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Sample records for carbon black nanoparticles

  1. Chemical and biological oxidative effects of carbon black nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Eiko; Kobayashi, Takahiro

    2006-11-01

    Several studies show that ultrafine particles have a larger surface area than coarse particles, thus causing a greater inflammatory response. In this study, we investigated chemical and biological oxidative effects of nanoparticles in vitro. Carbon black (CB) nanoparticles with mean aerodynamic diameters of 14, 56, and 95nm were examined. The innate oxidative capacity of the CB nanoparticles was measured by consumption of dithiothreitol (DTT) in cell-free system. The expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in rat alveolar type II epithelial cell line (SV40T2) and alveolar macrophages (AM) exposed to CB nanoparticles was measured by ELISA. DTT consumption of 14nm CB was higher than that of other CB nanoparticles having the same particle weight. However, DTT consumption was directly proportional to the particle surface area. HO-1 protein in SV40T2 cells was significantly increased by the 14nm and 56nm CB, however, 95nm CB did not affect. HO-1 protein in AM was significantly increased by the 14, 56, and 95nm CB. The increase in HO-1 expression was diminished by N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) treatment of each CB nanoparticles before exposure although the difference between the effects of NAC-treated and untreated 14nm CB did not achieve significant. In conclusion, CB nanoparticles have innate oxidative capacity that may be dependent on the surface area. CB nanoparticles can induce oxidative stress in alveolar epithelial cells and AM that is more prominent with smaller particles. The oxidative stress may, at least partially, be mediated by surface function of particles.

  2. Carbon black nanoparticle instillation induces sustained inflammation and genotoxicity in mouse lung and liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourdon, Julie A; Saber, Anne T; Jacobsen, Nicklas R;

    2012-01-01

    Widespread occupational exposure to carbon black nanoparticles (CBNPs) raises concerns over their safety. CBNPs are genotoxic in vitro but less is known about their genotoxicity in various organs in vivo.......Widespread occupational exposure to carbon black nanoparticles (CBNPs) raises concerns over their safety. CBNPs are genotoxic in vitro but less is known about their genotoxicity in various organs in vivo....

  3. Comparison of manufactured and black carbon nanoparticle concentrations in aquatic sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelmans, A.A.; Nowack, B.; Wiesner, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we show that concentrations of manufactured carbon-based nanoparticles (MCNPs) in aquatic sediments will be negligible compared to levels of black carbon nanoparticles (BCNPs). This is concluded from model calculations accounting for MCNP sedimentation fluxes, removal rates due to

  4. Pulmonary exposure to carbon black nanoparticles and vascular effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallin Håkan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to small size particulates is regarded as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Methods We exposed young and aged apolipoprotein E knockout mice (apoE-/- to carbon black (Printex 90, 14 nm by intratracheal instillation, with different dosing and timing, and measured vasomotor function, progression of atherosclerotic plaques, and VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and 3-nitrotyrosine in blood vessels. The mRNA expression of VCAM-1, ICAM-1, HO-1, and MCP-1 was examined in lung tissue. Results Young apoE-/- mice exposed to two consecutive 0.5 mg/kg doses of carbon black exhibited lower acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation in aorta segments mounted in myographs, whereas single doses of 0.05-2.7 mg/kg produced no such effects. The phenylephrine-dependent vasocontraction response was shifted toward a lower responsiveness in the mice exposed once to a low dose for 24 hours. No effects were seen on the progression of atherosclerotic plaques in the aged apoE-/- mice or on the expression of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 and the presence of 3-nitrotyrosine in the vascular tissue of either young or aged apoE-/- mice. The expression of MCP-1 mRNA was increased in the lungs of young apoE-/- mice exposed to 0.9-2.7 mg/kg carbon black for 24 hours and of aged apoE-/- mice exposed to two consecutive 0.5 mg/kg doses of carbon black seven and five weeks prior to sacrifice. Conclusion Exposure to nano-sized carbon black particles is associated with modest vasomotor impairment, which is associated neither with nitrosative stress nor with any obvious increases in the expression of cell adhesion proteins on endothelial cells or in plaque progression. Evidence of pulmonary inflammation was observed, but only in animals exposed to higher doses.

  5. Effect of carbon black nanoparticles on methane/air explosions: Influence at low initial turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrado, David; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Dufaud, Olivier

    2017-06-01

    Nanoparticles are widely used in industrial applications as additives to modify materials properties such as resistance, surface, rheology or UV-radiation. As a consequence, the quantification and characterization of nanoparticles have become almost compulsory, including the understanding of the risks associated to their use. Since a few years ago, several studies of dust explosion properties involving nano-sized powder have been published. During the production and industrial use of nanoparticles, simultaneous presence of gas / vapor / solvents and dispersed nanoparticles mixtures might be obtained, increasing the risk of a hybrid mixture explosion. The aim of this work is to study the severity of the explosion of carbon black nanoparticles/methane mixtures and understand the influence of adding nanopowders on the behavior of the gas explosions. These results are also useful to understand the influence of soot on the efficiency of the gas combustion. Two grades of carbon black nanoparticles (ranging from 20 to 300 nm average diameter) have been mixed with methane. Tests have been performed on these mixtures in a standard 20 L explosion sphere. Regarding the scale precision, the lowest concentration of carbon black nanoparticles was set at 0.5 g.m-3. Tests were also performed at 2.5 g.m-3, which is still far below 60 g.m-3, the minimum explosive concentration of such powders previously determined in our laboratory. The influence of carbon black particles on the severity of the explosions has been compared to that of pure gas. It appears that the use of carbon black nanoparticles increases the explosion overpressure for lean methane mixtures at low initial turbulences by c. 10%. Similar results were obtained for high initial turbulent systems. Therefore, it seems that carbon black nanoparticles have an impact on the severity of the explosion even for quiescent systems, as opposed to systems involving micro-sized powders that require dispersion at high turbulence

  6. Effects of prenatal exposure to nanoparticles titanium dioxide and carbon black on female germline DNA stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Anne Mette Zenner

    are actively dividing. The aim of this PhD study was to determine if two widely used nanoparticles titanium dioxide UV-Titan and carbon black Printex 90 induce ESTR mutations in the germ cells of prenatally exposed females. Pregnant generation P mice were exposed to ~42 mg UV-Titan/m3/1 h/d during gestation...

  7. Migration of nanoparticles from plastic packaging materials containing carbon black into foodstuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bott, Johannes; Störmer, Angela; Franz, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Carbon black was investigated to assess and quantify the possibility that nanoparticles might migrate out of plastic materials used in the food packaging industry. Two types of carbon black were incorporated in low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and polystyrene (PS) at 2.5% and 5.0% loading (w/w), and then subjected to migration studies. The samples were exposed to different food simulants according to European Union Plastics Regulation 10/2011, simulating long-term storage with aqueous and fatty foodstuffs. Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to a multi-angle laser light-scattering (MALLS) detector was used to separate, characterise and quantify the potential release of nanoparticles. The AF4 method was successful in differentiating carbon black from other matrix components, such as extracted polymer chains, in the migration solution. At a detection limit of 12 µg kg⁻¹, carbon black did not migrate from the packaging material into food simulants. The experimental findings are in agreement with theoretical considerations based on migration modelling. From both the experimental findings and theoretical considerations, it can be concluded that carbon black does not migrate into food once it is incorporated into a plastics food contact material.

  8. Effect of molecular weight on the electrophoretic deposition of carbon black nanoparticles in moderately viscous systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Satyam; Panwar, Artee; Mead, Joey L; Barry, Carol M F

    2013-08-06

    Electrophoretic deposition from viscous media has the potential to produce in-mold assembly of nanoparticles onto three-dimensional parts in high-rate, polymer melt-based processes like injection molding. The effects of the media's molecular weight on deposition behavior were investigated using a model system of carbon black and polystyrene in tetrahydrofuran. Increases in molecular weight reduced the electrophoretic deposition of the carbon black particles due to increases in suspension viscosity and preferential adsorption of the longer polystyrene chains on the carbon black particles. At low deposition times (≤5 s), only carbon black deposited onto the electrodes, but the deposition decreased with increasing molecular weight and the resultant increases in suspension viscosity. For longer deposition times, polystyrene codeposited with the carbon black, with the amount of polystyrene increasing with molecular weight and decreasing with greater charge on the polystyrene molecules. This deposition behavior suggests that use of lower molecular polymers and control of electrical properties will permit electrophoretic deposition of nanoparticles from polymer melts for high-rate, one-step fabrication of nano-optical devices, biochemical sensors, and nanoelectronics.

  9. Binder-Free and Carbon-Free Nanoparticle Batteries: A Method for Nanoparticle Electrodes without Polymeric Binders or Carbon Black

    KAUST Repository

    Ha, Don-Hyung

    2012-10-10

    In this work, we have developed a new fabrication method for nanoparticle (NP) assemblies for Li-ion battery electrodes that require no additional support or conductive materials such as polymeric binders or carbon black. By eliminating these additives, we are able to improve the battery capacity/weight ratio. The NP film is formed by using electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of colloidally synthesized, monodisperse cobalt NPs that are transformed through the nanoscale Kirkendall effect into hollow Co 3O 4. EPD forms a network of NPs that are mechanically very robust and electrically connected, enabling them to act as the Li-ion battery anode. The morphology change through cycles indicates stable 5-10 nm NPs form after the first lithiation remained throughout the cycling process. This NP-film battery made without binders and conductive additives shows high gravimetric (>830 mAh/g) and volumetric capacities (>2100 mAh/cm 3) even after 50 cycles. Because similar films made from drop-casting do not perform well under equal conditions, EPD is seen as the critical step to create good contacts between the particles and electrodes resulting in this significant improvement in battery electrode assembly. This is a promising system for colloidal nanoparticles and a template for investigating the mechanism of lithiation and delithiation of NPs. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  10. Carbon black nanoparticles promote the maturation and function of mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Eiko; Takano, Hirohisa; Inoue, Ken-Ichiro; Yanagisawa, Rie; Kobayashi, Takahiro

    2008-09-01

    Particulate matter including carbon black (CB) nanoparticles can enhance antigen-related inflammation and immunoglobulin production in vivo. Dendritic cells (DC) as antigen-presenting cells (APC) are the most capable inducers of immune responses. The present study was designed to determine whether CB nanoparticles affect the maturation/activation and function of DC in vitro. DC were differentiated from bone marrow (BM) cells of BALB/c mice by culture with granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). At day 8 of culture, BM-derived DC (BMDC) were exposed to CB nanoparticles with a diameter of 14nm or 56nm for 24h. The expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II, DEC205, CD80, and CD86 (maturation/activation markers of BMDC) was measured by flow cytometry. BMDC function was evaluated by an allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) assay. CB nanoparticles significantly increased the expression of DEC205 and CD86 in BMDC and tended to increase MHC class II and CD80 expression; however, a size-dependent effect was not observed. On the other hand, BMDC-mediated MLR was significantly enhanced by the CB nanoparticles and the enhancement was greater by 14nm CB nanoparticles than by 56nm CB nanoparticles. Taken together, CB nanoparticles can promote the maturation/activation and function of BMDC, which could be related to their effects on allergic diseases and/or responses. In addition, BMDC-mediated MLR might be useful assay for in vitro screening for adjuvant activity of environmental toxicants.

  11. Internalization of carbon black and maghemite iron oxide nanoparticle mixtures leads to oxidant production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, J Michael; Ho, Shu; Hwang, Wonjoong; Zebda, Rema; Cummins, Kyle; Soriaga, Manuel P; Taylor, Robert; Guo, Bing; Sayes, Christie M

    2010-12-20

    The risk of potential human exposure to mixed nanomaterials in consumer, occupational, and medicinal settings is increasing as nanomaterials enter both the workplace and the marketplace. In this study, we investigated the toxicity of mixed engineered carbon black (ECB) and maghemite iron oxide (Fe(2)O(3)) nanoparticles in a cellular system to understand the mechanism of toxicity and potential methods of toxicity mitigation. Lung epithelial cells (A549) were exposed to mixed Fe(2)O(3) and ECB nanoparticles, mixed Fe(2)O(3) and ECB nanoparticles with the addition of L-ascorbic acid, and mixed Fe(2)O(3) and surface-oxidized engineered carbon black (ox-ECB) nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption surface area measurement (BET), X-ray diffraction, and surface charge measurement. The carbon black nanoparticles were also characterized with a reductive capacity assay and by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The cellular uptake of nanoparticles was analyzed via transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy; the cellular uptake of iron was quantified using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Both the MTT assay and the ethidium homodimer and calcein AM live/dead assay were used to measure cellular proliferation and cytotoxicity, respectively. The dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) assay was used to measure the intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species. Results show that both Fe(2)O(3) and ECB (or Fe(2)O(3) and ox-ECB) were co-internalized in intracellular vesicles. Additionally, after exposure to the mixture of nanoparticles, the amount of acidified lysosomes increased over time. The cellular uptake of Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles was unaffected by mixing with ECB. Significant oxidant production occurred in cells exposed to mixed Fe(2)O(3) and ECB, but not in cells exposed to mixed Fe(2)O(3) and ox-ECB or in cells exposed to Fe(2)O(3) and ECB with the

  12. Three-dimensional shapes and spatial distributions of Pt and PtCr catalyst nanoparticles on carbon black

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gontard, Lionel Cervera; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Ozkaya, D.

    2008-01-01

    High-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy tomography is applied to the study of Pt and PtCr nanoparticles supported on carbon black, which are used as heterogeneous catalysts in the electrodes of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. By using electron tomography, the ...

  13. Interaction between carboxyl-functionalized carbon black nanoparticles and porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Song-Bae; Kang, Jin-Kyu; Yi, In-Geol

    2015-04-01

    Carbon nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes, fullerene, and graphene, have received considerable attention due to their unique physical and chemical characteristics, leading to mass production and widespread application in industrial, commercial, and environmental fields. During their life cycle from production to disposal, however, carbon nanomaterials are inevitably released into water and soil environments, which have resulted in concern about their health and environmental impacts. Carbon black is a nano-sized amorphous carbon powder that typically contains 90-99% elemental carbon. It can be produced from incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons in petroleum and coal. Carbon black is widely used in chemical and industrial products or applications such as ink pigments, coating plastics, the rubber industry, and composite reinforcements. Even though carbon black is strongly hydrophobic and tends to aggregate in water, it can be dispersed in aqueous media through surface functionalization or surfactant use. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the transport behavior of carboxyl-functionalized carbon black nanoparticles (CBNPs) in porous media. Column experiments were performed for potassium chloride (KCl), a conservative tracer, and CBNPs under saturated flow conditions. Column experiments was conducted in duplicate using quartz sand, iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS), and aluminum oxide-coated sand (AOCS) to examine the effect of metal (Fe, Al) oxide presence on the transport of CBNPs. Breakthrough curves (BTCs) of CBNPs and chloride were obtained by monitoring effluent, and then mass recovery was quantified from these curves. Additionally, interaction energy profiles for CBNP-porous media were calculated using DLVO theory for sphere-plate geometry. The BTCs of chloride had relative peak concentrations ranging from 0.895 to 0.990. Transport parameters (pore-water velocity v, hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient D) obtained by the model fit from the

  14. Stormwater and fire as sources of black carbon nanoparticles to Lake Tahoe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisiaux, Marion M; Edwards, Ross; Heyvaert, Alan C; Thomas, James M; Fitzgerald, Brian; Susfalk, Richard B; Schladow, S Geoffrey; Thaw, Melissa

    2011-03-15

    Emitted to the atmosphere through fire and fossil fuel combustion, refractory black carbon nanoparticles (rBC) impact human health, climate, and the carbon cycle. Eventually these particles enter aquatic environments, where they may affect the fate of other pollutants. While ubiquitous, the particles are still poorly characterized in freshwater systems. Here we present the results of a study determining rBC in waters of the Lake Tahoe watershed in the western United States from 2007 to 2009. The study period spanned a large fire within the Tahoe basin, seasonal snowmelt, and a number of storm events, which resulted in pulses of urban runoff into the lake with rBC concentrations up to 4 orders of magnitude higher than midlake concentrations. The results show that rBC pulses from both the fire and urban runoff were rapidly attenuated suggesting unexpected aggregation or degradation of the particles. We find that those processes prevent rBC concentrations from building up in the clear and oligotrophic Lake Tahoe. This rapid removal of rBC soon after entry into the lake has implications for the transport of rBC in the global aquatic environment and the flux of rBC from continents to the global ocean.

  15. Application of Black Pearl carbon-supported WO 3 nanostructures as hybrid carriers for electrocatalytic RuSe x nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miecznikowski, Krzysztof; Kulesza, Pawel J.; Fiechter, Sebastian

    2011-07-01

    RuSe x electrocatalytic nanoparticles were deposited onto hybrid carriers composed of Black Pearl carbon-supported tungsten oxide; and the resulting system's electrochemical activity was investigated during oxygen reduction reaction. The tungsten oxide-utilizing and RuSe x nanoparticle-containing materials were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and electrochemical diagnostic techniques such as cyclic voltammetry and rotating ring-disk voltammetry. Application of Black Pearl carbon carriers modified with ultra-thin films of WO 3 as matrices (supports) for RuSe x catalytic centers results during electroreduction of oxygen in 0.5 mol dm -3 H 2SO 4 (under rotating disk voltammetric conditions) in the potential shift of ca. 70 mV towards more positive values relative to the behavior of the analogous WO 3-free system. Also the percent formation (at ring in the rotating ring-disk voltammetry) of the undesirable hydrogen peroxide has been decreased approximately twice by utilizing WO 3-modified carbon carriers. The results are consistent with the bifunctional mechanism in which oxygen reduction is initiated at RuSe x centers and the hydrogen peroxide intermediate is reductively decomposed at reactive WO 3-modified Black Pearl supports. The electrocatalytic activity of the system utilizing WO 3-modified Black Pearl supports has been basically unchanged upon addition of acetic acid, formic acid or methyl formate to the sulfuric acid supporting electrolyte.

  16. Press-Printed Conductive Carbon Black Nanoparticle Films for Molecular Detection at the Microscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Pelle, Flavio; Vázquez, Luis; Del Carlo, Michele; Sergi, Manuel; Compagnone, Dario; Escarpa, Alberto

    2016-08-26

    Carbon black nanoparticle (CBNP) press-transferred film-based transducers for the molecular detection at the microscale level were proposed for the first time. Current-sensing atomic force microscopy (CS-AFM) revealed that the CBNP films were effectively press-transferred, retaining their good conductivity. A significant correlation between the morphology and the resistance was observed. The highest resistance was localized at the top of the press-transferred film protrusions, whereas low values are usually obtained at the deep crevices or grooves. The amount of press-transferred CBNPs is the key parameter to obtain films with improved conductivity, which is in good agreement with the electrochemical response. In addition, the conductivity of such optimum films was not only Ohmic; in fact, tunneling/hopping contributions were observed, as assessed by CS-AFM. The CBNP films acted as exclusive electrochemical transducers as evidenced by using two classes of molecules, that is, neurotransmitters and environmental organic contaminants. These results revealed the potential of these CBNP press-transferred films for providing new options in microfluidics and other related micro- and nanochemistry applications.

  17. Carbon black nanoparticle instillation induces sustained inflammation and genotoxicity in mouse lung and liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bourdon Julie A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Widespread occupational exposure to carbon black nanoparticles (CBNPs raises concerns over their safety. CBNPs are genotoxic in vitro but less is known about their genotoxicity in various organs in vivo. Methods We investigated inflammatory and acute phase responses, DNA strand breaks (SB and oxidatively damaged DNA in C57BL/6 mice 1, 3 and 28 days after a single instillation of 0.018, 0.054 or 0.162 mg Printex 90 CBNPs, alongside sham controls. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid was analyzed for cellular composition. SB in BAL cells, whole lung and liver were assessed using the alkaline comet assay. Formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG sensitive sites were assessed as an indicator of oxidatively damaged DNA. Pulmonary and hepatic acute phase response was evaluated by Saa3 mRNA real-time quantitative PCR. Results Inflammation was strongest 1 and 3 days post-exposure, and remained elevated for the two highest doses (i.e., 0.054 and 0.162 mg 28 days post-exposure (P Saa3 mRNA in lung tissue on day 1 (all doses, 3 (all doses and 28 (0.054 and 0.162 mg, but not in liver. Conclusions Deposition of CBNPs in lung induces inflammatory and genotoxic effects in mouse lung that persist considerably after the initial exposure. Our results demonstrate that CBNPs may cause genotoxicity both in the primary exposed tissue, lung and BAL cells, and in a secondary tissue, the liver.

  18. Biological effects of carbon black nanoparticles are changed by surface coating with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Karina; Ströbele, Michael; Schlick, Sandra; Webering, Sina; Jenckel, André; Kopf, Johannes; Danov, Olga; Sewald, Katherina; Buj, Christian; Creutzenberg, Otto; Tillmann, Thomas; Pohlmann, Gerhard; Ernst, Heinrich; Ziemann, Christina; Hüttmann, Gereon; Heine, Holger; Bockhorn, Henning; Hansen, Tanja; König, Peter; Fehrenbach, Heinz

    2017-03-21

    Carbon black nanoparticles (CBNP) are mainly composed of carbon, with a small amount of other elements (including hydrogen and oxygen). The toxicity of CBNP has been attributed to their large surface area, and through adsorbing intrinsically toxic substances, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). It is not clear whether a PAH surface coating changes the toxicological properties of CBNP by influencing their physicochemical properties, through the specific toxicity of the surface-bound PAH, or by a combination of both. Printex(®)90 (P90) was used as CBNP; the comparators were P90 coated with either benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) or 9-nitroanthracene (9NA), and soot from acetylene combustion that bears various PAHs on the surface (AS-PAH). Oxidative stress and IL-8/KC mRNA expression were determined in A549 and bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14o-, Calu-3), mouse intrapulmonary airways and tracheal epithelial cells. Overall toxicity was tested in a rat inhalation study according to Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) criteria. Effects on cytochrome monooxygenase (Cyp) mRNA expression, cell viability and mucociliary clearance were determined in acute exposure models using explanted murine trachea. All particles had similar primary particle size, shape, hydrodynamic diameter and ζ-potential. All PAH-containing particles had a comparable specific surface area that was approximately one third that of P90. AS-PAH contained a mixture of PAH with expected higher toxicity than BaP or 9NA. PAH-coating reduced some effects of P90 such as IL-8 mRNA expression and oxidative stress in A549 cells, granulocyte influx in the in vivo OECD experiment, and agglomeration of P90 and mucus release in the murine trachea ex vivo. Furthermore, P90-BaP decreased particle transport speed compared to P90 at 10 μg/ml. In contrast, PAH-coating induced IL-8 mRNA expression in bronchial epithelial cell lines, and Cyp mRNA expression and apoptosis in tracheal epithelial

  19. DNA Damage Following Pulmonary Exposure by Instillation to Low Doses of Carbon Black (Printex 90) Nanoparticles in Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyjovska, Zdenka O.; Jacobsen, Nicklas R.; Saber, Anne T.;

    2015-01-01

    We previously observed genotoxic effects of carbon black nanoparticles at low doses relative to the Danish Occupational Exposure Limit (3.5 mg/m3). Furthermore, DNA damage occurred in broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) cells in the absence of inflammation, indicating that inflammation is not required ....... Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Environmental Mutagen Society...... the comet assay. We interpret the increased DNA strand breaks occurring following these low exposure doses of NPCB as DNA damage caused by primary genotoxicity in the absence of substantial inflammation, cell damage, and acute phase response. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 56:41-49, 2015. (c) 2014 The Authors...

  20. Bactericidal and catalytic performance of green nanocomposite based-on chitosan/carbon black fiber supported monometallic and bimetallic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Fayaz; Khan, Sher Bahadar; Kamal, Tahseen; Anwar, Yasir; Alamry, Khalid A; Asiri, Abdullah M

    2017-08-28

    Nanoparticles were synthesized on the surface of green nanocomposite based on carbon black dispersed in chitosan (CB-CS) fibres. The nanoparticles were monometallic Co, Ag and Cu and bimetallic Co + Cu and Co + Ag. The CB-CS fibres were prepared and introduced into separate metal salt solutions containing Co(2+), Ag(+) and Cu(2+) and mixed Co(2+)+Cu(2+) and Co(2+)+Ag(+) ions. The metal ions immobilized on the surface of CB-CS were reduced using sodium borohydride (NaBH4) as reducing agent to synthesize the corresponding zero-valent metal nanoparticles-loaded CB-CS fibres. All the nanoparticles-loaded CB-CS samples were characterized using field emission-scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. When tested as catalysts, the nanoparticles-loaded CB-CS showed excellent catalytic ability for the reduction of toxic and environmentally unwanted pollutants of para-nitrophenol, congo red and methyl orange dyes. Afterwards, the antimicrobial activities of virgin and metal-loaded CB-CS fibres were tested and the metal-loaded CB-CS fibres were found to be effective against Escherichia coli. In addition, the catalyst can be recovered easily by simply removing the fibres from the reaction mixture and can be recycled several times while maintaining high catalytic efficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Carbon black nanoparticles promote endothelial activation and lipid accumulation in macrophages independently of intracellular ROS production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Yi; Roursgaard, Martin; Danielsen, Pernille Høgh;

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to nanoparticles (NPs) may cause vascular effects including endothelial dysfunction and foam cell formation, with oxidative stress and inflammation as supposed central mechanisms. We investigated oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction and lipid accumulation caused by nano-sized carbon...... and WST-1 assays, especially in THP-1 and THP-1a cells. The CB exposure decreased the glutathione (GSH) content in THP-1 and THP-1a cells, whereas GSH was increased in HUVECs. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was increased in all cell types after CB exposure. A reduction of the intracellular...

  2. Ethanol oxidation reaction activity of highly dispersed Pt/SnO{sub 2} double nanoparticles on carbon black

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, Eiji; Miyata, Kazumasa; Takase, Tomonori; Inoue, Hiroshi [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan)

    2011-02-15

    Highly dispersed Pt and SnO{sub 2} double nanoparticles containing different Pt/Sn ratios (denoted as Pt/SnO{sub 2}/CB) were prepared on carbon black (CB) by the modified Boennemann method. The average size of Pt and SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles was 3.1 {+-} 0.5 nm and 2.5 {+-} 0.3 nm, respectively, in Pt/SnO{sub 2}(3:1)/CB, 3.0 {+-} 0.5 nm and 2.6 {+-} 0.3 nm, respectively, in Pt/SnO{sub 2}(1:1)/CB, and 2.8 {+-} 0.5 nm and 2.5 {+-} 0.3 nm, respectively, in Pt/SnO{sub 2}(1:3)/CB. The Pt/SnO{sub 2}(3:1)/CB electrode showed the highest specific activity and lowest overpotential for ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR), and was superior to a Pt/CB electrode. Current density for EOR at 0.40 and 0.60 V vs. reversible hydrogen electrode for the Pt/SnO{sub 2}(3:1)/CB electrode decayed more slowly than that for the Pt/CB electrode because of a synergistic effect between Pt and SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles. The predominant reaction product was acetic acid, and its current efficiency was about 70%, while that for CO{sub 2} production was about 30%. (author)

  3. DNA Damage Following Pulmonary Exposure by Instillation to Low Doses of Carbon Black (Printex 90) Nanoparticles in Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyjovska, Zdenka O.; Jacobsen, Nicklas R.; Saber, Anne T.;

    2015-01-01

    of 0.67, 2, 6, and 162 mu g Printex 90 NPCB and vehicle. Cellular composition and protein concentration was evaluated in BAL fluid as markers of inflammatory response and cell damage. DNA strand breaks in BAL cells, lung, and liver tissue were assessed using the alkaline comet assay. The pulmonary......We previously observed genotoxic effects of carbon black nanoparticles at low doses relative to the Danish Occupational Exposure Limit (3.5 mg/m3). Furthermore, DNA damage occurred in broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) cells in the absence of inflammation, indicating that inflammation is not required...... the comet assay. We interpret the increased DNA strand breaks occurring following these low exposure doses of NPCB as DNA damage caused by primary genotoxicity in the absence of substantial inflammation, cell damage, and acute phase response. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 56:41-49, 2015. (c) 2014 The Authors...

  4. Gene expression profiling to identify potentially relevant disease outcomes and support human health risk assessment for carbon black nanoparticle exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdon, Julie A; Williams, Andrew; Kuo, Byron; Moffat, Ivy; White, Paul A; Halappanavar, Sabina; Vogel, Ulla; Wallin, Håkan; Yauk, Carole L

    2013-01-07

    New approaches are urgently needed to evaluate potential hazards posed by exposure to nanomaterials. Gene expression profiling provides information on potential modes of action and human relevance, and tools have recently become available for pathway-based quantitative risk assessment. The objective of this study was to use toxicogenomics in the context of human health risk assessment. We explore the utility of toxicogenomics in risk assessment, using published gene expression data from C57BL/6 mice exposed to 18, 54 and 162 μg Printex 90 carbon black nanoparticles (CBNP). Analysis of CBNP-perturbed pathways, networks and transcription factors revealed concomitant changes in predicted phenotypes (e.g., pulmonary inflammation and genotoxicity), that correlated with dose and time. Benchmark doses (BMDs) for apical endpoints were comparable to minimum BMDs for relevant pathway-specific expression changes. Comparison to inflammatory lung disease models (i.e., allergic airway inflammation, bacterial infection and tissue injury and fibrosis) and human disease profiles revealed that induced gene expression changes in Printex 90 exposed mice were similar to those typical for pulmonary injury and fibrosis. Very similar fibrotic pathways were perturbed in CBNP-exposed mice and human fibrosis disease models. Our synthesis demonstrates how toxicogenomic profiles may be used in human health risk assessment of nanoparticles and constitutes an important step forward in the ultimate recognition of toxicogenomic endpoints in human health risk. As our knowledge of molecular pathways, dose-response characteristics and relevance to human disease continues to grow, we anticipate that toxicogenomics will become increasingly useful in assessing chemical toxicities and in human health risk assessment. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of Ingredients of Carbon Black Nano-Particle Suspension of Ammonia Solution on Viscosity of Nanofluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Bo; DU Kai; ZHANG Xiao-song; YANG Liu

    2009-01-01

    A series of experiments were performed on the viscosity of a nanofluid,produced by mixing car-bon black and mulsifier OP-10 using ammonia-water with the ultrasonic dispersion.The results show that,when adding surfactant separately in low mass concentrations,at first the viscosity of solution decreases sharply compared with that of ammonia-water.then increases with increasing the concentration of OP-IO.In a certain concentration of surfactant,the viscosity of nanofluids increases with increasing the concentration of nanoparti·des.Based on Einstein model and Langrnuir absorption theory,a new model啪s summed up for nanoflukls.Compared with test values,the calcuhted values on the new model have verified that the model is suitable to predict the viscosity of rmnofluids.beoll.k.the maximum relative error is less than 5%.Nano-particles absorp-tion in the nanofluids is not only single-molecule layer adsorption,but aLso multi-layer molecular adsorption and other complicated adsorption.So the new model,ordy based on single-molecule layer adsorption theory of Lang-muir.is not fully in line with the real circumstances.

  6. Black carbon in marine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelburg, J.J.; Nieuwenhuize, J.; Van Breugel, P.

    1999-01-01

    Concentrations of black carbon were determined for a number of marine sediments. A comparison of black carbon based on thermal oxidation and hot concentrated nitric acid pretreatments revealed that the latter significantly overestimates combustion derived carbon phases. Black carbon accounts for

  7. Composite films of carbon black nanoparticles and sulfonated-polythiophene as flexible counter electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-Ting; Lee, Chi-Ta; Li, Sie-Rong; Lee, Chuan-Pei; Chiu, I.-Ting; Vittal, R.; Wu, Nae-Lih; Sun, Shih-Sheng; Ho, Kuo-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    A composite film based on carbon black nanoparticles and sulfonated-poly(thiophene-3-[2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethoxy]-2,5-diyl) (CB-NPs/s-PT) is formed on a flexible titanium foil for the use as the electro-catalytic counter electrode (CE) of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The CB-NPs provide the large amount of electro-catalytic active sites for the composite film, and the s-PT polymer serves as a conductive binder to enhance the inter-particle linkage among CB-NPs and to improve the adhesion between the composite film and the flexible substrate. The flexible CB-NPs/s-PT composite film is designed to possess good electro-catalytic ability for I-/I3- redox couple by providing large active sites and rapid reduction kinetic rate constant of I3- . The cell with a CB-NPs/s-PT CE exhibits a good cell efficiency (η) of 9.02 ± 0.01% at 100 mW cm-2, while the cell with a platinum CE shows an η of only 8.36 ± 0.02% under the same conditions. At weak light illuminations (20-80 mW cm-2), a DSSC with CB-NPs/s-PT CE still exhibits η's of 7.20 ± 0.04-9.08 ± 0.02%. The low-cost CB-NPs/s-PT CE not only renders high cell efficiency to its DSSC but also shows a great potential to replace the expensive platinum; moreover it is suitable for large-scale production or for indoor applications.

  8. 聚合物包覆的亲水性碳黑纳米粒子%Polymer-encapsulated Hydrophilic Carbon Black Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李寒莹; 陈红征; 徐文君; 袁芳; 汪茫

    2004-01-01

    It reported a simple method of coacervation by which carbon black nanoparticles were encapsulated by poly vinyl alcohol or poly acrylamide. This strategy avoids the complicated polymerization process involved in the counterpart of polymer-coating approaches%通过简单的相变方法,成功地在碳黑纳米粒子表面包覆上亲水性的聚乙烯醇或聚丙稀酰胺,从而赋予碳黑亲水性的表面.该方法避免了其他的聚合物包覆的方法中所涉及的复杂的聚合步骤.

  9. Endothelial dysfunction in normal and prediabetic rats with metabolic syndrome exposed by oral gavage to carbon black nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkmann, Janne Kjærsgaard; Vesterdal, Lise Kristine; Sheykhzade, Majid

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to nanosized particles may increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases by endothelial dysfunction, particularly in susceptible subjects with metabolic syndrome. We investigated vasomotor dysfunction in aorta from obese and lean Zucker rats after oral exposure to nanosized carbon black (CB....... In conclusion, repeated oral exposure to CB was associated with endothelial dysfunction in rats, further aggravating the effect of metabolic syndrome.......). Rats were exposed to 1 or 10 weekly doses of 0, 0.064, 0.64 or 6.4mg/kg bodyweight and sacrificed 24h or 13 weeks later. The exposure to 10 doses of 0.064 or 0.64mg/kg reduced the acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation in the lean and obese rats. The half maximal effect concentration values increased...

  10. Electrodeposited ultrafine NbOx, ZrOx, and TaO x nanoparticles on carbon black supports for oxygen reduction electrocatalysts in acidic media

    KAUST Repository

    Seo, Jeongsuk

    2013-09-06

    A remarkable electrocatalytic activity was obtained for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic solutions on ultrafine nano-oxide catalysts based on group IV or V elements. By potentiostatic electrodepostion in nonaqueous solutions at 298 K followed by heat treatment in H2 gas, highly dispersed fine nanoparticles of NbOx, ZrOx, and TaOx with sizes of less than 5 nm were prepared and deposited on carbon black (CB) loaded electrodes. These oxide nanoparticles showed high catalytic activities with high onset potentials of 0.96 VRHE (NbOx), 1.02 VRHE (ZrOx), and 0.93 V RHE (TaOx) for the ORR. Owing to the high chemical stability of group IV and V oxides, the catalysts were very stable during the ORR in acidic solutions. Surface characterization and chemical identification were performed using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). All results clearly indicate the formation of nano-oxide electrocatalysts that show an outstanding ORR performance, whereas the bulk oxides are not active because of the absence of electronic conductivity. The present work demonstrates potential candidates for highly stable, non-noble-metal cathode catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs), where the catalysts are exposed to highly acidic and oxidizing conditions. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  11. Thermal properties of carbon black aqueous nanofluids for solar absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Dongxiao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article, carbon black nanofluids were prepared by dispersing the pretreated carbon black powder into distilled water. The size and morphology of the nanoparticles were explored. The photothermal properties, optical properties, rheological behaviors, and thermal conductivities of the nanofluids were also investigated. The results showed that the nanofluids of high-volume fraction had better photothermal properties. Both carbon black powder and nanofluids had good absorption in the whole wavelength ranging from 200 to 2,500 nm. The nanofluids exhibited a shear thinning behavior. The shear viscosity increased with the increasing volume fraction and decreased with the increasing temperature at the same shear rate. The thermal conductivity of carbon black nanofluids increased with the increase of volume fraction and temperature. Carbon black nanofluids had good absorption ability of solar energy and can effectively enhance the solar absorption efficiency.

  12. Thermal properties of carbon black aqueous nanofluids for solar absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dongxiao; Meng, Zhaoguo; Wu, Daxiong; Zhang, Canying; Zhu, Haitao

    2011-07-18

    In this article, carbon black nanofluids were prepared by dispersing the pretreated carbon black powder into distilled water. The size and morphology of the nanoparticles were explored. The photothermal properties, optical properties, rheological behaviors, and thermal conductivities of the nanofluids were also investigated. The results showed that the nanofluids of high-volume fraction had better photothermal properties. Both carbon black powder and nanofluids had good absorption in the whole wavelength ranging from 200 to 2,500 nm. The nanofluids exhibited a shear thinning behavior. The shear viscosity increased with the increasing volume fraction and decreased with the increasing temperature at the same shear rate. The thermal conductivity of carbon black nanofluids increased with the increase of volume fraction and temperature. Carbon black nanofluids had good absorption ability of solar energy and can effectively enhance the solar absorption efficiency.

  13. Thermal properties of carbon black aqueous nanofluids for solar absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dongxiao; Meng, Zhaoguo; Wu, Daxiong; Zhang, Canying; Zhu, Haitao

    2011-07-01

    In this article, carbon black nanofluids were prepared by dispersing the pretreated carbon black powder into distilled water. The size and morphology of the nanoparticles were explored. The photothermal properties, optical properties, rheological behaviors, and thermal conductivities of the nanofluids were also investigated. The results showed that the nanofluids of high-volume fraction had better photothermal properties. Both carbon black powder and nanofluids had good absorption in the whole wavelength ranging from 200 to 2,500 nm. The nanofluids exhibited a shear thinning behavior. The shear viscosity increased with the increasing volume fraction and decreased with the increasing temperature at the same shear rate. The thermal conductivity of carbon black nanofluids increased with the increase of volume fraction and temperature. Carbon black nanofluids had good absorption ability of solar energy and can effectively enhance the solar absorption efficiency.

  14. Prenatal Exposure to Carbon Black (Printex 90)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Petra; Vogel, Ulla; Wallin, Håkan;

    2011-01-01

    Maternal pulmonary exposure to ultrafine particles during pregnancy may affect the health of the child. Developmental toxicity of carbon black (Printex 90) nanoparticles was evaluated in a mouse model. Time-mated mice were intratracheally instilled with Printex 90 dispersed in Millipore water on ...... on gestation days (GD) 7, 10, 15 and 18, with total doses of 11, 54 and 268 mu g Printex 90/animal. The female offspring prenatally exposed to 268 mu g Printex 90/animal displayed altered habituation pattern during the Open field test....

  15. Distribution and Fate of Black Carbon Nanoparticles from Regional Urban Pollution and Wildfire at a Large Subalpine Lake in the Western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisiaux, M. M.; Heyvaert, A. C.; Edwards, R.

    2012-04-01

    Emitted to the atmosphere through fire and fossil fuel combustion, refractory black carbon nanoparticles (rBC) impact human health, climate, atmospheric chemistry, and the carbon cycle. Eventually these particles enter aquatic environments, where their distribution, fate and association with other pollutants are still poorly characterized. This study presents results from an evaluation of rBC in the waters of oligotrophic Lake Tahoe and its watershed in the western United States. The study period included a large wildfire within the Tahoe basin, seasonal snowmelt, and a number of storm events that resulted in pulsed urban runoff into the lake with rBC concentrations up to four orders of magnitude higher than mid-lake concentrations. The results show that elevated rBC concentrations from wildfire and urban runoff were rapidly attenuated in the lake, suggesting unexpected aggregation or degradation of the particles that prevent rBC concentrations from building up in the water of this lake, renowned for its clarity. The rBC concentrations were also measured in sediment cores from Lake Tahoe to evaluate the sediment archive as a potential combustion record. The evidence suggests that rBC is efficiently transferred to these sediments, which preserve a local-to-regional scale history of rBC emissions, as revealed by comparison with other pollutant records in the sediment. Rapid removal of rBC soon after entry into the lake has implications for transport of rBC in the global aquatic environment and flux of rBC from continents to the global ocean.

  16. Human health hazards of persistent inorganic and carbon nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnders, L.

    2012-01-01

    Persistent inorganic and carbon nanoparticles are increasingly engineered for applications and may also be present in conventional materials such as carbon black. Furthermore, they may originate from conventional non particulate materials by processes such as wear and tear. Persistent inorganic and

  17. Admix Compatibility in Carbon Black Loaded Toners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul C. Julien

    2004-01-01

    In a xerographic system where the charge on the toner is controlled by the electrical nature of the carbon black used as a pigment, it is found that the speed with which added toner is charged to the proper level depends on the relative electrical negativity of the carbon black in the original and added toner. This is due to the fact that the incumbent toner typically shares its charge with the new toner through charge exchange among the conductive carbon black particles. If the carbon blacks are electrically dissimilar, this charge sharing may fail.Thus, a toner may work well by itself in a machine, but the same toner may fail when added to a machine already running with a toner from a different vendor or even a different lot of toner from the same vendor. Thus the electrical nature of the carbon black needs to be controlled. This can be done by controlling the oxidation of the carbon black.

  18. Flexible all-solid-state supercapacitors based on graphene/carbon black nanoparticle film electrodes and cross-linked poly(vinyl alcohol)-H2SO4 porous gel electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Haojie; Yang, Chongyang; Bao, Hua; Wang, Gengchao

    2014-11-01

    Flexible all-solid-state supercapacitors (SCs) are fabricated using graphene/carbon black nanoparticle (GCB) film electrodes and cross-linked poly(vinyl alcohol)-H2SO4 porous gel electrolytes (gPVAP-H2SO4). The GCB composite films, with carbon black (CB) nanoparticles uniformly distributed in the graphene nanosheets, greatly improve the active surface areas and ion transportation of pristine graphene film. The porous structure of as-prepared gPVAP-H2SO4 membrane improves the equilibrium swelling ratio in electrolyte and provides interconnected ion transport channels. The chemical crosslinking solves the fluidity problem of PVA-H2SO4 gel electrolyte at high temperature. As-fabricated GCB//gPVAP(20)-H2SO4//GCB flexible SC displays an increased specific capacitance (144.5 F g-1 at 0.5 A g-1) and a higher specific capacitance retention (67.9% from 0.2 to 4 A g-1). More importantly, the flexible SC possesses good electrochemical performance at high temperature (capacitance retention of 78.3% after 1000 cycles at 70 °C).

  19. Black carbon and organic carbon emissions from wildfires in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    XÓCHITL CRUZ NÚÑEZ; LOURDES VILLERS RUIZ; CARLOS GAY GARCÍA

    2014-01-01

    In Mexico, approximately 7650 wildfires occur annually, affecting 263 115 hectares of land. In addition to their impact on land degradation, wildfires cause deforestation, damage to ecosystems and promote land use change; apart from being the source of emissions of toxic substances to the environment (i.e., hydrogen cya - nide, black carbon and organic carbon). Black carbon is a short-lived greenhouse pollutant that also promotes snow and ice melting and decreased rainfall; it has an estimate...

  20. Soil Black Carbon Loss and Sediment Black Carbon Accumulation in a Central Texas Woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieve, E. A.; Hockaday, W. C.; White, J. D.

    2016-12-01

    The Balcones Canyonlands National Wildlife Refuge is located along the eastern edge of the Edwards Plateau in Texas, and was established in 1992 for the purpose of conserving habitat for two endangered bird species. The landscape is composed of hilly, mesa-valley terrain, which is mostly covered by grasslands and woodlands dominated by juniper with intermingling of various oak species. Based on historical photo analysis and tree fire scar dendrochronology, the area has experienced major land use changes over the last century due to wildfire, logging, and drought affecting soil stability and woodland species composition. A previous study on soil black carbon showed that site-specific soil erosion potential and time since last fire may act as controls on soil black carbon concentrations. However, the black carbon transport flux, depositional fate, or the magnitude of soil erosion effects upon the black carbon budget are unconstrained at the watershed scale. To address this, we sampled the sediments accumulating in small ponds constructed during the 1950's for livestock watering. We are quantifying black carbon in sediments using solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Preliminary data suggest that the pond sediments are a black carbon sink. Black carbon comprises 15 % - 25 %, of the sedimentary organic carbon, as substantial enrichment relative to soils within the watershed. We will present an early assessment of the black carbon erosion and sediment accumulation rates in first- and second-order watersheds.

  1. Black carbon in deep-Sea sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiello; Druffel

    1998-06-19

    Black carbon (BC) enters the ocean through aerosol and river deposition. BC makes up 12 to 31 percent of the sedimentary organic carbon (SOC) at two deep ocean sites, and it is 2400 to 13,900 carbon-14 years older than non-BC SOC deposited concurrently. BC is likely older because it is stored in an intermediate reservoir before sedimentary deposition. Possible intermediate pools are oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and terrestrial soils. If DOC is the intermediate reservoir, then BC is 4 to 22 percent of the DOC pool. If soils are the intermediate reservoir, then the importance of riverine carbon in the ocean carbon cycle has been underestimated.

  2. Simulations of phenol adsorption on activated carbon and carbon black

    OpenAIRE

    Prosenjak, Claudia; Valente Nabais, Joao; Laginhas, Carlos; Carrott, Peter; Carrott, Manuela

    2010-01-01

    We use grand canonical Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations to study the adsorption of phenol on carbon materials. Activated carbon is modelled by pore size distributions based on DFT methods; carbon black is represented by a single carbon slab with varying percentages of surface atoms removed. GCMC results for the adsorption from the corresponding gas phase gave reasonable agreement with experimental adsorption results. MD simulations, that studied the influence of the presence of ...

  3. Pyrolytic carbon black composite and method of making the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naskar, Amit K.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Bi, Zhonghe

    2016-09-13

    A method of recovering carbon black includes the step of providing a carbonaceous source material containing carbon black. The carbonaceous source material is contacted with a sulfonation bath to produce a sulfonated material. The sulfonated material is pyrolyzed to produce a carbon black containing product comprising a glassy carbon matrix phase having carbon black dispersed therein. A method of making a battery electrode is also disclosed.

  4. Studies of activated carbon and carbon black for supercapacitor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richner, R.; Mueller, S.; Koetz, R.; Wokaun, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Carbon Black and activated carbon materials providing high surface areas and a distinct pore distribution are prime materials for supercapacitor applications at frequencies < 0.5 Hz. A number of these materials were tested for their specific capacitance, surface and pore size distribution. High capacitance electrodes were manufactured on the laboratory scale with attention to ease of processability. (author) 1 fig., 1 ref.

  5. Black carbon in deep-sea sediments

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) enters the ocean through aerosol and river deposition. BC makes up 12 to 31 percent of the sedimentary organic carbon (SOC) at two deep ocean sites, and it is 2400 to 13,900 carbon-14 years older than non-BC SOC deposited concurrently. BC is likely older because it is stored in an intermediate reservoir before sedimentary deposition. Possible intermediate pools are oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and terrestrial soils. If DOC is the intermediate reservoir, then BC is ...

  6. Imaging carbon nanoparticles and related cytotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, C; Porter, A E; Welland, M [Nanoscience Centre, University of Cambridge, 11 JJ Thompson Ave, Cambridge CB3 OFF (United Kingdom); Muller, K; Skepper, J N [Multi-imaging Centre, Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, Anatomy Building, University of Cambridge, Downing St, Cambridge, CB2 3DY (United Kingdom); Koziol, K; Midgley, P, E-mail: mew10@cam.ac.u [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke St, Cambridge, CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-01

    Carbon-based nanoparticles have attracted significant attention due to their unique physical, chemical, and electrical properties. Numerous studies have been published on carbon nanoparticle toxicity; however, the results remain contradictory. An ideal approach is to combine a cell viability assay with nanometer scale imaging to elucidate the detailed physiological and structural effects of cellular exposure to nanoparticles. We have developed and applied a combination of advanced microscopy techniques to image carbon nanoparticles within cells. Specifically, we have used EFTEM, HAADF-STEM, and tomography and confocal microscopy to generate 3-D images enabling determination of nanoparticle spatial distribution in a cell. With these techniques, we can differentiate between the carbon nanoparticles and the cell in both stained and unstained sections. We found carbon nanoparticles (C{sub 60}, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT)) within the cytoplasm, lysosomes, and nucleus of human monocyte-derived macrophage cells (HMM). C{sub 60} aggregated along the plasma and nuclear membrane while MWNTs and SWNTs were seen penetrating the plasma and nuclear membranes. Both the Neutral Red (NR) assay and ultra-structural analysis showed an increase in cell death after exposure to MWNTs and SWNTs. SWNTs were more toxic than MWNTs. For both MWNTs and SWNTs, we correlated uptake of the nanoparticles with a significant increase in necrosis. In conclusion, high resolution imaging studies provide us with significant insight into the localised interactions between carbon nanoparticles and cells. Viability assays alone only provide a broad toxicological picture of nanoparticle effects on cells whereas the high resolution images associate the spatial distributions of the nanoparticles within the cell with increased incidence of necrosis. This combined approach will enable us to probe the mechanisms of particle uptake and subsequent chemical

  7. Are there "black holes" in carbonate deposystems?

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, V.P.; Cherns, L.

    2009-01-01

    The likelihood that extensive dissolution of aragonite (and high magnesian calcite) takes place during very early burial, even in relatively shallow tropical settings, has wide implications for interpreting and modelling ancient limestones. Some low energy environments may constitute net sinks (“black holes”) for carbonates. If this is the case attempts to model sediment budgets and develop depth-productivity profiles for carbonate systems require as yet unavailable quantitative data on the e...

  8. Worker exposure to ultrafine particles during carbon black treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Mikołajczyk

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the project was to assess the exposure of workers to ultrafine particles released during handling and packing of carbon black. The assessment included the results of the measurements performed in a carbon black handling plant before, during, and after work shift. Material and Methods: The number concentration of particles within the dimension range 10–1000 nm and 10–100 nm was assayed by a condensation particle counter (CPC. The mass concentration of particles was determined by a DustTrak II DRX aerosol concentration monitor. The surface area concentration of the particles potentially deposited in the alveolar (A and tracheo-bronchial (TB regions was estimated by an AeroTrak 9000 nanoparticle monitor. Results: An average mass concentration of particles during the process was 6-fold higher than that before its start, while a 3-fold increase in the average number concentration of particles within the dimension range 10–1000 nm and 10–100 nm was observed during the process. At the same time a 4-fold increase was found in the surface area concentration of the particles potentially deposited in the A and TB regions. Conclusions: During the process of carbon black handling and packing a significantly higher values of each of the analysed parameters, characterizing the exposure to ultrafine particles, were noted. Med Pr 2015;66(3:317–326

  9. Black carbon in aerosol during BIBLE B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liley, J. Ben; Baumgardner, D.; Kondo, Y.; Kita, K.; Blake, D. R.; Koike, M.; Machida, T.; Takegawa, N.; Kawakami, S.; Shirai, T.; Ogawa, T.

    2003-02-01

    The Biomass Burning and Lightning Experiment (BIBLE) A and B campaigns over the tropical western Pacific during springtime deployed a Gulfstream-II aircraft with systems to measure ozone and numerous precursor species. Aerosol measuring systems included a MASP optical particle counter, a condensation nucleus (CN) counter, and an absorption spectrometer for black carbon. Aerosol volume was very low in the middle and upper troposphere during both campaigns, and during BIBLE A, there was little aerosol enhancement in the boundary layer away from urban areas. In BIBLE B, there was marked aerosol enhancement in the lowest 3 km of the atmosphere. Mixing ratios of CN in cloud-free conditions in the upper troposphere were in general higher than in the boundary layer, indicating new particle formation from gaseous precursors. High concentrations of black carbon were observed during BIBLE B, with mass loadings up to 40 μg m-3 representing as much as one quarter of total aerosol mass. Strong correlations with hydrocarbon enhancement allow the determination of a black carbon emission ratio for the fires at that time. Expressed as elemental carbon, it is about 0.5% of carbon dioxide and 6% of carbon monoxide emissions from the same fires, comparable to methane production, and greater than that of other hydrocarbons.

  10. Modified carbon black materials for lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostecki, Robert; Richardson, Thomas; Boesenberg, Ulrike; Pollak, Elad; Lux, Simon

    2016-06-14

    A lithium (Li) ion battery comprising a cathode, a separator, an organic electrolyte, an anode, and a carbon black conductive additive, wherein the carbon black has been heated treated in a CO.sub.2 gas environment at a temperature range of between 875-925 degrees Celsius for a time range of between 50 to 70 minutes to oxidize the carbon black and reduce an electrochemical reactivity of the carbon black towards the organic electrolyte.

  11. Black Carbon, The Pyrogenic Clay Mineral?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most soils contain significant amounts of black carbon, much of which is present as discrete particles admixed with the coarse clay fraction (0.2–2.0 µm e.s.d.) and can be physically separated from the more abundant diffuse biogenic humic materials. Recent evidence has shown that naturally occurring...

  12. Black carbon: The reverse of its dark side

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelmans, A.A.; Jonker, M.T.O.; Cornelissen, G.; Bucheli, T.D.; Noort, van P.C.M.; Gustafsson, O.

    2006-01-01

    The emission of black carbon is known to cause major environmental problems. Black carbon particles contribute to global warming, carry carcinogenic compounds and cause serious health risks. Here, we show another side of the coin. We review evidence that black carbon may strongly reduce the risk pos

  13. Opportunities and Challenges for Being a Carbon Black Great Power

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    1. The "Uth Five-year Plan" Lay- ing the Foundation for Carbon Black Great Power 1.1 Rapid growth of carbon black output and production capacity During the "llth Five-year Plan" Period, China carbon black output was increased by 1.1 times and realized doubling; and the production capacity of carbon black realized an average annu- al growth of 16.9%. In 2011, the carbon black output was 3.853 million tons, increased by 14.2% compared with that of the last year, and the pro- portion of carbon black output in the world carbon black output was increased from 16% to 36%. The carbon black production capacity was 5.345 mil- lion tons, increased by 6% compared with that of the last year, and the proportion of carbon black production capacity in the world carbon black out- put reached 38%. Chinese carbon black output has been ranking the 1st place throughout the world for 6 years successively, and China has become a great power of carbon black production in the world.

  14. A black carbon air quality network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchstetter, T.; Caubel, J.; Cados, T.; Preble, C.; Rosen, A.

    2016-12-01

    We developed a portable, power efficient black carbon sensor for deployment in an air quality network in West Oakland, California. West Oakland is a San Francisco Bay Area residential/industrial community adjacent to regional port and rail yard facilities, and is surrounded by major freeways. As such, the community is affected by diesel particulate matter emissions from heavy-duty diesel trucks, locomotives, and ships associated with freight movement. In partnership with Environmental Defense Fund, the Bay Area Air Quality Management District, and the West Oakland Environmental Indicators Project, we are collaborating with community members to build and operate a 100-sensor black carbon measurement network for a period of several months. The sensor employs the filter-based light transmission method to measure black carbon. Each sensor node in the network transmits data hourly via SMS text messages. Cost, power consumption, and performance are considered in choosing components (e.g., pump) and operating conditions (e.g., sample flow rate). In field evaluation trials over several weeks at three monitoring locations, the sensor nodes provided black carbon concentrations comparable to commercial instruments and ran autonomously for a week before sample filters and rechargeable batteries needed to be replaced. Buildup to the 100-sensor network is taking place during Fall 2016 and will overlap with other ongoing air monitoring projects and monitoring platforms in West Oakland. Sensors will be placed along commercial corridors, adjacent to freeways, upwind of and within the Port, and throughout the residential community. Spatial and temporal black carbon concentration patterns will help characterize pollution sources and demonstrate the value of sensing networks for characterizing intra-urban air pollution concentrations and exposure to air pollution.

  15. Cycling of black carbon in the ocean

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a byproduct of combustion from wildfires and fossil fuels and is a slow-cycling component of the carbon cycle. Whether BC accumulates and ages on millennial timescales in the world oceans has remained unknown. Here, we quantified dissolved BC (DBC) in marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) isolated by solid phase extraction (SPE) at several sites in the world ocean. We find that DBC in the Atlantic, Pacific and Arctic oceans ranges from 1.4 to 2.6 μM in the surface and is ...

  16. Cycling of black carbon in the ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Coppola, Alysha I; Druffel, Ellen R. M.

    2016-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a byproduct of combustion from wildfires and fossil fuels and is a slow-cycling component of the carbon cycle. Whether BC accumulates and ages on millennial timescales in the world oceans has remained unknown. Here, we quantified dissolved BC (DBC) in marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) isolated by solid phase extraction (SPE) at several sites in the world ocean. We find that DBC in the Atlantic, Pacific and Arctic oceans ranges from 1.4 to 2.6 μM in the surface and is ...

  17. Assessment of carbon nanoparticle exposure on murine macrophage function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suro-Maldonado, Raquel M.

    There is growing concern about the potential cytotoxicity of nanoparticles. Exposure to respirable ultrafine particles (2.5uM) can adversely affect human health and have been implicated with episodes of increased respiratory diseases such as asthma and allergies. Nanoparticles are of particular interest because of their ability to penetrate into the lung and potentially elicit health effects triggering immune responses. Nanoparticles are structures and devises with length scales in the 1 to 100-nanometer range. Black carbon (BC) nanoparticles have been observed to be products of combustion, especially flame combustion and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) have been shown to be found in both indoor and outdoor air. Furthermore, asbestos, which have been known to cause mesothelioma as well as lung cancer, have been shown to be structurally identical to MWCNTs. The aims of these studies were to examine the effects of carbon nanoparticles on murine macrophage function and clearance mechanisms. Macrophages are immune cells that function as the first line of defense against invading pathogens and are likely to be amongst the first cells affected by nanoparticles. Our research focused on two manufactured nanoparticles, MWCNT and BC. The two were tested against murine-derived macrophages in a chronic contact model. We hypothesized that long-term chronic exposure to carbon nanoparticles would decrease macrophages ability to effectively respond to immunological challenge. Production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), cell surface macrophage; activation markers, reactive oxygen species formation (ROS), and antigen processing and presentation were examined in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) following a 144hr exposure to the particulates. Data demonstrated an increase in TNF-alpha, and NO production; a decrease in phagocytosis and antigen processing and presentation; and a decrease in the expression levels of cell surface macrophage

  18. Ozone adsorption on carbon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassard, Guillaume; Gosselin, Sylvie; Visez, Nicolas; Petitprez, Denis

    2014-05-01

    Carbonaceous particles produced by incomplete combustion or thermal decomposition of hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. On these particles are adsorbed hundreds of chemical species. Those of great concern to health are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). During atmospheric transport, particulate PAHs react with gaseous oxidants. The induced chemical transformations may change toxicity and hygroscopicity of these potentially inhalable particles. The interaction between ozone and carbon particles has been extensively investigated in literature. However ozone adsorption and surface reaction mechanisms are still ambiguous. Some studies described a fast catalytic decomposition of ozone initiated by an atomic oxygen chemisorption followed by a molecular oxygen release [1-3]. Others suggested a reversible ozone adsorption according to Langmuir-type behaviour [4,5]. The aim of this present study is a better understanding of ozone interaction with carbon surfaces. An aerosol of carbon nanoparticles was generated by flowing synthetic air in a glass tube containing pure carbon (primary particles p. 967-973. [2] Smith, D. and A. Chughtai, Reaction kinetics of ozone at low concentrations with n-hexane soot. Journal of geophysical research, 1996. 101(D14): p. 19607-19,620. [3] Kamm, S., et al., The heterogeneous reaction of ozone with soot aerosol. Atmospheric Environment, 1999. 33(28): p. 4651-4661. [4] Stephens, S., M.J. Rossi, and D.M. Golden, The heterogeneous reaction of ozone on carbonaceous surfaces. International journal of chemical kinetics, 1986. 18(10): p. 1133-1149. [5] Pöschl, U., et al., Interaction of ozone and water vapor with spark discharge soot aerosol particles coated with benzo [a] pyrene: O3 and H2O adsorption, benzo [a] pyrene degradation, and atmospheric implications. The Journal of Physical Chemistry A, 2001. 105(16): p. 4029-4041.

  19. Black carbon measurements using an integrating sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitzenberger, R.; Dusek, U.; Berner, A.

    1996-08-01

    An integrating sphere was used to determine the black carbon (BC) content of aerosol filter samples dissolved in chloroform (method originally described by Heintzenberg [1982]). The specific absorption coefficient Ba (equal to absorption per mass) of the samples was also measured using the sphere as an integrating detector for transmitted light. Comparing the Ba of ambient samples taken in Vienna, Austria, to the BC concentrations measured on the dissolved filters, a value of approximately 6 m2/g was found to be a reasonable value for the Ba of the black carbon found at the site. The size dependence of Ba of a nebulized suspension of soot was measured using a rotating impactor, and a reasonable agreement between measured and calculated values was found.

  20. Discussion on Application of Modified Nano-particle Black Carbon for the Remediation of Soil Heavy Metals Pollution%改性纳米黑碳应用于钝化修复重金属污染土壤中的问题探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    成杰民

    2011-01-01

    通过有关文献资料调研,综述纳米黑碳在钝化修复污染土壤中的应用,分析其应用于钝化修复重金属污染土壤时尚待弄清的几个问题.结果表明:(1)由于纳米黑碳是疏水的非极性吸附剂,选择纳米黑碳作为土壤重金属钝化修复剂时,需对其进行氧化改性,以进一步提高其钝化能力.目前常用的氧化剂为氧化性无机酸、酸性高锰酸钾、双氧水、臭氧等,强烈的氧化过程.会破坏纳米黑碳微孔结构.一定程度上降低其吸附量.(2)为了明确其应用的可能性和适用范围.需揭示改性纳米黑碳对土壤中重金属的钝化机理及其影响因素.土壤CEC、pH、重金属离子的性质等可能是影响改性纳米黑碳对土壤中重金属吸附件能的主要因素.(3)充分利用改性纳米黑碳在土壤修复中的有益作用的同时,还需考虑其可能存在的生态环境负面效应,研究其在土壤中的径流迁移、渗漏等,明确其污染地表水和地下水的可能性,研究其生物效应和将吸附钝化后的纳米黑碳从土壤中移除的可能性,明确其潜在的生态环境风险.%In this paper, application of modified nano-particle black carbon for the remediation of soil heavy metals pollution was summarized and several scientific problems needed to be discussed. Firstly, nano-particle black carbon, as a nonpolar and hydrophobic sorbent, needs to be modified with oxidizing agents to improve its absorption characteristic of heavy metals. Oxidizing agents most in use were inorganic oxyacids, KMnO4, H202 or 03. The microporous surface structure of nano-particle black carbon could be damaged in intense oxidation reaction and the adsorption capacity of heavy metals could be decreased. Secondly, absorption mechanism and influence factors should be illuminated to verify the feasibility and scope of application of modified nano-particle black carbon for the remediation of soil heavy metals pollution. The soil pH, CE

  1. Black Carbon Contribution to Organic Carbon Stocks in Urban Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edmondson, Jill L.; Stott, Iain; Potter, Jonathan;

    2015-01-01

    Soil holds 75% of the total organic carbon (TOC) stock in terrestrial ecosystems. This comprises ecosystem-derived organic carbon (OC) and black carbon (BC), a recalcitrant product of the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and biomass. Urban topsoils are often enriched in BC from historical...... increased with soil depth, and was enriched in topsoil under trees when compared to grassland. Our findings establish the importance of urban ecosystems in storing large amounts of OC in soils and that these soils also capture a large proportion of BC particulates emitted within urban areas....

  2. Fe-inserted and shell-shaped carbon nanoparticles by cluster-mediated laser pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleaca, C.T., E-mail: claudiufleaca@yahoo.com [Laser Photochemistry Laboratory, National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics (NILPRP), P.O. Box MG 36, R-077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Dumitrache, F.; Morjan, I.; Alexandrescu, R.; Sandu, I.; Luculescu, C.; Birjega, S. [Laser Photochemistry Laboratory, National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics (NILPRP), P.O. Box MG 36, R-077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Prodan, G. [Ovidius University of Constanta, 124 Mamaia Bd., Constanta (Romania); Stamatin, I. [3 Nano-SAE Research Center, University of Bucharest, P.O. Box MG-38, R-077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Iron-inserted carbon nanoparticles were obtained by laser pyrolysis technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two different structures (shell-shape and turbostratic) were found in the same experiment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing the pressure causes the increasing in carbon crystallinity/decreasing the Fe content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Iron nanoinclusions are protected from oxidation by the carbon matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetism-related applications of these nanoparticles in life sciences are proposed. - Abstract: We report here the high-yield continuous synthesis of carbon nanoparticles with and without Fe content by laser pyrolysis technique. The laser beam decomposes (via C{sub 2}H{sub 4} sensitizer) the Fe(CO){sub 5} as Fe clusters which absorb themselves the laser radiation. They trigger the fast carbon particles formation by exothermic dehydrogenation/polymerization of the surrounded C{sub 2}H{sub 2} molecules. This combination between Fe clusters and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} generates nanoparticles with unusual structure. Depending on the gas pressure in the reaction chamber, two kinds of nanoparticles were obtained: at lower pressure, 30-40 nm diameter particles with a defective structure, part of them crowded with Fe clusters (3-6 nm) and two types of nanoparticles (around 50-60 nm) at the highest pressure. Some of them have a shell-shape structure, presenting a distinct envelope, other with a turbostratic arrangement, and few containing one or several smaller (3-20 nm) Fe nanoparticles trapped inside. We consider that these particular structures of our nanoparticles may be useful in applications such as MRI applications, drug delivery or catalysts.

  3. Black carbon network in Mexico. First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Valter; Peralta, Oscar; Granado, Karen; Ortinez, Abraham; Alvarez-Ospina, Harry; Espinoza, Maria de la Luz; Castro, Telma

    2017-04-01

    After the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change celebrated in Paris 2016, many countries should adopt some mechanisms in the next years to contribute to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and support sustainable development. Mexico Government has adopted an unconditional international commitment to carry out mitigation actions that would result in the reduction of 51% in black carbon (BC) emissions by year 2030. However, many BC emissions have been calculated by factor emissions. Since optical measurements of environmental BC concentrations can vary according the different components and their subsequence wavelength measure, it's important to obtain more accurate values. BC is formally defined as an ideally light-absorbing substance composed by carbon (Bond et al., 2013), and is the second main contributor (behind Carbon Dioxide; CO2) to positive radiative forcing (Ramanathan and Carmichael, 2008). Recently, BC has been used as an additional indicator in air quality management in some cities because is emitted from the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels, biofuel and biomass burning in both anthropogenic and it is always emitted with other particles and gases, such as organic carbon (OC), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and sulfur dioxide (SO2). Black Carbon, PM2.5 and pollutant gases were measured from January 2015 to December 2015 at three main cities in Mexico, and two other places to evaluate the BC concentration levels in the country. The urban background sites (Mexico City, Monterrey, Guadalajara, MXC-UB, GDL-UB, MTY-UB), a sub-urban background site (Juriquilla, Queretaro, JUR-SUB) and a regional background site (Altzomoni, ALT-RB). Results showed the relationship between BC and PM2.5 in the 3 large cities, with BC/PM2.5 ratios near 0.14 to 0.09 and a high BC-CO relationship in all the year in Mexico City, who showed that mobile sources are a common, at least in cities with a non-significant biomass burning emission related to agriculture or coal

  4. The role of caveolin-1 for carbon black nanoparticles uptake in vitro%Caveolin-1在超微细炭黑颗粒入胞途径中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余珉; 陈日萍; 贾振宇; 陈钧强; 蒋兆强; 冯玲芳; 张幸

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the protein expression of caveolin-1 in type Ⅱ alveolar epithelial cells (A549) exposed to carbon black nanoparticles (CB NPs) and the role of caveolin in the endocytosis of CB NPs.Methods A549 cells were exposed to 0,25,50,100,200,and 400 μg/ml CB NPs for 24 h; then,trypan blue assay was applied to determine the cell viability.A549 cells were also exposed to 0,25,50,and 100 μg/ml CB NPs for 24 h,then,transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and flow cytometry were applied to observe the morphological change of cells and cellular side scatter (SSC),and Western blot was used to analyze the effect of CB NPs on the protein expression of caveolin-1.A549 cells were co-exposed to 1 μg/ml filipin and 100 μg/ml CB NPs for 24 h,then,the cellular SSC was observed.Results Compared with controls,the A549 ceils exposed to 200 and 400 μg/ml CB NPs had the cell viability decreased by 38.2% and 46.6%,respectively (P<0.05),while those exposed to 25,50,and 100 μg/ml CB NPs showed no significant decrease in cell vitality (P>0.05).The protein expression of caveolin-1 was significantly higher in the cells exposed to 50 and 100 μg/ml CB NPs than in controls (P<0.05).The TEM showed that plasmalemmal vesicles containing black particles were found in the cytoplasm of the cells exposed to 50 and 100 μg/ml CB NPs.The flow cytometry showed that the cellular SSC ratio increased from 1.007 to 1.331 as the dose of CB NPs rose within 0~100 μg/ml and fell to 1.25 after the cells were co-exposed to 1 μg/ml filipin and 100 μg/ml CB NPs.Conclusion Carbon black nanoparticles can be transferred into A549 cells by endocytosis,but caveolin-mediated endocytic pathway plays a minor role in this process.%目的 探讨超微细炭黑颗粒(Carbon black nanoparticles,CB NPs)对肺泡Ⅱ型上皮细胞(A549)Caveolin-1蛋白的表达的影响及其在入胞过程中的作用.方法 A549细胞接受0、25、50、100、200、400 μg/ml CB NPs染毒24h,

  5. Black Carbon Measurement and Modeling in the Arabian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawad, Faisal Al; Khoder, Mamdouh; Almazroui, Mansour; Alghamdi, Mansour; Lihavainen, Heikki; Hyvarinen, Antti; Henriksson, Svante

    2017-04-01

    Black carbon is an important atmospheric aerosol as an effective factor in public health, changing the global and regional climate, and reducing visibility. Black carbon absorbs light, warms the atmosphere, and modifies cloud droplets and the amount of precipitation. In spite of this significance, knowledge of black carbon over the Arabian Peninsula is hard to find in literature until recently. The total mass of black carbon and wind direction and speeds were measured continuously at Hada Al-Sham, Saudi Arabia for the year 2013. In addition, a state of the art global aerosol - climate model (ECHAM5-HAM) was used to determine black carbon climatology over the Arabian Peninsula. Simulation of the model was carried out for the years eight years (2004 - 2011). The daily mean values of the concentrations of black carbon had a minimum of 15.0 ng/m3 and a maximum of 6372 ng/m3 with a mean of at 1899 ng/m3. The diurnal pattern of black carbon showed higher values overnight, and steady low values during daytimes caused by sea and land breezes. Seasons of black carbon vary over the Arabian Peninsula, and the longest is in the Northern Region where it lasts from July to October. High concentrations of black carbon at Hada Al-Sham was observed with a mean of 1.9 µm/m3, and seasons of black carbon vary widely across the Arabian Peninsula. Assessment of the effects of black carbon over the Arabian Peninsula on the global radiation balance. Initiating a black carbon monitoring network is highly recommended to assess its impacts on health, environment, and climate.

  6. CCN activation of pure and coated carbon black particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusek, U; Reischl, G P; Hitzenberger, R

    2006-02-15

    The CCN (cloud condensation nucleus) activation of pure and coated carbon black particles was investigated using the University of Vienna cloud condensation nuclei counter (Giebl, H.; Berner, A.; Reischl, G.; Puxbaum, H.; Kasper-Giebl, A.; Hitzenberger, R. J. Aerosol Sci. 2002, 33, 1623-1634). The particles were produced by nebulizing an aqueous suspension of carbon black in a Collison atomizer. The activation of pure carbon black particles was found to require higher supersaturations than predicted by calculations representing the particles as insoluble, wettable spheres with mobility equivalent diameter. To test whether this effect is an artifact due to heating of the light-absorbing carbon black particles in the laser beam, experiments at different laser powers were conducted. No systematic dependence of the activation of pure carbon black particles on laser power was observed. The observations could be modeled using spherical particles and an effective contact angle of 4-6 degrees of water at their surface. The addition of a small amount of NaCl to the carbon black particles (by adding 5% by mass NaCl to the carbon black suspension) greatly enhanced their CCN efficiency. The measured CCN efficiencies were consistent with Kohler theory for particles consisting of insoluble and hygroscopic material. However, coating the carbon black particles with hexadecanol (a typical film-forming compound with one hydrophobic and one hydrophilic end) efficiently suppressed the CCN activation of the carbon black particles.

  7. Supply Deficit of Feedstock Oils for Carbon Black

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Bingyan

    2007-01-01

    @@ Feedstock oils used for carbon blackproduction mainly include ethylene tar,anthracene oil and coal tar. With thegrowing output of carbon black in re-cent years, demand for feedstock oilshas increased constantly.

  8. Surface analysis of carbon black waste materials from tire residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W. H.; Kim, J. Y.; Ko, Y. K.; Reucroft, P. J.; Zondlo, J. W.

    1999-03-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to obtain surface chemical state information on two carbon black waste materials in terms of the surface element distribution/concentration and chemical structure. Small amounts of sulfur in the form of CS 2 were detected on the surface (less than 1.7 mass %). C-H/C-C was the major carbon functional component on the surface of carbon black samples but other functional forms of carbon were also present such as CO and C-O. The surface of the carbon black obtained from a hydropyrolysis process was highly oxidized primarily in the form of carbon based oxygen groups. On the other hand, surface oxygen atoms on the surface of the carbon black obtained from a pyrolysis process in the absence of H 2 were in the form of both metal oxides and carbon based oxygen groups.

  9. Optimization of multicomponent aqueous suspensions of lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) nanoparticles and carbon black for lithium-ion battery cathodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianlin; Armstrong, Beth L; Daniel, Claus; Kiggans, Jim; Wood, David L

    2013-09-01

    Addition of polyethyleneimine (PEI) to aqueous LiFePO4 nanoparticle suspensions improves stability and reduces agglomerate size, which is beneficial to lithium-ion battery cathode manufacturing. This research examines the effect of both PEI concentration and molecular weight (MW) on dispersing LiFePO4 and Super P C45 in multicomponent aqueous suspensions. It is demonstrated that the optimal conditions for obtaining stable suspensions with minimal agglomerate size are 1.5 wt% PEI with MW=2000 g mol(-1) and 5.0 wt% PEI with MW=10,000 g mol(-1) for LiFePO4 and Super P C45, respectively. The mixing sequence also affects rheological properties of these suspensions. It is found that dispersing the LiFePO4 and Super P C45 separately yielded suspensions with superior properties (Newtonian rheological behavior, smaller agglomerate size, improved settling, etc.). In particular, dispersing the LiFePO4 prior to the Super P C45 when making the final multicomponent suspension is found to be beneficial, which was evidenced by higher half-cell discharge capacity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Antimicrobial Activity of Carbon-Based Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solmaz Maleki Dizaj

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the vast and inappropriate use of the antibiotics, microorganisms have begun to develop resistance to the commonly used antimicrobial agents. So therefore, development of the new and effective antimicrobial agents seems to be necessary. According to some recent reports, carbon-based nanomaterials such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes (CNTs (especially single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and graphene oxide (GO nanoparticles show potent antimicrobial properties. In present review, we have briefly summarized the antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanoparticles together with their mechanism of action. Reviewed literature show that the size of carbon nanoparticles plays an important role in the inactivation of the microorganisms. As major mechanism, direct contact of microorganisms with carbon nanostructures seriously affects their cellular membrane integrity, metabolic processes and morphology. The antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanostructures may interestingly be investigated in the near future owing to their high surface/volume ratio, large inner volume and other unique chemical and physical properties. In addition, application of functionalized carbon nanomaterials as carriers for the ordinary antibiotics possibly will decrease the associated resistance, enhance their bioavailability and provide their targeted delivery.

  11. Design and synthesis of palladium/graphitic carbon nitride/carbon black hybrids as high-performance catalysts for formic acid and methanol electrooxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Huayu; Huang, Huajie; Wang, Xin

    2015-02-01

    Here we report a facile two-step method to synthesize high-performance palladium/graphitic carbon nitride/carbon black (Pd/g-C3N4/carbon black) hybrids for electrooxidizing formic acid and methanol. The coating of g-C3N4 on carbon black surface is realized by a low-temperature heating treatment, followed by the uniform deposition of palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) via a wet chemistry route. Owning to the significant synergistic effects of the individual components, the preferred Pd/g-C3N4/carbon black electrocatalyst exhibits exceptional forward peak current densities as high as 2155 and 1720 mA mg-1Pd for formic acid oxidation in acid media and methanol oxidation in alkaline media, respectively, far outperforming the commercial Pd-C catalyst. The catalyst also shows reliable stability, demonstrating that the newly-designed hybrids have great promise in constructing high-performance portable fuel cell systems.

  12. Solvothermal synthesis of green-fluorescent carbon nanoparticles and their application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Hongyan; Mi Congcong; Huang Huaiqing; Han Baofu; Li Jing [Chemistry department, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Xu Shukun, E-mail: xushukun46@126.com [Chemistry department, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2012-06-15

    A novel solvothermal approach to synthesize green-fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) was developed using L-ascorbic acid as the carbon source, glycol and triple distilled water as the solvent. The CNPs emit strong green fluorescence under UV irradiation, and the fluorescence intensity showed a good linear relationship with pH value within a certain range. Direct yeast cell labeling was achieved through cell endocytosis of these CNPs. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A one-step approach to synthesize fluorescent carbon nanoparticles was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A linear relationship between fluorescence intensity and pH value was observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct labeling of yeast cells was realized successfully with the CNPs.

  13. Effect of sterilization on mineralization of straw and black carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bobul'ská, Lenka; Bruun, Sander; Fazekašová, Danica

    2013-01-01

    The study was aimed at investigating the role of microorganisms in the degradation of BC (black carbon). CO evolution was measured under sterilized and non-sterilized soil using BC and straw amendments. Black carbon and straw were produced from homogenously C labelled roots of barley (Hordeum vul...... abiotic source must also be present perhaps abiotic mineralization of labile BC components....

  14. Cycling of black carbon in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Alysha I.; Druffel, Ellen R. M.

    2016-05-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a by-product of combustion from wildfires and fossil fuels and is a slow-cycling component of the carbon cycle. Whether BC accumulates and ages on millennial time scales in the world oceans has remained unknown. Here we quantified dissolved BC (DBC) in marine dissolved organic carbon isolated by solid phase extraction at several sites in the world ocean. We find that DBC in the Atlantic, Pacific, and Arctic oceans ranges from 1.4 to 2.6 μM in the surface and is 1.2 ± 0.1 μM in the deep Atlantic. The average 14C age of surface DBC is 4800 ± 620 14C years and much older in a deep water sample (23,000 ± 3000 14C years). The range of DBC structures and 14C ages indicates that DBC is not homogeneous in the ocean. We show that there are at least two distinct pools of marine DBC, a younger pool that cycles on centennial time scales and an ancient pool that cycles on >105 year time scales.

  15. Geolocating Russian sources for Arctic black carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Meng-Dawn

    2014-08-01

    To design and implement an effective emission control strategy for black carbon (BC), the locations and strength of BC sources must be identified. Lack of accurate source information from the Russian Federation has created difficulty for a range of research and policy activities in the Arctic because Russia occupies the largest landmass in the Arctic Circle. A project was initiated to resolve emission sources of BC in the Russian Federation by using the Potential Source Contribution Function (PSCF). It used atmospheric BC data from two Arctic sampling stations at Alert Nunavut, Canada, and Tiksi Bay, Russia. The geographical regions of BC emission sources in Russia were identified and summarized as follows: (1) a region surrounding Moscow, (2) regions in Eurasia stretching along the Ural Mountains from the White Sea to the Black Sea, and (3) a number of scattered areas from western Siberia to the Russian Far East. Particulate potassium ions, non-marine sulfate, and vanadium were used to assist in resolving the source types: forest fire/biomass burning, coal-fired power plant, and oil combustion. Correlating these maps with the BC map helped to resolve source regions of BC emissions and connect them to their corresponding source types. The results imply that a region south of Moscow and another north of the Ural Mountains could be significant BC sources, but none of the grid cells in these regions could be linked to forest fires, oil combustion, or coal-fired power plants based on these three markers.

  16. Attachment of Gold Nanoparticles to Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Cheng MA; Ning LUN; Shu Lin WEN

    2005-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes were initially chemically modified with an H2SO4-HNO3 treatment,and subsequently activated with Pd-Sn catalytic nuclei via a one-step activation approach. These activated nanotubes were used as precursors for obtaining gold nanoparticles-attached nanotubes via simple electroless plating. This approach provides an efficient method for attachment of metal nanostructures to carbon nanotubes. Such novel hybrid nanostructures are attractive for many applications.

  17. Estimation and prediction of black carbon emissions in Beijing City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yuan; SHAO Min

    2007-01-01

    Black carbon is a by-product of incomplete combustion of carbon containing fuels. It can alter atmospheric radiation property and make adverse impacts on human health. The energy consumption in Beijing City depends largely on coal burning. Recently, Beijing City has been performing the municipal energy structure adjustment as a tool for air pollution abatement, aiming at the air quality goal for the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games. Based on Beijing energy use data in 2000, combined with emission factors of major sources of black carbon, the emission of black carbon in Beijing City is estimated to be 7.77 Gg. Coke, raw coal and biomass as non-commercial energy are the main contributors to municipal black carbon emissions. Based on Beijing energy planning in the year 2008, the emission of black carbon in 2008 will be 2.97 Gg if the contribution from biomass is not taken into account. Assuming that the black carbon emission from rural biomass in 2008 is the same as that in 2004, the biomass burning will be the largest emitter of black carbon to Beijing City in 2008.

  18. Preparation and application of active gangue's carbon black

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiang-lin; ZHANG Yi-dong

    2007-01-01

    After three-stage pulverization, dry-distillated activation and coupling agent surface modification, the kaolinite-typed gangue of Sichuan Hongni Coal Mine(SHCM) can be manufactured into activated gangue's carbon black. Its surface area is >25 m2/g, and possesses carbon black's carbon framework and structure. It can be used as strengthening agent of high polymer material such as rubber.

  19. Addressing inconsistencies in black carbon literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shonkoff, S. B.; Chafe, Z.; Smith, K. R.

    2010-12-01

    The literature describing black carbon (BC) emissions, and their effect on Earth’s climate, is growing rapidly. Unfortunately, inconsistencies in definitions; data collection and characterization; system boundaries; and time horizons have led to confusion about the relative importance of BC compared to other climate-active pollutant (CAPs). We discuss three sources of confusion: 1) Currently available BC inventories are not directly comparable to those used by the IPCC to track the greenhouse gases (GHGs) considered in the Kyoto Protocol (CO2, CH4, N2O). In particular, BC inventories often include all emissions: natural and anthropogenic in origin, controllable and non-controllable. IPCC inventories include only anthropogenic emissions. This BC accounting is appropriate for atmospheric science deliberations, but risks being interpreted as an overstatement against official Kyoto GHG inventories in a policy or control context. The IPCC convention of using 1750 as the starting year for emission inventories further complicates matters: significant BC emissions were emitted previous to that date by both human and natural sources. Though none of the pre-1750 BC emissions remain in the atmosphere today, their legacy presents challenges in assigning historical responsibility for associated global warming among sectors and regional populations. 2) Inconsistencies exist in the specific emissions sources considered in atmospheric models used to predict net BC forcing often lead to widely varying climate forcing estimates. For example, while some analyses consider only fossil fuel 1, others include both open biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion 2, and yet others include sources beyond biomass and fossil fuel burning 3. 3) Inconsistencies exist in how analyses incorporate the relationship between BC emissions and the associated cooling aerosols and processes, such as organic carbon (OC), and aerosol indirect effects (AIE). Unlike Kyoto GHGs, BC is rarely emitted in pure

  20. Carbon solubility in nickel nanoparticles: A grand canonical Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diarra, Mamadou [Centre Interdisciplinaire de Nanoscience de Marseille, CNRS and Aix Marseille University, Campus de Luminy, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France); Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures, ONERA-CNRS, BP 72, 92322 Chatillon Cedex (France); Amara, Hakim; Ducastelle, Francois [Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures, ONERA-CNRS, BP 72, 92322 Chatillon Cedex (France); Bichara, Christophe [Centre Interdisciplinaire de Nanoscience de Marseille, CNRS and Aix Marseille University, Campus de Luminy, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France)

    2012-12-15

    Producing single-wall carbon nanotubes with a given structure, in terms of diameter and chirality, is still a difficult issue. In this context, understanding the physical and chemical properties of the catalyst nanoparticle during the chemical vapor deposition synthesis is fundamental. By using tight-binding calculations at atomic scale, we show that carbon solubility is larger for smaller nanoparticles (NPs), with solubility limits depending on the size, but also on the physical state (solid, partially molten liquid) of the catalyst. Moreover, optimal thermodynamic conditions have been found to nucleate carbon cap after saturation of the metal catalyst with carbon atoms. Density profiles along the radius of the nanoparticle calculated at 1000 K (black: C, orange: Ni). The inset presents the structure of C-rich NPs with a crystalline core surrounded by a molten layer. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Black Carbon Contribution to Organic Carbon Stocks in Urban Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Jill L; Stott, Iain; Potter, Jonathan; Lopez-Capel, Elisa; Manning, David A C; Gaston, Kevin J; Leake, Jonathan R

    2015-07-21

    Soil holds 75% of the total organic carbon (TOC) stock in terrestrial ecosystems. This comprises ecosystem-derived organic carbon (OC) and black carbon (BC), a recalcitrant product of the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and biomass. Urban topsoils are often enriched in BC from historical emissions of soot and have high TOC concentrations, but the contribution of BC to TOC throughout the urban soil profile, at a regional scale is unknown. We sampled 55 urban soil profiles across the North East of England, a region with a history of coal burning and heavy industry. Through combined elemental and thermogravimetic analyses, we found very large total soil OC stocks (31-65 kg m(-2) to 1 m), exceeding typical values reported for UK woodland soils. BC contributed 28-39% of the TOC stocks, up to 23 kg C m(-2) to 1 m, and was affected by soil texture. The proportional contribution of the BC-rich fraction to TOC increased with soil depth, and was enriched in topsoil under trees when compared to grassland. Our findings establish the importance of urban ecosystems in storing large amounts of OC in soils and that these soils also capture a large proportion of BC particulates emitted within urban areas.

  2. Temperature driven transport of gold nanoparticles physisorbed inside carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoen, P.A.E.; Poulikakos, D.; Walther, Jens Honore

    2006-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to demonstrate the temperature driven mass transport of solid gold nanoparticles, physisorbed inside carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Our results indicate that the nanoparticle experiences a guided motion, in the direction opposite to the direction of the temperature...... affects the nanoparticle motion along the carbon lattice....

  3. Source attribution of black carbon in Arctic snow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegg, Dean A; Warren, Stephen G; Grenfell, Thomas C; Doherty, Sarah J; Larson, Timothy V; Clarke, Antony D

    2009-06-01

    Snow samples obtained at 36 sites in Alaska, Canada, Greenland, Russia, and the Arctic Ocean in early 2007 were analyzed for light-absorbing aerosol concentration together with a suite of associated chemical species. The light absorption data, interpreted as black carbon concentrations, and other chemical data were input into the EPA PMF 1.1 receptor model to explore the sources for black carbon in the snow. The analysis found four factors or sources: two distinct biomass burning sources, a pollution source, and a marine source. The first three of these were responsible for essentially all of the black carbon, with the two biomass sources (encompassing both open and closed combustion) together accounting for >90% of the black carbon.

  4. The uptake of ethyl iodide on black carbon surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Shi; WANG WeiGang; GE MaoFa

    2008-01-01

    The importance of the iodine chemistry in the atmosphere has been demonstrated by recent observations. The uptake of ethyl iodine on black carbon surface was investigated at 298 K for the first time. Degussa FW2 (an amorphous black carbon comprising medium oxides) was used as black carbon sample. Black carbon surface was found to be deactivated in reaction with C2H5I, and the uptake coefficient (γ) was dependent on the time of exposure. The value of (2.3±0.9)×10-2 was determined for the initial uptake coefficient (γ0). The result suggests that the heterogeneous loss of C2H5I on carbonaceous aerosols may be important under the atmospheric conditions.

  5. Global civil aviation black carbon emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stettler, Marc E J; Boies, Adam M; Petzold, Andreas; Barrett, Steven R H

    2013-09-17

    Aircraft black carbon (BC) emissions contribute to climate forcing, but few estimates of BC emitted by aircraft at cruise exist. For the majority of aircraft engines the only BC-related measurement available is smoke number (SN)-a filter based optical method designed to measure near-ground plume visibility, not mass. While the first order approximation (FOA3) technique has been developed to estimate BC mass emissions normalized by fuel burn [EI(BC)] from SN, it is shown that it underestimates EI(BC) by >90% in 35% of directly measured cases (R(2) = -0.10). As there are no plans to measure BC emissions from all existing certified engines-which will be in service for several decades-it is necessary to estimate EI(BC) for existing aircraft on the ground and at cruise. An alternative method, called FOX, that is independent of the SN is developed to estimate BC emissions. Estimates of EI(BC) at ground level are significantly improved (R(2) = 0.68), whereas estimates at cruise are within 30% of measurements. Implementing this approach for global civil aviation estimated aircraft BC emissions are revised upward by a factor of ~3. Direct radiative forcing (RF) due to aviation BC emissions is estimated to be ~9.5 mW/m(2), equivalent to ~1/3 of the current RF due to aviation CO2 emissions.

  6. Comparative DEMS study on the electrochemical oxidation of carbon blacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashton, Sean James; Arenz, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    heat-treated between 2100 and 3200 °C, such as those typically used as corrosion resistant carbon (CRC) supports for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) catalysts. A methodology combining cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS) is used, which allows...... the characterisation and comparison of the complete electrochemical oxidation rates and behaviours of the various carbon blacks. It is observed that the behaviour of the carbon black towards electrochemical oxidation is highly dynamic, and dependent on the properties of the pristine carbon back, the degree...

  7. Effects of Surface-modification of Carbon Black on the Characteristics of Polymerized Toner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Ho; Kim, Dae Su [Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Carbon black was surface-modified to prepare styrene-based suspension polymerized toner with excellent carbon black dispersibility inside toner particles. Carbon black was oxidized first to introduce hydroxyl groups on the surfaces, then esterification between the hydroxyl groups and carboxyl groups of organic acids (oleic acid, palmitic acid, acrylic acid) was followed to obtain organically surface-modified carbon black. The surface-modification of carbon black was confirmed by FTIR. Apparent carbon black dispersibility in the monomer mixture of the binder resin was tested and the particle size of dispersed carbon black was measured by particle size analyzer. Optical micrographs showed that carbon black dispersibility inside toner particles was improved considerably when the carbon black surface-modified with oleic acid was used. The polymerized toner prepared with the carbon black surface-modified with oleic acid showed ideal particle size and size distribution as a toner.

  8. Epoxy based photoresist/carbon nanoparticle composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillemose, Michael; Gammelgaard, Lauge; Richter, Jacob;

    2008-01-01

    We have fabricated composites of SU-8 polymer and three different types of carbon nanoparticles (NPs) using ultrasonic mixing. Structures of composite thin films have been patterned on a characterization chip with standard UV photolithography. Using a four-point bending probe, a well defined stress...... is applied to the composite thin film and we have demonstrated that the composites are piezoresistive. Stable gauge factors of 5-9 have been measured, but we have also observed piezoresistive responses with gauge factors as high as 50. As SU-8 is much softer than silicon and the gauge factor of the composite...... material is relatively high, carbon nanoparticle doped SU-8 is a valid candidate for the piezoresistive readout in polymer based cantilever sensors, with potentially higher sensitivity than silicon based cantilevers....

  9. Black carbon radiative forcing at TOA decreased during aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu; Cheng, Tianhai; Zheng, Lijuan; Chen, Hao

    2016-12-01

    During aging processing, black carbon (also called soot) particles may tend to be mixed with other aerosols, and highly influence their radiative forcing. In this study, freshly emitted soot particles were simulated as fractal aggregates composed of small spherical primary monomers. After aging in the atmosphere, soot monomers were coated by a thinly layer of sulfate as thinly coated soot particles. These soot particles were entirely embedded into large sulfate particle by further aging, and becoming heavily coated soot particles. In clear-sky conditions, black carbon radiative forcing with different aging states were investigated for the bottom and top of atmosphere (BOA and TOA). The simulations showed that black carbon radiative forcing increased at BOA and decreased at TOA after their aging processes. Thinly and heavily coated states increased up to ~12% and ~35% black carbon radiative forcing at BOA, and black carbon radiative forcing at TOA can reach to ~20% and ~100% smaller for thinly and heavily coated states than those of freshly emitted states, respectively. The effect of aging states of black carbon radiative forcing was varied with surface albedo, aerosol optical depth and solar zenith angles. These findings would be helpful for the assessments of climate change.

  10. Nanoparticle tracers in calcium carbonate porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yan Vivian

    2014-07-15

    Tracers are perhaps the most direct way of diagnosing subsurface fluid flow pathways for ground water decontamination and for natural gas and oil production. Nanoparticle tracers could be particularly effective because they do not diffuse away from the fractures or channels where flow occurs and thus take much less time to travel between two points. In combination with a chemical tracer they can measure the degree of flow concentration. A prerequisite for tracer applications is that the particles are not retained in the porous media as the result of aggregation or sticking to mineral surfaces. By screening eight nanoparticles (3-100 nm in diameter) for retention when passed through calcium carbonate packed laboratory columns in artificial oil field brine solutions of variable ionic strength we show that the nanoparticles with the least retention are 3 nm in diameter, nearly uncharged, and decorated with highly hydrophilic polymeric ligands. The details of these column experiments and the tri-modal distribution of zeta potential of the calcite sand particles in the brine used in our tests suggests that parts of the calcite surface have positive zeta potential and the retention of negatively charged nanoparticles occurs at these sites. Only neutral nanoparticles are immune to at least some retention. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media.

  11. Synthesis of multiwalled carbon nanotube from different grades of carbon black using arc discharge method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, Neha, E-mail: n4neha31@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani (India); Sharma, N. N. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani (India); Director, School of Automobile, Mechanical & Mechatronics, Manipal University,Jaipur,India (India)

    2016-04-13

    This paper describes the synthesis of nanotube from different grades (Tread * A(non-ASTM), N134,N121,N660 and N330)of carbon black using DC arc discharge method at 40A current for 60sec. Carbon black samples of different grades were procured from industry (Aditya Birla Science and Technology Limited, India). Scanning Electron Micrographs (SEM) of the deposited carbon nanostructures suggests that MWCNTs are formed at 40A and for a minimal exposure time of 60sec.The result formed indicates the N330 grade of carbon black gets converted to MWCNTs (Multiwall Carbon nanotube) as compared to other grades.

  12. Adsorption of Remazol Black B dye on Activated Carbon Felt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donnaperna Lucio

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of Remazol Black B (anionic dye on a microporous activated carbon felt is investigated from its aqueous solution. The surface chemistry of activated carbon is studied using X-ray microanalysis, "Boehm" titrations and pH of PZC measurements which indicates that the surface oxygenated groups are mainly acidic in nature. The kinetics of Remazol Black B adsorption is observed to be pH dependent and governed by the diffusion of the dye molecules. The experimental data can be explained by "intra-particle diffusion model". For Remazol Black B, the Khan model is best suited to simulate the adsorption isotherms.

  13. Phonon assisted thermophoretic motion of gold nanoparticles inside carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoen, Philipp A. E.; Walther, Jens H.; Poulikakos, Dimos; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2007-06-01

    The authors investigate the thermally driven mass transport of gold nanoparticles confined inside carbon nanotubes using molecular dynamics simulations. The observed thermophoretic motion of the gold nanoparticles correlates with the phonon dispersion exhibited by a standard carbon nanotube and, in particular, with the breathing mode of the tube. Additionally, the results show an increased static friction for gold nanoparticles confines inside a zig-zag carbon nanotube when increasing the size (length) of the nanoparticles. However, an unexpected, opposite trend is observed for the same nanoparticles inside armchair tubes.

  14. Phonon assisted thermophoretic motion of gold nanoparticles inside carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoen, Philipp A.E.; Walther, Jens Honore; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2007-01-01

    The authors investigate the thermally driven mass transport of gold nanoparticles confined inside carbon nanotubes using molecular dynamics simulations. The observed thermophoretic motion of the gold nanoparticles correlates with the phonon dispersion exhibited by a standard carbon nanotube and......, in particular, with the breathing mode of the tube. Additionally, the results show an increased static friction for gold nanoparticles confines inside a zig-zag carbon nanotube when increasing the size length of the nanoparticles. However, an unexpected, opposite trend is observed for the same nanoparticles...

  15. Artificial black opal fabricated from nanoporous carbon spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yuri; Ishii, Masahiko; Nakamura, Tadashi; Yano, Kazuhisa

    2010-06-15

    A nanocasting method via chemical vapor deposition of acetonitrile was successfully employed to fabricate porous carbon colloidal crystal using colloidal crystal from monodispersed mesoporous silica spheres (MMSS) as a sacrificial scaffold. The mesostructure as well as periodic arrays within (111) plane of MMSS were replicated for the carbon colloidal crystal (black opal) with the length scale in the centimeter range. Brilliant iridescent colors were clearly observed for the first time on the black carbon colloidal crystal fabricated from porous carbon spheres, and they changed dramatically in accordance with the observation angle, like natural black opals. Reflection spectra measurements based on 2D surface diffraction and Bragg diffraction in the mirror mode were conducted for the fabricated carbon periodic arrays. The periodicity in the (111) plane as well as in the direction perpendicular to the (111) plane of the colloidal crystal was evaluated by comparing the results obtained from these two measurements. It was found that the periodicity in the direction perpendicular to the (111) surface is not high for the obtained black carbon opal. On the other hand, the relationship between the incident angles and the peak wavelengths of the reflection spectra, collected in the condition where the incident light and the reflected light pass through in the same direction, is governed by an approximation based on 2D surface diffraction. The results imply that the origin of the iridescent colors on the fabricated black carbon opal is derived from the periodicity not in the direction perpendicular to the (111) plane but within the (111) plane.

  16. An Important Supplement to NAA in Study on Atmosphere Pollution:Determination of Black Carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Light absorption in the atmosphere is dominated by elemental carbon (EC), sometimes called black carbon (BC). Black carbon is an important indication of man-made pollution in airborne particulate matter

  17. Carbon encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles produced by hydrothermal reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nong Yue He; Ya Fei Guo; Yan Deng; Zhi Fei Wang; Song Li; Hong Na Liu

    2007-01-01

    Carbon encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles (CEMNs) were synthesized by heating an aqueous glucose solution containing FeAu (Au coated Fe nanoparticles) nanoparticles at 160-180 ℃ for 2 h. This novel hydrothermal approach is not only simple but also provides the surface of CEMNs with functional groups like-OH. The formation of carbon encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles was not favored when using pure Fe nanoparticles as cores because of the oxidation of Fe nanoparticles by H2O during the reaction and,therefore, the surfaces of the naked Fe nanoparticles had to be coated by Au shell in advance. TEM, XRD, XPS and VSM measurments characterized that they were uniform carbon spheres containing some embedded Fe-Au nanoparticles, with a saturation of 14.6 emu/g and the size of the typical product is ~350 nm.

  18. Electrochemical determination of chrysophanol based on the enhancement effect of acetylene black nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yanying; Wu, Kangbing; Zhang, Shichao; Zhang, Yu; Wan, Chidan

    2013-03-01

    Acetylene black (AB) nanoparticles were readily dispersed into water in the presence of dihexadecyl hydrogen phosphate. After evaporation of water, the surface of glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was coated with AB nanoparticles as confirmed from the scanning electron microscopy measurements. The transmission electron microscopy images indicated that AB nanoparticles possessed porous structure. Electrochemical behavior of chrysophanol was studied, and a sensitive oxidation peak was observed in pH 3.6 acetate buffer solution. Compared with the bare GCE, the AB nanoparticles-modified GCE greatly increased the oxidation peak current of chrysophanol, showing remarkable signal enhancement effect. The influences of pH value, amount of AB, accumulation potential and time on the signal enhancement of chrysophanol were studied. As a result, a novel electrochemical method was developed for the determination of chrysophanol. The linear range was from 1.5 to 200 μgL(-1), and the detection limit was 0.51 μgL(-1) (2.01 × 10(-9)M) after 2-min accumulation. Finally, this method was used in traditional Chinese medicines, and the results consisted with the values that obtained by high-performance liquid chromatography.

  19. Catalytic Enhancement of Carbon Black and Coal-Fueled Hybrid Direct Carbon Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleebeeck, Lisa; Ippolito, Davide; Kammer Hansen, Kent

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid direct carbon fuel cells (HDCFCs) consisting of a solid carbon (carbon black)-molten carbonate ((62–38 wt% Li-K)2CO3) mixtures in the anode chamber of an anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell type full-cell are tested for their electrochemical performance between 700 and 800°C. Performance...

  20. Trade and the Future of China's Black Carbon Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persad, G.; Oppenheimer, M.; Naik, V.

    2016-12-01

    Emissions of black carbon aerosols in China have increased by over 200% during the last 50 years, with negative implications both for human health and for regional and global climate. The Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) emissions scenarios all assume that China's future black carbon emissions will decrease. However, this decline partially depends on the assumption that the evolution of future pollutant emissions in developing nations will match the observed historical relationship between air quality and income in developed nations. Recent research has demonstrated that a substantial portion of China's current black carbon emissions are driven by the production of goods exported for consumption elsewhere. This constitutes an external demand for black carbon-emitting activity in China that is much smaller in the developed nations on which the historical air quality/income relationship is based. We here show using integrated assessment model output, general circulation modeling, and emissions and economic data that (1) China must achieve a faster technological and regulatory evolution than did developed countries in order achieve the same air quality/income trajectory; (2) China's uniquely large share of export-related black carbon-emitting activities and their potential growth are a plausible explanation for this disparity; and (3) the climate and health implications of these export-related black carbon emissions, if unmitigated, are of interest from a policy perspective. Together these results indicate that the production of goods for export will steepen the mitigation curve for China relative to developed nations, if China is to achieve the future black carbon emissions reductions assumed in the RCPs.

  1. Inkjet printing of carbon black electrodes for dielectric elastomer actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlatter, Samuel; Rosset, Samuel; Shea, Herbert

    2017-04-01

    Inkjet printing is an appealing technique to print electrodes for Dielectric Elastomer Actuators (DEAs). Here we present the preparation and ink-jet printing of a carbon black electrode mixture and characterise its properties. Carbon black has been used extensively in the past because it is very compliant; however, it has a high resistance and can be very dirty to work with. In this paper we show that carbon black remains an appropriate electrode material, and when inkjet printed can be used to fabricate devices meeting today's demanding requirements. DEAs are becoming thinner to decrease actuation voltages and are shrinking in size to match the scale of the devices in the biomedical field, tuneable optics, and microfluidics. Inkjet printing addresses both of these problems. Firstly, Inkjet printing is a non-contact technique and can print on very thin freestanding membranes. Secondly, the high precision of inkjet printers makes it possible to print complex electrode geometries in the millimetre scale. We demonstrate the advantages of inkjet printing and carbon black electrodes by conducting a full characterisation of the printed electrodes. The printed carbon black electrodes have resistances as low as 13kΩ/□, an elastic modulus of approximately 1MPa, and a cyclic resistance swing which increases by 7% over 1500 cycles at 50% stretch. We also demonstrate a DEA with printed carbon black electrodes with a diametral stretch of 8.8% at an electric field of approximately 94V/μm. Finally a qualitative test is conducted to show that the printed carbon black electrode is extremely hardwearing.

  2. Nanoparticles Ni electroplating and black paint for solar collector applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. El Nady

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A nanoparticles layer of bright nickel base was deposited on copper substrates using electrodeposition technique before spraying the paint. IR reflectance of the paint was found to be around 0.4 without bright nickel layer and the reflectance increased to 0.6 at a Ni layer thickness of 750 nm. The efficiency of the constructed solar collectors using black paint and black paint combined with bright nickel was found to be better than black paint individually. After aging tests under high temperature, Bright nickel improved the stability of the absorber paint. The collector optical gain FR(τα was lowered by 24.7% for the commercial paint and lowered by 19.3% for the commercial paint combined with bright nickel. The overall heat loss FR(UL was increased by 3.3% for the commercial paint and increased by 2.7% for the commercial paint combined with bright nickel after the temperature aging test.

  3. MORPHOLOGY OF BLACK CARBON AEROSOLS AND UBIQUITY OF 50-NANOMETER BLACK CARBON AEROSOLS IN THE ATMOSPHERE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengfu Fu; Liangjun Xu; Wei Ye; Yiquan Chen; Mingyu Jiang; Xueqin Xu

    2006-01-01

    Different-sized aerosols were collected by an Andersen air sampler to observe the detailed morphology of the black carbon (BC) aerosols which were separated chemically from the other accompanying aerosols, using a Scanning Electron Microscope equipped with an Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer (SEM-EDX). The results indicate that most BC aerosols are spherical particles of about 50 nm in diameter and with a homogeneous surface. Results also show that these particles aggregate with other aerosols or with themselves to form larger agglomerates in the micrometer range. The shape of these 50-nm BC spherical particles was found to be very similar to that of BC particles released from petroleum-powered vehicular internal combustion engines. These spherical BC particles were shown to be different from the previously reported fullerenes found using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS).

  4. Solidification of gold nanoparticles in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcidiacono, S; Walther, J H; Poulikakos, D; Passerone, D; Koumoutsakos, P

    2005-03-18

    The structure and the solidification of gold nanoparticles in a carbon nanotube are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations indicate that the predicted solidification temperature of the enclosed particle is lower than its bulk counterpart, but higher than that observed for clusters placed in vacuum. A comparison with a phenomenological model indicates that, in the considered range of tube radii (R(CNT)) of 0.5 < R(CNT) < 1.6 nm, the solidification temperature depends mainly on the length of the particle with a minor dependence on R(CNT).

  5. Red Fluorescent Carbon Nanoparticle-Based Cell Imaging Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Haydar; Bhunia, Susanta Kumar; Dalal, Chumki; Jana, Nikhil R

    2016-04-13

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based probes with tunable visible emission are biocompatible, environment friendly and most suitable for various biomedical applications. However, synthesis of red fluorescent carbon nanoparticles and their transformation into functional nanoparticles are very challenging. Here we report red fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based nanobioconjugates of nanoparticles are synthesized via high temperature colloid-chemical approach and transformed into water-soluble functional nanoparticles via coating with amphiphilic polymer followed by covalent linking with desired biomolecules. Following this approach, carbon nanoparticles are functionalized with polyethylene glycol, primary amine, glucose, arginine, histidine, biotin and folic acid. These functional nanoparticles can be excited with blue/green light (i.e., 400-550 nm) to capture their emission spanning from 550 to 750 nm. Arginine and folic acid functionalized nanoparticles have been demonstrated as fluorescent cell labels where blue and green excitation has been used for imaging of labeled cells. The presented method can be extended for the development of carbon nanoparticle-based other bioimaging probes.

  6. Preparation and Characterization of Calcium Carbonate Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassim, Aqilah; Rachmawati, Heni

    2010-10-01

    Taking calcium supplements can reduce the risk of developing osteoporosis, but they are not readily absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract. Nanotechnology is expected to resolve this problem. In this study, we prepared and characterized calcium carbonate nanoparticle to improve the solubility by using bottom-up method. The experiment was done by titrating calcium chloride with sodium carbonate with the addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as stabilizer, using ultra-turrax. Various concentrations of calcium chloride and sodium carbonate as well as various speed of stirring were used to prepare the calcium carbonate nanoparticles. Evaluations studied were including particle size, polydispersity index (PI) and zeta potential with particle analyzer, surface morphology with scanning electron microscope, and saturated solubility. In addition, to test the ability of PVP to prevent particles growth, short stability study was performed by storing nano CaCO3 suspension at room temperature for 2 weeks. Results show that using 8000 rpm speed of stirring, the particle size tends to be bigger with the range of 500-600 nm (PI between 0.2-0.4) whereas with stirring speed of 4000 rpm, the particle size tends to be smaller with 300-400 nm (PI between 0.2-0.4). Stirring speed of 6000 rpm produced particle size within the range of 400-500 nm (PI between 0.2-0.4). SEM photograph shows that particles are monodisperse confirming that particles were physically stable without any agglomeration within 2 weeks storage. Taken together, nano CaCO3 is successfully prepared by bottom-up method and PVP is a good stabilizer to prevent the particle growth.

  7. Radiocarbon Studies of Black Carbon in the Marine Environment

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The incomplete combustion of biomass and fossil fuels produces black carbon (BC). BC is recalcitrant and serves as a long term holding pool for carbon, with a mean residence time of one to two orders of magnitude greater than unburnt carbon on land. Yet the known sources of BC are far larger than the known sinks, which led to studies of BC in the ocean’s dissolved organic carbon (DOC) reservoir. The goal of this dissertation was to measure the abundance and residence times of BC in sedime...

  8. Surface area of particle administered versus mass in determining the pulmonary toxicity of ultrafine and fine carbon black: comparison to ultrafine titanium dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sager Tina M

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nanoparticles are characterized by having a high surface area per mass. Particulate surface area has been reported to play an important role in determining the biological activity of nanoparticles. However, recent reports have questioned this relationship. This study was conducted to determine whether mass of particles or surface area of particles is the more appropriate dose metric for pulmonary toxicity studies. In this study, rats were exposed by intratracheal instillation to various doses of ultrafine and fine carbon black. At 1, 7, or 42 days post-exposure, inflammatory and cytotoxic potential of each particle type was compared on both a mass dosage (mg/rat as well as an equal surface area dosage (cm2 of particles per cm2 of alveolar epithelium. In an additional study, the pulmonary responses to instillation of ultrafine carbon black were compared to equivalent particle surface area doses of ultrafine titanium dioxide. Results Ultrafine carbon black particles caused a dose dependent but transient inflammatory and cytotoxic response. On a mass basis, these responses were significantly (65 fold greater than those for fine sized carbon black. However, when doses were equalized based on surface area of particles given, the ultrafine carbon black particles were only slightly (non-significantly more inflammogenic and cytotoxic compared to the fine sized carbon black. At one day post-exposure, inflammatory potencies of the ultrafine carbon black and ultrafine titanium dioxide particles were similar. However, while the pulmonary reaction to ultrafine carbon black resolved with time, the inflammatory effects of ultrafine titanium dioxide were more persistent over a 42 day post-exposure period. Conclusion These results indicate that for low toxicity low solubility materials, surface area of particles administered rather than mass burden of particles may be a more appropriate dose metric for pulmonary toxicity studies. In addition

  9. Using measurements for evaluation of black carbon modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gilardoni

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The ever increasing use of air quality and climate model assessments to underpin economic, public health, and environmental policy decisions makes effective model evaluation critical. This paper discusses the properties of black carbon and light attenuation and absorption observations that are the key to a reliable evaluation of black carbon model and compares parametric and nonparametric statistical tools for the quantification of the agreement between models and observations. Black carbon concentrations are simulated with TM5/M7 global model from July 2002 to June 2003 at four remote sites (Alert, Jungfraujoch, Mace Head, and Trinidad Head and two regional background sites (Bondville and Ispra. Equivalent black carbon (EBC concentrations are calculated using light attenuation measurements from January 2000 to December 2005. Seasonal trends in the measurements are determined by fitting sinusoidal functions and the representativeness of the period simulated by the model is verified based on the scatter of the experimental values relative to the fit curves. When the resolution of the model grid is larger than 1°×1°, it is recommended to verify that the measurement site is representative of the grid cell. For this purpose, equivalent black carbon measurements at Alert, Bondville and Trinidad Head are compared to light absorption and elemental carbon measurements performed at different sites inside the same model grid cells. Comparison of these equivalent black carbon and elemental carbon measurements indicates that uncertainties in black carbon optical properties can compromise the comparison between model and observations. During model evaluation it is important to examine the extent to which a model is able to simulate the variability in the observations over different integration periods as this will help to identify the most appropriate timescales. The agreement between model and observation is accurately described by the overlap of

  10. Using measurements for evaluation of black carbon modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gilardoni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The ever increasing use of air quality and climate model assessments to underpin economic, public health, and environmental policy decisions makes effective model evaluation critical. This paper discusses the properties of black carbon and light attenuation and absorption observations that are the key to a reliable evaluation of black carbon model and compares parametric and nonparametric statistical tools for the quantification of the agreement between models and observations. Black carbon concentrations are simulated with TM5/M7 global model from July 2002 to June 2003 at four remote sites (Alert, Jungfraujoch, Mace Head, and Trinidad Head and two regional background sites (Bondville and Ispra. Equivalent black carbon (EBC concentrations are calculated using light attenuation measurements from January 2000 to December 2005. Seasonal trends in the measurements are determined by fitting sinusoidal functions and the representativeness of the period simulated by the model is verified based on the scatter of the experimental values relative to the fit curves. When the resolution of the model grid is larger than 1° × 1°, it is recommended to verify that the measurement site is representative of the grid cell. For this purpose, equivalent black carbon measurements at Alert, Bondville and Trinidad Head are compared to light absorption and elemental carbon measurements performed at different sites inside the same model grid cells. Comparison of these equivalent black carbon and elemental carbon measurements indicates that uncertainties in black carbon optical properties can compromise the comparison between model and observations. During model evaluation it is important to examine the extent to which a model is able to simulate the variability in the observations over different integration periods as this will help to identify the most appropriate timescales. The agreement between model and observation is accurately described by the overlap of

  11. Improvement of water/resin wettability of graphite using carbon black nano particles coating via ink media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharif, M., E-mail: Sharif_m@metaleng.iust.ac.i [Iran University of Science and Technology (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Golestani-Fard, F.; Sarpoolaky, H. [Iran University of Science and Technology (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-08-12

    Carbon coated graphite with high resin and water wettability characteristics could expand the refractory and carbon-carbon composites application in different fields. Improvement of water and resin wettability of graphite using carbon black coating via ink media is reported. Present method is based on preparing colloidal disperion of carbon black in ink followed by adding proper amount of graphite to the mixture which was dried and heat treated at 250 deg. C afterwards. The results showed that by controlling the amount of carbon black in ink and optimizing the process, a uniform coating with a thickness of 50 nm could be developed on the graphite surface. The wettability was evaluated by measuring contact angle and the microstructure of samples was characterized by optic microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Also Raman spectroscopy was employed to support the results. The microstructure of coating was found to be uniform composed of carbon black nanoparticles. It was also demonstrated that the coating that could enhance the phenolic resin wettability was well. We also showed the coating could be applied on other ceramic particles such as MgO.

  12. Costs and global impacts of black carbon abatement strategies

    OpenAIRE

    K. Rypdal; Rive, N.; T. K. Berntsen; Z. Klimont; Mideksa, T.K.; G. Myhre; R. B. Skeie

    2009-01-01

    Abatement of particulate matter has traditionally been driven by health concerns rather than its role in global warming. Here we assess future abatement strategies in terms of how much they reduce the climate impact of black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) from contained combustion. We develop global scenarios which take into account regional differences in climate impact, costs of abatement and ability to pay, as well as both the direct and indirect (snow-albedo) climate impact of BC ...

  13. Composite Materials with Magnetically Aligned Carbon Nanoparticles Having Enhanced Electrical Properties and Methods of Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Haiping (Inventor); Peterson, G.P. (Bud) (Inventor); Salem, David R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Magnetically aligned carbon nanoparticle composites have enhanced electrical properties. The composites comprise carbon nanoparticles, a host material, magnetically sensitive nanoparticles and a surfactant. In addition to enhanced electrical properties, the composites can have enhanced mechanical and thermal properties.

  14. Evaluation of black carbon estimations in global aerosol models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, D.; Schulz, M.; McNaughton, C.; Spackman, J.R.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Krol, M.C.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluate black carbon (BC) model predictions from the AeroCom model intercomparison project by considering the diversity among year 2000 model simulations and comparing model predictions with available measurements. These model-measurement intercomparisons include BC surface and aircraft concentr

  15. Black silicon maskless templates for carbon nanotube forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wierzbicki, Rafal; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk; Boisen, Anja

    2013-01-01

    We present here a proof of concept for a novel fabrication method of vertically aligned carbon nanotube forests, utilizing black silicon nanograss (a forest of silicon nanometer-sized spikes created with reactive ion etching) coated with titanium tungsten diffusion barrier as a template. The meth...

  16. Potential impacts of black carbon on the marine microbial community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malits, A.; Cattaneo, R.; Sintes, E.; Gasol, J.M.; Herndl, G.J.; Weinbauer, M.G.

    2015-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) is the carbonaceous residue of the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and biomass and encompasses a range of chemically heterogeneous substances from partly charred plant material to highly condensed soot aerosols. We addressed the potential role of BC aerosol deposition on mari

  17. Molecular simulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon sorption to black carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haftka, J.J.H.; Parsons, J.R.; Govers, H.A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Strong sorption of hydrophobic organic contaminants to soot or black carbon (BC) is an important environmental process limiting the bioremediation potential of contaminated soils and sediments. Reliable methods to predict BC sorption coefficients for organic contaminants are therefore required. A co

  18. New strategy for synthesis and functionalization of carbon nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongquan; Chen, Feng; Lagally, Max G; Denes, Ferencz S

    2010-02-02

    We describe a novel "one-step" combined synthesis and functionalization of carbon nanoparticles, using a new generation of all-in-one small submerged-arc plasma reactor that we have developed. We take advantage of long-lived free radicals generated by a submerged-arc helium atmosphere plasma and resident on the nanoparticle surfaces to supply ethylenediamine directly after the plasma to functionalize the carbon nanoparticles. XPS, TG/DTG, FTIR, and fluorescence tests confirm the viability of this new amination process. The nanoparticles are small and relatively uniformly sized. Their dispersibility in aqueous solution is significant.

  19. Carbon nanotubes polymer nanoparticles inks for healthcare textile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Pratyush; Lee, Jungmin; Mathur, Gyanesh N.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2012-10-01

    Healthcare textiles are ambient health monitoring systems that can contribute towards medical aid as well as general fitness of the populace. These are textile based products that have sensor systems mounted on them or are electrically functionalized to act as sensors. While embedded sensor chipsets and connection wires have been shown as working prototypes of this concept, there is a need for seamless integration of sensor technologies without hindering the inherent properties of the textile. Screen printing or stamping with electrically conductive inks have been demonstrated as technologies for fabricating electronics on flexible substrates. They are applicable to textile manufacturing as well. Printing technology allows for fabrication of nanocomposite based electronics elements in a bottom-up fashion. This has advantages such as low material consumption, high speed fabrication and low temperature processing. In this research, Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) and polyaniline nanoparticles (PANP) core shell based nanocomposites were synthesized and formulated into colloidal ink. Printed MWCNTs-PANP traces were electrically characterized and compared with traces made with those made by other composites such as Silver, and Carbon Black. The nanocomposite based inks are compared for proposed applications as sensor systems and conductive tracks on smart textile for pervasive wireless healthcare system that can be mass produced using low cost printing processes.

  20. Preparation and structure of carbon encapsulated copper nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Chuncheng; Xiao, Feng; Cui, Zuolin

    2008-01-01

    Carbon-encapsulated copper nanoparticles were synthesized by a modified arc plasma method using methane as carbon source. The particles were characterized in detail by transmission electron microscope, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected-area electron diffraction, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry. The encapsulated copper nanoparticles were about 30 nm in diameter with 3-5 nm graphitic carbon shells. The outside graphitic carbon layers effectively prevented unwanted oxidation of the copper inside. The effect of the ratio of He/CH4 on the morphologies and the formation of the carbon shell were investigated.

  1. Preparation and structure of carbon encapsulated copper nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao Chuncheng, E-mail: clx@qust.edu.cn; Xiao Feng; Cui Zuolin [Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Shandong Key Lab for Nanostructured Materials (China)

    2008-01-15

    Carbon-encapsulated copper nanoparticles were synthesized by a modified arc plasma method using methane as carbon source. The particles were characterized in detail by transmission electron microscope, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected-area electron diffraction, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry. The encapsulated copper nanoparticles were about 30 nm in diameter with 3-5 nm graphitic carbon shells. The outside graphitic carbon layers effectively prevented unwanted oxidation of the copper inside. The effect of the ratio of He/CH{sub 4} on the morphologies and the formation of the carbon shell were investigated.

  2. One-step facile synthesis of carbon-supported PdAu nanoparticles and their electrochemical property and stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Xiulan, E-mail: whoxiulan@163.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing Tech University (China); Shi, Junjun; Zhang, Jianbo [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing Tech University (China); Tang, Weiping [Shanghai Institute of Space Power Sources, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Haikui; Shen, Xiaodong [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing Tech University (China); Saito, Nagahiro [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Well-crystallized PdAu alloy nanoparticles with the average size of 2–5 nm supported on Ketjen Black (KB) were successfully fabricated from the metal wire electrodes via a one-step solution plasma process in water at atmospheric pressure. Multi-scan cyclic voltammetry showed they have better electrochemical stability in alkaline than in acidic solution. - Highlights: • Carbon-supported PdAu nanoparticles were fabricated by a solution plasma technique. • As-obtained PdAu nanoparticles were confirmed to be alloy. • PdAu nanoparticles have good electrochemical activities and stabilities. • PdAu nanoparticles in alkaline have better stability than that in acidic solution. - Abstract: Well-crystallized PdAu nanoparticles supported on Ketjen Black (KB) were successfully fabricated when both Pd and Au wires were served as the electrode pair by a solution plasma technique at atmospheric pressure. The synthesis of PdAu nanoparticles was almost simultaneous with their dispersion on KB. As-obtained PdAu nanoparticles were confirmed to be alloy by ultraviolet–visible spectrophotometer, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) of each particle. PdAu nanoparticles with the average diameter of 2–5 nm were equably distributed on KB. PdAu nanoparticles showed good electrocatalytic activity both in acidic and alkaline solution corresponding to their obvious oxidation and reduction features. PdAu nanoparticles have improved electrochemical stability compared with the electrochemical properties of Pd and Au nanoparticles mixture after long time multi-scan cyclic voltammetry. Multi-scan cyclic voltammetry also presented the PdAu nanoparticles in alkaline solution have better stability than that in acidic solution. Thus as-obtained PdAu alloy nanoparticles would become a promising electrocatalysts for fuel cells or Li-air batteries. This novel process showed its potential applications in designing optimization of

  3. Black lead molybdate nanoparticles: Facile synthesis and photocatalytic properties responding to visible light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Weimin, E-mail: duweimin75@gmail.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Anyang Normal University, Anyang, Henan 455000 (China); Liu, Lixin; Zhou, Keke; Ma, Xiaodan; Hao, Yaming [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Anyang Normal University, Anyang, Henan 455000 (China); Qian, Xuefeng [School of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Black lead molybdate (PbMoO{sub 4}) nanoparticles were first synthesized. • A novel energy band structure leads to better absorption of visible light. • Black PbMoO{sub 4} nanoparticles have better visible-light-responsive photocatalytic activities. • It has better applied prospects in conversion and utilization of solar energy. - Abstract: Black lead molybdate (PbMoO{sub 4}) nanoparticles were first synthesized by the glycol–solvothermal method. Phase, morphology, crystal lattice, and specific surface of products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller nitrogen adsorption–desorption, respectively. Results revealed that the as-synthesized PbMoO{sub 4} nanoparticles are the scheelite-type tetragonal structure with 30–50 nm in size. Also, glycol played a dual function in present synthetic system: solvent and surface modification agent. Optical properties reveal glycol-modification on the surface of PbMoO{sub 4} nanoparticles can generate new energy level between the original conduction band and valence band, leading to better absorption of visible light and the black appearance. Photocatalytic experimental results demonstrate that black PbMoO{sub 4} nanoparticles synthesized in glycol medium have pretty visible-light-responsive photocatalytic degradation performance on methylene blue and phenol solution. Reaction mechanism investigations show that the excellent photocatalytic activities of black PbMoO{sub 4} nanoparticles derive from the novel energy band structure, smaller size, and larger specific surface area. Hence one can see that black PbMoO{sub 4} nanoparticles are a type of visible-light-responsive photocatalysts with excellent photocatalytic activities and potentially applied prospects in dye wastewater treatment and environmental protection. Meanwhile, the present work provides an innovative strategy for adjusting

  4. A New Method of Synthesizing Black Birnessite Nanoparticles: From Brown to Black Birnessite with Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Okoh

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A new method for preparing black birnessite nanoparticles is introduced. The initial synthesis process resembles the classical McKenzie method of preparing brown birnessite except for slower cooling and closing the system from the ambient air. Subsequent process, including wet-aging at 7∘C for 48 hours, overnight freezing, and lyophilization, is shown to convert the brown birnessite into black birnessite with complex nanomorphology with folded sheets and spirals. Characterization of the product is performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and N2 adsorption (BET techniques. Wet-aging and lyophilization times are shown to affect the architecture of the product. XRD patterns show a single phase corresponding to a semicrystalline birnessite-based manganese oxide. TEM studies suggest its fibrous and petal-like structures. The HRTEM images at 5 and 10 nm length scales reveal the fibrils in folding sheets and also show filamentary breaks. The BET surface area of this nanomaterial was found to be 10.6 m2/g. The TGA measurement demonstrated that it possessed an excellent thermal stability up to 400∘C. Layer-structured black birnessite nanomaterial containing sheets, spirals, and filamentary breaks can be produced at low temperature (−49∘C from brown birnessite without the use of cross-linking reagents.

  5. Comparison of anti-angiogenic properties of pristine carbon nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Sawosz, Ewa; Grodzik, Marta;

    2013-01-01

    nanoparticles decreased the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor. These results provide new insights into the biological activity of carbon nanomaterials and emphasise the potential use of multi-wall nanotubes and diamond nanoparticles in anti-angiogenic tumour therapy.......Angiogenesis is vital for tumour formation, development and metastasis. Recent reports show that carbon nanomaterials inhibit various angiogenic signalling pathways and, therefore, can be potentially used in anti-angiogenic therapy. In the present study, we compared the effect of different carbon...... nanomaterials on blood vessel development. Diamond nanoparticles, graphite nanoparticles, graphene nanosheets, multi-wall nanotubes and C60 fullerenes were evaluated for their angiogenic activities using the in ovo chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane model. Diamond nanoparticles and multi-wall nanotubes...

  6. Self-Assembled Enzyme Nanoparticles for Carbon Dioxide Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanbhag, Bhuvana Kamath; Liu, Boyin; Fu, Jing; Haritos, Victoria S; He, Lizhong

    2016-05-11

    Enzyme-based processes have shown promise as a sustainable alternative to amine-based processes for carbon dioxide capture. In this work, we have engineered carbonic anhydrase nanoparticles that retain 98% of hydratase activity in comparison to their free counterparts. Carbonic anhydrase was fused with a self-assembling peptide that facilitates the noncovalent assembly of the particle and together were recombinantly expressed from a single gene construct in Escherichia coli. The purified enzymes, when subjected to a reduced pH, form 50-200 nm nanoparticles. The CO2 capture capability of enzyme nanoparticles was demonstrated at ambient (22 ± 2 °C) and higher (50 °C) temperatures, under which the nanoparticles maintain their assembled state. The carrier-free enzymatic nanoparticles demonstrated here offer a new approach to stabilize and reuse enzymes in a simple and cost-effective manner.

  7. Characterization of Black Carbon Mixing State Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlacek, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Davidovits, P. [Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA (United States); Lewis, E. R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Onasch, T. B. [Aerodyne Research, Billerica, MA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Interpreting the temporal relationship between the scattering and incandescence signals recorded by the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), Sedlacek et al. (2012) reported that 60% of the refractory black carbon containing particles in a plume containing biomass burning tracers exhibited non-core-shell structure. Because the relationship between the rBC (refractory black carbon) incandescence and the scattering signals had not been reported in the peer-reviewed literature, and to further evaluate the initial interpretation by Sedlacek et al., a series of experiments was undertaken to investigate black carbon-containing particles of known morphology using Regal black (RB), a proxy for collapsed soot, as the light-absorbing substance to characterize this signal relationship. Particles were formed by coagulation of RB with either a solid substance (sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate) or a liquid substance (dioctyl sebacate), and by condensation with dioctyl sebacate, the latter experiment forming particles in a core-shell configuration. Each particle type experienced fragmentation (observed as negative lagtimes), and each yielded similar lagtime responses in some instances, confounding attempts to differentiate particle morphology using current SP2 lagtime analysis. SP2 operating conditions, specifically laser power and sample flow rate, which in turn affect the particle heating and dissipation rates, play an important role in the behavior of particles in the SP2, including probability of fragmentation. This behavior also depended on the morphology of the particles and on the thermochemical properties of the non-RB substance. Although these influences cannot currently be unambiguously separated, the SP2 analysis may still provide useful information on particle mixing states and black carbon particle sources. This work was communicated in a 2015 publication (Sedlacek et al. 2015)

  8. Phase Transformations of Graphite and Carbon Black by Laser with Low Power Density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The structure phase transformations of graphite and carbon black induced by pulsed laser were studied in this paper. Under irradiation with laser beam of 1.06μm wavelength and power density of 106 W· cm- 2, both graphite structure and carbon black structure were changed obviously. The results of Raman analyses and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) observations show that graphite transforms into nanodiamond about 5 nm and carbon black is graphitized. It is demonstrated that graphite is the intermediate phase in the transformation from carbon black to diamond, and graphite is easier to transform into diamond by laser irradiation than carbon black.

  9. Centennial black carbon turnover observed in a Russian steppe soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hammes

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Black carbon (BC, from incomplete combustion of fuels and biomass, has been considered highly recalcitrant and a substantial sink for carbon dioxide. Recent studies have shown that BC can be degraded. We use soils sampled 100 years apart in a Russian steppe preserve to generate the first whole-profile estimate of BC stocks and turnover in the field. BC stocks (initially 2.5 kg m-2 decreased 25% with cessation of biomass burning. BC turnover in the soil was 293 y (best estimate; range 212–541 y, much faster than inert/passive carbon in soil models. Such results provide a new constraint on theories of soil carbon stabilization. Most importantly, BC cannot be assumed chemically recalcitrant in all soils; other explanations for very old soil carbon are needed.

  10. Study on Microwave Dielectric Property of Carbon Black and Short Carbon Fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Hong-huan; ZHU Dong-mei; LUO Fa; ZHOU Wan-cheng; WANG Xiao-yan

    2006-01-01

    Carbon black and carbon fibers of different lengths were introduced in different matrices at different ratios to explore their microwave dielectric properties under 8.2 GHz-12.4 GHz. It is found that the actual dielectric constants of the samples containing carbon black are in a two-order function of the contents of carbon black ((з)′,(з)″=Av2+Bv+C) and the complex dielectric constants show an obvious frequency response. Of the added fibers of different lengths, the 4 mm-long one could well disperse in the matrices having not only good frequency response, but also larger real parts, imaginary parts and loss values. The imaginary parts and the loss values (tanδ) of the samples with 4 mm-long carbon fibers added increase linearly with the contents of fiber increasing. So it is practicable to adjust the dielectric parameters of the material in a wide range by changing the added amount of carbon black, and the carbon fiber or altering the lengths of the carbon fiber added.

  11. Dependence of climate forcing and response on the altitude of black carbon aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban-Weiss, George A.; Cao, Long; Bala, G.; Caldeira, Ken

    2012-03-01

    Black carbon aerosols absorb solar radiation and decrease planetary albedo, and thus can contribute to climate warming. In this paper, the dependence of equilibrium climate response on the altitude of black carbon is explored using an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a mixed layer ocean model. The simulations model aerosol direct and semi-direct effects, but not indirect effects. Aerosol concentrations are prescribed and not interactive. It is shown that climate response of black carbon is highly dependent on the altitude of the aerosol. As the altitude of black carbon increases, surface temperatures decrease; black carbon near the surface causes surface warming, whereas black carbon near the tropopause and in the stratosphere causes surface cooling. This cooling occurs despite increasing planetary absorption of sunlight (i.e. decreasing planetary albedo). We find that the trend in surface air temperature response versus the altitude of black carbon is consistent with our calculations of radiative forcing after the troposphere, stratosphere, and land surface have undergone rapid adjustment, calculated as "regressed" radiative forcing. The variation in climate response from black carbon at different altitudes occurs largely from different fast climate responses; temperature dependent feedbacks are not statistically distinguishable. Impacts of black carbon at various altitudes on the hydrological cycle are also discussed; black carbon in the lowest atmospheric layer increases precipitation despite reductions in solar radiation reaching the surface, whereas black carbon at higher altitudes decreases precipitation.

  12. Defect-induced loading of Pt nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Jin; Park, Yong Jin; Ra, Eun Ju; Kim, Ki Kang; An, Kay Hyeok; Lee, Young Hee; Choi, Jae Young; Park, Chan Ho; Doo, Seok Kwang; Park, Min Ho; Yang, Cheol Woong

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes-supported Pt nanoparticles were loaded using a microwave oven on the defective carbon nanotubes generated by an additional oxidant during acid treatment. The authors' Raman spectra and x-ray diffraction analysis demonstrated that defects created during oxidation and microwave treatment acted as nucleation seeds for Pt adsorption. The generated Pt nanoparticles had the size distributions of 2-3nm and were uniformly distributed on the defects of carbon nanotubes. The authors' density functional calculations showed that the adsorption of Pt atom on the vacancy of nanotube was significantly stronger by s-p hybridization with carbon atoms near the defect site.

  13. Carbon nanoparticles trapped in vivo-similar to carbon nanotubes in time-dependent biodistribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia-Hui; Yang, Sheng-Tao; Wang, Xin; Wang, Haifang; Liu, Yamin; Luo, Pengju G; Liu, Yuanfang; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2014-08-27

    Carbon nanoparticles are in all of the carbon nanomaterials that are presently widely pursued for potential bioapplications, but their in vivo biodistribution-related properties are largely unknown. In this work, highly (13)C-enriched carbon nanoparticles were prepared to allow their quantification in biological samples by using isotope-ratio mass spectroscopy. The in vivo biodistribution results are presented and discussed, and also compared with those of the aqueous suspended carbon nanotubes reported previously. The distribution profile and time dependencies are largely similar between the nanoparticles and nanotubes, with results on both suggesting meaningful accumulation in some major organs over an extended period of time. Therefore, the surface modification of carbon nanoparticles, preferably the chemical functionalization of the nanoparticles with biocompatible molecules or species, is desirable or necessary in the pursuit of these nanomaterials for various bioapplications.

  14. Catalytic Oxidation of Propylene, Toluene, Carbon Monoxide, and Carbon Black over Au/CeO2 Solids: Comparing the Impregnation and the Deposition-Precipitation Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Aboukaïs

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Au/CeO2 solids were prepared by two methods: deposition-precipitation (DP and impregnation (Imp. The prepared solids were calcined under air at 400°C. Both types of catalysts have been tested in the total oxidation of propylene, toluene, carbon monoxide, and carbon black. Au/CeO2-DP solids were the most reactive owing to the high number of gold nanoparticles and Au+ species and the low concentration of Cl- ions present on its surface compared to those observed in Au/CeO2-Imp solids.

  15. Oxidation behavior of a kind of carbon black

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG JunShi; SONG Qiang; HE BaiLei; YAO Qiang

    2009-01-01

    The DTG curves of a kind of carbon black during TPO tests were found to have multiple peaks with an unusual sharp peak after the main peak. TPO tests with different sample loads, oxygen fractions and heating rates were carried out to study the influence of the experimental parameters on the sharp peak. The results show that the sharp peak is not caused by heat and mass transfer limitations, but by the intrinsic oxidation kinetics of the carbon black. The evolution of the specific surface area during the intrinsic kinetic controlled oxidation process was then analyzed using isothermal oxidation at low temperatures which showed that the sharp peak is caused by the increase of the specific surface area. The pore structure changes greatly influence the oxidation process when the reaction is controlled by the intrinsic kinetics. When there were no heat and mass transfer limitations, the different oxidation processes result in the same specific surface area evolution.

  16. Electromagnetic properties of carbon black and barium titanate composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Guiqin [School of Material Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China)], E-mail: c2b2chen@163.com; Chen Xiaodong; Duan Yuping; Liu Shunhua [School of Material Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2008-04-24

    Nanocrystalline carbon black/barium titanate compound particle (CP) was synthesized by sol-gel method. The phase structure and morphology of compound particle were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Raman spectrum measurements, the electroconductivity was test by trielectrode arrangement and the precursor powder was followed by differential scanning calorimetric measurements (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). In addition, the complex relative permittivity and permeability of compound particle were investigated by reflection method. The compound particle/epoxide resin composite (CP/EP) with different contents of CP were measured. The results show barium titanate crystal is tetragonal phase and its grain is oval shape with 80-100 nm which was coated by carbon black film. As electromagnetic (EM) complex permittivity, permeability and reflection loss (RL) shown that the compound particle is mainly a kind of electric and dielectric lossy materials and exhibits excellent microwave absorption performance in the X- and Ku-bands.

  17. Final recommendations for reference materials in black carbon analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Michael W. I.; Masiello, Caroline A.; Skjemstad, Jan O.

    Last summer, a symposium was held to discuss aspects of global biogeochemical cycles, including organic matter cycling in soils, rivers, and marine environments; black carbon particle fluxes and the biological pump; dissolved organic matter; and organic matter preservation. Seventy scientists from various disciplines, including oceanography, soil science, geology, and chemistry attended the 3-day meeting at the Friday Harbor Laboratories, a research station of the University of Washington.“New Approaches in Marine Organic Biogeochemistry” commemorated the life and science of a colleague and friend, John I. Hedges, who was also involved in several groups developing chemical reference materials. Part of this symposium included a workshop on chemical reference materials, where final recommendations of the Steering Committee for Black Carbon Reference Materials were presented.

  18. Evaluation of the genetic activity of industrially produced carbon black.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwin, C J; LeBlanc, J V; Thomas, W C; Haworth, S R; Kirby, P E; Thilagar, A; Bowman, J T; Brusick, D J

    1981-06-01

    Commercially produced oil furnace carbon black (Chemical Abstract Service Registry No. 1333-86-4) has been evaluated by five different assay for genetic activity. These were the Ames Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation test, sister chromatid exchange test in CHO cells, mouse lymphoma test, cell transformation assay in C3H/10T1/2 cells, and assay for genetic effects in Drosophila melanogaster. Limited cellular toxicity was exhibited but no significant genetic activity was noted.

  19. Laboratory estimation of black carbon emissions from cookstoves

    OpenAIRE

    Sota, Candela de la; Kane, M.; M. Viana; Lumbreras Martin, Julio; Ba, M.B.; Querol, Xavier; Mazorra, J.; Narros Sierra, Adolfo; Borge, R.; Youm, I.

    2016-01-01

    Recent estimations show that residential solid fuel combustion accounts for 25% of global black carbon (BC) emissions (Lamarque et al., 2010). Thus, the control of these emissions through the implementation of cleaner cooking technologies could be crucial for climate change mitigation (Venkataraman et al., 2005). However, BC emission factors for biofuel cooking stoves have been poorly estimated due to the wide distribution and remote location of the stoves and the relatively complex existing ...

  20. Carbon Materials Metal/Metal Oxide Nanoparticle Composite and Battery Anode Composed of the Same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method of forming a composite material for use as an anode for a lithium-ion battery is disclosed. The steps include selecting a carbon material as a constituent part of the composite, chemically treating the selected carbon material to receive nanoparticles, incorporating nanoparticles into the chemically treated carbon material and removing surface nanoparticles from an outside surface of the carbon material with incorporated nanoparticles. A material making up the nanoparticles alloys with lithium.

  1. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Decorated with Cobalt Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Larrude

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs synthesized by spray pyrolysis were decorated with cobalt oxide nanoparticles using a simple synthesis route. This wet chemistry method yielded nanoparticles randomly anchored to the surface of the nanotubes by decomposition of cobalt nitrate hexahydrate diluted in acetone. Electron microscopy analysis indicated that dispersed particles were formed on the MWCNTs walls. The average size increased with the increasing concentration of cobalt nitrate in acetone in the precursor mixture. TEM images indicated that nanoparticles were strongly attached to the tube walls. The Raman spectroscopy results suggested that the MWCNT structure was slightly damaged after the nanoparticle growth.

  2. Palladium-nanoparticle-coated carbon nanotube gas sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Maeum; Jung, Daewoong; Lee, Gil S.

    2014-08-01

    Flexible hydrogen gas sensors were fabricated using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) decorated with Pd nanoparticles for the detection of H2 gas at room temperature. A comparative gas-sensing study was carried out on both the Pd-nanoparticles-decorated and undecorated MWCNT sheets in order to examine the effect of Pd nanoparticles on the gas-sensing performances at room temperature. Experimental results showed that the MWCNTs/Pd sensor exhibited fast response and recovery as well as high sensitivity compared with the pure MWCNT sensor. The improved sensing properties of this sensor were attributed to the spillover effect of Pd nanoparticles and the highly conductive MWCNT sheet.

  3. Submesothelial deposition of carbon nanoparticles after toner exposition: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippou Stathis

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Inhalation of carbon nanoparticles (CNP from toner dust has been shown to have impact on the respiratory health of persons exposed. Office printers are known emitters of CNP. We report about a female open office worker who developed weight loss and diarrhoea. Laparoscopy done for suspected endometriosis surprisingly revealed black spots within the peritoneum. Submesothelial aggregates of CNP with a diameter of 31-67 nm were found by scanning and transmission electron microscopy in these tissue specimens. Colon biopsies showed inflammatory bowel disease with typically signs of Crohn disease, but no dust deposits. Transport of CNP via lymphatic and blood vessels after inhalation in the lungs has to be assumed. In this case respiratory symptoms were not reported, therefore no lung function tests were done. We have shown that workers with toner dust exposure from laser printers can develop submesothelial deposition of CNP in the peritoneum. Impact of toner dust exposure on the respiratory health of office workers, as suspected in other studies, has to be evaluated further.

  4. Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact Study Final Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, Tate [Baylor Univ., Waco, TX (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact (BBCSI) Study was to characterize the concentration and isotopic composition of carbonaceous atmospheric particulate matter (PM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site in Barrow, AK. The carbonaceous component was characterized via measurement of the organic and black carbon (OC and BC) components of the total PM. To facilitate complete characterization of the particulate matter, filter-based collections were used, including a medium volume PM2.5 sampler and a high volume PM10 sampler. Thirty-eight fine (PM2.5) and 49 coarse (PM10) particulate matter fractions were collected at weekly and bi-monthly intervals. The PM2.5 sampler operated with minimal maintenance during the 12 month campaign. The PM10 sampler used for the BBCSI used standard Tisch hi-vol motors which have a known lifetime of ~1 month under constant use; this necessitated monthly maintenance and it is suggested that the motors be upgraded to industrial blowers for future deployment in the Arctic. The BBCSI sampling campaign successfully collected and archived 87 ambient atmospheric particulate matter samples from Barrow, AK from July 2012 to June 2013. Preliminary analysis of the organic and black carbon concentrations has been completed. This campaign confirmed known trends of high BC lasting from the winter through to spring haze periods and low BC concentrations in the summer.

  5. Personal exposure to Black Carbon in transport microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dons, Evi; Int Panis, Luc; Van Poppel, Martine; Theunis, Jan; Wets, Geert

    2012-08-01

    We evaluated personal exposure of 62 individuals to the air pollutant Black Carbon, using 13 portable aethalometers while keeping detailed records of their time-activity pattern and whereabouts. Concentrations encountered in transport are studied in depth and related to trip motives. The evaluation comprises more than 1500 trips with different transport modes. Measurements were spread over two seasons. Results show that 6% of the time is spent in transport, but it accounts for 21% of personal exposure to Black Carbon and approximately 30% of inhaled dose. Concentrations in transport were 2-5 times higher compared to concentrations encountered at home. Exposure was highest for car drivers, and car and bus passengers. Concentrations of Black Carbon were only half as much when traveling by bike or on foot; when incorporating breathing rates, dose was found to be twice as high for active modes. Lowest 'in transport' concentrations were measured in trains, but nevertheless these concentrations are double the concentrations measured at home. Two thirds of the trips are car trips, and those trips showed a large spread in concentrations. In-car concentrations are higher during peak hours compared to off-peak, and are elevated on weekdays compared to Saturdays and even more so on Sundays. These findings result in significantly higher exposure during car commute trips (motive 'Work'), and lower concentrations for trips with motive 'Social and leisure'. Because of the many factors influencing exposure in transport, travel time is not a good predictor of integrated personal exposure or inhaled dose.

  6. Carbon-supported base metal nanoparticles: cellulose at work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Jacco; Versluijs-Helder, Marjan; Vlietstra, Edward J; Geus, John W; Jenneskens, Leonardus W

    2015-03-01

    Pyrolysis of base metal salt loaded microcrystalline cellulose spheres gives a facile access to carbon-supported base metal nanoparticles, which have been characterized with temperature-dependent XRD, SEM, TEM, ICP-MS and elemental analysis. The role of cellulose is multifaceted: 1) it facilitates a homogeneous impregnation of the aqueous base metal salt solutions, 2) it acts as an efficacious (carbonaceous) support material for the uniformly dispersed base metal salts, their oxides and the metal nanoparticles derived therefrom, and 3) it contributes as a reducing agent via carbothermal reduction for the conversion of the metal oxide nanoparticles into the metal nanoparticles. Finally, the base metal nanoparticles capable of forming metastable metal carbides catalytically convert the carbonaceous support into a mesoporous graphitic carbon material.

  7. Adsorption ability of the carbon black for nickel ions uptake from aqueous solution

    OpenAIRE

    Rađenović Ankica; Malina Jadranka

    2013-01-01

    Surface modification can be performed by adsorption of certain organic compounds on the surface of carbon. The main objective of this work was to compare the adsorption ability of acid-modified carbon black with the non-modified one. Modification process was performed by adsorption of acetic acid onto commercial carbon black surface. A batch adsorption system was applied to study the both adsorption reaction, acetic acid and Ni(II) adsorption onto the carbon black. Adsorption isotherms ...

  8. Analysis of transpacific transport of black carbon during HIPPO-3: implications for black carbon aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Shen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-range transport of black carbon (BC is a growing concern as a result of the efficiency of BC in warming the climate and its adverse impact on human health. We study transpacific transport of BC during HIPPO-3 using a combination of inverse modeling and sensitivity analysis. We use the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and its adjoint to constrain Asian BC emissions and estimate the source of BC over the North Pacific. We find that different sources of BC dominate the transport to the North Pacific during the southbound (29 March 2010 and northbound (13 April 2010 measurements in HIPPO-3. While biomass burning in Southeast Asia (SE contributes about 60% of BC in March, more than 90% of BC comes from fossil fuel and biofuel combustion in East Asia (EA during the April mission. GEOS-Chem simulations generally resolve the spatial and temporal variation of BC concentrations over the North Pacific, but are unable to reproduce the low and high tails of the observed BC distribution. We find that the optimized BC emissions derived from inverse modeling fail to improve model simulations significantly. This failure indicates that uncertainties in BC transport, rather than in emissions, account for the major biases in GEOS-Chem simulations of BC. The aging process, transforming BC from hydrophobic into hydrophilic form, is one of the key factors controlling wet scavenging and remote concentrations of BC. Sensitivity tests on BC aging suggest that the aging time scale of anthropogenic BC from EA is several hours, faster than assumed in most global models, while the aging process of biomass burning BC from SE may occur much slower, with a time scale of a few days. To evaluate the effects of BC aging and wet deposition on transpacific transport of BC, we develop an idealized model of BC transport. We find that the mid-latitude air masses sampled during HIPPO-3 may have experienced a series of precipitation events, particularly near the EA and SE source

  9. Carbon nanotubes/laser ablation gold nanoparticles composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lascialfari, Luisa [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), Via Giusti 9, Firenze 50123 (Italy); Marsili, Paolo [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Caporali, Stefano [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), Via Giusti 9, Firenze 50123 (Italy); Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Margheri, Giancarlo [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Serafini, Andrea; Brandi, Alberto [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Giorgetti, Emilia, E-mail: emilia.giorgetti@fi.isc.cnr.it [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Cicchi, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.cicchi@unifi.it [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), Via Giusti 9, Firenze 50123 (Italy)

    2014-10-31

    The production of nanohybrids formed by oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and nanoparticles, produced by pulsed laser ablation in liquids process, is described. The use of linkers, obtained by transformation of pyrene-1-butanol, is mandatory to generate an efficient and stable interaction between the two components. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed the obtainment of the efficient coverage of the MWCNTs by nanoparticles composed by metal gold and, partially, by oxides. - Highlights: • Laser ablation is a used for the production of gold nanoparticle colloids • An efficient decoration of carbon nanotubes with nanoparticles is obtained through the use of a linker • This method allows an efficient and tunable preparation of carbon nanotube hybrids.

  10. Black-carbon absorption enhancement in the atmosphere determined by particle mixing state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dantong; Whitehead, James; Alfarra, M. Rami; Reyes-Villegas, Ernesto; Spracklen, Dominick V.; Reddington, Carly L.; Kong, Shaofei; Williams, Paul I.; Ting, Yu-Chieh; Haslett, Sophie; Taylor, Jonathan W.; Flynn, Michael J.; Morgan, William T.; McFiggans, Gordon; Coe, Hugh; Allan, James D.

    2017-02-01

    Atmospheric black carbon makes an important but poorly quantified contribution to the warming of the global atmosphere. Laboratory and modelling studies have shown that the addition of non-black-carbon materials to black-carbon particles may enhance the particles’ light absorption by 50 to 60% by refracting and reflecting light. Real-world experimental evidence for this `lensing’ effect is scant and conflicting, showing that absorption enhancements can be less than 5% or as large as 140%. Here we present simultaneous quantifications of the composition and optical properties of individual atmospheric black-carbon particles. We show that particles with a mass ratio of non-black carbon to black carbon of less than 1.5, which is typical of fresh traffic sources, are best represented as having no absorption enhancement. In contrast, black-carbon particles with a ratio greater than 3, which is typical of biomass-burning emissions, are best described assuming optical lensing leading to an absorption enhancement. We introduce a generalized hybrid model approach for estimating scattering and absorption enhancements based on laboratory and atmospheric observations. We conclude that the occurrence of the absorption enhancement of black-carbon particles is determined by the particles’ mass ratio of non-black carbon to black carbon.

  11. Dielectric study of Poly(styrene- co -butadiene) Composites with Carbon Black, Silica, and Nanoclay

    KAUST Repository

    Vo, Loan T.

    2011-08-09

    Dielectric spectroscopy is used to measure polymer relaxation in styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) composites. In addition to the bulk polymer relaxation, the SBR nanocomposites also exhibit a slower relaxation attributed to polymer relaxation at the polymer-nanoparticle interface. The glass transition temperature associated with the slower relaxation is used as a way to quantify the interaction strength between the polymer and the surface. Comparisons were made among composites containing nanoclay, silica, and carbon black. The interfacial relaxation glass transition temperature of SBR-clay nanocomposites is more than 80 °C higher than the SBR bulk glass transition temperature. An interfacial mode was also observed for SBR-silica nanocomposites, but the interfacial glass transition temperature of SBR-silica nanocomposite is somewhat lower than that of clay nanocomposites. An interfacial mode is also seen in the carbon black filled system, but the signal is too weak to analyze quantitatively. The interfacial polymer relaxation in SBR-clay nanocomposites is stronger compared to both SBR-carbon black and SBR-silica composites indicating a stronger interfacial interaction in the nanocomposites containing clay. These results are consistent with dynamic shear rheology and dynamic mechanical analysis measurements showing a more pronounced reinforcement for the clay nanocomposites. Comparisons were also made among clay nanocomposites using different SBRs of varying styrene concentration and architecture. The interfacial glass transition temperature of SBR-clay nanocomposites increases as the amount of styrene in SBR increases indicating that styrene interacts more strongly than butadiene with clay. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  12. Thermal Analysis Characterization of Elastomers and Carbon Black Filled Rubber Composites for Army Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-01

    Organ~ce, 60.40 % Carbon Black, 36.15 450(S) 2 Carbon black, 36.40 500 % Residue, 2.09 410(SH) 2 Residue, 3.20 22 2 Organica , 64.99 2 Organics, 62.97 2...64.92 1 Organics, 62.30 I Carbon Black, 31.42 395(S) I Carbon Black, 34.02 420 Z Residue, 3.66 440(SR) 1 Reuidue, 3.69 73 - C I Organica , 6’.33 470... Organica , 62.80 % Organics, 62.80 % Carbon black, 36.27 470(S) 2 Carbon black, It.60 505 2 Residue, 0.963 435(51) 2 Residue, 1.60 Iii 2 Organics

  13. Effect of substrate bias in nitrogen incorporated amorphous carbon films with embedded nanoparticles deposited by filtered cathodic jet carbon arc technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panwar, O.S., E-mail: ospanwar@mail.nplindia.ernet.in [Amorphous and Microcrystalline Silicon Solar Cell Group, Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, National Physical Laboratory (C.S.I.R.), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110012 (India); Kumar, Sushil; Ishpal,; Srivastava, A.K.; Chouksey, Abhilasha; Tripathi, R.K.; Basu, A. [Amorphous and Microcrystalline Silicon Solar Cell Group, Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, National Physical Laboratory (C.S.I.R.), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110012 (India)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer a-C: N films having nanoparticles were deposited by filtered cathodic jet carbon arc (FCJCA) technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of negative substrate bias on the properties of a-C: N films embedded with nanoparticles have been studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The properties of a-C: N films deposited by FCJCA technique have been compared with ta-C: N films deposited by FCVA process. - Abstract: The properties of nitrogen incorporated amorphous carbon (a-C: N) films with embedded nanoparticles, deposited using a filtered cathodic jet carbon arc technique, are reported. X-ray diffraction, high resolution transmission electron microscope and Raman spectroscopy measurements reveal an amorphous structure, but on closer examination the presence of clusters of nanocarbon single crystals with d-spacing close to diamond cubic-phase have also been identified. The effect of substrate bias on the microstructure, conductivity, activation energy, optical band gap, optical constants, residual stress, hardness, elastic modulus, plastic index parameter, percentage elastic recovery and density of states of a-C: N films have been studied and the properties obtained are found to depend on the substrate bias.

  14. Adsorption of Reactive Black 5 on Synthesized Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles: Equilibrium Isotherm and Kinetic Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Shaheed, Majeed A.; Falah H. Hussein

    2014-01-01

    The synthesized titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) were used as adsorbent to remove reactive black 5 (RB 5) in aqueous solution. Various factors affecting adsorption of RB 5 aqueous solutions such as pH, initial concentration, contact time, dose of nanoparticles, and temperature were analyzed at fixed solid/solution ratio. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were used as model adsorption equilibrium data. Langmuir isotherm was found to be the most adequate model. The pseudo-first-order, ...

  15. Biomass burning in boreal forests and peatlands: Effects on ecosystem carbon losses and soil carbon stabilization as black carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turetsky, M. R.; Kane, E. S.; Benscoter, B.

    2011-12-01

    Climate change has increased both annual area burned and the severity of biomass combustion in some boreal regions. For example, there has been a four-fold increase in late season fires in boreal Alaska over the last decade relative to the previous 50 years. Such changes in the fire regime are expected to stimulate ecosystem carbon losses through fuel combustion, reduced primary production, and increased decomposition. However, biomass burning also will influence the accumulation of black carbon in soils, which could promote long-term soil carbon sequestration. Variations in slope and aspect regulate soil temperatures and drainage conditions, and affect the development of permafrost and thick peat layers. Wet soil conditions in peatlands and permafrost forests often inhibit combustion during wildfires, leading to strong positive correlations between pre- and post- fire organic soil thickness that persist through multiple fire cycles. However, burning can occur in poorly drained ecosystems through smouldering combustion, which has implications for emission ratios of CO2:CH4:CO as well as black carbon formation. Our studies of combustion severity and black carbon concentrations in boreal soils show a negative relationship between concentrations of black carbon and organic carbon in soils post-fire. Relative to well drained stands, poorly drained sites with thick peat layers (such as north-facing stands) had less severe burning and low concentrations of black carbon in mineral soils post-fire. Conversely, drier forests lost a greater proportion of their organic soils during combustion but retained larger black carbon stocks following burning. Overall, we have quantified greater black carbon concentrations in surface mineral soil horizons than in organic soil horizons. This is surprising given that wildfires typically do not consume the entire organic soil layer in boreal forests, and could be indicative of the vulnerability of black carbon formed in organic horizons

  16. Structural, mechanical and electrical characterization of epoxy-amine/carbon black nanonocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an insight into the effect of preparation procedure and the filler content on both electrical and mechanical properties of a nanocomposite system. For the preparation of the nanocomposites diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA was used with triethylenetetramine (TETA as a curing agent. As fillers carbon black (CB nanoparticles with size from 25 to 75 nm were used. The characterization was done using Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA, Dielectric Relaxation Spectroscopy (DRS, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC, Wide Angle X-ray Diffraction (WAXD and electrical conductivity measurements. The dependence of the dynamic mechanical and dielectric parameters (E′, E″, tanδ, ε', ε″, σ and Tg is associated with the filler content and is controlled by the employed curing conditions. An increase in electrical conductivity, which is observed at about 1% w/w of carbon black, indicates the creation of conducting paths and is associated with the Maxwell Wagner Sillars (MWS relaxation, probably due to the formation of aggregated microstructures in the bulk composite..

  17. Nanocomposite electrodes made of carbon nanofibers and black wax. Anodic stripping voltammetry of zinc and lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, N; Fletcher, S; Madden, C E; Marken, F

    2001-11-01

    Nanocomposite electrodes offer exciting new possibilities in electroanalytical chemistry. In this preliminary study, nanocomposite electrodes made of carbon nanofibers and black wax were characterized and investigated as novel substrates for metal deposition and stripping processes. Carbon nanofibers were grown from ethylene-hydrogen gas mixtures over Fe-Ni-Cu (85:10:5) nanoparticle catalysts at 600 degrees C and then embedded in Apiezon black wax under vacuum at 140 degrees C. The resulting nanocomposite electrodes showed (i) good conductivity, (ii) a wide potential window in aqueous solutions, (iii) low background currents, (iv) near steady state voltammetric responses with substantial Faradaic currents and (v) sharply peaked fast scan metal stripping responses. Zinc is a notoriously difficult metal to determine in aqueous solutions, because its deposition and stripping are accompanied by hydrogen evolution at extreme negative potentials. It therefore provided a challenging test for our new nanocomposite electrode. Although numerous complications associated with the hydrogen evolution process could not be eliminated, remarkably clear voltammograms could be obtained even at scan rates of 40 V s(-1).

  18. Black Carbon in Estuarine and Coastal Ocean Dissolved Organic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannino, Antonio; Harvey, H. Rodger

    2003-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) in ultrafiltered high-molecular-weight DOM (UDOM) was measured in surface waters of Delaware Bay, Chesapeake Bay and the adjacent Atlantic Ocean (USA) to ascertain the importance of riverine and estuarine DOM as a source of BC to the ocean. BC comprised 5-72% of UDOM-C (27+/-l7%) and on average 8.9+/-6.5% of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) with higher values in the turbid region of the Delaware Estuary and lower yields in the river and coastal ocean. The spatial and seasonal distributions of BC along the salinity gradient of Delaware Bay suggest that the higher levels of BC in surface water UDOM originated from localized sources, possibly from atmospheric deposition or released from resuspended sediments. Black carbon comprised 4 to 7% of the DOC in the coastal Atlantic Ocean, revealing that river-estuary systems are important exporters of colloidal BC to the ocean. The annual flux of BC from Delaware Bay UDOM to the Atlantic Ocean was estimated at 2.4x10(exp 10) g BC yr(exp -1). The global river flux of BC through DOM to the ocean could be on the order of 5.5x1O(exp 12)g BC yr (exp -1). These results support the hypothesis that the DOC pool is the intermediate reservoir in which BC ages prior to sedimentary deposition.

  19. Effect of boron doping in the carbon support on platinum nanoparticles and carbon corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharya, Chethan K.; Li, Wei; Kwon, Gihan; Heath Turner, C.; Lane, Alan M.; Klein, Tonya [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Liu, Zhufang; Nikles, David [Department of Chemistry, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Weaver, Mark [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States)

    2009-07-15

    Carbon supported catalysts can lose their activity over a period of time due to the sintering of the nanometer-sized catalyst particles. The sintering of metal clusters on carbon supports can occur due to the weak interaction between the metal and the support and also due to the corrosion of carbon, especially in fuel cell electrocatalysts. The sintering may be reduced by increasing the interaction between the metal and the support and also by increasing the corrosion resistance of carbon supports. In an effort to mitigate the growth of the nanoparticles, carbon-substituted boron defects were introduced in the carbon lattice. The interaction between the Pt nanoparticles on the pure and boron-doped carbon supports was examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that the interaction between the Pt nanoparticles and the boron-doped carbon support was slightly stronger than the interaction between the Pt nanoparticles and the pure carbon support. Also, by using accelerated aging tests, the boron-doped system was found to be more resistant to carbon corrosion when compared to the pristine carbon-supported Pt catalyst. (author)

  20. Inflammation and Vascular Effects after Repeated Intratracheal Instillations of Carbon Black and Lipopolysaccharide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Daniel Vest; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Jensen, Ditte Marie;

    2016-01-01

    .5% plasma extracted from CB-exposed ApoE-/- mice caused vasoconstriction in aorta rings isolated from naïve mice; this effect was abolished by the treatment with the serotonin receptor antagonist Ketanserin. In conclusion, repeated pulmonary exposure to nanosized CB and LPS caused lung inflammation without......Inflammation and oxidative stress are considered the main drivers of vasomotor dysfunction and progression of atherosclerosis after inhalation of particulate matter. In addition, new studies have shown that particle exposure can induce the level of bioactive mediators in serum, driving vascular......- and systemic toxicity. We aimed to investigate if pulmonary inflammation would accelerate nanoparticle-induced atherosclerotic plaque progression in Apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE-/-) mice. ApoE -/- mice were exposed to vehicle, 8.53 or 25.6 μg nanosized carbon black (CB) alone or spiked with LPS (0.2 μg...

  1. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF FUNCTIONALIZED CARBON BLACK/POLY(VINYL ALCOHOL) HIGH REFRACTIVE INDEX NANOCOMPOSITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng-fei Xue; Ji-bin Wang; Yu-bin Bao; Qiu-ying Li; Chi-fei Wu

    2012-01-01

    Carbon black (CB)/polymer composites with high refractive index (RI) were fabricated from poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and covalently functionalized nano-CB (PVA-es-CB) by simple esterification reaction.Transmission electron microscopy showed that uniform aggregates of PVA-es-CB nanoparticles with a size smaller than 100 nm formed in the nanocomposite films.Ellipsometric measurements indicated that the PVA-es-CB/PVA composite films had a RI in the range 1.520-1.598 linearly increased with the PVA-es-CB volume content.Theoretical equation based on Lorentz-Lorenz theory provided reasonably close estimation of the refractive indices to the experimentally observed values.The hybrid films also revealed relatively good surface planarity,thermal stability and optical transparency.

  2. Inflammation and Vascular Effects after Repeated Intratracheal Instillations of Carbon Black and Lipopolysaccharide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Daniel Vest; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Jensen, Ditte Marie

    2016-01-01

    -and systemic toxicity. We aimed to investigate if pulmonary inflammation would accelerate nanoparticle-induced atherosclerotic plaque progression in Apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE-/-) mice. ApoE-/- mice were exposed to vehicle, 8.53 or 25.6 mu g nanosized carbon black (CB) alone or spiked with LPS (0.2 mu g...... mediators in plasma of exposed ApoE-/- mice was assessed in aorta rings isolated from naive C57BL/6 mice. Pulmonary exposure to CB and/or LPS resulted in pulmonary inflammation with a robust influx of neutrophils. The CB exposure did not promote plaque progression in aorta or BCA. Incubation with 0.......5% plasma extracted from CB-exposed ApoE-/- mice caused vasoconstriction in aorta rings isolated from naive mice; this effect was abolished by the treatment with the serotonin receptor antagonist Ketanserin. In conclusion, repeated pulmonary exposure to nanosized CB and LPS caused lung inflammation without...

  3. Biomaterial-Derived Calcium Carbonate Nanoparticles for Enteric Drug Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Diane Render; Temesgen Samuel; Howard King; Madan Vig; Shaik Jeelani; Ramapuram Jayachandra Babu; Vijaya Rangari

    2016-01-01

    Oral drug delivery systems provide the most convenient, noninvasive, readily acceptable alternatives to parenteral systems. In the current work, eggshell-derived calcium carbonate (CaCO3) nanoparticles were used to develop enteric drug delivery system in the form of tablets. CaCO3 nanoparticles were manufactured using top-down ball-milling method and characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and loaded with 5-fluorouracil as a model drug. Tablets w...

  4. Characterisation of carbon nanotubes decorated with platinum nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    M. Pawlyta; D. Łukowiec; A.D. Dobrzańska-Danikiewicz

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In presented work results of synthesis of carbon nanotubes decorated with platinum nanoparticles by organic colloidal process as an example of direct formation of nanoparticles onto CNTs are reported.Design/methodology/approach: Powder XRD and transmission electron microscopy were used for characterisation of the morphology of composite as well as the distribution of nanocrystals on the CNTs surfaces.Findings: TEM results confirm that CNT were homogeneous and clean, without any admix...

  5. Black Carbon Emissions from Associated Natural Gas Flaring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyant, Cheryl L; Shepson, Paul B; Subramanian, R; Cambaliza, Maria O L; Heimburger, Alexie; McCabe, David; Baum, Ellen; Stirm, Brian H; Bond, Tami C

    2016-02-16

    Approximately 150 billion cubic meters (BCM) of natural gas is flared and vented in the world annually, emitting greenhouse gases and other pollutants with no energy benefit. About 7 BCM per year is flared in the United States, and half is from North Dakota alone. There are few emission measurements from associated gas flares and limited black carbon (BC) emission factors have been previously reported from the field. Emission plumes from 26 individual flares in the Bakken formation in North Dakota were sampled. Methane, carbon dioxide, and BC were measured simultaneously, allowing the calculation of BC mass emission factors using the carbon balance method. Particle optical absorption was measured using a three-wavelength particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP) and BC particle number and mass concentrations were measured with a single particle soot photometer. The BC emission factors varied over 2 orders of magnitude, with an average and uncertainty range of 0.14 ± 0.12 g/kg hydrocarbons in associated gas and a median of 0.07 g/kg which represents a lower bound on these measurements. An estimation of the BC emission factor derived from PSAP absorption provides an upper bound at 3.1 g/kg. These results are lower than previous estimations and laboratory measurements. The BC mass absorption cross section was 16 ± 12 m(2)/g BC at 530 nm. The average absorption Ångström exponent was 1.2 ± 0.8, suggesting that most of the light absorbing aerosol measured was black carbon and the contribution of light absorbing organic carbon was small.

  6. Centennial black carbon turnover observed in a Russia steppe soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammes, K.; Torn, M.S.; Lapenas, A.G.; Schmidt, M.W.I.

    2008-09-15

    Black carbon (BC), from incomplete combustion of fuels and biomass, has been considered highly recalcitrant and a substantial sink for carbon dioxide. Recent studies have shown that BC can be degraded in soils. We use two soils with very low spatial variability sampled 100 years apart in a Russian steppe preserve to generate the first whole-profile estimate of BC stocks and turnover in the field. Quantities of fire residues in soil changed significantly over a century. Black carbon stock was 2.5 kg m{sup -2}, or about 7-10% of total organic C in 1900. With cessation of biomass burning, BC stocks decreased 25% over a century, which translates into a centennial soil BC turnover (293 years best estimate; range 182-541 years), much faster than so-called inert or passive carbon in ecosystem models. The turnover time presented here is for loss by all processes, namely decomposition, leaching, and erosion, although the latter two were probably insignificant in this case. Notably, at both time points, the peak BC stock was below 30 cm, a depth interval, which is not typically accounted for. Also, the quality of the fire residues changed with time, as indicated by the use benzene poly carboxylic acids (BPCA) as molecular markers. The proportions of less-condensed (and thus more easily degradable) BC structures decreased, whereas the highly condensed (and more recalcitrant) BC structures survived unchanged over the 100-year period. Our results show that BC cannot be assumed chemically recalcitrant in all soils, and other explanations for very old soil carbon are needed.

  7. Fabrication of Ultrafine Carbon Fibers Possessing a Nanoporous Structure from Electrospun Polyvinyl Alcohol Fibers Containing Silica Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Ultrafine carbon fibers with a nanoporous structure were fabricated by the template method using silica nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in fibers of approximate diameter 500 nm, electrospun from an aqueous solution of polyvinyl alcohol, CoCl2, silica NPs, and N,N-dimethylformamide. Black, conductive fibers were obtained by heat treatment in air and a chemical vapor deposition reaction under methanol vapor for more than 5 h. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated that the fabricated ...

  8. Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact Study Final Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, Tate

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact campaign was to characterize the concentration and isotopic composition of carbonaceous atmospheric particulate matter (PM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility site in Barrow, Alaska. The carbonaceous component was characterized by measuring the organic and black carbon (OC and BC) components of the total PM. To facilitate complete characterization of the PM, filter-based collections were used, including a medium volume PM2.5 sampler and a high volume PM10 sampler. Thirty-eight fine PM fractions (PM2.5) and 49 coarse (PM10) PM fractions were collected at weekly and bi-monthly intervals. The PM2.5 sampler operated with minimal maintenance during the 12 month campaign. The PM10 sampler used for the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact (BBCSI) study used standard Tisch “hi-vol” motors that have a known lifetime of approximately 1 month under constant use; this necessitated monthly maintenance, and it is suggested that, for future deployment in the Arctic, the motors be upgraded to industrial blowers. The BBCSI sampling campaign successfully collected and archived 87 ambient atmospheric PM samples from Barrow, Alaska, from July 2012 to June 2013. Preliminary analysis of the OC and BC concentrations has been completed. This campaign confirmed known trends of high BC lasting from the winter through to spring haze periods and low BC concentrations in the summer. However, the annual OC concentrations had a very different seasonal pattern with the highest concentrations during the summer, lowest concentrations during the fall, and increased concentrations during the winter and spring (Figure 1).

  9. Mesozoic black shales, source mixing and carbon isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suan, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    Over the last decades, considerable attention has been devoted to the paleoenvironmental and biogeochemical significance of Mesozoic black shales. Black shale-bearing successions indeed often display marked changes in the organic carbon isotope composition (δ13Corg), which have been commonly interpreted as evidence for dramatic perturbations of global carbon budgets and CO2 levels. Arguably the majority of these studies have discarded some more "local" explanations when interpreting δ13Corg profiles, most often because comparable profiles occur on geographically large and distant areas. Based on newly acquired data and selected examples from the literature, I will show that the changing contribution of organic components with distinct δ13C signatures exerts a major but overlooked influence of Mesozoic δ13Corg profiles. Such a bias occurs across a wide spectrum of sedimentological settings and ages, as shown by the good correlation between δ13Corg values and proxies of kerogen proportions (such as rock-eval, biomarker, palynofacies and palynological data) recorded in Mesozoic marginal to deep marine successions of Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous age. In most of these successions, labile, 12C-enriched amorphous organic matter of marine origin dominates strata deposited under anoxic conditions, while oxidation-resistant, 13C-rich terrestrial particles dominate strata deposited under well-oxygenated conditions. This influence is further illustrated by weathering profiles of Toarcian (Lower Jurassic) black shales from France, where weathered areas dominated by refractory organic matter show dramatic 13C-enrichment (and decreased total organic carbon and pyrite contents) compared to non-weathered portions of the same horizon. The implications of these results for chemostratigraphic correlations and pCO2 reconstructions of Mesozoic will be discussed, as well as strategies to overcome this major bias.

  10. Seasonal features of black carbon measured at Syowa Station, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, K.; Osada, K.; Yabuki, M.; Shiobara, M.; Yamanouchi, T.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) is one of important aerosol constituents because the strong light absorption ability. Low concentrations of aerosols and BC let BC make insignificant contribution to aerosol radiative forcing in the Antarctica at the moment. Because of less or negligible source strength of BC in the Antarctic circle, BC can be used as a tracer of transport from the mid-latitudes. This study aims to understand seasonal feature, transport pathway, and origins of black carbon in the Antarctic coats. Black carbon measurement has been made using 7-wavelength aethalometer at Syowa Station, Antarctica since February, 2005. Mass BC concentrations were estimated from light attenuation by Weingartner's correction procedure (Weingartner et al., 2003) in this study. Detection limit was 0.2 - 0.4 ng/m3 in our measurement conditions (2-hour resolution and flow rate of ca. 10LPM). BC concentrations ranged from near detection limit to 55.7 ng/m3 at Syowa Station, Antarctica during the measurements. No trend has been observed since February, 2005. High BC concentrations were coincident with poleward flow from the mid-latitudes under the storm conditions by cyclone approach, whereas low BC concentrations were found in transport from coastal regions and the Antarctic continent. Considering that outflow from South America and Southern Africa affect remarkably air quality in the Southern Ocean of Atlantic and Indian Ocean sectors, BC at Syowa Station might be originated from biomass burning and human activity on South America and Southern Africa. Seasonal features of BC at Syowa Station shows maximum in September - October and lower in December - April. Spring maximum in September - October was obtained at the other Antarctic stations (Neumayer, Halley, South pole, and Ferraz). Although second maximum was found in January at the other stations, the maximum was not observed at Syowa Station.

  11. Formation and microstructure of carbon encapsulated superparamagnetic Co nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiang-Cheng; Reyes-Gasga, J.; Dong, X. L.

    Carbon encapsulated magnetic cobalt nanoparticles have been synthesized by the modified arc-discharge method. Both high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HREM) and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) profiles reveal the presence of 8-15nm diameter crystallites coated with 1-3 carbon layers. In particular, HREM images indicate that the intimate and contiguous carbon fringe around those Co nanoparticles is good evidence for complete encapsulation by carbon shell layers. The encapsulated phases are identified as hcp α-Co, fcc β-Co and cobalt carbide (Co 3 C) nanocrystals using X-ray diffraction (XRD), nano-area electron diffraction (SAED) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). However, some fcc β-Co particles with a significant fraction of stacking faults are observed by HREM and confirmed by means of numerical fast Fourier transform (FFT) of HREM lattice images. The carbon encapsulation formation and growth mechanism are also reviewed.

  12. Size Dependent Phase Diagrams of Nickel-Carbon Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnin, Y; Zappelli, A; Amara, H; Ducastelle, F; Bichara, C

    2015-11-13

    The carbon rich phase diagrams of nickel-carbon nanoparticles, relevant to catalysis and catalytic chemical vapor deposition synthesis of carbon nanotubes, are calculated for system sizes up to about 3 nm (807 Ni atoms). A tight binding model for interatomic interactions drives the grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations used to locate solid, core shell and liquid stability domains, as a function of size, temperature, and carbon chemical potential or concentration. Melting is favored by carbon incorporation from the nanoparticle surface, resulting in a strong relative lowering of the eutectic temperature and a phase diagram topology different from the bulk one. This should lead to a better understanding of the nanotube growth mechanisms.

  13. World Carbon Black Output to Reach 12.7 Million Tons in 2015

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Yongkang

    2012-01-01

    From April 13 to April 17, "Carbon Black China of 2012" (CBC2012) was held in Hangzhou, China. Mr. Paul Ita, the president of US marketing research institution Notch Consulting Group, announced that the prospect of carbon black industry was closely linked with the development of auto industry and tire industry. The demand for carbon black of 2010 increased by 15% compared with that of 2009; the growth rate of demand for carbon black was 5.8% in 2011 and the total output was 10.7 million tons, which increased by about 5.5% compared with that of 2010.

  14. Synthesis of Carbon Encapsulated Mono- and Multi-Iron Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Reza Sanaee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Core–shell nanostructures of carbon encapsulated iron nanoparticles (CEINPs show unique properties and technological applications, because carbon shell provides extreme chemical stability and protects pure iron core against oxidation without impairing the possibility of functionalization of the carbon surface. Enhancing iron core magnetic properties and, in parallel, improving carbon shell sealing are the two major challenges in the synthesis of CEINPs. Here, we present the synthesis of both CEINPs and a new carbon encapsulated multi-iron nanoparticle by a new modified arc discharge reactor. The nanoparticle size, composition, and crystallinity and the magnetic properties have been studied. The morphological properties were observed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. In order to evaluate carbon shell protection, the iron cores were characterized by selected area diffraction and fast Fourier transform techniques as well as by electron energy loss and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopies. Afterward, the magnetic properties were investigated using a superconducting quantum interference device. As main results, spherical, oval, and multi-iron cores were controllably synthesized by this new modified arc discharge method. The carbon shell with high crystallinity exhibited sufficient protection against oxidation of pure iron cores. The presented results also provided new elements for understanding the growth mechanism of iron core and carbon shell.

  15. Photocatalytic composites based on titania nanoparticles and carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Bich Ha; Hieu Nguyen, Van; Vu, Dinh Lam

    2015-09-01

    In this article we present a review on recent experimental works toward the formation of visible light responsive composite photocatalysts on the basis of titania nanoparticles and carbon nanomaterials of different types. The research results achieved in last years has shown that the nanocomposite photocatalysts comprising titania nanoparticles and graphene or graphene oxide sheets, and also nanoparticles of noble metals and metallic oxides, exhibited the evident priority compared to the others. Therefore our review emphasizes the research on these promising visible light responsive nanophotocatalysts.

  16. Recommendations for the interpretation of "black carbon" measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Petzold

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Although black carbon (BC is one of the key atmospheric particulate components driving climate change and air quality, there is no agreement on the terminology that considers all aspects of specific properties, definitions, measurement methods, and related uncertainties. As a result, there is much ambiguity in the scientific literature of measurements and numerical models that refer to BC with different names and based on different properties of the particles, with no clear definition of the terms. The authors present here a recommended terminology to clarify the terms used for BC in atmospheric research, with the goal of establishing unambiguous links between terms, targeted material properties and associated measurement techniques.

  17. Modal character of atmospheric black carbon size distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, A.; Sidla, S.; Galambos, Z.; Kruisz, C.; Hitzenberger, R.; ten Brink, H. M.; Kos, G. P. A.

    1996-08-01

    Samples of atmospheric aerosols, collected with cascade impactors in the urban area of Vienna (Austria) and at a coastal site on the North Sea, were investigated for black carbon (BC) as the main component of absorbing material and for mass. The size distributions are structured. The BC distributions of these samples show a predominant mode, the accumulation aerosol, in the upper submicron size range, a less distinct finer mode attributable to fresh emissions from combustion sources, and a distinct coarse mode of unclear origin. It is important to note that some parameters of the accumulation aerosol are related statistically, indicating the evolution of the atmospheric accumulation aerosol.

  18. Black carbon concentrations and mixing state in the Finnish Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raatikainen, T.; Brus, D.; Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Svensson, J.; Asmi, E.; Lihavainen, H.

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric aerosol composition was measured using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) in the Finnish Arctic during winter 2011-2012. The Sammaltunturi measurement site at the Pallas GAW (Global Atmosphere Watch) station receives air masses from different source regions including the Arctic Ocean and continental Europe. The SP2 provides detailed information about mass distributions and mixing state of refractory black carbon (rBC). The measurements showed widely varying rBC mass concentrations (0-120 ng m-3), which were related to varying contributions of different source regions and aerosol removal processes. The rBC mass was log-normally distributed showing a relatively constant rBC core mass mean diameter with an average of 194 nm (75-655 nm sizing range). On average, the number fraction of particles containing rBC was 0.24 (integrated over 350-450 nm particle diameter range) and the average particle diameter to rBC core volume equivalent diameter ratio was 2.0 (averaged over particles with 150-200 nm rBC core volume equivalent diameters). These average numbers mean that the observed rBC core mass mean diameter is similar to those of aged particles, but the observed particles seem to have unusually high particle to rBC core diameter ratios. Comparison of the measured rBC mass concentration with that of the optically detected equivalent black carbon (eBC) using an Aethalometer and a MAAP showed that eBC was larger by a factor of five. The difference could not be fully explained without assuming that only a part of the optically detected light absorbing material is refractory and absorbs light at the wavelength used by the SP2. Finally, climate implications of five different black carbon mixing state representations were compared using the Mie approximation and simple direct radiative forcing efficiency calculations. These calculations showed that the observed mixing state means significantly lower warming effect or even a net cooling effect when compared with

  19. Climate effects of black carbon aerosols in China and India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Surabi; Hansen, James; Nazarenko, Larissa; Luo, Yunfeng

    2002-09-27

    In recent decades, there has been a tendency toward increased summer floods in south China, increased drought in north China, and moderate cooling in China and India while most of the world has been warming. We used a global climate model to investigate possible aerosol contributions to these trends. We found precipitation and temperature changes in the model that were comparable to those observed if the aerosols included a large proportion of absorbing black carbon ("soot"), similar to observed amounts. Absorbing aerosols heat the air, alter regional atmospheric stability and vertical motions, and affect the large-scale circulation and hydrologic cycle with significant regional climate effects.

  20. Noncovalent functionalization of few-layer black phosphorus with metal nanoparticles and its application in catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Caporali, Maria; Telesio, Francesca; Heun, Stefan; Nicotra, Giuseppe; Spinella, Corrado; Caporali, Stefano; Peruzzini, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Transition metal nanoparticles of Ni, Pd, Ru and Au, each of them stabilized by a suitable capping agent, were dispersed on the surface of few-layer black phosphorus (2D BP) achieving new nanocomposite 2D materials. Ni nanoparticles supported on 2D BP worked successfully in the hydrogenation of phenylacetylene, showing good catalytic activity preserved after recycling tests. These results highlight that 2D BP is able to stabilize metal nanoparticles through weak noncovalent interactions and disclose a wide application of 2D BP as a hosting platform for catalytically active metal species.

  1. A photochemically resistant component in riverine dissolved black carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmar, Thorsten; Riedel, Thomas; Niggemann, Jutta; Vähätalo, Anssi

    2015-04-01

    Rivers transport combustion-derived dissolved black carbon (DBC) to the oceans at an annual flux that is much higher than required to balance the oceanic inventory of DBC. To resolve this mismatch we studied the long-term stability of DBC in ten major world rivers that together account for approximately 1/3 of the global freshwater discharge to the oceans. Riverine DBC was remarkably resistant against microbial degradation, but decomposition of nearly all chromophoric dissolved organic matter under extensive irradiation with simulated sunlight removed almost 80% of DBC. Photochemically transformed DBC was further microbially decomposed by more than 10% in a subsequent one-year long bioassay. Based on these findings, on a global scale, the estimated riverine flux of microbially degraded and photo-resistant DBC is sufficient to replenish the oceans with DBC and likely contributes to the dissolved organic matter pool that persists in the oceans and sequesters carbon for centuries to millennia.

  2. Effect of the Purple carbon black on the properties of NR/BR blend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanfang, Zhao; Dan, Liu; Shengbo, Lin; Binjian; Yinmei, Zhao; Shuangquan, Liao

    2014-08-01

    Purple black is light colored mineral filler mining in recent years in Hainan. The effect of the dosage of the purple carbon black and purple carbon black modificated by Si69 on the vulcanization characteristics, mechanical properties, thermal stability, the damping performance of NR/BR blend rubber were studied, and the blending adhesive tensile sections were analyzed by SEM. Research showed that, with the increasing dosage of the purple carbon black, vulcanization characteristics of NR/BR blend had a little change. Adding the purple carbon black into blending had a reinforcing effect. when the dosage of the purple carbon black was 20, the mechanical properties of blending adhesive was good; Coupling agent Si69 had a modification effect on the purple carbon black. With increasing dosage of Si69, performance of the rubber was improved initially and then decreased; when the mass fraction of Si69 was 8% of the dosage of the purple carbon black, rubber performance was optimal. Purple carbon black had no obvious effect on thermal stability of the rubber, but it improved the damping rubber temperature and damping factor.

  3. Birchwood biochar as partial carbon black replacement in styrene-butadiene rubber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchwood feedstock was used to make slow pyrolysis biochar that contained 89% carbon and rubber. Composites made from blended fillers of 25/75 biochar/carbon black were equivalent to or superior to their 100% carbo...

  4. High Black Carbon (BC) Concentrations along Indian National Highways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S.; Singh, A. K.; Singh, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract:Black carbon (BC), the optically absorbing component of carbonaceous aerosol, has direct influence on radiation budget and global warming. Vehicular pollution is one of the main sources for poor air quality and also atmospheric pollution. The number of diesel vehicles has increased on the Indian National Highways during day and night; these vehicles are used for the transport of goods from one city to another city and also used for public transport. A smoke plume from the vehicles is a common feature on the highways. We have made measurements of BC mass concentrations along the Indian National Highways using a potable Aethalometer installed in a moving car. We have carried out measurements along Varanasi to Kanpur (NH-2), Varanasi to Durgapur (NH-2), Varanasi to Singrauli (SH-5A) and Varanasi to Ghazipur (NH-29). We have found high concentration of BC along highways, the average BC mass concentrations vary in the range 20 - 40 µg/m3 and found high BC mass concentrations up to 600 μg/m3. Along the highways high BC concentrations were characteristics of the presence of industrial area, power plants, brick kilns and slow or standing vehicles. The effect of increasing BC concentrations along the National Highways and its impact on the vegetation and human health will be presented. Key Words: Black Carbon; Aethalometer; mass concentration; Indian National Highways.

  5. Oxidation behavior of a kind of carbon black

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The DTG curves of a kind of carbon black during TPO tests were found to have multiple peaks with an unusual sharp peak after the main peak.TPO tests with different sample loads,oxygen fractions and heating rates were carried out to study the influence of the experimental parameters on the sharp peak.The results show that the sharp peak is not caused by heat and mass transfer limitations,but by the intrinsic oxidation kinetics of the carbon black.The evolution of the specific surface area during the intrinsic kinetic controlled oxidation process was then analyzed using isothermal oxidation at low temperatures which showed that the sharp peak is caused by the increase of the specific surface area.The pore structure changes greatly influence the oxidation process when the reaction is controlled by the intrinsic kinetics.When there were no heat and mass transfer limitations,the different oxidation processes result in the same specific surface area evolution.

  6. Changing Export of Dissolved Black Carbon from Arctic Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbins, A.; Spencer, R. G.; Mann, P. J.; Dittmar, T.; Niggemann, J.; Holmes, R. M.; McClelland, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Arctic rivers carry black carbon (BC) from Arctic soils to the ocean, linking two of the largest carbon stores on Earth. Wildfires have charred biomass since land plants emerged. BC, a refractory component of char, has accumulated in soils. In the oceans, dissolved BC (DBC) has also accumulated. Here we use samples and data collected as part of the long-term, high temporal resolution Arctic Great Rivers Observatory to model export of DBC from the six largest Arctic Rivers. Scaling to the pan-Arctic catchment, we report that ~3 million tons of DBC are delivered to the Arctic Ocean each year, which is ~8% of dissolved organic carbon loads to the Arctic Ocean. We suggest the transfer of Arctic river DBC to areas of deep water formation is a major source of DBC to the deep ocean carbon store. As the Arctic warms, greater wildfire occurrence is expected to produce more BC and changing hydrology and permafrost thaw to promote DBC export. Thus, the transfer of BC from Arctic soils to the ocean is predicted to increase.

  7. Carbon Nanotube/Graphene Supercapacitors Containing Manganese Oxide Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    electrolytes : 0.5 M K2SO4, 1 M sodium chloride (NaCl), and 1 M calcium chloride (CaCl2). The qualitative CV behavior of the three electrolytes can be seen...Carbon Nanotube/ Graphene Supercapacitors Containing Manganese Oxide Nanoparticles by Matthew Ervin, Vinay Raju, Mary Hendrickson, and...Laboratory Adelphi, MD 20783-1197 ARL-TR-6289 December 2012 Carbon Nanotube/ Graphene Supercapacitors Containing Manganese Oxide

  8. Presence of Fluorescent Carbon Nanoparticles in Baked Lamb: Their Properties and Potential Application for Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haitao; Xie, Yisha; Liu, Shan; Cong, Shuang; Song, Yukun; Xu, Xianbing; Tan, Mingqian

    2017-08-30

    The presence of nanoparticles in food has drawn much attention in recent years. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles are a new class of nanostructures; however, the distribution and physicochemical properties of such nanoparticles in food remain unclear. Herein, the presence of fluorescent carbon nanoparticles in baked lamb was confirmed, and their physicochemical properties were investigated. The fluorescent carbon nanoparticles from baked lamb emit strong blue fluorescence under ultraviolet light with a 10% fluorescent quantum yield. The nanoparticles are roughly spherical in appearance with a diameter of around 2.0 nm. Hydroxyl, amino, and carboxyl groups exist on the surface of nanoparticles. In addition, the nanoparticles could serve as a fluorescence sensor for glucose detection through an oxidation-reduction reaction. This work is the first report on fluorescent carbon nanoparticles present in baked lamb, which provides valuable insight into the physicochemical properties of such nanoparticles and their potential application in sensors.

  9. An improved method for quantitatively measuring the sequences of total organic carbon and black carbon in marine sediment cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoming; Zhu, Qing; Zhou, Qianzhi; Liu, Jinzhong; Yuan, Jianping; Wang, Jianghai

    2017-04-01

    Understanding global carbon cycle is critical to uncover the mechanisms of global warming and remediate its adverse effects on human activities. Organic carbon in marine sediments is an indispensable part of the global carbon reservoir in global carbon cycling. Evaluating such a reservoir calls for quantitative studies of marine carbon burial, which closely depend on quantifying total organic carbon and black carbon in marine sediment cores and subsequently on obtaining their high-resolution temporal sequences. However, the conventional methods for detecting the contents of total organic carbon or black carbon cannot resolve the following specific difficulties, i.e., (1) a very limited amount of each subsample versus the diverse analytical items, (2) a low and fluctuating recovery rate of total organic carbon or black carbon versus the reproducibility of carbon data, and (3) a large number of subsamples versus the rapid batch measurements. In this work, (i) adopting the customized disposable ceramic crucibles with the micropore-controlled ability, (ii) developing self-made or customized facilities for the procedures of acidification and chemothermal oxidization, and (iii) optimizing procedures and carbon-sulfur analyzer, we have built a novel Wang-Xu-Yuan method (the WXY method) for measuring the contents of total organic carbon or black carbon in marine sediment cores, which includes the procedures of pretreatment, weighing, acidification, chemothermal oxidation and quantification; and can fully meet the requirements of establishing their highresolution temporal sequences, whatever in the recovery, experimental efficiency, accuracy and reliability of the measurements, and homogeneity of samples. In particular, the usage of disposable ceramic crucibles leads to evidently simplify the experimental scenario, which further results in the very high recovery rates for total organic carbon and black carbon. This new technique may provide a significant support for

  10. Photo-lability of deep ocean dissolved black carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stubbins

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved black carbon (DBC, defined here as condensed aromatics isolated from seawater via PPL solid phase extraction and quantified as benzene polycarboxylic acid oxidation products, is a significant component of the oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC pool. These condensed aromatics are widely distributed in the open ocean and appear to be tens of thousands of years old. As such DBC is regarded as highly refractory. In the current study, the photo-lability of DBC, DOC and coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM; ultraviolet-visible absorbance were determined over the course of a 28 d irradiation of North Atlantic Deep Water under a solar simulator. During the irradiation DBC fell from 1044 ± 164 nM C to 55 ± 15 nM C, a 20-fold decrease in concentration. Dissolved black carbon photo-degradation was more rapid and more extensive than for bulk CDOM and DOC. Further, the photo-lability of components of the DBC pool increased with their degree of aromatic condensation. These trends indicate that a continuum of compounds of varying photo-lability exists within the marine DOC pool. In this continuum, photo-lability scales with aromatic character, specifically the degree of condensation. Scaling the rapid photo-degradation of DBC to rates of DOC photo-mineralisation for the global ocean leads to an estimated photo-chemical half-life for oceanic DBC of less than 800 yr. This is more than an order of magnitude shorter than the apparent age of DBC in the ocean. Photo-degradation is therefore posited as the primary sink for oceanic DBC and the survival of DBC molecules in the oceans for millennia appears to be facilitated not by their inherent inertness but by the rate at which they are cycled through the surface ocean's photic zone.

  11. Plasma Polymerization Surface Modification of Carbon Black and its Effect in Elastomers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathew, T.; Datta, R.N.; Dierkes, W.K.; Talma, A.G.; Ooij, van W.J.; Noordermeer, J.W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Surface modification of carbon black by plasma polymerization was aimed to reduce its surface energy in order to compatibilize the filler with various elastomers. A fullerenic carbon black was used for the modification process. Thermogravimetric analysis, wetting behavior with liquids of known surfa

  12. Sources of uncertainties in modelling black carbon at the global scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vignati, E.; Karl, M.; Krol, M.C.; Wilson, J.; Stier, P.; Cavalli, F.

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of the global black carbon (BC) cycle is essentially qualitative due to uncertainties in our knowledge of its properties. This work investigates two source of uncertainties in modelling black carbon: those due to the use of different schemes for BC ageing and its removal rate in th

  13. Sources of uncertainties in modelling black carbon at the global scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vignati, E.; Karl, M.; Krol, M.C.; Wilson, J.; Stier, P.; Cavalli, F.

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of the global black carbon (BC) cycle is essentially qualitative due to uncertainties in our knowledge of its properties. This work investigates two source of uncertainties in modelling black carbon: those due to the use of different schemes for BC ageing and its removal rate in

  14. Climate Response due to Black Carbon Aerosols and Black-Carbon-induced SST Effects in MIROC5.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Y.; Nakajima, T.; Goto, D.

    2014-12-01

    This study used the Models for Interdisciplinary Research on Climate, MIROC5.0, one member of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5), to investigate the effects of black carbon (BC) aerosols on atmospheric circulations and climate including intricate feedback mechanism. The simulations with and without BC were conducted and the difference between these two runs is the corresponding response due to BC. Both atmosphere-ocean coupled general circulation model simulation (CGCM with full ocean) and the fixed SST runs (AGCM with prescribed sea surface temperature and sea ice temperature) were used to study the effects from ocean boundary conditions. The regional effects due to BC may be much larger than models have assumed (Andreae and Ramanathan, 2013; Bond et al., 2013). There are many studies used simplified mixed-layer ocean under prescribed surface heat flux to estimate the climate effect of BC (Kim et al., 2014), however these ocean-atmosphere coupled processes act on seasonal and annual time scales more real than non-ocean-atmosphere coupled models. Our results showed that the comprehensively sea-air interaction amplified the heating effect of black carbon aerosols; the presence of BC affected climate not only at local source areas but also at remote regions due to changes on energy transport processes and atmospheric circulations; we also discussed how the feedback of SST induced by BC affected on the distribution and magnitudes of climate response such as temperature, precipitation and cloud coverage between CGCM and AGCM runs.

  15. Nanoparticles of carbon allotropes inhibit glioblastoma multiforme angiogenesis in ovo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodzik, Marta; Sawosz, Ewa; Wierzbicki, Mateusz

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of carbon nanoparticles produced by different methods on the growth of brain tumor and the development of blood vessels. Glioblastoma multiforme cells were cultured on the chrioallantoic membrane of chicken embryo and after 7 days of incubati...

  16. The point-defect of carbon nanotubes anchoring Au nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lv, Y. A.; Cui, Y. H.; Li, X. N.

    2010-01-01

    The understanding of the interaction between Au and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is very important since Au/CNTs composites have wide applications in many fields. In this study, we investigated the dispersion of Au nanoparticles on the CNTs by transmission electron microscopy and the bonding mechanism...... of states, charge transfer and frontier molecular orbitals. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  17. Carbon-supported base metal nanoparticles : Cellulose at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Jacco; Versluijs-Helder, Marjan; Vlietstra, Edward J.; Geus, John W.; Jenneskens, Leonardus W.

    2015-01-01

    Pyrolysis of base metal salt loaded microcrystalline cellulose spheres gives a facile access to carbon-supported base metal nanoparticles, which have been characterized with temperature-dependent XRD, SEM, TEM, ICP-MS and elemental analysis. The role of cellulose is multifaceted: 1) it facilitates a

  18. Is marine dissolved organic matter the "missing sink" for soil-derived black carbon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmar, Thorsten; Suryaputra, I. Gusti N. A.; Niggemann, Jutta

    2010-05-01

    The thermal alteration of biomass during wildfires can be an important factor for the stabilization of organic matter in soils. Black carbon, i.e. biochars and soot, is more resistant to biodegradation than unaltered biomass, and it can therefore accumulate in soils and sediments. Our knowledge on the turnover of black carbon is still very fragmentary, and the known loss rates do not account for the estimated production rates. Major loss mechanisms remain unidentified or have been underestimated. Recently, we have identified a major thermogenic component in dissolved organic matter (DOM) of the deep ocean. We hypothesize that black carbon in soils is solubilized over time, probably via microbial interaction, and transported via rivers into the ocean. DOM, one of the largest organic carbon pools on earth, could therefore be an important transport medium of soil-derived black carbon. A case study was performed in the Suwannee River estuary and adjacent oceanic shelf (Florida, USA). The Suwannee River drains extensive wetlands and fire-impacted forests. The fate of dissolved black carbon was traced from the river through its estuary into the open Gulf of Mexico. Black carbon was molecularly quantified as benzenepolycarboxylic acids after nitric acid oxidation via a new UPLC method (ultra-performance liquid chromatography). The molecular analysis was accompanied by optical (excitation-emission matrix fluorescence and absorbance spectroscopy) and elemental characterization of DOM. A major component (approx. 10% on a carbon basis) of Suwannee River DOM could be identified as black carbon. The concentration of black carbon decreased offshore, and on the open ocean only about 1% of DOM could be identified as black carbon. In the deep ocean, the thermogenic component of DOM is higher and approx. 2.4% of DOM. The surface ocean must therefore be an efficient sink for dissolved black carbon. We hypothesize that sunlight may initiate photochemical reactions that cause a loss of

  19. Hyaluronan and calcium carbonate hybrid nanoparticles for colorectal cancer chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Jinghui; Xu, Jian; Zhao, Jian; Zhang, Rui

    2017-09-01

    A hybrid drug delivery system (DDS) composed of hyaluronan and calcium carbonate (CC) was developed. By taking advantage of the tumor-targeting ability of hyaluronan and the drug-loading property of CC, the well-formed hyaluronan–CC nanoparticles were able to serve as a DDS targeting colorectal cancer with a decent drug loading content, which is beneficial in the chemotherapy of colorectal cancer. In this study, hyaluronan–CC nanoparticles smaller than 100 nm were successfully developed to load the wide-range anti-cancer drug adriamycin (Adr) to construct hyaluronan–CC/Adr nanoparticles. On the other hand, we also found that hyaluronan–CC/Adr nanoparticles can possibly increase the uptake ratio of Adr into HT29 colorectal cancer cells when compared with hyaluronan-free nanoparticles (CC/Adr) via the CD44 receptor-mediated endocytosis via competitive uptake and in vivo imaging assays. Note that both in vitro (CCK-8 assay on HT29 cells) and in vivo (anti-cancer assay on HT-29 tumor-bearing nude mice model) experiments revealed that hyaluronan–CC/Adr nanoparticles exhibited stronger anti-cancer activity than free Adr or CC/Adr nanoparticles with minimized toxic side effects and preferable cancer-suppression potential.

  20. Influence of carbon black and indium tin oxide absorber particles on laser transmission welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aden, Mirko; Mamuschkin, Viktor; Olowinsky, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    For laser transmission welding of polypropylene carbon black and indium tin oxide (ITO) are used as absorber particles. Additionally, the colorant titanium dioxide is mixed to the absorbing part, while the transparent part is kept in natural state. The absorption coefficients of ITO and carbon black particles are obtained, as well as the scattering properties of polypropylene loaded with titanium dioxide (TiO2). At similar concentrations the absorption coefficient of ITO is an order of magnitude smaller than that of carbon black. Simulations of radiation propagation show that the penetration depth of laser light is smaller for carbon black. Therefore, the density of the released heat is higher. Adding TiO2 changes the distribution of heat in case of ITO, whereas for carbon black the effect is negligible. Thermal simulations reveal the influence of the two absorbers and TiO2 on the heat affected zone. The results of the thermal simulations are compared to tensile test results.

  1. Towards Soil and Sediment Inventories of Black Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiello, C. A.

    2008-12-01

    A body of literature on black carbon (BC) concentrations in soils and sediments is rapidly accumulating, but as of yet, there are no global or regional inventories of BC in either reservoir. Soil and sediment BC inventories are badly needed for a range of fields. For example, in oceanography a global sediment BC inventory is crucial in understanding the role of biomass burning in the development of stable marine carbon reservoirs, including dissolved organic carbon and sedimentary organic carbon. Again in the marine environment, BC likely strongly impacts the fate and transport of anthropogenic pollutants: regional inventories of BC in sediments will help develop better environmental remediation strategies. In terrestrial systems well-constrained natural BC soil inventories would help refine ecological, agricultural, and soil biogeochemical studies. BC is highly sorptive of nutrients including nitrogen and phosphorous. The presence of BC in ecosystems almost certainly alters N and P cycling; however, without soil BC inventories, we cannot know where BC has a significant impact. BC's nutrient sorptivity and water-holding capacity make it an important component of agricultural soils, and some researchers have proposed artificially increasing soil BC inventories to improve soil fertility. Natural soil BC concentrations in some regions are quite high, but without a baseline inventory, it is challenging to predict when agricultural amendment will significantly exceed natural conditions. And finally, because BC is one of the most stable fractions of organic carbon in soils, understanding its concentration and regional distribution will help us track the dynamics of soil organic matter response to changing environmental conditions. Developing effective regional and global BC inventories is challenging both because of data sparsity and methodological intercomparison issues. In this presentation I will describe a roadmap to generating these valuable inventories.

  2. Multilayer Graphene/Carbon Black/Chlorine Isobutyl Isoprene Rubber Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Frasca

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available High loadings of carbon black (CB are usually used to achieve the properties demanded of rubber compounds. In recent years, distinct nanoparticles have been investigated to replace CB in whole or in part, in order to reduce the necessary filler content or to improve performance. Multilayer graphene (MLG is a nanoparticle made of just 10 graphene sheets and has recently become commercially available for mass-product nanocomposites. Three phr (part for hundred rubbers of MLG are added to chlorine isobutyl isoprene rubber (CIIR/CB composites in order to replace part of the CB. The incorporation of just 3 phr MLG triples the Young’s modulus of CIIR; the same effect is obtained with 20 phr CB. The simultaneous presence of three MLG and CB also delivers remarkable properties, e.g. adding three MLG and 20 phr CB increased the hardness as much as adding 40 phr CB. A comprehensive study is presented, showing the influence on a variety of mechanical properties. The potential of the MLG/CB combination is illustrated to reduce the filler content or to boost performance, respectively. Apart from the remarkable mechanical properties, the CIIR/CB/MLG nanocomposites showed an increase in weathering resistance.

  3. Carbon Supported Ag Nanoparticles as High Performance Cathode Catalyst for Anion Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le eXin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A solution phase-based nanocapsule method was successfully developed to synthesize non-precious metal catalyst - carbon supported Ag nanoparticles (Ag/C. XRD patterns and TEM image show Ag nanoparticles with a small average size (5.4 nm and narrow size distribution (2-9 nm are uniformly dispersed on the carbon black Vulcan XC-72 support. The intrinsic activity and pathway of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR on the Ag/C and commercial Pt/C were investigated using rotating ring disc electrode (RRDE tests at room temperature. The results confirmed that the 4-electron pathway of ORR proceeds on small Ag nanoparticles, and showed comparable ORR activities on the self-prepared Ag/C and a commercial Pt/C. A single H2-O2 anion exchange membrane fuel cell with the Ag/C cathode catalyst exhibited an open circuit potential of 0.98 V and a peak power density of 190 mW/cm2 at 80 oC.

  4. Light Absorption in Arctic Sea Ice - Black Carbon vs Chlorophyll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunro, O. O.; Wingenter, O. W.; Elliott, S.; Hunke, E. C.; Flanner, M.; Wang, H.; Dubey, M. K.; Jeffery, N.

    2015-12-01

    The fingerprint of climate change is more obvious in the Arctic than any other place on Earth. This is not only because the surface temperature there has increased at twice the rate of global mean temperature but also because Arctic sea ice extent has reached a record low of 49% reduction relative to the 1979-2000 climatology. Radiation absorption through black carbon (BC) deposited on Arctic snow and sea ice surface is one of the major hypothesized contributors to the decline. However, we note that chlorophyll-a absorption owing to increasing biology activity in this region could be a major competitor during boreal spring. Modeling of sea-ice physical and biological processes together with experiments and field observations promise rapid progress in the quality of Arctic ice predictions. Here we develop a dynamic ice system module to investigate discrete absorption of both BC and chlorophyll in the Arctic, using BC deposition fields from version 5 of Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) and vertically distributed layers of chlorophyll concentrations from Sea Ice Model (CICE). To this point, our black carbon mixing ratios compare well with available in situ data. Both results are in the same order of magnitude. Estimates from our calculations show that sea ice and snow around the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and Baffin Bay has the least black carbon absorption while values at the ice-ocean perimeter in the region of the Barents Sea peak significantly. With regard to pigment concentrations, high amounts of chlorophyll are produced in Arctic sea ice by the bottom microbial community, and also within the columnar pack wherever substantial biological activity takes place in the presence of moderate light. We show that the percentage of photons absorbed by chlorophyll in the spring is comparable to the amount attributed to BC, especially in areas where the total deposition rates are decreasing with time on interannual timescale. We expect a continuous increase in

  5. COPPER/CARBON CORE SHELL NANOPARTICLES AS ADDITIVE FOR NATURAL FIBER/WOOD PLASTIC BLENDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinglin Wu,

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Copper/carbon core/shell nanoparticles (CCCSNs recently have been introduced as an industrial material. In this paper, composites based on high density polyethylene (HDPE, bamboo fiber, CCCSNs, and coupling agent (MAPE were prepared by melt compounding. The influence of CCCSN content on the resulting composites’ mechanical, biological resistance, and thermal properties was investigated. It was found that CCCSNs within the carbon black matrix were processed well with bamboo fiber-plastic blends through mixing and injection molding. The materials enhanced composite strength and modulus-related properties. Composites with CCCSNs and natural fibers reduced heat capacity and thermal diffusivity. Composites with CCCSN materials also enhanced termite and mold performance. Thus, the material can be used as additive for plastics and other polymers to modify strength properties, biological resistance (e.g., mold and stain, and thermal conductivity properties.

  6. Black Carbon in Marine Dissolved Organic Carbon: Abundance and Radiocarbon Measurements in the Global Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, A. I.; Walker, B. D.; Druffel, E. R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Compound specific radiocarbon analysis is a powerful tool for understanding the cycling of individual components, such as black carbon (BC) produced from biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion, within bulk pools, like the marine dissolved organic carbon pool. Here, we use a solid phase extraction method and a wide range of solvent polarities to concentrate dissolved organic carbon from seawater. Then we isolate BC in sufficient quantities for radiocarbon analysis. We report the radiocarbon age of BC, concentrations and its relative structure, from coastal and open ocean surface samples. We will discuss our progress towards measuring these quantities in dissolved organic carbon collected from the Pacific and Atlantic oceans to understand the fate, transformation and cycling of BC in the world ocean. These measurements are paired with bulk DOC Δ14C profiles, providing insight into the role of BC as a missing sink in the ultra-refractory DOC pool.

  7. Analysis of the Thermal Conductivity of Polymer Nanocomposites Filled with Carbon Nanotubes and Carbon Black

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.V. Dinzhos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Experimental results and theoretical studies of thermophysical characteristics crystalline polyethylene nanocomposites containing from 0.3 to 2.5 wt. % carbon black and nanocomposites containing from 0.2 to 1.5 wt. % carbon nanotubes is done in the article. The fundamentals of the effective medium theory and percolation theory and how they correlate with the experimental data is shown. The features of the structure’s influence of polymer composites on their thermal properties is studied. A comparative analysis of the thermal conductivity of the compositions according to the geometry of the filler is done.

  8. Brief Analysis on the Production & Operation Situation of Chinese Carbon Black Industry in the First Half Year

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    At present, there are about 120 carbon black manufacturing enterprises in China with the production capacity of 3.41 million tons, accounting for 78% of the total production capacity of the country, in which there are 31 carbon black enterprises with the production capacity of over 50,000 tons. Compared with the international carbon black industry, our carbon black industry has a low intensification.

  9. Apparatus for producing carbon-coated nanoparticles and carbon nanospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, W. Lee; Weigle, John C.; Phillips, Jonathan

    2015-10-20

    An apparatus for producing carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles comprising a container for entraining particles in an aerosol gas, providing an inlet for carbon-containing gas, providing an inlet for plasma gas, a proximate torch for mixing the aerosol gas, the carbon-containing gas, and the plasma gas, bombarding the mixed gases with microwaves, and providing a collection device for gathering the resulting carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles. Also disclosed is a method and apparatus for making hollow carbon nano- or micro-scale spheres.

  10. Black Carbon Vertical Profiles Strongly Affect Its Radiative Forcing Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Bellouin, N.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kinne, S.; Kirkevag, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Penner, J. E.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, K.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of black carbon (BC) aerosols on the global radiation balance is not well constrained. Here twelve global aerosol models are used to show that at least 20% of the present uncertainty in modeled BC direct radiative forcing (RF) is due to diversity in the simulated vertical profile of BC mass. Results are from phases 1 and 2 of the global aerosol model intercomparison project (AeroCom). Additionally, a significant fraction of the variability is shown to come from high altitudes, as, globally, more than 40% of the total BC RF is exerted above 5 km. BC emission regions and areas with transported BC are found to have differing characteristics. These insights into the importance of the vertical profile of BC lead us to suggest that observational studies are needed to better characterize the global distribution of BC, including in the upper troposphere.

  11. Optical Properties of Small Ice Crystals with Black Carbon Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X.; Geier, M.; Arienti, M.

    2013-12-01

    The optical properties of ice crystals play a fundamental role in modeling atmospheric radiation and hydrological cycle, which are critical in monitoring climate change. While Black Carbon (BC) is recognized as the dominant absorber with positive radiative forcing (warming) (Ramanathan & Carmichael, 2008), in-situ observations (Cappa, et al, 2012) indicate that the characterization of the mixing state of BC with ice crystals and other non-BC particles in global climate models (Ghan & Schwartz, 2007) needs further investigation. The limitation in the available mixing models is due to the drastically different absorbing properties of BC compared to other aerosols. We explore the scattering properties of ice crystals (in shapes commonly found in cirrus clouds and contrails - Yang, et al. 2012) with the inclusion of BC particles. The Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA) (Yurkin & Hoekstra, 2011) is utilized to directly calculate the optical properties of the crystals with multiple BC inclusions, modeled as a distribution of spheres. The results are then compared with the most popular models of internal and external mixing (Liou, et al. 2011). The DDA calculations are carried out over a broad range of BC particle sizes and volume fractions within the crystal at the 532 nm wavelength and for ice crystals smaller than 50 μm. The computationally intensive database generated in this study is critical for understanding the effect of different types of BC inclusions on the atmosphere radiative forcing. Examples will be discussed to illustrate the modification of BC optical properties by encapsulation in ice crystals and how the parameterization of the BC mixing state in global climate models can be improved. Acknowledgements Support by Sandia National Laboratories' LDRD (Laboratory Directed Research and Development) is gratefully acknowledged. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of

  12. Black carbon aerosol-induced Northern Hemisphere tropical expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovilakam, Mahesh; Mahajan, Salil

    2015-06-01

    Global climate models (GCMs) underestimate the observed trend in tropical expansion. Recent studies partly attribute it to black carbon (BC) aerosols, which are poorly represented in GCMs. We conduct a suite of idealized experiments with the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 coupled to a slab ocean model forced with increasing BC concentrations covering a large swath of the estimated range of current BC radiative forcing while maintaining their spatial distribution. The Northern Hemisphere (NH) tropics expand poleward nearly linearly as BC radiative forcing increases (0.7° W-1 m2), indicating that a realistic representation of BC could reduce GCM biases. We find support for the mechanism where BC-induced midlatitude tropospheric heating shifts the maximum meridional tropospheric temperature gradient poleward resulting in tropical expansion. We also find that the NH poleward tropical edge is nearly linearly correlated with the location of the Intertropical Convergence Zone, which shifts northward in response to increasing BC.

  13. Electrical properties of foamed polypropylene/carbon black composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliev, M.; Kotzev, G.; Vulchev, V.

    2016-02-01

    Polypropylene composites containing carbon black fillers were produced by vibration assisted extrusion process. Solid (unfoamed) composite samples were molded by conventional injection molding method, while structural foams were molded by a low pressure process. The foamed samples were evidenced to have a solid skin-foamed core structure which main parameters were found to depend on the quantity of material injected in the mold. The average bubbles' sizes and their distribution were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. It is established that the conductivity of the foamed samples gradually decreases when reducing the sample density. Nevertheless, the conductivity is found to be lower than the conductivity of the unfoamed samples both being of the same order. The flexural properties of the composites were studied and the results were discussed in the context of the structure parameters of the foamed samples.

  14. Sources of uncertainties in modelling Black Carbon at the global scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cavalli

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the global black carbon cycle is essentially qualitative due to uncertainties in our knowledge of the properties of black carbon. This work investigates uncertainties related to modelling black carbon: due to the use of different schemes for BC ageing and its removal rate in the global Transport-Chemistry model TM5 and due to the uncertainties in the definition and quantification of observed black carbon, which propagate through to both the emission inventories, and the measurements used for the model evaluation.

    The schemes for the atmospheric processing of black carbon that have been tested with the model are (i a simple approach considering black carbon as bulk aerosol and a simple treatment in the removal and (ii a more complete description of microphysical aging within an aerosol dynamics model, where removal is coupled to the microphysical properties of the aerosol. In the first approach a fixed 70% of black carbon is scavenged in clouds and removed when rain is present. The second leads to a global average of 40% black carbon that is scavenged in clouds and subsequently removed by rain, thus resulting in a longer lifetime. This difference is reflected in comparisons between both sets of modelled results and the measurements. Close to the sources, both anthropogenic and vegetation fire source regions, the model results do not differ significantly, showing that the emissions are the prevailing mechanism determining the concentrations and the choice of the aerosol scheme does not influence the levels. In more remote areas such as oceanic and polar regions the differences can be orders of magnitude, due to the differences between the two schemes. The more complete description reproduces the seasonal trend of the black carbon observations in those areas, although not always the magnitude of the signal, while the more simplified approach underestimates black carbon concentrations by orders of magnitude.

  15. Adsorption ability of the carbon black for nickel ions uptake from aqueous solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rađenović Ankica

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface modification can be performed by adsorption of certain organic compounds on the surface of carbon. The main objective of this work was to compare the adsorption ability of acid-modified carbon black with the non-modified one. Modification process was performed by adsorption of acetic acid onto commercial carbon black surface. A batch adsorption system was applied to study the both adsorption reaction, acetic acid and Ni(II adsorption onto the carbon black. Adsorption isotherms of acetic acid and Ni(II adsorption onto the non-modified and modified carbon black were fitted by classical adsorption models, such as Freundlich and Langmuir models. Modified carbon black surface become more active for Ni(II ions removal from aqueous solutions. The results showed that modification by acetic acid increases the adsorption capacity of carbon black from 18.3823 mg Ni(II g-1 to 86.9566 mg Ni(II g-1. SEM analysis enabled the observation of any surface changes in the carbon black that have occurred due to either acid modification or Ni(II adsorption.

  16. Characterization of black carbon in the ambient air of Agra, India: Seasonal variation and meteorological influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pratima; Singh, Shalendra Pratap; Jangid, Ashok; Kumar, Ranjit

    2017-09-01

    This study characterizes the black carbon in Agra, India home to the Taj Mahal—and situated in the Indo-Gangetic basin. The mean black carbon concentration is 9.5 μg m-3 and, owing to excessive biomass/fossil fuel combustion and automobile emissions, the concentration varies considerably. Seasonally, the black carbon mass concentration is highest in winter, probably due to the increased fossil fuel consumption for heating and cooking, apart from a low boundary layer. The nocturnal peak rises prominently in winter, when the use of domestic heating is excessive. Meanwhile, the concentration is lowest during the monsoon season because of the turbulent atmospheric conditions and the process of washout by precipitation. The ratio of black carbon to brown carbon is less than unity during the entire study period, except in winter (December). This may be because that biomass combustion and diesel exhaust are major black carbon contributors in this region, while a higher ratio in winter may be due to the increased consumption of fossil fuel and wood for heating purposes. ANOVA reveals significant monthly variation in the concentration of black carbon; plus, it is negatively correlated with wind speed and temperature. A high black carbon mass concentration is observed at moderate (1-2 m s-1) wind speed, as compared to calm or turbulent atmospheric conditions.

  17. Fluxes of soot black carbon to South Atlantic sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, Rainer; Bollinger, Kevyn; Cantwell, Mark; Feichter, Johann; Fischer-Bruns, Irene; Zabel, Matthias

    2009-03-01

    Deep sea sediment samples from the South Atlantic Ocean were analyzed for soot black carbon (BC), total organic carbon (TOC), stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Soot BC was present at low concentrations (0.04-0.17% dry weight), but accounted for 3-35% of TOC. Fluxes of soot BC were calculated on the basis of known sedimentation rates and ranged from 0.5 to 7.8 μg cm-2 a-1, with higher fluxes near Africa compared to South America. Values of δ13C indicated a marine origin for the organic carbon but terrestrial sources for the soot BC. PAH ratios implied a pyrogenic origin for most samples and possibly a predominance of traffic emissions over wood burning off the African coast. A coupled ocean-atmosphere-aerosol-climate model was used to determine fluxes of BC from 1860 to 2000 to the South Atlantic. Model simulation and measurements both yielded higher soot BC fluxes off the African coast and lower fluxes off the South American coast; however, measured sedimentary soot BC fluxes exceeded simulated values by ˜1 μg cm-2 a-1 on average (within a factor of 2-4). For the sediments off the African coast, soot BC delivery from the Congo River could possibly explain the higher flux rates, but no elevated soot BC fluxes were detected in the Amazon River basin. In total, fluxes of soot BC to the South Atlantic were ˜480-700 Gg a-1 in deep sea sediments. Our results suggest that attempts to construct a global mass balance of BC should include estimates of the atmospheric deposition of BC.

  18. Observation of black carbon, ozone and carbon monoxide in the Kali Gandaki Valley Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhungel, S.; Panday, A. K.; Kathayat, B.

    2014-12-01

    The increased melting of snow and ice in the arctic and the Himalaya is a growing concern for all of the earth's population. Deposition of black carbon (BC) on the snow and ice surface accelerates melting by absorbing the radiative energy and directly transferring all that energy onto the underlying surface. During pre-monsoon season, satellite images show a thick layer of haze covering the Indo-Gangetic plain (IGP) and the Himalayan foothills. Sub-micron particles are transported to the Himalaya from the IGP predominantly driven by the thermal valley wind system. The Himalayas consist of some of the tallest mountain ranges in the world, over 8000m tall that reach the stratosphere. The Kali Gandaki Valley in Nepal is one of the deepest gorges in the world, and has some of the highest up-valley winds in the world. It is also one of the most open connecting points for air from IGP to reach the Tibetan Plateau. In 2010 the University of Virginia, in collaboration with ICIMOD and Nepal Wireless, established an atmospheric research station in Jomsom, Nepal (28.78N, 83.42E, 2900 m.a.s.l.) half-way along the Kali Gandaki valley. The station is equipped to measure black carbon (BC), carbon monoxide (CO), and ozone concentrations. It also has an automated weather station, a filter sampler, and a NASA Aeronet Sunphotometer. Here we present our observations of black carbon, ozone, carbon monoxide at Jomsom to show the diurnal and seasonal variability of the pollutants. The results show diurnal patterns in the concentration of these pollutants and also episodes of high pollutant transport along the valley. These transport episodes are more common during the pre-monsoon season which indicates that deep mountain valleys like the Kali Gandaki valley facilitate the transport of pollutants and thus promote snow and glacial melting.

  19. Room-temperature synthesis of soluble, fluorescent carbon nanoparticles from organogel precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Néabo, Jules Roméo; Vigier-Carrière, Cécile; Rondeau-Gagné, Simon; Morin, Jean-François

    2012-10-18

    Carbon nanoparticles were obtained at room temperature by irradiating an organogel made from a 1,8-diaryloctatetrayne derivative in chloroform. During the topochemical polymerization, the morphology of the gel changes from fibers to soluble, yellow fluorescent nanoparticles in high yield. Analyses suggest that the resulting nanoparticles are made of amorphous graphitic carbon.

  20. Ostwald Ripening of Platinum Nanoparticles Confined in a Carbon Nanotube/Silica-Templated Cylindrical Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Mateo-Mateo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sintering of nanoparticles mediated by an Ostwald ripening mechanism is generally assessed examining the final particle size distributions. Based on this methodology, a general approach for depositing platinum nanoparticles onto carbon nanotubes in solution has been employed in order to evaluate the sintering process of these metallic nanoparticles at increasing temperatures in a carbon nanotube/silica-templated confined space.

  1. Carbon black dispersion pre-plating technology for printed wire board manufacturing. Final technology evaluation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folsom, D.W.; Gavaskar, A.R.; Jones, J.A.; Olfenbuttel, R.F.

    1993-10-01

    The project compared chemical use, waste generation, cost, and product quality between electroless copper and carbon-black-based preplating technologies at the printed wire board (PWB) manufacturing facility of McCurdy Circuits in Orange, CA. The carbon-black based preplating technology evaluated is used as an alternative process for electroless copper (EC) plating of through-holes before electrolytic copper plating. The specific process used at McCurdy is the BlackHole (BH) technology process, which uses a dispersion of carbon black in an aqueous solution to provide a conductive surface for subsequent electrolytic copper plating. The carbon-black dispersion technology provided effective waste reduction and long-term cost savings. The economic analysis determined that the new process was cost efficient because chemical use was reduced and the process proved more efficient; the payback period was less than 4 yrs.

  2. Black carbon emissions in Russia: A critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Meredydd; Kholod, Nazar; Kuklinski, Teresa; Denysenko, Artur; Smith, Steven J.; Staniszewski, Aaron; Hao, Wei Min; Liu, Liang; Bond, Tami C.

    2017-08-01

    This study presents a comprehensive review of estimated black carbon (BC) emissions in Russia from a range of studies. Russia has an important role regarding BC emissions given the extent of its territory above the Arctic Circle, where BC emissions have a particularly pronounced effect on the climate. We assess underlying methodologies and data sources for each major emissions source based on their level of detail, accuracy and extent to which they represent current conditions. We then present reference values for each major emissions source. In the case of flaring, the study presents new estimates drawing on data on Russia's associated petroleum gas and the most recent satellite data on flaring. We also present estimates of organic carbon (OC) for each source, either based on the reference studies or from our own calculations. In addition, the study provides uncertainty estimates for each source. Total BC emissions are estimated at 688 Gg in 2014, with an uncertainty range 401 Gg-1453 Gg, while OC emissions are 9224 Gg with uncertainty ranging between 5596 Gg and 14,736 Gg. Wildfires dominated and contributed about 83% of the total BC emissions: however, the effect on radiative forcing is mitigated in part by OC emissions. We also present an adjusted estimate of Arctic forcing from Russia's BC and OC emissions. In recent years, Russia has pursued policies to reduce flaring and limit particulate emissions from on-road transport, both of which appear to significantly contribute to the lower emissions and forcing values found in this study.

  3. Dissolved Black Carbon in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Z.; Yang, W.; Chen, M.; Ma, H.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved black carbon (DBC) has been ubiquitously reported in dissolved organic matter (DOM). However, the abundance and provenance of DBC in the ocean are not well understood. Here, DBC in the South China Sea (SCS) was determined at molecular level using the benzenepolycarboxylic acids (BPCAs) method. DBC showed high concentrations in the upper 100 m seawater with the average of 1.13 μmol l-1 (n=55). In the intermediate seawater (200-1500 m), DBC ranged from 0.67 to 0.89 μmol l-1 with the average of 0.78 μmol l-1 (n=9), exhibiting nearly homogeneous distributions. The vertical distribution pattern indicated that DBC significantly degraded in the photic zone, corresponding to an attenuate constant of 12.5±4.9 km-1. The ratios of B6CA/B3CAs increased downward, implying that aromatic condensation degree of DBC increase during transport from surface to deep water. Using the standing crops of DBC in the upper 200 m and the residence time of seawater, atmospheric deposition of DBC was estimated to be 1.94 TgC yr-1, accounting for around 16% of the global BC deposition. Our study highlights that DBC could be an important component of ocean carbon cycling in Pacific Asia Marginal Seas.

  4. Black carbon emissions in Russia: A critical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Meredydd; Kholod, Nazar; Kuklinski, Teresa; Denysenko, Artur; Smith, Steven J.; Staniszewski, Aaron; Hao, Wei Min; Liu, Liang; Bond, Tami C.

    2017-08-01

    Russia has a particularly important role regarding black carbon (BC) emissions given the extent of its territory above the Arctic Circle, where BC emissions have a particularly pronounced effect on the climate. This study presents a comprehensive review of BC estimates from a range of studies. We assess underlying methodologies and data sources for each major emissions source based on their level of detail, accuracy and extent to which they represent current conditions. We then present reference values for each major emissions source. In the case of flaring, the study presents new estimates drawing on data on Russian associated petroleum gas and the most recent satellite data on flaring. We also present estimates of organic carbon (OC) for each source, either based on the reference studies or from our own calculations. In addition, the study provides uncertainty estimates for each source. Total BC emissions are estimated at 689 Gg in 2014, with an uncertainty range between (407-1,416), while OC emissions are 9,228 Gg (with uncertainty between 5,595 and 14,728). Wildfires dominated and contributed about 83% of the total BC emissions, however the effect on radiative forcing is mitigated by OC emissions. We also present an adjusted estimate of Arctic forcing from Russian OC and BC emissions. In recent years, Russia has pursued policies to reduce flaring and limit particulate emissions from on-road transport, both of which appear to significantly contribute to the lower emissions and forcing values found in this study.

  5. Ni/Carbon Hybrid Prepared by Hydrothermal Carbonization and Thermal Treatment as Support for PtRu Nanoparticles for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marcelo Marques Tusi; Michele Brandalise; Nataly Soares de Oliveira Polanco; Olandir Vercino Correa; Antonio Carlos da Silva; Juan Carlo Villalba; Fauze Jaco Anaissi

    2013-01-01

    Ni/Carbon was prepared in two steps:initially cellulose as carbon source and NiCl2.6H20 as catalyst of the carbonization process were submitted to hydrothermal treatment at 200 ℃ and further to thermal treatment at 900 ℃ under argon atmosphere.The obtained material contains Ni nanoparticles with face-centered cubic (fcc) structure dispersed on amorphous carbon with graphitic domains.PtRu/C electrocatalysts (carbonsupported PtRu nanoparticles) were prepared by an alcohol-reduction process using Ni/Carbon as support.The materials were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis,energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy,Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy,X-ray diffraction,transmission electron microscopy and tested as anodes in single direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC).The performances of PtRu/C electrocatalysts using Ni/Carbon as support were superior to those obtained for PtRu/C using commercial carbon black Vulcan XC72 as support.

  6. Structure aggregation of carbon black in ethylene-propylene diene polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The modulus of filled and unfilled Ethylene-propylene diene rubber (EPDM vulcanizates was used to predict the shape-factor of carbon black aggregation in the polymer. Four types of carbon black that vary in particle size and structure were used in this study. Quadratic curves relating the carbon black volume concentration and the modulus ratio of filled and unfilled rubber vulcanizates were used to adopt the shape factor of certain carbon black type. The shape factor of MT, HAF, SRF and Lampblack were 3, 3.75, 4 and 4.25 respectively. X-ray diffraction technique (XRD was also used to evaluate the relative size of crystallite on the filler surface to that of the rubber and correlating it to the shape factor of carbon black aggregation in the polymer. Effect of the pH values and structure of carbon blacks used on the shape factor of filler aggregates were also studied. It was found that the shape factor is independent on the particle size while it is dependent on the pH value and structure of carbon black. Also the crystallites size of the filler is proportional to the shape factor.

  7. Photo-lability of deep ocean dissolved black carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stubbins

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved black carbon (DBC, defined here as condensed aromatics isolated from seawater via PPL solid phase extraction and quantified as benzenepolycarboxylic acid (BPCA oxidation products, is a significant component of the oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC pool. These condensed aromatics are widely distributed in the open ocean and appear to be tens of thousands of years old. As such DBC is regarded as highly refractory. In the current study, the photo-lability of DBC, DOC and coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM; ultraviolet-visible absorbance were determined over the course of a 28 day irradiation of North Atlantic Deep Water under a solar simulator. During the irradiation DBC fell from 1044 ± 164 nM-C to 55 ± 15 nM-C, a 20-fold decrease in concentration. Dissolved black carbon photo-degradation was more rapid and more extensive than for bulk CDOM and DOC. The concentration of DBC correlated with CDOM absorbance and the quality of DBC indicated by the ratios of different BPCAs correlated with CDOM absorbance spectral slope, suggesting the optical properties of CDOM may provide a proxy for both DBC concentrations and quality in natural waters. Further, the photo-lability of components of the DBC pool increased with their degree of aromatic condensation. These trends indicate that a continuum of compounds of varying photo-lability exists within the marine DOC pool. In this continuum, photo-lability scales with aromatic character, specifically the degree of condensation. Scaling the rapid photo-degradation of DBC to rates of DOC photo-mineralisation for the global ocean leads to an estimated photo-chemical half-life for oceanic DBC of less than 800 years. This is more than an order of magnitude shorter than the apparent age of DBC in the ocean. Consequently, photo-degradation is posited as the primary sink for oceanic DBC and the apparent survival of DBC molecules in the oceans for millennia appears to be facilitated not by their

  8. Photo-lability of deep ocean dissolved black carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbins, A.; Niggemann, J.; Dittmar, T.

    2012-05-01

    Dissolved black carbon (DBC), defined here as condensed aromatics isolated from seawater via PPL solid phase extraction and quantified as benzenepolycarboxylic acid (BPCA) oxidation products, is a significant component of the oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool. These condensed aromatics are widely distributed in the open ocean and appear to be tens of thousands of years old. As such DBC is regarded as highly refractory. In the current study, the photo-lability of DBC, DOC and coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM; ultraviolet-visible absorbance) were determined over the course of a 28 day irradiation of North Atlantic Deep Water under a solar simulator. During the irradiation DBC fell from 1044 ± 164 nM-C to 55 ± 15 nM-C, a 20-fold decrease in concentration. Dissolved black carbon photo-degradation was more rapid and more extensive than for bulk CDOM and DOC. The concentration of DBC correlated with CDOM absorbance and the quality of DBC indicated by the ratios of different BPCAs correlated with CDOM absorbance spectral slope, suggesting the optical properties of CDOM may provide a proxy for both DBC concentrations and quality in natural waters. Further, the photo-lability of components of the DBC pool increased with their degree of aromatic condensation. These trends indicate that a continuum of compounds of varying photo-lability exists within the marine DOC pool. In this continuum, photo-lability scales with aromatic character, specifically the degree of condensation. Scaling the rapid photo-degradation of DBC to rates of DOC photo-mineralisation for the global ocean leads to an estimated photo-chemical half-life for oceanic DBC of less than 800 years. This is more than an order of magnitude shorter than the apparent age of DBC in the ocean. Consequently, photo-degradation is posited as the primary sink for oceanic DBC and the apparent survival of DBC molecules in the oceans for millennia appears to be facilitated not by their inherent inertness but

  9. Toxicity assessment of carbon black waste: A by-product from oil refineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Xu; Ng, Wei Cheng; Fendy; Tong, Yen Wah; Dai, Yanjun; Neoh, Koon Gee; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2017-01-05

    In Singapore, approximately 30t/day of carbon-based solid waste are produced from petrochemical processes. This carbon black waste has been shown to possess physical properties that are characteristic of a good adsorbent such as high external surface area. Therefore, there is a growing interest to reutilize and process this carbon black waste into secondary materials such as adsorbents. However, the carbon black waste obtained from petrochemical industries may contain heavy metals that are hazardous to human health and the environment, hence restricting its full potential for re-utilization. Therefore, it is important to examine the possible toxicity effects and toxicity mechanism of carbon black waste on human health. In this study, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) analysis showed that the heavy metals, vanadium (V), molybdenum (Mo) and nickel (Ni), were present in the carbon black waste in high concentrations. Three human cell lines (HepG2 cells, MRC-5 cells and MDA-MB-231 cells) were used to investigate the toxicity of carbon black waste extract in a variety of in vitro assays. Results from MTS assays indicated that carbon black waste extract decreased the viability of all three cell lines in a dose and time-dependent manner. Observations from confocal microscopy further confirmed this phenomenon. Flow cytometry assay also showed that carbon black waste extract induced apoptosis of human cell lines, and the level of apoptosis increased with increasing waste concentration. Results from reactive oxygen species (ROS) assay indicated that carbon black waste extract induced oxidative stress by increasing intracellular ROS generation in these three human cell lines. Moreover, induction of oxidative damage in these cells was also observed through the alteration of glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. Last but not least, by treating the cells with V-spiked solution of concentration equivalent to that found in the

  10. Black Carbon at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaffe, Dan A. [Univ. of Washington, Bothell, WA (United States); Sedlacek, Arthur [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Laing, James R. [Univ. of Washington, Bothell, WA (United States)

    2017-03-01

    This campaign was initiated to measure refractory black carbon (rBC, as defined in Schwarz et al. (2010)) at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory (MBO) using the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility single-particle soot photometer (SP2; unit 54). MBO is a high-elevation site located on the summit of Mt. Bachelor in central Oregon, USA (43.979°N, 121.687°W, 2,763 meters ASL). This site is operated by Professor Dan Jaffe’s group at the University of Washington Bothell and has been used continuously as an atmospheric observatory for the past 12 years (Jaffe et al., 2005; Gratz et al., 2014). The location of MBO allows frequent sampling of the free troposphere along with a wide array of plumes from regional and distant sources. MBO is currently supported with funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to the Principal Investigator (PI; D. Jaffe) via the project “Influence of Free Tropospheric Ozone and PM on Surface Air Quality in the Western U.S.” (#1447832) covering the period 03/15/2015 to 02/28/2018. The SP2 instrument from Droplet Measurement Technologies provides particle-resolved measurements of rBC mass loading, size and mass distributions, and mixing state. The SP2 was installed at MBO on 6/27/2016 and ran through 9/23/2016. Additional measurements at MBO during this campaign included carbon monoxide (CO), fine particulate matter (PM1), aerosol light scattering coefficients (σscat) at three wavelengths using a TSI nephelometer, aerosol absorption coefficients (σabs) with the Brechtel tricolor absorption photometer (TAP), aerosol number size distributions with a scanning mobility particle sizer spectrometer (SMPS), and black carbon (eBC) with an aethalometer. BC data from this campaign have been submitted to the ARM Data Archive. Black carbon (BC) is the predominant light-absorbing aerosol constituent in the atmosphere, and is estimated to exert a positive radiative forcing second only to CO

  11. Preparation of Dispersed Platinum Nanoparticles on a Carbon Nanostructured Surface Using Supercritical Fluid Chemical Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mineo Hiramatsu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a method of forming platinum (Pt nanoparticles using a metal organic chemical fluid deposition (MOCFD process employing a supercritical fluid (SCF, and have demonstrated the synthesis of dispersed Pt nanoparticles on the surfaces of carbon nanowalls (CNWs, two-dimensional carbon nanostructures, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs. By using SCF-MOCFD with supercritical carbon dioxide as a solvent of metal-organic compounds, highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles of 2 nm diameter were deposited on the entire surface of CNWs and CNTs. The SCF-MOCFD process proved to be effective for the synthesis of Pt nanoparticles on the entire surface of intricate carbon nanostructures with narrow interspaces.

  12. Feasibility study of production of radioactive carbon black or carbon nanotubes in cyclotron facilities for nanobioscience applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, K; Simonelli, F; Holzwarth, U; Cydzik, I; Bulgheroni, A; Gibson, N; Kozempel, J

    2013-03-01

    A feasibility study regarding the production of radioactive carbon black and nanotubes has been performed by proton beam irradiation. Experimental and theoretical excitation functions of the nuclear reaction (nat)C(p,x)(7)Be in the proton energy range 24-38 MeV are reported, with an acceptable agreement. We have demonstrated that sufficient activities of (7)Be radioisotope can be produced in carbon black and nanotube that would facilitate studies of their possible impact on human and environment.

  13. Black carbon or brown carbon? The nature of light-absorbing carbonaceous aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. O. Andreae

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the definition and measurement techniques for atmospheric 'black carbon' ('BC' or 'elemental carbon'' ('EC' have long been subjects of scientific controversy, the recent discovery of light-absorbing carbon that is not black ('brown carbon, Cbrown' makes it imperative to reassess and redefine the components that make up light-absorbing carbonaceous matter (LAC in the atmosphere. Evidence for the atmospheric presence of Cbrown comes from (1 spectral aerosol light absorption measurements near specific combustion sources, (2 observations of spectral properties of water extracts of continental aerosol, (3 laboratory studies indicating the formation of light-absorbing organic matter in the atmosphere, and (4 indirectly from the chemical analogy of aerosol species to colored natural humic substances. We show that brown carbon may severely bias measurements of 'BC' and 'EC' over vast parts of the troposphere, especially those strongly polluted by biomass burning, where the mass concentration of Cbrown is high relative to that of soot carbon. Chemical measurements to determine 'EC' are biased by the refractory nature of Cbrown as well as by complex matrix interferences. Optical measurements of 'BC' suffer from a number of problems: (1 many of the presently used instruments introduce a substantial bias into the determination of aerosol light absorption, (2 there is no unique conversion factor between light absorption and 'EC' or 'BC' concentration in ambient aerosols, and (3 the difference in spectral properties between the different types of LAC, as well as the chemical complexity of Cbrown, lead to several conceptual as well as practical complications. We also suggest that due to the sharply increasing absorption of Cbrown towards the UV, single-wavelength light absorption measurements may not be adequate for the assessment of absorption of solar radiation in the troposphere. We discuss the possible consequences of these effects for our

  14. Organic carbon isotopes of the Sinian and Early Cambrian black shales on Yangtze Platform, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李任伟; 卢家烂; 张淑坤; 雷加锦

    1999-01-01

    Organic matter of the Sinian and early Cambrian black shales on the Yangtze Platform belongs to the light carbon group of isotopes with the δ13C values from - 27 % to -35 % , which are lower than those of the contemporaneously deposited carbonates and phosphorites. A carbon isotope-stratified paleooceanographic model caused by upwelling is proposed, which can be used not only to interpret the characteristics of organic carbon isotopic compositions of the black shales, but also to interpret the paleogeographic difference in the organic carbon isotope compositions of various types of sedimentary rocks.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of black, red and yellow nanoparticles pigments from the iron sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mufti, Nandang, E-mail: nandangmufti@gmail.com; Atma, T., E-mail: nandangmufti@gmail.com; Fuad, A., E-mail: nandangmufti@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Malang, Jl Semarang-65145, Malang (Indonesia); Sutadji, E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Malang, Jl Semarang-65145, Malang (Indonesia)

    2014-09-25

    The aim of this research is to synthesize nanoparticles of black pigment of Magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}), red pigment of hematite (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and yellow pigment of ghoetite (α-FeOOH) from the iron sand. The black pigment of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and the yellow pigment α-FeOOH nanoparticles were synthesized by coprecipitation method with variation of pH. Whereas, the red pigment Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} was synthesized by sintering Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles at temperature between 400 °C and 700 7°C for 1 hour. All the pigments has been characterized using X-ray diffraction and SEM. The XRD results shown that the particle size of the black pigmen Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, red pigment Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and yellow pigment α-FeOOH are around 12, 32, and 30 nm respectively. The particle size of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles increase by increasing sintering temperature from 32 nm at 400 °C to 39 nm at 700 °C. For yellow pigment of α-FeOOH, the particle size increase by increasing pH from 30,54 nm at pH 4 to 48,60 nm at pH 7. The SEM results shown that the morphologies of black, yellow and red pigments are aglomarated.

  16. Black tattoo inks induce reactive oxygen species production correlating with aggregation of pigment nanoparticles and product brand but not with the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høgsberg, Trine; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Clausen, Per Axel; Serup, Jørgen

    2013-07-01

    Black tattoo inks are composed of carbon nanoparticles, additives and water and may contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We aimed to clarify whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by black inks in vitro is related to pigment chemistry, physico-chemical properties of the ink particles and the content of chemical additives and contaminants including PAHs. The study included nine brands of tattoo inks of six colours each (black, red, yellow, blue, green and white) and two additional black inks of different brands (n = 56). The ROS formation potential was determined by the dichlorofluorescein (DCFH) assay. A semiquantitative method was developed for screening extractable organic compounds in tattoo ink based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Two black inks produced high amounts of ROS. Peroxyl radicals accounted for up to 72% of the free radicals generated, whereas hydroxyl radicals and H₂O₂ accounted for brands. Ten of 11 black inks had PAH concentrations exceeding the European Council's recommended level, and all 11 exceeded the recommended level for benzo(a)pyrene. It is a new finding that aggregation of tattoo pigment particles correlates with ROS production and brand, independently of chemical composition including PAHs. ROS is hypothesized to be implicated in minor clinical symptoms.

  17. Influence of sample composition on aerosol organic and black carbon determinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novakov, T.; Corrigan, C.E.

    1995-07-01

    In this paper we present results on characterization of filter-collected redwood (Sequoia sempevirens)-needle and eucalyptus smoke particles by thermal, optical, and solvent extraction methods. Our results demonstrate that organic and black carbon concentrations determined by thermal and optical methods are not only method dependent, but also critically influenced by the overall chemical composition of the samples. These conclusions are supported by the following: (1) the organic fraction of biomass smoke particles analyzed includes a component, ranging in concentration from about 6-20% of total carbon or from 16-30% of organic carbon, that is relatively non-volatile and has a combustion temperature close to that of black carbon; (2) presence of K or Na in biomass smoke samples lowers the combustion temperatures of this organic component and of black carbon, making their combustion properties indistinguishable; (3) about 20% of total organic material is nonvolatile when heated to 550{degrees}C in an inert atmosphere. Consequently, thermal methods that rely on a specific temperature to separate organic from black carbon may either underestimate or overestimate the black and organic carbon concentrations, depending on the amounts of Na and K and on the composition and concentration of organic material present in a sample. These analytical uncertainties and, under some conditions, absorption by organic material may contribute to the variability of empirically derived proportionality between light transmission through filter deposits and black carbon concentrations.

  18. An approach to a black carbon emission inventory for Mexico by two methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Núñez, Xochitl

    2014-05-01

    A black carbon (BC) emission inventory for Mexico is presented. Estimate was performed by using two approaches, based on fuel consumption and emission factors in a top-down scheme, and the second from PM25 emission data and its correlation with black carbon by source category, assuming that black carbon=elemental carbon. Results show that black carbon emissions are in interval 53-473Gg using the fuel consumption approach and between 62 and 89 using the sector method. Black carbon key sources come from biomass burning in the rural sector, with 47 percent share to the National total. Mobile sources emissions account to 16% to the total. An opportunity to reduce, in the short-term, carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2-eq) emissions by reducing black carbon emissions would be obtained in reducing emissions mainly from biomass burning in rural housing sector and diesel emissions in the transport sector with important co-benefits in direct radiative forcing, public health and air quality.

  19. Grafted, cross-linked carbon black as a double-layer capacitor electrode material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richner, R.; Mueller, S.; Wokaun, A.

    2001-03-01

    Isocyanate prepolymers readily react with oxidic functional groups on carbon black. On carbon black grafted with diisocyanates, reactive isocyanate groups are available for cross-linking to a polyurethane system. This cross-linked carbon black was considered as a new active material for electrochemical electrodes. Active material for electric double-layer capacitor electrodes was produced which had values of specific capacitance of up to 200 F/g. Cross-linking efficiencies of up to 58 % of the polymers utilised were achieved. (author)

  20. The impact of black wattle encroachment of indigenous grasslands on soil carbon, Eastern Cape, South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oelofse, Myles; Birch-Thomsen, Torben; Magid, Jakob;

    2016-01-01

    adverse environmental impacts in South Africa. Little is known about the effects of black wattle encroachment on soil carbon, therefore the aim of this study was to investigate the impact of black wattle encroachment of natural grassland on soil carbon stocks and dynamics. Focussing on two sites...... in the Eastern Cape, South Africa, the study analysed carbon stocks in soil and litter on a chronosequence of black wattle stands of varying ages (up to >50 years) and compared these with adjacent native grassland. The study found that woody encroachment of grassland at one site had an insignificant effect...

  1. Variable effects of labile carbon on the carbon use of different microbial groups in black slate degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Anne-Gret; Trumbore, Susan; Xu, Xiaomei; Zhang, Dachung; Kothe, Erika; Gleixner, Gerd

    2011-05-01

    Weathering of ancient organic matter contributes significantly to biogeochemical carbon cycles over geological times. The principle role of microorganisms in this process is well recognized. However, information is lacking on the contribution of individual groups of microorganisms and on the effect of labile carbon sources to the degradation process. Therefore, we investigated the contribution of fungi, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in the degradation process using a column experiment. Investigations were performed on low metamorphic black slates. All columns contained freshly crushed, sieved (0.63-2 mm), not autoclaved black slates. Two columns were inoculated with the lignite-degrading fungus Schizophyllum commune and received a culture medium containing 13C labeled glucose, two columns received only this culture medium and two control columns received only water. The total mass balance was calculated from all carbon added to the slate and the CO 2 and DOC losses. Phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) were extracted to investigate microbial communities. We used both the compound specific 14C and 13C signal of the PLFA to quantify carbon uptake from black slates and the glucose of the culture medium, respectively. The total carbon loss in these columns exceeded the amount of added carbon by approximately 60%, indicating that black slate carbon has been used. PLFA associated with Gram-positive bacteria dominated the indigenous community and took up 22% of carbon from black slate carbon, whereas PLFA of Gram-negative bacteria used only 8% of carbon from the slates. PLFA of Gram-negative bacteria and fungi were both mostly activated by the glucose addition. The added Schizophyllum did not establish well in the columns and was overgrown by the indigenous microbial community. Our results suggest that especially Gram-positive bacteria are able to live on and degrade black slate material. They also benefit from easy degradable carbon from the nutrient broth. In

  2. Carbonation acceleration of calcium hydroxide nanoparticles: induced by yeast fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Arce, Paula; Zornoza-Indart, Ainara

    2015-09-01

    Carbonation of Ca(OH)2 nanoparticles and consolidation of limestone are accelerated by high humidity and a yeast fermentation system that supplies a saturated atmosphere on CO2, H2O vapor and ethanol during 28 days. Nanoparticles were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and differential thermal analyses with thermogravimetry. Spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscopy analyses, and hydric and mechanical tests were also performed in stones specimens. Samples exposed to the yeast environment achieve 100 % relative CaCO3 yield, whereas at high humidity but without the yeast and under laboratory environment, relative yields of 95 % CaCO3 and 15 % CaCO3 are, respectively, reached, with white crusts and glazing left on the stone surfaces when the nanoparticles are applied at a concentration of 25 g/l. The largest increase in the drilling resistance and surface hardness values with slight increase in the capillarity absorption and desorption coefficients and with lesser stone color changes are produced at a concentration of 5 g/l, in the yeast system environment. This especially happens in stone specimens initially with bimodal pore size distributions, more amounts of pores with diameters between 0.1 and 1 µm, higher open porosity values and faster capillary coefficients. An inexpensive and reliable method based on water and yeast-sugar solution is presented to speed up carbonation of Ca(OH)2 nanoparticles used as a consolidating product to improve the mechanical properties of decayed limestone from archaeological and architectural heritage.

  3. Carbon nanoparticles as possible radioprotectors in biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krokosz, Anita; Lichota, Anna; Nowak, Katarzyna E.; Grebowski, Jacek

    2016-11-01

    Ionizing radiation causes radiolysis of water and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which interact with biochemically important molecules in cells leading to cell death. In order to reduce the dangerous radiation effects on cells, tissues and organs, the search for radioprotectors is essential. ROS result in damage to biomolecules, e.g. proteins, lipids and DNA, and as a consequence, cause the loss of cell function. The chemical and biological properties of fullerenes and other carbon nanoparticles enable the possibility of generating either oxidative stress or its attenuation by both scavenging free radicals and modification/upregulation of endogenous antioxidative systems in cells. This study discusses the possible applications of carbon nanoparticles as radioprotective agents and/or free radical scavengers. Special attention is paid to water-soluble fullerenes as they are promising radioprotectors and exhibit low toxicity and cytotoxicity.

  4. A solution phase fabrication of magnetic nanoparticles encapsulated in carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xian-Wen; Zhu, Guo-Xing; Xia, Chuan-Jun; Ye, Yin

    2006-09-01

    To avoid high energy consumption, intensive use of hardware and high cost in the manufacture of nanoparticles encapsulated in carbon, a simple, efficient and economical solution-phase method for the fabrication of FeNi@C nanostructures has been explored. The reaction to the magnetic metal@C structures here is conducted at a relatively low temperature (160 °C) and this strategy can be transferred to prepare other transition metal@C core-shell nanostructures. The saturation magnetization of metal in metal@C nanostructures is similar to those of the corresponding buck metals. Magnetic metal@C nanostructures with magnetic metal nanoparticles inside and a functionalized carbon surface outside may not only provide the opportunity to tailor the magnetic properties for magnetic storage devices and therapeutics but also make possible the loading of other functional molecules (e.g. enzymes, antigens) for clinic diagnostics, molecular biology, bioengineering, and catalysis.

  5. Carbon nanoparticle-modified multi-wall carbon nanotubes with fast adsorption kinetics for water treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guan; Ren, Wei; Tan, Hui Ru; Liu, Ye

    2017-02-01

    Carbon nanoparticle-modified multi-wall carbon nanotubes were prepared using a dehydration of carbohydrate compound method. The structural change was characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and Brunauer, Emmett and Teller measurement. Fast adsorption kinetics was observed for multi-wall carbon nanotubes with modification, as demonstrated by the adsorption of the model compound methylene blue. This work provides a novel facile engineering strategy to equip multi-wall carbon nanotubes with fast adsorption kinetics, which is promising for efficient water purification.

  6. Carbon Nanoparticles in Nematic Liquid Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.Eren San; Mustafa Okutan; O(g)uz K(o)ysal; Yusuf Yer-li

    2008-01-01

    Fullerene G60,C70,single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene sheets are doped to nematic liquid crystal(LC)host in the same percentage.Planar samples of these mixtures are prepared and our measurements constitute an optimization basis for possible applications.Fullerene balls are found to be the best compatible material for optical aims and reorientation of LC molecules,while the carbon nanotubes experience some reorientation possibility in LC media and graphene layers are good barriers to preserve reorientation.

  7. Microbially Mediated-Precipitation of Cadmium Carbonate Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Serku; Kim, Yumi; Lee, Youngjae; Rohl, Yul

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the microbially mediated precipitation of cadmium using microorganisms enriched from rhodoliths and to characterize the mineralogical properties of the precipitates. A 16S rRNA sequence analysis showed the enriched microorganisms contained carbonate forming microorganisms such as Proteus mirabilis. The microorganisms mediated Cd-precipitation with Cd-acetate, but no precipitates were formed without the microbes in D-1 medium. XRD analysis showed the precipitates were poorly crystalline Cd-carbonates (CdCO3). SEM and TEM-EDS analyses showed that the Cd-carbonate minerals were irregular in shape, 20-30 nm in size, and composed of C, O, and Cd. Therefore, microbially mediated precipitation of cadmium carbonates could be used as a precursor of CdO nanoparticles and could play an important role in Cd immobilization in Cd-contaminated water as well as CO2 fixation in natural environments.

  8. Retrieval of Black Carbon Absorption from Proposed Satellite Measurements Over the Ocean Glint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Matins, J. V.; Remer, L. A.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Yamasoe, M. A.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Haze and air pollution includes many chemicals that together form small particles suspended in the air called aerosols. One of the main ingredients found to affect climate and human health is Black Carbon. Black particles emitted from engines that do not burn the fuel completely, e.g. old trucks. Black carbon absorption of sunlight emerges as one of the key components of man-made forcing of climate. However, global characterization of black carbon emissions, distribution and pathways in which it can affect the amount of solar radiation absorbed by the atmosphere is very uncertain. A new method is proposed to measure sunlight absorption by fine aerosol particles containing black carbon over the ocean glint from a satellite mission designed for this purpose. The satellite will scan the same spot over the ocean in the glint plane and a plane 40 degrees off-glint a minute apart, collecting measurements of the reflected light across the solar spectrum. First the dark ocean off the glint is used to derive aerosol properties. Then the black carbon absorption is derived prop the attenuation of the bright glint by the aerosol layer. Such measurements if realized in a proposed future mission - COBRA are expected to produce global monthly climatology of black carbon absorption with high accuracy (110 to 15%) that can show their effect on climate.

  9. Dynamics of Gold Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanostructures Driven by van der Waals and Electrostatic Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Torre, Alessandro; Gimenez-Lopez, Maria del Carmen; Fay, Michael W; Lucas, Carlos Herreros; Brown, Paul D; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2015-06-01

    Transmission electron microscopy studies on the assembly and growth of gold nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes supported on few-layer graphene and amorphous carbon reveal a competition between van der Waals forces and electrostatic interactions, enabling controlled positioning and sizing of adsorbed nanoparticles at the nanochannels formed between the carbon nanotube and the few-layer graph-ene surface.

  10. Black carbon, a 'hidden' player in the global C cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santín, C.; Doerr, S. H.

    2012-04-01

    During the 2011 alone more than 600 scientific papers about black carbon (BC) were published, half of them dealing with soils (ISI Web of Knowledge, accessed 15/01/2012). If the search is extended to the other terms by which BC is commonly named (i.e. biochar, charcoal, pyrogenic C or soot), the number of 2011 publications increases to >2400, 20% of them also related to soils. These figures confirm BC as a well-known feature in the scientific literature and, thus, in our research community. In fact, there is a wide variety of research topics where BC is currently studied: from its potential as long-term C reservoir in soils (man-made biochar), to its effects on the Earth's radiation balance (soot-BC), including its value as indicator in paleoenvironmental studies (charcoal) or, even surprisingly, its use in suicide attempts. BC is thus relevant to many aspects of our environment, making it a very far-reaching, but also very complex topic. When focusing 'only' on the role of BC in the global C cycle, numerous questions arise. For example: (i) how much BC is produced by different sources (i.e. vegetation fires, fossil fuel and biofuel combustion); (ii) what are the main BC forms and their respective proportions generated (i.e. proportion of atmospheric BC [BC-soot] and the solid residues [char-BC]); (iii) where does this BC go (i.e. main mobilization pathways and sinks); (iv) how long does BC stay in the different systems (i.e. residence times in soils, sediments, water and atmosphere); (v) which are the BC stocks and its main transformations within and between the different systems (i.e. BC preservation, alteration and mineralization); (vi) what is the interaction of BC with other elements and how does this influence BC half-life (i.e. physical protection, interaction with pollutants, priming effects in other organic materials)? These questions, and some suggestions about how to tackle these, will be discussed in this contribution. It will focus in particular on the

  11. Formation of enriched black tea extract loaded chitosan nanoparticles via electrospraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Samuel James

    Creating nanoparticles of beneficial nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals has had a large surge of research due to the enhancement of absorption and bioavailability by decreasing their size. One of these ways is by electrohydrodynamic atomization, also known as electrospraying. In general, this novel process is done by forcing a liquid through a capillary nozzle and which is subjected to an electrical field. While there are different ways to create nanoparticles, the novel method of electrospraying can be beneficial over other types of nanoparticle formation. Reasons include high control over particle size and distribution by altering electrospray parameters (voltage, flow rate, distance, and time), higher encapsulation efficiency than other methods, and also it is a one step process without exposure to extreme conditions (Gomez-Estaca et. al. 2012, Jaworek and Sobcyzk 2008). The current study aimed to create a chitosan encapsulated theaflavin-2 enriched black tea extract (BTE) nanoparticles via electrospraying. The first step of this process was to create the smallest chitosan nanoparticles possible by altering the electrospray parameters and the chitosan-acetic acid solution parameters. The solution properties altered include chitosan molecular weight, acetic acid concentration, and chitosan concentration. Specifically, the electrospray parameters such as voltage, flow rate and distance from syringe to collector are the most important in determining particle size. After creating the smallest chitosan particles, the TF-2 enriched black tea extract was added to the chitosan-acetic acid solution to be electrosprayed. The particles were assessed with the following procedures: Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for particle morphology and size, and loading efficiency with ultraviolet--visible spectrophotometer (UV-VIS). Chitosan-BTE nanoparticles were successfully created in a one step process. Diameter of the particles on average

  12. Global anthropogenic emissions of particulate matter including black carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Klimont

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive assessment of historical (1990–2010 global anthropogenic particulate matter (PM emissions including the consistent and harmonized calculation of mass-based size distribution (PM1, PM2. 5, PM10, as well as primary carbonaceous aerosols including black carbon (BC and organic carbon (OC. The estimates were developed with the integrated assessment model GAINS, where source- and region-specific technology characteristics are explicitly included. This assessment includes a number of previously unaccounted or often misallocated emission sources, i.e. kerosene lamps, gas flaring, diesel generators, refuse burning; some of them were reported in the past for selected regions or in the context of a particular pollutant or sector but not included as part of a total estimate. Spatially, emissions were calculated for 172 source regions (as well as international shipping, presented for 25 global regions, and allocated to 0.5°  ×  0.5° longitude–latitude grids. No independent estimates of emissions from forest fires and savannah burning are provided and neither windblown dust nor unpaved roads emissions are included. We estimate that global emissions of PM have not changed significantly between 1990 and 2010, showing a strong decoupling from the global increase in energy consumption and, consequently, CO2 emissions, but there are significantly different regional trends, with a particularly strong increase in East Asia and Africa and a strong decline in Europe, North America, and the Pacific region. This in turn resulted in important changes in the spatial pattern of PM burden, e.g. European, North American, and Pacific contributions to global emissions dropped from nearly 30 % in 1990 to well below 15 % in 2010, while Asia's contribution grew from just over 50 % to nearly two-thirds of the global total in 2010. For all PM species considered, Asian sources represented over 60 % of the global

  13. Global anthropogenic emissions of particulate matter including black carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimont, Zbigniew; Kupiainen, Kaarle; Heyes, Chris; Purohit, Pallav; Cofala, Janusz; Rafaj, Peter; Borken-Kleefeld, Jens; Schöpp, Wolfgang

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive assessment of historical (1990-2010) global anthropogenic particulate matter (PM) emissions including the consistent and harmonized calculation of mass-based size distribution (PM1, PM2. 5, PM10), as well as primary carbonaceous aerosols including black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC). The estimates were developed with the integrated assessment model GAINS, where source- and region-specific technology characteristics are explicitly included. This assessment includes a number of previously unaccounted or often misallocated emission sources, i.e. kerosene lamps, gas flaring, diesel generators, refuse burning; some of them were reported in the past for selected regions or in the context of a particular pollutant or sector but not included as part of a total estimate. Spatially, emissions were calculated for 172 source regions (as well as international shipping), presented for 25 global regions, and allocated to 0.5° × 0.5° longitude-latitude grids. No independent estimates of emissions from forest fires and savannah burning are provided and neither windblown dust nor unpaved roads emissions are included. We estimate that global emissions of PM have not changed significantly between 1990 and 2010, showing a strong decoupling from the global increase in energy consumption and, consequently, CO2 emissions, but there are significantly different regional trends, with a particularly strong increase in East Asia and Africa and a strong decline in Europe, North America, and the Pacific region. This in turn resulted in important changes in the spatial pattern of PM burden, e.g. European, North American, and Pacific contributions to global emissions dropped from nearly 30 % in 1990 to well below 15 % in 2010, while Asia's contribution grew from just over 50 % to nearly two-thirds of the global total in 2010. For all PM species considered, Asian sources represented over 60 % of the global anthropogenic total, and residential combustion

  14. Nanoparticle Decoration of Carbon Nanotubes by Sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    on metal morphology, as does diffusion activation energy. Comparison of the metal– graphene interfa- cial energy to the surface energy of the metal...Nanotechnology 2009;20:375501–11. [17] O. Yaglioglu, Thesis . Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering; 2007. [18] Venables...25] Osswald S, Flahaut E, Ye H, Gogotsi Y. Elimination of D-band in Raman spectra of double-wall carbon nanotubes by oxidation . Chem Phys Lett

  15. Production of Structural Colors with High Contrast and Wide Viewing Angles from Assemblies of Polypyrrole Black Coated Polystyrene Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoming; Ge, Dengteng; Wu, Gaoxiang; Liao, Zhiwei; Yang, Shu

    2016-06-29

    Structural color with wide viewing angles has enormous potential applications in pigment, ink formulation, displays, and sensors. However, colors obtained from colloidal assemblies with low refractive index contrast or without black additives typically appear pale. Here, we prepare polypyrrole (PPy) black coated polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles and demonstrate well-defined colors with high color contrast and wide viewing angles under ambient light. Depending on the loading of pyrrole during polymerization, PPy nanogranules of different sizes and coverages are grafted to the surface of PS nanoparticles. The bumpy particles can self-assemble into quasi-amorphous arrays, resulting in low angle dependent structure colors under ambient light. The color can be tuned by the size of the PS nanoparticles, and the presence of the PPy black on PS nanoparticles enhances the color contrast by suppressing incoherent and multiple scattering.

  16. Russia's black carbon emissions: focus on diesel sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholod, Nazar; Evans, Meredydd; Kuklinski, Teresa

    2016-09-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a significant climate forcer with a particularly pronounced forcing effect in polar regions such as the Russian Arctic. Diesel combustion is a major global source of BC emissions, accounting for 25-30 % of all BC emissions. While the demand for diesel is growing in Russia, the country's diesel emissions are poorly understood. This paper presents a detailed inventory of Russian BC emissions from diesel sources. Drawing on a complete Russian vehicle registry with detailed information about vehicle types and emission standards, this paper analyzes BC emissions from diesel on-road vehicles. We use the COPERT emission model (COmputer Programme to calculate Emissions from Road Transport) with Russia-specific emission factors for all types of on-road vehicles. On-road diesel vehicles emitted 21 Gg of BC in 2014: heavy-duty trucks account for 60 % of the on-road BC emissions, while cars represent only 5 % (light commercial vehicles and buses account for the remainder). Using Russian activity data and fuel-based emission factors, the paper also presents BC emissions from diesel locomotives and ships, off-road engines in industry, construction and agriculture, and generators. The study also factors in the role of superemitters in BC emissions from diesel on-road vehicles and off-road sources. The total emissions from diesel sources in Russia are estimated to be 49 Gg of BC and 17 Gg of organic carbon (OC) in 2014. Off-road diesel sources emitted 58 % of all diesel BC in Russia.

  17. Wetting and Non-Wetting Models of Black Carbon Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, B. F.; Laura, S.

    2006-12-01

    We present the results of recent modeling studies on the activation of black carbon (BC) aerosol to form cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). We use a model of BC activation based on a general modification of the Koehler equation for insoluble activation in which we introduce a term based on the activity of water adsorbed on the particle surface. We parameterize the model using the free energy of adsorption, a parameter directly comparable to laboratory measurements of water adsorption on carbon. Although the model of the water- surface interaction is general, the form of the activation equation that results depends upon a further model of the distribution of water on the particle. One possible model involves the symmetric growth of a water shell around the isoluble particle core (wetting). This model predicts upper and lower bounding curves for the activation supersaturation given by the range of water interaction energies from hydrophobic to hydrophilic which are in agreement with a large body of recent activation data. The resulting activation diameters are from 3 to 10 times smaller than activation of soluble particles of identical dry diameter. Another possible model involves an exluded liquid droplet growing in contact with the particle (non-wetting). The geometry of this model much more resembles classic assumptions of heterogeneous nucleation theory. This model can yield extremely high activation supersaturation as a function of diameter, as has been observed in some experiments, and enables calculations in agreement with some of these results. We discuss these two geometrical models of water growth, the different behaviors predicted by the resulting activation equation, and the means to determine which model of growth is appropriate for a given BC particle characterized by either water interaction energy or morphology. These simple models enable an efficient and physically reasonable means to calculate the activation of BC aerosol to form CCN based upon a

  18. Black carbon reduction will weaken the aerosol net cooling effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. L. Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Black carbon (BC, a distinct type of carbonaceous material formed from the incomplete combustion of fossil and biomass based fuels under certain conditions, can interact with solar radiation and clouds through its strong light-absorption ability, thereby warming the Earth's climate system. Some studies have even suggested that global warming could be slowed down in a short term by eliminating BC emission due to its short lifetime. In this study, we estimate the influence of removing some sources of BC and other co-emitted species on the aerosol radiative effect by using an aerosol-climate coupled model BCC_AGCM2.0.1_CUACE/Aero, in combination with the aerosol emissions from the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs scenarios. We find that the global annual mean aerosol net cooling effect at the top of the atmosphere (TOA will be enhanced by 0.12 W m−2 compared with present-day conditions if the BC emission is reduced exclusively to the level projected for 2100 based on the RCP2.6 scenario. This will be beneficial for the mitigation of global warming. However, the global annual mean aerosol net cooling effect at the TOA will be weakened by 1.7–2.0 W m−2 relative to present-day conditions if emissions of BC and co-emitted sulfur dioxide and organic carbon are simultaneously reduced as the most close conditions to the actual situation to the level projected for 2100 in different ways based on the RCP2.6, RCP4.5, and RCP8.5 scenarios. Because there are no effective ways to remove the BC exclusively without influencing the other co-emitted components, our results therefore indicate that a reduction in BC emission can lead to an unexpected warming on the Earth's climate system in the future.

  19. Atmospheric black carbon and sulfate concentrations in Northeast Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Massling

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of Black Carbon (BC in aerosols at the high Arctic field site Villum Research Station (VRS at Station Nord in North Greenland showed a seasonal variation in BC concentrations with a maximum in winter and spring at ground level. The data was obtained using a Multi Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP. A similar seasonal pattern was found for sulfate concentrations with a maximum level during winter and spring analyzed by ion chromatography. A correlation between BC and sulfate concentrations was observed over the years 2011 to 2013. This finding gives the hint that most likely transport of primary emitted BC particles to the Arctic was accompanied by aging of the aerosols through condensational processes. This process may have led to the formation of secondary inorganic matter and further transport of BC particles as cloud processing and further washout of particles is less likely based on the typically observed transport patterns of air masses arriving at VRS. Additionally, concentrations of EC (elemental carbon based on a thermo-optical method were determined and compared to BC measurements. Model estimates of the climate forcing due to BC in the Arctic are based on contributions of long-range transported BC during spring and summer. The measured concentrations were here compared with model results obtained by the Danish Hemispheric Model, DEHM. Good agreement between measured and modeled concentrations of both BC and sulfate was observed. The dominant source is found to be combustion of fossil fuel with biomass burning as a minor though significant source. During winter and spring the Arctic atmosphere is known to be impacted by long-range transport of BC and associated with the Arctic haze phenomenon.

  20. Ultra-small Palladium Nanoparticle Decorated Carbon Nanotubes: Conductivity and Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiuting; Batchelor-McAuley, Christopher; Tschulik, Kristina; Shao, Lidong; Compton, Richard G

    2015-08-03

    Carbon nanotubes decorated with ultra-small metal nanoparticles are of great value in catalysis. We report that individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes decorated with ultra-small palladium nanoparticles can be detected by using the nano-impacts method. The high conductivity and reactivity of each decorated carbon nanotube is directly evidenced; this is achieved through studying the proton-reduction reaction for the underpotential deposition of hydrogen onto the nanoparticles decorated on the carbon nanotube walls. The reductive spikes from current amplification are analyzed to estimate the approximate length of the decorated carbon nanotubes, revealing that the decorated carbon nanotubes are electroactive along its entire length of several micrometers.

  1. Simplifying the calculation of light scattering properties for black carbon fractal aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A. J. A.; Grainger, R. G.

    2014-02-01

    Black carbon fractal aggregates have complicated shapes that make the calculation of their optical properties particularly computationally expensive. Here, a method is presented to estimate fractal aggregate light scattering properties by optimising simplified models to full light scattering calculations. It is found that there are no possible spherical models (at any size or refractive index) that well represent the light scattering in the visible, or near-thermal infrared. As such, parameterisations of the light scattering as a function of the number of aggregate particles is presented as the most pragmatic choice for modelling distributions of black carbon when the large computational overheads of rigorous scattering calculations cannot be justified. This parameterisation can be analytically integrated to provide light scattering properties for log-normal distributions of black carbon fractal aggregates and return extinction cross-sections with 0.1% accuracy for typical black carbon size distributions. Scattering cross-sections and the asymmetry parameter can be obtained to within 3%.

  2. The scavenging processes controlling the seasonal cycle in Arctic sulphate and black carbon aerosol

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Browse, J; Carslaw, K. S; Arnold, S. R; Pringle, K; Boucher, O

    2012-01-01

    .... Here, we use a global aerosol microphysics model (GLOMAP) and surface-level aerosol observations to understand how wet scavenging processes control the seasonal variation in Arctic black carbon (BC...

  3. Simplifying the calculation of light scattering properties for black carbon fractal aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. A. Smith

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Black carbon fractal aggregates have complicated shapes that make the calculation of their optical properties particularly computationally expensive. Here, a method is presented to estimate fractal aggregate light scattering properties by optimising simplified models to full light scattering calculations. It is found that there are no possible spherical models (at any size or refractive index that well represent the light scattering in the visible or near-thermal infrared. As such, parameterisations of the light scattering as a function of the number of aggregate particles is presented as the most pragmatic choice for modelling distributions of black carbon when the large computational overheads of rigorous scattering calculations cannot be justified. This parameterisation can be analytically integrated to provide light scattering properties for lognormal distributions of black carbon fractal aggregates and return extinction cross sections with 0.1% accuracy for typical black carbon size distributions. Scattering cross sections and the asymmetry parameter can be obtained to within 3%.

  4. Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts Based on Coupled Iron Nitride Nanoparticles with Nitrogen-Doped Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jung Park

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aimed at developing a highly active and stable non-precious metal electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR, a novel FexNy/NC nanocomposite—that is composed of highly dispersed iron nitride nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped carbon (NC—was prepared by pyrolyzing carbon black with an iron-containing precursor in an NH3 atmosphere. The influence of the various synthetic parameters such as the Fe precursor, Fe content, pyrolysis temperature and pyrolysis time on ORR performance of the prepared iron nitride nanoparticles was investigated. The formed phases were determined by experimental and simulated X-ray diffraction (XRD of numerous iron nitride species. We found that Fe3N phase creates superactive non-metallic catalytic sites for ORR that are more active than those of the constituents. The optimized Fe3N/NC nanocomposite exhibited excellent ORR activity and a direct four-electron pathway in alkaline solution. Furthermore, the hybrid material showed outstanding catalytic durability in alkaline electrolyte, even after 4,000 potential cycles.

  5. Micromorphological evidence of black carbon in colluvial soils from NW Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaal, J.; van Mourik, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Biomass burning produces a residue called black carbon (BC). Black C is generally considered to be highly resistant against biodegradation and has a potential role in the global C cycle, but is difficult to identify and quantify when subjected to prolonged degradation in terrestrial sediments. The c

  6. Characterization of Black and Brown Carbon Concentrations and Sources during winter in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Caiqing; Liu, Yue; Hansen, Anthony D. A.; Močnik, Griša; Zheng, Mei

    2017-04-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols, including black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC), play important roles in air quality, human health, and climate change. A better understanding of sources of light-absorbing carbonaceous aerosol (including black carbon and brown carbon) is particular critical for formulating emission-based control strategies and reducing uncertainties in current aerosol radiative forcing estimates. Beijing, the capital of China, has experienced serious air pollution problems and high concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols in recent years, especially during heating seasons. During November and December of 2016, several severe haze episodes occurred in Beijing, with hourly average PM2.5 mass concentration up to 400 μg/m3. In this study, concentration levels and sources of black carbon and brown carbon were investigated based on 7-wavelength Aethalometer (AE-33) with combination of other PM2.5 chemical composition information. Contributions of traffic and non-traffic emissions (e.g., coal combustion, biomass burning) were apportioned, and brown carbon was separated from black carbon. Our preliminary results showed that (1) Concentrations of BC were around 5.3±4.2 μg/m3 during the study period, with distinct diurnal variations during haze and non-haze days. (2) Traffic emissions contributed to about 37±17% of total BC, and exhibited higher contributions during non-haze days compared to haze days. (3) Coal combustion was a major source of black carbon and brown carbon in Beijing, which was more significant compared to biomass burning. Sources and the relative contributions to black carbon and brown carbon during haze and non-haze days will be further discussed.

  7. Metal Nanoparticles Preparation In Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harry W. Rollins

    2004-04-01

    The novel optical, electronic, and/or magnetic properties of metal and semiconductor nanoparticles have resulted in extensive research on new methods for their preparation. An ideal preparation method would allow the particle size, size distribution, crystallinity, and particle shape to be easily controlled, and would be applicable to a wide variety of material systems. Numerous preparation methods have been reported, each with its inherent advantages and disadvantages; however, an ideal method has yet to emerge. The most widely applied methods for nanoparticle preparation include the sonochemical reduction of organometallic reagents,(1&2) the solvothermal method of Alivisatos,(3) reactions in microemulsions,(4-6) the polyol method (reduction by alcohols),(7-9) and the use of polymer and solgel materials as hosts.(10-13) In addition to these methods, there are a variety of methods that take advantage of the unique properties of a supercritical fluid.(14&15) Through simple variations of temperature and pressure, the properties of a supercritical fluid can be continuously tuned from gas-like to liquid-like without undergoing a phase change. Nanoparticle preparation methods that utilize supercritical fluids are briefly reviewed below using the following categories: Rapid Expansion of Supercritical Solutions (RESS), Reactive Supercritical Fluid Processing, and Supercritical Fluid Microemulsions. Because of its easily accessible critical temperature and pressure and environmentally benign nature, carbon dioxide is the most widely used supercritical solvent. Supercritical CO2 is unfortunately a poor solvent for many polar or ionic species, which has impeded its use in the preparation of metal and semiconductor nanoparticles. We have developed a reactive supercritical fluid processing method using supercritical carbon dioxide for the preparation of metal and metal sulfide particles and used it to prepare narrowly distributed nanoparticles of silver (Ag) and silver sulfide

  8. Characterization of PZT/PVC Composites Added with Carbon Black

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiaofang; XIONG Chuanxi; SUN Huajun; DONG Lijie; LI Rui; LIU Yang

    2005-01-01

    A new three-phase PZT/ C/ PVC composite comprising PZT (50vol%), nanocrystalline PVC (50 vol% ) and a small volume fraction f of carbon black (C) was prepared by the hot-pressing technique. The dielectric property of the composite as a function of the frequency and the dielectric and piezoelectric properties as a function of the volume fraction f of C were studied. The measured dielectric property demonstrates that a percolation transition occurs in the three-phase composites as in normal two-phase metal-insulator continuum media. The dielectric constant varies slightly with f at f < 0.1 and increases rapidly when f is close to the percolation threshold at 1 kHz. The optimum properties were obtained for f = 0.5 before the percolation threshold in the PZT/ C/ PVC (50/f/(50 - f) vol% ) composite with its d33 (20 pC/N) being 50% higher than that of the PZT/ PVC (50/50vol% ), and its g33(47.23 × 10-3 Vm/N) and Kp (0.25) much higher than the earlier reported values.XRD patterns and P-E hysteresis loops were used to interpret the experimental results.

  9. Improved piezoelectricity of PVDF-HFP/carbon black composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liangke; Yuan, Weifeng; Hu, Ning; Wang, Zhongchang; Chen, Chunlin; Qiu, Jianhui; Ying, Ji; Li, Yuan

    2014-04-01

    We report a substantial improvement of piezoelectricity for poly(vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP) copolymer films by introducing carbon black (CB) into the PVDF-HFP to form PVDF-HFP/CB composite films. The optimized output voltage of the composite film at an optimal CB content of 0.5 wt% is found to be 204% of the pristine PVDF-HFP film. Its harvested electrical power density is 464% and 561% of the pristine PVDF-HFP film by using ac and dc circuits, respectively. Through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis, differential scanning calorimetry analysis, and polarized optical microscopy observations, we clarify the enhancement mechanism of piezoelectricity for the PVDF-HFP/CB composite films. We find that the added CB acts as nucleating agent during the initial formation of crystals, but imposes an insignificant effect on the α-β phase transformation during stretching. We also demonstrate that the addition of optimal CB reduces crystal size yet increases the number of crystals in the composite films. This is beneficial for the formation of elongated, oriented and fibrillar crystalline morphology during stretching and consequently results in a highly efficient poling process. The addition of overdosed CB leads to the formation of undersized crystals, lowered crystallinity, and hence reduced piezoelectric performance of the PVDF-HFP/CB composite films.

  10. Siberian Arctic black carbon sources constrained by model and observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winiger, Patrik; Andersson, August; Eckhardt, Sabine; Stohl, Andreas; Semiletov, Igor P.; Dudarev, Oleg V.; Charkin, Alexander; Shakhova, Natalia; Klimont, Zbigniew; Heyes, Chris; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2017-02-01

    Black carbon (BC) in haze and deposited on snow and ice can have strong effects on the radiative balance of the Arctic. There is a geographic bias in Arctic BC studies toward the Atlantic sector, with lack of observational constraints for the extensive Russian Siberian Arctic, spanning nearly half of the circum-Arctic. Here, 2 y of observations at Tiksi (East Siberian Arctic) establish a strong seasonality in both BC concentrations (8 ngṡm-3 to 302 ngṡm-3) and dual-isotope-constrained sources (19 to 73% contribution from biomass burning). Comparisons between observations and a dispersion model, coupled to an anthropogenic emissions inventory and a fire emissions inventory, give mixed results. In the European Arctic, this model has proven to simulate BC concentrations and source contributions well. However, the model is less successful in reproducing BC concentrations and sources for the Russian Arctic. Using a Bayesian approach, we show that, in contrast to earlier studies, contributions from gas flaring (6%), power plants (9%), and open fires (12%) are relatively small, with the major sources instead being domestic (35%) and transport (38%). The observation-based evaluation of reported emissions identifies errors in spatial allocation of BC sources in the inventory and highlights the importance of improving emission distribution and source attribution, to develop reliable mitigation strategies for efficient reduction of BC impact on the Russian Arctic, one of the fastest-warming regions on Earth.

  11. Field Measurements of Black Carbon Yields from Gas Flaring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Bradley M; Johnson, Matthew R

    2017-02-07

    Black carbon (BC) emissions from gas flaring in the oil and gas industry are postulated to have critical impacts on climate and public health, but actual emission rates remain poorly characterized. This paper presents in situ field measurements of BC emission rates and flare gas volume-specific BC yields for a diverse range of flares. Measurements were performed during a series of field campaigns in Mexico and Ecuador using the sky-LOSA optical measurement technique, in concert with comprehensive Monte Carlo-based uncertainty analyses. Parallel on-site measurements of flare gas flow rate and composition were successfully performed at a subset of locations enabling direct measurements of fuel-specific BC yields from flares under field conditions. Quantified BC emission rates from individual flares spanned more than 4 orders of magnitude (up to 53.7 g/s). In addition, emissions during one notable ∼24-h flaring event (during which the plume transmissivity dropped to zero) would have been even larger than this maximum rate, which was measured as this event was ending. This highlights the likely importance of superemitters to global emission inventories. Flare gas volume-specific BC yields were shown to be strongly correlated with flare gas heating value. A newly derived correlation fitting current field data and previous lab data suggests that, in the context of recent studies investigating transport of flare-generated BC in the Arctic and globally, impacts of flaring in the energy industry may in fact be underestimated.

  12. Black carbon aerosols and the third polar ice cap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Menon

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent thinning of glaciers over the Himalayas (sometimes referred to as the third polar region have raised concern on future water supplies since these glaciers supply water to large river systems that support millions of people inhabiting the surrounding areas. Black carbon (BC aerosols, released from incomplete combustion, have been increasingly implicated as causing large changes in the hydrology and radiative forcing over Asia and its deposition on snow is thought to increase snow melt. In India BC from biofuel combustion is highly prevalent and compared to other regions, BC aerosol amounts are high. Here, we quantify the impact of BC aerosols on snow cover and precipitation from 1990 to 2010 over the Indian subcontinental region using two different BC emission inventories. New estimates indicate that Indian BC from coal and biofuel are large and transport is expected to expand rapidly in coming years. We show that over the Himalayas, from 1990 to 2000, simulated snow/ice cover decreases by ~0.9% due to aerosols. The contribution of the enhanced Indian BC to this decline is ~30%, similar to that simulated for 2000 to 2010. Spatial patterns of modeled changes in snow cover and precipitation are similar to observations (from 1990 to 2000, and are mainly obtained with the newer BC estimates.

  13. Black carbon aerosols and the third polar ice cap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Menon

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent thinning of glaciers over the Himalayas (sometimes referred to as the third polar region have raised concern on future water supplies since these glaciers supply water to large river systems that support millions of people inhabiting the surrounding areas. Black carbon (BC aerosols, released from incomplete combustion, have been increasingly implicated as causing large changes in the hydrology and radiative forcing over Asia and its deposition on snow is thought to increase snow melt. In India BC emissions from biofuel combustion is highly prevalent and compared to other regions, BC aerosol amounts are high. Here, we quantify the impact of BC aerosols on snow cover and precipitation from 1990 to 2010 over the Indian subcontinental region using two different BC emission inventories. New estimates indicate that Indian BC emissions from coal and biofuel are large and transport is expected to expand rapidly in coming years. We show that over the Himalayas, from 1990 to 2000, simulated snow/ice cover decreases by ~0.9% due to aerosols. The contribution of the enhanced Indian BC to this decline is ~36%, similar to that simulated for 2000 to 2010. Spatial patterns of modeled changes in snow cover and precipitation are similar to observations (from 1990 to 2000, and are mainly obtained with the newer BC estimates.

  14. Black Carbon Trends over Several Decades at Multiple Locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preble, C. V.; Hadley, O. L.; Bond, T. C.; Kirchstetter, T.

    2012-12-01

    Archived air quality data in the U.S. and Europe can be used to reconstruct past trends in black carbon (BC), an indicator of fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning. Here, we consider coefficient of haze (COH) data that was extensively measured in California, New Jersey, and other North American locations from the mid-1960s to the turn of the century. We reinstated COH monitors alongside aethalometers in Vallejo and San Jose, California, and after two years of air monitoring determined that COH is proportional to and, thus, can be used to infer past concentrations of BC. Analyzing COH data sets, we found that BC concentrations markedly decreased from 1965 to 2000 in both California and New Jersey. The opposing trend of increasing energy consumption over the same period indicates successful regulatory control of sources and a shift from dirtier to cleaner fuels. As air quality improved over four decades, a seasonal trend of maximum BC concentrations in winter persisted in California but, somewhat surprisingly, disappeared in New Jersey. A strong weekly cycle of lowest BC concentrations on weekends was evident in California and New Jersey, suggesting that diesel traffic, which exhibits a similar weekly cycle, has been a major source of BC in both states. Our extended analysis will include BC trends in other regions of North America and Europe and will be applied to understand BC radiative forcing in California and deposition of pollutants in the Arctic.

  15. Characteristics and source of black carbon aerosol over Taklimakan Desert

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU; S.Joshua

    2010-01-01

    Black carbon(BC) and PM10 in the center of the Taklimakan Desert were online monitored in the whole year of 2007.In addi-tion,TSP samples were also synchronously daily collected by medium-volume samplers with Whatman41 filters in the spring of 2007.BC in the dust aerosol was up to 1.14%of the total mass of PM10.A remarkable seasonal variation of BC in the aerosol was observed in the order of winter>spring>autumn>summer.The peak value of BC appeared at midnight while the lowest one in the evening each day,which was just the reverse of that in the urban area.The contribution of BC to the total mass of PM10 on non-dust storm days was~11 times of that in dust storm.Through back trajectory and principal component analysis,it was found that BC in the dust aerosol over Taklimakan Desert might be attributed to the emission from the anthropogenic activities,including domestic heating,cooking,combustion of oil and natural gas,and the medium-range transport from those oases located in the margins of the desert.The total BC aerosol from the Taklimakan Desert to be transported to the eastward downstream was estimated to be 6.3×104 ton yr-1.

  16. Factors controlling seasonal variations in Arctic black carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Z.; Ming, Y.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic haze has a distinct seasonality with higher concentrations in winter and spring. This study evaluates how different processes of large-scale circulation and removal control seasonal variations in Arctic black carbon (BC) using the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) atmospheric general circulation model (AM3). We find that transport and wet deposition play unequal roles in determining Arctic BC seasonal cycle. Despite seasonal differences in general circulation patterns, the eddy-driven BC transport changes little throughout the year, and the seasonal cycle of Arctic BC is attributed to wet removal. BC hydrophilic fraction affected by the aging process and hydrophilic BC (BCpi) wet deposition rate affected by cloud microphysics determine wet deposition. Both low hydrophilic fraction and low wet deposition rate account for the peak of BC in winter. The transition to low BC in summer results from an increase in wet deposition rate, while the return of BC in late autumn is mainly caused by a sharp decrease in hydrophilic fraction. The results suggest that the concentrations of Arctic aerosols as well as their climate impacts may be susceptible to modification in a future climate.

  17. Black Carbon in Seasonal Snow across Northern Xinjiang, Northwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, H.; Zhang, R.; Shi, J.; Huang, J.; Warren, S. G.; Fu, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) particles in snow can significantly reduce the snow albedo and enhance the absorption of solar radiation, with important impacts on climate and the hydrological cycle. A field campaign was carried out to measure the BC content in seasonal snow in Qinghai and Xinjiang provinces of western China, in January and February, 2012. About 300 snow samples were collected at 38 sites, 6 in Qinghai and 32 in Xinjiang. The observational results at the sites in Xinjiang, where the dominant absorbing impurities in snow are BC particles, are reported in this paper. The BC mass-fractions in seasonal snow across northern Xinjiang have a median value of ~70 ng/g, lower than those in northeast China but comparable to those in snow on glaciers of the Tianshan Mountains. The estimated concentration of BC at the cleanest site in Xinjiang is 20 ng/g, which is similar to that found along the coast of the Arctic Ocean. In general, the BC content of snow decreases with altitude. The data from this field campaign should be useful for testing transport models and climate models for the simulated BC in snow.

  18. Preparation and characterization of dopamine-decorated hydrophilic carbon black

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Lijun; Lu Yonglai [State Key Laboratory of Organic-Inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Key Laboratory of Beijing City on Preparation and Processing of Novel Polymer Materials, Beijing 100029 (China); Wang Yiqing [State Key Laboratory of Organic-Inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100029 (China); Zhang Liqun [State Key Laboratory of Organic-Inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Key Laboratory of Beijing City on Preparation and Processing of Novel Polymer Materials, Beijing 100029 (China); Wang Wencai, E-mail: wangw@mail.buct.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Organic-Inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2012-05-01

    Inspired by the bio-adhesive proteins secreted by mussels for attachment to almost all wet substrates, a facile method involving oxidative polymerization of dopamine was proposed to prepare highly hydrophilic carbon black (CB) particles. A self-assembled polydopamine (PDA) ad-layer was formed via the oxidative polymerization of dopamine on the surface of CB simply by dipping the CB into an alkaline dopamine solution and mildly stirring at room temperature. The process is simple, controllable, and environment-friendly. The surface composition and structure of the CB were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The surface morphology of the CB was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed that the PDA ad-layer was successfully deposited on the CB surfaces. The PDA-functionalized CB (CB-PDA) gave a stable colloidal dispersion in water. Contact angle measurement results indicated that the hydrophilicity of CB was significantly improved after dopamine modification. TGA results confirmed that the modified CB maintained good heat resistance. The method provided a facile route to prepare hydrophilic CB having terminal hydroxyl groups.

  19. Black carbon absorption effects on cloud cover, review and synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Koch

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Absorbing aerosols (AA's such as black carbon (BC or dust absorb incoming solar radiation, perturb the temperature structure of the atmosphere, and influence cloud cover. Previous studies have described conditions where AA's either increase or decrease cloud cover. The effect depends on several factors, including the altitude of the AA relative to the cloud and on the cloud type. Cloud cover is decreased if the AA's are embedded in the cloud layer. AA's below cloud may enhance convection and cloud cover. AA's over cloud-level stabilize the underlying layer and tend to enhance stratocumulus clouds but may reduce cumulus clouds. AA's can also promote cloud cover in convergent regions as they enhance deep convection and low level convergence as it draws in moisture from ocean to land regions. Most global model studies indicate a regional variation in the cloud response but generally increased cloud cover over oceans and some land regions, with net increased low-level and/or reduced upper level cloud cover. The result is net negative radiative forcing from cloud response to AA's. In some of these climate model studies, the cooling effect of BC due to cloud changes was strong enough to essentially cancel the warming direct effects.

  20. Black carbon aerosols and the third polar ice cap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menon, Surabi; Koch, Dorothy; Beig, Gufran; Sahu, Saroj; Fasullo, John; Orlikowski, Daniel

    2010-04-15

    Recent thinning of glaciers over the Himalayas (sometimes referred to as the third polar region) have raised concern on future water supplies since these glaciers supply water to large river systems that support millions of people inhabiting the surrounding areas. Black carbon (BC) aerosols, released from incomplete combustion, have been increasingly implicated as causing large changes in the hydrology and radiative forcing over Asia and its deposition on snow is thought to increase snow melt. In India BC emissions from biofuel combustion is highly prevalent and compared to other regions, BC aerosol amounts are high. Here, we quantify the impact of BC aerosols on snow cover and precipitation from 1990 to 2010 over the Indian subcontinental region using two different BC emission inventories. New estimates indicate that Indian BC emissions from coal and biofuel are large and transport is expected to expand rapidly in coming years. We show that over the Himalayas, from 1990 to 2000, simulated snow/ice cover decreases by {approx}0.9% due to aerosols. The contribution of the enhanced Indian BC to this decline is {approx}36%, similar to that simulated for 2000 to 2010. Spatial patterns of modeled changes in snow cover and precipitation are similar to observations (from 1990 to 2000), and are mainly obtained with the newer BC estimates.

  1. Factorial Based Response Surface Modeling with Confidence Intervals for Optimizing Thermal Optical Transmission Analysis of Atmospheric Black Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    We demonstrate how thermal-optical transmission analysis (TOT) for refractory light-absorbing carbon in atmospheric particulate matter was optimized with empirical response surface modeling. TOT employs pyrolysis to distinguish the mass of black carbon (BC) from organic carbon (...

  2. The Influence of Unidirectional Pressure on Electrical Conductivity of Carbon Black Filled Polyethylene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ke; ZHANG Guo; ZHAO Zhudi; PENG Yi; DI Weihua; DU Chuang

    2006-01-01

    High density polyethylene filled with conductive carbon black was prepared by conventional melt-mixing method. The effect of unidirectional pressure on the conductivity was studied. Wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) was used to show the influence of pressure on the aggregate structure of the polymer filled with carbon black (CB) fillers. A model on the basis of the formation and destruction of conductive networks was proposed to explain the change in the conductivity with the application of pressure.

  3. Sources of uncertainties in modelling black carbon at the global scale

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of the global black carbon (BC) cycle is essentially qualitative due to uncertainties in our knowledge of its properties. This work investigates two source of uncertainties in modelling black carbon: those due to the use of different schemes for BC ageing and its removal rate in the global Transport-Chemistry model TM5 and those due to the uncertainties in the definition and quantification of the observations, which propagate through to both the emission inventories, and the...

  4. Synthesis and characterization of carbon-coated cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshi, Hamed; Shokuhfar, Ali; Vahdati, Nima

    2016-09-01

    Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (CFNPs) were prepared via a reverse micelle method. The CFNPs were subsequently coated with carbon shells by means of thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD). In this process, acetylene gas (C2H2) was used as a carbon source and the coating was carried out for 1, 2, or 3 h at 750°C. The Ar/C2H2 ratio was 10:1. Heating during the TCVD process resulted in a NP core size that approached 30 nm; the thickness of the shell was less than 10 nm. The composition, structure, and morphology of the fabricated composites were characterized using X-ray diffraction, simultaneous thermal analysis, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and selected-area diffraction. A vibrating sample magnetometer was used to survey the samples' magnetic properties. The deposited carbon shell substantially affected the growth and magnetic properties of the CFNPs. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to study the carbon coating and revealed that the deposited carbon comprised graphite, multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and diamond- like carbon. With an increase in coating time, the intensity ratio between the amorphous and ordered peaks in the Raman spectra decreased, which indicated an increase in crystallite size.

  5. Monitoring Moisture Damage Propagation in GFRP Composites Using Carbon Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Al-Sabagh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP composites are widely used in infrastructure applications including water structures due to their relatively high durability, high strength to weight ratio, and non-corrosiveness. Here we demonstrate the potential use of carbon nanoparticles dispersed during GFRP composite fabrication to reduce water absorption of GFRP and to enable monitoring of moisture damage propagation in GFRP composites. GFRP coupons incorporating 2.0 wt % carbon nanofibers (CNFs and 2.0 wt % multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were fabricated in order to study the effect of moisture damage on mechanical properties of GFRP. Water absorption tests were carried out by immersing the GFRP coupons in a seawater bath at two temperatures for a time period of three months. Effects of water immersion on the mechanical properties and glass transition temperature of GFRP were investigated. Furthermore, moisture damage in GFRP was monitored by measuring the electrical conductivity of the GFRP coupons. It was shown that carbon nanoparticles can provide a means of self-sensing that enables the monitoring of moisture damage in GFRP. Despite the success of the proposed technique, it might not be able to efficiently describe moisture damage propagation in GFRP beyond a specific threshold because of the relatively high electrical conductivity of seawater. Microstructural investigations using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR explained the significance of seawater immersion time and temperature on the different levels of moisture damage in GFRP.

  6. Selection and Characterization of Carbon Black and Surfactants for Development of Small Scale Uranium Oxicarbide Kernels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    This report supports the effort for development of small scale fabrication of UCO (a mixture of UO{sub 2} and UC{sub 2}) fuel kernels for the generation IV high temperature gas reactor program. In particular, it is focused on optimization of dispersion conditions of carbon black in the broths from which carbon-containing (UO{sub 2} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O + C) gel spheres are prepared by internal gelation. The broth results from mixing a hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) and urea solution with an acid-deficient uranyl nitrate (ADUN) solution. Carbon black, which is previously added to one or other of the components, must stay dispersed during gelation. The report provides a detailed description of characterization efforts and results, aimed at identification and testing carbon black and surfactant combinations that would produce stable dispersions, with carbon particle sizes below 1 {micro}m, in aqueous HMTA/urea and ADUN solutions. A battery of characterization methods was used to identify the properties affecting the water dispersability of carbon blacks, such as surface area, aggregate morphology, volatile content, and, most importantly, surface chemistry. The report introduces the basic principles for each physical or chemical method of carbon black characterization, lists the results obtained, and underlines cross-correlations between methods. Particular attention is given to a newly developed method for characterization of surface chemical groups on carbons in terms of their acid-base properties (pK{sub a} spectra) based on potentiometric titration. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to confirm the identity of surfactants, both ionic and non-ionic. In addition, background information on carbon black properties and the mechanism by which surfactants disperse carbon black in water is also provided. A list of main physical and chemical properties characterized, samples analyzed, and results obtained, as well as information on the desired trend or

  7. Global emission inventory and atmospheric transport of black carbon. Evaluation of the associated exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Rong

    2015-06-01

    This thesis presents research focusing on the improvement of high-resolution global black carbon (BC) emission inventory and application in assessing the population exposure to ambient BC. A particular focus of the thesis is on the construction of a high-resolution (both spatial and sectorial) fuel consumption database, which is used to develop the emission inventory of black carbon. Above all, the author updates the global emission inventory of black carbon, a resource subsequently used to study the atmospheric transport of black carbon over Asia with the help of a high-resolution nested model. The thesis demonstrates that spatial bias in fuel consumption and BC emissions can be reduced by means of the sub-national disaggregation approach. Using the inventory and nested model, ambient BC concentrations can be better validated against observations. Lastly, it provides a complete uncertainty analysis of global black carbon emissions, and this uncertainty is taken into account in the atmospheric modeling, helping to better understand the role of black carbon in regional and global air pollution.

  8. The Effectiveness of the Regulatory Regime for Black Carbon Mitigation in the Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Shapovalova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In addition to being a hazardous air pollutant, Black Carbon is the second-largest contributor to Arctic warming. Its mitigation is being addressed at the international regulatory level by the Arctic Council and the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution (CLRTAP. Whilst the Convention and its protocols are binding documents, the Black Carbon regulation under their framework appears to have ‘soft law’ characteristics. At the same time, the voluntary Black Carbon and Methane Framework, adopted by the Arctic Council, demonstrates positive compliance and follow-up dynamics compared to earlier norm-creating attempts. This paper argues that the nature of the norm (binding or non-binding is not the decisive factor regarding effective implementation in the Arctic region. Current efforts to mitigate Black Carbon by means of a non-binding Arctic Council Black Carbon and Methane Framework represent an improvement in the Council's normative function and may have more effect on the behaviour of Arctic States than relevant provisions under the Gothenburg Protocol to the CLRTAP. To support this argument, the first section presents an overview of the Arctic Council as an actor in Arctic policy-making. It then provides an assessment of current efforts to combat Black Carbon carried out by the Arctic Council and the CLRTAP.

  9. Challenges for Reducing Emissions of Black Carbon from the Transport Sector in Urban Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala, M. A.; Molina, L. T.

    2013-05-01

    The transport sector is a large contributor of harmful gaseous and particulate emissions in many urban areas. Black carbon is a component of short-lived particulate matter emitted predominantly by freight, public transport, and heavy- duty trucks. Controlling the emissions of black carbon from the transport sector is important for mitigating its impacts on climate, ecosystems, and human health. However, reducing the emissions of black carbon from mobile sources may be a challenging task in many developing urban areas due to economic, social, and technical constrains. Several emissions control technologies offer a proven approach for reducing emissions of black carbon from diesel-powered mobile sources, but the accurate quantification of associated emissions benefits in developing urban areas is not well documented. We describe recent advances for the estimation of black carbon emissions from the transport sector in real world driving conditions and present examples of the potential benefits of implementing various emission control technologies in Mexico. The results can help in the identification of key factors that hinder the implementation of control emissions for reducing emissions of black carbon elsewhere.

  10. Measurement of Black Carbon and Co-pollutants Emitted from Diesel Vehicles in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala, M. A.; Molina, L. T.; Fortner, E.; Herndon, S.; Knighton, B.; Yacovitch, T. I.; Floerchinger, C. R.; Roscioli, J. R.; Kolb, C. E.; Paramo, V. H.; Zirath, S.; Mejia, J.; Jazcilevich, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    Freight, public transport, and heavy-duty trucks can contribute to harmful emissions of black carbon and other co-pollutants in many urban areas. Controlling the emissions of black carbon from the transport sector is important for the potential of mitigating its impacts on climate, ecosystems, and human health. However, reducing the emissions of black carbon from mobile sources is be a challenging task in many developing urban areas due to economic, social, and technical constrains, as well as the uncertainties surrounding the accurate quantification of the associated benefits. Several emissions control technologies offer a proven approach for reducing emissions of black carbon from diesel-powered mobile sources, but the accurate quantification of associated emissions benefits in developing urban areas is not well documented. We present the results of the measurement of black carbon and co-emitted pollutants of dozens of diesel powered vehicles, including freight trucks, public transport buses, and intra-city metrobuses sampled during a 4-day experiment in Mexico City in February of 2013 as part of the SLCFs-Mexico project. Measurements were obtained with the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory, remote sensing, and portable emissions measurements, and encompassed the sampling of several vehicle models and technologies in experimental and real-world driving conditions. The results can help in the identification of key factors that hinder the implementation of control emissions for reducing emissions of black carbon elsewhere and the potential benefits of implementing various emission control technologies.

  11. The nature of carbon material in the black shale rock mass of Kazakhstan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchenko, L.G.

    1981-01-01

    Carbon material is closely tied to ores of various origin lying in the carbon (black shale) rock masses of Kazakhastan. The nature of the carbon material in several gold fields is closely examined. Shungite, its paragenesis with ore materials and its role in the carbon and ore material processes, is described. The accumulation of shungite in zones determined to consist of ores, is looked at in terms of prospecting criteria.

  12. Laser-generated plasma by carbon nanoparticles embedded into polyethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L.; Ceccio, G.; Cutroneo, M.

    2016-05-01

    Carbon nanoparticles have been embedded into polyethylene at different concentrations by using chemical-physical processes. The synthesized material was characterized in terms of physical modifications concerning the mechanical, compositional and optical properties. Obtained flat targets have been irradiated by Nd:YAG laser at intensities of the order of 1010 W/cm2 in order to generate non-equilibrium plasma in vacuum. The laser-matter interaction produces charge separation effects with consequent acceleration of protons and carbon ions. Plasma was characterized using time-of-flight measurements of the accelerated ions. Applications of the produced targets in order to generate carbon ion beams from laser-generated plasma are presented and discussed.

  13. Supercritical fluid attachment of palladium nanoparticles on aligned carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiang-Rong; Lin, Yuehe; Wai, Chien M; Talbot, Jan B; Jin, Sungho

    2005-06-01

    Nanocomposite materials consisting of Pd nanoparticles deposited on aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes have been fabricated through hydrogen reduction of palladium-beta-diketone precursor in supercritical carbon dioxide. The supercritical fluid processing allowed deposition of high-density Pd nanoparticles (approximately 5-10 nm) on both as-grown (unfunctionalized) and functionalized (using HNO3 oxidation) nanotubes. However, the wet processing for functionalization results in pre-agglomerated, bundle-shaped nanotubes, thus significantly reducing the effective surface area for Pd particle deposition, although the bundling provides more secure, lock-in-place positioning of nanotubes and Pd catalyst particles. The nanotube bundling is substantially mitigated by Pd nanoparticle deposition on the unfunctionalized and geometrically separated nanotubes, which provides much higher catalyst surface area. Such nanocomposite materials utilizing geometrically secured and aligned nanotubes can be useful for providing much enhanced catalytic activities to chemical and electrochemical reactions (e.g., fuel cell reactions), and eliminate the need for tedious catalyst recovery process after the reaction is completed.

  14. Structure and electrocatalytic performance of carbon-supported platinum nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esparbe, Isaac; Brillas, Enric; Centellas, Francesc; Garrido, Jose Antonio; Rodriguez, Rosa Maria; Arias, Conchita; Cabot, Pere-Lluis [Laboratori d' Electroquimica dels Materials i del Medi Ambient, Departament de Quimica Fisica, Facultat de Quimica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-05-15

    The structure of Pt nanoparticles and the composition of the catalyst-Nafion films strongly determine the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The effect of Nafion content in the catalyst ink, prepared with a commercially available carbon-supported Pt, in the kinetics of the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR), has been studied by the thin layer rotating disk electrode technique. The kinetic parameters have been related to the catalyst nanoparticles structure, characterized by X-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The size-shape analysis is consistent with the presence of 3D cubo-octahedral Pt nanoparticles with average size of 2.5 nm. The electrochemically active surface area, determined by CO stripping, appears to depend on the composition of the deposited Pt/C-Nafion film, with a maximum value of 73 m{sup 2} g{sub Pt}{sup -1} for 30 wt.% Nafion. The results of CO stripping indicate that the external Pt faces are mainly (1 0 0) and (1 1 1) terraces, thus confirming the cubo-octahedral structure of nanoparticles. Cyclic voltammetry combined with the RDE technique has been applied to study the kinetic parameters of HOR besides the ionomer resistance effect on the anode kinetic current at different ionomer contents. The kinetic parameters show that H{sub 2} oxidation behaves reversibly with an estimated exchange current density of 0.27 mA cm{sup -2}. (author)

  15. Analyzing 20 years of Black Carbon measurements in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutzner, R. D.; Quedenau, J.; Kuik, F.; von Schneidemesser, E.; Schmale, J.

    2016-12-01

    Black Carbon (BC) is an important short-lived climate-forcing pollutant contributing to global warming through absorption of sunlight. In addition, BC, as a component of particulate matter (PM) exerts adverse health effects. Anthropogenic emission sources of BC include residential heating, transport, and agricultural fires, and the dominant natural emission source is wildfires. Despite the adverse effects of BC, legislation that requires mandatory monitoring of BC concentrations does not currently exist in the European Union (EU). Instead, BC is only indirectly monitored as component of PM10 and PM2.5 (PM with a diameter smaller 10 µm and 2.5 µm, respectively). Before the introduction of mandatory PM10 and PM2.5 monitoring in the EU in 2005 and 2015, respectively, `black smoke' (BS), a surrogate for BC, was a required measurement in Germany from the early 1990s. The annual mean limit value was 14 µg/m3 from 1995 and 8 µg/m³ from 1998. In 2004, many measurements were stopped, with the repeal of the regulations. In most German federal states a limited number BC monitoring stations continued to operate. We present a synthesis of BC data from 213 stations across Germany covering the period between 1994 and 2014. Due to the lack of a standardized method and respective legislation, the data set is very heterogeneous relying on twelve different measurement methods including chemical, optical, and thermal-optical methods. Stations include, among others, urban background, traffic and rural. We highlight results from the year 2009, as it is the year with the largest measurement coverage based on the same measurement method, with 28 stations. Further, we calculated trends in BC concentrations for 13 stations with at least 10 years of data, for median concentrations, as well as 5th percentile (background) and 95th percentile (peak episodes). Preliminary results suggest that concentrations have generally declined, with a larger trend at traffic stations compared to urban

  16. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on hierarchically structured cobalt nanoparticle/carbon nanofiber/carbon felt composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarubova, Sarka; Rane, Shreyas; Yang, Jia; Yu, Yingda; Zhu, Ye; Chen, De; Holmen, Anders

    2011-07-18

    The hierarchically structured carbon nanofibers (CNFs)/carbon felt composites, in which CNFs were directly grown on the surface of microfibers in carbon felt, forming a CNF layer on a micrometer range that completely covers the microfiber surfaces, were tested as a novel support material for cobalt nanoparticles in the highly exothermic Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis. A compact, fixed-bed reactor, made of disks of such composite materials, offered the advantages of improved heat and mass transfer, relatively low pressure drop, and safe handling of immobilized CNFs. An efficient 3-D thermal conductive network in the composite provided a relatively uniform temperature profile, whereas the open structure of the CNF layer afforded an almost 100 % effectiveness of Co nanoparticles in the F-T synthesis in the fixed bed. The greatly improved mass and heat transport makes the compact reactor attractive for applications in the conversion of biomass, coal, and natural gas to liquids.

  17. Are emissions of black carbon from gasoline vehicles overestimated? Real-time, in situ measurement of black carbon emission factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Xing, Zhenyu; Zhao, Shuhui; Zheng, Mei; Mu, Chao; Du, Ke

    2016-03-15

    Accurately quantifying black carbon (BC) emission factors (EFs) is a prerequisite for estimation of BC emission inventory. BC EFs determined by measuring BC at the roadside or chasing a vehicle on-road may introduce large uncertainty for low emission vehicles. In this study, BC concentrations were measured inside the tailpipe of gasoline vehicles with different engine sizes under different driving modes to determine the respective EFs. BC EFs ranged from 0.005-7.14 mg/kg-fuel under the speeds of 20-70 km/h, 0.05-28.95 mg/kg-fuel under the accelerations of 0.5-1.5m/s(2). Although the water vapor in the sampling stream could result in an average of 12% negative bias, the BC EFs are significantly lower than the published results obtained with roadside or chasing vehicle measurement. It is suggested to conduct measurement at the tailpipe of gasoline vehicles instead of in the atmosphere behind the vehicles to reduce the uncertainty from fluctuation in ambient BC concentration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Probing Black Carbon-containing Particle Microphysics with the Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlacek, A. J.; Lewis, E. R.; Onasch, T. B.; Lambe, A. T.; Davidovits, P.; Kleinman, L. I.

    2012-12-01

    Knowledge of the structure and mixing state of black-carbon containing particles is important for calculating their radiative forcing and provides insight into their source and life cycle. Recently analysis of black carbon-containing particles has demonstrated that for a fraction of such particles, the black carbon may reside on or near the surface of the particle as opposed to the traditional core-shell configuration typically assumed in which the black carbon core is surrounded by a shell of non-refractory material. During the DOE-sponsored Aerosol Lifecycle field campaign held in summer, 2011 at Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island, NY, episodes were encountered in which a high fraction of particles containing black carbon had such configurations, and these episodes corresponded to air masses that contained biomass burning plumes (Sedlacek et al., 2012). Subsequent analysis found other episodes in field campaigns in Colorado and California in which high fractions this configuration corresponded to biomass burning plumes. In an effort to evaluate this interpretation and explore formation mechanisms, a series of laboratory-based experiments examining the coagulation of regal black (surrogate for collapsed soot) with model non-refractory coatings [dioctyl sebacate (surrogate for organic aerosols with liquid-like character) and deliquesced ammonium sulfate (solid)] were carried out. The results of these experiments and their potential implications on black carbon radiative forcing will be discussed. Sedlacek, III, Arthur, E. R. Lewis, L. I. Kleinman, J. Xu and Q. Zhang (2012), Determination of and Evidence for Non-core-shell structure of particles containing black carbon using the single particle soot photometer (SP2). Geophys. Res. Lett., 39 L06802, doi:10.1029/2012GL050905

  19. Flexible all solid state supercapacitor with high energy density employing black titania nanoparticles as a conductive agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Jian; Yang, Chongyin; Lin, Tianquan; Cui, Houlei; Wang, Zhou; Zhang, Hui; Huang, Fuqiang

    2016-02-01

    Increasing the electrical conductivity of pseudocapacitive materials without changing their morphology is an ideal structural solution to realize both high electrochemical performance and superior flexibility for an all solid state supercapacitor (ASSSC). Herein, we fabricate a flexible ASSSC device employing black titania (TiO2-x:N) decorated two-dimensional (2D) NiO nanosheets as the positive electrode and mesoporous graphene as the negative electrode. In this unique design, NiO nanosheets are used as pseudocapacitive materials and TiO2-x:N nanoparticles serve as the conductive agent. Owing to the excellent electrical conductivity of TiO2-x:N and well defined ``particle on sheet'' planar structure of NiO/TiO2-x:N composites, the 2D morphology of the decorated NiO nanosheets is completely retained, which efficiently reinforces the pseudocapacitive activity and flexibility of the whole all solid state device. The maximum specific capacitance of fabricated the NiO/TiO2-x:N//mesoporous graphene supercapacitor can reach 133 F g-1, which is 2 and 4 times larger than the values of the NiO based ASSSC employing graphene and carbon black as the conductive agent, respectively. In addition, the optimized ASSSC displays intriguing performances with an energy density of 47 W h kg-1 in a voltage region of 0-1.6 V, which is, to the best of our knowledge, the highest value for flexible ASSSC devices. The impressive results presented here may pave the way for promising applications of black titania in high energy density flexible storage systems.Increasing the electrical conductivity of pseudocapacitive materials without changing their morphology is an ideal structural solution to realize both high electrochemical performance and superior flexibility for an all solid state supercapacitor (ASSSC). Herein, we fabricate a flexible ASSSC device employing black titania (TiO2-x:N) decorated two-dimensional (2D) NiO nanosheets as the positive electrode and mesoporous graphene as the

  20. Impacts of black carbon and co-pollutant emissions from transportation sector in Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala, Miguel; Almanza, Victor; Garcia, Agustin; Jazcilevich, Aron; Lei, Wenfang; Molina, Luisa

    2016-04-01

    Black carbon is one of the most important short-lived climate-forcing agents, which is harmful to human health and also contributes significantly to climate change. Transportation is one of the largest sources of black carbon emissions in many megacities and urban complexes, with diesel vehicles leading the way. Both on-road and off-road vehicles can emit substantial amounts of harmful BC-containing particulate matter (PM) and are also responsible for large emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and many other co-emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Regionally, black carbon emissions contributions from mobile sources may vary widely depending on the technical characteristics of the vehicle fleet, the quality and chemical properties of the fuels consumed, and the degree of local development and economic activities that foster wider and more frequent or intensive use of vehicles. This presentation will review and assess the emissions of black carbon from the on-road and off-road transportation sector in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area. Viable mitigation strategies, including innovative technological alternatives to reduce black carbon and co-pollutants in diesel vehicles and their impacts on climate, human health and ecosystems will be described.

  1. Coalescence of functional gold and monodisperse silver nanoparticles mediated by black Panax ginseng Meyer root extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dandan; Markus, Josua; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Wang, Chao; Jiménez Pérez, Zuly Elizabeth; Ahn, Sungeun; Aceituno, Verónica Castro; Mathiyalagan, Ramya; Yang, Deok Chun

    2016-01-01

    A rapid biological synthesis of multifunctional gold nanoparticle (AuNp) and monodisperse silver nanoparticle (AgNp) was achieved by an aqueous extract of black Panax ginseng Meyer root. The physicochemical transformation into black ginseng (BG) greatly enhanced the pharmacological activities of white ginseng and its minor ginsenoside content. The optimal temperature conditions and kinetics of bioreduction were investigated. Formation of BG-AuNps and BG-AgNps was verified by ultraviolet–visible spectrophotometry at 548 and 412 nm, respectively. The biosynthesized BG-AgNps were spherical and monodisperse with narrow distribution, while BG-AuNps were icosahedral-shaped and moderately polydisperse. Synthesized nanoparticles exhibited long-term stability in buffers of pH 7.0–8.0 and biological media (5% bovine serum albumin) at an ambient temperature and at 37°C. BG-AgNps showed effective antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. BG-AuNps and BG-AgNps demonstrated increased scavenging activity against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radicals. In addition, BG-AuNps and BG-AgNps were nontoxic to HaCaT and MCF-7 cells; the latter showed no cytotoxicity at concentrations lower than 10 µg/mL. At higher concentrations, BG-AgNps exhibited apparent apoptotic activity in MCF-7 breast cancer cell line through reactive oxygen species generation and nuclear fragmentation. PMID:28008248

  2. Sources of uncertainties in modelling black carbon at the global scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Vignati

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the global black carbon (BC cycle is essentially qualitative due to uncertainties in our knowledge of its properties. This work investigates two source of uncertainties in modelling black carbon: those due to the use of different schemes for BC ageing and its removal rate in the global Transport-Chemistry model TM5 and those due to the uncertainties in the definition and quantification of the observations, which propagate through to both the emission inventories, and the measurements used for the model evaluation.

    The schemes for the atmospheric processing of black carbon that have been tested with the model are (i a simple approach considering BC as bulk aerosol and a simple treatment of the removal with fixed 70% of in-cloud black carbon concentrations scavenged by clouds and removed when rain is present and (ii a more complete description of microphysical ageing within an aerosol dynamics model, where removal is coupled to the microphysical properties of the aerosol, which results in a global average of 40% in-cloud black carbon that is scavenged in clouds and subsequently removed by rain, thus resulting in a longer atmospheric lifetime. This difference is reflected in comparisons between both sets of modelled results and the measurements. Close to the sources, both anthropogenic and vegetation fire source regions, the model results do not differ significantly, indicating that the emissions are the prevailing mechanism determining the concentrations and the choice of the aerosol scheme does not influence the levels. In more remote areas such as oceanic and polar regions the differences can be orders of magnitude, due to the differences between the two schemes. The more complete description reproduces the seasonal trend of the black carbon observations in those areas, although not always the magnitude of the signal, while the more simplified approach underestimates black carbon concentrations by orders of

  3. Sources of uncertainties in modelling black carbon at the global scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignati, E.; Karl, M.; Krol, M.; Wilson, J.; Stier, P.; Cavalli, F.

    2010-03-01

    Our understanding of the global black carbon (BC) cycle is essentially qualitative due to uncertainties in our knowledge of its properties. This work investigates two source of uncertainties in modelling black carbon: those due to the use of different schemes for BC ageing and its removal rate in the global Transport-Chemistry model TM5 and those due to the uncertainties in the definition and quantification of the observations, which propagate through to both the emission inventories, and the measurements used for the model evaluation. The schemes for the atmospheric processing of black carbon that have been tested with the model are (i) a simple approach considering BC as bulk aerosol and a simple treatment of the removal with fixed 70% of in-cloud black carbon concentrations scavenged by clouds and removed when rain is present and (ii) a more complete description of microphysical ageing within an aerosol dynamics model, where removal is coupled to the microphysical properties of the aerosol, which results in a global average of 40% in-cloud black carbon that is scavenged in clouds and subsequently removed by rain, thus resulting in a longer atmospheric lifetime. This difference is reflected in comparisons between both sets of modelled results and the measurements. Close to the sources, both anthropogenic and vegetation fire source regions, the model results do not differ significantly, indicating that the emissions are the prevailing mechanism determining the concentrations and the choice of the aerosol scheme does not influence the levels. In more remote areas such as oceanic and polar regions the differences can be orders of magnitude, due to the differences between the two schemes. The more complete description reproduces the seasonal trend of the black carbon observations in those areas, although not always the magnitude of the signal, while the more simplified approach underestimates black carbon concentrations by orders of magnitude. The sensitivity to wet

  4. 20 years of Black Carbon measurements in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutzner, Rebecca; Quedenau, Jörn; Kuik, Friderike; von Schneidemesser, Erika; Schmale, Julia

    2016-04-01

    Black Carbon (BC) is an important short-lived climate-forcing pollutant contributing to global warming through absorption of sunlight. At the same time, BC, as a component of particulate matter (PM) exerts adverse health effects, like decreased lung function and exacerbated asthma. Globally, anthropogenic emission sources of BC include residential heating, transport, and agricultural fires, while the dominant natural emission sources are wildfires. Despite the various adverse effects of BC, legislation that requires mandatory monitoring of BC concentrations does not currently exist in the European Union. Instead, BC is only indirectly monitored as component of PM10 and PM2.5 (particulate matter with a diameter smaller 10 μm and 2.5 μm). Before the introduction of mandatory PM10 and PM2.5 monitoring in the European Union in 2005 and 2015, respectively, 'black smoke', a surrogate for BC, was a required measurement in Germany from the early 1990s. The annual mean limit value was 14 μg m-3 from 1995 and 8 μg m-3 from 1998 onwards. Many 'black smoke' measurements were stopped in 2004, with the repeal of the regulations obtaining at the time. However, in most German federal states a limited number BC monitoring stations continued to operate. Here we present a synthesis of BC data from 213 stations across Germany covering the period between 1994 and 2014. Due to the lack of a standardized method and respective legislation, the data set is very heterogeneous relying on twelve different measurement methods including chemical, optical, and thermal-optical methods. Stations include locations classified as background, urban-background, industrial and traffic among other types. Raw data in many different formats has been modelled and integrated in a relational database, allowing various options for further data analysis. We highlight results from the year 2009, as it is the year with the largest measurement coverage based on the same measurement method, with 30 stations. In

  5. The Deposition of Gold Nanoparticles Onto Activated Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaworski W.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the results of spectrophotometric, dynamic light scattering (DLS and microscopic (SEM studies of the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs deposition on activated carbon (AC surface modified with primary (ethanolamine and secondary (diethylenetriamine and triethylenetetramine amines. It was found that this method is efficient for deposition of AuNPs from aqueous solution. However, nanoparticles change their morphology depending on the kind of amine used in experiments. On the AC surface modified with ethanolamine, the uniform spherical AuNPs were formed. In case of diethylenetriamine and triethylenetetramine application, the agglomerates of AuNPs are present. The diameter of individual AuNPs did not exceed 15 nm and was bigger as compared with the diameter of particles present in precursor solution (ca. 10 nm.

  6. Theoretical investigation of magnetic properties in interfaces of magnetic nanoparticles and amorphous carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shih-Jye; Hsu, Hua-Shu; Ovchinnikov, Sergei; Chen, Guan-Long

    2017-06-01

    Based on the experimental finding of the exchange bias in amorphous carbon samples with embedded Co nanoparticles and on the graphited character of the amorphous carbon interface confirmed by molecular dynamics simulations we have proposed the interface of graphited carbon to be antiferromagnetic. A theoretical model, which comprises the Kondo interactions in the interfaces of Co nanoparticles and the induced antiferromagnetic interactions in the graphited carbons, is employed to evaluate the ferromagnetism of the interfaces of Co nanoparticles. We have shown that the ferromagnetism of interfaces of Co nanoparticles will be enhanced by the increase of antiferromagnetic interaction as well as the increase of electron density in the graphited carbons. In particular, we found that the antiferromagnetic interactions in graphited carbons will change the spin-wave excitation in interfaces of Co nanoparticles from the quasiacoustic mode to the quasioptical one.

  7. Estimates of increased black carbon emissions from electrostatic precipitators during powdered activated carbon injection for mercury emissions control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clack, Herek L

    2012-07-03

    The behavior of mercury sorbents within electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) is not well-understood, despite a decade or more of full-scale testing. Recent laboratory results suggest that powdered activated carbon exhibits somewhat different collection behavior than fly ash in an ESP and particulate filters located at the outlet of ESPs have shown evidence of powdered activated carbon penetration during full-scale tests of sorbent injection for mercury emissions control. The present analysis considers a range of assumed differential ESP collection efficiencies for powdered activated carbon as compared to fly ash. Estimated emission rates of submicrometer powdered activated carbon are compared to estimated emission rates of particulate carbon on submicrometer fly ash, each corresponding to its respective collection efficiency. To the extent that any emitted powdered activated carbon exhibits size and optical characteristics similar to black carbon, such emissions could effectively constitute an increase in black carbon emissions from coal-based stationary power generation. The results reveal that even for the low injection rates associated with chemically impregnated carbons, submicrometer particulate carbon emissions can easily double if the submicrometer fraction of the native fly ash has a low carbon content. Increasing sorbent injection rates, larger collection efficiency differentials as compared to fly ash, and decreasing sorbent particle size all lead to increases in the estimated submicrometer particulate carbon emissions.

  8. Decoration of carbon nanotubes with magnetic Ni{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles by microemulsion method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Syed Tajammul, E-mail: dr_tajammul@yahoo.ca [National Centre for Physics, Quaid-e-Azam University Campus, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Gilani, Syeda Rubina [Department of Chemistry, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore (Pakistan); Ali, Syed Danish [National Centre for Physics, Quaid-e-Azam University Campus, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Department of Chemistry, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore (Pakistan); Safdar Bhatti, Humaira [National Centre for Physics, Quaid-e-Azam University Campus, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The novel Ni{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/CNTs nanocomposites were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A simple microemulsion method was first time used for the synthesis of nanocomposites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon nanotubes were coated with large quantity of magnetic nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ferrite/CNTs nanocomposites show ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ferrite/CNTs nanocomposites have many applications in nanoscience and technology. - Abstract: In this study, magnetic monodisperse ferrite Ni{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 0.2, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6 and 0.8) nanoparticles have been successfully deposited on the side wall of the carbon nanotubes by a simple, effective and reproducible microemulsion method. The structure, composition and size of the as prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Vibrating sample magnetometer was used to investigate magnetic properties of prepared samples. Results indicated that a large number of high purity magnetic ferrite nanoparticles of size about 15-25 nm were decorated uniformly on the surface of carbon nanotubes. Magnetic measurements showed that all the CNTs decorated with ferrite nanoparticles show ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature and can be easily manipulated by an external magnetic field. The maximum saturation magnetization value of the Ni{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/CNTs nanocomposites reached 44.21 emu/g. These magnetic ferrite/CNTs nanocomposites have many potential applications ranging from biomedical field to electromagnetic devices.

  9. Cellphones as a Distributed Platform for Black Carbon Data Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, N.; Ramana, M.; Lukac, M. L.; Siva, P.; Ahmed, T.; Kar, A.; Rehman, I.; Ramanathan, V.

    2010-12-01

    Black carbon (BC), the visible component of soot that gives emissions such as diesel engine exhaust their dark color, has come to be recognized as a major contributor to global warming, and a frontline concern for climate change strategies (Ramanathan 2001, Jacobson 2010). We have developed a new low-cost instrument for gathering and measuring atmospheric BC concentrations that leverages cellphones to transmit data from an air filtration unit to a centralized database for analysis. Our new system relies on image processing techniques, as opposed to other more expensive optical methods, to interpret images of filters captured with a cellphone camera. As a result, the entire system costs less than $500 (and is orders of magnitude cheaper than an Aethalometer, the prevailing method for measuring atmospheric BC). We are working with three community groups in Los Angeles, and will recruit three groups in the San Francisco Bay Area, to enable 40 citizens to be actively engaged in monitoring BC across California. We are working with The Energy Resources Institute, an international NGO based in India, to deploy this instrument with 60 people in conjunction with Project Surya, which aims to deploy clean cookstoves and rigorously evaluate their impact on BC emissions. Field tests of this new instrument performed in California report an average error of 0.28 µg/m3 when compared with an Aethelometer. These excellent results hold the promise of making large-scale data collection of BC feasible and relatively easy to reproduce (Ramanathan et al., forthcoming). The use of cellphones for data collection permits monitoring of BC to occur on a greater, more comprehensive scale not previously possible, and serves as a means of instituting more precise, variation-sensitive evaluations of emissions. By storing the data in a publicly available repository, our system will provide real-time access to mass-scale BC measurements to researchers and the public. Through our pilot

  10. Climate Response of Direct Radiative Forcing of Anthropogenic Black Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Serena H.; Seinfeld,John H.

    2008-01-01

    The equilibrium climate effect of direct radiative forcing of anthropogenic black carbon (BC) is examined by 100-year simulations in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies General Circulation Model II-prime coupled to a mixed-layer ocean model. Anthropogenic BC is predicted to raise globally and annually averaged equilibrium surface air temperature by 0.20 K if BC is assumed to be externally mixed. The predicted increase is significantly greater in the Northern Hemisphere (0.29 K) than in the Southern Hemisphere (0.11 K). If BC is assumed to be internally mixed with the present day level of sulfate aerosol, the predicted annual mean surface temperature increase rises to 0.37 K globally, 0.54 K for the Northern Hemisphere, and 0.20 K for the Southern Hemisphere. The climate sensitivity of BC direct radiative forcing is calculated to be 0.6 K W (sup -1) square meters, which is about 70% of that of CO2, independent of the assumption of BC mixing state. The largest surface temperature response occurs over the northern high latitudes during winter and early spring. In the tropics and midlatitudes, the largest temperature increase is predicted to occur in the upper troposphere. Direct radiative forcing of anthropogenic BC is also predicted to lead to a change of precipitation patterns in the tropics; precipitation is predicted to increase between 0 and 20 N and decrease between 0 and 20 S, shifting the intertropical convergence zone northward. If BC is assumed to be internally mixed with sulfate instead of externally mixed, the change in precipitation pattern is enhanced. The change in precipitation pattern is not predicted to alter the global burden of BC significantly because the change occurs predominantly in regions removed from BC sources.

  11. Radiative absorption enhancement from coatings on black carbon aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Xinjuan; Wang, Xinfeng; Yang, Lingxiao [Environmental Research Institute, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Chen, Bing, E-mail: bingchen@sdu.edu.cn [Environmental Research Institute, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Chen, Jianmin, E-mail: jmchen@sdu.edu.cn [Environmental Research Institute, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Andersson, August; Gustafsson, Örjan [Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry (ACES) and the Bolin Centre for Climate Research, Stockholm University, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-05-01

    The radiative absorption enhancement of ambient black carbon (BC), by light-refractive coatings of atmospheric aerosols, constitutes a large uncertainty in estimates of climate forcing. The direct measurements of radiative absorption enhancement require the experimentally-removing the coating materials in ambient BC-containing aerosols, which remains a challenge. Here, the absorption enhancement of the BC core by non-absorbing aerosol coatings was quantified using a two-step removal of both inorganic and organic matter coatings of ambient aerosols. The mass absorption cross-section (MAC) of decoated/pure atmospheric BC aerosols of 4.4 ± 0.8 m{sup 2}g{sup −1} was enhanced to 9.6 ± 1.8 m{sup 2}g{sup −1} at 678-nm wavelength for ambiently-coated BC aerosols at a rural Northern China site. The enhancement of MAC (E{sub MAC}) rises from 1.4 ± 0.3 in fresh combustion emissions to ~ 3 for aged ambient China aerosols. The three-week high-intensity campaign observed an average E{sub MAC} of 2.25 ± 0.55, and sulfates were primary drivers of the enhanced BC absorption. - Highlights: • A method was developed to remove coatings surrounding BC in ambient aerosols. • The MAC of decoated BC of 4.4 was enhanced to 9.6 m{sup 2}g{sup −1} for ambient BC aerosols. • BC radiative forcing in the ambient atmosphere was enhanced by a factor of ~ 2. • BC absorption enhancement peaked in day time driven by secondary sulfate.

  12. Increased fire frequency optimization of black carbon mixing and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, Lacey; Masiello, Caroline; Clark, Kenneth

    2016-04-01

    Soil carbon makes up a substantial part of the global carbon budget and black carbon (BC - produced from incomplete combustion of biomass) can be significant fraction of soil carbon. Soil BC cycling is still poorly understood - very old BC is observed in soils, suggesting recalcitrance, yet in short term lab and field studies BC sometimes breaks down rapidly. Climate change is predicted to increase the frequency of fires, which will increase global production of BC. As up to 80% of BC produced in wildfires can remain at the fire location, increased fire frequency will cause significant perturbations to soil BC accumulation. This creates a challenge in estimating soil BC storage, in light of a changing climate and an increased likelihood of fire. While the chemical properties of BC are relatively well-studied, its physical properties are much less well understood, and may play crucial roles in its landscape residence time. One important property is density. When BC density is less than 1 g/cm3 (i.e. the density of water), it is highly mobile and can easily leave the landscape. This landscape mobility following rainfall may inflate estimates of its degradability, making it crucial to understand both the short- and long term density of BC particles. As BC pores fill with minerals, making particles denser, or become ingrown with root and hyphal anchors, BC is likely to become protected from erosion. Consequently, how quickly BC is mixed deeper into the soil column is likely a primary controller on BC accumulation. Additionally the post-fire recovery of soil litter layers caps BC belowground, protecting it from erosional forces and re-combustion in subsequent fires, but still allowing bioturbation deeper into the soil column. We have taken advantage of a fire chronosequence in the Pine Barrens of New Jersey to investigate how density of BC particles change over time, and how an increase in fire frequency affects soil BC storage and soil column movement. Our plots have

  13. Atmospheric black carbon and sulfate concentrations in Northeast Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massling, A.; Nielsen, I. E.; Kristensen, D.; Christensen, J. H.; Sørensen, L. L.; Jensen, B.; Nguyen, Q. T.; Nøjgaard, J. K.; Glasius, M.; Skov, H.

    2015-08-01

    Measurements of equivalent black carbon (EBC) in aerosols at the high Arctic field site Villum Research Station (VRS) at Station Nord in North Greenland showed a seasonal variation in EBC concentrations with a maximum in winter and spring at ground level. Average measured concentrations were about 0.067 ± 0.071 for the winter and 0.011 ± 0.009 for the summer period. These data were obtained using a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP). A similar seasonal pattern was found for sulfate concentrations with a maximum level during winter and spring analyzed by ion chromatography. Here, measured average concentrations were about 0.485 ± 0.397 for the winter and 0.112 ± 0.072 for the summer period. A correlation between EBC and sulfate concentrations was observed over the years 2011 to 2013 stating a correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.72. This finding gives the hint that most likely transport of primary emitted BC particles to the Arctic was accompanied by aging of the aerosols through condensational processes. BC and sulfate are known to have only partly similar sources with respect to their transport pathways when reaching the high Arctic. Aging processes may have led to the formation of secondary inorganic matter and further transport of BC particles as cloud processing and further washout of particles is less likely based on the typically observed transport patterns of air masses arriving at VRS. Additionally, concentrations of EC (elemental carbon) based on a thermo-optical method were determined and compared to EBC measurements. EBC measurements were generally higher, but a correlation between EC and EBC resulted in a correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.64. Model estimates of the climate forcing due to BC in the Arctic are based on contributions of long-range transported BC during spring and summer. The measured concentrations were here compared with model results obtained by the Danish Eulerian Hemispheric Model, DEHM. Good agreement between measured and

  14. Fluvial organic carbon losses from a Bornean black water river

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The transport of carbon from terrestrial ecosystems such as peatlands into rivers and out to the oceans plays an important role in the carbon cycle because it provides a link between the terrestrial and marine carbon cycles. Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) were analysed from the source to the mouth of the River Sebangau in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia during the dry and wet seasons in 2008/2009 and an annual total organic carbon (TOC) flu...

  15. In site formation and growth of Prussian blue nanoparticles anchored to multiwalled carbon nanotubes with poly(4-vinylpyridine) linker by layer-by-layer assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Na; He Bo; Xu Shaoya [College of Chemistry and Life Sciences, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China); Yuan Junhua, E-mail: jhyuan@zjnu.cn [College of Chemistry and Life Sciences, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China); Miao Jigen [College of Chemistry and Life Sciences, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China); Niu Li, E-mail: lniu@ciac.jl.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Song Jixia [Jilin City Institute of Testing on Product Quality, Jilin 132013 (China)

    2012-04-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon nanotubes were grafted with poly(4-vinylpyridine). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prussian blue nanoparticles were deposited on carbon nanotubes by complextion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The size of these nanoparticles can be controlled by layer-by-layer assembly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The compoistes show a superior catalytic activity to the oxidation of L-cysteine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The efficiency is dependent on the capacity of Prussian blue nanoparticles loaded. - Abstract: Poly(4-vinylpyridine) (P4VB) was grafted to multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by an in situ polymerization. This grafted polymer plays two roles in the synthesis of Prussian Blue (PB)/MWCNT composites: (1) a stabilizer to protect PB nanoparticles from aggregation; (2) a linker to anchor these nanoparticles on the surface of MWCNTs. The size of PB nanoparticles deposited on MWCNTs can be controlled by in site layer-by-layer coordination of Fe{sup 3+} and [Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sup 4-} ions in aqueous solution. The as-prepared PB/P4VP-g-MWCNT composites were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction, which revealed that these PB nanoparticles were uniformly distributed on the surface of MWCNTs, and grew upon layer-by-layer assembly. A potential use of PB/P4VP-g-MWCNT composites was demonstrated as an electrocatalyst used in the electrochemical detection of L-cysteine. The as-prepared electrodes modified with PB/P4VP-g-MWCNT composites showed two reversible redox waves assigned to a fast surface-controlled processes. The analytical performance for L-cysteine detection is associated with the load of PB nanoparticles onto MWCNTs. In an optimal experiment, for these as-prepared electrodes, their detection limit of L-cysteine can be measured as low as 0.01 {mu}M with a sensitivity 778.34 nA {mu}M{sup -1} cm{sup -2}.

  16. Carbon Materials Embedded with Metal Nanoparticles as Anode in Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-cheh

    2002-01-01

    Carbon materials containing metal nanoparticles that can form an alloy with lithium were tested for their capacity and cycle life to store and release lithium electrochemically. Metal nanoparticles may provide the additional lithium storage capacity as well as additional channels to conduct lithium in carbon. The cycle life of this carbon-metal composite can be long because the solid-electrolyte interface (SEI) on the carbon surface may protect both lithium and the metal particles in the carbon interior. In addition, the voids in the carbon interior may accommodate the nanoparticle's volume change, and such volume change may not cause much internal stress due to small sizes of the nanoparticles. This concept of improving carbon's performance to store and release lithium was demonstrated using experimental cells of C(Pd)/0.5M Lil-50/50 (vol.%) EC and DMC/Li, where C(Pd) was graphitized carbon fibers containing palladium nanoparticles, EC was ethylene carbonate, and DMC was dimethyl carbonate. However, such improvement was not observed if the Pd nanoparticles are replaced by aluminum, possibly because the aluminum nanoparticles were oxidized in air during storage, resulting in an inert oxide of aluminum. Further studies are needed to use this concept for practical applications.

  17. Dynamac molecular structure of plant biomass-derived black carbon (Biochar)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Char black carbon (BC), the solid residue of incomplete combustion, is continuously being added to soils and sediments due to natural vegetation fires, anthropogenic pollution, and new strategies for carbon sequestration (“biochar”). Here we present a molecular-level assessment o...

  18. Robust Means for Estimating Black Carbon-Water Sorption Coefficients of Organic Contaminants in Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    include "black carbons" (BCs) such as soots and biomass chars, and that 4 these special components of the organic carbon content must be distinguished... disadvantages of the traditional batch method: difficult soot-water separation, long equilibrium time, high sorbents consumption, and uncertainty

  19. Low temperature synthesis of iron containing carbon nanoparticles in critical carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasumura, Takashi; Fukuda, Takahiro; Whitby, Raymond L. D.; Aschenbrenner, Ortrud; Maekawa, Toru

    2011-01-01

    We develop a low temperature, organic solvent-free method of producing iron containing carbon (Fe@C) nanoparticles. We show that Fe@C nanoparticles are self-assembled by mixing ferrocene with sub-critical (25.0 °C), near-critical (31.0 °C) and super-critical (41.0 °C) carbon dioxide and irradiating the solutions with UV laser of 266-nm wavelength. The diameter of the iron particles varies from 1 to 100 nm, whereas that of Fe@C particles ranges from 200 nm to 1 μm. Bamboo-shaped structures are also formed by iron particles and carbon layers. There is no appreciable effect of the temperature on the quantity and diameter distributions of the particles produced. The Fe@C nanoparticles show soft ferromagnetic characteristics. Iron particles are crystallised, composed of bcc and fcc lattice structures, and the carbon shells are graphitised after irradiation of electron beams.

  20. Electrodeposition of tantalum on carbon black in non-aqueous solution and its electrocatalytic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Ara; Lee, Youngmi, E-mail: youngmilee@ewha.ac.kr; Lee, Chongmok, E-mail: cmlee@ewha.ac.kr

    2016-08-24

    In this work, we synthesized tantalum (Ta) nanoclusters on carbon black (Ta/CB) via simple electrodeposition in non-aqueous solvent, acetonitrile (ACN) at ambient temperature. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed that the electrodeposited Ta nanoclusters consisted of tiny Ta nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) result represented that the outermost Ta formed the native oxide on Ta/CB due to its ambient exposure to air. Electrochemical catalytic properties of prepared Ta/CB on glassy carbon electrode (Ta/CB/GC) were investigated toward reductions of oxygen and hydrogen peroxide, and oxidations of ascorbic acid and dopamine. For oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acid, Ta/CB/GC represented a decent electrocatalytic performance which was better or comparable to bare Pt. The operational stability in acidic condition was maintained up to 500 repetitive potential cycles presumably due to the protective native Ta oxide layer. Ta/CB/GC also showed high amperometric sensitivity (4.5 (±0.1{sub 6}) mA mM{sup −1} cm{sup −2}, n = 5) for reduction of hydrogen peroxide in 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution (PBS, pH 7.4). In addition, Ta/CB/GC was demonstrated for the possibility of simultaneous detection of ascorbic acid and dopamine using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). - Highlights: • We electrodeposited Ta nanoclusters (Ta/CB/GC) in acetonitrile at room temperature. • The Ta/CB/GC showed better or comparable performance to bare Pt for ORR. • The Ta/CB/GC showed high sensitivity for reduction of hydrogen peroxide at pH 7.4. • The Ta/CB/GC showed possible simultaneous detection of ascorbic acid and dopamine. • We extended the applicability of Ta electrode material for various electrocatalytic reactions.

  1. Quantification of extraneous carbon during compound specific radiocarbon analysis of black carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziolkowski, Lori A; Druffel, Ellen R M

    2009-12-15

    Radiocarbon ((14)C) is a radioactive isotope that is useful for determining the age and cycling of carbon-based materials in the Earth system. Compound specific radiocarbon analysis (CSRA) provides powerful insight into the turnover of individual components that make up the carbon cycle. Extraneous or nonspecific background carbon (C(ex)) is added during sample processing and subsequent isolation of CSRA samples. Here, we evaluate the quantity and radiocarbon signature of C(ex) added from two sources: preparative capillary gas chromatography (PCGC, C(PCGC)) and chemical preparation of CSRA of black carbon samples (C(chemistry)). We evaluated the blank directly using process blanks and indirectly by quantifying the difference in the isotopic composition between processed and unprocessed samples for a range of sample sizes. The direct and indirect assessment of C(chemistry+PCGC) agree, both in magnitude and radiocarbon value (1.1 +/- 0.5 microg of C, fraction modern = 0.2). Half of the C(ex) is introduced before PCGC isolation, likely from coeluting compounds in solvents used in the extraction method. The magnitude of propagated uncertainties of CSRA samples are a function of sample size and collection duration. Small samples collected for a brief amount of time have a smaller propagated (14)C uncertainty than larger samples collected for a longer period of time. CSRA users are cautioned to consider the magnitude of uncertainty they require for their system of interest, to frequently evaluate the magnitude of C(ex) added during sampling processing, and to avoid isolating samples < or = 5 microg of carbon.

  2. Tailoring oxidation of aluminum nanoparticles reinforced with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manjula; Sharma, Vimal

    2016-05-01

    In this report, the oxidation temperature and reaction enthalpy of Aluminum (Al) nanoparticles has been controlled by reinforcing with carbon nanotubes. The physical mixing method with ultrasonication was employed to synthesize CNT/Al nanocomposite powders. The micro-morphology of nanoconmposite powders has been analysed by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. The oxidation behavior of nanocomposite powders analyzed by thermogravimetry/differential scanning calorimertry showed improvement in the exothermic enthalpy. Largest exothermic enthalpy of-1251J/g was observed for CNT (4 wt%)/Al nanocomposite.

  3. Electrocatalysis of chemically synthesized noble metal nanoparticles on carbon electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ling; Ulstrup, Jens; Zhang, Jingdong

    Noble metal nanoparticles (NPs), such as platinum (Pt) and palladium (Pd) NPs are promising catalysts for dioxygen reduction and oxidation of molecules such as formic acid and ethanol in fuel cells. Carbon nanomaterials are ideal supporting materials for electrochemical catalysts due to their good...... microscopy (AFM) which have proved to be highly efficient techniques to map the in situ structures of selfassembled molecular monolayers at molecular or sub-molecular resolution. Electrocatalysis of the Pd NPs immobilized on atomically flat, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) will be investigated...

  4. Sedimentary records of black carbon in the sea area of the Nansha Islands since the last glaciation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Core 17962 taken from the sea area of the Nansha Islands recorded a sedimentary history of more than 30 000 years. The black carbon data from the core, which can inform us of the history of vegetation fires, show that during the last glaciation, especially during the last glacial maximum at about 18 kaBP, the fluctuation of the concentration and accumulation rate of the black carbon was relatively great, whereas it was small during the Holocene. The isotope composition of the black carbon indicates that the precursors of black carbon were mainly grasses from the last glaciation to the Holocene. The sub-alpine and alpine vegetation zones covered mainly with grass and bush on the lands around the southern South China Sea were probably the sources of black carbon. The altitudinal vegetation changes from the last glaciation to the Holocene gave rise to the changes of the sedimentary characteristics of black carbon.

  5. Adsorption of Reactive Black 5 on Synthesized Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles: Equilibrium Isotherm and Kinetic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majeed A. Shaheed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesized titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs were used as adsorbent to remove reactive black 5 (RB 5 in aqueous solution. Various factors affecting adsorption of RB 5 aqueous solutions such as pH, initial concentration, contact time, dose of nanoparticles, and temperature were analyzed at fixed solid/solution ratio. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were used as model adsorption equilibrium data. Langmuir isotherm was found to be the most adequate model. The pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and intraparticle diffusion models were used to describe the adsorption kinetics. The experimental data was fitted to pseudo-second-order kinetics. The thermodynamic parameters such as Gibbs-free energy, enthalpy, and entropy changes were determined. These parameters indicated the endothermic and spontaneity nature of the adsorption. The results demonstrated the fact that the TiO2-NPs are promising adsorbent for the removal of RB 5 from aqueous solutions.

  6. Carbon-coated nanoparticle superlattices for energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Yiliguma, Affa; Wang, Yifei; Zheng, Gengfeng

    2016-07-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) superlattices represent a unique material architecture for energy conversion and storage. Recent reports on carbon-coated NP superlattices have shown exciting electrochemical properties attributed to their rationally designed compositions and structures, fast electron transport, short diffusion length, and abundant reactive sites via enhanced coupling between close-packed NPs, which are distinctive from their isolated or disordered NP or bulk counterparts. In this minireview, we summarize the recent developments of highly-ordered and interconnected carbon-coated NP superlattices featuring high surface area, tailorable and uniform doping, high conductivity, and structure stability. We then introduce the precisely-engineered NP superlattices by tuning/studying specific aspects, including intermetallic structures, long-range ordering control, and carbon coating methods. In addition, these carbon-coated NP superlattices exhibit promising characteristics in energy-oriented applications, in particular, in the fields of lithium-ion batteries, fuel cells, and electrocatalysis. Finally, the challenges and perspectives are discussed to further explore the carbon-coated NP superlattices for optimized electrochemical performances.

  7. Black carbon from the Mississippi River: quantities, sources, and potential implications for the global carbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Siddhartha; Bianchi, Thomas S; McKee, Brent A; Sutula, Martha

    2002-06-01

    Black carbon (BC) may be a major component of riverine carbon exported to the ocean, but its flux from large rivers is unknown. Furthermore, the global distribution of BC between natural and anthropogenic sources remains uncertain. We have determined BC concentrations in suspended sediments of the Mississippi River, the 7th largest river in the world in terms of sediment and water discharge, during high flow and low flow in 1999. The 1999 annual flux of BC from the Mississippi River was 5 x 10(-4) petagrams (1 Pg = 10(15) g = 1 gigaton). We also applied a principal components analysis to particulate-phase high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon isomer ratios in Mississippi River suspended sediments. In doing so, we determined that approximately 27% of the BC discharged from the Mississippi River in 1999 originated from fossil fuel combustion (coal and smelter-derived combustion), implicating fluvial BC as an important source of anthropogenic BC contamination into the ocean. Using our value for BC flux and the annual estimate for BC burial in ocean sediments, we calculate that, in 1999, the Mississippi River discharged approximately 5% of the BC buried annually in the ocean. These results have important implications, not only for the global carbon cycle but also for the fluvial discharge of particulate organic contaminants into the world's oceans.

  8. Hydrogen-induced Ostwald ripening of cobalt nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Vece, Marcel; Zoican-Loebick, Codruta; Pfefferle, Lisa D.

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes can be used as a high surface area catalyst or as a means to produce well-defined particles. In this study, cobalt nanoparticles were formed on xxsingle-walled carbon nanotubes during hydrogen exposure at an elevated temperature. The average particle size increased

  9. Nanoparticles containing allotropes of carbon have genotoxic effects on glioblastoma multiforme cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinzmann, Mateusz; Jaworski, Sławomir; Kutwin, Marta

    2014-01-01

    viability by Trypan blue assay and level of DNA fragmentation of U87 cells after 24 hours of incubation with 50 μg/mL carbon nanoparticles. DNA fragmentation was studied using single-cell gel electrophoresis. Incubation with nanoparticles containing the allotropes of carbon did not alter the morphology...

  10. Cupric Hexacyanoferrate Nanoparticle Modified Carbon Ceramic Composite Electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG,Peng(王鹏); ZHU,Guo-Yi(朱果逸)

    2002-01-01

    Graphite powder-supported cupric hexacyanoferrate (CuHCF)nanoparticles were dispersed into methyltrimethoxysilane-based gels to produce a conducting carbon ceramic composite, which was used as electrode material to fabricate surface-renewable CuHCF-modified electrodes. Electrochemical behavior of the CuHCF-modified carbon ceramic composite electrodes was characterized using cyclic and square-wave voitammetry.Cyclic voltammograms at various scan rates indicated that peak currents were surface-confined at low scan rates. In the presence of glutathione, a clear electrocatalytic response was observed at the CuHCF-modified composite electrodes. In addition, the electrodes exhibited a distinct advantage of reproducible surface-renewal by simple mechanical polishing on emery paper, as well as ease of preparation, and good chemical and mechanical stability in a flowing stream.

  11. Cupric Hexacyanoferrate Nanoparticle Modified Carbon Ceramic Composite Electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG,Peng; ZHU,Guo-Yi

    2002-01-01

    Graphite powder-supported cupric hexacyanoferrate(CuHCF) nanoparticles were dispersed into methyltrimethoxysilane-based gels to produce a conducting carbon ceramic composite,which was used as electrode materials to fabricate surface-renewable CuHCF-modified electrodes.Electrochemical behavior of the CuHCF-modified carbon ceramic composite electrodes was characterized using cyclic and square-wave voltammetry. Cyclinc voltammograms at various scan rates indicated that peak currents were suface-confined at low scan rates.In the presence of glutathione,a clear electrocatalytic response was observed at the CuHCF-modified composite electrodes.In addition,the electrodes exhibited a distinct advantage of reproducible surface-renewal by simple mechanical polishing on emery paper,as well as ease of preparation,and good chemical and mechanical stability in a flowing stream.

  12. Cobalt magnetic nanoparticles embedded in carbon matrix: biofunctional validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krolow, Matheus Z., E-mail: matheuskrolow@ifsul.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Engenharia de Materiais, Centro de Desenvolvimento Tecnologico (Brazil); Monte, Leonardo G.; Remiao, Mariana H.; Hartleben, Claudia P.; Moreira, Angela N.; Dellagostin, Odir A. [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Nucleo de Biotecnologia, Centro de Desenvolvimento Tecnologico (Brazil); Piva, Evandro [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Faculdade de Odontologia (Brazil); Conceicao, Fabricio R. [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Nucleo de Biotecnologia, Centro de Desenvolvimento Tecnologico (Brazil); Carreno, Neftali L. V. [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Engenharia de Materiais, Centro de Desenvolvimento Tecnologico (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    Carbon nanostructures and nanocomposites display versatile allotropic morphologies, physico-chemical properties and have a wide range of applications in mechanics, electronics, biotechnology, structural material, chemical processing, and energy management. In this study we report the synthesis, characterization, and biotechnological application of cobalt magnetic nanoparticles, with diameter approximately 15-40 nm, embedded in carbon structure (Co/C-MN). A single-step chemical process was used in the synthesis of the Co/C-MN. The Co/C-MN has presented superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature an essential property for immunoseparation assays carried out here. To stimulate interactions between proteins and Co/C-MN, this nanocomposite was functionalized with acrylic acid (AA). We have showed the bonding of different proteins onto Co/C-AA surface using immunofluorescence assay. A Co/C-AA coated with monoclonal antibody anti-pathogenic Leptospira spp. was able to capture leptospires, suggesting that it could be useful in immunoseparation assays.

  13. Macromolecularly "Caged" Carbon Nanoparticles for Intracellular Trafficking via Switchable Photoluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Santosh K; Srivastava, Indrajit; Tripathi, Indu; Daza, Enrique; Ostadhossein, Fatemeh; Pan, Dipanjan

    2017-02-08

    Reversible switching of photoluminescence (PL) of carbon nanoparticles (CNP) can be achieved with counterionic macromolecular caging and decaging at the nanoscale. A negatively charged uncoated, "bare" CNP with high luminescence loses its PL when positively charged macromolecules are wrapped around its surface. Prepared caged carbons could regain their emission only through interaction with anionic surfactant molecules, representing anionic amphiphiles of endocytic membranes. This process could be verified by gel electrophoresis, spectroscopically and in vitro confocal imaging studies. Results indicated for the first time that luminescence switchable CNPs can be synthesized for efficient intracellular tracking. This study further supports the origin of photoluminescence in CNP as a surface phenomenon correlated a function of characteristic charged macromolecules.

  14. Electrodeposition of Pd Nanowires and Nanorods on Carbon Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliznakov, S.; Vukmirovic, M.; Sutter, E.; Adzic, R.

    2011-06-01

    We report on the method for synthesizing palladium nanowires and nanorods involving the electrodeposition on oxidized amorphous carbon nanoparticles from chloride containing solutions. The effect of the deposition overpotential and the concentration of palladium ions on the morphology of the Pd electrodeposits have been established. Palladium grows predominately in the shape of nanowires if electrodeposited at potentials in the H underpotential deposition potential (UPD) range, where chloride ions are adsorbed only at the edges of nucleated monolayer-thick clusters on the carbon surface. The effect of the concentration of palladium ions on deposits morphology is also discussed. The mechanism of electrodeposition of Pd nanowires and nanorods in the H UPD potential range has been proposed.

  15. Carbon black retention in saturated natural soils: Effects of flow conditions, soil surface roughness and soil organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohwacharin, J; Takizawa, S; Punyapalakul, P

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated factors affecting the transport, retention, and re-entrainment of carbon black nanoparticles (nCBs) in two saturated natural soils under different flow conditions and input concentrations using the two-site transport model and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Soil organic matter (SOM) was found to create unfavorable conditions for the retention. Despite an increased flow velocity, the relative stability of the estimated maximum retention capacity in soils may suggest that flow-induced shear stress forces were insufficient to detach nCB. The KPFM observation revealed that nCBs were retained at the grain boundary and on surface roughness, which brought about substantial discrepancy between theoretically-derived attachment efficiency factors and the ones obtained by the experiments using the two-site transport model. Thus, decreasing ionic strength and increasing solution pH caused re-entrainment of only a small fraction of retained nCB in the soil columns.

  16. Thermal Oxidation of Tail Gases from the Production of Oil-furnace Carbon Black

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosak, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the production technology of oil-furnace carbon black, as well as the selected solution for preventing the emissions of this process from contaminating the environment.The products of industrial oil-furnace carbon black production are different grades of carbon black and process tail gases. The qualitative composition of these tail gases during the production of oil-furnace carbon black are: carbon(IV oxide, carbon(II oxide, hydrogen, methane, hydrogen sulfide, nitrogen, oxygen, and water vapor.The quantitative composition and lower caloric value of process tail gases change depending on the type of feedstock used in the production, as well as the type of process. The lower caloric value of process tail gases is relatively small with values ranging between 1500 and 2300 kJ m–3.In the conventional production of oil-furnace carbon black, process tail gases purified from carbon black dust are freely released into the atmosphere untreated. In this manner, the process tail gases pollute the air in the town of Kutina, because their quantitative values are much higher than the prescribed emissions limits for hydrogen sulfide and carbon(II oxide. A logical solution for the prevention of such air pollution is combustion of the process tail gases, i. e. their thermal oxidation. For this purpose, a specially designed flare system has been developed. Consuming minimum amounts of natural gas needed for oxidation, the flare system is designed to combust low caloric process tail gases with 99 % efficiency. Thus, the toxic and flammable components of the tail gases (hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen, carbon(II oxide, methane and other trace hydrocarbons would be transformed into environmentally acceptable components (sulfur(IV oxide, water, carbon(IV oxide and nitrogen(IV oxide, which are in compliance with the emissions limit values prescribed by law.Proper operation of this flare system in the production of oil-furnace carbon black would solve

  17. Facile Synthesis of Calcium Carbonate Nanoparticles from Cockle Shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kh. Nurul Islam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and low-cost method for the synthesis of calcium carbonate nanoparticles from cockle shells was described. Polymorphically, the synthesized nanoparticles were aragonites which are biocompatible and thus frequently used in the repair of fractured bone and development of advanced drug delivery systems, tissue scaffolds and anticarcinogenic drugs. The rod-shaped and pure aragonite particles of 30±5 nm in diameter were reproducibly synthesized when micron-sized cockle shells powders were mechanically stirred for 90 min at room temperature in presence of a nontoxic and nonhazardous biomineralization catalyst, dodecyl dimethyl betaine (BS-12. The findings were verified using a combination of analytical techniques such as variable pressure scanning electron microscopy (VPSEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD, and energy dispersive X-ray analyser (EDX. The reproducibility and low cost of the method suggested that it could be used in industry for the large scale synthesis of aragonite nanoparticles from cockle shells, a low cost and easily available natural resource.

  18. Biomaterial-Derived Calcium Carbonate Nanoparticles for Enteric Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Render

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral drug delivery systems provide the most convenient, noninvasive, readily acceptable alternatives to parenteral systems. In the current work, eggshell-derived calcium carbonate (CaCO3 nanoparticles were used to develop enteric drug delivery system in the form of tablets. CaCO3 nanoparticles were manufactured using top-down ball-milling method and characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM and loaded with 5-fluorouracil as a model drug. Tablets with varying CaCO3 core and binder compositions were fabricated and coated with Eudragit S100 or Eudragit L100. Suitability for enteric delivery of the tablets was tested by oral administration to rabbits and radiography. Radiograph images showed that the tablet remained in the stomach of the rabbit for up to 3 hours. Further modifications of these biomaterial-derived nanoparticles and the coatings will enable manufacturing of stable formulations for slow or controlled release of pharmaceuticals for enteric delivery.

  19. Preparation of Aromatic Polycarbonate Nanoparticles using Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun-Young; Song, Cheong-Hun; Kim, Joong-In; Kim, Jung-Hyun

    2002-04-01

    A novel synthetic process for producing aromatic polycarbonate (PC) nanoparticles using supercritical CO2 was developed. The objective of the present research work was to synthesize high molecular weight PC nanoparticles using transesterification between bisphenol-A (BPA) and diphenyl carbonate (DPC) in supercritical CO2 which is an excellent plasticizing agent and a good solvent for phenol, a by-product of the reaction. Poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide) tri-block copolymer with CO2-phobic anchor and CO2-philic tail group was used as a stabilizer for the preparation of stable dispersions of BPA-DPC mixture in a CO2 continuous phase. As the reaction was proceeding, phenol formed from the reaction was dissolved and diffused into supercritical CO2 phase. The PC nanoparticles were isolated by simple venting of the supercritical CO2 from the reactor. Spherical morphology of PC particles was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. Particle size and morphology of PC particles were modified upon variation of the process conditions. The resulting PC particles with a nano-size of 30-140 nm have a high molecular weight ( M w) of 3.1×105 (g/mol).

  20. Transport of carbon-based nanoparticles in saturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerlund, Fritjof; Hedayati, Maryeh; Sharma, Prabhakar; Katyal, Deeksha

    2015-04-01

    Carbon-based nanoparticles (NPs) are commonly occurring, both with origin from natural sources such as fires, and in the form of man-made, engineered nanoparticles, manufactured and widely used in many applications due to their unique properties. Toxicity of carbonbased NPs has been observed, and their release and distribution into the environment is therefore a matter of concern. In this research, transport and retention of three types of carbon-based NPs in saturated porous media were investigated. This included two types of engineered NPs; multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and C60 with cylindrical and spherical shapes, respectively, and natural carbon NPs in the extinguishing water collected at a site of a building fire. Several laboratory experiments were conducted to study the transport and mobility of NPs in a sand-packed column. The effect of ionic strength on transport of the NPs with different shapes was investigated. Results were interpreted using Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. It was observed that the mobility of the two types of engineered NPs was reduced with an increase in ionic strength from 1.3 mM to 60 mM. However, at ionic strength up to 10.9 mM, C60 was relatively more mobile than MWCNTs but the mobility of MWCNTs became significantly higher than C60 at 60 mM. In comparison with natural particles originating from a fire, both engineered NPs were much less mobile at the selected experimental condition. Inverse modelling was also used to calculate parameters such as attachment efficiency, the longitudinal dispersivity, and capacity of the solid phase for the removal of particles. The simulated results were in good agreement with the observed data.

  1. Aerosol light absorption, black carbon, and elemental carbon at the Fresno Supersite, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Judith C.; Watson, John G.; Doraiswamy, Prakash; Chen, Lung-Wen Antony; Sodeman, David A.; Lowenthal, Douglas H.; Park, Kihong; Arnott, W. Patrick; Motallebi, Nehzat

    2009-08-01

    Particle light absorption ( bap), black carbon (BC), and elemental carbon (EC) measurements at the Fresno Supersite during the summer of 2005 were compared to examine the equivalency of current techniques, evaluate filter-based bap correction methods, and determine the EC mass absorption efficiency (σ ap) and the spectral dependence of bap. The photoacoustic analyzer (PA) was used as a benchmark for in-situ bap. Most bap measurement techniques were well correlated ( r ≥ 0.95). Unadjusted Aethalometer (AE) and Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) bap were up to seven times higher than PA bap at similar wavelengths because of absorption enhancement by backscattering and multiple scattering. Applying published algorithms to correct for these effects reduced the differences to 24 and 17% for the AE and PSAP, respectively, at 532 nm. The Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP), which accounts for backscattering effects, overestimated bap relative to the PA by 51%. BC concentrations determined by the AE, MAAP, and Sunset Laboratory semi-continuous carbon analyzer were also highly correlated ( r ≥ 0.93) but differed by up to 57%. EC measured with the IMPROVE/STN thermal/optical protocols, and the French two-step thermal protocol agreed to within 29%. Absorption efficiencies determined from PA bap and EC measured with different analytical protocols averaged 7.9 ± 1.5, 5.4 ± 1.1, and 2.8 ± 0.6 m 2/g at 532, 670, and 1047 nm, respectively. The Angström exponent (α) determined from adjusted AE and PA bap ranged from 1.19 to 1.46. The largest values of α occurred during the afternoon hours when the organic fraction of total carbon was highest. Significant biases associated with filter-based measurements of bap, BC, and EC are method-specific. Correcting for these biases must take into account differences in aerosol concentration, composition, and sources.

  2. Evaluation of Black Carbon Estimations in Global Aerosol Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, D.; Schulz, M.; Kinne, Stefan; McNaughton, C. S.; Spackman, J. R.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T.; Bond, Tami C.; Boucher, Olivier; Chin, M.; Clarke, A. D.; De Luca, N.; Dentener, F.; Diehl, T.; Dubovik, O.; Easter, Richard C.; Fahey, D. W.; Feichter, J.; Fillmore, D.; Freitag, S.; Ghan, Steven J.; Ginoux, P.; Gong, S.; Horowitz, L.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Klimont, Z.; Kondo, Yutaka; Krol, M.; Liu, Xiaohong; Miller, R.; Montanaro, V.; Moteki, N.; Myhre, G.; Penner, J.; Perlwitz, Ja; Pitari, G.; Reddy, S.; Sahu, L.; Sakamoto, H.; Schuster, G.; Schwarz, J. P.; Seland, O.; Stier, P.; Takegawa, Nobuyuki; Takemura, T.; Textor, C.; van Aardenne, John; Zhao, Y.

    2009-11-27

    We evaluate black carbon (BC) model predictions from the AeroCom model intercomparison project by considering the diversity among year 2000 model simulations and comparing model predictions with available measurements. These model-measurement intercomparisons include BC surface and aircraft concentrations, aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) from AERONET and OMI retrievals and BC column estimations based on AERONET. In regions other than Asia, most models are biased high compared to surface concentration measurements. However compared with (column) AAOD or BC burden retreivals, the models are generally biased low. The average ratio of model to retrieved AAOD is less than 0.7 in South American and 0.6 in African biomass burning regions; both of these regions lack surface concentration measurements. In Asia the average model to observed ratio is 0.6 for AAOD and 0.5 for BC surface concentrations. Compared with aircraft measurements over the Americas at latitudes between 0 and 50N, the average model is a factor of 10 larger than observed, and most models exceed the measured BC standard deviation in the mid to upper troposphere. At higher latitudes the average model to aircraft BC is 0.6 and underestimate the observed BC loading in the lower and middle troposphere associated with springtime Arctic haze. Low model bias for AAOD but overestimation of surface and upper atmospheric BC concentrations at lower latitudes suggests that most models are underestimating BC absorption and should improve estimates for refractive index, particle size, and optical effects of BC coating. Retrieval uncertainties and/or differences with model diagnostic treatment may also contribute to the model-measurement disparity. Largest AeroCom model diversity occurred in northern Eurasia and the remote Arctic, regions influenced by anthropogenic sources. Changing emissions, aging, removal, or optical properties within a single model generated a smaller change in model predictions than the

  3. Factors Controlling Black Carbon Deposition in Snow in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, L.; Li, Q.; He, C.; Li, Y.

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluates the sensitivity of black carbon (BC) concentration in snow in the Arctic to BC emissions, dry deposition and wet scavenging efficiency using a 3D global chemical transport model GEOS-Chem driven by meteorological field GEOS-5. With all improvements, simulated median BC concentration in snow agrees with observation (19.2 ng g-1) within 10%, down from -40% in the default GEOS-Chem. When the previously missed gas flaring emissions (mainly located in Russia) are included, the total BC emission in the Arctic increases by 70%. The simulated BC in snow increases by 1-7 ng g-1, with the largest improvement in Russia. The discrepancy of median BC in snow in the whole Arctic reduces from -40% to -20%. In addition, recent measurements of BC dry deposition velocity suggest that the constant deposition velocity of 0.03 cm s-1 over snow and ice used in the GEOS-Chem is too low. So we apply resistance-in-series method to calculate the dry deposition velocity over snow and ice and the resulted dry deposition velocity ranges from 0.03 to 0.24 cm s-1. However, the simulated total BC deposition flux in the Arctic and BC in snow does not change, because the increased dry deposition flux has been compensated by decreased wet deposition flux. However, the fraction of dry deposition to total deposition increases from 16% to 25%. This may affect the mixing of BC and snow particles and further affect the radative forcing of BC deposited in snow. Finally, we reduced the scavenging efficiency of BC in mixed-phase clouds to account for the effect of Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) process based on recent observations. The simulated BC concentration in snow increases by 10-100%, with the largest increase in Greenland (100%), Tromsø (50%), Alaska (40%), and Canadian Arctic (30%). Annual BC loading in the Arctic increases from 0.25 to 0.43 mg m-2 and the lifetime of BC increases from 9.2 to 16.3 days. This indicates that BC simulation in the Arctic is really sensitive to

  4. Evaluation of black carbon estimations in global aerosol models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhao

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate black carbon (BC model predictions from the AeroCom model intercomparison project by considering the diversity among year 2000 model simulations and comparing model predictions with available measurements. These model-measurement intercomparisons include BC surface and aircraft concentrations, aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD retrievals from AERONET and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI and BC column estimations based on AERONET. In regions other than Asia, most models are biased high compared to surface concentration measurements. However compared with (column AAOD or BC burden retreivals, the models are generally biased low. The average ratio of model to retrieved AAOD is less than 0.7 in South American and 0.6 in African biomass burning regions; both of these regions lack surface concentration measurements. In Asia the average model to observed ratio is 0.7 for AAOD and 0.5 for BC surface concentrations. Compared with aircraft measurements over the Americas at latitudes between 0 and 50N, the average model is a factor of 8 larger than observed, and most models exceed the measured BC standard deviation in the mid to upper troposphere. At higher latitudes the average model to aircraft BC ratio is 0.4 and models underestimate the observed BC loading in the lower and middle troposphere associated with springtime Arctic haze. Low model bias for AAOD but overestimation of surface and upper atmospheric BC concentrations at lower latitudes suggests that most models are underestimating BC absorption and should improve estimates for refractive index, particle size, and optical effects of BC coating. Retrieval uncertainties and/or differences with model diagnostic treatment may also contribute to the model-measurement disparity. Largest AeroCom model diversity occurred in northern Eurasia and the remote Arctic, regions influenced by anthropogenic sources. Changing emissions, aging, removal, or optical properties within a single model

  5. Evaluation of black carbon estimations in global aerosol models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Koch

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate black carbon (BC model predictions from the AeroCom model intercomparison project by considering the diversity among year 2000 model simulations and comparing model predictions with available measurements. These model-measurement intercomparisons include BC surface and aircraft concentrations, aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD from AERONET and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI retrievals and BC column estimations based on AERONET. In regions other than Asia, most models are biased high compared to surface concentration measurements. However compared with (column AAOD or BC burden retreivals, the models are generally biased low. The average ratio of model to retrieved AAOD is less than 0.7 in South American and 0.6 in African biomass burning regions; both of these regions lack surface concentration measurements. In Asia the average model to observed ratio is 0.6 for AAOD and 0.5 for BC surface concentrations. Compared with aircraft measurements over the Americas at latitudes between 0 and 50 N, the average model is a factor of 10 larger than observed, and most models exceed the measured BC standard deviation in the mid to upper troposphere. At higher latitudes the average model to aircraft BC is 0.6 and underestimates the observed BC loading in the lower and middle troposphere associated with springtime Arctic haze. Low model bias for AAOD but overestimation of surface and upper atmospheric BC concentrations at lower latitudes suggests that most models are underestimating BC absorption and should improve estimates for refractive index, particle size, and optical effects of BC coating. Retrieval uncertainties and/or differences with model diagnostic treatment may also contribute to the model-measurement disparity. Largest AeroCom model diversity occurred in northern Eurasia and the remote Arctic, regions influenced by anthropogenic sources. Changing emissions, aging, removal, or optical properties within a single model generated a

  6. Estimation of Black Carbon Emissions from Dry Dipterocarp Forest Fires in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubonwan Chaiyo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on the estimation of black carbon emissions from dry dipterocarp forest fires in Thailand. Field experiments were set up at the natural forest, Mae Nam Phachi wildlife sanctuary, Ratchaburi Province, Thailand. The dead leaves were the main component consumed of the surface biomass with coverage higher than 90% in volume and mass. The dead leaves load was 342 ± 190 g∙m−2 and followed by a little mass load of twig, 100 g∙m−2. The chemical analysis of the dead leaves showed that the carbon content in the experimental biomass fuel was 45.81 ± 0.04%. From the field experiments, it was found that 88.38 ± 2.02% of the carbon input was converted to carbon released to the atmosphere, while less than 10% were left in the form of residues, and returned to soil. The quantity of dead leaves consumed to produce each gram of carbon released was 2.40 ± 0.02 gdry biomass burned. From the study, the emissions factor of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, particulate matter (PM2.5 and black carbon amounted 1329, 90, 26.19 and 2.83 g∙kg−1dry biomass burned, respectively. In Thailand, the amount of black carbon emissions from dry dipterocarp forest fires amounted 17.43 tonnes∙y−1.

  7. A facile hydrothermal approach for construction of carbon coating on TiO2 nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Olurode, Kehinde; Neelgund, Gururaj M.; Oki, Aderemi; Luo, Zhiphing

    2011-01-01

    Herein a facile hydrothermal approach is used to construct carbon coated TiO2 nanoparticles employing dextrose as the source of carbon. The procedure is operated at a low temperature of 200 °C. Fourier infrared spectroscopy demonstrated the successful coating of carbon on TiO2 nanoparticles. The phase composition of TiO2 and carbon coated TiO2 nanoparticles were studied using X-ray diffraction and the surface morphology was analyzed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The existe...

  8. Estimate the influence of snow grain size and black carbon on albedo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhongMing Guo; NingLian Wang; XiaoBo Wu; HongBo Wu; YuWei Wu

    2015-01-01

    Estimation of the influence of snow grain size and black carbon on albedo is essential in obtaining the accurate albedo. In this paper, field measurement data, including snow grain size, snow depth and density was obtained. Black carbon samples were collected from the snow surface. A simultaneous observation using Analytical Spectral Devices was employed in the Qiyi Glacier located in the Qilian Mountain. Analytical Spectral Devices spectrum data were used to analyze spectral re-flectance of snow for different grain size and black carbon content. The measurements were compared with the results obtained from the Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation model, and the simulation was found to correlate well with the ob-served data. However, the simulated albedo was near to 0.98 times of the measured albedo, so the other factors were as-sumed to be constant using the corrected Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation model to estimate the influence of measured snow grain size and black carbon on albedo. Field measurements were controlled to fit the relationship between the snow grain size and black carbon in order to estimate the influence of these factors on the snow albedo.

  9. A synthetic DNA motor that transports nanoparticles along carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Tae-Gon; Pan, Jing; Chen, Haorong; Salgado, Janette; Li, Xiang; Mao, Chengde; Choi, Jong Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular protein motors have evolved to perform specific tasks critical to the function of cells such as intracellular trafficking and cell division. Kinesin and dynein motors, for example, transport cargoes in living cells by walking along microtubules powered by adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis. These motors can make discrete 8 nm centre-of-mass steps and can travel over 1 µm by changing their conformations during the course of adenosine triphosphate binding, hydrolysis and product release. Inspired by such biological machines, synthetic analogues have been developed including self-assembled DNA walkers that can make stepwise movements on RNA/DNA substrates or can function as programmable assembly lines. Here, we show that motors based on RNA-cleaving DNA enzymes can transport nanoparticle cargoes--CdS nanocrystals in this case--along single-walled carbon nanotubes. Our motors extract chemical energy from RNA molecules decorated on the nanotubes and use that energy to fuel autonomous, processive walking through a series of conformational changes along the one-dimensional track. The walking is controllable and adapts to changes in the local environment, which allows us to remotely direct `go' and `stop' actions. The translocation of individual motors can be visualized in real time using the visible fluorescence of the cargo nanoparticle and the near-infared emission of the carbon-nanotube track. We observed unidirectional movements of the molecular motors over 3 µm with a translocation velocity on the order of 1 nm min-1 under our experimental conditions.

  10. Camphor-mediated synthesis of carbon nanoparticles, graphitic shell encapsulated carbon nanocubes and carbon dots for bioimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oza, Goldie; Ravichandran, M.; Merupo, Victor-Ishrayelu; Shinde, Sachin; Mewada, Ashmi; Ramirez, Jose Tapia; Velumani, S.; Sharon, Madhuri; Sharon, Maheshwar

    2016-01-01

    A green method for an efficient synthesis of water-soluble carbon nanoparticles (CNPs), graphitic shell encapsulated carbon nanocubes (CNCs), Carbon dots (CDs) using Camphor (Cinnamomum camphora) is demonstrated. Here, we describe a competent molecular fusion and fission route for step-wise synthesis of CDs. Camphor on acidification and carbonization forms CNPs, which on alkaline hydrolysis form CNCs that are encapsulated by thick graphitic layers and on further reduction by sodium borohydride yielded CDs. Though excitation wavelength dependent photoluminescence is observed in all the three carbon nanostructures, CDs possess enhanced photoluminescent properties due to more defective carbonaceous structures. The surface hydroxyl and carboxyl functional groups make them water soluble in nature. They possess excellent photostability, higher quantum yield, increased absorption, decreased cytotoxicity and hence can be utilized as a proficient bio imaging agent. PMID:26905737

  11. Effect of carbon-black treatment by radiation emulsion polymerization on temperature dependence of resistivity of carbon-black-filled polymer blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia Shaojin [Key Lab of Insulation and Thermal of Aging of Shanghai, Department of Polymer Engineering and Science, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Road 800, Shanghai 200240 (China) and Department of Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Chengzhong Road 20, Shanghai 201800 (China)]. E-mail: jiashaojin2@yahoo.com.cn; Jiang Pingkai [Key Lab of Insulation and Thermal of Aging of Shanghai, Department of Polymer Engineering and Science, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Road 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhang Zhicheng [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Wang Zhongguang [Key Lab of Insulation and Thermal of Aging of Shanghai, Department of Polymer Engineering and Science, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Road 800, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2006-04-15

    High dispersibility and stability of carbon black particles in low-density-polyethylene (LDPE) matrix were obtained by radiation emulsion polymerization on carbon particles surface, and electrical resistivities of its simple were examined. First carbon particles treatment on radiation emulsion polymerization on surface were synthesized by the reaction with a polymer-emulsion systems containing reactive group in the molecular unit, carbon particles and emulsifier. Then, the carbon particles treatment on radiation emulsion polymerization on surface was dispersed into LDPE, and its composites were prepared for electrical measurements. The effect of radiation crosslinking of the composite on the Positive temperature coefficient (PTC) and negative temperature coefficient (NTC) phenomenon was investigated. The experimental results showed that PTC and NTC effects of the composites were obviously influenced by the irradiation dose. Various microstructure-exploring means were used to study the conductive composite, such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

  12. Effect of carbon-black treatment by radiation emulsion polymerization on temperature dependence of resistivity of carbon-black-filled polymer blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaojin, Jia; Pingkai, Jiang; Zhicheng, Zhang; Zhongguang, Wang

    2006-04-01

    High dispersibility and stability of carbon black particles in low-density-polyethylene (LDPE) matrix were obtained by radiation emulsion polymerization on carbon particles surface, and electrical resistivities of its simple were examined. First carbon particles treatment on radiation emulsion polymerization on surface were synthesized by the reaction with a polymer-emulsion systems containing reactive group in the molecular unit, carbon particles and emulsifier. Then, the carbon particles treatment on radiation emulsion polymerization on surface was dispersed into LDPE, and its composites were prepared for electrical measurements. The effect of radiation crosslinking of the composite on the Positive temperature coefficient (PTC) and negative temperature coefficient (NTC) phenomenon was investigated. The experimental results showed that PTC and NTC effects of the composites were obviously influenced by the irradiation dose. Various microstructure-exploring means were used to study the conductive composite, such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  13. Copper nanoparticles encapsulated in multi-shell carbon cages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaper, A.K. [Material Sciences Center and Department of Geosciences, Philipps University, Hans-Meerwein-Str., 35032, Marburg (Germany); Hou, H. [Material Sciences Center and Department of Chemistry, Philipps University, Hans-Meerwein-Str., 35032, Marburg (Germany); University of Akron, Ohio (United States); Greiner, A. [Material Sciences Center and Department of Chemistry, Philipps University, Hans-Meerwein-Str., 35032, Marburg (Germany); Schneider, R. [Institute of Physics, Humboldt University, Invalidenstr. 110, 10115, Berlin (Germany); Phillipp, F. [Max Planck Institute for Metal Research, Heisenbergstr. 3, 70569, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2004-01-01

    Nanoparticles are attracting increasing interest because of their high potential for a great number of practical applications, such as optical and electronic devices, nanoscale storage, and delivery systems. Using Cu-phthalocyanine as precursor material, we have synthesized multi-shell graphitic carbon nanospheres without and with metal encapsulation, depending on the pyrolysis conditions. The encapsulated elemental copper nanocrystals achieved using that route were of the order of 50 nm in size. The particles were characterized in detail by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and by energy filtering microscopy (EFTEM). The concentric graphitic carbon shells of the as-grown particles were clearly discernable. After in situ high-temperature annealing, an increase in the degree of order was observed. Under high-voltage electron irradiation and heating, a melting point reduction of the enclosed nanosized copper of more than 200 K could be detected, as compared to the melting point 1083 C of bulk copper. Time-resolved imaging revealed the displacement of the melting copper by migration through the carbon shells, leaving intact carbon cages with a central hole. At intermediate stages of this process the transformation into a hexagonal morphology of the copper nanocrystals was observed. (orig.)

  14. Laser-generated plasma by carbon nanoparticles embedded into polyethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrisi, L., E-mail: lorenzo.torrisi@unime.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche MIFT, Università di Messina, V.le F.S. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); Ceccio, G. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche MIFT, Università di Messina, V.le F.S. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); Cutroneo, M. [Nuclear Physics Institute, AS CR, 25068 Rez (Czech Republic)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Advanced targets are prepared using UHMWPE containing CNT at different concentrations. • The composite has different optical, mechanical, electrical and compositional properties with respect to polyethylene. • Higher ion accelerations with respect to the pure polyethylene are obtained from laser generated plasmas at 10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2} intensity. • High carbon ion yields with respect to the pure polyethylene are obtained from laser generated plasmas at 10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2} intensity. • Advanced targets were prepared to be irradiated in TNSA regime using laser at 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} intensity. - Abstract: Carbon nanoparticles have been embedded into polyethylene at different concentrations by using chemical–physical processes. The synthesized material was characterized in terms of physical modifications concerning the mechanical, compositional and optical properties. Obtained flat targets have been irradiated by Nd:YAG laser at intensities of the order of 10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2} in order to generate non-equilibrium plasma in vacuum. The laser–matter interaction produces charge separation effects with consequent acceleration of protons and carbon ions. Plasma was characterized using time-of-flight measurements of the accelerated ions. Applications of the produced targets in order to generate carbon ion beams from laser-generated plasma are presented and discussed.

  15. Microbially-Mediated Precipitation of Calcium Carbonate Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ser Ku; Roh, Yul

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the biomineralization of carbonate minerals using microorganisms (Wu Do-1) enriched from rhodoliths. A 16S rRNA sequence analysis showed that Wu Do-1 mainly contained Proteus mirabilis. The pH decreased from 6.5 to 5.3 over the first 4 days of incubation due to microbial oxidation of organic acids, after which it increased to 7.8 over the remaining incubation period. XRD analysis showed that the precipitates were Mg-rich cal- cite (MgxCa(1-x)CO3), whereas no precipitates were formed without the addition of Wu Do-1 in D-1 medium. SEM-EDS analyses showed that the Mg-rich calcite had a rhombohedron shape and consisted of Ca, Si and Mg with an extracelluar polymeric substance (EPS). In addition, TEM-EDS analyses revealed they were hexagon in shape, 500-700 nm in size, and composed of Ca, Mg, C, and O. These results indicated that Wu Do-1 induced precipitation of Mg-rich calcite on the cell walls and EPS via the accumulation of Ca and/or Mg ions. Therefore, microbial precipitation of carbonate nanoparticles may play an important role in metal and carbon biogeochemistry, as well as in carbon sequestration in natural environments.

  16. Effects of carbon nanoparticles on properties of thermoset polymer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movva, Siva Subramanyam

    Polymer nanocomposites are novel materials in which at least one of the dimensions of the reinforcing material is on the order of 100 nm or less. While thermoplastic nanocomposites have been studied very widely, there are fewer studies concerning the effect of nanoparticles on thermoset systems. Low temperature cure thermoset systems are very important for many important applications. In this study, the processing, mechanical and thermal properties and reaction kinetics of carbon nanofiber (CNF) and/or carbon nanotubes (CNT) reinforced low temperature vinyl ester and epoxy nanocomposites were studied. In the first part, the processing challenge of incorporating CNFs into conventional fiber reinforced composites made by Vacuum infusion resin transfer molding (VARTM) was addressed by a new technique. The CNFs are pre-bound on the long fiber mats, instead of mixing them in the polymer resin, thereby eliminating several processing drawbacks. The resulting hybrid nanocomposites showed significant improvements in tensile, flexural and thermal properties. The effect of CNFs on the mold filling in VARTM was also studied and shown to follow the Darcy's law. In the second part, the effect of CNFs on the low temperature cure kinetics of vinyl ester and epoxy resins is studied using a thermal analysis technique, namely Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The effect of CNFs on the free radical polymerization of vinyl esters was found to be very complex as the CNFs interact with the various curing ingredients in the formulation. Specifically, the interaction effects of CNFs and the inhibitor were studied and a reaction mechanism was proposed to explain the observed phenomenon. The effect of surface modification of the carbon nanoparticles on the cure kinetics of wind-blade epoxy was studied. The surface functionalization reduced the activation energy of the epoxy reaction and was found to have an acceleration effect on the cure kinetics of epoxy resin at room temperature

  17. Transport and retention of carbon-based engineered and natural nanoparticles through saturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayati, Maryeh; Sharma, Prabhakar; Katyal, Deeksha; Fagerlund, Fritjof

    2016-03-01

    Carbon-based engineered nanoparticles have been widely used due to their small size and unique physical and chemical properties. At the same time, the toxic effects of these nanoparticles on human and fish cells have also been observed; therefore, their release and distribution into the surface and subsurface environment is a subject of concern. The aim of this research is to evaluate and compare the transports and retentions of two types of engineered nanoparticles (multiwalled carbon nanotubes and C60) and the natural carbon nanoparticles collected from a fire accident. Several laboratory experiments were conducted to observe the transport behavior of nanoparticles through a column packed with silica sand. The column experiments were intended to monitor the effect of ionic strength on transport of nanoparticles as a function of their shapes. It was observed that the mobilities of both types of engineered nanoparticles were reduced with the increasing ionic strength from 1.34 to 60 mM. However, at ionic strengths up to 10.89 mM, spherical nanoparticles were more mobile than cylindrical nanoparticles, but the mobility of the cylindrical nanoparticles became significantly higher than spherical nanoparticles at the ionic strength of 60 mM. In comparison with natural fire-born nanoparticles, both types of engineered nanoparticles were much less mobile under the selected experimental condition in this study. Furthermore, inverse modeling was used to calculate parameters such as attachment efficiency, the longitudinal dispersivity, and capacity of the solid phase for the attachment of nanoparticles. The results indicate that the combination of the shape and the solution chemistry of the NPs are responsible for the transport and the retention of nanoparticles in natural environment; however, fire-burned nanoparticles can be highly mobile at the natural groundwater chemistry.

  18. Aerosol organic carbon to black carbon ratios: Analysis ofpublished data and implications for climate forcing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novakov, T.; Menon, S.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Koch, D.; Hansen, J.E.

    2005-07-11

    Measurements of organic carbon (OC) and black carbon (BC)concentrations over a variety of locations worldwide, have been analyzed to infer the spatial distributions of the ratios of OC to BC. Since these ratios determine the relative amounts of scattering and absorption, they are often used to estimate the radiative forcing due to aerosols. An artifact in the protocol for filter measurements of OC has led to widespread overestimates of the ratio of OC to BC in atmospheric aerosols. We developed a criterion to correct for this artifact and analyze corrected OC to BC ratios. The OC to BC ratios, ranging from 1.3to 2.4, appear relatively constant and are generally unaffected by seasonality, sources or technology changes, at the locations considered here. The ratios compare well with emission inventories over Europe and China but are a factor of two lower in other regions. The reduced estimate for OC/BC in aerosols strengthens the argument that reduction of soot emissions maybe a useful approach to slow global warming.

  19. An expeditious synthesis of early transition metal carbide nanoparticles on graphitic carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressnig, Debora; Moldovan, Simona; Ersen, Ovidiu; Beaunier, Patricia; Portehault, David; Sanchez, Clément; Carenco, Sophie

    2016-08-01

    An expeditious synthesis of metal carbide nanoparticles onto various carbon supports is demonstrated. The procedure is versatile and readily yields TiC, VC, Mo2C and W2C nanoparticles on different types of carbons. The reaction is initiated at room temperature and proceeds within seconds. This novel synthetic route paves the way for a large variety of metal carbide-carbon nanocomposites that may be implemented in emerging nanotechnology fields.

  20. A study on the DC-electrical and thermal conductivities of epoxy/ZnO composites doped with carbon black

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juwhari, Hassan K.; Zihlif, Awwad; Elimat, Ziad; Ragosta, Giuseppe

    2014-06-01

    Thermo-electrical characterizations of hybrid polymer composites, made of epoxy matrix filled with various zinc oxide (ZnO) concentrations (0, 4.9, 9.9, 14.9, and 19.9 wt%), and reinforced with conductive carbon black (CB) nanoparticles (0.1 wt%), have been investigated as a function of ZnO concentration and temperature. Both the measured DC-electrical and thermal conductivities showed ZnO concentration and temperature dependencies. Increasing the temperature and filler concentrations were reflected in a negative temperature coefficient of resistivity and enhancement of the electrical conductivity as well. The observed increase in the DC conductivity and decrease in the determined activation energy were explained based on the concept of existing paths and connections between the ZnO particles and the conductive CB nanoparticles. Alteration of ZnO concentration with a fixed content of CB nanoparticles and/or temperature was found to be crucial in the thermal conductivity behavior. The addition of CB nanoparticles to the epoxy/ZnO matrix was found to enhance the electrical conduction resulting from the electronic and impurity contributions. Also, the thermal conductivity enhancement was mostly attributed to the heat transferred by phonons and electrons hopping to higher energy levels throughout the thermal processes. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy were used to observe the morphology and elements' distribution in the composites. The observed thermal conductivity behavior was found to correlate well with that of the DC-electrical conductivity as a function of the ZnO content. The overall enhancements in both the measured DC- and thermal conductivities of the prepared hybrid composites are mainly produced through mutual interactions between the filling conductive particles and also from electrons tunneling in the composite's bulk as well.

  1. Thickness effect on electric resistivity on polystyrene and carbon black- based composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Lopez, S; Vigueras-Santiago, E [Laboratorio de Investigacion y Desarrollo de Materiales Avanzados (LIDMA) Facultad de Quimica, Paseo Colon Esquina con Paseo Tollocan, s/n, CP 50000, Toluca (Mexico); Mayorga-Rojas, M; Reyes-Contreras, D, E-mail: eviguerass@uaemex.m [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico. Av. Instituto Literario 100 Ote. C. P. 50000, Toluca (Mexico)

    2009-05-01

    Changes on electrical resistivity were experimentally studied for polystyrene and carbon black-based composites respect to the temperature. 22% w/w carbon black composite films at 30{mu}m, 2mm y 1cm thick were submitted to thermal heating-cooling cycles from room temperature to 100 deg. C, slightly up to T{sub g} of the composite. For each cycle changes on electrical resistivity constituent a hysteresis loop that depends on the sample thickness. The changes during the heating stage could be explained as a consequence of the thermal expansion and mobility of the polymer chains at T{sub g}, producing a disconnecting of the electrical contacts among carbon black particles and an important increasing (200%) of the electrical resistivity. For each cycle, the hysteresis loop was observed in thicker samples, whereas for 30 mu m thickness sample the hysteresis loop was lost after four cycles.

  2. Influence of γ-ray Irradiation on the PTC Effect of EPDM/Carbon Black Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@ Introduction The positive temperature coefficient(PTC) effect is characterized by an increase of resistivity with an elevated temperature.The PTC effect of carbon black(CB) filled polymers is useful for self-regulation heaters,over-current protectors,sensors,etc.Much work has been done on the PTC effect of the carbon black filled crystalline polymer composite[1-4],whereas carbon black filled amorphous polymers have not drawn researchers much attention because the PTC effect in these composites is small or cannot be detected[5-7].In this work,the influence of γ-ray irradiation on the PTC effect of CB filled amorphous ethylene-propylene-diene terpolymer(EPDM) composites was studied.

  3. A method for monitoring mass concentration of black carbon particulate matter using photothermal interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baosheng; Wang, Yicheng; Li, Zhengqiang

    2016-03-01

    A method for measurements of mass concentration of black carbon particulate matter (PM) is proposed based on photothermal interferometry (PTI). A folded Jamin photothermal interferometer was used with a laser irradiation of particles deposited on a filter paper. The black carbon PM deposited on the filter paper was regarded as a film while the quartz filter paper was regarded as a substrate to establish a mathematical model for measuring the mass concentration of PM using a photothermal method. The photothermal interferometry system was calibrated and used to measure the atmospheric PM concentration corresponding to different dust-treated filter paper. The measurements were compared to those obtained using β ray method and were found consistent. This method can be particularly relevant to polluted atmospheres where PM is dominated by black carbon.

  4. Electric anisotropy in high density polyethylene + carbon black composites induced by mechanical deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigueras-Santiago, E; Hernandez-Lopez, S; Camacho-Lopez, M A; Lara-Sanjuan, O, E-mail: eviguerass@uaemex.m [Laboratorio de Investigacion y Desarrollo de Materiales Avanzados (LIDMA), Facultad de Quimica, UAEM. Paseo Colon esq. con Paseo Tollocan, s/n. C.P. 50000, Toluca (Mexico)

    2009-05-01

    High density polyethylene + carbon black composites with electrical anisotropy was studied. Electrical anisotropy was induced by uniaxial mechanical deformation and injection moulding. We show that anisotropy depends on the carbon black concentration and percentage deformation. Resistivity had the highest anisotropy resistivity around the percolation threshold. Perpendicular resistivity showed two magnitude orders higher than parallel resistivity for injected samples, whereas resistivity showed an inverse behaviour for 100% tensile samples. Both directions were set respect to the deformation axe. Anisotropy could be explained in terms of the molecular deformation (alignment) of the polymer chains as a response of the deformation process originating a redistribution of the carbon black particles in both directions. Alignment of the polymer chains was evidenced by polarized Raman spectroscopy.

  5. The effects of additional black carbon on Arctic sea ice surface albedo: variation with sea ice type and snow cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Marks

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Black carbon in sea ice will decrease sea ice surface albedo through increased absorption of incident solar radiation, exacerbating sea ice melting. Previous literature has reported different albedo responses to additions of black carbon in sea ice and has not considered how a snow cover may mitigate the effect of black carbon in sea ice. Sea ice is predominately snow covered. Visible light absorption and light scattering coefficients are calculated for a typical first year and multi-year sea ice and "dry" and "wet" snow types that suggest black carbon is the dominating absorbing impurity. The albedo response of first year and multi-year sea ice to increasing black carbon, from 1–1024 ng g−1, in a top 5 cm layer of a 155 cm thick sea ice was calculated using the radiative transfer model: TUV-snow. Sea ice albedo is surprisingly unresponsive to black carbon additions up to 100 ng g−1 with a decrease in albedo to 98.7% of the original albedo value due to an addition of 8 ng g−1 of black carbon in first year sea ice compared to an albedo decrease to 99.6% for the same black carbon mass ratio increase in multi-year sea ice. The first year sea ice proved more responsive to black carbon additions than the multi-year ice. Comparison with previous modelling of black carbon in sea ice suggests a more scattering sea ice environment will be less responsive to black carbon additions. Snow layers on sea ice may mitigate the effects of black carbon in sea ice. "Wet" and "dry" snow layers of 0.5, 1, 2, 5 and 10 cm were added onto the sea ice surface and the snow surface albedo calculated with the same increase in black carbon in the underlying sea ice. Just a 0.5 cm layer of snow greatly diminishes the effect of black carbon on surface albedo, and a 2–5 cm layer (less than half the e-folding depth of snow is enough to "mask" any change in surface albedo owing to additional black carbon in sea ice, but not thick enough to ignore the underlying sea ice.

  6. Commuter exposure to black carbon, carbon monoxide, and noise in the mass transport khlong boats of Bangkok, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, A. D.; Velasco, E.; Ho, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    Khlong (canal) boats are a unique mass transport alternative in the congested city of Bangkok. Canals and rivers provide exclusive transit-ways for reducing the commuting time of thousands of city residents daily. However, as a consequence of the service characteristics and boats design and state of repair, they can represent a potential public health risk and an important source of black carbon and greenhouse gases. This work quantifies commuter exposure to black carbon, CO and noise when waiting for and travelling in these diesel fueled boats. Exposure to toxic pollutants and acute noise is similar or worse than for other transportation modes. Mean black carbon concentrations observed at one busy pier and along the main canal were much higher than ambient concentrations at sites impacted by vehicular traffic. Concentrations of CO were similar to those reported for roadside areas of Bangkok. The equivalent continuous sound levels registered at the landing pier were similar to those reported for roadsides, but values recorded inside the boats were significantly higher. We believe that the boat service is a viable alternative mode of mass transport, but public safety could be improved to provide a high quality service, comparable to modern rail systems or emerging bus rapid transit systems. These investments would also contribute to reduce the emission of black carbon and other greenhouse and toxic pollutants.

  7. Offsetting features of climate responses to anthropogenic sulfate and black carbon direct radiative forcings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocko, I.; Ramaswamy, V.

    2012-12-01

    The two most prominent anthropogenic aerosols—sulfate and black carbon—affect Earth's radiation budget in opposing ways. Here we examine how these aerosols independently impact the climate, by simulating climate responses from pre-industrial times (1860) to present-day (2000) for isolated sulfate and black carbon direct radiative forcings. The NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory CM2.1 global climate model is employed with prescribed distributions of externally mixed aerosols. We find that sulfate and black carbon induce opposite effects for a myriad of climate variables. Sulfate (black carbon) is generally cooling (warming), shifts the ITCZ southward (northward), reduces (enhances) the SH Hadley Cell, enhances (reduces) the NH Hadley Cell, and increases (decreases) total sea ice volume. Individually, sulfate and black carbon affect Hadley Cell circulation more than long-lived greenhouse gases, but the net aerosol effect is a weakened response due to opposite behaviors somewhat canceling out the individual effects. Because anthropogenic aerosols are a critical contributor to Earth's climate conditions, this study has implications for future climate changes as well.

  8. Phosphate-Doped Carbon Black as Pt Catalyst Support: Co-catalytic Functionality for Dimethyl Ether and Methanol Electro-oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Min; Huang, Yunjie; Li, Qingfeng

    2014-01-01

    Niobium-phosphate-doped (NbP-doped) carbon blacks were prepared as the composite catalyst support for Pt nanoparticles. Functionalities of the composite include intrinsic proton conductivity, surface acidity, and interfacial synergistic interactions with methanol and dimethyl ether (DME......). The supported Pt catalysts show significant improvement in catalytic activity towards the direct oxidation of methanol and DME, attributable to the enhanced adsorption and dehydrogenation of methanol and DME, as well as the presence of activated OH species in the catalysts. The latter is demonstrated...

  9. An index-based approach to assessing recalcitrance and soil carbon sequestration potential of engineered black carbons (biochars).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Omar R; Kuo, Li-Jung; Zimmerman, Andrew R; Louchouarn, Patrick; Amonette, James E; Herbert, Bruce E

    2012-02-07

    The ability of engineered black carbons (or biochars) to resist abiotic and, or biotic degradation (herein referred to as recalcitrance) is crucial to their successful deployment as a soil carbon sequestration strategy. A new recalcitrance index, the R(50), for assessing biochar quality for carbon sequestration is proposed. The R(50) is based on the relative thermal stability of a given biochar to that of graphite and was developed and evaluated with a variety of biochars (n = 59), and soot-like black carbons. Comparison of R(50), with biochar physicochemical properties and biochar-C mineralization revealed the existence of a quantifiable relationship between R(50) and biochar recalcitrance. As presented here, the R(50) is immediately applicable to pre-land application screening of biochars into Class A (R(50) ≥ 0.70), Class B (0.50 ≤ R(50) carbon sequestration classes. Class A and Class C biochars would have carbon sequestration potential comparable to soot/graphite and uncharred plant biomass, respectively, whereas Class B biochars would have intermediate carbon sequestration potential. We believe that the coupling of the R(50), to an index-based degradation, and an economic model could provide a suitable framework in which to comprehensively assess soil carbon sequestration in biochars.

  10. Polymer-carbon black composite sensors in an electronic nose for air-quality monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, M. A.; Shevade, A. V.; Zhou, H.; Homer, M. L.

    2004-01-01

    An electronic nose that uses an array of 32 polymer-carbon black composite sensors has been developed, trained, and tested. By selecting a variety of chemical functionalities in the polymers used to make sensors, it is possible to construct an array capable of identifying and quantifying a broad range of target compounds, such as alcohols and aromatics, and distinguishing isomers and enantiomers (mirror-image isomers). A model of the interaction between target molecules and the polymer-carbon black composite sensors is under development to aid in selecting the array members and to enable identification of compounds with responses not stored in the analysis library.

  11. Long-term airborne black carbon measurements on a Lufthansa passenger aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditas, Jeannine; Su, Hang; Scharffe, Dieter; Wang, Siwen; Zhang, Yuxuan; Brenninkmeijer, Carl; Pöschl, Ulrich; Cheng, Yafang

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol particles containing black carbon are the most absorbing component of incoming solar radiation and exert a significant positive radiative forcing thus forming next to CO² the strongest component of current global warming (Bond, 2013). Nevertheless, the role of black carbon particles and especially their complex interaction with clouds needs further research which is hampered by the limited experimental data, especially observations in the free and upper troposphere, and in the UTLS (upper troposphere and lower stratosphere). Many models underestimate the global atmospheric absorption attributable to black carbon by a factor of almost 3 (Bond, 2013). In August 2014, a single particle soot photometer was included in the extensive scientific payload of the CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container) project. CARIBIC is in operation since 1997 (with an interruption for 2002-2005) and carries out systematic observations at 10-12 km altitude. For this a special air freight container combining different instruments is transported on a monthly basis using a Lufthansa Airbus A340-600 passenger aircraft with destinations from 120°W to 120°E and 10°N to 75°N. The container has equipment for trace gas analyses and sampling and aerosol analyses and sampling and is connected to an inlet system that is part of the aircraft which contains a camera and DOAS remote sensing system. The integration of a single particle soot photometer (SP2) offers the possibility for the first long-term measurement of global distribution of black carbon and so far flights up to November 2015 have been conducted with more than 400 flight hours. So far the SP2 measurements have been analysed for flights over four continents from Munich to San Francisco, Sao Paulo, Tokyo, Beijing, Cape Town, Los Angeles and Hong Kong). The first measurements show promising results of black carbon measurements. Background concentrations in the UTLS

  12. Nanohybrid TiO2/carbon black sensor for NO2 gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Jen Liou; Hong-Ming Lin

    2007-01-01

    A nanohybrid sensor of nanosized TiO2-coated carbon black particles, prepared by sol-gel technology for the detection of NO2 gas, has been developed. The response of the electric resistance of the hybrid sensor to NO2 concentration is investigated, showing that the sensitivity of the hybrid sensor is raised as certain ratio of the TiO2 content in the sensor. Easy and cheap to fabricate, the hybrid TiO2/carbon black promises to be a practical sensor for detecting NO2 gas.

  13. Aerosol Absorption by Black Carbon and Dust: Implications of Climate Change and Air Quality in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Mian

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol distributions from 2000 to 2007 are simulated with the global model GOCART to attribute light absorption by aerosol to its composition and sources. We show the seasonal and interannual variations of absorbing aerosols in the atmosphere over Asia, mainly black carbon and dust. and their linkage to the changes of anthropogenic and dust emissions in the region. We compare our results with observations from satellite and ground-based networks, and estimate the importance of black carbon and dust on regional climate forcing and air quality.

  14. Black carbon fractal morphology and short-wave radiative impact: a modelling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kahnert

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the impact of the morphological properties of freshly emitted black carbon aerosols on optical properties and on radiative forcing. To this end, we model the optical properties of fractal black carbon aggregates by use of numerically exact solutions to Maxwell's equations within a spectral range from the UVC to the mid-IR. The results are coupled to radiative transfer computations, in which we consider six realistic case studies representing different atmospheric pollution conditions and surface albedos. The spectrally integrated radiative impacts of black carbon are compared for two different fractal morphologies, which brace the range of recently reported experimental observations of black carbon fractal structures. We also gauge our results by performing corresponding calculations based on the homogeneous sphere approximation, which is commonly employed in climate models. We find that at top of atmosphere the aggregate models yield radiative impacts that can be as much as 2 times higher than those based on the homogeneous sphere approximation. An aggregate model with a low fractal dimension can predict a radiative impact that is higher than that obtained with a high fractal dimension by a factor ranging between 1.1–1.6. Although the lower end of this scale seems like a rather small effect, a closer analysis reveals that the single scattering optical properties of more compact and more lacy aggregates differ considerably. In radiative flux computations there can be a partial cancellation due to the opposing effects of different error sources. However, this cancellation effect can strongly depend on atmospheric conditions and is therefore quite unpredictable. We conclude that the fractal morphology of black carbon aerosols and their fractal parameters can have a profound impact on their radiative forcing effect, and that the use of the homogeneous sphere model introduces unacceptably high biases in radiative impact studies. We

  15. Aerosol Absorption by Black Carbon and Dust: Implications of Climate Change and Air Quality in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Mian

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol distributions from 2000 to 2007 are simulated with the global model GOCART to attribute light absorption by aerosol to its composition and sources. We show the seasonal and interannual variations of absorbing aerosols in the atmosphere over Asia, mainly black carbon and dust. and their linkage to the changes of anthropogenic and dust emissions in the region. We compare our results with observations from satellite and ground-based networks, and estimate the importance of black carbon and dust on regional climate forcing and air quality.

  16. Methanol Electro-Oxidation on Pt-Ru Alloy Nanoparticles Supported on Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangchuan Xing

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have been investigated in recent years as a catalyst support for proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Improved catalyst activities were observed and attributed to metal-support interactions. We report a study on the kinetics of methanol electro-oxidation on CNT supported Pt-Ru alloy nanoparticles. Alloy catalysts with different compositions, Pt53Ru47/CNT, Pt69Ru31/CNT and Pt77Ru23/CNT, were prepared and investigated in detail. Experiments were conducted at various temperatures, electrode potentials, and methanol concentrations. It was found that the reaction order of methanol electro-oxidation on the PtRu/CNT catalysts was consistent with what has been reported for PtRu alloys with a value of 0.5 in methanol concentrations. However, the electro-oxidation reaction on the PtRu/CNT catalysts displayed much lower activation energies than that on the Pt-Ru alloy catalysts unsupported or supported on carbon black (PtRu/CB. This study provides an overall kinetic evaluation of the PtRu/CNT catalysts and further demonstrates the beneficial role of CNTs.

  17. Factors controlling black carbon distribution in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ling; Li, Qinbin; Li, Yinrui; He, Cenlin

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of black carbon (BC) in the Arctic, including BC concentration in snow (BCsnow, ng g-1) and surface air (BCair, ng m-3), as well as emissions, dry deposition, and wet scavenging using the global three-dimensional (3-D) chemical transport model (CTM) GEOS-Chem. We find that the model underestimates BCsnow in the Arctic by 40 % on average (median = 11.8 ng g-1). Natural gas flaring substantially increases total BC emissions in the Arctic (by ˜ 70 %). The flaring emissions lead to up to 49 % increases (0.1-8.5 ng g-1) in Arctic BCsnow, dramatically improving model comparison with observations (50 % reduction in discrepancy) near flaring source regions (the western side of the extreme north of Russia). Ample observations suggest that BC dry deposition velocities over snow and ice in current CTMs (0.03 cm s-1 in the GEOS-Chem) are too small. We apply the resistance-in-series method to compute a dry deposition velocity (vd) that varies with local meteorological and surface conditions. The resulting velocity is significantly larger and varies by a factor of 8 in the Arctic (0.03-0.24 cm s-1), which increases the fraction of dry to total BC deposition (16 to 25 %) yet leaves the total BC deposition and BCsnow in the Arctic unchanged. This is largely explained by the offsetting higher dry and lower wet deposition fluxes. Additionally, we account for the effect of the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) process in mixed-phase clouds, which releases BC particles from condensed phases (water drops and ice crystals) back to the interstitial air and thereby substantially reduces the scavenging efficiency of clouds for BC (by 43-76 % in the Arctic). The resulting BCsnow is up to 80 % higher, BC loading is considerably larger (from 0.25 to 0.43 mg m-2), and BC lifetime is markedly prolonged (from 9 to 16 days) in the Arctic. Overall, flaring emissions increase BCair in the Arctic (by ˜ 20 ng m-3), the updated vd more than halves BCair (by ˜ 20 ng m-3

  18. Iron nanoparticles embedded in carbon films: structural and optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashayekhi, Fatemeh; Shafiekhani, Azizollah; Sebt, Seyed Ali

    2016-06-01

    In the present work amorphous hydrogenated carbon films with sputtered iron nanoparticles (Fe NPs @ a-C:H) were deposited by co-deposition of RF-sputtering and RF-plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition methods using acetylene gas and iron target on quartz and silicon substrates. Samples were prepared in different initial pressures and during constant deposition time. The crystalline structure of Fe NPs @ a-C:H was studied using X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction patterns. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis presents that increasing the initial pressure decreases the atomic ratio of Fe/C and the sp3-hybridized carbon content in prepared samples. The transmission electron microscope image shows the encapsulated Fe NPs in carbon films. The optical properties and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of samples were studied using UV-visible spectrophotometry, which is shown that increasing of Fe content decreases the intensity of LSPR peak and increases the optical band gap.

  19. Large-scale solvothermal synthesis of fluorescent carbon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Kahoe; Lee, Seung-Wook; Park, Jinwoo; Kim, Nayon; Chung, Haegeun; Han, Chi-Hwan; Kim, Woong

    2014-09-01

    The large-scale production of high-quality carbon nanomaterials is highly desirable for a variety of applications. We demonstrate a novel synthetic route to the production of fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) in large quantities via a single-step reaction. The simple heating of a mixture of benzaldehyde, ethanol and graphite oxide (GO) with residual sulfuric acid in an autoclave produced 7 g of CNPs with a quantum yield of 20%. The CNPs can be dispersed in various organic solvents; hence, they are easily incorporated into polymer composites in forms such as nanofibers and thin films. Additionally, we observed that the GO present during the CNP synthesis was reduced. The reduced GO (RGO) was sufficiently conductive (σ ≈ 282 S m-1) such that it could be used as an electrode material in a supercapacitor; in addition, it can provide excellent capacitive behavior and high-rate capability. This work will contribute greatly to the development of efficient synthetic routes to diverse carbon nanomaterials, including CNPs and RGO, that are suitable for a wide range of applications.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of iron-cobalt (FeCo) alloy nanoparticles supported on carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutsopoulos, Sotiris; Barfod, Rasmus; Eriksen, Kim Michael

    2017-01-01

    of the alloy nanoparticles differed depending on the preparation method. When the wet impregnation technique of acetate precursor salts of Fe and Co were used for the synthesis, the size of FeCo alloy nanoparticles was approximately 13 nm. FeCo alloy nanoparticles were characterized by crystallography (XRD...... and mechanically stable for prolonged periods of time. AFM analysis showed that the FeCo nanoparticles were formed on the surface of the carrier. The results of this study suggest that using these easy and inexpensive synthetic methods iron-cobalt nanoparticles can be formed on carbon microparticles support...

  1. Understanding the mechanism of toxicity of carbon nanoparticles in humans in the new millennium: A systemic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Mukesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Manmade nanoparticles range from the well-established multi-ton production of carbon black and fumed silica for applications in plastic fillers and car tyres to microgram quantities of fluorescent quantum dots used as markers in biological imaging. While benefits of nanotechnology are widely publicized, the discussion of the potential effects of their widespread use in the consumer and industrial products are just beginning to emerge. Acceptance of nanoparticle toxicity led to wide acceptance of the fact that nanotoxicology, as a scientific discipline shall be quite different from occupational hygiene in approach and context. Understanding the toxicity of nanomaterials and nano-enabled products is important for human and environmental health and safety as well as public acceptance. Assessing the state of knowledge about nanotoxicology is an important step in promoting comprehensive understanding of the health and environmental implications of these new materials. Very limited data exist for health effects secondary to inhalation of very fine respirable particles in the occupational environment. Nanomaterials may have effects on health due to their size, surface, shape, charge, or other factors, which are not directly predictable from mass concentration measurements. Numerous epidemiological studies have associated exposure to small particles such as combustion-generated fine particles with lung cancer, heart disease, asthma and/or increased mortality. The omnipresence of nanoparticles shifts focus of research toward efforts to mitigate the health effects of nanoparticles. Newer health assessment methods and newer techniques need to be developed for diagnosing sub-optimal health in populations exposed to carbon nanoparticles.

  2. Hydrogen and Carbon Black Production from Thermal Decomposition of Sub-Quality Natural Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Javadi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is computational investigation of the hydrogen and carbon black production through thermal decomposition of waste gases containing CH4 and H2S, without requiring a H2S separation process. The chemical reaction model, which involves solid carbon, sulfur compounds and precursor species for the formation of carbon black, is based on an assumed Probability Density Function (PDF parameterized by the mean and variance of mixture fraction and β-PDF shape. The effects of feedstock mass flow rate and reactor temperature on hydrogen, carbon black, S2, SO2, COS and CS2 formation are investigated. The results show that the major factor influencing CH4 and H2S conversions is reactor temperature. For temperatures higher than 1100° K, the reactor CH4 conversion reaches 100%, whilst H2S conversion increases in temperatures higher than 1300° K. The results reveal that at any temperature, H2S conversion is less than that of CH4. The results also show that in the production of carbon black from sub-quality natural gas, the formation of carbon monoxide, which is occurring in parallel, play a very significant role. For lower values of feedstock flow rate, CH4 mostly burns to CO and consequently, the production of carbon black is low. The results show that the yield of hydrogen increases with increasing feedstock mass flow rate until the yield reaches a maximum value, and then drops with further increase in the feedstock mass flow rate.

  3. Solid phase extraction method for the study of black carbon cycling in dissolved organic carbon using radiocarbon

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V.. Radiocarbon analysis is a powerful tool for understanding the cycling of individual components within carbon pools, such as black carbon (BC) in dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Radiocarbon (δ14C) measurements of BC in DOC provide insight into one source of aged, recalcitrant DOC. We report a modified solid phase extraction (SPE) method to concentrate 43±6% of DOC (SPE-DOC) from seawater. We used the Benzene Polycarboxylic Acid (BPCA) method to isolate BC from SPE-DOC (SP...

  4. Effect of the secondary organic aerosol coatings on black carbon water uptake, cloud condensation nuclei activity, and particle collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of black carbon aerosols to absorb water and act as a cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) directly controls their lifetime in the atmosphere as well as their impact on cloud formation, thus impacting the earth’s climate. Black carbon emitted from most combustion pro...

  5. Effects of carbon blacks with various structures on vulcanization and reinforcement of filled ethylene-propylene-diene rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of carbon blacks on vulcanization and mechanical properties of filled ethylene-propylene-diene rubber (EPDM are investigated, by comparing with five types of rubber-grade carbon blacks. Curing kinetics is studied by rheometer and the results indicate that the curing characteristics are influenced by combination of surface area of carbon black and sulphur content on the filler surface, because the former one enhances the physical cross-linking and the latter one introduces the additional chemical cross-linking. Both the degree of cross-linking and cure rate increase with increasing surface area and sulphur content, whereas the optimum cure time and scorch time decrease. The reinforcing nature of the carbon black is assessed from mechanical measurements. It is suggested that the surface area of carbon blacks strongly affects the physical properties of EPDM/carbon black composites. Conductive carbon black (N472 can be used as desirable reinforcing filler due to the higher degree of cross-linking of EPDM with N472 than other EPDM/carbon black composites. The morphology and distribution of particles are studied by using scanning electron microscope. The sound reinforcing ability of N472 is also supported by scanning electron microscope due to the notable dispersibility of N472 within EPDM matrix. N472 ensures the EPDM/N472 composite the most conductive sample among the five composites.

  6. Structure of carbon-supported Pt-Ru nanoparticles and their electrocatalytic behavior for hydrogen oxidation reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velazquez, Amado; Centellas, Francesc; Garrido, Jose Antonio; Arias, Conchita; Rodriguez, Rosa Maria; Brillas, Enric; Cabot, Pere-Lluis [Laboratori d' Electroquimica dels Materials i del Medi Ambient, Departament de Quimica Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-02-01

    The electrochemical activity towards hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) of a high performance carbon-supported Pt-Ru electrocatalyst (HP 20 wt.% 1:1 Pt-Ru alloy on Vulcan XC-72 carbon black) has been studied using the thin-film rotating disk electrode (RDE) technique. The physical properties of the Pt-Ru nanoparticles in the electrocatalyst were previously determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution TEM, fast Fourier transform (FFT), electron diffraction and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The corresponding compositional and size-shape analyses indicated that nanoparticles generally presented a 3D cubo-octahedral morphology with about 26 at.% Ru in the lattice positions of the face-centred cubic structure of Pt. The kinetics for HOR was studied in a hydrogen-saturated 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution using thin-film electrodes prepared by depositing an ink of the electrocatalyst with different Nafion contents in a one-step process on a glassy carbon electrode. A maximum electrochemically active surface area (ECSA) of 119 m{sup 2} g Pt{sup -1} was found for an optimum Nafion composition of the film of about 35 wt.%. The kinetic current density in the absence of mass transfer effects was 21 mA cm{sup -2}. A Tafel slope of 26 mV dec{sup -1}, independent of the rotation rate and Nafion content, was always obtained, evidencing that HOR behaves reversibly. The exchange current density referred to the ECSA of the Pt-Ru nanoparticles was 0.17 mA cm{sup -2}, a similar value to that previously found for analogous inks containing pure Pt nanoparticles. (author)

  7. Solvothermal synthesis of superhydrophobic hollow carbon nanoparticles from a fluorinated alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyth, S. M.; Ma, W.; Liu, J.; Daio, T.; Sasaki, K.; Takahara, A.; Ameduri, B.

    2015-09-01

    A new and simple method of synthesizing fluorinated carbon at the gram scale is presented by reacting a fluorinated alcohol with sodium at elevated temperatures in a sealed Teflon reactor. The resulting carbon nanoparticles are around 100 nm in diameter, and display a hollow shell morphology, with a significant amount of fluorine doped into the carbon. The nanoparticles disperse easily in ethanol, and are thermally stable up to 400 °C and 450 °C under air and nitrogen, respectively. The nanoparticle dispersion was printed onto various substrates (paper, cloth, silicon), inducing superhydrophobicity.

  8. Automatic Method for Controlling the Iodine Adsorption Number in Carbon Black Oil Furnaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zečević, N.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available There are numerous of different inlet process factors in carbon black oil furnaces which must be continuously and automatically adjusted, due to stable quality of final product. The most important six inlet process factors in carbon black oil-furnaces are:1. volume flow of process air for combustion2. temperature of process air for combustion3. volume flow of natural gas for insurance the necessary heat for thermal reaction of conversionthe hydrocarbon oil feedstock in oil-furnace carbon black4. mass flow rate of hydrocarbon oil feedstock5. type and quantity of additive for adjustment the structure of oil-furnace carbon black6. quantity and position of the quench water for cooling the reaction of oil-furnace carbon black.The control of oil-furnace carbon black adsorption capacity is made with mass flow rate of hydrocarbon feedstock, which is the most important inlet process factor. Oil-furnace carbon black adsorption capacity in industrial process is determined with laboratory analyze of iodine adsorption number. It is shown continuously and automatically method for controlling iodine adsorption number in carbon black oil-furnaces to get as much as possible efficient control of adsorption capacity. In the proposed method it can be seen the correlation between qualitatively-quantitatively composition of the process tail gasses in the production of oil-furnace carbon black and relationship between air for combustion and hydrocarbon feedstock. It is shown that the ratio between air for combustion and hydrocarbon oil feedstock is depended of adsorption capacity summarized by iodine adsorption number, regarding to BMCI index of hydrocarbon oil feedstock.The mentioned correlation can be seen through the figures from 1. to 4. From the whole composition of the process tail gasses the best correlation for continuously and automatically control of iodine adsorption number is show the volume fraction of methane. The volume fraction of methane in the

  9. Bounding the role of black carbon in the climate system: A scientific assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, T. C.; Doherty, S. J.; Fahey, D. W.; Forster, P. M.; Berntsen, T.; Deangelo, B. J.; Flanner, M. G.; Ghan, S.; KäRcher, B.; Koch, D.; Kinne, S.; Kondo, Y.; Quinn, P. K.; Sarofim, M. C.; Schultz, M. G.; Schulz, M.; Venkataraman, C.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, S.; Bellouin, N.; Guttikunda, S. K.; Hopke, P. K.; Jacobson, M. Z.; Kaiser, J. W.; Klimont, Z.; Lohmann, U.; Schwarz, J. P.; Shindell, D.; Storelvmo, T.; Warren, S. G.; Zender, C. S.

    2013-06-01

    carbon aerosol plays a unique and important role in Earth's climate system. Black carbon is a type of carbonaceous material with a unique combination of physical properties. This assessment provides an evaluation of black-carbon climate forcing that is comprehensive in its inclusion of all known and relevant processes and that is quantitative in providing best estimates and uncertainties of the main forcing terms: direct solar absorption; influence on liquid, mixed phase, and ice clouds; and deposition on snow and ice. These effects are calculated with climate models, but when possible, they are evaluated with both microphysical measurements and field observations. Predominant sources are combustion related, namely, fossil fuels for transportation, solid fuels for industrial and residential uses, and open burning of biomass. Total global emissions of black carbon using bottom-up inventory methods are 7500 Gg yr-1 in the year 2000 with an uncertainty range of 2000 to 29000. However, global atmospheric absorption attributable to black carbon is too low in many models and should be increased by a factor of almost 3. After this scaling, the best estimate for the industrial-era (1750 to 2005) direct radiative forcing of atmospheric black carbon is +0.71 W m-2 with 90% uncertainty bounds of (+0.08, +1.27) W m-2. Total direct forcing by all black carbon sources, without subtracting the preindustrial background, is estimated as +0.88 (+0.17, +1.48) W m-2. Direct radiative forcing alone does not capture important rapid adjustment mechanisms. A framework is described and used for quantifying climate forcings, including rapid adjustments. The best estimate of industrial-era climate forcing of black carbon through all forcing mechanisms, including clouds and cryosphere forcing, is +1.1 W m-2 with 90% uncertainty bounds of +0.17 to +2.1 W m-2. Thus, there is a very high probability that black carbon emissions, independent of co-emitted species, have a positive forcing and warm

  10. The filtration of colloidal gold nanoparticles with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Frans Jan; Buffet, Adeline

    2016-11-01

    Understanding the local filtering of nanoparticles (NPs) is essential for the development and optimization of medical and industrial applications. Microfocus small-angle X-ray scattering (μSAXS) was used to determine the local filtration kinetics of 100 nm sized colloidal gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) within a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) forest. To get a physical insight into the Au NP filtration process within the MWCNT forest a novel model based on the well-known DLVO theory was developed. The DLVO theory is commonly used to describe the interaction between colloidal particles. In addition to the attractive Van de Waals force and the electrostatic double-layer force, a non-DLVO force is added to account for hydration and hydrophobic effects. The model presented here shows that the Au NPs are mainly unfavorably deposited into the so-called secondary energy minimum. This latter finding is in good agreement with the experimental observations and the literature, in which unfavorable particle deposition is related to deposition into the secondary energy minimum. The use of μSAXS to get a physical insight into the local deposition kinetics of submicrometer particles opens up new pathways to optimize the preparation of MWCNT forests for filtration purposes.

  11. Electrochemical Properties of Carbon Nanoparticles Entrapped in Silica Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Sangho; Lubguban, Arnold A.; Gao, Yuanfang; Bhattacharya, Shantanu; Korampally, Venu; Hossain, Maruf; Gillis, Kevin D.; Gangopadhyay, Shubhra

    2008-01-01

    Carbon-based electrode materials have been widely used for many years for electrochemical charge storage, energy generation, and catalysis. We have developed an electrode material with high specific capacitance by entrapping graphite nanoparticles into a sol-gel network. Films from the resulting colloidal suspensions were highly porous due to the removal of the entrapped organic solvents from sol-gel matrix giving rise to high Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) specific surface areas (654 m2/g) and a high capacitance density (∼37 F/g). An exponential increase of capacitance was observed with decreasing scan rates in cyclic voltammetry studies on these films suggesting the presence of pores ranging from micro (< 2 nm) to mesopores. BET surface analysis and scanning electron microscope images of these films also confirmed the presence of the micropores as well as mesopores. A steep drop in the double layer capacitance with polar electrolytes was observed when the films were rendered hydrophilic upon exposure to a mild oxygen plasma. We propose a model whereby the microporous hydrophobic sol-gel matrix perturbs the hydration of ions which moves ions closer to the graphite nanoparticles and consequently increase the capacitance of the film. PMID:18953420

  12. Benzene Removal by Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Decorated Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aamir Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, carbon nanotubes (CNTs impregnated with iron oxide nanoparticles were employed for the removal of benzene from water. The adsorbents were characterized using scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, BET surface area, and thermogravimetric analysis. Batch adsorption experiments were carried out to study the adsorptive removal of benzene and the effect of parameters such as pH, contact time, and adsorbent dosage. The maximum removal of benzene was 61% with iron oxide impregnated CNTs at an adsorbent dosage 100 mg, shaking speed 200 rpm, contact time 2 hours, initial concentration 1 ppm, and pH 6. However, raw CNTs showed only 53% removal under same experimental conditions. Pseudo-first-order kinetic model was found well to describe the obtained data on benzene removal from water. Initial concentration was varied from 1 to 200 mg/L for isotherms study. Langmuir isotherm model was observed to best describe the adsorption data. The maximum adsorption capacities were 987.58 mg/g and 517.27 mg/g for iron oxide impregnated CNTs and raw CNTs, respectively. Experimental results revealed that impregnation with iron oxide nanoparticles significantly increased the removal efficiency of CNTs.

  13. Carbon nanoparticles as a multimodal thermoacoustic and photoacoustic contrast agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xin; Wu, Lina; Xing, Wenxin; Xia, Jun; Nie, Liming; Zhang, Ruiying; Lanza, Gregory M.; Shen, Baozhong; Pan, Dipanjan; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrated the potential of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) as exogenous contrast agents for both thermoacoustic (TA) tomography (TAT) and photoacoustic (PA) tomography (PAT). In comparison to deionized water, the CNPs provided a four times stronger signal in TAT at 3 GHz. In comparison to blood, The CNPs provided a much stronger signal in PAT over a broad wavelength range of 450-850 nm. Specifically, the maximum signal enhancement in PAT was 9.4 times stronger in the near-infrared window of 635-670 nm. In vivo blood-vessel PA imaging was performed non-invasively on a mouse femoral area. The images, captured after the tail vein injection of CNPs, show a gradual enhancement of the optical absorption in the vessels by up to 230%. The results indicate that CNPs can be potentially used as contrast agents for TAT and PAT to monitor the intravascular or extravascular pathways in clinical applications.

  14. Improvement of the Rotary Dryers of Wet Pelletized Oil-Furnace Carbon Blacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zečević, M

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to the demand for higher production capacity and natural-gas energy savings, improvements were made to the rotary dryers in the drying process of wet pelletized oil-furnace carbon blacks. Since the rotary dryers were originally designed for drying semi-wet pelletized oil-furnace carbon blacks, they did not entirely satisfy optimal conditions for drying wet pelletized oil-furnace carbon blacks. Figure 1 shows the drying principle with key dimensions. The energy for drying the wet pelletized oil-furnace carbon blacks was provided by natural gas combustion in an open-furnace system with an uncontrolled feed of combustion air. Improvements on the rotary dryers were carried out by adjusting the excess oxygen in the gases passing through the butterfly valve on the dryer exhaust stack. By regulating the butterfly valve on the dryer exhaust stack, and applying the prescribed operations for drying wet pelletized oil furnace carbon blacks, the excess oxygen in the tail gases was adjusted in the range of φ = 3.0 % and 5.0 %, depending on the type of oil-furnace carbon blacks. Suggested also is installation of a direct-reverse automatic butterfly valve on the dryer exhaust stack to automatically determine the volume fraction of oxygen in the tail gas, and the volume flow rate of natural gas for combustion. The results the improvements carried out are shown in Tables 3 to 5. Table 2 shows the thermal calculations for the hood of the rotary dryer. Preheating of the process water in the temperature range of 70 °C and 80 °C is also recommended using the net heat from the oil-furnace process for wet pelletization. The results of preheating the process water are shown in Table 1. Depending on the type of oil-furnace carbon black, the aforementioned improvements resulted in natural gas energy savings ranging from 25 % to 35 % in relation to the average natural gas requirement in the drying process, and thus a reduction in carbon emissions of up to 40

  15. Seasonal and diurnal variations of black carbon and organic carbon aerosols in Bangkok

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, L. K.; Kondo, Y.; Miyazaki, Y.; Pongkiatkul, Prapat; Kim Oanh, N. T.

    2011-08-01

    Measurements of black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) were conducted in Bangkok during 2007-2008. Annual trends of BC and OC show strong seasonality with lower and higher concentrations during wet and dry seasons, respectively. Flow of cleaner air, wet removal, and negligible biomass burning resulted in the lowest concentrations of aerosols in the wet season. In addition to anthropogenic sources, long-range transport and biomass burning caused higher concentrations in the dry and hot seasons, respectively. Despite extensive biomass burning in the hot season, moderate levels of aerosols were due to the mixing with air masses from the Pacific Ocean. Diurnal distributions exhibit peaks during rush hour marked by minima in the OC/BC ratio and stagnant wind flow. The lowest concentrations in the afternoon hours could be due to deeper planetary boundary layer and reduced traffic. Overall, the concentrations of both BC and OC decrease with the increase in wind speed. The weekend effects, due to reduced emission during weekends, in the concentrations of both BC and OC were significant. Therefore, stricter abatement in vehicular emissions could substantially reduce pollution. A slope of ΔBC/ΔCO of 9.8 ngm-3 ppbv-1 for the wet season represents the emission ratio from vehicular sources. The highest of ΔOC/ΔBC (3 μg μg-1) in the hot season was due to the predominant influence of biomass burning and significant formation of secondary OC. The levels of BC and OC in Bangkok fall within the ranges of their concentrations measured in the major cities of East Asia.

  16. Critical review of black carbon and elemental carbon source apportionment in Europe and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Nicole L.; Long, Christopher M.

    2016-11-01

    An increasing number of air pollution source apportionment studies in Europe and the United States have focused on the black carbon (BC) fraction of ambient particulate matter (PM) given its linkage with adverse public health and climate impacts. We conducted a critical review of European and US BC source apportionment studies published since 2003. Since elemental carbon (EC) has been used as a surrogate measure of BC, we also considered source apportionment studies of EC measurements. This review extends the knowledge presented in previous ambient PM source apportionment reviews because we focus on BC and EC and critically examine the differences between source apportionment results for different methods and source categories. We identified about 50 BC and EC source apportionment studies that have been conducted in either Europe or the US since 2003, finding a striking difference in the commonly used source apportionment methods between the two regions and variations in the assigned source categories. Using three dominant methodologies (radiocarbon, aethalometer, and macro-tracer methods) that only allow for BC to be broadly apportioned into either fossil fuel combustion or biomass burning source categories, European studies generally support fossil fuel combustion as the dominant ambient BC source, but also show significant biomass burning contributions, in particular in wintertime at non-urban locations. Among US studies where prevailing methods such as chemical mass balance (CMB) and positive matrix factorization (PMF) models have allowed for estimation of more refined source contributions, there are fewer findings showing the significance of biomass burning and variable findings on the relative proportion of BC attributed to diesel versus gasoline emissions. Overall, the available BC source apportionment studies provide useful information demonstrating the significance of both fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning BC emission sources in Europe and the US

  17. Black carbon and carbon monoxide over Bay of Bengal during W_ICARB: Source characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girach, I. A.; Nair, Vijayakumar S.; Babu, S. Suresh; Nair, Prabha R.

    2014-09-01

    The ship borne measurements of near-surface black carbon (BC) and carbon monoxide (CO) were carried out over Bay of Bengal (BoB) during the winter period of 2009 under W_ICARB, the second phase of ‘Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB)'. The CO mixing ratio and BC mass concentration varied in the ranges of 80-480 ppbv and 75-10,000 ng m-3, respectively over this marine region. The BC and CO showed similar variations over northern BoB where airmass from Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) region prevailed during the observations period leading to a very strong positive correlation. The association of BC and CO was poor over the eastern and southern part of BoB could be due to the removal of BC aerosols by rain and/or processes of dilution and mixing while transported over to BoB. The highest value of CO observed over eastern BoB was partially due to biomass burning over East Asia. The BC/CO ratio for IGP airmass found to be 20.3 ng m-3 ppb-1 and ∼16 ng m-3 ppb-1 during winter and pre-monsoon, respectively which indicate the role of biomass burning as the source of BC over the region. Based on the emission flux of CO from various inventories and observed BC/CO ratios during pre-monsoon and winter, the BC emission for India is estimated to be in the range of 0.78-1.23 Tg year-1. The analysis of scavenging of BC revealed the loss rate of BC due to relative humidity 0.39 ± 0.08 ng m-3 ppb-1 RH (%)-1 over northern BoB and 0.53 ± 0.04 ng m-3 ppb-1 RH (%)-1 over the southern-BoB during winter.

  18. Enhanced Activated Carbon Cathode Performance for Microbial Fuel Cell by Blending Carbon Black

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan

    2014-02-04

    Activated carbon (AC) is a useful and environmentally sustainable catalyst for oxygen reduction in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs), but there is great interest in improving its performance and longevity. To enhance the performance of AC cathodes, carbon black (CB) was added into AC at CB:AC ratios of 0, 2, 5, 10, and 15 wt % to increase electrical conductivity and facilitate electron transfer. AC cathodes were then evaluated in both MFCs and electrochemical cells and compared to reactors with cathodes made with Pt. Maximum power densities of MFCs were increased by 9-16% with CB compared to the plain AC in the first week. The optimal CB:AC ratio was 10% based on both MFC polarization tests and three electrode electrochemical tests. The maximum power density of the 10% CB cathode was initially 1560 ± 40 mW/m2 and decreased by only 7% after 5 months of operation compared to a 61% decrease for the control (Pt catalyst, 570 ± 30 mW/m2 after 5 months). The catalytic activities of Pt and AC (plain or with 10% CB) were further examined in rotating disk electrode (RDE) tests that minimized mass transfer limitations. The RDE tests showed that the limiting current of the AC with 10% CB was improved by up to 21% primarily due to a decrease in charge transfer resistance (25%). These results show that blending CB in AC is a simple and effective strategy to enhance AC cathode performance in MFCs and that further improvement in performance could be obtained by reducing mass transfer limitations. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  19. Black carbon emission reduction strategies in healthcare industry for effective global climate change management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raila, Emilia Mmbando; Anderson, David O

    2017-04-01

    Climate change remains one of the biggest threats to life on earth to date with black carbon (BC) emissions or smoke being the strongest cause after carbon dioxide (CO2). Surprisingly, scientific evidence about black carbon emissions reduction in healthcare settings is sparse. This paper presents new research findings on the reduction of black carbon emissions from an observational study conducted at the UN Peacekeeping Operations (MINUSTAH) in Haiti in 2014. Researchers observed 20 incineration cycles, 30 minutes for each cycle of plastic and cardboard sharps healthcare waste (HCW) containers ranged from 3 to 14.6 kg. The primary aim was to determine if black carbon emissions from healthcare waste incineration can be lowered by mainstreaming the use of cardboard sharps healthcare waste containers instead of plastic sharps healthcare waste containers. Similarly, the study looks into whether burning temperature was associated with the smoke levels for each case or not. Independent samples t-tests demonstrated significantly lower black carbon emissions during the incineration of cardboard sharps containers (6.81 ± 4.79% smoke) than in plastic containers (17.77 ± 8.38% smoke); a statistically significant increase of 10.96% smoke (95% Confidence Interval ( CI) [4.4 to 17.5% smoke], p = 0.003). Correspondingly, lower bottom burner temperatures occurred during the incineration of cardboard sharps containers than in plastic (95% Cl [16 to 126°C], p = 0.014). Finally, we expect the application of the new quantitative evidence to form the basis for policy formulation, mainstream the use of cardboard sharps containers and opt for non-incineration disposal technologies as urgent steps for going green in healthcare waste management.

  20. Black Carbon Flux Across the Himalaya through the Kali Gandaki Valley in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhungel, S.; Panday, A. K.; Mahata, K. S.

    2013-12-01

    Significant increases in black carbon concentration have been observed in the recent years over the Indo-Gangetic plain, the foothills of the Himalaya, as well as the high Himalaya and the Tibetan Plateau. The concentration of increased black carbon can be significantly correlated to the albedo effect and the warming of atmosphere at high altitudes due to the deposition of black carbon in the snow clad mountains. It is hypothesized that this deposition contributes to increased melting of Himalayan glaciers and snowfields. Satellite images show increasing amounts of aerosol haze over the Indo-Gangetic plains which penetrate into the Himalayan valleys. But how does it reach the high altitude of the Himalayan cryosphere? To date, mechanisms of transport upwind of the valley from the Indo-Gangetic plains up to the Himalaya have not been thoroughly investigated. We hypothesize that wind systems in the deep river valleys that cut across the Himalaya, such as the Arun valley and Kali Gandaki valley, serve as important pathways for pollutant transport. In 2010 the University of Virginia, in collaboration with ICIMOD and Nepal Wireless, established an atmospheric research station in Jomsom, Nepal (28.78N, 83.42E, 2900 m.a.s.l.). The station is equipped to measure black carbon (BC), carbon monoxide (CO), and ozone concentrations. It also has an automated weather station, a filter sampler, and a NASA Aeronet Sunphotometer. Here we use our observations in Jomsom to present an estimate of the annual flux of black carbon from the Indo-Gangetic plains to the Tibetan Plateau through the Kali Gandaki valley. In this way, we gain insight into the significance of deep valleys and their role as pathways for pollutant transport.

  1. Supercritical Fluid Synthesis and Characterization of Catalytic Metal Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Xiangrong; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Chong M.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Wang, Yong; Wai, Chien M.

    2004-02-27

    A rapid, convenient and environmentally benign method has been developed for the fabrication of metal nanoparticle/multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) composites. Nanoparticles of palladium, rhodium and ruthenium are deposited onto functionalized MWCNTs through a simple hydrogen reduction of metal-?-diketone precursors in supercritical carbon dioxide, and are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. These highly dispersed nanoparticles, with a narrow range of size distribution and good adhesion on MWCNT surfaces, are expected to exhibit promising catalytic properties for a variety of chemical reactions. Preliminary experiments demonstrate that Pd nanoparticles supported on MWCNTs are effective catalysts for hydrogenation of olefins in carbon dioxide. The Pd nanoparticle?MWCNT composite also shows a high electrocatalytic activity in oxygen reduction for potential fuel cell application.

  2. 硫化胶中炭黑品种的粒径分布鉴别方法%Determination of Carbon Black Type in Vulcanized Compound by Particle Size Distribution Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张翠翠; 苍飞飞; 邹滔; 高原; 马姜; 邓平晔

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between particle size distribution and carbon black type was established and the test method to determine the carbon black type in vulcanized compound was obtained by particle size distribution analysis. The carbon black in the vulcanized compound was recovered by pyrolysis and its particle size distribution was measured by laser diffraction nano-particle size analyzer. The results showed that peak value and standard deviation of different type of carbon black were different and the peak value and standard deviation fluctuated within a small range for the same type of carbon black. Thus the unknown carbon black could be identiifed by measuring its particle size distribution. This identiifcation method was suitable for analysis of carbon black in the vulcanized compound iflled with only one type of carbon black and it could not be applied to blended carbon black and carbon black N774.%探索炭黑粒径分布与炭黑品种之间的关系,建立通过炭黑粒径分布鉴别炭黑品种的方法。通过热裂解法回收硫化胶中的炭黑,将回收的炭黑加入分散剂制成悬浊液,利用纳米激光粒度分布仪进行粒径分布测试。结果表明,不同品种炭黑粒径分布的峰值和标准偏差不同,同种炭黑粒径分布的峰值和标准偏差在一个较小的范围内波动,这是硫化胶中未知炭黑品种鉴别的依据。本方法适用于单一炭黑品种硫化胶分析,不适用于并用炭黑及炭黑N774硫化胶分析。

  3. One-pot solventless preparation of PEGylated black phosphorus nanoparticles for photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Caixia; Wen, Ling; Zeng, Jianfeng; Wang, Yong; Sun, Qiao; Deng, Lijuan; Zhao, Chongjun; Li, Zhen

    2016-06-01

    Black phosphorus (BP) nanostructures such as nanosheets and nanoparticles have attracted considerable attention in recent years due to their unique properties and great potential in various physical, chemical, and biological fields. In this article, water-soluble and biocompatible PEGylated BP nanoparticles with a high yield were prepared by one-pot solventless high energy mechanical milling technique. The resultant BP nanoparticles can efficiently convert near infrared (NIR) light into heat, and exhibit excellent photostability, which makes them suitable as a novel nanotheranostic agent for photoacoustic (PA) imaging and photothermal therapy of cancer. The in-vitro results demonstrate the excellent biocompatibility of PEGylated BP nanoparticles, which can be used for photothermal ablation of cancer cells under irradiation with NIR light. The in-vivo PA images demonstrate that these BP nanoparticles can be efficiently accumulated in tumors through the enhanced permeability retention effect. The resultant BP nanoparticles can be further utilized for photothermal ablation of tumors by irradiation with NIR light. The tumor-bearing mice were completely recovered after photothermal treatment with BP nanoparticles, in comparison with mice from control groups. Our research highlights the great potential of PEGylated BP nanoparticles in detection and treatment of cancer.

  4. Penelitian pengaruh naphthenic oil dan carbon black terhadap sifat kekerasan lis kaca mobil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Any Setyaningsih

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available This research have a purpose to know influence naphthenic oil and car bon black about properties hardness weather strip for auto mobile. Compound wea ther strip for auto mobile make for Natural Rubber (RSS and sintetic rubber (SBR 1502 with in creasing ingrediens such plasticizer, activator, filler, anti oxidant, accelerator and vulkanizing agent. Compount formula making variation naphthenic oil 3,5 and 7 part along with carbon black 45,50 and 55 part result hardness test with value 67 shore A for compount with naphthenic oil 7 part and carbon black 50 part and after perform make in to fill requrements SNI 1490 – 89 A weather strip auto mobile.

  5. Temporal variations of black carbon during haze and non-haze days in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingyang; Ma, Tangming; Olson, Michael R.; Liu, Yanju; Zhang, Tingting; Wu, Yu; Schauer, James J.

    2016-09-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol has been identified as one of key factors responsible for air quality in Beijing. BC emissions abatement could help slow regional climate change while providing benefits for public health. In order to quantify its variations and contribution to air pollution, we systematically studied real-time measurements of equivalent black carbon (eBC) in PM2.5 aerosols at an urban site in Beijing from 2010 to 2014. Equivalent black carbon (eBC) is used instead of black carbon (BC) for data derived from Aethalometer-31 measurement. Equivalent BC concentrations showed significant temporal variations with seasonal mean concentration varying between 2.13 and 5.97 μg m‑3. The highest concentrations of eBC were found during autumn and winter, and the lowest concentrations occurred in spring. We assessed the temporal variations of eBC concentration during haze days versus non-haze days and found significantly lower eBC fractions in PM2.5 on haze days compared to those on non-haze days. Finally, we observed a clear inverse relationship between eBC and wind speed. Our results show that wind disperses PM2.5 more efficiently than eBC; so, secondary aerosols are not formed to the same degree as primary aerosols over the same transport distance during windy conditions.

  6. Analysis of the Interphase on Carbon Black Formed in High Voltage Batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younesi, Reza; Christiansen, Ane Sælland; Scipioni, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Carbon black (CB) additives commonly used to increase the electrical conductivity of electrodes in Li-ion batteries are generally believed to be electrochemically inert additives in cathodes. Decomposition of electrolyte in the surface region of CB in Li-ion cells at high voltages up to 4.9 V...

  7. Quantification methods of Black Carbon: Comparison of Rock-Eval analysis with traditional methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poot, A.; Quik, J.T.K.; Veld, H.; Koelmans, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Black Carbon (BC) quantification methods are reviewed, including new Rock-Eval 6 data on BC reference materials. BC has been reported to have major impacts on climate, human health and environmental quality. Especially for risk assessment of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) it is important to ac

  8. Soil Fraction and Black Carbon Particles of Amazonian Dark Earth Harbor Different Fungal Abundance and Diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reis Lucheta, Adriano; Souza Cannavan, F.S.; Tsai, S.M.; Kuramae, E.E.

    2017-01-01

    Amazonian Dark Earth (ADE) is a highly fertile soil of anthropogenic origin characterized by higher amount of charred black carbon (BC). ADE is considered a fertility model, however knowledge about the fungal community structure and diversity inhabiting ADE and BC is scarce. Fungal community

  9. Influence of nanoclay-carbon black hybrid fillers on cure and properties of natural rubber compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapkota, J.; Poikelispää, M.; Das, A.; Dierkes, W.K.; Vuorinen, J.

    2013-01-01

    The influence of organically modified nanoclay-carbon black (CB) hybrid filler on the curing behavior of natural rubber (NR) was explored in this investigation. Here an effort was paid to understand the curing kinetics of organomodified nanoclay filled rubber compounds. On the basis of two different

  10. Electrical Percolation of Carbon Black Filled Poly (ethylene oxide) Composites in Relation to the Matrix Morphology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gen Shui CHENG; Ji Wen HU; Ming Qiu ZHANG; Ming Wei LI; Ding Shu XIAO; Min Zhi RONG

    2004-01-01

    The present work studies the electrical conduction performance of carbon black (CB)filled poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) composites. The addition of CB leads to reduced matrix crystallinity as the fillers which are partly situated inside the lamellae and hinder the growth of PEO crystallites. As a result, the electrical percolation behavior is related with the matrix morphology.

  11. Evaluation of Methods for the Determination of Black Carbon Emissions from an Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    The emissions from aircraft gas turbine engines consist of nanometer size black carbon (BC) particles plus gas-phase sulfur and organic compounds which undergo gas-to-particle conversion downstream of the engine as the plume cools and dilutes. In this study, four BC measurement ...

  12. Study of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy in carbon black-filled HDPE composite

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang Xian Feng; Zhou Xian Yi; Weng Hu Imin; Ye Bang Jiao; Han Rong Dian; Jia Shao Jin; Zhang Zhi Cheng

    2002-01-01

    The variation of the electrical conductivity of high density polyethylene (HDPE) with the carbon black (CB) content was studied using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and free-volume model, the crystallinity of HDPE/CB composite and 'percolation' effect were discussed with measurements of conductivity and DSC test

  13. Investigation of reinforcement of the modified carbon black from wasted tires by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jie; YANG Yong-rong; REN Xiao-hong; STAPF Siegfried

    2006-01-01

    Pyrolysis has the potential of transforming waste into recyclable products. Pyrolytic carbon black (PCB) is one of the most important products from the pyrolysis of used tires. Techniques for surface modifications of PCB have been developed. One of the most significant applications for modified PCB is to reinforce the rubber matrix to obtain high added values. The transverse relaxation and the chain dynamics of vulcanized rubber networks with PCB and modified PCB were studied and compared with those of the commercial carbon blacks using selective 1H transverse relaxation (T2) experiments and dipolar correlation effect (DCE) experiments on the stimulated echo. Demineralization and coupling agent modification not only intensified the interactions between the modified PCB and the neighboring polyisoprene chains, but also increased the chemical cross-link density of the vulcanized rubber with modified PCB. The mechanical testing of the rubbers with different kinds of carbon blacks showed that the maximum strain of the rubber with modified PCB was improved greatly. The mechanical testing results confirmed the conclusion obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). PCB modified by the demineralization and NDZ-105 titanate coupling agent could be used to replace the commercial semi-reinforcing carbon black.

  14. Temporal variations of black carbon during haze and non-haze days in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingyang; Ma, Tangming; Olson, Michael R; Liu, Yanju; Zhang, Tingting; Wu, Yu; Schauer, James J

    2016-09-16

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol has been identified as one of key factors responsible for air quality in Beijing. BC emissions abatement could help slow regional climate change while providing benefits for public health. In order to quantify its variations and contribution to air pollution, we systematically studied real-time measurements of equivalent black carbon (eBC) in PM2.5 aerosols at an urban site in Beijing from 2010 to 2014. Equivalent black carbon (eBC) is used instead of black carbon (BC) for data derived from Aethalometer-31 measurement. Equivalent BC concentrations showed significant temporal variations with seasonal mean concentration varying between 2.13 and 5.97 μg m(-3). The highest concentrations of eBC were found during autumn and winter, and the lowest concentrations occurred in spring. We assessed the temporal variations of eBC concentration during haze days versus non-haze days and found significantly lower eBC fractions in PM2.5 on haze days compared to those on non-haze days. Finally, we observed a clear inverse relationship between eBC and wind speed. Our results show that wind disperses PM2.5 more efficiently than eBC; so, secondary aerosols are not formed to the same degree as primary aerosols over the same transport distance during windy conditions.

  15. Simplifying the calculation of light scattering properties for black carbon fractal aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. A. Smith

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Black carbon fractal aggregates have complicated shapes that make the calculation of their optical properties particularly computationally expensive. Here, a method is presented to estimate fractal aggregate light scattering properties by optimising simplified models to full light scattering calculations. It is found that there are no possible spherical models (at any size or refractive index that well represent the light scattering in the visible, or near-thermal infrared. As such, parameterisations of the light scattering as a function of the number of aggregate particles is presented as the most pragmatic choice for modelling distributions of black carbon when the large computational overheads of rigorous scattering calculations cannot be justified. This parameterisation can be analytically integrated to provide light scattering properties for log-normal distributions of black carbon fractal aggregates and return extinction cross-sections with 0.1% accuracy for typical black carbon size distributions. Scattering cross-sections and the asymmetry parameter can be obtained to within 3%.

  16. Black carbon and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in surface sediments of China's marginal seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yanju; Wang, Xuchen; Dai, Minhan; Feng, Huan; Li, Anchun; Song, Qian

    2009-05-01

    This study investigates the distribution of black carbon (BC) and its correlation with total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (ΣPAH) in the surface sediments of China’s marginal seas. BC content ranges from cycling in China’s marginal seas.

  17. Nanoscale Interactions between Engineered Nanomaterials and Black Carbon (Biochar) in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    An understanding of the interactions between engineered nanomaterials (NMs) and soil constituents, and a comprehension of how these interactions may affect biological uptake and toxicity are currently lacking. Charcoal black carbon is a normal constituent of soils due to fire history, and can be pre...

  18. Effects of occupational exposure to carbon black on peripheral white blood cell counts and lymphocyte subsets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dai, Yufei; Niu, Yong; Duan, Huawei; Bassig, Bryan A; Ye, Meng; Zhang, Xiao; Meng, Tao; Bin, Ping; Jia, Xiaowei; Shen, Meili; Zhang, Rong; Hu, Wei; Yang, Xiaofa; Vermeulen, Roel; Silverman, Debra; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing; Yu, Shanfa; Zheng, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified carbon black (CB) as a possible (Group 2B) human carcinogen. Given that most CB manufacturing processes result in the emission of various types of chemicals, it is uncertain if the adverse health effects that have been observed in CB-exp

  19. Metallic nanoparticles deposited on carbon microspheres: novel materials for combinatorial electrochemistry and electroanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Ronan; Wildgoose, Gregory G; Compton, Richard G

    2009-04-01

    This review deals with the preparation of metallic nanoparticles on glassy carbon microspheres and the use of these new hybrid materials for combinatorial electrochemistry and electroanalysis. First, the preparation of gold, silver and palladium nanoparticles on glassy carbon microspheres by a simple electroless procedure is described. Then, different types of electrodes modified with glassy carbon microspheres are described. These are: (i) glassy carbon electrodes modified by a composite film of glassy carbon microspheres and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, (ii) basal plane pyrolylic graphite electrodes modified by the abrasive attachment of glassy carbon microspheres and (iii) carbon-epoxy composite electrodes loaded with glassy carbon microspheres. The three types of electrode architectures described consist of metallic nanoparticles embedded in a carbon matrix and each of the electrode macrodisc surfaces actually correspond to a random metallic nanoelectrode array. Carbon-epoxy composite electrodes have good characteristics for their use as practical sensors. Furthermore, the use of several kinds of metallic nanoparticles allows the construction of a multi-analyte electrode and the screening of electroactive materials by following a combinatorial approach.

  20. Distribution and Sources of Black Carbon in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ling

    The Arctic is warming at twice the global rate over recent decades. To slow down this warming trend, there is growing interest in reducing the impact from short-lived climate forcers, such as black carbon (BC), because the benefits of mitigation are seen more quickly relative to CO2 reduction. To propose efficient mitigation policies, it is imperative to improve our understanding of BC distribution in the Arctic and to identify the sources. In this dissertation, we investigate the sensitivity of BC in the Arctic, including BC concentrations in snow (BCsnow) and BC concentrations in air (BCair), to emissions, dry deposition and wet scavenging using a global 3-D chemical transport model (CTM) GEOS-Chem. By including flaring emissions, estimating dry deposition velocity using resistance-in-series method, and including Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) in wet scavenging, simulated BCsnow in the eight Arctic sub-regions agree with the observations within a factor of two, and simulated BCair fall within the uncertainty range of observations. Specifically, we find that natural gas flaring emissions in Western Extreme North of Russia (WENR) strongly enhance BCsnow (by up to ?50%) and BCair (by 20-32%) during snow season in the so-called 'Arctic front', but has negligible impact on BC in the free troposphere. The updated dry deposition velocity over snow and ice is much larger than those used in most of global CTMs and agrees better with observation. The resulting BCsnow changes marginally because of the offsetting of higher dry and lower wet deposition fluxes. In contrast, surface BCair decreases strongly due to the faster dry deposition (by 27-68%). WBF occurs when the environmental vapor pressure is in between the saturation vapor pressure of ice crystals and water drops in mixed-phase clouds. As a result, water drops evaporate and releases BC particles in them back into the interstitial air. In most CTMs, WBF is either missing or represented by a uniform and low BC

  1. Shear thickening behavior of nanoparticle suspensions with carbon nanofillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sha, Xiaofei; Yu, Kejing, E-mail: yukejing@gmail.com; Cao, Haijian; Qian, Kun [Ministry of Education, Jiangnan University, Key Laboratory of Eco-textiles (China)

    2013-07-15

    Suspensions comprised of silica nanoparticle (average diameter: 650 nm) and carbon nanofillers dispersed in polyethylene glycol were prepared and investigated. Rheological measurement demonstrated that the mixed suspensions showed a non-Newtonian flow profile, and the shear thickening effect was enhanced by the addition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) (main range of diameter: 10-20 nm; length: 5-15 {mu}m; purity: >97 wt%) and graphene nanoplatelets (GNs) (average diameter: >50 nm; average length: 20 {mu}m; purity: >92 wt%). It suggested that better the aggregation effect of dispersed particles was, the more significant the shear thickening effect achieved. The results also revealed that the formation of large nanomaterials clusters could be suitable to explain the phenomena. Furthermore, the trend of shear thickening behavior of the silica suspension with CNTs was more striking than that of GNs. The physical reactions between those multi-dispersed phases had been described by the schematic illustrations in papers. Otherwise, a model was built to explain these behaviors, which could be attributed to the unique structures and inherent properties of these two different nanofillers. And the morphologies of the shear thickening fluid which were examined by transmission electron microscopy confirmed this mechanism.

  2. Rh(0)/Rh(iii) core-shell nanoparticles as heterogeneous catalysts for cyclic carbonate synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Younjae; Shin, Taeil; Kim, Kiseong; Byun, Hyeeun; Cho, Sung June; Kim, Hyunwoo; Song, Hyunjoon

    2016-12-22

    Rh(0)/Rh(iii) core-shell nanoparticles were prepared by surface oxidation of Rh nanoparticles with N-bromosuccinimide. They were employed as heterogeneous catalysts for cyclic carbonate synthesis from propylene oxide and CO2, and exhibited high activity and excellent recyclability due to Lewis acidic Rh(iii) species on the shells.

  3. Characterisation and catalytic properties of Ni, Co, Ce and Ru nanoparticles in mesoporous carbon spheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros, Francisco A. A. [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Departamento de Quimica Analitica e Fisico-Quimica, Langmuir Lab de Adsorcao e Catalise (Brazil); Castro, Antonio J. R.; Filho, Josue M. [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil); Viana, Bartolomeu C. [Universidade Federal do Piaui, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil); Campos, Adriana [CETENE Av. Prof. Luiz Freire, Cidade Universitaria (Brazil); Oliveira, Alcineia C., E-mail: alcineia@ufc.br [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Departamento de Quimica Analitica e Fisico-Quimica, Langmuir Lab de Adsorcao e Catalise (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    Ni, Co, Ce and Ru nanoparticles were inserted into templated carbon using a nanocasting technique and evaluated for the dehydration of glycerol. NiO and CeO{sub 2} preferentially yielded 5 nm uniformly sized particles that filled the mesoporous carbon via a geometric confinement effect. Ru generated Ru{sup o} and RuO{sub 2} nanoparticles that selectively migrated towards the carbon surface and did not undergo sintering, whereas Co nanoparticles containing CoO and Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} showed the opposite behaviour. The stabilising effects of the Ce and Ru nanoparticles on the carbon matrix effectively prevented the aggregation of small particles, resulting in superior catalytic performance in glycerol dehydration.

  4. Biopolymer protected silver nanoparticles on the support of carbon nanotube as interface for electrocatalytic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satyanarayana, M.; Kumar, V. Sunil; Gobi, K. Vengatajalabathy, E-mail: drkvgobi@gmail.com, E-mail: satyam.nitw@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, National Institute of Technology, Warangal - 506004, Telangana (India)

    2016-04-13

    In this research, silver nanoparticles (SNPs) are prepared on the surface of carbon nanotubes via chitosan, a biopolymer linkage. Here chitosan act as stabilizing agent for nanoparticles and forms a network on the surface of carbon nanotubes. Synthesized silver nanoparticles-MWCNT hybrid composite is characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy, XRD analysis, and FESEM with EDS to evaluate the structural and chemical properties of the nanocomposite. The electrocatalytic activity of the fabricated SNP-MWCNT hybrid modified glassy carbon electrode has been evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance analysis. The silver nanoparticles are of size ∼35 nm and are well distributed on the surface of carbon nanotubes with chitosan linkage. The prepared nanocomposite shows efficient electrocatalytic properties with high active surface area and excellent electron transfer behaviour.

  5. Synthesis of ternary metal nitride nanoparticles using mesoporous carbon nitride as reactive template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Anna; Müller, Jens Oliver; Antonietti, Markus; Thomas, Arne

    2008-12-23

    Mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride was used as both a nanoreactor and a reactant for the synthesis of ternary metal nitride nanoparticles. By infiltration of a mixture of two metal precursors into mesoporous carbon nitride, the pores act first as a nanoconfinement, generating amorphous mixed oxide nanoparticles. During heating and decomposition, the carbon nitride second acts as reactant or, more precisely, as a nitrogen source, which converts the preformed mixed oxide nanoparticles into the corresponding nitride (reactive templating). Using this approach, ternary metal nitride particles with diameters smaller 10 nm composed of aluminum gallium nitride (Al-Ga-N) and titanium vanadium nitride (Ti-V-N) were synthesized. Due to the confinement effect of the carbon nitride matrix, the composition of the resulting metal nitride can be easily adjusted by changing the concentration of the preceding precursor solution. Thus, ternary metal nitride nanoparticles with continuously adjustable metal composition can be produced.

  6. Biopolymer protected silver nanoparticles on the support of carbon nanotube as interface for electrocatalytic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana, M.; Kumar, V. Sunil; Gobi, K. Vengatajalabathy

    2016-04-01

    In this research, silver nanoparticles (SNPs) are prepared on the surface of carbon nanotubes via chitosan, a biopolymer linkage. Here chitosan act as stabilizing agent for nanoparticles and forms a network on the surface of carbon nanotubes. Synthesized silver nanoparticles-MWCNT hybrid composite is characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy, XRD analysis, and FESEM with EDS to evaluate the structural and chemical properties of the nanocomposite. The electrocatalytic activity of the fabricated SNP-MWCNT hybrid modified glassy carbon electrode has been evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance analysis. The silver nanoparticles are of size ˜35 nm and are well distributed on the surface of carbon nanotubes with chitosan linkage. The prepared nanocomposite shows efficient electrocatalytic properties with high active surface area and excellent electron transfer behaviour.

  7. Polymer-templated mesoporous carbons synthesized in the presence of nickel nanoparticles, nickel oxide nanoparticles, and nickel nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choma, Jerzy; Jedynak, Katarzyna; Marszewski, Michal; Jaroniec, Mietek

    2012-02-01

    Mesoporous carbon composites, containing nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles, were obtained by soft-templating method. Samples were synthesized under acidic conditions using resorcinol and formaldehyde as carbon precursors, poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) triblock co-polymer Lutrol F127 as a soft template and nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles, and nickel nitrate as metal precursors. In addition, a one set of samples was obtained by impregnation of mesoporous carbons with a nickel nitrate solution followed by further annealing at 400 °C. Wide angle X-ray powder diffraction along with thermogravimetric analysis proved the presence of nickel nanoparticles in the final composites obtained using nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles, and Ni(NO3)2 solution. Whereas, the impregnation of carbons with a nickel nitrate solution followed by annealing at 400 °C resulted in needle-like nickel oxide nanoparticles present inside the composites’ pores. Low-temperature (-196 °C) nitrogen physisorption, X-ray powder diffraction, and thermogravimetric analysis confirmed good adsorption and structural properties of the synthesized nickel-carbon composites, in particular, the samples possessed high surface areas (>600 m2/g), large total pore volumes (>0.50 cm3/g), and maxima of pore size distribution functions at circa 7 nm. It was found that the composites were partially graphitized during carbonization process at 850 °C. The samples are stable in an air environment below temperature of 500 °C. All these features make the synthesized nickel-carbon composites attractive materials for adsorption, catalysis, energy storage, and environmental applications.

  8. Morphology and Optical Properties of Black-Carbon Particles Relevant to Engine Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelsen, H. A.; Bambha, R.; Dansson, M. A.; Schrader, P. E.

    2013-12-01

    Black-carbon particles are believed to have a large influence on climate through direct radiative forcing, reduction of surface albedo of snow and ice in the cryosphere, and interaction with clouds. The optical properties and morphology of atmospheric particles containing black carbon are uncertain, and characterization of black carbon resulting from engines emissions is needed. Refractory black-carbon particles found in the atmosphere are often coated with unburned fuel, sulfuric acid, water, ash, and other combustion by-products and atmospheric constituents. Coatings can alter the optical and physical properties of the particles and therefore change their optical properties and cloud interactions. Details of particle morphology and coating state can also have important effects on the interpretation of optical diagnostics. A more complete understanding of how coatings affect extinction, absorption, and incandescence measurements is needed before these techniques can be applied reliably to a wide range of particles. We have investigated the effects of coatings on the optical and physical properties of combustion-generated black-carbon particles using a range of standard particle diagnostics, extinction, and time-resolved laser-induced incandescence (LII) measurements. Particles were generated in a co-flow diffusion flame, extracted, cooled, and coated with oleic acid. The diffusion flame produces highly dendritic soot aggregates with similar properties to those produced in diesel engines, diffusion flames, and most natural combustion processes. A thermodenuder was used to remove the coating. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) was used to monitor aggregate sizes; a centrifugal particle mass analyzer (CPMA) was used to measure coating mass fractions, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to characterize particle morphologies. The results demonstrate important differences in optical measurements between coated and uncoated particles.

  9. Development of New Photovoltaic Devices Based on Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes and Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2013-0014 Development of new photovoltaic devices based on multi wall carbon nanotubes and nanoparticles... photovoltaic devices based on multi wall carbon nanotubes and nanoparticles 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8655-11-1-3036 5b. GRANT NUMBER Grant 11...response is registered in all the photon spectral range studied. The new kind of Graetzel-like solar cell device was built without dye and TiO2 , showing

  10. Characterisation of surface ionisation and adsorption of phenol and 4-nitrophenol on non-porous carbon blacks

    OpenAIRE

    Carrott, Peter; Carrott, Manuela; Vale, Tania; Valente Nabais, Joao; Mourao, Paulo

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption of phenol and 4-nitrophenol from aqueous solutions by carbon blacks was studied. Particular attention was paid to the characterisation of the surface chemistry and ionisation of the carbon blacks by use of a simple carbon surface ionisation model, as well as the use of a normalised form of the Freundlich equation for the analysis of the adsorption isotherms. The results indicated that the solutes interact directly with the graphene layers and that the adsorpti...

  11. Low-wind and other microclimatic factors in near-road black carbon variability: A case study and assessment implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Marissa S.; Keener, Timothy C.; Birch, M. Eileen; Baldauf, Richard; Neal, Jill; Yang, Y. Jeffrey

    2013-12-01

    Airborne black carbon from urban traffic is a climate forcing agent and has been associated with health risks to near-road populations. In this paper, we describe a case study of black carbon concentration and compositional variability at and near a traffic-laden multi-lane highway in Cincinnati, Ohio, using an onsite aethalometer and filter-based NIOSH Method 5040 measurements; the former measured 1-min average black carbon concentrations and the latter determined the levels of organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC) averaged over an approximately 2-h time interval. The results show significant wind and temperature effects on black carbon concentration and composition in a way more complex than predicted by Gaussian dispersion models. Under oblique low winds, namely ux[=u×sin(θ)]˜ (0, -0.5 m s-1), which mostly occurred during morning hours, black carbon concentrations per unit traffic flow were highest and had large variation. The variability did not always follow Gaussian dispersion but was characteristic of a uniform distribution at a near-road distance. Under all other wind conditions, the near-road black carbon variation met Gaussian dispersion characteristics. Significant differences in roadside dispersion are observed between OC and EC fractions, between PM2.5 and PM10-2.5, and between the morning period and rest of the day. In a general case, the overall black carbon variability at the multi-lane highway can be stated as bimodal consisting of Gaussian dispersion and non-Gaussian uniform distribution. Transition between the two types depends on wind velocity and wind angle to the traffic flow. In the order of decreasing importance, the microclimatic controlling factors over the black carbon variability are: 1) wind velocity and the angle with traffic; 2) diurnal temperature variations due to thermal buoyancy; and 3) downwind Gaussian dispersion. Combinations of these factors may have created various traffic-microclimate interactions that have significant

  12. Heterogeneous atoms in laser-induced synthesis of carbon black

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovici, E.; Gavrila Florescu, L.; Soare, I.; Scarisoreanu, M.; Sandu, I.; Prodan, G.; Fleaca, C. T.; Morjan, I.; Voicu, I.

    2009-03-01

    Based on a high temperature hydrocarbon/heterogeneous atoms system of well-established composition, the formation of carbon nanostructures by laser-induced pyrolysis is related to the presence of heteroatoms in the reactants. In this paper, the goal is to underline the influence of some heteroatoms on the morphology and functionalizing nanostructured carbon materials by changing both gas composition and experimental parameters, with the focus to drive these materials into a regime where they can naturally interface with the surrounding matter. To investigate, in the versatile laser pyrolysis method, how to in situ modulate - through the presence of heterogeneous atoms - the characteristics of carbon nanopowders claimed by specific application is a challenge. Some preliminary results confirm experimentally their particular behavior during interaction with polymer matrices of some nanocomposites.

  13. Supercapacitive evaluation of carbon black/exfoliated graphite/MnO{sub 2} ternary nanocomposite electrode by continuous cyclic voltammetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naderi, Hamid Reza, E-mail: hrnaderi@ut.ac.ir [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Norouzi, Parviz, E-mail: norouzi@khayam.ut.ac.ir [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biosensor Research Center, Endocrinology & Metabolism Molecular-Cellular Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ganjali, Mohammad Reza, E-mail: ganjali@khayam.ut.ac.ir [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biosensor Research Center, Endocrinology & Metabolism Molecular-Cellular Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-08-01

    A new ternary nanocomposite was prepared by using MnO{sub 2}, carbon black (CB), and exfoliated graphite (EG) through a sonochemical method. In this process, the MnO{sub 2} nanoparticles was anchored on the mixture of CB and EG to maximize the specific capacitances of these materials. Structure and morphology of the CB/EG/MnO{sub 2} nanocomposites were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The electrochemical properties of the CB/EG/MnO{sub 2} nanocomposites with different content of MnO{sub 2} were studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV), fast Fourier transformation continuous cyclic voltammetry (FFTCCV) technique, galvanostatic charge–discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The best nanocomposite electrode displayed specific capacitance of 364 F g{sup −1} at the scan rate of 2 mV s{sup −1} in 0.5 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aqueous solution, which is higher than pure MnO{sub 2} (289 F g{sup −1}). The capacitance stability of the nanocomposite electrode was studied by FFTCCV at the scan rate of 500 mV s{sup −1}. The result shows that after recording 4000 CVs, the specific capacitance of the nanocomposite decline only 5%. Furthermore, the nanocomposite electrode showed higher energy density than MnO{sub 2} electrode. - Highlights: • MnO{sub 2}/exfoliated graphite/Carbon black nanocomposites were synthesized by ultrasonic vibration. • The best nanocomposite electrode exhibits specific capacitance of 364 F g{sup −1} in 2 mV s{sup −1}. • The stability of the nanocomposite electrode was study FFTCCV technique. • The capacitance decreases only 5.2% of initial capacitance after 4000 cycles.

  14. Measurements of Black Carbon and aerosol absorption during global circumnavigation and Arctic campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Močnik, Griša; Drinovec, Luka; Vidmar, Primož; Lenarčič, Matevž

    2015-04-01

    During two flight campaigns: around the world (2012) and over the Arctic (2013) we demonstrated the feasibility of scientific research and aerial measurements of aerosolized Black Carbon with ultra-light aircraft. Conducted measurements provided first ever information on Black Carbon concentrations and sources over such a large area at altitude. Ground-level measurements of atmospheric aerosols are routinely performed around the world, but there exists very little data on their vertical and geographical distribution in the global atmosphere. These data is a crucial requirement for our understanding of the dispersion of pollutant species of anthropogenic origin, and their possible effects on radiative forcing, cloud condensation, and other phenomena which can contribute to adverse outcomes. Light absorbing carbonaceous aerosols and black carbon (BC) in particular are a unique tracer for combustion emissions, and can be detected rapidly and with great sensitivity by filter-based optical methods. A single-seat ultra-light aircraft flew around the world and on a Arctic expedition. The flights covered all seven continents; crossed all major oceans; and operated at altitudes around 3000 m ASL and up to 8900 m ASL. The aircraft carried a specially-developed high-sensitivity miniaturized dual-wavelength Aethalometer, which recorded BC concentrations with very high temporal resolution and sensitivity [1, 2]. We present examples of data from flight tracks over remote oceans, uninhabited land masses, and densely populated areas. Measuring the dependence of the aerosol absorption on the wavelength, we show that aerosols produced during biomass combustion can be transported to high altitude in high concentrations and we estimate the underestimation of the direct forcing by models assuming a simple linear relationship between BC concentration and forcing in comparison to observations [3,4]. 1. , Carbon Sampling Takes Flight, Science 2012, 335, 1286. 2. G. Močnik, L. Drinovec, M

  15. Soil Organic Carbon, Black Carbon, and Enzyme Activity Under Long-Term Fertilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Xing-hua; ZHENG Jian-wei

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to understand the effects of long-term fertilization on soil organic carbon (SOC), black carbon (BC), enzyme activity, and the relationships among these parameters. Paddy ifeld was continuously fertilized over 30 yr with nine different fertilizer treatments including N, P, K, NP, NK, NPK, 2NPK (two-fold NPK), NPK+manure (NPKM), and CK (no fertilization), N, 90 kg urea-N ha-1 yr-1; P, 45 kg triple superphosphate-P2O5 ha-1 yr-1; K, 75 kg potassium chloride-K2O ha-1 yr-1;and pig manure, 22 500 kg ha-1 yr-1. Soil samples were collected and determined for SOC, BC content, and enzyme activity. The results showed that the SOC in the NPKM treatment was signiifcantly higher than those in the K, P, and CK treatments. The lowest SOC content was found in the CK treatment. SOC content was similar in the N, NP, NK, NPK, 2NPK, and NPKM treatments. There was no signiifcant difference in BC content among different treatments. The BC-to-SOC ratios (BC/SOC) ranged from 0.50 to 0.63, suggesting that BC might originate from the same source. Regarding enzyme activity, NPK treatment had higher urease activity than NPKM treatment. The urease activity of NPKM treatment was signiifcantly higher than that of 2NPK, NP, N, P, K, CK, and NPKM treatment which produced higher activities of acid phosphatase, catalase, and invertase than all other treatments. Our results indicated that long-term fertilization did not signiifcantly affect BC content. Concurrent application of manure and mineral fertilizers increased SOC content and signiifcantly enhanced soil enzyme activities. Correlation analysis showed that catalase activity was signiifcantly associated with invertase activity, but SOC, BC, and enzyme activity levels were not signiifcantly correlated with one another. No signiifcant correlations were observed between BC and soil enzymes. It is unknown whether soil enzymes play a role in the decomposition of BC.

  16. Hydrogen production using thermocatalytic decomposition of methane on Ni30/activated carbon and Ni30/carbon black.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srilatha, K; Viditha, V; Srinivasulu, D; Ramakrishna, S U B; Himabindu, V

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen is an energy carrier of the future need. It could be produced from different sources and used for power generation or as a transport fuel which mainly in association with fuel cells. The primary challenge for hydrogen production is reducing the cost of production technologies to make the resulting hydrogen cost competitive with conventional fuels. Thermocatalytic decomposition (TCD) of methane is one of the most advantageous processes, which will meet the future demand, hence an attractive route for COx free environment. The present study deals with the production of hydrogen with 30 wt% of Ni impregnated in commercially available activated carbon and carbon black catalysts (samples coded as Ni30/AC and Ni30/CB, respectively). These combined catalysts were not attempted by previous studies. Pure form of hydrogen is produced at 850 °C and volume hourly space velocity (VHSV) of 1.62 L/h g on the activity of both the catalysts. The analysis (X-ray diffraction (XRD)) of the catalysts reveals moderately crystalline peaks of Ni, which might be responsible for the increase in catalytic life along with formation of carbon fibers. The activity of carbon black is sustainable for a longer time compared to that of activated carbon which has been confirmed by life time studies (850 °C and 54 sccm of methane).

  17. Preparation and characterization of aligned carbon nanotubes coated with titania nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Hongtao; ZHAO Huimin; QUAN Xie; CHEN Shuo

    2006-01-01

    Well-aligned carbon nanotubes coated with titania (TiO2) were prepared by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD), and the sequential experiments including carbon nanotubes preparation, air-oxidation purification and titania nanoparticles coating were performed at different temperatures in the same reactor. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD), and energy- dispersive X-ray spectra (EDX) demonstrated the well-aligned nanotubes and TiO2 nanoparticles in close proximity and the average diameter of TiO2 nanoparticles was 11.5 nm.

  18. Supercritical CO 2 -philic nanoparticles suitable for determining the viability of carbon sequestration in shale

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Yisheng

    2015-01-01

    © The Royal Society of Chemistry. A fracture spacing less than a decimeter is probably required for the successful sequestration of CO2 in shale. Tracer experiments using inert nanoparticles could determine if a fracturing this intense has been achieved. Here we describe the synthesis of supercritical CO2-philic nanoparticles suitable for this application. The nanoparticles are ~50 nm in diameter and consist of iron oxide (Fe3O4) and silica (SiO2) cores functionalized with a fluorescent polymeric corona. The nanoparticles stably disperse in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and are detectable to concentrations of 10 ppm. This journal is

  19. Gold Nanoparticles as the Catalyst of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Homma

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles have been proven to act as efficient catalysts for chemical reactions, such as oxidation and hydrogen production. In this review we focus on a different aspect of the catalysis of gold nanoparticles; single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT synthesis. This is not a traditional meaning of catalytic reaction, but SWCNTs cannot be synthesized without nanoparticles. Previously, gold was considered as unsuitable metal species as the catalyst of SWCNT synthesis. However, gold nanoparticles with diameters smaller than 5 nm were found to effectively produce SWCNTs. We discuss the catalysis of gold and related metals for SWCNT synthesis in comparison with conventional catalysts, such as iron, cobalt, and nickel.

  20. Effect of oxide nanoparticles on structural properties of multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhall, Shivani; Jaggi, Neena

    2016-03-01

    A simple chemical precipitation route is reported to partially decorate mutliwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with oxide nanoparticles in the present study. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to investigate the structural properties of MWCNTs composite with nickel, cuprous, zinc and tin oxides nanoparticles. Raman analysis confirms that, ZnO nanoparticles attached nanotubes show more ordering of graphene layers as compared to the others because of uniform dispersion of nanoparticles. It is investigated that, adopted route proved helpful to improve the structural properties of the nanotubes.

  1. Time-resolved analysis of particle emissions from residential biomass combustion - Emissions of refractory black carbon, PAHs and organic tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Ingeborg E.; Eriksson, Axel C.; Lindgren, Robert; Martinsson, Johan; Nyström, Robin; Nordin, Erik Z.; Sadiktsis, Ioannis; Boman, Christoffer; Nøjgaard, Jacob K.; Pagels, Joakim

    2017-09-01

    Time-resolved particle emissions from a conventional wood stove were investigated with aerosol mass spectrometry to provide links between combustion conditions, emission factors, mixing state of refractory black carbon and implications for organic tracer methods. The addition of a new batch of fuel results in low temperature pyrolysis as the fuel heats up, resulting in strong, short-lived, variable emission peaks of organic aerosol-containing markers of anhydrous sugars, such as levoglucosan (fragment at m/z 60). Flaming combustion results in emissions dominated by refractory black carbon co-emitted with minor fractions of organic aerosol and markers of anhydrous sugars. Full cycle emissions are an external mixture of larger organic aerosol-dominated and smaller thinly coated refractory black carbon particles. A very high burn rate results in increased full cycle mass emission factors of 66, 2.7, 2.8 and 1.3 for particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, refractory black carbon, total organic aerosol and m/z 60, respectively, compared to nominal burn rate. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are primarily associated with refractory black carbon-containing particles. We hypothesize that at very high burn rates, the central parts of the combustion zone become air starved, leading to a locally reduced combustion temperature that reduces the conversion rates from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to refractory black carbon. This facilitates a strong increase of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons emissions. At nominal burn rates, full cycle emissions based on m/z 60 correlate well with organic aerosol, refractory black carbon and particulate matter. However, at higher burn rates, m/z 60 does not correlate with increased emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, refractory black carbon and organic aerosol in the flaming phase. The new knowledge can be used to advance source apportionment studies, reduce emissions of genotoxic compounds and model the climate impacts of

  2. Potential role of carbon nanoparticles in protection of parathyroid glands in patients with papillary thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenbin; Zhu, Lijun; Xu, Guohui; Song, Yuntao; Li, Guojun; Zhang, Naisong

    2016-10-01

    As a novel type of lymphatic tracer, carbon nanoparticles (CNs) were reported not to stain parathyroid glands (PGs) into black, so it may have a clinical potential in protection of PGs during thyroidectomy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical application and significance of CN in protection of PGs from surrounding tissues.A total of 82 consecutive patients were enrolled into this study and were divided into CN group and control group. Parathyroid function (hypoparathyroidism and hypocalcemia) was evaluated.The identification rates of PGs (≤2) and PGs (≥3) were 24.4% and 75.6% in the CN group and 46.3% and 53.7% in the control group, respectively. The difference in the identification rates between the 2 groups was statistically significant (P = 0.038). Pathological results revealed 3 accidental PGs resection occurred in the CN group, whereas 9 accidental PGs removal occurred in the control group. The difference was statistically significant (P = 0.046). Moreover, the incidence of the patients with hypoparathyroidism was statistically significant between the 2 groups (36.6% in CN group vs 53.7% in control group, P = 0.043) at day 1, but not at day 7 (P = 0.424).CN may have a potential in protecting PGs clinically.

  3. Nickel nanoparticles embedded in carbon foam for improving electromagnetic shielding effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Kumari, Saroj; Dhakate, Sanjay R.

    2015-06-01

    To improve electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of light weight carbon foam (CF), magnetic nanoparticles were embedded in it during processing. The CF was developed from the coal tar pitch and mixture of coal tar pitch-Nickel (Ni) nanoparticles by sacrificial template technique and heat treated to up 1,000 °C. To ascertain the effect of Ni nanoparticles embedded in CF, it was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, vector network analyzer and vibration sample magnetometer. It is observed that Ni nanoparticles embedded in the carbon material play an important role for improving the structure and electrical conductivity of CF-Ni by catalytic carbonization. The structural investigation suggests that the Ni nanoparticles embedded in the carbon material in bulk as well on the surface of CF. The CF demonstrates excellent shielding response in the frequency range 8.2-12.4 GHz in which total shielding effectiveness (SE) dominated by absorption losses. The total SE is -25 and -61 dB of CF and CF-Ni, it is governed by absorption losses -48.5 dB in CF-Ni. This increase is due to the increase in dielectric and magnetic losses of ferromagnetic Ni nanoparticles with high surface area. Thus, light weight CF embedded with small amount of magnetic nanoparticles can be useful material for stealth technology.

  4. Nanoparticle Filtration in a RTM Processed Epoxy/Carbon Fiber Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Micham, Logan; Copa, Christine C.; Criss, James M., Jr.; Mintz, Eric A.

    2011-01-01

    Several epoxy matrix composite panels were fabricated by resin transfer molding (RTM) E862/W resin onto a triaxially braided carbon fiber pre-form. Nanoparticles including carbon nanofiber, synthetic clay, and functionalized graphite were dispersed in the E862 matrix, and the extent of particle filtration during processing was characterized. Nanoparticle dispersion in the resin flashing on both the inlet and outlet edges of the panel was compared by TEM. Variation in physical properties such as Tg and moisture absorption throughout the panel were also characterized. All nanoparticle filled panels showed a decrease in Tg along the resin flow path across the panel, indicating nanoparticle filtration, however there was little change in moisture absorption. This works illustrates the need to obtain good nano-particle dispersion in the matrix resin to prevent particle agglomeration and hence particle filtration in the resultant polymer matrix composites (PMC).

  5. Assembly of metal nanoparticle-carbon nanotube composite materials at the liquid/liquid interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang Yeol; Kim, Minjung; Hahn, Joeoong; Suh, Jung Sang; Lee, Inhyung; Kim, Kwan; Han, Sang Woo

    2006-02-14

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-mediated self-assembly of metal (Au and Ag) nanoparticles at the liquid/liquid interface in the form of a stable nanocomposite film is reported. The metallic luster results from the electronic coupling of nanoparticles, suggesting the formation of closely packed nanoparticle thin films. The interfacial film could be transferred to mica substrates and carbon-coated transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids. The transferred films were very stable for a prolonged time. The samples were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), TEM, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). SEM and TEM results show that the films formed at the liquid/liquid interface are indeed composite materials consisting of CNTs and nanoparticles. XPS measurements further indicate the presence of the interaction between nanoparticles and CNTs.

  6. Hybrid nanoparticle architecture for cellular uptake and bioimaging: direct crystallization of a polymer immobilized with magnetic nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depan, D; Misra, R D K

    2012-10-21

    We describe here the success of an innovative approach of direct immobilization of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) onto carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The approach involved functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles and consequent covalent linkage to a copolymer (PE-b-PEG). Next, the immobilized magnetic nanoparticles on the copolymer were directly crystallized on the long axis of CNTs, where the interfacial adhesion comes from electrostatic and van der Waals interaction. The intracellular trafficking of a hybrid nanoparticle system [(PE-b-PEG)-MNP-CNT-FITC] in HeLa cells was monitored using a fluorescent marker, FITC, conjugated to the nanoparticle system. The distribution of the nanoparticle system inside cells was studied by fluorescence microscopy in a time and dose dependent manner, and it was observed that the nanoparticles are located in the cytoplasm and no apparent cell death was observed at the concentration studied. Also, the effect of an externally applied magnetic field on actin cytoskeleton, cell morphology and intracellular uptake of iron was studied. The approach described here is promising for simultaneous imaging and monitoring intracellular uptake.

  7. Peculiarities of the initial stages of carbonization processes in polyimide-based nanocomposite films containing carbon nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Gofman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbonization of the polyimide-based composite films containing carbon nanoparticles, namely nanofibers and nanocones/disks, in the temperature range 500–550°C was studied and the kinetics of the initial stage of carbonization and the effect of the filler on the mechanical properties of the carbonized films were evaluated. Two polyimides (PIs characterized by different macrochains’ rigidity and different degrees of ordering of the intermolecular structure were used. The character of the nanofiller’s action on the kinetics of the carbonization process depends on the heating rate. In this work, the intensity of the destruction of the PI matrix of the composite films was shown to be slightly higher than that of films of the same polymers with no filler. The introduction of the carbon nanoparticles into both PIs provokes the increase in the ultimate deformation values of the partially carbonized films, while the carbonization of the unfilled PI films yields the brittle materials. The Young’s modulus values of the materials based on the rigid-rod PI do not increase after carbonization, while those for compositions based on the PI with semi-rigid chains increase substantially. Carbon nanocones/disks are characterized by the best compatibility with matrix PIs in comparison with carbon nanofibers.

  8. Effect of Cationic and Anionic Surfactants on the Application of Calcium Carbonate Nanoparticles in Paper Coating

    CERN Document Server

    Barhoum, Ahmed; Abou-Zaied, Ragab Esmail; Rehan, Mohamed; Dufour, Thierry; Hill, Gavin; Dufresne, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Modification of calcium carbonate particles with surfactant significantly improves the properties of the calcium carbonate coating on paper. Unmodified and CTAB and oleate-modified calcium carbonate nanoparticles were prepared using the wet carbonation technique for paper coating. CTAB (cationic surfactant) and sodium oleate (anionic surfactant) were used to modify the size, morphology, and surface properties of the precipitated nanoparticles. The obtained particles were characterized by XRD, FT-IR spectroscopy, zeta potential measurements, TGA and TEM. Coating colors were formulated from the prepared unmodified and modified calcium carbonates and examined by creating a thin coating layer on reference paper. The effect of calcium carbonate particle size and surface modification on paper properties, such as coating thickness, coating weight, surface roughness, air permeability, brightness, whiteness, opacity, and hydrophobicity, were investigated and compared with GCC calcium carbonate-coated papers. The obtai...

  9. Multiple-diffusion flame synthesis of pure anatase and carbon-coated titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Memon, Nasir

    2013-09-01

    A multi-element diffusion flame burner (MEDB) is useful in the study of flame synthesis of nanomaterials. Here, the growth of pure anatase and carbon-coated titanium dioxide (TiO2) using an MEDB is demonstrated. Hydrogen (H2), oxygen (O2), and argon (Ar) are utilized to establish the flame, whereas titanium tetraisopropoxide is used as the precursor for TiO2. The nanoparticles are characterized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, with elemental mapping (of C, O, and Ti), X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The growth of pure anatase TiO2 nanoparticles occurs when Ar and H2 are used as the precursor carrier gas, while the growth of carbon-coated nanoparticles ensues when Ar and ethylene (C2H4) are used as the precursor carrier gas. A uniform coating of 3-5nm of carbon is observed around TiO2 particles. The growth of highly crystalline TiO2 nanoparticles is dependent on the gas flow rate of the precursor carrier and amorphous particles are observed at high flow rates. Carbon coating occurs only on crystalline nanoparticles, suggesting a possible growth mechanism of carbon-coated TiO2 nanoparticles. © 2013 The Combustion Institute.

  10. Hydrogen and Carbon Black Production from the Degradation of Methane by Thermal Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Cottet

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Methane gas (CH4 is the main inducer of the so called greenhouse gases effect. Recent scientific research aims to minimize the accumulation of this gas in the atmosphere and to develop processes capable of producing stable materials with added value. Thermal plasma technology is a promising alternative to these applications, since it allows obtaining H2 and solid carbon from CH4, without the parallel formation of byproducts such as CO2 and NOx. In this work, CH4 was degraded by thermal plasma in order to produce hydrogen (H2 and carbon black. The degradation efficiency of CH4, selectivity for H2 production as well as the characterization of carbon black were studied. The best results were obtained in the CH4 flow rate of 5 L min-1 the degradation percentage and the selectivity for H2 production reached 98.8 % and 48.4 %, respectively. At flow rates of less than 5 L min-1 the selectivity for H2 production increases and reaches 91.9 %. The carbon black has obtained amorphous with hydrophobic characteristics and can be marketed to be used in composite material, and can also be activated chemically and/or physically and used as adsorbent material.

  11. Black carbon fractal morphology and short-wave radiative impact: a modelling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kahnert

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the impact of the morphological properties of freshly emitted black carbon aerosols on optical properties and on radiative forcing. To this end, we model the optical properties of fractal black carbon aggregates by use of numerically exact solutions to Maxwell's equations within a spectral range from the UVC to the mid-IR. The results are coupled to radiative transfer computations, in which we consider six realistic case studies representing different atmospheric pollution conditions and surface albedos. The spectrally integrated radiative impacts of black carbon are compared for two different fractal morphologies, which brace the range of recently reported experimental observations of black carbon fractal structures. We also gauge our results by performing corresponding calculations based on the homogeneous sphere approximation, which is commonly employed in climate models. We find that at top of atmosphere the aggregate models yield radiative impacts that can be as much as 2 times higher than those based on the homogeneous sphere approximation. An aggregate model with a low fractal dimension can predict a radiative impact that is higher than that obtained with a high fractal dimension by a factor ranging between 1.1–1.6. Although the lower end of this scale seems like a rather small effect, a closer analysis reveals that the single scattering optical properties of more compact and more lacy aggregates differ considerably. In radiative flux computations there can be a partial cancellation due to the opposing effects of differences in the optical cross sections and asymmetry parameters. However, this cancellation effect can strongly depend on atmospheric conditions and is therefore quite unpredictable. We conclude that the fractal morphology of black carbon aerosols and their fractal parameters can have a profound impact on their radiative forcing effect, and that the use of the homogeneous sphere model introduces unacceptably

  12. Carbon nanoparticle doped micro-patternable nano-composites for wearable sensing applications (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, Ajit

    2017-04-01

    This talk focuses on preparation, characterization and micropatterning of electrically conducting KETJENBLACK carbon black nanoparticle (80 nm-diameter) doped Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) by employing extrusion mixing. Previously, we had reported fabrication of various micropatternable nanocomposites for wearable sensing applications vis solvent assisted ultrasonic mixing technique[1-16] . Extrusion mixing has an advantage as no organic solvents are used and homogenous dispersion of carbon nanoparticles is observed, which is confirmed by SEM analysis. The developed nanocomposite can be micropatterened using standard microfabrication techniques. It is also observed that percolation threshold occurs at 0.51 wt% of carbon nanoparticles in polymer matrix. Examples of developed nano-composites for wearable sensing applications for precision medicine will also be discussed. References: 1.http://summit.sfu.ca/item/12017 A. Khosla. Micropatternable multifunctional nanocomposite polymers for flexible soft MEMS applications. Diss. Applied Science: School of Engineering Science, 2011. 2. A. Khosla ; B. L. Gray; Fabrication of multiwalled carbon nanotube polydimethylsiloxne nanocomposite polymer flexible microelectrodes for microfluidics and MEMS. Proc. SPIE 7642, Electroactive Polymer Actuators and Devices (EAPAD) 2010, 76421V (April 09, 2010); doi:10.1117/12.847292. 3. Ang Li ; Ajit Khosla ; Connie Drewbrook ; Bonnie L. Gray; Fabrication and testing of thermally responsive hydrogel-based actuators using polymer heater elements for flexible microvalves. Proc. SPIE 7929, Microfluidics, BioMEMS, and Medical Microsystems IX, 79290G (February 14, 2011); doi:10.1117/12.873197. 4. Khosla, A. and Gray, B. L. (2010), Preparation, Micro-Patterning and Electrical Characterization of Functionalized Carbon-Nanotube Polydimethylsiloxane Nanocomposite Polymer. Macromol. Symp., 297: 210-218. doi:10.1002/masy.200900165 5. A. Khosla ; D. Hilbich ; C. Drewbrook ; D. Chung ; B. L. Gray; Large

  13. Abundance, distribution, and isotopic composition of particulate black carbon in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weifeng; Guo, Laodong

    2014-11-01

    There exists increasing evidence supporting the important role of black carbon in global carbon cycles. Particulate black carbon (PBC) is allochthonous and has distinct reactivities compared to the bulk particulate organic carbon (tot-POC) in marine environments. However, the abundance, geochemical behavior of PBC and its importance in oceanic carbon budget remain poorly understood. Here we report the abundance, distribution, and stable isotopic signatures of BC derived from the chemo-thermal oxidation (CTO-375) method (BCCTO) in the Gulf of Mexico. Our results show that BCCTO abundance decreased from shelf to basin, and more than a half of riverine BCCTO could be removed over the shelf. Moreover, BCCTO is much more refractory compared to the tot-POC and has δ13C values lower than those of BC-excluded POC. These results highlight the significance of PBC in marine carbon cycles and potentially suggest the need for a new end-member term in quantifying POC sources in the ocean.

  14. Carbon nanoparticles downregulate expression of basic fibroblast growth factor in the heart during embryogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Sawosz, Ewa; Grodzik, Marta;

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanoparticles, with their high biocompatibility and low toxicity, have recently been considered for biomedical applications, including antiangiogenic therapy. Critical to normal development and tumor formation, angiogenesis is the process of forming capillary blood vessels from preexisting...... vessels. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of diamond and graphite nanoparticles on the development of chicken embryos, as well as vascularization of the chorioallantoic membrane and heart at the morphological and molecular level. Nanoparticles did not affect either body/heart weight or serum...... indices of the embryos' health. However, vascularization of the heart and the density of branched vessels were significantly reduced after treatment with diamond nanoparticles and, to a lesser extent, graphite nanoparticles. Application of nanoparticles significantly downregulated gene and protein...

  15. Capillary electrophoretic study of green fluorescent hollow carbon nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lizhen; Feng, Feng; Hu, Qin; Paau, Man Chin; Liu, Yang; Chen, Zezhong; Bai, Yunfeng; Guo, Fangfang; Choi, Martin M F

    2015-09-01

    CE coupled with laser-induced fluorescence and UV absorption detections has been applied to study the complexity of as-synthesized green fluorescent hollow carbon nanoparticles (HC-NP) samples. The effects of pH, type, and concentration of the run buffer and SDS on the separation of HC-NP are studied in detail. It is observed that phosphate run buffer is more effective in separating the HC-NP and the optimal run buffer is found to be 30 mM phosphate and 10 mM SDS at pH 9.0. The CE separation of this HC-NP is based on the difference in size and electrophoretic mobility of HC-NP. Some selected HC-NP fractions are collected and further characterized by UV-visible absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, MS, and transmission electron microscopy. The fractionated HC-NP show profound differences in absorption, emission characteristics, and PL quantum yield that would have been otherwise misled by studying the complex mixture alone. It is anticipated that our CE methodology will open a new initiative on extensive studies of individual HC-NP species in the biomedical, catalysis, electronic, and optical device, energy storage, material, and sensing field.

  16. Cytocompatibility of amine functionalized carbon nanoparticles grafted on polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žáková, Pavlína; Slepičková Kasálková, Nikola; Kolská, Zdeňka; Leitner, Jindřich; Karpíšková, Jana; Stibor, Ivan; Slepička, Petr; Švorčík, Václav

    2016-03-01

    Five types of amide-amine Carbon Nano-Particles (CNPs) were prepared by functionalization of CNPs and characterized by several analytical methods. The successful grafting of amines on CNPs was verified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), organic elemental analysis and electrokinetic analysis. The size and morphology of CNPs were determined from transmission electron microscopy. The surface area and porosity of CNPs were examined by adsorption and desorption isotherms. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to investigate thermal stability of CNPs. The amount of bonded amine depends on its dimensionality arrangement. Surface area and pore volumes of CNPs decrease several times after individual amino-compound grafting. Selected types of functionalized CNPs were grafted onto a plasma activated surface of HDPE. The successful grafting of CNPs on the polymer surface was verified by XPS. Wettability was determined by contact angle measurements. Surface morphology and roughness were studied by atomic force microscopy. A dramatic decrease of contact angle and surface morphology was observed on CNP grafted polymer surface. Cytocompatibility of modified surfaces was studied in vitro, by determination of adhesion, proliferation and viability of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Grafting of CNPs onto the polymer surface has a positive effect on the adhesion, proliferation and viability of VSMCs.

  17. Cytocompatibility of amine functionalized carbon nanoparticles grafted on polyethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Žáková, Pavlína, E-mail: pavlina.zakova@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, University of Chemistry and Technology, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Slepičková Kasálková, Nikola [Department of Solid State Engineering, University of Chemistry and Technology, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Kolská, Zdeňka [Faculty of Science, J. E. Purkyně University, Ústí nad Labem (Czech Republic); Leitner, Jindřich [Department of Solid State Engineering, University of Chemistry and Technology, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Karpíšková, Jana; Stibor, Ivan [Institute for Nanomaterials, Advanced Technologies and Innovation, Technical University of Liberec (Czech Republic); Slepička, Petr; Švorčík, Václav [Department of Solid State Engineering, University of Chemistry and Technology, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2016-03-01

    Five types of amide–amine Carbon Nano-Particles (CNPs) were prepared by functionalization of CNPs and characterized by several analytical methods. The successful grafting of amines on CNPs was verified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), organic elemental analysis and electrokinetic analysis. The size and morphology of CNPs were determined from transmission electron microscopy. The surface area and porosity of CNPs were examined by adsorption and desorption isotherms. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to investigate thermal stability of CNPs. The amount of bonded amine depends on its dimensionality arrangement. Surface area and pore volumes of CNPs decrease several times after individual amino-compound grafting. Selected types of functionalized CNPs were grafted onto a plasma activated surface of HDPE. The successful grafting of CNPs on the polymer surface was verified by XPS. Wettability was determined by contact angle measurements. Surface morphology and roughness were studied by atomic force microscopy. A dramatic decrease of contact angle and surface morphology was observed on CNP grafted polymer surface. Cytocompatibility of modified surfaces was studied in vitro, by determination of adhesion, proliferation and viability of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Grafting of CNPs onto the polymer surface has a positive effect on the adhesion, proliferation and viability of VSMCs. - Highlights: • Amine functionalized CNPs were successfully grafted on HDPE surface. • Significant change to the positive zeta potential for grafted CNPs was induced. • Grafting of CNPs significantly enhanced cell cytocompatibility and viability. • Homogeneous distribution of cells with correct size was achieved.

  18. Conductive additive content balance in Li-ion battery cathodes: Commercial carbon blacks vs. in situ carbon from LiFePO{sub 4}/C composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomares, Veronica; Goni, Aintzane; Muro, Izaskun Gil de; Rojo, Teofilo [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad del Pais Vasco UPV/EHU, P.O. Box. 644, 48080, Bilbao (Spain); de Meatza, Iratxe; Bengoechea, Miguel [Energy Department, CIDETEC-IK4, P Miramon 196, Parque Tecnologico de San Sebastian, 20009, San Sebastian (Spain); Cantero, Igor [Departamento I+D+i Nuevas Tecnologias, CEGASA, Artapadura, 11, 01013 Vitoria-Gasteiz (Spain)

    2010-11-15

    Two samples of commercial conducting carbon black and the carbon generated in situ during LiFePO{sub 4}/C composite synthesis from citric acid are studied, with the aim of finding out whether carbon from the composite can fulfil the same function as carbon black in the electrode blend for a Li-ion battery. For this purpose, the carbon samples are analyzed by several techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, granulometry, BET specific area and conductivity measurements. Different cathode compositions and component proportions are tested for pellet and cast electrodes. Electrochemical results show that a moderate reduction of commercial carbon black content in both kinds of cathodes, by adding more LiFePO{sub 4}/C composite, enhanced the electrochemical behaviour by around 10%. In situ generated carbon can partially replace commercial conducting carbon black because its high specific surface probably enhances electrolyte penetration into the cathode, but it is always necessary to maintain a minimum amount of carbon black that provides better conductivity in order to obtain a good electrochemical response. (author)

  19. An Investigation of the Effects of Black Carbon on Precipitation in the Western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Hsien-Liang Rose

    Black carbon (BC), the byproduct of incomplete combustion, is considered to be the second most important anthropogenic climate forcing agent after carbon dioxide. BC warms the atmosphere by absorbing solar radiation (direct effect), alters cloud and precipitation formation by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (indirect effect), and modifies cloud distribution via cloud burn-off (semi-direct effect). Currently, there are large discrepancies in general circulation model estimates of the influence of BC on precipitation. Even less known is how BC changes precipitation on regional scales. In the drought-stricken western United States (WUS), where BC emissions are known to affect the hydrological cycle, an investigation on how BC influences precipitation is warranted. In this study, we employ the Weather Research and Forecasting-Chemistry (WRF Chem) model (version 3.6.0) with the newly chemistry- and microphysics-coupled Fu-Liou-Gu radiation scheme to study how black carbon affects precipitation by separating BC-related effects into direct and semi-direct, and indirect effects. In this three-part study, we use a recent wet year (2005) to investigate black carbon effects. We first examine BC effects during a heavy wintertime heavy precipitation event (7-11 January 2005), a heavy summertime precipitation week for comparison to the wintertime event (20-24 July 2005), and finally, examine these same effects for the months of January to June 2005 to investigate month-long trends. We find that BC suppresses precipitation, predominantly through its direct and semi-direct effects. The direct and semi-direct effects warm the air aloft, and cool the lower levels of the atmosphere (surface dimming) through the reduction of downward shortwave radiation flux at the surface. These changes in vertical temperature increase the stability of the atmosphere and reduce convective precipitation. Convective precipitation reduction accounts for approximately 60 75% of the total

  20. Nucleation and aggregative growth of palladium nanoparticles on carbon electrodes: Experiment and kinetic model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Yang-Rae; Lai, Stanley C.S.; McKelvey, Kim; Zhang, Guohui; Perry, David; Miller, Thomas S.; Unwin, Patrick R.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism and kinetics of the electrochemical nucleation and growth of palladium (Pd) nanoparticles (NPs) on carbon electrodes have been investigated using a microscale meniscus cell on both highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and a carbon-coated transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grid

  1. High performance silicon nanoparticle anode in fluoroethylene carbonate-based electrolyte for Li-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yong-Mao; Klavetter, Kyle C; Abel, Paul R; Davy, Nicholas C; Snider, Jonathan L; Heller, Adam; Mullins, C Buddie

    2012-07-25

    Electrodes composed of silicon nanoparticles (SiNP) were prepared by slurry casting and then electrochemically tested in a fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC)-based electrolyte. The capacity retention after cycling was significantly improved compared to electrodes cycled in a traditional ethylene carbonate (EC)-based electrolyte.

  2. Thermal Conversion of Pine Wood Char to Carbon Nanomaterials in the Presence of Iron Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung Phil Mun; Zhiyong Cai; Fumiya Watanabe; Umesh P. Agarwal; Jilei. Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Southern yellow pine (Pinus taeda) wood char powder was thermally treated at 1,000:C in the presence of a 25-nm-size Fe nanoparticle catalyst. The thermally treated carbon materials were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Well-aligned graphitic carbon structures with 15 to 17 layers on...

  3. Effective photocatalysis of functional nanocomposites based on carbon and TiO2 nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chan; Song, Yang; Cao, Lixin; Chen, Shaowei

    2013-06-07

    A unique nanocomposite C-TiO2 was prepared by the growth of TiO2 on carbon nanoparticles using a simple hydrothermal procedure. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) measurements showed that the nanocomposites exhibited an average core diameter of approximately 5 nm with a rather well-defined lattice space (0.4 nm) that was somewhat larger than that (0.38 nm) of the (100) crystalline planes of anatase TiO2. This lattice expansion was accounted for by the formation of surface defect dipoles of the nanosized TiO2 particles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) measurements suggested that partial charge transfer occurred from carbon nanoparticles to TiO2 by the interfacial Ti-O-C linkages, which led to effective diminishment of the C-TiO2 photoluminescence as compared to that of pure TiO2 or carbon nanoparticles, suggesting intimate electronic interactions between the carbon and TiO2 components in the nanocomposites. Such unique characteristics were then exploited for the effective photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutants, as exemplified by methylene blue, by C-TiO2 under UV photoirradiation. Experimental measurements showed that the photocatalytic activity of C-TiO2 nanocomposites was about twice that of TiO2 alone, whereas little activity was observed with carbon nanoparticles. This was attributed to the electron-accepting sites on the carbon nanoparticles that facilitated interfacial charge separation.

  4. Thermoplastics Reinforced with Self-Welded Short Carbon Fibers: Nanoparticle-Promoted Structural Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongge; Liu, Yaohua; Lin, Yu; Wu, Guozhang

    2016-07-27

    The large volume of currently available fiber-reinforced polymer composites critically limits the intrinsic versatility of fibers such as high mechanical strength, heat resistance, and excellent thermal/electrical conductivity. We proposed a facile and widely applicable strategy to promote self-organization of randomly dispersed short carbon fibers (CFs) into a three-dimensionally continuous scaffold. The morphological evolution and structural reinforcement of the self-welded CF-polyamide 6 (PA6) scaffold in polystyrene (PS) matrix were investigated, with carbon black (CB) or titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) selectively localized in the PA6 domains. Surprisingly, all of the PA6 droplets once dispersed in the PS matrix can migrate and evenly encapsulate onto the CF surface when 5.8 wt % CB is incorporated, whereas in the TiO2-filled system, the PA6 droplets preferentially segregate at the junction point of CFs to fasten the self-welded CF structure. In addition, a remarkable increase in the interfacial adhesive work between PA6 and CF was observed only when TiO2 is added, and a loading of even less than 0.8 wt % can effectively abruptly strengthen the self-welded CF scaffold. We clarified that the structural evolution is promoted by the nature of self-agglomeration of NPs. CB is highly capable of self-networking in the PA6 domain, resulting in high encapsulation of PA6, although the capillary force for preferential segregation of PA6 at the junction point of CFs is reduced. By contrast, the TiO2 particles tend to form compact aggregates. Such an agglomeration pattern, together with enhanced interfacial affinity, must contribute to a strong capillary force for the preferential segregation of PA6.

  5. Seasonality of Black Carbon over the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spak, S. N.; Holloway, T.

    2006-12-01

    We employ a 2001 annual simulation with the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model to identify patterns in the mass concentration and aerosol fraction of elemental carbon in the Upper Midwestern United States. CMAQ 4.3 is run at 36 km resolution using the 2001 EPA Clean Air Interstate Rule emissions inventory, MM5 meteorology, and boundary conditions from the MOZART global atmospheric chemistry model. Results are compared to daily-average surface observations from the IMPROVE and EPA Speciation Trends networks. Effects of CMAQ model configuration (plume-in-grid dispersion, advection scheme, sectional PM) are compared, identifying common findings and model-dependent features.

  6. Low temperature synthesis of fibres composed of carbon-nickel nanoparticles in super-critical carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasumura, Takashi; Fukuda, Takahiro; Whitby, Raymond L. D.; Aschenbrenner, Ortrud; Maekawa, Toru

    2010-06-01

    We show that fibres composed of carbon-nickel nanoparticles are self-assembled by mixing nickelocene and oxygen with super-critical carbon dioxide in a dc electric field. The fibres grow in the direction of the electric field and the growth rate increases with an increase in the strength of the electric field. We also irradiate the fibres with electron beams and find that crystallized nickel particles are captured by carbon particles. The present result suggests that a low temperature method of creating carbon-metal hybrid nanostructures may be developed by mixing metallocene and trigger molecules with super-critical fluids subjected to a dc electric field.

  7. Effect of vulcanization system and carbon black on mechanical and swelling properties of EPDM blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesty Eka Mayasari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available EPDM (Ethylene propylene diene monomer is one of synthetic rubber that widely used in automotive. It must be vulcanized and added by other materials before used. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of vulcanization system and the addition of carbon black (CB to the mechanical properties and swelling characteristic of EPDM. This research used three vulcanization system, conventional vulcanization (CV, efficient vulcanization (EV and semi-efficient vulcanization (SEV with the variation of carbon black 50, 60, 70 phr (per hundred resin. This research showed that EV system resulted faster vulcanization time and lower delta torque than SEV and CV systems. This system also performed the highest tensile strength, elongation, and tear strength, while SEV system resulted the highest hardness. Furthermore, the conventional vulcanization system resulted the lowest swelling index.

  8. NANOMECHANICAL MAPPING OF CARBON BLACK REINFORCED NATURAL RUBBER BY ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Toshio Nishi; Hideyuki Nukaga; So Fujinami; Ken Nakajima

    2007-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has the advantage of obtaining mechanical properties as well as topographic information at the same time. By analyzing force-distance curves measured over two-dimensional area using Hertzian contact mechanics, Young's modulus mapping was obtained with nanometer-scale resolution. Furthermore, the sample deformation by the force exerted was also estimated from the force-distance curve analyses. We could thus reconstruct a real topographic image by incorporating apparent topographic image with deformation image. We applied this method to carbon black reinforced natural rubber to obtain Young's modulus distribution image together with reconstructed real topographic image.Then we were able to recognize three regions; rubber matrix, carbon black (or bound rubber) and intermediate regions.Though the existence of these regions had been investigated by pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance, this paper would be the first to report on the quantitative evaluation of the interfacial region in real space.

  9. Human lung epithelial cell A549 proteome data after treatment with titanium dioxide and carbon black.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Ngoc Q; Goegan, Patrick; Mohottalage, Susantha; Breznan, Dalibor; Ariganello, Marianne; Williams, Andrew; Elisma, Fred; Karthikeyan, Subramanian; Vincent, Renaud; Kumarathasan, Premkumari

    2016-09-01

    Here, we have described the dataset relevant to the A549 cellular proteome changes after exposure to either titanium dioxide or carbon black particles as compared to the non-exposed controls, "Proteomic changes in human lung epithelial cells (A549) in response to carbon black and titanium dioxide exposures" (Vuong et al., 2016) [1]. Detailed methodologies on the separation of cellular proteins by 2D-GE and the subsequent mass spectrometry analyses using MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS are documented. Particle exposure-specific protein expression changes were measured via 2D-GE spot volume analysis. Protein identification was done by querying mass spectrometry data against SwissProt and RefSeq protein databases using Mascot search engine. Two-way ANOVA analysis data provided information on statistically significant A549 protein expression changes associated with particle exposures.

  10. Preparation of Waterborne Nanoscale Carbon Black Dispersion with Sodium Carboxymethyl Cellulose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Xia; FANG Kuan-jun

    2006-01-01

    Waterborne nanoscale carbon black dispersion (NCBD) was widely used in inkjet printing, spun-dyeing fibers and coloration fabrics. In this paper, NCBD was prepared using sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) as dispersant.Effects of CMC viscosity, ultrasonic time and oxidation with hydrogen peroxide on carbon black (CB) particle size were discussed. The results showed that CB particle size decreased by mechanical agitation while it increased by ultrasonic with the increase of CMC viscosity. Ultrasonic is a more effective method to disperse CB particles than that of mechanical agitation. CB particle size obviously decreased with increasing ultrasonic time and arrived at about 160 nm for 60 min. In addition, oxidation with 2 mol/L of H2O2 and 0.2 wt% of CMC300 reduced CB particle size to 160 nm at 90℃ for 2.5 h.

  11. Modulation of snow reflectance and snowmelt from Central Asian glaciers by anthropogenic black carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, Julia; Flanner, Mark; Kang, Shichang; Sprenger, Michael; Zhang, Qianggong; Guo, Junming; Li, Yang; Schwikowski, Margit; Farinotti, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Deposited mineral dust and black carbon are known to reduce the albedo of snow and enhance melt. Here we estimate the contribution of anthropogenic black carbon (BC) to snowmelt in glacier accumulation zones of Central Asia based on in-situ measurements and modelling. Source apportionment suggests that more than 94% of the BC is emitted from mostly regional anthropogenic sources while the remaining contribution comes from natural biomass burning. Even though the annual deposition flux of mineral dust can be up to 20 times higher than that of BC, we find that anthropogenic BC causes the majority (60% on average) of snow darkening. This leads to summer snowmelt rate increases of up to 6.3% (7 cm a‑1) on glaciers in three different mountain environments in Kyrgyzstan, based on albedo reduction and snowmelt models.

  12. Implications of multiple scattering on the assessment of black carbon aerosol radiative forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Vijayakumar S.; Suresh Babu, S.; Krishna Moorthy, K.; Satheesh, S. K.

    2014-11-01

    The effects of radiative coupling between scattering and absorbing aerosols, in an external mixture, on the aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) due to black carbon (BC), its sensitivity to the composite aerosol loading and composition, and surface reflectance are investigated using radiative transfer model simulations. The ARF due to BC is found to depend significantly on the optical properties of the ‘neighboring’ (non-BC) aerosol species. The scattering due to these species significantly increases the top of the atmospheric warming due to black carbon aerosols, and significant changes in the radiative forcing efficiency of BC. This is especially significant over dark surfaces (such as oceans), despite the ARF due to BC being higher over snow and land-surfaces. The spatial heterogeneity of this effect (coupling or multiple scattering by neighboring aerosol species) imposes large uncertainty in the estimation ARF due to BC aerosols, especially over the oceans.

  13. Human lung epithelial cell A549 proteome data after treatment with titanium dioxide and carbon black

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngoc Q. Vuong

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Here, we have described the dataset relevant to the A549 cellular proteome changes after exposure to either titanium dioxide or carbon black particles as compared to the non-exposed controls, “Proteomic changes in human lung epithelial cells (A549 in response to carbon black and titanium dioxide exposures” (Vuong et al., 2016 [1]. Detailed methodologies on the separation of cellular proteins by 2D-GE and the subsequent mass spectrometry analyses using MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS are documented. Particle exposure-specific protein expression changes were measured via 2D-GE spot volume analysis. Protein identification was done by querying mass spectrometry data against SwissProt and RefSeq protein databases using Mascot search engine. Two-way ANOVA analysis data provided information on statistically significant A549 protein expression changes associated with particle exposures.

  14. Current Situation and Prospect of White Carbon Black Industry in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Chunyu

    2011-01-01

    1.Analysis of Market Operation in 2010 Year 2010 is the ending year of the "11th Five-Year Plan".Under the effect of a series of central government policies including coping with the international financial crisis,accelerating the transformation of economic development pattern and economic restructuring,and promoting steady and rapid development of economy,the situation is basically established that industrial economy operation changes from turnaround to steady growth,and industrial economy develops steadily and rapidly.This can be shown in the white carbon black industry,through the whole year,white carbon black industry maintains steady and rapid development,and the output of which has grown greatly compared with last year.

  15. Distribution of black carbon in Ponderosa pine litter and soils following the High Park wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, C. M.; Haddix, M.; Paustian, K.; Cotrufo, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    Black carbon (BC), the heterogeneous product of burned biomass, is a critical component in the global carbon cycle, yet timescales and mechanisms for incorporation into the soil profile are not well understood. The High Park Fire, which took place in northwestern Colorado in the summer of 2012, provided an opportunity to study the effects of both fire intenstiy and geomorphology on properties of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and BC in the Cache La Poudre River drainage. We sampled montane Ponderosa pine litter, 0-5 cm soils, and 5-15 cm soils four months post-fire in order to examine the effects of slope and burn intensity on %C, C stocks, %N and black carbon (g kg-1 C, and g m-2). We developed and implemented the benzene polycarboxylic acid (BPCA) method for quantifying BC. With regard to slope, we found that steeper slopes had higher C : N than shallow slopes, but that there was no difference in black carbon content or stocks. BC content was greatest in the litter in burned sites (19 g kg-1 C), while BC stocks were greatest in the 5-15 cm subsurface soils (23 g m-2). At the time of sampling, none of the BC deposited on the land surface post-fire had been incorporated into to either the 0-5 cm or 5-15 cm soil layers. The ratio of B5CA : B6CA (less condensed to more condensed BC) indicated there was significantly more older, more processed BC at depth. Total BC soil stocks were relatively low compared to other fire-prone grassland and boreal forest systems, indicating most of the BC produced in this system is likely transported off the surface through erosion events. Future work examining mechanisms for BC transport will be required for understanding the role BC plays in the global carbon cycle.

  16. Distribution of black carbon in Ponderosa pine litter and soils following the High Park wildfire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Boot

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Black carbon (BC, the heterogeneous product of burned biomass, is a critical component in the global carbon cycle, yet timescales and mechanisms for incorporation into the soil profile are not well understood. The High Park Fire, which took place in northwestern Colorado in the summer of 2012, provided an opportunity to study the effects of both fire intenstiy and geomorphology on properties of carbon (C, nitrogen (N, and BC in the Cache La Poudre River drainage. We sampled montane Ponderosa pine litter, 0–5 cm soils, and 5–15 cm soils four months post-fire in order to examine the effects of slope and burn intensity on %C, C stocks, %N and black carbon (g kg−1 C, and g m−2. We developed and implemented the benzene polycarboxylic acid (BPCA method for quantifying BC. With regard to slope, we found that steeper slopes had higher C : N than shallow slopes, but that there was no difference in black carbon content or stocks. BC content was greatest in the litter in burned sites (19 g kg−1 C, while BC stocks were greatest in the 5–15 cm subsurface soils (23 g m−2. At the time of sampling, none of the BC deposited on the land surface post-fire had been incorporated into to either the 0–5 cm or 5–15 cm soil layers. The ratio of B5CA : B6CA (less condensed to more condensed BC indicated there was significantly more older, more processed BC at depth. Total BC soil stocks were relatively low compared to other fire-prone grassland and boreal forest systems, indicating most of the BC produced in this system is likely transported off the surface through erosion events. Future work examining mechanisms for BC transport will be required for understanding the role BC plays in the global carbon cycle.

  17. Comparison of structural health assessment capabilities in epoxy – carbon black and epoxy – carbon nanotube nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Inam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel method for comparing structural health of different types of brittle epoxy nanocomposites filled with carbon nanostructured fillers is presented. Epoxy – 0.2 vol% carbon black (CB and epoxy – 0.2 vol% carbon nanotube (CNT nanocomposite bars were prepared by calendering and thermal curing. Nanocomposite bars were subjected to Vickers diamond indentation to produce sub-surface damage. Electrical conductivities were analysed by 4-point method to estimate the structural damage caused by indentation. For comprehensive comparison, fracture toughness and percolation threshold were analysed as well. Because of the systematically induced indentation damage, a sharp decrease of 89% was observed in the electrical conductivity of epoxy – CNT nanocomposite as compared to 25% in the electrical conductivity of epoxy – CB nanocomposite. CNTs impart superior damage sensing capability in brittle nanocomposite structures, in comparison to CB, due to their high aspect ratio (fibrous nature and high electrical conductivity.

  18. Black carbon mixing state impacts on cloud microphysical properties: effects of aerosol plume and environmental conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ching, Ping Pui; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew

    2016-05-27

    Black carbon (BC) is usually mixed with other aerosol species within individual aerosol particles. This mixture, along with the particles' size and morphology, determines the particles' optical and cloud condensation nuclei properties, and hence black carbon's climate impacts. In this study the particle-resolved aerosol model PartMC-MOSAIC was used to quantify the importance of black carbon mixing state for predicting cloud microphysical quantities. Based on a set of about 100 cloud parcel simulations a process level analysis framework was developed to attribute the response in cloud microphysical properties to changes in the underlying aerosol population ("plume effect") and the cloud parcel cooling rate ("parcel effect"). It shows that the response of cloud droplet number concentration to changes in BC emissions depends on the BC mixing state. When the aerosol population contains mainly aged BC particles an increase in BC emission results in increasing cloud droplet number concentrations ("additive effect"). In contrast, when the aerosol population contains mainly fresh BC particles they act as sinks for condensable gaseous species, resulting in a decrease in cloud droplet number concentration as BC emissions are increased ("competition effect"). Additionally, we quantified the error in cloud microphysical quantities when neglecting the information on BC mixing state, which is often done in aerosol models. The errors ranged from -12% to +45% for the cloud droplet number fraction, from 0% to +1022% for the nucleation-scavenged black carbon (BC) mass fraction, from -12% to +4% for the effective radius, and from -30% to +60% for the relative dispersion.

  19. Climate effects of black carbon and the emission reduction for mitigating climate change /

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yangyang

    2014-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosols are significant contributors to anthropogenic climate change and are considered as the second largest warming agent only after CO₂. To better quantify the present-day Asian BC aerosol forcing, in Chapter 2 we utilize both a top-down approach using ground -based and satellite observations, as well as a bottom-up approach using a latest global climate model. By comparing the observations with the model simulations, we show that the emission inventory over Asia used in...

  20. Adsorption Behavior of Black Carbon for Radioactive Iodine Species in Subsurface Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choung, S.; Kim, M.; Um, W.

    2012-12-01

    Releases of radioactive iodines (125/129/131I) into subsurface environments occur during nuclear power plant operations, nuclear weapons tests, and nuclear accidents such as Chernobyl and Fukushima. Environmental concern is mostly for 129I due to high toxicity and long-half life, t1/2=1,600,000 years. The fate and transport of radioactive iodines depend on the speciation in the environments. Sorption of iodate (IO3-) is strongly affected by natural organic matter (NOM) in soil/sediments, while iodide (I-) sorption is less. Although there are numerous forms and compositions of NOM in soil/sediments, previous studies were mostly focused on general organic matter such as humic and fulvic acids. The objective of this study is addressed to evaluate the impact of black carbon as different NOM forms in subsurface environments. Laboratory-produced wood char was used as a representative of black carbon for sorption batch experiments. Commercial humic acid was added to experiments for comparison of iodine sorption behavior to black carbon material. Stable iodine isotope, 127I, was used as a surrogate of radioactive iodine. The 13C-NMR analyses indicated that the wood char consisted of dominantly aromatic chemical structures, while the humic acid exhibited relatively more aliphatic structures than aromaticity. The char and humic acid significantly increased iodide and iodate sorption, respectively. However, iodate sorption on char and iodide sorption on humic acid were negligible in this study. These observations implied different sorption mechanisms between black carbon and humic acid due to different pore structures and chemical compositions. Both of sorption isotherms are dependent on aqueous concentrations, following Freundlich isotherm with n~0.7. The sorption behavior and mechanism of iodine is significantly influenced by the NOM types in soils and sediments, which can enhance iodine retardation in the subsurface environment.

  1. Modelling black spruce primary production and carbon allocation in the Quebec boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennaretti, Fabio; Guiot, Joel; Berninger, Frank; Boucher, Etienne; Gea-Izquierdo, Guillermo

    2017-04-01

    Boreal ecosystems are crucial carbon stores that must be urgently quantified and preserved. Their future evolution is extremely important for the global carbon budget. Here, we will show the progresses achieved with the MAIDEN forest ecophysiological model in simulating carbon fluxes of black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.) forests, the most representative ecosystem of the North American boreal biome. Starting from daily minimum-maximum air temperature, precipitation and CO2 atmospheric concentration, MAIDEN models the phenological (5 phenological phases are simulated each year) and meteorological controls on gross primary production (GPP) and carbon allocation to stem. The model is being calibrated on eddy covariance and tree-ring data. We will discuss the model's performance and the modifications introduced in MAIDEN to adapt the model to temperature sensitive forests of the boreal region.

  2. Iron and ruthenium nanoparticles in carbon prepared by thermolysis of buckymetallocenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakae, Takahiro; Matsuo, Yutaka; Takagi, Masatoshi; Sato, Yuta; Suenaga, Kazu; Nakamura, Eiichi

    2009-03-02

    Thermolysis of fullerene iron and ruthenium complexes (buckymetallocene M(C(60)R(5))Cp (M = Fe; R = Ph (1) and Me (2), M = Ru; R = Ph (3), Me (4)) under a nitrogen atmosphere produced metal nanoparticles dispersed in carbon materials. The thermal degradation processes of the buckymetallocenes were studied by TG-DTA, TEM with a heating sample stage, and VT-XRD. Variation of the thermolysis temperature led to a change in the size of the nanoparticles and the morphology of the carbon materials. Thermolysis of buckyferrocene at 700 degrees C gave highly dispersed iron nanoparticles (average diameter of 7.4 nm). After thermal treatment at 900 degrees C, graphite structures such as carbon nanocapsules and carbon nanotubes formed because of the catalytic activity of the iron nanoparticles. Ruthenium nanoparticles prepared from buckyruthenocene were much smaller than the iron counterparts, and did not catalyze the formation of graphite structures. When buckyruthenocene absorbed on silica gel was heated at 500 degrees C under a hydrogen atmosphere, the resulting ruthenium nanoparticles showed high activity in catalytic hydrogenation.

  3. Experimental techniques for the characterization of carbon nanoparticles – a brief overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Kempiński

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The review of four experimental methods: X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance and four-point electrical conductivity measurements is presented to characterize carbon nanoparticles. Two types of carbon nanoparticle systems are discussed: one comprising the powder of individual carbon nanoparticles and the second as a structurally interconnected nanoparticle matrix in the form of a fiber. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy reveal the atomic structure of the carbon nanoparticles and allow for observation of the changes in the quasi-graphitic ordering induced by ultrasonic irradiation and with the so-called quasi-high pressure effect under adsorption conditions. Structural changes have strong influence on the electronic properties, especially the localization of charge carriers within the nanoparticles, which can be observed with the EPR technique. This in turn can be well-correlated with the four-point electrical conductivity measurements which directly show the character of the charge carrier transport within the examined structures.

  4. Role of Black Carbon and Absorbing Organic Carbon Aerosols in Surface Dimming Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Y.; Ramanathan, V.; Kotamarthi, V. R.

    2010-12-01

    Solar radiation reaching at the Earth’s surface plays an essential role in driving both atmosphere hydrological and land/ocean biogeochemical processes. Measurements have shown significant decreases in surface solar radiation (dimming) in many regions since 1960s. At least half of the observed dimming could be linked to the direct radiative effect of anthropogenic aerosols, especially absorbing aerosols like black carbon (BC) due to their strong atmospheric absorption. However, previous model-data comparisons indicate that absorption by aerosols is commonly and significantly underestimated in current GCM simulations by several factors over regions. Using a global chemical transport model coupled with a radiative transfer model, we include a treatment for absorbing organic carbons (OC) from bio-fuel and open biomass burnings in optical calculations and estimate aerosol radiative forcings for two anthropogenic aerosol emission scenarios representative of 1975 and 2000. Assumptions about aerosol mixing and the OC absorption spectrum are examined by comparing simulated atmospheric heating against aircraft optical and radiation measurements. The calculated aerosol single scattering albedo distribution (0.93+/-0.044) is generally comparable to the AERONET data (0.93+/-0.030) for year 2001, with best agreements in Europe and N. America, while overestimated in E. Asia and underestimated in the S. American biomass burning areas. On a global scale, inclusion of absorbing OC enhances the absorption in the atmosphere by 11% for July. The estimated aerosol direct radiative forcing at TOA (-0.24 W/m2) is similar to the average value of the AeroCom models based on the same 2000 emissions, but significantly enhanced negatively at surface by about 53% (-1.56 W/m2) and the atmosphere absorption is increased by +61% (+1.32 W/m2). About 87% of the estimated atmosphere absorption and 42% of the surface dimming is contributed by BC. Between 1975 and 2000, the calculated all-sky flux

  5. Performance improvement of ionic surfactant flooding in carbonate rock samples by use of nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Ahmadi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Various surfactants have been used in upstream petroleum processes like chemical flooding. Ultimately, the performance of these surfactants depends on their ability to reduce the interfacial tension between oil and water. The surfactant concentration in the aqueous solution decreases owing to the loss of the surfactant on the rock surface in the injection process. The main objective of this paper is to inhibit the surfactant loss by means of adding nanoparticles. Sodium dodecyl sulfate and silica nanoparticles were used as ionic surfactant and nanoparticles in our experiments, respectively. AEROSIL® 816 and AEROSIL® 200 are hydrophobic and hydrophilic nanoparticles. T