WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon cluster formation

  1. Formation of transition metal cluster adducts on the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes: HRTEM studies

    KAUST Repository

    Kalinina, Irina V.

    2014-01-01

    We report the formation of chromium clusters on the outer walls of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The clusters were obtained by reacting purified SWNTs with chromium hexacarbonyl in dibutyl ether at 100°C. The functionalized SWNTs were characterized by thermogravimetic analysis, XPS, and high-resolution TEM. The curvature of the SWNTs and the high mobility of the chromium moieties on graphitic surfaces allow the growth of the metal clusters and we propose a mechanism for their formation. © 2014 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  2. Inhibition of nitrobenzene adsorption by water cluster formation at acidic oxygen functional groups on activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yuichi; Machida, Motoi; Tatsumoto, Hideki

    2008-06-15

    The inhibition effect of nitrobenzene adsorption by water clusters formed at the acidic groups on activated carbon was examined in aqueous and n-hexane solution. The activated carbon was oxidized with nitric acid to introduce CO complexes and then outgassed in helium flow at 1273 K to remove them completely without changing the structural properties of the carbon as a reference adsorbent. The amounts of acidic functional groups were determined by applying Boehm titration. A relative humidity of 95% was used to adsorb water onto the carbon surface. Strong adsorption of water onto the oxidized carbon can be observed by thermogravimetric analysis. The adsorption kinetic rate was estimated to be controlled by diffusion from the kinetic analysis. Significant decline in both capacity and kinetic rate for nitrobenzene adsorption onto the oxidized carbon was also observed in n-hexane solution by preadsorption of water to the carbon surface, whereas it was not detected for the outgassed carbons. These results might reveal that water molecules forming clusters at the CO complexes inhibited the entrance of nitrobenzene into the interparticles of the carbon. PMID:18440013

  3. Formation and properties of astrophysical carbonaceous dust. I: ab-initio calculations of the configuration and binding energies of small carbon clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Mauney, Christopher; Lazzati, Davide

    2014-01-01

    The binding energies of n < 100 carbon clusters are calculated using the ab-initio density functional theory code Quantum Espresso. Carbon cluster geometries are determined using several levels of classical techniques and further refined using density functional theory. The resulting energies are used to compute the work of cluster formation and the nucleation rate in a saturated, hydrogen-poor carbon gas. Compared to classical calculations that adopt the capillary approximation, we find that nucleation of carbon clusters is enhanced at low temperatures and depressed at high temperatures. This difference is ascribed to the different behavior of the critical cluster size. We find that the critical cluster size is at n = 27 or n = 8 for a broad range of temperatures and saturations, instead of being a smooth function of such parameters. The results of our calculations can be used to follow carbonaceous cluster/grain formation, stability, and growth in hydrogen poor environments, such as the inner layers of c...

  4. Globular Cluster Formation in the Virgo Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Moran, C Corbett; Lake, G

    2014-01-01

    Metal poor globular clusters (MPGCs) are a unique probe of the early universe, in particular the reionization era. Systems of globular clusters in galaxy clusters are particularly interesting as it is in the progenitors of galaxy clusters that the earliest reionizing sources first formed. Although the exact physical origin of globular clusters is still debated, it is generally admitted that globular clusters form in early, rare dark matter peaks (Moore et al. 2006; Boley et al. 2009). We provide a fully numerical analysis of the Virgo cluster globular cluster system by identifying the present day globular cluster system with exactly such early, rare dark matter peaks. A popular hypothesis is that that the observed truncation of blue metal poor globular cluster formation is due to reionization (Spitler et al. 2012; Boley et al. 2009; Brodie & Strader 2006); adopting this view, constraining the formation epoch of MPGCs provides a complementary constraint on the epoch of reionization. By analyzing both the l...

  5. Star Cluster Formation and Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Krumholz, Mark R; Arce, Hector G; Dale, James E; Gutermuth, Robert; Klein, Richard I; Li, Zhi-Yun; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Zhang, Qizhou

    2014-01-01

    Stars do not generally form in isolation. Instead, they form in clusters, and in these clustered environments newborn stars can have profound effects on one another and on their parent gas clouds. Feedback from clustered stars is almost certainly responsible for a number of otherwise puzzling facts about star formation: that it is an inefficient process that proceeds slowly when averaged over galactic scales; that most stars disperse from their birth sites and dissolve into the galactic field over timescales $\\ll 1$ Gyr; and that newborn stars follow an initial mass function (IMF) with a distinct peak in the range $0.1 - 1$ $M_\\odot$, rather than an IMF dominated by brown dwarfs. In this review we summarize current observational constraints and theoretical models for the complex interplay between clustered star formation and feedback.

  6. Polymer modification via. cluster formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion beam treatment studies have been carried out to investigate the potential for improvements in conductivity properties of the polymers. Change in polymer stoichiometry were characterised by investigating into the carbon clusters formed along the latent tracks of energetic ions in polymers. Here we present some new results which have been derived from UV-Vis spectroscopic examinations. (author)

  7. Doping and cluster formation in diamond

    KAUST Repository

    Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2011-09-09

    Introducing a cluster formation model, we provide a rational fundamental viewpoint for the difficulty to achieve n-type dopeddiamond. We argue that codoping is the way forward to form appropriately doped shallow regions in diamond and other forms of carbon such as graphene. The electronegativities of the codopants are an important design criterion for the donor atom to efficiently donate its electron. We propose that the nearest neighbour codopants should be of a considerably higher electronegativity compared to the donor atom. Codoping strategies should focus on phosphorous for which there are a number of appropriate codopants.

  8. STAR FORMATION IN DENSE CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model of core-clump accretion with equally likely stopping describes star formation in the dense parts of clusters, where models of isolated collapsing cores may not apply. Each core accretes at a constant rate onto its protostar, while the surrounding clump gas accretes as a power of protostar mass. Short accretion flows resemble Shu accretion and make low-mass stars. Long flows resemble reduced Bondi accretion and make massive stars. Accretion stops due to environmental processes of dynamical ejection, gravitational competition, and gas dispersal by stellar feedback, independent of initial core structure. The model matches the field star initial mass function (IMF) from 0.01 to more than 10 solar masses. The core accretion rate and the mean accretion duration set the peak of the IMF, independent of the local Jeans mass. Massive protostars require the longest accretion durations, up to 0.5 Myr. The maximum protostar luminosity in a cluster indicates the mass and age of its oldest protostar. The distribution of protostar luminosities matches those in active star-forming regions if protostars have a constant birthrate but not if their births are coeval. For constant birthrate, the ratio of young stellar objects to protostars indicates the star-forming age of a cluster, typically ∼1 Myr. The protostar accretion luminosity is typically less than its steady spherical value by a factor of ∼2, consistent with models of episodic disk accretion.

  9. Modeling Formation of Globular Clusters: Beacons of Galactic Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Gnedin, Oleg Y

    2010-01-01

    Modern hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation are able to predict accurately the rates and locations of the assembly of giant molecular clouds in early galaxies. These clouds could host star clusters with the masses and sizes of real globular clusters. I describe current state-of-the-art simulations aimed at understanding the origin of the cluster mass function and metallicity distribution. Metallicity bimodality of globular cluster systems appears to be a natural outcome of hierarchical formation and gradually declining fraction of cold gas in galaxies. Globular cluster formation was most prominent at redshifts z>3, when massive star clusters may have contributed as much as 20% of all galactic star formation.

  10. Investigations of acetonitrile solvent cluster formation in supercritical carbon dioxide, and its impact on microscale syntheses of carbon-11-labeled radiotracers for PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new strategy has been developed for synthesizing positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers using [11C]methyl iodide. This strategy relies on the ability of organic co-solvents to cluster within mixtures of supercritical fluids resulting in localized regions of high density which can serve as microscopic pockets for reaction. We've shown that acetonitrile will cluster about dilute solutes when mixtures of this co-solvent with carbon dioxide are forced to behave as a homogeneous fluid at the critical point. We applied this strategy in a systematic investigation of the conditions for optimized reaction between methyl iodide and L-α-methyl-N-2-propynyl phenethylamine (nordeprenyl) to yield L-deprenyl. Variables such as temperature, ultraviolet light exposure, co-solvent concentration, system pressure, and methyl iodide concentration were explored. The synthesis of radioactive [11C]-L-deprenyl using no-carrier-added concentrations of [11C]methyl iodide was also tested. Results showed that greater than 90% radiochemical yield of the desired product could be attained using 40 times less labeling substrate than in conventional PET tracer syntheses

  11. The hierarchical formation of a stellar cluster

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnell, Ian A.; Bate, Matthew R.; Vine, Stephen G.

    2003-01-01

    Recent surveys of star forming regions have shown that most stars, and probably all massive stars, are born in dense stellar clusters. The mechanism by which a molecular cloud fragments to form several hundred to thousands of individual stars has remained elusive. Here, we use a numerical simulation to follow the fragmentation of a turbulent molecular cloud and the subsequent formation and early evolution of a stellar cluster containing more than 400 stars. We show that the stellar cluster fo...

  12. Formation and stability of sputtered clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current theory for the formation of sputtered clusters states that either atoms are sputtered individually and aggregate after having left the surface or they are sputtered as complete clusters. There is no totally sharp boundary between the two interpretations, but experimental evidence is mainly thought to favour the latter model. Both theories demand a criterion for the stability of the clusters. In computer simulations of sputtering, the idea has been to use the same interaction potential as in the lattice computations to judge the stability. More qualitatively, simple geometrical shapes have also been looked for. It is found here, that evidence for 'magic numbers' and electron parity effects in clusters have existed in the sputtering literature for a long time, making more sophisticated stability criteria necessary. The breakdown of originally sputtered metastable clusters into stable clusters gives strong support to the 'sputtered as clusters' hypothesis. (author)

  13. Formation and Evolution of Young Massive Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, B G

    2006-01-01

    Clusters are the dense inner regions of a wide-spread hierarchy of young stellar structures. They often reveal a continuation of this hierarchy inside of them, to smaller scales, when they are young, but orbital mixing eventually erases these subparts and a only smooth cluster or smooth unbound group remains. The stellar hierarchy follows a similar structure in the interstellar gas, which is presumably scale-free because of supersonic motions in the presence of turbulence and self-gravity. The efficiency of star formation increases automatically with density in a hierarchical ISM, causing most dense stellar groups to be initially bound for local conditions. In lower pressure environments, the infant mortality rates should be higher. Also following from hierarchical structure is the cluster mass distribution function and perhaps also the cluster size distribution function, although the predicted mass-size relation is not observed. Cluster destruction is from a variety of causes. The destruction time should dep...

  14. Photodissociation and stability of carbon clusters; Photodissociation et stabilite d`agregats de carbone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouyer, R.

    1995-04-01

    This work is devoted to the study of the dissociation of ionised carbon clusters (containing 16 to 36 atoms) after photoexcitation by a UV-visible laser pulse. It contributes to experimental studies on formation mechanisms of carbon clusters, and particularly fullerenes. Its first aim is the knowledge of the internal energy of the clusters before dissociation. In the first part, a general overview summarizes the theoretical and experimental studies devoted to energetics (structure, stability, dissociation) of carbon clusters containing less than 60 atoms. In the second part, two techniques for producing mass-selected carbon clusters are described. The particular characteristics for such a production in a direct vaporization source are compared to those in a collisional-cooled source. The question of stability of intermediate-size clusters is asked. We study the photoabsorption spectroscopy of carbon clusters in the third part. A model for sequential absorption of several photons is developed, and used to analyze cluster dissociation versus the photoexcitation laser fluence. The absolute photoabsorption cross sections, and the number of absorbed photons are deduced. For some cluster sizes, laser wavelength scanning leads to evidence for existence of several clusters structures (or so-called isomers). The last part deals with photo dissociation mechanisms. Dissociation is found to occur after single-photon absorption, or after vibrational heating of the clusters. In that latter case, a statistical model including restricted intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution is used to calculate dissociation energies from measured fragmentation times of well-defined internal energy states. These energies, which are characteristic of cyclic structures, are then used to a better understanding of carbon cluster formation in a direct vaporization source. (Author). 76 refs., 63 figs., 23 tabs.

  15. Near edge X-ray absorption fine structure study for optimization of hard diamond-like carbon film formation with Ar cluster ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Kitagawa, T; Kanda, K; Shimizugawa, Y; Toyoda, N; Matsui, S; Yamada, I; Tsubakino, H; Matsuo, J

    2003-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) film deposited using C sub 6 sub 0 vapor with simultaneous irradiation of an Ar cluster ion beam was characterized by a near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS), in order to optimize the hard DLC film deposition conditions. Contents of sp sup 2 orbitals in the films, which were estimated from NEXAFS spectra, are 30% lower than that of a conventional DLC film deposited by a RF plasma method. Those contents were obtained under the flux ratio of the C sub 6 sub 0 molecules to the Ar cluster ions to range from 1 to 20, at 5keV of Ar cluster ion acceleration energy. Average hardness of the films was 50 GPa under these flux ratios. This hardness was three times higher than that of a conventional DLC film. Furthermore, the lowest sp sup 2 content and above-mentioned high hardness were obtained at room temperature of the substrate when the depositions were performed in the range of the substrate temperature from room temperature to 250degC. (author)

  16. Cluster Beams Sources. Part 2. The Formation of Cluster Beams in Nozzle Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Ju. Karpenko

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article briefly examines the processes occurring during the formation of cluster beams in sources of clusters, using the expansion of the gas mixture through a nozzle. The basic parameters of the gas cluster flow at the outlet nozzle, leading to the formation of clusters are analyzed. Some aspects of the formation of cluster beams from aerodynamic flows are discussed.

  17. The Cognitive Limits to Economic Cluster Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C. Carrol

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been increasing interest in the social dimensions of economic clusters. The literature now includes select examples of social network analysis plus an extensive discussion of learning regions. Unfortunately, much of this work treats the network as the primary unit of analysis. It may be that network attributes such as density, centrality, and power are primarily dependent on human limitations and not instituted factors. In other words, a human’s limited ability to process information may be a better determinant of cluster success than economic or network theory. The purpose of this paper is to highlight human limits in cluster formation. To do this, we draw on recent developments in the cognitive psychology and communications literatures. We explain that many of the factors that lead to underperforming cluster policies are the result of a human’s inability to develop and sustain a large number of social interactions. Any cluster policy must be cognizant of such limitations and carefully address these limits in the formation of the initial strategy.

  18. Cluster formation probability in the trans-tin and trans-lead nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Santhosh, K P; Sahadevan, Sabina; 10.1016/j.nuclphysa.2010.03.004

    2010-01-01

    Within our fission model, the Coulomb and proximity potential model (CPPM) cluster formation probabilities are calculated for different clusters ranging from carbon to silicon for the parents in the trans-tin and trans- lead regions. It is found that in trans-tin region the 12^C, 16^O, 20^Ne and 24^Mg clusters have maximum cluster formation probability and lowest half lives as compared to other clusters. In trans-lead region the 14^C, 18, 20^O, 23^F, 24,26^Ne, 28,30^Mg and 34^Si clusters have the maximum cluster formation probability and minimum half life, which show that alpha like clusters are most probable for emission from trans-tin region while non-alpha clusters are probable from trans-lead region. These results stress the role of neutron proton symmetry and asymmetry of daughter nuclei in these two cases.

  19. Formation of Millisecond Pulsars in Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanova, Natalia; Rasio, Frederic A

    2007-01-01

    In this contribution we discuss how neutron stars are produced and retained in globular clusters, outlining the most important dynamical channels and evolutionary events that affect thepopulation of mass-transferring binaries with neutron stars and result in the formation of recycled pulsars. We confirm the importance of electron-capture supernovae in globular clusters as the major supplier of retained neutron stars.By comparing the observed millisecond pulsar population and the results obtained from simulations, we discuss several constraints on the evolution of mass-transferring systems.In particular, we find that in our cluster model the following mass-gaining events create populations of MSPs that do not match the observations (with respect to binary periods and companion masses or the number of produced systems) and therefore likely do not lead to NSs spun up to millisecond periods: (i) accretion during a common envelope event with a NS formed through accretion-induced collapse, and (ii) mass transfer fr...

  20. Formation Mechanisms of IMBH in Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Giersz, Mirek; Hypki, Arkadiusz; Askar, Abbas; Lützgendorf, Nora

    2016-01-01

    We very briefly discuss proposed in the literature possible scenarios for intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) formation in globular clusters. We also discuss the results of the MOCCA simulations of about 2000 models (BigSurvey) regarding the distribution of events connected with electromagnetic and gravitational radiations, namely: mass transfer on IMBH, collisions and mergers with IMBH and mergers with IMBH due to gravitational radiation. The rates of these events are very small, so their observation is very improbable.

  1. Cluster formation, breaking, and excitation in light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we discuss cluster phenomena in light nuclei based on calculations using the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) method. Cluster structures in C, B, and Be were studied systematically, and their cluster formation and excitation are discussed. Cluster gas states and their band members are suggested for the excited states of 12C and 11B. The ground state cluster correlation and excited cluster gas state are discussed from the point of view of symmetry breaking and restoration. (authors)

  2. The effects of cluster carbon implantation at low temperature on damage recovery after annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoda, Hiroshi; Nakashima, Yoshiki; Hamamoto, Nariaki; Nagayama, Tsutomu; Koga, Yuji; Umisedo, Sei; Kawamura, Yasunori; Hashimoto, Masahiro

    2012-11-01

    Amorphous Si layer formation with cluster carbon ion implantations at low substrate temperature and its effects on damage recovery and diffusion suppression have been discussed. Cluster carbon molecule species (C3Hx˜C7Hx), implantation temperature (RT ˜ -60°C), implantation dose and energy were used as parameters. Amorphous Si formation by cluster carbon implantation is more effective compared with monomer carbon implantation. Low temperature cluster carbon implantations increase amorphous Si thickness far beyond monomer carbon implantation even at very low temperature. Amorphous-crystal interface smoothness was characterized by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy, and is improved by lower temperature implantations. The smoothness improvement affects the residual damage, End of Range Defects, after annealing. Thicker amorphous Si over 100 nm depth can be formed with light Cn+ molecule implantations. That makes it possible to suppress wide distributed phosphorus diffusion.

  3. Nanodroplet cluster formation in ionic liquid microemulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yanan; Voigt, Andreas; Hilfert, Liane; Sundmacher, Kai

    2008-08-01

    A common ionic liquid (IL), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (bmimBF(4)), is used as polar solvent to induce the formation of a reverse bmimBF(4)-in-toluene IL microemulsion with the aid of the nonionic surfactant Triton X-100. The swelling process of the microemulsion droplets by increasing bmimBF(4) content is detected by dynamic light scattering (DLS), conductivity, UV/Vis spectroscopy, and freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy (FF-TEM). The results show that the microemulsion droplets initially formed are enlarged by the addition of bmimBF(4). However, successive addition of bmimBF(4) lead to the appearance of large-sized microemulsion droplet clusters (200-400 nm). NMR spectroscopic analysis reveal that the special structures and properties of bmimBF(4) and Triton X-100 together with the polar nature of toluene contribute to the formation of such self-assemblies. These unique self-assembled structures of IL-based microemulsion droplet clusters may have some unusual and unique properties with a number of interesting possibilities for potential applications. PMID:18576451

  4. Carbon-cluster mass calibration at SHIPTRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhuri, Ankur

    2007-12-10

    A carbon-cluster ion source has been installed and tested at SHIPTRAP, the Penning-trap mass spectrometer for mass measurements of heavy elements at GSI/Darmstadt, Germany. A precision mass determination is carried out by measuring the ion cyclotron frequency {omega}{sub c}=qB=m, where q/m is the charge-to-mass ratio of the ion and B is the magnetic field. The mass of the ion of interest is obtained from the comparison of its cyclotron frequency {omega}{sub c} with that of a well-known reference ion. Carbon clusters are the mass reference of choice since the unified atomic mass unit is defined as 1/12 of the mass of the {sup 12}C atom. Thus the masses of carbon clusters {sup 12}C{sub n}, n=1,2,3,.. are multiples of the unified atomic mass unit. Carbon-cluster ions {sup 12}C{sub n}{sup +}, 5{<=}n{<=}23, were produced by laser-induced desorption and ionization from a carbon sample. Carbon clusters of various sizes ({sup 12}C{sub 7}{sup +}, {sup 12}C{sub 9}{sup +}, {sup 12}C{sub 10}{sup +}, {sup 12}C{sub 11}{sup +}, {sup 12}C{sub 12}{sup +}, {sup 12}C{sub 15}{sup +}, {sup 12}C{sub 18}{sup +}, {sup 12}C{sub 19}{sup +}, {sup 12}C{sub 20}{sup +}) were used for an investigation of the accuracy of SHIPTRAP covering a mass range from 84 u to 240 u. To this end the clusters were used both as ions of interest and reference ions. Hence the true values of the frequency ratios are exactly known. The mass-dependent uncertainty was found to be negligible for the case of (m-m{sub ref})<100 u. However, a systematic uncertainty of 4.5 x 10{sup -8} was revealed. In addition, carbon clusters were employed for the first time as reference ions in an on-line studies of short-lived nuclei. Absolute mass measurements of the radionuclides {sup 144}Dy, {sup 146}Dy and {sup 147}Ho were performed using {sup 12}C{sub 11}{sup +} as reference ion. The results agree with measurements during the same run using {sup 85}Rb{sup +} as reference ion. The investigated radionuclides were produced in the

  5. Sarcomeric Pattern Formation by Actin Cluster Coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Benjamin M.; Fischer-Friedrich, Elisabeth; Gov, Nir S.; Safran, Samuel A.

    2012-01-01

    Contractile function of striated muscle cells depends crucially on the almost crystalline order of actin and myosin filaments in myofibrils, but the physical mechanisms that lead to myofibril assembly remains ill-defined. Passive diffusive sorting of actin filaments into sarcomeric order is kinetically impossible, suggesting a pivotal role of active processes in sarcomeric pattern formation. Using a one-dimensional computational model of an initially unstriated actin bundle, we show that actin filament treadmilling in the presence of processive plus-end crosslinking provides a simple and robust mechanism for the polarity sorting of actin filaments as well as for the correct localization of myosin filaments. We propose that the coalescence of crosslinked actin clusters could be key for sarcomeric pattern formation. In our simulations, sarcomere spacing is set by filament length prompting tight length control already at early stages of pattern formation. The proposed mechanism could be generic and apply both to premyofibrils and nascent myofibrils in developing muscle cells as well as possibly to striated stress-fibers in non-muscle cells. PMID:22685394

  6. Sarcomeric pattern formation by actin cluster coalescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M Friedrich

    Full Text Available Contractile function of striated muscle cells depends crucially on the almost crystalline order of actin and myosin filaments in myofibrils, but the physical mechanisms that lead to myofibril assembly remains ill-defined. Passive diffusive sorting of actin filaments into sarcomeric order is kinetically impossible, suggesting a pivotal role of active processes in sarcomeric pattern formation. Using a one-dimensional computational model of an initially unstriated actin bundle, we show that actin filament treadmilling in the presence of processive plus-end crosslinking provides a simple and robust mechanism for the polarity sorting of actin filaments as well as for the correct localization of myosin filaments. We propose that the coalescence of crosslinked actin clusters could be key for sarcomeric pattern formation. In our simulations, sarcomere spacing is set by filament length prompting tight length control already at early stages of pattern formation. The proposed mechanism could be generic and apply both to premyofibrils and nascent myofibrils in developing muscle cells as well as possibly to striated stress-fibers in non-muscle cells.

  7. On the formation of massive stellar clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Tenorio-Tagle, G; Silich, S A; Medina-Tanco, G A; Muñoz-Tunón, C; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Palous, Jan; Silich, Sergiy; Medina-Tanco, Gustavo A.; Munoz-Tunon, Casiana

    2003-01-01

    Here we model a star forming factory in which the continuous creation of stars results in a highly concentrated, massive (globular cluster-like) stellar system. We show that under very general conditions a large-scale gravitational instability in the ISM, which triggers the collapse of a massive cloud, leads with the aid of a spontaneous first generation of massive stars, to a standing, small-radius, cold and dense shell. Eventually, as more of the collapsing matter is processed and incorporated, the shell becomes gravitationally unstable and begins to fragment, allowing the formation of new stars, while keeping its location. This is due to a detailed balance established between the ram pressure from the collapsing cloud which, together with the gravitational force exerted on the shell by the forming cluster, acts against the mechanical energy deposited by the collection of new stars. We analyze the mass spectrum of fragments that result from the continuous fragmentation of the standing shell and show that it...

  8. The physics and modes of star cluster formation: observations

    CERN Document Server

    Lada, Charles J

    2009-01-01

    Stellar clusters are born in cold and dusty molecular clouds and the youngest clusters are embedded to various degrees in dusty dark molecular material. Such embedded clusters can be considered protocluster systems. The most deeply buried examples are so heavily obscured by dust that they are only visible at infrared wavelengths. These embedded protoclusters constitute the nearest laboratories for direct astronomical investigation of the physical processes of cluster formation and early evolution. I review the present state of empirical knowledge concerning embedded cluster systems and discuss the implications for understanding their formation and subsequent evolution to produce bound stellar clusters.

  9. Reactions of carbon cluster ions stored in an RF trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactions of carbon cluster ions with O2 were studied by using an RF ion trap in which cluster ions of specific size produced by laser ablation could be stored selectively. Reaction rate constants for positive and negative carbon cluster ions were estimated. In the case of the positive cluster ions, these were consistent with the previous experimental results using FTMS. Negative carbon cluster ions C-n (n=4-8) were much less reactive than positive cluster ions. The CnO- products were seen only in n=4 and 6. (orig.)

  10. Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury XVI. Star Cluster Formation Efficiency and the Clustered Fraction of Young Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, L. Clifton; Seth, Anil C.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Beerman, Lori C.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Lewis, Alexia R.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Bell, Eric F.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Larsen, Søren S.; Sandstrom, Karin; Skillman, Evan D.

    2016-01-01

    We use the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey dataset to perform spatially resolved measurements of star cluster formation efficiency ($\\Gamma$), the fraction of stellar mass formed in long-lived star clusters. We use robust star formation history and cluster parameter constraints, obtained through color-magnitude diagram analysis of resolved stellar populations, to study Andromeda's cluster and field populations over the last $\\sim$300 Myr. We measure $\\Gamma$ of 4-8% for y...

  11. Resolving Globular Cluster Formation within a Cosmological Context

    CERN Document Server

    Boley, Aaron C; Read, Justin; Teyssier, Romain

    2009-01-01

    We place constraints on the formation redshifts for blue globular clusters (BGCs), independent of the details of hydrodynamics and population III star formation. We argue that BGCs and stellar halos have a common origin and that simulations of 1 Mpc boxes up to $z\\sim10$ must resolve BGC formation. We present a proof-of-concept simulation that captures the formation of globular-like star clusters.

  12. Computational Approaches for Probing the Formation of Atmospheric Molecular Clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elm, Jonas

    This thesis presents the investigation of atmospheric molecular clusters using computational methods. Previous investigations have focused on solving problems related to atmospheric nucleation, and have not been targeted at the performance of the applied methods. This thesis focuses on assessing...... the performance of computational strategies in order to identify a sturdy methodology, which should be applicable for handling various issues related to atmospheric cluster formation. Density functional theory (DFT) is applied to study individual cluster formation steps. Utilizing large test sets of numerous...

  13. Phosphorous transient enhanced diffusion suppression and activation enhancement with cluster carbon co-implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Yoshiki; Hamamoto, Nariaki; Nagayama, Tsutomu; Koga, Yuji; Umisedo, Sei; Kawamura, Yasunori; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Onoda, Hiroshi [Nissin Ion Equipment Co., Ltd., 575 Kuze Tonoshiro-cho, Minami-ku, Kyoto, 601-8205 (Japan)

    2012-11-06

    Carbon co-implantation is well known as an effective method for suppressing boron/phosphorous transient enhanced diffusion (TED). Germanium pre-amorphization implantation (PAI) is usually applied prior to carbon co-implantation for suppressing channeling tail of dopants. In this study, cluster carbon was applied instead of the combination of germanium PAI and monomer carbon co-implantation prior to phosphorous implantation. Dependence of phosphorous activation and TED on amorphous layer thickness, carbon dose, carbon distribution and substrate temperature have been investigated. Cluster carbon implantation enables thick amorphous layer formation and TED suppression at the same time and low temperature implantation enhances the ability of amorphous layer formation so that shallow junction and low Rs can be achieved without Ge implantation.

  14. Star Formation in Extreme Starburst Environments - "Super" Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    De Grijs, R

    2003-01-01

    The currently available empirical evidence on the star formation processes in the extreme, high-pressure environments induced by galaxy encounters, mostly based on high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope imaging observations, strongly suggests that star CLUSTER formation is an important and perhaps even the dominant mode of star formation in the starburst events associated with galaxy interactions. The production of "super star clusters" (SSCs; luminous, compact star clusters) seems to be a hallmark of intense star formation, particularly in interacting and starburst galaxies. Their sizes, luminosities, and mass estimates are entirely consistent with what is expected for young Milky Way-type globular clusters (GCs). SSCs are important because of what they can tell us about GC formation and evolution (e.g., initial characteristics and early survival rates). They are also of prime importance as probes of the formation and (chemical) evolution of their host galaxies, and of the initial mass function in the extrem...

  15. Mass spectrometric studies of the cluster formation of radon progeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new experimental system is developed to study the cluster formation of radon progeny with neutral molecules in the environment, which includes a modified mass spectrometer and a surface barrier detector. With the system, the cluster research is carried out at molecular level at which the mass of individual cluster formed is measured. A theory is also proposed to treat the cluster formation as a discrete process based on the ion-dipole and dipole-dipole interactions. Comparison between the theory and experiment is given. (author). 16 refs., 6 figs

  16. Reaction of the C3(X1Σg+) carbon cluster with H2S(X1A1), hydrogen sulfide: Photon-induced formation of C3S, tricarbon sulfur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we report on the neutral-neutral reaction of the C3 carbon cluster with H2S in solid inert argon at 12 K, conditions that mimic, in part, the surfaces of interstellar grains. In the first step of the reaction, a C3•H2S complex is formed via an almost barrierless entrance addition mechanism. This complex, stabilized by an estimated 7.45 kJ/mol (CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level), is formed by the interaction of a terminal carbon of C3 with a hydrogen in H2S. This con-covalent complex displays a band at 2044.1 cm−1 observed via Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy. With the help of the MP2/aug-ccpVDZ level method, this band is assigned to the CC asymmetric vibration mode. When the complex is exposed to UV-visible photons (hν < 5.5 eV) the tricarbon sulfur C3S molecule is identified, based on the appearance of a characteristic CC stretching band at 2047.5 cm−1. Calculated ground-state potential energy surfaces also confirm the concomitant formation of molecular H2. This facile reaction pathway involves an attainable transition state of 174.4 kJ/mol. Conversely, competing lower-energy reaction pathways that would lead to the generation of H2C3S (propadienethione), or C2H2 (acetylene) and CS, involve much more complex, multi-stage pathways, and are not observed experimentally

  17. Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury XVI. Star Cluster Formation Efficiency and the Clustered Fraction of Young Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, L Clifton; Dalcanton, Julianne J; Beerman, Lori C; Fouesneau, Morgan; Lewis, Alexia R; Weisz, Daniel R; Williams, Benjamin F; Bell, Eric F; Dolphin, Andrew E; Larsen, Søren S; Sandstrom, Karin; Skillman, Evan D

    2016-01-01

    We use the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey dataset to perform spatially resolved measurements of star cluster formation efficiency ($\\Gamma$), the fraction of stellar mass formed in long-lived star clusters. We use robust star formation history and cluster parameter constraints, obtained through color-magnitude diagram analysis of resolved stellar populations, to study Andromeda's cluster and field populations over the last $\\sim$300 Myr. We measure $\\Gamma$ of 4-8% for young, 10-100 Myr old populations in M31. We find that cluster formation efficiency varies systematically across the M31 disk, consistent with variations in mid-plane pressure. These $\\Gamma$ measurements expand the range of well-studied galactic environments, providing precise constraints in an HI-dominated, low intensity star formation environment. Spatially resolved results from M31 are broadly consistent with previous trends observed on galaxy-integrated scales, where $\\Gamma$ increases with increasing star formation r...

  18. The Imprints Of Galactic Environment On Cluster Formation and Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Adamo, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Young star clusters (YSCs) appear to be a ubiquitous product of star formation in local galaxies, thus, they can be used to study the star formation process at work in their host galaxies. Moreover, YSCs are intrinsically brighter that single stars, potentially becoming the most important tracers of the recent star formation history in galaxies in the local Universe. In local galaxies, we also witness the presence of a large population of evolved star clusters, commonly called globular clusters (GCs). GCs peak formation history is very close to the redshift (z~2) when the cosmic star formation history reached the maximum. Therefore, GCs are usually associated to extreme star formation episodes in high-redshift galaxies. It is yet not clear whether YSCs and GCs share a similar formation process (same physics under different interstellar medium conditions) and evolution process, and whether the former can be used as progenitor analogs of the latter. In this invited contribution, I review general properties of Y...

  19. An Effective Method of Producing Small Neutral Carbon Clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Zhu-Hong; CHEN Cheng-Chu; HSU Yen-Chu

    2007-01-01

    An effective method of producing small neutral carbon clusters Cn (n = 1-6) is described. The small carbon clusters (positive or negative charge or neutral) are formed by plasma which are produced by a high power 532nm pulse laser ablating the surface of the metal Mn rod to react with small hydrocarbons supplied by a pulse valve, then the neutral carbon clusters are extracted and photo-ionized by another laser (266nm or 355nm) in the ionization region of a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The distributions of the initial neutral carbon clusters are analysed with the ionic species appeared in mass spectra. It is observed that the yield of small carbon clusters with the present method is about 10 times than that of the traditional widely used technology of laser vaporization of graphite.

  20. Clustering algorithms for Stokes space modulation format recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boada, Ricard; Borkowski, Robert; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2015-01-01

    Stokes space modulation format recognition (Stokes MFR) is a blind method enabling digital coherent receivers to infer modulation format information directly from a received polarization-division-multiplexed signal. A crucial part of the Stokes MFR is a clustering algorithm, which largely...... influences the performance of the detection process, particularly at low signal-to-noise ratios. This paper reports on an extensive study of six different clustering algorithms: k-means, expectation maximization, density-based DBSCAN and OPTICS, spectral clustering and maximum likelihood clustering, used...... for discriminating between dual polarization: BPSK, QPSK, 8-PSK, 8-QAM, and 16-QAM. We determine essential performance metrics for each clustering algorithm and modulation format under test: minimum required signal-to-noise ratio, detection accuracy and algorithm complexity....

  1. Quantum fluctuation effects on nuclear fragment and atomic cluster formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, Akira [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Randrup, J.

    1997-05-01

    We investigate the nuclear fragmentation and atomic cluster formation by means of the recently proposed quantal Langevin treatment. It is shown that the effect of the quantal fluctuation is in the opposite direction in nuclear fragment and atomic cluster size distribution. This tendency is understood through the effective classical temperature for the observables. (author)

  2. Master equation calculations of cluster formation in supersonic jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of cluster formation in supersonic jets is examined by numerical integration of the master equation system. Some general characteristics of cluster kinetics could be formulated. Excellent agreement between experimental curves of p-cresol (H2O)0,1,2,3 formation as function of H2O pressure and the corresponding calculated curves were obtained assuming successive cluster formation. From the kinetic curves, and unambiguous assignment of cluster size was possible which agreed with mass-resolved REMPI measurements. The fit of the rate coefficients shows the formation of p-cresol (H2O)1 to be faster than p-cresol (H2O)2 and p-cresol (H2O)3. (orig.)

  3. Turbulent Clustering of Protoplanetary Dust and Planetesimal Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Liubin; Scalo, John; Kritsuk, Alexei G; Norman, Michael L

    2011-01-01

    We study clustering of inertial particles in turbulent flows and discuss its applications to dust particles in protoplanetary disks. Using numerical simulations, we compute the radial distribution function (RDF), which measures the probability of finding particle pairs at given distances, and the probability density function of the particle concentration. The clustering statistics depend on the Stokes number, $St$, defined as the ratio of the particle friction timescale, $\\tau_{\\rm p} $, to the Kolmogorov timescale in the flow. In the dissipation range, the clustering intensity strongly peaks at $St \\simeq 1$, and the RDF for $St \\sim 1$ shows a fast power-law increase toward small scales, suggesting that turbulent clustering may considerably enhance the particle collision rate. Clustering at inertial-range scales is of particular interest to the problem of planetesimal formation. At these scales, the strongest clustering is from particles with $\\tau_{\\rm p}$ in the inertial range. Clustering of these particl...

  4. Structure and cluster formation in granular media

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Luding

    2005-06-01

    The two most important phenomena at the basis of granular media are excluded volume and dissipation. The former is captured by the hard sphere model and is responsible for, e.g., crystallization, the latter leads to interesting structures like clusters in non-equilibrium dynamical, freely cooling states. The freely cooling system is examined concerning the energy decay and the cluster evolution in time. Corrections for crystallization and multi-particle contacts are provided, which become more and more important with increasing density.

  5. Formation of Proto-Globular Cluster Clouds by Thermal Instability

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Hyesung; Lake, George; Ryu, Dongsu

    2000-01-01

    Many models of globular cluster formation assume the presence of cold dense clouds in early universe. Here we re-examine the Fall & Rees (1985) model for formation of proto-globular cluster clouds (PGCCs) via thermal instabilities in a protogalactic halo. We first argue, based on the previous study by others, that under the protogalactic environments only nonlinear density inhomogeneities can condense into PGCCs. We then carry out numerical simulations of the collapse of overdense clouds in o...

  6. Detection of the linear carbon cluster C10: rotationally resolved diode-laser spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesen, T F; Berndt, U; Yamada, K M; Fuchs, G; Schieder, R; Winnewisser, G; Provencal, R A; Keutsch, F N; Van Orden, A; Saykally, R J

    2001-04-17

    Detected in interstellar space and as intermediates in soot formation, molecules of pure carbon in the form of linear chains or ring structures have interested researchers for several decades, who attempt to elucidate their physical properties and the processes govering their formation. A high-resolution infrared spectrometer housing a tunable diode laser and combined with an effective laser ablation source for the cluster production has been used to study the molecular properties of small carbon clusters; reported herein is the first gas-phase spectrum of linear C10.

  7. STAR FORMATION IN HIGH-REDSHIFT CLUSTER ELLIPTICALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Cory R.; Brodwin, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, 5110 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Snyder, Gregory F. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Mancone, Conor L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Stanford, S. A. [University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Alberts, Stacey; Pope, Alexandra [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Stern, Daniel; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Zeimann, Gregory R. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Chary, Ranga-Ram [Spitzer Science Center, MC 220-6, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Dey, Arjun [NOAO, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Moustakas, John, E-mail: cwagner@astro.queensu.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Siena College, 515 Loudon Road, Loudonville, NY 12211 (United States)

    2015-02-20

    We measure the star formation rates (SFRs) of massive (M {sub *} > 10{sup 10.1} M {sub ☉}) early-type galaxies (ETGs) in a sample of 11 high-redshift (1.0 < z < 1.5) galaxy clusters drawn from the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS). We identify ETGs visually from Hubble Space Telescope imaging and select likely cluster members as having either an appropriate spectroscopic redshift or red-sequence color. Mid-infrared SFRs are measured using Spitzer 24 μm data for isolated cluster galaxies for which contamination by neighbors, and active galactic nuclei, can be ruled out. Cluster ETGs show enhanced specific star formation rates (sSFRs) compared to cluster galaxies in the local universe, but have sSFRs more than four times lower than that of field ETGs at 1 < z < 1.5. Relative to the late-type cluster population, isolated ETGs show substantially quenched mean SFRs, yet still contribute 12% of the overall star formation activity measured in 1 < z < 1.5 clusters. We find that new ETGs are likely being formed in ISCS clusters; the fraction of cluster galaxies identified as ETGs increases from 34% to 56% from z ∼ 1.5 → 1.25. While the fraction of cluster ETGs that are highly star-forming (SFR ≥ 26 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) drops from 27% to 10% over the same period, their sSFRs are roughly constant. All these factors taken together suggest that, particularly at z ≳ 1.25, the events that created these distant cluster ETGs—likely mergers, at least among the most massive—were both recent and gas-rich.

  8. Star formation properties of galaxy cluster A1767

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abell 1767 is a dynamically relaxed, cD cluster of galaxies with a redshift of 0.0703. Among 250 spectroscopically confirmed member galaxies within a projected radius of 2.5r200, 243 galaxies (∼ 97%) are spectroscopically covered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Based on this homogeneous spectral sample, the stellar evolutionary synthesis code STARLIGHT is applied to investigate the stellar populations and star formation histories of galaxies in this cluster. The star formation properties of galaxies, such as mean stellar ages, metallicities, stellar masses, and star formation rates, are presented as functions of local galaxy density. A strong environmental effect is found such that massive galaxies in the high-density core region of the cluster tend to have higher metallicities, older mean stellar ages, and lower specific star formation rates (SSFRs), and their recent star formation activities have been remarkably suppressed. In addition, the correlations of the metallicity and SSFR with stellar mass are confirmed. (paper)

  9. Star formation properties of galaxy cluster A1767

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Peng-Fei; Yuan, Qi-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Abell 1767 is a dynamically relaxed, cD cluster of galaxies with a redshift of 0.0703. Among 250 spectroscopically confirmed member galaxies within a projected radius of 2.5r_{200}, 243 galaxies (~ 97%) are spectroscopically covered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Based on this homogeneous spectral sample, the stellar evolutionary synthesis code, STARLIGHT, is applied to investigate the stellar populations and star formation histories (SFHs) of cluster galaxies. The star formation properties of galaxies, such as mean stellar ages, metallicities, stellar masses, and star formation rates (SFRs), are presented as the functions of local galaxy density. Strong environmental effect is found in the manner that massive galaxies in the high-density core region of cluster tend to have higher metallicities, longer mean stellar ages, and lower specific star formation rates (SSFRs), and their recent star formation activities have been remarkably suppressed. In addition, the correlations of the metallicity and SSFR...

  10. Active transport and cluster formation on 2D networks

    CERN Document Server

    Greulich, Philip

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a model for active transport on inhomogeneous networks embedded in a diffusive environment and investigate the formation of particle clusters. In the presence of a hard-core interaction, cluster sizes exhibit an algebraically decaying distribution in a large parameter regime, indicating the existence of clusters on all scales. The results are compared with a diffusion limited aggregation model and active transport on a regular network. For both models we observe aggregation of particles to clusters which are characterized by a finite size-scale if the relevant time-scales and particle densities are considered.

  11. Quasars formation around clusters of primordial black holes

    OpenAIRE

    Dokuchaev, Vyacheslav; Eroshenko, Yury; Rubin, Sergei

    2004-01-01

    We propose the model of first quasars formation around the cluster of rimordial black holes (PBHs). It is supposed, that mass fraction of the universe ~10^-3 is composed of the compact clusters of PBHs, produced during the phase transitions in the early universe. The clusters of PBHs become the centers of dark matter condensation. As a result, the galaxies with massive central black holes are formed. In the process of galaxies formation the central black holes are growing due to accretion. Th...

  12. Electrostatic cluster formation in lipid monolayers

    OpenAIRE

    Ellenbroek, Wouter G.; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Christian, David A.; Discher, Dennis E.; Janmey, Paul A.; Liu, Andrea J.

    2010-01-01

    We study phase separation in mixed monolayers of neutral and highly negatively charged lipids, induced by the addition of divalent positively charged counterions. We find good agreement between experiments on mixtures of pip2 and sopc and simulations of a simplified model in which only the essential electrostatic interactions are retained. Thus, our results support an interpretation of pip2 clustering as governed primarily by electrostatic interactions, in which divalent ions such as calcium ...

  13. Formation and Levitation of Unconfined Droplet Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S.; Ruff, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    Combustion experiments using arrays of droplets seek to provide a link between single droplet combustion phenomena and the behavior of complex spray combustion systems. Both single droplet and droplet array studies have been conducted in microgravity to better isolate the droplet interaction phenomena and eliminate or reduce the confounding effects of buoyancy-induced convection. In most experiments involving droplet arrays, the droplets are supported on fibers to keep them stationary and close together before the combustion event. The presence of the fiber, however, disturbs the combustion process by introducing a source of heat transfer and asymmetry into the configuration. As the number of drops in a droplet array increases, supporting the drops on fibers becomes less practical because of the cumulative effect of the fibers on the combustion process. The overall objective of this research is to study the combustion of well-characterized drop clusters in a microgravity environment. Direct experimental observations and measurements of the combustion of droplet clusters would fill a large gap in our current understanding of droplet and spray combustion and provide unique experimental data for the verification and improvement of spray combustion models. This paper describes current work on the design and performance of an apparatus to generate and stabilize droplet clusters using acoustic and electrostatic forces.

  14. The formation and dynamical evolution of young star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Fujii, Michiko

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations have revealed a variety of young star clusters, including embedded systems, young massive clusters, and associations. We study the formation and dynamical evolution of these clusters using a combination of simulations and theoretical models. Our simulations start with a turbulent molecular cloud that collapses under its own gravity. The stars are assumed to form in the densest regions in the collapsing cloud after an initial free-fall times of the molecular cloud. The dynamical evolution of these stellar distributions are continued by means of direct $N$-body simulations. The molecular clouds typical for the Milky Way Galaxy tend to form embedded clusters which evolve to resemble open clusters. The associations were initially considerably more clumpy, but lost their irregularity in about a dynamical time scale due to the relaxation process. The densest molecular clouds, which are absent in the Milky Way but are typical in starburst galaxies, form massive young star clusters. They indeed ar...

  15. The double galaxy cluster Abell 2465 - II. Star formation in the cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Wegner, Gary A; Hwang, Ho Seong

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the star formation rate and its location in the major merger cluster Abell 2465 at $z$ = 0.245. Optical properties of the cluster are described in Paper I. Measurements of the H$\\alpha$ and infrared dust emission of galaxies in the cluster were made with an interference filter centred on the redshifted line at a wavelength of 817 nm and utilized data from the WISE satellite 12 $\\mu$m band. Imaging in the Johnson $U$ and $B$ bands was obtained, and along with SDSS $u$ and $r$ was used to study the blue fraction, which appears enhanced, as a further signatures of star formation in the cluster. Star formation rates were calculated using standard calibrations. The total star formation rate normalized by the cluster mass, $\\Sigma SFR/M_{cl}$ compared to compilations for other clusters indicate that the components of Abell 2465 lie above the mean $z$ and $M_{cl}$ relations, suggestive that interacting galaxy clusters have enhanced star formation. The projected radial distribution of the star forming ...

  16. Local Clusters formation for Indian Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr.Srinatha Karur

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discussed about the concept called “Local clusters” in the Indian Universities point of view. The Indian Universities have different structures which are completely depend on local Government policies. The available Universities are aided by local Government or Semi Government or Private or Central Government .Even though University Grants Commission (UGC is a decision authority all these Universities are highly influenced by local Government policies. Our aim is integrate these local policies with UGC policies and form a cluster as local Unit.UGC is a autonomous body under Ministry of Human Resources (MoHR

  17. Local Clusters formation for Indian Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinatha Karur

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available n this paper we discussed about the concept called “Local clusters” in the Indian Universities point ofview. The Indian Universities have different structures which are completely depend on local Government policies. The available Universities are aided by local Government or Semi Government or Private or Central Government .Even though University Grants Commission (UGC is a decision authority all these Universities are highly influenced by local Government policies. Our aim is integrate these local policies with UGC policies and form a cluster as local Unit.UGC is a autonomous body under Ministry of Human Resources (MoHR

  18. Tracing Star Formation in Cool Core Clusters with GALEX

    CERN Document Server

    Hicks, Amalia; Donahue, Megan

    2009-01-01

    We present recent results from a GALEX investigation of star formation in 16 cooling core clusters of galaxies, selected to span a broad range in both redshift and central cooling time. Initial results demonstrate clear UV excesses in most, but not all, brightest cluster galaxies in our sample. This UV excess is a direct indication of the presence of young massive stars and, therefore, recent star formation. We report on the physical extent of UV emission in these objects as well as their FUV-NUV colors, and compare GALEX inferred star formation rates to central cooling times, H-alpha and IR luminosities for our sample.

  19. Clusters in strong laser fields: Comparison between carbon, platinum, and lead clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, M.; Teuber, S.; Köller, L.; Köhn, J.; Tiggesbäumker, J.; Meiwes-Broer, K. H.

    Carbon and metal clusters are excited by strong femtosecond laser pulses with up to 1016 W/cm2, yielding ionized clusters and highly charged atomic ions. For small carbon clusters and fullerenes the abundance of charged species correlates with the laser power, while for metal clusters the ionization efficiency is additionally strongly affected by the chosen laser pulse width which may result in an enhanced up-charging of the metal particle. In the case of platinum atomic charge states up to z=20 are detected at a pulse duration of about 600 fs. This observation is in accordance with a model based on a multi-plasmon excitation process.

  20. SIGNATURES OF STAR CLUSTER FORMATION BY COLD COLLAPSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsova, Aleksandra; Hartmann, Lee [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 1085 S. University Ave., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier, E-mail: kuza@umich.edu [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 72-3 (Xangari), Morelia, Michocán 58089, México (Mexico)

    2015-12-10

    Subvirial gravitational collapse is one mechanism by which star clusters may form. Here we investigate whether this mechanism can be inferred from observations of young clusters. To address this question, we have computed smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the initial formation and evolution of a dynamically young star cluster through cold (subvirial) collapse, starting with an ellipsoidal, turbulently seeded distribution of gas, and forming sink particles representing (proto)stars. While the initial density distributions of the clouds do not have large initial mass concentrations, gravitational focusing due to the global morphology leads to cluster formation. We use the resulting structures to extract observable morphological and kinematic signatures for the case of subvirial collapse. We find that the signatures of the initial conditions can be erased rapidly as the gas and stars collapse, suggesting that kinematic observations need to be made early in cluster formation and/or at larger scales, away from the growing cluster core. Our results emphasize that a dynamically young system is inherently evolving on short timescales, so that it can be highly misleading to use current-epoch conditions to study aspects such as star formation rates as a function of local density. Our simulations serve as a starting point for further studies of collapse including other factors such as magnetic fields and stellar feedback.

  1. Theoretical study of the nucleation/growth process of carbon clusters under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineau, N; Soulard, L; Los, J H; Fasolino, A

    2008-07-14

    We used molecular dynamics and the empirical potential for carbon LCBOPII to simulate the nucleation/growth process of carbon clusters both in vacuum and under pressure. In vacuum, our results show that the growth process is homogeneous and yields mainly sp(2) structures such as fullerenes. We used an argon gas and Lennard-Jones potentials to mimic the high pressures and temperatures reached during the detonation of carbon-rich explosives. We found that these extreme thermodynamic conditions do not affect substantially the topologies of the clusters formed in the process. However, our estimation of the growth rates under pressure are in much better agreement with the values estimated experimentally than our vacuum simulations. The formation of sp(3) carbon was negligible both in vacuum and under pressure which suggests that larger simulation times and cluster sizes are needed to allow the nucleation of nanodiamonds. PMID:18624553

  2. GAMMA RAYS FROM STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storm, Emma M.; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Profumo, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2012-08-20

    Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission, presumably from non-thermal processes connected to the acceleration of cosmic-ray nuclei and electrons. The detection of gamma rays from starburst galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity. Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 {mu}m) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star-forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study, we apply the functional relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities of galaxies derived by the Fermi Collaboration to a sample of the best candidate galaxy clusters for detection in gamma rays in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with star formation in galaxy clusters. We find that several clusters have predicted gamma-ray emission from star formation that are within an order of magnitude of the upper limits derived in Ackermann et al. based on non-detection by Fermi-LAT. Given the current gamma-ray limits, star formation likely plays a significant role in the gamma-ray emission in some clusters, especially those with cool cores. We predict that both Fermi-LAT over the course of its lifetime and the future Cerenkov Telescope Array will be able to detect gamma-ray emission from star-forming galaxies in clusters.

  3. New insights on the formation of nuclear star clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillard, Nicolas; Emsellem, Eric; Renaud, Florent

    2016-10-01

    Nuclear clusters (NCs) are common stellar systems in the centres of galaxies. Yet, the physical mechanisms involved in their formation are still debated. Using a parsec-resolution hydrodynamical simulation of a dwarf galaxy, we propose an updated formation scenario for NCs. In this `wet migration scenario', a massive star cluster forms in the gas-rich disc, keeping a gas reservoir, and growing further while it migrates to the centre via a combination of interactions with other substructures and dynamical friction. A wet merger with another dense cluster and its own gas reservoir can occur, although this is not a prerequisite for the actual formation of the NC. The merging process does significantly alter the properties of the NC (mass, morphology, star formation history), also quenching the ongoing local star formation activity, thus leading to interesting observational diagnostics for the physical origin of NCs. A population of lower mass clusters co-exist during the simulation, but these are either destroyed via tidal forces, or have high angular momentum preventing them to interact with the NC and contribute to its growth. The proposed updated scenario emphasizes the role of gas reservoirs associated with the densest star clusters formed in a gas-rich low-mass galaxy.

  4. The physics and modes of star cluster formation: simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Clarke, Cathie

    2009-01-01

    We review progress in numerical simulations of star cluster formation. These simulations involve the bottom-up assembly of clusters through hierarchical mergers, which produces a fractal stellar distribution at young (~0.5 Myr) ages. The resulting clusters are predicted to be mildly aspherical and highly mass-segregated, except in the immediate aftermath of mergers. The upper initial mass function within individual clusters is generally somewhat flatter than for the aggregate population. Recent work has begun to clarify the factors that control the mean stellar mass in a star-forming cloud and also the efficiency of star formation. The former is sensitive to the thermal properties of the gas while the latter depends both on the magnetic field and the initial degree of gravitational boundedness of the natal cloud. Unmagnetized clouds that are initially bound undergo rapid collapse, which is difficult to reverse by ionization feedback or stellar winds.

  5. Star formation in shocked cluster spirals and their tails

    CERN Document Server

    Roediger, E; Owers, M S; Ebeling, H; Sun, M

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations of ram pressure stripped spiral galaxies in clusters revealed details of the stripping process, i.e., the truncation of all interstellar medium (ISM) phases and of star formation (SF) in the disk, and multiphase star-forming tails. Some stripped galaxies, in particular in merging clusters, develop spectacular star-forming tails, giving them a jellyfish-like appearance. In merging clusters, merger shocks in the intra-cluster medium (ICM) are thought to have overrun these galaxies, enhancing the ambient ICM pressure and thus triggering SF, gas stripping and tail formation. We present idealised hydrodynamical simulations of this scenario, including standard descriptions for SF and stellar feedback. To aid the interpretation of recent and upcoming observations, we focus on particular structures and dynamics in SF patterns in the remaining gas disk and in the near tails, which are easiest to observe. The observed jellyfish morphology is qualitatively reproduced for, both, face-on and edge-on st...

  6. Simulation of swift boron clusters traversing amorphous carbon foils

    OpenAIRE

    Heredia Ávalos, Santiago; Abril Sánchez, Isabel; Denton Zanello, Cristian D.; García Molina, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    We use a simulation code to study the interaction of swift boron clusters (Bn+, n=2–6, 14) with amorphous carbon foils. We analyze different aspects of this interaction, such as the evolution of the cluster structure inside the target, the energy and angle distributions at the detector or the stopping power ratio. Our simulation code follows in detail the motion of the cluster fragments through the target and in the vacuum until reaching a detector, taking into account the following interacti...

  7. Formation and evolution of black holes in dense star clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Sanghamitra

    Using supercomputer simulations combining stellar dynamics and stellar evolution, we have studied various problems related to the existence of black holes in dense star clusters. We consider both stellar and intermediate-mass black holes, and we focus on massive, dense star clusters, such as old globular clusters and young, so called "super star clusters." The first problem concerns the formation of intermediate-mass black holes in young clusters through the runaway collision instability. A promising mechanism to form intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) is runaway mergers in dense star clusters, where main-sequence stars collide re- peatedly and form a very massive star (VMS), which then collapses to a black hole (BH). Here we study the effects of primordial mass segregation and the importance of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) on the runaway growth of VMSs using a dynamical Monte Carlo code to model systems with N as high as 10^6 stars. Our Monte Carlo code includes an explicittreatment of all stellar collisions. We place special emphasis on the possibility of top-heavy IMFs, as observed in some very young massive clusters. We find that both primordial mass segregation and the shape of the IMF affect the rate of core collapse of star clusters and thus the time of the runaway. When we include primordial mass segregation we generally see a decrease in core collapse time (tcc). Although for smaller degrees of primordial mass segregation this decrease in tcc is mostly due to the change in the density profile of the cluster, for highly mass-segregated (primordial) clusters, it is the increase in the average mass in the core which reduces the central relaxation time, decreasing tcc. Finally, flatter IMFs generally increase the average mass in the whole cluster, which increases tcc. For the range of IMFs investigated in this thesis, this increase in tcc is to some degree balanced by stellar collisions, which accelerate core collapse. Thus there is no

  8. Star cluster formation in cosmological simulations. I. properties of young clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hui; Gnedin, Nickolay Y; Meng, Xi; Semenov, Vadim A; Kravtsov, Andrey V

    2016-01-01

    We present a new implementation of star formation in cosmological simulations, by considering star clusters as a unit of star formation. Cluster particles grow in mass over several million years at the rate determined by local gas properties, with high time resolution. The particle growth is terminated by its own energy and momentum feedback on the interstellar medium. We test this implementation for Milky Way-sized galaxies at high redshift, by comparing the properties of model clusters with observations of young star clusters. We find that the cluster initial mass function is best described by a Schechter function rather than a single power law. In agreement with observations, at low masses the logarithmic slope is $\\alpha\\approx 1.8-2$, while the cutoff at high mass scales with the star formation rate. A related trend is a positive correlation between the surface density of star formation rate and fraction of stars contained in massive clusters. Both trends indicate that the formation of massive star clust...

  9. Mass distributions of star clusters for different star formation histories in a galaxy cluster environment

    CERN Document Server

    Schulz, Christine; Kroupa, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies usually contain rich populations of globular clusters (GCs). We investigate how different star formation histories (SFHs) shape the final mass distribution of star clusters. We assume that every star cluster population forms during a formation epoch of length dt at a constant star-formation rate (SFR). The mass distribution of such a population is described by the embedded cluster mass function (ECMF), which is a pure power law extending to an upper limit M_max. Since the SFR determines M_max, the ECMF implicitly depends on the SFR. Starting with different SFHs, each SFH is divided into formation epochs of length dt at different SFRs. The requested mass function arises from the superposition of the star clusters of all formation epochs. An improved optimal sampling technique is introduced that allows generating number and mass distributions, both of which accurately agree with the ECMF. Moreover, for each SFH the distribution function of all involved SFRs, F(SFR), is computed. For monoton...

  10. Carbon monoxide formation in tomatoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladon, R.J.; Staby, G.L.

    1979-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is not emanated to any large extent from tomato fruits (Lycopersicon esculentum, Mill. cvs. Rutgers and Ohio MR-13), but is retained within the internal atmosphere. CO is found during all stages of fruit development, but no set pattern of CO concentration is evident.

  11. Linked supramolecular building blocks for enhanced cluster formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLellan, Ross; Palacios, Maria A.; Beavers, Christine M.;

    2015-01-01

    (Figure Presented). Methylene-bridged calix[4]arenes have emerged as extremely versatile ligand supports in the formation of new polymetallic clusters possessing fascinating magnetic properties. Metal ion binding rules established for this building block allow one to partially rationalise...... the complex assembly process. The ability to covalently link calix[4]arenes at the methylene bridge provides significantly improved control over the introduction of different metal centres to resulting cluster motifs. Clusters assembled from bis-calix[4]-arenes and transition metal ions or 3d-4 f combinations...

  12. The Peculiarities of Cluster Formation in the Russian Nanotechnology Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurchenkov Vladimir Viktorovich

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The innovative development of the Russian economy in modern conditions should be based on the development of advanced nanotechnology. The formation of the nanotechnology industry in Russia requires optimal organization, the development of networking, the search for new forms of integrating the primary and secondary productions. The cluster organization in nanotech industry is based on high-tech production and has a number of advantages: uncertainty elimination, restriction of the competition by monopolization of supply with raw materials and semi-finished products, improvement of quality and decrease in expenses. The main forms of interaction of the enterprises and organizations which are a part of a nanoindustrial cluster are allocated. The article describes the peculiarities of the Russian nanoidustry formation, determines the significance of the cluster policy in this sphere. The author develops the criteria for identifying the nanoclusters on the basis of the basic nanotechnology and the nomenclature of final product. The author also proposes the approach to the analysis of cluster interaction and determines the boundaries of the cluster based on the difference between system and quasisystem cluster interaction. In this regard it is necessary to consider possibilities of the analysis of both system, and quasisystem interaction of the main participants of a nanoindustrial cluster.

  13. Formation of Cool Cores in Galaxy Clusters via Hierarchical Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Motl, P M; Loken, C; Norman, M L; Bryan, G; Motl, Patrick M.; Burns, Jack O.; Loken, Chris; Norman, Michael L.; Bryan, Greg

    2004-01-01

    We present a new scenario for the formation of cool cores in rich galaxy clusters based on results from recent high spatial dynamic range, adaptive mesh Eulerian hydrodynamic simulations of large-scale structure formation. We find that cores of cool gas, material that would be identified as a classical cooling flow based on its X-ray luminosity excess and temperature profile, are built from the accretion of discrete, stable subclusters. Any ``cooling flow'' present is overwhelmed by the velocity field within the cluster - the bulk flow of gas through the cluster typically has speeds up to about 2,000 km s^-1 and significant rotation is frequently present in the cluster core. The inclusion of consistent initial cosmological conditions for the cluster within its surrounding supercluster environment is crucial when simulating the evolution of cool cores in rich galaxy clusters. This new model for the hierarchical assembly of cool gas naturally explains the high frequency of cool cores in rich galaxy clusters des...

  14. Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury. XVI. Star Cluster Formation Efficiency and the Clustered Fraction of Young Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L. Clifton; Seth, Anil C.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Beerman, Lori C.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Lewis, Alexia R.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Bell, Eric F.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Larsen, Søren S.; Sandstrom, Karin; Skillman, Evan D.

    2016-08-01

    We use the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury survey data set to perform spatially resolved measurements of star cluster formation efficiency (Γ), the fraction of stellar mass formed in long-lived star clusters. We use robust star formation history and cluster parameter constraints, obtained through color-magnitude diagram analysis of resolved stellar populations, to study Andromeda’s cluster and field populations over the last ˜300 Myr. We measure Γ of 4%-8% for young, 10-100 Myr-old populations in M31. We find that cluster formation efficiency varies systematically across the M31 disk, consistent with variations in mid-plane pressure. These Γ measurements expand the range of well-studied galactic environments, providing precise constraints in an H i-dominated, low-intensity star formation environment. Spatially resolved results from M31 are broadly consistent with previous trends observed on galaxy-integrated scales, where Γ increases with increasing star formation rate surface density (ΣSFR). However, we can explain observed scatter in the relation and attain better agreement between observations and theoretical models if we account for environmental variations in gas depletion time (τ dep) when modeling Γ, accounting for the qualitative shift in star formation behavior when transitioning from a H2-dominated to a H i-dominated interstellar medium. We also demonstrate that Γ measurements in high ΣSFR starburst systems are well-explained by τ dep-dependent fiducial Γ models.

  15. Clustered Star Formation in W75 N

    CERN Document Server

    Shepherd, D S; Stark, D P

    2003-01-01

    We present 2" to 7" resolution 3 mm continuum and CO(J=1-0) line emission and near infrared Ks, H2, and [FeII] images toward the massive star forming region W75 N. The CO emission uncovers a complex morphology of multiple, overlapping outflows. A total flow mass of greater than 255 Msun extends 3 pc from end-to-end and is being driven by at least four late to early-B protostars. More than 10% of the molecular cloud has been accelerated to high velocities by the molecular flows (> 5.2 km/s relative to v{LSR}) and the mechanical energy in the outflowing gas is roughly half the gravitational binding energy of the cloud. The W75 N cluster members represent a range of evolutionary stages, from stars with no apparent circumstellar material to deeply embedded protostars that are actively powering massive outflows. Nine cores of millimeter-wavelength emission highlight the locations of embedded protostars in W75 N. The total mass of gas & dust associated with the millimeter cores ranges from 340 Msun to 11 Msun. ...

  16. More Magic Numbers in Anionic Titanium-carbon Mixed Clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAU Huajin; LIU Bingchen; ZHOU Rufang; NI Guoquan

    2000-01-01

    @@ Met-Cars[1] and related transition metal-carbon clusters represent a latest breakthrough in gas phase cluster research following the discovery and macroscopic synthesis of fullerenes. Different kinds of structural growth patterns (SGPs) have been proposed to analyze the observed magic numbers of these transition metal-carbon mixed clusters, including the multicage SGP[2], the nanocrystal SGP[3], and the recent layered SGP[4]. Recording larger magic numbers will be of great help to test and distinguish between the various SGPs.

  17. New insights on the formation of nuclear star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Guillard, Nicolas; Renaud, Florent

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Clusters (NCs) are common stellar systems in the centres of galaxies. Yet, the physical mechanisms involved in their formation are still debated. Using a parsec-resolution hydrodynamical simulation of a dwarf galaxy, we propose an updated formation scenario for NCs. In this 'wet migration scenario', a massive star cluster forms in the gas-rich disc, keeping a gas reservoir, and growing further while it migrates to the centre via a combination of interactions with other substructures and dynamical friction. A wet merger with another dense cluster and its own gas reservoir can occur, although this is not a pre-requisite for the actual formation of the NC. The merging process does significantly alter the properties of the NC (mass, morphology, star formation history), also quenching the on-going local star formation activity, thus leading to interesting observational diagnostics for the physical origin of NCs. A population of lower mass clusters co-exist during the simulation, but these are either destro...

  18. The Impact of Star Formation on Cool Core Galaxy Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Motl, P. M.; Burns, J. O.; Norman, M. L.; Bryan, G L

    2003-01-01

    We present results from recent simulations of the formation and evolution of clusters of galaxies in a LambdaCDM cosmology. These simulations contain our most physically complete input physics to date including radiative cooling, star formation that transforms rapidly cooling material into aggregate star particles and we also model the thermal feedback from resulting supernovae in the star particles. We use an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) Eulerian hydrodynamics scheme to obtain very high sp...

  19. Fragmentation energetics of clusters relevant to atmospheric new particle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bzdek, Bryan R; DePalma, Joseph W; Ridge, Douglas P; Laskin, Julia; Johnston, Murray V

    2013-02-27

    The exact mechanisms by which small clusters form and grow in the atmosphere are poorly understood, but this process may significantly impact cloud condensation nuclei number concentrations and global climate. Sulfuric acid is the key chemical component to new particle formation (NPF), but basic species such as ammonia are also important. Few laboratory experiments address the kinetics or thermodynamics of acid and base incorporation into small clusters. This work utilizes a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer equipped with surface-induced dissociation to investigate time- and collision-energy-resolved fragmentation of positively charged ammonium bisulfate clusters. Critical energies for dissociation are obtained from Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus/quasi-equilibrium theory modeling of the experimental data and are compared to quantum chemical calculations of the thermodynamics of cluster dissociation. Fragmentation of ammonium bisulfate clusters occurs by two pathways: (1) a two-step pathway whereby the cluster sequentially loses ammonia followed by sulfuric acid and (2) a one-step pathway whereby the cluster loses an ammonium bisulfate molecule. Experimental critical energies for loss of an ammonia molecule and loss of an ammonium bisulfate molecule are higher than the thermodynamic values. If cluster growth is considered the reverse of cluster fragmentation, these results require the presence of an activation barrier to describe the incorporation of ammonia into small acidic clusters and suggest that kinetically (i.e., diffusion) limited growth should not be assumed. An important corollary is that models of atmospheric NPF should be revised to consider activation barriers to individual chemical steps along the growth pathway.

  20. Teenage suicide cluster formation and contagion: implications for primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriksson Anders

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously studied unintentional as well as intentional injury deaths among teenagers living in the four northernmost counties, forming approximately 55% of Sweden with 908,000 inhabitants in 1991. During this work, we found what we suspected to be a suicide cluster among teenagers and we also suspected contagion since there were links between these cases. In this present study, we investigate the occurrence of suicide clustering among teenagers, analyze cluster definitions, and suggest preventive measures. Methods A retrospective study of teenager suicides autopsied at the Department of Forensic Medicine in Umeå, Sweden, during 1981 through 2000. Police reports, autopsy protocols, and medical records were studied in all cases, and the police officers that conducted the investigation at the scene were interviewed in all cluster cases. Parents of the suicide victims of the first cluster were also interviewed. Two aggregations of teenager suicides were detected and evaluated as possible suicide clusters using the US Centers for Disease Control definition of a suicide cluster. Results Two clusters including six teenagers were confirmed, and contagion was established within each cluster. Conclusion The general practitioner is identified as a key person in the aftermath of a teenage suicide since the general practitioner often meet the family, friends of the deceased, and other acquaintances early in the process after a suicide. This makes the general practitioner suitable to initiate contacts with others involved in the well-being of the young, in order to prevent suicide cluster formation and para-suicidal activities.

  1. METALS IN THE ICM: WITNESSES OF CLUSTER FORMATION AND EVOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Lovisari

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The baryonic composition of galaxy clusters and groups is dominated by a hot, X-ray emitting Intra-Cluster Medium (ICM. The mean metallicity of the ICM has been found to be roughly 0.3 ÷ 0.5 times the solar value, therefore a large fraction of this gas cannot be of purely primordial origin. Indeed, the distribution and amount of metals in the ICM is a direct consequence of the past history of star formation in the cluster galaxies and of the processes responsible for the injection of enriched material into the ICM. We here shortly summarize the current views on the chemical enrichment, focusing on the observational evidence in terms of metallicity measurements in clusters, spatial metallicity distribution and evolution, and expectations from future missions.

  2. Turbulence and Vorticity in Galaxy Clusters Generated by Structure Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Vazza, F; Brüggen, M; Brunetti, G; Gheller, C; Porter, D; Ryu, D

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence is a key ingredient for the evolution of the intracluster medium, whose properties can be predicted with high resolution numerical simulations. We present initial results on the generation of solenoidal and compressive turbulence in the intracluster medium during the formation of a small-size cluster using highly resolved, non-radiative cosmological simulations, with a refined monitoring in time. In this first of a series of papers, we closely look at one simulated cluster whose formation was distinguished by a merger around $z \\sim 0.3$. We separate laminar gas motions, turbulence and shocks with dedicated filtering strategies and distinguish the solenoidal and compressive components of the gas flows using Hodge-Helmholtz decomposition. Solenoidal turbulence dominates the dissipation of turbulent motions ($\\sim 95\\%$) in the central cluster volume at all epochs. The dissipation via compressive modes is found to be more important ($\\sim 30 \\%$ of the total) only at large radii ($\\geq 0.5 ~r_{\\rm vi...

  3. Star formation activities in early-type brightest cluster galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, F S; Meng, X M

    2012-01-01

    We identify a total of 120 early-type Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) at 0.1cluster catalogues selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). They are selected with strong emission lines in their optical spectra, with both H{\\alpha} and [O II]{\\lambda}3727 line emission, which indicates significant ongoing star formation. They constitute about ~ 0.5% of the largest, optically-selected, low-redshift BCG sample, and the fraction is a strong function of cluster richness. Their star formation history can be well described by a recent minor and short starburst superimposed on an old stellar component, with the recent episode of star formation contributing on average only less than 1 percent of the total stellar mass. We show that the more massive star-forming BCGs in richer clusters tend to have higher star formation rate (SFR) and specific SFR (SFR per unit galaxy stellar mass). We also compare their statistical properties with a control sample selected from X-ray luminous c...

  4. Formation of Very Young Massive Clusters and implications for globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Sambaran

    2015-01-01

    How Very Young Massive star Clusters (VYMCs; also known as "starburst" clusters), which typically are of $\\gtrsim 10^4M_\\odot$ and are a few Myr old, form out of Giant Molecular Clouds is still largely an open question. Increasingly detailed observations of young star clusters and star-forming molecular clouds and computational studies provide clues about their formation scenarios and the underlying physical processes involved. This chapter is focused on reviewing the decade-long studies that attempt to computationally reproduce the well-observed nearby VYMCs, such as the Orion Nebula Cluster, R136 and NGC 3603 young cluster, thereby shedding light on birth conditions of massive star clusters, in general. On this regard, focus is given on direct N-body modeling of real-sized massive star clusters, with a monolithic structure and undergoing residual gas expulsion, which have consistently reproduced the observed characteristics of several VYMCs and also of young star clusters, in general. The connection of thes...

  5. Carbon and nitrogen abundance variations in globular cluster red giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martell, Sarah L.

    2008-06-01

    This dissertation describes investigations into two of the persistent questions of elemental abundances in Galactic globular clusters: the phenomenon of deep mixing, observed through the progressive depletion of surface carbon abundance as stars evolve along the red giant branch, and abundance bimodality, a phenomenon observed only in globular clusters, in which a subset of stars in a given globular cluster have a distinctive pattern of elemental enhancements and depletions relative to the Solar pattern. The first chapter gives an introduction to the history of globular cluster abundance studies, with particular focus on low-resolution spectroscopy. For both deep mixing and abundance bimodality, the leading theoretical models and the data which support and challenge them are laid out. Each section ends with a description of presently-unanswered questions; these are the motivation for the various projects contained in this dissertation. The second chapter describes the use of molecular handstrengths for determining elemental abundances from low-resolution spectra, and introduces a new CH bandstrength index that is designed to be sensitive to carbon abundance and insensitive to nitrogen abundance in Pop. II red giants over a wide range of metallicity. Various CH indices defined elsewhere in the literature are also discussed, and are shown to have comparable accuracy to the new index only over a limited range of stellar properties. Carbon abundances determined using the new CH index are compared to literature abundances for a few stars, and general concordance with published abundances is found. The third chapter contains a large-scale application of the new CH index: a survey of present-day carbon abundances and calculated carbon depletion rates in bright red giants belonging to eleven Galactic globular clusters spanning the full metallicity range of halo globular clusters. Targets were selected with similar evolutionary states, were observed with one instrument on

  6. Galaxy Proto-clusters as an Interface Between Structure, Cluster, and Galaxy Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Yi-Kuan

    2016-01-01

    Proto-clusters, the progenitor large-scale structures of present day galaxy clusters, are unique laboratories to study dark matter assembly, cosmic baryon cycle, galaxy growth, and environmental impact on galaxy evolution. In this dissertation talk, I will present our recent progress in this subject, both theoretical and observational. Using a set of cosmological N-body simulations and semi-analytic galaxy models, we extract the mass, size, and overdensity evolution for ˜3000 simulated clusters from z=8 to z=0. In line with the scenario of cosmic downsizing, the models predict that the fraction of cosmic star formation rate occurs in (proto-)clusters increases from <1% at z=0 to 20-30% at z=8. This result demonstrates that the seemingly sharp distinction when discussing field and cluster galaxy evolution has to be blurred at high redshift, and a significant fraction of cosmic reionization was done by cluster progenitors. Observationally, we focus on the epoch of z≈2 when the first cluster scale halos (1014 M⊙) were about to form. We perform a systematic proto-cluster search using a photometric redshift catalog in the COSMOS field, revealing a large sample of 36 candidate proto-clusters at 1.6cluster in this field at z=2.44 with Mz=0 = 1014.5±0.4 M⊙ using a sample of Lyα emitters (LAE) in the HETDEX Pilot Survey with a highly homogeneous selection function in 3D redshift space. Compared to the cosmic mean, this structure shows a LAE overdensity of 4 on a scale of few tens cMpc, a 5 times higher fraction of extended Lya blobs, a 2 times higher median stellar mass of NIR selected galaxies with photometric redshift, and a significantly enhanced intergalactic gas revealed in the Lyα absorption maps of Lee et al. (2014, 2015). With these results, I will discuss proto-clusters in the context of

  7. Numerical simulation of primary cluster formation in silane plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nandini; Stoffels, W. W.; Kroesen, G. M. W.

    2003-04-01

    The usage of low-cost silicon-based solar cells is limited by their tendency to degrade on prolonged exposure to sunlight. Current research has indicated that the inclusion of nano-particles in the plasma-deposited film enhances its efficiency considerably. It is therefore essential to identify the plasma operating conditions such that nano-particles are formed and deposited in the film. The early stages of cluster formation, nucleation and coagulation are still open to experimental and theoretical investigation. In this paper, a simulation of the first stage of particle formation in capacitively coupled radio-frequency discharges in SiH4 is attempted. A molecular dynamics based model has been set up to simulate one of the principal reaction pathways in cluster formation. This simulation model appears to produce valid and meaningful trends. Further studies are planned to explore the effect of other parameters and alternate pathways.

  8. Numerical simulation of primary cluster formation in silane plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, N; Kroesen, G

    2003-01-01

    The usage of low-cost silicon-based solar cells is limited by their tendency to degrade on prolonged exposure to sunlight. Current research has indicated that the inclusion of nano-particles in the plasma-deposited film enhances its efficiency considerably. It is therefore essential to identify the plasma operating conditions such that nano-particles are formed and deposited in the film. The early stages of cluster formation, nucleation and coagulation are still open to experimental and theoretical investigation. In this paper, a simulation of the first stage of particle formation in capacitively coupled radio-frequency discharges in SiH sub 4 is attempted. A molecular dynamics based model has been set up to simulate one of the principal reaction pathways in cluster formation. This simulation model appears to produce valid and meaningful trends. Further studies are planned to explore the effect of other parameters and alternate pathways.

  9. Young stellar clusters and star formation throughout the Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Feigelson, Eric; Allen, Lori; Bergin, Edwin; Bally, John; Balog, Zoltan; Bourke, Tyler; Brogan, Crystal; Chu, You-Hua; Churchwell, Edward; Gagne, Marc; Getman, Konstantin; Hunter, Todd; Morgan, Larry; Massey, Philip; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Mamajek, Eric; Megeath, S Thomas; O'Dell, C Robert; Rathborne, Jill; Rebull, Luisa; Stahler, Steven; Townsley, Leisa; Wang, Junfeng; Williams, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    Most stars are born in rich young stellar clusters (YSCs) embedded in giant molecular clouds. The most massive stars live out their short lives there, profoundly influencing their natal environments by ionizing HII regions, inflating wind-blown bubbles, and soon exploding as supernovae. Thousands of lower-mass pre-main sequence stars accompany the massive stars, and the expanding HII regions paradoxically trigger new star formation as they destroy their natal clouds. While this schematic picture is established, our understanding of the complex astrophysical processes involved in clustered star formation have only just begun to be elucidated. The technologies are challenging, requiring both high spatial resolution and wide fields at wavelengths that penetrate obscuring molecular material and remove contaminating Galactic field stars. We outline several important projects for the coming decade: the IMFs and structures of YSCs; triggered star formation around YSC; the fate of OB winds; the stellar populations of...

  10. Star formation in the massive cluster merger Abell 2744

    CERN Document Server

    Rawle, T D; Egami, E; Perez-Gonzalez, P G; Richard, J; Santos, J S; Valtchanov, I; Walth, G; Bouy, H; Haines, C P; Okabe, N

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of star-forming (SF) galaxies in the HST Frontier Field recent cluster merger A2744 (z=0.308). Wide-field, ultraviolet-infrared (UV-IR) imaging enables a direct constraint of the total star formation rate (SFR) for 53 cluster galaxies, with SFR{UV+IR}=343+/-10 Msun/yr. Within the central 4 arcmin (1.1 Mpc) radius, the integrated SFR is complete, yielding a total SFR{UV+IR}=201+/-9 Msun/yr. Focussing on obscured star formation, this core region exhibits a total SFR{IR}=138+/-8 Msun/yr, a mass-normalised SFR{IR} of Sigma{SFR}=11.2+/-0.7 Msun/yr per 10^14 Msun and a fraction of IR-detected SF galaxies f{SF}=0.080(+0.010,-0.037). Overall, the cluster population at z~0.3 exhibits significant intrinsic scatter in IR properties (total SFR{IR}, Tdust distribution) apparently unrelated to the dynamical state: A2744 is noticeably different to the merging Bullet cluster, but similar to several relaxed clusters. However, in A2744 we identify a trail of SF sources including jellyfish galax...

  11. The formation and evolution of star clusters in interacting galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Maji, Moupiya; Li, Yuexing; Charlton, Jane; Hernquist, Lars; Knebe, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Observations of globular clusters show that they have universal lognormal mass functions with a characteristic peak at $\\sim 2\\times 10^{5}\\, {\\rm{M_{\\odot}}}$, but the origin of this peaked distribution is highly debated. Here we investigate the formation and evolution of star clusters in interacting galaxies using high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations performed with two different codes in order to mitigate numerical artifacts. We find that massive star clusters in the range of $\\sim 10^{5.5} - 10^{7.5}\\, {\\rm{M_{\\odot}}}$ form preferentially in the highly-shocked regions produced by galaxy interactions. The nascent cluster-forming clouds have high gas pressures in the range of $P/k \\sim 10^8 - 10^{12}\\, \\rm{K}\\,\\rm{cm^{-3}}$, which is $\\sim 10^4 - 10^8$ times higher than the typical pressure of the interstellar medium but consistent with recent observations of a pre-super star cluster cloud in the Antennae Galaxies. Furthermore, these massive star clusters have quasi-lognormal initial mass functions wi...

  12. Modeling of cluster formation in nonlinear optical lithium niobate crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voskresenskii, V. M.; Starodub, O. R., E-mail: starodub@chemy.kolasc.net.ru; Sidorov, N. V.; Palatnikov, M. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Chemistry and Technology of Rare Earth Elements and Mineral Raw Materials, Kola Science Center (Russian Federation); Mavrin, B. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Spectroscopy (Russian Federation)

    2011-03-15

    The processes occurring during the formation of energetically equilibrium oxygen-octahedral clusters in the ferroelectric phase of lithium niobate (LiNbO{sub 3}) crystal, have been qualitatively modeled in dependence of the phase composition. The modeling results are compared with the data obtained within vacancy models. It is shown that the cluster structure constructed along the crystallographic Y axis is most ordered, while that constructed along the polar Z axis is least ordered. The largest spread in the ratio R = Li/Nb is observed in the direction of the Z axis.

  13. Formation and characterization of thioglycolic acid-silver cluster complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellina, Bruno; Antoine, Rodolphe; Broyer, Michel; Gell, Lars; Sanader, Željka; Mitrić, Roland; Bonačić-Koutecký, Vlasta; Dugourd, Philippe

    2013-06-21

    Gas phase reactivity observed in an ion trap was used to produce silver clusters protected with thioglycolic acid. Fragmentation pathways as well as optical properties were explored experimentally and theoretically. Sequential losses of SCH2 and CO2 in the ion trap lead to redox reactions with charge transfers between the metal part and the carboxylate and thiolate groups. This allows us to control the number of electrons in the metallic subunit and thus optical properties of the complexes. The presented formation process can be used as a prototype for tuning optical and chemical properties of ligated metal clusters by varying the number of confined electrons within the metallic subunit.

  14. Star Formation and Chemical Enrichment for Globular Clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林清; 束成钢; 常瑞香; 赵君亮

    2001-01-01

    A model considering gas outflows due to supernova explosions is developed for the star formation and chemical enrichment for the globular clusters (GCs) in the Milky Way galaxy. Through Monte Carlo simulations, the observed global properties of GCs can be well reproduced, including the metallicity distribution, no-correlation between cluster masses and galactocentric distances, etc. The predicted mass function of the parent clouds for the observed GCs at present day can be well described as a power law with the index of-1.8, which is consistent with the current observations for the molecular clouds.

  15. STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN CLASH BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogarty, Kevin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Postman, Marc [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan [Physics and Astronomy Dept., Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Moustakas, John [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Siena College, 515 Loudon Road, Loudonville, NY 12211 (United States)

    2015-11-10

    The CLASH X-ray selected sample of 20 galaxy clusters contains 10 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) that exhibit significant (>5σ) extinction-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Star formation activity is inferred from photometric estimates of UV and Hα+[N ii] emission in knots and filaments detected in CLASH Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 observations. UV-derived SFRs in these BCGs span two orders of magnitude, including two with a SFR ≳ 100 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. These measurements are supplemented with [O ii], [O iii], and Hβ fluxes measured from spectra obtained with the SOAR telescope. We confirm that photoionization from ongoing star formation powers the line emission nebulae in these BCGs, although in many BCGs there is also evidence of a LINER-like contribution to the line emission. Coupling these data with Chandra X-ray measurements, we infer that the star formation occurs exclusively in low-entropy cluster cores and exhibits a correlation with gas properties related to cooling. We also perform an in-depth study of the starburst history of the BCG in the cluster RXJ1532.9+3021, and create 2D maps of stellar properties on scales down to ∼350 pc. These maps reveal evidence for an ongoing burst occurring in elongated filaments, generally on ∼0.5–1.0 Gyr timescales, although some filaments are consistent with much younger (≲100 Myr) burst timescales and may be correlated with recent activity from the active galactic nucleus. The relationship between BCG SFRs and the surrounding intracluster medium gas properties provide new support for the process of feedback-regulated cooling in galaxy clusters and is consistent with recent theoretical predictions.

  16. Starbursts versus Truncated Star Formation in Nearby Clusters of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Rose, J A; Caldwell, N; Chaboyer, B; Rose, James A.; Gaba, Alejandro E.; Caldwell, Nelson; Chaboyer, Brian

    2001-01-01

    We present long-slit spectroscopy, B and R bandpass imaging, and 21 cm observations of a sample of early-type galaxies in nearby clusters which are known to be either in a star-forming phase or to have had star formation which recently terminated. From the long-slit spectra, obtained with the Blanco 4-m telescope, we find that emission lines in the star-forming cluster galaxies are significantly more centrally concentrated than in a sample of field galaxies. The broadband imaging reveals that two currently star-forming early-type galaxies in the Pegasus I cluster have blue nuclei, again indicating that recent star formation has been concentrated. In contrast, the two galaxies for which star formation has already ended show no central color gradient. The Pegasus I galaxy with the most evident signs of ongoing star formation (NGC7648), exhibits signatures of a tidal encounter. Neutral hydrogen observations of that galaxy with the Arecibo radiotelescope reveal the presence of ~4 x 10^8 solar masses of HI. Arecib...

  17. Star Formation Activity in CLASH Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Fogarty, Kevin; Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John

    2015-01-01

    The CLASH X-ray selected sample of 20 galaxy clusters contains ten brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) that exhibit significant ($>$5 $\\sigma$) extinction-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Star formation activity is inferred from photometric estimates of UV and H$\\alpha$+[NII] emission in knots and filaments detected in CLASH HST observations. These measurements are supplemented with [OII], [OIII], and H$\\beta$ fluxes measured from spectra obtained with the SOAR telescope. Reddening-corrected UV-derived SFRs in these BCGs are broadly consistent with H$\\alpha$-derived SFRs. Five BCGs exhibit SFRs $>$10 M$_{\\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ and an additional two have a SFR $>$ 100 M$_{\\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$. We confirm that photoionization from ongoing star formation powers the line emission nebulae in these BCGs, although in many BCGs there is also evidence for a LINER-like contribution. Using Chandra X-ray measurements, we infer that the star formation occurs exclusively in low-entropy cluster cores and exhibits a correlation ...

  18. Carbon clusters for absolute mass measurements at ISOLTRAP

    CERN Document Server

    Blaum, K; Herfurth, F; Kellerbauer, A G; Kluge, H J; Kuckein, M; Sauvan, E; Scheidenberger, C; Schweikhard, L

    2002-01-01

    The cyclotron frequencies of singly charged carbon clusters C/sub n //sup +/ (n >or= 2) were measured with the Penning-trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN. The present limit of mass accuracy delta m/m = 1.2.10/sup -8/ and the extent of the mass- dependent systematic shift ( delta m/m)/sub sys/ = 1.7(0.6).10/sup -10//u.(m - m/sub ref/) of the setup were investigated for the first time. In addition, absolute mass measurements by use of pure clusters of the most abundant carbon isotope /sup 12/C are now possible at ISOLTRAP. (15 refs).

  19. Formation of globular clusters induced by external ultraviolet radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Hasegawa, Kenji; Kitayama, Tetsu

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel scenario for globular cluster (GC) formation, where the ultraviolet (UV) background radiation effectively works so as to produce compact star clusters. Here, we explore the formation of GCs in UV radiation fields. For this purpose, we calculate baryon and dark matter (DM) dynamics in spherical symmetry, incorporating the self-shielding effects by solving the radiative transfer of UV radiation. In addition, we prescribe the star formation in cooled gas components and pursue the dynamics of formed stars. As a result, we find that the evolution of subgalactic objects in UV background radiation are separated into three types, that is, (1) prompt star formation, where less massive clouds ~10^{5-8} M_sun are promptly self-shielded and undergo star formation, (2) delayed star formation, where photoionized massive clouds >10^8 M_sun collapse despite high thermal pressure and are eventually self-shielded to form stars in a delayed fashion, and (3) supersonic infall, where photoionized less massive c...

  20. Formation of stars and clusters over cosmological time

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, Bruce G

    2014-01-01

    The concept that stars form in the modern era began some 60 years ago with the key observation of expanding OB associations. Now we see that these associations are an intermediate scale in a cascade of hierarchical structures that begins on the ambient Jeans length close to a kiloparsec in size and continues down to the interiors of clusters, perhaps even to binary and multiple stellar systems. The origin of this structure lies with the dynamical nature of cloud and star formation, driven by supersonic turbulence and interstellar gravity. Dynamical star formation is relatively fast compared to the timescale for cosmic accretion, and then the star formation rate keeps up with the accretion rate, leading to a sequence of near-equilibrium states during galaxy formation and evolution. Dynamical star formation also helps to explain the formation of bound clusters, which require a local efficiency that exceeds the average by more than an order of magnitude. Efficiency increases with density in a hierarchically stru...

  1. Tetrathiomolybdate Inhibits Copper Trafficking Proteins Through Metal Cluster Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, Hamsell M.; Xue, Yi; Robinson, Chandler D.; Canalizo-Hernández, Mónica A.; Marvin, Rebecca G.; Kelly, Rebekah A.; Mondragón, Alfonso; Penner-Hahn, James E.; O’Halloran, Thomas V. (Michigan); (NWU)

    2010-05-06

    Tetrathiomolybdate (TM) is an orally active agent for treatment of disorders of copper metabolism. Here we describe how TM inhibits proteins that regulate copper physiology. Crystallographic results reveal that the surprising stability of the drug complex with the metallochaperone Atx1 arises from formation of a sulfur-bridged copper-molybdenum cluster reminiscent of those found in molybdenum and iron sulfur proteins. Spectroscopic studies indicate that this cluster is stable in solution and corresponds to physiological clusters isolated from TM-treated Wilson's disease animal models. Finally, mechanistic studies show that the drug-metallochaperone inhibits metal transfer functions between copper-trafficking proteins. The results are consistent with a model wherein TM can directly and reversibly down-regulate copper delivery to secreted metalloenzymes and suggest that proteins involved in metal regulation might be fruitful drug targets.

  2. Signatures of Star Formation in Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Donahue, Megan

    2009-01-01

    I discuss and review recent studies of the signatures of activity in brightest cluster galaxies. Mid-IR spectra appear to show indications of star formation in a sample of 9 BCGs from de Messieres et al. (2009). Other processes like cosmic ray heating and conduction may play a role. The incidence of emission-line BCGs in X-ray selected clusters is higher than in optically-selected clusters, and higher still in systems known to be cool cores. We report early results of a UV and H-alpha survey of the BCGs in the REXCESS sample, which reveals that this sample has an interestingly low number of emission-line or UV excess systems. [Note added post facto: fainter emission-line sources discovered this summer increasses the rate to 22%.

  3. Formation of Carbonic Acid in Impact of CO2 on Ice and Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshberg, Barak; Gerber, R Benny

    2016-08-01

    A new mode of formation is proposed for carbonic acid in the atmosphere. It involves impact of vibrationally excited gas-phase CO2 molecules on water or ice particles. This is a first mechanism that supports formation on ice as well as on liquid water surfaces. Results of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations are presented on collisions of CO2 with (H2O)n clusters (n = 1, 4, 8, 12). Efficient formation of carbonic acid is seen with product lifetimes exceeding 100 ps. The reaction is feasible even for collision of CO2 with a single water molecule but in a different mechanism than for larger clusters. For clusters, the transition state shows charge separation into H3O(+)···HCO3(-), which transforms into neutral carbonic acid as the product, hydrated by the remaining waters. Possible atmospheric implications of the results are discussed.

  4. ON THE FORMATION OF MULTIPLE STELLAR POPULATIONS IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nearly all globular clusters (GCs) studied to date show evidence for multiple stellar populations, in stark contrast to the conventional view that GCs are a mono-metallic, coeval population of stars. This generic feature must therefore emerge naturally within massive star cluster formation. Building on earlier work, we propose a simple physical model for the early evolution (several 108 yr) of GCs. We consider the effects of stellar mass loss, Type II supernovae (SNe II) and prompt Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), ram pressure, and accretion from the ambient interstellar medium (ISM) on the development of a young GC's own gas reservoir. In our model, SNe II from a first generation of star formation clears the GC of its initial gas reservoir. Over the next several 108 yr, mass lost from asymptotic giant branch stars and matter accreted from the ambient ISM collect at the center of the GC. This material must remain quite cool (T ∼ 102 K), but does not catastrophically cool on a crossing time because of the high Lyman-Werner flux density in young GCs. The collection of gas within the GC must compete with ram pressure from the ambient ISM. After several 108 yr, the Lyman-Werner photon flux density drops by more than three orders of magnitude, allowing molecular hydrogen and then stars to form. After this second generation of star formation, SNe II from the second generation and then prompt SNe Ia associated with the first generation maintain a gas-free GC, thereby ending the cycle of star formation events. Our model makes clear predictions for the presence or absence of multiple stellar populations within GCs as a function of GC mass and formation environment. While providing a natural explanation for the approximately equal number of first- and second-generation stars in GCs, substantial accretion from the ambient ISM may produce fewer chemically peculiar second-generation stars than are observed. Analyzing intermediate-age LMC clusters, we find for the first time

  5. Observations of Protostellar Outflow Feedback in Clustered Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, Fumitaka

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the role of protostellar outflow feedback in clustered star formation using the observational data of recent molecular outflow surveys toward nearby cluster-forming clumps. We found that for almost all clumps, the outflow momentum injection rate is significantly larger than the turbulence dissipation rate. Therefore, the outflow feedback is likely to maintain supersonic turbulence in the clumps. For less massive clumps such as B59, L1551, and L1641N, the outflow kinetic energy is comparable to the clump gravitational energy. In such clumps, the outflow feedback probably affects significantly the clump dynamics. On the other hand, for clumps with masses larger than about 200 M$_\\odot$, the outflow kinetic energy is significantly smaller than the clump gravitational energy. Since the majority of stars form in such clumps, we conclude that outflow feedback cannot destroy the whole parent clump. These characteristics of the outflow feedback support the scenario of slow star formation.

  6. Cluster formation rate in models with ''dark energy''

    CERN Document Server

    Basilakos, S

    2003-01-01

    Based on flat Friedmann-Robertson Walker cold dark matter (CDM) type models driven by non-relativistic matter and an exotic fluid (quintessence) with an equation of state: $p_{Q}=w\\rho_{Q}$ ($-1\\le w<0$), we investigate whether or not the large scale dynamical effects regarding the cluster formation and virialization are related to the cosmic equation of state. Using the non-linear spherical collapse we find that the cluster formation rate, in quintessence models, is intermediate between the open and $\\Lambda$CDM respectively. For the QCDM case, using the virial theorem and energy conservation and assuming a spherical mass overdensity shell, we obtain analytically the ratio between the final (virial) and the turn-around radius. We find that the above ratio is almost independent from the equation of state.

  7. The Impact of Star Formation on Cool Core Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Motl, P M; Norman, M L; Bryan, G L

    2003-01-01

    We present results from recent simulations of the formation and evolution of clusters of galaxies in a LambdaCDM cosmology. These simulations contain our most physically complete input physics to date including radiative cooling, star formation that transforms rapidly cooling material into aggregate star particles and we also model the thermal feedback from resulting supernovae in the star particles. We use an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) Eulerian hydrodynamics scheme to obtain very high spatial resolution (~ 2 kpc) in a computational volume 256 Mpc on a side with mass resolution for dark matter and star particles of ~ 10^8 M_solar. We examine in detail the appearance and evolution of the core region of our simulated clusters.

  8. The Peculiarities of Cluster Formation in the Russian Nanotechnology Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Kurchenkov Vladimir Viktorovich

    2015-01-01

    The innovative development of the Russian economy in modern conditions should be based on the development of advanced nanotechnology. The formation of the nanotechnology industry in Russia requires optimal organization, the development of networking, the search for new forms of integrating the primary and secondary productions. The cluster organization in nanotech industry is based on high-tech production and has a number of advantages: uncertainty elimination, restriction of the competition ...

  9. The Formation and Early Evolution of Young Massive Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Longmore, Steven N; Bastian, Nate; Bally, John; Rathborne, Jill; Testi, Leonardo; Stolte, Andrea; Dale, James; Bressert, Eli; Alves, Joao

    2014-01-01

    We review the formation and early evolution of the most massive and dense young stellar clusters, focusing on the role they can play in our understanding of star and planet formation as a whole. Young massive cluster (YMC) progenitor clouds in the Galactic Center can accumulate to a high enough density without forming stars that the initial protostellar densities are close to the final stellar density. For this to hold in the disk, the time scale to accumulate the gas to such high densities must be much shorter than the star formation timescale. Otherwise the gas begins forming stars while it is being accumulated to high density. The distinction between the formation regimes in the two environments is consistent with the predictions of environmentally-dependent density thresholds for star formation. This implies that stars in YMCs of similar total mass and radius can have formed at widely different initial protostellar densities. The fact that no systematic variations in fundamental properties are observed be...

  10. The life-cycle of star formation in distant clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Barger, A J; Ellis, Richard S; Couch, W J; Smail, I; Sharples, R M

    1995-01-01

    We analyse the detailed distribution of star-forming and post-starburst members in three distant (z = 0.31) galaxy clusters in terms of evolutionary sequences that incorporate secondary bursts of star formation on pre-existing stellar populations. Using the number density of spectroscopically-confirmed members on the EW(H\\delta) versus B-R plane from existing data, and for a larger K'-limited sample on the U-I versus I-K' plane from newly-acquired infrared images, we demonstrate that the proportion of cluster members undergoing secondary bursts of star formation during the last ~2 Gyr prior to the epoch of observation is probably as high as 30 per cent of the member galaxies. A key observation leading to this conclusion is the high proportion of H\\delta strong galaxies in all three clusters. The evolutionary modelling, whilst necessarily approximate, returns the correct proportions of galaxies in various stages of the star formation cycle both in terms of spectral and colour properties. HST images for the thr...

  11. Gamma Rays from Star Formation in Clusters of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Storm, Emma; Profumo, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission. The detection of gamma rays from star-forming galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity (Ackermann et. al. 2012). Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 micrometers) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study we apply the relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities derived in Ackermann et. al. 2012 to a sample of galaxy clusters from Ackermann et. al. 2010 in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with sta...

  12. Dynamical Formation of Cataclysmic Variables in Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Jongsuk; Belloni, Diogo; Giersz, Mirek

    2016-01-01

    The formation and evolution of X-ray sources in globular clusters is likely to be affected by the cluster internal dynamics and the stellar interactions in the cluster dense environment.Several observational studies have revealed a correlation between the number of X-ray sources and the stellar encounter rate and provided evidence of the role of dynamics in the formation of X-ray binaries. We have performed a survey of Monte-Carlo simulations aimed at exploring the connection between the dynamics and formation of cataclysmic variables (CVs) and the origin of the observed correlation between the number of these objects, $N_{\\rm cv}$, and the stellar encounter rate, $\\Gamma$.The results of our simulations show a correlation between $N_{\\rm cv}$ and $\\Gamma$ as found in observational data, illustrate the essential role played by dynamics, and shed light on the dynamical history behind this correlation. CVs in our simulations are more centrally concentrated than single stars with masses close to those of turn-off...

  13. The orbital motion of the Arches cluster - clues on cluster formation near the galactic center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolte, Andrea; Ghez, Andrea M; Morris, Mark R; Lu, Jessica R [UCLA, 430 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Brandner, Wolfgang [MPIA, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Matthews, Keith [Caltech Optical Observatories, California Institute of Technology, MS 320-47, Pasadena, CA 91225 (United States)], E-mail: astolte@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: kym@caltech.edu

    2008-10-15

    The Arches cluster is one of the most massive, young clusters in the Milky Way. Located inside the central molecular zone in the inner 200 pc of the Galactic center, it formed in one of the most extreme star-forming environments in the present-day Galaxy. Its young age of only 2.5 Myr allows us to observe the cluster despite the strong tidal shear forces in the inner Galaxy. The orbit of the cluster determines its dynamical evolution, tidal stripping, and hence its fate. We have measured the proper motion of the Arches cluster relative to the ambient field from Keck/NIRC2 LGS-AO and VLT/NAOS-CONICA NGS-AO observations taken 4.3 years earlier. When combined with the radial velocity, we derive a 3D space motion of 232 {+-} 30 km/s for the Arches. This motion is exceptionally large when compared to molecular cloud orbits in the GC, and places stringent constraints on the formation scenarios for starburst clusters in dense, nuclear environments.

  14. Turbulence and Vorticity in Galaxy Clusters Generated by Structure Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazza, F.; Jones, T. W.; Brüggen, M.; Brunetti, G.; Gheller, C.; Porter, D.; Ryu, D.

    2016-09-01

    Turbulence is a key ingredient for the evolution of the intracluster medium, whose properties can be predicted with high resolution numerical simulations. We present initial results on the generation of solenoidal and compressive turbulence in the intracluster medium during the formation of a small-size cluster using highly resolved, non-radiative cosmological simulations, with a refined monitoring in time. In this first of a series of papers, we closely look at one simulated cluster whose formation was distinguished by a merger around z ˜ 0.3. We separate laminar gas motions, turbulence and shocks with dedicated filtering strategies and distinguish the solenoidal and compressive components of the gas flows using Hodge-Helmholtz decomposition. Solenoidal turbulence dominates the dissipation of turbulent motions (˜95%) in the central cluster volume at all epochs. The dissipation via compressive modes is found to be more important (˜30% of the total) only at large radii (≥0.5~rvir) and close to merger events. We show that enstrophy (vorticity squared) is good proxy of solenoidal turbulence. All terms ruling the evolution of enstrophy (i.e. baroclinic, compressive, stretching and advective terms) are found to be significant, but in amounts that vary with time and location. Two important trends for the growth of enstrophy in our simulation are identified: first, enstrophy is continuously accreted into the cluster from the outside, and most of that accreted enstrophy is generated near the outer accretion shocks by baroclinic and compressive processes. Second, in the cluster interior vortex stretching is dominant, although the other terms also contribute substantially.

  15. Sequential clustering of star formations in IC 1396

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a comprehensive study of the H II region IC 1396 and its star forming activity, in which multi-wavelength data ranging from the optical to the near- and far-infrared were employed. The surface density distribution of all the 2MASS sources with a certain detection toward IC 1396 indicates the existence of a compact cluster spatially consistent with the position of the exciting source of the H II region, HD 206267. The spatial distribution of the sources with excessive infrared emission, selected based on archived 2MASS data, reveals the existence of four sub-clusters in this region. One is associated with the open cluster Trumpler 37. The other three are found to be spatially coincident with the bright rims of the H II region. All the sources with excessive emission in the near infrared are cross-identified with AKARI IRC data. An analysis of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the resultant sample leads to the identification of eight CLASS I, 15 CLASS II and 15 CLASS III sources in IC 1396. Optical identification of the sample sources with R magnitudes brighter than 17 mag corroborates the results from the SED analysis. Based on the spatial distribution of the infrared young stellar objects at different evolutionary stages, the surrounding sub-clusters located in the bright rims are believed to be younger than the central one. This is consistent with a scenario of sequential star formation in this region. Imaging data of a dark patch in IC 1396 by Herschel SPIRE, on the other hand, indicate the presence of two far-infrared cores in LDN 1111, which are likely to be a new generation of protostellar objects in formation. So we infer that the star formation process in this H II region was not continuous but rather episodic

  16. Sequential clustering of star formations in IC 1396

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-Fang Huang; Jin-Zeng Li

    2013-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the H Ⅱ region IC 1396 and its star forming activity,in which multi-wavelength data ranging from the optical to the nearand far-infrared were employed.The surface density distribution of all the 2MASS sources with a certain detection toward IC 1396 indicates the existence of a compact cluster spatially consistent with the position of the exciting source of the H Ⅱ region,HD 206267.The spatial distribution of the sources with excessive infrared emission,selected based on archived 2MASS data,reveals the existence of four sub-clusters in this region.One is associated with the open cluster Trumpler 37.The other three are found to be spatially coincident with the bright rims of the H Ⅱ region.All the sources with excessive emission in the near infrared are cross-identified with AKARI IRC data.An analysis of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the resultant sample leads to the identification of eight CLASS I,15 CLASS Ⅱ and 15 CLASS Ⅲ sources in IC 1396.Optical identification of the sample sources with R magnitudes brighter than 17 mag corroborates the results from the SED analysis.Based on the spatial distribution of the infrared young stellar objects at different evolutionary stages,the surrounding sub-clusters located in the bright rims are believed to be younger than the central one.This is consistent with a scenario of sequential star formation in this region.Imaging data of a dark patch in IC 1396 by Herschel SPIRE,on the other hand,indicate the presence of two far-infrared cores in LDN 1111,which are likely to be a new generation of protostellar objects in formation.So we infer that the star formation process in this H Ⅱ region was not continuous but rather episodic.

  17. Sequential clustering of star formations in IC 1396

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ya-Fang; Li, Jin-Zeng

    2013-05-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the H II region IC 1396 and its star forming activity, in which multi-wavelength data ranging from the optical to the near- and far-infrared were employed. The surface density distribution of all the 2MASS sources with a certain detection toward IC 1396 indicates the existence of a compact cluster spatially consistent with the position of the exciting source of the H II region, HD 206267. The spatial distribution of the sources with excessive infrared emission, selected based on archived 2MASS data, reveals the existence of four sub-clusters in this region. One is associated with the open cluster Trumpler 37. The other three are found to be spatially coincident with the bright rims of the H II region. All the sources with excessive emission in the near infrared are cross-identified with AKARI IRC data. An analysis of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the resultant sample leads to the identification of eight CLASS I, 15 CLASS II and 15 CLASS III sources in IC 1396. Optical identification of the sample sources with R magnitudes brighter than 17 mag corroborates the results from the SED analysis. Based on the spatial distribution of the infrared young stellar objects at different evolutionary stages, the surrounding sub-clusters located in the bright rims are believed to be younger than the central one. This is consistent with a scenario of sequential star formation in this region. Imaging data of a dark patch in IC 1396 by Herschel SPIRE, on the other hand, indicate the presence of two far-infrared cores in LDN 1111, which are likely to be a new generation of protostellar objects in formation. So we infer that the star formation process in this H II region was not continuous but rather episodic.

  18. On the Assembly of Dwarf Galaxies in Clusters and their Efficient Formation of Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Mistani, Pouria A; Pillepich, Annalisa; Sanchez-Janssen, Ruben; Vogelsberger, Mark; Nelson, Dylan; Rodriguez-Gomez, Vicente; Torrey, Paul; Hernquist, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy clusters contain a large population of low mass dwarf elliptical galaxies whose exact origin is unclear: their colors, structural properties and kinematics differ substantially from those of dwarf irregulars in the field. We use the Illustris cosmological simulation to study differences in the assembly paths of dwarf galaxies (3e8 < M_*/M_sun < 1e10) according to their environment. We find that cluster dwarfs achieve their maximum total and stellar mass on average ~ 8 and ~ 4.5 Gyr ago, respectively, around the time of infall into the clusters. In contrast, field dwarfs not subjected to environmental stripping, reach their maximum mass at redshift z = 0. This different assembly history naturally produces a color bimodality, with blue isolated dwarfs and redder cluster dwarfs exhibiting negligible star-formation today. The cessation of star formation happens over median times 3.5-5 Gyr depending on stellar mass, and shows a large scatter (~ 1-8 Gyr), with the lower values associated with starburst...

  19. Star Formation Activity in CLASH Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Kevin; Postman, Marc; Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John

    2015-11-01

    The CLASH X-ray selected sample of 20 galaxy clusters contains 10 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) that exhibit significant (>5σ) extinction-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Star formation activity is inferred from photometric estimates of UV and Hα+[N ii] emission in knots and filaments detected in CLASH Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 observations. UV-derived SFRs in these BCGs span two orders of magnitude, including two with a SFR ≳ 100 M⊙ yr-1. These measurements are supplemented with [O ii], [O iii], and Hβ fluxes measured from spectra obtained with the SOAR telescope. We confirm that photoionization from ongoing star formation powers the line emission nebulae in these BCGs, although in many BCGs there is also evidence of a LINER-like contribution to the line emission. Coupling these data with Chandra X-ray measurements, we infer that the star formation occurs exclusively in low-entropy cluster cores and exhibits a correlation with gas properties related to cooling. We also perform an in-depth study of the starburst history of the BCG in the cluster RXJ1532.9+3021, and create 2D maps of stellar properties on scales down to ˜350 pc. These maps reveal evidence for an ongoing burst occurring in elongated filaments, generally on ˜0.5-1.0 Gyr timescales, although some filaments are consistent with much younger (≲100 Myr) burst timescales and may be correlated with recent activity from the active galactic nucleus. The relationship between BCG SFRs and the surrounding intracluster medium gas properties provide new support for the process of feedback-regulated cooling in galaxy clusters and is consistent with recent theoretical predictions. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel

  20. The quenching of the star formation activity in cluster galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Boselli, A; Fossati, M; Buat, V; Boissier, S; Boquien, M; Burgarella, D; Ciesla, L; Gavazzi, G; Serra, P

    2016-01-01

    We study the star formation quenching mechanism in cluster galaxies by fitting the SED of the Herschel Reference Survey, a complete volume-limited K-band-selected sample of nearby galaxies including objects in different density regions, from the core of the Virgo cluster to the general field. The SED are fitted using the CIGALE SED modelling code. The truncated activity of cluster galaxies is parametrised using a specific SFH with 2 free parameters, the quenching age QA and the quenching factor QF. These 2 parameters are crucial for the identification of the quenching mechanism which acts on long timescales if starvation while rapid and efficient if ram pressure. To be sensitive to an abrupt and recent variation of the star formation activity, we combine in a new way 20 UV to FIR photometric bands with 3 age-sensitive Balmer line absorption indices extracted from available medium-resolution integrated spectroscopy and with Halpha narrow band imaging data. The use of a truncated SFH significantly increases the...

  1. The formation of globular clusters through minihalo-minihalo mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Trenti, Michele; Jimenez, Raul

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel scenario for the formation of Globular Clusters (GCs) based on the merger of two or more atomic cooling halos at high-redshift (z>6). The model naturally fulfills several key observational constraints on GCs that have emerged in the last decade. Specifically, absolute and relative ages, widespread presence of multiple stellar populations, spatial distribution around host galaxies, and correlations between galactocentric radius and metallicity. In our framework, the oldest globular clusters form the first generation stars as an intense burst in the center of a minihalo that grows above the threshold for hydrogen cooling (halo mass M_h~1e8 Msun) and undergoes a major merger within the cooling timescale (~150 Myr). Subsequent minor mergers and sustained gas infall bring new supply of pristine gas at the halo center, diluting AGB ejecta, and triggering additional bursts of star formation which form multiple generation of stars in the majority of the clusters. The DM halo around the GC is then s...

  2. Simulating radiative feedback and star cluster formation in GMCs - I. Dependence on gravitational boundedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Corey S.; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Harris, William E.

    2016-09-01

    Radiative feedback is an important consequence of cluster formation in giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in which newly formed clusters heat and ionize their surrounding gas. The process of cluster formation, and the role of radiative feedback, has not been fully explored in different GMC environments. We present a suite of simulations which explore how the initial gravitational boundedness, and radiative feedback, affect cluster formation. We model the early evolution (<5 Myr) of turbulent, 106 M⊙ clouds with virial parameters ranging from 0.5 to 5. To model cluster formation, we use cluster sink particles, coupled to a raytracing scheme, and a custom subgrid model which populates a cluster via sampling an initial mass function (IMF) with an efficiency of 20 per cent per free-fall time. We find that radiative feedback only decreases the cluster particle formation efficiency by a few per cent. The initial virial parameter plays a much stronger role in limiting cluster formation, with a spread of cluster formation efficiencies of 37-71 per cent for the most unbound to the most bound model. The total number of clusters increases while the maximum mass cluster decreases with an increasing initial virial parameter, resulting in steeper mass distributions. The star formation rates in our cluster particles are initially consistent with observations but rise to higher values at late times. This suggests that radiative feedback alone is not responsible for dispersing a GMC over the first 5 Myr of cluster formation.

  3. Interacting star clusters in the LMC Overmerging problem solved by cluster group formation

    CERN Document Server

    Leon, S; Vallenari, A

    1999-01-01

    We present the tidal tail distributions of a sample of candidate binary clusters located in the bar of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). One isolated cluster, SL 268, is presented in order to study the effect of the LMC tidal field. All the candidate binary clusters show tidal tails, confirming that the pairs are formed by physically linked objects. The stellar mass in the tails covers a large range, from $1.8\\times 10^3$ to $3\\times 10^4$\\msun. We derive a total mass estimate for SL 268 and SL 356. At large radii, the projected density profiles of SL 268 and SL 356 fall off as $r^{-\\gamma}$, with $\\gamma= 2.27$ and $\\gamma=3.44$, respectively. Out of 4 pairs or multiple systems, 2 are older than the theoretical survival time of binary clusters (going from a few $10^6$ yr to $10^8$ yr). A pair shows too large age difference between the components to be consistent with classical theoretical models of binary cluster formation (Fujimoto & Kumai 1997). We refer to this as the ``overmerging'' problem.A differe...

  4. CELL FORMATION IN GROUP TECHNOLOGY: A SIMILARITY ORDER CLUSTERING APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfrey C. Onwubolu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Grouping parts into families which can be produced by a cluster of machine cells is the cornerstone of cellular manufacturing, which in turn is the building block for flexible manufacturing systems. Cellular manufacturing is a group technology (GT concept that has recently attracted the attention of manufacturing firms operating under jobshop environment to consider redesigning their manufacturing systems so as to take advantage of increased throughput, reduction in work-in-progress, set-up time, and lead times; leading to product quality and customer satisfaction. The paper presents a generalised approach for machine cell formation from a jobshop using similarity order clustering technique for preliminary cell grouping and considering machine utilisation for the design of nonintergrouping material handling using the single-pass heuristic. The work addresses the shortcomings of cellular manufacturing systems design and implementations which ignore machine utilisations, group sizes and intergroup moves.

  5. Galaxy Formation at z~3 Constraints from Spatial Clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Wechsler, R H; Bullock, J S; Kolatt, T S; Primack, Joel R; Blumenthal, G R; Dekel, A; Wechsler, Risa H.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Bullock, James S.; Kolatt, Tsafrir S.; Primack, Joel R.; Blumenthal, George R.; Dekel, Avishai

    2001-01-01

    We use N-body simulations combined with semi-analytic models to compute the clustering properties of modeled galaxies at z~3, and confront these predictions with the clustering properties of the observed population of Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs). Several scenarios for the nature of LBGs are explored, which may be broadly categorized into models in which high-redshift star formation is driven by collisional starbursts and those in which quiescent star formation dominates. For each model, we make predictions for the LBG overdensity distribution, the variance of counts-in-cells, the correlation length, and close pair statistics. Models which assume a one-to-one relationship between massive dark-matter halos and galaxies are disfavored by close pair statistics, as are models in which colliding halos are associated with galaxies in a simplified way. However, when modeling of gas consumption and star formation is included using a semi-analytic treatment, the quiescent and collisional starburst models predict simila...

  6. Formation of Proto-Globular Cluster Clouds by Thermal Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, H; Ryu, D; Kang, Hyesung; Lake, George; Ryu, Dongsu

    2000-01-01

    Many models of globular cluster formation assume the presence of cold dense clouds in early universe. Here we re-examine the Fall & Rees (1985) model for formation of proto-globular cluster clouds (PGCCs) via thermal instabilities in a protogalactic halo. We first argue, based on the previous study by others, that under the protogalactic environments only nonlinear density inhomogeneities can condense into PGCCs. We then carry out numerical simulations of the collapse of overdense clouds in one-dimensional spherical geometry, including self-gravity and radiative cooling down to T=10^4 K. Since imprinting of Jeans mass at 10^4 K is essential to this model, here we focus on the cases where external UV background radiation prevents the formation of H2 molecules and so prevent the cloud from cooling below 10^4 K. The quantitative results from these simulations can be summarized as follows: 1) Perturbations smaller than M_min ~ (10^{5.6} M_sun) (n_h/0.05 cm3)^{-2} cool isobarically, while perturbations larger ...

  7. The formation of cosmic fullerenes from arophatic clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Micelotta, Elisabetta R; Cami, Jan; Peeters, Els; Bernard-Salas, Jeronimo; Fanchini, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Fullerenes have recently been identified in space and they may play a significant role in the gas and dust budget of various astrophysical objects including planetary nebulae (PNe), reflection nebulae (RNe) and H II regions. The tenuous nature of the gas in these environments precludes the formation of fullerene materials following known vaporization or combustion synthesis routes even on astronomical timescales. We have studied the processing of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H or HAC) nano-particles and their specific derivative structures, which we name "arophatics", in the circumstellar environments of young, carbon-rich PNe. We find that UV-irradiation of such particles can result in the formation of fullerenes, consistent with the known physical conditions in PNe and with available timescales.

  8. The Formation of Cosmic Fullerenes from Arophatic Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micelotta, Elisabetta R.; Jones, Anthony P.; Cami, Jan; Peeters, Els; Bernard-Salas, Jeronimo; Fanchini, Giovanni

    2012-12-01

    Fullerenes have recently been identified in space and they may play a significant role in the gas and dust budget of various astrophysical objects including planetary nebulae (PNe), reflection nebulae, and H II regions. The tenuous nature of the gas in these environments precludes the formation of fullerene materials following known vaporization or combustion synthesis routes even on astronomical timescales. We have studied the processing of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H or HAC) nanoparticles and their specific derivative structures, which we name "arophatics," in the circumstellar environments of young, carbon-rich PNe. We find that UV-irradiation of such particles can result in the formation of fullerenes, consistent with the known physical conditions in PNe and with available timescales.

  9. Modeling jet and outflow feedback during star cluster formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powerful jets and outflows are launched from the protostellar disks around newborn stars. These outflows carry enough mass and momentum to transform the structure of their parent molecular cloud and to potentially control star formation itself. Despite their importance, we have not been able to fully quantify the impact of jets and outflows during the formation of a star cluster. The main problem lies in limited computing power. We would have to resolve the magnetic jet-launching mechanism close to the protostar and at the same time follow the evolution of a parsec-size cloud for a million years. Current computer power and codes fall orders of magnitude short of achieving this. In order to overcome this problem, we implement a subgrid-scale (SGS) model for launching jets and outflows, which demonstrably converges and reproduces the mass, linear and angular momentum transfer, and the speed of real jets, with ∼1000 times lower resolution than would be required without the SGS model. We apply the new SGS model to turbulent, magnetized star cluster formation and show that jets and outflows (1) eject about one-fourth of their parent molecular clump in high-speed jets, quickly reaching distances of more than a parsec, (2) reduce the star formation rate by about a factor of two, and (3) lead to the formation of ∼1.5 times as many stars compared to the no-outflow case. Most importantly, we find that jets and outflows reduce the average star mass by a factor of ∼ three and may thus be essential for understanding the characteristic mass of the stellar initial mass function.

  10. Modeling the Formation of Globular Cluster Systems in the Virgo Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Globular cluster (GC) systems are some of the oldest and most unique building blocks of galaxies. The mass and chemical composition of GCs preserve the fossil record of the early stages of formation of their host galaxies. The observed distribution of GC colors within massive early-type galaxies in the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey (ACSVCS) reveals a multi-modal shape, which likely corresponds to a multi-modal metallicity distribution. In this paper, we present a simple model for the formation and dynamical disruption of globular clusters that aims to match the ACSVCS data. We test the hypothesis that GCs are formed during major mergers of gas-rich galaxies and inherit the metallicity of their hosts. To trace merger events, we use halo merger trees extracted from a large cosmological N-body simulation. We select 20 halos in the mass range 2*10^{12}-7*10^{13} M_sun and match them to 18 Virgo galaxies with K-band luminosity between 3*10^{10} and 3*10^{11}L_sun. To set the Iron abundances, we use an empirical galaxy ...

  11. Star Formation Efficiency in the Cool Cores of Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Michael; Veilleux, Sylvain; Rupke, David S. N.; Mushotzky, Richard; Reynolds, Christopher

    2011-06-01

    We have assembled a sample of high spatial resolution far-UV (Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys/Solar Blind Channel) and Hα (Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter) imaging for 15 cool core galaxy clusters. These data provide a detailed view of the thin, extended filaments in the cores of these clusters. Based on the ratio of the far-UV to Hα luminosity, the UV spectral energy distribution, and the far-UV and Hα morphology, we conclude that the warm, ionized gas in the cluster cores is photoionized by massive, young stars in all but a few (A1991, A2052, A2580) systems. We show that the extended filaments, when considered separately, appear to be star forming in the majority of cases, while the nuclei tend to have slightly lower far-UV luminosity for a given Hα luminosity, suggesting a harder ionization source or higher extinction. We observe a slight offset in the UV/Hα ratio from the expected value for continuous star formation which can be modeled by assuming intrinsic extinction by modest amounts of dust (E(B - V) ~ 0.2) or a top-heavy initial mass function in the extended filaments. The measured star formation rates vary from ~0.05 M sun yr-1 in the nuclei of non-cooling systems, consistent with passive, red ellipticals, to ~5 M sun yr-1 in systems with complex, extended, optical filaments. Comparing the estimates of the star formation rate based on UV, Hα, and infrared luminosities to the spectroscopically determined X-ray cooling rate suggests a star formation efficiency of 14+18 - 8%. This value represents the time-averaged fraction, by mass, of gas cooling out of the intracluster medium, which turns into stars and agrees well with the global fraction of baryons in stars required by simulations to reproduce the stellar mass function for galaxies. This result provides a new constraint on the efficiency of star formation in accreting systems.

  12. Star Formation Efficiency in the Cool Cores of Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, Michael; Rupke, David S N; Mushotzky, Richard; Reynolds, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    We have assembled a sample of high spatial resolution far-UV (Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys Solar Blind Channel) and Halpha (Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter) imaging for 15 cool core galaxy clusters. These data provide a detailed view of the thin, extended filaments in the cores of these clusters. Based on the ratio of the far-UV to Halpha luminosity, the UV spectral energy distribution, and the far-UV and Halpha morphology, we conclude that the warm, ionized gas in the cluster cores is photoionized by massive, young stars in all but a few (Abell 1991, Abell 2052, Abell 2580) systems. We show that the extended filaments, when considered separately, appear to be star-forming in the majority of cases, while the nuclei tend to have slightly lower far-UV luminosity for a given Halpha luminosity, suggesting a harder ionization source or higher extinction. We observe a slight offset in the UV/Halpha ratio from the expected value for continuous star formation which can be modeled by assuming in...

  13. Sequential clustering of star formation in IC 1396

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Ya Fang

    2012-01-01

    We present in this paper a comprehensive study of the H II region IC 1396 and its star formation activity, in which multi-wavelength data ranging from the optical to the near- and far-infrared were employed. The surface density distribution of all the 2MASS sources with certain detection toward IC 1396 indicates the existence of a compact cluster spatially consistent with the position of the exciting source of the H II region, HD 206267. The spatial distribution of the infrared excessive emission sources selected based on archived 2MASS data reveals the existence of four sub-clusters in this region. One is in association with the open cluster Trumpler 37. The other three are found to be spatially coincident with the bright rims of the H II region. All the excessive emission sources in the near infrared are cross-identified with the AKARI IRC data, an analysis of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the resultant sample leads to the identification of 8 CLASS I, 15 CLASS II and 15 CLASS III sources in IC...

  14. Cluster formation in liverwort-associated methylobacteria and its implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutschera, U.; Thomas, J.; Hornschuh, M.

    2007-08-01

    Pink-pigmented methylotropic bacteria of the genus Methylobacterium inhabit the surfaces of plant organs. In bryophytes, these methylobacteria enhance cell growth, but the nature of this plant-microbe interaction is largely unknown. In this study, methylobacteria were isolated from the upper surface of the free-living thalli of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha L. Identification of one strain by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene-targeted polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and other data show that these microbes represent an undescribed species of the genus Methylobacterium ( Methylobacterium sp.). The growth-promoting activity of these wild-type methylobacteria was tested and compared with that of the type strain Methylobacterium mesophilicum. Both types of methylobacteria stimulated surface expansion of isolated gemmae from Marchantia polymorpha by about 350%. When suspended in water, the liverwort-associated bacteria ( Methylobacterium sp.) formed dense clusters of up to 600 cells. In liquid cultures of Methylobacterium mesophilicum, single cells were observed, but no clustering occurred. We suggest that the liverwort-associated methylobacteria are co-evolved symbionts of the plants: Cluster formation may be a behavior that enhances the survival of the epiphytic microbes during periods of drought of these desiccation-tolerant lower plants.

  15. On the electronic structure of small cyclic carbon clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousaf, Kazim E. [Department of Chemistry and Centre for Scientific Computing, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Taylor, Peter R. [Department of Chemistry and Centre for Scientific Computing, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)], E-mail: p.r.taylor@warwick.ac.uk

    2008-06-16

    We present the results of correlated calculations on a variety of small carbon rings. Equilibrium structures and vibrational frequencies are calculated and transition states connecting symmetry-equivalent minima are considered in detail. We show that neither single-reference coupled-cluster nor multiconfigurational self-consistent field methods (even after perturbational inclusion of dynamical correlation effects) give qualitatively correct potential surfaces in the vicinity of the minima, suggesting that there is little recourse for these systems other than a multireference coupled-cluster treatment. Density-functional theory using the B3LYP functional produces results broadly in agreement with single-reference coupled-cluster methods and is thus no more reliable, but considerably more economical.

  16. Hydrophilic carbon clusters as therapeutic, high capacity antioxidants

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel, Errol L. G.; Duong, MyLinh T.; Bitner, Brittany R.; Marcano, Daniela C.; James M. Tour; Kent, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress reflects an excessive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and is a hallmark of several acute and chronic human pathologies. While many antioxidants have been investigated, the majority have demonstrated poor efficacy in clinical trials. Here, we discuss limitations of current antioxidants and describe a new class of nanoparticle antioxidants, poly(ethylene glycol)-functionalized hydrophilic carbon clusters (PEG-HCCs). PEG-HCCs show high capacity to annihilate ROS su...

  17. Ionization Thresholds of Small Carbon Clusters: Tunable VUVExperiments and Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belau, Leonid; Wheeler, Steven E.; Ticknor, Brian W.; Ahmed,Musahid; Leone, Stephen R.; Allen, Wesley D.; Schaefer III, Henry F.; Duncan, Michael A.

    2007-07-31

    Small carbon clusters (Cn, n = 2-15) are produced in amolecular beam by pulsed laser vaporization and studied with vacuumultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry. The required VUVradiation in the 8-12 eV range is provided by the Advanced Light Source(ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Mass spectra atvarious ionization energies reveal the qualitative relative abundances ofthe neutral carbon clusters produced. By far the most abundant species isC3. Using the tunability of the ALS, ionization threshold spectra arerecorded for the clusters up to 15 atoms in size. The ionizationthresholds are compared to those measured previously with charge-transferbracketing methods. To interpret the ionization thresholds for differentcluster sizes, new ab initio calculations are carried out on the clustersfor n = 4-10. Geometric structures are optimized at the CCSD(T) levelwith cc-pVTZ (or cc-pVDZ) basis sets, and focal point extrapolations areapplied to both neutral and cation species to determine adiabatic andvertical ionization potentials. The comparison of computed and measuredionization potentials makes it possible to investigate the isomericstructures of the neutral clusters produced in this experiment. Themeasurements are inconclusive for the n = 4-6 species because ofunquenched excited electronic states. However, the data provide evidencefor the prominence of linear structures for the n = 7, 9, 11, 13 speciesand the presence of cyclic C10.

  18. The life-cycle of young star-clusters; the role of the galactic environment on cluster formation and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, Angela

    2015-08-01

    Our understanding of star formation on galactic scales has been fairly grasped (e.g. the rate at which stars form scales proportionally to the molecular gas content) both in the local and high redshift universe. However, our knowledge on how star formation proceeds at small scales (e.g. the fraction of star formation happening in stellar clusters, the time-scales for star-forming regions to dissolve, the impact of the galactic environment on star and cluster formation) remains a challenge. Gravitationally bound young stellar clusters appear to be a commune product of star formation. There are tantalizing similarities between young star clusters and globular clusters, the latter formed by gravitationally bound ancient stellar populations. However, the young and globular cluster populations show statistical properties (mass functions, formation efficiencies, and survival times) that have been claimed incompatible, leaving the two populations being the results of distinct processes of formation. In my contribution, I will discuss the latest results produced with the analysis of the young cluster populations in several nearby galaxies. The use of new statistical methods, the link with dense gas fueling star formation, the access to homogenous datasets show, for the first time, clear evidence of the influence of the galactic environment in shaping the properties of young star cluster populations. After all, the differences between the two cluster populations may not be so pronounced, suggesting that the same physical formation process under different environmental conditions has been (and currently is) at work at high redshift (when globular clusters were formed) and in the local universe.

  19. Young Massive Clusters: Their Population Properties, Formation and Evolution, and Their Relation to the Ancient Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Bastian, Nate

    2016-01-01

    This review summarises the main properties of Young Massive Clusters (YMCs), including their population properties, particularly focusing on extragalactic cluster samples. We discuss potential biases and caveats that can affect the construction of cluster samples and how incompleteness effects can result in erroneous conclusions regarding the long term survival of clusters. In addition to the luminosity, mass and age distributions of the clusters, we discuss the size distribution and profile evolution of the clusters. We also briefly discuss the stellar populations within YMCs. The final part of the review focusses on the connections between YMCs and the ancient globular clusters, whether or not they are related objects and how we can use what we know about YMC formation and evolution to understand how GCs formed in the early universe and how they relate to galaxy formation/evolution.

  20. Simulating radiative feedback and star cluster formation in GMCs - I. Dependence on gravitational boundedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Corey S.; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Harris, William E.

    2016-09-01

    Radiative feedback is an important consequence of cluster formation in giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in which newly formed clusters heat and ionize their surrounding gas. The process of cluster formation, and the role of radiative feedback, has not been fully explored in different GMC environments. We present a suite of simulations which explore how the initial gravitational boundedness, and radiative feedback, affect cluster formation. We model the early evolution (values at late times. This suggests that radiative feedback alone is not responsible for dispersing a GMC over the first 5 Myr of cluster formation.

  1. Cluster size and substrate temperature affecting thin film formation during copper cluster deposition on a Si (001) surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gong Heng-Feng; Lü Wei; Wang Lu-Min; Li Gong-Ping

    2012-01-01

    The soft deposition of Cu clusters on a Si (001) surface was studied by molecular dynamics simulations.The embedded atom method,the Stillinger-Weber and the Lennar Jones potentials were used to describe the interactions between the cluster atoms,between the substrate atoms,and between the cluster and the substrate atoms,respectively.The Cu13,Cu55,and Cu147 clusters were investigated at different substrate temperatures.We found that the substrate temperature had a significant effect on the Cu147 cluster.For smaller Cu13 and Cu55 clusters,the substrate temperature in the range of study appeared to have little effect on the mean center-of-mass height.The clusters showed better degrees of epitaxy at 800 K.With the same substrate temperature,the Cu55 cluster demonstrated the highest degree of epitaxy,followed by Cu147 and then Cu13 clusters.In addition,the Cu55 cluster showed the lowest mean center-of-mass height.These results suggested that the Cu55 cluster is a better choice for the thin-film formation among the clusters considered.Our studies may provide insight into the formation of desired Cu thin films on a Si substrate.

  2. Star Formation in Massive Clusters via Bondi Accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Norman; Chang, Philip

    2012-02-01

    Essentially all stars form in giant molecular clouds (GMCs). However, inside GMCs, most of the gas does not participate in star formation; rather, denser gas accumulates in clumps in the GMC, with the bulk of the stars in a given GMC forming in a few of the most massive clumps. In the Milky Way, these clumps have masses M cl ffM_{cl}/\\tau _{cl}, with epsilonff ≈ 0.017). However, after ~2 GMC free-fall times τGMC, the clump accretion rate accelerates rapidly; formally, the clump can accrete the entire GMC in ~3τGMC. At the same time, the star formation rate accelerates, tracking the Bondi accretion rate. If the GMC is disrupted by feedback from the largest clump, half the stars in that clump form in the final τGMC before the GMC is disrupted. The theory predicts that the distribution of effective star formation rates, measured per GMC free-fall time, is broad, ranging from ~0.001 up to 0.1 or larger and that the mass spectrum of star clusters is flatter than that of clumps, consistent with observations.

  3. Cluster observes formation of high-beta plasma blobs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Haerendel

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Late in a sequence of four moderate substorms on 26 July 2001, Cluster observed periods of a few minutes durations of high-beta plasma events (B<10nT, β=2-30, connected with dipolarizations of the magnetic field. Cluster was located near 02:45 MLT, at R=19RE and at about 5°N GSM. These events began late in the recovery phase of the second and about 5min before onset of the third substorm and lasted for three hours, way beyond the recovery phase of the fourth substorm. The most remarkable observation is that the onset coincided with the arrival of energetic (E~7keV O+ ions and energetic electrons obviously from the ionosphere, which tended to dominate the plasma composition throughout the remaining time. The magnetic flux and plasma transport is continuously directed equatorward and earthward, with oscillatory east-west movements superposed. Periods of the order of 5-10min and strong correlations between the magnetic elevation angle and log β (correlation coefficient 0.78 are highly reminiscent of the high-beta plasma blobs discovered with Equator-S and Geotail between 9 and 11RE in the late night/early morning sector (Haerendel et al., 1999.

    We conclude that Cluster observed the plasma blob formation in the tail plasma sheet, which seems to occur predominantly in the recovery and post-recovery phases of substorms. This is consistent with the finding of Equator-S and Geotail. The origin is a pulsed earthward plasma transport with velocity amplitudes of only several tens of km/s.

  4. M82, Starbursts, Star Clusters, and the Formation of Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Keto, E; Lo, K Y; Keto, Eric; Ho, Luis C.

    2005-01-01

    We observed the nearby starburst galaxy M82 in CO in the higher frequency (2--1) transition to achieve an angular resolution below 1 arc second or 17 pc at the target. We resolved the molecular gas into a large number of compact clouds, with masses ranging from about 2x10^3 to 2x10^6 solar masses. The mass spectrum scales as N(M) ~ M^-1.5, similar to the mass spectra of young massive star clusters suggesting that individual molecular clouds are transformed in the starburst into individual star clusters. The larger clouds are surrounded by supernovae and HII regions suggesting that star formation proceeds from the outside of the clouds and progresses inward consistent with triggering by a sudden increase in external pressure. The clouds with internal star formation have velocity gradients and inverse P-Cygni spectral line profiles indicating inward motions of 35 kms consistent with shock driven compression. Diffuse free-free radio emission and X-ray emission around the clouds provides evidence for superheated ...

  5. Ionisation Feedback in Star and Cluster Formation Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Ercolano, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Feedback from photoionisation may dominate on parsec scales in massive star-forming regions. Such feedback may inhibit or enhance the star formation efficiency and sustain or even drive turbulence in the parent molecular cloud. Photoionisation feedback may also provide a mechanism for the rapid expulsion of gas from young clusters' potentials, often invoked as the main cause of 'infant mortality'. There is currently no agreement, however, with regards to the efficiency of this process and how environment may affect the direction (positive or negative) in which it proceeds. The study of the photoionisation process as part of hydrodynamical simulations is key to understanding these issues, however, due to the computational demand of the problem, crude approximations for the radiation transfer are often employed. We will briefly review some of the most commonly used approximations and discuss their major drawbacks. We will then present the results of detailed tests carried out using the detailed photoionisation ...

  6. Deep Mixing and Metallicity: Carbon Depletion in Globular Cluster Giants

    CERN Document Server

    Martell, Sarah L; Briley, Michael M

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of an observational study of the efficiency of deep mixing in globular cluster red giants as a function of stellar metallicity. We determine [C/Fe] abundances based on low-resolution spectra taken with the Kast spectrograph on the 3m Shane telescope at Lick Observatory. Spectra centered on the 4300 Angstrom CH absorption band were taken for 42 bright red giants in 11 Galactic globular clusters ranging in metallicity from M92 ([Fe/H]=-2.29) to NGC 6712 ([Fe/H]=-1.01). Carbon abundances were derived by comparing values of the CH bandstrength index S2(CH) measured from the data with values measured from a large grid of SSG synthetic spectra. Present-day abundances are combined with theoretical calculations of the time since the onset of mixing, which is also a function of stellar metallicity, to calculate the carbon depletion rate across our metallicity range. We find that the carbon depletion rate is twice as high at a metallicity of [Fe/H]=-2.3 than at [Fe/H]=-1.3, which is a result qual...

  7. Open star cluster: formation, parameters, membership and importance

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, Gireesh C

    2016-01-01

    We have been represented the collective information of estimation procedures of parameters of the open clusters and put them together for showing the importance of clusters to understand their role in stellar evolution phenomenon. Moreover, we have been discussed about analytic techniques to determine the structural and dynamical properties of galactic clusters. The members of clusters provide unique opportunity to determine their basic parameters such as: age, metallicity, distance, reddening etc. The membership probabilities of stars of clusters is assigned through the various approaches and each approach provides different number of probable members of the cluster. Here, we have been briefly discussed about various approaches to determine the stellar membership within clusters.

  8. Formation of thick dielectrophoretic carbon nanotube fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plaado, Margo; Mononen, Robert Matias; Lohmus, Ruenno; Kink, Ilmar; Saal, Kristjan, E-mail: saal@fi.tartu.ee [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, and Estonian Nanotechnology Competence Centre, 142 Riia Street, 51014 Tartu (Estonia)

    2011-07-29

    The aim of this work was to study the formation process of dielectrophoretic (DEP) carbon nanotube fibers (CNT-fibers) and characterize the fiber properties relevant to their technological applications. The fiber diameter was shown to increase when applied voltage was increased (up to 350 V{sub pp}) and when retraction speed was decreased (down from 400 {mu}m s{sup -1}) in accordance with theoretical expectations. This paper represents the first demonstration of the formation of thick DEP CNT-fibers (up to {approx} 0.4 mm). This is an intriguing result, as it expands the diversity of possible applications of the fibers and facilitates their characterization by analytical methods that require large quantities of the material. The performance of these thick fibers was as follows: a density of {approx} 0.35 g cm{sup -3}, a tensile strength of {approx} 15 MPa, a Young's modulus of {approx} 1 GPa, and an electrical resistivity of {approx} 70 m{Omega} cm.

  9. In vivo cluster formation of nisin and lipid II is correlated with membrane depolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tol, Menno B; Morales Angeles, Danae; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Nisin and related lantibiotics kill bacteria by pore formation or by sequestering lipid II. Some lantibiotics sequester lipid II into clusters, which were suggested to kill cells through delocalized peptidoglycan synthesis. Here, we show that cluster formation is always concomitant with (i) membrane pore formation and (ii) membrane depolarization. Nisin variants that cluster lipid II kill L-form bacteria with similar efficiency, suggesting that delocalization of peptidoglycan synthesis is not the primary killing mechanism of these lantibiotics.

  10. Modeling jet and outflow feedback during star cluster formation

    CERN Document Server

    Federrath, Christoph; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S

    2014-01-01

    Powerful jets and outflows are launched from the protostellar disks around newborn stars. These outflows carry enough mass and momentum to transform the structure of their parent molecular cloud and to potentially control star formation itself. Despite their importance, we have not been able to fully quantify the impact of jets and outflows during the formation of a star cluster. The main problem lies in limited computing power. We would have to resolve the magnetic jet-launching mechanism close to the protostar and at the same time follow the evolution of a parsec-size cloud for a million years. Current computer power and codes fall orders of magnitude short of achieving this. In order to overcome this problem, we implement a subgrid-scale (SGS) model for launching jets and outflows, which demonstrably converges and reproduces the mass, linear and angular momentum transfer, and the speed of real jets, with ~ 1000 times lower resolution than would be required without SGS model. We apply the new SGS model to t...

  11. Thermal recovery of bitumen from carbonate reservoirs: formation damage aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thimm, H.F. [Thimm Petroleum Technologies Inc. (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    In Alberta, about a third of bitumen resources are located in carbonate reservoirs but none of it is considered as a reserve by the Alberta Energy Resources Conservation Board (ERCB). In fact no pilot has been successful in recovering bitumen from carbonate reservoirs due to formation damage problems. Carbonate rock is chemically active at the high temperatures reached in thermal recovery processes, carbon dioxide is generated and carbonate minerals are precipitated. The aim of this paper is to find methods to control the phenomenon. Kinetic and thermodynamic controls were used. Results showed that formation damage is due to aqueous carbon dioxide attacking the reservoir rock. They found that a reduction of the partial pressure of carbon dioxide could inhibit the initial dissolution of rock material by reducing the concentration of aqueous carbon dioxide. A method to overcome the formation damage problem was found and a co-injection of gas and steam process was developed to apply it.

  12. Constraining globular cluster formation through studies of young massive clusters - II. A Single Stellar Population Young Massive Cluster in NGC 34

    CERN Document Server

    Cabrera-Ziri, I; Davies, B; Magris, G; Bruzual, G; Schweizer, F

    2014-01-01

    Currently there are two competing scenarios to explain the origin of the stellar population in globular clusters (GCs). The main difference between them is whether or not multiple events of star formation took place within GCs. In this paper we present the star formation history (SFH) of Cluster 1, a massive young cluster in NGC 34 $(\\sim10^7\\mbox{ M}_\\odot)$. We use DynBaS, a spectrum fitting algorithm, to retrieve the SFH and find that Cluster 1 is consistent with a single stellar population of solar metallicity with an age of $100\\pm30$ Myr and a mass of $1.9\\pm0.4\\times10^7\\mbox{ M}_\\odot$. These results are in conflict with the expectations/predictions of the scenarios that invoke extended or multiple episodes within 30--100 Myr of the initial star-formation burst in young massive clusters.

  13. Cluster merger blast wave and the mystery of ringlike radio-relic formation around some galaxy clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work I studied the nature and important effects of massive galaxy cluster merger phenomena. Due to inherent complexity of such events analytical solution is impossible, so, numerical simulations are performed using ENZO-2.1 hydrodynamic code. It is noticed that the formation of Mega parsec scale merger shocks in such events substantially change the energy distribution of Inter Cluster Medium. A striking similarity is noticed between expanding intra cluster medium during mergers with the blast wave formation in supernovae explosion. The blast wave meets the void/ accretion shocks when propagated out to the virial radius. Particle acceleration at the meeting point produce a significant amount of synchrotron radio emission through which curved shocks are made visible in radio waves. This study thus also sheds some light on the formation of curved and nearly symmetric radio emission found in Abell 3376, Abell 3667, CIZA J2242.8+5301, plck g287.0+32.9 etc. clusters.

  14. On the formation of cD galaxies and their parent clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovmassian, Hrant M.; Andernach, Heinz

    2012-12-01

    In order to study the mechanism of the formation of cD galaxies, we search for possible dependencies between the K-band luminosity of cD galaxies and the parameters of their host clusters which we select to have a dominant cD galaxy, corresponding to a cluster morphology of Bautz-Morgan type I (BM I). As a comparison sample we use cD galaxies in clusters where they are not dominant, which we define here as non-BM I (NBMI) type clusters. We find that for 71 BM I clusters the absolute K-band luminosity of cD galaxies depends on the cluster richness, but less strongly on the cluster velocity dispersion. Meanwhile, for 35 NBMI clusters the correlation between cD luminosity and cluster richness is weaker, and is absent between cD luminosity and velocity dispersion. In addition, we find that the luminosity of the cD galaxy hosted in BM I clusters tends to increase with the cD's peculiar velocity with respect to the cluster mean velocity. In contrast, for NBMI clusters the cD luminosity decreases with increasing peculiar velocity. Also, the X-ray luminosity of BM I clusters depends on the cluster velocity dispersion, while in NBMI clusters such a correlation is absent. These findings favour the cannibalism scenario for the formation of cD galaxies. We suggest that cD galaxies in clusters of BM I type were formed and evolved preferentially in one and the same cluster. In contrast, cD galaxies in NBMI-type clusters were either originally formed in clusters that later merged with groups or clusters to form the current cluster, or are now in the process of merging.

  15. Fe-inserted and shell-shaped carbon nanoparticles by cluster-mediated laser pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleaca, C.T., E-mail: claudiufleaca@yahoo.com [Laser Photochemistry Laboratory, National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics (NILPRP), P.O. Box MG 36, R-077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Dumitrache, F.; Morjan, I.; Alexandrescu, R.; Sandu, I.; Luculescu, C.; Birjega, S. [Laser Photochemistry Laboratory, National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics (NILPRP), P.O. Box MG 36, R-077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Prodan, G. [Ovidius University of Constanta, 124 Mamaia Bd., Constanta (Romania); Stamatin, I. [3 Nano-SAE Research Center, University of Bucharest, P.O. Box MG-38, R-077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Iron-inserted carbon nanoparticles were obtained by laser pyrolysis technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two different structures (shell-shape and turbostratic) were found in the same experiment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing the pressure causes the increasing in carbon crystallinity/decreasing the Fe content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Iron nanoinclusions are protected from oxidation by the carbon matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetism-related applications of these nanoparticles in life sciences are proposed. - Abstract: We report here the high-yield continuous synthesis of carbon nanoparticles with and without Fe content by laser pyrolysis technique. The laser beam decomposes (via C{sub 2}H{sub 4} sensitizer) the Fe(CO){sub 5} as Fe clusters which absorb themselves the laser radiation. They trigger the fast carbon particles formation by exothermic dehydrogenation/polymerization of the surrounded C{sub 2}H{sub 2} molecules. This combination between Fe clusters and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} generates nanoparticles with unusual structure. Depending on the gas pressure in the reaction chamber, two kinds of nanoparticles were obtained: at lower pressure, 30-40 nm diameter particles with a defective structure, part of them crowded with Fe clusters (3-6 nm) and two types of nanoparticles (around 50-60 nm) at the highest pressure. Some of them have a shell-shape structure, presenting a distinct envelope, other with a turbostratic arrangement, and few containing one or several smaller (3-20 nm) Fe nanoparticles trapped inside. We consider that these particular structures of our nanoparticles may be useful in applications such as MRI applications, drug delivery or catalysts.

  16. Self-organized formation of metal-carbon nanostructures by hyperthermal ion deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannstein, I.K.

    2006-04-26

    The quasi-simultaneous deposition of mass-selected hyperthermal carbon and metal ions results in a variety of interesting film morphologies, depending on the metal used and the deposition conditions. The observed features are of the order of a few nanometres and are therefore interesting for future potential applications in the various fields of nanotechnology. The present study focuses on the structural analysis of amorphous carbon films containing either copper, silver, gold, or iron using amongst others Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy. The film morphologies found are as follows: copper-containing films consist of copper nanoclusters with sizes ranging from about 3 to 9 nm uniformly distributed throughout the amorphous carbon matrix. The cluster size hereby rises with the copper content of the films. The silver containing films decompose into a pure amorphous carbon film with silver agglomerates at the surface. Both, the gold- and the iron-containing films show a multilayer structure of metal-rich layers with higher cluster density separated by metal-depleted amorphous carbon layers. The layer distances are of the order of up to 15 nm in the case of gold-carbon films and 7 nm in the case of iron-carbon films. The formation of theses different structures cannot be treated in the context of conventional self-organization mechanisms basing upon thermal diffusion and equilibrium thermodynamics. Instead, an ion-induced atomic transport, sputtering effects, and the stability of small metal clusters were taken into account in order to model the structure formation processes. A similar multilayer morphology was recently also reported in the literature for metal-carbon films grown by magnetron sputtering techniques. In order to investigate, whether the mechanisms are the same as in the case of the ion beam deposited films described above, first experiments were conducted

  17. Insights on Clusters Formation Mechanism by Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry. 2. The Case of Acetone-Water Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apicella, B.; Li, X.; Passaro, M.; Russo, C.

    2016-11-01

    This paper is the second of a series dealing with clusters formation mechanism. In part 1, water clusters with the addition of an electrophilic molecule such as ethanol were studied by Time Of Flight Mass Spectrometry (TOFMS). Mass distributions of molecular clusters of ethanol, water and ethanol-water mixed clusters, were obtained by means of two different ionization methods: Electron Ionization (EI) and picosecond laser Photo-Ionization (PI) at a wavelength of 355 nm. In part 2, the same experimental approach was employed to obtain mass spectra of clusters generated by acetone-water binary mixtures with a different composition. Strong dependence of the mass spectra of clusters with EI and PI on the acetone-water mixing ratio was observed. It was shown that the spectral pattern changes gradually and water-rich cluster signals become fainter while acetone-rich cluster signals become more intensive with increasing acetone concentrations from 0.3% to 40%. Owing to the hydrogen bond acceptor character of acetone, its self-association is discouraged with respect to ethanol. The autocorrelation function (AF) was used to analyze the variation of the water clusters composition with the increase of the acetone concentration in terms of fundamental periodicities. However, although acetone and ethanol present a very different hydrogen-bonding ability, similarly to ethanol-water system, in acetone-water system the formation of water-rich clusters and subsequent metastable fragmentation are the dominant process that determine the clusters distribution, irrespective of the ionization process, while the ionization process significantly affects the acetone-rich clusters distribution.

  18. Star Formation Ecology: YSO Outflow Feedback in Young Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Adam; Bally, John; Blackman, Eric; Gutermuth, Robert; Pipher, Judy; Quillen, Alice

    2007-05-01

    Energetic outflows associated with young stellar objects exert a strong effect on their parent molecular clouds. The dynamics of this interaction is yet to be well understood. In particular the role of jets and outflows in powering cloud turbulence, modifying the star formation efficiency (SFE) and/or disrupting the parent clouds remains unclear. Spitzer images of young clusters have provided new views of jet-cloud interactions that can help resolve these critical issues. In this proposal we seek to continue a highly successful (cycle 2) theory program to explore theoretical issues of jet-cloud interactions, turbulence and cloud disruption. Our research relies on 3-D Adaptive Mesh Refinement hydrodynamic and MHD simulations developed in house, in concert with Spitzer databases and other complementary observations. The team we have assembled includes computational and analytic theorists (Frank, Blackman) as well as observers who have worked closely with existing Spitzer Datasets (Bally, Quillen, Pipher, Gutermuth) The work funded through the previous TR program revealed fundamentally new aspects of YSO outflow feedback on parent cloud cores including the importance of the temporal evolution of outflow power. In this proposal we seek to extend the understanding gained in those studies to address specific questions on the nature and efficacy of outflow feedback in real systems.

  19. Serine one-carbon catabolism with formate overflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiser, Johannes; Tumanov, Sergey; Maddocks, Oliver; Labuschagne, Christiaan Fred; Athineos, Dimitris; Van Den Broek, Niels; Mackay, Gillian M.; Gottlieb, Eyal; Blyth, Karen; Vousden, Karen; Kamphorst, Jurre J.; Vazquez, Alexei

    2016-01-01

    Serine catabolism to glycine and a one-carbon unit has been linked to the anabolic requirements of proliferating mammalian cells. However, genome-scale modeling predicts a catabolic role with one-carbon release as formate. We experimentally prove that in cultured cancer cells and nontransformed fibroblasts, most of the serine-derived one-carbon units are released from cells as formate, and that formate release is dependent on mitochondrial reverse 10-CHO-THF synthetase activity. We also show that in cancer cells, formate release is coupled to mitochondrial complex I activity, whereas in nontransformed fibroblasts, it is partially insensitive to inhibition of complex I activity. We demonstrate that in mice, about 50% of plasma formate is derived from serine and that serine starvation or complex I inhibition reduces formate synthesis in vivo. These observations transform our understanding of one-carbon metabolism and have implications for the treatment of diabetes and cancer with complex I inhibitors.

  20. Electron propagator calculations on linear and branched carbon cluster dianions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakrzewski, V.G.; Ortiz, J.V. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Electron propagator calculations have been performed on linear carbon cluster dianions from C{sub 7}{sup 2-} to C{sub 10}{sup 2-} and on branched C{sub 7}{sup 2-}, C{sub 9}{sup 2-} and C{sub 11}{sup 2-} structures which have a central, tricoordinate carbon bound to three branches with alternating long and short bonds. The more stable, branched isomer of C{sub 7}{sup 2-} has a positive vertical ionization energy, but the linear form does not. While linear C{sub 10}{sup 2-} is stable with respect to electron loss, it is not possible to decide from these calculations whether linear C{sub 8}{sup 2-} and C{sub 9}{sup 2-} have the same property. There is evidence that better calculations would obtain bound C{sub 8}{sup 2-} and C{sub 9}{sup 2-} species. All branched dianions have positive, vertical ionization energies. Feynman-Dyson amplitudes for dianion ionization energies display delocalized {pi} bonding, with the two terminal carbons of the longest branches making the largest contributions.

  1. Early formation of galaxies initiated by clusters of primordial black holes

    OpenAIRE

    Dokuchaev, V. I.; Eroshenko, Yu. N.; Rubin, S. G.

    2008-01-01

    Model of supermassive black holes formation inside the clusters of primordial black holes is developed. Namely, it is supposed, that some mass fraction of the universe ~10^-3 is composed of the compact clusters of primordial (relic) black holes, produced during phase transitions in the early universe. These clusters are the centers of dark matter condensation. We model the formation of protogalaxies with masses about 2*10^8M_sun at the redshift z=15. These induced protogalaxies contain centra...

  2. Simulating radiative feedback and star cluster formation in GMCs: 1. Dependence on gravitational boundedness

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Corey; Harris, William

    2016-01-01

    Radiative feedback is an important consequence of cluster formation in Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs) in which newly formed clusters heat and ionize their surrounding gas. The process of cluster formation, and the role of radiative feedback, has not been fully explored in different GMC environments. We present a suite of simulations which explore how the initial gravitational boundedness, and radiative feedback, affect cluster formation. We model the early evolution (< 5 Myr) of turbulent, 10$^6$ M$_{\\odot}$ clouds with virial parameters ranging from 0.5 to 5. To model cluster formation, we use cluster sink particles, coupled to a raytracing scheme, and a custom subgrid model which populates a cluster via sampling an IMF with an efficiency of 20% per freefall time. We find that radiative feedback only decreases the cluster formation efficiency, measured via the total particle mass, by a few percent. The initial virial parameter plays a much stronger role in limiting cluster formation, with a spread of clust...

  3. Teenage suicide cluster formation and contagion: implications for primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson Anders; Lindqvist Per; Johansson Lars

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background We have previously studied unintentional as well as intentional injury deaths among teenagers living in the four northernmost counties, forming approximately 55% of Sweden with 908,000 inhabitants in 1991. During this work, we found what we suspected to be a suicide cluster among teenagers and we also suspected contagion since there were links between these cases. In this present study, we investigate the occurrence of suicide clustering among teenagers, analyze cluster de...

  4. Simulating the Formation of Carbon-rich Molecules on an idealised Graphitic Surface

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, David W

    2015-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence for the presence of complex molecules, including carbon-bearing and organic molecules, in the interstellar medium. Much of this evidence comes to us from studies of chemical composition, photo- and mass-spectroscopy in cometary, meteoritic and asteroid samples, indicating a need to better understand the surface chemistry of astrophysical objects. There is also considerable interest in the origins of life-forming and life-sustaining molecules on Earth. Here, we perform reactive molecular dynamics simulations to probe the formation of carbon-rich molecules and clusters on carbonaceous surfaces resembling dust grains and meteoroids. Our results show that large chains form on graphitic surfaces at low temperatures (100K - 500K) and smaller fullerene-like molecules form at higher temperatures (2000K - 3000K). The formation is faster on the surface than in the gas at low temperatures but slower at high temperatures as surface interactions prevent small clusters from coagulation. We fi...

  5. Cluster formation in molecular clouds: I. stellar populations, star formation rates, and ionizing radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Corey S; Harris, William E

    2013-01-01

    We present a model for the radiative output of star clusters in the process of star formation suitable for use in hydrodynamical simulations of radiative feedback. Gas in a clump, defined as a region whose density exceeds 10^4 cm^-3, is converted to stars via the random sampling of the Chabrier IMF. A star formation efficiency controls the rate of star formation. We have completed a suite of simulations which follow the evolution of accretion-fed clumps with initial masses ranging from 0 to 10^5 M_sol and accretion rates ranging from 10^-5 to 10^-1 M_sol yr^-1. The stellar content is tracked over time which allows the aggregate luminosity, ionizing photon rate, number of stars, and star formation rate (SFR) to be determined. For a fiducial clump of 10^4 M_sol, the luminosity is ~4x10^6 L_sol with a SFR of roughly 3x10^-3 M_sol yr^-1. We identify two regimes in our model. The accretion-dominated regime obtains the majority of its gas through accretion and is characterized by an increasing SFR while the reservo...

  6. Dilute Surfactant Methods for Carbonate Formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2006-02-01

    There are many fractured carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). The process of using dilute anionic surfactants in alkaline solutions has been investigated in this work for oil recovery from fractured oil-wet carbonate reservoirs both experimentally and numerically. This process is a surfactant-aided gravity drainage where surfactant diffuses into the matrix, lowers IFT and contact angle, which decrease capillary pressure and increase oil relative permeability enabling gravity to drain the oil up. Anionic surfactants have been identified which at dilute concentration of 0.05 wt% and optimal salinity can lower the interfacial tension and change the wettability of the calcite surface to intermediate/water-wet condition as well or better than the cationic surfactant DTAB with a West Texas crude oil. The force of adhesion in AFM of oil-wet regions changes after anionic surfactant treatment to values similar to those of water-wet regions. The AFM topography images showed that the oil-wetting material was removed from the surface by the anionic surfactant treatment. Adsorption studies indicate that the extent of adsorption for anionic surfactants on calcite minerals decreases with increase in pH and with decrease in salinity. Surfactant adsorption can be minimized in the presence of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. Laboratory-scale surfactant brine imbibition experiments give high oil recovery (20-42% OOIP in 50 days; up to 60% in 200 days) for initially oil-wet cores through wettability alteration and IFT reduction. Small (<10%) initial gas saturation does not affect significantly the rate of oil recovery in the imbibition process, but larger gas saturation decreases the oil recovery rate. As the core permeability decreases, the rate of oil recovery reduces

  7. On the Motion of Carbon Nanotube Clusters near Optical Fiber Tips: Thermophoresis, Radiative Pressure, and Convection Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vélez-Cordero, J Rodrigo; Hernández-Cordero, J

    2015-09-15

    We analyze the motion of multiwalled carbon nanotubes clusters in water or ethanol upon irradiation with a 975 and 1550 nm laser beam guided by an optical fiber. Upon measuring the velocities of the nanotube clusters in and out of the laser beam cone, we were able to identify thermophoresis, convection and radiation pressure as the main driving forces that determine the equilibrium position of the dispersion at low optical powers: while thermophoresis and convection pull the clusters toward the laser beam axis (negative Soret coefficient), radiation pressure pushes the clusters away from the fiber tip. A theoretical solution for the thermophoretic velocity, which considers interfacial motion and a repulsive potential interaction between the nanotubes and the solvent (hydrophobic interaction), shows that the main mechanism implicated in this type of thermophoresis is the thermal expansion of the fluid, and that the clusters migrate to hotter regions with a characteristic thermal diffusion coefficient D(T) of 9 × 10(-7) cm(2) K(-1) s(-1). We further show that the characteristic length associated with thermophoresis is not that of the nanotube clusters size, O(1) μm, but that corresponding to the microstructure of the clusters, O(1) nm. We finally discuss the role of the formation of gas-liquid interfaces (microbubbles) at high optical powers on the deposition of carbon nanotubes on the optical fiber end faces. PMID:26309145

  8. Environments and Morphologies of Red Sequence Galaxies with Residual Star Formation in Massive Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Crossett, Jacob P; Stott, John P; Jones, D Heath

    2013-01-01

    We present a photometric investigation into recent star formation in galaxy clusters at z ~ 0.1. We use spectral energy distribution templates to quantify recent star formation in large X-ray selected clusters from the LARCS survey using matched GALEX NUV photometry. These clusters all have signs of red sequence galaxy recent star formation (as indicated by blue NUV-R colour), regardless of cluster morphology and size. A trend in environment is found for these galaxies, such that they prefer to occupy low density, high cluster radius environments. The morphology of these UV bright galaxies suggests that they are in fact red spirals, which we confirm with light curves and Galaxy Zoo voting percentages as morphological proxies. These UV bright galaxies are therefore seen to be either truncated spiral galaxies, caught by ram pressure in falling into the cluster, or high mass spirals, with the photometry dominated by the older stellar population.

  9. Transient cluster formation in sheared non-Brownian suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thøgersen, Kjetil; Dabrowski, Marcin; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders

    2016-02-01

    We perform numerical simulations of non-Brownian suspensions in the laminar flow regime to study the scaling behavior of particle clusters and collisions under shear. As the particle fraction approaches the maximum packing fraction, large transient clusters appear in the system. We use methods from percolation theory to discuss the cluster size distribution. We also give a scaling relation for the percolation threshold as well as system size effects through time-dependent fluctuations of this threshold and relate them to system size. System size effects are important close to the maximum packing fraction due to the divergence of the cluster length scale. We then investigate the transient nature of the clusters through characterization of particle collisions and show that collision times exhibit scale-invariant properties. Finally, we show that particle collision times can be modeled as first-passage processes. PMID:26986381

  10. Still Red and Dead? Measuring feedback and star-formation in clusters at z > 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khullar, Gourav; McDonald, Michael; Bleem, Lindsey; Benson, Bradford; Gladders, Michael; South Pole Telescope (SPT) Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Optical and infrared (IR) surveys have discovered that galaxy clusters at z 2 and underwent passive evolution thereafter without dominant star formation, some samples indicate that an era of star formation and AGN activity is seen in cluster galaxies at z > 1. Only recently have large samples of z > 1 clusters been identified, mostly through IR and Sunyaev-Zel’dovich (SZ) surveys, which indicate an increase in SFR in clusters at high redshifts and incomplete quenching. Moreover, a robust cluster sample in-hand allows us to understand how galaxy clusters become "red and dead", and the role of astrophysical feedback in this process. The South Pole Telescope (SPT) collaboration has produced mass-limited redshift-independent catalog of 516 clusters from 0.0 1.0, with three newly found systems having a zphot > 1.5. In this work, we focus on a sub-sample of SPT-SZ selected clusters at z > 1.2 with multi-wavelength observations in X-ray (Chandra), infrared (Herschel, Spitzer), optical (Magellan - imaging and spectroscopy), and mm-wavelength (SPT) bands. These observations enable constraints on cluster stellar, baryonic, and total mass, in addition to a host of other information, including the star-formation rate, level of AGN activity, cluster dynamical state, and signatures of astrophysical feedback in the intra-cluster gas. We will describe the overall observing program, early results, and future directions.

  11. Knowledge Cluster Formation as a Science Policy in Malaysia: Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Dieter Evers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Regional science policy aims to create productive knowledge clusters, which are central places within an epistemic landscape of knowledge production and dissemination. These so-called K-clusters are said to have the organisational capability to drive innovations and create new industries. Many governments have used cluster formation as one of their development strategies. This paper looks at Malaysia’s path towards a knowledge-based economy and offers some evidence on the current state of knowledge cluster formation in that country. If the formation of a knowledge cluster has been the government policy, what has been the result? Is there an epistemic landscape of knowledge clusters? Has the main knowledge cluster really materialised? Data collected from websites, directories, government publications and expert interviews have enabled us to construct the epistemic landscape of Peninsular Malaysia, and Penang in particular. We identify and describe several knowledge clusters with a high density of knowledge producing institutions and their knowledge workers. An analysis of the knowledge output, measured in terms of scientific publications, patents and trademarks, shows that knowledge clusters have indeed been productive – as predicted by cluster theory – although the internal working of clusters require further explanation.

  12. Impact of diagenesis on carbonate mound formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Land, C.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to define the parameters influencing cold-water coral growth and therefore carbonate mound development with a focus on the impact of diagenesis on mound sediments. The first part of this thesis (Chapters 2 to 4) discusses the distributionand growth history of carbonate mounds,

  13. Captured older stars as the reason for apparently prolonged star formation in young star clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Pflamm-Altenburg, Jan; Kroupa, Pavel

    2006-01-01

    The existence of older stars within a young star cluster can be interpreted to imply that star formation occurs on time scales longer than a free-fall time of a pre-cluster cloud core. Here the idea is explored that these older stars are not related to the star formation process forming the young star cluster but rather that the orbits of older field stars are focused by the collapsing pre-cluster cloud core. Two effects appear: The focussing of stellar orbits leads to an enhancement of the d...

  14. Structural and scaling properties of galaxy clusters: probing the physics of structure formation

    CERN Document Server

    Arnaud, M; Pratt, G W

    2003-01-01

    We present XMM-Newton studies of the total mass, gas density, temperature and entropy profiles in nearby hot and cool clusters, together with follow-up observations of distant clusters from the SHARC Survey. The observed structural and scaling properties are compared with the predictions of the self-similar model of cluster formation. These data indicate that clusters do form a self-similar population down to low mass and up to high redshift, and give support to the standard picture of structure formation for the dark matter component. However, deviations from the standard scaling laws confirm that the specific physics of the gas component is still insufficiently understood.

  15. Beyond the Cool Core: The Formation of Cool Core Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Burns, J O; Gantner, B; Motl, P M; Norman, M L; Burns, Jack O.; Hallman, Eric J.; Gantner, Brennan; Motl, Patrick M.; Norman, Michael L.

    2006-01-01

    Why do some clusters have cool cores while others do not? In this paper, cosmological simulations, including radiative cooling and heating, are used to examine the formation and evolution of cool core (CC) and non-cool core (NCC) clusters. Numerical CC clusters at z=0 accreted mass more slowly over time and grew enhanced cool cores via hierarchical mergers; when late major mergers occurred, the CCs survived the collisions. By contrast, NCC clusters of similar mass experienced major mergers early in their evolution that destroyed embryonic cool cores and produced conditions that prevent CC re-formation. We discuss observational consequences.

  16. Beyond the Cool Core: The Formation of Cool Core Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, J. O.; Hallman, E. J.; Gantner, B.; Motl, P. M.; Norman, M. L.

    Why do some clusters have cool cores while others do not? In this paper, cosmological simulations, including radiative cooling and heating, are used to examine the formation and evolution of cool core (CC) and non-cool core (NCC) clusters. Numerical CC clusters at z=0 accreted mass more slowly over time and grew enhanced cool cores via hierarchical mergers; when late major mergers occurred, the CCs survived the collisions. By contrast, NCC clusters of similar mass experienced major mergers early in their evolution that destroyed embryonic cool cores and produced conditions that prevent CC re-formation. We discuss observational consequences.

  17. Novel method for Ag colloidal cluster formation by laser ablation at the air-liquid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Teppei; Akimoto, Yusuke; Takahashi, Naoko; Kitazumi, Kosuke; Kajiya, Shuji; Watanabe, Yoshihide

    2015-09-01

    We report a novel method for formation of sub-nanoclusters by laser ablation at the air-liquid interface. The density of plasma induced by laser ablation at the air-liquid interface should be lower than that produced by laser ablation in liquid. In the lower density plasma, the produced clusters rarely grow or aggregate into larger clusters because the collision probability is low, resulting in the formation of small clusters. Ag sub-nanoclusters were observed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). These results show that low-density plasma can be applied to small-cluster formation and that laser ablation at the air-liquid interface produces a good reactive field for the formation of sub-nanoclusters. Our results highlight the importance of low-density plasma induced at the air-liquid interface for sub-nanocluster formation.

  18. Clues on galaxy and cluster formation from their scaling relations

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzoni, B; Cappi, A; Tormen, G; Zamorani, G

    2003-01-01

    By means of high-resolution N-body simulations in a LambdaCDM cosmology, we verify that scaling relations similar to those observed for nearby galaxy clusters are also defined by their dark matter hosts; the slopes, however, are not the same. We then show that the scaling relations of galaxy clusters can be explained as the result of the cosmological collapse of density fluctuations at the appropriate scales, plus a systematic trend of the M/L ratio with cluster mass. The empirical fact that the exponent of the Faber-Jackson relation of elliptical galaxies is significantly different (higher) than that of clusters, force us to conclude that the galaxy scaling laws might derive from the cosmological collapse of density fluctuations at the epoch when galactic scales became non-linear, plus modifications afterward due to early-time dissipative merging.

  19. Multi-phase Hydrodynamics and X-ray Clusters Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Teyssier, Romain; CHIEZE, Jean-Pierre; Alimi, Jean-Michel

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the role of radiative cooling within the core of large X-ray clusters using multi-phase hydrodynamics. We developed for that purpose a spherically symmetric hydrodynamical code, coupled to a "fluid model" that describes accurately the dark matter component. Cooling is included using a self-consistent multi-phase approach, leading to "cooled gas" mass deposition throughout the flow. We simulate the collapse and the subsequent evolution of a Coma-like X-ray cluster, avoiding the ...

  20. Formation of dislocation loops during He clustering in bcc Fe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, N.; Van Swygenhoven, H.; Victoria, M.; Chen, J.

    2011-11-01

    The clustering of helium in bcc (body centered cubic) iron and the growth of a helium bubble are simulated at the atomistic level for the helium-rich vacancy-poor condition. It is shown that a \\frac{1}{2}\\langle 111\\rangle dislocation loop is formed as a sequential collection of crowdions, the latter being the most stable self-interstitial atom configuration in the presence of a He cluster.

  1. Formation of dislocation loops during He clustering in bcc Fe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, N; Chen, J [NES-High Temperature Materials, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Van Swygenhoven, H [NUM/ASQ-Materials Science and Simulation, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Victoria, M, E-mail: helena.vanswygenhoven@psi.ch [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, PO Box 808 L-370, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2011-11-09

    The clustering of helium in bcc (body centered cubic) iron and the growth of a helium bubble are simulated at the atomistic level for the helium-rich vacancy-poor condition. It is shown that a 1/2 <111> dislocation loop is formed as a sequential collection of <111> crowdions, the latter being the most stable self-interstitial atom configuration in the presence of a He cluster. (fast track communication)

  2. Formation of bcc and fcc during the coalescence of free and supported Fe and Ni clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guojian; Wang, Qiang; Sui, Xudong; Wang, Kai; Wu, Chun; He, Jicheng

    2015-09-01

    The formation of bcc and fcc during the coalescence of free and supported Fe and Ni clusters has been studied by molecular dynamics simulation using an embedded atom method. Structural evolution of the clusters, coalesced under varying temperature, Ni content and substrate conditions, was explored by interatomic energy, snapshots, pair distribution functions and bond order parameters. The results show that the formation of bcc and fcc is strongly related to Ni content, substrate and coalescence temperature. Free clusters coalesced at 1200 K form bcc at lower Ni contents with fcc forming at higher Ni concentrations and no observable coexistence of bcc and fcc. Differences in coalescence at 1000 K result from the coexistence of bcc and fcc within the Ni range of 50-70%. Free clusters supported on disordered Ni substrates were shown to transform from spherical morphology to islands of supported clusters with preferred epitaxial orientation. The Ni content required to form bcc and fcc coexistence on supported clusters at 1000 K decreased to 30-50% Ni. Free clusters possessing bcc and fcc generally stacked along the bcc (110) and fcc (111) facets, whereas supported clusters stacked along the (111) bcc and (100) fcc planes. Structural transformation was induced by clusters containing greater numbers of atoms. Spread over the substrate enhanced interatomic energy, order substrates affect the epitaxial growth direction and increase the melting points of the supported clusters. This study can be used to predict the nature of fcc and bcc formation in Fe-Ni films.

  3. Simulating the formation of carbon-rich molecules on an idealized graphitic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, David W.; Sadeghpour, H. R.

    2016-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence for the presence of complex molecules, including carbon-bearing and organic molecules, in the interstellar medium. Much of this evidence comes to us from studies of chemical composition, photo- and mass spectroscopy in cometary, meteoritic and asteroid samples, indicating a need to better understand the surface chemistry of astrophysical objects. There is also considerable interest in the origins of life-forming and life-sustaining molecules on the Earth. Here, we perform reactive molecular dynamics simulations to probe the formation of carbon-rich molecules and clusters on carbonaceous surfaces resembling dust grains and meteoroids. Our results show that large chains form on graphitic surfaces at low temperatures (100-500 K) and smaller fullerene-like molecules form at higher temperatures (2000-3000 K). The formation is faster on the surface than in the gas at low temperatures but slower at high temperatures as surface interactions prevent small clusters from coagulation. We find that for efficient formation of molecular complexity, mobility about the surface is important and helps to build larger carbon chains on the surface than in the gas phase at low temperatures. Finally, we show that the temperature of the surface strongly determines what kind of structures forms and that low turbulent environments are needed for efficient formation.

  4. Martensite Formation in Partially and Fully Austenitic Plain Carbon Steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Bohemen, S.M.C.; Sietsma, J.

    2009-01-01

    The progress of martensite formation in plain carbon steels Fe-0.46C, Fe-0.66C, and Fe-0.80C has been investigated by dilatometry. It is demonstrated that carbon enrichment of the remaining austenite due to intercritical annealing of Fe-0.46C and Fe-0.66C does not only depress the start temperature

  5. Formation of globular clusters induced by external ultraviolet radiation II: Three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, Makito; Hasegawa, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    We explore the possibility of the formation of globular clusters under ultraviolet (UV) background radiation. One-dimensional spherical symmetric radiation hydrodynamics (RHD) simulations by Hasegawa et al. have demonstrated that the collapse of low-mass (10^6-10^7 solar masses) gas clouds exposed to intense UV radiation can lead to the formation of compact star clusters like globular clusters (GCs) if gas clouds contract with supersonic infall velocities. However, three-dimensional effects, such as the anisotropy of background radiation and the inhomogeneity in gas clouds, have not been studied so far. In this paper, we perform three-dimensional RHD simulations in a semi-cosmological context, and reconsider the formation of compact star clusters in strong UV radiation fields. As a result, we find that although anisotropic radiation fields bring an elongated shadow of neutral gas, almost spherical compact star clusters can be procreated from a "supersonic infall" cloud, since photo-dissociating radiation supp...

  6. Star formation in the first galaxies - III. Formation, evolution, and characteristics of the first stellar cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Milosavljevic, Milos; Bromm, Volker

    2015-01-01

    We simulate the formation of a low metallicity (0.01 Zsun) stellar cluster in a dwarf galaxy at redshift z~14. Beginning with cosmological initial conditions, the simulation utilizes adaptive mesh refinement and sink particles to follow the collapse and evolution of gas past the opacity limit for fragmentation, thus resolving the formation of individual protostellar cores. A time- and location-dependent protostellar radiation field, which heats the gas by absorption on dust, is computed by integration of protostellar evolutionary tracks with the MESA code. The simulation also includes a robust non-equilibrium chemical network that self-consistently treats gas thermodynamics and dust-gas coupling. The system is evolved for 18 kyr after the first protostellar source has formed. In this time span, 30 sink particles representing protostellar cores form with a total mass of 81 Msun. Their masses range from ~0.1 Msun to 14.4 Msun with a median mass ~0.5-1 Msun. Massive protostars grow by competitive accretion while...

  7. Knowledge cluster formation as a science policy in Malaysia: lessons learned

    OpenAIRE

    Hans-Dieter Evers; Solvay Gerke

    2015-01-01

    Regional science policy aims to create productive knowledge clusters, which are central places within an epistemic landscape of knowledge production and dissemination. These so-called K-clusters are said to have the organisational capability to drive innovations and create new industries. Many governments have used cluster formation as one of their development strategies. This paper looks at Malaysia's path towards a knowledge-based economy and offers some evidence on the current state of kno...

  8. A single model for the variety of multiple-population formation(s) in globular clusters: a temporal sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Antona, F.; Vesperini, E.; D'Ercole, A.; Ventura, P.; Milone, A. P.; Marino, A. F.; Tailo, M.

    2016-05-01

    We explain the multiple populations recently found in the `prototype' globular cluster (GC) NGC 2808 in the framework of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) scenario. The chemistry of the five - or more - populations is approximately consistent with a sequence of star formation events, starting after the Type II supernova epoch, lasting approximately until the time when the third dredge-up affects the AGB evolution (age ˜90-120 Myr), and ending when the Type Ia supernovae begin exploding in the cluster, eventually clearing it from the gas. The formation of the different populations requires episodes of star formation in AGB gas diluted with different amounts of pristine gas. In the nitrogen-rich, helium-normal population identified in NGC 2808 by the UV Legacy Survey of GCs, the nitrogen increase is due to the third dredge-up in the smallest mass AGB ejecta involved in the star formation of this population. The possibly iron-rich small population in NGC 2808 may be a result of contamination by a single Type Ia supernova. The NGC 2808 case is used to build a general framework to understand the variety of `second-generation' stars observed in GCs. Cluster-to-cluster variations are ascribed to differences in the effects of the many processes and gas sources which may be involved in the formation of the second generation. We discuss an evolutionary scheme, based on pollution by delayed Type II supernovae, which accounts for the properties of s-Fe-anomalous clusters.

  9. Collisions of relativistic clusters and the formation of black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We perform numerical simulations of head-on collisions of relativistic clusters. The cluster particles interact only gravitationally, and so satisfy the collisionless Boltzmann equation in general relativity. We construct and follow the evolution of three classes of initial configurations: spheres of particles at rest; spheres of particles boosted towards each other; and spheres of particles in circular orbits about their respective centers. In the first two cases, the spheres implode towards their centers and may form black holes before colliding. These scenarios thus can be used to study the head-on collision of two black holes. In the third case the clusters are initially in equilibrium and cannot implode. In this case collision from rest leads either to coalescence and virialization, or collapse to a black hole. This scenario is the collisionless analog of colliding neutron stars in relativistic hydrodynamics

  10. Hierarchically Clustered Star Formation in the Magellanic Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios A; Ossenkopf, Volker; Klessen, Ralf S; Dolphin, Andrew E

    2012-01-01

    We present a cluster analysis of the bright main-sequence and faint pre--main-sequence stellar populations of a field ~ 90 x 90 pc centered on the HII region NGC 346/N66 in the Small Magellanic Cloud, from imaging with HST/ACS. We extend our earlier analysis on the stellar cluster population in the region to characterize the structuring behavior of young stars in the region as a whole with the use of stellar density maps interpreted through techniques designed for the study of the ISM structuring. In particular, we demonstrate with Cartwrigth & Whitworth's Q parameter, dendrograms, and the Delta-variance wavelet transform technique that the young stellar populations in the region NGC 346/N66 are hierarchically clustered, in agreement with other regions in the Magellanic Clouds observed with HST. The origin of this hierarchy is currently under investigation.

  11. From collisions to clusters: first steps of sulphuric acid nanocluster formation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukonen, Ville; Bork, Nicolai; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2014-08-01

    The clustering of sulphuric acid with base molecules is one of the main pathways of new-particle formation in the Earth's atmosphere. First step in the clustering process is likely the formation of a (sulphuric acid)1(base)1(water)n cluster. Here, we present results from direct first-principles molecular dynamics collision simulations of (sulphuric acid)1(water)0, 1 + (dimethylamine) → (sulphuric acid)1(dimethylamine)1(water)0, 1 cluster formation processes. The simulations indicate that the sticking factor in the collisions is unity: the interaction between the molecules is strong enough to overcome the possible initial non-optimal collision orientations. No post-collisional cluster break up is observed. The reasons for the efficient clustering are (i) the proton transfer reaction which takes place in each of the collision simulations and (ii) the subsequent competition over the proton control. As a consequence, the clusters show very dynamic ion pair structure, which differs from both the static structure optimisation calculations and the equilibrium first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. In some of the simulation runs, water mediates the proton transfer by acting as a proton bridge. In general, water is able to notably stabilise the formed clusters by allocating a fraction of the released clustering energy.

  12. The dynamical state of brightest cluster galaxies and the formation of clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Coziol, R; Caretta, C A; Alamo-Martinez, K A; Tago, E

    2009-01-01

    A large sample of Abell clusters of galaxies, selected for the likely presence of a dominant galaxy, is used to study the dynamical properties of brightest cluster members (BCMs). From visual inspection of Digitized Sky Survey images combined with redshift data we identify 1426 candidate BCMs in 1221 redshift components in 1169 different Abell clusters, the largest such sample published so far. By our own morphological classification we find ~92% of these BCMs to be early-type galaxies, and 48% of cD type. We confirm previous findings based on much smaller samples, namely that a large fraction of BCMs have significant peculiar velocities. For a subsample of 452 clusters with at least 10 measured radial velocities, we find a median BCM peculiar velocity of 32% of their host clusters' radial velocity dispersion. This suggests that most BCMs are not at rest in the potential well of their clusters, and that the phenomenon is thus not a special trait of clusters hosting cD galaxies. We show that the peculiar veloc...

  13. On the Formation of cD Galaxies and their Parent Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Tovmassian, H M; 10.1111/j.1365-2966.2012.22044.x

    2012-01-01

    In order to study the mechanism of formation of cD galaxies we search for possible dependencies between the K-band luminosity of cDs and the parameters of their host clusters which we select to have a dominant cD galaxy, corresponding to a cluster morphology of Bautz-Morgan (BM) type I. As a comparison sample we use cD galaxies in clusters where they are not dominant, which we define here as non-BMI (NBMI) type clusters. We find that for 71 BMI clusters the absolute K-band luminosity of cDs depends on the cluster richness, but less strongly on the cluster velocity dispersion. Meanwhile, for 35 NBMI clusters the correlation between cD luminosity and cluster richness is weaker, and is absent between cD luminosity and velocity dispersion. In addition, we find that the luminosity of the cD galaxy hosted in BMI clusters tends to increase with the cD's peculiar velocity with respect to the cluster mean velocity. In contrast, for NBMI clusters the cD luminosity decreases with increasing peculiar velocity. Also, the ...

  14. Formation of proto-cluster: a virialized structure from gravo-turbulent collapse I. Simulation of cluster formation in collapsing molecular cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Yueh-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Stars are often observed to form in clusters. It is therefore important to understand how such a region of concentrated mass is assembled out of the diffuse medium and its properties eventually prescribe the important physical mechanisms and determine the characteristics of the stellar cluster. We study the formation of a gaseous proto-cluster inside a molecular cloud by performing high resolution MHD simulations and associate its internal properties to those of the parent cloud by varying the level of the initial turbulence of the cloud, with a view to better characterize the subsequent stellar cluster formation. The gaseous proto-cluster is formed out of global collapse of a molecular cloud, and has non-negligible rotation due to angular momentum conservation during the collapse of the object. Most of the star formation occurs in this region which occupies only a small volume fraction of the whole cloud. We identify such regions in simulations and compare the gas and sink particles to observations. The gase...

  15. Slow quenching of star formation in OMEGAWINGS clusters: galaxies in transition in the local universe

    OpenAIRE

    Paccagnella, Angela; Vulcani, Benedetta; Poggianti, Bianca Maria; Moretti, Alessia; Fritz, Jacopo; Gullieuszik, Marco; Couch, Warrick; Bettoni, Daniela; Cava, Antonio; Fasano, Giovanni; D'Onofrio, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    The star formation quenching depends on environment, but a full understanding of what mechanisms drive it is still missing. Exploiting a sample of galaxies with masses $M_\\ast>10^{9.8}M_\\odot$, drawn from the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) and its recent extension OMEGAWINGS, we investigate the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of stellar mass (M$_*$) in galaxy clusters at $0.04

  16. A Theoretical Assessment of the Formation of IT clusters in Kazakhstan: Approaches and Positive Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Anel A. Kireyeva

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this research is to develop new theoretical approaches of the formation of IT clusters in order to strengthen of trend of the innovative industrialization and competitiveness of the country. Keeping with the previous literature, this study determines by the novelty of the problem, concerning the formation of IT clusters, which can become a driving force of transformation due to the interaction, improving efficiency and introducing advanced technology. In this research,...

  17. Pd clusters supported on amorphous, low-porosity carbon spheres for hydrogen production from formic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulushev, Dmitri A; Bulusheva, Lyubov G; Beloshapkin, Sergey; O'Connor, Thomas; Okotrub, Alexander V; Ryan, Kevin M

    2015-04-29

    Amorphous, low-porosity carbon spheres on the order of a few micrometers in size were prepared by carbonization of squalane (C30H62) in supercritical CO2 at 823 K. The spheres were characterized and used as catalysts' supports for Pd. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure studies of the spheres revealed sp(2) and sp(3) hybridized carbon. To activate carbons for interaction with a metal precursor, often oxidative treatment of a support is needed. We showed that boiling of the obtained spheres in 28 wt % HNO3 did not affect the shape and bulk structure of the spheres, but led to creation of a considerable amount of surface oxygen-containing functional groups and increase of the content of sp(2) hybridized carbon on the surface. This carbon was seen by scanning transmission electron microscopy in the form of waving graphene flakes. The H/C atomic ratio in the spheres was relatively high (0.4) and did not change with the HNO3 treatment. Palladium was deposited by impregnation with Pd acetate followed by reduction in H2. This gave uniform Pd clusters with a size of 2-4 nm. The Pd supported on the original C spheres showed 2-3 times higher catalytic activity in vapor phase formic acid decomposition and higher selectivity for H2 formation (98-99%) than those for the catalyst based on the HNO3 treated spheres. Using of such low-porosity spheres as a catalyst support should prevent mass transfer limitations for fast catalytic reactions.

  18. Oxygen aggregation kinetics, thermal donors and carbon-oxygen defect formation in silicon containing carbon and tin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Localized vibrational mode spectroscopy measurements on Czochralski silicon (Cz-Si) samples subjected to isothermal annealing at 450 °C are reported. First, we studied the effect of carbon (C) and tin (Sn) isovalent dopants on the aggregation kinetics of oxygen. It is determined that the reduction rate of oxygen is described by the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation in accordance with previous reports. The activation energy related with the reaction rate constant of the process is calculated to increase from Cz-Si, to C-doped Cz-Si (CCz-Si), to Sn-doped Cz-Si contained C (SnCz-Si). This is attributed to the presence of the isovalent dopants that may impact both the kinetics of the oxygen atoms and also may lead to the formation of other oxygen-related clusters. Second, we studied the effect of Sn on the formation and evolution of carbon-oxygen (C-O) defects. It was determined that the presence of Sn suppresses the formation of the C-O defects as indicated by the reduction in the strength of the 683, 626, and 586 cm−1 well-known bands of CsOi defect. The phenomenon is attributed to the association of Sn with C atoms that may prevent the pairing of O with C. Third, we investigated the effect of C and Sn on the formation of thermal donors (TDs). Regarding carbon our results verified previous reports that carbon suppresses the formation of TDs. Interestingly, when both C and Sn are present in Si, very weak bands of TDs were observed, although it is known that Sn alone suppress their formation. This may be attributed to the competing strains of C and Sn in the Si lattice

  19. Oxygen aggregation kinetics, thermal donors and carbon-oxygen defect formation in silicon containing carbon and tin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angeletos, T.; Sgourou, E. N.; Andrianakis, A.; Diamantopoulou, A.; Londos, C. A. [Solid State Section, Physics Department, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos, 157 84 Athens (Greece); Chroneos, A. [Faculty of Engineering and Computing, Coventry University, Priory Street, Coventry CV1 5FB (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BP (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-07

    Localized vibrational mode spectroscopy measurements on Czochralski silicon (Cz-Si) samples subjected to isothermal annealing at 450 °C are reported. First, we studied the effect of carbon (C) and tin (Sn) isovalent dopants on the aggregation kinetics of oxygen. It is determined that the reduction rate of oxygen is described by the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation in accordance with previous reports. The activation energy related with the reaction rate constant of the process is calculated to increase from Cz-Si, to C-doped Cz-Si (CCz-Si), to Sn-doped Cz-Si contained C (SnCz-Si). This is attributed to the presence of the isovalent dopants that may impact both the kinetics of the oxygen atoms and also may lead to the formation of other oxygen-related clusters. Second, we studied the effect of Sn on the formation and evolution of carbon-oxygen (C-O) defects. It was determined that the presence of Sn suppresses the formation of the C-O defects as indicated by the reduction in the strength of the 683, 626, and 586 cm{sup −1} well-known bands of C{sub s}O{sub i} defect. The phenomenon is attributed to the association of Sn with C atoms that may prevent the pairing of O with C. Third, we investigated the effect of C and Sn on the formation of thermal donors (TDs). Regarding carbon our results verified previous reports that carbon suppresses the formation of TDs. Interestingly, when both C and Sn are present in Si, very weak bands of TDs were observed, although it is known that Sn alone suppress their formation. This may be attributed to the competing strains of C and Sn in the Si lattice.

  20. The Turn Over of the Odd-even Pattern in Mass Spectra of Carbon Cluster Anions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Guoquan; LIU Bingchen; ZHAI Huajin

    2000-01-01

    @@ Although investigations by many authorsd on the properties of carbon cluster anions by mass spectrometry and photoelectron spectroscopy last more than a decade[1~3], a general conclusion concerning the various features of the carbon clusters generated most commonly in laser vaporization/molecular beam sources has not yet been reached. In this Letter we report that the turn-over of the odd-even patter in relative abundance in the mass spectra of carbon clusters and the "manipulation" of the pattern can be realized in a controlled way by altering the vaporizing laser intensity, the backing pressure and the conductance of carries gas.

  1. The formation of higher-order hierarchical systems in star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    van den Berk, J; McMillan, S; Berk, Jelle van den; Zwart, Simon Portegies; Millan, Steve Mc

    2006-01-01

    We simulate open clusters containing up to 182 stars initially in the form of singles, binaries and triples. Due to the high interaction rate a large number of stable quadruples, quintuples, sextuples, and higher-order hierarchies form during the course of the simulations. For our choice of initial conditions, the formation rate of quadruple systems after about 2Myr is roughly constant with time at about 0.008 per cluster per Myr. The formation rate of quintuple and sextuple systems are about half and one quarter, respectively, of the quadruple formation rate, and both rates are also approximately constant with time. We present reaction channels and relative probabilities for the formation of persistent systems containing up to six stars. The reaction networks for the formation and destruction of quintuple and sextuple systems can become quite complicated, although the branching ratios remain largely unchanged during the course of the cluster evolution. The total numbers of quadruples is about a factor of thr...

  2. Formation and magic number characteristics of clusters formed during solidification processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A molecular dynamics simulation study has been performed for a large-sized system consisting of 106 liquid metal Al atoms to investigate the formation and magic number characteristics of various clusters formed during solidification processes. The cluster-type index method (CTIM) is adopted to describe various types of cluster by basic clusters. It is demonstrated that the icosahedral cluster (12 0 12 0) is the most important basic cluster, and that it plays a critical role in the microstructure transition. A new statistical method has been proposed to classify the clusters as some group levels according to the numbers of basic clusters contained in each cluster. The magic numbers can be determined by the respective peak value positions of different group levels of clusters, and the magic number sequence in the system is 13, 19, 25(27), 31(33), 38(40), 42(45), 48(51), 55(59), 61(65), 67,... the numbers in the brackets are the second magic number of the corresponding group levels of clusters. This magic number sequence is in good agreement with the experimental results obtained by Schriver and Harris et al, and the experimental results can be reasonably well explained

  3. Are globular clusters the natural outcome of regular high-redshift star formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik

    2016-02-01

    We summarise the recent progress in understanding the formation and evolution of globular clusters (GCs) in the context of galaxy formation and evolution. It is discussed that an end-to-end model for GC formation and evolution should capture four different phases: (1) star and cluster formation in the high-pressure interstellar medium of high-redshift galaxies, (2) cluster disruption by tidal shocks in the gas-rich host galaxy disc, (3) cluster migration into the galaxy halo, and (4) the final evaporation-dominated evolution of GCs until the present day. Previous models have mainly focussed on phase 4. We present and discuss a simple model that includes each of these four steps - its key difference with respect to previous work is the simultaneous addition of the high-redshift formation and early evolution of young GCs, as well as their migration into galaxy haloes. The new model provides an excellent match to the observed GC mass spectrum and specific frequency, as well as the relations of GCs to the host dark matter halo mass and supermassive black hole mass. These results show (1) that the properties of present-day GCs are reproduced by assuming that they are the natural outcome of regular high-redshift star formation (i.e. they form according to same physical processes that govern massive cluster formation in the local Universe), and (2) that models only including GC evaporation strongly underestimate their integrated mass loss over a Hubble time.

  4. Massive Clusters in the Inner Regions of NGC 1365: Cluster Formation and Gas Dynamics in Galactic Bars

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, Bruce G; Alloin, Danielle

    2009-01-01

    Cluster formation and gas dynamics in the central regions of barred galaxies are not well understood. This paper reviews the environment of three 10^7 Msun clusters near the inner Lindblad resonance of the barred spiral NGC 1365. The morphology, mass, and flow of HI and CO gas in the spiral and barred regions are examined for evidence of the location and mechanism of cluster formation. The accretion rate is compared with the star formation rate to infer the lifetime of the starburst. The gas appears to move from inside corotation in the spiral region to looping filaments in the interbar region at a rate of ~6 Msun/yr before impacting the bar dustlane somewhere along its length. The gas in this dustlane moves inward, growing in flux as a result of the accretion to ~40 Msun/yr near the ILR. This inner rate exceeds the current nuclear star formation rate by a factor of 4, suggesting continued buildup of nuclear mass for another ~0.5 Gyr. The bar may be only 1-2 Gyr old. Extrapolating the bar flow back in time, w...

  5. Formation of globular clusters induced by external ultraviolet radiation II: Three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Makito; Umemura, Masayuki; Hasegawa, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    We explore the possibility of the formation of globular clusters under ultraviolet (UV) background radiation. One-dimensional spherical symmetric radiation hydrodynamics (RHD) simulations by Hasegawa et al. have demonstrated that the collapse of low-mass (106-7 M⊙) gas clouds exposed to intense UV radiation can lead to the formation of compact star clusters like globular clusters (GCs) if gas clouds contract with supersonic infall velocities. However, three-dimensional effects, such as the anisotropy of background radiation and the inhomogeneity in gas clouds, have not been studied so far. In this paper, we perform three-dimensional RHD simulations in a semi-cosmological context, and reconsider the formation of compact star clusters in strong UV radiation fields. As a result, we find that although anisotropic radiation fields bring an elongated shadow of neutral gas, almost spherical compact star clusters can be procreated from a "supersonic infall" cloud, since photo-dissociating radiation suppresses the formation of hydrogen molecules in the shadowed regions and the regions are compressed by UV heated ambient gas. The properties of resultant star clusters match those of GCs. On the other hand, in weak UV radiation fields, dark matter-dominated star clusters with low stellar density form due to the self-shielding effect as well as the positive feedback by ionizing photons. Thus, we conclude that the "supersonic infall" under a strong UV background is a potential mechanism to form GCs.

  6. STAR CLUSTER FORMATION WITH STELLAR FEEDBACK AND LARGE-SCALE INFLOW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matzner, Christopher D.; Jumper, Peter H., E-mail: matzner@astro.utoronto.ca [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3H4 (Canada)

    2015-12-10

    During star cluster formation, ongoing mass accretion is resisted by stellar feedback in the form of protostellar outflows from the low-mass stars and photo-ionization and radiation pressure feedback from the massive stars. We model the evolution of cluster-forming regions during a phase in which both accretion and feedback are present and use these models to investigate how star cluster formation might terminate. Protostellar outflows are the strongest form of feedback in low-mass regions, but these cannot stop cluster formation if matter continues to flow in. In more massive clusters, radiation pressure and photo-ionization rapidly clear the cluster-forming gas when its column density is too small. We assess the rates of dynamical mass ejection and of evaporation, while accounting for the important effect of dust opacity on photo-ionization. Our models are consistent with the census of protostellar outflows in NGC 1333 and Serpens South and with the dust temperatures observed in regions of massive star formation. Comparing observations of massive cluster-forming regions against our model parameter space, and against our expectations for accretion-driven evolution, we infer that massive-star feedback is a likely cause of gas disruption in regions with velocity dispersions less than a few kilometers per second, but that more massive and more turbulent regions are too strongly bound for stellar feedback to be disruptive.

  7. Acceleration of raindrops formation due to tangling-clustering instability in turbulent stratified atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Elperin, T; Krasovitov, B; Kulmala, M; Liberman, M; Rogachevskii, I; Zilitinkevich, S

    2013-01-01

    Condensation of water vapor on active cloud condensation nuclei produces micron-size water droplets. To form rain, they must grow rapidly into at least 50-100 micron-size droplets. Observations show that this process takes only 15-20 minutes. The unexplained physical mechanism of such fast growth, is crucial for understanding and modeling of rain, and known as "condensation-coalescence bottleneck in rain formation". We show that the recently discovered phenomenon of the tangling clustering instability of small droplets in temperature-stratified turbulence (Phys. Fluids 25, 085104, 2013) results in the formation of droplet clusters with drastically increased droplet number densities and strong five-orders-of-magnitude enhancement of the collision-coalescence rate inside the clusters. The mechanism of tangling clustering instability in the temperature-stratified turbulence is much more effective than the previously considered pure inertial clustering caused by the centrifugal effect of turbulent vortices. Our a...

  8. Unveiling hidden properties of young star clusters: differential reddening, star-formation spread and binary fraction

    CERN Document Server

    Bonatto, Charles; Bica, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Usually, important parameters of young, low-mass star clusters are very difficult to obtain by means of photometry, especially when differential reddening and/or binaries occur in large amounts. We present a semi-analytical approach that, applied to the Hess diagram of a young star cluster, is able to retrieve the values of mass, age, star-formation spread, distance modulus, foreground and differential reddening, and binary fraction. The global optimisation method known as adaptive simulated annealing (ASA) is used to minimise the residuals between the observed and simulated Hess diagrams of a star cluster. The simulations are realistic and take the most relevant parameters of young clusters into account. Important features of the simulations are: a normal (Gaussian) differential reddening distribution, a time-decreasing star-formation rate, the unresolved binaries, and the smearing effect produced by photometric uncertainties on Hess diagrams. Free parameters are: cluster mass, age, distance modulus, star-fo...

  9. Study of the formation of solute clusters under irradiation in model ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron irradiation results in the formation of a high number density (1023 to 1024 m-3) of ultrafine (2 nm in diameter) solute clusters in reactor vessel steels. These clusters contain a supersaturated element (copper), and some others solutes (Mn, Ni, Si and P) soluble at the temperature of irradiation (300 C). The aim of the work described in this report is to understand what are the basic processes at the origin of the formation of these clusters, and to obtain information about the effect of the different solutes. The microstructure of model alloys, after different irradiation experiments is characterised by atom probe. The comparison between experimental results and results obtained by mean field modelling (evolution of point defects under irradiation) suggests that the precipitation of the solute clusters is heterogeneous, on point defects clusters. Precipitation kinetic is slowed down by solutes other than copper. (author)

  10. Mean-field instabilities and cluster formation in nuclear reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Colonna, M; Baran, V

    2016-01-01

    We review recent results on intermediate mass cluster production in heavy ion collisions at Fermi energy and in spallation reactions. Our studies are based on modern transport theories, employing effective interactions for the nuclear mean-field and incorporating two-body correlations and fluctuations. Namely we will consider the Stochastic Mean Field (SMF) approach and the recently developed Boltzmann-Langevin One Body (BLOB) model. We focus on cluster production emerging from the possible occurrence of low-density mean-field instabilities in heavy ion reactions. Within such a framework, the respective role of one and two-body effects, in the two models considered, will be carefully analysed. We will discuss, in particular, fragment production in central and semi-peripheral heavy ion collisions, which is the object of many recent experimental investigations. Moreover, in the context of spallation reactions, we will show how thermal expansion may trigger the development of mean-field instabilities, leading to...

  11. Formation of new stellar populations from gas accreted by massive young star clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengyuan; de Grijs, Richard; Deng, Licai; Geller, Aaron M; Xin, Yu; Hu, Yi; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André

    2016-01-28

    Stars in clusters are thought to form in a single burst from a common progenitor cloud of molecular gas. However, massive, old 'globular' clusters--those with ages greater than ten billion years and masses several hundred thousand times that of the Sun--often harbour multiple stellar populations, indicating that more than one star-forming event occurred during their lifetimes. Colliding stellar winds from late-stage, asymptotic-giant-branch stars are often suggested to be triggers of second-generation star formation. For this to occur, the initial cluster masses need to be greater than a few million solar masses. Here we report observations of three massive relatively young star clusters (1-2 billion years old) in the Magellanic Clouds that show clear evidence of burst-like star formation that occurred a few hundred million years after their initial formation era. We show that such clusters could have accreted sufficient gas to form new stars if they had orbited in their host galaxies' gaseous disks throughout the period between their initial formation and the more recent bursts of star formation. This process may eventually give rise to the ubiquitous multiple stellar populations in globular clusters. PMID:26819043

  12. Formation and local electronic structure of Ge clusters on Si(111)-7×7 surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Hai-Feng; Xu Ming-Chun; Yang Bing; Shi Dong-Xia; Guo Hai-Ming; Pang Shi-Jin; Gao Hong-Jun

    2007-01-01

    We report the formation and local electronic structure of Ge clusters on the Si(111)-7×7 surface studied by using variable temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy (VT-STM) and low-temperature scanning tunnelling spectroscopy (STS). Atom-resolved STM images reveal that the Ge atoms are prone to forming clusters with 1.0 nm in diameter for coverage up to 0.12 ML. Such Ge clusters preferentially nucleate at the centre of the faulted-half unit cells, leading to the 'dark sites' of Si centre adatoms from the surrounding three unfaulted-half unit cells in filled-state images. Biasdependent STM images show the charge transfer from the neighbouring Si adatoms to Ge clusters. Low-temperature STS of the Ge clusters reveals that there is a band gap on the Ge cluster and the large voltage threshold is about 0.9 V.

  13. Two Types of Mass Abundance Distributions for Anionic Carbon Clusters Investigated by Laser Vaporization and Pulsed Molecular Beam Techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAI Hua-Jin; LIU Bing-Chen; NI Guo-Quan; XUZhi-Zhan

    2000-01-01

    Two types of mass spectra for anionic carbon clusters Cn- have been revealed using laser vaporization and pulsed molecular beam techniques. The less structured mass spectrum characteristic of the magic-numbers at n = 5, 8,11, 15, and 17 is established at the early stage of the cluster formation process, namely, in the laser vaporization process. The more structured one is featured for a regular odd-even alternation and the magic numbers at n =10, 12, 16, 18, 22, and 28, and has been developed only after extensive clustering and qnenching processes, where low-energy electron attachment plays a vital role. Transition between these two types of mass spectra can be realized by controlling either the strength of the pulsed gas flow or the synchronism between the gas flow and the laser vaporization.

  14. Displacement damage rate dependence of defect cluster formation in α-Fe during irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Y.; Morishita, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Hamaguchi, D.; Tanigawa, H.

    2013-05-01

    Formation kinetics of defect clusters in pure iron during irradiation has been numerically investigated by reaction rate theory, with focusing on nucleation process of vacancy clusters (voids) and self-interstitial-atoms (SIA) clusters under a wide range of atomic displacement damage rate (dpa rate) and temperature conditions. In the rate theory model, the size dependence of thermal stability of a defect cluster is treated for a wide range of cluster size. The numerical analysis shows that the nucleation processes of voids and SIA-clusters are quite different from each other. As to the voids, the nucleation rate of voids depends much on temperature and dpa rate, and has the individual peak temperature for each dpa rate, during which the peak temperature increases with increasing dpa rate. This tendency for void nucleation is similar to that for void swelling observed in experiments. As to the SIA-clusters, the nucleation rate of SIA-clusters does not depend much on temperature and has no peak temperatures because of the relatively high thermal stability of an SIA-cluster, indicating that the conventional model (di-interstitial model) is applicable to describe the nucleation of SIA-clusters in a wide range of temperature.

  15. Cluster center formation in neutron-damaged silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of vacancy clusters in neutron-damaged silicon has been investigated by electron spin resonance. It is found that the production of P3 four vacancies and P6 di-interstitials is independent of oxygen concentration, suggesting that these defects are formed in the primary cascade. Approximately two P3 centers were formed per primary cascade independent of the primary mean recoil energy for irradiations in varying fast neutron spectra. This suggests that these defects are associated with the Brinkman spike which terminates the cascade. Low energy primaries from thermal neutron capture and subsequent gamma recoil are very inefficient in producing these centers

  16. In situ observation of cluster formation during nanoparticle solution casting on a colloidal film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, S V; Herzog, G; Buffet, A; Schwartzkopf, M; Perlich, J; Abul Kashem, M M; Doehrmann, R; Gehrke, R; Rothkirch, A; Stassig, K; Benecke, G [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Koerstgens, V; Rawolle, M; Mueller-Buschbaum, P [TU Muenchen, Physik Department, Lehrstuhl fuer Funkt. Mat., James-Franck-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Wurth, W [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany); Li, C; Fratzl, P, E-mail: stephan.roth@desy.de [MPI fuer Colloids and Interfaces Golm, Abteilung Biomat., Wissenschaftspark Potsdam-Golm, D-14424 Potsdam (Germany)

    2011-06-29

    We present a real-time study of the nanostructuring and cluster formation of gold nanoparticles deposited in aqueous solution on top of a pre-structured polystyrene colloidal thin film. Cluster formation takes place at different length scales, from the agglomerations of the gold nanoparticles to domains of polystyrene colloids. By combining in situ imaging ellipsometry and microbeam grazing incidence small-angle x-ray scattering, we are able to identify different stages of nanocomposite formation, namely diffusion, roughness increase, layer build-up and compaction. The findings can serve as a guideline for nanocomposite tailoring by solution casting.

  17. Efficient star cluster formation in the core of a galaxy cluster: The dwarf irregular NGC 1427A in Fornax

    CERN Document Server

    Mora, Marcelo D; Puzia, Thomas H

    2014-01-01

    Gas-rich galaxies in dense environments such as galaxy clusters and massive groups are affected by a number of possible types of interactions with the cluster environment, which make their evolution radically different than that of field galaxies. The dIrr galaxy NGC 1427A, presently infalling towards the core of the Fornax galaxy cluster, offers a unique opportunity to study those processes in a level of detail not possible to achieve for galaxies at higher redshits. Using HST/ACS and auxiliary VLT/FORS ground-based observations, we study the properties of the most recent episodes of star formation in this gas-rich galaxy, the only one of its type near the core of the Fornax cluster. We study the structural and photometric properties of young star cluster complexes in NGC 1427A, identifying 12 bright such complexes with exceptionally blue colors. The comparison of our broadband near-UV/optical photometry with simple stellar population models yields ages below ~4x10^6 yr and stellar masses from a few thousand...

  18. Formation of a protocluster: A virialized structure from gravoturbulent collapse. I. Simulation of cluster formation in a collapsing molecular cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yueh-Ning; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Context. Stars are often observed to form in clusters and it is therefore important to understand how such a region of concentrated mass is assembled out of the diffuse medium. The properties of such a region eventually prescribe the important physical mechanisms and determine the characteristics of the stellar cluster. Aims: We study the formation of a gaseous protocluster inside a molecular cloud and associate its internal properties with those of the parent cloud by varying the level of the initial turbulence of the cloud with a view to better characterize the subsequent stellar cluster formation. Methods: We performed high resolution magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of gaseous protoclusters forming in molecular clouds collapsing under self-gravity. We determined ellipsoidal cluster regions via gas kinematics and sink particle distribution, permitting us to determine the mass, size, and aspect ratio of the cluster. We studied the cluster properties, such as kinetic and gravitational energy, and made links to the parent cloud. Results: The gaseous protocluster is formed out of global collapse of a molecular cloud and has non-negligible rotation owing to angular momentum conservation during the collapse of the object. Most of the star formation occurs in this region, which occupies only a small volume fraction of the whole cloud. This dense entity is a result of the interplay between turbulence and gravity. We identify such regions in simulations and compare the gas and sink particles to observed star-forming clumps and embedded clusters, respectively. The gaseous protocluster inferred from simulation results presents a mass-size relation that is compatible with observations. We stress that the stellar cluster radius, although clearly correlated with the gas cluster radius, depends sensitively on its definition. Energy analysis is performed to confirm that the gaseous protocluster is a product of gravoturbulent reprocessing and that the support of turbulent

  19. Carbon monoxide adsorption on neutral and cationic vanadium doped gold clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Le, Hai Thuy; Lang, Sandra M; de Haeck, Jorg; Lievens, Peter; Janssens, Ewald

    2012-01-01

    The effect of a single vanadium dopant atom on the reactivity of small gold clusters is studied in the gas phase. In particular we investigated carbon monoxide adsorption on vanadium doped gold clusters using a low-pressure collision cell. Employing this technique the reactivity of both neutral and cationic clusters was studied under the same experimental conditions. Analysis of the kinetic data as a function of the pressure in the reaction cell shows that the reaction mechanism is composed o...

  20. Pseudopotential Density-Functional Calculations for Structures of Small Carbon Clusters CN (N = 2~8)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Yu-Lin; CHEN Xiang-Rong; YANG Xiang-Dong; LU Peng-Fei

    2004-01-01

    We introduce a first-principles density-functional theory, i.e. the finite-difference pseudopotential densityfunctional theory in real space and the Langevin molecular dynamics annealing technique, to the descriptions of structures and some properties of small carbon clusters (CN, N = 2 ~ 8). It is shown that the odd-numbered clusters have linear structures and most of the even-numbered clusters prefer cyclic structures.

  1. A solvothermal method for synthesizing monolayer protected amorphous calcium carbonate clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Shengtong; Gebauer, Denis; Cölfen, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    A solvothermal method was developed for synthesizing organic monolayer protected amorphous calcium carbonate clusters using 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid as ligand, ethanol as solvent and NaHCO3 decomposition as CO2 source, which can be extended to synthesize other monolayer protected mineral clusters. published

  2. Thick disk and pseudobulge formation in a clump cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inoue S.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Bulges in spiral galaxies have been supposed to be classified into two types: classical bulges or pseudobulges. Classical bulges are thought to form by galactic merger with bursty star formation, whereas pseudobulges are suggested to form by secular evolution. Noguchi (1998,199 suggested another bulge formation scenario, ‘clump-origin bulge’ [1,2]. He demonstrated using a numerical simulation that a galactic disc suffers dynamical instability to form clumpy structures in the early stage of disc formation, then the clumps are sucked into the galactic centre by dynamical friction and merge into a single bulge at the centre. Therefore, clump-origin bulges may have their own unique properties. I perform a high-resolution N-body/SPH simulation for the formation of the clump-origin bulge in an isolated galaxy model and study the formation of the clump-origin bulge. I find that the clump-origin bulge resembles pseudobulges in dynamical properties, a nearly exponential surface density profile, a barred boxy shape and a significant rotation. I also find that this bulge consists of old and metal-rich stars. These natures, old metal-rich population but pseudobulge-like structures, mean that the clump-origin bulge can not be simply classified into classical bulges nor pseudobulges. From these results, I discuss similarities of the clump-origin bulge to the Milky Way (MW bulge.

  3. The regulation of star formation in cool-core clusters: imprints on the stellar populations of brightest cluster galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Loubser, S I; Hoekstra, H; Mahdavi, A; Donahue, M; Bildfell, C; Voit, G M

    2015-01-01

    A fraction of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) shows bright emission in the UV and the blue part of the optical spectrum, which has been interpreted as evidence of recent star formation. Most of these results are based on the analysis of broadband photometric data. Here, we study the optical spectra of a sample of 19 BCGs hosted by X-ray luminous galaxy clusters at 0.15 < z < 0.3, a subset from the Canadian Cluster Comparison Project (CCCP) sample. We identify plausible star formation histories of the galaxies by fitting Simple Stellar Populations (SSPs) as well as composite populations, consisting of a young stellar component superimposed on an intermediate/old stellar component, to accurately constrain their star formation histories. We detect prominent young (~200 Myr) stellar populations in 4 of the 19 galaxies. Of the four, the BCG in Abell 1835 shows remarkable A-type stellar features indicating a relatively large population of young stars, which is extremely unusual even amongst star forming BCG...

  4. On the composition of ammonia-sulfuric acid clusters during aerosol particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Schobesberger

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The formation of particles from precursor vapors is an important source of atmospheric aerosol. Research at the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD facility at CERN tries to elucidate which vapors are responsible for this new particle formation, and how in detail it proceeds. Initial measurement campaigns at the CLOUD stainless-steel aerosol chamber focused on investigating particle formation from ammonia (NH3 and sulfuric acid (H2SO4. Experiments were conducted in the presence of water, ozone and sulfur dioxide. Contaminant trace gases were suppressed at the technological limit. For this study, we mapped out the compositions of small NH3-H2SO4 clusters over a wide range of atmospherically relevant environmental conditions. We covered [NH3] in the range from 2SO4] from 3.3 × 106 to 1.4 × 109 cm−3, and a temperature range from −25 to +20 °C. Negatively and positively charged clusters were directly measured by an atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (APi-TOF mass spectrometer, as they initially formed from gas-phase NH3 and H2SO4, and then grew to larger clusters containing more than 50 molecules of NH3 and H2SO4, corresponding to mobility-equivalent diameters greater than 2 nm. Water molecules evaporate from these clusters during sampling and are not observed. We found that the composition of the NH3-H2SO4 clusters is primarily determined by the ratio of gas-phase concentrations [NH3] / [H2SO4], as well as by temperature. Pure binary H2O-H2SO4 clusters (observed as clusters of only H2SO4 only form at [NH3] / [H2SO4]3] / [H2SO4], the composition of NH3-H2SO4 clusters was characterized by the number of NH3 molecules m added for each added H2SO4 molecule n (Δm / Δn, where n is in the range 4–18 (negatively charged clusters or 1–17 (positively charged clusters. For negatively charged clusters, Δm / Δn saturated between 1 and 1.4 for [NH3] / [H2SO4]>10. Positively charged clusters grew on average by Δm / Δn = 1.05 and

  5. Formation of carbon nanotubes from a silicon carbide/carbon composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Ravi; Engstler, Jörg; Haridoss, Prathap; Schneider, Jörg J.

    2009-02-01

    The reaction of a SiC/C composite powder in an arcing plasma forms carbon nanotubes in good yield. Besides carbon nanotubes, a Si/C composite composed of β SiC covered with a shell of graphite is formed. The graphitic carbon surface layers of the carbon shell of this composite reacts further to form carbon nanotubes when heated to 600 °C. This process seems highly effective since only a small overall low weight loss, indicative for a complete carbon shell oxidation is observed by thermal analysis. The formation of the carbon nanotubes from SiC is unlikely since no SiO 2 has been found when heating the SiC/C core shell composite to its reaction temperature of 600 °C under O 2. The CNTs formed are of good quality with 3 to 6 concentric walls and high aspect ratio. Occasionally even single walled carbon naotubes have been observed.

  6. The Formation of Ethane from Carbon Dioxide under Cold Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Pulsed-corona plasma has been used as a new method for ethane dehydrogenation at low temperature and normal pressure using carbon dioxide as an oxidant in this paper. The effect of carbon dioxide content in the feed, power input, and flow rate of the reactants on the ethane dehydrogenation has been investigated. The experimental results show that the conversion of ethane increases with the increase in the amount of carbon dioxide in the feed. The yield of ethylene and acetylene decreases with the increase in the yield of carbon monoxide, indicating that the increased carbon dioxide leads to the part of ethylene and acetylene being oxidized to carbon monoxide. Power input is primarily an electrical parameter in pulsed-corona plasma, which plays an important role in reactant conversion and product formation. When the power input reaches 16 W, ethane conversion is 41.0% and carbon dioxide conversion is 26.3%. The total yield of ethylene and acetylene is 15.6%. The reduced flow rate of feed improves the conversion of ethane,carbon dioxide and the yield of acetylene, and induces carbon deposit as well.

  7. Feedback Regulated Star Formation: From Star Clusters to Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Dib, Sami

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarises results from semi-analytical modelling of star formation in protocluster clumps of different metallicities. In this model, gravitationally bound cores form uniformly in the clump following a prescribed core formation efficiency per unit time. After a contraction timescale which is equal to a few times their free-fall times, the cores collapse into stars and populate the IMF. Feedback from the newly formed OB stars is taken into account in the form of stellar winds. When the ratio of the effective wind energy of the winds to the gravitational energy of the system reaches unity, gas is removed from the clump and core and star formation are quenched. The power of the radiation driven winds has a strong dependence on metallicity and increases with increasing metallicity. Thus, winds from stars in the high metallicity models lead to a rapid evacuation of the gas from the protocluster clump and to a reduced star formation efficiency, SFE_{exp}, as compared to their low metallicity counterparts...

  8. Formation and evolution mechanisms of large-clusters during rapid solidification process of liquid metal Al

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Rangsu; DONG Kejun; LIU Fengxiang; ZHENG Caixing; LIU Hairong; LI Jiyong

    2005-01-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation study has been performed for the formation and evolution characteristics of nano-clusters in a large-scale system consisting of 400000 atoms of liquid metal Al. The center-atom method combined with pair-bond analysis technique and cluster-type index method (CTIM) has been applied here to describe the structural configurations of various basic clusters. It is demonstrated that both the 1551 bond-type and the icosahedral cluster (12 0 12 0) constructed by 1551 bond-types are dominant among all the bond-types and cluster-types, respectively, in the system and play a critical role in the microstructure transitions of liquid metal Al. The nano-clusters (containing up to 150 atoms) are formed by the combination of some middle and small clusters with distinctly different sizes, through mutual competition by unceasing annex and evolution in a seesaw manner (in turn of obtaining and losing),which do not occur as the multi-shell structures accumulated with an atom as the center and the surrounding atoms are arranged according to a certain rule. This is the essential distinction of nano-cluster in liquid metal from those obtained by gaseous deposition, ionic spray methods, and so on. Though the nano-clusters differ from each other in shape and size, all of them possess protruding corners that could become the starting points of various dendrite structures in the solidification processes of liquid metals.

  9. A parsec-resolution simulation of the Antennae galaxies: Formation of star clusters during the merger

    CERN Document Server

    Renaud, Florent; Duc, Pierre-Alain

    2014-01-01

    We present a hydrodynamical simulation of an Antennae-like galaxy merger at parsec resolution, including a multi-component model for stellar feedback and reaching numerical convergence in the global star formation rate for the first time. We analyse the properties of the dense stellar objects formed during the different stages of the interaction. Each galactic encounter triggers a starburst activity, but the varying physical conditions change the triggering mechanism of each starburst. During the first two pericenter passages, the starburst is spatially extended and forms many star clusters. However, the starburst associated to the third, final passage is more centrally concentrated: stars form almost exclusively in the galactic nucleus and no new star cluster is formed. The maximum mass of stars clusters in this merger is more than 30 times higher than those in a simulation of an isolated Milky Way-like galaxy. Antennae-like mergers are therefore a formation channel of young massive clusters possibly leading...

  10. Lipid Reconstitution-Enabled Formation of Gold Nanoparticle Clusters for Mimetic Cellular Membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Jiyoung Nam; Yong-Tae Kim; Aeyeon Kang; Kook-Han Kim; KyoRee Lee; Wan Soo Yun; Yong Ho Kim

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) encapsulated within reconstituted phospholipid bilayers have been utilized in various bioapplications due to their improved cellular uptake without compromising their advantages. Studies have proved that clustering AuNPs can enhance the efficacy of theranostic effects, but controllable aggregation or oligomerization of AuNPs within lipid membranes is still challenging. Here, we successfully demonstrate the formation of gold nanoparticle clusters (AuCLs), supported b...

  11. SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE FORMATION VIA GAS ACCRETION IN NUCLEAR STELLAR CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black holes exceeding a billion solar masses have been detected at redshifts greater than six. The rapid formation of these objects may suggest a massive early seed or a period of growth faster than Eddington. Here we suggest a new mechanism along these lines. We propose that in the process of hierarchical structure assembly, dense star clusters can be contracted on dynamical timescales due to the nearly free-fall inflow of self-gravitating gas with a mass comparable to or larger than that of the clusters. This process increases the velocity dispersion to the point where the few remaining hard binaries can no longer effectively heat the cluster, and the cluster goes into a period of homologous core collapse. The cluster core can then reach a central density high enough for fast mergers of stellar-mass black holes and hence the rapid production of a black hole seed that could be 105 Msun or larger.

  12. A study of defect cluster formation in vanadium by heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekimura, Naoto; Shirao, Yasuyuki; Morishita, Kazunori [Tokyo Univ. (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Formation of defect clusters in thin foils of vanadium was investigated by heavy ion irradiation. In the very thin region of the specimens less than 20 nm, vacancy clusters were formed under gold ion irradiation, while very few clusters were detected in the specimens irradiated with 200 and 400 keV self-ions up to 1 x 10{sup 16} ions/m{sup 2}. The density of vacancy clusters were found to be strongly dependent on ion energy. Only above the critical value of kinetic energy transfer density in vanadium, vacancy clusters are considered to be formed in the cascade damage from which interstitials can escape to the specimen surface in the very thin region. (author)

  13. Formation of carbon allotrope aerosol by colliding plasmas in an inertial fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Along with repeated implosions, the interior of an inertial fusion target chamber is exposed to short pulses of high-energy x-ray, unburned DT-fuel particles, He-ash and pellet debris. As a result, chamber wall materials are subjected to ablation, emitting particles in the plasma state. Ablated particles will either be re-deposited elsewhere or collide with each other, perhaps in the centre-of-symmetry region of the chamber volume. Colliding ablation plasma particles can lead to the formation of clusters to grow into aerosol, possibly floating thereafter, which can deteriorate the subsequent implosion performance via laser scattering, etc. In a laboratory-scale YAG laser setup, the formation of nano-scale aerosol has been demonstrated in vacuum at irradiation power densities of the orders of 108–10 W cm−2 at 10 Hz, each 6 ns long, simulating the high-repetition rate inertial fusion reactor situation. Interestingly, carbon aerosol formation has been observed in the form of fullerene onion, nano- and micro-tubes when laser-ablated plasma plumes of carbon collide with each other. In contrast, colliding plasma plumes of metals tend to generate aerosol in the form of droplets under identical laser irradiation conditions. An atomic and molecular reaction model is proposed to interpret the process of carbon allotrope aerosol formation. (letter)

  14. Star formation trends in the unrelaxed, post-merger cluster A2255

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of dense environments on normal field galaxies are still up for debate despite much study since Abell published his catalog of nearby clusters in 1958. There are changes in color, morphology, and star formation properties when galaxies fall into groups and clusters, but the specifics of how and where these modifications occur are not fully understood. To look for answers, we focused on star-forming galaxies in A2255, an unrelaxed cluster thought to have recently experienced a merger with another cluster or large group. We used Hα, MIPS 24 μm, and WISE 22 μm to estimate total star formation rates (SFRs) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometry to find stellar masses (M *) for galaxies out to ∼5 r 200. We compared the star-forming cluster galaxies with the field SFR-mass distribution and found no enhancement or suppression of star formation in currently star-forming galaxies of high mass (log (M */M ☉) ≳ 10). This conclusion holds out to very large distances from the cluster center. However, the core (r proj < 3 Mpc) has a much lower fraction of star-forming galaxies than anywhere else in the cluster. These results indicate that for the mass range studied here, the majority of the star formation suppression occurs in the core on relatively short timescales, without any enhancement prior to entering the central region. If any significant enhancement or quenching of star formation occurs, it will be in galaxies of lower mass (log (M */M ☉) < 10).

  15. Stretching the threshold of reversible dynamics in silicon clusters: A case of carbon alloyed Si6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazrulla, Mohammed Azeezulla; Krishnamurty, Sailaja

    2016-09-01

    Silicon clusters with 3-50 atoms undergo isomerization/reversible dynamics or structural deformation at significantly lower temperatures of 350 K-500 K. Through Born Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamical (BOMD) simulations, the current study demonstrates that carbon alloying enhances the thermal stability of a silicon cluster. The study is carried out on a Si6 cluster which has been recently reported to undergo reversible dynamical movements using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Present BOMD simulations validate the experimentally observed reversible atomic displacements (reversible dynamical movements) at finite temperatures which are seen to persist nearly up to 2000 K. Carbon alloying of Si6 is seen to stretch the threshold of reversible dynamics from 200 K to 600 K depending upon the alloying concentration of carbon in the cluster.

  16. Formation of new stellar populations from gas accreted by massive young star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Chengyuan; Deng, Licai; Geller, Aaron M; Xin, Yu; Hu, Yi; Faucher-Giguere, Claude-Andre

    2016-01-01

    Stars in star clusters are thought to form in a single burst from a common progenitor cloud of molecular gas. However, massive, old globular clusters -- with ages greater than 10 billion years and masses of several hundred thousand solar masses -- often harbour multiple stellar populations, indicating that more than one star-forming event occurred during their lifetimes. Colliding stellar winds from late-stage, asymptotic-giant-branch stars are often invoked as second-generation star-formation trigger. The initial cluster masses should be at least 10 times more massive than they are today for this to work. However, large populations of clusters with masses greater than a few million solar masses are not found in the local Universe. Here we report on three 1-2 billion-year-old, massive star clusters in the Magellanic Clouds, which show clear evidence of burst-like star formation that occurred a few hundred million years after their initial formation era. We show that such clusters could accrete sufficient gas ...

  17. Effect of alloying on carbon formation during ethane dehydrogenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rovik, Anne; Kegnæs, Søren; Dahl, Søren;

    2009-01-01

    -impregnation of Ag and Ni. The effect of Ag is limited for Ru since the active sites are self-poisoned by carbon; nor for Rh/spinel is the effect observed, which is possibly due to island formation of Ag on the terraces of the Rh metal. A prolongation of the initial period with hydrogenolysis is observed for Ag...

  18. Formate oxidation driven calcium carbonate precipitation by Methylocystis parvus OBBP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganendra, G; De Muynck, W; Ho, A.; Arvaniti, EC; Hosseinkhani, B; Ramos, JA; Rahier, H; Boon, N.

    2014-01-01

    Microbially Induced Carbonate Precipitation (MICP) applied in the construction industry poses several disadvantages such as ammonia release to the air and nitric acid production. An alternative MICP from calcium formate by Methylocystis parvus OBBP is presented in this study to overcome these disadv

  19. Stability of Galactic Gaseous Disks and the Formation of Massive Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Escala, Andres

    2008-01-01

    We study gravitational instabilities in disks, with special attention to the most massive clumps that form because they are expected to be the progenitors of globular-type clusters. The maximum unstable mass is set by rotation and depends only on the surface density and orbital frequency of the disk. We propose that the formation of massive clusters is related to this largest scale in galaxies not stabilized by rotation. Using data from the literature, we predict that globular-like clusters can form in nuclear starburst disks and protogalactic disks but not in typical spiral galaxies, in agreement with observations.

  20. Stability of Galactic Gas Disks and the Formation of Massive Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Escala, Andres

    2008-01-01

    We study gravitational instabilities in disks, with special attention to the most massive clumps that form because they are expected to be the progenitors of globular-type clusters. The maximum unstable mass is set by rotation and depends only on the surface density and orbital frequency of the disk. We propose that the formation of massive clusters is related to this largest scale in galaxies not stabilized by rotation. Using data from the literature, we predict that globular-like clusters can form in nuclear starburst disks and protogalactic disks but not in typical spiral galaxies, in agreement with observations.

  1. Stability of Galactic Gaseous Disks and the Formation of Massive Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escala, Andres; Larson, Richard B.

    2008-08-21

    We study gravitational instabilities in disks, with special attention to the most massive clumps that form because they are expected to be the progenitors of globular-type clusters. The maximum unstable mass is set by rotation and depends only on the surface density and orbital frequency of the disk. We propose that the formation of massive clusters is related to this largest scale in galaxies not stabilized by rotation. Using data from the literature, we predict that globular-like clusters can form in nuclear starburst disks and protogalactic disks but not in typical spiral galaxies, in agreement with observations.

  2. Stellar contents and star formation in the young open cluster Stock 8

    CERN Document Server

    Jose, Jessy; Ojha, D K; Ogura, K; Chen, W P; Bhatt, B C; Ghosh, S K; Mito, H; Maheswar, G; Sharma, Saurabh

    2007-01-01

    We present $UBVI_c$ CCD photometry of the young open cluster Stock 8 with the aim to study the basic properties and star formation scenario in this region. The radius of the cluster is found to be $\\sim 6^{\\prime}$ ($\\sim 3.6$ pc) and the reddening within the cluster region varies from $E(B-V)=0.40$ to 0.60 mag. The cluster is located at a distance of $2.05 \\pm 0.10$ kpc. Using H$\\alpha$ slitless spectroscopy and 2MASS NIR data we identified H$\\alpha$ emission and NIR excess young stellar objects (YSOs), respectively. The colour-magnitude diagrams of these YSOs reveal that majority of these objects have ages between 1 to 5 Myr indicating a non-coeval star formation in the cluster. Massive stars in the cluster region reveal an average age of $\\le$ 2 Myr. In the cluster region ($r \\le 6^\\prime$) the slope of the mass function (MF), $\\Gamma$, in the mass range $\\sim 1.0 \\le M/M_\\odot < 13.4$ can be represented by a power law having a slope of $-1.38\\pm0.12$, which agrees well with Salpeter value (-1.35). In t...

  3. Iron-carbide cluster thermal dynamics for catalyzed carbon nanotube growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Feng; Bolton, Kim; Rosén, Arne

    2004-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to study the thermal behavior of FeN-mCm clusters where N, the total number of atoms, extends up to 2400. Comparison of the computed results with experimental data shows that the simulations yield the correct trends for the liquid-solid region of the iron-carbide phase diagram as well as the correct dependence of cluster melting point as a function of cluster size. The calculation indicates that, when carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are grown on large (>3-4 nm) catalyst particles at low temperatures (melting of the cluster. .

  4. Formation of a "Cluster Molecule" (C20)2 and its thermal stability

    OpenAIRE

    Podlivaev, A. I.; Openov, L. A.

    2006-01-01

    The possible formation of a "cluster molecule" (C20)2 from two single C20 fullerenes is studied by the tight-binding method. Several (C20)2 isomers in which C20 fullerenes are bound by strong covalent forces and retain their identity are found; actually, these C20 fullerenes play the role of "atoms" in the "cluster molecule". The so-called open-[2+2] isomer has a minimum energy. Its formation path and thermal stability at T = 2000 - 4000 K are analyzed in detail. This isomer loses its molecul...

  5. A Blind Equalizer Based on Unsupervised Gaussian Cluster Formation with an Adaptive Non—Linearity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuHanyu; TongWen; 等

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we present a blind equalizer algorithm based on an unsupervised Gaussian cluster formation technique with an optimized gradient adaptive step-size to update the equalizer coefficients.The novelty of this work lies in the optimization of the nonlinearity of the cluster formation used to achieve an optimal soft decision.The proposed iterative procedure combined with the variable step-size gradient-based adaptation,significantly accelerates the convergence speed of the blind equalization.The advantages of the proposed equalization techniques are illustrated by simulation.Simulation results obtained are compared with the Sato and Godard blind equalizers.

  6. Molecular dynamics study of crater formation by core-shell structured cluster impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Takaaki; Seki, Toshio; Matsuo, Jiro

    2012-07-01

    Crater formation processes by the impacts of large clusters with binary atomic species were studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Argon and xenon atoms are artificially organized in core-shell cluster structures with various component ratios and irradiated on a Si(1 0 0) target surface. When the cluster has Xe1000 core covered with 1000 Ar atoms, and impacts at a total of 20 keV, the core Xe cluster penetrates into the deep area, and a crater with a conical shape is left on the target. On the other hand, in the case of a cluster with the opposite structure, Ar1000 core covered with 1000 Xe atoms, the cluster stops at a shallow area of the target. The incident cluster atoms are mixed and tend to spread in a lateral direction, which results in a square shaped crater with a shallower hole and wider opening. The MD simulations suggest that large cluster impacts cause different irradiation effects by changing the structure, even if the component ratio is the same.

  7. Molecular dynamics study of crater formation by core-shell structured cluster impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crater formation processes by the impacts of large clusters with binary atomic species were studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Argon and xenon atoms are artificially organized in core-shell cluster structures with various component ratios and irradiated on a Si(1 0 0) target surface. When the cluster has Xe1000 core covered with 1000 Ar atoms, and impacts at a total of 20 keV, the core Xe cluster penetrates into the deep area, and a crater with a conical shape is left on the target. On the other hand, in the case of a cluster with the opposite structure, Ar1000 core covered with 1000 Xe atoms, the cluster stops at a shallow area of the target. The incident cluster atoms are mixed and tend to spread in a lateral direction, which results in a square shaped crater with a shallower hole and wider opening. The MD simulations suggest that large cluster impacts cause different irradiation effects by changing the structure, even if the component ratio is the same.

  8. Formation and evolution properties of clusters in liquid metal copper during rapid cooling processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI Xue-hua; LIU Rang-su; TIAN Ze-an; HOU Zhao-yang; LI Xiao-yang; ZHOU Qun-yi

    2008-01-01

    Based on the quantum Sutton-Chen many-body potential, a molecular dynamics simulation was performed to investigate the formation and evolution properties of clusters in liquid Cu with 50 000 atoms. The cluster-type index method(CTIM) was used to describe the complex microstructure transitions. It is demonstrated that the amorphous structures are mainly formed with the three bond-types of 1551, 1541 and 1431 in the system, and the icosahedral cluster (12 0 12 0) and other basic polyhedron clusters of (12 2 8 2), (13 1 10 2), (13 3 6 4), (14 1 10 3), (14 2 8 4) and (14 3 6 5) play a critical and leading role in the transition from liquid to glass. The nano-clusters formed in the system consist of some basic clusters and middle cluster configurations by connecting to each other, and distinguish from those obtained by gaseous deposition and ionic spray. From the results of structural parameter pair distribution function g(r), bond-types and basic cluster-types, it is found that the glass transition temperature Tg for liquid metal Cu is about 673 K at the cooling rate of 1.0×1014 K/s.

  9. FORMATION AND EVOLUTION OF NUCLEAR STAR CLUSTERS WITH IN SITU STAR FORMATION: NUCLEAR CORES AND AGE SEGREGATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear stellar cluster (NSCs) are known to exist around massive black holes (MBHs) in galactic nuclei. Two formation scenarios were suggested for their origin: (1) buildup of NSCs from consecutive infall of stellar clusters and (2) continuous in situ star formation. Though the cluster infall scenario has been extensively studied, the in situ formation scenario has been hardly explored. Here we use Fokker-Planck (FP) calculations to study the effects of star formation on the buildup of NSCs and its implications for their long-term evolution and their resulting structure. We use the FP equation to describe the evolution of stellar populations and add appropriate source terms to account for the effects of newly formed stars. We show that continuous star formation even 1-2 pc away from the MBH can lead to the buildup of an NSC with properties similar to those of the Milky Way NSC. We find that the structure of the old stellar population in the NSC with in situ star formation could be very similar to the steady-state Bahcall-Wolf cuspy structure. However, its younger populations do not yet achieve a steady state. In particular, formed/evolved NSCs with in situ star formation contain differential age-segregated stellar populations that are not yet fully mixed. Younger stellar populations formed in the outer regions of the NSC have a cuspy structure toward the NSC outskirts, while showing a core-like distribution inward, with younger populations having larger core sizes. In principal, such a structure can give rise to an apparent core-like radial distribution of younger stars, as observed in the Galactic center

  10. FORMATION AND EVOLUTION OF NUCLEAR STAR CLUSTERS WITH IN SITU STAR FORMATION: NUCLEAR CORES AND AGE SEGREGATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aharon, Danor; Perets, Hagai B. [Physics Department, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear stellar cluster (NSCs) are known to exist around massive black holes (MBHs) in galactic nuclei. Two formation scenarios were suggested for their origin: (1) buildup of NSCs from consecutive infall of stellar clusters and (2) continuous in situ star formation. Though the cluster infall scenario has been extensively studied, the in situ formation scenario has been hardly explored. Here we use Fokker-Planck (FP) calculations to study the effects of star formation on the buildup of NSCs and its implications for their long-term evolution and their resulting structure. We use the FP equation to describe the evolution of stellar populations and add appropriate source terms to account for the effects of newly formed stars. We show that continuous star formation even 1-2 pc away from the MBH can lead to the buildup of an NSC with properties similar to those of the Milky Way NSC. We find that the structure of the old stellar population in the NSC with in situ star formation could be very similar to the steady-state Bahcall-Wolf cuspy structure. However, its younger populations do not yet achieve a steady state. In particular, formed/evolved NSCs with in situ star formation contain differential age-segregated stellar populations that are not yet fully mixed. Younger stellar populations formed in the outer regions of the NSC have a cuspy structure toward the NSC outskirts, while showing a core-like distribution inward, with younger populations having larger core sizes. In principal, such a structure can give rise to an apparent core-like radial distribution of younger stars, as observed in the Galactic center.

  11. Star and Stellar Cluster Formation: ALMA-SKA Synergies

    CERN Document Server

    Fuller, G A; Rathborne, J M; Longmore, S; Molinari, S

    2015-01-01

    Over the next decade, observations conducted with ALMA and the SKA will reveal the process of mass assembly and accretion onto young stars and will be revolutionary for studies of star formation. Here we summarise the capabilities of ALMA and discuss recent results from its early science observations. We then review infrared and radio variability observations of both young low-mass and high-mass stars. A time domain SKA radio continuum survey of star forming regions is then outlined. This survey will produce radio light-curves for hundreds of young sources, providing for the first time a systematic survey of radio variability across the full range of stellar masses. These light-curves will probe the magnetospheric interactions of young binary systems, the origins of outflows, trace episodic accretion on the central sources and potentially constrain the rotation rates of embedded sources.

  12. Dwarf Detachment and Globular Cluster Formation in Arp 305

    CERN Document Server

    Hancock, M; Struck, C; Giroux, M L; Hurlock, S

    2009-01-01

    Tidal Dwarf Galaxies (TDG), concentrations of interstellar gas and stars in the tidal features of interacting galaxies, have been the subject of much scrutiny. The `smoking gun' that will prove the TDG hypothesis is the discovery of independent dwarf galaxies that are detached from other galaxies, but have clear tidal histories. As part of a search for TDGs we are using GALEX to conduct a large UV imaging survey of interacting galaxies selected from the Arp Atlas. As part of that study, we present a GALEX UV and SDSS and SARA optical study of the gas-rich interacting galaxy pair Arp 305. The GALEX UV data reveal much extended diffuse UV emission and star formation outside the disks including a candidate TDG between the two galaxies. We have used a smooth particle hydrodynamics code to model the interaction and determine the fate of the candidate TDG.

  13. Catalytic Formation of Propylene Carbonate from Supercritical Carbon Dioxide/Propylene Oxide Mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Propylene carbonate was synthesized from supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2)/ propylene oxide mixture with phthalocyaninatoaluminium chloride (ClAlPc)/ tetrabutylammon-ium bromide (n-Bu4NBr) as catalyst. The high rate of reaction was attributed to rapid diffusion and the high miscibility of propylene oxide in SC-CO2 under employed conditions. Various reaction periods present different formation rate of propylene carbonate, mainly due to the existence of phase change during the reaction. The experimental results demonstrate that SC-CO2 could be used as not only an environmentally benign solvent but also a carbon precursor in synthesis.

  14. Major contribution of neutral clusters to new particle formation in the free troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Rose

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The formation of new aerosol particles in the atmosphere is a key process influencing the aerosol number concentration as well as the climate, in particular in the free troposphere (FT where the newly formed particles directly influence cloud formation. However, free tropospheric new particle formation (NPF is poorly documented due to logistic limitations and complex atmospheric dynamics around high altitude stations that make the observation of this day-time process challenging. Recent improvements in measurement techniques make now possible the detection of neutral clusters down to ~ 1 nm sizes, which opens new horizons in our understanding of the nucleation process. Indeed, only the charged fraction of clusters has been reported in the upper troposphere up to now. Here we report observations of charged and neutral clusters (1 to 2.5 nm mobility diameter during day-time free tropospheric conditions at the altitude site of Puy de Dôme (1465 m a.s.l., central France, between 10 and 29 February 2012. Our findings demonstrate that in the free troposphere, the formation of 1.5 nm neutral clusters is about 40 times higher than the one of ionic clusters during NPF events, indicating that they dominate in the nucleation process. We also observe that the total cluster concentration increases by a factor of 5.5 during NPF events compared to the other days, which was not clearly observed for the charged cluster population in the past. In the FT, the nucleation process does not seem to be sulphuric acid-limited, as previously suggested, and could be promoted by the transport of pollutants to the upper troposphere.

  15. Are globular clusters the natural outcome of regular high-redshift star formation?

    CERN Document Server

    Kruijssen, J M Diederik

    2015-01-01

    We summarise some of the recent progress in understanding the formation and evolution of globular clusters (GCs) in the context of galaxy formation and evolution. It is discussed that an end-to-end model for GC formation and evolution should capture four different phases: (1) star and cluster formation in the high-pressure interstellar medium of high-redshift galaxies, (2) cluster disruption by tidal shocks in the gas-rich host galaxy disc, (3) cluster migration into the galaxy halo, and (4) the final evaporation-dominated evolution of GCs until the present day. Previous models have mainly focussed on phase 4. We present and discuss a simple model that includes each of these four steps - its key difference with respect to previous work is the simultaneous addition of the high-redshift formation and early evolution of young GCs, as well as their migration into galaxy haloes. The new model provides an excellent match to the observed GC mass spectrum and specific frequency, as well as the relations of GCs to the...

  16. THE RICH GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEM OF ABELL 1689 AND THE RADIAL DEPENDENCE OF THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER FORMATION EFFICIENCY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alamo-Martínez, K. A.; González-Lópezlira, R. A. [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Morelia 58090 (Mexico); Blakeslee, J. P.; Côté, P.; Ferrarese, L. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Jee, M. J. [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Jordán, A. [Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, 7820436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Meurer, G. R. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Peng, E. W. [Department of Astronomy and Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); West, M. J., E-mail: k.alamo@crya.unam.mx [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile)

    2013-09-20

    We study the rich globular cluster (GC) system in the center of the massive cluster of galaxies Abell 1689 (z = 0.18), one of the most powerful gravitational lenses known. With 28 Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys orbits in the F814W bandpass, we reach a magnitude I{sub 814} = 29 with ∼>90% completeness and sample the brightest ∼5% of the GC system. Assuming the well-known Gaussian form of the GC luminosity function (GCLF), we estimate a total population of N{sup total}{sub GC}= 162,850{sup +75,450}{sub -51,310} GCs within a projected radius of 400 kpc. As many as half of the GCs may comprise an intracluster component. Even with the sizable uncertainties, which mainly result from the uncertain GCLF parameters, this system is by far the largest GC population studied to date. The specific frequency S{sub N} is high, but not uncommon for central galaxies in massive clusters, rising from S{sub N} ≈ 5 near the center to ∼12 at large radii. Passive galaxy fading would increase S{sub N} by ∼20% at z = 0. We construct the radial mass profiles of the GCs, stars, intracluster gas, and lensing-derived total mass, and we compare the mass fractions as a function of radius. The estimated mass in GCs, M{sub GC}{sup total} = 3.9 × 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}, is comparable to ∼80% of the total stellar mass of the Milky Way. The shape of the GC mass profile appears intermediate between those of the stellar light and total cluster mass. Despite the extreme nature of this system, the ratios of the GC mass to the baryonic and total masses, and thus the GC formation efficiency, are typical of those in other rich clusters when comparing at the same physical radii. The GC formation efficiency is not constant, but varies with radius, in a manner that appears similar for different clusters; we speculate on the reasons for this similarity in profile.

  17. Carbonate-coordinated metal complexes precede the formation of liquid amorphous mineral emulsions of divalent metal carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Stephan E.; Müller, Lars; Barrea, Raul; Kampf, Christopher J.; Leiterer, Jork; Panne, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Emmerling, Franziska; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2011-03-01

    During the mineralisation of metal carbonates MCO3 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Cd, Pb) liquid-like amorphous intermediates emerge. These intermediates that form via a liquid/liquid phase separation behave like a classical emulsion and are stabilized electrostatically. The occurrence of these intermediates is attributed to the formation of highly hydrated networks whose stability is mainly based on weak interactions and the variability of the metal-containing pre-critical clusters. Their existence and compositional freedom are evidenced by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Liquid intermediates in non-classical crystallisation pathways seem to be more common than assumed.During the mineralisation of metal carbonates MCO3 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Cd, Pb) liquid-like amorphous intermediates emerge. These intermediates that form via a liquid/liquid phase separation behave like a classical emulsion and are stabilized electrostatically. The occurrence of these intermediates is attributed to the formation of highly hydrated networks whose stability is mainly based on weak interactions and the variability of the metal-containing pre-critical clusters. Their existence and compositional freedom are evidenced by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Liquid intermediates in non-classical crystallisation pathways seem to be more common than assumed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: (S1 and S5) TEM at higher magnifications and of crystallizations conducted at pH = 6.0, 9.0 and 11.3; (S2) sketch of a spreading liquid particle on a TEM grid; (S3) wide-angle scattering of BaCO3 and CdCO3; (S4 and S6-S9) ESI-MS spectra of a solution of carbon dioxide and of bicarbonates of Sr, Ba, Pb, Mn and Cd. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00761g

  18. Effects of Cooling and Star Formation on the Baryon Fractions in Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Nagai, Daisuke; Vikhlinin, Alexey A.

    2005-06-01

    We study the effects of radiative cooling and galaxy formation on the baryon fractions in clusters using high-resolution cosmological simulations that resolve formation of cluster galaxies. The simulations of nine individual clusters spanning a decade in mass are performed with the shock-capturing Eulerian adaptive mesh refinement N-body+gasdynamical Adaptive Refinement Tree code. For each cluster the simulations were done in the adiabatic regime (without dissipation) and with radiative cooling and several physical processes critical to various aspects of galaxy formation: star formation, metal enrichment, and stellar feedback. We show that radiative cooling of gas and associated star formation increase the total baryon fractions within radii as large as the virial radius. The effect is strongest within cluster cores, where the simulations with cooling have baryon fractions larger than the universal value, in contrast to the adiabatic simulations in which the fraction of baryons is substantially smaller than the universal value. At larger radii (r>~r500) the cumulative baryon fractions in simulations with cooling are close to the universal value. The gas fractions in simulations with dissipation are reduced by ~20%-40% at rentropy-conserving smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code Gadget. The cumulative gas fraction profiles in the two sets of simulations on average agree to better than ~3% outside the cluster core (r/rvir>~0.2) but differ by up to 10% at small radii. The differences are smaller than those found in previous comparisons of Eulerian and SPH simulations. Nevertheless, they are systematic and have to be kept in mind when using gas fractions from cosmological simulations.

  19. Neutral molecular cluster formation of sulfuric acid–dimethylamine observed in real time under atmospheric conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Kürten, Andreas; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Junninen, Heikki; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Hutterli, Manuel; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Seinfeld, John H; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Winkler, Paul M; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Curtius, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    For atmospheric sulfuric acid (SA) concentrations the presence of dimethylamine (DMA) at mixing ratios of several parts per trillion by volume can explain observed boundary layer new particle formation rates. However, the concentration and molecular composition of the neutral (uncharged) clusters have not been reported so far due to the lack of suitable instrumentation. Here we report on experiments from the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research revealing the formation of neutral particles containing up to 14 SA and 16 DMA molecules, corresponding to a mobility diameter of about 2 nm, under atmospherically relevant conditions. These measurements bridge the gap between the molecular and particle perspectives of nucleation, revealing the fundamental processes involved in particle formation and growth. The neutral clusters are found to form at or close to the kinetic limit where particle formation is limited only by the collision rate of SA molecules. Even tho...

  20. Clustered star formation and outflows in AFGL 2591

    CERN Document Server

    Sanna, A; Carrasco-Gonzàlez, C; Menten, K M; Brunthaler, A; Moscadelli, L; Rygl, K L J

    2011-01-01

    We report on a detailed study of the water maser kinematics and radio continuum emission toward the most massive and young object in the star-forming region AFGL 2591. Our analysis shows at least two spatial scales of multiple star formation, one projected across 0.1 pc on the sky and another one at about 2000 AU from a ZAMS star of about 38 Solar masses. This young stellar object drives a powerful jet- and wind-driven outflow system with the water masers associated to the outflow walls, previously detected as a limb-brightened cavity in the NIR band. At about 1300 AU to the north of this object a younger protostar drives two bow shocks, outlined by arc-like water maser emission, at 200 AU either side of the source. We have traced the velocity profile of the gas that expands along these arc-like maser structures and compared it with the jet-driven outflow model. This analysis suggests that the ambient medium around the northern protostar is swept up by a jet-driven shock (>66 km/s) and perhaps a lower-velocit...

  1. CLUSTERED STAR FORMATION AND OUTFLOWS IN AFGL 2591

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a detailed study of the water maser kinematics and radio continuum emission toward the most massive and young object in the star-forming region AFGL 2591. Our analysis shows at least two spatial scales of multiple star formation, one projected across 0.1 pc on the sky and another one at about 2000 AU from a ZAMS star of about 38 M☉. This young stellar object drives a powerful jet- and wind-driven outflow system with the water masers associated to the outflow walls, previously detected as a limb-brightened cavity in the NIR band. At about 1300 AU to the north of this object a younger protostar drives two bow shocks, outlined by arc-like water maser emission, at 200 AU either side of the source. We have traced the velocity profile of the gas that expands along these arc-like maser structures and compared it with the jet-driven outflow model. This analysis suggests that the ambient medium around the northern protostar is swept up by a jet-driven shock (>66 km s–1) and perhaps a lower-velocity (∼10 km s–1) wind with an opening angle of about 20° from the jet axis.

  2. The star formation history of the Large Magellanic Cloud star cluster NGC1751

    CERN Document Server

    Rubele, Stefano; Kozhurina-Platais, Vera; Goudfrooij, Paul; Kerber, Leandro

    2011-01-01

    The HST/ACS colour-magnitude diagrams (CMD) of the populous LMC star cluster NGC1751 present both a broad main sequence turn-off and a dual clump of red giants. We show that the latter feature is real and associate it to the first appearance of electron-degeneracy in the H-exhausted cores of the cluster stars. We then apply to the NGC1751 data the classical method of star formation history (SFH) recovery via CMD reconstruction, for different radii corresponding to the cluster centre, the cluster outskirts, and the underlying LMC field. The mean SFH derived from the LMC field is taken into account during the stage of SFH-recovery in the cluster regions, in a novel approach which is shown to significantly improve the quality of the SFH results. For the cluster centre, we find a best-fitting solution corresponding to prolonged star formation for a for a timespan of 460 Myr, instead of the two peaks separated by 200 Myr favoured by a previous work based on isochrone fitting. Remarkably, our global best-fitting so...

  3. Simulating galaxy Clusters -II: global star formation histories and galaxy populations

    CERN Document Server

    Romeo, A D; Sommer-Larsen, J

    2004-01-01

    Cosmological (LambdaCDM) TreeSPH simulations of the formation and evolution of galaxy groups and clusters have been performed. The simulations invoke star formation, chemical evolution with non-instantaneous recycling, metal dependent radiative cooling, strong star burst and (optionally) AGN driven galactic super winds, effects of a meta-galactic UV field and thermal conduction. The properties of the galaxy populations in two clusters, one Virgo-like (T~3 keV) and one (sub) Coma-like (T~6 keV), are discussed. The global star formation rates of the cluster galaxies are found to decrease very significantly with time from redshift z=2 to 0, in agreement with observations. The total K-band luminosity of the cluster galaxies correlates tightly with total cluster mass, and for models without additional AGN feedback, the zero point of the relation matches the observed one fairly well. The match to observed galaxy luminosity functions is reasonable, except for a deficiency of bright galaxies (M_B < -20), which bec...

  4. Deep Mixing and Metallicity: Carbon Depletion in Globular Cluster Giants

    OpenAIRE

    Martell, Sarah L.; Smith, Graeme H.; Briley, Michael M.

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of an observational study of the efficiency of deep mixing in globular cluster red giants as a function of stellar metallicity. We determine [C/Fe] abundances based on low-resolution spectra taken with the Kast spectrograph on the 3m Shane telescope at Lick Observatory. Spectra centered on the 4300 Angstrom CH absorption band were taken for 42 bright red giants in 11 Galactic globular clusters ranging in metallicity from M92 ([Fe/H]=-2.29) to NGC 6712 ([Fe/H]=-1.01). Ca...

  5. Architecture and Channel-Belt Clustering in the Fluvial lower Wasatch Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisel, J. R.; Pyles, D. R.; Bracken, B.; Rosenbaum, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Eocene lower Wasatch Formation of the Uinta Basin contains exceptional outcrops of low net-sand content (27% sand) fluvial strata. This study quantitatively documents the stratigraphy of a 7 km wide by 300 meter thick strike-oriented outcrop in order to develop a quantitative data base that can be used to improve our knowledge of how some fluvial systems evolve over geologic time scales. Data used to document the outcrop are: (1) 550 meters of decimeter to half meter scale resolution stratigraphic columns that document grain size and physical sedimentary structures; (2) detailed photopanels used to document architectural style and lithofacies types in the outcrop; (3) thickness, width, and spatial position for all channel belts in the outcrop, and (4) directional measurements of paleocurrent indicators. Two channel-belt styles are recognized: lateral and downstream accreting channel belts; both of which occur as either single or multi-story. Floodplain strata are well exposed and consist of overbank fines and sand-rich crevasse splay deposits. Key upward and lateral characteristics of the outcrop documented herein are the following. First, the shapes of 243 channels are documented. The average width, thickness and aspect ratios of the channel belts are 110 m, 7 m, and 16:1, respectively. Importantly, the size and shape of channel belts does not change upward through the 300 meter transect. Second, channels are documented to spatially cluster. 9 clusters are documented using a spatial statistic. Key upward patterns in channel belt clustering are a marked change from non-amalgamated isolated channel-belt clusters to amalgamated channel-belt clusters. Critically, stratal surfaces can be correlated from mudstone units within the clusters to time-equivalent floodplain strata adjacent to the cluster demonstrating that clusters are not confined within fluvial valleys. Finally, proportions of floodplain and channel belt elements underlying clusters and channel belts

  6. Formation of a massive black hole in the centre of a dense stellar cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of a disc-like subcluster of low-mass stars formed of the gas released in inelastic stellar collisions in a dense stellar cluster is investigated. The subcluster evolution due to elastic and inelastic collisions between disc and cluster stars and of the cluster stars with one another are taken inot consideration. the processes of possible disc stellar mass rise owing to coalescences of disc stars is shown to be unimortant, hence the subcluster stellar mass remains low over the whole period of subcluster evolution, until instability coming. The contraction of self-gravitating subcluster of new stars after the instability moment is considered. It is shown that the dynamical friction can be an important mechanism of angular momentum loss during the subcluster contraction. It is shown that subcluster collapse leads to massive black hole formation, its mass being ε7/12 of the cluster mass (where ε is ellipticity)

  7. Progressive star formation in the young galactic super star cluster NGC 3603

    CERN Document Server

    Beccari, Giacomo; De Marchi, Guido; Paresce, Francesco; Young, Erick; Andersen, Morten; Panagia, Nino; Balick, Bruce; Bond, Howard; Calzetti, Daniela; Carollo, C Marcella; Disney, Michael J; Dopita, Michael A; Frogel, Jay A; Hall, Donald N B; Holtzman, Jon A; Kimble, Randy A; McCarthy, Patrick J; O'Connell, Robert W; Saha, Abhijit; Silk, Joseph I; Trauger, John T; Walker, Alistair R; Whitmore, Bradley C; Windhorst, Rogier A

    2010-01-01

    Early release science observations of the cluster NGC3603 with the WFC3 on the refurbished HST allow us to study its recent star formation history. Our analysis focuses on stars with Halpha excess emission, a robust indicator of their pre-main sequence (PMS) accreting status. The comparison with theoretical PMS isochrones shows that 2/3 of the objects with Halpha excess emission have ages from 1 to 10 Myr, with a median value of 3 Myr, while a surprising 1/3 of them are older than 10 Myr. The study of the spatial distribution of these PMS stars allows us to confirm their cluster membership and to statistically separate them from field stars. This result establishes unambiguously for the first time that star formation in and around the cluster has been ongoing for at least 10-20 Myr, at an apparently increasing rate.

  8. A new methodology to test galaxy formation models using the dependence of clustering on stellar mass

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, David J R; Mitchell, Peter D; Helly, John C; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Lacey, Cedric G; Lagos, Claudia del P; Simha, Vimal; Farrow, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    We present predictions for the two-point correlation function of galaxy clustering as a function of stellar mass, computed using two new versions of the GALFORM semi-analytic galaxy formation model. These models make use of a new high resolution, large volume N-body simulation, set in the WMAP7 cosmology. One model uses a universal stellar initial mass function (IMF), while the other assumes different IMFs for quiescent star formation and bursts. Particular consideration is given to how the assumptions required to estimate the stellar masses of observed galaxies (such as the choice of IMF, stellar population synthesis model and dust extinction) influence the perceived dependence of galaxy clustering on stellar mass. Broad-band spectral energy distribution fitting is carried out to estimate stellar masses for the model galaxies in the same manner as in observational studies. We show clear differences between the clustering signals computed using the true and estimated model stellar masses. As such, we highligh...

  9. Introduction to the cluster formation theory. Application to the nuclear fragmentation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This course reviews the theory of geometrical models of cluster formation in nuclear reactions. After an elementary introduction to the theory of critical phenomena, illustrated by percolation models, we discuss kinetic theories of aggregation and fragmentation. The realization of these ideas in the context of nuclear fragmentation reactions and the search of signals of phase transitions is also reviewed

  10. Crossover model for the work of critical cluster formation in nucleation theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalikmanov, V.I.

    2004-01-01

    We propose a relation for the work of critical cluster formation in nucleation theory W for the systems with long-range interparticle interactions. The method of bridge functions is used to combine the system behavior at sufficiently small quenches, adequately predicted by the classical nucleation t

  11. Star Cluster Formation and Destruction in the Merging Galaxy NGC 3256

    CERN Document Server

    Mulia, Alexander J; Whitmore, Bradley C

    2016-01-01

    We use the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope to study the rich population of young massive star clusters in the main body of NGC 3256, a merging pair of galaxies with a high star formation rate (SFR) and SFR per unit area ($\\Sigma_{\\rm{SFR}}$). These clusters have luminosity and mass functions that follow power laws, $dN/dL \\propto L^{\\alpha}$ with $\\alpha = -2.23 \\pm 0.07$, and $dN/dM \\propto M^{\\beta}$ with $\\beta = -1.86 \\pm 0.34$ for $\\tau < 10$ Myr clusters, similar to those found in more quiescent galaxies. The age distribution can be described by $dN/d\\tau \\propto \\tau ^ \\gamma$, with $\\gamma \\approx -0.67 \\pm 0.08$ for clusters younger than about a few hundred million years, with no obvious dependence on cluster mass. This is consistent with a picture where $\\sim 80 \\%$ of the clusters are disrupted each decade in time. We investigate the claim that galaxies with high $\\Sigma_{\\rm{SFR}}$ form clusters more efficiently than quiescent systems by determining the fraction of sta...

  12. First-principles study of ZnO cluster-decorated carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Guo-Liang; Lin, Chen-Sheng; Cheng, Wen-Dan

    2011-11-01

    We have investigated the structural, electronic and carbon monoxide (CO) detection properties of the ZnO cluster-decorated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by using density functional theory (DFT). The stable structures of hybrid ZnO/SWCNT materials are that the ZnO cluster plane is perpendicular to the surface of SWCNTs with the Zn atoms towards the SWCNTs (Zn atom above axial C-C bond or above the C atom). For the ZnO cluster-decorated semiconducting SWCNTs, the SWCNTs present p-type characteristics which may lead to the decrease of conductance upon illumination with ultraviolet (UV) light. The CO can be adsorbed on the hybrid ZnO/SWCNT materials due to the charge transfer between them. Compared with isolated ZnO clusters or bare SWCNTs, the ZnO/SWCNT network would have excellent CO detection ability due to their suitable adsorption energy and conductivity. PMID:21983431

  13. Ultra-fast oscillation of cobalt clusters encapsulated inside carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the authors have studied the oscillatory characteristics of the 2Co - CNT oscillator systems. Each of these oscillator systems consists of a hosting carbon nanotube (CNT) and two encapsulated cobalt (Co) clusters, and oscillations are initiated by prescribing an initial kinetic energy to each of the two cobalt clusters. The non-symmetric oscillation mode, in which the two cobalt clusters always move towards the same direction, was found to be stable over a wide range of initial energy. However, the symmetric oscillation mode, in which the two cobalt clusters move towards or away from each other, bouncing off each other in each oscillation, is stable only when the initial kinetic energies are lower than a threshold value. Above this threshold, the oscillation becomes increasingly unstable with the increasing initial kinetic energy. The instability is found to take place through transferring energy from the translational motion to the rotational motion of the cobalt clusters, due to the fact that the impact of the cluster-cluster collisions can be slightly off-center, causing the clusters to roll and rock. The rocking motion of the cobalt clusters serves as the channel for the energy transfer. The rocking motion can be retarded and may even be eliminated by reducing the hosting CNT diameter. But a smaller hosting CNT does not always lead to more stable translational oscillation. There apparently exists an optimal CNT for a given size of clusters for stabilizing the translational oscillation. A hosting CNT that is too much smaller than optimum causes severe cobalt-carbon atomic interactions, which lead to losses of energy from the ordered translational motion of clusters to disordered thermal motions of the atoms

  14. Ultra-fast oscillation of cobalt clusters encapsulated inside carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Xiaohong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Xin Hao [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Leonard, Jon N [Advanced Programs, Raytheon Missile Systems, Tucson, AZ 85734 (United States); Chen Guanhua [Department of Chemistry, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Jiang Qing [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)

    2007-11-07

    Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the authors have studied the oscillatory characteristics of the 2Co - CNT oscillator systems. Each of these oscillator systems consists of a hosting carbon nanotube (CNT) and two encapsulated cobalt (Co) clusters, and oscillations are initiated by prescribing an initial kinetic energy to each of the two cobalt clusters. The non-symmetric oscillation mode, in which the two cobalt clusters always move towards the same direction, was found to be stable over a wide range of initial energy. However, the symmetric oscillation mode, in which the two cobalt clusters move towards or away from each other, bouncing off each other in each oscillation, is stable only when the initial kinetic energies are lower than a threshold value. Above this threshold, the oscillation becomes increasingly unstable with the increasing initial kinetic energy. The instability is found to take place through transferring energy from the translational motion to the rotational motion of the cobalt clusters, due to the fact that the impact of the cluster-cluster collisions can be slightly off-center, causing the clusters to roll and rock. The rocking motion of the cobalt clusters serves as the channel for the energy transfer. The rocking motion can be retarded and may even be eliminated by reducing the hosting CNT diameter. But a smaller hosting CNT does not always lead to more stable translational oscillation. There apparently exists an optimal CNT for a given size of clusters for stabilizing the translational oscillation. A hosting CNT that is too much smaller than optimum causes severe cobalt-carbon atomic interactions, which lead to losses of energy from the ordered translational motion of clusters to disordered thermal motions of the atoms.

  15. Carbon cluster ions for a study of the accuracy of ISOLTRAP

    CERN Document Server

    Kellerbauer, A G; Bollen, G; Herfurth, F; Kluge, H J; Kuckein, M; Sauvan, E; Scheidenberger, C; Schweikhard, L

    2003-01-01

    Cyclotron frequency measurements of singly charged carbon clusters $^{12}$C$_{n}^{+}$ were carried out with the ISOLTRAP apparatus. The carbon cluster ions were produced externally by use of laser- induced desorption, fragmentation, and ionization of C$_{60}$ fullerenes. They were injected into and stored in the Penning trap system. The observation of carbon clusters of different sizes has provided detailed insight into the final mass uncertainty achievable with ISOLTRAP and yielded a value of $u(m)/m = 8 \\times 10^{-9}$. Since the unified atomic mass unit is defined as 1/12 the mass of the $^{12}$C atom, ISOLTRAP can now be used to carry out absolute mass measurements.

  16. Large carbon cluster thin film gauges for measuring aerodynamic heat transfer rates in hypersonic shock tunnels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different types of Large Carbon Cluster (LCC) layers are synthesized by a single-step pyrolysis technique at various ratios of precursor mixture. The aim is to develop a fast responsive and stable thermal gauge based on a LCC layer which has relatively good electrical conduction in order to use it in the hypersonic flow field. The thermoelectric property of the LCC layer has been studied. It is found that these carbon clusters are sensitive to temperature changes. Therefore suitable thermal gauges were developed for blunt cone bodies and were tested in hypersonic shock tunnels at a flow Mach number of 6.8 to measure aerodynamic heating. The LCC layer of this thermal gauge encounters high shear forces and a hostile environment for test duration in the range of a millisecond. The results are favorable to use large carbon clusters as a better sensor than a conventional platinum thin film gauge in view of fast responsiveness and stability. (paper)

  17. Carbon antisite clusters in SiC: a possible pathway to the D_{II} center

    OpenAIRE

    Mattausch, Alexander; Bockstedte, Michel; Pankratov, Oleg

    2003-01-01

    The photoluminescence center D_{II} is a persistent intrinsic defect which is common in all SiC polytypes. Its fingerprints are the characteristic phonon replicas in luminescence spectra. We perform ab-initio calculations of vibrational spectra for various defect complexes and find that carbon antisite clusters exhibit vibrational modes in the frequency range of the D_{II} spectrum. The clusters possess very high binding energies which guarantee their thermal stability--a known feature of the...

  18. Influence of Carbon Nanotube Clustering on Mechanical and Electrical Properties of Cement Pastes

    OpenAIRE

    Sung-Hwan Jang; Shiho Kawashima; Huiming Yin

    2016-01-01

    Given the continued challenge of dispersion, for practical purposes, it is of interest to evaluate the impact of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) at different states of clustering on the eventual performance properties of cement paste. This study evaluated the clustering of MWCNTs and the resultant effect on the mechanical and electrical properties when incorporated into cement paste. Cement pastes containing different concentrations of MWCNTs (up to 0.5% by mass of cement) with/without...

  19. Inherent-opening-controlled pattern formation in carbon nanotube arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Xiao; Zhou, Jijie J.; Sansom, Elijah; Gharib, Morteza; Haur, Sow Chorng

    2007-01-01

    We have introduced inherent openings into densely packed carbon nanotube arrays to study self-organized pattern formation when the arrays undergo a wetting–dewetting treatment from nanotube tips. These inherent openings, made of circular or elongated hollows in nanotube mats, serve as dewetting centres, from where liquid recedes from. As the dewetting centres initiate dry zones and the dry zones expand, surrounding nanotubes are pulled away from the dewetting centres by liquid surface tension...

  20. Secondary brown carbon formation via the dicarbonyl imine pathway: nitrogen heterocycle formation and synergistic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampf, C J; Filippi, A; Zuth, C; Hoffmann, T; Opatz, T

    2016-07-21

    Dicarbonyls are known to be important precursors of so-called atmospheric brown carbon, significantly affecting aerosol optical properties and radiative forcing. In this systematic study we report the formation of light-absorbing nitrogen containing compounds from simple 1,2-, 1,3-, 1,4-, and 1,5-dicarbonyl + amine reactions. A combination of spectrophotometric and mass spectrometric techniques was used to characterize reaction products in solutions mimicking atmospheric particulates. Experiments with individual dicarbonyls and dicarbonyl mixtures in ammonium sulfate and glycine solutions demonstrate that nitrogen heterocycles are common structural motifs of brown carbon chromophores formed in such reaction systems. 1,4- and 1,5-dicarbonyl reaction systems, which were used as surrogates for terpene ozonolysis products, showed rapid formation of light-absorbing material and products with absorbance maxima at ∼450 nm. Synergistic effects on absorbance properties were observed in mixed (di-)carbonyl experiments, as indicated by the formation of a strong absorber in ammonium sulfate solutions containing acetaldehyde and acetylacetone. This cross-reaction oligomer shows an absorbance maximum at 385 nm, relevant for the actinic flux region of the atmosphere. This study demonstrates the complexity of secondary brown carbon formation via the imine pathway and highlights that cross-reactions with synergistic effects have to be considered an important pathway for atmospheric BrC formation. PMID:27334793

  1. Corrosion Products and Formation Mechanism During Initial Stage of Atmospheric Corrosion of Carbon Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Kui; DONG Chao-fang; LI Xiao-gang; WANG Fu-ming

    2008-01-01

    The formation and development of corrosion products on carbon steel surface during the initial stage of atmospheric corrosion in a laboratory simulated environment have been studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM)and Raman spectroscopy.The results showed that two different shapes of corrosion products,that is,ring and chain,were formed in the initial stage of corrosion.MnS clusters were found in the nuclei of corrosion products at the active local corrosion sites.The ring-shaped products were composed of lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) and maghemite(γ-Fe2 O3) transformed from lepidocrocite.The chain-type products were goethite (α-FeOOH).A formation mechanism of the corrosion products is proposed.

  2. Cooling, AGN Feedback and Star Formation in Simulated Cool-Core Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yuan; Ruszkowski, Mateusz; Voit, G Mark; O'Shea, Brian W; Donahue, Megan

    2015-01-01

    Numerical simulations of active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback in cool-core galaxy clusters have successfully avoided classical cooling flows, but often produce too much cold gas. We perform adaptive mesh simulations that include momentum-driven AGN feedback, self-gravity, star formation and stellar feedback, focusing on the interplay between cooling, AGN heating and star formation in an isolated cool-core cluster. Cold clumps triggered by AGN jets and turbulence form filamentary structures tens of kpc long. This cold gas feeds both star formation and the supermassive black hole (SMBH), triggering an AGN outburst that increases the entropy of the ICM and reduces its cooling rate. Within 1-2 Gyr, star formation completely consumes the cold gas, leading to a brief shutoff of the AGN. The ICM quickly cools and redevelops multiphase gas, followed by another cycle of star formation/AGN outburst. Within 6.5 Gyr, we observe three such cycles. There is good agreement between our simulated cluster and the observations...

  3. Star Formation in Intermediate Redshift 0.2 < Z < 0.7 Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Cooke, Kevin C; Baum, Stefi A; Tremblay, Grant R; Cox, Isabella G; Gladders, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength photometric and spectroscopic study of 42 Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) in two samples of clusters of galaxies chosen for the study of gravitational lensing. The study's initial sample combines 25 BCGs from the Cluster Lensing and Supernova Survey with Hubble (CLASH) sample and 37 BCGs from the Sloan Giant Arcs Survey (SGAS) with a total redshift range of 0.2 < Z < 0.7. Using archival GALEX, HST, WISE, Herschel, and VLA data we determine the BCGs' stellar mass, radio power, and star formation rates. The radio power is higher than expected if due to star formation, consistent with the BCGs being AGN-powered radio sources. This suggests that the AGN and star formation are both fueled by cold gas in the host galaxy. The specific star formation rate (sSFR) is low and constant with redshift. The mean sSFR is 9.42 * 10^-12 yr^-1 which corresponds to a mass doubling time of 105 billion years. These findings are consistent with models for hierarchical formation of BCGs which su...

  4. A unique model for the variety of multiple populations formation(s) in globular clusters: a temporal sequence

    CERN Document Server

    D'Antona, F; D'Ercole, A; Ventura, P; Milone, A P; Marino, A F; Tailo, M

    2016-01-01

    We explain the multiple populations recently found in the 'prototype' Globular Cluster (GC) NGC 2808 in the framework of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) scenario. The chemistry of the five -or more- populations is approximately consistent with a sequence of star formation events, starting after the supernovae type II epoch, lasting approximately until the time when the third dredge up affects the AGB evolution (age ~90-120Myr), and ending when the type Ia supernovae begin exploding in the cluster, eventually clearing it from the gas. The formation of the different populations requires episodes of star formation in AGB gas diluted with different amounts of pristine gas. In the nitrogen-rich, helium-normal population identified in NGC 2808 by the UV Legacy Survey of GCs, the nitrogen increase is due to the third dredge up in the smallest mass AGB ejecta involved in the star formation of this population. The possibly-iron-rich small population in NGC 2808 may be a result of contamination by a single type Ia su...

  5. Relationship among Photosys- tem Ⅱ carbonic anhydrase, extrinsic polypeptides and manganese cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Effects of Photosystem Ⅱ (PS Ⅱ) extrinsic poly- peptides of oxygen-evolving complex and manganese clusters on PSⅡ carbonic anhydrase (CA) were studied with spinach PSⅡ membranes. The result supported that membrane-bound CA is located in the donor side of PSⅡ. The extrinsic polypeptides played an important role of maintaining CA activity. After removing manganese clusters, oxygen evolution activity was inhibited, but PSⅡ-CA activity was unchanged. It was concluded that CA activity is independent of the presence of manganese clusters, and was not directly correlated with oxygen evolution activity.

  6. The role of low-mass star clusters in massive star formation in Orion

    CERN Document Server

    Rivilla, V M; Jimenez-Serra, I; Rodriguez-Franco, A

    2013-01-01

    To distinguish between the different theories proposed to explain massive star formation, it is crucial to establish the distribution, the extinction, and the density of low-mass stars in massive star-forming regions. We analyzed deep X-ray observations of the Orion massive star-forming region using the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP) catalog. We found that pre-main sequence (PMS) low-mass stars cluster toward the three massive star-forming regions: the Trapezium Cluster (TC), the Orion Hot Core (OHC), and OMC1-S. We derived low-mass stellar densities of 10^{5} stars pc^{-3} in the TC and OMC1-S, and of 10^{6} stars pc^{-3} in the OHC. The close association between the low-mass star clusters with massive star cradles supports the role of these clusters in the formation of massive stars. The X-ray observations show for the first time in the TC that low-mass stars with intermediate extinction are clustered toward the position of the most massive star, which is surrounded by a ring of non-extincted low-ma...

  7. The role of low-mass star clusters in massive star formation. The Orion Case

    CERN Document Server

    Rivilla, V M; Jimenez-Serra, I; Rodriguez-Franco, A

    2013-01-01

    To distinguish between the different theories proposed to explain massive star formation, it is crucial to establish the distribution, the extinction, and the density of low-mass stars in massive star-forming regions. We analyze deep X-ray observations of the Orion massive star-forming region using the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP) catalog. We studied the stellar distribution as a function of extinction, with cells of 0.03 pc x 0.03 pc, the typical size of protostellar cores. We derived stellar density maps and calculated cluster stellar densities. We found that low-mass stars cluster toward the three massive star-forming regions: the Trapezium Cluster (TC), the Orion Hot Core (OHC), and OMC1-S. We derived low-mass stellar densities of 10^{5} stars pc^{-3} in the TC and OMC1-S, and of 10^{6} stars pc^{-3} in the OHC. The close association between the low-mass star clusters with massive star cradles supports the role of these clusters in the formation of massive stars. The X-ray observations show for ...

  8. GOVERNMENTAL CONTROL OF THE FORMATION EFFICIENCY OF EDUCATIONAL CLUSTERS AT THE REGIONAL LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Ivanovna Larionova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Studying the cluster institutionalization processes in the modern practices of the social development allows determining the formation trends of an efficient governmental control system at the subfederal level. The efficiency parameters suggested by the author for the cluster policy implementation for the governmental control purposes, such as density, integrity, complementarity and institutional sphere conductivity will allow controlling the development efficiency of the educational clusters in the modern reality. The research shows that the formation of the governmental control mechanisms and instruments is based on a general study of the institutional aspects of the cluster policy. It has been determined that the main driving force and the main actor of the modernization processes at the regional level is the scientific community. The educational clusters have their potential both for generating fundamental and applied knowledge and for managing innovation projects. Education is a mobile self-organizing system, with its intellectual resources acting as a strategic resource of modernization for the regions of Russia.

  9. Dynamics of the tidal fields and formation of star clusters in galaxy mergers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In interacting galaxies, strong tidal forces disturb the global morphology of the progenitors and give birth to the long stellar, gaseous and dusty tails often observed. In addition to this destructive effect, tidal forces can morph into a transient, protective setting called compressive mode. Such modes then shelter the matter in their midst by increasing its gravitational binding energy. This thesis focuses on the study of this poorly known regime by quantifying its properties thanks to numerical and analytical tools applied to a spectacular merging system of two galaxies, commonly known as the Antennae galaxies. N-body simulations of this pair yield compressive modes in the regions where observations reveal a burst of star formation. Furthermore, characteristic time- and energy scales of these modes match well those of self-gravitating substructures such as star clusters and tidal dwarf galaxies. Comparisons with star formation rates derived from hydrodynamical runs confirm the correlation between the location of compressive modes and sites where star formation is likely to show enhanced activity. Altogether, these results suggest that the compressive modes of tidal fields plays an important role in the formation and evolution of young clusters, at least in a statistical sense, over a lapse of ∼10 million years. Preliminary results from simulations of stellar associations highlight the importance of embedding the clusters in the evolving background galaxies to account precisely for their morphology and internal evolution. These conclusions have been extended to numerous configurations of interacting galaxies and remain robust to a variation of the main parameters that characterize a merger. We report however a clear anti-correlation between the importance of the compressive mode and the distance between the galaxies. Further studies including hydrodynamics are now underway and will help pin down the exact role of the compressive mode on the formation and later

  10. Experimental comparison of impact of auction format on carbon allowance market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cong, Ronggang; Wei, Yi-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Carbon allowances auctions are a good way to achieve the carbon allowance allocations under international agreements to address global climate change. Based on an economic experiment, this paper compares three possible carbon allowance auction formats (uniform price auction, discriminatory price ...

  11. Study of Swarm Behavior in Modeling and Simulation of Cluster Formation in Nanofluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Pirani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling the multiagents cooperative systems inspired from biological self-organized systems in the context of swarm model has been under great considerations especially in the field of the cooperation of multi robots. These models are trying to optimize the behavior of artificial multiagent systems by introducing a consensus, which is a mathematical model between the agents as an intelligence property for each member of the swarm set. The application of this novel approach in the modeling of nonintelligent multi agents systems in the field of cohesion and cluster formation of nanoparticles in nanofluids has been investigated in this study. This goal can be obtained by applying the basic swarm model for agents that are more mechanistic by considering their physical properties such as their mass, diameter, as well as the physical properties of the flow. Clustering in nanofluids is one of the major issues in the study of its effects on heat transfer. Study of the cluster formation dynamics in nanofluids using the swarm model can be useful in controlling the size and formation time of the clusters as well as designing appropriate microchannels, which the nanoparticles are plunged into.

  12. Cluster formation in fluids with competing short-range and long-range interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweatman, Martin B., E-mail: martin.sweatman@ed.ac.uk; Fartaria, Rui [Institute of Materials and Processes, School of Engineering, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JL (United Kingdom); Lue, Leo [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-28

    We investigate the low density behaviour of fluids that interact through a short-ranged attraction together with a long-ranged repulsion (SALR potential) by developing a molecular thermodynamic model. The SALR potential is a model of effective solute interactions where the solvent degrees of freedom are integrated-out. For this system, we find that clusters form for a range of interaction parameters where attractive and repulsive interactions nearly balance, similar to micelle formation in aqueous surfactant solutions. We focus on systems for which equilibrium behaviour and liquid-like clusters (i.e., droplets) are expected, and find in addition a novel coexistence between a low density cluster phase and a high density cluster phase within a very narrow range of parameters. Moreover, a simple formula for the average cluster size is developed. Based on this formula, we propose a non-classical crystal nucleation pathway whereby macroscopic crystals are formed via crystal nucleation within microscopic precursor droplets. We also perform large-scale Monte Carlo simulations, which demonstrate that the cluster fluid phase is thermodynamically stable for this system.

  13. The Celestial Buffet: multiple populations and globular cluster formation in dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Aaron J.; Wadsley, James; Couchman, H. M. P.; Sills, Alison

    2014-04-01

    We present a framework that explains the commonly observed variation in light element abundances in globular clusters. If globular clusters form in the centres of dwarf galaxies, they will be pumped on to larger orbits as star formation progresses. The potential well will only retain the moderate velocity asymptotic giant branch (AGB) ejecta, the expected source of enrichment, but not supernova ejecta. There is no need to increase the initial cluster mass, a requirement of self-enrichment scenarios, as all the stars within the dwarf can contribute. As the clusters move through the dwarf centre they sweep up a mix of AGB ejecta and in-falling pristine gas to form a second generation of stars. The specific mix will vary in time and is thus able to explain the spread in second generation abundances observed in different clusters. The globular clusters will survive to the present day or be stripped as part of the hierarchical merging process of larger galaxies. We illustrate how this process may operate using a high-resolution simulation of a dwarf galaxy at high redshift.

  14. The Celestial Buffet: multiple populations and globular cluster formation in dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Maxwell, Aaron J; Couchman, H M P; Sills, Alison

    2014-01-01

    We present a framework that explains the commonly observed variation in light element abundances in globular clusters. If globular clusters form in the centres of dwarf galaxies, they will be pumped onto larger orbits as star formation progresses. The potential well will only retain the moderate velocity AGB ejecta, the expected source of enrichment, but not supernova ejecta. There is no need to increase the initial cluster mass, a requirement of self-enrichment scenarios, as all the stars within the dwarf can contribute. As the clusters move through the dwarf centre they sweep up a mix of AGB ejecta and in-falling pristine gas to form a second generation of stars. The specific mix will vary in time and is thus able to explain the spread in second generation abundances observed in different clusters. The globular clusters will survive to the present day or be stripped as part of the hierarchical merging process of larger galaxies. We illustrate how this process may operate using a high-resolution simulation o...

  15. Formation of metal and nonmetal clusters by laser and electron beam methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the information of clusters, which was studied experimentally for the materials of metal and nonmetal elements selected in order to the periodic table. These materials were vaporized from the solid state by the irradiation of laser and electron beams. And, in relation with the clustering behavior, the deposition rate at the vapors onto their condensates was studied by measuring the film thickness. Evaporated vapors having clusters of large size are to be favorable for sticking or condensation onto their condensates. The elements giving small values of the cohesive energy such as the 1b group form clusters of sizes distributed widely, were as the elements of large cohesive energy such as the 1a(V,Nb) and 8(Fe, Co) are hardly evaporated and clustered into large sizes. The deposition rate of the evaporated vapors can be largely related with the formation of both monomer and clusters, although due to the energy difference of the beams the relationships are not always comprehensively understood. The 2b group has larger deposition rates and the 5a has smaller rates, although much larger and smaller values are observed for [Mn(7a), Cr(6a)] and [Cu(lb), Ag(1b), Ar(4a)], respectively

  16. Basic Tools for Studies on the Formation and Disruption of Star Clusters: the Luminosity Function

    CERN Document Server

    Gieles, M

    2009-01-01

    The luminosity function (LF) of young star clusters is often approximated by a power law function. For clusters in a wide range of galactic environments this has resulted in fit indices near -2, but on average slightly steeper. A fundamental property of the -2 power law function is that the luminosity of the brightest object (L_max) scales linearly with the total number of clusters, which is close to what is observed. This suggests that the formation of Young Massive Clusters (YMCs) is a result of the size of the sample, i.e. when the SFR is high it is statistically more likely to form YMCs, but no particular physical conditions are required. In this contribution we provide evidence that the LF of young clusters is not a -2 power law, but instead is curved, showing a systematic decrease of the (logarithmic) slope from roughly -1.8 at low luminosities to roughly -2.8 at high luminosities. The empirical LFs can be reproduced by model LFs using an underlying cluster IMF with a Schechter type truncation around M*...

  17. Cluster formation in fluids with competing short-range and long-range interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweatman, Martin B; Fartaria, Rui; Lue, Leo

    2014-03-28

    We investigate the low density behaviour of fluids that interact through a short-ranged attraction together with a long-ranged repulsion (SALR potential) by developing a molecular thermodynamic model. The SALR potential is a model of effective solute interactions where the solvent degrees of freedom are integrated-out. For this system, we find that clusters form for a range of interaction parameters where attractive and repulsive interactions nearly balance, similar to micelle formation in aqueous surfactant solutions. We focus on systems for which equilibrium behaviour and liquid-like clusters (i.e., droplets) are expected, and find in addition a novel coexistence between a low density cluster phase and a high density cluster phase within a very narrow range of parameters. Moreover, a simple formula for the average cluster size is developed. Based on this formula, we propose a non-classical crystal nucleation pathway whereby macroscopic crystals are formed via crystal nucleation within microscopic precursor droplets. We also perform large-scale Monte Carlo simulations, which demonstrate that the cluster fluid phase is thermodynamically stable for this system.

  18. Peptide Bond Formation in Water Mediated by Carbon Disulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leman, Luke J; Huang, Zheng-Zheng; Ghadiri, M Reza

    2015-09-01

    Demonstrating plausible nonenzymatic polymerization mechanisms for prebiotic monomers represents a fundamental goal in prebiotic chemistry. While a great deal is now known about the potentially prebiotic synthesis of amino acids, our understanding of abiogenic polymerization processes to form polypeptides is less well developed. Here, we show that carbon disulfide (CS2), a component of volcanic emission and sulfide mineral weathering, and a widely used synthetic reagent and solvent, promotes peptide bond formation in modest yields (up to ∼20%) from α-amino acids under mild aqueous conditions. Exposure of a variety of α-amino acids to CS2 initially yields aminoacyl dithiocarbamates, which in turn generate reactive 2-thiono-5-oxazolidone intermediates, the thio analogues of N-carboxyanhydrides. Along with peptides, thiourea and thiohydantoin species are produced. Amino acid stereochemistry was preserved in the formation of peptides. Our findings reveal that CS2 could contribute to peptide bond formation, and possibly other condensation reactions, in abiogenic settings. PMID:26308392

  19. The role of systematic innovation management in cluster formations based on ecologically oriented approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.H. Melnyk

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. The aim of the article is to study the role of the system of innovation management in cluster formations on the basis of ecologically oriented creative approach for sustainable development. The results of the analysis. The paper studies the problem of system management in the formation of cluster structures as еcopolis in the transition to environmentally sustainable development, addressed organizational and economic background applications eco-creative approach to the establishment and operation of еcopolis as self- reproduction socio-ecological-economic system. Perspective directions of solving the problems systems management in the context of sustainable development, in our view, next: the reproductive mechanism of the economic transformations directed on «green» development areas; dematerialization activation processes at various levels of management; ecologically oriented economic development (dynamic transformation of the economy, taking into account the principles of sustainable development based on innovation; clustering scientific production and educational specialization (ecopolis. Question the beneficial use of environmental conditions and initiatives arise when a key prerequisite for the formation of ecopolis. Conclusions and directions of further researches. It is shown that one of the best ways to achieve these goals, mechanisms that implement ecologically effective management at the regional level, is to create in the country such as forms of ecopolis. These studies need to continue to develop a system of tools and mechanisms to ensure the implementation of the concept of innovation management system such as cluster formations ecopolis in the context of sustainable development. Also it is required the development the organizational and economic development of system management tools cluster units.

  20. Highly efficient conversion of superoxide to oxygen using hydrophilic carbon clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel, Errol L. G.; Marcano, Daniela C.; Berka, Vladimir; Bitner, Brittany R.; Wu, Gang; Potter, Austin; Fabian, Roderic H.; Pautler, Robia G; Kent, Thomas A; Tsai, Ah-Lim; James M. Tour

    2015-01-01

    Mechanistic studies of nontoxic hydrophilic carbon cluster nanoparticles show that they are able to accomplish the direct conversion of superoxide to dioxygen and hydrogen peroxide. This is accomplished faster than in most single-active-site enzymes, and it is precisely what dioxygen-deficient tissue needs in the face of injury where reactive oxygen species, particularly superoxide, overwhelm the natural enzymes required to remove superoxide. We confirm here that the hydrophilic carbon cluste...

  1. Large-Scale Structure Formation: from the first non-linear objects to massive galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Planelles, S; Bykov, A M

    2014-01-01

    The large-scale structure of the Universe formed from initially small perturbations in the cosmic density field, leading to galaxy clusters with up to 10^15 Msun at the present day. Here, we review the formation of structures in the Universe, considering the first primordial galaxies and the most massive galaxy clusters as extreme cases of structure formation where fundamental processes such as gravity, turbulence, cooling and feedback are particularly relevant. The first non-linear objects in the Universe formed in dark matter halos with 10^5-10^8 Msun at redshifts 10-30, leading to the first stars and massive black holes. At later stages, larger scales became non-linear, leading to the formation of galaxy clusters, the most massive objects in the Universe. We describe here their formation via gravitational processes, including the self-similar scaling relations, as well as the observed deviations from such self-similarity and the related non-gravitational physics (cooling, stellar feedback, AGN). While on i...

  2. The location, clustering, and propagation of massive star formation in giant molecular clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Ochsendorf, B B; Chastenet, J; Tielens, A G G M; Roman-Duval, J

    2016-01-01

    Massive stars are key players in the evolution of galaxies, yet their formation pathway remains unclear. In this work, we use data from several galaxy-wide surveys to build an unbiased dataset of ~700 massive young stellar objects (MYSOs), ~200 giant molecular clouds (GMCs), and ~100 young (<10 Myr) optical stellar clusters (SCs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We employ this data to quantitatively study the location and clustering of massive star formation and its relation to the internal structure of GMCs. We reveal that massive stars do not typically form at the highest column densities nor centers of their parent GMCs at the ~6 pc resolution of our observations. Massive star formation clusters over multiple generations and on size scales much smaller than the size of the parent GMC. We find that massive star formation is significantly boosted in clouds near SCs. Yet, whether a cloud is associated with a SC does not depend on either the cloud's mass or global surface density. These results reveal a conne...

  3. The general mechanisms of Cu cluster formation in the processes of condensation from the gas phase

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I V Chepkasov; Yu Ya Gafner; S L Gafner; S P Bardakhanov

    2015-06-01

    Technological applications of metallic clusters impose very strict requirements for particle size, shape, structure and defect density. Such geometrical characteristics of nanoparticles are mainly determined by the process of their growth. This work represents the basic mechanisms of cluster formation from the gas phase that has been studied on the example of copper. The process of Cu nanoclusters synthesis has been studied by the moleculardynamics method based on tight-binding potentials. It has been shown that depending on the size and temperature of the initial nanoclusters the process of nanoparticle formation can pass through different basic scenarios. The general conditions of different types of particles formation have been defined and clear dependence of the cluster shape from collision temperature of initial conglomerates has been shown. The simulation results demonstrate a very good agreement with the available experimental data. Thus, it has been shown that depending on the specific application of the synthesized particles or in electronics, where particles of a small size with a spherical shape are required, or in catalytic reactions, where the main factor of effectiveness is the maximum surface area with the help of temperature of the system it is possible to get the realization of a certain frequency of this or that scenario of the shape formation of nanocrystalline particles.

  4. Asymptotic Analysis of Coagulation–Fragmentation Equations of Carbon Nanotube Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castellano Gloria

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe possibility of the existence of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs in organic solvents in the form of clusters is discussed. A theory is developed based on abundletmodel for clusters describing the distribution function of clusters by size. The phenomena have a unified explanation in the framework of the bundlet model of a cluster, in accordance with which the free energy of an SWNT involved in a cluster is combined from two components: a volume one, proportional to the number of moleculesnin a cluster, and a surface one, proportional ton1/2. During the latter stage of the fusion process, the dynamics were governed mainly by the displacement of the volume of liquid around the fusion site between the fused clusters. The same order of magnitude for the average cluster-fusion velocity is deduced if the fusion process starts with several fusion sites. Based on a simple kinetic model and starting from the initial state of pure monomers, micellization of rod-like aggregates at high critical micelle concentration occurs in three separated stages. A convenient relation is obtained for at transient stage. At equilibrium, another relation determines dimensionless binding energy α. A relation with surface dilatational viscosity is obtained.

  5. Formation of binary silver sulfide clusters and sulfur sensitization of photographic process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭必先; 崔卫东; 于忠德; 高振; 朱起鹤; 孔繁敖

    1997-01-01

    Formation of silver sulfide binary cluster ions,as well as the effects of silver and sulfur content proportion,the cluster size range,the influence of laser fluence,the UV laser photolysis,etc.,was studied with the laser ablation method and a tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometer.The results show that there exist two different forms of positively charge-bearing cluster ions;[(Ag2S)n Ag] + and [ (Ag2S)n-1 Ag3]+.The most possible forms of the sulfur sensitization centers acting as traps of photoelectrons are [Ag2S] +,[ Ag2S Ag] +,[ Ag2S Ag3]+ and the analogs.

  6. Mapping the formation areas of giant molybdenum blue clusters: a spectroscopic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botar, Bogdan; Ellern, Arkady; Kogerler, Paul

    2012-05-18

    The self-assembly of soluble molybdenum blue species from simple molybdate solutions has primarily been associated with giant mixed-valent wheel-shaped cluster anions, derived from the {MoV/VI154/176} archetypes, and a {MoV/VI368} lemon-shaped cluster. The combined use of Raman spectroscopy and kinetic precipitation as self-assembly monitoring techniques and single-crystal X-ray diffraction is key to mapping the realm of molybdenum blue species by establishing spherical {MoV/VI102}-type Keplerates as an important giant molybdenum blue-type species. We additionally rationalize the empirical effect of reducing agent concentration on the formation of all three relevant skeletal types: wheel, lemon and spheres. Whereas both wheels and the lemon-shaped {MoV/VI368} cluster are obtained from weakly reduced molybdenum blue solutions, considerably higher reduced solutions lead to {MoV/VI102}-type Keplerates.

  7. The galactocentric radius dependent upper mass limit of young star clusters: stochastic star formation ruled out

    CERN Document Server

    Pflamm-Altenburg, Jan; Kroupa, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the distribution function of the masses of young star clusters is universal and can be purely interpreted as a probability density distribution function with a constant upper mass limit. As a result of this picture the masses of the most-massive objects are exclusively determined by the size of the sample. Here we show, with very high confidence, that the masses of the most-massive young star clusters in M33 decrease with increasing galactocentric radius in contradiction to the expectations from a model of a randomly sampled constant cluster mass function with a constant upper mass limit. Pure stochastic star formation is thereby ruled out. We use this example to elucidate how naive analysis of data can lead to unphysical conclusions.

  8. The Structure, Dynamics and Star Formation Rate of the Orion Nebula Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Da Rio, Nicola; Jaehnig, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The spatial morphology and dynamical status of a young, still-forming stellar cluster provide valuable clues on the conditions during the star formation event and the processes that regulated it. We analyze the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), utilizing the latest censuses of its stellar content and membership estimates over a large wavelength range. We determine the center of mass of the ONC, and study the radial dependence of angular substructure. The core appears rounder and smoother than the outskirts, consistent with a higher degree of dynamical processing. At larger distances the departure from circular symmetry is mostly driven by the elongation of the system, with very little additional substructure, indicating a somewhat evolved spatial morphology or an expanding halo. We determine the mass density profile of the cluster, which is well fitted by a power law that is slightly steeper than a singular isothermal sphere. Together with the ISM density, estimated from average stellar extinction, the mass content...

  9. Collective motion and nonequilibrium cluster formation in colonies of gliding bacteria

    CERN Document Server

    Peruani, Fernando; Jakovljevic, Vladimir; Sogaard-Andersen, Lotte; Deutsch, Andreas; Bar, Markus; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.098102

    2013-01-01

    We characterize cell motion in experiments and show that the transition to collective motion in colonies of gliding bacterial cells confined to a monolayer appears through the organization of cells into larger moving clusters. Collective motion by non-equilibrium cluster formation is detected for a critical cell packing fraction around 17%. This transition is characterized by a scale-free power-law cluster size distribution, with an exponent $0.88\\pm0.07$, and the appearance of giant number fluctuations. Our findings are in quantitative agreement with simulations of self-propelled rods. This suggests that the interplay of self-propulsion of bacteria and the rod-shape of bacteria is sufficient to induce collective motion.

  10. ALFALFA HI Content and Star Formation in Virgo Cluster Early-Type Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Koopmann, R A; Haynes, M P; Brosch, N

    2009-01-01

    The ALFALFA (Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA) blind survey is providing a census of HI in galaxies of all types in a range of environments. Here we report on ALFALFA results for Virgo Cluster early-type dwarfs between declinations of 4 and 16 degrees. Less than 2% of the Virgo early-type dwarf population is detected, compared to 70-80% of the Im/BCD dwarf population. Most of the dwarfs detected in HI show evidence for ongoing or recent star formation. Early-type galaxies with HI tend to be located in the outer regions of the cluster and to be brighter. Early-type dwarfs with HI may be undergoing morphological transition due to cluster environmental effects.

  11. Star formation in grand-design, spiral galaxies. Young, massive clusters in the near-infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosbøl, P.; Dottori, H.

    2012-06-01

    Aims: Spiral structure is a prominent feature in many disk galaxies and is often outlined by bright, young objects. We study the distribution of young stellar clusters in grand-design spiral galaxies and thereby determine whether strong spiral perturbations can influence star formation. Methods: Deep, near-infrared JHK-maps were observed for ten nearby, grand-design, spiral galaxies using HAWK-I at the Very Large Telescope. Complete, magnitude-limited candidate lists of star-forming complexes were obtained by searching within the K-band maps. The properties of the complexes were derived from (H - K) - (J - H) diagrams including the identification of the youngest complexes (i.e. ≲7 Myr) and the estimation of their extinction. Results: Young stellar clusters with ages ≲7 Myr have significant internal extinction in the range of AV = 3-7m, while older ones typically have AV pattern, the star formation rate in the arms is higher by a factor of 2-5 than in the inter-arm regions. The CLF in the arms is also shifted towards brighter MK by at least 0.4m. We also detect clusters with colors compatible with Large Magellanic Cloud intermediate age clusters and Milky Way globular clusters. The (J - K) - MK diagram of several galaxies shows, for the brightest clusters, a clear separation between young clusters that are highly attenuated by dust and older ones with low extinction. Conclusions: The gap in the (J - K) - MK diagrams implies that there has been a rapid expulsion of dust at an age around 7 Myr, possibly triggered by supernovae. Strong spiral perturbations concentrate the formation of clusters in the arm regions and shifts their CLF towards brighter magnitudes. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile; program: ESO 82.B-0331.Appendices A-C are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgThe photometric data are available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http

  12. Point-Defect Mediated Bonding of Pt Clusters on (5,5) Carbon Nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, J. G.; Lv, Y. A.; Li, X. N.;

    2009-01-01

    ). The stronger orbital hybridization between the Pt atom and the carbon atom shows larger charge transfers on the defective CNTs than on the defect free CNTs, which allows the strong interaction between Pt clusters and CNTs. On the basis of DFT calculations, CNTs with point defect can be used as the catalyst...

  13. Ions colliding with clusters of fullerenes-Decay pathways and covalent bond formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, F.; Zettergren, H.; Chen, T.; Gatchell, M.; Alexander, J. D.; Stockett, M. H.; Schmidt, H. T.; Cederquist, H. [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Rousseau, P.; Chesnel, J. Y.; Capron, M.; Poully, J. C.; Mery, A.; Maclot, S.; Adoui, L. [CIMAP, UMR 6252, CEA/CNRS/ENSICAEN/Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, bd Henri Becquerel, BP 5133, F-14070 Caen cedex 05 (France); Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Esplanade de la Paix, F-14032 Caen (France); Wang, Y.; Martin, F. [Departamento de Quimica, Modulo 13, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Instituto Madrileno de Estudios Avanzados en Nanociencia (IMDEA-Nano), Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Rangama, J.; Domaracka, A.; Vizcaino, V. [CIMAP, UMR 6252, CEA/CNRS/ENSICAEN/Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, bd Henri Becquerel, BP 5133, F-14070 Caen cedex 05 (France); and others

    2013-07-21

    We report experimental results for the ionization and fragmentation of weakly bound van der Waals clusters of n C{sub 60} molecules following collisions with Ar{sup 2+}, He{sup 2+}, and Xe{sup 20+} at laboratory kinetic energies of 13 keV, 22.5 keV, and 300 keV, respectively. Intact singly charged C{sub 60} monomers are the dominant reaction products in all three cases and this is accounted for by means of Monte Carlo calculations of energy transfer processes and a simple Arrhenius-type [C{sub 60}]{sub n}{sup +}{yields}C{sub 60}{sup +}+(n-1)C{sub 60} evaporation model. Excitation energies in the range of only {approx}0.7 eV per C{sub 60} molecule in a [C{sub 60}]{sub 13}{sup +} cluster are sufficient for complete evaporation and such low energies correspond to ion trajectories far outside the clusters. Still we observe singly and even doubly charged intact cluster ions which stem from even more distant collisions. For penetrating collisions the clusters become multiply charged and some of the individual molecules may be promptly fragmented in direct knock-out processes leading to efficient formations of new covalent systems. For Ar{sup 2+} and He{sup 2+} collisions, we observe very efficient C{sub 119}{sup +} and C{sub 118}{sup +} formation and molecular dynamics simulations suggest that they are covalent dumb-bell systems due to bonding between C{sub 59}{sup +} or C{sub 58}{sup +} and C{sub 60} during cluster fragmentation. In the Ar{sup 2+} case, it is possible to form even smaller C{sub 120-2m}{sup +} molecules (m= 2-7), while no molecular fusion reactions are observed for the present Xe{sup 20+} collisions.

  14. Investigating the Formation of Pedogenic Carbonate Using Stable Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breecker, D. O.; Sharp, Z. D.; McFadden, L.

    2006-12-01

    The stable isotope composition of pedogenic carbonate has been used as a paleoenvironmental proxy because it is thought to form in isotopic equilibrium with soil CO2 and soil water, which are influenced by vegetation type and atmospheric circulation patterns, respectively. However, the isotopic composition of soil CO2 and soil water change seasonally and it is not known what portion of this variability is recorded by the isotopic composition of pedogenic carbonate. It is generally believed that carbonate precipitation in soils is driven by evaporative concentration of Ca ions and/or decreasing soil pCO2. We seek to improve the proxy by determining the seasonality of pedogenic carbonate formation, in particular whether pedogenic carbonate forms during the wet season after individual rainstorms or during seasonal drying following the wet season. This was done by comparing the variations in carbon and oxygen isotope composition of soil CO2 with the isotopic composition of proximally located, newly-formed carbonates. Soil CO2 and incipient pedogenic carbonate coatings were collected in a very young (soil developing in an inset terrace on the piedmont of the Sandia Mountains, central New Mexico. We also measure soil temperatures at the same site. In May 2006, at the end of the driest 6-month period on record in central New Mexico, soil CO2 profiles displayed a 2‰ decrease in δ13C values with depth from 9 to 100 cm. In August 2006, the shapes of the profiles were similar, but the δ13C values were 3-4‰ lower at each depth than in May. These results can be explained by an increase in respiration rate during the latter half of the summer (the wettest on record) when monsoon rainfall maintained high moisture contents in soils across New Mexico. Calculated δ13C values of calcite in equilibrium with May (but not August) soil CO2 agree with measured carbonate δ13C values below 20 cm depth. Very shallow carbonate has anomalously high δ13C values. Measurements of the

  15. Star formation activity in a young galaxy cluster at z=0.866

    CERN Document Server

    Laganá, T F; Martins, L P; da Cunha, E

    2016-01-01

    The galaxy cluster RXJ1257$+$4738 at $z=0.866$ is one of the highest redshift clusters with a richness of multi-wavelength data, and thus a good target to study the star formation-density relation at early epochs. Using a sample of spectroscopically-confirmed cluster members, we derive the star formation rates of our galaxies using two methods, (I) the relation between SFR and total infrared luminosity extrapolated from the observed \\textit{Spitzer} MIPS 24$\\mu$m imaging data, and (II) spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting using the MAGPHYS code, including eight different bands. We show that, for this cluster, the SFR-density relation is very weak and seems to be dominated by the two central galaxies and the SFR presents a mild dependence on stellar mass, with more massive galaxies having higher SFR. However, the specific SFR (SSFR) decreases with stellar mass, meaning that more massive galaxies are forming less stars per unit of mass, and thus suggesting that the increase in star-forming members is driv...

  16. Slow quenching of star formation in OMEGAWINGS clusters: galaxies in transition in the local universe

    CERN Document Server

    Paccagnella, Angela; Poggianti, Bianca Maria; Moretti, Alessia; Fritz, Jacopo; Gullieuszik, Marco; Couch, Warrick; Bettoni, Daniela; Cava, Antonio; Fasano, Giovanni; D'Onofrio, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    The star formation quenching depends on environment, but a full understanding of what mechanisms drive it is still missing. Exploiting a sample of galaxies with masses $M_\\ast>10^{9.8}M_\\odot$, drawn from the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) and its recent extension OMEGAWINGS, we investigate the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of stellar mass (M$_*$) in galaxy clusters at $0.04cluster galaxies with reduced SFRs which is rare in the field. These {\\it transition} galaxies are mainly found within the cluster virial radius ($R_{200}$) but they impact on the SFR-M$_*$ relation only within 0.6R$_{200}$. The ratio of transition to PSF galaxies strongly depends on environment, being larger than 0.6 within 0.3R$_{200}$ and rapidly decreasing with distance, while it is almost flat with $M_*$. As ...

  17. Binary interactions as a possible scenario for the formation of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Dengkai; Li, Lifang

    2014-01-01

    Observations revealed the presence of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters (GCs) that exhibit wide abundance variations and multiple sequences in Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram. We present a scenario for the formation of multiple stellar populations in GCs. In this scenario, initial GCs are single-generation clusters, and our model predicts that the abundance anomalous stars observed in GCs are the merged stars and the accretor stars produced by binary interactions, which are rapidly rotating stars at the moment of their formation and are more massive than normal single stars in the same evolutionary stage. We find that due to their own evolution, these rapidly rotating stars have different surface abundances, effective temperatures and luminosities from normal single stars in the same evolutionary stage. The stellar population with binaries can reproduce two important observational evidences of multiple stellar populations, the Na-O anticorrelation and the multiple sequences in HR diagram. Thi...

  18. Pitfalls when observationally characterizing the relative formation rates of stars and stellar clusters in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kruijssen, J M Diederik

    2015-01-01

    Stars generally form in aggregates, some of which are bound ('clusters') while others are unbound and disperse on short ($\\sim10$ Myr) timescales ('associations'). The fraction of stars forming in bound clusters ($\\Gamma$) is a fundamental outcome of the star formation process. Recent observational and theoretical work has suggested that $\\Gamma$ increases with the gas surface density ($\\Sigma$) or star formation rate (SFR) surface density ($\\Sigma_{\\rm SFR}$), both within galaxies and between different ones. However, a recent paper by Chandar et al. has challenged these results, showing that the $total$ number of stellar aggregates per unit SFR does not vary systematically with the host galaxy's absolute SFR. In this Letter, we show that no variations are expected when no distinction is made between bound and unbound aggregates, because the sum of these two fractions should be close to unity. We also demonstrate that any scaling of $\\Gamma$ with the absolute SFR is much weaker than with $\\Sigma_{\\rm SFR}$, d...

  19. Controlled Formation and Vibrational Characterization of Large Solvated Ionic Clusters in Cryogenic Ion Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garand, Etienne; Marsh, Brett; Voss, Jonathan; Duffy, Erin M.

    2016-06-01

    An experimental approach for the formation of solvated ionic clusters and their vibrational spectroscopy will be presented. This recently developed apparatus combines an electrospray ionization source, two temperature controlled cryogenic ion traps and a time-of-flight infrared photofragmentation spectrometer, to allow for a universal and controlled formation and characterization of solvent clusters around ionic core as well as product of ion-molecule reaction. Recent results on the spectroscopy of such solvated ions, will be presented and discussed. In particular, this talk will present the structural evolution of glycylglycine as a function of stepwise solvation, and show how the presence of just a few water can modify the geometry of this model peptide. I will also present results solvation of ion that do not form hydrogen bond or strongly interactions with the solvent.

  20. Shallowed cusp slope of dark matter in disc galaxy formation through clump clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Inoue, Shigeki

    2011-01-01

    Cusp-core problem is a controversial problem on galactic dark matter haloes. Cosmological N-body simulations has demonstrated that galactic dark matter haloes have a cuspy density profile at the centre. However, baryonic physics may affect the dark matter density profile. For example, it was suggested that adiabatic contraction of baryonic gas makes the dark matter cusp steeper. However, it is still an open question if the gas falls into the galactic centre in smooth adiabatic manner. Recent numerical studies suggested that disc galaxies might experience clumpy phase in their early stage of the disc formation, which could also explain clump clusters and chain galaxies observed in high redshift Universe. In this letter, using numerical simulations with an isolated model, we study how the dark matter halo responds to these clumpy nature of baryon component in disc galaxy formation through the clump cluster phase. Our simulation demonstrates that such clumpy phase leads to a shallower density profile of the dark...

  1. Oxygen-18 and carbon-13 in the carbonates of the Salina formation of southwestern Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Shea, K.J.; Miles, M.C.; Fritz, P.; Frape, S.K.; Lawson, D.E.

    1988-02-01

    The oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of the carbonates of the Upper Silurian Salina formation of the Michigan Basin was investigated to aid in interpretation of depositional environments. /sup 13/C results indicate that a change from generally anoxic bottom conditions to oxic conditions occurred during deposition of the salt and anhydrite evaporite unit. The lower organic-rich carbonate units were deposited in a shallow-water, evaporitic setting, most likely adjacent to a sabkha-type environment. A positive water balance maintained the anoxic conditions and buffered the carbon isotopes. Above the salt and anhydrite evaporite, the isotopic composition suggests that the development of a similar depositional environment, a sub-aerial prograding sabkha, occurred over wide areas of the basin. /sup 18/O results support the conclusion that Silurian oceans were depleted in /sup 18/O with respect to modern oceans by 5-6%. 56 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Study of small carbon and semiconductor clusters using negative ion threshold photodetachment spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bonding and electronics of several small carbon and semiconductor clusters containing less than ten atoms are probed using negative ion threshold photodetachment (zero electron kinetic energy, or ZEKE) spectroscopy. ZEKE spectroscopy is a particularly advantageous technique for small cluster study, as it combines mass selection with good spectroscopic resolution. The ground and low-lying electronic states of small clusters in general can be accessed by detaching an electron from the ground anion state. The clusters studied using this technique and described in this work are C6-/C6, Sin-/Sin (n = 2, 3, 4), Ge2-/Ge2, In2P-/In2P,InP2-/InP2, and Ga2As-. The total photodetachment cross sections of several other small carbon clusters and the ZEKE spectrum of the I-·CH3I SN2 reaction complex are also presented to illustrate the versatility of the experimental apparatus. Clusters with so few atoms do not exhibit bulk properties. However, each specie exhibits bonding properties that relate to the type of bonding found in the bulk. C6, as has been predicted, exhibits a linear cumulenic structure, where double bonds connect all six carbon atoms. This double bonding reflects how important π bonding is in certain phases of pure carbon (graphite and fullerenes). The symmetric stretch frequencies observed in the C6- spectra, however, are in poor agreement with the calculated values. Also observed as sharp structure in total photodetachment cross section scans was an excited anion state bound by only ∼40 cm-1 relative to the detachment continuum. This excited anion state appears to be a valence bound state, possible because of the high electron affinity of C6, and the open shell of the anion

  3. Cosmology and Astrophysics from Relaxed Galaxy Clusters V: Consistency with Cold Dark Matter Structure Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Mantz, Adam B; Morris, R Glenn

    2016-01-01

    This is the fifth in a series of papers studying the astrophysics and cosmology of massive, dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters. Our sample comprises 40 clusters identified as being dynamically relaxed and hot in Papers I and II of this series. Here we use constraints on cluster mass profiles from X-ray data to test some of the basic predictions of cosmological structure formation in the Cold Dark Matter (CDM) paradigm. We present constraints on the concentration--mass relation for massive clusters, finding a power-law mass dependence with a slope of $\\kappa_m=-0.16\\pm0.07$, in agreement with CDM predictions. For this relaxed sample, the relation is consistent with a constant as a function of redshift (power-law slope with $1+z$ of $\\kappa_\\zeta=-0.17\\pm0.26$), with an intrinsic scatter of $\\sigma_{\\ln c}=0.16\\pm0.03$. We investigate the shape of cluster mass profiles over the radial range probed by the data (typically $\\sim50$kpc--1Mpc), and test for departures from the simple Navarro, Frenk & White (NFW...

  4. KAT-7 Science Verification: Cold Gas, Star Formation, and Substructure in the Nearby Antlia Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Hess, Kelley M; Carignan, Claude; Passmoor, Sean S; Goedhart, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    The Antlia Cluster is a nearby, dynamically young structure, and its proximity provides a valuable opportunity for detailed study of galaxy and group accretion onto clusters. We present a deep HI mosaic completed as part of spectral line commissioning of the Karoo Array Telescope (KAT-7), and identify infrared counterparts from the WISE extended source catalog to study neutral atomic gas content and star formation within the cluster. We detect 37 cluster members out to a radius of ~0.9 Mpc with M_HI > 5x10^7 M_Sun. Of these, 35 are new HI detections, 27 do not have previous spectroscopic redshift measurements, and one is the Compton thick Seyfert II, NGC 3281, which we detect in HI absorption. The HI galaxies lie beyond the X-ray emitting region 200 kpc from the cluster center and have experienced ram pressure stripping out to at least 600 kpc. At larger radii, they are distributed asymmetrically suggesting accretion from surrounding filaments. Combining HI with optical redshifts, we perform a detailed dynami...

  5. The structure, dynamics, and star formation rate of the Orion nebula cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spatial morphology and dynamical status of a young, still-forming stellar cluster provide valuable clues to the conditions during the star formation event and the processes that regulated it. We analyze the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), utilizing the latest censuses of its stellar content and membership estimates over a large wavelength range. We determine the center of mass of the ONC and study the radial dependence of angular substructure. The core appears rounder and smoother than the outskirts, which is consistent with a higher degree of dynamical processing. At larger distances, the departure from circular symmetry is mostly driven by the elongation of the system, with very little additional substructure, indicating a somewhat evolved spatial morphology or an expanding halo. We determine the mass density profile of the cluster, which is well fitted by a power law that is slightly steeper than a singular isothermal sphere. Together with the interstellar medium density, which is estimated from average stellar extinction, the mass content of the ONC is insufficient by a factor ∼1.8 to reproduce the observed velocity dispersion from virialized motions, in agreement with previous assessments that the ONC is moderately supervirial. This may indicate recent gas dispersal. Based on the latest estimates for the age spread in the system and our density profiles, we find that at the half-mass radius, 90% of the stellar population formed within ∼5-8 free-fall times (t ff). This implies a star formation efficiency per t ff of εff ∼ 0.04-0.07 (i.e., relatively slow and inefficient star formation rates during star cluster formation).

  6. Neutral molecular cluster formation of sulfuric acid dimethylamine observed in real time under atmospheric conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Kürten, Andreas; Jokinen, Tuija; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Junninen, Heikki; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    For atmospheric sulfuric acid (SA) concentrations the presence of dimethylamine (DMA) at mixing ratios of several parts per trillion by volume can explain observed boundary layer new particle formation rates. However, the concentration and molecular composition of the neutral (uncharged) clusters have not been reported so far due to the lack of suitable instrumentation. Here we report on experiments from the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Res...

  7. Slow Quenching of Star Formation in OMEGAWINGS Clusters: Galaxies in Transition in the Local Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paccagnella, A.; Vulcani, B.; Poggianti, B. M.; Moretti, A.; Fritz, J.; Gullieuszik, M.; Couch, W.; Bettoni, D.; Cava, A.; D'Onofrio, M.; Fasano, G.

    2016-01-01

    The star formation quenching depends on environment, but a full understanding of what mechanisms drive it is still missing. Exploiting a sample of galaxies with masses {M}*\\gt {10}9.8{M}⊙ , drawn from the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) and its recent extension OMEGAWINGS, we investigate the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of stellar mass (M{}*) in galaxy clusters at 0.04\\lt z\\lt 0.07. We use non-member galaxies at 0.02 relation in the two environments, but detect a population of cluster galaxies with reduced SFRs, which is rare in the field. These transition galaxies are mainly found within the cluster virial radius (R200), but they impact on the SFR-M{}* relation only within 0.6R200. The ratio of transition to pure star-forming galaxies strongly depends on environment, being larger than 0.6 within 0.3R200 and rapidly decreasing with distance, while it is almost flat with M*. As galaxies move downward from the SFR-M{}* main sequence, they become redder and present older luminosity- and mass-weighted ages. These trends, together with the analysis of the star formation histories, suggest that transition galaxies have had a reduced SFR for the past 2-5 Gyr. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the interaction of galaxies with the intracluster medium via strangulation causes a gradual shut down of star formation, giving birth to an evolved population of galaxies in transition from being star forming to becoming passive.

  8. Coarse-Grained Model for Colloidal Protein Interactions, B22, and Protein Cluster Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco, Marco A.; Sahin, Eric; Robinson, Anne S.; Roberts, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Reversible protein cluster formation is an important initial step in the processes of native and non-native protein aggregation, but involves relatively long time and length scales for detailed atomistic simulations and extensive mapping of free energy landscapes. A coarse-grained (CG) model is presented to semi-quantitatively characterize the thermodynamics and key configurations involved in the landscape for protein oligomerization, as well as experimental measures of interactions such as t...

  9. Cosmology and astrophysics from relaxed galaxy clusters - V. Consistency with cold dark matter structure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantz, A. B.; Allen, S. W.; Morris, R. G.

    2016-10-01

    This is the fifth in a series of papers studying the astrophysics and cosmology of massive, dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters. Our sample comprises 40 clusters identified as being dynamically relaxed and hot in Papers I and II of this series. Here we use constraints on cluster mass profiles from X-ray data to test some of the basic predictions of cosmological structure formation in the cold dark matter (CDM) paradigm. We present constraints on the concentration-mass relation for massive clusters, finding a power-law mass dependence with a slope of κm = -0.16 ± 0.07, in agreement with CDM predictions. For this relaxed sample, the relation is consistent with a constant as a function of redshift (power-law slope with 1 + z of κζ = -0.17 ± 0.26), with an intrinsic scatter of σln c = 0.16 ± 0.03. We investigate the shape of cluster mass profiles over the radial range probed by the data (typically ˜50 kpc-1 Mpc), and test for departures from the simple Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) form, for which the logarithmic slope of the density profile tends to -1 at small radii. Specifically, we consider as alternatives the generalized NFW (GNFW) and Einasto parametrizations. For the GNFW model, we find an average value of (minus) the logarithmic inner slope of β = 1.02 ± 0.08, with an intrinsic scatter of σβ = 0.22 ± 0.07, while in the Einasto case we constrain the average shape parameter to be α = 0.29 ± 0.04 with an intrinsic scatter of σα = 0.12 ± 0.04. Our results are thus consistent with the simple NFW model on average, but we clearly detect the presence of intrinsic, cluster-to-cluster scatter about the average.

  10. "Dark" systems in globular clusters: GWs emission and limits on the formation of IMBHs

    CERN Document Server

    Arca-Sedda, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Many observed globular clusters (GCs) seem to show a central overabundance of mass whose nature has not yet fully understood. Indeed, it is not clear whether it is due to a central intermediate mass black hole (IMBH) or to a massive stellar system (MSS) composed of mass segregated stars. In this contribution we present a semi-analytic approach to the problem complemented by 12 $N$-body simulations in which we followed the formation of MSSs in GCs with masses up to $3\\times 10^5$ \\Ms. Some implications for the formation of IMBHs and gravitational waves emission are discussed in perspective of a future work.

  11. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy on nanostructured carbon electrodes grown by supersonic cluster beam deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettini, Luca Giacomo; Bardizza, Giorgio; Podesta, Alessandro; Milani, Paolo; Piseri, Paolo, E-mail: piseri@mi.infn.it [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica and CIMaINa (Italy)

    2013-02-15

    Nanostructured porous films of carbon with density of about 0.5 g/cm{sup 3} and 200 nm thickness were deposited at room temperature by supersonic cluster beam deposition (SCBD) from carbon clusters formed in the gas phase. Carbon film surface topography, determined by atomic force microscopy, reveals a surface roughness of 16 nm and a granular morphology arising from the low kinetic energy ballistic deposition regime. The material is characterized by a highly disordered carbon structure with predominant sp2 hybridization as evidenced by Raman spectroscopy. The interface properties of nanostructured carbon electrodes were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy employing KOH 1 M solution as aqueous electrolyte. An increase of the double layer capacitance is observed when the electrodes are heat treated in air or when a nanostructured nickel layer deposited by SCBD on top of a sputter deposited film of the same metal is employed as a current collector instead of a plain metallic film. This enhancement is consistent with an improved charge injection in the active material and is ascribed to the modification of the electrical contact at the interface between the carbon and the metal current collector. Specific capacitance values up to 120 F/g have been measured for the electrodes with nanostructured metal/carbon interface.

  12. Carbon in Red Giants in Globular Clusters and Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kirby, Evan N; Zhang, Andrew J; Deng, Michelle; Cohen, Judith G; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Shetrone, Matthew D; Lee, Young Sun; Rizzi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    We present carbon abundances of red giants in Milky Way globular clusters and dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). Our sample includes measurements of carbon abundances for 154 giants in the clusters NGC 2419, M68, and M15 and 398 giants in the dSphs Sculptor, Fornax, Ursa Minor, and Draco. This sample doubles the number of dSph stars with measurements of [C/Fe]. The [C/Fe] ratio in the clusters decreases with increasing luminosity above log(L/L_sun) ~= 1.6, which can be explained by deep mixing in evolved giants. The same decrease is observed in dSphs, but the initial [C/Fe] of the dSph giants is not uniform. Stars in dSphs at lower metallicities have larger [C/Fe] ratios. We hypothesize that [C/Fe] (corrected to the initial carbon abundance) declines with increasing [Fe/H] due to the metallicity dependence of the carbon yield of asymptotic giant branch stars and due to the increasing importance of Type Ia supernovae at higher metallicities. We also identified 11 very carbon-rich giants (8 previously known) in...

  13. FORMATION OF BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARIES IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inspired by the recent identification in extragalactic globular clusters of the first candidate black hole-white dwarf (BH-WD) X-ray binaries, where the compact accretors may be stellar-mass black holes (BHs), we explore how such binaries could be formed in a dynamical environment. We provide analyses of the formation rates via well-known formation channels like binary exchange and physical collisions and propose that the only possibility of forming BH-WD binaries is via coupling these usual formation channels with subsequent hardening and/or triple formation. In particular, we find that the most important mechanism for the creation of a BH-WD X-ray binary from an initially dynamically formed BH-WD binary is mass transfer induced in a triple system via the Kozai mechanism. Furthermore, we find that BH-WD binaries that evolve into X-ray sources can be formed by exchanges of a BH into a WD-WD binary or possibly by collisions of a BH and a giant star. If BHs undergo significant evaporation from the cluster or form a completely detached subcluster of BHs, then we cannot match the observationally inferred production rates even using the most optimistic estimates of formation rates. To explain the observations with stellar-mass BH-WD binaries, at least 1% of all formed BHs, or presumably 10% of the BHs present in the core now, must be involved in interactions with the rest of the core stellar population.

  14. Machine-Part cell formation through visual decipherable clustering of Self Organizing Map

    CERN Document Server

    Chattopadhyay, Manojit; Dan, Pranab K; 10.1007/s00170-010-2802-4

    2011-01-01

    Machine-part cell formation is used in cellular manufacturing in order to process a large variety, quality, lower work in process levels, reducing manufacturing lead-time and customer response time while retaining flexibility for new products. This paper presents a new and novel approach for obtaining machine cells and part families. In the cellular manufacturing the fundamental problem is the formation of part families and machine cells. The present paper deals with the Self Organising Map (SOM) method an unsupervised learning algorithm in Artificial Intelligence, and has been used as a visually decipherable clustering tool of machine-part cell formation. The objective of the paper is to cluster the binary machine-part matrix through visually decipherable cluster of SOM color-coding and labelling via the SOM map nodes in such a way that the part families are processed in that machine cells. The Umatrix, component plane, principal component projection, scatter plot and histogram of SOM have been reported in t...

  15. Constraining the high redshift formation of black hole seeds in nuclear star clusters with gas inflows

    CERN Document Server

    Lupi, Alessandro; Devecchi, Bernadetta; Galanti, Giorgio; Volonteri, Marta

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we explore a possible route of black hole seed formation that appeal to a model by Davies, Miller & Bellovary who considered the case of the dynamical collapse of a dense cluster of stellar black holes subjected to an inflow of gas. Here, we explore this case in a broad cosmological context. The working hypotheses are that (i) nuclear star clusters form at high redshifts in pre-galactic discs hosted in dark matter halos, providing a suitable environment for the formation of stellar black holes in their cores, (ii) major central inflows of gas occur onto these clusters due to instabilities seeded in the growing discs and/or to mergers with other gas-rich halos, and that (iii) following the inflow, stellar black holes in the core avoid ejection due to the steepening to the potential well, leading to core collapse and the formation of a massive seed of $<~ 1000\\, \\rm M_\\odot$. We simulate a cosmological box tracing the build up of the dark matter halos and there embedded baryons, and explore...

  16. On the composition of ammonia-sulfuric acid clusters during aerosol particle formation

    CERN Document Server

    Schobesberger, S; Bianchi, F; Rondo, L; Duplissy, J; Kürten, A; Ortega, I K; Metzger, A; Schnitzhofer, R; Almeida, J; Amorim, A; Dommen, J; Dunne, E M; Ehn, M; Gagné, S; Ickes, L; Junninen, H; Hansel, A; Kerminen, V-M; Kirkby, J; Kupc, A; Laaksonen, A; Lehtipalo, K; Mathot, S; Onnela, A; Petäjä, T; Riccobono, F; Santos, F D; Sipilä, M; Tomé, A; Tsagkogeorgas, G; Viisanen, Y; Wagner, P E; Wimmer, D; Curtius, J; Donahue, N M; Baltensperger, U; Kulmala, M; Worsnop, D R

    2014-01-01

    The formation of particles from precursor vapors is an important source of atmospheric aerosol. Research at the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) facility at CERN tries to elucidate which vapors are responsible for this new particle formation, and how in detail it proceeds. Initial measurement campaigns at the CLOUD stainless-steel aerosol chamber focused on investigating particle formation from ammonia (NH3) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4). Experiments were conducted in the presence of water, ozone and sulfur dioxide. Contaminant trace gases were suppressed at the technological limit. For this study, we mapped out the compositions of small NH3-H2SO4 clusters over a wide range of atmospherically relevant environmental conditions. We covered [NH3] in the range from 10. Positively charged clusters grew on average by Δm / Δn = 1.05 and were only observed at sufficiently high [NH3] / [H2SO4]. The H2SO4 molecules of these clusters are partially neutralized by NH3, in close resemblance to the acid-base bindings ...

  17. A Theoretical Assessment of the Formation of IT clusters in Kazakhstan: Approaches and Positive Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anel A. Kireyeva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this research is to develop new theoretical approaches of the formation of IT clusters in order to strengthen of trend of the innovative industrialization and competitiveness of the country. Keeping with the previous literature, this study determines by the novelty of the problem, concerning the formation of IT clusters, which can become a driving force of transformation due to the interaction, improving efficiency and introducing advanced technology. In this research, we used conceptual approach employs the study of different conceptual views of scientists on a specific research object; structured approach involves determination of properties of a whole object by identifying the different relationships; system approach aims to develop research methods and design of complex objects – systems of different types. This study allows to conclude that IT-clusters will be most effective when they evolve naturally, originating under the action of internal forces of consolidation of  innovative, information and communications infrastructure (industrial parks, techno polis, research laboratories and business incubators, formation of soft infrastructure, that can help to find quick, innovative and creative ways to solve problems.

  18. Pitfalls when observationally characterizing the relative formation rates of stars and stellar clusters in galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik; Bastian, Nate

    2016-03-01

    Stars generally form in aggregates, some of which are bound (`clusters') while others are unbound and disperse on short ({˜ }10 { Myr}) time-scales (`associations'). The fraction of stars forming in bound clusters (Γ) is a fundamental outcome of the star formation process. Recent observational and theoretical work has suggested that Γ increases with the gas surface density (Σ) or star formation rate (SFR) surface density (ΣSFR), both within galaxies and between different ones. However, a recent paper by Chandar et al. has challenged these results, showing that the total number of stellar aggregates per unit SFR does not vary systematically with the host galaxy's absolute SFR. In this Letter, we show that no variations are expected when no distinction is made between bound and unbound aggregates, because the sum of these two fractions should be close to unity. We also demonstrate that any scaling of Γ with the absolute SFR is much weaker than with ΣSFR, due to the mass-radius-SFR relation of star-forming `main-sequence' galaxies. The environmental variation of Γ should therefore be probed as a function of area-normalized quantities, such as Σ or ΣSFR. We present a set of guidelines for meaningful observational tests of cluster formation theories and show that these resolve the reported discrepancy.

  19. Ab Initio Investigation of the Structures of Fe-Doped Carbon Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovato, Christella; Brownrigg, Clifton; Hira, Ajit

    2012-02-01

    We continue our interest in the theoretical study of carbon clusters to examine the effects of the doping of small carbon clusters (Cn, n = 2 - 15) with iron atoms. This work applies the hybrid ab initio methods of quantum chemistry to derive the different FemCn (m = 1-3) geometries. Of particular interest are linear, fan, and cyclic geometries. Electronic energies, rotational constants, dipole moments, and vibrational frequencies for these geometries are calculated. Exploration of the singlet, triplet, quintet, and septet potential energy surfaces is performed. The type of bonding in terms of competition between sp^2 and sp^3 hybridization is examined, with a view to addressing the possibility of the stabilization of the doped carbon nano-particles in a diamond type structure. The potential for the existence of new pathways to the fabrication of nanotubes is explored.

  20. Tribological behavior and film formation mechanisms of carbon nanopearls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Chad Nicholas

    amounts of undesired carbon (99.36 atomic % carbon as measured by XPS) because carbon rather than gold was sputtered from the magnetron target surface. Carbon impurities of co-deposited films were reduced with increasing oxygen concentration using argon-oxygen mixtures; EQP analysis showed that reactive oxygen species such as O and O+ effectively remove unwanted carbon during co-deposition processes. The tribological behavior of films deposited using simultaneous MAPLE and magnetron sputtering was similar to hydrogenated Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) in that a structure transformation (graphitization) occurred in the wear track during cyclic loading resulting in low friction coefficients. In fact, carbon and hydrocarbon fragments from solvent vapor were incorporated into the films leading to formation of hydrogenated DLC-gold composites. This behavior occurs for frozen toluene MAPLE targets regardless of whether they are loaded with CNPs. The exception to this is in a humid air environment where higher friction coefficients are observed for CNP-loaded targets. In these studies, the potential of carbon nanopearls to create environmentally stable solid lubricants has been demonstrated for future aerospace needs. This development could drastically change current approaches of lubrication for space applications. Additionally a new MAPLE-sputtering process in which solvent-dispersed nano-scale materials are incorporated into metal and ceramic matrices was developed to enable synthesis of novel nanostructured hybrid materials for a variety of applications.

  1. Clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinfei Liu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available DBSCAN is a well-known density-based clustering algorithm which offers advantages for finding clusters of arbitrary shapes compared to partitioning and hierarchical clustering methods. However, there are few papers studying the DBSCAN algorithm under the privacy preserving distributed data mining model, in which the data is distributed between two or more parties, and the parties cooperate to obtain the clustering results without revealing the data at the individual parties. In this paper, we address the problem of two-party privacy preserving DBSCAN clustering. We first propose two protocols for privacy preserving DBSCAN clustering over horizontally and vertically partitioned data respectively and then extend them to arbitrarily partitioned data. We also provide performance analysis and privacy proof of our solution..

  2. Hα Star Formation Rates for z>1 Galaxy Clusters in the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey Using WFC3 IR Grism Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeimann, Gregory; Stanford, A.; Brodwin, M.; Dey, A.; Stern, D.; Gonzalez, A.

    2011-05-01

    We present new HST WFC3 grism data for 17 z>1 galaxy clusters in the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS). Using the G141 grism (λ = 1.10 - 1.65 μm, 46.5 A/pixel), we identified ˜5-15 new cluster members in each cluster candidate with a visual inspection of emission line galaxies in the reduced 1-d and 2-d spectral extractions. Given the redshift range of the cluster candidates and the wavelength coverage of the G141 grism, the emission line most identified was the blended Hα+NII. Correlations found in the literature between the EW of Hα+NII and the line ratio of NII to Hα were used to deblend the two fluxes. Hα emission was used as an indicator of star formation. Our program is sensitive to an unobscured star formation rate of 4 M⊙ / Year for z=1.5 and a nominal 1:4 ratio of NII to Hα. Concurrent MIPS 24μm data allows for the comparison of different SFR tracers. Whenever possible, we also use the ratio of Hβ/Hα to estimate dust obscuration and correct the SFRs. This dataset allows the study of a wide-range of star formation rates in dense cluster cores during the peak epoch of galaxy formation.

  3. On the formation of sulphuric acid – amine clusters in varying atmospheric conditions and its influence on atmospheric new particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. K. Ortega

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Sulphuric acid is a key component in atmospheric new particle formation. However, sulphuric acid alone does not form stable enough clusters to initiate particle formation in atmospheric conditions. Strong bases, such as amines, have been suggested to stabilize sulphuric acid clusters and thus participate in particle formation. We modelled the formation rate of clusters with two sulphuric acid and two amine molecules (JA2B2 at varying atmospherically relevant conditions with respect to concentrations of sulphuric acid ([H2SO4], dimethylamine ([DMA] and trimethylamine ([TMA], temperature and relative humidity (RH. We also tested how the model results change if we assume that the clusters with two sulphuric acid and two amine molecules would act as seeds for heterogeneous nucleation of organic vapours (other than amines with higher atmospheric concentrations than sulphuric acid. The modelled formation rates JA2B2 were functions of sulphuric acid concentration with close to quadratic dependence, which is in good agreement with atmospheric observations of the connection between the particle formation rate and sulphuric acid concentration. The coefficients KA2B2 connecting the cluster formation rate and sulphuric acid concentrations as JA2B2=KA2B2[H2SO4]2 turned out to depend also on amine concentrations, temperature and relative humidity. We compared the modelled coefficients KA2B2 with the corresponding coefficients calculated from the atmospheric observations (Kobs from environments with varying temperatures and levels of anthropogenic influence. By taking into account the modelled behaviour of JA2B2 as a function of [H2SO4], temperature and RH, the atmospheric particle formation rate was reproduced more closely than with the traditional semi-empirical formulae based on sulphuric acid concentration only. The formation rates of clusters with two sulphuric acid and two amine molecules with different amine compositions (DMA or TMA or one of both had

  4. A New Paradigm for Carbon-Carbon Bond Formation: Aerobic, Copper-Templated Cross-Coupling

    OpenAIRE

    Villalobos, Janette M.; Srogl, Jiri; Liebeskind, Lanny S.

    2007-01-01

    Thiol esters and boronic acids react to produce ketones under aerobic conditions in the presence of catalytic quantities of a CuI or CuII salt. The reaction occurs at reasonable rates between room temperature and 50 °C at neutral pH using thiol esters derived from bulky 2° amides of thiosalicylamides such as those based on N-tert-butyl-2-mercaptobenzamide. In this mechanistically unprecedented reaction system the carbon-carbon bond formation occurs through templating of the thiol ester and th...

  5. Analyses on the formation of atmospheric particles and stabilized sulphuric acid clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paasonen, P.

    2012-11-01

    Aerosol particles have various effects on our life. They affect the visibility and have diverse health effects, but are also applied in various applications, from drug inhalators to pesticides. Additionally, aerosol particles have manifold effects on the Earths' radiation budget and thus on the climate. The strength of the aerosol climate effect is one of the factors causing major uncertainties in the global climate models predicting the future climate change. Aerosol particles are emitted to atmosphere from various anthropogenic and biogenic sources, but they are also formed from precursor vapours in many parts of the world in a process called atmospheric new particle formation (NPF). The uncertainties in aerosol climate effect are partly due to the current lack of knowledge of the mechanisms governing the atmospheric NPF. It is known that gas phase sulphuric acid most certainly plays an important role in atmospheric NPF. However, also other vapours are needed in NPF, but the exact roles or even identities of these vapours are currently not exactly known. In this thesis I present some of the recent advancements in understanding of the atmospheric NPF in terms of the roles of the participating vapours and the meteorological conditions. Since direct measurements of new particle formation rate in the initial size scale of the formed particles (below 2 nm) are so far infrequent in both spatial and temporal scales, indirect methods are needed. The work presented on the following pages approaches the NPF from two directions: by analysing the observed formation rates of particles after they have grown to sizes measurable with widely applied instruments (2 nm or larger), and by measuring and modelling the initial sulphuric acid cluster formation. The obtained results can be summarized as follows. (1) The observed atmospheric new particle formation rates are typically connected with sulphuric acid concentration to the power close to two. (2) Also other compounds, most

  6. A modified Fuzzy C-Means (FCM) Clustering algorithm and its application on carbonate fluid identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lifeng; Sun, Sam Zandong; Yu, Hongyu; Yue, Xingtong; Zhang, Dong

    2016-06-01

    Considering the fact that the fluid distribution in carbonate reservoir is very complicated and the existing fluid prediction methods are not able to produce ideal predicted results, this paper proposes a new fluid identification method in carbonate reservoir based on the modified Fuzzy C-Means (FCM) Clustering algorithm. Both initialization and globally optimum cluster center are produced by Chaotic Quantum Particle Swarm Optimization (CQPSO) algorithm, which can effectively avoid the disadvantage of sensitivity to initial values and easily falling into local convergence in the traditional FCM Clustering algorithm. Then, the modified algorithm is applied to fluid identification in the carbonate X area in Tarim Basin of China, and a mapping relation between fluid properties and pre-stack elastic parameters will be built in multi-dimensional space. It has been proven that this modified algorithm has a good ability of fuzzy cluster and its total coincidence rate of fluid prediction reaches 97.10%. Besides, the membership of different fluids can be accumulated to obtain respective probability, which can evaluate the uncertainty in fluid identification result.

  7. Formation of nanoclusters on silicon from carbon deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in the structure of silicon surfaces can be induced by adsorption of carbon-containing molecules followed by thermal treatments. Clean Si(111) surfaces, prepared in vacuum and exposed to different adsorbants such as methanol or carbon monoxide, change their structures with the formation of self-organised nanostructures (15-50 nm diameter) after suitable UHV annealing procedures. Evolution of the size and density per unit area over different heating periods indicates that the structures are nucleated by carbon atoms present on the surface while their growth derives from mobile surface silicon atoms during the annealing process. Methanol adsorbs dissociatively on silicon at room temperature thus leading to a high density of nucleation centres, but when the process is applied to partially oxide-masked silicon surfaces using CO as adsorbant the nanostructures form preferentially at the Si/SiO2 interface around the mask border thus offering the possibility to grow more ordered self-organised nanoscale patterns. Monte Carlo simulations of this process correlate well with STM measurements

  8. The 100 Myr Star Formation History of NGC 5471 from Cluster and Resolved Stellar Photometry

    CERN Document Server

    García-Benito, Rubén; Díaz, Ángeles I; Apellániz, Jesús Maíz; Cerviño, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    We show that star formation in the giant HII region NGC 5471 has been ongoing during the past 100 Myr. Using HST/WFPC2 F547M and F675W, ground based JHKs, and GALEX FUV and NUV images, we have conducted a photometric study of the star formation history in the massive giant extragalactic HII region NGC 5471 in M101. We perform a photometric study of the colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) of the resolved stars, and an integrated analysis of the main individual star forming clusters and of NGC 5471 as a whole. The integrated UV-optical-nIR photometry for the whole region provides two different reference ages, 8 Myr and 60 Myr, revealing a complex star formation history, clearly confirmed by the CMD resolved stellar photometry analysis. The spatial distribution of the stars shows that the star formation in NGC 5471 has proceeded along the whole region during, at least, the last 100 Myr. The current ionizing clusters are enclosed within a large bubble, which is likely to have been produced by the stars that formed in ...

  9. Core-halo age gradients and star formation in the Orion Nebula and NGS 2024 young stellar clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyze age distributions of two nearby rich stellar clusters, the NGC 2024 (Flame Nebula) and Orion Nebula cluster (ONC) in the Orion molecular cloud complex. Our analysis is based on samples from the MYStIX survey and a new estimator of pre-main sequence (PMS) stellar ages, AgeJX , derived from X-ray and near-infrared photometric data. To overcome the problem of uncertain individual ages and large spreads of age distributions for entire clusters, we compute median ages and their confidence intervals of stellar samples within annular subregions of the clusters. We find core-halo age gradients in both the NGC 2024 cluster and ONC: PMS stars in cluster cores appear younger and thus were formed later than PMS stars in cluster peripheries. These findings are further supported by the spatial gradients in the disk fraction and K-band excess frequency. Our age analysis is based on AgeJX estimates for PMS stars and is independent of any consideration of OB stars. The result has important implications for the formation of young stellar clusters. One basic implication is that clusters form slowly and the apparent age spreads in young stellar clusters, which are often controversial, are (at least in part) real. The result further implies that simple models where clusters form inside-out are incorrect and more complex models are needed. We provide several star formation scenarios that alone or in combination may lead to the observed core-halo age gradients.

  10. Globular clusters as the relics of regular star formation in 'normal' high-redshift galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kruijssen, J M Diederik

    2015-01-01

    We present an end-to-end, two-phase model for the origin of globular clusters (GCs). In the model, populations of stellar clusters form in the high-pressure discs of high-redshift ($z>2$) galaxies (a rapid-disruption phase due to tidal perturbations from the dense interstellar medium), after which the galaxy mergers associated with hierarchical galaxy formation redistribute the surviving, massive clusters into the galaxy haloes, where they remain until the present day (a slow-disruption phase due to tidal evaporation). The high galaxy merger rates of $z>2$ galaxies allow these clusters to be `liberated' into the galaxy haloes before they are disrupted within the high-density discs. This physically-motivated toy model is the first to include the rapid-disruption phase, which is shown to be essential for simultaneously reproducing the wide variety of properties of observed GC systems, such as their universal characteristic mass-scale, the dependence of the specific frequency on metallicity and galaxy mass, the ...

  11. Analysis of the static properties of cluster formations in symmetric linear multiblock copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fytas, N G; Theodorakis, P E

    2011-06-15

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the static properties of a single linear multiblock copolymer chain under poor solvent conditions varying the block length N, the number of blocks n, and the solvent quality by variation of the temperature T. We study the most symmetrical case, where the number of blocks of monomers of type A, n(A), equals that of monomers B, n(B) (n(A) = n(B) = n/2), the length of all blocks is the same irrespective of their type, and the potential parameters are also chosen symmetrically, as for a standard Lennard-Jones fluid. Under poor solvent conditions the chains collapse and blocks with monomers of the same type form clusters, which are phase separated from the clusters with monomers of the other type. We study the dependence of the size of the clusters formed on n, N and T. Furthermore, we discuss our results with respect to recent simulation data on the phase behaviour of such macromolecules, providing a complete picture for the cluster formations in single multiblock copolymer chains under poor solvent conditions.

  12. Lipid Reconstitution-Enabled Formation of Gold Nanoparticle Clusters for Mimetic Cellular Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyoung Nam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs encapsulated within reconstituted phospholipid bilayers have been utilized in various bioapplications due to their improved cellular uptake without compromising their advantages. Studies have proved that clustering AuNPs can enhance the efficacy of theranostic effects, but controllable aggregation or oligomerization of AuNPs within lipid membranes is still challenging. Here, we successfully demonstrate the formation of gold nanoparticle clusters (AuCLs, supported by reconstituted phospholipid bilayers with appropriate sizes for facilitating cellular uptake. Modulation of the lipid membrane curvatures influences not only the stability of the oligomeric state of the AuCLs, but also the rate of cellular uptake. Dynamic light scattering (DLS data showed that 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE, with its relatively small head group, is crucial for establishing an effective membrane curvature to encapsulate the AuCLs. The construction of phospholipid bilayers surrounding AuCLs was confirmed by analyzing the secondary structure of M2 proteins incorporated in the lipid membrane surrounding the AuCLs. When AuCLs were incubated with cells, accumulated clusters were found inside the cells without the lipids being removed or exchanged with the cellular membrane. We expect that our approach of clustering gold nanoparticles within lipid membranes can be further developed to design a versatile nanoplatform.

  13. On the Formation of Cool, Non-Flowing Cores in Galaxy Clusters via Hierarchical Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Burns, J O; Norman, M L; Bryan, G L

    2003-01-01

    We present a new model for the creation of cool cores in rich galaxy clusters within a LambdaCDM cosmological framework using the results from high spatial dynamic range, adaptive mesh hydro/N-body simulations. It is proposed that cores of cool gas first form in subclusters and these subclusters merge to create rich clusters with cool, central X-Ray excesses. The rich cool clusters do not possess ``cooling flows'' due to the presence of bulk velocities in the intracluster medium in excess of 1000 km/sec produced by on-going accretion of gas from supercluster filaments. This new model has several attractive features including the presence of substantial core substructure within the cool cores, and it predicts the appearance of cool bullets, cool fronts, and cool filaments all of which have been recently observed with X-Ray satellites. This hierarchical formation model is also consistent with the observation that cool cores in Abell clusters occur preferentially in dense supercluster environments. On the other ...

  14. Ultraviolet Morphologies and Star-Formation Rates of CLASH Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Donahue, Megan; Fogarty, Kevin; Li, Yuan; Voit, G Mark; Postman, Marc; Koekemoer, Anton; Moustakas, John; Bradley, Larry; Ford, Holland

    2015-01-01

    Brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) are usually quiescent, but many exhibit star formation. Here we exploit the opportunity provided by rest-frame UV imaging of galaxy clusters in the CLASH (Cluster Lensing and Supernovae with Hubble) Multi-Cycle Treasury Project to reveal the diversity of UV morphologies in BCGs and to compare them with recent simulations of the cool, star-forming gas structures produced by precipitation-driven feedback. All of the CLASH BCGs are detected in the rest-frame UV (280 nm), regardless of their star-formation activity, because evolved stellar populations produce a modest amount of UV light that traces the relatively smooth, symmetric, and centrally peaked stellar distribution seen in the near infrared. Ultraviolet morphologies among the BCGs with strong UV excesses exhibit distinctive knots, multiple elongated clumps, and extended filaments of emission that distinctly differ from the smooth profiles of the UV-quiet BCGs. These structures, which are similar to those seen in the few s...

  15. THE STATE POLICY OF OF CLUSTER FORMS IN ORGANIZATION OF INTERACTION IN AGRARIAN FORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govdya V. V.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The optimization issues of governance and the development of agriculture sector are particularly relevant in times of financial sanctions, implementation of the strategy of import substitution. Integration is the one of these mechanisms. In the article, we have discussed in detail the historical aspect of the appearance agroindustrial integration in Russia. The authors highlighted the negative aspects constraining the development of integration processes in the industry. The agro-industrial complex is considered as a set of regional and microcomplexes. The article identified three main areas of the industry. Its balance is able to provide dynamic and sustainable development of agriculture. Dynamics of the share of industry in the formation of the key indicators of the Russian economy are presented. It demonstrates the need to solve issues of increasing the efficiency of all agrarian formations. The authors proposed industrial and economic way out of the current crisis on the results of the research. The Government support of agriculture is the main instrument of agrarian policy, especially in times of economic crisis. The authors proposed a cluster approach to economic development as a priority. It allows reaching high competitiveness and stability of economic systems of cluster. In the article the advantages of creating clusters in the regional economic system are presented. We have summed up the implementation of the previously developed innovative, systemic management model

  16. A Multi-Wavelength Photometric Census of AGN and Star Formation Activity in the Brightest Cluster Galaxies of X-ray Selected Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, T. S.; Edge, A. C.; Stott, J. P.; Ebeling, H.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Draper, P. W.; Metcalfe, N.; Kaiser, N.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2016-06-01

    Despite their reputation as being "red and dead", the unique environment inhabited by Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) can often lead to a self-regulated feedback cycle between radiatively cooling intracluster gas and star formation and AGN activity in the BCG. However the prevalence of "active" BCGs, and details of the feedback involved, are still uncertain. We have performed an optical, UV and Mid-IR photometric analysis of the BCGs in 981 clusters at 0.03 medium.

  17. Slow cluster formation of purified human or rhesus T cells requires protein kinase C and LFA-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eylar, E H; Molina, C; Báez, I; Kessler, M

    1996-03-01

    Homotropic T cell adhesion, as generally studied, consists of a rapid, transient binding process that is measured over a 15-120 min. period. Here we report a slow type of adhesion process occurring with human or rhesus T cells, purified from peripheral blood, that manifests itself by the formation of rounded, multi-layer clusters which may contain hundreds of cells. The maximal number and size of the clusters peak 1-2 days after the addition of phorbol ester, an absolute requirement. The number of clusters formed is proportional to phorbol ester concentration up to 1.25 ng/mL. Phorbol esters such as phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), phorbol dibutyrate (PDB), and 7-octylindolactam (OIL) induced optimal cluster formation at 1-13 ng/mL, levels slightly higher than that required to induce mitogenesis of purified T cells. Phorbol itself and the alpha-form of the ester were inactive. Both cluster formation and mitogenesis (stimulated by Con A or anti-CD3) are completely inhibited by staurosporin at 12.5 ng/mL. Even at 2.5 ng/mL, 74% of cluster formation was inhibited, which strongly implies a crucial role for protein kinase C. In the presence of accessory cells, T cell clusters were suppressed. Monoclonal Ab such as anti-CD3, mouse anti-CD3 followed by anti-mouse IgG, anti-CD4, anti-CD4A, anti-CD2, anti-CD8, and anti-CD45 did not induce cluster formation. None were inhibitory or stimulatory in the presence of PMA, except for anti-CD3 which enhanced cluster formation by 26%. However, anti-LFA-1 beta-chain (mouse monoclonal) completely blocked cluster formation over the range studied (63-1000 ng/mL) for both human and rhesus cells; rat anti-LFA-1 only blocked human cell adhesion. Anti LFA-1 only partially inhibited T cell mitogenesis. These results show that slow cluster formation shares the LFA-1 and phorbol ester requirements of the rapid adhesion of T cells requiring LFA-1 and ICAM-1. However, cluster occurs at a very low phorbol ester concentration, appears more

  18. Characterization and prevention of formation damage for fractured carbonate reservoir formations with low permeability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu Yong; Yan Jienian

    2008-01-01

    Stress sensitivity and water blocking in fractured carbonate reservoir formations with low permeability were determined as the main potential damage mechanisms during drilling and completion operations in the ancient buried hill Ordovician reservoirs in the Tarim Basin. Geological structure,lithology, porosity, permeability and mineral components all affect the potential for formation damage.The experimental results showed that the permeability loss was 83.8%-98.6% caused by stress sensitivity,and was 27.9%-48.1% caused by water blocking. Based on the experimental results, several main conclusions concerning stress sensitivity can be drawn as follows: the lower the core permeability and the smaller the core fracture width, the higher the stress sensitivity. Also, stress sensitivity results in lag effect for both permeability recovery and fracture closure. Aimed at the mechanisms of formation damage, a modified low-damage mixed metal hydroxide (MMH) drilling fluid system was developed,which was mainly composed of low-fluorescence shale control agent, filtration control agent, lowfluorescence lubricant and surfactant. The results of experimental evaluation and field test showed that the newly-developed drilling fluid and engineering techniques provided could dramatically increase the return permeability (over 85%) of core samples. This drilling fluid had such advantages as good rheological and lubricating properties, high temperature stability, and low filtration rate (API filtration less than 5 ml after aging at 120 ℃ for 4 hours). Therefore, fractured carbonate formations with low permeability could be protected effectively when drilling with the newly-developed drilling fluid.Meanwhile, field test showed that both penetration rate and bore stability were improved and the soaking time of the drilling fluid with formation was sharply shortened, indicating that the modified MMH drilling fluid could meet the requirements of drilling engineering and geology.

  19. Interpreting Dual Laterolog Fracture Data in Fractured Carbonate Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Shaogui; Wang Xiaochang; Zou Dejiang; Fan Yiren; Yang Zhen

    2006-01-01

    The estimation of fractures is key to evaluating fractured carbonate reservoirs. It is difficult to evaluate this kind of reservoir because of its heterogeneously distributed fractures and anisotropy.A three-dimensional numerical model was used to simulate the responses of the dual laterolog (DLL) in a fractured formation based on a macro-isotropic anisotropic model. Accordingly, a fast fracturecomputing method was developed. First, the apparent conductivity of the DLL is linearly related to the porosity of the fracture and the conductivity of pore fluid. Second, the amplitude difference of the deep and shallow apparent resistivity logs is mainly dependenton the dip angle of the fracture. Then the response of the DLL to a formation with dip angle fracturesis approximately depicted as a function of the bulk resistivity of the rock, the porosity of the fractures and the conductivity of fracture fluid. This function can be used to compute the porosity of fracture quickly. The actual data show that the fracture parameters determined by the DLL closely coincide with the formation micro imager log.

  20. Formate: an Energy Storage and Transport Bridge between Carbon Dioxide and a Formate Fuel Cell in a Single Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Tracy; Purohit, Krutarth; Nguyen, Christopher; Biggs, Brenna; Mayoral, Salvador; Haan, John L

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate the first device to our knowledge that uses a solar panel to power the electrochemical reduction of dissolved carbon dioxide (carbonate) into formate that is then used in the same device to operate a direct formate fuel cell (DFFC). The electrochemical reduction of carbonate is carried out on a Sn electrode in a reservoir that maintains a constant carbon balance between carbonate and formate. The electron-rich formate species is converted by the DFFC into electrical energy through electron release. The product of DFFC operation is the electron-deficient carbonate species that diffuses back to the reservoir bulk. It is possible to continuously charge the device using alternative energy (e.g., solar) to convert carbonate to formate for on-demand use in the DFFC; the intermittent nature of alternative energy makes this an attractive design. In this work, we demonstrate a proof-of-concept device that performs reduction of carbonate, storage of formate, and operation of a DFFC.

  1. Multi-wavelength study of X-ray luminous clusters at z ~ 0.3 I. Star formation activity of cluster galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Braglia, F G; Biviano, A; Böhringer, H

    2009-01-01

    The current paradigm of cosmic formation and evolution of galaxy clusters foresees growth mostly through merging. Galaxies in the infall region or in the core of a cluster undergo transformations owing to different environmental stresses. For two X-ray luminous clusters at redshift z ~ 0.3 with opposite X-ray morphologies, RXCJ0014.3-3022 and RXCJ2308.3-0211, we assess differences in galaxy populations as a function of cluster topography. Cluster large-scale structure and substructure are determined from the combined photometry in the B, V, and R bands, and from multi-object optical spectroscopy at low resolution. A spectral index analysis is performed, based on the [OII] and Hdelta features, and the D4000 break, available for more than 100 member galaxies per cluster. Combination of spectral indices and FUV-optical colours provides a picture of the star formation history in galaxies. In spite of the potential presence of a small fraction of galaxies with obscured star formation activity, the average star-for...

  2. Study of silicon carbide formation by liquid silicon infiltration of porous carbon structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margiotta, Jesse C.

    Silicon carbide (SiC) materials are prime candidates for high temperature heat exchangers for next generation nuclear reactors due to their refractory nature and high thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures. This research has focused on demonstrating the potential of liquid silicon infiltration (LSI) for making SiC to achieve this goal. The major advantage of this method over other ceramic processing techniques is the enhanced capability of making fully dense, high purity SiC materials in complex net shapes. For successful formation of net shape SiC using LSI techniques, the carbon preform reactivity and pore structure must be controlled to allow the complete infiltration of the porous carbon structure followed by conversion of this carbon to SiC. We have established a procedure for achieving desirable carbon properties by using carbon precursors consisting of two readily available high purity organic materials, crystalline cellulose and phenolic resin. Phenolic resin yields a glassy carbon with low reactivity and porosity, and cellulose carbon is highly reactive and porous. By adjusting the ratio of these two materials in the precursor mixtures, the properties of the carbons produced can be controlled. We have identified the most favorable carbon precursor composition to be a cellulose:resin mass ratio of 6:4 for LSI formation of SiC. The optimum reaction conditions are a temperature of 1800°C, a pressure of 0.5 Torr of argon, and a time of 120 minutes. The fully dense net shape SiC material produced has a density of 2.96 g cm-3 (about 92% of pure SiC) and a SiC volume fraction of over 0.82. Kinetics of the LSI SiC formation process were studied by optical microscopy and quantitative digital image analysis. This study identified six reaction stages and provided important understanding of the process. Such knowledge can be used to further refine the LSI technique. Although the thermal conductivity of pure SiC at elevated temperatures is very high, thermal

  3. Outflow Feedback Regulated Massive Star Formation in Parsec-Scale Cluster Forming Clumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys.Dept.; Li, Zhi-Yun; /Virginia U., Astron. Dept.; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys.Dept.; Nakamura, Fumitaka; /Niigata U.

    2010-02-15

    We investigate massive star formation in turbulent, magnetized, parsec-scale clumps of molecular clouds including protostellar outflow feedback using three dimensional numerical simulations of effective resolution 2048{sup 3}. The calculations are carried out using a block structured adaptive mesh refinement code that solves the ideal MHD equations including self-gravity and implements accreting sink particles. We find that, in the absence of regulation by magnetic fields and outflow feedback, massive stars form readily in a turbulent, moderately condensed clump of {approx} 1,600 M{sub {circle_dot}} (containing {approx} 10{sup 2} initial Jeans masses), along with a cluster of hundreds of lower mass stars. The massive stars are fed at high rates by (1) transient dense filaments produced by large-scale turbulent compression at early times, and (2) by the clump-wide global collapse resulting from turbulence decay at late times. In both cases, the bulk of the massive star's mass is supplied from outside a 0.1 pc-sized 'core' that surrounds the star. In our simulation, the massive star is clump-fed rather than core-fed. The need for large-scale feeding makes the massive star formation prone to regulation by outflow feedback, which directly opposes the feeding processes. The outflows reduce the mass accretion rates onto the massive stars by breaking up the dense filaments that feed the massive star formation at early times, and by collectively slowing down the global collapse that fuel the massive star formation at late times. The latter is aided by a moderate magnetic field of strength in the observed range (corresponding to a dimensionless clump mass-to-flux ratio {lambda} {approx} a few); the field allows the outflow momenta to be deposited more efficiently inside the clump. We conclude that the massive star formation in our simulated turbulent, magnetized, parsec-scale clump is outflow-regulated and clump-fed (ORCF for short). An important implication

  4. Formation, migration, and clustering energies of interstitial He in α-quartz and β-cristobalite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kan-Ju; Ding, Hepeng; Demkowicz, Michael J.

    2016-10-01

    Precipitation of implanted helium (He) is detrimental to many nuclear materials. A solid in which implanted He does not precipitate, but rather remains in solution and diffuses readily is potentially of interest for applications requiring resistance to He-induced damage. We use density functional theory (DFT) calculations to examine He interstitial formation, migration, and clustering energies in two SiO2 polymorphs: α-quartz and β-cristobalite. Our findings show greater He solubility and mobility in the latter than in the former. This difference appears to be due primarily to the unlike atomic-level structures of α-quartz and β-cristobalite, rather than their differing densities. Our findings also suggest that He is unlikely to cluster in either material. The behavior of He in α-quartz and β-cristobalite, and similar forms of silica make them promising materials for further investigation for potential use in applications requiring resistance to He-induced damage.

  5. Investigating carbonate formation in urban soils as a method for capture and storage of atmospheric carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates the potential for engineered urban soils to capture and store atmospheric carbon (C). Calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) bearing waste silicate minerals within the soil environment can capture and store atmospheric C through the process of weathering and secondary carbonate mineral precipitation. Anthropogenic soils, known to contain substantial quantities of Ca and Mg-rich minerals derived from demolition activity (particularly cement and concrete), were systematically sampled at the surface across a 10 ha brownfield site, Science Central, located in the urban centre of Newcastle upon Tyne, U.K. Subsequent analysis yielded average carbonate contents of 21.8 ± 4.7% wt CaCO3. Isotopic analysis demonstrated δ18O values between − 9.4‰ and − 13.3‰ and δ13C values between − 7.4‰ and − 13.6‰ (relative to Pee Dee Belemnite), suggesting that up to 39.4 ± 8.8% of the carbonate C has been captured from the atmosphere through hydroxylation of dissolved CO2 in high pH solutions. The remaining carbonate C is derived from lithogenic sources. 37.4 kg of atmospheric CO2 has already been captured and stored as carbonate per Mg of soil across the site, representing a carbon dioxide (CO2) removal rate of 12.5 kgCO2 Mg−1 yr−1. There is the potential for capture and storage of a further 27.3 kgCO2 Mg−1 in residual reactive materials, which may be exploited through increased residence time (additional in situ weathering). Overall, the Science Central site has the potential to capture and store a total of 64,800 Mg CO2 as carbonate minerals. This study illustrates the potential for managing urban soils as tools of C capture and storage, an important ecosystem service, and demonstrates the importance of studying C storage in engineering urban anthropogenic soils. Highlights: ► Urban soils potentially capture 12.5 kgCO2 Mg−1 yr−1 (value £51,843–£77,765 ha−1). ► Formation of carbonate may be significant and exploitable storage

  6. Globular Cluster Abundances and What They Can Tell Us About Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Judith G

    2009-01-01

    We review the properties of globular clusters which make them useful for studying the Galactic halo, Galactic chemical evolution, and the early stages of the formation of the Milky Way. We review the evidence that GCs have a chemical inventory similar to those of halo field stars. We discuss the abundance ratios for dSph galaxies and show that it is possible to have formed at least part the Galactic halo field stellar population by dissolving globular clusters and/or accreting dSph galaxies but only if this occurred at an early stage in the formation of the Galaxy. We review the constraints on halo formation timescales deduced from the low Mg isotopic ratios in metal-poor halo field dwarfs which indicate that AGB stars did not have time to contribute significantly, while M71 contains two populations, one without and also one with a substantial AGB contribution. We review the limited evidence for GCs with a second population showing additional contributions from SNII, currently confined to Omega Cen, M54, and ...

  7. Cluster formation in water-in-oil microemulsions at percolation: evaluation of the electrical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordi, F.; Cametti, C.; Rouch, J.; Sciortino, F.; Tartaglia, P.

    1996-06-01

    We study water-in-oil microemulsion systems in the droplet phase and in the vicinity of a percolation transition in the non-percolating region. We focus on the electrical conductivity and permittivity, quantities that show large variations when approaching the percolation threshold. The accepted model for the interpretation of the increasing conductivity - very large compared to that of the bathing oil phase - is related to clustering of the microemulsion droplets and migration of charges within the aggregates. Power laws have been used to interpret the behaviour of the static dielectric properties and scaling functions proposed for the frequency-dependent conductivity and permittivity. We review some relevant experiments in this field and the proposed interpretations, and formulate a phenomenological model of conduction. It is based on the physical picture of cluster formation due to attractive interactions among the constituent water droplets, anomalous diffusion in the bulk of fractal aggregates and polydispersity of the clusters. The model gives quantitative expressions for both conductivity and permittivity over the entire frequency range of the percolative relaxation phenomena, including the static behaviour. A closed expression is derived for the scaling function of a scaling variable which involves frequency, the cut-off cluster size and the parameters of the bulk components. The results are also expressed in the time domain in terms of the polarization time correlation function. The latter exhibits a rather interesting behaviour, since it gradually evolves from an exponential decay to a power-law decay and to a stretched exponential as time increases. The time-scales of the different stages are obtained from the typical decay times of the single droplet and the largest cluster. We have analysed many different sets of data obtained for different microemulsion systems as functions of the composition of the dispersed phase, the temperature and the frequency

  8. Non-aqueous formation of the calcium carbonate polymorph vaterite: astrophysical implications

    CERN Document Server

    Day, Sarah J; Parker, Julia E; Evans, Aneurin

    2013-01-01

    We study the formation of calcium carbonate, through the solid-gas interaction of amorphous Ca-silicate with gaseous CO2, at elevated pressures, and link this to the possible presence of calcium carbonate in a number of circumstellar and planetary environments. We use in-situ synchrotron X-Ray powder diffraction to obtain detailed structural data pertaining to the formation of the crystalline calcium carbonate phase vaterite and its evolution with temperature. We found that the metastable calcium carbonate phase vaterite was formed alongside calcite, at elevated CO2 pressure, at room temperature and subsequently remained stable over a large range of temperature and pressure. We report the formation of the calcium carbonate mineral vaterite whilst attempting to simulate carbonate dust grain formation in astrophysical environments. This suggests that vaterite could be a mineral component of carbonate dust and also presents a possible method of formation for vaterite and its polymorphs on planetary surfaces.

  9. The effect of carbon monoxide on planetary haze formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organic haze plays a key role in many planetary processes ranging from influencing the radiation budget of an atmosphere to serving as a source of prebiotic molecules on the surface. Numerous experiments have investigated the aerosols produced by exposing mixtures of N2/CH4 to a variety of energy sources. However, many N2/CH4 atmospheres in both our solar system and extrasolar planetary systems also contain carbon monoxide (CO). We have conducted a series of atmosphere simulation experiments to investigate the effect of CO on the formation and particle size of planetary haze analogues for a range of CO mixing ratios using two different energy sources, spark discharge and UV. We find that CO strongly affects both number density and particle size of the aerosols produced in our experiments and indicates that CO may play an important, previously unexplored, role in aerosol chemistry in planetary atmospheres.

  10. The effect of carbon monoxide on planetary haze formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hörst, S. M.; Tolbert, M. A, E-mail: sarah.horst@colorado.edu [Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2014-01-20

    Organic haze plays a key role in many planetary processes ranging from influencing the radiation budget of an atmosphere to serving as a source of prebiotic molecules on the surface. Numerous experiments have investigated the aerosols produced by exposing mixtures of N{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} to a variety of energy sources. However, many N{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} atmospheres in both our solar system and extrasolar planetary systems also contain carbon monoxide (CO). We have conducted a series of atmosphere simulation experiments to investigate the effect of CO on the formation and particle size of planetary haze analogues for a range of CO mixing ratios using two different energy sources, spark discharge and UV. We find that CO strongly affects both number density and particle size of the aerosols produced in our experiments and indicates that CO may play an important, previously unexplored, role in aerosol chemistry in planetary atmospheres.

  11. Cluster-formation in the Rosette molecular cloud at the junctions of filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, N.; Csengeri, T.; Hennemann, M.; Motte, F.; Didelon, P.; Federrath, C.; Bontemps, S.; Di Francesco, J.; Arzoumanian, D.; Minier, V.; André, Ph.; Hill, T.; Zavagno, A.; Nguyen-Luong, Q.; Attard, M.; Bernard, J.-Ph.; Elia, D.; Fallscheer, C.; Griffin, M.; Kirk, J.; Klessen, R.; Könyves, V.; Martin, P.; Men'shchikov, A.; Palmeirim, P.; Peretto, N.; Pestalozzi, M.; Russeil, D.; Sadavoy, S.; Sousbie, T.; Testi, L.; Tremblin, P.; Ward-Thompson, D.; White, G.

    2012-04-01

    Aims: For many years feedback processes generated by OB-stars in molecular clouds, including expanding ionization fronts, stellar winds, or UV-radiation, have been proposed to trigger subsequent star formation. However, hydrodynamic models including radiation and gravity show that UV-illumination has little or no impact on the global dynamical evolution of the cloud. Instead, gravitational collapse of filaments and/or merging of filamentary structures can lead to building up dense high-mass star-forming clumps. However, the overall density structure of the cloud has a large influence on this process, and requires a better understanding. Methods: The Rosette molecular cloud, irradiated by the NGC 2244 cluster, is a template region for triggered star-formation, and we investigated its spatial and density structure by applying a curvelet analysis, a filament-tracing algorithm (DisPerSE), and probability density functions (PDFs) on Herschel column density maps, obtained within the HOBYS key program. Results: The analysis reveals not only the filamentary structure of the cloud but also that all known infrared clusters except one lie at junctions of filaments, as predicted by turbulence simulations. The PDFs of sub-regions in the cloud show systematic differences. The two UV-exposed regions have a double-peaked PDF we interprete as caused by shock compression, while the PDFs of the center and other cloud parts are more complex, partly with a power-law tail. A deviation of the log-normal PDF form occurs at AV ≈ 9m for the center, and around 4m for the other regions. Only the part of the cloud farthest from the Rosette nebula shows a log-normal PDF. Conclusions: The deviations of the PDF from the log-normal shape typically associated with low- and high-mass star-forming regions at AV ≈ 3-4m and 8-10m, respectively, are found here within the very same cloud. This shows that there is no fundamental difference in the density structure of low- and high-mass star

  12. A carbon cluster ion source for mass calibration at TRIGA-TRAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TRIGA-TRAP is a high-precision penning trap mass spectrometer installed at the research reactor TRIGA Mainz in order to determine the masses of short-lived fission products and - in addition to that - also the masses of actinide elements ranging from uranium up to californium. In order to determine precisely the masses of the nuclides of interest, the superconducting magnet providing the strong magnetic field for the Penning trap has to be calibrated by measuring the cyclotron frequency of an ion with well-known mass, which is, if possible, an isobaric nuclide of the ion of interest. Therefore, the best possible choice for mass calibration is to use carbon clusters as mass references, as demonstrated at the ISOLTRAP facility at ISOLDE/CERN. A laser ablation ion source for the production of carbon clusters has been developed using a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. The design, current status, and results of the production of carbon cluster ions, using C60 and Sigradure registered samples, as well as other ions are presented

  13. The formation of multiple populations in the globular cluster 47 Tuc

    OpenAIRE

    Ventura, P; Di~Criscienzo, M.; D'Antona, F.; Vesperini, E.; Tailo, M.; Dell'Agli, F.; D'Ercole, A.

    2013-01-01

    We use the combination of photometric and spectroscopic data of 47 Tuc stars to reconstruct the possible formation of a second generation of stars in the central regions of the cluster, from matter ejected from massive Asymptotic Giant Branch stars, diluted with pristine gas. The yields from massive AGB stars with the appropriate metallicity (Z=0.004, i.e. [Fe/H]=-0.75) are compatible with the observations, in terms of extension and slope of the patterns observed, involving oxygen, nitrogen, ...

  14. Formation of fragments in heavy-ion collisions using modified clusterization method

    CERN Document Server

    Goyal, Supriya

    2011-01-01

    We study the formation of fragments by extending the minimum spanning tree method (MST) for clusterization. In this extension, each fragment is subjected to a binding-energy check calculated using the modified Bethe-Weizsacker formula. Earlier, a constant binding-energy cut of 4 MeV/nucleon was imposed. Our results for 197Au +197 Au collisions are compared with ALADiN data and also with the calculations based on the simulated annealing technique. We shall show that the present modified version improves the agreement compared to the MST method.

  15. Cluster formation of antigen antibody reaction studied by laser light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, P. J.; Tripathi, Deep N.

    1995-12-01

    Antigoat IgG raised in rabbit has been used to study its aggregation with goat antigen and the cluster formation is studied using laser light scattering. A (chi) 2 fitting method is used to fit the experimentally determined scattered intensity with the theoretically calculated scattered intensity. Scattered intensity is theoretically computed using a radial distribution function of the rD-3 form. The static structure factor S(q,Rg), the radius of gyration (Rg), and the correlation function ((xi) ) are determined.

  16. Cluster analysis of particulate matter (PM10) and black carbon (BC) concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žibert, Janez; Pražnikar, Jure

    2012-09-01

    The monitoring of air-pollution constituents like particulate matter (PM10) and black carbon (BC) can provide information about air quality and the dynamics of emissions. Air quality depends on natural and anthropogenic sources of emissions as well as the weather conditions. For a one-year period the diurnal concentrations of PM10 and BC in the Port of Koper were analysed by clustering days into similar groups according to the similarity of the BC and PM10 hourly derived day-profiles without any prior assumptions about working and non-working days, weather conditions or hot and cold seasons. The analysis was performed by using k-means clustering with the squared Euclidean distance as the similarity measure. The analysis showed that 10 clusters in the BC case produced 3 clusters with just one member day and 7 clusters that encompasses more than one day with similar BC profiles. Similar results were found in the PM10 case, where one cluster has a single-member day, while 7 clusters contain several member days. The clustering analysis revealed that the clusters with less pronounced bimodal patterns and low hourly and average daily concentrations for both types of measurements include the most days in the one-year analysis. A typical day profile of the BC measurements includes a bimodal pattern with morning and evening peaks, while the PM10 measurements reveal a less pronounced bimodality. There are also clusters with single-peak day-profiles. The BC data in such cases exhibit morning peaks, while the PM10 data consist of noon or afternoon single peaks. Single pronounced peaks can be explained by appropriate cluster wind speed profiles. The analysis also revealed some special day-profiles. The BC cluster with a high midnight peak at 30/04/2010 and the PM10 cluster with the highest observed concentration of PM10 at 01/05/2010 (208.0 μg m-3) coincide with 1 May, which is a national holiday in Slovenia and has very strong tradition of bonfire parties. The clustering of

  17. STAR FORMATION HISTORY OF THE MILKY WAY HALO TRACED BY THE OOSTERHOFF DICHOTOMY AMONG GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Sohee; Lee, Young-Wook, E-mail: ywlee2@yonsei.ac.kr [Center for Galaxy Evolution Research and Department of Astronomy, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-22

    In our recent investigation of the Oosterhoff dichotomy in the multiple population paradigm, we have suggested that the RR Lyrae variables in the globular clusters (GCs) of Oosterhoff groups I, II, and III are produced mostly by first, second, and third generation stars (G1, G2, and G3), respectively. Here we show, for the first time, that the observed dichotomies in the inner and outer halo GCs can be naturally reproduced when these models are extended to all metallicity regimes, while maintaining reasonable agreements in the horizontal-branch type versus [Fe/H] correlations. In order to achieve this, however, specific star formation histories are required for the inner and outer halos. In the inner halo GCs, the star formation commenced and ceased earlier with a relatively short formation timescale between the subpopulations (∼0.5 Gyr), while in the outer halo, the formation of G1 was delayed by ∼0.8 Gyr with a more extended timescale between G1 and G2 (∼1.4 Gyr). This is consistent with the dual origin of the Milky Way halo. Despite the difference in detail, our models show that the Oosterhoff period groups observed in both outer and inner halo GCs are all manifestations of the “population-shift” effect within the instability strip, for which the origin can be traced back to the two or three discrete episodes of star formation in GCs.

  18. Brightest cluster galaxy formation in the cluster C0037-2522: flattening of the dark matter cusp

    CERN Document Server

    Nipoti, C; Ciotti, L; Treu, T; Rosati, P

    2003-01-01

    The X-ray cluster C0337-2522 at redshift $z=0.59$ hosts in its core a group of five elliptical galaxies. Using N-body simulations we show that a multiple merging event among the five galaxies is expected to take place in the next few Gyrs, forming a central brightest cluster galaxy. We also find indications that dynamical friction heating associated with this event is likely to modify the central slope of the cluster dark matter density profile.

  19. Authigenic carbonate mineral formation in a latest Pleistocene palaeolake, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karageorgis, A. P.; Kanellopoulos, T. D.; Mavromatis, V.; Anagnostou, C. L.; Koutsopoulou, E.; Schmidt, M.; Pavlopoulos, K.; Tripsanas, E. K.; Hallberg, R. O.

    2012-12-01

    The Pagassitikos Gulf in Greece, is a semi-enclosed bay with maximum depth 102 m. According to the present-day bathymetric configuration and the sea level during the latest Pleistocene, the gulf would have been isolated from the open sea, forming a palaeolake since ~32 cal. ka B.P.. Initial visual inspection of sediment core B-4 (length, 258 cm), recovered from the deepest sector of the Pagassitikos Gulf, revealed evidence of a totally different depositional environment in the lowest part of the core: this contained light grey-coloured sediments, contrasting strongly with the overlain olive grey muds of the upper part. Multi-proxy analyses (mineralogy, geochemistry and scanning electron microscopy) showed the predominance of carbonate minerals (aragonite, dolomite and calcite) together with gypsum in the lowest part of the core. Additional evidence (δ18O and δ13C isotopes, and AMS 14C datings) suggest that carbonate mineral deposition can be attributed to autochthonous precipitation that took place in a saline palaeolake during the last glacial-early deglacial period. High δ18O values recorded in the lowest part of the core were associated with hypersaline and evaporative depositional environment. The most plausible explanation for the formation of the observed carbonate minerals directs to dolomite precipitation from hypersaline evaporating water bodies at low precipitation rates. Under varying weather conditions the precipitation of aragonite is favoured. Alternatively, high evaporation rates and gypsum formation, favouring an increase in Mg/Ca ratio, is proposed as a possible mechanism supporting authigenic dolomite precipitation. The lowest core sample to be AMS 14C dated provided an age of 19.53 cal. ka B.P. The palaeolake was presumably reconnected to the open sea at ~13.2 cal. ka B.P. during the last sea-level rise, marking the commencement of marine sedimentation characterised by the predominance of terrigenous aluminosilicates and fairly homogeneous

  20. Study of small carbon and semiconductor clusters using negative ion threshold photodetachment spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, C.C.

    1994-08-01

    The bonding and electronics of several small carbon and semiconductor clusters containing less than ten atoms are probed using negative ion threshold photodetachment (zero electron kinetic energy, or ZEKE) spectroscopy. ZEKE spectroscopy is a particularly advantageous technique for small cluster study, as it combines mass selection with good spectroscopic resolution. The ground and low-lying electronic states of small clusters in general can be accessed by detaching an electron from the ground anion state. The clusters studied using this technique and described in this work are C{sub 6}{sup {minus}}/C{sub 6}, Si{sub n}{sup {minus}}/Si{sub n} (n = 2, 3, 4), Ge{sub 2}{sup {minus}}/Ge{sub 2}, In{sub 2}P{sup {minus}}/In{sub 2}P,InP{sub 2}{sup {minus}}/InP{sup 2}, and Ga{sub 2}As{sup {minus}}. The total photodetachment cross sections of several other small carbon clusters and the ZEKE spectrum of the I{sup {minus}}{center_dot}CH{sub 3}I S{sub N}2 reaction complex are also presented to illustrate the versatility of the experimental apparatus. Clusters with so few atoms do not exhibit bulk properties. However, each specie exhibits bonding properties that relate to the type of bonding found in the bulk. C{sub 6}, as has been predicted, exhibits a linear cumulenic structure, where double bonds connect all six carbon atoms. This double bonding reflects how important {pi} bonding is in certain phases of pure carbon (graphite and fullerenes). The symmetric stretch frequencies observed in the C{sub 6}{sup {minus}} spectra, however, are in poor agreement with the calculated values. Also observed as sharp structure in total photodetachment cross section scans was an excited anion state bound by only {approximately}40 cm{sup {minus}1} relative to the detachment continuum. This excited anion state appears to be a valence bound state, possible because of the high electron affinity of C{sub 6}, and the open shell of the anion.

  1. Dynamics of the Tidal Fields and Formation of Star Clusters in Galaxy Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Renaud, Florent

    2010-01-01

    In interacting galaxies, strong tidal forces disturb the global morphology of the progenitors and give birth to the long stellar, gaseous and dusty tails often observed. In addition to this destructive effect, tidal forces can morph into a transient, protective setting called compressive mode. Such modes then shelter the matter in their midst by increasing its gravitational binding energy. This thesis focuses on the study of this poorly known regime by quantifying its properties thanks to numerical and analytical tools applied to a spectacular merging system of two galaxies, commonly known as the Antennae galaxies. N-body simulations of this pair yield compressive modes in the regions where observations reveal a burst of star formation. Furthermore, characteristic time- and energy scales of these modes match well those of self-gravitating substructures such as star clusters and tidal dwarf galaxies. These results suggest that the compressive modes of tidal fields plays an important role in the formation and e...

  2. Effect of Mn cluster on the formation of superoxide radicals in photoinhibition of photosystem Ⅱ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    To further realize the action of superoxide radicals (O-2) in photoinhibition of photosystem Ⅱ (PS Ⅱ),we employed 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) as a spin trap, associated with EPR spectroscopy, to study the effect of illumination time on O-*2 formation during high light photoinhibition in PS Ⅱ membranes and Mn-depleted PS Ⅱ membranes. Results indicated that the removal of Mn cluster from PSⅡmembranes has a strong influence on the dynamnics of superoxide formation.The relative mechanism was also discussed.These novel findings may further promote the studies of the structure and function of PSⅡand the mechanism of photoinhibition.

  3. Fragmentation of neutral carbon clusters formed by high velocity atomic collision; Fragmentation d'agregats de carbone neutres formes par collision atomique a haute vitesse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinet, G

    2004-05-01

    The aim of this work is to understand the fragmentation of small neutral carbon clusters formed by high velocity atomic collision on atomic gas. In this experiment, the main way of deexcitation of neutral clusters formed by electron capture with ionic species is the fragmentation. To measure the channels of fragmentation, a new detection tool based on shape analysis of current pulse delivered by semiconductor detectors has been developed. For the first time, all branching ratios of neutral carbon clusters are measured in an unambiguous way for clusters size up to 10 atoms. The measurements have been compared to a statistical model in microcanonical ensemble (Microcanonical Metropolis Monte Carlo). In this model, various structural properties of carbon clusters are required. These data have been calculated with Density Functional Theory (DFT-B3LYP) to find the geometries of the clusters and then with Coupled Clusters (CCSD(T)) formalism to obtain dissociation energies and other quantities needed to compute fragmentation calculations. The experimental branching ratios have been compared to the fragmentation model which has allowed to find an energy distribution deposited in the collision. Finally, specific cluster effect has been found namely a large population of excited states. This behaviour is completely different of the atomic carbon case for which the electron capture in the ground states predominates. (author)

  4. Formation Mechanism and Binding Energy for Equilateral Triangle Structure of Li3 Cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The formation mechanism for the equilateral triangle structure of Li3 cluster is proposed. The curve of the total energy versus the interatomic distance for this structure has been calculated by using the method of Gou's Modified Arrangement Channel Quantum Mechanics. The result shows that the curve has a minimal energy of-22.338 60 a.u at R = 5.82 a0. The total energy of Li3 when R approaches ∞ has the value of-22.284 09 a.u. This is also the total energy of three lithium atoms dissociated from Li3. The difference value of 0.0545 08 a.u. for the above two energy values is the dissociation energy of Li3 cluster, which is also its binding energy. Therefore the binding energy per lithium atom for Li3 is 0.018 169 a.u. = 0.494 eV, which is greater than the binding energy of 0.453 eV per atom for Li2 calculated in a previous work. This means that the Li3 cluster may be formed in the equilateral triangle structure of side length R = 5.82a0 stably with a stronger binding from the symmetrical interaction among the three lithium atoms.

  5. Formation of Innovation Clusters of Economics of Knowledge in Kharkiv Region

    OpenAIRE

    Kizim Nikolay A.; Cherednik Vitaliy I.; Dorovskoy V. A.

    2009-01-01

    In article the problem of formation of the regional economic policy, based on cluster approach is considered. Are considered regional cluster structures in mechanical engineering and pharmaceutical industry of the Kharkov area, as the most priority for region development. The actions, called to provide development of these clusters are offered.В статье рассматривается проблема формирования региональной экономической политики, основанной на кластерном подходе. Рассматриваются региональные клас...

  6. The Lost Dwarfs of Centaurus A and the Formation of its Dark Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Bovill, Mia Sauda; Ricotti, Massimo; Taylor, Matthew A

    2016-01-01

    We present theoretical constraints for the formation of the newly discovered dark star clusters (DSCs) with high mass-to-light (M/L) ratios, from Taylor et al (2015). These compact stellar systems photometrically resemble globular clusters (GCs) but have dynamical M/L ratios of ~ 10 - 100, closer to the expectations for dwarf galaxies. The baryonic properties of the dark star clusters (DSCs) suggest their host dark matter halos likely virialized at high redshift with M > 10^8 M_sun. We use a new set of high-resolution N-body simulations of Centaurus A to determine if there is a set of z=0 subhalos whose properties are in line with these observations. While we find such a set of subhalos, when we extrapolate the dark matter density profiles into the inner 20 pc, no dark matter halo associated with Centaurus A in our simulations, at any redshift, can replicate the extremely high central mass densities of the DSCs. Among the most likely options for explaining 10^5 - 10^7 M_sun within 10 pc diameter subhalos is t...

  7. FORMATION OF THE FIRST NUCLEAR CLUSTERS AND MASSIVE BLACK HOLES AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a model for the formation of massive black holes (∼1000 M sun) due to stellar-dynamical processes in the first stellar clusters formed at early cosmic times (z ∼ 10-20). These black holes are likely candidates as seeds for the supermassive black holes detected in quasars and nearby quiescent galaxies. The high redshift black hole seeds form as a result of multiple successive instabilities that occur in low metallicity (Z ∼ 10-5 Z sun) protogalaxies. We focus on relatively massive halos at high redshift (T vir > 104 K, z ∼> 10) after the very first stars in the universe have completed their evolution. This set of assumptions ensures that (1) atomic hydrogen cooling can contribute to the gas cooling process, (2) a UV field has been created by the first stars, and (3) the gas inside the halo has been mildly polluted by the first metals. The second condition implies that at low density H 2 is dissociated and does not contribute to cooling. The third condition sets a minimum threshold density for fragmentation, so that stars form efficiently only in the very inner core of the protogalaxy. Within this core, very compact stellar clusters form. The typical star cluster masses are of order 105 M sun and the typical half mass radii ∼1 pc. A large fraction of these very dense clusters undergoes core collapse before stars are able to complete stellar evolution. Runaway star-star collisions eventually lead to the formation of a very massive star, leaving behind a massive black hole remnant. Clusters unstable to runaway collisions are always the first, less massive ones that form. As the metallicity of the universe increases, the critical density for fragmentation decreases and stars start to form in the entire protogalactic disk so that (1) accretion of gas in the center is no longer efficient and (2) the core collapse timescale increases. Typically, a fraction ∼0.05 of protogalaxies at z ∼ 10-20 form black hole seeds, with masses ∼1000-2000 M sun

  8. Slow formation of [3Fe-4S](1+) clusters in mutant forms of Desulfovibrio africanus ferredoxin III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, J P; Busch, J L; James, R; Thomson, A J; Moore, G R; Davy, S L

    2000-02-25

    Desulfovibrio africanus ferredoxin III (Da FdIII) readily interconverts between a 7Fe and an 8Fe form with Asp-14 believed to provide a cluster ligand in the latter form. To investigate the factors important for cluster interconversion in Fe/S cluster-containing proteins we have studied two variants of Da FdIII produced by site-directed mutagenesis, Asp14Glu and Asp14His, with cluster incorporation performed in vitro. Characterisation of these proteins by UV/visible, EPR and (1)H NMR spectroscopies revealed that the formation of the stable 7Fe form of these proteins takes some time to occur. Evidence is presented which indicates the [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster is incorporated prior to the [3Fe-4S](1+) cluster. PMID:10692579

  9. Morphological Dependence of Star Formation Properties for the Galaxies in the Merging Galaxy Cluster A2255

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Q; Yang, Y; Wen, Z; Zhou, X; Yuan, Qirong; Zhao, Lifang; Yang, Yanbin; Wen, Zhonglue; Zhou, Xu

    2005-01-01

    The merging cluster of galaxies A2255 is covered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) survey. In this paper we perform a morphological classification on the basis of the SDSS imaging and spectral data, and investigate the morphological dependence of the star formation rates (SFRs) for these member galaxies. As we expect, a tight correlation between the normalized SFR by stellar mass (SFR/M$_*$) and the H$\\alpha$ equivalent width is found for the late-type galaxies in A2255. The correlation of SFR/M$_*$ with the continuum break strength at 4000 \\AA is also confirmed. The SFR/M$_*$ - M$_*$ correlation is found for both the early- and late-type galaxies, indicating that the star formation activity tends to be suppressed when the assembled stellar mass M$_*$) increases, and this correlation is tighter and steeper for the late-type cluster galaxies. Compared with the mass range of field spiral galaxies, only two massive late-type galaxies with M$_*>10^{11}$ M$_{\\odot}$ are survived in A2255, suggesting that the ...

  10. Cluster-formation in the Rosette molecular cloud at the junctions of filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, N; Hennemann, M; Motte, F; Didelon, P; Federrath, C; Bontemps, S; Di Francesco, J; Arzoumanian, D; Minier, V; André, Ph; Hill, T; Zavagno, A; Nguyen-Luong, Q; Attard, M; Bernard, J -Ph; Elia, D; Fallscheer, C; Griffin, M; Kirk, J; Klessen, R; Könyves, V; Martin, P; Men'shchikov, A; Palmeirim, P; Peretto, N; Pestalozzi, M; Russeil, D; Sadavoy, S; Sousbie, T; Testi, L; Tremblin, P; Ward-Thompson, D; White, G

    2012-01-01

    For many years feedback processes generated by OB-stars in molecular clouds, including expanding ionization fronts, stellar winds, or UV-radiation, have been proposed to trigger subsequent star formation. However, hydrodynamic models including radiation and gravity show that UV-illumination has little or no impact on the global dynamical evolution of the cloud. The Rosette molecular cloud, irradiated by the NGC2244 cluster, is a template region for triggered star-formation, and we investigated its spatial and density structure by applying a curvelet analysis, a filament-tracing algorithm (DisPerSE), and probability density functions (PDFs) on Herschel column density maps, obtained within the HOBYS key program. The analysis reveals not only the filamentary structure of the cloud but also that all known infrared clusters except one lie at junctions of filaments, as predicted by turbulence simulations. The PDFs of sub-regions in the cloud show systematic differences. The two UV-exposed regions have a double-peak...

  11. THE CLUSTERED NATURE OF STAR FORMATION. PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE CLUSTERS IN THE STAR-FORMING REGION NGC 602/N90 IN THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Gennaro, Mario [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Schmeja, Stefan [Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, P.O. Box 11337, Tucson, AZ 85734 (United States); Tognelli, Emanuele; Prada Moroni, Pier Giorgio [Dipartimento di Fisica ' Enrico Fermi' , Universita di Pisa, largo Pontecorvo 3, Pisa I-56127 (Italy)

    2012-03-20

    Located at the tip of the wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), the star-forming region NGC 602/N90 is characterized by the H II nebular ring N90 and the young cluster of pre-main-sequence (PMS) and early-type main-sequence stars NGC 602, located in the central area of the ring. We present a thorough cluster analysis of the stellar sample identified with Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys in the region. We show that apart from the central cluster low-mass PMS stars are congregated in 13 additional small, compact sub-clusters at the periphery of NGC 602, identified in terms of their higher stellar density with respect to the average background density derived from star counts. We find that the spatial distribution of the PMS stars is bimodal, with an unusually large fraction ({approx}60%) of the total population being clustered, while the remaining is diffusely distributed in the intercluster area, covering the whole central part of the region. From the corresponding color-magnitude diagrams we disentangle an age difference of {approx}2.5 Myr between NGC 602 and the compact sub-clusters, which appear younger, on the basis of comparison of the brighter PMS stars with evolutionary models, which we accurately calculated for the metal abundance of the SMC. The diffuse PMS population appears to host stars as old as those in NGC 602. Almost all detected PMS sub-clusters appear to be centrally concentrated. When the complete PMS stellar sample, including both clustered and diffused stars, is considered in our cluster analysis, it appears as a single centrally concentrated stellar agglomeration, covering the whole central area of the region. Considering also the hot massive stars of the system, we find evidence that this agglomeration is hierarchically structured. Based on our findings, we propose a scenario according to which the region NGC 602/N90 experiences an active clustered star formation for the last {approx}5 Myr. The central cluster NGC 602 was

  12. Globular clusters as the relics of regular star formation in `normal' high-redshift galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik

    2015-12-01

    We present an end-to-end, two-phase model for the origin of globular clusters (GCs). In the model, populations of stellar clusters form in the high-pressure discs of high-redshift (z > 2) galaxies (a rapid-disruption phase due to tidal perturbations from the dense interstellar medium), after which the galaxy mergers associated with hierarchical galaxy formation redistribute the surviving, massive clusters into the galaxy haloes, where they remain until the present day (a slow-disruption phase due to tidal evaporation). The high galaxy merger rates of z > 2 galaxies allow these clusters to be `liberated' into the galaxy haloes before they are disrupted within the high-density discs. This physically motivated toy model is the first to include the rapid-disruption phase, which is shown to be essential for simultaneously reproducing the wide variety of properties of observed GC systems, such as their universal characteristic mass-scale, the dependence of the specific frequency on metallicity and galaxy mass, the GC system mass-halo mass relation, the constant number of GCs per unit supermassive black hole mass, and the colour bimodality of GC systems. The model predicts that most of these observables were already in place at z = 1-2, although under rare circumstances GCs may still form in present-day galaxies. In addition, the model provides important constraints on models for multiple stellar populations in GCs by putting limits on initial GC masses and the amount of pristine gas accretion. The paper is concluded with a discussion of these and several other predictions and implications, as well as the main open questions in the field.

  13. Monte Carlo studies of drug nucleation 1: formation of crystalline clusters of bicalutamide in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Rasmus; Nordholm, Sture; Perlovich, German; Lindfors, Lennart

    2011-03-31

    A computational method of predicting the effects of the metastability of drug solutions is sought. A simple extension of our in silicio approach to thermodynamic drug solubility is tested on the drug bicalutamide for which we performed vapor pressure measurements complementing earlier measurements of aqueous solubility and crystal-water interfacial tension. The free energy of formation of an N-cluster of the drug molecule is estimated semiempirically by use of an Einstein model of the crystal in which experiment supplies the crystal structure, enthalpy of sublimation, and Einstein frequency of vibration. The rigid drug clusters with N from 2 to 14 are extracted from the bulk crystal by minimization of either cluster energy or radius of gyration. The free energy of hydration is estimated by Monte Carlo simulation combined with simplified response theory based on the OPLS-AA/COMPASS force field for the drug-water interaction and the TIP4P water model. The results have been interpreted in terms of an apparent crystal-water interfacial tension according to classical nucleation theory. The energy-minimal and radius of gyration-minimal clusters seem to give very similar crystal-water interfacial tensions for both the monoclinic and the triclinic polymorph. The interfacial tension of the monoclinic polymorph is significantly higher (by around 20%) than that of the triclinic polymorph in accordance with experiment. For the triclinic polymorph a substantial overestimation of the interfacial tension compared to estimates from crystal nucleation experiments is found, mitigated somewhat by an empirical scaling of the simulated binding energies and free energies of hydration.

  14. Formation of Clustered DNA Damage after High-LET Irradiation: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Megumi; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.

    2008-01-01

    Radiation can cause as well as cure cancer. The risk of developing radiation-induced cancer has traditionally been estimated from cancer incidence among survivors of the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These data provide the best estimate of human cancer risk over the dose range for low linear energy transfer (LET) radiations, such as X- or gamma-rays. The situation of estimating the real biological effects becomes even more difficult in the case of high LET particles encountered in space or as the result of domestic exposure to particles from radon gas emitters or other radioactive emitters like uranium-238. Complex DNA damage, i.e., the signature of high-LET radiations comprises by closely spaced DNA lesions forming a cluster of DNA damage. The two basic groups of complex DNA damage are double strand breaks (DSBs) and non-DSB oxidative clustered DNA lesions (OCDL). Theoretical analysis and experimental evidence suggest there is increased complexity and severity of complex DNA damage with increasing LET (linear energy transfer) and a high mutagenic or carcinogenic potential. Data available on the formation of clustered DNA damage (DSBs and OCDL) by high-LET radiations are often controversial suggesting a variable response to dose and type of radiation. The chemical nature and cellular repair mechanisms of complex DNA damage have been much less characterized than those of isolated DNA lesions like an oxidized base or a single strand break especially in the case of high-LET radiation. This review will focus on the induction of clustered DNA damage by high-LET radiations presenting the earlier and recent relative data.

  15. Fast formation of statistically reliable FDG parametric images based on clustering and principal components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Y. [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Naka, Itabashi, Tokyo (Japan); Senda, M. [Foundation for Biomedical Research and Innovation, 7F Chamber of Commerce, Minatojima-Nakamachi, Chuo, Kobe (Japan); Alpert, N.M. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)]. E-mail: alpert@pet.mgh.harvard.edu

    2002-02-07

    Formation of parametric images requires voxel-by-voxel estimation of rate constants, a process sensitive to noise and computationally demanding. A model-based clustering method for a two-parameter model (CAKS) was extended to the FDG three-parameter model. The concept was to average voxels with similar kinetic signatures to reduce noise. Voxel kinetics were categorized by the first two principal components of the tissue time-activity curves for all voxels. k{sub 2} and k{sub 3} were estimated cluster-by-cluster, and K{sub 1} was estimated voxel-by-voxel within clusters. When CAKS was applied to simulated images with noise levels similar to brain FDG scans, estimation bias was well suppressed, and estimation errors were substantially smaller - 1.3 times for K{sub i} and 1.5 times for k{sub 3} - than those of conventional voxel-based estimation. The statistical reliability of voxel-level estimation by CAKS was comparable with ROI analysis including 100 voxels. CAKS was applied to clinical cases with Alzheimer's disease (ALZ) and cortico basal degeneration (CBD). In ALZ, the affected regions had low K{sub i}(K{sub 1}k{sub 3}/(k{sub 2}+k{sub 3})) and k{sub 3}. In CBD, K{sub i} was low, but k{sub 3} was preserved. These results were consistent with ROI-based kinetic analysis. Because CAKS decreased the number of invoked estimations, the calculation time was reduced substantially. In conclusion, CAKS has been extended to allow parametric imaging of a three-compartment model. The method is computationally efficient, with low bias and excellent noise properties. (author)

  16. Formation of clustered DNA damage after high-LET irradiation: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Megumi; Georgakilas, Alexandros G

    2008-05-01

    Radiation can cause as well as cure cancer. The risk of developing radiation-induced cancer has traditionally been estimated from cancer incidence among survivors of the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki.(1)) These data provide the best estimate of human cancer risk over the dose range for low linear energy transfer (LET) radiations, such as X- or gamma-rays. The situation of estimating the real biological effects becomes even more difficult in the case of high LET particles encountered in space or as the result of domestic exposure to alpha-particles from radon gas emitters or other radioactive emitters like uranium-238. Complex DNA damage, i.e., the signature of high-LET radiations comprises of closely spaced DNA lesions forming a cluster of DNA damage. The two basic groups of complex DNA damage are double strand breaks (DSBs) and non-DSB oxidative clustered DNA lesions (OCDL). Theoretical analysis and experimental evidence suggest an increased complexity and severity of complex DNA damage with increasing LET (linear energy transfer) and a high mutagenic or carcinogenic potential. Data available on the formation of clustered DNA damage (DSBs and OCDL) by high-LET radiations are often controversial suggesting a variable response to dose and type of radiation. The chemical nature and cellular repair mechanisms of complex DNA damage have been much less characterized than those of isolated DNA lesions like an oxidized base or a single strand break especially in the case of high-LET radiation. This review will focus on the induction of clustered DNA damage by high-LET radiations presenting the earlier and recent relative data. PMID:18413977

  17. Carbonate-coordinated metal complexes precede the formation of liquid amorphous mineral emulsions of divalent metal carbonates†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Stephan E.; Müller, Lars; Barrea, Raul; Kampf, Christopher J.; Leiterer, Jork; Panne, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    During the mineralisation of metal carbonates MCO3 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Cd, Pb) liquid-like amorphous intermediates emerge. These intermediates that form via a liquid/liquid phase separation behave like a classical emulsion and are stabilized electrostatically. The occurrence of these intermediates is attributed to the formation of highly hydrated networks whose stability is mainly based on weak interactions and the variability of the metal-containing pre-critical clusters. Their existence and compositional freedom are evidenced by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Liquid intermediates in non-classical crystallisation pathways seem to be more common than assumed. PMID:21218241

  18. Dynamic core hole screening in small-diameter conducting carbon nanotubes: A cluster density functional study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The many-electron response of a small-diameter conducting carbon nanotube, to the sudden creation of a 1s core state, is studied using density functional theory with different Gaussian basis sets and the generalized gradient approximation for exchange and correlation. Cluster computations are performed on carbon atoms located at a finite-size cylindrical network that is terminated by hydrogen atoms. Core-hole creation is simulated by replacing the 1s electron pair, localized at a central site of the structure, with effective pseudo-potentials for both neutral and ionized atomic carbon. The same approach is used to describe a neutral and core-ionized C60 fullerene molecule. The overlaps between the excited states of the ionized systems and the ground states of the neutral systems are combined in a Fermi's golden rule treatment yielding the shake-up spectra from the two clusters. The numerical response for the fullerene molecule is found in good agreement with the measured X-ray photoelectron spectrum from thick C60 films, including the low energy satellites at excitation energies below 4 eV, within a peak position error of 0.3 eV. The nanotube spectrum reveals features in common with X-ray photoelectron data from Bucky balls and Bucky papers. - Highlights: • Many body effects induced in carbon nanotubes by core level ionization are studied. • Cluster density functional theory, with effective core pseudo-potentials, is used. • Low lying excited states of the ionized system are calculated. • Numerical photoelectron spectra are derived with a modified Fermi's golden rule. • Numerical calculations are compared with X-ray data from Bucky balls and papers

  19. Discovery of multi-seeded multi-mode formation of embedded clusters in the Rosette Molecular Complex

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, J Z L M D

    2005-01-01

    An investigation based on data from the spatially complete 2MASS Survey reveals that a remarkable burst of clustered star formation is taking place throughout the south-east quadrant of the Rosette Molecular Cloud. Compact clusters are forming in a multi-seeded mode, in parallel and at various places. In addition, sparse aggregates of embedded young stars are extensively distributed. In this study, we report the primary results and implications for high-mass and clustered star formation in giant molecular clouds. In particular, we incorporate for the first time the birth of medium to low-mass stars into the scenario of sequential formation of OB clusters. Following the emergence of the young OB cluster NGC 2244, a variety of manifestations of forming clusters of medium to high mass appear in the vicinity of the swept-up layer of the H{\\small II} region as well as further into the molecular cloud. The embedded clusters appear to form in a structured manner, which suggests they follow tracks laid out by the dec...

  20. The Evolution of Star Formation Activity in Cluster Galaxies Over $0.15

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, Cory R; Brodwin, Mark; Stanford, S A; Snyder, Gregory F; Stern, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    We explore 7.5 billion years of evolution in the star formation activity of massive ($M_{\\star}>10^{10.1}\\,M_{\\odot}$) cluster galaxies using a sample of 25 clusters over $0.15Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble and 11 clusters over $1Cluster Survey. Galaxy morphologies are determined visually using high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope images. Using the spectral energy distribution fitting code CIGALE, we measure star formation rates, stellar masses, and 4000 \\AA\\ break strengths. The latter are used to separate quiescent and star-forming galaxies (SFGs). From $z\\sim1.3$ to $z\\sim0.2$, the specific star formation rate (sSFR) of cluster SFGs and quiescent galaxies decreases by factors of three and four, respectively. Over the same redshift range, the sSFR of the entire cluster population declines by a factor of 11, from $0.48\\pm0.06\\;\\mathrm{Gyr}^{-1}$ to $0.043\\pm0.009\\;\\mathrm{Gyr}^{-1}$. This strong overall sSFR evolution is driven by t...

  1. Einstein observations of the Hydra A cluster and the efficiency of galaxy formation in groups and clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, L. P.; Arnaud, K. A.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.

    1990-01-01

    The Einstein imaging proportional counter observations of the poor cluster of galaxies centered on the radio galaxy Hydra A are examined. From the surface brightness profile, it is found that the X-ray-emitting gas in the Hydra A cluster must be condensing out of the intracluster medium at a rate of 600 solar masses/yr. This is one of the largest mass deposition rates observed in a cluster of galaxies. The ratio of gas mass to stellar mass is compared for a variety of systems, showing that this ratio correlates with the gas temperature.

  2. Molecular clouds toward the super star cluster NGC 3603; possible evidence for a cloud-cloud collision in triggering the cluster formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, Y.; Ohama, A.; Hanaoka, N.; Furukawa, N.; Torii, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Fukuda, T.; Soga, S.; Moribe, N.; Kuroda, Y.; Hayakawa, T.; Kuwahara, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Okuda, T. [Department of Astrophysics, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Dawson, J. R. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Sandy Bay Campus, Churchill Avenue, Sandy Bay, TAS 7005 (Australia); Mizuno, N.; Kawamura, A. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Onishi, T.; Maezawa, H. [Department of Astrophysics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Mizuno, A., E-mail: fukui@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Solar-terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2014-01-01

    We present new large field observations of molecular clouds with NANTEN2 toward the super star cluster NGC 3603 in the transitions {sup 12}CO(J = 2-1, J = 1-0) and {sup 13}CO(J = 2-1, J = 1-0). We suggest that two molecular clouds at 13 km s{sup –1} and 28 km s{sup –1} are associated with NGC 3603 as evidenced by higher temperatures toward the H II region, as well as morphological correspondence. The mass of the clouds is too small to gravitationally bind them, given their relative motion of ∼20 km s{sup –1}. We suggest that the two clouds collided with each other 1 Myr ago to trigger the formation of the super star cluster. This scenario is able to explain the origin of the highest mass stellar population in the cluster, which is as young as 1 Myr and is segregated within the central sub-pc of the cluster. This is the second super star cluster along with Westerlund 2 where formation may have been triggered by a cloud-cloud collision.

  3. Carbon Monoxide Promotes Lateral Root Formation in Rapeseed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO), an odorless, tasteless and colorless gas, has recently proved to be an important bioactive or signal molecule in mammalian cells, with its effects mediated mainly by nitric oxide (NO). In the present report, we show that exogenous CO induces lateral root (LR) formation, an NO-dependent process. Administration of the CO donor hematin to rapeseed (Brassica napus L. Yangyou 6) seedlings for 3 days, dose-dependently promoted the total length and number of LRs. These responses were also seen following the application of gaseous CO aqueous solutions of different saturated concentrations. Furthermore, the actions of CO on seedlings were fully reversed when the CO scavenger hemoglobin (Hb)or the CO-specific synthetic inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin-Ⅸ (ZnPPIX) were added. Interestingly, depletion of endogenous NO using its specific scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide potassium salt (cPTIO)or the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), led to the complete abolition of LR development, illustrating an important role for endogenous NO in the action of CO on LR formation. However, the or absence of ZnPPIX. Furthermore, using an anatomical approach combined with laser scanning confocal microscopy with the NO-specific fluorophore 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate, we observed that both hematin and SNP increased NO release compared with control samples and that the NO signal was mainly distributed in the LR primordia (LRP), especially after 36 h treatment. The LRP were found to have similar morphology in control, SNP- and hematin-treated seedlings.Similarly, the enhancement of the NO signal by CO at 36 h was differentially quenched by the addition of cPTIO, L-NAME,ZnPPIX and Hb. In contrast, the induction of NO caused by SNP was not affected by the application of ZnPPIX. Therefore,we further deduced that CO induces LR formation probably mediated by the NO/NOS pathway and NO may act

  4. Theoretical studies of zirconium and carbon clusters with molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this dissertation, we will present a systematic study of structures of fullerenes ranging from C20 to C100 by introducing a novel scheme. Using our new scheme, we not only reproduce all known fullerene structures but also successfully predicted several other fullerene structures which were confirmed by experiments. By utilizing the tight-binding molecular-dynamic (TBMD) simulation, we also studied the dynamical behavior of fullerenes: Vibrations, thermal disintegration of individual clusters as well as collisions between fullerenes. If the beauty of carbon fullerene is not enough, people found that carbon can also form tubules and even speculated that they can form three-dimensional graphite-like networks. By extending our fullerene structure searching scheme, we performed a search for the ground-state structure of three dimensional carbon network. We found the most stable structure people ever proposed for simple cubic based networks. From the difference of this new form of carbon and graphite in the electronic and vibrational properties, we propose an experimental probe to identify these novel three-dimensional carbon networks

  5. Theoretical studies of zirconium and carbon clusters with molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, B.

    1993-08-01

    In this dissertation, we will present a systematic study of structures of fullerenes ranging from C{sub 20} to C{sub 100} by introducing a novel scheme. Using our new scheme, we not only reproduce all known fullerene structures but also successfully predicted several other fullerene structures which were confirmed by experiments. By utilizing the tight-binding molecular-dynamic (TBMD) simulation, we also studied the dynamical behavior of fullerenes: Vibrations, thermal disintegration of individual clusters as well as collisions between fullerenes. If the beauty of carbon fullerene is not enough, people found that carbon can also form tubules and even speculated that they can form three-dimensional graphite-like networks. By extending our fullerene structure searching scheme, we performed a search for the ground-state structure of three dimensional carbon network. We found the most stable structure people ever proposed for simple cubic based networks. From the difference of this new form of carbon and graphite in the electronic and vibrational properties, we propose an experimental probe to identify these novel three-dimensional carbon networks.

  6. Dynamics of formation of particles of the condensed carbon phase at shock compression of organic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Fedotov, M G; Luckjanchikov, L A; Lyakhov, N Z; Sharafutdinov, M R; Sheromov, M A; Ten, K A; Titov, V M; Tolochko, B P; Zubkov, P I

    2001-01-01

    Results of the SR study of the density behavior and dynamics of formation of condensed carbon particles at expansion of shock waves in organic materials and some low-sensitive explosives as well as at shock loading of ultra-dispersed diamonds are presented. Appearance of particles of the condensed carbon phase was observed in carbon-rich organic materials.

  7. Carbon in Red Giants in Globular Clusters and Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Guo, Michelle; Zhang, Andrew J.; Deng, Michelle; Cohen, Judith G.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Lee, Young Sun; Rizzi, Luca

    2015-03-01

    We present carbon abundances of red giants in Milky Way (MW) globular clusters and dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). Our sample includes measurements of carbon abundances for 154 giants in the clusters NGC 2419, M68, and M15 and 398 giants in the dSphs Sculptor, Fornax, Ursa Minor, and Draco. This sample doubles the number of dSph stars with measurements of [C/Fe]. The [C/Fe] ratio in the clusters decreases with increasing luminosity above log (L/{{L}})≃ 1.6, which can be explained by deep mixing in evolved giants. The same decrease is observed in dSphs, but the initial [C/Fe] of the dSph giants is not uniform. Stars in dSphs at lower metallicities have larger [C/Fe] ratios. We hypothesize that [C/Fe] (corrected to the initial carbon abundance) declines with increasing [Fe/H] due to the metallicity dependence of the carbon yield of asymptotic giant branch stars and due to the increasing importance of SNe Ia at higher metallicities. We also identified 11 very carbon-rich giants (eight previously known) in three dSphs. However, our selection biases preclude a detailed comparison to the carbon-enhanced fraction of the MW stellar halo. Nonetheless, the stars with [C/Fe]\\lt +1 in dSphs follow a different [C/Fe] track with [Fe/H] than the halo stars. Specifically, [C/Fe] in dSphs begins to decline at lower [Fe/H] than in the halo. The difference in the metallicity of the [C/Fe] “knee” adds to the evidence from [α/Fe] distributions that the progenitors of the halo had a shorter timescale for chemical enrichment than the surviving dSphs. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  8. From large scale gas compression to cluster formation in the Antennae overlap region

    CERN Document Server

    Herrera, Cinthya N; Nesvadba, Nicole P H

    2011-01-01

    We present a detailed observational analysis of how merger-driven turbulence may regulate the star-formation efficiency during galaxy interactions and set the initial conditions for the formation of super star clusters. Using VLT/SINFONI, we obtained near-infrared imaging spectroscopy of a small region in the Antennae overlap region, coincident with the supergiant molecular cloud 2 (SGMC 2). We find extended H2 line emission across much of the 600 pc field-of-view, traced at sub-arcsecond spatial resolution. The data also reveal a compact H2 source with broad lines and a dynamical mass Mdyn 10^7 Msun, which has no observable Brg or K-band continuum emission, and no obvious counterpart in the 6 cm radio continuum. Line ratios indicate that the H2 emission of both sources is powered by shocks, making these lines a quantitative tracer of the dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy. The turbulence appears to be driven by the large-scale gas dynamics, and not by feedback from star formation. We propose a scenario ...

  9. Formation and evolution of heavy sub-structures in the centre of galaxy clusters: the local effect of dark energy

    CERN Document Server

    Sedda, Manuel Arca; Merafina, Marco

    2016-01-01

    We discuss how the centres of galaxy clusters evolve in time, showing the results of a series of direct N-body simulations. In particular, we followed the evolution of a galaxy cluster with a mass $M_{clus} \\simeq 10^{14} $M$_{\\odot}$ in different configurations. The dynamical evolution of the system leads in all the cases to the formation of dense and massive sub-structures in the cluster centre, that form in consequence of a series of collisions and merging among galaxies travelling in the cluster core. We investigate how the structural properties of the main merging product depends on the characteristics of those galaxies that contributed to its formation.

  10. Interconversion between formate and hydrogen carbonate by tungsten-containing formate dehydrogenase-catalyzed mediated bioelectrocatalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kento Sakai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We have focused on the catalytic properties of tungsten-containing formate dehydrogenase (FoDH1 from Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 to construct a bioelectrochemical interconversion system between formate (HCOO− and hydrogen carbonate (HCO3−. FoDH1 catalyzes both of the HCOO oxidation and the HCO3− reduction with several artificial dyes. The bi-molecular reaction rate constants between FoDH1 and the artificial electron acceptors and NAD+ (as the natural electron acceptor show the property called a linear free energy relationship (LFER, indicating that FoDH1 would have no specificity to NAD+. Similar LFER is also observed for the catalytic reduction of HCO3−. The reversible reaction between HCOO− and HCO3− through FoDH1 has been realized on cyclic voltammetry by using methyl viologen (MV as a mediator and by adjusting pH from the thermodynamic viewpoint. Potentiometric measurements have revealed that the three redox couples, MV2+/MV·−+, HCOO−/HCO3−, FoDH1 (ox/red, reach an equilibrium in the bulk solution when the two-way bioelectrocatalysis proceeds in the presence of FoDH1 and MV. The steady-state voltammograms with two-way bioelectrocatalytic properties are interpreted on a simple model by considering the solution equilibrium.

  11. Spontaneous formation of stringlike clusters and smectic sheets for colloidal rods confined in thin wedgelike gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Hideatsu; Maeda, Yoshiko

    2013-08-20

    Monodispersed colloidal rods of β-FeOOH with sizes ranging from 270 to 580 nm in length and 50 to 80 nm in width were synthesized. Narrow wedgelike gaps (0 to 700 nm in height) were formed around the inner bottom edge of the suspension glass cells. Optical microscopic observations revealed the formation of stringlike clusters of the rods and smectic sheets (by spontaneous side-by-side clustering of the strings) in the isotropic phase of the rod suspensions confined in narrow gaps; the electrolyte (HCl) concentrations of the suspensions are 5-40 mM, at which inter-rod interactions are attractive. The strings exhibit different colors that were used to investigate the structures of the strings with the help of interference color theory for thin films. The results are as follows. (1) The rods, lying flat on the gap bottom, are connected side-by-side and stacked upward to form stringlike clusters with different thicknesses depending on the gap height. (2) The stacking numbers (N(sr)) of the rods are estimated to be 1-5. With N(sr) increasing from 2 to 5, the volume fractions (ϕ) of the rods in the strings increased typically from 0.25-0.3 to 0.35-0.42 to reach limiting values (close to the ϕ values of the rods in the bulk smectic phase). (3) Unexpected low-ϕ strings are found in regions with an intermediate height in the gaps. These behaviors of ϕ may be caused by thermal fluctuations of the strings.

  12. Spontaneous formation of stringlike clusters and smectic sheets for colloidal rods confined in thin wedgelike gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Hideatsu; Maeda, Yoshiko

    2013-08-20

    Monodispersed colloidal rods of β-FeOOH with sizes ranging from 270 to 580 nm in length and 50 to 80 nm in width were synthesized. Narrow wedgelike gaps (0 to 700 nm in height) were formed around the inner bottom edge of the suspension glass cells. Optical microscopic observations revealed the formation of stringlike clusters of the rods and smectic sheets (by spontaneous side-by-side clustering of the strings) in the isotropic phase of the rod suspensions confined in narrow gaps; the electrolyte (HCl) concentrations of the suspensions are 5-40 mM, at which inter-rod interactions are attractive. The strings exhibit different colors that were used to investigate the structures of the strings with the help of interference color theory for thin films. The results are as follows. (1) The rods, lying flat on the gap bottom, are connected side-by-side and stacked upward to form stringlike clusters with different thicknesses depending on the gap height. (2) The stacking numbers (N(sr)) of the rods are estimated to be 1-5. With N(sr) increasing from 2 to 5, the volume fractions (ϕ) of the rods in the strings increased typically from 0.25-0.3 to 0.35-0.42 to reach limiting values (close to the ϕ values of the rods in the bulk smectic phase). (3) Unexpected low-ϕ strings are found in regions with an intermediate height in the gaps. These behaviors of ϕ may be caused by thermal fluctuations of the strings. PMID:23876087

  13. From Boron Cluster to Two-Dimensional Boron Sheet on Cu(111) Surface: Growth Mechanism and Hole Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Hongsheng Liu; Junfeng Gao; Jijun Zhao

    2013-01-01

    As attractive analogue of graphene, boron monolayers have been theoretically predicted. However, due to electron deficiency of boron atom, synthesizing boron monolayer is very challenging in experiments. Using first-principles calculations, we explore stability and growth mechanism of various boron sheets on Cu(111) substrate. The monotonic decrease of formation energy of boron cluster BN with increasing cluster size and low diffusion barrier for a single B atom on Cu(111) surface ensure cont...

  14. Tools for the selection of the transmission probability in the cluster formation phase for Event-Driven Wireless Sensor Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Mario Eduardo Rivero-Angeles; Izlian Yolanda Orea-Flores

    2014-01-01

    In the literature, it is common to find studies on Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) that consider the Carrier Sense Multiple Access (CSMA) protocol with a fixed transmission probability for means of the random access strategy. This is especially true for event-driven applications for clustered- based architectures. However, due to the highly variable environment in these networks in terms of the number of nodes attempting a transmission (at the beginning of the cluster formation all nodes in t...

  15. Formation Mechanism and Binding Energy for Body-Centred Regular Octahedral Structure of Li7 Cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The formation mechanism for the body-centred regular octahedral structure of Lh cluster is proposed. The curve of the total energy versus the separation R between the nucleus at tie centre and nuclei at the apexes for this structure of Lh has been calculated by using the method of Gou's modified arrangement channel quantum mechanics (MACQM). The result shows that the curve has a minimal energy of-52.169 73 a.u. at R= 5.06a0. When R approaches infinity, the totai energy of seven lithium atoms has the value of -51.996 21 a.u. So the binding energy of Lh with respect to seven lithium atoms is 0.173 52 a.u. Therefore the binding energy per atom for hit is 0.024 79 a.u. or 0.674 eV, which is greater than the binding energy per atom of 0.453 eV for Lii, the binding energy per atom of 0.494 eV for Liz and the binding energy per atom of 0.632 eV for Li& calculated previously by us. This means that the Lh cluster may be formed stably in a body-centred regular octahedral structure with a greater binding energy.

  16. Formation Mechanism and Binding Energy for Body-Centred Regular Icosahedral Structure of Li13 Cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wei-Na; LI Ping; GOU Qing-Quan; ZHAO Yan-Ping

    2008-01-01

    The formation mechanism for the body-centred regular icosahedral structure of Li13 cluster is proposed. The curve of the total energy versus the separation R between the nucleus at the centre and nuclei at the apexes for this structure of Li13 has been calculated by using the method of Gou's modified arrangement channel quantum mechanics (MACQM). The result shows that the curve has a minimal energy of-96.951 39 a.u. at R = 5.46a0. When R approaches to infinity, the total energy of thirteen lithium atoms has the value of-96.564 38 a.u. So the binding energy of Li13 with respect to thirteen lithium atoms is 0.387 01 a.u. Therefore the binding energy per atom for Li13 is 0.029 77 a.u. or 0.810 eV, which is greater than the binding energy per atom of 0.453 eV for Li2, 0.494 eV for Lia, 0.7878 eV for Li4, 0.632 eV for Lis, and 0.674 eV for Lit calculated by us previously. This means that the Li13 cluster may be formed stably in a body-centred regular icosahedral structure with a greater binding energy.

  17. Star Formation in the Extreme Outer Galaxy: Digel Cloud 2 Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Yasui, Chikako; Tokunaga, Alan T; Terada, Hiroshi; Saito, Masao

    2007-01-01

    As a first step for studying star formation in the extreme outer Galaxy (EOG), we obtained deep near-infrared images of two embedded clusters at the northern and southern CO peaks of Cloud 2, which is one of the most distant star forming regions in the outer Galaxy (galactic radius R_g ~ 19 kpc). With high spatial resolution (FWHM ~ 0".35) and deep imaging (K ~ 21 mag) with the IRCS imager at the Subaru telescope, we detected cluster members with a mass detection limit of < 0.1 M_{sun}, which is well into the substellar regime. These high quality data enables a comparison of EOG to those in the solar neighborhood on the same basis for the first time. Before interpreting the photometric result, we have first constructed the NIR color-color diagram (dwarf star track, classical T Tauri star (CTTS) locus, reddening law) in the Mauna Kea Observatory filter system and also for the low metallicity environment since the metallicity in EOG is much lower than those in the solar neighborhood. The estimated stellar de...

  18. Formation Mechanism and Binding Energy for Regular Octahedral Structure of Li6 Cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yan-Ping; LI Ping; GOU Qing-Quan; LIU Wei-Na

    2008-01-01

    The formation mechanism for the regular octahedral structure of Li6cluster is proposed. The curve of the total energy versus the separation R between any two neighboring nuclei has been calculated by using the method of Gou's modified arrangement channel quantum mechanics (MACQM). The result shows that the curve has a minimal energy of-44.736 89 a.u. At R=5.07α0. When R approaches infinity, the total energy of six lithium atoms has the value of-44.568 17 a.u. So the binding energy of Li6 with respect to six lithium atoms is 0.1687 a.u. Therefore, the binding energy per atom for Li6 is 0.028 12 a.u., or 0.7637 eV, which is greater than the binding energy per atom of 0.453 eV for Li2 arid the binding energy per atom of 0.494 eV for Li3 calculated in our previous work. This means that the Li6 cluster may be formed in a regular octahedral structure with a greater binding energy.

  19. Star formation quenching in simulated group and cluster galaxies: When, how, and why?

    CERN Document Server

    Bahe, Yannick M

    2014-01-01

    Star formation is observed to be suppressed in group and cluster galaxies compared to the field. To gain insight into the quenching process, we have analysed ~2000 galaxies formed in the GIMIC suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. The time of quenching varies from ~2 Gyr before accretion (first crossing of r200,c) to >4 Gyr after, depending on satellite and host mass. Once begun, quenching is rapid (>~ 500 Myr) in low-mass galaxies (M* < 10^10 M_Sun), but significantly more protracted for more massive satellites. The simulations predict a substantial role of outflows driven by ram pressure -- but not tidal forces -- in removing the star-forming interstellar matter (ISM) from satellite galaxies, especially dwarfs (M* ~ 10^9 M_Sun) where they account for nearly two thirds of ISM loss in both groups and clusters. Immediately before quenching is complete, this fraction rises to ~80% even for Milky Way analogues (M* ~ 10^10.5 M_Sun) in groups (M_host ~ 10^13.5 M_Sun). We show that (i) ISM stripping ...

  20. Star Cluster Formation and Destruction in the Merging Galaxy NGC 3256

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulia, A. J.; Chandar, R.; Whitmore, B. C.

    2016-07-01

    We use the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope to study the rich population of young massive star clusters in the main body of NGC 3256, a merging pair of galaxies with a high star formation rate (SFR) and SFR per unit area (ΣSFR). These clusters have luminosity and mass functions that follow power laws, dN/dL ∝ L α with α = ‑2.23 ± 0.07, and dN/dM ∝ M β with β = ‑1.86 ± 0.34 for τ function) for NGC 3256 and comparing the results with those for other galaxies. We find that the CMF/SFR statistic for NGC 3256 agrees well with that found for galaxies with ΣSFR and SFRs that are lower by 1–3 orders of magnitude, but that estimates for Γ are only robust when the same sets of assumptions are applied. Currently, Γ values available in the literature have used different sets of assumptions, making it more difficult to compare the results between galaxies.

  1. Development of a piston utilizing carbon-cluster as a pressure transmission medium at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is necessary to require pressure transmission mechanism in the vacuum and low temperature environment such mechanically RF tuning operation for superconducting RF cavities. As a medium of pressure transmission, water, oil and air can not use such environment. Nano-cluster particles and carbon seems to have possibility of pressure transmission medium. Because their characteristics of chemical and physical reaction at low temperature environment is very stable. Also they have small number of the friction coefficient. We have been studying possibility of their characteristics as pressure transmission medium. (author)

  2. The Hubble Space Telescope UV Legacy Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters. V. Constraints on Formation Scenarios

    CERN Document Server

    Renzini, A; Cassisi, S; King, I R; Milone, A P; Ventura, P; Anderson, J; Bedin, L R; Bellini, A; Brown, T M; Piotto, G; van der Marel, R P; Barbuy, B; Dalessandro, E; Hidalgo, S; Marino, A F; Ortolani, S; Salaris, M; Sarajedini, A

    2015-01-01

    We build on the evidence provided by our Legacy Survey of Galactic globular clusters (GC) to submit to a crucial test four scenarios currently entertained for the formation of multiple stellar generations in GCs. The observational constraints on multiple generations to be fulfilled are manifold, including GC specificity, ubiquity, variety, predominance, discreteness, supernova avoidance, p-capture processing, helium enrichment and mass budget. We argue that scenarios appealing to supermassive stars, fast rotating massive stars and massive interactive binaries violate in an irreparable fashion two or more among such constraints. Also the scenario appealing to AGB stars as producers of the material for next generation stars encounters severe difficulties, specifically concerning the mass budget problem and the detailed chemical composition of second generation stars. We qualitatively explore ways possibly allowing one to save the AGB scenario, specifically appealing to a possible revision of the cross section o...

  3. Asymmetric distribution of gas in the large magellanic cloud and dynamical condition for globular cluster formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highly asymmetric distributions of HI and CO gases in LMC (Large Magellanic Cloud) are reproduced by taking into account hydrodynamical collision between LMC and SMC (Small Magellanic cloud) 0.15 to 0.2 Gyr ago. Two-valued rotation curves in HI gas are due, respectively, to gas clouds accelerated by collision and to those escaped therefrom. It is also concluded that a large-scale noncircular motion of >50 to 100 km s-1 and a resultant compression of >104 (solar mass) in mass-scale are necessary conditions for globular cluster formation from interstellar gas. This process seems to be independent of the chemical abundance of heavy elements in the range -2.0<[Fe/H]<0. (author)

  4. Molecular gas and star formation in HI-deficient Virgo cluster galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Jeffrey D.; Young, Judith S.

    1987-01-01

    Mapping of the CO emission line in 42 Virgo cluster galaxies reveals that the molecular gas contents and distributions are roughly normal in severaly HI-deficient Virgo spirals. The survival of the molecular component mitigates the impact of the HI-stripping on star formation and subsequent galactic evolution. For spirals which are deficient in HI by a factor of 10, far-infrared, H alpha line, and nonthermal radio continuum luminosities are lower by no more than a factor of 2. The fact that the inner galactic disks are stripped of HI, while CO is normal, suggests that the lifetime of the molecular phase is approximately one billion years in the inner regions of luminous spirals.

  5. LoCuSS: The slow quenching of star formation in cluster galaxies and the need for pre-processing

    CERN Document Server

    Haines, C P; Smith, G P; Egami, E; Babul, A; Finoguenov, A; Ziparo, F; McGee, S L; Rawle, T D; Okabe, N; Moran, S M

    2015-01-01

    We present a study of the spatial distribution and kinematics of star-forming galaxies in 30 massive clusters at 0.15cluster members. The fraction (f_SF) of star-forming cluster galaxies rises steadily with cluster-centric radius, increasing fivefold by 2r200, but remains well below field values even at 3r200. This suppression of star formation at large radii cannot be reproduced by models in which star formation is quenched in infalling field galaxies only once they pass within r200 of the cluster, but is consistent with some of them being first pre-processed within galaxy groups. Despite the increasing f_SF-radius trend, the surface density of star-forming galaxies actually declines steadily with radius, falling ~15x from the core to 2r200. This requires star-formation to survive within recently accreted spirals for 2--3Gyr to build up the apparent over-density of star-forming galaxies within clusters...

  6. Neutral hydrogen gas, past and future star formation in galaxies in and around the `Sausage' merging galaxy cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroe, Andra; Oosterloo, Tom; Röttgering, Huub J. A.; Sobral, David; van Weeren, Reinout; Dawson, William

    2015-09-01

    CIZA J2242.8+5301 (z = 0.188, nicknamed `Sausage') is an extremely massive (M200 ˜ 2.0 × 1015 M⊙), merging cluster with shock waves towards its outskirts, which was found to host numerous emission line galaxies. We performed extremely deep Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope H I observations of the `Sausage' cluster to investigate the effect of the merger and the shocks on the gas reservoirs fuelling present and future star formation (SF) in cluster members. By using spectral stacking, we find that the emission line galaxies in the `Sausage' cluster have, on average, as much H I gas as field galaxies (when accounting for the fact cluster galaxies are more massive than the field galaxies), contrary to previous studies. Since the cluster galaxies are more massive than the field spirals, they may have been able to retain their gas during the cluster merger. The large H I reservoirs are expected to be consumed within ˜0.75-1.0 Gyr by the vigorous SF and active galactic nuclei activity and/or driven out by the outflows we observe. We find that the star formation rate (SFR) in a large fraction of H α emission line cluster galaxies correlates well with the radio broad-band emission, tracing supernova remnant emission. This suggests that the cluster galaxies, all located in post-shock regions, may have been undergoing sustained SFR for at least 100 Myr. This fully supports the interpretation proposed by Stroe et al. and Sobral et al. that gas-rich cluster galaxies have been triggered to form stars by the passage of the shock.

  7. Ages and Luminosities of Young SMC/LMC Star Clusters and the recent Star Formation History of the Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Glatt, Katharina; Koch, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the age and spatial distribution of young (age$<$1Gyr) SMC and LMC clusters using data from the Magellanic Cloud Photometric Surveys. Luminosities are calculated for all age-dated clusters. Ages of 324 and 1193 populous star clusters in the Small and the Large Magellanic Cloud have been determined fitting Padova and Geneva isochrone models to their resolved color-magnitude diagrams. The clusters cover an age range between 10Myr and 1Gyr in each galaxy. For the SMC a constant distance modulus of $(m-M)_0$ = 18.90 and a metallicity of Z = 0.004 were adopted. For the LMC, we used a constant distance modulus of $(m-M)_0$ = 18.50 and a metallicity of Z = 0.008. For both galaxies, we used a variable color excess to derive the cluster ages. We find two periods of enhanced cluster formation in both galaxies at 160Myr and 630Myr (SMC) and at 125Myr and 800Myr (LMC). We present the spatially resolved recent star formation history of both Clouds based on young star clusters. The first peak ma...

  8. Carbon cluster diagnostics-I: Direct Recoil Spectroscopy (DRS) of Ar+ and Kr+ bombarded graphite

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmad, Shoaib; Qayyum, A; Ahmad, B; Bahar, K; Arshed, W

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of the energy spectra of multiply charged positive and negative carbon ions recoiling from graphite surface under 100 and 150 keV argon and krypton ion bombardment are presented. With the energy spectrometer set at recoil angle of 79.5 degrees, direct recoil (DR) peaks have been observed with singly as well as multiply charged carbon ions , where n = 1 to 6. These monatomic and cluster ions have been observed recoiling with the characteristic recoil energy E(DR) . We have observed sharp DR peaks. A collimated projectile beam with small divergence is supplemented with a similar collimation before the energy analyzer to reduce the background of sputtered ions due to scattered projectiles.

  9. Ex-Situ Kinetic Investigations of the Formation of the Poly-Oxo Cluster U38.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falaise, Clément; Volkringer, Christophe; Hennig, Christoph; Loiseau, Thierry

    2015-11-01

    The ex-situ qualitative study of the kinetic formation of the poly-oxo cluster U38 , has been investigated after the solvothermal reaction. The resulting products have been characterized by means of powder XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for the solid phase and UV/Vis, X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and NMR spectroscopies for the supernatant liquid phase. The analysis of the different synthesis batches, stopped at different reaction times, revealed the formation of spherical crystallites of UO2 from t=3 h, after the formation of unknown solid phases at an early stage. The crystallization of U38 occurred from t=4 h at the expense of UO2 , and is completed after t=8 h. Starting from pure uranium(IV) species in solution (t=0-1 h), oxidation reactions are observed with a U(IV) /U(VI) ratio of 70:30 for t=1-3 h. Then, the ratio is inversed with a U(IV) /U(VI) ratio of 25/75, when the precipitation of UO2 occurs. Thorough SEM observations of the U38 crystallites showed that the UO2 aggregates are embedded within. This may indicate that UO2 acts as reservoir of uranium(IV), for the formation of U38 , stabilized by benzoate and THF ligands. During the early stages of the U38 crystallization, a transient crystallized phase appeared at t=4 h. Its crystal structure revealed a new dodecanuclear moiety (U12 ), based on the inner hexanuclear core of {U6 O8 } type, decorated by three additional pairs of dinuclear U2 units. The U12 motif is stabilized by benzoate, oxalates, and glycolate ligands. PMID:26418869

  10. Gas Giants in Hot Water: Inhibiting Giant Planet Formation and Planet Habitability in Dense Star Clusters Through Cosmic Time

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Todd A

    2012-01-01

    I show that the temperature of nuclear star clusters, starburst clusters in M82, compact high-z galaxies, and some globular clusters of the Galaxy likely exceeded the ice line temperature (T_Ice ~ 150-170 K) during formation for a time comparable to the planet formation timescale. The protoplanetary disks within these systems will thus not have an ice line, decreasing the total material available for building protoplanetary embryos, inhibiting the formation of gas- and ice-giants if they form by core accretion, and prohibiting habitability. Planet formation by gravitational instability is similarly suppressed because Toomre's Q > 1 in all but the most massive disks. I discuss these results in the context of the observed lack of planets in 47 Tuc. I predict that a similar search for planets in the globular cluster NGC 6366 ([Fe/H] = -0.82) should yield detections, whereas (counterintuitively) the relatively metal-rich globular clusters NGC 6440, 6441, and 6388 should be devoid of giant planets. The characteris...

  11. Root Cluster Formation and Citrate Exudation of White Lupin (Lupinus albus L.) as Related to Phosphorus Availability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Jian LI; Rui-Xia LIANG

    2005-01-01

    A split-root system was used to investigate whether the external or internal P concentration controls root cluster formation and citrate exudation in white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) grown under controlled conditions. In spite of low P concentrations in the shoots and roots of the -P plant, its dry weight was not reduced compared with the +P plant. Supplying external P (0.25 mmol/L) to one root halfresulted in an increase in P concentration not only in the shoot, but also in the P-deprived root half, indicating P cycling within the plants. Omitting P from both split-root pots stimulated root cluster formation in both root halves,whereas P supply to one root halfstimulated root cluster formation at the beginning of the treatment. Neither P supply to just one root half continuously nor resupply of P to one root half after 19 d of P starvation inhibited root cluster formation on the P-deprived side, although the concentration of P in this root half and shoot increased markedly. The results indicate that root cluster formation in L. albus is controlled by both shoot and root P concentrations. The rates of citrate exudation by both root halves with P deficiency were higher than those of the one root half supplied with P only. In the treatment with one root half supplied with P, the rates of citrate exudation by either the P-supplied or -deprived root halves were almost the same,regardless of P concentration in the roots. The results suggest that internal P concentration controls root cluster formation and citrate exudation in white lupin, but these processes may be regulated by different mechanisms.

  12. Calcium Carbonate Formation by Genetically Engineered Inorganic Binding Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresswell, Carolyn Gayle

    Understanding how organisms are capable of forming (synthesize, crystallize, and organize) solid minerals into complex architectures has been a fundamental question of biomimetic materials chemistry and biomineralization for decades. This study utilizes short peptides selected using a cell surface display library for the specific polymorphs of calcium carbonate, i.e., aragonite and calcite, to identify two sets of sequences which can then be used to examine their effects in the formation, crystal structure, morphology of the CaCO3 minerals. A procedure of counter selection, along with fluorescence microscopy (FM) characterization, was adapted to insure that the sequences on the cells were specific to their respective substrate, i.e., aragonite or calcite. From the resulting two sets of sequences selected, five distinct strong binders were identified with a variety of biochemical characteristics and synthesized for further study. Protein derived peptides, using the known sequences of the proteins that are associated with calcite or aragonite, were also designed using a bioinformatics-based similarity analysis of the two sets of binders. In particular, an aragonite binding protein segment, AP7, a protein found in nacre, was chosen for this design and the resulting effects of the designed peptides and the AP7 were examined. Specifically, the binding affinities of the selected and the protein derived peptides off the cells were then tested using FM; these studies resulted in different binding characteristics of the synthesized and cellular bound peptides. Two of the peptides that displayed strong binding on the cells bound to neither of the CaCO 3 substrates and both the high and low similarity protein-derived peptides bound to both polymorphs. However, two of the peptides were found to only bind to their respective polymorph showing; these results are significant in that with this study it is demonstrated that the designed peptides based on experimental library

  13. Cooperativity between Al Sites Promotes Hydrogen Transfer and Carbon-Carbon Bond Formation upon Dimethyl Ether Activation on Alumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comas-Vives, Aleix; Valla, Maxence; Copéret, Christophe; Sautet, Philippe

    2015-09-23

    The methanol-to-olefin (MTO) process allows the conversion of methanol/dimethyl ether into olefins on acidic zeolites via the so-called hydrocarbon pool mechanism. However, the site and mechanism of formation of the first carbon-carbon bond are still a matter of debate. Here, we show that the Lewis acidic Al sites on the 110 facet of γ-Al2O3 can readily activate dimethyl ether to yield CH4, alkenes, and surface formate species according to spectroscopic studies combined with a computational approach. The carbon-carbon forming step as well as the formation of methane and surface formate involves a transient oxonium ion intermediate, generated by a hydrogen transfer between surface methoxy species and coordinated methanol on adjacent Al sites. These results indicate that extra framework Al centers in acidic zeolites, which are associated with alumina, can play a key role in the formation of the first carbon-carbon bond, the initiation step of the industrial MTO process. PMID:27162986

  14. A multiwavelength photometric census of AGN and star formation activity in the brightest cluster galaxies of X-ray selected clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, T. S.; Edge, A. C.; Stott, J. P.; Ebeling, H.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Draper, P. W.; Metcalfe, N.; Kaiser, N.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2016-09-01

    Despite their reputation as being `red and dead', the unique environment inhabited by brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) can often lead to a self-regulated feedback cycle between radiatively cooling intracluster gas and star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in the BCG. However the prevalence of `active' BCGs, and details of the feedback involved, are still uncertain. We have performed an optical, UV and mid-IR photometric analysis of the BCGs in 981 clusters at 0.03 AGN and/or star formation activity within the BCG. We find that whilst the majority of BCGs are consistent with being passive, at least 14 per cent of our BCGs show a significant colour offset from passivity in at least one colour index. And, where available, supplementary spectroscopy reveals the majority of these particular BCGs show strong optical emission lines. On comparing BCG `activity' with the X-ray luminosity of the host cluster, we find that BCGs showing a colour offset are preferentially found in the more X-ray luminous clusters, indicative of the connection between BCG `activity' and the intracluster medium.

  15. Ab initio scaling laws for the formation energy of nanosized interstitial defect clusters in iron, tungsten, and vanadium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, R.; Marinica, M.-C.; Proville, L.; Willaime, F.; Arakawa, K.; Gilbert, M. R.; Dudarev, S. L.

    2016-07-01

    The size limitation of ab initio calculations impedes first-principles simulations of crystal defects at nanometer sizes. Considering clusters of self-interstitial atoms as a paradigm for such crystal defects, we have developed an ab initio-accuracy model to predict formation energies of defect clusters with various geometries and sizes. Our discrete-continuum model combines the discrete nature of energetics of interstitial clusters and continuum elasticity for a crystalline solid matrix. The model is then applied to interstitial dislocation loops with and 1 /2 Burgers vectors, and to C15 clusters in body-centered-cubic crystals Fe, W, and V, to determine their relative stabilities as a function of size. We find that in Fe the C15 clusters were more stable than dislocation loops if the number of self-interstitial atoms involved was fewer than 51, which corresponds to a C15 cluster with a diameter of 1.5 nm. In V and W, the 1 /2 loops represent the most stable configurations for all defect sizes, which is at odds with predictions derived from simulations performed using some empirical interatomic potentials. Further, the formation energies predicted by the discrete-continuum model are reparametrized by a simple analytical expression giving the formation energy of self-interstitial clusters as a function of their size. The analytical scaling laws are valid over a very broad range of defect sizes, and they can be used in multiscale techniques including kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and cluster dynamics or dislocation dynamics studies.

  16. The formation of carbon nanostructures by in situ TEM mechanical nanoscale fatigue and fracture of carbon thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J J; Lockwood, A J; Peng, Y; Xu, X; Inkson, B J [Department of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Bobji, M S, E-mail: beverley.inkson@sheffield.ac.u [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012, Karnataka (India)

    2009-07-29

    A technique to quantify in real time the microstructural changes occurring during mechanical nanoscale fatigue of ultrathin surface coatings has been developed. Cyclic nanoscale loading, with amplitudes less than 100 nm, is achieved with a mechanical probe miniaturized to fit inside a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The TEM tribological probe can be used for nanofriction and nanofatigue testing, with 3D control of the loading direction and simultaneous TEM imaging of the nano-objects. It is demonstrated that fracture of 10-20 nm thick amorphous carbon films on sharp gold asperities, by a single nanoscale shear impact, results in the formation of <10 nm diameter amorphous carbon filaments. Failure of the same carbon films after cyclic nanofatigue, however, results in the formation of carbon nanostructures with a significant degree of graphitic ordering, including a carbon onion.

  17. A possible formation channel for blue hook stars in globular cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Lei, Zhenxin; Zhang, Fenghui; Han, Zhanwen

    2015-01-01

    The formation mechanism for blue hook (BHk) stars in globular clusters (GCs) is still unclear. Following one of the possible scenario, named late hot flash scenario, we proposed that tidally enhanced stellar wind in binary evolution may provide the huge mass loss on the red giant branch (RGB) and produce BHk stars. Employing the detailed stellar evolution code, Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA), we investigated the contributions of tidally enhanced stellar wind as a possible formation channel for BHk stars in GCs. We evolved the primary stars with different initial orbital periods using the binary module in MESA (version 6208) from zero age main-sequence (ZAMS) to post horizontal branch (HB) stage, and obtained their evolution parameters which are compared with the observation. The results are consistent with observation in the color-magnitude diagram (CMD) and the logg-Teff plane for NGC 2808, which is an example GC hosting BHk stars. However, the helium abundance in the surface for our ...

  18. Compound nucleus formation probability PCN defined within the dynamical cluster-decay model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Sahila; Kaur, Arshdeep; Gupta, Raj K.

    2015-01-01

    With in the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM), the compound nucleus fusion/ formation probability PCN is defined for the first time, and its variation with CN excitation energy E* and fissility parameter χ is studied. In DCM, the (total) fusion cross section σfusion is sum of the compound nucleus (CN) and noncompound nucleus (nCN) decay processes, each calculated as the dynamical fragmentation process. The CN cross section σCN is constituted of the evaporation residues (ER) and fusion-fission (ff), including the intermediate mass fragments (IMFs), each calculated for all contributing decay fragments (A1, A2) in terms of their formation and barrier penetration probabilities P0 and P. The nCN cross section σnCN is determined as the quasi-fission (qf) process where P0=1 and P is calculated for the entrance channel nuclei. The calculations are presented for six different target-projectile combinations of CN mass A~100 to superheavy, at various different center-of-mass energies with effects of deformations and orientations of nuclei included in it. Interesting results are that the PCN=1 for complete fusion, but PCN <1 or ≪1 due to the nCN conribution, depending strongly on both E* and χ.

  19. Compound nucleus formation probability PCN defined within the dynamical cluster-decay model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chopra Sahila

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With in the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM, the compound nucleus fusion/ formation probability PCN is defined for the first time, and its variation with CN excitation energy E* and fissility parameter χ is studied. In DCM, the (total fusion cross section σfusion is sum of the compound nucleus (CN and noncompound nucleus (nCN decay processes, each calculated as the dynamical fragmentation process. The CN cross section σCN is constituted of the evaporation residues (ER and fusion-fission (ff, including the intermediate mass fragments (IMFs, each calculated for all contributing decay fragments (A1, A2 in terms of their formation and barrier penetration probabilities P0 and P. The nCN cross section σnCN is determined as the quasi-fission (qf process where P0=1 and P is calculated for the entrance channel nuclei. The calculations are presented for six different target-projectile combinations of CN mass A~100 to superheavy, at various different center-of-mass energies with effects of deformations and orientations of nuclei included in it. Interesting results are that the PCN=1 for complete fusion, but PCN <1 or ≪1 due to the nCN conribution, depending strongly on both E* and χ.

  20. Stem Cell-Soluble Signals Enhance Multilumen Formation in SMG Cell Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, C L M; Leigh, N J; Nelson, J W; McCall, A D; Mellas, R E; Lei, P; Andreadis, S T; Baker, O J

    2015-11-01

    Saliva plays a major role in maintaining oral health. Patients with salivary hypofunction exhibit difficulty in chewing and swallowing foods, tooth decay, periodontal disease, and microbial infections. At this time, treatments for hyposalivation are limited to medications (e.g., muscarinic receptor agonists: pilocarpine and cevimeline) that induce saliva secretion from residual acinar cells as well as artificial salivary substitutes. Therefore, advancement of restorative treatments is necessary to improve the quality of life in these patients. Our previous studies indicated that salivary cells are able to form polarized 3-dimensional structures when grown on growth factor-reduced Matrigel. This basement membrane is rich in laminin-III (L1), which plays a critical role in salivary gland formation. Mitotically inactive feeder layers have been used previously to support the growth of many different cell types, as they provide factors necessary for cell growth and organization. The goal of this study was to improve salivary gland cell differentiation in primary cultures by using a combination of L1 and a feeder layer of human hair follicle-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hHF-MSCs). Our results indicated that the direct contact of mouse submandibular (mSMG) cell clusters and hHF-MSCs was not required for mSMG cells to form acinar and ductal structures. However, the hHF-MSC conditioned medium enhanced cell organization and multilumen formation, indicating that soluble signals secreted by hHF-MSCs play a role in promoting these features. PMID:26285810

  1. Search for Signal on Percolation Cluster Formation in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at Relativistic Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Abdinov, O B; Kuznetsov, A A; Suleymanov, M K; Vodopyanov, A S; Vokal, S

    2005-01-01

    The appearance of the strongly interacting matter mixed phase (MP)has been suggested to consider to understand qualitatively the regime change existence in the behavior of some centrality depending characteristics of events. The MP has been predicted by QCD for the temperatures around the critical temperature Tc and could be formed as a result of nucleon percolation in the density nuclear matter. Our main goal is to get a new experimental confirmation of the percolation cluster formation as an accompanying effect of the MP formation. To reach the goal, the experimental data on Kr+Em - reaction at 0.95 GeV/nuc and Au+Em - reaction at 10.6 GeV/nucl. with a number of target fragments N_h > 8, have been analyzed. The behavior of the distributions of the target and the projectile fragments has been studied. The experimental data have been compared of the data coming from the cascade-evaporation model. We can conclude that: -- the centrality of the collision could be defined as a number of the target g-fragments in...

  2. High-dispersion spectroscopy of luminous, young star clusters evidence for present-day formation of globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, L C; Ho, Luis C; Filippenko, Alexei V

    1996-01-01

    We present evidence that some of the compact, luminous, young star clusters recently discovered through images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have masses comparable to those of old Galactic globular clusters. The "super star cluster" in the center of the nearby amorphous galaxy NGC 1705 has been observed with high dispersion at optical wavelengths using the HIRES echelle spectrograph on the Keck 10 m telescope. Numerous weak metal lines arising from the atmospheres of cool supergiants have been detected in the integrated spectrum, permitting a direct measurement of the line-of-sight stellar velocity dispersion through cross-correlation with a template star; the result is \\sigma_* = 11.4\\pm1.5 \\kms. Assuming that the system is gravitationally bound and using a cluster size measured from HST images, we apply the virial theorem to obtain the dynamical mass. Its derived mass [(8.2\\pm2.1) x 10^4 M_{\\odot}], mass density (2.7 x 10^4 M_{\\odot} pc^{-3}), and predicted mass-to-light ratio after aging by 1...

  3. Photospheric carbon and oxygen abundances of F-G type stars in the Pleiades cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Takeda, Yoichi; Honda, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate the carbon-to-oxygen ratio of the young open cluster M45 (Pleiades), the C and O abundances of selected 32 F-G type dwarfs (in the effective temperature range of Teff~5800-7600K and projected rotational velocity range of vesini~10-110km/s) belonging to this cluster were determined by applying the synthetic spectrum-fitting technique to C I 5380 and O I 6156-8 lines. The non-LTE corrections for these C I and O I lines were found to be practically negligible (less than a few hundredths dex). The resulting C and O abundances (along with the Fe abundance) turned out nearly uniform without any systematic dependence upon Teff or vesini. We found, however, in spite of almost solar Fe abundance ([Fe/H]~0), carbon turned out to be slightly subsolar ([C/H]~-0.1) while oxygen slightly supersolar ([O/H]~+0.1). This lead to a conclusion that [C/O] ratio was moderately subsolar (~-0.2) in the primordial gas from which these Pleiades stars were formed ~120--130 Myr ago. Interestingly, similarly young...

  4. Nonadditivity of convoy- and secondary-electron yields in the forward-electron emission from thin carbon foils under irradiation of fast carbon-cluster ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, S.; Yoda, S.; Uchiyama, R.; Ishii, S.; Sasa, K.; Kaneko, T.; Kudo, H.

    2006-06-01

    We have measured energy spectra of secondary electrons produced by fast-carbon-cluster Cn+ (n=1-4) bombardment of thin carbon foils (3.2, 7.3, 11.9, and 20.3μg/cm2 ). For clusters of identical velocity, the convoy-electron yield is enhanced with increasing cluster size n , while the yield of secondary electrons is reduced. The yield of convoy electrons normalized to the number of injected atoms increases proportionally with cluster size n . This proportionality suggests that there is only a weak vicinage effect on the number of primary electrons scattered by the projectile. The vicinage effect observed in low-energy secondary electrons must therefore arise from either transport or transmission through the surface.

  5. Fusion process of Lennard-Jones clusters: global minima and magic numbers formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.; Greiner, Walter

    2004-01-01

    it with experimental observations. We report the striking correspondence of the peaks in the dependence of the second derivative of the binding energy per atom on cluster size calculated for the chain of the (LJ)-clusters based on the icosahedral symmetry with the peaks in the abundance mass spectra experimentally......We present a new theoretical framework for modeling the fusion process of Lennard–Jones (LJ) clusters. Starting from the initial tetrahedral cluster configuration, adding new atoms to the system and absorbing its energy at each step, we find cluster growing paths up to the cluster size of 150 atoms....... We demonstrate that in this way all known global minima structures of the (LJ)-clusters can be found. Our method provides an efficient tool for the calculation and analysis of atomic cluster structure. With its use we justify the magic number sequence for the clusters of noble gas atoms and compare...

  6. Analytic and computational micromechanics of clustering and interphase effects in carbon nanotube composites.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, Gary D.; Hammerand, Daniel Carl; Lagoudas, Dimitris C. (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX)

    2006-01-01

    Effective elastic properties for carbon nanotube reinforced composites are obtained through a variety of micromechanics techniques. Using the in-plane elastic properties of graphene, the effective properties of carbon nanotubes are calculated utilizing a composite cylinders micromechanics technique as a first step in a two-step process. These effective properties are then used in the self-consistent and Mori-Tanaka methods to obtain effective elastic properties of composites consisting of aligned single or multi-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in a polymer matrix. Effective composite properties from these averaging methods are compared to a direct composite cylinders approach extended from the work of Hashin and Rosen (1964) and Christensen and Lo (1979). Comparisons with finite element simulations are also performed. The effects of an interphase layer between the nanotubes and the polymer matrix as result of functionalization is also investigated using a multi-layer composite cylinders approach. Finally, the modeling of the clustering of nanotubes into bundles due to interatomic forces is accomplished herein using a tessellation method in conjunction with a multi-phase Mori-Tanaka technique. In addition to aligned nanotube composites, modeling of the effective elastic properties of randomly dispersed nanotubes into a matrix is performed using the Mori-Tanaka method, and comparisons with experimental data are made. Computational micromechanical analysis of high-stiffness hollow fiber nanocomposites is performed using the finite element method. The high-stiffness hollow fibers are modeled either directly as isotropic hollow tubes or equivalent transversely isotropic effective solid cylinders with properties computed using a micromechanics based composite cylinders method. Using a representative volume element for clustered high-stiffness hollow fibers embedded in a compliant matrix with the appropriate periodic boundary conditions, the effective elastic properties

  7. A possible formation channel for blue hook stars in globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Zhenxin; Chen, Xuemei; Zhang, Fenghui; Han, Zhanwen

    2015-05-01

    The formation mechanism for blue hook (BHk) stars in globular clusters (GCs) is still unclear. Following one of the possible scenarios, called the late hot flash scenario, we propose that a tidally enhanced stellar wind in binary evolution might provide the huge mass loss on the red giant branch (RGB) and produce BHk stars. Employing the detailed stellar evolution code MESA (Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics), we have investigated the contributions of tidally enhanced stellar wind as a possible formation channel for BHk stars in GCs. We evolved the primary stars with different initial orbital periods using the binary module in MESA (version 6208) from the zero-age main-sequence (ZAMS) to the post-horizontal branch (HB) stage, and obtained their evolution parameters, which are compared with the observation. The results are consistent with observations in the colour-magnitude diagram and the log g-Teff plane for NGC 2808, which is an example GC hosting BHk stars. However, the helium abundance in the surface for our models is higher than the one obtained in BHk stars. This discrepancy between our models and observations is possibly due to the fact that gravitational settling and radiative levitation, which are common processes in hot HB stars, are not considered in the models as well as the fact that the flash mixing efficiency might be overestimated in the calculations. Our results suggest that tidally enhanced stellar wind in binary evolution is able to naturally provide the huge mass loss on the RGB needed for the late hot flash scenario, and it is a possible and reasonable formation channel for BHk stars in GCs.

  8. Studying the YMC population of M83: how long clusters remain embedded, their interaction with the ISM and implications for GC formation theories

    CERN Document Server

    Hollyhead, Katherine; Adamo, Angela; Silva-Villa, Esteban; Dale, Jim; Ryon, Jenna; Gazak, Zack

    2015-01-01

    The study of young massive clusters can provide key information for the formation of globular clusters, as they are often considered analogues. A currently unanswered question in this field is how long these massive clusters remain embedded in their natal gas, with important implications for the formation of multiple populations that have been used to explain phenomena observed in globular clusters. We present an analysis of ages and masses of the young massive cluster population of M83. Through visual inspection of the clusters, and comparison of their SEDs and position in colour-colour space, the clusters are all exposed (no longer embedded) by < 4 Myr, most likely less, indicating that current proposed age spreads within older clusters are unlikely. We also present several methods of constraining the ages of very young massive clusters. This can often be difficult using SED fitting due to a lack of information to disentangle age-extinction degeneracies and possible inaccurate assumptions in the models u...

  9. Dusty starbursts and the formation of elliptical galaxies: A SCUBA-2 survey of a z=1.46 cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, C -J; Swinbank, A M; Simpson, J M; Thomson, A P; Chen, C -C; Danielson, A L R; Hilton, M; Tadaki, K; Stott, J P; Kodama, T

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of a deep SCUBA-2 850- and 450-$\\mu$m survey for dust-obscured ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (U/LIRGs) in the field of the z=1.46 cluster XCS J2215.9-1738. We detect a striking overdensity of sub-millimeter sources coincident with the core of this cluster: $\\sim 3-4 \\times$ higher than expected in a blank field. We use the likely radio and mid-infrared counterparts to show that the bulk of these sub-millimeter sources have spectroscopic or photometric redshifts which place them in the cluster and that their multi-wavelength properties are consistent with this association. The average far-infrared luminosities of these galaxies are $(1.0\\pm0.1) \\times 10^{12} L_{\\odot}$, placing them on the U/LIRG boundary. Using the total star formation occurring in the obscured U/LIRG population within the cluster we show that the resulting mass-normalized star-formation rate for this system supports previous claims of a rapid increase in star-formation activity in cluster cores out to $z\\sim1.5$, wh...

  10. Herschel Observations of the W3 GMC: Clues to the Formation of Clusters of High-mass Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Martin, P. G.; Polychroni, D.; Motte, F.; Schneider, N.; Bontemps, S.; Hennemann, M.; Men'shchikov, A.; Nguyen Luong, Q.; André, Ph.; Arzoumanian, D.; Bernard, J.-Ph.; Di Francesco, J.; Elia, D.; Fallscheer, C.; Hill, T.; Li, J. Z.; Minier, V.; Pezzuto, S.; Roy, A.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Sadavoy, S. I.; Spinoglio, L.; White, G. J.; Wilson, C. D.

    2013-04-01

    The W3 GMC is a prime target for the study of the early stages of high-mass star formation. We have used Herschel data from the HOBYS key program to produce and analyze column density and temperature maps. Two preliminary catalogs were produced by extracting sources from the column density map and from Herschel maps convolved to 500 μm resolution. Herschel reveals that among the compact sources (FWHM < 0.45 pc), W3 East, W3 West, and W3 (OH) are the most massive and luminous and have the highest column density. Considering the unique properties of W3 East and W3 West, the only clumps with ongoing high-mass star formation, we suggest a "convergent constructive feedback" scenario to account for the formation of a cluster with decreasing age and increasing system/source mass toward the innermost regions. This process, which relies on feedback by high-mass stars to ensure the availability of material during cluster formation, could also lead to the creation of an environment suitable for the formation of Trapezium-like systems. In common with other scenarios proposed in other HOBYS studies, our results indicate that an active/dynamic process aiding in the accumulation, compression, and confinement of material is a critical feature of the high-mass star/cluster formation, distinguishing it from classical low-mass star formation. The environmental conditions and availability of triggers determine the form in which this process occurs, implying that high-mass star/cluster formation could arise from a range of scenarios: from large-scale convergence of turbulent flows to convergent constructive feedback or mergers of filaments. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  11. HERSCHEL OBSERVATIONS OF THE W3 GMC: CLUES TO THE FORMATION OF CLUSTERS OF HIGH-MASS STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera-Ingraham, A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Martin, P. G.; Luong, Q. Nguyen; Roy, A. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Polychroni, D. [Department of Astrophysics, Astronomy and Mechanics, Faculty of Physics, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, 15784 Zografos, Athens (Greece); Motte, F.; Schneider, N.; Hennemann, M.; Men' shchikov, A.; Andre, Ph.; Arzoumanian, D.; Hill, T.; Minier, V. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/IRFU-CNRS/INSU-Universite Paris Diderot, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Bontemps, S. [Universite Bordeaux, LAB, UMR 5804, F-33270 Floirac (France); Bernard, J.-Ph. [CNRS, IRAP, 9 Avenue colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Di Francesco, J.; Fallscheer, C. [National Research Council Canada, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Elia, D.; Pezzuto, S. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Li, J. Z. [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); and others

    2013-04-01

    The W3 GMC is a prime target for the study of the early stages of high-mass star formation. We have used Herschel data from the HOBYS key program to produce and analyze column density and temperature maps. Two preliminary catalogs were produced by extracting sources from the column density map and from Herschel maps convolved to 500 {mu}m resolution. Herschel reveals that among the compact sources (FWHM < 0.45 pc), W3 East, W3 West, and W3 (OH) are the most massive and luminous and have the highest column density. Considering the unique properties of W3 East and W3 West, the only clumps with ongoing high-mass star formation, we suggest a 'convergent constructive feedback' scenario to account for the formation of a cluster with decreasing age and increasing system/source mass toward the innermost regions. This process, which relies on feedback by high-mass stars to ensure the availability of material during cluster formation, could also lead to the creation of an environment suitable for the formation of Trapezium-like systems. In common with other scenarios proposed in other HOBYS studies, our results indicate that an active/dynamic process aiding in the accumulation, compression, and confinement of material is a critical feature of the high-mass star/cluster formation, distinguishing it from classical low-mass star formation. The environmental conditions and availability of triggers determine the form in which this process occurs, implying that high-mass star/cluster formation could arise from a range of scenarios: from large-scale convergence of turbulent flows to convergent constructive feedback or mergers of filaments.

  12. LoCuSS: The Slow Quenching of Star Formation in Cluster Galaxies and the Need for Pre-processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, C. P.; Pereira, M. J.; Smith, G. P.; Egami, E.; Babul, A.; Finoguenov, A.; Ziparo, F.; McGee, S. L.; Rawle, T. D.; Okabe, N.; Moran, S. M.

    2015-06-01

    We present a study of the spatial distribution and kinematics of star-forming galaxies in 30 massive clusters at 0.15 < z < 0.30, combining wide-field Spitzer 24 μm and GALEX near-ultraviolet imaging with highly complete spectroscopy of cluster members. The fraction (fSF) of star-forming cluster galaxies rises steadily with cluster-centric radius, increasing fivefold by 2r200, but remains well below field values even at 3r200. This suppression of star formation at large radii cannot be reproduced by models in which star formation is quenched in infalling field galaxies only once they pass within r200 of the cluster, but is consistent with some of them being first pre-processed within galaxy groups. Despite the increasing fSF-radius trend, the surface density of star-forming galaxies actually declines steadily with radius, falling ˜15× from the core to 2r200. This requires star formation to survive within recently accreted spirals for 2-3 Gyr to build up the apparent over-density of star-forming galaxies within clusters. The velocity dispersion profile of the star-forming galaxy population shows a sharp peak of 1.44 σν at 0.3r500, and is 10%-35% higher than that of the inactive cluster members at all cluster-centric radii, while their velocity distribution shows a flat, top-hat profile within r500. All of these results are consistent with star-forming cluster galaxies being an infalling population, but one that must also survive ˜0.5-2 Gyr beyond passing within r200. By comparing the observed distribution of star-forming galaxies in the stacked caustic diagram with predictions from the Millennium simulation, we obtain a best-fit model in which star formation rates decline exponentially on quenching timescales of 1.73 ± 0.25 Gyr upon accretion into the cluster.

  13. In Situ Formation of Carbon Nanomaterials on Bulk Metallic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Y. Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanomaterials were synthesized in situ on bulk 316L stainless steel, pure cobalt, and pure nickel by hybrid surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT. The microstructures of the treated samples and the resulted carbon nanomaterials were investigated by SEM and TEM characterizations. Different substrates resulted in different morphologies of products. The diameter of carbon nanomaterials is related to the size of the nanograins on the surface layer of substrates. The possible growth mechanism was discussed. Effects of the main parameters of the synthesis, including the carbon source and gas reactant composition, hydrogen, and the reaction temperature, were studied. Using hybrid SMAT is proved to be an effective way to synthesize carbon nanomaterials in situ on surfaces of metallic materials.

  14. Accretion of pristine gas and dilution during the formation of multiple-population globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ercole, A.; D'Antona, F.; Vesperini, E.

    2016-10-01

    We study the interaction of the early spherical GC wind powered by Type II supernovae (SNe II) with the surrounding ambient medium consisting of the gaseous disc of a star-forming galaxy at redshift z ≳ 2. The bubble formed by the wind eventually breaks out of the disc, and most of the wind moves directly out of the galaxy and is definitively lost. The fraction of the wind moving nearly parallel to the galactic plane carves a hole in the disc which will contract after the end of the SN activity. During the interval of time between the end of the SN explosions and the `closure' of the hole, very O-poor stars (the Extreme population) can form out of the super-AGB (asymptotic giant branch) ejecta collected in the GC centre. Once the hole contracts, the AGB ejecta mix with the pristine gas, allowing the formation of stars with an oxygen abundance intermediate between that of the very O-poor stars and that of the pristine gas. We show that this mechanism may explain why Extreme populations are present only in massive clusters, and can also produce a correlation between the spread in helium and the cluster mass. Finally, we also explore the possibility that our proposed mechanism can be extended to the case of multiple populations showing bimodality in the iron content, with the presence of two populations characterized by a small difference in [Fe/H]. Such a result can be obtained taking into account the contribution of delayed SN II.

  15. The photoelectronic behaviors of MoO3-loaded ZrO2/carbon cluster nanocomposite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, H.; Ishiko, A.; Karuppuchamy, S.; Hassan, M. A.; Yoshihara, M.

    2012-03-01

    A novel nano-sized ZrO2/carbon cluster composite materials (Ic's) were successfully obtained by the calcination of ZrCl4/starch complexes I's under an argon atmosphere. Pt- and/or MoO3-loaded ZrO2/carbon clusters composite materials were also prepared by doping Pt and/or MoO3 particles on the surface of Ic's. The surface characterization of the composite materials was carried out using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The TEM observation of the materials showed the presence of particles with the diameters of a few nanometers, possibly Pt particles, and of 50-100 nm, possibly MoO3 particles, in the matrix. Pt- and/or MoO3-loaded ZrO2/carbon cluster composite materials show the efficient photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation.

  16. Bulgeless Giant Galaxies Challenge Our Picture of Galaxy Formation by Hierarchical Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormendy, John; Drory, Niv; Bender, Ralf; Cornell, Mark E.

    2010-11-01

    To better understand the prevalence of bulgeless galaxies in the nearby field, we dissect giant Sc-Scd galaxies with Hubble Space Telescope (HST) photometry and Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) spectroscopy. We use the HET High Resolution Spectrograph (resolution R ≡ λ/FWHM ~= 15, 000) to measure stellar velocity dispersions in the nuclear star clusters and (pseudo)bulges of the pure-disk galaxies M 33, M 101, NGC 3338, NGC 3810, NGC 6503, and NGC 6946. The dispersions range from 20 ± 1 km s-1 in the nucleus of M 33 to 78 ± 2 km s-1 in the pseudobulge of NGC 3338. We use HST archive images to measure the brightness profiles of the nuclei and (pseudo)bulges in M 101, NGC 6503, and NGC 6946 and hence to estimate their masses. The results imply small mass-to-light ratios consistent with young stellar populations. These observations lead to two conclusions. (1) Upper limits on the masses of any supermassive black holes are M • 150 km s-1, including M 101, NGC 6946, IC 342, and our Galaxy, show no evidence for a classical bulge. Four may contain small classical bulges that contribute 5%-12% of the light of the galaxy. Only four of the 19 giant galaxies are ellipticals or have classical bulges that contribute ~1/3 of the galaxy light. We conclude that pure-disk galaxies are far from rare. It is hard to understand how bulgeless galaxies could form as the quiescent tail of a distribution of merger histories. Recognition of pseudobulges makes the biggest problem with cold dark matter galaxy formation more acute: How can hierarchical clustering make so many giant, pure-disk galaxies with no evidence for merger-built bulges? Finally, we emphasize that this problem is a strong function of environment: the Virgo cluster is not a puzzle, because more than 2/3 of its stellar mass is in merger remnants. Based on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford

  17. Tracing the star formation history of three Blue Compact galaxies through the analysis of their star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Adamo, Angela; Zackrisson, Erik; Hayes, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a study of the compact star cluster populations in three local luminous blue compact galaxies: ESO 185-IG 013, ESO 350-IG 038 (a.k.a. Haro 11), and MRK 930. These systems show peculiar morphologies and the presence of hundreds of SCs that have been produced by the past, recent, and/or current starburst phases. We use a complete set of HST images ranging from the UV to IR for each galaxy. Deep images in V (WFPC2/f606w) and I (WFPC2/f814w) are used to capture most of the star cluster candidates up to the old ones (fainter) which have had, in the past, less possibility to be detected. The other bands are used in the SED fitting technique for constraining ages and masses. Our goals are to investigate the evolution of these three blue compact galaxies and the star cluster formation impact on their star formation history.

  18. The Rich Globular Cluster System of Abell 1689 and the Radial Dependence of the Globular Cluster Formation Efficiency

    CERN Document Server

    Alamo-Martínez, K A; Jee, M J; Côté, P; Ferrarese, L; González-Lópezlira, R A; Jordán, A; Meurer, G R; Peng, E W; West, M J

    2013-01-01

    We study the rich globular cluster (GC) system in the center of the massive cluster of galaxies Abell 1689 (z=0.18), one of the most powerful gravitational lenses known. With 28 HST/ACS orbits in the F814W bandpass, we reach magnitude I_814=29 with >90% completeness and sample the brightest ~5% of the GC system. Assuming the well-known Gaussian form of the GC luminosity function (GCLF), we estimate a total population of N(GC_total) = 162,850 GCs within a projected radius of 400kpc. As many as half may comprise an intracluster component. Even with the sizable uncertainties, which mainly result from the uncertain GCLF parameters, this is by far the largest GC system studied to date. The specific frequency S_N is high, but not uncommon for central galaxies in massive clusters, rising from S_N~5 near the center to ~12 at large radii. Passive galaxy fading would increase S_N by ~20% at z=0. We construct the radial mass profiles of the GCs, stars, intracluster gas, and lensing-derived total mass, and we compare the...

  19. Structure and Turbulence in Simulated Galaxy Clusters and the Implications for the Formation of Radio Halos

    CERN Document Server

    Hallman, Eric J

    2011-01-01

    We track the histories of massive clusters of galaxies formed within a cosmological hydrodynamic simulation. Specifically, we track the time evolution of the energy in random bulk motions of the intracluster medium and X-ray measures of cluster structure and their relationship to cluster mergers. We aim to assess the viability of the turbulent re-acceleration model for the generation of giant radio halos by comparing the level of turbulent kinetic energy in simulated clusters with the observed properties of radio halo clusters, giving particular attention to the association of radio halos to clusters with disturbedX-ray structures. The evolution of X-ray cluster structure and turbulence kinetic energy, k, in simulations can then inform us about the expected lifetime of radio halos and the fraction of clusters as a function of redshift expected to host them. We find strong statistical correlation of disturbed structure measures and the presence of enhancements in k. Specifically, quantitatively "disturbed", ra...

  20. Formation of bimetallic nanoalloys by Au coating of size-selected Cu clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bimetallic clusters display new characteristics that could not be obtained by varying either the size of pure metallic systems or the composition of bulk bimetals alone. Coating of pre-deposited clusters by vapour deposition is a typical synthesis process of bimetallic clusters. Here, we have demonstrated that hierarchical, gold cluster-decorated copper clusters as well as both heterogeneous and homogeneous Cu–Au bimetallic clusters (4.6 to 10.7 nm) can be prepared by coating pre-deposited, size-selected Cu5000 (4.6 ± 0.2 nm) with Au evaporation at various temperatures. These bimetallic clusters were analyzed by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and associated electron energy loss spectroscopy. The results indicate that the growth of bimetallic clusters is controlled by a competition between nucleation and diffusion of the coating Au atoms.

  1. Neutral hydrogen gas, past and future star-formation in galaxies in and around the 'Sausage' merging galaxy cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Stroe, Andra; Rottgering, Huub J A; Sobral, David; van Weeren, Reinout; Dawson, William

    2015-01-01

    CIZA J2242.8+5301 ($z = 0.188$, nicknamed 'Sausage') is an extremely massive ($M_{200}\\sim 2.0 \\times 10^{15}M_\\odot$ ), merging cluster with shock waves towards its outskirts, which was found to host numerous emission-line galaxies. We performed extremely deep Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope HI observations of the 'Sausage' cluster to investigate the effect of the merger and the shocks on the gas reservoirs fuelling present and future star formation (SF) in cluster members. By using spectral stacking, we find that the emission-line galaxies in the 'Sausage' cluster have, on average, as much HI gas as field galaxies (when accounting for the fact cluster galaxies are more massive than the field galaxies), contrary to previous studies. Since the cluster galaxies are more massive than the field spirals, they may have been able to retain their gas during the cluster merger. The large HI reservoirs are expected to be consumed within $\\sim0.75-1.0$ Gyr by the vigorous SF and AGN activity and/or driven out by t...

  2. Low-Dimensional Network Formation in Molten Sodium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilding, Martin C.; Wilson, Mark; Alderman, Oliver L. G.; Benmore, Chris; Weber, J. K. R.; Parise, John B.; Tamalonis, Anthony; Skinner, Lawrie

    2016-04-01

    Molten carbonates are highly inviscid liquids characterized by low melting points and high solubility of rare earth elements and volatile molecules. An understanding of the structure and related properties of these intriguing liquids has been limited to date. We report the results of a study of molten sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) which combines high energy X-ray diffraction, containerless techniques and computer simulation to provide insight into the liquid structure. Total structure factors (Fx(Q)) are collected on the laser-heated carbonate spheres suspended in flowing gases of varying composition in an aerodynamic levitation furnace. The respective partial structure factor contributions to Fx(Q) are obtained by performing molecular dynamics simulations treating the carbonate anions as flexible entities. The carbonate liquid structure is found to be heavily temperature-dependent. At low temperatures a low-dimensional carbonate chain network forms, at T = 1100 K for example ~55% of the C atoms form part of a chain. The mean chain lengths decrease as temperature is increased and as the chains become shorter the rotation of the carbonate anions becomes more rapid enhancing the diffusion of Na+ ions.

  3. Coarse-grained model for colloidal protein interactions, B(22), and protein cluster formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Marco A; Sahin, Erinc; Robinson, Anne S; Roberts, Christopher J

    2013-12-19

    Reversible protein cluster formation is an important initial step in the processes of native and non-native protein aggregation, but involves relatively long time and length scales for detailed atomistic simulations and extensive mapping of free energy landscapes. A coarse-grained (CG) model is presented to semiquantitatively characterize the thermodynamics and key configurations involved in the landscape for protein oligomerization, as well as experimental measures of interactions such as the osmotic second virial coefficient (B22). Based on earlier work (Grüenberger et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 2013, 117, 763), this CG model treats proteins as rigid bodies composed of one bead per amino acid, with each amino acid having specific parameters for its size, hydrophobicity, and charge. The net interactions are a combination of steric repulsions, short-range attractions, and screened long-range charge-charge interactions. Model parametrization was done by fitting simulation results against experimental value of B22 as a function of solution ionic strength for α-chymotrypsinogen A and γD-Crystallin (gD-Crys). The CG model is applied to characterize the pairwise interactions and dimerization of gD-Crys and the dependence on temperature, protein concentration, and ionic strength. The results illustrate that at experimentally relevant conditions where stable dimers do not form, the entropic contributions are predominant in the free-energy of protein cluster formation and colloidal protein interactions, arguing against interpretations that treat B22 primarily from energetic considerations alone. Additionally, the results suggest that electrostatic interactions help to modulate the population of the different stable configurations for protein nearest-neighbor pairs, while short-range attractions determine the relative orientations of proteins within these configurations. Finally, simulation results are combined with Principal Component Analysis to identify those amino

  4. Organic Carbon Isotope Geochemistry of the Neoproterozoic Doushantuo Formation, South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Qingjun; LIU Congqiang; Harald STRAUSS; Tatiana GOLDBERG; ZHU Maoyan; PI Daohui; WANG Jian

    2006-01-01

    The Neoproterozoic Doushantuo Formation on the Yangtze Platform, South China,documents a sedimentary succession with different sedimentary facies from carbonate platform to slope and to deep sea basin, and hosts one of the world-class phosphorite deposits. In these strata,exquisitely preserved fossils have been discovered: the Weng'an biota. This study presents carbon isotope geochemistry which is associated paired carbonate and organic matter from the Weng'an section of a carbonate platform (shelf of the Yangtze Platform, Guizhou Province) from the Songtao section and Nanming section of a transition belt (slope of the Yangtze Platform, Guizhou Province) and from the Yanwutan section (basin area of the Yangtze Platform, Hunan Province). Environmental variations and bio-events on the Yangtze Platform during the Late Neoproterozoic and their causal relationship are discussed. Negative carbon isotope values for carbonate and organic carbon (mean δ13Corg = -35.0%) from the uppermost Nantuo Formation are followed by an overall increase in δ13C up-section. Carbon isotope values vary between -9.9% and 3.6% for carbonate and between -35.6% and -21.5% for organic carbon, respectively. Heavier δ13Ccarb values suggest an increase in organic carbon burial, possibly related to increasing productivity (such as the Weng'an biota). The δ13C values of the sediments from the Doushantuo Formation decreased from the platform via the slope to basin,reflecting a reduced environment with minor dissolved inorganic carbon possibly due to a lower primary productivity. It is deduced that the classical upwelling process, the stratification structure and the hydrothermal eruption are principally important mechanisms to interpret the carbon isotopic compositions of the sediments from the Doushantuo Formation.

  5. Formation of global energy minimim structures in the growth process of Lennard-Jones clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Koshelev, Andrey; Shutovich, Andrey;

    2003-01-01

    that in this way all known global minimum structures of the Lennard-Jones (LJ) clusters can be found. Our method provides an efficient tool for the calculation and analysis of atomic cluster structure. With its use we justify the magic numbers sequence for the clusters of noble gases atoms and compare...... for the clusters of noble gases atoms. Our method serves an efficient alternative to the global optimization techniques based on the Monte-Carlo simulations and it can be applied for the solution of a broad variety of problems in which atomic cluster structure is important....

  6. Formation and vibrational structure of Si nano-clusters in ZnO matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Serrano, J. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Hidalgo (Mexico); Pal, U. [Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Koshizaki, N.; Sasaki, T. [National Institute of Materials and Chemical Research, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-02-01

    We have studied the formation and vibrational structure of Si nano-clusters in ZnO matrix prepared by radio-frequency (r.f.) co-sputtering, and characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Infrared (IR) spectroscopy techniques. The composite films of Si/ZnO were grown o quartz substrates by co-sputtering of Si and ZnO targets. TEM images show a homogeneous distribution of clusters in the matrix with average size varied from 3.7 nm to 34 nm depending on the temperature of annealing. IR absorption measurements revealed the bands correspond to the modes of vibrations of Si{sub 3} in its triangular geometrical structure. By analysing the IR absorption and XPS spectra we found that the nano-clusters consist of a Si{sub 3} core and a SiO{sub x} cap layer. With the increase of annealing temperature, the vibrational states of Si changed from the triplet {sup 3}B1(C2{sub v}) and {sup 3}A'{sub 2}(D{sub 3h}) states to its singlet ground state {sup 1}A{sub 1}(C2{sub v}) and the oxidation state of Si in SiO{sub x} increased. The evolution of the local atomic structure of the Si nano-clusters with the variation of Si content in the film and with the variation of the temperature of annealing are discussed. [Spanish] Se estudia la formacion y estructura vibracional de nano-cumulos de Si en matriz de ZnO preparados por la tecnica de radio-frecuencia (r.f.) co-sputtering, y caracterizados por Microscopia Electronica de Transmision (TEM), Espectroscopia Fotoelectronica de rayos X (XPS) y Espectroscopia de Infrarrojo (IR). Las peliculas compositas de Si/ZnO fueron crecidas sobre sustratos de cuarzo mediante el co-sputtering de blancos de Si y ZnO. Las imagenes de TEM mostraron una distribucion homogenea de cumulos en la matriz con un tamano promedio de 3.7 nm a 34 nm dependiendo de la temperatura de tratamiento. Las mediciones de IR relevaron las bandas correspondientes a los modos de vibracion de Si{sub 3} en su estructura

  7. Techniques for Representation of Regional Clusters in Geographical In-formation Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana REVEIU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an overview of visualization techniques adapted for regional clusters presentation in Geographic Information Systems. Clusters are groups of companies and insti-tutions co-located in a specific geographic region and linked by interdependencies in providing a related group of products and services. The regional clusters can be visualized by projecting the data into two-dimensional space or using parallel coordinates. Cluster membership is usually represented by different colours or by dividing clusters into several panels of a grille display. Taking into consideration regional clusters requirements and the multilevel administrative division of the Romania’s territory, I used two cartograms: NUTS2- regions and NUTS3- counties, to illustrate the tools for regional clusters representation.

  8. M4C9 +(M = Ti, V): New gas phase clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Selvan; L Gowrishankar; T Pradeep

    2001-10-01

    New metal-carbon clusters, M4C9 +(M = Ti, V), generated using a combined thermal arc discharge evaporation set-up, have been studied with quadrupole mass spectrometry. Reactivities of these clusters have been investigated by means of association reactions with H2O. Metal-carbon clusters of other compositions have also been studied. We speculate on the mechanism of formation of larger metal-carbon clusters.

  9. Formation of anomalous globular clusters with metallicity spreads: A unified picture

    CERN Document Server

    Bekki, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Recent observations have revealed that at least 8 globular clusters (GCs) in the Galaxy show internal abundance spreads in [Fe/H]. We investigate the origin of these `anomalous' GCs using numerical simulations of GCs in the dwarfs orbiting around the Galaxy and chemical evolution model of dwarfs hosting the GCs. The principal results are as follows. GCs formed in a host dwarf galaxy with a total mass of ~ 10^10 M_sun can merge to form a single nuclear GC before the host is completely destroyed by the Galaxy, if they are massive (> 3*10^5 M_sun) and if they are formed in the inner region (R<400 pc). The GC merger remnants can capture field stars during its spiral-in to nuclear regions. If two GCs are formed from star formation events separated by ~300 Myr in their host dwarf, then the new GC formed from GC merging can have [Fe/H] spread of 0.2 dex and [Ba/Fe] spread of 0.3 dex. GCs formed from GC merging can show variety of internal abundance spreads depending on the details of their hosts' chemical evoluti...

  10. Pair and Cluster Formation in Hybrid Active-Passive Matter Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafnick, Ryan; Garcia, Angel

    2015-03-01

    Systems composed of self-propelling entities, dubbed active matter, are ubiquitous in nature, from flocks of birds and schools of fish to swarms of bacteria and catalytic nanomotors. These systems (both biological and industrial) have applications ranging from micron-scale cargo manipulation and directed transport to water remediation and material processing. When added to a solution with passive (non-self-propelling) particles, active matter leads to new and altered system properties. For example, the diffusion of passive particles increases by orders of magnitude in typical systems, leading to a raised effective temperature. Additionally, particles that normally repel each other exhibit effective attractions which can lead to pair formation and clustering. The nature of these effects depends on both the mechanical collisions of swimmers and the hydrodynamic flow fields they propagate. We computationally examine the effect and dependence of various system parameters, such as particle shape and density, on these properties. This work was funded by NIH grant GM086801 and NSF grant MCB-1050966.

  11. Recent galaxy mergers and residual star formation of red sequence galaxies in galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Ree, Chang H; Jaffé, Yara; Demarco, Ricardo; Treister, Ezequiel

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the GALEX ultraviolet (UV) properties of optical red sequence galaxies in 4 rich Abell clusters at z \\leq 0.1. In particular, we tried to find a hint of merger-induced recent star formation (RSF) in red sequence galaxies. Using the NUV - r' colors of the galaxies, RSF fractions were derived based on various criteria for post-merger galaxies and normal galaxies. Following k-correction, about 36% of the post-merger galaxies were classified as RSF galaxies with a conservative criterion (NUV - r' \\leq 5), and that number was doubled (~ 72%) when using a generous criterion (NUV - r' \\leq 5.4). The trend was the same when we restricted the sample to galaxies within 0.5xR_{200}. Post-merger galaxies with strong UV emission showed more violent, asymmetric features in the deep optical images. The RSF fractions did not show any trend along the clustocentric distance within R_{200}. We performed a Dressler-Shectman test to check whether the RSF galaxies had any correlation with the sub-structures in ...

  12. Megaparsec-Scale Triggers for Star Formation: Clusters and Filaments of Galaxies in the Horologium-Reticulum Supercluster

    CERN Document Server

    Fleenor, Matthew C

    2009-01-01

    Specific indications of star-formation are presented within cluster and filament galaxies that are members of the Horologium-Reticulum supercluster (HRS, z ~0.06). These indicators arise from multi-wavelength observations, primarily emission lines from optical spectroscopy and faint excess from radio continuum (1.4 GHz) photometry. HRS galaxies exhibiting current star formation are consistent with previous studies in that the star-forming populations organize around megaparsec-scale filament axes as well as near the cluster core. Therefore with support from optical photometry, mechanisms for triggering star formation in these galaxies are most likely due to merger interactions in lower density (and lower velocity) environments and possible bursts prior to stripping within the higher density (and higher velocity) environments.

  13. Carbon dioxide sequestration via olivine carbonation: Examining the formation of reaction products

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, H. E.; Plümper, O.; Putnis, A.

    2009-04-01

    Due to its abundance and natural ability to sequester CO2, olivine has been proposed as one mineral that could be used in the control of CO2 emissions into the atmosphere (Metz, 2005). Large scale peridotite deposits found in locations such as the Western Gneiss Region in Norway could provide in-situ sites for sequestration or the raw materials for ex-situ mineral carbonation. Determining the conditions under which magnesite (MgCO3) forms most efficiently is crucial to conduct a cost effective process. Understanding the development of secondary minerals is particularly important for in-situ methods as these phases can form passivating layers and affect the host rock porosity. The final solution of flow-through experiments conducted at alkaline pH have been shown to be supersaturated with respect to talc and chrysotile (Giammer et al., 2005), although these phases were not found to have precipitated the formation of a passivating, amorphous silica layer has been observed on reacted olivine surfaces (Bearat et al., 2006). By studying magnesite and other products produced during the carbonation of olivine within Teflon lined steel autoclaves we have begun to form a more comprehensive understanding of how these reactions would proceed during sequestration processes. We have performed batch experiments using carbonated saline solutions in the presence of air or gaseous CO2 from 80 to 200 ˚ C. X-ray powder diffraction was used to identify magnesite within the reaction products. Crystals of magnesite up to 20 m in diameter can be observed on olivine grain surfaces with scanning electron microscopy. Secondary reaction products formed a platy layer on olivine surfaces in reactions above 160 ˚ C and below pH 12. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis of the platy layer revealed an increase in Fe concentration. The macroscopically observable red colouration of the reaction products and Raman spectroscopy indicate that hematite is present in these layers. For experiments with

  14. The Effect of Carbon Source and Fluoride Concentrations in the "Streptococcus Mutans" Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulino, Tony P.; Andrade, Ricardo O.; Bruschi-Thedei, Giuliana C. M.; Thedei, Geraldo, Jr.; Ciancaglini, Pietro

    2004-01-01

    The main objective of this class experiment is to show the influence of carbon source and of different fluoride concentrations on the biofilm formation by the bacterium "Streptococcus mutans." The observation of different biofilm morphology as a function of carbon source and fluoride concentration allows an interesting discussion regarding the…

  15. CH4-consuming microorganisms and the formation of carbonate crusts at cold seeps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aloisi, G; Bouloubassi, [No Value; Heijs, SK; Pancost, RD; Pierre, C; Damste, JSS; Gottschal, JC; Forney, LJ; Rouchy, JM

    2002-01-01

    To understand the role played by microorganisms in the formation of cold seep carbonates, we conducted an integrated microbial, mineralogical and organic geochemical study of methane-related authigenic carbonate crusts formed on eastern Mediterranean mud volcanoes. We show that supersaturation with

  16. CH4-consuming microorganisms and the formation of carbonate crusts at cold-seeps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Aloisi, G.; Bouloubassi, I.; Heijs, S.K.; Pancost, R.D.; Pierre, C.; Gottschal, J.C.; Forney, L.J.; Rouchy, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    To understand the role played by microorganisms in the formation of cold seep carbonates, we conducted an integrated microbial, mineralogical and organic geochemical study of methane-related authigenic carbonate crusts formed on eastern Mediterranean mud volcanoes. We show that supersaturation with

  17. Formation and transformation of a short range ordered iron carbonate precursor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dideriksen, Knud; Frandsen, Cathrine; Bovet, Nicolas;

    2015-01-01

    Fe(II)-carbonates, such as siderite, form in environments where O2 is scarce, e.g., during marine sediment diagenesis, corrosion and possibly CO2 sequestration, but little is known about their formation pathways. We show that early precipitates from carbonate solutions containing 0.1M Fe(II) with...

  18. Palladium on Nitrogen-Doped Mesoporous Carbon: A Bifunctional Catalyst for Formate-Based, Carbon-Neutral Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fanan; Xu, Jinming; Shao, Xianzhao; Su, Xiong; Huang, Yanqiang; Zhang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    The lack of safe, efficient, and economical hydrogen storage technologies is a hindrance to the realization of the hydrogen economy. Reported herein is a reversible formate-based carbon-neutral hydrogen storage system that is established over a novel catalyst comprising palladium nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon. The support was fabricated by a hard template method and nitridated under a flow of ammonia. Detailed analyses demonstrate that this bicarbonate/formate redox equilibrium is promoted by the cooperative role of the doped nitrogen functionalities and the well-dispersed, electron-enriched palladium nanoparticles. PMID:26763714

  19. Palladium on Nitrogen-Doped Mesoporous Carbon: A Bifunctional Catalyst for Formate-Based, Carbon-Neutral Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fanan; Xu, Jinming; Shao, Xianzhao; Su, Xiong; Huang, Yanqiang; Zhang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    The lack of safe, efficient, and economical hydrogen storage technologies is a hindrance to the realization of the hydrogen economy. Reported herein is a reversible formate-based carbon-neutral hydrogen storage system that is established over a novel catalyst comprising palladium nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon. The support was fabricated by a hard template method and nitridated under a flow of ammonia. Detailed analyses demonstrate that this bicarbonate/formate redox equilibrium is promoted by the cooperative role of the doped nitrogen functionalities and the well-dispersed, electron-enriched palladium nanoparticles.

  20. Effect of carbon on void formation in neutron-irradiated nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made of neutron irradiation at 1100C producing octahedral voids in high purity nickel samples containing up to 84 wt ppm carbon. The kinetics of void size, formation, and density with increasing carbon content is discussed. It was found that the effect of carbon was mainly to suppress void nucleation, with little or no effect on void growth. Also a trapping mechanism is proposed. There are 64 references

  1. The rise and fall of star-formation in $\\bf z\\sim0.2$ merging galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Stroe, Andra; Dawson, William; Jee, M James; Hoekstra, Henk; Wittman, David; van Weeren, Reinout J; Brüggen, Marcus; Röttgering, Huub J A

    2014-01-01

    CIZA J2242.8+5301 (`Sausage') and 1RXS J0603.3+4213 (`Toothbrush') are two low-redshift ($z\\sim0.2$), massive ($\\sim2\\times10^{15}M_\\odot$), post-core passage merging clusters, which host shock waves traced by diffuse radio emission. To study their star-formation properties, we uniformly survey the `Sausage' and `Toothbrush' clusters in broad and narrow band filters and select a sample of $201$ and $463$ line emitters, down to a rest-frame equivalent width ($13${\\AA}). We robustly separate between H$\\alpha$ and higher redshift emitters using a combination of optical multi-band (B, g, V, r, i, z) and spectroscopic data. We build H$\\alpha$ luminosity functions for the entire cluster region, near the shock fronts, and away from the shock fronts and find striking differences between the two clusters. In the dynamically younger, $1$ Gyr old `Sausage' cluster we find numerous ($59$) H$\\alpha$ emitters above a star-formation rate (SFR) of $0.17$ M$_{\\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ surprisingly located in close proximity to the sh...

  2. The Epipolythiodiketopiperazine Gene Cluster in Claviceps purpurea: Dysfunctional Cytochrome P450 Enzyme Prevents Formation of the Previously Unknown Clapurines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Dopstadt

    Full Text Available Claviceps purpurea is an important food contaminant and well known for the production of the toxic ergot alkaloids. Apart from that, little is known about its secondary metabolism and not all toxic substances going along with the food contamination with Claviceps are known yet. We explored the metabolite profile of a gene cluster in C. purpurea with a high homology to gene clusters, which are responsible for the formation of epipolythiodiketopiperazine (ETP toxins in other fungi. By overexpressing the transcription factor, we were able to activate the cluster in the standard C. purpurea strain 20.1. Although all necessary genes for the formation of the characteristic disulfide bridge were expressed in the overexpression mutants, the fungus did not produce any ETPs. Isolation of pathway intermediates showed that the common biosynthetic pathway stops after the first steps. Our results demonstrate that hydroxylation of the diketopiperazine backbone is the critical step during the ETP biosynthesis. Due to a dysfunctional enzyme, the fungus is not able to produce toxic ETPs. Instead, the pathway end-products are new unusual metabolites with a unique nitrogen-sulfur bond. By heterologous expression of the Leptosphaeria maculans cytochrome P450 encoding gene sirC, we were able to identify the end-products of the ETP cluster in C. purpurea. The thioclapurines are so far unknown ETPs, which might contribute to the toxicity of other C. purpurea strains with a potentially intact ETP cluster.

  3. The Epipolythiodiketopiperazine Gene Cluster in Claviceps purpurea: Dysfunctional Cytochrome P450 Enzyme Prevents Formation of the Previously Unknown Clapurines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudzynski, Paul; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Claviceps purpurea is an important food contaminant and well known for the production of the toxic ergot alkaloids. Apart from that, little is known about its secondary metabolism and not all toxic substances going along with the food contamination with Claviceps are known yet. We explored the metabolite profile of a gene cluster in C. purpurea with a high homology to gene clusters, which are responsible for the formation of epipolythiodiketopiperazine (ETP) toxins in other fungi. By overexpressing the transcription factor, we were able to activate the cluster in the standard C. purpurea strain 20.1. Although all necessary genes for the formation of the characteristic disulfide bridge were expressed in the overexpression mutants, the fungus did not produce any ETPs. Isolation of pathway intermediates showed that the common biosynthetic pathway stops after the first steps. Our results demonstrate that hydroxylation of the diketopiperazine backbone is the critical step during the ETP biosynthesis. Due to a dysfunctional enzyme, the fungus is not able to produce toxic ETPs. Instead, the pathway end-products are new unusual metabolites with a unique nitrogen-sulfur bond. By heterologous expression of the Leptosphaeria maculans cytochrome P450 encoding gene sirC, we were able to identify the end-products of the ETP cluster in C. purpurea. The thioclapurines are so far unknown ETPs, which might contribute to the toxicity of other C. purpurea strains with a potentially intact ETP cluster. PMID:27390873

  4. Accuracy studies with carbon clusters at the Penning trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketelaer, J.; Beyer, T.; Blaum, K.; Block, M.; Eberhardt, K.; Eibach, M.; Herfurth, F.; Smorra, C.; Nagy, Sz.

    2010-05-01

    Extensive cross-reference measurements of well-known frequency ratios using various sizes of carbon cluster ions 12Cn + (10≤n≤23) were performed to determine the effects limiting the accuracy of mass measurements at the Penning-trap facility TRIGA-TRAP. Two major contributions to the uncertainty of a mass measurement have been identified. Fluctuations of the magnetic field cause an uncertainty in the frequency ratio due to the required calibration by a reference ion of uf(νref)/νref = 6(2) × 10-11/min × Δt. A mass-dependent systematic shift of the frequency ratio of epsilonm(r)/r = -2.2(2) × 10-9 × (m-mref)/u has been found as well. Finally, the nuclide 197Au was used as a cross-check since its mass is already known with an uncertainty of 0.6 keV.

  5. Negative Ion Photoelectron Spectroscopy Reveals Thermodynamic Advantage of Organic Acids in Facilitating Formation of Bisulfate Ion Clusters: Atmospheric Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Gao-Lei; Lin, Wei; Deng, Shihu; Zhang, Jian; Zheng, Weijun; Paesani, Francesco; Wang, Xue B.

    2013-03-07

    Recent lab and field measurements have indicated critical roles of organic acids in enhancing new atmospheric aerosol formation. Such findings have stimulated theoretical studies with the aim of understanding interaction of organic acids with common aerosol nucleation precursors like bisulfate (HSO4-). In this Letter, we report a combined negative ion photoelectron spectroscopic and theoretical investigation of molecular clusters formed by HSO4- with succinic acid (SUA, HO2C(CH2)2CO2H), HSO4-(SUA)n (n = 0-2), along with HSO4-(H2O)n and HSO4-(H2SO4)n. It is found that one SUA molecule can stabilize HSO4- by ca. 39 kcal/mol, triple the corresponding value that one water molecule is capable of (ca. 13 kcal/mol). Molecular dynamics simulations and quantum chemical calculations reveal the most plausible structures of these clusters and attribute the stability of these clusters due to formation of strong hydrogen bonds. This work provides direct experimental evidence showing significant thermodynamic advantage by involving organic acid molecules to promote formation and growth in bisulfate clusters and aerosols.

  6. Distribution of star formation rates during the rapid assembly of NGC 1399 as deduced from its globular cluster system

    CERN Document Server

    Schulz, C; Kroupa, P; Pflamm-Altenburg, J

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) share many properties with globular clusters (GCs) and are found in similar environments. A large sample of UCDs and GCs around NGC 1399, the central giant elliptical of the Fornax galaxy cluster, is used to infer their formation history and also that of NGC 1399. We assumed that all GCs and UCDs in our sample are star clusters (SCs) and used them as tracers of past star formation activities. After correcting our GC/UCD sample for mass loss, we interpreted their overall mass function to be a superposition of SC populations that formed coevally during different times. The SC masses of each population were distributed according to the embedded cluster mass function (ECMF), a pure power law with the slope $-\\beta$ and a stellar upper mass limit, $M_{\\mathrm{max}}$, which depended on the star formation rate (SFR). We decomposed the observed GC/UCD mass function into individual SC populations and converted $M_{\\mathrm{max}}$ of each SC population to an SFR. The overall distribut...

  7. Galaxy Clustering Topology in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Main Galaxy Sample: a Test for Galaxy Formation Models

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Yun-Young; Kim, Juhan; Gott, J Richard; Weinberg, David H; Vogeley, Michael S; Kim, Sungsoo S

    2010-01-01

    We measure the topology of the main galaxy distribution using the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, examining the dependence of galaxy clustering topology on galaxy properties. The observational results are used to test galaxy formation models. A volume-limited sample defined by $M_r<-20.19$ enables us to measure the genus curve with amplitude of $G=378$ at $6h^{-1}$Mpc smoothing scale, with 4.8\\% uncertainty including all systematics and cosmic variance. The clustering topology over the smoothing length interval from 6 to $10 h^{-1}$Mpc reveals a mild scale-dependence for the shift ($\\Delta\

  8. Combining Semi-Analytic Models of Galaxy Formation with Simulations of Galaxy Clusters: the Need for AGN Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Short, C J

    2009-01-01

    We present hydrodynamical N-body simulations of clusters of galaxies with feedback taken from semi-analytic models of galaxy formation. The advantage of this technique is that the source of feedback in our simulations is a population of galaxies that closely resembles that found in the real universe. We demonstrate that, to achieve the high entropy levels found in clusters, active galactic nuclei must inject a large fraction of their energy into the intergalactic/intracluster media throughout the growth period of the central black hole. These simulations reinforce the argument of Bower et al. (2008), who arrived at the same conclusion on the basis of purely semi-analytic reasoning.

  9. Formation of charged H3O+ and OH- fragments at consistent shifts of protons in water clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednyakov, A. S.; Novakovskaya, Yu. V.

    2016-09-01

    Probable paths of consistent shifts of bridge protons within the hexamolecular rings of dodecamer water cluster at different arrangement of neighboring molecules are determined. As with individual rings, consistent shifts of protons in molecular cages are found to be promoted by contraction/extension of the oxygen skeleton. Transition states characterized by the formation of different numbers of such charged fragments as H3Oδ+, H5O 2 δ+ , and OH-, are identified. Conditions of the relatively long-term (about picoseconds) existence of the fragments in cluster systems are determined.

  10. Geological Sequestration of CO2 by Hydrous Carbonate Formation with Reclaimed Slag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Von L. Richards; Kent Peaslee; Jeffrey Smith

    2008-02-06

    The concept of this project is to develop a process that improves the kinetics of the hydrous carbonate formation reaction enabling steelmakers to directly remove CO2 from their furnace exhaust gas. It is proposed to bring the furnace exhaust stream containing CO2 in contact with reclaimed steelmaking slag in a reactor that has an environment near the unit activity of water resulting in the production of carbonates. The CO2 emissions from the plant would be reduced by the amount sequestered in the formation of carbonates. The main raw materials for the process are furnace exhaust gases and specially prepared slag.

  11. Gas dynamic effects on formation of carbon dimers in laser-produced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shboul, K. F.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2011-09-01

    We investigated the effect of helium and nitrogen pressures on the dynamics of molecular species formation during laser ablation of carbon. For producing plasmas, planar carbon targets were irradiated with 1064 nm, 6 ns pulses from an Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet laser. The emission from excited C2 and CN molecules was studied using space resolved optical time-of-flight emission spectroscopy and spectrally resolved fast imaging. The intensity oscillations in C2 and CN monochromatic fast imaging and their emission space-time contours suggest that recombination is the major mechanism of C2 formation within the laser ablation carbon plumes in the presence of ambient gas.

  12. Observational constraints on star cluster formation theory - I. The mass-radius relation

    CERN Document Server

    Pfalzner, S; Sills, A; Urquhart, J S; Kauffmann, J; Kuhn, M A; Bhandare, A; Menten, K M

    2015-01-01

    Stars form predominantly in groups usually denoted as clusters or associations. The observed stellar groups display a broad spectrum of masses, sizes and other properties, so it is often assumed that there is no underlying structure in this diversity. Here we show that the assumption of an unstructured multitude of cluster or association types might be misleading. Current data compilations of clusters show correlations between cluster mass, size, age, maximum stellar mass etc. In this first paper we take a closer look at the correlation of cluster mass and radius. We use literature data to explore relations in cluster and molecular core properties in the solar neighborhood. We show that for embedded clusters in the solar neighborhood there exists a clear correlation between cluster mass and half-mass radius of the form $M_c = C R_c^{\\gamma}$ with gamma = 1.7 +/-0.2. This correlation holds for infra red K band data as well as X-ray sources and for clusters containing a hundred stars up to those consisting of a...

  13. Skeletal myotube formation enhanced by electrospun polyurethane carbon nanotube scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Sirivisoot S; Harrison BS

    2011-01-01

    Sirinrath Sirivisoot, Benjamin S Harrison Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC, USA Background: This study examined the effects of electrically conductive materials made from electrospun single- or multiwalled carbon nanotubes with polyurethane to promote myoblast differentiation into myotubes in the presence and absence of electrical stimulation. Methods and results: After electrical stimulation,...

  14. Methods and systems for the formation of cyclic carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Trevor Alan; Jamison, Timothy F; Kozak, Jennifer Aiden; Simeon, Fritz; Wu, Jie

    2014-12-30

    Described herein are inventive methods for synthesis of cyclic carbonates from CO.sub.2 and epoxide. In some embodiments, the methods are carried out in the presence of a catalyst comprising an electrophilic halogen. In some embodiments, the methods are carried out in a flow reactor.

  15. Formation of silicon carbide nanorods from wood-based carbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hata, T; Castro, [No Value; Fujisawa, M; Imamura, Y; Bonnamy, S; Bronsveld, P; Kikuchi, H

    2005-01-01

    Man-made ceramic wood similar to petrified wood found in nature can be used at high temperature as the high oxidation rate of carbon above 500 degrees C is suppressed by a mu m thin SiC coating similar to the shuttle's heat shield. Possible applications are in the field of energy production, e.g., g

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation of melting and crystallization processes of polyethylene clusters confined in armchair single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhou; Wang, Jinjian; Zhu, Xiaolei; Lu, Xiaohua; Guan, Wenwen; Yang, Yuchen

    2015-01-01

    The confined interaction is important to understand the melting and crystallization of polymers within single-wall carbon tube (SWNT). However, it is difficult for us to observe this interaction. In the current work, the structures and behaviors of melting and crystallization for polyethylene (PE) clusters confined in armchair single-walled carbon nanotubes ((n,n)-SWNTs) are investigated and examined based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The nonbonded energies, structures, Lindemman indices, radial density distributions, and diffusion coefficients are used to demonstrate the features of melting phase transition for PE clusters confined in (n,n)-SWNTs. The chain end-to-end distance (R(n)) and chain end-to-end distribution are used to examine the flexibility of the PE chain confined in SWNT. The global orientational order parameter (P2) is employed to reveal the order degree of whole PE polymer. The effect of polymerization degree on melting temperature and the influence of SWNT chirality on structure of PE cluster are examined and discussed. Results demonstrate that within the confined environment of SWNT, PE clusters adopt novel co-axial crystalline layer structure, in which parallel chains of each layer are approximately vertical to tube axis. The disordered-ordered transformation of PE chains in each layer is an important structural feature for crystallization of confined PE clusters. SWNTs have a considerable effect on the structures and stabilities of the confined PE clusters.

  17. Carbon and oxygen isotope variations of the Middle-Late Triassic Al Aziziyah Formation, northwest Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Mohamed S. H.; Pope, Michael C.; Grossman, Ethan L.; Mriheel, Ibrahim Y.

    2016-06-01

    This study presents the δ13C and δ18O records from whole rock samples of the Middle-Late Triassic (Ladinian-Carnian) Al Aziziyah Formation that were deposited on a gently sloping carbonate ramp within the Jifarah Basin of Northwest Libya. The Al Aziziyah Formation consists of gray limestone, dolomite, and dolomitic limestone interbedded with shale. The Ghryan Dome and Kaf Bates sections were sampled and analyzed for carbon and oxygen isotope chemostratigraphy to integrate high-resolution carbon isotope data with an outcrop-based stratigraphy, to provide better age control of the Al Aziziyah Formation. This study also discusses the relation between the facies architecture of the Al Aziziyah Formation and the carbon isotope values. Seven stages of relative sea level rise and fall within the Ghryan Dome were identified based on facies stacking patterns, field observations and carbon stable isotopes. The Al Aziziyah Formation δ13C chemostratigraphic curve can be partially correlated with the Triassic global δ13C curve. This correlation indicates that the Al Aziziyah Formation was deposited during the Ladinian and early Carnian. No straight-forward relationship is seen between δ13C and relative sea level probably because local influences complicated systematic environmental and diagenetic isotopic effects associated with sea level change.

  18. Thermodynamic analysis of carbon formation boundary and reforming performance for steam reforming of dimethyl ether

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faungnawakij, Kajornsak; Kikuchi, Ryuji; Eguchi, Koichi

    Thermodynamic analysis of dimethyl ether steam reforming (DME SR) was investigated for carbon formation boundary, DME conversion, and hydrogen yield for fuel cell application. The equilibrium calculation employing Gibbs free minimization was performed to figure out the required steam-to-carbon ratio (S/C = 0-5) and reforming temperature (25-1000 °C) where coke formation was thermodynamically unfavorable. S/C, reforming temperature and product species strongly contributed to the coke formation and product composition. When chemical species DME, methanol, CO 2, CO, H 2, H 2O and coke were considered, complete conversion of DME and hydrogen yield above 78% without coke formation were achieved at the normal operating temperatures of molten carbonate fuel cell (600 °C) and solid oxide fuel cell (900 °C), when S/C was at or above 2.5. When CH 4 was favorable, production of coke and that of hydrogen were significantly suppressed.

  19. Pattern Formation and Reaction Textures during Dunite Carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisabeth, H. P.; Zhu, W.

    2015-12-01

    Alteration of olivine-bearing rocks by fluids is one of the most pervasive geochemical processes on the surface of the Earth. Serpentinized and/or carbonated ultramafic rocks often exhibit characteristic textures on many scales, from polygonal mesh textures on the grain-scale to onion-skin or kernel patterns on the outcrop scale. Strong disequilibrium between pristine ultramafic rocks and common geological fluids such as water and carbon dioxide leads to rapid reactions and coupled mechanical and chemical feedbacks that manifest as characteristic textures. Textural evolution during metasomatic reactions can control effective reaction rates by modulating dynamic porosity and therefore reactant supply and reactive surface area. We run hydrostatic experiments on thermally cracked dunites saturated with carbon dioxide bearing brine at 15 MPa confining pressure and 150°C to explore the evolution of physical properties and reaction textures as carbon mineralization takes place in the sample. Compaction and permeability reduction are observed throughout experiments. Rates of porosity and permeability changes are sensitive to pore fluid chemistry. After reaction, samples are imaged in 3-dimension (3D) using a dual-beam FIB-SEM. Analysis of the high resolution 3D microstructure shows that permeable, highly porous domains are created by olivine dissolution at a characteristic distance from pre-existing crack surfaces while precipitation of secondary minerals such as serpentine and magnesite is limited largely to the primary void space. The porous dissolution channels provide an avenue for fluid ingress, allow reactions to continue and could lead to progressive hierarchical fracturing. Initial modeling of the system indicates that this texture is the result of coupling between dissolution-precipitation reactions and the local stress state of the sample.

  20. Protein Conformational Flexibility Enables the Formation of Dense Liquid Clusters: Tests Using Solution Shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byington, Michael C; Safari, Mohammad S; Conrad, Jacinta C; Vekilov, Peter G

    2016-07-01

    According to recently proposed two-step nucleation mechanisms, crystal nuclei form within preexisting dense liquid clusters. Clusters with radii about 100 nm, which capture from 10(-7) to 10(-3) of the total protein, have been observed with numerous proteins and shown to host crystal nucleation. Theories aiming to understand the mesoscopic size and small protein fraction held in the clusters have proposed that in solutions of single-chain proteins, the clusters consist of partially misfolded protein molecules. To test this conjecture, we perturb the protein conformation by shearing solutions of the protein lysozyme. We demonstrate that shear rates greater than a threshold applied for longer than 1 h reduce the volume of the cluster population. The likely mechanism of the observed response involves enhanced partial unfolding of lysozyme molecules, which exposes hydrophobic surfaces between the constituent domains to the aqueous solution. PMID:27267087