WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon complexes

  1. Evidence for Carbonate Surface Complexation during Forsterite Carbonation in Wet Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loring, John S.; Chen, Jeffrey; Benezeth Ep Gisquet, Pascale; Qafoku, Odeta; Ilton, Eugene S.; Washton, Nancy M.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2015-07-14

    Continental flood basalts are attractive formations for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide because of their reactive divalent-cation containing silicates, such as forsterite (Mg2SiO4), suitable for long-term trapping of CO2 mineralized as metal carbonates. The goal of this study was to investigate at a molecular level the carbonation products formed during the reaction of forsterite with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) as a function of the concentration of H2O adsorbed to the forsterite surface. Experiments were performed at 50 °C and 90 bar using an in situ IR titration capability, and post-reaction samples were examined by ex situ techniques, including SEM, XPS, FIB-TEM, TGA-MS, and MAS-NMR. Carbonation products and reaction extents varied greatly with adsorbed H2O. We show for the first time evidence of Mg-carbonate surface complexation under wet scCO2 conditions. Carbonate is found to be coordinated to Mg at the forsterite surface in a predominately bidentate fashion at adsorbed H2O concentrations below 27 µmol/m2. Above this concentration and up to 76 µmol/m2, monodentate coordinated complexes become dominant. Beyond a threshold adsorbed H2O concentration of 76 µmol/m2, crystalline carbonates continuously precipitate as magnesite, and the particles that form are hundreds of times larger than the estimated thicknesses of the adsorbed water films of about 7 to 15 Å. At an applied level, these results suggest that mineral carbonation in scCO2 dominated fluids near the wellbore and adjacent to caprocks will be insignificant and limited to surface complexation, unless adsorbed H2O concentrations are high enough to promote crystalline carbonate formation. At a fundamental level, the surface complexes and their dependence on adsorbed H2O concentration give insights regarding forsterite dissolution processes and magnesite nucleation and growth.

  2. Evidence for Carbonate Surface Complexation during Forsterite Carbonation in Wet Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loring, John S.; Chen, Jeffrey; Benezeth, Pascale; Qafoku, Odeta; Ilton, Eugene S.; Washton, Nancy M.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2015-06-16

    Continental flood basalts are attractive formations for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide because of their reactive divalent-cation containing silicates, such as forsterite (Mg2SiO4), suitable for long-term trapping of CO2 mineralized as metal carbonates. The goal of this study was to investigate at a molecular level the carbonation products formed during the reaction of forsterite with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) as a function of the concentration of H2O adsorbed to the forsterite surface. Experiments were performed at 50 °C and 90 bar using an in situ IR titration capability, and post-reaction samples were examined by ex situ techniques, including SEM, XPS, FIB-TEM, TGA-MS, and MAS-NMR. Carbonation products and reaction extents varied greatly with adsorbed H2O. We show for the first time evidence of Mg-carbonate surface complexation under wet scCO2 conditions. Carbonate is found to be coordinated to Mg at the forsterite surface in a predominately bidentate fashion at adsorbed H2O concentrations below 27 µmol/m2. Above this concentration and up to 76 µmol/m2, monodentate coordinated complexes become dominant. Beyond a threshold adsorbed H2O concentration of 76 µmol/m2, crystalline carbonates continuously precipitate as magnesite, and the particles that form are hundreds of times larger than the estimated thicknesses of the adsorbed water films of about 7 to 15 Å. At an applied level, the implication of these results is that mineral trapping in scCO2 dominated fluids will be insignificant and limited to surface complexation unless adsorbed H2O concentrations are high enough to promote crystalline carbonate formation. At a fundamental level, the surface complexes and their dependence on adsorbed H2O concentration give insights regarding forsterite dissolution processes and magnesite nucleation and growth.

  3. Evidence for Carbonate Surface Complexation during Forsterite Carbonation in Wet Supercritical Carbon Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loring, John S; Chen, Jeffrey; Bénézeth, Pascale; Qafoku, Odeta; Ilton, Eugene S; Washton, Nancy M; Thompson, Christopher J; Martin, Paul F; McGrail, B Peter; Rosso, Kevin M; Felmy, Andrew R; Schaef, Herbert T

    2015-07-14

    Continental flood basalts are attractive formations for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide because of their reactive divalent-cation containing silicates, such as forsterite (Mg2SiO4), suitable for long-term trapping of CO2 mineralized as metal carbonates. The goal of this study was to investigate at a molecular level the carbonation products formed during the reaction of forsterite with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) as a function of the concentration of H2O adsorbed to the forsterite surface. Experiments were performed at 50 °C and 90 bar using an in situ IR titration capability, and postreaction samples were examined by ex situ techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), focused ion beam transmission electron microscopy (FIB-TEM), thermal gravimetric analysis mass spectrometry (TGA-MS), and magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR). Carbonation products and reaction extents varied greatly with adsorbed H2O. We show for the first time evidence of Mg-carbonate surface complexation under wet scCO2 conditions. Carbonate is found to be coordinated to Mg at the forsterite surface in a predominately bidentate fashion at adsorbed H2O concentrations below 27 μmol/m(2). Above this concentration and up to 76 μmol/m(2), monodentate coordinated complexes become dominant. Beyond a threshold adsorbed H2O concentration of 76 μmol/m(2), crystalline carbonates continuously precipitate as magnesite, and the particles that form are hundreds of times larger than the estimated thicknesses of the adsorbed water films of about 7 to 15 Å. At an applied level, these results suggest that mineral carbonation in scCO2 dominated fluids near the wellbore and adjacent to caprocks will be insignificant and limited to surface complexation, unless adsorbed H2O concentrations are high enough to promote crystalline carbonate formation. At a fundamental level, the surface complexes and their dependence on adsorbed H2O

  4. Complexity of carbon market from multi-scale entropy analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xinghua; Li, Shasha; Tian, Lixin

    2016-06-01

    Complexity of carbon market is the consequence of economic dynamics and extreme social political events in global carbon markets. The multi-scale entropy can measure the long-term structures in the daily price return time series. By using multi-scale entropy analysis, we explore the complexity of carbon market and mean reversion trend of daily price return. The logarithmic difference of data Dec16 from August 6, 2010 to May 22, 2015 is selected as the sample. The entropy is higher in small time scale, while lower in large. The dependence of the entropy on the time scale reveals the mean reversion of carbon prices return in the long run. A relatively great fluctuation over some short time period indicates that the complexity of carbon market evolves consistently with economic development track and the events of international climate conferences.

  5. Electrochemical water oxidation with carbon-grafted iridium complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deKrafft, Kathryn E; Wang, Cheng; Xie, Zhigang; Su, Xin; Hinds, Bruce J; Lin, Wenbin

    2012-02-01

    Hydrogen production from water splitting provides a potential solution to storing harvested solar energy in chemical fuels, but this process requires active and robust catalysts that can oxidize water to provide a source of electrons for proton reduction. Here we report the direct, covalent grafting of molecular Ir complexes onto carbon electrodes, with up to a monolayer coverage. Carbon-grafted Ir complexes electrochemically oxidize water with a turnover frequency of up to 3.3 s(-1) and a turnover number of 644 during the first hour. Electrochemical water oxidation with grafted catalysts gave enhanced rates and stability compared to chemically driven water oxidation with the corresponding molecular catalysts. This strategy provides a way to systematically evaluate catalysts under tunable conditions, potentially providing new insights into electrochemical water oxidation processes and water oxidation catalyst design.

  6. Yellow luminescence of gallium nitride generated by carbon defect complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demchenko, D O; Diallo, I C; Reshchikov, M A

    2013-02-22

    We demonstrate that yellow luminescence often observed in both carbon-doped and pristine GaN is the result of electronic transitions via the C(N)-O(N) complex. In contrast to common isolated defects, the C(N)-O(N) complex is energetically favorable, and its calculated optical properties, such as absorption and emission energies, a zero phonon line, and the thermodynamic transition level, all show excellent agreement with measured luminescence data. Thus, by combining hybrid density functional theory and experimental measurements, we propose a solution to a long-standing problem of the GaN yellow luminescence.

  7. Nanoporous carbon sorbent for molecular-sieve chromatography of lipoprotein complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerimkulova, A. R.; Mansurova, B. B.; Gil'manov, M. K.; Mansurov, Z. A.

    2012-06-01

    The physicochemical characteristics of carbon sorbents are investigated. Electron microscopy data for the sorbent and separated lipoprotein complex are presented. It is found that the obtained carbon sorbent possess high porosity. Nanoporous carbon sorbents for the chromatography of molecular-sieve markers are obtained and tested. The applicability of nanoporous carbon sorbents for separation of lipoprotein complexes (LPC) is investigated.

  8. Carbonate complexation of Np(IV) in alkaline solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Akira [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai Works, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Kohara, Yukitoshi [Inspection Development Company Ltd., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    Reliable thermodynamic data for actinide (IV) have been required. The solubility of Np(IV) in carbonate media was studied for determination of thermodynamic data. The concentration of dissolved Np(IV) was measured with ionic strengths from 0.5 to 2.9 M (M {identical_to} mol{center_dot}dm{sup -3}), hydrogen-ion concentration exponent (pH{sub c} = -log[H{sup +}]) from 8 to 13 and with the total carbonate concentration (C{sub T}) from 5x10{sup -3} M to 7x10{sup -1} M by an oversaturation method. It was found that the solubility of Np(IV) decreased with increasing pH{sub c} and increased with increasing C{sub T}. On the basis of analysis of the solubility data, the dominant aqueous species of Np(IV) were expected to be Np(CO{sub 3}){sub 4}{sup 4-}, Np(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}(OH){sub 2}{sup 2-} and Np(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}(OH){sub 4}{sup 4-} in the present study. The apparent equilibrium constants of the carbonate and carbonatohydroxo complexes were obtained in the respective ionic strength and the equilibrium constants at the zero ionic strength were extrapolated. The obtained equilibrium constants supported the literature values strongly, and contributed to improve the reliability of the thermodynamic data. (author)

  9. Cryogenic Origin for Mars Analog Carbonates in the Bockfjord Volcanic Complex Svalbard (Norway)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundsen, H. E. F.; Benning, L.; Blake, D. F.; Fogel, M.; Ming, D.; Skidmore, M.; Steele, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Sverrefjell and Sigurdfjell eruptive centers in the Bockfjord Volcanic Complex (BVC) on Svalbard (Norway) formed by subglacial eruptions ca. 1 Ma ago. These eruptive centers carry ubiquitous magnesian carbonate deposits including dolomitemagnesite globules similar to those in the Martian meteorite ALH84001. Carbonates in mantle xenoliths are dominated by ALH84001 type carbonate globules that formed during quenching of CO2-rich mantle fluids. Lava hosted carbonates include ALH84001 type carbonate globules occurring throughout lava vesicles and microfractures and massive carbonate deposits associated with vertical volcanic vents. Massive carbonates include < or equal 5 cm thick magnesite deposits protruding downwards into clear blue ice within volcanic vents and carbonate cemented lava breccias associated with volcanic vents. Carbonate cements comprise layered deposits of calcite, dolomite, huntite, magnesite and aragonite associated with ALH84001 type carbonate globules lining lava vesicles. Combined Mossbauer, XRD and VNIR data show that breccia carbonate cements at Sverrefjell are analog to Comanche carbonates at Gusev crater.

  10. Complexation of aromatic drugs with single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchelnikov, Anatoly S.; Voronin, Dmitry P.; Kostjukov, Viktor V.; Deryabina, Tatyana A.; Khrapatiy, Sergii V.; Prylutskyy, Yuriy I.; Ritter, Uwe; Evstigneev, Maxim P.

    2014-07-01

    We report a detailed study of the complexation of aromatic molecules and drugs with the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs, the diameter and the length ranges are 0.5-2 nm and 1-5 μm, respectively) in terms of equilibrium binding constants, K. It is found that the binding constants have magnitudes of the order of 104-105 M-1 and that there is some ligand specificity to the SWCNT surface depending on the structure of the aromatic molecule. The observed specificity is strongly governed by the curvature of the ligand chromophore and the type of side chains, resulting in the highest K for methylene blue which closely matches the curvature of the SWCNT surface. Stabilization of the drug-SWCNT complexes is found to be mainly due to intermolecular van der Waals forces and to a lesser extent by hydrophobic interactions. The approach suggested for determination of the binding parameters may be used as an alternative, or complementary, to standard Langmuir analysis.

  11. Multiphase carbon and its properties in complex mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Thiel, M.; Ree, F.H.

    1990-09-01

    We describe some key features of a carbon three-phase equation of state and a high-pressure high temperature mixture model in which it is used. Electronic terms in the carbon model have been investigated with INFERNO (atom in a cell model). The Lindeman criterion for melting is rederived for the anisotropic structure of the graphite lattice. The curvature of the graphite melting line is constrained by the evidence for the positive slope of the diamond melting line. The importance of carbon is apparent from various experiments on shock generated mixtures. The model allows us to estimate the energy of carbon clusters produced in a detonating mixture. A cluster model with specific surface structure is used to predict this energy. 41 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Interaction of carbon-vacancy complex with minor alloying elements of ferritic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakaev, A.; Terentyev, D.; He, X.; Zhurkin, E. E.; Van Neck, D.

    2014-08-01

    Interstitial carbon, dissolved in bcc matrix of ferritic steels, plays an important role in the evolution of radiation-induced microstructure since it exhibits strong interaction with vacancies. Frequent formation and break-up of carbon-vacancy pairs, occurring in the course of irradiation, affect both kinetics of the accumulation of point defect clusters and carbon spatial distribution. The interaction of typical alloying elements (Mn, Ni, Cu, Si, Cr and P) in ferritic steels used as structural materials in nuclear reactors with a carbon-vacancy complex is analyzed using ab initio techniques. It is found that all the considered solutes form stable triple clusters resulting in the increase of the total binding energy by 0.2-0.3 eV. As a result of the formation of energetically favourable solute-carbon-vacancy triplets, the dissociation energy for vacancy/carbon emission is also increased by ∼0.2-0.3 eV, suggesting that the solutes enhance thermal stability of carbon-vacancy complex. Association of carbon-vacancy pairs with multiple solute clusters is found to be favorable for Ni, Cu and P. The energetic stability of solute(s)-carbon-vacancy complexes was rationalized on the basis of pairwise interaction data and by analyzing the variation of local magnetic moments on atoms constituting the clusters.

  13. Anoxic carbon degradation in Arctic sediments: Microbial transformations of complex substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnosti, Carol; Finke, Niko; Larsen, Ole

    2005-01-01

    Complex substrates are degraded in anoxic sediments by the concerted activities of diverse microbial communities. To explore the effects of substrate complexity on carbon transformations in permanently cold anoxic sediments, four substrates—Spirulina cells, Isochrysis cells, and soluble high...... of carbon degradation diverged, with an additional 43%, 32%, 33%, and 8% of Isochrysis, Iso-Ex, Spirulina, and Spir-Ex carbon respired to CO2 over the next 750 h of incubation. Somewhat surprisingly, the soluble, carbohydrate-rich extracts did not prove to be more labile substrates than the whole cells from...... which they were derived. Although Spirulina and Iso-Ex differed in physical and chemical characteristics (solid/soluble, C/N ratio, lipid and carbohydrate content), nearly identical quantities of carbon were respired to CO2. In contrast, only 15% of Spir-Ex carbon was respired, despite the initial burst...

  14. Treatment of metal-containing wastewater by adsorption of metal-chelate complexes onto activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shay, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    To eliminate difficulties associated with interference of chelating or complexing agents on precipitation of heavy metals from wastewaters, the feasibility of a process which utilized chelating agents in the removal of the heavy metals was investigated. Heavy metal ions were removed from simulated metal plating wastewater by sorption of a heavy metal chelate complex onto activated carbon. In this process, a chelate which might be present in a wastewater could be used in removal of a heavy metal, rather than interfere with its removal. System development of a continuous flow process consisted of bench scale column tests to answer questions about key adsorption column operating parameters. The metals investigated were Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II). Hydrogen ion concentration had the largest effect on removal of heavy metalchelate complexes, but contact time and heavy metal:chelate ratio were important. The normal contact time for activated carbon columns of 30 to 60 minutes was found adequate to achieve heavy metal-chelate removals of at least 90% for citrate or EDTA complexes. For citrate complexes better removals were achieved at heavy metal:chelate ratios greater than 1:1. For EDTA, there was no advantage to ratios greater than 1:1. Increasing pH, at least to pH 9.0, increased the heavy metal chelate removal; however, for EDTA, removals greater than 90% could be achieved at a pH as low as 3.0. The maximum amount of Cu(II)-citrate complex that could be removed was 2.8 mg per gram of carbon, the maximum amount for Zn(II)citrate complex was 1.2 mg per gram of carbon, and for Ni(II)-citrate, the maximum was 1.3 mg per gram of carbon. For the EDTA complexes, the maximum removal was 2.1 mg of Cu(II)-EDTA complex per gram of carbon, 6.9 mg of Zn(II)-EDTA complex per gram of carbon, and 3.2 mg of Ni(II)-EDTA complex per gram of carbon.

  15. Complex Study of the Physical Properties of Reticulated Vitreous Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alifanov, O. M.; Cherepanov, V. V.; Morzhukhina, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    We give an example of using a two-level identifi cation system incorporating an augmented mathematical model covering the structure, the thermal, electrophysical, and optical properties of nonmetallic ultraporous reticulated materials. The model, when combined with a nonstationary thermal experiment and methods of the theory of inverse heat transfer problems, permits determining the little studied characteristics of the above materials. We present some of the results of investigations of reticulated vitreous carbon confirming the possibility of using it in a number of engineering applications.

  16. COMPLEX COMPOST AND CIRCULATION OF NITROGEN AND CARBON AT THE AGROLANDSCAPE SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belyuchenko I. S.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Complex compost includes all elements of the periodic table and is valuable due to the complexity of its system. Among the elements forming a chemical composition of the complex compost we can identify two most important, which are distinguishing a specific character of the interaction with each other and defining the basic processes to ensure vegetation of living system - nitrogen and carbon. Nitrogen determines the rate of energy and connects with living forms of organic matter; it is included as the part of protein and is a major element in determining the productivity of ecosystems. At the cycle of carbon its organic forms and carbon dioxide take a part, presenting the main factors of the processes of respiration and photosynthesis

  17. Preparation of TiO2-activated carbon complex membranes and their photoelectrocatalytic activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尤宏; 姚杰; 孙丽欣; 王强

    2003-01-01

    The experimental process of preparing TiO2-activated carbon complex membranes with activated carbon powder as main carrier, PTFE as binder and wire netting as matrix is described in detail, and both photo-catalysis and photo-electro-catalysis are measured to study the properties of complex membranes. Experimental results show that the photo-catalytic activity of the membranes is high and stable in the process of treating Rhodamine-B; the application of an electric field accelerates the speed of photo-catalysis, and the efficiency of photo-catalysis is increased 2.5 times when the applied voltage is 0.8 V; and the degradation of Rhodamine-B follows the dynamics of first order reaction. It is concluded from the discussion of experimental results that the preparation process of TiO2-activated carbon complex membranes is a simple low-cost process suitable for large scale application.

  18. Transient carbon isotope changes in complex systems: Finding the global signal, embracing the local signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, G. J.; Schneider-Mor, A.; Filley, T. R.

    2008-12-01

    Global, transient carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) in the geological record are increasingly invoked as evidence of short-lived changes in carbon fluxes to/from the ocean-atmosphere-biosphere (exogenic) system. Reconstructing the dynamics of carbon cycle perturbation and response during such events requires that the global extent, magnitude, and temporal pattern of carbon isotope change are well understood. Unfortunately, no simple, globally integrated measure of exogenic δ13C change exists in the geological record: during major global perturbations even the best-case candidates such as deep-ocean carbonate δ13C values likely respond to a complex of factors including ocean carbonate chemistry and circulation. Here we consider the utility of organic carbon isotope records from two complex depositional systems common in the geological record, fossil soils and continental margin sediments, which are of interest in terms of their relationship to organic carbon cycling and records of past ecological change. Within both systems changes in ecology, climate, carbon source, residence time, and molecular composition have clear potential to modulate the preserved record of global exogenic δ13C change, compromising 1st-order interpretations of bulk or compound-specific isotopic records. Process-explicit eco- geochemical models, ideally combined with multi-substrate data, provide one approach to the isolation of global δ13C change and identification of local or regional processes reflected in such records. Examples from both systems drawn from ongoing work on the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum illustrate the potential pitfalls, as well as opportunities, afforded by coupled data/model assessment of transient δ13C changes in complex systems.

  19. Spontaneous Resolution and Carbonation of Chiral Benzyllithium Complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lennartson, Anders; Sundberg, Jonas; Wiklund, Tove

    2010-01-01

    In search for new examples of absolute asymmetric synthesis (AAS), chiral α-substituted benzyllithium complexes have been prepared. While [Li(phet)(pmdta)] (1) (phet = 1-phenylethyl, pmdta = N,N,N′,N″,N″-pentamethyldiethylenetriamine) affords only racemic crystals, a promising candidate for AAS...... was indeed found: [Li(phet)(tmpda)], α-2, (tmpda = N,N,N′,N′-tetramethylpropylenediamine) crystallises as a conglomerate. Although concomitant polymorphism was not observed, a racemic phase (β-2) could also be isolated. Chiral crystals of α-2 gave 2-phenylpropionic acid in high yield on reaction with gaseous...

  20. Competition between humic acid and carbonates for rare earth elements complexation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourret, Olivier; Davranche, Mélanie; Gruau, Gérard; Dia, Aline

    2007-01-01

    The competitive binding of rare earth elements (REE) to humic acid (HA) and carbonates was studied experimentally at various pH and alkalinity values by combining ultrafiltration and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry techniques. The results show that the REE species occur as binary humate or carbonate complexes but not as ternary REE-carbonate-humate as previously proposed. The results also reveal the strong pH and alkalinity dependence of the competition as well as the existence of a systematic fractionation across the REE series. Specifically, carbonate complexation is at a maximum at pH 10 and increase with increasing alkalinity and with the atomic number of the REE (LuCO(3)>LaCO(3)). Modeling of the data using Model VI and recently published stability constants for complexation of REE by humic acid well reproduced the experimental data, confirming the ability of Model VI to accurately determine REE speciation in natural waters. This modeling also confirms the reliability of recently published stability constants. This work shed more light not only on the competition between carbonates and HA for REE complexation but also on the reliability of WHAM 6 and Model VI for calculating the speciation of REE with organic matter in alkaline organic-rich water.

  1. Complexes of carbon nanotubes with oligonucleotides in thin Langmuir-Blodgett films to detect electrochemically hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, A. S.; Egorova, V. P.; Krylova, H. V.; Lipnevich, I. V.; Orekhovskaya, T. I.; Veligura, A. A.; Govorov, M. I.; Shulitsky, B. G.

    2014-10-01

    Self-assembled complexes consisting of thin multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and DNA-oligonucleotides which are able to a cooperative binding to complementary oligonucleotides have been investigated. It was establised a high-performance charge transport in nanostructured Langmuir-Blodgett complexes thin MWCNTs/DNA. A method to electrochemically detect DNA hybridization on the self-organized structures has been proposed.

  2. Anoxic carbon degradation in Arctic sediments: Microbial transformations of complex substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnosti, C.; Finke, N.; Larsen, O.; Ghobrial, S.

    2005-05-01

    Complex substrates are degraded in anoxic sediments by the concerted activities of diverse microbial communities. To explore the effects of substrate complexity on carbon transformations in permanently cold anoxic sediments, four substrates— Spirulina cells, Isochrysis cells, and soluble high molecular weight carbohydrate-rich extracts of these cells (Spir-Ex and Iso-Ex)—were added to sediments collected from Svalbard. The sediments were homogenized, incubated anaerobically in gas-tight bags at 0°C, and enzyme activities, fermentation, and terminal respiration were monitored over a 1134 h time course. All substrate additions yielded a fraction (8%-13%) of carbon that was metabolized to CO 2 over the first 384 h of incubation. The timecourse of VFA (volatile fatty acid) production and consumption, as well as the suite of VFAs produced, was similar for all substrates. After this phase, pathways of carbon degradation diverged, with an additional 43%, 32%, 33%, and 8% of Isochrysis, Iso-Ex, Spirulina, and Spir-Ex carbon respired to CO 2 over the next 750 h of incubation. Somewhat surprisingly, the soluble, carbohydrate-rich extracts did not prove to be more labile substrates than the whole cells from which they were derived. Although Spirulina and Iso-Ex differed in physical and chemical characteristics (solid/soluble, C/N ratio, lipid and carbohydrate content), nearly identical quantities of carbon were respired to CO 2. In contrast, only 15% of Spir-Ex carbon was respired, despite the initial burst of activity that it fueled, its soluble nature, and its relatively high (50%) carbohydrate content. The microbial community in these cold anoxic sediments clearly has the capacity to react rapidly to carbon input; extent and timecourse of remineralization of added carbon is similar to observations made at much higher temperatures in temperate sediments. The extent of carbon remineralization from these specific substrates, however, would not likely have been predicted

  3. Formation of oxygen complexes in controlled atmosphere at surface of doped glassy carbon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aleksandra A Perić-Grujić; Tatjana M Vasiljević; Olivera M Nešković; Miomir V Veljković; Zoran V Laušević; Mila D Laušević

    2006-10-01

    The effects of boron and phosphorus incorporation in phenolic resin precursor to the oxidation resistance of glassy carbon have been studied. In order to reveal the nature and composition of the oxygen complexes formed at the surface of doped glassy carbon, under controlled atmosphere, the surface of the samples was cleaned under vacuum up to 1273 K. Specific functional groups, subsequently formed under dry CO2 or O2 atmosphere on the surface of boron-doped and phosphorus-doped glassy carbon samples, were examined using the temperature-programmed desorption method combined with mass spectrometric analysis. Characterization of surface properties of undoped and doped samples has shown that in the presence of either boron or phosphorus heteroatoms, a lower amount of oxygen complexes formed after CO2 exposure, while, typically, higher amount of oxygen complexes formed after O2 exposure. It has been concluded that the surface of undoped glassy carbon has a greater affinity towards CO2, while in the presence of either boron or phosphorus heteroatoms, the glassy carbon surface affinity becomes greater towards O2, under experimental conditions.

  4. PALADYN, a comprehensive land surface-vegetation-carbon cycle model of intermediate complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willeit, Matteo; Ganopolski, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    PALADYN is presented, a new comprehensive and computationally efficient land surface-vegetation-carbon cycle model designed to be used in Earth system models of intermediate complexity for long-term simulations and paleoclimate studies. The model treats in a consistent manner the interaction between atmosphere, terrestrial vegetation and soil through the fluxes of energy, water and carbon. Energy, water and carbon are conserved. The model explicitly treats permafrost, both in physical processes and as important carbon pool. The model distinguishes 9 surface types of which 5 are different vegetation types, bare soil, land ice, lake and ocean shelf. Including the ocean shelf allows to treat continuous changes in sea level and shelf area associated with glacial cycles. Over each surface type the model solves the surface energy balance and computes the fluxes of sensible, latent and ground heat and upward shortwave and longwave radiation. It includes a single snow layer. The soil model distinguishes between three different macro surface types which have their own soil column: vegetation and bare soil, ice sheet and ocean shelf. The soil is vertically discretized into 5 layers where prognostic equations for temperature, water and carbon are consistently solved. Phase changes of water in the soil are explicitly considered. A surface hydrology module computes precipitation interception by vegetation, surface runoff and soil infiltration. The soil water equation is based on Darcy's law. Given soil water content, the wetland fraction is computed based on a topographic index. Photosynthesis is computed using a light use efficiency model. Carbon assimilation by vegetation is coupled to the transpiration of water through stomatal conductance. The model includes a dynamic vegetation module with 5 plant functional types competing for the gridcell share with their respective net primary productivity. Each macro surface type has its own carbon pools represented by a litter, a fast

  5. Catalytic Asymmetric Carbon-Carbon Forming Reactions Catalyzed Chiral Schiff Base-Metal Complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takanori; Tanaka; Masahiko; Hayashi

    2007-01-01

    1 Results In 1991, we disclosed the novel asymmetric catalysts prepared from chiral Schiff base and titanium alkoxide in the reaction of asymmetric silylcyanation of aldehydes (eq.1)[1]. Since our first report, chiral Schiff base-metal complex was proven to be efficient in a variety of asymmetric reactions. We reported the first example of enantioselective addition of diketene to aldehydes promoted by chiral Schiff base-titanium alkoxide complexes (eq.2)[2]. The products of this reaction have been cove...

  6. New strategy for chemically attachment of Schiff base complexes on Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Moradi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemically attachment of Schiff base complexes on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs surfaces through a convenient and simple method was studied. In the first step of this method, we present a new method for preparation of aminated MWCNTs in order to attachment of (new chlorinated salen Schiff bases. Amination of multiwalled carbon nanotubes performed under microwave (MW irradiation through a one pot two step reaction. The chemically attachment of salen Schiff bases on functionalized MWCNTs (salen@MWCNTs performed under a facile simple nucleophilic substitution reaction and complexation of attached salen Schiff bases (salen complex@MWCNTs in last step, have been occurred with reaction of transition metal salts and salen@MWCNTs. The obtained products were characterized in detail, using FTIR, XRD, UV-Vis absorption, SEM and EDX methods.

  7. Capture of unstable protein complex on the streptavidin-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Zunfeng, E-mail: liuz2@chem.leidenuniv.nl; Voskamp, Patrick [Cell Observatory, Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden Institute of Chemistry (Netherlands); Zhang Yue; Chu Fuqiang [Changzhou University, School of Pharmaceutical Engineering and Life Science (China); Abrahams, Jan Pieter, E-mail: abrahams@chem.leidenuniv.nl [Cell Observatory, Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden Institute of Chemistry (Netherlands)

    2013-04-15

    Purification of unstable protein complexes is a bottleneck for investigation of their 3D structure and in protein-protein interaction studies. In this paper, we demonstrate that streptavidin-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes (Strep Bullet SWNT) can be used to capture the biotinylated DNA-EcoRI complexes on a 2D surface and in solution using atomic force microscopy and electrophoresis analysis, respectively. The restriction enzyme EcoRI forms unstable complexes with DNA in the absence of Mg{sup 2+}. Capturing the EcoRI-DNA complexes on the Strep Bullet SWNT succeeded in the absence of Mg{sup 2+}, demonstrating that the Strep Bullet SWNT can be used for purifying unstable protein complexes.

  8. DFT studies of uranyl acetate, carbonate, and malonate, complexes in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Jordi; Bo, Carles; Poblet, Josep Maria; de Pablo, Joan; Bruno, Jordi

    2003-09-22

    The aim of this work is to demonstrate that theoretical chemistry can be used as a complementary tool in determining geometric parameters of a number of uranyl complexes in solution, which are not observable by experimental methods. In addition, we propose plausible structures with partial geometric data from experimental results. A gradient corrected DFT methodology with relativistic effects is used employing a COSMO solvation model. The theoretical calculations show good agreement with experimental X-ray and EXAFS data for the triacetato-dioxo-uranium(VI) and tricarbonato-dioxo-uranium(VI) complexes and are used to assign possible geometries for dicalcium-tricarbonato-dioxo-uranium(VI) and malonato-dioxo-uranium(VI) complexes. The results of this exercise indicate that carbonate bonding in these complexes is mainly bidentate and that hydroxo bridging plays a critical role in the stabilization of the polynuclear uranyl complexes.

  9. Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with N-[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ethylenediamine and its cobalt complex

    OpenAIRE

    Oki, Aderemi; Adams, Luqman; Luo, Zhipping; Osayamen, Edigin; Biney, Paul; Khabashesku, Valery

    2008-01-01

    The reaction of N-[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ethylenediamine with fluorinated carbon nanotubes (F-CNT) produced the corresponding aminoalkylalkoxysilane functionalized carbon nanotubes. Cobalt salt is then complexed to this functionalized carbon nanotubes by the addition of cobalt chloride to form cobalt complexed nanocomposite in high yield. This composite and precursors were characterized by using Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energ...

  10. Organo-mineral complexation alters carbon and nitrogen cycling in stream microbial assemblages

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter, William Ross; Wanek, Wolfgang; Prommer, Judith; Mooshammer, Maria; Battin, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Inland waters are of global biogeochemical importance receiving carbon inputs of ~ 4.8 Pg C y-1. Of this 12 % is buried, 18 % transported to the oceans, and 70 % supports aquatic secondary production. However, the mechanisms that determine the fate of organic matter (OM) in these systems are poorly defined. One important aspect is the formation of organo-mineral complexes in aquatic systems and their potential as a route for OM transport and burial vs. their use potential as organic carbon (C...

  11. Transformation of Graphitic and Amorphous Carbon Dust to Complex Organic Molecules in a Massive Carbon Cycle in Protostellar Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Johnson, Natasha M.

    2012-01-01

    relatively inert carbonaceous dust from the ISM into the vital organic precursors to life such as amino acids and sugars intimately mixed with dust and ice in primitive planetesimals. Since the number of carbon atoms entering the Solar Nebula as dust exceeds the number of atoms entering the nebula as oxide grains. the formation of large quantities of complex organic molecules may represent the largest single chemical cycle in the nebula.

  12. Quantum mechanical calculation of aqueuous uranium complexes: carbonate, phosphate, organic and biomolecular species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jha Prashant

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantum mechanical calculations were performed on a variety of uranium species representing U(VI, U(V, U(IV, U-carbonates, U-phosphates, U-oxalates, U-catecholates, U-phosphodiesters, U-phosphorylated N-acetyl-glucosamine (NAG, and U-2-Keto-3-doxyoctanoate (KDO with explicit solvation by H2O molecules. These models represent major U species in natural waters and complexes on bacterial surfaces. The model results are compared to observed EXAFS, IR, Raman and NMR spectra. Results Agreement between experiment and theory is acceptable in most cases, and the reasons for discrepancies are discussed. Calculated Gibbs free energies are used to constrain which configurations are most likely to be stable under circumneutral pH conditions. Reduction of U(VI to U(IV is examined for the U-carbonate and U-catechol complexes. Conclusion Results on the potential energy differences between U(V- and U(IV-carbonate complexes suggest that the cause of slower disproportionation in this system is electrostatic repulsion between UO2 [CO3]35- ions that must approach one another to form U(VI and U(IV rather than a change in thermodynamic stability. Calculations on U-catechol species are consistent with the observation that UO22+ can oxidize catechol and form quinone-like species. In addition, outer-sphere complexation is predicted to be the most stable for U-catechol interactions based on calculated energies and comparison to 13C NMR spectra. Outer-sphere complexes (i.e., ion pairs bridged by water molecules are predicted to be comparable in Gibbs free energy to inner-sphere complexes for a model carboxylic acid. Complexation of uranyl to phosphorus-containing groups in extracellular polymeric substances is predicted to favor phosphonate groups, such as that found in phosphorylated NAG, rather than phosphodiesters, such as those in nucleic acids.

  13. Joint Optimal Production Planning for Complex Supply Chains Constrained by Carbon Emission Abatement Policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longfei He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We focus on the joint production planning of complex supply chains facing stochastic demands and being constrained by carbon emission reduction policies. We pick two typical carbon emission reduction policies to research how emission regulation influences the profit and carbon footprint of a typical supply chain. We use the input-output model to capture the interrelated demand link between an arbitrary pair of two nodes in scenarios without or with carbon emission constraints. We design optimization algorithm to obtain joint optimal production quantities combination for maximizing overall profit under regulatory policies, respectively. Furthermore, numerical studies by featuring exponentially distributed demand compare systemwide performances in various scenarios. We build the “carbon emission elasticity of profit (CEEP” index as a metric to evaluate the impact of regulatory policies on both chainwide emissions and profit. Our results manifest that by facilitating the mandatory emission cap in proper installation within the network one can balance well effective emission reduction and associated acceptable profit loss. The outcome that CEEP index when implementing Carbon emission tax is elastic implies that the scale of profit loss is greater than that of emission reduction, which shows that this policy is less effective than mandatory cap from industry standpoint at least.

  14. Carbon nanotubes dispersed in aqueous solution by ruthenium(ii) polypyridyl complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kewei; Saha, Avishek; Dirian, Konstantin; Jiang, Chengmin; Chu, Pin-Lei E.; Tour, James M.; Guldi, Dirk M.; Martí, Angel A.

    2016-07-01

    Cationic ruthenium(ii) polypyridyl complexes with appended pyrene groups have been synthesized and used to disperse single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) in aqueous solutions. To this end, planar pyrene groups enable association by means of π-stacking onto carbon nanotubes and, in turn, the attachment of the cationic ruthenium complexes. Importantly, the ionic nature of the ruthenium complexes allows the formation of stable dispersions featuring individualized SWCNTs in water as confirmed in a number of spectroscopic and microscopic assays. In addition, steady-state photoluminescence spectroscopy was used to probe the excited state interactions between the ruthenium complexes and SWCNTs. These studies show that the photoluminescence of both, that is, of the ruthenium complexes and of SWCNTs, are quenched when they interact with each other. Pump-probe transient absorption experiments were performed to shed light onto the nature of the photoluminescence quenching, showing carbon nanotube-based bands with picosecond lifetimes, but no new bands which could be unambigously assigned to photoinduced charge transfer process. Thus, from the spectroscopic data, we conclude that quenching of the photoluminescence of the ruthenium complexes is due to energy transfer to proximal SWCNTs.Cationic ruthenium(ii) polypyridyl complexes with appended pyrene groups have been synthesized and used to disperse single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) in aqueous solutions. To this end, planar pyrene groups enable association by means of π-stacking onto carbon nanotubes and, in turn, the attachment of the cationic ruthenium complexes. Importantly, the ionic nature of the ruthenium complexes allows the formation of stable dispersions featuring individualized SWCNTs in water as confirmed in a number of spectroscopic and microscopic assays. In addition, steady-state photoluminescence spectroscopy was used to probe the excited state interactions between the ruthenium complexes and SWCNTs

  15. Quantitative carbon detector (QCD) for calibration-free, high-resolution characterization of complex mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maduskar, Saurabh; Teixeira, Andrew R; Paulsen, Alex D; Krumm, Christoph; Mountziaris, T J; Fan, Wei; Dauenhauer, Paul J

    2015-01-21

    Current research of complex chemical systems, including biomass pyrolysis, petroleum refining, and wastewater remediation requires analysis of large analyte mixtures (>100 compounds). Quantification of each carbon-containing analyte by existing methods (flame ionization detection) requires extensive identification and calibration. In this work, we describe an integrated microreactor system called the Quantitative Carbon Detector (QCD) for use with current gas chromatography techniques for calibration-free quantitation of analyte mixtures. Combined heating, catalytic combustion, methanation and gas co-reactant mixing within a single modular reactor fully converts all analytes to methane (>99.9%) within a thermodynamic operable regime. Residence time distribution of the QCD reveals negligible loss in chromatographic resolution consistent with fine separation of complex mixtures including cellulose pyrolysis products.

  16. Synthesis of acetyl coenzyme A by carbon monoxide dehydrogenase complex from acetate-grown Methanosarcina thermophila.

    OpenAIRE

    Abbanat, D R; Ferry, J G

    1990-01-01

    The carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH) complex from Methanosarcina thermophila catalyzed the synthesis of acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) from CH3I, CO, and coenzyme A (CoA) at a rate of 65 nmol/min/mg at 55 degrees C. The reaction ended after 5 min with the synthesis of 52 nmol of acetyl-CoA per nmol of CODH complex. The optimum temperature for acetyl-CoA synthesis in the assay was between 55 and 60 degrees C; the rate of synthesis at 55 degrees C was not significantly different between pHs...

  17. Hydroxyl, water, ammonia, carbon monoxide and neutral carbon towards the Sgr A complex

    CERN Document Server

    Karlsson, Roland; Hjalmarson, Åke; Winnberg, Anders; Fathi, Kambiz; Frisk, Urban; Olberg, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We observed OH, H$_2$O, HN$_3$, C$^{18}$O, and C$_I$ towards the +50 km/s cloud (M-0.02-0.07), the CND and the +20 km/s (M-0.13-0.08) cloud in the Sgr A complex with the VLA, Odin and SEST. Strong OH absorption, H$_2$O emission and absorption lines were seen at all three positions. Strong C$^{18}$O emissions were seen towards the +50 and +20 km/s clouds. The CND is rich in H$_2$O and OH, and these abundances are considerably higher than in the surrounding clouds, indicating that shocks, star formation and clump collisions prevail in those objects. A comparison with the literature reveals that it is likely that PDR chemistry including grain surface reactions, and perhaps also the influences of shocks has led to the observed abundances of the observed molecular species studied here. In the redward high-velocity line wings of both the +50 and +20 km/s clouds and the CND, the very high H$_2$O abundances are suggested to be caused by the combined action of shock desorption from icy grain mantles and high-temperatu...

  18. Age, extent and carbon storage of the central Congo Basin peatland complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargie, Greta C; Lewis, Simon L; Lawson, Ian T; Mitchard, Edward T A; Page, Susan E; Bocko, Yannick E; Ifo, Suspense A

    2017-02-02

    Peatlands are carbon-rich ecosystems that cover just three per cent of Earth's land surface, but store one-third of soil carbon. Peat soils are formed by the build-up of partially decomposed organic matter under waterlogged anoxic conditions. Most peat is found in cool climatic regions where unimpeded decomposition is slower, but deposits are also found under some tropical swamp forests. Here we present field measurements from one of the world's most extensive regions of swamp forest, the Cuvette Centrale depression in the central Congo Basin. We find extensive peat deposits beneath the swamp forest vegetation (peat defined as material with an organic matter content of at least 65 per cent to a depth of at least 0.3 metres). Radiocarbon dates indicate that peat began accumulating from about 10,600 years ago, coincident with the onset of more humid conditions in central Africa at the beginning of the Holocene. The peatlands occupy large interfluvial basins, and seem to be largely rain-fed and ombrotrophic-like (of low nutrient status) systems. Although the peat layer is relatively shallow (with a maximum depth of 5.9 metres and a median depth of 2.0 metres), by combining in situ and remotely sensed data, we estimate the area of peat to be approximately 145,500 square kilometres (95 per cent confidence interval of 131,900-156,400 square kilometres), making the Cuvette Centrale the most extensive peatland complex in the tropics. This area is more than five times the maximum possible area reported for the Congo Basin in a recent synthesis of pantropical peat extent. We estimate that the peatlands store approximately 30.6 petagrams (30.6 × 10(15) grams) of carbon belowground (95 per cent confidence interval of 6.3-46.8 petagrams of carbon)-a quantity that is similar to the above-ground carbon stocks of the tropical forests of the entire Congo Basin. Our result for the Cuvette Centrale increases the best estimate of global tropical peatland carbon stocks by

  19. Age, extent and carbon storage of the central Congo Basin peatland complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargie, Greta C.; Lewis, Simon L.; Lawson, Ian T.; Mitchard, Edward T. A.; Page, Susan E.; Bocko, Yannick E.; Ifo, Suspense A.

    2017-01-01

    Peatlands are carbon-rich ecosystems that cover just three per cent of Earth’s land surface, but store one-third of soil carbon. Peat soils are formed by the build-up of partially decomposed organic matter under waterlogged anoxic conditions. Most peat is found in cool climatic regions where unimpeded decomposition is slower, but deposits are also found under some tropical swamp forests. Here we present field measurements from one of the world’s most extensive regions of swamp forest, the Cuvette Centrale depression in the central Congo Basin. We find extensive peat deposits beneath the swamp forest vegetation (peat defined as material with an organic matter content of at least 65 per cent to a depth of at least 0.3 metres). Radiocarbon dates indicate that peat began accumulating from about 10,600 years ago, coincident with the onset of more humid conditions in central Africa at the beginning of the Holocene. The peatlands occupy large interfluvial basins, and seem to be largely rain-fed and ombrotrophic-like (of low nutrient status) systems. Although the peat layer is relatively shallow (with a maximum depth of 5.9 metres and a median depth of 2.0 metres), by combining in situ and remotely sensed data, we estimate the area of peat to be approximately 145,500 square kilometres (95 per cent confidence interval of 131,900–156,400 square kilometres), making the Cuvette Centrale the most extensive peatland complex in the tropics. This area is more than five times the maximum possible area reported for the Congo Basin in a recent synthesis of pantropical peat extent. We estimate that the peatlands store approximately 30.6 petagrams (30.6 × 1015 grams) of carbon belowground (95 per cent confidence interval of 6.3–46.8 petagrams of carbon)—a quantity that is similar to the above-ground carbon stocks of the tropical forests of the entire Congo Basin. Our result for the Cuvette Centrale increases the best estimate of global tropical peatland carbon

  20. Synthesis of PCP-supported nickel complexes and their reactivity with carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeier, Timothy J; Nova, Ainara; Hazari, Nilay; Maseras, Feliu

    2012-05-29

    The Ni amide and hydroxide complexes [(PCP)Ni(NH(2))] (2; PCP=bis-2,6-di-tert-butylphosphinomethylbenzene) and [(PCP)Ni(OH)] (3) were prepared by treatment of [(PCP)NiCl] (1) with NaNH(2) or NaOH, respectively. The conditions for the formation of 3 from 1 and NaOH were harsh (2 weeks in THF at reflux) and a more facile synthetic route involved protonation of 2 with H(2)O, to generate 3 and ammonia. Similarly the basic amide in 2 was protonated with a variety of other weak acids to form the complexes [(PCP)Ni(2-Me-imidazole)] (4), [(PCP)Ni(dimethylmalonate)] (5), [(PCP)Ni(oxazole)] (6), and [(PCP)Ni(CCPh)] (7), respectively. The hydroxide compound 3, could also be used as a Ni precursor and treatment of 3 with TMSCN (TMS=trimethylsilyl) or TMSN(3) generated [(PCP)Ni(CN)] (8) or [(PCP)Ni(N(3))] (9), respectively. Compounds 3-7, and 9 were characterized by X-ray crystallography. Although 3, 4, 6, 7, and 9 are all four-coordinate complexes with a square-planar geometry around Ni, 5 is a pseudo-five-coordinate complex, with the dimethylmalonate ligand coordinated in an X-type fashion through one oxygen atom, and weakly as an L-type ligand through another oxygen atom. Complexes 2-9 were all reacted with carbon dioxide. Compounds 2-4 underwent facile reaction at low temperature to form the κ(1)-O carboxylate products [(PCP)Ni{OC(O)NH(2)}] (10), [(PCP)Ni{OC(O)OH}] (11), and [(PCP)Ni{OC(O)-2-Me-imidazole}] (12), respectively. Compounds 10 and 11 were characterized by X-ray crystallography. No reaction was observed between 5-9 and carbon dioxide, even at elevated temperatures. DFT calculations were performed to model the thermodynamics for the insertion of carbon dioxide into 2-9 to form a κ(1)-O carboxylate product and understand the pathways for carbon dioxide insertion into 2, 3, 6, and 7. The computed free energies indicate that carbon dioxide insertion into 2 and 3 is thermodynamically favorable, insertion into 8 and 9 is significantly uphill, insertion into 5 and 7

  1. Heterologous Production of an Energy-Conserving Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase Complex in the Hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit Jan Schut

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO is an important intermediate in anaerobic carbon fixation pathways in acetogenesis and methanogenesis. In addition, some anaerobes can utilize CO as an energy source. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus, which grows optimally at 80°C, CO oxidation and energy conservation is accomplished by a respiratory complex encoded by a 16-gene cluster containing a carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, a membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase and a Na+/H+ antiporter module. This complex oxidizes CO, evolves CO2 and H2, and generates a Na+ motive force that is used to conserve energy by a Na+-dependent ATP synthase. Herein we used a bacterial artificial chromosome to insert the 13.2 kb gene cluster encoding the CO-oxidizing respiratory complex of T. onnurineus into the genome of the heterotrophic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally at 100°C. P. furiosus is normally unable to utilize CO, however, the recombinant strain readily oxidized CO and generated H2 at 80°C. Moreover, CO also served as an energy source and allowed the P. furiosus strain to grow with a limiting concentration of sugar or with peptides as the carbon source. Moreover, CO oxidation by P. furiosus was also coupled to the re-utilization, presumably for biosynthesis, of acetate generated by fermentation. The functional transfer of CO utilization between Thermococcus and Pyrococcus species demonstrated herein is representative of the horizontal gene transfer of an environmentally-relevant metabolic capability. The transfer of CO utilizing, hydrogen-producing genetic modules also has applications for biohydrogen production and a CO-based industrial platform for various thermophilic organisms.

  2. The abundances of atomic carbon and carbon monoxide compared with visual extinction in the Ophiuchus molecular cloud complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerking, Margaret A.; Keene, Jocelyn; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Phillips, T. G.

    1989-01-01

    Emission from the 492 GHz lines of C I have been observed toward six positions in the Ophiuchus molecular cloud complex for which accurate visual extinctions are available. The column density of C I increases with A(V) to greater than 2 x 10 to the 17th/sq cm at 100 mag, the column-averaged fractional abundance reaches a peak of about 2.2 x 10 to the -5th for A(V) in the range 4-11 mag and the column-averaged abundance ratio of C I to CO decreases with A(V) from about 1 at 2 mag to greater that about 0.03 at 100 mag. These results imply that, while C I is not the primary reservoir of gaseous carbon even at cloud edges, its fractional abundance remains high for at least 10 mag into the cloud and may be significant at even greater depths.

  3. On the thermal stability of vacancy-carbon complexes in alpha iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terentyev, D; Bonny, G; Bakaev, A; Van Neck, D

    2012-09-26

    In this work we have summarized the available ab initio data addressing the interaction of carbon with vacancy defects in bcc Fe and performed additional calculations to extend the available dataset. Using an ab initio based parameterization, we apply object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulations to model the process of isochronal annealing in bcc Fe doped with carbon to compare with experimental data. As a result of this work, we clarify that a binding energy of ~0.65 eV for a vacancy-carbon (V-C) pair fits the available experimental data best. It is found that the V (2)-C complex is less stable than the V-C pair and its dissociation with activation energy of 0.55 + 0.49 eV also rationalizes a number of experimental data where the breakup of V-C complexes was assumed instead. From the summarized ab initio data, the subsequently obtained OKMC results and critical discussion, provided here, we suggest that the twofold interpretation of the V-C binding energy, which is believed to vary between 0.47 and 0.65 eV, depending on the ab initio approximation, should be removed. The stability and mobility of small and presumably immobile SIA clusters formed at stage II is also discussed in the view of experimental data.

  4. CARBON DIOXIDE INFLUENCE ON THE THERMAL FORMATION OF COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES IN INTERSTELLAR ICE ANALOGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinogradoff, V.; Fray, N.; Bouilloud, M.; Cottin, H. [LISA Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systèmes Atmosphériques, UMR CNRS 7583, Université Paris Est Créteil (UPEC), Université Paris Diderot (UPD), Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, Labex ESEP, Paris (France); Duvernay, F.; Chiavassa, T., E-mail: vvinogradoff@mnhn.fr [PIIM, Laboratoire de Physique des Interactions Ioniques et Moléculaires, Université Aix-Marseille, UMR CNRS 7345, Marseille (France)

    2015-08-20

    Interstellar ices are submitted to energetic processes (thermal, UV, and cosmic-ray radiations) producing complex organic molecules. Laboratory experiments aim to reproduce the evolution of interstellar ices to better understand the chemical changes leading to the reaction, formation, and desorption of molecules. In this context, the thermal evolution of an interstellar ice analogue composed of water, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and formaldehyde is investigated. The ice evolution during the warming has been monitored by IR spectroscopy. The formation of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) and polymethylenimine (PMI) are observed in the organic refractory residue left after ice sublimation. A better understanding of this result is realized with the study of another ice mixture containing methylenimine (a precursor of HMT) with carbon dioxide and ammonia. It appears that carbamic acid, a reaction product of carbon dioxide and ammonia, plays the role of catalyst, allowing the reactions toward HMT and PMI formation. This is the first time that such complex organic molecules (HMT, PMI) are produced from the warming (without VUV photolysis or irradiation with energetic particles) of abundant molecules observed in interstellar ices (H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}CO). This result strengthens the importance of thermal reactions in the ices’ evolution. HMT and PMI, likely components of interstellar ices, should be searched for in the pristine objects of our solar system, such as comets and carbonaceous chondrites.

  5. Adsorption of some metal complexes derived from acetyl acetone on activated carbon and purolite S-930

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salam A.H. Al-Ameri

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A new Schiff base (HL derived from condensation of p-anisidine and acetyl acetone has been prepared and used as a chelating ligand to prepare Cr(III, Mn(II, Co(II, Ni(II and Cu(II complexes. The study of the nature of these complexes formed in ethanol solution following the mole ratio method (2:1, L:M gave results which were compared successfully with these obtained from isolated solid state studies. These studies revealed that the complexes having square planner geometry of the type (ML2, M = Co(II, Ni(II and Cu(II, and octahedral geometry of the type [CrIIIL2(H2O2]Cl and [MNIIL2(H2O2]. The adsorption studies of three complexes Cr(III, Mn(II, and Co(II on activated carbon, H and Na-forms of purolite S-930 resin show high adsorption percentage for Cr(III on purolite S-930 due to ion exchange interaction compared with high adsorption of neutral Mn(II, Co(II complexes on activated charcoal. Linear plot of log Qe versus log Ce showed that the adsorption isotherm of these three complexes on activated carbon, H and Na-forms of purolite S-930 surface obeys Freundlich isotherm and was similar to S-curve type according to Giles classification which investigates heterogeneous adsorption. The regression values indicate that the adsorption data for these complexes fitted well within the Freundlich isothermal plots for the concentration studied. The accuracy and precision of the concentration measurements of these complexes were determined by preparing standard laboratory samples, the results show relative error ranging from ±1.08 to 5.31, ±1.04 to 4.82 and ±0.28 to 3.09 and the relative standard deviation did not exceed ±6.23, ±2.77 and ±4.38% for A1, A2 and A3 complexes, respectively.

  6. Complex and new modification techniques of thiocholine detection electrodes with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-Ping; Zheng, Yi; Shan, Lian-Gang; Shi, Li-yi; Leng, Kai-liang

    2008-11-01

    A new and complex modification technique of glassy carbon electrode (GCE) with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) was developed. Firstly, MWNTs were electro-deposited on GCE at 1.70 V for 2 h. Secondly, by layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly technique, a functional membrane of {PDDA/MWNTs} n were fabricated by alternative immersion in 1% PDDA solution and 1 mg L -1 MWNTs dispersion either. As a result, the modified membrane with five {PDDA/MWNTs} bilayers have good sensitivity, stability, anti-fouling ability and catalytic activity for thiocholine (TCh) detection, the oxidation potential on the modified GCE was decreased almost by 50% while the peak current was increased almost by 100% compared with that on bare GCE. Meanwhile, it showed a low detection limit of less than 7.500 × 10 -7 mol L -1 TCh.

  7. Preparation of Carbon Nanotubes by the Catalysis of Polymer Metal Complex on Porous Al203 Matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI YanLi; ZHANG XiaoGang; LI HuLin

    2001-01-01

    @@ At present, synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is normally conducted on a vapor-to-solid interface at ca. 500-3500℃ via various vapor phase methods, such as are discharge, laser ablation, catalytic pyrolysis and chemical vapor deposition, etc.1-2 Recently, channel materials (such as channels of alumina and of AlPO4-5 zeolite) 3 have been utilized as solid-state templates to grow CNTs inside the channel. Here we described a novel method to prepare the carbon nanotubes based on the decomposition of C2H2 gas on the Co-Ni catalyst anchored by polymer complex on the porous A12O3 matrix. The degree of graphitization of synthesized CNTs and catalysts are of great interest.

  8. Preparation of Carbon Nanotubes by the Catalysis of Polymer Metal Complex on Porous Al203 Matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI; YanLi

    2001-01-01

    At present, synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is normally conducted on a vapor-to-solid interface at ca. 500-3500℃ via various vapor phase methods, such as are discharge, laser ablation, catalytic pyrolysis and chemical vapor deposition, etc.1-2 Recently, channel materials (such as channels of alumina and of AlPO4-5 zeolite) 3 have been utilized as solid-state templates to grow CNTs inside the channel. Here we described a novel method to prepare the carbon nanotubes based on the decomposition of C2H2 gas on the Co-Ni catalyst anchored by polymer complex on the porous A12O3 matrix. The degree of graphitization of synthesized CNTs and catalysts are of great interest.  ……

  9. A Ni-Fe Layered Double Hydroxide-Carbon Nanotube Complex for Water Oxidation

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Ming; Wang, Hailiang; Liang, Yongye; Wu, Justin Zachary; Zhou, Jigang; Wang, Jian; Regier, Tom; Wei, Fei; Dai, Hongjie

    2013-01-01

    Highly active, durable and cost-effective electrocatalysts for water oxidation to evolve oxygen gas hold a key to a range of renewable energy solutions including water splitting and rechargeable metal-air batteries. Here, we report the synthesis of ultrathin nickel iron layered double hydroxide nanoplates on mildly oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Incorporation of Fe into the nickel hydroxide induced the formation of NiFe-layered double hydroxide. The nanoplates were covalently attached to a network of nanotubes, affording excellent electrical wiring to the nanoplates. The ultra-thin Ni-Fe layered double hydroxide nanoplates/carbon nanotube complex was found to exhibit unusually high electro-catalytic activity and stability for oxygen evolution and outperformed commercial precious metal Ir catalysts.

  10. Charge transport and optical properties of the complexes of indigo wrapped over carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Ankita; Ramachandran, C N

    2016-05-18

    A new molecular system comprising the non-covalently functionalized complexes of single walled (6,6) carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) of finite length with indigo is proposed based on the dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations. In the complexes viz. the dyad and triad, indigo is wrapped over carbon nanotubes in the ratio of 1 : 1 and 2 : 1, respectively. A comprehensive study of stabilization energy, ionization energy, electron affinity, the energy gap between the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (ΔELUMO-HOMO), and absorption spectra unravels the structure-property relationship of the complexes. The energy gap of ∼1 eV between the HOMO and the LUMO of the complexes suggests that they can be semiconductive. The energy levels of the frontier molecular orbitals of indigo and CNT suggest the possibility of the photoinduced charge transfer between them. Using the charge hopping rate based on Marcus theory, a hole mobility as high as 8.77 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) is obtained for the dyad. For both the dyad and triad, a higher value of hole mobility than electron mobility is observed, thereby suggesting them to be useful for p-type semiconductor devices. The time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations predict that the absorption of indigo-CNT complexes occurs in the visible and the near-infrared regions finding applications in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). Furthermore, the effects of the length and the capping of CNTs as well as the orientation of indigo over the CNTs on the charge transport properties are also discussed.

  11. Heterologous Production of an Energy-Conserving Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase Complex in the Hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schut, Gerrit J.; Lipscomb, Gina L.; Nguyen, Diep M. N.; Kelly, Robert M.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an important intermediate in anaerobic carbon fixation pathways in acetogenesis and methanogenesis. In addition, some anaerobes can utilize CO as an energy source. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus, which grows optimally at 80°C, CO oxidation and energy conservation is accomplished by a respiratory complex encoded by a 16-gene cluster containing a CO dehydrogenase, a membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase and a Na+/H+ antiporter module. This complex oxidizes CO, evolves CO2 and H2, and generates a Na+ motive force that is used to conserve energy by a Na+-dependent ATP synthase. Herein we used a bacterial artificial chromosome to insert the 13.2 kb gene cluster encoding the CO-oxidizing respiratory complex of T. onnurineus into the genome of the heterotrophic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally at 100°C. P. furiosus is normally unable to utilize CO, however, the recombinant strain readily oxidized CO and generated H2 at 80°C. Moreover, CO also served as an energy source and allowed the P. furiosus strain to grow with a limiting concentration of sugar or with peptides as the carbon source. Moreover, CO oxidation by P. furiosus was also coupled to the re-utilization, presumably for biosynthesis, of acetate generated by fermentation. The functional transfer of CO utilization between Thermococcus and Pyrococcus species demonstrated herein is representative of the horizontal gene transfer of an environmentally relevant metabolic capability. The transfer of CO utilizing, hydrogen-producing genetic modules also has applications for biohydrogen production and a CO-based industrial platform for various thermophilic organisms. PMID:26858706

  12. Laser-induced synthesis of a nanostructured polymer-like metal-carbon complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakelian, S.; Kutrovskaya, S.; Kucherik, A.; Osipov, A.; Povolotckaia, A.; Povolotskiy, A.; Manshina, A.

    2016-04-01

    Synthesis of nanotructured metal-carbon materials by laser irradiation is an actual branch of laser physics and nanotechnology. Laser sources with different pulse duration allow changing the heating rate with realization of different transition scenarios and synthesis materials with various physical properties. We study the process of the formation of nanostructured metal-clusters and complexes using laser irradiation of colloidal systems which were consisted of carbon micro- nanoparticles and nanoparticles of noble metals. For carbon nanoparticles synthesis we use the method of laser ablation in liquid. For the realization of different regimes of laser surface modification of the target (glassycarbon and shungite) and the formation of micro- nanoparticles in a liquid the YAG:Nd laser with a pulse duration from 0.5 ms up to 20 ms (pulse energy up to 50J) was applied. We have used the CW-laser with moderate intensity in liquid (water or ethanol) for nanoparticle of noble metals synthesis. Thus, colloidal systems were obtained by using CW-laser with λ = 1.06 μm, I ~ 105-6 W/cm2, and t = 10 min. The average size of resulting particles was approximately about 10 to 100 nm. The nanoparticle obtaining was provided in the colloidal solution with different laser parameters. In this work we have investigated the mechanism of the metal-carbon cluster formation during the process of irradiation of colloidal system which were consisted of separate carbon, silver and gold nanoparticles. This system was irradiated by nanosecond laser (100 ns) with average power up to 50W.

  13. Synthesis of the Multinuclear Cobaloxime Complexes via Click Chemistry as Catalysts for the Formation of Cyclic Carbonates from Carbon Dioxide and Epoxides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ahmet Kilic; Armagan Keles; Emine Aytar; Mustafa Durgun; Mahmut Ulusoy

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the structurally similar multinuclear cobaloxime complexes based on dioxime ligands were synthesized and characterized as trinuclear complexes with respect to varied axial groups. The multinuclear cobaloxime complexes were characterized by 1H, 13C-NMR, FT-IR, UV-Vis, LC-MS spectra, melting point and magnetic susceptibility measurements. These multinuclear cobaloxime complexes have been successfully applied to the synthesis of cyclic carbonates from CO2 and epoxides under optimized conditions and with-out using any solvent. All multinuclear cobaloxime complexes obtained by click chemistry are good catalysts for the cycloaddition of CO2 to different epoxides in the presence of pyridine as a co-catalyst. Additionally, the effects of epoxides, bases, temperature, pressure, and time on the yield of cyclic carbonates were investigated.

  14. Comparison of complex permittivities of isotonic colloids containing single-wall carbon nanotubes of varying chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Tejas; Symanowski, James T; Gach, H Michael

    2012-02-01

    The application of bio-compatible, conductive nanoparticles in combination with radiofrequency (RF) irradiation to raise tissue temperatures between 40 and 60 °C for hyperthermia and ablation spurred interest in the complex permittivities of isotonic nanoparticle-based colloids. Nanoparticles with large aspect ratios and high permittivities increase the bulk permittivity of the colloid and RF losses at the macroscopic scale. The complex permittivities of isotonic colloids with and without single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) containing either metallic, semiconducting, or mixed chiralities were measured from 20 MHz to 1 GHz at room temperature. The colloids were made with one of three different isotonic solvents: phosphate buffered saline (PBS), and Dulbecco's modified eagle medium (DMEM) with and without 0.5% weight/volume bovine serum albumin to simulate cytosol and blood, respectively. The concentration of elemental carbon from the SWCNTs in the colloids ranged from 16 to 17 mM. The permittivities were corrected for electrode polarization effects by fitting the data to the Cole-Cole relaxation model with a constant phase angle element. The presence of SWCNTs increased both the real and imaginary components of the permittivities of the colloids. For all three solvents, the direct current (DC) components of the real and imaginary permittivities were greatest for the colloids containing the mixed chirality SWCNTs, followed by the colloids with semiconducting SWCNTs, and then metallic SWCNTs.

  15. The complex ion structure of warm dense carbon measured by spectrally resolved x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, D.; Barbrel, B.; Falcone, R. W. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Vorberger, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik komplexer Systeme, Nöthnitzer Straße 38, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Helfrich, J.; Frydrych, S.; Ortner, A.; Otten, A.; Roth, F.; Schaumann, G.; Schumacher, D.; Siegenthaler, K.; Wagner, F.; Roth, M. [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstraße 9, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Gericke, D. O.; Wünsch, K. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Bachmann, B.; Döppner, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Bagnoud, V.; Blažević, A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); and others

    2015-05-15

    We present measurements of the complex ion structure of warm dense carbon close to the melting line at pressures around 100 GPa. High-pressure samples were created by laser-driven shock compression of graphite and probed by intense laser-generated x-ray sources with photon energies of 4.75 keV and 4.95 keV. High-efficiency crystal spectrometers allow for spectrally resolving the scattered radiation. Comparing the ratio of elastically and inelastically scattered radiation, we find evidence for a complex bonded liquid that is predicted by ab-initio quantum simulations showing the influence of chemical bonds under these conditions. Using graphite samples of different initial densities we demonstrate the capability of spectrally resolved x-ray scattering to monitor the carbon solid-liquid transition at relatively constant pressure of 150 GPa. Showing first single-pulse scattering spectra from cold graphite of unprecedented quality recorded at the Linac Coherent Light Source, we demonstrate the outstanding possibilities for future high-precision measurements at 4th Generation Light Sources.

  16. Asynchronous Reductive Release of Iron and Organic Carbon from Hematite-Humic Acid Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, D.; Poulson, S.; Sumaila, S.; Dynes, J.; McBeth, J. M.; Yang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Association with solid-phase iron plays an important role in the accumulation and stabilization of soil organic matter (SOM). Ferric minerals are subject to redox reactions, which can compromise the stability of iron-bound SOM. To date, there is limited information available concerning the fate of iron-bound SOM during redox reactions. In this study, we investigated the release kinetics of hematite-bound organic carbon (OC) during the abiotic reduction of hematite-humic acid (HA) complexes by dithionite, as an analog for the fate of iron-bound SOM in natural redox reactions. Carbon 1s near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy was used to examine the ratio of the aromatic, phenolic and carboxylic/imide functional groups of the adsorbed OC before and after reduction. Our results indicate that the reductive release of iron obeyed first-order kinetics with release rate constants of 6.67×10-3 to 13.0×10-3 min-1. The iron-bound OC was released rapidly during the initial stage with release rate constants of 0.011 to 1.49 min-1, and then became stable with residual fractions of 4.6% to 58.2% between 120 and 240 min. The release rate of aromatic OC was much faster than for the non-aromatic fraction of HA, and 90% of aromatic OC was released within the first hour for most samples. The more rapid release of aromatic OC was attributed to its potential distribution on the outer layer because of steric effects and the possible reduction of quinoids. Our findings show that in the reductive reaction the mobilization of iron-bound organic carbon was asynchronous with the reduction of iron, and aromatic carbon was released more readily than other organic components. This study illustrates the importance of evaluating the stability of iron-bound SOM, especially under aerobic-anaerobic transition conditions.

  17. Evidence of Different Stoichiometries for the Limiting Carbonate Complexes across the Lanthanide(III) Series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philippini, V.; Vercouter, T.; Vitorge, P. [CEA Saclay, DEN DPC SECR Lab Speciat Radionucleides and Mol, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Vitorge, P. [Univ Evry Val Essonne, CNRS, Lab Anal and Modelisat Biol and Environm, UMR 8587, F-91025 Evry (France)

    2010-07-01

    The stoichiometries of limiting carbonate complexes of lanthanide(III) ions were investigated by solubility measurements of hydrated NaLn(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} solid compounds (Ln = La, Nd, Eu and Dy) at room temperature in aqueous solutions of high ionic strength (3. 5 mol. kg{sup -1}) NaClO{sub 4}) and high CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} concentrations (0. 1 to 1. 5 mol. kg{sup -1}). The results were interpreted by considering the stability of carbonate complexes, with limiting species found to be La(CO{sub 3}){sub 4}{sup 5-}, Nd(CO{sub 3}){sub 4}{sup 5-}, Eu(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 3-} and Dy(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 3-}. TRLFS measurements on the Eu and Dy solutions confirmed the predominance of a single aqueous complex in all the samples. Equilibrium constants were determined for the reaction Ln(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 3-} + CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} reversible arrow Ln(CO{sub 3}){sub 4}{sup 5-}: log(10) K{sub 4,} {sub L}a{sup 3}. 5{sup m} {sup N}a{sup C}l{sup O}{sub 4} = 0. 7 {+-} 0. 3, log(10) K{sub 4,} {sub N}d{sup 3}. 5{sup m} {sup N}a{sup C}l{sup O}{sub 4} = 1. 3 {+-} 0. 3, and for Ln = Eu and Dy, log(10) K{sub 4,} {sub L}n{sup 3}. 5{sup m} {sup N}a{sup C}l{sup O}{sub 4}) {<=} -0. 4. These results suggest that tetra-carbonato complexes are stable only for the light lanthanide ions in up to 1. 5 molal CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} aqueous solutions, in agreement with our recent capillary electrophoresis study. Comparison with literature results indicates that analogies between actinide(III) and lanthanide(III) ions of similar ionic radii do not hold in concentrated carbonate solutions. Am(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 3-} was previously evidenced by solubility measurements, whereas we have observed that Nd(CO{sub 3}){sub 4}{sup 5-} predominates in similar conditions. We may speculate that small chemical differences between Ln(III) and An(III) could result in macroscopic differences when their coordination sphere is complete. (authors)

  18. Ultrasound detection of damage in complex carbon fibre/metal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thursby, G. J.; MacLean, A.; Hogg, H.; Culshaw, B.

    2006-03-01

    We describe work carried out to monitor the structural health of a complex structure comprising both carbon fibre and metal components using ultrasound techniques. The work is designed to be used in a high performance car, but could find applications in other areas such as the aerospace industry. There are two different types of potential problem that need to be examined; the first is damage (e.g. holes, delaminations) to carbon fibre structure, and the second is damage to joints either between two carbon fibre components or between a carbon fibre component and a metallic one. The techniques used are based around the use of PZT transducers for both the generation and detection of ultrasonic Lamb waves. To date we have been carrying out experiments on mock-up samples, but are due to conduct tests on an actual vehicle. Lamb waves propagate in modes whose order is determined by the frequency thickness product. Their properties, such as phase and amplitude can be modified by the presence of damage, such as holes and delaminations. If we record the response of a healthy structure, we can then compare it with signals obtained on subsequent occasions to determine if any significant change has taken place. It is essential, however, to be able to differentiate between the effects of damage and those of environmental changes such as temperature. For this reason we have monitored the response of a sample at different temperatures both before and after drilling a hole in it to simulate damage. Depending on the positions of the transducers with respect to the damaged area, it is possible to detect either attenuation of the entire signal or changes in a specific portion of the signal produced by reflections. Results from these experiments will be presented at the conference. Signal processing techniques for separating damage from the effects of temperature will also be discussed. We also look at the deterioration of joints, which can either be epoxy bonded (carbon fibre to

  19. UV/TiO2 photocatalytic disinfection of carbon-bacteria complexes in activated carbon-filtered water: Laboratory and pilot-scale investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jin Hui; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Yaqian; Liu, Cuiyun; Liu, Ranbin

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of carbon-bacteria complexes in activated carbon filtered water has posed a public health problem regarding the biological safety of drinking water. The application of combined process of ultraviolet radiation and nanostructure titanium dioxide (UV/TiO2) photocatalysis for the disinfection of carbon-bacteria complexes were assessed in this study. Results showed that a 1.07 Lg disinfection rate can be achieved using a UV dose of 20 mJ cm(-2), while the optimal UV intensity was 0.01 mW cm(-2). Particle sizes ≥8 μm decreased the disinfection efficiency, whereas variation in particle number in activated carbon-filtered water did not significantly affect the disinfection efficiency. Photoreactivation ratio was reduced from 12.07% to 1.69% when the UV dose was increased from 5 mJ cm(-2) to 20 mJ cm(-2). Laboratory and on-site pilot-scale experiments have demonstrated that UV/TiO2 photocatalytic disinfection technology is capable of controlling the risk posed by carbon-bacteria complexes and securing drinking water safety.

  20. Endohedral and exohedral complexes of substituted benzenes with carbon nanotubes and graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munusamy, Elango; Wheeler, Steven E.

    2013-09-01

    Non-covalent complexes of cyclohexane and a series of substituted benzenes with short carbon nanotube (CNT) models are investigated primarily at the B97-D3/TZV(2d,2p) level of theory. Understanding non-covalent interactions of arenes with CNTs is vital for the development of next-generation organic electronic materials and for harnessing CNTs as nano-reactors and vehicles for drug delivery. The interaction of benzene and cyclohexane with the interior and exterior of CNTs depends on the nanotube diameter, particularly for endohedral complexes. Both benzene and cyclohexane interact more strongly with the interior of CNTs than the outside, with benzene exhibiting stronger interactions than cyclohexane for CNTs larger than (8,8). Studies of two benzenes inside of CNTs predict the formation of one-dimensional sandwich and parallel-displaced stacks of benzenes within certain sized CNTs, which could have interesting optoelectronic properties. Concerning the impact of substituents on the interaction of benzene with CNTs, we find that electrostatic interactions do not control substituent effects. That is, the electron-donating or -withdrawing character of the substituents is not correlated with the predicted interaction energies. Moreover, substituent effects are the same for both endohedral and exohedral complexes, despite the different electronic character of the interior and exterior CNT walls. Ultimately, substituent effects in π-stacking interactions with CNTs and graphene are explained by differences in dispersion interactions between the substituents and CNT walls or graphene surface.

  1. Architecture and evolution of an Early Permian carbonate complex on a tectonically active island in east-central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Calvin H.; Magginetti, Robert T.; Stone, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The newly named Upland Valley Limestone represents a carbonate complex that developed on and adjacent to a tectonically active island in east-central California during a brief interval of Early Permian (late Artinskian) time. This lithologically unique, relatively thin limestone unit lies within a thick sequence of predominantly siliciclastic rocks and is characterized by its high concentration of crinoidal debris, pronounced lateral changes in thickness and lithofacies, and a largely endemic fusulinid fauna. Most outcrops represent a carbonate platform and debris derived from it and shed downslope, but another group of outcrops represents one or possibly more isolated carbonate buildups that developed offshore from the platform. Tectonic activity in the area occurred before, probably during, and after deposition of this short-lived carbonate complex.

  2. Polymeric Framboidal Nanoparticles Loaded with a Carbon Monoxide Donor via Phenylboronic Acid-Catechol Complexation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vlies, André J; Inubushi, Ryosuke; Uyama, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Urara

    2016-06-15

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an essential gaseous signaling molecule in the human body. Toward the controlled delivery of CO to the target tissues or cells, nanomaterial-based CO donors have attracted growing attention. Here, we present CO-releasing polymeric nanoparticles (CONPs) prepared by simple mixing of phenylboronic acid-containing framboidal nanoparticles with the catechol-bearing CO-donor Ru(CO)3Cl(L-DOPA) via phenylboronic acid-catechol complexation. The CONPs release CO in response to cysteine and suppress the production of the pro-inflammatory mediators interleukin 6 (IL-6) and nitric oxide (NO) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine macrophages. This CONP platform may show promise in therapeutic applications of CO.

  3. Organometallic Complexes Anchored to Conductive Carbon for Electrocatalytic Oxidation of Methane at Low Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joglekar, Madhura; Nguyen, Vinh; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Ngo, Chilan; Li, Quanning; O'Reilly, Matthew E; Gray, Tristan S; Hubbard, William A; Gunnoe, T Brent; Herring, Andrew M; Trewyn, Brian G

    2016-01-13

    Low-temperature direct methane fuel cells (DMEFCs) offer the opportunity to substantially improve the efficiency of energy production from natural gas. This study focuses on the development of well-defined platinum organometallic complexes covalently anchored to ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) for electrochemical oxidation of methane in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell at 80 °C. A maximum normalized power of 403 μW/mg Pt was obtained, which was 5 times higher than the power obtained from a modern commercial catalyst and 2 orders of magnitude greater than that from a Pt black catalyst. The observed differences in catalytic activities for oxidation of methane are linked to the chemistry of the tethered catalysts, determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The chemistry/activity relationships demonstrate a tangible path for the design of electrocatalytic systems for C-H bond activation that afford superior performance in DMEFC for potential commercial applications.

  4. Hydrogen bonded complexes of cyanuric acid with pyridine and guanidinium carbonate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Sivashankar

    2000-12-01

    Hydrogen bonded complexes of cyanuric acid (CA) with pyridine, [C3N3H3O3:C5H5N], 1, and guanidinium carbonate [C3H2N3][C(NH2)3], 2, have been prepared at room temperature and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Structure of 1 shows pyridine molecules substituting the inter-tape hydrogen bond in CA by N-H…N and C-H…O hydrogen bonds. The structure reveals CA-pyridine hydrogen-bonded single helices held together by dimeric N-H…O hydrogen bonding between CA molecules. In 2, the CA tapes, resembling a sine wave interact with the guanidinium cations through N-H…O and N-H…N hydrogen bonds forming guanidinium cyanurate sheets.

  5. Treatment of complex Remazol dye effluent using sawdust- and coal-based activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, K; Won, Sung Wook; Yun, Yeoung-Sang

    2009-08-15

    A complex Remazol dye effluent, comprised of four reactive dyes and auxiliary chemicals, was decolorized using SPS-200 (sawdust-based) and SPC-100 (coal-based) activated carbons. A detailed characterization revealed that the pore diameter of the activated carbon played an important role in dye adsorption. The solution pH had no significant effect on the adsorption capacity in the pH range of 2-10.7. According to the Langmuir model, the maximum uptakes of SPS-200 were 415.4, 510.3, 368.5 and 453.0 mg g(-1) for Reactive Black 5 (RB5), Reactive Orange 16 (RO16), Remazol Brilliant Blue R (RBBR) and Remazol Brilliant Violet 5R (RBV), respectively. Conversely, those of SPC-100 were slightly lower, at 150.8, 197.4, 178.3 and 201.1 mg g(-1) for RB5, RO16, RBBR and RBV, respectively. In the case of Remazol effluent, SPS-200 exhibited a decolorization efficiency of 100% under unadjusted pH conditions at 10.7, compared to that of 52% for SPC-100.

  6. Carbon-tuned bonding method significantly enhanced the hydrogen storage of BN-Li complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qing-ming; Zhao, Lina; Luo, You-hua; Zhang, Meng; Zhao, Li-xia; Zhao, Yuliang

    2011-11-01

    Through first-principles calculations, we found doping carbon atoms onto BN monolayers (BNC) could significantly strengthen the Li bond on this material. Unlike the weak bond strength between Li atoms and the pristine BN layer, it is observed that Li atoms are strongly hybridized and donate their electrons to the doped substrate, which is responsible for the enhanced binding energy. Li adsorbed on the BNC layer can serve as a high-capacity hydrogen storage medium, without forming clusters, which can be recycled at room temperature. Eight polarized H(2) molecules are attached to two Li atoms with an optimal binding energy of 0.16-0.28 eV/H(2), which results from the electrostatic interaction of the polarized charge of hydrogen molecules with the electric field induced by positive Li atoms. This practical carbon-tuned BN-Li complex can work as a very high-capacity hydrogen storage medium with a gravimetric density of hydrogen of 12.2 wt%, which is much higher than the gravimetric goal of 5.5 wt % hydrogen set by the U.S. Department of Energy for 2015.

  7. Cationic organobismuth complex as an effective catalyst for conversion of CO2 into cyclic carbonates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaowen ZHANG; Weili DAI; Shuangfeng YIN; Shenglian LUO; Chak-Tong AU

    2009-01-01

    In order to achieve high-efficiency conversion of CO2 into valuable chemicals, and to exploit new appli-cations of organobismuth compounds, cationic organo-bismuth complex with 5,6,7,12-tetrahydrodibenz[c,f] [ 1,5 ]azabismocine framework was examined for the first time for the coupling of CO2 into cyclic carbonates, using ter-minal epoxides as substrates and tetrabutylammonium halide as co-catalyst in a solvent-free environment under mild conditions. It is shown that the catalyst exhibited high activity and selectivity for the coupling reaction of CO2 with a wide range of terminal epoxide. The selectivity of propylene carbonates could reach 100%, and the max-imum turnover frequency was up to 10740 h-1 at 120℃ and 3 MPa CO2 pressure when tetrabutylammonium iod-ide was used as co-catalyst. Moreover, the catalyst is environment friendly, resistant to air and water, and can be readily reused and recycled without any loss of activity,demonstrating a potential in industrial application.

  8. Nitrogen-doped carbon nanofoam derived from amino acid chelate complex for supercapacitor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Prakash; Shanmugam, Sangaraju

    2016-06-01

    We report a novel strategy to fabricate the nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon nanofoam structures (N-MCNF), derived from magnesium amino acid chelate complex (Mg-acc-complex) for its application towards high performance supercapacitor (SCs) system. A series of N-MCNF with well-connected carbon nanofoam structure have been developed by varying the synthesis temperature. The fabricated N-MCNF material possesses a high surface area (1564 m2 g-1) and pore volume (1.767 cm3 g-1) with nitrogen content of 3.42 wt%. A prototypical coin cell type symmetric N-MCNF SC device has been assembled with 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate [EMIMBF4] ionic liquid electrolyte, and evaluated for SCs studies. The N-MCNF with high textural properties delivers unprecedented SC performance, such as high specific capacitance (204 Fg-1 at 0.25 Ag-1, 25 °C), high energy density (63.4 Wh kg-1), high power density (35.9 kW kg-1) and long-term cycle life (32,500 cycles). Significantly, N-MCNF materials exhibited high power rate performance, at 500 mV-1 (115 Fg-1) and 25 Ag-1 (166 Fg-1) owing to the uniform mesopore size distribution (∼4 nm). The N-MCNF SC device delivered maximum energy densities of 83.4 and 93.3 Wh kg-1 at 60 °C and 90 °C, respectively. Such outstanding N-MCNF SC device is successfully demonstrated in solar energy harvester applications.

  9. Introduction to the special section: Recent advancement on integrated carbonate reservoirs prediction with complex secondary storage space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Carbonate reservoirs in Western China show tremendous exploration and development potential.These have become the key area for oil and gas reserves addition and sustainable resource development for China.Compared to conventional carbonate reservoirs,prediction of this kind of reservoir predominated by secondary storage is much more difficult and presents significant challenges.Seismic detection of dissolution pores and fractures always requires a high standard of technology,which puts further serious challenges on exploration and creates many technological issues for field development plans.The key geophysical problems are tackled based on a detailed analysis of exploration issues for such complex carbonate reservoirs.

  10. Unique chemical properties of metal-carbon bonds in metal-carboranyl and metal-carboryne complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU ZaoZao; XIE ZuoWei

    2009-01-01

    The metal-carbon bonds in metal-carboranyl and metal-carboryne complexes behave very differently from those in classical organometallic complexes. The unique electronic and steric properties of icosahedral carboranyl moiety make the M-C bond in metal-carboranyl complexes inert toward unsaturated molecules, and on the other hand, the sterically demanding carborane cage can induce unexpected C-C coupling reactions. The M-C bonds in metal-carboryne complexes are, however, active toward various kinds of unsaturated molecules and the reactivity patterns are dependent upon the electronic configurations of the metal ions. This account provides an overview of our recent work in this area.

  11. Unique chemical properties of metal-carbon bonds in metal-carboranyl and metal-carboryne complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The metal-carbon bonds in metal-carboranyl and metal-carboryne complexes behave very differently from those in classical organometallic complexes. The unique electronic and steric properties of ico-sahedral carboranyl moiety make the M-C bond in metal-carboranyl complexes inert toward unsaturated molecules, and on the other hand, the sterically demanding carborane cage can induce unexpected C-C coupling reactions. The M-C bonds in metal-carboryne complexes are, however, active toward various kinds of unsaturated molecules and the reactivity patterns are dependent upon the electronic configurations of the metal ions. This account provides an overview of our recent work in this area.

  12. Organo-mineral complexation alters carbon and nitrogen cycling in stream microbial assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, William Ross; Wanek, Wolfgang; Prommer, Judith; Mooshammer, Maria; Battin, Tom

    2014-05-01

    Inland waters are of global biogeochemical importance receiving carbon inputs of ~ 4.8 Pg C y-1. Of this 12 % is buried, 18 % transported to the oceans, and 70 % supports aquatic secondary production. However, the mechanisms that determine the fate of organic matter (OM) in these systems are poorly defined. One important aspect is the formation of organo-mineral complexes in aquatic systems and their potential as a route for OM transport and burial vs. microbial utilization as organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) sources. Organo-mineral particles form by sorption of dissolved OM to freshly eroded mineral surfaces and may contribute to ecosystem-scale particulate OM fluxes. We tested the availability of mineral-sorbed OM as a C & N source for streamwater microbial assemblages and streambed biofilms. Organo-mineral particles were constructed in vitro by sorption of 13C:15N-labelled amino acids to hydrated kaolin particles, and microbial degradation of these particles compared with equivalent doses of 13C:15N-labelled free amino acids. Experiments were conducted in 120 ml mesocosms over 7 days using biofilms and streamwater sampled from the Oberer Seebach stream (Austria), tracing assimilation and mineralization of 13C and 15N labels from mineral-sorbed and dissolved amino acids. Here we present data on the effects of organo-mineral sorption upon amino acid mineralization and its C:N stoichiometry. Organo-mineral sorption had a significant effect upon microbial activity, restricting C and N mineralization by both the biofilm and streamwater treatments. Distinct differences in community response were observed, with both dissolved and mineral-stabilized amino acids playing an enhanced role in the metabolism of the streamwater microbial community. Mineral-sorption of amino acids differentially affected C & N mineralization and reduced the C:N ratio of the dissolved amino acid pool. The present study demonstrates that organo-mineral complexes restrict microbial degradation

  13. Hydroxyl, water, ammonia, carbon monoxide, and neutral carbon towards the Sagittarius A complex. VLA, Odin, and SEST observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, R.; Sandqvist, Å.; Hjalmarson, Å.; Winnberg, A.; Fathi, K.; Frisk, U.; Olberg, M.

    2013-06-01

    Aims: The Sagittarius A complex in the Galactic centre comprises an ensemble of molecular clouds of different species with a variety of geometrical and kinematic properties. This work aims to study molecular abundances, morphology, and kinematics by comparing hydroxyl, water, carbon monoxide, ammonia, and atomic carbon and some of their isotopologues, in the +50 km s-1 cloud, the circumnuclear disk (CND), the +20 km s-1 cloud, the expanding molecular ring and the line-of-sight spiral arm features, including the Local/Sgr arm, the -30 km s-1 arm, and the 3-kpc arm. Methods: We observed the +50 km s-1 cloud, the CND and the +20 km s-1 cloud, and other selected positions at the Galactic centre with the VLA, and the Odin satellite. The VLA was used to map the 1665 and 1667 MHz OH lambda doublet main lines of the (2Π3/2) state, and the Odin satellite was used to map the 557 GHz H2O (110 - 101) line as well as to observe the 548 GHz H218O (110-101) line, the 572 GHz NH3 (10 - 00) line, the 576 GHz CO J = 5 - 4 line and the 492 GHz C i (3P1-3P0) line. Furthermore, the SEST was used to map a region of the Sgr A complex in the 220 GHz C18O J = 2-1 line. Results: Strong OH absorption, H2O emission and absorption lines were seen at all observed positions, and the H218O line was detected in absorption towards the +50 km s-1 cloud, the CND, the +20 km s-1cloud, the expanding molecular ring, and the 3-kpc arm. Strong CO J = 5-4, C18O J = 2-1, and neutral carbon C i emissions were seen towards the +50 and +20 km s-1 clouds. NH3 was only detected in weak absorption originating in the line-of-sight spiral arm features. The abundances of OH and H2O in the +50 and +20 km s-1 clouds reflect the different physical environments in the clouds, where shocks and star formation prevail in the +50 km s-1 cloud and giving rise to a higher rate of H2O production there than in the +20 km s-1 cloud. In the CND, cloud collisions and shocks are frequent, and the CND is also subject to intense UV

  14. "Drawing with nanotubes": creating nanowires with complex geometries by pulsed electrodeposition on self-organized carbon nanotube patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarden, Tohar S; Joselevich, Ernesto

    2010-11-10

    We present a new approach for the creation of nanowires with well-defined complex geometries by electrodeposition onto self-organized single-walled carbon nanotubes. The concept is demonstrated by generation of continuous Au nanowires with various geometries, including parallel arrays, serpentines, and coils. The generality of this approach is further illustrated by synthesizing Bi(2)Te(3) nanowires. Our concept of "drawing with nanotubes" offers to combine different material properties with complex geometries on the route to new functional nanosystems.

  15. Characterization of complex (B + C) diffusion layers formed on chromium and nickel-based low-carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pertek, A.; Kulka, M

    2002-12-30

    Combined surface hardening with boron and carbon was used for low-carbon chromium and nickel-based steels. The microstructure, boron contents, carbon profiles and chosen properties of borided layers produced on the carburized steels have been examined. These complex (B+C) layers are termed borburized layers. The microhardness profiles and wear resistance of these layers have been studied. In the microstructure of the borocarburized layer two zones have been observed: iron borides (FeB+Fe{sub 2}B) and a carburized layer. The depth (70-125 {mu}m) and microhardness (1500-1800 HV) of iron borides zone have been found. The carbon content (1.2-1.94 wt.%) and microhardness (700-950 HV) beneath iron borides zone have been determined. The microhardness gradient in borocarburized layer has been reduced in comparison with the only borided layer. An increase of distance from the surface is accompanied by a decrease of carbon content and microhardness in the carburized zone. The carbon and microhardness profiles of borided, carburized and borocarburized layers have been presented. A positive influence of complex layers (B+C) on the wear resistance was determined. The wear resistance of the borocarburized layer was determined to be greater in comparison with that for only borided or only carburized layers.

  16. Degraded tropical rain forests possess valuable carbon storage opportunities in a complex, forested landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamgir, Mohammed; Campbell, Mason J.; Turton, Stephen M.; Pert, Petina L.; Edwards, Will; Laurance, William F.

    2016-07-01

    Tropical forests are major contributors to the terrestrial global carbon pool, but this pool is being reduced via deforestation and forest degradation. Relatively few studies have assessed carbon storage in degraded tropical forests. We sampled 37,000 m2 of intact rainforest, degraded rainforest and sclerophyll forest across the greater Wet Tropics bioregion of northeast Australia. We compared aboveground biomass and carbon storage of the three forest types, and the effects of forest structural attributes and environmental factors that influence carbon storage. Some degraded forests were found to store much less aboveground carbon than intact rainforests, whereas others sites had similar carbon storage to primary forest. Sclerophyll forests had lower carbon storage, comparable to the most heavily degraded rainforests. Our findings indicate that under certain situations, degraded forest may store as much carbon as intact rainforests. Strategic rehabilitation of degraded forests could enhance regional carbon storage and have positive benefits for tropical biodiversity.

  17. Degraded tropical rain forests possess valuable carbon storage opportunities in a complex, forested landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamgir, Mohammed; Campbell, Mason J.; Turton, Stephen M.; Pert, Petina L.; Edwards, Will; Laurance, William F.

    2016-01-01

    Tropical forests are major contributors to the terrestrial global carbon pool, but this pool is being reduced via deforestation and forest degradation. Relatively few studies have assessed carbon storage in degraded tropical forests. We sampled 37,000 m2 of intact rainforest, degraded rainforest and sclerophyll forest across the greater Wet Tropics bioregion of northeast Australia. We compared aboveground biomass and carbon storage of the three forest types, and the effects of forest structural attributes and environmental factors that influence carbon storage. Some degraded forests were found to store much less aboveground carbon than intact rainforests, whereas others sites had similar carbon storage to primary forest. Sclerophyll forests had lower carbon storage, comparable to the most heavily degraded rainforests. Our findings indicate that under certain situations, degraded forest may store as much carbon as intact rainforests. Strategic rehabilitation of degraded forests could enhance regional carbon storage and have positive benefits for tropical biodiversity. PMID:27435389

  18. Degraded tropical rain forests possess valuable carbon storage opportunities in a complex, forested landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamgir, Mohammed; Campbell, Mason J; Turton, Stephen M; Pert, Petina L; Edwards, Will; Laurance, William F

    2016-07-20

    Tropical forests are major contributors to the terrestrial global carbon pool, but this pool is being reduced via deforestation and forest degradation. Relatively few studies have assessed carbon storage in degraded tropical forests. We sampled 37,000 m(2) of intact rainforest, degraded rainforest and sclerophyll forest across the greater Wet Tropics bioregion of northeast Australia. We compared aboveground biomass and carbon storage of the three forest types, and the effects of forest structural attributes and environmental factors that influence carbon storage. Some degraded forests were found to store much less aboveground carbon than intact rainforests, whereas others sites had similar carbon storage to primary forest. Sclerophyll forests had lower carbon storage, comparable to the most heavily degraded rainforests. Our findings indicate that under certain situations, degraded forest may store as much carbon as intact rainforests. Strategic rehabilitation of degraded forests could enhance regional carbon storage and have positive benefits for tropical biodiversity.

  19. THE INFLUENCE OF THE COMPLEX CHEMICAL ADDITIVE CONTAINING THE STRUCTURED CARBON NANOMATERIAL ON PROPERTIES OF CEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Yu. Sheyda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of investigations on influence of domestic complex chemical additive containing structured carbon nanomaterial and characterized by a combination effect (curing acceleration and plasticizing on cement and cement stone properties. The purpose of the investigations, on the one hand, has been to confirm efficacy of УКД-1additive from the perspective for increasing the rate of gain, strength growth of cement concrete and additive influence on setting time with the purpose to preserve molding properties of concrete mixes in time, and on the other hand, that is to assess “mechanism” of the УКД-1 additive action in the cement concrete. The research results have revealed regularities in changes due to the additive of water requirements and time period of the cement setting. The reqularities are considered as a pre-requisite for relevant changes in molding properties of the concrete mixes. The paper also experimentally substantiates the possibility to decrease temperature of cement concrete heating with the УДК-1 additive. It has been done with the purpose to save energy resources under production conditions. In addition to this the paper proves the efficiency of the additive which is expressed in strength increase of cement stone up to 20–40 % in the rated age (28 days that is considered as a basis for strength growth of cement concrete. The paper confirms a hypothesis on physical nature of this phenomenon because the X-ray phase analysis method has shown that there are no changes in morphology of portland cement hydration products under the action of the additive agent containing a structured carbon nanomaterial. Results of theoretical and experimental investigations on УКД-1 additive efficiency have been proved by industrial approbation while fabricating precast concrete products and construction of monolithic structures under plant industrial conditions (Minsk, SS “Stroyprogress” JSC MAPID and on

  20. Further evidence for charge transfer complexes in brown carbon aerosols from excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Sabrina M; Smith, Geoffrey D

    2015-05-14

    The light-absorbing fraction of organic molecules in ambient aerosols, known as "brown carbon," is an important yet poorly characterized component. Despite the fact that brown carbon could alter the radiative forcing of aerosols significantly, identification of specific chromophores has remained challenging. We recently demonstrated that charge transfer (CT) complexes formed in organic molecules could be responsible for a large fraction of absorption observed in water-extracted ambient particulate matter.1 In the present study, we use excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy to further corroborate the importance of CT complexes in defining aerosol optical properties. Monotonically increasing and decreasing quantum yields, decreasing Stokes shifts, and red-shifting emission maxima are observed from ambient particulate matter collected in Athens, Georgia, strongly suggesting that a superposition of independent chromophores is not sufficient to explain brown carbon absorption and fluorescence. Instead, we show that a model in which such chromophores are energetically coupled to a dense manifold of CT complexes is consistent with all of the observations. Further, we suggest that a significant fraction of the observed fluorescence originates from CT complexes and that their contribution to brown carbon absorption is likely greater than we reported previously.

  1. Trace element geochemistry of Amba Dongar carbonatite complex, India: Evidence for fractional crystallization and silicate-carbonate melt immiscibility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jyotiranjan S Ray; P N Shukla

    2004-12-01

    Carbonatites are believed to have crystallized either from mantle-derived primary carbonate magmas or from secondary melts derived from carbonated silicate magmas through liquid immiscibility or from residual melts of fractional crystallization of silicate magmas. Although the observed coexistence of carbonatites and alkaline silicate rocks in most complexes, their coeval emplacement in many, and overlapping initial 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd ratios are supportive of their cogenesis; there have been few efforts to devise a quantitative method to identify the magmatic processes. In the present study we have made an attempt to accomplish this by modeling the trace element contents of carbonatites and coeval alkaline silicate rocks of Amba Dongar complex, India. Trace element data suggest that the carbonatites and alkaline silicate rocks of this complex are products of fractional crystallization of two separate parental melts. Using the available silicate melt-carbonate melt partition coefficients for various trace elements, and the observed data from carbonatites, we have tried to simulate trace element distribution pattern for the parental silicate melt. The results of the modeling not only support the hypothesis of silicate-carbonate melt immiscibility for the evolution of Amba Dongar but also establish a procedure to test the above hypothesis in such complexes.

  2. Formation and annealing of metastable (interstitial oxygen)-(interstitial carbon) complexes in n- and p-type silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Makarenko, L F; Lastovskii, S B; Murin, L I; Moll, M; Pintilie, I

    2014-01-01

    It is shown experimentally that, in contrast to the stable configuration of (interstitial carbon)-(interstitial oxygen) complexes (CiOi), the corresponding metastable configuration (CiOi{*}) cannot be found in n-Si based structures by the method of capacitance spectroscopy. The rates of transformation CiOi{*} -> CiOi are practically the same for both n- and p-Si with a concentration of charge carriers of no higher than 10(13) cm(-3). It is established that the probabilities of the simultaneous formation of stable and metastable configurations of the complex under study in the case of the addition of an atom of interstitial carbon to an atom of interstitial oxygen is close to 50\\%. This is caused by the orientation dependence of the interaction potential of an atom of interstitial oxygen with an interstitial carbon atom, which diffuses to this oxygen atom.

  3. Evolution of multi-mineral formation evaluation using LWD data in complex carbonates offshore Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraris, Paolo; Borovskaya, Irina [Schlumberger, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Petrophysical Formation Evaluation using Logging While Drilling (LWD) measurements is a new requisite when drilling in carbonates reservoirs offshore Brazil. These reservoirs are difficult to characterize due to an unusual mixture of the minerals constituting the matrix and affecting rock texture. As wells are getting deeper and more expensive, an early identification of the drilled targets potential is necessary for valuable decisions. Brazil operators have been especially demanding towards service providers, pushing for development of suitable services able to positively identify and quantify not only the presence of hydrocarbons but also their flowing capability. In addition to the standard gamma ray / resistivity / porosity and density measurements, three new measurements have proven to be critical to evaluate complex carbonate formations: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), Spectroscopy and Capture Cross-Section (sigma). Under appropriate logging conditions, NMR data provides lithology independent porosity, bound and free fluids fractions, reservoir texture and permeability. Capture Spectroscopy allows assessment of mineral composition in terms of calcite, dolomite, quartz and clay fractions, and in addition highlights presence of other heavier minerals. Finally, sigma allows performing a volumetric formation evaluation without requiring custom optimization of the classical exponents used in all forms of resistivity saturation equations. All these new measurements are inherently statistical and if provided by wireline after drilling the well they may result in significant usage of rig time. When acquired simultaneously while drilling they have three very clear advantages: 1) no extra rig time, 2) improved statistics due to long formation exposure (drilling these carbonates is a slow process and rate of penetration (ROP) rarely exceeds 10 m/hr), 3) less invasion effect and better hole condition. This paper describes the development of two LWD tools performing the

  4. Study of new complexes of uranium and comba radical. I.- Complexes defective in sodium carbonate; Estudio de nuevos complejos entre el uranio y el radical CDMBA. I. Complejos con defectos de carbonato sodico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vera Palomino, J.; Galiano Sedano, J. A.; Parellada Bellod, R.; Bellido Gonzalez, A.

    1975-07-01

    Some complexes formed in presence of defect of sodium carbonate with respect to the stoichiometric ratio (U): (C0{sub 3}) = 1:3 are studied. This ratio corresponds to the main complex which is responsible for the uranium extraction with CDMBAC organic solutions and from U(VI) aqueous solutions with an excess of sodium carbonate. (Author) 10 refs.

  5. Evidence of different stoichiometries for the limiting carbonate complexes of lanthanides(3); Mise en evidence d'un changement de stoechiometrie du complexe carbonate limite au sein de la serie des lanthanides(3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philippini, V

    2007-12-15

    Two stoichiometries have been proposed by different laboratories to interpret measurements on the limiting carbonate complexes of An{sup 3+} and Ln{sup 3+} cations. The study of the solubility of double carbonates (AlkLn(CO{sub 3}){sub 2},xH{sub 2}O) in concentrated carbonate solutions at room temperature and high ionic strengths has shown that on the one hand the lightest lanthanides (La and Nd) form Ln(CO{sub 3}){sub 4}{sup 5-} whereas the heaviest (Eu and Dy) form Ln(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 3-} in the studied chemical conditions, and on the other hand, that the kinetics of precipitation of double carbonates depends on the alkali metal and the lanthanide ions. The existence of two stoichiometries for the limiting carbonate complexes was confirmed by capillary electrophoresis hyphenated to an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (CE-ICP-MS), used to extend the study to the whole series of lanthanides (except Ce, Pm and Yb). Two behaviours have been put forward comparing the electrophoretic mobilities: La to Tb form Ln(CO{sub 3}){sub 4}{sup 5-} while Dy to Lu form Ln(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 3-}. Measurements by time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) on Eu(III) indicate small variations of the geometry of Eu(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 3-} complex, specially with Cs{sup +}. Although analogies are currently used among the 4f-block trivalent elements, different aqueous speciations are evidenced in concentrated carbonate solutions across the lanthanide series. (author)

  6. Simplifying the complexity of a coupled carbon turnover and pesticide degradation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschmann, Gianna; Erhardt, André H.; Pagel, Holger; Kügler, Philipp; Streck, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    The mechanistic one-dimensional model PECCAD (PEsticide degradation Coupled to CArbon turnover in the Detritusphere; Pagel et al. 2014, Biogeochemistry 117, 185-204) has been developed as a tool to elucidate regulation mechanisms of pesticide degradation in soil. A feature of this model is that it integrates functional traits of microorganisms, identifiable by molecular tools, and physicochemical processes such as transport and sorption that control substrate availability. Predicting the behavior of microbially active interfaces demands a fundamental understanding of factors controlling their dynamics. Concepts from dynamical systems theory allow us to study general properties of the model such as its qualitative behavior, intrinsic timescales and dynamic stability: Using a Latin hypercube method we sampled the parameter space for physically realistic steady states of the PECCAD ODE system and set up a numerical continuation and bifurcation problem with the open-source toolbox MatCont in order to obtain a complete classification of the dynamical system's behaviour. Bifurcation analysis reveals an equilibrium state of the system entirely controlled by fungal kinetic parameters. The equilibrium is generally unstable in response to small perturbations except for a small band in parameter space where the pesticide pool is stable. Time scale separation is a phenomenon that occurs in almost every complex open physical system. Motivated by the notion of "initial-stage" and "late-stage" decomposers and the concept of r-, K- or L-selected microbial life strategies, we test the applicability of geometric singular perturbation theory to identify fast and slow time scales of PECCAD. Revealing a generic fast-slow structure would greatly simplify the analysis of complex models of organic matter turnover by reducing the number of unknowns and parameters and providing a systematic mathematical framework for studying their properties.

  7. Characterisation of three regimes of collapsing Arctic ice complex deposits on the SE Laptev Sea coast using biomarkers and dual carbon isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Garcia, Laura; Vonk, Jorien; Charkin, Alexander; Kosmach, Denis; Dudarev, Oleg; Semiletov, Igor; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2014-01-01

    Arctic amplification of climate warming is intensifying the thaw and coastal erosion of the widespread and carbon-rich Siberian Ice Complex Deposits (ICD). Despite the potential for altering long-term carbon dynamics in the Arctic, the susceptibility of organic carbon (OC) to degradation as the ICD

  8. The complex analytical method for assessment of passive smokers' exposure to carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czogala, Jan; Goniewicz, Maciej Lukasz

    2005-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is one of the toxic constituents in tobacco smoke. The aim of the study was to evaluate a complex analytical method that allows quantification of the exposure of passive smokers to CO. The exposed volunteers were placed in the model room where portions of cigarettes (5, 10, or 15 cigarettes every 30 or 60 min over 4 h) were smoked using a homemade smoking machine. The concentrations of CO and of the ventilation marker (methane) were monitored for the duration of each experiment. CO and methane were analyzed on-line using GC-FID with methanization. Carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) was analyzed twice: just before and after the experiment. After hemolysis of a 100-microL blood sample, CO was quantitatively released by adding 10% K3[Fe(CN)6] inside a small reactor and under stable pressure transported through a microtube with an absorbing agent on a chromatography loop. The proposed analytical method allows us to quantify exposure of passive smokers by measuring the dose-effect correlation. We observed that increasing COHb levels were directly correlated with the CO concentration in the air, but were also intermediately correlated with the frequency and number of smoked cigarettes and with the ventilation coefficient.

  9. Electrochemical sensor for ranitidine determination based on carbon paste electrode modified with oxovanadium (IV) salen complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymundo-Pereira, Paulo A; Teixeira, Marcos F S; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando; Dockal, Edward R; Bonifácio, Viviane Gomes; Marcolino, Luiz H

    2013-10-01

    The preparation and electrochemical characterization of a carbon paste electrode modified with the N,N-ethylene-bis(salicyllideneiminato)oxovanadium (IV) complex ([VO(salen)]) as well as its application for ranitidine determination are described. The electrochemical behavior of the modified electrode for the electroreduction of ranitidine was investigated using cyclic voltammetry, and analytical curves were obtained for ranitidine using linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) under optimized conditions. The best voltammetric response was obtained for an electrode composition of 20% (m/m) [VO(salen)] in the paste, 0.10 mol L(-1) of KCl solution (pH 5.5 adjusted with HCl) as supporting electrolyte and scan rate of 25 mV s(-1). A sensitive linear voltammetric response for ranitidine was obtained in the concentration range from 9.9×10(-5) to 1.0×10(-3) mol L(-1), with a detection limit of 6.6×10(-5) mol L(-1) using linear sweep voltammetry. These results demonstrated the viability of this modified electrode as a sensor for determination, quality control and routine analysis of ranitidine in pharmaceutical formulations.

  10. Electroless deposition of bis(4'-(4-Pyridyl)-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine)iron(II) thiocyanate complex onto carbon nanotubes modified glassy carbon electrode: application to simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid

    OpenAIRE

    Kamyabi,M. A; Narimani,O; Monfared,H. H

    2011-01-01

    A glassy carbon (GC) electrode modified by multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and bis(pyterpy)iron(II) thiocyanate complex (pyterpy = 4'-(4-pyridyl)-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine) was investigated by voltammetric methods in acetate buffer solution (pH 5). Performances of the iron(II)-complex/MWNTs modified electrode were evaluated with differential pulse voltammetry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The modified glassy carbon electrode shows an excellent electrochemical response for ascorb...

  11. PALADYN v1.0, a comprehensive land surface-vegetation-carbon cycle model of intermediate complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willeit, Matteo; Ganopolski, Andrey

    2016-10-01

    PALADYN is presented; it is a new comprehensive and computationally efficient land surface-vegetation-carbon cycle model designed to be used in Earth system models of intermediate complexity for long-term simulations and paleoclimate studies. The model treats in a consistent manner the interaction between atmosphere, terrestrial vegetation and soil through the fluxes of energy, water and carbon. Energy, water and carbon are conserved. PALADYN explicitly treats permafrost, both in physical processes and as an important carbon pool. It distinguishes nine surface types: five different vegetation types, bare soil, land ice, lake and ocean shelf. Including the ocean shelf allows the treatment of continuous changes in sea level and shelf area associated with glacial cycles. Over each surface type, the model solves the surface energy balance and computes the fluxes of sensible, latent and ground heat and upward shortwave and longwave radiation. The model includes a single snow layer. Vegetation and bare soil share a single soil column. The soil is vertically discretized into five layers where prognostic equations for temperature, water and carbon are consistently solved. Phase changes of water in the soil are explicitly considered. A surface hydrology module computes precipitation interception by vegetation, surface runoff and soil infiltration. The soil water equation is based on Darcy's law. Given soil water content, the wetland fraction is computed based on a topographic index. The temperature profile is also computed in the upper part of ice sheets and in the ocean shelf soil. Photosynthesis is computed using a light use efficiency model. Carbon assimilation by vegetation is coupled to the transpiration of water through stomatal conductance. PALADYN includes a dynamic vegetation module with five plant functional types competing for the grid cell share with their respective net primary productivity. PALADYN distinguishes between mineral soil carbon, peat carbon, buried

  12. Clay:organic-carbon and organic carbon as determinants of the soil physical properties: reassessment of the Complexed Organic Carbon concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter, Adrien; Johannes, Alice; Boivin, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) is well known to largely determine the soil physical properties and fertility. Total porosity, structural porosity, aeration, structural stability among others are reported to increase linearly with increasing SOC in most studies. Is there an optimal SOC content as target in soil management, or is there no limit in physical fertility improvement with SOC? Dexter et al. (2008) investigated the relation between clay:SOC ratio and the physical properties of soils from different databases. They observed that the R2 of the relation between SOC and the physical properties were maximized when considering the SOC fraction limited to a clay:SOC ratio of 10. They concluded that this fraction of the SOC was complexed, and that the additional SOC was not influencing the physical properties as strongly as the complexed one. In this study, we reassessed this approach, on a database of 180 undisturbed soil samples collected from cambiluvisols of the Swiss Plateau, on an area of 2400 km2, and from different soil uses. The physical properties were obtained with Shrinkage Analysis, which involved the parameters used in Dexter et al., 2008. We used the same method, but detected biases in the statistical approach, which was, therefore, adapted. We showed that the relation between the bulk density and SOC was changing with the score of visual evaluation of the structure (VESS) (Ball et al., 2007). Therefore, we also worked only on the "good" structures according to VESS. All shrinkage parameters were linearly correlated to SOC regardless of the clay:SOC ratio, with R2 ranging from 0.45 to 0.8. Contrarily to Dexter et al. (2008), we did not observed an optimum in the R2 of the relation when considering a SOC fraction based on the clay:SOC ratio. R2 was increasing until a Clay:SOC of about 7, where it reached, and kept, its maximum value. The land use factor was not significant. The major difference with the former study is that we worked on the same soil group

  13. A novel non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor based on single walled carbon nanotubes-manganese complex modified glassy carbon electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salimi, Abdollah, E-mail: absalimi@uok.ac.i [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Nanotechnology, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdioun, Monierosadat; Noorbakhsh, Abdollah [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdolmaleki, Amir [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156/83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghavami, Raoof [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-03-30

    A simple procedure was developed to prepare a glassy carbon (GC) electrode modified with single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and phenazine derivative of Mn-complex. With immersing the GC/CNTs modified electrode into Mn-complex solution for a short period of time 20-100 s, a stable thin layer of the complex was immobilized onto electrode surface. Modified electrode showed a well defined redox couples at wide pH range (1-12). The surface coverages and heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants (k{sub s}) of immobilized Mn-complex were approximately 1.58 x 10{sup -10} mole cm{sup -2} and 48.84 s{sup -1}. The modified electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity toward H{sub 2}O{sub 2} reduction. Detection limit, sensitivity, linear concentration range and k{sub cat} for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} were, 0.2 {mu}M and 692 nA {mu}M{sup -1} cm{sup -2}, 1 {mu}M to 1.5 mM and 7.96({+-}0.2) x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. Compared to other modified electrodes, this electrode has many advantageous such as remarkable catalytic activity, good reproducibility, simple preparation procedure and long term stability.

  14. Highly microporous carbons derived from a complex of glutamic acid and zinc chloride for use in supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiao-Ling; Lu, An-Hui; He, Bin; Li, Wen-Cui

    2016-09-01

    The selection of carbon precursor is an important factor when designing carbon materials. In this study, a complex derived from L-glutamic acid and zinc chloride was used to prepare highly microporous carbons via facile pyrolysis. L-glutamic acid, a new carbon precursor with nitrogen functionality, coordinated with zinc chloride resulted in a homogeneous distribution of Zn2+ on the molecular level. During pyrolysis, the evaporation of the in situ formed zinc species creates an abundance of micropores together with the inert gases. The obtained carbons exhibit high specific surface area (SBET: 1203 m2 g-1) and a rich nitrogen content (4.52 wt%). In excess of 89% of the pore volume consists of micropores with pore size ranging from 0.5 to 1.2 nm. These carbons have been shown to be suitable for use as supercapacitor electrodes, and have been tested in 6 M KOH where a capacitance of 217 F g-1 was achieved at a current density of 0.5 A g-1. A long cycling life of 30 000 cycles was achieved at a current density of 1 A g-1, with only a 9% loss in capacity. The leakage current through a two-electrode device was measured as 2.3 μA per mg of electrode and the self-discharge characteristics were minimal.

  15. Reconstruction of Holocene carbon dynamics in a large boreal peatland complex, southern Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathijssen, Paul J. H.; Väliranta, Minna; Korrensalo, Aino; Alekseychik, Pavel; Vesala, Timo; Rinne, Janne; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina

    2016-06-01

    Holocene peatland development and associated carbon (C) dynamics were reconstructed for a southern boreal Finnish peatland complex with fen and bog areas. In order to assess the role of local factors and long-term allogenic climate forcing in peatland development patterns, we studied a total of 18 peat cores and reconstructed vertical peat growth and lateral peat area expansion rates, the C accumulation rate (CAR), past vegetation composition and past methane (CH4) fluxes. We combined fossil plant data with measured contemporary CH4 flux - vegetation relationship data to reconstruct CH4 fluxes over time. When these reconstructions were added to the CAR estimations, a more complete picture of Holocene-scale C dynamics was achieved. Basal peat ages showed that expansion of the peat area was rapid between 11,000 and 8000 cal. BP, but decreased during the dry mid-Holocene and is probably currently limited by basal topography. A similar pattern was observed for peat growth and CAR in the fen core, whereas in the bog core CAR increased after ombrotrophication, i.e. after 4400 cal. BP. The effect of fire on vegetation and CAR was more conspicuous at the bog site than at the fen site. The CH4 flux reconstructions showed that during the Holocene CH4 emissions at the fen site decreased from 19 ± 15 to 16 ± 8 g CH4 m-2 yr-1 and at the bog site from 20 ± 15 to 14 ± 8 g CH4 m-2 yr-1. Our results suggest that a combination of changing climate, fire events and local conditions have modified the autogenic peatland development and C dynamics.

  16. Basin-scale Modeling of Geological Carbon Sequestration: Model Complexity, Injection Scenario and Sensitivity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, X.; Bandilla, K.; Celia, M. A.; Bachu, S.

    2013-12-01

    Geological carbon sequestration can significantly contribute to climate-change mitigation only if it is deployed at a very large scale. This means that injection scenarios must occur, and be analyzed, at the basin scale. Various mathematical models of different complexity may be used to assess the fate of injected CO2 and/or resident brine. These models span the range from multi-dimensional, multi-phase numerical simulators to simple single-phase analytical solutions. In this study, we consider a range of models, all based on vertically-integrated governing equations, to predict the basin-scale pressure response to specific injection scenarios. The Canadian section of the Basal Aquifer is used as a test site to compare the different modeling approaches. The model domain covers an area of approximately 811,000 km2, and the total injection rate is 63 Mt/yr, corresponding to 9 locations where large point sources have been identified. Predicted areas of critical pressure exceedance are used as a comparison metric among the different modeling approaches. Comparison of the results shows that single-phase numerical models may be good enough to predict the pressure response over a large aquifer; however, a simple superposition of semi-analytical or analytical solutions is not sufficiently accurate because spatial variability of formation properties plays an important role in the problem, and these variations are not captured properly with simple superposition. We consider two different injection scenarios: injection at the source locations and injection at locations with more suitable aquifer properties. Results indicate that in formations with significant spatial variability of properties, strong variations in injectivity among the different source locations can be expected, leading to the need to transport the captured CO2 to suitable injection locations, thereby necessitating development of a pipeline network. We also consider the sensitivity of porosity and

  17. Carbon-carbon bond cleavage of 1,2-hydroxy ethers b7 vanadium(V) dipicolinate complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Susan K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gordon, John C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thorn, David L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scott, Brian L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baker, R Tom [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The development of alternatives to current petroleum-based fuels and chemicals is becoming increasingly important due to concerns over climate change, growing world energy demand, and energy security issues. Using non-food derived biomass to produce renewable feedstocks for chemicals and fuels is a particularly attractive possibility. However, the majority of biomass is in the form of lignocellulose, which is often not fully utilized due to difficulties associated with breaking down both lignin and cellulose. Recently, a number of methods have been reported to transform cellulose directly into more valuable materials such as glucose, sorbitol, 5-(chloromethyl)furfural, and ethylene glycol. Less progress has been made with selective transformations of lignin, which is typically treated in paper and forest industries by kraft pulping (sodium hydroxide/sodium sulfide) or incineration. Our group has begun investigating aerobic oxidative C-C bond cleavage catalyzed by dipicolinate vanadium complexes, with the idea that a selective C-C cleavage reaction of this type could be used to produce valuable chemicals or intermediates from cellulose or lignin. Lignin is a randomized polymer containing methoxylated phenoxy propanol units. A number of different linkages occur naturally; one of the most prevalent is the {beta}-O-4 linkage shown in Figure 1, containing a C-C bond with 1,2-hydroxy ether substituents. While the oxidative C-C bond cleavage of 1,2-diols has been reported for a number of metals, including vanadium, iron, manganese, ruthenium, and polyoxometalate complexes, C-C bond cleavage of 1,2-hydroxy ethers is much less common. We report herein vanadium-mediated cleavage of C-C bonds between alcohol and ether functionalities in several lignin model complexes. In order to explore the scope and potential of vanadium complexes to effect oxidative C-C bond cleavage in 1,2-hydroxy ethers, we examined the reactivity of the lignin model complexes pinacol monomethyl ether (A

  18. Electrocatalytic O2 Reduction at a Bio-inspired Mononuclear Copper Phenolato Complex Immobilized on a Carbon Nanotube Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentil, Solène; Serre, Doti; Philouze, Christian; Holzinger, Michael; Thomas, Fabrice; Le Goff, Alan

    2016-02-12

    An original copper-phenolate complex, mimicking the active center of galactose oxidase, featuring a pyrene group was synthesized. Supramolecular pi-stacking allows its efficient and soft immobilization at the surface of a Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube (MWCNT) electrode. This MWCNT-supported galactose oxidase model exhibits a 4 H(+)/4 e(-) electrocatalytic activity towards oxygen reduction at a redox potential of 0.60 V vs. RHE at pH 5.

  19. Mechanistic information on the reductive elimination from cationic trimethylplatinum(IV) complexes to form carbon-carbon bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procelewska, Joanna; Zahl, Achim; Liehr, Günter; van Eldik, Rudi; Smythe, Nicole A; Williams, B Scott; Goldberg, Karen I

    2005-10-31

    Cationic complexes of the type fac-[(L(2))Pt(IV)Me(3)(pyr-X)][OTf] (pyr-X = 4-substituted pyridines; L(2) = diphosphine, viz., dppe = bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane and dppbz = o-bis(diphenylphosphino)benzene; OTf = trifluoromethanesulfonate) undergo C-C reductive elimination reactions to form [L(2)Pt(II)Me(pyr-X)][OTf] and ethane. Detailed studies indicate that these reactions proceed by a two-step pathway, viz., initial reversible dissociation of the pyridine ligand from the cationic complex to generate a five-coordinate Pt(IV) intermediate, followed by irreversible concerted C-C bond formation. The reaction is inhibited by pyridine. The highly positive values for DeltaS()(obs) = +180 +/- 30 J K(-1) mol(-1), DeltaH(obs) = 160 +/- 10 kJ mol(-1), and DeltaV()(obs) = +16 +/- 1 cm(3) mol(-1) can be accounted for in terms of significant bond cleavage and/or partial reduction from Pt(IV) to Pt(II) in going from the ground to the transition state. These cationic complexes have provided the first opportunity to carry out detailed studies of C-C reductive elimination from cationic Pt(IV) complexes in a variety of solvents. The absence of a significant solvent effect for this reaction provides strong evidence that the C-C reductive coupling occurs from an unsaturated five-coordinate Pt(IV) intermediate rather than from a six-coordinate Pt(IV) solvento species.

  20. Carbon-water Cycling in the Critical Zone: Understanding Ecosystem Process Variability Across Complex Terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, Holly [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Brooks, Paul [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2016-06-16

    One of the largest knowledge gaps in environmental science is the ability to understand and predict how ecosystems will respond to future climate variability. The links between vegetation, hydrology, and climate that control carbon sequestration in plant biomass and soils remain poorly understood. Soil respiration is the second largest carbon flux of terrestrial ecosystems, yet there is no consensus on how respiration will change as water availability and temperature co-vary. To address this knowledge gap, we use the variation in soil development and topography across an elevation and climate gradient on the Front Range of Colorado to conduct a natural experiment that enables us to examine the co-evolution of soil carbon, vegetation, hydrology, and climate in an accessible field laboratory. The goal of this project is to further our ability to combine plant water availability, carbon flux and storage, and topographically driven hydrometrics into a watershed scale predictive model of carbon balance. We hypothesize: (i) landscape structure and hydrology are important controls on soil respiration as a result of spatial variability in both physical and biological drivers: (ii) variation in rates of soil respiration during the growing season is due to corresponding shifts in belowground carbon inputs from vegetation; and (iii) aboveground carbon storage (biomass) and species composition are directly correlated with soil moisture and therefore, can be directly related to subsurface drainage patterns.

  1. The complex environment of the bright carbon star TX Piscium as probed by spectro-astrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hron, J.; Uttenthaler, S.; Aringer, B.; Klotz, D.; Lebzelter, T.; Paladini, C.; Wiedemann, G.

    2015-12-01

    Context. Stars on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) show broad evidence of inhomogeneous atmospheres and circumstellar envelopes. These have been studied by a variety of methods on various angular scales. In this paper we explore the envelope of the well-studied carbon star TX Psc by the technique of spectro-astrometry. Aims: We explore the potential of this method for detecting asymmetries around AGB stars. Methods: We obtained CRIRES observations of several CO Δv = 1 lines near 4.6 μm and HCN lines near 3 μm in 2010 and 2013. These were then searched for spectro-astrometric signatures. For the interpretation of the results, we used simple simulated observations. Results: Several lines show significant photocentre shifts with a clear dependence on position angle. In all cases, tilde-shaped signatures are found where the positive and negative shifts (at PA 0°) are associated with blue and weaker red components of the lines. The shifts can be modelled with a bright blob 70 mas to 210 mas south of the star with a flux of several percent of the photospheric flux. We estimate a lower limit of the blob temperature of 1000 K. The blob may be related to a mass ejection as found for AGB stars or red supergiants. We also consider the scenario of a companion object. Conclusions: Although there is clear spectro-astrometric evidence of a rather prominent structure near TX Psc, it does not seem to relate to the other evidence of asymmetries, so no definite explanation can be given. Our data thus underline the very complex structure of the environment of this star, but further observations that sample the angular scales out to a few hundred milli-arcseconds are needed to get a clearer picture. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme IDs 386.D-0091 and 091.D-0094.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  2. Complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenson, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The term complexity derives etymologically from the Latin plexus, which means interwoven. Intuitively, this implies that something complex is composed by elements that are difficult to separate. This difficulty arises from the relevant interactions that take place between components. This lack of separability is at odds with the classical scientific method - which has been used since the times of Galileo, Newton, Descartes, and Laplace - and has also influenced philosophy and engineering. In recent decades, the scientific study of complexity and complex systems has proposed a paradigm shift in science and philosophy, proposing novel methods that take into account relevant interactions.

  3. A computational study on novel carbon-based lithium materials for hydrogen storage and the role of carbon in destabilizing complex metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghouri, Mohammed Minhaj

    materials with varying amounts of hydrogen. A detailed analysis of the heats of reactions of these materials using different reaction schemes is performed and based on the promising thermodynamic and gravimetric storage density, LiC4Be2H5 is divulged as a promising novel carbon based lithium material. In the later part, this dissertation performs a detailed study on the effect of carbon when it is used as a dopant in four different well known complex hydrides, lithium beryllium hydride (Li2BeH4), lithium borohydride (LiBH4), lithium aluminum hydride (LiAlH 4) and sodium borohydride (NaBH4). Initially, the unit cells of the crystal structure are fully resolved using the plane-wave pseudopotential implementation of DFT. The supercells of each of these are then constructed and optimized. Varying amounts of carbon is introduced as impurity in these crystals in different sites such as the top, subsurface and the bulk of the crystal lattice. Using the electronic structure calculations, it is established that (i) C-Be-H, C-B-H or C-Al-H compounds are formed respectively in the cases of Li2BeH4, LiBH4 and LiAlH4 when carbon is doped in them; (ii) and carbon dopant causes a decrease in the bond strengths of Be-H, B-H and Al-H in respective cases. This reduction in the bond strengths combined with the fact that there is a decrease in the ionic interaction between the cation and the anionic hydride units of these complex hydrides causes a destabilization effect.

  4. Complex formation during dissolution of metal oxides in molten alkali carbonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qingfeng; Borup, Flemming; Petrushina, Irina;

    1999-01-01

    Dissolution of metal oxides in molten carbonates relates directly to the stability of materials for electrodes and construction of molten carbonate fuel cells. In the present work the solubilities of PbO, NiO, Fe2O3,and Bi2O3 in molten Li/K carbonates have been measured at 650 degrees C under...... carbon dioxide atmosphere. It is found that the solubilities of NiO and PbO decrease while those of Fe2O3 and Bi2O3 remain approximately constant as the lithium mole fraction increases from 0.43 to 0.62 in the melt. At a fixed composition of the melt, NiO and PbO display both acidic and basic dissolution...

  5. Electrocatalytic and simultaneous determination of isoproterenol, uric acid and folic acid at molybdenum (VI) complex-carbon nanotube paste electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beitollahi, Hadi, E-mail: h.beitollahi@yahoo.com [Environment Department, Research Institute of Environmental Sciences, International Center for Science, High Technology and Environmental Sciences, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sheikhshoaie, Iran [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman 76175-133 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-30

    Highlights: > A molybdenum (VI) complex-carbon nanotube paste electrode have been fabricated. > This electrode reduced the oxidation potential of isoproterenol by about 175 mV. > It resolved the voltammetric waves of isoproterenol, uric acid and folic acid. - Abstract: This paper describes the development, electrochemical characterization and utilization of a novel modified molybdenum (VI) complex-carbon nanotube paste electrode for the electrocatalytic determination of isoproterenol (IP). The electrochemical profile of the proposed modified electrode was analyzed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) that showed a shift of the oxidation peak potential of IP at 175 mV to less positive value, compared with an unmodified carbon paste electrode. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) in 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution (PBS) at pH 7.0 was performed to determine IP in the range from 0.7 to 600.0 {mu}M, with a detection limit of 35.0 nM. Then the modified electrode was used to determine IP in an excess of uric acid (UA) and folic acid (FA) by DPV. Finally, this method was used for the determination of IP in some real samples.

  6. Synthesis and evaluation of multi-wall carbon nanotube–paclitaxel complex as an anti-cancer agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemvand, Fariba; Biazar, Esmaeil; Tavakolifard, Sara; Khaledian, Mohammad; Rahmanzadeh, Saeid; Momenzadeh, Daruosh; Afroosheh, Roshanak; Zarkalami, Faezeh; Shabannezhad, Marjan; Hesami Tackallou, Saeed; Massoudi, Nilofar; Heidari Keshel, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to design multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) loaded with paclitaxel (PTX) anti-cancer drug and investigate its anti-cancerous efficacy of human gastric cancer. Background: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) represent a novel nano-materials applied in various fields such as drug delivery due to their unique chemical properties and high drug loading. Patients and methods: In this study, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) pre-functionalized covalently with a paclitaxel (PTX) as an anti-cancer drug and evaluated by different analyses including, scanning electron microscope (SEM), particle size analyzer and cellular analyses. Results: A well conjugated of anti-cancer drug on the carbon nanotube surfaces was shown. This study demonstrates that the MWCN-PTX complex is a potentially useful system for delivery of anti-cancer drugs. The flow cytometry, CFU and MTT assay results have disclosed that MWCNT/PTXs might promote apoptosis in MKN-45 gastric adenocarcinoma cell line. Conclusion: According to results, our simple method can be designed a candidate material for chemotherapy. It has presented a few bio-related applications including, their successful use as a nano-carriers for drug transport. PMID:27458512

  7. Theory of complex fluids in the warm-dense-matter regime, and application to phase-transitions in liquid carbon

    CERN Document Server

    Dharma-wardana, M W C

    2016-01-01

    Using data from recent laser-shock experiments and related density-functional molecular-dynamics simulations on carbon, we demonstrate that the ionic structures predicted within the neutral-pseudo-atom approach for a complex liquid in the warm-dense matter regime are in good agreement with available data, even where transient covalent bonding dominates ionic correlations. Evidence for an unusual phase transition of a liquid $\\to$ vapor with an abrupt decrease in ionization occurring simultaneously is presented. Here a covalently-bonded metallic-liquid, i.e., carbon of density 1.0 g/cm$^3$, transits to a disordered mono-atomic fluid at 7 eV. Other transitions where the mean ionization $Z$ drops abruptly are also uncovered

  8. Synthesis of Novel Porphyrin and its Complexes Covalently Linked to Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Study of their Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Jun

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Novel covalent porphyrin and its complexes (Co2+, Zn2+ functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs have been successfully synthesized by the reaction of the carboxyl on the surface of MWNTs which was synthesized to use carbon radicals generated by the thermal decomposition of azodiisobutyronitrile (AIBN with 5-p-hydroxyphenyl-10,15,20-triphenyl-porphyrin and its complexes (Co2+, Zn2+. Three resulting nanohybrids were characterized by spectroscopy (FT-IR, Raman, and UV-vis, TGA, and TEM. The quality of porphyrin attached to the MWNTs was determined from thermogravimeric analysis (TGA of the MWNTs, which showed a weight loss of about 60%. The Raman and absorption spectroscopy data showed that the electronic properties of modified MWNTs were mostly retained, without damaging their one-dimensional electronic properties. From fluorescence measurements, it was observed that the porphyrin and its complexes (Co2+, Zn2+ were nearly quenched by MWNTs, indicating that this covalently modified mode facilitated the effective energy or electron transfer between the excited porphyrin moiety and the extended π-system of MWNTs.

  9. Formation of complex Al-N-C layer in aluminium by successive carbon and nitrogen implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uglov, V.V.; Cherenda, N.N. E-mail: info@research.bsu.unibel.by; Khodasevich, V.V.; Sokol, V.A.; Abramov, I.I.; Danilyuk, A.L.; Wenzel, A.; Gerlach, J.; Rauschenbach, B

    1999-01-01

    The results of Auger electron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy of the surface layer of aluminium after successive implantation by carbon and nitrogen ions are presented in this work. The energy of implanted ions is 40 keV. The implantation dose varies in the range (3.3-6.5)x10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2}. The findings show that successive implantation leads to the formation of two main layers in aluminium. The first layer is AlNC{sub x} (0carbon atoms form bonds with nitrogen atoms. The second layer contains disoriented Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} precipitates and carbon atoms migrated from the first layer. The mechanism of migration is discussed.

  10. Formation of complex Al-N-C layer in aluminium by successive carbon and nitrogen implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uglov, V. V.; Cherenda, N. N.; Khodasevich, V. V.; Sokol, V. A.; Abramov, I. I.; Danilyuk, A. L.; Wenzel, A.; Gerlach, J.; Rauschenbach, B.

    1999-01-01

    The results of Auger electron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy of the surface layer of aluminium after successive implantation by carbon and nitrogen ions are presented in this work. The energy of implanted ions is 40 keV. The implantation dose varies in the range (3.3-6.5) × 10 17 ions/cm 2. The findings show that successive implantation leads to the formation of two main layers in aluminium. The first layer is AlNC x (0 < x < 0.5) layer with violated hcp. AlN structure, where carbon atoms form bonds with nitrogen atoms. The second layer contains disoriented Al 4C 3 precipitates and carbon atoms migrated from the first layer. The mechanism of migration is discussed.

  11. Hydration properties of lanthanoid(III) carbonate complexes in liquid water determined by polarizable molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Fausto; Jeanvoine, Yannick; Vercouter, Thomas; Beuchat, César; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Spezia, Riccardo

    2014-02-28

    In this work we have studied the structure and dynamics of complexes formed by three and four carbonates and a central lanthanoid(III) ion in liquid water by means of polarizable molecular dynamics simulations. With this aim we have developed a force field employing an extrapolation procedure that was previously developed for lanthanoid(III) aqua ions and then we have validated it against DFT-based data. In this way we were able to shed light on properties of the whole series, finding some similarities and differences across the series, and to help in interpreting experiments on those systems. We found that the bi-dentate tri-carbonate complexes are the most stable for all the atoms, but a variation of the number of water molecules in the first ion shell, and the associated exchange dynamics, is observed from lighter to heavier elements. On the other hand, for four-carbonate systems only one water molecule is observed in the first shell, with 10-20% probability, for La(III) and Ce(III), while for the rest of the series it seems impossible for a water molecule to enter the first ion shell in the presence of such an excess of carbonate ligands. Finally, the good performance of our extrapolation procedure, based on ionic radii, makes us confident in extending such approaches to study the structure and dynamics of other systems in solution containing Ln(III) and An(III) ions. This parametrization method results particularly useful since it does not need expensive quantum chemistry calculations for all the atoms in the series.

  12. Electro-Thermal and Semiconductivity Behaviour of Natural Sintered Complex Carbonate Ore for Thermo-Technological Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Loutfy H. Madkour

    2014-01-01

    The polymetal (Zn, Pb, Fe, Ca, Mg, Cd, Ba, Ni, Ti, and SiO2) complex Umm-Gheig carbonate ore is subjected to sintering treatment at 573, 773, 973 and 1273 K respectively for four hours. Chemical, spectral, X-ray and differential thermal analyses are applied for the native ore as well as for the samples preheated and sintered. The current versus applied DC voltage (I–V) characteristics, bulk density (Db), percent shrinkage (%S), activation energy (Ea) and energy gap (Eg) are established for th...

  13. Fundamental reactivity of the Metal-Carbon bond in cyclometalated PNC-complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.S. Jongbloed

    2016-01-01

    The activation of C-H bonds by transition metals and the reactivity of the corresponding metal-carbon bond are interesting research topics form different point of views. Catalytic C-H bond functionalization has emerged as a highly active research area for the development of green construction of Car

  14. Building complex hybrid carbon architectures by covalent interconnections: graphene-nanotube hybrids and more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Ruitao; Cruz-Silva, Eduardo; Terrones, Mauricio

    2014-05-27

    Graphene is theoretically a robust two-dimensional (2D) sp(2)-hybridized carbon material with high electrical conductivity and optical transparency. However, due to the existence of grain boundaries and defects, experimentally synthesized large-area polycrystalline graphene sheets are easily broken and can exhibit high sheet resistances; thus, they are not suitable as flexible transparent conductors. As described in this issue of ACS Nano, Tour et al. circumvented this problem by proposing and synthesizing a novel hybrid structure that they have named "rebar graphene", which is composed of covalently interconnected carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with graphene sheets. In this particular configuration, CNTs act as "reinforcing bars" that not only improve the mechanical strength of polycrystalline graphene sheets but also bridge different crystalline domains so as to enhance the electrical conductivity. This report seems to be only the tip of the iceberg since it is also possible to construct novel and unprecedented hybrid carbon architectures by establishing covalent interconnections between CNTs with graphene, thus yielding graphene-CNT hybrids, three-dimensional (3D) covalent CNT networks, 3D graphene networks, etc. In this Perspective, we review the progress of these carbon hybrid systems and describe the challenges that need to be overcome in the near future.

  15. From simple to complex prebiotic chemistry in a carbon-rich universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lage, C.; Janot-Pacheco, E.; Domiciano de Souza, A.; Suárez, O.; Bendjoya, P.; Gadotti, D. A.

    2012-09-01

    It is well known that the main components of important biomolecules are quite common not only in the Solar System, but also in other planetary systems and in the Galactic ISM. The ubiquitous presence of C in the Universe and the unique carbon chemical properties and carbon bonding thermodynamics supports the spontaneous self-replication of monomers into larger polymers, yielding the formation of large molecules. The detection of an ever increasing number of organic molecules in the interstellar medium (ISM) by radio-telescopes and chemical analysis of meteorites boosted astrochemical theories on radiation-induced chemistry, supported by laboratory experiments. In this scenario of exogenous origin of carbon compounds, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) may represent a resilient way of accumulating carbon as a robust cosmic reservoir. Consisting of a family of compounds with fused aromatic rings, the abundances of its larger members (50-100 carbon atoms) were estimated to be on top scores just after H2 and CO. PAHs have been detected in the ISM, in star-forming regions, ~14% of low-mass premainsequence stars, and, remarkably, in some 54% of intermediate mass stars. They have also been detected by SPITZER in distant galaxies up to z = 3. PAHs were promptly photolysed into a family of radicals if exposed to UV and oxygen-bearing molecules in laboratory. The presence of oxygenbearing molecules was shown in the laboratory to bring aromatic rings into an unstable chemistry leading to the production of e.g. alcohols, ketones and ether radicals. It has already been observed that carbon-and oxygen-rich stellar envelopes give rise to richer carbon chemistry. It appears very tempting to think that key prebiotic fragments should appear along planetary formation as C-O reaction byproducts such as methanol (CH3OH), formaldehyde (H2CO) and also simpler hydrocarbons as methyl acetylene (CH3CCH). Under an Astrobiology perspective it is plausible to map PAHs and oxygen compounds

  16. High-resolution structure of human carbonic anhydrase II complexed with acetazolamide reveals insights into inhibitor drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sippel, Katherine H; Robbins, Arthur H; Domsic, John; Genis, Caroli; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; McKenna, Robert

    2009-10-01

    The crystal structure of human carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) complexed with the inhibitor acetazolamide (AZM) has been determined at 1.1 A resolution and refined to an R(cryst) of 11.2% and an R(free) of 14.7%. As observed in previous CA II-inhibitor complexes, AZM binds directly to the zinc and makes several key interactions with active-site residues. The high-resolution data also showed a glycerol molecule adjacent to the AZM in the active site and two additional AZMs that are adventitiously bound on the surface of the enzyme. The co-binding of AZM and glycerol in the active site demonstrate that given an appropriate ring orientation and substituents, an isozyme-specific CA inhibitor may be developed.

  17. METALLOPROTEINS. A tethered niacin-derived pincer complex with a nickel-carbon bond in lactate racemase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desguin, Benoît; Zhang, Tuo; Soumillion, Patrice; Hols, Pascal; Hu, Jian; Hausinger, Robert P

    2015-07-03

    Lactic acid racemization is involved in lactate metabolism and cell wall assembly of many microorganisms. Lactate racemase (Lar) requires nickel, but the nickel-binding site and the role of three accessory proteins required for its activation remain enigmatic. We combined mass spectrometry and x-ray crystallography to show that Lar from Lactobacillus plantarum possesses an organometallic nickel-containing prosthetic group. A nicotinic acid mononucleotide derivative is tethered to Lys(184) and forms a tridentate pincer complex that coordinates nickel through one metal-carbon and two metal-sulfur bonds, with His(200) as another ligand. Although similar complexes have been previously synthesized, there was no prior evidence for the existence of pincer cofactors in enzymes. The wide distribution of the accessory proteins without Lar suggests that it may play a role in other enzymes.

  18. Carbon Nanotube Container: Complexes of C50H10 with Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodziuk, Helena; Korona, Tatiana; Lomba, Enrique; Bores, Cecilia

    2012-11-13

    The stability of complexes of a recently synthetized (Scott et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2011, 134, 107) opened nanocontainer C50H10 with several guest molecules, H2, N2, CO, HCN, H2O, CO2, CS2, H2S, C2H2, NH3, CH4, CH3CN, CH3OH, CH3CCH, 2-butyne, methyl halides, and with noble gas atoms, has been examined by means of symmetry-adapted perturbation theory of intermolecular interactions, which fully incorporates all important energy components, including a difficult dispersion term. All complexes under scrutiny have been found stable for all studied guests at 0 K, but entropic effects cause many of them to dissociate into constituent molecules under standard conditions. The estimation of temperature at which the Gibbs free energy ΔG = 0 revealed that the recently observed (Scott et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2011, 134, 107) complex CS2@C50H10 is the most stable at room temperature while the corresponding complexes with HCN and Xe guests should decompose at ca. 310 K and that with CO2 at room temperature (ca. 300 K). In agreement with the ΔG estimation, molecular dynamics simulations performed in vacuum for the CS2@C50H10 complex predicted that the complex is stable but decomposes at ca. 350 K. The MD simulations in CHCl3 solution showed that the presence of solvent stabilizes the CS2@C50H10 complex in comparison to vacuum. Thus, for the complexes obtained in solution the CO2 gas responsible for the greenhouse effect could be stored in the C50H10 nanotube.

  19. Determination of carbon number distributions of complex phthalates by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with ammonia chemical ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sanzo, Frank P; Lim, Peniel J; Han, Wenning W

    2015-01-01

    An assay method for phthalate esters with a complex mixture of isomer of varying carbon numbers, such as di-isononyl phthalate (DINP) and di-isodecyl phthalate (DIDP), using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) positive chemical ionization (PCI) with 5% ammonia in methane is described. GC-MS-PCI-NH3, unlike GC-MS electron ionization (EI) (GC-MS-EI) that produces generally m/z 149 ion as the main base peak and low intensity M(+) peaks, produces higher intensity (M + 1) ions that allow the determination of total (R + R') carbon number distributions based on the various R and R' alkyl groups of the di-esters moiety. The technique allows distinguishing among the various commercial DINP and DIDP plasticizers. The carbon number distributions are determined in the acceptable range of 85 mole percent (m/m). Several examples of analysis made on commercial DINP and DIDP are presented. The use of only 5% instead of 100% ammonia simplifies use of GC-MS-PCI-NH3 but still produces sufficient M + 1 ion intensities that are appropriate for the assay. In addition, use of low concentrations of ammonia mitigates potential safety aspects related to use of ammonia and provides less corrosion for the instrument hardware.

  20. Electrocatalytic Study of Carbon Dioxide Reduction By Co(TPPCl Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalaf Alenezi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide (CO2 is notorious for being a greenhouse gas and is the most important cause of global warming. However, it can be converted into useful products as it is a source of carbon. Reduction of CO2 is therefore an attractive research topic for many chemists. Different methods of electrocatalytic reduction of CO2 have been reported previously. Since CO2 is very stable, the direct electroreduction of CO2 into CO requires high potential at −2.2 V versus Ag/AgCl. In this work, CO2 reduction was carried out by the photoelectrocatalysis of CO2 in the presence of cobalt(IIItetraphenylporphyrin [Co(TPPCl] at −1.85 V with a current efficiency of 71%. At illuminated p-type silicon photocathode, the reduction of CO2 into CO was performed at a potential of 300 mV which is positive. However, at the same conditions, potential of −1.55 V with a current efficiency of ca 65% is required for the carbon electrode.

  1. Half-sandwich rhodium poly-chalcogenide complexes and a carbon insertion into Te-Te bond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Treatment of CptRh(PMe3)Cl2(1) (Cpt = 5(- tBu2C5H3) with [Et4N]2Se6 in DMF solution leads to the formation of cyclo-tetraselenido half-sandwich rhodium complexes CptRh(PMe3)(Se4) (2). The elimination of 2 with excess of nBu3P results in cyclo-diselenido rhodium complex CptRh(PMe3)(Se2) (3). 1 reacts with [nBu4N]2Te5 in DMF solution to yield cyclo-ditellurido rhodium complex CptRh (PMe3)(Te2) (4) in which carbon atom from CH2Cl2 can be inserted into Te-Te bond to form CptRh(PMe3)(TeCH2Te) (5). The new complexes 2-5 have been characterized by their IR, EI-MS, and 1H, 13C, 31P, 103Rh NMR spectra as well as elemental analysis.

  2. Dinuclear and Trinuclear Nickel Complexes as Effective Catalysts for Alternating Copolymerization on Carbon Dioxide and Cyclohexene Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chen-Yen; Cheng, Fu-Yin; Lu, Kuan-Yeh; Wu, Jung-Tsu; Huang, Bor-Hunn; Chen, Wei-An; Lin, Chu-Chieh; Ko, Bao-Tsan

    2016-08-15

    A series of novel nickel complexes 1-9 supported by NNO-tridentate Schiff-base derivatives have been synthesized and characterized. Treatment of the pro-ligands [L(1)-H = 2,4-di-tert-butyl-6-(((2-(dimethylamino)ethyl)imino)methyl)phenol, L(2)-H = 2-(((2-(dimethylamino)ethyl)imino)methyl)-4,6-bis(2-phenylpropan-2-yl)phenol, L(3)-H = 2-(((2-(dimethylamino)ethyl)imino)methyl)phenol] with Ni(OAc)2·4H2O in refluxing ethanol afforded mono- or bimetallic nickel complexes {[(L(1))Ni(OAc)] (1); (L(2))Ni(OAc)] (2); (L(3))2Ni2(OAc)2(H2O)] (3)}. Alcohol-solvated trimetallic nickel acetate complexes {[(L(3))2Ni3(OAc)4(MeOH)2] (4); (L(3))2Ni3(OAc)4(EtOH)2] (5)} could be generated from the reaction of L(3)-H and anhydrous nickel(II) acetate with a ratio of 2:3 in refluxing anhydrous MeOH or EtOH. The reaction of nickel acetate tetrahydrate and L(4)-H to L(6)-H [L(4)-H = 2-(((2-(dimethylamino)ethyl)imino)methyl)-5-methoxyphenol, L(5)-H = 2-(((2-(dimethylamino)ethyl)imino)methyl)-4-methoxy-phenol, L(6)-H = 2-(((2-(dimethylamino)ethyl)imino)(phenyl)methyl)phenol] produced, respectively, the alcohol-free trinuclear nickel complexes {[(L(4))2Ni3(OAc)4] (7); [(L(5))2Ni3(OAc)4] (8); [(L(6))2Ni3(OAc)4] (9)} with the same ratio in refluxing EtOH under the atmospheric environment. Interestingly, recrystallization of [(L(3))2Ni3(OAc)4(MeOH)] (4) or [(L(3))2Ni3(OAc)4(EtOH)] (5) in the mixed solvent of CH2Cl2/hexane gives [(L(3))2Ni3(OAc)4] (6), which is isostructural with analogues 7-9. All bi- and trimetallic nickel complexes exhibit efficient activity and good selectivity for copolymerization of CO2 with cyclohexene oxide, resulting in copolymers with a high alternating microstructure possessing ≥99% carbonate-linkage content. This is the first example to apply well-defined trinuclear nickel complexes as efficient catalysts for the production of perfectly alternating poly(cyclohexene carbonate).

  3. Characterization of Ketoprofen/Methyl-β-Cyclodextrin Complexes Prepared Using Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Banchero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Complexes of methyl-β-cyclodextrin and ketoprofen, a crystalline anti-inflammatory drug with poor water solubility, have been prepared for the first time in the presence of supercritical CO2 at 40°C and 20 MPa. The supercritical treatment allows these pharmaceutical formulations to be prepared without the use of any auxiliary agents or organic solvents. The treated samples were characterized through differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffractometry, and the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to exclude the presence of crystalline drug and check the formation of the complexes. The increase of the drug dissolution rate was investigated performing in vitro release tests in aqueous solutions. The results showed that the supercritical treatment can be an efficient method to obtain inclusion complexes with enhanced release kinetics. The operating methods of the release tests, that is, the “tablet method” or the “dispersed amount method,” affected both the dissolution rate and its dependence on the drug amount in the samples. On the contrary, the variation of the pH of the dissolution medium did not show any effect on the release rate of the supercritical complexes.

  4. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to alkenes over partially degraded iron-cobalt complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snel, R.

    1989-01-01

    Complex-derived iron-cobalt alloy catalysts have been studied under conditions similar to those normally prevailing in industry. Despite reports in the literature indicating unusual selectivities with iron-cobalt alloy catalysts under atmospheric pressure conditions, no deviations from normal select

  5. Lanthanide Complexes with Multidentate Oxime Ligands as Single-Molecule Magnets and Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Fixation Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hołyńska, Małgorzata; Clérac, Rodolphe; Rouzières, Mathieu

    2015-09-14

    The synthesis, structure, and magnetic properties of five lanthanide complexes with multidentate oxime ligands are described. Complexes 1 and 2 (1: [La2 (pop)2 (acac)4 (CH3 OH)], 2: [Dy2 (pop)(acac)5 ]) are synthesized from the 2-hydroxyimino-N-[1-(2-pyridyl)ethylidene]propanohydrazone (Hpop) ligand, while 3, 4, and 5 (3: [Dy2 (naphthsaoH)2 (acac)4 H(OH)]⋅0.85 CH3 CN⋅1.58 H2 O; 4: [Tb2 (naphthsaoH)2 (acac)4 H(OH)]⋅0.52 CH3 CN⋅1.71 H2 O; 5: [La6 (CO3 )2 (naphthsao)5 (naphthsaoH)0.5 (acac)8 (CO3 )0.5 (CH3 OH)2.76 H5.5 (H2 O)1.24 ]⋅2.39 CH3 CN⋅0.12 H2 O) contain 1-(1-hydroxynaphthalen-2-yl)-ethanone oxime (naphthsaoH2 ). In 1-4, dinuclear [Ln2 ] complexes crystallize, whereas hexanuclear La(III) complex 5 is formed after fixation of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Dy(III) -based complexes 2 and 3 display single-molecule-magnet properties with energy barriers of 27 and 98 K, respectively. The presence of a broad and unsymmetrical relaxation mode observed in the ac susceptibility data for 3 suggest two different dynamics of the magnetization which might be a consequence of independent relaxation processes of the two different Dy(3+) ions.

  6. Manganese(III) Schiff base complexes: chemistry relevant to the copolymerization of epoxides and carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darensbourg, Donald J; Frantz, Eric B

    2007-07-23

    Schiff base complexes of the form (acacen)Mn(III)X (acacen = N,N'-bis(acetylacetone)-1,2-ethylenediimine), where X = OAc, Cl, or N(3), have been evaluated for their ability to couple CO(2) and cyclohexene oxide in the presence of a variety of cocatalysts to provide cyclic or polycarbonates. These complexes proved to be ineffective at catalyzing this process; however, valuable information related to the coordination chemistry of these manganese Schiff bases was elucidated. Of importance, mechanistic findings as revealed by comprehensive studies involving structurally related (salen)CrX and (salen)CoX complexes strongly support the requirement of six-coordinate metal species for the effective copolymerization of CO(2) and epoxides. In the case of these Mn(III) complexes, it was determined that in chloroform or toluene solution a five-coordinate species was greatly favored over a six-coordinate species even in the presence of 20 equiv or more of various Lewis bases. Significantly epoxide monomers such as propylene oxide and cyclohexene oxide displayed no tendency to bind to these (acacen)MnX derivatives, even when used as solvents. Only in the case of excessive quantities of heterocyclic amines such as pyridine, DMAP, and DBU was spectral evidence of a six-coordinate Mn derivative observed in solution. X-ray crystal structures are provided for many of the complexes involved in this study, including the one-dimensional polymeric structures of [(acacen)MnOAc x 2H(2)O](n), [(acacen)MnN(3)](n) (mu(1,3)-N(3)), and a rare mixed bridging species [(acacen)MnN(3)](n) (mu(1,3)-N(3)/mu(1,1)-N(3)). In addition, a structure was obtained in which the unit cell contains both a (acacen)MnN(3)(DMAP) and a (acacen)MnN(3) species.

  7. Enhancing Carbon Fixation by Metabolic Engineering: A Model System of Complex Network Modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Gregory Stephanopoulos

    2008-04-10

    In the first two years of this research we focused on the development of a DNA microarray for transcriptional studies in the photosynthetic organism Synechocystis and the elucidation of the metabolic pathway for biopolymer synthesis in this organism. In addition we also advanced the molecular biological tools for metabolic engineering of biopolymer synthesis in Synechocystis and initiated a series of physiological studies for the elucidation of the carbon fixing pathways and basic central carbon metabolism of these organisms. During the last two-year period we focused our attention on the continuation and completion of the last task, namely, the development of tools for basic investigations of the physiology of these cells through, primarily, the determination of their metabolic fluxes. The reason for this decision lies in the importance of fluxes as key indicators of physiology and the high level of information content they carry in terms of identifying rate limiting steps in a metabolic pathway. While flux determination is a well-advanced subject for heterotrophic organisms, for the case of autotrophic bacteria, like Synechocystis, some special challenges had to be overcome. These challenges stem mostly from the fact that if one uses {sup 13}C labeled CO{sub 2} for flux determination, the {sup 13}C label will mark, at steady state, all carbon atoms of all cellular metabolites, thus eliminating the necessary differentiation required for flux determination. This peculiarity of autotrophic organisms makes it imperative to carry out flux determination under transient conditions, something that had not been accomplished before. We are pleased to report that we have solved this problem and we are now able to determine fluxes in photosynthetic organisms from stable isotope labeling experiments followed by measurements of label enrichment in cellular metabolites using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry. We have conducted extensive simulations to test the method and

  8. Visible-Light Photoredox Catalysis: Selective Reduction of Carbon Dioxide to Carbon Monoxide by a Nickel N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Isoquinoline Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoi, VanSara; Kornienko, Nick; Margarit, C; Yang, Peidong; Chang, Christopher

    2013-06-07

    The solar-driven reduction of carbon dioxide to value-added chemical fuels is a longstanding challenge in the fields of catalysis, energy science, and green chemistry. In order to develop effective CO2 fixation, several key considerations must be balanced, including (1) catalyst selectivity for promoting CO2 reduction over competing hydrogen generation from proton reduction, (2) visible-light harvesting that matches the solar spectrum, and (3) the use of cheap and earth-abundant catalytic components. In this report, we present the synthesis and characterization of a new family of earth-abundant nickel complexes supported by N-heterocyclic carbene amine ligands that exhibit high selectivity and activity for the electrocatalytic and photocatalytic conversion of CO2 to CO. Systematic changes in the carbene and amine donors of the ligand have been surveyed, and [Ni(Prbimiq1)]2+ (1c, where Prbimiq1 = bis(3-(imidazolyl)isoquinolinyl)propane) emerges as a catalyst for electrochemical reduction of CO2 with the lowest cathodic onset potential (Ecat = 1.2 V vs SCE). Using this earth-abundant catalyst with Ir(ppy)3 (where ppy = 2-phenylpyridine) and an electron donor, we have developed a visible-light photoredox system for the catalytic conversion of CO2 to CO that proceeds with high selectivity and activity and achieves turnover numbers and turnover frequencies reaching 98,000 and 3.9 s1, respectively. Further studies reveal that the overall efficiency of this solar-to-fuel cycle may be limited by the formation of the active Ni catalyst and/or the chemical reduction of CO2 to CO at the reduced nickel center and provide a starting point for improved photoredox systems for sustainable carbon-neutral energy conversion.

  9. Kinetics of the Removal of Chromium Complex Dye from Aqueous Solutions Using Activated Carbons and Polymeric Adsorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eglė Kazlauskienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of the removal of chromium complex dye (Lanasyn Navy M-DNL from aqueous solutions using polymeric adsorbent Macronet MN 200 (MN 200 as an alternative option for activated carbon Norit RB 0.8 CC (AC was studied in the batch system. The residual colour of dye solution treated with AC or MN 200 strongly depends on solution pH with lower values at acidic pH when a positively charged surface net is favourable for the adsorption of the dye anion. The removal of dye using MN 200 was found relatively higher than that using AC. The pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion models agreed well with experimental data. The parameters of these models were studied as a function of temperature and adsorbent nature.Article in Lithuanian

  10. Hierarchically-Porous Carbon Derived from a Large-Scale Iron-based Organometallic Complex for Versatile Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chao-Ying; Li, Huan-Huan; Wang, Hai-Feng; Sun, Hai-Zhu; Wu, Xing-Long; Zhang, Jing-Ping

    2016-06-22

    Inspired by the preparation of the hierarchically-porous carbon (HPC) derived from metal organic frameworks (MOFs) for energy storage, in this work, a simple iron-based metal- organic complex (MOC), which was simpler and cheaper compared with the MOF, was selected to achieve versatile energy storage. The intertwined 1 D nanospindles and enriched-oxygen doping of the HPC was obtained after one-step carbonization of the MOC. When employed in lithium-ion batteries, the HPC exhibited reversible capacity of 778 mA h g(-1) after 60 cycles at 50 mA g(-1) . Moreover, the HPC maintained a capacity of 188 mA h g(-1) after 400 cycles at 100 mA g(-1) as the anode material in a sodium-ion battery. In addition, the HPC served as the cathode matrix for evaluation of a lithium-sulfur battery. The general preparation process of the HPC is commercial, which is responsible for the large-scale production for its practical application.

  11. A sensing mechanism for the detection of carbon nanotubes using selective photoluminescent probes based on ionic complexes with organic dyes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Petro Lutsyk; Raz Arif; Jan Hruby; Anatolii Bukivskyi; Olexander Vinijchuk; Mykola Shandura; Viktor Yakubovskyi

    2016-01-01

    The multifunctional properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) make them a powerful platform for unprecedented innovations in a variety of practical applications.As a result of the surging growth of nanotechnology,nanotubes present a potential problem as an environmental pollutant,and as such,an efficient method for their rapid detection must be established.Here,we propose a novel type of ionic sensor complex for detecting CNTs-an organic dye that responds sensitively and selectively to CNTs with a photoluminescent signal.The complexes are formed through Coulomb attractions between dye molecules with uncompensated charges and CNTs covered with an ionic surfactant in water.We demonstrate that the photoluminescent excitation of the dye can be transferred to the nanotubes,resulting in selective and strong amplification (up to a factor of 6) of the light emission from the excitonic levels of CNTs in the near-infrared spectral range,as experimentally observed via excitation-emission photoluminescence (PL) mapping.The chirality of the nanotubes and the type of ionic surfactant used to disperse the nanotubes both strongly affect the amplification;thus,the complexation provides sensing selectivity towards specific CNTs.Additionally,neither similar uncharged dyes nor CNTs covered with neutral surfactant form such complexes.As model organic molecules,we use a family of pelymethine dyes with an easily tailorable molecular structure and,consequently,tunable absorbance and PL characteristics.This provides us with a versatile tool for the controllable photonic and electronic engineering of an efficient probe for CNT detection.

  12. Spatial and seasonal variabilities of the stable carbon isotope composition of soil CO2 concentration and flux in complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Liyin L.; Riveros-Iregui, Diego A.; Risk, David A.

    2016-09-01

    Biogeochemical processes driving the spatial variability of soil CO2 production and flux are well studied, but little is known about the variability in the spatial distribution of the stable carbon isotopes that make up soil CO2, particularly in complex terrain. Spatial differences in stable isotopes of soil CO2 could indicate fundamental differences in isotopic fractionation at the landscape level and may be useful to inform modeling of carbon cycling over large areas. We measured the spatial and seasonal variabilities of the δ13C of soil CO2 (δS) and the δ13C of soil CO2 flux (δP) in a subalpine forest ecosystem located in the Rocky Mountains of Montana. We found consistently more isotopically depleted values of δS and δP in low and wet areas of the landscape relative to steep and dry areas. Our results suggest that the spatial patterns of δS and δP are strongly mediated by soil water and soil respiration rate. More interestingly, our analysis revealed different temporal trends in δP across the landscape; in high landscape positions δP became more positive, whereas in low landscape positions δP became more negative with time. These trends might be the result of differential dynamics in the seasonality of soil moisture and its effects on soil CO2 production and flux. Our results suggest concomitant yet independent effects of water on physical (soil gas diffusivity) and biological (photosynthetic discrimination) processes that mediate δS and δP and are important when evaluating the δ13C of CO2 exchanged between soils and the atmosphere in complex terrain.

  13. An X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) Study of Activated Carbons Impregnated with Some Organocopper Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    organocuivre ont dte imprdgn~s & la surface du charbon activd, et la composition de la surface du charbon imprdgn6 a dt examinee par spectroscopie...F/Cu et du C/Cu a pu fitre calcule. Ii a dtd trouvd que trois de ces * complexes dtaient soit instables ou ddcomposds & la surface du charbon . Cette...surface composition analysis, there was actually a higher concentration of Cu(I) than Cu(II), the original impregnant. It has been mentioned in an

  14. Characteristics and distribution patterns of reef complexes on the carbonate platform margin in deep water areas:the western South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ping; DU Xuebin; LI Xushen; WANG Yahui; LU Yongchao; ZHONG Zehong; CHEN Lei; ZUO Qianmei; MA Yiquan; WANG Chao

    2015-01-01

    As a potential oil and gas reservoir, reef complexes have been a research focus from petroleum geologists for a long time. There are favorable conditions for the development of reef complexes in the South China Sea; however, their internal structures, evolution and distribution are still poorly understood. Based on 2D and 3D seismic data, the internal structures and evolution patterns of the reef complexes on the carbonate platform margin in the deep water areas over the western South China Sea were studied in detail. The result shows that two types of reef complexes, i.e., fault controlling platform margin reef complexes and ramp reef complexes have been developed in the study area. The reef complexes have independent or continuous mound or lenticular seismic reflections, with three internal structures (i.e., aggrading, prograding and retrograding structures). There are different growth rates during the evolution of the reef complexes, resulting in the formation of catch-up reefs, keep-up reefs and quick step reefs. The study also reveals that different platform margin reef complexes have different internal structures and distributions, because of the different platform types. These results may be applied to the exploration and prediction of carbonate platform margin reef complexes in other areas that are similar to the study area.

  15. Suzuki-Miyaura, Mizoroki-Heck carbon-carbon coupling and hydrogenation reactions catalysed by PdII and RhI complexes containing cyclodiphosphazane cis-{tBuNP(OC6H4OMe-)}2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sasmita Mohanty; Maravanji S Balakrishna

    2010-03-01

    The catalytic activity of the palladium complex cis-[PdCl2{(tBuNP(OC6H4OMe-))2- }2] (2) containing cis-{tBuNP(OC6H4OMe-)}2 (1) in Suzuki-Miyaura and Mizoroki-Heck carbon-carbon cross coupling reactions is described. The compound 2 also displays very high activity in Mizoroki-Heck coupling reactions. The rhodium(I) complex [RhCl(COD){(tBuNP(OC6H4OMe-))2- }] (3) acts as an excellent catalyst for the hydrogenation of several terminal olefins.

  16. Conformational Mobility of GOx Coenzyme Complex on Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Kang

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A critical issue in bioelectrochemical applications that use electrodes modified by Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs is to ensure high activity of the catalytic site of an immobilized enzyme protein interacting with nanomaterials. Since Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide (FAD, a coenzyme of glucose oxidase (GOx, is the active center of the catalytic site, conformation of which could determine the activity of enzyme, it is important to understand the dynamic mechanism of its conformational mobility while GOx is adsorbed on SWCNTs with multiple orientations. However, this dynamic mechanism still remains unclear at the atomic level due to the coenzyme being embedded in the apo-GOx and the limitations of appropriate experimental methods. In this study, a molecular dynamics (MD simulation was performed to investigate the conformational mobility mechanism of the coenzyme. The trajectory and the interaction energy clearly indicate that the adsorption of GOx onto SWCNTs plays an important role in the conformational mobility of the coenzyme, and its mobility is greatly affected by the distribution of water molecules due to it being hydrophobic.

  17. The complex environment of the bright carbon star TX Psc as probed by spectro-astrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Hron, J; Aringer, B; Klotz, D; Lebzelter, T; Paladini, C; Wiedemann, G

    2015-01-01

    Context: Stars on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) show broad evidence of inhomogeneous atmospheres and circumstellar envelopes. These have been studied by a variety of methods on various angular scales. In this paper we explore the envelope of the well-studied carbon star TX Psc by the technique of spectro-astrometry. Aims: We explore the potential of this method for detecting asymmetries around AGB stars. Methods:We obtained CRIRES observations of several CO $\\Delta$v=1 lines near 4.6 $\\mu$m and HCN lines near 3 $\\mu$m in 2010 and 2013. These were then searched for spectro-astrometric signatures. For the interpretation of the results, we used simple simulated observations. Results: Several lines show significant photocentre shifts with a clear dependence on position angle. In all cases, tilde-shaped signatures are found where the positive and negative shifts (at PA 0deg) are associated with blue and weaker red components of the lines. The shifts can be modelled with a bright blob 70 mas to 210 mas south of...

  18. Complex mountain terrain and disturbance history drive variation in forest aboveground live carbon density in the western Oregon Cascades, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zald, Harold S J; Spies, Thomas A; Seidl, Rupert; Pabst, Robert J; Olsen, Keith A; Steel, E Ashley

    2016-04-15

    was also affected by finer scale topographic conditions associated with sheltered sites. Past wildfires only had a small influence on current ALC density, which may be a result of long times since fire and/or prevalence of non-stand replacing fire. Our results indicate that forest ALC density depends on a suite of multi-scale environmental drivers mediated by complex mountain topography, and that these relationships are dependent on stand age. The high and context-dependent spatial variability of forest ALC density has implications for quantifying forest carbon stores, establishing upper bounds of potential carbon sequestration, and scaling field data to landscape and regional scales.

  19. Liposome encapsulation of lipophilic N-alkyl-propanediamine platinum complexes: impact on their cytotoxic activity and influence of the carbon chain length

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Heveline; Fontes, Ana Paula S. [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFJF), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Lopes, Miriam Teresa P. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Farmacologia; Frezard, Frederic, E-mail: frezard@icb.ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Fisiologia e Biofisica

    2010-07-01

    Antitumor platinum(II) complexes derived from N-alkyl-propanediamine differing in the length of their carbon chain (C8, C10, C12 and C14) were incorporated in liposomes and the cytotoxic activity of these formulations was evaluated against tumor (A{sub 549}, MDA-MB-231, B16-F1 and B16-F10) and non-tumor (BHK-21 and CHO) cell lines. Stable and monodisperse liposome suspensions incorporating the platinum complexes were obtained from the lipid composition consisting of distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, cholesterol and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero- 3-phosphoethanolamine-N-(methoxy(polyethylene glycol)-2000) at 5:3:0.3 molar ratio. The entrapment efficiency (EE%) of the platinum complexes in liposomes increased with the carbon chain length. EE% was higher than 80% in C12- and C14-derivatives. The effect of liposome encapsulation on the cytotoxic activity of the complexes was found to depend on the carbon chain length. These data indicate that the highest drug bioavailability from liposome formulations was achieved with the complex showing intermediate carbon chain length and partition between the liposome membrane and aqueous phase. (author)

  20. In vitro platelet activation, aggregation and platelet-granulocyte complex formation induced by surface modified single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fent, János; Bihari, Péter; Vippola, Minnamari; Sarlin, Essi; Lakatos, Susan

    2015-08-01

    Surface modification of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) such as carboxylation, amidation, hydroxylation and pegylation is used to reduce the nanotube toxicity and render them more suitable for biomedical applications than their pristine counterparts. Toxicity can be manifested in platelet activation as it has been shown for SWCNTs. However, the effect of various surface modifications on the platelet activating potential of SWCNTs has not been tested yet. In vitro platelet activation (CD62P) as well as the platelet-granulocyte complex formation (CD15/CD41 double positivity) in human whole blood were measured by flow cytometry in the presence of 0.1mg/ml of pristine or various surface modified SWCNTs. The effect of various SWCNTs was tested by whole blood impedance aggregometry, too. All tested SWCNTs but the hydroxylated ones activate platelets and promote platelet-granulocyte complex formation in vitro. Carboxylated, pegylated and pristine SWCNTs induce whole blood aggregation as well. Although pegylation is preferred from biomedical point of view, among the samples tested by us pegylated SWCNTs induced far the most prominent activation and a well detectable aggregation of platelets in whole blood.

  1. Evidence for an early evolutionary emergence of γ-type carbonic anhydrases as components of mitochondrial respiratory complex I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray Michael W

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complexity of mitochondrial complex I (CI; NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase has increased considerably relative to the homologous complex in bacteria. Comparative analyses of CI composition in animals, fungi and land plants/green algae suggest that novel components of mitochondrial CI include a set of 18 proteins common to all eukaryotes and a variable number of lineage-specific subunits. In plants and green algae, several purportedly plant-specific proteins homologous to γ-type carbonic anhydrases (γCA have been identified as components of CI. However, relatively little is known about CI composition in the unicellular protists, the characterizations of which are essential to our understanding of CI evolution. Results We have performed a tandem mass spectrometric characterization of CI from the amoeboid protozoon Acanthamoeba castellanii. Among the proteins identified were two γCA homologs, AcCa1 and AcCa2, demonstrating that γCA proteins are not specific to plants/green algae. In fact, through bioinformatics searches we detected γCA homologs in diverse protist lineages, and several of these homologs are predicted to possess N-terminal mitochondrial targeting peptides. Conclusions The detection of γCAs in CI of Acanthamoeba, considered to be a closer relative of animals and fungi than plants, suggests that γCA proteins may have been an ancestral feature of mitochondrial CI, rather than a novel, plant-specific addition. This assertion is supported by the presence of genes encoding γCAs in the nuclear genomes of a wide variety of eukaryotes. Together, these findings emphasize the importance of a phylogenetically broad characterization of CI for elucidating CI evolution in eukaryotes.

  2. Electro-oxidation of chlorophenols at glassy carbon electrodes modified with polyNi(II)complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrios, Cristhian [Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Departamento de Ciencias del Ambiente, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACh), casilla 40, correo 33, Santiago (Chile); Marco, Jose F.; Gutierrez, Claudio [Instituto de Quimica Fisica ' Rocasolano' , CSIC, C. Serrano, 119, 28006, Madrid (Spain); Ureta-Zanartu, Maria Soledad [Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Departamento de Ciencias del Ambiente, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACh), casilla 40, correo 33, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: soledad.ureta@usach.cl

    2009-11-01

    The effect of the ligand macrocycle (phenylporphyrin (PP) or phthalocyanine (Pc)) and of the ligand substituent (-NH{sub 2} or -SO{sub 3}{sup -}) on the catalytic activity for the electro-oxidation in a pH 11 buffer electrolyte of 2- and 4-chlorophenol (2-CP and 4-CP), 2,4- and 2,6-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP and 2,6-DCP), 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP), and pentachlorophenol (PCP) at glassy carbon electrodes modified with electropolymerized Ni(II) macrocycles was studied. The polyphenolic residue deposited at the electrode surface was characterized by cyclic voltammetry, impedance measurements, ex situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). A band of aliphatic C=O stretching in the IR spectrum of the fouling film produced by potential cycling in 2,4,6-TCP indicated that the aromatic ring had been broken, yielding ketones, aldehydes and/or carboxylic acids. The sulphonated Ni(II) polymers, which showed the Ni(III)/Ni(II) process in the CV, had XP spectra typical of paramagnetic Ni(II), indicating that they contained Ni(OH){sub 2} clusters. On the contrary, the CVs of the amino Ni(II) did not show the Ni(III)/Ni(II) process at all, this process appearing only after previous activation by potential cycling, and only to a small extent. As was to be expected, the XP spectra of activated amino films corresponded to diamagnetic Ni(II), showing that the concentration of Ni(OH){sub 2} clusters was very small. The amino films were less active than the sulpho films for the oxidation of chlorophenols, in agreement with the lower concentration of Ni(OH){sub 2} clusters in the former films. For all electrodes the highest activity was observed for 2,4,6-TCP, since its oxidation yields a phenolic residue which is much more porous than those produced by the other CPs.

  3. Coupling of Carbon Dioxide with Epoxides Efficiently Catalyzed by Thioether-Triphenolate Bimetallic Iron(III) Complexes: Catalyst Structure-Reactivity Relationship and Mechanistic DFT Study

    KAUST Repository

    Della Monica, Francesco

    2016-08-25

    A series of dinuclear iron(III)I complexes supported by thioether-triphenolate ligands have been prepared to attain highly Lewis acidic catalysts. In combination with tetrabutylammonium bromide (TBAB) they are highly active catalysts in the synthesis of cyclic organic carbonates through the coupling of carbon dioxide to epoxides with the highest initial turnover frequencies reported to date for the conversion of propylene oxide to propylene carbonate for iron-based catalysts (5200h-1; 120°C, 2MPa, 1h). In particular, these complexes are shown to be highly selective catalysts for the coupling of carbon dioxide to internal oxiranes affording the corresponding cyclic carbonates in good yield and with retention of the initial stereochemical configuration. A density functional theory (DFT) investigation provides a rational for the relative high activity found for these Fe(III) complexes, showing the fundamental role of the hemilabile sulfur atom in the ligand skeleton to promote reactivity. Notably, in spite of the dinuclear nature of the catalyst precursor only one metal center is involved in the catalytic cycle. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Complexes With Biologically Active Ligands. Part 111. Synthesis and Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitory Activity of Metal Complexes of 4,5-Disubstituted-3-Mercapto-1,2,4-Triazole Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scozzafava, Andrea; Cavazza, Christine; Saramet, Ioana; Briganti, Fabrizio; Banciu, Mircea D.

    1998-01-01

    Complexes containing five 4,5-disubstituted-3-mercapto-1,2,4-triazoles and Zn(II), Hg(II) and Cu(I) were synthesized and characterized by standard procedures (elemental analysis; IR, electronic and NMR spectroscopy, conductimetry and TG analysis). Both the thione as well as the thiolate forms of the ligands were evidenced to interact with the metal ions in the prepared complexes. The original mercaptans and their metal complexes behave as inhibitors of three carbonic anhydrase (CA) isozymes, CA I, II and IV, but did not lower intraocular pressure in rabbits in animal models of glaucoma. PMID:18475819

  5. Complexes with biologically active ligands. Part 11. Synthesis and carbonic anhydrase inhibitory activity of metal complexes of 4,5-disubstituted-3-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scozzafava, A; Cavazza, C; Supuran, C T; Saramet, I; Briganti, F; Banciu, M D

    1998-01-01

    Complexes containing five 4,5-disubstituted-3-mercapto-1,2,4-triazoles and Zn(II), Hg(II) and Cu(I) were synthesized and characterized by standard procedures (elemental analysis; IR, electronic and NMR spectroscopy, conductimetry and TG analysis). Both the thione as well as the thiolate forms of the ligands were evidenced to interact with the metal ions in the prepared complexes. The original mercaptans and their metal complexes behave as inhibitors of three carbonic anhydrase (CA) isozymes, CA I, II and IV, but did not lower intraocular pressure in rabbits in animal models of glaucoma.

  6. Complex effects of fertilization on plant and herbivore performance in the presence of a plant competitor and activated carbon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafiseh Mahdavi-Arab

    Full Text Available Plant-herbivore interactions are influenced by host plant quality which in turn is affected by plant growth conditions. Competition is the major biotic and nutrient availability a major abiotic component of a plant's growth environment. Yet, surprisingly few studies have investigated impacts of competition and nutrient availability on herbivore performance and reciprocal herbivore effects on plants. We studied growth of the specialist aphid, Macrosiphoniella tanacetaria, and its host plant tansy, Tanacetum vulgare, under experimental addition of inorganic and organic fertilizer crossed with competition by goldenrod, Solidago canadensis. Because of evidence that competition by goldenrod is mediated by allelopathic compounds, we also added a treatment with activated carbon. Results showed that fertilization increased, and competition with goldenrod decreased, plant biomass, but this was likely mediated by resource competition. There was no evidence from the activated carbon treatment that allelopathy played a role which instead had a fertilizing effect. Aphid performance increased with higher plant biomass and depended on plant growth conditions, with fertilization and AC increasing, and plant competition decreasing aphid numbers. Feedbacks of aphids on plant performance interacted with plant growth conditions in complex ways depending on the relative magnitude of the effects on plant biomass and aphid numbers. In the basic fertilization treatment, tansy plants profited from increased nutrient availability by accumulating more biomass than they lost due to an increased number of aphids under fertilization. When adding additional fertilizer, aphid numbers increased so high that tansy plants suffered and showed reduced biomass compared with controls without aphids. Thus, the ecological cost of an infestation with aphids depends on the balance of effects of growth conditions on plant and herbivore performance. These results emphasize the importance

  7. Complex effects of fertilization on plant and herbivore performance in the presence of a plant competitor and activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi-Arab, Nafiseh; Meyer, Sebastian T; Mehrparvar, Mohsen; Weisser, Wolfgang W

    2014-01-01

    Plant-herbivore interactions are influenced by host plant quality which in turn is affected by plant growth conditions. Competition is the major biotic and nutrient availability a major abiotic component of a plant's growth environment. Yet, surprisingly few studies have investigated impacts of competition and nutrient availability on herbivore performance and reciprocal herbivore effects on plants. We studied growth of the specialist aphid, Macrosiphoniella tanacetaria, and its host plant tansy, Tanacetum vulgare, under experimental addition of inorganic and organic fertilizer crossed with competition by goldenrod, Solidago canadensis. Because of evidence that competition by goldenrod is mediated by allelopathic compounds, we also added a treatment with activated carbon. Results showed that fertilization increased, and competition with goldenrod decreased, plant biomass, but this was likely mediated by resource competition. There was no evidence from the activated carbon treatment that allelopathy played a role which instead had a fertilizing effect. Aphid performance increased with higher plant biomass and depended on plant growth conditions, with fertilization and AC increasing, and plant competition decreasing aphid numbers. Feedbacks of aphids on plant performance interacted with plant growth conditions in complex ways depending on the relative magnitude of the effects on plant biomass and aphid numbers. In the basic fertilization treatment, tansy plants profited from increased nutrient availability by accumulating more biomass than they lost due to an increased number of aphids under fertilization. When adding additional fertilizer, aphid numbers increased so high that tansy plants suffered and showed reduced biomass compared with controls without aphids. Thus, the ecological cost of an infestation with aphids depends on the balance of effects of growth conditions on plant and herbivore performance. These results emphasize the importance to investigate both

  8. Synthesis of isocoumarins through three-component couplings of arynes, terminal alkynes, and carbon dioxide catalyzed by an NHC-copper complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Woo-Jin; Nguyen, Thanh V Q; Kobayashi, Shū

    2014-09-15

    A copper-catalyzed multicomponent coupling reaction between in situ generated ortho-arynes, terminal alkynes, and carbon dioxide was developed to access isocoumarins in moderate to good yields. The key to this CO2-incorporating reaction was the use of a versatile N-heterocyclic carbene/copper complex that was able to catalyze multiple transformations within the three-component reaction.

  9. Electrocatalytic oxidation of 2-mercaptoethanol using modified glassy carbon electrode by MWCNT in combination with unsymmetrical manganese (II) Schiff base complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohebbi, Sajjad, E-mail: smohebbi@uok.ac.ir; Eslami, Saadat

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • High electocatalytic efficiency and stability of modified hybrid electrode GC/MWCNTs/MnSaloph. • Direct reflection of catalytic activity of manganese complexes on electrocatalytic oxidation of 2-ME. • Decreasing overpotential and increasing catalytic peak current toward oxidation of 2-ME. • Deposition of range of novel substituted N{sub 2}O{sub 2} Saloph complexes of manganese(II) on GCE/MWCNT. • Enhancement of electrocatalytic oxidation activity upon electron donating substitutions on the Saloph. - Abstract: The performance of modified hybrid glassy carbon electrode with composite of carbon nanotubes and manganese complexes for the electrocatalytic oxidation of 2-mercaptoethanol is developed. GC electrode was modified using MWCNT and new N{sub 2}O{sub 2} unsymmetrical tetradentate Schiff base complexes of manganese namely Manganese Saloph complexes 1-5, with general formula Mn[(5-x-4-y-Sal)(5-x′-4-y′-Sal) Ph], where x, x′ = H, Br, NO{sub 2} and y, y′ = H, MeO. Direct immobilization of CNT on the surface of GCE is performed by abrasive immobilization, and then modified by manganese(II) complexes via direct deposition method. These novel modified electrodes clearly demonstrate the necessity of modifying bare carbon electrodes to endow them with the desired behavior and were identified by HRTEM. Also complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, MS, UV–vis and IR spectroscopy. Modified hybrid GC/MWCNT/MnSaloph electrode exhibits strong and stable electrocatalytic activity towards the electrooxidation of 2-mercaptoethanol molecules in comparison with bare glassy carbon electrode with advantages of very low over potential and high catalytic current. Such ability promotes the thiol’s electron transfer reaction. Also, electron withdrawing substituent on the Saloph was enhanced electrocatalytic oxidation activity.

  10. Reservoir Modeling of Carbonate on Fika Field: The Challenge to Capture the Complexity of Rock and Oil Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erawati Fitriyani Adji

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v1i2.181The carbonate on Fika Field has a special character, because it grew above a basement high with the thickness and internal character variation. To develop the field, a proper geological model which can be used in reservoir simulation was needed. This model has to represent the complexity of the rock type and the variety of oil types among the clusters. Creating this model was challenging due to the heterogeneity of the Baturaja Formation (BRF: Early Miocene reef, carbonate platform, and breccia conglomerate grew up above the basement with a variety of thickness and quality distributions. The reservoir thickness varies between 23 - 600 ft and 3D seismic frequency ranges from 1 - 80 Hz with 25 Hz dominant frequency. Structurally, the Fika Field has a high basement slope, which has an impact on the flow unit layering slope. Based on production data, each area shows different characteristics and performance: some areas have high water cut and low cumulative production. Oil properties from several clusters also vary in wax content. The wax content can potentially build up a deposit inside tubing and flow-line, resulted in a possible disturbance to the operation. Five well cores were analyzed, including thin section and XRD. Seven check-shot data and 3D seismic Pre-Stack Time Migration (PSTM were available with limited seismic resolution. A seismic analysis was done after well seismic tie was completed. This analysis included paleogeography, depth structure map, and distribution of reservoir and basement. Core and log data generated facies carbonate distribution and rock typing, defining properties for log analysis and permeability prediction for each zone. An Sw prediction for each well was created by J-function analysis. This elaborates capillary pressure from core data, so it is very similar to the real conditions. Different stages of the initial model were done i.e. scale-up properties, data analysis, variogram modeling

  11. Selection, characterisation and mapping of complex electrochemical processes at individual single-walled carbon nanotubes: the case of serotonin oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güell, Aleix G; Meadows, Katherine E; Dudin, Petr V; Ebejer, Neil; Byers, Joshua C; Macpherson, Julie V; Unwin, Patrick R

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical (EC) oxidation of the neurotransmitter, serotonin, at individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is investigated at high resolution using a novel platform that combines flow-aligned SWNTs with atomic force microscopy, Raman microscopy, electronic conductance measurements, individual SWNT electrochemistry and high-resolution scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM). SECCM has been used to visualise the EC activity along side-wall sections of metallic SWNTs to assess the extent to which side-walls promote the electrochemistry of this complex multi-step process. Uniform and high EC activity is observed that is consistent with significant reaction at the side-wall, rather than electrochemistry being driven by defects alone. By scanning forward and reverse (trace and retrace) over the same region of a SWNT, it is also possible to assess any blocking of EC activity by serotonin oxidation reaction products. At a physiologically relevant concentration (5 μM), there is no detectable blocking of SWNTs, which can be attributed, at least in part, to the high diffusion rate to an individual, isolated SWNT in the SECCM format. At higher serotonin concentration (2 mM), oligomer formation from oxidation products is much more significant and major blocking of the EC process is observed from line profiles recorded as the SECCM meniscus moves over an SWNT. The SECCM line profile morphology is shown to be highly diagnostic of whether blocking occurs during EC processes. The studies herein add to a growing body of evidence that various EC processes at SWNTs, from simple outer sphere redox reactions to complex multi-step processes, occur readily at pristine SWNTs. The platform described is of general applicability to various types of nanostructures and nanowires.

  12. (Co-)solvent selection for single-wall carbon nanotubes: best solvents, acids, superacids and guest-host inclusion complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrens, Francisco; Castellano, Gloria

    2011-06-01

    Analysis of 1-octanol-water, cyclohexane-water and chloroform (CHCl(3))-water partition coefficients P(o-ch-cf) allows calculation of molecular lipophilicity patterns, which show that for a given atom log P(o-ch-cf) is sensitive to the presence of functional groups. Program CDHI does not properly differentiate between non-equivalent atoms. The most abundant single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT), (10,10), presents a relatively small aqueous solubility and large elementary polarizability, P(o-ch-cf) and kinetic stability. The SWNT solubility is studied in various solvents, finding a class of non-hydrogen-bonding Lewis bases with good solubility. Solvents group into three classes. The SWNTs in some organic solvents are cationic while in water/Triton X mixture are anionic. Categorized solubility is semiquantitatively correlated with solvent parameters. The coefficient of term β is positive while the ones of ε and V negative. The electron affinity of d-glucopyranoses (d-Glcp(n)) suggests the formation of colloids of anionic SWNTs in water. Dipole moment for d-Glcp(n)-linear increases with n until four in agreement with 18-fold helix. The I(n)(z-) and SWNT(-) are proposed to form inclusion complexes with cyclodextrin (CD) and amylose (Amy). Starch, d-Glcp, CD and Amy are proposed as SWNT co-solvents. Guests-hosts are unperturbed. A central channel expansion is suggested.

  13. Cooperative effect by monopodal silica-supported niobium com-plexes pairs enhancing catalytic cyclic carbonate production

    KAUST Repository

    D'Elia, Valerio

    2015-05-07

    Recent discoveries highlighted the activity and the intriguing mechanistic features of NbCl5 as a molecular catalyst for the cycloaddition of CO2 and epoxides under ambient conditions. This has inspired the preparation of novel silica supported Nb-species by reacting a molecular niobium precursor [NbCl5•OEt2] with silica dehydroxylated at 700 °C (SiO2-700) or at 200 oC (SiO2-200) to generate diverse surface complexes. The product of the reaction between SiO2-700 and [NbCl5•OEt2] was identified as a monopodal supported surface species [≡SiONbCl4•OEt2] (1a). The reactions of SiO2-200 with the niobium precursor, according to two different protocols, generated surface complexes 2a and 3a presenting significant, but different, populations of the monopodal surface complex along with bipodal [(≡SiO)2NbCl3•OEt2]. 93Nb SSNMR spectra of 1a-3a and 31P SSNMR on their PMe3 derivatives (1b-3b) led to the unambiguous assignment of 1a as a single site, monopodal Nb-species while 2a and 3a were found to present two distinct surface-supported components, with 2a being mostly monopodal [≡SiONbCl4•OEt2] and 3a being mostly bipodal [≡S ONbCl3•OEt2]. Double-quantum/single-quantum 31P NMR correlation experiment carried out on 2b supported the existence of vicinal Nb centers on the silica surface for this species. 1a-3a were active heterogeneous catalysts for the synthesis of propylene carbonate from CO2 and propylene oxide under mild catalytic conditions; the performance of 2a was found to significantly surpass that of 1a and 3a. With the support of a systematic DFT study carried out on model silica surfaces, the observed differences in catalytic efficiency were correlated with an unprece-dented cooperative effect between two neighboring Nb centers on the surface of 2a. This is in an excellent agreement with our previous discoveries regarding the mechanism of the NbCl5 catalyzed cycloaddition in the homogeneous phase.

  14. Enantioselective Michael reaction catalyzed by well-defined chiral ru amido complexes: isolation and characterization of the catalyst intermediate, ru malonato complex having a metal-carbon bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masahito; Murata, Kunihiko; Ikariya, Takao

    2003-06-25

    Chiral Ru amido complexes promote asymmetric Michael addition of malonates to cyclic enones, leading to Michael adducts with excellent ee's, in which the chiral Ru amido complexes react with malonates to give isolable catalyst intermediates, chiral Ru malonato complexes bearing a metal bound C-nucleophile.

  15. MEDUSA-2.0: an intermediate complexity biogeochemical model of the marine carbon cycle for climate change and ocean acidification studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yool

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available MEDUSA-1.0 (Model of Ecosystem Dynamics, nutrient Utilisation, Sequestration and Acidification was developed as an "intermediate complexity" plankton ecosystem model to study the biogeochemical response, and especially that of the so-called "biological pump", to anthropogenically-driven change in the World Ocean (Yool et al., 2011. The base currency in this model was nitrogen from which fluxes of organic carbon, including export to the deep ocean, were calculated by invoking fixed C:N ratios in phytoplankton, zooplankton and detritus. Since the beginning of the industrial era, the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2 has significantly increased above its natural, inter-glacial background concentration. Simulating and predicting the carbon cycle in the ocean in its entirety, including ventilation of CO2 with the atmosphere and the resulting impact of ocean acidification on marine ecosystems, therefore requires that both organic and inorganic carbon be afforded a full representation in the model specification. Here, we introduce MEDUSA-2.0, an expanded successor model which includes additional state variables for dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, dissolved oxygen and detritus carbon (permitting variable C:N in exported organic matter, as well as a simple benthic formulation and extended parameterisations of phytoplankton growth, calcification and detritus remineralisation. A full description of MEDUSA-2.0, including its additional functionality, is provided and a multi-decadal hindcast simulation described (1860–2005, to evaluate the biogeochemical performance of the model.

  16. Platform margins, reef facies, and microbial carbonates; a comparison of Devonian reef complexes in the Canning Basin, Western Australia, and the Guilin region, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jian-Wei; Webb, Gregory E.; Jell, John S.

    2008-05-01

    Devonian reef complexes were well developed in Western Australia and South China, but no detailed direct comparison has been made between reef building in the two regions. The regions differ in several respects, including tectonic, stratigraphic and palaeoceanographic-palaeogeographic settings, and the reef building styles reflect minor differences in reef builders and reef facies. Similarities and differences between the two reef complexes provide insights into the characteristics of platform margins, reef facies and microbial carbonates of both regions. Here we present a comparison of platform margin types from different stratigraphic positions in the Late Devonian reef complex of the Canning Basin, Western Australia and Middle and Late Devonian margin to marginal slope successions in Guilin, South China. Comparisons are integrated into a review of the reefal stratigraphy of both regions. Reef facies, reef complex architecture, temporal reef builder associations, 2nd order stratigraphy and platform cyclicity in the two regions were generally similar where the successions overlap temporally. However, carbonate deposition began earlier in South China. Carbonate complexes were also more widespread in South China and represent a thicker succession overall. Platforms in the Canning Basin grew directly on Precambrian crystalline basement or early Palaeozoic sedimentary rocks, but in South China, carbonate complexes developed conformably on older Devonian siliciclastic strata. Pre-Frasnian reef facies in South China had more abundant skeletal frameworks than in Canning Basin reefs of equivalent age, and Famennian shoaling margins containing various microbial reefs may have been more common and probably more diverse in South China. However, Late Devonian platform margin types have been documented more completely in the Canning Basin. Deep intra-platform troughs (deep depressions containing non-carbonate pelagic sediments — Nandan-type successions) that developed along

  17. Tumor Acidity-Induced Sheddable Polyethylenimine-Poly(trimethylene carbonate)/DNA/Polyethylene Glycol-2,3-Dimethylmaleicanhydride Ternary Complex for Efficient and Safe Gene Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Caiyan; Shao, Leihou; Lu, Jianqing; Deng, Xiongwei; Wu, Yan

    2016-03-01

    Amphiphilic PEI derivatives/DNA complexes are widely used for DNA delivery, but they are unstable in vivo and have cytotoxicity due to the excess cationic charge. PEGylation of cationic complexes can improve sterical stability and biocompatibility. However, PEGylation significantly inhibits cellular uptake and endosomal escape. In this work, sheddable ternary complexes were developed by coating a tumor acidity-sensitive β-carboxylic amide functionalized PEG layer on the binary complexes of amphiphilic cationic polyethylenimine-poly(trimethylene carbonate) nanoparticles/DNA (PEI-PTMC/DNA). Such sheddable ternary complexes markedly reduced their nonspecific interactions with serum protein in the bloodstream and obtained minimal cytotoxicity due to the protection of the PEG shell. At the tumor site, the PEG layer was deshielded by responding to the tumor acidic microenvironment and the positively charged complexes re-exposed that had higher affinity with negatively charged cell membranes. Meanwhile the positively charged complexes facilitated endosomal escape. Accordingly, this delivery system improved the biocompatibility of gene-loaded complexes and enhanced the gene transfection efficiency. Such PEGylated complexes with the ability to deshield the PEG layer at the target tissues hold great promise for efficient and safe gene delivery in vivo.

  18. Low temperature in situ synthesis and the formation mechanism of various carbon-encapsulated nanocrystals by the electrophilic oxidation of metallocene complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Boyang; Fan, Chunhua; Chen, Jianwei; Wang, Junhua; Lu, Zepeng; Ren, Jiayuan; Yu, Shuaiqin; Dong, Lihua; Li, Wenge

    2016-02-19

    The core-shell nanostructures have the advantages of combining distinctive properties of varied materials and improved properties over their single-component counterparts. Synthesis approaches for this class of nanostructures have been intensively explored, generally involving multiple steps. Here, a general and convenient strategy is developed for one-step in situ synthesis of various carbon-encapsulated nanocrystals with a core-shell structure via a solid-state reaction of metallocene complexes with (NH4)2S2O8 in an autoclave at 200 °C. A variety of near-spherical and equiaxed nanocrystals with a small median size ranging from 6.5 to 50.6 nm are prepared as inner cores, including Fe7S8, Ni3S4 and NiS, CoS, TiO2, TiO2 and S8, ZrO2, (NH4)3V(SO4)3 and VO2, Fe7S8 and Fe3O4, MoS2 and MoO2. The worm-like carbon shell provides exclusive room for hundreds of nanocrystals separated from each other, preventing nanocrystal aggregation. The synergistic effect of ammonium and a strong oxidizing anion on the electrophilic oxidation of metallocene complexes containing a metal-ligand π bond contributes to the carbon formation at low temperature. It is considered that the cyclopentadienyl ligand in a metallocene complex will decompose into highly reactive straight chain olefinic pieces and the metal-olefin π interaction enables an ordered self-assembly of olefinic pieces on nanocrystals to partially form graphitizable carbon and a core-shell structure. The high capacity, good cycling behavior and rate capability of Fe7S8@C and Ni3S4 and NiS@C electrodes are attributed to the good protection and electrical conductivity of the carbon shell.

  19. Evolution of chemical and isotopic composition of inorganic carbon in a complex semi-arid zone environment: Consequences for groundwater dating using radiocarbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, K. T.; Han, L. F.; Hollins, S. E.; Cendón, D. I.; Jacobsen, G. E.; Baker, A.

    2016-09-01

    Estimating groundwater age is important for any groundwater resource assessment and radiocarbon (14C) dating of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) can provide this information. In semi-arid zone (i.e. water-limited environments), there are a multitude of reasons why 14C dating of groundwater and traditional correction models may not be directly transferable. Some include; (1) the complex hydrological responses of these systems that lead to a mixture of different ages in the aquifer(s), (2) the varied sources, origins and ages of organic matter in the unsaturated zone and (3) high evaporation rates. These all influence the evolution of DIC and are not easily accounted for in traditional correction models. In this study, we determined carbon isotope data for; DIC in water, carbonate minerals in the sediments, sediment organic matter, soil gas CO2 from the unsaturated zone, and vegetation samples. The samples were collected after an extended drought, and again after a flood event, to capture the evolution of DIC after varying hydrological regimes. A graphical method (Han et al., 2012) was applied for interpretation of the carbon geochemical and isotopic data. Simple forward mass-balance modelling was carried out on key geochemical processes involving carbon and agreed well with observed data. High values of DIC and δ13CDIC, and low 14CDIC could not be explained by a simple carbonate mineral-CO2 gas dissolution process. Instead it is suggested that during extended drought, water-sediment interaction leads to ion exchange processes within the top ∼10-20 m of the aquifer which promotes greater calcite dissolution in saline groundwater. This process was found to contribute more than half of the DIC, which is from a mostly 'dead' carbon source. DIC is also influenced by carbon exchange between DIC in water and carbonate minerals found in the top 2 m of the unsaturated zone. This process occurs because of repeated dissolution/precipitation of carbonate that is dependent on

  20. The morphology of Al-Ti-O complex oxide inclusions formed in an ultra low-carbon steel melt during the RH process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doo, Won-Chul; Kim, Dong-Yong; Kang, Soo-Chang; Yi, Kyung-Woo

    2007-06-01

    Internal morphologies of bulk shape oxides in a melt of Ti bearing low-carbon steel were analyzed. The outer shapes of nearly spherical inclusions containing Ti were quite different from the shape of alumina inclusions that typically have a cluster form. A cross-section investigation using a polishing method and the FIB method revealed that the TiOx-Al2O3 complex oxide covers alumina clusters and that the interfaces of the alumina and complex oxide are modified as time passes.

  1. Recyclability of water-soluble ruthenium–phosphine complex catalysts in multiphase selective hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde using toluene and pressurized carbon dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    Fujita, Shin-ichiro; Akihara, Shuji; Arai, Masahiko

    2006-01-01

    The recyclability of water-soluble ruthenium–phosphine complex catalysts was investigated in water–toluene and in water–pressurized carbon dioxide systems for selective hydrogenation of trans-cinnamaldehyde (CAL). For the first hydrogenation run, the selectivity for cinnamyl alcohol (COL) is high for both toluene and dense CO2, because of interfacial catalysis in which the reaction mainly occurs at the interface between the aqueous phase and the other toluene or dense CO2 phase. The total CAL...

  2. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF HIGH MOLECULAR WEIGHT POLY(1,2-PROPYLENE CARBONATE-co-1,2-CYCLOHEXYLENE CARBONATE)USING ZINC COMPLEX CATALYST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-shu Wu; Min Xiao; Hu He; Shuan-jin Wang; Dong-mei Han; Yue-zhong Meng

    2011-01-01

    Using supported multi-component zinc dicarboxylate catalyst,poly(1,2-propylene carbonate-co-l,2-cyclohexylene carbonate) (PPCHC) was successfully synthesized from carbon dioxide (CO2) with propylene oxide (PO) and cyclohexene oxide (CHO).The conversion of epoxides dramatically increased up to 89.7% (yield:384.2 g of polymer per g of Zn) with increasing reaction temperature from 60℃ to 80℃.The optimized reaction temperature is 80℃.The chemical structure,the molecular weight,as well as thermal and mechanical properties of the resulting terpolymers were investigated extensively.When CHO feed content (mol%) is lower than 10%,the PPCHC terpolymers have number average molecular weight (Mn)ranging from 102 × 103 to 202 × 103 and molecular weight distribution (MWD) values ranging from 2.8 to 3.5.In contrast to poly(propylene carbonate) (PPC),the introduction of small amount of CHO leads to increase in the glass transition temperature from 38.0℃ to 42.6℃.Similarly,the mechanical strength of the synthesized terpolymer is greatly enhanced due to the incorporation of CHO.These improvements in mechanical and thermal properties are of importance for the practical application of PPC.

  3. The influence of dissolved H2O content in supercritical carbon dioxide to the inclusion complexes formation of ketoprofen/β-cyclodextrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goenawan, Joshua; Trisanti, P. N.; Sumarno

    2015-12-01

    This work studies the relation between dissolved H2O content in supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) with the formation of ketoprofen (KP)/β-cyclodextrin(CD) inclusion complexes. The process involves a physical mixture of these two compounds into contact with the supercritical carbon dioxide which had been previously saturated with H2O over a certain duration. The pressure used for saturation process is 130 bar and saturation temperature was ranged between 30 °C to 50 °C. The inclusion process was achieved by keeping it for 2 hours at 160 bar and 200 bar with inclusion temperature of 50 °C. The results enable us to suggest explanations for the inclusion formation. The inclusion complexes can be formed by contacting the dissolved H2O in SC-CO2 to the physical mixture of KP and CD. An increase in the temperature of saturation process resulted in an increase of dissolved H2O content in the supercritical carbon dioxide. The increasing levels of this water soluble resulted an increase in the inclusion complexes that has been formed. The formation of inclusion complexes includes the water molecules enhancing the emptying of the CD cavities and being replaced by KP, towards a more stable energy state. The drug release used for analyzing the dissolution rate of the KP/CD complexes. The results vary from 79,85% to 99,98% after 45 minutes which is above the rate that has been assigned by Farmakope Indonesia at 70% dissolution rate for KP. The use of SC-CO2 offers a new methods for increasing the rate of dissolution of drugs that are hydrophobic such as KP. CO2 used as a supercritical fluid because of its relatively low cost, easily obtainable supercritical conditions, and lack of toxicity. The material samples were characterized by DSC and Spectrophotometer UV-vis technique.

  4. Deposition of new thia-containing Schiff-base iron (III) complexes onto carbon nanotube-modified glassy carbon electrodes as a biosensor for electrooxidation and determination of amino acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saghatforoush, Lotfali [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Payame Noor University (PNU), P.O. Box 58168-45164, Khoy (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hasanzadeh, Mohammad, E-mail: mhmmd_hasanzadeh@yahoo.co [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Payame Noor University (PNU), P.O. Box 58168-45164, Khoy (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, K.N. Toosi University of Technology (KNTU), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shadjou, Nasrin [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Payame Noor University (PNU), P.O. Box 58168-45164, Khoy (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, K.N. Toosi University of Technology (KNTU), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khalilzadeh, Balal [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Arak University, Arak (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-01-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were used as an immobilization matrix to incorporate an Fe (III)-Schiff base complex as an electron-transfer mediator onto a glassy carbon electrode surface. First, the preheated glassy carbon was subjected to abrasive immobilization of MWCNTs by gently rubbing the electrode surface on filter paper supporting the carbon nanotubes. Second, the electrode surface was modified by casting 100 {mu}L of an Fe (III)-complex solution (0.01 M in ACN). The cyclic voltammograms of the modified electrode in an aqueous solution displayed a pair of well-defined, stable and nearly reversible reductive oxidation redox systems with surface confined characteristics. Combinations of unique electronic and electrocatalytic properties of MWCNTs and Fe (III)-Schiff base complexes resulted in a remarkable synergistic augmentation of the response. The electrochemical behavior and stability of the modified electrode in aqueous solutions at pH 1-9 were characterized by cyclic voltammetry. The apparent electron transfer rate constant (K{sub s}) and transfer coefficient (a) were determined by cyclic voltammetry and were approximately 7 s{sup -1} and 0.55, respectively. The modified electrodes showed excellent catalytic activity towards the oxidation of amino acids at an unusually positive potential in acidic solution. They also displayed inherent stability at a wide pH range, fast response time, high sensitivity, low detection limit and had a remarkably positive potential oxidation of amino acids that decreased the effect of interferences in analysis. The linear concentration range, limits of detection (LOD), limits of quantization (LOQ) and relative standard deviation of the proposed sensor for the amino acid detection were 1-55,000, 1.10-13.70, 2.79-27.14 and 1.30-5.11, respectively.

  5. Synthesis, characterization and in vitro inhibition of metal complexes of pyrazole based sulfonamide on human erythrocyte carbonic anhydrase isozymes I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyükkıdan, Nurgün; Büyükkıdan, Bülent; Bülbül, Metin; Kasımoğulları, Rahmi; Mert, Samet

    2017-12-01

    Sulfonamides represent an important class of biologically active compounds. A sulfonamide possessing carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitory properties obtained from a pyrazole based sulfonamide, ethyl 1-(3-nitrophenyl)-5-phenyl-3-((5-sulfamoyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)carbamoyl)-1H-pyrazole-4-carboxylate (1), and its metal complexes with the Ni(II) for (2), Cu(II) for (3) and Zn(II) for (4) have been synthesized. The structures of metal complexes (2-4) were established on the basis of their elemental analysis, (1)H NMR, IR, UV-Vis and MS spectral data. The inhibition of two human carbonic anhydrase (hCA, EC 4.2.1.1) isoenzymes I and II, with 1 and synthesized complexes (2-4) and acetazolamide (AAZ) as a control compound was investigated in vitro by using the hydratase and esterase assays. The complexes 2, 3 and 4 showed inhibition constant in the range 0.1460-0.3930 µM for hCA-I and 0.0740-0.0980 µM for hCA-II, and they had effective more inhibitory activity on hCA-I and hCA-II than corresponding free ligand 1 and than AAZ.

  6. Free Energy Minimization Calculation of Complex Chemical Equilibria. Reduction of Silicon Dioxide with Carbon at High Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai, C. M.; Hutchinson, S. G.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the calculation of free energy in reactions between silicon dioxide and carbon. Describes several computer programs for calculating the free energy minimization and their uses in chemistry classrooms. Lists 16 references. (YP)

  7. MEDUSA-2.0: an intermediate complexity biogeochemical model of the marine carbon cycle for climate change and ocean acidification studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yool, A.; Popova, E. E.; Anderson, T. R.

    2013-10-01

    MEDUSA-1.0 (Model of Ecosystem Dynamics, nutrient Utilisation, Sequestration and Acidification) was developed as an "intermediate complexity" plankton ecosystem model to study the biogeochemical response, and especially that of the so-called "biological pump", to anthropogenically driven change in the World Ocean (Yool et al., 2011). The base currency in this model was nitrogen from which fluxes of organic carbon, including export to the deep ocean, were calculated by invoking fixed C:N ratios in phytoplankton, zooplankton and detritus. However, due to anthropogenic activity, the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) has significantly increased above its natural, inter-glacial background. As such, simulating and predicting the carbon cycle in the ocean in its entirety, including ventilation of CO2 with the atmosphere and the resulting impact of ocean acidification on marine ecosystems, requires that both organic and inorganic carbon be afforded a more complete representation in the model specification. Here, we introduce MEDUSA-2.0, an expanded successor model which includes additional state variables for dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, dissolved oxygen and detritus carbon (permitting variable C:N in exported organic matter), as well as a simple benthic formulation and extended parameterizations of phytoplankton growth, calcification and detritus remineralisation. A full description of MEDUSA-2.0, including its additional functionality, is provided and a multi-decadal spin-up simulation (1860-2005) is performed. The biogeochemical performance of the model is evaluated using a diverse range of observational data, and MEDUSA-2.0 is assessed relative to comparable models using output from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5).

  8. MEDUSA-2.0: an intermediate complexity biogeochemical model of the marine carbon cycle for climate change and ocean acidification studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yool

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available MEDUSA-1.0 (Model of Ecosystem Dynamics, nutrient Utilisation, Sequestration and Acidification was developed as an "intermediate complexity" plankton ecosystem model to study the biogeochemical response, and especially that of the so-called "biological pump", to anthropogenically driven change in the World Ocean (Yool et al., 2011. The base currency in this model was nitrogen from which fluxes of organic carbon, including export to the deep ocean, were calculated by invoking fixed C:N ratios in phytoplankton, zooplankton and detritus. However, due to anthropogenic activity, the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2 has significantly increased above its natural, inter-glacial background. As such, simulating and predicting the carbon cycle in the ocean in its entirety, including ventilation of CO2 with the atmosphere and the resulting impact of ocean acidification on marine ecosystems, requires that both organic and inorganic carbon be afforded a more complete representation in the model specification. Here, we introduce MEDUSA-2.0, an expanded successor model which includes additional state variables for dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, dissolved oxygen and detritus carbon (permitting variable C:N in exported organic matter, as well as a simple benthic formulation and extended parameterizations of phytoplankton growth, calcification and detritus remineralisation. A full description of MEDUSA-2.0, including its additional functionality, is provided and a multi-decadal spin-up simulation (1860–2005 is performed. The biogeochemical performance of the model is evaluated using a diverse range of observational data, and MEDUSA-2.0 is assessed relative to comparable models using output from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5.

  9. Determination of porosity and facies trends in a complex carbonate reservoir, by using 3-D seismic, borehole tools, and outcrop geology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacharakis, T.G. Jr.; Comet, J.N.; Murillo, A.A. [Respol Exploracion, S.A., Madrid (Spain)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    Mesozoic carbonate reservoirs are found in the Mediterranean Sea, off the east coast of Spain. A wide variation of porosities are found in the core samples and logs: vuggy, breccia, fractures, and cavern porosity. In addition, complex Tertiary carbonate geometries include olistostromes, breccia bodies, and reef buildups, which are found on top of Mesozoic carbonates. Predicting the porosity trends within these oil productive reservoirs requires an understanding of how primary porosity was further enhanced by secondary processes, including fractures, karstification, and dolomitization in burial conditions. Through an extensive investigation of field histories, outcrop geology, and seismic data, a series of basic reservoir styles have been identified and characterized by well log signature and seismic response. The distribution pattern of the different reservoirs styles is highly heterogeneous, but by integrating subsurface data and outcrop analogs, it is possible to distinguish field-scale and local patterns of both vertical and local variations in reservoir properties. Finally, it is important to quantify these reservoir properties through the study of seismic attributes, such as amplitude variations, and log responses at the reservoir interval. By incorporating 3-D seismic data, through the use of seismic inversion, it is possible to predict porosity trends. Further, the use of geostatistics can lead to the prediction of reservoir development within the carbonate facies.

  10. Carbon-carbon cross-coupling reactions catalyzed by a two-coordinate nickel(II)-bis(amido) complex via observable Ni(I) , Ni(II) , and Ni(III) intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipschutz, Michael I; Tilley, T Don

    2014-07-01

    Recently, the development of more sustainable catalytic systems based on abundant first-row metals, especially nickel, for cross-coupling reactions has attracted significant interest. One of the key intermediates invoked in these reactions is a Ni(III) -alkyl species, but no such species that is part of a competent catalytic cycle has yet been isolated. Herein, we report a carbon-carbon cross-coupling system based on a two-coordinate Ni(II) -bis(amido) complex in which a Ni(III) -alkyl species can be isolated and fully characterized. This study details compelling experimental evidence of the role played by this Ni(III) -alkyl species as well as those of other key Ni(I) and Ni(II) intermediates. The catalytic cycle described herein is also one of the first examples of a two-coordinate complex that competently catalyzes an organic transformation, potentially leading to a new class of catalysts based on the unique ability of first-row transition metals to accommodate two-coordinate complexes.

  11. Covalent and Non-covalent Chemical Modification of Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes with Tetra-(4-hydroxylphenyl)porphyrin and Its Complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao, Hongbin; Wang, Hongke; Chang, Hui; Qiu, Shijun; Deng, Biyun; Liao, Junxu

    2011-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were covalently and non-covalently functionalized with tetra- (4-hydroxylphenyl) porphyrin (THPPH2) and its complexes (ZnTHPP) forming dispersible nanohybrids in organic solution. The morphology of the nanohybrids was observed with transmission electron microscopy. The structure of the product was characterized by FT-IR, UV-Vis spectrophotometer, fluorescence spectroscopy and thermogravim- etric analysis. The photo-induced electron-transfer process of the nanohybrids in organic solution was also revealed.

  12. Metal Complexes of 1,3,4-Thiadiazole-2,5-Disulfonamide are Strong Dual Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors, although the Ligand Possesses very Weak such Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supuran, Claudiu T.

    1995-01-01

    Coordination compounds of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II) with 1,3,4-thiadiazole-2,5-disulfonamide as ligand were synthesized and characterized by IR and UV spectroscopy, conductimetry and thermogravimetry. The parent ligand is a very weak carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitor, although it constituted the lead for developing important classes of diuretics. The complex derivatives behave as much stronger CA inhibitors, with IC50 values around 10−8M against isozyme CA II, and 10−7 M against isozyme CAI. PMID:18472784

  13. XAFS study on the sulfidation mechanisms of Co-Mo catalysts supported on activated carbon and alumina: effect of complexing agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, K; Umeki, T; Yokoyama, Y; Kitada, T; Iwanami, Y; Nonaka, O; Shimada, H; Matsubayashi, N; Nishijima, A; Nomura, M

    2001-03-01

    The effect of nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) as a complexing agent on the sulfidation mechanisms of Co-Mo catalysts supported on activated carbon and alumina was examined by the XAFS technique. The XAFS results revealed that NTA interacted with Co atoms and formed the Co-NTA interaction, while it showed almost no influence on the local structures around Mo atoms. The Co-NTA interaction suppressed the aggregation of cobalt atoms and the interaction between cobalt and alumina during sulfiding, and consequently promoted the formation of the Co-Mo-S phase.

  14. Metal Complexes of 1,3,4-Thiadiazole-2,5-Disulfonamide are Strong Dual Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors, although the Ligand Possesses very Weak such Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supuran, C T

    1995-01-01

    Coordination compounds of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II) with 1,3,4-thiadiazole-2,5-disulfonamide as ligand were synthesized and characterized by IR and UV spectroscopy, conductimetry and thermogravimetry. The parent ligand is a very weak carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitor, although it constituted the lead for developing important classes of diuretics. The complex derivatives behave as much stronger CA inhibitors, with IC(50) values around 10(-8)M against isozyme CA II, and 10(-7) M against isozyme CAI.

  15. Five phosphonate operon gene products as components of a multi-subunit complex of the carbon-phosphorus lyase pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochimsen, Bjarne; Lolle, Signe; McSorley, Fern R.;

    2011-01-01

    Organophosphonate utilization by Escherichia coli requires the 14 cistrons of the phnCDEFGHIJKLMNOP operon, of which the carbon-phosphorus lyase has been postulated to consist of the seven polypeptides specified by phnG to phnM. A 5,660-bp DNA fragment encompassing phnGHIJKLM is cloned, followed ...

  16. Cobalt(III) complexes of [3(5)] adamanzane, 1,5,9,13-tetraazabicyclo[7.7.3]nonadecane. Report of an inert, chelate hydrogen carbonate ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broge, L; Søtofte, I; Olsen, C E; Springborg, J

    2001-06-18

    Three cobalt(III) complexes of the macrocyclic tetraamine [3(5)]adamanzane (1,5,9,13-tetraazabicyclo[7.7.3]nonadecane) were isolated as salts. The X-ray crystal structures were solved for the compounds [Co([3(5)]adz)(CO(3))]AsF(6) (1b), [Co([3(5)]adz)(HCO(3))]ZnBr(4).H(2)O (2a), and [Co([3(5)]adz)(SO(4))]AsF(6).H(2)O (3a). The coordination geometry around the cobalt(III) ion is a distorted octahedron with the inorganic ligands at cis-positions. Complex 2 is the second example of a cobalt(III) complex for which the X-ray structure shows a chelate binding mode of the hydrogen carbonate entity. The pK(a) value of the [Co([3(5)]adz)(HCO(3))](2+) ion (2) was determined spectrophotometrically to be 0.27 (25 degrees C, I = 5.0 M). The protonation appears to occur at the noncoordinated carbonyl oxygen atom of the carbonate group, with hydrogen bonding to the crystal water molecule. Evidence is presented for this oxygen atom as the site of protonation in solution as well. In 5.0 M CF(3)SO(3)H a slow reaction of the carbonato complex, quantitatively yielding the [Co([3(5)]adz)(H(2)O)(2)](3+) ion, was observed. k(obs) = 7.9(1) x 10(-)(6) s(-)(1) at 25 degrees C.

  17. Actinide metals with multiple bonds to carbon: synthesis, characterization, and reactivity of U(IV) and Th(IV) bis(iminophosphorano)methandiide pincer carbene complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Guibin; Ferguson, Michael J; McDonald, Robert; Cavell, Ronald G

    2011-07-18

    Treatment of ThCl(4)(DME)(2) or UCl(4) with 1 equiv of dilithiumbis(iminophosphorano) methandiide, [Li(2)C(Ph(2)P═NSiMe(3))(2)] (1), afforded the chloro actinide carbene complexes [Cl(2)M(C(Ph(2)P═NSiMe(3))(2))] (2 (M = Th) and 3 (M = U)) in situ. Stable PCP metal-carbene complexes [Cp(2)Th(C(Ph(2)P═NSiMe(3))(2))] (4), [Cp(2)U(C(Ph(2)P═NSiMe(3))(2))] (5), [TpTh(C(Ph(2)P═NSiMe(3))(2))Cl] (6), and [TpU(C(Ph(2)P═NSiMe(3))(2))Cl] (7) were generated from 2 or 3 by further reaction with 2 equiv of thallium(I) cyclopentadienide (CpTl) in THF to yield 4 or 5 or with 1 equiv of potassium hydrotris(pyrazol-1-yl) borate (TpK) also in THF to give 6 or 7, respectively. The derivative complexes were isolated, and their crystal structures were determined by X-ray diffraction. All of these U (or Th)-carbene complexes (4-7) possess a very short M (Th or U)═carbene bond with evidence for multiple bond character. Gaussian 03 DFT calculations indicate that the M═C double bond is constructed by interaction of the 5f and 6d orbitals of the actinide metal with carbene 2p orbitals of both π and σ character. Complex 3 reacted with acetonitrile or benzonitrile to cyclo-add C≡N to the U═carbon double bond, thereby forming a new C-C bond in a new chelated quadridentate ligand in the bridged dimetallic complexes (9 and 10). A single carbon-U bond is retained. The newly coordinated uranium complex dimerizes with one equivalent of unconverted 3 using two chlorides and the newly formed imine derived from the nitrile as three connecting bridges. In addition, a new crystal structure of [CpUCl(3)(THF)(2)] (8) was determined by X-ray diffraction.

  18. Studies of properties of complex carbon-silica adsorbents used in sorption-desorption processes (solid-phase extraction)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudzinski, W. [Maria Curie-Sklodowska Univ., Lublin (Poland). Faculty of Chemistry; Gierak, A. [Maria Curie-Sklodowska Univ., Lublin (Poland). Faculty of Chemistry; Leboda, R. [Maria Curie-Sklodowska Univ., Lublin (Poland). Faculty of Chemistry; Dabrowski, A. [Maria Curie-Sklodowska Univ., Lublin (Poland). Faculty of Chemistry

    1995-08-01

    Adsorption properties of carbon and carbon-silica adsorbents, prepared by n-octanol and glucose pyrolysis and catalytic decomposition of n-butane, have been studied regarding their applicability for the extraction and concentration of phenol, its nitro- and chloro-derivatives and trihalomethanes [THM] from aqueous solutions in the concentration range of 2 to 20 mg/l. The adsorbents investigated have been subjected to various physico-chemical processes (hydrothermal treatment, oxidation, silanization) in order to improve their efficiency. The adsorption isotherms measured correspond well to the Freundlich equation. A good correlation have been observed between the values of the Freundlich constant k and the adsorbent efficiency. The investigation has been carried out using the ``off line`` method, and recovery rates for the compounds studied as high as 40-100% have been obtained. (orig.)

  19. Synthesis of Polyketone by Copolymerization of Styrene and CO Using Carbon Nanotube-Complex Pd2+Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭锦棠; 肖淼; 王海霞; 胡光

    2014-01-01

    The dipping method was devised to deposit Pd onto carbon nanotube as supported catalyst (Pd/CNT) for the copolymerization of carbon monoxide (CO) and styrene(ST) towards the formation of polyketone (PK). The Pd/CNT was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The construction and crystallization property of PK were evaluated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR) and XRD, respectively. The catalyst showed excellent activity and reusability in promoting the fabrication of PK. It can be recycled 14 times with the highest total catalytic activity of 4 239.64 gPK/(gPd·h) at Pd content of 8.63wt%. The results indicate that the prepared catalyst is effective to catalyze the copolymerization of CO and styrene.

  20. A New Nitrogenase Mechanism Using a CFe8S9 Model: Does H2 Elimination Activate the Complex to N2 Addition to the Central Carbon Atom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Michael L

    2016-02-11

    A truncated model of the FeMo cofactor is used to explore a new mechanism for the conversion of N2 to NH3 by the nitrogenase enzyme. After four initial protonation/reduction steps, the H4CFe8S9 cluster has two hydrogen atoms attached to sulfur, one hydrogen bridging two iron centers and one hydrogen bonded to carbon. The loss of the CH and FeHFe hydrogens as molecular hydrogen activates the cluster to addition of N2 to the carbon center. This unique step takes place at a nearly planar four-coordinate carbon center and leads to an intermediate with a significantly weakened N-N bond. A hydrogen attached to a sulfur atom is then transferred to the distal nitrogen atom. Additional prontonation/reduction steps are modeled by adding a hydrogen atom to sulfur and locating the transition states for transfer to nitrogen. The first NH3 is lost in a thermal neutral step, while the second step is endothermic. The loss of H2 activates the complex by reducing the barrier for N2 addition by 3.5 kcal/mol. Since this is the most difficult step in the mechanism, reducing the barrier for this step justifies the "extra expense" of H2 production.

  1. Complexing Agents on Carbon Content and Lithium Storage Capacity of LiFePO4/C Cathode Synthesized via Sol-Gel Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Guan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Olivine-structured LiFePO4 faces its intrinsic challenges in terms of poor electrical conductivity and lithium-ion diffusion capability for application to lithium-ion batteries. Cost-effective sol-gel approach is advantageous to in situ synthesize carbon-coated LiFePO4 (LiFePO4/C which can not only improve electronic conductivity but also constrain particle size to nanometer scale. In this study, the key parameter is focused on the choice and amount of chelating agents in this synthesis route. It was found that stability of complexing compounds has significant impacts on the carbon contents and electrochemical properties of the products. At the favorable choice of precursors, composition, and synthesis conditions, nanocrystalline LiFePO4/C materials with appropriate amount of carbon coating were successfully obtained. A reversible capacity of 162 mAh/g was achieved at 0.2C rate, in addition to good discharge rate capability.

  2. Effects of germanium doping on the behavior of oxygen and carbon impurities and impurity-related complexes in Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Londos, C.A., E-mail: hlontos@phys.uoa.g [University of Athens, Solid State Physics Section, Panepistimiopolis Zografos, Athens 157 84 (Greece); Andrianakis, A. [University of Athens, Solid State Physics Section, Panepistimiopolis Zografos, Athens 157 84 (Greece); Emtsev, V.V.; Oganesyan, G.A. [Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Politeknicheskaya ul. 26, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Ohyama, H. [Kumamoto National College of Technology, 26592, Nishigoshi, Kumamoto 861-1102 (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    The production and annealing of oxygen and carbon related defects in electron-irradiated Ge-doped Czochralski silicon have been studied by means of IR spectroscopy. The results demonstrate that the role of Ge changes with increasing Ge content. At low Ge concentrations, much less than 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}, Ge atoms act as temporary traps for vacancies preventing their annihilation with self-interstitials. At high Ge concentrations, Ge atoms form clusters which tend to attract vacancies and self-interstitials, enhancing their mutual annihilation. As a result, for low Ge concentrations the production of oxygen-related defects (VO) and carbon-related defects (C{sub i}O{sub i}, C{sub i}O{sub i}(Si{sub I}), C{sub i}C{sub s}) tend to increase as a function of Ge content, while for high Ge concentrations tend to decrease. The annealing of the oxygen-related defects VO{sub n} (1<=n<=6) is also affected by the Ge presence. The ratio of the VO defects that convert to VO{sub 2} is reduced in Ge doped material. However, this ratio increases for the conversions VO{sub n}->VO{sub n+1} (3<=n<=5), respectively. The annealing temperature of VO defect and the growth temperature of VO{sub 2} defect decrease versus Ge content. On the other hand, the thermal stability of the carbon-related defects was found to be insensitive to the presence of Ge. It was also found that the carbon precipitation process shows some marked differences in irradiated Ge-doped Si, in comparison with the undoped material.

  3. Real-time imaging of complex nanoscale mechanical responses of carbon nanotubes in highly compressible porous monoliths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitby, Raymond L D; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V [Brighton Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Group, PABS, University of Brighton, Lewes Road, Brighton, BN2 4GJ (United Kingdom); Fukuda, Takahiro; Maekawa, Toru [Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe Saitama 350-8585 (Japan); Cundy, Andrew B, E-mail: r.whitby@brighton.ac.uk [School of Environment and Technology, University of Brighton, Lewes Road, Brighton, BN2 4GJ (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-19

    A facile and rapid assembly of powdered carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into compressible, porous, macroscale monoliths is reported. Despite a Poisson's ratio just above zero, we found that the sample under compression inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM) revealed CNT regions behaving in auxetic and vortex-like rotational modes as well as standard collapse responses. This method is crucial in understanding the macroscale behaviour based on the accumulation of nanoscale responses to an applied force.

  4. Real-time imaging of complex nanoscale mechanical responses of carbon nanotubes in highly compressible porous monoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitby, Raymond L. D.; Fukuda, Takahiro; Maekawa, Toru; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V.; Cundy, Andrew B.

    2010-02-01

    A facile and rapid assembly of powdered carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into compressible, porous, macroscale monoliths is reported. Despite a Poisson's ratio just above zero, we found that the sample under compression inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM) revealed CNT regions behaving in auxetic and vortex-like rotational modes as well as standard collapse responses. This method is crucial in understanding the macroscale behaviour based on the accumulation of nanoscale responses to an applied force.

  5. The loading of coordination complex modified polyoxometalate nanobelts on activated carbon fiber: a feasible strategy to obtain visible light active and highly efficient polyoxometalate based photocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tingting; Xu, Xinxin; Li, Huili; Li, Zhenyu; Zhang, Xia; Ou, Jinzhao; Mei, Mingliang

    2015-02-01

    To enhance the photocatalytic properties of coordination complex modified polyoxometalates (CC/POMs) in the visible light region, its nanobelts (CC/POMNBs) were loaded on activated carbon fiber (ACF) through a simple colloidal blending process. The resulting coordination complex modified polyoxometalate nanobelts loaded activated carbon fiber composite materials (CC/POMNBs/ACF) exhibited dramatic photocatalytic activity for the degradation of rhodamine B (RhB) under visible light irradiation. Optical and electrochemical methods illustrated the enhanced photocatalytic activity of CC/POMNBs/ACF, which originates from the high separation efficiency of the photogenerated electrons and holes on the interface of the CC/POMNBs and ACF, which results from the synergistic effects between them. In the composite material, the role of ACF could be described as a photosensitizer and a good electron transporter. Furthermore, the influence of the mass ratio between the CC/POMNBs and ACF on the photocatalytic performance of the resulting composite material was discussed, and an ideal value to obtain highly efficient photocatalysts was obtained. The results suggested that the loading of CC/POMNBs on the surface of ACF would be a feasible strategy to enhance their photocatalytic activity.

  6. Zn(II), Cd(II) and Cu(II) complexes of 2,5-bis{N-(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)iminomethyl}pyrrole: synthesis, structures and their high catalytic activity for efficient cyclic carbonate synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignesh Babu, Heeralal; Muralidharan, Krishnamurthi

    2013-01-28

    The syntheses of Zn(II), Cd(II) and Cu(II) complexes of 2,5-bis{N-(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)iminomethyl}pyrrole (DIP(2)pyr)H 1 and their catalytic activities in CO(2) fixation are reported. The structures of these complexes were characterized by IR, (1)H, (13)C NMR and single crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. The catalytic activities of these complexes for the cycloaddition of CO(2) to an epoxide under one atmosphere of pressure and mild temperature conditions to yield cyclic carbonate have been studied. Among the four complexes synthesized, the Zn(II) and Cu(II) complexes were found to be versatile whereas the Cu(II) complex was more selective in the conversion. They were highly effective for the conversion of monosubstituted terminal epoxides, disubstituted terminal and internal epoxides to their corresponding cyclic carbonates with good to high yields.

  7. Trace analysis of cefotaxime at carbon paste electrode modified with novel Schiff base Zn(II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Preeti; Mohan, Swati; Kundu, Subir; Prakash, Rajiv

    2009-02-15

    Cefotaxime a third generation cephalosporin drug estimation in nanomolar concentration range is demonstrated for the first time in aqueous and human blood samples using novel Schiff base octahedral Zn(II) complex. The cefotaxime electrochemistry is studied over graphite paste and Zn(II) complex modified graphite paste capillary electrodes in H(2)SO(4) (pH 2.3) using cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. Cefotaxime enrichment is observed over Zn(II) complex modified graphite paste electrode probably due to interaction of functional groups of cefotaxime with Zn(II) complex. Possible interactions between metal complex and cefotaxime drug is examined by UV-vis and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) techniques and further supported by voltammetric analysis. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) with modified electrode is applied for the determination of cefotaxime in acidified aqueous and blood samples. Cefotaxime estimation is successfully demonstrated in the range of 1-500 nM for aqueous samples and 0.1-100 microM in human blood samples. Reproducibility, accuracy and repeatability of the method are checked by triplicate reading for large number of samples. The variation in the measurements is obtained less than 10% without any interference of electrolyte or blood constituents.

  8. Carbon dioxide is tightly bound in the [Co(Pyridine)(CO{sub 2})]{sup −} anionic complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, Jacob D.; Buytendyk, Allyson M.; Zhang, Xinxing; Bowen, Kit H., E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Kim, Seong K. [Department of Chemistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-14

    The [Co(Pyridine)(CO{sub 2})]{sup −} anionic complex was studied through the combination of photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. This complex was envisioned as a primitive model system for studying CO{sub 2} binding to negatively charged sites in metal organic frameworks. The vertical detachment energy (VDE) measured via the photoelectron spectrum is 2.7 eV. Our calculations imply a structure for [Co(Pyridine)(CO{sub 2})]{sup −} in which a central cobalt atom is bound to pyridine and CO{sub 2} moieties on either sides. This structure was validated by acceptable agreement between the calculated and measured VDE values. Based on our calculations, we found CO{sub 2} to be bound within the anionic complex by 1.4 eV.

  9. Complex Physiological Response of Norway Spruce to Atmospheric Pollution – Decreased Carbon Isotope Discrimination and Unchanged Tree Biomass Increment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čada, Vojtěch; Šantrůčková, Hana; Šantrůček, Jiří; Kubištová, Lenka; Seedre, Meelis; Svoboda, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric pollution critically affects forest ecosystems around the world by directly impacting the assimilation apparatus of trees and indirectly by altering soil conditions, which subsequently also leads to changes in carbon cycling. To evaluate the extent of the physiological effect of moderate level sulfate and reactive nitrogen acidic deposition, we performed a retrospective dendrochronological analysis of several physiological parameters derived from periodic measurements of carbon stable isotope composition (13C discrimination, intercellular CO2 concentration and intrinsic water use efficiency) and annual diameter increments (tree biomass increment, its inter-annual variability and correlation with temperature, cloud cover, precipitation and Palmer drought severity index). The analysis was performed in two mountain Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands of the Bohemian Forest (Czech Republic, central Europe), where moderate levels of pollution peaked in the 1970s and 1980s and no evident impact on tree growth or link to mortality has been reported. The significant influence of pollution on trees was expressed most sensitively by a 1.88‰ reduction of carbon isotope discrimination (Δ13C). The effects of atmospheric pollution interacted with increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration and temperature. As a result, we observed no change in intercellular CO2 concentrations (Ci), an abrupt increase in water use efficiency (iWUE) and no change in biomass increment, which could also partly result from changes in carbon partitioning (e.g., from below- to above-ground). The biomass increment was significantly related to Δ13C on an individual tree level, but the relationship was lost during the pollution period. We suggest that this was caused by a shift from the dominant influence of the photosynthetic rate to stomatal conductance on Δ13C during the pollution period. Using biomass increment-climate correlation analyses, we did not identify any clear pollution

  10. A fluorescence-Raman dual-imaging platform based on complexes of conjugated polymers and carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Huang, Jun; Sun, Min-Jie; Yu, Ji-Cheng; Chen, Yu-Lei; Zhang, Yu-Qi; Jiang, Shao-Jun; Shen, Qun-Dong

    2014-01-01

    The present study describes a flexible nanoplatform based on electrostatic assembly of conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs) and carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (cMWNTs). It is demonstrated that the obtained nanocomposites inherit intrinsic optical properties of CPEs and characteristic Raman vibration modes of MWNTs, providing a fluorescence-Raman dual-imaging method for intracellular tracking and locating of MWNTs. We suggest that the cellular internalization of the CPE-cMWNT nanocomposites is a surface charge-dependent process. The strengths of this nanoplatform include satisfying biocompatibility, enhanced protein-repellent property, and ease of implementation, making it available for both in vitro and in vivo applications.

  11. Reductive electropolymerization of a vinyl-containing poly-pyridyl complex on glassy carbon and fluorine-doped tin oxide electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Daniel P; Carpenter, Logan S; Hyde, Jacob T

    2015-01-30

    Controllable electrode surface modification is important in a number of fields, especially those with solar fuels applications. Electropolymerization is one surface modification technique that electrodeposits a polymeric film at the surface of an electrode by utilizing an applied potential to initiate the polymerization of substrates in the Helmholtz layer. This useful technique was first established by a Murray-Meyer collaboration at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the early 1980s and utilized to study numerous physical phenomena of films containing inorganic complexes as the monomeric substrate. Here, we highlight a procedure for coating electrodes with an inorganic complex by performing reductive electropolymerization of the vinyl-containing poly-pyridyl complex onto glassy carbon and fluorine doped tin oxide coated electrodes. Recommendations on electrochemical cell configurations and troubleshooting procedures are included. Although not explicitly described here, oxidative electropolymerization of pyrrole-containing compounds follows similar procedures to vinyl-based reductive electropolymerization but are far less sensitive to oxygen and water.

  12. Development and evaluation of pH-responsive single-walled carbon nanotube-doxorubicin complexes in cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu YJ

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Yan-Juan Gu1,2,*, Jinping Cheng2,*, Jiefu Jin3, Shuk Han Cheng2, Wing-Tak Wong11Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, 2Department of Biology and Chemistry, The City University of Hong Kong, 3Department of Chemistry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs have been identified as an efficient drug carrier. Here a controlled drug-delivery system based on SWNTs coated with doxorubicin (DOX through hydrazone bonds was developed, because the hydrazone bond is more sensitive to tumor microenvironments than other covalent linkers. The SWNTs were firstly stabilized with polyethylene glycol (H2N-PEG-NH2. Hydrazinobenzoic acid (HBA was then covalently attached on SWNTs via carbodiimide-activated coupling reaction to form hydrazine-modified SWNTs. The anticancer drug DOX was conjugated to the HBA segments of SWNT using hydrazine as the linker. The resulting hydrazone bonds formed between the DOX molecules and the HBA segments of SWNTs are acid cleavable, thereby providing a strong pH-responsive drug release, which may facilitate effective DOX release near the acidic tumor microenvironment and thus reduce its overall systemic toxicity. The DOX-loaded SWNTs were efficiently taken up by HepG2 tumor cells, and DOX was released intracellularly, as revealed by MTT assay and confocal microscope observations. Compared with SWNT-DOX conjugate formed by supramolecular interaction, the SWNT-HBA-DOX featured high weight loading and prolonged release of DOX, and thus improved its cytotoxicity against cancer cells. This study suggests that while SWNTs have great potential as a drug carrier, the efficient formulation strategy requires further study.Keywords: carbon nanotubes, drug delivery, controlled release, SWNTs

  13. Extraction of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and carbonic anhydrase from stroma-free red blood cell hemolysate for the preparation of the nanobiotechnological complex of polyhemoglobin-superoxide dismutase-catalase-carbonic anhydrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, C; Gynn, M; Chang, T M S

    2015-06-01

    We report a novel method to simultaneously extract superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and carbonic anhydrase (CA) from the same sample of red blood cells (RBCs). This avoids the need to use expensive commercial enzymes, thus enabling a cost-effective process for large-scale production of a nanobiotechnological polyHb-SOD-CAT-CA complex, with enhancement of all three red blood cell functions. An optimal concentration of phosphate buffer for ethanol-chloroform treatment results in good recovery of CAT, SOD, and CA after extraction. Different concentrations of the enzymes can be used to enhance the activity of polyHb-SOD-CAT-CA to 2, 4, or 6 times that of RBC.

  14. Organometallic ruthenium(II) complexes: synthesis, structure and influence of substitution at azomethine carbon towards DNA/BSA binding, radical scavenging and cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyadevi, Palanisamy; Krishnamoorthy, Paramasivam; Bhuvanesh, Nattamai S P; Kalaiselvi, Palaniswamy; Vijaya Padma, Viswanadha; Dharmaraj, Nallasamy

    2012-09-01

    Bivalent, ruthenium organometallics containing hydrazone ligands with the composition [RuH(CO)(PPh(3))(2)(L(1-3))] (4-6) have been synthesised from the reactions of [RuH(2)(CO)(PPh(3))(3)] and benzoic acid pyridine-2-ylmethylene-hydrazide (HL(1)) (1) /benzoic acid (1-pyridin-2-yl-ethylidene)-hydrazide (HL(2)) (2)/benzoic acid (phenyl-pyridin-2-yl-methylene)-hydrazide (HL(3)) (3) and characterised by various physico-chemical techniques. The X-ray crystal structure of one of the above complexes, [RuH(CO)(PPh(3))(2)(L(3))] (6) demonstrated a distorted octahedral coordination geometry around the metal centre. Results of our investigation on the effect of substitution (H or CH(3) or C(6)H(5)) at the azomethine carbon of coordinated hydrazone in these ruthenium chelates on the potential binding with DNA/BSA, free radical scavenging and cytotoxicity is presented.

  15. Fabrication of electrochemical sensor for paracetamol based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes and chitosan-copper complex by self-assembly technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Airong; Li, Hongbo; Jin, Dangqin; Yu, Liangyun; Hu, Xiaoya

    2015-11-01

    An electrochemical sensor for paracetamol based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes and chitosan-copper complex (MWCNTs/CTS-Cu) was fabricated by self-assembly technique. The MWCNTs/CTS-Cu modified GCE showed an excellent electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of paracetamol, and accelerated electron transfer between the electrode and paracetamol. Under optimal experimental conditions, the differential pulse peak current was linear with the concentration of paracetamol in the range of 0.1-200 μmol L(-1) with a detection limit of 0.024 μmol L(-1). The sensitivity was found to be 0.603 A/mol L(-1). The proposed sensor also showed a high selectivity for paracetamol in the presence of ascorbic acid and dopamine. Moreover, the proposed electrode revealed good reproducibility and stability. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of paracetamol in tablet and human serum samples.

  16. Fabrication of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles/surfactant polymer complex film on glassy carbon electrode and its application to sensing trace dopamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan Shuai [Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Chen Wanhua [Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Hu Shengshui [Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)]. E-mail: sshu@whu.edu.cn

    2005-06-15

    A novel method for the fabrication of a TiO{sub 2}/Nafion nano-film on glassy carbon electrode (NTGCE) is described. In the presence of dispersant, TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were dispersed into water to give a homogeneous and stable suspension. After the solvent evaporation, a porous and uniform TiO{sub 2} nano-film was obtained on the GCE surface. Further coated with Nafion, the complex film possesses remarkable stability in aqueous solution. This nano-film was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The prepared electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic behavior of dopamine and high concentration of ascorbic acid does not interfere with the dopamine detection. Based on this, an electrochemical method is developed for the determination of dopamine with simplicity and high sensitivity.

  17. Lithium insertion into boron containing carbons prepared by co-pyrolysis of coal-tar pitch and borane-pyridine complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machnikowski, J.; Frackowiak, E.; Kierzek, K.; Waszak, D.; Benoit, R.; Beguin, F. [Wroclaw University of Technology, Wroclaw (Poland)

    2004-03-01

    Carbon materials of boron content ranging from 0.6 to 4 wt.% were synthesized by co-pyrolysis of QI-free coal-tar pitch with the borane-pyridine complex. The growing amount of boron introduced into the carbonaceous material is associated with an increase in nitrogen content and a progressive degradation of structural and textural ordering. The structural variations of the boron-doped materials on heat treatment up to 2500{sup o}C were monitored using X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The intrinsic boron acts effectively as a catalyst of graphitization above 2100{sup o}C. The carbonaceous material with boron content of about 1.5 wt% shows the highest degree of structural ordering after thermal treatment. A high amount of oxygen was found in the graphitized boronated carbons, proving that the incorporated boron induces a strong chemisorption activity of the material when exposed to air. For a series of cokes calcined at 1000 {sup o}C, the most striking effect of increasing the boron content is an increase of irreversible capacity X-irr from 0.2 to 0.7. The reversible capacity (X-rev) amounts to about 1, with a slight tendency to decrease with the boron content. Upon increasing the temperature up to 2500{sup o}C, X-irr decreases to about 0.1 in the graphitic carbons, while X-rev reaches a minimum of 0.4-0.5 at 1700{sup o}C and next increases to a value close to 1 at 2500{sup o}C. In the boron doped graphite, X-irr has a slight tendency to increase with the boron content, due to the simultaneous presence of nitrogen in these materials and their strong affinity for oxygen from the atmosphere.

  18. Improving the Spatial Prediction of Soil Organic Carbon Stocks in a Complex Tropical Mountain Landscape by Methodological Specifications in Machine Learning Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ließ, Mareike; Schmidt, Johannes; Glaser, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Tropical forests are significant carbon sinks and their soils' carbon storage potential is immense. However, little is known about the soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks of tropical mountain areas whose complex soil-landscape and difficult accessibility pose a challenge to spatial analysis. The choice of methodology for spatial prediction is of high importance to improve the expected poor model results in case of low predictor-response correlations. Four aspects were considered to improve model performance in predicting SOC stocks of the organic layer of a tropical mountain forest landscape: Different spatial predictor settings, predictor selection strategies, various machine learning algorithms and model tuning. Five machine learning algorithms: random forests, artificial neural networks, multivariate adaptive regression splines, boosted regression trees and support vector machines were trained and tuned to predict SOC stocks from predictors derived from a digital elevation model and satellite image. Topographical predictors were calculated with a GIS search radius of 45 to 615 m. Finally, three predictor selection strategies were applied to the total set of 236 predictors. All machine learning algorithms-including the model tuning and predictor selection-were compared via five repetitions of a tenfold cross-validation. The boosted regression tree algorithm resulted in the overall best model. SOC stocks ranged between 0.2 to 17.7 kg m-2, displaying a huge variability with diffuse insolation and curvatures of different scale guiding the spatial pattern. Predictor selection and model tuning improved the models' predictive performance in all five machine learning algorithms. The rather low number of selected predictors favours forward compared to backward selection procedures. Choosing predictors due to their indiviual performance was vanquished by the two procedures which accounted for predictor interaction.

  19. Evidence of different stoichiometries for the limiting carbonate complexes across the lanthanide(III) series: A capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philippini, V.; Vercouter, T.; Vitorge, P. [CEA, Dept Physicochem, Lab Speciat Radionucleides et Mol, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Aupiais, J.; Topin, S.; Ambard, C. [CEA, Serv Radioanalyse Chim et Environm, Bruyeres Le Chatel, (France); Chausse, A.; Vitorge, P. [Lab Analyse et Modelisat Biol et Environm, Evry, (France)

    2008-07-01

    The electrophoretic mobilities ({mu}{sub ep,Ln}) of twelve lanthanides (not Ce, Pr and Yb) were measured by CE-ICP-MS in 0.15 and 0.5 mol L{sup -1} Alk{sub 2}CO{sub 3} aqueous solutions for Alk{sup +} = Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +} and Cs{sup +}. In 0.5 mol L{sup -1} solutions, two different {mu}{sub ep,Ln} values were found for the light (La to Nd) and the heavy (Dy to Tm) lanthanides, which suggests two different stoichiometries for the carbonate limiting complexes. These results are consistent with a solubility study that attests the Ln(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 3-} and Ln(CO{sub 3}){sub 4}{sup 5-} stoichiometries for the heavy (small) and the light (big) lanthanides, respectively. The Alk{sup +} counter-ions influence the {mu}{sub ep,Ln}{sup Alk2CO3} values, but not the overall shape of the {mu}{sub ep,Ln}{sup Alk2CO3} plots as a function of the lanthanide atomic numbers: the counter-ions do not modify the stoichiometries of the inner sphere complexes. The influence of the Alk{sup +} counter-ions decreases in the Li{sup +} {>=} Na{sup +} {>=}{>=} K{sup +} {>=} Cs{sup +} series. The K{sub 3,Ln} stepwise formation constants of the Ln(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 3-} complexes slightly increase with the atomic numbers of the lanthanides while K{sub 4,Ln}, the stepwise formation constants of Ln(CO{sub 3}){sub 4}{sup 5-} complexes, slightly decrease from La to Th, and is no longer measurable for heavier lanthanides. (authors)

  20. Nickel-phendione complex covalently attached onto carbon nanotube/cross linked glucose dehydrogenase as bioanode for glucose/oxygen compartment-less biofuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korani, Aazam; Salimi, Abdollah; Hadadzadeh, Hasan

    2015-05-01

    Here, [Ni(phendion) (phen)]Cl2 complex, (phendion and phen are 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione and 5-amino-1, 10-phenanthrolin) covalently attached onto carboxyl functionalized multi walls carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE/MWCNTs-COOH) using solid phase interactions and combinatorial approaches.The attached [Ni(phendion) (phen)]Cl2 complex displays a surface controlled electrode process and it acts as an effective redox mediator for electrocatalytic oxidation of dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) at reduced overpotentials. With co-immobilization of glucose dehydrogenase enzyme (GDH) by crosslinking an effective biocatalyst for glucose oxidation designed. The onset potential and current density are -0.1 V versus Ag/AgCl electrode and 0.550 mA cm-2, which indicate the applicability of the proposed system as an efficient bioanode for biofuel cell (BFC) design. A GCE/MWCNTs modified with electrodeposited gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as a platform for immobilization of bilirubin oxidase (BOD) and the prepared GCE/MWCNTs/AuNPs/BOD biocathode exhibits an onset potential of 0.56 V versus Ag/AgCl. The performance of the fabricated bioanode and biocathode in a membraneless enzyme based glucose/O2 biofuel cell is evaluated. The open circuit voltage of the cell and maximum current density are 520 mV and 0.233 mA cm-2, respectively, while maximum power density of 40 μWcm-2 achieves at voltage of 280 mV with stable output power after 24 h continues operation.

  1. Highly active and selective catalysis of copper diphosphine complexes for the transformation of carbon dioxide into silyl formate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motokura, Ken; Kashiwame, Daiki; Takahashi, Naoki; Miyaji, Akimitsu; Baba, Toshihide

    2013-07-22

    Copper diphosphine complexes have been found to be highly active and selective homogeneous catalysts for the hydrosilylation of CO2. The structure of the phosphine ligands strongly affects their catalytic activity. Turnover number (TON) reaches 70,000 after 24 hours with 1,2-bis(diisopropylphosphino)benzene as a ligand under 1 atmosphere of CO2. (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra, carried out under the reaction conditions, showed the reaction mechanism through insertion of CO2 into Cu-H to afford Cu/formate species.

  2. Quantitative electrochemical detection of cathepsin B activity in complex tissue lysates using enhanced AC voltammetry at carbon nanofiber nanoelectrode arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisher, Luxi Z; Prior, Allan M; Shishido, Stephanie; Nguyen, Thu A; Hua, Duy H; Li, Jun

    2014-06-15

    The proteolytic activity of a cancer-related enzyme cathepsin B is measured with alternating current voltammetry (ACV) using ferrocene (Fc) labeled tetrapeptides attached to nanoelectrode arrays (NEAs) fabricated with vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs). This combination enables the use of high AC frequencies (~1kHz) with enhanced electrochemical signals. The specific proteolysis of the Fc-peptide by cathepsin B produces decay in the ACV peak current versus the reaction time. The exponential component of the raw data can be extracted and defined as the "extracted proteolytic signal" which allows consistent quantitative analyses using a heterogeneous Michaelis-Menten model. A "specificity constant" kcat/KM = (3.68 ± 0.50) × 10(4)M(-1)s(-1) for purified cathepsin B was obtained. The detections of cathepsin B activity in different concentrations of whole lysate of human breast tissue, tissue lysate spiked with varied concentrations of cathepsin B, and the tissue lysate after immunoprecipitation showed that there is ~13.4 nM higher cathepsin B concentration in 29.1 µg mL(-1) of whole tissue lysate than the immunoprecipitated sample. The well-defined regular VACNF NEAs by e-beam lithography show a much faster kinetics for cathepsin B proteolysis with kcat/KM = 9.2 × 10(4)M(-1)s(-1). These results illustrate the potential of this technique as a portable multiplex electronic system for cancer diagnosis by rapid protease profiling of serum or blood samples.

  3. C-H Bond Activation of Bisimines by Palladium (Ⅱ) and Platinum (Ⅱ).Synthesis,Characterization of Bis (imino) aryl-palladium (Ⅱ) Pincer Complexes and Their Application in Carbon-Carbon Cross Coupling Reactions%C-H Bond Activation of Bisimines by Palladium (Ⅱ) and Platinum (Ⅱ).Synthesis, Characterization of Bis (imino) aryl-palladium (Ⅱ) Pincer Complexes and Their Application in Carbon-Carbon Cross Coupling Reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Rong; CHEN Ying; LIU Fang; LI Ping; HU Zhao-xia; WANG Hong-xing

    2013-01-01

    Abstract:The reactions of a variety of 4,6-dimethyl-1,3-bis (imino) benzenes 2a-g derived from 4,6-dimethylisophthalaldehyde and anilines or benzylamine with palladium (Ⅱ) acetate in anhydrous acetic acid under nitrogen were investigated.Experiment results demonstrate that cyclopalladations in such condition are applicable not only to the present system under study but also to the 5-substituted bis(imino)benzenes 6,7.The molecular structure of 3 b was further confirmed by X-Ray single-crystal diffraction.3b Crystallizes in orthorhombic,space groupP2 (1) 2 (1) 2 (1) with a =0.734 53 (8),b =1.683 8 (3),c =1.691 7(2) nm,α =β =γ =90°.Treatment of 2b with K2PtCl4 in anhydrous acetic acid affords the corresponding NCN-platinum pincer.Carbon-carbon cross coupling reactions catalyzed with 3b were investigated.These palladium complexes have been proved to be high effective catalysts for Suzuki coupling reaction.

  4. BaFe12O19-chitosan Schiff-base Ag (I) complexes embedded in carbon nanotube networks for high-performance electromagnetic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jie; Xie, Yu; Guan, Dongsheng; Hua, Helin; Zhong, Rong; Qin, Yuancheng; Fang, Jing; Liu, Huilong; Chen, Junhong

    2015-07-28

    The multiwalled carbon nanotubes/BaFe12O19-chitosan (MCNTs/BF-CS) Schiff base Ag (I) complex composites were synthesized successfully by a chemical bonding method. The morphology and structures of the composites were characterized with electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. Their conductive properties were measured using a four-probe conductivity tester at room temperature, and their magnetic properties were tested by a vibrating sample magnetometer. The results show that the BF-CS Schiff base Ag (I) complexes are embedded into MCNT networks. When the mass ratio of MCNTs and BF-CS Schiff base is 0.95:1, the conductivity, Ms (saturation magnetization), Mr (residual magnetization), and Hc (coercivity) of the BF-CS Schiff base composites reach 1.908 S cm(-1), 28.20 emu g(-1), 16.66 emu g(-1) and 3604.79 Oe, respectively. Finally, a possible magnetic mechanism of the composites has also been proposed.

  5. Formation of molecular complexes of salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid, and methyl salicylate in a mixture of supercritical carbon dioxide with a polar cosolvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, V. E.; Antipova, M. L.; Gurina, D. L.; Odintsova, E. G.

    2015-08-01

    The solvate structures formed by salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid, and methyl salicylate in supercritical (SC) carbon dioxide with a polar cosolvent (methanol, 0.03 mole fractions) at a density of 0.7 g/cm3 and a temperature of 318 K were studied by the molecular dynamics method. Salicylic and acetylsalicylic acids were found to form highly stable hydrogen-bonded complexes with methanol via the hydrogen atom of the carboxyl group. For methyl salicylate in which the carboxyl hydrogen is substituted by a methyl radical, the formation of stable hydrogen bonds with methanol was not revealed. The contribution of other functional groups of the solute to the interactions with the cosolvent was much smaller. An analysis of correlations between the obtained data and the literature data on the cosolvent effect on the solubility of the compounds in SC CO2 showed that the dissolving ability of SC CO2 with respect to a polar organic substance in the presence of a cosolvent increased only when stable hydrogen-bonded complexes are formed between this substance and the cosolvent.

  6. Thermodynamic and kinetic studies of the equilibration reaction between the sulfur and carbon bonded forms of a cobalt(III) complex with the ligands 1,4,7-triazycyclononane and 1,4-diaza-7-thiacyclodecane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Y.S.; Becker, J.; Kofod, Pauli

    1996-01-01

    -sulfur complex to form the alkyl complex gave 100% loss of deuterium. It is concluded that the labile methylene proton is bound to the carbon atom which in the alkyl complex is bound to cobalt(III). From the kinetic data it is estd. that the carbanion reacts with water 270 times faster than it is captured......The new cyclic thioether 1,4-diaza-7-thiacyclodecane, dathicd, has been synthesized and used for the prepn. of the sulfur- and carbon-bonded cobalt(III) complexes: [Co(tacn)(S-dathicd)]Cl3.5H2O and [Co(tacn)(C-dathicd)](ClO4)2 (tacn, 1,4,7-triazacyclononane; C-dathicd, 1,4-diamino-7-thiacyclodecan...

  7. Development of quercetin-phospholipid complex to improve the bioavailability and protection effects against carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity in SD rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kexia; Zhang, Meiyu; Liu, Ziying; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Gu, Liqiang; Hu, Gaosheng; Chen, Xiaohui; Jia, Jingming

    2016-09-01

    Quercetin (QT) is a natural flavonoid with various biological activities and pharmacological actions. However, the bioavailability of QT is relatively low due to its low solubility which severely limits its use. In this study, we intended to improve the bioavailability of QT by preparing quercetin-phospholipid complex (QT-PC) and investigate the protective effect of QT-PC against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) induced acute liver damage in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The physicochemical properties of QT-PC were characterized in terms of infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (XRPD) and water/n-octanol solubility. FTIR, DSC and XRPD data confirmed the formation of QT-PC. The water solubility of QT was improved significantly in the prepared complex, indicating its increased hydrophilicity. Oral bioavailability of QT and QT-PC was evaluated in SD rats, and the plasma QT was estimated by HPLC-MS. QT-PC exhibited higher Cmax (1.58±0.11 vs. 0.67±0.08μg/mL), increased AUC0-∞ (8.60±1.25 vs. 2.41±0.51mg/Lh) and t1/2z (7.76±1.09 vs. 4.81±0.87h) when compared to free QT. The greater absorption of QT-PC group suggested the improved bioavailability. Moreover, biochemical changes and histopathological observations revealed that QT-PC provided better protection to rat liver than free QT at the same dose. Thus, phospholipid complexation might be one of the suitable approaches to improve the oral bioavailability of QT and obtain better protective effects against CCl4 induced acute liver damage in SD rats than free QT at the same dose level.

  8. Planting increases the abundance and structure complexity of soil core functional genes relevant to carbon and nitrogen cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Liang, Yuting; Jiang, Yuji; Yang, Yunfeng; Xue, Kai; Xiong, Jinbo; Zhou, Jizhong; Sun, Bo

    2015-09-23

    Plants have an important impact on soil microbial communities and their functions. However, how plants determine the microbial composition and network interactions is still poorly understood. During a four-year field experiment, we investigated the functional gene composition of three types of soils (Phaeozem, Cambisols and Acrisol) under maize planting and bare fallow regimes located in cold temperate, warm temperate and subtropical regions, respectively. The core genes were identified using high-throughput functional gene microarray (GeoChip 3.0), and functional molecular ecological networks (fMENs) were subsequently developed with the random matrix theory (RMT)-based conceptual framework. Our results demonstrated that planting significantly (P soils and 83.5% of microbial alpha-diversity can be explained by the plant factor. Moreover, planting had significant impacts on the microbial community structure and the network interactions of the microbial communities. The calculated network complexity was higher under maize planting than under bare fallow regimes. The increase of the functional genes led to an increase in both soil respiration and nitrification potential with maize planting, indicating that changes in the soil microbial communities and network interactions influenced ecological functioning.

  9. Study of Copper and Purine-Copper Complexes on Modified Carbon Electrodes by Cyclic and Elimination Voltammetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frantisek Jelen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a paraffin impregnated graphite electrode (PIGE and mercury-modifiedpyrolytic graphite electrode with basal orientation (Hg-PGEb copper(II and Cu(II-DNApurine base solutions have been studied by cyclic (CV and linear sweep voltammetry(LSV in connection with elimination voltammetry with linear scan (EVLS. In chlorideand bromide solutions (pH 6, the redox process of Cu(II proceeded on PIGE with twocathodic and two anodic potentially separated signals. According to the eliminationfunction E4, the first cathodic peak corresponds to the reduction Cu(II e- → Cu(I withthe possibility of fast disproportionation 2Cu(I → Cu(II Cu(0. The E4 of the secondcathodic peak signalized an electrode process controlled by a surface reaction. Theelectrode system of Cu(II on Hg-PGEb in borate buffer (pH 9.2 was characterized by onecathodic and one anodic peak. Anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV on PIGE and cathodicstripping voltammetry (CSV on Hg-PGEb were carried out at potentials where thereduction of copper ions took place and Cu(I-purine complexes were formed. By usingASV and CSV in combination with EVLS, the sensitivity of Cu(I-purine complexdetection was enhanced relative to either ASV or CSV alone, resulting in higher peakcurrents of more than one order of magnitude. The statistical treatment of CE data wasused to determine the reproducibility of measurements. Our results show that EVLS inconnection with the stripping procedure is useful for both qualitative and quantitativemicroanalysis of purine derivatives and can also reveal details of studied electrodeprocesses.

  10. Study of Copper and Purine-Copper Complexes on Modified Carbon Electrodes by Cyclic and Elimination Voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trnkova, Libuse; Zerzankova, Lenka; Dycka, Filip; Mikelova, Radka; Jelen, Frantisek

    2008-01-24

    Using a paraffin impregnated graphite electrode (PIGE) and mercury-modifiedpyrolytic graphite electrode with basal orientation (Hg-PGEb) copper(II) and Cu(II)-DNApurine base solutions have been studied by cyclic (CV) and linear sweep voltammetry(LSV) in connection with elimination voltammetry with linear scan (EVLS). In chlorideand bromide solutions (pH 6), the redox process of Cu(II) proceeded on PIGE with twocathodic and two anodic potentially separated signals. According to the eliminationfunction E4, the first cathodic peak corresponds to the reduction Cu(II) e⁻ → Cu(I) withthe possibility of fast disproportionation 2Cu(I) → Cu(II) Cu(0). The E4 of the secondcathodic peak signalized an electrode process controlled by a surface reaction. Theelectrode system of Cu(II) on Hg-PGEb in borate buffer (pH 9.2) was characterized by onecathodic and one anodic peak. Anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) on PIGE and cathodicstripping voltammetry (CSV) on Hg-PGEb were carried out at potentials where thereduction of copper ions took place and Cu(I)-purine complexes were formed. By usingASV and CSV in combination with EVLS, the sensitivity of Cu(I)-purine complexdetection was enhanced relative to either ASV or CSV alone, resulting in higher peakcurrents of more than one order of magnitude. The statistical treatment of CE data wasused to determine the reproducibility of measurements. Our results show that EVLS inconnection with the stripping procedure is useful for both qualitative and quantitativemicroanalysis of purine derivatives and can also reveal details of studied electrodeprocesses.

  11. 碳纳米管-苯胺电荷转移复合物中的胺荧光淬灭效应%Quenching Effects of Amine on Fluorescence of Carbon Nanotube-Aniline Charge Transfer Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Xu-feng; WANG Yu; JIN Wei-jun

    2005-01-01

    Under refluxing, carbon nanotube (CNT) and aniline (An) can form the charge transfer complex (CTC) of CNT-An.The corresponding fluorescence emission peaks lied at 564nm and 606nm, respectively, with the excitation wavelength of 516nm in the acetone solution. The quenching effects of various amines on CNT- An CTC fluorescence were investigated in detail.

  12. REE: Alkaline intensive and carbonates complexes at Fuerteventura (Canary Islands). Mineralizaciones de tierras raras: los complejos de rocas plutonicas alcalinas y carbonatitas del complejo basal de Fuerteventura (Islas Canarias)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangas Viuela, J.; Perez Torrado, F.J.

    1993-01-01

    Alkaline intrusive complexes at Fuerteventura have been explored as potential source of REE. Two main complexes constituted by ultramafic to salic rocks and carbonatitas are present in the island: the Puerto de la Pea-Cueva de Lobos (= 60 Ma) in the western centerpoint and the Esquinzo (=30 Ma) in the northern zone. The calciocarbonatites (sovites and alwikites), formed in the last crystallization phases of these complexes, show the highest values of REE (511-7,372 ppm) and these elements mainly are associated with carbonates (synchysite), phosphates (REE apatite), silicates (allanite). (Author) 17 refs.

  13. Alkali-metal ion coordination in uranyl(VI) poly-peroxo complexes in solution, inorganic analogues to crown-ethers. Part 2. Complex formation in the tetramethyl ammonium-, Li(+)-, Na(+)- and K(+)-uranyl(VI)-peroxide-carbonate systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanonato, Pier Luigi; Szabó, Zoltán; Vallet, Valerie; Di Bernardo, Plinio; Grenthe, Ingmar

    2015-10-01

    The constitution and equilibrium constants of ternary uranyl(vi) peroxide carbonate complexes [(UO2)p(O2)q(CO3)r](2(p-q-r)) have been determined at 0 °C in 0.50 M MNO3, M = Li, K, and TMA (tetramethyl ammonium), ionic media using potentiometric and spectrophotometric data; (17)O NMR data were used to determine the number of complexes present. The formation of cyclic oligomers, "[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]n", n = 4, 5, 6, with different stoichiometries depending on the ionic medium used, suggests that Li(+), Na(+), K(+) and TMA ions act as templates for the formation of uranyl peroxide rings where the uranyl-units are linked by μ-η(2)-η(2) bridged peroxide-ions. The templating effect is due to the coordination of the M(+)-ions to the uranyl oxygen atoms, where the coordination of Li(+) results in the formation of Li[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]4(7-), Na(+) and K(+) in the formation of Na/K[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]5(9-) complexes, while the large tetramethyl ammonium ion promotes the formation of two oligomers, TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]5(9-) and TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-). The NMR spectra demonstrate that the coordination of Na(+) in the five- and six-membered oligomers is significantly stronger than that of TMA(+); these observations suggest that the templating effect is similar to the one observed in the synthesis of crown-ethers. The NMR experiments also demonstrate that the exchange between TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]5(9-) and TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-) is slow on the (17)O chemical shift time-scale, while the exchange between TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-) and Na[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-) is fast. There was no indication of the presence of large clusters of the type identified by Burns and Nyman (M. Nyman and P. C. Burns, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2012, 41, 7314-7367) and possible reasons for this and the implications for the synthesis of large clusters are briefly discussed.

  14. Determination of total selenium content in sediments and natural water by graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectroscopy after collection as a selenium(IV) complex on activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, T; Suzuki, K; Okutani, T

    1995-07-01

    A trace level of Se was collected on activated carbon (AC) as the Se(IV)-3-phenyl-5-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2(3H)-thione (Bismuthiol II) complex. The AC was directly introduced as an AC-suspension into the graphite tube atomizer and the Se concentration was determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy (T. Okutani, T. Kubota, N. Sugiyama and Y. Turuta, Nippon Kagaku Kaishi, (1991) 375). The amount of Se in heavily contaminated samples including sediment, lake water and seawater was determined using this method. The sediments were digested with HNO(3)HClO(4)HF and the interference from AlF(3) was removed using H(3)BO(3)HClO(4). Lake water and seawater were acidified with H(2)SO(4) and digested with KMnO(4). The Se concentrations of these samples were determined by this method with satisfactory results. The above method is simple, rapid and applicable to heavily contaminated samples.

  15. Immobilized organoruthenium(II) complexes onto polyethyleneimine-wrapped carbon nanotubes/in situ formed gold nanoparticles as a novel electrochemical sensing platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azadbakht, Azadeh, E-mail: Azadbakht.a@gmail.com; Abbasi, Amir Reza; Derikvand, Zohreh; Amraei, Shiba

    2015-03-01

    The polyethyleneimine (PEI) wrapped multi-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with a carboxylic acid group (CNTs–COOH) gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-modified gold (Au) electrode has been utilized as a platform to immobilize organoruthenium(II) complexes (ORC). The surface structure and composition of the sensor were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Electrocatalytic reduction of iodate and nitrite on the surface of modified electrode was investigated with cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and hydrodynamic voltammetry methods. The cyclic voltammetric results indicated the ability of AuNPs/PEI/CNT–COOH/ORC modified Au electrode to catalyze the reduction of this compound. AuNPs/PEI/CNTs–COOH nanocomposite combined the advantages of PEI-well dispersed CNTs–COOH and in situ formed AuNPs. - Highlights: • We prepared composite containing polyethyleneimine (PEI), CNTs and AuNPs. • AuNPs were in situ formed on the surface of CNTs–PEI. • When the AuNPs were in situ formed the stability would be improved. • Nanocomposite combined the advantages of PEI–CNTs and in situ formed AuNPs. • Modified nanocomposite Au electrode catalyzes the reduction of iodate and nitrite.

  16. RING-OPENING POLYMERIZAION OF 2,2-DIMETHYLTRIMETHYLENE CARBONATE INITIATED BY IN SITU GENERATED, TETRAHYDROSALEN STABLIZED YTTRIUM BOROHYDRIDE COMPLEX AND RANDOM COPOLYMERIZATION WITH ε-CAPROLACTONE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Huang; Jian-fang Yu; Han-jian Yu; Wei-lin Sun; Zhi-quan Shen

    2011-01-01

    The poly(2,2-dimethyltrimethylene carbonate) (PDTC) with one hydroxyl and one formate tenninal fimctions was synthesized by in situ generated, tetrahydrosalen stabilized yttrium borohydride complex. The influences of monomer/initiator molar ratio, temperature and reaction time on polymerization of DTC were investigated. Under the condition: [DTC]/[I] = 500, 55℃, toluene: 0.5 mL, DTC: 0.6 g, PDTC with Mn = 15600 and PDI = 2.15 was obtained.Through 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR analyses, the structure of PDTC was characterized and a coordination-insertion mechanism was proposed. In addition, the random copolymerization of DTC and caprolactone (CL) initiated by rare-earth borohydride compound was studied. The microstructure of PDTC-co-PCL includes four diads: DTC-CL, CL-CL, DTC-DTC and CLDTC, which were determined by the specific signals in 1H-NMR spectra. Based on the typical signals of the formate (δ=8.08) and hydroxyl (δ = 3.34) end groups of PDTC-co-PCL, a mechanism involving DTC monomer inserts before CL during the initiation process was presumed. Furthermore, the thermal properties of amorphous copolymer were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results support the random structure of PDTC-co-PCL.

  17. Controlled synthesis, formation mechanism, and carbon oxidation properties of Ho2Cu2O5 nanoplates prepared with a coordination-complex method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rui; You, Junhua; Han, Fei; Li, Chaoyang; Zheng, Guiyuan; Xiao, Weicheng; Liu, Xuanwen

    2017-02-01

    Ho2Cu2O5 nanoplates with perovskite structures were synthesized via a simple solution method (SSM) and a coordination-complex method (CCM) using [HoCu(3,4-pdc)2(OAc)(H2O)3]·8H2O (L = 3,4-pyridinedicarboxylic acid) as a precursor. The CCM was also performed in an N2 environment (CCMN) under various calcination conditions. The crystallization processes were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Ho2Cu2O5 formed through the diffusion of CuO into Ho2O3 particles. Cu2+ diffused faster than Ho3+ during this process. The initial products of CCMN (along with the thermal decomposition products) were initially laminarized in the N2 atmosphere, which prevented the growth of CuO particles and decreased the size of the Ho2Cu2O5 particles. The final Ho2Cu2O5 particles from CCMN had a nanoplate morphology with an average thickness of 75 nm. The decomposition of organic molecules and protection from N2 played important roles in determining the morphology of the resulting Ho2Cu2O5. The catalytic oxidation activity of Ho2Cu2O5 samples for carbon was characterized using a specific surface area measurement and thermogravimetric analysis, which revealed that the samples produced by CCMN had the highest catalytic activity.

  18. Warm ISM in the Sagittarius A Complex. I. Mid-J CO, atomic carbon, ionized atomic carbon, and ionized nitrogen sub-mm/FIR line observations with the Herschel-HIFI and NANTEN2/SMART telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, P.; Simon, R.; Stutzki, J.; Güsten, R.; Requena-Torres, M. A.; Higgins, R.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We investigate the spatial and spectral distribution of the local standard of rest (LSR) velocity resolved submillimetre emission from the warm (25-90 K) gas in the Sgr A Complex, located in the Galactic centre. Methods: We present large-scale submillimetre heterodyne observations towards the Sgr A Complex covering ~300 arcmin2. These data were obtained in the frame of the Herschel EXtraGALactic guaranteed time key program (HEXGAL) with the Herschel-HIFI satellite and are complemented with submillimetre observations obtained with the NANTEN2/SMART telescope as part of the NANTEN2/SMART Central Nuclear Zone Survey. The observed species are CO(J = 4-3) at 461.0 GHz observed with the NANTEN2/SMART telescope, and [CI] 3P1-3P0 at 492.2 GHz, [CI] 3P2-3P1 at 809.3 GHz, [NII] 3P1-3P0 at 1461.1 GHz, and [CII] 2P3/2-2P1/2 at 1900.5 GHz observed with the Herschel-HIFI satellite. The observations are presented in a 1 km s-1 spectral resolution and a spatial resolution ranging from 46 arcsec to 28 arcsec. The spectral coverage of the three lower frequency lines is ±200 km s-1, while in the two high frequency lines, the upper LSR velocity limit is +94 km s-1 and +145 km s-1 for the [NII] and [CII] lines, respectively. Results: The spatial distribution of the emission in all lines is very widespread. The bulk of the carbon monoxide emission is found towards Galactic latitudes below the Galactic plane, and all the known molecular clouds are identified. Both neutral atomic carbon lines have their brightest emission associated with the +50 km s-1 cloud. Their spatial distribution at this LSR velocity describes a crescent-shape structure, which is probably the result of interaction with the energetic event (one or several supernovae explosions) that gave origin to the non-thermal Sgr A-East source. The [CII] and [NII] emissions have most of their flux associated with the thermal arched-filaments and the H region and bright spots in [CII] emission towards the central nuclear

  19. Synthesis, structure, and reactivity of iridium perfluorocarbene complexes: regio- and stereo-specific addition of HCl across a metal carbon double bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jian; Bourgeois, Cheryl J; Rheingold, Arnold L; Hughes, Russell P

    2015-12-07

    Reductive activation of an α-fluorine in the perfluoroalkyl complexes Cp*(L)(i)Ir-CF2RF using Mg/graphite leads to perfluorocarbene complexes Cp*(L)Ir[double bond, length as m-dash]CFRF (L = CO, PMe3; RF = CF3, C2F5, C6F5). New complexes E-Cp*(PMe3)Ir[double bond, length as m-dash]CFC2F5 and E-Cp*(CO)Ir[double bond, length as m-dash]CFC6F5 have been characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies, and a comparison of metric parameters with previously reported analogues is reported. Experimental NMR and computational DFT (B3LYP/LACV3P**++) studies agree that for Ir[double bond, length as m-dash]CFRF complexes (RF = CF3, CF2CF3) the thermodynamic preference for the E or Z isomer depends on the steric requirements of ligand L; when L = CO the Z-isomer (F cis to Cp*) is preferred and for L = PMe3 the E-isomer is preferred. When reduction of the precursors is carried out in the dark the reaction is completely selective to produce E- or Z-isomers. Exposure of solutions of these compounds to ambient light results in slow conversion to a photostationary non-equilibrium mixture of E and Z isomers. In the dark, these E/Z mixtures convert thermally to their preferred E or Z equilibrium geometries in an even slower reaction. A study of the temperature dependent kinetics of this dark transformation allows ΔG(‡)298 for rotation about the Ir[double bond, length as m-dash]CFCF3 double bond to be experimentally determined as 25 kcal mol(-1); a DFT/B3LYP/LACV3P**++ calculation of this rotation barrier is in excellent agreement (27 kcal mol(-1)) with the experimental value. Reaction of HCl with toluene solutions of Cp*(L)Ir[double bond, length as m-dash]CFRF (L = CO, PMe3) or Cp*(CO)Ir[double bond, length as m-dash]C(CF3)2 at low temperature resulted in regiospecific addition of HCl across the metal carbon double bond, ultimately yielding Cp*(L)Ir(CHFRF)Cl and Cp*(CO)Ir[CH(CF3)2]Cl. Reaction of HCl with single E or Z diastereomers of Cp*(L)Ir[double bond, length as m

  20. Neutron structure of human carbonic anhydrase II in complex with methazolamide: mapping the solvent and hydrogen-bonding patterns of an effective clinical drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayank Aggarwal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrases (CAs; EC 4.2.1.1 catalyze the interconversion of CO2 and HCO3−, and their inhibitors have long been used as diuretics and as a therapeutic treatment for many disorders such as glaucoma and epilepsy. Acetazolamide (AZM and methazolamide (MZM, a methyl derivative of AZM are two of the classical CA inhibitory drugs that have been used clinically for decades. The jointly refined X-ray/neutron structure of MZM in complex with human CA isoform II (hCA II has been determined to a resolution of 2.2 Å with an Rcryst of ∼16.0%. Presented in this article, along with only the second neutron structure of a clinical drug-bound hCA, is an in-depth structural comparison and analyses of differences in hydrogen-bonding network, water-molecule orientation and solvent displacement that take place upon the binding of AZM and MZM in the active site of hCA II. Even though MZM is slightly more hydrophobic and displaces more waters than AZM, the overall binding affinity (Ki for both of the drugs against hCA II is similar (∼10 nM. The plausible reasons behind this finding have also been discussed using molecular dynamics and X-ray crystal structures of hCA II–MZM determined at cryotemperature and room temperature. This study not only allows a direct comparison of the hydrogen bonding, protonation states and solvent orientation/displacement of AZM and MZM, but also shows the significant effect that the methyl derivative has on the solvent organization in the hCA II active site.

  1. Changes of soil organic carbon and complex iron in Momoge Wetland%莫莫格湿地土壤有机碳与络合态铁的动态变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于秀丽; 许林书

    2012-01-01

    The temporal changes of soil organic carbon and complex iron content were studied in three types wetland soil of Momoge Wetlands, which include Phragmites marsh and Leymus chinensis meadow and Phragmites-Leymus chinensis meadow. The result showed that the highest content of soil total organic carbon is in Phragmites marsh,followed by Leymus chinensis meadow and the lowest is in Phragmites-Leymus chinensis meadow. The content of soil complex iron has the same variation as soil total organic carbon. However, the highest content of soil dissolved organic carbon is in Leymus chinensis meadow,followed by Phragmites-Leymus chinensis meadow and the lowest is in Phragmites marsh. With the soil depth increases,the content of soil total organic carbon,dissolved organic carbon and complex iron decreased gradually. Correlation analysis showed that in the vertical change soil total organic carbon and dissolved organic carbon were positively correlated with soil complex iron. And in the seasonal variation,soil complex iron was negatively correlated with total organic carbon;Between soil dissolved organic carbon with complex iron there were significantly negative correlations in Phragmites marsh and Leymus chinensis meadow soil, but there were significantly negative correlations in Phragmites-Leymus chinensis meadow.%以莫莫格芦苇沼泽、芦苇-羊草草甸和羊草草甸3种类型湿地土壤为对象,研究了土壤总有机碳(TOC)、溶解有机碳(DOC)和络合态铁的动态变化情况.结果表明:3种类型湿地土壤TOC含量芦苇沼泽最高,羊草草旬次之,芦苇-羊草草甸最低;土壤络合态铁含量变化规律与TOC变化相同;土壤DOC含量则表现为羊草草甸最高,芦苇-羊草草甸次之,芦苇沼泽最低.随着土层深度的增加,湿地土壤TOC、DOC以及络合态铁含量都表现为自表层向深层递减的规律.相关性分析表明:从垂直动态变化看,土壤络合态铁与土壤TOC、DOC含量均有正相关关系

  2. Metal-mediated controllable creation of secondary, tertiary, and quaternary carbon centers: a powerful strategy for the synthesis of iron, cobalt, and copper complexes with in situ generated substituted 1-pyridineimidazo[1,5-a]pyridine ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanmei; Li, Lei; Chen, Zhou; Liu, Yonglu; Hu, Hailiang; Chen, Wenqian; Liu, Wei; Li, Yahong; Lei, Tao; Cao, Yanyuan; Kang, Zhenghui; Lin, Miaoshui; Li, Wu

    2012-09-17

    An efficient strategy for the synthesis of a wide variety of coordination complexes has been developed. The synthetic protocol involves a solvothermal in situ metal-ligand reaction of picolinaldehyde, ammonium acetate, and transition-metal ions, leading to the generation of 12 coordination complexes supported by a novel class of substituted 1-pyridineimidazo[1,5-a]pyridine ligands (L1-L5). The ligands L1-L5 were afforded by metal-mediated controllable conversion of the aldehyde group of picolialdehyde into a ketone and secondary, tertiary, and quaternary carbon centers, respectively. Complexes of various nuclearities were obtained: from mono-, di-, and tetranuclear to 1D chain polymers. The structures of the in situ formed complexes could be controlled rationally via the choice of appropriate starting materials and tuning of the ratio of the starting materials. The plausible mechanisms for the formation of the ligands L1-L5 were proposed.

  3. Fixation of carbon dioxide by macrocyclic lanthanide(III) complexes under neutral conditions producing self-assembled trimeric carbonato-bridged compounds with μ3-η2:η2:η2 bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, Pradip; Dutta, Supriya; Biswas, Papu; Maji, Swarup Kumar; Flörke, Ulrich; Nag, Kamalaksha

    2012-03-28

    A series of mononuclear lanthanide(III) complexes [Ln(LH(2))(H(2)O)(3)Cl](ClO(4))(2) (Ln = La, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Lu) of the tetraiminodiphenolate macrocyclic ligand (LH(2)) in 95 : 5 (v/v) methanol-water solution fix atmospheric carbon dioxide to produce the carbonato-bridged trinuclear complexes [{Ln(LH(2))(H(2)O)Cl}(3)(μ(3)-CO(3))](ClO(4))(4)·nH(2)O. Under similar conditions, the mononuclear Y(III) complex forms the dimeric compound [{Y(LH(2))(H(2)O)Cl}(μ(2)-CO(3)){Y(LH(2))(H(2)O)(2)}](ClO(4))(3)·4H(2)O. These complexes have been characterized by their IR and NMR ((1)H, (13)C) spectra. The X-ray crystal structures have been determined for the trinuclear carbonato-bridged compounds of Nd(III), Gd(III) and Tb(III) and the dinuclear compound of Y(III). In all cases, each of the metal centers are 8-coordinate involving two imine nitrogens and two phenolate oxygens of the macrocyclic ligand (LH(2)) whose two other imines are protonated and intramolecularly hydrogen-bonded with the phenolate oxygens. The oxygen atoms of the carbonate anion in the trinuclear complexes are bonded to the metal ions in tris-bidentate μ(3)-η(2):η(2):η(2) fashion, while they are in bis-bidentate μ(2)-η(2):η(2) mode in the Y(III) complex. The magnetic properties of the Gd(III) complex have been studied over the temperature range 2 to 300 K and the magnetic susceptibility data indicate a very weak antiferromagnetic exchange interaction (J = -0.042 cm(-1)) between the Gd(III) centers (S = 7/2) in the metal triangle through the carbonate bridge. The luminescence spectral behaviors of the complexes of Sm(III), Eu(III), and Tb(III) have been studied. The ligand LH(2) acts as a sensitizer for the metal ions in an acetonitrile-toluene glassy matrix (at 77 K) and luminescence intensities of the complexes decrease in the order Eu(3+) > Sm(3+) > Tb(3+).

  4. Catalytic applications of mono- and dinuclear complexes containing metal-carbon sigma bonds. Final report, November 1, 1993--October 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    This report discusses results from several studies involved in the project. Investigations include: vibrational models for surface olefins and alkylidenes; mechanism of the formation and fragmentation of diosmacyclobutanes; reaction of dienes and allenes with diosmacyclobutanes; determination by nematic phase NMR of the structure of mononuclear and dinuclear ethylene complexes of osmium; and generation of ``coordinatively unsaturated`` complexes by protonation of methyl osmium complexes.

  5. Simultaneous determination of hydrazine and phenyl hydrazine using 4′-(4-carboxyphenyl)-2,2′:6′,2″ terpyridine diacetonitrile triphenylphosphine ruthenium(II) tetrafluoroborate complex functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes modified electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, Ida, E-mail: idatiwari_2001@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry (Center of Advanced Study), Faculty of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (India); Gupta, Mandakini; Sinha, Preeti [Department of Chemistry (Center of Advanced Study), Faculty of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (India); Banks, Craig E. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Science and the Environment, Division of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, Chester Street, Manchester M1 5GD (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • A nanocomposite of ruthenium(II) terpyridine, triphenylphosphine based complex and multiwalled carbon nanotubes have been used first time for simultaneous detection of hydrazine and phenyl hydrazine. • The detection limit reported is lower as compared to other reported works. • The paper also focuses towards effect of ligand variation attached to ruthenium(II) terpyridine based complexes complex for the hydrazine and phenyl hydrazine detection. • Nanocomposite does not involve any biological entity hence high stability. - Abstract: A nanocomposite based on the incorporation of the complex 4′-(4-carboxyphenyl)-2,2′:6′,2″ terpyridine triphenylphosphine diacetonitrile ruthenium(II) tetrafluoroborate with multiwalled carbon nanotubes and ionomer supported upon a glassy carbon electrode substrate is reported and characterized with scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. The electrochemical behavior and stability of the composite electrode was investigated via cyclic voltammetry. The modified electrode exhibits an electro-catalytic activity towards the oxidation of both hydrazine and phenyl hydrazine in 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution (PBS, pH 7.4). The oxidation of hydrazine and phenyl hydrazine occurs at 0.81 V and 0.32 V with limit of detection found to be 3.7 × 10{sup −7} M and 1.15 × 10{sup −7} M and having a linear range from 5 × 10{sup −6} M to 6.5 × 10{sup −3} M, and 5 × 10{sup −6} M to 0.2 × 10{sup −3} M, respectively.

  6. Immobilization of [Cu(bpy){sub 2}]Br{sub 2} complex onto a glassy carbon electrode modified with {alpha}-SiMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}{sup 4-} and single walled carbon nanotubes: Application to nanomolar detection of hydrogen peroxide and bromate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salimi, Abdollah [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Nanotechnology, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: absalimi@uok.ac.ir; Korani, Aazam; Hallaj, Rahman; Khoshnavazi, Roshan [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hadadzadeh, Hasan [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-03-02

    A simple procedure has been used for preparation of modified glassy carbon electrode with carbon nanotubes and copper complex. Copper complex [Cu(bpy){sub 2}]Br{sub 2} was immobilized onto glassy carbon (GC) electrode modified with silicomolybdate, {alpha}-SiMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}{sup 4-} and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs){sub .} Copper complex and silicomolybdate irreversibly and strongly adsorbed onto GC electrode modified with CNTs. Electrostatic interactions between polyoxometalates (POMs) anions and Cu-complex, cations mentioned as an effective method for fabrication of three-dimensional structures. The modified electrode shows three reversible redox couples for polyoxometalate and one redox couple for Cu-complex at wide range of pH values. The electrochemical behavior, stability and electron transfer kinetics of the adsorbed redox couples were investigated using cyclic voltammetry. Due to electrostatic interaction, copper complex immobilized onto GC/CNTs/{alpha}-SiMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}{sup 4-} electrode shows more stable voltammetric response compared to GC/CNTs/Cu-complex modified electrode. In comparison to GC/CNTs/Cu-complex the GC/CNTs/{alpha}-SiMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}{sup 4-} modified electrodes shows excellent electrocatalytic activity toward reduction H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and BrO{sub 3}{sup -} at more reduced overpotential. The catalytic rate constants for catalytic reduction hydrogen peroxide and bromate were 4.5({+-}0.2) x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} and 3.0({+-}0.10) x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. The hydrodynamic amperommetry technique at 0.08 V was used for detection of nanomolar concentration of hydrogen peroxide and bromate. Detection limit, sensitivity and linear concentration range proposed sensor for bromate and hydrogen peroxide detection were 1.1 nM and 6.7 nA nM{sup -1}, 10 nM-20 {mu}M, 1 nM, 5.5 nA nM{sup -1} and 10 nM-18 {mu}M, respectively.

  7. Mechanistic studies of the copolymerization reaction of oxetane and carbon dioxide to provide aliphatic polycarbonates catalyzed by (Salen)CrX complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darensbourg, Donald J; Moncada, Adriana I; Choi, Wonsook; Reibenspies, Joseph H

    2008-05-21

    Chromium salen derivatives in the presence of anionic initiators have been shown to be very effective catalytic systems for the selective coupling of oxetane and carbon dioxide to provide the corresponding polycarbonate with a minimal amount of ether linkages. Optimization of the chromium(III) system was achieved utilizing a salen ligand with tert-butyl groups in the 3,5-positions of the phenolate rings and a cyclohexylene backbone for the diimine along with an azide ion initiator. The mechanism for the coupling reaction of oxetane and carbon dioxide has been studied. Based on binding studies done by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, kinetic data, end group analysis done by (1)H NMR, and infrared spectroscopy, a mechanism of the copolymerization reaction is proposed. The formation of the copolymer is shown to proceed in part by way of the intermediacy of trimethylene carbonate, which was observed as a minor product of the coupling reaction, and by the direct enchainment of oxetane and CO 2. The parity of the determined free energies of activation for these two processes, namely 101.9 kJ x mol (-1) for ring-opening polymerization of trimethylene carbonate and 107.6 kJ x mol (-1) for copolymerization of oxetane and carbon dioxide supports this conclusion.

  8. Efficient biological conversion of carbon monoxide (CO) to carbon dioxide (CO2) and for utilization in bioplastic production by Ralstonia eutropha through the display of an enzyme complex on the cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyeon, Jeong Eun; Kim, Seung Wook; Park, Chulhwan; Han, Sung Ok

    2015-06-25

    An enzyme complex for biological conversion of CO to CO2 was anchored on the cell surface of the CO2-utilizing Ralstonia eutropha and successfully resulted in a 3.3-fold increase in conversion efficiency. These results suggest that this complexed system may be a promising strategy for CO2 utilization as a biological tool for the production of bioplastics.

  9. Electronic Structures of Uranyl(VI) Carbonate Complexes in the Aqueous Phase%水溶液中碳酸铀酰化合物的电子结构

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辜家芳; 陆春海; 陈文凯; 陈勇; 许可; 黄昕; 章永凡

    2012-01-01

    A systematic study of series of non-hydrated and hydrated Cnlm uranyl carbonate complexes (n is number of carbonate ligands, and m is number of water molecules) in the aqueous phase was carried out using relativistic density functional theory. The conductor-like screening model was used to calculate solvent effects. The zeroth-order regular approximation was used to account for scalar relativistic effects and spin-orbit coupling relativistic effects. Time-dependent density functional theory with the inclusion of spin-orbit coupling relativistic effects was used to calculate electronic transitions using the statistically averaged orbital potentials. The results indicate that carbonate ligands play an important role in the geometric and electronic transition properties of the complex. The stability of the C3/0 carbonate complex in the aqueous phase may be attributed to the involvement of 5f components in the highest occupied bonding orbital. The addition of carbonate ligands caused a blue shift in the maximum wavelength and high intensity absorptions in the near visible region.%应用相对论密度泛函理论系统研究了水溶液中非水合化和水合化碳酸铀酰化合物Cnlm(其中仃和m分别为结构中碳酸配体和水配体的个数)的结构.溶剂效应采用类导体屏蔽模型(COSMO),并采用零级规整近似(ZORA)方法考虑标量相对论效应和旋-轨耦合相对论效应,电子跃迁采用包含旋-轨耦合相对论效应的含时密度泛函理论并在相关交换势中采用轨道势能统计平均(SAOP)做近似计算,结果表明碳酸配体对配合物结构和电子跃迁有很大的影响.C3/0配合物的稳定性可归于5f轨道参与了高占据轨道的成键作用.增加碳酸盐配体导致最大波长的蓝移,并在近町见光区域出现高强度的吸收.

  10. Polyionic complex of single-walled carbon nanotubes and PEG-grafted-hyperbranched polyethyleneimine (PEG-PEI-SWNT) for an improved doxorubicin loading and delivery: development and in vitro characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farvadi, Fakhrossadat; Tamaddon, AliMohammad; Sobhani, Zahra; Abolmaali, Samira Sadat

    2016-05-13

    To take advantages of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for cellular delivery of chemotherapeutic agents (e.g. doxorubicin) in order to decrease general toxicities of doxorubicin (DOX) and to promote the efficacy, we aimed to develop a novel approach to stabilize SWNTs through consequent steps of oxidation and PEG-g-PEI polyionic complexation (PEG-PEI-SWNT). The DOX loading capacity of modified SWNTs was about 900%. Moreover, it showed an enhanced dispersibility in physiologic-stimulated medium. DOX release was prolonged, independent of dilution, and exhibited an acidic pH-stimulated release. Therefore, PEG-PEI-SWNT could be used for cancer chemotherapy in vivo.

  11. Self-assembly of a chiral carbonate- and cytidine-containing dodecanuclear copper(II) complex: a multiarm-supplied globular capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armentano, Donatella; Marino, Nadia; Mastropietro, Teresa F; Martínez-Lillo, José; Cano, Joan; Julve, Miguel; Lloret, Francesc; De Munno, Giovanni

    2008-11-17

    A dodecanuclear copper(II) globular-shaped structure has been obtained with the cytidine nucleoside and the templating carbonate anion. It shows receptor properties through anion-cation and multiple anion-pi interactions toward ClO 4 (-) as well as an overall antiferromagnetic coupling.

  12. Effect the conditions of the acid-thermal modification of clinoptilolite have on the catalytic properties of palladium-copper complexes anchored on it in the reaction of carbon monoxide oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakitskaya, T. L.; Kiose, T. A.; Ennan, A. A.; Golubchik, K. O.; Oleksenko, L. P.; Gerasiova, V. G.

    2016-06-01

    The dependence of the physicochemical and structural-adsorption properties of natural and acid-thermal modified clinoptilolite, and of Pd(II)-Cu(II) catalysts based on them, on the duration of acid-thermal modification is investigated. The samples under study are described via XRD and thermal gravimetric (DTG and DTA) analysis, IR, DR UV-Vis, EPR spectroscopy, and water vapor adsorption. Values of both the specific surface area ( S sp) and pH of aqueous suspensions are determined. The resulting catalysts are tested in the reaction of low-temperature carbon monoxide oxidation with air oxygen. A conclusion is drawn about the nature of surface bimetallic Pd(II)-Cu(II) complexes. The greatest catalytic activity is shown by complexes based on clinoptilolite and modified with 3 M HNO3 for 0.5 and 1 h.

  13. Silica-grafted diethylzinc and a silsesquioxane-based zinc alkyl complex as catalysts for the alternating oxirane-carbon dioxide copolymerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duchateau, Robbert; van Meerendonkt, Wouter J.; Huijser, Saskia; Staal, Bastiaan B. P.; van Schilt, Marcus A.; Gerritsen, Gijsbert; Meetsma, Auke; Koning, Cor E.; Kemmere, Maartje F.; Keurentjes, Jos T. F.

    2007-01-01

    A novel zinc silsesquioxane complex ([(c-C5H9)(7)Si7O11(OSiMePh2)](2)Zn4Me4 (1)) has been used as a model compound for silica-grafted zinc catalysts in the copolymerization of cyclohexene oxide and CO2. Complex 1 exists as a dimer in the solid state and is moderately active in the copolymerization,

  14. Textural analyses of carbon fiber materials by 2D-FFT of complex images obtained by high frequency eddy current imaging (HF-ECI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Martin H.; Heuer, Henning

    2012-04-01

    Carbon fiber based materials are used in many lightweight applications in aeronautical, automotive, machine and civil engineering application. By the increasing automation in the production process of CFRP laminates a manual optical inspection of each resin transfer molding (RTM) layer is not practicable. Due to the limitation to surface inspection, the quality parameters of multilayer 3 dimensional materials cannot be observed by optical systems. The Imaging Eddy- Current (EC) NDT is the only suitable inspection method for non-resin materials in the textile state that allows an inspection of surface and hidden layers in parallel. The HF-ECI method has the capability to measure layer displacements (misaligned angle orientations) and gap sizes in a multilayer carbon fiber structure. EC technique uses the variation of the electrical conductivity of carbon based materials to obtain material properties. Beside the determination of textural parameters like layer orientation and gap sizes between rovings, the detection of foreign polymer particles, fuzzy balls or visualization of undulations can be done by the method. For all of these typical parameters an imaging classification process chain based on a high resolving directional ECimaging device named EddyCus® MPECS and a 2D-FFT with adapted preprocessing algorithms are developed.

  15. Synthesis and reactivity of iron complexes with a new pyrazine-based pincer ligand, and application in catalytic low-pressure hydrogenation of carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivada-Wheelaghan, Orestes; Dauth, Alexander; Leitus, Gregory; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Milstein, David

    2015-05-04

    A novel pincer ligand based on the pyrazine backbone (PNzP) has been synthesized, (2,6-bis(di(tert-butyl)phosphinomethyl)pyrazine), tBu-PNzP. It reacts with FeBr2 to yield [Fe(Br)2(tBu-PNzP)], 1. Treatment of 1 with NaBH4 in MeCN/MeOH gives the hydride complex [Fe(H)(MeCN)2(tBu-PNzP)][X] (X = Br, BH4), 2·X. Counterion exchange and exposure to CO atmosphere yields the complex cis-[Fe(H)(CO)(MeCN)(tBu-PNzP)][BPh4] 4·BPh4, which upon addition of Bu4NCl forms [Fe(H)(Cl)(CO)(tBu-PNzP)] 5. Complex 5, under basic conditions, catalyzes the hydrogenation of CO2 to formate salts at low H2 pressure. Treatment of complex 5 with a base leads to aggregates, presumably of dearomatized species B, stabilized by bridging to another metal center by coordination of the nitrogen at the backbone of the pyrazine pincer ligand. Upon dissolution of compound B in EtOH the crystallographically characterized complex 7 is formed, comprised of six iron units forming a 6-membered ring. The dearomatized species can activate CO2 and H2 by metal-ligand cooperation (MLC), leading to complex 8, trans-[Fe(PNzPtBu-COO)(H)(CO)], and complex 9, trans-[Fe(H)2(CO)(tBu-PNzP)], respectively. Our results point at a very likely mechanism for CO2 hydrogenation involving MLC.

  16. Carbon Carbon Composites: An Overview .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rohini Devi

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon carbon composites are a new class of engineering materials that are ceramic in nature but exhibit brittle to pseudoplastic behaviour. Carbon-carbon is a unique all-carbon composite with carbon fibre embeded in carbon matrix and is known as an inverse composite. Due to their excellent thermo-structural properties, carbon-carbon composites are used in specialised application like re-entry nose-tips, leading edges, rocket nozzles, and aircraft brake discs apart from several industrial and biomedical applications. The multidirectional carbon-carbon product technology is versatile and offers design flexibility. This paper describes the multidirectional preform and carbon-carbon process technology and research and development activities within the country. Carbon-carbon product experience at DRDL has also been discussed. Development of carbon-carbon brake discs process technology using the liquid impregnation process is described. Further the test results on material characterisation, thermal, mechanical and tribological properties are presented.

  17. Synthesis, characterization, computational studies, antimicrobial activities and carbonic anhydrase inhibitor effects of 2-hydroxy acetophenone-N-methyl p-toluenesulfonylhydrazone and its Co(II), Pd(II), Pt(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özbek, Neslihan; Alyar, Saliha; Memmi, Burcu Koçak; Gündüzalp, Ayla Balaban; Bahçeci, Zafer; Alyar, Hamit

    2017-01-01

    2-Hydroxyacetophenone-N-methyl p-toluenesulfonylhydrazone (afptsmh) derived from p-toluenesulfonicacid-1-methylhydrazide (ptsmh) and its Co(II), Pd(II), Pt(II) complexes were synthesized for the first time. Synthesized compounds were characterized by spectroscopic methods (FT-IR, 1Hsbnd 13C NMR, LC-MS, UV-vis), magnetic susceptibility and conductivity measurements. 1H and 13C shielding tensors for crystal structure of ligand were calculated with GIAO/DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) methods in CDCl3. The vibrational band assignments were performed at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) theory level combined with scaled quantum mechanics force field (SQMFF) methodology. The antibacterial activities of synthesized compounds were studied against some Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria by using microdilution and disc diffusion methods. In vitro enzyme inhibitory effects of the compounds were measured by UV-vis spectrophotometer. The enzyme activities against human carbonic anhydrase II (hCA II) were evaluated as IC50 (the half maximal inhibitory concentration) values. It was found that afptsmh and its metal complexes have inhibitory effects on hCA II isoenzyme. General esterase activities were determined using alpha and beta naphtyl acetate substrates (α- and β-NAs) of Drosophila melanogaster (D. melanogaster). Activity results show that afptsmh does not strongly affect the bacteria strains and also shows poor inhibitory activity against hCAII isoenzyme whereas all complexes posses higher biological activities.

  18. Asymmetric carbon-carbon bond forming reactions catalyzed by chiral titanium complexes. Efficient synthesis of optically active secondary alcohols; Kiraru na chitan shokubai ni yoru fuseitanso-tanso ketsugo keisei. Kogaku kassei dainikyu arukoru no gosei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, M. [Yamaguchi Univ., Yamaguchi (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1996-02-01

    For asymmetric metal complex catalysts with high catalytic activity and ability for recognizing asymmetry, it is most important to choose center metals and design asymmetric organic ligands. When the authors began to study on the title reactions, combination of titanium alkoxides as center metals and chiral Schiff bases as organic ligands was unknown, although two moieties had been used independently for asymmetric reactions with excellent results. Asymmetric silylcyanation of aldehydes and enantio-selective addition of diketone to aldehydes are introduced, that have been achieved by authors using titanium complexes of the above combination. In the silylcyanation, reactivity is remarkably improved, compared with a single catalyst of titanium isopropoxide. Cyanohydrin of R from was obtained preferentially with salicyladehyde, particularly having 3-tert butyl group, in an asymmetric yield of 85 % ee. In the latter addition reaction, 5-hydroxy-3-ketoesters were obtained from benzaldehyde in an asymmetric yield as high as 91 % ee. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Cobalt(III) complexes of [3(5)]adamanzane, 1,5,9,13-tetraazabicyclo[7.7.3]nonadecane. Report of an inert, chelate hydrogen carbonate ion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broge, Louise; Søtofte, Inger; Olsen, Carl Erik

    2001-01-01

    Three cobalt(III) complexes of themacrocyclic tetraamine [3(5)]adamanzane (1,5,9,13-tetraazabicyclo[7.7.3]-nonadecane) were isolated as salts. The X-ray crystal structures were solved for the compounds [Co([3(5)]adz)-(CO3)AsF6 (1b), [Co([3(5)]adz)(HCO3)]znBr(4).H2O (2a), and [Co([35]adz)(SO4)]AsF...

  20. Field Responses of Anopheles gambiae Complex (Diptera: Culicidae) in Liberia using Yeast-Generated Carbon Dioxide and Synthetic Lure-Baited Light Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES, SURVEILLANCE, PREVENTION Field Responses of Anopheles gambiae Complex (Diptera: Culicidae) in Liberia using Yeast-Generated...and light, bed-net, tent, andodor-baited traps (Mboera 2005). TheCenters forDiseaseControl and Prevention (CDC) light trap with its typical 4Ð6 W...using paper- clips. Although primarily developed and used to attract day ßying Stegomyia ( Aedes ) mosquitoes, blends of this lureÕs primary ingredients

  1. Density Functional Study of the Optimized Structure, Enthalpy of Formation, Strain Energy, and Vibrational Properties of the Highly-Strained Carbon Complex: [15]Triangulane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Steven L.; Pederson, Mark R.

    2002-03-01

    In organic chemistry, cyclopropane (C_3H_6) is a highly-strained three-membered carbon ring which can be networked to form [n]triangulanes, which are branched hydrocarbons consisting entirely of spiroannulated cyclopropyl groups. The C_2v-symmetric branched [15]triangulane (C_31H_34) have been recently synthesized (M. von Seebach, S. I. Kozhushkov, R. Boese, J. Benet-Buchholz, D. S. Yufit, J. A. K. Howard, and A. de Meijere, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 39,) 2495 (2001). and is the largest triangulane molecule experimentally known to date. We report accurate density functional studies(M. R. Pederson and K. A. Jackson, Phys. Rev. B41,) 7453 (1990). of [15]triangulane which determine its optimized geometry and have calculated an enthalpy of formation and strain energy, using the appropriate isodesmic and homodesmotic reactions. The vibrational frequencies of [15]triangulane are also computed and our results are compared to experimental results, where available.

  2. Method for the preparation of carbon fiber from polyolefin fiber precursor, and carbon fibers made thereby

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naskar, Amit Kumar; Hunt, Marcus Andrew; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-08-04

    Methods for the preparation of carbon fiber from polyolefin fiber precursor, wherein the polyolefin fiber precursor is partially sulfonated and then carbonized to produce carbon fiber. Methods for producing hollow carbon fibers, wherein the hollow core is circular- or complex-shaped, are also described. Methods for producing carbon fibers possessing a circular- or complex-shaped outer surface, which may be solid or hollow, are also described.

  3. Oxidation of guanine by carbonate radicals derived from photolysis of carbonatotetramminecobalt(III) complexes and the pH dependence of intrastrand DNA cross-links mediated by guanine radical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crean, Conor; Lee, Young Ae; Yun, Byeong Hwa; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2008-08-11

    The carbonate radical anion CO(3)(*-) is a decomposition product of nitrosoperoxycarbonate derived from the combination of carbon dioxide and peroxynitrite, an important biological byproduct of the inflammatory response. The selective oxidation of guanine in DNA by CO(3)(*-) radicals is known to yield spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) and guanidinohydantoin (Gh) products, and also a novel intrastrand cross-linked product: 5'-d(CCATCG*CT*ACC), featuring a linkage between guanine C8 (G*) and thymine N3 (T*) atoms in the oligonucleotide (Crean et al., Nucleic Acids Res. 2008, 36, 742-755). Involvement of the T-N3 (pK(a) of N3-H is 9.67) suggests that the formation of 5'-d(CCATCG*CT*ACC) might be pH-dependent. This hypothesis was tested by generating CO(3)(*-) radicals through the photodissociation of carbonatotetramminecobalt(III) complexes by steady-state UV irradiation, which allowed for studies of product yields in the pH 5.0-10.0 range. The yield of 5'-d(CCATCG*CT*ACC) at pH 10.0 is approximately 45 times greater than at pH 5.0; this is consistent with the proposed mechanism, which requires N3(H) thymine proton dissociation followed by nucleophilic addition to the C8 guanine radical.

  4. Can the financialized atmosphere be effectively regulated? A critical analysis of the proposed Australian carbon pollution reduction scheme as a complex market solution to global warming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windsor, C. [Bond Univ. (Australia); McNicholas, P. [Monash Univ. (Australia)

    2009-07-01

    A large body of scientific evidence indicates that global warming from human induced greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions is producing harmful climate change that will lead to global environmental and economic catastrophe within 10 years. The threat of human induced global warming has been on the international and public policy agenda for several years; for example on 11 December 1998, government representatives of 108 countries signed the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) an international agreement to reduce global warming or the Kyoto Protocol, with the then exception of the Australian and the United States (U.S.) governments. International action on GHG emissions reduction was thwarted by U.S. and Australian goverments. The then Australian government (1996-2007) surreptitiously funding by vested interests such as the coal industry, had no intention to act even though scientific evidence reported that Australia had begun to experience the detrimental effects of global warming. To fulfil an electoral promise, the center left Labor government signed the Kyoto Protocol on 3 December 2007. To deal with the global warming crisis, the Australian government has proposed an emissions trading scheme now officially called the 'Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme' or CPRS. The proposed scheme is a cap and trade market mechanism that purportedly encourages businesses to operate more efficiently, thus reducing GHG emissions through price signalling in a government instigated market. Hence credible, transparent and efficient information underpins such a market in a post-Keynes deregulated world. The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the integrity of using current financial and reporting regulation that will oversee and monitor the veracity of newly commoditized carbon financial products, particularly since the global financial crisis has exposed significant financial regulatory weaknesses. Further we contend that current corporate

  5. Aggregation kinetics of single-walled carbon nanotubes investigated using mechanically wrapped multinuclear complexes: probing the tube-tube repulsive barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameen, Anjail A; Giordano, Andrea N; Alston, Jeffrey R; Forney, Michael W; Herring, Natalie P; Kobayashi, Shiho; Ridlen, Shawn G; Subaran, Sarah S; Younts, Thomas J; Poler, J C

    2014-03-28

    The rational design of supraparticle assemblies requires a detailed understanding of directed assembly processes. The stability of dispersions of nanoscale materials, like single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), is still not fully understood, nor are the mechanisms of aggregation and assembly. A detailed balance of attractive van der Waals type interactions with various repulsive barrier mechanisms is needed to control the assembly of industrially viable and functional hybrid-nanoscale supraparticles. We report a detailed study of SWCNT dispersion stability and aggregation kinetics as a function of the nature of the coagulant used in various solvent systems. We explore three classes of coagulants that vary in charge, size, shape, solvation energy, and the ability to bind to the SWCNTs. We use these kinetic data to assess the tube-solvent-coagulant-tube interactions. We compare the relative contributions from two types of repulsive barriers. We find that tube-mediated structured solvent around the SWCNTs does not sufficiently describe our measured kinetic data. A DLVO type, electrical double layer repulsion is used to rationalize our observations. The data presented in this paper require a more detailed theoretical understanding of the physico-chemical environment near nanoparticle surfaces such as aggregating SWCNTs.

  6. Carbon dioxide exchange in a cool-temperate evergreen coniferous forest over complex topography in Japan during two years with contrasting climates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Taku M; Tamagawa, Ichiro; Muraoka, Hiroyuki; Lee, Na-Yeon M; Yashiro, Yuichiro; Koizumi, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    We investigated carbon dioxide (CO(2)) exchange and its environmental response during two years with contrasting climate (2006 and 2007) in a cool-temperate mixed evergreen coniferous forest dominated by Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) and Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa). The study, which was conducted in a mountainous region of central Japan, used the eddy-covariance technique. Our results (crosschecked using the common u (*) approach and van Gorsel's alternative approach) showed that annual gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (RE) were at least 6% higher in the dry year than in the wet year, whereas net ecosystem exchange (NEE) was similar in both years. Without soil water stress, strong light stress or seasonality of plant area index during most of the study period, the forest had high metabolic activity. GPP and RE differed greatly between the two years, especially in spring (April-May) and summer (July-September), respectively. The spring GPP difference (>20%) was influenced by different winter air temperatures and snow melt timing, which controlled photosynthetic capacity in spring, and by different spring light intensities. The annual NEE differed depending on the evaluation method used, but the mean 2-year NEE estimated by the u (*) threshold approach [-3.39 +/- 0.11 (SD) MgC ha(-1) year(-1)] appears more reasonable in comparison with results from other forests.

  7. Occupational exposure to complex mixtures of volatile organic compounds in ambient air: desorption from activated charcoal using accelerated solvent extraction can replace carbon disulfide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrizi, Giovanni; Fioretti, Marzia; Rocca, Lucia Mainero

    2013-01-01

    A desorption study of 57 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has been conducted by use of accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Different solvents were tested to extract activated charcoal tubes with the objective of replacing carbon disulfide, used in official methods, because of its highly toxic health and environmental effects. Extraction conditions, for example temperature and number of cycles, were investigated and optimized. The definitive extraction procedure selected was use of acetone at 150 °C and two consecutive extraction cycles at a pressure of 1,500 psi. Considering a sample volume of 0.005 Nm(3), corresponding to a sampling time of 8 h at a flow rate of 0.01 L min(-1), the method was validated over the concentration range 65-26,300 μg Nm(-3). The lowest limit of quantification was 6 μg Nm(-3), and recovery for the 93 % of analytes ranged from 65 to 102 %. For most of the compounds, relative standard deviations were less than 15 % for inter and intra-day precision. Uncertainty of measurement was also determined: the relative expanded uncertainty was always below 29.6 %, except for dichlorodifluoromethane. This work shows that use of friendlier solvent, for example acetone, coupled with use of ASE, can replace use of CS(2) for chemical removal of VOCs from activated charcoal. ASE has several advantages over traditional solvent-extraction methods, including shorter extraction time, minimum sample manipulation, high reproducibility, and less extraction discrimination. No loss of sensitivity occurs and there is also a salutary effect on bench workers' health and on the smell of laboratory air.

  8. Cobalt Complexes as Antiviral and Antibacterial Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    L = thioacetamide L = semicarbazide L = thiosemicarbazide L = pyrazole Pharmaceuticals 2010, 3 1719 The complexes...alanine; c: alanine methyl ester d: pyrazole ; e: dimethyl pyrazole L L = 29 28 Organometallic complexes containing a formal metal carbon bond are

  9. Complex WS 2 nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitby, R. L. D.; Hsu, W. K.; Lee, T. H.; Boothroyd, C. B.; Kroto, H. W.; Walton, D. R. M.

    2002-06-01

    A range of elegant tubular and conical nanostructures has been created by template growth of (WS 2) n layers on the surfaces of single-walled carbon nanotube bundles. The structures exhibit remarkably perfect straight segments together with interesting complexities at the intersections, which are discussed here in detail in order to enhance understanding of the structural features governing tube growth.

  10. Anodic Oxidation and Amperometric Sensing of Hydrazine at a Glassy Carbon Electrode Modified with Cobalt (II Phthalocyanine–cobalt (II Tetraphenylporphyrin (CoPc- (CoTPP4 Supramolecular Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth I. Ozoemena

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the electrocatalytic behaviour of a glassy carbon electrode (GCEmodified with cobalt(IIphthalocyanine (CoPc complex peripherally tetrasubstituted withcobalt(IItetraphenylporphyrin (CoTPP complexes via ether linkages (i.e., CoPc-(CoTPP4. Thefeatures of the immobilised pentamer were interrogated with cyclic voltammetry andelectrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS using [Fe(CN6]3-/4- as redox probe revealedenhanced electron transfer properties with kapp ≈ 18 x 10-6 cms-1 compared to that of the bareGCE (4.7 x 10-6 cms-1. The viability of this supramolecular complex as a redox mediator for theanodic oxidation and sensitive amperometric determination of hydrazine in alkaline conditions isdescribed. The electrocatalytic oxidation of hydrazine by GCE-CoPc-(CoTPP4 was characterisedwith satisfactory catalytic current response with low non-Faradaic current (ca. 30 times lowerthan the bare GCE and at much lower oxidation potential (ca. 300 mV lower than the bareGCE. A mechanism for the studied electrocatalytic reaction was proposed based on thespectrophotometric evidence that revealed the major involvement of the Co(III/Co(II redox coupleof the central CoPc species rather than the CoTPP component of the pentamer. Rate constant forthe anodic oxidation of hydrazine was estimated from chronoamperometry as ~ 3x103 M-1s-1. Theproposed amperometric sensor displayed excellent charateristics towards the determination ofhydrazine in 0.2 M NaOH ; such as low overpotentials ( 100 mV vs Ag|AgCl, very fastamperometric response time (1 s, linear concentration range of up to 230 μM, with micromolardetection limit, high sensitivity and stability.

  11. Warm ISM in the Sgr A Complex. I: Mid-J CO, atomic carbon, ionized atomic carbon,and ionized nitrogen sub-mm/FIR line observations with the Herschel-HIFI and NANTEN2/SMART telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    García, P; Stutzki, J; Güsten, R; Requena-Torres, M A; Higgins, R

    2016-01-01

    We present large-scale submm observations towards the Sgr A Complex covering ~300 arcmin2. These data were obtained in the frame of the HEXGAL Program with the Herschel-HIFI satellite and are complemented with submm observations obtained with the NANTEN2/SMART telescope as part of the NANTEN2/SMART Central Nuclear Zone Survey. The observed species are CO(4-3) observed with the NANTEN2/SMART telescope, and [CI](1-0), [CI](2-1), [NII](1-0), and [CII](3/2-1/2) observed with the Herschel-HIFI satellite. The observations are presented in a 1 km/s spectral resolution and a spatial resolution ranging from 46" to 28". The spectral coverage of the three lower frequency lines is +-200 km/s, while in the two high frequency lines, the upper LSR velocity limit is +94 km/s and +145 km/s for the [NII] and [CII] lines, respectively. The spatial distribution of the emission in all lines is very widespread. The bulk of the CO emission is found towards Galactic latitudes below the Galactic plane, and all the known molecular clo...

  12. Carney Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types of Cancer > Carney Complex Request Permissions Carney Complex Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 11/2015 What is Carney complex? Carney complex is a hereditary condition associated with: ...

  13. Scientific Opinion on the efficacy of Lenziaren (iron, aqua carbonate hydroxyl oxo starch sucrose complex as a feed additive for cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Lenziaren is a polynuclear Fe(III starch–saccharose complex intended to be used in food for adult cats to reduce phosphate absorption in the gastrointestinal tract in order to prevent chronic kidney disease. The recommended minimum and maximum levels are 0.25 and 1.0 g/cat per day, equivalent to 5 000 and 20 000 mg/kg complete feed, respectively. In a previous opinion, the Panel concluded that the minimum effective dose was 1 g/cat per day based on three studies which showed either a significant reduction in serum phosphorus or a reduction in urinary phosphate. Two of these studies showed an effect at 0.25 g/cat per day, while the third one only showed an effect at a level of 1 g/cat per day. The results of a new study submitted in this application showed that overall urine inorganic phosphorus concentrations significantly decreased in cats receiving Lenziaren at 0.25 g/day compared with the control group. Therefore, considering the two previous studies, which showed an effect at 0.25 g/cat per day, and the results of the new study, the FEEDAP Panel considers that Lenziaren has the potential to be efficacious in binding intestinal phosphorus at the minimum recommended dose of 0.25 g/cat per day (equivalent to 5 g/kg complete feed. On balance, the Panel considers that the sex difference seen in the new study is an anomaly, possibly owing, as the applicant suggests, to selective feed intake. However, the Panel notes that sex differences were not explored in the remaining efficacy studies. The Panel still has the reservations expressed in the previous opinion regarding the value of the long-term use of the additive in healthy cats.

  14. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of Lenziaren (iron, aqua carbonate hydroxyl oxo starch sucrose complex as a feed additive for cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The additive Lenziaren is a polynuclear Fe(III starch/saccharose complex intended to be used in food for adult cats to reduce phosphate absorption in the gastrointestinal tract in order to prevent chronic kidney disease. The recommended minimum and maximum levels are 0.25 g and 1.0 g per cat per day, equivalent to 5 000 and 20 000 mg/kg feed, respectively. The FEEDAP Panel considers that Lenziaren is safe for adult cats at the maximum recommended dose. However, the consequences of chronic exposure have not been investigated. The additive is not genotoxic. No adverse effects were seen in a repeat-dose toxicity study in mice. Lenziaren had no adverse effects on reproduction and development at dose levels that were not toxic to the mother. A no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL of 500 mg/kg body weight (bw per day was identified for Lenziaren on the basis of maternal toxicity (diarrhoea and reduced body weight gain, which was seen in rabbits at an oral dose of 1 000 mg/kg bw per day or greater. Similar effects were seen in rats, dogs and monkeys at higher doses in repeat-dose toxicity studies. No NOAELs were identified in these studies. Lenziaren is not regarded as an irritant to skin or eyes or as a skin sensitiser. Although some inhalation exposure is possible, it is not expected to be harmful to those exposed as a result of handling the additive. Based on the results of three in vivo efficacy studies, the FEEDAP Panel concludes that Lenziaren has the potential to be efficacious in cats at the highest recommended dose of 1 g/cat per day (equivalent to 20 000 mg/kg feed. However, the FEEDAP Panel has some reservations regarding the value of its long-term use in healthy cats. The Panel concludes that there is a need for a post-market monitoring plan.

  15. 连接链长对双核钌分子内与分子间协同 ECL影响研究%Research on effect of different carbon chain linkage on concerted intra- & intermolecular ECL of bimetallic ruthenium complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘凤玉; 孙世国; 高玉龙

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effect of carbon chain linkage on both intramolecular and intra‐&intermolecular electrochemiluminescence ( ECL ) of bimetallic ruthenium complexes Ru(bpy)2+3 (CH2 )nRu(bpy)2+3 (n=3 ,5 ,8) ,ECL measurement has been performed with and without the presence of amine co‐reactants ,such as dibutylaminoethanol (DBAE) and tripropylamine (TPA) , on different working electrodes ,such as Pt ,glassy carbon (GC) and Au .The experimental results demonstrate that the longer the carbon chain linkage , the stronger the ECL intensity , and quite different ECL performance can be observed on different working electrodes .All these results can lay a solid foundation for structure designing of bimetallic ECL labels , and improvement of the ECL efficiency through combining both intra‐ & intermolecular interaction .%  为深入研究连接碳链长度 n对双核三联吡啶钌标记物Ru(bpy)2+3(CH2)nRu(bpy)2+3(n=3,5,8)自身分子内,以及不同外加碱存在下的分子内与分子间协同ECL性能,考察了在DBAE(二丁基乙醇胺)、TPA(三丙胺)等共反应碱存在下,Pt、Au、GC等不同工作电极上,连接碳链长度 n对双核标记物自身分子内,以及外加碱存在下的分子内与分子间协同EC L性能的影响规律。结果表明,EC L强度随着连接碳链长度的增加逐渐增大,并且工作电极种类将直接影响EC L结果,这为今后该类双核标记物的结构设计以及双核标记物分子内与分子间协同EC L性能的提升奠定了基础。

  16. Eustatic and far-field tectonic control on the development of an intra-platform carbonate-shoal complex: upper tongue of the Tanglewood Member, Upper Ordovician Lexington Limestone, central Kentucky, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koirala, Dibya Raj; Ettensohn, Frank R.; Clepper, Marta L.

    2016-11-01

    The Lexington or Trenton Limestone is an Upper Ordovician (Chatfieldian-Edenian; upper Sandbian-lower Katian), temperate-water unit, averaging about 60-m thick, that was deposited in relatively shallow waters across the Lexington Platform in east-central United States during the Taconian Orogeny. Lexington/Trenton shallow-water deposition ended across most of the platform in late Chatfieldian time and from that point deepened upward into the more shale-rich Clays Ferry, Point Pleasant and Kope formations due to apparent sea-level rise. In central Kentucky, however, deposition of the Lexington Limestone continued into early Edenian time and includes up to 50 m of additional coarse calcarenites and calcirudites at the top, which form the Tanglewood buildup and reflect locally regressive conditions, apparently related to local structural uplift. Consequently, in central Kentucky, the Lexington is more than 100-m thick, and Lexington deposition on the buildup continued into early Edenian time as an intra-platform shoal complex that tongues out into deeper-water units in all directions. In an attempt to understand how this shoal complex developed, we examined the last major body of coarse skeletal sands in the central Kentucky Lexington Limestone, the upper tongue of the Tanglewood Member, a 12-m-thick succession of fossiliferous calcarenite and calcirudite that occurs across an area of 5200 km2 near the center of the Lexington Platform. Although relatively homogeneous, the upper Tanglewood is divisible into five, small-scale, fining-upward, sequence-like cycles, which contain prominent, widespread deformed horizons. Facies analysis indicates that four lithofacies, which reflect distinct depositional environments, comprise the sequences across the shoal complex. Lithofacies were correlated across the shoal complex by integrating cyclicity and widespread deformed horizons in order to delineate the locations of major depositional environments. Facies analysis shows that

  17. Complex Beauty

    OpenAIRE

    Franceschet, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Complex systems and their underlying convoluted networks are ubiquitous, all we need is an eye for them. They pose problems of organized complexity which cannot be approached with a reductionist method. Complexity science and its emergent sister network science both come to grips with the inherent complexity of complex systems with an holistic strategy. The relevance of complexity, however, transcends the sciences. Complex systems and networks are the focal point of a philosophical, cultural ...

  18. Carbon isotope anomalies in carbonates of the Karelian series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iudovich, Ia. E.; Makarikhin, V. V.; Medvedev, P. V.; Sukhanov, N. V.

    1990-07-01

    Results are presented on carbon isotope distributions in carbonates of the Karelian complex. A highly anomalous isotopic composition was found in carbonate rocks aged from 2.6 to 1.9 b.y. In the stromatolitic carbonates of the Onega water table, delta-(C-13) reaches a value of +18 percent, while the shungite layer of the Zaonega horizon is characterized by a wide dispersion (from +7.9 to -11.8 percent). These data are in good agreement with the known geochemical boundary (about 2.2 b.y. ago) in the history of the earth.

  19. Carbonized asphaltene-based carbon-carbon fiber composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohnert, George; Lula, James; Bowen, III, Daniel E.

    2016-12-27

    A method of making a carbon binder-reinforced carbon fiber composite is provided using carbonized asphaltenes as the carbon binder. Combinations of carbon fiber and asphaltenes are also provided, along with the resulting composites and articles of manufacture.

  20. Bucolic Complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Brešar, Bostjan; Chepoi, Victor; Gologranc, Tanja; Osajda, Damian

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we introduce and investigate bucolic complexes, a common generalization of systolic complexes and of CAT(0) cubical complexes. This class of complexes is closed under Cartesian products and amalgamations over some convex subcomplexes. We study various approaches to bucolic complexes: from graph-theoretic and topological viewpoints, as well as from the point of view of geometric group theory. Bucolic complexes can be defined as locally-finite simply connected prism complexes satisfying some local combinatorial conditions. We show that bucolic complexes are contractible, and satisfy some nonpositive-curvature-like properties. In particular, we prove a version of the Cartan-Hadamard theorem, the fixed point theorem for finite group actions, and establish some results on groups acting geometrically on such complexes. We also characterize the 1-skeletons (which we call bucolic graphs) and the 2-skeletons of bucolic complexes. In particular, we prove that bucolic graphs are precisely retracts of Ca...

  1. Aqueous complexes of lanthanides(III) and actinides(III) with the carbonate and sulphate ions. Thermodynamic study by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and electro-spray-ionisation mass spectrometry; Complexes aqueux de lanthanides (3) et actinides (3) avec les ions carbonate et sulfate. Etude thermodynamique par spectrofluorimetrie laser resolue en temps et spectrometrie de masse a ionisation electrospray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vercouter, Th

    2005-03-15

    The prediction of the environmental impact of a possible geological disposal of radioactive wastes is supported by the thermodynamic modelling of the radionuclides behaviour in the groundwater. In this framework, the analogy between lanthanides and actinides(III) is confirmed by a critical analysis of the literature and the comparison with experimental results obtained here. The limiting complex, Eu(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 3-}, is identified by solubility measurements in Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solutions. Then the formation constants of the complexes Eu(CO{sub 3}){sub i}{sup 3-2i} (i=1-3) and Eu(SO{sub 4}){sub i}{sup 3-2i} (i=1-2) are measured by TRLFS. The formation of aqueous LaSO{sub 4}{sup +} is studied by ESI-MS and is in good agreement with the expected speciation. The enthalpy and entropy of the reaction Cm(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup -} + CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} {r_reversible} Cm(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 3-} are deduced from TRLFS measurements of the equilibrium constant between 10 and 70 C. The ionic strength effect is calculated using the SIT formula. (author)

  2. An unprecedented up-field shift in the 13C NMR spectrum of the carboxyl carbons of the lantern-type dinuclear complex TBA[Ru2(O2CCH3)4Cl2] (TBA+ = tetra(n-butyl)ammonium cation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraoka, Yuya; Ikeue, Takahisa; Sakiyama, Hiroshi; Guégan, Frédéric; Luneau, Dominique; Gillon, Béatrice; Hiromitsu, Ichiro; Yoshioka, Daisuke; Mikuriya, Masahiro; Kataoka, Yusuke; Handa, Makoto

    2015-08-14

    A large up-field shift (-763 ppm) has been observed for the carboxyl carbons of the dichlorido complex TBA[Ru(2)(O(2)CCH(3))(4)Cl(2)] (TBA(+) = tetra(n-butyl)ammonium cation) in the (13)C NMR spectrum (CD(2)Cl(2) at 25 °C). The DFT calculations showed spin delocalization from the paramagnetic Ru(2)(5+) core to the ligands, in agreement with the large up-field shift.

  3. Carbonate aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Kevin J.; Sukop, Michael; Curran, H. Allen

    2012-01-01

    Only limited hydrogeological research has been conducted using ichnology in carbonate aquifer characterization. Regardless, important applications of ichnology to carbonate aquifer characterization include its use to distinguish and delineate depositional cycles, correlate mappable biogenically altered surfaces, identify zones of preferential groundwater flow and paleogroundwater flow, and better understand the origin of ichnofabric-related karst features. Three case studies, which include Pleistocene carbonate rocks of the Biscayne aquifer in southern Florida and Cretaceous carbonate strata of the Edwards–Trinity aquifer system in central Texas, demonstrate that (1) there can be a strong relation between ichnofabrics and groundwater flow in carbonate aquifers and (2) ichnology can offer a useful methodology for carbonate aquifer characterization. In these examples, zones of extremely permeable, ichnofabric-related macroporosity are mappable stratiform geobodies and as such can be represented in groundwater flow and transport simulations.

  4. Carbon classified?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Ingmar

    2012-01-01

    How does a corporation know it emits carbon? Acquiring such knowledge starts with the classification of environmentally relevant consumption information. This paper visits the corporate location at which this underlying element for their knowledge is assembled to give rise to carbon emissions. Us...

  5. Porous carbons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Satish M Manocha

    2003-02-01

    Carbon in dense as well as porous solid form is used in a variety of applications. Activated porous carbons are made through pyrolysis and activation of carbonaceous natural as well as synthetic precursors. Pyrolysed woods replicate the structure of original wood but as such possess very low surface areas and poor adsorption capacities. On activation, these exhibit increased adsorption volumes of 0.5–0.8 cm3 /gm and surface areas of 700–1800 m2 /gm depending on activation conditions, whether physical or chemical. Former carbons possess mixed pore size distribution while chemically activated carbons predominantly possess micropores. Thus, these carbons can be used for adsorption of wide distributions of molecules from gas to liquid. The molecular adsorption within the pores is due to single layer or multilayer molecule deposition at the pore walls and hence results in different types of adsorption isotherm. On the other hand, activated carbon fibres with controlled microporous structure and surface area in the range of 2500 m2 /gm can be developed by controlled pyrolysis and physical activation of amorphous carbon fibres. Active carbon fibres with unmatchable pore structure and surface characteristics are present and futuristic porous materials for a number of applications from pollution control to energy storage.

  6. Carbon photonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konov, V I [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-30

    The properties of new carbon materials (single-crystal and polycrystalline CVD diamond films and wafers, single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene) and the prospects of their use as optical elements and devices are discussed. (optical elements of laser devices)

  7. Carbon-Carbon Piston Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Schwind, Francis A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An improved structure for carbon-carbon composite piston architectures is disclosed. The improvement consists of replacing the knitted fiber, three-dimensional piston preform architecture described in U.S. Pat.No. 4,909,133 (Taylor et al.) with a two-dimensional lay-up or molding of carbon fiber fabric or tape. Initially, the carbon fabric of tape layers are prepregged with carbonaceous organic resins and/or pitches and are laid up or molded about a mandrel, to form a carbon-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite part shaped like a "U" channel, a "T"-bar, or a combination of the two. The molded carbon-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite part is then pyrolized in an inert atmosphere, to convert the organic matrix materials to carbon. At this point, cylindrical piston blanks are cored from the "U"-channel, "T"-bar, or combination part. These blanks are then densified by reimpregnation with resins or pitches which are subsequently carbonized. Densification is also accomplished by direct infiltration with carbon by vapor deposition processes. Once the desired density has been achieved, the piston billets are machined to final piston dimensions; coated with oxidation sealants; and/or coated with a catalyst. When compared to conventional steel or aluminum alloy pistons, the use of carbon-carbon composite pistons reduces the overall weight of the engine; allows for operation at higher temperatures without a loss of strength; allows for quieter operation; reduces the heat loss; and reduces the level of hydrocarbon emissions.

  8. Complexity Plots

    KAUST Repository

    Thiyagalingam, Jeyarajan

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present a novel visualization technique for assisting the observation and analysis of algorithmic complexity. In comparison with conventional line graphs, this new technique is not sensitive to the units of measurement, allowing multivariate data series of different physical qualities (e.g., time, space and energy) to be juxtaposed together conveniently and consistently. It supports multivariate visualization as well as uncertainty visualization. It enables users to focus on algorithm categorization by complexity classes, while reducing visual impact caused by constants and algorithmic components that are insignificant to complexity analysis. It provides an effective means for observing the algorithmic complexity of programs with a mixture of algorithms and black-box software through visualization. Through two case studies, we demonstrate the effectiveness of complexity plots in complexity analysis in research, education and application. © 2013 The Author(s) Computer Graphics Forum © 2013 The Eurographics Association and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Engaging complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gys M. Loubser

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I discuss studies in complexity and its epistemological implications for systematic and practical theology. I argue that engagement with complexity does not necessarily assurea non-reductionist approach. However, if complexity is engaged transversally, it becomes possible to transcend reductionist approaches. Moreover, systematic and practical the ologians can draw on complexity in developing new ways of understanding and, therefore, new ways of describing the focus, epistemic scope and heuristic structures of systematic and practical theology. Firstly, Edgar Morin draws a distinction between restricted and general complexity based on the epistemology drawn upon in studies in complexity. Moving away from foundationalist approaches to epistemology, Morin argues for a paradigm of systems. Secondly,I discuss Kees van Kooten Niekerk�s distinction between epistemology, methodology andontology in studies in complexity and offer an example of a theological argument that drawson complexity. Thirdly, I argue for the importance of transversality in engaging complexity by drawing on the work of Wentzel van Huyssteen and Paul Cilliers. In conclusion, I argue that theologians have to be conscious of the epistemic foundations of each study in complexity, and these studies illuminate the heart of Reformed theology.Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: Therefore, this article has both intradisciplinary and interdisciplinary implications. When theologians engage studies incomplexity, the epistemological roots of these studies need to be considered seeing thatresearchers in complexity draw on different epistemologies. Drawing on transversality wouldenhance such considerations. Furthermore, Edgar Morin�s and Paul Cilliers� approach tocomplexity will inform practical and theoretical considerations in church polity and unity.

  10. Carbon cyclist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    A satellite launched in early August as part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth could dramatically increase understanding of how carbon cycles through the Earth's biosphere and living organisms and how this process influences global climate. The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) will measure the color of the oceans with a radiometer to determine the concentration of chlorophyll found in oceanic phytoplankton. The single-celled plants, at the base of food chains around the world, remove carbon dioxide from seawater through photosynthesis, which allows oceans to absorb more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

  11. High-Melt Carbon-Carbon Coating for Nozzle Extensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, James

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-Carbon Advanced Technologies, Inc. (C-CAT), has developed a high-melt coating for use in nozzle extensions in next-generation spacecraft. The coating is composed primarily of carbon-carbon, a carbon-fiber and carbon-matrix composite material that has gained a spaceworthy reputation due to its ability to withstand ultrahigh temperatures. C-CAT's high-melt coating embeds hafnium carbide (HfC) and zirconium diboride (ZrB2) within the outer layers of a carbon-carbon structure. The coating demonstrated enhanced high-temperature durability and suffered no erosion during a test in NASA's Arc Jet Complex. (Test parameters: stagnation heat flux=198 BTD/sq ft-sec; pressure=.265 atm; temperature=3,100 F; four cycles totaling 28 minutes) In Phase I of the project, C-CAT successfully demonstrated large-scale manufacturability with a 40-inch cylinder representing the end of a nozzle extension and a 16-inch flanged cylinder representing the attach flange of a nozzle extension. These demonstrators were manufactured without spalling or delaminations. In Phase II, C-CAT worked with engine designers to develop a nozzle extension stub skirt interfaced with an Aerojet Rocketdyne RL10 engine. All objectives for Phase II were successfully met. Additional nonengine applications for the coating include thermal protection systems (TPS) for next-generation spacecraft and hypersonic aircraft.

  12. Simplifying complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemput, van de I.A.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis I use mathematical models to explore the properties of complex systems ranging from microbial nitrogen pathways and coral reefs to the human state of mind. All are examples of complex systems, defined as systems composed of a number of interconnected parts, where the systemic behavior

  13. Complex odontoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preetha, A; Balikai, Bharati S; Sujatha, D; Pai, Anuradha; Ganapathy, K S

    2010-01-01

    Odontomas are hamartomatous lesions or malformations composed of mature enamel, dentin, and pulp. They may be compound or complex, depending on the extent of morphodifferentiation or their resemblance to normal teeth. The etiology of odontoma is unknown, although several theories have been proposed. This article describes a case of a large infected complex odontoma in the residual mandibular ridge, resulting in considerable mandibular expansion.

  14. Complex narratives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper brings together narratology, game theory, and complexity theory to untangle the intricate nature of complex narratives in contemporary cinema. It interrogates the different terms - forking-path narratives, mind-game films, modular narratives, multiple-draft films, database narratives, puz

  15. Computational Complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Tenreiro Machado

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex systems (CS involve many elements that interact at different scales in time and space. The challenges in modeling CS led to the development of novel computational tools with applications in a wide range of scientific areas. The computational problems posed by CS exhibit intrinsic difficulties that are a major concern in Computational Complexity Theory. [...

  16. Carbon Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T. Lloyd Evans

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, the present state of knowledge of the carbon stars is discussed. Particular attention is given to issues of classification, evolution, variability, populations in our own and other galaxies, and circumstellar material.

  17. Carbon Nanoelectronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cory D. Cress

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Initiated by the first single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT transistors [1,2], and reinvigorated with the isolation of graphene [3], the field of carbon-based nanoscale electronic devices and components (Carbon Nanoelectronics for short has developed at a blistering pace [4]. Comprising a vast number of scientists and engineers that span materials science, physics, chemistry, and electronics, this field seeks to provide an evolutionary transition path to address the fundamental scaling limitations of silicon CMOS [5]. Concurrently, researchers are actively investigating the use of carbon nanomaterials in applications including back-end interconnects, high-speed optoelectronic applications [6], spin-transport [7], spin tunnel barrier [8], flexible electronics, and many more.

  18. Infiltrated carbon foam composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Rick D. (Inventor); Danford, Harry E. (Inventor); Plucinski, Janusz W. (Inventor); Merriman, Douglas J. (Inventor); Blacker, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An infiltrated carbon foam composite and method for making the composite is described. The infiltrated carbon foam composite may include a carbonized carbon aerogel in cells of a carbon foam body and a resin is infiltrated into the carbon foam body filling the cells of the carbon foam body and spaces around the carbonized carbon aerogel. The infiltrated carbon foam composites may be useful for mid-density ablative thermal protection systems.

  19. The Bio-accessibility of Synthetic Fe-Organo Complexes in Subsurface Soil with Elevated Temperature: a Proxy for the Vulnerability of Mineral Associated Carbon to Warming Rachel C. Porras, Peter S. Nico, and Margaret Torn Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras, R. C.; Hicks Pries, C.

    2015-12-01

    Globally, subsurface soils (>30 cm) represent an important reservoir of soil organic carbon (SOC). However, the vulnerability of this deep SOC and, in particular mineral-associated SOC, to warming, and its potential to amplify the effects of climate change is highly uncertain. To gain insight into the bio-accessibility and temperature sensitivity of mineral-associated organic C, we conducted a series of incubations using soils collected from three depths (0-10, 50-60, and 80-90 cm) under coniferous forest. The soils are moderately acidic (mean pH=6.5) sandy, mixed, mesic Ultic Haploxeralfs. To understand how mechanisms controlling SOC bio-accessibilty or temperature sensitivity differ with depth and with the properties of Fe-organo complexes (i.e.,degree of crystallinity, amount of reactive surface area, or surface saturation), we used a 13C labeled glucose substrate to prepare synthetic Fe-organo complexes spanning a range of crystallinity and mineral surface saturation. The synthetic Fe-organo complexes were then added to soil from three depths. The soils containing the 13C labeled Fe-organo adduct were incubated at two temperatures (ambient and +4°C) and respired 13CO2 was measured and used to estimate flux rates. Differences in measured 13CO2 fluxes as a function of depth, surface loading, and mineral properties are discussed in terms of their implications for the temperature sensitivity of mineral protected organic carbon in subsurface soils.

  20. Managing Complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maylath, Bruce; Vandepitte, Sonia; Minacori, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the largest and most complex international learning-by-doing project to date- a project involving translation from Danish and Dutch into English and editing into American English alongside a project involving writing, usability testing, and translation from English into Dut...... and into French. The complexity of the undertaking proved to be a central element in the students' learning, as the collaboration closely resembles the complexity of international documentation workplaces of language service providers. © Association of Teachers of Technical Writing....

  1. Complex variables

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, Stephen D

    1999-01-01

    The most important topics in the theory and application of complex variables receive a thorough, coherent treatment in this introductory text. Intended for undergraduates or graduate students in science, mathematics, and engineering, this volume features hundreds of solved examples, exercises, and applications designed to foster a complete understanding of complex variables as well as an appreciation of their mathematical beauty and elegance. Prerequisites are minimal; a three-semester course in calculus will suffice to prepare students for discussions of these topics: the complex plane, basic

  2. Oxidation of Guanine by Carbonate Radicals Derived from Photolysis of Carbonatotetramminecobalt(III) Complexes and the pH Dependence of Intrastrand DNA Cross-links Mediated by Guanine Radical Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Crean, Conor; Lee, Young Ae; Yun, Byeong Hwa; Geacintov, Nicholas E.; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    The carbonate radical anion CO3•− is a decomposition product of nitrosoperoxycarbonate derived from the combination of carbon dioxide and peroxynitrite, an important biological byproduct of the inflammatory response. The selective oxidation of guanine in DNA by CO3•− radicals is known to yield spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp), guanidinohydantoin (Gh), and a novel intrastrand cross-linked product, 5’-d(CCATCG*CT*ACC) between guanine C8 (G*) and thymine N3 (T*) atoms in the oligonucleotide (Crean et ...

  3. Selectivity in the carbon-oxygen reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skokova, Kristina A.

    The dependence of the carbon-oxygen reaction rate and the CO/COsb2 ratio on temperature, oxygen pressure, carbon crystallite size, concentration of surface C(O) complexes, and content of heteroatoms was studied. It was shown that the temperature dependence of the CO/COsb2 ratio obeys an Arrhenius-type relationship, but the pre-exponential factor and the activation energy depend on oxygen pressure and carbon nature. The Arrhenius parameters were found to be directly proportional to each other. This confirmed the importance of the compensation effect in carbon oxidation. It was explained by active site heterogeneity in carbon materials. For all experimental conditions, the CO/COsb2 ratio was lower for carbons with more ordered graphitic structure. It was shown that the CO/COsb2 ratio is inversely proportional to the surface coverage with reactive C(O) complexes. More ordered carbons were revealed to possess lower concentrations of stable complexes, higher surface coverages with reactive complexes and thus lower CO/COsb2 ratios. The influence of B and N heteroatoms on carbon reactivity and the CO/COsb2 ratio was studied. It was confirmed that B acts as an inhibitor of carbon oxidation due to the formation of a protective Bsb2Osb3 coating. The N presence in the carbon structure increases its rate of oxidation, maybe due to decreasing carbon crystallite dimensions. The CO/COsb2 ratio did not correlate with the N content in the carbon, but depended on the concentration of surface carbon-oxygen complexes. A new reaction mechanism is proposed. A key feature of the mechanism is that it takes into account the presence and mobility of oxygen atoms on the basal plane. It was shown with the aid of theoretical molecular orbital calculations that chemisorption on a pair of adjacent edge and basal sites is thermodynamically favorable as a parallel process to the generally accepted path of chemisorption on two edge carbon atoms. The former process can lead to the formation of a

  4. Isotherm And Kinetic Studies On The Electrosorption Of Uranyl Tricarbonate Complex [UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}]{sup 4-} From Aqueous Solutions By Activated Carbon Electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, Aznan Fazli; Yim, Man Sung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Many types of adsorbent materials have been developed over the past 50 years, and the most recognizable is amidoxime based materials which is known to have high affinity in in chelating uranyl ions from seawater. However, the fabrication cost of amidoxime based materials was high which lead to high uranium extraction cost. In recent studies, use of porous carbon materials combined with the electrosorption technique was shown to have high selectivity for uranium separation from seawater. It is clear that the electrosorption capacity increase with the increasing of electrolyte concentration. The investigated activated carbon electrode still not reach the maximum adsorption capacity in the test condition. The morphology analysis confirmed that the fabricated activated carbon electrode has a porous structure, where BET analysis has revealed that the size of the pores can be categorized in mesopores region which is the optimum condition for electrosorption purposes. Other than that, the FT-IR analysis has enough evident that the molecular interaction of the activated carbon electrode involves the intermolecular interaction (physical crosslink/bonding) and stable for electrosorption application.

  5. Integrating plant carbon dynamics with mutualism ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Elizabeth G

    2016-04-01

    Plants reward microbial and animal mutualists with carbohydrates to obtain nutrients, defense, pollination, and dispersal. Under a fixed carbon budget, plants must allocate carbon to their mutualists at the expense of allocation to growth, reproduction, or storage. Such carbon trade-offs are indirectly expressed when a plant exhibits reduced growth or fecundity in the presence of its mutualist. Because carbon regulates the costs of all plant mutualisms, carbon dynamics are a common platform for integrating these costs in the face of ecological complexity and context dependence. The ecophysiology of whole-plant carbon allocation could thus elucidate the ecology and evolution of plant mutualisms. If mutualisms are costly to plants, then they must be important but frequently underestimated sinks in the terrestrial carbon cycle.

  6. Hydrogen isotherms in palladium loaded carbon nanotubes and activated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, M. T.; Anson, A.; Lafuente, E.; Urriolabeitia, E.; Navarro, R.; Benito, A. M.; Maser, W. K.

    2005-07-01

    Session 5a In order to increase the hydrogen sorption capacity of carbon materials, a sample of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and the activated carbon MAXSORB have been loaded with palladium nanoparticles. While carbon materials adsorb hydrogen due to physical interactions, palladium can capture hydrogen into the bulk structure or chemically react to form hydrides. Experiental SWNTs have been synthesized in an electric arc reactor, using Ni and Y as catalysts in a 660 mbar He atmosphere. MAXSORB is a commercial activated carbon obtained from petroleum coke through a chemical treatment with KOH. Palladium has been deposited over the carbon support by means of a reflux method in a solution of an organometallic complex. Different samples have been prepared depending on the weight ratio (Carbon material / Pd) in the original reactants. The effectiveness of the deposition method has been examined by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), induction coupled plasma spectrometry (ICPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The volumetric system Autosorb-1 from Quantachrome Instruments has been used to obtain the nitrogen adsorption isotherms at 77 K for all the materials. The hydrogen isotherms at 77 K and room temperature and up to 800 torr have also been obtained in the Autosorb-1. The BET specific surface area and the micropore volume have been calculated from the nitrogen adsorption data. High pressure hydrogen isotherms up to 90 bar have been carried out at room temperature in a VTI system provided with a Rubotherm microbalance. (Author)

  7. Organometallic Complexes of Graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkar, Santanu; Bekyarova, Elena; Haddon, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the organometallic hexahapto complexation of chromium with graphene, graphite and carbon nanotubes. All of these extended periodic pi-electron systems exhibit some degree of reactivity toward the reagents CrCO)6 and (eta6-benzene)Cr(CO)3, and we are able to demonstrate the formation of (eta6-rene)Cr(CO)3 or (eta6-arene)2Cr, where arene = single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), exfoliated graphene (XG), epitaxial graphene (EG) and highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). We find that the SWNTs are the least reactive presumably as a result of the effect of curvature on the formation of the hexahapto bond; in the case of HOPG, (eta6-HOPG)Cr(CO)3 was isolated while the exfoliated graphene samples were found to give both (eta6-graphene)2Cr, and (eta6-graphene)Cr(CO)3 structures. We report simple and efficient routes for the mild decomplexation of the graphene-chromium complexes which appears to restore the original pristine graphene state. This study represents the first example of the use of graph...

  8. Kinetics of reactive extraction of Nd from nd203 with tbp-hno3 complex in supercritical carbon dioxide%在超临界二氧化碳中用TBP-HN03络合剂反应萃取Nd203中Nd的动力学

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱礼洋; 段五华; 徐景明; 朱永贝睿

    2009-01-01

    The process based on supercriticaI fluid extraction for reprocessing Of the spent nuclear fuel has some remarkable advantages over the plutonium-uranium extraction(PUREX) process.Especially,it can minimize the generation of secondary waste.Dynamic reactive extraction of neodymium oxide(Nd2 O3)in supercritical carbon dioxide(SC-CO2)containing tri-n-butyl phosphate-nitric acid(TBP-HNO3)complex was investigated.Temperature showed a positive effect on the extraction efficiency,while pressure showed a negative effect when the unsaturated TBP-HNO3 complex was employed for the dynamic reactive extraction of Nd2O3 in SC-CO2.Both temperature and pressure effects indicated that the kinetic proccss of the reactive extraction was controlled by the chemical reaction.A kinetic model was proposed to describe the extraction process.

  9. Carbon nanomaterials in biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pu Chun Ke [Laboratory of Single-Molecule Biophysics and Polymer Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Qiao Rui [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2007-09-19

    This paper intends to reflect, from the biophysical viewpoint, our current understanding on interfacing nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes and fullerenes, with biological systems. Strategies for improving the solubility, and therefore, the bioavailability of nanomaterials in aqueous solutions are summarized. In particular, the underlining mechanisms of attaching biomacromolecules (DNA, RNA, proteins) and lysophospholipids onto carbon nanotubes and gallic acids onto fullerenes are analyzed. The diffusion and the cellular delivery of RNA-coated carbon nanotubes are characterized using fluorescence microscopy. The translocation of fullerenes across cell membranes is simulated using molecular dynamics to offer new insight into the complex issue of nanotoxicity. To assess the fate of nanomaterials in the environment, the biomodification of lipid-coated carbon nanotubes by the aquatic organism Daphnia magna is discussed. The aim of this paper is to illuminate the need for adopting multidisciplinary approaches in the field study of nanomaterials in biological systems and in the environment. (topical review)

  10. Complex analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Freitag, Eberhard

    2005-01-01

    The guiding principle of this presentation of ``Classical Complex Analysis'' is to proceed as quickly as possible to the central results while using a small number of notions and concepts from other fields. Thus the prerequisites for understanding this book are minimal; only elementary facts of calculus and algebra are required. The first four chapters cover the essential core of complex analysis: - differentiation in C (including elementary facts about conformal mappings) - integration in C (including complex line integrals, Cauchy's Integral Theorem, and the Integral Formulas) - sequences and series of analytic functions, (isolated) singularities, Laurent series, calculus of residues - construction of analytic functions: the gamma function, Weierstrass' Factorization Theorem, Mittag-Leffler Partial Fraction Decomposition, and -as a particular highlight- the Riemann Mapping Theorem, which characterizes the simply connected domains in C. Further topics included are: - the theory of elliptic functions based on...

  11. 不同区域稻田土壤复合体有机碳分配及δ13C特征%Distribution and δ13C Characteristics of Organic Carbon in Soil Organo-mineral Complexes of Paddy Fields Located in Different Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱洁; 慈恩; 杨林章; 马力; 谢德体

    2011-01-01

    Representative paddy fields were selected in five regions(Longjing of Jilin Province, Fengqiu of Henan province, Cixi of Zhejiang province, Jinxian of Jiangxi province and Haikou of Hainan province).Distribution and δ13 C characters of organo-mineral complexes in these paddy soils were studied.The results showed that the content (mass percent) changes of complexes <2 μm and >50 μm were more obvious than other particle-sizes complexes in paddy soils located in different regions.In southern paddy fields, the content of complex <2 μm in the 0-20 cm layer was lower than the 20-40 cm layer, and conversely in soil profiles of northern paddy fields.Distribution of organic carbon content in different particle-sizes complexes <50 μm kept consistent in the 0-20 cm layer and the 20-40 cm layer of paddy fields.Organic carbon content of complexes >50 μm in the 20-40 cm layer of paddy fields declined sharply, and was significantly lower than the topsoil.Soil organic carbon of cropland was mainly accumulated in complexes < 10 μm.Climate conditions, cultivation system and original soil would have significant influence on distribution of organic carbon in soil organo-mineral complexes of cropland, and water culture was propitious to accumulation of coarse organism in the topsoil of paddy fields.In the 0-20 cm layer of paddy fields located in different regions, organic carbon with higher δ13C value and lower activity was contained in smaller particle-size complexes.The rule wasn't strictly followed in the 20-40 cm layer that the activity of organic carbon in coarse complex was higher than fine complex, and especially in coarse complex >50 μm.%选取位于5个不同区域(吉林龙井、河南封丘、浙江慈溪、江西进贤和海南海口)的代表性稻田,对其土壤复合体有机碳分配及δ13C特征进行了研究.结果表明,不同区域稻田土壤中各粒级复合体含量(质量百分比)变化主要体现在<2μm和>50

  12. Thermodynamic and kinetic studies of the equilibration reaction between the sulfur and carbon bonded forms of a cobalt(III) complex with the ligands 2-aminoethyl-3-aminopropylsulfide and 1,1,1-tris(aminomethyl)ethane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, J.; Kjellerup, S.; Kofod, Pauli

    1996-01-01

    A thermodn. and kinetic study of the equilibration between the Co-S bonded complex Co(tame)(S-aeaps)3+ and the Co-C bonded complex Co(tame)(C-aeaps)2+ is reported (tame = 1,1,1-tris(aminomethyl)ethane, aeaps = 2-aminoethyl-3-aminopropyl sulfide = 3-thiahexane-1,6-diamine and C-aeaps = 1,6-diamine-3...

  13. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doctor if you have or have ever had kidney disease or stomach conditions.tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking calcium carbonate, call your doctor.

  14. The series of carbon-chain complexes {Ru(dppe)Cp*}₂{μ-(C≡C)x} (x = 4–8, 11): Synthesis, structures, properties and some reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce, Michael I. [Univ. of Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Cole, Marcus L. [Univ. of Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Ellis, Benjamin G. [Univ. of Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Gaudio, Maryka [Univ. of Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Nicholson, Brian K. [Univ. of Waikato, Hamilton (New Zealand); Parker, Christian R. [Univ. of Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Skelton, Brian W. [Univ. of Western Australia, Crawley (Western Australia); White, Allan H. [Univ. of Western Australia, Crawley (Western Australia)

    2015-01-28

    The construction of a series of compounds {Ru(dppe)Cp*}2(μ-C2x) (Ru*-C2x-Ru*, x = 4–8, 11)) is described. A direct reaction between RuCl(dppe)Cp* and Me3Si(Ctriple bond; length of mdashC)4SiMe3 afforded Ru*-C8-Ru* in 89% yield. The Pd(0)/Cu(I)-catalysed coupling of Ru{Ctriple bond; length of mdashCCtriple bond; length of mdashCAu(PPh3)}(dppe)Cp*Ru*-C4-Au (2 equiv.) with diiodoethyne gave Ru*-C10-Ru* (64%), or of 1 equiv. with I(Ctriple bond; length of mdashC)3I gave Ru*-C14-Ru* (36%); similarly, Ru{(Ctriple bond; length of mdashC)4Au(PPh3)}(dppe)Cp*Ru*-C8-Au and I(Ctriple bond; length of mdashC)3I gave Ru*-C22-Ru* (12%). Desilylation (TBAF) of Ru{(Ctriple bond; length of mdashC)xSiMe3}(dppe)Cp*Ru*-C2x-Si (x = 3, 4) followed by oxidative coupling [Cu(OAc)2/py] gave Ru*-C12-Ru* (82%) and Ru*-C16-Ru* (58%), respectively. Similar oxidative coupling of Ru(Ctriple bond; length of mdashCCtriple bond; length of mdashCH)(dppe)Cp* was a second route to Ru*-C8-Ru* (82%). Appropriate precursors are already known, or obtained by coupling of Ru*-C2x-Si (x = 2, 4) with AuCl(PPh3)/NaOMe [Ru*-C4-Au, 95%; Ru*-C8-Au, 74%] or from Pd(0)/Cu(I) catalysed coupling of Ru*-C2x-Au (x = 2, 3) with I(Ctriple bond; length of mdashC)2SiMe3 (Ru*-C8-Si, 64%; Ru*-C10-Si, 2%). Reactions between Ru*-C2x-Ru* (x = 3, 4) and Fe2(CO)9 gave {Fe3(CO)9}{μ3-CCtriple bond; length of mdashC[Ru(dppe)Cp*]}2Fe(C3-Ru*)2 and {Fe3(CO)9}{μ3-CCtriple bond; length of mdashC[Ru(dppe)Cp*]}{μ3-C(Ctriple bond; length of mdashC)2[Ru(dppe)Cp*]} Fe(C3-Ru*)(C5-Ru*), respectively. The redox properties of the series of complexes with 2x = 2–16 were measured and showed a diminution of the

  15. Analysis of Seismic Acquisition Technology in Bare Carbonate Outcrop in Southern Complex Mountainous Area%南方复杂山地碳酸盐岩出露区地震采集技术分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李桂林; 康家光; 冯明刚; 王涛

    2013-01-01

    The quality of seismic data collected in complicated southern area with mountains and bare carbon-ates,is hard to reach the desired effect.This paper does a series of comparative analyses about technologies and methods for seismic data acquisition based on thorough understanding of the geological characteristics and the key exploration technical difficulties of seismic.(1)Using various surface survey techniques to fulfill fine sur-face structure survey,and to set up relative accurate near-surface structure model and velocity model for compu-ting statics,choosing the best well site and designing well depth.(2)Dynamic observation system is used wide-ly in the southern complex terrain.For example,long arrangement and wide shot distance is utilized to deal with imaging of high and steep structure,observation system with increased density is employed in limestone district, and wide-line observation system is adopted in the special region with caverns and fissures.(3)The conditions of excitation and reception are improved to meet the sophisticated exploration needs of multilayer lithology with naked rocks.The position of shot is optimized to adapt the lithology changing and to avoid caverns and thick pure limestone district.Double well combined excitation is often used in the limestone district,and large com-bined reception need more than two strings of detectors per channel.Of course,the reception effect of detector in the well is better than those on the ground.Applying the above techniques and methods to processing and analyzing the collected seismic data,the quality of the seismic profiles and single shot records are improved, and both seismic reflection wave energy and SNR are all heightened.%在受山地和碳酸盐岩裸露双重复杂条件影响的南方地区开展地震勘探工作,采集的地震数据质量很难达到理想效果。基于对南方复杂地形山区的地震地质特征及勘探技术难点深入分析的基础上,对地震数据采集

  16. Complex Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Evsukoff, Alexandre; González, Marta

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade we have seen the emergence of a new inter-disciplinary field focusing on the understanding of networks which are dynamic, large, open, and have a structure sometimes called random-biased. The field of Complex Networks is helping us better understand many complex phenomena such as the spread of  deseases, protein interactions, social relationships, to name but a few. Studies in Complex Networks are gaining attention due to some major scientific breakthroughs proposed by network scientists helping us understand and model interactions contained in large datasets. In fact, if we could point to one event leading to the widespread use of complex network analysis is the availability of online databases. Theories of Random Graphs from Erdös and Rényi from the late 1950s led us to believe that most networks had random characteristics. The work on large online datasets told us otherwise. Starting with the work of Barabási and Albert as well as Watts and Strogatz in the late 1990s, we now know th...

  17. Complex chemistry with complex compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eichler Robert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years gas-phase chemical studies assisted by physical pre-separation allowed for the investigation of fragile single molecular species by gas-phase chromatography. The latest success with the heaviest group 6 transactinide seaborgium is highlighted. The formation of a very volatile hexacarbonyl compound Sg(CO6 was observed similarly to its lighter homologues molybdenum and tungsten. The interactions of these gaseous carbonyl complex compounds with quartz surfaces were investigated by thermochromatography. Second-generation experiments are under way to investigate the intramolecular bond between the central metal atom of the complexes and the ligands addressing the influence of relativistic effects in the heaviest compounds. Our contribution comprises some aspects of the ongoing challenging experiments as well as an outlook towards other interesting compounds related to volatile complex compounds in the gas phase.

  18. Carbon-carbon bond cleavage in activation of the prodrug nabumetone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varfaj, Fatbardha; Zulkifli, Siti N A; Park, Hyoung-Goo;

    2014-01-01

    Carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions are catalyzed by, among others, lanosterol 14-demethylase (CYP51), cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11), sterol 17β-lyase (CYP17), and aromatase (CYP19). Because of the high substrate specificities of these enzymes and the complex nature of their su...

  19. The long-term carbon cycle, fossil fuels and atmospheric composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Robert A

    2003-11-20

    The long-term carbon cycle operates over millions of years and involves the exchange of carbon between rocks and the Earth's surface. There are many complex feedback pathways between carbon burial, nutrient cycling, atmospheric carbon dioxide and oxygen, and climate. New calculations of carbon fluxes during the Phanerozoic eon (the past 550 million years) illustrate how the long-term carbon cycle has affected the burial of organic matter and fossil-fuel formation, as well as the evolution of atmospheric composition.

  20. Managing Complexity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chassin, David P.; Posse, Christian; Malard, Joel M.

    2004-08-01

    Physical analogs have shown considerable promise for understanding the behavior of complex adaptive systems, including macroeconomics, biological systems, social networks, and electric power markets. Many of today’s most challenging technical and policy questions can be reduced to a distributed economic control problem. Indeed, economically-based control of large-scale systems is founded on the conjecture that the price-based regulation (e.g., auctions, markets) results in an optimal allocation of resources and emergent optimal system control. This paper explores the state of the art in the use physical analogs for understanding the behavior of some econophysical systems and to deriving stable and robust control strategies for them. In particular we review and discussion applications of some analytic methods based on the thermodynamic metaphor according to which the interplay between system entropy and conservation laws gives rise to intuitive and governing global properties of complex systems that cannot be otherwise understood.

  1. Solid-state Synthesis of Carbon-nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.Wilhelm; A.Winkel; D.Jain

    2007-01-01

    1 Results In addition to single wall and multiwall carbon nanotubes[1], several structures,which are more or less related to fullerenes,including carbon nanohorns[2a], carbon nanospheres[2b] and onion like carbon structures[2c] have been reported.A new simple straight forward method to access some of these structures is the solid-state pyrolysis of different organometallic complexes in a sealed vessel,which led so far to carbon nanotubes[3a,b], carbon nanocables[3c] and onions[3d].

  2. Huella del Carbono. Parte 1: Conceptos, Métodos de Estimación y Complejidades Metodológicas Carbon Footprint. Part 1: Concepts, Estimation Methods and Methodological Complexities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Espíndola

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta y analiza el concepto de huella del carbono, su origen, su relación con los gases efecto invernadero, y sobre los procedimientos para cuantificarla. El efecto invernadero provoca que la energía que llega a la Tierra sea devuelta más lentamente, por lo que es mantenida más tiempo junto a la superficie elevando la temperatura. Es aceptado hoy en día que este efecto es producido por algunos gases liberados en forma natural o por las acciones humanas. La Huella de Carbono es considerada una de las más importantes herramientas para cuantificar las emisiones de gases efecto invernadero y en forma muy general, representa la cantidad de gases efecto invernadero emitidos a la atmósfera derivados de las actividades de producción o consumo de bienes y servicios. Al no existir consenso en cuanto a la definición y menos en la cuantificación de la huella del carbono, la primera parte de este trabajo analiza las principales corrientes y enfoques actuales.The concept of Carbon Footprint, its origin, its relation with greenhouse gases and the methods to quantify it are presented and analyzed. The so-called greenhouse effect causes that the energy that reaches the earth at a certain rate is returned to a slower rate, increasing the temperature of the earth surface. Additionally, it is nowadays accepted that this effect is produced by some gases that are naturally emitted or produced by human actions. The Carbon Footprint is considered to be one of the most important tools for quantifying greenhouse emissions and in a general form it represents the quantity of gases emitted to the atmosphere and that is produced by human activities, and by goods and service consumption. Since there is no consensus about the definition of Carbon Footprint or the forms of quantifying it, this first part of the paper series analyzes the main concept and the main present views on the Carbon Footprint.

  3. Quantification of carbon nanomaterials in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haifang; Yang, Sheng-Tao; Cao, Aoneng; Liu, Yuanfang

    2013-03-19

    A diverse array of carbon nanomaterials (NMs), including fullerene, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene, nanodiamonds, and carbon nanoparticles, have been discovered and widely applied in a variety of industries. Carbon NMs have been detected in the environment and have a strong possibility of entering the human body. The safety of carbon NMs has thus become a serious concern in academia and society. To achieve strict biosafety assessments, researchers need to fully understand the effects and fates of NMs in the human body, including information about absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADME/T). To acquire the ADME data, researchers must quantify NMs, but carbon NMs are very difficult to quantify in vivo. The carbon background in a typical biological system is high, particularly compared with the much lower concentration of carbon NMs. Moreover, carbon NMs lack a specific detection signal. Therefore, isotopic labeling, with its high sensitivity and specificity, is the first choice to quantify carbon NMs in vivo. Previously, researchers have used many isotopes, including ¹³C, ¹⁴C, ¹²⁵I, ¹³¹I, ³H, ⁶⁴Cu, ¹¹¹In, ⁸⁶Y, 99mTc, and ⁶⁷Ga, to label carbon NMs. We used these isotopic labeling methods to study the ADME of carbon NMs via different exposure pathways in animal models. Except for the metabolism of carbon NMs, which has seldom been investigated, significant amounts of data have been reported on the in vivo absorption, distribution, excretion, and toxicity of carbon NMs, which have revealed characteristic behaviors of carbon NMs, such as reticuloendothelial system (RES) capture. However, the complexity of the biological systems and diverse preparation and functionalization of the same carbon NMs have led to inconsistent results across different studies. Therefore, the data obtained so far have not provided a compatible and systematic profile of biosafety. Further efforts are needed to address these problems. In

  4. Digital carbonate rock physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenger, Erik H.; Vialle, Stephanie; Lebedev, Maxim; Uribe, David; Osorno, Maria; Duda, Mandy; Steeb, Holger

    2016-08-01

    Modern estimation of rock properties combines imaging with advanced numerical simulations, an approach known as digital rock physics (DRP). In this paper we suggest a specific segmentation procedure of X-ray micro-computed tomography data with two different resolutions in the µm range for two sets of carbonate rock samples. These carbonates were already characterized in detail in a previous laboratory study which we complement with nanoindentation experiments (for local elastic properties). In a first step a non-local mean filter is applied to the raw image data. We then apply different thresholds to identify pores and solid phases. Because of a non-neglectable amount of unresolved microporosity (micritic phase) we also define intermediate threshold values for distinct phases. Based on this segmentation we determine porosity-dependent values for effective P- and S-wave velocities as well as for the intrinsic permeability. For effective velocities we confirm an observed two-phase trend reported in another study using a different carbonate data set. As an upscaling approach we use this two-phase trend as an effective medium approach to estimate the porosity-dependent elastic properties of the micritic phase for the low-resolution images. The porosity measured in the laboratory is then used to predict the effective rock properties from the observed trends for a comparison with experimental data. The two-phase trend can be regarded as an upper bound for elastic properties; the use of the two-phase trend for low-resolution images led to a good estimate for a lower bound of effective elastic properties. Anisotropy is observed for some of the considered subvolumes, but seems to be insignificant for the analysed rocks at the DRP scale. Because of the complexity of carbonates we suggest using DRP as a complementary tool for rock characterization in addition to classical experimental methods.

  5. Developing a Carbon Observing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, B., III

    2015-12-01

    There is a clear need to better understand and predict future climate change, so that science can more confidently inform climate policy, including adaptation planning and future mitigation strategies. Understanding carbon cycle feedbacks, and the relationship between emissions (fossil and land use) and the resulting atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) concentrations in a changing climate has been recognized as an important goal by the IPCC. The existing surface greenhouse gas observing networks provide accurate and precise measurements of background values, but they are not configured to target the extended, complex and dynamic regions of the carbon budget. Space Agencies around the globe are committed to CO2 and CH4 observations: GOSAT-1/2, OCO-2/3, MERLin, TanSat, and CarbonSat. In addition to these Low Earth Orbit (LEO) missions, a new mission in Geostationary Orbit (GEO), geoCARB, which would provide mapping-like measurements of carbon dioxide, methane, and carbon monoxide concentrations over major land areas, has been recently proposed to the NASA Venture Program. These pioneering missions do not provide the spatial/temporal coverage to answer the key carbon-climate questions at process relevant scales nor do they address the distribution and quantification of anthropogenic sources at urban scales. They do demonstrate, however, that a well-planned future system of system integrating space-based LEO and GEO missions with extensive in situ observations could provide the accuracy, spatial resolution, and coverage needed to address critical open issues in the carbon-climate system. Dr. Diana Wickland devoted enormous energy in developing a comprehensive apprioach to understand the global carbon cycle; she understood well that an integrated, coordinated, international approach is needed. This shines through in her recent contribution in co-chairing the team that produced the "CEOS Strategy for Carbon Observations from Space." A NASA-funded community

  6. Complex variables

    CERN Document Server

    Flanigan, Francis J

    2010-01-01

    A caution to mathematics professors: Complex Variables does not follow conventional outlines of course material. One reviewer noting its originality wrote: ""A standard text is often preferred [to a superior text like this] because the professor knows the order of topics and the problems, and doesn't really have to pay attention to the text. He can go to class without preparation."" Not so here-Dr. Flanigan treats this most important field of contemporary mathematics in a most unusual way. While all the material for an advanced undergraduate or first-year graduate course is covered, discussion

  7. Complex Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Talha Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex sleep apnea is the term used to describe a form of sleep disordered breathing in which repeated central apneas (>5/hour persist or emerge when obstructive events are extinguished with positive airway pressure (PAP and for which there is not a clear cause for the central apneas such as narcotics or systolic heart failure. The driving forces in the pathophysiology are felt to be ventilator instability associated oscillation in PaCO2 arterial partial pressure of Carbon Dioxide, continuous cositive airway pressure (CPAP related increased CO2 carbon dioxide elimination, and activation of airway and pulmonary stretch receptors triggering these central apneas. The prevalence ranges from 0.56% to 18% with no clear predictive characteristics as compared to simple obstructive sleep apnea. Prognosis is similar to obstructive sleep apnea. The central apnea component in most patients on followup using CPAP therap, has resolved. For those with continued central apneas on simple CPAP therapy, other treatment options include bilevel PAP, adaptive servoventilation, permissive flow limitation and/or drugs.

  8. Preparation of hollow spherical carbon nanocages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, C.-K.; Kang, H. Y.; Hong, C.-I; Huang, C.-H.; Chang, F.-C.; Wang, H. Paul, E-mail: wanghp@mail.ncku.edu.tw [National Cheng Kung University, Department of Environmental Engineering, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-15

    This study presents a new and simple method for the synthesis of hollow carbon spheres possessing nanocage sizes of 7.1, 14, and 20 nm in diameter. The core-shell (i.e., Cu-C) nanoparticles prepared by carbonization of the Cu{sup 2+}-cyclodextrin (CD) complexes at 573 K for 2 h was etched with HCl (6N) to yield the hollow carbon spheres. The carbon-shell of the hollow carbon nanospheres, which consisted of mainly diamond-like and graphite carbons, is not perturbed during etching. In addition to the nanocages, the hollow carbon nanospheres also possess micropores with an opening of 0.45 nm, allowing small molecules to diffuse in and out through the carbon-shell. Many elements (such as Zn{sup 2+} or Cu{sup 2+}) can therefore be filled into the nanocages of the hollow carbon nanospheres. With these unique properties, for instance, designable active species such as Cu and ZnO encapsulated in the carbon-shell can act as Cu-ZnO-C yolk-shell nanoreactors which are found very effective in the catalytic decomposition of methanol.

  9. Carbon Dioxide Extraction from Air: Is It An Option?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lackner, Klaus; Ziock, Hans-Joachim; Grimes, Patrick

    1999-02-01

    Controlling the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere without limiting access to fossil energy resources is only possible if carbon dioxide is collected and disposed of away from the atmosphere. While it may be cost-advantageous to collect the carbon dioxide at concentrated sources without ever letting it enter the atmosphere, this approach is not available for the many diffuse sources of carbon dioxide. Similarly, for many older plants a retrofit to collect the carbon dioxide is either impossible or prohibitively expensive. For these cases we investigate the possibility of collecting the carbon dioxide directly from the atmosphere. We conclude that there are no fundamental obstacles to this approach and that it deserves further investigation. Carbon dioxide extraction directly from atmosphere would allow carbon management without the need for a completely changed infrastructure. In addition it eliminates the need for a complex carbon dioxide transportation infrastructure, thus at least in part offsetting the higher cost of the extraction from air.

  10. Complex dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Carleson, Lennart

    1993-01-01

    Complex dynamics is today very much a focus of interest. Though several fine expository articles were available, by P. Blanchard and by M. Yu. Lyubich in particular, until recently there was no single source where students could find the material with proofs. For anyone in our position, gathering and organizing the material required a great deal of work going through preprints and papers and in some cases even finding a proof. We hope that the results of our efforts will be of help to others who plan to learn about complex dynamics and perhaps even lecture. Meanwhile books in the field a. re beginning to appear. The Stony Brook course notes of J. Milnor were particularly welcome and useful. Still we hope that our special emphasis on the analytic side will satisfy a need. This book is a revised and expanded version of notes based on lectures of the first author at UCLA over several \\Vinter Quarters, particularly 1986 and 1990. We owe Chris Bishop a great deal of gratitude for supervising the production of cour...

  11. Carbonic inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Kerkhof, Alfons; Thiéry, Régis

    2001-01-01

    The paper gives an overview of the phase relations in carbonic fluid inclusions with pure, binary and ternary mixtures of the system CO 2-CH 4-N 2, compositions, which are frequently found in geological materials. Phase transitions involving liquid, gas and solid phases in the temperature range between -192°C and 31°C are discussed and presented in phase diagrams ( PT, TX and VX projections). These diagrams can be applied for the interpretation of microthermometry data in order to determine fluid composition and molar volume (or density).

  12. Cosmic Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    What explains the extraordinary complexity of the observed universe, on all scales from quarks to the accelerating universe? My favorite explanation (which I certainty did not invent) ls that the fundamental laws of physics produce natural instability, energy flows, and chaos. Some call the result the Life Force, some note that the Earth is a living system itself (Gaia, a "tough bitch" according to Margulis), and some conclude that the observed complexity requires a supernatural explanation (of which we have many). But my dad was a statistician (of dairy cows) and he told me about cells and genes and evolution and chance when I was very small. So a scientist must look for me explanation of how nature's laws and statistics brought us into conscious existence. And how is that seemll"!gly Improbable events are actually happening a!1 the time? Well, the physicists have countless examples of natural instability, in which energy is released to power change from simplicity to complexity. One of the most common to see is that cooling water vapor below the freezing point produces snowflakes, no two alike, and all complex and beautiful. We see it often so we are not amazed. But physlc!sts have observed so many kinds of these changes from one structure to another (we call them phase transitions) that the Nobel Prize in 1992 could be awarded for understanding the mathematics of their common features. Now for a few examples of how the laws of nature produce the instabilities that lead to our own existence. First, the Big Bang (what an insufficient name!) apparently came from an instability, in which the "false vacuum" eventually decayed into the ordinary vacuum we have today, plus the most fundamental particles we know, the quarks and leptons. So the universe as a whole started with an instability. Then, a great expansion and cooling happened, and the loose quarks, finding themselves unstable too, bound themselves together into today's less elementary particles like protons and

  13. Cosmic Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    What explains the extraordinary complexity of the observed universe, on all scales from quarks to the accelerating universe? My favorite explanation (which I certainty did not invent) ls that the fundamental laws of physics produce natural instability, energy flows, and chaos. Some call the result the Life Force, some note that the Earth is a living system itself (Gaia, a "tough bitch" according to Margulis), and some conclude that the observed complexity requires a supernatural explanation (of which we have many). But my dad was a statistician (of dairy cows) and he told me about cells and genes and evolution and chance when I was very small. So a scientist must look for me explanation of how nature's laws and statistics brought us into conscious existence. And how is that seemll"!gly Improbable events are actually happening a!1 the time? Well, the physicists have countless examples of natural instability, in which energy is released to power change from simplicity to complexity. One of the most common to see is that cooling water vapor below the freezing point produces snowflakes, no two alike, and all complex and beautiful. We see it often so we are not amazed. But physlc!sts have observed so many kinds of these changes from one structure to another (we call them phase transitions) that the Nobel Prize in 1992 could be awarded for understanding the mathematics of their common features. Now for a few examples of how the laws of nature produce the instabilities that lead to our own existence. First, the Big Bang (what an insufficient name!) apparently came from an instability, in which the "false vacuum" eventually decayed into the ordinary vacuum we have today, plus the most fundamental particles we know, the quarks and leptons. So the universe as a whole started with an instability. Then, a great expansion and cooling happened, and the loose quarks, finding themselves unstable too, bound themselves together into today's less elementary particles like protons and

  14. Carbon Nanotubes: Molecular Electronic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1997-01-01

    The carbon Nanotube junctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for use as the building blocks in the formation of nanoscale molecular electronic networks. While the simple joint of two dissimilar tubes can be generated by the introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise perfect hexagonal graphene sheet, more complex joints require other mechanisms. In this work we explore structural characteristics of complex 3-point junctions of carbon nanotubes using a generalized tight-binding molecular-dynamics scheme. The study of pi-electron local densities of states (LDOS) of these junctions reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap.

  15. Merging allylic carbon-hydrogen and selective carbon-carbon bond activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masarwa, Ahmad; Didier, Dorian; Zabrodski, Tamar; Schinkel, Marvin; Ackermann, Lutz; Marek, Ilan

    2014-01-01

    Since the nineteenth century, many synthetic organic chemists have focused on developing new strategies to regio-, diastereo- and enantioselectively build carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds in a predictable and efficient manner. Ideal syntheses should use the least number of synthetic steps, with few or no functional group transformations and by-products, and maximum atom efficiency. One potentially attractive method for the synthesis of molecular skeletons that are difficult to prepare would be through the selective activation of C-H and C-C bonds, instead of the conventional construction of new C-C bonds. Here we present an approach that exploits the multifold reactivity of easily accessible substrates with a single organometallic species to furnish complex molecular scaffolds through the merging of otherwise difficult transformations: allylic C-H and selective C-C bond activations. The resulting bifunctional nucleophilic species, all of which have an all-carbon quaternary stereogenic centre, can then be selectively derivatized by the addition of two different electrophiles to obtain more complex molecular architecture from these easily available starting materials.

  16. Carbon-free D3d [E3ME3]2- (E=P,As;M=Ni,Pd,Pt):The smallest inorganic sandwich complexes with aromatic η3-P3- and η3-As3- ligands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A density functional theory and wave function theory investigation on the possibility of carbon-free phosphametallocenes [P3MP3]2-and arsenametallocenes [As3MAs3]2- (M=Ni, Pd, Pt) is presented in this work. Staggered singlet D3d [E3ME3]2- (E=P, As)-the smallest inorganic metallocenes possible to construct-proved to be the global minima of the heptaatomic sys- tems and may be targeted in future experiments. Cyclo-P3- and cyclo-As3- turned out to possess similar aromaticity to cyclo-P5- and cyclo-As5- and may serve as effective ligands to sandwich a wide range of transition metals. The first vertical electron detachment energies of Cs [E3ME3]Li+ monoanions with a staggered [E3ME3]2- sandwich core were predicted to be between 2.7 and 2.9 eV; the extent of stabilization by Li+ suggests that such materials be viable targets for experimental characterization.

  17. Carbon Farming as a Carbon Negative Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, C.; Laird, D.; Hayes, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon farms have a pivotal role in national and international efforts to mitigate and adapt to climate change. A carbon farm in its broadest sense is one that reduces greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions or captures and holds carbon in vegetation and soils. Their capacity to remove carbon from the air and store it safely and permanently, while providing additional human and ecosystem benefits, means they could contribute significantly to national efforts to stabilize or reduce GHGs. We examine carbon farms in the context of corn and soybean production agriculture. We illustrate, using Iowa data but with relevance across United States corn and soybean production, the potential for carbon farms to reduce human GHG emissions and sequester carbon permanently at a rate that has meaningful impact on global greenhouse gas concentration. Carbon has been viewed as a next generation cash crop in Iowa for over a decade. The carbon farm perspective, however, goes beyond carbon as cash crop to make carbon the center of an entire farm enterprise. The transformation is possible through slight adjustment crop practices mixed with advances in technology to sequester carbon through biochar. We examine carbon balance of Iowa agriculture given only the combination of slight reduction in fertilizer and sequestration by biochar. We find the following. Iowa carbon farms could turn Iowa agriculture into a carbon sink. The estimated range of GHG reduction by statewide implementation of carbon farms is 19.46 to 90.27 MMt CO2-equivalent (CO2-e), while the current agricultural CO2-e emission estimate is 35.38 MMt CO2-e. Iowa carbon farm GHG reduction would exceed Iowa GHG reduction by wind energy (8.7 MMt CO2-e) and could exceed combined reductions from wind energy and corn grain ethanol (10.7 MMt CO2-e; 19.4 MMt CO2-e combined). In fact, Iowa carbon farms alone could exceed GHG reduction from national corn grain ethanol production (39.6 MMt CO2-e). A carbon price accessible to agricultural

  18. Carbon Monoxide Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Materials Working with the Media Fire Protection Technology Carbon monoxide safety outreach materials Help inform residents in ... with these messages and free materials. What is carbon monoxide? Carbon monoxide, also known as CO, is ...

  19. Carbon monoxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and smokers. Carbon monoxide can harm a fetus (unborn baby still in the womb). Symptoms of carbon ... symptoms Outlook (Prognosis) Carbon monoxide poisoning can cause death. For those who survive, recovery is slow. How ...

  20. Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux is defined as the year-over-year change in Total Ecosystem Carbon Stock, or the net rate of carbon exchange between an ecosystem and the...

  1. Nonequilibrium Thermodynamic Model of Manganese Carbonate Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝瑞霞; 彭省临

    1999-01-01

    Manganese carbonate can be converted to many kinds of manganese oxides when it is aerated in air and oxygen.Pure manganese carbonate can be changed into Mn3O4 and γ-MnOOH,and manganese carbonate ore can be converted to MnO2 under the air-aerating and oxygen-aerating circumstances.The oxidation process of manganese carbonate is a changing process of mineral association,and is also a converting process of valence of manganese itself.Not only equilibrium stat,but also nonequilibrium state are involved in this whole process,This process is an irreversible heterogeneous complex reaction,and oberys the nonequilibrium thermodynamic model,The oxidation rate of manganese cabonate is controlled by many factors,especially nonmanganese metallic ions which play an important role in the oxidation process of manganese carbonate.

  2. Sequencing the Black Aspergilli species complex

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The ~15 members of the Aspergillus section Nigri species complex (the "Black Aspergilli") are significant as platforms for bioenergy and bioindustrial technology, as members of soil microbial communities and players in the global carbon cycle, and as food processing and spoilage agents and agricultural toxigens. Despite their utility and ubiquity, the morphological and metabolic distinctiveness of the complex's members, and thus their taxonomy, is poorly defined. We are using short read pyros...

  3. Carbon nanotube computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulaker, Max M; Hills, Gage; Patil, Nishant; Wei, Hai; Chen, Hong-Yu; Wong, H-S Philip; Mitra, Subhasish

    2013-09-26

    The miniaturization of electronic devices has been the principal driving force behind the semiconductor industry, and has brought about major improvements in computational power and energy efficiency. Although advances with silicon-based electronics continue to be made, alternative technologies are being explored. Digital circuits based on transistors fabricated from carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have the potential to outperform silicon by improving the energy-delay product, a metric of energy efficiency, by more than an order of magnitude. Hence, CNTs are an exciting complement to existing semiconductor technologies. Owing to substantial fundamental imperfections inherent in CNTs, however, only very basic circuit blocks have been demonstrated. Here we show how these imperfections can be overcome, and demonstrate the first computer built entirely using CNT-based transistors. The CNT computer runs an operating system that is capable of multitasking: as a demonstration, we perform counting and integer-sorting simultaneously. In addition, we implement 20 different instructions from the commercial MIPS instruction set to demonstrate the generality of our CNT computer. This experimental demonstration is the most complex carbon-based electronic system yet realized. It is a considerable advance because CNTs are prominent among a variety of emerging technologies that are being considered for the next generation of highly energy-efficient electronic systems.

  4. Carbon nanofillers for machining insulating ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Malek

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of ceramics in emerging applications is principally limited by the final machining process necessary for producing microcomponents with complex geometries. The addition of carbon nanotubes greatly enhances the electrical properties of insulating ceramics allowing electrical discharge machining to be used to manufacture intricate parts. Meanwhile other properties of the ceramic may be either preserved or even improved. For the first time, a silicon nitride/carbon nanotubes microgear is electrically discharge machined with a remarkably high material removal rate, low surface roughness, and low tool wear. This offers unprecedented opportunities for the manufacture of complicated ceramic parts by adding carbon nanotubes for new engineering and biomedical applications.

  5. Confined self-assembly approach to produce ultrathin carbon nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weixia; Cui, Jiecheng; Tao, Cheng-An; Lin, Changxu; Wu, Yiguang; Li, Guangtao

    2009-07-21

    A surfactant containing a terminal carbon source moiety was synthesized and used simultaneously as both template molecule and carbon source. On the basis of this special structure-directing agent, an efficient strategy for producing uniform carbon nanowires with diameter below 1 nm was developed using a confined self-assembly approach. Besides the capability of producing ultralong and thin carbon wires inaccessible by the previously reported approaches, the method described here presents many advantages such as the direct use of residue iron complex as catalyst for carbonization and no requirement of conventional tedious infiltration process of carbon source into small channels. Different methods including SEM, TEM, XRD, Raman spectroscopy, and conductivity measurement were employed to characterize the formed ultrathin carbon nanofibers. Additionally, the described strategy is extendable. By designing an appropriate surfactant, it is also possible for the fabrication of the finely structured carbon network and ultrathin graphitic sheets through the construction of the corresponding cubic and lamellar mesostructured templates.

  6. Carbon dioxide stripping in aquaculture. part 1: terminology and reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colt, John; Watten, Barnaby; Pfeiffer, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The removal of carbon dioxide gas in aquacultural systems is much more complex than for oxygen or nitrogen gas because of liquid reactions of carbon dioxide and their kinetics. Almost all published carbon dioxide removal information for aquaculture is based on the apparent removal value after the CO2(aq) + HOH ⇔ H2CO3 reaction has reached equilibrium. The true carbon dioxide removal is larger than the apparent value, especially for high alkalinities and seawater. For low alkalinity freshwaters (carbon dioxide removal.

  7. Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijgen, W.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    The increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, mainly caused by fossil fuel combustion, has lead to concerns about global warming. A possible technology that can contribute to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions is CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. The basic concept beh

  8. Carbon Residence Times in Pedogenic Carbonate Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monger, H.; Feng, Y.; Karnjanapiboonwang, A.

    2013-12-01

    Soil carbonate is a huge pool of terrestrial carbon that contains at least 930 to 940 Pg C and has influx rates on the order of 1 to 12 g CaCO3/m2/yr. Such large mass to flux ratios yield long mean residence times for carbon (e.g., 85,000 years)--assuming steady state. Like other global carbon pools, the soil carbonate pool has smaller sub-pools with higher influx rates and shorter mean residence times. For example, pedogenic carbonate in coppice dunes known to have formed since 1858 and carbonate formed on lithic artifacts in soils at archaeology sites suggests mean residence times can be as short as 120 years--again assuming steady state. Harder to assess are efflux rates as CO2 emissions or bicarbonate leaching. Some Bowen-ratio studies have nevertheless found evidence for CO2 emissions resulting from carbonate dissolution, and other studies have found evidence for bicarbonate leaching based on dissolution pipes through calcic horizons using soil morphology studies. Since an understanding of mean residence times are prerequisite for a better understanding of soil carbonate in the global carbon cycle, especially in a scenario of an expanding Aridosphere, more influx and efflux measurements are needed to evaluate the possibility of carbon sequestration by soil carbonate in hyperarid, arid, semiarid, or subhumid soils.

  9. Research on Welding Test of Grey Cast Iron and Low-Carbon Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Grey cast iron's welding itself is a complex proble m.So proper welding materials must be selected,complex welding techniques such as preheating before weldingslow cooling after welding etc,should be taken. However the carbon component in low-carbon steel is comparatively low,the carbo n of welded joint will diffuse to the low-carbon steel when it is welded with gr ey cast iron,which will cause the component of carbon greatly increased at the low-carbon steel side in HAZ,high carbon martensite and cracks ...

  10. C-H complex in Si observed at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, L.; Lavrov, E.V.; Bech Nielsen, B. [Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Inst. for Fysik og Astronomi

    1999-02-12

    Local vibrational modes of a carbon-hydrogen complex have been identified with infrared absorption spectroscopy. After implantation of protons or deuterons at {approx}20 K a carbon mode at 596 cm{sup -1} and a hydrogen mode at 1884 cm{sup -1} are observed in the sample annealed at 180 K. The two modes originate from the same defect, which is tentatively identified as bond centred hydrogen in the vicinity of a nearby substitutional carbon atom. (orig.) 10 refs.

  11. Composite carbon foam electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1997-05-06

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granulated materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

  12. Composite carbon foam electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1997-01-01

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivty and power to system energy.

  13. Carbon-carbon bond cleavage in activation of the prodrug nabumetone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varfaj, Fatbardha; Zulkifli, Siti N A; Park, Hyoung-Goo; Challinor, Victoria L; De Voss, James J; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2014-05-01

    Carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions are catalyzed by, among others, lanosterol 14-demethylase (CYP51), cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11), sterol 17β-lyase (CYP17), and aromatase (CYP19). Because of the high substrate specificities of these enzymes and the complex nature of their substrates, these reactions have been difficult to characterize. A CYP1A2-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction is required for conversion of the prodrug nabumetone to its active form, 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA). Despite worldwide use of nabumetone as an anti-inflammatory agent, the mechanism of its carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction remains obscure. With the help of authentic synthetic standards, we report here that the reaction involves 3-hydroxylation, carbon-carbon cleavage to the aldehyde, and oxidation of the aldehyde to the acid, all catalyzed by CYP1A2 or, less effectively, by other P450 enzymes. The data indicate that the carbon-carbon bond cleavage is mediated by the ferric peroxo anion rather than the ferryl species in the P450 catalytic cycle. CYP1A2 also catalyzes O-demethylation and alcohol to ketone transformations of nabumetone and its analogs.

  14. Carbon Nanomembranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Polina; Gölzhäuser, Armin

    2017-03-01

    This chapter describes the formation and properties of one nanometer thick carbon nanomembranes (CNMs), made by electron induced cross-linking of aromatic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). The cross-linked SAMs are robust enough to be released from the surface and placed on solid support or over holes as free-standing membranes. Annealing at 1000K transforms CNMs into graphene accompanied by a change of mechanical stiffness and electrical resistance. The developed fabrication approach is scalable and provides molecular level control over thickness and homogeneity of the produced CNMs. The mechanisms of electron-induced cross-linking process are discussed in details. A variety of polyaromatic thiols: oligophenyls as well as small and extended condensed polycyclic hydrocarbons have been successfully employed, demonstrating that the structural and functional properties of the resulting nanomembranes are strongly determined by the structure of molecular monolayers. The mechanical properties of CNMs (Young's modulus, tensile strength and prestress) are characterized by bulge testing. The interpretation of the bulge test data relates the Young's modulus to the properties of single molecules and to the structure of the pristine SAMs. The gas transport through the CNM is measured onto polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) - thin film composite membrane. The established relationship of permeance and molecular size determines the molecular sieving mechanism of permeation through this ultrathin sheet.

  15. From carbon nanotubes to carbon atomic chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas García, Gilberto; Zhang, Weijia; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2010-10-01

    Carbyne is a linear allotrope of carbon. It is formed by a linear arrangement of carbon atoms with sp-hybridization. We present a reliable and reproducible experiment to obtain these carbon atomic chains using few-layer-graphene (FLG) sheets and a HRTEM. First the FLG sheets were synthesized from worm-like exfoliated graphite and then drop-casted on a lacey-carbon copper grid. Once in the TEM, two holes are opened near each other in a FLG sheet by focusing the electron beam into a small spot. Due to the radiation, the carbon atoms rearrange themselves between the two holes and form carbon fibers. The beam is concentrated on the carbon fibers in order excite the atoms and induce a tension until multi wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) is formed. As the radiation continues the MWCNT breaks down until there is only a single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT). Then, when the SWCNT breaks, an atomic carbon chain is formed, lasts for several seconds under the radiation and finally breaks. This demonstrates the stability of this carbon structure.

  16. Marine sequestration of carbon in bacterial metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechtenfeld, Oliver J; Hertkorn, Norbert; Shen, Yuan; Witt, Matthias; Benner, Ronald

    2015-03-31

    Linking microbial metabolomics and carbon sequestration in the ocean via refractory organic molecules has been hampered by the chemical complexity of dissolved organic matter (DOM). Here, using bioassay experiments and ultra-high resolution metabolic profiling, we demonstrate that marine bacteria rapidly utilize simple organic molecules and produce exometabolites of remarkable molecular and structural diversity. Bacterial DOM is similar in chemical composition and structural complexity to naturally occurring DOM in sea water. An appreciable fraction of bacterial DOM has molecular and structural properties that are consistent with those of refractory molecules in the ocean, indicating a dominant role for bacteria in shaping the refractory nature of marine DOM. The rapid production of chemically complex and persistent molecules from simple biochemicals demonstrates a positive feedback between primary production and refractory DOM formation. It appears that carbon sequestration in diverse and structurally complex dissolved molecules that persist in the environment is largely driven by bacteria.

  17. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  18. Mutagenicity of carbon nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallin, Håkan; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; White, Paul A;

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials such carbon nanotubes, graphene and fullerenes are some the most promising nanomaterials. Although carbon nanomaterials have been reported to possess genotoxic potential, it is imperitive to analyse the data on the genotoxicity of carbon nanomaterials in vivo and in vitro...

  19. Electroanalysis with carbon paste electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Svancara, Ivan; Walcarius, Alain; Vytras, Karel

    2011-01-01

    Introduction to Electrochemistry and Electroanalysis with Carbon Paste-Based ElectrodesHistorical Survey and GlossaryField in Publication Activities and LiteratureCarbon Pastes and Carbon Paste ElectrodesCarbon Paste as the Binary MixtureClassification of Carbon Pastes and Carbon Paste ElectrodesConstruction of Carbon Paste HoldersCarbon Paste as the Electrode MaterialPhysicochemical Properties of Carbon PastesElectrochemical Characteristics of Carbon PastesTesting of Unmodified CPEsIntera

  20. Complexed iron removal from groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munter, R.; Ojaste, H.; Sutt, J. [Tallinn Technical University, Tallinn (Estonia). Dept. of Environmental & Chemical Technology

    2005-07-01

    The paper demonstrates an intensive work carried out and results obtained on the pilot plant of the City of Kogalym Water Treatment Station (Tjumen, Siberia, Russian Federation) to elaborate on a contemporary nonreagent treatment technology for the local iron-rich groundwater. Several filter materials (Birm, Pyrolox, hydroanthracite, Everzit, granulated activated carbon) and chemical oxidants (ozone, chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, oxygen, and potassium permanganate) were tested to solve the problem with complexed iron removal from groundwater. The final elaborated technology consists of raw water intensive aeration in the gas-degas treatment unit followed by sequential filtration through hydroanthracite and the special anthracite Everzit.

  1. Mesoporous carbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng; Fulvio, Pasquale Fernando; Mayes, Richard T.; Wang, Xiqing; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Guo, Bingkun

    2014-09-09

    A conductive mesoporous carbon composite comprising conductive carbon nanoparticles contained within a mesoporous carbon matrix, wherein the conductive mesoporous carbon composite possesses at least a portion of mesopores having a pore size of at least 10 nm and up to 50 nm, and wherein the mesopores are either within the mesoporous carbon matrix, or are spacings delineated by surfaces of said conductive carbon nanoparticles when said conductive carbon nanoparticles are fused with each other, or both. Methods for producing the above-described composite, devices incorporating them (e.g., lithium batteries), and methods of using them, are also described.

  2. Pyrolyzed thin film carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Liger, Matthieu (Inventor); Harder, Theodore (Inventor); Konishi, Satoshi (Inventor); Miserendino, Scott (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method of making carbon thin films comprises depositing a catalyst on a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon in contact with the catalyst and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon. A method of controlling a carbon thin film density comprises etching a cavity into a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon into the cavity, and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon while in the cavity to form a carbon thin film. Controlling a carbon thin film density is achieved by changing the volume of the cavity. Methods of making carbon containing patterned structures are also provided. Carbon thin films and carbon containing patterned structures can be used in NEMS, MEMS, liquid chromatography, and sensor devices.

  3. The Stabilizing Effects in Gold Carbene Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes Dos Santos Comprido, Laura; Klein, Johannes E M N; Knizia, Gerald; Kästner, Johannes; Hashmi, A Stephen K

    2015-08-24

    Bonding and stabilizing effects in gold carbene complexes are investigated by using Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT) and the intrinsic bond orbital (IBO) approach. The π-stabilizing effects of organic substituents at the carbene carbon atom coordinated to the gold atom are evaluated for a series of recently isolated and characterized complexes, as well as intermediates of prototypical 1,6-enyne cyclization reactions. The results indicate that these effects are of particular importance for gold complexes especially because of the low π-backbonding contribution from the gold atom.

  4. STRUCTURE AND CHARACTERISTICS OF PATENTED HIGH-CARBON WIRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ju. Borisenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of bainite structure on mechanical characteristics of wire of steel 80 after patenting is studied. The quantity and structure state of bainite, providing high complex of mechanical characteristics of high-carbon wire, is determined.

  5. Conformal Carbon Nanotubes for Stray Light Suppression Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our objective is to apply CVD and non-CVD carbon nanotubes to complex shapes that numerous scientists have requested for stray light control.  Currently, CVD...

  6. Serine one-carbon catabolism with formate overflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiser, Johannes; Tumanov, Sergey; Maddocks, Oliver; Labuschagne, Christiaan Fred; Athineos, Dimitris; Van Den Broek, Niels; Mackay, Gillian M.; Gottlieb, Eyal; Blyth, Karen; Vousden, Karen; Kamphorst, Jurre J.; Vazquez, Alexei

    2016-01-01

    Serine catabolism to glycine and a one-carbon unit has been linked to the anabolic requirements of proliferating mammalian cells. However, genome-scale modeling predicts a catabolic role with one-carbon release as formate. We experimentally prove that in cultured cancer cells and nontransformed fibroblasts, most of the serine-derived one-carbon units are released from cells as formate, and that formate release is dependent on mitochondrial reverse 10-CHO-THF synthetase activity. We also show that in cancer cells, formate release is coupled to mitochondrial complex I activity, whereas in nontransformed fibroblasts, it is partially insensitive to inhibition of complex I activity. We demonstrate that in mice, about 50% of plasma formate is derived from serine and that serine starvation or complex I inhibition reduces formate synthesis in vivo. These observations transform our understanding of one-carbon metabolism and have implications for the treatment of diabetes and cancer with complex I inhibitors.

  7. Using Carbon Emissions Data to "Heat Up" Descriptive Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This article illustrates using carbon emissions data in an introductory statistics assignment. The carbon emissions data has desirable characteristics including: choice of measure; skewness; and outliers. These complexities allow research and public policy debate to be introduced. (Contains 4 figures and 2 tables.)

  8. Compositions and methods for cancer treatment using targeted carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Jr., Roger G.; Resasco, Daniel E.; Neves, Luis Filipe Ferreira

    2016-11-29

    Compositions for detecting and/or destroying cancer tumors and/or cancer cells via photodynamic therapy are disclosed, as well as methods of use thereof. The compositions comprise a linking protein or peptide attached to or otherwise physically associated with a carbon nanotube to form a targeted protein-carbon nanotube complex.

  9. Explorations of soil microbial processes driven by dissolved organic carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straathof, A.L.

    2015-01-01

    Explorations of soil microbial processes driven by dissolved organic carbon Angela L. Straathof June 17, 2015, Wageningen UR ISBN 978-94-6257-327-7 Abstract Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a complex, heterogeneous mixture of C compounds which, as

  10. Torsional Carbon Nanotube Artificial Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroughi, Javad; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Wallace, Gordon G.; Oh, Jiyoung; Kozlov, Mikhail E.; Fang, Shaoli; Mirfakhrai, Tissaphern; Madden, John D. W.; Shin, Min Kyoon; Kim, Seon Jeong; Baughman, Ray H.

    2011-10-01

    Rotary motors of conventional design can be rather complex and are therefore difficult to miniaturize; previous carbon nanotube artificial muscles provide contraction and bending, but not rotation. We show that an electrolyte-filled twist-spun carbon nanotube yarn, much thinner than a human hair, functions as a torsional artificial muscle in a simple three-electrode electrochemical system, providing a reversible 15,000° rotation and 590 revolutions per minute. A hydrostatic actuation mechanism, as seen in muscular hydrostats in nature, explains the simultaneous occurrence of lengthwise contraction and torsional rotation during the yarn volume increase caused by electrochemical double-layer charge injection. The use of a torsional yarn muscle as a mixer for a fluidic chip is demonstrated.

  11. Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide on Activated Carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Guo; Liping Chang; Kechang Xie

    2006-01-01

    The adsorption of CO2 on a raw activated carbon A and three modified activated carbon samples B, C, and D at temperatures ranging from 303 to 333 K and the thermodynamics of adsorption have been investigated using a vacuum adsorption apparatus in order to obtain more information about the effect of CO2 on removal of organic sulfur-containing compounds in industrial gases. The active ingredients impregnated in the carbon samples show significant influence on the adsorption for CO2 and its volumes adsorbed on modified carbon samples B, C, and D are all larger than that on the raw carbon sample A. On the other hand, the physical parameters such as surface area, pore volume, and micropore volume of carbon samples show no influence on the adsorbed amount of CO2. The Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) equation was the best model for fitting the adsorption data on carbon samples A and B, while the Freundlich equation was the best fit for the adsorption on carbon samples C and D. The isosteric heats of adsorption on carbon samples A, B, C, and D derived from the adsorption isotherms using the Clapeyron equation decreased slightly increasing surface loading. The heat of adsorption lay between 10.5 and 28.4 kJ/mol, with the carbon sample D having the highest value at all surface coverages that were studied. The observed entropy change associated with the adsorption for the carbon samples A, B, and C (above the surface coverage of 7 ml/g) was lower than the theoretical value for mobile adsorption. However, it was higher than the theoretical value for mobile adsorption but lower than the theoretical value for localized adsorption for carbon sample D.

  12. Immobilized Ruthenium Catalyst for Carbon Dioxide Hydrogenation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Min YU; Jin Hua FEI; Yi Ping ZHANG; Xiao Ming ZHENG

    2006-01-01

    Three kinds of cross linked polystyrene resin (PS) supported ruthenium complexes were developed as catalysts for the synthesis of formic acid from carbon dioxide hydrogenation. Many factors, such as the functionalized supports, solvents and ligands, could influence their activities and reuse performances greatly. These immobilized catalysts also offer the industrial advantages such as easy separation.

  13. High frequency conductivity in carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Abukari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on theoretical analysis of high frequency conductivity in carbon nanotubes. Using the kinetic equation with constant relaxation time, an analytical expression for the complex conductivity is obtained. The real part of the complex conductivity is initially negative at zero frequency and become more negative with increasing frequency, until it reaches a resonance minimum at ω ∼ ωB for metallic zigzag CNs and ω < ωB for armchair CNs. This resonance enhancement is indicative for terahertz gain without the formation of current instabilities induced by negative dc conductivity. We noted that due to the high density of states of conduction electrons in metallic zigzag carbon nanotubes and the specific dispersion law inherent in hexagonal crystalline structure result in a uniquely high frequency conductivity than the corresponding values for metallic armchair carbon nanotubes. We suggest that this phenomenon can be used to suppress current instabilities that are normally associated with a negative dc differential conductivity.

  14. Indium-carbon pairs in germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tessema, G; Vianden, R [Helmholtz Institut fuer Strahlen-und Kernphysik, Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 14-16, 53115 Bonn (Germany)

    2003-08-06

    The interactions of carbon with the probe nucleus {sup 111}In have been studied in germanium using the perturbed angular correlation method, which has the ability to detect the microscopic environments of the probe atom by means of the interaction of the nuclear moments of the probe with the surrounding electromagnetic fields. At high dose carbon implantation in germanium two complexes have been identified by their unique quadrupole interaction frequencies. An interaction frequency of {nu}{sub Q1} = 207(1) MHz ({eta} = 0.16(3)) appeared at annealing temperatures below 650 deg. C. Above 650 deg. C, it was replaced by a second interaction frequency of {nu}{sub Q2} 500(1) MHz ({eta} = 0). The frequencies are attributed to two different carbon-indium pairs. The orientation of the corresponding electric field gradients and the thermal stability of the defect complexes are studied.

  15. ELECTROCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF NANOPOROUS CARBON ELECTRODES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Nigu

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical double layer and electrochemical characteristics at the nanoporous carbon | (C2H54NBF4 + acetonitrile interface have been studied by the cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy methods. The value of zero charge potential (0.23 V vs. SCE in H2O, the region of ideal polarizability and other characteristics have been established. Analysis of complex plane plots shows that the nanoporous carbon | x M (C2H54NBF4 + acetonitrile interface can be simulated by the equivalent circuit, in which the two parallel conduction parts in the solid and liquid phases are interconnected by the double layer capacitance in parallel with the complex admittance of hindered reaction of the charge transfer process. The values of the characteristic frequency depend on the electrolyte concentration and on the electrode potential, i.e. on the nature of ions adsorbed at the surface of nanoporous carbon electrode.

  16. Radical carbon-carbon bond formations enabled by visible light active photocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallentin, Carl-Johan; Nguyen, John D; Stephenson, Corey R J

    2012-01-01

    This mini-review highlights the Stephenson group's contribution to the field of photoredox catalysis with emphasis on carbon-carbon bond formation. The realization of photoredox mediated reductive dehalogenation initiated investigations toward both intra- and intermolecular coupling reactions. These reactions commenced via visible light-mediated reduction of activated halogens to give carbon-centered radicals that were subsequently involved in carbon-carbon bond forming transformations. The developed protocols using Ru and Ir based polypyridyl complexes as photoredox catalysts were further tuned to efficiently catalyze overall redox neutral atom transfer radical addition reactions. Most recently, a simplistic flow reactor technique has been utilized to affect a broad scope of photocatalytic transformations with significant enhancement in reaction efficiency.

  17. Carbon fuel cells with carbon corrosion suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F [Oakland, CA

    2012-04-10

    An electrochemical cell apparatus that can operate as either a fuel cell or a battery includes a cathode compartment, an anode compartment operatively connected to the cathode compartment, and a carbon fuel cell section connected to the anode compartment and the cathode compartment. An effusion plate is operatively positioned adjacent the anode compartment or the cathode compartment. The effusion plate allows passage of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide exhaust channels are operatively positioned in the electrochemical cell to direct the carbon dioxide from the electrochemical cell.

  18. CATALYTIC ACTIVITIES OF RARE-EARTH CALIXARENE COMPLEXES IN POLYMER SYNTHESES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-quan Shen

    2005-01-01

    The studies of our group on the catalytic activities of rare earth calixarene complexes in polymer syntheses are reviewed. Rare earth calixarene complexes are effect catalysts for the polymerizations of butadiene, isoprene, ethylene,styrene, propylene oxide, styrene oxide, trimethylene carbonate and 2,2-dimethyl-trimethylene carbonate.

  19. Delithiation kinetics study of carbon coated and carbon free LiFePO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepage, D.; Sobh, F.; Kuss, C.; Liang, G.; Schougaard, S. B.

    2014-06-01

    A chemical oxidation method was employed to measure the kinetics of lithium release from LiFePO4 during oxidation. Similar to potential step measurements, the chemical method simplifies quantification compared to the common electrochemical techniques (PITT, GITT etc.). It was found that the overall release of lithium fits one dimensional diffusion kinetics, however, it is also shown that the mechanism must be more complex as the derived activation energy led to an unusually low attack rate of ∼108 Hz. A comparison of carbon coated/carbon free LiFePO4 samples indicated that the carbon coating has only a marginal effect on the delithiation kinetics.

  20. Compositional Zoning and Mn-Cr Systematics in Carbonates from the Y791198 CM2 Carbonaceous Chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brearley, Adrian J.; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Browning, Lauren

    2001-01-01

    Cathodoluminescence and microprobe analyses show that carbonates in Y791198 exhibit complex zoning. Cr-Mn dating suggests formation of carbonates 10 Ma after CAI formation Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract..

  1. Understanding the Organo-Carbonate Associations in Carbonaceous Chondrites with the Use of Micro-Raman Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    Carbonates can potentially provide sites for organic materials to accrue and develop into complex macromolecules. This study examines the organics associated with carbonates in carbonaceous chondrites using micron-Raman imaging.

  2. Modelling carbon overconsumption and the formation of extracellular particulate organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schartau, M.; Engel, A.; Schröter, J.; Thoms, S.; Völker, C.; Wolf-Gladrow, D.

    2007-07-01

    During phytoplankton growth a fraction of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) assimilated by phytoplankton is exuded in the form of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), which can be transformed into extracellular particulate organic carbon (POC). A major fraction of extracellular POC is associated with carbon of transparent exopolymer particles (TEP; carbon content = TEPC) that form from dissolved polysaccharides (PCHO). The exudation of PCHO is linked to an excessive uptake of DIC that is not directly quantifiable from utilisation of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), called carbon overconsumption. Given these conditions, the concept of assuming a constant stoichiometric carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N) ratio for estimating new production of POC from DIN uptake becomes inappropriate. Here, a model of carbon overconsumption is analysed, combining phytoplankton growth with TEPC formation. The model describes two modes of carbon overconsumption. The first mode is associated with DOC exudation during phytoplankton biomass accumulation. The second mode is decoupled from algal growth, but leads to a continuous rise in POC while particulate organic nitrogen (PON) remains constant. While including PCHO coagulation, the model goes beyond a purely physiological explanation of building up carbon rich particulate organic matter (POM). The model is validated against observations from a mesocosm study. Maximum likelihood estimates of model parameters, such as nitrogen- and carbon loss rates of phytoplankton, are determined. The optimisation yields results with higher rates for carbon exudation than for the loss of organic nitrogen. It also suggests that the PCHO fraction of exuded DOC was 63±20% during the mesocosm experiment. Optimal estimates are obtained for coagulation kernels for PCHO transformation into TEPC. Model state estimates are consistent with observations, where 30% of the POC increase was attributed to TEPC formation. The proposed model is of low complexity and is applicable

  3. Modelling carbon overconsumption and the formation of extracellular particulate organic carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Völker

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available During phytoplankton growth a fraction of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC assimilated by phytoplankton is exuded in the form of dissolved organic carbon (DOC, which can be transformed into extracellular particulate organic carbon (POC. A major fraction of extracellular POC is associated with carbon of transparent exopolymer particles (TEP; carbon content = TEPC that form from dissolved polysaccharides (PCHO. The exudation of PCHO is linked to an excessive uptake of DIC that is not directly quantifiable from utilisation of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN, called carbon overconsumption. Given these conditions, the concept of assuming a constant stoichiometric carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N ratio for estimating new production of POC from DIN uptake becomes inappropriate. Here, a model of carbon overconsumption is analysed, combining phytoplankton growth with TEPC formation. The model describes two modes of carbon overconsumption. The first mode is associated with DOC exudation during phytoplankton biomass accumulation. The second mode is decoupled from algal growth, but leads to a continuous rise in POC while particulate organic nitrogen (PON remains constant. While including PCHO coagulation, the model goes beyond a purely physiological explanation of building up carbon rich particulate organic matter (POM. The model is validated against observations from a mesocosm study. Maximum likelihood estimates of model parameters, such as nitrogen- and carbon loss rates of phytoplankton, are determined. The optimisation yields results with higher rates for carbon exudation than for the loss of organic nitrogen. It also suggests that the PCHO fraction of exuded DOC was 63±20% during the mesocosm experiment. Optimal estimates are obtained for coagulation kernels for PCHO transformation into TEPC. Model state estimates are consistent with observations, where 30% of the POC increase was attributed to TEPC formation. The proposed model is of low complexity and is

  4. Modelling carbon overconsumption and the formation of extracellular particulate organic carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schartau

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available During phytoplankton growth a fraction of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC assimilated by phytoplankton is exuded in the form of dissolved organic carbon (DOC, which can be transformed into extracellular particulate organic carbon (POC. A major fraction of extracellular POC is associated with carbon of transparent exopolymer particles (TEP; carbon content = TEPC that form from dissolved polysaccharides (PCHO. The exudation of PCHO is linked to an excessive uptake of DIC that is not directly quantifiable from utilisation of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN, called carbon overconsumption. Given these conditions, the concept of assuming a constant stoichiometric carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N ratio for estimating new production of POC from DIN uptake becomes inappropriate. Here, a model of carbon overconsumption is analysed, combining phytoplankton growth with TEPC formation. The model describes two modes of carbon overconsumption. The first mode is associated with DOC exudation during phytoplankton biomass accumulation. The second mode is decoupled from algal growth, but leads to a continuous rise in POC while particulate organic nitrogen (PON remains constant. While including PCHO coagulation, the model goes beyond a purely physiological explanation of building up carbon rich particulate organic matter (POM. The model is validated against observations from a mesocosm study. Maximum likelihood estimates of model parameters, such as nitrogen- and carbon loss rates of phytoplankton, are determined. The optimisation yields results with higher rates for carbon exudation than for the loss of organic nitrogen. It also suggests that the PCHO fraction of exuded DOC was 63±20% during the mesocosm experiment. Optimal estimates are obtained for coagulation kernels for PCHO transformation into TEPC. Model state estimates are consistent with observations, where 30% of the POC increase was attributed to TEPC formation. The proposed model is of low complexity and is

  5. Composting MSW and sewage sludge with effective complex microorganisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The effects of complex microorganisms in composting process of the municipal solid waste (MSW) and sludge were examined through inspecting biomass, temperature, oxygen consumption, organic mater, and C/N (the ratio of carbon and nitrogen). The experimental results shows: complex microorganisms are effective to compose organic matter and speedup composting change into humus.

  6. Metallic carbon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, M.L.; Crespi, V.H.; Louie, S.G.S.; Zettl, A.K.

    1999-11-30

    Novel metallic forms of planar carbon are described, as well as methods of designing and making them. Nonhexagonal arrangements of carbon are introduced into a graphite carbon network essentially without destroying the planar structure. Specifically a form of carbon comprising primarily pentagons and heptagons, and having a large density of states at the Fermi level is described. Other arrangements of pentagons and heptagons that include some hexagons, and structures incorporating squares and octagons are additionally disclosed. Reducing the bond angle symmetry associated with a hexagonal arrangement of carbons increases the likelihood that the carbon material will have a metallic electron structure.

  7. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Kalpana; Srivastava, Anchal; Srivastava, O N

    2005-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes play a fundamental role in the rapidly developing field of nanoscience and nanotechnology because of their unique properties and high potential for applications. In this article, the different synthesis methods of carbon nanotubes (both multi-walled and single-walled) are reviewed. From the industrial point of view, the chemical vapor deposition method has shown advantages over laser vaporization and electric arc discharge methods. This article also presents recent work in the controlled synthesis of carbon nanotubes with ordered architectures. Special carbon nanotube configurations, such as nanocoils, nanohorns, bamboo-shaped and carbon cylinder made up from carbon nanotubes are also discussed.

  8. Instantaneous carbon-carbon bond formation using a microchannel reactor with a catalytic membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uozumi, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Yoichi M A; Beppu, Tomohiko; Fukuyama, Naoshi; Ueno, Masaharu; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2006-12-20

    Instantaneous catalytic carbon-carbon bond forming reactions were achieved in a microchannel reactor having a polymeric palladium complex membrane. The catalytic membrane was constructed inside the microchannel via self-assembling complexation at the interface between the organic and aqueous phases flowing laminarly, where non-cross-linked polymer-bound phosphine and ammonium tetrachloropalladate dissolved, respectively. A palladium-catalyzed coupling reaction of aryl halides and arylboronic acids was performed using the microchannel reactor to give quantitative yields of biaryls within 4 s of retention time in the defined channel region.

  9. Electrocatalytic Oxidation of H2O2 at a Carbon Paste Electrode Modified with a Nickel (Ⅱ)-5, 11,17, 23-Tetra-Tert-Butyl-25,27-Bis ( Diethylcarbamoylmethoxy ) Calix[ 4 ] Arene Complex and Its Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiChun-ya; ChertYong; WangChang-fa; LiHai-bing; ChenYuan-yin

    2003-01-01

    Electrochemical behavior of a carbon paste elec-trode (CPE) modified with nickel(Ⅱ)-5, 11, 17, 23-tetra-tert-butyl-25, 27-bis (diethylcarhamoylmethoxy) calix[4] arene (Ni(Ⅱ)-L) complex and its electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of hydrogen peroxide were investigated by cyclic voham-metric technique in a 5.0 × 10-2 mol/L NaClO4 + 1. 0× 10-3 mol/L NaOH solution. It was found that Ni(Ⅱ)-L acts as an effective catalyst for the oxidation of hydrogen peroxide. The modified electrode exhibited a linear response over a hydrogen peroxide concentrations in the range of 2. 0 × 10-6--1.0 × 10-4 mol/L with a detection limit as low as 1.0× 10-6 mol/L. The relative standard deviation was 3. 5% for 5 successive determi-nations of H2O2 at 1.0×10-5 mol/L. The modified electrode was used successfully in rainwater analysis.

  10. Modern carbonate mound systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriet, J. P.; Dullo, C.

    2003-04-01

    Carbonate mounds are prominent features throughout the geological record. In many hydrocarbon provinces, they form prime reservoir structures. But recent investigations have increasingly reported occurrences of large mound clusters at the surface of the seabed, or buried at shallow depth on modern ocean margins, and in particular in basins rich in hydrocarbons. Such exciting new observations along the West-European margin are promising for elucidating the setting and environment of modern carbonate mounds, but at the same time they confront us with puzzling or sometimes contradictory observations in the quest for their genesis. Spectacular cold-water coral communities have colonized such mounds, but convincing arguments for recognizing them as prime builders are still lacking. The geological record provides ample evidence of microbial mediation in mound build-up and stabilisation, but as long as mound drilling is lacking, we have no opportunity to verify the role of such processes and identify the key actors in the earliest stage of onset and development of modern mounds. Some evidence from the past record and from present very-high resolution observations in the shallow seabed suggest an initial control by fluid venting, and fluid migration pathways have been imaged or are tentatively reconstructed by modelling in the concerned basins, but the ultimate link in the shallow subsurface seems still to elude a large part of our efforts. Surface sampling and analyses of both corals and surface sediments have largely failed in giving any conclusive evidence of present-day or recent venting in the considered basins. But on the other hand, applying rigourously the interpretational keys derived from e.g. Porcupine Seabight settings off NW Ireland on brand new prospective settings e.g. on the Moroccan margin have resulted in the discovery of totally new mound settings, in the middle of a field of giant, active mud volcanoes. Keys are apparently working, but we still do not

  11. New PHA products using unrelated carbon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, Fernanda; de Andrade Rodrigues, Maria Filomena

    2011-10-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) are natural polyesters stored by a wide range of bacteria as carbon source reserve. Due to its chemical characteristics and biodegradability PHA can be used in chemical, medical and pharmaceutical industry for many human purposes. Over the past years, few Burkholderia species have become known for production of PHA. Aside from that, these bacteria seem to be interesting for discovering new PHA compositions which is important to different industrial applications. In this paper, we introduce two new strains which belong either to Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) or genomovar-type, Burkholderia cepacia SA3J and Burkholderia contaminans I29B, both PHA producers from unrelated carbon sources. The classification was based on 16S rDNA and recA partial sequence genes and cell wall fatty acids composition. These two strains were capable to produce different types of PHA monomers or precursors. Unrelated carbon sources were used for growth and PHA accumulation. The amount of carbon source evaluated, or mixtures of them, was increased with every new experiment until it reaches eighteen carbon sources. As first bioprospection experiments staining methods were used with colony fluorescent dye Nile Red and the cell fluorescent dye Nile Blue A. Gas chromatography analysis coupled to mass spectrometry was used to evaluate the PHA composition on each strain cultivated on different carbon sources. The synthesized polymers were composed by short chain length-PHA (scl-PHA), especially polyhydroxybutyrate, and medium chain length-PHA (mcl-PHA) depending on the carbon source used.

  12. Carbon Nanomaterials for Road Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaporotskova Irina Vladimirovna

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The requirement of developing and modernizing the roads in Russia and in the Volgograd region in particular, is based on need of expanding the directions of scientific research on road and transport complexes. They have to be aimed at the development of the theory of transport streams, traffic safety increase, and, first of all, at the application of original methods of road development and modernization, introduction of modern technologies and road-building materials.On the basis of the analysis of the plans for transportation sphere development in the Volgograd region assuming the need to apply the new technologies allowing to create qualitative paving, the authors propose the technology of creating a heavy-duty paving with the use of carbon nanomaterial. The knowledge on strengthening the characteristics of carbon nanotubes is a unique material for nanotechnology development which allowed to assume the analysis of general information about asphalt concrete. The analysis showed that carbon nanotubes can be used for improvement of operational characteristics of asphalt concrete, and it is possible to carry out additives of nanotubes in hot as well as in cold bitumen. The article contains the basic principles of creation of the new road material received by means of bitumen reinforcing by carbon nanotubes. The structures received by the offered technique binding on the basis of the bitumens modified by carbon nanomaterial can be used for coverings and bases on highways of all categories in all road and climatic zones of Russia. The technical result consists in increasing the durability and elasticity of the received asphalt covering, and also the increase of water resistance, heat resistance and frost resistance, the expansion of temperature range of its laying in the field of negative temperatures.

  13. Structurally simple complexes of CO2

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Luke J.; Robertson, Katherine N.; Richard A. Kemp; TUONONEN, Heikki; Clyburne, Jason A. C.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to bind CO2 through the formation of low-energy, easily-broken, bonds could prove invaluable in a variety of chemical contexts. For example, weak bonds to CO2 would greatly decrease the cost of the energy-intensive sorbent-regeneration step common to most carbon capture technologies. Furthermore, exploration of this field could lead to the discovery of novel CO2 chemistry. Reduction of complexed carbon dioxide might generate chemical feedstocks for the preparation of value-added p...

  14. Carbon Sequestration in Wetland Soils of the Northern Gulf of Mexico Coastal Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coastal wetlands play an important but complex role in the global carbon cycle, contributing to the ecosystem service of greenhouse gas regulation through carbon sequestration. Although coastal wetlands occupy a small percent of the total US land area, their potential for carbon...

  15. Preliminary research on movement regularity of fine carbon fiber powder injected into intracrania of mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FEI Ke-xiang; LI Guo-wei; GONG Ti; WANG Hong; PENG Xian-gao; GAO Lin; Zhang Yan-xiang; LIU Lian-tao

    2001-01-01

    @@ The carbon fiber and carbon fiber for complex materials implanted have been applied to the clinic medicine, in which they are served as the materials for repairing tissues and organs as well as the materials of artificial tissuesand organs. The carbon fiber also acts as the surrogate of extracellular matrix in the study of tissue engineering tendon,and so on.

  16. Substantial global carbon uptake by cement carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Fengming; Davis, Steven J.; Ciais, Philippe; Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Guan, Dabo; Pade, Claus; Shi, Tiemao; Syddall, Mark; Lv, Jie; Ji, Lanzhu; Bing, Longfei; Wang, Jiaoyue; Wei, Wei; Yang, Keun-Hyeok; Lagerblad, Björn; Galan, Isabel; Andrade, Carmen; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Zhu

    2016-12-01

    Calcination of carbonate rocks during the manufacture of cement produced 5% of global CO2 emissions from all industrial process and fossil-fuel combustion in 2013. Considerable attention has been paid to quantifying these industrial process emissions from cement production, but the natural reversal of the process--carbonation--has received little attention in carbon cycle studies. Here, we use new and existing data on cement materials during cement service life, demolition, and secondary use of concrete waste to estimate regional and global CO2 uptake between 1930 and 2013 using an analytical model describing carbonation chemistry. We find that carbonation of cement materials over their life cycle represents a large and growing net sink of CO2, increasing from 0.10 GtC yr-1 in 1998 to 0.25 GtC yr-1 in 2013. In total, we estimate that a cumulative amount of 4.5 GtC has been sequestered in carbonating cement materials from 1930 to 2013, offsetting 43% of the CO2 emissions from production of cement over the same period, not including emissions associated with fossil use during cement production. We conclude that carbonation of cement products represents a substantial carbon sink that is not currently considered in emissions inventories.

  17. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and electronic structure of some new Cu(I) carbene complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chinnappan Sivasankar; Christina Baskaran; Ashoka G Samuelson

    2006-05-01

    Reaction of oligomeric Cu(I) complexes [Cu{-S-C(=NR)(O-Ar-CH3)}] with Lewis acids gave Cu(I) carbene complexes, which were characterized by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Cu(I) carbene complexes could be directly generated from RNCS, Cu(I)-OAr and Lewis acids; this method can be used to prepare Cu(I) carbene complexes with different substitutents on the carbene carbon. The complexes were unreactive towards olefins and do not undergo cyclopropanation. Electronic structure calculations (DFT) show that the charge on the carbene carbon plays an important role in controlling the reactivity of the carbene complex.

  18. Potassium carbonate poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potassium carbonate is a white powder used to make soap, glass, and other items. This article discusses poisoning from swallowing or breathing in potassium carbonate. This article is for information only. Do ...

  19. Sodium carbonate poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodium carbonate (known as washing soda or soda ash) is a chemical found in many household and ... products. This article focuses on poisoning due to sodium carbonate. This article is for information only. Do ...

  20. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  1. Carbon Monoxide (CO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IAQ) Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Carbon Monoxide's Impact on Indoor Air Quality On this ... length of exposure. Top of Page Sources of Carbon Monoxide Sources of CO include: unvented kerosene and ...

  2. Soil Organic Carbon Stock

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Soil organic carbon (SOC) is the carbon held within soil organic constituents (i.e., products produced as dead plants and animals decompose and the soil microbial...

  3. Biomass Carbon Stock

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Biomass carbon includes carbon stored in above- and below-ground live plant components (such as leaf, branch, stem and root) as well as in standing and down dead...

  4. Trading forest carbon - OSU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issues associate with trading carbon sequestered in forests are discussed. Scientific uncertainties associated with carbon measurement are discussed with respect to proposed accounting procedures. Major issues include: (1) Establishing baselines. (2) Determining additivity from f...

  5. Yeast Carbon Catabolite Repression†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gancedo, Juana M.

    1998-01-01

    Glucose and related sugars repress the transcription of genes encoding enzymes required for the utilization of alternative carbon sources; some of these genes are also repressed by other sugars such as galactose, and the process is known as catabolite repression. The different sugars produce signals which modify the conformation of certain proteins that, in turn, directly or through a regulatory cascade affect the expression of the genes subject to catabolite repression. These genes are not all controlled by a single set of regulatory proteins, but there are different circuits of repression for different groups of genes. However, the protein kinase Snf1/Cat1 is shared by the various circuits and is therefore a central element in the regulatory process. Snf1 is not operative in the presence of glucose, and preliminary evidence suggests that Snf1 is in a dephosphorylated state under these conditions. However, the enzymes that phosphorylate and dephosphorylate Snf1 have not been identified, and it is not known how the presence of glucose may affect their activity. What has been established is that Snf1 remains active in mutants lacking either the proteins Grr1/Cat80 or Hxk2 or the Glc7 complex, which functions as a protein phosphatase. One of the main roles of Snf1 is to relieve repression by the Mig1 complex, but it is also required for the operation of transcription factors such as Adr1 and possibly other factors that are still unidentified. Although our knowledge of catabolite repression is still very incomplete, it is possible in certain cases to propose a partial model of the way in which the different elements involved in catabolite repression may be integrated. PMID:9618445

  6. Quantifying Carbon-14 for Biology Using Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartt, A Daniel; Ognibene, Ted J; Bench, Graham; Turteltaub, Kenneth W

    2016-09-06

    A cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) instrument was developed using mature, robust hardware for the measurement of carbon-14 in biological studies. The system was characterized using carbon-14 elevated glucose samples and returned a linear response up to 387 times contemporary carbon-14 concentrations. Carbon-14 free and contemporary carbon-14 samples with varying carbon-13 concentrations were used to assess the method detection limit of approximately one-third contemporary carbon-14 levels. Sources of inaccuracies are presented and discussed, and the capability to measure carbon-14 in biological samples is demonstrated by comparing pharmacokinetics from carbon-14 dosed guinea pigs analyzed by both CRDS and accelerator mass spectrometry. The CRDS approach presented affords easy access to powerful carbon-14 tracer techniques that can characterize complex biochemical systems.

  7. SILICA SURFACED CARBON FIBERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    carbon fibers . Several economical and simple processes were developed for obtaining research quantities of silica surfaced carbon filaments. Vat dipping processes were utilized to deposit an oxide such as silica onto the surface and into the micropores of available carbon or graphite base fibers. High performance composite materials were prepared with the surface treated carbon fibers and various resin matrices. The ablative characteristics of these composites were very promising and exhibited fewer limitations than either silica or...treated

  8. Study on Microwave Dielectric Property of Carbon Black and Short Carbon Fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Hong-huan; ZHU Dong-mei; LUO Fa; ZHOU Wan-cheng; WANG Xiao-yan

    2006-01-01

    Carbon black and carbon fibers of different lengths were introduced in different matrices at different ratios to explore their microwave dielectric properties under 8.2 GHz-12.4 GHz. It is found that the actual dielectric constants of the samples containing carbon black are in a two-order function of the contents of carbon black ((з)′,(з)″=Av2+Bv+C) and the complex dielectric constants show an obvious frequency response. Of the added fibers of different lengths, the 4 mm-long one could well disperse in the matrices having not only good frequency response, but also larger real parts, imaginary parts and loss values. The imaginary parts and the loss values (tanδ) of the samples with 4 mm-long carbon fibers added increase linearly with the contents of fiber increasing. So it is practicable to adjust the dielectric parameters of the material in a wide range by changing the added amount of carbon black, and the carbon fiber or altering the lengths of the carbon fiber added.

  9. Protolytic carbon film technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renschler, C.L.; White, C.A.

    1996-04-01

    This paper presents a technique for the deposition of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) on virtually any surface allowing carbon film formation with only the caveat that the substrate must withstand carbonization temperatures of at least 600 degrees centigrade. The influence of processing conditions upon the structure and properties of the carbonized film is discussed. Electrical conductivity, microstructure, and morphology control are also described.

  10. Carbon Goes To…

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savasci, Funda

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this activity are to help middle school students understand the carbon cycle and realize how human activities affect the carbon cycle. This activity consists of two parts. The first part of the activity focuses on the carbon cycle, especially before the Industrial Revolution, while the second part of the activity focuses on how…

  11. Carbon nanotube quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapmaz, S.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature electron transport measurements on individual single wall carbon nanotubes are described in this thesis. Carbon nanotubes are small hollow cylinders made entirely out of carbon atoms. At low temperatures (below ~10 K) finite length nanotubes form quantum dots. Because of its small si

  12. Carbon sequestration on Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Christopher S.; Ehlmann, Bethany L.

    2015-01-01

    On Earth, carbon sequestration in geologic units plays an important role in the carbon cycle, scrubbing CO_2 from the atmosphere for long-term storage. While carbonate is identified in low abundances within the dust and soils of Mars, at

  13. Global Carbon Budget 2016

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quéré, Le Corinne; Andrew, Robbie M.; Canadell, Josep G.; Sitch, Stephen; Korsbakken, Jan Ivar; Peters, Glen P.; Manning, Andrew C.; Boden, Thomas A.; Tans, Pieter P.; Houghton, Richard A.; Keeling, Ralph F.; Alin, Simone; Andrews, Oliver D.; Anthoni, Peter; Barbero, Leticia; Bopp, Laurent; Chevallier, Frédéric; Chini, Louise P.; Ciais, Philippe; Currie, Kim; Delire, Christine; Doney, Scott C.; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Gkritzalis, Thanos; Harris, Ian; Hauck, Judith; Haverd, Vanessa; Hoppema, Mario; Klein Goldewijk, Kees; Jain, Atul K.; Kato, Etsushi; Körtzinger, Arne; Landschützer, Peter; Lefèvre, Nathalie; Lenton, Andrew; Lienert, Sebastian; Lombardozzi, Danica; Melton, Joe R.; Metzl, Nicolas; Millero, Frank; Monteiro, Pedro M.S.; Munro, David R.; Nabel, Julia E.M.S.; Nakaoka, S.; O'Brien, Kevin; Olsen, Are; Omar, Abdirahman M.; Ono, Tsuneo; Pierrot, Denis; Poulter, Benjamin; Rödenbeck, Christian; Salisbury, Joe; Schuster, Ute; Schwinger, Jörg; Séférian, Roland; Skjelvan, Ingunn; Stocker, Benjamin D.; Sutton, Adrienne J.; Takahashi, Taro; Tian, Hanqin; Tilbrook, Bronte; Laan-Luijkx, van der Ingrid T.; Werf, van der Guido R.; Viovy, Nicolas; Walker, Anthony P.; Wiltshire, Andrew J.; Zaehle, Sönke

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere – the “global carbon budget” – is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project futur

  14. Science Letters: Nitrogen doping of activated carbon loading Fe2O3 and activity in carbon-nitric oxide reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Xian-kai; ZOU Xue-quan; SHI Hui-xiang; WANG Da-hui

    2007-01-01

    Nitrogen doping of activated carbon loading Fe2O3 was performed by annealing in ammonia, and the activity of the modified carbon for NO reduction was studied in the presence of oxygen. Results show that Fe2O3 enhances the amount of surface oxygen complexes and facilitates nitrogen incorporation in the carbon, especially in the form of pyridinic nitrogen. The modified carbon shows excellent activity for NO reduction in the low temperature regime (<500 ℃) because of the cooperative effect of Fe2O3 and the surface nitrogen species.

  15. ACTIVATED CARBON FROM LIGNITE FOR WATER TREATMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwin S. Olson; Daniel J. Stepan

    2000-07-01

    High concentrations of humate in surface water result in the formation of excess amounts of chlorinated byproducts during disinfection treatment. These precursors can be removed in water treatment prior to disinfection using powdered activated carbon. In the interest of developing a more cost-effective method for removal of humates in surface water, a comparison of the activities of carbons prepared from North Dakota lignites with those of commercial carbons was conducted. Previous studies indicated that a commercial carbon prepared from Texas lignite (Darco HDB) was superior to those prepared from bituminous coals for water treatment. That the high alkali content of North Dakota lignites would result in favorable adsorptive properties for the very large humate molecules was hypothesized, owing to the formation of larger pores during activation. Since no standard humate test has been previously developed, initial adsorption testing was performed using smaller dye molecules with various types of ionic character. With the cationic dye, methylene blue, a carbon prepared from a high-sodium lignite (HSKRC) adsorbed more dye than the Darco HDB. The carbon from the low-sodium lignite was much inferior. With another cationic dye, malachite green, the Darco HDB was slightly better. With anionic dyes, methyl red and azocarmine-B, the results for the HSKRC and Darco HDB were comparable. A humate test was developed using Aldrich humic acid. The HSKRC and the Darco HDB gave equally high adsorption capacities for the humate (138 mg/g), consistent with the similarities observed in earlier tests. A carbon prepared from a high-sodium lignite from a different mine showed an outstanding improvement (201 mg/g). The carbons prepared from the low-sodium lignites from both mines showed poor adsorption capacities for humate. Adsorption isotherms were performed for the set of activated carbons in the humate system. These exhibited a complex behavior interpreted as resulting from two types

  16. Amorphous iron (II) carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sel, Ozlem; Radha, A.V.; Dideriksen, Knud;

    2012-01-01

    exothermic than that of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC). This suggests that enthalpy of crystallization in carbonate systems is ionic-size controlled, which may have significant implications in a wide variety of conditions, including geological sequestration of anthropogenic carbon dioxide.......Abstract The synthesis, characterization and crystallization energetics of amorphous iron (II) carbonate (AFC) are reported. AFC may form as a precursor for siderite (FeCO3). The enthalpy of crystallization (DHcrys) of AFC is similar to that of amorphous magnesium carbonate (AMC) and more...

  17. Minimizing activated carbons production cost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stavropoulos, G.G.; Zabaniotou, A.A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Univ. P. O. Box 1520, 54006, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2009-07-15

    A detailed economic evaluation of activated carbons production process from various raw materials is undertaken using the conventional economic indices (ROI, POT, and NPV). The fundamental factors that affect production cost were taken into account. It is concluded that for an attractive investment in activated carbons production one should select the raw material with the highest product yield, adopt a chemical activation production scheme and should base product price on product-surface area (or more generally on product adsorption capacity for the adsorbate in consideration). A raw material that well meets the above-mentioned criteria is petroleum coke but others are also promising (charcoals, and carbon black). Production cost then can be optimized by determining its minimum value of cost that results from the intercept between the curves of plant capacity and raw material cost - if any. Taking into account the complexity of such a techno-economic analysis, a useful suggestion could be to start the evaluations from a plant capacity corresponding to the break-even point, i. e. the capacity at which income equals production cost. (author)

  18. Separation of gas mixtures by supported complexes. Final report, 1 October 1982-30 September 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, D.A.; Hallen, R.T.; Lilga, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    This final report covers research performed to identify and demonstrate advantageous procedures for the chemical separation of gases, such as CO, CO/sub 2/, and H/sub 2/, from medium-Btu gas mixtures by use of supported complexes. Three complexes were chosen for rapid gas uptake and selectivity at 25/sup 0/C from among a group of 22 coordination complexes synthesized during this program. The three complexes showed considerable selectivity toward individual gases. For instance, Pd/sub 2/(dpm)/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ or bis-..mu..-(bisdiphenylphosphinomethane)-dichlorodipalladium (Pd-Pd), rapidly bound carbon monoxide from solution. This complex could be regenerated, with the carbon monoxide reversibly removed, by warming to 40/sup 0/C. The presence of other gases, such as carbon dioxide, oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, ethylene, or acetylene, had no effect upon the rapid uptake of carbon monoxide or its removal. Such selectivity was also noted with Ru(CO)/sub 2/(PPh/sub 3/)/sub 3/, biscarbonyltris(triphenylphosphine)ruthenium. Although this complex bound hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and oxygen in solution, the hydrogen was taken up twice as fast as carbon monoxide and seven times faster than oxygen. These gases could be removed from the complex with mild heat or decreased pressure. Crystalline Rh(OH)(CO)(PPh/sub 3/)/sub 2/, hydroxocarbonylbis(triphenylphosphine)rhodium, rapidly bound carbon dioxide; the complex was regenerated at 50/sup 0/C under reduced pressure. The rapid uptake of carbon dioxide by this complex was not changed in the presence of oxygen. In general the three selected crystalline or solvent dissolved complexes performed well in the absence of polymeric support. The stability and favorable kinetics of the three complexes suggest that they could be utilized in a solution system for gas separation (Conceptual Analyses and Preliminary Economics). Further, these complexes appear to be superb candidates as transport agents for facilitated-transport, membrane systems

  19. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes and the nanotube heterojunctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for nanoscale molecular electronic device components. Experimental measurements on the conductivity, rectifying behavior and conductivity-chirality correlation have also been made. While quasi-one dimensional simple heterojunctions between nanotubes with different electronic behavior can be generated by introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise all hexagon graphene sheet. Other complex 3- and 4-point junctions may require other mechanisms. Structural stability as well as local electronic density of states of various nanotube junctions are investigated using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GDBMD) scheme that incorporates non-orthogonality of the orbitals. The junctions investigated include straight and small angle heterojunctions of various chiralities and diameters; as well as more complex 'T' and 'Y' junctions which do not always obey the usual pentagon-heptagon pair rule. The study of local density of states (LDOS) reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap. The proposed three and four pointjunctions are one of the smallest possible tunnel junctions made entirely of carbon atoms. Furthermore the electronic behavior of the nanotube based device components can be taylored by doping with group III-V elements such as B and N, and BN nanotubes as a wide band gap semiconductor has also been realized in experiments. Structural properties of heteroatomic nanotubes comprising C, B and N will be discussed.

  20. Carbonate Cements from the Sverrefjell and Sigurdfjell Volcanoes, Svalbard Norway: Analogs for Martian Carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, D. F.; Treiman, A. H.; Morris, R.; Bish, D.; Amundsen, H.E.F.; Steele, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Sverrefjell and Sigurdfjell volcanic complexes erupted at 1Ma on Svalbard, Norway. Sverrefjell is a cone of cinders, pillow lavas and dikes; Sigurdfjell is elongate in outcrop and may represent a fissure eruption [1]. The lavas of both volcanos were volatile rich. The volcanos erupted under ice and were subsequently dissected by glaciation (glacial eratics are present on most of Sverrefjell, even on its summit). Eruption beneath an ice sheet is inferred, based on the presence of pillow lavas from near sea level to 1000 m above sea level. Sverrefjell contains the largest fraction of ultramafic xenoliths of any volcanic complex in the world, in places accounting for as much as 50% of the volume of the outcrop. The Sverrefjell and Sigurdfell volcanos contain carbonate cements of several varieties: (1) Amundsen [2] reported Mg-Fe-rich carbonate in sub-mm globules in basalts and ultramafic xenoliths from the volcanos. These globules are the best terrestrial analogs to the carbonate globules in the Mars meteorite ALH84001 [3]. (2) Thick (1-3 cm) coatings of carbonate cement drape the walls of vertical volcanic pipes or conduits on the flanks and near the present summit of Sverrefjell. Similar occurrences are found on Sigurdfjell. (3) Breccia-filled pipes or vents occur on Sverrefjell and Siggurdfjell in which the breccia fragments are cemented by carbonate. The fragments themselves commonly contain carbonate globules similar to those found in the basalts and ultramafic xenoliths.

  1. Metallacumulenes and carbide complexes. Final performance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selegue, J.P.

    1992-12-31

    We investigated many aspects of transition metal complexes of carbon-rich ligands, including cumulated transition metal carbene complexes of the types vinylidene (M=C=CR{sub 2})(M = Fe, Ru, Os, Mo, W), allenylidene (M=C=C=CR{sub 2}), and butatrienylidene (M=C=C=CR{sub 2}), as well as ``naked`` carbon ligands C{sub 1}, C{sub 2}, and C{sub 3}. In the last 3 years, we began to put some effort into studying the fullerenes. Finally, we investigated initial aspects of the coordination chemistry of thiophenes, from the perspectives of (1) modeling the transition- metal-catalyzed hydrodesulfurization of fossil fuels and (2) development of metal-doped, polythiophene-based polymers.

  2. Does carbon dioxide pool or stream in the subsurface?

    CERN Document Server

    Cardoso, Silvana S S

    2014-01-01

    Pools of carbon dioxide are found in natural geological accumulations and in engineered storage in saline aquifers. It has been thought that once this CO2 dissolves in the formation water, making it denser, convection streams would transport it efficiently to depth, but this may not be so. Here, we assess the impact of natural chemical reactions between the dissolved CO2 and the rock formation on the convection streams in the subsurface. We show that, while in carbonate rocks the streaming of dissolved carbon dioxide persists, the chemical interactions in silicate-rich rocks may curb this transport drastically and even inhibit it altogether. New laboratory experiments confirm the curtailing of convection by reaction. Wide and narrow streams of dense carbon-rich water are shut-off gradually as reaction strength increases until all transport of the pooled carbon dioxide occurs by slow molecular diffusion. These results show that the complex fluid dynamic and kinetic interactions between pooled carbon dioxide an...

  3. The carbon holdings of northern Ecuador's mangrove forests

    CERN Document Server

    Hamilton, Stuart E; Borbor, Mercy; Millones, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Within a GIS environment, we combine field measures of mangrove diameter, mangrove species distribution, and mangrove density with remotely sensed measures of mangrove location and mangrove canopy cover to estimate the mangrove carbon holdings of northern Ecuador. We find that the four northern estuaries of Ecuador contain approximately 7,742,999 t (plus or minus 15.47 percent) of standing carbon. Of particular high carbon holdings are the Rhizophora mangle dominated mangrove stands found in-and-around the Cayapas-Mataje Ecological Reserve in northern Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador and certain stands of Rhizophora mangle in-and-around the Isla Corazon y Fragata Wildlife Refuge in central Manabi Province, Ecuador. Our field driven mangrove carbon estimate is higher than all but one of the comparison models evaluated. We find that basic latitudinal mangrove carbon models performed at least as well, if not better, than the more complex species based allometric models in predicting standing carbon levels. In additi...

  4. Hyper Space Complex Number

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Shanguang

    2007-01-01

    A new kind of numbers called Hyper Space Complex Numbers and its algebras are defined and proved. It is with good properties as the classic Complex Numbers, such as expressed in coordinates, triangular and exponent forms and following the associative and commutative laws of addition and multiplication. So the classic Complex Number is developed from in complex plane with two dimensions to in complex space with N dimensions and the number system is enlarged also.

  5. Complex networks analysis of language complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Amancio, Diego R; Oliveira, Osvaldo N; Costa, Luciano da F; 10.1209/0295-5075/100/58002

    2013-01-01

    Methods from statistical physics, such as those involving complex networks, have been increasingly used in quantitative analysis of linguistic phenomena. In this paper, we represented pieces of text with different levels of simplification in co-occurrence networks and found that topological regularity correlated negatively with textual complexity. Furthermore, in less complex texts the distance between concepts, represented as nodes, tended to decrease. The complex networks metrics were treated with multivariate pattern recognition techniques, which allowed us to distinguish between original texts and their simplified versions. For each original text, two simplified versions were generated manually with increasing number of simplification operations. As expected, distinction was easier for the strongly simplified versions, where the most relevant metrics were node strength, shortest paths and diversity. Also, the discrimination of complex texts was improved with higher hierarchical network metrics, thus point...

  6. Catalysts in syntheses of carbon and carbon precursors

    OpenAIRE

    Mochida, Isao; Yoon, Seong-Ho; Qiao, Wenming

    2006-01-01

    Carbon materials have been applied in different fields because of their unique performances. Naturally, the physical and chemical structures of carbon precursors and carbon materials decide their properties and applications. Catalysts play a very important role in the synthesis of carbon precursors and carbon materials by controlling the molecular and compositional chemistry at the transformation of organic substrates into carbon through carbonaceous intermediates. Carbon materials of high pe...

  7. Dissolved Organic Carbon Cycling in Forested Watersheds: A Carbon Isotope Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, S. L.; Aravena, R.; Trumbore, S. E.; Dillon, P. J.

    1990-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is important in the acid-base chemistry of acid-sensitive freshwater systems; in the complexation, mobility, persistence, and toxicity of metals and other pollutants; and in lake carbon metabolism. Carbon isotopes (13C and 14C) are used to study the origin, transport, and fate of DOC in a softwater catchment in central Ontario. Precipitation, soil percolates, groundwaters, stream, beaver pond, and lake waters, and lake sediment pore water were characterized chemically and isotopically. In addition to total DOC, isotopic measurements were made on the humic and fulvic DOC fractions. The lake is a net sink for DOC. Δ14C results indicate that the turnover time of most of the DOC in streams, lakes, and wetlands is fast, less than 40 years, and on the same time scale as changes in acidic deposition. DOC in groundwaters is composed of older carbon than surface waters, indicating extensive cycling of DOC in the upper soil zone or aquifer.

  8. Carbon dioxide sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Prabir K. (Worthington, OH); Lee, Inhee (Columbus, OH); Akbar, Sheikh A. (Hilliard, OH)

    2011-11-15

    The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

  9. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal with different carbon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Nan; Zhou, Yan

    2016-06-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process is one of the most economical and sustainable methods for phosphorus removal from wastewater. However, the performance of EBPR can be affected by available carbon sources types in the wastewater that may induce different functional microbial communities in the process. Glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) and polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) are commonly found by coexisting in the EBPR process. Predominance of GAO population may lead to EBPR failure due to the competition on carbon source with PAO without contributing phosphorus removal. Carbon sources indeed play an important role in alteration of PAOs and GAOs in EBPR processes. Various types of carbon sources have been investigated for EBPR performance. Certain carbon sources tend to enrich specific groups of GAOs and/or PAOs. This review summarizes the types of carbon sources applied in EBPR systems and highlights the roles of these carbon sources in PAO and GAO competition. Both single (e.g., acetate, propionate, glucose, ethanol, and amino acid) and complex carbon sources (e.g., yeast extract, peptone, and mixed carbon sources) are discussed in this review. Meanwhile, the environmental friendly and economical carbon sources that are derived from waste materials, such as crude glycerol and wasted sludge, are also discussed and compared.

  10. Microbial Enzyme Activity and Carbon Cycling in Grassland Soil Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, S. D.; Jastrow, J. D.

    2004-12-01

    Extracellular enzymes are necessary to degrade complex organic compounds present in soils. Using physical fractionation procedures, we tested whether old soil carbon is spatially isolated from degradative enzymes across a prairie restoration chronosequence in Illinois, USA. We found that carbon-degrading enzymes were abundant in all soil fractions, including macroaggregates, microaggregates, and the clay fraction, which contains carbon with a mean residence time of ~200 years. The activities of two cellulose-degrading enzymes and a chitin-degrading enzyme were 2-10 times greater in organic matter fractions than in bulk soil, consistent with the rapid turnover of these fractions. Polyphenol oxidase activity was 3 times greater in the clay fraction than in the bulk soil, despite very slow carbon turnover in this fraction. Changes in enzyme activity across the restoration chronosequence were small once adjusted for increases in soil carbon concentration, although polyphenol oxidase activity per unit carbon declined by 50% in native prairie versus cultivated soil. These results are consistent with a `two-pool' model of enzyme and carbon turnover in grassland soils. In light organic matter fractions, enzyme production and carbon turnover both occur rapidly. However, in mineral-dominated fractions, both enzymes and their carbon substrates are immobilized on mineral surfaces, leading to slow turnover. Soil carbon accumulation in the clay fraction and across the prairie restoration chronosequence probably reflects increasing physical isolation of enzymes and substrates on the molecular scale, rather than the micron to millimeter scale.

  11. Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, A. A.; Calvin, M.

    1948-06-01

    Although the overall reaction of photosynthesis can be specified with some degree of certainty (CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O + light {yields} sugars + possibly other reduced substances), the intermediates through which the carbon passes during the course of this reduction have, until now, been largely a matter of conjecture. The availability of isotopic carbon, that is, a method of labeling the carbon dioxide, provides the possibility of some very direct experiments designed to recognize these intermediates and, perhaps, help to understand the complex sequence and interplay of reactions which must constitute the photochemical process itself. The general design of such experiments is an obvious one, namely the exposure of the green plant to radioactive carbon dioxide and light under a variety of conditions and for continually decreasing lengths of time, followed by the identification of the compounds into which the radioactive carbon is incorporated under each condition and time period. From such data it is clear that in principle, at least, it should be possible to establish the sequence of compounds in time through which the carbon passes on its path from carbon dioxide to the final products. In the course of shortening the photosynthetic times, one times, one ultimately arrives at the condition of exposing the plants to the radioactive carbon dioxide with a zero illumination time, that is, in the dark. Actually, in the work the systematic order of events was reversed, and they have begun by studying first the dark fixation and then the shorter photosynthetic times. The results of the beginnings of this sort of a systematic investigation are given in Table I which includes three sets of experiments, namely a dark fixation experiment and two photosynthetic experiments, one of 30 seconds duration and the other of 60 seconds duration.

  12. Carbon Dioxide Photodissociation on Iapetus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Eric; Brown, R. H.

    2009-09-01

    Carbon dioxide has been detected on Iapetus (Buratti et al., 2005) and is correlated with the dark material, mostly at mid-latitudes on the leading face of Iapetus (Palmer and Brown, in preparation). The average absorption feature of CO2 in the dark region is 24.7%; if it were a thin veneer of CO2 ice, it would be 14 um thick. Estimating the surface area of dark material and extrapolating gives a total CO2 budget of 8 x 107 kg on the surface of Iapetus. Volatile studies indicate that the surface of Iapetus is too hot to have CO2 ice remain on the surface for more than a few hundred years (Palmer and Brown, 2008). It has been suggested that complexing of volatiles, such as in clathrates, fluid or gas inclusions, or adsorption, would increase the stability on the Jovian and Saturnian satellites, increasing their residence times (McCord; et al., 1998; Hibbitts et al., 2001, 2002, 2007). While complexing would increase carbon dioxide's thermal stability, the resident time of CO2 on Iapetus would remain short due to the effect of UV radiation. We calculated the photodissociation rate for CO2 and found that the entire budget of CO2 on Iapetus would be destroyed in less than one Earth year. If we assume a steady-state system on Iapetus (photodissociation equal to photo-generation) approx. 108 kg will be destroyed and produced every Earth year. Unless the complexing mechanism provides some shielding from UV radiation while still allowing the detection of the 4.26-micron CO2 band, then a source of CO2 is required. We suggest that the source of CO2 is photolytic production from water ice and carbonaceous material.

  13. Can amino-functionalized carbon nanotubes carry functional nerve growth factor?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Chen; Qing Xiong; Quanxia Ren; Yake Guo; Gao Li

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes can carry protein into cells to induce biological effects. Amino-functionalized carbon nanotubes are soluble and biocompatible, have high reactivity and low toxicity, and can help promote nerve cell growth. In this study, amino-functionalized ethylenediamine-treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes were used to prepare carbon nanotubes-nerve growth factor complexes by non-covalent grafting. The physicochemical properties, cytotoxicity to PC12 and chick embryo dorsal root ganglion, and biological activity of the carbon nanotubes-nerve growth factor complexes were investigated. The results showed that amino functionalization improved carbon nanotubes-nerve growth factor complex dispersibility, reduced their toxicity to PC12 cells, and promoted PC12 cell differentiation and chick embryo dorsal root ganglion.

  14. Graphitic Carbons and Biosignatures

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard, S.; Papineau, D

    2014-01-01

    The unambiguous identification of graphitic carbons as remains of life in ancient rocks is challenging because fossilized biogenic molecules are inevitably altered and degraded during diagenesis and metamorphism of the host rocks. Yet, recent studies have highlighted the possible preservation of biosignatures carried by some of the oldest graphitic carbons. Laboratory simulations are increasingly being used to better constrain the transformations of organic molecules into graphitic carbons in...

  15. Carbon Dioxide Absorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    1950-05-17

    carbondioxide content of the solution was then determined. A gas mixture containing 2.6% carbon dioxide and 97.4% nitrogen was prepared in the...which carbon dioxide is removed by heat0 Since this step is usually carried out by "steam stripping ", that is, contacting the solution at its boiling...required to produce the steam required for stripping the carbon dioxide from the s olution. The method ueed in this investigation for determining the

  16. Carbon emissions Inventory Games

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Emadi, Eiman Ali

    2016-01-01

    Carbon emissions reduction has been the center of attention in many organizations during the past few decades. Many international entities developed rules and regulations to monitor and control carbon emissions especially under supply chain context. Furthermore, researchers investigated techniques and methods on how reduce carbon emissions under operational adjustment which can be done by cooperation or coordination. The main contribution of this thesis is to measure to what extend cooperatio...

  17. Animating the Carbon Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the biogeochemical processes reg- ulating carbon cycling is central to mitigating atmospheric CO2 emissions. The role of living organisms has been accounted for, but the focus has traditionally been on contributions of plants and microbes. We develop the case that fully ‘‘animating’’ the carbon cycle requires broader consideration of the functional role of animals in mediating biogeochemical processes and quanti- fication of their effects on carbon storage and exchange among ter...

  18. Zooplankton and the Ocean Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Deborah K.; Landry, Michael R.

    2017-01-01

    Marine zooplankton comprise a phylogenetically and functionally diverse assemblage of protistan and metazoan consumers that occupy multiple trophic levels in pelagic food webs. Within this complex network, carbon flows via alternative zooplankton pathways drive temporal and spatial variability in production-grazing coupling, nutrient cycling, export, and transfer efficiency to higher trophic levels. We explore current knowledge of the processing of zooplankton food ingestion by absorption, egestion, respiration, excretion, and growth (production) processes. On a global scale, carbon fluxes are reasonably constrained by the grazing impact of microzooplankton and the respiratory requirements of mesozooplankton but are sensitive to uncertainties in trophic structure. The relative importance, combined magnitude, and efficiency of export mechanisms (mucous feeding webs, fecal pellets, molts, carcasses, and vertical migrations) likewise reflect regional variability in community structure. Climate change is expected to broadly alter carbon cycling by zooplankton and to have direct impacts on key species.

  19. Multilayered and complex nanoparticle architectures through plasma synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wakeland, Stephen [UNM MECH.ENG.; Cui, Yuehua [UNM MECH.ENG.; Knapp, Angela [TOYOTA USA; Richard, Monique [TOYOTA USA; Luhrs, Claudia [UNM MECH.ENG.

    2009-01-01

    Using the Aerosol Through Plasma (ATP) method in conjunction with simple chemical techniques a variety of complex and novel nanoparticle architectures were created. A TP was used to make metal-core/carbon shell nanoparticles (ca. 50 nm diameter) of SnlCarbon and AI/Carbon. These have, respectively, potential for application as battery anode (for hybrid and electric vehicles) and high energy fuel In one example of post processing, the Sn-core/carbon-shell material is treated in acidic solution and yields a true nano-sized hollow carbon shell. These shells have potential application as catalyst supports, gas storage, a neutral buoyancy material for applications as varied as proppants, and slow release capsules for pharmaceutical or agricultural applications. A different set of post-A-T-P processes were used to make three layer nanoparticles with a metal core, graphite inner shell and ceramic outer shell. This method extends the range of achievable nanoparticles architectures, hence enabling new applications.

  20. Nanographene reinforced carbon/carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Dhruv

    Carbon/Carbon Composites (CCC) are made of carbon reinforcement in carbon matrix and have high thermal stability and fatigue resistance. CCC are used in nose cones, heat shields and disc brakes of aircrafts due to their exceptional mechanical properties at high temperature. The manufacturing process of CCC involves a carbonization stage in which unwanted elements, except carbon, are eliminated from the polymer precursor. Carbonization results in the formation of voids and cracks due to the thermal mismatch between the reinforcement and the matrix and expulsion of volatiles from the polymer matrix. Thermal cracks and voids decrease the density and mechanical properties of the manufactured CCC. In this work, Nanographene Platelets (NGP) were explored as nanofillers to fill the voids/cracks and reduce thermal shrinkage in CCC. They were first compared with Vapor Grown Carbon Nanofibers (VGCNF) by dispersion of different concentrations (0.5wt%, 1.5wt%, 3wt%) in resole-type phenolic resin and were characterized to explore their effect on rheology, heat of reaction and wetting behavior. The dispersions were then cured to form nanocomposites and were characterized for morphology, flexure and thermal properties. Finally, NGP were introduced into the carbon/carboncomposites in two stages, first by spraying in different concentrations (0.5wt%, 1.5wt%, 3wt%, 5wt %) during the prepreg formation and later during densification by directly mixing in the corresponding densification mix. The manufactured NGP reinforced CCC were characterized for microstructure, porosity, bulk density and mechanical properties (Flexure and ILSS) which were further cross-checked by non-destructive techniques (vibration and ultrasonic). In this study, it was further found that at low concentration (≤ 1.5 wt%) NGP were more effective in increasing the heat of reaction and in decreasing the viscosity of the phenolic resin. The decrease in viscosity led to better wetting properties of NGP / phenolic

  1. CARBON DIOXIDE REDUCTION SYSTEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CARBON DIOXIDE , *SPACE FLIGHT, RESPIRATION, REDUCTION(CHEMISTRY), RESPIRATION, AEROSPACE MEDICINE, ELECTROLYSIS, INSTRUMENTATION, ELECTROLYTES, VOLTAGE, MANNED, YTTRIUM COMPOUNDS, ZIRCONIUM COMPOUNDS, NICKEL.

  2. Irinotecan Lipid Complex Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irinotecan lipid complex is used in combination with other medications to treat pancreatic cancer that has spread to other ... worsened after treatment with other chemotherapy medications. Irinotecan lipid complex is in a class of antineoplastic medications ...

  3. Doxorubicin Lipid Complex Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doxorubicin lipid complex is used to treat ovarian cancer that has not improved or that has worsened after treatment with other medications. Doxorubicin lipid complex is also used to treat Kaposi's sarcoma ( ...

  4. Daunorubicin Lipid Complex Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daunorubicin lipid complex is used to treat advanced Kaposi's sarcoma (a type of cancer that causes abnormal tissue to ... body) related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Daunorubicin lipid complex is in a class of medications called ...

  5. Vincristine Lipid Complex Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincristine lipid complex is used to treat a certain type of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; a type of cancer ... least two different treatments with other medications. Vincristine lipid complex is in a class of medications called ...

  6. Oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Azevedo, Cristina G.; Vollhardt, K. Peter C.

    2002-01-18

    Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes, namely those of fulvalene, tercyclopentadienyl, quatercyclopentadienyl, and pentacyclopentadienyl(cyclopentadienyl) are the subject of this account. Thermal-, photo-, and redox chemistries of homo- and heteropolynuclear complexes are described.

  7. Medicinal organometallic chemistry: designing metal arene complexes as anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Anna F A; Sadler, Peter J

    2008-11-13

    The field of medicinal inorganic chemistry is rapidly advancing. In particular organometallic complexes have much potential as therapeutic and diagnostic agents. The carbon-bound and other ligands allow the thermodynamic and kinetic reactivity of the metal ion to be controlled and also provide a scaffold for functionalization. The establishment of structure-activity relationships and elucidation of the speciation of complexes under conditions relevant to drug testing and formulation are crucial for the further development of promising medicinal applications of organometallic complexes. Specific examples involving the design of ruthenium and osmium arene complexes as anticancer agents are discussed.

  8. Life without complex I: proteome analyses of an Arabidopsis mutant lacking the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, Steffanie; Senkler, Jennifer; Eubel, Holger; Peterhänsel, Christoph; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2016-05-01

    The mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase complex (complex I) is of particular importance for the respiratory chain in mitochondria. It is the major electron entry site for the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC) and therefore of great significance for mitochondrial ATP generation. We recently described an Arabidopsis thaliana double-mutant lacking the genes encoding the carbonic anhydrases CA1 and CA2, which both form part of a plant-specific 'carbonic anhydrase domain' of mitochondrial complex I. The mutant lacks complex I completely. Here we report extended analyses for systematically characterizing the proteome of the ca1ca2 mutant. Using various proteomic tools, we show that lack of complex I causes reorganization of the cellular respiration system. Reduced electron entry into the respiratory chain at the first segment of the mETC leads to induction of complexes II and IV as well as alternative oxidase. Increased electron entry at later segments of the mETC requires an increase in oxidation of organic substrates. This is reflected by higher abundance of proteins involved in glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and branched-chain amino acid catabolism. Proteins involved in the light reaction of photosynthesis, the Calvin cycle, tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, and photorespiration are clearly reduced, contributing to the significant delay in growth and development of the double-mutant. Finally, enzymes involved in defense against reactive oxygen species and stress symptoms are much induced. These together with previously reported insights into the function of plant complex I, which were obtained by analysing other complex I mutants, are integrated in order to comprehensively describe 'life without complex I'.

  9. Complexity Near Horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Halyo, Edi

    2015-01-01

    We generalize the concept of complexity near horizons to all nondegenerate black holes. For Schwarzschild black holes, we show that Rindler observers see a complexity change of $S$ during proper time $1/\\kappa$ which corresponds to the creation of a causal patch with proper length $1/\\kappa$ inside the horizon. We attempt to describe complexity in the horizon CFT and the Euclidean picture.

  10. Quaternionic versus complex maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asorey, M [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad de Zaragoza 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Scolarici, G [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita del Salento and INFN, Sezione di Lecce, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Solombrino, L [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita del Salento and INFN, Sezione di Lecce, I-73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2007-11-15

    We discuss the relation between completely positive quaternionic maps and the corresponding complex maps obtained via projection operation. In order to illustrate this formalism, we reobtain the (complex) qubit subdynamics of maximally entangled Bell states, as complex projection of unitary dynamics between quaternionic pure states.

  11. Complexity, Systems, and Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-14

    complex ( Hidden issues; dumbs down operator) 11 Complexity, Systems, and Software Sarah Sheard August 14, 2014 © 2014 Carnegie...August 14, 2014 © 2014 Carnegie Mellon University Addressing Complexity in SoSs Source: SEBOK Wiki System Con truer Strateglc Context

  12. Microbially mediated mineral carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, I. M.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral carbonation involves silicate dissolution and carbonate precipitation, which are both natural processes that microorganisms are able to mediate in near surface environments (Ferris et al., 1994; Eq. 1). (Ca,Mg)SiO3 + 2H2CO3 + H2O → (Ca,Mg)CO3 + H2O + H4SiO4 + O2 (1) Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophs with cell surface characteristics and metabolic processes involving inorganic carbon that can induce carbonate precipitation. This occurs partly by concentrating cations within their net-negative cell envelope and through the alkalinization of their microenvironment (Thompson & Ferris, 1990). Regions with mafic and ultramafic bedrock, such as near Atlin, British Columbia, Canada, represent the best potential sources of feedstocks for mineral carbonation. The hydromagnesite playas near Atlin are a natural biogeochemical model for the carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals (Power et al., 2009). Field-based studies at Atlin and corroborating laboratory experiments demonstrate the ability of a microbial consortium dominated by filamentous cyanobacteria to induce the precipitation of carbonate minerals. Phototrophic microbes, such as cyanobacteria, have been proposed as a means for producing biodiesel and other value added products because of their efficiency as solar collectors and low requirement for valuable, cultivable land in comparison to crops (Dismukes et al., 2008). Carbonate precipitation and biomass production could be facilitated using specifically designed ponds to collect waters rich in dissolved cations (e.g., Mg2+ and Ca2+), which would allow for evapoconcentration and provide an appropriate environment for growth of cyanobacteria. Microbially mediated carbonate precipitation does not require large quantities of energy or chemicals needed for industrial systems that have been proposed for rapid carbon capture and storage via mineral carbonation (e.g., Lackner et al., 1995). Therefore, this biogeochemical approach may represent a readily

  13. Improvement of capacitive performances of symmetric carbon/carbon supercapacitors by addition of nanostructured polypyrrole powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhaddad, L.; Gamby, J.; Makhloufi, L.; Pailleret, A.; Pillier, F.; Takenouti, H.

    2016-03-01

    A nanostructured polypyrrole powder was synthesized in a previous work from the oxidation of pyrrole by a nanostructured MnO2 powder used simultaneously as an oxidizing agent and a sacrificial template in a redox heterogeneous mechanism. In this study, this original PPy powder was used as an active additive material with different ratio in carbon/carbon symmetrical supercapacitors whose performances were studied by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) using a Swagelok-type cell. From the EIS spectra, the complex capacitance was extracted using a model involving two Cole-Cole type complex capacitances linked in series. The specific capacitance values evaluated by EIS and cyclic voltammetry are in a good agreement between them. The results show that the addition of nanostructured polypyrrole powder improves significantly the specific capacitance of the carbon electrode and consequently the performances of carbon/carbon supercapacitors. The original and versatile synthesis method used to produce this polypyrrole powder appears to be attractive for large scale production of promising additives for electrode materials of supercapacitors.

  14. SYSTEMS WITH COMPLEXITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chenghong; ZHANG Lijun

    2004-01-01

    Science of Complexity is a newly emerging branch of natural scienceAlthoughwe still haven't a precise definition, there are some principles for justifying whether a systemis a complex systemThe purpose of this article is to reveal some of such principlesOnthe basis of them, the concept of a system with complexity is proposedThey may helpus to distinguish a real complex system from complicated objects in common senseThenwe propose some fundamental problems faced by the study of systems with complexity.

  15. Complex variables I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Solomon, Alan D

    2013-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Complex Variables I includes functions of a complex variable, elementary complex functions, integrals of complex functions in the complex plane, sequences and series, and poles and r

  16. Carbon Dioxide Fountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seong-Joo; Ryu, Eun-Hee

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the development of a carbon dioxide fountain. The advantages of the carbon dioxide fountain are that it is odorless and uses consumer chemicals. This experiment also is a nice visual experiment that allows students to see evidence of a gaseous reagent being consumed when a pressure sensor is available. (Contains 3 figures.)…

  17. De-carbonizingChina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    zhou; Xiaoyan

    2013-01-01

    Innovation in the energy sector will pave the way for the country’slow-carbon future Although its per-capita emission is roughly on par with the world’s average, China is the world’s largest carbon dioxide emitter,

  18. Carbon for sensing devices

    CERN Document Server

    Tagliaferro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    This book reveals why carbon is playing such an increasingly prominent role as a sensing material. The various steps that transform a raw material in a sensing device are thoroughly presented and critically discussed.  The authors deal with all aspects of carbon-based sensors, starting from the various hybridization and allotropes of carbon, with specific focus on micro and nanosized carbons (e.g., carbon nanotubes, graphene) and their growth processes. The discussion then moves to the role of functionalization and the different routes to achieve it. Finally, a number of sensing applications in various fields are presented, highlighting the connection with the basic properties of the various carbon allotropes.  Readers will benefit from this book’s bottom-up approach, which starts from the local bonding in carbon solids and ends with sensing applications, linking the local hybridization of carbon atoms and its modification by functionalization to specific device performance. This book is a must-have in th...

  19. China's carbon conundrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ye; Wu, Tong; He, Jiankun; King, David A.

    2013-07-01

    China's carbon dioxide emissions are rising fast. Yet, per capita, gross domestic product and energy use are only a fraction of their United States equivalents. With a growing urban middle class, the trend will continue, but there is progress on the path to a low-carbon economy.

  20. Global carbon budget 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Peters, G. P.; Ciais, P.; Friedlingstein, P.; Jones, S. D.; Sitch, S.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Boden, T. A.; Bopp, L.; Bozec, Y.; Canadell, J. G.; Chevallier, F.; Cosca, C. E.; Harris, I.; Hoppema, M.; Houghton, R. A.; House, J. I.; Jain, A.; Johannessen, T.; Kato, E.; Keeling, R. F.; Kitidis, V.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Koven, C.; Landa, C. S.; Landschützer, P.; Lenton, A.; Lima, I. D.; Marland, G.; Mathis, J. T.; Metzl, N.; Nojiri, Y.; Olsen, A.; Ono, T.; Peters, W.; Pfeil, B.; Poulter, B.; Raupach, M. R.; Regnier, P.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Salisbury, J. E.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Séférian, R.; Segschneider, J.; Steinhoff, T.; Stocker, B. D.; Sutton, A. J.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; van der Werf, G. R.; Viovy, N.; Wang, Y.-P.; Wanninkhof, R.; Wiltshire, A.; Zeng, N.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we descr

  1. Global Carbon Budget 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quéré, Le C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R.M.; Canadell, J.G.; Sitch, S.; Korsbakken, J.I.; Friedlingstein, P.; Peters, G.P.; Andres, R.J.; Boden, T.A.; Houghton, R.A.; House, J.I.; Keeling, R.F.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Bakker, D.C.E.; Barbero, L.; Bopp, L.; Chang, J.; Chevallier, F.; Chini, L.P.; Ciais, P.; Fader, M.; Feely, R.A.; Gkritzalis, T.; Harris, I.; Hauck, J.; Ilyina, T.; Jain, A.K.; Kato, E.; Kitidis, V.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Koven, C.; Landschützer, P.; Lauvset, S.K.; Lefèvre, N.; Lenton, A.; Lima, I.D.; Metzl, N.; Millero, F.; Munro, D.R.; Murata, A.; Nabel, J.E.M.S.; Nakaoka, S.; Nojiri, Y.; O'Brien, K.; Olsen, A.; Ono, T.; Pérez, F.F.; Pfeil, B.; Pierrot, D.; Poulter, B.; Rehder, G.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Séférian, R.; Steinhoff, T.; Stocker, B.D.; Sutton, A.J.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; Laan-Luijkx, Van Der I.T.; Werf, Van Der G.R.; Heuven, Van S.; Vandemark, D.; Viovy, N.; Wiltshire, A.; Zaehle, S.; Zeng, N.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we de

  2. Global carbon budget 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Quéré, C.; Peters, G. P.; Andres, R. J.; Andrew, R. M.; Boden, T. A.; Ciais, P.; Friedlingstein, P.; Houghton, R. A.; Marland, G.; Moriarty, R.; Sitch, S.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Arvanitis, A.; Bakker, D. C E; Bopp, L.; Canadell, J. G.; Chini, L. P.; Doney, S. C.; Harper, A.; Harris, I.; House, J. I.; Jain, A. K.; Jones, S. D.; Kato, E.; Keeling, R. F.; Klein Goldewijk, Kees; Körtzinger, A.; Koven, C.; Lefèvre, N.; Maignan, F.; Omar, A.; Ono, T.; Park, G. H.; Pfeil, B.; Poulter, B.; Raupach, M. R.; Regnier, Piere; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Schwinger, J.; Segschneider, J.; Stocker, B. D.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; Van Heuven, S.; Viovy, N.; Wanninkhof, R.; Wiltshire, A.; Zaehle, S.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we descr

  3. Global Carbon Budget 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Canadell, J. G.; Sitch, S.; Korsbakken, J. I.; Friedlingstein, P.; Peters, G. P.; Andres, R. J.; Boden, T. A.; Houghton, R. A.; House, J. I.; Keeling, R. F.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Bakker, D. C. E.; Barbero, L.; Bopp, L.; Chang, J.; Chevallier, F.; Chini, L. P.; Ciais, P.; Fader, M.; Feely, R. A.; Gkritzalis, T.; Harris, I.; Hauck, J.; Ilyina, T.; Jain, A. K.; Kato, E.; Kitidis, V.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Koven, C.; Landschützer, P.; Lauvset, S. K.; Lefèvre, N.; Lenton, A.; Lima, I. D.; Metzl, N.; Millero, F.; Munro, D. R.; Murata, A.; Nabel, J. E. M. S.; Nakaoka, S.; Nojiri, Y.; O'Brien, K.; Olsen, A.; Ono, T.; Pérez, F. F.; Pfeil, B.; Pierrot, D.; Poulter, B.; Rehder, G.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Séférian, R.; Steinhoff, T.; Stocker, B. D.; Sutton, A. J.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; van der Laan-Luijkx, I. T.; van der Werf, G. R.; van Heuven, S.; Vandemark, D.; Viovy, N.; Wiltshire, A.; Zaehle, S.; Zeng, N.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we descr

  4. Fly ash carbon passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  5. Carbon Dioxide and Climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Peter G.

    1978-01-01

    The amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is increasing at a rate that could cause significant warming of the Earth's climate in the not too distant future. Oceanographers are studying the role of the ocean as a source of carbon dioxide and as a sink for the gas. (Author/BB)

  6. COMMITTED TO CARBON REDUCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Chinese efforts to lower carbon emissions through environmentally friendly means begin gaining momentum Efforts to curb carbon emissions continue to take shape as China adheres to its pledge for a brighter, greener future. More importantly, as environmental measures take hold and develop

  7. Global carbon budget 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quéré, Le C.; Peters, W.; Moriarty, R.; Friedlingstein, P.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we descr

  8. Carbon Capture and Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benson, S.M.; Bennaceur, K.; Cook, P.; Davison, J.; Coninck, H. de; Farhat, K.; Ramirez, C.A.; Simbeck, D.; Surles, T.; Verma, P.; Wright, I.

    2012-01-01

    Emissions of carbon dioxide, the most important long-lived anthropogenic greenhouse gas, can be reduced by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS). CCS involves the integration of four elements: CO 2 capture, compression of the CO2 from a gas to a liquid or a denser gas, transportation of pressurized CO 2

  9. COMMERCIAL VIABILITY ANALYSIS OF LIGNIN BASED CARBON FIBRE

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Lignin is a rich renewable source of aromatic compounds. As a potentialpetroleum feedstock replacement, lignin can reduce environmental impacts such ascarbon emission. Due to its complex chemical structure, lignin is currently underutilized.Exploiting lignin as a precursor for carbon fibre adds high economic value to lignin andencourages further development in lignin extraction technology. This report includes apreliminary cost analysis and identifies the key aspects of lignin-based carbon fi...

  10. The Airborne Carbon in the Mountains Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimel, D.; Stephens, B.; Running, S.; Monson, R.; Vukicevic, T.; Ojima, D.

    2004-12-01

    Mountain landscapes of the Western US contain a significant portion of the North American carbon sink. This results from the land use history of the region, which has a preponderance of potentially aggrading mid-aged stands. The issue is significant not only because of the significant sink but because of the vulnerability of that sink to drought, insects, wildfire and other ecological changes occurring rapidly in the West. Quantification of the carbon budgets of western forests have received relatively limited attention, in part because direct carbon flux measurements are believed to be difficult to apply in complex landscapes. New techniques that take advantage of organized nighttime drainage flows may allow quantification of respiration on scales inaccessible in level landscapes, while Lagrangian airborne measurements may allow daytime fluxes to be quantified. Airborne and ground-based measurements during the summer of 2004 in Colorado show substantial drawdown of atmospheric carbon dioxide during the day and strong enrichment of the nocturnal boundary layer from nighttime respiration. We present a strategy whereby in situ measurements at multiple scales, remote sensing and data assimilation may be used to quantify carbon dynamics in mountain landscapes. Larger scales of integration may be possible in mountainous than level landscapes because of the integrative flow of air and water, while because of high heterogeneity, scaling from detailed local process studies remains difficult.

  11. Four-electron deoxygenative reductive coupling of carbon monoxide at a single metal site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, Joshua A.; Agapie, Theodor

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is the ultimate source of the fossil fuels that are both central to modern life and problematic: their use increases atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, and their availability is geopolitically constrained. Using carbon dioxide as a feedstock to produce synthetic fuels might, in principle, alleviate these concerns. Although many homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts convert carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide, further deoxygenative coupling of carbon monoxide to generate useful multicarbon products is challenging. Molybdenum and vanadium nitrogenases are capable of converting carbon monoxide into hydrocarbons under mild conditions, using discrete electron and proton sources. Electrocatalytic reduction of carbon monoxide on copper catalysts also uses a combination of electrons and protons, while the industrial Fischer-Tropsch process uses dihydrogen as a combined source of electrons and electrophiles for carbon monoxide coupling at high temperatures and pressures. However, these enzymatic and heterogeneous systems are difficult to probe mechanistically. Molecular catalysts have been studied extensively to investigate the elementary steps by which carbon monoxide is deoxygenated and coupled, but a single metal site that can efficiently induce the required scission of carbon-oxygen bonds and generate carbon-carbon bonds has not yet been documented. Here we describe a molybdenum compound, supported by a terphenyl-diphosphine ligand, that activates and cleaves the strong carbon-oxygen bond of carbon monoxide, enacts carbon-carbon coupling, and spontaneously dissociates the resulting fragment. This complex four-electron transformation is enabled by the terphenyl-diphosphine ligand, which acts as an electron reservoir and exhibits the coordinative flexibility needed to stabilize the different intermediates involved in the overall reaction sequence. We anticipate that these design elements might help in the development of efficient catalysts for

  12. Complexity Through Nonextensivity

    CERN Document Server

    Bialek, W; Tishby, N; Bialek, William; Nemenman, Ilya; Tishby, Naftali

    2001-01-01

    The problem of defining and studying complexity of a time series has interested people for years. In the context of dynamical systems, Grassberger has suggested that a slow approach of the entropy to its extensive asymptotic limit is a sign of complexity. We investigate this idea further by information theoretic and statistical mechanics techniques and show that these arguments can be made precise, and that they generalize many previous approaches to complexity, in particular unifying ideas from the physics literature with ideas from learning and coding theory; there are even connections of this statistical approach to algorithmic or Kolmogorov complexity. Moreover, a set of simple axioms similar to those used by Shannon in his development of information theory allows us to prove that the divergent part of the subextensive component of the entropy is a unique complexity measure. We classify time series by their complexities and demonstrate that beyond the `logarithmic' complexity classes widely anticipated in...

  13. Photocytotoxic lanthanide complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Akhtar Hussain; Akhil R Chakravarty

    2012-11-01

    Lanthanide complexes have recently received considerable attention in the field of therapeutic and diagnostic medicines. Among many applications of lanthanides, gadolinium complexes are used as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents in clinical radiology and luminescent lanthanides for bioanalysis, imaging and sensing. The chemistry of photoactive lanthanide complexes showing biological applications is of recent origin. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a non-invasive treatment modality of cancer using a photosensitizer drug and light. This review primarily focuses on different aspects of the chemistry of lanthanide complexes showing photoactivated DNA cleavage activity and cytotoxicity in cancer cells. Macrocyclic texaphyrin-lanthanide complexes are known to show photocytotoxicity with the PDT effect in near-IR light. Very recently, non-macrocyclic lanthanide complexes are reported to show photocytotoxicity in cancer cells. Attempts have been made in this perspective article to review and highlight the photocytotoxic behaviour of various lanthanide complexes for their potential photochemotherapeutic applications.

  14. New PHA products using unrelated carbon sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Matias

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA are natural polyesters stored by a wide range of bacteria as carbon source reserve. Due to its chemical characteristics and biodegradability PHA can be used in chemical, medical and pharmaceutical industry for many human purposes. Over the past years, few Burkholderia species have become known for production of PHA. Aside from that, these bacteria seem to be interesting for discovering new PHA compositions which is important to different industrial applications. In this paper, we introduce two new strains which belong either to Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc or genomovar-type, Burkholderia cepacia SA3J and Burkholderia contaminans I29B, both PHA producers from unrelated carbon sources. The classification was based on 16S rDNA and recA partial sequence genes and cell wall fatty acids composition. These two strains were capable to produce different types of PHA monomers or precursors. Unrelated carbon sources were used for growth and PHA accumulation. The amount of carbon source evaluated, or mixtures of them, was increased with every new experiment until it reaches eighteen carbon sources. As first bioprospection experiments staining methods were used with colony fluorescent dye Nile Red and the cell fluorescent dye Nile Blue A. Gas chromatography analysis coupled to mass spectrometry was used to evaluate the PHA composition on each strain cultivated on different carbon sources. The synthesized polymers were composed by short chain length-PHA (scl-PHA, especially polyhydroxybutyrate, and medium chain length-PHA (mcl-PHA depending on the carbon source used.

  15. Determination of Glutathione with Cu( Ⅱ )-Schiff-base Complex Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode%甲硫氨酸席夫碱铜(Ⅱ)配合物修饰玻碳电极测定还原型谷胱甘肽的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王松梅; 刘峥; 张小鸽; 莫夏玲

    2011-01-01

    Shiff-base copper complex was modified on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) through an electro-deposition method. The electro-chemical properties of the electrode was studied and used for the determination of GSH with cyclic voltammetry method. The results showed that in phosphate buffer(pH = 4. 0), with linear scan in the range of-0.2-+0.2V and a scan rate of 100 mV/s, the catalyticpeak had a linear relationship with GSH concentration in the range of 0. 2~0. 8× 10-4 mol·L-1. The method was used to detect GSH in cucumber, and an average of 0. 252 × 10-4 mol·L-1 GSH in real sample was obtained, with a relative standard deviation of 4. 0% and a detection limit of 7.1×10-1 mol·LT-1.%采用电沉积法将吡啶-4-甲醛缩甲硫氨酸席夫碱铜(Ⅱ)配合物制备[CuL( H2O)2]/GC修饰电极.研究了该电极的电化学性质,发现此电极对还原型谷胱甘肽有良好的电催化氧化作用.考察了修饰电极作为还原型谷胱甘肽传感器的操作条件.结果表明,修饰电极在pH=4.0的磷酸盐缓冲溶液中,于-2~+2 V的电位范围内,以100mV/s的扫描速率进行循环伏安扫描,氧化电流峰值与还原型谷胱甘肽浓度在0.2×10-4~0.8×10-4 mol/L范围内呈线性关系,检出限达7.1×10-6 mol/L.该方法已应用于黄瓜中还原型谷胱甘肽含量的测定,其平均含量为0.252×10-4 mol/L,相对标准偏差为4.0%,回收率为95.6%~98.4%.

  16. Followup to Columbia Investigation: Reinforced Carbon/Carbon From the Breach Location in the Wing Leading Edge Studied

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Tallant, David

    2005-01-01

    Initial estimates on the temperature and conditions of the breach in the Space Shuttle Columbia's wing focused on analyses of the slag deposits. These deposits are complex mixtures of the reinforced carbon/carbon (RCC) constituents, insulation material, and wing structural materials. Identification of melted/solidified Cerachrome insulation (Thermal Ceramics, Inc., Augusta, GA) indicated that the temperatures at the breach had exceeded 1760 C.

  17. Synthesis of hydrated lutetium carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Liu [South China Univ. of Technology, Dept. of Applied Chemistry, Guangdong (China); Rong-jun Ma [Changsha Research Institute of Minig and Metallurgy, Hunan (China)

    1997-09-01

    Crystalline lutetium carbonate was synthesized for the corresponding chloride using ammonium bicarbonate as precipitant. The chemical analyses suggest that the synthesized lutetium carbonate is a hydrated basic carbonate or oxycarbonate. The X-ray powder diffraction data are presented. The IR data for the compound show the presence of two different carbonate groups. There is no stable intermediate carbonate in the process of thermal decomposition of the lutetium carbonate. (au) 15 refs.

  18. Wildfire Risk to Aboveground Terrestrial Carbon Stocks in the Western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, K. L.; Finney, M.

    2015-12-01

    Wildfire is an important part of the terrestrial carbon cycle, moving carbon stored in wood, leaves, litter, and duff into the black carbon and emissions pools. Here, we utilize a national raster of burn probabilities from wildland fire, a tree list for the western United States, and a national map of fuel loading models to calculate the risk to terrestrial carbon from wildland fires in the western United States. Annual burn probabilities are estimated by the Large Fire Simulator (FSim), based on current static landscape conditions and at least 10,000 years of statistically plausible weather sequences. For fires of varying intensity, forest carbon retained onsite and carbon emissions are estimated by the Fire and Fuels Extension of the Forest Vegetation Simulator. In grasslands and shrublands, carbon retained and emitted by wildfire is estimated based on current fuel loading and estimated consumption. We summarize expected carbon stocks and expected annual carbon loss at a variety of scales, aggregating values from the 270m pixel to National Forest, ecoregion, state, and regional scales. Our results indicate that following even a high intensity wildland fire in forested areas, the majority of aboveground carbon is retained onsite in the form of tree trunks. Because of the low annual probability of burning, emissions are small relative to carbon stocks. Additional work will be needed to integrate the complex temporal dimension of the carbon cycle, with areas burned in recent years being at first a carbon source and then a carbon sink after less than a decade in most areas.

  19. Carbon footprint of electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloma, Marcin

    2013-07-01

    Paper assesses the greenhouse gas emissions related to the electronic sectors including information and communication technology and media sectors. While media often presents the carbon emission problem of other industries like petroleum industry, the airlines and automobile sectors, plastics and steel manufacturers, the electronics industry must include the increasing carbon footprints caused from their applications like media and entertainment, computers and cooling devices, complex telecommunications networks, cloud computing and powerful mobile phones. In that sense greenhouse gas emission of electronics should be studied in a life cycle perspective, including regular operational electricity use. Paper presents which product groups or processes are major contributors in emission. From available data and extrapolation of existing information we know that the information and communication technology sector produced 1.3% and media sector 1.7% of global gas emissions within production cycle, using the data from 2007.In the same time global electricity use of that sectors was 3.9% and 3.2% respectively. The results indicate that for both sectors operation leads to more gas emissions than manufacture, although impacts from the manufacture is significant, especially in the supply chain. Media electronics led to more emissions than PCs (manufacture and operation). Examining the role of electronics in climate change, including disposal of its waste, will enable the industry to take internal actions, leading to lowering the impact on the climate change within the sector itself.

  20. Three carbon pairs in Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Docaj, A. [Physics Department, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409-1051 (United States); Estreicher, S.K., E-mail: Stefan.Estreicher@ttu.edu [Physics Department, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409-1051 (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Carbon impurities in Si are common in floating-zone and cast-Si materials. The simplest and most discussed carbon complex is the interstitial-substitutional C{sub i}C{sub s} pair, which readily forms when self-interstitials are present in the material. This pair has three possible configurations, each of which is electrically active. The less common C{sub s}C{sub s} pair has been studied in irradiated material but has also recently been seen in as-grown C-rich cast-Si, which is commonly used to fabricate solar cells. The third pair consists of two interstitial C atoms: C{sub i}C{sub i}. Although its formation probability is low for several reasons, the C{sub i}C{sub i} pair is very stable and electrically inactive. In this contribution, we report preliminary results of first-principles calculations of these three C pairs in Si. The structures, binding energies, vibrational spectra, and electrical activity are predicted.

  1. Sorting carbon nanotubes for electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Richard

    2008-11-25

    Because of their unique structure and composition, single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are at the interface between molecules and crystalline solids. They also present properties that are ideal for making lightweight, inexpensive, and flexible electronics. The raw material is composed of a heterogeneous mixture of SWNTs that differ in helicity and diameter and, therefore, requires purification and separation. In a series of groundbreaking experiments, a robust process serving this purpose was developed based on SWNTs encapsulated in surfactants and water. Ultracentrifugation in a density gradient combined with surfactant mixtures provided buoyant density differences, enabling enrichment for both diameter and electronic properties. A new paper in this issue explores further the process through the hydrodynamic properties of SWNT-surfactant complexes. The study reveals that we have just begun to uncover the dynamics and properties of nanotube-surfactant interactions and highlights the potential that could be gained from a better understanding of their chemistry. The time scale of integration of carbon nanotubes into electronics applications remains unclear, but the recent developments in sorting out SWNTs paves the way for improving on the properties of network-based SWNTs.

  2. Carbon stewardship: land management decisions and the potential for carbon sequestration in Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Failey, Elisabeth L.; Dilling, Lisa

    2010-04-01

    Land use and its role in reducing greenhouse gases is a key element of policy negotiations to address climate change. Calculations of the potential for enhanced terrestrial sequestration have largely focused on the technical characteristics of carbon stocks, such as vegetation type and management regime, and to some degree, on economic incentives. However, the actual potential for carbon sequestration critically depends on who owns the land and additional land management decision drivers. US land ownership patterns are complex, and consequently land use decision making is driven by a variety of economic, social and policy incentives. These patterns and incentives make up the 'carbon stewardship landscape'—that is, the decision making context for carbon sequestration. We examine the carbon stewardship landscape in the US state of Colorado across several public and private ownership categories. Achieving the full potential for land use management to help mitigate carbon emissions requires not only technical feasibility and financial incentives, but also effective implementing mechanisms within a suite of often conflicting and hard to quantify factors such as multiple-use mandates, historical precedents, and non-monetary decision drivers.

  3. Carbon dioxide conversion over carbon-based nanocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavarian, Mehrnoush; Chai, Siang-Piao; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2013-07-01

    The utilization of carbon dioxide for the production of valuable chemicals via catalysts is one of the efficient ways to mitigate the greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. It is known that the carbon dioxide conversion and product yields are still low even if the reaction is operated at high pressure and temperature. The carbon dioxide utilization and conversion provides many challenges in exploring new concepts and opportunities for development of unique catalysts for the purpose of activating the carbon dioxide molecules. In this paper, the role of carbon-based nanocatalysts in the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide and direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate from carbon dioxide and methanol are reviewed. The current catalytic results obtained with different carbon-based nanocatalysts systems are presented and how these materials contribute to the carbon dioxide conversion is explained. In addition, different strategies and preparation methods of nanometallic catalysts on various carbon supports are described to optimize the dispersion of metal nanoparticles and catalytic activity.

  4. Correlation and dimensional effects of trions in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønnow, Troels Frimodt; Pedersen, Thomas Garm; Cornean, Horia

    2010-01-01

    We study the binding energies of singlet trions, i.e., charged excitons, in carbon nanotubes. The problem is modeled, through the effective-mass model, as a three-particle complex on the surface of a cylinder, which we investigate using both one- and two-dimensional expansions of the wave function...... are used to compute physical binding energies for a wide selection of carbon nanotubes. In addition, the dependence on dielectric screening is examined. Our findings indicate that trions are detectable at room temperature in carbon nanotubes with radius below 8 Å....

  5. Carbon nanotube-polymer composites manufacture, properties, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Grady, Brian P

    2011-01-01

    The accessible compendium of polymers in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) Carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-extremely thin tubes only a few nanometers in diameter but able to attain lengths thousands of times greater-are prime candidates for use in the development of polymer composite materials. Bringing together thousands of disparate research works, Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Composites: Manufacture, Properties, and Applications covers CNT-polymers from synthesis to potential applications, presenting the basic science and engineering of this dynamic and complex area in an accessible, readable way. Desi

  6. The effect of carbon nanotubes on chiral chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rance, Graham A.; Miners, Scott A.; Chamberlain, Thomas W.; Khlobystov, Andrei N.

    2013-02-01

    The intrinsic helicity of carbon nanotubes influences the formation of chiral molecules in chemical reactions. A racemic mixture of P and M enantiomers of nanotubes affects the enantiomeric excess of the products of the autocatalytic Soai reaction proportional to the amount of nanotubes added in the reaction mixture. An intermediate complex formed between the nanotube and the organometallic reagent is essential and explains the observed correlation between the enantiomeric distribution of products and the curvature of the carbon nanostructure. This Letter establishes a key mechanism for harnessing the helicity of nanoscale carbon surfaces for preparative organic reactions.

  7. Latitudinal gradients in degradation of marine dissolved organic carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnosti, Carol; Steen, Andrew; Ziervogel, Kai

    2011-01-01

    Heterotrophic microbial communities cycle nearly half of net primary productivity in the ocean, and play a particularly important role in transformations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The specific means by which these communities mediate the transformations of organic carbon are largely...... molecular weight organic substrates and thereby initiate organic matter degradation. These data demonstrate the existence of a latitudinal gradient in the range of complex substrates available to heterotrophic microbial communities, paralleling the global gradient in bacterial species richness. As changing......, such a change could profoundly affect the global carbon cycle....

  8. Developing Carbon Budgets for Cities: Phoenix as a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHale, M. R.; Baker, L. A.; Koerner, B. A.; Grimm, N. B.

    2008-12-01

    Studies have shown that cities can alter regional carbon dynamics through changing ecosystem productivity, overall carbon cycling rate, and total carbon storage in vegetation and soils. Furthermore, people in urban regions import a large amount of carbon in food and fuel, as well as release an exceptional amount of CO2 into the atmosphere. Numerous studies have attempted to quantify some sources and sinks of carbon in urban areas, although a complete carbon budget for a city that accounts for total inputs, outputs, and storage within the ecosystem has yet to be fully accomplished. One challenge is associated with attaining the data necessary to accurately account for all carbon dynamics in these heterogeneous and complex ecosystems. Our goal was to estimate a budget for the Phoenix metropolitan area while developing methodology to calculate carbon dynamics in urban systems that can be applied to cities across the US. Only with comparable carbon budgets for multiple cities will we finally begin to understand the influence of urbanization on carbon dynamics. Our analysis shows when calculating certain variables like transportation emissions, results can vary radically (up to 250%) depending on the data source and methodology implemented (i.e. bottom-up vs. top-down). A common assumption is that productivity and carbon storage will increase with urbanization in arid systems due to water and nutrient inputs, as well as changes in vegetation structure; however, our results indicated that this may not actually be the case in Phoenix where a large number of residents design landscapes to conserve water. Even if all urban expansion was dedicated to landscapes designed for carbon sequestration and storage, vegetation and soils will unlikely have a large effect on the C budget without significant changes in transportation and lifestyle choices.

  9. Drivers and patterns of land biosphere carbon balance reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Christoph; Stehfest, Elke; van Minnen, Jelle G.; Strengers, Bart; von Bloh, Werner; Beusen, Arthur H. W.; Schaphoff, Sibyll; Kram, Tom; Lucht, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    The carbon balance of the land biosphere is the result of complex interactions between land, atmosphere and oceans, including climatic change, carbon dioxide fertilization and land-use change. While the land biosphere currently absorbs carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, this carbon balance might be reversed under climate and land-use change (‘carbon balance reversal’). A carbon balance reversal would render climate mitigation much more difficult, as net negative emissions would be needed to even stabilize atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. We investigate the robustness of the land biosphere carbon sink under different socio-economic pathways by systematically varying climate sensitivity, spatial patterns of climate change and resulting land-use changes. For this, we employ a modelling framework designed to account for all relevant feedback mechanisms by coupling the integrated assessment model IMAGE with the process-based dynamic vegetation, hydrology and crop growth model LPJmL. We find that carbon balance reversal can occur under a broad range of forcings and is connected to changes in tree cover and soil carbon mainly in northern latitudes. These changes are largely a consequence of vegetation responses to varying climate and only partially of land-use change and the rate of climate change. Spatial patterns of climate change as deduced from different climate models, substantially determine how much pressure in terms of global warming and land-use change the land biosphere will tolerate before the carbon balance is reversed. A reversal of the land biosphere carbon balance can occur as early as 2030, although at very low probability, and should be considered in the design of so-called peak-and-decline strategies.

  10. Synthesis of Optically Active Polystyrene Catalyzed by Monophosphine Pd Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouffroy, Matthieu; Armspach, Dominique; Matt, Dominique; Osakada, Kohtaro; Takeuchi, Daisuke

    2016-07-11

    Cationic Pd(II) monophosphine complexes derived from α- and β-cyclodextrins (CDs) promote the homopolymerization of styrene under carbon monoxide pressure. Although reversible CO coordination takes place under catalytic conditions according to (13) C NMR studies with (13) C-enriched CO, both complexes catalyze the formation of CO-free styrene polymers. These macromolecules display optical activity as a result of the presence of stereoregular sequences within the overall atactic polymer.

  11. The influence of surface effect on vibration behaviors of carbon nanotubes under initial stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X.; Fang, C. Q.; Wang, X.

    2017-01-01

    An analytical method is presented to solve the influence of surface effect on non-coaxial resonance of multi-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in matrix utilizing laminated structures model. Due to coupled van der Waals forces between adjacent tubes and surface effect exerted carbon nanotubes, the resonance frequencies and amplitude ratios of multi-walled carbon nanotubes under initial stresses show that the resonant characteristics of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes become complex and the numbers of vibrational modes do not keep increase under identical conditions after considering surface effects. The result obtained can be used as a beneficial reference for investigating the electronic and physical behaviors of carbon nanotubes.

  12. Small diameter carbon nanopipettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Riju; Bhattacharyya, Sayan; Orynbayeva, Zulfiya; Vitol, Elina; Friedman, Gary; Gogotsi, Yury

    2010-01-01

    Nanoscale multifunctional carbon probes facilitate cellular studies due to their small size, which makes it possible to interrogate organelles within living cells in a minimally invasive fashion. However, connecting nanotubes to macroscopic devices and constructing an integrated system for the purpose of fluid and electrical signal transfer is challenging, as is often the case with nanoscale components. We describe a non-catalytic chemical vapor deposition based method for batch fabrication of integrated multifunctional carbon nanopipettes (CNPs) with tip diameters much smaller (10-30 nm) than previously reported (200 nm and above) and approaching those observed for multiwalled carbon nanotubes. This eliminates the need for complicated attachment/assembly of nanotubes into nanofluidic devices. Variable tip geometries and structures were obtained by controlled deposition of carbon inside and outside quartz pipettes. We have shown that the capillary length and gas flow rate have a marked effect on the carbon deposition. This gives us a flexible protocol, useful for growing carbon layers of different thicknesses at selective locations on a glass pipette to yield a large variety of cellular probes in bulk quantities. The CNPs possess an open channel for fluid transfer with the carbon deposited inside at 875 °C behaving like an amorphous semiconductor. Vacuum annealing of the CNP tips at temperatures up to 2000 °C yields graphitic carbon structures with an increase in conductivity of two orders of magnitude. Penetration of the integrated carbon nanoprobes into cells was shown to produce minimal Ca2+ signals, fast recovery of basal Ca2+ levels and no adverse activation of the cellular metabolism during interrogation times as long as 0.5-1 h.

  13. On Complex Random Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwer Khurshid

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE In this paper, it is shown that a complex multivariate random variable  is a complex multivariate normal random variable of dimensionality if and only if all nondegenerate complex linear combinations of  have a complex univariate normal distribution. The characteristic function of  has been derived, and simpler forms of some theorems have been given using this characterization theorem without assuming that the variance-covariance matrix of the vector  is Hermitian positive definite. Marginal distributions of  have been given. In addition, a complex multivariate t-distribution has been defined and the density derived. A characterization of the complex multivariate t-distribution is given. A few possible uses of this distribution have been suggested.

  14. Measuring static complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Goertzel

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of “pattern” is introduced, formally defined, and used to analyze various measures of the complexity of finite binary sequences and other objects. The standard Kolmogoroff-Chaitin-Solomonoff complexity measure is considered, along with Bennett's ‘logical depth’, Koppel's ‘sophistication'’, and Chaitin's analysis of the complexity of geometric objects. The pattern-theoretic point of view illuminates the shortcomings of these measures and leads to specific improvements, it gives rise to two novel mathematical concepts--“orders” of complexity and “levels” of pattern, and it yields a new measure of complexity, the “structural complexity”, which measures the total amount of structure an entity possesses.

  15. Simplicial complexes of graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Jonsson, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    A graph complex is a finite family of graphs closed under deletion of edges. Graph complexes show up naturally in many different areas of mathematics, including commutative algebra, geometry, and knot theory. Identifying each graph with its edge set, one may view a graph complex as a simplicial complex and hence interpret it as a geometric object. This volume examines topological properties of graph complexes, focusing on homotopy type and homology. Many of the proofs are based on Robin Forman's discrete version of Morse theory. As a byproduct, this volume also provides a loosely defined toolbox for attacking problems in topological combinatorics via discrete Morse theory. In terms of simplicity and power, arguably the most efficient tool is Forman's divide and conquer approach via decision trees; it is successfully applied to a large number of graph and digraph complexes.

  16. Complex networks and computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuigeng ZHOU; Zhongzhi ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    @@ Nowadays complex networks are pervasive in various areas of science and technology. Popular examples of complex networks include the Internet, social networks of collaboration, citations and co-authoring, as well as biological networks such as gene and protein interactions and others. Complex networks research spans across mathematics, computer science, engineering, biology and the social sciences. Even in computer science area, increasing problems are either found to be related to complex networks or studied from the perspective of complex networks, such as searching on Web and P2P networks, routing in sensor networks, language processing, software engineering etc. The interaction and mergence of complex networks and computing is inspiring new chances and challenges in computer science.

  17. Alkane oxidation with porphyrins and metal complexes thereof having haloalkyl side chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesekera, Tilak; Lyons, James E.; Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Bhinde, Manoj V.

    1998-01-01

    Transition metal complexes of meso-haloalkylporphyrins, wherein the haloalkyl groups contain 2 to 8 carbon atoms have been found to be highly effective catalysts for oxidation of alkanes and for the decomposition of hydroperoxides.

  18. Carbon Superatom Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canning, A. [Cray Research, PSE, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Canning, A.; Galli, G. [Institut Romand de Recherche Numerique en Physique des Materiaux (IRRMA), IN-Ecublens, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Kim, J. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    1997-06-01

    We report on quantum molecular dynamics simulations of C{sub 28} deposition on a semiconducting surface. Our results show that under certain deposition conditions C{sub 28} {close_quote}s act as building blocks on a nanometer scale to form a thin film of nearly defect-free molecules. The C{sub 28} {close_quote}s behave as carbon superatoms, with the majority of them being threefold or fourfold coordinated, similar to carbon atoms in amorphous systems. The microscopic structure of the deposited film supports recent suggestions about the stability of a new form of carbon, the hyperdiamond solid. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Production of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journet, C.; Bernier, P.

    Carbon nanostructures such as single-walled and multi-walled nanotubes (SWNTs and MWNTs) or graphitic polyhedral nanoparticles can be produced using various methods. Most of them are based on the sublimation of carbon under an inert atmosphere, such as the electric arc discharge process, the laser ablation method, or the solar technique. But chemical methods can also be used to synthesize these kinds of carbon materials: the catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbons, the production by electrolysis, the heat treatment of a polymer, the low temperature solid pyrolysis, or the in situ catalysis.

  20. Recognizing dualizing complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Jorgensen, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Let A be a noetherian local commutative ring and let M be a suitable complex of A-modules. This paper proves that M is a dualizing complex for A if and only if the trivial extension A \\ltimes M is a Gorenstein Differential Graded Algebra. As a corollary follows that A has a dualizing complex if and only if it is a quotient of a Gorenstein local Differential Graded Algebra.

  1. Complex Systems and Dependability

    CERN Document Server

    Zamojski, Wojciech; Sugier, Jaroslaw

    2012-01-01

    Typical contemporary complex system is a multifaceted amalgamation of technical, information, organization, software and human (users, administrators and management) resources. Complexity of such a system comes not only from its involved technical and organizational structure but mainly from complexity of information processes that must be implemented in the operational environment (data processing, monitoring, management, etc.). In such case traditional methods of reliability analysis focused mainly on technical level are usually insufficient in performance evaluation and more innovative meth

  2. Genetics of complex diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motulsky, Arno G

    2006-02-01

    Approaches to the study of the genetic basis of common complex diseases and their clinical applications are considered. Monogenic Mendelian inheritance in such conditions is infrequent but its elucidation may help to detect pathogenic mechanisms in the more common variety of complex diseases. Involvement by multiple genes in complex diseases usually occurs but the isolation and identification of specific genes so far has been exceptional. The role of common polymorphisms as indicators of disease risk in various studies is discussed.

  3. Berger Engineering Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Engineering laboratory The Berger Lab Complex is a multi-purpose building with professional office, 100 seat auditorium, general purpose labs,...

  4. Higher Koszul complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶郁; 张璞

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we generalize the Koszul complexes and Koszul algebras, and introduce the higherKoszul (t-Koszul) complexes and higher Koszul algebras, where t ≥ 2 is an integer. We prove that an algebra ist-Koszul if and only if its t-Koszul complex is augmented, i.e. the higher degree (≥ 1) homologies vanish. Forarbitrary t-Koszul algebra , we also give a description of the structure of the cohomology algebra Ext ( 0, 0)by using the t-Koszul complexes, where the 0 is the direct sum of the simples.

  5. Temperature-dependent hyperfine interactions at {sup 111}Cd-C complex in germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mola, Genene Tessema [University of Kwazulu-Natal, School Chemistry and Physics, Pietermaritzburg Campus, Private Bag X01, Scottsville (South Africa)

    2013-09-15

    The temperature dependent nuclear hyperfine interaction of {sup 111}Cd-carbon complex in germanium has been studied using the perturbed {gamma}-{gamma} angular correlation (PAC) method. The parameters of the hyperfine interaction representing substitutional carbon-cadmium complex in germanium ({nu} {sub Q1}=207(1) MHz ({eta}=0.16)) shows dependence on temperature. The formation and thermal stability of the complex has been reported by the same author earlier. It was found in this study that the quadrupole coupling constant of the interaction increases at sample temperature below 293 K. The results are encouraging toward better understanding of the complex in the host matrix. (orig.)

  6. Supercritical separation process for complex organic mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chum, Helena L.; Filardo, Giuseppe

    1990-01-01

    A process is disclosed for separating low molecular weight components from complex aqueous organic mixtures. The process includes preparing a separation solution of supercritical carbon dioxide with an effective amount of an entrainer to modify the solvation power of the supercritical carbon dioxide and extract preselected low molecular weight components. The separation solution is maintained at a temperature of at least about 70.degree. C. and a pressure of at least about 1,500 psi. The separation solution is then contacted with the organic mixtures while maintaining the temperature and pressure as above until the mixtures and solution reach equilibrium to extract the preselected low molecular weight components from the organic mixtures. Finally, the entrainer/extracted components portion of the equilibrium mixture is isolated from the separation solution.

  7. Asymmetric Michael Reaction of Malononitrile Catalyzed by Chiral Ru(Ⅱ) Complex and Achiral Base

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Ya-Ping; XING Zhi-Kui; ZHU Jin; CUI Xin; CUN Lin-Feng; DENG Jin-Gen

    2003-01-01

    @@ Michael addition reactions represent one of the most important carbon-carbon bond forming reactions in modern synthetic organic chemistry. [1 ~3] We achieved catalytic enantioselective Michael addition reactions of malononitrile with chiral vicinal diamine-Ru(Ⅱ) complex in the presence of achiral base. High yields and moderate ee were observed.

  8. Authigenic Carbonate and the History of the Global Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrag, Daniel P.; Higgins, John. A.; Macdonald, Francis A.; Johnston, David T.

    2013-02-01

    We present a framework for interpreting the carbon isotopic composition of sedimentary rocks, which in turn requires a fundamental reinterpretation of the carbon cycle and redox budgets over Earth's history. We propose that authigenic carbonate, produced in sediment pore fluids during early diagenesis, has played a major role in the carbon cycle in the past. This sink constitutes a minor component of the carbon isotope mass balance under the modern, high levels of atmospheric oxygen but was much larger in times of low atmospheric O2 or widespread marine anoxia. Waxing and waning of a global authigenic carbonate sink helps to explain extreme carbon isotope variations in the Proterozoic, Paleozoic, and Triassic.

  9. Carbon Stock and Carbon Cycle of Wetland Ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhangquan; ZENG; Canming; ZHANG; Jiao; LI; Nan; YANG; Xihao; LI; Yandong; NIU; Zijian; WU

    2014-01-01

    Wetland ecosystem is an essential ecosystem in the world. Its organic carbon stock and carbon cycle are important basis of global carbon cycle researches and also major contents of global climate change researches. Researches have shown that wetland protection and restoration can promote carbon accumulation and reduce emission of greenhouse gases. This paper discussed influence of carbon stock and carbon balance of wetland ecosystem and emission of greenhouse gases,as well as the relationship between wetland and global climate changes. Finally,it made prospect on researches about carbon cycle of Dongting Lake.

  10. A novel carbon fiber based porous carbon monolith

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, T.D.; Klett, J.W.; Weaver, C.E.

    1995-06-01

    A novel porous carbon material based on carbon fibers has been developed. The material, when activated, develops a significant micro- or mesopore volume dependent upon the carbon fiber type utilized (isotropic pitch or polyacrylonitrile). The materials will find applications in the field of fluid separations or as a catalyst support. Here, the manufacture and characterization of our porous carbon monoliths are described. A novel adsorbent carbon composite material has been developed comprising carbon fibers and a binder. The material, called carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS), was developed through a joint research program between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Kentucky, Center for Applied Energy Research (UKCAER).

  11. Reduction of carbon monoxide. Past research summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrock, R.R.

    1981-10-01

    Research programs for the year on the preparation, characterization, and reactions of binuclear tantalum complexes are described. All evidence to date suggest the following of these dimeric molecules: (1) the dimer does not break into monomers under mild conditions; (2) intermolecular hydride exchange is not negligible, but it is slow; (3) intermolecular non-ionic halide exchange is fast; (4) the ends of the dimers can rotate partially with respect to one another. The binuclear tantalum hydride complexes were found to react with carbon monoxide to give a molecule which is the only example of reduction of CO by a transition metal hydride to give a complex containing a CHO ligand. Isonitrides also reacted in a similar manner with dimeric tantalum hydride. (ATT)

  12. High performance carbon-carbon composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lalit M Manocha

    2003-02-01

    Carbon-carbon composites rank first among ceramic composite materials with a spectrum of properties and applications in various sectors. These composites are made of fibres in various directions and carbonaceous polymers and hydrocarbons as matrix precursors. Their density and properties depend on the type and volume fraction of reinforcement, matrix precursor used and end heat treatment temperature. Composites made with thermosetting resins as matrix precursors possess low densities (1.55–1.75 g/cm3) and well-distributed microporosity whereas those made with pitch as the matrix precursor, after densification exhibit densities of 1.8–2.0 g/cm3 with some mesopores, and those made by the CVD technique with hydrocarbon gases, possess intermediate densities and matrices with close porosities. The former (resin-based) composites exhibit high flexural strength, low toughness and low thermal conductivity, whereas the latter (pitch- and CVD-based) can be made with very high thermal conductivity (400–700 W/MK) in the fibre direction. Carbon-carbon composites are used in a variety of sectors requiring high mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, good frictional properties for brake pads in high speed vehicles or high thermal conductivity for thermal management applications. However, for extended life applications, these composites need to be protected against oxidation either through matrix modification with Si, Zr, Hf etc. or by multilayer oxidation protection coatings consisting of SiC, silica, zircon etc.

  13. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2012 Annual Estimates OCTOBER 13, 2015 Incidents, Deaths, and In-Depth Investigations Associated with Non-Fire ...

  14. [Particle therapy: carbon ions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommier, Pascal; Hu, Yi; Baron, Marie-Hélène; Chapet, Olivier; Balosso, Jacques

    2010-07-01

    Carbon ion therapy is an innovative radiation therapy. It has been first proposed in the forties by Robert Wilson, however the first dedicated centres for human care have been build up only recently in Japan and Germany. The interest of carbon ion is twofold: 1) the very sharp targeting of the tumour with the so called spread out Bragg peak that delivers most of the beam energy in the tumour and nothing beyond it, sparing very efficiently the healthy tissues; 2) the higher relative biological efficiency compared to X rays or protons, able to kill radioresistant tumour cells. Both properties make carbon ions the elective therapy for non resectable radioresistant tumours loco-regionally threatening. The technical and clinical experience accumulated during the recent decades is summarized in this paper along with a detailed presentation of the elective indications. A short comparison between conventional radiotherapy and hadrontherapy is proposed for the indications which are considered as priority for carbon ions.

  15. Global carbon budget 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Peters, G. P.; Ciais, P.; Friedlingstein, P.; Jones, S. D.; Sitch, S.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Boden, T. A.; Bopp, L.; Bozec, Y.; Canadell, J. G.; Chevallier, F.; Cosca, C. E.; Harris, I.; Hoppema, M.; Houghton, R. A.; House, J. I.; Jain, A.; Johannessen, T.; Kato, E.; Keeling, R. F.; Kitidis, V.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Koven, C.; Landa, C. S.; Landschützer, P.; Lenton, A.; Lima, I. D.; Marland, G.; Mathis, J. T.; Metzl, N.; Nojiri, Y.; Olsen, A.; Ono, T.; Peters, W.; Pfeil, B.; Poulter, B.; Raupach, M. R.; Regnier, P.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Salisbury, J. E.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Séférian, R.; Segschneider, J.; Steinhoff, T.; Stocker, B. D.; Sutton, A. J.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; van der Werf, G. R.; Viovy, N.; Wang, Y.-P.; Wanninkhof, R.; Wiltshire, A.; Zeng, N.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2)emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, andterrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the globalcarbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and projectfuture climate change. Here we describe

  16. Total Ecosystem Carbon Stock

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Total ecosystem carbon includes above- and below-ground live plant components (such as leaf, branch, stem and root), dead biomass (such as standing dead wood, down...

  17. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Community Outreach Resource Center Toy Recall Statistics CO Poster Contest Pool Safely Business & Manufacturing Business & Manufacturing Business ... Featured Resources CPSC announces winners of carbon monoxide poster contest Video View the blog Clues You Can ...

  18. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Unites States die every year from accidental non-fire related CO poisoning associated with consumer products, including ... CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of ...

  19. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Criminal Penalties Federal Court Orders & Decisions Research & Statistics Research & Statistics Technical Reports Injury Statistics NEISS Injury Data ... On Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths ...

  20. Carbon partitioning in photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Anastasios

    2013-06-01

    The work seeks to raise awareness of a fundamental problem that impacts the renewable generation of fuels and chemicals via (photo)synthetic biology. At issue is regulation of the endogenous cellular carbon partitioning between different biosynthetic pathways, over which the living cell exerts stringent control. The regulation of carbon partitioning in photosynthesis is not understood. In plants, microalgae and cyanobacteria, methods need be devised to alter photosynthetic carbon partitioning between the sugar, terpenoid, and fatty acid biosynthetic pathways, to lower the prevalence of sugar biosynthesis and correspondingly upregulate terpenoid and fatty acid hydrocarbons production in the cell. Insight from unusual but naturally occurring carbon-partitioning processes can help in the design of blueprints for improved photosynthetic fuels and chemicals production.