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Sample records for carbon ceramic material

  1. Novel sintered ceramic materials incorporated with EAF carbon steel slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayannis, V.; Ntampegliotis, K.; Lamprakopoulos, S.; Papapolymerou, G.; Spiliotis, X.

    2017-01-01

    In the present research, novel sintered clay-based ceramic materials containing electric arc furnace carbon steel slag (EAFC) as a useful admixture were developed and characterized. The environmentally safe management of steel industry waste by-products and their valorization as secondary resources into value-added materials towards circular economy have attracted much attention in the last years. EAF Carbon steel slag in particular, is generated during the manufacture of carbon steel. It is a solid residue mainly composed of rich-in- Fe, Ca and Si compounds. The experimental results show that the beneficial incorporation of lower percentages of EAFC up to 6%wt. into ceramics sintered at 950 °C is attained without significant variations in sintering behavior and physico-mechanical properties. Further heating up to 1100 °C strongly enhances the densification of the ceramic microstructures, thus reducing the porosity and strengthening their mechanical performance. On the other side, in terms of thermal insulation behavior as well as energy consumption savings and production cost alleviation, the optimum sintering temperature appears to be 950 °C.

  2. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Villalobos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements.

  3. Ceramic laser materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikesue, Akio; Aung, Yan Lin

    2008-12-01

    The word 'ceramics' is derived from the Greek keramos, meaning pottery and porcelain. The opaque and translucent cement and clay often used in tableware are not appropriate for optical applications because of the high content of optical scattering sources, that is, defects. Recently, scientists have shown that by eliminating the defects, a new, refined ceramic material - polycrystalline ceramic - can be produced. This advanced ceramic material offers practical laser generation and is anticipated to be a highly attractive alternative to conventional glass and single-crystal laser technologies in the future. Here we review the history of the development of ceramic lasers, the principle of laser generation based on this material, some typical results achieved with ceramic lasers so far, and discuss the potential future outlook for the field.

  4. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soules, T F; Clapsaddle, B J; Landingham, R L; Schaffers, K I

    2005-02-15

    Transparent ceramic materials have several major advantages over single crystals in laser applications, not the least of which is the ability to make large aperture parts in a robust manufacturing process. After more than a decade of working on making transparent YAG:Nd, Japanese workers have recently succeeded in demonstrating samples that performed as laser gain media as well as their single crystal counterparts. Since then several laser materials have been made and evaluated. For these reasons, developing ceramic laser materials is the most exciting and futuristic materials topic in today's major solid-state laser conferences. We have established a good working relationship with Konoshima Ltd., the Japanese producer of the best ceramic laser materials, and have procured and evaluated slabs designed by us for use in our high-powered SSHCL. Our measurements indicate that these materials will work in the SSHCL, and we have nearly completed retrofitting the SSHCL with four of the largest transparent ceramic YAG:Nd slabs in existence. We have also begun our own effort to make this material and have produced samples with various degrees of transparency/translucency. We are in the process of carrying out an extensive design-of-experiments to establish the significant process variables for making transparent YAG. Finally because transparent ceramics afford much greater flexibility in the design of lasers, we have been exploring the potential for much larger apertures, new materials, for example for the Mercury laser, other designs for SSHL, such as, edge pumping designs, slabs with built in ASE suppression, etc. This work has just beginning.

  5. In vitro degradation and cell response of calcium carbonate composite ceramic in comparison with other synthetic bone substitute materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fupo; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Fanwen; Zhu, Jixiang; Tian, Xiumei; Chen, Xiaoming

    2015-05-01

    The robust calcium carbonate composite ceramics (CC/PG) can be acquired by fast sintering calcium carbonate at a low temperature (650 °C) using a biocompatible, degradable phosphate-based glass (PG) as sintering agent. In the present study, the in vitro degradation and cell response of CC/PG were assessed and compared with 4 synthetic bone substitute materials, calcium carbonate ceramic (CC), PG, hydroxyapatite (HA) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) ceramics. The degradation rates in decreasing order were as follows: PG, CC, CC/PG, β-TCP, and HA. The proliferation of rat bone mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) cultured on the CC/PG was comparable with that on CC and PG, but inferior to HA and β-TCP. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of rMSCs on CC/PG was lower than PG, comparable with β-TCP, but higher than HA. The rMSCs on CC/PG and PG had enhanced gene expression in specific osteogenic markers, respectively. Compared to HA and β-TCP, the rMSCs on the CC/PG expressed relatively lower level of collagen I and runt-related transcription factor 2, but showed more considerable expression of osteopontin. Although CC, PG, HA, and β-TCP possessed impressive performances in some specific aspects, they faced extant intrinsic drawbacks in either degradation rate or mechanical strength. Based on considerable compressive strength, moderate degradation rate, good cell response, and being free of obvious shortcoming, the CC/PG is promising as another choice for bone substitute materials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Sol-gel synthesis of carbon based materials reinforced ultra high temperature ceramic composites

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaojing

    2017-01-01

    This Ph.D. research is based on the development of novel sol-gel techniques for synthesis of nanostructured ultra high temperature ceramics (UHTCs) and subsequent spark plasma sintering (SPS) for densifying the UHTC composites. The liquid nature of the sol-gel process offers advantages such as high purity and ability for mixing and infiltration, and thus it can overcome some shortcomings of the conventional power processing of ceramics. SPS delivers microstructures with good density and fine ...

  7. Ceramic catalyst materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sault, A.G.; Gardner, T.J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hanprasopwattanna, A.; Reardon, J.; Datye, A.K. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) ion-exchange materials show great potential as ceramic catalyst supports due to an inherently high ion-exchange capacity which allows facile loading of catalytically active transition metal ions, and an ability to be cast as thin films on virtually any substrate. By coating titania and HTO materials onto inexpensive, high surface area substrates such as silica and alumina, the economics of using these materials is greatly improved, particularly for the HTO materials, which are substantially more expensive in the bulk form than other oxide supports. In addition, the development of thin film forms of these materials allows the catalytic and mechanical properties of the final catalyst formulation to be separately engineered. In order to fully realize the potential of thin film forms of titania and HTO, improved methods for the deposition and characterization of titania and HTO films on high surface area substrates are being developed. By varying deposition procedures, titania film thickness and substrate coverage can be varied from the submonolayer range to multilayer thicknesses on both silica and alumina. HTO films can also be formed, but the quality and reproducibility of these films is not nearly as good as for pure titania films. The films are characterized using a combination of isopropanol dehydration rate measurements, point of zero charge (PZC) measurements, BET surface area, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and elemental analysis. In order to assess the effects of changes in film morphology on catalytic activity, the films are being loaded with MoO{sub 3} using either incipient wetness impregnation or ion-exchange of heptamolybdate anions followed by calcining. The MoO{sub 3} is then sulfided to form MOS{sub 2}, and tested for catalytic activity using pyrene hydrogenation and dibenzothiophene (DBT) desulfurization, model reactions that simulate reactions occurring during coal liquefaction.

  8. Catalyzed Ceramic Burner Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Amy S., Dr.

    2012-06-29

    Catalyzed combustion offers the advantages of increased fuel efficiency, decreased emissions (both NOx and CO), and an expanded operating range. These performance improvements are related to the ability of the catalyst to stabilize a flame at or within the burner media and to combust fuel at much lower temperatures. This technology has a diverse set of applications in industrial and commercial heating, including boilers for the paper, food and chemical industries. However, wide spread adoption of catalyzed combustion has been limited by the high cost of precious metals needed for the catalyst materials. The primary objective of this project was the development of an innovative catalyzed burner media for commercial and small industrial boiler applications that drastically reduce the unit cost of the catalyzed media without sacrificing the benefits associated with catalyzed combustion. The scope of this program was to identify both the optimum substrate material as well as the best performing catalyst construction to meet or exceed industry standards for durability, cost, energy efficiency, and emissions. It was anticipated that commercial implementation of this technology would result in significant energy savings and reduced emissions. Based on demonstrated achievements, there is a potential to reduce NOx emissions by 40,000 TPY and natural gas consumption by 8.9 TBtu in industries that heavily utilize natural gas for process heating. These industries include food manufacturing, polymer processing, and pulp and paper manufacturing. Initial evaluation of commercial solutions and upcoming EPA regulations suggests that small to midsized boilers in industrial and commercial markets could possibly see the greatest benefit from this technology. While out of scope for the current program, an extension of this technology could also be applied to catalytic oxidation for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Considerable progress has been made over the course of the grant

  9. Materials and Concepts for Full Ceramic SOFCs with Focus on Carbon Containing Fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtappels, Peter; Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy; Veltzé, Sune

    , stability, and S- tolerance has been investigated. These results and an assessment on a 1 kW system level using CPOX reformed natural gas will be reviewed and further perspectives of the cell concept discussed, especially with respect to efficient operation on high carbon containing fuels.......-doped SrTiO3 anodes, and LSM/YSZ cathodes have been developed and tested as single 5 x 5 cm2 cells. The initial performance reached 0.4 W/cm2 at 850 °C and redox tolerance has been proven. The cell concept provides flexibility with respect to the used electro catalysts and their impact on power output...

  10. Flight-vehicle materials, structures, and dynamics - Assessment and future directions. Vol. 3 - Ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Stanley R. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The present volume discusses ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites in prospective aerospace systems, monolithic ceramics, transformation-toughened and whisker-reinforced ceramic composites, glass-ceramic matrix composites, reaction-bonded Si3N4 and SiC composites, and chemical vapor-infiltrated composites. Also discussed are the sol-gel-processing of ceramic composites, the fabrication and properties of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites with directed metal oxidation, the fracture behavior of ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs), the fatigue of fiber-reinforced CMCs, creep and rupture of CMCs, structural design methodologies for ceramic-based materials systems, the joining of ceramics and CMCs, and carbon-carbon composites.

  11. Ceramic cutting tools materials, development and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Whitney, E Dow

    1994-01-01

    Interest in ceramics as a high speed cutting tool material is based primarily on favorable material properties. As a class of materials, ceramics possess high melting points, excellent hardness and good wear resistance. Unlike most metals, hardness levels in ceramics generally remain high at elevated temperatures which means that cutting tip integrity is relatively unaffected at high cutting speeds. Ceramics are also chemically inert against most workmetals.

  12. Method of making molten carbonate fuel cell ceramic matrix tape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maricle, Donald L.; Putnam, Gary C.; Stewart, Jr., Robert C.

    1984-10-23

    A method of making a thin, flexible, pliable matrix material for a molten carbonate fuel cell is described. The method comprises admixing particles inert in the molten carbonate environment with an organic polymer binder and ceramic particle. The composition is applied to a mold surface and dried, and the formed compliant matrix material removed.

  13. All ceramic structure for molten carbonate fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James L.; Kucera, Eugenia H.

    1992-01-01

    An all-ceramic molten carbonate fuel cell having a composition formed of a multivalent metal oxide or oxygenate such as an alkali metal, transition metal oxygenate. The structure includes an anode and cathode separated by an electronically conductive interconnect. The electrodes and interconnect are compositions ceramic materials. Various combinations of ceramic compositions for the anode, cathode and interconnect are disclosed. The fuel cell exhibits stability in the fuel gas and oxidizing environments. It presents reduced sealing and expansion problems in fabrication and has improved long-term corrosion resistance.

  14. Bonded carbon or ceramic fiber composite filter vent for radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassell, Gilbert W.; Brugger, Ronald P.

    1985-02-19

    Carbon bonded carbon fiber composites as well as ceramic or carbon bonded ceramic fiber composites are very useful as filters which can separate particulate matter from gas streams entraining the same. These filters have particular application to the filtering of radioactive particles, e.g., they can act as vents for containers of radioactive waste material.

  15. New ceramic materials; Nuevos materiales ceramicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, R.; Dominguez-Rodriguez, A.

    2010-07-01

    This article is to provide a new ceramic materials in which, with a control of their processing and thus their microstructural properties, you can get ceramic approaching ever closer to a metal, both in its structural behavior at low as at high temperatures. (Author) 30 refs.

  16. Lightweight high performance ceramic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Stephen D [Knoxville, TN

    2008-09-02

    A sintered ceramic composition includes at least 50 wt. % boron carbide and at least 0.01 wt. % of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu, the sintered ceramic composition being characterized by a density of at least 90% of theoretical density.

  17. Ultra low and negative expansion glass–ceramic materials ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Ultra low and negative expansion glass–ceramic materials have been obtained from pyrophyllite and blast furnace slag. The batch composition was modified with the addition of lithium carbonate, hydrated alumina, boric acid and nucleating agent (titania). The batch was melted at 1400°C followed by casting in the.

  18. Ultra low and negative expansion glass–ceramic materials ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ultra low and negative expansion glass–ceramic materials have been obtained from pyrophyllite and blast furnace slag. The batch composition was modified with the addition of lithium carbonate, hydrated alumina, boric acid and nucleating agent (titania). The batch was melted at 1400°C followed by casting in the form of ...

  19. Dynamic properties of ceramic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Experimental Impact Physics Dept.

    1995-02-01

    The present study offers new data and analysis on the transient shock strength and equation-of-state properties of ceramics. Various dynamic data on nine high strength ceramics are provided with wave profile measurements, through velocity interferometry techniques, the principal observable. Compressive failure in the shock wave front, with emphasis on brittle versus ductile mechanisms of deformation, is examined in some detail. Extensive spall strength data are provided and related to the theoretical spall strength, and to energy-based theories of the spall process. Failure waves, as a mechanism of deformation in the transient shock process, are examined. Strength and equation-of-state analysis of shock data on silicon carbide, boron carbide, tungsten carbide, silicon dioxide and aluminum nitride is presented with particular emphasis on phase transition properties for the latter two. Wave profile measurements on selected ceramics are investigated for evidence of rate sensitive elastic precursor decay in the shock front failure process.

  20. Preparation of Ceramic-Bonded Carbon Block for Blast Furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiwei; Li, Yawei; Sang, Shaobai; Chen, Xilai; Zhao, Lei; Li, Yuanbing; Li, Shujing

    2014-01-01

    Traditional carbon blocks for blast furnaces are mainly produced with electrically calcined anthracite owing to its good hot metal corrosion resistance. However, this kind of material shows low thermal conductivity and does not meet the demands for cooling of the hearth and the bottom of blast furnaces. In this article, a new kind of a high-performance carbon block has been prepared via ceramic-bonded carbon (CBC) technology in a coke bed at 1673 K (1400 °C) using artificial graphite aggregate, alumina, metallic aluminum, and silicon powders as starting materials. The results showed that artificial graphite aggregates were strongly bonded by the three-dimensional network of ceramic phases in carbon blocks. In this case, the good resistance of the CBC blocks against erosion/corrosion by the hot metal is provided by the ceramic matrix and the high thermal conductivity by the graphite aggregates. The microstructure of this carbon block resembles that of CBC composites with a mean pore size of less than 0.1 μm, and up to 90 pct of the porosity shows a pore size <1 μm. Its thermal conductivity is higher than 30 W · m-1 · K-1 [293 K (20 °C)]. Meanwhile, its hot metal corrosion resistance is better than that of traditional carbon blocks.

  1. Comparative study for the nondestructive testing of advanced ceramic materials by infrared thermography and holographic interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfarra, S.; Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Bendada, A.; Maldague, X.; Ambrosini, D.; Paoletti, D.

    2010-05-01

    Advanced ceramic materials are increasingly employed in varied and new applications where improved electrical, mechanical and/or thermal properties are sought. For instance, in a manner similar to carbon or glass fiber reinforced plastics, ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are designed to improve the naturally brittle characteristics of monolithic ceramics thanks to the inclusion of fibers. Among the main interests for advanced ceramics are the increase in the operation temperature of components, the elimination of the use of cooling fluids, and weight savings. In this paper, the capabilities of infrared thermography and holographic interferometry are investigated and compared for the nondestructive assessment of advanced ceramic materials using three experimental specimens: (1) a monolithic green ceramic tile with fabricated defects, (2) a CMC specimen (from production reject) with a porous alumina matrix reinforced with glass fibers, and (3) a sandwich structure consisting on a carbon fiber honeycomb core with a ceramic plate bonded in one side.

  2. Developments in carbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchell, Timothy D.

    1994-01-01

    The following carbon-based materials are reviewed and their applications discussed: fullerenes; graphite (synthetic and manufactured); activated carbon fibers; and carbon-carbon composites. Carbon R&D activities at ORNL are emphasized.

  3. Advanced Ceramic Materials for Future Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    With growing trend toward higher temperature capabilities, lightweight, and multifunctionality, significant advances in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will be required for future aerospace applications. The presentation will provide an overview of material requirements for future aerospace missions, and the role of ceramics and CMCs in meeting those requirements. Aerospace applications will include gas turbine engines, aircraft structure, hypersonic and access to space vehicles, space power and propulsion, and space communication.

  4. Fabrication of low specific resistance ceramic carbon composites by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ceramic carbon composites were fabricated by colloidal processing using glucose as soluble carbon source.Glucose is converted into conducting carbon at high temperature treatment. Ceramic carbon composites were sintered inflowing argon at 1400◦C showing resistor behaviour even at low carbon content (1 wt%).

  5. Lightweight Ceramic Composition of Carbon Silicon Oxygen and Boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiser, Daniel B. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-Ta (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Lightweight, monolithic ceramics resistant to oxidation in air at high temperatures are made by impregnating a porous carbon preform with a sol which contains a mixture of tetraethoxysilane, dimethyldiethoxysilane and trimethyl borate. The sol is gelled and dried on the carbon preform to form a ceramic precursor. The precursor is pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere to form the ceramic which is made of carbon, silicon, oxygen and boron. The carbon of the preform reacts with the dried gel during the pyrolysis to form a component of the resulting ceramic. The ceramic is of the same size, shape and form as the carbon precursor. Thus, using a porous, fibrous carbon precursor, such as a carbon felt, results in a porous, fibrous ceramic. Ceramics of the invention are useful as lightweight tiles for a reentry spacecraft.

  6. In situ-growth of silica nanowires in ceramic carbon composites

    OpenAIRE

    Rahul Kumar; Parag Bhargava

    2017-01-01

    An understanding of the processing and microstructure of ceramic–carbon composites is critical to development of these composites for applications needing electrically conducting, thermal shock resistant ceramic materials. In the present study green compacts of carbon ceramic composites were prepared either by slurry processing or dry powder blending of one or more of the three — clay, glass, alumina and carbon black or graphite. The dried green compacts were sintered at 1400 °C in flowing ar...

  7. Smart Energy Materials of PZT Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuhiro Okayasu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the material properties of lead zirconate titanate (PZT ceramics, the domain-switching characteristics and electric power generation characteristics have been investigated during loading and unloading by using various experimental techniques. Furthermore, the influence of oscillation condition on the electrical power generation properties of lead zirconate titanate (PZT piezoelectric ceramics has been investigated. It is found that the power generation is directly attributed to the applied load and wave mode. The voltage rises instantly to the maximum level under square-wave mode, although the voltage increases gradually under triangular-wave mode. After this initial increase, there is a rapid fall to zero, followed by generation of increasingly negative voltage as the applied load is removed for all wave modes. Variation of the electric voltage is reflected by the cyclic loading at higher loading frequencies. On the basis of the obtained experimental results for the wave modes, the electrical power generation characteristics of PZT ceramics are proposed, and the voltages generated during loading and unloading are accurately estimated. The electric generation value is decrease with increasing the cyclic number due to the material failure, e.g., domain switching and crack. The influence of domain switching on the mechanical properties PZT piezoelectric ceramics is clarified, and 90 degree domain switching occurs after the load is applied to the PZT ceramic directly. Note that, in this paper, our experimental results obtained in our previous works were introduced [1,2].

  8. Smart Energy Materials of PZT Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuhiro Okayasu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the material properties of lead zirconate titanate (PZT ceramics, the domain-switching characteristics and electric power generation characteristics have been investigated during loading and unloading by using various experimental techniques. Furthermore, the influence of oscillation condition on the electrical power generation properties of lead zirconate titanate (PZT piezoelectric ceramics has been investigated. It is found that the power generation is directly attributed to the applied load and wave mode. The voltage rises instantly to the maximum level under square-wave mode, although the voltage increases gradually under triangular-wave mode. After this initial increase, there is a rapid fall to zero, followed by generation of increasingly negative voltage as the applied load is removed for all wave modes. Variation of the electric voltage is reflected by the cyclic loading at higher loading frequencies. On the basis of the obtained experimental results for the wave modes, the electrical power generation characteristics of PZT ceramics are proposed, and the voltages generated during loading and unloading are accurately estimated. The electric generation value is decrease with increasing the cyclic number due to the material failure, e.g., domain switching and crack. The influence of domain switching on the mechanical properties PZT piezoelectric ceramics is clarified, and 90 degree domain switching occurs after the load is applied to the PZT ceramic directly. Note that, in this paper, our experimental results obtained in our previous works were introduced

  9. Ceramic nanostructure materials, membranes and composite layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burggraaf, A.J.; Keizer, Klaas; van Hassel, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    Synthesis methods to obtain nanoscale materials will be briefly discussed with a focus on sol-gel methods. Three types of nanoscale composites (powders, membranes and ion implanted layers) will be discussed and exemplified with recent original research results. Ceramic membranes with a thickness of

  10. Glasses, ceramics, and composites from lunar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, George H.

    1992-02-01

    A variety of useful silicate materials can be synthesized from lunar rocks and soils. The simplest to manufacture are glasses and glass-ceramics. Glass fibers can be drawn from a variety of basaltic glasses. Glass articles formed from titania-rich basalts are capable of fine-grained internal crystallization, with resulting strength and abrasion resistance allowing their wide application in construction. Specialty glass-ceramics and fiber-reinforced composites would rely on chemical separation of magnesium silicates and aluminosilicates as well as oxides titania and alumina. Polycrystalline enstatite with induced lamellar twinning has high fracture toughness, while cordierite glass-ceramics combine excellent thermal shock resistance with high flexural strengths. If sapphire or rutile whiskers can be made, composites of even better mechanical properties are envisioned.

  11. Formation and Characterization of Carbon and Ceramic Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huczko, Andrzej; Bystrzejewski, Michał; Lange, Hubert; Baranowski, Piotr

    Different carbon and ceramic nanostructures (nanotubes, nanowires, nanofibres, nanorods, and nanoencapsulates) have great potential for improving our understanding of the fundamental concepts of the roles of both dimensionality and size on physical properties, as well as for many potential applications. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were produced in carbon arc plasma using different starting carbons, as the anode material. Low-graphitized carbons (including carbon black) proved to be much more efficient comparing to the regular graphite material. The optical emission and absorption spectroscopy was used for spectral diagnostics of the carbon arc. Carbon arc was also used to produce carbon onions containing magnetic nanocrystallites (Fe and magnetic alloys) in the core. The process was optimized and the procedure to isolate encapsulates was elaborated. Carbon nanocapsules containing Fe were also obtained via combustion synthesis from mixtures NaN3-C6Cl6-Ferrocene. This technique also proved to be very efficient to produce silicon carbide nanowires from Teflon (PTFE) and different reductants (CaSi2, Si). The protocol to isolate and efficiently purify the final product (up to 98 wt%) was proposed.

  12. Thermal shock performance of carbon-bonded carbon fiber composite and ceramic matrix composite joints for thermal protection re-entry applications

    OpenAIRE

    Triantou, K.I.; Mergia, K.; Perez, B.; Florez, S.; Stefan, A.; Ban, C.; Pelin, G.; Ionescu, G.; Zuber, C.; Fischer, W.P.P.; Barcena, J.

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid thermal protection systems for aerospace applications based on carbon-bonded carbon fiber composite (CALCARB®) and ceramic matrix composites have been investigated. Two types of ceramic composite materials were considered, Cf/SiC (SiCARBON™) and C/C-SiC. The ablative material and the ceramic matrix composite were joined using alumina, graphite and zirconia-zirconium silicate based commercial high temperature adhesives and their performance on thermal shock tests was evaluated. Microstr...

  13. Constitutive Theory Developed for Monolithic Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janosik, Lesley A.

    1998-01-01

    With the increasing use of advanced ceramic materials in high-temperature structural applications such as advanced heat engine components, the need arises to accurately predict thermomechanical behavior that is inherently time-dependent and that is hereditary in the sense that the current behavior depends not only on current conditions but also on the material's thermomechanical history. Most current analytical life prediction methods for both subcritical crack growth and creep models use elastic stress fields to predict the time-dependent reliability response of components subjected to elevated service temperatures. Inelastic response at high temperatures has been well documented in the materials science literature for these material systems, but this issue has been ignored by the engineering design community. From a design engineer's perspective, it is imperative to emphasize that accurate predictions of time-dependent reliability demand accurate stress field information. Ceramic materials exhibit different time-dependent behavior in tension and compression. Thus, inelastic deformation models for ceramics must be constructed in a fashion that admits both sensitivity to hydrostatic stress and differing behavior in tension and compression. A number of constitutive theories for materials that exhibit sensitivity to the hydrostatic component of stress have been proposed that characterize deformation using time-independent classical plasticity as a foundation. However, none of these theories allow different behavior in tension and compression. In addition, these theories are somewhat lacking in that they are unable to capture the creep, relaxation, and rate-sensitive phenomena exhibited by ceramic materials at high temperatures. The objective of this effort at the NASA Lewis Research Center has been to formulate a macroscopic continuum theory that captures these time-dependent phenomena. Specifically, the effort has focused on inelastic deformation behavior associated

  14. Material properties of ceramics for dental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Janet Bernice

    2000-12-01

    Ceramic tooth-replacement materials have been greatly improved since their introduction near the end of the eighteenth century, but still have problems concerning clinical performance and aesthetics. Material property testing has advanced as well as the ability to form new dental ceramics. The purpose of this study was to test some of the new materials according to recently developed standards, and to utilize the results to better understand, predict and determine how to improve dental material performance and machinability. Aspects of this study include unique applications of testing methodology and the development of a new edge chipping test. A new brittleness parameter, B, is introduced. Unlike previously suggested brittleness parameters, B has theoretical significance as a volume energy to surface energy ratio. The ascertained properties were used to evaluate the dental ceramics. Toughness-related parameters were important in the clinical results, and correlations with microstructural characteristics indicate potential improvements as well as limitations. A good fit to a model predicting toughness increases with grain size, for example, suggests processing-induced thermal mismatch stresses as a toughening mechanism in glass-ceramics. Stresses that are too high, however, can result in local microcracking and a decrease in toughness. Machinability is of particular importance in fabricating dental components, which have complicated shapes and tight tolerances. As there is no currently accepted quantitative definition of machinability, a subjective analysis involving professional machinists and a regression analysis was used. Material properties and a theoretical model for material removal rates, based on lateral crack formation, were compared with the subjective machinability rankings. Although there were differences among the machinists' criteria, hardness was found to be the single most effective property in predicting machinability. High temperature properties

  15. Ceramics for Molten Materials Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standish, Evan; Stefanescu, Doru M.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    The paper reviews the main issues associated with molten materials transfer and handling on the lunar surface during the operation of a hig h temperature electrowinning cell used to produce oxygen, with molten iron and silicon as byproducts. A combination of existing technolog ies and purposely designed technologies show promise for lunar exploi tation. An important limitation that requires extensive investigation is the performance of refractory currently used for the purpose of m olten metal containment and transfer in the lunar environment associa ted with electrolytic cells. The principles of a laboratory scale uni t at a scale equivalent to the production of 1 metric ton of oxygen p er year are introduced. This implies a mass of molten materials to be transferred consistent with the equivalent of 1kg regolithlhr proces sed.

  16. Analysis of ceramic materials for impact members in isotopic heat sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonen, F.A.; Duckworth, W.H.

    1976-05-14

    Of the available high strength ceramics, silicon nitride offers the most promise followed by silicon carbide and aluminum oxide, and stress analyses show severe limitations on allowable velocities for impact with granite following reentry for these ceramics. Impact velocities in the 100 to 200 fps regime can be achieved only by the addition of an additional layer to distribute the high contact stress. Besides impact limitations, application of ceramic materials in heat sources would present problems both in terms of weight and fabrication. The required thickness of a ceramic impact member would be comparable to that for a carbon-carbon composite material, but the least dense of the high strength ceramics are 2 to 3 times more dense than the carbon-carbon composites. Fabrication of a ceramic heat source would require a high strength bond between the fuel and the impact member if reasonable impact velocities are to be achieved. Formation of such a bond in ceramic materials is a difficult task under normal circumstances, and would be more difficult under the restrictions imposed on the processing and handling of the /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ fuel. 16 fig.

  17. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  18. Surface Characteristics and Biofilm Development on Selected Dental Ceramic Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kyoung H.; Loch, Carolina; Waddell, J. Neil; Tompkins, Geoffrey; Schwass, Donald

    2017-01-01

    Background. Intraoral adjustment and polishing of dental ceramics often affect their surface characteristics, promoting increased roughness and consequent biofilm growth. This study correlated surface roughness to biofilm development with four commercially available ceramic materials. Methods. Four ceramic materials (Vita Enamic®, Lava™ Ultimate, Vitablocs Mark II, and Wieland Reflex®) were prepared as per manufacturer instructions. Seventeen specimens of each material were adjusted and polis...

  19. Pre-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture by a New Dual Phase Ceramic-Carbonate Membrane Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jerry Y. S. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2015-01-31

    This report documents synthesis, characterization and carbon dioxide permeation and separation properties of a new group of ceramic-carbonate dual-phase membranes and results of a laboratory study on their application for water gas shift reaction with carbon dioxide separation. A series of ceramic-carbonate dual phase membranes with various oxygen ionic or mixed ionic and electronic conducting metal oxide materials in disk, tube, symmetric, and asymmetric geometric configurations was developed. These membranes, with the thickness of 10 μm to 1.5 mm, show CO2 permeance in the range of 0.5-5×10-7 mol·m-2·s-1·Pa-1 in 500-900°C and measured CO2/N2 selectivity of up to 3000. CO2 permeation mechanism and factors that affect CO2 permeation through the dual-phase membranes have been identified. A reliable CO2 permeation model was developed. A robust method was established for the optimization of the microstructures of ceramic-carbonate membranes. The ceramic-carbonate membranes exhibit high stability for high temperature CO2 separations and water gas shift reaction. Water gas shift reaction in the dual-phase membrane reactors was studied by both modeling and experiments. It is found that high temperature syngas water gas shift reaction in tubular ceramic-carbonate dual phase membrane reactor is feasible even without catalyst. The membrane reactor exhibits good CO2 permeation flux, high thermal and chemical stability and high thermal shock resistance. Reaction and separation conditions in the membrane reactor to produce hydrogen of 93% purity and CO2 stream of >95% purity, with 90% CO2 capture have been identified. Integration of the ceramic-carbonate dual-phase membrane reactor with IGCC process for carbon dioxide capture was analyzed. A methodology was developed to identify optimum operation conditions for a

  20. Thermal cyclic durability testing of ceramic materials for turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    The thermal cyclic durability of commercial ceramic materials for turbine engines was under evaluation since 1978. Ceramic materials are exposed to cyclic diesel-fired burner exhaust at either 1204 or 1371 C (2200 or 2500 F) for up to 3500 hours. The test conditions are selected to simulate the environment experienced by the hot flow path components in an automotive gas turbine engine. The silicon nitride and silicon carbide materials tested are the same ceramic materials currently used on the AGT100 and AGT101 ceramic turbine engine program.

  1. Influence of ceramic thickness and ceramic materials on fracture resistance of posterior partial coverage restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakeman, E M; Rego, N; Chaiyabutr, Y; Kois, J C

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of ceramic thickness and ceramic materials on fracture resistance of posterior partial coverage ceramic restorations. Forty extracted molars were allocated into four groups (n=10) to test for two variables: 1) the thickness of ceramic (1 mm or 2 mm) and 2) the ceramic materials (a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic [IPS e.max] or leucite-reinforced glass ceramic [IPS Empress]). All ceramic restorations were luted with resin cement (Variolink II) on the prepared teeth. These luted specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine, in the compression mode, with a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and the Tukey Honestly Significantly Different multiple comparison test (α =0.05). The fracture resistance revealed a significant effect for materials (pmaterials was not significant (p=0.406). Mean (standard deviation) fracture resistance values were as follows: a 2-mm thickness of a lithium disilicate bonded to tooth structure (2505 [401] N) revealed a significantly higher fracture resistance than did a 1-mm thickness of leucite-reinforced (1569 [452] N) and a 2-mm thickness of leucite-reinforced ceramic bonded to tooth structure (1716 [436] N) (presistance values between a lithium disilicate ceramic at 1-mm thickness (2105 [567] N) and at 2-mm thickness. Using a lithium disilicate glass ceramic for partial coverage restoration significantly improved fracture resistance compared to using a leucite-reinforced glass ceramic. The thickness of ceramic had no significant effect on fracture resistance when the ceramics were bonded to the underlying tooth structure.

  2. Boundary film for structural ceramic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajayi, O.O.; Erdemir, A.; Hsieh, J.H.; Erck, R.A.; Fenske, G.R.; Nichols, F.A.

    1992-05-01

    Structural ceramic materials, like metals, will require lubrication if they are to be used extensively for tribological applications. The use of thin soft metallic coatings (specifically Ag) as a boundary film during mineral oil lubrication of silicon nitride (Si[sub 3]N[sub 4]) and zirconia (ZrO[sub 2]) ceramic materials was investigated in this study. With a pin-on-flat contact configuration in reciprocating sliding, the steady friction coefficient was reduced by a factor of 2 (0.14 [minus]0.16 vs. 0.06--0.07) when the flats were coated with Ag. Also, with Ag coatings the wear of pins was reduced to an unmeasurable level, whereas, in the absence of Ag coatings specific wear rates of [approx]2 [times] 10[sup [minus]9] -- 4 [times] 10[sup [minus]8] mm[sup 3]/Nm and [approx]7 [times] 10[sup [minus]8] -- 2 [times] 10[sup [minus]7] mm[sup 3]/Nm were measured for Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] and ZrO[sub 2] pins respectively. In addition to preventing direct contact between pins and flats, thereby reducing wear, the Ag coatings also act as a solid lubricant, help dissipate flash heating, and accelerate modification of the [lambda] ratio.

  3. Boundary film for structural ceramic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajayi, O.O.; Erdemir, A.; Hsieh, J.H.; Erck, R.A.; Fenske, G.R.; Nichols, F.A.

    1992-05-01

    Structural ceramic materials, like metals, will require lubrication if they are to be used extensively for tribological applications. The use of thin soft metallic coatings (specifically Ag) as a boundary film during mineral oil lubrication of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) and zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}) ceramic materials was investigated in this study. With a pin-on-flat contact configuration in reciprocating sliding, the steady friction coefficient was reduced by a factor of 2 (0.14 {minus}0.16 vs. 0.06--0.07) when the flats were coated with Ag. Also, with Ag coatings the wear of pins was reduced to an unmeasurable level, whereas, in the absence of Ag coatings specific wear rates of {approx}2 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} -- 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} mm{sup 3}/Nm and {approx}7 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} -- 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} mm{sup 3}/Nm were measured for Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and ZrO{sub 2} pins respectively. In addition to preventing direct contact between pins and flats, thereby reducing wear, the Ag coatings also act as a solid lubricant, help dissipate flash heating, and accelerate modification of the {lambda} ratio.

  4. Recent advances in understanding the reinforcing ability and mechanism of carbon nanotubes in ceramic matrix composites

    OpenAIRE

    Estili, Mehdi; Sakka, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), commonly referred to as ultimate reinforcement, the main purpose for fabricating CNT?ceramic matrix composites has been mainly to improve the fracture toughness and strength of the ceramic matrix materials. However, there have been many studies reporting marginal improvements or even the degradation of mechanical properties. On the other hand, those studies claiming noticeable toughening measured using indentation, which is an indirect/unreliabl...

  5. Ceramic materials for SOFCs: Current status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozhukharov, V.

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the main parts of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs are build from ceramic materials. Namely the ceramic materials and composites, used for SOFCs manufacturing, are objects of the overview in the present work. The analysis carried out covers the last current publications in the field discussed. Special attention and examination in details have been done on patents state-of-the-art. After a background and short classification of the ceramic SOFCs materials the attention is focused on cathode, electrolyte, anode, interconnection and sealing materials. Their requirements, structure, thermal stability, composition control and behavior, processing and performance are the object of overview. A correlation has been made between the phase diagrams oxygen incorporation and transport, and SOFC advantages, generally for materials of lanthanum- base perovskite family. In order to analyze the innovative investigations regarding the patent branch of the SOFCs development and application, an object of review was patents from Japan, USA, Germany and European Union. Some examples of the inventions with accent on the ceramic materials are shown. In addition the tendency regarding R & D activities of SOFCs development materials from the leading companies in the world is analyzed. On the base of the most important technological and economical parameters of cell cathode/electrolyte/anode materials an attempt for evaluation and correlation has been made and innovative conceptions are shown.

    Es bien sabido que los componentes principales de las celdas de combustible de óxido sólido (SOFCs estan constituidos por materiales cerámicos. Dichos materiales cerámicos y materiales compuestos que se utilizan en la fabricación de SOFCs son objeto de estudio en el presente trabajo. El análisis llevado a cabo incluye la revisión de las últimas publicaciones en la materia, con una especial atención y examen minucioso sobre las patentes m

  6. Bio-Inspired Ceramic/Carbon Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    the synthesis are in the previous report). Fe2O3 nanoparticles with concentrations ranging from 0.2 to 0.02 M were used. As a first approach, the...time, and carbon sources on the quality and homogeneity of the in situ grown carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was evaluated. The synthesis approach we used...was based on in situ aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition using alumina scaffolds (supplied by Imperial) as substrate materials. Fe2O3

  7. Emerging Ceramic-based Materials for Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denry, I.; Kelly, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Our goal is to give an overview of a selection of emerging ceramics and issues for dental or biomedical applications, with emphasis on specific challenges associated with full-contour zirconia ceramics, and a brief synopsis on new machinable glass-ceramics and ceramic-based interpenetrating phase composites. Selected fabrication techniques relevant to dental or biomedical applications such as microwave sintering, spark plasma sintering, and additive manufacturing are also reviewed. Where appropriate, the authors have added their opinions and guidance. PMID:25274751

  8. MECHANICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ADVANCED CERAMIC MATERIALS USING NANOINDENTATION

    OpenAIRE

    COSTEA Traian-Octavian; MOLDOVAN Ovidiu Gheorghe

    2016-01-01

    The paper aims to present the result obtained during mechanical characterization of ceramic materials. The characterization of the materials was realized using the G200 nanoindenter with the goal of fully characterizing the mechanical proprieties (hardness, and modulus).

  9. Ceramic fiber-reinforced monoclinic celsian phase glass-ceramic matrix composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Dicarlo, James A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A hyridopolysilazane-derived ceramic fiber reinforced monoclinic celsian phase barium aluminum silicate glass-ceramic matrix composite material is prepared by ball-milling an aqueous slurry of BAS glass powder and fine monoclinic celsian seeds. The fibers improve the mechanical strength and fracture toughness and with the matrix provide superior dielectric properties.

  10. Glass-ceramics as building materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rincón, J. María

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Glass-ceramics are materials composed as any ceramic material by several crystalline phases embedded in an amorphous or vitreous matrix, but their manufacture process implies the controlled devitrification or nucleation and growth of phases from an original glass. The original shape of the original glass molded by conventional methods is carried out by using pressing and sintering followed by crystallization steps. By both processing routes are obtained transparent and/or opaque materials, with or without colours, which after adequate control and design of composition and microstructure have numerous domestic and architectonic applications. They can be used as pavements or wall coatings and in various decorative elements. In fact, their use is very extensive in east-European, American and Asian (Japan countries in constructions for covering large surfaces. The greater advantage of the glass-ceramic process is that due to the own process of vitrification allows the incorporation in their structure of a wide range of compositions from mining and industrial residues, such as red muds, ashes, fangos, scraps... which they can in this way not only be inertizated, but furthermore it be converted without risk for the environment into products useful in construction applications, offering to the architect and to the decorator a new range of "eco-materials" with multiple complementary possibilities of the already existing architectural materials in the market.

    Los productos o materiales vitrocerámicos se componen, como cualquier material de tipo cerámico, de una o varias fases cristalinas embebidas en una matriz amorfa o vítrea, pero cuyo proceso de fabricación implica la desvitrificación o nucleación y cristalización controlada de un vidrio original o de partida. En el proceso de obtención de estos materiales se puede conservar la forma original conferida al vidrio de partida por los métodos convencionales de moldeado de vidrios

  11. Emerging ceramic-based materials for dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denry, I; Kelly, J R

    2014-12-01

    Our goal is to give an overview of a selection of emerging ceramics and issues for dental or biomedical applications, with emphasis on specific challenges associated with full-contour zirconia ceramics, and a brief synopsis on new machinable glass-ceramics and ceramic-based interpenetrating phase composites. Selected fabrication techniques relevant to dental or biomedical applications such as microwave sintering, spark plasma sintering, and additive manufacturing are also reviewed. Where appropriate, the authors have added their opinions and guidance. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  12. Raw-materials mixtures from waste of the coal industry for production of ceramic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galpern, E.I. [Scientific-Manufacturing Enterprise ``Ceramics``, Donetsk (Ukraine); Pashchenko, L.V. [Inst. of Physical, Organic and Coal Chemistry of NASU, Donetsk (Ukraine)

    1998-09-01

    The liquidation of waste dumps on the surface of mining enterprises and realization of measures by environment protection of air and aquatic basins are connected to the complex processing of mining mass. The main directions of utilization of mining rocks and coal wastes realized in Ukraine industry are: - filling of mines worked-out area by grouting solutions; - ceramic brick, porous filling materials and binding materials production; - road-making, construction of hydrostructures and industrial objects; - output of concrete items predominantly for using in mining conditions. The peculiarity of wastes using in above-mentioned fields is the possibility of their mass application in quantities commensurable with valumes of their yields. The experience of enterprises work which process mining rocks into building materials by burning method (ceramic brick, porous aggregates of concretes as aggloporite, expanded clay aggregate) has shown that unconstant and, as the rule, exceeding norms content of carbon and sulphur in the rock results to deterioration of products quality and technological factors of production. Unstability of carbon content in raw material makes the burning process hardly operated. Obtained products having residual carbon in the view of coke residue are often characterized by lower physical-mechanical characteristics. (orig./SR)

  13. Cerec anterior crowns: restorative options with monolithic ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Sven; Fiedlar, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss the different types of monolithic ceramic crowns that can be placed on anterior teeth with existing shoulder preparations. Anterior crowns were indicated for the teeth 12 to 22 in the present case. The patient, a 65-year-old male, had received all-ceramic crowns 20 years earlier, which had started to develop cracks and palatal fractures over the last few years. The patient's teeth were prepared and four sets of crowns were fabricated using different monolithic ceramic materials: IPS e.max CAD, Cerec Blocs C In, VITABLOCS Real Life, and ENAMIC. Both shade characterization and crystallization firing were performed on the monolithic lithium disilicate glass ceramic crowns. The silicate ceramic crowns received glaze firing alone. The crowns made of hybrid ceramic (ENAMIC) were treated with a polymer sealant.

  14. Composite glass ceramics - a promising material for aviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М. В. Дмитрієв

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the technical and technological characteristics of the composite ceramic as a material for electrical and structural parts in aircraft. The economic and technological advantages compared to ceramic pottery and proposed options for development of production in Ukraine

  15. Translucency and biaxial flexural strength of four ceramic core materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ya-Ming; Smales, Roger J; Yip, Kevin H-K; Sung, Wei-Jia

    2008-11-01

    To assess the relative translucencies and flexural strengths of four dental restorative ceramic core materials. Eight disk specimens (14 mm in diameterx 0.5+/-0.05 mm in thickness) were prepared for each group of four ceramic core materials (IPS Empress 2 dentin, VITA In-Ceram Alumina, VITA In-Ceram Zirconia, Cercon Base Zirconia), according to the manufacturers' instructions. A color meter was used to measure the relative translucencies of the specimens. The biaxial flexure test (ISO 6872) was then used to measure their flexural strengths. Data for relative translucency (0.0-1.0), fracture load (N) and biaxial flexural strength (MPa) were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey's multiple comparison test for significant findings (alpha = 0.05). For relative translucency: IPS Empress 2 (0.78+/-0.03), VITA In-Ceram Alumina (0.94+/-0.01), VITA In-Ceram Zirconia (1.00+/-0.01), Cercon Base Zirconia (1.00+/-0.01), PCeram Alumina (514.0+/-49.5), VITA In-Ceram Zirconia (592.4+/-84.7), Cercon Base Zirconia (910.5+/-95.3), PCeram Alumina were significantly more translucent than the two opaque zirconia-containing core materials. IPS Empress 2 was significantly weaker, and Cercon Base Zirconia was significantly stronger, than the other two ceramic core materials.

  16. Aluminium nitrate ceramics: A potential UV dosemeter material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinkler, L.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Berzina, B.

    2002-01-01

    The ceramic material AIN-Y2O3 is proposed as a potential ultraviolet radiation (UVR) dosemeter using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and thermally stimulated luminescence (TL). Experimental studies have shown that AIN ceramics exhibit attractive characteristics suitable for practical UV d...

  17. Tribology of ceramics and composites materials science perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Bikramjit

    2011-01-01

    This book helps students and practicing scientists alike understand that a comprehensive knowledge about the friction and wear properties of advanced materials is essential to further design and development of new materials. With important introductory chapters on the fundamentals, processing, and applications of tribology, the book then examines in detail the nature and properties of materials, the friction and wear of structural ceramics, bioceramics, biocomposites, and nanoceramics, as well as lightweight composites and the friction and wear of ceramics in a cryogenic environment.

  18. Simulation of microcrack initiation in nanocomposite ceramic tool materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, T.; Huang, C.

    2017-09-01

    In this work, the microcrack initiation behavior of nanocomposite ceramic tool materials caused by the residual stress initiated during the cooling stage is simulated by means of a micromechanical model based on the Voronoi tessellation and the cohesive element theory. Influences of microstructure morphologies such as nanoparticle size, nanoparticle volume content and microstructure types on the microcrack distribution and material properties are analyzed respectively. The conclusions are useful for providing theoretical basis for the development of nanocomposite ceramic tool materials.

  19. Dental ceramics: a review of new materials and processing methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Hian da SILVA

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The evolution of computerized systems for the production of dental restorations associated to the development of novel microstructures for ceramic materials has caused an important change in the clinical workflow for dentists and technicians, as well as in the treatment options offered to patients. New microstructures have also been developed by the industry in order to offer ceramic and composite materials with optimized properties, i.e., good mechanical properties, appropriate wear behavior and acceptable aesthetic characteristics. The objective of this literature review is to discuss the main advantages and disadvantages of the new ceramic systems and processing methods. The manuscript is divided in five parts: I monolithic zirconia restorations; II multilayered dental prostheses; III new glass-ceramics; IV polymer infiltrated ceramics; and V novel processing technologies. Dental ceramics and processing technologies have evolved significantly in the past ten years, with most of the evolution being related to new microstructures and CAD-CAM methods. In addition, a trend towards the use of monolithic restorations has changed the way clinicians produce all-ceramic dental prostheses, since the more aesthetic multilayered restorations unfortunately are more prone to chipping or delamination. Composite materials processed via CAD-CAM have become an interesting option, as they have intermediate properties between ceramics and polymers and are more easily milled and polished.

  20. Ceramic Oxygen Generator for Carbon Dioxide Electrolysis Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this SBIR Phase I proposal (Topic X9.01), NexTech Materials, Ltd. proposes to develop a high efficiency ceramic oxygen generation system which will separate O2...

  1. Optical and physical properties of ceramic crystal laser materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Jed A.

    Historically ceramic crystal laser material has had disadvantages compared to single crystal laser material. However, progress has been made in the last decade and a half to overcome the disadvantages associated with ceramic crystal. Today, because of the promise of ceramic crystal as a high power laser material, investigation into its properties, both physical and optical, is warranted and important. Thermal expansion was measured in this thesis for Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) ceramic crystal using an interferometric method. The interferometer employed a spatially filtered HeNe at 633 nm wavelength. Thermal expansion coefficients measured for the ceramic crystal samples were near the reported values for single crystal Nd:YAG. With a similar experimental setup as that for the thermal expansion measurements, dn/dT for ceramic crystal Nd:YAG was measured and found to be slightly higher than the reported value for single crystal. Depolarization loss due to thermal gradient induced stresses can limit laser performance. As a result this phenomenon was modeled for ceramic crystal materials and compared to single crystals for slab and rod shaped gain media. This was accomplished using COMSOL Multiphysics, and MATLAB. Results indicate a dependence of the depolarization loss on the grain size where the loss decreases with decreased grain size even to the point where lower loss may be expected in ceramic crystals than in single crystal samples when the grain sizes in the ceramic crystal are sufficiently small. Deformation-induced thermal lensing was modeled for a single crystal slab and its relevance to ceramic crystal is discussed. Data indicates the most notable cause of deformation-induced thermal lensing is a consequence of the deformation of the top and bottom surfaces. Also, the strength of the lensing along the thickness is greater than the width and greater than that due to other causes of lensing along the thickness of the slab. Emission spectra, absorption

  2. Fabrication of low specific resistance ceramic carbon composites by slip casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic carbon composites (CCCs utilize carbon as the conducting phase and can be used as resistors for high voltage electrical applications. To obtain superior mechanical properties it is desired to minimize the amount of carbon yet achieve desired electrical conductivity. Thus, electrically conducting nanosized carbon like carbon black (CB was used with the matrix materials. Uniform dispersion of CB in ceramic matrix leading to a percolating network at lowest possible volume fraction is a challenge. The present work reports colloidal processing approach to overcome these challenges. Fabrication of CCCs was done by slip casting. Two types of slurries, CB slurry and alumina–clay slurry, were made independently and mixed together at a later stage to make CCCs. Electrical, thermal and mechanical properties of the CCCs have been studied.

  3. Actively Cooled Ceramic Composite Nozzle Material Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase I Project demonstrated the capability of the Pyrowave? manufacturing process to produce fiber-reinforced ceramics (FRCs) with integral metal features, such...

  4. Boron-containing organosilane polymers and ceramic materials thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccitiello, Salvatore R. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    The present invention relates to organic silicon-boron polymers which upon pyrolysis produce high-temperature ceramic materials. More particularly, it relates to the polyorganoborosilanes containing -Si-B- bonds which generate high-temperature ceramic materials (e.g., SiC, SiB4, B4C) upon thermal degradation. The process for preparing these organic silicon-boron polymer precursors are also part of the invention.

  5. Spectroradiometric and spectrophotometric translucency of ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ho-Nam; Yu, Bin; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2010-10-01

    The spectroradiometer (SR) was introduced as an alternative instrument to the spectrophotometer (SP) for measuring color in dentistry. No published studies were identified on the SR-based translucency of clinically simulated dental ceramics that closely reflect clinical conditions. Furthermore, it is unclear whether there is a correlation between SR- and SP-based translucency values. The purpose of this study was to compare the translucency parameter (TP) of core, veneer, and layered ceramics determined by an SR, and to determine the correlations in TPs measured by an SR and a reflection SP. Seven A2 shade core ceramics and corresponding A2 and A3 shade veneer ceramics were fabricated with a layered thickness of 1.5 mm. The color of core, veneer, and A2- and A3-layered ceramics was measured over white and black backgrounds by an SR with 2 measuring apertures of 2.63 and 5.25 mm in diameter, and also by an SP (n=7). TP values were calculated and the differences in SR (5.25)-based TP values of the layered ceramics were analyzed with 2-way ANOVA with the fixed factors of shade designation and type of ceramic core (α=.05). The influence of the brand on the TP values of core, veneer, and A2- and A3-layered ceramics was also analyzed with 1-way ANOVA. Correlation analysis and paired t test were performed for the SR- and SP-based TP values (α=.05). SR (5.25)-based TP values of layered ceramics ranged from 4.4 to 12.5, and were influenced by the type but not by the shade designation. SR-based TP values of core, veneer, and A2- and A3-layered ceramics were influenced by the brand. SR- and SP-based TP values were highly correlated (r=0.982 to 0.987, Pceramic specimens. TP values measured by the SR and the SP were significantly different but highly correlated. Copyright © 2010 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Translucency of ceramic material in different core-veneer combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kursoglu, Pinar; Karagoz Motro, Pelin F; Kazazoglu, Ender

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the translucency of ceramic materials is important to achieve good esthetics. Ceramic thickness is related to translucency; however, less information about core-veneer thickness in combination is available. The purpose of this study was to investigate the translucency parameters of core-veneer thicknesses in 2 different ceramic materials. A total of 56 ceramic disks of different thickness were fabricated as cores according to the manufacturer's recommendations and divided into groups (n=7). Each was veneered with its compatible veneer ceramic with a different thickness (0.2, 0.5, 0.7 mm). One group of each ceramic type was left without veneer. The groups were named according to core names (group IPS e.max Press [EP], group IPS Empress Esthetic [EE]), and numbers were given according to thickness combination: 1=(1.00+0.5); 2=(0.8+0.7); 3=(1.00); 4=(0.8+0.2). All surfaces were measured by profilometry to ensure consistency within the groups. A glass disk (1.5 mm) positive control (group P) and a metal core (1.5 mm) negative control (group N) were prepared. The translucency parameter values were calculated by using spectrophotometry to calculate the color differences of the specimens over black and white backgrounds. A 1-way ANOVA found significant differences among the translucency parameter values of the ceramic groups (P.05). Total ceramic thickness affected the translucency; higher combined ceramic thickness resulted in lower translucency parameter values. When total thickness decreases, the translucency of core material has more effect than that of veneer material on translucency parameter values. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Surface Characteristics and Biofilm Development on Selected Dental Ceramic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung H. Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Intraoral adjustment and polishing of dental ceramics often affect their surface characteristics, promoting increased roughness and consequent biofilm growth. This study correlated surface roughness to biofilm development with four commercially available ceramic materials. Methods. Four ceramic materials (Vita Enamic®, Lava™ Ultimate, Vitablocs Mark II, and Wieland Reflex® were prepared as per manufacturer instructions. Seventeen specimens of each material were adjusted and polished to simulate clinical intraoral procedures and another seventeen remained unaltered. Specimens were analysed by SEM imaging, confocal microscopy, and crystal violet assay. Results. SEM images showed more irregular surface topography in adjusted specimens than their respective controls. Surface roughness (Ra values were greater in all materials following adjustments. All adjusted materials with the exception of Vitablocs Mark II promoted significantly greater biofilm growth relative to controls. Conclusion. Simulated intraoral polishing methods resulted in greater surface roughness and increased biofilm accumulation.

  8. A review of advanced metallic and ceramic materials suitable for high temperature use in space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashford, David

    Spacecraft, satellites and launch vehicles require efficient, lightweight structural materials. At present, the structural requirements can be largely met by aluminium alloys and polymeric matrix composites based on carbon fibres. However, increasingly there will be a need to specify materials capable of sustaining operational use at temperatures in excess of 250°C and towards 2000°C. Ambitious spaceplane projects such as Hermes, HOTOL, Sanger, HOPE and NASP have highlighted this need. Within the operational temperature band 250°C to 2000°C various metallic and ceramic materials are appropriate for consideration, either in alloy or composite form. This review paper identifies the status of technology on the following: i) Aluminium and titanium alloys and their composites. ii) Superalloys and their composites. iii) Carbon, glass-ceramic and ceramic matrix composites. The development of more weight efficient and thermally stable metallic and ceramic materials has centred on a number of key areas (1). For metallics, improved alloy composition and grain refinement from Rapidly Solidified Powders have given improvements in strength retention at high temperatures (a). The introduction of reinforcements, either particulate, whisker or continuous fibre, have improved the basic alloys by reducing density, increasing stiffness and strength and extending thermal capabilities. Monolithic ceramics possess thermal stability but are inherently brittle and crack sensitive. The addition of ceramic fibres and whiskers has the effect of modifying fracture characteristics by introducing "pseudo-ductility" to raise apparent toughness. In the foreseeable future the emerging high temperature materials will find uses in: Spaceplane substructures and control surfaces; Thermal protection systems and insulation; Propulsion plants and thruster units; Air breathing engines.

  9. Carbon Materials Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    wt% polyvinyl alcohol (Airvol 2005 PVA,Air Products andChemicals,Allentown, PA). The mixture was uniaxially pressed into bars (11 mm long × 9.9 mm...process. First, carbon fibers, which carry the mechanical load, are woven, braided, felted, or filament wound into a preform which has the shape of the... filaments , injection of brake preforms, and in fab- rication of anode materials for lithium ion batteries. The principle behind the impregnation with in

  10. In situ-growth of silica nanowires in ceramic carbon composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of the processing and microstructure of ceramic–carbon composites is critical to development of these composites for applications needing electrically conducting, thermal shock resistant ceramic materials. In the present study green compacts of carbon ceramic composites were prepared either by slurry processing or dry powder blending of one or more of the three — clay, glass, alumina and carbon black or graphite. The dried green compacts were sintered at 1400 °C in flowing argon. The ceramic carbon composites except the ones without clay addition showed formation of silica nanowires. The silica nanowire formation was observed in both samples prepared by slip casting and dry powder compaction containing either carbon black or graphite. TEM micrographs showed presence of carbon at the core of the silica nanowires indicating that carbon served the role of a catalyst. Selected area electron diffraction (SAED suggested that the silica nanowires are amorphous. Prior studies have reported formation of silica nanowires from silicon, silica, silicon carbide but this is the first report ever on formation of silica nanowires from clay.

  11. Translucency of ceramic materials for CEREC CAD/CAM system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichi, Alessandro; Carrabba, Michele; Paravina, Rade; Ferrari, Marco

    2014-01-01

    To compare translucency of the ceramic materials (CEREC CAD/CAM). Fifteen ceramic materials for CEREC CAD/CAM system were evaluated: IPS e.max HT/LT/MO, ZirCAD, Empress HT/LT; VITA Mark II, VITA AL; VITA YZ, VITA In-Ceram Spinell/Alumina/Zirconia; and Sirona InCoris AL; Sirona InCoris ZI/TZI. Specimens (0.5-mm and 1.0-mm thick; n = 10 each material) were cut from commercial blocks using a water-cooled diamond saw. Contrast ratio (CR = YB /YW ) was measured using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere. Kruskal-Wallis one way analysis of variance was performed followed by Dunn's multiple test for post-hoc. CR varied from 0.35 to 1.00 and from 0.48 to 1.00 for 0.5 mm and 1.0 mm thicknesses, respectively. CR increased in the following order: IPS e.max HT (most translucent-least opaque), IPS Empress HT, VITA Mark II, IPS Empress LT, IPS e.max LT, In-Ceram Spinell, IPS e.max MO, VITA YZ, InCoris TZI, IPS e.max ZirCAD, InCoris ZI, In-Ceram Alumina, VITA AL, InCoris AL, and In-Ceram Zirconia (least translucent-most opaque). The null hypothesis has been rejected because tested materials exhibited a wide range of CR. Translucency needs to be taken into account in different clinical situations, including considerations associated with thickness of restoration and/or particular layers. A wide range of translucency was identified for the ceramic materials tested. This variability has to be taken into account for the selection of the materials in different clinical situations also related to the thickness clinically required. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Heat Treated Carbon Fiber Material Selection Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effinger, M.; Patel, B.; Koenig, J.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon fibers are used in a variety high temperature applications and materials. However, one limiting factor in their transition into additional applications is an understanding of their functional properties during component processing and function. The requirements on the fibers are governed by the nature of the materials and the environments in which they will be used. The current carbon fiber vendor literature is geared toward the polymeric composite industry and not the ceramic composite industry. Thus, selection of carbon fibers is difficult, since their properties change as a function of heat treatment, processing or component operational temperature, which ever is greatest. To enable proper decisions to be made, a program was established wherein multiple fibers were selected and heat treated at different temperatures. The fibers were then examined for their physical and mechanical properties which are reported herein.

  13. Recent Advances in Materials for All-Ceramic Restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Jason A.

    2010-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The past three years of research on materials for all-ceramic veneers, inlays, onlays, single-unit crowns, and multi-unit restorations are reviewed. The primary changes in the field were the proliferation of zirconia-based frameworks and computer-aided fabrication of prostheses, as well as, a trend toward more clinically relevant in vitro test methods. This report includes an overview of ceramic fabrication methods, suggestions for critical assessment of material property data, and a summary of clinical longevity for prostheses constructed of various materials. PMID:17586152

  14. Glass-ceramic material and method of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinhardt, Kerry D [Richland, WA; Vienna, John D [West Richland, WA; Armstrong, Timothy R [Pasco, WA; Pederson, Larry R [Kennewick, WA

    2002-08-13

    The present invention is a glass-ceramic material and method of making useful for joining at least two solid ceramic parts. The seal is a blend of M.sub.A O--M.sub.B O.sub.y --SiO.sub.2 that substantially matches a coefficient of thermal expansion of the solid electrolyte. According to the present invention, a series of glass ceramics in the M.sub.A O--M.sub.B O.sub.y --SiO.sub.2 system can be used to join or seal both tubular and planar ceramic solid oxide fuel cells, oxygen electrolyzers, and membrane reactors for the production of syngas, commodity chemicals and other products.

  15. Valorization of rice straw waste: an alternative ceramic raw material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Á. Guzmán A

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the production of rice a large amount of solid residue is produced, for which alternative utilizations are scarce or are not commonly applied in industry. Rice straw (RS is a waste product of rice harvest that is generated in equal or greater quantities than the rice itself. RS is frequently burned in open air, which makes it a significant source of pollution. In the search for possible uses of RS, it should be noted that its ash (RSA is particularly rich in silica, alkaline and alkaline earth metals and may be used as a source of alkalis and silica for the production of triaxial ceramics. The present research work proposes the production of a ceramic raw material from RS for its use in the fabrication of ceramic materials for the construction industry. Based on the chemical and mineralogical composition of RSA created under different thermal conditions, the most suitable RSA for this purpose was that obtained from treating RS at a temperature of 800 ºC for a time of 2 h. The resulting RSA presented high contents of SiO2 (79.62%, alkaline oxides (K2O (10.53% and alkaline earth oxides (CaO (2.80%. It is concluded that RSA is a new alternative ceramic raw material that can be used as a replacement for the fluxing (mainly feldspar and inert (quartz materials that are used in the production of triaxial ceramics.

  16. Temperature Measurement of Ceramic Materials Using a Multiwavelength Pyrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Daniel; Fralick, Gustave

    1999-01-01

    The surface temperatures of several pure ceramic materials (alumina, beryllia, magnesia, yittria and spinel) in the shape of pellets were measured using a multiwavelength pyrometer. In one of the measurements, radiation signal collection is provided simply by an optical fiber. In the other experiments, a 4.75 inch (12 cm) parabolic mirror collects the signal for the spectrometer. Temperature measurement using the traditional one- and two-color pyrometer for these ceramic materials is difficult because of their complex optical properties, such as low emissivity which varies with both temperature and wavelength. In at least one of the materials, yittria, the detected optical emission increased as the temperature was decreased due to such emissivity variation. The reasons for such changes are not known. The multiwavelength pyrometer has demonstrated its ability to measure surface temperatures under such conditions. Platinum electrodes were embedded in the ceramic pellets for resistance measurements as the temperature changed.

  17. A glass-ceramic material for fixation of radioactive waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozadzhiev L.S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a starting mixture for the preparation of glass-ceramic material for radioactive waste (RW, consisting of 85-95 mass % basanite and 5-15 mass % oxides of elements in I-VIII group of the Periodical table of elements imitating RW, is proposed. The glass-ceramic material is obtained by melting the starting mixture in air at 1450°C for 1 hour and by further crystallization of the melts at 950°C for 30 minutes. It has been noticed that the texture of the glass-ceramic material is microgranular. The main mineral is pyroxene, while a mixture phases are magnetite, hematite and residual glass. It was shown that the RW elements are fixed in the pyroxene and partly in the admixture phases.

  18. Analysis of waste coal from the enterprises of Kemerovo region as raw materials for production of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolboushkin, A. Yu; Akst, D. V.; Fomina, O. A.; Ivanov, A. I.; Syromyasov, V. A.

    2017-09-01

    The analysis of waste coal from mining enterprises of Kemerovo region as raw materials for production of building ceramics is given. The results of studies of material, chemical and mineralogical compositions of waste coal from Abashevskaya processing plant (Novokuznetsk) are presented. It was established that the chemical composition of waste coal refers to aluminosilicate raw materials with a high content of alumina and coloring oxides, the residual carbon content in the wastes is 12-25 %. According to the granulometric composition the waste coal is basically a sandy-dusty fraction with a small amount of clay particles (1-3 %). Additional grinding of coal waste and the introduction of a clay additive in an amount of up to 30 % are recommended. The results of the study of the mineral composition of waste coal are presented. Clay minerals are represented in the descending order by hydromuscovite, montmorillonite and kaolinite, minerals-impurities consist of quartz, feldspar fine-dispersed carbonates. The results of the investigation of ceramic-technological properties of waste coal, which belong to the group of moderately plastic low-melting raw materials, are given. As a result of a comprehensive study it was been established that with chemical, granulometric and mineralogical compositions waste coal with the reduced residual carbon can be used in the production of ceramic bricks.

  19. Materials Development Program: Ceramic Technology Project bibliography, 1984--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology [for Advanced Heat Engines] Project was begun in 1983 to meet the ceramic materials needs of the companion DOE automotive engine program, the Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) project, and the Heavy Duty Transport (low-heat-rejection, heavy-duty diesel) project. Goal is to develop an industry technology base for reliable and cost effective ceramics for applications in advanced automotive gas turbine and diesel engines. Research areas were identified following extensive input from industry and academia. Majority of research is done by industry (60%); work is also done at colleges and universities, in-house, and at other national laboratories and government agencies. In the beginning, reliability of ceramic components was the key issue. The reliability issues have largely been met and, at the present time, cost is the driving issue, especially in light of the highly cost-sensitive automotive market. Emphasis of the program has now been shifted toward developing cost-effective ceramic components for high-performance engines in the near-term. This bibliography is a compilation of publications done in conjunction with the Ceramic Technology Project since its beginning. Citations were obtained from reports done by participants in the project. We have tried to limit citations to those published and easily located. The end date of 1992 was selected.

  20. Comparative study on in vivo response of porous calcium carbonate composite ceramic and biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Fupo, E-mail: fphebm@126.com [School of Electromechanical Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Ren, Weiwei [School of Electromechanical Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Tian, Xiumei [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Basic Sciences, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510182 (China); Liu, Wei; Wu, Shanghua [School of Electromechanical Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Chen, Xiaoming, E-mail: xmchenw@126.com [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Basic Sciences, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510182 (China)

    2016-07-01

    In a previous study, robust calcium carbonate composite ceramics (CC/PG) were prepared by using phosphate-based glass (PG) as an additive, which showed good cell response. In the present study the in vivo response of porous CC/PG was compared to that of porous biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics (BCP), using a rabbit femoral critical-size grafting model. The materials degradation and bone formation processes were evaluated by general observation, X-ray radiography, micro-computed tomography, and histological examination. The results demonstrated excellent biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, and progressive degradation of CC/PG and BCP. Although the in vitro degradation rate of CC/PG was distinctly faster than that of BCP, at 4 week post-implantation, the bone generation and material degradation of CC/PG were less than those of BCP. Nevertheless, at postoperative week 8, the increment of bone formation and material degradation of CC/PG was pronouncedly larger than that of BCP. These results show that CC/PG is a potential resorbable bone graft aside from the traditional synthetic ones. - Highlights: • A calcium carbonate composite ceramic (CC/PG) was acquired. • The in vivo response of CC/PG and biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) was compared. • CC/PG showed faster in vitro degradation rate compared to BCP. • CC/PG showed less in vivo degradation and bone formation than BCP at week 4. • CC/PG had larger increment of degradation and bone formation than BCP at week 8.

  1. Sodium-carbonate co-substituted hydroxyapatite ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltan Z. Zyman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Powders of sodium-carbonate co-substituted hydroxyapatite, having sodium content in the range of 0.25–1.5 wt.% with a 0.25 wt.% step, were prepared by a precipitation-solid state reaction route. Compacts of the powders were sintered in a CO2 flow (4 mL/min at 1100 °C for 2 h. The sintered ceramics contained sodium and carbonate ions in the ranges of 0–1.5 wt.% and 1.3–6 wt.%, respectively, which are typical impurity concentrations in biological apatite. A relationship between sodium and carbonate contents and the type of carbonate substitution was found. The total carbonate content progressively increased with the sodium content. The obtained ceramics showed an AB-type carbonate substitution. However, the substitution became more B-type as the sodium content increased. As a result, the carbonation was almost B-type (94 % for the highest sodium content (1.5 wt.%.

  2. Laser ablation of advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials: Reference position dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola, D.; Escartín, A.; Cases, R.; Peña, J. I.

    2011-04-01

    In this work, we present the effect produced by modifying the reference position as well as the method of machining on the results obtained when advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials are machined by laser ablation. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at its fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm with pulsewidths in the nanosecond range has been used. Morphology, depth and volume obtained by means of pulse bursts and grooves have been studied. Working within the same laser conditions, it has been shown that these values depend on the thermal, optical and mechanical features of the material processed. We have also studied the variation in the ablation yield when the position of the surface to be machined is modified. Material properties and work conditions are related to the results obtained. We have described and discussed the morphology, composition, microstructure and hardness of the materials processed.

  3. Interpenetrating network ceramic-resin composite dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, M V; Coldea, A; Bilkhair, A; Guess, P C

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the structure and some properties of resin infiltrated ceramic network structure materials suitable for CAD/CAM dental restorative applications. Initially the basis of interpenetrating network materials is defined along with placing them into a materials science perspective. This involves identifying potential advantages of such structures beyond that of the individual materials or simple mixing of the components. Observations from a number of recently published papers on this class of materials are summarized. These include the strength, fracture toughness, hardness and damage tolerance, namely to pointed and blunt (spherical) indentation as well as to burr adjustment. In addition a summary of recent results of crowns subjected to simulated clinical conditions using a chewing simulator are presented. These results are rationalized on the basis of existing theoretical considerations. The currently available ceramic-resin IPN material for clinical application is softer, exhibits comparable strength and fracture toughness but with substantial R-curve behavior, has lower E modulus and is more damage tolerant than existing glass-ceramic materials. Chewing simulation observations with crowns of this material indicate that it appears to be more resistant to sliding/impact induced cracking although its overall contact induced breakage load is modest. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. PRODUCTION OF COMPOSITE CERAMIC MATERIAL FOR THERMAL SPRAYING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Okovity

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A composite ceramic material has been developed for thermal spraying that permits to increase wear resistance due to introduction of high-chromium steel and molybdenum in its structure, to obtain optimum porosity in the starting charge material while synthesizing  FeCrMo – MoS2/CaF2/С – TiC compositions,  to improve technological parameters of powders and thereby increase coefficient of powder usage in spraying, to reduce cost of wear-resistant coating technology. The paper presents characteristics and parameters of the developed material and coating which is based on it. Methodology is based on  complex metallographical, X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy investigations of structural elements of composite plasma coatings. Main components of composite particles are solid solutions based on iron, titanium carbides, solid lubricant inclusions in the form of molybdenum disulfide, calcium fluoride, carbon. Presence of such powder particles predetermines obtaining wear-resistant coatings which are rather efficient in case of molecular and mechanical and abrasive wear-out under disadvantageous friction conditions (boundary lubrication or absence of lubrication material, elevated temperature actions.  The contemplated powders are characterized by complex geometric shape and developed surface relief of particles. There has been observed a stable distribution of hard carbide phase in volumes of deposited materials and absence of superficial zone with deficit of TiC inclusions that positively influence on working capacity of the investigated wear-resistant coatings. Plasma coatings which have been deposited with the help of  FeCrMo – MoS2 – TiC powders in accordance with the technology developed by authors have better wear resistance in case of dry friction in a steel 45 (coating wear-out is less by 1.2-fold; scoring load is higher by 1.2-fold than a coating which has been obtained with the help of Ni80Cr20 – 12 % MoS2 – 50

  5. The Uniaxial Tensile Response of Porous and Microcracked Ceramic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Amit [ORNL; Shyam, Amit [ORNL; Watkins, Thomas R [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL; Stafford, Randall [Cummins, Inc; Hemker, Kevin J [Johns Hopkins University

    2014-01-01

    The uniaxial tensile stress-strain behavior of three porous ceramic materials was determined at ambient conditions. Test specimens in the form of thin beams were obtained from the walls of diesel particulate filter honeycombs and tested using a microtesting system. A digital image correlation technique was used to obtain full-field 2D in-plane surface displacement maps during tensile loading, and in turn, the 2D strains obtained from displacement fields were used to determine the Secant modulus, Young s modulus and initial Poisson s ratio of the three porous ceramic materials. Successive unloading-reloading experiments were performed at different levels of stress to decouple the linear elastic, anelastic and inelastic response in these materials. It was found that the stress-strain response of these materials was non-linear and that the degree of nonlinearity is related to the initial microcrack density and evolution of damage in the material.

  6. Glass and glass–ceramic coatings, versatile materials for industrial ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Among various coating systems for industrial and engineering applications, glass and glass–ceramic coatings have advantages of chemical inertness, high temperature stability and superior mechanical properties such as abrasion, impact etc as compared to other coating materials applied by thermal spraying in ...

  7. Processing and Material Characterization of Continuous Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Polymer Derived Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Sarah B.

    2014-01-01

    The need for high performance vehicles in the aerospace industry requires materials which can withstand high loads and high temperatures. New developments in launch pads and infrastructure must also be made to handle this intense environment with lightweight, reusable, structural materials. By using more functional materials, better performance can be seen in the launch environment, and launch vehicle designs which have not been previously used can be considered. The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Polymer matrix composites can be used for temperatures up to 260C. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in the composites. In this study, continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. The oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing have been performed on test panels and the test results are presented.

  8. Microtensile Bond Strength of New Ceramic/Polymer Materials Repaired with Composite Resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-30

    34Microtensile Bond Strength of New Ceramic/Polymer Materials Repaired with Composite Resin " 7. Intended publication/meeting: General Dentistry 8...Strength of New Ceramic/Polymer Materials Repaired with Composite Resin Maj Stephen S. Potter APPROVED: Lt Col Clifton W. Bailey I Col Villa l...Microtensile Bond Strength of New Ceramic/Polymer Materials Repaired with Composite Resin Abstract The new millable ceramic/polymer block materials

  9. Comparative study on in vivo response of porous calcium carbonate composite ceramic and biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fupo; Ren, Weiwei; Tian, Xiumei; Liu, Wei; Wu, Shanghua; Chen, Xiaoming

    2016-07-01

    In a previous study, robust calcium carbonate composite ceramics (CC/PG) were prepared by using phosphate-based glass (PG) as an additive, which showed good cell response. In the present study the in vivo response of porous CC/PG was compared to that of porous biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics (BCP), using a rabbit femoral critical-size grafting model. The materials degradation and bone formation processes were evaluated by general observation, X-ray radiography, micro-computed tomography, and histological examination. The results demonstrated excellent biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, and progressive degradation of CC/PG and BCP. Although the in vitro degradation rate of CC/PG was distinctly faster than that of BCP, at 4week post-implantation, the bone generation and material degradation of CC/PG were less than those of BCP. Nevertheless, at postoperative week 8, the increment of bone formation and material degradation of CC/PG was pronouncedly larger than that of BCP. These results show that CC/PG is a potential resorbable bone graft aside from the traditional synthetic ones. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Carbon Materials Research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoffman, Wesley P

    2005-01-01

    Carbon-carbon composites have been used by the Air Force and others for over 25 years in a variety of thermostructural applications including rocket propulsion, re-entry, hypersonics and aircraft brakes...

  11. Reduction of CO2 diffuse emissions from the traditional ceramic industry by the addition of Si-Al raw material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, I; Barba-Brioso, C; Campos, P; Romero, A; Galán, E

    2016-09-15

    The fabrication of ceramics can produce the emission of several gases, denominated exhaust gases, and also vapours resulting from firing processes, which usually contain metals and toxic substances affecting the environment and the health of workers. Especially harmful are the diffuse emissions of CO2, fluorine, chlorine and sulphur from the ceramics industry, which, in highly industrialized areas, can suppose an important emission focus of dangerous effects. Concerning CO2, factories that use carbonate-rich raw materials (>30% carbonates) can emit high concentrations of CO2 to the atmosphere. Thus, carbonate reduction or substitution with other raw materials would reduce the emissions. In this contribution, we propose the addition of Al-shales to the carbonated ceramic materials (marls) for CO2 emission reduction, also improving the quality of the products. The employed shales are inexpensive materials of large reserves in SW-Spain. The ceramic bodies prepared with the addition of selected Al-shale to marls in variable proportions resulted in a 40%-65% CO2 emission reduction. In addition, this research underlines at the same time that the use of a low-price raw material can also contribute to obtaining products with higher added value. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Advanced ceramic materials for next-generation nuclear applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, John

    2011-10-01

    The nuclear industry is at the eye of a 'perfect storm' with fuel oil and natural gas prices near record highs, worldwide energy demands increasing at an alarming rate, and increased concerns about greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that have caused many to look negatively at long-term use of fossil fuels. This convergence of factors has led to a growing interest in revitalization of the nuclear power industry within the United States and across the globe. Many are surprised to learn that nuclear power provides approximately 20% of the electrical power in the US and approximately 16% of the world-wide electric power. With the above factors in mind, world-wide over 130 new reactor projects are being considered with approximately 25 new permit applications in the US. Materials have long played a very important role in the nuclear industry with applications throughout the entire fuel cycle; from fuel fabrication to waste stabilization. As the international community begins to look at advanced reactor systems and fuel cycles that minimize waste and increase proliferation resistance, materials will play an even larger role. Many of the advanced reactor concepts being evaluated operate at high-temperature requiring the use of durable, heat-resistant materials. Advanced metallic and ceramic fuels are being investigated for a variety of Generation IV reactor concepts. These include the traditional TRISO-coated particles, advanced alloy fuels for 'deep-burn' applications, as well as advanced inert-matrix fuels. In order to minimize wastes and legacy materials, a number of fuel reprocessing operations are being investigated. Advanced materials continue to provide a vital contribution in 'closing the fuel cycle' by stabilization of associated low-level and high-level wastes in highly durable cements, ceramics, and glasses. Beyond this fission energy application, fusion energy will demand advanced materials capable of withstanding the extreme environments of high

  13. Method of making carbon fiber-carbon matrix reinforced ceramic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brian (Inventor); Benander, Robert (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of making a carbon fiber-carbon matrix reinforced ceramic composite wherein the result is a carbon fiber-carbon matrix reinforcement is embedded within a ceramic matrix. The ceramic matrix does not penetrate into the carbon fiber-carbon matrix reinforcement to any significant degree. The carbide matrix is a formed in situ solid carbide of at least one metal having a melting point above about 1850 degrees centigrade. At least when the composite is intended to operate between approximately 1500 and 2000 degrees centigrade for extended periods of time the solid carbide with the embedded reinforcement is formed first by reaction infiltration. Molten silicon is then diffused into the carbide. The molten silicon diffuses preferentially into the carbide matrix but not to any significant degree into the carbon-carbon reinforcement. Where the composite is intended to operate between approximately 2000 and 2700 degrees centigrade for extended periods of time such diffusion of molten silicon into the carbide is optional and generally preferred, but not essential.

  14. Evaluation Of Shielding Efficacy Of A Ferrite Containing Ceramic Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verst, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-12

    The shielding evaluation of the ferrite based Mitsuishi ceramic material has produced for several radiation sources and possible shielding sizes comparative dose attenuation measurements and simulated projections. High resolution gamma spectroscopy provided uncollided and scattered photon spectra at three energies, confirming theoretical estimates of the ceramic’s mass attenuation coefficient, μ/ρ. High level irradiation experiments were performed using Co-60, Cs-137, and Cf-252 sources to measure penetrating dose rates through steel, lead, concrete, and the provided ceramic slabs. The results were used to validate the radiation transport code MCNP6 which was then used to generate dose rate attenuation curves as a function of shielding material, thickness, and mass for photons and neutrons ranging in energy from 200 keV to 2 MeV.

  15. Surface Hardness of Resin Cement Polymerized under Different Ceramic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimmada Kesrak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate the surface hardness of two light-cured resin cements polymerized under different ceramic discs. Methods. 40 experimental groups of 2 light-cured resin cement specimens (Variolink Veneer and NX3 were prepared and polymerized under 5 different ceramic discs (IPS e.max Press HT, LT, MO, HO, and Cercon of 4 thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mm, Those directly activated of both resin cements were used as control. After light activation and 37∘C storage in an incubator, Knoop hardness measurements were obtained at the bottom. The data were analyzed with three-way ANOVA, t-test, and one-way ANOVA. Results. The KHN of NX3 was of significantly higher than that of Variolink Veneer (<0.05. The KHN of resin cement polymerized under different ceramic types and thicknesses was significant difference (<0.05. Conclusion. Resin cements polymerized under different ceramic materials and thicknesses showed statistically significant differences in KHN.

  16. Property Screening and Evaluation of Ceramic Turbine Engine Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-01

    doped with 1% MgO, 8% Y2 03, and 15% Y20 3 ) were of lower strength than the Norton NC-132 and NCX- 34 materials, Slow crick growth was in evidence...T.L. Francis and R.L. Coble, "Creep of Polycrystalline Silicon Carbide," Jour. Amer. Ceram. Soc., 51(2) pp. 115-6 (1968). 44. P.L. Farnsworth and R.L

  17. A Study of Time Dependent Response of Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemann, John

    1997-01-01

    The research accomplishments under this grant were very extensive in the areas of the development of computer software for the design of ceramic materials. Rather than try to summarize all this research I have enclosed research papers and reports which were completed with the funding provided by the grant. These papers and reports are listed below. Additionally a large amount of technology transfer occurred in this project and a significant number of national awards were received.

  18. Novel Functionalized Ceramic Getter Materials for Adsorption of Radioiodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Fryxell, Glen E.; Parker, Kent E.; Kaplan, Daniel I.

    2003-08-02

    A new class of getter materials has been synthesized for immobilization of long-lived radionuclides such as 129I. These novel materials consist of nanoporous ceramic substrates with tailored pore sizes ranging from 2 – 20 nm. These high surface area (~1000 m2/g) ceramic substrates have been functionalized with self-assembled monolayers consisting of soft cation-capped thiol-functionality. The resulting getter materials exhibit highly dense binding sites, and excellent selectivity for iodide. The effectiveness of these novel getter materials was evaluated using radioiodide-spiked samples of surface water and concrete leachate and adsorption performance was compared with natural sulfide mineral getter materials. The data indicated that the novel getter materials have very high affinity for radioiodide (Kd: 4 x 104 – 3 x 105 ml/g and 6 x 105 ml/g in surface and concrete leachate respectively). Comparatively, the radioiodide Kd values for natural mineral getters were typically two to three orders magnitude less than the novel getters. The results indicated that the synthetic getter materials have the potential to immobilize and therefore retard the migration of 129I in the subsurface environment. Additional studies are being conducted to evaluate the long-term stability of these materials in waste disposal environments.

  19. Integration of Computer Tomography and Simulation Analysis in Evaluation of Quality of Ceramic-Carbon Bonded Foam Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karwiński A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Filtration of liquid casting alloys is used in casting technologies for long time. The large quantity of available casting filters allows using them depending on casting technology, dimensions of casting and used alloys. Technological progress of material science allows of using new materials in production of ceramic filters. In this article the Computed Tomography (CT technique was use in order to evaluate the thickness of branch in cross section of 20ppi ceramic-carbon bonded foam filter. Than the 3D image of foam filter was used in computer simulation of flow of liquid metal thru the running system.

  20. Recycling ceramic industry wastes in sound absorbing materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Arenas

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this investigation is to develop a material mainly composed (80% w/w of ceramic wastes that can be applied in the manufacture of road traffic noise reducing devices. The characterization of the product has been carried out attending to its acoustic, physical and mechanical properties, by measuring the sound absorption coefficient at normal incidence, the open void ratio, density and compressive strength. Since the sound absorbing behavior of a porous material is related to the size of the pores and the thickness of the specimen tested, the influence of the particle grain size of the ceramic waste and the thickness of the samples tested on the properties of the final product has been analyzed. The results obtained have been compared to a porous concrete made of crushed granite aggregate as a reference commercial material traditionally used in similar applications. Compositions with coarse particles showed greater sound absorption properties than compositions made with finer particles, besides presenting better sound absorption behavior than the reference porous concrete. Therefore, a ceramic waste-based porous concrete can be potentially recycled in the highway noise barriers field.

  1. Recent advances in understanding the reinforcing ability and mechanism of carbon nanotubes in ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estili, Mehdi; Sakka, Yoshio

    2014-12-01

    Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), commonly referred to as ultimate reinforcement, the main purpose for fabricating CNT-ceramic matrix composites has been mainly to improve the fracture toughness and strength of the ceramic matrix materials. However, there have been many studies reporting marginal improvements or even the degradation of mechanical properties. On the other hand, those studies claiming noticeable toughening measured using indentation, which is an indirect/unreliable characterization method, have not demonstrated the responsible mechanisms applicable to the nanoscale, flexible CNTs; instead, those studies proposed those classical methods applicable to microscale fiber/whisker reinforced ceramics without showing any convincing evidence of load transfer to the CNTs. Therefore, the ability of CNTs to directly improve the macroscopic mechanical properties of structural ceramics has been strongly questioned and debated in the last ten years. In order to properly discuss the reinforcing ability (and possible mechanisms) of CNTs in a ceramic host material, there are three fundamental questions to our knowledge at both the nanoscale and macroscale levels that need to be addressed: (1) does the intrinsic load-bearing ability of CNTs change when embedded in a ceramic host matrix?; (2) when there is an intimate atomic-level interface without any chemical reaction with the matrix, could one expect any load transfer to the CNTs along with effective load bearing by them during crack propagation?; and (3) considering their nanometer-scale dimensions, flexibility and radial softness, are the CNTs able to improve the mechanical properties of the host ceramic matrix at the macroscale when individually, intimately and uniformly dispersed? If so, how? Also, what is the effect of CNT concentration in such a defect-free composite system? Here, we briefly review the recent studies addressing the above fundamental questions. In particular, we discuss the new

  2. Material Flows and Carbon Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrell, E.

    2003-12-01

    The industrial sector emits almost 43 percent of the global anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions to produce materials and products. Furthermore, energy is used to move materials and products and process the waste. Hence, a large amount of energy is consumed and CO2 is emitted to sustain our materials system. Until recently, studies investigating mitigation options focused on changes in the energy system. For industrial processes most studies evaluate how the current materials system can be maintained producing fewer greenhouse gas emissions. Three elements of a strategy to improve the long-term materials productivity are the reduction of dissipative uses of non-biodegradable materials, secondly, the re-design of products to use less material or design for re-use or recycling, and thirdly, develop more efficient technologies for material conversion and recycling. This will reduce or eliminate the need to extract virgin materials from the environment, and reduce CO2 emissions from the energy-intensive production processes. To assess measures to reduce materials consumption, fossil fuels consumption and CO2 emissions, detailed understanding of the material system is needed. The lifecycle of materials has to be investigated including all branches of industry with all the inputs and outputs. We start with a discussion of materials and the carbon cycle focusing on the contribution of materials to anthropogenic carbon flows. We discuss CO2 emissions from energy use in materials extraction and production, fossil (e.g. plastics) and biomass carbon (e.g. lumber, paper) used as feedstock of materials, and mineral sources (e.g. cement). We discuss opportunities to reduce CO2 emissions by improving the efficiency with which society uses materials through product design, material substitution, product reuse and material recycling.

  3. Ceramics Porcelain Based Electric Solid Insulator Using Local Raw Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Indiani

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractElectric solid insulator based on ceramics porcelain had been made by using local raw materials: 68% feldspar, 10% kaolinite and 22% quartz, and also added 0%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25% cullet (From total mass. The forming process of the porcelain was conducted by milling the raw materials using ball mill and screened using 200 mesh screening. The samples were formed by using the dry-press method with the pressure of 50MPa, then the samples is sintered at temperature of 1000oC, 1050oC, 1100oC, 1150oC for 2 hours. The properties of the samples had been analyzed for their shrinkage, density, bending strength and resistivity. The result of the experiment showed that the optimum value was reached by ceramic which was added by 15% cullet and sintered at temperature of 1100oC. This ceramic had shrinkage of 9,70%, density of 2,44 g/cm3, bending strength of 86,73 MPa and the resistivity at 25oC is 2,32x108 Ωcm.

  4. Compression deformation of WC: atomistic description of hard ceramic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qing; Song, Xiaoyan; Liu, Xuemei; Liang, Shuhua; Wang, Haibin; Nie, Zuoren

    2017-11-01

    The deformation characteristics of WC, as a typical hard ceramic material, were studied on the nanoscale using atomistic simulations for both the single-crystal and polycrystalline forms under uniaxial compression. In particular, the effects of crystallographic orientation, grain boundary coordination and grain size on the origin of deformation were investigated. The deformation behavior of the single-crystal and polycrystalline WC both depend strongly on the orientation towards the loading direction. The grain boundaries play a significant role in the deformation coordination and the potential high fracture toughness of the nanocrystalline WC. In contrast to conventional knowledge of ceramics, maximum strength was obtained at a critical grain size corresponding to the turning point from a Hall–Petch to an inverse Hall–Petch relationship. For this the mechanism of the combined effect of dislocation motion within grains and the coordination of stress concentration at the grain boundaries were proposed. The present work has moved forward our understanding of plastic deformability and the possibility of achieving a high strength of nanocrystalline ceramic materials.

  5. Ultrasonic and radiographic evaluation of advanced aerospace materials: Ceramic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    1990-01-01

    Two conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques were used to evaluate advanced ceramic composite materials. It was shown that neither ultrasonic C-scan nor radiographic imaging can individually provide sufficient data for an accurate nondestructive evaluation. Both ultrasonic C-scan and conventional radiographic imaging are required for preliminary evaluation of these complex systems. The material variations that were identified by these two techniques are porosity, delaminations, bond quality between laminae, fiber alignment, fiber registration, fiber parallelism, and processing density flaws. The degree of bonding between fiber and matrix cannot be determined by either of these methods. An alternative ultrasonic technique, angular power spectrum scanning (APSS) is recommended for quantification of this interfacial bond.

  6. In vitro cytotoxicity of all-ceramic substructural materials after aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerem Kilic

    2013-09-01

    Conclusion: Several types of all-ceramic substructures did not cause the same in vitro responses. Finesse and Zirkonzahn did not carry high biologic risk. However, our results suggest that In-Ceram Alumina, In-Ceram Zirconia, Turkom Cera, and IPS e.max should not be considered as entirely biocompatible materials.

  7. Use of basaltic waste as red ceramic raw material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Mendes

    Full Text Available Abstract Nowadays, environmental codes restrict the emission of particulate matters, which result in these residues being collected by plant filters. This basaltic waste came from construction aggregate plants located in the Metropolitan Region of Londrina (State of Paraná, Brazil. Initially, the basaltic waste was submitted to sieving (< 75 μm and the powder obtained was characterized in terms of density and particle size distribution. The plasticity of ceramic mass containing 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% of basaltic waste was measured by Atterberg method. The chemical composition of ceramic formulations containing 0% and 20% of basaltic waste was determined by X-ray fluorescence. The prismatic samples were molded by extrusion and fired at 850 °C. The specimens were also tested to determine density, water absorption, drying and firing shrinkages, flexural strength, and Young's modulus. Microstructure evaluation was conducted by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and mercury intrusion porosimetry. Basaltic powder has similar physical and chemical characteristics when compared to other raw materials, and contributes to ceramic processing by reducing drying and firing shrinkage. Mechanical performance of mixtures containing basaltic powder is equivalent to mixtures without waste. Microstructural aspects such as pore size distribution were modified by basaltic powder; albite phase related to basaltic powder was identified by X-ray diffraction.

  8. Colour variations in graffiti-proofed ceramic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García Santos, A.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The investigation analyses the variation of superficial properties, COLOUR and LUMINOSITY, hat the ceramic support protected by the incorporation of a protection with transparent painting undergoes, antigraffiti. The test pieces were analysed by digital procedures, obtaining quantifiable values of each ceramic sample by means of computer programs (modifications of colour taking itself as it bases the same type of ceramics without protection. In the surface of the pieces ceramics dealt with painting antigraffiti, tones different from the original ones were observed from the piece without painting. The type of painting and the material of base, obtaining itself the following results, determine this variation: - The rustic ceramics is much more susceptible to modify its characteristics of colour that the industrialists. - In both types of analysed industrial ceramics in the investigation, the variation of the tone independently took place with the same characteristics or parameters of quantification of the type of painting. - In all the analysed types of ceramics dealt with painting antigraffiti, the colour modifies its tonality tending towards the called tones «cold», violates, by the presence of blue and the loss of the red one. Before a same painting, it was observed a greater alteration of tones and luminosity in the rustic ceramics in comparison with the industrialists.

    Se analiza la variación de propiedades superficiales, COLOR Y LUMINOSIDAD, que sufre el soporte cerámico protegido por la incorporación de una protección con pintura transparente, antigraffiti. Las probetas fueron analizadas por procedimientos digitales, obteniéndose valores cuantificables de cada muestra cerámica mediante programas de ordenador (modificaciones de color, tomándose como base el mismo tipo de cerámica sin protección. En la superficie de las piezas cerámicas tratadas con pintura antigraffiti, se observaron tonos distintos a los originales de la

  9. Interfacial characterization of ceramic core materials with veneering porcelain for all-ceramic bi-layered restorative systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagmatarchis, Alexander; Tripodakis, Aris-Petros; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Zinelis, Spiros; Eliades, George

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize the elemental distribution at the interface between all-ceramic core and veneering porcelain materials. Three groups of all-ceramic cores were selected: A) Glass-ceramics (Cergo, IPS Empress, IPS Empress 2, e-max Press, Finesse); B) Glass-infiltrated ceramics (Celay Alumina, Celay Zirconia) and C) Densely sintered ceramics (Cercon, Procera Alumina, ZirCAD, Noritake Zirconia). The cores were combined with compatible veneering porcelains and three flat square test specimens were produced for each system. The core-veneer interfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis. The glass-ceramic systems showed interfacial zones reach in Si and O, with the presence of K, Ca, Al in core and Ca, Ce, Na, Mg or Al in veneer material, depending on the system tested. IPS Empress and IPS Empress 2 demonstrated distinct transitional phases at the core-veneer interface. In the glassinfiltrated systems, intermixing of core (Ce, La) with veneer (Na, Si) elements occurred, whereas an abrupt drop of the core-veneer elemental concentration was documented at the interfaces of all densely sintered ceramics. The results of the study provided no evidence of elemental interdiffusion at the core-veneer interfaces in densely sintered ceramics, which implies lack of primary chemical bonding. For the glass-containing systems (glassceramics and glass-infiltrated ceramics) interdiffusion of the glass-phase seems to play a critical role in establishing a primary bonding condition between ceramic core and veneering porcelain.

  10. Glassy Carbon Coating Deposited on Hybrid Structure of Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Posmyk A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method of production metal matrix composites with aluminum oxide foam covered by glassy carbon layer used as reinforcement. The glassy carbon coating was formed for decreasing of friction coefficient and reducing the wear. In first step of technology liquid glassy carbon precursor is on ceramic foam deposited, subsequently cured and carbonated at elevated temperature. In this way ceramic foam is covered with glassy carbon coating with thickness of 2-8 μm. It provides desirable amount of glassy carbon in the structure of the material. In the next step, porous spheres with carbon coating are infiltrated by liquid matrix of Al-Cu-Mg alloy. Thereby, equable distribution of glassy carbon in composite volume is achieved. Moreover, typical problems for composites reinforced by particles like sedimentation, agglomeration and clustering of particles are avoided. Tribological characteristics during friction in air versus cast iron as a counterpart were made. Produced composites with glassy carbon layer are characterised by friction coefficient between 0.08-0.20, thus meeting the typical conditions for solid lubricants.

  11. Materials for carbon dioxide separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qingqing

    2014-10-01

    The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at room temperature have been investigated by comparing carbon nanotubes, fullerene, graphenes, graphite and granular activated carbons. It turned out that the amount of the micropore surface area was dominating the CO{sub 2} adsorption ability. Another promising class of materials for CO{sub 2} capture and separation are CaO derived from the eggshells. Two aspects were studied in present work: a new hybrid materials synthesized by doping the CaTiO{sub 3} and the relationship between physisorption and chemisorption properties of CaO-based materials.

  12. Effects of sintering atmosphere controlled using carbon pellet on translucency of AlN ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, T.; Kamitamari, M.; Kuroki, Y.; Okamoto, T.; Takata, M.

    2011-05-01

    Translucent AlN ceramics were sintered with a carbon pellet in order to control the CO gas surrounding the sample during sintering. The total transmittance of the ceramics increased by sintering with the carbon pellet because of the decrease of light scattering. One of causes of the light scattering was the presence of calcium aluminates at grain boundaries. The light scattering can be controlled by the CO gas using the carbon pellet.

  13. Corrosion resistance of ceramic materials in pyrochemical reprocessing condition by using molten salt for spent nuclear oxide fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, M.; Kato, T.; Hanada, K.; Koizumi, T.; Aose, S.

    2005-02-01

    The corrosion resistance of ceramic materials in pyrochemical reprocessing using molten salts was discussed through the thermodynamic calculation and corrosion test. The corrosion test was basically carried out in alkali molten salt under chlorine gas. In addition, the effects of oxygen, carbon and main fission product's chlorides on ceramics corrosion were evaluated in that condition. Most of ceramic oxides showed good chemical stability on chlorine, oxygen and uranyl chloride from thermodynamic calculation results. On the other hand, from corrosion test result, silicon nitride, mullite (Al6Si2O13) and cordierite (Mg2Al3(AlSi5O18)) have a good corrosion resistance which is corresponding to 0.1 mm/y or less. No cracks on the materials were observed and flexural strength did not drop remarkably after 480 h corrosion testing in molten salt under Cl2 O2 atmosphere.

  14. Novel Processing of Unique Ceramic-Based Nuclear Materials and Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui Zhang; Raman P. Singh

    2008-11-30

    Advances in nuclear reactor technology and the use of gas-cooled fast reactors require the development of new materials that can operate at the higher temperatures expected in these systems. These include refractory alloys base on Nb, Zr, Ta, Mo, W, and Re; ceramics and composites such as those based on silicon carbide (SiCf-SiC); carbon-carbon composites; and advanced coatings. Besides the ability to handle higher expected temperatures, effective heat transfer between reactor componets is necessary for improved efficiency. Improving thermal conductivity of the materials used in nuclear fuels and other temperature critical components can lower the center-line fuel temperature and thereby enhance durability and reduce the risk of premature failure.

  15. Contrast ratio and masking ability of three ceramic veneering materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shono, N N; Al Nahedh, H N A

    2012-01-01

    Porcelain veneer materials are translucent and are therefore affected by their thickness as well as the color of the underlying substructure, which limits their masking ability and compromises the esthetic result in heavily stained teeth. The purpose of this study was to compare the contrast ratio (CR) and masking ability of three different veneering ceramics with two thicknesses by measuring the color differences over white and black backgrounds. Correlations between CR and masking ability of these veneering ceramics were evaluated. A total of 30 disc-shaped specimens (12 mm diameter × 1.0 mm or 1.5 mm) were fabricated in shade A2 from three types of all-ceramic systems: IPS e.max Press (IPSe; Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtensein), Vita VM7 (VM7; VITA Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Germany), and Nobel Rondo Press Alumina: Solo (NRPA; Nobel Biocare, Zürich-Flughafen, Switzerland). The CR, defined as the ratio of illuminance (Y) of the test material when placed on the black background (Yb) to the illuminance of the same material when placed over a white background (Yw), was determined (CR=Yb/Yw). The color (CIE L*a*b*) and Y of each specimen were measured over standard white and black tiles using a spectrophotometer (ColorEye 7000 A, Model C6, GretagMacbeth, New Windsor, NY, USA). Masking abilities of the specimens were determined by measuring the color difference (ΔE) over white and black backgrounds. Both CR and ΔE data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). One-way ANOVA was used to compare the mean values of CR across the three materials followed by the Duncan multiple comparison test. The correlations between CR and ΔE were determined by comparing R(2) values obtained from a linear regression analysis. A Student t-test for independent samples was used to compare the mean contrast ratio and ΔE values for the two thicknesses. CR values of NRPA were significantly less than those of IPSe and VM7, and the CR of IPSe was higher than that of VM

  16. Natural materials for carbon capture.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myshakin, Evgeniy M. (National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA); Romanov, Vyacheslav N. (National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA); Cygan, Randall Timothy

    2010-11-01

    Naturally occurring clay minerals provide a distinctive material for carbon capture and carbon dioxide sequestration. Swelling clay minerals, such as the smectite variety, possess an aluminosilicate structure that is controlled by low-charge layers that readily expand to accommodate water molecules and, potentially, carbon dioxide. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated the efficacy of intercalating carbon dioxide in the interlayer of layered clays but little is known about the molecular mechanisms of the process and the extent of carbon capture as a function of clay charge and structure. A series of molecular dynamics simulations and vibrational analyses have been completed to assess the molecular interactions associated with incorporation of CO2 in the interlayer of montmorillonite clay and to help validate the models with experimental observation.

  17. A novel approach for the fabrication of carbon nanofibre/ceramic porous structures

    KAUST Repository

    Walter, Claudia

    2013-11-01

    This paper describes the fabrication of hybrid ceramic/carbon scaffolds in which carbon nanofibres and multi-walled carbon nanotubes fully cover the internal walls of a microporous ceramic structure that provides mechanical stability. Freeze casting is used to fabricate a porous, lamellar ceramic (Al2O3) structure with aligned pores whose width can be controlled between 10 and 90μm. Subsequently, a two step chemical vapour deposition process that uses iron as a catalyst is used to grow the carbon nanostructures inside the scaffold. This catalyst remains in the scaffold after the growth process. The formation of the alumina scaffold and the influence of its structure on the growth of nanofibres and tubes are investigated. A set of growth conditions is determined to produce a dense covering of the internal walls of the porous ceramic with the carbon nanostructures. The limiting pore size for this process is located around 25μm. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. A Spray Pyrolysis Method to Grow Carbon Nanotubes on Carbon Fibres, Steel and Ceramic Bricks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilatela, Juan J; Rabanal, M E; Cervantes-Sodi, Felipe; García-Ruiz, Máximo; Jiménez-Rodríguez, José A; Reiband, Gerd; Terrones, Mauricio

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate a spray pyrolysis method to grow carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with high degree of crystallinity, aspect ratio and degree of alignment on a variety of different substrates, such as conventional steel, carbon fibres (CF) and ceramics. The process consists in the chemical vapour deposition of both a thin SiO2 layer and CNTs that subsequently grow on this thin layer. After CNT growth, increases in specific surface by factors of 1000 and 30 for the steel and CF samples, respectively, are observed. CNTs growth on ceramic surfaces results in a surface resistance of 37.5 Ohm/sq. When using conventional steel as a rector tube, we observed CNTs growth rates of 0.6 g/min. Details of nanotube morphology and the growth mechanism are discussed. Since the method discussed here is highly versatile, it opens up a wide variety of applications in which specific substrates could be used in combination with CNTs.

  19. Characterization of silicon-silicon carbide ceramic derived from carbon-carbon silicon carbide composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Vijay K. [Indian Institute of Technology, Varanasi (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Krenkel, Walter [Univ. of Bayreuth (Germany). Dept. of Ceramic Materials Engineering

    2013-04-15

    The main objective of the present work is to process porous silicon - silicon carbide (Si - SiC) ceramic by the oxidation of carboncarbon silicon carbide (C/C - SiC) composites. Phase studies are performed on the oxidized porous composite to examine the changes due to the high temperature oxidation. Further, various characterization techniques are performed on Si- SiC ceramics in order to study the material's microstructure. The effects of various parameters such as fiber alignment (twill weave and short/chopped fiber) and phenolic resin type (resol and novolak) are characterized.

  20. Synthesis of Hafnium-Based Ceramic Materials for Ultra-High Temperature Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sylvia; Feldman, Jay

    2004-01-01

    This project involved the synthesis of hafnium (Hf)-based ceramic powders and Hf-based precursor solutions that were suitable for preparation of Hf-based ceramics. The Hf-based ceramic materials of interest in this project were hafnium carbide (with nominal composition HE) and hafnium dioxide (HfO2). The materials were prepared at Georgia Institute of Technology and then supplied to research collaborators Dr. Sylvia Johnson and Dr. Jay Feldman) at NASA Ames Research Center.

  1. Characterization of porous glass-ceramic material as absorber of electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmina, O.; Suslyaev, V.; Dushkina, M.; Semukhin, B.

    2015-04-01

    Investigations of a foam glass-ceramic material synthesized from raw siliceous earth material by the two-stage method at temperatures below 950°C have demonstrated the improvement of its physic mechanical properties in comparison with foam glass synthesized from glass cullet. This material actively interacts with microwaves and can be used for the development of protective screens reducing the adverse effect of microwaves on biological objects, anechoic chambers, and rooms with low level of electromagnetic background noise. Spectra of the transmission and absorption coefficients and of the complex dielectric permittivity for frequencies in the range 26-260 GHz are presented. The observed effects demonstrate the existence of regions with partial and total reflection arising on the glass-pore boundary and of the microwave interaction with ultradisperse carbon particles that remain after foaming with incomplete frothier transition from the soot to the gas phase.

  2. Determination of minor and trace elements in geological materials used as raw ceramic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazulla Barreda, M.F.; Rodrigo Edo, M.; Orduña Cordero, M.; Ventura Vaquer, M.J.

    2016-07-01

    A study has been undertaken to develop a methodology to determine minor and trace elements in geological ceramic raw materials by wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF) spectrometry. The set up of the methodology has been done either by optimising not only the sample preparation process but also optimising the measurement with the aid of the software Pro-Trace, and also by making an exhaustive compilation of reference materials for calibration and validation. The developed method is precise and accurate and allows the analysis of Ba, Ce, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, La, Mn, Ni, Pb, Rb, S, Sr, Ta, Th, U, V, Y, Zn and Zr present in the sample as minor or trace elements in geological materials used as raw ceramic material in a relatively short period of time. Besides, the method is more environmentally friendly than other methodologies as it does not require the use of solvents or reagents. (Author)

  3. An optical coherence tomography investigation of materials defects in ceramic fixed partial dental prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda; Hughes, Michael; Bradu, Adrian; Todea, Carmen; Rominu, Mihai; Laissue, Philippe L.; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2008-04-01

    Metal ceramic and integral ceramic fixed partial prostheses are mainly used in the frontal part of the dental arch because for esthetics reasons. The masticatory stress may induce fractures of the bridges. There are several factors that are associated with the stress state created in ceramic restorations, including: thickness of ceramic layers, mechanical properties of the materials, elastic modulus of the supporting substrate material, direction, magnitude and frequency of applied load, size and location of occlusal contact areas, residual stresses induced by processing or pores, restoration-cement interfacial defects and environmental defects. The fractures of these bridges lead to functional, esthetic and phonetic disturbances which finally render the prosthetic treatment inefficient. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the capability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in detection and analysis of possible material defects in metal-ceramic and integral ceramic fixed partial dentures.

  4. Ceramic silicon-boron-carbon fibers from organic silicon-boron-polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccitiello, Salvatore R. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Novel high strength ceramic fibers derived from boron, silicon, and carbon organic precursor polymers are discussed. The ceramic fibers are thermally stable up to and beyond 1200 C in air. The method of preparation of the boron-silicon-carbon fibers from a low oxygen content organosilicon boron precursor polymer of the general formula Si(R2)BR(sup 1) includes melt-spinning, crosslinking, and pyrolysis. Specifically, the crosslinked (or cured) precursor organic polymer fibers do not melt or deform during pyrolysis to form the silicon-boron-carbon ceramic fiber. These novel silicon-boron-carbon ceramic fibers are useful in high temperature applications because they retain tensile and other properties up to 1200 C, from 1200 to 1300 C, and in some cases higher than 1300 C.

  5. Influence of Material Properties on the Ballistic Performance of Ceramics for Personal Body Armour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Kaufmann

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In support of improved personal armour development, depth of penetration tests have been conducted on four different ceramic materials including alumina, modified alumina, silicon carbide and boron carbide. These experiments consisted of impacting ceramic tiles bonded to aluminum cylinders with 0.50 caliber armour piercing projectiles. The results are presented in terms of ballistic efficiency, and the validity of using ballistic efficiency as a measure of ceramic performance was examined. In addition, the correlation between ballistic performance and ceramic material properties, such as elastic modulus, hardness, spall strength and Hugoniot Elastic Limit, has been considered.

  6. A novel processing of carbon nanotubes grown on molecular sieve coated porous ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, Sangram; Sarkar, Naboneeta; Park, Jung Gyu; Zhao, Wei; Kim, Sukyoung; Kim, Ik Jin

    2015-08-01

    The present study focuses on the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on Fe-containing zeolites coated porous ceramics by implementing three different and independent techniques, successively. Direct foaming-derived porous ceramics were subjected to hydrothermal reaction for on-site growth of NaA zeolites within it. The porous ceramics-zeolite composite was subjected to ion-exchange reaction to obtain the catalyst for CNT synthesis. Multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs) were grown by catalytic chemical vapour deposition (CCVD) process using acetylene as carbon source. Microstructural, thermogravimetric and spectroscopic analyses showed distinctive differences in terms of hollow structural feature, yield and crystallinity of the MWCNTs with different reaction temperatures.

  7. Standard test methods for vitrified ceramic materials for electrical applications

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1986-01-01

    1.1 These test methods outline procedures for testing samples of vitrified ceramic materials that are to be used as electrical insulation. Where specified limits are mentioned herein, they shall not be interpreted as specification limits for completed insulators. 1.2 These test methods are intended to apply to unglazed specimens, but they may be equally suited for testing glazed specimens. The report section shall indicate whether glazed or unglazed specimens were tested. 1.3 The test methods appear as follows: This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. Specific precaution statements are given in 11.3, 13.5, and 15.3.

  8. The feasibility of castable ceramic material in dental bridge construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, T H; Chung, K H; Chan, C C

    1992-11-01

    This study was to investigate the feasibility of dental bridges constructed with castable ceramic material (Dicor). A dental bridge model was designed similar to the clinical situation. The marginal fit of Dicor crown and a three-unit bridge was evaluated and no statistically significant differences in marginal openings between Dicor crowns and bridges were determined except the mesial and distal end surfaces of the bridge works. The fracture strengths of different thicknesses of Dicor test bars were measured with a three-point bending technique in a jig mounted in a universal testing machine. The results revealed that the bridge design with the thickest (6mm) connector and the shortest (8 mm) width of the pontic had the highest fracture resistance. In addition, pores with size up to 50 microns were disclosed in the fractured interface. The optimal design of Dicor bridge is determined according to the results of this study along with the clinical trial.

  9. Optimisation of the cooling channel design of carbon-ceramic brakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guether, H.M.; Wuellner, A. [SGL Brakes GmbH, Meitingen (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Carbon-Ceramic Brake Discs are more and more applied in upper class limousines or high performance vehicles. Normally, a larger brake disc diameter is necessary because of a lower specific heat of carbon ceramic materials as far as the mass is concerned, compared to the specific heat of grey cast iron. A thermal and for production suitable design may represent a remedy for this extension of the brake disc. A suitable optimisation of the cooling channel design represents the most efficient possibility of thermal optimisation. Therefore an improvement of the convective heat transfer in the cooling channels by the help of optimised geometry is realised. Within the scope of a development project at SGL Brakes, several calculation and simulation models have been developed, which make the construction of optimised, highly complex cooling channel geometry possible. The model calculations were checked at the dynamometer by the help of prototype parts. The result is an optimised cooling channel design, which can be realised by the help of the 'lost cores' technology. The validation of the results for optimising the cooling channel design took part within the Bugatti Veyron project. (orig.)

  10. Sacrificial Paste for Fabrication of Ceramic Materials by Layer-By-Layer Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falkowski P.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to develop a sacrificial paste suitable for securing channels during shaping of ceramic materials with internal structures via combination of tape casting and soft lithography. Poly(ethylene glycol methyl ether and polyethylene glycols with different molecular weight were selected as a main components of a sacrificial paste due to their compatibility to UV curable dispersion. The research shows that sacrificial paste should be characterized by proper melting point. This goal was achieved by using a composition of PEG600 with 15wt.%PEG20000 and 10wt.% carbon. The invented sacrificial paste solidify beyond 27°C (melting point. After heating up to 80°C the viscosity of paste is low enough and easily fills the channels with diameter of 150-300μm. What is more, the operational time during free cooling from 80°C to solidification is around 8 minutes what gives enough time for application. Carbon was added as a modifier of rheological properties and as a black dye that helps in visual evaluation of a degree of filling channel. The first test proved that proposed method of preparation of ceramic samples with application of invented sacrificial paste is reliable and can be practically applied.

  11. Carbon-ceramic composites from coal tar pitch and clays: application as electrocatalyst support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montilla, F.; Morallon, E.; Vazquez, J.L.; Alcaniz-Monge, J.; Cazorla-Amoros, D.

    2002-07-01

    Carbon-ceramic composites were prepared and characterised by different techniques (electron microscopy, X-ray microanalysis, X-ray diffraction and cyclic voltammetry). The effect on the conductivity of the thermal treatment temperature of the composites and the structure of the starting ceramic were analysed. The results demonstrate that the layered structure of the clay determines their conductivity. The composites prepared are conductors and the conductivity increases to a maximum with increasing thermal treatment. Platinum was successfully deposited on the carbon-ceramic composite by chemical and electrochemical methods. A better distribution of platinum and smaller particle sizes are obtained by the electrochemical method. The direct electrooxidation of methanol in acid medium was studied on platinum-modified carbon-ceramic electrodes.

  12. Refractory Materials for Flame Deflector Protection System Corrosion Control: Refractory Ceramics Literature Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Hintze, Paul E.; Parlier, Christopher R.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark; Perusich, Stephen; Whitten, Mary C.; Trejo, David; Zidek, Jason; Sampson, Jeffrey W.; hide

    2009-01-01

    Ceramics can be defmed as a material consisting of hard brittle properties produced from inorganic and nonmetallic minerals made by firing at high temperatures. These materials are compounds between metallic and nonmetallic elements and are either totally ionic, or predominately ionic but having some covalent character. This definition allows for a large range of materials, not all applicable to refractory applications. As this report is focused on potential ceramic materials for high temperature, aggressive exposure applications, the ceramics reviewed as part of this report will focus on refractory ceramics specifically designed and used for these applications. Ceramic materials consist of a wide variety of products. Callister (2000) 1 characterized ceramic materials into six classifications: glasses, clay products, refractories, cements, abrasives, and advanced ceramics. Figure 1 shows this classification system. This review will focus mainly on refractory ceramics and cements as in general, the other classifications are neither applicable nor economical for use in large structures such as the flame trench. Although much work has been done in advanced ceramics over the past decade or so, these materials are likely cost prohibitive and would have to be fabricated off-site, transported to the NASA facilities, and installed, which make these even less feasible. Although the authors reviewed the literature on advanced ceramic refractories 2 center dot 3 center dot 4 center dot 5 center dot 6 center dot 7 center dot 8 center dot 9 center dot 10 center dot 11 center dot 12 after the review it was concluded that these materials should not be ' the focus of this report. A review is in progress on materials and systems for prefabricated refractory ceramic panels, but this review is focusing more on typical refractory materials for prefabricated systems, which could make the system more economically feasible. Refractory ceramics are used for a wide variety of applications

  13. Flexural resistance of Cerec CAD/CAM system ceramic blocks. Part 2: Outsourcing materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedda, Maurizio; Vichi, Alessandro; Del Siena, Francesco; Louca, Chris; Ferrari, Marco

    2014-02-01

    To test different Cerec CAD/CAM system ceramic blocks, comparing mean flexural strength (sigma), Weibull modulus (m), and Weibull characteristic strength (sigma0) in an ISO standardized set-up. Following the recent ISO Standard (ISO 6872:2008), 11 types of ceramic blocks were tested: IPS e.max CAD MO, IPS e.max CAD LT and IPS e.max CAD HT (lithium disilicate glass-ceramic); In-Ceram SPINELL, In-Ceram Alumina and In-Ceram Zirconia (glass-infiltrated materials); inCoris AL and In-Ceram AL (densely sintered alumina); In-Ceram YZ, IPS e.max Zir-CAD and inCoris ZI (densely sintered zirconia). Specimens were cut out from ceramic blocks, finished, crystallized/infiltrated/sintered, polished, and tested in a three-point bending test apparatus. Flexural strength, Weibull characteristic strength, and Weibull modulus were obtained. A statistically significant difference was found (P materials (sigma = 376.9 +/- 405.5 MPa, m = 7.5 +/- 11.5, sigma0 = 393.7 +/- 427.0 MPa). No statistically significant difference was found (P = 0.160) in densely sintered zirconia (sigma = 1,060.8 +/- 1,227.8 MPa, m = 5.8 +/- 7.4, sigma0 = 1,002.4 +/- 1,171.0 MPa). Not all the materials tested fulfilled the requirements for the clinical indications recommended by the manufacturer.

  14. Corundum ceramic materials modified with silica nanopowders: structure and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostytsyn, M. A.; Muratov, D. S.; Lysov, D. V.; Chuprunov, K. O.; Yudin, A. G.; Leybo, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    Filtering elements are often used in the metallurgy of rare earth metals. Corundum ceramic is one of the most suitable materials for this purpose. The process of formation and the properties of nanomodified ceramic materials, which are proposed as filtering materials with tunable effective porosity, are described. A silica nanopowder is used as a porosity-increasing agent. Vortex layer apparatus is used for mixing of precursor materials. The obtained results show that nanomodification with the vortex layer apparatus using 0.04 wt. % silica nanopowder as a modifying agent leads to an increase in the compression strength of corundum ceramic by the factor of 1.5.

  15. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for Propulsion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivakumar, Kunigal; Argade, Shyam

    2003-01-01

    This report presents a critical review of the processing techniques for fabricating continuous fiber-reinforced CMCs for possible applications at elevated temperatures. Some of the issues affecting durability of the composite materials such as fiber coatings and cracking of the matrix because of shrinkage in PIP-process are also examined. An assessment of the potential inexpensive processes is also provided. Finally three potential routes of manufacturing C/SiC composites using a technology that NC A&T developed for carbon/carbon composites are outlined. Challenges that will be encountered are also listed.

  16. Reliability and properties of core materials for all-ceramic dental restorations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ban, Seiji

    2008-01-01

    ... preparation than ceramics. Sixty years later, reinforcement of the jacket crown with aluminum oxide was achieved as a result of the work of McLean and Hughes. Further materials developments were based on increasing the crystalline content, for example leucite (Empress), mica (Dicor), hydroxyapatite (Cerapearl) or mixed glass oxides (In-Ceram). Pure ...

  17. Preparation of formed ceramic materials by recycling of aluminium dross

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Je-Shin; Park, Hyung-Kyu; Jang, Tae-Kyu [Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Taejeon(Korea)

    2001-08-31

    Recycling of aluminum dross is a significant issue in domestic aluminum industry. In this study, formed ceramic materials were prepared using aluminum dross mixed with feldspar powders to investigate its application as industrial materials and utilization of aluminum dross. In the prepared sample, feldspar was melted at the sintered temperature, and its phase was transformed into amorphous, and spinel(MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) phase in the dross was remained clearly. Density of the test specimen increased from 0.91 to 0.65 gr/cm{sup 3} and water absorbance decreased from 2.5 to 1.7% with increasing of sintered time at the sintered temperature 1220 deg.C with composition of feldspar 55 wt.%, dross 40 wt.% and bentonite 5 wt.%. At the same experimental conditions, bending strength of the test specimen was 10.8 MPa, and heat conductivity was 0.34 W/m{center_dot}K with sintered time 30 minutes. (author). 3 refs., 3 tabs., 5 figs.

  18. Glass and glass–ceramic coatings, versatile materials for industrial ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... required functional properties such as heat, abrasion and corrosion resistance to suit particular end use requirements, the glass and glass–ceramic coatings in general also provide good adherence, defect free surface and refractoriness. Systematic studies covering the basic science of glass and glass–ceramic coatings, ...

  19. Metals and Ceramics Division Materials Science Program. Annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHargue, C.J. (comp.)

    1984-11-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Materials Sciences Program in the Metals and Ceramics Division for the period January 1, 1983, to June 30, 1984. These activities constitute about one-fourth of the research and development conducted by the division. The emphasis of the program can be described as the scientific design of materials. The efforts are directed toward three classes of materials: high-temperature metallic alloys based on intermetallic compounds, structural ceramics, and radiation-resistant alloys.

  20. New Knowledge about Zirconium-Ceramic as a Structural Material in Fixed Prosthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Špehar, Davor

    2015-01-01

    Dental ceramics represents a major structural material in fixed prosthodontics. Increasing demands for esthetics led to development of new ceramic materials in order to eliminate the use of metal framework and for all ceramic restorations with mechanical properties to withstand high occlusal forces. Out of all the present ceramic materials, zirconium-ceramic has the best mechanical properties, and is the only material that can be used for longer span fixed dental restorations. Despite its excellent mechanical properties, to achieve great esthetics, due to absence of translucency, zirconium-dioxide cannot be used as a single material and needs veneering with more esthetic ceramic. When introduced in dental medicine, it was considered an almost ideal material for fixed prosthodontics, but clinical use and in vivo and in vitro studies showed many problems which still persist despite the improvements.
This review aims to reveal new developments in zirconium-ceramics and technical procedures which could increase clinical performance and longevity of these restorations. PMID:27688396

  1. Effect of number of firings on the color and translucency of ceramic core materials with veneer ceramic of different thicknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayindir, Funda; Ozbayram, Ozlem

    2017-05-12

    Whether masking or translucency should be the goal for achieving an esthetic restoration with ceramic materials is unknown. The purpose of this in vitro study was to examine the effect of the number of firings on the color and translucency of ceramic core material with different thicknesses of veneer ceramic. Three different ceramic systems were used: IPS Empress (IE), IPS e.max Press (IEP), and Turkom Cera (TC). Ninety disk-shaped cores, 10 mm in diameter and 0.8 mm in thickness were prepared using each system (n=30). The specimens were divided into 3 subgroups (n=10) according to the thickness of the veneering ceramic: 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mm. The specimens were fired 1, 3, and 5 times, and the color parameters of the specimens were measured. The color measurements were repeated, and the data were statistically evaluated using 2-way and multifactorial analysis of variance, the Duncan test, and the Bonferroni post hoc test. The number of firings affected the translucency parameter and CIELab values. Increased porcelain thickness led to decreased translucency parameter and L* values and increased a* and b* values (Ptranslucent (P.05). The number of firings affected the color change of the IE and IEP systems but not of the translucency parameter system. Repeated firings and porcelain thickness affected the final color and translucency of the ceramic systems tested. These 2 factors adversely affected the esthetic result and should be considered in both the preparation and the laboratory phase. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Relative translucency of six all-ceramic systems. Part II: core and veneer materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Michael J; Aquilino, Steven A; Diaz-Arnold, Ana M; Haselton, Debra R; Stanford, Clark M; Vargas, Marcos A

    2002-07-01

    STATEMENT OF PROBLEM All-ceramic core materials with various strengthening compositions have a range of translucencies. It is unknown whether translucency differs when all-ceramic materials are fabricated similarly to the clinical restoration with a veneered core material. This study compared the translucency of 6 all-ceramic materials veneered and glazed at clinically appropriate thicknesses. Core specimens (n = 5 per group) of Empress dentin, Empress 2 dentin, In-Ceram Alumina, In-Ceram Spinell, In-Ceram Zirconia, and Procera AllCeram were fabricated as described in Part I of this study and veneered with their corresponding dentin porcelain to a final thickness of 1.47 +/- 0.01 mm. These specimens were compared with veneered Vitadur Alpha opaque dentin (as a standard), a clear glass disc (positive control), and a high-noble metal-ceramic alloy (Porc. 52 SF) veneered with Vitadur Omega dentin (negative control). Specimen reflectance was measured with an integrating sphere attached to a spectrophotometer across the visible spectrum (380 to 700 nm); 0-degree illumination and diffuse viewing geometry were used. Measurements were repeated after a glazing cycle. Contrast ratios were calculated from the luminous reflectance (Y) of the specimens with a black (Yb) and a white backing (Yw) to give Yb/Yw with CIE illuminant D65 and a 2-degree observer function (0.0 = transparent, 1.0 = opaque). One-way analysis of variance and Tukey's multiple-comparison test were used to analyze the data (Pceramic systems tested when they were veneered (Pceramic systems tested. Such variability may affect their ability to match natural teeth. The glazing cycle resulted in decreased opacity for all test materials except the completely opaque In-Ceram Zirconia and metal-ceramic specimens.

  3. Materials Development Program, Ceramic Technology Project addendum to program plan: Cost effective ceramics for heat engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    This is a new thrust in the Ceramic Technology project. This effort represents an expansion of the program and an extension through FY 1997. Moderate temperature applications in conventional automobile and truck engines will be included along with high-temp. gas turbine and low heat rejection diesel engines. The reliability goals are expected to be met on schedule by end of FY 1993. Ceramic turbine rotors have been run (in DOE's ATTAP program) for 1000 h at 1370C and full speed. However, the cost of ceramic components is a deterrrent to near-term commercialization. A systematic approach to reducing this cost includes the following elements: economic cost modeling, ceramic machining, powder synthesis, alternative forming and densification processes, yield improvement, system design studies, standards development, and testing and data base development. A draft funding plan is outlined. 6 figs, 1 tab.

  4. Materials Development Program, Ceramic Technology Project addendum to program plan: Cost effective ceramics for heat engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    This is a new thrust in the Ceramic Technology project. This effort represents an expansion of the program and an extension through FY 1997. Moderate temperature applications in conventional automobile and truck engines will be included along with high-temp. gas turbine and low heat rejection diesel engines. The reliability goals are expected to be met on schedule by end of FY 1993. Ceramic turbine rotors have been run (in DOE`s ATTAP program) for 1000 h at 1370C and full speed. However, the cost of ceramic components is a deterrrent to near-term commercialization. A systematic approach to reducing this cost includes the following elements: economic cost modeling, ceramic machining, powder synthesis, alternative forming and densification processes, yield improvement, system design studies, standards development, and testing and data base development. A draft funding plan is outlined. 6 figs, 1 tab.

  5. Sinterable Ceramic Powders from Laser Heated Gas Phase Reactions and Rapidly Solidified Ceramic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    Gattuso, T. R., Meunier, M., Adler, D., and Haggerty, J. S., "IR Laser- Induced Deposition of Silicon Thin Films ", to be published in the Proceedings of...and Thin Films by Laser Induced Gas Phase Reactions", presented at the Nineteenth University Conference on Ceramic Science, Emergent Process Methods... Silicon Carbonitrides from Monomeric Organosilicon Precursors". To be presented at the 1983 Annual Meeting of the American Ceramic Society, April 1983

  6. Microwave cavity studies for thermal testing of ceramic breeder materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuston, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Dielectric heating of proposed ceramic tritium breeder material to study the thermomechanical and thermal-hydraulic properties of the material has been previously suggested. Recent computer studies using codes capable of modeling three-dimensional EM cavities with enclosed dielectric material have been used to determine the size limitations of cavity designs at 200 MHz. The sample can be as large as 0.44 /times/ 0.72m in the plane that is transverse to the direction of neutron flux. The uniformity of volumetric heating over the transverse plane is constant to within a few percent. The sample can be as long as 10cm in the direction of the heat flux and match the expected exponential decay of heat generation, exp( /minus/z/lambda), to within +/minus/8%. The design of the chamber is decribed, including the sample region, additional dielectric loading blocks on two sides of the sample region that are required to generate the field uniformity in the transverse plane, and a description of the matching-section portion of the cavity which provides the correct geometry to cause the cavity to resonate at 200 MHz with the right z dependence to stimulate the exponentially-decaying heat profile in the sample region. The matching section consists of two dielectric slabs, one on each wall of the chamber, and an air or free space region in the center of the matching section. The coupling loop is located near the wall end of the matching section in the free space region. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Aspects of bonding between resin luting cements and glass ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Tsoi, James Kit-Hon; Matinlinna, Jukka P; Burrow, Michael F

    2014-07-01

    The bonding interface of glass ceramics and resin luting cements plays an important role in the long-term durability of ceramic restorations. The purpose of this systematic review is to discuss the various factors involved with the bond between glass ceramics and resin luting cements. An electronic Pubmed, Medline and Embase search was conducted to obtain laboratory studies on resin-ceramic bonding published in English and Chinese between 1972 and 2012. Eighty-three articles were included in this review. Various factors that have a possible impact on the bond between glass ceramics and resin cements were discussed, including ceramic type, ceramic crystal structure, resin luting cements, light curing, surface treatments, and laboratory test methodology. Resin-ceramic bonding has been improved substantially in the past few years. Hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching followed by silanizaiton has become the most widely accepted surface treatment for glass ceramics. However, further studies need to be undertaken to improve surface preparations without HF because of its toxicity. Laboratory test methods are also required to better simulate the actual oral environment for more clinically compatible testing. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Relative translucency of six all-ceramic systems. Part I: core materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Michael J; Aquilino, Steven A; Diaz-Arnold, Ana M; Haselton, Debra R; Stanford, Clark M; Vargas, Marcos A

    2002-07-01

    All-ceramic restorations have been advocated for superior esthetics. Various materials have been used to improve ceramic core strength, but it is unclear whether they affect the opacity of all-ceramic systems. This study compared the translucency of 6 all-ceramic system core materials at clinically appropriate thicknesses. Disc specimens 13 mm in diameter and 0.49 +/- 0.01 mm in thickness were fabricated from the following materials (n = 5 per group): IPS Empress dentin, IPS Empress 2 dentin, In-Ceram Alumina core, In-Ceram Spinell core, In-Ceram Zirconia core, and Procera AllCeram core. Empress and Empress 2 dentin specimens also were fabricated and tested at a thickness of 0.77 +/- 0.02 mm (the manufacturer's recommended core thickness is 0.8 mm). A high-noble metal-ceramic alloy (Porc. 52 SF) served as the control, and Vitadur Alpha opaque dentin was used as a standard. Sample reflectance (ratio of the intensity of reflected light to that of the incident light) was measured with an integrating sphere attached to a spectrophotometer across the visible spectrum (380 to 700 nm); 0-degree illumination and diffuse viewing geometry were used. Contrast ratios were calculated from the luminous reflectance (Y) of the specimens with a black (Yb) and a white (Yw) backing to give Yb/Yw with CIE illuminant D65 and a 2-degree observer function (0.0 = transparent, 1.0 = opaque). One-way analysis of variance and Tukey's multiple-comparison test were used to analyze the data (PCeram Spinell 0.67 +/- 0.02, Empress 2 (0.5 mm) 0.68 +/- 0.02, Empress (0.8 mm) 0.72 +/- 0.01, Procera 0.72 +/- 0.01, Empress 2 (0.8 mm) 0.74 +/- 0.01, In-Ceram Alumina 0.87 +/- 0.01, In-Ceram Zirconia 1.00 +/- 0.01, and 52 SF alloy 1.00 +/- 0.00. Within the limitations of this study, there was a range of ceramic core translucency at clinically relevant core thicknesses. In order of decreasing translucency, the ranges were Vitadur Alpha dentin (standard) > In-Ceram Spinell > Empress, Procera, Empress 2

  9. Novel Scintillation Material - ZnO Transparent Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Rodnyi, P. A.; Chernenko, K. A.; Gorokhova, E. I.; Kozlovskii, S. S.; Khanin, V. M.; Khodyuk, I. V.

    2011-01-01

    ZnO-based scintillation ceramics for application in HENPA LENPA analyzers have been investigated. The following ceramic samples have been prepared: undoped ones (ZnO), an excess of zinc in stoichiometry (ZnO:Zn), doped with gallium (ZnO:Ga) and lithium (ZnO:Li). Optical transmission, x-ray excited emission, scintillation decay and pulse height spectra were measured and analyzed. Ceramics have reasonable transparency in visible range (up to 60% for 0.4 mm thickness) and energy resolution (14.9...

  10. Laser ceramics with rare-earth-doped anisotropic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Jun; Sato, Yoichi; Taira, Takunori

    2010-11-01

    The fabrication of laser-grade anisotropic ceramics by a conventional sintering process is not possible owing to optical scattering at randomly oriented grain boundaries. In this Letter, we report the first (to our knowledge) realization of transparent anisotropic ceramics by using a new crystal orientation process based on large magnetic anisotropy induced by 4f electrons. By slip casting in a 1.4 T magnetic field and subsequent heat treatments, we could successfully fabricate laser-grade calcium fluorapatite ceramics with a loss coefficient of 1.5 cm(-1).

  11. Solid-State Ceramic Laser Material for Remote Sensing of Ozone Using Nd:Yttria Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase II we will develop transparent Nd:Yttria ceramic laser materials that can operate at 914 nm and 946 nm suitable for applications in ozone LIDAR systems. We...

  12. Multilayer Electroactive Polymer Composite Material Comprising Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. (Inventor); Draughon, Gregory K. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An electroactive material comprises multiple layers of electroactive composite with each layer having unique dielectric, electrical and mechanical properties that define an electromechanical operation thereof when affected by an external stimulus. For example, each layer can be (i) a 2-phase composite made from a polymer with polarizable moieties and an effective amount of carbon nanotubes incorporated in the polymer for a predetermined electromechanical operation, or (ii) a 3-phase composite having the elements of the 2-phase composite and further including a third component of micro-sized to nano-sized particles of an electroactive ceramic incorporated in the polymer matrix.

  13. Shear bond strength of different materials used as core build-up to ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilaj, Bledar; Franz, Alexander; Dangl, Viktoria; Dauti, Rinet; Moritz, Andreas; Cvikl, Barbara

    2017-10-01

    To determine the performance of a resin composite material specially developed for core build-ups in comparison with conventional restorative materials. 90 roughened ceramic blocs were divided into three groups; one group (n=30) was used for the core build-up material (Gradia Core) and the other two groups (n=30, each) were used for two conventional restorative materials (Tetric EvoCeram, Compoglass F). After adhesive fixation, specimens of each material were subdivided in accordance with the storage conditions (thermocycling or water storage). Shear bond strength was measured and fracture behavior was analyzed. Gradia Core presented significantly higher shear bond strength values than the conventional restorative material Tetric EvoCeram, both after 24 hours water storage as well as after thermocycling. Compoglass F did not show any statistically significant differences compared to the other materials, independent of the storage condition. However, Compoglass F resulted in numerically higher shear bond values than Tetric EvoCeram, but lower shear bond values than Gradia Core. Within the same materials, no statistically significant differences occurred regarding the storage conditions. The specific core build-up material provided stronger bonding properties when luted to feldspar ceramic than conventional restorative materials, making it a suitable supporting material when high-quality esthetic restorations are needed for restoring decayed, but vital teeth.

  14. Cervical and Incisal Marginal Discrepancy in Ceramic Laminate Veneering Materials: A SEM Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Hemalatha Ranganathan; Dhanraj M Ganapathy; Jain, Ashish R

    2017-01-01

    Context: Marginal discrepancy influenced by the choice of processing material used for the ceramic laminate veneers needs to be explored further for better clinical application. Aims: This study aimed to evaluate the amount of cervical and incisal marginal discrepancy associated with different ceramic laminate veneering materials. Settings and Design: This was an experimental, single-blinded, in vitro trial. Subjects and Methods: Ten central incisors were prepared for laminate veneers with 2 ...

  15. Effect of additional materials on the properties of glass-ceramic produced from incinerator fly ashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, T W

    2004-07-01

    There are 21 Metro-waste incinerators in Taiwan under construction and are expected to be finished at year 2003. It is estimated that these incinerators will produce about two million tons of incinerator ash. In order to reduce the volume and eliminate contamination problems, high temperature molten technology studies have been conducted. The purpose of this research was that of trying to control the chemical composition of the glass-ceramic produced from incinerator fly ash, in order to improve the characteristics of the glass-ceramic. The experimental results showed that the additional materials, Mg(OH)2 and waste glass cullet, can change glass-ceramic phases from gehlenite to augite, pigeonite, and diopside. The physical, mechanical and chemical resistance properties of the glass-ceramic also showed much better characteristics than prepared glass-ceramic using incinerator fly ash alone.

  16. Needs assessment for nondestructive testing and materials characterization for improved reliability in structural ceramics for heat engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.; McClung, R.W.; Janney, M.A.; Hanusiak, W.M.

    1987-08-01

    A needs assessment was performed for nondestructive testing and materials characterization to achieve improved reliability in ceramic materials for heat engine applications. Raw materials, green state bodies, and sintered ceramics were considered. The overall approach taken to improve reliability of structural ceramics requires key inspections throughout the fabrication flowsheet, including raw materials, greed state, and dense parts. The applications of nondestructive inspection and characterization techniques to ceramic powders and other raw materials, green ceramics, and sintered ceramics are discussed. The current state of inspection technology is reviewed for all identified attributes and stages of a generalized flowsheet for advanced structural ceramics, and research and development requirements are identified and listed in priority order. 164 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Sensing/actuating materials made from carbon nanotube polymer composites and methods for making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. (Inventor); Draughon, Gregory K. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An electroactive sensing or actuating material comprises a composite made from a polymer with polarizable moieties and an effective amount of carbon nanotubes incorporated in the polymer for a predetermined electromechanical operation of the composite when such composite is affected by an external stimulus. In another embodiment, the composite comprises a third component of micro-sized to nano-sized particles of an electroactive ceramic that is also incorporated in the polymer matrix. The method for making the three-phase composite comprises either incorporating the carbon nanotubes in the polymer matrix before incorporation of the particles of ceramic or mixing the carbon nanotubes and particles of ceramic together in a solution before incorporation in the polymer matrix.

  18. Method of Making an Electroactive Sensing/Actuating Material for Carbon Nanotube Polymer Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. (Inventor); Draughon, Gregory K. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An electroactive sensing or actuating material comprises a composite made from a polymer with polarizable moieties and an effective amount of carbon nanotubes incorporated in the polymer for a predetermined electromechanical operation of the composite when such composite is affected by an external stimulus. In another embodiment, the composite comprises a, third component of micro -sized to nano-sized particles of an electroactive ceramic that is also incorporated in the polymer matrix. The method for making the three-phase composite comprises either incorporating the carbon nanotubes in the polymer matrix before incorporation of the particles of ceramic or mixing the carbon nanotubes and particles of ceramic together in a solution before incorporation in the polymer matrix.

  19. Standardization Efforts for Mechanical Testing and Design of Advanced Ceramic Materials and Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Jenkins, Michael G.

    2003-01-01

    Advanced aerospace systems occasionally require the use of very brittle materials such as sapphire and ultra-high temperature ceramics. Although great progress has been made in the development of methods and standards for machining, testing and design of component from these materials, additional development and dissemination of standard practices is needed. ASTM Committee C28 on Advanced Ceramics and ISO TC 206 have taken a lead role in the standardization of testing for ceramics, and recent efforts and needs in standards development by Committee C28 on Advanced Ceramics will be summarized. In some cases, the engineers, etc. involved are unaware of the latest developments, and traditional approaches applicable to other material systems are applied. Two examples of flight hardware failures that might have been prevented via education and standardization will be presented.

  20. Radioactivity and associated radiation hazards in ceramic raw materials and end products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viruthagiri, G; Rajamannan, B; Suresh Jawahar, K

    2013-12-01

    Studies have been planned to obtain activity and associated radiation hazards in ceramic raw materials (quartz, feldspar, clay, zircon, kaolin, grog, alumina bauxite, baddeleyite, masse, dolomite and red mud) and end products (ceramic brick, glazed ceramic wall and floor tiles) as the activity concentrations of uranium, thorium and potassium vary from material to material. The primordial radionuclides in ceramic raw materials and end products are one of the sources of radiation hazard in dwellings made of these materials. By the determination of the activity level in these materials, the indoor radiological hazard to human health can be assessed. This is an important precautionary measure whenever the dose rate is found to be above the recommended limits. The aim of this work was to measure the activity concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in ceramic raw materials and end products. The activity of these materials has been measured using a gamma-ray spectrometry, which contains an NaI(Tl) detector connected to multichannel analyser (MCA). Radium equivalent activity, alpha-gamma indices and radiation hazard indices associated with the natural radionuclides are calculated to assess the radiological aspects of the use of the ceramic end products as decorative or covering materials in construction sector. Results obtained were examined in the light of the relevant international legislation and guidance and compared with the results of similar studies reported in different countries. The results suggest that the use of ceramic end product samples examined in the construction of dwellings, workplace and industrial buildings is unlikely to give rise to any significant radiation exposure to the occupants.

  1. Ceramic materials for porcelain veneers: part II. Effect of material, shade, and thickness on translucency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barizon, Karine T L; Bergeron, Cathia; Vargas, Marcos A; Qian, Fang; Cobb, Deborah S; Gratton, David G; Geraldeli, Saulo

    2014-10-01

    Information regarding the differences in translucency among new ceramic systems is lacking. The purpose of this study was to compare the relative translucency of the different types of ceramic systems indicated for porcelain veneers and to evaluate the effect of shade and thickness on translucency. Disk specimens 13 mm in diameter and 0.7-mm thick were fabricated for the following 9 materials (n=5): VITA VM9, IPS Empress Esthetic, VITA PM9, Vitablocks Mark II, Kavo Everest G-Blank, IPS Empress CAD, IPS e.max CAD, IPS e.maxPress, and Lava Zirconia. VITA VM9 served as the positive control and Lava as the negative control. The disks were fabricated with the shade that corresponds to A1. For IPS e.maxPress, additional disks were made with different shades (BL2, BL4, A1, B1, O1, O2, V1, V2, V3), thickness (0.3 mm), and translucencies (high translucency, low translucency). Color coordinates (CIE L∗ a∗ b∗) were measured with a tristimulus colorimeter. The translucency parameter was calculated from the color difference of the material on a black versus a white background. One-way ANOVA, the post hoc Tukey honestly significant difference, and the Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsch multiple range tests were used to analyze the data (α=.05). Statistically significant differences in the translucency parameter were found among porcelains (PPM9, Empress Esthetic>Empress CAD>Mark II, Everest, e.max CAD>e.max Press>Lava. Significant differences also were noted when different shades and thickness were compared (Pveneers present varying degrees of translucency. The thickness and shade of lithium disilicate ceramic affect its translucency. Shade affects translucency parameter less than thickness. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Acousto-ultrasonic evaluation of ceramic matrix composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosreis, Henrique L. M.

    1991-01-01

    Acousto-ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation of ceramic composite specimens with a lithium-alumino-silicate glass matrix reinforced with unidirectional silicon carbide (NICALON) fibers was conducted to evaluate their reserve of strength. Ceramic composite specimens with different amount of damage were prepared by four-point cyclic fatigue loading of the specimens at 500 C for a different number of cycles. The reserve of strength of the specimens was measured as the maximum bending stress recorded during four-pointed bending test with the load monotonically increased until failure occurs. It was observed that the reserve of strength did not correlate with the number of fatigue cycles. However, it was also observed that higher values of the stress wave factor measurements correspond to higher values of the reserve of strength test data. Therefore, these results show that the acousto-ultrasonic approach has the potential of being used to monitor damage and to estimate the reserve of strength of ceramic composites.

  3. The role of ceramic materials in the production of hydrogen with simultaneous CO{sub 2} capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros, B.S. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), PE (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: Hydrogen is considered one of the most promising alternatives to fossil fuels. However, it is mainly obtained from syngas resulting from natural gas steam reforming (SMR), producing a significant amount of carbon dioxide as a side product. Carbon dioxide emission (CO2) is a major contributor to global warming, and one-third of those emissions come from fuel combustion for power generation. A new interesting process has been described to control CO2 emission: the reforming optimized by CO2 sorption, which associates conventional methane reforming and in situ capture of CO2 via absorption in a solid oxide. Furthermore, this strategy can increase the H2 production and concentrate CO2 for the eventual use as chemicals or energy vectors. Alkaline and alkaline-earth ceramics have been proposed for CO2 capture through adsorption and chemisorption processes. These materials can be classified into two large groups: dense and porous ceramics. Dense ceramics mainly trap CO2 chemically: the CO2 is chemisorbed. Among these ceramics, CaO is the most studied one. CaO-based materials have been highlighted as the solid sorbents in the capture of CO2 because of their favorable thermodynamic and chemical properties. The main problem with CaO is the strong decrease in the sorption capacity after multiple carbonation–calcination cycles. This talk will cover some strategies to improve this sorption capacity, such as the deposition of calcium oxide on an inert support, Ca12Al14O33 (mayenite). This oxide has no sorption properties but presents a large surface area, and provides stable network inhibiting deactivation of CaO by sintering. (author)

  4. Structural design methodologies for ceramic-based material systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Stephen F.; Chulya, Abhisak; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1992-01-01

    One of the primary pacing items for realizing the full potential of ceramic-based structural components is the development of new design methods and protocols. The focus here is on low temperature, fast-fracture analysis of monolithic, whisker-toughened, laminated, and woven ceramic composites. A number of design models and criteria are highlighted. Public domain computer algorithms, which aid engineers in predicting the fast-fracture reliability of structural components, are mentioned. Emphasis is not placed on evaluating the models, but instead is focused on the issues relevant to the current state of the art.

  5. A 3-year prospective study of implant-supported, single-tooth restorations of all-ceramic and metal-ceramic materials in patients with tooth agenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Mandana; Worsaae, Nils; Schiødt, Morten

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this clinical study was to describe outcome variables of all-ceramic and metal-ceramic implant-supported, single-tooth restorations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 59 patients (mean age: 27.9 years) with tooth agenesis and treated with 98 implant-supported single-too...

  6. Preparation and electrical characterization of ceramic material for energy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alessandrini, F.; Alvani, C.; Casadio, S.; De Logu, P.; Dikonimos Makris, T.; Masci, A.; Nannetti, C.A.; Petrucci, L. [ENEA, Casaccia (Italy). Area Energia e Innovazione

    1993-11-01

    Ceramic oxides such as lithium aluminate, lithium zirconate, Y-doped zirconia and Sr-doped lanthanum manganite were prepared and characterized in terms of electric conductivity, a property related to their use in critical functional components of advanced energy converters, e.g., solid oxide fuel cell.

  7. Experimental investigations on radiative properties of two kinds of open-cell porous ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Gaosheng; Huang, Pingrui; Chen, Lin; Xu, Chao; Du, Xiaoze

    2017-06-01

    Open-cell porous ceramic is an ideal volumetric heat absorbing material, and understanding in detail the thermal properties of the material, particularly its radiative properties, is of primary importance for the design and improvement of volumetric solar receivers. This work investigates the radiative properties of open-cell porous ceramic through experiment. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was applied to measure the spectral transmittance of open-cell porous ceramic samples with different porosities and cell densities in infrared wavelengths between 2.5 and 25 µm. The results were analyzed to determine the spectral extinction coefficient and Rosseland extinction coefficient, which showed that the radiative properties of porous ceramic are strongly dependent on its microstructure parameters, while the type of material has little influence. The spectral extinction coefficient and Rosseland extinction coefficient both increased with increasing cell density and decreasing porosity. Based on the experimental results, two empirical correlations related to the window diameter and porosity were proposed to predict the Rosseland extinction coefficient of open-cell porous ceramics. Finally, the radiative thermal conductivities of different porous ceramics were studied.

  8. In vitro study of matrix surface properties of porous granulated calcium phosphate ceramic materials made in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chissov, V I; Sviridova, I K; Sergeeva, N S; Kirsanova, V A; Achmedova, S A; Filiushin, M M; Barinov, S M; Fadeeva, I V; Komlev, V S; Smirnov, V V

    2008-04-01

    We performed in vitro screening of monophasic (hydroxyapatite, beta-tricalcium phosphate, carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite with 0.59 and 5.9 wt% substitution with CO(3)(2-)) and biphasic (hydroxyapatite-tricalcium phosphate with various percentage of the components 80/20, 60/40, 20/80, silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite with 0.79 wt% SiO(2)) porous granulated ceramics composed of calcium phosphate powders synthesized by methods of heterophasic interaction of reagents and precipitation from aqueous solutions using MTT test and cultured human fibroblasts. Acute toxicity of materials (24-h incubation with cell culture) and matrix properties (3, 5, 7, 14, 18, 21, 28 days in culture) were evaluated. We selected a batch of materials obtained by precipitation from aqueous solutions, which were non-toxic and were characterized by good matrix properties (for cells). Biphasic ceramics with hydroxyapatite-tricalcium phosphate ratio of 80/20 exhibited best characteristics, and ceramics on the basis of silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite showed moderate characteristics.

  9. PREFACE: Symposium 1: Advanced Structure Analysis and Characterization of Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashima, Masatomo

    2011-05-01

    Preface to Symposium 1 (Advanced Structure Analysis and Characterization of Ceramic Materials) of the International Congress of Ceramics III, held 14-18 November 2010 in Osaka, Japan Remarkable developments have been made recently in the structural analysis and characterization of inorganic crystalline and amorphous materials, such as x-ray, neutron, synchrotron and electron diffraction, x-ray/neutron scattering, IR/Raman scattering, NMR, XAFS, first-principle calculations, computer simulations, Rietveld analysis, the maximum-entropy method, in situ measurements at high temperatures/pressures and electron/nuclear density analysis. These techniques enable scientists to study not only static and long-range periodic structures but also dynamic and short-/intermediate-range structures. Multi-scale characterization from the electron to micrometer levels is becoming increasingly important as a means of understanding phenomena at the interfaces, grain boundaries and surfaces of ceramic materials. This symposium has discussed the structures and structure/property relationships of various ceramic materials (electro, magnetic and optical ceramics; energy and environment related ceramics; bio-ceramics; ceramics for reliability secure society; traditional ceramics) through 38 oral presentations including 8 invited lectures and 49 posters. Best poster awards were given to six excellent poster presentations (Y-C Chen, Tokyo Institute of Technology; C-Y Chung, Tohoku University; T Stawski, University of Twente; Y Hirano, Nagoya Institute of Technology; B Bittova, Charles University Prague; Y Onodera, Kyoto University). I have enjoyed working with my friends in the ICC3 conference. I would like to express special thanks to other organizers: Professor Scott T Misture, Alfred University, USA, Professor Xiaolong Chen, Institute of Physics, CAS, China, Professor Takashi Ida, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Japan, Professor Isao Tanaka, Kyoto University, Japan. I also acknowledge the

  10. Effect of cooling rate on shear bond strength of veneering porcelain to a zirconia ceramic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komine, Futoshi; Saito, Ayako; Kobayashi, Kazuhisa; Koizuka, Mai; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Matsumura, Hideo

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of cooling rates after firing procedures of veneering porcelain on shear bond strength between veneering porcelain and a zirconium dioxide (zirconia; ZrO₂) ceramic material. A total of 48 ZrO₂ disks were divided equally into three groups. Two veneering porcelains that are recommended for ZrO₂ material - Cerabien ZR (CZR), IPS e.max Ceram (EMX) - and one that is recommended for metal ceramics - Super Porcelain AAA (AAA) were assessed. Each group was then further divided into two subgroups (n = 8) according to cooling time (0 or 4 min) after porcelain firing. Specimens were fabricated by veneering the porcelain on the ZrO₂ disks, after which shear bond testing was conducted. Bond strength differed significantly by cooling time in ZrO₂-AAA (P veneering porcelain to a zirconia material depending on porcelain material used.

  11. Electrochemical cholesterol sensor based on carbon nanotube@molecularly imprinted polymer modified ceramic carbon electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yuejin; Li, Haidong; Guan, Huaimin; Zhao, Jianming; Majeed, Saadat; Anjum, Saima; Liang, Feng; Xu, Guobao

    2013-09-15

    A monolithic molecular imprinting sensor based on ceramic carbon electrode (CCE) has been reported. The sensor can be renewed simply by smoothing. It was fabricated by thoroughly mixing multiwalled carbon nanotube@molecularly imprinted polymer (MWCNT@MIP), graphite powder, and silicon alkoxide, and then packing the resulting complex mixture of components firmly into the electrode cavity of a Teflon sleeve. The incorporated MWCNT@MIP in CCEs functioned as a recognition element for cholesterol determination. The MWCNT@MIP-CCEs were tested in the presence or absence of cholesterol by cyclic voltammetry and linear sweep voltammetry. The cholesterol sensor has excellent sensitivity with a linear range of 10-300nM and a detection limit of 1nM (S/N=3). The monolithic molecular imprinting sensor exhibits good stability, high sensitivity, and user-friendly reusability for cholesterol determination. This study shows that CCE is a promising matrix for MIP sensors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Full Polymer Dielectric Elastomeric Actuators (DEA Functionalised with Carbon Nanotubes and High-K Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilo Köckritz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA are special devices which have a simple working and construction principle and outstanding actuation properties. The DEAs consist of a combination of different materials for the dielectric and electrode layers. The combination of these layers causes incompatibilities in their interconnections. Dramatic differences in the mechanical properties and bad adhesion of the layers are the principal causes for the reduction of the actuation displacement and strong reduction of lifetime. Common DEAs achieve actuation displacements of 2% and a durability of some million cycles. The following investigations represent a new approach to solving the problems of common systems. The investigated DEA consists of only one basic raw polymer, which was modified according to the required demands of each layer. The basic raw polymer was modified with single-walled carbon nanotubes or high-k ceramics, for example, lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate. The development of the full polymer DEA comprised the development of materials and technologies to realise a reproducible layer composition. It was proven that the full polymer actuator worked according to the theoretical rules. The investigated system achieved actuation displacements above 20% regarding thickness, outstanding interconnections at each layer without any failures, and durability above 3 million cycles without any indication of an impending malfunction.

  13. Method of making carbon nanotube composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2014-05-20

    The present invention is a method of making a composite polymeric material by dissolving a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes and optionally additives in a solvent to make a solution and removing at least a portion of the solvent after casting onto a substrate to make thin films. The material has enhanced conductivity properties due to the blending of the un-functionalized and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes.

  14. Porous biomorphic silicon carbide ceramics coated with hydroxyapatite as prospective materials for bone implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryshkov, Oleksandr; Klyui, Nickolai I; Temchenko, Volodymyr P; Kyselov, Vitalii S; Chatterjee, Anamika; Belyaev, Alexander E; Lauterboeck, Lothar; Iarmolenko, Dmytro; Glasmacher, Birgit

    2016-11-01

    Porous and cytocompatible silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics derived from wood precursors and coated with bioactive hydroxyapatite (HA) and HA-zirconium dioxide (HA/ZrO2) composite are materials with promising application in engineering of bone implants due to their excellent mechanical and structural properties. Biomorphic SiC ceramics have been synthesized from wood (Hornbeam, Sapele, Tilia and Pear) using a forced impregnation method. The SiC ceramics have been coated with bioactive HA and HA/ZrO2 using effective gas detonation deposition approach (GDD). The surface morphology and cytotoxicity of SiC ceramics as well as phase composition and crystallinity of deposited coatings were analyzed. It has been shown that the porosity and pore size of SiC ceramics depend on initial wood source. The XRD and FTIR studies revealed the preservation of crystal structure and phase composition of in the HA coating, while addition of ZrO2 to the initial HA powder resulted in significant decomposition of the final HA/ZrO2 coating and formation of other calcium phosphate phases. In turn, NIH 3T3 cells cultured in medium exposed to coated and uncoated SiC ceramics showed high re-cultivation efficiency as well as metabolic activity. The recultivation efficiency of cells was the highest for HA-coated ceramics, whereas HA/ZrO2 coating improved the recultivation efficiency of cells as compared to uncoated SiC ceramics. The GDD method allowed generating homogeneous HA coatings with no change in calcium to phosphorus ratio. In summary, porous and cytocompatible bio-SiC ceramics with bioactive coatings show a great promise in construction of light, robust, inexpensive and patient-specific bone implants for clinical application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Advanced Materials Development Program: Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines program plan, 1983--1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-07-01

    The purpose of the Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines (CTAHE) Project is the development of an industrial technology base capable of providing reliable and cost-effective high temperature ceramic components for application in advanced heat engines. There is a deliberate emphasis on industrial'' in the purpose statement. The project is intended to support the US ceramic and engine industries by providing the needed ceramic materials technology. The heat engine programs have goals of component development and proof-of-concept. The CTAHE Project is aimed at developing generic basic ceramic technology and does not involve specific engine designs and components. The materials research and development efforts in the CTAHE Project are focused on the needs and general requirements of the advanced gas turbine and low heat rejection diesel engines. The CTAHE Project supports the DOE Office of Transportation Systems' heat engine programs, Advanced Turbine Technology Applications (ATTAP) and Heavy Duty Transport (HDT) by providing the basic technology required for development of reliable and cost-effective ceramic components. The heat engine programs provide the iterative component design, fabrication, and test development logic. 103 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs.

  16. Process Development of Porcelain Ceramic Material with Binder Jetting Process for Dental Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyanaji, Hadi; Zhang, Shanshan; Lassell, Austin; Zandinejad, Amirali; Yang, Li

    2016-03-01

    Custom ceramic structures possess significant potentials in many applications such as dentistry and aerospace where extreme environments are present. Specifically, highly customized geometries with adequate performance are needed for various dental prostheses applications. This paper demonstrates the development of process and post-process parameters for a dental porcelain ceramic material using binder jetting additive manufacturing (AM). Various process parameters such as binder amount, drying power level, drying time and powder spread speed were studied experimentally for their effect on geometrical and mechanical characteristics of green parts. In addition, the effects of sintering and printing parameters on the qualities of the densified ceramic structures were also investigated experimentally. The results provide insights into the process-property relationships for the binder jetting AM process, and some of the challenges of the process that need to be further characterized for the successful adoption of the binder jetting technology in high quality ceramic fabrications are discussed.

  17. Fracture Toughness of Veneering Ceramics for Fused to Metal (PFM) and Zirconia Dental Restorative Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Janet B.; Quinn, George D.; Sundar, Veeraraghaven

    2010-01-01

    Veneering ceramics designed to be used with modern zirconia framework restorations have been reported to fracture occasionally in vivo. The fracture toughness of such veneering ceramics was measured and compared to that of conventional feldspathic porcelain veneering ceramics for metal framework restorations. The fracture toughness of the leucite free veneer was measured to be 0.73 MPa m ± 0.02 MPa m, which is less than that for the porcelain fused to metal (PFM) veneering ceramic: 1.10 MPa ± 0.2 MPa. (Uncertainties are one standard deviation unless otherwise noted.) The surface crack in flexure (SCF) method was suitable for both materials, but precrack identification was difficult for the leucite containing feldspathic porcelain PFM veneer. PMID:21833158

  18. Fabrication of Porous Ceramic-Geopolymer Based Material to Improve Water Absorption and Retention in Construction Materials: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, N. H.; Ibrahim, W. M. A. W.; Abdullah, M. M. A. B.; Sandu, A. V.; Tahir, M. F. M.

    2017-06-01

    Porous ceramic nowadays has been investigated for a variety of its application such as filters, lightweight structural component and others due to their specific properties such as high surface area, stability and permeability. Besides, it has the properties of low thermal conductivity. Various formation techniques making these porous ceramic properties can be tailored or further fine-tuned to obtain the optimum characteristic. Porous materials also one of the good candidate for absorption properties. Conventional construction materials are not design to have good water absorption and retention that lead to the poor performance on these criteria. Temperature is a major driving force for moisture movement and influences sorption characteristics of many constructions materials. The effect of elevated temperatures on the water absorption coefficient and retention remain as critical issue that need to be investigated. Therefore, this paper will review the process parameters in fabricating porous ceramic for absorption properties.

  19. Carbon Nanotube-Enhanced Carbon-Phenenolic Ablator Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikolaev, P.; Stackpoole, M.; Fan, W.; Cruden, B. A.; Waid, M.; Moloney, P.; Arepalli, S.; Arnold, J.; Partridge, H.; Yowell, L.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of PICA (phenolic impregnated carbon ablator) as the selected material for heat shielding for future earth return vehicles. It briefly reviews the manufacturing of PICA and the advantages for the use of heat shielding, and then explains the reason for using Carbon Nanotubes to improve strength of phenolic resin that binds carbon fibers together. It reviews the work being done to create a carbon nanotube enhanced PICA. Also shown are various micrographic images of the various PICA materials.

  20. Precise Determination of Silicon in Ceramic Reference Materials by Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis at JRR-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Miura

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Prompt gamma activation analysis using a thermal neutron-guided beam at Japan Atomic Energy Agency JRR-3M was applied for the precise determination of Si in silicon nitride ceramic reference materials [Japan Ceramic Reference Material (JCRM R 003]. In this study, the standard addition method coupled with internal standard was used for the nondestructive determination of Si in the sample. Cadmium was used as internal standard to obtain the linear calibration curves and to compensate for the neutron beam variability. The analytical result of determining Si in JCRM R 003 silicon nitride fine powder ceramic reference materials using prompt gamma activation analysis was in good agreement with that obtained by classical gravimetric analysis. The relative expanded measurement uncertainty (k = 2 associated with the determined value was 2.4%.

  1. Carbon materials for chemical capacitive energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yunpu; Dou, Yuqian; Zhao, Dongyuan; Fulvio, Pasquale F; Mayes, Richard T; Dai, Sheng

    2011-11-09

    Carbon materials have attracted intense interests as electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors, because of their high surface area, electrical conductivity, chemical stability and low cost. Activated carbons produced by different activation processes from various precursors are the most widely used electrodes. Recently, with the rapid growth of nanotechnology, nanostructured electrode materials, such as carbon nanotubes and template-synthesized porous carbons have been developed. Their unique electrical properties and well controlled pore sizes and structures facilitate fast ion and electron transportation. In order to further improve the power and energy densities of the capacitors, carbon-based composites combining electrical double layer capacitors (EDLC)-capacitance and pseudo-capacitance have been explored. They show not only enhanced capacitance, but as well good cyclability. In this review, recent progresses on carbon-based electrode materials are summarized, including activated carbons, carbon nanotubes, and template-synthesized porous carbons, in particular mesoporous carbons. Their advantages and disadvantages as electrochemical capacitors are discussed. At the end of this review, the future trends of electrochemical capacitors with high energy and power are proposed. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Separation of Hydrogen from Carbon Dioxide through Porous Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Taro Shimonosono; Hikari Imada; Hikaru Maeda; Yoshihiro Hirata

    2016-01-01

    The gas permeability of α-alumina, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), and silicon carbide porous ceramics toward H2, CO2, and H2–CO2 mixtures were investigated at room temperature. The permeation of H2 and CO2 single gases occurred above a critical pressure gradient, which was smaller for H2 gas than for CO2 gas. When the Knudsen number (λ/r ratio, λ: molecular mean free path, r: pore radius) of a single gas was larger than unity, Knudsen flow became the dominant gas transportation process. Th...

  3. Poly(trimethylene carbonate)-based composite materials for reconstruction of critical-sized cranial bone defects in sheep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, Ni; van Leeuwen, Anne C.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Bos, Ruud R. M.; Kuijer, Roel

    Purpose: The use of ceramic materials in repair of bone defects is limited to non-load -bearing sites. We tested poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) combined with beta-tricalcium phosphate or biphasic calcium phosphate particles for reconstruction of cranial defects. Materials and methods:

  4. Poly(trimethylene carbonate)-based composite materials for reconstruction of critical-sized cranial bone defects in sheep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, Ni; van Leeuwen, Anne C.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Bos, Ruud R.M.; Kuijer, Roel

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The use of ceramic materials in repair of bone defects is limited to non-load-bearing sites. We tested poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) combined with β-tricalcium phosphate or biphasic calcium phosphate particles for reconstruction of cranial defects. Materials and methods PTMC-calcium

  5. Resin bond to indirect composite and new ceramic/polymer materials: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitznagel, Frank A; Horvath, Sebastian D; Guess, Petra C; Blatz, Markus B

    2014-01-01

    Resin bonding is essential for clinical longevity of indirect restorations. Especially in light of the increasing popularity of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing-fabricated indirect restorations, there is a need to assess optimal bonding protocols for new ceramic/polymer materials and indirect composites. The aim of this article was to review and assess the current scientific evidence on the resin bond to indirect composite and new ceramic/polymer materials. An electronic PubMed database search was conducted from 1966 to September 2013 for in vitro studies pertaining the resin bond to indirect composite and new ceramic/polymer materials. The search revealed 198 titles. Full-text screening was carried out for 43 studies, yielding 18 relevant articles that complied with inclusion criteria. No relevant studies could be identified regarding new ceramic/polymer materials. Most common surface treatments are aluminum-oxide air-abrasion, silane treatment, and hydrofluoric acid-etching for indirect composite restoration. Self-adhesive cements achieve lower bond strengths in comparison with etch-and-rinse systems. Thermocycling has a greater impact on bonding behavior than water storage. Air-particle abrasion and additional silane treatment should be applied to enhance the resin bond to laboratory-processed composites. However, there is an urgent need for in vitro studies that evaluate the bond strength to new ceramic/polymer materials. This article reviews the available dental literature on resin bond of laboratory composites and gives scientifically based guidance for their successful placement. Furthermore, this review demonstrated that future research for new ceramic/polymer materials is required. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Cervical and Incisal Marginal Discrepancy in Ceramic Laminate Veneering Materials: A SEM Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Hemalatha; Ganapathy, Dhanraj M; Jain, Ashish R

    2017-01-01

    Marginal discrepancy influenced by the choice of processing material used for the ceramic laminate veneers needs to be explored further for better clinical application. This study aimed to evaluate the amount of cervical and incisal marginal discrepancy associated with different ceramic laminate veneering materials. This was an experimental, single-blinded, in vitro trial. Ten central incisors were prepared for laminate veneers with 2 mm uniform reduction and heavy chamfer finish line. Ceramic laminate veneers fabricated over the prepared teeth using four different processing materials were categorized into four groups as Group I - aluminous porcelain veneers, Group II - lithium disilicate ceramic veneers, Group III - lithium disilicate-leucite-based veneers, Group IV - zirconia-based ceramic veneers. The cervical and incisal marginal discrepancy was measured using a scanning electron microscope. ANOVA and post hoc Tukey honest significant difference (HSD) tests were used for statistical analysis. The cervical and incisal marginal discrepancy for four groups was Group I - 114.6 ± 4.3 μm, 132.5 ± 6.5 μm, Group II - 86.1 ± 6.3 μm, 105.4 ± 5.3 μm, Group III - 71.4 ± 4.4 μm, 91.3 ± 4.7 μm, and Group IV - 123.1 ± 4.1 μm, 142.0 ± 5.4 μm. ANOVA and post hoc Tukey HSD tests observed a statistically significant difference between the four test specimens with regard to cervical marginal discrepancy. The cervical and incisal marginal discrepancy scored F = 243.408, P veneers fabricated using leucite reinforced lithium disilicate exhibited the least marginal discrepancy followed by lithium disilicate ceramic, aluminous porcelain, and zirconia-based ceramics. The marginal discrepancy was more in the incisal region than in the cervical region in all the groups.

  7. Correlations between spectroradiometric and spectrophotometric colors of all-ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ho-Nam; Yu, Bin; Lim, Jin Ik; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2010-11-01

    Color coordinates of translucent esthetic materials measured by traditional spectrophotometers (SP) would deviate from those measured by newly introduced spectroradiometers (SR), which might simulate the clinical viewing condition better. This study aimed to determine the correlations in the SP- and SR-based color coordinates and color differences of all-ceramic materials. Specimens for seven A2 shade core ceramics (n=7) and corresponding A2 and A3 shades veneer ceramics (n=7) were fabricated in clinically relevant thicknesses (1.5mm after layering). Color of layered specimens was measured according to the CIELAB color scale by a SP and a SR. Color differences (ΔE(ab)(*)) between the reference ceramics and the corresponding layered ceramics were calculated. Correlations between SP- and SR-based color coordinates and color difference values were determined (α=0.05). SR-based color coordinates were significantly different from the SP-based values; however, general shifting trends by the instrument were observed. SP- and SR-based CIE a*, b* and chroma values showed significant correlations (p0.05). The color coordinates representing the hue attribute (CIE a*, b* and chroma) measured by a spectrophotometer and a spectroradiometer showed significant correlations; however, the color coordinates and the color difference values were significantly different by the instrument. Therefore, color coordinates and the color difference values based on different instruments should not be compared directly. Copyright © 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Separation of Hydrogen from Carbon Dioxide through Porous Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Shimonosono

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The gas permeability of α-alumina, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ, and silicon carbide porous ceramics toward H2, CO2, and H2–CO2 mixtures were investigated at room temperature. The permeation of H2 and CO2 single gases occurred above a critical pressure gradient, which was smaller for H2 gas than for CO2 gas. When the Knudsen number (λ/r ratio, λ: molecular mean free path, r: pore radius of a single gas was larger than unity, Knudsen flow became the dominant gas transportation process. The H2 fraction for the mixed gas of (20%–80% H2–(80%–20% CO2 through porous Al2O3, YSZ, and SiC approached unity with decreasing pressure gradient. The high fraction of H2 gas was closely related to the difference in the critical pressure gradient values of H2 and CO2 single gas, the inlet mixed gas composition, and the gas flow mechanism of the mixed gas. Moisture in the atmosphere adsorbed easily on the porous ceramics and affected the critical pressure gradient, leading to the increased selectivity of H2 gas.

  9. Separation of Hydrogen from Carbon Dioxide through Porous Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimonosono, Taro; Imada, Hikari; Maeda, Hikaru; Hirata, Yoshihiro

    2016-11-16

    The gas permeability of α-alumina, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), and silicon carbide porous ceramics toward H₂, CO₂, and H₂-CO₂ mixtures were investigated at room temperature. The permeation of H₂ and CO₂ single gases occurred above a critical pressure gradient, which was smaller for H₂ gas than for CO₂ gas. When the Knudsen number (λ/r ratio, λ: molecular mean free path, r: pore radius) of a single gas was larger than unity, Knudsen flow became the dominant gas transportation process. The H₂ fraction for the mixed gas of (20%-80%) H₂-(80%-20%) CO₂ through porous Al₂O₃, YSZ, and SiC approached unity with decreasing pressure gradient. The high fraction of H₂ gas was closely related to the difference in the critical pressure gradient values of H₂ and CO₂ single gas, the inlet mixed gas composition, and the gas flow mechanism of the mixed gas. Moisture in the atmosphere adsorbed easily on the porous ceramics and affected the critical pressure gradient, leading to the increased selectivity of H₂ gas.

  10. Separation of Hydrogen from Carbon Dioxide through Porous Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimonosono, Taro; Imada, Hikari; Maeda, Hikaru; Hirata, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    The gas permeability of α-alumina, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), and silicon carbide porous ceramics toward H2, CO2, and H2–CO2 mixtures were investigated at room temperature. The permeation of H2 and CO2 single gases occurred above a critical pressure gradient, which was smaller for H2 gas than for CO2 gas. When the Knudsen number (λ/r ratio, λ: molecular mean free path, r: pore radius) of a single gas was larger than unity, Knudsen flow became the dominant gas transportation process. The H2 fraction for the mixed gas of (20%–80%) H2–(80%–20%) CO2 through porous Al2O3, YSZ, and SiC approached unity with decreasing pressure gradient. The high fraction of H2 gas was closely related to the difference in the critical pressure gradient values of H2 and CO2 single gas, the inlet mixed gas composition, and the gas flow mechanism of the mixed gas. Moisture in the atmosphere adsorbed easily on the porous ceramics and affected the critical pressure gradient, leading to the increased selectivity of H2 gas. PMID:28774051

  11. Fabrication and characterization of biomimetic ceramic/polymer composite materials for dental restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrini, Morena; Ferrante, Maurizio; Su, Bo

    2013-04-01

    Conventional dental composites with randomly dispersed inorganic particles within a polymer matrix fail to recapitulate the aligned and anisotropic structure of the dentin and enamel. The aim of the study was to produce a biomimetic composite consisting of a ceramic preform with graded and continuously aligned open pores, infiltrated with epoxy resin. The freeze casting technique was used to obtain the hierarchically structured architecture of the ceramic preforms. Optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential thermal analysis and thermogravimetry (TG-DTA) were used to characterize the samples. Three point bending test and compression test were also performed. All analysis confirmed that the biomimetic composite was characterized by a multi-level hierarchical structure along the freezing direction. In the bottom layers close to the cooling plate (up to 2mm thick), a randomly packed ceramic with closed pores were formed, which resulted in incomplete infiltration with resin and resultant poor mechanical propertiesof the composite. Above 2mm, all ceramic samples showed an aligned structure with an increasing lamellae spacing (wavelength) and a decreasing wall thickness. Mechanical tests showed that the properties of the composites made from ceramic preforms above 2mm from cooling plate are similar to those of the dentin. The fabrication processing reported in this work offers a viable route for the fabrication of biomimetic composites, which could be potentially used in a range of dental restorations to compete with the current dental composites and ceramics. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. All rights reserved.

  12. Raman Scattering in a New Carbon Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronov, O. A.; Street, K. W., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Samples of a new carbon material, Diamonite-B, were fabricated under high pressure from a commercial carbon black--identified as mixed fullerenes. The new material is neither graphite-like nor diamond-like, but exhibits electrical properties close to graphite and mechanical properties close to diamond. The use of Raman spectroscopy to investigate the vibrational dynamics of this new carbon material and to provide structural characterization of its short-, medium- and long-range order is reported. We also provide the results of investigations of these samples by high-resolution electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Hardness, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and other properties of this new material are compared with synthetic graphite-like and diamond-like materials, two other phases of synthetic bulk carbon.

  13. Grinding model and material removal mechanism of medical nanometer zirconia ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongkun; Li, Changhe; Jia, Dongzhou; Wang, Sheng; Li, Runze; Qi, Xiaoxiao

    2014-01-01

    Many patents have been devoted to developing medical nanometer zirconia ceramic grinding techniques that can significantly improve both workpiece surface integrity and grinding quality. Among these patents is a process for preparing ceramic dental implants with a surface for improving osseo-integration by sand abrasive finishing under a jet pressure of 1.5 bar to 8.0 bar and with a grain size of 30 µm to 250 µm. Compared with other materials, nano-zirconia ceramics exhibit unmatched biomedical performance and excellent mechanical properties as medical bone tissue and dentures. The removal mechanism of nano-zirconia materials includes brittle fracture and plastic removal. Brittle fracture involves crack formation, extension, peeling, and chipping to completely remove debris. Plastic removal is similar to chip formation in metal grinding, including rubbing, ploughing, and the formation of grinding debris. The materials are removed in shearing and chipping. During brittle fracture, the grinding-led transverse and radial extension of cracks further generate local peeling of blocks of the material. In material peeling and removal, the mechanical strength and surface quality of the workpiece are also greatly reduced because of crack extension. When grinding occurs in the plastic region, plastic removal is performed, and surface grinding does not generate grinding fissures and surface fracture, producing clinically satisfactory grinding quality. With certain grinding conditions, medical nanometer zirconia ceramics can be removed through plastic flow in ductile regime. In this study, we analyzed the critical conditions for the transfer of brittle and plastic removal in nano-zirconia ceramic grinding as well as the high-quality surface grinding of medical nanometer zirconia ceramics by ELID grinding.

  14. Application of Technogenic-Raw Material and Burning Out Additive in Composite Ceramic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga KIZINIEVIČ

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of the composite ceramic system containing easily fusible hydro-micous clay, technogenic finely dispersed raw material, and burning out waste additive is presented in the article. The properties of the raw materials used are described in the paper. The obtained ceramic bodies were burned at 1000 °C and 1050 °C temperatures, keeping at the highest burning temperature for 4 h. The analysis of physical-mechanical properties of composite ceramics (density, compressive strength, water absorption, its structural parameters (effective and total open porosity, reserve of pore volume, relative wall thickness of the pores and capillaries, and X-ray diffraction analysis was performed. The interdependencies between some structural parameters are described by empirical equations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.3.2443

  15. Basaltic scorias from Romania - complex building material us for concrete, glazing tiles, ceramic glazes, glass ceramics, mineral wool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marica, S.; Cetean, V. [PROCEMA S.A., Bucharest (Romania)

    2002-07-01

    The most spectacular deposit of basaltic scoria from Romania is the Heghes Hill from Racos, locality situated in the central part of country. This deposit emerged as grains of various dimensions, as volcanic ash with specific porosity up to 30% and vacuolar basaltic rocks. All types of basaltic scorias have specific vacuolar appearance, red- brick or blackish - grey coloured, scoria textures and similar chemical composition with others basalts of the world. The physical and mechanical characteristics determined included the scorias in the Heghes Hill in the following categories : light rocks (2,98 g/ dmc), porous(11,04%), similar to expanded slag, slightly absorbing rocks (3,86%), with low compression strengths (1700 daN/cmp). Basaltic scoria from Heghes is a very good row material for the manufacture of concrete, for obtain decorative cutting tiles glazing with ceramic and basaltic glazes (up to 40%) varied the range of colours and for obtaining glass ceramic, mineral wool, crushing sand for road maintenance, heat -insulating bricks and shid -proof material. (orig.)

  16. Thermal/chemical degradation of ceramic cross-flow filter materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvin, M.A.; Lane, J.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1989-11-01

    This report summarizes the 14-month, Phase 1 effort conducted by Westinghouse on the Thermal/Chemical Degradation of Ceramic Cross-Flow Filter Materials program. In Phase 1 expected filter process conditions were identified for a fixed-bed, fluid-bed, and entrained-bed gasification, direct coal fired turbine, and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion system. Ceramic cross-flow filter materials were also selected, procured, and subjected to chemical and physical characterization. The stability of each of the ceramic cross-flow materials was assessed in terms of potential reactions or phase change as a result of process temperature, and effluent gas compositions containing alkali and fines. In addition chemical and physical characterization was conducted on cross-flow filters that were exposed to the METC fluid-bed gasifier and the New York University pressurized fluidized-bed combustor. Long-term high temperature degradation mechanisms were proposed for each ceramic cross-flow material at process operating conditions. An experimental bench-scale test program is recommended to be conducted in Phase 2, generating data that support the proposed cross-flow filter material thermal/chemical degradation mechanisms. Papers on the individual subtasks have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  17. Shear bond strength of veneering ceramic to coping materials with different pre-surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarib, Natasya Ahmad; Anuar, Norsamihah; Ahmad, Marlynda

    2016-10-01

    Pre-surface treatments of coping materials have been recommended to enhance the bonding to the veneering ceramic. Little is known on the effect on shear bond strength, particularly with new coping material. The aim of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength of veneering ceramic to three coping materials: i) metal alloy (MA), ii) zirconia oxide (ZO), and iii) lithium disilicate (LD) after various pre-surface treatments. Thirty-two (n = 32) discs were prepared for each coping material. Four pre-surface treatments were prepared for each sub-group (n = 8); a) no treatment or control (C), b) sandblast (SB), c) acid etch (AE), and d) sandblast and acid etch (SBAE). Veneering ceramics were applied to all discs. Shear bond strength was measured with a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparisons tests. Mean shear bond strengths were obtained for MA (19.00 ± 6.39 MPa), ZO (24.45 ± 5.14 MPa) and LD (13.62 ± 5.12 MPa). There were statistically significant differences in types of coping material and various pre-surface treatments ( P veneering ceramic to zirconia oxide was higher than metal alloy and lithium disilicate. The highest shear bond strengths were obtained in sandblast and acid etch treatment for zirconia oxide and lithium disilicate groups, and in acid etch treatment for metal alloy group.

  18. Optical Material Researches for Frontier Optical Ceramics and Visible Fiber Laser Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-07

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0059 Optical material researches for frontier optical ceramics and visible fiber laser technologies Yasushi Fujimoto Osaka...07-2016 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 18 Apr 2013 to 17 Apr 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Optical material researches for frontier...are very useful for scientific and industrial applications. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Fibre Lasers, Laser Dynamics, Nonlinear Optical Materials 16. SECURITY

  19. Improving impact resistance of ceramic materials by energy absorbing surface layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, H. P.; Seretsky, J.

    1974-01-01

    Energy absorbing surface layers were used to improve the impact resistance of silicon nitride and silicon carbide ceramics. Low elastic modulus materials were used. In some cases, the low elastic modulus was achieved using materials that form localized microcracks as a result of thermal expansion anisotropy, thermal expansion differences between phases, or phase transformations. In other cases, semi-vitreous or vitreous materials were used. Substantial improvements in impact resistance were observed at room and elevated temperatures.

  20. Computational materials chemistry for carbon capture using porous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Abhishek; Huang, Runhong; Malani, Ateeque; Babarao, Ravichandar

    2017-11-01

    Control over carbon dioxide (CO2) release is extremely important to decrease its hazardous effects on the environment such as global warming, ocean acidification, etc. For CO2 capture and storage at industrial point sources, nanoporous materials offer an energetically viable and economically feasible approach compared to chemisorption in amines. There is a growing need to design and synthesize new nanoporous materials with enhanced capability for carbon capture. Computational materials chemistry offers tools to screen and design cost-effective materials for CO2 separation and storage, and it is less time consuming compared to trial and error experimental synthesis. It also provides a guide to synthesize new materials with better properties for real world applications. In this review, we briefly highlight the various carbon capture technologies and the need of computational materials design for carbon capture. This review discusses the commonly used computational chemistry-based simulation methods for structural characterization and prediction of thermodynamic properties of adsorbed gases in porous materials. Finally, simulation studies reported on various potential porous materials, such as zeolites, porous carbon, metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and covalent organic frameworks (COFs), for CO2 capture are discussed.

  1. Yeast-based microporous carbon materials for carbon dioxide capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wenzhong; He, Yue; Zhang, Shouchun; Li, Junfen; Fan, Weibin

    2012-07-01

    A hierarchical microporous carbon material with a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area of 1348 m(2) g(-1) and a pore volume of 0.67 cm(3) g(-1) was prepared from yeast through chemical activation with potassium hydroxide. This type of material contains large numbers of nitrogen-containing groups (nitrogen content >5.3 wt%), and, consequently, basic sites. As a result, this material shows a faster adsorption rate and a higher adsorption capacity of CO(2) than the material obtained by directly carbonizing yeast under the same conditions. The difference is more pronounced in the presence of N(2) or H(2)O, showing that chemical activation of discarded yeast with potassium hydroxide could afford high-performance microporous carbon materials for the capture of CO(2). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Characterization of Carbon Molecular Sieve Membranes Supported on Ceramic Tubes

    OpenAIRE

    Briceño, Kelly; Silvestre Albero, Joaquín; Silvestre Albero, Ana; Calvo Díaz, José Ignacio; Montané, Daniel; Garcia-Valls, Ricard; Hernández Giménez, Antonio; Rodríguez Reinoso, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Carbon molecular sieve membranes have been analyzed in supported and unsupported configurations in this experimental study. The membranes were used to adsorb CO2, N2 and CH4, and their adsorption data were analyzed to establish differences in rate and capacity of adsorption between the two types of samples (supported and unsupported). Experimental results show an important effect of the support, which can be considered as an additional parameter to tailor pore size on these carbon membranes. ...

  3. Heat and Mass Transfer in the Chemical Vapor Deposition of Silicon Carbide in a Porous Carbon-Carbon Composite Material for a Heat Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznik, S. V.; Mikhailovskii, K. V.; Prosuntsov, P. V.

    2017-03-01

    Physical and mathematical simulations of the chemical vapor deposition of silicon carbide in a porous carbon-carbon composite material in a chemical vapor deposition reactor for formation of a matrix of a carbon-ceramic composite material for a heat shield of an aerospace aircraft have been performed. Results of parametric calculations of the heat and mass transfer at the macro- and microlevels in representative elements of the microstructure of carbon-carbon composite materials different in residual porosity at different temperatures in the reaction zone of the reactor are presented. Features of compaction of the pore space of a carbon-carbon composite material by a silicon-carbide matrix depending on the technological parameters of the reaction medium were analyzed.

  4. Metals and Ceramics Division materials science annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHargue, C.J. (comp.)

    1977-09-01

    Progress is reported for research programs in the metals and ceramics division of ORNL. In structure of materials, theoretical research, x-ray diffraction studies, studies of erosion of ceramics, preparation and synthesis of high temperature and special service materials, and studies of stabilities of microphases in high-temperature structural materials. Research into deformation and mechanical properties included physical metallurgy, and grain boundary segregation and embrittlement. Physical properties and transport phenomena were studied and included mechanisms of surface and solid state reactions, and properties of superconducting materials. The radiation effects program, directed at understanding the effects of composition and microstructure on the structure and properties of materials irradiated at elevated temperatures, is also described. (GHT)

  5. Standard practice for labeling ceramic art materials for chronic adverse health hazards

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice describes a procedure for developing precautionary labels for ceramic art materials and provides hazard and precautionary statements based upon knowledge that exists in the scientific and medical communities. This practice concerns those chronic adverse health hazards known to be associated with a product or product component(s), when the component(s) is present in a physical form, volume, or concentration that in the opinion of a toxicologist has the potential to produce a chronic adverse health effect(s). 1.2 This practice is intended to apply exclusively to ceramic art materials which are packaged in sizes intended for use by artists or crafts people, either individually, or in a small group or class. 1.3 This practice applies to developing precautionary labeling for ceramic art materials intended for adult usage. Conformance to this practice does not imply that ceramic art materials will necessarily be labeled adequately or safe for use by children. Labeling determinations should conside...

  6. Electrical treeing in ceramic-based insulating materials (Ba TiO3 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Electrical treeing in ceramic-based insulating materials (Ba TiO3 – SiO2). ... It was observed that the tree-like structures were of two types and that the initiation could have been due to partial discharges that arose from microcracks, pores and other similar defects. This equally shows that the mechanism of the initiation of an ...

  7. Engineering spinal fusion: evaluating ceramic materials for cell based tissue engineered approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, C.E.

    2011-01-01

    The principal aim of this thesis was to advance the development of tissue engineered posterolateral spinal fusion by investigating the potential of calcium phosphate ceramic materials to support cell based tissue engineered bone formation. This was accomplished by developing several novel model

  8. Synthesis, Mechanical Behavior, and Multi-Scale Tribological Performance of Carbon Nanoparticle Reinforced Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Andy

    This dissertation investigates the effects of carbon nanoparticles on the synthesis, mechanical behavior, and tribological performance of ceramic based composites. Specifically graphene Nanoplatelet (GNP) reinforced Al 2O3 and nanodiamond (ND) reinforced WC-Co systems are investigated. Carbon based nanoparticles such as GNPs and NDs are ideal reinforcements for ceramic based composites because of their unique functional and mechanical properties. GNPs have exceptional mechanical properties such as yield strength and elastic modulus, along with superb functional properties such as thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity. NDs possess the highest hardness of any materials, very high elastic modulus, and have a very high thermal conductivity. GNPs are demonstrated to affect the sintering of Al2O 3 matrix composites by wrapping around grains, inhibiting diffusion, and thereby suppressing grain growth. High applied pressures (90 MPa) during sintering are observed to exacerbate grain growth suppression, while promoting attainment of fully dense ceramic composites. Higher applied pressures facilitate the wrapping of GNPs around grains, which promotes the onset of GNP induced grain growth suppression. Grain growth suppression compensates for the decreased hardness induced by low strength of the GNPs phase along the c-axis direction. GNPs enhanced the toughness and wear resistance of the nanocomposites by 21% and 39%, respectively, due to the intrinsic energy dissipating mechanisms such as GNP sheet kinking and sliding and GNP induced phenomena such as micro-cracking and crack bridging. The addition of ND affects the deposition of thermally sprayed coatings. Porosity increased in samples deposited by high velocity oxyacetylene flame spray (HVOF) and decreased in samples deposited by air plasma spray (APS). NDs are believed to inhibit solid state diffusion during splat impact, in the low thermal energy and high kinetic energy HVOF process. The high thermal

  9. Strength characterization of tubular ceramic materials by flexure of semi-cylindrical specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwok, Kawai; Kiesel, Lutz; Frandsen, Henrik Lund

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical strength at elevated temperatures and operating atmospheres needs to be characterized during development of tubular ceramic components for advanced energy technologies. Typical procedures are time-consuming because a large number of tests are required for a reliable statistical strength...... characterization and every specimen has to be subjected to the process conditions individually. This paper presents an efficient strength characterization methodology for tubular ceramics. The methodology employs flexure of semi-cylindrical specimens as the strength test and implements the tests within a facility...... conducted on oxygen transport membrane materials at room temperature and 850°C....

  10. CO2 capture in different carbon materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Vicente; Ramírez-Lucas, Ana; Díaz, José Antonio; Sánchez, Paula; Romero, Amaya

    2012-07-03

    In this work, the CO(2) capture capacity of different types of carbon nanofibers (platelet, fishbone, and ribbon) and amorphous carbon have been measured at 26 °C as at different pressures. The results showed that the more graphitic carbon materials adsorbed less CO(2) than more amorphous materials. Then, the aim was to improve the CO(2) adsorption capacity of the carbon materials by increasing the porosity during the chemical activation process. After chemical activation process, the amorphous carbon and platelet CNFs increased the CO(2) adsorption capacity 1.6 times, whereas fishbone and ribbon CNFs increased their CO(2) adsorption capacity 1.1 and 8.2 times, respectively. This increase of CO(2) adsorption capacity after chemical activation was due to an increase of BET surface area and pore volume in all carbon materials. Finally, the CO(2) adsorption isotherms showed that activated amorphous carbon exhibited the best CO(2) capture capacity with 72.0 wt % of CO(2) at 26 °C and 8 bar.

  11. Tough ceramic coatings: Carbon nanotube reinforced silica sol-gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, A.J., E-mail: antoniojulio.lopez@urjc.es [Dept. de Ciencia e Ingenieria de Materiales, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/Tulipan s/n, Mostoles 28933, Madrid (Spain); Rico, A.; Rodriguez, J.; Rams, J. [Dept. de Ciencia e Ingenieria de Materiales, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/Tulipan s/n, Mostoles 28933, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-08-15

    Silica coatings reinforced with carbon nanotubes were produced via sol-gel route using two mixing techniques of the sol-gel precursors, mechanical and ultrasonic mixing, and dip-coating as deposition process on magnesium alloy substrates. Effective incorporation and distribution of 0.1 wt.% of carbon nanotubes in the amorphous silica matrix of the coatings were achieved using both techniques. Fabrication procedure determines the morphological aspects of the coating. Only mechanical mixing process produced coatings dense and free of defects. Nanoindentation technique was used to examine the influence of the fabrication process in the mechanical features of the final coatings, i.e. indentation fracture toughness, Young's modulus and hardness. A maximum toughening effect of about 24% was achieved in silica coatings reinforced with carbon nanotubes produced by the mechanical mixing route. Scanning electron microscopy investigation revealed that the toughening of these reinforced coatings was mainly due to bridging effect of the reinforcement.

  12. Bond strength of adhesively luted ceramic discs to different core materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozogullari, Nalan; Inan, Ozgur; Usumez, Aslihan

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the shear bond strengths of resin, glass-ionomer, and ceramic-based core materials to all ceramic discs. Five core materials (Core max, Sankin; Clearfil AP-X, Kuraray; Empress Cosmo, Ivoclar-Vivadent; Photocore, Kuraray; Dyract Extra, Dentsply) were prepared as discs 10 mm in diameter and 2 mm in height according to the manufacturer's instructions. Ten disc specimens per group were prepared, and dentin served as the control. All resin specimens were embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin, with one surface facing up. All ceramic discs (IPS Empress I, Ivoclar-Vivadent) 3 mm in diameter and 2 mm in height were prepared and bonded to core specimens with a dual-curing luting resin cement (Variolink II, Vivadent). Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C. Shear bond strength of each sample was measured after 24 h using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance and Tukey HSD tests (alpha = 0.05). Shear bond strength varied significantly depending on the core material used (p strength value while Empress Cosmo provided the lowest (p Core-Max (p > 0.05). And also there were no statistically significant differences between Dyract Extra and the control group (p > 0.05). In vitro shear bond strengths of ceramic discs bonded to resin-based core materials showed higher bond strength values than ceramic-based core material.

  13. Phosphate-bonded ceramics as candidate final-waste-form materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, D.; Wagh, A.S.; Cunnane, J.; Sutaria, M.; Kurokawa, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Mayberry, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Room-temperature-setting phosphate-bonded ceramics were studied as candidate materials for stabilizing DOE low-level problem mixed wastes, which cannot be treated by other established stabilization techniques. Phosphates of Mg, Mg-Na, Al, and Zr were studied to stabilize ash-surrogate waste that contained RCRA metals as nitrates and RCRA organics. We show that for a typical loading of 35 wt.% of ash waste, the phosphate ceramics pass the Toxic Chemicals Leaching Procedure test (TCLP). The waste forms have high compression strength that exceeds ASTM recommendations for final waste forms. Detailed X-ray diffraction studies and differential thermal analyses of the waste forms show evidence of chemical reaction of the waste with phosphoric acid and the host matrix. SEM studies show evidence of physical bonding. Excellent performance in the leaching test is attributed to chemical solidification and to both physical and chemical bonding of the ash wastes with the phosphate ceramics.

  14. Strength and thickness of the layer of materials used for ceramic veneers bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurek, Karolina; Mierzwińska-Nastalska, Elżbieta; Molak, Rafał; Kożuchowski, Mariusz; Pakieła, Zbigniew

    2012-01-01

    The use of adhesive bonding systems and composites in prosthetic dentistry brought improved and more aesthetic prosthetic restorations. The adhesive bonding of porcelain veneers is based on the micromechanical and chemical bond between tooth surface, cement layer and ceramic material. The aim of the study was to measure the thickness of the material layer formed during cementing of a ceramic restoration, and - in the second part of the study - to test tension of these cements. The materials investigated comprised dual-curing materials: Variolink II, KoNroot Cem, KoNroot Cem Viscous and Panavia F 2.0, as well as a light-curing composite: Variolink Veneer. The thickness was measured with the use of ZIP Lite 250 optical gauging apparatus. SEM microscope - Hitachi Tabletop Microscope TM-100 - was used to analyse the characteristics of an adhesive bond and filler particle size of particular materials. Tension tests of the cements under study were carried out on the MTS Q Test 10 static electrodynamic apparatus. The tests showed that KoNroot Cem exhibited the best mechanical properties of bonding to enamel and dentin among the materials tested. Variolink II base light-curing cement formed the thinnest layer. All the materials tested formed the layer not exceeding 1/3 of ceramic restoration thickness.

  15. Architectural integration of energy solar collectors made with ceramic materials and suitable for the Mediterranean climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Roviras

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The work presented here aims to demonstrate the technical, architectural and energy viability of solar thermal collectors made with ceramic materials and the Mediterranean climate suitable for the production of domestic hot water (DHW and for heating systems in buildings. The design of a ceramic shell formed by panels collectors and panels no sensors, which are part of the same building system that is capable of responding to the basic requirements of a building envelope and capture solar energy is proposed. Ceramics considerably reduced the final cost of the sensor system and offers the new system a variety of compositional and chromatic since, with reduced performance compared to a conventional metallic collector, can occupy the entire surface of front and get a high degree of architectural integration. A tool for assessing the new ceramic solar collector has been defined from a multi-criteria perspective: economic, environmental and social. The tool enables the comparison of the ceramic solar collector with solar collectors on the market under different climatic and demand conditions.

  16. Effect of ceramic dental waste in thermo-physical properties of materials composed with polyester resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Martínez-Maldonado

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Thermophysical properties at room temperature of a composite material based on polyester resins and powders obtained from dental ceramic residues for mixtures with percentage by weight of 50-50, 60-40, 70- 30, 80-20 and 90-10 are recorded, where the minority phase are dental ceramic powders with particle size through sieve No. 200 (75 um, and the majority of pre-accelerated polyester resin brand P-2000, and as catalyst (Meck-Peroxide. The manufacturing process of the specimens was by casting them into cylindrical molds of diameter 3 cm and 6 cm long. The properties of conductivity (k and thermal diffusivity (α and the specific heat per unit volume (ρc, were found using the KD2 Pro® system which operates on the physical principle of linear transient heat flow. Thermal effusivity (ε was determined using data from k and α, and the expression ε = k/√ α. The results show that as the percentage of the ceramic powder is increased, the density of the samples increases, and thus the thermal conductivity (k, which is directly proportional to both heat diffusion rate (α and the amount of heat that the material can store or release (ρc. These results suggest a new material for technological applications, as well as they help to mitigate the environmental impact due to the recycling process of dental ceramic waste.

  17. Light transmission through all-ceramic dental materials: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasetto, Flavio H; Driscoll, Carl F; Prestipino, Vince; Masri, Radi; von Fraunhofer, Joseph Anthony

    2004-05-01

    Statement of problem Light transmission through veneers affects the degree of polymerization of light-polymerized resin luting agents. Light transmission through different all-ceramic veneers when irradiated by 3 types of light-polymerization units was measured to evaluate the degree of polymerization. Material and methods The power outputs from a conventional halogen (3M Unitek), a plasma arc (Apollo 95E), and a high-intensity halogen (Kreativ Kuring Light Model 2000) light were measured by a radiometer. The light intensity (mW/cm(2) ) from these units was also measured after transmission through 0.25-, 0.40-, and 0.60-mm-thick Procera copings and through 1-mm-thick disks of feldspathic porcelain (Ceramco II), aluminous porcelain (Vitadur Alpha), and a castable pressed ceramic (IPS Empress). Two disks of each material were fabricated by a commercial laboratory in accordance with the manufacturers' recommendations. The light transmissions through these materials were compared with those through Procera-aluminous porcelain combinations. These disks were fabricated by applying appropriate thicknesses of aluminous porcelain (AllCeram). Light intensities were subjected to ANOVA and post hoc Scheffé tests at a priori alpha=.05. Intensities of light from 3 polymerization units, conventional halogen light, high-intensity halogen light, and plasma arc, were 660, 1050, and 2475 mW/cm,(2) respectively, and these together with the ceramic veneer thickness dictated the light transmission through veneers. Mean values (+/-SD) of light transmission through Procera copings for thicknesses of 0.25, 0.40 and 0.60 mm, respectively, were as follows: Apollo plasma arc (1083 +/- 117, 843 +/- 59, and 593 +/- 132); Kreativ high-intensity halogen (425 +/- 41, 345 +/- 74, and 256 +/- 79); 3M Unitek halogen (270 +/- 102, 230 +/- 48, and 180 +/- 113). Comparable transmissions occurred with the other ceramics. Only the plasma arc and the high-intensity halogen polymerization units emitted

  18. Mechanical behavior of polycrystalline ceramics: Brittle fracture of SiC-Si3N4 materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leipold, M. H.; Kapadia, C. M.; Kelkar, A. H.

    1974-01-01

    The first study area involved magnesium oxide and the role of anion impurities, while the second area was directed toward slow crack growth in silicon nitride-silicon carbide ceramics. The oxide program involved development of fabrication techniques for anion doped materials and evaluation of the role of these anions in the hot pressing response, grain boundary diffusion of nickel doped material, grain boundary microhardness, and grain growth.

  19. Implementation of carbon nanomodification for sorption materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babkin Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article addresses the urgent task of improving the adsorption capacity and expanding the scope of application for commonly used industrial sorbents – activated carbons and synthetic zeolites. Among a variety of methods for modifying these sorbents, more attention is now being given to techniques that employ carbon nanomaterials. This is due to the unique properties of nanostructures – developed surface, availability of active functional groups, etc. In the present work, the classic materials – NWC coconut shell activated carbon and synthetic NaX zeolite – were chosen as initial sorbent samples to be modified. The authors developed a process flowsheet for the carbon nanomodification, which contains the following main stages: preparation of a catalytic mixture solution under given temperature conditions, impregnation of porous materials using the obtained solution, and drying and synthesis of carbon nanotubes via chemical vapor deposition. The proposed technological line consists of a reactor for synthesis of carbon nanotubes, the patented design of which will allow for simultaneously modifying in an effective way different types of materials. As a result, the layer of carbon nanostructures, the quality of which can be varied by changing the conditions of the modification procedure, is formed on the substrate surface.

  20. Crack propagation and the material removal mechanism of glass-ceramics by the scratch test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhongjun; Liu, Congcong; Wang, Haorong; Yang, Xue; Fang, Fengzhou; Tang, Junjie

    2016-12-01

    To eliminate the negative effects of surface flaws and subsurface damage of glass-ceramics on clinical effectiveness, crack propagation and the material removal mechanism of glass-ceramics were studied by single and double scratch experiments conducted using an ultra-precision machine. A self-manufactured pyramid shaped single-grit tool with a small tip radius was used as the scratch tool. The surface and subsurface crack propagations and interactions, surface morphology and material removal mechanism were investigated. The experimental results showed that the propagation of lateral cracks to the surface and the interaction between the lateral cracks and radial cracks are the two main types of material peeling, and the increase of the scratch depth increases the propagation angle of the radial cracks and the interaction between the cracks. In the case of a double scratch, the propagation of lateral cracks and radial cracks between paired scratches results in material peeling. The interaction between adjacent scratches depends on the scratch depth and separation distance. There is a critical separation distance where the normalized material removal volume reaches its peak. These findings can help reduce surface flaws and subsurface damage induced by the grinding process and improve the clinical effectiveness of glass-ceramics used as biological substitute and repair materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of silica fiber on the mechanical and chemical behavior of alumina-based ceramic core material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiguo Jiang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the chemical leachability, the alumina-based ceramic core material with the silica fiber was injected and sintered at 1100 °C/4 h, 1200 °C/4 h, 1300 °C/4 h and 1400 °C/4 h, respectively. The micrographs of ceramic core materials at sintered and leached state were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The phase composition of ceramic core material after sintering and the leaching product after leaching were detected by X-ray diffraction (XRD. The porosity, room temperature bend strength, creep property at elevated temperature and the leaching rate in aqueous caustic solution were studied. The experimental results show that the ceramic core material with silica fiber obtain a fair balance between mechanical and chemical properties at sintering of 1300 °C/4 h. Specifically, the leach rate of ceramic core material with silica fiber is increased apparently. High leaching surface and weak adhesive strength between agglomerated alumina particles are the reasons that responsible for the ceramic core material with silica fiber be leaching fast than that of the ceramic core material without fiber.

  2. Thermal Protection of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Composites by Ceramic Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baljinder Kandola

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The thermal barrier efficiency of two types of ceramic particle, glass flakes and aluminum titanate, dispersed on the surface of carbon-fiber epoxy composites, has been evaluated using a cone calorimeter at 35 and 50 kW/m2, in addition to temperature gradients through the samples’ thicknesses, measured by inserting thermocouples on the exposed and back surfaces during the cone tests. Two techniques of dispersing ceramic particles on the surface have been employed, one where particles were dispersed on semi-cured laminate and the other where their dispersion in a phenolic resin was applied on the laminate surface, using the same method as used previously for glass fiber composites. The morphology and durability of the coatings to water absorption, peeling, impact and flexural tension were also studied and compared with those previously reported for glass-fiber epoxy composites. With both methods, uniform coatings could be achieved, which were durable to peeling or water absorption with a minimal adverse effect on the mechanical properties of composites. While all these properties were comparable to those previously observed for glass fiber composites, the ceramic particles have seen to be more effective on this less flammable, carbon fiber composite substrate.

  3. Composite material having controlled coefficient of thermal expansion with oxidic ceramics and procedure for the obtainment thereof

    OpenAIRE

    Torrecillas, Ramón; García Moreno, Olga; Fernández, Adolfo

    2009-01-01

    [EN] The present invention relates to a composite material comprising a ceramic component, characterized in having a negative coefficient of thennal expansion, and oxidic ceramic particles, to the procedure for the obtainment thereof, and to the uses thereof in microelectronics, precision optics, aeronautics and aerospace.

  4. Ceramic superconductor/metal composite materials employing the superconducting proximity effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, Matthew J.

    2002-01-01

    Superconducting composite materials having particles of superconducting material disposed in a metal matrix material with a high electron-boson coupling coefficient (.lambda.). The superconducting particles can comprise any type of superconductor including Laves phase materials, Chevrel phase materials, A15 compounds, and perovskite cuprate ceramics. The particles preferably have dimensions of about 10-500 nanometers. The particles preferably have dimensions larger than the superconducting coherence length of the superconducting material. The metal matrix material has a .lambda. greater than 0.2, preferably the .lambda. is much higher than 0.2. The metal matrix material is a good proximity superconductor due to its high .lambda.. When cooled, the superconductor particles cause the metal matrix material to become superconducting due to the proximity effect. In cases where the particles and the metal matrix material are chemically incompatible (i.e., reactive in a way that destroys superconductivity), the particles are provided with a thin protective metal coating. The coating is chemically compatible with the particles and metal matrix material. High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) cuprate ceramic particles are reactive and therefore require a coating of a noble metal resistant to oxidation (e.g., silver, gold). The proximity effect extends through the metal coating. With certain superconductors, non-noble metals can be used for the coating.

  5. Preparation and Photocatalytic Property of TiO2/Diatomite-Based Porous Ceramics Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuilin Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The diatomite-based porous ceramics was made by low-temperature sintering. Then the nano-TiO2/diatomite-based porous ceramics composite materials were prepared by hydrolysis deposition method with titanium tetrachloride as the precursor of TiO2 and diatomite-based porous as the supporting body of the nano-TiO2. The structure and microscopic appearance of nano-TiO2/diatomite-based porous ceramics composite materials was characterized by XRD and SEM. The photocatalytic property of the composite was investigated by the degradation of malachite green. Results showed that, after calcination at 550°C, TiO2 thin film loaded on the diatomite-based porous ceramics is anatase TiO2 and average grain size of TiO2 is about 10 nm. The degradation ratio of the composite for 5 mg/L malachite green solution reached 86.2% after irradiation for 6 h under ultraviolet.

  6. Experimental Investigation on the Material Removal of the Ultrasonic Vibration Assisted Abrasive Water Jet Machining Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultrasonic vibration activated in the abrasive water jet nozzle is used to enhance the capability of the abrasive water jet machinery. The experiment devices of the ultrasonic vibration assisted abrasive water jet are established; they are composed of the ultrasonic vibration producing device, the abrasive supplying device, the abrasive water jet nozzle, the water jet intensifier pump, and so on. And the effect of process parameters such as the vibration amplitude, the system working pressure, the stand-off, and the abrasive diameter on the ceramics material removal is studied. The experimental result indicates that the depth and the volume removal are increased when the ultrasonic vibration is added on abrasive water jet. With the increase of vibration amplitude, the depth and the volume of material removal are also increased. The other parameters of the ultrasonic vibration assisted abrasive water jet also have an important role in the improvement of ceramic material erosion efficiency.

  7. The Capabilities of Electrodischarge Microdrilling of High Aspect Ratio Holes in Ceramic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skoczypiec Sebastian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the first part of the article the review of ceramic materials drilling possibilities was presented. Among the described methods special attention is paid to electrodischarge drilling. This process have especially been predicted for machining difficult-to-cut electrically conductive materials. The second part consist of the results analysis of electrodischarge microdrilling of siliconized silicon carbide. The experiment involves the impact of current amplitude, discharge voltage and pulse time on the hole depth, side gap, linear tool wear and mean drilling speed. The results shows that electrodischarge drilling is a good alternative when machining inhomogeneous ceramic materials and gives possibility to drill high aspect ratio holes with relatively high efficiency (the drilling speed >2 mm/min.

  8. Cervical and Incisal Marginal Discrepancy in Ceramic Laminate Veneering Materials: A SEM Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Hemalatha; Ganapathy, Dhanraj M.; Jain, Ashish R.

    2017-01-01

    Context: Marginal discrepancy influenced by the choice of processing material used for the ceramic laminate veneers needs to be explored further for better clinical application. Aims: This study aimed to evaluate the amount of cervical and incisal marginal discrepancy associated with different ceramic laminate veneering materials. Settings and Design: This was an experimental, single-blinded, in vitro trial. Subjects and Methods: Ten central incisors were prepared for laminate veneers with 2 mm uniform reduction and heavy chamfer finish line. Ceramic laminate veneers fabricated over the prepared teeth using four different processing materials were categorized into four groups as Group I - aluminous porcelain veneers, Group II - lithium disilicate ceramic veneers, Group III - lithium disilicate-leucite-based veneers, Group IV - zirconia-based ceramic veneers. The cervical and incisal marginal discrepancy was measured using a scanning electron microscope. Statistical Analysis Used: ANOVA and post hoc Tukey honest significant difference (HSD) tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: The cervical and incisal marginal discrepancy for four groups was Group I - 114.6 ± 4.3 μm, 132.5 ± 6.5 μm, Group II - 86.1 ± 6.3 μm, 105.4 ± 5.3 μm, Group III - 71.4 ± 4.4 μm, 91.3 ± 4.7 μm, and Group IV - 123.1 ± 4.1 μm, 142.0 ± 5.4 μm. ANOVA and post hoc Tukey HSD tests observed a statistically significant difference between the four test specimens with regard to cervical marginal discrepancy. The cervical and incisal marginal discrepancy scored F = 243.408, P veneers fabricated using leucite reinforced lithium disilicate exhibited the least marginal discrepancy followed by lithium disilicate ceramic, aluminous porcelain, and zirconia-based ceramics. The marginal discrepancy was more in the incisal region than in the cervical region in all the groups. PMID:28839415

  9. Cervical and incisal marginal discrepancy in ceramic laminate veneering materials: A SEM analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemalatha Ranganathan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Marginal discrepancy influenced by the choice of processing material used for the ceramic laminate veneers needs to be explored further for better clinical application. Aims: This study aimed to evaluate the amount of cervical and incisal marginal discrepancy associated with different ceramic laminate veneering materials. Settings and Design: This was an experimental, single-blinded, in vitro trial. Subjects and Methods: Ten central incisors were prepared for laminate veneers with 2 mm uniform reduction and heavy chamfer finish line. Ceramic laminate veneers fabricated over the prepared teeth using four different processing materials were categorized into four groups as Group I - aluminous porcelain veneers, Group II - lithium disilicate ceramic veneers, Group III - lithium disilicate-leucite-based veneers, Group IV - zirconia-based ceramic veneers. The cervical and incisal marginal discrepancy was measured using a scanning electron microscope. Statistical Analysis Used: ANOVA and post hoc Tukey honest significant difference (HSD tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: The cervical and incisal marginal discrepancy for four groups was Group I - 114.6 ± 4.3 μm, 132.5 ± 6.5 μm, Group II - 86.1 ± 6.3 μm, 105.4 ± 5.3 μm, Group III - 71.4 ± 4.4 μm, 91.3 ± 4.7 μm, and Group IV - 123.1 ± 4.1 μm, 142.0 ± 5.4 μm. ANOVA and post hoc Tukey HSD tests observed a statistically significant difference between the four test specimens with regard to cervical marginal discrepancy. The cervical and incisal marginal discrepancy scored F = 243.408, P < 0.001 and F = 180.844, P < 0.001, respectively. Conclusion: This study concluded veneers fabricated using leucite reinforced lithium disilicate exhibited the least marginal discrepancy followed by lithium disilicate ceramic, aluminous porcelain, and zirconia-based ceramics. The marginal discrepancy was more in the incisal region than in the cervical region in all the groups.

  10. Edge chipping resistance and flexural strength of polymer infiltrated ceramic network and resin nanoceramic restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyrou, Renos; Thompson, Geoffrey A; Cho, Seok-Hwan; Berzins, David W

    2016-09-01

    Two novel restorative materials, a polymer infiltrated ceramic network (PICN) and a resin nanoceramic (RNC), for computer-assisted design and computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD-CAM) applications have recently become commercially available. Little independent evidence regarding their mechanical properties exists to facilitate material selection. The purpose of this in vitro study was to measure the edge chipping resistance and flexural strength of the PICN and RNC materials and compare them with 2 commonly used feldspathic ceramic (FC) and leucite reinforced glass-ceramic (LRGC) CAD-CAM materials that share the same clinical indications. PICN, RNC, FC, and LRGC material specimens were obtained by sectioning commercially available CAD-CAM blocks. Edge chipping test specimens (n=20/material) were adhesively attached to a resin substrate before testing. Edge chips were produced using a 120-degree, sharp, conical diamond indenter mounted on a universal testing machine and positioned 0.1 to 0.7 mm horizontally from the specimen's edge. The chipping force was plotted against distance to the edge, and the data were fitted to linear and quadratic equations. One-way ANOVA determined intergroup differences (α=.05) in edge chipping toughness. Beam specimens (n=22/material) were tested for determining flexural strength using a 3-point bend test. Weibull statistics determined intergroup differences (α=.05). Flexural modulus and work of fracture were also calculated, and 1-way ANOVA determined intergroup differences (α=.05) RESULTS: Significant (Pmaterials for the 4 mechanical properties. Specifically, the material rankings were edge chipping toughness: RNC>LRGC=FC>PICN; flexural strength: RNC=LRGC>PICN>FC; flexural modulus: RNCLRGC=PICN>FC. The RNC material demonstrated superior performance for the mechanical properties tested compared with the other 3 materials. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  11. Bonding of a mica-based castable ceramic material with a tri-n-butylborane-initiated adhesive resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, T; Matsumura, H; Atsuta, M

    1996-07-01

    Adhesive bonding of a mica-based castable ceramic material (Olympus Castable Ceramics, OCC) was evaluated in vitro with the use of a silane primer in conjunction with an adhesive luting material. The primer contained a silane coupler and 4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride (4-META), while the methyl methacrylate (MMA)-based luting agent was initiated with a tri-n-butylborane derivative (TBB) and contained 4-META (4-META/MMA-TBB resin). Ceramic specimens were sanded with No. 600 silicon carbide paper followed by blasting with alumina and/or etching with ammonium bifluoride. The specimens were bonded with various combinations and shear bond strengths were determined. Both priming and alumina blasting enhanced the bond between 4-META resin and OCC. Although etching with ammonium bifluoride roughened the ceramic surface, this procedure did not improve the bond strength. Electron probe microanalysis of the ceramic surface revealed a decrease in silicon and aluminium elements after etching with ammonium bifluoride.

  12. Thermal/chemical degradation of ceramic candle filter materials. Final report, September 1988--October 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    High-temperature ceramic candle filters are being developed for use in advanced power generation systems such as the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustor (PFBC), and Direct Coal-Fired Turbine (DCFT). The direct firing of coal produces particulate matter which must be removed to meet both environmental and process limitations. The ceramic candles increase the efficiency of the advanced power generation systems and protect downstream equipment from erosion and impingement of particulate matter in the hot exhaust gases. Ceramic candle filters are rigid, closed-ended (capped on one side) porous cylinders which generally have a flange on the open-ended side. The flange at the open end allows the candle to be suspended by a tubesheet in the filter vessel. Candle filters have shown promise, but have also encountered durability problems during use in hostile, high-temperature environments. Limitations in the candle lifetime lower the economic advantages of using candle filters for this application. Candles typically fail by cracking at the flange or in the body of the candle. The objective of this project was to test and analyze ceramic candle filter materials and to evaluate the degradation mechanisms. The tests were conducted such that the effects of each degradation mechanism could be examined. Separately. The overall objective of the project was to: (a) develop a better understanding of the thermal and chemical degradation mechanisms of ceramic candle filter materials in advanced coal utilization projects, (b) develop test procedures, and (c) recommend changes to increase filter lifetime. 15 refs., 67 figs., 17 tabs.

  13. Full-field characterization of thermal diffusivity in continuous-fiber ceramic composite materials and components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckenrider, J. Scott; Ellingson, William A.; Rothermel, Scott A.

    1995-03-01

    Continuous-fiber ceramic matrix composites (CFCCs) are currently being developed for various high-temperature applications, including use in advanced heat engines. Among the material classes of interest for such applications are silicon carbide (SiC)-fiber-reinforced SiC (SiC(f)/SiC), SiC-fiber-reinforced silicon nitride (SiC(f)/Si3N4), aluminum oxide (Al2O3)-fiber-reinforced Al2O3 (Al2O3(f)/Al2O3), and others. In such composites, the condition of the interfaces (between the fibers and matrix) are critical to the mechanical and thermal behavior of the component (as are conventional mechanical defects such as cracks, porosity, etc.). For example, oxidation of this interface (especially on carbon coated fibers) can seriously degrade both mechanical and thermal properties. Furthermore, thermal shock damage can degrade the matrix through extensive crack generation. A nondestructive evaluation method that could be used to assess interface condition, thermal shock damage, and to detect other `defects' would thus be very beneficial, especially if applicable to full-scale components. One method under development uses infrared thermal imaging to provide `single-shot' full-field assessment of the distribution of thermal properties in large components by measuring thermal diffusivity. By applying digital image filtering, interpolation, and least-squares-estimation techniques for noise reduction, we can achieve acquisition and analysis times of minutes or less with submillimeter spatial resolution. The system developed at Argonne National Laboratory has been used to examine the effects of thermal shock, oxidation treatment, density variations, and variations in oxidation resistance coatings in a full array of test specimens. Subscale CFCC components with nonplanar geometries have also been studied for manufacturing-induced variations in thermal properties.

  14. Carbon nanotube materials from hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, A.C.; Bekkedahl, T.A.; Cahill, A.F. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The lack of convenient and cost-effective hydrogen storage is a major impediment to wide scale use of hydrogen in the United States energy economy. Improvements in the energy densities of hydrogen storage systems, reductions in cost, and increased compatibility with available and forecasted systems are required before viable hydrogen energy use pathways can be established. Carbon-based hydrogen adsorption materials hold particular promise for meeting and exceeding the U.S. Department of Energy hydrogen storage energy density targets for transportation if concurrent increases in hydrogen storage capacity and carbon density can be achieved. These two goals are normally in conflict for conventional porous materials, but may be reconciled by the design and synthesis of new adsorbent materials with tailored pore size distributions and minimal macroporosity. Carbon nanotubes offer the possibility to explore new designs for adsorbents because they can be fabricated with small size distributions, and naturally tend to self-assemble by van der Waals forces. This year we report heats of adsorption for hydrogen on nanotube materials that are 2 and 3 times greater than for hydrogen on activated carbon. The hydrogen which is most strongly bound to these materials remains on the carbon surface to temperatures greater than 285 K. These results suggest that nanocapillary forces are active in stabilizing hydrogen on the surfaces of carbon nanotubes, and that optimization of the adsorbent will lead to effective storage at higher temperatures. In this paper we will also report on our activities which are targeted at understanding and optimizing the nucleation and growth of single wall nanotubes. These experiments were made possible by the development of a unique feedback control circuit which stabilized the plasma-arc during a synthesis run.

  15. Functional Carbon Materials for Electrochemical Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huihui

    The ability to harvest and convert solar energy has been associated with the evolution of human civilization. The increasing consumption of fossil fuels since the industrial revolution, however, has brought to concerns in ecological deterioration and depletion of the fossil fuels. Facing these challenges, humankind is forced to seek for clean, sustainable and renewable energy resources, such as biofuels, hydraulic power, wind power, geothermal energy and other kinds of alternative energies. However, most alternative energy sources, generally in the form of electrical energy, could not be made available on a continuous basis. It is, therefore, essential to store such energy into chemical energy, which are portable and various applications. In this context, electrochemical energy-storage devices hold great promises towards this goal. The most common electrochemical energy-storage devices are electrochemical capacitors (ECs, also called supercapacitors) and batteries. In comparison to batteries, ECs posses high power density, high efficiency, long cycling life and low cost. ECs commonly utilize carbon as both (symmetric) or one of the electrodes (asymmetric), of which their performance is generally limited by the capacitance of the carbon electrodes. Therefore, developing better carbon materials with high energy density has been emerging as one the most essential challenges in the field. The primary objective of this dissertation is to design and synthesize functional carbon materials with high energy density at both aqueous and organic electrolyte systems. The energy density (E) of ECs are governed by E = CV 2/2, where C is the total capacitance and V is the voltage of the devices. Carbon electrodes with high capacitance and high working voltage should lead to high energy density. In the first part of this thesis, a new class of nanoporous carbons were synthesized for symmetric supercapacitors using aqueous Li2SO4 as the electrolyte. A unique precursor was adopted to

  16. Synthesis of Micro/Nano Crystalline Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Philip; Isac, Sheelakumari; Abraham, Rosalin; Isac, Jayakumari

    2008-04-01

    As a matter of fact almost every industrial production line, office and home is dependant on ceramic materials. Newly designed devices incorporate ceramic materials because of their useful chemical, electrical, mechanical, thermal and structural properties. The effectiveness of a large system depends critically on its ceramic components. That is ceramics are important, first because they comprise a large basic industry and second because their properties are essential for many applications. Ceramics are more stable than metals both in chemical and thermal environments. In this work the authors describes a method for the preparation of PBT ceramics material from lead oxide (PbO), barium carbonate and titanium oxide based on pre-calcinations of oxides. The results were analyzed by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Infrared Spectroscopy (IR) and TGA. XRD and SEM studies revealed that its particle size is in nanometer range. Dielectric studies were conducted at a frequency range of 100 KHz to 13 MHz. Mechanical properties were calculated.

  17. In vitro evaluation of the fracture strength of all-ceramic core materials on zirconium posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Nihal; Sahin, Erdal

    2013-10-01

    For most endodontically treated teeth, tooth-colored post-core systems are preferable for esthetic reasons. Therefore, improvements in material strength must also consider tooth colored post-core complexes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the difference in tooth colored post-core complex strengths. A total of 33 human maxillary central incisor teeth were used for this study, with three groups of 11 teeth. Three different methods were used to fabricate all-ceramic post-core restorations: zirconia blanks, Cerec 3D-milled to one-piece post-core restorations (Test Group 1); feldspathic cores (from feldspathic prefabricated CAD/CAM blocks) adhesively luted to CosmoPost zirconia posts (Test Group 2); and IPS Empress cores directly pressed to CosmoPost zirconia posts (Test Group 3). All-ceramic crowns from feldspathic ceramic were constructed using a CAD/CAM system (Cerec 3D) for all specimens. The post-core complexes were tested to failure with the load applied at 45° angled relative to the tooth long axis. The load at fracture was recorded. The maximum fracture strength of the milled zirconia cores (Test Group 1) was 577 N; corresponding values for the milled feldspathic cores (Test Group 2) and the pressed cores (Test Group 3) were 586 and 585 N, respectively. Differences were not statistically significant at P cores adhesively luted on zirconia posts and one-piece all-ceramic zirconium post-core structures offer a viable alternative to conventional pressing.

  18. Fabrication of Silicon Nitride Dental Core Ceramics with Borosilicate Veneering material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wananuruksawong, R.; Jinawath, S.; Padipatvuthikul, P.; Wasanapiarnpong, T.

    2011-10-01

    Silicon nitride (Si3N4) ceramic is a great candidate for clinical applications due to its high fracture toughness, strength, hardness and bio-inertness. This study has focused on the Si3N4 ceramic as a dental core material. The white Si3N4 was prepared by pressureless sintering at relative low sintering temperature of 1650 °C in nitrogen atmosphere. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of Si3N4 ceramic is lower than that of Zirconia and Alumina ceramic which are popular in this field. The borosilicate glass veneering was employed due to its compatibility in thermal expansion. The sintered Si3N4 specimens represented the synthetic dental core were paintbrush coated by a veneer paste composed of borosilicate glass powder (veneer on the Si3N4 specimens, the firing was performed in electric tube furnace between 1000-1200°C. The veneered specimens fired at 1100°C for 15 mins show good bonding, smooth and glossy without defect and crazing. The veneer has thermal expansion coefficient as 3.98×10-6 °C-1, rather white and semi opaque, due to zirconia addition, the Vickers hardness as 4.0 GPa which is closely to the human teeth.

  19. Synthesis of steel slag ceramics: chemical composition and crystalline phases of raw materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li-hua; Wei, Wei; Bai, Hao; Zhang, Xu; Cang, Da-qiang

    2015-03-01

    Two types of porcelain tiles with steel slag as the main raw material (steel slag ceramics) were synthesized based on the CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 and CaO-MgO-SiO2 systems, and their bending strengths up to 53.47 MPa and 99.84 MPa, respectively, were obtained. The presence of anorthite, α-quartz, magnetite, and pyroxene crystals (augite and diopside) in the steel slag ceramics were very different from the composition of traditional ceramics. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA) results illustrated that the addition of steel slag reduced the temperature of extensive liquid generation and further decreased the firing temperature. The considerable contents of glass-modifying oxide liquids with rather low viscosities at high temperature in the steel slag ceramic adobes promoted element diffusion and crystallization. The results of this study demonstrated a new approach for extensive and effective recycling of steel slag.

  20. Identification and analysis of factors affecting thermal shock resistance of ceramic materials in solar receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselman, D. P. H.; Singh, J. P.; Satyamurthy, K.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis was conducted of the possible modes of thermal stress failure of brittle ceramics for potential use in point-focussing solar receivers. The pertinent materials properties which control thermal stress resistance were identified for conditions of steady-state and transient heat flow, convective and radiative heat transfer, thermal buckling and thermal fatigue as well as catastrophic crack propagation. Selection rules for materials with optimum thermal stress resistance for a particular thermal environment were identified. Recommendations for materials for particular components were made. The general requirements for a thermal shock testing program quantitatively meaningful for point-focussing solar receivers were outlined. Recommendations for follow-on theoretical analyses were made.

  1. Metals and Ceramics Division materials science program. Annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHargue, C.J. (comp.)

    1981-09-01

    Information is presented concerning the theoretical studies of metals and alloys; x-ray diffraction research; structural ceramics; structure of coal; analytical and high-voltage electron microscopy; deformation and mechanical properties; mechanisms of surface and solid-state reactions; physical properties research; metastable materials; neutron radiation effects; charged particle radiation effects; theory and modeling of radiation effects; facility and advanced technique development; fundamentals of welding and joining; and studies in nondestructive evaluation.

  2. Synthesis and chemical modification of carbon nanostructures for materials applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbotham, Amanda Lynn

    This dissertation explores the structure, chemical reactivities, electromagnetic response, and materials properties of various carbon nanostructures, including single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), graphite, and graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). Efficient production and modification of these unique structures, each with their own distinct properties, will make them more accessible for applications in electronics, materials, and biology. A method is reported for controlling the permittivity from 1--1000 MHz of SWCNT-polymer composites (0.5 wt%) for radio frequency applications including passive RF antenna structures and EMI shielding. The magnitude of the real permittivity varied between 20 and 3.3, decreasing as higher fractions of functionalized-SWCNTs were added. The microwave absorbing properties and subsequent heating of carbon nanotubes were used to rapidly cure ceramic composites. With less than 1 wt% carbon nanotube additives and 30--40 W of directed microwave power (2.45 GHz), bulk composite samples reached temperatures above 500°C within 1 min. Graphite oxide (GO) polymer nanocomposites were developed at 1, 5, and 10 wt% for the purpose of evaluating the flammability reduction and materials properties of the resulting systems. Microscale oxygen consumption calorimetry revealed that addition of GO reduced the total heat release in all systems, and GO-polycarbonate composites demonstrated very fast self-extinguishing times in vertical open flame tests. A simple solution-based oxidative process using potassium permanganate in sulfuric acid was developed for producing nearly 100% yield of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) by lengthwise cutting and unraveling of MWCNT sidewalls. Subsequent chemical reduction of the GNRs resulted in restoration of electrical conductivity. The GNR synthetic conditions were investigated in further depth, and an improved method which utilized a two-acid reaction medium was found to produce GNRs with

  3. Fabrication of Yb:Sc2O3 transparent ceramics from co-precipitated nanopowders: The effect of ammonium hydrogen carbonate to metal ions molar ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhengfa; Liu, Qiang; Hreniak, Dariusz; Dai, Jiawei; Wang, Wei; Li, Jiang

    2018-01-01

    5 at%Yb:Sc2O3 transparent ceramics were fabricated by the co-precipitation and vacuum sintering method. NH4HCO3 and (NH4)2SO4 were used as precipitant and dispersing agent in the precipitation process, respectively. The influence of ammonium hydrogen carbonate to metal ions molar ratio (R value) on the morphology, agglomeration of resultant powders and the optical quality of transparent ceramics was investigated systematically. It was found that all the calcined powders synthesized with different R values exhibited same phase. The morphology of the precursors and calcined powders was investigated by FESEM, and the results show that the R value has a significant influence on the morphology of 5 at%Yb:Sc2O3 precursors and calcined powders. The precursors and resultant powders exhibit a severe agglomeration with R = 4.4 and 4.8. Using these powders as starting materials, 5 at%Yb:Sc2O3 transparent ceramics were successfully fabricated by vacuum sintering at 1850 °C for 10 h. There is only little difference in optical transmittances of 5 at%Yb:Sc2O3 ceramics with R value within the 3.2-4.0 range. The ceramic sample with R = 4.0 possesses the best optical quality with the in-line transmittance of 71.9% at the wavelength of 1100 nm. The microstructures of the 5 at%Yb:Sc2O3 transparent ceramics with different R values were also investigated.

  4. Hot extruded carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum matrix composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hansang; Leparoux, Marc

    2012-10-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced aluminum (Al) matrix composite materials were successfully fabricated by mechanical ball milling followed by powder hot extrusion processes. Microstructural analysis revealed that the CNTs were well dispersed at the boundaries and were aligned with the extrusion direction in the composites obtained. Although only a small quantity of CNTs were added to the composite (1 vol%), the Vickers hardness and the tensile strength were significantly enhanced, with an up to three-fold increase relative to that of pure Al. From the fractography of the extruded Al-CNT composite, several shapes were observed in the fracture surface, and this unique morphology is discussed based on the strengthening mechanism. The damage in the CNTs was investigated with Raman spectroscopy. However, the Al-CNT composite materials were not only strengthened by the addition of CNTs but also enhanced by several synergistic effects. The nanoindentation stress-strain curve was successfully constructed by setting the effective zero-load and zero-displacement points and was compared with the tensile stress-strain curve. The yield strengths of the Al-CNT composites from the nanoindentation and tensile tests were compared and discussed. We believe that the yield strength can be predicted using a simple nanoindentation stress/strain curve and that this method will be useful for materials that are difficult to machine, such as complex ceramics.

  5. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with ceramic inlays and different base materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saridag, Serkan; Sari, Tugrul; Ozyesil, Atilla Gokhan; Ari Aydinbelge, Hale

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with different base materials and mesioocclusal-distal (MOD) ceramic inlays. Fifty mandibular molars were assigned into five groups (n=10 per group). Group1 (control) comprised intact molar teeth without any treatment. Teeth in other groups were subjected to root canal treatment and restored with MOD ceramic inlays on different base materials. In Group 2, base material was zinc phosphate cement; Group 3's was glass ionomer cement; Group 4's was composite resin, and Group 5's was composite resin reinforced with fiber. Finally, a continuous occlusal load was applied until fracture occurred. Mean fracture resistance of Group 1 (3,027 N) was significantly higher than the other groups (890, 1,070, 1,670, 1,226 N respectively). Fracture resistance of Group 4 was statistically comparable with Group 5 and significantly higher than Groups 2 and 3 (pmaterials under ceramic inlay restorations could affect the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth.

  6. Reliability and properties of core materials for all-ceramic dental restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiji Ban

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Various core materials have been used as all-ceramic dental restorations. Since many foreign zirconia product systems were introduced to the Japanese dental market in the past few years, the researches and the papers on zirconia for ceramic biomaterials have immediately drawn considerable attention. Recently, most of the manufactures supply zirconia blocks available to multi-unit posterior bridges using CAD/CAM, because zirconia has excellent mechanical properties comparable to metal, due to its microstructures. The properties of conventional zirconia were further improved by the composite in nano-scale such as zirconia/alumina nanocomposite (NANOZR. There are many interesting behaviors such as long-term stability related to low temperature degradation, effect of sandblasting and heat treatment on the microstructure and the strength, bonding to veneering porcelains, bonding to cement, visible light translucency related to esthetic restoration, X-ray opacity, biocompatibility, fracture load of clinical bridge as well as lifetime and clinical survival rates of the restoratives made with zirconia. From the recent material researches on zirconia not only in Japan but also in the world, this review takes into account these interesting properties of zirconia and reliability as core material for all-ceramic dental restorations.

  7. Carbon nanotubes/carbon fiber hybrid material: a super support material for sludge biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qijie; Dai, Guangze; Bao, Yanling

    2017-07-16

    Carbon fiber (CF) is widely used as a sludge biofilm support material for wastewater treatment. Carbon nanotubes/carbon fiber (CNTs/CF) hybrid material was prepared by ultrasonically assisted electrophoretic deposition (EPD). CF supports (CF without handling, CF oxidized by nitric acid, CNTs/CF hybrid material) were evaluated by sludge immobilization tests, bacterial cell adsorption tests and Derjaguin -Landau -Verwey -Overbeek (DLVO) theory. We found that the CNTs/CF hybrid material has a high capacity for adsorbing activated sludge, nitrifying bacterial sludge and pure strains (Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus). CNTs deposited on CF surface easily wound around the curved surface of bacterial cell which resulted in capturing more bacterial cells. DLVO theory indicated the lowest total interaction energy of CNTs/CF hybrid material, which resulted in the highest bacteria cell adsorption velocity. Experiments and DLVO theory results proved that CNTs/CF hybrid material is a super support material for sludge biofilms.

  8. Flexural resistance of Cerec CAD/CAM system ceramic blocks. Part 1: Chairside materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichi, Alessandro; Sedda, Maurizio; Del Siena, Francesco; Louca, Chris; Ferrari, Marco

    2013-10-01

    This study tested the materials available on the market for Cerec CAD/CAM, comparing the mean flexural strength in an ISO standardized set-up, since the ISO standard for testing such materials was issued later than the marketing of the materials tested. Following the recent Standard ISO 6872:2008, eight types of ceramic blocks were tested: Paradigm C, IPS Empress CAD LT, IPS Empress CAD Multi, Cerec Blocs, Cerec Blocs PC, Triluxe, Triluxe Forte, Mark II. Specimens were cut out from ceramic blocks, finished, polished, and tested in a three-point bending test apparatus until failure. Flexural strength, Weibull characteristic strength, and Weibull modulus, were calculated. The results obtained from the materials for flexural strength were IPS Empress CAD (125.10 +/- 13.05), Cerec Blocs (112.68 +/- 7.97), Paradigm C (109.14 +/- 10.10), Cerec Blocs PC (105.40 +/- 5.39), Triluxe Forte (105.06 +/- 4.93), Mark II (102.77 +/- 3.60), Triluxe (101.95 +/- 7.28) and IPS Empress CAD Multi (100.86 +/- 15.82). All the tested materials had a flexural strength greater than 100 MPa, thereby satisfying the requirements of the ISO standard for the clinical indications of the materials tested. In all tested materials the Weibull characteristic strength was greater than 100 MPa.

  9. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters and heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crossland, C.E.; Shelleman, D.L.; Spear, K.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    A vertical flow-through furnace has been built to study the effect of corrosion on the morphology and mechanical properties of ceramic hot gas filters. Sections of 3M Type 203 and DuPont Lanxide SiC-SiC filter tubes were sealed at one end and suspended in the furnace while being subjected to a simulated coal combustion environment at 870{degrees}C. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy is used to identify phase and morphology changes due to corrosion while burst testing determines the loss of mechanical strength after exposure to the combustion gases. Additionally, a thermodynamic database of gaseous silicon compounds is currently being established so that calculations can be made to predict important products of the reaction of the environment with the ceramics. These thermodynamic calculations provide useful information concerning the regimes where the ceramic may be degraded by material vaporization. To verify the durability and predict lifetime performance of ceramic heat exchangers in coal combustion environments, long-term exposure testing of stressed (internally pressurized) tubes must be performed in actual coal combustion environments. The authors have designed a system that will internally pressurize 2 inch OD by 48 inch long ceramic heat exchanger tubes to a maximum pressure of 200 psi while exposing the outer surface of the tubes to coal combustion gas at the Combustion and Environmental Research Facility (CERF) at the Pittsburgh Energy and Technology Center. Water-cooled, internal o-ring pressure seals were designed to accommodate the existing 6 inch by 6 inch access panels of the CERF. Tubes will be exposed for up to a maximum of 500 hours at temperatures of 2500 and 2600{degrees}F with an internal pressure of 200 psi. If the tubes survive, their retained strength will be measured using the high temperature tube burst test facility at Penn State University. Fractographic analysis will be performed to identify the failure source(s) for the tubes.

  10. In vitro evaluation of fracture strength of zirconia restoration veneered with various ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yu-Sung; Lee, Jai-Bong; Han, Jung-Suk; Yeo, In-Sung

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE Fracture of the veneering material of zirconia restorations frequently occurs in clinical situations. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the fracture strengths of zirconia crowns veneered with various ceramic materials by various techniques. MATERIALS AND METHODS A 1.2 mm, 360° chamfer preparation and occlusal reduction of 2 mm were performed on a first mandibular molar, and 45 model dies were fabricated in a titanium alloy by CAD/CAM system. Forty-five zirconia copings were fabricated and divided into three groups. In the first group (LT) zirconia copings were veneered with feldspathic porcelain by the layering technique. In the second group (HT) the glass ceramic was heat-pressed on the zirconia coping, and for the third group (ST) a CAD/CAM-fabricated high-strength anatomically shaped veneering cap was sintered onto the zirconia coping. All crowns were cemented onto their titanium dies with Rely X™ Unicem (3M ESPE) and loaded with a universal testing machine (Instron 5583) until failure. The mean fracture values were compared by an one-way ANOVA and a multiple comparison post-hoc test (α=0.05). Scanning electron microscope was used to investigate the fractured interface. RESULTS Mean fracture load and standard deviation was 4263.8±1110.8 N for Group LT, 5070.8±1016.4 for Group HT and 6242.0±1759.5 N for Group ST. The values of Group ST were significantly higher than those of the other groups. CONCLUSION Zirconia crowns veneered with CAD/CAM generated glass ceramics by the sintering technique are superior to those veneered with feldspathic porcelain by the layering technique or veneered with glass ceramics by the heat-pressing technique in terms of fracture strength. PMID:22977725

  11. Advanced ceramic materials and electrochemical processes at interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chick, L.A.; Armstrong, T.R.; Bates, J.L.; Coffey, G.W.; Kingsley, J.J.; Maupin, G.D.; McCready, D.E.; Pederson, L.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-07-01

    Significant progress has been made in controlling the sintering of complex chromites, used as electrical interconnects in solid oxide fuel cells. Small changes in stoichiometry of these ABO{sub 3}-type perovskites can be used to promote liquid-phase sintering and rapid densification. Sample compositions with a slight A-site enrichment were found to undergo two rapid densification steps, leading to a sintered material that was fully dense. Compositions with a slight A-site depletion underwent only the first rapid shrinkage event, and could not be sintered to full density. Temperatures required to sinter the lanthanum calcium chromites to full density have been lowered by several hundred degrees relative to that previously possible.

  12. Multifunctional Carbon Electromagnetic Materials, Motors, and Actuators Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of the proposal is to apply multifunctional carbon electromagnetic materials, including carbon nanotube electrical thread (replaces copper wire) and...

  13. Mechanical and trybological characterization of ceramic materials obtained of mine solid wastes; Caracterizacion mecanica y tribologica de materiales ceramicos obtenidos de residuos solidos mineros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto T, J.L

    2003-07-01

    A discussion of the physical, mechanical and tribological characterization of the ceramics Jaar, Jaca and Vijaar is presented in this work. They have been obtained from the industrial residuals, coming from metals and sand of the mining industry in Pachuca Hidalgo, Mexico. The methodology followed for the obtention and characterization of these ceramics consists on eliminating the cyanides from the tailings through columns coupled with a system controlled with thermostats. Then, the chemical composition is analysed with spectrometry emission of plasma and scanning electronic microscopy. Then the ceramics are produced. The base material is agglutinated with clay or kaolin. For this purpose, it was used a sintering processes and isothermal compacting in hot condition. Finally, the physical, chemical, mechanical and tribological properties of these new products are determined. Carbon, oxygen, sodium, magnesium, aluminium, manganese, silicon, potassium, phosphor, calcium, titanium, iron, molybdenum, silver and gold are in the chemical composition or ceramic analysed. Also these are heterogeneous mixture of clay and kaolin. The cyanide was eliminated. The results show that Vijaar has better wear resistances to the waste; this was demonstrated in tribology tests. They were not perforated with the abrasive particles. Also, they have high hardness and they can to support more loads in compression than Jaar and the Jaca. Consequently, they are less fragile and, therefore, they can tolerate bending stresses and bigger impact loading. (Author)

  14. A study on the performance of concrete containing recycled aggregates and ceramic as materials replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, N. B.; Khalid, F. S.; Irwan, J. M.; Anting, N.; Mazenan, P. N.

    2017-11-01

    Natural fine aggregate materials are commonly used in development and commercial construction in Malaysia. In fact, concrete production was increased as linear with the growing Malaysia economy. However, an issue was production of concrete was to locate adequate sources of natural fine aggregates. There lot of studies have been conducted in order to replace the fine aggregate in which natural fine aggregate replace with the waste material in concrete preparation. Therefore, this study aims to utilize the Recycled Concrete Aggregate (RCA) and ceramic waste which has great potential to replace the natural aggregate in concrete mix with different type of method, admixture, and parameters. This research were focused on compressive strength and water absorption test to determine the optimum mix ratio of concrete mix. The concrete aggregate was chosen due to improvement capillary bonding mechanisms and ceramic presented similar strength compared to the conventional concrete using natural aggregate. Percent of replacement have been used in this study was at 25%, 35% and 45% of the RCA and 5%, 10% and 15% for ceramic, respectively. Furthermore, this research was conduct to find the optimum percentage of aggregate replacement, using water-cement ratio of 0.55 with concrete grade 25/30. The best percentage of replacement was the RCA35% C15% with the compressive strength of 34.72 MPa and the water absorption was satisfied.

  15. Characterization of Ceramic Material Produced From a Cold Crucible Induction Melter Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Marra, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-04-30

    This report summarizes the results from characterization of samples from a melt processed surrogate ceramic waste form. Completed in October of 2014, the first scaled proof of principle cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) test was conducted to process a Fe-hollandite-rich titanate ceramic for treatment of high level nuclear waste. X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy for Cs), and product consistency tests were used to characterize the CCIM material produced. Core samples at various radial locations from the center of the CCIM were taken. These samples were also sectioned and analyzed vertically. Together, the various samples were intended to provide an indication of the homogeneity throughout the CCIM with respect to phase assemblage, chemical composition, and chemical durability. Characterization analyses confirmed that a crystalline ceramic with desirable phase assemblage was produced from a melt using a CCIM. Hollandite and zirconolite were identified in addition to possible highly-substituted pyrochlore and perovskite. Minor phases rich in Fe, Al, or Cs were also identified. Remarkably only minor differences were observed vertically or radially in the CCIM material with respect to chemical composition, phase assemblage, and durability. This recent CCIM test and the resulting characterization in conjunction with demonstrated compositional improvements support continuation of CCIM testing with an improved feed composition and improved melter system.

  16. Carbon Nanotube Composites: Strongest Engineering Material Ever?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayeaux, Brian; Nikolaev, Pavel; Proft, William; Nicholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of the carbon nanotube project at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is to fabricate structural materials with a much higher strength-to-weight ratio than any engineered material today, Single-wall nanotubes present extraordinary mechanical properties along with new challenges for materials processing. Our project includes nanotube production, characterization, purification, and incorporation into applications studies. Now is the time to move from studying individual nanotubes to applications work. Current research at JSC focuses on structural polymeric materials to attempt to lower the weight of spacecraft necessary for interplanetary missions. These nanoscale fibers present unique new challenges to composites engineers. Preliminary studies show good nanotube dispersion and wetting by the epoxy materials. Results of tensile strength tests will also be reported. Other applications of nanotubes are also of interest for energy storage, gas storage, nanoelectronics, field emission, and biomedical uses.

  17. Composition and properties of ceramic heat insulating building materials made ofthe masses of low temperature foaming on the basis of clay raw material

    OpenAIRE

    Selivanov Y.V.; Shiltsina A.D.; Selivanov V.M.; Loginova Y.V.; Korolkova N.N.

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic heat-insulating building materials are the most promising for modern construction. Longlived, bio-resistant and corrosion-resistant, nonhygroscopic and noncombustible, they have the greatest stability of heat engineering properties through time. The combination of these properties is especially important in construction in seismic areas.The article contains the study results of compositions and properties of ceramic heat-insulting building materials of masses on the basis of clay raw ...

  18. Detection of ionizing radiations by studying ceramic tiles materials using thermoluminescence technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandavia, H. C.; Murthy, K. V. R.; Purohit, R. U.

    2017-05-01

    Natural background radiation comes from two primary sources: cosmic radiation and terrestrial sources. Our natural environment has both livings and non-livings like - Sun, Moon, Sky, Air, Water, Soil, Rivers, Mountains, Forests, besides plants and animals. The worldwide average background dose for a human being is about 2.4 millisievert (mSv) per year. This exposure is mostly from cosmic radiation and natural radionuclides in the environment. The Earth, and all living things on it, are constantly bombarded by radiation from outer space. This radiation primarily consists of positively charged ions from protons to iron and larger nuclei derived sources outside our solar system. This radiation interacts with atoms in the atmosphere to create secondary radiation, including X-rays, muons, protons, alpha particles, pions, electrons, and neutrons. The present study discusses the utility of ceramic tiles as radiation dosimeters in case of nuclear fallout. Many flooring materials most of them are in natural form are used to manufacture floor tiles for household flooring purpose. Many natural minerals are used as the raw materials required for the manufacturing ceramic ware. The following minerals are used to manufacturing the ceramic tiles i.e. Quartz, Feldspar, Zircon, Talc, Grog, Alumina oxide, etc. Most of the minerals are from Indian mines of Gujarat and Rajasthan states, some of are imported from Russian subcontinent. The present paper reports the thermoluminescence dosimetry Study of Feldspar and Quartz minerals collected from the ceramic tiles manufacturing unit, Morbi. The main basis in the Thermoluminescence Dosimetry (TLD) is that TL output is directly proportional to the radiation dose received by the phosphor and hence provides the means of estimating unknown radiations from environment.

  19. Carbon Fiber Composite Materials for Automotive Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, Jr., Robert E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mainka, Hendrik [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Volkswagen (VW) is internationally recognized for quantity and quality of world-wide vehicle production and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is internationally recognized in materials research and development. With automotive production ramping up in the recently constructed VW Group of America facility in Chattanooga, Tennessee, ORNL and VW initiated discussions in 2012 concerning opportunities for collaboration around ORNL’s carbon fiber and composites programs. ORNL is conducting an internationally recognized program to develop and implement lower cost carbon fibers and composites for automotive and other “energy missions” for the US Department of Energy. Significant effort is ongoing in selecting, developing, and evaluating alternative precursors, developing and demonstrating advanced conversion techniques, and developing and tailoring surface treatment, sizings, and formatting fiber for specific composite matrices and end-use applications. ORNL already had North America’s most comprehensive suite of tools for carbon fiber research and development and established a semiproduction demonstration line referred to as the Carbon Fiber Technology Facility (CFTF) to facilitate implementation of low cost carbon fiber (LCCF) approaches in early 2013. ORNL and VW agreed to collaborate in a formal Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (NFE-12-03992) specifically focused on evaluating applicability of low cost carbon fiber products for potential vehicle components. The goal of the work outlined in this report was to develop and qualify uses for carbon fiber-reinforced structures in connection with civilian ground transportation. Significant progress was achieved in evaluating and understanding lignin-based precursor materials; however, availability of carbon fiber converted from lignin precursor combined with logistical issues associated with the Visa limitations for the VW participant resulted in significantly shortening of the collaboration

  20. ADVANCED CERAMIC MATERIALS FOR NEXT-GENERATION NUCLEAR APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, J.

    2010-09-29

    , and proliferation), the worldwide community is working to develop and deploy new nuclear energy systems and advanced fuel cycles. These new nuclear systems address the key challenges and include: (1) extracting the full energy value of the nuclear fuel; (2) creating waste solutions with improved long term safety; (3) minimizing the potential for the misuse of the technology and materials for weapons; (4) continually improving the safety of nuclear energy systems; and (5) keeping the cost of energy affordable.

  1. Partial ceramic crowns: influence of preparation design and luting material on internal adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federlin, Marianne; Schmidt, Sebastian; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Thonemann, Birger; Schmalz, Gottfried

    2004-01-01

    The influence of three different cavity preparations on the marginal integrity of partial ceramic crowns (PCC) luted with four different luting systems was investigated in this in vitro study. PCC preparations were performed in 144 extracted human molars using one of the following preparation designs (n=48/preparation): A--Coverage of functional cusps/butt joint preparation; B--horizontal reduction of functional cusps and C--complete reduction of functional cusps/butt joint preparation. Non-functional cusps were not covered; mesial and distal proximal boxes were extended 1 mm below the cemento-enamel-junction. PCC were fabricated from Vita Mark II ceramic (Vita) with a Cerec 3 Unit (Sirona) and adhesively luted to the cavities using the following luting systems: (VL) Variolink II/Excite (Vivadent), (PA) Panavia F/ED Primer (Kuraray), (DY) Dyract/Prime & Bond NT (DeTrey/Dentsply) and (FU) Fuji Plus/GC Cavity Conditioner (GC). Samples were simultaneously exposed to thermocycling and mechanical loading (TC: 5000x8-55 degrees C, 30 seconds/cycle; ML: 500000x72.5N, 1.6Hz). Marginal adaptation was assessed by evaluating dye penetration on multiple sections by relating the actual penetration distance to the maximal length of the corresponding cavity wall (100%). Ceramic- and tooth-luting material interfaces were evaluated separately. The data were statistically analyzed with the Mann Whitney U-test and Wilcoxon Rank Sumtest. In general, no significant differences could be found between preparations A, B and C. The combination of preparation C and luting material PA showed a tendency for the lowest dye penetration values, especially within dentin (30%). Significant differences could be determined between luting materials: Composite luting materials PA (0%) and VL (1%) revealed less dye penetration than the compomer DY (6%) and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) FU (26%); use of RMGIC caused fractures of the restorations. The dentin/luting material interface showed

  2. Lightweight Ablative and Ceramic Thermal Protection System Materials for NASA Exploration Systems Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Peter G.; Lawrence, Timothy W.; Gubert, Michael K.; Milos, Frank S.; Kiser, James D.; Ohlhorst, Craig W.; Koenig, John R.

    2006-01-01

    As a collaborative effort among NASA Centers, the "Lightweight Nonmetallic Thermal Protection Materials Technology" Project was set up to assist mission/vehicle design trade studies, to support risk reduction in thermal protection system (TPS) material selections, to facilitate vehicle mass optimization, and to aid development of human-rated TPS qualification and certification plans. Missions performing aerocapture, aerobraking, or direct aeroentry rely on advanced heatshields that allow reductions in spacecraft mass by minimizing propellant requirements. Information will be presented on candidate materials for such reentry approaches and on screening tests conducted (material property and space environmental effects tests) to evaluate viable candidates. Seventeen materials, in three classes (ablatives, tiles, and ceramic matrix composites), were studied. In additional to physical, mechanical, and thermal property tests, high heat flux laser tests and simulated-reentry oxidation tests were performed. Space environmental effects testing, which included exposures to electrons, atomic oxygen, and hypervelocity impacts, was also conducted.

  3. Computational materials science aided design of glass ceramics and crystal properties (abstract only).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannstadt, Wolfgang

    2008-02-13

    Today's high tech materials have in many cases highly specialized properties and designed functionalities. Materials parameters like high temperature stability, high stiffness and certain optical properties have to be optimized and in many cases an adaptation to given processes is necessary. Many materials are compounds or layered structures. Thus, surface and interface properties need to be considered as well. At the same time to some extent just a few atomic layers sometimes determine the properties of the material, as is well known in semiconductor and other thin film technologies. Therefore, a detailed understanding of the materials properties at the atomic scale becomes more and more important. In addition many high tech materials have to be of high purity or selective dopant concentrations have to be adjusted to fulfill the desired functionality. Modern materials developments successfully use computational materials science to achieve that goal. Improved software tools and continuously growing computational power allow us to predict macroscopic properties of materials on the basis of microscopic/atomic ab initio simulation approaches. At Schott, special materials, in particular glasses and glass ceramics, are produced for a variety of applications. For a glass ceramic all the above mentioned difficulties for materials development arise. The properties of a glass ceramic are determined by the interplay of crystalline phases embedded in an amorphous glass matrix. For materials development the understanding of crystal structures and their properties, surfaces and interface phenomena, and amorphous systems are necessary, likewise. Each by itself is already a challenging problem. Many crystal phases that are grown within the glass matrix do not exist as single crystals or are difficult to grow in reasonable amounts for experimental investigations. The only way to obtain the properties of these crystalline phases is through 'ab initio' simulations in the computer

  4. A Process for Manufacturing Metal-Ceramic Cellular Materials with Designed Mesostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelling, Dean Andrew, Jr.

    The goal of this work is to develop and characterize a manufacturing process that is able to create metal matrix composites with complex cellular geometries. The novel manufacturing method uses two distinct additive manufacturing processes: i) fabrication of patternless molds for cellular metal castings and ii) printing an advanced cellular ceramic for embedding in a metal matrix. However, while the use of AM greatly improves the freedom in the design of MMCs, it is important to identify the constraints imposed by the process and its process relationships. First, the author investigates potential differences in material properties (microstructure, porosity, mechanical strength) of A356 - T6 castings resulting from two different commercially available Binder Jetting media and traditional "no-bake" silica sand. It was determined that they yielded statistically equivalent results in four of the seven tests performed: dendrite arm spacing, porosity, surface roughness, and tensile strength. They differed in sand tensile strength, hardness, and density. Additionally, two critical sources of process constraints on part geometry are examined: (i) depowdering unbound material from intricate casting channels and (ii) metal flow and solidification distances through complex mold geometries. A Taguchi Design of Experiments is used to determine the relationships of important independent variables of each constraint. For depowdering, a minimum cleaning diameter of 3 mm was determined along with an equation relating cleaning distance as a function of channel diameter. Furthermore, for metal flow, choke diameter was found to be significantly significant variable. Finally, the author presents methods to process complex ceramic structure from precursor powders via Binder Jetting AM technology to incorporate into a bonded sand mold and the subsequently casted metal matrix. Through sintering experiments, a sintering temperature of 1375°C was established for the ceramic insert (78

  5. Carbon Nanotubes Filled with Ferromagnetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissker, Uhland; Hampel, Silke; Leonhardt, Albrecht; Büchner, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) filled with ferromagnetic metals like iron, cobalt or nickel are new and very interesting nanostructured materials with a number of unique properties. In this paper we give an overview about different chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods for their synthesis and discuss the influence of selected growth parameters. In addition we evaluate possible growth mechanisms involved in their formation. Moreover we show their identified structural and magnetic properties. On the basis of these properties we present different application possibilities. Some selected examples reveal the high potential of these materials in the field of medicine and nanotechnology. PMID:28883334

  6. Carbon Nanotubes Filled with Ferromagnetic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albrecht Leonhardt

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNT filled with ferromagnetic metals like iron, cobalt or nickel are new and very interesting nanostructured materials with a number of unique properties. In this paper we give an overview about different chemical vapor deposition (CVD methods for their synthesis and discuss the influence of selected growth parameters. In addition we evaluate possible growth mechanisms involved in their formation. Moreover we show their identified structural and magnetic properties. On the basis of these properties we present different application possibilities. Some selected examples reveal the high potential of these materials in the field of medicine and nanotechnology.

  7. Amorphous titania/carbon composite electrode materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughey, John T.; Jansen, Andrew; Joyce, Christopher D.

    2017-05-09

    An isolated salt comprising a compound of formula (H.sub.2X)(TiO(Y).sub.2) or a hydrate thereof, wherein X is 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO), and Y is oxalate anion (C.sub.2O.sub.4.sup.-2), when heated in an oxygen-containing atmosphere at a temperature in the range of at least about 275.degree. C. to less than about 400.degree. C., decomposes to form an amorphous titania/carbon composite material comprising about 40 to about 50 percent by weight titania and about 50 to about 60 percent by weight of a carbonaceous material coating the titania. Heating the composite material at a temperature of about 400 to 500.degree. C. crystallizes the titania component to anatase. The titania materials of the invention are useful as components of the cathode or anode of a lithium or lithium ion electrochemical cell.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of ceramic/carbon nanotubes composite adsorptive membrane for copper ion removal from water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tofighy, Maryam Ahmadzadeh; Mohammadi, Toraj [Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    We prepared a novel adsorptive membrane by implanting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in pore channels of ceramic (α-alumina) support via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method using cyclohexanol and ferrocene as carbon precursor and catalyst, respectively. Optimization of CNTs growth conditions resulted in uniform distribution of the CNTs in the pore channels of the support. The optimized CNTs-ceramic membrane was oxidized with concentrated nitric acid, and chitosan was employed for filling intertube-CNT gaps. The modified CNTs-ceramic membrane was used for copper ion removal from water, and the effects of the modification steps (oxidation and filling intertube-CNT gaps with chitosan) and pH on permeation flux and rejection of the prepared adsorptive membrane were investigated. Moreover, static adsorption was also investigated and Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms and two kinetics models were used to describe adsorption behavior of copper ions by the prepared adsorptive membrane.

  9. Alternative technological approach for synthesis of ceramic pigments by waste materials recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doynov, M.; Dimitrov, T.; Kozhukharov, S.

    2016-05-01

    Alternative technological approach is proposed enabling utilization of raw materials from an oil refinery, such as waste guard layers from reactors. Reagent grade and purified MgO, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), were used as additional precursors. The homogeneous mixtures obtained were formed into pellets and sintered at different temperatures. The main phase was proved by X-ray phase analysis (XRD) and compared to ICPDS database. The main phase in the ceramics synthesized was solid solution of spinel MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and magnesiochromite. These minerals are classified as chromspinelide MgCr{sub 1}.2Al{sub 0}.4Fe{sub 0}.4O{sub 4} and alumochromite MgCr{sub 1}.6Al{sub 0}.4O{sub 4}. Additional SEM observations, combined with EDX analysis were performed, evincing agglomeration at lower temperatures, followed by agglomerate crumbling, at elevated calcination temperature. The complete transformation of initial precursors into the final ceramic compounds was found to occur at 800 degree centigrade 1 h. The ceramic samples synthesized had high density of 1.72-1.93 g/cm{sup 3} and large absorption area - 32.93% which is probably due to the high porosity of the sample. (Author)

  10. X-Ray Diffraction Phase Analyses for Granulated and Sintered Ceramic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suminar Pratapa

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available One basic problematic aspect in x-ray diffraction phase analysis is microabsorption effect which may arise from the size of the crystallite phases. Complication of the problem may intensify in sintered ceramic materials where milling of the samples is not simple. We report the Rietveld x-ray diffraction phase analysis of MgO-α-Al2O3 powder mixtures with phase content ratio of 1:1 by weight and MgO-Y2O3 sintered ceramic composites with Y2O3 contents of 10%, 20% and 30% by weight. The mixtures were pre-sintered at 1000°C for 2 hours and then milled while the composites were sintered at 1550°C for 3 hours. The phase composition analysis was done using Rietica, a non-commercial Rietveld method-based software. Relative and absolute phase compositions were examined and results showed that there was a significant amount of phase composition bias resulted from the examination. For the powder mixture, milling can reduce microabsorption effect and hence the calculation bias. For the ceramic composite where milling is almost impossible, additional of Y2O3 caused smaller crystallite size of MgO, so that composition bias is smaller in composites with higher Y2O3 content. A mathematical model is proposed to provide more acceptable phase composition results.

  11. Viability of utilization of waste materials from ceramic products in precast concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez de Rojas, M. I.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The recycled and re-valuation process of waste materials involves studies lead to a deep acknowledges of them, finding applications for their intended use. The waste materials from ceramic products can be recycled into the construction sector, as arid or pozzolanic materials. The current work deals with the incorporation of ceramic materials in these two different ways, checking the behaviour of the elaborated mortar by mean of laboratory tests. Also, tests are developed in factory, using these as components for precast concrete tiles.

    Todo proceso de reciclado y revalorización de residuos implica estudios encaminados a un conocimiento profundo de los mismos, de forma que se busquen aplicaciones concretas de uso. Los materiales de desecho procedentes de productos cerámicos pueden ser reciclados dentro del sector de la construcción, ya sea como áridos o como materiales puzolánicos. El presente trabajo aborda la incorporación de materiales cerámicos desde estas dos vertientes, comprobando, en cada caso, el comportamiento de los morteros elaborados mediante ensayos de laboratorio. También se llevan a cabo pruebas en fábrica, siendo utilizados como componentes en prefabricados de hormigón.

  12. Use of sugar-cane bagasse ash to produce glass-ceramic material in the system Ca O-SiO{sub 2}-Na{sub 2}O; Utilizacao de cinza de bagaco de cana para produzir material vitro-ceramico do sistema SiO{sub 2}-CaO-Na{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, S.R.; Santos, G.T.A.; Magalhaes, R.S., E-mail: rainho@fct.unesp.b [Universidade Estadual Paulista (DFQB/FCT/UNESP), Presidente Prudente, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias e Tecnologia. Dept. de Fisica, Quimica e Biologia; Rincon, J.Ma.; Romero, M. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (IETCC/CSIC), Madri (Spain). Inst. de Ciencias de la Construccion Eduardo Torroja; Carvalho, C.L. [Universidade Estadual Paulista (FEIS/UNESP), Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia

    2009-07-01

    A bottom ash was used as raw material to obtain glass which was crystallized to form glass-ceramic material. The characterization of the ash shows that it consists mainly of crystalline materials, predominantly quartz, with oxides of iron, potassium and aluminum as minor elements. The glass was obtained from the mixing of ash with calcium and sodium carbonates. The glass and the glass-ceramic were examined using differential thermal analysis (DTA), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). XRD and DTA data show that Wollastonita is the only crystalline phase present in the material crystallized at 1050 deg C. Part of the glass was synthesized at this temperature for one hour, resulting in a green/brown hard material glass-ceramic. The images of SEM show morphology of spherilithic growth indicating volumetric crystallization mechanism. (author)

  13. Influence of abutment material and luting cements color on the final color of all ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dede, Dogu Ömür; Armaganci, Arzu; Ceylan, Gözlem; Cankaya, Soner; Celik, Ersan

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of different abutment materials and luting cements color on the final color of implant-supported all-ceramic restorations. Ten A2 shade IPS e.max Press disc shape all-ceramic specimens were prepared (11 × 1.5 mm). Three different shades (translucent, universal and white opaque) of disc shape luting cement specimens were prepared (11 × 0.2 mm). Three different (zirconium, gold-palladium and titanium) implant abutments and one composite resin disc shape background specimen were prepared at 11 mm diameter and appropriate thicknesses. All ceramic specimens colors were measured with each background and luting cement samples on a teflon mold. A digital spectrophotometer used for measurements and data recorded as CIE L*a*b* color co-ordinates. An optical fluid applied on to the samples to provide a good optical connection and measurements on the composite resin background was saved as the control group. ΔE values were calculated from the ΔL, Δa and Δb values between control and test groups and data were analyzed with one-way variance analysis (ANOVA) and mean values were compared by the Tukey HSD test (α = 0.05). One-way ANOVA of ΔL, Δa, Δb and ΔE values of control and test groups revealed significant differences for backgrounds and seldom for cement color groups (p the 0.05). Only zirconium implant abutment groups and gold palladium abutment with universal shade cement group were found to be clinically acceptable (ΔE ≤ 3.0). Using titanium or gold-palladium abutments for implant supported all ceramics will be esthetically questionable and white opaque cement will be helpful to mask the dark color of titanium abutment.

  14. Effect of Surface Treatments on the Bond Strength to Turkom-Cera All-ceramic Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, Abdul Aa; Abu-Hassan, Mohamed I; Al-Makramani, Bandar Ma; Al-Sanabani, Fuad A; Al-Shami, Ibrahim Z; Almansour, Hosain M

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of surface treatments on shear bond strength (SBS) of Turkom-Cera (Turkom-Ceramic (M) Sdn. Bhd., Puchong, Malaysia) all-ceramic material cemented with resin cement Panavia-F (Kuraray Medical Inc., Okayama, Japan). Forty Turkom-Cera ceramic disks (10 mm × 3 mm) were prepared and randomly divided into four groups. The disks were wet ground to 1000-grit and subjected to four surface treatments: (1) No treatment (Control), (2) sandblasting, (3) silane application, and (4) sandblasting + silane. The four groups of 10 specimens each were bonded with Panavia-F resin cement according to manufacturer's recommendations. The SBS was determined using the universal testing machine (Instron) at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. Failure modes were recorded and a qualitative micromorphologic examination of different surface treatments was performed. The data were analyzed using the one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey honestly significant difference (HSD) tests. The SBS of the control, sandblasting, silane, and sandblasting + silane groups were: 10.8 ± 1.5, 16.4 ± 3.4, 16.2 ± 2.5, and 19.1 ± 2.4 MPa respectively. According to the Tukey HSD test, only the mean SBS of the control group was significantly different from the other three groups. There was no significant difference between sandblasting, silane, and sandblasting + silane groups. In this study, the three surface treatments used improved the bond strength of resin cement to Turkom-Cera disks. The surface treatments used in this study appeared to be suitable methods for the cementation of glass infiltrated all-ceramic restorations.

  15. Fabrication of Silicon Nitride Dental Core Ceramics with Borosilicate Veneering material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wananuruksawong, R; Jinawath, S; Wasanapiarnpong, T [Research Unit of Advanced Ceramic, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok (Thailand); Padipatvuthikul, P, E-mail: raayaa_chula@hotmail.com [Faculty of Dentistry, Srinakharinwirot University, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2011-10-29

    Silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramic is a great candidate for clinical applications due to its high fracture toughness, strength, hardness and bio-inertness. This study has focused on the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic as a dental core material. The white Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} was prepared by pressureless sintering at relative low sintering temperature of 1650 deg. C in nitrogen atmosphere. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic is lower than that of Zirconia and Alumina ceramic which are popular in this field. The borosilicate glass veneering was employed due to its compatibility in thermal expansion. The sintered Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} specimens represented the synthetic dental core were paintbrush coated by a veneer paste composed of borosilicate glass powder (<150 micrometer, Pyrex) with 5 wt% of zirconia powder (3 wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} - partial stabilized zirconia) and 30 wt% of polyvinyl alcohol (5 wt% solution). After coating the veneer on the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} specimens, the firing was performed in electric tube furnace between 1000-1200 deg. C. The veneered specimens fired at 1100 deg. C for 15 mins show good bonding, smooth and glossy without defect and crazing. The veneer has thermal expansion coefficient as 3.98x10{sup -6} deg. C{sup -1}, rather white and semi opaque, due to zirconia addition, the Vickers hardness as 4.0 GPa which is closely to the human teeth.

  16. Fatigue resistance of 2 different CAD/CAM glass-ceramic materials used for single-tooth implant crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çavuşoğlu, Yeliz; Sahin, Erdal; Gürbüz, Riza; Akça, Kivanç

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the fatigue resistance of 2 different CAD/CAM in-office monoceramic materials with single-tooth implant-supported crowns in functional area. A metal experimental model with a dental implant was designed to receive in-office CAD/CAM-generated monoceramic crowns. Laterally positioned axial dynamic loading of 300 N at 2 Hz was applied to implant-supported crowns machined from 2 different glass materials for 100,000 cycle. Failures in terms of fracture, crack formation, and chipping were macroscopically recorded and microscopically evaluated. Four of 10 aluminasilicate glass-ceramic crowns fractured at early loading cycles, the rest completed loading with a visible crack formation. Crack formation was recorded for 2 of 10 leucite glass-ceramic crowns. Others completed test without visible damage but fractured upon removal. Lack in chemical adhesion between titanium abutment and dental cement likely reduces the fatigue resistance of machinable glass-ceramic materials. However, relatively better fractural strength of leucite glass-ceramics could be taken into consideration. Accordingly, progress on developmental changes in filler composition of glass-ceramics may be promising. Machinable glass-ceramics do not possess sufficient fatigue resistance for single-tooth implant crowns in functional area.

  17. Glass-ceramic coating material for the CO2laser based sintering of thin films as caries and erosion protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilandžić, Marin Dean; Wollgarten, Susanne; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Poprawe, Reinhart; Esteves-Oliveira, Marcella; Fischer, Horst

    2017-09-01

    The established method of fissure-sealing using polymeric coating materials exhibits limitations on the long-term. Here, we present a novel technique with the potential to protect susceptible teeth against caries and erosion. We hypothesized that a tailored glass-ceramic material could be sprayed onto enamel-like substrates to create superior adhesion properties after sintering by a CO 2 laser beam. A powdered dental glass-ceramic material from the system SiO 2 -Na 2 O-K 2 O-CaO-Al 2 O 3 -MgO was adjusted with individual properties suitable for a spray coating process. The material was characterized using X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF), heating microscopy, dilatometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), grain size analysis, biaxial flexural strength measurements, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and gas pycnometry. Three different groups of samples (each n=10) where prepared: Group A, powder pressed glass-ceramic coating material; Group B, sintered hydroxyapatite specimens; and Group C, enamel specimens (prepared from bovine teeth). Group B and C where spray coated with glass-ceramic powder. All specimens were heat treated using a CO 2 laser beam process. Cross-sections of the laser-sintered specimens were analyzed using laser scanning microscopy (LSM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and SEM. The developed glass-ceramic material (grain size d50=13.1mm, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE)=13.310 -6 /K) could be spray coated on all tested substrates (mean thickness=160μm). FTIR analysis confirmed an absorption of the laser energy up to 95%. The powdered glass-ceramic material was successfully densely sintered in all sample groups. The coating interface investigation by SEM and EDX proved atomic diffusion and adhesion of the glass-ceramic material to hydroxyapatite and to dental enamel. A glass-ceramic material with suitable absorption properties was successfully sprayed and laser-sintered in thin films on hydroxyapatite as well as on

  18. Use of new raw materials and industrial wastes to improve the possibilities of using ceramic materials from Bailén (Jaén, southern Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galán-Arboledas, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Raw materials used by the ceramic industry in Jaén (southern Spain consist of mixtures of carbonated clays from the Guadalquivir Basin and red clays from the Iberian Massif. The mixtures formulation usually obeys empirical experience developed by this industry for many generations. This work evaluates different possibilities of using these raw materials to manufacture new ceramic products on the basis of clay physical-chemical properties and analyzes limitations to produce high added value products. As an alternative to overcome these limitations, the mixture of these clays with raw materials from near regions (pyrophyllite clay and with different industrial wastes is proposed. These wastes are screen glass from monitors and oil impregnated diatomaceous earth. The study of the technological properties shows that the new mixtures are suitable for the processing of ceramic products in which structural and thermal insulating properties are improved or kept.La materia prima empleada por la industria cerámica de Jaén consiste en mezclas de margas de la Depresión del Guadalquivir con arcillas rojas del Macizo Ibérico. La formulación de estas mezclas responde generalmente a la experiencia empírica desarrollada por esta industria durante generaciones. El presente trabajo evalúa las posibilidades de utilización de estas materias primas para fabricar nuevos productos cerámicos de construcción basándose en sus propiedades físico-químicas y analiza las limitaciones que presentan para la fabricación de productos de mayor valor añadido. Como alternativa para superar estas limitaciones se propone la mezcla con arcillas pirofilíticas de áreas geográficamente cercanas y con diferentes residuos industriales. Estos residuos son vidrio de pantalla descontaminado y tierras diatomeas impregnadas con aceites vegetales. El estudio de caracterización tecnológica muestra que las nuevas mezclas permiten el procesamiento de piezas cerámicas y que en

  19. Materials design for electrocatalytic carbon capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Tan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We discuss our philosophy for implementation of the Materials Genome Initiative through an integrated materials design strategy, exemplified here in the context of electrocatalytic capture and separation of CO2 gas. We identify for a group of 1:1 X–N graphene analogue materials that electro-responsive switchable CO2 binding behavior correlates with a change in the preferred binding site from N to the adjacent X atom as negative charge is introduced into the system. A reconsideration of conductive N-doped graphene yields the discovery that the N-dopant is able to induce electrocatalytic binding of multiple CO2 molecules at the adjacent carbon sites.

  20. Activated carbon briquettes from biomass materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Alejandro; Medero, Natalia; Tancredi, Néstor; Silva, Hugo; Deiana, Cristina

    2007-05-01

    Disposal of biomass wastes, produced in different agricultural activities, is frequently an environmental problem. A solution for such situation is the recycling of these residues for the production of activated carbon, an adsorbent which has several applications, for instance in the elimination of contaminants. For some uses, high mechanical strength and good adsorption characteristics are required. To achieve this, carbonaceous materials are conformed as pellets or briquettes, in a process that involves mixing and pressing of char with adhesive materials prior to activation. In this work, the influence of the operation conditions on the mechanical and surface properties of briquettes was studied. Eucalyptus wood and rice husk from Uruguay were used as lignocellulosic raw materials, and concentrated grape must from Cuyo Region-Argentina, as a binder. Different wood:rice and solid:binder ratios were used to prepare briquettes in order to study their influence on mechanical and surface properties of the final products.

  1. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, F. P.; Winschel, R. A.; Lancet, M. S.

    1989-06-01

    The program is designed to address a substantial, demonstrated need of the coprocessing community (both exploratory and development) for a technique to quantitatively distinguish the contributions of the individual coprocessing feedstocks to the various products. The carbon isotope technique is currently in routine use for other applications. Results achieved this quarter include: Feed and product fractions from a Kentucky 9 coal/Kentucky tar sand bitumen coprocessing bench unit run at the Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) were analyzed for carbon isotope ratios. Corrections were made to the coal carbon recoveries and selectivities from the products of HRI Run 227-53. Feeds (Westerholt coal/Cold Lake VSB) and products from two periods of HRI coprocessing Run 238-1 were analyzed. Three petroleum samples and three coal samples were pyrolyzed at 800{degree}F for 30 min to determine the effect of pyrolysis on the isotopic homogeneity of each petroleum and coal sample. Products from each pyrolysis test were separated into five fractions; an additional set of coprocessing samples and a set of two-stage coal liquefaction samples were obtained from HRI for future work; work performed by the Pennsylvania State University show that microscopy is a promising method for distinguishing coal and petroleum products in residual coprocessing materials; and coal and petroleums that have large differences in carbon isotope ratios were identified for Auburn University. 7 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  2. Advanced Thermal Protection Systems (ATPS), Aerospace Grade Carbon Bonded Carbon Fiber Material Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Carbon bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulating material is the basis for several highly successful NASA developed thermal protection systems (TPS). Included among...

  3. Advanced Thermal Protection Systems (ATPS), Aerospace Grade Carbon Bonded Carbon Fiber Material Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Carbon bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulating material is the basis for several highly successful NASA developed thermal protection systems (TPS). Among the...

  4. Cell response of calcium phosphate based ceramics, a bone substitute material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Marchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize calcium phosphate ceramics with different Ca/P ratios and evaluate cell response of these materials for use as a bone substitute. Bioceramics consisting of mixtures of hydroxyapatite (HAp and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP powders in different proportions were pressed and sintered. The physical and chemical properties of these bioceramics were then characterized. Characterization of the biological properties of these materials was based on analysis of cell response using cultured fibroblasts. The number of cells attached to the samples was counted from SEM images of samples exposed to cell culture solution for different periods. These data were compared by analysis of variance (ANOVA complemented by the Tukey's test. The TCP sample had higher surface roughness and lower density. The adherence and growth of FMM1 cells on samples from all groups was studied. Even though the different calcium based ceramics exhibited properties which made them suitable as bone substitutes, those with higher levels of β-TCP revealed improved cell growth on their surfaces. These observations indicated two-phase calcium phosphate based materials with a β-TCP surface layer to be a promising bone substitute.

  5. [Research on bond durability among different core materials and zirconia ceramic cemented by self-adhesive resin cements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinyu, Luo; Xiangfeng, Meng

    2017-02-01

    This research estimated shear bond durability of zirconia and different substrates cemented by two self-adhesive resin cements (Clearfil SA Luting and RelyX U100) before and after aging conditioning. Machined zirconia ceramic discs were cemented with four kinds of core material (cobalt-chromium alloy, flowable composite resin core material, packable composite resin, and dentin) with two self-adhesive resin cements (Clearfil SA Luting and RelyX U100). All specimens were divided into eight test groups, and each test group was divided into two subgroups. Each subgroup was subjected to shear test before and after 10 000 thermal cycles. All factors (core materials, cements, and thermal cycle) significantly influenced bond durability of zirconia ceramic (P0.05); observed shear bond strength was significantly higher than those of other substrates (P0.05). Different core materials and self-adhesive resin cements can significantly affect bond durability of zirconia ceramic. 
.

  6. Preparation and oxidation resistance of carbon/ceramic composites prepared from phenolic resin, B(OH)3 and Si(OC2H5)4; Phenol jushi, B(OH){sub 3} oyobi Si(OC{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 4} wo mochiiru tanso/ceramics fukugo zairyo no chosei taisankasei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, S. [Industrial Tech. Center of Okayama Prefecture, Okayama (Japan); Kameda, K. [Nakamura Refactories Co. Ltd., Okayama (Japan); Yu, J.; Hiragushi, K. [Okayama Ceramics Research Foundation, Okayama (Japan); Miura, Y. [Okayama Univ. (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    For a binding agent of the carbon containing refractories, phenolic resin and pitch are widely used. Carbon forming by heat treatment of these binding agents has different crystallization and oxidation resistance due to kinds and additives of raw materials. In general, carbon obtained by thermal decomposition of phenolic resin has inferior crystallization and worse oxidation resistance to that from pitch. Conventionally, in order to provide oxidation resistance to carbon material, for example, a method to increase crystallization of the carbon material by adding B4C, a method of coating the carbon material with oxide system coating film and so on are investigated. In this study, for raw materials of carbon materials and coating film forming materials phenolic rein and B(OH)3 and Si(OC2H5)4 were used respectively to make organic/inorganic composites, to conduct their heat treatments at 1300-1900degC and to prepare carbon/ceramic composites. As a result of investigation on oxidation resistance and so forth of these composites, the composite was thought to be more effective than a method to graphitize carbon. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Development of Advanced Materials for Electro-Ceramic Application Final Report CRADA No. TC-1331-96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caplan, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Olstad, R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); McMillan, L. [Symetrix International, Inc., Colorado Springs, CO (United States); Tulupov, A. [Soliton-NTT, Moscow (Russia)

    2017-10-19

    The goal of this project was to further develop and characterize the electrochemical methods originating in Russia for producing ultra high purity organometallic compounds utilized as precursors in the production of high quality electro-ceramic materials. Symetrix planned to use electro-ceramic materials with high dielectric constant for microelectronic memory circuit applications. General Atomics planned to use the barium titanate type ceramics with low loss tangent for producing a high power ferroelectric tuner used to match radio frequency power into their Dill-D fusion machine. Phase I of the project was scheduled to have a large number of organometallic (alkoxides) chemical samples produced using various methods. These would be analyzed by LLNL, Soliton and Symetrix independently to determine the level of chemical impurities thus verifying each other's analysis. The goal was to demonstrate a cost-effective production method, which could be implemented in a large commercial facility to produce high purity organometallic compounds. In addition, various compositions of barium-strontium-titanate ceramics were to be produced and analyzed in order to develop an electroceramic capacitor material having the desired characteristics with respect to dielectric constant, loss tangent, temperature characteristics and non-linear behavior under applied voltage. Upon optimizing the barium titanate material, 50 capacitor preforms would be produced from this material demonstrating the ability to produce, in quantity, the pills ultimately required for the ferroelectric tuner (approx 2000-3000 ceramic pills).

  8. Effects of Surface Morphology of ZnAl2O4 Ceramic Materials on Osteoblastic Cells Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Suárez-Franco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic scaffolds are widely studied in the tissue engineering field due to their potential in medical applications as bone substitutes or as bone-filling materials. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of surface morphology of nanostructure thin films of ZnAl2O4 prepared by spray pyrolysis and bulk pellets of polycrystalline ZnAl2O4 prepared by chemical coprecipitation reaction on the in vitro cell adhesion, viability, and cell-material interactions of osteoblastic cells. Our result showed that cell attachment was significantly enhanced from 60 to 80% on the ZnAl2O4 nanostructured material surface when compared with bulk ceramic surfaces. Moreover, our results showed that the balance of morphological properties of the thin film nanostructure ceramic improves cell-material interaction with enhanced spreading and filopodia with multiple cellular extensions on the surface of the ceramic and enhancing cell viability/proliferation in comparison with bulk ceramic surfaces used as control. Altogether, these results suggest that zinc aluminate nanostructured materials have a great potential to be used in dental implant and bone substitute applications.

  9. A high temperature potentiometric CO{sub 2} sensor mixed with binary carbonate and glassy ceramic oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satyanarayana, L. [Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Hyderabad, 500-007 (India); Noh, Whyo Sup; Lee, Woon Young [Research Institute of Energy Resources Technology, Chosun University, Gwangju, 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Gwang Hu [Department of Advanced Materials and Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju, 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin Seong [Department of Advanced Materials and Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju, 501-759 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: jsepark@chosun.ac.kr

    2009-04-15

    A high temperature (700 deg. C) lithium ion-based CO{sub 2} sensor was fabricated using Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-BaCO{sub 3} binary carbonate and SiO{sub 2}:B{sub 2}O{sub 3}:P{sub 2}O{sub 5} (1:2:1 mol%) amorphous glassy ceramic oxide as sensing electrode. The sensor works efficiently at 700 deg. C without any degradation of the sensing material. The electro motive force (EMF) of the sensor is very stable and follows perfect Nernstian behavior with the logarithm of CO{sub 2} concentration in the range 500-5000 ppm. It is revealed that Li{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}, Ba{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} and quartz were formed at high temperatures (500-700 deg. C) due to the reaction of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and BaCO{sub 3} with glassy ceramic oxide. The time taken by the sensor to reach a change in 90% CO{sub 2} is 10 s. The sensor does not show significant cross-sensitivity to the interfering gases like NO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} at 500 deg. C. TG-DTA, XRD, SEM and FT-IR studies were employed to characterize and suggest a probable mechanism. The increase in EMF of the sensor may be due to the easier movement of Lithium ion in to the glass in the sensing electrode.

  10. Data on post irradiation experiments of heat resistant ceramic composite materials. PIE for 97M-13A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Shin-ichi; Ishihara, Masahiro; Souzawa, Shizuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Sekino, Hajime [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The research on the radiation damage mechanism of heat resistant ceramic composite materials is one of the research subjects of the innovative basic research in the field of high temperature engineering, using the High Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). Three series of irradiation tests on the heat resistant ceramic composite materials, first to third irradiation test program, were carried out using the Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR). This is a summary report on the first irradiation test program; irradiation induced dimensional change, thermal expansion coefficient, X-ray diffraction and {gamma}-ray spectrum are reported. (author)

  11. Finite element modeling of deposition of ceramic material during SLM additive manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A three dimensional model for material deposition in Selective Laser Melting (SLM with application to Al2O3-ZrO2 eutectic ceramic is presented. As the material is transparent to laser, dopants are added to increase the heat absorption efficiency. Based on Beer-Lambert law, a volumetric heat source model taking into account the material absorption is derived. The Level Set method with multiphase homogenization is used to track the shape of deposed bead and the thermodynamic is coupled to calculate the melting-solidification path. The shrinkage during consolidation from powder to compact medium is modeled by a compressible Newtonian constitutive law. A semi-implicit formulation of surface tension is used, which permits a stable resolution to capture the gas-liquid interface. The formation of droplets is obtained and slight waves of melt pool are observed. The influence of different process parameters on temperature distribution, melt pool profiles and bead shapes is discussed.

  12. Theoretical Studies on the Electronic Structures and Properties of Complex Ceramic Crystals and Novel Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ching, Wai-Yim

    2012-01-14

    This project is a continuation of a long program supported by the Office of Basic Energy Science in the Office of Science of DOE for many years. The final three-year continuation started on November 1, 2005 with additional 1 year extension to October 30, 2009. The project was then granted a two-year No Cost Extension which officially ended on October 30, 2011. This report covers the activities within this six year period with emphasis on the work completed within the last 3 years. A total of 44 papers with acknowledgement to this grant were published or submitted. The overall objectives of this project are as follows. These objectives have been evolved over the six year period: (1) To use the state-of-the-art computational methods to investigate the electronic structures of complex ceramics and other novel crystals. (2) To further investigate the defects, surfaces/interfaces and microstructures in complex materials using large scale modeling. (3) To extend the study on ceramic materials to more complex bioceramic crystals. (4) To initiate the study on soft condensed matters including water and biomolecules. (5) To focus on the spectroscopic studies of different materials especially on the ELNES and XANES spectral calculations and their applications related to experimental techniques. (6) To develop and refine computational methods to be effectively executed on DOE supercomputers. (7) To evaluate mechanical properties of different crystals and those containing defects and relate them to the fundamental electronic structures. (8) To promote and publicize the first-principles OLCAO method developed by the PI (under DOE support for many years) for applications to large complex material systems. (9) To train a new generation of graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in modern computational materials science and condensed matter physics. (10) To establish effective international and domestic collaborations with both experimentalists and theorists in materials

  13. Carbon nanotube materials for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, A.C.; Parilla, P.A.; Jones, K.M.; Riker, G.; Heben, M.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) are essentially elongated pores of molecular dimensions and are capable of adsorbing hydrogen at relatively high temperatures and low pressures. This behavior is unique to these materials and indicates that SWNTs are the ideal building block for constructing safe, efficient, and high energy density adsorbents for hydrogen storage applications. In past work the authors developed methods for preparing and opening SWNTs, discovered the unique adsorption properties of these new materials, confirmed that hydrogen is stabilized by physical rather than chemical interactions, measured the strength of interaction to be {approximately} 5 times higher than for adsorption on planar graphite, and performed infrared absorption spectroscopy to determine the chemical nature of the surface terminations before, during, and after oxidation. This year the authors have made significant advances in synthesis and characterization of SWNT materials so that they can now prepare gram quantities of high-purity SWNT samples and measure and control the diameter distribution of the tubes by varying key parameters during synthesis. They have also developed methods which purify nanotubes and cut nanotubes into shorter segments. These capabilities provide a means for opening the tubes which were unreactive to the oxidation methods that successfully opened tubes, and offer a path towards organizing nanotube segments to enable high volumetric hydrogen storage densities. They also performed temperature programmed desorption spectroscopy on high purity carbon nanotube material obtained from collaborator Prof. Patrick Bernier and finished construction of a high precision Seivert`s apparatus which will allow the hydrogen pressure-temperature-composition phase diagrams to be evaluated for SWNT materials.

  14. Carbon nanotube materials for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, A.C.; Jones, K.M.; Heben, M.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen burns pollution-free and may be produced from renewable energy resources. It is therefore an ideal candidate to replace fossil fuels as an energy carrier. However, the lack of a convenient and cost-effective hydrogen storage system greatly impedes the wide-scale use of hydrogen in both domestic and international markets. Although several hydrogen storage options exist, no approach satisfies all of the efficiency, size, weight, cost and safety requirements for transportation or utility use. A material consisting exclusively of micropores with molecular dimensions could simultaneously meet all of the requirements for transportation use if the interaction energy for hydrogen was sufficiently strong to cause hydrogen adsorption at ambient temperatures. Small diameter ({approx}1 mm) carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) are elongated micropores of molecular dimensions, and materials composed predominantly of SWNTs may prove to be the ideal adsorbent for ambient temperature storage of hydrogen. Last year the authors reported that hydrogen could be adsorbed on arc-generated soots containing 12{Angstrom} diameter nanotubes at temperatures in excess of 285K. In this past year they have learned that such adsorption does not occur on activated carbon materials, and that the cobalt nanoparticles present in their arc-generated soots are not responsible for the hydrogen which is stable at 285 K. These results indicate that enhanced adsorption forces within the internal cavities of the SWNTs are active in stabilizing hydrogen at elevated temperatures. This enhanced stability could lead to effective hydrogen storage under ambient temperature conditions. In the past year the authors have also demonstrated that single-wall carbon nanotubes in arc-generated soots may be selectively opened by oxidation in H{sub 2}O resulting in improved hydrogen adsorption, and they have estimated experimentally that the amount of hydrogen stored is {approximately}10% of the nanotube weight.

  15. High-temperature corrosion resistance of ceramics and ceramic coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorelli, P.F.

    1996-06-01

    Ceramics and ceramic composites offer the potential to operate fossil energy systems at the higher temperatures necessary for improved energy efficiency and better environmental control. However, because many fossil fuel-derived processes contain sulfur, chlorine, and carbon, as well as oxygen, degradation from high-temperature corrosion and environmental effects arising from reactions of solids with gases and condensable products is a common life-determining factor in operating systems. Ceramic-based products are not immune to such degradation; adequate corrosion resistance must be assured to exploit the technical and economic potential of such materials. This is normally accomplished by using stable, sound oxides that exist in their bulk form, that naturally grow as surface layers upon exposure to an oxidizing environment, or that are deposited as a coating on a susceptible material. It is therefore important to examine the critical issues with respect to more environmental stability of ceramics that have the potential to be corrosion resistant in particular fossil environments. Key aspects include not only chemical compatibility, but the influence of the environment on the mechanical behavior of the ceramic materials. In addition, for coatings, the mechanical reliability of the ceramic is a key issue in that an otherwise corrosion-resistant surface layer must remain sound and adherent in order to provide protection to the underlying substrate. The purpose of this work is to support the development of advanced ceramics and ceramic composites for applications in fossil environments by examining critical issues related to high-temperature corrosion resistance. More specifically, the overall objective of this task is to examine the chemical compatibility and reliability of potentially corrosion-resistant ceramics being developed as protective overcoats and/or structural materials as parts of other work elements funded by the AR&TD Program.

  16. Study of high temperature ceramic turbocharger. ; Basic research on turbine housing materials. Koon ceramic turbocharger no kenkyu. ; Turbine shashitsu zairyo no kiso shiken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyashita, K.; Miyagi, Y.; Sugihara, H.; Kitagawa, M. (Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries, Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-04-01

    In order to engineer the development of high temperature ceramic turbocharger for the gasoline engine use, characteristics at high temperature were studied of ceramics-made turbine impeller and turbine housing material. Used ceramics is silica nitride, developed for the gas turbine use and sintered under the atmospheric pressure. Prototypically prepared turbine rotors, designed upon studying the centrifugal stress, thermal stress, impeller shape and joint strength between the impellers and metallic shaft, were durable against 1050 centigrade in turbine inlet gas temperature (TIT), as a result of reliability evaluation test thereon. The turbine housing material comprises five categories such as stainless steel, Ni-resist cast iron and N155 (turbocharger housing material for the race use). As a comparative result of high temperature tensile strength, thermal cycle oxidation and thermal fatigue tests, the stainless steel was excellent in oxidation characteristics and at the equal level to the N155 in thermal fatigue strength at 1050 centigrade in TIT. 5 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Conversion of sandy tailing from banded iron formation exploitation into glass-ceramic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Alves Rodrigues de Melo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Glass-ceramic materials made of 40.0 wt. (% of sandy tailing from banded iron formation exploitation and 60 wt. (% of slag from steelwork were analyzed. Vitrification was obtained by heating the batch samples up to 1400 °C for 1 hour and quenching the melt on a stainless steel plate. Devitrification was obtained by heat-treating the as-quenched glass samples in isothermal conditions at 750 and 1000 °C for 2 hours. FTIR spectroscopy analysis on the devitrified samples indicates a peak shift towards higher wave number with respect to the as-quenched glass because of the crystallization. XRD analysis revealed the presence of crystalline diopside CaMgSi2O6 as the major phase in the glass samples isothermally heat-treated at 1000 °C. Results also indicated that the devitrification at 1000 °C and an incipient devitrification at 750 °C resulted into harder glass-ceramic materials.

  18. A mesomechanical analysis of the deformation and fracture in polycrystalline materials with ceramic porous coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balokhonov, R. R.; Zinoviev, A. V.; Romanova, V. A.; Batukhtina, E. E.

    2015-10-01

    The special features inherent in the mesoscale mechanical behavior of a porous ceramic coating-steel substrate composite are investigated. Microstructure of the coated material is accounted for explicitly as initial conditions of a plane strain dynamic boundary-value problem solved by the finite difference method. Using a mechanical analogy method, a procedure for generating a uniform curvilinear finite difference computational mesh is developed to provide a more accurate description of the complex grain boundary geometry. A modified algorithm for generation of polycrystalline microstructure of the substrate is designed on the basis of the cellular automata method. The constitutive equations for a steel matrix incorporate an elastic-plastic model for a material subjected to isotropic hardening. The Hall-Petch relation is used to account for the effect of the grain size on the yield stress and strain hardening history. A brittle fracture model for a ceramic coating relying on the Huber criterion is employed. The model allows for crack nucleation in the regions of triaxial tension. The complex inhomogeneous stress and plastic strain patterns are shown to be due to the presence of interfaces of three types: coating-substrate interface, grain boundaries, and pore surfaces.

  19. Graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid materials and use as electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tour, James M.; Zhu, Yu; Li, Lei; Yan, Zheng; Lin, Jian

    2016-09-27

    Provided are methods of making graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid materials. Such methods generally include: (1) associating a graphene film with a substrate; (2) applying a catalyst and a carbon source to the graphene film; and (3) growing carbon nanotubes on the graphene film. The grown carbon nanotubes become covalently linked to the graphene film through carbon-carbon bonds that are located at one or more junctions between the carbon nanotubes and the graphene film. In addition, the grown carbon nanotubes are in ohmic contact with the graphene film through the carbon-carbon bonds at the one or more junctions. The one or more junctions may include seven-membered carbon rings. Also provided are the formed graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid materials.

  20. Isotope exchange reactions on ceramic breeder materials and their effect on tritium inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, M.; Baba, A. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Kawamura, Y.; Nishi, M.

    1998-03-01

    Though lithium ceramic materials such as Li{sub 2}O, LiAlO{sub 2}, Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} and Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} are considered as breeding materials in the blanket of a D-T fusion reactor, the release behavior of the bred tritium in these solid breeder materials has not been fully understood. The isotope exchange reaction rate between hydrogen isotopes in the purge gas and tritium on the surface of breeding materials have not been quantified yet, although helium gas with hydrogen or deuterium is planned to be used as the blanket purge gas in the recent blanket designs. The mass transfer coefficient representing the isotope exchange reaction between H{sub 2} and D{sub 2}O or that between D{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O in the ceramic breeding materials bed is experimentally obtained in this study. Effects of isotope exchange reactions on the tritium inventory in the bleeding blanket is discussed based on data obtained in this study where effects of diffusion of tritium in the grain, absorption of water in the bulk of grain, and adsorption of water on the surface of grain, together with two types of isotope exchange reactions are considered. The way to estimate the tritium inventory in a Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} blanket used in this study shows a good agreement with data obtained in such in-situ experiments as MOZART, EXOTIC-5, 6 and TRINE experiments. (author)

  1. Effect of self-glazing on reducing the radioactivity levels of red mud based ceramic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Shuo [College of Material Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Technology, Guilin, Guangxi 541004 (China); Wu, Bolin, E-mail: wubolin3211@gmail.com [College of Material Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Technology, Guilin, Guangxi 541004 (China)

    2011-12-30

    Graphical abstract: Self-glazing red mud based ceramic materials (RMCM) were produced by normal pressure sintering process using the main raw materials of red mud. The properties of the RMCM samples were investigated by the measurements of mechanical properties, radiation measurement, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that the self-glazing RMCM have good mechanical properties (water absorption and apparent porosity approached zero; bulk density, 2.94 g/cm{sup 3}; compressive strength, 78.12 MPa). The radiation level has clear change regularity that the radioactivity levels of red mud (6360 Bq) are obvious declined, and can be reduced to that of the natural radioactive background of Guilin Karst landform, China (3600 Bq). It will not only consume large quantities of red mud, but also decrease the production cost of self-glazing RMCM. And the statement of this paper will offer effective ways to reduce the radioactivity level of red mud. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The self-glazing phenomenon in red mud system was first discovered in our research. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation levels of red mud can be reduced efficiently by self-glazing layer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Red mud based ceramic materials will not cause harm to environment and humans. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This research possesses important economic significances to aluminum companies. - Abstract: Self-glazing red mud based ceramic materials (RMCM) were produced by normal pressure sintering process using the main raw materials of red mud. The properties of the RMCM samples were investigated by the measurements of mechanical properties, radiation measurement, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that the self-glazing RMCM have good mechanical properties (water absorption and apparent porosity approached zero; bulk density, 2.94 g/cm{sup 3}; compressive strength, 78.12 MPa). The radiation

  2. Synthesis of Tb4O7 nanopowders by the carbonate-precipitation method for Tb3Al5O12 magneto-optical ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jiawei; Pan, Yubai; Chen, Haohong; Xie, Tengfei; Kou, Huamin; Li, Jiang

    2017-11-01

    Tb4O7 nanopowders were synthesized by the precipitation method using ammonium hydrogen carbonate (AHC) as the precipitant. The influence of calcination temperature on the properties of Tb4O7 powders was investigated by FTIR, XRD and FESEM. It is found that 1000 °C is the optimum calcination temperature for Tb4O7 powders used for fabrication of Tb3Al5O12 (TAG) transparent ceramics, and the average particle size of the 1000 °C-calcined powder is about 150 nm. Using the 800 to 1100 °C-calcined Tb4O7 powders as raw materials, TAG transparent ceramics were fabricated by vacuum sintering at 1700 °C for 20 h. The sample sintered from 1000 °C-calcined Tb4O7 powders shows the best transparency, and its in-line transmittance is above 55% in the 500-1480 nm region, reaching 58.3% at the wavelength of 633 nm. The microstructures and the magneto-optical properties of the TAG ceramics sintered from 800 to 1100 °C-calcined Tb4O7 powders were also studied.

  3. Partial ceramic crowns. Influence of preparation design and luting material on margin integrity--a scanning electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federlin, Marianne; Sipos, C; Hiller, K-A; Thonemann, B; Schmalz, G

    2005-03-01

    This in vitro study examines the effects of three preparation designs and different luting agents on the marginal integrity of partial ceramic crowns. One hundred forty-four extracted human molars were prepared according to the following preparation designs: A. Coverage of functional cusps, B. Horizontal reduction of functional cusps and C. Complete reduction of functional cusps. Partial ceramic crowns (Vita Mark II, Cerec 3 System) were bonded to the cavities with: Variolink II/Excite (Vivadent), Panavia F/ED primer (Kuraray), Dyract/Prime and Bond NT (Detrey/Dentsply), and Fuji Plus/GC cavity conditioner (GC). The specimens were exposed to thermocycling and mechanical loading. Marginal adaptation was assessed on replicas using quantitative margin analysis in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Significant differences were observed between the preparation designs in general. Coverage of functional cusps with preparation of butt joints and use of Variolink as luting material showed a tendency toward the lowest values for compromised adhesion, especially within the dentin. Significant differences could be determined between luting systems: resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) caused fracture of the restorations and revealed higher values than all other luting materials for compromised adhesion at ceramic-luting agent and tooth-luting agent interfaces. The dentin-luting material interface, in general, showed higher percentages of compromised adhesion (38-100%) than enamel- and ceramic-luting material interfaces (0-30%). In conclusion, the SEM data indicate that, with adhesively bonded partial ceramic crowns, retentive preparation is not contraindicated and the choice of luting material is more relevant than the preparation design. Margins below the cemento-enamel junction reveal significant loss of adhesion in spite of adhesive luting techniques. The RMGIC cannot be recommended as a luting material for feldspathic partial ceramic crowns.

  4. The effect of investment materials on the surface of cast fluorcanasite glasses and glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay-Ghosh, Sanchita; Reaney, Ian M; Johnson, Antony; Hurrell-Gillingham, Kathryn; Brook, Ian M; Hatton, P V

    2008-02-01

    Modified fluorcanasite glass-ceramics were produced by controlled two stage heat-treatment of as-cast glasses. Castability was determined using a spiral castability test and the lost-wax method. Specimens were cast into moulds formed from gypsum and phosphate bonded investments to observe their effect on the casting process, surface roughness, surface composition and biocompatibility. Both gypsum and phosphate bonded investments could be successfully used for the lost-wax casting of fluorcanasite glasses. Although the stoichiometric glass composition had the highest castability, all modified compositions showed good relative castability. X-ray diffraction showed similar bulk crystallisation for each glass, irrespective of the investment material. However, differences in surface crystallisation were detected when different investment materials were used. Gypsum bonded investment discs showed slightly improved in vitro biocompatibility than equivalent phosphate bonded investment discs under the conditions used.

  5. Optimizing the Advanced Ceramic Material (ACM) for Diesel Particulate Filter Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, Heather E.; Stewart, Mark L.; Maupin, Gary D.; Gallant, Thomas R.; Li, Cheng; Mao, Frank H.; Pyzik, Aleksander J.; Ramanathan, Ravi

    2006-10-02

    This paper describes the application of pore-scale filtration simulations to the ‘Advanced Ceramic Material’ (ACM) developed by Dow Automotive for use in advanced diesel particulate filters. The application required the generation of a three dimensional substrate geometry to provide the boundary conditions for the flow model. An innovative stochastic modeling technique was applied matching chord length distribution and the porosity profile of the material. Additional experimental validation was provided by the single channel experimental apparatus. Results show that the stochastic reconstruction techniques provide flexibility and appropriate accuracy for the modeling efforts. Early optimization efforts imply that needle length may provide a mechanism for adjusting performance of the ACM for DPF applications. New techniques have been developed to visualize soot deposition in both traditional and new DPF substrate materials. Loading experiments have been conducted on a variety of single channel DPF substrates to develop a deeper understanding of soot penetration, soot deposition characteristics, and to confirm modeling results.

  6. Polymer-Ceramic Composite Materials for Pyroelectric Infrared Detectors: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, M. D; Currie, J. R.; Penn, B. G.; Batra, A. K.; Lal, R. B.

    2007-01-01

    Ferroelectrics:Polymer composites can be considered an established substitute for conventional electroceramics and ferroelectric polymers. The composites have a unique blend of polymeric properties such as mechanical flexibility, high strength, formability, and low cost, with the high electro-active properties of ceramic materials. They have attracted considerable interest because of their potential use in pyroelectric infrared detecting devices and piezoelectric transducers. These flexible sensors and transducers may eventually be useful for their health monitoring applications for NASA crew launch vehicles and crew exploration vehicles being developed. In the light of many technologically important applications in this field, it is worthwhile to present an overview of the pyroelectric infrared detector theory, models to predict dielectric behavior and pyroelectric coefficient, and the concept of connectivity and fabrication techniques of biphasic composites. An elaborate review of Pyroelectric-Polymer composite materials investigated to date for their potential use in pyroelectric infrared detectors is presented.

  7. ENERGY EFFICIENCY CHALLENGES ADDRESSED THROUGH THE USE OF ADVANCED REFRACTORY CERAMIC MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Refractory ceramics can play a critical role in improving the energy efficiency of traditional industrial processes through increased furnace efficiency brought about by the employment of novel refractory systems and techniques. Examples of advances in refractory materials related to aluminum, gasification, glass, and lime are highlighted. Energy savings are realized based on reduction of chemical reactions, elimination of mechanical degradation caused by the service environment, reduction of temperature limitations of materials, and elimination of costly installation and repair needs. Key results of projects resulting from US Department of Energy (DOE) funded research programs are discussed with emphasis on applicability of these results to high temperature furnace applications and needed research directions for the future.

  8. INVESTIGATION OF NON ERODING NOZZLE MATERIALS FOR OPTIMIZED COATED HYBRID LEADING EDGE DESIGNS FOR REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICALS WITH LEADING EDGE RADII OF 0.03? TO 1? AND TEMPERATURES NEAR 4000?F Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Effort explores using innovative hybrid reinforced carbon-carbon, refractory ceramics, super alloys and composite materials as thermal protection system specifically...

  9. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters. Topical report for part 1 of high temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters and heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spear, K.E.; Crossland, C.E.; Shelleman, D.L.; Tressler, R.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-11

    This program consists of two separate research areas. Part 1, for which this report is written, studied the high temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic hot gas filters, while Part 2 studied the long-term durability of ceramic heat exchangers to coal combustion environments. The objectives of Part 1 were to select two candidate ceramic filter materials for flow-through hot corrosion studies and subsequent corrosion and mechanical properties characterization. In addition, a thermodynamic database was developed so that thermochemical modeling studies could be performed to simulate operating conditions of laboratory reactors and existing coal combustion power plants, and to predict the reactions of new filter materials with coal combustion environments. The latter would make it possible to gain insight into problems that could develop during actual operation of filters in coal combustion power plants so that potential problems could be addressed before they arise.

  10. Comparative in vitro wear resistance of CAD/CAM composite resin and ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Li; Bortolotto, Tissiana; Krejci, Ivo

    2016-02-01

    Composite resin is a promising option in computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) dentistry; however, the wear resistance of composite resin remains a primary concern. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the wear resistance of 5 CAD/CAM materials (n=10), consisting of 4 composite resins (3M Lava Ultimate, Kerr experimental composite resin material, Vita Enamic, 3M Paradigm MZ100) and 1 ceramic (Vita Mark II) in contact with natural human enamel cusps. Specimens were loaded into a computer-controlled mastication simulator and subjected to 200000 mechanical cycles (49 N) against natural human enamel simultaneously with 500 thermal cycles (5°C to 50°C to 5°C). The wear resistance was analyzed by measuring the vertical substance loss (the maximum depth of the worn area) in the contact point area of the specimen. The worn surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy to determine the wear patterns. Vita Mark II exhibited the best wear resistance among the tested materials, followed by 3M Lava Ultimate, Vita Enamic, and 3M Paradigm MZ100. The Kerr experimental material exhibited the lowest wear resistance, yet its results were not significantly different from those of the 3 other composite resin blocks (P>.05). Within the limitations of this in vitro study, the wear resistance of composite resin blocks in contact with enamel cusps was significantly lower than that of a ceramic block. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Biocompatibility of polymer-infiltrated-ceramic-network (PICN) materials with Human Gingival Keratinocytes (HGKs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenade, Charlotte; De Pauw-Gillet, Marie-Claire; Pirard, Catherine; Bertrand, Virginie; Charlier, Corinne; Vanheusden, Alain; Mainjot, Amélie

    2017-03-01

    Biocompatibility of polymer-infiltrated-ceramic-network (PICN) materials, a new class of CAD-CAM composites, is poorly explored in the literature, in particular, no data are available regarding Human Gingival Keratinocytes (HGK). The first objective of this study was to evaluate the in vitro biocompatibility of PICNs with HGKs in comparison with other materials typically used for implant prostheses. The second objective was to correlate results with PICN monomer release and indirect cytotoxicity. HGK attachment, proliferation and spreading on PICN, grade V titanium (Ti), yttrium zirconia (Zi), lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (eM) and polytetrafluoroethylene (negative control) discs were evaluated using a specific insert-based culture system. For PICN and eM samples, monomer release in the culture medium was quantified by high performance liquid chromatography and indirect cytotoxicity tests were performed. Ti and Zi exhibited the best results regarding HGK viability, number and coverage. eM showed inferior results while PICN showed statistically similar results to eM but also to Ti regarding cell number and to Ti and Zi regarding cell viability. No monomer release from PICN discs was found, nor indirect cytotoxicity, as for eM. The results confirmed the excellent behavior of Ti and Zi with gingival cells. Even if polymer based, PICN materials exhibited intermediate results between Ti-Zi and eM. These promising results could notably be explained by PICN high temperature-high pressure (HT-HP) innovative polymerization mode, as confirmed by the absence of monomer release and indirect cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterization of a wollastonite glass-ceramic material prepared using sugar cane bagasse ash (SCBA) as one of the raw materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Silvio R., E-mail: rainho@fct.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista — UNESP, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia — FCT, 19060-900 Presidente Prudente — SP (Brazil); Souza, Agda E. [Universidade Estadual Paulista — UNESP, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia — FCT, 19060-900 Presidente Prudente — SP (Brazil); Carvalho, Claudio L.; Reynoso, Victor C.S. [Universidade Estadual Paulista — UNESP, Faculdade de Engenharia de Ilha Solteira — FEIS, 15385-000 Ilha Solteira – SP (Brazil); Romero, Maximina; Rincón, Jesús Ma. [Instituto de Ciencias de la Construccion Eduardo Torroja — IETCC, CSIC, 28033 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-12-15

    Glass-ceramic material prepared with sugar cane bagasse ash as one of the raw materials was characterized to determine some important properties for its application as a coating material. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that wollastonite-2M (CaSiO{sub 3}) was the major glass-ceramic phase. The Rietveld method was used to quantify the crystalline (60 wt.%) and vitreous (40 wt.%) phases in the glass-ceramic. The microstructure (determined by scanning electron microscopy) of this material had a marble appearance, showing a microporous network of elongated crystals with some areas with dendritic, feather-like ordering. Microhardness data gave a mean hardness value of 564.4 HV (Vickers-hardness), and light microscopy disclosed a greenish brown colored material with a vitreous luster. - Highlights: • We studied the properties of a glass-ceramic material obtained from sugarcane ash. • This material has the appearance and hardness of natural stones. • A refining method gave information about its amorphous and crystalline phases. • This material has potential to be used as coating plates for buildings.

  13. Fifty years in studying carbon-based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresselhaus, Mildred S.

    2012-01-01

    A review is presented based on our 50 year involvement in studying carbon materials physics and carbon-based nanostructures. The review topics include an early history of studies of graphene and graphite, graphite intercalation compounds, forerunners of nano-carbons, fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and, finally, graphene and graphene nanoribbons.

  14. Chemistry and materials options of sustainable carbon materials made by hydrothermal carbonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titirici, Maria-Magdalena; Antonietti, Markus

    2010-01-01

    The production of functional nanostructured materials starting from cheap natural precursors using environmentally friendly processes is a highly attractive subject in material chemistry today. Recently, much attention has been focused on the use of plant biomass to produce functional carbonaceous materials, encompassing economic, environmental and social issues. Besides the classical route to produce activated carbons from agricultural side products, the hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) process shows clear advantages in that it can generate a variety of cheap and sustainable carbonaceous materials with attractive nanostructure and functionalization patterns for a wide range of applications. In this tutorial review we present the latest developments in this traditional but recently invigorated technique. It will be shown that HTC does not only access carbonaceous materials under comparatively mild hydrothermal conditions, but also replaces the more technical and structurally well-defined charring by a controlled chemical process. It will be shown that this makes it possible to tailor the final structure with the tools of colloid and polymer science, leading to very different morphologies with miscellaneous applications, including modern carbon nanocomposites and hybrids.

  15. Blunt indentation of nuclear carbon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEnaney; Hartley, M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Bath, Bath (United Kingdom)

    1998-09-01

    Blunt indentation is a useful technique for investigating the resistance of nuclear carbon materials to contact stresses. The method is illustrated by describing the response of a series of graphites of widely different textures to blunt indentation loading. It is shown that there is a transition from a Hertzian type of cracking for very fine textured graphites to a response that is dominated by shear deformation and micro-cracking in coarser textured materials. Cyclic indentation loading is characterised by pronounced hysteresis and the associated energy dissipation can be used as a quantitative measure of the microstructural damage. Blunt indentation was also carried out on a series of thermally-oxidised nuclear grade graphites and it was shown that the extent of permanent deformation increased with extent of oxidation of the graphite. There was also a change in the deformation and fracture modes with increasing oxidation. The results show that the responses of these materials to blunt indentation are affected by both microstructure and porosity. Some blunt indentation measurements were also carried out on radiolytically oxidised graphites taken from UK AGRs. After correction for hardening effects, it was shown that there is a decrease in blunt indentation strength with increasing radiolytic oxidation, although with much scatter in the data. 16 refs.

  16. Lessons learned from the development and manufacture of ceramic reusable surface insulation materials for the space shuttle orbiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banas, R. P.; Elgin, D. R.; Cordia, E. R.; Nickel, K. N.; Gzowski, E. R.; Aguiler, L.

    1983-01-01

    Three ceramic, reusable surface insulation materials and two borosilicate glass coatings were used in the fabrication of tiles for the Space Shuttle orbiters. Approximately 77,000 tiles were made from these materials for the first three orbiters, Columbia, Challenger, and Discovery. Lessons learned in the development, scale up to production and manufacturing phases of these materials will benefit future production of ceramic reusable surface insulation materials. Processing of raw materials into tile blanks and coating slurries; programming and machining of tiles using numerical controlled milling machines; preparing and spraying tiles with the two coatings; and controlling material shrinkage during the high temperature (2100-2275 F) coating glazing cycles are among the topics discussed.

  17. Long-term Bond Strength between Layering Indirect Composite Material and Zirconia Coated with Silicabased Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fushiki, Ryosuke; Komine, Futoshi; Honda, Junichi; Kamio, Shingo; Blatz, Markus B; Matsumura, Hideo

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated the long-term shear bond strength between an indirect composite material and a zirconia framework coated with silica-based ceramics, taking the effect of different primers into account. A total of 165 airborne-particle abraded zirconia disks were subjected to one of three pretreatments: no pretreatment (ZR-AB), airborne-particle abrasion of zirconia coated with feldspathic porcelain (ZR-PO-AB), and 9.5% hydrofluoric acid etching of zirconia coated with feldspathic porcelain (ZR-PO-HF). An indirect composite material (Estenia C&B) was then bonded to the zirconia disks after they were treated with one of the following primers: Clearfil Photo Bond (CPB), Clearfil Photo Bond with Clearfil Porcelain Bond Activator (CPB + Activator), Estenia Opaque Primer (EOP), Porcelain Liner M Liquid B (PLB), or no priming (CON, control group). Shear bond strength was tested after 100,000 thermocycles, and the data were analyzed using the Steel-Dwass U-test (α = 0.05). For ZR-PO-AB and ZR-PO-HF specimens, bond strength was highest in the CPB+Activator group (25.8 MPa and 22.4 MPa, respectively). Bond strengths were significantly lower for ZR-AB specimens in the CON and PLB groups and for ZR-PO-AB specimens in the CON, CPB, and EOP groups. Combined application of a hydrophobic phosphate monomer (MDP) and silane coupling agent enhanced the long-term bond strength of indirect composite material to a zirconia coated with silica-based ceramics.

  18. The comparative evaluation of the translucency of crowns fabricated with three different all-ceramic materials: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sravanthi, Y; Ramani, Y V; Rathod, Asha M; Ram, Sabita M; Turakhia, Hetal

    2015-02-01

    All-ceramic crowns with different core materials of different strength and aesthetics are available in recent years. The aesthetics of the crown depends mainly on the shade and translucency. Clinician should be aware of the quality and characteristics of these materials so that they will be able to opt for good material for successful clinical use. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the translucency of crowns fabricated with three different commercially available all-ceramic materials viz. Alumina - CAD-CAM Procera, Lithium disilicate - Pressable IPS e.max Press, Zirconia - CAD-CAM Lava. All-ceramic crowns (5 per each group and total of 15 samples) were made of Alumina - CAD-CAM Procera (Group I), Lithium disilicate - Pressable IPS e.max Press (Group II), Zirconia - CAD-CAM Lava (Group III) and veneered with their respective layering ceramic. Evaluation for the Translucency (CR=Yb/Yw) over the White (Yw) and Black (Yb) backgrounds at the Incisal, Middle, Cervical, Mesial and Distal thirds of each crown were done using the Spectrophotometer. The results obtained were statistically analyzed by Paired t-test (pceramic system depends on the translucency needed for successful prosthesis of artificial tooth so that it mimics patient's natural dentition. The qualitative measurement of translucency will give the evidence for the clinicians during selection of high or low value translucent tooth for successful replacement. Lithium disilicate - Pressable IPS e.max Press is having better translucency in comparison with other two materials in our study.

  19. Ceramic gradient materials for components of internal combustion engines. Keramische Gradientenwerkstoffe fuer Komponenten in Verbrennungsmotoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henning, W.; Mielke, S. (Kolbenschmidt AG, Neckarsulm (Germany)); Melzer, C. (Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstoffkunde)

    1992-05-01

    Formed ceramic bodies with density gradients were attached to the pistons of Diesel engines for passenger cars by diecasting under pressure in order to reinforce the piston heads. With this hybrid design, the ceramic content gradually decreases with increasing distance from the piston head. An assessment of the potentials of this design in off-motor tests shows the technical benefits of this development. The termal fatigue strength could be increased, and the high ceramic content features a heat-insulating effect. The gradient design offers a number of advantages in comparison with conventional approaches to approve the thermal fatigue resistance (hard anodizing, spray-coating of ceramic coatings, solid ceramic inserts). (orig.).

  20. LS&T and CMS FY 2004 Feasibility Proposal 04-FS-006 - Ceramic Laser Materials Interim Report - June 8, 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soules, T; Clapsaddle, B; Schaffers, K; Landingham, R

    2005-02-03

    The purpose of this memo is to give an update on our work on ceramic laser materials--feasibility proposal 04-FS-006. Transparent ceramic materials have several major advantages over single crystals in laser applications including, ease and robustness of manufacturing, large apertures, design flexibility, fracture toughness, high activator concentrations, uniformity of composition, no residual stress, and others discussed in the proposal. After a decade of working on making transparent YAG:Nd in 1995 Japanese workers demonstrated samples for the first time that performed as well in lasers as their single crystal counterparts. Since then several laser materials have been made and evaluated. For these reasons, developing ceramic laser materials is the most exciting and futuristic materials topic in today's major solid-state laser conferences. The highlights and executive summary of our work to date are: (1) Ordered a slab of transparent YAG:Nd from Konoshima Chemical Co. for evaluation in the SSHCL. Konoshima is the only company in the world currently making ceramic laser materials for sale. Our slab, the largest one made to date, will arrive within a week and will be evaluated in the SSHCL. (2) Met with the inventor of the Konoshima laser ceramic, Dr. Takagimi Yanagitani, and discussed synthesis and performance of these materials in an all day session at LLNL on May 17. (3) Made our first LLNL in-house nano-sized yttrium aluminum garnet by the CMS sol-gel process. (4) Successfully sintering several samples of nano-particle YAG to near translucency. In this report we will discuss each of the above items and include where relevant pictures or tables or references. In addition to reporting interim results this memo will serve as a reference and a place to put relevant data from subsequent samples throughout the study.

  1. Carbon The Future Material for Advanced Technology Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Messina, Giacomo

    2006-01-01

    Carbon-based materials and their applications constitute a burgeoning topic of scientific research among scientists and engineers attracted from diverse areas such as applied physics, materials science, biology, mechanics, electronics and engineering. Further development of current materials, advances in their applications, and discovery of new forms of carbon are the themes addressed by the frontier research in these fields. This book covers all the fundamental topics concerned with amorphous and crystalline C-based materials, such as diamond, diamond-like carbon, carbon alloys, carbon nanotubes. The goal is, by coherently progressing from growth - and characterisation techniques to technological applications for each class of material, to fashion the first comprehensive state-of-the-art review of this fast evolving field of research in carbon materials.

  2. Designed amyloid fibers as materials for selective carbon dioxide capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Deng, Hexiang; Liu, Cong; Yaghi, Omar M; Eisenberg, David S

    2014-01-07

    New materials capable of binding carbon dioxide are essential for addressing climate change. Here, we demonstrate that amyloids, self-assembling protein fibers, are effective for selective carbon dioxide capture. Solid-state NMR proves that amyloid fibers containing alkylamine groups reversibly bind carbon dioxide via carbamate formation. Thermodynamic and kinetic capture-and-release tests show the carbamate formation rate is fast enough to capture carbon dioxide by dynamic separation, undiminished by the presence of water, in both a natural amyloid and designed amyloids having increased carbon dioxide capacity. Heating to 100 °C regenerates the material. These results demonstrate the potential of amyloid fibers for environmental carbon dioxide capture.

  3. Optimization of solid-state synthesis process of advanced ceramics materials: influence of mixing conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakri Adel

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect of mixing process on solid state reaction of solid oxide material mixture was studied. Lead piezoelectric ceramic specimens 0.5 Pb(Zn1/3,Sb2/3O3-0.5 Pb0.98La0.02(Zr0.48,Ti0.52O3 prepared by different mixing procedures, were conducted under different conditions such as order, combination and mixing time. The phase formation, composition nature, structural properties of powder mixture was analyzed by X-ray diffraction. The obtained results for different mixing processes make the solid state reaction method more selective, taking into consideration the attraction forces between the reactants and the electronegativity of oxide reactants.

  4. Growth and instability of charged dislocation loops under irradiation in ceramic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Ryazanov, A I; Kinoshita, C; Klaptsov, A V

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the physical mechanisms of the growth and stability of charged dislocation loops in ceramic materials with very strong different mass of atoms (stabilized cubic zirconia) under different energies and types of irradiation conditions: 100-1000 keV electrons, 100 keV He sup + and 300 keV O sup + ions. The anomalous formation of extended defect clusters (charged dislocation loops) has been observed by TEM under electron irradiation subsequent to ion irradiation. It is demonstrated that very strong strain field (contrast) near charged dislocation loops is formed. The dislocation loops grow up to a critical size and after then become unstable. The instability of the charged dislocation loop leads to the multiplication of dislocation loops and the formation of dislocation network near the charged dislocation loops. A theoretical model is suggested for the explanation of the growth and stability of the charged dislocation loop, taking the charge state of point defects. The calculated distribution...

  5. Combined static-dynamic compaction of metal powder and ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironovs, V.; Korjakins, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Barone, E.; Glushchenkov, V.

    2017-10-01

    Combined static-dynamic compaction of powder material presents advantages for achievement of a higher degree of powder compaction for in dry conditions. One of possible realizations is the use of pulsed electromagnetic compaction (MPC) applied in addition to the static pre-compaction carried out by a hydraulic press. Experimental MPC equipment was used for compaction powders of SiC and Al-B with W fibers at different stages of grinding. The degree of compaction was evaluated by shock plate’s displacement at different levels and regimes of dynamic loading. The paper demonstrates feasibility of the method for compaction of the selected ceramic and metal powders and presents some quantitative data for practices.

  6. Shear bond strength of four resin cements used to lute ceramic core material to human dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Subutayhan; Eldeniz, Ayçe Unverdi; Usumez, Aslihan

    2008-12-01

    This study evaluated the effect of four resin cements on the shear bond strength of a ceramic core material to dentin. One hundred twenty molar teeth were embedded in a self-curing acrylic resin. The occlusal third of the crowns were sectioned under water cooling. All specimens were randomly divided into four groups of 30 teeth each according to the resin cement used. One hundred twenty cylindrical-shaped, 2.7-mm wide, 3-mm high ceramic core materials were heat-pressed. The core cylinders were then luted with one of the four resin systems to dentin (Super-Bond C&B, Chemiace II, Variolink II, and Panavia F). Half of the specimens (n = 15) were tested after 24 hours; the other half (n = 15) were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 1 day and then thermocycled 1000 times between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C prior to testing. Shear bond strength of each specimen was measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The bond strength values were calculated in MPa, and the results were statistically analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD tests. The shear bond strength varied significantly depending on the resin cement used (p strengths after thermocycling were not remarkable as compared with the corresponding prethermal cycling groups (p > 0.05). Significant interactions were present between resin cement and thermocycling (p strength, whereas the specimens luted with Chemiace II (1.6 +/- 0.4 MPa) showed the lowest. After thermocycling, the bond strength values of specimens luted with Chemiace II (1.1 +/- 0.1 MPa) and Super-Bond C&B (1.7 +/- 0.4 MPa) decreased; however, this was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The increase in the shear bond strength values in the Panavia F (4.5 +/- 0.7 MPa) and Variolink II (5.5 +/- 2.1 MPa) groups after thermocycling was also not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Variolink II and Panavia F systems showed higher shear bond strength values than Chemiace II and

  7. Marginal integrity of partial ceramic crowns within dentin with different luting techniques and materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenke, Frederike; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Schmalz, Gottfried; Federlin, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the marginal integrity of partial ceramic crowns (PCCs) luted with or without a resin-coating and compared the results with the marginal sealing of a recently introduced self-adhesive universal resin cement. PCC preparations were performed on 84 extracted human molars, with proximal margins placed 1 mm below the cemento-enamel junction. The PCCs were fabricated from Vita Mark II ceramic (Vita) using the Cerec-3 Unit (Sirona). The prepared teeth were assigned to three groups: (1) conventional luting technique (n=36), (2) resin-coating luting technique (n=36) or (3) recently introduced self-adhesive universal resin cement (n=12). Within these three groups, the following materials were applied: (1) Excite/Variolink II (EVC), ED-Primer/Panavia-F2.0 (PAC), Syntac Classic/ Variolink II (SYC); (2) Excite/Variolink II with Excite/Tetric Flow resin-coating (EVR), ED-Primer/Panavia-F2.0 with Clearfil SE-Bond/ Protect-Liner F resin-coating (PAR), Excite/ Variolink II with Syntac Classic/Tetric Flow resin-coating (SYR); (3) RelyX Unicem (REX). After thermocycling and mechanical loading (TC: 5000 cycles at 5 degrees C/55 degrees C; 30 seconds/cycle; ML:500000 cycles at 72.5 N, 1.6 Hz), microleakage was assessed by evaluating silver staining (%) on multiple tooth sections. Ceramic/composite-, resin-coating/composite- (where applicable) and dentin/composite-interfaces were evaluated separately. The data were statistically analyzed with the Mann-Whitney-U-test and the Error Rates Method. In Groups 1 and 2, the evaluation of microleakage at dentin showed better marginal integrity when the resin-coating technique was applied (EVR, PAR, SYR: 18-53%) than within the conventional luting technique group (EVC, PAC, SYC: 58-67%). However, the lowest microleakage values were found for RelyX Unicem (REX: 15%). In conclusion, resin-coating may improve the marginal sealing within dentin, depending on the materials used. Luting with a self-adhesive universal resin

  8. Fine structure analysis of biocompatible ceramic materials based hydroxyapatite and metallic biomaterials 316L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anghelina, F.V.; Ungureanu, D.N.; Bratu, V. [Faculty of Materials Engineering and Mechanics, Valahia University of Targoviste, 18-24 Unirii Bd., 130082 (Romania); Popescu, I.N., E-mail: pinicoleta24@yahoo.com [Faculty of Materials Engineering and Mechanics, Valahia University of Targoviste, 18-24 Unirii Bd., 130082 (Romania); Rusanescu, C.O. [Politehnica University, 060042 Bucharest (Romania)

    2013-11-15

    The aim of this paper was to obtain and characterize (surface morphology and fine structure) two types of materials: Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2} hydroxyapatite powder (HAp) as biocompatible ceramic materials and AISI 316L austenitic stainless steels as metallic biomaterials, which are the components of the metal–ceramic composites used for medical implants in reconstructive surgery and prosthetic treatment. The HAp was synthesized by coprecipitation method, heat treated at 200 °C, 800 °C and 1200 °C for 4 h, analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The stainless steel 316L type was made by casting, annealing and machined with a low speed (100 mm/s) in order to obtain a smooth surface and after that has been studied from residual stresses point of view in three polishing regimes conditions: at low speed polishing (150 rpm), at high speed polishing (1500 rpm) and high speed-vibration contact polishing (1500 rpm) using wide angle X-ray diffractions (WAXD). The chemical compositions of AISI 316 steel samples were measured using a Foundry Master Spectrometer equipped with CCD detector for spectral lines and the sparking spots of AISI 316L samples were analyzed using SEM. By XRD the phases of HAp powders have been identified and also the degree of crystallinity and average size of crystallites, and with SEM, we studied the morphology of the HAp. It has been found from XRD analysis that we obtained HAp with a high degree of crystallinity at 800 °C and 1200 °C, no presence of impurity and from SEM analysis we noticed the influence of heat treatment on the ceramic particles morphology. From the study of residual stress profiles of 316L samples were observed that it differs substantially for different machining regimes and from the SEM analysis of sparking spots we revealed the rough surfaces of stainless steel rods necessary for a better adhesion of HAp on it.

  9. Electromagnetic characteristics of carbon nanotube film materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wei

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotube (CNT possesses remarkable electrical conductivity, which shows great potential for the application as electromagnetic shielding material. This paper aims to characterize the electromagnetic parameters of a high CNT loading film by using waveguide method. The effects of layer number of CNT laminate, CNT alignment and resin impregnation on the electromagnetic characteristics were analyzed. It is shown that CNT film exhibits anisotropic electromagnetic characteristic. Pristine CNT film shows higher real part of complex permittivity, conductivity and shielding effectiveness when the polarized direction of incident wave is perpendicular to the winding direction of CNT film. For the CNT film laminates, complex permittivity increases with increasing layer number, and correspondingly, shielding effectiveness decreases. The five-layer CNT film shows extraordinary shielding performance with shielding effectiveness ranging from 67 dB to 78 dB in X-band. Stretching process induces the alignment of CNTs. When aligned direction of CNTs is parallel to the electric field, CNT film shows negative permittivity and higher conductivity. Moreover, resin impregnation into CNT film leads to the decrease of conductivity and shielding effectiveness. This research will contribute to the structural design for the application of CNT film as electromagnetic shielding materials.

  10. Heteroatom-Doped Carbon Materials for Electrocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asefa, Tewodros; Huang, Xiaoxi

    2017-08-10

    Fuel cells, water electrolyzers, and metal-air batteries are important energy systems that have started to play some roles in our renewable energy landscapes. However, despite much research works carried out on them, they have not yet found large-scale applications, mainly due to the unavailability of sustainable catalysts that can catalyze the reactions employed in them. Currently, noble metal-based materials are the ones that are commonly used as catalysts in most commercial fuel cells, electrolyzers, and metal-air batteries. Hence, there has been considerable research efforts worldwide to find alternative noble metal-free and metal-free catalysts composed of inexpensive, earth-abundant elements for use in the catalytic reactions employed in these energy systems. In this concept paper, a brief introduction on catalysis in renewable energy systems, followed by the recent efforts to develop sustainable, heteroatom-doped carbon and non-noble metal-based electrocatalysts, the challenges to unravel their structure-catalytic activity relationships, and the authors' perspectives on these topics and materials, are discussed. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Ceramic-Based 4D Components: Additive Manufacturing (AM of Ceramic-Based Functionally Graded Materials (FGM by Thermoplastic 3D Printing (T3DP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Scheithauer

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In our study, we investigated the additive manufacturing (AM of ceramic-based functionally graded materials (FGM by the direct AM technology thermoplastic 3D printing (T3DP. Zirconia components with varying microstructures were additively manufactured by using thermoplastic suspensions with different contents of pore-forming agents (PFA, which were co-sintered defect-free. Different materials were investigated concerning their suitability as PFA for the T3DP process. Diverse zirconia-based suspensions were prepared and used for the AM of single- and multi-material test components. All of the samples were sintered defect-free, and in the end, we could realize a brick wall-like component consisting of dense (<1% porosity and porous (approx. 5% porosity zirconia areas to combine different properties in one component. T3DP opens the door to the AM of further ceramic-based 4D components, such as multi-color, multi-material, or especially, multi-functional components.

  12. Ceramic-Based 4D Components: Additive Manufacturing (AM) of Ceramic-Based Functionally Graded Materials (FGM) by Thermoplastic 3D Printing (T3DP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheithauer, Uwe; Weingarten, Steven; Johne, Robert; Schwarzer, Eric; Abel, Johannes; Richter, Hans-Jürgen; Moritz, Tassilo; Michaelis, Alexander

    2017-11-28

    In our study, we investigated the additive manufacturing (AM) of ceramic-based functionally graded materials (FGM) by the direct AM technology thermoplastic 3D printing (T3DP). Zirconia components with varying microstructures were additively manufactured by using thermoplastic suspensions with different contents of pore-forming agents (PFA), which were co-sintered defect-free. Different materials were investigated concerning their suitability as PFA for the T3DP process. Diverse zirconia-based suspensions were prepared and used for the AM of single- and multi-material test components. All of the samples were sintered defect-free, and in the end, we could realize a brick wall-like component consisting of dense (<1% porosity) and porous (approx. 5% porosity) zirconia areas to combine different properties in one component. T3DP opens the door to the AM of further ceramic-based 4D components, such as multi-color, multi-material, or especially, multi-functional components.

  13. The diametral tensile strength and hydrostability of polymer-ceramic nano-composite (pcnc) material prototypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yepez, Johanna

    Statement of the problem: There is a weak connection between the filler and the resin matrix of dental composites caused primarily by hydrolysis of silane coupling agent, therefore, jeopardizing the mechanical properties of the dental restorations. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the diametral tensile strength (DTS) of a nano-mechanically bonded polymer ceramic nano composite (pcnc) versus the chemically bonding prototype polymer ceramic nano composite (pcnc) fabricated by using hydrolytically stable interphase. Materials and Methods: Composites were made with 60wt % filler, 38% triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEDGMA), 1% camphorquinone (CQ) and 1% 2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA). Tests for DTS were performed using a universal testing machine. The disk-shaped specimens were loaded in compression between two supporting plates at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture. The samples, measuring 3 mm in height and 6 mm in diameter, were produced in a round stainless steel (SS) mold. A total of 144 samples were created. Groups of 48 samples were made for each of three different fillers. Specimens were soaked in artificial saliva at 37° for four time periods, dry(t=0), 1 day, 7 days, 28 days). At the end of each soaking time DTS tests were performed. Results: There where statistically significant differences in the DTS between the filler groups and the soaking times (p=matrix composition and bonding interphase of resin base composites promise improvements of mechanical properties, decreasing the incidence of clinical failure of posterior composite restorations, hence resulting in a more ideal restorative material for use in posterior segment. The results of this investigation showed that the deficiency of hydrostability in dental composites is a detrimental factor in the mechanical behavior. The silanation of the filler particles have a positive influence on the mechanical properties of dental composites but the hydrolysis of the

  14. Contact resistance of ceramic interfaces between materials used for solid oxide fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, S.

    2002-01-01

    The contact resistance can be divided into two main contributions. The small area of contact between ceramic components results in resistance due to current constriction. Resistive phases or potential barriers at the interface result in an interface contribution to the contact resistance, which may be smaller or larger than the constriction resistance. The contact resistance between pairs of three different materials were analysed (strontium doped lanthanum manganite, yttria stabilised zirconia and strontium and nickel doped lanthanum cobaltite), and the effects of temperature, atmosphere, polarisation and mechanical load on the contact resistance were investigated. The investigations revealed that the mechanical load of a ceramic contact has a high influence on the contact resistance, and generally power law dependence between the contact resistance and the mechanical load was found. The influence of the mechanical load on the contact resistance was ascribed to an area effect. The contact resistance of the investigated materials was dominated by current constriction at high temperatures. The measured contact resistance was comparable to the resistance calculated on basis of the contact areas found by optical and electron microscopy. At low temperatures, the interface contribution to the contact resistance was dominating. The cobaltite interface could be described by one potential barrier at the contact interface, whereas the manganite interfaces required several consecutive potential barriers to model the observed behaviour. The current-voltage behaviour of the YSZ contact interfaces was only weakly non-linear, and could be described by 22{+-}1 barriers in series. Contact interfaces with sinterable contact layers were also investigated, and the measured contact resistance for these interfaces were more than 10 times less than for the other interfaces. (au)

  15. Evaluation of adhesive bonding of lithium disilicate ceramic material with duel cured resin luting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambade, Dipti Pravin; Gundawar, Sham M; Radke, Usha M

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this vitro study was to comparatively evaluate the adhesive bonding of dual cured resin luting agents with lithium disilicate ceramic material. Porcelain laminate veneers were prepared with lithium disilicate ceramic material i.e. IPS Empress II( E-Max Press). These laminates were bonded with RelyX ARC, Panavia F 2.0, Variolink II, Duolink and Nexus NX3.The porcelain laminates were etched with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid (Pulpdent Corporation) for one minute, washed for 15 sec with three way syringe and dried for 15 sec with air syringe. The silane (Ultradent) was applied with the help of applicator tip in a single coat and kept undisturbed for one minute. The prepared surfaces of the premolars were treated with 37% phosphoric acid (Prime dent) for 15 sec, thoroughly rinsed and dried as per manufactures instructions. The shear bond test was carried out on all samples with the Universal testing machine (Instron U.S.A.) The scanning electron microscopic study was performed at the fractured interface of representative samples from each group of luting agents. In this study, the highest value of shear bond strength was obtained for NEXUS NX3 and the lowest for VARIOLINK II. The difference in bond strength can be interpreted as the difference in fracture resistance of luting agents, to which shearing load was applied during the shear bond strength test. It is inferred from this study that the composition of the luting agent determines the adhesive characteristics in addition to surface treatment and bonding surface area.

  16. The compatibility of SiC/SiC composites with ceramic breeder materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sample, T. (Institute for Advanced Materials, Commission of the European Communities, Joint Research Centre, I-21020, Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy)); Fenici, P. (Institute for Advanced Materials, Commission of the European Communities, Joint Research Centre, I-21020, Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy)); Kolbe, H. (Institute for Advanced Materials, Commission of the European Communities, Joint Research Centre, I-21020, Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy)); Orecchia, L. (Institute for Advanced Materials, Commission of the European Communities, Joint Research Centre, I-21020, Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy))

    1994-09-01

    The compatibility of three lithium-containing ceramic breeder materials Li[sub 4]SiO[sub 4], Li[sub 2]ZrO[sub 3] and LiAlO[sub 2] with two industrially available SiC/SiC composites was determined. Simple capsule tests were carried out at 600 and 800 C in closed capsules, dynamic vacuum and flowing helium. All three breeder materials were reactive towards the SiO[sub 2] content of the SiC/SiC composites forming a surface layer of Li[sub 2]SiO[sub 3]. The as-received' Li[sub 4]SiO[sub 4] was found to be much more reactive than Li[sub 2]ZrO[sub 3] or LiAlO[sub 2]. However, the greater reactivity was found to be governed by the Li[sub 2]CO[sub 3] impurity content of the Li[sub 4]SiO[sub 4] granules. Removal of the Li[sub 2]CO[sub 3], through thermal decomposition under vacuum, reduced the extend of Li[sub 2]SiO[sub 3] formation. The reaction of the breeder materials to form Li[sub 2]SiO[sub 3] is briefly discussed in relation to the probable operating conditions for a SiC/SiC composite structural material in a blanket. ((orig.))

  17. Metals and Ceramics Division Materials Sciences Program: Annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stiegler, J.O. (comp.)

    1988-04-01

    The program is directed at uncovering principles for the scientific design of materials. The efforts emphasize three classes of materials: high-temperature metallic alloys based on intermetallic compounds, structural ceramics, and radiation-resistant alloys. The first two materials are central to the theme of the High Temperature Materials Laboratory, and the third supports the Laboratory's mission in fission and fusion reactor technology. We combine the use of unique structural characterization facilities, the activities of the Theory Group, and accurate property determination to establish structure-property relationships. An important aspect of the program is the interaction with universities, industry, and other laboratories. Two collaborative research centers established to aid these interactions are SHaRe and ORSOAR, which make our strong structural characterization capabilities available to researchers outside ORNL. Their research activities and capabilities are summarized in Chap. 1, ''Structural Characterization,'' and Chap. 6, ''Collaborative Research Centers.'' Other interactions with the scientific community are summarized in the Appendixes.

  18. Carbon Cryogel Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. 10 One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nano-foams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. 1-4,9 Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  19. Science and Technology of Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Science and Technology of Ceramics. 2. Functional Ceramics. Sheela Ramasesha. In Part 11 we saw that ceramics could be broadly classified as traditional and advanced ceramics. Traditional ceramics are those made from naturally occurring materials like clays and minerals without requiring much refinement. In this part ...

  20. Engineering ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Bengisu, Murat

    2001-01-01

    This is a comprehensive book applying especially to junior and senior engineering students pursuing Materials Science/ Engineering, Ceramic Engineering and Mechanical Engineering degrees. It is also a reference book for other disciplines such as Chemical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering and Environmental Engineering. Important properties of most engineering ceramics are given in detailed tables. Many current and possible applications of engineering ceramics are described, which can be used as a guide for materials selection and for potential future research. While covering all relevant information regarding raw materials, processing properties, characterization and applications of engineering ceramics, the book also summarizes most recent innovations and developments in this field as a result of extensive literature search.

  1. Survival of ceramic veneers made of different materials after a minimum follow-up period of five years: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petridis, Haralampos P; Zekeridou, Alkisti; Malliari, Maria; Tortopidis, Dimitrios; Koidis, Petros

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to compare the survival and complication rates of ceramic veneers produced with different techniques and materials after a minimum follow-up time of 5 years. A literature search was conducted, using electronic databases, relevant references, citations and journal researching, for clinical studies reporting on the survival of ceramic veneers fabricated with different techniques and materials with a mean followup time of at least 5 years. The search period spanned from January 1980 up to October 2010. Event rates were calculated for the following complications associated with ceramic veneers: fracture, debonding, marginal discoloration, marginal integrity, and caries. Summary estimates, and 5-year event rates were reported. Comparison between subgroups of different materials, as well as statistical significance, was calculated using a mixed effects model. Nine studies were selected for final analysis over an initial yield of 409 titles. No study directly compared the incidence of complications between ceramic veneers fabricated from different materials. Four of the included studies reported on the survival of ceramic veneers made out of feldspathic ceramics; four studies were on glass-ceramic veneers and one study included veneers fabricated from both materials. The mean observation time ranged between 5 and 10 years. Overall, the 5-year complication rates were low, with the exception of studies reporting on extended ceramic veneers. The most frequent complication reported was marginal discoloration (9% at 5 years), followed by marginal integrity (3.9-7.7% at 5 years). There was no statistically significant difference in the event rates between the subgroups of different materials (feldspathic vs. glass-ceramic). The results of this systematic review showed that ceramic veneers fabricated from feldspathic or glass-ceramics have an adequate clinical survival for at least 5 years of clinical service, with very low complication

  2. Development of Sesquioxide Ceramic for High Energy Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-25

    Ceramic Matrix Composites , Ceramics ...important. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Laser Materials Processing, Ceramic Matrix Composites , Ceramics 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF... ceramic processing, optimizing the processing requires time and resources. Once the fabrication process is established, composition adjustment

  3. COMPARISON OF BIOACTIVITY IN VITRO OF GLASS AND GLASS CERAMIC MATERIALS DURING SOAKING IN SBF AND DMEM MEDIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GABRIELA LUTIŠANOVÁ

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the surface reactivity of two sets of glasses and glass ceramic materials belonging to the Li2O–SiO2–CaO–P2O5–CaF2 system. The in vitro bioactivity of coatings was evaluated using simulated body fluid (SBF and Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium (DMEM soaking test in static regime for up to 28 days at 36.5°C in microincubator. The surface structure changes were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA methods. The functional groups of the silicate and phosphates were identified by infrared spectroscopy (IR. The crystal phases of the glasses and glass ceramics were identified by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD. The results suggest the bioactivity behavior for all compositions of glasses as well as glass ceramic samples after 28 days in the SBF and DMEM medium. The surface characterization and in vitro tests revealed a few variations in the reactivity of the different glasses and glass ceramic samples in their pristine form. The best results show the samples of glass and glass ceramic samples with higher content of fluorapatite (FA. The use of the acellular culture medium DMEM resulted in a delay at the start of precipitation.

  4. Investigation of Effects of Material Architecture on the Elastic Response of a Woven Ceramic Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Bonacuse, Peter J.; Mital, Subodh K.

    2012-01-01

    To develop methods for quantifying the effects of the microstructural variations of woven ceramic matrix composites on the effective properties and response of the material, a research program has been undertaken which is described in this paper. In order to characterize and quantify the variations in the microstructure of a five harness satin weave, CVI SiC/SiC, composite material, specimens were serially sectioned and polished to capture images that detailed the fiber tows, matrix, and porosity. Open source quantitative image analysis tools were then used to isolate the constituents and collect relevant statistics such as within ply tow spacing. This information was then used to build two dimensional finite element models that approximated the observed section geometry. With the aid of geometrical models generated by the microstructural characterization process, finite element models were generated and analyses were performed to quantify the effects of the microstructure and its variation on the effective stiffness and areas of stress concentration of the material. The results indicated that the geometry and distribution of the porosity appear to have significant effects on the through-thickness modulus. Similarly, stress concentrations on the outer surface of the composite appear to correlate to regions where the transverse tows are separated by a critical amount.

  5. Survey of materials selection for ceramic fuel cells: 1. Electolytes and bi-polar plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, B.C.H. [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials

    1996-10-01

    By assigning target values (0.15{Omega} cm{sup 2}) for the area specific resistance of the individual components in a single SOFC cell it is possible to identify three operating temperature regimes: 500-700{sup o}C; 700-900{sup o}C; 900-1000{sup o}C; for SOFC stacks. These are determined by the relevant properties of the bi-polar plate (interconnect) material, and the appropriate ionic conductivity values for the ceramic electrolyte. Particular attention is given to the level of electronic conductivity in CeO{sub 2} based eelctrolytes, and to the width of the ionic domain in La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 2.85} materials. It is emphasised that SrO and CaO doped LaCrO{sub 3} bi-polar plate materials are not expected to be stable in the CO{sub 2} partial pressure prevailing at 85% fuel conversion levels. Moreover these compositions exhibit dimensional instabilities in the oxygen partial pressure gradients experienced in SOFC stacks. Problems have also been encountered with metallic alloy bi-polar plates due to the high vapour pressures of chromium containing gaseous species. It follows that there is increasing interest in operating SOFC stacks at intermediate temperatures (500-700{sup o}C) using ferritic stainless steel bi-polar plates. (author)

  6. The effects of hydrochloric acid on all-ceramic restorative materials: an in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harryparsad, A; Dullabh, H; Sykes, L; Herbst, D

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this in-vitro study was to assess the long-term effects of hydrochloric acid on the surface roughness of three all-ceramic restorative materials CEREC VITABLOC Mark II CAD, IPS Empress CAD and IPS e.max CAD. Six cylindrical specimens (10mm diameter, 3mm height) of each material type were prepared, using the CEREC CAD/CAM machine. The unpolished samples were immersed in 15ml hydrochloric acid (pH 2) at 37 degrees C. Before immersion (baseline) and at periods of 7.5 hours, 45 hours and 91 hours, the specimens were removed from the acid and two randomised areas (10 microm X 10 microm) were selected and tested on each. The atomic force microscope (Bruker Dimension icon) was used to assess surface roughness and surface area at baseline and after each exposure time. The materials were compared over time with respect to surface roughness and surface area (baseline, 1 month, 6 months, 1 year) in a repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Sample groups differed significantly for roughness (p hydrochloric acid.

  7. Composite material consisting of microporous β-TCP ceramic and alginate for delayed release of antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidenstuecker, Michael; Ruehe, Juergen; Suedkamp, Norbert P; Serr, Annerose; Wittmer, Annette; Bohner, Marc; Bernstein, Anke; Mayr, Hermann O

    2017-03-15

    The aim of this study was to produce a novel composite of microporous β-TCP filled with alginate and Vancomycin (VAN) to prolong the release behavior of the antibiotic for up to 28days. Using the flow chamber developed by the group, porous ceramics in a directional flow were filled with alginates of different composition containing 50mg/mL of antibiotics. After cross-linking the alginate with calcium ions, incubation took place in 10mL double-distilled water for 4weeks at 37°C. At defined times (1, 2, 3, 6, 9, 14, 20 and 28days), the liquid was completely exchanged and analyzed by capillary zone electrophoresis and microtiter trials. For statistical purposes, the mean and standard deviation were calculated and analyzed by ANOVA. The release of VAN from alginate was carried out via an external calcium source over the entire period with concentrations above the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC). The burst release measured 35.2±1.5%. The release of VAN from alginate with an internal calcium source could only be observed over 14days. The burst release here was 61.9±4.3%. The native alginate's burst release was 54.1±7.8%; that of the sterile alginate 40.5±6.4%. The microtiter experiments revealed efficacy over the entire study period for VAN. The MIC value was determined in the release experiments as well in a range of 0.5-2.0μg/mL against Staphylococcus aureus. Drug release systems based on β-TCP and hydrogels are well documented in literature. However, in all described systems the ceramic, as granule or powder, is inserted into a hydrogel. In our work, we do the opposite, a hydrogel which acts as reservoir for antibiotics is placed into a porous biodegradable ceramic. Eventually, this system should be applied as treatment of bone infections. Contrary to the "granule in hydrogel" composites it has the advantage of mechanical stability. Thus, it can take over functions of the bone during the healing process. For a quicker translation from our scientific

  8. Determination of the raw material source used in the production of ceramics of the Hatahara archaeological site, AM, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunes, Kelly P.; Munita, Casimiro S.; Oliveira, Paulo T.M.S., E-mail: kquimica@usp.b, E-mail: camunita@ipen.b, E-mail: poliver@usp.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Neves, Eduardo G.; Kazuo, Eduardo T., E-mail: edgneves@usp.b, E-mail: eduardo.tamanaha@gmail.co [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Museu de Arqueologia e Etnologia; Soares, Emilio A.A., E-mail: easoares@usp.b [Universidade Federal do Amazonas (UFAM), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Dept. de Geociencias

    2009-07-01

    The archaeological interventions carried out at the Hatahara archaeological site, located in the central Amazonia, showed the presence of a great amount of ceramic artifacts in this region. As a consequence, several works have been conducted with this archaeological material, searching clear questions on how the ancient societies produced such objects, as well as, the use they did of the environment where they were inserted. Considering that the analysis of the ceramic material showed the simultaneous occurrence of four distinct phases of occupation in the Hatahara site, which, in relation to its pre-colonial composition is as an integral part of a quite complex context, the present work had the purpose of helping the Archaeologists to understand better the development of the societies that occupied this region, with basis on the study of the archaeological ceramics provenance. For this, the chemical characterization was done, with application of the analytical technique by neutron activation analysis (NAA); the elementary concentrations of As, Ba, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Na, Nd, Rb, Sb, Sc, Ta, Tb, Th, U, Yb and Zn were determined in 127 ceramic fragments and in 7 samples of clay, collected next to the Hatahara archaeological site. The data of elementary concentrations were submitted to the multivariate statistical analysis, the techniques of cluster analysis and discriminant analysis. The results showed that a single type of clay was used in the manufacture of a group of 25 ceramic fragments, belonging to the phases Paredao, Manacapuru and Guarita. These results have been added to the archaeological interpretations with regard to the classification of the rescued ceramics fragments, in order to complement them. Therefore, this work supplied some pertinent clarifications that certainly will give support to the reconstruction of human path in the Hatahara archaeological site. (author)

  9. Ceramic Membrane combined with Powdered Activated Carbon (PAC) or Coagulation for Treatment of Impaired Quality Waters

    KAUST Repository

    Hamad, Juma Z.

    2013-08-29

    Ceramic membranes (CM) are robust membranes attributed with high production, long life span and stability against critical conditions. While capital costs are high, these are partially offset by lower operation and maintenance costs compared to polymeric membranes. Like any other low-pressure membrane (LPM), CM faces problems of fouling, low removal of organic matter and poor removal of trace organic compounds (TOrCs). Current pretreatment approaches that are mainly based on coagulation and adsorption can remove some organic matter but with a low removal of the biopolymers component which is responsible for fouling. Powdered activated carbon (PAC) accompanied with a LPM maintains good removal of TOrCs. However, enhanced removal of TOrCs to higher level is required. Submicron powdered activated carbon (SPAC), obtained after crushing commercial activated carbon into very fine particle, and novel activated carbon (KCU 6) which is characterized with larger pores and high surface area were employed. A pre-coating approach, which provides intimated contact between PAC and contaminants, was adopted for wastewater and (high DOC) surface water treatment. For seawater, in-line coagulation with iron III chloride was adopted. Both SPAC and KCU 6 showed good removal of biopolymers at a dose of 30 mg/L with > 85 % and 90 %, respectively. A dose of 40 mg/L of SPAC and 30 mg/L KCU 6 pre-coats were successful used in controlling membrane fouling. SPAC is suggested to remove biopolymers by physical means and adsorption while KCU 6 removed biopolymers through adsorption. Both KCU 6 and SPAC attained high removal of TOrCs whereas KCU 6 showed outstanding performance. Out of 29 TOrCs investigated, KCU 6 showed > 87 % TOrCs rejection for 28 compounds. In seawater pretreatment, transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) were found to be an important foulant. TEP promoted both reversible and irreversible fouling. TEP are highly electronegative while alumina CM is positively charged which

  10. Surface-functionalized mesoporous carbon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Sheng; Gorka, Joanna; Mayes, Richard T.

    2016-02-02

    A functionalized mesoporous carbon composition comprising a mesoporous carbon scaffold having mesopores in which polyvinyl polymer grafts are covalently attached, wherein said mesopores have a size of at least 2 nm and up to 50 nm. Also described is a method for producing the functionalized mesoporous composition, wherein a reaction medium comprising a precursor mesoporous carbon, vinyl monomer, initiator, and solvent is subjected to sonication of sufficient power to result in grafting and polymerization of the vinyl monomer into mesopores of the precursor mesoporous carbon. Also described are methods for using the functionalized mesoporous carbon, particularly in extracting metal ions from metal-containing solutions.

  11. Preparation of different carbon materials by thermochemical conversion of Lignin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juana Maria Rosas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lignin valorization plays a crucial role within the modern biorefinery scheme from both the economic and environmental points of view; and the structure and composition of lignin becomes it an ideal precursor for the preparation of advanced carbon materials with high added-value. This review provides an overview of the different carbonaceous materials obtained by thermochemical conversion of lignin, such as activated carbons, carbon fibers, template carbons; high ordered carbons; giving information about the new strategies in terms of the preparation method and their possible applications.

  12. Preparation of different carbon materials by thermochemical conversion of Lignin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Juana; Berenguer, Raul; Valero-Romero, Maria; Rodriguez-Mirasol, Jose; Cordero, Tomás

    2014-12-01

    Lignin valorization plays a crucial role within the modern biorefinery scheme from both the economic and environmental points of view; and the structure and composition of lignin becomes it an ideal precursor for the preparation of advanced carbon materials with high added-value. This review provides an overview of the different carbonaceous materials obtained by thermochemical conversion of lignin, such as activated carbons, carbon fibers, template carbons; high ordered carbons; giving information about the new strategies in terms of the preparation method and their possible applications.

  13. Catalytic processing of coal and biomass to carbon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, B.N.; Shchipko, M.L.; Golovin, Y.G.; Ugay, M.Y. [Krasnoyarsk State University, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation). Inst. of Chemistry of Natural Organic Materials

    1996-12-31

    The synthesis of carbon materials is rather new and promising field of a catalyst application. The high potentialities of catalytic processes in the carbon materials production are connected with the catalyst ability to regulate the structure and some properties of carbon products, to increase the process affectivity and ecological safety. The new catalytic methods, developed by authors for the producing of different types of carbon products from coal and biomass raw materials, are described in the present paper. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Low cost silicon-on-ceramic photovoltaic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepke, B. G.; Heaps, J. D.; Grung, B. L.; Zook, J. D.; Sibold, J. D.; Leipold, M. H.

    1980-01-01

    A technique has been developed for coating low-cost mullite-based refractory substrates with thin layers of solar cell quality silicon. The technique involves first carbonizing one surface of the ceramic and then contacting it with molten silicon. The silicon wets the carbonized surface and, under the proper thermal conditions, solidifies as a large-grained sheet. Solar cells produced from this composite silicon-on-ceramic material have exhibited total area conversion efficiencies of ten percent.

  15. Validation of new ceramic materials from tungsten mining wastes. Mechanical properties; Validacion de nuevos materiales ceramicos a partir de rocas de desecho de mineria. Propiedades mecanicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran Suarez, J. A.; Montoya Herrera, J.; Silva, A. P.; Peralbo Cano, R.; Castro-Gomes, J. P.

    2014-07-01

    New ceramic materials obtained from tungsten mining wastes, from region of Beira Interior in Portugal, with no commercial use, responsible for landscape and environmental problems are presented. These preshaped new ceramic products, prepared in a wide thermal range (800 degree centigrade to 1300 degree centigrade) was evaluated by mechanical test, but also was characterized the starting raw materials: tungsten wastes mining and industrial kaolin. Results, which also include a mineralogical characterization of ceramic products and morphologic evaluation of neoformed by scanning electron microscopy, show firstly, the feasibility of converting a large number of these wastes in marketable ceramics. Thanks to the experimentation carried out, the ability to generate ceramic materials is emphasized, without the presence of mineral clay, due to the particular composition of these waste of mining with content of acid, neutral and basic oxides. (Author)

  16. Development of new ceramic materials from the waste of serpentinite and red clay; Desenvolvimento de novos materiais ceramicos a partir de residuo de serpentinito e argila vermelha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Presotto, P., E-mail: petula.presotto@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Mymrine, V. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UFTPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this work is to develop new ceramic materials using serpentine and glass waste and clay red. The raw materials were characterized through morphological, granulometric, mineralogical and chemical analysis. Six formulations have been developed based on the serpentine and red clay, which three of the six compositions have been adjusted with the addition of residual glass. The ceramic bodies were formed by uniaxial pressing and subjected to burn in an electric oven at temperatures of 1100 ° C, 1200 ° C, 1250 ° C and 1300 ° C. The ceramic samples obtained this way were characterized according to their physical properties (specific mass and linear retraction) and the mechanical (three points bending strength). The final properties varied according to the proportions of raw materials and firing temperature. In general, the different formulations fit the standards for traditional ceramics such as tiles and ceramic blocks. (author)

  17. Effect of two connector designs on the fracture resistance of all-ceramic core materials for fixed dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plengsombut, Kwansiri; Brewer, Jane D; Monaco, Edward A; Davis, Elaine L

    2009-03-01

    Most all-ceramic fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) fail at the connectors. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of 2 connector designs on the fracture resistance of core materials used for all-ceramic FDPs. Three materials were tested: (1) heat-pressed lithium disilicate glass ceramic (IPS e.max Press (Press)), (2) milled lithium disilicate glass ceramic (IPS e.max CAD (CAD)), and (3) milled yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (Y-TZP) (IPS e.max ZirCAD (ZirCAD)). Specimens were made into 30 x 4 x 4-mm bars to represent 3-unit FDPs. Two connector designs, round (0.60 +/-0.01-mm radius of curvature) and sharp (0.06 +/-0.001-mm radius of curvature), with a 3.00 +/-0.05-mm cross-section for each connector, were studied (n=5). Each specimen was loaded to fracture in a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.1 mm/min. Data were analyzed with a 2-way univariate ANOVA and Tukey HSD test (alpha=.05). Mean (SD) failure loads for round connector designs were 684.2 (70.1) N for ZirCAD, 260 (7.8) N for CAD, and 172.9 (35.5) N for Press. Mean (SD) failure loads for sharp connector designs were 386.3 (51.5) N for ZirCAD, 87.9 (7.0) N for CAD, and 125.1 (15.1) N for Press. The 2-way univariate ANOVA indicated statistically significant differences (Pmaterial and connector design, and, also, a significant interaction between material and connector design. Higher maximum failure loads were found for the round connector design when compared to the sharp connector design, for ZirCAD and CAD. However, this difference was not statistically significant for the Press groups. SEM subjective assessment of the fractured specimens revealed that the fracture initiated from the gingival surface (tensile) of the connector toward the pontic (central loading point). Fracture resistance of ceramic core materials is affected by fabrication technique and connector design. Connector design affected fracture resistance of the milled ceramic, but not the

  18. Comparison of two modified coal ash ferric-carbon micro-electrolysis ceramic media for pretreatment of tetracycline wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kunlun; Jin, Yang; Yue, Qinyan; Zhao, Pin; Gao, Yuan; Wu, Suqing; Gao, Baoyu

    2017-05-01

    Application of modified sintering ferric-carbon ceramics (SFC) and sintering-free ferric-carbon ceramics (SFFC) based on coal ash and scrap iron for pretreatment of tetracycline (TET) wastewater was investigated in this article. Physical property, morphological character, toxic metal leaching content, and crystal component were studied to explore the application possibility of novel ceramics in micro-electrolysis reactors. The influences of operating conditions including influent pH, hydraulic retention time (HRT), and air-water ratio (A/W) on the removal of tetracycline were studied. The results showed that SFC and SFFC were suitable for application in micro-electrolysis reactors. The optimum conditions of SFC reactor were pH of 3, HRT of 7 h, and A/W of 10. For SFFC reactor, the optimum conditions were pH of 2, HRT of 7 h, and A/W of 15. In general, the TET removal efficiency of SFC reactor was better than that of SFFC reactor. However, the harden resistance of SFFC was better than that of SFC. Furthermore, the biodegradability of TET wastewater was improved greatly after micro-electrolysis pretreatment for both SFC and SFFC reactors.

  19. Chemical and Microstructural Changes in Metallic and Ceramic Materials Exposed to Venusian Surface Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Gustavo C. C.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Lukco, Dorothy; Hunter, Gary W.; Nakley, Leah; Radoman-Shaw, Brandon G.; Harvey, Ralph P.

    2017-01-01

    (TradeMark) ? exhibited corrosion at the base of the alloy. All ceramics tested showed no clear evidence of reaction. The weight-gain-per-area performance of the materials exposed in the GEER for 10 and 42 days are reported from the lowest to the highest weight gain per area as follows: gold did not exhibit any weight change; nickel-based alloys: beta- NiAl < G30 < 625; steels: 304 < 310 < 316 < 1018; ceramics: considering the experimental uncertainties, no weight change was observed for all ceramics of this work (alpha-Al2O3, Si3N4, SiC, and amorphous SiO2).

  20. [Study on color matching of equal volume in dental ceramic prothesis materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Bei-yan; Zhang, Yan; Luo, Yun; Sun, Jun; Chao, Yong-lie

    2007-10-01

    To study the color changes on brightness and hue in dental ceramic prothesis materials. The different color mark of VINTAGE series was sintered on 15 pieces Ni-Cr alloy denture materials. The sample group and control group was given the sintering of color blending with equivalent volume. The order of color mark was of A1 and A2, A2 and A3, A3 and A4, B1 and B2, B2 and B3, B3 and B4 in sample group, and A1, A2, A3, A3.5, A4, B1, B2, B3 and B4 orderly in control group. The chromatic analysis on samples of VITA had been taken through applying PR 650 spectrum detector and adopted the statistic software of Photo Research and SPSS 12.0 for analysis. The statistical difference (P<0.05) of L*a*b* value was found in the different color mark of the same color serials. A non-linearity relation had been found in the chromatic parameters a*b*. It means the change of color was visible. Set A has a bigger grading change of brightness than Set B. The change of red-green is obviously in Set A, as well as yellow-blue in Set B.

  1. The role of soft (metallic) film in tribological behavior of ceramic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajayi, O.O.; Erdemir, A.; Erck, R.A.; Fenske, G.R.; Nichols, F.A.

    1990-01-01

    The friction coefficient and wear rate in structural ceramic materials are often too high to make them attractive for applications requiring dry sliding. The role of a thin soft silver film in improving the tribological characteristics of silicon nitride materials is investigated in this study. In a pin-on-disc contact configuration in reciprocating motion, the friction coefficient was reduced by about 50% and the wear rate by one to two orders of magnitude. The friction reduction is thought to be due to the reduction of the contact interface shear strength by the presence of the soft film. The wear rate reduction is likely due to modification of the contact stresses by the film. Combined, these two factors lead to a decrease in the magnitude of the damaging tensile stresses. The durability and thus the effectiveness of the film is very dependent on the bond strength (i.e., adhesion strength) between the film and the substrate. 21 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Joining Ceramics By Brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Sudsina, Michael W.

    1992-01-01

    Certain ceramic materials tightly bond together by brazing with suitable alloys. Enables fabrication of parts of wide variety of shapes from smaller initial pieces of ceramics produced directly in only limited variety of shapes.

  3. Perspectives of development of ceramic materials with luminescent applications; Perspectivas del desarrollo de materiales ceramicos con aplicaciones luminiscentes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarado E, A.; Fernandez M, J.L.; Diaz G, J.L.I.; Rivera M, T. [IPN, Av. Legaria 694, 11500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    The science and technology of materials believes and it applies the knowledge that allow to relate the composition, it structures and the one processed with those properties that those they make capable for each one of the applications. The ceramic materials are inorganic materials not metallic, constituted by metallic elements and not metallic. In general, they usually behave, as good insulating electric and thermal due to the absence of conductive electrons. Usually, they possess relatively high coalition temperatures and, also, a chemical stability relatively high. Due to these properties, they are indispensable for many of those designs in engineering. The ceramic materials for luminescent applications are constituted typically by pure compounds (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2}, SiO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}) or cocktails with some sludges giving as a result (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:TR, TiO{sub 2}:Eu, Si:ZrO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}:TR). Presently work describes the panorama to big features on the development of ceramic materials in the CICATA Unit it would Bequeath, which can be characterized by the photoluminescence techniques and thermoluminescence mainly. (Author)

  4. Immobilization of actinides in stable mineral type and ceramic materials (high temperature synthesis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starkov, O.; Konovalov, E.

    1996-05-01

    Alternative vitrification technologies are being developed in the world for the immobilization of high radioactive waste in materials with improved thermodynamic stability, as well as improved chemical and thermal stability and stability to radiation. Oxides, synthesized in the form of analogs to rock-forming minerals and ceramics, are among those materials that have highly stable properties and are compatible with the environment. In choosing the appropriate material, we need to be guided by its geometric stability, the minimal number of cations in the structure of the material and the presence of structural elements in the mineral that are isomorphs of uranium and thorium, actinoids found in nature. Rare earth elements, yttrium, zirconium and calcium are therefore suitable. The minerals listed in the table (with the exception of the zircon) are pegatites by origin, i.e. they are formed towards the end of the magma crystallization of silicates form the residual melt, enriched with Ta, Nb, Ti, Zr, Ce, Y, U and Th. Uranium and thorium in the form of isomorphic admixtures form part of the lattice of the mineral. These minerals, which are rather simple in composition and structure and are formed under high temperatures, may be viewed as natural physio-chemical systems that are stable and long-lived in natural environments. The similarity of the properties of actinoids and lanthanoids plays an important role in the geochemistry of uranium and thorium; however, uranium (IV) is closer to the {open_quotes}heavy{close_quotes} group of lanthanoids (the yttrium group) while thorium (IV) is closer to the {open_quotes}light{close_quotes} group (the cerium group). That is why rare earth minerals contain uranium and thorium in the form of isomorphic admixtures.

  5. [The research on optical properties of four all-ceramic veneer materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Luo, Xiaoping; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the color parameters and translucency of four frequently-used veneer materials. Forty disc specimens[(1.00±0.01) mm in thickness, 10 mm in diameter] were fabricated according to the manufacturer's instructions with IPS Empress(®) CAD[A2, high translucency (HT)], IPS e.max(®) Press(A2, HT), IPS e.max(®) CAD (A2, HT) and VITABLOCS(®) Mark II (A2) respectively and were divided into Groups A, B, C, D. All of the specimens were ground and polished on a grinding machine. Then color parameters (L*, a*, b*) and transmittance (τ) were measured using spectrocolorimeter and transmissivity testing device. The color parameters of the specimens were compared to the color parameters of A2 shade of Ivoclar Vivadent A-D shade guide. The data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and mean values were compared by the Tukey's test (α = 0.05). There was no statistical difference between the color parameters L*, a*, b* and C*ab of Group A and Group D (P > 0.05). But the color parameters of those two ceramic materials were statistically different from the color parameters of Group B and Group C (P 0.05). However, the color parameters L* and a* of the two materials were statistically different(P materials are different. Their transmittance are relatively high but statistically different. The color difference (ΔE) between IPS e.max(®) CAD (A2, HT) and standard A2 is lowest among all the groups.

  6. The effect of neutron irradiation on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchell, T. D.; Eatherly, W. P.; Robbins, J. M.; Strizak, J. P.

    1992-09-01

    Carbon-based materials are an attractive choice for fusion reactor plasma facing components (PFCs) because of their low atomic number, superior thermal shock resistance, and low neutron activation. Next generation plasma fusion reactors, such as the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER), will require advanced carbon-carbon composite materials possessing extremely high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated severe heat loads. Moreover, ignition machines such as ITER wilt produce high neutron fluxes. Consequently, the influence of neutron damage on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials must be evaluated. Data from an irradiation experiment are reported and discussed here. Fusion relevant graphite and carbon-carbon composites were irradiated in a target capsule in the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A peak damage dose of 1.58 dpa (displacements per atom) at 600°C was attained. The carbon materials irradiated included nuclear graphite grade H-451 and one-, two-, and three-directional carbon-carbon composite materials. Dimensional changes and strength are reported for the materials examined. The influence of fiber type, architecture, and heat treatment temperature on properties and irradiation behavior are reported. Carbon-carbon composite dimensional changes are interpreted in terms of simple microstructural models.

  7. Development of a ceramic material to cover walls to be applied in diagnostic radiological protection; Desenvolvimento de um material ceramico para utilizacao em protecao radiologica diagnostica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frimaio, Audrew

    2006-07-01

    This study aims to formulate a ceramic composition for wall coating seeking to contribute to the optimization of diagnosis rooms' shielding. The work was based on experimental measures of X-radiation attenuation (80 and 100 kV) using ceramic coating materials containing different ceramic bases (red, white, gres, stoneware porcelain tiles, etc). Among the appraised ceramic bases, the white gres presented better attenuation properties and it was considered the most suitable material for the targets of this work. Different formulations of white gres were studied and altered in order to obtain better attenuation properties. Simulations of ceramic compositions using gres coating were made maintaining the percentages of 12-20% clay; 6-18% kaolin; 12-25% phyllite; 8-14% quartz; 1018% feldspar; 32-40% pegmatite and 6-8% talc in the composition of the necessary raw-material. The quantitative and qualitative chemical compositions of these materials were also evaluated and the most common representative elements are SiO{sub 2}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaO and Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Formulations containing Pb and Ba oxides were studied, considering that CaO can be replaced by PbO or BaO. The attenuation properties for X-radiation were investigated by computer simulations considering the incident and transmitted X-ray spectra for the different studied compositions and they were compared to the properties of the reference materials Pb, Ba and BaSO{sub 4} (barite). The results obtained with the simulations indicated the formulated composition of gres ceramic base that presented better attenuation properties considering the X-ray energies used in diagnosis (80, 100 and 150 kV). Ceramic plates based on the formulated compositions that presented lower percentage differences related to Pb were experimentally produced and physically tested as wall coating and protecting barrier. Properties as flexion resistance module, density, load rupture, water absorption and X

  8. Templating for hierarchical structure control in carbon materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrettl, Stephen; Schulte, Bjoern; Frauenrath, Holger

    2016-12-07

    Carbon-based materials show a remarkable variety of physical properties. For this reason, they have recently been explored for many advanced applications and emerging technologies. In the absence of actual "chemical" functionalities in these materials, tailoring these physical properties requires control on all levels of the structural hierarchy, from the atomic structure (carbon connectivity, defects, impurities), to the supramolecular level (domain orientations), nanoscopic length scale (domain sizes, porosity), microscopic structure (morphology), and macroscopic aspects (shape, surface chemistry). When preparing carbon materials, all these features can be tailored through the use of hard, soft, or molecular templates. Based on such templating approaches or through their combination, tremendous progress towards hierarchically structured carbon materials has recently been accomplished. Novel carbon nanomaterials such as brick-walled carbon tubes, carbon nanotube forests, coral-like carbon monoliths, or functional carbon nanosheets have become available, some of which exhibit unusual combinations of electronic, mechanical, and chemical properties. This review aims to discuss how the different templating approaches allow the control of structure formation on various length scales, how hierarchical structure formation can be realized, and which challenges remain, such as the detailed control over the carbon connectivity or the surface chemistry.

  9. Carbon nanotubes grown on bulk materials and methods for fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menchhofer, Paul A [Clinton, TN; Montgomery, Frederick C [Oak Ridge, TN; Baker, Frederick S [Oak Ridge, TN

    2011-11-08

    Disclosed are structures formed as bulk support media having carbon nanotubes formed therewith. The bulk support media may comprise fibers or particles and the fibers or particles may be formed from such materials as quartz, carbon, or activated carbon. Metal catalyst species are formed adjacent the surfaces of the bulk support material, and carbon nanotubes are grown adjacent the surfaces of the metal catalyst species. Methods employ metal salt solutions that may comprise iron salts such as iron chloride, aluminum salts such as aluminum chloride, or nickel salts such as nickel chloride. Carbon nanotubes may be separated from the carbon-based bulk support media and the metal catalyst species by using concentrated acids to oxidize the carbon-based bulk support media and the metal catalyst species.

  10. Identifying Opportunities in the Development of Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Materials for Armor Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    These materials are currently used in aerospace, industrial, semiconductor , and automotive areas. 2.4 Patents Table 2 is a compilation of the...addition of CNTs (Zhang et al. 2009) and graphene oxide (Wang et al. 2016) into carbon fiber precursors. Finally, entire fibers have been synthesized...from nanostructures, such as graphene (Xin et al. 2015), which exhibits high-thermal conductivity but relatively low-mechanical properties when

  11. Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries Based on Carbon Cryogels and Carbon Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nanofoams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  12. Carbon Cryogel and Carbon Paper-Based Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. 6 One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nano-foams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. 1-5 Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  13. Evaluating the effect of increasing ceramic content on the mechanical properties, material microstructure and degradation of selective laser sintered polycaprolactone/β-tricalcium phosphate materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Heather; Lohfeld, Stefan; McHugh, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Orthopaedic scaffold materials were fabricated from polycaprolactone (PCL) and composite PCL-β-tricalcium phosphate (PCL/β-TCP) powders using selective laser sintering (SLS). Incorporating β-TCP particles is desirable to promote osteogenesis. The effects of increasing β-TCP content on the material's mechanical properties and microstructure were evaluated. The wt% of β-TCP and PCL particle sizes were found to influence material microstructure and mechanical properties, with increasing ceramic content causing a small but significant increase in stiffness but significant reductions in strength. Degradation of materials was achieved using accelerated ageing methods. The influence of β-TCP content on degradation at 7 weeks was evaluated through changes in mechanical properties and microstructure, and the ceramic particles were found to reduce elastic modulus and increase strength. The results of this study highlight the influence of ceramic content on mechanical properties and degradation behaviour of PCL/β-TCP SLS materials, and indicate that these changes must be considered in the design of scaffolds for critical-sized defects. Copyright © 2015 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Surface analysis of carbon black waste materials from tire residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W. H.; Kim, J. Y.; Ko, Y. K.; Reucroft, P. J.; Zondlo, J. W.

    1999-03-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to obtain surface chemical state information on two carbon black waste materials in terms of the surface element distribution/concentration and chemical structure. Small amounts of sulfur in the form of CS 2 were detected on the surface (less than 1.7 mass %). C-H/C-C was the major carbon functional component on the surface of carbon black samples but other functional forms of carbon were also present such as CO and C-O. The surface of the carbon black obtained from a hydropyrolysis process was highly oxidized primarily in the form of carbon based oxygen groups. On the other hand, surface oxygen atoms on the surface of the carbon black obtained from a pyrolysis process in the absence of H 2 were in the form of both metal oxides and carbon based oxygen groups.

  15. Comparison of slime-producing coagulase-negative Staphylococcus colonization rates on vinyl and ceramic tile flooring materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazgi, H; Uyanik, M H; Ayyildiz, A

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the colonization of slime-producing coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) in 80 patient wards in Turkey (40 vinyl and 40 ceramic tile floors). A total of 480 samples that included 557 CoNS isolates were obtained. Slime production was investigated with the Christensen method and methicillin-susceptibility was tested by the disk-diffusion method. There was a significant difference in the percentage of slime-producing CoNS isolates on vinyl (12.4%) versus ceramic tile flooring (4.4%). From vinyl flooring, the percentage of slime producing methicillin-resistant CoNS (MRCoNS) (8.9%) was significantly higher than for methicillin-sensitive CoNS (MSCoNS) (3.6%), whereas there was no difference from ceramic tile flooring (2.5% MRCoNS versus 1.8% MSCoNS). The most commonly isolated slime-producing CoNS species was S. epidermidis on both types of flooring. It is concluded that vinyl flooring seems to be a more suitable colonization surface for slime-producing CoNS than ceramic tile floors. Further studies are needed to investigate bacterial strains colonized on flooring materials, which are potential pathogens for nosocomial infections.

  16. Measuring Fracture Times Of Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlichta, Paul J.; Bister, Leo; Bickler, Donald G.

    1989-01-01

    Electrical measurements complement or replace fast cinematography. Electronic system measures microsecond time intervals between impacts of projectiles on ceramic tiles and fracture tiles. Used in research on ceramics and ceramic-based composite materials such as armor. Hardness and low density of ceramics enable them to disintegrate projectiles more efficiently than metals. Projectile approaches ceramic tile specimen. Penetrating foil squares of triggering device activate display and recording instruments. As ceramic and resistive film break oscilloscope plots increase in electrical resistance of film.

  17. Calcium phosphate/microgel composites for 3D powderbed printing of ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkholz, Mandy-Nicole; Agrawal, Garima; Bergmann, Christian; Schröder, Ricarda; Lechner, Sebastian J; Pich, Andrij; Fischer, Horst

    2016-06-01

    Composites of microgels and calcium phosphates are promising as drug delivery systems and basic components for bone substitute implants. In this study, we synthesized novel composite materials consisting of pure β-tricalcium phosphate and stimuli-responsive poly(N-vinylcaprolactam-co-acetoacetoxyethyl methacrylate-co-vinylimidazole) microgels. The chemical composition, thermal properties and morphology for obtained composites were extensively characterized by Fourier transform infrared, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, IGAsorp moisture sorption analyzer, thermogravimetric analysis, granulometric analysis, ESEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and TEM. Mechanical properties of the composites were evaluated by ball-on-three-balls test to determine the biaxial strength. Furthermore, initial 3D powderbed-based printing tests were conducted with spray-dried composites and diluted 2-propanol as a binder to evaluate a new binding concept for β-tricalcium phosphate-based granulates. The printed ceramic bodies were characterized before and after a sintering step by ESEM. The hypothesis that the microgels act as polymer adhesive agents by efficient chemical interactions with the β-tricalcium phosphate particles was confirmed. The obtained composites can be used for the development of new scaffolds.

  18. Inhibitory Effects of Far-Infrared Irradiation Generated by Ceramic Material on Murine Melanoma Cell Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Kai Leung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The biological effects of specific wavelengths, so-called “far-infrared radiation” produced from ceramic material (cFIR, on whole organisms are not yet well understood. In this study, we investigated the biological effects of cFIR on murine melanoma cells (B16-F10 at body temperature. cFIR irradiation treatment for 48 h resulted in an 11.8% decrease in the proliferation of melanoma cells relative to the control. Meanwhile, incubation of cells with cFIR for 48 h significantly resulted in 56.9% and 15.7% decreases in the intracellular heat shock protein (HSP70 and intracellular nitric oxide (iNO contents, respectively. Furthermore, cFIR treatment induced 6.4% and 12.3% increases in intracellular reactive oxygen species stained by 5-(and 6-carboxyl-2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate and dihydrorhodamine 123, respectively. Since malignant melanomas are known to have high HSP70 expression and iNO activity, the suppressive effects of cFIR on HSP70 and NO may warrant future interest in antitumor applications.

  19. Microstructural characterization and influence of manufacturing parameters on technological properties of vitreous ceramic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Njoya, D. [Laboratoire de Physico-chimie des Materiaux Mineraux, Departement de Chimie Inorganique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite de Yaounde I, B.P. 812, Yaounde (Cameroon); Laboratoire de Physico-chimie des Materiaux et Environnement, Departement de Chimie, Faculte des Sciences Semlalia, Universite Cadi Ayyad, B.P. 2390, Marrakech (Morocco); Hajjaji, M., E-mail: Hajjaji@ucam.ac.ma [Laboratoire de Physico-chimie des Materiaux et Environnement, Departement de Chimie, Faculte des Sciences Semlalia, Universite Cadi Ayyad, B.P. 2390, Marrakech (Morocco); Bacaoui, A. [Laboratoire de Chimie Organique Appliquee, Departement de Chimie, Faculte des Sciences Semlalia, Universite Cadi Ayyad, B.P. 2390, Marrakech (Morocco); Njopwouo, D. [Laboratoire de Physico-chimie des Materiaux Mineraux, Departement de Chimie Inorganique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite de Yaounde I, B.P. 812, Yaounde (Cameroon)

    2010-03-15

    Microstructure of vitreous ceramic samples manufactured from kaolinitic-clay and feldspars raw materials from Cameroon was investigated in the range 1150-1250 deg. C by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy and by measuring some technological properties. Moreover, the simultaneous influence of feldspars content, heating temperature and soaking time on water absorption and firing shrinkage was evaluated by adopting the response surface methodology (Doehlert matrix), using the New Efficient Methodology for Research using Optimal Design (NEMROD) software. The results show that a spinel phase, mullite, glassy phase and some amount of hematite were formed. However, the spinel phase and potassic feldspar, as compared to the sodic one, disappeared at moderate firing temperature and soaking time. Apparently, mullite developed from spinel phase, which is formed from the demixion of metakaolin. On the other hand, it is found that the effects of fluxing content and firing temperature on the measured properties were almost similar and more influent than soaking time. Antagonistic and synergetic interactions existed between the considered parameters, and their importance differed for the considered properties. By using this mathematical tool, suitable operating conditions for manufacturing vitreous bodies were determined.

  20. Thermal Conductivity and Water Vapor Stability of Ceramic HfO2-Based Coating Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Fox, Dennis S.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    HfO2-Y2O3 and La2Zr2O7 are candidate thermal/environmental barrier coating materials for gas turbine ceramic matrix composite (CMC) combustor liner applications because of their relatively low thermal conductivity and high temperature capability. In this paper, thermal conductivity and high temperature phase stability of plasma-sprayed coatings and/or hot-pressed HfO2-5mol%Y2O3, HfO2-15mol%Y2O3 and La2Zr2O7 were evaluated at temperatures up to 1700 C using a steady-state laser heat-flux technique. Sintering behavior of the plasma-sprayed coatings was determined by monitoring the thermal conductivity increases during a 20-hour test period at various temperatures. Durability and failure mechanisms of the HfO2-Y2O3 and La2Zr2O7 coatings on mullite/SiC Hexoloy or CMC substrates were investigated at 1650 C under thermal gradient cyclic conditions. Coating design and testing issues for the 1650 C thermal/environmental barrier coating applications will also be discussed.

  1. Effect of ultra high temperature ceramics as fuel cladding materials on the nuclear reactor performance by SERPENT Monte Carlo code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkut, Turgay; Kara, Ayhan; Korkut, Hatun [Sinop Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Nuclear Energy Engineering

    2016-12-15

    Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs) have low density and high melting point. So they are useful materials in the nuclear industry especially reactor core design. Three UHTCs (silicon carbide, vanadium carbide, and zirconium carbide) were evaluated as the nuclear fuel cladding materials. The SERPENT Monte Carlo code was used to model CANDU, PWR, and VVER type reactor core and to calculate burnup parameters. Some changes were observed at the same burnup and neutronic parameters (keff, neutron flux, absorption rate, and fission rate, depletion of U-238, U-238, Xe-135, Sm-149) with the use of these UHTCs. Results were compared to conventional cladding material zircalloy.

  2. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Polypropylene Composite Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Polypropylene (PP composites reinforced with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs were prepared by using twin screw extruder. The experimental results showed that with the increasing amount of MWNTs the elongation at break decreased whereas the tensile strength, bending strength, and impact strength increased. By using scanning electron microscope (SEM, we find that the hydroxyl-modified carbon nanotube has better dispersion performance in PP and better mechanical properties.

  3. Lithium aluminosilicate reinforced with carbon nanofiber and alumina for controlled-thermal-expansion materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amparo Borrell, Olga García-Moreno, Ramón Torrecillas, Victoria García-Rocha and Adolfo Fernández

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Materials with a very low or tailored thermal expansion have many applications ranging from cookware to the aerospace industry. Among others, lithium aluminosilicates (LAS are the most studied family with low and negative thermal expansion coefficients. However, LAS materials are electrical insulators and have poor mechanical properties. Nanocomposites using LAS as a matrix are promising in many applications where special properties are achieved by the addition of one or two more phases. The main scope of this work is to study the sinterability of carbon nanofiber (CNFs/LAS and CNFs/alumina/LAS nanocomposites, and to adjust the ratio among components for obtaining a near-zero or tailored thermal expansion. Spark plasma sintering of nanocomposites, consisting of commercial CNFs and alumina powders and an ad hoc synthesized β-eucryptite phase, is proposed as a solution to improving mechanical and electrical properties compared with the LAS ceramics obtained under the same conditions. X-ray diffraction results on phase compositions and microstructure are discussed together with dilatometry data obtained in a wide temperature range (−150 to 450 °C. The use of a ceramic LAS phase makes it possible to design a nanocomposite with a very low or tailored thermal expansion coefficient and exceptional electrical and mechanical properties.

  4. Advanced Carbon Materials for Environmental and Energy Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Dua, Rubal

    2014-05-01

    Carbon based materials, including porous carbons and carbon layer composites, are finding increased usage in latest environmental and energy related research. Among porous carbon materials, hierarchical porous carbons with multi-modal porosity are proving out to be an effective solution for applications where the traditional activated carbons fail. Thus, there has been a lot of recent interest in developing low-cost, facile, easy to scale-up, synthesis techniques for producing such multi-modal porous carbons. This dissertation offers two novel synthesis techniques: (i) ice templating integrated with hard templating, and (ii) salt templating coupled with hard templating, for producing such hierarchically porous carbons. The techniques offer tight control and tunability of porosity (macro- meso- and microscale) in terms of both size and extent. The synthesized multi-modal porous carbons are shown to be an effective solution for three important environment related applications – (i) Carbon dioxide capture using amine supported hierarchical porous carbons, (ii) Reduction in irreversible fouling of membranes used for wastewater reuse through a deposition of a layer of hierarchical porous carbons on the membrane surface, (iii) Electrode materials for electrosorptive applications. Finally, because of their tunability, the synthesized multi-modal porous carbons serve as excellent model systems for understanding the effect of different types of porosity on the performance of porous carbons for these applications. Also, recently, there has been a lot of interest in developing protective layer coatings for preventing photo-corrosion of semiconductor structures (in particular Cu2O) used for photoelectrochemical water splitting. Most of the developed protective strategies to date involve the use of metals or co-catalyst in the protective layer. Thus there is a big need for developing low-cost, facile and easy to scale protective coating strategies. Based on the expertise

  5. The carbon footprint and embodied energy of construction material ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    4.4 Material choices. Low-carbon footprint and embodied energy-intensive materials have been identified and selected through an iterative simulation process. The design proposes minimal use of precast concrete and steel, while extensively using recycled materials such as aggregate and composite timber and resin slats.

  6. Materials and vapour-phase techniques for the synthesis of ceramic coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albella, J. M.

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A survey on recent advances in the synthesis of hard ceramic coatings is given, including materials processes and techniques. Emphasis is made on the parameters which control the coating properties (crystalline structure, morphology, etc, namely arrival energy of the atoms to the growing surface and substrate temperature. Some relevant coating materials are discussed in relation to their applications either as hard protective coatings or with decorative purposes, namely: the family of metal nitrides, carbides, and oxides, in different layer structures (monolithic, multilayers and nanocomposites and ternary compounds of the BCN system.

    Se hace un descripción de los avances recientes en la síntesis de recubrimientos duros de tipo cerámico, depositados mediante técnicas de deposición en fase vapor. Se dedica especial atención a los parámetros del proceso de deposición que controlan las propiedades finales de las capas (estructura cristalina, morfología, etc, tales como la energía de llegada de los átomos a las superficie en crecimiento, y la temperatura. Finalmente, se hace una revisión de los materiales más relevantes en lo que se refiere a sus aplicaciones como recubrimientos duros y protectores, o como recubrimientos decorativos, entre ellos, la familia de los nitruros, carburos y óxidos metálicos, depositados en diversos tipos de estructuras (monolíticas, multicapas y nanocomposites, y los compuestos ternarios del sistema BCN.

  7. Metals and Ceramics Division Materials Sciences Program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stiegler, J.O. (comp.)

    1986-06-01

    The report is divided into the following: structural characterization, high-temperature alloy research, structural ceramics, radiation effects, structure and properties of surfaces and interfaces, and collaborative research centers. (DLC)

  8. Alternative technological approach for synthesis of ceramic pigments by waste materials recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihail Doynov

    2016-03-01

    The complete transformation of initial precursors into the final ceramic compounds was found to occur at 800 °C – 1 h. The ceramic samples synthesized had high density of 1.72–1.93 g/cm3 and large absorption area – 32.93% which is probably due to the high porosity of the sample.

  9. Iron impregnated carbon materials with improved physicochemical characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Irfan; Adnan, Rohana, E-mail: r_adnan@usm.my; Wan Ngah, Wan Saime; Mohamed, Norita

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • The morphology of raw AC was altered upon Fe impregnation and surface oxidation. • Surface modification had increased the pores diameter and surface functionalities. • Development of iron oxides have been expected on Fe impregnated carbon materials. • The M1, M2 and M3 have revealed magnetic susceptibility in applied magnetic field. • Dyes removal efficiency of M3 was notably higher (90–99%) than the raw AC (60–85%). - Abstract: This paper highlights the effect of iron impregnation and surface oxidation on the physicochemical characteristics of iron impregnated carbon materials. These materials were characterized by various techniques like surface area, pore size distribution, SEM/EDX, CHN, XRD, FTIR, TG/DT, VSM and XPS analyses. The increase in the surface functionalities and pores diameter (3.51–5.49 nm) of the iron-impregnated carbon materials was observed with the increase in iron contents and surface oxidation. The saturated magnetization values (0.029–0.034 emu/g) for the iron-impregnated carbon materials reflected the magnetic tendency due to the development of small size iron oxides on their surfaces. The XPS spectra revealed the existence of different oxidation states of the corresponding metals on the iron impregnated carbon materials. The percentage removal of model dyes (Methylene Blue and Methyl Orange) by iron-impregnated carbon materials was enhanced (>90%) with the increase in iron contents and pores diameters.

  10. Carbon and Carbon Hybrid Materials as Anodes for Sodium Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yan; Zhong, Xiongwu; Wu, Ying; Zen, Sifan

    2018-02-12

    Sodium ion batteries (SIBs) have attracted much attention for application in large-scale grid energy storage due to the abundance and low-cost sodium sources. However, the low energy density and poor cycling life hinder the practice application of SIBs. Recently, substantial efforts have been made to develop electrode materials to push forward large-scale practical application. Carbon materials can be directly used as anode materials, showing excellent sodium storage performance. Additionally, designing and constructing carbon hybrid materials is an effective strategy to obtain high-performance anodes for SIBs. In this review, we summarize recent research progress of carbon and carbon hybrid materials as anodes for SIBs. Nanostructural design to enhance the sodium storage performance of anode materials is discussed, and we offer some insight on the potential directions and future high-performance anode materials of SIBs. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Erosion mechanism and erosion products in carbon-based materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkhipov, N.; Bakhtin, V.; Barsuk, V.; Kurkin, S.; Mironova, E.; Piazza, G.; Safronov, V. E-mail: vsafr@rico.ttk.ru; Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Toporkov, D.; Vasenin, S.; Wuerz, H.; Zhitlukhin, A

    2002-12-01

    Plasma/material interaction was studied in disruption simulation experiments at the plasma gun facility MK-200. Graphite and carbon-fibre composites were exposed to pulsed energetic plasma under heat loads typically expected for disruptions in future tokamaks. Erosion rates, erosion mechanisms and the properties of the eroded carbon have been studied.

  12. How We Used NASA Lunar Set in Planetary Material Science Analog Studies on Lunar Basalts and Breccias with Industrial Materials of Steels and Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berczi, S.; Cech, V.; Jozsa, S.; Szakmany, G.; Fabriczy, A.; Foldi, T.; Varga, T.

    2005-01-01

    Analog studies play important role in space materials education. Various aspects of analogies are used in our courses. In this year two main rock types of NASA Lunar Set were used in analog studies in respect of processes and textures with selected industrial material samples. For breccias and basalts on the lunar side, ceramics and steels were found as analogs on the industrial side. Their processing steps were identified on the basis of their textures both in lunar and in industrial groups of materials.

  13. Ultrasonic Vibration Assisted Grinding of Bio-ceramic Materials: Modeling, Simulation, and Experimental Investigations on Edge Chipping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfay, Hayelom D.

    Bio-ceramics are those engineered materials that find their applications in the field of biomedical engineering or medicine. They have been widely used in dental restorations, repairing bones, joint replacements, pacemakers, kidney dialysis machines, and respirators. etc. due to their physico-chemical properties, such as excellent corrosion resistance, good biocompatibility, high strength and high wear resistance. Because of their inherent brittleness and hardness nature they are difficult to machine to exact sizes and dimensions. Abrasive machining processes such as grinding is one of the most widely used manufacturing processes for bioceramics. However, the principal technical challenge resulted from these machining is edge chipping. Edge chipping is a common edge failure commonly observed during the machining of bio-ceramic materials. The presence of edge chipping on bio-ceramic products affects dimensional accuracy, increases manufacturing cost, hider their industrial applications and causes potential failure during service. To overcome these technological challenges, a new ultrasonic vibration-assisted grinding (UVAG) manufacturing method has been developed and employed in this research. The ultimate aim of this study is to develop a new cost-effective manufacturing process relevant to eliminate edge chippings in grinding of bio-ceramic materials. In this dissertation, comprehensive investigations will be carried out using experimental, theoretical, and numerical approaches to evaluate the effect of ultrasonic vibrations on edge chipping of bioceramics. Moreover, effects of nine input variables (static load, vibration frequency, grinding depth, spindle speed, grinding distance, tool speed, grain size, grain number, and vibration amplitude) on edge chipping will be studied based on the developed models. Following a description of previous research and existing approaches, a series of experimental tests on three bio-ceramic materials (Lava, partially fired Lava

  14. Properties of carbon nanotube-dispersed Sr-hydroxyapatite injectable material for bone defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raucci, M G; Alvarez-Perez, M; Giugliano, D; Zeppetelli, S; Ambrosio, L

    2016-03-01

    This study concerns the synthesis of gel materials based on carbon nanotubes dispersed strontium-modified hydroxyapatite (Sr-HA) at different compositions obtained by sol-gel technology and their influence on human-bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Furthermore, an evaluation of the influence of nanotubes and Strontium on physico-chemical, morphological, rheological and biological properties of hydroxyapatite gel was also performed. Morphological analysis (scanning electron microscopy) shows a homogeneous distribution of modified nanotubes in the ceramic matrix improving the bioactive properties of materials. The biological investigations proved that Sr-HA/carbon nanotube gel containing 0-20 mol (%) of Sr showed no toxic effect and promote the expression of early and late markers of osteogenic differentiation in cell culture performed in basal medium without osteogenic factors. Finally, the SrHA/carbon nanotube gels could have a good potential application as filler in bone repair and regeneration and may be used in the osteoporotic disease treatment.

  15. Surface characterization and functional properties of carbon-based materials

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Carbon-based materials are poised to be an important class of 21st century materials, for bio-medical, bio-electronic, and bio-sensing applications. Diamond and polymers are two examples of carbon-based materials of high interest to the bio-materials community. Diamond, in its conductive form, can be used as an electrochemical bio-sensor, whilst its nanoparticle form is considered a non-inflammatory platform to deliver drugs or to grow neuronal cells. Polymers, especially when chemically m...

  16. Effect of frame design and veneering material on biomechanical behavior of zirconia dental crowns veneered with overpressing ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porojan, Liliana; Topală, Florin; Porojan, Sorin; Savencu, Cristina

    2017-05-31

    The objective of this investigation was to compare alternative framework designs of molar zirconia crowns veneered with various overpressing ceramics and to predict the biomechanical behavior based on the stress evaluation. The hypothesis of the study is that the zirconia framework design and type of the veneering material, using the same technological procedure, may influence the biomechanical behavior of the restorations. Three geometric models with differential coping designs (uniform thickness, cutback and buccal reduction) were developed and two types of hot-pressed ceramics (leucite and lithium disilicate reinforced) were analyzed for the veneers. Using finite element analysis (FEA), maximum principle stresses were recorded in the tooth structures and in the restorations for all the developed designs. Results led to the conclusion that the hypothesis was accepted.

  17. Simulation of the dynamic fracture of ceramic materials based on ZrB2 in a wide temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, A. Yu.; Skripnyak, E. G.; Skripnyak, V. V.; Vaganova, I. K.

    2017-12-01

    The damage kinetics and dynamic fracture of nanostructured ZrB2-based ceramics in a wide range of temperatures were studied by the numerical simulation method. 3D models taking into account the distribution of microvoids and inclusions were used for computer simulation of deformation and fracture of ZrB2-based ceramic materials. It was shown that the dynamic fracture of ZrB2-B4C nanocomposites is quasi-brittle in a wide temperature range. The failure is caused by microcrack nucleation and coalescence. The threshold failure stresses for ZrB2-B4C nanocomposites under compression in the strain rate range 10-3-106 s-1 and temperature range from 297 to 1673 K are predicted.

  18. Developing polymer composite materials: carbon nanotubes or graphene?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuemei; Sun, Hao; Li, Houpu; Peng, Huisheng

    2013-10-04

    The formation of composite materials represents an efficient route to improve the performances of polymers and expand their application scopes. Due to the unique structure and remarkable mechanical, electrical, thermal, optical and catalytic properties, carbon nanotube and graphene have been mostly studied as a second phase to produce high performance polymer composites. Although carbon nanotube and graphene share some advantages in both structure and property, they are also different in many aspects including synthesis of composite material, control in composite structure and interaction with polymer molecule. The resulting composite materials are distinguished in property to meet different applications. This review article mainly describes the preparation, structure, property and application of the two families of composite materials with an emphasis on the difference between them. Some general and effective strategies are summarized for the development of polymer composite materials based on carbon nanotube and graphene. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. [Carbon-carbon materials and composites for experimental tracheal reconstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Jiang, Zhao-yang; Qin, Yong

    2010-08-01

    The Carbon fiber reinforced carbon matrix composites were employed for reconstruction of large circumferential defect of the cervical trachea. The biocompatibility and biofunctionality of the new type carbonaceous tracheal prosthesis were evaluated, and the feasibility for cervical tracheal reconstruction discussed. Two types of carbonaceous tracheal prosthesis with different weaving methods of carbon fiber were used on eight healthy canines. Three to six tracheal cartilage rings were resected circumferentially. The 2 cm long tracheal prosthesis was transplanted into canines and the anastomosis was completed by end-to-end, tracheal-into-prosthesis and prosthesis-into-tracheal method. The function of breathing, eating and infection was observed after surgery. Four months later, the five survival canines were sacrificed and the prosthesis with surrounding tissues was removed for observation by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. All dogs had cough symptom in different degree lasted 1 - 4 weeks after surgery. Two dogs with tracheal-into-prosthesis anastomosis showed eating disorders in different degree. One canine died due to airway obstruction caused by dislocation of prosthesis within three weeks after operation. Another two deaths in 11th week and 12th week were attributed to suffocation because of hypergranulation and scar formation. Prosthesis was surrounded by connective tissues and anchored firmly to the neighboring tissues. Most part of the luminal surface of tracheal prosthesis was not covered by respiratory mucosa. However, the inner layer showed scant re-epithelialization beyond the anastomosis. The implantation of the carbonaceous tracheal prosthesis can maintain the normal respiratory function of the experimental canines, but hypergranulation and scar formation around the end of the tracheal prosthesis and epithelium on the luminal surface of the prosthesis are questions still remained to be solved.

  20. Functional carbon nitride materials — design strategies for electrochemical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Fabian K.; Zheng, Yun; Schwarz, Dana; Merschjann, Christoph; Schnick, Wolfgang; Wang, Xinchen; Bojdys, Michael J.

    2017-06-01

    In the past decade, research in the field of artificial photosynthesis has shifted from simple, inorganic semiconductors to more abundant, polymeric materials. For example, polymeric carbon nitrides have emerged as promising materials for metal-free semiconductors and metal-free photocatalysts. Polymeric carbon nitride (melon) and related carbon nitride materials are desirable alternatives to industrially used catalysts because they are easily synthesized from abundant and inexpensive starting materials. Furthermore, these materials are chemically benign because they do not contain heavy metal ions, thereby facilitating handling and disposal. In this Review, we discuss the building blocks of carbon nitride materials and examine how strategies in synthesis, templating and post-processing translate from the molecular level to macroscopic properties, such as optical and electronic bandgap. Applications of carbon nitride materials in bulk heterojunctions, laser-patterned memory devices and energy storage devices indicate that photocatalytic overall water splitting on an industrial scale may be realized in the near future and reveal a new avenue of 'post-silicon electronics'.

  1. Ballistic performance of polyurea-coated armor grade ceramic tiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiee, Ahsan; Isaacs, Jon; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2010-04-01

    The use of ceramics as energy absorbents has been studied by many researchers and some improvements in the ballistic performance of ceramic tiles have been made by coating them with different classes of materials (e.g. E-glass/epoxy, carbon-fiber/epoxy, etc.). Using ceramics for energy absorbing applications leads to a significant weight reduction of the system. Therefore, any modification to the ceramic configuration in the system which leads to more energy absorption with the same or less areal density is significant. On the other hand, polyurea has been proved to be an excellent energy dissipating agent in many applications. Inspired by this, we are studying the effect of coating ceramics with polyurea and other materials, on the energy absorption and ballistic performance of the resulting ceramic-based composites. In this study, we investigate the effect of polyurea on ballistic efficiency of ceramic tiles. To this end, we have performed a set of penetration tests on polyurea-ceramic composites. In our experiments, a high velocity projectile is propelled to impact and perforate the ceramic-polyurea composite. The velocity and mass of the projectile are measured before and after the penetration. The change in the kinetic energy of the projectile is evaluated and compared for different polyurea-ceramic configurations (e.g., polyurea on front face, polyurea on back face, polyurea between two ceramic tiles, etc.). The experimental results suggest that polyurea is not as effective as other restraining materials such as E-glass/epoxy and carbon-fiber/epoxy.

  2. Hydrogen storage in nanoporous carbon materials: myth and facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Hołyst, Robert; Terrones, Mauricio; Terrones, Humberto

    2007-04-21

    We used Grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation to model the hydrogen storage in the primitive, gyroid, diamond, and quasi-periodic icosahedral nanoporous carbon materials and in carbon nanotubes. We found that none of the investigated nanoporous carbon materials satisfy the US Department of Energy goal of volumetric density and mass storage for automotive application (6 wt% and 45 kg H(2) m(-3)) at considered storage condition. Our calculations indicate that quasi-periodic icosahedral nanoporous carbon material can reach the 6 wt% at 3.8 MPa and 77 K, but the volumetric density does not exceed 24 kg H(2) m(-3). The bundle of single-walled carbon nanotubes can store only up to 4.5 wt%, but with high volumetric density of 42 kg H(2) m(-3). All investigated nanoporous carbon materials are not effective against compression above 20 MPa at 77 K because the adsorbed density approaches the density of the bulk fluid. It follows from this work that geometry of carbon surfaces can enhance the storage capacity only to a limited extent. Only a combination of the most effective structure with appropriate additives (metals) can provide an efficient storage medium for hydrogen in the quest for a source of "clean" energy.

  3. New three-phase polymer-ceramic composite materials for miniaturized microwave antennas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Unique polymer-ceramic composites for microwave antenna applications were prepared via melt extrusion using high-density polyethylene (HDPE as the matrix and low-density polyethylene (LDPE coated BaO–Nd2O3–TiO2 (BNT ceramic-powders as the filler. By incorporating LDPE into the composites via a coating route, high ceramic-powder volume content (up to 50 vol% could be achieved. The composites exhibited good microwave dielectric and thermomechanical behaviors. As BNT ceramic content increased from 10 vol% to 50 vol%, the permittivity of the composites increased from 3.45 (9 GHz to 11.87 (7 GHz, while the dielectric loss remained lower than 0.0016. Microstrip antennas for applications in global positioning systems (GPS were designed and fabricated from the composites containing 50 vol% BNT ceramics. The results indicate that the composites that have suitable permittivity and low dielectric loss are promising candidates for applications in miniaturized microwave devices, such as antennas.

  4. New three-phase polymer-ceramic composite materials for miniaturized microwave antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Jie; Yue, Zhenxing; Li, Longtu

    2016-09-01

    Unique polymer-ceramic composites for microwave antenna applications were prepared via melt extrusion using high-density polyethylene (HDPE) as the matrix and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) coated BaO-Nd2O3-TiO2 (BNT) ceramic-powders as the filler. By incorporating LDPE into the composites via a coating route, high ceramic-powder volume content (up to 50 vol%) could be achieved. The composites exhibited good microwave dielectric and thermomechanical behaviors. As BNT ceramic content increased from 10 vol% to 50 vol%, the permittivity of the composites increased from 3.45 (9 GHz) to 11.87 (7 GHz), while the dielectric loss remained lower than 0.0016. Microstrip antennas for applications in global positioning systems (GPS) were designed and fabricated from the composites containing 50 vol% BNT ceramics. The results indicate that the composites that have suitable permittivity and low dielectric loss are promising candidates for applications in miniaturized microwave devices, such as antennas.

  5. Fabrication of Iron-Containing Carbon Materials From Graphite Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-cheh

    1996-01-01

    Carbon materials containing iron alloy, iron metal, iron oxide or iron halide were fabricated. Typical samples of these metals were estimated to contain 1 iron atom per 3.5 to 5 carbon atoms. Those carbon materials containing iron alloy, iron metal, and/or Fe3O4 were magnetic. The kinetics of the fabrication process were studied by exposing graphite fluoride (CF(0.68)) to FeCl3 over a 280 to 420 C temperature range. Between 280 and 295 C, FeCl3 quickly entered the structure of CF(0.68), broke the carbon-fluorine bonds, and within 10 to 30 min, completely converted it to carbon made up of graphite planes between which particles of crystalline FeF3 and noncrystalline FeCl3 were located. Longer reaction times (e.g., 28 hr) or higher reaction temperatures (e.g., 420 C) produced materials containing graphite, a FeCl3-graphite intercalation compound, FeCl2(center dot)4H2O, and FeCl2(center dot)2H2O. These products were further heat treated to produce iron-containing carbon materials. When the heating temperature was kept in the 750 to 850 C range, and the oxygen supply was kept at the optimum level, the iron halides in the carbon structure were converted to iron oxides. Raising the heat to temperatures higher than 900 C reduced such iron oxides to iron metal. The kinetics of these reactions were used to suggest processes for fabricating carbon materials containing iron alloy. Such processes were then tested experimentally. In one of the successful trial runs, commercially purchased CF(0.7) powder was used as the reactant, and NiO was added during the final heating to 1200 C as a source of both nickel and oxygen. The product thus obtained was magnetic and was confirmed to be a nickel-iron alloy in carbon.

  6. Economic application, design analysis, and material availability for ceramic heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennery, V. J.

    1981-01-01

    Fuel consumption in an industrial process can be reduced by 40% or more by using recuperation or regeneration to heat air for the burners compared with use of ambient temperature air for fuel combustion with furnace gases in the range of 1300 C and air preheat temperatures above 800 C. Alloy temperature limitations and corrosion of the alloys severely limit the use of metal recuperators to preheat air above about 600 C. Structural ceramics, such as silicon carbide, offer promise for use in high-temperature HXs for recovering waste heat from hot flue gases. An assessment was made of industrial attitudes toward advanced high-temperature ceramic recuperators. Three promising industrial processes are identified where these recuperators could be applied. Conceptual designs of ceramic recuperators are given consistent with the furnace requirements for these processes. The annual national fuel saving possible for the three applications of these recuperators was estimated.

  7. Si-B-(N,C) a new ceramic material for high performance applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldus, H.P.; Passing, G. [Bayer AG, Leverkusen (France); Sporn, D.; Thieraf, A. [Franuhofer-Institut fuer Silicatforschung, Wuerzburg (France)

    1995-12-01

    A new multinary, single phase (carbo-)nitride ceramic with outstanding properties has been developed. The {open_quotes}single-source{close_quotes} precursor Cl{sub 3}Si-NH-BCl{sub 2} reacts with alkylamines to form a preceramic polymer which can be a liquid or a fusible or infusible solid depending on reaction conditions. Polymer pyrolysis in ammonia or nitrogen leads to amorphous Si{sub 3}B{sub 3}N{sub 7} and SiBN{sub 3}C ceramics, respectively. The present paper reports on the physical and chemical properties of SiBN{sub 3}C ceramics, with emphasis on its outstanding oxidation resistance. The resistance towards crystallization up to 1800{degrees}C enables the development of considerably improved high-performance inorganic fibers.

  8. Carbon nanotubes produced from natural cellulosic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodell, Barry; Xie, Xinfeng; Qian, Yuhui; Daniel, Geoffrey; Peterson, Michael; Jellison, Jody

    2008-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were produced from wood fiber using a low temperature process, which included continuous oxidization at 240 degrees C and cyclic oxidation at 400 degrees C. The inside diameter of the CNTs was approximately 4-5 nm and the outside diameter ranged from 10 nm to 20 nm. No CNTs were produced when pure lignin and cellulose were tested indicating that the molecular and spatial arrangement of cell wall plays an important role in CNT formation. The research suggests that the chemical components in the secondary plant cell wall and their differential ablation properties are critical for the formation of CNTs at these comparatively low temperatures.

  9. Characterization of mechanical damage mechanisms in ceramic composite materials. Technical report, 23 May 1987-24 May 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lankford, J.

    1988-09-01

    High-strain-rate compressive failure mechanisms in fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composite materials were characterized. These are contrasted with composite damage development at low-strain rates, and with the dynamic failure of monolithic ceramics. It is shown that it is possible to derive major strain-rate strengthening benefits if a major fraction of the fiber reinforcement is aligned with the load axis. This effect considerably exceeds the inertial microfracture strengthening observed in monolithic ceramics, and non-aligned composites. Its basis is shown to be the trans-specimen propagation time period for heterogeneously-nucleated, high-strain kink bands. A brief study on zirconia focused on the remarkable inverse strength-strain rate result previously observed for both fully and partially-stabilized zirconia single crystals, whereby the strength decreased with increasing strain rate. Based on the hypothesis that the suppression of microplastic flow, hence, local stress relaxation, might be responsible for this behavior, fully stabilized (i.e., non-transformable) specimens were strain-gaged and subjected to compressive microstrain. The rather stunning observation was that the crystals are highly microplastic, exhibiting plastic yield on loading and anelasticity and reverse plasticity upon unloading. These results clearly support the hypothesis that with increasing strain rate, microcracking is favored at the expense of microplasticity.

  10. In-flight behavior of dissimilar co-injected particles in the spraying of metal-ceramic functionally gradient materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fincke, J.R.; Swank, W.D.; Haggard, D.C. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-12-31

    In the spraying of functionally gradient coatings the particle ensemble delivered to the substrate can vary from a relatively low melting point metallic particle to a significantly higher melting point ceramic particle. At various stages in the spray process the particle ensemble can be either predominantly metallic, ceramic, or an intermediate combination. For co-injected particles the mixtures do not behave as a simple linear superposition of the spray patterns of the individual particle types. The particle temperature, velocity, size distributions, and pattern characteristics of the resulting spray fields is examined for all ceramic particle sprays (ZrO{sub 2}), all metallic particle sprays (NiCrAlY), and for a 1:1 mixture. The major particle-particle interaction occurs in the injector itself and results in a modified spray pattern which is different from that of either material sprayed alone. The particle velocity distributions generally exhibit a bimodal nature which is dependent on the size and density of the injected particles.

  11. Glass and Glass-Ceramic Materials from Simulated Composition of Lunar and Martian Soils: Selected Properties and Potential Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, C. S.; Sen, S.; Reis, S. T.; Kim, C. W.

    2005-01-01

    In-situ resource processing and utilization on planetary bodies is an important and integral part of NASA's space exploration program. Within this scope and context, our general effort is primarily aimed at developing glass and glass-ceramic type materials using lunar and martian soils, and exploring various applications of these materials for planetary surface operations. Our preliminary work to date have demonstrated that glasses can be successfully prepared from melts of the simulated composition of both lunar and martian soils, and the melts have a viscosity-temperature window appropriate for drawing continuous glass fibers. The glasses are shown to have the potential for immobilizing certain types of nuclear wastes without deteriorating their chemical durability and thermal stability. This has a direct impact on successfully and economically disposing nuclear waste generated from a nuclear power plant on a planetary surface. In addition, these materials display characteristics that can be manipulated using appropriate processing protocols to develop glassy or glass-ceramic magnets. Also discussed in this presentation are other potential applications along with a few selected thermal, chemical, and structural properties as evaluated up to this time for these materials.

  12. The archaeometric study of ceramic materials in JCR journals and conference proceedings during the last decade (2000-2010)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena-Poza, J.; Garcia-Heras, M.; Villegas, M. A.

    2011-07-01

    Ceramic is the oldest synthetic material created by the mankind and has been present in human societies from around ten thousand years ago. During the last few decades, within the research field of Archaeometry, the study of archaeological and historical ceramic materials has experienced a significant increase in the application of chemical-physical techniques to obtain information on technology and production of these materials in the past. This paper presents the results obtained in a biblio metric study undertaken on 589 articles published on this subject in JCR journals and conference proceedings during the last decade (2000-2010). The main purpose of this research was to address the recent evolution and trends of this kind of investigations. The parameters analyzed were: date of publication, type of journal, topic, cultural-chronological classification of materials studied, origin country of authors, and analytical techniques used. Resulting data indicated a continual, stable, and growing publication rate on the subject in journals and conference proceedings of the three JCR indexes, namely SCI, AHCI, and SSCI, which evidences a high level of interdisciplinary. Authors from Europe and the United States carried out the majority of contributions. (Author) 30 refs.

  13. Hydrogen storage by carbon materials synthesized from oil seeds and fibrous plant materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharon, Maheshwar; Bhardwaj, Sunil; Jaybhaye, Sandesh [Nanotechnology Research Center, Birla College, Kalyan 421304 (India); Soga, T.; Afre, Rakesh [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya (Japan); Sathiyamoorthy, D.; Dasgupta, K. [Powder Metallurgy Division, BARC, Trombay 400 085 (India); Sharon, Madhuri [Monad Nanotech Pvt. Ltd., A702 Bhawani Tower, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India)

    2007-12-15

    Carbon materials of various morphologies have been synthesized by pyrolysis of various oil-seeds and plant's fibrous materials. These materials are characterized by SEM and Raman. Surface areas of these materials are determined by methylene blue method. These carbon porous materials are used for hydrogen storage. Carbon fibers with channel type structure are obtained from baggas and coconut fibers. It is reported that amongst the different plant based precursors studied, carbon from soyabean (1.09 wt%) and baggas (2.05 wt%) gave the better capacity to store hydrogen at 11kg/m{sup 2} pressure of hydrogen at room temperature. Efforts are made to correlate the hydrogen adsorption capacity with intensities and peak positions of G- and D-band obtained with carbon materials synthesized from plant based precursors. It is suggested that carbon materials whose G-band is around 1575cm{sup -1} and the intensity of D-band is less compared to G-band, may be useful material for hydrogen adsorption study. (author)

  14. Evaluation of performance of materials used in the ceramic materials restoration of the Plaza de España (Sevilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandre Sánchez, F. J.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Different commercial mortars and stuecos used to cold restore the glazing on deteriorated tile in Seville s Plaza de España were tested for performance and durability. Five types of samples were applied to ceramic bisques and subsequently coloured and protected with resins. The samples were subjected to accelerated weathering consisting in salt crystallization, temperature and relative humidity cycles and ultraviolet radiation. Durability was assessed by visually comparing the effect of salt crystallization, determining the colour parameters with colourimetry and measuring adherence and capillary water absorption. The results obtained were used to differentiate the materials tested in two respects: stucco and protective resin performance under the environmental conditions prevailing in the Plaza de España on the one hand and colour stability on the other.

    En el presente trabajo se estudia el comportamiento y la durabilidad de diferentes morteros y estucos comerciales que se han utilizado para restituir enfrío las pérdidas de vidriado en azulejos deteriorados de la Plaza de España (Sevilla. Para ello se han preparado 5 tipos de muestras que se han aplicado sobre bizcochos cerámicos y que posteriormente se han coloreado y protegido con resinas. Las muestras se han sometido a ensayos de alteración acelerada: cristalización de sales, ciclos de temperatura y humedad relativa, y radiación ultravioleta. La evaluación de la durabilidad se ha llevado a cabo mediante la comparación visual del efecto de cristalización de las sales, la determinación de los parámetros de color mediante colorimetría, de la adherencia y de la absorción de agua por capilaridad. Los resultados obtenidos, permiten realizar una diferenciación en dos aspectos, por un lado, el comportamiento del estuco y su protección para soportar las condiciones medioambientales de la Plaza de España, y, por otro, la estabilidad de los diferentes colores.

  15. Mesoporous functionalized carbon materials as advanced sorbents and electrode materials

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Zhangxiong

    2017-01-01

    The problems of environmental pollution and energy depletion have triggered enormous concerns across the world. There has been a vast abundance of global research development and demonstration efforts to alleviate these problems. However, it is obvious that these problems will continue in the 21st century, and thus advances in development and deployment of new technologies are in high demand. To approach these goals, fundamental research regarding creating novel materials carrying targeted fu...

  16. Covalent Crosslinking of Carbon Nanotube Materials for Improved Tensile Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, James S.; Miller, Sandi G.; Williams, Tiffany A.; Meador, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have attracted much interest in recent years due to their exceptional mechanical properties. Currently, the tensile properties of bulk carbon nanotube-based materials (yarns, sheets, etc.) fall far short of those of the individual nanotube elements. The premature failure in these materials under tensile load has been attributed to inter-tube sliding, which requires far less force than that needed to fracture individual nanotubes.1,2 In order for nanotube materials to achieve their full potential, methods are needed to restrict this tube-tube shear and increase inter-tube forces.Our group is examining covalent crosslinking between the nanotubes as a means to increase the tensile properties of carbon nanotube materials. We are working with multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) sheet and yarn materials obtained from commercial sources. Several routes to functionalize the nanotubes have been examined including nitrene, aryl diazonium, and epoxide chemistries. The functional nanotubes were crosslinked through small molecule or polymeric bridges. Additionally, electron beam irradiation induced crosslinking of the non-functional and functional nanotube materials was conducted. For example, a nanotube sheet material containing approximately 3.5 mol amine functional groups exhibited a tensile strength of 75 MPa and a tensile modulus of 1.16 GPa, compared to 49 MPa and 0.57 GPa, respectively, for the as-received material. Electron beam irradiation (2.2x 1017 ecm2) of the same amine-functional sheet material further increased the tensile strength to 120 MPa and the modulus to 2.61 GPa. This represents approximately a 150 increase in tensile strength and a 360 increase in tensile modulus over the as-received material with only a 25 increase in material mass. Once we have optimized the nanotube crosslinking methods, the performance of these materials in polymer matrix composites will be evaluated.

  17. Use of municipal solid waste incineration bottom ashes in alkali-activated materials, ceramics and granular applications: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, R V; de Brito, J; Lynn, C J; Dhir, R K

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a literature review on the incorporation of municipal solid waste incinerated bottom ash as raw material in several markets, other than those where it is conventionally used, such as geotechnical applications and road pavement construction. The main findings of an ample selection of experimental investigations on the use of the bottom ash as precursor of alkali-activated materials, as an adsorbent material for the removal of hazardous elements from wastewater and landfill gases, as soil replacement in agricultural activities, as partial or complete substitute of raw materials for the manufacture of ceramic-based products, as landfill cover and as biogas production enhancer, were gathered, collated and analysed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular simulation for novel carbon buckyball materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan R. Obayes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of buckyballs was unexpected because the researchers were delivering carbon plasmas to reproduce and describe unidentified interstellar matter. Density functional theory was done to study and design the structure of [8]circulene and three new buckyballs with molecular dimensions of less than a nanometer. Cyclic polymerization reactions can be utilized to prepare new buckyballs, and this process also produces molecules of hydrogen. All reactions are spontaneous and exothermic as per the estimations to the values of entropy, Gibbs energy, and enthalpy changes. The results demonstrate that the most symmetric buckyball is the most stable, and the molecular dimensions are less than a nanometer. The new buckyballs are characterized by the high efficiency of their energy gaps, making it potentially useful for solar cell applications.

  19. Carbon-Nanotube-Based Thermoelectric Materials and Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackburn, Jeffrey L. [Chemistry and Nanoscience Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO 80401-3305 USA; Ferguson, Andrew J. [Chemistry and Nanoscience Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO 80401-3305 USA; Cho, Chungyeon [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station TX 77843-3003 USA; Grunlan, Jaime C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station TX 77843-3003 USA

    2018-01-22

    Conversion of waste heat to voltage has the potential to significantly reduce the carbon footprint of a number of critical energy sectors, such as the transportation and electricity-generation sectors, and manufacturing processes. Thermal energy is also an abundant low-flux source that can be harnessed to power portable/wearable electronic devices and critical components in remote off-grid locations. As such, a number of different inorganic and organic materials are being explored for their potential in thermoelectric-energy-harvesting devices. Carbon-based thermoelectric materials are particularly attractive due to their use of nontoxic, abundant source-materials, their amenability to high-throughput solution-phase fabrication routes, and the high specific energy (i.e., W g-1) enabled by their low mass. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) represent a unique 1D carbon allotrope with structural, electrical, and thermal properties that enable efficient thermoelectric-energy conversion. Here, the progress made toward understanding the fundamental thermoelectric properties of SWCNTs, nanotube-based composites, and thermoelectric devices prepared from these materials is reviewed in detail. This progress illuminates the tremendous potential that carbon-nanotube-based materials and composites have for producing high-performance next-generation devices for thermoelectric-energy harvesting.

  20. Carbon-Nanotube-Based Thermoelectric Materials and Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Jeffrey L; Ferguson, Andrew J; Cho, Chungyeon; Grunlan, Jaime C

    2018-01-22

    Conversion of waste heat to voltage has the potential to significantly reduce the carbon footprint of a number of critical energy sectors, such as the transportation and electricity-generation sectors, and manufacturing processes. Thermal energy is also an abundant low-flux source that can be harnessed to power portable/wearable electronic devices and critical components in remote off-grid locations. As such, a number of different inorganic and organic materials are being explored for their potential in thermoelectric-energy-harvesting devices. Carbon-based thermoelectric materials are particularly attractive due to their use of nontoxic, abundant source-materials, their amenability to high-throughput solution-phase fabrication routes, and the high specific energy (i.e., W g -1 ) enabled by their low mass. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) represent a unique 1D carbon allotrope with structural, electrical, and thermal properties that enable efficient thermoelectric-energy conversion. Here, the progress made toward understanding the fundamental thermoelectric properties of SWCNTs, nanotube-based composites, and thermoelectric devices prepared from these materials is reviewed in detail. This progress illuminates the tremendous potential that carbon-nanotube-based materials and composites have for producing high-performance next-generation devices for thermoelectric-energy harvesting. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. [Scintigraphic detection of osteoblast activity after implantation of BAS-0 bioactive glass-ceramic material into long bone defects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponer, P; Urban, K; Urbanová, E

    2006-06-01

    The aim of the study was to demonstrate, by three-phase bone scintigraphy, radionuclide uptake at the site of defects in long bones filled with the non-resorbable bioactive glass-ceramic material BAS-0 at a long follow-up. Twenty patients, 14 men and 6 women, operated on between 1990 and 2000 for benign bone tumors or tumor-like lesions localized in the femur, tibia or humerus were comprised in the study. Their average age at the time of operation was 14 years (range, 8 to 24). The diagnoses based on histological examination included juvenile bone cysts in 11, aneurysmal bone cyst in five, non-ossifying fibroma in two, and fibrous dysplasia in two patients. The lesions were localized in the femur, humerus and tibia in 11, five and four patients, respectively. The metaphysis was affected in eight and the diaphysis in 12 patients. Clinical, radiological and scintigraphic examinations were carried out at 2 to 12 years (7 years on average) after surgery. The clinical evaluation included subjective complaints and objective findings. Radiographs were made in standard projections and the osteo-integration of glass-ceramic material was investigated. Three-phase bone scans were made and the healthy and the affected limbs in each patient were compared by means of an index. Radionuclide uptake was considered normal when the index value was equal to 1.0, mildly increased at an index value of 1.2, moderately increased at 1.2-1.5 and markedly increased at an index value higher than 1.5. The clinical evaluation showed that, in the patients with glass-ceramic filling of metaphyses, six had no subjective complaints and two reported transient pain. In the patients with implants in diaphyses, subjective complaints were recorded in nine and no complaints in three patients. No inflammatory changes in soft tissues were found. No restriction in weightbearing of the limb treated was reported by any of the patients. On radiography, 18 patients were free from any disease residue or

  2. Microwave Sintering of Ceramic Materials for Industrial Application Final Report CRADA No. TC-1116-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caplan, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tandon, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Callis, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-19

    The goal of this project was to develop the commercial capability in the US to sinter alumina oxide ceramic parts for the semiconductor manufacturing equipment industry. We planned to use the millimeter microwave (30 GHz) sintering system first developed by IAP in Russia.

  3. LSST camera grid structure made out of ceramic composite material, HB-Cesic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroedel, Matthias R.; Langton, J. Bryan

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we are presenting the ceramic design and the fabrication of the camera structure which is using the unique manufacturing features of the HB-Cesic technology and associated with a dedicated metrology device in order to ensure the challenging flatness requirement of 4 micron over the full array.

  4. Sintered gahnite–cordierite glass-ceramic based on raw materials ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Glass-ceramic based on Zn-containing cordierite was prepared from kaolin, silica'sand and commer- cial ZnO. The addition of AlF3, MgF2 and CaF2 was performed as nucleation catalysts. Dark brown glasses were obtained from the glass batches. The transformation and crystallization temperatures were in the ...

  5. Application of Ceramic Powder as Supplementary Cementitious Material in Lime Plasters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika ČÁCHOVÁ

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the properties of plasters based on lime – brick powder binder of varying composition (ceramics content from 0 to 80 % are studied. The plasters are prepared with a constant water amount. The pore size distribution is thus influenced in a positive way; the total porosity increases with the ceramics content but the volume of capillary pores is reduced. It results in lower water vapor diffusion resistance factor while the apparent moisture diffusivity coefficient increases just moderately. The influence of ceramic on strength of plasters is not found very important. The thermal conductivity of plasters containing ceramics is lower than those with the pure lime what is again in agreement with the pore size distribution. It can be concluded that fine brick powder can be used as pozzolanic admixture in lime based plasters with a positive influence on its functional parameters.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.3.7433

  6. High gamma-ray measurement using optical emission of ceramic material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakuta, Tsunemi; Sakasai, Kaoru; Yamagishi, Hideshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Nakazawa, Masaharu

    1996-07-01

    This paper describes the fluorescence phenomena in Zr-O ceramic under expose to high gamma-ray and fission neutron source. In addition, the paper also discusses the possibility of ionizing radiation detection in the core region of reactor. (J.P.N.)

  7. Materiais cerâmicos para células a combustível Ceramic materials for fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Z. de Florio

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A partir da definição de células a combustível, é feita uma introdução sucinta dos tipos de células e dos materiais cerâmicos que são empregados em projeto e fabricação destes dispositivos geradores de energia elétrica. Tomando por base a ampla literatura científica disponível em publicações periódicas internacionais indexadas e arbitradas, bem como patentes, são relatados com detalhes os materiais cerâmicos com comportamento elétrico adequado para uso como eletrólitos, anodos, catodos, interconectores e selantes, que são os componentes básicos de células a combustível de óxidos sólidos. Por fim, é feita uma avaliação do estado da arte na pesquisa e desenvolvimento de materiais cerâmicos para uso em células a combustível de óxidos sólidos.Basic definitions of fuel cells and a brief introduction of different types of fuel cells are given. A review of the most important ceramic materials being considered for the design and fabrication of devices for producing electrical energy is presented. Ceramic materials with suitable electrical behavior to be used as electrolytes, anodes, cathodes, interconnectors, and sealants of solid oxide fuel cells are reported with details, taking into account the large number of available indexed and refereed scientific publications and patents. Finally, an evaluation of the state of the art of the research and development of ceramic materials for solid oxide fuel cells is presented.

  8. Multiscale experimental mechanics of hierarchical carbon-based materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Horacio D; Filleter, Tobin; Naraghi, Mohammad

    2012-06-05

    Investigation of the mechanics of natural materials, such as spider silk, abalone shells, and bone, has provided great insight into the design of materials that can simultaneously achieve high specific strength and toughness. Research has shown that their emergent mechanical properties are owed in part to their specific self-organization in hierarchical molecular structures, from nanoscale to macroscale, as well as their mixing and bonding. To apply these findings to manmade materials, researchers have devoted significant efforts in developing a fundamental understanding of multiscale mechanics of materials and its application to the design of novel materials with superior mechanical performance. These efforts included the utilization of some of the most promising carbon-based nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes, carbon nanofibers, and graphene, together with a variety of matrix materials. At the core of these efforts lies the need to characterize material mechanical behavior across multiple length scales starting from nanoscale characterization of constituents and their interactions to emerging micro- and macroscale properties. In this report, progress made in experimental tools and methods currently used for material characterization across multiple length scales is reviewed, as well as a discussion of how they have impacted our current understanding of the mechanics of hierarchical carbon-based materials. In addition, insight is provided into strategies for bridging experiments across length scales, which are essential in establishing a multiscale characterization approach. While the focus of this progress report is in experimental methods, their concerted use with theoretical-computational approaches towards the establishment of a robust material by design methodology is also discussed, which can pave the way for the development of novel materials possessing unprecedented mechanical properties. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. In Situ Formation of Carbon Nanomaterials on Bulk Metallic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Y. Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanomaterials were synthesized in situ on bulk 316L stainless steel, pure cobalt, and pure nickel by hybrid surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT. The microstructures of the treated samples and the resulted carbon nanomaterials were investigated by SEM and TEM characterizations. Different substrates resulted in different morphologies of products. The diameter of carbon nanomaterials is related to the size of the nanograins on the surface layer of substrates. The possible growth mechanism was discussed. Effects of the main parameters of the synthesis, including the carbon source and gas reactant composition, hydrogen, and the reaction temperature, were studied. Using hybrid SMAT is proved to be an effective way to synthesize carbon nanomaterials in situ on surfaces of metallic materials.

  10. Research & Development of Materials/Processing Methods for Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) Phase 2 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szweda, A.

    2001-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) Initiative that begun in 1992 has led the way for Industry, Academia, and Government to carry out a 10 year R&D plan to develop CFCCs for these industrial applications. In Phase II of this program, Dow Corning has led a team of OEM's, composite fabricators, and Government Laboratories to develop polymer derived CFCC materials and processes for selected industrial applications. During this phase, Dow Corning carried extensive process development and representative component demonstration activities on gas turbine components, chemical pump components and heat treatment furnace components.

  11. Early-Transition-Metal Silicon Compounds and Their Roles in the Synthesis of New Polymeric and Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-31

    trimethylsilyl)silyl Derivatives of Tri (tert- b Utoxy) zircon ium and - Hafnium . X-ray Crystal Structure Of (Me 3 CO)3ZrSi(SiMe 3 )3 ." R. 1-1. H-eyn and T. D...Rules in the Synthesis of New Polymeric and Ceramic Materials 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) T. Don Tilley 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF...California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0506 ____ Acc’-ion For - INCLUSIVE DATES : 01 June1 1988 -31 May 1991NTSC& GRANT NUMBER: Al-OSIR-88

  12. Improved Composites Using Crosslinked, Surface-Modified Carbon Nanotube Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, James Stewart

    2014-01-01

    Individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit exceptional tensile strength and stiffness; however, these properties have not translated well to the macroscopic scale. Premature failure of bulk CNT materials under tensile loading occurs due to the relatively weak frictional forces between adjacent CNTs, leading to poor load transfer through the material. When used in polymer matrix composites (PMCs), the weak nanotube-matrix interaction leads to the CNTs providing less than optimal reinforcement.Our group is examining the use of covalent crosslinking and surface modification as a means to improve the tensile properties of PMCs containing carbon nanotubes. Sheet material comprised of unaligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) was used as a drop-in replacement for carbon fiber in the composites. A variety of post-processing methods have been examined for covalently crosslinking the CNTs to overcome the weak inter-nanotube shear interactions, resulting in improved tensile strength and modulus for the bulk sheet material. Residual functional groups from the crosslinking chemistry may have the added benefit of improving the nanotube-matrix interaction. Composites prepared using these crosslinked, surface-modified nanotube sheet materials exhibit superior tensile properties to composites using the as received CNT sheet material.

  13. Polymeric Materials Reinforced with Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes: A Constitutive Material Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Ortega

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we have modified an existing material model introduced by Cantournet and co-workers to take into account softening and residual strain effects observed in polymeric materials reinforced with carbon nanotubes when subjected to loading and unloading cycles. In order to assess the accuracy of the modified material model, we have compared theoretical predictions with uniaxial extension experimental data obtained from reinforced polymeric material samples. It is shown that the proposed model follows experimental data well as its maximum errors attained are lower than 2.67%, 3.66%, 7.11% and 6.20% for brominated isobutylene and paramethylstyrene copolymer reinforced with multiwall carbon nanotubes (BIMSM-MWCNT, reinforced natural rubber (NR-MWCNT, polybutadiene-carbon black (PB-CB, and PC/ABS reinforced with single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT, respectively.

  14. Metal-Free Carbon Materials for CO2 Electrochemical Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiaochuan; Xu, Jiantie; Wei, Zengxi; Ma, Jianmin; Guo, Shaojun; Wang, Shuangyin; Liu, Huakun; Dou, Shixue

    2017-11-01

    The rapid increase of the CO2 concentration in the Earth's atmosphere has resulted in numerous environmental issues, such as global warming, ocean acidification, melting of the polar ice, rising sea level, and extinction of species. To search for suitable and capable catalytic systems for CO2 conversion, electrochemical reduction of CO2 (CO2 RR) holds great promise. Emerging heterogeneous carbon materials have been considered as promising metal-free electrocatalysts for the CO2 RR, owing to their abundant natural resources, tailorable porous structures, resistance to acids and bases, high-temperature stability, and environmental friendliness. They exhibit remarkable CO2 RR properties, including catalytic activity, long durability, and high selectivity. Here, various carbon materials (e.g., carbon fibers, carbon nanotubes, graphene, diamond, nanoporous carbon, and graphene dots) with heteroatom doping (e.g., N, S, and B) that can be used as metal-free catalysts for the CO2 RR are highlighted. Recent advances regarding the identification of active sites for the CO2 RR and the pathway of reduction of CO2 to the final product are comprehensively reviewed. Additionally, the emerging challenges and some perspectives on the development of heteroatom-doped carbon materials as metal-free electrocatalysts for the CO2 RR are included. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Experimental Studies of Carbon Nanotube Materials for Space Radiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    SanSoucie, MIchael P.; Rogers, Jan R.; Craven, Paul D.; Hyers, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    Game ]changing propulsion systems are often enabled by novel designs using advanced materials. Radiator performance dictates power output for nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) systems. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and carbon fiber materials have the potential to offer significant improvements in thermal conductivity and mass properties. A test apparatus was developed to test advanced radiator designs. This test apparatus uses a resistance heater inside a graphite tube. Metallic tubes can be slipped over the graphite tube to simulate a heat pipe. Several sub ]scale test articles were fabricated using CNT cloth and pitch ]based carbon fibers, which were bonded to a metallic tube using an active braze material. The test articles were heated up to 600 C and an infrared (IR) camera captured the results. The test apparatus and experimental results are presented here.

  16. Migration Mechanism for Atomic Hydrogen in Porous Carbon Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayanan, B.; Zhao, Y. F.; Ciobanu, C. V.

    2012-05-14

    To explain the fast kinetics of H in porous carbon, we propose that the migration relies on H hopping from a carbon nanotube (CNT) to another. Using density functional theory, we have found that the barrier for H hopping becomes smaller than that for diffusion along a tube for certain CNT separations, decreasting to less than 0.5 eV for separations of -3.1 {angstrom}. Such significant reduction occurs irrespective of radius, chirality, registry, and orientation of the two CNTs: the diffusion is thus facilitated by the porous nature of the material itself. The mechanism proposed is applicable for any porous carbon-based nanomaterials.

  17. Influence of corn flour as pore forming agent on porous ceramic material based mullite: Morphology and mechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayala-Landeros J.G.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Porous material was processed by the mixing, molding and pressing the ceramic material, afterward burnout and sintering; through the forming porous, using corn flour at different concentration (10, 15 and 20 wt.% as a pore forming agent; in order to determinate the influence of porous on the mechanical, morphological and structural properties. The effect of the volume fraction of corn flour in the mullite matrix, at various sintering temperature from 1100, 1200, 1300 and 1500°C were tested by Diffraction X ray, showing changes in crystalline phases of mullite (3Al2O3-2SiO2, as result of sintered temperatures. Presence of talcum powder in formula, also cause the formation of the cordierite and cristobalite crystalline phases, giving stability and adhesion to the structure of ceramic material. When sintering at temperatures between 1300 to 1500°C, and it was used the concentration of corn flour 15-20 wt.% as forming agent porous, it was found the better mechanical properties. The scanning electron microscopy analysis shows the presence of open porosity and anisotropy.

  18. Growth of Carbon Nanostructure Materials Using Laser Vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehozeky, S.

    2000-01-01

    Since the potential applications of carbon nanotubes (CNT) was discovered in many fields, such as non-structure electronics, lightweight composite structure, and drug delivery, CNT has been grown by many techniques in which high yield single wall CNT has been produced by physical processes including arc vaporization and laser vaporization. In this presentation, the growth mechanism of the carbon nanostructure materials by laser vaporization is to be discussed. Carbon nanoparticles and nanotubes have been synthesized using pulsed laser vaporization on Si substrates in various temperatures and pressures. Two kinds of targets were used to grow the nanostructure materials. One was a pure graphite target and the other one contained Ni and Co catalysts. The growth temperatures were 600-1000 C and the pressures varied from several torr to 500 torr. Carbon nanoparticles were observed when a graphite target was used, although catalysts were deposited on substrates before growing carbon films. When the target contains catalysts, carbon nanotubes (CNT) are obtained. The CNT were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, optical absorption and transmission, and Raman spectroscopy. The temperature-and pressure-dependencies of carbon nanotubes' growth rate and size were investigated.

  19. Creep in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    This textbook is one of its kind, since there are no other books on Creep in Ceramics. The book consist of two parts: A and B. In part A general knowledge of creep in ceramics is considered, while part B specifies creep in technologically important ceramics. Part B covers creep in oxide ceramics, carnides and nitrides. While covering all relevant information regarding raw materials and characterization of creep in ceramics, the book also summarizes most recent innovations and developments in this field as a result of extensive literature search.

  20. LD-end-pumped passively Q-switched Nd:YAG ceramic laser with single wall carbon nanotube saturable absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C. Y.; Bo, Y.; Zong, N.; Wang, Y. G.; Jiang, B. X.; Pan, Y. B.; Niu, G.; Fan, Z. W.; Peng, Q. J.; Cui, D. F.; Xu, Z. Y.

    2012-10-01

    We report on a LD-end-pumped passively Q-switched Nd:YAG ceramic laser by using a novel single wall carbon nanotube saturable absorber (SWCNT-SA). The SWCNT wafer was fabricated by electric Arc discharge method on quartz substrate with absorption wavelength of 1064 nm. We firstly investigated the continuous wave (CW) laser performance and scattering properties of Nd:YAG ceramic sample. For the case of passively Q-switched operation, a maximum output power of 376 mW was obtained at an incident pump power of 8.68 W at 808 nm, corresponding to an optical-optical conversion efficiency of 4.3%. The repetition rate as the increase of pump power varied from 14 to 95 kHz. The minimum pulse duration of 1.2 μs and maximum pulse energy of 4.5 μJ was generated at a repetition rate of 31.8 kHz.

  1. Carbon-based nanomaterials: multifunctional materials for biomedical engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Chaenyung; Shin, Su Ryon; Annabi, Nasim; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-04-23

    Functional carbon-based nanomaterials (CBNs) have become important due to their unique combinations of chemical and physical properties (i.e., thermal and electrical conductivity, high mechanical strength, and optical properties), and extensive research efforts are being made to utilize these materials for various industrial applications, such as high-strength materials and electronics. These advantageous properties of CBNs are also actively investigated in several areas of biomedical engineering. This Perspective highlights different types of carbon-based nanomaterials currently used in biomedical applications.

  2. Efficiency of dual-cured resin cement polymerization induced by high-intensity LED curing units through ceramic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, H; Kazama, Re; Asai, T; Kanaya, F; Ishizaki, H; Fukushima, M; Okiji, T

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the ability of high-intensity light-emitting diode (LED) and other curing units to cure dual-cured resin cement through ceramic material. A halogen curing unit (Jetlite 3000, Morita), a second-generation LED curing unit (Demi, Kerr), and two high-intensity LED curing units (PenCure 2000, Morita; Valo, Ultradent) were tested. Feldspathic ceramic plates (VITABLOCS Mark II, A3; Vita Zahnfabrik) with thicknesses of 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 mm were prepared. Dual-cured resin cement samples (Clearfil Esthetic Cement, Kuraray Noritake Dental) were irradiated directly or through one of the ceramic plates for different periods (5, 10, 15, or 20 seconds for the high-intensity LED units and 20, 40, 60, or 80 seconds for the others). The Knoop hardness test was used to determine the level of photopolymerization that had been induced in the resin cement. Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Dunnett's post-hoc test to identify test-control (maximum irradiation without a ceramic plate) differences for each curing unit (punits, the curing conditions had a statistically significant effect on the Knoop hardness numbers (KHNs) of the irradiated cement samples (punits (except for PenCure 2000 at 3.0 mm) were able to achieve control-level KHN values when the irradiation time was extended. At a plate thickness of 3.0 mm, irradiation for 20 seconds with the Valo or for 80 seconds with the Demi were the only methods that produced KHN values equivalent to those produced by direct irradiation. Regardless of the type of curing unit used, indirect irradiation of dual-cured resin cement through a ceramic plate resulted in decreased KHN values compared with direct irradiation. When the irradiation period was extended, only the LED units were able to achieve similar KHN values to those observed under direct irradiation in the presence of plates ≥2.0-mm thick. High-intensity LED units require a shorter irradiation period than halogen and second

  3. An investigation into the role of core porcelain thickness and lamination in determining the flexural strength of In-Ceram dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshehri, Sharifa Abdullah

    2011-06-01

    A biaxial flexure test was conducted to evaluate the effect of reducing the thickness of In-Ceram core material and veneering with Vitadur α dentine porcelain on its flexural strength. Four groups of 10 discs were tested; group I discs were In-Ceram discs with mean thickness of 1.58 ± 0.08 mm, group II discs were In-Ceram discs with mean thickness of 1.0 ± 0.11 mm, group III discs were laminated In-Ceram core porcelain/Vitadur α discs with a mean total thickness of 2.06 ± 0.15 mm and core porcelain thickness of 1.0 ± 0.11 mm; group IV discs were Vitadur α discs with a mean thickness of 2.08 ± 0.16 mm. Mean flexural strength values decreased between groups: 436 ± 38 MPa for group I, 352 ± 30 MPa for group II, 237 ± 24 MPa for group III, and 77 ± 14 MPa for group IV. The result of ANOVA and Tukey tests indicated that the mean flexural strength of group II was significantly less than group I, indicating that thickness of the In-Ceram core provides critical flexural strength to the final product. The addition of ≈ 1 mm of Vitadur α veneering porcelain to In-Ceram core significantly (p= 0.05) reduced the flexural strength as compared to the nonveneered In-Ceram core specimens (group II). The Vitadur α specimens (group IV) were significantly weaker than all the other groups. This study indicates that lamination should be avoided in areas where maximum strength is required for In-Ceram all-ceramic crowns and bridges. © 2011 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  4. Spectroscopic investigation of nitrogen-functionalized carbon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Kevin N. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois Street Golden CO 80401 USA; Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor MI 48109 USA; Christensen, Steven T. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Pkwy Golden CO 80401 USA; Nordlund, Dennis [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd Menlo Park CA 94023 USA; Dameron, Arrelaine A. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Pkwy Golden CO 80401 USA; Ngo, Chilan [Department of Chemistry and Geochemistry, Colorado School of Mines, 1012 14th Street Golden CO 80401 USA; Dinh, Huyen [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Pkwy Golden CO 80401 USA; Gennett, Thomas [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Pkwy Golden CO 80401 USA; O' Hayre, Ryan [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois Street Golden CO 80401 USA; Pylypenko, Svitlana [Department of Chemistry and Geochemistry, Colorado School of Mines, 1012 14th Street Golden CO 80401 USA

    2016-04-07

    Carbon materials are used in a diverse set of applications ranging from pharmaceuticals to catalysis. Nitrogen modification of carbon powders has shown to be an effective method for enhancing both surface and bulk properties of as-received material for a number of applications. Unfortunately, control of the nitrogen modification process is challenging and can limit the effectiveness and reproducibility of N-doped materials. Additionally, the assignment of functional groups to specific moieties on the surface of nitrogen-modified carbon materials is not straightforward. Herein, we complete an in-depth analysis of functional groups present at the surface of ion-implanted Vulcan and Graphitic Vulcan through the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near edge X-ray adsorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS). Our results show that regardless of the initial starting materials used, nitrogen ion implantation conditions can be tuned to increase the amount of nitrogen incorporation and to obtain both similar and reproducible final distributions of nitrogen functional groups. The development of a well-controlled/reproducible nitrogen implantation pathway opens the door for carbon supported catalyst architectures to have improved numbers of nucleation sites, decreased particle size, and enhanced catalyst-support interactions.

  5. Faradaic current in different mullite materials. Single crystal, ceramic and cermets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mata-Osoro, Gustavo; Moya, Jose S.; Pecharroman, Carlos [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC) (Spain); Morales, Miguel [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain). LabCaF; Diaz, L. Antonio [Centro de Investigacion en Nanomateriales y Nanotecnologia (CINN-CSIC), Llanera (Spain); Schneider, Hartmut [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kristallographie

    2012-04-15

    Faradaic current measurements have been carried out on three different types of mullite: 2: 1 mullite single crystals (E perpendicular to c), 3: 2 ceramics and 11 % mullite/Mo composites. Measurements were carried out on very thin samples (60 {mu}m) at high voltages (500 to 1 000 V). Under these conditions, measurable currents were recorded even at room temperature. Results indicate notable differences between these three samples, which suggest that, although they share the same name and similar crystalline structure, binding energies and defect distributions seem to be very different. Finally, it has been seen that the excellent behaviour against dielectric breakdown of ceramic mullite does not hold for single crystals or mullite based cermets. (orig.)

  6. Process for inertization of asbestos containing materials and recycling of inerts for production of cordierite ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marabini, A.M.; Plescia, P.; Maccari, D. [CNR Istituto Trattamento Minerali, Rome (Italy)

    1997-12-31

    A process has been studied for the inertization of asbestos-containing wastes and the subsequent recycling of the inerts for the production of cordierite ceramics used in electronic industry and in automotive industry (catalytic converters). The proposed process called Cordiam 94 involves mixing the refuse containing chrysotile asbestos with kaolinite or kaolinite-illite to obtain a sintered cordierite product through high-temperature solid-state reactions. Characteristics of the original and final products are presented

  7. Creep Performance of Oxide Ceramic Fiber Materials at Elevated Temperature in Air and in Steam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    boundary etching. Kronenberg et al. [74] and Castaing et al. [19] characterized the hydrogen impurities in hydrothermally annealed ceramics and...performed a TEM examination of the alumina specimens tested by Castaing et al. [19]. In general, the study concluded that small grain size promotes...pp. 257-264, 1987. 19. J. Castaing , A. K. Kronenberg, S. H. Kirby and T. E. Mitchell, "Hydrogen defects in α-Al2O3 and water weakening of

  8. Carbon-Carbon Composites as Recuperator Material for Direct Gas Brayton Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RA Wolf

    2006-07-19

    Of the numerous energy conversion options available for a space nuclear power plant (SNPP), one that shows promise in attaining reliable operation and high efficiency is the direct gas Brayton (GB) system. In order to increase efficiency, the GB system incorporates a recuperator that accounts for nearly half the weight of the energy conversion system (ECS). Therefore, development of a recuperator that is lighter and provides better performance than current heat exchangers could prove to be advantageous. The feasibility of a carbon-carbon (C/C) composite recuperator core has been assessed and a mass savings of 60% and volume penalty of 20% were projected. The excellent thermal properties, high-temperature capabilities, and low density of carbon-carbon materials make them attractive in the GB system, but development issues such as material compatibility with other structural materials in the system, such as refractory metals and superalloys, permeability, corrosion, joining, and fabrication must be addressed.

  9. Nano Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, In Ju; Lee, Ik Mo; Kwon, Yeung Gu; and others

    2006-02-15

    This book introduces background of nano science such as summary, plenty room at the bottom, access way to nano technique, nanoparticles using bottom-up method which are a marvel of nature, and modern alchemy : chemical synthesis of artificial nano structure, understanding of quantum mechanics, STM/AFM, nano metal powder, ceramic nanoparticles, nano structure film, manufacture of nanoparticles using reverse micelle method, carbon nano tube, sol-gel material, nano energy material, nano catalyst nano bio material technology and spintronics.

  10. Intermittent loading of teeth restored using quartz fiber, carbon-quartz fiber, and zirconium dioxide ceramic root canal posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannocci, F; Ferrari, M; Watson, T F

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to compare the performances of teeth restored with quartz fiber, carbon-quartz fiber, and zirconium-dioxide posts covered with all-ceramic crowns when subjected to a cyclic loading test performed in a wet environment. Forty single-rooted human lower premolars having similar dimensions were endodontically treated and mounted in acrylic resin blocks with a simulated periodontal ligament. The teeth were divided into three experimental groups and one control group. Post holes 8 mm long were prepared in the roots of the experimental groups in which quartz fiber, carbon-quartz fiber, and zirconium dioxide posts were cemented. In the control group, no posts were used. The crown buildup was made with composite resin. The teeth were covered with all-ceramic crowns and intermittently loaded at an angle of 45 degrees to the long axis of the tooth at a frequency of two loads per second. Only one failure (root fracture + post fracture) was observed in each of the fiber post groups, while in the zirconium dioxide post group, six failures were observed (one crown fracture and 5 root fractures + post fractures). The Kaplan-Meier analysis of the three experimental groups showed that the survival rate of zirconium dioxide posts was significantly lower than that of both types of fiber post. All the experimental groups showed a survival rate higher than that of the control group. Fiber posts reduced to a minimum the risk of root fractures of teeth restored with composite cores and Empress crowns under the present experimental conditions (intermittent loading in a wet environment).

  11. Preparation, microstructure and oxidation resistance of SiCN ceramic matrix composites with glass-like carbon interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Xia

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Glass-like carbon (GC interface was successfully introduced into carbon fiber-reinforced SiCN ceramic matrix composite (C/GC/SiCN by polymer infiltration and pyrolysis using phenolic resin as precursor. In order to highlight the Oxidation resistance of GC interface, the Oxidation behavior of GC, carbon fiber (Cf containing approximately 0.3 μm GC coating and C/GC/SiCN was investigated by means of weight changes and residual strength ratio before and after oxidizing, and the results were also compared with that of Cf containing Pyrocarbon (PyC coating and C/PyC/SiCN composite. Scanning electron microscopy displays homogeneous, adherent GC coating on Cf. Weight loss rate of Cf containing GC coating is lower than that of Cf containing PyC coating. The residual stress ratio of C/GC/SiCN was higher than that of C/PyC/SiCN. The results indicate that GC interface can improve anti-oxidation of Cf-reinforced composite than PyC interface.

  12. Sol-gel derived multiwalled carbon nanotubes ceramic electrode modified with molecularly imprinted polymer for ultra trace sensing of dopamine in real samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Bhim Bali, E-mail: prof.bbpd@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005 (India); Kumar, Deepak; Madhuri, Rashmi; Tiwari, Mahavir Prasad [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005 (India)

    2011-08-01

    Highlights: > MWCNTs-CE was prepared by silane acrylate which provides a nanometer thin MIP film. > The sensor was modified by iniferter and MIP using 'surface grafting-from approach'. > A comparative study was performed between differentially designed ceramic electrodes. > The sensor can detect dopamine in real samples with LODs (0.143-0.154 ng mL{sup -1}). - Abstract: A new class of composite electrodes made of sol-gel derived ceramic-multiwalled carbon nanotubes is used for the growth of a nanometer thin film adopting 'surface grafting-from approach'. For this the multiwalled carbon nanotubes-ceramic electrode surface is first modified with an iniferter (benzyl N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate) and then dopamine imprinted polymer, under UV irradiation, for differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetric sensing of dopamine in aqueous, blood serum, cerebrospinal fluid, and pharmaceutical samples (detection limit 0.143-0.154 ng mL{sup -1}, 3{sigma}), without any cross reactivity, interferences and false-positive contributions. Such composite electrodes offer higher stability, electron kinetics, and renewable porous surface of larger electroactive area (with insignificant capacitance) than carbon ceramic electrodes. Additional cyclic voltammetry (stripping mode) and chronocoulometry experiments were performed to explore electrodics and kinetics of electro-oxidation of dopamine.

  13. Surface modification of microfibrous materials with nanostructured carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasnikova, Irina V., E-mail: tokareva@catalysis.ru [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, pr. Ac. Lavrentieva, 5, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin av., 30, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Mishakov, Ilya V.; Vedyagin, Aleksey A. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, pr. Ac. Lavrentieva, 5, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin av., 30, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Bauman, Yury I. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, pr. Ac. Lavrentieva, 5, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Korneev, Denis V. [State Research Center of Virology and Biotechnology VECTOR, Koltsovo, Novosibirsk Region 630559 (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The surface of fiberglass cloth, carbon and basalt microfibers was modified with carbon nanostructured coating via catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) of 1,2-dichloroethane. Incipient wetness impregnation and solution combustion synthesis (SCS) methods were used to deposit nickel catalyst on the surface of microfibrous support. Prepared NiO/support samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis and temperature-programmed reduction. The samples of resulted hybrid materials were studied by means of scanning and transmission electron microscopies as well as by low-temperature nitrogen adsorption. The nature of the support was found to have considerable effect on the CCVD process peculiarities. High yield of nanostructured carbon with largest average diameter of nanofibers within the studied series was observed when carbon microfibers were used as a support. This sample characterized with moderate surface area (about 80 m{sup 2}/g after 2 h of CCVD) shows the best anchorage effect. Among the mineral supports, fiberglass tissue was found to provide highest carbon yield (up to 3.07 g/g{sub FG}) and surface area (up to 344 m{sup 2}/g) due to applicability of SCS method for Ni deposition. - Highlights: • The microfibers of different nature were coated with nanostructured carbon layer. • Features of CNF growth and characteristics of hybrid materials were studied. • Appropriate anchorage of CNF layer on microfiber’s surface was demonstrated.

  14. Formation of porous clay ceramic using sago waste ash as a prospective additive material with controllable milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aripin H.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel type of ceramic material was produced by mixing sago waste ash from the sago processing industry in Indonesia with clay. The composition was prepared by adding 50 %wt amount of sago waste into the clay, then a series of samples was milled for 6 h, 12 h, 24 h and 48 h, respectively. The samples were dry pressed and sintered at temperatures ranging from 800°C to 1200°C. The influence of the sintering temperature and the milling time on bulk density, firing shrinkage, water adsorption, and hardness was studied in detail. The results demonstrate that the low water absorption of less than 0.5% and the highest hardness of 5.82 GPa were obtained for the sample sintered at 1100°C and milled for 48 h. The investigation of the absorptive properties of such ceramics indicates that they could be recommended as a promising material for manufacturing of unglazed floor tiles.

  15. Resonance Raman spectroscopy in one-dimensional carbon materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dresselhaus Mildred S.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Brazil has played an important role in the development and use of resonance Raman spectroscopy as a powerful characterization tool for materials science. Here we present a short history of Raman scattering research in Brazil, highlighting the important contributions to the field coming from Brazilian researchers in the past. Next we discuss recent and important contributions where Brazil has become a worldwide leader, that is on the physics of quasi-one dimensional carbon nanotubes. We conclude this article by presenting results from a very recent resonance Raman study of exciting new materials, that are strictly one-dimensional carbon chains formed by the heat treatment of very pure double-wall carbon nanotube samples.

  16. Enhanced durability of carbon nanotube grafted hierarchical ceramic microfiber-reinforced epoxy composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Ajay; Hunston, Donald L; Forster, Amanda L; Natarajan, Bharath; Liotta, Andrew H; Wicks, Sunny S; Stutzman, Paul E; Wardle, Brian L; Liddle, J Alexander; Forster, Aaron M

    2017-12-01

    As carbon nanotube (CNT) infused hybrid composites are increasingly identified as next-generation aerospace materials, it is vital to evaluate their long-term structural performance under aging environments. In this work, the durability of hierarchical, aligned CNT grafted aluminoborosilicate microfiber-epoxy composites (CNT composites) are compared against baseline aluminoborosilicate composites (baseline composites), before and after immersion in water at 25 °C (hydro) and 60 °C (hydrothermal), for extended durations (90 d and 180 d). The addition of CNTs is found to reduce water diffusivities by approximately 1.5 times. The mechanical properties (bending strength and modulus) and the damage sensing capabilities (DC conductivity) of CNT composites remain intact regardless of exposure conditions. The baseline composites show significant loss of strength (44 %) after only 15 d of hydrothermal aging. This loss of mechanical strength is attributed to fiber-polymer interfacial debonding caused by accumulation of water at high temperatures. In situ acoustic and DC electrical measurements of hydrothermally aged CNT composites identify extensive stress-relieving micro-cracking and crack deflections that are absent in the aged baseline composites. These observations are supported by SEM images of the failed composite cross-sections that highlight secondary matrix toughening mechanisms in the form of CNT pullouts and fractures which enhance the service life of composites and maintain their properties under accelerated aging environments.

  17. The carbon footprint and embodied energy of construction material ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article describes strategic design decisions that architects can make during the initial stages of a project to minimise the use of construction materials, reduce carbon emissions and increase energy efficiency. A proposed prototypical Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) station Switch is used as a case study. The investigation ...

  18. Fabrication and characterization of nanotemplated carbon monolithic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoyun; Nesterenko, Ekaterina P; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Brabazon, Dermot; Zhou, Lin; Glennon, Jeremy D; Luong, John H T; Paull, Brett

    2013-09-11

    A novel hierarchical nanotemplated carbon monolithic rod (NTCM) was prepared using a novel facile nanotemplating approach. The NTCM was obtained using C60-fullerene modified silica gels as hard templates, which were embedded in a phenolic resin containing a metal catalyst for localized graphitization, followed by bulk carbonization, and template and catalyst removal. TEM, SEM, and BET measurements revealed that NTCM possessed an integrated open hierarchical porous structure, with a trimodal pore distribution. This porous material also possessed a high mesopore volume and narrow mesopore size distribution. During the course of carbonization, the C60 conjugated to aminated silica was partly decomposed, leading to the formation of micropores. The Raman signature of NTCM was very similar to that of multiwalled carbon nanotubes as exemplified by three major peaks as commonly observed for other carbon materials, i.e., the sp3 and sp2 carbon phases coexisted in the sample. Surface area measurements were obtained using both nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms (BET) and with a methylene blue binding assay, with BET results showing the NTCM material possessed an average specific surface area of 435 m2 g(-1), compared to an area of 372 m2 g(-1) obtained using the methylene blue assay. Electrochemical studies using NTCM modified glassy carbon or boron doped diamond (BDD) electrodes displayed quasi-reversible oxidation/reduction with ferricyanide. In addition, the BDD electrode modified with NTCM was able to detect hydrogen peroxide with a detection limit of below 300 nM, whereas the pristine BDD electrode was not responsive to this target compound.

  19. Preparation and Characterization of Microfiltration Ceramic Membranes Based on Natural Quartz Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Ivanets

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of phase and chemical composition of natural quartz sand, binder and burnable additives was studied. The conditions of application of the membrane and biocide layers on the formation of porous ceramic and microfiltration membranes were investigated. It is shown that a crystalline oxide of Si(IV is determinant for obtaining the ceramic materials. The presence of carbonates (calcite, dolomite, aragonite, etc. and crystalline aluminosilicates (microcline, albite, phlogopit, etc. leads to a decrease in mechanical strength of ceramics. The biocide coating designed to protect the ceramic membrane surfaces from biofouling was applied and its anti-bacterial activity was shown.

  20. Nanoporous Carbide-Derived Carbon Material-Based Linear Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janno Torop

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Devices using electroactive polymer-supported carbon material can be exploited as alternatives to conventional electromechanical actuators in applications where electromechanical actuators have some serious deficiencies. One of the numerous examples is precise microactuators. In this paper, we show for first time the dilatometric effect in nanocomposite material actuators containing carbide-derived carbon (CDC and polytetrafluoroetylene polymer (PTFE. Transducers based on high surface area carbide-derived carbon electrode materials are suitable for short range displacement applications, because of the proportional actuation response to the charge inserted, and high Coulombic efficiency due to the EDL capacitance. The material is capable of developing stresses in the range of tens of N cm-2. The area of an actuator can be dozens of cm2, which means that forces above 100 N are achievable. The actuation mechanism is based on the interactions between the high-surface carbon and the ions of the electrolyte. Electrochemical evaluations of the four different actuators with linear (longitudinal action response are described. The actuator electrodes were made from two types of nanoporous TiC-derived carbons with surface area (SA of 1150 m2 g-1 and 1470 m2 g-1, respectively. Two kinds of electrolytes were used in actuators: 1.0 M tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEABF4 solution in propylene carbonate and pure ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate (EMITf. It was found that CDC based actuators exhibit a linear movement of about 1% in the voltage range of 0.8 V to 3.0 V at DC. The actuators with EMITf electrolyte had about 70% larger movement compared to the specimen with TEABF4 electrolyte.

  1. Immobilization of heavy metals arising sludge galvanic, in glass ceramic material; Imobilizacao de metais pesados oriundos de lodo galvanico em material vitreo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felisberto, R., E-mail: regina.felisberto@poa.ifrs.edu.br [Instituto Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (IFRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Santos, M.C.; Basegio, T.; Bergmann, C.P. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (PPGEM/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    The use of galvanic sludge in the glass-ceramic formulation for immobilizing environmentally harmful materials is consolidated in more developed countries as raw material in the formulation of new materials. In this work, we have used galvanic sludge provided by a metallurgical company located in Vale dos Sinos, RS. The sludge was dried at 105°C and mixed with soda-lime glass in proportions of 1, 5, 10 and 20%, relative to the glass mass. Its composition was determined by FRX, and evaluated for leaching (NBR 10005) and solubilization (NBR 10006). The specimens (CPs) were burned at temperatures 750, 800 and 850°C, also submitted to the tests. The sludge, Class I - dangerous, presented Se content greater than provisions of NBR 10004. It was possible to immobilize the heavy metals at a temperature of 850°C for specimens of the F1 formulation, having been thus classified as Class II B Inert Residue. (author)

  2. Materials selection for carbon nanotube composites in power transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolov K.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays designers and producers implement non-metallic gears in power transmissions because of their better mechanical properties, like high elastic modulus, tensile strength and high wear resistance. In order to examine these properties we need to get familiarized with the most common materials used to make composites, like POM, PEEK, PA 6, PA 6/6, UHMWPE and one of newest materials in this area – carbon nanotubes (CNTs. This paper describes how to select the best materials in order to create the composite we need for the necessary applications. The article also gives information about the polymers and a comparison between them and CNTs.

  3. Carbon-Based Materials for Photo-Triggered Theranostic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Karunya; Hsu, Hsin-Yun

    2016-11-20

    Carbon-based nanomaterials serve as a type of smart material for photo-triggered disease theranostics. The inherent physicochemical properties of these nanomaterials facilitate their use for less invasive treatments. This review summarizes the properties and applications of materials including fullerene, nanotubes, nanohorns, nanodots and nanographenes for photodynamic nanomedicine in cancer and antimicrobial therapies. Carbon nanomaterials themselves do not usually act as photodynamic therapy (PDT) agents owing to the high hydrophobicity, however, when the surface is passivated or functionalized, these materials become great vehicles for PDT. Moreover, conjugation of carbonaceous nanomaterials with the photosensitizer (PS) and relevant targeting ligands enhances properties such as selectivity, stability, and high quantum yield, making them readily available for versatile biomedical applications.

  4. Carbon-Based Materials for Photo-Triggered Theranostic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karunya Albert

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon-based nanomaterials serve as a type of smart material for photo-triggered disease theranostics. The inherent physicochemical properties of these nanomaterials facilitate their use for less invasive treatments. This review summarizes the properties and applications of materials including fullerene, nanotubes, nanohorns, nanodots and nanographenes for photodynamic nanomedicine in cancer and antimicrobial therapies. Carbon nanomaterials themselves do not usually act as photodynamic therapy (PDT agents owing to the high hydrophobicity, however, when the surface is passivated or functionalized, these materials become great vehicles for PDT. Moreover, conjugation of carbonaceous nanomaterials with the photosensitizer (PS and relevant targeting ligands enhances properties such as selectivity, stability, and high quantum yield, making them readily available for versatile biomedical applications.

  5. The carbon price: a toothless tool for material efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This article explores whether a carbon price will effectively encourage the more efficient use of greenhouse gas intensive materials such as steel. The article identifies a range of distortions that arise when some of the restrictive assumptions of neoclassical economics are relaxed. Distortions occur due to the sequential nature of decision-making along supply chains, due to imperfect competition and due to government intervention to reduce the risk of carbon leakage. If upstream sectors do not pass on carbon costs, downstream sectors do not have the opportunity to react. Of the distortions identified, compensation mechanisms that reduce the risk of carbon leakage are likely to act as the greatest hinderance to appropriate incentives for the more efficient use of steel in the UK: as things currently stand, unless upstream companies are encouraged to make windfall profits, incentives downstream are weakened. The article concludes by exploring policy options to address the distortions identified, including efforts to reinstate the carbon price downstream and efforts to remove other distortive taxes. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Material demand reduction’. PMID:28461438

  6. Improvement of strength of carbon nanotube-dispersed Si3N4 ceramics by bead milling and adding lower-temperature sintering aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuaki Matsuoka

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the dispersion of carbon nanotubes (CNTs in silicon nitride (Si3N4 ceramics to provide the latter with electrical conductivity have been carried out in recent years. The density and the strength of Si3N4 ceramics were degraded, however, because the CNTs prevented Si3N4 from densifying. The CNTs disappeared after firing at high temperatures owing to the reaction between CNTs and Si3N4 or SiO2, or both Si3N4 and SiO2. In order to improve the density and suppress the reaction, sintering aids for lower-temperature densification of Si3N4 are needed. In this study, we added HfO2 as a sintering aid to a Si3N4–Y2O3–Al2O3–AlN–TiO2 system to fabricate CNT-dispersed Si3N4 ceramics at lower temperatures. Furthermore, bead milling was applied to disperse the CNTs homogeneously. Agglomerates of CNTs were pulverized by bead milling without obvious changes in morphology to eliminate larger fracture origins in CNT-dispersed ceramics. As a result of both the addition of HfO2 and bead milling, we successfully fabricated dense CNT-dispersed Si3N4 ceramics with high strength and electrical conductivity.

  7. Highly magnetic nanoporous carbon/iron-oxide hybrid materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Sher; Anand, Chokkalingam; Lakhi, Kripal Singh; Choy, Jin-Ho; Cha, Wang Soo; Elzhatry, Ahmed; Al-Deyab, Salem S; Ohya, Yutaka; Vinu, Ajayan

    2014-11-10

    The preparation of size-controllable Fe2O3 nanoparticles grown in nanoporous carbon with tuneable pore diameters is reported. These hybrid materials exhibit strong non-linear magnetic properties and a magnetic moment of approximately 229 emu g(-1), which is the highest value ever reported for nanoporous hybrids, and can be attributed to the nanosieve effect and the strong interaction between the nanoparticles and the carbon walls. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Bipolar plate materials in molten carbonate fuel cells. Final CRADA report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumpelt, M.

    2004-06-01

    Advantages of implementation of power plants based on electrochemical reactions are successfully demonstrated in the USA and Japan. One of the msot promising types of fuel cells (FC) is a type of high temperature fuel cells. At present, thanks to the efforts of the leading countries that develop fuel cell technologies power plants on the basis of molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) and solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are really close to commercialization. One of the problems that are to be solved for practical implementation of MCFC and SOFC is a problem of corrosion of metal components of stacks that are assembled of a number of fuel cells. One of the major components of MCFC and SOFC stacks is a bipolar separator plate (BSP) that performs several functions - it is separation of reactant gas flows sealing of the joints between fuel cells, and current collection from the surface of electrodes. The goal of Task 1 of the project is to develop new cost-effective nickel coatings for the Russian 20X23H18 steel for an MCFC bipolar separator plate using technological processes usually implemented to apply corrosion stable coatings onto the metal parts for products in the defense. There was planned the research on production of nickel coatings using different methods, first of all the galvanic one and the explosion cladding one. As a result of the works, 0.4 x 712 x 1296 mm plates coated with nickel on one side were to be made and passed to ANL. A line of 4 galvanic baths 600 liters was to be built for the galvanic coating applications. The goal of Task 2 of the project is the development of a new material of an MCFC bipolar separator plate with an upgraded corrosion stability, and development of a technology to produce cold roll sheets of this material the sizes of which will be 0.8 x 712x 1296 mm. As a result of these works, a pilot batch of the rolled material in sheets 0.8 x 712 x 1296 mm in size is to be made (in accordance with the norms and standards of the Russian

  9. Structural properties of a bone-ceramic composite as a promising material in spinal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirilova, I. A., E-mail: IKirilova@mail.ru; Sadovoy, M. A.; Podorozhnaya, V. T., E-mail: VPodorognaya@niito.ru; Taranov, O. S. [Novosibirsk Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics n.a. Ya.L. Tsivyan, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Klinkov, S. V.; Kosarev, V. F. [Christianovich Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Shatskaya, S. S. [Institute of Solid State Chemistry and Mechanochemistry, SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    The paper describes the results of in vitro tests of composite bone-ceramic implants and procedures for modifying implant surfaces to enhance osteogenesis. Analysis of CBCI ESs demonstrated that they have a porous structure with the mean longitudinal pore size of 70 µm and the mean transverse pore size of 46 µm; surface pores are open, while inner pores are closed. Elemental analysis of the CBCI surface demonstrates that CBCIs are composed of aluminum and zirconium oxides and contain HA inclusions. Profilometry of the CBCI ES surface revealed the following deviations: the maximum deviation of the profile in the sample center is 15 µm and 16 µm on the periphery, while the arithmetical mean and mean square deviations of the profile are 2.65 and 3.4 µm, respectively. In addition, CBCI biodegradation products were pre-examined; a 0.9% NaCl solution was used as a comparison group. Potentially toxic and tissue accumulated elements, such as cadmium, cobalt, mercury, and lead, are present only in trace amounts and have no statistically significant differences with the comparison group, which precludes their potential toxic effects on the macroorganism. Ceramic-based CBCI may be effective and useful in medicine for restoration of the anatomic integrity and functions of the bone tissue.

  10. A comparative study on the wear behavior of a polymer infiltrated ceramic network (PICN) material and tooth enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhou; Yu, Ping; Arola, Dwayne D; Min, Jie; Gao, Shanshan

    2017-09-20

    To investigate the wear mechanisms of a polymer infiltrated ceramic network (PICN) material, to compare its wear behavior with that of tooth enamel, and to provide evidence relevant to its clinical use. The Vickers hardness (HV) and elastic modulus (E) of a commercial PICN material (ENAMIC) and enamel were measured. Reciprocating wear tests were performed under a ball-on-flat configuration. Three wear pairs were explored including ENAMIC and enamel subjected to Si3N4 ball antagonists and ENAMIC subjected to enamel cusp antagonists. The coefficients of Friction (CoFs) were monitored continuously to 5×104 cycles. The wear depth of ENAMIC, enamel specimens and enamel cusps were quantified using white light interferometry, and the wear morphologies were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to distinguish the wear mechanisms. The HV of ENAMIC is similar to tooth enamel but the E is much lower. For both materials, the CoFs increased sharply in the early stage and then reached plateaus in the later phase. Throughout the cyclic loading history, ENAMIC exhibited larger wear depths than enamel. However, the damage evolution in ENAMIC was similar to that of enamel as the polymer phase was worn preferentially similar to inter-rod enamel, and then the ceramic phase exfoliated from the wear surface akin to enamel rods. The SEM images showed evidence of few cracks within wear tracks of ENAMIC, in comparison to numerous cracks in tooth enamel. ENAMIC has lower wear resistance than tooth enamel, but it exhibits a wear damage mode similar to tooth enamel. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. An evaluation of the fit of metal-ceramic restorations made with an autoclaved silicone-based impression material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollefrath, Ralf; Savary, Marcel; Schwela, Jörg

    2010-07-01

    To demonstrate the clinical feasibility of autoclaving certain silicone impression materials in order to avoid potential cross-contamination during handling, transport, and subsequent processing. Semicritical devices are recommended to be treated at least with high-level disinfectants or actually steam sterilized at 134°C. To date dental impressions have been disinfected rather than sterilized, so the question remains should they be sterilized before being sent to the dental laboratory? Two identical impressions per case were made of metal-ceramic crown and fixed partial denture preparations on the same patient using addition type polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impression materials (AFFINIS,® Coltene/Whaledent AG, 9450 Altstätten, Switzerland) in different trays. The first impression (IMPx1) was cleaned and treated with an intermediate-level disinfectant (FD 322--Fast Disinfection Spray, Dürr Dental, 74321 Bietigheim-Bissingen, Germany). The second impression (IMPx2) was cleaned, treated with an intermediate-level disinfectant as with IMPx1, subjected to a computer tomography (CT) scan with a dimensional resolution of ± 10 µm, steam sterilized, and then subjected to a second CT scan. The dimensional changes of the second impression after steam sterilization were calculated by comparing the overlay of the two CT scans and expressed by color coding of the impression graphics. After the second scan, the impression was sent to a dental laboratory to fabricate a metal-ceramic crown or metal-ceramic fixed partial denture restoration to the one produced from the first impression (IMPx1) subjected only to disinfection. This process was repeated for four clinical cases. Impressions made with AFFINIS® silicone impression materials in a rigid reinforced polycarbonate impression tray or in a metal dual-arch tray can be autoclaved. The overall dimensional stability of the impressions and the quality of single crowns and small fixed partial dentures made using IMPx2 was not

  12. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  13. Lightweight Materials for Automotive Application: An Assessment of Material Production Data for Magnesium and Carbon Fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, M. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Sullivan, J. L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division

    2014-09-01

    The use of lightweight materials in vehicle components, also known as “lightweighting,” can result in automobile weight reduction, which improves vehicle fuel economy and generally its environmental footprint. Materials often used for vehicle lightweighting include aluminum, magnesium, and polymers reinforced with either glass or carbon fiber. However, because alternative materials typically used for vehicle lightweighting require more energy to make on a per part basis than the material being replaced (often steel or iron), the fuel efficiency improvement induced by a weight reduction is partially offset by an increased energy for the vehicle material production. To adequately quantify this tradeoff, reliable and current values for life-cycle production energy are needed for both conventional and alternative materials. Our focus here is on the production of two such alternative materials: magnesium and carbon fibers. Both these materials are low density solids with good structural properties. These properties have enabled their use in applications where weight is an issue, not only for automobiles but also for aerospace applications. This report addresses the predominant production methods for these materials and includes a tabulation of available material and energy input data necessary to make them. The life cycle inventory (LCI) information presented herein represents a process chain analysis (PCA) approach to life cycle assessment (LCA) and is intended for evaluation as updated materials production data for magnesium and carbon fiber for inclusion into the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation model (GREET2_2012). The summary life-cycle metrics used to characterize the cradle-to-gate environmental performance of these materials are the cumulative energy demand (CED) and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) per kilogram of material.

  14. Studies on development of new functional natural materials from agricultural products - Technology developments for ceramic powders and materials from rice phytoliths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Dae Kap; Kim, Yong Ik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Nang Kyu; Seong, Seo Yong [Myongseong Ceramics Com., Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Sang Eun [Bae Jae Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Chun [Myungji Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-08-01

    Based on an estimation of annual rice production of 5.2 million tons, rice husks by-production reaches to 1.17 million tons per year in Korea. Distinguished to other corns, rice contains a lot of Si; 10-20% by weight in rice husks calculated as silica. The aim of this research project is to develop technologies for ceramic powders and materials utilizing the silica in rice husks called phytoliths. In this first year research, researches of the following subjects were performed; material properties of rice husks, milling of rice husks, acid treatments, oxidations at low and high temperatures, sintering and crystalization of amorphous silica, low temperature carburization, formation of silicon carbide whiskers, and brick lightening method using milled rice husks. 11 tabs., 49 figs., 75 refs. (Author).

  15. Ceramic heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaHaye, P.G.; Rahman, F.H.; Lebeau, T.P.; Severin, B.K.

    1998-06-16

    A tube containment system is disclosed. The tube containment system does not significantly reduce heat transfer through the tube wall. The contained tube is internally pressurized, and is formed from a ceramic material having high strength, high thermal conductivity, and good thermal shock resistance. The tube containment system includes at least one ceramic fiber braid material disposed about the internally pressurized tube. The material is disposed about the tube in a predetermined axial spacing arrangement. The ceramic fiber braid is present in an amount sufficient to contain the tube if the tube becomes fractured. The tube containment system can also include a plurality of ceramic ring-shaped structures, in contact with the outer surface of the tube, and positioned between the tube and the ceramic fiber braid material, and/or at least one transducer positioned within tube for reducing the internal volume and, therefore, the energy of any shrapnel resulting from a tube fracture. 6 figs.

  16. Cement Thickness of Inlay Restorations Made of Lithium Disilicate, Polymer-Infiltrated Ceramic and Nano-Ceramic CAD/CAM Materials Evaluated Using 3D X-Ray Micro-Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzgur, Recep; Ercan, Ertuğrul; Uzgur, Zeynep; Çolak, Hakan; Yalçın, Muhammet; Özcan, Mutlu

    2016-08-12

    To evaluate the marginal and internal cement thicknesses of inlay restorations made of various CAD/CAM materials using 3D X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) technique. Caries-free extracted mandibular molars (N = 30) with similar size were randomly assigned to three groups (N = 10 per group). Mesio-occlusal-distal (MOD) cavities were prepared, and inlay restorations were obtained by milling out CAD/CAM materials namely, (a) IPS: monolithic lithium disilicate (control), (b) VE: polymer-infiltrated ceramic, and (c) CS: nano-ceramic using a CAM unit. Marginal and internal cement thicknesses were measured using 3D micro-CT. Data were analyzed using 1-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (alpha = 0.05). The mean marginal and internal cement thickness were not significant in all inlay materials (p > 0.05). Mean marginal cement thickness (μm) was the lowest for the IPS group (67.54 ± 10.16) followed by VE (84.09 ± 3.94) and CS (95.18 ± 10.58) (p > 0.05). The internal cement thickness (μm) was the lowest in the CS group (54.85 ± 6.94) followed by IPS (60.58 ± 9.22) and VE (77.53 ± 12.13) (p > 0.05). Marginal and internal cement thicknesses of MOD inlays made of monolithic lithium disilicate, polymer-infiltrated ceramic, and nano-ceramic CAD/CAM materials were similar and all less than 100 μm, which could be considered clinically acceptable. MOD inlays made of different CAD/CAM materials presented similar cement thickness, less than 100 μm. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  17. Carbon dioxide: A new material for energy storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Amouroux

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Though carbon dioxide is the main green house gas due to burning of fossil resource or miscellaneous chemical processes, we propose here that carbon dioxide be a new material for energy storage. Since it can be the key to find the solution for three critical issues facing the world: food ecosystems, the greenhouse issue and energy storage. We propose to identify the carbon recovery through a circular industrial revolution in the first part, and in the second part we present the starting way of three business plants to do that from industrial examples. By pointing out all the economic constraints and the hidden competitions between energy, water and food, we try to qualify the phrase “sustainable development” and open the way of a huge circular economy.

  18. Potentiality of a frit waste from ceramic sector as raw material to glass-ceramic material production; Potencialidad de un residuo de frita procedente del sector ceramico como materia prima para la produccion de material vitroceramico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrachina Albert, E.; Llop Pla, J.; Notari Abad, M. D.; Carda Castello, J. B.

    2015-10-01

    This work consists of studying the devitrification capacity of a residue from sodium-calcium frit, using the vitreous powder sintering method, which follows the traditional ceramic processing route, including a specific heat treatment to generate the appearance of crystals from the original glass phase. Initially the frit residue has been characterized by instrumental techniques such as XRF, XRD and DTA/TG. Furthermore, the chemical analysis (XRF) has allowed the prediction of devitrification potentiality of this residue by theoretical approaches represented by Gingsberg, Raschin-Tschetverikov and Lebedeva ternary diagrams. Then, this residue was subjected to traditional ceramic method, by changing the grinding time, the pressing pressure and prepared samples were obtained at different temperatures. In this part, the techniques for measuring particle size by laser diffraction and XRD and SEM to evaluate the generated crystalline phases, were applied. Finally, it has been found that this frit residue works as glass-ceramic precursor, devitrifying in wollastonite crystals as majority phase and without being subjected to the melting step of the glass-ceramic typical method. (Author)

  19. Synthesis Methods of Carbon Nanotubes and Related Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Szabó

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The challenge on carbon nanotubes is still the subject of many research groups. While in the first years the focus was on the new synthesis methods, new carbon sources and support materials, recently, the application possibilities are the principal arguments of the studies. The three main synthesis methods discussed in this review are the arc discharge, the laser ablation and the chemical vapour deposition (CVD with a special regard to the latter one. In the early stage of the nanotube production the first two methods were utilized mainly for the production of SWNTs while the third one produced mainly MWNTs. The principle of CVD is the decomposition of various hydrocarbons over transition metal supported catalyst. Single-walled (SWNT, multi-walled (MWNT and coiled carbon nanotubes are produced. In some case, interesting carbonaceous materials are formed during the synthesis process, such as bamboo-like tubes, onions, horn-like structures. In this paper, we refer to the progresses made in the field of the synthesis techniques of carbon nanotubes in the last decade.

  20. Synthesis Methods of Carbon Nanotubes and Related Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Andrea; Perri, Caterina; Csató, Anita; Giordano, Girolamo; Vuono, Danilo; Nagy, János B.

    2010-01-01

    The challenge on carbon nanotubes is still the subject of many research groups. While in the first years the focus was on the new synthesis methods, new carbon sources and support materials, recently, the application possibilities are the principal arguments of the studies. The three main synthesis methods discussed in this review are the arc discharge, the laser ablation and the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) with a special regard to the latter one. In the early stage of the nanotube production the first two methods were utilized mainly for the production of SWNTs while the third one produced mainly MWNTs. The principle of CVD is the decomposition of various hydrocarbons over transition metal supported catalyst. Single-walled (SWNT), multi-walled (MWNT) and coiled carbon nanotubes are produced. In some case, interesting carbonaceous materials are formed during the synthesis process, such as bamboo-like tubes, onions, horn-like structures. In this paper, we refer to the progresses made in the field of the synthesis techniques of carbon nanotubes in the last decade.

  1. Towards Flexible Transparent Electrodes Based on Carbon and Metallic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghui Luo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Flexible transparent electrodes (FTEs with high stability and scalability are in high demand for the extremely widespread applications in flexible optoelectronic devices. Traditionally, thin films of indium thin oxide (ITO served the role of FTEs, but film brittleness and scarcity of materials limit its further application. This review provides a summary of recent advances in emerging transparent electrodes and related flexible devices (e.g., touch panels, organic light-emitting diodes, sensors, supercapacitors, and solar cells. Mainly focusing on the FTEs based on carbon nanomaterials (e.g., carbon nanotubes and graphene and metal materials (e.g., metal grid and metal nanowires, we discuss the fabrication techniques, the performance improvement, and the representative applications of these highly transparent and flexible electrodes. Finally, the challenges and prospects of flexible transparent electrodes will be summarized.

  2. Carbon-nanostructured materials for energy generation and storage applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Linkov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed and refined a chemical vapour deposition method to synthesise nanotubes using liquid petroleum gasasthe carbonsource. The nanotubes were thoroughly characterised by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy
    X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis. The protocol to grow nanotubes was then adapted to deposit nanotubes on the surface of different substrates, which were chosen based upon how
    the substrates could be applied in various hydrogen energyconver-sion systems. Carbon nanotubes area nanostructured material with an extremely wide range of application sinvariousenergy applications. The methods outlined demonstrate the complete
    development of carbon nanotube composite materials with direct applications in hydrogen energy generation, storage and conversion.

  3. Phase Composition and Microstructure of Hot-Pressing Sintered Ti2AlN Metal-Ceramic Bulk Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIANG Suying

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ti2AlN metal-ceramic bulk material was fabricated by hot-pressing sintering (HPS using TiN, Ti and Al powder in a stoichiometric ratio of 1:1:1.03 after mechanical mixing. XRD, SEM and TEM were employed to investigate the phase composition and microstructures of the products. The results show that the high purity Ti2AlN can be obtained by HPS at 1300 ℃ for 2.5 h. The sintered Ti2AlN presented a hexagonal system layered structure with an anisotropy. Twins are found in the Ti2AlN. There were a few nano-scale TiN particles in the products.

  4. Ceramic Technology Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  5. Expression of interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha in soft tissue over ceramic and metal implant materials before uncovering: a clinical pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickenig, Hans-Joachim; Schlegel, Karl Andreas; Wichmann, Manfred; Eitner, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    To compare the effect of ceramic and metal implant materials on the expression pattern of inflammatory cytokines in peri-implant soft tissue. This split-mouth study included patients who received dental implants. In each patient, four different materials were used for the implant cover screws: the ceramic material titanium niobium oxynitride ([Ti,Nb]ON) with plasma-chemical oxidation treatment, (Ti,Nb)ON, a titanium-tantalum alloy, and tantalum. Biopsy specimens of peri-implant tissue were harvested at reentry, 4 months after the initial surgery. Immunohistochemical staining was performed for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6). Six patients received a total of 24 dental implants with the four different types of implant cover screws. Quantitative analysis of TNF-α; and IL-6 expression showed the lowest expression of IL-6 (1.5; interquartile range, 0 to 8.5) and TNF-α (4.8; interquartile range, 3.5 to 7.5) in tissue adjacent to the (Ti,Nb)ON layer. In comparison to the metal surfaces, the expression of both cytokines was significantly lower (P = .01 and P = .03). The lowest levels of cytokine expression were observed in tissue adjacent to the ceramic (Ti,Nb)ON coating with plasma-chemical oxidation. Based on the results of this study, this ceramic layer shows promise as a biocompatible material, and further study is warranted.

  6. Development of New Ecological Ceramic Tiles by Recycling of Waste Glass and Ceramic Materials; Incorporacion de residuos derivados de la fabricacion ceramica y del vidrio reciclado en el proceso ceramico integral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaro, C.; Ramon Trilles, V.; Gomez, F.; Allepuz, S.; Fraga, D.; Carda, J. B.

    2012-07-01

    The following research work shows the results of the introduction of waste generated by the ceramic industry, such as the calcined clay from fired porcelain of stoneware and raw biscuit, sludge and cleaning water, as well as waste from other sectors like the recycling glass. In this way, it can be obtained a stoneware porcelain slab, engobe-glaze and satin glaze that contains high percentage of recyclable raw materials. (Author)

  7. Carbon nanotubes for thermal interface materials in microelectronic packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei

    As the integration scale of transistors/devices in a chip/system keeps increasing, effective cooling has become more and more important in microelectronics. To address the thermal dissipation issue, one important solution is to develop thermal interface materials with higher performance. Carbon nanotubes, given their high intrinsic thermal and mechanical properties, and their high thermal and chemical stabilities, have received extensive attention from both academia and industry as a candidate for high-performance thermal interface materials. The thesis is devoted to addressing some challenges related to the potential application of carbon nanotubes as thermal interface materials in microelectronics. These challenges include: 1) controlled synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on various bulk substrates via chemical vapor deposition and the fundamental understanding involved; 2) development of a scalable annealing process to improve the intrinsic properties of synthesized carbon nanotubes; 3) development of a state-of-art assembling process to effectively implement high-quality vertically aligned carbon nanotubes into a flip-chip assembly; 4) a reliable thermal measurement of intrinsic thermal transport property of vertically aligned carbon nanotube films; 5) improvement of interfacial thermal transport between carbon nanotubes and other materials. The major achievements are summarized. 1. Based on the fundamental understanding of catalytic chemical vapor deposition processes and the growth mechanism of carbon nanotube, fast synthesis of high-quality vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on various bulk substrates (e.g., copper, quartz, silicon, aluminum oxide, etc.) has been successfully achieved. The synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on the bulk copper substrate by the thermal chemical vapor deposition process has set a world record. In order to functionalize the synthesized carbon nanotubes while maintaining their good vertical alignment

  8. Effect of carbon microfiber materials on sensitivity of adenosine and hydroxyadenine at carbon microfiber sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.M.M. Abou El-Nour

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the sensitivity measurements and microfiber electrodes made from different carbon microfiber materials, such as polyacrylonitrile (PAN T650 and PAN HCB and Pitch P25 was established in this work. The different microfiber electrodes were nanostructured by an electrochemical pretreatment method. Sensitivity of adenosine (ADO and 2,8-dihydroxyadenine (2,8-DHA was measured at different carbon microfiber sensors made from different carbon microfiber materials. Sensitivity of PAN microfiber electrodes for ADO and 2,8-DHA determinations measured at 500 V s−1 vs. SCE is higher than that measured at Pitch P25 microfiber electrodes due to more defects in PAN microfiber electrodes. Adsorption of ADO and 2,8-DHA is greater at PAN HCB electrodes. High conductivity of PAN fibers correlates with sensitivity determinations of the investigated analytes.

  9. Modification of the Interfacial Interaction between Carbon Fiber and Epoxy with Carbon Hybrid Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kejing Yu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of the hybrid materials and epoxy and carbon fiber (CF composites were improved significantly as compared to the CF composites made from unmodified epoxy. The reasons could be attributed to the strong interfacial interaction between the CF and the epoxy composites for the existence of carbon nanomaterials. The microstructure and dispersion of carbon nanomaterials were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and optical microscopy (OM. The results showed that the dispersion of the hybrid materials in the polymer was superior to other carbon nanomaterials. The high viscosity and shear stress characterized by a rheometer and the high interfacial friction and damping behavior characterized by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA indicated that the strong interfacial interaction was greatly improved between fibers and epoxy composites. Remarkably, the tensile tests presented that the CF composites with hybrid materials and epoxy composites have a better reinforcing and toughening effect on CF, which further verified the strong interfacial interaction between epoxy and CF for special structural hybrid materials.

  10. Carbon-Encapsulated Sn@N-Doped Carbon Nanotubes as Anode Materials for Application in SIBs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Boyang; Guo, Hai-Peng; Hou, Yuyang; Liu, Qiannan; Deng, Yuanfu; Chen, Guohua; Chou, Shu-Lei; Liu, Hua-Kun; Wang, Jia-Zhao

    2017-11-01

    Carbon-encapsulated Sn@N-doped carbon tubes with submicron diameters were obtained via the simple reduction of C@SnO2@N-doped carbon composites that were fabricated by a hydrothermal approach. Sn nanoparticles encapsulated in carbon layers were distributed uniformly on the surfaces of the N-doped carbon nanotubes. The electrochemical performances of the composites were systematically investigated as anode materials in sodium-ion batteries (SIBs). The composite electrode could attain a good reversible capacity of 398.4 mAh g-1 when discharging at 100 mA g-1, with capacity retention of 67.3% and very high Coulombic efficiency of 99.7% over 150 cycles. This good cycling performance, when compared to only 17.5 mAh g-1 delivered by bare Sn particles prepared via the same method without the presence of N-doped carbon, could be mainly ascribed to the uniform distribution of the precursor SnO2 on the substrate of N-doped carbon tubes with three-dimensional structure, which provides more reaction sites to reduce the diffusion distance of Na+, further facilitating Na+-ion diffusion and relieves the huge volume expansion during charging/discharging. These outcomes imply that such a Sn/C composite would provide more options as an anode candidate for SIBs.

  11. Ultrasound-assisted synthesis and processing of carbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, Maria E.

    2011-12-01

    Part I: Porous carbons are of interest in many applications because of their high surface areas and other physicochemical properties, and much effort has been directed towards developing new methods for controlling the porosity of carbons. Ultrasonic spray pyrolysis (USP) is an aerosol method suitable for large-scale, continuous synthesis of materials. Ultrasound is used to create aerosol droplets of a precursor solution which serve as micron-sized spherical reactors for materials synthesis. This work presents a precursor system for the template-free USP synthesis of porous carbons using low-cost precursors that do not evolve or require hazardous chemicals: sucrose was used as the carbon source, and sodium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate, or sodium nitrate was added as a decomposition catalyst and porogen. The USP carbons had macroporous interiors and microporous shells with surface areas as high as 800 m2/g and a narrow pore size distribution. It was determined that the interior porosity was a result of the gas evolution from salt decomposition and not from the presence of a salt template. Porous carbon is frequently used as a catalyst support because it provides high surface area and it is chemically and physically stable under many anoxic reaction conditions. Typically, the preparation of supported catalysts requires multiple steps for carbonization and metal impregnation. In this work, iron-impregnated porous carbon microspheres (Fe-C) were prepared by a one-step USP process by incorporating both the carbon and metal sources into the precursor solution. Carbonization, pore formation, metal impregnation, and metal activation occurred simultaneously to produce Fe-C materials with surface areas as high as 800 m2/g and up to 10 wt% Fe incorporated as nanoparticles 109 K/sec). In solid-liquid slurries, surface erosion and particle fracture occur due to the shockwaves and microjets formed from asymmetric bubble collapse at extended surfaces. The chemical and physical

  12. "Bucky gels" for tailoring electroactive materials and devices: the composites of carbon materials with ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeongho; Aida, Takuzo

    2011-06-28

    Bucky gels are gelatinous composite materials consisting of carbon nanotubes and ionic liquids. This article gives an overview of some promising applications of bucky gels reported mostly in the last few years and a possible extension to the dispersion of graphene sheets. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  13. Fatigue Hysteresis of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Longbiao

    2016-02-01

    When the fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) are first loading to fatigue peak stress, matrix multicracking and fiber/matrix interface debonding occur. Under fatigue loading, the stress-strain hysteresis loops appear as fiber slipping relative to matrix in the interface debonded region upon unloading/reloading. Due to interface wear at room temperature or interface oxidation at elevated temperature, the interface shear stress degredes with increase of the number of applied cycles, leading to the evolution of the shape, location and area of stress-strain hysteresis loops. The evolution characteristics of fatigue hysteresis loss energy in different types of fiber-reinforced CMCs, i.e., unidirectional, cross-ply, 2D and 2.5D woven, have been investigated. The relationships between the fatigue hysteresis loss energy, stress-strain hysteresis loops, interface frictional slip, interface shear stress and interface radial thermal residual stress, matrix stochastic cracking and fatigue peak stress of fiber-reinforced CMCs have been established.

  14. Micromechanical Modeling for Tensile Behaviour of Carbon Fiber - Reinforced Ceramic - Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longbiao, Li

    2015-12-01

    The stress-strain curves of fiber - reinforced ceramic - matrix composites (CMCs) exhibit obvious non-linear behaviour under tensile loading. The occurrence of multiple damage mechanisms, i.e., matrix multicracking, fiber/matrix interface debonding and fibers fracture, is the mainly reason for the non-linear characteristic. The micromechanics approach has been developed to predict the tensile stress-strain curves of unidirectional, cross-ply and woven CMCs. The shear-lag model was used to describe the micro stress field of the damaged composite. The damage models were used to determine the evolution of micro damage parameters, i.e., matrix crack spacing, interface debonded length and broken fibers fraction. By combining the shear-lag model with damage models and considering the effect of transverse multicracking in the 90° plies or transverse yarns in cross-ply or woven CMCs, the tensile stress-strain curves of unidirectional, cross-ply, 2D and 2.5D woven CMCs have been predicted. The results agreed with experimental data.

  15. Effects of silicon carbide on the phase developments in mullite-carbon ceramic composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatai Olufemi ARAMIDE

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the addition of silicon carbide and sintering temperatures on the phases developed, in sintered ceramic composite produced from kaolin and graphite was investigated. The kaolin and graphite of known mineralogical composition were thoroughly blended with 4 and 8 vol % silicon carbide. From the homogeneous mixture of kaolin, graphite and silicon carbide, standard samples were prepared via uniaxial compaction. The test samples produced were subjected to firing (sintering at 1300°C, 1400°C and 1500°C. The sintered samples were characterized for the developed phases using x‐ray diffractometry analysis, microstructural morphology using ultra‐high resolution field emission scanning electron microscope (UHRFEGSEM. It was observed that microstructural morphology of the samples revealed the evolution of mullite, cristobalite and microcline. The kaolinite content of the raw kaolin undergoes transformation into mullite and excess silica, the mullite and the silica phases contents increased with increased sintering temperature. It is also generally observed that the graphite content progressively reduced linearly with increased sintering temperature. It is concluded that silicon carbide acts as anti-oxidant for the graphite, this anti-oxidant effect was more effective at 4 vol % silicon carbide.

  16. Fabrication and characterization of carbon and boron carbide nanostructured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaud, Sara

    Carbon is present in nature in a variety of allotropes and chemical compounds. Due to reduced dimensionality, nanostructured carbon materials, i.e. single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), are characterized by unique physical and chemical properties. There is a potential for SWNTs use as biological probes and assists for tunable tissue growth in biomedical applications. However, the presumed cytotoxicity of SWNTs requires investigation of the risks of their incorporation into living systems. Boron is not found in nature in elementary form. Boron based materials are chemically complex and exist in various polymorphic forms, i.e. boron carbide (BC). Because BC is a lightweight material with exceptional mechanical and elastic properties, it is the ideal candidate for armor and ballistic applications. However, practical use of BC as armor material is limited because of its anomalous glass-like behaviour at high velocity impacts, which has been linked to stress-induced structural instability in one of BC polymorphs, B12(CCC). Theoretical calculations suggest that formation of B12(CCC) in BC could be suppressed by silicon doping. In the first part of this thesis, biocompatibility of SWNTs is investigated. It is shown that under normal cell implantation conditions, the electrical conductivity of the SWNTs decreases due to an increase in structural disorder. This research suggests that SWNTs can be functionalized by protein and biological cells reducing the risk of cytotoxicity. In the second part of this thesis, boron carbide nanostructured materials are synthesized and investigated. Radio frequency sputtering deposition technique is employed for fabrication of BC (Si free) and BC:Si thin films. Variation of plasma conditions and temperature are found to affect chemical composition, adhesion to the substrate and morphology of the films. It is shown that BC films are predominantly amorphous and a small addition of Si largely improves their mechanical properties. In addition

  17. [Influence of La2O3 and Li2O on glass powder for infiltrating ZTA all-ceramic dental material formed by gel-casting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Qiong; Wang, Xiao-fei; Yang, Zheng-yu; Tong, Yi-ping; Zhu, Li; Ma, Jian-feng

    2012-10-01

    The influence of La2O3 and Li2O on glass powder was studied in this paper, which is to infiltrate ZTA all-ceramic dental material formed by gel-casting. The performance of different component was analyzed to optimize glass formula. Six groups of glass powder were designed and prepared by conventional melt-quenching method. ZTA ceramic blocks were covered with glass paste, which were formed by gel-casting and sintered in 1200 degrees centigrade, then infiltrated in 1150 degrees centigrade for twice to make glass/ZTA ceramic composites. By detecting differential thermal analysis and melting range of infiltration glass power, as well as flexural strength, linear shrinkage, SEM and EDS of glass/ZTA ceramic composites, the optimized glass group was determined out. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 13.0 software package by means of paired t test or one way ANOVA. The bending strength of group Li1 was (291.2±27.9) MPa, significantly higher than group Li2 and group La2(Pglass of group Li1 can lubricate ZTA ceramics well, their structure was compact and had a few small pores. Intergranular fracture existed on cross surface as well as transgranular fracture. The results showed that Li1(30%La2O3-15%Al2O3-15%SiO2-15%B2O3-5%Li2O) glass infiltrated ZTA ceramic composite had the best capability. Glass/ZTA composite material can be prepared by gel-casting and infiltrating way, and this process is simple and economically suitable for general dental laboratory.

  18. Low Carbon Footprint mortar from Pozzolanic Waste Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmannavaz, Taha; Mehman navaz, Hossein Ali; Moayed Zefreh, Fereshteh; Aboata, Zahra

    2017-04-01

    Nowadays, Portland cement clinker leads to emission of CO2 into the atmosphere and therefore causes greenhouse effect. Incorporating of Palm Oil Fuel Ash (POFA) and Pulverized Fuel Ash (PFA) as partial cement replacement materials into mix of low carbon mortar decreases the amount of cement use and reduces high dependence on cements compared to ordinary mortar. The result of this research supported use of the new concept in preparing low carbon mortar for industrial constructions. Strength of low carbon mortar with POFA and PFA replacement in cement was affected and changed by replacing percent finesse, physical and chemical properties and pozzolanic activity of these wastes. Waste material replacement instead of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) was used in this study. This in turn was useful for promoting better quality of construction and innovative systems in construction industry, especially in Malaysia. This study was surely a step forward to achieving quality products which were affordable, durable and environmentally friendly. Disposing ash contributes to shortage of landfill space in Malaysia. Besides, hazard of ash might be another serious issue for human health. The ash disposal area also might create a new problem, which is the area's sedimentation and erosion.

  19. Copper-based Composite Materials Reinforced with Carbon Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Larionova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work is devoted to development of high performance Cu-based material reinforced with carbon. For this purpose Cu-C composite powders were produced by one-step CVD process. The powders containing carbon nanofibers and graphene were subjected to compacting and analyzed. Mechanical properties of Cu-carbon nanofibers (CNFs and Cu-graphene composites were compared to traditional Cu-graphite and pure copper samples compacted under the same technology. Cu-CNFs material showed the best performance (1.7 times increase in the hardness compared to copper, that is primarily explained by the smallest matrix grain size, which growth is inhibited by the homogeneously dispersed CNFs. Friction coefficient of the Cu-(17-33vol.%CNF was found to be 9 times less than that of pure copper and coincides within the error with Cu-graphite, however the wear of Cu-33vol.%CNF reduced by more than 2 times over Cu-33vol.% graphite samples.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.3.7348

  20. Photophysics of Carbon Nanotubes Interfaced with Organic and Inorganic Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Levitsky, Igor A; Karachevtsev, Victor A

    2012-01-01

    Photophysics of Carbon Nanotubes Interfaced with Organic and Inorganic Materials describes physical, optical and spectroscopic properties of the emerging class of nanocomposites formed from carbon nanotubes (CNTs)  interfacing with organic and inorganic materials. The three main chapters detail novel trends in  photophysics related to the interaction of  light with various carbon nanotube composites from relatively simple CNT/small molecule assemblies to complex hybrids such as CNT/Si and CNT/DNA nanostructures.   The latest experimental results are followed up with detailed discussions and scientific and technological perspectives to provide a through coverage of major topics including: ·   Light harvesting, energy conversion, photoinduced charge separation  and transport  in CNT based nanohybrids · CNT/polymer composites exhibiting photoactuation; and ·         Optical  spectroscopy  and structure of CNT/DNA complexes. Including original data and a short review of recent research, Phot...