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Sample records for carbon catabolite repression

  1. Engineering of carbon catabolite repression in recombinant xylose fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roca, Christophe Francois Aime; Haack, Martin Brian; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2004-01-01

    Two xylose-fermenting glucose-derepressed Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were constructed in order to investigate the influence of carbon catabolite repression on xylose metabolism. S. cerevisiae CPB.CR2 (Deltamig1, XYL1, XYL2, XKS1) and CPB.MBH2 (Deltamig1, Deltamig2, XYL1, XYL2, XKS1) were...

  2. Nitrogen Catabolite Repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofman-Bang, H Jacob Peider

    1999-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the expression of all known nitrogen catabolite pathways are regulated by four regulators known as Gln3, Gat1, Da180, and Deh1. This is known as nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR). They bind to motifs in the promoter region to the consensus sequence S' GATAA 3'. Gln3...

  3. Trichoderma reesei CRE1-mediated Carbon Catabolite Repression in Re-sponse to Sophorose Through RNA Sequencing Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniêto, Amanda Cristina Campos; de Paula, Renato Graciano; Castro, Lílian Dos Santos; Silva-Rocha, Rafael; Persinoti, Gabriela Felix; Silva, Roberto Nascimento

    2016-04-01

    Carbon catabolite repression (CCR) mediated by CRE1 in Trichoderma reesei emerged as a mechanism by which the fungus could adapt to new environments. In the presence of readily available carbon sources such as glucose, the fungus activates this mechanism and inhibits the production of cellulolytic complex enzymes to avoid unnecessary energy expenditure. CCR has been well described for the growth of T. reesei in cellulose and glucose, however, little is known about this process when the carbon source is sophorose, one of the most potent inducers of cellulase production. Thus, we performed high-throughput RNA sequencing to better understand CCR during cellulase formation in the presence of sophorose, by comparing the mutant ∆cre1 with its parental strain, QM9414. Of the 9129 genes present in the genome of T. reesei, 184 were upregulated and 344 downregulated in the mutant strain ∆cre1 compared to QM9414. Genes belonging to the CAZy database, and those encoding transcription factors and transporters are among the gene classes that were repressed by CRE1 in the presence of sophorose; most were possible indirectly regulated by CRE1. We also observed that CRE1 activity is carbon-dependent. A recent study from our group showed that in cellulose, CRE1 repress different groups of genes when compared to sophorose. CCR differences between these carbon sources may be due to the release of cellodextrins in the cellulose polymer, resulting in different targets of CRE1 in both carbon sources. These results contribute to a better understanding of CRE1-mediated CCR in T. reesei when glucose comes from a potent inducer of cellulase production such as sophorose, which could prove useful in improving cellulase production by the biotechnology sector. PMID:27226768

  4. Demonstration of Carbon Catabolite Repression in Naphthalene Degrading Soil Bacteria via Raman Spectroscopy Based Stable Isotope Probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar B N, Vinay; Guo, Shuxia; Bocklitz, Thomas; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-08-01

    Carbon catabolite repression (CCR) is a regulatory phenomenon occurring in both lower organisms like bacteria and higher organisms like yeast, which allows them to preferentially utilize a specific carbon source to achieve highest metabolic activity and cell growth. CCR has been intensely studied in the model organisms Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis by following diauxic growth curves, assays to estimate the utilization or depletion of carbon sources, enzyme assays, Western blotting and mass spectrometric analysis to monitor and quantify the involvement of specific enzymes and proteins involved in CCR. In this study, we have visualized this process in three species of naphthalene degrading soil bacteria at a single cell level via Raman spectroscopy based stable isotope probing (Raman-SIP) using a single and double labeling approach. This is achieved using a combination of (2)H and (13)C isotope labeled carbon sources like glucose, galactose, fructose, and naphthalene. Time dependent metabolic flux of (13)C and (2)H isotopes has been followed via semi quantification and 2D Raman correlation analysis. For this, the relative intensities of Raman marker bands corresponding to (2)H and (13)C incorporation in newly synthesized macromolecules like proteins and lipids have been utilized. The 2D correlation analysis of time dependent Raman spectra readily identified small sequential changes resulting from isotope incorporation. Overall, we show that Raman-SIP has the potential to be used to obtain information about regulatory processes like CCR in bacteria at a single cell level within a time span of 3 h in fast growing bacteria. We also demonstrate the potential of this approach in identifying the most efficient naphthalene degraders asserting its importance for use in bioremediation. PMID:27305464

  5. Molecular physiology of the dynamic regulation of carbon catabolite repression in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borirak, Orawan; Bekker, Martijn; Hellingwerf, Klaas J

    2014-06-01

    We report on the use of the chemostat as an optimal device to create time-invariant conditions that allow accurate sampling for various omics assays in Escherichia coli, in combination with recording of the dynamics of the physiological transition in the organism under study that accompany the initiation of glucose repression. E. coli cells respond to the addition of glucose not only with the well-known transcriptional response, as was revealed through quantitative PCR analysis of the transcript levels of key genes from the CRP (cAMP receptor protein) regulon, but also with an increased growth rate and a transient decrease in the efficiency of its aerobic catabolism. Less than half of a doubling time is required for the organism to recover to maximal values of growth rate and efficiency. Furthermore, calculations based on our results show that the specific glucose uptake rate (qs) and the H(+)/e(-) ratio increase proportionally, up to a growth rate of 0.4 h(-1), whilst biomass yield on glucose (Yx / s) drops during the first 15 min, followed by a gradual recovery. Surprisingly, the growth yields after the recovery phase show values even higher than the maximum theoretical yield. Possible explanations for these high yields are discussed. PMID:24603062

  6. Defining the genome-wide role of CRE1 during carbon catabolite repression in Trichoderma reesei using RNA-Seq analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniêto, Amanda Cristina Campos; dos Santos Castro, Lílian; Silva-Rocha, Rafael; Persinoti, Gabriela Felix; Silva, Roberto Nascimento

    2014-12-01

    The ascomycete Trichoderma reesei is one of the most well-studied cellulolytic fungi and is widely used by the biotechnology industry in the production of second generation bioethanol. The carbon catabolite repression (CCR) mechanism adopted by T. reesei is mediated by the transcription factor CRE1. CCR represses genes related to cellulase production when a carbon source is readily available in the medium. Using RNA sequencing, we investigated CCR during the synthesis of cellulases, comparing the T. reesei Δcre1 mutant strain with its parental strain, QM9414. Of 9129 genes in the T. reesei genome, 268 genes were upregulated and 85 were downregulated in the presence of cellulose (Avicel). In addition, 251 genes were upregulated and 230 were downregulated in the presence of a high concentration of glucose. Genes encoding cellulolytic enzymes and transcription factors and genes related to the transport of nutrients and oxidative metabolism were also targets of CCR, mediated by CRE1 in a carbon source-dependent manner. Our results also suggested that CRE1 regulates the expression of genes related to the use of copper and iron as final electron acceptors or as cofactors of enzymes that participate in biomass degradation. As a result, the final effect of CRE1-mediated transcriptional regulation is to modulate the access of cellulolytic enzymes to cellulose polymers or blocks the entry of cellulase inducers into the cell, depending on the glucose content in the medium. These results will contribute to a better understanding of the mechanism of carbon catabolite repression in T. reesei, thereby enhancing its application in several biotechnology fields. PMID:25459535

  7. The interplay of StyR and IHF regulates substrate-dependent induction and carbon catabolite repression of styrene catabolism genes in Pseudomonas fluorescens ST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leoni Livia

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Pseudomonas fluorescens ST, the promoter of the styrene catabolic operon, PstyA, is induced by styrene and is subject to catabolite repression. PstyA regulation relies on the StyS/StyR two-component system and on the IHF global regulator. The phosphorylated response regulator StyR (StyR-P activates PstyA in inducing conditions when it binds to the high-affinity site STY2, located about -40 bp from the transcription start point. A cis-acting element upstream of STY2, named URE, contains a low-affinity StyR-P binding site (STY1, overlapping the IHF binding site. Deletion of the URE led to a decrease of promoter activity in inducing conditions and to a partial release of catabolite repression. This study was undertaken to assess the relative role played by IHF and StyR-P on the URE, and to clarify if PstyA catabolite repression could rely on the interplay of these regulators. Results StyR-P and IHF compete for binding to the URE region. PstyA full activity in inducing conditions is achieved when StyR-P and IHF bind to site STY2 and to the URE, respectively. Under catabolite repression conditions, StyR-P binds the STY1 site, replacing IHF at the URE region. StyR-P bound to both STY1 and STY2 sites oligomerizes, likely promoting the formation of a DNA loop that closes the promoter in a repressed conformation. We found that StyR and IHF protein levels did not change in catabolite repression conditions, implying that PstyA repression is achieved through an increase in the StyR-P/StyR ratio. Conclusion We propose a model according to which the activity of the PstyA promoter is determined by conformational changes. An open conformation is operative in inducing conditions when StyR-P is bound to STY2 site and IHF to the URE. Under catabolite repression conditions StyR-P cellular levels would increase, displacing IHF from the URE and closing the promoter in a repressed conformation. The balance between the open and the closed

  8. Regulation of pqs quorum sensing via catabolite repression control in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lianbo; Gao, Qingguo; Chen, Wanying;

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa catabolite repression control protein regulates the Pseudomonas quinolone signal quorum sensing, which further controls synthesis of virulence factor pyocyanin, biofilm formation and survival during infection models. Our study suggests that deregulation of the catabolite repression by P...

  9. Ethanol from Whey: Continuous Fermentation with a Catabolite Repression-Resistant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mutant

    OpenAIRE

    Terrell, Scott L.; Bernard, Alain; Bailey, Richard B.

    1984-01-01

    An alternative method for the conversion of cheese whey lactose into ethanol has been demonstrated. With the help of continuous-culture technology, a catabolite repression-resistant mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae completely fermented equimolar mixtures of glucose and galactose into ethanol. The first step in this process was a computer-controlled fed-batch operation based on the carbon dioxide evolution rate of the culture. In the absence of inhibitory ethanol concentrations, this step al...

  10. Influence of Catabolite Repression and Inducer Exclusion on the Bistable Behavior of the lac Operon

    OpenAIRE

    Santillán, Moisés; Mackey, Michael C.

    2004-01-01

    A mathematical model of the lac operon which includes all of the known regulatory mechanisms, including external-glucose-dependent catabolite repression and inducer exclusion, as well as the time delays inherent to transcription and translation, is presented. With this model we investigate the influence of external glucose, by means of catabolite repression and the regulation of lactose uptake, on the bistable behavior of this system.

  11. In situ assay for 5-aminolevulinate dehydratase and application to the study of a catabolite repression-resistant Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borralho, L M; Panek, A D; Malamud, D R; Sanders, H K; Mattoon, J R

    1983-10-01

    To facilitate the study of the effects of carbon catabolite repression and mutations on 5-aminolevulinate dehydratase (EC 4.2.1.24) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a sensitive in situ assay was developed, using cells permeabilized by five cycles of freezing and thawing. Enzymatic activity was measured by colorimetric determination of porphobilinogen with a modified Ehrlich reagent. For normal strains, porphobilinogen production was linear for 15 min, and the reaction rate was directly proportional to the permeabilized cell concentration up to 20 mg (dry weight) per ml. The reaction exhibited Michaelis-Menten-type kinetics, and an apparent Km of 2.6 mM was obtained for 5-aminolevulinic acid. This value is only slightly higher than the value of 1.8 mM obtained for the enzyme assayed in cell extracts. The in situ assay was used to assess catabolite repression-dependent changes in 5-aminolevulinate dehydratase during batch culture on glucose medium. In normal S. cerevisiae cells, the enzyme is strongly repressed as long as glucose is present in the medium. In contrast, a strain bearing the hex2-3 mutation exhibits derepressed levels of enzyme activity during growth on glucose. Synthesis of cytochromes by this strain is also resistant to catabolite repression. Similar studies employing a strain containing the glc1 mutation, which enhances porphyrin accumulation, did not reveal any significant phenotypic change in catabolite regulation of 5-aminolevulinate dehydratase. PMID:6352674

  12. Osmoprotectant-dependent expression of plcH, encoding the hemolytic phospholipase C, is subject to novel catabolite repression control in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    OpenAIRE

    Sage, A E; Vasil, M L

    1997-01-01

    Expression of the hemolytic phospholipase C (PlcH) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is induced under phosphate starvation conditions or in the presence of the osmoprotectants choline and glycine betaine. Because choline and glycine betaine may serve as carbon and energy sources in addition to conferring osmoprotection to P. aeruginosa, it seemed possible that induction of plcH is subject to catabolite repression control (CRC) by tricarboxylic cycle intermediates such as succinate. Total phospholipas...

  13. The CRE1 carbon catabolite repressor of the fungus Trichoderma reesei: a master regulator of carbon assimilation.

    OpenAIRE

    Seiboth Bernhard; Druzhinina Irina S; Karaffa Levente; Hartl Lukas; Sándor Erzsébet; Fekete Erzsébet (1975-) (biotechnológus); Atanasova Lea; Linke Rita; Margeot Antoine; Portnoy Thomas; Le Crom Stéphane; Kubicek Christian P

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The identification and characterization of the transcriptional regulatory networks governing the physiology and adaptation of microbial cells is a key step in understanding their behaviour. One such wide-domain regulatory circuit, essential to all cells, is carbon catabolite repression (CCR): it allows the cell to prefer some carbon sources, whose assimilation is of high nutritional value, over less profitable ones. In lower multicellular fungi, the C2H2 zinc finger CreA/C...

  14. Transient repression of catabolite-sensitive enzyme synthesis elicited by 2,4-dinitrophenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, R

    1975-09-01

    Transient inhibition of catabolic enzyme synthesis in Escherichia coli occurred when a low concentration of 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) was simultaneously added with inducer. Using mutant strains defective for gamma-gene product or constitutive for lac enzymes, it was found that the inhibition is not due to the exclusion of inducer by uncoupling. The addition of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate overcame repression. The components of the lac operon coordinately responded to DNP inhibition. From deoxyribonucleic acid-ribonucleic acid hybridization experiments, it was found that the inhibition of beta-galactosidase induction occurred at the level of messenger ribonucleic acid synthesis specific for the lac operon. It seems probable that DNP represses induction in a similar manner to that of transient repression observed upon the addition of glucose. Furthermore, it was found that transient repression disappeared if cells were preincubated with DNP before induction. This indicates that new contact of cells with DNP is obligatory for transient repression. From these results, it is suggested that the cell membrane may be responsible for regulation of catabolite-sensitive enzyme synthesis. PMID:169228

  15. Identification of novel secreted fatty acids that regulate nitrogen catabolite repression in fission yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoying; Hirai, Go; Ueki, Masashi; Hirota, Hiroshi; Wang, Qianqian; Hongo, Yayoi; Nakamura, Takemichi; Hitora, Yuki; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Sodeoka, Mikiko; Osada, Hiroyuki; Hamamoto, Makiko; Yoshida, Minoru; Yashiroda, Yoko

    2016-01-01

    Uptake of poor nitrogen sources such as branched-chain amino acids is repressed in the presence of high-quality nitrogen sources such as NH4+ and glutamate (Glu), which is called nitrogen catabolite repression. Amino acid auxotrophic mutants of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe were unable to grow on minimal medium containing NH4Cl or Glu even when adequate amounts of required amino acids were supplied. However, growth of these mutant cells was recovered in the vicinity of colonies of the prototrophic strain, suggesting that the prototrophic cells secrete some substances that can restore uptake of amino acids by an unknown mechanism. We identified the novel fatty acids, 10(R)-acetoxy-8(Z)-octadecenoic acid and 10(R)-hydroxy-8(Z)-octadecenoic acid, as secreted active substances, referred to as Nitrogen Signaling Factors (NSFs). Synthetic NSFs were also able to shift nitrogen source utilization from high-quality to poor nitrogen sources to allow adaptive growth of the fission yeast amino acid auxotrophic mutants in the presence of high-quality nitrogen sources. Finally, we demonstrated that the Agp3 amino acid transporter was involved in the adaptive growth. The data highlight a novel intra-species communication system for adaptation to environmental nutritional conditions in fission yeast. PMID:26892493

  16. Mathematical model of the lac operon: inducer exclusion, catabolite repression, and diauxic growth on glucose and lactose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, P; Gladney, S; Keasling, J D

    1997-01-01

    A mathematical model of the lactose (lac) operon was developed to study diauxic growth on glucose and lactose. The model includes catabolite repression, inducer exclusion, lactose hydrolysis to glucose and galactose, and synthesis and degradation of allolactose. Two models for catabolite repression were tested: (i) cyclic AMP (cAMP) synthesis inversely correlated with the external glucose concentration and (ii) synthesis inversely correlated with the glucose transport rate. No significant differences in the two models were observed. In addition to synthesis, degradation and secretion of cAMP were also included in the model. Two models for the phosphorylation of the glucose produced from lactose hydrolysis were also tested: (i) phosphorylation by intracellular hexokinase and (ii) secretion of glucose and subsequent phosphorylation upon transport back into the cell. The latter model resulted in weak catabolite repression when the glucose produced from lactose was transported out of the cell, whereas the former model showed no catabolite repression during growth on lactose. Parameter sensitivity analysis indicates the importance of key parameters to lac operon expression and cell growth: the lactose and allolactose transformation rates by beta-galactosidase and the glucose concentrations that affect catabolite repression and inducer exclusion. Large values of the allolactose hydrolysis rate resulted in low concentrations of allolactose, low-level expression of the lac operon, and slow growth due to limited import and metabolism of lactose; small values resulted in a high concentration of allolactose, high-level expression of the lac operon, and slow growth due to a limiting concentration of glucose 6-phosphate formed from allolactose. Changes in the rates of all beta-galactosidase-catalyzed reactions showed similar behavior, but had more drastic effects on the growth rate. Changes in the glucose concentration that inhibited lactose transport could extend or contract

  17. The CRE1 carbon catabolite repressor of the fungus Trichoderma reesei: a master regulator of carbon assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiboth Bernhard

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification and characterization of the transcriptional regulatory networks governing the physiology and adaptation of microbial cells is a key step in understanding their behaviour. One such wide-domain regulatory circuit, essential to all cells, is carbon catabolite repression (CCR: it allows the cell to prefer some carbon sources, whose assimilation is of high nutritional value, over less profitable ones. In lower multicellular fungi, the C2H2 zinc finger CreA/CRE1 protein has been shown to act as the transcriptional repressor in this process. However, the complete list of its gene targets is not known. Results Here, we deciphered the CRE1 regulatory range in the model cellulose and hemicellulose-degrading fungus Trichoderma reesei (anamorph of Hypocrea jecorina by profiling transcription in a wild-type and a delta-cre1 mutant strain on glucose at constant growth rates known to repress and de-repress CCR-affected genes. Analysis of genome-wide microarrays reveals 2.8% of transcripts whose expression was regulated in at least one of the four experimental conditions: 47.3% of which were repressed by CRE1, whereas 29.0% were actually induced by CRE1, and 17.2% only affected by the growth rate but CRE1 independent. Among CRE1 repressed transcripts, genes encoding unknown proteins and transport proteins were overrepresented. In addition, we found CRE1-repression of nitrogenous substances uptake, components of chromatin remodeling and the transcriptional mediator complex, as well as developmental processes. Conclusions Our study provides the first global insight into the molecular physiological response of a multicellular fungus to carbon catabolite regulation and identifies several not yet known targets in a growth-controlled environment.

  18. Diverse Regulation of the CreA Carbon Catabolite Repressor in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, Laure N A; Beattie, Sarah R; Espeso, Eduardo A; Cramer, Robert A; Goldman, Gustavo H

    2016-05-01

    Carbon catabolite repression (CCR) is a process that selects the energetically most favorable carbon source in an environment. CCR represses the use of less favorable carbon sources when a better source is available. Glucose is the preferential carbon source for most microorganisms because it is rapidly metabolized, generating quick energy for growth. In the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans, CCR is mediated by the transcription factor CreA, a C2H2 finger domain DNA-binding protein. The aim of this work was to investigate the regulation of CreA and characterize its functionally distinct protein domains. CreA depends in part on de novo protein synthesis and is regulated in part by ubiquitination. CreC, the scaffold protein in the CreB-CreC deubiquitination (DUB) complex, is essential for CreA function and stability. Deletion of select protein domains in CreA resulted in persistent nuclear localization and target gene repression. A region in CreA conserved between Aspergillus spp. and Trichoderma reesei was identified as essential for growth on various carbon, nitrogen, and lipid sources. In addition, a role of CreA in amino acid transport and nitrogen assimilation was observed. Taken together, these results indicate previously unidentified functions of this important transcription factor. These novel functions serve as a basis for additional research in fungal carbon metabolism with the potential aim to improve fungal industrial applications. PMID:27017621

  19. Computational prediction of the Crc regulon identifies genus-wide and species-specific targets of catabolite repression control in Pseudomonas bacteria

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Browne, Patrick

    2010-11-25

    Abstract Background Catabolite repression control (CRC) is an important global control system in Pseudomonas that fine tunes metabolism in order optimise growth and metabolism in a range of different environments. The mechanism of CRC in Pseudomonas spp. centres on the binding of a protein, Crc, to an A-rich motif on the 5\\' end of an mRNA resulting in translational down-regulation of target genes. Despite the identification of several Crc targets in Pseudomonas spp. the Crc regulon has remained largely unexplored. Results In order to predict direct targets of Crc, we used a bioinformatics approach based on detection of A-rich motifs near the initiation of translation of all protein-encoding genes in twelve fully sequenced Pseudomonas genomes. As expected, our data predict that genes related to the utilisation of less preferred nutrients, such as some carbohydrates, nitrogen sources and aromatic carbon compounds are targets of Crc. A general trend in this analysis is that the regulation of transporters is conserved across species whereas regulation of specific enzymatic steps or transcriptional activators are often conserved only within a species. Interestingly, some nucleoid associated proteins (NAPs) such as HU and IHF are predicted to be regulated by Crc. This finding indicates a possible role of Crc in indirect control over a subset of genes that depend on the DNA bending properties of NAPs for expression or repression. Finally, some virulence traits such as alginate and rhamnolipid production also appear to be regulated by Crc, which links nutritional status cues with the regulation of virulence traits. Conclusions Catabolite repression control regulates a broad spectrum of genes in Pseudomonas. Some targets are genus-wide and are typically related to central metabolism, whereas other targets are species-specific, or even unique to particular strains. Further study of these novel targets will enhance our understanding of how Pseudomonas bacteria integrate

  20. Sip1 Is a Catabolite Repression-Specific Negative Regulator of Gal Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Mylin, L. M.; Bushman, V. L.; Long, R. M.; X. Yu; Lebo, C. M.; Blank, T. E.; Hopper, J E

    1994-01-01

    The yeast Snflp kinase is required for normal expression of amny genes involved in utilization of non-glucose carbon. Snflp is known to associate with several proteins. One is Sip1p, a protein that becomes phosphorylated in the presence of Snflp and thus is a candidate Snflp kinase substrate. We have isolated the SIP1 gene as a multicopy suppressor of the gal83-associated defect in glucose repression of GAL gene expression. Multicopy SIP1 also suppressed the gal82-associated defect in glucose...

  1. Membrane Association and Catabolite Repression of the Sulfolobus solfataricus α-Amylase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Soo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sulfolobus solfataricus is a thermoacidophilic member of the archaea whose envelope consists of an ether-linked lipid monolayer surrounded by a protein S-layer. Protein translocation across this envelope must accommodate a steep proton gradient that is subject to temperature extremes. To better understand this process in vivo, studies were conducted on the S. solfataricus glycosyl hydrolyase family 57 α-Amylase (AmyA. Cell lines harboring site specific modifications of the amyA promoter and AmyA structural domains were created by gene replacement using markerless exchange and characterized by Western blot, enzyme assay and culture-based analysis. Fusion of amyA to the malAp promoter overcame amyAp-mediated regulatory responses to media composition including glucose and amino acid repression implicating action act at the level of transcription. Deletion of the AmyA Class II N-terminal signal peptide blocked protein secretion and intracellular protein accumulation. Deletion analysis of a conserved bipartite C-terminal motif consisting of a hydrophobic region followed by several charged residues indicated the charged residues played an essential role in membrane-association but not protein secretion. Mutants lacking the C-terminal bipartite motif exhibited reduced growth rates on starch as the sole carbon and energy source; therefore, association of AmyA with the membrane improves carbohydrate utilization. Widespread occurrence of this motif in other secreted proteins of S. solfataricus and of related Crenarchaeota suggests protein association with membranes is a general trait used by these organisms to influence external processes.

  2. The catabolite repression control protein Crc plays a role in the development of antimicrobial-tolerant subpopulations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lianbo; Chiang, Wen-Chi; Gao, Qingguo;

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria form complex surface-attached biofilm communities in nature. Biofilm cells differentiate into subpopulations which display tolerance towards antimicrobial agents. However, the signal transduction pathways regulating subpopulation differentiation in biofilms are largely unelucidated. In t....... In the present study, we show that the catabolite repression control protein Crc regulates the metabolic state of Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells in biofilms, and plays an important role in the development of antimicrobial-tolerant subpopulations in P. aeruginosa biofilms....

  3. Cloning of a catabolite repression control (crc) gene from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, expression of the gene in Escherichia coli, and identification of the gene product in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    MacGregor, C H; Wolff, J A; Arora, S K; Phibbs, P V

    1991-01-01

    Mutants which are defective in catabolite repression control (CRC) of multiple independently regulated catabolic pathways have been previously described. The mutations were mapped at 11 min on the Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosome and designated crc. This report describes the cloning of a gene which restores normal CRC to these Crc- mutants in trans. The gene expressing this CRC activity was subcloned on a 2-kb piece of DNA. When this 2-kb fragment was placed in a plasmid behind a phage T7 pr...

  4. Nitrogen catabolite repression modulates the production of aromatic thiols characteristic of Sauvignon Blanc at the level of precursor transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subileau, Maeva; Schneider, Rémy; Salmon, Jean-Michel; Degryse, Eric

    2008-08-01

    The free thiols 3-mercapto-hexanol (3MH) and its acetate, practically absent from musts, are liberated by yeast during fermentation from a cysteinylated precursor [S-3-(hexan-1-ol)-l-cysteine (Cys-3MH)] present in the grape must and contribute favorably to the flavor of Sauvignon white wines. Production of 3MH is increased when urea is substituted for diammonium phosphate (DAP) as the sole nitrogen source on a synthetic medium. On grape must, complementation with DAP induces a decrease of 3MH production. This observation is reminiscent of nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR). The production of 3MH is significantly lower for a gap1Delta mutant compared with the wild type, during fermentation of a synthetic medium containing Cys-3MH as the precursor and urea as the sole nitrogen source. Mutants isolated from an enological strain with a relief of NCR on GAP1 produce significantly higher amounts of 3MH on synthetic medium than the parental strain. These phenotypes were not confirmed on grape must. It is concluded that on synthetic medium, Cys-3MH enters the cell through at least one identified transporter, GAP1p, whose activity is limiting the release of volatile thiols. On grape must, the uptake of the precursor through GAP1p is not confirmed, but the effect of addition of DAP, eventually prolonging NCR, is shown to decrease thiol production. PMID:18549408

  5. Genetic evidence that catabolites of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway signal C source repression of the sigma54 Pu promoter of Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez, Francisco; di Bartolo, Ilaria; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2004-12-01

    Glucose and other C sources exert an atypical form of catabolic repression on the sigma54-dependent promoter Pu, which drives transcription of an operon for m-xylene degradation encoded by the TOL plasmid pWW0 in Pseudomonas putida. We have used a genetic approach to identify the catabolite(s) shared by all known repressive C sources that appears to act as the intracellular signal that triggers downregulation of Pu. To this end, we reconstructed from genomic data the pathways for metabolism of repressor (glucose, gluconate) and nonrepressor (fructose) C sources. Since P. putida lacks fructose-6-phosphate kinase, glucose and gluconate appear to be metabolized exclusively by the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway, while fructose can be channeled through the Embden-Meyerhof (EM) route. An insertion in the gene fda (encoding fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase) that forces fructose metabolism to be routed exclusively to the ED pathway makes this sugar inhibitory for Pu. On the contrary, a crc mutation known to stimulate expression of the ED enzymes causes the promoter to be less sensitive to glucose. Interrupting the ED pathway by knocking out eda (encoding 2-dehydro-3-deoxyphosphogluconate aldolase) exacerbates the inhibitory effect of glucose in Pu. These observations pinpoint the key catabolites of the ED route, 6-phosphogluconate and/or 2-dehydro-3-deoxyphosphogluconate, as the intermediates that signal Pu repression. This notion is strengthened by the observation that 2-ketogluconate, which enters the ED pathway by conversion into these compounds, is a strong repressor of the Pu promoter. PMID:15576775

  6. Selection of Trichoderma mutants with enhanced cellulase production and resistant to catabolite repression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Szakacs G; Megyeri L; Kovacs K; Zacchi G

    2004-01-01

    @@ Due to high cost and relatively low efficiency of cellulase enzymes used for the saccharification of pretreated lignocelluloses, the improvement of cellulase secreting microorganisms is of vital importance. Trichoderma reesei QM 6a, an excellent source of cellulase was selected in the late 1960's at Natick Laboratories by its performance on pure cellulose (Solka Floc, Avicel) . QM 6a is the wild parent strain of best existing hypercellulolytic mutants such as Rut C30, VTT-D-80133,L27, CL-847 and others. Utilization of cheaper carbon sources (e. g. , pretreated wood or straw) both in enzyme production and in hydrolysis necessitates to investigate fungal species other than T. reesei.

  7. Role of materials released from Escherichia coli cells in the catabolite repression of L-arabinose isomerase induced by γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inhibition of L-arabinose isomerase synthesizing capacity of Escherichia coli by γ-irradiation was withdrawn when the irradiated cells were separated by centrifugation from the suspending medium and were suspended in a fresh growth medium. Further, there was an inhibition of the induced enzyme synthesis in unirradiated cells when suspended in the supernatant from γ-irradiated cell suspension. These findings suggested that some inhibitory material(s) was released from γ-irradiated cells into the suspending medium. Incubation of γ-irradiated cells suspended in fresh growth medium led to an exponential decrease in the enzyme synthesizing capacity, which was not caused by release of any inhibitory material. Cyclic AMP could reverse the inhibition of the enzyme synthesizing capacity in unirradiated cells caused by their suspension in the supernatant from γ-irradiated cell suspension immediately following irradiation suggesting that catabolite repression is the cause of the inhibition. Incubation of γ-irradiated cell suspension released the L-arabinose isomerase-synthesizing system from the catabolite repression. (author). 9 refs., 4 figs

  8. Involvement of a Putative Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein (CRP)-Like Binding Sequence and a CRP-Like Protein in Glucose-Mediated Catabolite Repression of thn Genes in Rhodococcus sp. Strain TFB

    OpenAIRE

    Tomás-Gallardo, Laura; Santero, Eduardo; Floriano, Belén

    2012-01-01

    Glucose catabolite repression of tetralin catabolic genes in Rhodococcus sp. strain TFB was shown to be exerted by a protein homologous to transcriptional regulators of the cyclic AMP receptor (CRP)-FNR family. The protein was detected bound to putative CRP-like boxes localized at the promoters of the thnA1 and thnS genes.

  9. Involvement of a putative cyclic amp receptor protein (CRP)-like binding sequence and a CRP-like protein in glucose-mediated catabolite repression of thn genes in Rhodococcus sp. strain TFB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás-Gallardo, Laura; Santero, Eduardo; Floriano, Belén

    2012-08-01

    Glucose catabolite repression of tetralin catabolic genes in Rhodococcus sp. strain TFB was shown to be exerted by a protein homologous to transcriptional regulators of the cyclic AMP receptor (CRP)-FNR family. The protein was detected bound to putative CRP-like boxes localized at the promoters of the thnA1 and thnS genes. PMID:22636000

  10. Ure2 is involved in nitrogen catabolite repression and salt tolerance via Ca2+ homeostasis and calcineurin activation in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Celia; Tejera, Paula; Medina, Braulio; Guillén, Rosa; Domínguez, Angel; Ramos, José; Siverio, José M

    2010-11-26

    Disruption of HpURE2 resulted in a low expression of genes encoding nitrate-assimilatory proteins; sensitivity to Li(+), Na(+), and Cd(2+); no induction of ENA1; low levels of the GATA-type transcription factor Gat1; and low intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Gat1 levels were also very low in a Δcnb1 mutant lacking the regulatory subunit of calcineurin. The strain Δure2 was very sensitive to the calcineurin inhibitor FK506 and displayed several phenotypes reminiscent of Δcnb1. The reporter 4xCDRE-lacZ, containing calcineurin-dependent response elements in its promoter, revealed that calcineurin activation was reduced in HpΔure2. Expression of ScURE2 in Δure2 rescued nitrogen catabolite repression and Cd(2+) tolerance but not those phenotypes depending on calcineurin activation, such as salt tolerance and nitrate assimilation gene derepression. HpΔure2 showed an increased expression of the gene PMR1 encoding the Golgi Ca(2+)-ATPase, whereas that of PMC1 encoding the vacuolar Ca(2+)-ATPase remained unaltered. PMR1 up-regulation was abolished by deletion of the GATA-type transcription factor GAT2 in a HpΔure2 genetic background, and normal Ca(2+) levels were recovered. Moreover, overexpression of GAT2 or PMR1 yielded strains mimicking the phenotype of the HpΔure2. This suggests that the low Ca(2+) levels in the HpΔure2 mutant are due to the high levels of Pmr1 that replenish the Golgi Ca(2+) content, thus acting as a negative signal for Ca(2+) entry into the cell. We conclude that HpUre2 is involved in salt tolerance and also in nitrate assimilation gene derepression via Ca(2+) homeostasis regulation and calcineurin activation, which control the levels of Gat1. PMID:20880842

  11. Carbon catabolite repression and global control of the carbohydrate metabolism in Lactococcus lactis.

    OpenAIRE

    Luesink, E.J.

    1998-01-01

    In view of the economic importance of fermented dairy products considerable scientific attention has been given to various steps of fermentation processes, including the L-lactate formation of lactic acid bacteria (de Vos, 1996). In particular, the carbohydrate metabolism of L. lactis has been the subject of extensive research and several genes encoding proteins involved in the central carbohydrate metabolism have been described (Llanos et al., 1992; Llanos et al., 1993; Cancilla et al., 1995...

  12. Carbon catabolite repression and global control of the carbohydrate metabolism in Lactococcus lactis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luesink, E.J.

    1998-01-01

    In view of the economic importance of fermented dairy products considerable scientific attention has been given to various steps of fermentation processes, including the L-lactate formation of lactic acid bacteria (de Vos, 1996). In particular, the carbohydrate metabolism of L. lactis has been the s

  13. Induction and carbon catabolite repression of phenol degradation genes in Rhodococcus erythropolis nad Rhodococcus jostii

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Szököl, Juraj; Rucká, Lenka; Šimčíková, M.; Halada, Petr; Nešvera, Jan; Pátek, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 98, č. 19 (2014), s. 8267-8279. ISSN 0175-7598 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B08062; GA ČR(CZ) GAP504/11/0394 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Phenol degradation * Phenol hydroxylase * Rhodococcus erythropolis Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.337, year: 2014

  14. The putrescine biosynthesis pathway in Lactococcus lactis is transcriptionally regulated by carbon catabolic repression, mediated by CcpA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Daniel M; del Río, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Redruello, Begoña; Martín, María Cruz; Fernández, María; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2013-07-01

    Lactococcus lactis is the lactic acid bacterium most widely used by the dairy industry as a starter for the manufacture of fermented products such as cheese and buttermilk. However, some strains produce putrescine from agmatine via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway. The proteins involved in this pathway, including those necessary for agmatine uptake and conversion into putrescine, are encoded by the aguB, aguD, aguA and aguC genes, which together form an operon. This paper reports the mechanism of regulation of putrescine biosynthesis in L. lactis. It is shown that the aguBDAC operon, which contains a cre site at the promoter of aguB (the first gene of the operon), is transcriptionally regulated by carbon catabolic repression (CCR) mediated by the catabolite control protein CcpA. PMID:23688550

  15. Physiological role of microbodies in the yeast Trichosporon cutaneum during growth on ethylamine as the source of energy, carbon and nitrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Veenhuis, M; van der Klei, I J; Harder, W

    1986-01-01

    Compartmentation of the metabolism of ethylamine in Trichosporon cutaneum X4 was studied in cells, grown on this compound as the sole source of energy, carbon, and nitrogen. Transfer experiments indicated that an amine oxidase is involved in the early metabolism of ethylamine. The synthesis of this enzyme was induced by primary amines and was subject to partial carbon catabolite repression. Repression by ammonium ions was not observed. Adaptation of glucose-grown ceils to growth on ethylamine...

  16. Relationship between carbon catabolite repression and the biosynthesis regulation of the prolidase PepQ from Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus CNRZ 397

    OpenAIRE

    Lamarque, Mauld; Morel, Fabienne; Bissardon, Isabelle; Galinier, Anne; Portalier, Raymond; Atlan, Danièle

    2001-01-01

    International audience Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus CNRZ 397 (L. bulgaricus) displays several enzymes specific of proline-containing peptides. We focused on the prolidase PepQ which specifically cleaves X-Pro dipeptides. PepQ biosynthesis was previously shown to be independent of the peptide concentration of the culture medium in contrast to the cell surface proteinase PrtB and several aminopeptidases. Regulation of PepQ biosynthesis can be explained by the genetic organizatio...

  17. A Hexose Transporter Homologue Controls Glucose Repression in the Methylotrophic Yeast Hansenula polymorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stasyk, Oleh V.; Stasyk, Olena G.; Komduur, Janet; Veenhuis, Marten; Cregg, James M.; Sibirny, Andrei A.

    2004-01-01

    Peroxisome biogenesis and synthesis of peroxisomal enzymes in the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha are under the strict control of glucose repression. We identified an H. polymorpha glucose catabolite repression gene (HpGCR1) that encodes a hexose transporter homologue. Deficiency in GCR1 l

  18. Repression and catabolite repression of the lactose operon of Staphylococcus aureus.

    OpenAIRE

    Oskouian, B; Stewart, G. C.

    1990-01-01

    The lacR gene encodes the repressor of the lactose operon of S. aureus. The nucleotide sequence of this gene and the promoter-operator region of the operon are reported. The lacR gene encodes a protein with a molecular weight of 28,534. This protein was found to share sequence homology with the DeoR protein, the repressor of the E. coli deoxyribonucleotide operon. Directly and invertedly repeated sequences were found associated with the promoter for the structural genes of the operon. These s...

  19. Assessment of CcpA-mediated catabolite control of gene expression in Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buist Girbe

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The catabolite control protein CcpA is a transcriptional regulator conserved in many Gram-positives, controlling the efficiency of glucose metabolism. Here we studied the role of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 CcpA in regulation of metabolic pathways and expression of enterotoxin genes by comparative transcriptome analysis of the wild-type and a ccpA-deletion strain. Results Comparative analysis revealed the growth performance and glucose consumption rates to be lower in the B. cereus ATCC 14579 ccpA deletion strain than in the wild-type. In exponentially grown cells, the expression of glycolytic genes, including a non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase that mediates conversion of D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate to 3-phospho-D-glycerate in one single step, was down-regulated and expression of gluconeogenic genes and genes encoding the citric acid cycle was up-regulated in the B. cereus ccpA deletion strain. Furthermore, putative CRE-sites, that act as binding sites for CcpA, were identified to be present for these genes. These results indicate CcpA to be involved in the regulation of glucose metabolism, thereby optimizing the efficiency of glucose catabolism. Other genes of which the expression was affected by ccpA deletion and for which putative CRE-sites could be identified, included genes with an annotated function in the catabolism of ribose, histidine and possibly fucose/arabinose and aspartate. Notably, expression of the operons encoding non-hemolytic enterotoxin (Nhe and hemolytic enterotoxin (Hbl was affected by ccpA deletion, and putative CRE-sites were identified, which suggests catabolite repression of the enterotoxin operons to be CcpA-dependent. Conclusion The catabolite control protein CcpA in B. cereus ATCC 14579 is involved in optimizing the catabolism of glucose with concomitant repression of gluconeogenesis and alternative metabolic pathways. Furthermore, the results point to metabolic control

  20. Glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kayikci, Omur; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although yeast cells can utilize a wide range of carbon sources, presence of glucose suppresses molecular activities involved in the use of alternate carbon sources as well as it represses respiration and...... gluconeogenesis. This dominant effect of glucose on yeast carbon metabolism is coordinated by several signaling and metabolic interactions that mainly regulate transcriptional activity but are also effective at post-transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review describes effects of glucose repression...... on yeast carbon metabolism with a focus on roles of the Snf3/Rgt2 glucose-sensing pathway and Snf1 signal transduction in establishment and relief of glucose repression....

  1. The involvement of catabolite repression in the virulence of Pseudomonas syringae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas syringae infects diverse plant species and is widely used as a model system in the study of effector function and the molecular basis of plant diseases. Although the relationship between bacterial metabolism, nutrient acquisition and virulence has attracted increasing attention in bacter...

  2. Elements Involved in Catabolite Repression and Substrate Induction of the Lactose Operon in Lactobacillus casei

    OpenAIRE

    Gosalbes, María José; Monedero, Vicente; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar

    1999-01-01

    In Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393, the chromosomally encoded lactose operon, lacTEGF, encodes an antiterminator protein (LacT), lactose-specific phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS) elements (LacE and LacF), and a phospho-β-galactosidase. lacT, lacE, and lacF mutant strains were constructed by double crossover. The lacT strain displayed constitutive termination at a ribonucleic antiterminator (RAT) site, whereas lacE and lacF mutants showed an inducer-independent antite...

  3. The PGC-1α/ERRα Axis Represses One-Carbon Metabolism and Promotes Sensitivity to Anti-folate Therapy in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Étienne Audet-Walsh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Reprogramming of cellular metabolism plays a central role in fueling malignant transformation, and AMPK and the PGC-1α/ERRα axis are key regulators of this process. The intersection of gene-expression and binding-event datasets for breast cancer cells shows that activation of AMPK significantly increases the expression of PGC-1α/ERRα and promotes the binding of ERRα to its cognate sites. Unexpectedly, the data also reveal that ERRα, in concert with PGC-1α, negatively regulates the expression of several one-carbon metabolism genes, resulting in substantial perturbations in purine biosynthesis. This PGC-1α/ERRα-mediated repression of one-carbon metabolism promotes the sensitivity of breast cancer cells and tumors to the anti-folate drug methotrexate. These data implicate the PGC-1α/ERRα axis as a core regulatory node of folate cycle metabolism and further suggest that activators of AMPK could be used to modulate this pathway in cancer.

  4. Multiple Gene Repression in Cyanobacteria Using CRISPRi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lun; Cengic, Ivana; Anfelt, Josefine; Hudson, Elton P

    2016-03-18

    We describe the application of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats interference (CRISPRi) for gene repression in the model cyanobacterium Synechcocystis sp. PCC 6803. The nuclease-deficient Cas9 from the type-II CRISPR/Cas of Streptrococcus pyogenes was used to repress green fluorescent protein (GFP) to negligible levels. CRISPRi was also used to repress formation of carbon storage compounds polyhydroxybutryate (PHB) and glycogen during nitrogen starvation. As an example of the potential of CRISPRi for basic and applied cyanobacteria research, we simultaneously knocked down 4 putative aldehyde reductases and dehydrogenases at 50-95% repression. This work also demonstrates that tightly repressed promoters allow for inducible and reversible CRISPRi in cyanobacteria. PMID:26689101

  5. Repression of the pyr operon in Lactobacillus plantarum prevents its ability to grow at low carbon dioxide levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicoloff, Hervé; Elagöz, Aram; Arsène-Ploetze, Florence; Kammerer, Benoit; Martinussen, Jan; Bringel, Francoise

    2005-01-01

    Carbamoyl phosphate is a precursor for both arginine and pyrimidine biosynthesis. In Lactobacillus plantarum, carbamoyl phosphate is synthesized from glutamine, ATP, and carbon dioxide by two sets of identified genes encoding carbamoyl phosphate synthase (CPS). The expression of the carAB operon ...

  6. Repression of the pyr operon in Lactobacillus plantarum prevents its ability to grow at low carbon dioxide levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicoloff, Hervé; Elagöz, Aram; Arsène-Ploetze, Florence;

    2005-01-01

    Carbamoyl phosphate is a precursor for both arginine and pyrimidine biosynthesis. In Lactobacillus plantarum, carbamoyl phosphate is synthesized from glutamine, ATP, and carbon dioxide by two sets of identified genes encoding carbamoyl phosphate synthase (CPS). The expression of the carAB operon...... UTP and CTP pools compared to wild-type levels. Low pyrimidine-independent expression of the pyr operon was obtained by antiterminator site-directed mutagenesis. The resulting AE1023 strain had reduced UTP and CTP pools and had the phenotype of a high-CO2-requiring auxotroph, since it was able to...

  7. Whole Genome Re-Sequencing Identifies a Quantitative Trait Locus Repressing Carbon Reserve Accumulation during Optimal Growth in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goold, Hugh Douglas; Nguyen, Hoa Mai; Kong, Fantao; Beyly-Adriano, Audrey; Légeret, Bertrand; Billon, Emmanuelle; Cuiné, Stéphan; Beisson, Fred; Peltier, Gilles; Li-Beisson, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae have emerged as a promising source for biofuel production. Massive oil and starch accumulation in microalgae is possible, but occurs mostly when biomass growth is impaired. The molecular networks underlying the negative correlation between growth and reserve formation are not known. Thus isolation of strains capable of accumulating carbon reserves during optimal growth would be highly desirable. To this end, we screened an insertional mutant library of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii for alterations in oil content. A mutant accumulating five times more oil and twice more starch than wild-type during optimal growth was isolated and named constitutive oil accumulator 1 (coa1). Growth in photobioreactors under highly controlled conditions revealed that the increase in oil and starch content in coa1 was dependent on light intensity. Genetic analysis and DNA hybridization pointed to a single insertional event responsible for the phenotype. Whole genome re-sequencing identified in coa1 a >200 kb deletion on chromosome 14 containing 41 genes. This study demonstrates that, 1), the generation of algal strains accumulating higher reserve amount without compromising biomass accumulation is feasible; 2), light is an important parameter in phenotypic analysis; and 3), a chromosomal region (Quantitative Trait Locus) acts as suppressor of carbon reserve accumulation during optimal growth. PMID:27141848

  8. Whole Genome Re-Sequencing Identifies a Quantitative Trait Locus Repressing Carbon Reserve Accumulation during Optimal Growth in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goold, Hugh Douglas; Nguyen, Hoa Mai; Kong, Fantao; Beyly-Adriano, Audrey; Légeret, Bertrand; Billon, Emmanuelle; Cuiné, Stéphan; Beisson, Fred; Peltier, Gilles; Li-Beisson, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae have emerged as a promising source for biofuel production. Massive oil and starch accumulation in microalgae is possible, but occurs mostly when biomass growth is impaired. The molecular networks underlying the negative correlation between growth and reserve formation are not known. Thus isolation of strains capable of accumulating carbon reserves during optimal growth would be highly desirable. To this end, we screened an insertional mutant library of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii for alterations in oil content. A mutant accumulating five times more oil and twice more starch than wild-type during optimal growth was isolated and named constitutive oil accumulator 1 (coa1). Growth in photobioreactors under highly controlled conditions revealed that the increase in oil and starch content in coa1 was dependent on light intensity. Genetic analysis and DNA hybridization pointed to a single insertional event responsible for the phenotype. Whole genome re-sequencing identified in coa1 a >200 kb deletion on chromosome 14 containing 41 genes. This study demonstrates that, 1), the generation of algal strains accumulating higher reserve amount without compromising biomass accumulation is feasible; 2), light is an important parameter in phenotypic analysis; and 3), a chromosomal region (Quantitative Trait Locus) acts as suppressor of carbon reserve accumulation during optimal growth. PMID:27141848

  9. Optimal Financial Repression

    OpenAIRE

    Olga A. Norkina; Sergey E. Pekarski

    2014-01-01

    Modern financial repression in advanced economies does not rely on increasing seigniorage revenue, but mostly rests upon regulatory measures to enlarge the demand for public debt that delivers extremely low or negative real interest rate. In this paper we propose the extension of the overlapping generations model to question the optimality of financial repression in the form of non-market placement of the public debt in the captive pension fund. We show that financial repression and capital i...

  10. Physiology of Aspergillus niger in Oxygen-Limited Continuous Cultures: Influence of Aeration, Carbon Source Concentration and Dilution Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diano, Audrey; Peeters, J.; Dynesen, Jens Østergaard;

    2009-01-01

    of low oxygen availability, at different carbon source concentrations and at different specific growth rates, on the metabolism of A. niger, using continuous cultures. The results show that there is an increase in the production of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates at low oxygen concentrations....... Indeed, at these conditions, a decrease in the mitochondrial respiratory chain activity leads to an accumulation of NADH and to a decreased ATP production which uncouples catabolism and anabolism, influences the intracellular pH and leads to production and excretion of organic acids. Moreover, mannitol...... is being produced in order to ensure reoxidation of NADH, and this is the main cellular response to balance the ratio NADH/NAD at low oxygen availability. Mannitol production is also coupled to low specific growth rate, which suggests a control of carbon catabolite repression on the mannitol pathway...

  11. Glucose lowers CRP* levels resulting in repression of the lac operon in cells lacking cAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagami, H; Inada, T; Kunimura, T; Aiba, H

    1995-07-01

    CRP-cAMP-dependent operons of Escherichia coli can be expressed in cells lacking functional adenylate cyclase when they carry a second-site mutation in the crp gene (crp*). It is known that the expression of these operons is repressed by glucose, but the molecular mechanism underlying this cAMP-independent catabolite repression has been a long-standing mystery. Here we address the question of how glucose inhibits the expression of beta-galactosidase in the absence of cAMP. We have isolated several mutations in the crp gene that confer a CRP* phenotype. The expression of beta-galactosidase is reduced by glucose in cells carrying these mutations. Using Western blotting and/or SDS-PAGE analysis, we demonstrate that glucose lowers the cellular concentration of CRP* through a reduction in crp* mRNA levels. The level of CRP* protein correlates with beta-galactosidase activity. When the crp promoter is replaced with the bla promoter, the inhibitory effect of glucose on crp* expression is virtually abolished. These data strongly suggest that the lowered level of CRP* caused by glucose mediates catabolite repression in cya- crp* cells and that the autoregulatory circuit of the crp gene is involved in the down-regulation of CRP* expression by glucose. PMID:7494474

  12. Financial Repression and Structural Imbalances

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, Anders C.; Wang, Xun

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes the relationship between financial repression and structural change. We present a simple theoretical model of structural transformation in which the impact of financial repression on unbalanced growth is studied. The model suggests that governments may choose to repress the financial sector to allow for continued development of the industry sector while inhibiting growth in the domestic service sector. We then present empirical evidence of financial repression having a sig...

  13. Analysis of the upstream activating sequence and site of carbon and nitrogen source repression in the promoter of an early-induced sporulation gene of Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Frisby, D; Zuber, P

    1991-01-01

    The transcription from the spoVG promoter of Bacillus subtilis is induced at the start of the stationary phase of growth and is dependent on the expression of the spoOA, spoOB, and spoOH genes. It is repressed in cells grown in the presence of excess glucose and glutamine and is under the negative control of the abrB gene. The spoOA and spoOB gene products function to suppress the negative control exerted by abrB. Transcription initiation requires the form of RNA polymerase holoenzyme that co...

  14. 13C-metabolic flux ratio and novel carbon path analyses confirmed that Trichoderma reesei uses primarily the respirative pathway also on the preferred carbon source glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saloheimo Markku

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei is an important host organism for industrial enzyme production. It is adapted to nutrient poor environments where it is capable of producing large amounts of hydrolytic enzymes. In its natural environment T. reesei is expected to benefit from high energy yield from utilization of respirative metabolic pathway. However, T. reesei lacks metabolic pathway reconstructions and the utilization of the respirative pathway has not been investigated on the level of in vivo fluxes. Results The biosynthetic pathways of amino acids in T. reesei supported by genome-level evidence were reconstructed with computational carbon path analysis. The pathway reconstructions were a prerequisite for analysis of in vivo fluxes. The distribution of in vivo fluxes in both wild type strain and cre1, a key regulator of carbon catabolite repression, deletion strain were quantitatively studied by performing 13C-labeling on both repressive carbon source glucose and non-repressive carbon source sorbitol. In addition, the 13C-labeling on sorbitol was performed both in the presence and absence of sophorose that induces the expression of cellulase genes. Carbon path analyses and the 13C-labeling patterns of proteinogenic amino acids indicated high similarity between biosynthetic pathways of amino acids in T. reesei and yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast to S. cerevisiae, however, mitochondrial rather than cytosolic biosynthesis of Asp was observed under all studied conditions. The relative anaplerotic flux to the TCA cycle was low and thus characteristic to respiratory metabolism in both strains and independent of the carbon source. Only minor differences were observed in the flux distributions of the wild type and cre1 deletion strain. Furthermore, the induction of the hydrolytic gene expression did not show altered flux distributions and did not affect the relative amino acid requirements or relative anabolic

  15. Transcriptome atlas of eight liver cell types uncovers effects of histidine catabolites on rat liver regeneration

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C. F. Chang; J. Y. Fan; F. C. Zhang; J. Ma; C. S. Xu

    2010-12-01

    Eight liver cell types were isolated using the methods of Percoll density gradient centrifugation and immunomagnetic beads to explore effects of histidine catabolites on rat liver regeneration. Rat Genome 230 2.0 Array was used to detect the expression profiles of genes associated with metabolism of histidine and its catabolites for the above-mentioned eight liver cell types, and bioinformatic and systems biology approaches were employed to analyse the relationship between above genes and rat liver regeneration. The results showed that the urocanic acid (UA) was degraded from histidine in Kupffer cells, acts on Kupffer cells itself and dendritic cells to generate immune suppression by autocrine and paracrine modes. Hepatocytes, biliary epithelia cells, oval cells and dendritic cells can convert histidine to histamine, which can promote sinusoidal endothelial cells proliferation by GsM pathway, and promote the proliferation of hepatocytes and biliary epithelia cells by GqM pathway.

  16. Escherichia coli catabolite gene activator protein mutants defective in positive control of lac operon transcription.

    OpenAIRE

    Eschenlauer, A C; Reznikoff, W S

    1991-01-01

    We isolated three Escherichia coli catabolite gene activator protein mutants that are defective in the positive control of transcription initiation from the lac operon promoter region yet retain negative control of transcription from other promoters. One mutant has a substitution of valine for glutamate at residue 72, which lies in the cyclic AMP binding domain and contacts cyclic AMP. The other two mutants have substitutions of asparagine and cysteine for glycine 162, which lies in a surface...

  17. Utilizing the CreA Gene to Better Understand Carbon Flux in Fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annecharico, Matthew D.; Baker, Scott E.

    2005-01-01

    Carbon catabolite repression (CCR) is a system which represses the synthesis of enzymes required for certain carbon sources when more favored carbon sources are present. Fungal enzymes are useful in various industrial applications such as the degradation of bi-product biomass produced in many areas of manufacturing and production. For example, the basidiomycete, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, a filamentous fungus, produces a number of lignin peroxidases (LiPs) such as an extra-cellular lignin-modifying protein and manganese-dependent peroxidase (MnPs). The LiPs secreted by P. chrysosporium are able to break down lignin, one of the main substances of wood, while leaving the cellulose behind. These enzymes are capable of degrading toxic waste as well as biomass waste. Through polysaccharide hydrolysis and lignin utilization, biobased products and biofuels can be processed from biomass instead of petroleum, which is more environmentally sound than current fuel options. Previous research in the fungal phylum, Ascomyces has shown that the creA gene is an important gene that controls various enzymes which have key roles in controlling carbon utilization by fungi. We hypothesize that there are similarities across all fungi in the mechanism by which carbon flux is controlled and that orthologs of the creA gene exist in all fungal phyla. A COnsensus-DEgenerate Hybrid Oligonucleotide Primers (CODEHOP) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) strategy was used to isolate genomic fragments of the creA gene from a variety of fungi with the objective to design and utilize a method for isolation of the creA gene from a wide range of fungi.

  18. Systematic HPLC/ESI-High Resolution-qTOF-MS Methodology for Metabolomic Studies in Nonfluorescent Chlorophyll Catabolites Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos, José Julián; Roca, María; Pérez-Gálvez, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of nonfluorescent chlorophyll catabolites (NCCs) and dioxobilane-type nonfluorescent chlorophyll catabolite (DNCC) in peel extracts of ripened lemon fruits (Citrus limon L.) was performed by HPLC/ESI-high resolution-qTOF-MS method. Compounds were identified in samples on the basis of measured accurate mass, isotopic pattern, and characteristic fragmentation profile with an implemented software postprocessing routine. Three NCC structures already identified in other vegetal tissues were present in the lemon fruit peels (Cl-NCC1; Cl-NCC2; Cl-NCC4) while a new structure not defined so far was characterized (Cl-NCC3). This catabolite exhibits an exceptional arrangement of the peripheral substituents, allowing concluding that the preferences for the NCC modifications could be a species-related matter. PMID:25741450

  19. Systematic HPLC/ESI-High Resolution-qTOF-MS Methodology for Metabolomic Studies in Nonfluorescent Chlorophyll Catabolites Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Julián Ríos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of nonfluorescent chlorophyll catabolites (NCCs and dioxobilane-type nonfluorescent chlorophyll catabolite (DNCC in peel extracts of ripened lemon fruits (Citrus limon L. was performed by HPLC/ESI-high resolution-qTOF-MS method. Compounds were identified in samples on the basis of measured accurate mass, isotopic pattern, and characteristic fragmentation profile with an implemented software postprocessing routine. Three NCC structures already identified in other vegetal tissues were present in the lemon fruit peels (Cl-NCC1; Cl-NCC2; Cl-NCC4 while a new structure not defined so far was characterized (Cl-NCC3. This catabolite exhibits an exceptional arrangement of the peripheral substituents, allowing concluding that the preferences for the NCC modifications could be a species-related matter.

  20. The unified theory of repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdelyi, Matthew Hugh

    2006-10-01

    Repression has become an empirical fact that is at once obvious and problematic. Fragmented clinical and laboratory traditions and disputed terminology have resulted in a Babel of misunderstandings in which false distinctions are imposed (e.g., between repression and suppression) and necessary distinctions not drawn (e.g., between the mechanism and the use to which it is put, defense being just one). "Repression" was introduced by Herbart to designate the (nondefensive) inhibition of ideas by other ideas in their struggle for consciousness. Freud adapted repression to the defensive inhibition of "unbearable" mental contents. Substantial experimental literatures on attentional biases, thought avoidance, interference, and intentional forgetting exist, the oldest prototype being the work of Ebbinghaus, who showed that intentional avoidance of memories results in their progressive forgetting over time. It has now become clear, as clinicians had claimed, that the inaccessible materials are often available and emerge indirectly (e.g., procedurally, implicitly). It is also now established that the Ebbinghaus retention function can be partly reversed, with resulting increases of conscious memory over time (hypermnesia). Freud's clinical experience revealed early on that exclusion from consciousness was effected not just by simple repression (inhibition) but also by a variety of distorting techniques, some deployed to degrade latent contents (denial), all eventually subsumed under the rubric of defense mechanisms ("repression in the widest sense"). Freudian and Bartlettian distortions are essentially the same, even in name, except for motive (cognitive vs. emotional), and experimentally induced false memories and other "memory illusions" are laboratory analogs of self-induced distortions. PMID:17156548

  1. The influence of carbon sources on the expression of the recA gene and genotoxicity detection by an Acinetobacter bioreporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bo; Song, Yizhi; Zhang, Dayi; Huang, Wei E; Zhang, Xu; Li, Guanghe

    2015-04-01

    Bacterial whole-cell bioreporters are practical and reliable analytical tools to assess the toxicity and bioavailability of environmental contaminants, yet evidence has shown that their performance could be affected by different carbon sources. This paper evaluated the influence of carbon sources on the recA gene (ACIAD1385) in a DNA damage-inducible recA::luxCDABE Acinetobacter bioreporter and optimized the induction conditions for its practical application in environmental monitoring. Different carbon sources, including LB, potassium acetate (MMA), sodium citrate (MMC), sodium pyruvate (MMP), and sodium succinate (MMS), significantly influenced (p < 0.05) the bioluminescence intensity of the genotoxicity bioreporter. A reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) showed the different expression levels of the DNA damage-inducible gene recA (p < 0.05), suggesting that carbon sources influenced the DNA damage response in the Acinetobacter bioreporter at the transcriptional level. Additionally, proteomic analysis identified 122 proteins that were differentially expressed after exposure to mitomycin C in defined media and LB, and 5 of them were related to the DNA damage response, indicating the effects of carbon sources on the DNA damage response in Acinetobacter at the translational level. The repression effect caused by the rich medium, LB, was possibly related to the mechanism of carbon catabolite repression. Our results suggest that the practical application of Acinetobacter bioreporters to the genotoxicity assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soils could be significantly improved by using a standard medium of defined composition, as this could increase their sensitivity. PMID:25764502

  2. Violent repression of environmental protests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulos, Helen M; Haddad, Mary Alice

    2016-01-01

    As global sea levels and natural resource demands rise, people around the world are increasingly protesting environmental threats to their lives and livelihoods. What are the conditions under which these peaceful environmental protests are violently repressed? This paper uses the random forest algorithm to conduct an event analysis of grassroots environmental protests around the world. Utilizing a database of 175 grassroots environmental protests, we found that: (1) a large proportion (37 %) of the protests involved violent repression; (2) most of the violence (56 %) was directed against marginalized groups; and (3) violence was geographically concentrated the global south in Latin America and Asia. The primary predictors of violence were political empowerment, GDP per capita, industry type, the presence of marginalized groups, and geographic region. Our analysis reveals a complex relationship between governance, resource extraction, and international funding that often resulted in human rights violations against marginalized groups. PMID:27026924

  3. Utilization of Lactose and Galactose by Streptococcus mutans: Transport, Toxicity, and Carbon Catabolite Repression▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Lin; Das, Satarupa; Burne, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Abundant in milk and other dairy products, lactose is considered to have an important role in oral microbial ecology and can contribute to caries development in both adults and young children. To better understand the metabolism of lactose and galactose by Streptococcus mutans, the major etiological agent of human tooth decay, a genetic analysis of the tagatose-6-phosphate (lac) and Leloir (gal) pathways was performed in strain UA159. Deletion of each gene in the lac operon caused various alt...

  4. mTORC2 Responds to Glutamine Catabolite Levels to Modulate the Hexosamine Biosynthesis Enzyme GFAT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloughney, Joseph G; Kim, Peter K; Vega-Cotto, Nicole M; Wu, Chang-Chih; Zhang, Sisi; Adlam, Matthew; Lynch, Thomas; Chou, Po-Chien; Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Werlen, Guy; Jacinto, Estela

    2016-09-01

    Highly proliferating cells are particularly dependent on glucose and glutamine for bioenergetics and macromolecule biosynthesis. The signals that respond to nutrient fluctuations to maintain metabolic homeostasis remain poorly understood. Here, we found that mTORC2 is activated by nutrient deprivation due to decreasing glutamine catabolites. We elucidate how mTORC2 modulates a glutamine-requiring biosynthetic pathway, the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway (HBP) via regulation of expression of glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase 1 (GFAT1), the rate-limiting enzyme of the HBP. GFAT1 expression is dependent on sufficient amounts of glutaminolysis catabolites particularly α-ketoglutarate, which are generated in an mTORC2-dependent manner. Additionally, mTORC2 is essential for proper expression and nuclear accumulation of the GFAT1 transcriptional regulator, Xbp1s. Thus, while mTORC1 senses amino acid abundance to promote anabolism, mTORC2 responds to declining glutamine catabolites in order to restore metabolic homeostasis. Our findings uncover the role of mTORC2 in metabolic reprogramming and have implications for understanding insulin resistance and tumorigenesis. PMID:27570073

  5. A reporter gene analysis of penicillin biosynthesis gene expression in Penicillium chrysogenum and its regulation by nitrogen and glucose catabolite repression.

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, B.; Friedlin, E; Marzluf, G A

    1994-01-01

    Vectors which possess a truncated niaD gene encoding nitrate reductase were developed to allow targeted gene integration during transformation of an niaD mutant Penicillium chrysogenum host. The Penicillium genes pcbC and penAB are immediately adjacent to each other and are divergently transcribed, with an intergenic control region serving as their promoters. Gene fusions were constructed with a reporter gene, uidA, which encodes beta-glucuronidase. The pcbC-penAB intergenic region was fused ...

  6. T he effect of different grain brans used as substrates on resistance to catabolite repression in soil-state fermentation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Production of a-amylase from Penicillium brevicompactum was investigated in solidstate fermentation (SSF) using as substrate wheat bran (WB), rye bran (RB) and barley bran (BB) enriched with different amount of glucose or not. Consumption of glucose by fungal cells in WB and RB cultures was more effective than BB cultures. Optimal moisture levels for maximal a-amylase production in WB, RB and BB cultures without glucose were 55, 65 and 35 %, respectively. Water absorption capacities of substrates were WB>RB>BB. In SSF process, decrease in enzyme production was greater in high moisture level than optimal moisture level. According to the other two cultures, production of a-amylase from P. brevicompactum was strongly inhibited in higher moisture levels than optimal moisture levels in BB cultures enriched with 500 mg/g glucose. (author)

  7. Implication du PTS dans la régulation de PrfA, activateur transcriptionnel des gènes de virulence de Listeria monocytogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Herro, Rana

    2006-01-01

    The activity of the Listeria monocytogenes transcription activator PrfA, which is required for the expression of several virulence genes, including the hemolysin-encoding hly, is inhibited by the presence of glucose, fructose and other rapidly metabolizable carbon sources. This inhibition is not mediated via the main carbon catabolite repression mechanism operative in Gram-positive bacteria, since inactivation of the catabolite control protein A (CcpA) did not prevent repression of virulence ...

  8. Global transcriptional control by glucose and carbon regulator CcpA in Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Ana; Camiade, Emilie; Monot, Marc; Courtois, Emmanuelle; Barbut, Frédéric; Sernova, Natalia V; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Martin-Verstraete, Isabelle; Dupuy, Bruno

    2012-11-01

    The catabolite control protein CcpA is a pleiotropic regulator that mediates the global transcriptional response to rapidly catabolizable carbohydrates, like glucose in Gram-positive bacteria. By whole transcriptome analyses, we characterized glucose-dependent and CcpA-dependent gene regulation in Clostridium difficile. About 18% of all C. difficile genes are regulated by glucose, for which 50% depend on CcpA for regulation. The CcpA regulon comprises genes involved in sugar uptake, fermentation and amino acids metabolism, confirming the role of CcpA as a link between carbon and nitrogen pathways. Using combination of chromatin immunoprecipitation and genome sequence analysis, we detected 55 CcpA binding sites corresponding to ∼140 genes directly controlled by CcpA. We defined the C. difficile CcpA consensus binding site (cre(CD) motif), that is, 'RRGAAAANGTTTTCWW'. Binding of purified CcpA protein to 19 target cre(CD) sites was demonstrated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. CcpA also directly represses key factors in early steps of sporulation (Spo0A and SigF). Furthermore, the C. difficile toxin genes (tcdA and tcdB) and their regulators (tcdR and tcdC) are direct CcpA targets. Finally, CcpA controls a complex and extended regulatory network through the modulation of a large set of regulators. PMID:22989714

  9. Gibberellins repress photomorphogenesis in darkness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabadí, David; Gil, Joan; Blázquez, Miguel A; García-Martínez, José L

    2004-03-01

    Plants undergo two different developmental programs depending on whether they are growing in darkness (skotomorphogenesis) or in the presence of light (photomorphogenesis). It has been proposed that the latter is the default pathway followed by many plants after germination and before the seedling emerges from soil. The transition between the two pathways is tightly regulated. The conserved COP1-based complex is central in the light-dependent repression of photomorphogenesis in darkness. Besides this control, hormones such as brassinosteroids (BRs), cytokinins, auxins, or ethylene also have been shown to regulate, to different extents, this developmental switch. In the present work, we show that the hormone gibberellin (GA) widely participates in this regulation. Studies from Arabidopsis show that both chemical and genetic reductions of endogenous GA levels partially derepress photomorphogenesis in darkness. This is based both on morphological phenotypes, such as hypocotyl elongation and hook and cotyledon opening, and on molecular phenotypes, such as misregulation of the light-controlled genes CAB2 and RbcS. Genetic studies indicate that the GA signaling elements GAI and RGA participate in these responses. Our results also suggest that GA regulation of this response partially depends on BRs. This regulation seems to be conserved across species because lowering endogenous GA levels in pea (Pisum sativum) induces full de-etiolation in darkness, which is not reverted by BR application. Our results, therefore, attribute an important role for GAs in the establishment of etiolated growth and in repression of photomorphogenesis. PMID:14963246

  10. MES16, a member of the methylesterase protein family, specifically demethylates fluorescent chlorophyll catabolites during chlorophyll breakdown in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Bastien; Schelbert, Silvia; Aubry, Sylvain; Süssenbacher, Iris; Müller, Thomas; Kräutler, Bernhard; Hörtensteiner, Stefan

    2012-02-01

    During leaf senescence, chlorophyll (Chl) is broken down to nonfluorescent chlorophyll catabolites (NCCs). These arise from intermediary fluorescent chlorophyll catabolites (FCCs) by an acid-catalyzed isomerization inside the vacuole. The chemical structures of NCCs from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) indicate the presence of an enzyme activity that demethylates the C13(2)-carboxymethyl group present at the isocyclic ring of Chl. Here, we identified this activity as methylesterase family member 16 (MES16; At4g16690). During senescence, mes16 leaves exhibited a strong ultraviolet-excitable fluorescence, which resulted from large amounts of different FCCs accumulating in the mutants. As confirmed by mass spectrometry, these FCCs had an intact carboxymethyl group, which slowed down their isomerization to respective NCCs. Like a homologous protein cloned from radish (Raphanus sativus) and named pheophorbidase, MES16 catalyzed the demethylation of pheophorbide, an early intermediate of Chl breakdown, in vitro, but MES16 also demethylated an FCC. To determine the in vivo substrate of MES16, we analyzed pheophorbide a oxygenase1 (pao1), which is deficient in pheophorbide catabolism and accumulates pheophorbide in the chloroplast, and a mes16pao1 double mutant. In the pao1 background, we additionally mistargeted MES16 to the chloroplast. Normally, MES16 localizes to the cytosol, as shown by analysis of a MES16-green fluorescent protein fusion. Analysis of the accumulating pigments in these lines revealed that pheophorbide is only accessible for demethylation when MES16 is targeted to the chloroplast. Together, these data demonstrate that MES16 is an integral component of Chl breakdown in Arabidopsis and specifically demethylates Chl catabolites at the level of FCCs in the cytosol. PMID:22147518

  11. DNA catabolites in triathletes: effects of supplementation with an aronia–citrus juice (polyphenols-rich juice)

    OpenAIRE

    García-Flores, Libia A.; Medina, Sonia; Cejuela Anta, Roberto; Martínez Sanz, José Miguel; Abellán, Ángel; Genieser, Hans-Gottfried; Ferreres, Federico; Gil-Izquierdo, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    In this study we analyzed whether our aronia–citrus juice (ACJ, the composition is based on a mixture of 95% citrus juice with 5% of Aronia melanocarpa juice), rich in polyphenols, and physical exercise had an effect on seven catabolites of DNA identified in plasma and on a urine isoprostane (8-iso-PGF2α). Sixteen elite triathletes on a controlled diet for triathlon training (45 days) were used in this clinical trial. Our results show a decrease in the 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine concentratio...

  12. Repression: Finding Our Way in the Maze of Concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Garssen, Bert

    2007-01-01

    Repression is associated in the literature with terms such as non-expression, emotional control, rationality, anti-emotionality, defensiveness and restraint. Whether these terms are synonymous with repression, indicate a variation, or are essentially different from repression is uncertain. To clarify this obscured view on repression, this paper indicates the similarities and differences between these concepts. Repression is the general term that is used to describe the tendency to inhibit the...

  13. Saccharomyces cerevisiae 14-3-3 proteins Bmh1 and Bmh2 participate in the process of catabolite inactivation of maltose permease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mayordomo, I.; Regelmann, J.; Horák, Jaroslav; Sanz, P.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 544, 1-3 (2003), s. 160-164. ISSN 0014-5793 Grant ostatní: Spanish Ministry of Educaton and Science(ES) PB98-0486 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : 14-3-3 proteins * maltose permease * catabolite inactivation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.609, year: 2003

  14. The three operators of the lac operon cooperate in repression.

    OpenAIRE

    Oehler, S; Eismann, E R; Krämer, H; Müller-Hill, B

    1990-01-01

    We tested the effect of systematic destruction of all three lac operators of the chromosomal lac operon of Escherichia coli on repression by Lac repressor. Absence of just one 'pseudo-operator' O2 or O3 decreases repression by wild-type tetrameric Lac repressor approximately 2- to 3-fold; absence of both 'pseudo-operators' decreases repression greater than 50-fold. O1 alone represses under these conditions only approximately 20-fold. Dimeric active Lac repressor (iadi) represses the wild-type...

  15. 19F nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of the carbamate reaction of alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine (FBAL), the major catabolite of fluoropyrimidines. Application to FBAL carbamate determination in body fluids of patients treated with 5'-deoxy-5-fluorouridine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    alpha-Fluoro-beta-alanine (FBAL), the major catabolite of the antineoplastic fluoropyrimidines, is an amino acid which is in equilibrium with its carbamate derivative in weakly alkaline aqueous solutions containing carbonate. In both water and control biological fluids (urine, plasma) spiked with FBAL (and sodium bicarbonate, in some cases), 19F NMR was used: (i) to determine the pH range over which FBAL carbamate is present (pH greater than or equal to 7), the maximum concentration formed occurring around pH 9, (ii) to show that the amino group of FBAL interacts very slowly with a non-protein plasma component to form a compound X, unstable in acid medium. The presumed structure of X is RCONHCH2CHFCOOH, with R different from an alkyl group but still unidentified. The behavior of FBAL in urine and plasma of rats treated with FBAL or 5'-deoxy-5-fluorouridine (5'-dFUrd), a prodrug of 5-fluorouracil, and from patients treated with 5'-dFUrd was investigated. FBAL carbamate was not present in acid medium and was therefore absent in acidic human urine. However, it was found in alkaline rat urine. FBAL carbamate was found in plasma along with the compound X. The 19F NMR spectra of FBAL and derivatives are complex since alpha-fluoro-beta-ureido-propionic acid, the precursor of FBAL in the catabolic pathway of antineoplastic fluoropyrimidines, produces a signal overlapping that of FBAL carbamate, and very close to that of compound X

  16. RNAi and heterochromatin repress centromeric meiotic recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellermeier, Chad; Higuchi, Emily C; Phadnis, Naina;

    2010-01-01

    During meiosis, the formation of viable haploid gametes from diploid precursors requires that each homologous chromosome pair be properly segregated to produce an exact haploid set of chromosomes. Genetic recombination, which provides a physical connection between homologous chromosomes, is....... Surprisingly, one mutant derepressed for recombination in the heterochromatic mating-type region during meiosis and several mutants derepressed for centromeric gene expression during mitotic growth are not derepressed for centromeric recombination during meiosis. These results reveal a complex relation between...... types of repression by heterochromatin. Our results also reveal a previously undemonstrated role for RNAi and heterochromatin in the repression of meiotic centromeric recombination and, potentially, in the prevention of birth defects by maintenance of proper chromosome segregation during meiosis....

  17. Cancer, acute stress disorder, and repressive coping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anette Fischer; Zachariae, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between repressive coping style and Acute Stress Disorder (ASD) in a sample of cancer patients. A total of 112 cancer patients recently diagnosed with cancer participated in the study. ASD was assessed by the Stanford Acute Stress...... Reaction Questionnaire, and repressive coping was assessed by a combination of scores from the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale, and the Bendig version of the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale. Significantly fewer patients classified as "repressors" were diagnosed with ASD compared to patients...... classified as "non-repressors". However, further investigations revealed that the lower incidence of ASD in repressors apparently was caused by a low score on anxiety and not by an interaction effect between anxiety and defensiveness. Future studies have to investigate whether different psychological...

  18. Repression and substitutive formation: the relationship between Freud's concepts reconsidered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepf, Siegfried

    2012-06-01

    This paper examines Freud's concept of repression and the relationship between repression and substitutive formation as it presents itself in Freud's writings. The author shows that Freud gives at least four different meanings to the term "repression": Freud uses it interchangeably with defense, as a consciously intended forgetting, as a specific unconscious mechanism of defense, and to describe the consequence of defense mechanisms leading to substitutive formations. The inconsistencies in this relationship are discussed and clarified, and Freud's economic and linguistic attempts at founding repression are subjected to critique; the need of a primal repression as a necessary condition for repression proper is pointed out. In developing Freud's linguistic foundation of repression further, the author presents defense as a semantic displacement. Ideas are excluded from the realm of the concepts that belong to them historically. These presentations become unconscious, that is, repressed, in that they can no longer be identified as "cases" of these conceptual internal contents. At the same time they are displaced into the extensions of concepts whose internal contents do not belong to them originally. It is by virtue of the internal contents of these concepts that the displaced elements as substitutive formations once again attain consciousness, albeit a false one. The author suggests dismissing repression as a specific defense mechanism of its own; to reversing Freud's thesis that repression, as a rule, creates a substitutive formation into its opposite; and recognizing that the mechanisms used to build substitutes, as a rule, create repression. PMID:22712593

  19. Nuclear AXIN2 represses MYC gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rennoll, Sherri A.; Konsavage, Wesley M.; Yochum, Gregory S., E-mail: gsy3@psu.edu

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •AXIN2 localizes to cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments in colorectal cancer cells. •Nuclear AXIN2 represses the activity of Wnt-responsive luciferase reporters. •β-Catenin bridges AXIN2 to TCF transcription factors. •AXIN2 binds the MYC promoter and represses MYC gene expression. -- Abstract: The β-catenin transcriptional coactivator is the key mediator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. In the absence of Wnt, β-catenin associates with a cytosolic and multi-protein destruction complex where it is phosphorylated and targeted for proteasomal degradation. In the presence of Wnt, the destruction complex is inactivated and β-catenin translocates into the nucleus. In the nucleus, β-catenin binds T-cell factor (TCF) transcription factors to activate expression of c-MYC (MYC) and Axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2). AXIN2 is a member of the destruction complex and, thus, serves in a negative feedback loop to control Wnt/β-catenin signaling. AXIN2 is also present in the nucleus, but its function within this compartment is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that AXIN2 localizes to the nuclei of epithelial cells within normal and colonic tumor tissues as well as colorectal cancer cell lines. In the nucleus, AXIN2 represses expression of Wnt/β-catenin-responsive luciferase reporters and forms a complex with β-catenin and TCF. We demonstrate that AXIN2 co-occupies β-catenin/TCF complexes at the MYC promoter region. When constitutively localized to the nucleus, AXIN2 alters the chromatin structure at the MYC promoter and directly represses MYC gene expression. These findings suggest that nuclear AXIN2 functions as a rheostat to control MYC expression in response to Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  20. Nuclear AXIN2 represses MYC gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •AXIN2 localizes to cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments in colorectal cancer cells. •Nuclear AXIN2 represses the activity of Wnt-responsive luciferase reporters. •β-Catenin bridges AXIN2 to TCF transcription factors. •AXIN2 binds the MYC promoter and represses MYC gene expression. -- Abstract: The β-catenin transcriptional coactivator is the key mediator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. In the absence of Wnt, β-catenin associates with a cytosolic and multi-protein destruction complex where it is phosphorylated and targeted for proteasomal degradation. In the presence of Wnt, the destruction complex is inactivated and β-catenin translocates into the nucleus. In the nucleus, β-catenin binds T-cell factor (TCF) transcription factors to activate expression of c-MYC (MYC) and Axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2). AXIN2 is a member of the destruction complex and, thus, serves in a negative feedback loop to control Wnt/β-catenin signaling. AXIN2 is also present in the nucleus, but its function within this compartment is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that AXIN2 localizes to the nuclei of epithelial cells within normal and colonic tumor tissues as well as colorectal cancer cell lines. In the nucleus, AXIN2 represses expression of Wnt/β-catenin-responsive luciferase reporters and forms a complex with β-catenin and TCF. We demonstrate that AXIN2 co-occupies β-catenin/TCF complexes at the MYC promoter region. When constitutively localized to the nucleus, AXIN2 alters the chromatin structure at the MYC promoter and directly represses MYC gene expression. These findings suggest that nuclear AXIN2 functions as a rheostat to control MYC expression in response to Wnt/β-catenin signaling

  1. DNA catabolites in triathletes: effects of supplementation with an aronia-citrus juice (polyphenols-rich juice).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Flores, Libia Alejandra; Medina, Sonia; Cejuela-Anta, Roberto; Martínez-Sanz, José Miguel; Abellán, Ángel; Genieser, Hans-Gottfried; Ferreres, Federico; Gil-Izquierdo, Ángel

    2016-04-20

    In this study we analyzed whether our aronia-citrus juice (ACJ, the composition is based on a mixture of 95% citrus juice with 5% of Aronia melanocarpa juice), rich in polyphenols, and physical exercise had an effect on seven catabolites of DNA identified in plasma and on a urine isoprostane (8-iso-PGF2α). Sixteen elite triathletes on a controlled diet for triathlon training (45 days) were used in this clinical trial. Our results show a decrease in the 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine concentration due to chronic physical exercise. The ACJ intake and physical exercise maintained the guanosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate plasmatic concentrations and decreased the concentration of 8-hydroxyguanine as well as urinary values of 8-iso-PGF2α. Finally, we observed a significant increase in the 8-nitroguanosine levels in triathletes after ACJ intake, compared to the placebo stage. It is concluded that the combination of the intake of ACJ, rich in polyphenolic compounds, with adequate training was able to influence the plasmatic and urinary values of oxidative stress biomarkers. This suggests a positive effect on the oxidative damage and potential associations with DNA repair mechanisms. PMID:27050256

  2. How Aromatic Compounds Block DNA Binding of HcaR Catabolite Regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngchang; Joachimiak, Grazyna; Bigelow, Lance; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2016-06-17

    Bacterial catabolism of aromatic compounds from various sources including phenylpropanoids and flavonoids that are abundant in soil plays an important role in the recycling of carbon in the ecosystem. We have determined the crystal structures of apo-HcaR from Acinetobacter sp. ADP1, a MarR/SlyA transcription factor, in complexes with hydroxycinnamates and a specific DNA operator. The protein regulates the expression of the hca catabolic operon in Acinetobacter and related bacterial strains, allowing utilization of hydroxycinnamates as sole sources of carbon. HcaR binds multiple ligands, and as a result the transcription of genes encoding several catabolic enzymes is increased. The 1.9-2.4 Å resolution structures presented here explain how HcaR recognizes four ligands (ferulate, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate, p-coumarate, and vanillin) using the same binding site. The ligand promiscuity appears to be an adaptation to match a broad specificity of hydroxycinnamate catabolic enzymes while responding to toxic thioester intermediates. Structures of apo-HcaR and in complex with a specific DNA hca operator when combined with binding studies of hydroxycinnamates show how aromatic ligands render HcaR unproductive in recognizing a specific DNA target. The current study contributes to a better understanding of the hca catabolic operon regulation mechanism by the transcription factor HcaR. PMID:27129205

  3. An endogenous growth model of money, banking, and financial repression

    OpenAIRE

    Espinosa, Marco; Yip, Chong K.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we develop an endogenous growth model with financial intermediation to examine the effects of financial repression on growth, inflation, and welfare. By limiting the liquidity provision, binding reserve requirements always suppress economic growth while their effect on inflation is a function, among other things, of the degree of repression. For example, contrary to previous claims, if financial repression is severe enough so that an informal financial sector emerges, liberaliz...

  4. Repression: finding our way in the maze of concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garssen, Bert

    2007-12-01

    Repression is associated in the literature with terms such as non-expression, emotional control, rationality, anti-emotionality, defensiveness and restraint. Whether these terms are synonymous with repression, indicate a variation, or are essentially different from repression is uncertain. To clarify this obscured view on repression, this paper indicates the similarities and differences between these concepts. Repression is the general term that is used to describe the tendency to inhibit the experience and the expression of negative feelings or unpleasant cognitions in order to prevent one's positive self-image from being threatened ('repressive coping style'). The terms self-deception versus other-deception, and socially related versus personally related repression refer to what is considered to be different aspects of repression. Defensiveness is a broader concept that includes both anxious defensiveness and repression; the essential difference is whether negative emotions are reported or not. Concepts that are sometimes associated with repression, but which are conceptually different, are also discussed in this paper: The act of suppression, 'repressed memories,' habitual suppression, concealment, type C coping pattern, type D personality, denial, alexithymia and blunting. Consequences for research: (1) When summarizing findings reported in the literature, it is essential to determine which concepts the findings represent. This is rarely made explicit, and failure to do so may lead to drawing the wrong conclusions (2) It is advisable to use scales based on different aspects of repression (3) Whether empirical findings substantiate the similarities and differences between concepts described in this paper will need to be shown. PMID:17653842

  5. ATRX represses alternative lengthening of telomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napier, Christine E; Huschtscha, Lily I; Harvey, Adam; Bower, Kylie; Noble, Jane R; Hendrickson, Eric A; Reddel, Roger R

    2015-06-30

    The unlimited proliferation of cancer cells requires a mechanism to prevent telomere shortening. Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT) is an homologous recombination-mediated mechanism of telomere elongation used in tumors, including osteosarcomas, soft tissue sarcoma subtypes, and glial brain tumors. Mutations in the ATRX/DAXX chromatin remodeling complex have been reported in tumors and cell lines that use the ALT mechanism, suggesting that ATRX may be an ALT repressor. We show here that knockout or knockdown of ATRX in mortal cells or immortal telomerase-positive cells is insufficient to activate ALT. Notably, however, in SV40-transformed mortal fibroblasts ATRX loss results in either a significant increase in the proportion of cell lines activating ALT (instead of telomerase) or in a significant decrease in the time prior to ALT activation. These data indicate that loss of ATRX function cooperates with one or more as-yet unidentified genetic or epigenetic alterations to activate ALT. Moreover, transient ATRX expression in ALT-positive/ATRX-negative cells represses ALT activity. These data provide the first direct, functional evidence that ATRX represses ALT. PMID:26001292

  6. Antiviral activity of extracts from Morinda citrifolia leaves and chlorophyll catabolites, pheophorbide a and pyropheophorbide a, against hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnoglik, Suratno Lulut; Aoki, Chie; Sudarmono, Pratiwi; Komoto, Mari; Deng, Lin; Shoji, Ikuo; Fuchino, Hiroyuki; Kawahara, Nobuo; Hotta, Hak

    2014-03-01

    The development of complementary and/or alternative drugs for treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is still needed. Antiviral compounds in medicinal plants are potentially good targets to study. Morinda citrifolia is a common plant distributed widely in Indo-Pacific region; its fruits and leaves are food sources and are also used as a treatment in traditional medicine. In this study, using a HCV cell culture system, it was demonstrated that a methanol extract, its n-hexane, and ethyl acetate fractions from M. citrifolia leaves possess anti-HCV activities with 50%-inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) of 20.6, 6.1, and 6.6 μg/mL, respectively. Bioactivity-guided purification and structural analysis led to isolation and identification of pheophorbide a, the major catabolite of chlorophyll a, as an anti-HCV compound present in the extracts (IC(50) = 0.3 μg/mL). It was also found that pyropheophorbide a possesses anti-HCV activity (IC(50) = 0.2 μg/mL). The 50%-cytotoxic concentrations (CC(50)) of pheophorbide a and pyropheophorbide a were 10.0 and 7.2 μg/mL, respectively, their selectivity indexes being 33 and 36, respectively. On the other hand, chlorophyll a, sodium copper chlorophyllin, and pheophytin a barely, or only marginally, exhibited anti-HCV activities. Time-of-addition analysis revealed that pheophorbide a and pyropheophorbide a act at both entry and the post-entry steps. The present results suggest that pheophorbide a and its related compounds would be good candidates for seed compounds for developing antivirals against HCV. PMID:24438164

  7. The Many Neuroprogressive Actions of Tryptophan Catabolites (TRYCATs) that may be Associated with the Pathophysiology of Neuro-Immune Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Gerwyn; Carvalho, André F; Anderson, George; Galecki, Piotr; Maes, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Many, if not all, chronic medical, neurodegenerative and neuroprogressive illnesses are characterised by chronic immune activation, oxidative and nitrosative stress (O&NS) and systemic inflammation. These factors, notably elevated pro-inflammatory cytokines, activate indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) leading to an upregulated tryptophan catabolite (TRYCAT) pathway of tryptophan degradation in the periphery and in the brain. In such conditions the TRYCAT pathway becomes the predominant system for tryptophan degradation in all body compartments. In this paper we review the pathways whereby TRYCATs may play a role in neuro-inflammatory and neuroprogressive disease. Thus chronic activation of the TRYCAT pathway leads to the production of a range of neuroactive, neuroprotective and neurotoxic TRYCATs. Some TRYCATs such as quinolinic acid act as potent neurotoxins which inhibit ATP production by mitochondria, provoke increases in O&NS, disrupt neuron glial communication and blood brain barrier integrity, induce apoptosis of glial cells, directly damage neurons and function as a N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor agonist. Other TRYCATs such as kynurenic acid function as antagonists of NMDA, α- amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid and kainate receptors and act to regulate levels of glutamate and dopamine. The neuroprotective functions of this TRYCAT are likely exercised via engagement with alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine and aryl hydrocarbon receptors but the neuroprotective effects stemming from elevated kynurenic acid levels come at the price of severely compromised neurocognitive function and emotional processing. Other TRYCATS also possess neurotoxic or neuroprotective properties via pro-oxidant and antioxidant effects. Here we discuss the involvement of the abovementioned TRYCAT pathways in schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease and chronic fatigue syndrome. PMID:26667000

  8. The Role of Protein-Ligand Contacts in Allosteric Regulation of the Escherichia coli Catabolite Activator Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Philip D.; Rodgers, Thomas L.; Glover, Laura C.; Korhonen, Heidi J.; Richards, Shane A.; Colwell, Lucy J.; Pohl, Ehmke; Wilson, Mark R.; Hodgson, David R. W.; McLeish, Tom C. B.; Cann, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Allostery is a fundamental process by which ligand binding to a protein alters its activity at a distant site. Both experimental and theoretical evidence demonstrate that allostery can be communicated through altered slow relaxation protein dynamics without conformational change. The catabolite activator protein (CAP) of Escherichia coli is an exemplar for the analysis of such entropically driven allostery. Negative allostery in CAP occurs between identical cAMP binding sites. Changes to the cAMP-binding pocket can therefore impact the allosteric properties of CAP. Here we demonstrate, through a combination of coarse-grained modeling, isothermal calorimetry, and structural analysis, that decreasing the affinity of CAP for cAMP enhances negative cooperativity through an entropic penalty for ligand binding. The use of variant cAMP ligands indicates the data are not explained by structural heterogeneity between protein mutants. We observe computationally that altered interaction strength between CAP and cAMP variously modifies the change in allosteric cooperativity due to second site CAP mutations. As the degree of correlated motion between the cAMP-contacting site and a second site on CAP increases, there is a tendency for computed double mutations at these sites to drive CAP toward noncooperativity. Naturally occurring pairs of covarying residues in CAP do not display this tendency, suggesting a selection pressure to fine tune allostery on changes to the CAP ligand-binding pocket without a drive to a noncooperative state. In general, we hypothesize an evolutionary selection pressure to retain slow relaxation dynamics-induced allostery in proteins in which evolution of the ligand-binding site is occurring. PMID:26187469

  9. Plant callus: mechanisms of induction and repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeuchi, Momoko; Sugimoto, Keiko; Iwase, Akira

    2013-09-01

    Plants develop unorganized cell masses like callus and tumors in response to various biotic and abiotic stimuli. Since the historical discovery that the combination of two growth-promoting hormones, auxin and cytokinin, induces callus from plant explants in vitro, this experimental system has been used extensively in both basic research and horticultural applications. The molecular basis of callus formation has long been obscure, but we are finally beginning to understand how unscheduled cell proliferation is suppressed during normal plant development and how genetic and environmental cues override these repressions to induce callus formation. In this review, we will first provide a brief overview of callus development in nature and in vitro and then describe our current knowledge of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms underlying callus formation. PMID:24076977

  10. Polycomb repressive complex 1 controls uterine decidualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Fenghua; Gao, Fei; Kartashov, Andrey V; Jegga, Anil G; Barski, Artem; Das, Sanjoy K

    2016-01-01

    Uterine stromal cell decidualization is an essential part of the reproductive process. Decidual tissue development requires a highly regulated control of the extracellular tissue remodeling; however the mechanism of this regulation remains unknown. Through systematic expression studies, we detected that Cbx4/2, Rybp, and Ring1B [components of polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1)] are predominantly utilized in antimesometrial decidualization with polyploidy. Immunofluorescence analyses revealed that PRC1 members are co-localized with its functional histone modifier H2AK119ub1 (mono ubiquitination of histone-H2A at lysine-119) in polyploid cell. A potent small-molecule inhibitor of Ring1A/B E3-ubiquitin ligase or siRNA-mediated suppression of Cbx4 caused inhibition of H2AK119ub1, in conjunction with perturbation of decidualization and polyploidy development, suggesting a role for Cbx4/Ring1B-containing PRC1 in these processes. Analyses of genetic signatures by RNA-seq studies showed that the inhibition of PRC1 function affects 238 genes (154 up and 84 down) during decidualization. Functional enrichment analyses identified that about 38% genes primarily involved in extracellular processes are specifically targeted by PRC1. Furthermore, ~15% of upregulated genes exhibited a significant overlap with the upregulated Bmp2 null-induced genes in mice. Overall, Cbx4/Ring1B-containing PRC1 controls decidualization via regulation of extracellular gene remodeling functions and sheds new insights into underlying molecular mechanism(s) through transcriptional repression regulation. PMID:27181215

  11. Superoxide dismutase during glucose repression of Hansenula polymorpha CBS 4732.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristozova, Tsonka; Rasheva, Tanya; Nedeva, Trayana; Kujumdzieva, Anna

    2002-01-01

    Hansenula polymorpha CBS 4732 was studied during cultivation on methanol and different glucose concentrations. Activities of Cu/Zn and Mn superoxide dismutase, catalase and methanol oxidase were investigated. During cultivation on methanol, increased superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and an induced methanol oxidase were achieved. Transfer of a methanol grown culture to medium with a high glucose concentration caused growth inhibition, low consumption of carbon, nitrogen and phosphate substrates, methanol oxidase inactivation as well as decrease of catalase activity (21.8 +/- 0.61 deltaE240 x min(-1) x mg protein(-1)). At the same time, a high value for superoxide dismutase enzyme was found (42.9 +/- 0.98 U x mg protein(-1), 25% of which was represented by Mn superoxide dismutase and 75% - by the Cu/Zn type). During derepression methanol oxidase was negligible (0.005 +/- 0.0001 U x mg protein(-1)), catalase tended to be the same as in the repressed culture, while superoxide dismutase activity increased considerably (63.67 +/- 1.72 U x mg protein(-1), 69% belonging to the Cu/Zn containing enzyme). Apparently, the cycle of growth inhibition and reactivation of Hansenula polymorpha CBS 4732 cells is strongly connected with the activity of the enzyme superoxide dismutase. PMID:12064733

  12. Structure of the apo form of the catabolite control protein A (CcpA) from Bacillus megaterium with a DNA-binding domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystal structure analysis of the apo form of catabolite control protein A reveals the three-helix bundle of the DNA-binding domain. In the crystal packing, this domain interacts with the binding site for the corepressor protein. Crystal structure determination of catabolite control protein A (CcpA) at 2.6 Å resolution reveals for the first time the structure of a full-length apo-form LacI-GalR family repressor protein. In the crystal structures of these transcription regulators, the three-helix bundle of the DNA-binding domain has only been observed in cognate DNA complexes; it has not been observed in other crystal structures owing to its mobility. In the crystal packing of apo-CcpA, the protein–protein contacts between the N-terminal three-helix bundle and the core domain consisted of interactions between the homodimers that were similar to those between the corepressor protein HPr and the CcpA N-subdomain in the ternary DNA complex. In contrast to the DNA complex, the apo-CcpA structure reveals large subdomain movements in the core, resulting in a complete loss of contacts between the N-subdomains of the homodimer

  13. Repression of death consciousness and the psychedelic trip

    OpenAIRE

    Varsha Dutta

    2012-01-01

    Death is our most repressed consciousness, it inheres our condition as the primordial fear. Perhaps it was necessary that this angst be repressed in man or he would be hurled against the dark forces of nature. Modern ethos was built on this edifice, where the ′denial of death′ while ′embracing one′s symbolic immortality′ would be worshipped, so this ideology simply overturned and repressed looking into the morass of the inevitable when it finally announced itself. Once this slowly pieced its ...

  14. Mechanisms of transcriptional repression by histone lysine methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hublitz, Philip; Albert, Mareike; Peters, Antoine H F M

    During development, covalent modification of both, histones and DNA contribute to the specification and maintenance of cell identity. Repressive modifications are thought to stabilize cell type specific gene expression patterns, reducing the likelihood of reactivation of lineage-unrelated genes. ...

  15. Repressive coping and alexithymia in idiopathic environmental intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Sine; Zachariae, Robert; Rasmussen, Alice;

    2010-01-01

    To examine if the non-expression of negative emotions (i.e., repressive coping) and differences in the ability to process and regulate emotions (i.e., alexithymia) is associated with idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI).......To examine if the non-expression of negative emotions (i.e., repressive coping) and differences in the ability to process and regulate emotions (i.e., alexithymia) is associated with idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI)....

  16. Legitimation, Kooptation und Repression im NS-Regime

    OpenAIRE

    Bialas, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    "This essay deals with the interplay between cooptation, legitimation, and repression with a special emphasis on the Nazi attitude and the behavior towards politically indifferent Germans. It analyzes the ideological framework of justification for the repressive Nazi politics that were also used to recruit followers who had a clean conscience and felt they were doing the right thing. Nazi ideology rejected the bourgeois - Christian concepts of universal human rights and dignity as anachronist...

  17. The effects of disruption of phosphoglucose isomerase gene on carbon utilisation and cellulase production in Trichoderma reesei Rut-C30

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pakula Tiina

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellulase and hemicellulase genes in the fungus Trichoderma reesei are repressed by glucose and induced by lactose. Regulation of the cellulase genes is mediated by the repressor CRE1 and the activator XYR1. T. reesei strain Rut-C30 is a hypercellulolytic mutant, obtained from the natural strain QM6a, that has a truncated version of the catabolite repressor gene, cre1. It has been previously shown that bacterial mutants lacking phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI produce more nucleotide precursors and amino acids. PGI catalyzes the second step of glycolysis, the formation of fructose-6-P from glucose-6-P. Results We deleted the gene pgi1, encoding PGI, in the T. reesei strain Rut-C30 and we introduced the cre1 gene in a Δpgi1 mutant. Both Δpgi1 and cre1+Δpgi1 mutants showed a pellet-like and growth as well as morphological alterations compared with Rut-C30. None of the mutants grew in media with fructose, galactose, xylose, glycerol or lactose but they grew in media with glucose, with fructose and glucose, with galactose and fructose or with lactose and fructose. No growth was observed in media with xylose and glucose. On glucose, Δpgi1 and cre1+Δpgi1 mutants showed higher cellulase activity than Rut-C30 and QM6a, respectively. But in media with lactose, none of the mutants improved the production of the reference strains. The increase in the activity did not correlate with the expression of mRNA of the xylanase regulator gene, xyr1. Δpgi1 mutants were also affected in the extracellular β-galactosidase activity. Levels of mRNA of the glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase did not increase in Δpgi1 during growth on glucose. Conclusions The ability to grow in media with glucose as the sole carbon source indicated that Trichoderma Δpgi1 mutants were able to use the pentose phosphate pathway. But, they did not increase the expression of gpdh. Morphological characteristics were the result of the pgi1 deletion. Deletion of pgi1 in

  18. Determination of antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotides and catabolites in biological fluids and tissue extracts using anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography and capillary gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S H; Qian, M; Brennan, J M; Gallo, J M

    1997-04-25

    Chemically modified phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) have become critical tools for research in the fields of gene expression and experimental therapeutics. Bioanalytical assays were developed that utilized fast anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) for the determination of 20-mer ODNs in biological fluids (plasma and urine) and tissues. A 20 mer ODN in the antisense orientation directed against DNA methyltransferase (denoted as MT-AS) was studied as the model ODN. The anion-exchange HPLC method employed a short column packed with non-porous polymer support and a ternary gradient elution with 2 M lithium bromide containing 30% formamide. Analysis of the MT-AS is accomplished within 5 min with a detection limit of approximately 3 ng on-column at 267 nm. For plasma and urine, samples were diluted with Nonidet P-40 in 0.9% NaCl and directly injected onto the column, resulting in 100% recovery. For tissue homogenates, a protein kinase K digestion and phenol-chloroform extraction were used, with an average recovery of about 50%. Since the HPLC assay cannot provide one-base separation, biological samples were also processed by an anion-exchange solid-phase extraction and a CGE method to characterize MT-AS and its catabolites of 15-20-mer, species most relevant to biological activity. One base separation, under an electric field of 400 V/cm at room temperature, was achieved for a mixture of 15-20-mer with about 50 pg injected. Assay validation studies revealed that the combined HPLC-CGE methods are accurate, reproducible and specific for the determination of MT-AS and its catabolites in biological fluids and tissue homogenates, and can be used for the pharmacokinetic characterization of MT-AS. PMID:9187382

  19. CRISPR Technology for Genome Activation and Repression in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Dan; Qi, Lei S

    2016-01-01

    Targeted modulation of transcription is necessary for understanding complex gene networks and has great potential for medical and industrial applications. CRISPR is emerging as a powerful system for targeted genome activation and repression, in addition to its use in genome editing. This protocol describes how to design, construct, and experimentally validate the function of sequence-specific single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) for sequence-specific repression (CRISPRi) or activation (CRISPRa) of transcription in mammalian cells. In this technology, the CRISPR-associated protein Cas9 is catalytically deactivated (dCas9) to provide a general platform for RNA-guided DNA targeting of any locus in the genome. Fusion of dCas9 to effector domains with distinct regulatory functions enables stable and efficient transcriptional repression or activation in mammalian cells. Delivery of multiple sgRNAs further enables activation or repression of multiple genes. By using scaffold RNAs (scRNAs), different effectors can be recruited to different genes for simultaneous activation of some and repression of others. The CRISPRi and CRISPRa methods provide powerful tools for sequence-specific control of gene expression on a genome-wide scale to aid understanding gene functions and for engineering genetic regulatory systems. PMID:26729910

  20. Antisense silencing of the creA gene in Aspergillus nidulans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bautista, L. F.; Aleksenko, Alexei Y.; Hentzer, Morten; Henriksen, Anne Laurence Santerre; Nielsen, Jens

    2000-01-01

    Antisense expression of a portion of the gene encoding the major carbon catabolite repressor CREA in Aspergillus nidulans resulted in a substantial increase in the levels of glucose-repressible enzymes, both endogenous and heterologous, in the presence of glucose. The derepression effect was...

  1. Reduced specificity of negative autobiographical memories in repressive coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraerts, Elke; Dritschel, Barbara; Kreplin, Ute; Miyagawa, Liv; Waddington, Joanne

    2012-12-01

    The current study examined memory specificity of autobiographical memories in individuals with and without a repressive coping style. It seems conceivable that reduced memory specificity may be a way to reduce accessibility of negative experiences, one of the hallmark features of a repressive coping style. It was therefore hypothesized that repressors would show reduced specificity when retrieving negative memories. In order to study memory specificity, participants (N = 103) performed the autobiographical memory test. Results showed that individuals with a repressive coping style were significantly less specific in retrieving negative experiences, relative to control groups of low anxious, high anxious, and defensive high anxious individuals. This result was restricted to negative memory retrieval, as participants did not differ in memory specificity for positive experiences. These results show that repressors retrieve negative autobiographical memories in an overgeneral way, possibly in order to avoid negative affect. PMID:23200428

  2. BSAP Can Repress Enhancer Activity by Targeting PU.1 Function

    OpenAIRE

    Maitra, Shanak; Atchison, Michael

    2000-01-01

    PU.1 and BSAP are transcription factors crucial for proper B-cell development. Absence of PU.1 results in loss of B, T, and myeloid cells, while absence of BSAP results in an early block in B-cell differentiation. Both of these proteins bind to the immunoglobulin κ chain 3′ enhancer, which is developmentally regulated during B-cell differentiation. We find here that BSAP can repress 3′ enhancer activity. This repression can occur in plasmacytoma lines or in a non-B-cell line in which the enha...

  3. Chromatin Repressive Complexes in Stem Cells, Development, and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Anne; Helin, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    The chromatin environment is essential for the correct specification and preservation of cell identity through modulation and maintenance of transcription patterns. Many chromatin regulators are required for development, stem cell maintenance, and differentiation. Here, we review the roles of the...... polycomb repressive complexes, PRC1 and PRC2, and the HDAC1- and HDAC2-containing complexes, NuRD, Sin3, and CoREST, in stem cells, development, and cancer, as well as the ongoing efforts to develop therapies targeting these complexes in human cancer. Furthermore, we discuss the role of repressive...... complexes in modulating thresholds for gene activation and their importance for specification and maintenance of cell fate....

  4. Polyvinyl chloride catheters with repressed migration of plasticizers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedláček, T.; Polášková, M.; Kašpárková, V.; Filip, Petr; Sáha, P.

    Larnaca : Polymer Processing Society, 2009, s. 243. [Polymer Processing Society Europe/Africa Regional Meeting. Larnaca (GR), 18.10.2009-21.10.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : Polyvinyl chloride * catheter * repressed migration of plasticizers Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  5. Repressive Policy of the Soviet Government During World War II

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantin N. Maksimov; Irina V. Lidzhieva

    2014-01-01

    The article features wide range of sources dealing with deportation of a number of Nations in the years of the great Patriotic war. The authors note that the repressive policy of the Soviet state, as well as the reason for the deportation of the peoples in the first half of XX century are rooted in the nature of the totalitarian mode.

  6. Addressing the repressed needs of the Arabic client.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwairy, M

    1997-01-01

    In comparison to families in Western society, the traditional Arabic family plays a relatively greater role in providing support for adult progeny. This serves to condition adult offspring to continue to comply with the will and values of the family. Therefore, in exchange for familial support, Arabic individuals learn to repress authentic needs and emotions, and within that process they relinquish the need for self-actualization. Arabic society discourages individualism and opposes self-actualization by means of simultaneous punishment and moralization. Thus, there is a relatively greater development of the social value system (or superego) and comparatively less development of the self (or ego). In comparison to Western society, Arabic individuals continue to experience greater oppression during adulthood. Given these cultural differences, the processes of reliving and activating repressed needs and emotions, which ultimately serves to promote self-actualization, will transform intrapsychic conflicts into interpersonal and social ones. Thus, personal actions typically encouraged during Western psychotherapy are likely to produce significant social oppression. Indeed, promoting awareness of repressed needs and emotions often leads the Arabic client to become more helpless, because such wishes will rarely be socially sanctioned or satisfactorily fulfilled. Therefore, when addressing repressed needs and emotions in psychotherapy, ego strength, cultural identity, and degree of strictness of the client's family of origin must be considered. PMID:9231529

  7. miRNA-dependent translational repression in the Drosophila ovary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Reich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Drosophila ovary is a tissue rich in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Many of the regulatory factors are proteins identified via genetic screens. The more recent discovery of microRNAs, which in other animals and tissues appear to regulate translation of a large fraction of all mRNAs, raised the possibility that they too might act during oogenesis. However, there has been no direct demonstration of microRNA-dependent translational repression in the ovary. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, quantitative analyses of transcript and protein levels of transgenes with or without synthetic miR-312 binding sites show that the binding sites do confer translational repression. This effect is dependent on the ability of the cells to produce microRNAs. By comparison with microRNA-dependent translational repression in other cell types, the regulated mRNAs and the protein factors that mediate repression were expected to be enriched in sponge bodies, subcellular structures with extensive similarities to the P bodies found in other cells. However, no such enrichment was observed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results reveal the variety of post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that operate in the Drosophila ovary, and have implications for the mechanisms of miRNA-dependent translational control used in the ovary.

  8. RBP1 Recruits Both Histone Deacetylase-Dependent and -Independent Repression Activities to Retinoblastoma Family Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Albert; Lee, Joseph M; Yang, Wen-Ming; DeCaprio, James A.; William G Kaelin; Seto, Edward; Branton, Philip E.

    1999-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor family proteins block cell proliferation in part by repressing certain E2F-specific promoters. Both histone deacetylase (HDAC)-dependent and -independent repression activities are associated with the RB “pocket.” The mechanism by which these two repression functions occupy the pocket is unknown. A known RB-binding protein, RBP1, was previously found by our group to be an active corepressor which, if overexpressed, represses E2F-mediated transcription via i...

  9. Dopamine signaling leads to loss of Polycomb repression and aberrant gene activation in experimental parkinsonism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Södersten, Erik; Feyder, Michael; Lerdrup, Mads;

    2014-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins bind to and repress genes in embryonic stem cells through lineage commitment to the terminal differentiated state. PcG repressed genes are commonly characterized by the presence of the epigenetic histone mark H3K27me3, catalyzed by the Polycomb repressive complex 2. ...

  10. Unintended Consequences of Repression: Alliance Formation in South Korea's Democracy Movement (1970-1979)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Paul Y.

    2008-01-01

    Research regarding the impact of repression on social movements has yielded conflicting findings; some argue that repression decreases the total quantity of protest events while others argue that it motivates protest. To move beyond this impasse, various scholars have suggested exploring how repression influences the quality of social movements.…

  11. A systems biology approach to study glucose repression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Steen Lund; Soberano de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Bro, Christoffer;

    2007-01-01

    repression of a wide range of genes involved to utilization of alternative carbon sources. In this work, we applied a systems biology approach to study the interaction between these two pathways. Through genome-wide transcription analysis of strains with disruption of HXK2, GRR1, MIG1, the combination of MIG......1 and MIG2, and the parentel strain, we identified 393 genes to have significantly changed expression levels. To identify co-regulation patterns in the different strains we applied principal component analysis. Disruption of either GRR1 or HXK2 were both found to have profound effects on...... reporter metabolites, and found that there is a high degree of consistency between the identified reporter metabolites and the physiological effects observed in the different mutants . Our systems biology approach points to close interaction between the two pathways, and our metabolism driven analysis of...

  12. An Updated GA Signaling 'Relief of Repression' Regulatory Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu-Hua Gao; Sen-Lin Xiao; Qin-Fang Yao; Yu-Juan Wang; Xiang-Dong Fu

    2011-01-01

    Gibberellic acid (GA)regulates many aspects of plant growth and development. The DELLA proteins act to restrain plant growth, and GA relieves this repression by promoting their degradation via the 26S proteasome pathway.The elucidation of the crystalline structure of the GA soluble receptor GID1 protein represents an important breakthrough for understanding the way in which GA is perceived and how it induces the destabilization of the DELLA proteins. Recent advances have revealed that the DELLA proteins are involved in protein-protein interactions within various environmental and hormone signaling pathways. In this review, we highlight our current understanding of the 'relief of repression" model that aims to explain the role of GA and the function of the DELLA proteins, incorporating the many aspects of cross-talk shown to exist in the control of plant development and the response to stress.

  13. Repression predicts outcome following multidisciplinary treatment of chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, J W

    2000-01-01

    This study examined whether repression predicts outcome following multidisciplinary treatment for chronic pain and whether links between anxiety and outcome are obscured by repressors. Ninety-three chronic pain patients completed a 4-week pain program. Lifting capacity, walking endurance, depression, pain severity, and activity were measured at pre- and posttreatment. Low-anxious, repressor, high-anxious, and defensive/high-anxious groups were formed from median splits of Anxiety Content (ACS) and Lie scales of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2; Butcher, Dahlstrom, Graham, Tellegen, & Kaemmer, 1989). Significant ACS x Lie interactions were found for lifting capacity, depression, and pain severity changes. Planned comparisons showed that both repressors and high-anxious patients performed poorly on lifting capacity; repressors alone recovered poorly on depression and pain severity. Results imply that repression may interfere with the process and outcome of pain programs. PMID:10711590

  14. Repressive effects of resveratrol on androgen receptor transcriptional activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-feng Shi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The chemopreventive effects of resveratrol (RSV on prostate cancer have been well established; the androgen receptor (AR plays pivotal roles in prostatic tumorigenesis. However, the exact underlying molecular mechanisms about the effects of RSV on AR have not been fully elucidated. A model system is needed to determine whether and how RSV represses AR transcriptional activity. METHODOLOGY: The AR cDNA was first cloned into the retroviral vector pOZ-N and then integrated into the genome of AR-negative HeLa cells to generate the AR(+ cells. The constitutively expressed AR was characterized by monitoring hormone-stimulated nuclear translocation, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation, with the AR(- cells serving as controls. AR(+ cells were treated with RSV, and both AR protein levels and AR transcriptional activity were measured simultaneously. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays were used to detect the effects of RSV on the recruitment of AR to its cognate element (ARE. RESULTS: AR in the AR (+ stable cell line functions in a manner similar to that of endogenously expressed AR. Using this model system we clearly demonstrated that RSV represses AR transcriptional activity independently of any effects on AR protein levels. However, neither the hormone-mediated nucleus translocation nor the AR/ARE interaction was affected by RSV treatment. CONCLUSION: We demonstrated unambiguously that RSV regulates AR target gene expression, at least in part, by repressing AR transcriptional activity. Repressive effects of RSV on AR activity result from mechanisms other than the affects of AR nuclear translocation or DNA binding.

  15. Financial Liberalization and Financial Repression in Formerly Socialist Economies

    OpenAIRE

    Cevdet Denizer; Ray M. Desai; Nikolay Gueorguiev

    2000-01-01

    The financial systems of developing countries tend to be restricted or repressed by burdensome reserve requirements, interest-rate ceilings, foreign-exchange regulations, constraints on banks? balance sheets, and the heavy financial-sector taxation. This article explores preliminary evidence from the post-communist economies of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. Using data from 25 countries between 1991 and 1996, we find that the standard public-finance framework has limited applicab...

  16. ANXIETY, REPRESSION AND FORECLOSURE: SOME REMARKS TO THE CLINIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Leite

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper focus on Freud’s studies on anxiety and highlights Lacan’s contributions to the subject. It emphasizes the clinical importance of freudian distinction between anxiety as a signal and realistic – or automatic – anxiety in order to answer the question: assuming that, concerning neurosis, what causes repression is a signal of anxiety, could it also be said that, in psychosis, it is realistic anxiety that produces foreclosure?

  17. REST represses a subset of the pancreatic endocrine differentiation program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, David; Kim, Yung-Hae; Sever, Dror;

    2015-01-01

    neurons and in endocrine cells, which is necessary for their normal function. During development, REST represses a subset of genes in the neuronal differentiation program and Rest is down-regulated as neurons differentiate. Here, we investigate the role of REST in the differentiation of pancreatic...... REST is active in pancreas progenitors where it gates the activation of part of the beta cell differentiation program....

  18. Political repression and child labor : theory and empirical evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Maffei, Sandro; Raabe, Nikolai; Heinrich W. Ursprung

    2004-01-01

    Most normative studies on child labor arrive at the conclusion that child labor is detrimental to social welfare. Child labor is, however, still prevalent in many developing countries even though in many of these countries it is forbidden by law. In this paper we develop a political-economic model that explains lenient enforcement of existing child labor legislation. The most important implication of our model is that in countries with repressive political regimes enforcement is more lenient ...

  19. Revisiting the Master-Signifier, or, Mandela and Repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Derek; Vanheule, Stijn

    2015-01-01

    The concept of the master-signifier has been subject to a variety of applications in Lacanian forms of political discourse theory and ideology critique. While there is much to be commended in literature of this sort, it often neglects salient issues pertaining to the role of master signifiers in the clinical domain of (individual) psychical economy. The popularity of the concept of the master (or "empty") signifier in political discourse analysis has thus proved a double-edged sword. On the one hand it demonstrates how crucial psychical processes are performed via the operations of the signifier, extending thus the Lacanian thesis that identification is the outcome of linguistic and symbolic as opposed to merely psychological processes. On the other, the use of the master signifier concept within the political realm to track discursive formations tends to distance the term from the dynamics of the unconscious and operation of repression. Accordingly, this paper revisits the master signifier concept, and does so within the socio-political domain, yet while paying particular attention to the functioning of unconscious processes of fantasy and repression. More specifically, it investigates how Nelson Mandela operates as a master signifier in contemporary South Africa, as a vital means of knitting together diverse elements of post-apartheid society, enabling the fantasy of the post-apartheid nation, and holding at bay a whole series of repressed and negated undercurrents. PMID:26834664

  20. Revisiting the master-signifier, or, Mandela and repression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek eHook

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the master-signifier has been subject to a variety of applications in Lacanian forms of political discourse theory and ideology critique. While there is much to be commended in literature of this sort, it often neglects salient issues pertaining to the role of master signifiers in the clinical domain of (individual psychical economy. The popularity of the concept of the master (or ‘empty’ signifier in political discourse analysis has thus proved a double-edged sword. On the one hand it demonstrates how crucial psychical processes are performed via the operations of the signifier, extending thus the Lacanian thesis that identification is as much the outcome of linguistic and symbolic as opposed to merely psychological processes. On the other, the use of the master signifier concept within the political realm to track discursive formations tends to distance the term from the dynamics of the unconscious and operation of repression. Accordingly, this paper revisits the master signifier concept, and does so within the socio-political domain, yet while paying particular attention to the functioning of unconscious processes of fantasy and repression. More specifically, it investigates how Nelson Mandela operates as a master signifier in contemporary South Africa, as a vital means of knitting together diverse elements of post-apartheid society, enabling the fantasy of the post-apartheid nation, and holding at bay a whole series of repressed and negated undercurrents.

  1. Snai1 represses Nanog to promote embryonic stem cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Galvagni

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cell (ESC self-renewal and pluripotency is maintained by an external signaling pathways and intrinsic regulatory networks involving ESC-specific transcriptional complexes (mainly formed by OCT3/4, Sox2 and Nanog proteins, the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2 and DNA methylation [1–8]. Among these, Nanog represents the more ESC specific factor and its repression correlates with the loss of pluripotency and ESC differentiation [9–11]. During ESC early differentiation, many development-associated genes become upregulated and although, in general, much is known about the pluripotency self-renewal circuitry, the molecular events that lead ESCs to exit from pluripotency and begin differentiation are largely unknown. Snai1 is one the most early induced genes during ESC differentiation in vitro and in vivo [12,13]. Here we show that Snai1 is able to directly repress several stemness-associated genes including Nanog. We use a ESC stable-line expressing a inducible Snai1 protein. We here show microarray analysis of embryonic stem cells (ESC expressing Snail-ER at various time points of induction with 4-OH. Data were deposited in Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO datasets under reference GSE57854 and here: http://epigenetics.hugef-research.org/data.php.

  2. Revisiting the Master-Signifier, or, Mandela and Repression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Derek; Vanheule, Stijn

    2016-01-01

    The concept of the master-signifier has been subject to a variety of applications in Lacanian forms of political discourse theory and ideology critique. While there is much to be commended in literature of this sort, it often neglects salient issues pertaining to the role of master signifiers in the clinical domain of (individual) psychical economy. The popularity of the concept of the master (or “empty”) signifier in political discourse analysis has thus proved a double-edged sword. On the one hand it demonstrates how crucial psychical processes are performed via the operations of the signifier, extending thus the Lacanian thesis that identification is the outcome of linguistic and symbolic as opposed to merely psychological processes. On the other, the use of the master signifier concept within the political realm to track discursive formations tends to distance the term from the dynamics of the unconscious and operation of repression. Accordingly, this paper revisits the master signifier concept, and does so within the socio-political domain, yet while paying particular attention to the functioning of unconscious processes of fantasy and repression. More specifically, it investigates how Nelson Mandela operates as a master signifier in contemporary South Africa, as a vital means of knitting together diverse elements of post-apartheid society, enabling the fantasy of the post-apartheid nation, and holding at bay a whole series of repressed and negated undercurrents. PMID:26834664

  3. Cell-Context Dependent TCF/LEF Expression and Function: Alternative Tales of Repression, De-Repression and Activation Potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Catherine D.; Byers, Stephen W.

    2011-01-01

    Wnt signaling controls cell specification and fate during development and adult tissue homeostasis by converging on a small family of DNA binding factors, the T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF) family. In response to Wnt signals, TCF/LEF members undergo a transcriptional switch from repression to activation mediated in part by nuclear β-catenin binding and recruitment of co-activator complexes. In mammals, the specificity and fine tuning of this transcriptional switch is also ac...

  4. Comorbidity between depression and inflammatory bowel disease explained by immune-inflammatory, oxidative, and nitrosative stress; tryptophan catabolite; and gut-brain pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Subero, Marta; Anderson, George; Kanchanatawan, Buranee; Berk, Michael; Maes, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The nature of depression has recently been reconceptualized, being conceived as the clinical expression of activated immune-inflammatory, oxidative, and nitrosative stress (IO&NS) pathways, including tryptophan catabolite (TRYCAT), autoimmune, and gut-brain pathways. IO&NS pathways are similarly integral to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The increased depression prevalence in IBD associates with a lower quality of life and increased morbidity in IBD, highlighting the role of depression in modulating the pathophysiology of IBD.This review covers data within such a wider conceptualization that better explains the heightened co-occurrence of IBD and depression. Common IO&NS underpinning between both disorders is evidenced by increased pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, eg, interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6 trans-signalling; Th-1- and Th-17-like responses; neopterin and soluble IL-2 receptor levels; positive acute phase reactants (haptoglobin and C-reactive protein); lowered levels of negative acute phase reactants (albumin, transferrin, zinc) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β); increased O&NS with damage to lipids, proteinsm and DNA; increased production of nitric oxide (NO) and inducible NO synthase; lowered plasma tryptophan but increased TRYCAT levels; autoimmune responses; and increased bacterial translocation. As such, heightened IO&NS processes in depression overlap with the biological underpinnings of IBD, potentially explaining their increased co-occurrence. This supports the perspective that there is a spectrum of IO&NS disorders that includes depression, both as an emergent comorbidity and as a contributor to IO&NS processes. Such a frame of reference has treatment implications for IBD when "comorbid" with depression. PMID:26307347

  5. Abscisic (ABA)-aldehyde is a precursor to, and 1',4'-trans-ABA-diol a catabolite of, ABA in apple

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous 18O labeling studies of abscisic acid (ABA) have shown that apple (Malus domestica Borkh. cv Granny Smith) fruits synthesize a majority of [18O]ABA with the label incorporated in the 1'-hydroxyl position and unlabeled in the carboxyl group (JAD Zeevaart, TG Heath, DA Gage [1989] Plant Physiol 91: 1594-1601). It was proposed that exchange of 18O in the side chain with the medium occurred at an aldehyde intermediate stage of ABA biosynthesis. We have isolated ABA-aldehyde and 1'-4'-trans-ABA-diol (ABA-trans-diol) from 18O-labeled apple fruit tissue and measured the extent and position of 18O incorporation by tandem mass spectrometry. 18O-Labeling patterns of ABA-aldehyde, ABA-trans-diol, and ABA indicate that ABA-aldehyde is a precursor to, and ABA-trans-diol a catabolite of, ABA. Exchange of 18O in the carbonyl of ABA-aldehyde can be the cause of loss of 18O from the side chain of [18O]ABA. Results of feeding experiments with deuterated substrates provide further support for the precursor-product relationship of ABA-aldehyde → ABA → ABA-trans-diol. The ABA-aldehyde and ABA-trans-diol contents of fruits and leaves were low, approximately 1 and 0.02 nanograms per gram fresh weight for ABA-aldehyde and ABA-trans-diol, respectively, while ABA levels in fruits ranged from 10 to 200 nanograms per gram fresh weight. ABA biosynthesis was about 10-fold lower in fruits than in leaves. In fruits, the majority of ABA was conjugated to β-D-glucopyranosyl abscisate, whereas in leaves ABA was mainly hydroxylated to phaseic acid. Parallel pathways for ABA and trans-ABA biosynthesis and conjugation in fruits and leaves are proposed

  6. Backbone and stereospecific (13)C methyl Ile (δ1), Leu and Val side-chain chemical shift assignments of Crc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rakhi; Sahu, Bhubanananda; Ray, Malay K; Deshmukh, Mandar V

    2015-04-01

    Carbon catabolite repression (CCR) allows bacteria to selectively assimilate a preferred compound among a mixture of several potential carbon sources, thus boosting growth and economizing the cost of adaptability to variable nutrients in the environment. The RNA-binding catabolite repression control (Crc) protein acts as a global post-transcriptional regulator of CCR in Pseudomonas species. Crc triggers repression by inhibiting the expression of genes involved in transport and catabolism of non-preferred substrates, thus indirectly favoring assimilation of preferred one. We report here a nearly complete backbone and stereospecific (13)C methyl side-chain chemical shift assignments of Ile (δ1), Leu and Val of Crc (~ 31 kDa) from Pseudomonas syringae Lz4W. PMID:24496608

  7. The relationship between repressive and defensive coping styles and monocyte, eosinophile, and serum glucose levels: support for the opioid peptide hypothesis of repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamner, L D; Schwartz, G E; Leigh, H

    1988-01-01

    The opioid peptide hypothesis of repression (1) predicts that repressive coping is associated with increased functional endorphin levels in the brain, which can result in decreased immunocompetence and hyperglycemia. In a random sample of 312 patients seen at a Yale Medical School outpatient clinic, significant main effects of coping style were found for monocyte and eosinophile counts, serum glucose levels, and self-reports of medication allergies. Specifically, repressive and defensive high-anxious patients demonstrated significantly decreased monocyte counts. In addition, repressive coping was associated with elevated eosinophile counts, serum glucose levels, and self-reported reactions to medications. This behavioral, immunologic, and endocrine profile is consistent with the opioid peptide hypothesis, which provides an integrative framework for relating the attenuated emotional experience of pain and distress characteristic of repressive coping with reduced resistance to infectious and neoplastic disease. PMID:2853404

  8. The Rewiring of Ubiquitination Targets in a Pathogenic Yeast Promotes Metabolic Flexibility, Host Colonization and Virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, Delma S.; Raziunaite, Ingrida; Mol Avelar, Gabriela; Mackie, Joanna; Budge, Susan; Stead, David; Gow, Neil A. R.; Lenardon, Megan D.; Ballou, Elizabeth R.; MacCallum, Donna M.; Brown, Alistair J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Efficient carbon assimilation is critical for microbial growth and pathogenesis. The environmental yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is “Crabtree positive”, displaying a rapid metabolic switch from the assimilation of alternative carbon sources to sugars. Following exposure to sugars, this switch is mediated by the transcriptional repression of genes (carbon catabolite repression) and the turnover (catabolite inactivation) of enzymes involved in the assimilation of alternative carbon sources. The pathogenic yeast Candida albicans is Crabtree negative. It has retained carbon catabolite repression mechanisms, but has undergone posttranscriptional rewiring such that gluconeogenic and glyoxylate cycle enzymes are not subject to ubiquitin-mediated catabolite inactivation. Consequently, when glucose becomes available, C. albicans can continue to assimilate alternative carbon sources alongside the glucose. We show that this metabolic flexibility promotes host colonization and virulence. The glyoxylate cycle enzyme isocitrate lyase (CaIcl1) was rendered sensitive to ubiquitin-mediated catabolite inactivation in C. albicans by addition of a ubiquitination site. This mutation, which inhibits lactate assimilation in the presence of glucose, reduces the ability of C. albicans cells to withstand macrophage killing, colonize the gastrointestinal tract and cause systemic infections in mice. Interestingly, most S. cerevisiae clinical isolates we examined (67%) have acquired the ability to assimilate lactate in the presence of glucose (i.e. they have become Crabtree negative). These S. cerevisiae strains are more resistant to macrophage killing than Crabtree positive clinical isolates. Moreover, Crabtree negative S. cerevisiae mutants that lack Gid8, a key component of the Glucose-Induced Degradation complex, are more resistant to macrophage killing and display increased virulence in immunocompromised mice. Thus, while Crabtree positivity might impart a fitness advantage for

  9. The Rewiring of Ubiquitination Targets in a Pathogenic Yeast Promotes Metabolic Flexibility, Host Colonization and Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, Delma S; Raziunaite, Ingrida; Mol Avelar, Gabriela; Mackie, Joanna; Budge, Susan; Stead, David; Gow, Neil A R; Lenardon, Megan D; Ballou, Elizabeth R; MacCallum, Donna M; Brown, Alistair J P

    2016-04-01

    Efficient carbon assimilation is critical for microbial growth and pathogenesis. The environmental yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is "Crabtree positive", displaying a rapid metabolic switch from the assimilation of alternative carbon sources to sugars. Following exposure to sugars, this switch is mediated by the transcriptional repression of genes (carbon catabolite repression) and the turnover (catabolite inactivation) of enzymes involved in the assimilation of alternative carbon sources. The pathogenic yeast Candida albicans is Crabtree negative. It has retained carbon catabolite repression mechanisms, but has undergone posttranscriptional rewiring such that gluconeogenic and glyoxylate cycle enzymes are not subject to ubiquitin-mediated catabolite inactivation. Consequently, when glucose becomes available, C. albicans can continue to assimilate alternative carbon sources alongside the glucose. We show that this metabolic flexibility promotes host colonization and virulence. The glyoxylate cycle enzyme isocitrate lyase (CaIcl1) was rendered sensitive to ubiquitin-mediated catabolite inactivation in C. albicans by addition of a ubiquitination site. This mutation, which inhibits lactate assimilation in the presence of glucose, reduces the ability of C. albicans cells to withstand macrophage killing, colonize the gastrointestinal tract and cause systemic infections in mice. Interestingly, most S. cerevisiae clinical isolates we examined (67%) have acquired the ability to assimilate lactate in the presence of glucose (i.e. they have become Crabtree negative). These S. cerevisiae strains are more resistant to macrophage killing than Crabtree positive clinical isolates. Moreover, Crabtree negative S. cerevisiae mutants that lack Gid8, a key component of the Glucose-Induced Degradation complex, are more resistant to macrophage killing and display increased virulence in immunocompromised mice. Thus, while Crabtree positivity might impart a fitness advantage for yeasts in

  10. Repression of death consciousness and the psychedelic trip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Dutta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Death is our most repressed consciousness, it inheres our condition as the primordial fear. Perhaps it was necessary that this angst be repressed in man or he would be hurled against the dark forces of nature. Modern ethos was built on this edifice, where the ′denial of death′ while ′embracing one′s symbolic immortality′ would be worshipped, so this ideology simply overturned and repressed looking into the morass of the inevitable when it finally announced itself. Once this slowly pieced its way into all of life, ′death′ would soon become a terminology in medicine too and assert its position, by giving a push to those directly dealing with the dying to shy away from its emotional and spiritual affliction. The need to put off death and prolong one′s life would become ever more urgent. Research using psychedelics on the terminally ill which had begun in the 1950s and 1960s would coerce into another realm and alter the face of medicine; but the aggression with which it forced itself in the 1960s would soon be politically maimed, and what remained would be sporadic outpours that trickled its way from European labs and underground boot camps. Now, with the curtain rising, the question has etched itself again, about the use of psychedelic drugs in medicine, particularly psychedelic psychotherapy with the terminally ill. This study is an attempt to philosophically explore death anxiety from its existential context and how something that is innate in our condition cannot be therapeutically cured. Psychedelic use was immutably linked with ancient cultures and only recently has it seen its scientific revival, from which a scientific culture grew around psychedelic therapy. How much of what was threaded in the ritual and spiritual mores can be extricated and be interpreted in our own mechanized language of medicine is the question that nudges many.

  11. Repressive coping and alexithymia in ideopathic environmental intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Sine; Zachariae, Robert; Rasmussen, Alice;

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine if the non-expression of negative emotions (i.e., repressive coping) and differences in the ability to process and regulate emotions (i.e., alexithymia) is associated with idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI). Methods The study included participants who had previously...... and negative emotional reactions, defensiveness and difficulties identifying feelings were found, suggesting a need for exploring the influence of these emotional reactions in IEI.......) and the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale (TMAS), the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), and a negative affectivity scale (NAS). Multiple, hierarchical linear regression analyses were conducted using IEI variables as the dependent variables. Results The TMAS and MCSDS scores were independently associated...

  12. ATF3 represses PPARγ expression and inhibits adipocyte differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Min-Kyung; Jung, Myeong Ho, E-mail: jung0603@pusan.ac.kr

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • ATF3 decrease the expression of PPARγ and its target gene in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. • ATF3 represses the promoter activity of PPARγ2 gene. • ATF/CRE (−1537/−1530) is critical for ATF3-mediated downregulation of PPARγ. • ATF3 binds to the promoter region containing the ATF/CRE. • ER stress inhibits adipocyte differentiation through downregulation of PPARγ by ATF3. - Abstract: Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) is a stress-adaptive transcription factor that mediates cellular stress response signaling. We previously reported that ATF3 represses CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα) expression and inhibits 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation. In this study, we explored potential role of ATF3 in negatively regulating peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPARγ). ATF3 decreased the expression of PPARγ and its target gene in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. ATF3 also repressed the activity of −2.6 Kb promoter of mouse PPARγ2. Overexpression of PPARγ significantly prevented the ATF3-mediated inhibition of 3T3-L1 differentiation. Transfection studies with 5′ deleted-reporters showed that ATF3 repressed the activity of −2037 bp promoter, whereas it did not affect the activity of −1458 bp promoter, suggesting that ATF3 responsive element is located between the −2037 and −1458. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that ATF3 binds to ATF/CRE site (5′-TGACGTTT-3′) between −1537 and −1530. Mutation of the ATF/CRE site abrogated ATF3-mediated transrepression of the PPARγ2 promoter. Treatment with thapsigargin, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducer, increased ATF3 expression, whereas it decreased PPARγ expression. ATF3 knockdown significantly blocked the thapsigargin-mediated downregulation of PPARγ expression. Furthermore, overexpression of PPARγ prevented inhibition of 3T3-L1 differentiation by thapsigargin. Collectively, these results suggest that ATF3-mediated

  13. The complexity of miRNA-mediated repression

    OpenAIRE

    Wilczynska, A.; Bushell, M.

    2014-01-01

    Since their discovery 20 years ago, miRNAs have attracted much attention from all areas of biology. These short (∼22 nt) non-coding RNA molecules are highly conserved in evolution and are present in nearly all eukaryotes. They have critical roles in virtually every cellular process, particularly determination of cell fate in development and regulation of the cell cycle. Although it has long been known that miRNAs bind to mRNAs to trigger translational repression and degradation, there had bee...

  14. Quality and position of the three lac operators of E. coli define efficiency of repression.

    OpenAIRE

    Oehler, S; Amouyal, M; Kolkhof, P.; von Wilcken-Bergmann, B; Müller-Hill, B

    1994-01-01

    Repression of the lac promoter may be achieved in two different ways: either by interference with the action of RNA polymerase or by interference with CAP activation. We investigated cooperative repression of the Escherichia coli lac operon by systematic conversion of its three natural operators (O1, O2 and O3) on the chromosome. We find that cooperative repression by tetrameric Lac repressor increases with both quality and proximity of the interacting operators. A short distance of 92 bp all...

  15. Serum repressing efflux pump CDR1 in Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Jen-Chung

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past decades, the prevalence of candidemia has increased significantly and drug resistance has also become a pressing problem. Overexpression of CDR1, an efflux pump, has been proposed as a major mechanism contributing to the drug resistance in Candida albicans. It has been demonstrated that biological fluids such as human serum can have profound effects on antifungal pharmacodynamics. The aim of this study is to understand the effects of serum in drug susceptibility via monitoring the activity of CDR1 promoter of C. albicans. Results The wild-type C. albicans cells (SC5314 but not the cdr1/cdr1 mutant cells became more susceptible to the antifungal drug when the medium contained serum. To understand the regulation of CDR1 in the presence of serum, we have constructed CDR1 promoter-Renilla luciferase (CDR1p-RLUC reporter to monitor the activity of the CDR1 promoter in C. albicans. As expected, the expression of CDR1p-RLUC was induced by miconazole. Surprisingly, it was repressed by serum. Consistently, the level of CDR1 mRNA was also reduced in the presence of serum but not N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, a known inducer for germ tube formation. Conclusion Our finding that the expression of CDR1 is repressed by serum raises the question as to how does CDR1 contribute to the drug resistance in C. albicans causing candidemia. This also suggests that it is important to re-assess the prediction of in vivo therapeutic outcome of candidemia based on the results of standard in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing, conducted in the absence of serum.

  16. Extremadura: Behind the material traces of Franco’s repression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muñoz Encinar, Laura

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available After the failed coup d’état of July 17th, 1936 and after the start of the Spanish Civil War that followed it, rebels carried out a repressive strategy based on the execution of thousands of people as a key tool of social control. The socialization of fear and terror through humiliation, killing and disappearance would become the main strategy employed throughout the war and the post-war period. In this context, perpetrators would exercise repressive practices on victims and their bodies. As a result, countless mass graves were opened in order to hide the bodies of victims. In the region of Extremadura, these mass graves have been investigated through the application of archeology and physical anthropology as disciplines of research and historical knowledge production. The exhumations, have given us a diachronic point of view of the repressive strategies developed, associated with different contexts between 1936 and 1946. Analyses of mass executions linked to rebels’ occupation of territories in this region, systematic rearguard killings in occupied areas, elimination procedures carried out in concentration camps and prisons and the fight against the armed guerrilla during the dictatorship, are the main contributions of this article.Tras el fracaso del golpe de Estado del 17 de julio de 1936 y el inicio de la Guerra Civil en España, se llevó a cabo, por parte de los sublevados, una estrategia represiva basada en la ejecución de miles de personas como principal herramienta de control social. La socialización del miedo y el terror a través de las vejaciones, ejecuciones y desapariciones será la principal estrategia utilizada, donde el uso de las víctimas y los cuerpos formará también parte de las prácticas represivas ideadas por los perpetradores. Como consecuencia, se abrieron incontables fosas comunes con el objetivo de ocultar los cadáveres de los represaliados. Estas fosas han sido investigadas en la Comunidad Autónoma de

  17. Mechanism and Role of SOX2 Repression in Seminoma: Relevance to Human Germline Specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, Ritu; Jagadish, Nirmala; Kustagi, Manjunath; Mendiratta, Geetu; Seandel, Marco; Soni, Rekha; Korkola, James E; Thodima, Venkata; Califano, Andrea; Bosl, George J; Chaganti, R S K

    2016-05-10

    Human male germ cell tumors (GCTs) are derived from primordial germ cells (PGCs). The master pluripotency regulator and neuroectodermal lineage effector transcription factor SOX2 is repressed in PGCs and the seminoma (SEM) subset of GCTs. The mechanism of SOX2 repression and its significance to GC and GCT development currently are not understood. Here, we show that SOX2 repression in SEM-derived TCam-2 cells is mediated by the Polycomb repressive complex (PcG) and the repressive H3K27me3 chromatin mark that are enriched at its promoter. Furthermore, SOX2 repression in TCam-2 cells can be abrogated by recruitment of the constitutively expressed H3K27 demethylase UTX to the SOX2 promoter through retinoid signaling, leading to expression of neuronal and other lineage genes. SOX17 has been shown to initiate human PGC specification, with its target PRDM1 suppressing mesendodermal genes. Our results are consistent with a role for SOX2 repression in normal germline development by suppressing neuroectodermal genes. PMID:27132888

  18. Mechanism and Role of SOX2 Repression in Seminoma: Relevance to Human Germline Specification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu Kushwaha

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Human male germ cell tumors (GCTs are derived from primordial germ cells (PGCs. The master pluripotency regulator and neuroectodermal lineage effector transcription factor SOX2 is repressed in PGCs and the seminoma (SEM subset of GCTs. The mechanism of SOX2 repression and its significance to GC and GCT development currently are not understood. Here, we show that SOX2 repression in SEM-derived TCam-2 cells is mediated by the Polycomb repressive complex (PcG and the repressive H3K27me3 chromatin mark that are enriched at its promoter. Furthermore, SOX2 repression in TCam-2 cells can be abrogated by recruitment of the constitutively expressed H3K27 demethylase UTX to the SOX2 promoter through retinoid signaling, leading to expression of neuronal and other lineage genes. SOX17 has been shown to initiate human PGC specification, with its target PRDM1 suppressing mesendodermal genes. Our results are consistent with a role for SOX2 repression in normal germline development by suppressing neuroectodermal genes.

  19. Human Pumilio Proteins Recruit Multiple Deadenylases to Efficiently Repress Messenger RNAs*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Etten, Jamie; Schagat, Trista L.; Hrit, Joel; Weidmann, Chase A.; Brumbaugh, Justin; Coon, Joshua J.; Goldstrohm, Aaron C.

    2012-01-01

    PUF proteins are a conserved family of eukaryotic RNA-binding proteins that regulate specific mRNAs: they control many processes including stem cell proliferation, fertility, and memory formation. PUFs repress protein expression from their target mRNAs but the mechanism by which they do so remains unclear, especially for humans. Humans possess two PUF proteins, PUM1 and PUM2, which exhibit similar RNA binding specificities. Here we report new insights into their regulatory activities and mechanisms of action. We developed functional assays to measure sequence-specific repression by PUM1 and PUM2. Both robustly inhibit translation and promote mRNA degradation. Purified PUM complexes were found to contain subunits of the CCR4-NOT (CNOT) complex, which contains multiple enzymes that catalyze mRNA deadenylation. PUMs interact with the CNOT deadenylase subunits in vitro. We used three approaches to determine the importance of deadenylases for PUM repression. First, dominant-negative mutants of CNOT7 and CNOT8 reduced PUM repression. Second, RNA interference depletion of the deadenylases alleviated PUM repression. Third, the poly(A) tail was necessary for maximal PUM repression. These findings demonstrate a conserved mechanism of PUF-mediated repression via direct recruitment of the CCR4-POP2-NOT deadenylase leading to translational inhibition and mRNA degradation. A second, deadenylation independent mechanism was revealed by the finding that PUMs repress an mRNA that lacks a poly(A) tail. Thus, human PUMs are repressors capable of deadenylation-dependent and -independent modes of repression. PMID:22955276

  20. Human Pumilio proteins recruit multiple deadenylases to efficiently repress messenger RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Etten, Jamie; Schagat, Trista L; Hrit, Joel; Weidmann, Chase A; Brumbaugh, Justin; Coon, Joshua J; Goldstrohm, Aaron C

    2012-10-19

    PUF proteins are a conserved family of eukaryotic RNA-binding proteins that regulate specific mRNAs: they control many processes including stem cell proliferation, fertility, and memory formation. PUFs repress protein expression from their target mRNAs but the mechanism by which they do so remains unclear, especially for humans. Humans possess two PUF proteins, PUM1 and PUM2, which exhibit similar RNA binding specificities. Here we report new insights into their regulatory activities and mechanisms of action. We developed functional assays to measure sequence-specific repression by PUM1 and PUM2. Both robustly inhibit translation and promote mRNA degradation. Purified PUM complexes were found to contain subunits of the CCR4-NOT (CNOT) complex, which contains multiple enzymes that catalyze mRNA deadenylation. PUMs interact with the CNOT deadenylase subunits in vitro. We used three approaches to determine the importance of deadenylases for PUM repression. First, dominant-negative mutants of CNOT7 and CNOT8 reduced PUM repression. Second, RNA interference depletion of the deadenylases alleviated PUM repression. Third, the poly(A) tail was necessary for maximal PUM repression. These findings demonstrate a conserved mechanism of PUF-mediated repression via direct recruitment of the CCR4-POP2-NOT deadenylase leading to translational inhibition and mRNA degradation. A second, deadenylation independent mechanism was revealed by the finding that PUMs repress an mRNA that lacks a poly(A) tail. Thus, human PUMs are repressors capable of deadenylation-dependent and -independent modes of repression. PMID:22955276

  1. THE DYNAMICS OF REPRESSIVE HABITUS LAWS: ETHNOGRAPHIC CASE STUDY IN UNWIMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teddy Asmara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This research describes repressive legal habitus Unwima community by focusing on the issue of why they create a legal cognition such manner and how to empower them in the public domain when facing a lawsuit in court and examination process in higher education office. The results of the research with ethnographic methods and interpretative analysis, First, that repressive legal habitus is a part of the neo-feudalistic thinking in education management. Second, the empowerment of repressive legal habitus in the public domain potentially generate a legal behavior of impulsive that tends to a manipulative, coercive, veiled, and other immorality practices.

  2. Multiple mechanisms mediate glucose repression of the yeast GAL1 gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Lamphier, M S; Ptashne, M

    1992-01-01

    Several mechanisms contribute to the glucose repression of the GAL1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that one mechanism involves the transcriptional down-regulation of the GAL4 gene and a second requires the GAL80 gene. We also examine the contribution of cis-acting negative elements in the GAL1 promoter to glucose repression. In an otherwise wild-type strain disruption of any one of these three mechanisms alleviates repression of GAL1 only 2- to 4-fold. However, in the absence of th...

  3. Four chromo-domain proteins of Schizosaccharomyces pombe differentially repress transcription at various chromosomal locations.

    OpenAIRE

    Thon, G.; Verhein-Hansen, J.

    2000-01-01

    Transcription is repressed in regions of the fission yeast genome close to centromeres, telomeres, or the silent mating-type cassettes mat2-P and mat3-M. The repression involves the chromo-domain proteins Swi6 and Clr4. We report that two other chromo-domain proteins, Chp1 and Chp2, are also important for these position effects. Chp1 showed a specificity for centromeric regions. Its essentiality for the transcriptional repression of centromeric markers correlates with its importance for chrom...

  4. The Functions of MicroRNAs: mRNA Decay and Translational Repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakawa, Hiro-oki; Tomari, Yukihide

    2015-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous small noncoding RNAs, which regulate complementary mRNAs by inducing translational repression and mRNA decay. Although this dual repression system seems to operate in both animals and plants, genetic and biochemical studies suggest that the mechanism underlying the miRNA-mediated silencing is different in the two kingdoms. Here, we review the recent progress in our understanding of how miRNAs mediate translational repression and mRNA decay, and discuss the contributions of the two silencing modes to the overall silencing effect in both kingdoms. PMID:26437588

  5. Posttranscriptional repression of the cel gene of the ColE7 operon by the RNA-binding protein CsrA of Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Tsung-Yeh; Sung, Yun-Min; Lei, Guang-Sheng; Romeo, Tony; Chak, Kin-Fu

    2010-01-01

    Carbon storage regulator (CsrA) is a eubacterial RNA-binding protein that acts as a global regulator of many functionally diverse chromosomal genes. Here, we reveal that CsrA represses expression from an extrachromosomal element of Escherichia coli, the lysis gene (cel) of the ColE7 operon (cea-cei-cel). This operon and colicin expression are activated upon SOS response. Disruption of csrA caused ∼5-fold increase of the lysis protein. Gel mobility shift assays established that both the single...

  6. The HTLV-1 Tax oncoprotein represses Ku80 gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducu, Razvan I; Dayaram, Tajhal; Marriott, Susan J

    2011-07-20

    The HTLV-I oncoprotein Tax interferes with DNA double strand break repair. Since non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is a major pathway used to repair DNA double strand breaks we examined the effect of Tax on this pathway, with particular interest in the expression and function of Ku80, a critical component of the NHEJ pathway. Tax expression decreased Ku80 mRNA and protein levels, and repressed transcription from the Ku80 promoter. Conversely, Ku80 mRNA increased following siRNA knockdown of Tax in HTLV-I infected cells. Tax expression was associated with an elevated number of micronuclei and nucleoplasmic bridges, hallmarks of improper DNA double strand break repair. Our studies identified Tax as a transcriptional repressor of Ku80 that correlates with decreased DNA repair function. The reduction of Ku80 transcription by Tax may deplete the cell of an essential DNA break binding protein, resulting in reduced repair of DNA double strand breaks and accumulation genomic mutations. PMID:21571351

  7. Repression of the albumin gene in Novikoff hepatoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikoff hepatoma cells have lost their capacity to synthesize albumin. As a first approach to study the mechanisms underlying this event, in vitro translation in a reticulocyte system was performed using total polyadenylated mRNA from rat liver and Novikoff hepatoma cells. Immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translation products with albumin-specific antibody revealed a total lack of albumin synthesis in Novikoff hepatoma, suggesting the absence of functional albumin mRNA in these cells. Titration experiments using as probe albumin cDNA cloned in pBR322 plasmid demonstrated the absence of albumin-specific sequences in both polysomal and nuclear polyadenylated and total RNA from Novikoff cells. This albumin recombinant plasmid was obtained by screening a rat liver cDNA library with albumin [/sup 32/P]cDNA reverse transcribed from immuno-precipitated mRNA. The presence of an albumin-specific gene insert was documented with translation assays as well as by restriction mapping. Repression of the albumin gene at the transcriptional level was further demonstrated by RNA blotting experiments using the cloned albumin cDNA probe. Genomic DNA blots using the cloned albumin cDNA as probe did not reveal any large-scale deletions, insertions, or rearrangements in the albumin gene, suggesting that the processes involved in the suppression of albumin mRNA synthesis do not involve extensive genomic rearrangements

  8. LATS2 Positively Regulates Polycomb Repressive Complex 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torigata, Kosuke; Daisuke, Okuzaki; Mukai, Satomi; Hatanaka, Akira; Ohka, Fumiharu; Motooka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shota; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Yabuta, Norikazu; Kondo, Yutaka; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    LATS2, a pivotal Ser/Thr kinase of the Hippo pathway, plays important roles in many biological processes. LATS2 also function in Hippo-independent pathway, including mitosis, DNA damage response and epithelial to mesenchymal transition. However, the physiological relevance and molecular basis of these LATS2 functions remain obscure. To understand novel functions of LATS2, we constructed a LATS2 knockout HeLa-S3 cell line using TAL-effector nuclease (TALEN). Integrated omics profiling of this cell line revealed that LATS2 knockout caused genome-wide downregulation of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and H3K27me3. Cell-cycle analysis revealed that downregulation of PRC2 was not due to cell cycle aberrations caused by LATS2 knockout. Not LATS1, a homolog of LATS2, but LATS2 bound PRC2 on chromatin and phosphorylated it. LATS2 positively regulates histone methyltransferase activity of PRC2 and their expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Our findings reveal a novel signal upstream of PRC2, and provide insight into the crucial role of LATS2 in coordinating the epigenome through regulation of PRC2. PMID:27434182

  9. REST represses a subset of the pancreatic endocrine differentiation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, David; Kim, Yung-Hae; Sever, Dror; Mao, Chai-An; Haefliger, Jacques-Antoine; Grapin-Botton, Anne

    2015-09-15

    To contribute to devise successful beta-cell differentiation strategies for the cure of Type 1 diabetes we sought to uncover barriers that restrict endocrine fate acquisition by studying the role of the transcriptional repressor REST in the developing pancreas. Rest expression is prevented in neurons and in endocrine cells, which is necessary for their normal function. During development, REST represses a subset of genes in the neuronal differentiation program and Rest is down-regulated as neurons differentiate. Here, we investigate the role of REST in the differentiation of pancreatic endocrine cells, which are molecularly close to neurons. We show that Rest is widely expressed in pancreas progenitors and that it is down-regulated in differentiated endocrine cells. Sustained expression of REST in Pdx1(+) progenitors impairs the differentiation of endocrine-committed Neurog3(+) progenitors, decreases beta and alpha cell mass by E18.5, and triggers diabetes in adulthood. Conditional inactivation of Rest in Pdx1(+) progenitors is not sufficient to trigger endocrine differentiation but up-regulates a subset of differentiation genes. Our results show that the transcriptional repressor REST is active in pancreas progenitors where it gates the activation of part of the beta cell differentiation program. PMID:26156633

  10. Angiogenesis is repressed by ethanol exposure during chick embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guang; Zhong, Shan; Zhang, Shi-Yao; Ma, Zheng-Lai; Chen, Jian-Long; Lu, Wen-Hui; Cheng, Xin; Chuai, Manli; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; Lu, Da-Xiang; Yang, Xuesong

    2016-05-01

    It is now known that excess alcohol consumption during pregnancy can cause fetal alcohol syndrome to develop. However, it is not known whether excess ethanol exposure could directly affect angiogenesis in the embryo or angiogenesis being indirectly affected because of ethanol-induced fetal alcohol syndrome. Using the chick yolk sac membrane (YSM) model, we demonstrated that ethanol exposure dramatically inhibited angiogenesis in the YSM of 9-day-old chick embryos, in a dose-dependent manner. Likewise, the anti-angiogenesis effect of ethanol could be seen in the developing vessel plexus (at the same extra-embryonic regions) during earlier stages of embryo development. The anti-angiogenic effect of ethanol was found associated with excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) production; as glutathione peroxidase activity increased while superoxide dismutase 1 and 2 activities decreased in the YSMs. We further validated this observation by exposing chick embryos to 2,2'-azobis-amidinopropane dihydrochloride (a ROS inducer) and obtained a similar anti-angiogenesis effect as ethanol treatment. Semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of the experimental YSMs revealed that expression of angiogenesis-related genes, vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor, fibroblast growth factor 2 and hypoxia-inducible factor, were all repressed following ethanol and 2,2'-azobis-amidinopropane dihydrochloride treatment. In summary, our results suggest that excess ethanol exposure inhibits embryonic angiogenesis through promoting superfluous ROS production during embryo development. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26177723

  11. microRNAs- powerful repression comes from small RNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Cong; LIU YuFei; HE Lin

    2009-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) encode a novel class of small, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression post-trancriptionally, miRNAs comprise one of the major non-coding RNA families, whose diverse bio-logical functions and unusual capacity for gene regulation have attracted enormous interests in the RNA world. Over the past 16 years, genetic, biochemical and computational approaches have greatly shaped the growth of the field, leading to the identification of thousands of miRNA genes in nearly all metazoans. The key molecular machinery for miRNA biogenesis and silencing has been identified, yet the precise biochemical and regulatory mechanisms still remain elusive. However, recent findings have shed new light on how miRNAs are generated and how they function to repress gene expression.miRNAs provide a paradigm for endogenous small RNAs that mediate gene silencing at a genome-wide level. The gene silencing mediated by these small RNAs constitutes a major component of gene regu-lation during various developmental and physiological processes. The accumulating knowledge about their biogenesis and gene silencing mechanism will add a now dimension to our understanding about the complex gene regulatory networks.

  12. DELLA proteins interact with FLC to repress flowering transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongwei Guo

    2016-01-01

    Flowering is a highly orchestrated and extremely critical process in a plant’s life cycle. Previous study has demonstrated that SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 (SOC1) and FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) integrate the gibberellic acid (GA) signaling pathway and vernalization pathway in regulating flowering time, but detailed molecular mechanisms remain largely unclear. In GA signaling pathway, DELLA proteins are a group of master transcriptional regulators, while in vernalization pathway FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) is a core transcriptional repressor that down-regulates the expression of SOC1 and FT. Here, we report that DELLA proteins interact with FLC in vitro and in vivo, and the LHRI domains of DELLAs and the C-terminus of MADS domain of FLC are required for these interactions. Phenotypic and gene expression analysis showed that mutation of FLC reduces while over-expression of FLC enhances the GA response in the flowering process. Further, DELLA-FLC interactions promote the repression ability of FLC on its target genes. In summary, these findings report that the interaction between MADS box transcription factor FLC and GRAS domain regulator DELLAs may integrate various signaling inputs in flowering time control, and shed new light on the regulatory mechanism both for FLC and DELLAs in regulating gene expression.

  13. microRNAs-powerful repression comes from small RNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) encode a novel class of small, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression post-trancriptionally. miRNAs comprise one of the major non-coding RNA families, whose diverse bio- logical functions and unusual capacity for gene regulation have attracted enormous interests in the RNA world. Over the past 16 years, genetic, biochemical and computational approaches have greatly shaped the growth of the field, leading to the identification of thousands of miRNA genes in nearly all metazoans. The key molecular machinery for miRNA biogenesis and silencing has been identified, yet the precise biochemical and regulatory mechanisms still remain elusive. However, recent findings have shed new light on how miRNAs are generated and how they function to repress gene expression. miRNAs provide a paradigm for endogenous small RNAs that mediate gene silencing at a genome-wide level. The gene silencing mediated by these small RNAs constitutes a major component of gene regu- lation during various developmental and physiological processes. The accumulating knowledge about their biogenesis and gene silencing mechanism will add a new dimension to our understanding about the complex gene regulatory networks.

  14. Expression of alpha-amylase in Bacillus licheniformis.

    OpenAIRE

    Rothstein, D. M.; Devlin, P E; Cate, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    In Bacillus licheniformis, alpha-amylase production varied more than 100-fold depending on the presence or absence of a catabolite-repressing carbon source in the growth medium. alpha-Amylase was produced during the growth phase and not at the onset of the stationary phase. Induction of alpha-amylase correlated with synthesis of mRNA initiating at the promoter of the alpha-amylase gene.

  15. Aspergillus nidulans protein kinase A plays an important role in cellulase production

    OpenAIRE

    de Assis, Leandro José; Ries, Laure Nicolas Annick; Savoldi, Marcela; dos Reis, Thaila Fernanda; Brown, Neil Andrew; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Background The production of bioethanol from lignocellulosic feedstocks is dependent on lignocellulosic biomass degradation by hydrolytic enzymes. The main component of lignocellulose is cellulose and different types of organisms are able to secrete cellulases. The filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans serves as a model organism to study cellulase production and the available tools allow exploring more in depth the mechanisms governing cellulase production and carbon catabolite repression. ...

  16. Effect of Culture Conditions on the Production of Tyrosine Phenol-Lyase by Erwinia herbicola

    OpenAIRE

    Para, G. M.; Baratti, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of environmental parameters on the growth and the tyrosine phenol-lyase content of Erwinia herbicola was investigated. On mineral medium containing glycerol, l-tyrosine increased the enzyme content 23-fold. When the l-tyrosine was also the carbon source, bacterial growth was 300 times greater than the basal level. On a rich medium, tyrosine phenol-lyase production was strongly dependent on pH and aeration. Catabolite repression and induction both probably control enzyme content.

  17. The Differential Proteome of the Probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM Grown on the Potential Prebiotic Cellobiose Shows Upregulation of Two beta-Glycoside Hydrolases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Zanten, Gabriella Christina; Sparding, Nadja; Majumder, Avishek;

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics, prebiotics, and combinations there of, that is, synbiotics, are known to exert beneficial health effects in humans; however interactions between pro-and prebiotics remain poorly understood at the molecular level. The present study describes changes in abundance of different proteins o...... bacterium NCFM. Several of the upregulated or downregulated identified proteins associated with utilization of cellobiose indicate the presence of carbon catabolite repression and regulation of enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism....

  18. The contentious fans: the impact of repression, media coverage, grievances and aggressive play on supporters’ violence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Braun; R. Vliegenthart

    2008-01-01

    This article poses the question of which macro-sociological explanations best predict the level of soccer supporters’ violence. By conceptualizing supporters’ violence as a form of contentious violence, four possible explanations are proposed: repression, media attention, unemployment and aggressive

  19. Repressive coping style and autonomic reactions to two experimental stressors in healthy men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Michael Martini; Zachariae, Robert

    2006-04-01

    Autonomic and affective responses to two different stress tasks were measured in 45 males and 74 females, categorized as repressive, true low-anxious, true high-anxious, and defensive high-anxious. Electrodermal activity (EDA) was used as a measure of sympathetic activity and the high frequency (HF) spectral component of heart rate variability as a measure of parasympathetic activity. Contrary to our predictions, reactivity of repressors did not differ from the reactivity of true low-anxious participants. The results draw attention to previous inconsistent findings within the literature on repressive coping style and autonomic nervous system dysregulation. It is suggested that future research could benefit from the use of more consistent operationalizations of the repressive coping construct and from comparing alternative measures of repressive coping within the same study. PMID:16542356

  20. Teaching microbial physiology using glucose repression phenomenon in baker's yeast as an examplele

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vijayendran, Raghavendran; Nielsen, Jens; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2005-01-01

    switching off the genes responsible for respiration even under aerobic conditions. This phenomenon is referred to as the Crabtree effect. The present review focuses on glucose repression in S. cerevisiae from a physiological perspective. Physiological studies presented involve batch and chemostat...... experiments of the wild type and a mutant that lacks a trait partially responsible for the fermentative behavior. Various undergraduate student exercises have been (and can be) formulated to illustrate the concept of glucose repression....

  1. THE TUG OF CONFESSION AND REPRESSION IN MICHEL FOUCAULT'S THE HISTORY OF SEXUALITY

    OpenAIRE

    Preeti Puri

    2014-01-01

    Michel Foucault, the magician of ideas has illuminated many shady areas of Western intellectual history. Throughout his career he kept returning to Freud and carved to formulate a counterproject to psychoanalysis. The focal point of the present paper is to figure out whether the contemporary man is actually repressed or a manifestation of confession as vouched by Michel Foucault. To delve into the binary opposition of repression/ confession the issues focused in the present paper ...

  2. FOXP3 interactions with histone acetyltransferase and class II histone deacetylases are required for repression

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Bin; Samanta, Arabinda; Song, Xiaomin; Iacono, Kathryn T.; Bembas, Kathryn; Tao, Ran; Basu, Samik; Riley, James L.; Hancock, Wayne W.; Shen, Yuan; Saouaf, Sandra J.; Mark I. Greene

    2007-01-01

    The forkhead family protein FOXP3 acts as a repressor of transcription and is both an essential and sufficient regulator of the development and function of regulatory T cells. The molecular mechanism by which FOXP3-mediated transcriptional repression occurs remains unclear. Here, we report that transcriptional repression by FOXP3 involves a histone acetyltransferase–deacetylase complex that includes histone acetyltransferase TIP60 (Tat-interactive protein, 60 kDa) and class II histone deacety...

  3. Protein sequestration versus Hill-type repression in circadian clock models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Kyoung

    2016-08-01

    Circadian (∼24 h) clocks are self-sustained endogenous oscillators with which organisms keep track of daily and seasonal time. Circadian clocks frequently rely on interlocked transcriptional-translational feedback loops to generate rhythms that are robust against intrinsic and extrinsic perturbations. To investigate the dynamics and mechanisms of the intracellular feedback loops in circadian clocks, a number of mathematical models have been developed. The majority of the models use Hill functions to describe transcriptional repression in a way that is similar to the Goodwin model. Recently, a new class of models with protein sequestration-based repression has been introduced. Here, the author discusses how this new class of models differs dramatically from those based on Hill-type repression in several fundamental aspects: conditions for rhythm generation, robust network designs and the periods of coupled oscillators. Consistently, these fundamental properties of circadian clocks also differ among Neurospora, Drosophila, and mammals depending on their key transcriptional repression mechanisms (Hill-type repression or protein sequestration). Based on both theoretical and experimental studies, this review highlights the importance of careful modelling of transcriptional repression mechanisms in molecular circadian clocks. PMID:27444022

  4. Freud's 'thought-transference', repression, and the future of psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, D

    1983-01-01

    Psychoanalysts since Freud have largely neglected his important, paradigmatic ideas on the possibility of 'thought-transference' (telepathy) as an influence in mental life. A chance recording of two dreams which proved to coincide in some detail with distant reality events again suggests evidence in favour of the telepathy hypothesis. On interpretation, one of these dreams reveals even greater correspondence with the reality event and shows the mechanism of transformation of the repressed wish from latent dream content into manifest dream, utilizing a number of elements of the dream instigator, an apparently telepathically received day residue. Working with this material proceeded against very strong resistance, most evident in repeated forgetting of one or another bit of the clinical data. This has been the fate of ideas pertaining to the occult since Freud's first formulations, as is documented here by references to the early history of psychoanalysis. The issue now and for the future is whether psychoanalysis will continue to ignore the crucial question of validity in regard to the telepathy hypothesis. The psychoanalytic method is uniquely qualified to investigate so-called parapsychological phenomena and has the same obligation to do so as with other mental events. We need to examine the evidence in spite of the threat posed to our conventional understanding of the limits of the mind by the very act of acknowledging the question. If we can overcome our resistance to undertaking this task, we may find that, once again, Freud pointed the way towards discovery of a new paradigm in science. PMID:6853049

  5. Phosphotransferase system-mediated glucose uptake is repressed in phosphoglucoisomerase-deficient Corynebacterium glutamicum strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Steffen N; Petrov, Dimitar P; Hagmann, Christian T; Henrich, Alexander; Krämer, Reinhard; Eikmanns, Bernhard J; Wendisch, Volker F; Seibold, Gerd M

    2013-04-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is particularly known for its industrial application in the production of amino acids. Amino acid overproduction comes along with a high NADPH demand, which is covered mainly by the oxidative part of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). In previous studies, the complete redirection of the carbon flux toward the PPP by chromosomal inactivation of the pgi gene, encoding the phosphoglucoisomerase, has been applied for the improvement of C. glutamicum amino acid production strains, but this was accompanied by severe negative effects on the growth characteristics. To investigate these effects in a genetically defined background, we deleted the pgi gene in the type strain C. glutamicum ATCC 13032. The resulting strain, C. glutamicum Δpgi, lacked detectable phosphoglucoisomerase activity and grew poorly with glucose as the sole substrate. Apart from the already reported inhibition of the PPP by NADPH accumulation, we detected a drastic reduction of the phosphotransferase system (PTS)-mediated glucose uptake in C. glutamicum Δpgi. Furthermore, Northern blot analyses revealed that expression of ptsG, which encodes the glucose-specific EII permease of the PTS, was abolished in this mutant. Applying our findings, we optimized l-lysine production in the model strain C. glutamicum DM1729 by deletion of pgi and overexpression of plasmid-encoded ptsG. l-Lysine yields and productivity with C. glutamicum Δpgi(pBB1-ptsG) were significantly higher than those with C. glutamicum Δpgi(pBB1). These results show that ptsG overexpression is required to overcome the repressed activity of PTS-mediated glucose uptake in pgi-deficient C. glutamicum strains, thus enabling efficient as well as fast l-lysine production. PMID:23396334

  6. Activator control of nucleosome occupancy in activation and repression of transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gene O Bryant

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between chromatin structure and gene expression is a subject of intense study. The universal transcriptional activator Gal4 removes promoter nucleosomes as it triggers transcription, but how it does so has remained obscure. The reverse process, repression of transcription, has often been correlated with the presence of nucleosomes. But it is not known whether nucleosomes are required for that effect. A new quantitative assay describes, for any given location, the fraction of DNA molecules in the population that bears a nucleosome at any given instant. This allows us to follow the time courses of nucleosome removal and reformation, in wild-type and mutant cells, upon activation (by galactose and repression (by glucose of the GAL genes of yeast. We show that upon being freed of its inhibitor Gal80 by the action of galactose, Gal4 quickly recruits SWI/SNF to the genes, and that nucleosome "remodeler" rapidly removes promoter nucleosomes. In the absence of SWI/SNF, Gal4's action also results in nucleosome removal and the activation of transcription, but both processes are significantly delayed. Addition of glucose to cells growing in galactose represses transcription. But if galactose remains present, Gal4 continues to work, recruiting SWI/SNF and maintaining the promoter nucleosome-free despite it being repressed. This requirement for galactose is obviated in a mutant in which Gal4 works constitutively. These results show how an activator's recruiting function can control chromatin structure both during gene activation and repression. Thus, both under activating and repressing conditions, the activator can recruit an enzymatic machine that removes promoter nucleosomes. Our results show that whereas promoter nucleosome removal invariably accompanies activation, reformation of nucleosomes is not required for repression. The finding that there are two routes to nucleosome removal and activation of transcription-one that requires the

  7. Derangement of a factor upstream of RARalpha triggers the repression of a pleiotropic epigenetic network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Corlazzoli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chromatin adapts and responds to extrinsic and intrinsic cues. We hypothesize that inheritable aberrant chromatin states in cancer and aging are caused by genetic/environmental factors. In previous studies we demonstrated that either genetic mutations, or loss, of retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARalpha, can impair the integration of the retinoic acid (RA signal at the chromatin of RA-responsive genes downstream of RARalpha, and can lead to aberrant repressive chromatin states marked by epigenetic modifications. In this study we tested whether the mere interference with the availability of RA signal at RARalpha, in cells with an otherwise functional RARalpha, can also induce epigenetic repression at RA-responsive genes downstream of RARalpha. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To hamper the availability of RA at RARalpha in untransformed human mammary epithelial cells, we targeted the cellular RA-binding protein 2 (CRABP2, which transports RA from the cytoplasm onto the nuclear RARs. Stable ectopic expression of a CRABP2 mutant unable to enter the nucleus, as well as stable knock down of endogenous CRABP2, led to the coordinated transcriptional repression of a few RA-responsive genes downstream of RARalpha. The chromatin at these genes acquired an exacerbated repressed state, or state "of no return". This aberrant state is unresponsive to RA, and therefore differs from the physiologically repressed, yet "poised" state, which is responsive to RA. Consistent with development of homozygosis for epigenetically repressed loci, a significant proportion of cells with a defective CRABP2-mediated RA transport developed heritable phenotypes indicative of loss of function. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Derangement/lack of a critical factor necessary for RARalpha function induces epigenetic repression of a RA-regulated gene network downstream of RARalpha, with major pleiotropic biological outcomes.

  8. Mechanisms of transcriptional repression by EWS-FLl1 in Ewing Sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The EWS-FLI1 chimeric oncoprotein characterizing Ewing Sarcoma (ES) is a prototypic aberrant ETS transcription factor with activating and repressive gene regulatory functions. Mechanisms of transcriptional regulation, especially transcriptional repression by EWS-FLI1, are poorly understood. We report that EWS-FLI1 repressed promoters are enriched in forkhead box recognition motifs, and identify FOXO1 as a EWS-FLI1 suppressed master regulator responsible for a significant subset of EWS-FLI1 repressed genes. In addition to transcriptional FOXO1 regulation by direct promoter binding of EWS-FLI1, its subcellular localization and activity is regulated by CDK2 and AKT mediated phosphorylation downstream of EWS-FLI1. Functional restoration of nuclear FOXO1 expression in ES cells impaired proliferation and significantly reduced clonogenicity. Gene-expression profiling revealed a significant overlap between EWS-FLI1 repressed and FOXO1-activated genes. Treatment of ES cell lines with Methylseleninic acid (MSA) evoked reactivation of endogenous FOXO1 in the presence of EWS-FLI1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner and induced massive cell death which was found to be partially FOXO1-dependent. In an orthotopic xenograft mouse model, MSA increased FOXO1 expression in the tumor paralleled by a significant decrease in ES tumor growth. Together, these data suggest that a repressive sub-signature of EWS-FLI1 repressed genes precipitates suppression of FOXO1. FOXO1 re-activation by small molecules may therefore constitute a novel therapeutic strategy in the treatment of ES. (author)

  9. Repression is relieved before attenuation in the trp operon of Escherichia coli as tryptophan starvation becomes increasingly severe.

    OpenAIRE

    Yanofsky, C; Kelley, R.L.; Horn, V.

    1984-01-01

    Expression of the tryptophan operon of Escherichia coli is regulated over about a 500- to 600-fold range by the combined action of repression and attenuation. Repression regulates transcription initiation in response to variation in the intracellular concentration of tryptophan. Attenuation regulates transcription termination at a site in the leader region of the operon in response to changes in the extent of charging of tRNATrp. We measured repression independently of attenuation to ascertai...

  10. Drosophila Pumilio Protein Contains Multiple Autonomous Repression Domains That Regulate mRNAs Independently of Nanos and Brain Tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Weidmann, Chase A.; Goldstrohm, Aaron C.

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster Pumilio is an RNA-binding protein that potently represses specific mRNAs. In developing embryos, Pumilio regulates a key morphogen, Hunchback, in collaboration with the cofactor Nanos. To investigate repression by Pumilio and Nanos, we created cell-based assays and found that Pumilio inhibits translation and enhances mRNA decay independent of Nanos. Nanos robustly stimulates repression through interactions with the Pumilio RNA-binding domain. We programmed Pumilio to r...

  11. ASXL1 Represses Retinoic Acid Receptor-mediated Transcription through Associating with HP1 and LSD1*

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sang-Wang; Cho, Yang-Sook; Na, Jung-Min; Park, Ui-Hyun; Kang, Myengmo; Kim, Eun-Joo; Um, Soo-Jong

    2009-01-01

    We previously suggested that ASXL1 (additional sex comb-like 1) functions as either a coactivator or corepressor for the retinoid receptors retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor in a cell type-specific manner. Here, we provide clues toward the mechanism underlying ASXL1-mediated repression. Transfection assays in HEK293 or H1299 cells indicated that ASXL1 alone possessing autonomous transcriptional repression activity significantly represses RAR- or retinoid X receptor-dependen...

  12. Wnt-mediated repression via bipartite DNA recognition by TCF in the Drosophila hematopoietic system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen U Zhang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays many important roles in animal development, tissue homeostasis and human disease. Transcription factors of the TCF family mediate many Wnt transcriptional responses, promoting signal-dependent activation or repression of target gene expression. The mechanism of this specificity is poorly understood. Previously, we demonstrated that for activated targets in Drosophila, TCF/Pangolin (the fly TCF recognizes regulatory DNA through two DNA binding domains, with the High Mobility Group (HMG domain binding HMG sites and the adjacent C-clamp domain binding Helper sites. Here, we report that TCF/Pangolin utilizes a similar bipartite mechanism to recognize and regulate several Wnt-repressed targets, but through HMG and Helper sites whose sequences are distinct from those found in activated targets. The type of HMG and Helper sites is sufficient to direct activation or repression of Wnt regulated cis-regulatory modules, and protease digestion studies suggest that TCF/Pangolin adopts distinct conformations when bound to either HMG-Helper site pair. This repressive mechanism occurs in the fly lymph gland, the larval hematopoietic organ, where Wnt/β-catenin signaling controls prohemocytic differentiation. Our study provides a paradigm for direct repression of target gene expression by Wnt/β-catenin signaling and allosteric regulation of a transcription factor by DNA.

  13. Repression by RB1 characterizes genes involved in the penultimate stage of erythroid development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji; Loyd, Melanie R; Randall, Mindy S; Morris, John J; Shah, Jayesh G; Ney, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Retinoblastoma-1 (RB1), and the RB1-related proteins p107 and p130, are key regulators of the cell cycle. Although RB1 is required for normal erythroid development in vitro, it is largely dispensable for erythropoiesis in vivo. The modest phenotype caused by RB1 deficiency in mice raises questions about redundancy within the RB1 family, and the role of RB1 in erythroid differentiation. Here we show that RB1 is the major pocket protein that regulates terminal erythroid differentiation. Erythroid cells lacking all pocket proteins exhibit the same cell cycle defects as those deficient for RB1 alone. RB1 has broad repressive effects on gene transcription in erythroid cells. As a group, RB1-repressed genes are generally well expressed but downregulated at the final stage of erythroid development. Repression correlates with E2F binding, implicating E2Fs in the recruitment of RB1 to repressed genes. Merging differential and time-dependent changes in expression, we define a group of approximately 800 RB1-repressed genes. Bioinformatics analysis shows that this list is enriched for terms related to the cell cycle, but also for terms related to terminal differentiation. Some of these have not been previously linked to RB1. These results expand the range of processes potentially regulated by RB1, and suggest that a principal role of RB1 in development is coordinating the events required for terminal differentiation. PMID:26397180

  14. Silencing MIG1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Effects of antisense MIG1 expression and MIG1 gene disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Lisbeth; Larsen, M.E.; Rønnow, B.; Mikkelsen, J.D.; Nielsen, Jens Bredal

    1997-01-01

    repression, However, silencing of MIG1 expression was not achieved by expressing antisense MIG1, even though antisense MIG1 RNA was sufficiently stable to be detected. In the wild-type and Delta mig1 strains, the specific growth rate was 0.32 to 0.33 h(-1), whereas it was lower in the antisense strains, 0......Silencing of MIG1, a transcription factor imposing carbon catabolite repression on invertase was attempted, either by disrupting the gene or by expressing antisense copies of the gene. The performance of the recombinant strains in bioreactor batch cultivations on sucrose, in the presence of glucose...

  15. Hairy Transcriptional Repression Targets and Cofactor Recruitment in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianchi-Frias Daniella

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of the widely conserved Hairy/Enhancer of split family of basic Helix-Loop-Helix repressors are essential for proper Drosophila and vertebrate development and are misregulated in many cancers. While a major step forward in understanding the molecular mechanism(s surrounding Hairy-mediated repression was made with the identification of Groucho, Drosophila C-terminal binding protein (dCtBP, and Drosophila silent information regulator 2 (dSir2 as Hairy transcriptional cofactors, the identity of Hairy target genes and the rules governing cofactor recruitment are relatively unknown. We have used the chromatin profiling method DamID to perform a global and systematic search for direct transcriptional targets for Drosophila Hairy and the genomic recruitment sites for three of its cofactors: Groucho, dCtBP, and dSir2. Each of the proteins was tethered to Escherichia coli DNA adenine methyltransferase, permitting methylation proximal to in vivo binding sites in both Drosophila Kc cells and early embryos. This approach identified 40 novel genomic targets for Hairy in Kc cells, as well as 155 loci recruiting Groucho, 107 loci recruiting dSir2, and wide genomic binding of dCtBP to 496 loci. We also adapted DamID profiling such that we could use tightly gated collections of embryos (2-6 h and found 20 Hairy targets related to early embryogenesis. As expected of direct targets, all of the putative Hairy target genes tested show Hairy-dependent expression and have conserved consensus C-box-containing sequences that are directly bound by Hairy in vitro. The distribution of Hairy targets in both the Kc cell and embryo DamID experiments corresponds to Hairy binding sites in vivo on polytene chromosomes. Similarly, the distributions of loci recruiting each of Hairy's cofactors are detected as cofactor binding sites in vivo on polytene chromosomes. We have identified 59 putative transcriptional targets of Hairy. In addition to finding putative targets for

  16. Repression of arterial genes in hemogenic endothelium is sufficient for haematopoietic fate acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizama, Carlos O; Hawkins, John S; Schmitt, Christopher E; Bos, Frank L; Zape, Joan P; Cautivo, Kelly M; Borges Pinto, Hugo; Rhyner, Alexander M; Yu, Hui; Donohoe, Mary E; Wythe, Joshua D; Zovein, Ann C

    2015-01-01

    Changes in cell fate and identity are essential for endothelial-to-haematopoietic transition (EHT), an embryonic process that generates the first adult populations of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from hemogenic endothelial cells. Dissecting EHT regulation is a critical step towards the production of in vitro derived HSCs. Yet, we do not know how distinct endothelial and haematopoietic fates are parsed during the transition. Here we show that genes required for arterial identity function later to repress haematopoietic fate. Tissue-specific, temporally controlled, genetic loss of arterial genes (Sox17 and Notch1) during EHT results in increased production of haematopoietic cells due to loss of Sox17-mediated repression of haematopoietic transcription factors (Runx1 and Gata2). However, the increase in EHT can be abrogated by increased Notch signalling. These findings demonstrate that the endothelial haematopoietic fate switch is actively repressed in a population of endothelial cells, and that derepression of these programs augments haematopoietic output. PMID:26204127

  17. Pluripotency factor binding and Tsix expression act synergistically to repress Xist in undifferentiated embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesterova Tatyana B

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression of Xist, the master regulator of X chromosome inactivation, is extinguished in pluripotent cells, a process that has been linked to programmed X chromosome reactivation. The key pluripotency transcription factors Nanog, Oct4 and Sox2 are implicated in Xist gene extinction, at least in part through binding to an element located in Xist intron 1. Other pathways, notably repression by the antisense RNA Tsix, may also be involved. Results Here we employ a transgene strategy to test the role of the intron 1 element and Tsix in repressing Xist in ES cells. We find that deletion of the intron 1 element causes a small increase in Xist expression and that simultaneous deletion of the antisense regulator Tsix enhances this effect. Conclusion We conclude that Tsix and pluripotency factors act synergistically to repress Xist in undifferentiated embryonic stem cells. Double mutants do not exhibit maximal levels of Xist expression, indicating that other pathways also play a role.

  18. The effects of social context and defensiveness on the physiological responses of repressive copers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, S D; Kircher, J C; Croyle, R T

    1997-11-01

    In previous research (T.L. Newton & R.J. Contrada, 1992), social context was found to moderate exaggerated physiological reactivity among individuals identified as using a repressive coping style. In this experiment, 119 undergraduates were classified into low-anxious, high-anxious, repressor, and defensive high-anxious coping categories. All participants completed a stressful speech task under either a public or private social context condition. The experimental social context was related to physiological reactivity and self-reported affect but did not moderate reactivity among repressive copers. Additionally, reactivity among repressive copers was not attributable to high defensiveness alone. Consistent with a theory of emotional inhibition, nonspecific skin conductance responses, but not heart rate, discriminated between repressors and nonrepressors. PMID:9417480

  19. LIN-39/Hox triggers cell division and represses EFF-1/fusogen-dependent vulval cell fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Shemer, Gidi; Podbilewicz, Benjamin

    2002-01-01

    General mechanisms by which Hox genes establish cell fates are known. However, a few Hox effectors mediating cell behaviors have been identified. Here we found the first effector of LIN-39/HoxD4/Dfd in Caenorhabditis elegans. In specific vulval precursor cells (VPCs), LIN-39 represses early and late expression of EFF-1, a membrane protein essential for cell fusion. Repression of eff-1 is also achieved by the activity of CEH-20/Exd/Pbx, a known cofactor of Hox proteins. Unfused VPCs in lin-39(...

  20. Repressive BMP2 gene regulatory elements near the BMP2 promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Shan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Medicine and Dentistry (UMDNJ), New Jersey Medical School (NJMS), Newark, NJ (United States); Chandler, Ronald L. [Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Center for Human Genetics Research, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Fritz, David T. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Medicine and Dentistry (UMDNJ), New Jersey Medical School (NJMS), Newark, NJ (United States); Mortlock, Douglas P. [Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Center for Human Genetics Research, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Rogers, Melissa B., E-mail: rogersmb@umdnj.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Medicine and Dentistry (UMDNJ), New Jersey Medical School (NJMS), Newark, NJ (United States)

    2010-02-05

    The level of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) profoundly influences essential cell behaviors such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and migration. The spatial and temporal pattern of BMP2 synthesis, particular in diverse embryonic cells, is highly varied and dynamic. We have identified GC-rich sequences within the BMP2 promoter region that strongly repress gene expression. These elements block the activity of a highly conserved, osteoblast enhancer in response to FGF2 treatment. Both positive and negative gene regulatory elements control BMP2 synthesis. Detecting and mapping the repressive motifs is essential because they impede the identification of developmentally regulated enhancers necessary for normal BMP2 patterns and concentration.

  1. Repressive BMP2 gene regulatory elements near the BMP2 promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The level of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) profoundly influences essential cell behaviors such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and migration. The spatial and temporal pattern of BMP2 synthesis, particular in diverse embryonic cells, is highly varied and dynamic. We have identified GC-rich sequences within the BMP2 promoter region that strongly repress gene expression. These elements block the activity of a highly conserved, osteoblast enhancer in response to FGF2 treatment. Both positive and negative gene regulatory elements control BMP2 synthesis. Detecting and mapping the repressive motifs is essential because they impede the identification of developmentally regulated enhancers necessary for normal BMP2 patterns and concentration.

  2. Menin Directly Represses Expression of Gli1 Independent of the Canonical Hedgehog Signaling Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Gurung, Buddha; Feng, Zijie; Hua, Xianxin

    2013-01-01

    Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type I (MEN1), a familial tumor syndrome results from mutations in the MEN1 gene, which encodes a tumor suppressor, menin. It has been previously shown that menin plays an important role in both repressing and activating gene expression. However, it is not well understood how menin represses expression of multiple genes. Here we show that upon Men1 excision, Gli1 and its target genes including PTCH1 and C-MYC are elevated in the absence of an apparent Hedgehog (Hh...

  3. Dominant negative autoregulation limits steady-state repression levels in gene networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semsey, Szabolcs; Krishna, Sandeep; Erdossy, János; Horváth, Péter; Orosz, László; Sneppen, Kim; Adhya, Sankar

    2009-07-01

    Many transcription factors repress transcription of their own genes. Negative autoregulation has been shown to reduce cell-cell variation in regulatory protein levels and speed up the response time in gene networks. In this work we examined transcription regulation of the galS gene and the function of its product, the GalS protein. We observed a unique operator preference of the GalS protein characterized by dominant negative autoregulation. We show that this pattern of regulation limits the repression level of the target genes in steady states. We suggest that transcription factors with dominant negative autoregulation are designed for regulating gene expression during environmental transitions. PMID:19429616

  4. Regulation of the cellulolytic system in Trichoderma reesei by sophorose: induction of cellulase and repression of beta-glucosidase.

    OpenAIRE

    Sternberg, D; Mandels, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    Sophorose has two regulatory roles in the production of cellulase enzymes in Trichoderma reesei: beta-glucosidase repression and cellulase induction. Sophorose also is hydrolyzed by the mycelial-associated beta-glucosidase. Repression of beta-glucosidase reduces sophorose hydrolysis and thus may increase cellulase induction.

  5. The Pichia pastoris transmembrane protein GT1 is a glycerol transporter and relieves the repression of glycerol on AOX1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Chunjun; Wang, Songwei; Sun, Yang; Dai, Xiaofeng; Liu, Xiuxia; Harvey, Linda; McNeil, Brian; Yang, Yankun; Bai, Zhonghu

    2016-06-01

    Promoter of alcohol oxidase I (PAOX1) is the most efficient promoter involved in the regulation of recombinant protein expression in Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris). PAOX1 is tightly repressed by the presence of glycerol in the culture medium; thus, glycerol must be exhausted before methanol can be taken up by P. pastoris and the expression of the heterologous protein can be induced. In this study, a candidate glycerol transporter (GT1, GeneID: 8197545) was identified, and its role was confirmed by further studies (e.g. bioinformatics analysis, heterologous complementation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe (S. pombe)). When GT1 is co-expressed with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), it localizes to the membrane and S. pombe carrying gt1 but not the wild-type strain can grow on medium containing glycerol as the sole carbon source. The present study is the first to report that AOX1 in the X-33Δgt1 mutant can achieve constitutive expression in medium containing glycerol; thus, knocking down gt1 can eliminate the glycerol repression of PAOX1 in P. pastoris These results suggest that the glycerol transporter may participate in the process of PAOX1 inhibition in glycerol medium. PMID:27189360

  6. Repression of p15INK4b expression by Myc through association with Miz-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staller, P; Peukert, K; Kiermaier, A;

    2001-01-01

    Deregulated expression of c-myc can induce cell proliferation in established cell lines and in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), through a combination of both transcriptional activation and repression by Myc. Here we show that a Myc-associated transcription factor, Miz-1, arrests cells ...... p15INK4b messenger RNA in primary cells and are, as a consequence, deficient in immortalization....

  7. Tumor FOXP3 represses the expression of long noncoding RNA 7SL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanhui; Cheng, Jingli; Ren, Huizhu; Zhao, Hui; Gong, Wei; Shan, Chunyan

    2016-04-01

    The long noncoding RNA 7SL was over-expressed in tumor cells to promote cell growth through repressing translation of P53. However, the regulatory mechanism of 7SL remains to be defined. FOXP3 was identified as a suppressor in several tumors in addition to be a marker of regulatory T cells. In this study, we detected that over-expression of FOXP3 repressed the transcription of 7SL RNA and contributed to inhibiting tumor growth. Knock down of FOXP3 in MCF-10A normal mammary breast cells up-regulated the transcription of 7SL RNA. Chromatin Immuno-precipitation (ChIP) analysis showed that FOXP3 directly bound to the Forkhead/HNF-3 domain DNA binding sites (-789 to -795) relative to the transcription start site. Meanwhile, Luciferase analysis showed that FOXP3 repressed the full-length 7SL promoter activity, but this suppressive effect was reversed after mutation of the FOXP3 binding site. Further studies showed that FOXP3 promoted the expression of P53 at translational levels through repressing 7SL RNA. In conclusion, this study suggests that 7SL RNA is a direct target of FOXP3 and may be involved in the formation of FOXP3/P53 feedback loop. PMID:26718402

  8. Repression of allo-cell transplant rejection through CIITA ribonuclease P+ hepatocyte

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Rong; Zou, Ping; Fan, Hua-Hua; Gao, Feng; Shang, Qing-Xin; Cao, Yi-Lin; Lu, Hua-Zhong

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Allo-cell transplant rejection and autoimmune responses were associated with the presence of class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC II) molecules on cells. This paper studied the effect of Ribonuclease P (RNase P) against CIITA, which was a major regulator of MHCII molecules, on repressing the expression of MHCII molecules on hepatocyte.

  9. The natural product peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth by inducing autophagic cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyu, Qing [School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Key Lab in Healthy Science and Technology, Division of Life Science, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen, 518055 (China); Tou, Fangfang [Jiangxi Provincial Key Lab of Oncology Translation Medicine, Jiangxi Cancer Hospital, Nanchang, 330029 (China); Su, Hong; Wu, Xiaoyong [First Affiliated Hospital, Guiyang College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Guiyang, 550002 (China); Chen, Xinyi [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, 100029 (China); Zheng, Zhi, E-mail: zheng_sheva@hotmail.com [Jiangxi Provincial Key Lab of Oncology Translation Medicine, Jiangxi Cancer Hospital, Nanchang, 330029 (China)

    2015-06-19

    Autophagy is evolutionarily conservative in eukaryotic cells that engulf cellular long-lived proteins and organelles, and it degrades the contents through fusion with lysosomes, via which the cell acquires recycled building blocks for the synthesis of new molecules. In this study, we revealed that peiminine induces cell death and enhances autophagic flux in colorectal carcinoma HCT-116 cells. We determined that peiminine enhances the autophagic flux by repressing the phosphorylation of mTOR through inhibiting upstream signals. Knocking down ATG5 greatly reduced the peiminine-induced cell death in wild-type HCT-116 cells, while treating Bax/Bak-deficient cells with peiminine resulted in significant cell death. In summary, our discoveries demonstrated that peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma cell proliferation and cell growth by inducing autophagic cell death. - Highlights: • Peiminine induces autophagy and upregulates autophagic flux. • Peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth. • Peiminine induces autophagic cell death. • Peiminine represses mTOR phosphorylation by influencing PI3K/Akt and AMPK pathway.

  10. A bifunctional O-GlcNAc transferase governs flagellar motility through anti-repression

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Aimee; Kamp, Heather D.; Gründling, Angelika; Darren E Higgins

    2006-01-01

    Flagellar motility is an essential mechanism by which bacteria adapt to and survive in diverse environments. Although flagella confer an advantage to many bacterial pathogens for colonization during infection, bacterial flagellins also stimulate host innate immune responses. Consequently, many bacterial pathogens down-regulate flagella production following initial infection. Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative intracellular pathogen that represses transcription of flagellar motility genes...

  11. The natural product peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth by inducing autophagic cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autophagy is evolutionarily conservative in eukaryotic cells that engulf cellular long-lived proteins and organelles, and it degrades the contents through fusion with lysosomes, via which the cell acquires recycled building blocks for the synthesis of new molecules. In this study, we revealed that peiminine induces cell death and enhances autophagic flux in colorectal carcinoma HCT-116 cells. We determined that peiminine enhances the autophagic flux by repressing the phosphorylation of mTOR through inhibiting upstream signals. Knocking down ATG5 greatly reduced the peiminine-induced cell death in wild-type HCT-116 cells, while treating Bax/Bak-deficient cells with peiminine resulted in significant cell death. In summary, our discoveries demonstrated that peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma cell proliferation and cell growth by inducing autophagic cell death. - Highlights: • Peiminine induces autophagy and upregulates autophagic flux. • Peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth. • Peiminine induces autophagic cell death. • Peiminine represses mTOR phosphorylation by influencing PI3K/Akt and AMPK pathway

  12. Reduced expression of ribosomal proteins relieves microRNA-mediated repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janas, Maja M; Wang, Eric; Love, Tara; Harris, Abigail S; Stevenson, Kristen; Semmelmann, Karlheinz; Shaffer, Jonathan M; Chen, Po-Hao; Doench, John G; Yerramilli, Subrahmanyam V B K; Neuberg, Donna S; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Housman, David E; Burge, Christopher B; Novina, Carl D

    2012-04-27

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate physiological and pathological processes by inducing posttranscriptional repression of target messenger RNAs (mRNAs) via incompletely understood mechanisms. To discover factors required for human miRNA activity, we performed an RNAi screen using a reporter cell line of miRNA-mediated repression of translation initiation. We report that reduced expression of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) dissociated miRNA complexes from target mRNAs, leading to increased polysome association, translation, and stability of miRNA-targeted mRNAs relative to untargeted mRNAs. RNA sequencing of polysomes indicated substantial overlap in sets of genes exhibiting increased or decreased polysomal association after Argonaute or RPG knockdowns, suggesting similarity in affected pathways. miRNA profiling of monosomes and polysomes demonstrated that miRNAs cosediment with ribosomes. RPG knockdowns decreased miRNAs in monosomes and increased their target mRNAs in polysomes. Our data show that most miRNAs repress translation and that the levels of RPGs modulate miRNA-mediated repression of translation initiation. PMID:22541556

  13. Epigenetic repression of male gametophyte-specific genes in the Arabidopsis sporophyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Robert D; Palmgren, Michael Broberg

    2013-01-01

    -regulated in the sporophyte has yet to be established. In this study, we have performed a bioinformatics analysis of publicly available genome-wide epigenetics data of several sporophytic tissues. By combining this analysis with DNase I footprinting data, we assessed means by which the repression of pollen-specific genes...

  14. RUNX1 represses the erythroid gene expression program during megakaryocytic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuvardina, Olga N; Herglotz, Julia; Kolodziej, Stephan; Kohrs, Nicole; Herkt, Stefanie; Wojcik, Bartosch; Oellerich, Thomas; Corso, Jasmin; Behrens, Kira; Kumar, Ashok; Hussong, Helge; Urlaub, Henning; Koch, Joachim; Serve, Hubert; Bonig, Halvard; Stocking, Carol; Rieger, Michael A; Lausen, Jörn

    2015-06-01

    The activity of antagonizing transcription factors represents a mechanistic paradigm of bidirectional lineage-fate control during hematopoiesis. At the megakaryocytic/erythroid bifurcation, the cross-antagonism of krueppel-like factor 1 (KLF1) and friend leukemia integration 1 (FLI1) has such a decisive role. However, how this antagonism is resolved during lineage specification is poorly understood. We found that runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1) inhibits erythroid differentiation of murine megakaryocytic/erythroid progenitors and primary human CD34(+) progenitor cells. We show that RUNX1 represses the erythroid gene expression program during megakaryocytic differentiation by epigenetic repression of the erythroid master regulator KLF1. RUNX1 binding to the KLF1 locus is increased during megakaryocytic differentiation and counterbalances the activating role of T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia 1 (TAL1). We found that corepressor recruitment by RUNX1 contributes to a block of the KLF1-dependent erythroid gene expression program. Our data indicate that the repressive function of RUNX1 influences the balance between erythroid and megakaryocytic differentiation by shifting the balance between KLF1 and FLI1 in the direction of FLI1. Taken together, we show that RUNX1 is a key player within a network of transcription factors that represses the erythroid gene expression program. PMID:25911237

  15. Conservation of uORF repressiveness and sequence features in mouse, human and zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Guo-Liang; Pauli, Andrea; Schier, Alexander F

    2016-01-01

    Upstream open reading frames (uORFs) are ubiquitous repressive genetic elements in vertebrate mRNAs. While much is known about the regulation of individual genes by their uORFs, the range of uORF-mediated translational repression in vertebrate genomes is largely unexplored. Moreover, it is unclear whether the repressive effects of uORFs are conserved across species. To address these questions, we analyse transcript sequences and ribosome profiling data from human, mouse and zebrafish. We find that uORFs are depleted near coding sequences (CDSes) and have initiation contexts that diminish their translation. Linear modelling reveals that sequence features at both uORFs and CDSes modulate the translation of CDSes. Moreover, the ratio of translation over 5' leaders and CDSes is conserved between human and mouse, and correlates with the number of uORFs. These observations suggest that the prevalence of vertebrate uORFs may be explained by their conserved role in repressing CDS translation. PMID:27216465

  16. REST mediates androgen receptor actions on gene repression and predicts early recurrence of prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Charlotte; Ceder, Jens; Iglesias Gato, Diego;

    2014-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a key regulator of prostate tumorgenesis through actions that are not fully understood. We identified the repressor element (RE)-1 silencing transcription factor (REST) as a mediator of AR actions on gene repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that AR binds...

  17. Polycomb complex 2 is required for E-cadherin repression by the Snail1 transcription factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herranz, Nicolás; Pasini, Diego; Díaz, Víctor M; Francí, Clara; Gutierrez, Arantxa; Dave, Natàlia; Escrivà, Maria; Hernandez-Muñoz, Inma; Di Croce, Luciano; Helin, Kristian; García de Herreros, Antonio; Peiró, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    -regulate CDH1 and partially de-represses CDH1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that Snail1 increases the binding of Suz12 to CDH1 promoter and the tri-methylation of lysine 27 in the histone 3. Moreover, Snail1 interacts with Suz12 and Ezh2 as shown by coimmunoprecipitation experiments. In...

  18. Gene Silencing Triggers Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 Recruitment to CpG Islands Genome Wide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riising, Eva Madi; Vacher-Comet, Itys; Leblanc, Benjamin Olivier;

    2014-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are required for normal differentiation and development and are frequently deregulated in cancer. PcG proteins are involved in gene silencing; however, their role in initiation and maintenance of transcriptional repression is not well defined. Here, we show that knoc...... by default to nontranscribed CGI genes to maintain their silenced state and to protect cell identity....

  19. Using phenotype microarrays to determine culture conditions that induce or repress toxin production by Clostridium difficile and other microorganisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-He Lei

    Full Text Available Toxin production is a central issue in the pathogenesis of Clostridium difficile and many other pathogenic microorganisms. Toxin synthesis is influenced by a variety of known and unknown factors of genetics, physiology, and environment. To facilitate the study of toxin production by C. difficile, we have developed a new, reliable, quantitative, and robust cell-based cytotoxicity assay. Then we combined this new assay with Phenotype MicroArrays (PM technology which provides high throughput testing of culture conditions. This allowed us to quantitatively measure toxin production by C. difficile type strain ATCC 9689 under 768 culture conditions. The culture conditions include different carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur sources. Among these, 89 conditions produced strong toxin induction and 31 produced strong toxin repression. Strong toxin inducers included adenine, guanosine, arginine dipeptides, γ-D-Glu-Gly, methylamine, and others. Some leucine dipeptides and the triple-leucine tripeptide were among the strongest toxin repressors. While some results are consistent with previous observations, others are new observations that provide insights into toxin regulation and pathogenesis of C. difficile. Additionally, we have demonstrated that this combined assay technology can be applied broadly to a wide range of toxin producing microorganisms. This study is the first demonstration of simultaneous assessment of a large number of culture conditions influencing bacterial toxin production. The new functional cytotoxin quantitation method developed provides a valuable tool for studying toxigenic microorganisms and may also find applications in clinical and epidemiological research.

  20. Targeted repression of AXIN2 and MYC gene expression using designer TALEs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We designed TALE–SID fusion proteins to target AXIN2 and MYC. • TALE–SIDs bound the chromosomal AXIN2 and MYC genes and repressed their expression. • TALE–SIDs repress β-cateninS45F-dependent AXIN2 and MYC transcription. - Abstract: Designer TALEs (dTALEs) are chimeric transcription factors that can be engineered to regulate gene expression in mammalian cells. Whether dTALEs can block gene transcription downstream of signal transduction cascades, however, has yet to be fully explored. Here we tested whether dTALEs can be used to target genes whose expression is controlled by Wnt/β-catenin signaling. TALE DNA binding domains were engineered to recognize sequences adjacent to Wnt responsive enhancer elements (WREs) that control expression of axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2) and c-MYC (MYC). These custom DNA binding domains were linked to the mSin3A interaction domain (SID) to generate TALE–SID chimeric repressors. The TALE–SIDs repressed luciferase reporter activity, bound their genomic target sites, and repressed AXIN2 and MYC expression in HEK293 cells. We generated a novel HEK293 cell line to determine whether the TALE–SIDs could function downstream of oncogenic Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Treating these cells with doxycycline and tamoxifen stimulates nuclear accumulation of a stabilized form of β-catenin found in a subset of colorectal cancers. The TALE–SIDs repressed AXIN2 and MYC expression in these cells, which suggests that dTALEs could offer an effective therapeutic strategy for the treatment of colorectal cancer

  1. Targeted repression of AXIN2 and MYC gene expression using designer TALEs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rennoll, Sherri A.; Scott, Samantha A.; Yochum, Gregory S., E-mail: gsy3@psu.edu

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • We designed TALE–SID fusion proteins to target AXIN2 and MYC. • TALE–SIDs bound the chromosomal AXIN2 and MYC genes and repressed their expression. • TALE–SIDs repress β-catenin{sup S45F}-dependent AXIN2 and MYC transcription. - Abstract: Designer TALEs (dTALEs) are chimeric transcription factors that can be engineered to regulate gene expression in mammalian cells. Whether dTALEs can block gene transcription downstream of signal transduction cascades, however, has yet to be fully explored. Here we tested whether dTALEs can be used to target genes whose expression is controlled by Wnt/β-catenin signaling. TALE DNA binding domains were engineered to recognize sequences adjacent to Wnt responsive enhancer elements (WREs) that control expression of axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2) and c-MYC (MYC). These custom DNA binding domains were linked to the mSin3A interaction domain (SID) to generate TALE–SID chimeric repressors. The TALE–SIDs repressed luciferase reporter activity, bound their genomic target sites, and repressed AXIN2 and MYC expression in HEK293 cells. We generated a novel HEK293 cell line to determine whether the TALE–SIDs could function downstream of oncogenic Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Treating these cells with doxycycline and tamoxifen stimulates nuclear accumulation of a stabilized form of β-catenin found in a subset of colorectal cancers. The TALE–SIDs repressed AXIN2 and MYC expression in these cells, which suggests that dTALEs could offer an effective therapeutic strategy for the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  2. Drosophila Pumilio protein contains multiple autonomous repression domains that regulate mRNAs independently of Nanos and brain tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidmann, Chase A; Goldstrohm, Aaron C

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster Pumilio is an RNA-binding protein that potently represses specific mRNAs. In developing embryos, Pumilio regulates a key morphogen, Hunchback, in collaboration with the cofactor Nanos. To investigate repression by Pumilio and Nanos, we created cell-based assays and found that Pumilio inhibits translation and enhances mRNA decay independent of Nanos. Nanos robustly stimulates repression through interactions with the Pumilio RNA-binding domain. We programmed Pumilio to recognize a new binding site, which garners repression of new target mRNAs. We show that cofactors Brain Tumor and eIF4E Homologous Protein are not obligatory for Pumilio and Nanos activity. The conserved RNA-binding domain of Pumilio was thought to be sufficient for its function. Instead, we demonstrate that three unique domains in the N terminus of Pumilio possess the major repressive activity and can function autonomously. The N termini of insect and vertebrate Pumilio and Fem-3 binding factors (PUFs) are related, and we show that corresponding regions of human PUM1 and PUM2 have repressive activity. Other PUF proteins lack these repression domains. Our findings suggest that PUF proteins have evolved new regulatory functions through protein sequences appended to their conserved PUF repeat RNA-binding domains. PMID:22064486

  3. P-Element repression in Drosophila melanogaster by variegating clusters of P-lacZ-white transgenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronsseray, S; Boivin, A; Anxolabéhère, D

    2001-12-01

    In Drosophila, clusters of P transgenes (P-lac-w) display a variegating phenotype for the w marker. In addition, X-ray-induced rearrangements of chromosomes bearing such clusters may lead to enhancement of the variegated phenotype. Since P-lacZ transgenes in subtelomeric heterochromatin have some P-element repression abilities, we tested whether P-lac-w clusters also have the capacity to repress P-element activity in the germline. One cluster (T-1), located on a rearranged chromosome (T2;3) and derived from a line bearing a variegating tandem array of seven P-lac-w elements, partially represses the dysgenic sterility (GD sterility) induced by P elements. This cluster also strongly represses in trans the expression of P-lacZ elements in the germline. This latter suppression shows a maternal effect. Finally, the combination of variegating P-lac-w clusters and a single P-lacZ reporter inserted in subtelomeric heterochromatic sequences at the X chromosome telomere (cytological site 1A) leads to strong repression of dysgenic sterility. These results show that repression of P-induced dysgenic sterility can be elicited in the absence of P elements encoding a polypeptide repressor and that a transgene cluster can repress the expression of a single homologous transgene at a nonallelic position. Implications for models of transposable element silencing are discussed. PMID:11779802

  4. Repression/depression of conjugative plasmids and their influence on the mutation-selection balance in static environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoav Atsmon-Raz

    Full Text Available We study the effect that conjugation-mediated Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT has on the mutation-selection balance of a population in a static environment. We consider a model whereby a population of unicellular organisms, capable of conjugation, comes to mutation-selection balance in the presence of an antibiotic, which induces a first-order death rate constant [Formula: see text] for genomes that are not resistant. We explicitly take into consideration the repression/de-repression dynamics of the conjugative plasmid, and assume that a de-repressed plasmid remains temporarily de-repressed after copying itself into another cell. We assume that both repression and de-repression are characterized by first-order rate constants [Formula: see text]and [Formula: see text], respectively. We find that conjugation has a deleterious effect on the mean fitness of the population, suggesting that HGT does not provide a selective advantage in a static environment, but is rather only useful for adapting to new environments. This effect can be ameliorated by repression, suggesting that while HGT is not necessarily advantageous for a population in a static environment, its deleterious effect on the mean fitness can be negated via repression. Therefore, it is likely that HGT is much more advantageous in a dynamic landscape. Furthermore, in the limiting case of a vanishing spontaneous de-repression rate constant, we find that the fraction of conjugators in the population undergoes a phase transition as a function of population density. Below a critical population density, the fraction of conjugators is zero, while above this critical population density the fraction of conjugators rises continuously to one. Our model for conjugation-mediated HGT is related to models of infectious disease dynamics, where the conjugators play the role of the infected (I class, and the non-conjugators play the role of the susceptible (S class.

  5. Repression of both isoforms of disproportionating enzyme leads to higher malto-oligosaccharide content and reduced growth in potato

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Henrik Lütken; Lloyd, James Richard; Glaring, Mikkel A.;

    2010-01-01

    Two glucanotransferases, disproportionating enzyme 1 (StDPE1) and disproportionating enzyme 2 (StDPE2), were repressed using RNA interference technology in potato, leading to plants repressed in either isoform individually, or both simultaneously. This is the first detailed report of their combined...... the fusion proteins, supporting a cytosolic role of the StDPE2 enzyme in leaf starch metabolism, as has been observed for Arabidopsis DPE2. It is concluded that StDPE1 and StDPE2 have individual essential roles in starch metabolism in potato and consequently repression of these disables regulation of...

  6. Role of the proto-oncogene Pokemon in cellular transformation and ARF repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Takahiro; Hobbs, Robin M; Merghoub, Taha; Guernah, Ilhem; Zelent, Arthur; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2005-01-20

    Aberrant transcriptional repression through chromatin remodelling and histone deacetylation has been postulated to represent a driving force underlying tumorigenesis because histone deacetylase inhibitors have been found to be effective in cancer treatment. However, the molecular mechanisms by which transcriptional derepression would be linked to tumour suppression are poorly understood. Here we identify the transcriptional repressor Pokemon (encoded by the Zbtb7 gene) as a critical factor in oncogenesis. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking Zbtb7 are completely refractory to oncogene-mediated cellular transformation. Conversely, Pokemon overexpression leads to overt oncogenic transformation both in vitro and in vivo in transgenic mice. Pokemon can specifically repress the transcription of the tumour suppressor gene ARF through direct binding. We find that Pokemon is aberrantly overexpressed in human cancers and that its expression levels predict biological behaviour and clinical outcome. Pokemon's critical role in cellular transformation makes it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:15662416

  7. Cinema e contraluz: limiares da repressão na cultura midiática argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Serelle

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the backlighting technique used in Argentine movies (mainly Valentín, Kamchatka, and The Secret in Their Eyes, seen as a kind of narrative composition in which events related to dictatorships and other forms of repression operate in the dark, but strongly affect the fate of the characters. Starting from a brief overview of the internationalization of the Argentine film industry, which, as early as the mid-1980s, had already articulated conventional dramatic structures and political denunciation, this study analyzes how part of the cinema of this century represents the violence of authoritarian states. Be it through imaginative investment, metalanguage, or allegory, these narratives renounce graphic images of the violence of repressive apparatuses and create dramaturgical compositions of highly effective communication. Thus, this work discusses the reflective capacity of these films as it pertains to the relationship between the fictional, mediatic and social contexts.

  8. The New State of the Art: Cas9 for Gene Activation and Repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Russa, Marie F; Qi, Lei S

    2015-11-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 technology has rapidly changed the landscape for how biologists and bioengineers study and manipulate the genome. Derived from the bacterial adaptive immune system, CRISPR-Cas9 has been coopted and repurposed for a variety of new functions, including the activation or repression of gene expression (termed CRISPRa or CRISPRi, respectively). This represents an exciting alternative to previously used repression or activation technologies such as RNA interference (RNAi) or the use of gene overexpression vectors. We have only just begun exploring the possibilities that CRISPR technology offers for gene regulation and the control of cell identity and behavior. In this review, we describe the recent advances of CRISPR-Cas9 technology for gene regulation and outline advantages and disadvantages of CRISPRa and CRISPRi (CRISPRa/i) relative to alternative technologies. PMID:26370509

  9. Selenite transiently represses transcription of photosynthesis-related genes in potato leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggi, Valeria; Del Vescovo, Valerio; Di Sanza, Claudio; Negri, Rodolfo; Hochkoeppler, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    A striking response of potato leaves to aspersion with selenite was observed at the transcriptional level by means of cDNA microarrays analysis. This response is characterized by a general transient repression of genes coding for components of photosynthetic systems and of other light-regulated genes. In particular, maximal repression was observed 8 h after selenite aspersion, while 24 h after the treatment a complete recovery of normal transcriptional levels was detected. Another general feature of the transcriptional response to selenite is represented by the transcriptional induction of genes related to amino acid metabolism, and to stress defense; interestingly, two genes coding for glutathione S-transferases were found early-induced upon selenite treatment. PMID:17846914

  10. Targeted transcriptional repression using a chimeric TALE-SRDX repressor protein

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2011-12-14

    Transcriptional activator-like effectors (TALEs) are proteins secreted by Xanthomonas bacteria when they infect plants. TALEs contain a modular DNA binding domain that can be easily engineered to bind any sequence of interest, and have been used to provide user-selected DNA-binding modules to generate chimeric nucleases and transcriptional activators in mammalian cells and plants. Here we report the use of TALEs to generate chimeric sequence-specific transcriptional repressors. The dHax3 TALE was used as a scaffold to provide a DNA-binding module fused to the EAR-repression domain (SRDX) to generate a chimeric repressor that targets the RD29A promoter. The dHax3. SRDX protein efficiently repressed the transcription of the RD29A

  11. Financial Repression and Exchange Rate Management in Developing Countries; Theory and Empirical Evidence for India

    OpenAIRE

    Renu Kohli; Kenneth Kletzer

    2001-01-01

    Most developing countries have imposed restrictions on domestic and international financial transactions at one time or another. Such restrictions have allowed governments to generate significant proportions of their revenues from financial repression while restraining inflation. The eventual fiscal importance of the revenues from seignorage and from implicit taxation of financial intermediation pose a challenge for financial reform and liberalization. This paper presents a model of the role ...

  12. Investigating the Effects of Financial Repression on Private Investment in Agriculture Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolmajid Jalaee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the present phenomena that virtually explain weaknesses in financial systems of different countries is financial repression. Financial repression encompasses the different interferences of governments in financial markets through determining the ceiling interest on bank deposits, high rates of legal reserves, and the government’s interference in distribution of bank credits,which prevents the efficient performance of financial market for better allocating resources and funds. On the other hand, investment in agricultural sector enjoys a significant importance due to the growth of production and employment in this sector and rooting for the same notions in other economic sectors. Regarding the fact that the subject matter of the current paper is of utmost importance, it tries to investigate the impacts of financial repression on investments in agricultural sector. In order to realize this objective, measures such as the size of the government in economy, the measure for financial intermediation of banks, and the ratio of savings to GDP (Gross Domestic Product were utilized as the factors for financial repression. The regression results of ARDL showed that the effects from the measures of government size in economy and financial intermediation of banks had a negative and significant impact on private investment in agricultural sector. This means that the bigger the size of government in economy the less the willingness of the private sector for investing in agriculture. Moreover, regarding the fact that the majority of banks in Iran are governmental, the measure for financial intermediation of banks had a negative and significant impact on private investment of agricultural sector.

  13. Genome-Scale CRISPR-Mediated Control of Gene Repression and Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, Luke A.; Horlbeck, Max A.; Adamson, Britt; Villalta, Jacqueline E.; Chen, Yuwen; Whitehead, Evan H.; Guimaraes, Carla; Panning, Barbara; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Bassik, Michael C.; Qi, Lei S.; Kampmann, Martin; Weissman, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    While the catalog of mammalian transcripts and their expression levels in different cell types and disease states is rapidly expanding, our understanding of transcript function lags behind. We present a robust technology enabling systematic investigation of the cellular consequences of repressing or inducing individual transcripts. We identify rules for specific targeting of transcriptional repressors (CRISPRi), typically achieving 90–99% knockdown with minimal off-target effects, and activat...

  14. WNT signaling : activation, repression and fine-tuning of TCF transcription factors

    OpenAIRE

    Brantjes, H.M.

    2003-01-01

    In the absence of a Wnt signal ß-catenin is phosphorylated by GSK3-ß, in a complex also containing Axin and APC. Upon phosphorylation, ß-catenin is primed for ubiquitination and subsequent degradation by the proteasome. In the nucleus, Tcf proteins bind Groucho family members and repress target genes. When a Wnt protein reaches the cell, it associates with the transmembrane receptors Frizzled and LRP. The destruction complex of GSK3-?, APC and Axin is subsequently inactivated via Dishevelled,...

  15. Critical Role of TCF-1 in Repression of the IL-17 Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Jian; Wang, Ruiqing; Fang, Xianfeng; Ding, Yan; Sun, Zuoming

    2011-01-01

    Overwhelming activation of IL-17, a gene involved in inflammation, leads to exaggerated Th17 responses associated with numerous autoimmune conditions, such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Here we show that TCF-1 is a critical factor to repress IL-17 gene locus by chromatin modifications during T cell development. Deletion of TCF-1 resulted in increased IL-17 gene expression both in thymus and peripheral T cells, which led to enhanced Th17 differentiation. As a result, TCF-...

  16. Critical role of TCF-1 in repression of the IL-17 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Ma

    Full Text Available Overwhelming activation of IL-17, a gene involved in inflammation, leads to exaggerated Th17 responses associated with numerous autoimmune conditions, such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. Here we show that TCF-1 is a critical factor to repress IL-17 gene locus by chromatin modifications during T cell development. Deletion of TCF-1 resulted in increased IL-17 gene expression both in thymus and peripheral T cells, which led to enhanced Th17 differentiation. As a result, TCF-1(-/- mice were susceptible to Th17-dependent EAE induction. Rag1(-/- mice reconstituted with TCF-1(-/- T cells were also susceptible to EAE, indicating TCF-1 is intrinsically required to repress IL-17. However, expression of wild-type TCF-1 or dominant negative TCF-1 did not interfere with Th17 differentiation in mature T cells. Furthermore, expression of TCF-1 in TCF-1(-/- T cells could not restore Th17 differentiation to wild-type levels, indicating that TCF-1 cannot affect IL-17 production at the mature T cell stage. This is also supported by the normal up-regulation or activation in mature TCF-1(-/- T cells of factors known to regulate Th17 differentiation, including RORγt and Stat3. We observed hyperacetylation together with trimethylation of Lys-4 at the IL-17 locus in TCF-1(-/- thymocytes, two epigenetic modifications indicating an open active state of the gene. Such epigenetic modifications were preserved even when TCF-1(-/- T cells migrated out of thymus. Therefore, TCF-1 mediates an active process to repress IL-17 gene expression via epigenetic modifications during T cell development. This TCF-1-mediated repression of IL-17 is critical for peripheral T cells to generate balanced immune responses.

  17. From sensorimotor inhibition to Freudian repression: insights from psychosis applied to neurosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane eBazan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available First, three case studies are presented of psychotic patients having in common an inability to hold something down or out. In line with other theories on psychosis, we propose that a key change is at the efference copy system. Going back to Freud’s mental apparatus, we propose that the messages of discharge of the motor neurones, mobilised to direct perception, also called indications of reality, are equivalent to the modern efference copies. With this key, the reading of the cases is coherent with the psychodynamic understanding of psychosis, being a downplay of secondary processes, and consequently, a dominance of primary processes. Moreover, putting together the sensorimotor idea of a failure of efference copy-mediated inhibition with the psychoanalytic idea of a failing repression in psychosis, the hypothesis emerges that the attenuation enabled by the efference copy dynamics is, in some instances, the physiological instantiation of repression. Second, we applied this idea to the mental organisation in neurosis. Indeed, the efference copy-mediated attenuation is thought to be the mechanism through which sustained activation of an intention, without reaching it – i.e. inhibition of an action – gives rise to mental imagery. Therefore, as inhibition is needed for any targeted action or for normal language understanding, acting in the world or processing language structurally induces mental imagery, constituting a subjective unconscious mental reality. Repression is a special instance of inhibition for emotionally threatening stimuli. These stimuli require stronger inhibition, leaving (the attenuation of the motor intentions totally unanswered, in order to radically prevent execution which would lead to development of excess affect. This inhibition, then, yields a specific type of motor imagery, called phantoms, which induce mental preoccupation, as well as symptoms which, especially through their form, refer to the repressed motor

  18. The Msx1 Homeoprotein Recruits G9a Methyltransferase to Repressed Target Genes in Myoblast Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jingqiang; Abate-Shen, Cory

    2012-01-01

    Although the significance of lysine modifications of core histones for regulating gene expression is widely appreciated, the mechanisms by which these modifications are incorporated at specific regulatory elements during cellular differentiation remains largely unknown. In our previous studies, we have shown that in developing myoblasts the Msx1 homeoprotein represses gene expression by influencing the modification status of chromatin at its target genes. We now show that genomic binding by M...

  19. Histone H3K9 methyltransferase G9a represses PPARγ expression and adipogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lifeng; Xu, Shiliyang; Lee, Ji-Eun; Baldridge, Anne; Grullon, Sean; Peng, Weiqun; Ge, Kai

    2012-01-01

    PPARγ promotes adipogenesis while Wnt proteins inhibit adipogenesis. However, the mechanisms that control expression of these positive and negative master regulators of adipogenesis remain incompletely understood. By genome-wide histone methylation profiling in preadipocytes, we find that among gene loci encoding adipogenesis regulators, histone methyltransferase (HMT) G9a-mediated repressive epigenetic mark H3K9me2 is selectively enriched on the entire PPARγ locus. H3K9me2 and G9a levels dec...

  20. Does base-pairing strength play a role in microRNA repression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmel, Ido; Shomron, Noam; Heifetz, Yael

    2012-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short, single-stranded RNAs that silence gene expression by either degrading mRNA or repressing translation. Each miRNA regulates a specific set of mRNA "targets" by binding to complementary sequences in their 3' untranslated region. In this study, we examined the importance of the base-pairing strength of the miRNA-target duplex to repression. We hypothesized that if base-pairing strength affects the functionality of miRNA repression, organisms with higher body temperature or that live at higher temperatures will have miRNAs with higher G/C content so that the miRNA-target complex will remain stable. In the nine model organisms examined, we found a significant correlation between the average G/C content of miRNAs and physiological temperature, supporting our hypothesis. Next, for each organism examined, we compared the average G/C content of miRNAs that are conserved among distant organisms and that of miRNAs that are evolutionarily recent. We found that the average G/C content of ancient miRNAs is lower than recent miRNAs in homeotherms, whereas the trend was inversed in poikilotherms, suggesting that G/C content is associated with temperature, thus further supporting our hypothesis. In the organisms examined, the average G/C content of miRNA "seed" sequences was higher than that of mature miRNAs, which was higher than pre-miRNA loops, suggesting an association between the degree of functionality of the sequence and its average G/C content. Our analyses show a possible association between the base-pairing strength of miRNA-targets and the temperature of an organism, suggesting that base-pairing strength plays a role in repression by miRNAs. PMID:23019592

  1. Insomnia symptoms and repressive coping in a sample of older Black and White women

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre-Louis Jessy; Consedine Nathan S; Magai Carol; Jean-Louis Girardin; Zizi Ferdinand; Casimir Georges J; Belzie Louis

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background This study examined whether ethnic differences in insomnia symptoms are mediated by differences in repressive coping styles. Methods A total of 1274 women (average age = 59.36 ± 6.53 years) participated in the study; 28% were White and 72% were Black. Older women in Brooklyn, NY were recruited using a stratified, cluster-sampling technique. Trained staff conducted face-to-face interviews lasting 1.5 hours acquiring sociodemographic data, health characteristics, and risk fa...

  2. Fate of the H-NS-repressed bgl operon in evolution of Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Sabari Sankar

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In the enterobacterial species Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica, expression of horizontally acquired genes with a higher than average AT content is repressed by the nucleoid-associated protein H-NS. A classical example of an H-NS-repressed locus is the bgl (aryl-beta,D-glucoside operon of E. coli. This locus is "cryptic," as no laboratory growth conditions are known to relieve repression of bgl by H-NS in E. coli K12. However, repression can be relieved by spontaneous mutations. Here, we investigated the phylogeny of the bgl operon. Typing of bgl in a representative collection of E. coli demonstrated that it evolved clonally and that it is present in strains of the phylogenetic groups A, B1, and B2, while it is presumably replaced by a cluster of ORFans in the phylogenetic group D. Interestingly, the bgl operon is mutated in 20% of the strains of phylogenetic groups A and B1, suggesting erosion of bgl in these groups. However, bgl is functional in almost all B2 isolates and, in approximately 50% of them, it is weakly expressed at laboratory growth conditions. Homologs of bgl genes exist in Klebsiella, Enterobacter, and Erwinia species and also in low GC-content Gram-positive bacteria, while absent in E. albertii and Salmonella sp. This suggests horizontal transfer of bgl genes to an ancestral Enterobacterium. Conservation and weak expression of bgl in isolates of phylogenetic group B2 may indicate a functional role of bgl in extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli.

  3. p53 represses human papillomavirus type 16 DNA replication via the viral E2 protein

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan Iain M; Taylor Ewan R; Kowalczyk Anna M; Brown Craig; Gaston Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA replication can be inhibited by the cellular tumour suppressor protein p53. However, the mechanism through which p53 inhibits viral replication and the role that this might play in the HPV life cycle are not known. The papillomavirus E2 protein is required for efficient HPV DNA replication and also regulates viral gene expression. E2 represses transcription of the HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes and can thereby modulate indirectly host cell prolifera...

  4. The Role of Bile Salt Export Pump Gene Repression in Drug-Induced Cholestatic Liver Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Garzel, Brandy; Yang, Hui; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Shiew-Mei; Polli, James E.; Wang, Hongbing

    2014-01-01

    The bile salt export pump (BSEP, ABCB11) is predominantly responsible for the efflux of bile salts, and disruption of BSEP function is often associated with altered hepatic homeostasis of bile acids and cholestatic liver injury. Accumulating evidence suggests that many drugs can cause cholestasis through interaction with hepatic transporters. To date, a relatively strong association between drug-induced cholestasis and attenuated BSEP activity has been proposed. However, whether repression of...

  5. Multi-Faceted Characterization of a Novel LuxR-Repressible Promoter Library for Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Zucca

    Full Text Available The genetic elements regulating the natural quorum sensing (QS networks of several microorganisms are widely used in synthetic biology to control the behaviour of single cells and engineered bacterial populations via ad-hoc constructed synthetic circuits. A number of novel engineering-inspired biological functions have been implemented and model systems have also been constructed to improve the knowledge on natural QS systems. Synthetic QS-based parts, such as promoters, have been reported in literature, to provide biological components with functions that are not present in nature, like modified induction logic or activation/repression by additional molecules. In this work, a library of promoters that can be repressed by the LuxR protein in presence of the QS autoinducer N-3-oxohexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (AHL was reported for Escherichia coli, to expand the toolkit of genetic parts that can be used to engineer novel synthetic QS-based systems. The library was constructed via polymerase chain reaction with highly constrained degenerate oligonucleotides, designed according to the consensus -35 and -10 sequences of a previously reported constitutive promoter library of graded strength, to maximize the probability of obtaining functional clones. All the promoters have a lux box between the -35 and -10 regions, to implement a LuxR-repressible behaviour. Twelve unique library members of graded strength (about 100-fold activity range were selected to form the final library and they were characterized in several genetic contexts, such as in different plasmids, via different reporter genes, in presence of a LuxR expression cassette in different positions and in response to different AHL concentrations. The new obtained regulatory parts and corresponding data can be exploited by synthetic biologists to implement an artificial AHL-dependent repression of transcription in genetic circuits. The target transcriptional activity can be selected among the

  6. Self-Serving Episodic Memory Biases: Findings in the Repressive Coping Style

    OpenAIRE

    Alston, Lauren L.; Carissa eKratchmer; Anna eJeznach; Bartlett, Nathan T.; Patrick SR Davidson; Esther eFujiwara

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with a repressive coping style self-report low anxiety, but show high defensiveness and high physiological arousal. Repressors have impoverished negative autobiographical memories and are better able to suppress memory for negatively valenced and self-related laboratory materials when asked to do so. Research on spontaneous forgetting of negative information in repressors suggests that they show significant forgetting of negative items, but only after a delay. Unknown is whether i...

  7. Evolution of VRN2/Ghd7-Like Genes in Vernalization-Mediated Repression of Grass Flowering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Daniel P; McKeown, Meghan A; Dong, Yinxin; Preston, Jill C; Amasino, Richard M

    2016-04-01

    Flowering of many plant species is coordinated with seasonal environmental cues such as temperature and photoperiod. Vernalization provides competence to flower after prolonged cold exposure, and a vernalization requirement prevents flowering from occurring prior to winter. In winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) and barley (Hordeum vulgare), three genes VRN1, VRN2, and FT form a regulatory loop that regulates the initiation of flowering. Prior to cold exposure, VRN2 represses FT. During cold, VRN1 expression increases, resulting in the repression of VRN2, which in turn allows activation of FT during long days to induce flowering. Here, we test whether the circuitry of this regulatory loop is conserved across Pooideae, consistent with their niche transition from the tropics to the temperate zone. Our phylogenetic analyses of VRN2-like genes reveal a duplication event occurred before the diversification of the grasses that gave rise to a CO9 and VRN2/Ghd7 clade and support orthology between wheat/barley VRN2 and rice (Oryza sativa) Ghd7 Our Brachypodium distachyon VRN1 and VRN2 knockdown and overexpression experiments demonstrate functional conservation of grass VRN1 and VRN2 in the promotion and repression of flowering, respectively. However, expression analyses in a range of pooids demonstrate that the cold repression of VRN2 is unique to core Pooideae such as wheat and barley. Furthermore, VRN1 knockdown in B. distachyon demonstrates that the VRN1-mediated suppression of VRN2 is not conserved. Thus, the VRN1-VRN2 feature of the regulatory loop appears to have evolved late in the diversification of temperate grasses. PMID:26848096

  8. Teaching microbial physiology using glucose repression phenomenon in baker's yeast as an examplele

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vijayendran, Raghavendran; Nielsen, Jens; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2005-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used by human beings since ancient times for its ability to convert sugar to alcohol. Continual exposure to glucose in the natural environment for innumerable generations has probably enabled S. cerevisiae to grow in fermentative mode on sugars by...... experiments of the wild type and a mutant that lacks a trait partially responsible for the fermentative behavior. Various undergraduate student exercises have been (and can be) formulated to illustrate the concept of glucose repression....

  9. BMP signaling turns up in fragile X syndrome: FMRP represses BMPR2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broihier, Heather T

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome is the most common inherited form of intellectual disability and results from a loss of function of the translational repressor FMRP. In this issue of Science Signaling, Kashima et al find that FMRP binds to and represses a specific isoform of BMPR2, a type II bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptor. Reducing signaling through this BMP pathway reverses neuroanatomical defects observed in fragile X models. PMID:27273094

  10. Transcriptional Repression of Gata3 Is Essential for Early B Cell Commitment

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Anupam; Northrup, Daniel; Boukarabila, Hanane; Jacobsen, Sten Erik W.; Allman, David

    2013-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms underlying the silencing of alternative fate potentials in very early B cell precursors remain unclear. Using gain- and loss-of-function approaches together with a synthetic Zinc-finger polypeptide (6ZFP) engineered to prevent transcription factor binding to a defined cis element, we show that the transcription factor EBF1 promotes B cell lineage commitment by directly repressing expression of the T-cell-lineage-requisite Gata3 gene. Ebf1-deficient lymphoid progenitors ...

  11. Political repression and children in South Africa: the social construction of damaging effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, L; Levett, A

    1989-01-01

    This article discusses some dilemmas facing mental health and social service workers studying and providing services for children affected by political repression in South Africa. We argue that it is almost inevitable that progressive care providers are affected by an image of childhood as one of passive innocence and vulnerability, an image which is both outmoded in terms of modern developmental psychology and potentially destructive if the aim of intervention is empowerment. Practical experience with children affected by repression has led us to question commonly held views on the nature of psychological damage, and to recognise that our views on stress tend to be class-bound. Questions of partiality and credibility affect both practical work and the way that social service workers conceive of their role. Without an approach to the understanding of repression which takes account of underlying ideological factors, the social construction of illness and symptoms, and the historical antecedents of current abuses of children in South Africa, we are unable adequately to situate and evaluate critically the work we are doing. Even the focus on children as particular victims of apartheid needs to be thoroughly examined. PMID:2652325

  12. sRNA Antitoxins: More than One Way to Repress a Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Wen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial toxin-antitoxin loci consist of two genes: one encodes a potentially toxic protein, and the second, an antitoxin to repress its function or expression. The antitoxin can either be an RNA or a protein. For type I and type III loci, the antitoxins are RNAs; however, they have very different modes of action. Type I antitoxins repress toxin protein expression through interacting with the toxin mRNA, thereby targeting the mRNA for degradation or preventing its translation or both; type III antitoxins directly bind to the toxin protein, sequestering it. Along with these two very different modes of action for the antitoxin, there are differences in the functions of the toxin proteins and the mobility of these loci between species. Within this review, we discuss the major differences as to how the RNAs repress toxin activity, the potential consequences for utilizing different regulatory strategies, as well as the confirmed and potential biological roles for these loci across bacterial species.

  13. RNAi mediates post-transcriptional repression of gene expression in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Protein coding genes accumulate anti-sense sRNAs in fission yeast S. pombe. • RNAi represses protein-coding genes in S. pombe. • RNAi-mediated gene repression is post-transcriptional. - Abstract: RNA interference (RNAi) is a gene silencing mechanism conserved from fungi to mammals. Small interfering RNAs are products and mediators of the RNAi pathway and act as specificity factors in recruiting effector complexes. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome encodes one of each of the core RNAi proteins, Dicer, Argonaute and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (dcr1, ago1, rdp1). Even though the function of RNAi in heterochromatin assembly in S. pombe is established, its role in controlling gene expression is elusive. Here, we report the identification of small RNAs mapped anti-sense to protein coding genes in fission yeast. We demonstrate that these genes are up-regulated at the protein level in RNAi mutants, while their mRNA levels are not significantly changed. We show that the repression by RNAi is not a result of heterochromatin formation. Thus, we conclude that RNAi is involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing in S. pombe

  14. Association of ORCA/LRWD1 with repressive histone methyl transferases mediates heterochromatin organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Sumanprava; Prasanth, Supriya G

    2015-11-01

    Heterochromatin mostly constitutes tightly packaged DNA, decorated with repressive histone marks, including histone H3 methylated at lysine 9, histone H4 methylated at lysine 20 and histone H3 methylated at lysine 27. Each of these marks is incorporated by specific histone lysine methyl transferases. While constitutive heterochromatin enriched with H3K9me3 and H4K20me3 occur within repetitive elements, including centromeres and telomeres, the facultative heterochromatin resides on the inactive X-chromosome and contains H3K27me3 mark. Origin recognition complex-associated (ORCA/LRWD1) protein is required for the initiation of DNA replication and also plays crucial roles in heterochromatin organization. ORCA associates with constitutive and facultative heterochromatin in human cells and binds to repressive histone marks. We demonstrate that ORCA binds to multiple repressive histone methyl transferases including G9a, GLP, Suv39h1 (H3K9me2/3), Suv420h1/h2 (H4K20me2/3) and EZH2 (H3K27me3). Removal of ORCA from human cells causes aberrations in the chromatin architecture. We propose that ORCA acts as a scaffold protein that enables the formation of multiple histone lysine methyltransferase complexes at heterochromatic sites thereby facilitating chromatin organization. PMID:26765314

  15. To suppress, or not to suppress? That is repression: controlling intrusive thoughts in addictive behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Antony C; Erskine, James A K; Albery, Ian P; Allen, James Richard; Georgiou, George J

    2015-05-01

    Research to understand how individuals cope with intrusive negative or threatening thoughts suggests a variety of different cognitive strategies aimed at thought control. In this review, two of these strategies--thought suppression and repressive coping--are discussed in the context of addictive behaviour. Thought suppression involves conscious, volitional attempts to expel a thought from awareness, whereas repressive coping, which involves the avoidance of thoughts without the corresponding conscious intention, appears to be a far more automated process. Whilst there has been an emerging body of research exploring the role of thought suppression in addictive behaviour, there remains a dearth of research which has considered the role of repressive coping in the development of, and recovery from, addiction. Based on a review of the literature, and a discussion of the supposed mechanisms which underpin these strategies for exercising mental control, a conceptual model is proposed which posits a potential common mechanism. This model makes a number of predictions which require exploration in future research to fully understand the cognitive strategies utilised by individuals to control intrusive thoughts related to their addictive behaviour. PMID:25648574

  16. Methylation of H2AR29 is a novel repressive PRMT6 target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldmann Tanja

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Covalent histone modifications are central to all DNA-dependent processes. Modifications of histones H3 and H4 are becoming well characterised, but knowledge of how H2A modifications regulate chromatin dynamics and gene expression is still very limited. Results To understand the function of H2A modifications, we performed a systematic analysis of the histone H2A methylation status. We identified and functionally characterised two new methylation sites in H2A: R11 (H2AR11 and R29 (H2AR29. Using an unbiased biochemical approach in combination with candidate assays we showed that protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT 1 and PRMT6 are unique in their ability to catalyse these modifications. Importantly we found that H2AR29me2 is specifically enriched at genes repressed by PRMT6, implicating H2AR29me2 in transcriptional repression. Conclusions Our data establishes R11 and R29 as new arginine methylation sites in H2A. We identified the specific modifying enzymes involved, and uncovered a novel functional role of H2AR29me2 in gene silencing in vivo. Thus this work reveals novel insights into the function of H2A methylation and in the mechanisms of PRMT6-mediated transcriptional repression.

  17. Reconstruction and logical modeling of glucose repression signaling pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Ana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the presence of high levels of glucose leads to an array of down-regulatory effects known as glucose repression. This process is complex due to the presence of feedback loops and crosstalk between different pathways, complicating the use of intuitive approaches to analyze the system. Results We established a logical model of yeast glucose repression, formalized as a hypergraph. The model was constructed based on verified regulatory interactions and it includes 50 gene transcripts, 22 proteins, 5 metabolites and 118 hyperedges. We computed the logical steady states of all nodes in the network in order to simulate wildtype and deletion mutant responses to different sugar availabilities. Evaluation of the model predictive power was achieved by comparing changes in the logical state of gene nodes with transcriptome data. Overall, we observed 71% true predictions, and analyzed sources of errors and discrepancies for the remaining. Conclusion Though the binary nature of logical (Boolean models entails inherent limitations, our model constitutes a primary tool for storing regulatory knowledge, searching for incoherencies in hypotheses and evaluating the effect of deleting regulatory elements involved in glucose repression.

  18. Repression of the human papillomavirus type 18 enhancer by the cellular transcription factor Oct-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe-Seyler, F; Butz, K; zur Hausen, H

    1991-01-01

    The role of cellular factors involved in the transcriptional regulation of the cancer-associated human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV18) is yet poorly understood. The presence of an Oct-1-binding site within the HPV18 upstream regulatory region led us to investigate the influence of Oct-1 on viral transcription. Cotransfection of Oct-1 expression plasmids together with luciferase reporter constructs containing HPV18 regulatory sequences indicated that Oct-1 can transcriptionally repress the HPV18 upstream regulatory region. In contrast, heterologous control regions were not affected by Oct-1. HPV18 cis elements that can be repressed by Oct-1 mapped to a 135-bp subregion of the viral constitutive enhancer. Analysis of an Oct-1 mutant defective in DNA binding suggested that HPV18 down-modulation does not require direct binding of Oct-1 to DNA. These results make Oct-1 a candidate factor involved in the intracellular surveillance of HPV18 transcription and support the notion of a host cell mechanism that can specifically repress HPV E6-E7 transforming gene expression. Images PMID:1654457

  19. Insomnia symptoms and repressive coping in a sample of older Black and White women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Louis Jessy

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study examined whether ethnic differences in insomnia symptoms are mediated by differences in repressive coping styles. Methods A total of 1274 women (average age = 59.36 ± 6.53 years participated in the study; 28% were White and 72% were Black. Older women in Brooklyn, NY were recruited using a stratified, cluster-sampling technique. Trained staff conducted face-to-face interviews lasting 1.5 hours acquiring sociodemographic data, health characteristics, and risk factors. A sleep questionnaire was administered and individual repressive coping styles were assessed. Fisher's exact test and Spearman and Pearson analyses were used to analyze the data. Results The rate of insomnia symptoms was greater among White women [74% vs. 46%; χ2 = 87.67, p 1,1272 = 304.75, p s = -0.43, p s = -0.18, p Conclusion Relationships between ethnicity and insomnia symptoms are jointly dependent on the degree of repressive coping, suggesting that Black women may be reporting fewer insomnia symptoms because of a greater ability to route negative emotions from consciousness. It may be that Blacks cope with sleep problems within a positive self-regulatory framework, which allows them to deal more effectively with sleep-interfering psychological processes to stressful life events and to curtail dysfunctional sleep-interpreting processes.

  20. Combinatorial activation and repression by seven transcription factors specify Drosophila odorant receptor expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadi Jafari

    Full Text Available The mechanism that specifies olfactory sensory neurons to express only one odorant receptor (OR from a large repertoire is critical for odor discrimination but poorly understood. Here, we describe the first comprehensive analysis of OR expression regulation in Drosophila. A systematic, RNAi-mediated knock down of most of the predicted transcription factors identified an essential function of acj6, E93, Fer1, onecut, sim, xbp1, and zf30c in the regulation of more than 30 ORs. These regulatory factors are differentially expressed in antennal sensory neuron classes and specifically required for the adult expression of ORs. A systematic analysis reveals not only that combinations of these seven factors are necessary for receptor gene expression but also a prominent role for transcriptional repression in preventing ectopic receptor expression. Such regulation is supported by bioinformatics and OR promoter analyses, which uncovered a common promoter structure with distal repressive and proximal activating regions. Thus, our data provide insight into how combinatorial activation and repression can allow a small number of transcription factors to specify a large repertoire of neuron classes in the olfactory system.

  1. A response regulator promotes Francisella tularensis intramacrophage growth by repressing an anti-virulence factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Kathryn M; Dove, Simon L

    2016-08-01

    The orphan response regulator PmrA is essential for the intramacrophage growth and survival of Francisella tularensis. PmrA was thought to promote intramacrophage growth by binding directly to promoters on the Francisella Pathogenicity Island (FPI) and positively regulating the expression of FPI genes, which encode a Type VI secretion system required for intramacrophage growth. Using both ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq we identify those regions of the F. tularensis chromosome occupied by PmrA and those genes that are regulated by PmrA. We find that PmrA associates with 252 distinct regions of the F. tularensis chromosome, but exerts regulatory effects at only a few of these locations. Rather than by functioning directly as an activator of FPI gene expression we present evidence that PmrA promotes intramacrophage growth by repressing the expression of a single target gene we refer to as priM (PmrA-repressed inhibitor of intramacrophage growth). Our findings thus indicate that the role of PmrA in facilitating intracellular growth is to repress a previously unknown anti-virulence factor. PriM is the first bacterially encoded factor to be described that can interfere with the intramacrophage growth and survival of F. tularensis. PMID:27169554

  2. Smad4 suppresses the tumorigenesis and aggressiveness of neuroblastoma through repressing the expression of heparanase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Hongxia; Zheng, Liduan; Jiao, Wanju; Mei, Hong; Li, Dan; Song, Huajie; Fang, Erhu; Wang, Xiaojing; Li, Shiwang; Huang, Kai; Tong, Qiangsong

    2016-01-01

    Heparanase (HPSE) is the only endo-β-D-glucuronidase that is correlated with the progression of neuroblastoma (NB), the most common extracranial malignancy in childhood. However, the mechanisms underlying HPSE expression in NB still remain largely unknown. Herein, through analyzing cis-regulatory elements and mining public microarray datasets, we identified SMAD family member 4 (Smad4) as a crucial transcription regulator of HPSE in NB. We demonstrated that Smad4 repressed the HPSE expression at the transcriptional levels in NB cells. Mechanistically, Smad4 suppressed the HPSE expression through directly binding to its promoter and repressing the lymphoid enhancer binding factor 1 (LEF1)-facilitated transcription of HPSE via physical interaction. Gain- and loss-of-function studies demonstrated that Smad4 inhibited the growth, invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis of NB cells in vitro and in vivo. Restoration of HPSE expression prevented the NB cells from changes in these biological features induced by Smad4. In clinical NB specimens, Smad4 was under-expressed and inversely correlated with HPSE levels, while LEF1 was highly expressed and positively correlated with HPSE expression. Patients with high Smad4 expression, low LEF1 or HPSE levels had greater survival probability. These results demonstrate that Smad4 suppresses the tumorigenesis and aggressiveness of NB through repressing the HPSE expression. PMID:27595937

  3. Generation of a glucose de-repressed mutant of Trichoderma reesei using disparity mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakuma, Hidekazu; Koyama, Yoshiyuki; Miyachi, Ayako; Nasukawa, Masashi; Matsumoto, Hitoshi; Yano, Shuntaro; Ogihara, Jun; Kasumi, Takafumi

    2016-03-01

    We obtained a novel glucose de-repressed mutant of Trichoderma reesei using disparity mutagenesis. A plasmid containing DNA polymerase δ lacking proofreading activity, and AMAI, an autonomously replicating sequence was introduced into T. reesei ATCC66589. The rate of mutation evaluated with 5-fluoroorotic acid resistance was approximately 30-fold higher than that obtained by UV irradiation. The transformants harboring incompetent DNA polymerase δ were then selected on 2-deoxyglucose agar plates with hygromycin B. The pNP-lactoside hydrolyzing activities of mutants were 2 to 5-fold higher than the parent in liquid medium containing glucose. Notably, the amino acid sequence of cre1, a key gene involved in glucose repression, was identical in the mutant and parent strains, and further, the cre1 expression levels was not abolished in the mutant. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the strains of T. reesei generated by disparity mutagenesis are glucose de-repressed variants that contain mutations in yet-unidentified factors other than cre1. PMID:26540299

  4. RNAi mediates post-transcriptional repression of gene expression in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smialowska, Agata, E-mail: smialowskaa@gmail.com [Center for Biosciences, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge 141-83 (Sweden); School of Life Sciences, Södertörn Högskola, Huddinge 141-89 (Sweden); Djupedal, Ingela; Wang, Jingwen [Center for Biosciences, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge 141-83 (Sweden); Kylsten, Per [School of Life Sciences, Södertörn Högskola, Huddinge 141-89 (Sweden); Swoboda, Peter [Center for Biosciences, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge 141-83 (Sweden); Ekwall, Karl, E-mail: Karl.Ekwall@ki.se [Center for Biosciences, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge 141-83 (Sweden); School of Life Sciences, Södertörn Högskola, Huddinge 141-89 (Sweden)

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Protein coding genes accumulate anti-sense sRNAs in fission yeast S. pombe. • RNAi represses protein-coding genes in S. pombe. • RNAi-mediated gene repression is post-transcriptional. - Abstract: RNA interference (RNAi) is a gene silencing mechanism conserved from fungi to mammals. Small interfering RNAs are products and mediators of the RNAi pathway and act as specificity factors in recruiting effector complexes. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome encodes one of each of the core RNAi proteins, Dicer, Argonaute and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (dcr1, ago1, rdp1). Even though the function of RNAi in heterochromatin assembly in S. pombe is established, its role in controlling gene expression is elusive. Here, we report the identification of small RNAs mapped anti-sense to protein coding genes in fission yeast. We demonstrate that these genes are up-regulated at the protein level in RNAi mutants, while their mRNA levels are not significantly changed. We show that the repression by RNAi is not a result of heterochromatin formation. Thus, we conclude that RNAi is involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing in S. pombe.

  5. An exploratory study of the interaction of cognitive complexity, dogmatism, and repression-sensitization among college students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starbird, Dannel H.; Biller, Henry B.

    1976-01-01

    A total of 219 male and female college students returned questionnaire measures relating to cognitive complexity, dogmatism, and repression-sensitization. Analyses revealed very complex interactions among the variables. (Author/SB)

  6. GIT2 represses Crk- and Rac1-regulated cell spreading and Cdc42-mediated focal adhesion turnover

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Scott R.; Adelstein, Molly R; Hansen, Steen H.

    2006-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase interactors (GITs) regulate focal adhesion (FA) turnover, cell spreading, and motility through direct interaction with paxillin and the Rac-exchange factor Pak-interacting exchange factor β (βPIX). However, it is not clear whether GITs function to activate or repress motility or if the predominant GIT forms, GIT1 and GIT2, serve distinct or redundant roles. Here we demonstrate an obligatory role for endogenous GIT2 in repression of lamellipodial extension and...

  7. Cooperative Action of Cdk1/cyclin B and SIRT1 Is Required for Mitotic Repression of rRNA Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Voit, Renate; Seiler, Jeanette; Grummt, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Author Summary In metazoans, transcription is arrested during mitosis. Previous studies have established that mitotic repression of cellular transcription is mediated by Cdk1/cyclin B-dependent phosphorylation of basal transcription factors that nucleate transcription complex formation. Repression of rDNA transcription at the onset of mitosis is brought about by inactivation of the TBP-containing transcription factor SL1 by Cdk1/cyclin B-dependent phosphorylation of the TAFI110 subunit, which...

  8. E2 represses the late gene promoter of human papillomavirus type 8 at high concentrations by interfering with cellular factors.

    OpenAIRE

    Stubenrauch, F.; Leigh, I M; Pfister, H

    1996-01-01

    The late gene promoter P7535 of the epidermodysplasia verruciformis-associated human papillomavirus type 8 (HPV8) is regulated by the viral E2 protein. Transfection experiments performed with the human skin keratinocyte cell line RTS3b and P7535 reporter plasmids revealed transactivation at low amounts and a repression of basal promoter activity at high amounts of E2 expression vector. This repression was promoter specific and correlated with the amount of transiently expressed E2 protein. Mu...

  9. In silico finding of Putative Cis-Acting Elements for the Tethering of Polycomb Repressive Complex2 in Human Genome

    OpenAIRE

    Hajjari, Mohammadreza; Behmanesh, Mehrdad; Jahani, Mohammad Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Polycomb Repressive Complex2 maintains a predetermined state of transcription which constitutes a cellular memory stable over many cell divisions. Since this complex acts through the regulation of chromatin structure, it is important to understand how it is recruited to chromatin. The specific target sequences of this complex such as PRE (polycomb repressive element) have not been completely recognized in human genome. In this study, we have compared the target sequences of this complex with ...

  10. Synergistic repression of the embryonic programme by SET DOMAIN GROUP 8 and EMBRYONIC FLOWER 2 in Arabidopsis seedlings

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Xurong; Lim, Myung-Ho; Pelletier, Julie; Tang, Mingjuan; Nguyen, Vi; Keller, Wilfred A.; Tsang, Edward W. T.; Wang, Aiming; Rothstein, Steven. J.; Harada, John J.; Cui, Yuhai

    2011-01-01

    The seed maturation programme occurs only during the late phase of embryo development, and repression of the maturation genes is pivotal for seedling development. However, mechanisms that repress the expression of this programme in vegetative tissues are not well understood. A genetic screen was performed for mutants that express maturation genes in leaves. Here, it is shown that mutations affecting SDG8 (SET DOMAIN GROUP 8), a putative histone methyltransferase, cause ectopic expression of a...

  11. Political Repressions by Senior Offices of Transbaikal Military District Case of Tank Squadron Commander M.M. Zakharov

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir S. Milbakh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article features one of the dark pages in Russian History – Mass Political Repressions in the country and in the army in 1937–1938. The starting point of repressions against the senior officers is shown on the example of Transbaikal Millitary District. The statistical data on political prisoners (chief officers, commanders, poorly disguised political cases by NKVD officers are shown. New archival files have been uncovered.

  12. Functional domains of the human orphan receptor ARP-1/COUP-TFII involved in active repression and transrepression.

    OpenAIRE

    Achatz, G; Hölzl, B; Speckmayer, R; Hauser, C; Sandhofer, F; Paulweber, B.

    1997-01-01

    The orphan receptor ARP-1/COUP-TFII, a member of the chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor (COUP-TF) subfamily of nuclear receptors, strongly represses transcriptional activity of numerous genes, including several apolipoprotein-encoding genes. Recently it has been demonstrated that the mechanism by which COUP-TFs reduce transcriptional activity involves active repression and transrepression. To map the domains of ARP-1/COUP-TFII required for repressor activity, a detailed ...

  13. Mir-29 repression in bladder outlet obstruction contributes to matrix remodeling and altered stiffness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Ekman

    Full Text Available Recent work has uncovered a role of the microRNA (miRNA miR-29 in remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Partial bladder outlet obstruction is a prevalent condition in older men with prostate enlargement that leads to matrix synthesis in the lower urinary tract and increases bladder stiffness. Here we tested the hypothesis that miR-29 is repressed in the bladder in outlet obstruction and that this has an impact on protein synthesis and matrix remodeling leading to increased bladder stiffness. c-Myc, NF-κB and SMAD3, all of which repress miR-29, were activated in the rat detrusor following partial bladder outlet obstruction but at different times. c-Myc and NF-κB activation occurred early after obstruction, and SMAD3 phosphorylation increased later, with a significant elevation at 6 weeks. c-Myc, NF-κB and SMAD3 activation, respectively, correlated with repression of miR-29b and miR-29c at 10 days of obstruction and with repression of miR-29c at 6 weeks. An mRNA microarray analysis showed that the reduction of miR-29 following outlet obstruction was associated with increased levels of miR-29 target mRNAs, including mRNAs for tropoelastin, the matricellular protein Sparc and collagen IV. Outlet obstruction increased protein levels of eight out of eight examined miR-29 targets, including tropoelastin and Sparc. Transfection of human bladder smooth muscle cells with antimiR-29c and miR-29c mimic caused reciprocal changes in target protein levels in vitro. Tamoxifen inducible and smooth muscle-specific deletion of Dicer in mice reduced miR-29 expression and increased tropoelastin and the thickness of the basal lamina surrounding smooth muscle cells in the bladder. It also increased detrusor stiffness independent of outlet obstruction. Taken together, our study supports a model where the combined repressive influences of c-Myc, NF-κB and SMAD3 reduce miR-29 in bladder outlet obstruction, and where the resulting drop in miR-29 contributes to

  14. Hormone-induced repression of genes requires BRG1-mediated H1.2 deposition at target promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacht, Ana Silvina; Pohl, Andy; Zaurin, Roser; Soronellas, Daniel; Quilez, Javier; Sharma, Priyanka; Wright, Roni H; Beato, Miguel; Vicent, Guillermo P

    2016-08-15

    Eukaryotic gene regulation is associated with changes in chromatin compaction that modulate access to DNA regulatory sequences relevant for transcriptional activation or repression. Although much is known about the mechanism of chromatin remodeling in hormonal gene activation, how repression is accomplished is much less understood. Here we report that in breast cancer cells, ligand-activated progesterone receptor (PR) is directly recruited to transcriptionally repressed genes involved in cell proliferation along with the kinases ERK1/2 and MSK1. PR recruits BRG1 associated with the HP1γ-LSD1 complex repressor complex, which is further anchored via binding of HP1γ to the H3K9me3 signal deposited by SUV39H2. In contrast to what is observed during gene activation, only BRG1 and not the BAF complex is recruited to repressed promoters, likely due to local enrichment of the pioneer factor FOXA1. BRG1 participates in gene repression by interacting with H1.2, facilitating its deposition and stabilizing nucleosome positioning around the transcription start site. Our results uncover a mechanism of hormone-dependent transcriptional repression and a novel role for BRG1 in progestin regulation of breast cancer cell growth. PMID:27390128

  15. Multiple determinants of splicing repression activity in the polypyrimidine tract binding proteins, PTBP1 and PTBP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppetipola, Niroshika M; Yeom, Kyu-Hyeon; Hernandez, Adrian L; Bui, Tessa; Sharma, Shalini; Black, Douglas L

    2016-08-01

    Most human genes generate multiple protein isoforms through alternative pre-mRNA splicing, but the mechanisms controlling alternative splicing choices by RNA binding proteins are not well understood. These proteins can have multiple paralogs expressed in different cell types and exhibiting different splicing activities on target exons. We examined the paralogous polypyrimidine tract binding proteins PTBP1 and PTBP2 to understand how PTBP1 can exhibit greater splicing repression activity on certain exons. Using both an in vivo coexpression assay and an in vitro splicing assay, we show that PTBP1 is more repressive than PTBP2 per unit protein on a target exon. Constructing chimeras of PTBP1 and 2 to determine amino acid features that contribute to their differential activity, we find that multiple segments of PTBP1 increase the repressive activity of PTBP2. Notably, when either RRM1 of PTBP2 or the linker peptide separating RRM2 and RRM3 are replaced with the equivalent PTBP1 sequences, the resulting chimeras are highly active for splicing repression. These segments are distinct from the known region of interaction for the PTBP1 cofactors Raver1 and Matrin3 in RRM2. We find that RRM2 of PTBP1 also increases the repression activity of an otherwise PTBP2 sequence, and that this is potentially explained by stronger binding by Raver1. These results indicate that multiple features over the length of the two proteins affect their ability to repress an exon. PMID:27288314

  16. Stability of XIST repression in relation to genomic imprinting following global genome demethylation in a human cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA methylation is essential in X chromosome inactivation and genomic imprinting, maintaining repression of XIST in the active X chromosome and monoallelic repression of imprinted genes. Disruption of the DNA methyltransferase genes DNMT1 and DNMT3B in the HCT116 cell line (DKO cells) leads to global DNA hypomethylation and biallelic expression of the imprinted gene IGF2 but does not lead to reactivation of XIST expression, suggesting that XIST repression is due to a more stable epigenetic mark than imprinting. To test this hypothesis, we induced acute hypomethylation in HCT116 cells by 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR) treatment (HCT116-5-aza-CdR) and compared that to DKO cells, evaluating DNA methylation by microarray and monitoring the expression of XIST and imprinted genes IGF2, H19, and PEG10. Whereas imprinted genes showed biallelic expression in HCT116-5-aza-CdR and DKO cells, the XIST locus was hypomethylated and weakly expressed only under acute hypomethylation conditions, indicating the importance of XIST repression in the active X to cell survival. Given that DNMT3A is the only active DNMT in DKO cells, it may be responsible for ensuring the repression of XIST in those cells. Taken together, our data suggest that XIST repression is more tightly controlled than genomic imprinting and, at least in part, is due to DNMT3A

  17. Gene Repression in Haloarchaea Using the CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)-Cas I-B System*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachler, Aris-Edda; Marchfelder, Anita

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas system is used by bacteria and archaea to fend off foreign genetic elements. Since its discovery it has been developed into numerous applications like genome editing and regulation of transcription in eukaryotes and bacteria. For archaea currently no tools for transcriptional repression exist. Because molecular biology analyses in archaea become more and more widespread such a tool is vital for investigating the biological function of essential genes in archaea. Here we use the model archaeon Haloferax volcanii to demonstrate that its endogenous CRISPR-Cas system I-B can be harnessed to repress gene expression in archaea. Deletion of cas3 and cas6b genes results in efficient repression of transcription. crRNAs targeting the promoter region reduced transcript levels down to 8%. crRNAs targeting the reading frame have only slight impact on transcription. crRNAs that target the coding strand repress expression only down to 88%, whereas crRNAs targeting the template strand repress expression down to 8%. Repression of an essential gene results in reduction of transcription levels down to 22%. Targeting efficiencies can be enhanced by expressing a catalytically inactive Cas3 mutant. Genes can be targeted on plasmids or on the chromosome, they can be monocistronic or part of a polycistronic operon. PMID:27226589

  18. Stability of XIST repression in relation to genomic imprinting following global genome demethylation in a human cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araújo, E.S.S. de [Departamento de Genética e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Centro Internacional de Pesquisa, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Vasques, L.R. [Departamento de Genética e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Stabellini, R.; Krepischi, A.C.V. [Departamento de Genética e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Centro Internacional de Pesquisa, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pereira, L.V. [Departamento de Genética e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-10-17

    DNA methylation is essential in X chromosome inactivation and genomic imprinting, maintaining repression of XIST in the active X chromosome and monoallelic repression of imprinted genes. Disruption of the DNA methyltransferase genes DNMT1 and DNMT3B in the HCT116 cell line (DKO cells) leads to global DNA hypomethylation and biallelic expression of the imprinted gene IGF2 but does not lead to reactivation of XIST expression, suggesting that XIST repression is due to a more stable epigenetic mark than imprinting. To test this hypothesis, we induced acute hypomethylation in HCT116 cells by 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR) treatment (HCT116-5-aza-CdR) and compared that to DKO cells, evaluating DNA methylation by microarray and monitoring the expression of XIST and imprinted genes IGF2, H19, and PEG10. Whereas imprinted genes showed biallelic expression in HCT116-5-aza-CdR and DKO cells, the XIST locus was hypomethylated and weakly expressed only under acute hypomethylation conditions, indicating the importance of XIST repression in the active X to cell survival. Given that DNMT3A is the only active DNMT in DKO cells, it may be responsible for ensuring the repression of XIST in those cells. Taken together, our data suggest that XIST repression is more tightly controlled than genomic imprinting and, at least in part, is due to DNMT3A.

  19. Carbon Carbon Composites: An Overview .

    OpenAIRE

    G. Rohini Devi; K. Rama Rao

    1993-01-01

    Carbon carbon composites are a new class of engineering materials that are ceramic in nature but exhibit brittle to pseudoplastic behaviour. Carbon-carbon is a unique all-carbon composite with carbon fibre embeded in carbon matrix and is known as an inverse composite. Due to their excellent thermo-structural properties, carbon-carbon composites are used in specialised application like re-entry nose-tips, leading edges, rocket nozzles, and aircraft brake discs apart from several indust...

  20. Influence of repressive coping style on cortical activation during encoding of angry faces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Veronika Rauch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coping plays an important role for emotion regulation in threatening situations. The model of coping modes designates repression and sensitization as two independent coping styles. Repression consists of strategies that shield the individual from arousal. Sensitization indicates increased analysis of the environment in order to reduce uncertainty. According to the discontinuity hypothesis, repressors are sensitive to threat in the early stages of information processing. While repressors do not exhibit memory disturbances early on, they manifest weak memory for these stimuli later. This study investigates the discontinuity hypothesis using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. METHODS: Healthy volunteers (20 repressors and 20 sensitizers were selected from a sample of 150 students on the basis of the Mainz Coping Inventory. During the fMRI experiment, subjects evaluated and memorized emotional and neutral faces. Subjects performed two sessions of face recognition: immediately after the fMRI session and three days later. RESULTS: Repressors exhibited greater activation of frontal, parietal and temporal areas during encoding of angry faces compared to sensitizers. There were no differences in recognition of facial emotions between groups neither immediately after exposure nor after three days. CONCLUSIONS: The fMRI findings suggest that repressors manifest an enhanced neural processing of directly threatening facial expression which confirms the assumption of hyper-responsivity to threatening information in repression in an early processing stage. A discrepancy was observed between high neural activation in encoding-relevant brain areas in response to angry faces in repressors and no advantage in subsequent memory for these faces compared to sensitizers.

  1. MicroRNA-22 promotes cell survival upon UV radiation by repressing PTEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Guangyun [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN (United States); Center for Adult Cancer Research, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN (United States); Jilin Province Key Laboratory of Animal Embryo Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Shi, Yuling [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN (United States); Center for Adult Cancer Research, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN (United States); Wu, Zhao-Hui, E-mail: zwu6@uthsc.edu [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN (United States); Center for Adult Cancer Research, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-22 is induced in cells treated with UV radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATM is required for miR-22 induction in response to UV. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-22 targets 3 Prime -UTR of PTEN to repress its expression in UV-treated cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upregulated miR-22 inhibits apoptosis in cells exposed to UV. -- Abstract: DNA damage response upon UV radiation involves a complex network of cellular events required for maintaining the homeostasis and restoring genomic stability of the cells. As a new class of players involved in DNA damage response, the regulation and function of microRNAs in response to UV remain poorly understood. Here we show that UV radiation induces a significant increase of miR-22 expression, which appears to be dependent on the activation of DNA damage responding kinase ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated). Increased miR-22 expression may result from enhanced miR-22 maturation in cells exposed to UV. We further found that tumor suppressor gene phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression was inversely correlated with miR-22 induction and UV-induced PTEN repression was attenuated by overexpression of a miR-22 inhibitor. Moreover, increased miR-22 expression significantly inhibited the activation of caspase signaling cascade, leading to enhanced cell survival upon UV radiation. Collectively, these results indicate that miR-22 is an important player in the cellular stress response upon UV radiation, which may promote cell survival via the repression of PTEN expression.

  2. Dominant Repression by Arabidopsis Transcription Factor MYB44 Causes Oxidative Damage and Hypersensitivity to Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Persak

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In any living species, stress adaptation is closely linked with major changes of the gene expression profile. As a substrate protein of the rapidly stress-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase MPK3, Arabidopsis transcription factor MYB44 likely acts at the front line of stress-induced re-programming. We recently characterized MYB44 as phosphorylation-dependent positive regulator of salt stress signaling. Molecular events downstream of MYB44 are largely unknown. Although MYB44 binds to the MBSII element in vitro, it has no discernible effect on MBSII-driven reporter gene expression in plant co-transfection assays. This may suggest limited abundance of a synergistic co-regulator. MYB44 carries a putative transcriptional repression (Ethylene responsive element binding factor-associated Amphiphilic Repression, EAR motif. We employed a dominant repressor strategy to gain insights into MYB44-conferred stress resistance. Overexpression of a MYB44-REP fusion markedly compromised salt and drought stress tolerance—the opposite was seen in MYB44 overexpression lines. MYB44-mediated resistance likely results from induction of tolerance-enhancing, rather than from repression of tolerance-diminishing factors. Salt stress-induced accumulation of destructive reactive oxygen species is efficiently prevented in transgenic MYB44, but accelerated in MYB44-REP lines. Furthermore, heterologous overexpression of MYB44-REP caused tissue collapse in Nicotiana. A mechanistic model of MAPK-MYB-mediated enhancement in the antioxidative capacity and stress tolerance is proposed. Genetic engineering of MYB44 variants with higher trans-activating capacity may be a means to further raise stress resistance in crops.

  3. Dexamethasone Induces Cardiomyocyte Terminal Differentiation via Epigenetic Repression of Cyclin D2 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Maresha S; Dasgupta, Chiranjib; Li, Yong; Kanna, Angela; Zhang, Lubo

    2016-08-01

    Dexamethasone treatment of newborn rats inhibited cardiomyocyte proliferation and stimulated premature terminal differentiation of cardiomyocytes in the developing heart. Yet mechanisms remain undetermined. The present study tested the hypothesis that the direct effect of glucocorticoid receptor-mediated epigenetic repression of cyclin D2 gene in the cardiomyocyte plays a key role in the dexamethasone-mediated effects in the developing heart. Cardiomyocytes were isolated from 2-day-old rats. Cells were stained with a cardiomyocyte marker α-actinin and a proliferation marker Ki67. Cyclin D2 expression was evaluated by Western blot and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Promoter methylation of CcnD2 was determined by methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP). Overexpression of Cyclin D2 was conducted by transfection of FlexiCcnD2 (+CcnD2) construct. Treatment of cardiomyocytes isolated from newborn rats with dexamethasone for 48 hours significantly inhibited cardiomyocyte proliferation with increased binucleation and decreased cyclin D2 protein abundance. These effects were blocked with Ru486 (mifepristone). In addition, the dexamethasone treatment significantly increased cyclin D2 gene promoter methylation in newborn rat cardiomyocytes. 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine inhibited dexamethasone-mediated promoter methylation, recovered dexamethasone-induced cyclin D2 gene repression, and blocked the dexamethasone-elicited effects on cardiomyocyte proliferation and binucleation. In addition, the overexpression of cyclin D2 restored the dexamethasone-mediated inhibition of proliferation and increase in binucleation in newborn rat cardiomyocytes. The results demonstrate that dexamethasone acting on glucocorticoid receptors has a direct effect and inhibits proliferation and stimulates premature terminal differentiation of cardiomyocytes in the developing heart via epigenetic repression of cyclin D2 gene. PMID:27302109

  4. Tbx3 represses PTEN and is over-expressed in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgucu Durmus

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite advances in diagnostic and treatment strategies, head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC constitutes one of the worst cancer types in terms of prognosis. PTEN is one of the tumour suppressors whose expression and/or activity have been found to be reduced in HNSCC, with rather low rates of mutations within the PTEN gene (6-8%. We reasoned that low expression levels of PTEN might be due to a transcriptional repression governed by an oncogene. Tbx2 and Tbx3, both of which are transcriptional repressors, have been found to be amplified or over-expressed in various cancer types. Thus, we hypothesize that Tbx3 may be over expressed in HNSCC and may repress PTEN, thus leading to cancer formation and/or progression. Methods Using immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR (qPCR, protein and mRNA levels of PTEN and Tbx3 were identified in samples excised from cancerous and adjacent normal tissues from 33 patients who were diagnosed with HNSCC. In addition, HeLa and HEK cell lines were transfected with a Tbx3 expressing plasmid and endogenous PTEN mRNA and protein levels were determined via qPCR and flow cytometry. Transcription assays were performed to demonstrate effects of Tbx3 on PTEN promoter activity. Mann–Whitney, Spearman’s Correlation and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to analyze the data. Results We demonstrate that in HNSCC samples, Tbx3 mRNA levels are increased with respect to their normal tissue counterparts (p Conclusions We show that Tbx3 is up-regulated in tissue samples of HNSCC patients and that Tbx3 represses PTEN transcription. Thus, our data not only reveals a new mechanism that may be important in cancer formation, but also suggests that Tbx3 can be used as a potential biomarker in cancer.

  5. Emotional repression, stress disclosure responses, and Epstein-Barr viral capsid antigen titers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esterling, B A; Antoni, M H; Kumar, M; Schneiderman, N

    1990-01-01

    Based on the theory of psychosomatic inhibition, we hypothesized that subjects who abstained from disclosing emotional material on a laboratory task would have poorer control of latent Epstein-Barr virus (as evidenced by high titers for the viral capsid antigen), and similarly, those subjects with psychometrically derived repressive interpersonal styles would show the highest Epstein-Barr viral capsid antigen titers (EBV-VCA). Eighty first-year undergraduates completed a personality inventory and were asked to write an essay/letter for 30 minutes about a stressful event that had happened in their life. Blood was collected from each subject immediately after writing. Essays were scored for degree of emotional disclosure according to the ratio of emotional-to-total words used. Degree of disclosure was found to be associated with impaired control of latent EBV (high antibody titers to the EBV-VCA) controlling for medication use, recent sleep loss, physical activity, lean body mass, caloric intake, and alcohol and recreational drug use. Further, individual differences in interpersonal style (characterized by emotional suppression) related to this immunologic marker in a similar fashion, and these two factors interacted in determining EBV-VCA titers. That is, Repressors who were either high or low disclosers had high levels of antibody titer to EBV-VCA, whereas only those Sensitizers who did not disclose had high antibody titers to EBV-VCA. In addition to supporting the hypothesis that emotional repression is associated with some aspects of host-virus interaction, the present findings highlight the importance of obtaining behavioral and psychometric assessments in psychoimmunologic investigations of this abstract affective construct (i.e., repression). PMID:2169064

  6. History and peasant memory: Silences and representations on peasant struggle for land and repression in Ongoy

    OpenAIRE

    Guido Chati

    2015-01-01

    This article argues that there are social spaces in Peru where alternative memories about the political violence that took place between 1980 and 2000 are produced. In Andahuaylas, Apurímac, recurrent narratives tell about servitude in the hacienda, peasant mobilization for the restitution of their land, land occupation and its violent repression. A victorious memory of the land occupation exists alongside of an oppressive memory of internal war. Yet these representations have been silenced b...

  7. Gene expression in self-repressing system with multiple gene copies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miekisz, Jacek; Szymańska, Paulina

    2013-02-01

    We analyze a simple model of a self-repressing system with multiple gene copies. Protein molecules may bound to DNA promoters and block their own transcription. We derive analytical expressions for the variance of the number of protein molecules in the stationary state in the self-consistent mean-field approximation. We show that the Fano factor (the variance divided by the mean value) is bigger for the one-gene case than for two gene copies and the difference decreases to zero as frequencies of binding and unbinding increase to infinity. PMID:23354928

  8. Gene Expression in Self-repressing System with Multiple Gene Copies

    OpenAIRE

    Miȩkisz, Jacek; Szymańska, Paulina

    2013-01-01

    We analyze a simple model of a self-repressing system with multiple gene copies. Protein molecules may bound to DNA promoters and block their own transcription. We derive analytical expressions for the variance of the number of protein molecules in the stationary state in the self-consistent mean-field approximation. We show that the Fano factor (the variance divided by the mean value) is bigger for the one-gene case than for two gene copies and the difference decreases to zero as frequencies...

  9. Bureau-repression: Administrative Sanction and Social Control in Modern Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Oliver Olmo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper explains the creation of an intelligible suggestion for better understanding the administrative sanction in many disciplines in social sciences: the bureau-repression. The coining of this concept is due especially to the repression to which social protestors and demonstrators have been subject since the birth of the 15-M movement in Spain. However, bureau-repression had already begun being exercised in the years following the Transition, and it has developed in parallel to the stage of Security State that characterizes the state system of social control. A detailed analysis of the administrative sanction is performed for many benefits which such sanction provides for those in power, who use it both to silence voices from the street and to dispose of elements which are harmful for the neoliberal system (disadvantaged groups or immigrants. In short, the reader will find the underlying political and repressive background which, at first glance, is usually a monetary fine, and will discover that there are ways to avoid this dense surveillance exercised over the governed people (bureau-resistance. Este artículo explica la creación de una sugerencia inteligible para una mejor comprensión de la sanción administrativa en muchas disciplinas de las ciencias sociales: la burorrepresión. Este término nació especialmente a raíz de la represión que han sufrido los manifestantes de las protestas sociales desde el nacimiento del movimiento 15-M en España. Sin embargo, la burorrepresión ya había comenzado a ejercerse en los años que siguieron a la Transición, y se ha desarrollado de forma paralela al estado de seguridad que caracteriza el sistema estatal de control social. Se realiza un análisis detallado de la sanción administrativa, desarrollada en beneficio de los que están en el poder, quienes la usan tanto para silenciar las voces de la calle como para deshacerse de elementos que sean perjudiciales para el sistema neoliberal

  10. Tbx3 represses PTEN and is over-expressed in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite advances in diagnostic and treatment strategies, head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) constitutes one of the worst cancer types in terms of prognosis. PTEN is one of the tumour suppressors whose expression and/or activity have been found to be reduced in HNSCC, with rather low rates of mutations within the PTEN gene (6-8%). We reasoned that low expression levels of PTEN might be due to a transcriptional repression governed by an oncogene. Tbx2 and Tbx3, both of which are transcriptional repressors, have been found to be amplified or over-expressed in various cancer types. Thus, we hypothesize that Tbx3 may be over expressed in HNSCC and may repress PTEN, thus leading to cancer formation and/or progression. Using immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR (qPCR), protein and mRNA levels of PTEN and Tbx3 were identified in samples excised from cancerous and adjacent normal tissues from 33 patients who were diagnosed with HNSCC. In addition, HeLa and HEK cell lines were transfected with a Tbx3 expressing plasmid and endogenous PTEN mRNA and protein levels were determined via qPCR and flow cytometry. Transcription assays were performed to demonstrate effects of Tbx3 on PTEN promoter activity. Mann–Whitney, Spearman’s Correlation and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to analyze the data. We demonstrate that in HNSCC samples, Tbx3 mRNA levels are increased with respect to their normal tissue counterparts (p<0.001), whereas PTEN mRNA levels are significantly reduced in cancer tissues. Moreover, Tbx3 protein is also increased in HNSCC tissue sections. Over-expression of Tbx3 in HeLa and HEK cell lines causes reduction in endogenous PTEN mRNA and protein levels. In addition, transcription activity assays reveal that Tbx3 is capable of repressing both the basal and induced promoter activity of PTEN. We show that Tbx3 is up-regulated in tissue samples of HNSCC patients and that Tbx3 represses PTEN transcription. Thus, our data not only reveals a new

  11. Cyclin D1 repression of nuclear respiratory factor 1 integrates nuclear DNA synthesis and mitochondrial function

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Chenguang; Li, Zhiping; Lu, Yinan; Du, Runlei; Katiyar, Sanjay; Yang, Jianguo; Fu, Maofu; Leader, Jennifer E.; Quong, Andrew; Novikoff, Phyllis M.; Pestell, Richard G

    2006-01-01

    Cyclin D1 promotes nuclear DNA synthesis through phosphorylation and inactivation of the pRb tumor suppressor. Herein, cyclin D1 deficiency increased mitochondrial size and activity that was rescued by cyclin D1 in a Cdk-dependent manner. Nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1), which induces nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes, was repressed in expression and activity by cyclin D1. Cyclin D1-dependent kinase phosphorylates NRF-1 at S47. Cyclin D1 abundance thus coordinates nuclear DNA synthesis...

  12. Repression of RNA Polymerase I Transcription by the Tumor Suppressor p53

    OpenAIRE

    Zhai, Weiguo; Comai, Lucio

    2000-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 is frequently inactivated in tumors. It functions as a transcriptional activator as well as a repressor for a number of viral and cellular promoters transcribed by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and by RNA Pol III. Moreover, it appears that p53 also suppresses RNA Pol I transcription. In this study, we examined the molecular mechanism of Pol I transcriptional inhibition by p53. We show that wild-type, but not mutant, p53 can repress Pol I transcription from a huma...

  13. PTEN Represses RNA Polymerase I Transcription by Disrupting the SL1 Complex†

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Cheng; Comai, Lucio; Johnson, Deborah L.

    2005-01-01

    PTEN is a tumor suppressor whose function is frequently lost in human cancer. It possesses a lipid phosphatase activity that represses the activation of PI3 kinase/Akt signaling, leading to decreased cell growth, proliferation, and survival. The potential for PTEN to regulate transcription of the large rRNAs by RNA polymerase I (RNA Pol I) was investigated. As increased synthesis of rRNAs is a hallmark of neoplastic transformation, the ability of PTEN to control the transcription of rRNAs mig...

  14. Cold shock domain proteins repress transcription from the GM-CSF promoter.

    OpenAIRE

    Coles, L S; P. Diamond; Occhiodoro, F; Vadas, M A; Shannon, M F

    1996-01-01

    The human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene promoter binds a sequence-specific single-strand DNA binding protein termed NF-GMb. We previously demonstrated that the NF-GMb binding sites were required for repression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) induction of the proximal GM-CSF promoter sequences in fibroblasts. We now describe the isolation of two different cDNA clones that encode cold shock domain (CSD) proteins with NF-GMb binding characteristics. On...

  15. Product binding enforces the genomic specificity of a yeast Polycomb repressive complex

    OpenAIRE

    Dumesic, Phillip A.; Homer, Christina M.; Moresco, James J.; Pack, Lindsey R.; Shanle, Erin K.; Coyle, Scott M.; Strahl, Brian D.; Fujimori, Danica G.; John R Yates; Madhani, Hiten D.

    2014-01-01

    We characterize the Polycomb system that assembles repressive subtelomeric domains of H3K27 methylation (H3K27me) in the yeast Cryptococcus neoformans. Purification of this PRC2-like protein complex reveals orthologs of animal PRC2 components as well as a chromodomain-containing subunit, Ccc1, which recognizes H3K27me. Whereas removal of either the EZH or EED ortholog eliminates H3K27me, disruption of mark recognition by Ccc1 causes H3K27me to redistribute. Strikingly, the resulting pattern o...

  16. Translationally Repressed mRNA Transiently Cycles through Stress Granules during Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Mollet, Stephanie; Cougot, Nicolas; Wilczynska, Ania; Dautry, François; Kress, Michel; Bertrand, Edouard; Weil, Dominique

    2008-01-01

    In mammals, repression of translation during stress is associated with the assembly of stress granules in the cytoplasm, which contain a fraction of arrested mRNA and have been proposed to play a role in their storage. Because physical contacts are seen with GW bodies, which contain the mRNA degradation machinery, stress granules could also target arrested mRNA to degradation. Here we show that contacts between stress granules and GW bodies appear during stress-granule assembly and not after ...

  17. Repression of a mating type cassette in the fission yeast by four DNA elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekwall, K; Nielsen, O; Ruusala, T;

    1991-01-01

    difference between the active and the silent stage of the P determinant is controlled by four repressive elements that are located at the silent locus. There are two elements to the left and two to the right of the mating type cassette. Both elements to the left and either one of the two elements to the...... right are required for an effective blockage of transcription. When they are combined, the four elements define a highly efficient silencer functionally similar to the HMRE and HMLE and HMLI silencers in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition, the DNA surrounding the silent P locus confers symmetric...

  18. G9a selectively represses a class of late-replicating genes at the nuclear periphery

    OpenAIRE

    Yokochi, Tomoki; Poduch, Kristina; Ryba, Tyrone; Lu, Junjie; Hiratani, Ichiro; Tachibana, Makoto; Shinkai, Yoichi; Gilbert, David M.

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the role of the histone methyltransferase G9a in the establishment of silent nuclear compartments. Following conditional knockout of the G9a methyltransferase in mouse ESCs, 167 genes were significantly up-regulated, and no genes were strongly down-regulated. A partially overlapping set of 119 genes were up-regulated after differentiation of G9a-depleted cells to neural precursors. Promoters of these G9a-repressed genes were AT rich and H3K9me2 enriched but H3K4me3 deplet...

  19. PADI4 acts as a coactivator of Tal1 by counteracting repressive histone arginine methylation.

    OpenAIRE

    Kolodziej, Stephan; Kuvardina, Olga N.; Oellerich, Thomas; Herglotz, Julia; Backert, Ingo; Kohrs, Nicole; Buscató, Estel la; Wittmann, Sandra K.; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Bonig, Halvard; Karas, Michael; Serve, Hubert; Proschak, Ewgenij; Lausen, Jörn

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor Tal1 is a critical activator or repressor of gene expression in hematopoiesis and leukaemia. The mechanism by which Tal1 differentially influences transcription of distinct genes is not fully understood. Here we show that Tal1 interacts with the peptidylarginine deiminase IV (PADI4). We demonstrate that PADI4 can act as an epigenetic coactivator through influencing H3R2me2a. At the Tal1/PADI4 target gene IL6ST the repressive H3R2me2a mark triggered by PRMT6 is counter...

  20. Simian Virus 40 Large T Overcomes p300 Repression of c-Myc

    OpenAIRE

    Singhal, Ghata; KADEPPAGARI, RAVI KUMAR; Sankar, Natesan; Thimmapaya, Bayar

    2008-01-01

    We previously showed that in quiescent cells p300/CBP negatively regulates the cell cycle G1-S transition by keeping c-Myc in a repressed state and that adenovirus E1A induces c-Myc by binding to p300/CBP. Studies have shown that p300/CBP binding to simian virus 40 large T is indirect and mediated by p53. By using a series of large T mutants that fail to bind to various cellular proteins including p53 as well as cells where p300 is overexpressed or p53 is knocked down, we show that the associ...

  1. Mutations that relieve nutritional repression of the Bacillus subtilis dipeptide permease operon.

    OpenAIRE

    Slack, F J; Mueller, J P; Sonenshein, A L

    1993-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis dciA operon encodes a dipeptide transport complex that is induced rapidly as cells enter stationary phase and initiate sporulation. Expression of this operon in growing cells is repressed by glucose, by a mixture of amino acids, and by the AbrB protein. A genetic screen was devised to identify mutations that allow inappropriate expression from the dciA promoter during growth. These mutations resulted in increased dciA transcription during growth in nutrient broth, in min...

  2. Individual differences in self-reported thought control: the role of the repressive coping sytle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciano, Juan Vicente; Algarabel, Salvador

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of the present research is to assess differences between repressors and non repressors in some aspects associated with conscious thought control. Thus, Sixty-three Spanish university students with different combinations of trait anxiety and defensiveness completed the Thought Control Ability Questionnaire (TCAQ) and the White Bear Suppression Inventory (WBSI). Data analysis showed that subjects with low anxiety (repressors and low anxious) reported higher perceived ability to control unpleasant thoughts and less tendency to suppress than did subjects with high anxiety (high anxious and defensive high anxious). Implications of these results are discussed in relation to recent researches that have explored the association between repression and thought suppression. PMID:17296036

  3. PABP and the poly(A) tail augment microRNA repression by facilitated miRISC binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Francesca; Kaiser, Constanze; Zdanowicz-Specht, Agnieszka; Hentze, Matthias W

    2012-06-01

    Polyadenylated mRNAs are typically more strongly repressed by microRNAs (miRNAs) than their nonadenylated counterparts. Using a Drosophila melanogaster cell-free translation system, we found that this effect is mediated by the poly(A)-binding protein (PABP). miRNA repression was positively correlated with poly(A) tail length, but this stimulatory effect on repression was lost when translation was repressed by the tethered GW182 silencing domain rather than the miRNA-induced silencing complex (miRISC) itself. These findings are mechanistically explained by a notable function of PABP: it promotes association of miRISC with miRNA-regulated mRNAs. We also found that PABP association with mRNA rapidly diminished with miRISC recruitment and before detectable deadenylation. We integrated these data into a revised model for the function of PABP and the poly(A) tail in miRNA-mediated translational repression. PMID:22635249

  4. Polycomb repressive complex 2 regulates MiR-200b in retinal endothelial cells: potential relevance in diabetic retinopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Anthony Ruiz

    Full Text Available Glucose-induced augmented vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF production is a key event in diabetic retinopathy. We have previously demonstrated that downregulation of miR-200b increases VEGF, mediating structural and functional changes in the retina in diabetes. However, mechanisms regulating miR-200b in diabetes are not known. Histone methyltransferase complex, Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2, has been shown to repress miRNAs in neoplastic process. We hypothesized that, in diabetes, PRC2 represses miR-200b through its histone H3 lysine-27 trimethylation mark. We show that human retinal microvascular endothelial cells exposed to high levels of glucose regulate miR-200b repression through histone methylation and that inhibition of PRC2 increases miR-200b while reducing VEGF. Furthermore, retinal tissue from animal models of diabetes showed increased expression of major PRC2 components, demonstrating in vivo relevance. This research established a repressive relationship between PRC2 and miR-200b, providing evidence of a novel mechanism of miRNA regulation through histone methylation.

  5. E2F-Rb Complexes Assemble and Inhibit cdc25A Transcription in Cervical Carcinoma Cells following Repression of Human Papillomavirus Oncogene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Lingling; Goodwin, Edward C.; Naeger, Lisa Kay; Vigo, Elena; Galaktionov, Konstantin; Helin, Kristian; DiMaio, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Expression of the bovine papillomavirus E2 protein in cervical carcinoma cells represses expression of integrated human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogenes, followed by repression of the cdc25A gene and other cellular genes required for cell cycle progression, resulting in dramatic growth arrest. To explore the mechanism of repression of cell cycle genes in cervical carcinoma cells following E6/E7 repression, we analyzed regulation of the cdc25A promoter, which contains two consensus E2F bin...

  6. Translational Repression of NhaR, a Novel Pathway for Multi-Tier Regulation of Biofilm Circuitry by CsrA

    OpenAIRE

    Pannuri, Archana; Yakhnin, Helen; Vakulskas, Christopher A.; Edwards, Adrianne N.; Babitzke, Paul; Romeo, Tony

    2012-01-01

    The RNA binding protein CsrA (RsmA) represses biofilm formation in several proteobacterial species. In Escherichia coli, it represses the production of the polysaccharide adhesin poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (PGA) by binding to the pgaABCD mRNA leader, inhibiting pgaA translation, and destabilizing this transcript. In addition, CsrA represses genes responsible for the synthesis of cyclic di-GMP, an activator of PGA production. Here we determined that CsrA also represses NhaR, a LysR-type...

  7. Epigenetic repression of ribosomal RNA transcription by ROCK-dependent aberrant cytoskeletal organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tse-Hsiang; Kuo, Yuan-Yeh; Lee, Hsiao-Hui; Kuo, Jean-Cheng; Ou, Meng-Hsin; Chang, Zee-Fen

    2016-01-01

    It is known that ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis is regulated by cellular energy and proliferation status. In this study, we investigated rRNA gene transcription in response to cytoskeletal stress. Our data revealed that the cell shape constrained by isotropic but not elongated micropatterns in HeLa cells led to a significant reduction in rRNA transcription dependent on ROCK. Expression of a dominant-active form of ROCK also repressed rRNA transcription. Isotropic constraint and ROCK over-activation led to different types of aberrant F-actin organization, but their suppression effects on rRNA transcription were similarly reversed by inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) or overexpression of a dominant negative form of Nesprin, which shields the signal transmitted from actin filament to the nuclear interior. We further showed that the binding of HDAC1 to the active fraction of rDNA genes is increased by ROCK over-activation, thus reducing H3K9/14 acetylation and suppressing transcription. Our results demonstrate an epigenetic control of active rDNA genes that represses rRNA transcription in response to the cytoskeletal stress. PMID:27350000

  8. Military westernization and state repression in the post-Cold War era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swed, Ori; Weinreb, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    The waves of unrest that have shaken the Arab world since December 2010 have highlighted significant differences in the readiness of the military to intervene in political unrest by forcefully suppressing dissent. We suggest that in the post-Cold War period, this readiness is inversely associated with the level of military westernization, which is a product of the acquisition of arms from western countries. We identify two mechanisms linking the acquisition of arms from western countries to less repressive responses: dependence and conditionality; and a longer-term diffusion of ideologies regarding the proper form of civil-military relations. Empirical support for our hypothesis is found in an analysis of 2523 cases of government response to political unrest in 138 countries in the 1996-2005 period. We find that military westernization mitigates state repression in general, with more pronounced effects in the poorest countries. However, we also identify substantial differences between the pre- and post-9/11 periods. PMID:26188453

  9. Repression of protein translation and mTOR signaling by proteasome inhibitor in colon cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protein homeostasis relies on a balance between protein synthesis and protein degradation. The ubiquitin-proteasome system is a major catabolic pathway for protein degradation. In this respect, proteasome inhibition has been used therapeutically for the treatment of cancer. Whether inhibition of protein degradation by proteasome inhibitor can repress protein translation via a negative feedback mechanism, however, is unknown. In this study, proteasome inhibitor MG-132 lowered the proliferation of colon cancer cells HT-29 and SW1116. In this connection, MG-132 reduced the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) at Ser2448 and Ser2481 and the phosphorylation of its downstream targets 4E-BP1 and p70/p85 S6 kinases. Further analysis revealed that MG-132 inhibited protein translation as evidenced by the reductions of 35S-methionine incorporation and polysomes/80S ratio. Knockdown of raptor, a structural component of mTOR complex 1, mimicked the anti-proliferative effect of MG-132. To conclude, we demonstrate that the inhibition of protein degradation by proteasome inhibitor represses mTOR signaling and protein translation in colon cancer cells.

  10. Authoritarianism, control and vigilance: Jacob Gorender on the aim of the repression (1940-1980

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucileide Costa Cardoso

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to demonstrate through analysis of documents of repressive nature, the elements highlighted by the Military Justice to establish the trace of persecution of the intellectuals among other social sectors which dared to challenge the Dictatorship. The complete mapping, involving the combat strategies against the “communism”, including the knowledge of the political parties and their military staff, was accumulated by police and military sectors along the 20th century. We intended to follow, through these records, the political trajectory of the intellectual Jacob Gorender. As a journalist, he got involved in the discussion about the Brazilian participation in the World War II, joined the FEB in 1943. Before that, however, Gorender became a communist, recruited by Mario Alves in 1942. In the early 60’s, he acted as a militant and coordinator of PCB, when he decided to join PCBR, founded in 1968. The historian, in the beginning of the 1964 Strike, with his life already devastated by the Information and Security Community, experienced marginalization, imprisonment, torture and censorship of his writings among other abuses that also reached his closest friends, political companions and family members. The crossing of this amount of information with the memorial documents helps to understand the political repression tricks and the different Revolutionary projects in course.

  11. p53 represses human papillomavirus type 16 DNA replication via the viral E2 protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Iain M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV DNA replication can be inhibited by the cellular tumour suppressor protein p53. However, the mechanism through which p53 inhibits viral replication and the role that this might play in the HPV life cycle are not known. The papillomavirus E2 protein is required for efficient HPV DNA replication and also regulates viral gene expression. E2 represses transcription of the HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes and can thereby modulate indirectly host cell proliferation and survival. In addition, the E2 protein from HPV 16 has been shown to bind p53 and to be capable of inducing apoptosis independently of E6 and E7. Results Here we use a panel of E2 mutants to confirm that mutations which block the induction of apoptosis via this E6/E7-independent pathway, have little or no effect on the induction of apoptosis by the E6/E7-dependent pathway. Although these mutations in E2 do not affect the ability of the protein to mediate HPV DNA replication, they do abrogate the repressive effects of p53 on the transcriptional activity of E2 and prevent the inhibition of E2-dependent HPV DNA replication by p53. Conclusion These data suggest that p53 down-regulates HPV 16 DNA replication via the E2 protein.

  12. RNA-binding protein RBM20 represses splicing to orchestrate cardiac pre-mRNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maatz, Henrike; Jens, Marvin; Liss, Martin; Schafer, Sebastian; Heinig, Matthias; Kirchner, Marieluise; Adami, Eleonora; Rintisch, Carola; Dauksaite, Vita; Radke, Michael H; Selbach, Matthias; Barton, Paul J R; Cook, Stuart A; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Gotthardt, Michael; Landthaler, Markus; Hubner, Norbert

    2014-08-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the RNA-binding protein RBM20 have been implicated in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), a major cause of chronic heart failure, presumably through altering cardiac RNA splicing. Here, we combined transcriptome-wide crosslinking immunoprecipitation (CLIP-seq), RNA-seq, and quantitative proteomics in cell culture and rat and human hearts to examine how RBM20 regulates alternative splicing in the heart. Our analyses revealed the presence of a distinct RBM20 RNA-recognition element that is predominantly found within intronic binding sites and linked to repression of exon splicing with RBM20 binding near 3' and 5' splice sites. Proteomic analysis determined that RBM20 interacts with both U1 and U2 small nuclear ribonucleic particles (snRNPs) and suggested that RBM20-dependent splicing repression occurs through spliceosome stalling at complex A. Direct RBM20 targets included several genes previously shown to be involved in DCM as well as genes not typically associated with this disease. In failing human hearts, reduced expression of RBM20 affected alternative splicing of several direct targets, indicating that differences in RBM20 expression may affect cardiac function. Together, these findings identify RBM20-regulated targets and provide insight into the pathogenesis of human heart failure. PMID:24960161

  13. miR-29 Represses the Activities of DNA Methyltransferases and DNA Demethylases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izuho Hatada

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Members of the microRNA-29 (miR-29 family directly target the DNA methyltransferases, DNMT3A and DNMT3B. Disturbances in the expression levels of miR-29 have been linked to tumorigenesis and tumor aggressiveness. Members of the miR-29 family are currently thought to repress DNA methylation and suppress tumorigenesis by protecting against de novo methylation. Here, we report that members of the miR-29 family repress the activities of DNA methyltransferases and DNA demethylases, which have opposing roles in control of DNA methylation status. Members of the miR-29 family directly inhibited DNA methyltransferases and two major factors involved in DNA demethylation, namely tet methylcytosine dioxygenase 1 (TET1 and thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG. Overexpression of miR-29 upregulated the global DNA methylation level in some cancer cells and downregulated DNA methylation in other cancer cells, suggesting that miR-29 suppresses tumorigenesis by protecting against changes in the existing DNA methylation status rather than by preventing de novo methylation of DNA.

  14. Nitric oxide inhibits larval settlement in Amphibalanus amphitrite cyprids by repressing muscle locomotion and molting

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Gen

    2015-08-28

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a universal signaling molecule and plays a negative role in the metamorphosis of many biphasic organisms. Recently, the NO/NO (cyclic guanosine monophosphate) signaling pathway was reported to repress larval settlement in the barnacle Amphibalanus amphitrite. To understand the underlying molecular mechanism, we analyzed changes in the proteome of A. amphitrite cyprids in response to different concentrations of the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 62.5, 250 and 1000 μM) using a label-free proteomics method. Compared with the control, the expression of 106 proteins differed in all three treatments. These differentially expressed proteins were assigned to 13 pathways based on KEGG pathway enrichment analysis. SNP treatment stimulated the expression of heat shock proteins and arginine kinase, which are functionally related to NO synthases, increased the expression levels of glutathione transferases for detoxification, and activated the iron-mediated fatty acid degradation pathway and the citrate cycle through ferritin. Moreover, NO repressed the level of myosins and cuticular proteins, which indicated that NO might inhibit larval settlement in A. amphitrite by modulating the process of muscle locomotion and molting.

  15. A Maternal System Initiating the Zygotic Developmental Program through Combinatorial Repression in the Ascidian Embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda-Ishii, Izumi; Kubo, Atsushi; Kari, Willi; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Rothbächer, Ute

    2016-01-01

    Maternal factors initiate the zygotic developmental program in animal embryos. In embryos of the chordate, Ciona intestinalis, three maternal factors—Gata.a, β-catenin, and Zic-r.a—are required to establish three domains of gene expression at the 16-cell stage; the animal hemisphere, vegetal hemisphere, and posterior vegetal domains. Here, we show how the maternal factors establish these domains. First, only β-catenin and its effector transcription factor, Tcf7, are required to establish the vegetal hemisphere domain. Second, genes specifically expressed in the posterior vegetal domain have additional repressive cis-elements that antagonize the activity of β-catenin/Tcf7. This antagonizing activity is suppressed by Zic-r.a, which is specifically localized in the posterior vegetal domain and binds to DNA indirectly through the interaction with Tcf7. Third, Gata.a directs specific gene expression in the animal hemisphere domain, because β-catenin/Tcf7 weakens the Gata.a-binding activity for target sites through a physical interaction in the vegetal cells. Thus, repressive regulation through protein-protein interactions among the maternal transcription factors is essential to establish the first distinct domains of gene expression in the chordate embryo. PMID:27152625

  16. Repressive coping style: relationships with depression, pain, and pain coping strategies in lung cancer outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasertsri, Nusara; Holden, Janean; Keefe, Francis J; Wilkie, Diana J

    2011-02-01

    Researchers have shown that coping style is related to pain and adjustment in people with chronic illness. This study was the first to examine how coping style related to pain, pain coping strategies, and depression in lung cancer outpatients. We conducted a comparative, secondary data analysis of 107 lung cancer patients (73% male, mean age 61.4±10.43 years, 88% Caucasian). As in prior studies, we classified patients into four coping style groups based on Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale and trait anxiety scores. The coping style groups were low-anxious (n=25); high-anxious (n=31); defensive high-anxious (n=21); and repressive (n=30). Compared to other coping style groups, the repressive group reported statistically significant lower mean scores for pain quality, pain catastrophizing, and depression. Assessing coping style by measuring personal characteristics such as social desirability and trait anxiety may help clinicians to identify vulnerable individuals with lung cancer who may be candidates for early and timely intervention efforts to enhance adjustment to pain. PMID:20557973

  17. Chronic idiopathic urticaria, psychological co-morbidity and posttraumatic stress: the impact of alexithymia and repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunkin, Victoria; Chung, Man Cheung

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the interrelationship between chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU), psychological co-morbidity, posttraumatic stress, repression and alexithymia. 89 participants with CIU and 105 without CIU responded to an online questionnaire. Both groups completed the general health questionnaire-12, the perceived stress scale, the posttraumatic stress diagnostic scale and the Toronto alexithymia scale-20 and were categorised into four defence mechanism groups (repressive, defensive, high-anxious, low-anxious). CIU participants also completed the Skindex-17 and a self-report severity measure. CIU participants reported higher levels of alexithymia than the control group and their defence mechanism was most likely to be categorised as defensive, with conscious self-image management reported alongside high manifest anxiety. Partial least squares analysis revealed significant paths between posttraumatic stress and CIU severity and psychological co-morbidity. Posttraumatic stress was associated with alexithymia and type of defence mechanism. Only being in the high-anxious group partially mediated the relationship between posttraumatic stress and CIU severity. In conclusion, there is evidence for a relationship between CIU and trauma. The severity of posttraumatic symptoms varies depending upon alexithymic traits and defence mechanisms used. Disease severity and psychological co-morbidity are differentially influenced by the relationships between trauma, alexithymic traits and defence mechanisms. PMID:22362490

  18. Mycobacterium leprae induces NF-κB-dependent transcription repression in human Schwann cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy, invades peripheral nerve Schwann cells, resulting in deformities associated with this disease. NF-κB is an important transcription factor involved in the regulation of host immune antimicrobial responses. We aimed in this work to investigate NF-κB signaling pathways in the human ST88-14 Schwannoma cell line infected with M. leprae. Gel shift and supershift assays indicate that two NF-κB dimers, p65/p50 and p50/p50, translocate to the nucleus in Schwann cells treated with lethally irradiated M. leprae. Consistent with p65/p50 and p50/p50 activation, we observed IκB-α degradation and reduction of p105 levels. The nuclear translocation of p50/p50 complex due to M. leprae treatment correlated with repression of NF-κB-driven transcription induced by TNF-α. Moreover, thalidomide inhibited p50 homodimer nuclear translocation induced by M. leprae and consequently rescues Schwann cells from NF-κB-dependent transcriptional repression. Here, we report for the first time that M. leprae induces NF-κB activation in Schwann cells and thalidomide is able to modulate this activation

  19. SUMOylation regulates the transcriptional repression activity of FOG-2 and its association with GATA-4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Perdomo

    Full Text Available Friend of GATA 2 (FOG-2, a co-factor of several GATA transcription factors (GATA-4, -5 and 6, is a critical regulator of coronary vessel formation and heart morphogenesis. Here we demonstrate that FOG-2 is SUMOylated and that this modification modulates its transcriptional activity. FOG-2 SUMOylation occurs at four lysine residues (K324, 471, 915, 955 [corrected]. Three of these residues are part of the characteristic SUMO consensus site (ψKXE, while K955 is found in the less frequent TKXE motif. Absence of SUMOylation did not affect FOG-2's nuclear localization. However, mutation of the FOG-2 SUMOylation sites, or de-SUMOylation, with SENP-1 or SENP-8 resulted in stronger transcriptional repression activity in both heterologous cells and cardiomyocytes. Conversely, increased FOG-2 SUMOylation by overexpression of SUMO-1 or expression of a SUMO-1-FOG-2 fusion protein rendered FOG-2 incapable of repressing GATA-4-mediated activation of the B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP promoter. Moreover, we demonstrate both increased interaction between a FOG-2 SUMO mutant and GATA-4 and enhanced SUMOylation of wild-type FOG-2 by co-expression of GATA-4. These data suggest a new dynamics in which GATA-4 may alter the activity of FOG-2 by influencing its SUMOylation status.

  20. YB1 binds to and represses the p16 tumor suppressor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotake, Yojiro; Ozawa, Yuichi; Harada, Masanori; Kitagawa, Kyoko; Niida, Hiroyuki; Morita, Yasutaka; Tanaka, Kenji; Suda, Takafumi; Kitagawa, Masatoshi

    2013-11-01

    Y box binding protein 1 (YB1) has multiple functions associated with drug resistance, cell proliferation and metastasis through transcriptional and translational regulation. Increased expression of YB1 is closely related to tumor growth and aggressiveness. We showed that YB1 protein levels were decreased through replicative and premature senescence and were correlated with increased expression levels of p16(INK) (4A) tumor suppressor gene. Depletion of YB1 was associated with increased levels of p16 in human and murine primary cells. Forced expression of YB1 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts resulted in decreased expression of p16 and increased cell proliferation. Senescence-associated expression of β-galactosidase was repressed in YB1-over-expressing cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that YB1 directly associates with the p16 promoter. Taken together, all our findings indicate that YB1 directly binds to and represses p16 transcription, subsequently resulting in the promotion of cell growth and prevention of cellular senescence. PMID:24165022

  1. Greves, sindicatos e repressão policial no Rio de Janeiro (1954-1964

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Badaró Mattos

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta parte dos resultados de uma pesquisa sobre as greves e a repressão aos sindicatos no Rio de Janeiro entre 1954 e 1964. Seu objetivo central é rediscutir a relação entre Estado, empresários e trabalhadores organizados no período em questão a partir da dimensão de conflito explicitada nos momentos de greve. Pretendeu-se também apresentar dados mais completos que os anteriormente disponíveis sobre o total e as características das greves, bem como explorar o potencial da documentação policial, aberta à consulta nos últimos anos.This article presents some conclusions on strikes and police repression to trade unions in Rio de Janeiro. The central question is the relation between State, capitalists and organized workers in that moment, with special attention to the conflict dimension expressed by strikes. The article tries to show more complete data about strike numbers and characteristics, as well as to explore the recently opened police documents.

  2. Different mechanisms contribute to the E2-mediated transcriptional repression of human papillomavirus type 18 viral oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeret, C; Desaintes, C; Yaniv, M; Thierry, F

    1997-12-01

    Transcription of the human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV18) E6 and E7 oncogenes is repressed by the viral E2 protein. In C33 cells, we have previously shown that of the four E2 binding sites (E2 BS) present in the HPV18 long control region (LCR), only the binding site adjacent to the TATA box (E2 BS 1) was involved in E2-mediated repression. In the present study, we sought to determine whether this phenomenon was conserved in other cell lines. We first showed that all three E2 BS proximal to the P105 promoter were required for full repression of its activity in HeLa and HaCaT cells. Repression by E2 at E2 BS 2 occurred through the displacement of Sp1. Second, a truncated E2 product, lacking the N-terminal transactivation domain, repressed transcription more efficiently than the full-length protein. Repression was abolished when the N-terminal domain of E2 was replaced by the activation domain of VP16. The VP16-E2 chimeric protein could activate transcription from an LCR mutated in its TATA box. DNA-protein binding studies showed that E2 associates with its four binding sites in the LCR with similar affinities. However, challenge of such complexes with excess binding sites demonstrated that interaction with E2 BS 4 was the most stable while interaction with E2 BS 1 was the least stable. Furthermore, complexes with the full-length E2 were less stable than those formed with the N-terminally truncated protein. PMID:9371593

  3. The N-CoR/Histone Deacetylase 3 Complex Is Required for Repression by Thyroid Hormone Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Ishizuka, Takahiro; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear receptor corepressors (N-CoR) and silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid receptors (SMRT) have both been implicated in thyroid hormone receptor (TR)-mediated repression. Here we show that endogenous N-CoR, TBL1, and histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3), but not HDAC1, -2, or -4, are recruited to a stably integrated reporter gene repressed by unliganded TR as well as the orphan receptor RevErb. Unliganded TR also recruits this complex to a transiently transfected reporter, and transcript...

  4. The OxyS regulatory RNA represses rpoS translation and binds the Hfq (HF-I) protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, A.; Altuvia, S; Tiwari, A; Argaman, L; Hengge-Aronis, R; Storz, G.

    1998-01-01

    The OxyS regulatory RNA integrates the adaptive response to hydrogen peroxide with other cellular stress responses and protects against DNA damage. Among the OxyS targets is the rpoS-encoded sigma(s) subunit of RNA polymerase. Sigma(s) is a central regulator of genes induced by osmotic stress, starvation and entry into stationary phase. We examined the mechanism whereby OxyS represses rpoS expression and found that the OxyS RNA inhibits translation of the rpoS message. This repression is depe...

  5. The Escherichia coli OxyS regulatory RNA represses fhlA translation by blocking ribosome binding.

    OpenAIRE

    Altuvia, S; Zhang, A.; Argaman, L; Tiwari, A; Storz, G.

    1998-01-01

    OxyS is a small untranslated RNA which is induced in response to oxidative stress in Escherichia coli. This novel RNA acts as a global regulator to activate or repress the expression of as many as 40 genes, including the fhlA-encoded transcriptional activator and the rpoS-encoded sigma(s) subunit of RNA polymerase. Deletion analysis of OxyS showed that different domains of the small RNA are required for the regulation of fhlA and rpoS. We examined the mechanism of OxyS repression of fhlA and ...

  6. Different mechanisms contribute to the E2-mediated transcriptional repression of human papillomavirus type 18 viral oncogenes.

    OpenAIRE

    Demeret, C; Desaintes, C.; Yaniv, M; Thierry, F

    1997-01-01

    Transcription of the human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV18) E6 and E7 oncogenes is repressed by the viral E2 protein. In C33 cells, we have previously shown that of the four E2 binding sites (E2 BS) present in the HPV18 long control region (LCR), only the binding site adjacent to the TATA box (E2 BS 1) was involved in E2-mediated repression. In the present study, we sought to determine whether this phenomenon was conserved in other cell lines. We first showed that all three E2 BS proximal to th...

  7. Estradiol repression of tumor necrosis factor-α transcription requires estrogen receptor activation function-2 and is enhanced by coactivators

    OpenAIRE

    An, Jinping; Ribeiro, Ralff C. J.; Webb, Paul; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Kushner, Peter J.; Baxter, John D.; Leitman, Dale C.

    1999-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) promoter was used to explore the molecular mechanisms of estradiol (E2)-dependent repression of gene transcription. E2 inhibited basal activity and abolished TNF-α activation of the TNF-α promoter. The E2-inhibitory element was mapped to the −125 to −82 region of the TNF-α promoter, known as the TNF-responsive element (TNF-RE). An AP-1-like site in the TNF-RE is essential for repression activity. Estrogen receptor (ER) β is more potent than ERα at repressin...

  8. Concentration-dependent repression of the soluble and membrane components of the Streptococcus mutans phosphoenolpyruvate: sugar phosphotransferase system by glucose.

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, I R; L. Gauthier; Desjardins, B; Vadeboncoeur, C

    1989-01-01

    Growth of Streptococcus mutans Ingbritt in continuous culture (pH 7.0, dilution rate of 0.1 h-1) at medium glucose concentrations above 2.6 mM resulted in repression of the sugar-specific membrane components, enzyme IIGlc (EIIGlc) and EIIMan, of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS). In one experiment, significant repression (27-fold) was observed with 73 mM glucose when the glycolytic capacity of the cells was reduced by only 2-fold and when the culture was still gluc...

  9. Wild type p53 transcriptionally represses the SALL2 transcription factor under genotoxic stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Farkas

    Full Text Available SALL2- a member of the Spalt gene family- is a poorly characterized transcription factor found deregulated in various cancers, which suggests it plays a role in the disease. We previously identified SALL2 as a novel interacting protein of neurotrophin receptors and showed that it plays a role in neuronal function, which does not necessarily explain why or how SALL2 is deregulated in cancer. Previous evidences indicate that SALL2 gene is regulated by the WT1 and AP4 transcription factors. Here, we identified SALL2 as a novel downstream target of the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Bioinformatic analysis of the SALL2 gene revealed several putative p53 half sites along the promoter region. Either overexpression of wild-type p53 or induction of the endogenous p53 by the genotoxic agent doxorubicin repressed SALL2 promoter activity in various cell lines. However R175H, R249S, and R248W p53 mutants, frequently found in the tumors of cancer patients, were unable to repress SALL2 promoter activity, suggesting that p53 specific binding to DNA is important for the regulation of SALL2. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated binding of p53 to one of the identified p53 half sites in the Sall2 promoter, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed in vivo interaction of p53 with the promoter region of Sall2 containing this half site. Importantly, by using a p53ER (TAM knockin model expressing a variant of p53 that is completely dependent on 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen for its activity, we show that p53 activation diminished SALL2 RNA and protein levels during genotoxic cellular stress in primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs and radiosensitive tissues in vivo. Thus, our finding indicates that p53 represses SALL2 expression in a context-specific manner, adding knowledge to the understanding of SALL2 gene regulation, and to a potential mechanism for its deregulation in cancer.

  10. Sequence Classification: 894838 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ent of the SCF ubiquitin-ligase complex, required for Cln1p and Cln2p degradation; involved in carbon catabolite repres...sion, glucose-dependent divalent cation transport, high-affinity glucose transport, and morphogenesis; Grr1p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6322549 ... ...Non-TMB Non-TMH Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB >gi|6322549|ref|NP_012623.1| F-box protein compon

  11. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 Represses Transcription of p21CIP1 by Inhibition of Transcription Activation by p53 and Sp1*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kim, Pyung-Hwan; Kim, Sung-Eun; Choi, Kang-Yell; Kim, Se Hoon; Hur, Man-Wook

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant transcriptional repression through chromatin remodeling and histone deacetylation has been postulated as the driving force for tumorigenesis. FBI-1 (formerly called Pokemon) is a member of the POK family of transcriptional repressors. Recently, FBI-1 was characterized as a critical oncogenic factor that specifically represses transcription of the tumor suppressor gene ARF, potentially leading indirectly to p53 inactivation. Our investigations on transcriptiona...

  12. EZH2 regulates neuroepithelium structure and neuroblast proliferation by repressing p21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akizu, Naiara; García, María Alejandra; Estarás, Conchi; Fueyo, Raquel; Badosa, Carmen; de la Cruz, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The function of EZH2 as a transcription repressor is well characterized. However, its role during vertebrate development is still poorly understood, particularly in neurogenesis. Here, we uncover the role of EZH2 in controlling the integrity of the neural tube and allowing proper progenitor proliferation. We demonstrate that knocking down the EZH2 in chick embryo neural tubes unexpectedly disrupts the neuroepithelium (NE) structure, correlating with alteration of the Rho pathway, and reduces neural progenitor proliferation. Moreover, we use transcriptional profiling and functional assays to show that EZH2-mediated repression of p21WAF1/CIP1 contributes to both processes. Accordingly, overexpression of cytoplasmic p21WAF1/CIP1 induces NE structural alterations and p21WAF1/CIP1 suppression rescues proliferation defects and partially compensates for the structural alterations and the Rho activity. Overall, our findings describe a new role of EZH2 in controlling the NE integrity in the neural tube to allow proper progenitor proliferation.

  13. Genome editing in butterflies reveals that spalt promotes and Distal-less represses eyespot colour patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linlin; Reed, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Butterfly eyespot colour patterns are a key example of how a novel trait can appear in association with the co-option of developmental patterning genes. Little is known, however, about how, or even whether, co-opted genes function in eyespot development. Here we use CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to determine the roles of two co-opted transcription factors that are expressed during early eyespot determination. We found that deletions in a single gene, spalt, are sufficient to reduce or completely delete eyespot colour patterns, thus demonstrating a positive regulatory role for this gene in eyespot determination. Conversely, and contrary to previous predictions, deletions in Distal-less (Dll) result in an increase in the size and number of eyespots, illustrating a repressive role for this gene in eyespot development. Altogether our results show that the presence, absence and shape of butterfly eyespots can be controlled by the activity of two co-opted transcription factors. PMID:27302525

  14. Using synthetic bacterial enhancers to reveal a looping-based mechanism for quenching-like repression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunwasser-Meirom, Michal; Pollak, Yaroslav; Goldberg, Sarah; Levy, Lior; Atar, Orna; Amit, Roee

    2016-02-01

    We explore a model for `quenching-like' repression by studying synthetic bacterial enhancers, each characterized by a different binding site architecture. To do so, we take a three-pronged approach: first, we compute the probability that a protein-bound dsDNA molecule will loop. Second, we use hundreds of synthetic enhancers to test the model's predictions in bacteria. Finally, we verify the mechanism bioinformatically in native genomes. Here we show that excluded volume effects generated by DNA-bound proteins can generate substantial quenching. Moreover, the type and extent of the regulatory effect depend strongly on the relative arrangement of the binding sites. The implications of these results are that enhancers should be insensitive to 10-11 bp insertions or deletions (INDELs) and sensitive to 5-6 bp INDELs. We test this prediction on 61 σ54-regulated qrr genes from the Vibrio genus and confirm the tolerance of these enhancers' sequences to the DNA's helical repeat.

  15. Long term consequences of suppression of intrusive anxious thoughts and repressive coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraerts, Elke; Merckelbach, Harald; Jelicic, Marko; Smeets, Elke

    2006-10-01

    The current experiment employed a thought suppression paradigm to investigate whether repressors (N=40) are more skilled in suppressing positive and anxious autobiographical thoughts than low anxious (N=40), high anxious (N=40), and defensive high anxious (N=40) individuals, both immediately and over a longer time period (i.e., 7 days). Regardless of suppression instructions, repressors reported during their lab visit fewer target thoughts for their most anxious events than participants in the other three groups. However, over a 7 days period, repressors showed the highest number of intrusive thoughts about their anxious autobiographical events. Thus, our results demonstrate that repressive coping might be adaptive in the short run, but counterproductive in the long run. PMID:16337604

  16. An X11alpha/FSBP complex represses transcription of the GSK3beta gene promoter.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lau, Kwok-Fai

    2010-08-04

    X11alpha is a neuronal adaptor protein that interacts with the amyloid precursor protein (APP) through a centrally located phosphotyrosine binding domain to inhibit the production of Abeta peptide that is deposited in Alzheimer\\'s disease brains. X11alpha also contains two C-terminal postsynaptic density-95, large discs, zona occludens 1 (PDZ) domains, and we show here that through its PDZ domains, X11alpha interacts with a novel transcription factor, fibrinogen silencer binding protein. Moreover, we show that an X11alpha\\/fibrinogen silencer binding protein complex signals to the nucleus to repress glycogen synthase kinase-3beta promoter activity. Glycogen synthase kinase-3beta is a favoured candidate kinase for phosphorylating tau in Alzheimer\\'s disease. Our findings show a new function for X11alpha that may impact on Alzheimer\\'s disease pathogenesis.

  17. Response to Comment on "Multiple repressive mechanisms in the hippocampus during memory formation".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jun; Yu, Nam-Kyung; Kim, V Narry; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2016-07-29

    Mathew et al. propose that many candidate genes identified in our study may reflect the events in the choroid plexus (ChP) potentially included in hippocampal samples. We reanalyze our data and find that the ChP inclusion is unlikely to affect our major conclusions regarding the basal suppression of translational machinery or the early translational repression (at 5 to 10 minutes). As Mathew et al. examined for a subset of genes at 4 hours, we agree that the late suppression may partly reflect the events in the ChP. Although the precise contribution of anatomical sources remains to be clarified, our behavioral analyses indicate that the late-phase suppression of these genes may contribute to memory formation. PMID:27482553

  18. Repression versus sensitization in response to media violence as predictors of cognitive avoidance and vigilance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahé, Barbara; Möller, Ingrid; Berger, Anja; Felber, Juliane

    2011-02-01

    Repression and sensitization as situational modes of coping with anxiety were examined as predictors of trait measures of cognitive avoidance and vigilance. In this study, 303 undergraduates saw a violent film clip to elicit anxiety. Increases in skin conductance level (SCL) and state anxiety (STA) from baseline were measured to identify repressors (high SCL, low STA) and contrast them with sensitizers (low SCL, high STA) and genuinely low anxious individuals (low SCL, low STA). State anger was also recorded. Trait measures of vigilance and cognitive avoidance were collected 2 weeks earlier. Significant SCL × STA interactions indicated that repressors scored higher on cognitive avoidance and lower on vigilance compared to sensitizers and low anxious participants. Repressors were less likely than sensitizers to report gaze avoidance during the clip. The anger by SCL interaction was nonsignificant, suggesting that repressors and sensitizers differ specifically in the processing of anxiety rather than negative affect in general. PMID:21223268

  19. Site-Specific Oligonucleotide Binding Represses Transcription of the Human c-myc Gene in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, Michael; Czernuszewicz, Graznya; Postel, Edith H.; Flint, S. Jane; Hogan, Michael E.

    1988-07-01

    A 27-base-long DNA oligonucleotide was designed that binds to duplex DNA at a single site within the 5' end of the human c-myc gene, 115 base pairs upstream from the transcription origin P1. On the basis of the physical properties of its bound complex, it was concluded that the oligonucleotide forms a colinear triplex with the duplex binding site. By means of an in vitro assay system, it was possible to show a correlation between triplex formation at -115 base pairs and repression of c-myc transcription. The possibility is discussed that triplex formation (site-specific RNA binding to a DNA duplex) could serve as the basis for an alternative program of gene control in vivo.

  20. History and peasant memory: Silences and representations on peasant struggle for land and repression in Ongoy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Chati

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that there are social spaces in Peru where alternative memories about the political violence that took place between 1980 and 2000 are produced. In Andahuaylas, Apurímac, recurrent narratives tell about servitude in the hacienda, peasant mobilization for the restitution of their land, land occupation and its violent repression. A victorious memory of the land occupation exists alongside of an oppressive memory of internal war. Yet these representations have been silenced by official studies on memory, which are now so fashionable.In Ongoy, Andahuaylas, in the guise of a conflict between communities and hacienda, there are peasant’s political practices in relation with respect to the state. Peasants developed association networks with state institutions, trade unions, students, migrants, political parties and others to seek the restitution of their land. They gathered documents which they use in support of their memory and seniority in the territory. These show that the struggle for land that culminated in 1963 with the occupation of land, the slaughter of peasants and repression, has colonial origins. These are stories and memories that reconstruct the land struggle as a heroic act and overlap with other more recent representations of political violence. To analyze the process, events in Ongoy between 1960 and 1969 are reconstructed in dialog with the peasants gathered documents and testimonies of the actors on how events are reinterpreted after political violence.

  1. Yeast genetic analysis reveals the involvement of chromatin reassembly factors in repressing HIV-1 basal transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Vanti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Rebound of HIV viremia after interruption of anti-retroviral therapy is due to the small population of CD4+ T cells that remain latently infected. HIV-1 transcription is the main process controlling post-integration latency. Regulation of HIV-1 transcription takes place at both initiation and elongation levels. Pausing of RNA polymerase II at the 5' end of HIV-1 transcribed region (5'HIV-TR, which is immediately downstream of the transcription start site, plays an important role in the regulation of viral expression. The activation of HIV-1 transcription correlates with the rearrangement of a positioned nucleosome located at this region. These two facts suggest that the 5'HIV-TR contributes to inhibit basal transcription of those HIV-1 proviruses that remain latently inactive. However, little is known about the cell elements mediating the repressive role of the 5'HIV-TR. We performed a genetic analysis of this phenomenon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae after reconstructing a minimal HIV-1 transcriptional system in this yeast. Unexpectedly, we found that the critical role played by the 5'HIV-TR in maintaining low levels of basal transcription in yeast is mediated by FACT, Spt6, and Chd1, proteins so far associated with chromatin assembly and disassembly during ongoing transcription. We confirmed that this group of factors plays a role in HIV-1 postintegration latency in human cells by depleting the corresponding human orthologs with shRNAs, both in HIV latently infected cell populations and in particular single-integration clones, including a latent clone with a provirus integrated in a highly transcribed gene. Our results indicate that chromatin reassembly factors participate in the establishment of the equilibrium between activation and repression of HIV-1 when it integrates into the human genome, and they open the possibility of considering these factors as therapeutic targets of HIV-1 latency.

  2. A response regulator that represses transcription of several virulence operons in the group A streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federle, M J; McIver, K S; Scott, J R

    1999-06-01

    A search for homologs of the Bacillus subtilis PhoP response regulator in the group A streptococcus (GAS) genome revealed three good candidates. Inactivation of one of these, recently identified as csrR (J. C. Levin and M. R. Wessels, Mol. Microbiol. 30:209-219, 1998), caused the strain to produce mucoid colonies and to increase transcription of hasA, the first gene in the operon for capsule synthesis. We report here that a nonpolar insertion in this gene also increased transcription of ska (encoding streptokinase), sagA (streptolysin S), and speMF (mitogenic factor) but did not affect transcription of slo (streptolysin O), mga (multiple gene regulator of GAS), emm (M protein), scpA (complement C5a peptidase), or speB or speC (pyrogenic exotoxins B and C). The amounts of streptokinase, streptolysin S, and capsule paralleled the levels of transcription of their genes in all cases. Because CsrR represses genes unrelated to those for capsule synthesis, and because CsrA-CsrB is a global regulatory system in Escherichia coli whose mechanism is unrelated to that of these genes in GAS, the locus has been renamed covR, for "control of virulence genes" in GAS. Transcription of the covR operon was also increased in the nonpolar insertion mutant, indicating that CovR represses its own synthesis as well. All phenotypes of the covR nonpolar insertion mutant were complemented by the covR gene on a plasmid. CovR acts on operons expressed both in exponential and in stationary phase, demonstrating that the CovR-CovS pathway is separate from growth phase-dependent regulation in GAS. Therefore, CovR is the first multiple-gene repressor of virulence factors described for this important human pathogen. PMID:10368137

  3. Host and bacterial proteins that repress recruitment of LC3 to Shigella early during infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh A Baxt

    Full Text Available Shigella spp. are intracytosolic gram-negative pathogens that cause disease by invasion and spread through the colonic mucosa, utilizing host cytoskeletal components to form propulsive actin tails. We have previously identified the host factor Toca-1 as being recruited to intracellular S. flexneri and being required for efficient bacterial actin tail formation. We show that at early times during infection (40 min., the type three-secreted effector protein IcsB recruits Toca-1 to intracellular bacteria and that recruitment of Toca-1 is associated with repression of recruitment of LC3, as well as with repression of recruitment of the autophagy marker NDP52, around these intracellular bacteria. LC3 is best characterized as a marker of autophagosomes, but also marks phagosomal membranes in the process LC3-associated phagocytosis. IcsB has previously been demonstrated to be required for S. flexneri evasion of autophagy at late times during infection (4-6 hr by inhibiting binding of the autophagy protein Atg5 to the Shigella surface protein IcsA (VirG. Our results suggest that IcsB and Toca-1 modulation of LC3 recruitment restricts LC3-associated phagocytosis and/or LC3 recruitment to vacuolar membrane remnants. Together with published results, our findings suggest that IcsB inhibits innate immune responses in two distinct ways, first, by inhibiting LC3-associated phagocytosis and/or LC3 recruitment to vacuolar membrane remnants early during infection, and second, by inhibiting autophagy late during infection.

  4. Expression of the MOZ-TIF2 oncoprotein in mice represses senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Largeot, Anne; Perez-Campo, Flor Maria; Marinopoulou, Elli; Lie-a-Ling, Michael; Kouskoff, Valerie; Lacaud, Georges

    2016-04-01

    The MOZ-TIF2 translocation, which fuses monocytic leukemia zinc finger protein (MOZ) histone acetyltransferase (HAT) with the nuclear co-activator TIF2, is associated with the development of acute myeloid leukemia. We recently found that in the absence of MOZ HAT activity, p16(INK4a) transcriptional levels are significantly increased, triggering an early entrance into replicative senescence. Because oncogenic fusion proteins must bypass cellular safeguard mechanisms, such as senescence and apoptosis, to induce leukemia, we hypothesized that this repressive activity of MOZ over p16(INK4a) transcription could be preserved, or even reinforced, in MOZ leukemogenic fusion proteins, such as MOZ-TIF2. We describe here that, indeed, MOZ-TIF2 silences expression of the CDKN2A locus (p16(INK4a) and p19(ARF)), inhibits the triggering of senescence and enhances proliferation, providing conditions favorable to the development of leukemia. Furthermore, we describe that abolishing the MOZ HAT activity of the fusion protein leads to a significant increase in expression of the CDKN2A locus and the number of hematopoietic progenitors undergoing senescence. Finally, we report that inhibition of senescence by MOZ-TIF2 is associated with increased apoptosis, suggesting a role for the fusion protein in p53 apoptosis-versus-senescence balance. Our results underscore the importance of the HAT activity of MOZ, preserved in the fusion protein, for repression of the CDKN2A locus transcription and the subsequent block of senescence, a necessary step for the survival of leukemic cells. PMID:26854485

  5. Mutations that relieve nutritional repression of the Bacillus subtilis dipeptide permease operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, F J; Mueller, J P; Sonenshein, A L

    1993-08-01

    The Bacillus subtilis dciA operon encodes a dipeptide transport complex that is induced rapidly as cells enter stationary phase and initiate sporulation. Expression of this operon in growing cells is repressed by glucose, by a mixture of amino acids, and by the AbrB protein. A genetic screen was devised to identify mutations that allow inappropriate expression from the dciA promoter during growth. These mutations resulted in increased dciA transcription during growth in nutrient broth, in minimal amino acids medium, and in minimal glucose medium. Some of the mutations, called dcs (dciA control site), were cloned and shown by sequence analysis to cluster near the start site of dciA transcription. Primer extension and in vitro transcription analysis revealed that the dcs mutations did not create a new promoter. These mutations may therefore disrupt an operator site necessary for the binding of a negative regulator responsive to the nutritional state of the cell. The dcs mutant promoters were still subject to AbrB control, suggesting that the dciA operon is regulated by at least two proteins, AbrB and a nutritionally responsive regulator. The gene(s) for the putative nutritional regulator may be defined by the cod (control of dciA) mutations, which appeared to relieve amino acid and glucose repression of dciA by altering a diffusible factor. An abrB cod double mutant exhibited high-level expression of dciA during exponential growth phase. PMID:8335620

  6. The multicopy gene Sly represses the sex chromosomes in the male mouse germline after meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocquet, Julie; Ellis, Peter J I; Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Mahadevaiah, Shantha K; Affara, Nabeel A; Ward, Monika A; Burgoyne, Paul S

    2009-11-01

    Studies of mice with Y chromosome long arm deficiencies suggest that the male-specific region (MSYq) encodes information required for sperm differentiation and postmeiotic sex chromatin repression (PSCR). Several genes have been identified on MSYq, but because they are present in more than 40 copies each, their functions cannot be investigated using traditional gene targeting. Here, we generate transgenic mice producing small interfering RNAs that specifically target the transcripts of the MSYq-encoded multicopy gene Sly (Sycp3-like Y-linked). Microarray analyses performed on these Sly-deficient males and on MSYq-deficient males show a remarkable up-regulation of sex chromosome genes in spermatids. SLY protein colocalizes with the X and Y chromatin in spermatids of normal males, and Sly deficiency leads to defective repressive marks on the sex chromatin, such as reduced levels of the heterochromatin protein CBX1 and of histone H3 methylated at lysine 9. Sly-deficient mice, just like MSYq-deficient mice, have severe impairment of sperm differentiation and are near sterile. We propose that their spermiogenesis phenotype is a consequence of the change in spermatid gene expression following Sly deficiency. To our knowledge, this is the first successful targeted disruption of the function of a multicopy gene (or of any Y gene). It shows that SLY has a predominant role in PSCR, either via direct interaction with the spermatid sex chromatin or via interaction with sex chromatin protein partners. Sly deficiency is the major underlying cause of the spectrum of anomalies identified 17 y ago in MSYq-deficient males. Our results also suggest that the expansion of sex-linked spermatid-expressed genes in mouse is a consequence of the enhancement of PSCR that accompanies Sly amplification. PMID:19918361

  7. Velvet-mediated repression of β-glucan synthesis in Aspergillus nidulans spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee-Soo; Yu, Yeong Man; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Maeng, Pil Jae; Kim, Sun Chang; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Beta-glucans are a heterologous group of fibrous glucose polymers that are a major constituent of cell walls in Ascomycetes and Basidiomycetes fungi. Synthesis of β (1,3)- and (1,6)-glucans is coordinated with fungal cell growth and development, thus, is under tight genetic regulation. Here, we report that β-glucan synthesis in both asexual and sexual spores is turned off by the NF-kB like fungal regulators VosA and VelB in Aspergillus nidulans. Our genetic and genomic analyses have revealed that both VosA and VelB are necessary for proper down-regulation of cell wall biosynthetic genes including those associated with β-glucan synthesis in both types of spores. The deletion of vosA or velB results in elevated accumulation of β-glucan in asexual spores. Double mutant analyses indicate that VosA and VelB play an inter-dependent role in repressing β-glucan synthesis in asexual spores. In vivo chromatin immuno-precipitation analysis shows that both VelB and VosA bind to the promoter region of the β-glucan synthase gene fksA in asexual spores. Similarly, VosA is required for proper repression of β-glucan synthesis in sexual spores. In summary, the VosA-VelB hetero-complex is a key regulatory unit tightly controlling proper levels of β-glucan synthesis in asexual and sexual spores. PMID:25960370

  8. Bach2 represses effector programmes to stabilize Treg-mediated immune homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Hirahara, Kiyoshi; Mousavi, Kambiz; Clever, David; Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Bonelli, Michael; Sciume, Giuseppe; Zare, Hossein; Vahedi, Golnaz; Dema, Barbara; Yu, Zhiya; Liu, Hui; Takahashi, Hayato; Rao, Mahadev; Muranski, Pawel; Crompton, Joseph G.; Punkosdy, George; Bedognetti, Davide; Wang, Ena; Hoffmann, Victoria; Rivera, Juan; Marincola, Francesco M.; Nakamura, Atsushi; Sartorelli, Vittorio; Kanno, Yuka; Gattinoni, Luca; Muto, Akihiko; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; O’Shea, John J.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2013-01-01

    Through their functional diversification, distinct lineages of CD4+ T cells play key roles in either driving or constraining immune-mediated pathology. Transcription factors are critical in the generation of cellular diversity, and negative regulators antagonistic to alternate fates often act in conjunction with positive regulators to stabilize lineage commitment1. Genetic polymorphisms within a single locus encoding the transcription factor BACH2 are associated with numerous autoimmune and allergic diseases including asthma2, Crohn’s disease3–4, coeliac disease5, vitiligo6, multiple sclerosis7 and type 1 diabetes8. While these associations point to a shared mechanism underlying susceptibility to diverse immune-mediated diseases, a function for Bach2 in the maintenance of immune homeostasis has not been established. Here, we define Bach2 as a broad regulator of immune activation that stabilizes immunoregulatory capacity while repressing the differentiation programmes of multiple effector lineages in CD4+ T cells. Bach2 was required for efficient formation of regulatory (Treg) cells and consequently for suppression of lethal inflammation in a manner that was Treg cell dependent. Assessment of the genome-wide function of Bach2, however, revealed that it represses genes associated with effector cell differentiation. Consequently, its absence during Treg polarization resulted in inappropriate diversion to effector lineages. In addition, Bach2 constrained full effector differentiation within Th1, Th2 and Th17 cell lineages. These findings identify Bach2 as a key regulator of CD4+ T-cell differentiation that prevents inflammatory disease by controlling the balance between tolerance and immunity. PMID:23728300

  9. EWS represses cofilin 1 expression by inducing nuclear retention of cofilin 1 mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, L; Kuwahara, I; Matsumoto, K

    2014-06-01

    In Ewing's sarcoma family tumors (ESFTs), the proto-oncogene EWS that encodes an RNA-binding protein is fused by chromosomal translocation to the gene encoding one of the E-twenty six (ETS) family of transcription factors, most commonly friend leukemia virus integration 1 (FLI-1). Although EWS/FLI-1 chimeric proteins are necessary for carcinogenesis, additional events seem to be required for transformation to occur. We have previously reported that a protein product of an EWS mRNA target, whose expression is negatively regulated by EWS but not by EWS/FLI-1, contributes to ESFT development. However, the mechanism by which EWS represses protein expression remains to be elucidated. Here, we report that overexpression of full-length EWS repressed protein expression and induced nuclear retention of reporter mRNAs in a tethering assay. In contrast, when a mutant lacking the EWS C-terminal nuclear localization signal (classified as a PY-NLS) was expressed, reporter protein expression was upregulated, and the number of cells exporting reporter mRNA to the cytoplasm increased. EWS binds to the 3'-untranslated region in another mRNA target, cofilin 1 (CFL1), and negatively regulates the expression of CFL1. Overexpression of EWS induced nuclear retention of CFL1 mRNA. Furthermore, ESFT cell proliferation and metastatic potential were suppressed by small interfering RNA-mediated CFL1 knockdown. Together, our findings suggest that EWS induces nuclear retention of CFL1 mRNA, thereby suppressing expression of CFL1, and that CFL1 promotes development of ESFT. Targeting CFL1 might therefore provide another novel approach for treatment of this aggressive disease. PMID:23831569

  10. Political repression, civil society and the politics of responding to AIDS in the BRICS nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Eduardo J; Harris, Joseph

    2016-02-01

    The policy responses to human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in the Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS) nations have played out amid radically different political environments that have shaped state-civil society relations in critical ways. In contrasting these different environments, this article offers the first comparison of the policy response to AIDS in the BRICS nations and seeks to understand the way in which political context matters for conditioning the response to a major epidemic. Using a comparative historical approach, we find that while collaborative state-civil society relations have produced an aggressive response and successful outcomes in Brazil, democratic openness and state-civil society engagement has not necessarily correlated with an aggressive response or better outcomes in the other cases. Response to the epidemic has been worst by far in democratic South Africa, followed by Russia, where in the former, denialism and antagonistic state-civil society relations fuelled a delayed response and proved extremely costly in terms of human lives. In Russia, a lack of civil societal opportunity for mobilization and non-governmental organization (NGO) growth, political centralization and the state's unwillingness to work with NGOs led to an ineffective government response. Top-down bureaucratic rule and a reluctance to fully engage civil society in democratic India substantially delayed the state's efforts to engage in a successful partnership with NGOs. Nevertheless, China has done surprisingly well, in spite of its repressive approach and narrow engagement with civil society. And in all cases, we find the relationship between state and civil society to be evolving over time in important ways. These findings suggest the need for more research on the links between democratic openness, political repression and policy responses to epidemics. PMID:25858965

  11. Sox2 is an androgen receptor-repressed gene that promotes castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Kregel

    Full Text Available Despite advances in detection and therapy, castration-resistant prostate cancer continues to be a major clinical problem. The aberrant activity of stem cell pathways, and their regulation by the Androgen Receptor (AR, has the potential to provide insight into novel mechanisms and pathways to prevent and treat advanced, castrate-resistant prostate cancers. To this end, we investigated the role of the embryonic stem cell regulator Sox2 [SRY (sex determining region Y-box 2] in normal and malignant prostate epithelial cells. In the normal prostate, Sox2 is expressed in a portion of basal epithelial cells. Prostate tumors were either Sox2-positive or Sox2-negative, with the percentage of Sox2-positive tumors increasing with Gleason Score and metastases. In the castration-resistant prostate cancer cell line CWR-R1, endogenous expression of Sox2 was repressed by AR signaling, and AR chromatin-IP shows that AR binds the enhancer element within the Sox2 promoter. Likewise, in normal prostate epithelial cells and human embryonic stem cells, increased AR signaling also decreases Sox2 expression. Resistance to the anti-androgen MDV3100 results in a marked increase in Sox2 expression within three prostate cancer cell lines, and in the castration-sensitive LAPC-4 prostate cancer cell line ectopic expression of Sox2 was sufficient to promote castration-resistant tumor formation. Loss of Sox2 expression in the castration-resistant CWR-R1 prostate cancer cell line inhibited cell growth. Up-regulation of Sox2 was not associated with increased CD133 expression but was associated with increased FGF5 (Fibroblast Growth Factor 5 expression. These data propose a model of elevated Sox2 expression due to loss of AR-mediated repression during castration, and consequent castration-resistance via mechanisms not involving induction of canonical embryonic stem cell pathways.

  12. Age-associated de-repression of retrotransposons in the Drosophila fat body, its potential cause and consequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiyang; Zheng, Xiaobin; Xiao, Danqing; Zheng, Yixian

    2016-06-01

    Eukaryotic genomes contain transposable elements (TE) that can move into new locations upon activation. Since uncontrolled transposition of TEs, including the retrotransposons and DNA transposons, can lead to DNA breaks and genomic instability, multiple mechanisms, including heterochromatin-mediated repression, have evolved to repress TE activation. Studies in model organisms have shown that TEs become activated upon aging as a result of age-associated deregulation of heterochromatin. Considering that different organisms or cell types may undergo distinct heterochromatin changes upon aging, it is important to identify pathways that lead to TE activation in specific tissues and cell types. Through deep sequencing of isolated RNAs, we report an increased expression of many retrotransposons in the old Drosophila fat body, an organ equivalent to the mammalian liver and adipose tissue. This de-repression correlates with an increased number of DNA damage foci and decreased level of Drosophila lamin-B in the old fat body cells. Depletion of the Drosophila lamin-B in the young or larval fat body results in a reduction of heterochromatin and a corresponding increase in retrotransposon expression and DNA damage. Further manipulations of lamin-B and retrotransposon expression suggest a role of the nuclear lamina in maintaining the genome integrity of the Drosophila fat body by repressing retrotransposons. PMID:27072046

  13. Conducting Field Research on Gender Relations in a Gender Repressive State: A Case Study of Gender Research in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezai-Rashti, Goli M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reflects on the experience of conducting fieldwork and the gendering of research within the context of a gender repressive state. The Islamic Republic of Iran has consistently enacted discriminatory policies regarding gender relations since 1979. These regressive measures have made the state apprehensive and sensitive towards any…

  14. Design and characterization of a dual-mode promoter with activation and repression capability for tuning gene expression in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, Mostafizur; McMillen, David R

    2014-08-01

    Modularity in controlling gene expression artificially is becoming an essential aspect of synthetic biology. Artificial transcriptional control of gene expression is one of the most well-developed methods for the design of novel synthetic regulatory networks. Such networks are intended to help understand natural cellular phenomena and to enable new biotechnological applications. Promoter sequence manipulation with cis-regulatory elements is a key approach to control gene expression transcriptionally. Here, we have designed a promoter that can be both activated and repressed, as a contribution to the library of synthetic biological 'parts'. Starting with the minimal cytochrome C (minCYC) promoter in yeast, we incorporated five steroid hormone responsive elements (SHREs) and one lac operator site, respectively, upstream and downstream of the TATA box. This allows activation through the testosterone-responsive androgen receptor, and repression through the LacI repressor. Exposure to varying concentrations of testosterone (to vary activation) and IPTG (to vary repression) demonstrated the ability to tune the promoter's output curve over a wide range. By integrating activating and repressing signals, the promoter permits a useful form of signal integration, and we are optimistic that it will serve as a component in future regulatory networks, including feedback controllers. PMID:25056312

  15. STENOFOLIA recruits TOPLESS to repress ASYMMETRIC LEAVES2 at the leaf margin and promote leaf blade outgrowth in Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fei; Wang, Yewei; Li, Guifen; Tang, Yuhong; Kramer, Elena M; Tadege, Million

    2014-02-01

    The Medicago truncatula WUSCHEL-related homeobox (WOX) gene, STENOFOLIA (STF), plays a key role in leaf blade outgrowth by promoting cell proliferation at the adaxial-abaxial junction. STF functions primarily as a transcriptional repressor, but the underlying molecular mechanism is unknown. Here, we report the identification of a protein interaction partner and a direct target, shedding light on the mechanism of STF function. Two highly conserved motifs in the C-terminal domain of STF, the WUSCHEL (WUS) box and the STF box, cooperatively recruit TOPLESS (Mt-TPL) family corepressors, and this recruitment is required for STF function, as deletion of these two domains (STFdel) impaired blade outgrowth whereas fusing Mt-TPL to STFdel restored function. The homeodomain motif is required for direct repression of ASYMMETRIC LEAVES2 (Mt-AS2), silencing of which partially rescues the stf mutant phenotype. STF and LAMINALESS1 (LAM1) are functional orthologs. A single amino acid (Asn to Ile) substitution in the homeodomain abolished the repression of Mt-AS2 and STF's ability to complement the lam1 mutant of Nicotiana sylvestris. Our data together support a model in which STF recruits corepressors to transcriptionally repress its targets during leaf blade morphogenesis. We propose that recruitment of TPL/TPL-related proteins may be a common mechanism in the repressive function of modern/WUS clade WOX genes. PMID:24585835

  16. Mutually repressing repressor functions and multi-layered cellular heterogeneity regulate the bistable Salmonella fliC census

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Mary K.; Cookson, Brad T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bistable flagellar and virulence gene expression generates specialized Salmonella subpopulations with distinct functions. Repressing flagellar genes allows Salmonella to evade caspase-1 mediated host defenses and enhances systemic colonization. By definition, bistability arises when intermediate states of gene expression are rendered unstable by the underlying genetic circuitry. We demonstrate sustained bistable fliC expression in virulent Salmonella 14028 and document dynamic control of the distribution, or single-cell census, of flagellar gene expression by the mutually repressing repressors YdiV and FliZ. YdiV partitions cells into the fliC-OFF subpopulation, while FliZ partitions cells into the fliC-HIGH subpopulation at late timepoints during growth. Bistability of ΔfliZ populations and ydiV-independent FliZ control of flagellar gene expression provide evidence that the YdiV-FliZ mutually repressing repressor circuit is not required for bistability. Repression and activation by YdiV and FliZ (respectively) can shape the census of fliC expression independently, and bistability collapses into a predominantly intermediate population in the absence of both regulators. Metered expression of YdiV and FliZ reveals variable sensitivity to these regulators and defines conditions where expression of FliZ enhances fliC expression and where FliZ does not alter the fliC census. Thus, this evolved genetic circuitry coordinates multiple layers of regulatory heterogeneity into a binary response. PMID:25315056

  17. Repression of nitrogen catabolic genes by ammonia and glutamine in nitrogen-limited continuous cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Schure, E G; Silljé, H H; Vermeulen, E E; Kalhorn, J W; Verkleij, A J; Boonstra, J; Verrips, C T

    1998-01-01

    Growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on ammonia and glutamine decreases the expression of many nitrogen catabolic genes to low levels. To discriminate between ammonia- and glutamine-driven repression of GAP1, PUT4, GDH1 and GLN1, a gln1-37 mutant was used. This mutant is not able to convert ammonia in

  18. Repression of the integrated papillomavirus E6/E7 promoter is required for growth suppression of cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, D A; Schmid, S I; Howley, P M

    2000-03-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) E2 protein is an important regulator of viral E6 and E7 gene expression. E2 can repress the viral promoter for E6 and E7 expression as well as block progression of the cell cycle in cancer cells harboring the DNA of "high-risk" HPV types. Although the phenomenon of E2-mediated growth arrest of HeLa cells and other HPV-positive cancer cells has been well documented, the specific mechanism by which E2 affects cellular proliferation has not yet been elucidated. Here, we show that bovine papillomavirus (BPV) E2-induced growth arrest of HeLa cells requires the repression of the E6 and E7 promoter. This repression is specific for E2TA and not E2TR, a BPV E2 variant that lacks the N-terminal transactivation domain. We demonstrate that expression of HPV16 E6 and E7 from a heterologous promoter that is not regulated by E2 rescues HeLa cells from E2-mediated growth arrest. Our data indicate that the pathway of E2-mediated growth arrest of HeLa cells requires repression of E6 and E7 expression through an activity specified by the transactivation domain of E2TA. PMID:10684283

  19. PSD-95 is post-transcriptionally repressed during early neural development by PTBP1 and PTBP2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Sika; Gray, Erin E; Chawla, Geetanjali;

    2012-01-01

    . Psd-95 was transcribed early in mouse embryonic brain, but most of its product transcripts were degraded. The polypyrimidine tract binding proteins PTBP1 and PTBP2 repressed Psd-95 (also known as Dlg4) exon 18 splicing, leading to premature translation termination and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay...

  20. Positive selection of mutants defective in transcriptional repression of riboflavin synthesis by iron in the flavinogenic yeast Pichia guilliermondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boretsky, Yuriy R; Kapustyak, Kostyantyn Y; Fayura, Lyubov R; Stasyk, Oleh V; Stenchuk, Mykola M; Bobak, Yaroslav P; Drobot, Lyudmyla B; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2005-06-01

    It is known for many years that iron represses synthesis of riboflavin (RF) and most of RF-synthesizing enzymes in several yeast species, known as flavinogenic yeasts. However, the mechanism of such repression is not known. We have found that iron represses transcription of RIB1 and RIB7 genes coding for the first and the last enzymes of RF biosynthesis in the model flavinogenic organism Pichia guilliermondii. To decipher molecular mechanisms of iron-dependent repression, isolation and study of the regulatory mutants defective in corresponding regulation is desirable. However, no suitable methods for isolation of such mutants were previously available. We have produced a single-point transition mutation in the RIB1 gene. The corresponding rib1-86 mutant exhibits leaky phenotype and is unable to grow in iron-sufficient minimal medium without exogenous RF. However, it can grow in minimal iron-deficient medium without RF, or in iron-sufficient medium upon introduction of the previously-isolated regulatory mutation rib81, which leads to increase in RF production. Using the rib1-86 mutant as parental strain, a collection of mutants able to grow in iron-sufficient medium without exogenous RF has been isolated. The mutants appeared to be defective in regulation of RF biosynthesis and iron homeostasis and were divided into six new complementation groups. Study of one corresponding mutant, red6, showed derepression of RIB1 mRNA synthesis in iron-sufficient medium. PMID:15925311

  1. Rapid generation of CRISPR/dCas9-regulated, orthogonally repressible hybrid T7-lac promoters for modular, tuneable control of metabolic pathway fluxes in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cress, Brady F; Jones, J Andrew; Kim, Daniel C; Leitz, Quentin D; Englaender, Jacob A; Collins, Shannon M; Linhardt, Robert J; Koffas, Mattheos A G

    2016-05-19

    Robust gene circuit construction requires use of promoters exhibiting low crosstalk. Orthogonal promoters have been engineered utilizing an assortment of natural and synthetic transcription factors, but design of large orthogonal promoter-repressor sets is complicated, labor-intensive, and often results in unanticipated crosstalk. The specificity and ease of targeting the RNA-guided DNA-binding protein dCas9 to any 20 bp user-defined DNA sequence makes it a promising candidate for orthogonal promoter regulation. Here, we rapidly construct orthogonal variants of the classic T7-lac promoter using site-directed mutagenesis, generating a panel of inducible hybrid promoters regulated by both LacI and dCas9. Remarkably, orthogonality is mediated by only two to three nucleotide mismatches in a narrow window of the RNA:DNA hybrid, neighboring the protospacer adjacent motif. We demonstrate that, contrary to many reports, one PAM-proximal mismatch is insufficient to abolish dCas9-mediated repression, and we show for the first time that mismatch tolerance is a function of target copy number. Finally, these promoters were incorporated into the branched violacein biosynthetic pathway as dCas9-dependent switches capable of throttling and selectively redirecting carbon flux in Escherichia coli We anticipate this strategy is relevant for any promoter and will be adopted for many applications at the interface of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering. PMID:27079979

  2. Improvement of Escherichia coli production strains by modification of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gosset Guillermo

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The application of metabolic engineering in Escherichia coli has resulted in the generation of strains with the capacity to produce metabolites of commercial interest. Biotechnological processes with these engineered strains frequently employ culture media containing glucose as the carbon and energy source. In E. coli, the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS transports glucose when this sugar is present at concentrations like those used in production fermentations. This protein system is involved in phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar transport, therefore, its activity has an important impact on carbon flux distribution in the phosphoenolpyruvate and pyruvate nodes. Furthermore, PTS has a very important role in carbon catabolite repression. The properties of PTS impose metabolic and regulatory constraints that can hinder strain productivity. For this reason, PTS has been a target for modification with the purpose of strain improvement. In this review, PTS characteristics most relevant to strain performance and the different strategies of PTS modification for strain improvement are discussed. Functional replacement of PTS by alternative phosphoenolpyruvate-independent uptake and phosphorylation activities has resulted in significant improvements in product yield from glucose and productivity for several classes of metabolites. In addition, inactivation of PTS components has been applied successfully as a strategy to abolish carbon catabolite repression, resulting in E. coli strains that use more efficiently sugar mixtures, such as those obtained from lignocellulosic hydrolysates.

  3. Repression of the nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner by steatotic drugs and in advanced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benet, Marta; Guzmán, Carla; Pisonero-Vaquero, Sandra; García-Mediavilla, M Victoria; Sánchez-Campos, Sonia; Martínez-Chantar, M Luz; Donato, M Teresa; Castell, José Vicente; Jover, Ramiro

    2015-04-01

    The small heterodimer partner (SHP) (NR0B2) is an atypical nuclear receptor that lacks a DNA-binding domain. It interacts with and inhibits many transcription factors, affecting key metabolic processes, including bile acid, cholesterol, fatty acid, and drug metabolism. Our aim was to determine the influence of steatotic drugs and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) on SHP expression and investigate the potential mechanisms. SHP was found to be repressed by steatotic drugs (valproate, doxycycline, tetracycline, and cyclosporin A) in cultured hepatic cells and the livers of different animal models of NAFLD: iatrogenic (tetracycline-treated rats), genetic (glycine N-methyltransferase-deficient mice), and nutritional (mice fed a methionine- and choline-deficient diet). Among the different transcription factors investigated, CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα) showed the strongest dominant-repressive effect on SHP expression in HepG2 and human hepatocytes. Reporter assays revealed that the inhibitory effect of C/EBPα and steatotic drugs colocalize between -340 and -509 base pair of the SHP promoter, and mutation of a predicted C/EBPα response element at -473 base pair abolished SHP repression by both C/EBPα and drugs. Moreover, inhibition of major stress signaling pathways demonstrated that the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 pathway activates, while the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase pathway represses SHP in a C/EBP-dependent manner. We conclude that SHP is downregulated by several steatotic drugs and in advanced NAFLD. These conditions can activate signals that target C/EBPα and consequently repress SHP, thus favoring the progression and severity of NAFLD. PMID:25576488

  4. PPARγ partial agonist GQ-16 strongly represses a subset of genes in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milton, Flora Aparecida [Faculdade de Ciências da Saúde, Laboratório de Farmacologia Molecular, Universidade de Brasília (Brazil); Genomic Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX (United States); Cvoro, Aleksandra [Genomic Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX (United States); Amato, Angelica A. [Faculdade de Ciências da Saúde, Laboratório de Farmacologia Molecular, Universidade de Brasília (Brazil); Sieglaff, Douglas H.; Filgueira, Carly S.; Arumanayagam, Anithachristy Sigamani [Genomic Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX (United States); Caro Alves de Lima, Maria do; Rocha Pitta, Ivan [Laboratório de Planejamento e Síntese de Fármacos – LPSF, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (Brazil); Assis Rocha Neves, Francisco de [Faculdade de Ciências da Saúde, Laboratório de Farmacologia Molecular, Universidade de Brasília (Brazil); Webb, Paul, E-mail: pwebb@HoustonMethodist.org [Genomic Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-08-28

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists that improve insulin resistance but trigger side effects such as weight gain, edema, congestive heart failure and bone loss. GQ-16 is a PPARγ partial agonist that improves glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in mouse models of obesity and diabetes without inducing weight gain or edema. It is not clear whether GQ-16 acts as a partial agonist at all PPARγ target genes, or whether it displays gene-selective actions. To determine how GQ-16 influences PPARγ activity on a gene by gene basis, we compared effects of rosiglitazone (Rosi) and GQ-16 in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes using microarray and qRT-PCR. Rosi changed expression of 1156 genes in 3T3-L1, but GQ-16 only changed 89 genes. GQ-16 generally showed weak effects upon Rosi induced genes, consistent with partial agonist actions, but a subset of modestly Rosi induced and strongly repressed genes displayed disproportionately strong GQ-16 responses. PPARγ partial agonists MLR24 and SR1664 also exhibit disproportionately strong effects on transcriptional repression. We conclude that GQ-16 displays a continuum of weak partial agonist effects but efficiently represses some negatively regulated PPARγ responsive genes. Strong repressive effects could contribute to physiologic actions of GQ-16. - Highlights: • GQ-16 is an insulin sensitizing PPARγ ligand with reduced harmful side effects. • GQ-16 displays a continuum of weak partial agonist activities at PPARγ-induced genes. • GQ-16 exerts strong repressive effects at a subset of genes. • These inhibitor actions should be evaluated in models of adipose tissue inflammation.

  5. The CovR response regulator of group A streptococcus (GAS) acts directly to repress its own promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusa, Asiya A; Scott, June R

    2005-06-01

    The CovR/S (CsrR/S) two component system is a global regulator of virulence gene expression in the group A streptococcus (GAS, Streptococcus pyogenes). The response regulator, CovR, regulates about 15% of the genes of GAS, including its own operon. Using in vitro DNA binding assays with purified CovR protein, we found that CovR binds a DNA fragment including the covR promoter (Pcov). DNaseI footprint analyses showed that phosphorylation of CovR enhanced and extended the protected regions. The proposed CovR consensus binding sequence (ATTARA) was present at most, but not all protected regions. The effect of replacing the two thymine residues in the consensus binding sequence (CB) with guanine residues was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. Most, but not all, CB mutations reduced binding of CovR in vitro. Using a transcriptional reporter introduced in single copy into the GAS chromosome, we found that mutations at each CB completely or partially relieved CovR-mediated repression in vivo. This suggests that CovR regulation of Pcov is direct. Further support for this conclusion comes from use of an in vitro GAS transcription system in which CovR was sufficient to mediate repression of Pcov. This repression was enhanced by phosphorylation of the protein. In addition, we found that the CovR binding region overlapping the promoter was essential for wild type repression of Pcov both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that promoter occlusion is a primary mechanism of Pcov repression by CovR. PMID:15882414

  6. PPARγ partial agonist GQ-16 strongly represses a subset of genes in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists that improve insulin resistance but trigger side effects such as weight gain, edema, congestive heart failure and bone loss. GQ-16 is a PPARγ partial agonist that improves glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in mouse models of obesity and diabetes without inducing weight gain or edema. It is not clear whether GQ-16 acts as a partial agonist at all PPARγ target genes, or whether it displays gene-selective actions. To determine how GQ-16 influences PPARγ activity on a gene by gene basis, we compared effects of rosiglitazone (Rosi) and GQ-16 in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes using microarray and qRT-PCR. Rosi changed expression of 1156 genes in 3T3-L1, but GQ-16 only changed 89 genes. GQ-16 generally showed weak effects upon Rosi induced genes, consistent with partial agonist actions, but a subset of modestly Rosi induced and strongly repressed genes displayed disproportionately strong GQ-16 responses. PPARγ partial agonists MLR24 and SR1664 also exhibit disproportionately strong effects on transcriptional repression. We conclude that GQ-16 displays a continuum of weak partial agonist effects but efficiently represses some negatively regulated PPARγ responsive genes. Strong repressive effects could contribute to physiologic actions of GQ-16. - Highlights: • GQ-16 is an insulin sensitizing PPARγ ligand with reduced harmful side effects. • GQ-16 displays a continuum of weak partial agonist activities at PPARγ-induced genes. • GQ-16 exerts strong repressive effects at a subset of genes. • These inhibitor actions should be evaluated in models of adipose tissue inflammation

  7. Genomic Analysis Reveals Contrasting PIFq Contribution to Diurnal Rhythmic Gene Expression in PIF-Induced and -Repressed Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Guiomar; Soy, Judit; Monte, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Members of the PIF quartet (PIFq; PIF1, PIF3, PIF4, and PIF5) collectively contribute to induce growth in Arabidopsis seedlings under short day (SD) conditions, specifically promoting elongation at dawn. Their action involves the direct regulation of growth-related and hormone-associated genes. However, a comprehensive definition of the PIFq-regulated transcriptome under SD is still lacking. We have recently shown that SD and free-running (LL) conditions correspond to "growth" and "no growth" conditions, respectively, correlating with greater abundance of PIF protein in SD. Here, we present a genomic analysis whereby we first define SD-regulated genes at dawn compared to LL in the wild type, followed by identification of those SD-regulated genes whose expression depends on the presence of PIFq. By using this sequential strategy, we have identified 349 PIF/SD-regulated genes, approximately 55% induced and 42% repressed by both SD and PIFq. Comparison with available databases indicates that PIF/SD-induced and PIF/SD-repressed sets are differently phased at dawn and mid-morning, respectively. In addition, we found that whereas rhythmicity of the PIF/SD-induced gene set is lost in LL, most PIF/SD-repressed genes keep their rhythmicity in LL, suggesting differential regulation of both gene sets by the circadian clock. Moreover, we also uncovered distinct overrepresented functions in the induced and repressed gene sets, in accord with previous studies in other examined PIF-regulated processes. Interestingly, promoter analyses showed that, whereas PIF/SD-induced genes are enriched in direct PIF targets, PIF/SD-repressed genes are mostly indirectly regulated by the PIFs and might be more enriched in ABA-regulated genes. PMID:27458465

  8. Active and Repressive Chromatin-Associated Proteome after MPA Treatment and the Role of Midkine in Epithelial Monolayer Permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Niamat; Lenz, Christof; Binder, Lutz; Pantakani, Dasaradha Venkata Krishna; Asif, Abdul R.

    2016-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is prescribed to maintain allografts in organ-transplanted patients. However, gastrointestinal (GI) complications, particularly diarrhea, are frequently observed as a side effect following MPA therapy. We recently reported that MPA altered the tight junction (TJ)-mediated barrier function in a Caco-2 cell monolayer model system. This study investigates whether MPA induces epigenetic changes which lead to GI complications, especially diarrhea. Methods: We employed a Chromatin Immunoprecipitation-O-Proteomics (ChIP-O-Proteomics) approach to identify proteins associated with active (H3K4me3) as well as repressive (H3K27me3) chromatin histone modifications in MPA-treated cells, and further characterized the role of midkine, a H3K4me3-associated protein, in the context of epithelial monolayer permeability. Results: We identified a total of 333 and 306 proteins associated with active and repressive histone modification marks, respectively. Among them, 241 proteins were common both in active and repressive chromatin, 92 proteins were associated exclusively with the active histone modification mark, while 65 proteins remained specific to repressive chromatin. Our results show that 45 proteins which bind to the active and seven proteins which bind to the repressive chromatin region exhibited significantly altered abundance in MPA-treated cells as compared to DMSO control cells. A number of novel proteins whose function is not known in bowel barrier regulation were among the identified proteins, including midkine. Our functional integrity assays on the Caco-2 cell monolayer showed that the inhibition of midkine expression prior to MPA treatment could completely block the MPA-mediated increase in barrier permeability. Conclusions: The ChIP-O-Proteomics approach delivered a number of novel proteins with potential implications in MPA toxicity. Consequently, it can be proposed that midkine inhibition could be a potent therapeutic approach to prevent the

  9. Carbon regulation of environmental pH by secreted small molecules that modulate pathogenicity in phytopathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Fangcheng; Barad, Shiri; Ment, Dana; Luria, Neta; Dubey, Amit; Casado, Virginia; Glam, Nofar; Mínguez, Jose Diaz; Espeso, Eduardo A; Fluhr, Robert; Prusky, Dov

    2016-10-01

    Fruit pathogens can contribute to the acidification or alkalinization of the host environment. This capability has been used to divide fungal pathogens into acidifying and/or alkalinizing classes. Here, we show that diverse classes of fungal pathogens-Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Penicillium expansum, Aspergillus nidulans and Fusarium oxysporum-secrete small pH-affecting molecules. These molecules modify the environmental pH, which dictates acidic or alkaline colonizing strategies, and induce the expression of PACC-dependent genes. We show that, in many organisms, acidification is induced under carbon excess, i.e. 175 mm sucrose (the most abundant sugar in fruits). In contrast, alkalinization occurs under conditions of carbon deprivation, i.e. less than 15 mm sucrose. The carbon source is metabolized by glucose oxidase (gox2) to gluconic acid, contributing to medium acidification, whereas catalysed deamination of non-preferred carbon sources, such as the amino acid glutamate, by glutamate dehydrogenase 2 (gdh2), results in the secretion of ammonia. Functional analyses of Δgdh2 mutants showed reduced alkalinization and pathogenicity during growth under carbon deprivation, but not in high-carbon medium or on fruit rich in sugar, whereas analysis of Δgox2 mutants showed reduced acidification and pathogencity under conditions of excess carbon. The induction pattern of gdh2 was negatively correlated with the expression of the zinc finger global carbon catabolite repressor creA. The present results indicate that differential pH modulation by fruit fungal pathogens is a host-dependent mechanism, affected by host sugar content, that modulates environmental pH to enhance fruit colonization. PMID:26666972

  10. Effect of decoyinine on the regulation of alpha-amylase synthesis in Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholson, W L; Chambliss, G H

    1987-01-01

    Decoyinine, an inhibitor of GMP synthetase, allows sporulation in Bacillus subtilis to initiate and proceed under otherwise catabolite-repressing conditions. The effect of decoyinine on alpha-amylase synthesis in B. subtilis, an event which exhibits regulatory features resembling sporulation initiation, was examined. Decoyinine did not overcome catabolite repression of alpha-amylase synthesis in a wild-type strain of B. subtilis but did cause premature and enhanced synthesis in a mutant strai...

  11. CRISPathBrick: Modular Combinatorial Assembly of Type II-A CRISPR Arrays for dCas9-Mediated Multiplex Transcriptional Repression in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cress, Brady F; Toparlak, Ö Duhan; Guleria, Sanjay; Lebovich, Matthew; Stieglitz, Jessica T; Englaender, Jacob A; Jones, J Andrew; Linhardt, Robert J; Koffas, Mattheos A G

    2015-09-18

    Programmable control over an addressable global regulator would enable simultaneous repression of multiple genes and would have tremendous impact on the field of synthetic biology. It has recently been established that CRISPR/Cas systems can be engineered to repress gene transcription at nearly any desired location in a sequence-specific manner, but there remain only a handful of applications described to date. In this work, we report development of a vector possessing a CRISPathBrick feature, enabling rapid modular assembly of natural type II-A CRISPR arrays capable of simultaneously repressing multiple target genes in Escherichia coli. Iterative incorporation of spacers into this CRISPathBrick feature facilitates the combinatorial construction of arrays, from a small number of DNA parts, which can be utilized to generate a suite of complex phenotypes corresponding to an encoded genetic program. We show that CRISPathBrick can be used to tune expression of plasmid-based genes and repress chromosomal targets in probiotic, virulent, and commonly engineered E. coli strains. Furthermore, we describe development of pCRISPReporter, a fluorescent reporter plasmid utilized to quantify dCas9-mediated repression from endogenous promoters. Finally, we demonstrate that dCas9-mediated repression can be harnessed to assess the effect of downregulating both novel and computationally predicted metabolic engineering targets, improving the yield of a heterologous phytochemical through repression of endogenous genes. These tools provide a platform for rapid evaluation of multiplex metabolic engineering interventions. PMID:25822415

  12. NiO nanoparticles induce apoptosis through repressing SIRT1 in human bronchial epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Wei-Xia; He, Min-Di; Mao, Lin [Department of Occupational Health, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Qian, Feng-Hua [Department of Hematology, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Li, Yu-Ming [Institute of Hepatobiliary Surgery, XinQiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Pi, Hui-Feng; Liu, Chuan; Chen, Chun-Hai; Lu, Yong-Hui; Cao, Zheng-Wang; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Zheng-Ping [Department of Occupational Health, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Zhou, Zhou, E-mail: lunazhou00@163.com [Department of Occupational Health, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China)

    2015-07-15

    With application of nano-sized nickel-containing particles (Nano-Ni) expanding, the health concerns about their adverse effects on the pulmonary system are increasing. However, the mechanisms for the pulmonary toxicity of these materials remain unclear. In the present study, we focused on the impacts of NiO nanoparticles (NiONPs) on sirtuin1 (SIRT1), a NAD-dependent deacetylase, and investigated whether SIRT1 was involved in NiONPs-induced apoptosis. Although the NiONPs tended to agglomerate in fluid medium, they still entered into the human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) and released Ni{sup 2+} inside the cells. NiONPs at doses of 5, 10, and 20 μg/cm{sup 2} inhibited the cell viability. NiONPs' produced cytotoxicity was demonstrated through an apoptotic process, indicated by increased numbers of Annexin V positive cells and caspase-3 activation. The expression of SIRT1 was markedly down-regulated by the NiONPs, accompanied by the hyperacetylation of p53 (tumor protein 53) and overexpression of Bax (Bcl-2-associated X protein). However, overexpression of SIRT1 through resveratrol treatment or transfection clearly attenuated the NiONPs-induced apoptosis and activation of p53 and Bax. Our results suggest that the repression of SIRT1 may underlie the NiONPs-induced apoptosis via p53 hyperacetylation and subsequent Bax activation. Because SIRT1 participates in multiple biologic processes by deacetylation of dozens of substrates, this knowledge of the impact of NiONPs on SIRT1 may lead to an improved understanding of the toxic mechanisms of Nano-Ni and provide a molecular target to antagonize Nano-Ni toxicity. - Highlights: • NiONPs were taken up by BEAS-2B cells and released Ni{sup 2+}. • NiONPs produced cytotoxicity was demonstrated through an apoptotic process. • NiONPs repressed SIRT1 expression and activated p53 and Bax. • Overexpression of SIRT1 attenuated NiONPs-induced apoptosis via deacetylation p53.

  13. Sulforaphane causes epigenetic repression of hTERT expression in human breast cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed M Meeran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sulforaphane (SFN, an isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables, is a common dietary component that has histone deacetylase inhibition activity and exciting potential in cancer prevention. The mechanisms by which SFN imparts its chemopreventive properties are of considerable interest and little is known of its preventive potential for breast cancer. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that SFN significantly inhibits the viability and proliferation of breast cancer cells in vitro while it has negligible effects on normal breast cells. Inhibition of telomerase has received considerable attention because of its high expression in cancer cells and extremely low level of expression in normal cells. SFN treatment dose- and time-dependently inhibited human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT, the catalytic regulatory subunit of telomerase, in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs, especially DNMT1 and DNMT3a, were also decreased in SFN-treated breast cancer cells suggesting that SFN may repress hTERT by impacting epigenetic pathways. Down-regulation of DNMTs in response to SFN induced site-specific CpG demethylation occurring primarily in the first exon of the hTERT gene thereby facilitating CTCF binding associated with hTERT repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP analysis of the hTERT promoter revealed that SFN increased the level of active chromatin markers acetyl-H3, acetyl-H3K9 and acetyl-H4, whereas the trimethyl-H3K9 and trimethyl-H3K27 inactive chromatin markers were decreased in a dose-dependent manner. SFN-induced hyperacetylation facilitated the binding of many hTERT repressor proteins such as MAD1 and CTCF to the hTERT regulatory region. Depletion of CTCF using siRNA reduced the SFN-induced down-regulation of hTERT mRNA transcription in these breast cancer cells. In addition, down-regulation of hTERT expression facilitated the induction of cellular apoptosis in human breast

  14. Inorganic arsenic represses interleukin-17A expression in human activated Th17 lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivalent inorganic arsenic [As(III)] is an efficient anticancer agent used to treat patients suffering from acute promyelocytic leukemia. Recently, experimental studies have clearly demonstrated that this metalloid can also cure lymphoproliferative and/or pro-inflammatory syndromes in different murine models of chronic immune-mediated diseases. T helper (Th) 1 and Th17 lymphocytes play a central role in development of these diseases, in mice and humans, especially by secreting the potent pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ and IL-17A, respectively. As(III) impairs basic functions of human T cells but its ability to modulate secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by differentiated Th lymphocytes is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that As(III), used at concentrations clinically achievable in plasma of patients, has no effect on the secretion of interferon-γ from Th1 cells but almost totally blocks the expression and the release of IL-17A from human Th17 lymphocytes co-stimulated for five days with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies, in the presence of differentiating cytokines. In addition, As(III) specifically reduces mRNA levels of the retinoic-related orphan receptor (ROR)C gene which encodes RORγt, a key transcription factor controlling optimal IL-17 expression in fully differentiated Th17 cells. The metalloid also blocks initial expression of IL-17 gene induced by the co-stimulation, probably in part by impairing activation of the JNK/c-Jun pathway. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that As(III) represses expression of the major pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17A produced by human Th17 lymphocytes, thus strengthening the idea that As(III) may be useful to treat inflammatory immune-mediated diseases in humans. -- Highlights: ► Arsenic inhibits secretion of IL-17A from human naïve and memory Th17 lymphocytes. ► Arsenic represses early expression of IL-17A gene in human activated T lymphocytes. ► Arsenic interferes with activation of

  15. Inorganic arsenic represses interleukin-17A expression in human activated Th17 lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morzadec, Claudie; Macoch, Mélinda; Robineau, Marc; Sparfel, Lydie [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France); Fardel, Olivier [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France); Pôle Biologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Rennes, 2 rue Henri Le Guilloux, 35033 Rennes (France); Vernhet, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.vernhet@univ-rennes1.fr [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France)

    2012-08-01

    Trivalent inorganic arsenic [As(III)] is an efficient anticancer agent used to treat patients suffering from acute promyelocytic leukemia. Recently, experimental studies have clearly demonstrated that this metalloid can also cure lymphoproliferative and/or pro-inflammatory syndromes in different murine models of chronic immune-mediated diseases. T helper (Th) 1 and Th17 lymphocytes play a central role in development of these diseases, in mice and humans, especially by secreting the potent pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ and IL-17A, respectively. As(III) impairs basic functions of human T cells but its ability to modulate secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by differentiated Th lymphocytes is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that As(III), used at concentrations clinically achievable in plasma of patients, has no effect on the secretion of interferon-γ from Th1 cells but almost totally blocks the expression and the release of IL-17A from human Th17 lymphocytes co-stimulated for five days with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies, in the presence of differentiating cytokines. In addition, As(III) specifically reduces mRNA levels of the retinoic-related orphan receptor (ROR)C gene which encodes RORγt, a key transcription factor controlling optimal IL-17 expression in fully differentiated Th17 cells. The metalloid also blocks initial expression of IL-17 gene induced by the co-stimulation, probably in part by impairing activation of the JNK/c-Jun pathway. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that As(III) represses expression of the major pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17A produced by human Th17 lymphocytes, thus strengthening the idea that As(III) may be useful to treat inflammatory immune-mediated diseases in humans. -- Highlights: ► Arsenic inhibits secretion of IL-17A from human naïve and memory Th17 lymphocytes. ► Arsenic represses early expression of IL-17A gene in human activated T lymphocytes. ► Arsenic interferes with activation of

  16. ICP0 antagonizes Stat 1-dependent repression of herpes simplex virus: implications for the regulation of viral latency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balliet John W

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 ICP0 protein is an E3 ubiquitin ligase, which is encoded within the HSV-1 latency-associated locus. When ICP0 is not synthesized, the HSV-1 genome is acutely susceptible to cellular repression. Reciprocally, when ICP0 is synthesized, viral replication is efficiently initiated from virions or latent HSV-1 genomes. The current study was initiated to determine if ICP0's putative role as a viral interferon (IFN antagonist may be relevant to the process by which ICP0 influences the balance between productive replication versus cellular repression of HSV-1. Results Wild-type (ICP0+ strains of HSV-1 produced lethal infections in scid or rag2-/- mice. The replication of ICP0- null viruses was rapidly repressed by the innate host response of scid or rag2-/- mice, and the infected animals remained healthy for months. In contrast, rag2-/- mice that lacked the IFN-α/β receptor (rag2-/- ifnar-/- or Stat 1 (rag2-/- stat1-/- failed to repress ICP0- viral replication, resulting in uncontrolled viral spread and death. Thus, the replication of ICP0- viruses is potently repressed in vivo by an innate immune response that is dependent on the IFN-α/β receptor and the downstream transcription factor, Stat 1. Conclusion ICP0's function as a viral IFN antagonist is necessary in vivo to prevent an innate, Stat 1-dependent host response from rapidly repressing productive HSV-1 replication. This antagonistic relationship between ICP0 and the host IFN response may be relevant in regulating whether the HSV-1 genome is expressed, or silenced, in virus-infected cells in vivo. These results may also be clinically relevant. IFN-sensitive ICP0- viruses are avirulent, establish long-term latent infections, and induce an adaptive immune response that is highly protective against lethal challenge with HSV-1. Therefore, ICP0- viruses appear to possess the desired safety and efficacy profile of a live vaccine against

  17. Role of the MetR regulatory system in vitamin B12-mediated repression of the Salmonella typhimurium metE gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, W F; Urbanowski, M L; Stauffer, G V

    1992-01-01

    The vitamin B12 (B12)-mediated repression of the metE gene in Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium requires the B12-dependent transmethylase, the metH gene product. It has been proposed that the MetH-B12 holoenzyme complex is involved directly in the repression mechanism. Using Escherichia coli strains lysogenized with a lambda phage carrying a metE-lacZ gene fusion, we examined B12-mediated repression of the metE-lacZ gene fusion. Although B12 supplementation results in a 10-fold repr...

  18. Tristetraprolin Recruits Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 4E2 To Repress Translation of AU-Rich Element-Containing mRNAs

    OpenAIRE

    Tao, Xianzun; Gao, Guangxia

    2015-01-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) regulates the expression of AU-rich element-containing mRNAs through promoting the degradation and repressing the translation of target mRNA. While the mechanism for promoting target mRNA degradation has been extensively studied, the mechanism underlying translational repression is not well established. Here, we show that TTP recruits eukaryotic initiation factor 4E2 (eIF4E2) to repress target mRNA translation. TTP interacted with eIF4E2 but not with eIF4E. Overexpressio...

  19. Glucose-induced repression of PPARalpha gene expression in pancreatic beta-cells involves PP2A activation and AMPK inactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnskjaer, Kim; Boergesen, Michael; Dalgaard, Louise T;

    2006-01-01

    mechanism underlying this transcriptional repression by glucose remains unclear. Here we report that glucose-induced repression of PPARalpha gene expression in INS-1E cells is independent of beta-cell excitation and insulin secretion but requires activation of protein phosphatase 2A in a process involving...... AMPKalpha1 using RNAi suppressed PPARalpha expression, thereby mimicking the effect of glucose. These results indicate that activation of protein phosphatase 2A and subsequent inactivation of AMPK is necessary for glucose repression of PPARalpha expression in pancreatic beta-cells....

  20. Engineered repressible lethality for controlling the pink bollworm, a lepidopteran pest of cotton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil I Morrison

    Full Text Available The sterile insect technique (SIT is an environmentally friendly method of pest control in which insects are mass-produced, irradiated and released to mate with wild counterparts. SIT has been used to control major pest insects including the pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella Saunders, a global pest of cotton. Transgenic technology has the potential to overcome disadvantages associated with the SIT, such as the damaging effects of radiation on released insects. A method called RIDL (Release of Insects carrying a Dominant Lethal is designed to circumvent the need to irradiate insects before release. Premature death of insects' progeny can be engineered to provide an equivalent to sterilisation. Moreover, this trait can be suppressed by the provision of a dietary antidote. In the pink bollworm, we generated transformed strains using different DNA constructs, which showed moderate-to-100% engineered mortality. In permissive conditions, this effect was largely suppressed. Survival data on cotton in field cages indicated that field conditions increase the lethal effect. One strain, called OX3402C, showed highly penetrant and highly repressible lethality, and was tested on host plants where its larvae caused minimal damage before death. These results highlight a potentially valuable insecticide-free tool against pink bollworm, and indicate its potential for development in other lepidopteran pests.

  1. Let-7b promotes alpaca hair growth via transcriptional repression of TGFβR I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shen; Yu, Zhang; Ning, Liu; Hai-Dong, Wang; Jian-Shan, Xie; Shu-Yuan, Gao; Jia-Qi, Cheng; Xiu-Ju, Yu; Ting, Wang; Chang-Sheng, Dong; Xiao-Yan, He

    2016-02-10

    The young male alpaca ear and the back skins were used to investigate the effect of transforming growth factor receptor-β I (TGFβR I) on alpaca hair follicles and hair growth. The expression level and location of TGFβR I in alpaca ear and dorsal skin were detected through real-time quantitative PCR (RT-PCR) and paraffin section immunohistochemical technique (ICC-P). The results shown TGFβR I was lower expression in back skin compared to ear skin and the mean density of the positive reaction in ear skin was significantly higher than back skin. The targeted relationship with let-7b was detected using the dual-luciferase reporter vector of TGFβR I, which showed a significant target relationship between let-7b and TGFβR I. After transfection with let-7b eukaryotic expression vector, the relative mRNA expression of TGFβR I in alpaca skin fibroblasts did not differ, while the relative protein level was significantly decreased. In summary, a higher TGFβR I expression level in the ear skin suggests that TGFβR I may inhibit coat hair elongation. Further studies showed TGFβR I protein was downregulated by let-7b through transcriptional repression. PMID:26611528

  2. Trp53 activity is repressed in radio-adapted cultured murine limb bud cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding the effects of ionizing radiation (IR) at low dose in fetal models is of great importance, because the fetus is considered to be at the most radiosensitive stage of the development and prenatal radiation might influence subsequent development. We previously demonstrated the existence of an adaptive response (AR) in murine fetuses after pre-exposure to low doses of X-rays. Trp53-dependent apoptosis was suggested to be responsible for the teratogenic effects of IR; decreased apoptosis was observed in adapted animals. In this study, in order to investigate the role of Trp53 in AR, we developed a new model of irradiated micromass culture of fetal limb bud cells, which replicated proliferation, differentiation and response to IR in murine embryos. Murine fetuses were exposed to whole-body priming irradiation of 0.3 Gy or 0.5 Gy at embryonic day 11 (E11). Limb bud cells (collected from digital ray areas exhibiting radiation-induced apoptosis) were cultured and exposed to a challenging dose of 4 Gy at E12 equivalent. The levels of Trp53 protein and its phosphorylated form at Ser18 were investigated. Our results suggested that the induction of AR in mouse embryos was correlated with a repression of Trp53 activity. (author)

  3. Three WRKY transcription factors additively repress abscisic acid and gibberellin signaling in aleurone cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liyuan; Gu, Lingkun; Ringler, Patricia; Smith, Stanley; Rushton, Paul J; Shen, Qingxi J

    2015-07-01

    Members of the WRKY transcription factor superfamily are essential for the regulation of many plant pathways. Functional redundancy due to duplications of WRKY transcription factors, however, complicates genetic analysis by allowing single-mutant plants to maintain wild-type phenotypes. Our analyses indicate that three group I WRKY genes, OsWRKY24, -53, and -70, act in a partially redundant manner. All three showed characteristics of typical WRKY transcription factors: each localized to nuclei and yeast one-hybrid assays indicated that they all bind to W-boxes, including those present in their own promoters. Quantitative real time-PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses indicated that the expression levels of the three WRKY genes varied in the different tissues tested. Particle bombardment-mediated transient expression analyses indicated that all three genes repress the GA and ABA signaling in a dosage-dependent manner. Combination of all three WRKY genes showed additive antagonism of ABA and GA signaling. These results suggest that these WRKY proteins function as negative transcriptional regulators of GA and ABA signaling. However, different combinations of these WRKY genes can lead to varied strengths in suppression of their targets. PMID:26025535

  4. Distance determination by GIY-YIG intron endonucleases: discrimination between repression and cleavage functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingqing; Derbyshire, Victoria; Belfort, Marlene; Edgell, David R

    2006-01-01

    GIY-YIG homing endonucleases are modular proteins, with conserved N-terminal catalytic domains connected by linkers to C-terminal DNA-binding domains. I-TevI, the T4 phage GIY-YIG intron endonuclease, functions both in promoting td intron homing, and in acting as a transcriptional autorepressor. Repression is achieved by binding to an operator, which is cleaved at 100-fold reduced efficiency relative to the intronless homing site. The linker includes a zinc finger, which functions in distance determination, to constrain the catalytic domain to cleave the homing site at a fixed position. Here we show that I-BmoI, a related GIY-YIG endonuclease lacking a zinc finger, also possesses some cleavage distance discrimination. Furthermore, hybrid endonucleases constructed by swapping the domains of I-BmoI and I-TevI are active, precise and demonstrate that features other than the zinc finger facilitate distance determination. Most importantly, I-TevI zinc finger mutants cleave the operator more efficiently than the homing site, the converse of wild-type protein. These results are consistent with the zinc finger acting as a measuring device, directing efficient cleavage of the homing site to promote intron mobility, while reducing cleavage at the operator to ensure transcriptional autorepression and phage viability. PMID:16582101

  5. Repression of Pumilio Protein Expression by Rbfox1 Promotes Germ Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreira-Rosario, Arnaldo; Bhargava, Varsha; Hillebrand, Jens; Kollipara, Rahul K; Ramaswami, Mani; Buszczak, Michael

    2016-03-01

    RNA-binding Fox (Rbfox) proteins have well-established roles in regulating alternative splicing, but specific Rbfox isoforms lack nuclear localization signals and accumulate in the cytoplasm. The potential splicing-independent functions of these proteins remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that cytoplasmic Drosophila Rbfox1 regulates germ cell development and represses the translation of mRNAs containing (U)GCAUG elements within their 3'UTRs. During germline cyst differentiation, Rbfox1 targets pumilio mRNA for destabilization and translational silencing, thereby promoting germ cell development. Mis-expression of pumilio results in the formation of germline tumors, which contain cysts that break down and dedifferentiate back to single, mitotically active cells. Together, these results reveal that cytoplasmic Rbfox family members regulate the translation of specific target mRNAs. In the Drosophila ovary, this activity provides a genetic barrier that prevents germ cells from reverting back to an earlier developmental state. The finding that Rbfox proteins regulate mRNA translation has implications for Rbfox-related diseases. PMID:26954550

  6. Histone H3 Serine 28 Is Essential for Efficient Polycomb-Mediated Gene Repression in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Yuk Kwong Yung

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Trimethylation at histone H3K27 is central to the polycomb repression system. Juxtaposed to H3K27 is a widely conserved phosphorylatable serine residue (H3S28 whose function is unclear. To assess the importance of H3S28, we generated a Drosophila H3 histone mutant with a serine-to-alanine mutation at position 28. H3S28A mutant cells lack H3S28ph on mitotic chromosomes but support normal mitosis. Strikingly, all methylation states of H3K27 drop in H3S28A cells, leading to Hox gene derepression and to homeotic transformations in adult tissues. These defects are not caused by active H3K27 demethylation nor by the loss of H3S28ph. Biochemical assays show that H3S28A nucleosomes are a suboptimal substrate for PRC2, suggesting that the unphosphorylated state of serine 28 is important for assisting in the function of polycomb complexes. Collectively, our data indicate that the conserved H3S28 residue in metazoans has a role in supporting PRC2 catalysis.

  7. Repression and black holes in Laurent Mauvignier novel about Algerian War

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Raccis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available XXth century history obliged narrators to clash with events that was literally inexpressible, measuring the potential and the lack of literary means. Laurent Mauvignier made this confrontarion the centre of his poetics: from minimal, private tragedies to great, historical dramas, passing through the media mystification of absurd fait divers, his novels face the Evil problem and its representation in words. With Des hommes (2009, Mauvignier addresses his question to one of the most problematic repression object in historical French memory: Algerian War. Building a polyphonic novel, he deals with an event deeply characterized by silence (the veteran silence studied by Benjamin Stora and Andrea Brazzoduro and that has been manipulated by the institutional and mediatic vulgata. Infact, the narration shows how the amnesty of collective faults is based on the "order to say nothing" (overturning Foucault, first of all caused by the social load of an history that nobody wants. This paper aims at showing how Mauvignier's work, inspired by modernist novel and "nouveau roman" (Duras, Simon, resorts to literary experimentalism to "défamiliariser" this historical event using the tools of a fiction claiming the value of a "secondary experience" to redeem a piece of history refused by the public discourse.

  8. Dlx transcription factors promote migration through repression of axon and dendrite growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobos, Inma; Borello, Ugo; Rubenstein, John L R

    2007-06-21

    In the mouse telencephalon, Dlx homeobox transcription factors are essential for the tangential migration of subpallial-derived GABAergic interneurons to neocortex. However, the mechanisms underlying this process are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that Dlx1/2 has a central role in restraining neurite growth of subpallial-derived immature interneurons at a stage when they migrate tangentially to cortex. In Dlx1-/-;Dlx2-/- mutants, neurite length is increased and cells fail to migrate. In Dlx1-/-;Dlx2+/- mutants, while the tangential migration of immature interneurons appears normal, they develop dendritic and axonal processes with increased length and decreased branching, and have deficits in their neocortical laminar positions. Thus, Dlx1/2 is required for coordinating programs of neurite maturation and migration. In this regard, we provide genetic evidence that in immature interneurons Dlx1/2 repression of the p21-activated serine/threonine kinase PAK3, a downstream effector of the Rho family of GTPases, is critical in restraining neurite growth and promoting tangential migration. PMID:17582329

  9. Polycomb repressive complex 2 component Suz12 is required for hematopoietic stem cell function and lymphopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stanley C W; Miller, Sarah; Hyland, Craig; Kauppi, Maria; Lebois, Marion; Di Rago, Ladina; Metcalf, Donald; Kinkel, Sarah A; Josefsson, Emma C; Blewitt, Marnie E; Majewski, Ian J; Alexander, Warren S

    2015-07-01

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) is a chromatin modifier that regulates stem cells in embryonic and adult tissues. Loss-of-function studies of PRC2 components have been complicated by early embryonic dependence on PRC2 activity and the partial functional redundancy of enhancer of zeste homolog 1 (Ezh1) and enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (Ezh2), which encode the enzymatic component of PRC2. Here, we investigated the role of PRC2 in hematopoiesis by conditional deletion of suppressor of zeste 12 protein homolog (Suz12), a core component of PRC2. Complete loss of Suz12 resulted in failure of hematopoiesis, both in the embryo and the adult, with a loss of maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). In contrast, partial loss of PRC2 enhanced HSC self-renewal. Although Suz12 was required for lymphoid development, deletion in individual blood cell lineages revealed that it was dispensable for the development of granulocytic, monocytic, and megakaryocytic cells. Collectively, these data reveal the multifaceted role of PRC2 in hematopoiesis, with divergent dose-dependent effects in HSC and distinct roles in maturing blood cells. Because PRC2 is a potential target for cancer therapy, the significant consequences of modest changes in PRC2 activity, as well as the cell and developmental stage-specific effects, will need to be carefully considered in any therapeutic context. PMID:26036803

  10. Repressed BMP signaling reactivates NKL homeobox gene MSX1 in a T-ALL subset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Stefan; Ehrentraut, Stefan; Meyer, Corinna; Kaufmann, Maren; Drexler, Hans G; MacLeod, Roderick A F

    2015-02-01

    In T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), several members of the NK-like (NKL) homeobox genes are aberrantly expressed. Here, we have analyzed the activity of NKL homeobox gene MSX1 using pediatric T-ALL in silico data, detecting overexpression in 11% of patients. Quantification of MSX1 transcripts in a panel of 24 T-ALL cell lines demonstrated overexpression in two examples. Comparative expression profiling indicated inhibition of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathway, which was shown to inhibit MSX1 transcription. In the LOUCY cell line we identified conspicuous expression of CHRDL1 encoding a BMP inhibitor which mediated activation of MSX1. Promoter analyses demonstrated activation of CHRDL1 by oncogenic PITX1. Furthermore, knockdown and overexpression studies of hematopoietic transcription factors demonstrated that GATA2 and FOXC1 mediate activation and GATA3, LEF1, TAL1 and TOX repression of MSX1 transcription. Collectively, our findings suggest that MSX1 is physiologically restricted to lymphoid progenitors. The identification of deregulated BMP signaling may provide novel therapeutic options for the treatment of T-ALL. PMID:24844359

  11. Mode-Locked CO Laser for Isotope Separation of Uranium Employing Condensation Repression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Y. Baranov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we have suggested a technical solution of a CO laser facility for industrial separation of uranium used in the production of fuel for nuclear power plants. There has been used a method of laser isotope separation of uranium, employing condensation repression in a free jet. The laser operation with nanosecond pulse irradiation can provide acceptable efficiency in the separating unit and the high effective coefficient of the laser with the wavelength of 5.3 μm. Receiving a uniform RF discharge under medium pressure and high Mach numbers in the gas stream solves the problem of an electron beam and cryogenic cooler of CO lasers. The laser active medium is being cooled while it is expanding in the nozzle; a low-current RF discharge is similar to a non-self-sustained discharge. In the present work, we have developed a calculation model of optimization and have defined the parameters of a mode-locked CO laser with an RF discharge in the supersonic stream. The CO laser average power of 3 kW is sufficient for efficient industrial isotope separation of uranium at one facility.

  12. Jarid2 regulates hematopoietic stem cell function by acting with polycomb repressive complex 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinkel, Sarah A; Galeev, Roman; Flensburg, Christoffer; Keniry, Andrew; Breslin, Kelsey; Gilan, Omer; Lee, Stanley; Liu, Joy; Chen, Kelan; Gearing, Linden J; Moore, Darcy L; Alexander, Warren S; Dawson, Mark; Majewski, Ian J; Oshlack, Alicia; Larsson, Jonas; Blewitt, Marnie E

    2015-03-19

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) plays a key role in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) function. Analyses of mouse mutants harboring deletions of core components have implicated PRC2 in fine-tuning multiple pathways that instruct HSPC behavior, yet how PRC2 is targeted to specific genomic loci within HSPCs remains unknown. Here we use short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown to survey the function of PRC2 accessory factors that were defined in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by testing the competitive reconstitution capacity of transduced murine HSPCs. We find that, similar to the phenotype observed upon depletion of core subunit Suz12, depleting Jarid2 enhances the competitive transplantation capacity of both fetal and adult mouse HSPCs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that depletion of JARID2 enhances the in vitro expansion and in vivo reconstitution capacity of human HSPCs. Gene expression profiling revealed common Suz12 and Jarid2 target genes that are enriched for the H3K27me3 mark established by PRC2. These data implicate Jarid2 as an important component of PRC2 that has a central role in coordinating HSPC function. PMID:25645357

  13. Jarid2 regulates hematopoietic stem cell function by acting with polycomb repressive complex 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinkel, Sarah A.; Galeev, Roman; Flensburg, Christoffer; Keniry, Andrew; Breslin, Kelsey; Gilan, Omer; Lee, Stanley; Liu, Joy; Chen, Kelan; Gearing, Linden J.; Moore, Darcy L.; Alexander, Warren S.; Dawson, Mark; Majewski, Ian J.; Oshlack, Alicia; Larsson, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) plays a key role in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) function. Analyses of mouse mutants harboring deletions of core components have implicated PRC2 in fine-tuning multiple pathways that instruct HSPC behavior, yet how PRC2 is targeted to specific genomic loci within HSPCs remains unknown. Here we use short hairpin RNA–mediated knockdown to survey the function of PRC2 accessory factors that were defined in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by testing the competitive reconstitution capacity of transduced murine HSPCs. We find that, similar to the phenotype observed upon depletion of core subunit Suz12, depleting Jarid2 enhances the competitive transplantation capacity of both fetal and adult mouse HSPCs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that depletion of JARID2 enhances the in vitro expansion and in vivo reconstitution capacity of human HSPCs. Gene expression profiling revealed common Suz12 and Jarid2 target genes that are enriched for the H3K27me3 mark established by PRC2. These data implicate Jarid2 as an important component of PRC2 that has a central role in coordinating HSPC function. PMID:25645357

  14. MicroRNA-155 promotes atherosclerosis by repressing Bcl6 in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari-Jahantigh, Maliheh; Wei, Yuanyuan; Noels, Heidi; Akhtar, Shamima; Zhou, Zhe; Koenen, Rory R; Heyll, Kathrin; Gremse, Felix; Kiessling, Fabian; Grommes, Jochen; Weber, Christian; Schober, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    Macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques drive inflammatory responses, degrade lipoproteins, and phagocytose dead cells. MicroRNAs (miRs) control the differentiation and activity of macrophages by regulating the signaling of key transcription factors. However, the functional role of macrophage-related miRs in the immune response during atherogenesis is unknown. Here, we report that miR-155 is specifically expressed in atherosclerotic plaques and proinflammatory macrophages, where it was induced by treatment with mildly oxidized LDL (moxLDL) and IFN-γ. Leukocyte-specific Mir155 deficiency reduced plaque size and number of lesional macrophages after partial carotid ligation in atherosclerotic (Apoe-/-) mice. In macrophages stimulated with moxLDL/IFN-γ in vitro, and in lesional macrophages, loss of Mir155 reduced the expression of the chemokine CCL2, which promotes the recruitment of monocytes to atherosclerotic plaques. Additionally, we found that miR-155 directly repressed expression of BCL6, a transcription factor that attenuates proinflammatory NF-κB signaling. Silencing of Bcl6 in mice harboring Mir155-/- macrophages enhanced plaque formation and CCL2 expression. Taken together, these data demonstrated that miR-155 plays a key role in atherogenic programming of macrophages to sustain and enhance vascular inflammation. PMID:23041630

  15. PADI4 acts as a coactivator of Tal1 by counteracting repressive histone arginine methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziej, Stephan; Kuvardina, Olga N.; Oellerich, Thomas; Herglotz, Julia; Backert, Ingo; Kohrs, Nicole; Buscató, Estel. La; Wittmann, Sandra K.; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Bonig, Halvard; Karas, Michael; Serve, Hubert; Proschak, Ewgenij; Lausen, Jörn

    2014-05-01

    The transcription factor Tal1 is a critical activator or repressor of gene expression in hematopoiesis and leukaemia. The mechanism by which Tal1 differentially influences transcription of distinct genes is not fully understood. Here we show that Tal1 interacts with the peptidylarginine deiminase IV (PADI4). We demonstrate that PADI4 can act as an epigenetic coactivator through influencing H3R2me2a. At the Tal1/PADI4 target gene IL6ST the repressive H3R2me2a mark triggered by PRMT6 is counteracted by PADI4, which augments the active H3K4me3 mark and thus increases IL6ST expression. In contrast, at the CTCF promoter PADI4 acts as a repressor. We propose that the influence of PADI4 on IL6ST transcription plays a role in the control of IL6ST expression during lineage differentiation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. These results open the possibility to pharmacologically influence Tal1 in leukaemia.

  16. Polycomb repressive complex 2 structure with inhibitor reveals a mechanism of activation and drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooun, Alexei; Gajiwala, Ketan S; Deng, Ya-Li; Liu, Wei; Bolaños, Ben; Bingham, Patrick; He, You-Ai; Diehl, Wade; Grable, Nicole; Kung, Pei-Pei; Sutton, Scott; Maegley, Karen A; Yu, Xiu; Stewart, Al E

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) mediates gene silencing through chromatin reorganization by methylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27). Overexpression of the complex and point mutations in the individual subunits of PRC2 have been shown to contribute to tumorigenesis. Several inhibitors of the PRC2 activity have shown efficacy in EZH2-mutated lymphomas and are currently in clinical development, although the molecular basis of inhibitor recognition remains unknown. Here we report the crystal structures of the inhibitor-bound wild-type and Y641N PRC2. The structures illuminate an important role played by a stretch of 17 residues in the N-terminal region of EZH2, we call the activation loop, in the stimulation of the enzyme activity, inhibitor recognition and the potential development of the mutation-mediated drug resistance. The work presented here provides new avenues for the design and development of next-generation PRC2 inhibitors through establishment of a structure-based drug design platform. PMID:27122193

  17. Autoregulatory and repressive inputs localize Hydra Wnt3 to the head organizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yukio; Tsiairis, Charisios D.; Özbek, Suat; Holstein, Thomas W.

    2011-01-01

    Polarized Wnt signaling along the primary body axis is a conserved property of axial patterning in bilaterians and prebilaterians, and depends on localized sources of Wnt ligands. However, the mechanisms governing the localized Wnt expression that emerged early in evolution are poorly understood. Here we find in the cnidarian Hydra that two functionally distinct cis-regulatory elements control the head organizer-associated Hydra Wnt3 (HyWnt3). An autoregulatory element, which mediates direct inputs of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, highly activates HyWnt3 transcription in the head region. In contrast, a repressor element is necessary and sufficient to restrict the activity of the autoregulatory element, thereby allowing the organizer-specific expression. Our results reveal that a combination of autoregulation and repression is crucial for establishing a Wnt-expressing organizing center in a basal metazoan. We suggest that this transcriptional control is an evolutionarily old strategy in the formation of Wnt signaling centers and metazoan axial patterning. PMID:21576458

  18. Notch signaling represses GATA4-induced expression of genes involved in steroid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Rajani M; Hahn, Katherine L; Rawls, Alan; Viger, Robert S; Wilson-Rawls, Jeanne

    2015-10-01

    Notch2 and Notch3 and genes of the Notch signaling network are dynamically expressed in developing follicles, where they are essential for granulosa cell proliferation and meiotic maturation. Notch receptors, ligands, and downstream effector genes are also expressed in testicular Leydig cells, predicting a potential role in regulating steroidogenesis. In this study, we sought to determine if Notch signaling in small follicles regulates the proliferation response of granulosa cells to FSH and represses the up-regulation steroidogenic gene expression that occurs in response to FSH as the follicle grows. Inhibition of Notch signaling in small preantral follicles led to the up-regulation of the expression of genes in the steroid biosynthetic pathway. Similarly, progesterone secretion by MA-10 Leydig cells was significantly inhibited by constitutively active Notch. Together, these data indicated that Notch signaling inhibits steroidogenesis. GATA4 has been shown to be a positive regulator of steroidogenic genes, including STAR protein, P450 aromatase, and 3B-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. We observed that Notch downstream effectors HEY1, HEY2, and HEYL are able to differentially regulate these GATA4-dependent promoters. These data are supported by the presence of HEY/HES binding sites in these promoters. These studies indicate that Notch signaling has a role in the complex regulation of the steroidogenic pathway. PMID:26183893

  19. p53 Represses the Oncogenic Sno-MiR-28 Derived from a SnoRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Yu

    Full Text Available p53 is a master tumour repressor that participates in vast regulatory networks, including feedback loops involving microRNAs (miRNAs that regulate p53 and that themselves are direct p53 transcriptional targets. We show here that a group of polycistronic miRNA-like non-coding RNAs derived from small nucleolar RNAs (sno-miRNAs are transcriptionally repressed by p53 through their host gene, SNHG1. The most abundant of these, sno-miR-28, directly targets the p53-stabilizing gene, TAF9B. Collectively, p53, SNHG1, sno-miR-28 and TAF9B form a regulatory loop which affects p53 stability and downstream p53-regulated pathways. In addition, SNHG1, SNORD28 and sno-miR-28 are all significantly upregulated in breast tumours and the overexpression of sno-miR-28 promotes breast epithelial cell proliferation. This research has broadened our knowledge of the crosstalk between small non-coding RNA pathways and roles of sno-miRNAs in p53 regulation.

  20. AP-2α suppresses skeletal myoblast proliferation and represses fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 promoter activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skeletal muscle development is partly characterized by myoblast proliferation and subsequent differentiation into postmitotic muscle fibers. Developmental regulation of expression of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene is required for normal myoblast proliferation and muscle formation. As a result, FGFR1 promoter activity is controlled by multiple transcriptional regulatory proteins during both proliferation and differentiation of myogenic cells. The transcription factor AP-2α is present in nuclei of skeletal muscle cells and suppresses myoblast proliferation in vitro. Since FGFR1 gene expression is tightly linked to myoblast proliferation versus differentiation, the FGFR1 promoter was examined for candidate AP-2α binding sites. Mutagenesis studies indicated that a candidate binding site located at - 1035 bp functioned as a repressor cis-regulatory element. Furthermore, mutation of this site alleviated AP-2α-mediated repression of FGFR1 promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that AP-2α interacted with the FGFR1 promoter in both proliferating myoblasts and differentiated myotubes. In total, these results indicate that AP-2α is a transcriptional repressor of FGFR1 gene expression during skeletal myogenesis.

  1. Repressed PKCδ activation in glycodelin-expressing cells mediates resistance to phorbol ester and TGFβ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautala, Laura C; Koistinen, Riitta; Koistinen, Hannu

    2016-10-01

    Glycodelin is a glycoprotein mainly expressed in well-differentiated epithelial cells in reproductive tissues. In normal secretory endometrium, the expression of glycodelin is abundant and regulated by progesterone. In hormone-related cancers glycodelin expression is associated with well-differentiated tumors. We have previously found that glycodelin drives epithelial differentiation of HEC-1B endometrial adenocarcinoma cells, resulting in reduced tumor growth in a preclinical mouse model. Here we show that glycodelin-transfected HEC-1B cells have repressed protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) activation, likely due to downregulation of PDK1, and are resistant to phenotypic change and enhanced migration induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). In control cells, which do not express glycodelin, the effects of PMA were abolished by using PKCδ and PDK1 inhibitors, and knockdown of PKCδ, MEK1 and 2, or ERK1 and 2 by siRNAs. Similarly, transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)-induced phenotypic change was only seen in control cells, not in glycodelin-producing cells, and it was mediated by PKCδ. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that PKCδ, via MAPK pathway, is involved in the glycodelin-driven cell differentiation rendering the cells resistant to stimulation by PMA and TGFβ. PMID:27373413

  2. Transcriptional repression of p27 is essential for murine embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teratake, Youichi; Kuga, Chisa; Hasegawa, Yuta; Sato, Yoshiharu; Kitahashi, Masayasu; Fujimura, Lisa; Watanabe-Takano, Haruko; Sakamoto, Akemi; Arima, Masafumi; Tokuhisa, Takeshi; Hatano, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    The Nczf gene has been identified as one of Ncx target genes and encodes a novel KRAB zinc-finger protein, which functions as a sequence specific transcriptional repressor. In order to elucidate Nczf functions, we generated Nczf knockout (Nczf-/-) mice. Nczf-/- mice died around embryonic day 8.5 (E8.5) with small body size and impairment of axial rotation. Histopathological analysis revealed that the cell number decreased and pyknotic cells were occasionally observed. We examined the expression of cell cycle related genes in Nczf-/- mice. p27 expression was increased in E8.0 Nczf-/- mice compared to that of wild type mice. Nczf knockdown by siRNA resulted in increased expression of p27 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Furthermore, p27 promoter luciferase reporter gene analysis confirmed the regulation of p27 mRNA expression by Nczf. Nczf-/-; p27-/- double knockout mice survived until E11.5 and the defect of axial rotation was restored. These data suggest that p27 repression by Nczf is essential in the developing embryo. PMID:27196371

  3. Repression of AS2 by WOX family transcription factors is required for leaf development in Medicago and Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fei; Tadege, Million

    2015-01-01

    WOX transcription factors are key regulators of meristematic activity in plants. The Medicago WOX gene, STF, functions in maintenance of leaf marginal meristem, analogous to the function of WUS in the shoot apical meristem. Both STF and WUS directly repress AS2 expression in their respective domains. Ectopic expression of AS2 with WUS promoter leads to a narrow leaf phenotype and other phenotypes similar to the wus mutant. We also found that a wox1 prs wus triple mutant produces much narrower leaf blades than the wox1 prs double mutant, indicating that WUS genetically interacts with WOX1 and PRS in Arabidopsis leaf blade development. Our data points to a general requirement for AS2 repression in meristematic regions to allow cell proliferation. PMID:25807065

  4. From Overcoming the fear to Protest, to using Fear as a repressive strategy towards the 15M movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Camps Calvet

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article we analyse the police repression strategies that were developed around the emergence of the 15M movement in Barcelona, which was an important turning point for protest and repression. Through press reviews, discussion groups and interviews we empirically contribute to previous theoretical studies that deal with strategies for policing protests. We recognize that "strategic incapacitation" is a new style of policing protests that has taken hold in the last decade. However, we reflect on the importance of understanding this new strategy, within an increasingly more punitive state under transformation, that creates enemies to erode the rights of most the population. In the case of the protests, this also seeks to create fear and consequently tries to dismantle and wear down current and potential participants of social movements.

  5. Repression of the DNA-binding inhibitor Id3 by Blimp-1 limits CD8+ T cell memory formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yun; Pos, Zoltan; Rao, Mahadev; Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Yu, Zhiya; Sukumar, Madhusudhanan; Reger, Robert N.; Palmer, Douglas C.; Borman, Zachary A.; Muranski, Pawel; Wang, Ena; Schrump, David S.; Marincola, Francesco M.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Gattinoni, Luca

    2011-01-01

    Blimp-1 is a transcriptional repressor that promotes the differentiation of CD8+ T cells into short-lived KLRG-1+ effector cells (SLEC), but how it operates remains poorly defined. Here we show that Blimp-1 binds and represses the Id3 promoter in SLEC. Repression of Id3 by Blimp-1 was dispensable for SLEC development but limited their capacity to persist as memory cells. Enforced expression of Id3 was sufficient to rescue SLEC survival and enhanced recall responses. Id3 function was mediated in part through inhibition of E2a transcriptional activity and induction of genes regulating genome stability. These findings identify a Blimp-1-Id3-E2a axis as a key molecular switch that determines whether effector CD8+ T cells are programmed to die or enter the memory pool. PMID:22057288

  6. 3'-UTR-located inverted Alu repeats facilitate mRNA translational repression and stress granule accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Terry; Huang, Sui

    2012-07-01

    Alu repeats within human genes may potentially alter gene expression. Here, we show that 3'-UTR-located inverted Alu repeats significantly reduce expression of an AcGFP reporter gene. Mutational analysis demonstrates that the secondary structure, but not the primary nucleotide sequence, of the inverted Alu repeats is critical for repression. The expression levels and nucleocytoplasmic distribution of reporter mRNAs with or without 3'-UTR inverted Alu repeats are similar; suggesting that reporter gene repression is not due to changes in mRNA levels or mRNA nuclear sequestration. Instead, reporter gene mRNAs harboring 3'-UTR inverted Alu repeats accumulate in cytoplasmic stress granules. These findings may suggest a novel mechanism whereby 3'-UTR-located inverted Alu repeats regulate human gene expression through sequestration of mRNAs within stress granules. PMID:22688648

  7. Repression of AS2 by WOX family transcription factors is required for leaf development in Medicago and Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Fei; Tadege, Million

    2015-01-01

    WOX transcription factors are key regulators of meristematic activity in plants. The Medicago WOX gene, STF, functions in maintenance of leaf marginal meristem, analogous to the function of WUS in the shoot apical meristem. Both STF and WUS directly repress AS2 expression in their respective domains. Ectopic expression of AS2 with WUS promoter leads to a narrow leaf phenotype and other phenotypes similar to the wus mutant. We also found that a wox1 prs wus triple mutant produces much narrower...

  8. CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 10 (COP10 Contributes to Floral Repression under Non-Inductive Short Days in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Young Kang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In Arabidopsis, CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC/DE-ETIOLATED/FUSCA (COP/DET/FUS genes act in repression of photomorphogenesis in darkness, and recent reports revealed that some of these genes, such as COP1 and DET1, also have important roles in controlling flowering time and circadian rhythm. The COP/DET/FUS protein COP10 interacts with DET1 and DNA DAMAGE-BINDING PROTEIN 1 (DDB1 to form a CDD complex and represses photomorphogenesis in darkness. The cop10-4 mutants flower normally in inductive long days (LD but early in non-inductive short days (SD compared with wild type (WT; however, the role of COP10 remains unknown. Here, we investigate the role of COP10 in SD-dependent floral repression. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR revealed that in SD, expression of the LD-dependent floral inducers GI, FKF1, and FT significantly increased in cop10-4 mutants, compared with WT. This suggests that COP10 mainly regulates FT expression in a CO-independent manner. We also show that COP10 interacts with GI in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that COP10 could also affect GI function at the posttranslational level. Moreover, FLC expression was repressed drastically in cop10-4 mutants and COP10 interacts with MULTICOPY SUPPRESSOR OF IRA1 4 (MSI4/FVE (MSI4/FVE, which epigenetically inhibits FLC expression. These data suggest that COP10 contributes to delaying flowering in the photoperiod and autonomous pathways by downregulating FT expression under SD.

  9. Kaiso is a key regulator of spleen germinal center formation by repressing Bcl6 expression in splenocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Dong-In; Yoon, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Min-Kyeong; An, Haemin; Kim, Min-Young; Hur, Man-Wook, E-mail: mwhur2@yuhs.ac

    2013-12-13

    Highlights: •Knockout of Kaiso results in concordant high expression of Bcl6 and c-Myc in spleen. •Kaiso binds the Bcl6 promoter and represses Bcl6 transcription by recruiting NCoR. •Upregulated Bcl6 increases splenocyte proliferation and causes large diffused GC. •Cell cycle-inhibition genes such as Cdkn1b and Cdkn1a are repressed by Bcl6. -- Abstract: Kaiso was previously described as a methylated DNA-binding protein and a transcription repressor interacting with the corepressor protein complex NCoR. In the current study, we show that generation-3 Kaiso knockout mice show a phenotype of splenomegaly and large diffused germinal centers (GC). In the spleens of Kaiso knockout mice, Bcl6 (a transcriptional repressor that plays a critical role in GC development in spleen) and c-Myc were highly expressed, while the cell cycle arrest genes p27 (CDKN1B), p21 (CDKN1A) and Gadd45a were downregulated. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and transcription assays suggested that Kaiso represses Bcl6 expression, and in Kaiso knockout mice, derepressed Bcl6 increased cell proliferation by suppressing p27 (CDKN1B), p21 (CDKN1A) and Gadd45a, while upregulating the oncogene c-Myc. Further evidence for Kaiso regulation of splenomegaly was provided by B lymphocyte Ramos cells, in which ectopic KAISO repressed BCL6 and c-MYC expression, while concomitantly increasing the expression of the cell cycle arrestors p21, p27 and Gadd45a. In summary, derepressed Bcl6 expression may be responsible for increases in GC cell proliferation and splenomegaly of Kaiso knockout mice.

  10. Mutually repressing repressor functions and multi-layered cellular heterogeneity regulate the bistable Salmonella fliC census

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Mary K.; Cookson, Brad T.

    2014-01-01

    Bistable flagellar and virulence gene expression generates specialized Salmonella subpopulations with distinct functions. Repressing flagellar genes allows Salmonella to evade caspase-1 mediated host defenses and enhances systemic colonization. By definition, bistability arises when intermediate states of gene expression are rendered unstable by the underlying genetic circuitry. We demonstrate sustained bistable fliC expression in virulent Salmonella 14028 and document dynamic control of the ...

  11. Kaiso is a key regulator of spleen germinal center formation by repressing Bcl6 expression in splenocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Knockout of Kaiso results in concordant high expression of Bcl6 and c-Myc in spleen. •Kaiso binds the Bcl6 promoter and represses Bcl6 transcription by recruiting NCoR. •Upregulated Bcl6 increases splenocyte proliferation and causes large diffused GC. •Cell cycle-inhibition genes such as Cdkn1b and Cdkn1a are repressed by Bcl6. -- Abstract: Kaiso was previously described as a methylated DNA-binding protein and a transcription repressor interacting with the corepressor protein complex NCoR. In the current study, we show that generation-3 Kaiso knockout mice show a phenotype of splenomegaly and large diffused germinal centers (GC). In the spleens of Kaiso knockout mice, Bcl6 (a transcriptional repressor that plays a critical role in GC development in spleen) and c-Myc were highly expressed, while the cell cycle arrest genes p27 (CDKN1B), p21 (CDKN1A) and Gadd45a were downregulated. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and transcription assays suggested that Kaiso represses Bcl6 expression, and in Kaiso knockout mice, derepressed Bcl6 increased cell proliferation by suppressing p27 (CDKN1B), p21 (CDKN1A) and Gadd45a, while upregulating the oncogene c-Myc. Further evidence for Kaiso regulation of splenomegaly was provided by B lymphocyte Ramos cells, in which ectopic KAISO repressed BCL6 and c-MYC expression, while concomitantly increasing the expression of the cell cycle arrestors p21, p27 and Gadd45a. In summary, derepressed Bcl6 expression may be responsible for increases in GC cell proliferation and splenomegaly of Kaiso knockout mice

  12. Telomere-Mediated Plasmid Segregation in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Involves Gene Products Required for Transcriptional Repression at Silencers and Telomeres

    OpenAIRE

    Longtine, M. S.; Enomoto, S.; Finstad, S L; Berman, J

    1993-01-01

    Plasmids that contain Saccharomyces cerevisiae TG(1-3) telomere repeat sequences (TRS plasmids) segregate efficiently during mitosis. Mutations in histone H4 reduce the efficiency of TRS-mediated plasmid segregation, suggesting that chromatin structure is involved in this process. Sir2, Sir3 and Sir4 are required for the transcriptional repression of genes located at the silent mating type loci (HML and HMR) and at telomeres (telomere position effect) and are also involved in the segregation ...

  13. Suppressors of Defective Silencing in Yeast: Effects on Transcriptional Repression at the Hmr Locus, Cell Growth and Telomere Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Sussel, L; Vannier, D; Shore, D

    1995-01-01

    To identify factors that affect transcriptional silencing at the HMR mating-type locus in yeast, we characterized a set of extragenic suppressor mutations that restore metastable repression in cells containing both a mutant silencer-binding protein (rap1(s)) and a mutated silencer element (hmrδA). A total of 57 suppressors comprising 21 different complementation groups was identified. This report describes a detailed genetic analysis of these suppressors of defective silencing (sds) mutants. ...

  14. Repression of multiple CYP2D genes in mouse primary hepatocytes with a single siRNA construct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elraghy, Omaima; Baldwin, William S

    2015-01-01

    The Cyp2d subfamily is the second most abun-dant subfamily of hepatic drug-metabolizing CYPs. In mice, there are nine Cyp2d members that are believed to have redundant catalytic activity. We are testing and optimizing the ability of one short interfering RNA (siRNA) construct to knockdown the expression of multiple mouse Cyp2ds in primary hepatocytes. Expression of Cyp2d10, Cyp2d11, Cyp2d22, and Cyp2d26 was observed in the primary male mouse hepatocytes. Cyp2d9, which is male-specific and growth hormone-dependent, was not expressed in male primary hepatocytes, potentially because of its dependence on pulsatile growth hormone release from the anterior pituitary. Several different siRNAs at different concentrations and with different reagents were used to knockdown Cyp2d expression. siRNA constructs designed to repress only one construct often mildly repressed several Cyp2d isoforms. A construct designed to knockdown every Cyp2d isoform provided the best results, especially when incubated with transfection reagents designed specifically for primary cell culture. Interestingly, a construct designed to knockdown all Cyp2d isoforms, except Cyp2d10, caused a 2.5× increase in Cyp2d10 expression, presumably because of a compensatory response. However, while RNA expression is repressed 24 h after siRNA treatment, associated changes in Cyp2d-mediated metabolism are tenuous. Overall, this study provides data on the expression of murine Cyp2ds in primary cell lines, valuable information on designing siRNAs for silencing multiple murine CYPs, and potential pros and cons of using siRNA as a tool for repressing Cyp2d and estimating Cyp2d's role in murine xenobiotic metabolism. PMID:25124873

  15. The DEAD-Box Protein DP103 (Ddx20 or Gemin-3) Represses Orphan Nuclear Receptor Activity via SUMO Modification

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Martin B.; Lebedeva, Lioudmila A.; Suzawa, Miyuki; Wadekar, Subhagya A.; Desclozeaux, Marion; Ingraham, Holly A.

    2005-01-01

    Structural analysis of nuclear receptor subfamily V orphan nuclear receptors suggests that ligand-independent mechanisms must regulate this subclass of receptors. Here, we report that steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) and liver receptor homolog 1 are repressed via posttranslational SUMO modification at conserved lysines within the hinge domain. Indeed, mutating these lysines or adding the SUMO isopeptidase SENP1 dramatically increased both native and Gal4-chimera receptor activities. The mechanis...

  16. Effects of carbon source on expression of alcohol oxidase activity and on morphologic pattern of YR-1 Strain, a filamentous fungus isolated from petroleum-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robelo, Carmen Rodríguez; Novoa, Vanesa Zazueta; Zazueta-Sandoval, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    Soluble alcohol oxidase (AO) activity was detected in the supernatant fraction of a high-speed centrifugation procedure after ballistic cellular homo-genization to break the mycelium from a filamentous fungus strain named YR-1, isolated from petroleum-contaminated soils. AO activity from aerobically grown mycelium was detected in growth media containing different carbon sources, including alcohols and hydrocarbons but not in glucose. In previous work, zymogram analysis conducted with crude extracts from aerobic mycelium of YR-1 strain indicated the existence of two AO enzymes originally named AO-1 and AO-2. In the present study, we were able to separate the AO-1 band into two bands depending on culture conditions, carbon source, and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) separation conditions; the enzyme activity pattern in zymograms from cell-free extracts exhibited three different bands after native PAGE. New nomenclature was used for upper bands AO-1 and AO-2 and lower band AO-3, respectively. The expression of AO activity was studied in the absence of glucose in the culture media and in the presence of hydrocarbons or petroleum as sole carbon source, suggesting that AO expression could be subjected to two regulatory possibilities: carbon catabolite regulation by glucose and induction by hydrocarbons. The possibility of catabolic inhibition of AO by glucose in the active enzyme was also tested, and the results confirm that this kind of regulatory mechanism is not present in AO activity. PMID:15054203

  17. Analysis of in-vivo LacR-mediated gene repression based on the mechanics of DNA looping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongli Zhang

    Full Text Available Interactions of E. coli lac repressor (LacR with a pair of operator sites on the same DNA molecule can lead to the formation of looped nucleoprotein complexes both in vitro and in vivo. As a major paradigm for loop-mediated gene regulation, parameters such as operator affinity and spacing, repressor concentration, and DNA bending induced by specific or non-specific DNA-binding proteins (e.g., HU, have been examined extensively. However, a complete and rigorous model that integrates all of these aspects in a systematic and quantitative treatment of experimental data has not been available. Applying our recent statistical-mechanical theory for DNA looping, we calculated repression as a function of operator spacing (58-156 bp from first principles and obtained excellent agreement with independent sets of in-vivo data. The results suggest that a linear extended, as opposed to a closed v-shaped, LacR conformation is the dominant form of the tetramer in vivo. Moreover, loop-mediated repression in wild-type E. coli strains is facilitated by decreased DNA rigidity and high levels of flexibility in the LacR tetramer. In contrast, repression data for strains lacking HU gave a near-normal value of the DNA persistence length. These findings underscore the importance of both protein conformation and elasticity in the formation of small DNA loops widely observed in vivo, and demonstrate the utility of quantitatively analyzing gene regulation based on the mechanics of nucleoprotein complexes.

  18. Organizer-Derived WOX5 Signal Maintains Root Columella Stem Cells through Chromatin-Mediated Repression of CDF4 Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Limin; Aichinger, Ernst; van der Graaff, Eric; Llavata-Peris, Cristina I; Weijers, Dolf; Hennig, Lars; Groot, Edwin; Laux, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Stem cells in plants and animals are maintained pluripotent by signals from adjacent niche cells. In plants, WUSCHEL HOMEOBOX (WOX) transcription factors are central regulators of stem cell maintenance in different meristem types, yet their molecular mode of action has remained elusive. Here we show that in the Arabidopsis root meristem, the WOX5 protein moves from the root niche organizer, the quiescent center, into the columella stem cells, where it directly represses the transcription factor gene CDF4. This creates a gradient of CDF4 transcription, which promotes differentiation opposite to the WOX5 gradient, allowing stem cell daughter cells to exit the stem cell state. We further show that WOX5 represses CDF4 transcription by recruiting TPL/TPR co-repressors and the histone deacetylase HDA19, which consequently induces histone deacetylation at the CDF4 regulatory region. Our results show that chromatin-mediated repression of differentiation programs is a common strategy in plant and animal stem cell niches. PMID:26028217

  19. Prdm12 specifies V1 interneurons through cross-repressive interactions with Dbx1 and Nkx6 genes in Xenopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thélie, Aurore; Desiderio, Simon; Hanotel, Julie; Quigley, Ian; Van Driessche, Benoit; Rodari, Anthony; Borromeo, Mark D; Kricha, Sadia; Lahaye, François; Croce, Jenifer; Cerda-Moya, Gustavo; Ordoño Fernandez, Jesús; Bolle, Barbara; Lewis, Katharine E; Sander, Maike; Pierani, Alessandra; Schubert, Michael; Johnson, Jane E; Kintner, Christopher R; Pieler, Tomas; Van Lint, Carine; Henningfeld, Kristine A; Bellefroid, Eric J; Van Campenhout, Claude

    2015-10-01

    V1 interneurons are inhibitory neurons that play an essential role in vertebrate locomotion. The molecular mechanisms underlying their genesis remain, however, largely undefined. Here, we show that the transcription factor Prdm12 is selectively expressed in p1 progenitors of the hindbrain and spinal cord in the frog embryo, and that a similar restricted expression profile is observed in the nerve cord of other vertebrates as well as of the cephalochordate amphioxus. Using frog, chick and mice, we analyzed the regulation of Prdm12 and found that its expression in the caudal neural tube is dependent on retinoic acid and Pax6, and that it is restricted to p1 progenitors, due to the repressive action of Dbx1 and Nkx6-1/2 expressed in the adjacent p0 and p2 domains. Functional studies in the frog, including genome-wide identification of its targets by RNA-seq and ChIP-Seq, reveal that vertebrate Prdm12 proteins act as a general determinant of V1 cell fate, at least in part, by directly repressing Dbx1 and Nkx6 genes. This probably occurs by recruiting the methyltransferase G9a, an activity that is not displayed by the amphioxus Prdm12 protein. Together, these findings indicate that Prdm12 promotes V1 interneurons through cross-repressive interactions with Dbx1 and Nkx6 genes, and suggest that this function might have only been acquired after the split of the vertebrate and cephalochordate lineages. PMID:26443638

  20. Staphylococcus aureus RNAIII coordinately represses the synthesis of virulence factors and the transcription regulator Rot by an antisense mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisset, Sandrine; Geissmann, Thomas; Huntzinger, Eric; Fechter, Pierre; Bendridi, Nadia; Possedko, Maria; Chevalier, Clément; Helfer, Anne Catherine; Benito, Yvonne; Jacquier, Alain; Gaspin, Christine; Vandenesch, François; Romby, Pascale

    2007-01-01

    RNAIII is the intracellular effector of the quorum-sensing system in Staphylococcus aureus. It is one of the largest regulatory RNAs (514 nucleotides long) that are known to control the expression of a large number of virulence genes. Here, we show that the 3′ domain of RNAIII coordinately represses at the post-transcriptional level, the expression of mRNAs that encode a class of virulence factors that act early in the infection process. We demonstrate that the 3′ domain acts primarily as an antisense RNA and rapidly anneals to these mRNAs, forming long RNA duplexes. The interaction between RNAIII and the mRNAs results in repression of translation initiation and triggers endoribonuclease III hydrolysis. These processes are followed by rapid depletion of the mRNA pool. In addition, we show that RNAIII and its 3′ domain mediate translational repression of rot mRNA through a limited number of base pairings involving two loop–loop interactions. Since Rot is a transcriptional regulatory protein, we proposed that RNAIII indirectly acts on many downstream genes, resulting in the activation of the synthesis of several exoproteins. These data emphasize the multitude of regulatory steps affected by RNAIII and its 3′ domain in establishing a network of S. aureus virulence factors. PMID:17545468

  1. Octamerization of lambda CI repressor is needed for effective repression of P(RM) and efficient switching from lysogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, I B; Perkins, A J; Tsemitsidis, D; Egan, J B

    2001-11-15

    The CI repressor of bacteriophage lambda is a model for the role of cooperativity in the efficient functioning of genetic switches. Pairs of CI dimers interact to cooperatively occupy adjacent operator sites at O(R) and at O(L). These CI tetramers repress the lytic promoters and activate transcription of the cI gene from P(RM). CI is also able to octamerize, forming a large DNA loop between O(R) and O(L), but the physiological role of this is unclear. Another puzzle is that, although a dimer of CI is able to repress P(RM) by binding to the third operator at O(R), O(R)3, this binding seems too weak to affect CI production in the lysogenic state. Here we show that repression of P(RM) at lysogenic CI concentrations is absolutely dependent on O(L), in this case 3.8 kb away. A mutant defective in this CI negative autoregulation forms a lysogen with elevated CI levels that cannot efficiently switch from lysogeny to lytic development. Our results invalidate previous evidence that Cro binding to O(R)3 is important in prophage induction. We propose the octameric CI:O(R)-O(L) complex increases the affinity of CI for O(R)3 by allowing a CI tetramer to link O(R)3 and the third operator at O(L), O(L)3. PMID:11711436

  2. GATA3 induces human T-cell commitment by restraining Notch activity and repressing NK-cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Walle, Inge; Dolens, Anne-Catherine; Durinck, Kaat; De Mulder, Katrien; Van Loocke, Wouter; Damle, Sagar; Waegemans, Els; De Medts, Jelle; Velghe, Imke; De Smedt, Magda; Vandekerckhove, Bart; Kerre, Tessa; Plum, Jean; Leclercq, Georges; Rothenberg, Ellen V; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Speleman, Frank; Taghon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The gradual reprogramming of haematopoietic precursors into the T-cell fate is characterized by at least two sequential developmental stages. Following Notch1-dependent T-cell lineage specification during which the first T-cell lineage genes are expressed and myeloid and dendritic cell potential is lost, T-cell specific transcription factors subsequently induce T-cell commitment by repressing residual natural killer (NK)-cell potential. How these processes are regulated in human is poorly understood, especially since efficient T-cell lineage commitment requires a reduction in Notch signalling activity following T-cell specification. Here, we show that GATA3, in contrast to TCF1, controls human T-cell lineage commitment through direct regulation of three distinct processes: repression of NK-cell fate, upregulation of T-cell lineage genes to promote further differentiation and restraint of Notch activity. Repression of the Notch1 target gene DTX1 hereby is essential to prevent NK-cell differentiation. Thus, GATA3-mediated positive and negative feedback mechanisms control human T-cell lineage commitment. PMID:27048872

  3. TBL1 and TBLR1 Phosphorylation on Regulated Gene Promoters Overcomes Dual CtBP and NCoR/SMRT Transcriptional Repression Checkpoints

    OpenAIRE

    Perissi, Valentina; Scafoglio, Claudio; Zhang, Jie; Ohgi, Kenneth A.; Rose, David W.; Glass, Christopher K.; Rosenfeld, Michael G.

    2008-01-01

    A key strategy to achieve regulated gene expression in higher eukaryotes is to prevent illegitimate signal-independent activation by imposing robust control on the dismissal of corepressors. Here, we report that many signaling pathways, including Notch, NFkB, and nuclear receptor ligands, are subjected to a dual repression “check point” based on distinct corepressor complexes. Gene activation requires the release of both CtBP1/2- and NCoR/SMRT-dependent repression, through the coordinate acti...

  4. Repression of Runx2 by Androgen Receptor (AR) in Osteoblasts and Prostate Cancer Cells: AR Binds Runx2 and Abrogates Its Recruitment to DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Baniwal, Sanjeev K.; Khalid, Omar; Sir, Donna; Buchanan, Grant; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Frenkel, Baruch

    2009-01-01

    Runx2 and androgen receptor (AR) are master transcription factors with pivotal roles in bone metabolism and prostate cancer (PCa). We dissected AR-mediated repression of Runx2 in dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-treated osteoblastic and PCa cells using reporter assays and endogenous Runx2 target genes. Repression required DHT, but not AR’s transactivation function, and was associated with nuclear colocalization of the two proteins. Runx2 and AR coimmunoprecipitated and interacted directly in glutath...

  5. Human THAP7 is a chromatin-associated, histone tail-binding protein that represses transcription via recruitment of HDAC3 and nuclear hormone receptor corepressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlan, Todd; Kutney, Sara; Altman, Brian; Montross, Rebecca; Yu, Jiujiu; Chakravarti, Debabrata

    2005-02-25

    The identities of signal transducer proteins that integrate histone hypoacetylation and transcriptional repression are largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that THAP7, an uncharacterized member of the recently identified THAP (Thanatos-associated protein) family of proteins, is ubiquitously expressed, associates with chromatin, and represses transcription. THAP7 binds preferentially to hypoacetylated (un-, mono-, and diacetylated) histone H4 tails in vitro via its C-terminal 77 amino acids. Deletion of this domain, or treatment of cells with the histone deacetylase inhibitor TSA, which leads to histone hyperacetylation, partially disrupts THAP7/chromatin association in living cells. THAP7 coimmunoprecipitates with histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) and the nuclear hormone receptor corepressor (NCoR) and represses transcription as a Gal4 fusion protein. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrate that these corepressors are recruited to promoters in a THAP7 dependent manner and promote histone H3 hypoacetylation. The conserved THAP domain is a key determinant for full HDAC3 association in vitro, and both the THAP domain and the histone interaction domain are important for the repressive properties of THAP7. Full repression mediated by THAP7 is also dependent on NCoR expression. We hypothesize that THAP7 is a dual function repressor protein that actively targets deacetylation of histone H3 necessary to establish transcriptional repression and functions as a signal transducer of the repressive mark of hypoacetylated histone H4. This is the first demonstration of the transcriptional regulatory properties of a human THAP domain protein, and a critical identification of a potential transducer of the repressive signal of hypoacetylated histone H4 in higher eukaryotes. PMID:15561719

  6. SIRT1 deacetylates RFX5 and antagonizes repression of collagen type I (COL1A2) transcription in smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► SIRT1 interacts with and deacetylates RFX5. ► SIRT1 activation attenuates whereas SIRT1 inhibition enhances collagen repression by RFX5 in vascular smooth muscle cells. ► SIRT1 promotes cytoplasmic localization and proteasomal degradation of RFX5 and cripples promoter recruitment of RFX5. ► IFN-γ represses SIRT1 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells. ► SIRT1 agonist alleviates collagen repression by IFN-γ in vascular smooth muscle cells. -- Abstract: Decreased expression of collagen by vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) within the atherosclerotic plaque contributes to the thinning of the fibrous cap and poses a great threat to plaque rupture. Elucidation of the mechanism underlying repressed collagen type I (COL1A2) gene would potentially provide novel solutions that can prevent rupture-induced complications. We have previously shown that regulatory factor for X-box (RFX5) binds to the COL1A2 transcription start site and represses its transcription. Here we report that SIRT1, an NAD-dependent, class III deacetylase, forms a complex with RFX5. Over-expression of SIRT1 or NAMPT, which synthesizes NAD+ to activate SIRT1, or treatment with the SIRT1 agonist resveratrol decreases RFX5 acetylation and disrupts repression of the COL1A2 promoter activity by RFX5. On the contrary, knockdown of SIRT1 or treatment with SIRT1 inhibitors induces RFX5 acetylation and enhances the repression of collagen transcription. SIRT1 antagonizes RFX5 activity by promoting its nuclear expulsion and proteasomal degradation hence dampening its binding to the COL1A2 promoter. The pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-γ represses COL1A2 transcription by down-regulating SIRT1 expression in SMCs. Therefore, our data have identified as novel pathway whereby SIRT1 maintains collagen synthesis in SMCs by modulating RFX5 activity.

  7. The interactions of GW182 proteins with PABP and deadenylases are required for both translational repression and degradation of miRNA targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntzinger, Eric; Kuzuoglu-Öztürk, Duygu; Braun, Joerg E; Eulalio, Ana; Wohlbold, Lara; Izaurralde, Elisa

    2013-01-01

    Animal miRNAs silence the expression of mRNA targets through translational repression, deadenylation and subsequent mRNA degradation. Silencing requires association of miRNAs with an Argonaute protein and a GW182 family protein. In turn, GW182 proteins interact with poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) and the PAN2-PAN3 and CCR4-NOT deadenylase complexes. These interactions are required for the deadenylation and decay of miRNA targets. Recent studies have indicated that miRNAs repress translation before inducing target deadenylation and decay; however, whether translational repression and deadenylation are coupled or represent independent repressive mechanisms is unclear. Another remaining question is whether translational repression also requires GW182 proteins to interact with both PABP and deadenylases. To address these questions, we characterized the interaction of Drosophila melanogaster GW182 with deadenylases and defined the minimal requirements for a functional GW182 protein. Functional assays in D. melanogaster and human cells indicate that miRNA-mediated translational repression and degradation are mechanistically linked and are triggered through the interactions of GW182 proteins with PABP and deadenylases. PMID:23172285

  8. Control of the Type 3 Secretion System in Vibrio harveyi by Quorum Sensing through Repression of ExsA ▿ ‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Christopher M.; Wu, Julie T.; Ramsey, Meghan E.; Harris, Rebecca C.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2010-01-01

    The type 3 secretion system (T3SS) genes of Vibrio harveyi are activated at low cell density and repressed at high cell density by quorum sensing (QS). Repression requires LuxR, the master transcriptional regulator of QS-controlled genes. Here, we determine the mechanism underlying the LuxR repression of the T3SS system. Using a fluorescence-based cell sorting approach, we isolated V. harveyi mutants that are unable to express T3SS genes at low cell density and identified two mutations in the V. harveyi exsBA operon. While LuxR directly represses the expression of exsBA, complementation and epistasis analyses reveal that it is the repression of exsA expression, but not exsB expression, that is responsible for the QS-mediated repression of T3SS genes at high cell density. The present work further defines the genes in the V. harveyi QS regulon and elucidates a mechanism demonstrating how multiple regulators can be linked in series to direct the expression of QS target genes specifically at low or high cell density. PMID:20543047

  9. Self-serving episodic memory biases: Findings in the repressive coping style

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren L Alston

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with a repressive coping style self-report low anxiety, but show high defensiveness and high physiological arousal. Repressors have impoverished negative autobiographical memories and are better able to suppress memory for negatively valenced and self-related laboratory materials when asked to do so. Research on spontaneous forgetting of negative information in repressors suggests that they show significant forgetting of negative items, but only after a delay. Unknown is whether increased forgetting after a delay is potentiated by self-relevance. Here we asked in three experiments whether repressors would show reduced episodic memories for negative self-relevant information when tested immediately versus after a 2-day delay. We predicted that repressors would show an exaggerated reduction in recall of negative self-relevant memories after a delay, at least without anew priming of this information. We tested a total of 300 participants (experiment 1: N= 95, experiment 2: N=106; experiment 3: N=99 of four types: repressors, high anxious, low anxious, and defensive high anxious individuals. Participants judged positive and negative adjectives with regard to self-descriptiveness, serving as incidental encoding. Surprise free recall was conducted immediately after encoding (experiment 1, after a 2-day delay (experiment 2 or after a 2-day delay following priming via a lexical decision task (experiment 3. In experiment 1, repressors showed a bias against negative self-relevant words in immediate recall. Such a bias was neither observed in delayed recall without priming nor in delayed recall with priming. Thus, counter to our hypothesis, negative information that was initially judged as self-relevant was not forgotten at a higher rate after a delay in repressors. We suggest that repressors may reinterpret initially negative information in a more positive light after a delay, and therefore no longer experience the need to bias their recall

  10. Stochastic de-repression of Rhodopsins in single photoreceptors of the fly retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranidhi Sood

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The photoreceptors of the Drosophila compound eye are a classical model for studying cell fate specification. Photoreceptors (PRs are organized in bundles of eight cells with two major types - inner PRs involved in color vision and outer PRs involved in motion detection. In wild type flies, most PRs express a single type of Rhodopsin (Rh: inner PRs express either Rh3, Rh4, Rh5 or Rh6 and outer PRs express Rh1. In outer PRs, the K(50 homeodomain protein Dve is a key repressor that acts to ensure exclusive Rh expression. Loss of Dve results in de-repression of Rhodopsins in outer PRs, and leads to a wide distribution of expression levels. To quantify these effects, we introduce an automated image analysis method to measure Rhodopsin levels at the single cell level in 3D confocal stacks. Our sensitive methodology reveals cell-specific differences in Rhodopsin distributions among the outer PRs, observed over a developmental time course. We show that Rhodopsin distributions are consistent with a two-state model of gene expression, in which cells can be in either high or basal states of Rhodopsin production. Our model identifies a significant role of post-transcriptional regulation in establishing the two distinct states. The timescale for interconversion between basal and high states is shown to be on the order of days. Our results indicate that even in the absence of Dve, the Rhodopsin regulatory network can maintain highly stable states. We propose that the role of Dve in outer PRs is to buffer against rare fluctuations in this network.

  11. Dietary grape seed polyphenols repress neuron and glia activation in trigeminal ganglion and trigeminal nucleus caudalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durham Paul L

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation and pain associated with temporomandibular joint disorder, a chronic disease that affects 15% of the adult population, involves activation of trigeminal ganglion nerves and development of peripheral and central sensitization. Natural products represent an underutilized resource in the pursuit of safe and effective ways to treat chronic inflammatory diseases. The goal of this study was to investigate effects of grape seed extract on neurons and glia in trigeminal ganglia and trigeminal nucleus caudalis in response to persistent temporomandibular joint inflammation. Sprague Dawley rats were pretreated with 200 mg/kg/d MegaNatural-BP grape seed extract for 14 days prior to bilateral injections of complete Freund's adjuvant into the temporomandibular joint capsule. Results In response to grape seed extract, basal expression of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 was elevated in neurons and glia in trigeminal ganglia and trigeminal nucleus caudalis, and expression of the glutamate aspartate transporter was increased in spinal glia. Rats on a normal diet injected with adjuvant exhibited greater basal levels of phosphorylated-p38 in trigeminal ganglia neurons and spinal neurons and microglia. Similarly, immunoreactive levels of OX-42 in microglia and glial fibrillary acidic protein in astrocytes were greatly increased in response to adjuvant. However, adjuvant-stimulated levels of phosphorylated-p38, OX-42, and glial fibrillary acidic protein were significantly repressed in extract treated animals. Furthermore, grape seed extract suppressed basal expression of the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide in spinal neurons. Conclusions Results from our study provide evidence that grape seed extract may be beneficial as a natural therapeutic option for temporomandibular joint disorders by suppressing development of peripheral and central sensitization.

  12. Accurate microRNA target prediction correlates with protein repression levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simossis Victor A

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs are small endogenously expressed non-coding RNA molecules that regulate target gene expression through translation repression or messenger RNA degradation. MicroRNA regulation is performed through pairing of the microRNA to sites in the messenger RNA of protein coding genes. Since experimental identification of miRNA target genes poses difficulties, computational microRNA target prediction is one of the key means in deciphering the role of microRNAs in development and disease. Results DIANA-microT 3.0 is an algorithm for microRNA target prediction which is based on several parameters calculated individually for each microRNA and combines conserved and non-conserved microRNA recognition elements into a final prediction score, which correlates with protein production fold change. Specifically, for each predicted interaction the program reports a signal to noise ratio and a precision score which can be used as an indication of the false positive rate of the prediction. Conclusion Recently, several computational target prediction programs were benchmarked based on a set of microRNA target genes identified by the pSILAC method. In this assessment DIANA-microT 3.0 was found to achieve the highest precision among the most widely used microRNA target prediction programs reaching approximately 66%. The DIANA-microT 3.0 prediction results are available online in a user friendly web server at http://www.microrna.gr/microT

  13. Transcriptional profiling of mouse uterus at pre-implantation stage under VEGF repression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Ji

    Full Text Available Uterus development during pre-implantation stage affects implantation process and embryo growth. Aberrant uterus development is associated with many human reproductive diseases. Among the factors regulating uterus development, vascular remodeling promoters are critical for uterus function and fertility. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, as one of the major members, has been found to be important in endothelial cell growth and blood vessel development, as well as in non-endothelial cells. VEGF mediation in reproduction has been broadly studied, but VEGF-induced transcriptional machinery during implantation window has not been systematically studied. In this study, a genetically repressed VEGF mouse model was used to analyze uterus transcriptome at gestation 2.5 (G2.5 by Solexa/Illumina's digital gene expression (DGE system. A number of 831 uterus-specific and 2398 VEGF-regulated genes were identified. Gene ontology (GO analysis indicated that genes actively involved in uterus development were members of collagen biosynthesis, cell proliferation and cell apoptosis. Uterus-specific genes were enriched in activities of phosphatidyl inositol phosphate kinase, histone H3-K36 demethylation and protein acetylation. Among VEGF-regulated genes, up-regulated were associated with RNA polymerase III activity while down-regulated were strongly related with muscle development. Comparable numbers of antisense transcripts were identified. Expression levels of the antisense transcripts were found tightly correlated with their sense expression levels, an indication of possibly non-specific transcripts generated around the active promoters and enhancers. The antisense transcripts with exceptionally high or low expression levels and the antisense transcripts under VEGF regulation were also identified. These transcripts may be important candidates in regulation of uterus development. This study provides a global survey on genes and antisense transcripts

  14. Repression of Ccr9 transcription in mouse T lymphocyte progenitors by the Notch signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, Veena; Carr, Tiffany; de Pooter, Renee F; Emanuelle, Akinola Olumide; Akinola, Emanuelle Olumide; Gounari, Fotini; Kee, Barbara L

    2015-04-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR9 controls the immigration of multipotent hematopoietic progenitor cells into the thymus to sustain T cell development. Postimmigration, thymocytes downregulate CCR9 and migrate toward the subcapsular zone where they recombine their TCR β-chain and γ-chain gene loci. CCR9 is subsequently upregulated and participates in the localization of thymocytes during their selection for self-tolerant receptor specificities. Although the dynamic regulation of CCR9 is essential for early T cell development, the mechanisms controlling CCR9 expression have not been determined. In this article, we show that key regulators of T cell development, Notch1 and the E protein transcription factors E2A and HEB, coordinately control the expression of Ccr9. E2A and HEB bind at two putative enhancers upstream of Ccr9 and positively regulate CCR9 expression at multiple stages of T cell development. In contrast, the canonical Notch signaling pathway prevents the recruitment of p300 to the putative Ccr9 enhancers, resulting in decreased acetylation of histone H3 and a failure to recruit RNA polymerase II to the Ccr9 promoter. Although Notch signaling modestly modulates the binding of E proteins to one of the two Ccr9 enhancers, we found that Notch signaling represses Ccr9 in T cell lymphoma lines in which Ccr9 transcription is independent of E protein function. Our data support the hypothesis that activation of Notch1 has a dominant-negative effect on Ccr9 transcription and that Notch1 and E proteins control the dynamic expression of Ccr9 during T cell development. PMID:25710912

  15. PINCH1 is transcriptional regulator in podocytes that interacts with WT1 and represses podocalyxin expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: PINCH1, an adaptor protein containing five LIM domains, plays an important role in regulating the integrin-mediated cell adhesion, migration and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. PINCH1 is induced in the fibrotic kidney after injury, and it primarily localizes at the sites of focal adhesion. Whether it can translocate to the nucleus and directly participate in gene regulation is completely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using cultured glomerular podocytes as a model system, we show that PINCH1 expression was induced by TGF-β1, a fibrogenic cytokine that promotes podocyte dysfunction. Interestingly, increased PINCH1 not only localized at the sites of focal adhesions, but also underwent nuclear translocation after TGF-β1 stimulation. This nuclear translocation of PINCH1 was apparently dependent on the putative nuclear export/localization signals (NES/NLS at its C-terminus, as deletion or site-directed mutations abolished its nuclear shuttling. Co-immunoprecipitation and pull-down experiments revealed that PINCH1 interacted with Wilms tumor 1 protein (WT1, a nuclear transcription factor that is essential for regulating podocyte-specific gene expression in adult kidney. Interaction of PINCH1 and WT1 was mediated by the LIM1 domain of PINCH1 and C-terminal zinc-finger domain of WT1, which led to the suppression of the WT1-mediated podocalyxin expression in podocytes. PINCH1 also repressed podocalyxin gene transcription in a promoter-luciferase reporter assay. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that PINCH1 can shuttle into the nucleus from cytoplasm in podocytes, wherein it interacts with WT1 and suppresses podocyte-specific gene expression. Our studies reveal a previously unrecognized, novel function of PINCH1, in which it acts as a transcriptional regulator through controlling specific gene expression.

  16. Molecular analysis of the bvg-repressed urease of Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, D J; Shojaei, M; Chhatwal, G S; Guzmán, C A; Walker, M J

    1996-11-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is a ureolytic mammalian respiratory pathogen. We have investigated the regulation of urease in B. bronchiseptica and the potential role of this enzyme in eukaryotic invasion and intracellular survival. Our results indicate urease is a bordetella virulence repressed gene. Urease activity in virulent B. bronchiseptica BB7865 is up-regulated from basal levels by 5 gl1 magnesium sulphate at 37 degrees C. At 30 degrees C, urease activity remained at basal levels, even in the presence on magnesium sulphate, suggesting a second temperature dependent mechanism of urease regulation was also operating. Urease was not inducible by 10 mM urea nor up-regulated in nitrogen limiting conditions. To evaluate the role of urease in intracellular invasion and survival urease-negative mutants of B. bronchiseptica BB7865 and B. bronchiseptica BB7866 were created by transposon mutagenesis, and compared to the urease-positive parental strains in a HeLa cell invasion assay. We demonstrate that increasing the concentration of urea in the assay increased survival of the urease-positive but not urease-negative strains after 24 h, suggesting that urease does have a role in intracellular survival. Partial DNA sequence analysis of an 11.0 kb EcoRI DNA fragment encoding urease activity revealed an open reading frame containing 50%, 45%, 45%, and 41% homology to the UreA urease subunit protein of Klebsiella aerogenes, Proteus vulgaris, Helicobacter pylori and Proteus mirabilis respectively. We also show Bordetella pertussis to contain sequences homologous with a DNA probe containing the gene encoding UreA of B. bronchiseptica indicating the possible presence of cryptic urease genes in this species. PMID:8938644

  17. Repression of germline RNAi pathways in somatic cells by retinoblastoma pathway chromatin complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyun Wu

    Full Text Available The retinoblastoma (Rb tumor suppressor acts with a number of chromatin cofactors in a wide range of species to suppress cell proliferation. The Caenorhabditis elegans retinoblastoma gene and many of these cofactors, called synMuv B genes, were identified in genetic screens for cell lineage defects caused by growth factor misexpression. Mutations in many synMuv B genes, including lin-35/Rb, also cause somatic misexpression of the germline RNA processing P granules and enhanced RNAi. We show here that multiple small RNA components, including a set of germline-specific Argonaute genes, are misexpressed in the soma of many synMuv B mutant animals, revealing one node for enhanced RNAi. Distinct classes of synMuv B mutants differ in the subcellular architecture of their misexpressed P granules, their profile of misexpressed small RNA and P granule genes, as well as their enhancement of RNAi and the related silencing of transgenes. These differences define three classes of synMuv B genes, representing three chromatin complexes: a LIN-35/Rb-containing DRM core complex, a SUMO-recruited Mec complex, and a synMuv B heterochromatin complex, suggesting that intersecting chromatin pathways regulate the repression of small RNA and P granule genes in the soma and the potency of RNAi. Consistent with this, the DRM complex and the synMuv B heterochromatin complex were genetically additive and displayed distinct antagonistic interactions with the MES-4 histone methyltransferase and the MRG-1 chromodomain protein, two germline chromatin regulators required for the synMuv phenotype and the somatic misexpression of P granule components. Thus intersecting synMuv B chromatin pathways conspire with synMuv B suppressor chromatin factors to regulate the expression of small RNA pathway genes, which enables heightened RNAi response. Regulation of small RNA pathway genes by human retinoblastoma may also underlie its role as a tumor suppressor gene.

  18. Repression of germline RNAi pathways in somatic cells by retinoblastoma pathway chromatin complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoyun; Shi, Zhen; Cui, Mingxue; Han, Min; Ruvkun, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor acts with a number of chromatin cofactors in a wide range of species to suppress cell proliferation. The Caenorhabditis elegans retinoblastoma gene and many of these cofactors, called synMuv B genes, were identified in genetic screens for cell lineage defects caused by growth factor misexpression. Mutations in many synMuv B genes, including lin-35/Rb, also cause somatic misexpression of the germline RNA processing P granules and enhanced RNAi. We show here that multiple small RNA components, including a set of germline-specific Argonaute genes, are misexpressed in the soma of many synMuv B mutant animals, revealing one node for enhanced RNAi. Distinct classes of synMuv B mutants differ in the subcellular architecture of their misexpressed P granules, their profile of misexpressed small RNA and P granule genes, as well as their enhancement of RNAi and the related silencing of transgenes. These differences define three classes of synMuv B genes, representing three chromatin complexes: a LIN-35/Rb-containing DRM core complex, a SUMO-recruited Mec complex, and a synMuv B heterochromatin complex, suggesting that intersecting chromatin pathways regulate the repression of small RNA and P granule genes in the soma and the potency of RNAi. Consistent with this, the DRM complex and the synMuv B heterochromatin complex were genetically additive and displayed distinct antagonistic interactions with the MES-4 histone methyltransferase and the MRG-1 chromodomain protein, two germline chromatin regulators required for the synMuv phenotype and the somatic misexpression of P granule components. Thus intersecting synMuv B chromatin pathways conspire with synMuv B suppressor chromatin factors to regulate the expression of small RNA pathway genes, which enables heightened RNAi response. Regulation of small RNA pathway genes by human retinoblastoma may also underlie its role as a tumor suppressor gene. PMID:22412383

  19. Glucocorticoid receptor repression mediated by BRCA1 inactivation in ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BRCA mutations are the main known hereditary factor for ovarian cancer. Notably, emerging evidence indicates that the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) has drawn considerable interest in ovarian cancer development. However, dynamic cross-talk between BRCA1 and GR signaling pathways are poorly understood. The regulatory effects of BRCA on GR were assessed in 146 serous ovarian cancer patients (28 pairs of BRCA1-mutated or not, 23 pairs of BRCA2-mutated or not, and 22 pairs with hypermethylated BRCA1 promoter or not). BRCA1 promoter methylation was analyzed by bisulfite sequencing using primers flanking the core promoter region. Expression levels of BRCA1 and GR were assessed by immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. Regression analysis was used to examine the possible relationship between BRCA1 and GR expression levels. The knockdown and overexpression of BRCA1 were achieved using a lentiviral vector in 293 T cells, SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells, and primary non-mutated and BRCA1-mutated ovarian cancer cells. GR expression levels were unchanged in non-BRCA1-mutated, non-BRCA2-mutated and BRCA2-mutated ovarian cancer compared to their normal tissues; BRCA1 repression (BRCA1 mutation or BRCA1 promoter hypermethylation) ovarian cancer showed decreased GR levels compared to normal tissue; there was a positive correlation between BRCA1 and GR expression in human ovarian cancer specimens; BRCA1 knockdown was effective at inhibiting GR expression, and overexpression of BRCA1 induces an increase in GR levels in ovarian cancer cells. These results suggest that GR may be a potential target for BRCA1 in ovarian cancer progression

  20. Self-serving episodic memory biases: findings in the repressive coping style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, Lauren L; Kratchmer, Carissa; Jeznach, Anna; Bartlett, Nathan T; Davidson, Patrick S R; Fujiwara, Esther

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with a repressive coping style self-report low anxiety, but show high defensiveness and high physiological arousal. Repressors have impoverished negative autobiographical memories and are better able to suppress memory for negatively valenced and self-related laboratory materials when asked to do so. Research on spontaneous forgetting of negative information in repressors suggests that they show significant forgetting of negative items, but only after a delay. Unknown is whether increased forgetting after a delay is potentiated by self-relevance. Here we asked in three experiments whether repressors would show reduced episodic memories for negative self-relevant information when tested immediately versus after a 2-day delay. We predicted that repressors would show an exaggerated reduction in recall of negative self-relevant memories after a delay, at least without anew priming of this information. We tested a total of 300 participants (experiment 1: N = 95, experiment 2: N = 106; experiment 3: N = 99) of four types: repressors, high-anxious (HA), low-anxious, and defensive HA individuals. Participants judged positive and negative adjectives with regard to self-descriptiveness, serving as incidental encoding. Surprise free-recall was conducted immediately after encoding (experiment 1), after a 2-day delay (experiment 2), or after a 2-day delay following priming via a lexical decision task (experiment 3). In experiment 1, repressors showed a bias against negative self-relevant words in immediate recall. Such a bias was neither observed in delayed recall without priming nor in delayed recall with priming. Thus, counter to our hypothesis, negative information that was initially judged as self-relevant was not forgotten at a higher rate after a delay in repressors. We suggest that repressors may reinterpret initially negative information in a more positive light after a delay, and therefore no longer experience the need to bias their recall after

  1. Repression of the Auxin Response Pathway Increases Arabidopsis Susceptibility to Necrotrophic Fungi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francisco Llorente; Paul Muskett; Andrea Sánchez-Vallet; Gemma López; Brisa Ramos; Clara Sánchez-Rodríguez; Lucia Jordá; Jane Parker; Antonio Molina

    2008-01-01

    In plants, resistance to necrotrophic pathogens depends on the interplay between different hormone systems, such as those regulated by salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), ethylene, and abscisic acid. Repression of auxin signaling by the SA pathway was recently shown to contribute to antibacterial resistance. Here, we demonstrate that Arabidopsis auxin signaling mutants axrl, axr2, and axr6 that have defects in the auxin-stimulated SCF (Skpl-Cullin-F-box) ubiquitination pathway exhibit increased susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungi Plectosphaerella cucumerina and Botrytis cinerea. Also, stabilization of the auxin transcriptional repressor AXR3 that is normally targeted for removal by the SCF-ubiquitin/proteasome machinery occurs upon P. cucumerina infection. Pharmacological inhibition of auxin transport or proteasome function each compromise necrotroph resistance of wild-type plants to a similar extent as in non-treated auxin response mutants. These results suggest that auxin signaling is important for resistance to the necrotrophic fungi P. cucumerina and B. cinerea. SGTlb (one of two Arabidopsis SGT1 genes encoding HSP90/HSC70 co-chaperones) promotes the functions of SCF E3-ubiquitin ligase complexes in auxin and JA responses and resistance conditioned by certain Resistance (R) genes to biotrophic pathogens. We find that sgtlb mutants are as resistant to P. cucumerina as wild-type plants. Conversely, auxin/SCF signaling mutants are uncompromised in RPP4-triggered resistance to the obligate biotrophic oomycete, Hyaloperonospora parasitica. Thus, the predominant action of SGTlb in R gene-conditioned resistance to oomycetes appears to be at a site other than assisting SCF E3-ubiquitin ligases. However, genetic additivity of sgtlb axr1 double mutants in susceptibility to H. parasitica suggests that SCF-mediated ubiquitination contributes to limiting biotrophic pathogen colonization once plant-pathogen compatibility is established.

  2. Repression of retinal microvascular endothelial cells by transthyretin under simulated diabetic retinopathy conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jun; Yao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate biological effects of transthyretin (TTR) on the development of neovascularization under simulated diabetic retinopathy (DR) condition associated with high glucose and hypoxia. METHODS Human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (hRECs) were cultured in normal and simulated DR environments with high glucose and hypoxia. The normal serum glucose concentration is approximately 5.5 mmol/L; thus, hyperglycemia was simulated with 25 mmol/L glucose, while hypoxia was induced using 200 µmol/L CoCl2. The influence of TTR on hRECs and human retinal pigment epithelial cells (hRPECs) was determined by incubating the cells with 4 µmol/L TTR in normal and abnormal media. A co-culture system was then employed to evaluate the effects of hRPECs on hRECs. RESULTS Decreased hRECs and hRPECs were observed under abnormal conditions, including high-glucose and hypoxic media. In addition, hRECs were significantly inhibited by 4 µmol/L exogenous TTR during hyperglycemic culture. During co-culture, hRPECs inhibited hRECs in both the normal and abnormal environments. CONCLUSION hREC growth is inhibited by exogenous TTR under simulated DR environments with high-glucose and hypoxic, particularly in the medium containing 25 mmol/L glucose. hRPECs, which manufacture TTR in the eye, also represses hRECs in the same environment. TTR is predicted to inhibit the proliferation of hRECs and neovascularization. PMID:27366679

  3. Transcriptomes of a xylose-utilizing industrial flocculating Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain cultured in media containing different sugar sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei-Yi; Tang, Yue-Qin; Gou, Min; Xia, Zi-Yuan; Kida, Kenji

    2016-12-01

    Lignocellulosic hydrolysates used for bioethanol production contain a mixture of sugars, with xylose being the second most abundant after glucose. Since xylose is not a natural substrate for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, recombinant S. cerevisiae strongly prefers glucose over xylose, and the fermentation rate and ethanol yield with xylose are both lower than those with glucose. To determine the molecular basis for glucose and xylose fermentation, we used microarrays to investigate the transcriptional difference of a xylose-utilizing industrial strain cultured in both single sugar media and a mixed sugar medium of glucose and xylose. The transcriptomes were nearly identical between glucose metabolizing cells in the glucose alone medium and those in the glucose fermentation phase in the mixed-sugar medium. Whereas the transcriptomes highly differed between the xylose metabolizing cells in the xylose alone medium and those in the xylose fermentation phase in the mixed sugar medium, and the differences mainly involved sulfur metabolism. When the transcriptional profiles were compared between glucose fermentation state and xylose fermentation state, we found the expression patterns of hexose transporters and glucose signaling pathway differed in response to different sugar sources, and the expression levels of the genes involved in gluconeogenesis, the glyoxylate and tricarboxylic acid cycles and respiration increased with xylose, indicating that the xylose-metabolizing cells had high requirements for maintenance energy and lacked the carbon catabolite repression capability. The effect of carbon catabolite repression by glucose lasted after glucose depletion for specific genes to different extents. PMID:27485516

  4. Epigenetic involvement of Alien/ESET complex in thyroid hormone-mediated repression of E2F1 gene expression and cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Corepressor Alien interacts with histone methyltransferase ESET in vivo. ► Alien/ESET complex is recruited to nTRE of T3-responsive gene by liganded TRβ1. ► ESET-mediated H3K9 methylation is required for liganded TRβ1-repressed transcription. ► ESET is involved in T3-repressed G1/S phase transition and proliferation. -- Abstract: The ligand-bound thyroid hormone receptor (TR) is known to repress via a negative TRE (nTRE) the expression of E2F1, a key transcription factor that controls the G1/S phase transition. Alien has been identified as a novel interacting factor of E2F1 and acts as a corepressor of E2F1. The detailed molecular mechanism by which Alien inhibits E2F1 gene expression remains unclear. Here, we report that the histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) methyltransferase (HMT) ESET is an integral component of the corepressor Alien complex and the Alien/ESET complex is recruited to both sites, the E2F1 and the nTRE site of the E2F1 gene while the recruitment to the negative thyroid hormone response element (nTRE) is induced by the ligand-bound TRβ1 within the E2F1 gene promoter. We show that, overexpression of ESET promotes, whereas knockdown of ESET releases, the inhibition of TRβ1-regulated gene transcription upon T3 stimulation; and H3K9 methylation is required for TRβ1-repressed transcription. Furthermore, depletion of ESET impairs thyroid hormone-repressed proliferation as well as the G1/S transition of the cell cycle. Taken together, our data indicate that ESET is involved in TRβ1-mediated transcription repression and provide a molecular basis of thyroid hormone-induced repression of proliferation.

  5. Histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity of p300 modulates human T lymphotropic virus type 1 p30II-mediated repression of LTR transcriptional activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is a deltaretrovirus that causes adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma, and is implicated in a variety of lymphocyte-mediated inflammatory disorders. HTLV-1 provirus has regulatory and accessory genes in four pX open reading frames. HTLV-1 pX ORF-II encodes two proteins, p13II and p30II, which are incompletely defined in virus replication or pathogenesis. We have demonstrated that pX ORF-II mutations block virus replication in vivo and that ORF-II encoded p30II, a nuclear-localizing protein that binds with CREB-binding protein (CBP)/p300, represses CREB and Tax responsive element (TRE)-mediated transcription. Herein, we have identified p30II motifs important for p300 binding and in regulating TRE-mediated transcription in the absence and presence of HTLV-1 provirus. Within amino acids 100-179 of p30II, a region important for repression of LTR-mediated transcription, we identified a single lysine residue at amino acid 106 (K3) that significantly modulates the ability of p30II to repress TRE-mediated transcription. Exogenous p300, in a dose-responsive manner, reverses p30II-dependent repression of TRE-mediated transcription, in the absence or presence of the provirus, In contrast to wild type p300, p300 HAT mutants (defective in histone acetyltransferase activity) only partially rescued p30II-mediated LTR repression. Deacetylation by histone deacetylase-1 (HDAC-1) enhanced p30II-mediated LTR repression, while inhibition of deacetylation by trichostatin A decreases p30II-mediated LTR repression. Collectively, our data indicate that HTLV-1 p30II modulates viral gene expression in a cooperative manner with p300-mediated acetylation

  6. Repression of btuB gene transcription in Escherichia coli by the GadX protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Wensi S

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background BtuB (B twelve uptake is an outer membrane protein of Escherichia coli, it serves as a receptor for cobalamines uptake or bactericidal toxin entry. A decrease in the production of the BtuB protein would cause E. coli to become resistant to colicins. The production of BtuB has been shown to be regulated at the post-transcriptional level. The secondary structure switch of 5' untranslated region of butB and the intracellular concentration of adenosylcobalamin (Ado-Cbl would affect the translation efficiency and RNA stability of btuB. The transcriptional regulation of btuB expression is still unclear. Results To determine whether the btuB gene is also transcriptionally controlled by trans-acting factors, a genomic library was screened for clones that enable E. coli to grow in the presence of colicin E7, and a plasmid carrying gadX and gadY genes was isolated. The lacZ reporter gene assay revealed that these two genes decreased the btuB promoter activity by approximately 50%, and the production of the BtuB protein was reduced by approximately 90% in the presence of a plasmid carrying both gadX and gadY genes in E. coli as determined by Western blotting. Results of electrophoretic mobility assay and DNase I footprinting indicated that the GadX protein binds to the 5' untranslated region of the btuB gene. Since gadX and gadY genes are more highly expressed under acidic conditions, the transcriptional level of btuB in cells cultured in pH 7.4 or pH 5.5 medium was examined by quantitative real-time PCR to investigate the effect of GadX. The results showed the transcription of gadX with 1.4-fold increase but the level of btuB was reduced to 57%. Conclusions Through biological and biochemical analysis, we have demonstrated the GadX can directly interact with btuB promoter and affect the expression of btuB. In conclusion, this study provides the first evidence that the expression of btuB gene is transcriptionally repressed by the acid

  7. Proteomic and functional consequences of hexokinase deficiency in glucose-repressible Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mates, Nadia; Kettner, Karina; Heidenreich, Falk; Pursche, Theresia; Migotti, Rebekka; Kahlert, Günther; Kuhlisch, Eberhard; Breunig, Karin D; Schellenberger, Wolfgang; Dittmar, Gunnar; Hoflack, Bernard; Kriegel, Thomas M

    2014-03-01

    The analysis of glucose signaling in the Crabtree-positive eukaryotic model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae has disclosed a dual role of its hexokinase ScHxk2, which acts as a glycolytic enzyme and key signal transducer adapting central metabolism to glucose availability. In order to identify evolutionarily conserved characteristics of hexokinase structure and function, the cellular response of the Crabtree-negative yeast Kluyveromyces lactis to rag5 null mutation and concomitant deficiency of its unique hexokinase KlHxk1 was analyzed by means of difference gel electrophoresis. In total, 2,851 fluorescent spots containing different protein species were detected in the master gel representing all of the K. lactis proteins that were solubilized from glucose-grown KlHxk1 wild-type and mutant cells. Mass spectrometric peptide analysis identified 45 individual hexokinase-dependent proteins related to carbohydrate, short-chain fatty acid and tricarboxylic acid metabolism as well as to amino acid and protein turnover, but also to general stress response and chromatin remodeling, which occurred as a consequence of KlHxk1 deficiency at a minimum 3-fold enhanced or reduced level in the mutant proteome. In addition, three proteins exhibiting homology to 2-methylcitrate cycle enzymes of S. cerevisiae were detected at increased concentrations, suggesting a stimulation of pyruvate formation from amino acids and/or fatty acids. Experimental validation of the difference gel electrophoresis approach by post-lysis dimethyl labeling largely confirmed the abundance changes detected in the mutant proteome via the former method. Taking into consideration the high proportion of identified hexokinase-dependent proteins exhibiting increased proteomic levels, KlHxk1 is likely to have a repressive function in a multitude of metabolic pathways. The proteomic alterations detected in the mutant classify KlHxk1 as a multifunctional enzyme and support the view of evolutionary conservation of

  8. Variable coordination of cotranscribed genes in Escherichia coli following antisense repression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulyté Agne

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A majority of bacterial genes belong to tight clusters and operons, which complicates gene functional studies using conventional knock-out methods. Antisense agents can down-regulate the expression of genes without disrupting the genome because they bind mRNA and block its expression. However, it is unclear how antisense inhibition affects expression from genes that are cotranscribed with the target. Results To examine the effects of antisense inhibition on cotranscribed genes, we constructed a plasmid expressing the two reporter genes gfp and DsRed as one transcriptional unit. Incubation with antisense peptide nucleic acid (PNA targeted to the mRNA start codon region of either the upstream gfp or the downstream DsRed gene resulted in a complete expression discoordination from this artificial construct. The same approach was applied to the three cotranscribed genes in the endogenously expressed lac-operon (lacZ, Y and A and partial downstream expression coordination was seen when the lacZ start codon was targeted with antisense PNA. Targeting the lacY mRNA start codon region showed no effect on the upstream lacZ gene expression whereas expression from the downstream lacA gene was affected as strongly as the lacY gene. Determination of lacZ and lacY mRNA levels revealed a pattern of reduction that was similar to the Lac-proteins, indicating a relation between translation inhibition and mRNA degradation as a response to antisense PNA treatment. Conclusion The results show that antisense mediated repression of genes within operons affect cotranscribed genes to a variable degree. Target transcript stability appears to be closely related to inhibition of translation and presumably depends on translating ribosomes protecting the mRNA from intrinsic decay mechanisms. Therefore, for genes within operons and clusters it is likely that the nature of the target transcript will determine the inhibitory effects on cotranscribed genes

  9. Corticosteroid-Induced MKP-1 Represses Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Secretion by Enhancing Activity of Tristetraprolin (TTP) in ASM Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhala, Pavan; Bunge, Kristin; Ge, Qi; Ammit, Alaina J

    2016-10-01

    Exaggerated cytokine secretion drives pathogenesis of a number of chronic inflammatory diseases, including asthma. Anti-inflammatory pharmacotherapies, including corticosteroids, are front-line therapies and although they have proven clinical utility, the molecular mechanisms responsible for their actions are not fully understood. The corticosteroid-inducible gene, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase 1 (MKP-1, DUSP1) has emerged as a key molecule responsible for the repressive effects of steroids. MKP-1 is known to deactivate p38 MAPK phosphorylation and can control the expression and activity of the mRNA destabilizing protein-tristetraprolin (TTP). But whether corticosteroid-induced MKP-1 acts via p38 MAPK-mediated modulation of TTP function in a pivotal airway cell type, airway smooth muscle (ASM), was unknown. While pretreatment of ASM cells with the corticosteroid dexamethasone (preventative protocol) is known to reduce ASM synthetic function in vitro, the impact of adding dexamethasone after stimulation (therapeutic protocol) had not been explored. Whether dexamethasone modulates TTP in a p38 MAPK-dependent manner in this cell type was also unknown. We address this herein and utilize an in vitro model of asthmatic inflammation where ASM cells were stimulated with the pro-asthmatic cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and the impact of adding dexamethasone 1 h after stimulation assessed. IL-6 mRNA expression and protein secretion was significantly repressed by dexamethasone acting in a temporally distinct manner to increase MKP-1, deactivate p38 MAPK, and modulate TTP phosphorylation status. In this way, dexamethasone-induced MKP-1 acts via p38 MAPK to switch on the mRNA destabilizing function of TTP to repress pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion from ASM cells. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2153-2158, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26825339

  10. KRAB-zinc finger proteins and KAP1 can mediate long-range transcriptional repression through heterochromatin spreading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna C Groner

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Krüppel-associated box domain-zinc finger proteins (KRAB-ZFPs are tetrapod-specific transcriptional repressors encoded in the hundreds by the human genome. In order to explore their as yet ill-defined impact on gene expression, we developed an ectopic repressor assay, allowing the study of KRAB-mediated transcriptional regulation at hundreds of different transcriptional units. By targeting a drug-controllable KRAB-containing repressor to gene-trapping lentiviral vectors, we demonstrate that KRAB and its corepressor KAP1 can silence promoters located several tens of kilobases (kb away from their DNA binding sites, with an efficiency which is generally higher for promoters located within 15 kb or less. Silenced promoters exhibit a loss of histone H3-acetylation, an increase in H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3, and a drop in RNA Pol II recruitment, consistent with a block of transcriptional initiation following the establishment of silencing marks. Furthermore, we reveal that KRAB-mediated repression is established by the long-range spreading of H3K9me3 and heterochromatin protein 1 beta (HP1beta between the repressor binding site and the promoter. We confirm the biological relevance of this phenomenon by documenting KAP1-dependent transcriptional repression at an endogenous KRAB-ZFP gene cluster, where KAP1 binds to the 3' end of genes and mediates propagation of H3K9me3 and HP1beta towards their 5' end. Together, our data support a model in which KRAB/KAP1 recruitment induces long-range repression through the spread of heterochromatin. This finding not only suggests auto-regulatory mechanisms in the control of KRAB-ZFP gene clusters, but also provides important cues for interpreting future genome-wide DNA binding data of KRAB-ZFPs and KAP1.

  11. Tcf3 represses Wnt-β-catenin signaling and maintains neural stem cell population during neocortical development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Kuwahara

    Full Text Available During mouse neocortical development, the Wnt-β-catenin signaling pathway plays essential roles in various phenomena including neuronal differentiation and proliferation of neural precursor cells (NPCs. Production of the appropriate number of neurons without depletion of the NPC population requires precise regulation of the balance between differentiation and maintenance of NPCs. However, the mechanism that suppresses Wnt signaling to prevent premature neuronal differentiation of NPCs is poorly understood. We now show that the HMG box transcription factor Tcf3 (also known as Tcf7l1 contributes to this mechanism. Tcf3 is highly expressed in undifferentiated NPCs in the mouse neocortex, and its expression is reduced in intermediate neuronal progenitors (INPs committed to the neuronal fate. We found Tcf3 to be a repressor of Wnt signaling in neocortical NPCs in a reporter gene assay. Tcf3 bound to the promoter of the proneural bHLH gene Neurogenin1 (Neurog1 and repressed its expression. Consistent with this, Tcf3 repressed neuronal differentiation and increased the self-renewal activity of NPCs. We also found that Wnt signal stimulation reduces the level of Tcf3, and increases those of Tcf1 (also known as Tcf7 and Lef1, positive mediators of Wnt signaling, in NPCs. Together, these results suggest that Tcf3 antagonizes Wnt signaling in NPCs, thereby maintaining their undifferentiated state in the neocortex and that Wnt signaling promotes the transition from Tcf3-mediated repression to Tcf1/Lef1-mediated enhancement of Wnt signaling, constituting a positive feedback loop that facilitates neuronal differentiation.

  12. Repression of callus initiation by the miRNA-directed interaction of auxin-cytokinin in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenhua; Li, Juan; Wang, Long; Li, Qiang; Lu, Qing; Yu, Yanchong; Li, Shuo; Bai, Ming-Yi; Hu, Yuxin; Xiang, Fengning

    2016-08-01

    In tissue culture systems plant cells can be induced to regenerate to whole plants. A particularly striking example of cellular reprogramming is seen in this regeneration process, which typically begins with the induction of an intermediate cell mass referred to as callus. The identity of the key genetic cues associated with callus formation is still largely unknown. Here a microRNA-directed phytohormonal interaction is described which represses callus initiation and formation in Arabidopsis thaliana. miR160 and ARF10 (At2g28350), a gene encoding an auxin response factor, were shown to exhibit a contrasting pattern of transcription during callus initiation from pericycle-like cells. The callus initiation is faster and more prolific in a miR160-resistant form of ARF10 (mARF10), but slower and less prolific in the transgenic line over-expressing miR160c (At5g46845), arf10 and arf10 arf16 mutants than that in the wild type. ARF10 repressed the expression of Arabidopsis Response Regulator15 (ARR15, At1g74890) via its direct binding to the gene's promoter. The loss of function of ARR15 enhanced callus initiation and partly rescued the phenotype induced by the transgene Pro35S:miR160c. Overexpression of ARR15 partly rescues the callus initiation defect of mARF10 plants. Our findings define miR160 as a key repressor of callus formation and reveal that the initiation of callus is repressed by miR160-directed interaction between auxin and cytokinin. PMID:27189514

  13. Role of the BAHD1 Chromatin-Repressive Complex in Placental Development and Regulation of Steroid Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakisic, Goran; Wendling, Olivia; Libertini, Emanuele; Radford, Elizabeth J.; Le Guillou, Morwenna; Champy, Marie-France; Wattenhofer-Donzé, Marie; Soubigou, Guillaume; Ait-Si-Ali, Slimane; Feunteun, Jean; Sorg, Tania; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C.; Cossart, Pascale; Bierne, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    BAHD1 is a vertebrate protein that promotes heterochromatin formation and gene repression in association with several epigenetic regulators. However, its physiological roles remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that ablation of the Bahd1 gene results in hypocholesterolemia, hypoglycemia and decreased body fat in mice. It also causes placental growth restriction with a drop of trophoblast glycogen cells, a reduction of fetal weight and a high neonatal mortality rate. By intersecting transcriptome data from murine Bahd1 knockout (KO) placentas at stages E16.5 and E18.5 of gestation, Bahd1-KO embryonic fibroblasts, and human cells stably expressing BAHD1, we also show that changes in BAHD1 levels alter expression of steroid/lipid metabolism genes. Biochemical analysis of the BAHD1-associated multiprotein complex identifies MIER proteins as novel partners of BAHD1 and suggests that BAHD1-MIER interaction forms a hub for histone deacetylases and methyltransferases, chromatin readers and transcription factors. We further show that overexpression of BAHD1 leads to an increase of MIER1 enrichment on the inactive X chromosome (Xi). In addition, BAHD1 and MIER1/3 repress expression of the steroid hormone receptor genes ESR1 and PGR, both playing important roles in placental development and energy metabolism. Moreover, modulation of BAHD1 expression in HEK293 cells triggers epigenetic changes at the ESR1 locus. Together, these results identify BAHD1 as a core component of a chromatin-repressive complex regulating placental morphogenesis and body fat storage and suggest that its dysfunction may contribute to several human diseases. PMID:26938916

  14. Thanatos-associated protein 7 associates with template activating factor-Ibeta and inhibits histone acetylation to repress transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlan, Todd; Parker, J Brandon; Nagata, Kyosuke; Chakravarti, Debabrata

    2006-02-01

    The posttranslational modifications of histones on chromatin or a lack thereof is critical in transcriptional regulation. Emerging studies indicate a role for histone-binding proteins in transcriptional activation and repression. We have previously identified template-activating factor-Ibeta (TAF-Ibeta, also called PHAPII, SET, and I(2)(pp2A)) as a component of a cellular complex called inhibitor of acetyltransferases (INHAT) that masks histone acetylation in vitro and blocks histone acetyltransferase (HAT)-dependent transcription in living cells. TAF-Ibeta has also been shown to associate with transcription factors, including nuclear receptors, to regulate their activities. To identify novel interactors of TAF-Ibeta, we employed a yeast two-hybrid screen and identified a previously uncharacterized human protein called thanatos-associated protein-7 (THAP7), a member of a large family of THAP domain-containing putative DNA-binding proteins. In this study we demonstrate that THAP7 associates with TAF-Ibeta in vitro and map their association domains to a C-terminal predicted coiled-coil motif on THAP7 and the central region of TAF-Ibeta. Similarly, stably transfected THAP7 associates with endogenous TAF-Ibeta in intact cells. Like TAF-Ibeta, THAP7 associates with histone H3 and histone H4 and inhibits histone acetylation. The histone-interacting domain of THAP7 is sufficient for this activity in vitro. Promoter-targeted THAP7 can also recruit TAF-Ibeta and silencing mediator of retinoid and thyroid receptors/nuclear hormone receptor corepressor (NCoR) proteins to promoters, and knockdown of TAF-Ibeta by small interfering RNA relieves THAP7-mediated repression, indicating that, like nuclear hormone receptors, THAP7 may represent a novel class of transcription factor that uses TAF-Ibeta as a corepressor to maintain histones in a hypoacetylated, repressed state. PMID:16195249

  15. Repression of the H5 histone gene by a factor from erythrocytes that binds to the region of transcription initiation.

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez-Cuadrado, A; Rousseau, S.; Renaud, J.; Ruiz-Carrillo, A

    1992-01-01

    Expression of histone H5, like that of other erythrocyte specific proteins, declines during the latter stages of erythroid maturation because of a decrease in the rate of gene transcription. Here, we report the isolation of cIBR (chicken initiation binding repressor), a 75 kDa DNA binding glycoprotein from mature chicken erythrocytes that recognizes sequences spanning the transcription start sites of the H5 gene. cIBR was found to repress transcription from the H5 promoter in vitro and this e...

  16. From Satis House to Newgate: Manipulation and Repression in the Adaptation of Great Expectations by Julian Jarrold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Cao

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes a serial of Great Expectations in two parts directed by Julian Jarrold for the BBC in 1999. Through the semiotic approach proposed by Nicola Dusi in his essay Il cinema come traduzione. Da un medium all’altro (2003, this paper wants to highlight the translation strategies employed in the target text in comparison with the hypotext. The aim of this article is to show how the dominant isotopies – Pip’s repression and manipulation – are figurativized in the representation of the main places of power in the adaptation: Satis House, Little Britain and Newgate.

  17. Dynamic competition between transcription initiation and repression: Role of nonequilibrium steps in cell-to-cell heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitarai, Namiko; Semsey, Szabolcs; Sneppen, Kim

    2015-08-01

    Transcriptional repression may cause transcriptional noise by a competition between repressor and RNA polymerase binding. Although promoter activity is often governed by a single limiting step, we argue here that the size of the noise strongly depends on whether this step is the initial equilibrium binding or one of the subsequent unidirectional steps. Overall, we show that nonequilibrium steps of transcription initiation systematically increase the cell-to-cell heterogeneity in bacterial populations. In particular, this allows also weak promoters to give substantial transcriptional noise. PMID:26382435

  18. Repression of the Integrated Papillomavirus E6/E7 Promoter Is Required for Growth Suppression of Cervical Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Francis, Delicia A.; Schmid, Susanne I.; Howley, Peter M.

    2000-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) E2 protein is an important regulator of viral E6 and E7 gene expression. E2 can repress the viral promoter for E6 and E7 expression as well as block progression of the cell cycle in cancer cells harboring the DNA of “high-risk” HPV types. Although the phenomenon of E2-mediated growth arrest of HeLa cells and other HPV-positive cancer cells has been well documented, the specific mechanism by which E2 affects cellular proliferation has not yet been elucidated. Her...

  19. The formamidase gene of Aspergillus nidulans: regulation by nitrogen metabolite repression and transcriptional interference by an overlapping upstream gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Fraser, J A; Davis, M A; Hynes, M J

    2001-01-01

    The ability to utilize formamide as a sole nitrogen source has been found in numerous fungi. We have cloned the fmdS gene encoding a formamidase from Aspergillus nidulans and found that it belongs to a highly conserved family of proteins separate from the major amidase families. The expression of fmdS is primarily regulated via AreA-mediated nitrogen metabolite repression and does not require the addition of exogenous inducer. Consistent with this, deletion analysis of the 5' region of fmdS h...

  20. YY1 represses beta-casein gene expression by preventing the formation of a lactation-associated complex.

    OpenAIRE

    Raught, B; Khursheed, B; Kazansky, A; Rosen, J.

    1994-01-01

    Site-specific mutagenesis of the highly conserved milk box (-140 to -110) region suggested that beta-casein expression is regulated by a hormone-mediated relief of repression (M. Schmitt-Ney, W. Doppler, R. K. Ball, and B. Groner, Mol. Cell. Biol. 11:3745-3755, 1991). However, when this sequence was placed upstream of a heterologous thymidine kinase promoter, it activated reporter gene expression. This apparent paradox was resolved when the trans-acting factor YY1, capable of acting as both a...

  1. Porous carbons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Satish M Manocha

    2003-02-01

    Carbon in dense as well as porous solid form is used in a variety of applications. Activated porous carbons are made through pyrolysis and activation of carbonaceous natural as well as synthetic precursors. Pyrolysed woods replicate the structure of original wood but as such possess very low surface areas and poor adsorption capacities. On activation, these exhibit increased adsorption volumes of 0.5–0.8 cm3 /gm and surface areas of 700–1800 m2 /gm depending on activation conditions, whether physical or chemical. Former carbons possess mixed pore size distribution while chemically activated carbons predominantly possess micropores. Thus, these carbons can be used for adsorption of wide distributions of molecules from gas to liquid. The molecular adsorption within the pores is due to single layer or multilayer molecule deposition at the pore walls and hence results in different types of adsorption isotherm. On the other hand, activated carbon fibres with controlled microporous structure and surface area in the range of 2500 m2 /gm can be developed by controlled pyrolysis and physical activation of amorphous carbon fibres. Active carbon fibres with unmatchable pore structure and surface characteristics are present and futuristic porous materials for a number of applications from pollution control to energy storage.

  2. A gene-rich, transcriptionally active environment and the pre-deposition of repressive marks are predictive of susceptibility to KRAB/KAP1-mediated silencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zangger Nadine

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background KRAB-ZFPs (Krüppel-associated box domain-zinc finger proteins are vertebrate-restricted transcriptional repressors encoded in the hundreds by the mouse and human genomes. They act via an essential cofactor, KAP1, which recruits effectors responsible for the formation of facultative heterochromatin. We have recently shown that KRAB/KAP1 can mediate long-range transcriptional repression through heterochromatin spreading, but also demonstrated that this process is at times countered by endogenous influences. Method To investigate this issue further we used an ectopic KRAB-based repressor. This system allowed us to tether KRAB/KAP1 to hundreds of euchromatic sites within genes, and to record its impact on gene expression. We then correlated this KRAB/KAP1-mediated transcriptional effect to pre-existing genomic and chromatin structures to identify specific characteristics making a gene susceptible to repression. Results We found that genes that were susceptible to KRAB/KAP1-mediated silencing carried higher levels of repressive histone marks both at the promoter and over the transcribed region than genes that were insensitive. In parallel, we found a high enrichment in euchromatic marks within both the close and more distant environment of these genes. Conclusion Together, these data indicate that high levels of gene activity in the genomic environment and the pre-deposition of repressive histone marks within a gene increase its susceptibility to KRAB/KAP1-mediated repression.

  3. Phosphotransferase System-Mediated Glucose Uptake Is Repressed in Phosphoglucoisomerase-Deficient Corynebacterium glutamicum Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Lindner, Steffen N.; Petrov, Dimitar P.; Hagmann, Christian T.; Henrich, Alexander; Krämer, Reinhard; Eikmanns, Bernhard J.; Wendisch, Volker F.; Seibold, Gerd M.

    2013-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is particularly known for its industrial application in the production of amino acids. Amino acid overproduction comes along with a high NADPH demand, which is covered mainly by the oxidative part of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). In previous studies, the complete redirection of the carbon flux toward the PPP by chromosomal inactivation of the pgi gene, encoding the phosphoglucoisomerase, has been applied for the improvement of C. glutamicum amino acid product...

  4. Threshold-dependent BMP-mediated repression: a model for a conserved mechanism that patterns the neuroectoderm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Mieko Mizutani

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Subdivision of the neuroectoderm into three rows of cells along the dorsal-ventral axis by neural identity genes is a highly conserved developmental process. While neural identity genes are expressed in remarkably similar patterns in vertebrates and invertebrates, previous work suggests that these patterns may be regulated by distinct upstream genetic pathways. Here we ask whether a potential conserved source of positional information provided by the BMP signaling contributes to patterning the neuroectoderm. We have addressed this question in two ways: First, we asked whether BMPs can act as bona fide morphogens to pattern the Drosophila neuroectoderm in a dose-dependent fashion, and second, we examined whether BMPs might act in a similar fashion in patterning the vertebrate neuroectoderm. In this study, we show that graded BMP signaling participates in organizing the neural axis in Drosophila by repressing expression of neural identity genes in a threshold-dependent fashion. We also provide evidence for a similar organizing activity of BMP signaling in chick neural plate explants, which may operate by the same double negative mechanism that acts earlier during neural induction. We propose that BMPs played an ancestral role in patterning the metazoan neuroectoderm by threshold-dependent repression of neural identity genes.

  5. The Fragaria vesca Homolog of SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS1 Represses Flowering and Promotes Vegetative Growth[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouhu, Katriina; Kurokura, Takeshi; Koskela, Elli A.; Albert, Victor A.; Elomaa, Paula; Hytönen, Timo

    2013-01-01

    In the annual long-day plant Arabidopsis thaliana, SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS1 (SOC1) integrates endogenous and environmental signals to promote flowering. We analyzed the function and regulation of the SOC1 homolog (Fragaria vesca [Fv] SOC1) in the perennial short-day plant woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca). We found that Fv SOC1 overexpression represses flower initiation under inductive short days, whereas its silencing causes continuous flowering in both short days and noninductive long days, similar to mutants in the floral repressor Fv TERMINAL FLOWER1 (Fv TFL1). Molecular analysis of these transgenic lines revealed that Fv SOC1 activates Fv TFL1 in the shoot apex, leading to the repression of flowering in strawberry. In parallel, Fv SOC1 regulates the differentiation of axillary buds to runners or axillary leaf rosettes, probably through the activation of gibberellin biosynthetic genes. We also demonstrated that Fv SOC1 is regulated by photoperiod and Fv FLOWERING LOCUS T1, suggesting that it plays a central role in the photoperiodic control of both generative and vegetative growth in strawberry. In conclusion, we propose that Fv SOC1 is a signaling hub that regulates yearly cycles of vegetative and generative development through separate genetic pathways. PMID:24038650

  6. The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Responsive miR-125a Represses Mesenchymal Morphology in Ovarian Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen D. Cowden Dahl

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT that occurs during embryonic development is recapitulated during tumor metastasis. Important regulators of this process include growth factors, transcription factors, and adhesion molecules. New evidence suggests that microRNA (miRNA activity contributes to metastatic progression and EMT; however, the mechanisms leading to altered miRNA expression during cancer progression remain poorly understood. Importantly, overexpression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR in ovarian cancer correlates with poor disease outcome and induces EMT in ovarian cancer cells. We report that EGFR signaling leads to transcriptional repression of the miRNA miR-125a through the ETS family transcription factor PEA3. Overexpression of miR-125a induces conversion of highly invasive ovarian cancer cells from a mesenchymal to an epithelial morphology, suggesting miR-125a is a negative regulator of EMT. We identify AT-rich interactive domain 3B (ARID3B as a target of miR-125a and demonstrate that ARID3B is overexpressed in human ovarian cancer. Repression of miR-125a through growth factor signaling represents a novel mechanism for regulating ovarian cancer invasive behavior.

  7. Transgenic Expression of a Functional Fragment of Harpin Protein Hpa1 in Wheat Represses English Grain Aphid Infestation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Man-yu; ZHOU Ting; ZHAO Yan-ying; LI Jia-bao; XU Heng; DONG Han-song; ZHANG Chun-ling

    2014-01-01

    The harpin protein Hpa1 produced by the rice bacterial blight pathogen promotes plant growth and induces plant resistance to pathogens and insect pests. The region of 10-42 residues (Hpa110-42) in the Hpa1 sequence is critical as the isolated Hpa110-42 fragment is 1.3-7.5-fold more effective than the full length in inducing plant growth and resistance. Here we report that transgenic expression of Hpa110-42 in wheat induces resistance to English grain aphid, a dominant species of wheat aphids. Hpa110-42-induced resistance is effective to inhibit the aphid behavior in plant preference at the initial colonization stage and repress aphid performances in the reproduction, nymph growth, and instar development on transgenic plants. The resistance characters are correlated with enhanced expression of defense-regulatory genes (EIN2, PP2-A, and GSL10) and consistent with induced expression of defense response genes (Hel, PDF1.2, PR-1b, and PR-2b). As a result, aphid infestations are alleviated in transgenic plants. The level of Hpa110-42-induced resistance in regard to repression of aphid infestations is equivalent to the effect of chemical control provided by an insecticide. These results suggested that the defensive role of Hpa110-42 can be integrated into breeding germplasm of the agriculturally signiifcant crop with a great potential of the agricultural application.

  8. WT1-mediated repression of the proapoptotic transcription factor ZNF224 is triggered by the BCR-ABL oncogene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, Giorgia; Vidovic, Karina; Palladino, Chiara; Cesaro, Elena; Sodaro, Gaetano; Quintarelli, Concetta; De Angelis, Biagio; Errichiello, Santa; Pane, Fabrizio; Izzo, Paola; Grosso, Michela; Gullberg, Urban; Costanzo, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The Kruppel-like protein ZNF224 is a co-factor of the Wilms’ tumor 1 protein, WT1. We have previously shown that ZNF224 exerts a specific proapoptotic role in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) K562 cells and contributes to cytosine arabinoside-induced apoptosis, by modulating WT1-dependent transcription of apoptotic genes. Here we demonstrate that ZNF224 gene expression is down-regulated both in BCR-ABL positive cell lines and in primary CML samples and is restored after imatinib and second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors treatment. We also show that WT1, whose expression is positively regulated by BCR-ABL, represses transcription of the ZNF224 gene. Finally, we report that ZNF224 is significantly down-regulated in patients with BCR-ABL positive chronic phase-CML showing poor response or resistance to imatinib treatment as compared to high-responder patients. Taken as a whole, our data disclose a novel pathway activated by BCR-ABL that leads to inhibition of apoptosis through the ZNF224 repression. ZNF224 could thus represent a novel promising therapeutic target in CML. PMID:26320177

  9. Imipenem represses CRISPR-Cas interference of DNA acquisition through H-NS stimulation in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Lung; Pan, Yi-Jiun; Hsieh, Pei-Fang; Hsu, Chun-Ru; Wu, Meng-Chuan; Wang, Jin-Town

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of the genome of Klebsiella pneumoniae NTUH-K2044 strain revealed the presence of two clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) arrays separated with CRISPR-associated (cas) genes. Carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae isolates were observed to be less likely to have CRISPR-Cas than sensitive strains (5/85 vs. 22/132). Removal of the transcriptional repressor, H-NS, was shown to prevent the transformation of plasmids carrying a spacer and putative proto-spacer adjacent motif (PAM). The CRISPR-Cas system also decreased pUC-4K plasmid stability, resulting in plasmid loss from the bacteria with acquisition of new spacers. Analysis of the acquired proto-spacers in pUC-4K indicated that 5'-TTN-3' was the preferred PAM in K. pneumoniae. Treatment of cells by imipenem induced hns expression, thereby decreasing cas3 expression and consequently repressed CRISPR-Cas activity resulted in increase of plasmid stability. In conclusion, NTUH-K2044 CRISPR-Cas contributes to decrease of plasmid transformation and stability. Through repression of CRISPR-Cas activity by induced H-NS, bacteria might be more able to acquire DNA to confront the challenge of imipenem. PMID:27531594

  10. G9a regulates group 2 innate lymphoid cell development by repressing the group 3 innate lymphoid cell program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antignano, Frann; Braam, Mitchell; Hughes, Michael R; Chenery, Alistair L; Burrows, Kyle; Gold, Matthew J; Oudhoff, Menno J; Rattray, David; Halim, Timotheus Y; Cait, Alissa; Takei, Fumio; Rossi, Fabio M; McNagny, Kelly M; Zaph, Colby

    2016-06-27

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are emerging as important regulators of homeostatic and disease-associated immune processes. Despite recent advances in defining the molecular pathways that control development and function of ILCs, the epigenetic mechanisms that regulate ILC biology are unknown. Here, we identify a role for the lysine methyltransferase G9a in regulating ILC2 development and function. Mice with a hematopoietic cell-specific deletion of G9a (Vav.G9a(-/-) mice) have a severe reduction in ILC2s in peripheral sites, associated with impaired development of immature ILC2s in the bone marrow. Accordingly, Vav.G9a(-/-) mice are resistant to the development of allergic lung inflammation. G9a-dependent dimethylation of histone 3 lysine 9 (H3K9me2) is a repressive histone mark that is associated with gene silencing. Genome-wide expression analysis demonstrated that the absence of G9a led to increased expression of ILC3-associated genes in developing ILC2 populations. Further, we found high levels of G9a-dependent H3K9me2 at ILC3-specific genetic loci, demonstrating that G9a-mediated repression of ILC3-associated genes is critical for the optimal development of ILC2s. Together, these results provide the first identification of an epigenetic regulatory mechanism in ILC development and function. PMID:27298444

  11. CAR-mediated repression of Foxo1 transcriptional activity regulates the cell cycle inhibitor p21 in mouse livers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • CAR activation decreased the level of Foxo1 in mouse livers. • CAR activation decreased the level of p21 in mouse livers. • CAR activation inhibited Foxo1 transcriptional activity in mouse livers. - Abstract: 1,4-Bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOBOP), an agonist of constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), is a well-known strong primary chemical mitogen for the mouse liver. Despite extensive investigation of the role of CAR in the regulation of cell proliferation, our knowledge of the intricate mediating mechanism is incomplete. In this study, we demonstrated that long-term CAR activation by TCPOBOP increased liver-to-body weight ratio and decreased tumour suppressor Foxo1 expression and transcriptional activity, which were correlated with reduced expression of genes regulated by Foxo1, including the cell-cycle inhibitor Cdkn1a(p21), and upregulation of the cell-cycle regulator Cyclin D1. Moreover, we demonstrated the negative regulatory effect of TCPOBOP-activated CAR on the association of Foxo1 with the target Foxo1 itself and Cdkn1a(p21) promoters. Thus, we identified CAR-mediated repression of cell cycle inhibitor p21, as mediated by repression of FOXO1 expression and transcriptional activity. CAR-FOXO1 cross-talk may provide new opportunities for understanding liver diseases and developing more effective therapeutic approaches to better drug treatments

  12. The catenin p120ctn inhibits Kaiso-mediated transcriptional repression of the β-catenin/TCF target gene matrilysin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The POZ-zinc finger transcription factor Kaiso was first identified as a specific binding partner for the Armadillo catenin and cell adhesion cofactor, p120ctn. Kaiso is a unique POZ protein with bi-modal DNA-binding properties; it associates with a sequence-specific DNA consensus Kaiso binding site (KBS) or methylated CpG dinucleotides, and regulates transcription of artificial promoters containing either site. Interestingly, the promoter of the Wnt/β-catenin/TCF target gene matrilysin possesses two conserved copies of the KBS, which suggested that Kaiso might regulate matrilysin expression. In this study, we demonstrate using chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis that Kaiso associates with the matrilysin promoter in vivo. Minimal promoter assays further confirmed that Kaiso specifically repressed transcription of the matrilysin promoter; mutation of the KBS element or RNAi-mediated depletion of Kaiso abrogated this effect. More importantly, Kaiso blocked β-catenin-mediated activation of the matrilysin promoter. Consistent with our previous findings, both Kaiso-DNA binding and Kaiso-mediated transcriptional repression of the matrilysin promoter were inhibited by overexpression of wild-type p120ctn, but not by a p120ctn mutant exhibiting impaired nuclear import. Collectively, our data establish Kaiso as a sequence-specific transcriptional repressor of the matrilysin promoter, and suggest that p120ctn and β-catenin act in a synergistic manner, via distinct mechanisms, to activate matrilysin expression

  13. MiR144/451 Expression Is Repressed by RUNX1 During Megakaryopoiesis and Disturbed by RUNX1/ETO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Kohrs

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A network of lineage-specific transcription factors and microRNAs tightly regulates differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells along the distinct lineages. Deregulation of this regulatory network contributes to impaired lineage fidelity and leukemogenesis. We found that the hematopoietic master regulator RUNX1 controls the expression of certain microRNAs, of importance during erythroid/megakaryocytic differentiation. In particular, we show that the erythorid miR144/451 cluster is epigenetically repressed by RUNX1 during megakaryopoiesis. Furthermore, the leukemogenic RUNX1/ETO fusion protein transcriptionally represses the miR144/451 pre-microRNA. Thus RUNX1/ETO contributes to increased expression of miR451 target genes and interferes with normal gene expression during differentiation. Furthermore, we observed that inhibition of RUNX1/ETO in Kasumi1 cells and in RUNX1/ETO positive primary acute myeloid leukemia patient samples leads to up-regulation of miR144/451. RUNX1 thus emerges as a key regulator of a microRNA network, driving differentiation at the megakaryocytic/erythroid branching point. The network is disturbed by the leukemogenic RUNX1/ETO fusion product.

  14. The Fragaria vesca homolog of suppressor of overexpression of constans1 represses flowering and promotes vegetative growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouhu, Katriina; Kurokura, Takeshi; Koskela, Elli A; Albert, Victor A; Elomaa, Paula; Hytönen, Timo

    2013-09-01

    In the annual long-day plant Arabidopsis thaliana, suppressor of overexpression of constans1 (SOC1) integrates endogenous and environmental signals to promote flowering. We analyzed the function and regulation of the SOC1 homolog (Fragaria vesca [Fv] SOC1) in the perennial short-day plant woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca). We found that Fv SOC1 overexpression represses flower initiation under inductive short days, whereas its silencing causes continuous flowering in both short days and noninductive long days, similar to mutants in the floral repressor Fv terminal flower1 (Fv TFL1). Molecular analysis of these transgenic lines revealed that Fv SOC1 activates Fv TFL1 in the shoot apex, leading to the repression of flowering in strawberry. In parallel, Fv SOC1 regulates the differentiation of axillary buds to runners or axillary leaf rosettes, probably through the activation of gibberellin biosynthetic genes. We also demonstrated that Fv SOC1 is regulated by photoperiod and Fv flowering locus T1, suggesting that it plays a central role in the photoperiodic control of both generative and vegetative growth in strawberry. In conclusion, we propose that Fv SOC1 is a signaling hub that regulates yearly cycles of vegetative and generative development through separate genetic pathways. PMID:24038650

  15. Repression of virulence genes by phosphorylation-dependent oligomerization of CsrR at target promoters in S. pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A A; Engleberg, N C; DiRita, V J

    2001-05-01

    csrRS encodes a two-component regulatory system that represses the transcription of a number of virulence factors in Streptococcus pyogenes, including the hyaluronic acid capsule and pyrogenic exotoxin B. CsrRS-regulated virulence factors have diverse functions during pathogenesis and are differentially expressed throughout growth. This suggests that multiple signals induce CsrRS-mediated gene regulation, or that regulated genes respond differently to CsrR, or both. As a first step in dissecting the csrRS signal transduction pathway, we determined the mechanism by which CsrR mediates the repression of its target promoters. We found that phosphorylated CsrR binds directly to all but one of the promoters of its regulated genes, with different affinities. Phosphorylation of CsrR enhances both oligomerization and DNA binding. We defined the binding site of CsrR at each of the regulated promoters using DNase I and hydroxyl radical footprinting. Based on these results, we propose a model for differential regulation by CsrRS. PMID:11401704

  16. The synergistic repressive effect of NF-κB and JNK inhibitor on the clonogenic capacity of Jurkat leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinli Liu

    Full Text Available Deregulation of Nuclear Transcription Factor-κB (NF-κB and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK signaling is commonly detected in leukemia, suggesting an important role for these two signaling pathways in the pathogenesis of leukemia. In this study, using Jurkat cells, an acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL cell line, we evaluated the effects of an NF-κB inhibitor and a JNK inhibitor individually and in combination on the proliferation, survival and clonogenic capacity of leukemic cells. We found that leukemic stem/progenitor cells (LSPCs were more sensitive to NF-κB inhibitor treatment than were healthy hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs, as shown by a reduction in the clonogenic capacity of the former. Inactivation of NF-κB leads to the activation of JNK signaling in both leukemic cells and healthy HSPCs. Interestingly, JNK inhibitor treatment enhanced the repressive effects of NF-κB inhibitor on LSPCs but prevented such repression in HSPCs. Our data suggest that JNK signaling stimulates proliferation/survival in LSPCs but is a death signal in HSPCs. The combination of NF-κB inhibitor and JNK inhibitor might provide a better treatment for T-ALL leukemia by synergistically killing LSPCs while simultaneously preventing the death of normal HPCs.

  17. The synergistic repressive effect of NF-κB and JNK inhibitor on the clonogenic capacity of Jurkat leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinli; Zhang, Jun; Li, Jing; Volk, Andrew; Breslin, Peter; Zhang, Jiwang; Zhang, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Deregulation of Nuclear Transcription Factor-κB (NF-κB) and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling is commonly detected in leukemia, suggesting an important role for these two signaling pathways in the pathogenesis of leukemia. In this study, using Jurkat cells, an acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cell line, we evaluated the effects of an NF-κB inhibitor and a JNK inhibitor individually and in combination on the proliferation, survival and clonogenic capacity of leukemic cells. We found that leukemic stem/progenitor cells (LSPCs) were more sensitive to NF-κB inhibitor treatment than were healthy hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), as shown by a reduction in the clonogenic capacity of the former. Inactivation of NF-κB leads to the activation of JNK signaling in both leukemic cells and healthy HSPCs. Interestingly, JNK inhibitor treatment enhanced the repressive effects of NF-κB inhibitor on LSPCs but prevented such repression in HSPCs. Our data suggest that JNK signaling stimulates proliferation/survival in LSPCs but is a death signal in HSPCs. The combination of NF-κB inhibitor and JNK inhibitor might provide a better treatment for T-ALL leukemia by synergistically killing LSPCs while simultaneously preventing the death of normal HPCs. PMID:25526629

  18. The Synergistic Repressive Effect of NF-κB and JNK Inhibitor on the Clonogenic Capacity of Jurkat Leukemia Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinli; Zhang, Jun; Li, Jing; Volk, Andrew; Breslin, Peter; Zhang, Jiwang; Zhang, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Deregulation of Nuclear Transcription Factor-κB (NF-κB) and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling is commonly detected in leukemia, suggesting an important role for these two signaling pathways in the pathogenesis of leukemia. In this study, using Jurkat cells, an acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cell line, we evaluated the effects of an NF-κB inhibitor and a JNK inhibitor individually and in combination on the proliferation, survival and clonogenic capacity of leukemic cells. We found that leukemic stem/progenitor cells (LSPCs) were more sensitive to NF-κB inhibitor treatment than were healthy hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), as shown by a reduction in the clonogenic capacity of the former. Inactivation of NF-κB leads to the activation of JNK signaling in both leukemic cells and healthy HSPCs. Interestingly, JNK inhibitor treatment enhanced the repressive effects of NF-κB inhibitor on LSPCs but prevented such repression in HSPCs. Our data suggest that JNK signaling stimulates proliferation/survival in LSPCs but is a death signal in HSPCs. The combination of NF-κB inhibitor and JNK inhibitor might provide a better treatment for T-ALL leukemia by synergistically killing LSPCs while simultaneously preventing the death of normal HPCs. PMID:25526629

  19. Drosophila Nanos acts as a molecular clamp that modulates the RNA-binding and repression activities of Pumilio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidmann, Chase A; Qiu, Chen; Arvola, René M; Lou, Tzu-Fang; Killingsworth, Jordan; Campbell, Zachary T; Tanaka Hall, Traci M; Goldstrohm, Aaron C

    2016-01-01

    Collaboration among the multitude of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) is ubiquitous, yet our understanding of these key regulatory complexes has been limited to single RBPs. We investigated combinatorial translational regulation by Drosophila Pumilio (Pum) and Nanos (Nos), which control development, fertility, and neuronal functions. Our results show how the specificity of one RBP (Pum) is modulated by cooperative RNA recognition with a second RBP (Nos) to synergistically repress mRNAs. Crystal structures of Nos-Pum-RNA complexes reveal that Nos embraces Pum and RNA, contributes sequence-specific contacts, and increases Pum RNA-binding affinity. Nos shifts the recognition sequence and promotes repression complex formation on mRNAs that are not stably bound by Pum alone, explaining the preponderance of sub-optimal Pum sites regulated in vivo. Our results illuminate the molecular mechanism of a regulatory switch controlling crucial gene expression programs, and provide a framework for understanding how the partnering of RBPs evokes changes in binding specificity that underlie regulatory network dynamics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17096.001 PMID:27482653

  20. Tumor protein 53-induced nuclear protein 1 (TP53INP1 enhances p53 function and represses tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeyran eShahbazi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Tumor protein 53-induced nuclear protein 1 (TP53INP1 is a stress-induced p53 target gene whose expression is modulated by transcription factors such as p53, p73 and E2F1. TP53INP1 gene encodes two isoforms of TP53INP1 proteins, TP53INP1α and TP53INP1β, both of which appear to be key elements in p53 function. When associated with homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 (HIPK2, TP53INP1 phosphorylates p53 protein at Serine 46, enhances p53 protein stability and its transcriptional activity, leading to transcriptional activation of p53 target genes such as p21, PIG-3 and MDM2, cell growth arrest and apoptosis upon DNA damage stress. The anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities of TP53INP1 indicate that TP53INP1 has an important role in cellular homeostasis and DNA damage response. Deficiency in TP53INP1 expression results in increased tumorigenesis; while TP53INP1 expression is repressed during early stages of cancer by factors such as miR-155. This review aims to summarize the roles of TP53INP1 in blocking tumor progression through p53-dependant and p53-independent pathways, as well as the elements which repress TP53INP1 expression, hence highlighting its potential as a therapeutic target in cancer treatment.

  1. Interaction of the phospholipid scramblase 1 with HIV-1 Tat results in the repression of Tat-dependent transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •PLSCR1 specifically interacted with HIV-1 Tat in vitro and in vivo. •PLSCR1 repressed Tat-dependent transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR. •Suppression of PLSCR1 expression enhanced the levels of HIV-1 transcripts. •PLSCR1 reduced the nuclear localization of Tat. -- Abstract: Human phospholipid scramblase 1 (PLSCR1) is an interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene and possesses an IFN-mediated antiviral function. We show here that PLSCR1 directly interacts with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) Tat. This interaction occurs both in vitro and in vivo through amino acids 160–250 of PLSCR1. Overexpression of PLSCR1 efficiently represses the Tat-dependent transactivation of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) and reduces the nuclear translocation of Tat. In addition, shRNA-mediated suppression of endogenous PLSCR1 expression enhances the levels of gag mRNA in an HIV-1-infected T-cell line. These findings indicate that PLSCR1 negatively regulates the Tat-dependent transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR during HIV-1 infection

  2. Hypothesis: A Role for Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein in Mediating and Relieving MicroRNA-Guided Translational Repression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Plante

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNA (miRNA-guided messenger RNA (mRNA translational repression is believed to be mediated by effector miRNA-containing ribonucleoprotein (miRNP complexes harboring fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP. Recent studies documented the nucleic acid chaperone properties of FMRP and characterized its role and importance in RNA silencing in mammalian cells. We propose a model in which FMRP could facilitate miRNA assembly on target mRNAs in a process involving recognition of G quartet structures. Functioning within a duplex miRNP, FMRP may also mediate mRNA targeting through a strand exchange mechanism, in which the miRNA* of the duplex is swapped for the mRNA. Furthermore, FMRP may contribute to the relief of miRNA-guided mRNA repression through a reverse strand exchange reaction, possibly initiated by a specific cellular signal, that would liberate the mRNA for translation. Suboptimal utilization of miRNAs may thus account for some of themolecular defects in patients with the fragile X syndrome.

  3. Scaffold protein enigma homolog 1 overcomes the repression of myogenesis activation by inhibitor of DNA binding 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Miyuki; Ito, Jumpei; Koyama, Riko; Iijima, Masumi; Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Niimi, Tomoaki; Kuroda, Shun'ichi; Maturana, Andrés D

    2016-05-27

    Enigma Homolog 1 (ENH1) is a scaffold protein for signaling proteins and transcription factors. Previously, we reported that ENH1 overexpression promotes the differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the role of ENH1 in the C2C12 cells differentiation remains elusive. ENH1 was shown to inhibit the proliferation of neuroblastoma cells by sequestering Inhibitor of DNA binding protein 2 (Id2) in the cytosol. Id2 is a repressor of basic Helix-Loop-Helix transcription factors activity and prevents myogenesis. Here, we found that ENH1 overcome the Id2 repression of C2C12 cells myogenic differentiation and that ENH1 overexpression promotes mice satellite cells activation, the first step toward myogenic differentiation. In addition, we show that ENH1 interacted with Id2 in C2C12 cells and mice satellite cells. Collectively, our results suggest that ENH1 plays an important role in the activation of myogenesis through the repression of Id2 activity. PMID:27114303

  4. Interaction of the phospholipid scramblase 1 with HIV-1 Tat results in the repression of Tat-dependent transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusano, Shuichi, E-mail: skusano@m2.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp; Eizuru, Yoshito

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •PLSCR1 specifically interacted with HIV-1 Tat in vitro and in vivo. •PLSCR1 repressed Tat-dependent transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR. •Suppression of PLSCR1 expression enhanced the levels of HIV-1 transcripts. •PLSCR1 reduced the nuclear localization of Tat. -- Abstract: Human phospholipid scramblase 1 (PLSCR1) is an interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene and possesses an IFN-mediated antiviral function. We show here that PLSCR1 directly interacts with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) Tat. This interaction occurs both in vitro and in vivo through amino acids 160–250 of PLSCR1. Overexpression of PLSCR1 efficiently represses the Tat-dependent transactivation of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) and reduces the nuclear translocation of Tat. In addition, shRNA-mediated suppression of endogenous PLSCR1 expression enhances the levels of gag mRNA in an HIV-1-infected T-cell line. These findings indicate that PLSCR1 negatively regulates the Tat-dependent transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR during HIV-1 infection.

  5. Receptor interconversion model of hormone action. 3. Estrogen receptor mediated repression of reporter gene activity in A431 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, A; Park, I; Krust, A; Smith, R G

    1990-03-20

    The chicken estrogen receptor exists in three interconvertible forms, two of which bind estradiol with high affinity and one which lacks the capacity to bind estradiol. Interconversion is regulated by reactions involving ATP/Mg2+. By cotransfecting into A431 cells estrogen receptor cDNA in an expression vector together with the pA2 (-821/-87) tk-CAT vitellogenin construct, we demonstrate that constitutive expression of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) activity can be regulated either by selection of ligand or by modifying phosphorylation reactions in the recipient cells. In the presence of estrogen receptors, constitutive expression of CAT activity is inhibited in three situations: (i) in the absence of an estrogenic ligand; (ii) in the presence of an anti-estrogen; and (iii) in the presence of an estrogenic ligand together with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). Estrogen receptor mediated repression of constitutive CAT activity is not observed with the pA2 (-331/-87) tk-CAT construct, indicating that DNA sequences required for repression are located between -821 and -331 base pairs upstream of the transcription initiation site. PMID:2346742

  6. Asymmetric arginine dimethylation of RelA provides a repressive mark to modulate TNFα/NF-κB response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reintjes, Anja; Fuchs, Julian E; Kremser, Leopold; Lindner, Herbert H; Liedl, Klaus R; Huber, Lukas A; Valovka, Taras

    2016-04-19

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is an inducible transcription factor that plays critical roles in immune and stress responses and is often implicated in pathologies, including chronic inflammation and cancer. Although much has been learned about NF-κB-activating pathways, the specific repression of NF-κB is far less well understood. Here we identified the type I protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) as a restrictive factor controlling TNFα-induced activation of NF-κB. PRMT1 forms a cellular complex with NF-κB through direct interaction with the Rel homology domain of RelA. We demonstrate that PRMT1 methylates RelA at evolutionary conserved R30, located in the DNA-binding L1 loop, which is a critical residue required for DNA binding. Asymmetric R30 dimethylation inhibits the binding of RelA to DNA and represses NF-κB target genes in response to TNFα. Molecular dynamics simulations of the DNA-bound RelA:p50 predicted structural changes in RelA caused by R30 methylation or a mutation that interferes with the stability of the DNA-NF-κB complex. Our findings provide evidence for the asymmetric arginine dimethylation of RelA and unveil a unique mechanism controlling TNFα/NF-κB signaling. PMID:27051065

  7. A Nitrogen-Regulated Glutamine Amidotransferase (GAT1_2.1) Represses Shoot Branching in Arabidopsis[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Huifen; Kranz, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    Shoot branching in plants is regulated by many environmental cues and by specific hormones such as strigolactone (SL). We show that the GAT1_2.1 gene (At1g15040) is repressed over 50-fold by nitrogen stress, and is also involved in branching control. At1g15040 is predicted to encode a class I glutamine amidotransferase (GAT1), a superfamily for which Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) has 30 potential members. Most members can be categorized into known biosynthetic pathways, for the amidation of known acceptor molecules (e.g. CTP synthesis). Some members, like GAT1_2.1, are of unknown function, likely involved in amidation of unknown acceptors. A gat1_2.1 mutant exhibits a significant increase in shoot branching, similar to mutants in SL biosynthesis. The results suggest that GAT1_2.1 is not involved in SL biosynthesis since exogenously applied GR24 (a synthetic SL) does not correct the mutant phenotype. The subfamily of GATs (GATase1_2), with At1g15040 as the founding member, appears to be present in all plants (including mosses), but not other organisms. This suggests a plant-specific function such as branching control. We discuss the possibility that the GAT1_2.1 enzyme may activate SLs (e.g. GR24) by amidation, or more likely could embody a new pathway for repression of branching. PMID:22885937

  8. Akt1-mediated Gata3 phosphorylation controls the repression of IFNγ in memory-type Th2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Endo, Yusuke; Kato, Miki; Shinoda, Kenta; Suzuki, Akane; Motohashi, Shinichiro; Matsumoto, Masaki; Nakayama, Keiichi I; Nakayama, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

    Th2 cells produce Th2 cytokines such as IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13, but repress Th1 cytokine IFNγ. Recent studies have revealed various distinct memory-type Th2 cell subsets, one of which produces a substantial amount of IFNγ in addition to Th2 cytokines, however it remains unclear precisely how these Th2 cells produce IFNγ. We herein show that phosphorylation of Gata3 at Ser308, Thr315 and Ser316 induces dissociation of a histone deacetylase Hdac2 from the Gata3/Chd4 repressive complex in Th2 cells. We also identify Akt1 as a Gata3-phosphorylating kinase, and the activation of Akt1 induces derepression of Tbx21 and Ifng expression in Th2 cells. Moreover, T-bet-dependent IFNγ expression in IFNγ-producing memory Th2 cells appears to be controlled by the phosphorylation status of Gata3 in human and murine systems. Thus, this study highlights the molecular basis for posttranslational modifications of Gata3 that control the regulation of IFNγ expression in memory Th2 cells. PMID:27053161

  9. Xylanase Production by Bacillus circulans D1 Using Maltose as Carbon Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchini, D. A.; Gomes, E.; da Silva, R.

    Bacillus circulans D1 is a good producer of extracellular thermostable xylanase. Xylanase production in different carbon sources was evaluated and the enzyme synthesis was induced by various carbon sources. It was found that d-maltose is the best inducer of the enzyme synthesis (7.05 U/mg dry biomass at 48 h), while d-glucose and d-arabinose lead to the production of basal levels of xylanase. The crude enzyme solution is free of cellulases, even when the microorganism was cultivated in a medium with d-cellobiose. When oat spelt xylan was supplemented with d-glucose, the repressive effect of this sugar on xylanase production was observed at 24 h, only when used at 5.0 g/L, leading to a reduction of 60% on the enzyme production. On the other hand, when the xylan medium was supplemented with d-xylose (3.0 or 5.0 g/L), this effect was more evident (80 and 90% of reduction on the enzyme production, respectively). Unlike that observed in the xylan medium, glucose repressed xylanase production in the maltose medium, leading to a reduction of 55% on the enzyme production at 24 h of cultivation. Xylose, at 1.0 g/L, induced xylanase production on the maltose medium. On this medium, the repressive effect of xylose, at 3.0 or 5.0 g/L, was less expressive when compared to its effect on the xylan medium.

  10. Catabolic regulation analysis of Escherichia coli and its crp, mlc, mgsA, pgi and ptsG mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Ruilian

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most bacteria can use various compounds as carbon sources. These carbon sources can be either co-metabolized or sequentially metabolized, where the latter phenomenon typically occurs as catabolite repression. From the practical application point of view of utilizing lignocellulose for the production of biofuels etc., it is strongly desirable to ferment all sugars obtained by hydrolysis from lignocellulosic materials, where simultaneous consumption of sugars would benefit the formation of bioproducts. However, most organisms consume glucose prior to consumption of other carbon sources, and exhibit diauxic growth. It has been shown by fermentation experiments that simultaneous consumption of sugars can be attained by ptsG, mgsA mutants etc., but its mechanism has not been well understood. It is strongly desirable to understand the mechanism of metabolic regulation for catabolite regulation to improve the performance of fermentation. Results In order to make clear the catabolic regulation mechanism, several continuous cultures were conducted at different dilution rates of 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.7 h-1 using wild type Escherichia coli. The result indicates that the transcript levels of global regulators such as crp, cra, mlc and rpoS decreased, while those of fadR, iclR, soxR/S increased as the dilution rate increased. These affected the metabolic pathway genes, which in turn affected fermentation result where the specific glucose uptake rate, the specific acetate formation rate, and the specific CO2 evolution rate (CER were increased as the dilution rate was increased. This was confirmed by the 13C-flux analysis. In order to make clear the catabolite regulation, the effect of crp gene knockout (Δcrp and crp enhancement (crp+ as well as mlc, mgsA, pgi and ptsG gene knockout on the metabolism was then investigated by the continuous culture at the dilution rate of 0.2 h-1 and by some batch cultures. In the case of Δcrp (and also

  11. An index of self-regulation of emotion and the study of repression in social contexts that threaten or do not threaten self-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendolia, Marilyn

    2002-09-01

    This research tests a model of repression (M. Mendolia, 1999; M. Mendolia, J. Moore, & A. Tesser, 1996) which specifies that the interaction of individual differences in emotional responsiveness and situational threats to self-concept contributes to one's tendency to regulate emotional responsiveness. This research demonstrates that (a) individuals regulate their autonomic activity, facial muscle activity, cognitive attention, and subjective experience during isolated and repeated exposures to self-threatening negative and positive emotional events and (b) repressive behavior can be predicted by the Index of Self-Regulation of Emotion, which complements and extends conventional categorical measures of dispositional repression. This model provides a more detailed understanding of basic mechanisms in emotion by identifying how individual differences in emotionality and particular social contexts contribute to self-regulation of emotion. PMID:12899355

  12. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 represses transcription of p21CIP1 by inhibition of transcription activation by p53 and Sp1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kim, Pyung-Hwan; Kim, Sung-Eun; Choi, Kang-Yell; Kim, Se Hoon; Hur, Man-Wook

    2009-05-01

    Aberrant transcriptional repression through chromatin remodeling and histone deacetylation has been postulated as the driving force for tumorigenesis. FBI-1 (formerly called Pokemon) is a member of the POK family of transcriptional repressors. Recently, FBI-1 was characterized as a critical oncogenic factor that specifically represses transcription of the tumor suppressor gene ARF, potentially leading indirectly to p53 inactivation. Our investigations on transcriptional repression of the p53 pathway revealed that FBI-1 represses transcription of ARF, Hdm2 (human analogue of mouse double minute oncogene), and p21CIP1 (hereafter indicated as p21) but not of p53. FBI-1 showed a more potent repressive effect on p21 than on p53. Our data suggested that FBI-1 is a master controller of the ARF-Hdm2-p53-p21 pathway, ultimately impinging on cell cycle arrest factor p21, by inhibiting upstream regulators at the transcriptional and protein levels. FBI-1 acted as a competitive transcriptional repressor of p53 and Sp1 and was shown to bind the proximal Sp1-3 GC-box and the distal p53-responsive elements of p21. Repression involved direct binding competition of FBI-1 with Sp1 and p53. FBI-1 also interacted with corepressors, such as mSin3A, NCoR, and SMRT, thereby deacetylating Ac-H3 and Ac-H4 histones at the promoter. FBI-1 caused cellular transformation, promoted cell cycle proliferation, and significantly increased the number of cells in S phase. FBI-1 is aberrantly overexpressed in many human solid tumors, particularly in adenocarcinomas and squamous carcinomas. The role of FBI-1 as a master controller of the p53 pathway therefore makes it an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:19244234

  13. Involvement of sigmaS accumulation in repression of the flhDC operon in acidic phospholipid-deficient mutants of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Junji; Nobue, Yuka; Zhao, Hong; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Nagahama, Hideki; Matsuoka, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Kouji; Hara, Hiroshi

    2010-06-01

    Escherichia coli pgsA mutations, which cause acidic phospholipid deficiency, repress transcription of the flagellar master operon flhDC, and thus impair flagellar formation and motility. The molecular mechanism of the strong repression of flhDC transcription in the mutant cells, however, has not yet been clarified. In order to shed light on this mechanism we isolated genes which, when supplied in multicopy, suppress the repression of flhD, and found that three genes, gadW, metE and yeaB, were capable of suppression. Taking into account a previous report that gadW represses sigma(S) production, the level of sigma(S) in the pgsA3 mutant was examined. We found that pgsA3 cells had a high level of sigma(S) and that introduction of a gadW plasmid into pgsA3 cells did reduce the sigma(S) level. The pgsA3 cells exhibited a sharp increase in sigma(S) levels that can only be partially attributed to the slight increase in rpoS transcription; the largest part of the effect is due to a post-transcriptional accumulation of sigma(S). GadW in multicopy exerts its effect by post-transcriptionally downregulating sigma(S). YeaB and MetE in multicopy also exert their effect via sigma(S). Disruption of rpoS caused an increase of the flhD mRNA level, and induction from P(trc)-rpoS repressed the flhD mRNA level. The strong repression of flhD transcription in pgsA3 mutant cells is thus suggested to be caused by the accumulated sigma(S). PMID:20185506

  14. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... before being swallowed; do not swallow them whole. Drink a full glass of water after taking either the regular or chewable tablets or capsules. Some liquid forms of calcium carbonate must be shaken well before use.Do not ...

  15. Carbon Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T. Lloyd Evans

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, the present state of knowledge of the carbon stars is discussed. Particular attention is given to issues of classification, evolution, variability, populations in our own and other galaxies, and circumstellar material.

  16. The translation start signal region of TEM beta-lactamase mRNA is responsible for heat shock-induced repression of amp gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuriki, Y

    1989-01-01

    pBR322 contains the amp gene encoding beta-lactamase. When Escherichia coli carrying this plasmid is exposed to heat shock, beta-lactamase synthesis is repressed transiently at the translational level. To identify the DNA element responsible for this translational repression, DNA segments containing the translation start region of the amp gene were excised from pAT153 and fused in frame with the lacZ reading frame in the open reading frame vector pORF1. These constructs were introduced into E...

  17. SIRT1 deacetylates RFX5 and antagonizes repression of collagen type I (COL1A2) transcription in smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Jun [Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University (China); Department of Respiratory Medicine, Jiangsu Provincial Hospital of Chinese Traditional Medicine (China); Wu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Yuyu; Zhao, Yuhao [Atherosclerosis Research Center, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease and Molecular Intervention, Department of Pathophysiology, Nanjing Medical University (China); Fang, Mingming [Jiangsu Jiankang Vocational Institute (China); Xie, Weiping, E-mail: wpxienjmu@gmail.com [Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University (China); Wang, Hong, E-mail: hwangnjmu@gmail.com [Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University (China); Xu, Yong [Atherosclerosis Research Center, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease and Molecular Intervention, Department of Pathophysiology, Nanjing Medical University (China)

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 interacts with and deacetylates RFX5. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 activation attenuates whereas SIRT1 inhibition enhances collagen repression by RFX5 in vascular smooth muscle cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 promotes cytoplasmic localization and proteasomal degradation of RFX5 and cripples promoter recruitment of RFX5. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IFN-{gamma} represses SIRT1 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 agonist alleviates collagen repression by IFN-{gamma} in vascular smooth muscle cells. -- Abstract: Decreased expression of collagen by vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) within the atherosclerotic plaque contributes to the thinning of the fibrous cap and poses a great threat to plaque rupture. Elucidation of the mechanism underlying repressed collagen type I (COL1A2) gene would potentially provide novel solutions that can prevent rupture-induced complications. We have previously shown that regulatory factor for X-box (RFX5) binds to the COL1A2 transcription start site and represses its transcription. Here we report that SIRT1, an NAD-dependent, class III deacetylase, forms a complex with RFX5. Over-expression of SIRT1 or NAMPT, which synthesizes NAD+ to activate SIRT1, or treatment with the SIRT1 agonist resveratrol decreases RFX5 acetylation and disrupts repression of the COL1A2 promoter activity by RFX5. On the contrary, knockdown of SIRT1 or treatment with SIRT1 inhibitors induces RFX5 acetylation and enhances the repression of collagen transcription. SIRT1 antagonizes RFX5 activity by promoting its nuclear expulsion and proteasomal degradation hence dampening its binding to the COL1A2 promoter. The pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-{gamma} represses COL1A2 transcription by down-regulating SIRT1 expression in SMCs. Therefore, our data have identified as novel pathway whereby SIRT1 maintains collagen synthesis in SMCs by modulating RFX5 activity.

  18. Global transcriptional analysis of nitrogen fixation and ammonium repression in root-associated Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Wei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biological nitrogen fixation is highly controlled at the transcriptional level by regulatory networks that respond to the availability of fixed nitrogen. In many diazotrophs, addition of excess ammonium in the growth medium results in immediate repression of nif gene transcription. Although the regulatory cascades that control the transcription of the nif genes in proteobacteria have been well investigated, there are limited data on the kinetics of ammonium-dependent repression of nitrogen fixation. Results Here we report a global transcriptional profiling analysis of nitrogen fixation and ammonium repression in Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501, a root-associated and nitrogen-fixing bacterium. A total of 166 genes, including those coding for the global nitrogen regulation (Ntr and Nif-specific regulatory proteins, were upregulated under nitrogen fixation conditions but rapidly downregulated as early as 10 min after ammonium shock. Among these nitrogen fixation-inducible genes, 95 have orthologs in each of Azoarcus sp. BH72 and Azotobacter vinelandii AvoP. In particular, a 49-kb expression island containing nif and other associated genes was markedly downregulated by ammonium shock. Further functional characterization of pnfA, a new NifA-σ54-dependent gene chromosomally linked to nifHDK, is reported. This gene encodes a protein product with an amino acid sequence similar to that of five hypothetical proteins found only in diazotrophic strains. No noticeable differences in the transcription of nifHDK were detected between the wild type strain and pnfA mutant. However, the mutant strain exhibited a significant decrease in nitrogenase activity under microaerobic conditions and lost its ability to use nitrate as a terminal electron acceptor for the support of nitrogen fixation under anaerobic conditions. Conclusions Based on our results, we conclude that transcriptional regulation of nif gene expression in A1501 is mediated by the nif

  19. Carbon sources effect on pectinase production from Aspergillus japonicus 586

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teixeira Maria F. S.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of different carbon sources on the pectinesterases, endo- and exo-polygalacturonase activities from Aspergillus japonicus 586 was evaluated in liquid media (Manachini solutions supplemented with different substrate concentrations. The culture medium was inoculated with 5.10(6 spores/ml and mantained under agitation (140 rpm, at 30°C, during 122 h. The enzyme evaluation was carried out 24 h after filtration. The crude extract from A. japonicus 586 indicated that the best enzymatic activities were afforded in the presence of 0.5% pectin (pectinesterease, 0.2% pectin and 0.2% glycerol (endopolygalacturonase, and 0.5% pectin associated to 0.5% glucose (exopolygalacturonase. Carbon sources concentration, isolated or associated, significantly affects the pectinesterase, and endo- and exopolygalacturonase activities. Pectin, glucose and saccharose, when added to the culture medium in high concentrations, exhibited a repression effect on all the analyzed enzymes.

  20. Identification of a negative response element in the human inducible nitric-oxide synthase (hiNOS) promoter: The role of NF-κB-repressing factor (NRF) in basal repression of the hiNOS gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xuesheng; Guo, Zhong; Nourbakhsh, Mahtab; Hauser, Hansjorg; Ganster, Ray; Shao, Lifang; Geller, David A.

    2002-01-01

    Although nuclear factor (NF)-κB plays a central role in mediating cytokine-stimulated human inducible nitric-oxide synthase (hiNOS) gene transcription, very little is known about the factors involved in silencing of the hiNOS promoter. NF-κB-repressing factor (NRF) interacts with a specific negative regulatory element (NRE) to mediate transcriptional repression of certain NF-κB responsive genes. By sequence comparison with the IFN-β and IL-8 promoters, we identified an NRE in the hiNOS promoter located at −6.7 kb upstream. In A549 and HeLa human cells, constitutive NRF mRNA expression is detected by RT-PCR. Gel shift assay showed constitutive NRF binding to the hiNOS NRE. Mutation of the −6.7-kb NRE site in the hiNOS promoter resulted in loss of NRF binding and increased basal but not cytokine-stimulated hiNOS transcription in promoter transfection experiments. Interestingly, overexpression of NRF suppressed both basal and cytokine-induced hiNOS promoter activity that depended on an intact cis-acting NRE motif. By using stably transformed HeLa cells with the tetracycline on/off expression system, reduction of cellular NRF by expressing antisense NRF increased basal iNOS promoter activity and resulted in constitutive iNOS mRNA expression. These data demonstrate that the transacting NRF protein is involved in constitutive silencing of the hiNOS gene by binding to a cis-acting NRE upstream in the hiNOS promoter. PMID:12381793

  1. Repression of Fgf signaling by sprouty1-2 regulates cortical patterning in two distinct regions and times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faedo, Andrea; Borello, Ugo; Rubenstein, John L R

    2010-03-17

    A fundamental question in developmental biology is how signaling pathways establish a transcription factor code that controls cell proliferation, regional fate and cell fate. Morphogenesis of the rostral telencephalon is controlled in part by Fgf signaling from the rostral patterning center. How Fgf signaling is regulated in the telencephalon is critical for understanding cerebral cortex formation. Here we show that mouse Sprouty1 and Sprouty2 (Spry1-2), which encode negative feedback regulators of Fgf signaling, are affecting cortical proliferation, differentiation, and the expression of genes regulating progenitor identity in the ventricular zone. In addition, Spry2 has a later function in regulating the MAPK pathway, proliferation, and gene expression in the cortex at mid-neurogenesis. Finally, we provide evidence that Coup-TFI, a transcription factor that promotes caudal fate, does so through repressing Fgf signaling, in part by promoting Spry expression. PMID:20237272

  2. Repression of Fgf-Signaling by Sprouty1-2 Regulates Cortical Patterning in Two Distinct Regions and Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faedo, Andrea; Borello, Ugo; Rubenstein, John L. R.

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental question in developmental biology is how signaling pathways establish a transcription factor code that controls cell proliferation, regional fate and cell fate. Morphogenesis of the rostral telencephalon is controlled in part by Fgf-signaling from the rostral patterning center (RPC). How Fgf signaling is regulated in the telencephalon is critical for understanding cerebral cortex formation. Here we show that mouse Sprouty1 and Sprouty2 (Spry1-2), which encode negative feedback regulators of Fgf signaling, are affecting cortical proliferation, differentiation, and the expression of genes regulating progenitor identity in the ventricular zone. In addition, Spry2 has a later function in regulating the MAPK pathway, proliferation and gene expression in the cortex at mid-neurogenesis. Finally, we provide evidence that Coup-TFI, a transcription factor that promotes caudal fate, does so through repressing Fgf-signaling, in part by promoting Spry expression. PMID:20237272

  3. Matriptase-2 is essential for hepcidin repression during fetal life and postnatal development in mice to maintain iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemetz, Alexandra; Lenoir, Anne; Deschemin, Jean-Christophe; Lopez-Otin, Carlos; Ramsay, Andrew J; Vaulont, Sophie; Nicolas, Gaël

    2014-07-17

    Iron is an essential element required for development and survival of all living organisms. In fetuses, maternofetal iron transfer across the placenta is essential for growth and development. In neonates, efficient intestinal iron absorption is required to scavenge as much iron as possible from the low-iron-content milk. During these periods, efficient iron mobilization is ensured by the downregulation of the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin by as-yet uncharacterized molecular mechanisms. Here we demonstrate that the recently described hepcidin repressor-the serine protease matriptase-2 (encoded by Tmprss6)-is responsible for this repression throughout development, with its deficiency leading to increased hepcidin levels triggering iron deficiency and anemia starting in utero. This result might have implications for a better understanding of iron homeostasis during early development in iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia patients, who present with microcytic anemia caused by hyperhepcidinemia, and of questions about the role of matriptase-2 in human neonates. PMID:24904115

  4. CDK11p58 represses vitamin D receptor-mediated transcriptional activation through promoting its ubiquitin-proteasome degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and regulates transcription of target genes. In this study, we identified CDK11p58 as a novel protein involved in the regulation of VDR. CDK11p58, a member of the large family of p34cdc2-related kinases, is associated with cell cycle progression, tumorigenesis, and apoptotic signaling. Our study demonstrated that CDK11p58 interacted with VDR and repressed VDR-dependent transcriptional activation. Furthermore, overexpression of CDK11p58 decreased the stability of VDR through promoting its ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated degradation. Taken together, these results suggest that CDK11p58 is involved in the negative regulation of VDR.

  5. Matrix Gla protein repression by miR-155 promotes oncogenic signals in breast cancer MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiago, Daniel M; Conceição, Natércia; Caiado, Helena; Laizé, Vincent; Cancela, Maria Leonor

    2016-04-01

    MGP is a protein that was initially associated with the inhibition of calcification in skeleton, soft tissues, and arteries, but more recently also implicated in cancer. In breast cancer, higher levels of MGP mRNA were associated with poor prognosis, but since this deregulation was never demonstrated at the protein level, we postulated the involvement of a post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism. In this work we show that MGP is significantly repressed by miR-155 in breast cancer MCF-7 cells, and concomitantly there is a stimulation of cell proliferation and cell invasiveness. This study brings new insights into the putative involvement of MGP and oncomiR-155 in breast cancer, and may contribute to develop new therapeutic strategies. PMID:27009385

  6. CDK11{sup p58} represses vitamin D receptor-mediated transcriptional activation through promoting its ubiquitin-proteasome degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Yayun; Hong, Yi; Zong, Hongliang; Wang, Yanlin; Zou, Weiying; Yang, Junwu; Kong, Xiangfei; Yun, Xiaojing [Gene Research Center, Shanghai Medical College and Institutes of Biomedical, Shanghai 200032 (China); Gu, Jianxin, E-mail: jxgu@shmu.edu.cn [Gene Research Center, Shanghai Medical College and Institutes of Biomedical, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2009-08-28

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and regulates transcription of target genes. In this study, we identified CDK11{sup p58} as a novel protein involved in the regulation of VDR. CDK11{sup p58}, a member of the large family of p34cdc2-related kinases, is associated with cell cycle progression, tumorigenesis, and apoptotic signaling. Our study demonstrated that CDK11{sup p58} interacted with VDR and repressed VDR-dependent transcriptional activation. Furthermore, overexpression of CDK11{sup p58} decreased the stability of VDR through promoting its ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated degradation. Taken together, these results suggest that CDK11{sup p58} is involved in the negative regulation of VDR.

  7. Divergence of the diapause transcriptome in apple maggot flies: winter regulation and post-winter transcriptional repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Peter J; Powell, Thomas H Q; Walden, Kimberly K O; Schieferecke, Adam J; Feder, Jeffrey L; Hahn, Daniel A; Robertson, Hugh M; Berlocher, Stewart H; Ragland, Gregory J

    2016-09-01

    The duration of dormancy regulates seasonal timing in many organisms and may be modulated by day length and temperature. Though photoperiodic modulation has been well studied, temperature modulation of dormancy has received less attention. Here, we leverage genetic variation in diapause in the apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella, to test whether gene expression during winter or following spring warming regulates diapause duration. We used RNAseq to compare transcript abundance during and after simulated winter between an apple-infesting population and a hawthorn-infesting population where the apple population ends pupal diapause earlier than the hawthorn-infesting population. Marked differences in transcription between the two populations during winter suggests that the 'early' apple population is developmentally advanced compared with the 'late' hawthorn population prior to spring warming, with transcripts participating in growth and developmental processes relatively up-regulated in apple pupae during the winter cold period. Thus, regulatory differences during winter ultimately drive phenological differences that manifest themselves in the following summer. Expression and polymorphism analysis identify candidate genes in the Wnt and insulin signaling pathways that contribute to population differences in seasonality. Both populations remained in diapause and displayed a pattern of up- and then down-regulation (or vice versa) of growth-related transcripts following warming, consistent with transcriptional repression. The ability to repress growth stimulated by permissive temperatures is likely critical to avoid mismatched phenology and excessive metabolic demand. Compared with diapause studies in other insects, our results suggest some overlap in candidate genes/pathways, though the timing and direction of changes in transcription are likely species specific. PMID:27312473

  8. Polycomb-Mediated Repression and Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Interact to Regulate Merkel Cell Specification during Skin Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina N Perdigoto

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An increasing amount of evidence indicates that developmental programs are tightly regulated by the complex interplay between signaling pathways, as well as transcriptional and epigenetic processes. Here, we have uncovered coordination between transcriptional and morphogen cues to specify Merkel cells, poorly understood skin cells that mediate light touch sensations. In murine dorsal skin, Merkel cells are part of touch domes, which are skin structures consisting of specialized keratinocytes, Merkel cells, and afferent neurons, and are located exclusively around primary hair follicles. We show that the developing primary hair follicle functions as a niche required for Merkel cell specification. We find that intraepidermal Sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling, initiated by the production of Shh ligand in the developing hair follicles, is required for Merkel cell specification. The importance of Shh for Merkel cell formation is further reinforced by the fact that Shh overexpression in embryonic epidermal progenitors leads to ectopic Merkel cells. Interestingly, Shh signaling is common to primary, secondary, and tertiary hair follicles, raising the possibility that there are restrictive mechanisms that regulate Merkel cell specification exclusively around primary hair follicles. Indeed, we find that loss of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2 in the epidermis results in the formation of ectopic Merkel cells that are associated with all hair types. We show that PRC2 loss expands the field of epidermal cells competent to differentiate into Merkel cells through the upregulation of key Merkel-differentiation genes, which are known PRC2 targets. Importantly, PRC2-mediated repression of the Merkel cell differentiation program requires inductive Shh signaling to form mature Merkel cells. Our study exemplifies how the interplay between epigenetic and morphogen cues regulates the complex patterning and formation of the mammalian skin structures.

  9. TWIST Represses Estrogen Receptor-alpha Expression by Recruiting the NuRD Protein Complex in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjiang Fu, Lianmei Zhang, Tao He, Xiuli Xiao, Xiaoyan Liu, Li Wang, Luquan Yang, Manman Yang, Tiandan Zhang, Rui Chen, Jianming Xu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Loss of estrogen receptor α (ERα expression and gain of TWIST (TWIST1 expression in breast tumors correlate with increased disease recurrence and metastasis and poor disease-free survival. However, the molecular and functional regulatory relationship between TWIST and ERα are unclear. In this study, we found TWIST was associated with a chromatin region in intron 7 of the human ESR1 gene coding for ERα. This association of TWIST efficiently recruited the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD repressor complex to this region, which subsequently decreased histone H3K9 acetylation, increased histone H3K9 methylation and repressed ESR1 expression in breast cancer cells. In agreement with these molecular events, TWIST expression was inversely correlated with ERα expression in both breast cancer cell lines and human breast ductal carcinomas. Forced expression of TWIST in TWIST-negative and ERα-positive breast cancer cells such as T47D and MCF-7 cells reduced ERα expression, while knockdown of TWIST in TWIST-positive and ERα-negative breast cancer cells such as MDA-MB-435 and 4T1 cells increased ERα expression. Furthermore, inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC activity including the one in NuRD complex significantly increased ERα expression in MDA-MB-435 and 4T1 cells. HDAC inhibition together with TWIST knockdown did not further increase ERα expression in 4T1 and MDA-MB-435 cells. These results demonstrate that TWIST/NuRD represses ERα expression in breast cancer cells. Therefore, TWIST may serve as a potential molecular target for converting ERα-negative breast cancers to ERα-positive breast cancers, allowing these cancers to restore their sensitivity to endocrine therapy with selective ERα antagonists such as tamoxifen and raloxifene.

  10. Metabolic engineering of proanthocyanidin production by repressing the isoflavone pathways and redirecting anthocyanidin precursor flux in legume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Penghui; Dong, Qiang; Ge, Shujun; He, Xianzhi; Verdier, Jerome; Li, Dongqin; Zhao, Jian

    2016-07-01

    MtPAR is a proanthocyanidin (PA) biosynthesis regulator; the mechanism underlying its promotion of PA biosynthesis is not fully understood. Here, we showed that MtPAR promotes PA production by a direct repression of biosynthesis of isoflavones, the major flavonoids in legume, and by redirecting immediate precursors, such as anthocyanidins, flux into PA pathway. Ectopic expression of MtPAR repressed isoflavonoid production by directly binding and suppressing isoflavone biosynthetic genes such as isoflavone synthase (IFS). Meanwhile, MtPAR up-regulated PA-specific genes and decreased the anthocyanin levels without altering the expression of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes. MtPAR may shift the anthocyanidin precursor flux from anthocyanin pathway to PA biosynthesis. MtPAR complemented PA-deficient phenotype of Arabidopsis tt2 mutant seeds, demonstrating their similar action on PA production. We showed the direct interactions between MtPAR, MtTT8 and MtWD40-1 proteins from Medicago truncatula and Glycine max, to form a ternary complex to trans-activate PA-specific ANR gene. Finally, MtPAR expression in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) hairy roots and whole plants only promoted the production of small amount of PAs, which was significantly enhanced by co-expression of MtPAR and MtLAP1. Transcriptomic and metabolite profiling showed an additive effect between MtPAR and MtLAP1 on the production of PAs, supporting that efficient PA production requires more anthocyanidin precursors. This study provides new insights into the role and mechanism of MtPAR in partitioning precursors from isoflavone and anthocyanin pathways into PA pathways for a specific promotion of PA production. Based on this, a strategy by combining MtPAR and MtLAP1 co-expression to effectively improve metabolic engineering performance of PA production in legume forage was developed. PMID:26806316

  11. Inhibition of DACH1 activity by short hairpin RNA represses cell proliferation and tumor invasion in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Xiao-Na; Qiu, Chan; Wang, Chuan; Jiang, Zheng

    2016-08-01

    Cancer of the pancreas is one of the most lethal diseases worldwide. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in tumorigenesis is of great consequence to elevate the survival rate. Human Dachshund homologue 1 (DACH1) plays a controversial role in human malignancy progression with its expression being altered in a variety of cancers. Nevertheless, its functional roles and molecular mechanisms in pancreatic cancer remain unknown. The expression of DACH1 in pancreatic cancer cell lines and the ductal epithelial cells were evaluated both at mRNA and protein levels. Three pairs of siRNA targeting the DACH1 gene were designed and synthesized, double-stranded short hairpin RNA (shRNA) were annealed and inserted into pGenesil-1 vector, which was confirmed by enzymatic digestion and sequencing analyses. The successfully constructed recombinant plasmids were transfected into Capan-1 cells and our data indicated that knockdown of DACH1 gene expression showed strong correlation with repressing tumorigenesis. The proliferation of Capan-1 cells was significantly repressed as evaluated by CCK-8 and colony formation assays. Flow cymetry revealed that cell apoptosis was promoted in interference plasmid group compared with control groups (P0.05). Transwell assay validated the abilities of migration and invasion as being significantly reduced in pshRNA-DACH1 group. Furthermore, our study suggested that DACH1 expression regulates the pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis through interacting with Bcl-2 signaling axis, whereas it controls cell migration and invasion via epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process. PMID:27278537

  12. Increased skin conductance responses and neural activity during fear conditioning are associated with a repressive coping style

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim eKlucken

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of individual differences in coping styles in response to fear conditioning is an important issue for a better understanding of the etiology and treatment of psychiatric disorders. It has been assumed that an avoidant (repressive coping style is characterized by increased emotion regulation efforts in context of fearful stimuli as compared to a more vigilant coping style. However, no study so far has investigated the neural correlates of fear conditioning of repressors and sensitizers.In the present fMRI study, 76 participants were classified as repressors or as sensitizers and were exposed to a fear conditioning paradigm, in which the CS+ predicted electrical stimulation, while another neutral stimulus (CS- did not. In addition, skin conductance responses (SCRs were measured continuously.As the main findings, we found increased neural activations in repressors as compared to sensitizers in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex during fear conditioning. In addition, elevated activity to the CS+ in amygdala, insula, occipital, and orbitofrontal cortex as well as conditioned SCRs were found in repressors.The present results demonstrate increased neural activations in structures linked to emotion down-regulation mechanisms like the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, which may reflect the increased coping effort in repressors. At the same time, repressors showed increased activations in arousal and evaluation-associated structures like the amygdala, the occipital cortex, and the orbitofrontal cortex, which is also mirrored in increased SCRs. The present results support recent assumptions about a two-process model of repression postulating a fast vigilant response to fearful stimuli, but also a second emotion down-regulating process.

  13. Polycomb-Mediated Repression and Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Interact to Regulate Merkel Cell Specification during Skin Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, Carmit; Tsai, Pai-Chi; Valdes, Victor J.; Cohen, Idan; Santoriello, Francis J.; Zhao, Dejian; Hsu, Ya-Chieh; Ezhkova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    An increasing amount of evidence indicates that developmental programs are tightly regulated by the complex interplay between signaling pathways, as well as transcriptional and epigenetic processes. Here, we have uncovered coordination between transcriptional and morphogen cues to specify Merkel cells, poorly understood skin cells that mediate light touch sensations. In murine dorsal skin, Merkel cells are part of touch domes, which are skin structures consisting of specialized keratinocytes, Merkel cells, and afferent neurons, and are located exclusively around primary hair follicles. We show that the developing primary hair follicle functions as a niche required for Merkel cell specification. We find that intraepidermal Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling, initiated by the production of Shh ligand in the developing hair follicles, is required for Merkel cell specification. The importance of Shh for Merkel cell formation is further reinforced by the fact that Shh overexpression in embryonic epidermal progenitors leads to ectopic Merkel cells. Interestingly, Shh signaling is common to primary, secondary, and tertiary hair follicles, raising the possibility that there are restrictive mechanisms that regulate Merkel cell specification exclusively around primary hair follicles. Indeed, we find that loss of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) in the epidermis results in the formation of ectopic Merkel cells that are associated with all hair types. We show that PRC2 loss expands the field of epidermal cells competent to differentiate into Merkel cells through the upregulation of key Merkel-differentiation genes, which are known PRC2 targets. Importantly, PRC2-mediated repression of the Merkel cell differentiation program requires inductive Shh signaling to form mature Merkel cells. Our study exemplifies how the interplay between epigenetic and morphogen cues regulates the complex patterning and formation of the mammalian skin structures. PMID:27414999

  14. SUPPRESSOR OF PHYTOCHROME B4-#3 Represses Genes Associated with Auxin Signaling to Modulate Hypocotyl Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favero, David S; Jacques, Caitlin N; Iwase, Akira; Le, Kimberly Ngan; Zhao, Jianfei; Sugimoto, Keiko; Neff, Michael M

    2016-08-01

    Developing seedlings are well equipped to alter their growth in response to external factors in order to maximize their chances of survival. SUPPRESSOR OF PHYTOCHROME B4-#3 (SOB3) and other members of the AT-HOOK MOTIF CONTAINING NUCLEAR LOCALIZED (AHL) family of transcription factors modulate the development of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) by repressing hypocotyl elongation in young seedlings growing in light. However, the molecular mechanism behind how AHLs influence seedling development is largely unknown. We have identified genes associated with auxin-mediated hypocotyl elongation as downstream targets of SOB3. We found that YUCCA8 (YUC8) as well as members of the SMALL AUXIN UP-REGULATED RNA19 (SAUR19) subfamily were down-regulated in the short-hypocotyl, gain-of-function SOB3-D mutant and up-regulated in the dominant-negative, tall-hypocotyl sob3-6 mutant. SOB3-D and sob3-6 hypocotyls also exhibited altered sensitivity to the polar auxin transport inhibitor N-1-napthylphthalamic acid, suggesting a critical connection between auxin and the modulation of seedling elongation by SOB3 Finally, we found that overexpression of GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN-SAUR19 in the SOB3-D line partially rescued defects in hypocotyl elongation, and SOB3 bound directly to the promoters of YUC8 and SAUR19 subfamily members. Taken together, these data indicate that SOB3 modulates hypocotyl elongation in young seedlings by directly repressing the transcription of genes associated with auxin signaling. PMID:27342309

  15. SUPPRESSOR OF PHYTOCHROME B4-#3 Represses Genes Associated with Auxin Signaling to Modulate Hypocotyl Growth1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwase, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Developing seedlings are well equipped to alter their growth in response to external factors in order to maximize their chances of survival. SUPPRESSOR OF PHYTOCHROME B4-#3 (SOB3) and other members of the AT-HOOK MOTIF CONTAINING NUCLEAR LOCALIZED (AHL) family of transcription factors modulate the development of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) by repressing hypocotyl elongation in young seedlings growing in light. However, the molecular mechanism behind how AHLs influence seedling development is largely unknown. We have identified genes associated with auxin-mediated hypocotyl elongation as downstream targets of SOB3. We found that YUCCA8 (YUC8) as well as members of the SMALL AUXIN UP-REGULATED RNA19 (SAUR19) subfamily were down-regulated in the short-hypocotyl, gain-of-function SOB3-D mutant and up-regulated in the dominant-negative, tall-hypocotyl sob3-6 mutant. SOB3-D and sob3-6 hypocotyls also exhibited altered sensitivity to the polar auxin transport inhibitor N-1-napthylphthalamic acid, suggesting a critical connection between auxin and the modulation of seedling elongation by SOB3. Finally, we found that overexpression of GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN-SAUR19 in the SOB3-D line partially rescued defects in hypocotyl elongation, and SOB3 bound directly to the promoters of YUC8 and SAUR19 subfamily members. Taken together, these data indicate that SOB3 modulates hypocotyl elongation in young seedlings by directly repressing the transcription of genes associated with auxin signaling. PMID:27342309

  16. MART-10, a newly synthesized vitamin D analog, represses metastatic potential of head and neck squamous carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shih-Wei; Tsai, Chi-Ying; Pan, Yi-Chun; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Pang, Jong-Hwei S; Takano, Masashi; Kittaka, Atsushi; Juang, Horng-Heng; Chen, Tai C; Chiang, Kun-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Even with multidisciplinary treatment, the prognosis and quality of life of patients diagnosed with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are still not satisfactory. Previously, 19-Nor-2α-(3-hydroxypropyl)-1α,25(OH)2D3 (MART-10), the new brand 1α,25(OH)2D3 analog, has been demonstrated to be an effective drug to inhibit HNSCC growth in vitro. Since most cancer patients die of metastasis, in this study, the antimetastatic effect of MART-10 on HNSCC was investigated. Our results reveal that both 1α,25(OH)2D3 and MART-10 effectively repressed the migration and invasion of HNSCC cells, with MART-10 being much more potent than 1α,25(OH)2D3. The antimetastatic effect of 1α,25(OH)2D3 and MART-10 was mediated by attenuation of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), which was supported by the finding that the expression of EMT-inducing transcriptional factors, Sail and Twist, was inhibited by 1α,25(OH)2D3 and MART-10. The upregulation of E-cadherin and downregulation of N-cadherin in FaDu cells induced by both drugs further confirmed the repression of EMT. In addition, 1α,25(OH)2D3 and MART-10 treatment inhibited intracellular MMP-9 expression and extracellular MMP activity in FaDu cells. Collectively, our results suggest that the less-calcemia 1α,25(OH)2D3 analog, MART-10, is a promising drug for HNSCC treatment. Further clinical studies are warranted.

  17. A Role of Newspaper «Evening Kiev» in Honouring of Memory of Political Repressions Victims Buried in Bykivnya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Osipchuk

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In the article opens up, what role was played by mass medias in opening of information about the soviet totalitarian mode crimes during Perestroika. The publications in the «Evening Kiev» newspaper about the victims of political repressions buried in Bykivnya forest (1989–1991 are the example used in our work.

  18. NB-LRR signaling induces translational repression of viral transcripts and the formation of RNA processing bodies through mechanisms differing from those activated by UV stress and RNAi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meteignier, Louis-Valentin; Zhou, Ji; Cohen, Mathias; Bhattacharjee, Saikat; Brosseau, Chantal; Caamal Chan, Maria Goretty; Robatzek, Silke; Moffett, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Plant NB-LRR proteins confer resistance to multiple pathogens, including viruses. Although the recognition of viruses by NB-LRR proteins is highly specific, previous studies have suggested that NB-LRR activation results in a response that targets all viruses in the infected cell. Using an inducible system to activate NB-LRR defenses, we find that NB-LRR signaling does not result in the degradation of viral transcripts, but rather prevents them from associating with ribosomes and translating their genetic material. This indicates that defense against viruses involves the repression of viral RNA translation. This repression is specific to viral transcripts and does not involve a global shutdown of host cell translation. As a consequence of the repression of viral RNA translation, NB-LRR responses induce a dramatic increase in the biogenesis of RNA processing bodies (PBs). We demonstrate that other pathways that induce translational repression, such as UV irradiation and RNAi, also induce PBs. However, by investigating the phosphorylation status of eIF2α and by using suppressors of RNAi we show that the mechanisms leading to PB induction by NB-LRR signaling are different from these stimuli, thus defining a distinct type of translational control and anti-viral mechanism in plants. PMID:26889008

  19. H-NS-mediated repression of CRISPR-based immunity in Escherichia coli K12 can be relieved by the transcription activator LeuO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, E.R.; Pul, Ü.; Heidrich, N.; Jore, M.M.; Lundgren, N.M.J.; Stratmann, T.; Wurm, R.; Raine, A.; Mescher, M.; Heereveld, van L.; Mastop, M.; Wagner, E.G.H.; Schnetz, K.; Oost, van der J.; Wagner, R.; Brouns, S.J.J.

    2010-01-01

    The recently discovered prokaryotic CRISPR/Cas defence system provides immunity against viral infections and plasmid conjugation. It has been demonstrated that in Escherichia coli transcription of the Cascade genes (casABCDE) and to some extent the CRISPR array is repressed by heat-stable nucleoid-s

  20. Changing a conserved amino acid in R2R3-MYB transcription repressors results in cytoplasmic accumulation and abolishes their repressive activity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Meiliang; Sun, Zhanmin; Wang, Chenglong; Zhang, Xinquan; Tang, Yixiong; Zhu, Xuemei; Shao, Jirong; Wu, Yanmin

    2015-10-01

    Sub-group 4 R2R3-type MYB transcription factors, including MYB3, MYB4, MYB7 and MYB32, act as repressors in phenylpropanoid metabolism. These proteins contain the conserved MYB domain and the ethylene-responsive element binding factor-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) repression domain. Additionally, MYB4, MYB7 and MYB32 possess a putative zinc-finger domain and a conserved GY/FDFLGL motif in their C-termini. The protein 'sensitive to ABA and drought 2' (SAD2) recognizes the nuclear pore complex, which then transports the SAD2-MYB4 complex into the nucleus. Here, we show that the conserved GY/FDFLGL motif contributes to the interaction between MYB factors and SAD2. The Asp → Asn mutation in the GY/FDFLGL motif abolishes the interaction between MYB transcription factors and SAD2, and therefore they cannot be transported into the nucleus and cannot repress their target genes. We found that MYB4(D261N) loses the capacity to repress expression of the cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) gene and biosynthesis of sinapoyl malate. Our results indicate conservation among MYB transcription factors in terms of their interaction with SAD2. Therefore, the Asp → Asn mutation may be used to engineer transcription factors. PMID:26332741