ulph

    2014-01-01

    This paper critically examines a number of issues relating to the measurement of tax complexity. It starts with an analysis of the concept of tax complexity, distinguishing tax design complexity and operational complexity. It considers the consequences/costs of complexity, and then examines the rationale for measuring complexity. Finally it applies the analysis to an examination of an index of complexity developed by the UK Office of Tax Simplification (OTS). Postprint

  20. Uranium nucleophilic carbene complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The only stable f-metal carbene complexes (excluding NHC) metals f present R2C2- groups having one or two phosphorus atoms in the central carbon in alpha position. The objective of this work was to develop the chemistry of carbenes for uranium (metal 5f) with the di-anion C{Ph2P(=S)}22- (SCS2-) to extend the organometallic chemistry of this element in its various oxidation states (+3-+6), and to reveal the influence of the 5f orbitals on the nature and reactivity of the double bond C=U. We first isolated the reactants M(SCHS) (M = Li and K) and demonstrated the role of the cation M+ on the evolution of the di-anion M2SCS (M = Li, K, Tl) which is transformed into LiSCHS in THF or into product of intramolecular cyclization K2[C(PhPS)2(C6H4)]. We have developed the necessary conditions mono-, bis- and tris-carbene directly from the di-anion SCS2- and UCl4, as the precursor used in uranium chemistry. The protonolysis reactions of amides compounds (U-NEt2) by the neutral ligand SCH2S were also studied. The compounds [Li(THF)]2[U(SCS)Cl3] and [U(SCS)Cl2(THF)2] were then used to prepare a variety of cyclopentadienyl and mono-cyclo-octa-tetra-enyliques uranium(IV) carbene compounds of the DFT analysis of compounds [M(SCS)Cl2(py)2] and [M(Cp)2(SCS)] (M = U, Zr) reveals the strong polarization of the M=C double bond, provides information on the nature of the σ and π interactions in this binding, and shows the important role of f orbitals. The influence of ancillary ligands on the M=C bond is revealed by examining the effects of replacing Cl- ligands and pyridine by C5H5- groups. Mulliken and NBO analyzes show that U=C bond, unlike the Zr=C bond, is not affected by the change in environment of the metal center. While the oxidation tests of carbene complexes of U(IV) were disappointing, the first carbene complex of uranium (VI), [UO2(SCS)(THF)2], was isolated with the uranyl ion UO22+. The reactions of compounds UO2X2 (X = I, OTf) with anions SCS2- and SCHS- provide the

  1. Carbon Residence Times in Pedogenic Carbonate Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monger, H.; Feng, Y.; Karnjanapiboonwang, A.

    2013-12-01

    Soil carbonate is a huge pool of terrestrial carbon that contains at least 930 to 940 Pg C and has influx rates on the order of 1 to 12 g CaCO3/m2/yr. Such large mass to flux ratios yield long mean residence times for carbon (e.g., 85,000 years)--assuming steady state. Like other global carbon pools, the soil carbonate pool has smaller sub-pools with higher influx rates and shorter mean residence times. For example, pedogenic carbonate in coppice dunes known to have formed since 1858 and carbonate formed on lithic artifacts in soils at archaeology sites suggests mean residence times can be as short as 120 years--again assuming steady state. Harder to assess are efflux rates as CO2 emissions or bicarbonate leaching. Some Bowen-ratio studies have nevertheless found evidence for CO2 emissions resulting from carbonate dissolution, and other studies have found evidence for bicarbonate leaching based on dissolution pipes through calcic horizons using soil morphology studies. Since an understanding of mean residence times are prerequisite for a better understanding of soil carbonate in the global carbon cycle, especially in a scenario of an expanding Aridosphere, more influx and efflux measurements are needed to evaluate the possibility of carbon sequestration by soil carbonate in hyperarid, arid, semiarid, or subhumid soils.

  2. Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijgen, W.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    The increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, mainly caused by fossil fuel combustion, has lead to concerns about global warming. A possible technology that can contribute to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions is CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. The basic concept beh

  3. On State Complexes and Special Cube Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Valerie J.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents the first steps toward a classification of non-positively curved cube complexes called state complexes. A "state complex" is a configuration space for a "reconfigurable system," i.e., an abstract system in which local movements occur in some discrete manner. Reconfigurable systems can be used to describe, for example,…

  4. Pricing complexity options

    OpenAIRE

    Malihe Alikhani; Bj{\\o}rn Kjos-Hanssen; Amirarsalan Pakravan; Babak Saadat

    2015-01-01

    We consider options that pay the complexity deficiency of a sequence of up and down ticks of a stock upon exercise. We study the price of European and American versions of this option numerically for automatic complexity, and theoretically for Kolmogorov complexity. We also consider run complexity, which is a restricted form of automatic complexity.

  5. Prospects in using carbon-carbon composite materials based on viscose carbon fibers for the space technology needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the unique combination of low density, high mechanical strength under elevated temperatures, high resistance to thermal shock loads and ablation resistance, carbon-carbon composite materials (CCCM) are widely used for manufacturing of highly thermally loaded structural components. The important scientific and technical difficulty is to increase and stabilize CCCM properties, reduce cost and leads to searching for new raw materials and engineering solutions. The article describes the prospects of replacing carbon fiber fills based on PAN-precursors which are traditionally used for producing CCCM by carbon fillers on the basis of viscose raw material; shows the advantages of using viscose-based carbon fibers when forming products of complex shape as well as the possibility of obtaining products with high functional characteristics. The creation of CCCM of layered reinforcement structure, in which carbon fabric layers interleave with layers of discontinuous carbon fibers, enabled to increase the overall density of carbon composites, to ensure sufficiently high level of mechanical characteristics and resistance to ablation

  6. 维生素C-稀土配合物在天然橡胶/炭黑复合材料中的防老化作用%Antiaging Effect of Vitamin C-Rare Earth Complex on Natural Rubber/Carbon Black Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗远芳; 杨超; 贾志欣; 贾德民; 陈俊; 郑德

    2012-01-01

    A novel rare earth complex was prepared from lanthanum ( La) and vitamin C and was used as a new type of antioxidant in natural rubber/carbon black ( NR/CB) composites. Then, the effects of the vitamin C-rare earth complex on the curing characteristics of NR/CB compounds and the mechanical properties of NR/CB vulcani-zates were investigated. Moreover, by means of FT-IR and according to the retention of mechanical properties and the variation of surface morphology, the effects of the rare earth complex on the antiaging properties of the NR/CB vulcanizates were also analyzed in detail and were compared with those of the commonly-used rubber antioxidants 4010NA, RD and MB. The results show that (1) the rare earth complex can accelerate the vulcanization of the NR/ CB compounds to a certain degree and improve the mechanical properties of the NR/CB vulcanizates; (2) the rare earth complex has a good antiaging effect on the NR/CB vulcanizates; (3) the thermo-oxidative aging resistance and UV aging resistance of the rare earth complex are close to those of 4010NA and RD and are superior to those of MB; and (4) the ozone aging resistance of the rare earth complex is particularly strong for the NR/CB vulcanizates, which is superior to those of RD and MB as well as to those of 4010NA with an excellent ozone aging resistance.%以镧和维生素C为原料制备了一种新型稀土配合物,将该新型稀土配合物作为一种新型防老剂应用于天然橡胶/炭黑(NR/CB)复合材料中,研究了该稀土配合物对NR/CB混炼胶硫化特性和硫化胶力学性能的影响,通过红外光谱、力学性能保持率及表面形貌变化详细分析了该稀土配合物对NR/CB硫化胶耐老化性能的影响,并与常用橡胶防老剂4010NA、RD和MB进行了比较.结果表明:维生素C-稀土配合物对NR/CB混炼胶具有一定的硫化促进作用,并能提高NR/CB硫化胶的力学性能;维生素C-稀土配合物在NR/CB复合材料中有优良的抗老化

  7. Measurement of carbon for carbon sequestration and site monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Madhavi Z [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    A 2 to 6 degree C increase in global temperature by 2050 has been predicted due to the production of greenhouse gases that is directly linked to human activities. This has encouraged an increase in the international efforts on ways to reduce anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases particularly carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) as evidence for the link between atmospheric greenhouse gases and climate change has been established. Suggestion that soils and vegetation could be managed to increase their uptake and storage of CO{sub 2}, and thus become 'land carbon sinks' is an incentive for scientists to undertake the ability to measure and quantify the carbon in soils and vegetation to establish base-line quantities present at this time. The verification of the permanence of these carbon sinks has raised some concern regarding the accuracy of their long-term existence. Out of the total percentage of carbon that is potentially sequestered in the terrestrial land mass, only 25% of that is sequestered above ground and almost 75% is hypothesized to be sequestered underground. Soil is composed of solids, liquids, and gases which is similar to a three-phase system. The gross chemical composition of soil organic carbon (SOC) consists of 65% humic substances that are amorphous, dark-colored, complex, polyelectrolyte-like materials that range in molecular weight from a few hundred to several thousand Daltons. The very complex structure of humic and fulvic acid makes it difficult to obtain a spectral signature for all soils in general. The humic acids of different soils have been observed to have polymeric structure, appearing as rings, chains and clusters as seen in electron microscope observations. The humification processes of the soils will decide the sizes of their macromolecules that range from 60-500 angstroms. The percentage of the humus that occurs in the light brown soils is much lower than the humus present in dark brown soils. The humus of forest soils is

  8. From carbon nanotubes to carbon atomic chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas García, Gilberto; Zhang, Weijia; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2010-10-01

    Carbyne is a linear allotrope of carbon. It is formed by a linear arrangement of carbon atoms with sp-hybridization. We present a reliable and reproducible experiment to obtain these carbon atomic chains using few-layer-graphene (FLG) sheets and a HRTEM. First the FLG sheets were synthesized from worm-like exfoliated graphite and then drop-casted on a lacey-carbon copper grid. Once in the TEM, two holes are opened near each other in a FLG sheet by focusing the electron beam into a small spot. Due to the radiation, the carbon atoms rearrange themselves between the two holes and form carbon fibers. The beam is concentrated on the carbon fibers in order excite the atoms and induce a tension until multi wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) is formed. As the radiation continues the MWCNT breaks down until there is only a single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT). Then, when the SWCNT breaks, an atomic carbon chain is formed, lasts for several seconds under the radiation and finally breaks. This demonstrates the stability of this carbon structure.

  9. Benchmarking carbon emissions performance in supply chains

    OpenAIRE

    Acquaye, Adolf; Genovese, Andrea; Barrett, John W.; Koh, Lenny

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – The paper aims to develop a benchmarking framework to address issues such as supply chain complexity and visibility, geographical differences and non-standardized data, ensuring that the entire supply chain environmental impact (in terms of carbon) and resource use for all tiers, including domestic and import flows, are evaluated. Benchmarking has become an important issue in supply chain management practice. However, challenges such as supply chain complexity and visibility, geogra...

  10. Serine one-carbon catabolism with formate overflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiser, Johannes; Tumanov, Sergey; Maddocks, Oliver; Labuschagne, Christiaan Fred; Athineos, Dimitris; Van Den Broek, Niels; Mackay, Gillian M.; Gottlieb, Eyal; Blyth, Karen; Vousden, Karen; Kamphorst, Jurre J.; Vazquez, Alexei

    2016-01-01

    Serine catabolism to glycine and a one-carbon unit has been linked to the anabolic requirements of proliferating mammalian cells. However, genome-scale modeling predicts a catabolic role with one-carbon release as formate. We experimentally prove that in cultured cancer cells and nontransformed fibroblasts, most of the serine-derived one-carbon units are released from cells as formate, and that formate release is dependent on mitochondrial reverse 10-CHO-THF synthetase activity. We also show that in cancer cells, formate release is coupled to mitochondrial complex I activity, whereas in nontransformed fibroblasts, it is partially insensitive to inhibition of complex I activity. We demonstrate that in mice, about 50% of plasma formate is derived from serine and that serine starvation or complex I inhibition reduces formate synthesis in vivo. These observations transform our understanding of one-carbon metabolism and have implications for the treatment of diabetes and cancer with complex I inhibitors.

  11. STRUCTURE AND CHARACTERISTICS OF PATENTED HIGH-CARBON WIRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ju. Borisenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of bainite structure on mechanical characteristics of wire of steel 80 after patenting is studied. The quantity and structure state of bainite, providing high complex of mechanical characteristics of high-carbon wire, is determined.

  12. Conformal Carbon Nanotubes for Stray Light Suppression Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our objective is to apply CVD and non-CVD carbon nanotubes to complex shapes that numerous scientists have requested for stray light control.  Currently, CVD...

  13. Potential for carbon adsorption on concrete: surface XPS analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselbach, Liv M; Ma, Shuguo

    2008-07-15

    The concrete industry is a contributor to the global carbon cycle particularly with respect to the contribution of carbon dioxide in the manufacturing of cement (calcination). The reverse reaction of carbonation is known to occur in concrete, but is usually limited to exterior surfaces exposed to carbon dioxide and humidity in the air. As alternate concrete uses expand which have more surface area, such as crushed concrete for recycling, it is important to understand surface adsorption of carbon dioxide and the positive impacts it might have on the carbon cycle. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used in this study to evaluate carbon species on hydrated cement mortar surfaces. Initial estimates for carbon absorption in concrete using othertechniques predictthe potential for carbonate species to be a fraction of the calcination stoichiometric equivalent The XPS results indicate that there is a rapid and substantial uptake of carbon dioxide on the surfaces of these mortars, sometimes exceeding the calcination stoichiometric equivalents, indicative of carbon dioxide surface complexation species. On pure calcite, the excess is on the order of 30%. This accelerated carbon dioxide surface adsorption phenomenon may be importantfor determining novel and effective carbon sequestration processes using recycled concrete. PMID:18754389

  14. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  15. Mutagenicity of carbon nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallin, Håkan; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; White, Paul A;

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials such carbon nanotubes, graphene and fullerenes are some the most promising nanomaterials. Although carbon nanomaterials have been reported to possess genotoxic potential, it is imperitive to analyse the data on the genotoxicity of carbon nanomaterials in vivo and in vitro...

  16. CATALYTIC ACTIVITIES OF RARE-EARTH CALIXARENE COMPLEXES IN POLYMER SYNTHESES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-quan Shen

    2005-01-01

    The studies of our group on the catalytic activities of rare earth calixarene complexes in polymer syntheses are reviewed. Rare earth calixarene complexes are effect catalysts for the polymerizations of butadiene, isoprene, ethylene,styrene, propylene oxide, styrene oxide, trimethylene carbonate and 2,2-dimethyl-trimethylene carbonate.

  17. Electroanalysis with carbon paste electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Svancara, Ivan; Walcarius, Alain; Vytras, Karel

    2011-01-01

    Introduction to Electrochemistry and Electroanalysis with Carbon Paste-Based ElectrodesHistorical Survey and GlossaryField in Publication Activities and LiteratureCarbon Pastes and Carbon Paste ElectrodesCarbon Paste as the Binary MixtureClassification of Carbon Pastes and Carbon Paste ElectrodesConstruction of Carbon Paste HoldersCarbon Paste as the Electrode MaterialPhysicochemical Properties of Carbon PastesElectrochemical Characteristics of Carbon PastesTesting of Unmodified CPEsIntera

  18. Mesoporous carbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng; Fulvio, Pasquale Fernando; Mayes, Richard T.; Wang, Xiqing; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Guo, Bingkun

    2014-09-09

    A conductive mesoporous carbon composite comprising conductive carbon nanoparticles contained within a mesoporous carbon matrix, wherein the conductive mesoporous carbon composite possesses at least a portion of mesopores having a pore size of at least 10 nm and up to 50 nm, and wherein the mesopores are either within the mesoporous carbon matrix, or are spacings delineated by surfaces of said conductive carbon nanoparticles when said conductive carbon nanoparticles are fused with each other, or both. Methods for producing the above-described composite, devices incorporating them (e.g., lithium batteries), and methods of using them, are also described.

  19. Pyrolyzed thin film carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Liger, Matthieu (Inventor); Harder, Theodore (Inventor); Konishi, Satoshi (Inventor); Miserendino, Scott (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method of making carbon thin films comprises depositing a catalyst on a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon in contact with the catalyst and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon. A method of controlling a carbon thin film density comprises etching a cavity into a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon into the cavity, and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon while in the cavity to form a carbon thin film. Controlling a carbon thin film density is achieved by changing the volume of the cavity. Methods of making carbon containing patterned structures are also provided. Carbon thin films and carbon containing patterned structures can be used in NEMS, MEMS, liquid chromatography, and sensor devices.

  20. Structurally simple complexes of CO2

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Luke J.; Katherine N. Robertson; Kemp, Richard A.; Tuononen, Heikki; Clyburne, Jason A. C.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to bind CO2 through the formation of low-energy, easily-broken, bonds could prove invaluable in a variety of chemical contexts. For example, weak bonds to CO2 would greatly decrease the cost of the energy-intensive sorbent-regeneration step common to most carbon capture technologies. Furthermore, exploration of this field could lead to the discovery of novel CO2 chemistry. Reduction of complexed carbon dioxide might generate chemical feedstocks for the preparation of value-added p...

  1. Using Carbon Emissions Data to "Heat Up" Descriptive Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This article illustrates using carbon emissions data in an introductory statistics assignment. The carbon emissions data has desirable characteristics including: choice of measure; skewness; and outliers. These complexities allow research and public policy debate to be introduced. (Contains 4 figures and 2 tables.)

  2. Explorations of soil microbial processes driven by dissolved organic carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straathof, A.L.

    2015-01-01

    Explorations of soil microbial processes driven by dissolved organic carbon Angela L. Straathof June 17, 2015, Wageningen UR ISBN 978-94-6257-327-7 Abstract Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a complex, heterogeneous mixture of C compounds which, as

  3. CARBON NANOTUBES AND PHARMACEUTICAL APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Pavani

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are often described as a graphene sheet rolled up into the shape of a cylinder. These have fascinated scientists with their extraordinary properties. These compounds have become increasingly popular in various fields simply because of their small size and amazing optical, electric and magnetic properties when used alone or with additions of metals. Carbon nanotubes have potential therapeutic applications in the field of drug delivery, diagnostics, and biosensing. Functionalized carbon nanotubes can also act as vaccine delivery systems.Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are considered to be one of the innovative resources in nanotechnology with possible use in wide range of biomedical applications viz. cancer treatment, bioengineering, cardiac autonomic regulation, platelet activation and tissue regeneration. The effect of CNTs on cells and tissues are extremely important for their use in various complex biological systems. With the increasing interest shown by the nanotechnology research community in this field, it is expected that plenty of applications of CNTs will be explored in future.

  4. Immobilized Ruthenium Catalyst for Carbon Dioxide Hydrogenation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Min YU; Jin Hua FEI; Yi Ping ZHANG; Xiao Ming ZHENG

    2006-01-01

    Three kinds of cross linked polystyrene resin (PS) supported ruthenium complexes were developed as catalysts for the synthesis of formic acid from carbon dioxide hydrogenation. Many factors, such as the functionalized supports, solvents and ligands, could influence their activities and reuse performances greatly. These immobilized catalysts also offer the industrial advantages such as easy separation.

  5. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and electronic structure of some new Cu(I) carbene complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chinnappan Sivasankar; Christina Baskaran; Ashoka G Samuelson

    2006-05-01

    Reaction of oligomeric Cu(I) complexes [Cu{-S-C(=NR)(O-Ar-CH3)}] with Lewis acids gave Cu(I) carbene complexes, which were characterized by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Cu(I) carbene complexes could be directly generated from RNCS, Cu(I)-OAr and Lewis acids; this method can be used to prepare Cu(I) carbene complexes with different substitutents on the carbene carbon. The complexes were unreactive towards olefins and do not undergo cyclopropanation. Electronic structure calculations (DFT) show that the charge on the carbene carbon plays an important role in controlling the reactivity of the carbene complex.

  6. Escaping carbon lock-in

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unruh, G.C. [Instituto de Empresa, Madrid (Spain)

    2002-03-01

    This article explores the climate policy implications of the arguments made in ''Understanding carbon lock-in'' (Unruh, 2000), which posited that industrial countries have become locked-into fossil fuel-based energy systems through path dependent processes driven by increasing returns to scale. Carbon lock-in arises through technological, organizational, social and institutional co-evolution, ''culminating'' in what was termed as techno-institutional complex (TIC). In order to resolve the climate problem, an escape from the lock-in condition is required. However, due to the self-referential nature of TIC, escape conditions are unlikely to be generated internally and it is argued here that erogenous forces are probably required. (author)

  7. High frequency conductivity in carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Abukari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on theoretical analysis of high frequency conductivity in carbon nanotubes. Using the kinetic equation with constant relaxation time, an analytical expression for the complex conductivity is obtained. The real part of the complex conductivity is initially negative at zero frequency and become more negative with increasing frequency, until it reaches a resonance minimum at ω ∼ ωB for metallic zigzag CNs and ω < ωB for armchair CNs. This resonance enhancement is indicative for terahertz gain without the formation of current instabilities induced by negative dc conductivity. We noted that due to the high density of states of conduction electrons in metallic zigzag carbon nanotubes and the specific dispersion law inherent in hexagonal crystalline structure result in a uniquely high frequency conductivity than the corresponding values for metallic armchair carbon nanotubes. We suggest that this phenomenon can be used to suppress current instabilities that are normally associated with a negative dc differential conductivity.

  8. Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide on Activated Carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Guo; Liping Chang; Kechang Xie

    2006-01-01

    The adsorption of CO2 on a raw activated carbon A and three modified activated carbon samples B, C, and D at temperatures ranging from 303 to 333 K and the thermodynamics of adsorption have been investigated using a vacuum adsorption apparatus in order to obtain more information about the effect of CO2 on removal of organic sulfur-containing compounds in industrial gases. The active ingredients impregnated in the carbon samples show significant influence on the adsorption for CO2 and its volumes adsorbed on modified carbon samples B, C, and D are all larger than that on the raw carbon sample A. On the other hand, the physical parameters such as surface area, pore volume, and micropore volume of carbon samples show no influence on the adsorbed amount of CO2. The Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) equation was the best model for fitting the adsorption data on carbon samples A and B, while the Freundlich equation was the best fit for the adsorption on carbon samples C and D. The isosteric heats of adsorption on carbon samples A, B, C, and D derived from the adsorption isotherms using the Clapeyron equation decreased slightly increasing surface loading. The heat of adsorption lay between 10.5 and 28.4 kJ/mol, with the carbon sample D having the highest value at all surface coverages that were studied. The observed entropy change associated with the adsorption for the carbon samples A, B, and C (above the surface coverage of 7 ml/g) was lower than the theoretical value for mobile adsorption. However, it was higher than the theoretical value for mobile adsorption but lower than the theoretical value for localized adsorption for carbon sample D.

  9. Accelerating Mineral Carbonation Using Carbonic Anhydrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Ian M; Harrison, Anna L; Dipple, Gregory M

    2016-03-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzymes have gained considerable attention for their potential use in carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technologies because they are able to catalyze rapidly the interconversion of aqueous CO2 and bicarbonate. However, there are challenges for widespread implementation including the need to develop mineralization process routes for permanent carbon storage. Mineral carbonation of highly reactive feedstocks may be limited by the supply rate of CO2. This rate limitation can be directly addressed by incorporating enzyme-catalyzed CO2 hydration. This study examined the effects of bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA) and CO2-rich gas streams on the carbonation rate of brucite [Mg(OH)2], a highly reactive mineral. Alkaline brucite slurries were amended with BCA and supplied with 10% CO2 gas while aqueous chemistry and solids were monitored throughout the experiments (hours to days). In comparison to controls, brucite carbonation using BCA was accelerated by up to 240%. Nesquehonite [MgCO3·3H2O] precipitation limited the accumulation of hydrated CO2 species, apparently preventing BCA from catalyzing the dehydration reaction. Geochemical models reproduce observed reaction progress in all experiments, revealing a linear correlation between CO2 uptake and carbonation rate. Data demonstrates that carbonation in BCA-amended reactors remained limited by CO2 supply, implying further acceleration is possible. PMID:26829491

  10. Carbon fuel cells with carbon corrosion suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.

    2012-04-10

    An electrochemical cell apparatus that can operate as either a fuel cell or a battery includes a cathode compartment, an anode compartment operatively connected to the cathode compartment, and a carbon fuel cell section connected to the anode compartment and the cathode compartment. An effusion plate is operatively positioned adjacent the anode compartment or the cathode compartment. The effusion plate allows passage of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide exhaust channels are operatively positioned in the electrochemical cell to direct the carbon dioxide from the electrochemical cell.

  11. Complex Multiplicative Calculus

    OpenAIRE

    Bashirov, Agamirza; Riza, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    In the present paper we extend the concepts of multiplicative de- rivative and integral to complex-valued functions of complex variable. Some drawbacks, arising with these concepts in the real case, are explained satis- factorily. Properties of complex multiplicative derivatives and integrals are studied. In particular, the fundamental theorem of complex multiplicative calculus, relating these concepts, is proved. It is shown that complex multi- plicative calculus is not just another realizat...

  12. Second Quantized Kolmogorov Complexity

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, Caroline; Vedral, Vlatko; Nagarajan, Rajagopal

    2008-01-01

    The Kolmogorov complexity of a string is the length of its shortest description. We define a second quantised Kolmogorov complexity where the length of a description is defined to be the average length of its superposition. We discuss this complexity's basic properties. We define the corresponding prefix complexity and show that the inequalities obeyed by this prefix complexity are also obeyed by von Neumann entropy.

  13. Complex networks analysis of language complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Amancio, Diego R; Oliveira, Osvaldo N; Costa, Luciano da F; 10.1209/0295-5075/100/58002

    2013-01-01

    Methods from statistical physics, such as those involving complex networks, have been increasingly used in quantitative analysis of linguistic phenomena. In this paper, we represented pieces of text with different levels of simplification in co-occurrence networks and found that topological regularity correlated negatively with textual complexity. Furthermore, in less complex texts the distance between concepts, represented as nodes, tended to decrease. The complex networks metrics were treated with multivariate pattern recognition techniques, which allowed us to distinguish between original texts and their simplified versions. For each original text, two simplified versions were generated manually with increasing number of simplification operations. As expected, distinction was easier for the strongly simplified versions, where the most relevant metrics were node strength, shortest paths and diversity. Also, the discrimination of complex texts was improved with higher hierarchical network metrics, thus point...

  14. Carbon Nanomaterials for Road Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaporotskova Irina Vladimirovna

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The requirement of developing and modernizing the roads in Russia and in the Volgograd region in particular, is based on need of expanding the directions of scientific research on road and transport complexes. They have to be aimed at the development of the theory of transport streams, traffic safety increase, and, first of all, at the application of original methods of road development and modernization, introduction of modern technologies and road-building materials.On the basis of the analysis of the plans for transportation sphere development in the Volgograd region assuming the need to apply the new technologies allowing to create qualitative paving, the authors propose the technology of creating a heavy-duty paving with the use of carbon nanomaterial. The knowledge on strengthening the characteristics of carbon nanotubes is a unique material for nanotechnology development which allowed to assume the analysis of general information about asphalt concrete. The analysis showed that carbon nanotubes can be used for improvement of operational characteristics of asphalt concrete, and it is possible to carry out additives of nanotubes in hot as well as in cold bitumen. The article contains the basic principles of creation of the new road material received by means of bitumen reinforcing by carbon nanotubes. The structures received by the offered technique binding on the basis of the bitumens modified by carbon nanomaterial can be used for coverings and bases on highways of all categories in all road and climatic zones of Russia. The technical result consists in increasing the durability and elasticity of the received asphalt covering, and also the increase of water resistance, heat resistance and frost resistance, the expansion of temperature range of its laying in the field of negative temperatures.

  15. Preliminary research on movement regularity of fine carbon fiber powder injected into intracrania of mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FEI Ke-xiang; LI Guo-wei; GONG Ti; WANG Hong; PENG Xian-gao; GAO Lin; Zhang Yan-xiang; LIU Lian-tao

    2001-01-01

    @@ The carbon fiber and carbon fiber for complex materials implanted have been applied to the clinic medicine, in which they are served as the materials for repairing tissues and organs as well as the materials of artificial tissuesand organs. The carbon fiber also acts as the surrogate of extracellular matrix in the study of tissue engineering tendon,and so on.

  16. Identification of carbonate pedofeatures of different ages in modern chernozems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovda, I. V.; Morgun, E. G.; Lebedeva, M. P.; Oleinik, S. A.; Shishkov, V. A.

    2016-07-01

    Carbonate pedofeatures of three chernozemic soils developed from loesslike loams in the foreststeppe zone of Lipetsk oblast under fallow plot (Luvic Chernozem (Clayic, Pachic)) and under forest (Calcic Chernozem (Clayic, Pachic)) and in the steppe zone of Dnepropetrovsk oblast (Calcic Chernozem (Episiltic, Endoclayic, Pachic)) were studied in the field and laboratory with the use of a set of methods, including the radiocarbon method, mass spectrometry, and micro- and submicromorphology. The morphological diversity of carbonate pedofeatures in these soils was represented by carbonate veins, coatings, disperse carbonates (carbonate impregnations), soft masses (beloglazka), and concretions. In the forest-steppe soils, disperse carbonates and soft masses were absent. The radiocarbon age of carbonate pedofeatures in the forest-steppe soils varied within a relatively narrow range of 3-4.3 ka cal BP with a tendency for a younger age of carbonate concretions subjected to destruction (geodes). In the steppe chernozem, this range was larger, and the 14C ages of different forms of carbonate pedofeatures were different. Thus, soft masses (beloglazka) had the age of 5.5-6 ka cal BP; disperse carbonates, 17.5-18.5 ka cal BP; and hard carbonate concretions, 26-27 ka cal BP. Data on δ13C demonstrated that the isotopic composition of carbon in virtually all the "nonlabile" carbonate pedofeatures does not correspond to the isotopic composition of carbon of the modern soil organic matter. It was shown that the studied chernozemic soils are polygenetic formations containing carbonate pedofeatures of different ages: (a) recent (currently growing), (b) relict, and (c) inherited pedofeatures. The latter group represents complex pedofeatures that include ancient fragments integrated in younger pedofeatures, e.g., the Holocene soft carbonate nodules with inclusions of fragments of the ancient microcodium.

  17. Air/Water-Stable Tridentate NHC-PdII Complex; Catalytic C-H Activation of Hydrocarbons via H/D Exchange Process in D2O

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Joo Ho; Yoo, Kyung Soo; Park, Chan Pil; Olsen, Janet M.; Sakaguchi, Satoshi; Surya Prakash, G. K.; Mathew, Thomas; Jung, Kyung Woon

    2009-01-01

    While developing novel catalysts for carbon-carbon or carbon-heteroatom coupling (N, O, or F), we were able to introduce tridentate NHC-amidate-alkoxide palladium(II) complexes. In aqueous solution, these NHC-Pd(II) complexes showed high ability for C-H activation of various hydrocarbons (cyclohexane, cyclopentane, dimethyl ether, THF, acetone, and toluene) under mild conditions.

  18. Exploring the uranyl organometallic chemistry: from single to double uranium carbon bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranyl organometallic complexes featuring uranium(VI) carbon single and double bonds have been obtained from uranyl UO2X2 precursors by avoiding reduction of the metal center. X-ray diffraction and density functional theory analyses of these complexes showed that the UC and UdC bonds are polarized toward the nucleophilic carbon. (authors)

  19. Separation of gas mixtures by supported complexes. Final report, 1 October 1982-30 September 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, D.A.; Hallen, R.T.; Lilga, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    This final report covers research performed to identify and demonstrate advantageous procedures for the chemical separation of gases, such as CO, CO/sub 2/, and H/sub 2/, from medium-Btu gas mixtures by use of supported complexes. Three complexes were chosen for rapid gas uptake and selectivity at 25/sup 0/C from among a group of 22 coordination complexes synthesized during this program. The three complexes showed considerable selectivity toward individual gases. For instance, Pd/sub 2/(dpm)/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ or bis-..mu..-(bisdiphenylphosphinomethane)-dichlorodipalladium (Pd-Pd), rapidly bound carbon monoxide from solution. This complex could be regenerated, with the carbon monoxide reversibly removed, by warming to 40/sup 0/C. The presence of other gases, such as carbon dioxide, oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, ethylene, or acetylene, had no effect upon the rapid uptake of carbon monoxide or its removal. Such selectivity was also noted with Ru(CO)/sub 2/(PPh/sub 3/)/sub 3/, biscarbonyltris(triphenylphosphine)ruthenium. Although this complex bound hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and oxygen in solution, the hydrogen was taken up twice as fast as carbon monoxide and seven times faster than oxygen. These gases could be removed from the complex with mild heat or decreased pressure. Crystalline Rh(OH)(CO)(PPh/sub 3/)/sub 2/, hydroxocarbonylbis(triphenylphosphine)rhodium, rapidly bound carbon dioxide; the complex was regenerated at 50/sup 0/C under reduced pressure. The rapid uptake of carbon dioxide by this complex was not changed in the presence of oxygen. In general the three selected crystalline or solvent dissolved complexes performed well in the absence of polymeric support. The stability and favorable kinetics of the three complexes suggest that they could be utilized in a solution system for gas separation (Conceptual Analyses and Preliminary Economics). Further, these complexes appear to be superb candidates as transport agents for facilitated-transport, membrane systems

  20. Yeast Carbon Catabolite Repression†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gancedo, Juana M.

    1998-01-01

    Glucose and related sugars repress the transcription of genes encoding enzymes required for the utilization of alternative carbon sources; some of these genes are also repressed by other sugars such as galactose, and the process is known as catabolite repression. The different sugars produce signals which modify the conformation of certain proteins that, in turn, directly or through a regulatory cascade affect the expression of the genes subject to catabolite repression. These genes are not all controlled by a single set of regulatory proteins, but there are different circuits of repression for different groups of genes. However, the protein kinase Snf1/Cat1 is shared by the various circuits and is therefore a central element in the regulatory process. Snf1 is not operative in the presence of glucose, and preliminary evidence suggests that Snf1 is in a dephosphorylated state under these conditions. However, the enzymes that phosphorylate and dephosphorylate Snf1 have not been identified, and it is not known how the presence of glucose may affect their activity. What has been established is that Snf1 remains active in mutants lacking either the proteins Grr1/Cat80 or Hxk2 or the Glc7 complex, which functions as a protein phosphatase. One of the main roles of Snf1 is to relieve repression by the Mig1 complex, but it is also required for the operation of transcription factors such as Adr1 and possibly other factors that are still unidentified. Although our knowledge of catabolite repression is still very incomplete, it is possible in certain cases to propose a partial model of the way in which the different elements involved in catabolite repression may be integrated. PMID:9618445

  1. Trading forest carbon - OSU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issues associate with trading carbon sequestered in forests are discussed. Scientific uncertainties associated with carbon measurement are discussed with respect to proposed accounting procedures. Major issues include: (1) Establishing baselines. (2) Determining additivity from f...

  2. Soil Organic Carbon Stock

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Soil organic carbon (SOC) is the carbon held within soil organic constituents (i.e., products produced as dead plants and animals decompose and the soil microbial...

  3. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education / Safety Education Centers En Español Carbon Monoxide Information Center The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known ... Install one and check its batteries regularly. View Information About CO Alarms Other CO Topics Safety Tips ...

  4. Biomass Carbon Stock

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Biomass carbon includes carbon stored in above- and below-ground live plant components (such as leaf, branch, stem and root) as well as in standing and down dead...

  5. Carbon Monoxide Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with the Media Fire Protection Technology Carbon monoxide safety outreach materials Help inform residents in your community ... KB | Spanish PDF 645 KB Handout: carbon monoxide safety Download this handout and add your organization's logo ...

  6. Calcium carbonate overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Some products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: ... and mineral supplements Other products may also contain calcium ...

  7. Potassium carbonate poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potassium carbonate is a white powder used to make soap, glass, and other items. This article discusses poisoning from swallowing or breathing in potassium carbonate. This article is for information only. Do ...

  8. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  9. Metal filled porous carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Adam F.; Vajo, John J.; Cumberland, Robert W.; Liu, Ping; Salguero, Tina T.

    2011-03-22

    A porous carbon scaffold with a surface and pores, the porous carbon scaffold containing a primary metal and a secondary metal, where the primary metal is a metal that does not wet the surface of the pores of the carbon scaffold but wets the surface of the secondary metal, and the secondary metal is interspersed between the surface of the pores of the carbon scaffold and the primary metal.

  10. Adaptive evolution of complex innovations through stepwise metabolic niche expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szappanos, Balázs; Fritzemeier, Jonathan; Csörgő, Bálint; Lázár, Viktória; Lu, Xiaowen; Fekete, Gergely; Bálint, Balázs; Herczeg, Róbert; Nagy, István; Notebaart, Richard A; Lercher, Martin J; Pál, Csaba; Papp, Balázs

    2016-01-01

    A central challenge in evolutionary biology concerns the mechanisms by which complex metabolic innovations requiring multiple mutations arise. Here, we propose that metabolic innovations accessible through the addition of a single reaction serve as stepping stones towards the later establishment of complex metabolic features in another environment. We demonstrate the feasibility of this hypothesis through three complementary analyses. First, using genome-scale metabolic modelling, we show that complex metabolic innovations in Escherichia coli can arise via changing nutrient conditions. Second, using phylogenetic approaches, we demonstrate that the acquisition patterns of complex metabolic pathways during the evolutionary history of bacterial genomes support the hypothesis. Third, we show how adaptation of laboratory populations of E. coli to one carbon source facilitates the later adaptation to another carbon source. Our work demonstrates how complex innovations can evolve through series of adaptive steps without the need to invoke non-adaptive processes. PMID:27197754

  11. Protolytic carbon film technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renschler, C.L.; White, C.A.

    1996-04-01

    This paper presents a technique for the deposition of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) on virtually any surface allowing carbon film formation with only the caveat that the substrate must withstand carbonization temperatures of at least 600 degrees centigrade. The influence of processing conditions upon the structure and properties of the carbonized film is discussed. Electrical conductivity, microstructure, and morphology control are also described.

  12. Carbon nanotube quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapmaz, S.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature electron transport measurements on individual single wall carbon nanotubes are described in this thesis. Carbon nanotubes are small hollow cylinders made entirely out of carbon atoms. At low temperatures (below ~10 K) finite length nanotubes form quantum dots. Because of its small si

  13. Carbon Goes To…

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savasci, Funda

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this activity are to help middle school students understand the carbon cycle and realize how human activities affect the carbon cycle. This activity consists of two parts. The first part of the activity focuses on the carbon cycle, especially before the Industrial Revolution, while the second part of the activity focuses on how…

  14. Science Letters: Nitrogen doping of activated carbon loading Fe2O3 and activity in carbon-nitric oxide reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Xian-kai; ZOU Xue-quan; SHI Hui-xiang; WANG Da-hui

    2007-01-01

    Nitrogen doping of activated carbon loading Fe2O3 was performed by annealing in ammonia, and the activity of the modified carbon for NO reduction was studied in the presence of oxygen. Results show that Fe2O3 enhances the amount of surface oxygen complexes and facilitates nitrogen incorporation in the carbon, especially in the form of pyridinic nitrogen. The modified carbon shows excellent activity for NO reduction in the low temperature regime (<500 ℃) because of the cooperative effect of Fe2O3 and the surface nitrogen species.

  15. Carbon/Carbon Pistons for Internal Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    Carbon/carbon piston performs same function as aluminum pistons in reciprocating internal combustion engines while reducing weight and increasing mechanical and thermal efficiencies of engine. Carbon/carbon piston concept features low piston-to-cylinder wall clearance - so low piston rings and skirts unnecessary. Advantages possible by negligible coefficient of thermal expansion of carbon/carbon.

  16. CARBONATE METHOD OF SEPARATION OF TETRAVALENT PLUTONIUM FROM FISSION PRODUCT VALUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, R.B.; Stoughton, R.W.

    1959-02-01

    It has been found that plutonium forms an insoluble precipitate with carbonate ion when the carbonate ion is present in stoichiometric proportions, while an excess of the carbonate ion complexes plutonium and renders it soluble. A method for separating tetravalent plutonium from lanthanum-group rare earths has been based on this discovery, since these rare earths form insoluble carbonates in approximately neutral solutions. According to the process the pH is adjusted to between 5 and 7, and approximately stoichiometric amounts of carbonate ion are added to the solution causing the formation of a precipitate of plutonium carbonate and the lanthanum-group rare earth carbonates. The precipitate is then separated from the solution and contacted with a carbonate solution of a concentration between 1 M and 3 M to complex and redissolve the plutonium precipitate, and thus separate it from the insoluble rare earth precipitate.

  17. Irinotecan Lipid Complex Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irinotecan lipid complex is used in combination with other medications to treat pancreatic cancer that has spread to other ... worsened after treatment with other chemotherapy medications. Irinotecan lipid complex is in a class of antineoplastic medications ...

  18. Doxorubicin Lipid Complex Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doxorubicin lipid complex is used to treat ovarian cancer that has not improved or that has worsened after treatment with other medications. Doxorubicin lipid complex is also used to treat Kaposi's sarcoma ( ...

  19. Vincristine Lipid Complex Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincristine lipid complex is used to treat a certain type of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; a type of cancer ... least two different treatments with other medications. Vincristine lipid complex is in a class of medications called ...

  20. Complexity An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Parwani, R R

    2002-01-01

    This article summarises a Web-book on "Complexity" that was developed to introduce undergraduate students to interesting complex systems in the biological, physical and social sciences, and the common tools, principles and concepts used for their study.

  1. Curve complexes are rigid

    OpenAIRE

    Rafi, Kasra; Schleimer, Saul

    2007-01-01

    Any quasi-isometry of the complex of curves is bounded distance from a simplicial automorphism. As a consequence, the quasi-isometry type of the curve complex determines the homeomorphism type of the surface.

  2. Quantum Communication Complexity

    OpenAIRE

    Klauck, Hartmut

    2000-01-01

    This paper surveys the field of quantum communication complexity. Some interesting recent results are collected concerning relations to classical communication, lower bound methods, one-way communication, and applications of quantum communication complexity.

  3. Oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Azevedo, Cristina G.; Vollhardt, K. Peter C.

    2002-01-18

    Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes, namely those of fulvalene, tercyclopentadienyl, quatercyclopentadienyl, and pentacyclopentadienyl(cyclopentadienyl) are the subject of this account. Thermal-, photo-, and redox chemistries of homo- and heteropolynuclear complexes are described.

  4. Complexity and Dynamical Depth

    OpenAIRE

    Terrence Deacon; Spyridon Koutroufinis

    2014-01-01

    We argue that a critical difference distinguishing machines from organisms and computers from brains is not complexity in a structural sense, but a difference in dynamical organization that is not well accounted for by current complexity measures. We propose a measure of the complexity of a system that is largely orthogonal to computational, information theoretic, or thermodynamic conceptions of structural complexity. What we call a system’s dynamical depth is a separate dimension of system c...

  5. ACTIVATED CARBON FROM LIGNITE FOR WATER TREATMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwin S. Olson; Daniel J. Stepan

    2000-07-01

    High concentrations of humate in surface water result in the formation of excess amounts of chlorinated byproducts during disinfection treatment. These precursors can be removed in water treatment prior to disinfection using powdered activated carbon. In the interest of developing a more cost-effective method for removal of humates in surface water, a comparison of the activities of carbons prepared from North Dakota lignites with those of commercial carbons was conducted. Previous studies indicated that a commercial carbon prepared from Texas lignite (Darco HDB) was superior to those prepared from bituminous coals for water treatment. That the high alkali content of North Dakota lignites would result in favorable adsorptive properties for the very large humate molecules was hypothesized, owing to the formation of larger pores during activation. Since no standard humate test has been previously developed, initial adsorption testing was performed using smaller dye molecules with various types of ionic character. With the cationic dye, methylene blue, a carbon prepared from a high-sodium lignite (HSKRC) adsorbed more dye than the Darco HDB. The carbon from the low-sodium lignite was much inferior. With another cationic dye, malachite green, the Darco HDB was slightly better. With anionic dyes, methyl red and azocarmine-B, the results for the HSKRC and Darco HDB were comparable. A humate test was developed using Aldrich humic acid. The HSKRC and the Darco HDB gave equally high adsorption capacities for the humate (138 mg/g), consistent with the similarities observed in earlier tests. A carbon prepared from a high-sodium lignite from a different mine showed an outstanding improvement (201 mg/g). The carbons prepared from the low-sodium lignites from both mines showed poor adsorption capacities for humate. Adsorption isotherms were performed for the set of activated carbons in the humate system. These exhibited a complex behavior interpreted as resulting from two types

  6. Complexity Near Horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Halyo, Edi

    2015-01-01

    We generalize the concept of complexity near horizons to all nondegenerate black holes. For Schwarzschild black holes, we show that Rindler observers see a complexity change of $S$ during proper time $1/\\kappa$ which corresponds to the creation of a causal patch with proper length $1/\\kappa$ inside the horizon. We attempt to describe complexity in the horizon CFT and the Euclidean picture.

  7. Carbonate Cements from the Sverrefjell and Sigurdfjell Volcanoes, Svalbard Norway: Analogs for Martian Carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, D. F.; Treiman, A. H.; Morris, R.; Bish, D.; Amundsen, H.E.F.; Steele, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Sverrefjell and Sigurdfjell volcanic complexes erupted at 1Ma on Svalbard, Norway. Sverrefjell is a cone of cinders, pillow lavas and dikes; Sigurdfjell is elongate in outcrop and may represent a fissure eruption [1]. The lavas of both volcanos were volatile rich. The volcanos erupted under ice and were subsequently dissected by glaciation (glacial eratics are present on most of Sverrefjell, even on its summit). Eruption beneath an ice sheet is inferred, based on the presence of pillow lavas from near sea level to 1000 m above sea level. Sverrefjell contains the largest fraction of ultramafic xenoliths of any volcanic complex in the world, in places accounting for as much as 50% of the volume of the outcrop. The Sverrefjell and Sigurdfell volcanos contain carbonate cements of several varieties: (1) Amundsen [2] reported Mg-Fe-rich carbonate in sub-mm globules in basalts and ultramafic xenoliths from the volcanos. These globules are the best terrestrial analogs to the carbonate globules in the Mars meteorite ALH84001 [3]. (2) Thick (1-3 cm) coatings of carbonate cement drape the walls of vertical volcanic pipes or conduits on the flanks and near the present summit of Sverrefjell. Similar occurrences are found on Sigurdfjell. (3) Breccia-filled pipes or vents occur on Sverrefjell and Siggurdfjell in which the breccia fragments are cemented by carbonate. The fragments themselves commonly contain carbonate globules similar to those found in the basalts and ultramafic xenoliths.

  8. Carbon-14 waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-14 occurs in nature, but is also formed in nuclear reactors. Because of its long half-life and the biological significance of carbon, releases from nuclear facilities could have a significant radiological impact. Waste management strategies for carbon-14 are therefore of current concern. Carbon-14 is present in a variety of waste streams both at reactors and at reprocessing plants. A reliable picture of the production and release of carbon-14 from various reactor systems has been built up for the purposes of this study. A possible management strategy for carbon-14 might be the reduction of nitrogen impurity levels in core materials, since the activation of 14N is usually the dominant source of carbon-14. The key problem in carbon-14 management is its retention of off-gas streams, particularly in the dissolver off-gas stream at reprocessing plants. Three alternative trapping processes that convert carbon dioxide into insoluble carbonates have been suggested. The results show that none of the options considered need be rejected on the grounds of potential radiation doses to individuals. All exposures should be as low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account. If, on these grounds, retention and disposal of carbon-14 is found to be beneficial, then, subject to the limitations noted, appropriate retention, immobilization and disposal technologies have been identified

  9. Complex variables I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Solomon, Alan D

    2013-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Complex Variables I includes functions of a complex variable, elementary complex functions, integrals of complex functions in the complex plane, sequences and series, and poles and r

  10. SYSTEMS WITH COMPLEXITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chenghong; ZHANG Lijun

    2004-01-01

    Science of Complexity is a newly emerging branch of natural scienceAlthoughwe still haven't a precise definition, there are some principles for justifying whether a systemis a complex systemThe purpose of this article is to reveal some of such principlesOnthe basis of them, the concept of a system with complexity is proposedThey may helpus to distinguish a real complex system from complicated objects in common senseThenwe propose some fundamental problems faced by the study of systems with complexity.

  11. The carbon holdings of northern Ecuador's mangrove forests

    CERN Document Server

    Hamilton, Stuart E; Borbor, Mercy; Millones, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Within a GIS environment, we combine field measures of mangrove diameter, mangrove species distribution, and mangrove density with remotely sensed measures of mangrove location and mangrove canopy cover to estimate the mangrove carbon holdings of northern Ecuador. We find that the four northern estuaries of Ecuador contain approximately 7,742,999 t (plus or minus 15.47 percent) of standing carbon. Of particular high carbon holdings are the Rhizophora mangle dominated mangrove stands found in-and-around the Cayapas-Mataje Ecological Reserve in northern Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador and certain stands of Rhizophora mangle in-and-around the Isla Corazon y Fragata Wildlife Refuge in central Manabi Province, Ecuador. Our field driven mangrove carbon estimate is higher than all but one of the comparison models evaluated. We find that basic latitudinal mangrove carbon models performed at least as well, if not better, than the more complex species based allometric models in predicting standing carbon levels. In additi...

  12. Does carbon dioxide pool or stream in the subsurface?

    CERN Document Server

    Cardoso, Silvana S S

    2014-01-01

    Pools of carbon dioxide are found in natural geological accumulations and in engineered storage in saline aquifers. It has been thought that once this CO2 dissolves in the formation water, making it denser, convection streams would transport it efficiently to depth, but this may not be so. Here, we assess the impact of natural chemical reactions between the dissolved CO2 and the rock formation on the convection streams in the subsurface. We show that, while in carbonate rocks the streaming of dissolved carbon dioxide persists, the chemical interactions in silicate-rich rocks may curb this transport drastically and even inhibit it altogether. New laboratory experiments confirm the curtailing of convection by reaction. Wide and narrow streams of dense carbon-rich water are shut-off gradually as reaction strength increases until all transport of the pooled carbon dioxide occurs by slow molecular diffusion. These results show that the complex fluid dynamic and kinetic interactions between pooled carbon dioxide an...

  13. Life without complex I: proteome analyses of an Arabidopsis mutant lacking the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, Steffanie; Senkler, Jennifer; Eubel, Holger; Peterhänsel, Christoph; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2016-05-01

    The mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase complex (complex I) is of particular importance for the respiratory chain in mitochondria. It is the major electron entry site for the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC) and therefore of great significance for mitochondrial ATP generation. We recently described an Arabidopsis thaliana double-mutant lacking the genes encoding the carbonic anhydrases CA1 and CA2, which both form part of a plant-specific 'carbonic anhydrase domain' of mitochondrial complex I. The mutant lacks complex I completely. Here we report extended analyses for systematically characterizing the proteome of the ca1ca2 mutant. Using various proteomic tools, we show that lack of complex I causes reorganization of the cellular respiration system. Reduced electron entry into the respiratory chain at the first segment of the mETC leads to induction of complexes II and IV as well as alternative oxidase. Increased electron entry at later segments of the mETC requires an increase in oxidation of organic substrates. This is reflected by higher abundance of proteins involved in glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and branched-chain amino acid catabolism. Proteins involved in the light reaction of photosynthesis, the Calvin cycle, tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, and photorespiration are clearly reduced, contributing to the significant delay in growth and development of the double-mutant. Finally, enzymes involved in defense against reactive oxygen species and stress symptoms are much induced. These together with previously reported insights into the function of plant complex I, which were obtained by analysing other complex I mutants, are integrated in order to comprehensively describe 'life without complex I'.

  14. Multilayered and complex nanoparticle architectures through plasma synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wakeland, Stephen [UNM MECH.ENG.; Cui, Yuehua [UNM MECH.ENG.; Knapp, Angela [TOYOTA USA; Richard, Monique [TOYOTA USA; Luhrs, Claudia [UNM MECH.ENG.

    2009-01-01

    Using the Aerosol Through Plasma (ATP) method in conjunction with simple chemical techniques a variety of complex and novel nanoparticle architectures were created. A TP was used to make metal-core/carbon shell nanoparticles (ca. 50 nm diameter) of SnlCarbon and AI/Carbon. These have, respectively, potential for application as battery anode (for hybrid and electric vehicles) and high energy fuel In one example of post processing, the Sn-core/carbon-shell material is treated in acidic solution and yields a true nano-sized hollow carbon shell. These shells have potential application as catalyst supports, gas storage, a neutral buoyancy material for applications as varied as proppants, and slow release capsules for pharmaceutical or agricultural applications. A different set of post-A-T-P processes were used to make three layer nanoparticles with a metal core, graphite inner shell and ceramic outer shell. This method extends the range of achievable nanoparticles architectures, hence enabling new applications.

  15. Photocytotoxic lanthanide complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Akhtar Hussain; Akhil R Chakravarty

    2012-11-01

    Lanthanide complexes have recently received considerable attention in the field of therapeutic and diagnostic medicines. Among many applications of lanthanides, gadolinium complexes are used as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents in clinical radiology and luminescent lanthanides for bioanalysis, imaging and sensing. The chemistry of photoactive lanthanide complexes showing biological applications is of recent origin. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a non-invasive treatment modality of cancer using a photosensitizer drug and light. This review primarily focuses on different aspects of the chemistry of lanthanide complexes showing photoactivated DNA cleavage activity and cytotoxicity in cancer cells. Macrocyclic texaphyrin-lanthanide complexes are known to show photocytotoxicity with the PDT effect in near-IR light. Very recently, non-macrocyclic lanthanide complexes are reported to show photocytotoxicity in cancer cells. Attempts have been made in this perspective article to review and highlight the photocytotoxic behaviour of various lanthanide complexes for their potential photochemotherapeutic applications.

  16. Complexity Through Nonextensivity

    CERN Document Server

    Bialek, W; Tishby, N; Bialek, William; Nemenman, Ilya; Tishby, Naftali

    2001-01-01

    The problem of defining and studying complexity of a time series has interested people for years. In the context of dynamical systems, Grassberger has suggested that a slow approach of the entropy to its extensive asymptotic limit is a sign of complexity. We investigate this idea further by information theoretic and statistical mechanics techniques and show that these arguments can be made precise, and that they generalize many previous approaches to complexity, in particular unifying ideas from the physics literature with ideas from learning and coding theory; there are even connections of this statistical approach to algorithmic or Kolmogorov complexity. Moreover, a set of simple axioms similar to those used by Shannon in his development of information theory allows us to prove that the divergent part of the subextensive component of the entropy is a unique complexity measure. We classify time series by their complexities and demonstrate that beyond the `logarithmic' complexity classes widely anticipated in...

  17. Quantum State Complexity Measure

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, Yuri

    2011-01-01

    The complexity measures role has become much clearer in recent years as they help to better understand complex systems dynamical behavior. Even though the large number of measures proposed to tackle this issue for classical systems, for quantum systems only Kolmogorov's algorithm complexity extensions have been proposed. Hence, the present approach makes use of a new and mathematically well-established complexity measure for classical systems and extends it to assess quantum states complexity as well. Then the proposed extension is applied to a mixed state constructed with a W-state together with controlled white noise, showing a convex behavior of quantum state complexity. Thus, this reinforces the differences from previous known quantum complexities.

  18. Oxygenated amorphous carbon for resistive memory applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Claudia A.; Sebastian, Abu; Marchiori, Chiara; Jonnalagadda, Vara Prasad; Dellmann, Laurent; Koelmans, Wabe W.; Rossell, Marta D.; Rossel, Christophe P.; Eleftheriou, Evangelos

    2015-10-01

    Carbon-based electronics is a promising alternative to traditional silicon-based electronics as it could enable faster, smaller and cheaper transistors, interconnects and memory devices. However, the development of carbon-based memory devices has been hampered either by the complex fabrication methods of crystalline carbon allotropes or by poor performance. Here we present an oxygenated amorphous carbon (a-COx) produced by physical vapour deposition that has several properties in common with graphite oxide. Moreover, its simple fabrication method ensures excellent reproducibility and tuning of its properties. Memory devices based on a-COx exhibit outstanding non-volatile resistive memory performance, such as switching times on the order of 10 ns and cycling endurance in excess of 104 times. A detailed investigation of the pristine, SET and RESET states indicates a switching mechanism based on the electrochemical redox reaction of carbon. These results suggest that a-COx could play a key role in non-volatile memory technology and carbon-based electronics.

  19. Carbon footprinting of electronic products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Challenges in adopting existing CF standards for electronic products are discussed. • Carbon footprint of electronic products is underestimated using existing standards. • Multipronged approach is presented to overcome the identified challenges. • Multipronged approach demonstrated on commercial and military grade DC–DC converter system. - Abstract: In order to mitigate the effects of global warming, companies are being compelled by governments, investors, and customers to control their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Similar to the European Union’s legislation on the airline industry, legislation is expected to require the electronics industry to assess their product’s carbon footprint before sale or use, as the electronics industry’s contribution to global GHG emissions is comparable to the airline industry’s contribution. Thus, it is necessary for members of the electronics industry to assess their current GHG emission rates and identify methods to reduce environmental impacts. Organizations use Carbon Footprint (CF) analysis methods to identify and quantify the GHG emissions associated with the life cycle stages of their product or services. This paper discusses the prevailing methods used by organizations to estimate the CF of their electronics products and identifies the challenges faced by the electronics industry when adopting these methods in an environment of decreasing product development cycles with complex and diffuse supply chains. We find that, as a result of the inconsistencies arising from the system boundary selection methods and databases, the use of outdated LCA approaches, and the lack of supplier’s emissions-related data, the CFs of electronic products are typically underestimated. To address these challenges, we present a comprehensive approach to the carbon footprinting of electronic products that involves the use of product-group-oriented standards, hybrid life cycle assessment techniques, and the

  20. Carbon-carbon bond cleavage and rearrangement of benzene by a trinuclear titanium hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shaowei; Shima, Takanori; Hou, Zhaomin

    2014-08-01

    The cleavage of carbon-carbon (C-C) bonds by transition metals is of great interest, especially as this transformation can be used to produce fuels and other industrially important chemicals from natural resources such as petroleum and biomass. Carbon-carbon bonds are quite stable and are consequently unreactive under many reaction conditions. In the industrial naphtha hydrocracking process, the aromatic carbon skeleton of benzene can be transformed to methylcyclopentane and acyclic saturated hydrocarbons through C-C bond cleavage and rearrangement on the surfaces of solid catalysts. However, these chemical transformations usually require high temperatures and are fairly non-selective. Microorganisms can degrade aromatic compounds under ambient conditions, but the mechanistic details are not known and are difficult to mimic. Several transition metal complexes have been reported to cleave C-C bonds in a selective fashion in special circumstances, such as relief of ring strain, formation of an aromatic system, chelation-assisted cyclometallation and β-carbon elimination. However, the cleavage of benzene by a transition metal complex has not been reported. Here we report the C-C bond cleavage and rearrangement of benzene by a trinuclear titanium polyhydride complex. The benzene ring is transformed sequentially to a methylcyclopentenyl and a 2-methylpentenyl species through the cleavage of the aromatic carbon skeleton at the multi-titanium sites. Our results suggest that multinuclear titanium hydrides could serve as a unique platform for the activation of aromatic molecules, and may facilitate the design of new catalysts for the transformation of inactive aromatics.

  1. Carbon dioxide sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Prabir K. (Worthington, OH); Lee, Inhee (Columbus, OH); Akbar, Sheikh A. (Hilliard, OH)

    2011-11-15

    The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

  2. Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, A. A.; Calvin, M.

    1948-06-01

    Although the overall reaction of photosynthesis can be specified with some degree of certainty (CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O + light {yields} sugars + possibly other reduced substances), the intermediates through which the carbon passes during the course of this reduction have, until now, been largely a matter of conjecture. The availability of isotopic carbon, that is, a method of labeling the carbon dioxide, provides the possibility of some very direct experiments designed to recognize these intermediates and, perhaps, help to understand the complex sequence and interplay of reactions which must constitute the photochemical process itself. The general design of such experiments is an obvious one, namely the exposure of the green plant to radioactive carbon dioxide and light under a variety of conditions and for continually decreasing lengths of time, followed by the identification of the compounds into which the radioactive carbon is incorporated under each condition and time period. From such data it is clear that in principle, at least, it should be possible to establish the sequence of compounds in time through which the carbon passes on its path from carbon dioxide to the final products. In the course of shortening the photosynthetic times, one times, one ultimately arrives at the condition of exposing the plants to the radioactive carbon dioxide with a zero illumination time, that is, in the dark. Actually, in the work the systematic order of events was reversed, and they have begun by studying first the dark fixation and then the shorter photosynthetic times. The results of the beginnings of this sort of a systematic investigation are given in Table I which includes three sets of experiments, namely a dark fixation experiment and two photosynthetic experiments, one of 30 seconds duration and the other of 60 seconds duration.

  3. Estimation of carbon and sulphur in MDU samples by combustion method using carbon sulphur analyser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The present paper describes an analytical method followed at Control Laboratory, Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC) for the determination of carbon and sulphur content in Magnesium Diuranate (MDU) which is the starting material for the production of Nuclear grade Uranium Dioxide (UO2) pellets. The knowledge of carbon and sulphur content in MDU is prerequisite since it poses process related problems during the conversion process of MDU to UO2 powder. A high content of carbon in MDU causes frothing during its dissolution in nitric acid before the solvent extraction step. Likewise high sulphur in the form of sulphate affects the efficiency of solvent extraction where-in uranium forms complex with sulphate which will not be extracted into the aqueous phase. This leads to retention of high quantity of uranium in raffinate affecting the overall production of UO2 powder. Hence, estimation of carbon and sulphur in MDU is vital for production process of UO2 powder. The sample under test is burnt in a pre-degassed ceramic crucible with tungsten and iron as accelerators in a stream of oxygen. During this process, the carbon and sulphur present in the sample gets converted to their respective oxides and detected by a non-dispersive infrared absorption detector. The complete experimental details are discussed in the paper. Also the paper presents comparison of carbon and sulphur content in MDU samples obtained from Turamdih and Jaduguda mines. In addition, the effect of heating of MDU samples to different temperatures on their carbon and sulphur contents is also studied. The sulphur content as sulphate obtained from Carbon-Sulphur Analyzer (CSA) is compared with those obtained from Wave Length Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer (WD-XRFS)

  4. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal with different carbon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Nan; Zhou, Yan

    2016-06-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process is one of the most economical and sustainable methods for phosphorus removal from wastewater. However, the performance of EBPR can be affected by available carbon sources types in the wastewater that may induce different functional microbial communities in the process. Glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) and polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) are commonly found by coexisting in the EBPR process. Predominance of GAO population may lead to EBPR failure due to the competition on carbon source with PAO without contributing phosphorus removal. Carbon sources indeed play an important role in alteration of PAOs and GAOs in EBPR processes. Various types of carbon sources have been investigated for EBPR performance. Certain carbon sources tend to enrich specific groups of GAOs and/or PAOs. This review summarizes the types of carbon sources applied in EBPR systems and highlights the roles of these carbon sources in PAO and GAO competition. Both single (e.g., acetate, propionate, glucose, ethanol, and amino acid) and complex carbon sources (e.g., yeast extract, peptone, and mixed carbon sources) are discussed in this review. Meanwhile, the environmental friendly and economical carbon sources that are derived from waste materials, such as crude glycerol and wasted sludge, are also discussed and compared. PMID:27087523

  5. Carbonic acid as a reserve of carbon dioxide on icy moons: The formation of carbon dioxide (CO2) in a polar environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) has been detected on the surface of several icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn via observation of the ν3 band with the Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on board the Galileo spacecraft and the Visible-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on board the Cassini spacecraft. Interestingly, the CO2 band for several of these moons exhibits a blueshift along with a broader profile than that seen in laboratory studies and other astrophysical environments. As such, numerous attempts have been made in order to clarify this abnormal behavior; however, it currently lacks an acceptable physical or chemical explanation. We present a rather surprising result pertaining to the synthesis of carbon dioxide in a polar environment. Here, carbonic acid was synthesized in a water (H2O)-carbon dioxide (CO2) (1:5) ice mixture exposed to ionizing radiation in the form of 5 keV electrons. The irradiated ice mixture was then annealed, producing pure carbonic acid which was then subsequently irradiated, recycling water and carbon dioxide. However, the observed carbon dioxide ν3 band matches almost exactly with that observed on Callisto; subsequent temperature program desorption studies reveal that carbon dioxide synthesized under these conditions remains in solid form until 160 K, i.e., the sublimation temperature of water. Consequently, our results suggest that carbon dioxide on Callisto as well as other icy moons is indeed complexed with water rationalizing the shift in peak frequency, broad profile, and the solid state existence on these relatively warm moons.

  6. Measuring static complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Goertzel

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of “pattern” is introduced, formally defined, and used to analyze various measures of the complexity of finite binary sequences and other objects. The standard Kolmogoroff-Chaitin-Solomonoff complexity measure is considered, along with Bennett's ‘logical depth’, Koppel's ‘sophistication'’, and Chaitin's analysis of the complexity of geometric objects. The pattern-theoretic point of view illuminates the shortcomings of these measures and leads to specific improvements, it gives rise to two novel mathematical concepts--“orders” of complexity and “levels” of pattern, and it yields a new measure of complexity, the “structural complexity”, which measures the total amount of structure an entity possesses.

  7. Complex networks and computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuigeng ZHOU; Zhongzhi ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    @@ Nowadays complex networks are pervasive in various areas of science and technology. Popular examples of complex networks include the Internet, social networks of collaboration, citations and co-authoring, as well as biological networks such as gene and protein interactions and others. Complex networks research spans across mathematics, computer science, engineering, biology and the social sciences. Even in computer science area, increasing problems are either found to be related to complex networks or studied from the perspective of complex networks, such as searching on Web and P2P networks, routing in sensor networks, language processing, software engineering etc. The interaction and mergence of complex networks and computing is inspiring new chances and challenges in computer science.

  8. Two giant stellar complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremov, Yu. N.; Efremov, E. Yu.

    Common star complexes are huge (0.3-1 kpc in diameter) groups of relatively young stars, associations and clusters. The complexes usually form regular chains along spiral arms of grand design galaxies, being evidently formed and supported by magneto- gravitational instability developing along an arm. Special attention is given to a few large complexes which have signatures of gravitational boundness, such as round shape and high central density. Concentrations of stars and clusters in such a complex in M51 galaxy were found in this paper; we concluded it is possible to suggest that the complex is gravitationally bound. It is also stressed that some properties of the giant complex in NGC 6946 (such as its semicircular and sharp Western edge) are still enigmatic.

  9. Simplicial complexes of graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Jonsson, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    A graph complex is a finite family of graphs closed under deletion of edges. Graph complexes show up naturally in many different areas of mathematics, including commutative algebra, geometry, and knot theory. Identifying each graph with its edge set, one may view a graph complex as a simplicial complex and hence interpret it as a geometric object. This volume examines topological properties of graph complexes, focusing on homotopy type and homology. Many of the proofs are based on Robin Forman's discrete version of Morse theory. As a byproduct, this volume also provides a loosely defined toolbox for attacking problems in topological combinatorics via discrete Morse theory. In terms of simplicity and power, arguably the most efficient tool is Forman's divide and conquer approach via decision trees; it is successfully applied to a large number of graph and digraph complexes.

  10. On Complex Random Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwer Khurshid

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE In this paper, it is shown that a complex multivariate random variable  is a complex multivariate normal random variable of dimensionality if and only if all nondegenerate complex linear combinations of  have a complex univariate normal distribution. The characteristic function of  has been derived, and simpler forms of some theorems have been given using this characterization theorem without assuming that the variance-covariance matrix of the vector  is Hermitian positive definite. Marginal distributions of  have been given. In addition, a complex multivariate t-distribution has been defined and the density derived. A characterization of the complex multivariate t-distribution is given. A few possible uses of this distribution have been suggested.

  11. Plumbing carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chuanhong; Suenaga, Kazu; Iijima, Sumio

    2008-01-01

    Since their discovery, the possibility of connecting carbon nanotubes together like water pipes has been an intriguing prospect for these hollow nanostructures. The serial joining of carbon nanotubes in a controlled manner offers a promising approach for the bottom-up engineering of nanotube structures-from simply increasing their aspect ratio to making integrated carbon nanotube devices. To date, however, there have been few reports of the joining of two different carbon nanotubes. Here we demonstrate that a Joule heating process, and associated electro-migration effects, can be used to connect two carbon nanotubes that have the same (or similar) diameters. More generally, with the assistance of a tungsten metal particle, this technique can be used to seamlessly join any two carbon nanotubes-regardless of their diameters-to form new nanotube structures.

  12. Carbonation Behavior of Pure Cement Hydrates under Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Conditions - 12199

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonation of cement-based waste forms using a supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2) is a developing technology for the waste immobilization of radioactive and non-radioactive wastes. However, the detail carbonation behaviors of cement matrices under the SCCO2 condition are unknown, since cement matrices forms very complex phases. In this study, in order to clarify the crystal phases, we synthesized pure cement hydrate phases as each single phases; portlandite (Ca(OH)2), ettringite (Ca6Al2(SO4)3(OH)12.26H2O), and calcium silicate hydrate (n CaO---m SiO2 ---x H2O), using suspensions containing a stoichiometric mixture of chemical regents, and performed carbonation experiments using an autoclave under supercritical condition for carbon dioxide. The XRD results revealed both the carbonate phases and co-product phases depending on the initial hydrate phases; gypsum for Ettringite, amorphous or crystalline silica for calcium silicate hydroxide. Thermogravimetric analysis was also performed to understand carbonation behaviors quantitatively. According to the experimental results, it was found that the major reaction was formation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in all cases. However, the behaviors of H2O and CO2 content were quietly different: Portlandite was most reactive for carbonation under SCCO2 conditions, and the CO2 content per one molar CaO was ranged from 0.96 ∼ 0.98. In the case of Ettringite, the experiment indicates partial decomposition of ettringite phase during carbonation. Ettringite was comparatively stable even under the SCCO2 conditions. Therefore, a part of ettringite remained and formed similar phases after the ettringite carbonation. The CO2 content for ettringite showed almost constant values around 0.86 ∼ 0.87. In the case of calcium silicate hydrate, the carbonation behavior was significantly influenced by the condition of SCCO2. The CO2 content for the calcium silicate hydrate had values that ranged from 0.51 ∼ 1.01. The co-products of the

  13. Double layer capacitance of carbon foam electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delnick, F. M.; Ingersoll, D.; Firsich, D.

    We have evaluated a wide variety of microcellular carbon foams prepared by the controlled pyrolysis and carbonization of several polymers including: polyacrylonitrile (PAN), polymethacrylonitrile (PMAN), resorcinol/formaldehyde (RF), divinylbenzene/methacrylonitrile (DVB), phenolics (furfuryl/alcohol), and cellulose polymers such as Rayon. The porosity may be established by several processes including: gelation (1-5), phase separation (1-3,5-8), emulsion (1,9,10), aerogel/xerogel formation (1,11,12,13), replication (14), and activation. In this report we present the complex impedance analysis and double layer charging characteristics of electrodes prepared from one of these materials for double layer capacitor applications, namely activated cellulose derived microcellular carbon foam.

  14. How evolution guides complexity

    OpenAIRE

    LARRY S. YAEGER

    2009-01-01

    Long-standing debates about the role of natural selection in the growth of biological complexity over geological time scales are difficult to resolve from the paleobiological record. Using an evolutionary model—a computational ecosystem subjected to natural selection—we investigate evolutionary trends in an information-theoretic measure of the complexity of the neural dynamics of artificial agents inhabiting the model. Our results suggest that evolution always guides complexity change, just n...

  15. Quantum Computational Complexity

    OpenAIRE

    Watrous, John

    2008-01-01

    This article surveys quantum computational complexity, with a focus on three fundamental notions: polynomial-time quantum computations, the efficient verification of quantum proofs, and quantum interactive proof systems. Properties of quantum complexity classes based on these notions, such as BQP, QMA, and QIP, are presented. Other topics in quantum complexity, including quantum advice, space-bounded quantum computation, and bounded-depth quantum circuits, are also discussed.

  16. Complex Systems and Dependability

    CERN Document Server

    Zamojski, Wojciech; Sugier, Jaroslaw

    2012-01-01

    Typical contemporary complex system is a multifaceted amalgamation of technical, information, organization, software and human (users, administrators and management) resources. Complexity of such a system comes not only from its involved technical and organizational structure but mainly from complexity of information processes that must be implemented in the operational environment (data processing, monitoring, management, etc.). In such case traditional methods of reliability analysis focused mainly on technical level are usually insufficient in performance evaluation and more innovative meth

  17. Genetics of complex diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motulsky, Arno G

    2006-02-01

    Approaches to the study of the genetic basis of common complex diseases and their clinical applications are considered. Monogenic Mendelian inheritance in such conditions is infrequent but its elucidation may help to detect pathogenic mechanisms in the more common variety of complex diseases. Involvement by multiple genes in complex diseases usually occurs but the isolation and identification of specific genes so far has been exceptional. The role of common polymorphisms as indicators of disease risk in various studies is discussed.

  18. Engineering Complex Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Mikos, Antonios G.; Herring, Susan W.; OCHAREON, PANNEE; Elisseeff, Jennifer; Lu, Helen H.; Kandel, Rita; Schoen, Frederick J.; Toner, Mehmet; Mooney, David; ATALA, ANTHONY; VAN DYKE, MARK E.; Kaplan, David; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2006-01-01

    This article summarizes the views expressed at the third session of the workshop “Tissue Engineering—The Next Generation,” which was devoted to the engineering of complex tissue structures. Antonios Mikos described the engineering of complex oral and craniofacial tissues as a “guided interplay” between biomaterial scaffolds, growth factors, and local cell populations toward the restoration of the original architecture and function of complex tissues. Susan Herring, reviewing osteogenesis and ...

  19. MULTISCALE COMPLEXITY/ENTROPY

    OpenAIRE

    Y. BAR-YAM

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the role of scale dependence of entropy/complexity and its relationship to component interdependence. The complexity as a function of scale of observation is expressed in terms of subsystem entropies for a system having a description in terms of variables that have the same a priori scale. The sum of the complexity over all scales is the same for any system with the same number of underlying degrees of freedom (variables), even though the complexity at specific scales differs due t...

  20. Berger Engineering Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Engineering laboratory The Berger Lab Complex is a multi-purpose building with professional office, 100 seat auditorium, general purpose labs,...

  1. Complex Chemistry on Interstellar Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widicus Weaver, Susanna L.; Kelley, Matthew J.; Blake, Geoffrey A.

    Early interstellar chemical models considered complex molecule formation on grains [Allen & Robinson (1977)], but current models assume that simple molecules form on grains and subsequent gas phase ion-molecule reactions produce the more complex species [Ruffle & Herbst (2001), Charnley (2001)]. It has been shown, however, that gas phase ion-molecule reactions are insufficient for the production of such complex organic species as ethanol (CH3CH2OH) and methyl formate (CH3OCHO) [Horn et al. (2004)]. Organics such as acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), ethanol, methyl formate, acetic acid (CH3COOH), and glycolaldehyde (CH2OHCHO) have also been detected in high abundance in regions of grain mantle disruption or evaporation, indicating that these species are formed on grain surfaces [see Chengalur & Kanekar (2003), Bottinelli et al. (2004), Hollis et al. (2001)]. The mechanisms for complex molecule production on grains are clearly much more important, and much more complex, than has been recognized. Recent observational studies of these types of species have offered insight into the mechanisms for their possible grain surface synthesis. The relative hot core abundances of the 2C structural isomers methyl formate, acetic acid, and glycolaldehyde (52:2:1, respectively [Hollis et al. (2001)]) indicate that if they form on grains it is not from kinetically-controlled single-atom addition reactions. Likewise, the 3C aldose sugar, glyceraldehyde (CH2OHCHOHCHO), was not detected in Sgr B2(N-LMH) [Hollis et al. (2004)] while the 3C ketose sugar, dihydroxyacetone (CO(CH2OH)2) was detected in this source [Widicus Weaver & Blake (2005)]. Chemical pathways favoring the more stable carbonates over acids and aldehydes are required to explain these results. Interestingly, all of these species can be formed from reactions involving the abundant grain mantle constituents CO, HCOOH, and CH3OH and their radical precursors. A model has been developed to investigate this type of chemical network, and

  2. Nanographene reinforced carbon/carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Dhruv

    Carbon/Carbon Composites (CCC) are made of carbon reinforcement in carbon matrix and have high thermal stability and fatigue resistance. CCC are used in nose cones, heat shields and disc brakes of aircrafts due to their exceptional mechanical properties at high temperature. The manufacturing process of CCC involves a carbonization stage in which unwanted elements, except carbon, are eliminated from the polymer precursor. Carbonization results in the formation of voids and cracks due to the thermal mismatch between the reinforcement and the matrix and expulsion of volatiles from the polymer matrix. Thermal cracks and voids decrease the density and mechanical properties of the manufactured CCC. In this work, Nanographene Platelets (NGP) were explored as nanofillers to fill the voids/cracks and reduce thermal shrinkage in CCC. They were first compared with Vapor Grown Carbon Nanofibers (VGCNF) by dispersion of different concentrations (0.5wt%, 1.5wt%, 3wt%) in resole-type phenolic resin and were characterized to explore their effect on rheology, heat of reaction and wetting behavior. The dispersions were then cured to form nanocomposites and were characterized for morphology, flexure and thermal properties. Finally, NGP were introduced into the carbon/carboncomposites in two stages, first by spraying in different concentrations (0.5wt%, 1.5wt%, 3wt%, 5wt %) during the prepreg formation and later during densification by directly mixing in the corresponding densification mix. The manufactured NGP reinforced CCC were characterized for microstructure, porosity, bulk density and mechanical properties (Flexure and ILSS) which were further cross-checked by non-destructive techniques (vibration and ultrasonic). In this study, it was further found that at low concentration (≤ 1.5 wt%) NGP were more effective in increasing the heat of reaction and in decreasing the viscosity of the phenolic resin. The decrease in viscosity led to better wetting properties of NGP / phenolic

  3. Physics of carbon nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon is a prominent element that appears in various structures with new promising technological applications. The physics of carbon nanostructures is one of the hot topics in modern condensed matter theory. I plan to present a brief introduction into the theory of variously shaped carbon nanostructures paying special attention to generic field-theory models. The preliminary plan is the following: (1) a brief historical excursus, (2) the most interesting experimental observations, (3) generic models for the description of electronic states in carbon nanoparticles (Dirac-type equations, defects, geometry, etc.), (4) open problems. (author)

  4. Carbon Monoxide Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniol, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    Of all fatal poisonings in the United States, an estimated half are due to carbon monoxide. The number of non-lethal poisonings due to carbon monoxide is difficult to estimate because signs and symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning cover a wide spectrum and mimic other disorders. Misdiagnosis is serious, as the patient often returns to the contaminated environment. Those not receiving proper treatment are at significant risk, as high as 10% to 12%, of developing late neurological sequelae. The diagnosis of carbon monoxide poisoning depends upon precise history taking, careful physical examination, and a high index of suspicion. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:21221282

  5. Nanoindentation of Carbon Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Singh, Karamjit; Verma, Veena; Bhatti, H S

    2016-06-01

    In the present research paper carbon nanostructures viz. single walled carbon nanotubes, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, single walled carbon nanohorns and graphene nanoplatelets have been synthesized by CVD technique, hydrothermal method, DC arc discharge method in liquid nitrogen and microwave technique respectively. After synthesis 5 mm thick pallets of given nanomaterial are prepared by making a paste in isopropyl alcohol and using polyvinylidene difluoride as a binder and then these pallets were used for nanoindentation measurements. Hardness, reduced modulus, stiffness, contact height and contact area have been measured using nanoindenter. PMID:27427726

  6. Synthesis of Optically Active Polystyrene Catalyzed by Monophosphine Pd Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouffroy, Matthieu; Armspach, Dominique; Matt, Dominique; Osakada, Kohtaro; Takeuchi, Daisuke

    2016-07-11

    Cationic Pd(II) monophosphine complexes derived from α- and β-cyclodextrins (CDs) promote the homopolymerization of styrene under carbon monoxide pressure. Although reversible CO coordination takes place under catalytic conditions according to (13) C NMR studies with (13) C-enriched CO, both complexes catalyze the formation of CO-free styrene polymers. These macromolecules display optical activity as a result of the presence of stereoregular sequences within the overall atactic polymer.

  7. Synthesis of Optically Active Polystyrene Catalyzed by Monophosphine Pd Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouffroy, Matthieu; Armspach, Dominique; Matt, Dominique; Osakada, Kohtaro; Takeuchi, Daisuke

    2016-07-11

    Cationic Pd(II) monophosphine complexes derived from α- and β-cyclodextrins (CDs) promote the homopolymerization of styrene under carbon monoxide pressure. Although reversible CO coordination takes place under catalytic conditions according to (13) C NMR studies with (13) C-enriched CO, both complexes catalyze the formation of CO-free styrene polymers. These macromolecules display optical activity as a result of the presence of stereoregular sequences within the overall atactic polymer. PMID:27218801

  8. Microbially mediated mineral carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, I. M.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral carbonation involves silicate dissolution and carbonate precipitation, which are both natural processes that microorganisms are able to mediate in near surface environments (Ferris et al., 1994; Eq. 1). (Ca,Mg)SiO3 + 2H2CO3 + H2O → (Ca,Mg)CO3 + H2O + H4SiO4 + O2 (1) Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophs with cell surface characteristics and metabolic processes involving inorganic carbon that can induce carbonate precipitation. This occurs partly by concentrating cations within their net-negative cell envelope and through the alkalinization of their microenvironment (Thompson & Ferris, 1990). Regions with mafic and ultramafic bedrock, such as near Atlin, British Columbia, Canada, represent the best potential sources of feedstocks for mineral carbonation. The hydromagnesite playas near Atlin are a natural biogeochemical model for the carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals (Power et al., 2009). Field-based studies at Atlin and corroborating laboratory experiments demonstrate the ability of a microbial consortium dominated by filamentous cyanobacteria to induce the precipitation of carbonate minerals. Phototrophic microbes, such as cyanobacteria, have been proposed as a means for producing biodiesel and other value added products because of their efficiency as solar collectors and low requirement for valuable, cultivable land in comparison to crops (Dismukes et al., 2008). Carbonate precipitation and biomass production could be facilitated using specifically designed ponds to collect waters rich in dissolved cations (e.g., Mg2+ and Ca2+), which would allow for evapoconcentration and provide an appropriate environment for growth of cyanobacteria. Microbially mediated carbonate precipitation does not require large quantities of energy or chemicals needed for industrial systems that have been proposed for rapid carbon capture and storage via mineral carbonation (e.g., Lackner et al., 1995). Therefore, this biogeochemical approach may represent a readily

  9. Novel carbon nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991 opened up a challenging new area of research, because they are expected to be ideal building blocks for nanoscale applications due to their extraordinary mechanical and electronic properties. Various production methods have been developed, however precise control of nanotube morphology (e.g. length, diameter) has yet to be realised, a fact which has delayed industrial exploitation. Thus a comprehensive understanding of nanotube growth is essential, and this thesis is concerned with this important problem, i.e. the controlled production of novel carbon nanomaterials. Chapter 1 surveys production methods for fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and other carbon-based materials, such as fibres, particles etc. The sophisticated tools required for this work, e.g. high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), etc. are reviewed in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 describes a novel approach to carbon nanotubes, using laser etching techniques, which generates aligned tubes of uniform diameter and length. The mode of catalyst preparation, as well as the nature of the precursor, play crucial roles in this process. The preparation of modified carbon nanotubes by the pyrolysis of metallocene, e.g. ferrocene in conjunction with various hydrocarbons, is discussed in Chapter 4. Superconducting interference device measurements (SQUID) show that Fe-filled carbon nanotubes exhibit enhanced coercivities in the 430-1070 Oe range, i.e. greater than those reported for Ni and Co nanowires. Carbon nanotubes can be also modified by replacing atoms of the carbon network with nitrogen, boron or both. The creation of large arrays of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes, for example CNx nanofibres, as well as the formation of BxCyNz onions is described in Chapter 5. Electron irradiation of these onions generates pure carbon onions. Finally (Chapter 6), the catalytic behaviour of metal particles in different

  10. Improvement of capacitive performances of symmetric carbon/carbon supercapacitors by addition of nanostructured polypyrrole powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhaddad, L.; Gamby, J.; Makhloufi, L.; Pailleret, A.; Pillier, F.; Takenouti, H.

    2016-03-01

    A nanostructured polypyrrole powder was synthesized in a previous work from the oxidation of pyrrole by a nanostructured MnO2 powder used simultaneously as an oxidizing agent and a sacrificial template in a redox heterogeneous mechanism. In this study, this original PPy powder was used as an active additive material with different ratio in carbon/carbon symmetrical supercapacitors whose performances were studied by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) using a Swagelok-type cell. From the EIS spectra, the complex capacitance was extracted using a model involving two Cole-Cole type complex capacitances linked in series. The specific capacitance values evaluated by EIS and cyclic voltammetry are in a good agreement between them. The results show that the addition of nanostructured polypyrrole powder improves significantly the specific capacitance of the carbon electrode and consequently the performances of carbon/carbon supercapacitors. The original and versatile synthesis method used to produce this polypyrrole powder appears to be attractive for large scale production of promising additives for electrode materials of supercapacitors.

  11. Complexity, Robustness, and Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Visser (Bauke)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThis paper analyses the relationship between organizational complexity ( the degree of detail of information necessary to correctly assign agents to positions), robustness (the relative loss of performance due to mis-allocated agents), and performance. More complex structures are not nec

  12. Complexity dimensions and learnability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S-H. Nienhuys-Cheng (Shan-Hwei); M. Polman

    1992-01-01

    textabstractA stochastic model of learning from examples has been introduced by Valiant [1984]. This PAC-learning model (PAC = probably approximately correct) reflects differences in complexity of concept classes, i.e. very complex classes are not efficiently PAC-learnable. Blumer et al. [1989] foun

  13. Introductory complex analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Silverman, Richard A

    1984-01-01

    A shorter version of A. I. Markushevich's masterly three-volume Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable, this edition is appropriate for advanced undergraduate and graduate courses in complex analysis. Numerous worked-out examples and more than 300 problems, some with hints and answers, make it suitable for independent study. 1967 edition.

  14. The complexity of science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.P.P. (Hennie Lótter

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article an alternative philosophy of science based on ideas drawn from the study of complex adaptive systems is presented. As a result of the enormous expansion in scientific disciplines, and the number of scientists and scientific institutions in the twentieth century, I believe science can be characterised as a complex system. I want to interpret the processes of science through which scientists themselves determine what is regarded as good science. This characterisation of science as a complex system can supply an answer to the question why the sciences have been so successful in solving growing numbers of problems and correcting their own mistakes. I utilise components of complexity theory to explain and interpret science as a complex system. I first explain the concept of complexity in ordinary language. The explanation of science as a complex system starts with a definition of the basic rules guiding the behaviour of science as a complex system. Next, I indicate how various sciences have resulted through the implementation of these rules in the study of a specific aspect of reality. The explanation of the growth of science through evolutionary adaptation and learning forms the core o f the article.

  15. Tuberculosis in complex emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coninx, Rudi

    2007-08-01

    This paper describes the key factors and remaining challenges for tuberculosis (TB) control programmes in complex emergencies. A complex emergency is "a humanitarian crisis in a country, region or society where there is total or considerable breakdown of authority resulting from internal or external conflict and which requires an international response that goes beyond the mandate or capacity of any single agency and/or the ongoing United Nations country programme." Some 200 million people are believed to live in countries affected by complex emergencies; almost all of these are developing countries that also bear the main burden of TB. The effects of complex emergencies impact on TB control programmes, interfering with the goals of identifying and curing TB patients and possibly leading to the emergence of MDR-TB. There are many detailed descriptions of aid interventions during complex emergencies; yet TB control programmes are absent from most of these reports. If TB is neglected, it may quickly result in increased morbidity and mortality, as was demonstrated in Bosnia and Herzegovina and in Somalia. TB is a major disease in complex emergencies and requires an appropriate public health response. While there is no manual to cover complex emergencies, the interagency manual for TB control in refugee and displaced populations provides valuable guidance. These programmes contribute to the body of evidence needed to compile such a manual, and should ensure that the experiences of TB control in complex emergencies lead to the establishment of evidence-based programmes. PMID:17768523

  16. Complexity and Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Jeanette Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    A central feature of complexity is that it is based on non-linear, recursive relations. However, in most current accounts of complexity such relations, while non-linear, are based on the reductive relations of a Newtonian onto-epistemological framework. This means that the systems that are emergent from the workings of such relations are a…

  17. Visual Complexity: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donderi, Don C.

    2006-01-01

    The idea of visual complexity, the history of its measurement, and its implications for behavior are reviewed, starting with structuralism and Gestalt psychology at the beginning of the 20th century and ending with visual complexity theory, perceptual learning theory, and neural circuit theory at the beginning of the 21st. Evidence is drawn from…

  18. Complexity in Picture Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierschynski, Jarek; Louie, Belinda; Pughe, Bronwyn

    2015-01-01

    One of the key requirements of Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in English Language Arts is that students are able to read and access complex texts across all grade levels. The CCSS authors emphasize both the limitations and lack of accuracy in the current CCSS model of text complexity, calling for the development of new frameworks. In response…

  19. Freestanding Complex Optical Scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisbie, David A.

    A complex freestanding optical mark recognition (OMR) scanner is one which is not on-line to an external processor; it has intelligence stemming from an internal processor located within the unit or system. The advantages and disadvantages of a complex OMR can best be assessed after identifying the scanning needs and constraints of the potential…

  20. Conducting metal dithiolate complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Underhill, A. E.; Ahmad, M. M.; Turner, D. J.;

    1985-01-01

    Further work on the chemical composition of the one-dimensional metallic metal dithiolene complex Li-Pt(mnt) is reported. The electrical conduction and thermopower properties of the nickel and palladium complexes are reported and compared with those of the platinum compound...

  1. Method for Making a Carbon-Carbon Cylinder Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransone, Phillip O. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method for making a lightweight cylinder block composed of carbon-carbon is disclosed. The use of carbon-carbon over conventional materials. such as cast iron or aluminum, reduces the weight of the cylinder block and improves thermal efficiency of the internal combustion reciprocating engine. Due to the negligible coefficient of thermal expansion and unique strength at elevated temperatures of carbon-carbon, the piston-to-cylinder wall clearance can be small, especially when the carbon-carbon cylinder block is used in conjunction with a carbon-carbon piston. Use of the carbon-carbon cylinder block has the effect of reducing the weight of other reciprocating engine components allowing the piston to run at higher speeds and improving specific engine performance.

  2. Leading healthcare in complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Jeffrey

    2014-12-01

    Healthcare institutions and providers are in complexity. Networks of interconnections from relationships and technology create conditions in which interdependencies and non-linear dynamics lead to surprising, unpredictable outcomes. Previous effective approaches to leadership, focusing on top-down bureaucratic methods, are no longer effective. Leading in complexity requires leaders to accept the complexity, create an adaptive space in which innovation and creativity can flourish and then integrate the successful practices that emerge into the formal organizational structure. Several methods for doing adaptive space work will be discussed. Readers will be able to contrast traditional leadership approaches with leading in complexity. They will learn new behaviours that are required of complexity leaders, along with challenges they will face, often from other leaders within the organization.

  3. [Complexity: an introduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Carlos Alberto Palacio; Jaramillo, Francisco Luis Ochoa

    2011-01-01

    Complexity appears in the twentieth century as a way to understand many phenomena that are perceived as chaotic and complex from classical thought, which still persist in our way of explaining the world. Its purpose is to study the complex and adaptive systems that are sensitive to initial conditions. Some of the characteristics of complex thought are systemic perspective, autopoiesis, self-organization, emergent properties, unpredictability of the systems, analogic thought, and the complementarity of the phenomena, among others. Living systems respond to a complex logic, and in that sense, our vision of human populations and patients, and how we try to solve problems and human diseases, should be open to the possibilities that arise from this form of understand the world. PMID:21503430

  4. 5.04 - Carbon Dioxide and Methane Dynamics in Estuaries

    OpenAIRE

    Borges, Alberto; Abril, Gwenaël

    2011-01-01

    Estuaries profoundly transform the large amounts of carbon delivered from rivers before their transfer to the adjacent coastal zone. As a consequence of the complex biogeochemical reworking of allochthonous carbon in the sediments and the water column, CO2 and CH4 are emitted into the atmosphere. We attempt to synthesize available knowledge on biogeochemical cycling of CO2 and CH4 in estuarine environments, with a particular emphasis on the exchange with the atmosphere. Unlike CH4, the global...

  5. COMMERCIAL VIABILITY ANALYSIS OF LIGNIN BASED CARBON FIBRE

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Chien-Wei Chen

    2014-01-01

    Lignin is a rich renewable source of aromatic compounds. As a potentialpetroleum feedstock replacement, lignin can reduce environmental impacts such ascarbon emission. Due to its complex chemical structure, lignin is currently underutilized.Exploiting lignin as a precursor for carbon fibre adds high economic value to lignin andencourages further development in lignin extraction technology. This report includes apreliminary cost analysis and identifies the key aspects of lignin-based carbon fi...

  6. Stakeholder assessments of Carbon Capture and Storage in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Gough, Clair Amanda

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes the development of methods and approaches aimed at bringing together diverse knowledge and stakeholder values as part of a broader Integrated Assessment (IA) process applied to the Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) family of technologies. IA brings together knowledge from a variety of disciplines and stakeholders to provide policy-relevant insights in complex and uncertain contexts. CCS is a climate change mitigation approach which removes carbon dioxide from fossil fuel ...

  7. Electronic Structure of Low-Dimensional Carbon Π-Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García Lastra, Juan Maria; Boukahil, Idris; Qiao, Ruimin;

    2016-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is combined with density functional theory (DFT) to determine the orbitals of one- and two-dimensional carbon Π-systems (lycopene, beta-carotene, retinal, retinol, retinoic acid, coronene, triphenylene). Considerable fine structure is observed for the transition......-bonded carbon structures with low-dimensional character, such as those used in molecular complexes for solar cells, confined graphene structures, and molecular wires....

  8. Temperature-dependent hyperfine interactions at {sup 111}Cd-C complex in germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mola, Genene Tessema [University of Kwazulu-Natal, School Chemistry and Physics, Pietermaritzburg Campus, Private Bag X01, Scottsville (South Africa)

    2013-09-15

    The temperature dependent nuclear hyperfine interaction of {sup 111}Cd-carbon complex in germanium has been studied using the perturbed {gamma}-{gamma} angular correlation (PAC) method. The parameters of the hyperfine interaction representing substitutional carbon-cadmium complex in germanium ({nu} {sub Q1}=207(1) MHz ({eta}=0.16)) shows dependence on temperature. The formation and thermal stability of the complex has been reported by the same author earlier. It was found in this study that the quadrupole coupling constant of the interaction increases at sample temperature below 293 K. The results are encouraging toward better understanding of the complex in the host matrix. (orig.)

  9. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Consumers Businesses Contact CPSC Website Design Feedback Consumers: Español Businesses: Español , 中文 , Tiếng Việt Connect with Us : Twitter YouTube ... Safely Home / Safety Education / Safety Education Centers En Español Carbon Monoxide Information Center The Invisible Killer Carbon ...

  10. Carbon black recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process and apparatus for recovering carbon black from hot smoke which comprises passing the smoke through a cyclone separation zone following cooling, then through aggregate filter beds and regeneration of filter beds with clean off-gas which is recycled to the carbon black reaction zone as quench

  11. Carbon for sensing devices

    CERN Document Server

    Tagliaferro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    This book reveals why carbon is playing such an increasingly prominent role as a sensing material. The various steps that transform a raw material in a sensing device are thoroughly presented and critically discussed.  The authors deal with all aspects of carbon-based sensors, starting from the various hybridization and allotropes of carbon, with specific focus on micro and nanosized carbons (e.g., carbon nanotubes, graphene) and their growth processes. The discussion then moves to the role of functionalization and the different routes to achieve it. Finally, a number of sensing applications in various fields are presented, highlighting the connection with the basic properties of the various carbon allotropes.  Readers will benefit from this book’s bottom-up approach, which starts from the local bonding in carbon solids and ends with sensing applications, linking the local hybridization of carbon atoms and its modification by functionalization to specific device performance. This book is a must-have in th...

  12. Fly ash carbon passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  13. Carbon Capture and Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benson, S.M.; Bennaceur, K.; Cook, P.; Davison, J.; Coninck, H. de; Farhat, K.; Ramirez, C.A.; Simbeck, D.; Surles, T.; Verma, P.; Wright, I.

    2012-01-01

    Emissions of carbon dioxide, the most important long-lived anthropogenic greenhouse gas, can be reduced by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS). CCS involves the integration of four elements: CO 2 capture, compression of the CO2 from a gas to a liquid or a denser gas, transportation of pressurized CO 2

  14. COMMITTED TO CARBON REDUCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Chinese efforts to lower carbon emissions through environmentally friendly means begin gaining momentum Efforts to curb carbon emissions continue to take shape as China adheres to its pledge for a brighter, greener future. More importantly, as environmental measures take hold and develop

  15. Amorphous iron (II) carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sel, Ozlem; Radha, A.V.; Dideriksen, Knud;

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The synthesis, characterization and crystallization energetics of amorphous iron (II) carbonate (AFC) are reported. AFC may form as a precursor for siderite (FeCO3). The enthalpy of crystallization (DHcrys) of AFC is similar to that of amorphous magnesium carbonate (AMC) and more...

  16. Carbon Dioxide Fountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seong-Joo; Ryu, Eun-Hee

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the development of a carbon dioxide fountain. The advantages of the carbon dioxide fountain are that it is odorless and uses consumer chemicals. This experiment also is a nice visual experiment that allows students to see evidence of a gaseous reagent being consumed when a pressure sensor is available. (Contains 3 figures.)…

  17. Carbon dioxide recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recycling of carbon dioxide to methanol and dimethyl ether is seen to offer a substantial route to renewable and environmentally carbon neutral fuels. One of the authors has championed the “Methanol Economy" in articles and a book. By recycling ambient CO2, the authors argue ...

  18. De-carbonizingChina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    zhou; Xiaoyan

    2013-01-01

    Innovation in the energy sector will pave the way for the country’slow-carbon future Although its per-capita emission is roughly on par with the world’s average, China is the world’s largest carbon dioxide emitter,

  19. Iron-Sulfur-Carbonyl and -Nitrosyl Complexes: A Laboratory Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glidewell, Christopher; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Background information, materials needed, procedures used, and typical results obtained, are provided for an experiment on iron-sulfur-carbonyl and -nitrosyl complexes. The experiment involved (1) use of inert atmospheric techniques and thin-layer and flexible-column chromatography and (2) interpretation of infrared, hydrogen and carbon-13 nuclear…

  20. Preliminary palaeomagnetic results from the Fen carbonatite complex, S. Norway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poorter, R.P.E.

    1972-01-01

    Samples from a hematite carbonate rock of the Eocambrian-Lower Cambrian Fen carbonatite-alkaline rock complex in southern Norway, yield a stable NRM with a direction after magnetic cleaning of D = 205°, I = −56° (N = 19, (k = 138, α95 = 3°). This corresponds with a palaeomagnetic pole position at 63