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Sample records for carbon arc cast

  1. Effect of arc behaviour on the temperature fluctuation of carbon electrode in DC arc discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, F; Tanaka, M; Choi, S; Watanabe, T

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse and multiple arc-anode attachment modes were observed in a DC arc discharge with a carbon electrode. During the arc discharge, the surface temperature of the electrode was successfully measured by two-colour pyrometry combined with a high-speed camera which employs appropriate band-pass filters. The relationship between the arc-anode attachment mode and the temperature fluctuation of electrode surface was investigated. The diffuse arc-anode attachment mode leads to relatively large temperature fluctuation on anode surface due to the rotation of the arc spot. In the case of diffuse mode, the purity of synthesized multi-wall carbon nanotube was deteriorated with temperature fluctuation

  2. Fracture toughness of 6.4 mm (0.25 inch) Arc-Cast molybdenum and molybdenum-TZM plate at room temperature and 300 oC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shields, J.A. jr.; Lipetzky, P.; Mueller, A.J.

    2001-01-01

    The fracture toughness of 6.4 mm (0.25 inch) low carbon arc-cast (LCAC) molybdenum and arc-cast molybdenum-TZM alloy plate were measured at room temperature and 300 o C using compact tension specimens. The effect of crack plane orientation (longitudinal vs. transverse) and annealing practice (stress-relieved vs. recrystallized) were evaluated. Depending upon the test temperature either a standard K IC or a J-integral analysis was used to obtain the toughness value. At room temperature, regardless of alloy, orientation, or microstructure, fracture toughness values between 15 and 22 MPa m 1/2 (14 and 20 ksi in 1/2 ) were measured. These K IC values were consistent with measurements by other authors. Increasing temperature improves the toughness, due to the fact that one takes advantage of the ductile-brittle transition behavior of molybdenum. At 300 o C, the fracture toughness of recrystallized LCAC and arc-cast TZM molybdenum were also similar at approximately 64 MPa m 1/2 (58 ksi in 1/2 ). In the stress-relieved condition, however, the toughness of arc-cast TZM (91 MPa m 1/2 / 83 ksi in 1/2 ) was higher than that of the LCAC molybdenum (74 MPa m 1/2 / 67 ksi in 1/2 ). (author)

  3. Study of electric arc welding of castings for nuclear power machine-building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rymkevich, A.I.; Korsunov, P.M.

    1977-01-01

    Mechanical and corrosion-resistance properties are studied of the welded joints of cast billets from steel 00Kh12N3DL by automatic submerged arc welding. It is shown by testing the joints made with preheating up to 100 deg C and subsequent tempering (620 deg C for 25 h + 640 deg C for 16 h) that in the temperature range of 20-350 deg C they possess fairly good strength, ductility, impact viscosity, and corrosion-resistance properties approximating the corresponding characteristics of the base metal. The welding technology developed can be used to make pump casings for atomic power equipment

  4. Depositing Nickel-based Hardfacing to Join Carbon Steel and Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás Fernández-Columbié

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this investigation is to determine the micro-structural behavior of a joint between cast iron and carbon steel by depositing a nickel-based substrate in the carbon steel. The filler was added through Shielded Metal Arc Welding using Castec 3099 (UTP 8 electrodes while the base materials were joined through Gas Tungsten Arc Welding with ER 70S – A1 bare electrodes. The Schaeffler diagram was used to analyze the chemical composition of the resulting weld beads. The results of the analysis performed on the welded area and the heat influence zone indicated the formation of acicular structures near the welded line when Castec 3099 electrodes are used and the formation of skeletal ferrite on the heat influence zone during the application of this welding process. An austenitic mixture is formed when ER 70S – A1 electrodes are used.

  5. The EC CAST project (carbon-14 source term)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-14 is a key radionuclide in the assessment of the safety of underground geological disposal facilities for radioactive wastes. It is possible for carbon-14 to be released from waste packages in a variety of chemical forms, both organic and inorganic, and as dissolved or gaseous species The EC CAST (CArbon-14 Source Term) project aims to develop understanding of the generation and release of carbon-14 from radioactive waste materials under conditions relevant to packaging and disposal. It focuses on the release of carbon-14 from irradiated metals (steels and zirconium alloys), from irradiated graphite and from spent ion-exchange resins. The CAST consortium brings together 33 partners. CAST commenced in October 2013 and this paper describes progress to March 2015. The main activities during this period were reviews of the current status of knowledge, the identification and acquisition of suitable samples and the design of experiments and analytical procedures. (authors)

  6. Impacts of continental arcs on global carbon cycling and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. T.; Jiang, H.; Carter, L.; Dasgupta, R.; Cao, W.; Lackey, J. S.; Lenardic, A.; Barnes, J.; McKenzie, R.

    2017-12-01

    On myr timescales, climatic variability is tied to variations in atmospheric CO2, which in turn is driven by geologic sources of CO2 and modulated by the efficiency of chemical weathering and carbonate precipitation (sinks). Long-term variability in CO2 has largely been attributed to changes in mid-ocean ridge inputs or the efficiency of global weathering. For example, the Cretaceous greenhouse is thought to be related to enhanced oceanic crust production, while the late Cenozoic icehouse is attributed to enhanced chemical weathering associated with the Himalayan orogeny. Here, we show that continental arcs may play a more important role in controlling climate, both in terms of sources and sinks. Continental arcs differ from island arcs and mid-ocean ridges in that the continental plate through which arc magmas pass may contain large amounts of sedimentary carbonate, accumulated over the history of the continent. Interaction of arc magmas with crustal carbonates via assimilation, reaction or heating can significantly add to the mantle-sourced CO2 flux. Detrital zircons and global mapping of basement rocks shows that the length of continental arcs in the Cretaceous was more than twice that in the mid-Cenozoic; maps also show many of these arcs intersected crustal carbonates. The increased length of continental arc magmatism coincided with increased oceanic spreading rates, placing convergent margins into compression, which favors continental arcs. Around 50 Ma, however, nearly all the continental arcs in Eurasia and North America terminated as India collided with Eurasia and the western Pacific rolled back, initiating the Marianas-Tonga-Kermadec intra-oceanic subduction complex and possibly leading to a decrease in global CO2 production. Meanwhile, extinct continental arcs continued to erode, resulting in regionally enhanced chemical weathering unsupported by magmatic fluxes of CO2. Continental arcs, during their magmatic lifetimes, are thus a source of CO2, driving

  7. Anode Sheath Switching in a Carbon Nanotube Arc Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetterman, Abe; Raitses, Yevgeny; Keidar, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The anode ablation rate is investigated as a function of anode diameter for a carbon nanotube arc plasma. It is found that anomalously high ablation occurs for small anode diameters. This result is explained by the formation of a positive anode sheath. The increased ablation rate due to this positive anode sheath could imply greater production rate for carbon nanotubes.

  8. Hypergravity synthesis of graphitic carbon nanomaterial in glide arc plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Šperka, J.; Soucek, P.; van Loon, J.J.W.A.; Dowson, A.; Schwarz, C.; Krause, J.; Butenko, Y.; Kroesen, G.; Kudrle, V.

    2014-01-01

    A nanostructured carbon material was synthesized using a methane/helium glide arc plasma under standard and increased gravity. Material analysis performed on samples collected from an effluent gas filter showed that the deposited material was present in the form of carbon nanoparticles. They

  9. More About Arc-Welding Process for Making Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Jeanette M.; Leidecker, Henning

    2005-01-01

    High-quality batches of carbon nanotubes are produced at relatively low cost in a modified atmospheric-pressure electric-arc welding process that does not include the use of metal catalysts. What would normally be a welding rod and a weldment are replaced by an amorphous carbon anode rod and a wider, hollow graphite cathode rod. Both electrodes are water-cooled. The cathode is immersed in ice water to about 0.5 cm from the surface. The system is shielded from air by flowing helium during arcing. As the anode is consumed during arcing at 20 to 25 A, it is lowered to maintain it at an approximately constant distance above the cathode. The process causes carbon nanotubes to form on the lowest 5 cm of the anode. The arcing process is continued until the anode has been lowered to a specified height. The nanotube-containing material is then harvested. The additional information contained in the instant report consists mostly of illustrations of carbon nanotubes and a schematic diagram of the arc-welding setup, as modified for the production of carbon nanotubes.

  10. Thermal motion of carbon clusters and production of carbon nanotubes by gravity-free arc discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mieno, T.; Takeguchi, M.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal and diffusion properties of hot gas around a dc arc discharge under a gravity-free condition are investigated using a jet plane in order to improve the arc production of carbon clusters. Spherically symmetric temperature distribution of He gas around the arc plasma and monotonic slow expansion of the high-temperature region are observed. By means of the passive-type Mie scattering method, random slow diffusion of carbon clusters around the arc plasma is clearly observed under the gravity-free condition. This indicates that carbon clusters including single-walled carbon nanotubes are synthesized around the arc plasma where the He temperature is higher than 1000 K. It is confirmed that large bundles of fatter single-walled carbon nanotubes are produced under the gravity-free condition

  11. Reduction of nitric oxide by arc vaporized carbons (AVC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsang, S C; Chen, Y K; Green, M L.H. [The Catalysis Centre, Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1996-07-04

    The reduction of nitric oxide by arc vaporized carbons (AVC) including the compound C{sub 6}0, fullerene soot and carbon nanotubes, giving dinitrogen and carbon oxides has been studied. It is found that the AVC carbons are more active towards oxidation by NO than by oxygen gas at low temperatures (300-400C). In contrast, conventional carbons such as graphite and microporous carbons are more readily oxidised by oxygen than by NO. The addition of copper salts and to a lesser extent, cobalt salts, to fullerene soot substantially promote NO reduction. The high intrinsic activity for NO reduction by AVC carbons compared to graphitic carbons is attributed to the presence of five membered carbon rings in the AVC carbons

  12. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koguchi, H.; Sakakita, H.; Kiyama, S.; Shimada, T.; Sato, Y.; Hirano, Y. [Energy Technology Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2012-02-15

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA/mm{sup 2} at the peak of the pulse.

  13. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H; Kiyama, S; Shimada, T; Sato, Y; Hirano, Y

    2012-02-01

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA∕mm(2) at the peak of the pulse.

  14. Carbon in condensed hydrocarbon phases, steels and cast irons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GAFAROVA Victoria Alexandrovna

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a review of studies carried out mainly by the researchers of the Ufa State Petroleum Technological University, which are aimed at detection of new properties of carbon in such condensed media as petroleum and coal pitches, steels and cast irons. Carbon plays an important role in the industry of construction materials being a component of road and roof bitumen and setting the main mechanical properties of steels. It was determined that crystal-like structures appear in classical glass-like substances – pitches which contain several thousands of individual hydrocarbons of various compositions. That significantly extends the concept of crystallinity. In structures of pitches, the control parameter of the staged structuring process is paramagnetism of condensed aromatic hydrocarbons. Fullerenes were detected in steels and cast irons and identified by various methods of spectrometry and microscopy. Fullerene С60, which contains 60 carbon atoms, has diameter of 0,7 nm and is referred to the nanoscale objects, which have a significant influence on the formation of steel and cast iron properties. It was shown that fullerenes appear at all stages of manufacture of cast irons; they are formed during introduction of carbon from the outside, during crystallization of metal in welded joints. Creation of modified fullerene layers in steels makes it possible to improve anticorrosion and tribological properties of structural materials. At the same time, outside diffusion of carbon from the carbon deposits on the metal surface also leads to formation of additional amount of fullerenes. This creates conditions for occurrence of local microdistortions of the structure, which lead to occurrence of cracks. Distribution of fullerenes in iron matrix is difficult to study as the method is labor-intensive, it requires dissolution of the matrix in the hydrofluoric acid and stage fullerene separation with further identification by spectral methods.

  15. Twin carbon arc torch | Skelskey | SINET: Ethiopian Journal of Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and applied to brazing and heating in order to offer an alternative to the much more expensive oxyacetylene torch and to the usually environmentally degrading use of charcoal. SINET: Ethiopian Journal of Science Vol. 24, No. 1 (June 2001), pp. 133-138. Key words/phrases: Arc, brazing, carbon electrode, plasma, torch ...

  16. Automatic Control of Arc Process for Making Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Carl D.; Pulumbarit, Robert B.; Victor, Joe

    2004-01-01

    An automatic-control system has been devised for a process in which carbon nanotubes are produced in an arc between a catalyst-filled carbon anode and a graphite cathode. The control system includes a motor-driven screw that adjusts the distance between the electrodes. The system also includes a bridge circuit that puts out a voltage proportional to the difference between (1) the actual value of potential drop across the arc and (2) a reference value between 38 and 40 V (corresponding to a current of about 100 A) at which the yield of carbon nanotubes is maximized. Utilizing the fact that the potential drop across the arc increases with the interelectrode gap, the output of the bridge circuit is fed to a motor-control circuit that causes the motor to move the anode toward or away from the cathode if the actual potential drop is more or less, respectively, than the reference potential. Thus, the system regulates the interelectrode gap to maintain the optimum potential drop. The system also includes circuitry that records the potential drop across the arc and the relative position of the anode holder as function of time.

  17. Electric-Arc Plasma Installation for Preparing Nanodispersed Carbon Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanov, P.; Garlanov, D.; Vissokov, G.

    2008-01-01

    An electric-arc plasma installation operated in the hidden anode arrangement is constructed and used for the preparation of carbon nanostructures. A contracted plasma arc generated by a plasma torch using an inert gas is used as heat source. The average mass temperature of arc is higher than 10 4 K, while its power density, which is directly transferred onto the electrode (anode), is ∼ 2 kW/mm 2 . The anode contact area formed on the electrode moves against the arc by way of shifting the electrode and is hidden completely in the interior of plasma gas stream moving towards it. As a result of both the direct plasma attack and the opposite movement of streams in the hidden anode contact area, a temperature higher than 6000 K is reached. Thus, intensive vaporization takes place, which forms a saturated plasma-gas-aerosol phase of the initial material of electrode (anode). This gas phase is mixed in and carried by the plasma stream. Over that mixed plasma stream, a controlled process of quenching (fixation) is carried out by twisted turbulent fluid streams. After the fixation, the resultant carbon nano-structures are caught by a filter and collected in a bunker.

  18. Cast Steel Filtration Trials Using Ceramic-Carbon Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipowska B.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Trials of cast steel filtration using two types of newly-developed foam filters in which carbon was the phase binding ceramic particles have been conducted. In one of the filters the source of carbon was flake graphite and coal-tar pitch, while in the other one graphite was replaced by a cheaper carbon precursor. The newly-developed filters are fired at 1000°C, i.e. at a much lower temperature than the currently applied ZrO2-based filters. During filtration trials the filters were subjected to the attack of a flowing metal stream having a temperature of 1650°C for 30 seconds.

  19. Comparative Analysis of Carbon Plasma in Arc and RF Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorovic-Markovic, B.; Markovic, Z.; Mohai, I.; Szepvolgyi, J.

    2004-01-01

    Results on studies of molecular spectra emitted in the initial stages of fullerene formation during the processing of graphite powder in induction RF reactor and evaporation of graphite electrodes in arc reactor are presented in this paper. It was found that C2 radicals were dominant molecular species in both plasmas. C2 radicals have an important role in the process of fullerene synthesis. The rotational-vibrational temperatures of C2 and CN species were calculated by fitting the experimental spectra to the simulated ones. The results of optical emission study of C2 radicals generated in carbon arc plasma have shown that rotational temperature of C2 species depends on carbon concentration and current intensity significantly. The optical emission study of induction RF plasma and SEM analysis of graphite powder before and after plasma treatment have shown that evaporation of the processed graphite powder depends on feed rate and composition of gas phase significantly. Based on the obtained results, it was concluded that in the plasma region CN radicals could be formed by the reaction of C2 species with atomic nitrogen at smaller loads. At larger feed rate of graphite powder, CN species were produced by surface reaction of the hot carbon particles with nitrogen atoms. The presence of nitrogen in induction RF plasma reduces the fullerene yield significantly. The fullerene yield obtained in two different reactors was: 13% in arc reactor and 4.1% in induction RF reactor. However, the fullerene production rate was higher in induction RF reactor-6.4 g/h versus 1.7 g/h in arc reactor

  20. Effect of vacuum arc melting/casting parameters on shrinkage cavity/piping of austenitic stainless steel ingot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamran, J.; Feroz, M.; Sarwar, M.

    2009-01-01

    Shrinkage cavity/piping at the end of the solidified ingot of steels is one of the most common casting problem in 316L austenitic stainless steel ingot, when consumable electrode is melted and cast in a water-cooled copper mould by vacuum arc re-melting furnace. In present study an effort has been made to reduce the size of shrinkage cavity/ piping by establishing the optimum value of hot topping process parameters at the end of the melting process. It is concluded that the shrinkage cavity/piping at the top of the solidified ingot can be reduced to minimum by adjusting the process parameters particularly the melting current density. (author)

  1. Co2FeSi Heusler alloy prepared by arc melting and planar flow casting methods: microstructure and magnetism.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Titov, Andrii; Životský, O.; Hendrych, A.; Janičkovič, D.; Buršík, Jiří; Jirásková, Yvonna

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 131, č. 4 (2017), s. 654-656 ISSN 0587-4246. [CSMAG 2016 - Czech and Slovak Conference on Magnetism /16./. Košice, 13.06.2016-17.06.2016] Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Heusler alloy * Surface morphology * Magnetic properties * Arc melting * Planar flow casting Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism; BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism (UFM-A) OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 0.469, year: 2016

  2. Synthesis of multiwalled carbon nanotube from different grades of carbon black using arc discharge method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, Neha, E-mail: n4neha31@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani (India); Sharma, N. N. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani (India); Director, School of Automobile, Mechanical & Mechatronics, Manipal University,Jaipur,India (India)

    2016-04-13

    This paper describes the synthesis of nanotube from different grades (Tread * A(non-ASTM), N134,N121,N660 and N330)of carbon black using DC arc discharge method at 40A current for 60sec. Carbon black samples of different grades were procured from industry (Aditya Birla Science and Technology Limited, India). Scanning Electron Micrographs (SEM) of the deposited carbon nanostructures suggests that MWCNTs are formed at 40A and for a minimal exposure time of 60sec.The result formed indicates the N330 grade of carbon black gets converted to MWCNTs (Multiwall Carbon nanotube) as compared to other grades.

  3. Influence of Plasma Jet Temperature Profiles in Arc Discharge Methods of Carbon Nanotubes Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raniszewski, Grzegorz; Wiak, Slawomir; Pietrzak, Lukasz; Szymanski, Lukasz; Kolacinski, Zbigniew

    2017-02-23

    One of the most common methods of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) synthesis is application of an electric-arc plasma. However, the final product in the form of cathode deposit is composed of carbon nanotubes and a variety of carbon impurities. An assay of carbon nanotubes produced in arc discharge systems available on the market shows that commercial cathode deposits contain about 10% CNTs. Given that the quality of the final product depends on carbon-plasma jet parameters, it is possible to increase the yield of the synthesis by plasma jet control. Most of the carbon nanotubes are multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). It was observed that the addition of catalysts significantly changes the plasma composition, effective ionization potential, the arc channel conductance, and in effect temperature of the arc and carbon elements flux. This paper focuses on the influence of metal components on plasma-jet forming containing carbon nanotubes cathode deposit. The plasma jet temperature control system is presented.

  4. Improved corrosion resistance of cast carbon steel in sulphur oxides by Alonizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtzer, M.; Dzioba, Z.

    1992-01-01

    The results of studies on the Alonizing of cast steel and of testing the corrosion resistance of this cast steel in an atmosphere containing 5 to 6% SO 2 + 50% SO 3 at 853 K are described and compared with the results obtained with unalonized cast carbon steel and high-alloy 23Cr-8Ni-2Mo cast steel. The duration of the corrosion tests was 336 hours. The aluminium diffusion layer on cast carbon steel was obtained by holding the specimens in a mixture containing 99% of powered Fe-Al and 1% of NH 4 Cl at 1323 ± 20 K. The holding time was 10 and 20 hours, respectively. The aluminium layer formed on the cast carbon steel was examined by optical microscopy and an X-ray microanalysis. After Alonizing for 10 h the layer had reached a thickness of 950 μm, and contained up to 35% Al. In a mixture of sulphur oxides corrosion rate of the alonized cast carbon steel was by about 600 times lower than of the unalonized cast carbon steel, and by about 50 times lower than that of the 23Cr-8Ni-2Mo cast steel. (orig.) [de

  5. Influence of Plasma Jet Temperature Profiles in Arc Discharge Methods of Carbon Nanotubes Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Raniszewski

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common methods of carbon nanotubes (CNTs synthesis is application of an electric-arc plasma. However, the final product in the form of cathode deposit is composed of carbon nanotubes and a variety of carbon impurities. An assay of carbon nanotubes produced in arc discharge systems available on the market shows that commercial cathode deposits contain about 10% CNTs. Given that the quality of the final product depends on carbon–plasma jet parameters, it is possible to increase the yield of the synthesis by plasma jet control. Most of the carbon nanotubes are multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. It was observed that the addition of catalysts significantly changes the plasma composition, effective ionization potential, the arc channel conductance, and in effect temperature of the arc and carbon elements flux. This paper focuses on the influence of metal components on plasma-jet forming containing carbon nanotubes cathode deposit. The plasma jet temperature control system is presented.

  6. Applicability of Carbonated Electric Arc Furnace Slag to Mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, S; Izaki, M; Arisawa, R; Hisyamudin, M N N; Murakami, K; Maegawa, A

    2012-01-01

    Authors have been studying the absorption of CO 2 in the steelmaking slag. In this study, an application of the electric arc furnace slag after the carbonation to admixture of mortar was investigated with the JIS (A6206-1997) method for ground granulated blast-furnace slag for concrete. The percent flows for the test mortar were smaller than that for the standard mortar. The percent flow of the carbonated slag whose average particle size of more than approximately 4 μm increased with an increase in the average size of the particles. Because the compressive strengths of the test mortar cured for 91 days were almost the same as those cured 28 days, the slag after the carbonation was thought not to have self-hardening property for a medium and long term. The compressive strength for the test mortar was almost unchanged within a range of approximately 2 to 7 μm of the average particle size, and it in this range was highest. The activity indexes for the test mortar prepared with the slag after the carbonation ranged from approximately 40 to 60%.

  7. Self-supported carbon electrodes obtained by tape casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubio-Marcos, F.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the preparation and electrochemical response of self-supported carbon electrodes prepared by tape casting. The dc electrical conductivity, σ, of the electrodes was determined by four-wire resistance measurements and a relation between the graphite/organic additives ratio and the electrical conductivity was established. The application of these self-supported carbon electrodes as working electrodes in analytical techniques was also evaluated using norepinephrine as electroactive substance in cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The results were compared with the traditional electrodes, carbon paste electrodes (CPEs, showing that the new self-supported carbon electrodes had both lower background noise and higher analytical response.

    Este artículo describe la preparación y respuesta electroquímica de electrodos de carbono autosoportados preparados mediante colado en cinta. La conductividad eléctrica en corriente continua de este nuevo tipo de electrodos de carbono se ha determinado usando el método de cuatro puntas y se ha establecido una relación ente la relación grafito/aditivos orgánicos y la conductividad eléctrica. La aplicación de estos electrodos autosoportados como electrodos de trabajo en diversas técnicas electroanalíticas también se ha evaluado, empleando norepinefrina como analito en voltametría cíclica y en cronoamperometría. Los resultados se compararon con los obtenidos empleando los electrodos de pasta de carbono tradicionales como electrodos de trabajo, viéndose que la señal de los nuevos electrodos autosoportados poseía menor ruido de fondo y mayor respuesta analítica.

  8. Surface martensitization of Carbon steel using Arc Plasma Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahyudi, Haris; Dimyati, Arbi; Sebayang, Darwin

    2018-03-01

    In this paper new technology of surface structure modification of steel by short plasma exposure in Arc Plasma Sintering (APS) device is presented. APS is an apparatus working based on plasma generated by DC pulsed current originally used for synthesizing materials via sintering and melting. Plasma exposure in APS was applied into the specimens for 1 and 3 seconds which generate temperature approximately about 1300-1500°C. The SUP9, pearlitic carbon steel samples were used. The hardness, hardening depth and microstructure of the specimens have been investigated by Vickers micro hardness test and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) supported by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDX). The results have showed that the mechanical property was significantly improved due to the formation of single martensitic structures as identified by SEM. The hardness of treated surface evaluated by Vickers hardness test showed significant improvement nearly three time from 190 VHN before to 524 VHN after treatment. Furthermore, EDX confirmed that the formation of martensite layer occurred without altering its composition. The APS also produced uniform hardened layer up to 250 μm. The experiment has demonstrated that arc plasma process was successfully improved the mechanical properties of steel in relatively very short time.

  9. Usage of Thermodynamic Activity for Optimization of Power Expenses in Respect of Casting Process in Arc Steel-Melting Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Chichko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The equilibrium between carbon and oxygen has been investigated during oxidizing refining in an arc steel-melting furnace. It is shown that there is a possibility to apply an equilibrium thermodynamic. It has been established that during oxidizing refining FeO concentration in slag practically does not depend on C concentration in metal. It is demonstrated that in a number of cases metal carbon oxidation is characterized by the presence of a transit period that may be attributed to incomplete slag-formation process.

  10. Continental Arcs as Both Carbon Source and Sink in Regulating Long Term Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H.; Lee, C. T.

    2017-12-01

    The long-term variability of atmospheric pCO2 is determined by the balance between the rate of geologic inputs of CO­­2 (e.g., magmatic/metamorphic degassing, carbonate weathering) and the rate of carbonate precipitation driven by silicate weathering. The Late Cretaceous-Early Cenozoic was characterized by elevated atmospheric pCO2 and greenhouse climate, likely due to increased magmatic flux from mid-ocean ridges and, in particular, continental arcs. However, it has been suggested that continental arc magmatism is accompanied by rapid uplift and erosion due to magmatic/tectonic thickening of the crust, thus continental arcs likely enhance the chemical weathering flux, in turn increasing the carbon sink. To assess the contribution of continental arcs to global carbon inputs and sinks, we conducted a case study in the Cretaceous Peninsular Ranges batholith (PRB) and associated forearc basin in southern California, USA, representing one segment of the Cretaceous Cordillera arc-forearc system. Arc magmatism occurred between 170-85 Ma, peaking at 100 Ma, but erosion of the arc continues into the early Eocene, with forearc sediments representing this protracted arc unroofing. During magmatism, we estimate the CO2 degassing flux from the PRB was at least 5-25*105 mol·km-2·yr-1. By calculating the depletion of Ca and Mg in the forearc sediments relative to their arc protoliths, we estimate the silicate weathering/carbonate precipitation flux to be 106 mol·km-2·yr-1 during Late Cretaceous magmatism, decreasing to 105 mol·km-2·yr-1 by the Early Eocene. We show that during active continental arc magmatism, the CO2 degassing flux is comparable to CO2 consumption driven by silicate weathering in the arc. However, after magmatism ends, a regional imbalance arises in which the arc no longer contributes to CO2 inputs but continued silicate weathering of the arc drives carbonate precipitation such that the arc indirectly becomes CO2 sink. We propose that the development of

  11. The multilayered structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon films synthesized by filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Na; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos

    2013-01-01

    The structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon (a-C) films synthesized by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) deposition was investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron

  12. Enhanced ablation of small anodes in a carbon nanotube arc discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Fetterman, Abraham; Keidar, Michael

    2008-11-01

    An atmospheric pressure helium arc discharge is used for carbon nanotube synthesis. The arc discharge operates in an anodic mode with the ablating anode made from a graphite material. For such conditions, models predict the electron-repelling (negative) anode sheath. In the present experiments, the anode ablation rate is investigated as a function of the anode diameter. It is found that anomalously high ablation occurs for small anode diameters (Fetterman, Y. Raitses and M. Keidar, Carbon (2008).

  13. Microstructure formation in partially melted zone during gas tungsten arc welding of AZ91 Mg cast alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Tianping; Chen, Zhan W.; Gao Wei

    2008-01-01

    During gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding of AZ91 Mg cast alloy, constitutional liquid forms locally in the original interdendritic regions in the partially melted zone (PMZ). The PMZ re-solidification behaviour has not been well understood. In this study, the gradual change of the re-solidification microstructure within PMZ from base metal side to weld metal side was characterised. High cooling rate experiments using Gleeble thermal simulator were also conducted to understand the morphological change of the α-Mg/β-Mg 17 Al 12 phase interface formed during re-solidification after partial melting. It was found that the original partially divorced eutectic structure has become a more regular eutectic phase in most of the PMZ, although close to the fusion boundary the re-solidified eutectic is again a divorced one. Proceeding the eutectic re-solidification, if the degree of partial melting is sufficiently high, α-Mg re-solidified with a cellular growth, resulting in a serrated interface between α-Mg and α-Mg/β-Mg 17 Al 12 in the weld sample and between α-Mg and β-Mg 17 Al 12 (fully divorced eutectic) in Gleeble samples. The morphological changes affected by the peak temperature and cooling rate are also explained

  14. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Synthesis Using Arc Discharge with Hydrocarbon as Feedstock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. T. Chaudhary

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT by arc discharge process is investigated with methane (CH4 as background and feedstock gas. The arc discharge is carried out between two graphite electrodes for ambient pressures 100, 300, and 500 torr and arc currents 50, 70, and 90 A. Plasma kinetics such as the density and temperature for arc discharge carbon plasma is determined to find out the contribution of physical parameters as arc current and ambient pressure on the plasma dynamics and growth of MWCNT. With increase in applied arc current and ambient pressure, an increase in plasma temperature and density is observed. The synthesized samples of MWCNT at different experimental conditions are characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. A decrease in the diameter and improvement in structure quality and growth of MWCNT are observed with increase in CH4 ambient pressure and arc current. For CH4 ambient pressure 500 torr and arc current 90 A, the well-aligned and straight MWCNT along with graphene stakes are detected.

  15. Ultrathin diamond-like carbon films deposited by filtered carbon vacuum arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anders, Andre; Fong, Walton; Kulkarni, Ashok; Ryan, Francis W.; Bhatia, C. Singh

    2001-01-01

    Ultrathin ( and lt; 5 nm) hard carbon films are of great interest to the magnetic storage industry as the areal density approaches 100 Gbit/in(sup 2). These films are used as overcoats to protect the magnetic layers on disk media and the active elements of the read-write slider. Tetrahedral amorphous carbon films can be produced by filtered cathodic arc deposition, but the films will only be accepted by the storage industry only if the ''macroparticle'' issue has been solved. Better plasma filters have been developed over recent years. Emphasis is put on the promising twist filter system - a compact, open structure that operates with pulsed arcs and high magnetic field. Based on corrosion tests it is shown that the macroparticle reduction by the twist filter is satisfactory for this demanding application, while plasma throughput is very high. Ultrathin hard carbon films have been synthesized using S-filter and twist filter systems. Film properties such as hardness, elastic modulus, wear, and corrosion resistance have been tested

  16. Evaporative behavior of carbon with MPD Arc Jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukegawa, Toshio; Madarame, Haruki; Okamoto, Koji [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.

    1996-10-01

    Using the Magneto-Plasma-Dynamic Arc Jet (MPD Arc Jet) device, the plasma-material interaction during simulated plasma disruption was experimentally investigated. To clarify the effects of the evaporation, the isotropic graphite was used as a target. The thermal conductivity of the isotropic graphite was much higher than that of the pyrolytic graphite, resulting in smaller evaporation. The light intensity distribution during the simulated disruption for the isotropic graphite was quite different from that for the pyrolytic graphite. (author)

  17. Investigation of carbon cathode surface before and after the passage of combined dc vacuum arc with superimposed high-current arc pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavaleyev, V.; Walkowicz, J.; Moszynski, D.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the results of studies of carbon cathode surface before and after the passage of the combined DC vacuum-arc with superimposed high-current arc pulses. Investigations of surface morphology of carbon cathode showed, that secondary nuclei of high-density are formed after passing of the combined DC-pulse vacuum-arc, which results in the formation of a globular structures. The phase structure analysis by Raman spectroscopy showed that even at a minimum operation time (5 s) of the combined DC-pulse vacuum-arc broadening of the peaks 1355 and 1583 cm-1 occurs, which means that the carbon cathode surface undergo phase transformation. Results obtained by XPS spectroscopy demonstrate that the globular structures formed on the cathode surface are composed of sp 3 -bonded carbon atoms and carbon-oxygen bonds.

  18. Magnetic properties of carbon-coated, ferromagnetic nanoparticles produced by a carbon-arc method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunsman, E. M.; Sutton, R.; Bortz, E.; Kirkpatrick, S.; Midelfort, K.; Williams, J.; Smith, P.; McHenry, M. E.; Majetich, S. A.; Artman, J. O.; De Graef, M.; Staley, S. W.

    1994-05-01

    The Krätschmer-Huffman carbon-arc method of preparing fullerenes has been used to generate carbon-coated transition metal (TM) and TM-carbide nanocrystallites. The magnetic nanocrystallites were extracted from the soot with a magnetic gradient field technique. For TM=Co the majority of nanocrystals exist as nominally spherical particles, 0.5-5 nm in radius. Hysteretic and temperature-dependent magnetic response, in randomly and magnetically aligned powder samples frozen in epoxy, correspond to fine particle magnetism associated with monodomain TM particles. The magnetization exhibits a unique functional dependence on H/T, and hysteresis below a blocking temperature TB. Below TB, the temperature dependence of the coercivity can be expressed as Hc=Hc0[1-(T/TB)1/2], where Hc0 is the 0 K coercivity.

  19. Superparamagnetism in carbon-coated Co particles produced by the Kratschmer carbon arc process

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenry, M. E.; Majetich, S. A.; Artman, J. O.; Degraef, M.; Staley, S. W.

    1994-04-01

    A process based on the Kratschmer-Huffman carbon arc method of preparing fullerenes has been used to generate carbon-coated cobalt and cobalt carbide nanocrystallites. Magnetic nanocrystallites are extracted from the soot with a gradient field technique. For Co/C composites, structural characterization by x-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals the presence of a fcc Co phase, graphite, and a minority Co2C phase. The majority of Co nanocrystals exists as nominally spherical particles, 0.5-5 nm in radius. Hysteretic and temperature-dependent magnetic response, in randomly and magnetically aligned powder samples frozen in epoxy reveals fine-particle magnetism associated with monodomain Co particles. The magnetization exhibits a unique functional dependence on H/T, and hysteresis below a blocking temperature, TB~=160 K. Below TB, the temperature dependence of the coercivity is given by Hc=Hci[1-(T/TB)1/2], with Hci~=450 Oe.

  20. Effect of electric arc, gas oxygen torch and induction melting techniques on the marginal accuracy of cast base-metal and noble metal-ceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Cogolludo, Pablo; Castillo-Oyagüe, Raquel; Lynch, Christopher D; Suárez-García, María-Jesús

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the most appropriate alloy composition and melting technique by evaluating the marginal accuracy of cast metal-ceramic crowns. Seventy standardised stainless-steel abutments were prepared to receive metal-ceramic crowns and were randomly divided into four alloy groups: Group 1: palladium-gold (Pd-Au), Group 2: nickel-chromium-titanium (Ni-Cr-Ti), Group 3: nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) and Group 4: titanium (Ti). Groups 1, 2 and 3 were in turn subdivided to be melted and cast using: (a) gas oxygen torch and centrifugal casting machine (TC) or (b) induction and centrifugal casting machine (IC). Group 4 was melted and cast using electric arc and vacuum/pressure machine (EV). All of the metal-ceramic crowns were luted with glass-ionomer cement. The marginal fit was measured under an optical microscope before and after cementation using image analysis software. All data was subjected to two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Duncan's multiple range test was run for post-hoc comparisons. The Student's t-test was used to investigate the influence of cementation (α=0.05). Uncemented Pd-Au/TC samples achieved the best marginal adaptation, while the worst fit corresponded to the luted Ti/EV crowns. Pd-Au/TC, Ni-Cr and Ti restorations demonstrated significantly increased misfit after cementation. The Ni-Cr-Ti alloy was the most predictable in terms of differences in misfit when either torch or induction was applied before or after cementation. Cemented titanium crowns exceeded the clinically acceptable limit of 120μm. The combination of alloy composition, melting technique, casting method and luting process influences the vertical seal of cast metal-ceramic crowns. An accurate use of the gas oxygen torch may overcome the results attained with the induction system concerning the marginal adaptation of fixed dental prostheses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A combined arc-melting and tilt-casting furnace for the manufacture of high-purity bulk metallic glass materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soinila, E; Pihlajamäki, T; Bossuyt, S; Hänninen, H

    2011-07-01

    An arc-melting furnace which includes a tilt-casting facility was designed and built, for the purpose of producing bulk metallic glass specimens. Tilt-casting was chosen because reportedly, in combination with high-purity processing, it produces the best fatigue endurance in Zr-based bulk metallic glasses. Incorporating the alloying and casting facilities in a single piece of equipment reduces the amount of laboratory space and capital investment needed. Eliminating the sample transfer step from the production process also saves time and reduces sample contamination. This is important because the glass forming ability in many alloy systems, such as Zr-based glass-forming alloys, deteriorates rapidly with increasing oxygen content of the specimen. The challenge was to create a versatile instrument, in which high purity conditions can be maintained throughout the process, even when melting alloys with high affinity for oxygen. Therefore, the design provides a high-vacuum chamber to be filled with a low-oxygen inert atmosphere, and takes special care to keep the system hermetically sealed throughout the process. In particular, movements of the arc-melting electrode and sample manipulator arm are accommodated by deformable metal bellows, rather than sliding O-ring seals, and the whole furnace is tilted for tilt-casting. This performance of the furnace is demonstrated by alloying and casting Zr(55)Cu(30)Al(10)Ni(5) directly into rods up to ø 10 mm which are verified to be amorphous by x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, and to exhibit locally ductile fracture at liquid nitrogen temperature.

  2. Free fall plasma-arc reactor for synthesis of carbon nanotubes in microgravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alford, J. M.; Mason, G. R.; Feikema, D. A.

    2006-01-01

    High temperatures inside the plasma of a carbon arc generate strong buoyancy driven convection which has an effect on the growth and morphology of the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). To study the effect of buoyancy on the arc process, a miniature carbon arc apparatus was designed and developed to synthesize SWNTs in a microgravity environment substantially free from buoyant convective flows. An arc reactor was operated in the 2.2 and 5.18 s drop towers at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The apparatus employed a 4 mm diameter anode and was powered by a portable battery pack capable of providing in excess of 300 A at 30 V to the arc for the duration of a 5 s drop. However, the principal result is that no dramatic difference in sample yield or composition was noted between normal gravity and 2.2 and 5 s long microgravity runs. Much longer duration microgravity time is required for SWNT's growth such as the zero-G aircraft, but more likely will need to be performed on the international space station or an orbiting spacecraft

  3. “Synthesis-on” and “synthesis-off” modes of carbon arc operation during synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yatom, Shurik; Selinsky, Rachel S.

    2017-01-01

    Arc discharge synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) remains largely uncontrollable, due to incomplete understanding of the synthetic process itself. Here, we show that synthesis of SWCNTs by a carbon arc may not constitute a single continuous process, but may instead consist of two distinct modes. One of these, a “synthesis-on” mode, produces the majority of the nanomaterials. During the synthesis-on mode, proportionally more carbon nanotubes are collected than in another mode, a “synthesis-off” mode. Both synthesis-on and synthesis-off modes for a typical arc configuration, employing a hollow anode filled with a mixture of powdered metal catalyst and graphite, were characterized by using in situ electrical, imaging, and spectroscopic diagnostics, along with ex situ imaging and spectroscopy. The synthesis-on mode duration is rare compared to the total arc run-time, helping to explain the poor selectivity found in the final collected products, a known inadequacy of arc synthesis. Finally, the rarity of the synthesis on mode occurence may be due to the synthesis off mode being more favorable energetically.

  4. Preparation of carbon nanotubes by DC arc discharge process under reduced pressure in an air atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyeon Hwan; Kim, Hyeong Joon

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown using a DC arc discharge process in an air atmosphere and relevant process parameters were investigated. Without using an inert gas, multi walled carbon nanotubes could be synthesized in the deposit area of the cathode even in an air atmosphere, but single walled carbon nanotubes were not detected in the soot area despite using the same process conditions as in the inert gas. The air pressure for the highest yield of multi walled CNTs was 300 Torr. In addition, the quantity of amorphous carbon and other nanoparticles in the process chamber was remarkably reduced by this technique, showing that an efficient, feasible method of large scale CNT fabrication could be achieved by the arc discharge process

  5. Techno-economics of carbon nanotubes produced by open air arc ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    method, a continuous and mass production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be achieved with ... CNTs are the most promising of all nanomaterials and have been studied for ... generated with a current of 150 A with 40V and the arc gap between the ... X- ray diffraction is a best method for characterization of CNT structures.

  6. Production of thin carbon stripper foils using heated-substrates in a cathodic arc deposition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchant, A.R.; Lobanov, N.; Elliman, R.G.; Ophel, T.R.; Rode, A.; Weisser, D.C.; Turkentine, R.B.

    1998-01-01

    The lifetime of carbon stripper foil can have a marked impact on the successful running of a beam line. Standard techniques for production of carbon stripper foils include evaporation of carbon (ec) and laser-pulsed ablation (Ipa). Recent work by a using Ipa has been successful in substantially increasing the lifetime of a very thin foil. The suspected mechanism for the increased lifetime of the foil is that the amorphous carbon foil is density-matched to that of graphite (around 2.26g/cc). In this work, we attempt to reproduce this result by producing carbon stripper foils with a mass-density similar to graphite using a cathodic arc deposition system. The cathodic arc is well known for the production of tetrahedral amorphous carbon: a high density, high stress form of carbon with over 90% sp 3 -like bonds; to reduce the density of the carbon and promote more graphitic structure, a high bias was initially attempted but this proved unsuccessful. Another method is to use a heated-substrate holder to reduce compressive stress within the deposited film. The performance of the density-matched carbon stripper foils and the implications for future production of high-quality carbon stripper foils in our laboratory will be discussed. (authors)

  7. Incidence Angle Effect of Energetic Carbon Ions on Deposition Rate, Topography, and Structure of Ultrathin Amorphous Carbon Films Deposited by Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, N.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of the incidence angle of energetic carbon ions on the thickness, topography, and structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon (a-C) films synthesized by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) was examined in the context of numerical

  8. Preparation by the nano-casting process of novel porous carbons from large pore zeolite templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    F Gaslain; J Parmentier; V Valtchev; J Patarin; C Vix Guterl

    2005-01-01

    The development of new growing industrial applications such as gas storage (e.g.: methane or hydrogen) or electric double-layer capacitors has focussed the attention of many research groups. For this kind of application, porous carbons with finely tailored micro-porosity (i.e.: pore size diameter ≤ 1 nm) appear as very promising materials due to their high surface area and their specific pore size distribution. In order to meet these requirements, attention has been paid towards the feasibility of preparing microporous carbons by the nano-casting process. Since the sizes and shapes of the pores and walls respectively become the walls and pores of the resultant carbons, using templates with different framework topologies leads to various carbon replicas. The works performed with commercially available zeolites employed as templates [1-4] showed that the most promising candidate is the FAU-type zeolite, which is a large zeolite with three-dimensional channel system. The promising results obtained on FAU-type matrices encouraged us to study the microporous carbon formation on large pore zeolites synthesized in our laboratory, such as EMC-1 (International Zeolite Association framework type FAU), zeolite β (BEA) or EMC-2 (EMT). The carbon replicas were prepared following largely the nano-casting method proposed for zeolite Y by the Kyotani research group [4]: either by liquid impregnation of furfuryl alcohol (FA) followed by carbonization or by vapour deposition (CVD) of propylene, or by an association of these two processes. Heat treatment of the mixed materials (zeolite / carbon) could also follow in order to improve the structural ordering of the carbon. After removal of the inorganic template by an acidic treatment, the carbon materials obtained were characterised by several analytical techniques (XRD, N 2 and CO 2 adsorption, electron microscopy, etc...). The unique characteristics of these carbons are discussed in details in this paper and compared to those

  9. Generation rate of carbon monoxide from CO2 arc welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojima, Jun

    2013-01-01

    CO poisoning has been a serious industrial hazard in Japanese workplaces. Although incomplete combustion is the major cause of CO generation, there is a risk of CO poisoning during some welding operations. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the generation rate of CO from CO2 arc welding under controlled laboratory conditions and estimate the ventilation requirements for the prevention of CO poisoning. Bead on plate welding was carried out with an automatic welding robot on a rolled steel base metal under several conditions. The concentration of emitted CO from the welding was measured by a real-time CO monitor in a well-ventilated laboratory that was free from ambient CO contamination. The generation rate of CO was obtained from the three measurements-the flow rate of the welding exhaust gas, CO concentration in the exhaust gas and the arcing time. Then the ventilation requirement to prevent CO poisoning was calculated. The generation rate of CO was found to be 386-883 ml/min with a solid wire and 331-1,293 ml/min with a flux cored wire respectively. It was found that the CO concentration in a room would be maintained theoretically below the OSHA PEL (50 ppm) providing the ventilation rate in the room was 6.6-25.9 m3/min. The actual ventilation requirement was then estimated to be 6.6-259 m3/min considering incomplete mixing. In order to prevent CO poisoning, some countermeasures against gaseous emission as well as welding fumes should be taken eagerly.

  10. The anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel and cast iron in artificial groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, N.R.; Blackwood, D.J.; Werme, L.

    2001-07-01

    In Sweden, high level radioactive waste will be disposed of in a canister with a copper outer and a cast iron or carbon steel inner. If the iron insert comes into contact with anoxic geological water, anaerobic corrosion leading to the generation of hydrogen will occur. This paper presents a study of the anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel and cast iron in artificial Swedish granitic groundwaters. Electrochemical methods and gas collection techniques were used to assess the mechanisms and rates of corrosion and the associated hydrogen gas production over a range of conditions. The corrosion rate is high initially but is anodically limited by the slow formation of a duplex magnetite film. The effects of key environmental parameters such as temperature and ionic strength on the anaerobic corrosion rate are discussed

  11. Formation mechanism of spheroidal carbide in ultra-low carbon ductile cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin-guo Fu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The formation mechanism of the spheroidal carbide in the ultra-low carbon ductile cast iron fabricated by the metal mold casting technique was systematically investigated. The results demonstrated that the spheroidal carbide belonged to eutectic carbide and crystallized in the isolated eutectic liquid phase area. The formation process of the spheroidal carbide was related to the contact and the intersection between the primary dendrite and the secondary dendrite of austenite. The oxides of magnesium, rare earths and other elements can act as heterogeneous nucleation sites for the spheroidal carbide. It was also found that the amount of the spheroidal carbide would increase with an increase in carbon content. The cooling rate has an important influence on the spheroidal carbide under the same chemical composition condition.

  12. The anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel and cast iron in artificial groundwaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smart, N.R. [AEA Technology plc, Culham Science Centre (United Kingdom); Blackwood, D.J. [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore); Werme, L. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-07-01

    In Sweden, high level radioactive waste will be disposed of in a canister with a copper outer and a cast iron or carbon steel inner. If the iron insert comes into contact with anoxic geological water, anaerobic corrosion leading to the generation of hydrogen will occur. This paper presents a study of the anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel and cast iron in artificial Swedish granitic groundwaters. Electrochemical methods and gas collection techniques were used to assess the mechanisms and rates of corrosion and the associated hydrogen gas production over a range of conditions. The corrosion rate is high initially but is anodically limited by the slow formation of a duplex magnetite film. The effects of key environmental parameters such as temperature and ionic strength on the anaerobic corrosion rate are discussed.

  13. Preparation and investigation of diamond-like carbon stripper foils by filtered cathodic vacuum arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Qiwen; Du, Yinghui; Zhang, Rong; Xu, Guoji

    2013-01-01

    Thin diamond-like carbon (DLC) stripper foils ∼5μg/cm 2 in thickness were produced and evaluated as heavy-ion strippers for the Beijing HI-13 Tandem Accelerator. The DLC layers ∼4μg/cm 2 in thickness were produced by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc technology onto glass slides coated with betaine–saccharose as releasing agent, which were previously covered with evaporated carbon layers ∼1μg/cm 2 in thickness by the controlled ac arc-discharge method. Irradiation lifetimes of the DLC stripper foils were tested using the heavy-ion beams at the terminal of the Beijing HI-13 Tandem Accelerator, and compared with those of the standard carbon stripper foils made by the combined dc and ac arc-discharge method. The measurements indicate that the DLC stripper foils outlast the standard combined dc and ac arc-discharge carbon stripper foils by a factor of at least 13 and 4 for the 197 Au − (∼9MeV, ∼1μA) and 63 Cu − (∼9MeV, ∼1μA) ion beams, respectively. The structure and properties of the DLC foils deposited onto silicon substrates by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc technology were also evaluated and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The scanning electron microscopy images show that the DLC foils contain hardly droplets through the double 90° filters. The X-ray photoelectron spectrum indicates that sp 3 bonds of the DLC foils exceed 70%. The integral intensity ratio of the D peak to the G peak (I D /I G ) measured by the Raman spectroscopy is 0.78

  14. Growth of small diameter multi-walled carbon nanotubes by arc discharge process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhary, K. T.; Ali, J.; Yupapin, P. P.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are grown by arc discharge method in a controlled methane environment. The arc discharge is produced between two graphite electrodes at the ambient pressures of 100 torr, 300 torr, and 500 torr. Arc plasma parameters such as temperature and density are estimated to investigate the influences of the ambient pressure and the contributions of the ambient pressure to the growth and the structure of the nanotubes. The plasma temperature and density are observed to increase with the increase in the methane ambient pressure. The samples of MWCNT synthesized at different ambient pressures are analyzed using transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. An increase in the growth of MWCNT and a decrease in the inner tube diameter are observed with the increase in the methane ambient pressure

  15. Effect of rare earth and titanium additions on the microstructures and properties of low carbon Fe-B cast steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Hanguang; Xiao Qiang; Kuang Jiacai; Jiang Zhiqiang; Xing Jiandong

    2007-01-01

    A new type of wear resistant low carbon Fe-B cast steel with granular borides can be obtained by alloying with titanium and cerium rare earth (RE). As a result, the as-cast eutectic boride structures of Fe-B cast steel are greatly refined and a blocky, less interconnected boride network is obtained from continuous ledeburite. After heat treatment, the boride eutectic in the modified Fe-B cast steel is in the form of a granular boride structure that appears to be isolated particles The guide rollers made of modified low carbon Fe-B cast steel show excellent wear resistance and thermal fatigue resistance in high speed wire mills

  16. Effects of carbon and molybdenum on the microstructures of high chromium white cast irons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinatora, Amilton; Ambrosio Filho, Francisco; Goldenstein, Helio; Fuoco, Ricardo; Albertin, Eduardo; Mei, Paulo Roberto

    1992-01-01

    The effects of 3 levels of carbon and 1.5% Mo addition on the solidification structures of a 15% chromium white cast iron were studied. The volume fraction of primary austenite and of eutectic carbides, as well as the number of carbide particles per unit length and the mean secondary dendrite arm spacing were measured. By means of thermal analysis, thermal arrest corresponding to the formation of the primary austenite and of the eutectic were determined. The increase in the carbon content and the addition of Mo led to lowering of the thermal arrests and to coarsening of the particles. (author)

  17. A Controlled Arc Welding and Separation Processes for Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Jeannette; Shaw, Harry; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Stage 1 for the Carbon Nanotube Project has been completed. This videograph presents the proposal for Stage 2. The goals of this stage are to: (1) produce CNTs under different conditions such as cooling temperature, voltage, current, cathode and anode sizes; (2) use ferrocene to make longer CNTs; (3) characterize CNTs by spectroscopic methods; (4) develop applications of CNTs, i.e., batteries, composites, wires, etc.; and (5) complete the patent application.

  18. Simultaneous synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene in a magnetically-enhanced arc plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Shashurin, Alexey; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Keidar, Michael

    2012-02-02

    Carbon nanostructures such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and graphene attract a deluge of interest of scholars nowadays due to their very promising application for molecular sensors, field effect transistor and super thin and flexible electronic devices(1-4). Anodic arc discharge supported by the erosion of the anode material is one of the most practical and efficient methods, which can provide specific non-equilibrium processes and a high influx of carbon material to the developing structures at relatively higher temperature, and consequently the as-synthesized products have few structural defects and better crystallinity. To further improve the controllability and flexibility of the synthesis of carbon nanostructures in arc discharge, magnetic fields can be applied during the synthesis process according to the strong magnetic responses of arc plasmas. It was demonstrated that the magnetically-enhanced arc discharge can increase the average length of SWCNT (5), narrow the diameter distribution of metallic catalyst particles and carbon nanotubes (6), and change the ratio of metallic and semiconducting carbon nanotubes (7), as well as lead to graphene synthesis (8). Furthermore, it is worthwhile to remark that when we introduce a non-uniform magnetic field with the component normal to the current in arc, the Lorentz force along the J×B direction can generate the plasmas jet and make effective delivery of carbon ion particles and heat flux to samples. As a result, large-scale graphene flakes and high-purity single-walled carbon nanotubes were simultaneously generated by such new magnetically-enhanced anodic arc method. Arc imaging, scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy were employed to analyze the characterization of carbon nanostructures. These findings indicate a wide spectrum of opportunities to manipulate with the properties of nanostructures produced in plasmas by means of controlling the

  19. The bacterial response regulator ArcA uses a diverse binding site architecture to regulate carbon oxidation globally.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan M Park

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of maintaining redox homeostasis for cellular viability, how cells control redox balance globally is poorly understood. Here we provide new mechanistic insight into how the balance between reduced and oxidized electron carriers is regulated at the level of gene expression by mapping the regulon of the response regulator ArcA from Escherichia coli, which responds to the quinone/quinol redox couple via its membrane-bound sensor kinase, ArcB. Our genome-wide analysis reveals that ArcA reprograms metabolism under anaerobic conditions such that carbon oxidation pathways that recycle redox carriers via respiration are transcriptionally repressed by ArcA. We propose that this strategy favors use of catabolic pathways that recycle redox carriers via fermentation akin to lactate production in mammalian cells. Unexpectedly, bioinformatic analysis of the sequences bound by ArcA in ChIP-seq revealed that most ArcA binding sites contain additional direct repeat elements beyond the two required for binding an ArcA dimer. DNase I footprinting assays suggest that non-canonical arrangements of cis-regulatory modules dictate both the length and concentration-sensitive occupancy of DNA sites. We propose that this plasticity in ArcA binding site architecture provides both an efficient means of encoding binding sites for ArcA, σ(70-RNAP and perhaps other transcription factors within the same narrow sequence space and an effective mechanism for global control of carbon metabolism to maintain redox homeostasis.

  20. Life Cycle Assessment of Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing compared to green sand casting and CNC milling in stainless steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, A.C.M.; Verlinden, J.C.

    2018-01-01

    Wire and Arc Additive Manufacturing (WAAM) is a metal 3D printing technique based on robotic welding. This technique yields potential in decreasing material consumption due to its high material efficiency and freedom of shape. Empirical measurements of WAAM, using a deposition rate of 1 kg/h, were

  1. Heat treatment of cathodic arc deposited amorphous hard carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, S.; Ager, J.W. III; Brown, I.G. [and others

    1997-02-01

    Amorphous hard carbon films of varying sp{sup 2}/sp{sup 3} fractions have been deposited on Si using filtered cathodic are deposition with pulsed biasing. The films were heat treated in air up to 550 C. Raman investigation and nanoindentation were performed to study the modification of the films caused by the heat treatment. It was found that films containing a high sp{sup 3} fraction sustain their hardness for temperatures at least up to 400 C, their structure for temperatures up to 500 C, and show a low thickness loss during heat treatment. Films containing at low sp{sup 3} fraction graphitize during the heat treatment, show changes in structure and hardness, and a considerable thickness loss.

  2. The spectral emissivity of the anode of a carbon arc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurer, K

    1968-03-01

    Data in the literature on the spectral emissivity of carbon and graphite show a great divergence, ranging from 0.75 to 0.99 in the visible region. A new determination has been undertaken at a number of wavelengths using an integrating sphere and modulated light. Emissivities ranging from 0.99 in the visible to 0.96 at 0.28 micro and 1.7 micro have been found for several different graphite anodes; the values for lampblack anodes are about 0.005 lower. There is a good agreement with the highest values thus far published. Most of the literature data on the spectral radiance of the anode are consistent with the emissivities found by the present author.

  3. Highly zone-dependent synthesis of different carbon nanostructures using plasma-enhanced arc discharge technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rajesh, E-mail: rajeshbhu1@gmail.com [Yonsei University, Department of Materials Science & Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Singh, Rajesh Kumar, E-mail: rksbhu@gmail.com [Banaras Hindu University, Department of Applied Physics, Indian Institute of Technology (India); Dubey, Pawan Kumar [University of Allahabad, Nanotechnology Application Centre (India); Yadav, Ram Manohar [Rice University, Department of Materials Science and Nano Engineering (United States); Singh, Dinesh Pratap [Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Departamento de Física (Chile); Tiwari, R. S.; Srivastava, O. N. [Banaras Hindu University, Department of Physics (India)

    2015-01-15

    Three kinds of carbon nanostructures, i.e., graphene nanoflakes (GNFs), multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), and spherical carbon nanoparticles (SCNPs) were comparatively investigated in one run experiment. These carbon nanostructures are located at specific location inside the direct current plasma-assisted arc discharge chamber. These carbon nanomaterials have been successfully synthesized using graphite as arcing electrodes at 400 torr in helium (He) atmosphere. The SCNPs were found in the deposits formed on the cathode holder, in which highly curled graphitic structure are found in majority. The diameter varies from 20 to 60 nm and it also appears that these particles are self-assembled to each other. The MWCNTs with the diameter of 10–30 nm were obtained which were present inside the swelling portion of cathode deposited. These MWCNTs have 14–18 graphitic layers with 3.59 Å interlayer spacing. The GNFs have average lateral sizes of 1–5 μm and few of them are stacked layers and shows crumpled like structure. The GNFs are more stable at low temperature (low mass loss) but SCNPs have low mass loss at high temperature.

  4. Microstructure and magnetism of Co2FeAl Heusler alloy prepared by arc and induction melting compared with planar flow casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, A.; Jiraskova, Y.; Zivotsky, O.; Bursik, J.; Janickovic, D.

    2018-04-01

    This paper is devoted to investigations of the structural and magnetic properties of the Co2FeAl Heusler alloy produced by three technologies. The alloys prepared by arc and induction melting have resulted in coarse-grained samples in contrast to the fine-grained ribbon-type sample prepared by planar flow casting. Scanning electron microscopy completed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and magnetic methods sensitive to both bulk and surface were applied. The chemical composition was slightly different from the nominal only for the ribbon sample. From the viewpoint of magnetic properties, the bulk coercivity and remnant magnetization have followed the structure influenced by the technology used. Saturation magnetization was practically the same for samples prepared by arc and induction melting, whereas the magnetization of ribbon is slightly lower due to a higher Al content at the expense of iron and cobalt. The surface magnetic properties were markedly influenced by anisotropy, grain size, and surface roughness of the samples. The surface roughness and brittleness of the ribbon-type sample did not make domain structure observation possible. The other two samples could be well polished and their highly smooth surface has enabled domain structure visualization by both magneto-optical Kerr microscopy and magnetic force microscopy.

  5. Growth of carbon nanotubes in arc plasma treated graphite disc: microstructural characterization and electrical conductivity study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, B. B.; Sahu, R. K.; Dash, T.; Pradhan, S.

    2018-03-01

    Circular graphite discs were treated in arc plasma by varying arcing time. Analysis of the plasma treated discs by field emission scanning electron microscope revealed globular grain morphologies on the surfaces, but when the same were observed at higher magnification and higher resolution under transmission electron microscope, growth of multiwall carbon nanotubes of around 2 nm diameter was clearly seen. In situ growth of carbon nanotube bundles/bunches consisting of around 0.7 nm tube diameter was marked in the case of 6 min treated disc surface. Both the untreated and the plasma treated graphite discs were characterized by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectra of X-ray, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, micro Raman spectroscopy and BET surface area measurement. From Raman spectra, BET surface area and microstructure observed in transmission electron microscope, growth of several layers of graphene was identified. Four-point probe measurements for electrical resistivity/conductivity of the graphite discs treated under different plasma conditions showed significant increase in conductivity values over that of untreated graphite conductivity value and the best result, i.e., around eightfold increase in conductivity, was observed in the case of 6 min plasma treated sample exhibiting carbon nanotube bundles/bunches grown on disc surface. By comparing the microstructures of the untreated and plasma treated graphite discs, the electrical conductivity increase in graphite disc is attributed to carbon nanotubes (including bundles/bunches) growth on disc surface by plasma treatment.

  6. Impact of arcing on carbon and tungsten. From the observations in JT-60U, LHD, and NAGDIS-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajita, Shin; Fukumoto, Masakatsu; Nakano, Tomohide; Tokitani, Masayuki; Masuzaki, Suguru; Ohno, Noriyasu; Takamura, Shuichi; Yoshida, Naoaki; Ueda, Yoshio

    2012-11-01

    This paper assesses the impact of arcing in fusion devices based on the observations in JT-60U, LHD, and the linear divertor simulator NAGDIS-II. In NAGDIS-II, the demonstration experiments of arcing/unipolar arcing have been conducted by simulating the transient heat load using a pulsed laser; it was found that the arcing can be easily initiated on the helium irradiated nanostructured tungsten. By measuring the field emission current property from the helium irradiated tungsten surface, the initiation conditions are discussed. From the detailed analysis of JT-60U tiles, it is found that arcing phenomena occurred on carbon baffle plates. From the observation of the arc trails recorded on the baffle plate, the amount of the eroded materials is discussed. The arcing seemed to occur frequently on inner baffles rather than the outer baffles. From LHD, it is shown that the arcing can be initiated on nanostructured tungsten even without transient events. The erosion of tungsten by arcing will become an important issue in a fusion reactor, where helium fluence is significantly increased. (author)

  7. INFLUENCE OF STRUCTURAL PARAMETERS OF LOW-CARBON STEEL ON ELECTRIC ARC BURNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. O. Vakulenko

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article is aimed to evaluate the influence of structural parameters of low-carbon steel on arcing process. Methodology. The values of the micro- and substructure characteristics of the electrode wire metal were changed by varying the parameters of heat treatment and cold deformation by drawing. The degree of plastic deformation was obtained by drawing blanks from different initial diameter to final dimension of 1 mm. The thermal treatment was carried out in electric chamber furnace of the SNOL-1,6.2,5.1/11-IZ type. The temperature was measured by chromel-alumel thermocouple and the electromotive force was determined using the DC potentiometer. In order to obtain the substructure of different dispersion degree the steel (after quenching from temperatures and tempering at 650°C for 1 hour was subjected to cold drawing to reduction 17 – 80%. To form structure with different ferrite grain size the steel after drawing was annealed at 680°C for 1 hour. The microstructure was examined under a light and electron transmission microscope UEMV-100K at the accelerating voltage 100 kV. The grain and subgrain sizes were evaluated using the methodologies of quantitative metallography. A welding converter of the PSG-500 type was used to study the arc welding process of direct and reverse polarities. Findings. The experimentally detected value of the welding current, which depends on the degree of deformation during wire drawing, under conditions of stable arc burning of direct polarity is about an order of magnitude lower than the calculated value. Similar difference was found for the arc of reverse polarity: the experimental value of the welding current is 5...6 times less than the calculated value. Dependence analysis shows that, regardless of the polarity of the welding arc, a good enough agreement between the calculated and experimental values of the welding current is limited to deformations of 60%. For deformation degrees of more than 60

  8. The Role of Carbon in Grain Refinement of Cast CrFeCoNi High-Entropy Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X. W.; Liu, L.; Liu, G.; Wu, X. X.; Lu, D. H.; Yao, J. Q.; Jiang, W. M.; Fan, Z. T.; Zhang, W. B.

    2018-06-01

    As a promising engineering material, high-entropy alloys (HEAs) CrFeCoNi system has attracted extensive attention worldwide. Their cast alloys are of great importance because of their great formability of complex components, which can be further improved through the transition of the columnar to equiaxed grains and grain refinement. In the current work, the influence of C contents on the grain structures and mechanical properties of the as-cast high-entropy alloy CrFeCoNi was chosen as the target and systematically studied via a hybrid approach of the experiments and thermodynamic calculations. The alloys with various C additions were prepared by arc melting and drop cast. The as-cast macrostructure and microstructure were characterized using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The cast HEAs transform from coarse columnar grains into equiaxed grains with the C level increased to ≥ 2 at. pct and the size of equiaxed grains is further decreased with the increasing C addition. It is revealed that the interdendritic segregation of Cr and C results in grain boundary precipitation of M23C6 carbides. The grain refinement is attributed to the additional constitutional supercoiling from the C addition. The yield stress and tensile strength at room temperature are improved due to the transition of columnar to equiaxed grains and grain refinement.

  9. Electroless nickel plating of arc discharge synthesized carbon nanotubes for metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannatham, M.; Sankaran, S.; Prathap, Haridoss

    2015-01-01

    Electroless nickel (EN) plating was performed on arc discharge synthesized multiwalled carbon nanotubes for various deposition times. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy characterization techniques are used to identify the presence of nickel deposition on the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the degree of graphitization. The results indicate that impurities are less in the purified CNTs as compared to raw carbon soot. Increasing deposition time up to 60 min increases uniform deposition of nickel throughout the length of the CNTs. However, for deposition time longer than 60 min, nickel particles are seen separated from the surface of the CNTs. Uniformly coated nickel CNTs throughout their length are potential candidates for reinforcements in composite materials. Magnetic properties of the nickel coated CNTs, with deposition time of 30 and 60 min were also evaluated. The magnetic saturation of nickel coated CNTs with deposition time of 30 min is less compared to nickel coated CNTs with deposition time of 60 min.

  10. Anti-carburizing Coating for Resin Sand Casting of Low Carbon Steel Based on Composite Silicate Powder Containing Zirconium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Chunyi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studied the structure and properties of anticarburizing coating based on composite silicate powder containing zirconium by X-ray diffraction analyzer, thermal expansion tester, digital microscope and other equipment. It is introduced that the application example of the coating in the resin-sand casting of ZG1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel impeller. The anti-carburizing effect of the coating on the surface layer of the cast is studied by using direct reading spectrometer and spectrum analyzer. The change of the micro-structure of the coating after casting and cooling is observed by scanning electron microscope. The analysis of anti-carburizing mechanism of the coating is presented. The results indicate that the coating possesses excellent suspension property, brush ability, permeability, levelling property and crackresistance. The coating exhibits high strength and low gas evolution. Most of the coating could be automatically stripped off flakily when the casting was shaken out. The casting possesses excellent surface finish and antimetal penetration effect. The carburizing layer thickness of the stainless steel impeller casting with respect to allowable upper limit of carbon content is about 1mm and maximum carburizing rate is 23.6%. The anticarburizing effect of casting surface is greatly improved than that of zircon powder coating whose maximum carburizing rate is 67.9% and the carburizing layer thickness with respect to allowable upper limit of carbon content is greater than 2mm. The composite silicate powder containing zirconium coating substantially reduces the zircon powder which is expensive and radioactive and mainly dependent on imports. The coating can be used instead of pure zircon powder coating to effectively prevent metal-penetration and carburizing of resin-sand-casting surface of low carbon steel, significantly improve the foundry production environment and reduce the production costs.

  11. Arc-Discharge Synthesis of Iron Encapsulated in Carbon Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Chaitoglou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present work is to improve the protection against the oxidation that usually appears in core@shell nanoparticles. Spherical iron nanoparticles coated with a carbon shell were obtained by a modified arc-discharge reactor, which permits controlling the diameter of the iron core and the carbon shell of the particles. Oxidized iron nanoparticles involve a loss of the magnetic characteristics and also changes in the chemical properties. Our nanoparticles show superparamagnetic behavior and high magnetic saturation owing to the high purity α-Fe of core and to the high core sealing, provided by the carbon shell. A liquid iron precursor was injected in the plasma spot dragged by an inert gas flow. A fixed arc-discharge current of 40 A was used to secure a stable discharge, and several samples were produced at different conditions. Transmission electron microscopy indicated an iron core diameter between 5 and 9 nm. Selected area electron diffraction provided evidences of a highly crystalline and dense iron core. The magnetic properties were studied up to 5 K temperature using a superconducting quantum interference device. The results reveal a superparamagnetic behaviour, a narrow size distribution (σg=1.22, and an average diameter of 6 nm for nanoparticles having a blocking temperature near 40 K.

  12. Carbon nanostructures obtained by underwater arc discharge of graphite electrodes: Synthesis and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darias Gonzalez, J. G.; Hernandez Tabare, L.; Herrera Palma, V.; Sierra Trujillo, J. S.; Desdin Garcia, L. F.; Codorniu Pujals, D.; Bermudez Martinez, A.; Arias de Fuentes, O.; Maury Toledo, A.

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, the application of the method of underwater arc discharge of graphite electrodes for obtaining several carbon nano structures is described. The analysis of the obtained products by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) showed that the samples collected from the material floating on the water surface were composed mainly by polyhedral onion-like particles, while those taken from the precipitate were a mixture multi walled nano-tubes, onion-like particles and other graphitic structures. The main features of the obtained nano structures are discussed. (Author)

  13. Metal-doped diamond-like carbon films synthesized by filter-arc deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, K.-W.; Chen, Y.-C.; Lin, T.-N.; Wang, D.-Y.

    2006-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films are extensively utilized in the semiconductor, electric and cutting machine industries owing to their high hardness, high elastic modulus, low friction coefficients and high chemical stability. DLC films are prepared by ion beam-assisted deposition (BAD), sputter deposition, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), cathodic arc evaporation (CAE), and filter arc deposition (FAD). The major drawbacks of these methods are the degraded hardness associated with the low sp 3 /sp 2 bonding ratio, the rough surface and poor adhesion caused by the presence of particles. In this study, a self-developed filter arc deposition (FAD) system was employed to prepare metal-containing DLC films with a low particle density. The relationships between the DLC film properties, such as film structure, surface morphology and mechanical behavior, with variation of substrate bias and target current, are examined. Experimental results demonstrate that FAD-DLC films have a lower ratio, suggesting that FAD-DLC films have a greater sp 3 bonding than the CAE-DLC films. FAD-DLC films also exhibit a low friction coefficient of 0.14 and half of the number of surface particles as in the CAE-DLC films. Introducing a CrN interfacial layer between the substrate and the DLC films enables the magnetic field strength of the filter to be controlled to improve the adhesion and effectively eliminate the contaminating particles. Accordingly, the FAD system improves the tribological properties of the DLC films

  14. Electrochemical properties of arc-black and carbon nano-balloon as electrochemical capacitor electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, T; Suda, Y; Uruno, H; Takikawa, H; Tanoue, H; Ue, H; Aoyagi, N; Okawa, T; Shimizu, K

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we used two types of carbon nanomaterials, arc-black (AcB) which has an amorphous structure and carbon nano-balloon (CNB) which has a graphitic structure as electrochemical capacitor electrodes. We made a coin electrode from these carbon materials and fabricated an electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC) that sandwiches a separator between the coin electrodes. On the other hand, RuO 2 was loaded on these carbon materials, and we fabricated a pseudo-capacitor that has an ion insertion mechanism into RuO 2 . For comparison with these carbon materials, activated carbon (AC) was also used for a capacitor electrode. The electrochemical properties of all the capacitors were evaluated in 1M H 2 SO 4 aqueous solution. As a result of EDLC performance, AcB electrode had a higher specific capacitance than AC electrode at a high scan rate (≥ 100 mV/s). In the evaluation of pseudo-capacitor performance, RuO 2 -loaded CNB electrode showed a high specific capacitance of 734 F/g per RuO 2 weight.

  15. Industrial study of iron oxide reduction by injection of carbon particles into the electric arc furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conejo, A. N.; Torres, R.; Cuellar, E.

    1999-01-01

    An industrial study was conducted in electric arc furnaces (EAF) employing 100% direct reduced iron to evaluate the oxidation level of the slag-metal system. Energy consumption is decreased by injecting gaseous oxygen, however, slag oxidation also increases. In order to reduce the extent of oxidation while keeping a high volume of the oxygen injected , it is required: a) to optimize the carbon injection practice, b) to increase the carbon concentration of sponge iron, c) to operate with soluble carbon in both the metal and the slag beyond a critical level and d) to employ a low temperature profile, on average 1,650 degree centigrade. A method to define the proper amount of carbon in sponge iron which considers their metallization as well as the amount of oxygen injected is proposed. The position of the lance is critical in order to optimize the practice of carbon injection and assure a better residence time of the carbon particles within the furnace. (Author) 23 refs

  16. Influence of thermal heating on diamond-like carbon film properties prepared by filtered cathodic arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khamnualthong, N.; Siangchaew, K.; Limsuwan, P.

    2013-01-01

    Tetrahedral amorphous diamond-like carbon (ta-DLC) films were deposited on magnetic recording heads using the filtered cathodic arc method. The deposited film thickness was on the order of several nanometers. The DLC films were then annealed to 100 °C–300 °C for 30 and 60 min, and the structure of the ta-DLC films was investigated using Raman spectroscopy, where the gross changes were observed in the Raman D and G peaks. Detailed interpretation concluded that there was sp 2 clustering as a function of temperature, and there was no sp 3 -to-sp 2 conversion after heating up to 300 °C. Furthermore, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy suggested that oxidation of both the ta-DLC film and the adhesion layer occurs at 300 °C. Additionally, more film wear was observed with heating as measured by a nanoindenter. - Highlights: • Tetrahedral-amorphous diamond-like carbon (ta-DLC) by filtered cathodic arc • ta-DLC used in magnetic recording head as head overcoat • ta-DLC thickness range of less than 2 nm • ta-DLC property dependence on heating • Temperature effect range of up to 300 °C

  17. Influence of Secondary Cooling Mode on Solidification Structure and Macro-segregation Behavior for High-carbon Continuous Casting Bloom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Kun; Yang, Zhenguo; Liu, Qing; Huang, Yunhua; Dong, Hongbiao

    2017-07-01

    A cellular automaton-finite element coupling model for high-carbon continuously cast bloom of GCr15 steel is established to simulate the solidification structure and to investigate the influence of different secondary cooling modes on characteristic parameters such as equiaxed crystal ratio, grain size and secondary dendrite arm spacing, in which the effect of phase transformation and electromagnetic stirring is taken into consideration. On this basis, evolution of carbon macro-segregation for GCr15 steel bloom is researched correspondingly via industrial tests. Based on above analysis, the relationship among secondary cooling modes, characteristic parameters for solidification structure as well as carbon macro-segregation is illustrated to obtain optimum secondary cooling strategy and alleviate carbon macro-segregation degree for GCr15 steel bloom in continuous casting process. The evaluating method for element macro-segregation is applicable in various steel types.

  18. Fingerprints of a forest fungus: Swiss needle cast, carbon isotopes, carbohydrates, and growth in Douglas-fir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrea Watts; Frederick Meinzer; Brandy J. Saffell

    2014-01-01

    Swiss needle cast is caused by a fungus native to the Pacific Northwest. Its host is Douglas-fir, an iconic evergreen tree in the region. The fungus does not kill its host, but it adversely affects the tree's growth. The fungal fruiting bodies block the stomata, small openings on the underside of the needle where carbon dioxide, water vapor, and other gases are...

  19. Corrosion Inhibiting Mechanism of Nitrite Ion on the Passivation of Carbon Steel and Ductile Cast Iron for Nuclear Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. T. Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available While NaNO2 addition can greatly inhibit the corrosion of carbon steel and ductile cast iron, in order to improve the similar corrosion resistance, ca. 100 times more NaNO2 addition is needed for ductile cast iron compared to carbon steel. A corrosion and inhibition mechanism is proposed whereby NO2- ion is added to oxidize. The NO2- ion can be reduced to nitrogen compounds and these compounds may be absorbed on the surface of graphite. Therefore, since nitrite ion needs to oxidize the surface of matrix and needs to passivate the galvanic corroded area and since it is absorbed on the surface of graphite, a greater amount of corrosion inhibitor needs to be added to ductile cast iron compared to carbon steel. The passive film of carbon steel and ductile cast iron, formed by NaNO2 addition showed N-type semiconductive properties and its resistance, is increased; the passive current density is thus decreased and the corrosion rate is then lowered. In addition, the film is mainly composed of iron oxide due to the oxidation by NO2- ion; however, regardless of the alloys, nitrogen compounds (not nitrite were detected at the outermost surface but were not incorporated in the inner oxide.

  20. Developing high strength and ductility in biomedical Co-Cr cast alloys by simultaneous doping with nitrogen and carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Kenta; Mori, Manami; Chiba, Akihiko

    2016-02-01

    There is a strong demand for biomedical Co-Cr-based cast alloys with enhanced mechanical properties for use in dental applications. We present a design strategy for development of Co-Cr-based cast alloys with very high strength, comparable to that of wrought Co-Cr alloys, without loss of ductility. The strategy consists of simultaneous doping of nitrogen and carbon, accompanied by increasing of the Cr content to increase the nitrogen solubility. The strategy was verified by preparing Co-33Cr-9W-0.35N-(0.01-0.31)C (mass%) alloys. We determined the carbon concentration dependence of the microstructures and their mechanical properties. Metal ion release of the alloys in an aqueous solution of 0.6% sodium chloride (NaCl) and 1% lactic acid was also evaluated to ensure their corrosion resistance. As a result of the nitrogen doping, the formation of a brittle σ-phase, a chromium-rich intermetallic compound, was significantly suppressed. Adding carbon to the alloys resulted in finer-grained microstructures and carbide precipitation; accordingly, the strength increased with increasing carbon concentration. The tensile ductility, on the other hand, increased with increasing carbon concentration only up to a point, reaching a maximum at a carbon concentration of ∼0.1mass% and decreasing with further carbon doping. However, the alloy with 0.31mass% of carbon exhibited 14% elongation and also possessed very high strength (725MPa in 0.2% proof stress). The addition of carbon did not significantly degrade the corrosion resistance. The results show that our strategy realizes a novel high-strength Co-Cr-based cast alloy that can be produced for advanced dental applications using a conventional casting procedure. The present study suggested a novel alloy design concept for realizing high-strength Co-Cr-based cast alloys. The proposed strategy is beneficial from the practical point of view because it uses conventional casting approach-a simpler, more cost-effective, industrially

  1. Fabrication and dispersion evaluation of single-wall carbon nanotubes produced by FH-arc discharge method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B; Zhao, X; Inoue, S; Ando, Y

    2010-06-01

    In this work, we produced SWNTs by a hydrogen DC arc discharge with evaporation of carbon anode containing 1 at% Fe catalyst in H2-Ar mixture gas. This was named as FH-arc discharge method. The as-grown SWNTs synthesized by FH-arc discharge method have high crystallinity. An oxidation purification process of as-grown SWNTs with H2O2 has been developed to remove the coexisting Fe catalyst nanoparticles. As a result, SWNTs with purity higher than 90 at% have been achieved. To exhibit remarkable characteristics, CNTs should be separated from the bundles and kept in homogeneous and stable suspensions. For this purpose, the SWNTs prepared by FH-arc discharge method also have been treated by Nanomizer process with some surfactants. SPM images showed that the SWNTs bundles had become thinner and shorter.

  2. LARGE AREA FILTERED ARC DEPOSITION OF CARBON AND BORON BASED HARD COATINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Rabi S.

    2003-12-05

    This document is a final report covering work performed under Contract No. DE-FG02-99ER82911 from the Department of Energy under a SBIR Phase II Program. Wear resistant, hard coatings can play a vital role in many engineering applications. The primary goal of this project was to develop coatings containing boron and carbon with hardness greater than 30 GPa and evaluate these coatings for machining applications. UES has developed a number of carbon and boron containing coatings with hardness in the range of 34 to 65 GPa using a combination of filtered cathodic arc and magnetron sputtering. The boron containing coatings were based on TiB2, TiBN, and TiBCN, while the carbon containing coatings ere TiC+C and hydrogen free diamond-like-carbon. Machining tests were performed with single and multilayer coated tools. The turning and milling tests were run at TechSolve Inc., under a subcontract at Ohio State University. Significant increases in tool lives were realized in end milling of H-13 die steel (8X) and titanium alloy (80%) using the TiBN coating. A multilayer TiBN/TiN performed the best in end-milling of highly abrasive Al-Si alloys. A 40% increase in life over the TiAlN benchmark coating was found. Further evaluations of these coatings with commercialization partners are currently in progress.

  3. Electric field induced needle-pulsed arc discharge carbon nanotube production apparatus: Circuitry and mechanical design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kia, Kaveh Kazemi [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Islamic Azad University of Bonab, Bonab (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bonabi, Fahimeh [Department of Engineering, Islamic Azad University of Bonab, Bonab (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    A simple and low cost apparatus is reported to produce multiwall carbon nanotubes and carbon nano-onions by a low power short pulsed arc discharge reactor. The electric circuitry and the mechanical design details and a micro-filtering assembly are described. The pulsed-plasma is generated and applied between two graphite electrodes. The pulse width is 0.3 {mu}s. A strong dc electric field is established along side the electrodes. The repetitive discharges occur in less than 1 mm distance between a sharp tip graphite rod as anode, and a tubular graphite as cathode. A hydrocarbon vapor, as carbon source, is introduced through the graphite nozzle in the cathode assembly. The pressure of the chamber is controlled by a vacuum pump. A magnetic field, perpendicular to the plasma path, is provided. The results show that the synergetic use of a pulsed-current and a dc power supply enables us to synthesize carbon nanoparticles with short pulsed plasma. The simplicity and inexpensiveness of this plan is noticeable. Pulsed nature of plasma provides some extra degrees of freedom that make the production more controllable. Effects of some design parameters such as electric field, pulse frequency, and cathode shape are discussed. The products are examined using scanning probe microscopy techniques.

  4. Electric field induced needle-pulsed arc discharge carbon nanotube production apparatus: circuitry and mechanical design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Kaveh Kazemi; Bonabi, Fahimeh

    2012-12-01

    A simple and low cost apparatus is reported to produce multiwall carbon nanotubes and carbon nano-onions by a low power short pulsed arc discharge reactor. The electric circuitry and the mechanical design details and a micro-filtering assembly are described. The pulsed-plasma is generated and applied between two graphite electrodes. The pulse width is 0.3 μs. A strong dc electric field is established along side the electrodes. The repetitive discharges occur in less than 1 mm distance between a sharp tip graphite rod as anode, and a tubular graphite as cathode. A hydrocarbon vapor, as carbon source, is introduced through the graphite nozzle in the cathode assembly. The pressure of the chamber is controlled by a vacuum pump. A magnetic field, perpendicular to the plasma path, is provided. The results show that the synergetic use of a pulsed-current and a dc power supply enables us to synthesize carbon nanoparticles with short pulsed plasma. The simplicity and inexpensiveness of this plan is noticeable. Pulsed nature of plasma provides some extra degrees of freedom that make the production more controllable. Effects of some design parameters such as electric field, pulse frequency, and cathode shape are discussed. The products are examined using scanning probe microscopy techniques.

  5. Segregation of Elements in Continuous Cast Carbon Steel Billets Designated for Long Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutny A. M.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents research results concerning designation of the scope of segregation of elements by analysing the ingot, designated for hot rolling of long products. The research tests were performed under industrial conditions, during continuous casting production cycle of high carbon steels. From cc ingots with square cross-section of 160 mm samples having the length of 400 mm were collected, out of which two samples were cut up, the so-called templates with the thickness of 20 mm. Segregation of elements was determined based on the quantitative analysis of results performed by using spark spectrometry pursuant to PN-H-04045. Changes in concentrations of elements were analysed along the line, which join the opposite sides of the sample in their half length and pass through the geometric centre of the square cross-section. In the further course of the research study, there was also determined the segregation along perpendicular line up to the surface connecting the core of the cross-section with lateral plane. Designations of element contents were performed at points distanced from each other by approx. 10 mm and situated on the lines. There was found segregation of carbon, sulphur and phosphorus.

  6. Growth of linear Ni-filled carbon nanotubes by local arc discharge in liquid ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagara, Takuya [Department of Electric Engineering, Graduated School of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 1-8-14 Surugadai Kanda, Chiyoda, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Kurumi, Satoshi [Department of Electric Engineering, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 1-8-14 Surugadai Kanda, Chiyoda, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Suzuki, Kaoru, E-mail: kaoru@ele.cst.nihon-u.ac.jp [Department of Electric Engineering, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 1-8-14 Surugadai Kanda, Chiyoda, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    The cylindrical geometry of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) allows them to be filled with metal catalysts; the resulting metal-filled CNTs possess different properties depending on the filler metal. Here we report the synthesis of Ni-filled CNTs in which Ni is situated linearly and homogeneously by local arc discharge in liquid ethanol. The structural characteristics of synthesized Ni-filled CNTs were determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the relationship between pyrolysis conditions and the length and diameter of Ni-filled CNTs was examined. The encapsulated Ni was identified by a TEM-equipped energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscope and found to have a single-crystal fcc structure by nano-beam diffraction. The features of linear Ni-filled CNT are expected to be applicable to probes for magnetic force microscopy.

  7. Carbon Nano-particle Synthesized by Pulsed Arc Discharge Method as a Light Emitting Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Ramin; Ahmadi, Mohamad Taghi; Ismail, Razali

    2018-04-01

    Owing to the specific properties such as high mobility, ballistic carrier transport and light emission, carbon nano-particles (CNPs) have been employed in nanotechnology applications. In the presented work, the CNPs are synthesized by using the pulsed arc discharge method between two copper electrodes. The rectifying behaviour of produced CNPs is explored by assuming an Ohmic contact between the CNPs and the electrodes. The synthesized sample is characterized by electrical investigation and modelling. The current-voltage (I-V) relationship is investigated and bright visible light emission from the produced CNPs was measured. The electroluminescence (EL) intensity was explored by changing the distance between two electrodes. An incremental behaviour on EL by a resistance gradient and distance reduction is identified.

  8. Electroless nickel plating of arc discharge synthesized carbon nanotubes for metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagannatham, M.; Sankaran, S.; Prathap, Haridoss

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Electroless Ni coatings have been performed on CNTs for various deposition times. • The deposition of nickel increased with increase in deposition time. • A deposition time of 60 min has been optimum for uniform coating of Ni on CNTs. • The CNTs with uniform coating of Ni are potential for reinforcements in composites. • Electroless nickel coatings are determined to be super paramagnetic behavior. - Abstract: Electroless nickel (EN) plating was performed on arc discharge synthesized multiwalled carbon nanotubes for various deposition times. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy characterization techniques are used to identify the presence of nickel deposition on the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the degree of graphitization. The results indicate that impurities are less in the purified CNTs as compared to raw carbon soot. Increasing deposition time up to 60 min increases uniform deposition of nickel throughout the length of the CNTs. However, for deposition time longer than 60 min, nickel particles are seen separated from the surface of the CNTs. Uniformly coated nickel CNTs throughout their length are potential candidates for reinforcements in composite materials. Magnetic properties of the nickel coated CNTs, with deposition time of 30 and 60 min were also evaluated. The magnetic saturation of nickel coated CNTs with deposition time of 30 min is less compared to nickel coated CNTs with deposition time of 60 min

  9. Electroless nickel plating of arc discharge synthesized carbon nanotubes for metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagannatham, M.; Sankaran, S.; Prathap, Haridoss, E-mail: prathap@iitm.ac.in

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Electroless Ni coatings have been performed on CNTs for various deposition times. • The deposition of nickel increased with increase in deposition time. • A deposition time of 60 min has been optimum for uniform coating of Ni on CNTs. • The CNTs with uniform coating of Ni are potential for reinforcements in composites. • Electroless nickel coatings are determined to be super paramagnetic behavior. - Abstract: Electroless nickel (EN) plating was performed on arc discharge synthesized multiwalled carbon nanotubes for various deposition times. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy characterization techniques are used to identify the presence of nickel deposition on the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the degree of graphitization. The results indicate that impurities are less in the purified CNTs as compared to raw carbon soot. Increasing deposition time up to 60 min increases uniform deposition of nickel throughout the length of the CNTs. However, for deposition time longer than 60 min, nickel particles are seen separated from the surface of the CNTs. Uniformly coated nickel CNTs throughout their length are potential candidates for reinforcements in composite materials. Magnetic properties of the nickel coated CNTs, with deposition time of 30 and 60 min were also evaluated. The magnetic saturation of nickel coated CNTs with deposition time of 30 min is less compared to nickel coated CNTs with deposition time of 60 min.

  10. Electrochemical performance of arc-produced carbon nanotubes as anode material for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Shubin; Song, Huaihe; Chen, Xiaohong; Okotrub, A.V.; Bulusheva, L.G.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of etching process on the morphology, structure and electrochemical performance of arc-produced multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as anode material for lithium-ion batteries were systematically investigated by TEM and a variety of electrochemical testing techniques. It was found that the etched CNTs exhibited four times higher reversible capacity than that of raw CNTs, and possessed excellent cyclability with almost 100% capacity retention after 30 cycles. The kinetic properties of three kinds of CNTs electrodes involving the pristine (CNTs-1), etched (CNTs-2) as well as etch-carbonized samples (CNTs-3) were characterized via ac impedance measurement. It was indicated that, after 30 cycles the exchange current density i 0 of etched CNTs ((7.6-7.8) x 10 -3 A cm -2 ) was higher than that of the raw CNTs (5.9 x 10 -3 A cm -2 ), suggesting the electrochemical activity of CNTs was enhanced by the etching treatment. The storage characteristics of the CNTs electrodes at room temperature and 50 o C were particularly compared. It was found that the film resistance on CNTs electrode generally tended to become large with the elongation of storage time, especially storage at high temperature. In comparison with CNTs-1 and CNTs-3, CNTs-2 exhibited more distinctly increase of film resistance, which is related with the surface properties

  11. Characterization of diamond-like carbon coatings prepared by pulsed bias cathodic vacuum arc deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jinbao; Chang, J.-J.; Li, M.-Y.; Leu, M.-S.; Li, A.-K.

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen free diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings have been deposited on Si(100) and stainless steel substrates by cathodic vacuum arc plasma deposition with pulse voltage. Adherent deposits on silicon can be obtained through applying gradient Ti/TiC/DLC layers. A pulse bias of - 100 V was applied to the substrate in order to obtain a denser structure of DLC coating approximately 1 μm thick. The microstructure and hardness value of DLC films were analyzed by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and nano-indenter. The experimental results show that the duty cycle strongly influenced the hardness and sp 3 content of the DLC coatings. We observed that when the duty cycle was raised from 2.5% to 12.5%, the hardness increased from 26 GPa to 49 GPa, and the sp 3 fraction of the DLC films measured by XPS increased from 39% to 50.8 % as well. But at constant duty cycle, say 12.5%, the hardness is dropped from 49 to 14 GPa in proportion to the increase of residual gas pressure from 3 x 10 -3 Pa to 1 Pa. As the residual gas pressure increased, collisional phenomenon will decrease the energy of the ions. Ions with low energy make more graphitic carbon links and result in a low hardness value

  12. The effect of calcination on multi-walled carbon nanotubes produced by dc-arc discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Sreejarani K; Augustyn, Willem G; Rossouw, Margaretha H; McCrindle, Robert I

    2008-07-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes were synthesized by dc-arc discharge in helium atmosphere and the effect of calcination at different temperatures ranging from 300-600 degrees C was studied in detail. The degree of degradation to the structural integrity of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes during the thermal process was studied by Raman spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy and High resolution transmission electron microscopy. The thermal behaviour of the as prepared and calcined samples was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis. Calcination in air at 400 degrees C for 2 hours was found to be an efficient and simple method to eliminate carbonaceous impurities from the nanotube bundles with minimal damage to the tube walls and length. The impurities were oxidized at a faster rate when compared to the nanotubes and gave good yield of about 50%. The nanotubes were observed to be damaged at temperature higher than 450 degrees C. The results show that this method is less destructive when compared liquid phase oxidation with 5 M HNO3.

  13. Prevention of burn-on defect on surface of hydroturbine blade casting of ultra-low-carbon refining stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ling

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The burn-on sand is common surface defect encountered in CO2-cured silicate-bonded sand casting of hydroturbine blade of ultra-low-carbon martensitic stainless steel, its feature, causes and prevention measures are presented in this paper. Experiments showed that the burn-on defect is caused by oxidization of chromium in the molten steel at high temperature and can be effectively eliminated by using chromium-corundum coating.

  14. A novel ultra-low carbon grain oriented silicon steel produced by twin-roll strip casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yang, E-mail: wy069024019@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Zhang, Yuan-Xiang; Lu, Xiang; Fang, Feng; Xu, Yun-Bo; Cao, Guang-Ming; Li, Cheng-Gang [State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Misra, R.D.K. [Laboratory for Excellence in Advanced Steel Research, Department of Metallurgical, Materials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Wang, Guo-Dong [State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2016-12-01

    A novel ultra-low carbon grain oriented silicon steel was successfully produced by strip casting and two-stage cold rolling method. The microstructure, texture and precipitate evolution under different first cold rolling reduction were investigated. It was shown that the as-cast strip was mainly composed of equiaxed grains and characterized by very weak Goss texture ({110}<001>) and λ-fiber (<001>//ND). The coarse sulfides of size ~100 nm were precipitated at grain boundaries during strip casting, while nitrides remained in solution in the as-cast strip and the fine AlN particles of size ~20–50 nm, which were used as grain growth inhibitors, were formed in intermediate annealed sheet after first cold rolling. In addition, the suitable Goss nuclei for secondary recrystallization were also formed during intermediate annealing, which is totally different from the conventional process that the Goss nuclei originated in the subsurface layer of the hot rolled sheet. Furthermore, the number of AlN inhibitors and the intensity of desirable Goss texture increased with increasing first cold rolling reduction. After secondary recrystallization annealing, very large grains of size ~10–40 mm were formed and the final magnetic induction, B{sub 8}, was as high as 1.9 T. - Highlights: • A novel chemical composition base on strip casting silicon steel was proposed. • The ultra-low carbon design could shorten the processing routes. • The novel composition and processes were beneficial to obtain more inhibitors. • The magnetic induction of grain oriented silicon steel was significantly improved.

  15. Casting Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Michael D.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Three articles discuss (1) casting technology as it relates to industry, with comparisons of shell casting, shell molding, and die casting; (2) evaporative pattern casting for metals; and (3) high technological casting with silicone rubber. (JOW)

  16. Properties of a large carbon steel casting used in French PWR nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benhamou, C.; Roux, F.; Nectoux, G.; Delorme, A.

    1980-09-01

    To introduce a large casting in a PWR nuclear plant migh appear detrimental to its safety when comparing with forgings or rollings. In this paper we would like to show the constant efforts of the founder in providing a product with reproducible and high quality. Furthermore a program test covering a complete investigation of a real channel head is presented; the three following aspects have been studied: characterisation of cast flaws by non destructive and destructive examination, homogeneity of casting and fatigue and use properties

  17. The multilayered structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon films synthesized by filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Na

    2013-08-01

    The structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon (a-C) films synthesized by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) deposition was investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results of the plasmon excitation energy shift and through-thickness elemental concentration show a multilayered a-C film structure comprising an interface layer consisting of C, Si, and, possibly, SiC, a buffer layer with continuously increasing sp 3 fraction, a relatively thicker layer (bulk film) of constant sp 3 content, and an ultrathin surface layer rich in sp 2 hybridization. A detailed study of the C K-edge spectrum indicates that the buffer layer between the interface layer and the bulk film is due to the partial backscattering of C+ ions interacting with the heavy atoms of the silicon substrate. The results of this study provide insight into the minimum thickness of a-C films deposited by FCVA under optimum substrate bias conditions. Copyright © 2013 Materials Research Society.

  18. The Effects of Varying Crustal Carbonate Composition on Assimilation and CO2 Degassing at Arc Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, L. B.; Holmes, A. K.; Dasgupta, R.; Tumiati, S.

    2015-12-01

    Magma-crustal carbonate interaction and subsequent decarbonation can provide an additional source of CO2 release to the exogenic system superimposed on mantle-derived CO2. Carbonate assimilation at present day volcanoes is often modeled by limestone consumption experiments [1-4]. Eruptive products, however, do not clearly display the characteristic ultracalcic melt compositions produced during limestone-magma interaction [4]. Yet estimated CO2outflux [5] and composition of volcanics in many volcanic systems may allow ~3-17% limestone- or dolostone-assimilated melt contribution. Crystallization may retain ultracalcic melts in pyroxenite cumulates. To extend our completed study on limestone assimilation, here we explore the effect of varying composition from calcite to dolomite on chemical and thermal decarbonation efficiency of crustal carbonates. Piston cylinder experiments at 0.5 GPa and 900-1200 °C demonstrate that residual mineralogy during interaction with magma shifts from CaTs cpx and anorthite/scapolite in the presence of calcite to Di cpx and Fo-rich olivine with dolomite. Silica-undersaturated melts double in magnesium content, while maintaining high (>30 wt.%) CaO values. At high-T, partial thermal breakdown of dolomite into periclase and CO2 is minimal (<5%) suggesting that in the presence of magma, CO2 is primarily released due to assimilation. Assimilated melts at identical P-T conditions depict similarly high volatile contents (10-20 wt.% by EMPA deficit at 0.5 GPa, 1150 °C with hydrous basalt) with calcite or dolomite. Analysis of the coexisting fluid phase indicates the majority of water is dissolved in the melt, while CO2 released from the carbonate is preferentially partitioned into the vapor. This suggests that although assimilated melts have a higher CO2 solubility, most of the CO2can easily degas from the vapor phase at arc volcanoes, possibly more so at volcanic plumbing systems traversing dolomite [8]. [1]Conte et al 2009 EuJMin (21) 763

  19. Carbon deposition using an expanding cascaded arc d.c. plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beulens, J.J.; Buuron, A.J.M.; Schram, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    In this work a strongly flowing cascaded arc burning on an argon-hydrogen mixture is used to dissociate and ionize hydrocarbons which are injected inside a nozzle which is mounted in the anode of the arc. The thermal plasma (T ˜ 10 000 K, p ˜ 0.5 bar) will then expand supersonically into a vessel

  20. New Raman-peak at 1850 cm(-1) observed in multiwalled carbon nanotubes produced by hydrogen arc discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B; Kadowaki, Y; Inoue, S; Ohkohchi, M; Zhao, X; Ando, Y

    2010-06-01

    The new peak (near 1850 cm(-1)) assigned to carbon linear chain included in the centre of very thin innermost multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) has been verified by Raman spectroscopy. These MWNTs were produced by dc arc discharge of pure graphite rods in pure hydrogen gas and existed in the cathode deposit. In this paper, we clarified that the new Raman-peaks could also be observed in the cathode deposit including MWNTs produced by hydrogen dc arc discharge using graphite electrode with added Y or La. By changing the quantity of addition (Y or La), dc arc current and pressure of ambient hydrogen gas, the optimum condition to get maximum intensity of the new Raman-peaks was obtained. For the case of 1 wt% La, dc 50 A, H2 pressure of 50 Torr was found to be optimum, and the intensity of new Raman-peak was even higher than the G-band peak. For the case of 1 wt% Y, dc 50 A, H2 pressure of 50 Torr was optimum, but the intensity of new Raman-peak was weaker than the G-band peak. Transmission electron microscopy observation revealed that the crystallinity of MWNTs produced with pure graphite rod was better than those produced with added Y or La.

  1. Improved Casting Furnace Conceptual Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fielding, Randall Sidney [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tolman, David Donald [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-02-01

    In an attempt to ensure more consistent casting results and remove some schedule variance associated with casting, an improved casting furnace concept has been developed. The improved furnace uses the existing arc melter hardware and glovebox utilities. The furnace concept was designed around physical and operational requirements such as; a charge sized of less than 30 grams, high heating rates and minimal additional footprint. The conceptual model is shown in the report as well as a summary of how the requirements were met.

  2. Preparation of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles in high yield by DC arc discharge and their characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Fan; Cui, Lan; Lin, Kui; Jin, Feng-min; Wang, Bin; Shi, Shu-xiu; Yang, De-an; Wang, Hui; He, Fei; Chen, Xiao-ping; Cui, Shen

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► CEINPs with core–shell structure and high Fe content were prepared in high yield by DC arc discharge. ► The anode II with a mass ratio of total iron to carbon 8:1 was used in DC arc discharge. ► The possible process of formation of CEINPs is briefly discussed. ► The uniformity of composition of anode is very important for the formation of CEINPs. ► The MEF and MMF of iron element may also play an important role in the formation of CEINPs. -- Abstract: Carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles (CEINPs) were prepared by DC arc discharge under nitrogen atmosphere of high temperature. The products were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscope, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS), and their magnetic properties were measured by physical property measurement system (PPMS). The product B I , obtained from the anode I, contains the nanoparticles of iron and iron carbide, and carbon coating with imperfect and disordered layer structure. The product B II , obtained from the anode II, mainly consists of CEINPs, whose cores mainly consist of iron and iron carbide and shells contain about 3–7 graphitic layers. The iron contents in the products B I and B II are 44.8 and 82.6 wt.%, respectively. The products B I and B II have similar phase composition which includes carbon, iron, iron carbide, ferrous and ferric oxide, iron nitride, and carbon nitride. The saturation magnetization (Ms) of the products B I and B II are 29.35 and 88.66 emu/g and their coercivity (Hc) are 220 and 240 Oe, respectively. The total yields of all the products formed in the arc discharge chamber from anodes I and II, except for the cylinder-shaped deposits formed on the top of the cathode, are 25.8 and 22.3 wt.%, respectively. The possible process of formation of CEINPs is briefly discussed on the foundation of our results and other

  3. Optical and structural properties of carbon dots/TiO2 nanostructures prepared via DC arc discharge in liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biazar, Nooshin; Poursalehi, Reza; Delavari, Hamid

    2018-01-01

    Synthesis and development of visible active catalysts is an important issue in photocatalytic applications of nanomaterials. TiO2 nanostructures coupled with carbon dots demonstrate a considerable photocatalytic activity in visible wavelengths. Extending optical absorption of a wide band gap semiconductor such as TiO2 with carbon dots is the origin of the visible activity of carbon dots modified semiconductor nanostructures. In addition, carbon dots exhibit high photostability, appropriate electron transport and chemical stability without considerable toxicity or environmental footprints. In this study, optical and structural properties of carbon dots/TiO2 nanostructures prepared via (direct current) DC arc discharge in liquid were investigated. Crystal structure, morphology and optical properties of the samples were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and UV-visible spectroscopy respectively. SEM images show formation of spherical nanoparticles with an average size of 27 nm. In comparison with pristine TiO2, optical transmission spectrum of carbon dots/TiO2 nanostructures demonstrates an absorption edge at longer wavelengths as well a high optical absorption in visible wavelengths which is significant for visible activity of nanostructures as a photocatalyst. Finally, these results can provide a flexible and versatile pathway for synthesis of carbon dots/oxide semiconductor nanostructures with an appropriate activity under visible light.

  4. The Effect of Hydrogen on the Mechanical Properties of Cast Irons and ADI with Various Carbon Equivalent and Graphite Morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong Gi; Lee, Kyung Sub

    1989-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of cast irons, flake, CV graphite cast iron ductile iron and ADI have been investigated. The effects of various carbon equivalent, graphite morphology and matrix have been analyzed to determine the predominant factor which influences on the hydrogen embrittlement. The effect of various carbon equivalent on the embrittlement was little in the similar graphite morphology. The embrittlement of ferrite matrix changed by heat treatment was less than that of pearlite matrix. In the case of ADI, the tendency of hydrogen embrittlement of lower bainite matrix was less remarkable than that of upper banite matrix. As the result of hydrogen charging, the tendency of interface decohesion between matrix-graphite was increased in flake G.C.I., and the trend from ductile fracture mode to brittle fracture mode was observed in CV G.C.I and ductile iron. Lower bainite in ADI showed the ductile fracture mode. Hydrogen solubility of lower bainite was higher than that of upper bainite

  5. Morphology and Precipitation Kinetics of MnS in Low-Carbon Steel During Thin Slab Continuous Casting Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Hao; KANG Yong-lin; ZHAO Zheng-zhi; SUN Hao

    2006-01-01

    The morphology of manganese sulfide formed during thin slab continuous casting process in low-carbon steel produced by compact strip production (CSP) technique was investigated. Using transmission electron microscopy analysis, it was seen that a majority of manganese sulfides precipitated at austenite grain boundaries, the morphologies of which were spherical or close to the spherical shape and the size of MnS precipitates ranged from 30 nm to 100 nm. A mathematical model of the manganese sulfide precipitation in this process was developed based on classical nucleation theory. Under the given conditions, the starting and finishing precipitation temperatures of MnS in the continuous casting thin slab of the studied low-carbon steel are 1 189 ℃ and 1 171 ℃, respectively, and the average diameter of MnS precipitates is about 48 nm within this precipitation temperature range. The influences of chemical components and thermo-mechanical processing conditions on the precipitation behavior of MnS in the same process were also discussed.

  6. Structural, nanomechanical and variable range hopping conduction behavior of nanocrystalline carbon thin films deposited by the ambient environment assisted filtered cathodic jet carbon arc technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panwar, O.S., E-mail: ospanwar@mail.nplindia.ernet.in [Polymorphic Carbon Thin Films Group, Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi - 110 012 (India); Rawal, Ishpal; Tripathi, R.K. [Polymorphic Carbon Thin Films Group, Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi - 110 012 (India); Srivastava, A.K. [Electron and Ion Microscopy, Sophisticated and Analytical Instruments, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi - 110 012 (India); Kumar, Mahesh [Ultrafast Opto-Electronics and Tetrahertz Photonics Group, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi - 110 012 (India)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Nanocrystalline carbon thin films are grown by filtered cathodic jet carbon arc process. • Effect of gaseous environment on the properties of carbon films has been studied. • The structural and nanomechanical properties of carbon thin films have been studied. • The VRH conduction behavior in nanocrystalline carbon thin films has been studied. - Abstract: This paper reports the deposition and characterization of nanocrystalline carbon thin films by filtered cathodic jet carbon arc technique assisted with three different gaseous environments of helium, nitrogen and hydrogen. All the films are nanocrystalline in nature as observed from the high resolution transmission electron microscopic (HRTEM) measurements, which suggests that the nanocrystallites of size ∼10–50 nm are embedded though out the amorphous matrix. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies suggest that the film deposited under the nitrogen gaseous environment has the highest sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} ratio accompanied with the highest hardness of ∼18.34 GPa observed from the nanoindentation technique. The film deposited under the helium gaseous environment has the highest ratio of the area under the Raman D peak to G peak (A{sub D}/A{sub G}) and the highest conductivity (∼2.23 S/cm) at room temperature, whereas, the film deposited under the hydrogen environment has the lowest conductivity value (2.27 × 10{sup −7} S/cm). The temperature dependent dc conduction behavior of all the nanocrystalline carbon thin films has been analyzed in the light of Mott’s variable range hopping (VRH) conduction mechanism and observed that all the films obey three dimension VRH conduction mechanism for the charge transport.

  7. Effects of carbon concentration on microstructure and mechanical properties of as-cast nickel-free Co–28Cr–9W-based dental alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Kenta; Mori, Manami; Chiba, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    We determined the effects of carbon concentration on the microstructures and tensile properties of the Ni-free Co–29Cr–9W–1Si–C (mass%) cast alloys used in dental applications. Alloy specimens prepared with carbon concentrations in the range 0.01–0.27 mass% were conventionally cast. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) revealed that precipitates had formed in all the alloy specimens. The σ phase, a chromium-rich intermetallic compound, had formed in the region between the dendrite arms of the low-carbon-content (e.g., 0.01C) alloys. Adding carbon to the alloys increased the amount of interdendritic precipitates that formed and changed the precipitation behavior; the precipitated phase changed from the σ phase to the M 23 C 6 carbide with increasing carbon concentration. Adding a small amount of carbon (i.e., 0.04 mass%) to the alloys dramatically enhanced the 0.2% proof stress, which subsequently gradually increased with increasing content of carbon in the alloys. Elongation-to-failure, on the other hand, increased with increasing carbon content and showed a maximum at carbon concentrations of ∼ 0.1 mass%. The M 23 C 6 carbide formed at the interdendritic region may govern the tensile properties of the as-cast Co–Cr–W alloys similar to how it governed those of the hot-rolled alloys prepared in our previous study. - Highlights: • Microstructure and tensile properties of C-doped Co–Cr–W cast alloys was studied. • Adding carbon stabilized the γ matrix and changed the precipitation behavior. • Formation of carbide precipitates strengthened C-doped Co–Cr–Mo alloys. • A maximum tensile elongation was obtained at carbon concentrations of ∼0.1 mass%

  8. Comparison of carbon stripper foils produced by ARC discharge and laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ophel, T.R.; Rhode, A.; Lobanov, N.; Weisser, D.C.; Turkentine, R.; Wolf, B.; Wlliman, R.G. [Australian National Univ. Canberra, ACT (Australia). Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering

    1998-06-01

    The present work describes a series of investigations which compared the arc-deposited foils, prepared at ANU with a batch of foils from Munich, prepared by laser-ablation. The two foil types were bombarded with a beam of 6.8 MeV of {sup 197}Au recording their behaviour and monitoring the total stripped current. Optical and electron spectroscopy was carried out and indicate that the arc-deposited foils were relatively amorphous and smooth, while the laser-ablated foils appears to be much more crystalline. It was found that the average useful lifetimes of the Munich foils were at least ten times longer than arc-deposited foils. Furthermore, they maintained a constant beam output during the time in marked contrast to the arc-deposited foils, for which the output decreased quite rapidly. The longevity, and no less importantly, the constant beam output of the laser-ablated foils have emerged as critical to the continuance of the ERDA program. More significantly though, such qualities have provoked re-examination of likely energies for heavy beams that could be obtained with the Linac booster if foil stripping were used in the 14UD terminal, rather than gas that had previously been considered the only viable option. A program is in progress to explore the means to produce laser-ablated foils, or their equivalent, locally. Extended abstract. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  9. Comparison of carbon stripper foils produced by ARC discharge and laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ophel, T.R.; Rhode, A.; Lobanov, N.; Weisser, D.C.; Turkentine, R.; Wolf, B.; Wlliman, R.G.

    1998-01-01

    The present work describes a series of investigations which compared the arc-deposited foils, prepared at ANU with a batch of foils from Munich, prepared by laser-ablation. The two foil types were bombarded with a beam of 6.8 MeV of 197 Au recording their behaviour and monitoring the total stripped current. Optical and electron spectroscopy was carried out and indicate that the arc-deposited foils were relatively amorphous and smooth, while the laser-ablated foils appears to be much more crystalline. It was found that the average useful lifetimes of the Munich foils were at least ten times longer than arc-deposited foils. Furthermore, they maintained a constant beam output during the time in marked contrast to the arc-deposited foils, for which the output decreased quite rapidly. The longevity, and no less importantly, the constant beam output of the laser-ablated foils have emerged as critical to the continuance of the ERDA program. More significantly though, such qualities have provoked re-examination of likely energies for heavy beams that could be obtained with the Linac booster if foil stripping were used in the 14UD terminal, rather than gas that had previously been considered the only viable option. A program is in progress to explore the means to produce laser-ablated foils, or their equivalent, locally

  10. Surface hardening of optic materials by deposition of diamond like carbon coatings from separated plasma of arc discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipkov, A. S.; Bashkov, V. M.; Belyaeva, A. O.; Stepanov, R.; Mironov, Y. M.; Galinovsky, A. L.

    2015-02-01

    This article considers the issue of strengthening of optic materials used in the IR spectrum by deposition of diamond like carbon coatings from separated plasma arc discharge. The report shows results of tests of bare and strengthened optical materials such as BaF2, MgF2, Si, Ge, including the testing of their strength and spectral characteristics. Results for the determination of optical constants for the DLC coatings deposited on substrates of Ge and Si, by using separated plasma, are also presented. Investigations showed that surface hardening of optical materials operable in the IR range, by the deposition of diamond like carbon coating onto their surface, according to this technology, considerably improves operational properties and preserves or improves their optic properties.

  11. Mo-containing tetrahedral amorphous carbon deposited by dual filtered cathodic vacuum arc with selective pulsed bias voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasaja, Nitisak; Sansongsiri, Sakon; Intarasiri, Saweat; Vilaithong, Thiraphat; Anders, Andre

    2007-01-01

    Metal-containing tetrahedral amorphous carbon films were produced by dual filtered cathodic vacuum arc plasma sources operated in sequentially pulsed mode. Negatively pulsed bias was applied to the substrate when carbon plasma was generated, whereas it was absent when the molybdenum plasma was presented. Film thickness was measured after deposition by profilometry. Glass slides with silver pads were used as substrates for the measurement of the sheet resistance. The microstructure and composition of the films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering, respectively. It was found that the electrical resistivity decreases with an increase of the Mo content, which can be ascribed to an increase of the sp 2 content and an increase of the sp 2 cluster size

  12. Effects of hydrogenation on thermal conductivity of ultrananocrystalline diamond/amorphous carbon composite films prepared via coaxial arc plasma deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeichi, Satoshi; Nishiyama, Takashi; Tabara, Mitsuru; Kawawaki, Shuichi; Kohno, Masamichi; Takahashi, Koji; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2018-06-01

    Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD)/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) composite (UNCD/a-C:H) and UNCD/non-hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C) composite (UNCD/a-C) films were prepared via coaxial arc plasma deposition, and their thermal conductivity and interfacial conductance in grain boundaries were measured using a time-domain thermoreflectance method. The interfacial conductance was estimated to be 1,010 and 4,892 MW/(m2·K) for UNCD/a-C:H and UNCD/a-C films, respectively. The reasons for the hydrogenated film having lower interfacial conductance than the non-hydrogenated film are 1) the reduced number of carriers that contribute to heat transport and 2) the hydrogen atoms, which are preferentially located at the grain boundaries and enhance phonon scattering.

  13. The effect of substrate bias on titanium carbide/amorphous carbon nanocomposite films deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xu; Liang, Hong; Wu, Zhenglong; Wu, Xiangying; Zhang, Huixing

    2013-01-01

    The titanium carbide/amorphous carbon nanocomposite films have been deposited on silicon substrate by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) technology, the effects of substrate bias on composition, structures and mechanical properties of the films are studied by scanning electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and nano-indentation. The results show that the Ti content, deposition rate and hardness at first increase and then decrease with increasing the substrate bias. Maximum hardness of the titanium carbide/amorphous carbon nanocomposite film is 51 Gpa prepared at −400 V. The hardness enhancement may be attributed to the compressive stress and the fraction of crystalline TiC phase due to ion bombardment

  14. The electrocatalytic oxidation of carbohydrates at a nickel/carbon paper electrode fabricated by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Yingyi; Wang, Tong; Su, Wen; Yu, Yanan; Hu, Jingbo

    2015-01-01

    The direct electrochemical behaviour of carbohydrates at a nickel/carbon paper electrode with a novel fabrication method is investigated. The investigation is used for verification the feasibility of using monosaccharides and disaccharides in the application of fuel cell. The selected monosaccharides are glucose, fructose and galactose; the disaccharides are sucrose, maltose and lactose. The modified nickel/carbon paper electrode was prepared using a filtered cathodic vacuum arc technique. The morphology image of the nickel thin film on the carbon paper surface was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The existence of nickel was verified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The contact angle measurement was also used to characterize the modified electrode. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) was employed to evaluate the electrochemical behaviour of monosaccharides and disaccharides in an alkaline aqueous solution. The modified electrode exhibits good electrocatalytic activities towards carbohydrates. In addition, the stability of the nickel/carbon paper electrode with six sugars was also investigated. The good catalytic effects of the nickel/carbon paper electrode allow for the use of carbohydrates as fuels in fuel cell applications

  15. Micrograph evidence of meniscus solidification and sub-surface microstructure evolution in continuous-cast ultralow-carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, J.; Shin, H.-J.; Thomas, B.G.; Kim, S.-H.

    2006-01-01

    Hooks and other sub-surface features in continuous-cast ultralow-carbon steel samples were examined using optical microscopy, electron backscattering diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and electron probe microanalysis techniques. Special etching reagents revealed dendrites growing from both sides of the line of hook origin. This line was found to represent the frozen meniscus and persisted into the final microstructure, as revealed by grain orientation measurements. A broken hook tip was observed in one micrograph, which explains the characteristic truncated shape of most hooks. Mold powder was found entrapped along the frozen meniscus. These results provide evidence of both solidification and subsequent overflow of the liquid steel meniscus. Thus, the instantaneous meniscus shape governs the shape and microstructure of the final hook, and the extent of the liquid steel overflow determines the shape of oscillation marks. This mechanism has important implications for the entrapment of inclusions and other surface defects

  16. Single-walled nanohorns and other nanocarbons generated by submerged arc discharge between carbon electrodes in liquid argon and other media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasu, K; Pramoda, K; Govindaraj, A; Rao, C N R; Moses, K

    2014-01-01

    Arc discharge between two graphite electrodes submerged in different liquid media yields various dimensional nanocarbon structures such as 1D carbon nanotubes and 2D graphene. Single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) prepared by submerged arc discharge in liquid nitrogen medium are found to have nitrogen impurities. Here, we report the structure and properties of pure and nitrogen-doped SWNHs obtained by submerged arc discharge in a liquid argon medium. The absence of an XPS N 1s signal, which is present in nanohorns obtained in liquid nitrogen, indicate that the nanohorns are free from nitrogen impurities. Raman spectra show a strong defect-induced D band and current–voltage characteristics show a slight nonlinear behavior. N 2 adsorption of pure SWNHs shows type-IV isotherms with a surface area of 300 m 2 g −1 . Adsorption of CO 2 and H 2 in pure SWNHs has also been measured. Arc discharge in other liquid media such as water, ethanol, dimethylformamide (DMF), n-methyl pyrrolidone (NMP), formamide, benzene, heptane and acetone yields different nanocarbon structures including multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), few-layer graphene, carbon onions and carbon nanoparticles. (papers)

  17. Interface Analyses Between a Case-Hardened Ingot Casting Steel and Carbon-Containing and Carbon-Free Refractories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruhstorfer, Jens; Dudczig, Steffen; Rudolph, Martin; Schmidt, Gert; Brachhold, Nora; Schöttler, Leandro; Rafaja, David; Aneziris, Christos G.

    2018-06-01

    Corrosion tests of carbon-free and carbon-containing refractories were performed. The carbon-free crucibles corroded, whereas the carbon-containing crucibles were negligibly attacked. On them, inclusions were attached. This study investigates melt oxygen contents, interface properties, and steel compositions with their non-metallic inclusions in order to explore the inclusion formation and deposition mechanisms. The carbon-free crucibles were based on alumina, mullite, and zirconia- and titania-doped alumina (AZT). The carbon-containing (-C) ones were alumina-C and AZT-C. Furthermore, nanoscaled carbon and alumina additives (-n) were applied in an AZT-C-n material. In the crucibles, the case-hardened steel 17CrNiMo7-6 was remelted at 1580 °C. It was observed that the melt and steel oxygen contents were higher for the tests in the carbon-free crucibles. Into these crucibles, the deoxidizing alloying elements Mn and Si diffused. Reducing contents of deoxidizing elements resulted in higher steel oxygen levels and less inclusions, mainly of the inclusion group SiO2-core-MnS-shell (2.5 to 8 μ m). These developed from smaller SiO2 nuclei. The inclusion amount in the steel was highest after remelting in AZT-C-n for 30 minutes but decreased strongly with increasing remelting time (60 minutes) due to inclusions' deposition on the refractory surface. The Ti from the AZT and the nanoadditives supported inclusion growth and deposition. Other inclusion groups were alumina and calcium aluminate inclusions. Their contents were high after remelting in carbon- or AZT-containing crucibles but generally decreased during remelting. On the AZT-C-n crucible, a dense layer formed from vitreous compositions including Al, Ca, Mg, Si, and Ti. To summarize, for reducing forming inclusion amounts, mullite is recommended as refractory material. For capturing formed inclusions, AZT-C-n showed a high potential.

  18. In situ synthesis of carbon nanotubes decorated with palladium nanoparticles using arc-discharge in solution method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bera, Debasis; Kuiry, Suresh C.; McCutchen, Matthew; Seal, Sudipta; Heinrich, Helge; Slane, Grady C.

    2004-01-01

    A unique, simple, inexpensive, and one-step synthesis route to produce carbon nanotubes (CNTs) decorated with palladium nanoparticles using a simplified dc arc-discharge in solution is reported. Zero-loss energy filtered transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy confirm the presence of 3 nm palladium nanoparticles. Such palladium nanoparticles form during the reduction of palladium tetra-chloro-square-planar complex. The deconvoluted x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy envelope shows the presence of palladium on the decorated CNTs. The energy dispersive spectroscopy suggests no functionalization of atomic chlorine to the sidewall of the CNTs. The presence of dislodged graphene sheets with wavy morphology supports the formation of CNTs through the 'scroll mechanism'

  19. Phase-field modelling of microstructure formation during the solidification of continuously cast low carbon and HSLA steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger, B.; Apel, M.; Santillana, B.; Eskin, D. G.

    2012-07-01

    Cracking in continuous casting of steels has been one of the main problems for decades. Many of the cracks that occur during solidification are hot tears. To better understand the factors leading to this defect, microstructure formation is simulated for a low carbon (LCAK) and two high strength low alloyed (HSLA) steel grades during the initial stage of the process where the first solidified shell is formed inside the mould and where breakouts typically occur. 2D simulation is performed using the multiphase-field software MICRESS [1], which is coupled to the thermodynamic database TCFE6 [2] and the mobility database MOB2 [2], taking into account all elements which may have a relevant effect on the mechanical properties and structure formation during or subsequent to solidification. The use of a moving-frame boundary condition allows travelling through the entire solidification history starting from the slab surface, and tracking the morphology changes during growth of the shell. A heterogeneous nucleation model is included to permit the description of morphological transitions between the initial solidification and the subsequent columnar growth region. Furthermore, a macroscopic one-dimensional temperature solver is integrated to account for the transient and nonlinear temperature field during the initial stage of continuous casting. The external heat flux boundary conditions for this process were derived from thermal process data of the industrial slab caster. The simulation results for the three steel grades have been validated by thickness measurements of breakout shells and microstructure observation of the corresponding grades. Furthermore, the primary dendrite spacing has been measured across the whole thickness of the shell and compared with the simulated microstructures. Significant microstructure differences between the steel grades are discussed and correlated with their hot-cracking behavior.

  20. Phase-field modelling of microstructure formation during the solidification of continuously cast low carbon and HSLA steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Böttger, B; Apel, M; Santillana, B; Eskin, D G

    2012-01-01

    Cracking in continuous casting of steels has been one of the main problems for decades. Many of the cracks that occur during solidification are hot tears. To better understand the factors leading to this defect, microstructure formation is simulated for a low carbon (LCAK) and two high strength low alloyed (HSLA) steel grades during the initial stage of the process where the first solidified shell is formed inside the mould and where breakouts typically occur. 2D simulation is performed using the multiphase-field software MICRESS, which is coupled to the thermodynamic database TCFE6 and the mobility database MOB2, taking into account all elements which may have a relevant effect on the mechanical properties and structure formation during or subsequent to solidification. The use of a moving-frame boundary condition allows travelling through the entire solidification history starting from the slab surface, and tracking the morphology changes during growth of the shell. A heterogeneous nucleation model is included to permit the description of morphological transitions between the initial solidification and the subsequent columnar growth region. Furthermore, a macroscopic one-dimensional temperature solver is integrated to account for the transient and nonlinear temperature field during the initial stage of continuous casting. The external heat flux boundary conditions for this process were derived from thermal process data of the industrial slab caster. The simulation results for the three steel grades have been validated by thickness measurements of breakout shells and microstructure observation of the corresponding grades. Furthermore, the primary dendrite spacing has been measured across the whole thickness of the shell and compared with the simulated microstructures. Significant microstructure differences between the steel grades are discussed and correlated with their hot-cracking behavior.

  1. Effect of high substrate bias and hydrogen and nitrogen incorporation on filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposited tetrahedral amorphous carbon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panwar, O.S.; Khan, Mohd. Alim; Kumar, Mahesh; Shivaprasad, S.M.; Satyanarayana, B.S.; Dixit, P.N.; Bhattacharyya, R.; Khan, M.Y.

    2008-01-01

    The application of a sufficiently high negative substrate bias, during the growth of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C), is usually associated with low sp 3 bonding configuration and stressed films. However, in an effort to understand and utilize the higher pseudo thermo dynamical conditions during the film growth, at high negative substrate bias (- 300 V), reported here is a study on ta-C films grown under different hydrogen and nitrogen concentration. As grown ta-C films were studied under different negative substrate bias conditions. The variation of the sp 3 content and sp 3 /sp 2 ratio in the ta-C films exhibits a trend similar to those reported in literature, with a subtle variation in this report being the substrate bias voltage, which was observed to be around - 200 V, for obtaining the highest sp 3 (80%) bonding and sp 3 /sp 2 (3.95) ratio. The hydrogen and nitrogen incorporated ta-C films studied, at a bias of - 300 V, show an increase in sp 3 (87-91%) bonding and sp 3 /sp 2 (7-10) ratio in the range of studies reported. The inference is drawn on the basis of the set of data obtained from measurements carried out using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray induced Auger electron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy of as grown and hydrogen and nitrogen incorporated ta-C films deposited using an S bend filtered cathodic vacuum arc system. The study indicates the possibility of further tailoring ta-C film properties and also extending capabilities of the cathodic arc system for developing carbon based films for electronics and tribological applications

  2. Effect of high substrate bias and hydrogen and nitrogen incorporation on filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposited tetrahedral amorphous carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panwar, O.S. [Plasma Processed Materials Group, National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110 012 (India)], E-mail: ospanwar@mail.nplindia.ernet.in; Khan, Mohd. Alim [Plasma Processed Materials Group, National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110 012 (India); Kumar, Mahesh; Shivaprasad, S.M. [Surface Physics and Nanostructures Group, National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110 012 (India); Satyanarayana, B.S. [MIT Innovation Centre and Electronics and Communication Department, Manipal Institute of Technology, Manipal-579104 (India); Dixit, P.N. [Plasma Processed Materials Group, National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110 012 (India); Bhattacharyya, R. [Emeritus Scientist, National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi-110012 (India); Khan, M.Y. [Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia, Central University, New Delhi-110025 (India)

    2008-02-29

    The application of a sufficiently high negative substrate bias, during the growth of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C), is usually associated with low sp{sup 3} bonding configuration and stressed films. However, in an effort to understand and utilize the higher pseudo thermo dynamical conditions during the film growth, at high negative substrate bias (- 300 V), reported here is a study on ta-C films grown under different hydrogen and nitrogen concentration. As grown ta-C films were studied under different negative substrate bias conditions. The variation of the sp{sup 3} content and sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} ratio in the ta-C films exhibits a trend similar to those reported in literature, with a subtle variation in this report being the substrate bias voltage, which was observed to be around - 200 V, for obtaining the highest sp{sup 3} (80%) bonding and sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} (3.95) ratio. The hydrogen and nitrogen incorporated ta-C films studied, at a bias of - 300 V, show an increase in sp{sup 3} (87-91%) bonding and sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} (7-10) ratio in the range of studies reported. The inference is drawn on the basis of the set of data obtained from measurements carried out using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray induced Auger electron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy of as grown and hydrogen and nitrogen incorporated ta-C films deposited using an S bend filtered cathodic vacuum arc system. The study indicates the possibility of further tailoring ta-C film properties and also extending capabilities of the cathodic arc system for developing carbon based films for electronics and tribological applications.

  3. On the properties of nanocomposite amorphous carbon films prepared by off-plane double bend filtered cathodic vacuum arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tay, B.K.; Zhang, P.

    2002-01-01

    It is known to deposit hard thin films, such as tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C), using a filtered cathode vacuum arc (FCVA). These ta-C films have interesting and useful properties because of the high sp 3 fraction of carbon atoms (up to 87%) in the film. However, the high internal stress in the films can limit their applications as the film may flake away from the substrate. In order to reduce the internal stress of the ta-C films and in an attempt to improve adhesion of thick films of this type, growth modifications such as incorporating metal into the ta-C films have been carried out. Nanocomposite amorphous carbon films were deposited by FCVA technique using metal-carbon composite target. Atomic force microscopy, Raman, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to characterize the morphology and structure of the films. Nanoindenter and surface profilometer were used to determine the hardness, Young's modulus, and internal stress. The same metal composition targets for different elements results in different metal composition in the corresponding nanocomposite amorphous carbon films. We attribute this observation to the dynamic balance deposition effect of the FCVA deposition process. The influence of the type of metallic elements and its composition in the films on the structural, mechanical properties, surface energy and field emission (FE) performance was studied. The incorporation of metal into the films results in the decrease of sp 3 fraction, internal stress in the films, but the hardness and Young's modulus remains at high level. The surface energy of the films increases with incorporating Ni atoms, but decreases after incorporating Fe and Al atoms into the films. After heat-treatment, the incorporation of metal into ta-C films can greatly improve the FE performance

  4. Incidence Angle Effect of Energetic Carbon Ions on Deposition Rate, Topography, and Structure of Ultrathin Amorphous Carbon Films Deposited by Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, N.

    2012-07-01

    The effect of the incidence angle of energetic carbon ions on the thickness, topography, and structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon (a-C) films synthesized by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) was examined in the context of numerical and experimental results. The thickness of a-C films deposited at different incidence angles was investigated in the light of Monte Carlo simulations, and the calculated depth profiles were compared with those obtained from high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The topography and structure of the a-C films were studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The film thickness decreased with the increase of the incidence angle, while the surface roughness increased and the content of tetrahedral carbon hybridization (sp 3) decreased significantly with the increase of the incidence angle above 45° , measured from the surface normal. TEM, AFM, and XPS results indicate that the smoothest and thinnest a-C films with the highest content of sp 3 carbon bonding were produced for an incidence angle of 45°. The findings of this study have direct implications in ultrahigh-density magnetic recording, where ultrathin and smooth a-C films with high sp 3 contents are of critical importance. © 2012 IEEE.

  5. Structural investigation of two carbon nitride solids produced by cathodic arc deposition and nitrogen implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, A.R.; McCulloch, D.; McKenzie, D.R.; Yin, Y.; Gerstner, E.G. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Carbon nitride materials have been the focus of research efforts worldwide. Most materials studied have been amorphous, with only a few groups claiming to have found a crystalline material. In this paper, carbon nitride materials prepared by two different techniques are analysed, and found to be remarkably similar in bonding and structure. The materials appear to have a primarily sp{sup 2} bonded carbon structure with a lower bond length than found in an amorphous carbon. This is explained by nitrogen substituting into `rings` to a saturation level of about one nitrogen per three carbon atoms. No evidence was found for a crystalline structure of formula C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, or any amorphous derivative of it. 16 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  6. Structural investigation of two carbon nitride solids produced by cathodic arc deposition and nitrogen implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, A R; McCulloch, D; McKenzie, D R; Yin, Y; Gerstner, E G [New South Wales Univ., Kensington, NSW (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    Carbon nitride materials have been the focus of research efforts worldwide. Most materials studied have been amorphous, with only a few groups claiming to have found a crystalline material. In this paper, carbon nitride materials prepared by two different techniques are analysed, and found to be remarkably similar in bonding and structure. The materials appear to have a primarily sp{sup 2} bonded carbon structure with a lower bond length than found in an amorphous carbon. This is explained by nitrogen substituting into `rings` to a saturation level of about one nitrogen per three carbon atoms. No evidence was found for a crystalline structure of formula C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, or any amorphous derivative of it. 16 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  7. Structural investigation of two carbon nitride solids produced by cathodic arc deposition and nitrogen implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchant, A.R.; McCulloch, D.; McKenzie, D.R.; Yin, Y.; Gerstner, E.G.

    1996-01-01

    Carbon nitride materials have been the focus of research efforts worldwide. Most materials studied have been amorphous, with only a few groups claiming to have found a crystalline material. In this paper, carbon nitride materials prepared by two different techniques are analysed, and found to be remarkably similar in bonding and structure. The materials appear to have a primarily sp 2 bonded carbon structure with a lower bond length than found in an amorphous carbon. This is explained by nitrogen substituting into 'rings' to a saturation level of about one nitrogen per three carbon atoms. No evidence was found for a crystalline structure of formula C 3 N 4 , or any amorphous derivative of it. 16 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs

  8. Nitrogen doped silicon-carbon multilayer protective coatings on carbon obtained by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciupinǎ, Victor; Vasile, Eugeniu; Porosnicu, Corneliu; Vladoiu, Rodica; Mandes, Aurelia; Dinca, Virginia; Nicolescu, Virginia; Manu, Radu; Dinca, Paul; Zaharia, Agripina

    2018-02-01

    To obtain protective nitrogen doped Si-C multilayer coatings on carbon, used to improve the oxidation resistance of carbon, was used TVA method. The initial carbon layer has been deposed on a silicon substrate in the absence of nitrogen, and then a 3nm Si thin film to cover carbon layer was deposed. Further, seven Si and C layers were alternatively deposed in the presence of nitrogen ions. In order to form silicon carbide at the interface between silicon and carbon layers, all carbon, silicon and nitrogen ions energy has increased up to 150eV. The characterization of microstructure and electrical properties of as-prepared N-Si-C multilayer structures were done using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, STEM) techniques, Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS) and electrical measurements. The retention of oxygen in the protective layer of N-Si-C is due to the following phenomena: (a) The reaction between oxygen and silicon carbide resulting in silicon oxide and carbon dioxide; (b) The reaction involving oxygen, nitrogen and silicon resulting silicon oxinitride with a variable composition; (c) Nitrogen acts as a trapping barrier for oxygen. To perform electrical measurements, ohmic contacts were attached on the N-Si-C samples. Electrical conductivity was measured in constant current mode. To explain the temperature behavior of electrical conductivity we assumed a thermally activated electric transport mechanism.

  9. Microstructure and mechanical properties of in situ casting TiC/Ti6Al4V composites through adding multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ya, Bin; Zhou, Bingwen; Yang, Hongshuo; Huang, Bingkun; Jia, Fei; Zhang, Xingguo, E-mail: zxgwj@dlut.edu.cn

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Adding MWCNTs in situ casting fabricating TiC/Ti6Al4V composites is first reported. • The solidification process of in situ casting TiC/Ti6Al4V composites is discussed. • Microstructure shows remarkable correlations with adding MWCNTS. • Strength and plasticity show remarkable correlations with adding MWCNTs. - Abstract: In this study, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were added as carbon sources to fabricate in situ casting TiC/Ti6Al4V (TC4) composites. The effects of MWCNTs on the microstructure and mechanical properties are studied. The composites are analyzed by X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscope and electron probe microanalysis. The fracture behavior of TiC/TC4 composites are also studied. Smaller size of TiC particles and grain compared with TC4-graphite composites can be observed. The tensile strength of TC4-MWCNTs composites is about 1110.1 MPa, which is higher than that of TC4-graphite composites, about 1003.6 MPa. Fracture behavior also was changed by adding MWCNTs in situ casting TiC/TC4 composites.

  10. Carbon nanotubes and nanofibers synthesized by CVD on nickel coatings deposited with a vacuum arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar, M. [LP and MC, Dep. de Fisica-FCEyN-UBA, Cdad. Universitaria Pab.1, (1428), Buenos Aires (Argentina); DQIAQF-FCEyN-UBA, Cdad. Universitaria Pab.1, (1428), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Giuliani, L. [INFIP, CONICET, Dep. de Fisica, FCEyN-UBA, Cdad. Univ. Pab.1, (1428), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Candal, R.J. [INQUIMAE-FCEyN-UBA, Cdad. Universitaria Pab.2, (1428), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Lamas, D.G. [CINSO, CITEFA, CONICET, J.B. de La Salle 4397, (1603) V.Martelli, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Caso, A. [LP and MC, Dep. de Fisica-FCEyN-UBA, Cdad. Universitaria Pab.1, (1428), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Rubiolo, G. [LP and MC, Dep. de Fisica-FCEyN-UBA, Cdad. Universitaria Pab.1, (1428), Buenos Aires (Argentina); UAM-CNEA, Av. Gral Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Grondona, D. [INFIP, CONICET, Dep. de Fisica, FCEyN-UBA, Cdad. Univ. Pab.1, (1428), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Goyanes, S. [LP and MC, Dep. de Fisica-FCEyN-UBA, Cdad. Universitaria Pab.1, (1428), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Marquez, A., E-mail: amarquez@df.uba.a [INFIP, CONICET, Dep. de Fisica, FCEyN-UBA, Cdad. Univ. Pab.1, (1428), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2010-04-16

    Nanotubes and nanofibers were grown on Ni coatings deposited by plasma generated with a pulsed vacuum arc on silicon wafers using three different bias conditions: at floating potential (approximately +30 V respect to the grounded cathode); at ground potential; and at -60 V. An atomic force microscopy study showed that the Ni film morphology was affected by the bias condition of the substrate. The morphology of carbonaceous species depended on Ni-films characteristics. FE-SEM and TEM analyses have shown that nanofibers growth was favoured on Ni coatings deposited at -60 V whereas nanotubes grew mainly on Ni coatings obtained at floating and ground potentials. Hence, this new method to produce the precursor can be optimized to obtain nanotubes or nanofibers varying the substrate bias for the Ni deposition.

  11. Investigation of supercapacitors with carbon electrodes obtained from argon-acetylene arc plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Kavaliauskas, Žydrūnas

    2010-01-01

    The dissertation examines topics related to the formation of supercapacitors using plasma technology and their analysis. Plasma spray technology was used to form supercapacitors electrodes. Carbon was deposited on stainless steel surface using the atmospheric pressure argon-acetylene plasma. The deposition of nickel oxide on the surface of carbon electrodes was made using magnetron sputtering method. The influence of acetylene amount to the supercapacitors electrodes and the electrical charac...

  12. Flop casting of nuclear materials for advanced fuel cycle research - 5247

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, A.J.; Koury, D.J.; Czerwinski, K.R.; Vollmer, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Next generation fast reactor designs of nuclear reactors utilizing metallic fuel are being developed as an alternative fuel cycle option in an effort to reduce carbon emissions. Metallic fuel systems are attractive because of their high thermal conductivity, fissile atom density, and inherent safety. Metallic fuel systems are also being investigated because of their potential to reach high burnups. The increased targeted burnups for metallic fuels lead to higher concentrations of actinides, lanthanides, and other fission products, which alter the fuel properties and impact the performance of the fuel. Before designs can be implemented, the fission product concentrations must be studied at variable fuel geometries and stages of fuel burnup. Arc flop casting serves as a viable option for casting alloys as the molds can be tailored to fit design specific requirements while cutting costs in time-consuming machining. Arc casting is done as the final preparation step in a small arc furnace with an argon or 5% hydrogen-argon atmosphere after the sample has been subsequently melted, overturned, and re-melted. The flop casting mold is then fitted to the chamber as needed and the previously prepared sample is quickly hit with a high current arc causing the molten metal to fill the copper mold. The U-Zr-Pu system will serve as the basis for this research as it has been extensively studied since the 1950 years, although flop casting can be adapted to any metallic fuel system. Multiple U-Zr-Pu with varying fission product concentrations alloys, Technetium metal, and Plutonium alloys have been flop cast based on burnup calculations. Prepared samples were cast using different molds and dimensions, then characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Thermogravimetric Analysis. The goal of this research is to test and develop flop casting techniques for the production of metallic fuel alloys applicable for various stages and

  13. Multi-layers castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In paper is presented the possibility of making of multi-layers cast steel castings in result of connection of casting and welding coating technologies. First layer was composite surface layer on the basis of Fe-Cr-C alloy, which was put directly in founding process of cast carbon steel 200–450 with use of preparation of mould cavity method. Second layer were padding welds, which were put with use of TIG – Tungsten Inert Gas surfacing by welding technology with filler on Ni matrix, Ni and Co matrix with wolfram carbides WC and on the basis on Fe-Cr-C alloy, which has the same chemical composition with alloy, which was used for making of composite surface layer. Usability for industrial applications of surface layers of castings were estimated by criterion of hardness and abrasive wear resistance of type metal-mineral.

  14. Effect of cast steel production metallurgy on the emergence of casting defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Čamek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper documents metallurgical possibilities of high alloy cast steel production in open induction medium frequency furnaces and an electric arc furnace in a gravity die casting foundry. The observation was focused on the emergence of gas defects in steel castings. The content of gases achieved during the metallurgical processes was evaluated for every unit of the production equipment and the casting ladle before casting into disposable sand moulds. The sand mould area was considered to be constant. The aim was to evaluate the current metallurgical possibilities of affecting the content of gases in high alloy cast steel in the current technical conditions of the foundry.

  15. Non-platinum nanocatalyst on porous nitrogen-doped carbon fabricated by cathodic vacuum arc plasma technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirirak, Reungruthai [Material Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Department of Chemistry and Center of Excellence for Innovation in Chemistry (PERCH-CIC), Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Sarakonsri, Thapanee, E-mail: tsarakonsri@gmail.com [Material Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Department of Chemistry and Center of Excellence for Innovation in Chemistry (PERCH-CIC), Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Medhesuwakul, Min [Plasma & Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2015-11-30

    Highlights: • High surface area porous coral-like nitrogen-doped carbon (NC) and non-platinum nanocatalysts were fabricated on proton exchange membrane using the cathodic vacuum arc plasma (CVAP) technique. • It is a one-step catalysts preparation directly on nafion proton exchange membrane. This CVAP technique is the first new method that was applied in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) catalysts preparation. • Due to these excellent characteristics of nitrogen-doped carbon, it is expected to exhibit a good catalyst supporter for PEMFC. • In addition, the Fe–NC catalysts fabricated via this CVAP technique are sphere-like nanoparticle and well disperse on coral-like NC film, which particularity exhibits that these prepared catalysts ought to be a good oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst for PEMFC. • This approach can be extended to the synthesis of other non-platinum ORR catalyst for broad range applications in energy conversion. - Abstract: Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy where catalysts composing of non-noble transition metals, nitrogen, and carbon compounds are the most promising materials to replace the expensive platinum catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this research, cathodic vacuum arc plasma (CVAP) technique was used to fabricate porous nitrogen doped carbon (NC) and non-platinum catalyst on porous NC (Fe–NC) directly on ion exchange membrane for being used as an ORR catalyst at the cathode. The porous NC layer was fabricated on silicon wafer at 0.05 mTorr, 0.1 mTorr, 0.5 mTorr, 1 mTorr, and 5 mTorr of nitrogen gas inlet. The AFM, and SEM images are observed to be regularly big with quite high hillocks and thin NC layers; these results indicate that the optimum process pressure of nitrogen gas inlet is 5 mTorr for porous NC fabrication. The SEM–EDS detects Fe, N, and C elements in the prepared catalysts, and the XRD pattern reviews

  16. Non-platinum nanocatalyst on porous nitrogen-doped carbon fabricated by cathodic vacuum arc plasma technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirirak, Reungruthai; Sarakonsri, Thapanee; Medhesuwakul, Min

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • High surface area porous coral-like nitrogen-doped carbon (NC) and non-platinum nanocatalysts were fabricated on proton exchange membrane using the cathodic vacuum arc plasma (CVAP) technique. • It is a one-step catalysts preparation directly on nafion proton exchange membrane. This CVAP technique is the first new method that was applied in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) catalysts preparation. • Due to these excellent characteristics of nitrogen-doped carbon, it is expected to exhibit a good catalyst supporter for PEMFC. • In addition, the Fe–NC catalysts fabricated via this CVAP technique are sphere-like nanoparticle and well disperse on coral-like NC film, which particularity exhibits that these prepared catalysts ought to be a good oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst for PEMFC. • This approach can be extended to the synthesis of other non-platinum ORR catalyst for broad range applications in energy conversion. - Abstract: Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy where catalysts composing of non-noble transition metals, nitrogen, and carbon compounds are the most promising materials to replace the expensive platinum catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this research, cathodic vacuum arc plasma (CVAP) technique was used to fabricate porous nitrogen doped carbon (NC) and non-platinum catalyst on porous NC (Fe–NC) directly on ion exchange membrane for being used as an ORR catalyst at the cathode. The porous NC layer was fabricated on silicon wafer at 0.05 mTorr, 0.1 mTorr, 0.5 mTorr, 1 mTorr, and 5 mTorr of nitrogen gas inlet. The AFM, and SEM images are observed to be regularly big with quite high hillocks and thin NC layers; these results indicate that the optimum process pressure of nitrogen gas inlet is 5 mTorr for porous NC fabrication. The SEM–EDS detects Fe, N, and C elements in the prepared catalysts, and the XRD pattern reviews

  17. Fabrication of nitrogen-containing diamond-like carbon film by filtered arc deposition as conductive hard-coating film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Yushi; Harigai, Toru; Isono, Ryo; Imai, Takahiro; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Kamiya, Masao; Taki, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yushi; Tsuji, Nobuhiro; Kaneko, Satoru; Kunitsugu, Shinsuke; Habuchi, Hitoe; Kiyohara, Shuji; Ito, Mikio; Yick, Sam; Bendavid, Avi; Martin, Phil

    2018-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films, which are amorphous carbon films, have been used as hard-coating films for protecting the surface of mechanical parts. Nitrogen-containing DLC (N-DLC) films are expected as conductive hard-coating materials. N-DLC films are expected in applications such as protective films for contact pins, which are used in the electrical check process of integrated circuit chips. In this study, N-DLC films are prepared using the T-shaped filtered arc deposition (T-FAD) method, and film properties are investigated. Film hardness and film density decreased when the N content increased in the films because the number of graphite structures in the DLC film increased as the N content increased. These trends are similar to the results of a previous study. The electrical resistivity of N-DLC films changed from 0.26 to 8.8 Ω cm with a change in the nanoindentation hardness from 17 to 27 GPa. The N-DLC films fabricated by the T-FAD method showed high mechanical hardness and low electrical resistivity.

  18. Fracture Mechanisms in Steel Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stradomski Z.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The investigations were inspired with the problem of cracking of steel castings during the production process. A single mechanism of decohesion - the intergranular one - occurs in the case of hot cracking, while a variety of structural factors is decisive for hot cracking initiation, depending on chemical composition of the cast steel. The low-carbon and low-alloyed steel castings crack due to the presence of the type II sulphides, the cause of cracking of the high-carbon tool cast steels is the net of secondary cementite and/or ledeburite precipitated along the boundaries of solidified grains. Also the brittle phosphor and carbide eutectics precipitated in the final stage solidification are responsible for cracking of castings made of Hadfield steel. The examination of mechanical properties at 1050°C revealed low or very low strength of high-carbon cast steels.

  19. Effects of Operating Temperature on Droplet Casting of Flexible Polymer/Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Composite Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Chern Chiou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the performance of a flexible polymer/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT composite sensor array as a function of operating temperature. The response magnitudes of a cost-effective flexible gas sensor array equipped with a heater were measured with respect to five different operating temperatures (room temperature, 40 °C, 50 °C, 60 °C, and 70 °C via impedance spectrum measurement and sensing response experiments. The selected polymers that were droplet cast to coat a MWCNT conductive layer to form two-layer polymer/MWCNT composite sensing films included ethyl cellulose (EC, polyethylene oxide (PEO, and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP. Electrical characterization of impedance, sensing response magnitude, and scanning electron microscope (SEM morphology of each type of polymer/MWCNT composite film was performed at different operating temperatures. With respect to ethanol, the response magnitude of the sensor decreased with increasing operating temperatures. The results indicated that the higher operating temperature could reduce the response and influence the sensitivity of the polymer/MWCNT gas sensor array. The morphology of polymer/MWCNT composite films revealed that there were changes in the porous film after volatile organic compound (VOC testing.

  20. Fabrication of TiO2/Carbon Photocatalyst using Submerged DC Arc Discharged in Ethanol/Acetic Acid Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswati, T. E.; Nandika, A. O.; Andhika, I. F.; Patiha; Purnawan, C.; Wahyuningsih, S.; Rahardjo, S. B.

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to fabricate a modified photocatalyst of TiO2/C to enhance its performance. The fabrication was achieved using the submerged direct current (DC) arc-discharge method employing two graphite electrodes, one of which was filled with a mixture of carbon powder, TiO2, and binder, in ethanol with acetic acid added in various concentrations. The arc-discharge method was conducted by flowing a current of 10-20 A (~20 V). X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns showed significant placements of the main peak characteristics of TiO2, C graphite, and titanium carbide. The surface analysis using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) revealed that fabricated TiO2/C nanoparticles had stretching vibrations of Ti-O, C-H, C═O, C-O, O-H and C═C in the regions of 450-550 cm-1, 2900-2880 cm-1, 1690-1760 cm-1, 1050-1300 cm-1, 3400-3700 cm-1 and ~1600 cm-1, respectively. In addition, the study investigated the photocatalysts of unmodified and modified TiO2/C for photodegradation of methylene blue (MB) dye solution under mercury lamp irradiation. The effectiveness of the degradation was defined by the decrease in 60-minute absorbance under a UV-Vis spectrophotometer. Modified TiO2/C proved to be significantly more efficient in reducing dye concentrations, reaching ~70%. It indicated that the oxygen-containing functional groups have been successfully attached to the surface of the nanoparticles and played a role in enhancing photocatalytic activity.

  1. New Stagnation Arc Jet Model Design for Testing ADEPT 3-D Carbon Cloth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, R.; Chen, Y.-K.; Wercinski, P.; Agrawal, P.; Chavez-Garcia, J.

    2017-01-01

    The ADEPT concept has been considered as an entry, descent and landing system to enable Human Mars class missions. Ground rules for the Mars studies required aerocapture, orbit, and then entry. The design utilizes a 3-D woven carbon cloth fabric as both heatshield and primary structure and design guidelines required 6 layers remaining after all entry events. The peak heating predicted for the ADEPT carbon cloth was 35 Wcm2 and resulting temperatures were predicted to be 1400K. Predictions for carbon mass loss were performed using equilibrium thermochemistry, which is only accurate for T2000K. Carbon oxidation is kinetically controlled at T2000K, and mass loss drops off considerably from equilibrium values. Design of the cloth thickness and mass would be significantly reduced if kinetics were considered. This effort was to design a stagnation test article design that could be used in the AHF with varying levels of oxygen where the results could be used to develop an engineering model to describe the recession rate of the carbon as a function of the partial pressure of monotomic oxygen.

  2. Effect of carbon additions on the as-cast microstructure and defect formation of a single crystal Ni-based superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Jarba, K.A.; Fuchs, G.E.

    2004-01-01

    In an effort to reduce grain defects in large single crystal Ni-base superalloy components, carbon is intentionally added. In this study, the effect of carbon additions on the microstructure and solidification defect formation of a model Ni-based superalloy, LMSX-1, was examined. The results show that the tendency of the alloy to form all types of solidification defects decreased as the carbon content increased. The as-cast microstructures also exhibited a decrease in the amount of γ-γ' eutectic structure and an increase in the volume fraction of carbides and porosity, as the carbon content was increased. The carbides formed in these alloys were mostly of script-type MC carbides which formed continuous, dendritic networks in the interdendritic region. Microprobe analysis of the as-cast structures showed that the partitioning coefficients did not change with carbon additions. Therefore, the reduction in defect formation with increasing carbon content could not be attributed to changes in segregation behavior of alloying elements. Instead, the presence of these carbides in the interdendritic regions of the alloy appeared to have prevented the thermosolutal fluid flow

  3. Investigations of the carbon coating properties on a surface of the implants made from the Co-Cr-Mo casting alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paszenda, Z.

    1999-01-01

    The project carried deals with the issue of improving the surface quality of the hip joint prostheses made from Co-Cr-Mo casting alloy. Wrap up analysis of many years clinical trials within the area of the hip joint alloplasty reveals explicit that initiation of the defensive reaction due to insufficient corrosion resistance of the metallic biomaterial, and due to unsatisfactory mechanical properties of the implant - tissue interfaces does not guarantee their safe use. Therefore, research work is carried out in many biomechanical engineering centers on coating of the metallic biomaterials with layers having physical and chemical properties similar to surrounding tissue environment. The focuses of this work are carbon coatings that - as it was shown by results of investigations carried out in last years - have advantageous physical and chemical properties in the tissue and body fluids environment. Influence of the Vitallium casting alloy structure and methods of its surface preparation, on physical and chemical properties of nanocrystalline carbon coating applied in the RF CVD process was investigated. The as cast and saturated alloy was investigated. Diversification of surface preparation methods was obtained by grinding, electrolytic polishing and passivation. Results of the pitting corrosion resistance tests of the Vitallium alloy with the carbon coating applied, carried out using the potentiodynamic method in the Tyrode's physiological solution, indicate its relationship with the alloy structure. Carbon coating applied in conditions worked out in the project, nearly doubles the pitting corrosion resistance of the investigated alloy in the Tyrode's physiological solution, and has a significant adherence to the metallic substrate. The suitable alloy structure casting of the Co β solution with multiple carbide precipitations features the condition of obtaining a coating with optimum physical and chemical properties. Heat treatment, homogenising the alloy chemical

  4. Bacteria, carbon dioxide, and methane data from bottle casts in the Cariaco Basin on the continental shelf of Venezuela from the HERMANO GINES from 2001-04-30 to 2001-05-01 (NODC Accession 0000737)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bacteria, carbon dioxide, and methane data were collected from bottle casts from the HERMANO GINES in the Cariaco Basin on the continental shelf of Venezuela. Data...

  5. Bacteria, carbon dioxide, and methane data from bottle casts in the Cariaco Basin on the continental shelf of Venezuela from the HERMANO GINES from 2000-05-03 to 2000-10-31 (NODC Accession 0000732)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bacteria, carbon dioxide, and methane data were collected employing bottle casts from the Hermano Gines in the Cariaco Basin on the continental shelf of Venezuela....

  6. Sedimentary Record of the Back-Arc Basins of South-Central Mexico: an Evolution from Extensional Basin to Carbonate Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Rojas, M. I.; Molina-Garza, R. S.; Lawton, T. F.

    2015-12-01

    The Lower Cretaceous depositional systems of southwestern Oaxaquia, in south-central Mexico, were controlled by tectonic processes related to the instauration of a continental arc and the accretion of the Guerrero arc to mainland Mexico. The Atzompa Formation refers to a succession of conglomerate, sandstone, siltstone, and limestone that crop out in southwestern Mexico with Early Cretaceous fauna and detrital zircon maximum depositional ages. The sedimentary record shows a transition from early fluvial/alluvial to shallow marine depositional environments. The first stage corresponds to juvenile fluvial/alluvial setting followed by a deep lacustrine depositional environment, suggesting the early stages of an extensional basin. The second stage is characterized by anabranched deposits of axial fluvial systems flowing to the NE-SE, showing deposition during a period of rapid subsidence. The third and final stage is made of tidal deposits followed, in turn, by abrupt marine flooding of the basin and development of a Barremian-Aptian carbonate ramp. We interpret the Tentzo basin as a response to crustal extension in a back-arc setting, with high rates of sedimentation in the early stages of the basin (3-4 mm/m.y), slower rates during the development of starved fluvial to tidal systems and carbonate ramps, and at the top of the Atzompa Formation an abrupt deepening of the basin due to flexural subsidence related to terrane docking and attendant thrusting to the west. These events were recorded in the back-arc region of a continental convergent margin (Zicapa arc) where syn-sedimentary magmatism is indicated by Early Cretaceous detrital and volcanic clasts from alluvial fan facies west of the basin. Finally, and as a response to the accretion of the Guerrero superterrane to Oaxaquia during the Aptian, a carbonate platform facing toward the Gulf of Mexico was established in central to eastern Oaxaquia.

  7. Transparent Low Electrostatic Charge Films Based on Carbon Nanotubes and Polypropylene. Homopolymer Cast Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe Vineth Quiñones-Jurado

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs in external layers (A-layers of ABA-trilayer polypropylene films was investigated, with the purpose of determining intrinsic and extrinsic factors that could lead to antistatic behavior of transparent films. The incorporation of 0.01, 0.1, and 1 wt % of MWCTNs in the A-layers was done by dilution through the masterbatch method. Masterbatches were fabricated using isotactic polypropylene (iPP with different melt flow indexes 2.5, 34, and 1200 g/10 min, and using different ultrasound assist methods. It was found that films containing MWCNTs show surface electrical resistivity of 1012 and 1016 Ω/sq, regardless of the iPP melt flow index (MFI and masterbatch fabrication method. However, electrostatic charge was found to depend upon the iPP MFI, the ultrasound assist method and MWCNT concentration. A percolation electron transport mechanism was determined most likely responsible for this behavior. Optical properties for films containing MWCNTs do not show significant differences compared to the reference film at MWCNT concentrations below 0.1 wt %. However, an enhancement in brightness was observed, and it was attributed to ordered iPP molecules wrapping the MWCNTs. Bright transparent films with low electrostatic charge were obtained even for MWCNTs concentrations as low as 0.01 wt %.

  8. Fabrication of sacrificial anode cathodic protection through casting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Sharif Sattar; Muhamad Daud; Siti Radiah Mohd Kamarudin; Azali Muhamad; Zaiton Selamat; Rusni Rejab

    2007-01-01

    Aluminum is one of the few metals that can be cast by all of the processes used in casting metals. These processes consist of die casting, permanent mold casting, sand casting (green sand and dry sand), plaster casting, investment casting, and continuous casting. Other processes such as lost foam, squeeze casting, and hot isostatic pressing are also used. Permanent mold casting method was selected in which used for fabricating of sacrificial anode cathodic protection. This product was ground for surface finished and fabricated in the cylindrical form and reinforced with carbon steel at a center of the anode. (Author)

  9. Estimation of cerium and lanthanum content in core material of high intensity carbon arc electrodes by x-ray fluorescence method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagpal, K.C.; Bhavalkar, R.H.

    1977-01-01

    The X-ray fluorescence method has been used to determine the weight percentages of cerium and lanthanum in the core material of high intensity carbon arc electrodes from the calibration curves plotted between the weight percentages of these elements and the peak-intensity ratios of CeLsub(α1), and LaLsub(α1) peaks to the neighbouring peak SnLsub(α1) due to an internal standard element. (author)

  10. Non-catalytic plasma-arc reforming of natural gas with carbon dioxide as the oxidizing agent for the production of synthesis gas or hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Blom, P.W.E.; Basson, G.W.

    2013-01-01

    The world’s energy consumption is increasing constantly due to the growing population of the world. The increasing energy consumption has a negative effect on the fossil fuel reserves of the world. Hydrogen has the potential to provide energy for all our needs by making use of fossil fuel such as natural gas and nuclear-based electricity. Hydrogen can be produced by reforming methane with carbon dioxide as the oxidizing agent. Hydrogen can be produced in a Plasma-arc reforming ...

  11. Contributions of Rare Earth Element (La,Ce) Addition to the Impact Toughness of Low Carbon Cast Niobium Microalloyed Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkamani, Hadi; Raygan, Shahram; Garcia Mateo, Carlos; Rassizadehghani, Jafar; Palizdar, Yahya; San-Martin, David

    2018-03-01

    In this research Rare Earth elements (RE), La and Ce (200 ppm), were added to a low carbon cast microalloyed steel to disclose their influence on the microstructure and impact toughness. It is suggested that RE are able to change the interaction between the inclusions and matrix during the solidification process (comprising peritectic transformation), which could affect the microstructural features and consequently the impact property; compared to the base steel a clear evolution was observed in nature and morphology of the inclusions present in the RE-added steel i.e. (1) they changed from MnS-based to (RE,Al)(S,O) and RE(S)-based; (2) they obtained an aspect ratio closer to 1 with a lower area fraction as well as a smaller average size. Besides, the microstructural examination of the matrix phases showed that a bimodal type of ferrite grain size distribution exists in both base and RE-added steels, while the mean ferrite grain size was reduced from 12 to 7 μm and the bimodality was redressed in the RE-added steel. It was found that pearlite nodule size decreases from 9 to 6 μm in the RE-added steel; however, microalloying with RE caused only a slight decrease in pearlite volume fraction. After detailed fractography analyses, it was found that, compared to the based steel, the significant enhancement of the impact toughness in RE-added steel (from 63 to 100 J) can be mainly attributed to the differences observed in the nature of the inclusions, the ferrite grain size distribution, and the pearlite nodule size. The presence of carbides (cementite) at ferrite grain boundaries and probable change in distribution of Nb-nanoprecipitation (promoted by RE addition) can be considered as other reasons affecting the impact toughness of steels under investigation.

  12. The effect of processing and composition on the properties of polylactide–multiwall carbon nanotube composites prepared by solvent casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizvi, Reza; Naguib, Hani; Kim, Jae-Kyung

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of processing solvent and filler concentration on the thermal, electrical and mechanical properties of polylactide (PLA)–multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT) composites. PLA–MWNT composites were prepared by a solvent casting method using two different solvents, chloroform and 1,4-dioxane, in compositions of 0, 0.5, 2 and 5 wt% MWNTs. The dispersion of the MWNTs in PLA was examined using a scanning electron microscope and was found to be improved when 1,4-dioxane was used as the solvent as compared with when chloroform was used. Owing to their better MWNT dispersion, composites prepared using 1,4-dioxane displayed a greater dependence on the MWNT concentration of the thermal, electrical and mechanical properties. Composites prepared using 1,4-dioxane had a greater effect on PLA's decomposition temperature and displayed faster crystallization kinetics than those prepared using chloroform. Not only was the conductivity of 1,4-dioxane prepared composites greater than that of chloroform prepared composites, but also the filler percolation point was observed to be reduced as well (less than 0.5 wt% MWNTs). At 5 wt% MWNT composition, a 31% increase in Young's modulus was observed in 1,4-dioxane prepared composites while a 14% improvement was observed in chloroform prepared composites, as compared with neat PLA. On the basis of the results, it is believed that the chemical interaction between the carboxylated MWNTs and 1,4-dioxane allows for a better dispersion of the MWNTs in PLA

  13. Effects of multi-pass arc welding on mechanical properties of carbon steel C25 plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adedayo, S.M.; Babatunde, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of multi-pass welding on mechanical properties of C25 carbon steel plate were examined. Mild steel plate workpieces of 90 x 55 mm 2 area and 10 mm thickness with a 30 degrees vee weld-grooves were subjected to single and multi-pass welding. Toughness, hardness and tensile tests of single and multi-pass welds were conducted. Toughness values of the welds under double pass welds were higher than both single pass and unwelded alloy, at respective maximum values of 2464, 2342 and 2170 kN/m. Hardness values were reduced under double pass relative to single pass welding with both being lower than the value for unwelded alloy; the values were 40.5, 43.2 and 48.5 Rs respectively at 12 mm from the weld line. The tensile strength of 347 N/mm 2 under multi-pass weld was higher than single pass weld with value of 314 N/mm 2 . Therefore, the temperature distribution and apparent pre-heating during multi-pass welding increased the toughness and tensile strength of the weldments, but reduced the hardness. (au)

  14. SPRAY CASTING

    OpenAIRE

    SALAMCI, Elmas

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT This paper is designed to provide a basic review of spray casting. A brief overview of the historical development of spray  casting and the description of plant and equipment have been given. Following metallurgical characteristics of spray formed alloys, process parameters and solidification mechanism of spray deposition have been discussed in detail. Finally, microstructure and mechanical properties of the selected spray cast Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys have been presented and comp...

  15. Perspectives of Single-Wall Carbon Nano-tube Production in the Arc Discharge Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krestinin, A.V.; Kiselev, N.A.; Raevskii, A.V; Ryabenko, A.G.; Zakharov, D.N.; Zvereva, G.I.

    2003-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nano tubes (SWNTs) promise wide applications in many technical fields. As a result purified SWNT material is sold now on the West market at more than 1000 dollars per 1 gram. Thus developing an effective technology for SWNTs production rises to a very important sintofene problem. The perspectives of three existing methods providing raw material in the technology of SWNT production have been analyzed. They are i) pulsed laser evaporation of graphite/metal composites, ii) evaporation of graphite electrodes with metal content in the are discharge process, and iii) catalytic decomposition of the mixture of CO and metal carbonyl catalyst precursor. The observed dynamites of SWNT market points to replacing the laser method of SWNTs production by the are process. The conclusion has been made that the technology based on the are process will be the major one for the fabrication of purified SWNTs at least for the next five years. A reliable estimation of a low price limit of SWNTs was derived from a comparison of two technologies based on the are discharge process: the first one is the production of SWNTs and the second one is the production of a fullerene mixture C 6 0 + C 7 0. The main conclusion was made that the price of purified SWNTs should always be more by 2-3 times the price of fullerene mixture. The parameters of a lab-scale technology for the production of purified SWNTs are listed. A large-scale application of the developed technology is expected to reduce the price of purified SWNTs by approximately ten times. The methods now employed for the characterization of products containing SWNTs are briefly observed. It is concluded that electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, absorption and Raman spectroscopy, measurement of the specific surface aria, optical microscopy - each in separation is not enough for extensive characterization of a sample containing SWNTs, and all these methods should be used together. (author)

  16. The research and implementation of coalfield spontaneous combustion of carbon emission WebGIS based on Silverlight and ArcGIS server

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Z; Bi, J; Wang, X; Zhu, W

    2014-01-01

    As an important sub-topic of the natural process of carbon emission data public information platform construction, coalfield spontaneous combustion of carbon emission WebGIS system has become an important study object. In connection with data features of coalfield spontaneous combustion carbon emissions (i.e. a wide range of data, which is rich and complex) and the geospatial characteristics, data is divided into attribute data and spatial data. Based on full analysis of the data, completed the detailed design of the Oracle database and stored on the Oracle database. Through Silverlight rich client technology and the expansion of WCF services, achieved the attribute data of web dynamic query, retrieval, statistical, analysis and other functions. For spatial data, we take advantage of ArcGIS Server and Silverlight-based API to invoke GIS server background published map services, GP services, Image services and other services, implemented coalfield spontaneous combustion of remote sensing image data and web map data display, data analysis, thematic map production. The study found that the Silverlight technology, based on rich client and object-oriented framework for WCF service, can efficiently constructed a WebGIS system. And then, combined with ArcGIS Silverlight API to achieve interactive query attribute data and spatial data of coalfield spontaneous emmission, can greatly improve the performance of WebGIS system. At the same time, it provided a strong guarantee for the construction of public information on China's carbon emission data

  17. Properties shaping and repair of selected types of cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents research results of twofold use of TIG - Tungsten Inert Gas also known as GTA - Gas Tungsten Arc. First is surfacing by welding on cold and hot-cold to repair chromium cast iron with chromium content about 15%. Second is remelting with electric arc of selected gray (with pearlitic matrix and ductile (with ferritic-pearlitic matrix cast iron. Repair of cast iron elements was realized in order to cut out a casting defects. Defects decrease a usability of castings for constructional application and increase a manufacturing costs. Application of surface heat treatment guarantees mechanical properties i.e. hardness and wear resistance improvement. The result of investigations show possibility of castings repair by put on defects a good quality padding welds, which have comparable properties with base material. Use of electric arc surface heat treatment resulted in increase of hardness and wear resistance, which was measured on the basis of ASTM G 65 - 00 standard.

  18. Melting and casting of FeAl-based cast alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, V.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wilkening, D. [Columbia Falls Aluminum Co., Columbia Falls, MT (United States); Liebetrau, J.; Mackey, B. [AFFCO, L.L.C., Anaconda, MT (United States)

    1998-11-01

    The FeAl-based intermetallic alloys are of great interest because of their low density, low raw material cost, and excellent resistance to high-temperature oxidation, sulfidation, carburization, and molten salts. The applications based on these unique properties of FeAl require methods to melt and cast these alloys into complex-shaped castings and centrifugal cast tubes. This paper addresses the melting-related issues and the effect of chemistry on the microstructure and hardness of castings. It is concluded that the use of the Exo-Melt{trademark} process for melting and the proper selection of the aluminum melt stock can result in porosity-free castings. The FeAl alloys can be melted and cast from the virgin and revert stock. A large variation in carbon content of the alloys is possible before the precipitation of graphite flakes occurs. Titanium is a very potent addition to refine the grain size of castings. A range of complex sand castings and two different sizes of centrifugal cast tubes of the alloy have already been cast.

  19. Caste System

    OpenAIRE

    Hoff, Karla

    2016-01-01

    In standard economics, individuals are rational actors and economic forces undermine institutions that impose large inefficiencies. The persistence of the caste system is evidence of the need for psychologically more realistic models of decision-making in economics. The caste system divides South Asian society into hereditary groups whose lowest ranks are represented as innately polluted. ...

  20. Highly stable carbon nanotube field emitters on small metal tips against electrical arcing for miniature X-ray tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Jun Mok; Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Hyun Nam; Raza, Hamid Saeed; Cho, Sung Oh

    2015-01-01

    If CNT emitters are operated at a high voltage or at a high electric field, electrical arcing (or vacuum breakdown) can occur. Arcing can be initiated by the removed CNTs, impurities on the CNTs or substrates, protrusion of CNTs, low operating vacuum, and a very high electric field. Since arcing is accompanied with a very high current flow and it can produce plasma channel near the emitter, CNTs are seriously damaged or sometimes CNTs are almost completely removed from the substrate by the arcing events. Detachment of CNTs from a substrate is an irreversible catastrophic phenomenon for a device operation. In addition to the detachment of CNTs, arcing induces a sudden voltage drop and thus device operation is stopped. The metal mixture strongly attached CNTs to the tip substrate. Due to the strong adhesion, CNT emitters could be pre-treated with electrical conditioning process without seriously damaging the CNTs even though many intense arcing events were induced at the small and sharp geometry of the tip substrate. Impurities that were loosely bound to the substrates were almost removed and CNTs heights became uniform after the electrical conditioning process

  1. Seal welded cast iron nuclear waste container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippi, A.M.; Sprecace, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    An article of manufacture is described comprising a cast iron container having an opening at one end and a cast iron plug; a first nickel-carbon alloy fusion weldable insert surrounding the opening and metallurgically bonded to the cast iron container at the one end of the container; a second nickel-carbon alloy insert metallurgically bonded to the cast iron plug located within the opening and surrounded by the first insert the inserts being jointed by a fusion bond in the opening without heating the cast iron container to an austenite formation temperature thereby sealing the interior of the container from the exterior ambient outside the opening; the nickel-carbon alloy containing about 2 to 5 w% carbon; and both the nickel-carbon alloy insert and the cast iron container have a microstructure containing a graphite phase

  2. Double Fillet Welding of Carbon Steel T-Joint by Double Channel Shielding Gas Metal Arc Welding Method Using Metal Cored Wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mert T.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Low carbon steel material and T-joints are frequently used in ship building and steel constructions. Advantages such as high deposition rates, high quality and smooth weld metals and easy automation make cored wires preferable in these industries. In this study, low carbon steel materials with web and flange thicknesses of 6 mm, 8 mm and 10 mm were welded with conventional GMAW and double channel shielding gas metal arc welding (DMAG method to form double fillet T-joints using metal cored wire. The difference between these two methods were characterized by measurements of mean welding parameters, Vickers hardness profiles, weld bead and HAZ geometry of the joints and thermal camera temperature measurements. When weld bead and HAZ geometries are focused, it was seen filler metal molten area increased and base metal molten area decreased in DMAG of low carbon steel. When compared with traditional GMAW, finer and acicular structures in weld metal and more homogenous and smaller grains in HAZ are obtained with double channel shielding gas metal arc welding.

  3. Microstructure and abrasive wear properties of M(Cr,Fe7C3 carbides reinforced high-chromium carbon coating produced by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soner BUYTOZ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, high-chromium ferrochromium carbon hypereutectic alloy powder was coated on AISI 4340 steel by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW process. The coating layers were analyzed by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS. Depending on the gas tungsten arc welding pa-rameters, either hypoeutectic or hypereutectic microstructures were produced. Wear tests of the coatings were carried out on a pin-on-disc apparatus as function of contact load. Wear rates of the all coating layers were decreased as a function of the loading. The improvement of abrasive wear resistance of the coating layer could be attributed to the high hardness of the hypereutectic M7C3 carbides in the microstruc-ture. As a result, the microstructure of surface layers, hardness and abrasive wear behaviours showed different characteristics due to the gas tungsten arc welding parameters.

  4. ARC Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    coordination on a regular basis. The overall ARC organizational structure is shown below. Organizational Structure Dynamics and Control of Vehicles Human Centered Modeling and Simulation High Performance

  5. Plasma's sweeping arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichon, Max

    2010-01-01

    Full text: It is purely elemental, returning materials to their basic atoms through extreme heat and then recondensing them in useful ways. Plasma arc gasification is the latest advanced waste treatment (AWT)concept to hit our shores, courtesy of Zenergy Australia. According to its fans, plasma technology can eliminate all domestic waste to landfill and turn it into beneficial by-products. Japan has toyed with it for a decade, but the idea is now creating a bit of buzz, in the US in particular. Consultancy URS last year undertook a review of 16 advanced technologies for the City of Los Angeles and determined plasma arc gasification was one of the most promising. The Waste Management Association of Australia (VVMAA), however, is cautious - too many AWT projects here have failed to live up to their promises. Plasma arc gasification works on the same principle as a welding machine. An inert gas is passed through an electrical arc between two electrodes and becomes ionised (called plasma), reaching temperatures as high as 13,900°C. It is then injected into the plasma converter holding the waste. Zenergy is working with US technology company Plasma Waste Recycling (PWR), which says it can convert 80 per cent of waste to syngas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen that can be used to generate renewable electricity. The inorganic compounds in the waste come out as a solid, either molten metal to be cast as scrap steel or a slag that can be used as a building material aggregate or spun into mineral wool. “The plasma arc process is the next generation for AWT plants as there is no incineration involved, no fly ash, no bottom ash and nothing left to landfill,” said Zenergy Australia's Paul Prasad. He estimates a plant could convert up to 175,000 tonnes of household waste a year into energy or reusable by-products. Technically, it also gets around Australia's fears over incineration, though whether that is really the case in practice remains to be seen. Prasad says

  6. Sixty Years of Casting Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, John

    2015-11-01

    The 60 years of solidification research since the publication of Chalmer's constitutional undercooling in 1953 has been a dramatic advance of understanding which has and continues to be an inspiration. In contrast, 60 years of casting research has seen mixed fortunes. One of its success stories relates to improvements in inoculation of gray irons, and another to the discovery of spheroidal graphite iron, although both of these can be classified as metallurgical rather than casting advances. It is suggested that true casting advances have dated from the author's lab in 1992 when a critical surface turbulence condition was defined for the first time. These last 20 years have seen the surface entrainment issues of castings developed to a sufficient sophistication to revolutionize the performance of light alloy and steel foundries. However, there is still a long way to go, with large sections of the steel and Ni-base casting industries still in denial that casting defects are important or even exist. The result has been that special ingots are still cast poorly, and shaped casting operations have suffered massive losses. For secondary melted and cast materials, electro-slag remelting has the potential to be much superior to expensive vacuum arc remelting, which has cost our aerospace and defense industries dearly over the years. This failure to address and upgrade our processing of liquid metals is a serious concern, since the principle entrainment defect, the bifilm, is seen as the principle initiator of cracks in metals; in general, bifilms are the Griffith cracks that initiate failures by cracking. A new generation of crack resistant metals and engineering structures can now be envisaged.

  7. Hair casts

    OpenAIRE

    Sweta S Parmar; Kirti S Parmar; Bela J Shah

    2014-01-01

    Hair casts or pseudonits are circumferential concretions, which cover the hair shaft in such a way that, it could be easily removed. They are thin, cylindrical, and elongated in length. We present an unusual case of an 8-year-old girl presenting with hair casts. Occurrence of these is unusual, and they may have varied associations. This patient was suffering from developmental delay. It is commonly misdiagnosed as and very important to differentiate from pediculosis capitis.

  8. MeV-ion beam analysis of the interface between filtered cathodic arc-deposited a-carbon and single crystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamwanna, T.; Pasaja, N.; Yu, L.D.; Vilaithong, T.; Anders, A.; Singkarat, S.

    2008-01-01

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) films were deposited on Si(1 0 0) wafers by a filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) plasma source. A negative electrical bias was applied to the silicon substrate in order to control the incident energy of carbon ions. Effects of the electrical bias on the a-C/Si interface characteristics were investigated by using standard Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) in the channeling mode with 2.1-MeV He 2+ ions. The shape of the Si surface peaks of the RBS/channeling spectra reflects the degree of interface disorder due to atomic displacement from the bulk position of the Si crystal. Details of the analysis method developed are described. It was found that the width of the a-C/Si interface increases linearly with the substrate bias voltage but not the thickness of the a-C film.

  9. Effect of volume ratio of liquid to solid on the interfacial microstructure and mechanical properties of high chromium cast iron and medium carbon steel bimetal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Bowen; Cai Changchun; Lu Baiping

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Volume ratio of liquid to solid affects significantly the interfacial microstructure. → Elemental diffusion activity is increased by increasing volume ratio. → Mechanical property is improved by increasing volume ratio. - Abstract: The high chromium cast iron and medium carbon steel bimetal was fabricated by liquid-solid casting technology. The effect of volume ratios of liquid to solid (6:1, 10:1 and 12:1) on the interfacial microstructure and mechanical properties of bimetal was investigated. The interfacial microstructure was analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The shear strength and microhardness in as-cast condition were studied at room temperature. The results show that the volume ratios of liquid to solid affect significantly the interfacial microstructure. When liquid-solid volume ratio was 6:1, the unbonded region was detected in interface region because the imported heat energy cannot support effectively the diffusion of element, whereas, when liquid-solid volume ratios reach 10:1 and 12:1, a sound interfacial microstructure was achieved by the diffusion of C, Cr, Mo, Cu and Mn, and metallurgical bonding without unbonded region, void and hole, etc. was detected. With the increase of liquid-solid volume ratio, the elemental diffusion activity improves, resulting in the increase of width of interface transition region. At the same distance from interface, with the increase of liquid-solid volume ratio, the microhardness is degraded in HCCI, but increased in MCS. The shear strength is also improved with the increase of liquid-solid volume ratio.

  10. Solidification and casting

    CERN Document Server

    Cantor, Brian

    2002-01-01

    INDUSTRIAL PERSPECTIVEDirect chillcasting of aluminium alloysContinuous casting of aluminium alloysContinuous casting of steelsCastings in the automotive industryCast aluminium-silicon piston alloysMODELLING AND SIMULATIONModelling direct chill castingMold filling simulation of die castingThe ten casting rulesGrain selection in single crystal superalloy castingsDefects in aluminium shape castingPattern formation during solidificationPeritectic solidificationSTRUCTURE AND DEFECTSHetergeneous nucleation in aluminium alloysCo

  11. Tape casting fluorinated YBC123

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, J.A.T.; Luke, D.M.; Whiteley, B.A.

    1991-01-01

    Tape casting the superconducting Ba-Y-Cu oxide was accomplished by several laboratories and show promise for being a versatile forming technique. The major problem is low current density, probably due to lack of grain alignment and grain boundary related weak links. The latter problem may be due to formation of carbonates and hydroxides during binder burnout. Preliminary work done at Alfred shows that a bimodal powder size distribution displays significant alignment after tape casting and that F treated powder is resistant to attack by steam at 100C. Such corrosion resistant powder cast as form tape should survive the binder burnout without the detrimental grain boundary phases that develop from reaction of the superconducting phase, steam and carbon dioxide. This paper presents the results of an investigation of tape casting fluorinated powder with a bimodal size distribution

  12. Fan Fuel Casting Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhoff, Seth D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-28

    LANL was approached to provide material and design guidance for a fan-shaped fuel element. A total of at least three castings were planned. The first casting is a simple billet mold to be made from high carbon DU-10Mo charge material. The second and third castings are for optimization of the actual fuel plate mold. The experimental scope for optimization is only broad enough for a second iteration of the mold design. It is important to note that partway through FY17, this project was cancelled by the sponsor. This report is being written in order to capture the knowledge gained should this project resume at a later date.

  13. Consolidating NASA's Arc Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboni, John A.; Gokcen, Tahir; Hui, Frank C. L.; Graube, Peter; Morrissey, Patricia; Lewis, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes the consolidation of NASA's high powered arc-jet testing at a single location. The existing plasma arc-jet wind tunnels located at the Johnson Space Center were relocated to Ames Research Center while maintaining NASA's technical capability to ground-test thermal protection system materials under simulated atmospheric entry convective heating. The testing conditions at JSC were reproduced and successfully demonstrated at ARC through close collaboration between the two centers. New equipment was installed at Ames to provide test gases of pure nitrogen mixed with pure oxygen, and for future nitrogen-carbon dioxide mixtures. A new control system was custom designed, installed and tested. Tests demonstrated the capability of the 10 MW constricted-segmented arc heater at Ames meets the requirements of the major customer, NASA's Orion program. Solutions from an advanced computational fluid dynamics code were used to aid in characterizing the properties of the plasma stream and the surface environment on the calorimeters in the supersonic flow stream produced by the arc heater.

  14. CASTING FURNACES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, R.H.; Winters, C.E.

    1961-01-01

    A device is described for casting uranium which comprises a crucible, a rotatable table holding a plurality of molds, and a shell around both the crucible and the table. The bottom of the crucible has an eccentrically arranged pouring hole aligned with one of the molds at a time. The shell can be connected with a vacuum.

  15. Phase transitions of doped carbon in CrCN coatings with modified mechanical and tribological properties via filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, J.J. [Faculty of Materials and Energy, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Wang, H.Q. [College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Qin, L.Z., E-mail: qin8394@163.com [Faculty of Materials and Energy, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Liao, B.; Liang, H. [College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Li, B. [Faculty of Materials and Energy, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)

    2017-04-15

    The CrCN coatings were fabricated onto Si (1 1 1) wafers and SUS304 stainless steel plates using filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposition (FCVAD) technique under different flow ratios of N{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 2} gas mixture. The morphology, crystalline structure and chemical composition of the coatings were characterized. It was found that the grain size reduce with increasing carbon content, which makes the CrCN coatings refined and smooth. The quasi-one-dimensional carbolite phase was also found in CrN host lattice with C{sub 2}H{sub 2} content ranging from 5% to 20%, and it will be evolved into amorphous carbon and amorphous CN{sub x} phases as C{sub 2}H{sub 2} content exceeds 20%. Moreover, we examined the mechanical and tribological properties of the CrCN coatings, and the experimental results confirmed that the friction coefficient of the coatings descend to the lowest value as 0.39 with 30% C{sub 2}H{sub 2} content, due to the graphite (sp{sup 2} C−C) phase embed in CrN host lattice; while the chromium carbon (Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}) and diamond (sp{sup 3} C−C) phases may give rise to the increase of the coating hardness with the highest value at 23.97 GPa under 20% C{sub 2}H{sub 2} content.

  16. Phase transitions of doped carbon in CrCN coatings with modified mechanical and tribological properties via filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, J.J.; Wang, H.Q.; Qin, L.Z.; Liao, B.; Liang, H.; Li, B.

    2017-01-01

    The CrCN coatings were fabricated onto Si (1 1 1) wafers and SUS304 stainless steel plates using filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposition (FCVAD) technique under different flow ratios of N_2/C_2H_2 gas mixture. The morphology, crystalline structure and chemical composition of the coatings were characterized. It was found that the grain size reduce with increasing carbon content, which makes the CrCN coatings refined and smooth. The quasi-one-dimensional carbolite phase was also found in CrN host lattice with C_2H_2 content ranging from 5% to 20%, and it will be evolved into amorphous carbon and amorphous CN_x phases as C_2H_2 content exceeds 20%. Moreover, we examined the mechanical and tribological properties of the CrCN coatings, and the experimental results confirmed that the friction coefficient of the coatings descend to the lowest value as 0.39 with 30% C_2H_2 content, due to the graphite (sp"2 C−C) phase embed in CrN host lattice; while the chromium carbon (Cr_3C_2) and diamond (sp"3 C−C) phases may give rise to the increase of the coating hardness with the highest value at 23.97 GPa under 20% C_2H_2 content.

  17. Phase transitions of doped carbon in CrCN coatings with modified mechanical and tribological properties via filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, J. J.; Wang, H. Q.; Qin, L. Z.; Liao, B.; Liang, H.; Li, B.

    2017-04-01

    The CrCN coatings were fabricated onto Si (1 1 1) wafers and SUS304 stainless steel plates using filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposition (FCVAD) technique under different flow ratios of N2/C2H2 gas mixture. The morphology, crystalline structure and chemical composition of the coatings were characterized. It was found that the grain size reduce with increasing carbon content, which makes the CrCN coatings refined and smooth. The quasi-one-dimensional carbolite phase was also found in CrN host lattice with C2H2 content ranging from 5% to 20%, and it will be evolved into amorphous carbon and amorphous CNx phases as C2H2 content exceeds 20%. Moreover, we examined the mechanical and tribological properties of the CrCN coatings, and the experimental results confirmed that the friction coefficient of the coatings descend to the lowest value as 0.39 with 30% C2H2 content, due to the graphite (sp2 Csbnd C) phase embed in CrN host lattice; while the chromium carbon (Cr3C2) and diamond (sp3 Csbnd C) phases may give rise to the increase of the coating hardness with the highest value at 23.97 GPa under 20% C2H2 content.

  18. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2009-05-01

    metallographic photos.Except for focusing on the effect of high carbon phases in cast iron, in this book, special attention is also paid to the effect of austenite on solidification, graphite morphology, and quality of cast iron; at the same time, the study on the solidification behaviours in the region around eutectic cells and its effects on mechanical properties of cast iron, are also emphasized.

  19. Casting methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Kenneth C.; Meyer, Mitchell K.; Grover, Blair K.; Fielding, Randall S.; Wolfensberger, Billy W.

    2012-12-18

    A casting device includes a covered crucible having a top opening and a bottom orifice, a lid covering the top opening, a stopper rod sealing the bottom orifice, and a reusable mold having at least one chamber, a top end of the chamber being open to and positioned below the bottom orifice and a vacuum tap into the chamber being below the top end of the chamber. A casting method includes charging a crucible with a solid material and covering the crucible, heating the crucible, melting the material, evacuating a chamber of a mold to less than 1 atm absolute through a vacuum tap into the chamber, draining the melted material into the evacuated chamber, solidifying the material in the chamber, and removing the solidified material from the chamber without damaging the chamber.

  20. CASTING APPARATUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, C.F.; Thompson, R.H.

    1958-09-23

    An apparatus is described for casting small quantities of uranlum. It consists of a crucible having a hole in the bottom with a mold positioned below. A vertical rcd passes through the hole in the crucible and has at its upper end a piercing head adapted to break the oxide skin encasing a molten uranium body. An air tight cylinder surrounds the crucible and mold, and is arranged to be evacuated.

  1. Nodular cast iron and casting monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper quality monitoring of nodular cast iron and casting made of it is presented. A control system of initial liquid cast iron to spheroidization, after spheroidization and inoculation with using of TDA method was shown. An application of an ultrasonic method to assessment of the graphite form and the metal matrix microstructure of castings was investigated.

  2. New carbon materials. Recent advances in the synthesis of fullerenes and carbon nanotubes; Shin tanso zairyo. Furaren, kabon nanochubu no gosei no saikin no shinpo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yumura, M [National Inst. of Materials and Chemical Research, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-01-01

    Arc synthesis method, which is now the center for the synthesis of new carbon compounds such as carbon nanocapsules and carbon nanotubes, is introduced together with its current status. Many new carbon compounds are synthesized by DC arc discharge heating method (arc discharge method) in which a graphite bar is used as the electrode. C70 and higher order fullerenes having larger carbon numbers are found one after another in the soot produced by the arc discharge method, and the structures of C76, C78, C84, C90, C94, and others have been clarified. It is considered in the arc discharge method that the processes of a large amount of carbon evaporation by high temperature and the succeeding quenching cause to produce various kinds of new carbon compounds. In connection with other synthesis methods, synthesis of fullerenes by incomplete combustion, synthesis of nanotubes by the vapor phase thermal decomposition method, and the synthesis of nanotubes using casting molds are discussed. 24 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Casting materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Anil R [Xenia, OH; Dzugan, Robert [Cincinnati, OH; Harrington, Richard M [Cincinnati, OH; Neece, Faurice D [Lyndurst, OH; Singh, Nipendra P [Pepper Pike, OH

    2011-06-14

    A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional casting processes.

  4. Relationship Between Solidification Microstructure and Hot Cracking Susceptibility for Continuous Casting of Low-Carbon and High-Strength Low-Alloyed Steels: A Phase-Field Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger, B.; Apel, M.; Santillana, B.; Eskin, D. G.

    2013-08-01

    Hot cracking is one of the major defects in continuous casting of steels, frequently limiting the productivity. To understand the factors leading to this defect, microstructure formation is simulated for a low-carbon and two high-strength low-alloyed steels. 2D simulation of the initial stage of solidification is performed in a moving slice of the slab using proprietary multiphase-field software and taking into account all elements which are expected to have a relevant effect on the mechanical properties and structure formation during solidification. To account for the correct thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the multicomponent alloy grades, the simulation software is online coupled to commercial thermodynamic and mobility databases. A moving-frame boundary condition allows traveling through the entire solidification history starting from the slab surface, and tracking the morphology changes during growth of the shell. From the simulation results, significant microstructure differences between the steel grades are quantitatively evaluated and correlated with their hot cracking behavior according to the Rappaz-Drezet-Gremaud (RDG) hot cracking criterion. The possible role of the microalloying elements in hot cracking, in particular of traces of Ti, is analyzed. With the assumption that TiN precipitates trigger coalescence of the primary dendrites, quantitative evaluation of the critical strain rates leads to a full agreement with the observed hot cracking behavior.

  5. Biodegradable Poly(Lactic Acid/Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposite Fabrication Using Casting And Hot Press Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park S.G.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable advanced polymer composites have recently received a large amount of attention. The present study aimed to design poly(lactic acid multiwalled carbon nanotube nanocomposites (PLA/MWCNTs using a simple fabrication technique. A PLA sheet was first dissolved in dichloromethane, and MWCNTs were subsequently added at various concentrations (0.5, 1.5 and 5% while applying shear strain stirring to achieve dispersion of carbon nanotubes (CNTs. These solutions were then molded and a hot press was used to generate sheets free of voids with entrapped solvent. The prepared samples were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, x-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. Our data showed composite samples free of defects and voids, indicating that the hot press is capable of generating sufficiently compact polymer matrices. Additionally, TGA and FTIR showed significant bonding interactions between the PLA matrix and the nano-fillers. Collectively, our results suggest that incorporation of CNTs as nano-fillers into biodegradable polymers may have multiple applications in many different sectors.

  6. The movement of the burden in submerged-arc furnaces for the production of high-carbon ferromanganese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyason, G.J.; See, J.B.

    1978-01-01

    The mechanism by which the burden moves in a submerged-arc furnace was investigated in two large industrial furnaces by the stimulus-response technique with a radiotracer of the radio-isotope 5 Fe as the stimulus. As this radio-isotope was suitable only for the measurement of residence-time distributions in the alloy phase, the analysis of the experiments was limited to that phase. The residence-time distributions obtained by the measurement of alloy samples obtained during tapping were analysed by various techniques. This analysis verified the existence of stagnant zones within the furnace, and showed that the movement of the burden through the furnace could not be described by either of the two idealized patterns of flow, i.e., plug flow or mixed flow. A composite model to describe the movement of the burden through the furnace was developed by consideration of the mechanism and position of heat generation within the furnace, the inner structure of the furnace, the general form of the measured residence-time distributions, and the mode of burden descent through the furnace. The composite model consisted of a dispersed plug-flow region in the upper regions of the furnace discharging into a constantly stirred tank reactor beneath the electrode tips. Non-linear regression analysis of the equations developed from the composite model permitted the selection of optimum values of model parameters to give computed curves that approximated to the residence-time distributions [af

  7. A New Sulfur and Carbon Degassing Inventory for the Southern Central American Volcanic Arc: The Importance of Accurate Time-Series Data Sets and Possible Tectonic Processes Responsible for Temporal Variations in Arc-Scale Volatile Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moor, J. M.; Kern, C.; Avard, G.; Muller, C.; Aiuppa, A.; Saballos, A.; Ibarra, M.; LaFemina, P.; Protti, M.; Fischer, T. P.

    2017-12-01

    This work presents a new database of SO2 and CO2 fluxes from the Southern Central American Volcanic Arc (SCAVA) for the period 2015-2016. We report ˜300 SO2 flux measurements from 10 volcanoes and gas ratios from 11 volcanoes in Costa Rica and Nicaragua representing the most extensive available assessment of this ˜500 km arc segment. The SO2 flux from SCAVA is estimated at 6,240 ± 1,150 T/d, about a factor of three higher than previous estimations (1972-2013). We attribute this increase in part to our more complete assessment of the arc. Another consideration in interpreting the difference is the context of increased volcanic activity, as there were more eruptions in 2015-2016 than in any period since ˜1980. A potential explanation for increased degassing and volcanic activity is a change in crustal stress regime (from compression to extension, opening volcanic conduits) following two large (Mw > 7) earthquakes in the region in 2012. The CO2 flux from the arc is estimated at 22,500 ± 4,900 T/d, which is equal to or greater than estimates of C input into the SCAVA subduction zone. Time-series data sets for arc degassing need to be improved in temporal and spatial coverage to robustly constrain volatile budgets and tectonic controls. Arc volatile budgets are strongly influenced by short-lived degassing events and arc systems likely display significant short-term variations in volatile output, calling for expansion of nascent geochemical monitoring networks to achieve spatial and temporal coverage similar to traditional geophysical networks.

  8. A new sulfur and carbon degassing inventory for the Southern Central American Volcanic Arc: The importance of accurate time-series datasets and possible tectonic processes responsible for temporal variations in arc-scale volatile emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moor, Maarten; Kern, Christoph; Avard, Geoffroy; Muller, Cyril; Aiuppa, Sandro; Saballos, Armando; Ibarra, Martha; LaFemina, Peter; Protti, Mario; Fischer, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    This work presents a new database of SO2 and CO2 fluxes from the Southern Central American Volcanic Arc (SCAVA) for the period 2015–2016. We report ∼300 SO2 flux measurements from 10 volcanoes and gas ratios from 11 volcanoes in Costa Rica and Nicaragua representing the most extensive available assessment of this ∼500 km arc segment. The SO2 flux from SCAVA is estimated at 6,240 ± 1,150 T/d, about a factor of three higher than previous estimations (1972–2013). We attribute this increase in part to our more complete assessment of the arc. Another consideration in interpreting the difference is the context of increased volcanic activity, as there were more eruptions in 2015–2016 than in any period since ∼1980. A potential explanation for increased degassing and volcanic activity is a change in crustal stress regime (from compression to extension, opening volcanic conduits) following two large (Mw > 7) earthquakes in the region in 2012. The CO2 flux from the arc is estimated at 22,500 ± 4,900 T/d, which is equal to or greater than estimates of C input into the SCAVA subduction zone. Time‐series data sets for arc degassing need to be improved in temporal and spatial coverage to robustly constrain volatile budgets and tectonic controls. Arc volatile budgets are strongly influenced by short‐lived degassing events and arc systems likely display significant short‐term variations in volatile output, calling for expansion of nascent geochemical monitoring networks to achieve spatial and temporal coverage similar to traditional geophysical networks.

  9. Effects of carbon and molybdenum on the microstructures of high chromium white cast irons; Efeito do carbono e do molibdenio na microestrutura dos ferros fundidos brancos de alto cromo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinatora, Amilton; Ambrosio Filho, Francisco; Goldenstein, Helio; Fuoco, Ricardo; Albertin, Eduardo; Mei, Paulo Roberto

    1992-12-31

    The effects of 3 levels of carbon and 1.5% Mo addition on the solidification structures of a 15% chromium white cast iron were studied. The volume fraction of primary austenite and of eutectic carbides, as well as the number of carbide particles per unit length and the mean secondary dendrite arm spacing were measured. By means of thermal analysis, thermal arrest corresponding to the formation of the primary austenite and of the eutectic were determined. The increase in the carbon content and the addition of Mo led to lowering of the thermal arrests and to coarsening of the particles. (author) 15 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Cast irons

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Cast iron offers the design engineer a low-cost, high-strength material that can be easily melted and poured into a wide variety of useful, and sometimes complex, shapes. This latest handbook from ASM covers the entire spectrum of one of the most widely used and versatile of all engineered materials. The reader will find the basic, but vital, information on metallurgy, solidification characteristics, and properties. Extensive reviews are presented on the low-alloy gray, ductile, compacted graphite, and malleable irons. New and expanded material has been added covering high-alloy white irons used for abrasion resistance and high-alloy graphitic irons for heat and corrosion resistance. Also discussed are melting furnaces and foundry practices such as melting, inoculation, alloying, pouring, gating and rising, and molding. Heat treating practices including stress relieving, annealing, normalizing, hardening and tempering, autempering (of ductile irons), and surface-hardening treatments are covered, too. ASM Spec...

  11. Rubber molds for investment casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibtain, S.N.

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of the project is to investigate different types of molding rubbers used for investment casting. The level of shape complexity which can be achieved by using these rubber molds is also studied. It was almost impossible to make complex shapes molds using metal molds, in that cases rubber molds are very important because they arc flexible and give accurate and precise part dimensions. Turbine blades are hi-tech components with air-foil geometries that have close dimensional tolerances. They are made of super-alloys and manufactured by investment casting. The final blade profile depends upon the dimensional accuracy in each of the processing steps. In the present work experimental study for the production of high quality low cost castings of turbine blades using rubber molds and injected wax patterns is presented. Natural Rubber molds and wax patterns from these molds were made. Different types of molding rubbers were studied including natural rubber, silicone rubber and liquid silicone rubber. It was found that by using rubber molds we can make most complex shape with very less finishing required. The shrinkage was 12% as compared to original master pattern. Rubber molds were made using laboratory hot press. Three layers of rubber above and below the master pattern. After that vulcanization was done by giving temperature and pressure. (author)

  12. Analysis of microstructural variation and mechanical behaviors in submerged arc welded joint of high strength low carbon bainitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, Liangyun, E-mail: lly.liangyun@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Rolling Technology and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Qiu, Chunlin; Zhao, Dewen; Gao, Xiuhua; Du, Linxiu [State Key Laboratory of Rolling Technology and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Microstructural variation in high strength low carbon bainitic steel weldment was investigated in detail by means of optical microscope, transmission electron microscope and scanning electron microscope equipped with electron backscattered diffraction. The results showed that the welded joint has various microstructures such as acicular ferrite, coarse granular ferrite and fine polygonal ferrite. The martensite-austenite (MA) constituent has a variable structure in each sub-zone, which includes fully martensite and fully retained austenite. Meanwhile, the fine grained heat affected zone has higher content of retained austenite than the welded metal (WM) and coarse grained heat affected zone (CGHAZ). The orientation relationship between retained austenite and product phases in the WM and CGHAZ is close to Kurdjumov-Sachs relationship. However, the polygonal ferrite in the fine grained HAZ has no specific orientation relationship with the neighboring retained austenite. The toughness of the coarse grained region is much lower than that of the WM because the coarse bainite contains many large MA constituents to assist the nucleation of microcracks and coarse cleavage facet lowers the ability to inhibit the crack propagation.

  13. Arc saw development report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deichelbohrer, P.R.; Beitel, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    The arc saw is one of the key components of the Contaminated Equipment Volume Reduction (CEVR) Program. This report describes the progress of the arc saw from its inception to its current developmental status. History of the arc saw and early contributors are discussed. Particular features of the arc saw and their advantages for CEVR are detailed. Development of the arc saw including theory of operation, pertinent experimental results, plans for the large arc saw and advanced control systems are covered. Associated topics such as potential applications for the arc saw and other arc saw installations in the world is also touched upon

  14. Empleo de la cáscara de arroz en la fundición de piezas de acero al carbono//Using of rice husk in the carbon steel casting parts process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Cruz-Pérez

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Los materiales auxiliares desempeñan un papel importante en el aumento de la eficiencia tecnológica del proceso de fundición de piezas de acero al carbono. En este artículo se exponen los primeros resultados del empleo de la cáscara de arroz como material termoaislante en la obtención de piezas fundidas de acero al carbono. En los experimentos se evaluó la influencia  de seis combinaciones de las variables espesor de pared del casquillo y capa de cobertura. En la confección de los casquillos se utilizó cáscara de arroz triturada, la que posteriormente fue aglutinada con silicato de sodio, apisonada y endurecida con CO2, mientras que la cobertura se utilizó sin procesamiento previo. El mayor nivel de entrega de acero se obtuvo al emplear un espesor de casquillo de 65 mm y una altura de cobertura de 85 mm. El valor del ASAF generado por las variantes experimentales resultó igual o inferior a 0,48. Palabras claves: casquillo termoaislante, polvo de cobertura, cáscara de arroz, acero fundido.______________________________________________________________________________ Abstract Feeding auxiliary materials perform a very important role in improves technological efficiency of carbon steel casting parts process. In this article are exposing the first results in the rice husk using as an insulating material in such process. The variables sleeve thickness and covering thickness’ influence were evaluated in six combinations by means of experiments. In sleeves preparation was used crushed rice husk, which was agglutinated with sodium silicate, compacted and hardened with CO2, meanwhile as covering it was uses without previous preparation. The mayor liquid steel delivering level was get employing 65 mm sleeve thickness and 85 mm covering thickness. The ASAF value generated for experimental variants was equal or inferior to 0.48. Key words: insulating sleeve, riser sleeve, hot topping, rice husk, steel cast.

  15. Exploring the structural controls on helium, nitrogen and carbon isotope signatures in hydrothermal fluids along an intra-arc fault system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardani, Daniele; Reich, Martin; Roulleau, Emilie; Takahata, Naoto; Sano, Yuji; Pérez-Flores, Pamela; Sánchez-Alfaro, Pablo; Cembrano, José; Arancibia, Gloria

    2016-07-01

    There is a general agreement that fault-fracture meshes exert a primary control on fluid flow in both volcanic/magmatic and geothermal/hydrothermal systems. For example, in geothermal systems and epithermal gold deposits, optimally oriented faults and fractures play a key role in promoting fluid flow through high vertical permeability pathways. In the Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ) of the Chilean Andes, both volcanism and hydrothermal activity are strongly controlled by the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System (LOFS), an intra-arc, strike-slip fault, and by the Arc-oblique Long-lived Basement Fault System (ALFS), a set of transpressive NW-striking faults. However, the role that principal and subsidiary fault systems exert on magma degassing, hydrothermal fluid flow and fluid compositions remains poorly constrained. In this study we report new helium, carbon and nitrogen isotope data (3He/4He, δ13C-CO2 and δ15N) of a suite of fumarole and hot spring gas samples from 23 volcanic/geothermal localities that are spatially associated with either the LOFS or the ALFS in the central part of the SVZ. The dataset is characterized by a wide range of 3He/4He ratios (3.39 Ra to 7.53 Ra, where Ra = (3He/4He)air), δ13C-CO2 values (-7.44‰ to -49.41‰) and δ15N values (0.02‰ to 4.93‰). The regional variations in 3He/4He, δ13C-CO2 and δ15N values are remarkably consistent with those reported for 87Sr/86Sr in lavas along the studied segment, which are strongly controlled by the regional spatial distribution of faults. Two fumaroles gas samples associated with the northern ;horsetail; transtensional termination of the LOFS are the only datapoints showing uncontaminated MORB-like 3He/4He signatures. In contrast, the dominant mechanism controlling helium isotope ratios of hydrothermal systems towards the south appears to be the mixing between mantle-derived helium and a radiogenic component derived from, e.g., magmatic assimilation of 4He-rich country rocks or contamination during the

  16. Segregation in cast products

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The agreement with experimental data is mostly qualitative. The paper also ... For example, a high degree of positive segregation in the central region .... solute in a cast product, important ones being: size of casting, rate of solidification, mode.

  17. The effect of cast-to-cast variations on the quality of thin section nickel alloy welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, J.A.

    1989-02-01

    The welding behaviour of 26 commercial casts of Alloy 800 has been quantified for mechanised, autogenous, full penetration, bead-on-strip tungsten inert gas welding tests. Weld front and back widths have been measured and correlated with minor element variations. Casts with similar welding responses have been sorted into groups. The behaviour of the weld pool, surface slags and arc have been compared and a convection controlled model has been used to account for differences between the groups of casts. The main factors governing laboratory process control variability have been identified and a statistical method has been used to identify all the components of weld variance. An optimum size of welding test matrix has been proposed to determine typical cast-to-cast variations at high significance levels. (author)

  18. Travelling Through Caste

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Raj

    2016-01-01

    With its peculiar caste system, India is considered the most stratified of all known societies in human history. This system is ‘peculiar’ as it divides human beings into higher and lower castes and this division is backed by certain religious sanctions based on the sociological concepts of ‘purity’ and ‘pollution’. While the higher caste is associated with ‘purity’, the lower caste is associated with ‘pollution’. The people of the lower castes are not allowed to undertake religious journeys ...

  19. Radiographic Co-60 in component of heavy equipment casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djoli Soembogo, Harun Al Rasyid R dan Namad Sianta

    2016-01-01

    The application of radiography using isotope Co-60 source has been used on component of heavy equipment such as component of heavy equipment casting. Components of heavy equipment casting made through metal casting of carbon steel. This study tried applying digital radiography are using isotope Co-60 sources and using scanning positive film media of Epson V700 for digitization results of conventional radiographic films. This radiography is using film AGFA D7 and Fuji 100 to obtain a contrast medium, medium sensitivity and image quality is good. The purpose radiographic Co-60 at a component of heavy equipment casting is detecting indications of the shape and type casting defects of component of heavy equipment casting thus fit for use. Radiographic test of Co-60 has been carried out on component of heavy equipment casting with single wall single image method and the results of radiographic films digitization using scanning positive film media of Epson V700 with observation parameters casting defects. Time exposure of Co-60 radiation was 10 and 15 minutes hours for metal castings of carbon steel for thickness 20.00-50.00 mm by using activity 30.05 Ci and the perpendicular distance to the source of the film is 820 mm. Scanner positive film results in the form of digital radiography which allow for the transfer of digital data or digital computerized data storage. Radiographic test results on component of heavy equipment casting with single wall single image method produce the parameter casting defect of component of heavy equipment casting in position of critical area is found shrinkage that should be repaired and in position of safety area is not found defect indication so casting defect of component of heavy equipment casting are not acceptable according to standards referenced. (author)

  20. Novel technologies for the lost foam casting process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenming; Fan, Zitian

    2018-03-01

    Lost foam casting (LFC) is a green precision casting process categorized as a near net forming technology. Yet, despite its popularity, it still suffers from some technological problems, such as poor filling ability of the castings, coarse and non-dense microstructure, low mechanical properties for the Al and Mg LFC processes, and defective carburization for the low carbon steel LFC process. These drawbacks restrict the development and widespread application of the LFC process. To solve these problems, the present study developed several novel LFC technologies, namely, LFC technologies under vacuum and low pressure, vibration solidification, and pressure solidification conditions; expendable shell casting technology; and preparation technology of bimetallic castings based on the LFC process. The results showed that the LFC under vacuum and low pressure evidently improved the filling ability and solved the oxidization problem of the alloys, which is suitable for producing complex and thinwall castings. The vibration and pressure solidifications increased the compactness of the castings and refined the microstructure, significantly improving the mechanical properties of the castings. The expendable shell casting technology could solve the pore, carburization, and inclusion defects of the traditional LFC method, obtaining castings with acceptable surface quality. Moreover, the Al/Mg and Al/Al bimetallic castings with acceptable metallurgical bonding were successfully fabricated using the LFC process. These proposed novel LFC technologies can solve the current technological issues and promote the technological progress of the LFC process.

  1. Caste and power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roy, Dayabati

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the institution of caste and its operation in a micro-level village setting of West Bengal, an Indian state, where state politics at grass roots level is vibrant with functioning local self-government and entrenched political parties. This ethnographic study reveals that caste...... relations and caste identities have overarching dimensions in the day-to-day politics of the study villages. Though caste almost ceases to operate in relation to strict religious strictures, under economic compulsion the division of labour largely coincides with caste division. In the cultural......–ideological field, the concept of caste-hierarchy seems to continue as an influencing factor, even in the operation of leftist politics....

  2. SLIP CASTING METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, A.G.

    1959-09-01

    S>A process is described for preparing a magnesium oxide slip casting slurry which when used in conjunction with standard casting techniques results in a very strong "green" slip casting and a fired piece of very close dimensional tolerance. The process involves aging an aqueous magnestum oxide slurry, having a basic pH value, until it attains a specified critical viscosity at which time a deflocculating agent is added without upsetting the basic pH value.

  3. Caste in Itself, Caste and Class, or Caste in Class

    OpenAIRE

    Ramkrishna Mukherjee

    2015-01-01

    After the British conquered Bengal and eventually the whole of India,they set out to administer the colony. In this context they encountered two phenomena with which they were not familiar: (1) the relation of people to land for production (and not for revenue receiving, household living, etc.), and (2) the caste system of India, viz. the jati strati?cation of society.

  4. Effect of Melting Techniques on Ductile Iron castings Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bockus, S.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was designed to investigate the effects of the charge, melting conditions, nodularizing and inoculation on the ductile iron castings properties. Results showed that the temperature and holding time of the melt in an induction furnace and the intensity of spheroidizing effect on the carbon and residual magnesium contents in the ductile iron castings. The same grade of ductile iron may be obtained using different chemical compositions. The castings of ductile iron will be ferritic as-cast only when large amount of pig iron in the charge and in addition some-steps inoculating treatment are used.

  5. In situ synthesis of TiB2-TiC particulates locally reinforced medium carbon steel-matrix composites via the SHS reaction of Ni-Ti-B4C system during casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.Y.; Huang, L.; Jiang, Q.C.

    2005-01-01

    The fabrication of medium carbon steel-matrix composites locally reinforced with in situ TiB 2 -TiC particulates using self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) reaction of Ni-Ti-B 4 C system during casting was investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results reveal that the exotherm of 1042 deg. C initiated by heat release of the solid state reaction in the differential thermal analysis (DTA) curve is an incomplete reaction in Ni-Ti-B 4 C system. As-cast microstructures of the in situ processed composites reveal a relatively uniform distribution of TiB 2 -TiC particulates in the locally reinforced regions. Furthermore, the particulate size and micro-porosity in the locally reinforced regions are significantly decreased with the increasing of the Ni content in the preforms. For a Ni content of 30 and 40 wt.%, near fully dense composites locally reinforced with in situ TiB 2 and TiC particulates can be fabricated. Although most of fine TiB 2 and TiC particulates which form by the reaction-precipitation mechanism during SHS reaction are present in the locally reinforced region, some large particulates which form by the nucleation-growth mechanism during solidification are entrapped inside the Fe-rich region located in the reinforcing region or inside the matrix region nearby the interface between matrix and reinforcing region. The hardness of the reinforcing region in the composite is significantly higher than that of the unreinforced medium carbon steel. Furthermore, the hardness values of the composites synthesized from 30 to 40 wt.% Ni-Ti-B 4 C systems are higher than those of the composites synthesized from 10 to 20 wt.% Ni-Ti-B 4 C systems

  6. AIS/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Strip Casting: Anticipating New Routes To Steel Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prof. Alan W. Camb; Prof. Anthony Rollett

    2001-08-31

    To determine the potential for strip casting in the steel industry and to develop the fundamental knowledge necessary to allow the role of strip casting in the modern steel industry to be understood. Based upon a study of carbon steel strip castings that were either produced for the program at British Steel or were received from a pre-commercial production machine, the following conclusions were made. Strip casting of carbon steels is technically feasible for sheet material from slightly less than 1 mm thick to 3 mm thick, and, assuming that it is economically viable, it will be first applied in carbon steel markets that do not require stringent surface quality or extensive forming. The potential of strip casting as a casting process to be developed for steel castings is very high as the cast strip has some very novel characteristics. Direct cast carbon strip has better surface quality, shape and profile than any other casting process currently available. The more rapidly solidified structure of direct cast strip tends to be strong with low ductility; however, with adequate thermal treatment, it is possible to develop a variety of properties from the same grade. The process is more amenable at this time to production tonnages per year of the order of 500,000 tons and as such will first find niche type applications. This technology is an additional technology for steel production and will be in addition to, rather than a replacement for, current casting machines.

  7. Casting Footprints for Eternity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Apollo 11 Astronaut Buzz Aldrin has his footprints casted during the dedication ceremony of the rocket fountain at Building 4200 at Marshall Space Flight Center. The casts of Aldrin's footprints will be placed in the newly constructed Von Braun courtyard representing the accomplishments of the Apollo 11 lunar landing.

  8. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - Chapter 3: Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron (Ⅳ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2010-11-01

    metallographic photos.Except for focusing on the effect of high carbon phases in cast iron, in this book, special attention is also paid to the effect of austenite on solidification, graphite morphology, and quality of cast iron; at the same time, the study on the solidification behaviours in the region around eutectic cells and its effects on mechanical properties of cast iron, are also emphasized.

  9. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - Chapter 3: Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron (Ⅰ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2010-02-01

    metallographic photos.Except for focusing on the effect of high carbon phases in cast iron, in this book, special attention is also paid to the effect of austenite on solidification, graphite morphology, and quality of cast iron; at the same time, the study on the solidification behaviours in the region around eutectic cells and its effects on mechanical properties of cast iron, are also emphasized.

  10. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - Chapter 4: Vermicular Graphite Cast Iron (Ⅱ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2011-05-01

    metallographic photos.Except for focusing on the effect of high carbon phases in cast iron, in this book, special attention is also paid to the effect of austenite on solidification, graphite morphology, and quality of cast iron; at the same time, the study on the solidification behaviours in the region around eutectic cells and its effects on mechanical properties of cast iron, are also emphasized.

  11. Monitoring ARC services with GangliARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, D; Karpenko, D

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring of Grid services is essential to provide a smooth experience for users and provide fast and easy to understand diagnostics for administrators running the services. GangliARC makes use of the widely-used Ganglia monitoring tool to present web-based graphical metrics of the ARC computing element. These include statistics of running and finished jobs, data transfer metrics, as well as showing the availability of the computing element and hardware information such as free disk space left in the ARC cache. Ganglia presents metrics as graphs of the value of the metric over time and shows an easily-digestable summary of how the system is performing, and enables quick and easy diagnosis of common problems. This paper describes how GangliARC works and shows numerous examples of how the generated data can quickly be used by an administrator to investigate problems. It also presents possibilities of combining GangliARC with other commonly-used monitoring tools such as Nagios to easily integrate ARC monitoring into the regular monitoring infrastructure of any site or computing centre.

  12. Caste in Itself, Caste and Class, or Caste in Class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramkrishna Mukherjee

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available After the British conquered Bengal and eventually the whole of India,they set out to administer the colony. In this context they encountered two phenomena with which they were not familiar: (1 the relation of people to land for production (and not for revenue receiving, household living, etc., and (2 the caste system of India, viz. the jati strati?cation of society.

  13. Repair welding of cast iron coated electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żuk, M.; Górka, J.; Dojka, R.; Czupryński, A.

    2017-08-01

    Welding cast iron is a complex production procedure. Repair welding was used to repair damaged or poorly made castings. This is due to a tendency to cracking of the material during welding as well as after it. Welding cast iron can be carried out on hot or on cold. Hot welding requires high heat material and the use of welding material in the form of cast iron. In the case of cold welding, it is possible to use different materials. Mostly used filler metals are nickel and copper based. The work shows the course of research concerning repairmen of ductile iron with arc welding method. For the reparation process four types of ESAB company coated electrodes dedicated for cast iron were used with diameter 3.2 and 4 mm: ES 18-8-6B (4mm), EB 150 (4mm), OK NiCl, EŻM. In the cast iron examined during the testing grooves were made using plasma methods, in order to simulate the removed casting flaws. Then the welding process with coated electrodes was executed. The process utilized low welding current row of 100A, so there would only be a small amount of heat delivered to the heat affected zone (HAZ). Short stitches were made, after welding it was hammered, in order to remove stresses. After the repair welding the part of studies commenced which purpose was finding surface defects using visual testing (VT) and penetration testing (PT). In the second part, a series of macro and microscopic studies were executed witch the purpose of disclosuring the structure. Then the hardness tests for welds cross sections were performed. An important aspect of welding cast iron is the colour of the padding weld after welding, more precisely the difference between the base material and padding weld, the use of different materials extra gives the extra ability to select the best variant. The research of four types of coated electrode was executed, based on the demands the best option in terms of aesthetic, strength and hardness.

  14. Clean Metal Casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The objective of this project is to develop a technology for clean metal processing that is capable of consistently providing a metal cleanliness level that is fit for a given application. The program has five tasks: Development of melt cleanliness assessment technology, development of melt contamination avoidance technology, development of high temperature phase separation technology, establishment of a correlation between the level of melt cleanliness and as cast mechanical properties, and transfer of technology to the industrial sector. Within the context of the first task, WPI has developed a standardized Reduced Pressure Test that has been endorsed by AFS as a recommended practice. In addition, within the context of task1, WPI has developed a melt cleanliness sensor based on the principles of electromagnetic separation. An industrial partner is commercializing the sensor. Within the context of the second task, WPI has developed environmentally friendly fluxes that do not contain fluorine. Within the context of the third task, WPI modeled the process of rotary degassing and verified the model predictions with experimental data. This model may be used to optimize the performance of industrial rotary degassers. Within the context of the fourth task, WPI has correlated the level of melt cleanliness at various foundries, including a sand casting foundry, a permanent mold casting foundry, and a die casting foundry, to the casting process and the resultant mechanical properties. This is useful in tailoring the melt cleansing operations at foundries to the particular casting process and the desired properties of cast components.

  15. Clean Metal Casting; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a technology for clean metal processing that is capable of consistently providing a metal cleanliness level that is fit for a given application. The program has five tasks: Development of melt cleanliness assessment technology, development of melt contamination avoidance technology, development of high temperature phase separation technology, establishment of a correlation between the level of melt cleanliness and as cast mechanical properties, and transfer of technology to the industrial sector. Within the context of the first task, WPI has developed a standardized Reduced Pressure Test that has been endorsed by AFS as a recommended practice. In addition, within the context of task1, WPI has developed a melt cleanliness sensor based on the principles of electromagnetic separation. An industrial partner is commercializing the sensor. Within the context of the second task, WPI has developed environmentally friendly fluxes that do not contain fluorine. Within the context of the third task, WPI modeled the process of rotary degassing and verified the model predictions with experimental data. This model may be used to optimize the performance of industrial rotary degassers. Within the context of the fourth task, WPI has correlated the level of melt cleanliness at various foundries, including a sand casting foundry, a permanent mold casting foundry, and a die casting foundry, to the casting process and the resultant mechanical properties. This is useful in tailoring the melt cleansing operations at foundries to the particular casting process and the desired properties of cast components

  16. Grindability of cast Ti-Cu alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Masafumi; Takada, Yukyo; Kiyosue, Seigo; Yoda, Masanobu; Woldu, Margaret; Cai, Zhuo; Okuno, Osamu; Okabe, Toru

    2003-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the grindability of a series of cast Ti-Cu alloys in order to develop a titanium alloy with better grindability than commercially pure titanium (CP Ti), which is considered to be one of the most difficult metals to machine. Experimental Ti-Cu alloys (0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 5.0, and 10.0 mass% Cu) were made in an argon-arc melting furnace. Each alloy was cast into a magnesia mold using a centrifugal casting machine. Cast alloy slabs (3.5 mm x 8.5 mm x 30.5 mm), from which the hardened surface layer (250 microm) was removed, were ground using a SiC abrasive wheel on an electric handpiece at four circumferential speeds (500, 750, 1000, or 1250 m/min) at 0.98 N (100 gf). Grindability was evaluated by measuring the amount of metal volume removed after grinding for 1min. Data were compared to those for CP Ti and Ti-6Al-4V. For all speeds, Ti-10% Cu alloy exhibited the highest grindability. For the Ti-Cu alloys with a Cu content of 2% or less, the highest grindability corresponded to an intermediate speed. It was observed that the grindability increased with an increase in the Cu concentration compared to CP Ti, particularly for the 5 or 10% Cu alloys at a circumferential speed of 1000 m/min or above. By alloying with copper, the cast titanium exhibited better grindability at high speed. The continuous precipitation of Ti(2)Cu among the alpha-matrix grains made this material less ductile and facilitated more effective grinding because small broken segments more readily formed.

  17. Electric arc hydrogen heaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zasypin, I.M.

    2000-01-01

    The experimental data on the electric arc burning in hydrogen are presented. Empirical and semiempirical dependences for calculating the arc characteristics are derived. An engineering method of calculating plasma torches for hydrogen heating is proposed. A model of interaction of a hydrogen arc with a gas flow is outlined. The characteristics of plasma torches for heating hydrogen and hydrogen-bearing gases are described. (author)

  18. CASTING METHOD AND APPARATUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, C.F.; Thompson, R.H.

    1958-10-01

    An improved apparatus for the melting and casting of uranium is described. A vacuum chamber is positioned over the casting mold and connected thereto, and a rod to pierce the oxide skin of the molten uranium is fitted into the bottom of the melting chamber. The entire apparatus is surrounded by a jacket, and operations are conducted under a vacuum. The improvement in this apparatus lies in the fact that the top of the melting chamber is fitted with a plunger which allows squeezing of the oxide skin to force out any molten uranium remaining after the skin has been broken and the molten charge has been cast.

  19. Casting thermal simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamsuddin bin Sulaiman

    1994-01-01

    The whole of this study is concerned with process simulation in casting processes. This study describes the application of the finite element method as an aid to simulating the thermal design of a high pressure die casting die by analysing the cooling transients in the casting cycle. Two types of investigation were carried out to model the linear and non-linear cooling behavior with consideration of a thermal interface effect. The simulated cooling for different stages were presented in temperature contour form. These illustrate the successful application of the Finite Element Method to model the process and they illustrate the significance of the thermal interface at low pressure

  20. Symptomatic stent cast.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keohane, John

    2012-02-03

    Biliary stent occlusion is a major complication of endoscopic stent insertion and results in repeat procedures. Various theories as to the etiology have been proposed, the most frequently studied is the attachment of gram negative bacteria within the stent. Several studies have shown prolongation of stent patency with antibiotic prophylaxis. We report the case of stent occlusion from a cast of a previously inserted straight biliary stent; a "stent cast" in an 86-year-old woman with obstructive jaundice. This was retrieved with the lithotrypter and she made an uneventful recovery. This is the first reported case of a biliary stent cast.

  1. Plasma arc melting of zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubesing, P.K.; Korzekwa, D.R.; Dunn, P.S.

    1997-01-01

    Zirconium, like some other refractory metals, has an undesirable sensitivity to interstitials such as oxygen. Traditionally, zirconium is processed by electron beam melting to maintain minimum interstitial contamination. Electron beam melted zirconium, however, does not respond positively to mechanical processing due to its large grain size. The authors undertook a study to determine if plasma arc melting (PAM) technology could be utilized to maintain low interstitial concentrations and improve the response of zirconium to subsequent mechanical processing. The PAM process enabled them to control and maintain low interstitial levels of oxygen and carbon, produce a more favorable grain structure, and with supplementary off-gassing, improve the response to mechanical forming

  2. INFLUENCE OF CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS ON THE FORMING OF WELDING ARC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. О. Vakulenko

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of work is a comparative analysis of chemical compounds influence on the process of forming arc welding and condition of its burning. Methodology. A wire with diameter 3 mm of low carbon steel with contain of carbon 0.15% was material for electrode. As chemical compounds, which determine the terms of arc welding forming the following compounds were used: kaolin; CaCO3 with admixtures of gypsum up to 60%; SiO2 and Fe − Si with the iron concentration up to 50%. Researches were conducted using the direct electric current and arc of reverse polarity. As a source of electric current a welding transformer of type PSO-500n was used. On the special stand initial gap between the electrode and metal plate was 1-1.5 mm. The inter electrode space was filled with the probed chemical compound and the electric arc was formed. At the moment of arc forming the values of electric current and arc voltage were determined. After the natural break of electric arc, the final gap value between electrodes was accepted as a maximal value of arc length. Findings. Experimentally the transfer of metal in interelectrode space corresponded to the tiny drop mechanism. According to external signs the relation between maximal arc length and the power of electric current has the form of exponential dependence. Specific power of electric arc at the moment of arc forming per unit of its length characterizes the environment in the interelectrode space. Originality. 1 Based on the analysis of influence of the studied chemical compounds on the formation processes of electric arc the inversely proportional relationship between the power of the electric current and the maximum arc length until the moment of its natural break is defined. 2 Ratio between the maximal arc length and the power of electric current, with the sufficiently high coefficient of correlation is submitted to the exponential dependence. Influence of the compounds under study on the process of

  3. Bainite obtaining in cast iron with carbides castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In these paper the possibility of upper and lower bainite obtaining in cast iron with carbides castings are presented. Conditions, when in cast iron with carbides castings during continuous free air cooling austenite transformation to upper bainite or its mixture with lower bainte proceeds, have been given. A mechanism of this transformation has been given, Si, Ni, Mn and Mo distribution in the eutectic cell has been tested and hardness of tested castings has been determined.

  4. HFIR Fuel Casting Support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhoff, Seth D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gibbs, Paul Jacob [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Solis, Eunice Martinez [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-28

    Process exploration for fuel production for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) using cast LEU-10wt.%Mo as an initial processing step has just begun. This project represents the first trials concerned with casting design and quality. The studies carried out over the course of this year and information contained in this report address the initial mold development to be used as a starting point for future operations. In broad terms, the final billet design is that of a solid rolling blank with an irregular octagonal cross section. The work covered here is a comprehensive view of the initial attempts to produce a sound casting. This report covers the efforts to simulate, predict, cast, inspect, and revise the initial mold design.

  5. Casting AISI 316 steel by gel cast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozols, A; Thern, G; Rozenberg, S; Barreiro, M; Marajofsky, A

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of producing AISI 316 steel components from their powders and avoiding their compaction is analyzed. A casting technique is tested that is similar to gel casting, used for ceramic materials. In the initial stage, the process consists of the formulation of a concentrated barbotine of powdered metal in a solution of water soluble organic monomers, which is cast in a mold and polymerized in situ to form a raw piece in the shape of the cavity. The process can be performed under controlled conditions using barbotines with a high monomer content from the acrylimide family. Then, the molded piece is slowly heated until the polymer is eliminated, and it is sintered at temperatures of 1160 o C to 1300 o C under a dry hydrogen atmosphere, until the desired densities are attained. The density and micro structure of the materials obtained are compared with those for the materials compacted and synthesized by the conventional processes. The preliminary results show the feasibility of the process for the production of certain kinds of structural components (CW)

  6. Carbon accumulation and changes in soil chemistry in reclaimed open-cast coal mining heaps near Sokolov using repeated measurement of chronosequence sites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartuška, Martin; Frouz, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 66, 1 /SI/ (2015), s. 104-111 ISSN 1351-0754 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP504/12/1288 Program:GA Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : carbon accumulation * changes in soil chemistry * post mining sites * chronosequence Subject RIV: DF - Soil Science Impact factor: 3.425, year: 2015

  7. Grindability of cast Ti-Hf alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Masafumi; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Sato, Hideki; Okuno, Osamu; Nunn, Martha E; Okabe, Toru

    2006-04-01

    As part of our systematic studies characterizing the properties of titanium alloys, we investigated the grindability of a series of cast Ti-Hf alloys. Alloy buttons with hafnium concentrations up to 40 mass% were made using an argon-arc melting furnace. Each button was cast into a magnesia-based mold using a dental titanium casting machine; three specimens were made for each metal. Prior to testing, the hardened surface layer was removed. The specimens were ground at five different speeds for 1 min at 0.98 N using a carborundum wheel on an electric dental handpiece. Grindability was evaluated as the volume of metal removed per minute (grinding rate) and the volume ratio of metal removed compared to the wheel material lost (grinding ratio). The data were analyzed using ANOVA. A trend of increasing grindability was found with increasing amounts of hafnium, although there was no statistical difference in the grindability with increasing hafnium contents. We also found that hafnium may be used to harden or strengthen titanium without deteriorating the grindability.

  8. INFLUENCE OF CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS ON THE FORMING OF ELECTRIC ARC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. O. Vakulenko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of work is a comparative analysis of chemical compounds influence on the process of electric arc forming and condition of its burning. Methodology. Material for an electrode was a wire 3 mm in diameter of low carbon steel with contain of carbon 0.15%. As chemical compounds, which determine the terms of forming of arc welding were used kaolin; CaCO3 with the admixtures of gypsum to 60%; SiO2 and Fe – Si with the iron concentration to 50%. Researches were conducted at the use of direct electric current and the arc of reverse polarity. As a source of electric current the welding transformer of type PSO-500 was used. On the special stand an initial gap between the electrode and metal-plate was equal to 1–1.5 mm. The interelectrode interval was filled with the probed chemical compounds and it was formed an electric arc. In the moment of electric arc arise the values of electric current and the arc voltage were determined. After the natural break of electric arc, the final size of the gap between electrodes was accepted as the maximal value of the arc lengths. Findings. In the conditions of experiment the metal transfer in interelectrode interval corresponded to the drop mechanism. According to external characteristics the ratio between the maximal arc length and the power of electric discharge has the appearance of exponential dependence. Specific power of electric arc characterizes environment of interelectrode interval in the moment of arc forming per unit of its length. Originality. 1. On the basis of influence analysis of the studied chemical compounds on the formation processes of electric arc inversely proportional relationship between the power of the electric current and the maximum arc length to the moment of its natural break is defined. 2. The ratio between the maximal arc length and the power of electric current with sufficiently high correlation coefficient is subjected to the exponential dependence. Influence of

  9. Centrifugal vacuum casting for fuel cladding tube blanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenskii, V.F.; Neklyudov, I.M.; Chernyi, B.P.; Zeidlits, M.P.; Vanzha, A.F.; Rubashko, V.G.; Ryabchikov, L.N.; Smirnov, Y.K.; Bespalova, V.R.; Mashkarova, V.T.; Rybal'chenko, N.D.

    1990-01-01

    An advanced technique for making tube blanks with an acceptable level of nonmetallic inclusions is vacuum induction melting combined with centrifugal casting, as the latter gives a cylindrical casting having an axial hole, while the cast metal has elevated density and contains fewer nonmetallic inclusions than does the metal cast in a stationary mold. The reduction in the nonmetallic inclusions occurs because of increased rates of floating up in the rotating mold on account of the centrifugal force and the rejection to the inner surface. One can choose the parameters such as the pouring speed, rotational speed, mold cooling, and liquid-metal temperature and can introduce a deoxidizer to remove the nonmetallic inclusions or reduce the grain size of them and produce an appropriate cast structure and obtain a metal whose quality is the same as that on vacuum induction melting with secondary arc remelting. For these purposes, the authors have developed centrifugal-casting machines for use under vacuum or in inert gases with horizontal and vertical mold rotation axes

  10. Application of gas shielded arc welding and submerged arc welding for fabrication of nuclear reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehani, M.L.; Rodrigues, W.D.

    1976-01-01

    The remarkable progress made in the development of knowhow and expertise in the manufacture of equipment for nuclear power plants in India is outlined. Some of the specific advances made in the application of higher efficiency weld processes for fabrication of nuclear reactor vessels and the higher level of quality attained are discussed in detail. Modifications and developments in submerged arc, gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc processes for welding of Calandria which have been a highly challenging and rewarding experience are discussed. Future scope for making the gas metal arc process more economical by using various gas-mixes like Agron + Oxygen, Argon + Carbon Dioxide, Argon + Nitrogen (for Copper Alloys) etc., in various proportions are outlined. Quality and dimensional control exercised in these jobs of high precision are highlighted. (K.B.)

  11. Removal of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus from the separated liquid phase of hog manure by the multi-zone BioCAST technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerushalmi, Laleh; Alimahmoodi, Mahmood; Afroze, Niema; Godbout, Stephane; Mulligan, Catherine N

    2013-06-15

    The removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD), total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) at concentrations of 960 ± 38 to 2400 ± 96 mg/L, 143 ± 9 to 235 ± 15 mg/L and 25 ± 2 to 57 ± 4 mg/L, respectively, from the separated liquid phase of hog manure by the multi-zone BioCAST technology is discussed. Despite the inhibitory effect of hog waste toward microbial activities, removal efficiencies up to 89.2% for COD, 69.2% for TN and 47.6% for TP were obtained during 185 d of continuous operation. The free ammonia inhibition was postulated to be responsible for the steady reduction of COD and TP removal with the increase of TN/TP ratio from 3.6 to 5.8. On the contrary, the increase of COD/TN ratio from 4.8 to 14.1 improved the removal of all contaminants. Nitrogen removal did not show any dependence on the COD/TP ratio, despite the steady increase of COD and TP removal with this ratio in the range of 19.3-50.6. The removal efficiencies of organic and inorganic contaminants increased progressively owing to the adaptation of microbial biomass, resulting from the presence of suspended biomass in the mixed liquor that circulated continuously between the three zones of aerobic, microaerophilic and anoxic, as well as the attached biomass immobilized inside the aerobic zone. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Aluminium Foam and Magnesium Compound Casting Produced by High-Pressure Die Casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iban Vicario

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions are two of the main focal points in vehicle design, promoting the reduction in the weight of vehicles by using lighter materials. The aim of the work is to evaluate the influence of different aluminium foams and injection parameters in order to obtain compound castings with a compromise between the obtained properties and weight by high-pressure die cast (HPDC using aluminium foams as cores into a magnesium cast part. To evaluate the influence of the different aluminium foams and injection parameters on the final casting products quality, the type and density of the aluminium foam, metal temperature, plunger speed, and multiplication pressure have been varied within a range of suitable values. The obtained compound HPDC castings have been studied by performing visual and RX inspections, obtaining sound composite castings with aluminium foam cores. The presence of an external continuous layer on the foam surface and the correct placement of the foam to support injection conditions permit obtaining good quality parts. A HPDC processed magnesium-aluminium foam composite has been developed for a bicycle application obtaining a suitable combination of mechanical properties and, especially, a reduced weight in the demonstration part.

  13. Arc melting in inert gas atmosphere of zirconium sponge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julio Junior, O.; Andrade, A.H.P. de

    1991-01-01

    The obtainment of metallic zirconium in laboratory scale with commercial and nuclear quality is the objective of the Metallurgy Department of IEN/CNEN - Brazil, so a melting procedure of zirconium sponge in laboratory scale using an arc furnace in inert atmosphere is developed. The effects of atmosphere operation, and the use of gas absorber and the sponge characteristics over the quality of button in as-cast reporting with hardness measures are described. (C.G.C.)

  14. Dimensional control of die castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karve, Aniruddha Ajit

    The demand for net shape die castings, which require little or no machining, is steadily increasing. Stringent customer requirements are forcing die casters to deliver high quality castings in increasingly short lead times. Dimensional conformance to customer specifications is an inherent part of die casting quality. The dimensional attributes of a die casting are essentially dependent upon many factors--the quality of the die and the degree of control over the process variables being the two major sources of dimensional error in die castings. This study focused on investigating the nature and the causes of dimensional error in die castings. The two major components of dimensional error i.e., dimensional variability and die allowance were studied. The major effort of this study was to qualitatively and quantitatively study the effects of casting geometry and process variables on die casting dimensional variability and die allowance. This was accomplished by detailed dimensional data collection at production die casting sites. Robust feature characterization schemes were developed to describe complex casting geometry in quantitative terms. Empirical modeling was utilized to quantify the effects of the casting variables on dimensional variability and die allowance for die casting features. A number of casting geometry and process variables were found to affect dimensional variability in die castings. The dimensional variability was evaluated by comparisons with current published dimensional tolerance standards. The casting geometry was found to play a significant role in influencing the die allowance of the features measured. The predictive models developed for dimensional variability and die allowance were evaluated to test their effectiveness. Finally, the relative impact of all the components of dimensional error in die castings was put into perspective, and general guidelines for effective dimensional control in the die casting plant were laid out. The results of

  15. The nucleation of austenite in ferritic ductile cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, J.M.; Hon, M.H.; Lee, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Austempered ductile cast iron has recently been receiving increasing attention because of its excellent combination of strength and ductility. Since the austenitization process has a significant influence on the mechanical properties of austempered ductile cast iron, several investigations on the nucleation sites of austenite and diffusion paths of carbon from spheroidal graphite have been reported in ferritic ductile cast iron. However, agreement on this subject has not ben reached. The purpose of this paper is to study the preferential nucleation sites of austenite during austenitization at two austenitizing temperatures in ferritic ductile cast iron. An attempt was made to understand the reasons which give rise to preferential austenite nucleation sites. The carbon diffusion paths from spheroidal graphite were also investigated

  16. Tokamak ARC damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.G.; Gorker, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Tokamak fusion reactors will have large plasma currents of approximately 10 MA with hundreds of megajoules stored in the magnetic fields. When a major plasma instability occurs, the disruption of the plasma current induces voltage in the adjacent conducting structures, giving rise to large transient currents. The induced voltages may be sufficiently high to cause arcing across sector gaps or from one protruding component to another. This report reviews a tokamak arcing scenario and provides guidelines for designing tokamaks to minimize the possibility of arc damage

  17. Tokamak ARC damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, J.G.; Gorker, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Tokamak fusion reactors will have large plasma currents of approximately 10 MA with hundreds of megajoules stored in the magnetic fields. When a major plasma instability occurs, the disruption of the plasma current induces voltage in the adjacent conducting structures, giving rise to large transient currents. The induced voltages may be sufficiently high to cause arcing across sector gaps or from one protruding component to another. This report reviews a tokamak arcing scenario and provides guidelines for designing tokamaks to minimize the possibility of arc damage.

  18. Metal halide arc discharge lamp having short arc length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzeroll, Martin E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A metal halide arc discharge lamp includes a sealed light-transmissive outer jacket, a light-transmissive shroud located within the outer jacket and an arc tube assembly located within the shroud. The arc tube assembly includes an arc tube, electrodes mounted within the arc tube and a fill material for supporting an arc discharge. The electrodes have a spacing such that an electric field in a range of about 60 to 95 volts per centimeter is established between the electrodes. The diameter of the arc tube and the spacing of the electrodes are selected to provide an arc having an arc diameter to arc length ratio in a range of about 1.6 to 1.8. The fill material includes mercury, sodium iodide, scandium tri-iodide and a rare gas, and may include lithium iodide. The lamp exhibits a high color rendering index, high lumen output and high color temperature.

  19. Bainitic high-strength cast iron with globular graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silman, G. I.; Makarenko, K. V.; Kamynin, V. V.; Zentsova, E. A.

    2013-07-01

    Special features of formation of bainitic structures in grayed cast irons are considered. The influence of the graphite phase and of the special features of chemical composition of the iron on the intermediate transformation in high-carbon alloys is allowed for. The range of application of high-strength cast irons with bainitic structure is determined. The paper is the last and unfinished work of G. I. Silman completed by his disciples as a tribute to their teacher.

  20. Repairs of Damaged Castings Made of Graphitic Cast Iron by Means of Brazing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mičian M.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article summarizes the theoretical knowledge from the field of brazing of graphitic cast iron, especially by means of conventional flame brazing using a filler metal based on CuZn (CuZn40SnSi – brass alloy. The experimental part of the thesis presents the results of performance assessment of brazed joints on other than CuZn basis using silicone (CuSi3Mn1 or aluminium bronze (CuAl10Fe. TIG electrical arc was used as a source of heat to melt these filler materials. The results show satisfactory brazed joints with a CuAl10Fe filler metal, while pre-heating is not necessary, which favours this method greatly while repairing sizeable castings. The technological procedure recommends the use of AC current with an increased frequency and a modified balance between positive and negative electric arc polarity to focus the heat on a filler metal without melting the base material. The suitability of the joint is evaluated on the basis of visual inspection, mechanic and metallographic testing.

  1. Vacuum arc anode phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, H.C.

    1976-01-01

    A brief review of anode phenomena in vacuum arcs is presented. Discussed in succession are: the transition of the arc into the anode spot mode; the temperature of the anode before, during and after the anode spot forms; and anode ions. Characteristically the anode spot has a temperature of the order of the atmospheric boiling point of the anode material and is a copious source of vapor and energetic ions. The dominant mechanism controlling the transition of the vacuum arc into the anode spot mode appears to depend upon the electrode geometry, the electrode material, and the current waveform of the particular vacuum arc being considered. Either magnetic constriction in the gap plasma or gross anode melting can trigger the transition; indeed, a combination of the two is a common cause of anode spot formation

  2. Filtered cathodic arc source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge is described. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45 degree to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles. 3 figures

  3. Comparison of marginal accuracy of castings fabricated by conventional casting technique and accelerated casting technique: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, S Srikanth; Revathi, Kakkirala; Reddy, S Kranthikumar

    2013-01-01

    Conventional casting technique is time consuming when compared to accelerated casting technique. In this study, marginal accuracy of castings fabricated using accelerated and conventional casting technique was compared. 20 wax patterns were fabricated and the marginal discrepancy between the die and patterns were measured using Optical stereomicroscope. Ten wax patterns were used for Conventional casting and the rest for Accelerated casting. A Nickel-Chromium alloy was used for the casting. The castings were measured for marginal discrepancies and compared. Castings fabricated using Conventional casting technique showed less vertical marginal discrepancy than the castings fabricated by Accelerated casting technique. The values were statistically highly significant. Conventional casting technique produced better marginal accuracy when compared to Accelerated casting. The vertical marginal discrepancy produced by the Accelerated casting technique was well within the maximum clinical tolerance limits. Accelerated casting technique can be used to save lab time to fabricate clinical crowns with acceptable vertical marginal discrepancy.

  4. Single-Arc IMRT?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortfeld, Thomas; Webb, Steve

    2009-01-01

    The idea of delivering intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a multileaf collimator in a continuous dynamic mode during a single rotation of the gantry has recently gained momentum both in research and industry. In this note we investigate the potential of this Single-Arc IMRT technique at a conceptual level. We consider the original theoretical example case from Brahme et al that got the field of IMRT started. Using analytical methods, we derive deliverable intensity 'landscapes' for Single-Arc as well as standard IMRT and Tomotherapy. We find that Tomotherapy provides the greatest flexibility in shaping intensity landscapes and that it allows one to deliver IMRT in a way that comes close to the ideal case in the transverse plane. Single-Arc and standard IMRT make compromises in different areas. Only in relatively simple cases that do not require substantial intensity modulation will Single-Arc be dosimetrically comparable to Tomotherapy. Compared with standard IMRT, Single-Arc could be dosimetrically superior in certain cases if one is willing to accept the spreading of low dose values over large volumes of normal tissue. In terms of treatment planning, Single-Arc poses a more challenging optimization problem than Tomotherapy or standard IMRT. We conclude that Single-Arc holds potential as an efficient IMRT technique especially for relatively simple cases. In very complex cases, Single-Arc may unduly compromise the quality of the dose distribution, if one tries to keep the treatment time below 2 min or so. As with all IMRT techniques, it is important to explore the tradeoff between plan quality and the efficiency of its delivery carefully for each individual case. (note)

  5. Energy efficiency and the influence of gas burners to the energy related carbon dioxide emissions of electric arc furnaces in steel industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirschen, Marcus; Risonarta, Victor; Pfeifer, Herbert

    2009-01-01

    Determining the complete energy balance of an electric arc furnace (EAF) provides an appropriate method to examine energy efficiency and identify energy saving potentials. However, the EAF energy balance is complex due to the combined input of electrical energy and chemical energy resulting from natural gas (NG) combustion and oxidation reactions in the steel melt. In addition, furnace off-gas measurements and slag analysis are necessary to reliably determine energy sinks. In this paper 70 energy balances and energy efficiencies from multiple EAFs are presented, including data calculated from plant measurements and compiled from the literature. Potential errors that can be incorporated in these calculations are also highlighted. The total energy requirement of these modern EAFs analysed ranged from 510 to 880 kWh/t, with energy efficiency values (η = ΔH Steel /E Total ) of between 40% and 75%. Furthermore, the focus was placed on the total energy related CO 2 emissions of EAF processes comprising NG combustion and electrical energy input. By assessing multiple EAF energy balances, a significant correlation between the total energy requirement and energy related specific CO 2 emissions was not evident. Whilst the specific consumption of NG in the EAF only had a minor impact on the EAF energy efficiency, it decreased the specific electrical energy requirement and increased EAF productivity where transformer power was restricted. The analysis also demonstrated that complementing and substituting electrical energy with NG was beneficial in reducing the total energy related CO 2 emissions when a certain level of substitution efficiency was achieved. Therefore, the appropriate use of NG burners in modern EAFs can result in an increased EAF energy intensity, whilst the total energy related CO 2 emissions remain constant or are even decreased.

  6. Study of waterline corrosion on the carbon steel liner cast in concrete at the condensation pool. I. Literature review II. Study of the risk for waterline corrosion on the steel liner cast in concrete at the cylinder wall at Barsebaeck 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sederholm, Bror; Kalinowski, Mariusz; Eistrat, Kaija

    2009-02-01

    The reactor containment in Swedish BWR-type nuclear power plants consists of an inner cylinder-shaped container of stainless steel, with an outer liner of carbon steel about 300 mm from the stainless steel container, both cast in concrete. If water leaks from the inner stainless steel container into the concrete, the risk of corrosion on the carbon steel liner may be increased by the presence of a waterline, and voids in the concrete at the metal surface. The first part of the report is a survey of published information regarding waterline corrosion and the effect of wholly or partly liquid-filled voids at a steel surface cast in concrete. The second part is a report on the investigations of the corrosion status of the steel liner on the inside of the reactor containment at the Barsebaeckverket 1 plant and of the laboratory investigations of the concrete samples that were taken from the reactor containment wall. The waterline corrosion effect is caused by local differences in environmental factors at the water/air border, primarily the supply of oxygen (air), which allows corrosion cells similar to galvanic cells to be set up. On a vertical, partly immersed steel structure the corrosion rate largely varies with the supply of oxygen, with the highest corrosion rate at or immediately above the waterline, where the supply of both oxygen (air) and electrolyte is good. The relative corrosion rates around the waterline may be modified by the action of various concentration cells. Waterline effects due to aeration cells or other concentration cells have been shown to increase the risk for corrosion damage locally, even when the overall corrosion rate does not increase, since corrosion is concentrated to a smaller area and may have a more localised character. Waterline conditions can also develop at a cast-in metal surface inside partly water-filled voids in the concrete. Voids as such at a concrete/metal interface, leaving metal without adhering concrete, have also been

  7. ToxCast Dashboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ToxCast Dashboard helps users examine high-throughput assay data to inform chemical safety decisions. To date, it has data on over 9,000 chemicals and information from more than 1,000 high-throughput assay endpoint components.

  8. Zirconium and cast zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krone, K

    1977-04-01

    A survey is given on the occurence of zirconium, production of Zr sponge and semi-finished products, on physical and mechanical properties, production of Zr cast, composition of the commercial grades and reactor grades qualities, metal cutting, welding, corrosion behavior and use.

  9. "Souvenir" casting silicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carel, R S; Salman, H; Bar-Ziv, J

    1994-10-01

    A case of silicosis in a 47-year-old worker who was employed for many years in a small souvenir casting shop is described. This work site demonstrates many unfavorable characteristics of small industries, such as lack of awareness of the need for safety measures, exposure control, protection of workers, and lack of compliance with environmental and medical-legal standards.

  10. Wear resistance of cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper investigations of abrasive and adhesive wear resistance of different cast iron grades have been presented. Examinations showed, that the most advantageous pair of materials is the cast iron – the hardened steel with low-tempered martensite. It was found, that martensitic nodular cast iron with carbides is the most resistant material.

  11. Cold deformation of ADI castings: Martensitic transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navea, Lilian R; Mannheim, Rodolfo M; Garin, Jorge L

    2004-01-01

    Research and applications in austempered ductile iron (ADI castings) have recently undergone noticeable progress in the industrialized world, becoming a highly competitive engineering material. The notable properties of these castings derive from their austenitic matrix stabilized by carbon, a thermally stable austenite during the austenizing process but possibly turning into martensite when undergoing plastic deformation. This work aims to study the changing structure of an ADI casting caused by one directional cold lamination. The samples that were studied were obtained from two nodular castings, one without alloying and the other alloyed with Cu, Ni and Mo. The samples were austenized in the first stage of the austempering process at 910 o C for 80 min. Then in the second stage the unalloyed samples were austempered at 410 o C for 10 min and the alloyed samples for 120 min. After the thermal treatment, the test pieces were deformed 0% to 25% by cold lamination. The quantification of the phases was performed using x-ray diffraction and the metallographic study using optic and Scanning Electronic Microscopy. The results show that the martensitic phase obtained by deformation is a very fine structure that evolves into a thicker one when the deformation of the samples increases (CW)

  12. Weld microstructure in cast AlSi9/SiC(p metal matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wysocki

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Welded joint in cast AlSi9/SiC/20(p metal matrix composite by manual TIG arc welding using AlMg5 filler metal has been described inhis paper. Cooling curves have been stated, and the influence in distribution of reinforced particles on crystallization and weldmicrostructure. Welded joint mechanical properties have been determined: hardness and tensile.

  13. Regression Analysis of the Effect of Bias Voltage on Nano- and Macrotribological Properties of Diamond-Like Carbon Films Deposited by a Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc Ion-Plating Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shojiro Miyake

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diamond-like carbon (DLC films are deposited by bend filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA technique with DC and pulsed bias voltage. The effects of varying bias voltage on nanoindentation and nanowear properties were evaluated by atomic force microscopy. DLC films deposited with DC bias voltage of −50 V exhibited the greatest hardness at approximately 50 GPa, a low modulus of dissipation, low elastic modulus to nanoindentation hardness ratio, and high nanowear resistance. Nanoindentation hardness was positively correlated with the Raman peak ratio Id/Ig, whereas wear depth was negatively correlated with this ratio. These nanotribological properties highly depend on the films’ nanostructures. The tribological properties of the FCVA-DLC films were also investigated using a ball-on-disk test. The average friction coefficient of DLC films deposited with DC bias voltage was lower than that of DLC films deposited with pulse bias voltage. The friction coefficient calculated from the ball-on-disk test was correlated with the nanoindentation hardness in dry conditions. However, under boundary lubrication conditions, the friction coefficient and specific wear rate had little correlation with nanoindentation hardness, and wear behavior seemed to be influenced by other factors such as adhesion strength between the film and substrate.

  14. Control of cast iron and casts manufacturing by Inmold method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the usability of cast iron spheroidizing process in mould control by ATD method as well as by ultrasonic method were presented. Structure of instrumentation needed for control form performance of cast iron spheroidizing by Inmold method was illustrated. Author, pointed out that amount of magnesium master alloy should obtain 0,8 ÷ 1,0% of mass in form at all. Such quantity of preliminary alloy assure of obtain of nodular graphite in cast iron. In consequence of this, is reduce the cast iron liquidus temperature and decrease of recalescence temperature of graphite-eutectic crystallization in compare with initial cast iron. Control of casts can be carried out by ultrasonic method. In plain cast iron, ferritic-pearlitic microstructure is obtaining. Additives of 1,5% Cu ensure pearlitic structure.

  15. Electron arc therapy: Influence of heterogeneities on dose to blood-forming organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leavitt, D.D.; Gibbs, F.A.; Moeller, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Electron arc therapy has been used successfully to treat extended chest wall surfaces after mastectomy. Treatment is frequently given simultaneously with chemotherapy. Although the primary electron arc treatment volume consists only of the chest wall and mediastinum, dose is accumulated at the isocenter of rotation due to the photon contamination of the arcing electron beam. Additionally, higher energy electron fields which are occasionally used over segments of the arc may contribute to the dose at isocenter if the electron range has been extended due to passage through a low-density heterogeneity such as lung. In some patient setups, the isocenter may intersect blood-forming organs, such as the vertebral bodies. Thermoluminescent dosimetry has been used to measure the dose at isocenter for the following setups: polystyrene phantom, polystyrene phantom covered by 1-cm-thick lead cast, polystyrene phantom with cork insert to simulate lung, and phantom plus cork insert plus lead cast. For the 9-MeV treatment mode, dose at isocenter per 90 0 of arc (as a percentage of maximum tumor dose) is as follows: phantom, 6.5%; phantom plus lead, 5%; phantom plus cork, 8%; and phantom plus cork plus lead, 6%. These values must be scaled by the size of the arc to estimate dose at isocenter in actual treatments. Computer calculation showed good agreement with these measured values, indicating that the computerized treatment plans can be used as a predictor of electron arc dose to blood-forming organs

  16. Nanoscratch technique for aligning multiwalled carbon nanotubes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Carbon nanotube; arc discharge; characterization; alignment; nanoscratch. 1. Introduction ... During arc discharge, when the gap between the electrodes is ∼ 1 mm, ..... increase in the D band intensity in the aligned region may not be possibly ...

  17. The casting of western sculpture during the XIXth century: sand casting versus lost wax casting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beentjes, T.P.C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper will discuss research into bronze casting techniques as practiced during the XIXth and early XXth century. Both natural sand casting (fonte au sable naturel) and lost wax casting (fonte à la cire perdue) were employed during this period and sometimes rivalled for commissions. Before the

  18. ALICE-ARC integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderlik, C; Gregersen, A R; Kleist, J; Peters, A; Saiz, P

    2008-01-01

    AliEn or Alice Environment is the Grid middleware developed and used within the ALICE collaboration for storing and processing data in a distributed manner. ARC (Advanced Resource Connector) is the Grid middleware deployed across the Nordic countries and gluing together the resources within the Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF). In this paper we will present our approach to integrate AliEn and ARC, in the sense that ALICE data management and job processing can be carried out on the NDGF infrastructure, using the client tools available in AliEn. The inter-operation has two aspects, one is the data management part and the second the job management aspect. The first aspect was solved by using dCache across NDGF to handle data. Therefore, we will concentrate on the second part. Solving it, was somewhat cumbersome, mainly due to the different computing models employed by AliEn and ARC. AliEN uses an Agent based pull model while ARC handles jobs through the more 'traditional' push model. The solution comes as a module implementing the functionalities necessary to achieve AliEn job submission and management to ARC enabled sites

  19. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - Chapter 2: Grey Iron (Ⅱ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2009-08-01

    metallographic photos.Except for focusing on the effect of high carbon phases in cast iron, in this book, special attention is also paid to the effect of austenite on solidification, graphite morphology, and quality of cast iron; at the same time, the study on the solidification behaviours in the region around eutectic cells and its effects on mechanical properties of cast iron, are also emphasized.

  20. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - Chapter 1: Introduction (Ⅰ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2009-02-01

    metallographic photos.Except for focusing on the effect of high carbon phases in cast iron, in this book, special attention is also paid to the effect of austenite on solidification, graphite morphology, and quality of cast iron; at the same time, the study on the solidification behaviours in the region around eutectic cells and its effects on mechanical properties of cast iron, are also emphasized.

  1. Cast iron - a predictable material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorg C. Sturm

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available High strength compacted graphite iron (CGI or alloyed cast iron components are substituting previously used non-ferrous castings in automotive power train applications. The mechanical engineering industry has recognized the value in substituting forged or welded structures with stiff and light-weight cast iron castings. New products such as wind turbines have opened new markets for an entire suite of highly reliable ductile iron cast components. During the last 20 years, casting process simulation has developed from predicting hot spots and solidification to an integral assessment tool for foundries for the entire manufacturing route of castings. The support of the feeding related layout of the casting is still one of the most important duties for casting process simulation. Depending on the alloy poured, different feeding behaviors and self-feeding capabilities need to be considered to provide a defect free casting. Therefore, it is not enough to base the prediction of shrinkage defects solely on hot spots derived from temperature fields. To be able to quantitatively predict these defects, solidification simulation had to be combined with density and mass transport calculations, in order to evaluate the impact of the solidification morphology on the feeding behavior as well as to consider alloy dependent feeding ranges. For cast iron foundries, the use of casting process simulation has become an important instrument to predict the robustness and reliability of their processes, especially since the influence of alloying elements, melting practice and metallurgy need to be considered to quantify the special shrinkage and solidification behavior of cast iron. This allows the prediction of local structures, phases and ultimately the local mechanical properties of cast irons, to asses casting quality in the foundry but also to make use of this quantitative information during design of the casting. Casting quality issues related to thermally driven

  2. Performance Steel Castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    system components to be built. Figure la shows the machine design . PSC-2012 Page 94 Glue Application Sheet Transfer Feed Elevator Figure la...Department of Defense such as cleats, ejection chutes , control arms, muzzle brakes, mortar components, clevises, tow bar clamps, ammo conveyor elements...Foundry and the members of Steel Founders’ Society of America. Abstract Weapon system designers and builders need advanced steel casting technology

  3. Casting and Splinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-21

    mcludmg suggost1ons klr reducing lite burden, to the Department ar Defense. Executive Service Director> lte (07,IJ4-0188). Respondents should be...Orthoglass) Casting Material );;:- Fiberglass , .... • \\ \\ General Principles )- Measure out dry material at extremity being treated ~Plaster...shrinks slightly when wet; If too long can fold ends back ~Can be measured on contralateral extremity > Apply 2-3 layers of webril, avoid wrinkles

  4. Vacuum Arc Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, I.

    2013-12-16

    The vacuum arc ion source has evolved into a more or less standard laboratory tool for the production of high-current beams of metal ions, and is now used in a number of different embodiments at many laboratories around the world. Applications include primarily ion implantation for material surface modification research, and good performance has been obtained for the injection of high-current beams of heavy-metal ions, in particular uranium, into particle accelerators. As the use of the source has grown, so also have the operational characteristics been improved in a variety of different ways. Here we review the principles, design, and performance of vacuum arc ion sources.

  5. Phase structures and morphologies of tempered CA6NM stainless steel welded by hybrid laser-arc process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirakhorli, F., E-mail: Fatemeh.mirakhorli.1@ens.etsmtl.ca [École de Technologie Supérieure, Montréal, Québec H3C 1K3 (Canada); National Research Council Canada – Aerospace, Montréal, Québec H3T 2B2 (Canada); Cao, X., E-mail: Xinjin.cao@cnrc-nrc.gc.ca [National Research Council Canada – Aerospace, Montréal, Québec H3T 2B2 (Canada); Pham, X-T., E-mail: Tan.pham@etsmtl.ca [École de Technologie Supérieure, Montréal, Québec H3C 1K3 (Canada); Wanjara, P., E-mail: Priti.wanjara@cnrc-nrc.gc.ca [National Research Council Canada – Aerospace, Montréal, Québec H3T 2B2 (Canada); Fihey, J.L., E-mail: jean-luc.fihey@etsmtl.ca [École de Technologie Supérieure, Montréal, Québec H3C 1K3 (Canada)

    2017-01-15

    The post-weld tempered microstructure of hybrid laser-arc welded CA6NM, a cast low carbon martensitic stainless steel, was investigated. The microstructural evolutions from the fusion zone to the base metal were characterized in detail using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and microhardness techniques. The fusion zone, in its post-weld tempered condition, consisted of tempered lath martensite, residual delta-ferrite with various morphologies, reversed austenite and chromium carbides. The reversed austenite, which can be detected through both EBSD and XRD techniques, was found to be finely dispersed along the martensite lath boundaries, particularly at triple junctions. Based on the EBSD analysis, the orientation relationship between the reversed austenite and the adjacent martensite laths seemed to follow the Kurdjumov-Sachs (K-S) model. The results also revealed the presence of the reversed austenite in the different regions of the heat affected zone after post-weld tempering. The microindentation hardness distribution was measured, and correlated to the evolution of the corresponding microstructure across the welds. - Highlights: •The EBSD analysis was performed on hybrid laser-arc welded CA6NM. •The FZ consisted of tempered lath martensite, reversed austenite, carbides and δ ferrite after tempering. •The reversed γ was formed along the α′ lath boundaries, particularly at triple junctions.

  6. Arc Heated Scramjet Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Arc Heated Scramjet Test Facility is an arc heated facility which simulates the true enthalpy of flight over the Mach number range of about 4.7 to 8 for free-jet...

  7. Controlling DC permeability in cast steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumner, Aaran; Gerada, Chris; Brown, Neil; Clare, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Annealing (at multiple cooling rates) and quenching (with tempering) was performed on specimens of cast steel of varying composition. The aim was to devise a method for selecting the steel with the highest permeability, from any given range of steels, and then increasing the permeability by heat treatment. Metallographic samples were imaged using optical microscopy to show the effect of the applied heat treatments on the microstructure. Commonly cast steels can have DC permeability altered by the careful selection of a heat treatment. Increases of up to 381% were achieved by annealing using a cooling rate of 6.0 °C/min. Annealing was found to cause the carbon present in the steel to migrate from grain boundaries and from within ferrite crystals into adjacent pearlite crystals. The migration of the carbon resulted in less carbon at grain boundaries and within ferrite crystals reducing the number of pinning sites between magnetic domains. This gives rise to a higher permeability. Quenching then tempering was found to cause the formation of small ferrite crystals with the carbon content of the steel predominately held in the martensitic crystal structures. The results show that with any given range of steel compositions the highest baseline DC permeability will be found with the steel that has the highest iron content and the lowest carbon content. For the samples tested in this paper a cooling rate of 4.5 °C/min resulted in the relative permeability of the sample with the highest baseline permeability, AS4, increasing from 783 to 1479 at 0.5 T. This paper shows how heat treatments commonly applied to hypoeutectoid cast steels, to improve their mechanical performance, can be used to also enhance electromagnetic properties of these alloys. The use of cast steels allows the creation of DC components for electrical machines not possible by the widely used method of stacking of electrical grade sheet steels. - Highlights: • A range of structural steels had their

  8. Controlling DC permeability in cast steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumner, Aaran, E-mail: aaran.sumner@nottingham.ac.uk [University of Nottingham, Nottingham University Park Campus, Nottingham NG7 2RD, England (United Kingdom); Gerada, Chris, E-mail: chris.gerada@nottingham.ac.uk [Electrical Machines, University of Nottingham, Tower Building, Nottingham NG7 2RD, England (United Kingdom); Brown, Neil, E-mail: neil.brown@cummins.com [Advanced Electrical Machines Research and Technology at Cummins Power Generation, Peterborough PE2 6FZ, England (United Kingdom); Clare, Adam, E-mail: adam.clare@nottingham.ac.uk [Advanced Manufacturing, University of Nottingham, University Park Campus, Nottingham NG7 2RD, England (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-01

    Annealing (at multiple cooling rates) and quenching (with tempering) was performed on specimens of cast steel of varying composition. The aim was to devise a method for selecting the steel with the highest permeability, from any given range of steels, and then increasing the permeability by heat treatment. Metallographic samples were imaged using optical microscopy to show the effect of the applied heat treatments on the microstructure. Commonly cast steels can have DC permeability altered by the careful selection of a heat treatment. Increases of up to 381% were achieved by annealing using a cooling rate of 6.0 °C/min. Annealing was found to cause the carbon present in the steel to migrate from grain boundaries and from within ferrite crystals into adjacent pearlite crystals. The migration of the carbon resulted in less carbon at grain boundaries and within ferrite crystals reducing the number of pinning sites between magnetic domains. This gives rise to a higher permeability. Quenching then tempering was found to cause the formation of small ferrite crystals with the carbon content of the steel predominately held in the martensitic crystal structures. The results show that with any given range of steel compositions the highest baseline DC permeability will be found with the steel that has the highest iron content and the lowest carbon content. For the samples tested in this paper a cooling rate of 4.5 °C/min resulted in the relative permeability of the sample with the highest baseline permeability, AS4, increasing from 783 to 1479 at 0.5 T. This paper shows how heat treatments commonly applied to hypoeutectoid cast steels, to improve their mechanical performance, can be used to also enhance electromagnetic properties of these alloys. The use of cast steels allows the creation of DC components for electrical machines not possible by the widely used method of stacking of electrical grade sheet steels. - Highlights: • A range of structural steels had their

  9. Electric contact arcing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuthrell, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    Electrical contacts must function properly in many types of components used in nuclear weapon systems. Design, application, and testing of these components require detailed knowledge of chemical and physical phenomena associated with stockpile storage, stockpile testing, and operation. In the past, investigation of these phenomena has led to significant discoveries on the effects of surface contaminants, friction and wear, and the mechanics of closure on contact performance. A recent investigation of contact arcing phenomena which revealed that, preceding contact closure, arcs may occur at voltages lower than had been previously known is described. This discovery is important, since arcing may damage contacts, and repetitive testing of contacts performed as part of a quality assurance program might produce cumulative damage that would yield misleading life-test data and could prevent proper operation of the contacts at some time in the future. This damage can be avoided by determining the conditions under which arcing occurs, and ensuring that these conditions are avoided in contact testing

  10. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz Abd Malek, Muhamad; Hayati Saad, Nor; Kiyai Abas, Sunhaji; Mohd Shah, Noriyati

    2013-06-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  11. Circular arc structures

    KAUST Repository

    Bo, Pengbo; Pottmann, Helmut; Kilian, Martin; Wang, Wen Ping; Wallner, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    and connecting elements as well as repetition of costly parts. This paper proposes so-called circular arc structures as a means to faithfully realize freeform designs without giving up smooth appearance. In contrast to non-smooth meshes with straight edges where

  12. ALICE-ARC integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderlik, Csaba; Gregersen, Anders Rhod; Kleist, Josva

    2008-01-01

    Data Grid Facility (NDGF). In this paper we will present our approach to integrate AliEn and ARC, in the sense that ALICE data management and job processing can be carried out on the NDGF infrastructure, using the client tools available in AliEn. The interoperation has two aspects, one is the data...

  13. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malek, Muhamad Hafiz Abd; Saad, Nor Hayati; Abas, Sunhaji Kiyai; Shah, Noriyati Mohd

    2013-01-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  14. THE ARC TRAIL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INTRODUCTION. The project, carried out by the 1985 Conservation. Team at Durban Girls1 High School, consisted of three main aims- Awareness, Recreation and conservation, which were incorporated into the naming of the ARC trail. The trail is situated in suburban Durban where it was felt that it was important to ...

  15. ARC Software and Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archives RESEARCH ▼ Research Areas Ongoing Projects Completed Projects SOFTWARE CONTACT ▼ Primary Contacts Researchers External Link MLibrary Deep Blue Software Archive Most research conducted at the ARC produce software code and methodologies that are transferred to TARDEC and industry partners. These

  16. ALICE: ARC integration

    CERN Document Server

    Anderlik, C; Kleist, J; Peters, A; Saiz, P

    2008-01-01

    AliEn or Alice Environment is the Grid middleware developed and used within the ALICE collaboration for storing and processing data in a distributed manner. ARC (Advanced Resource Connector) is the Grid middleware deployed across the Nordic countries and gluing together the resources within the Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF). In this paper we will present our approach to integrate AliEn and ARC, in the sense that ALICE data management and job processing can be carried out on the NDGF infrastructure, using the client tools available in AliEn. The inter-operation has two aspects, one is the data management part and the second the job management aspect. The first aspect was solved by using dCache across NDGF to handle data. Therefore, we will concentrate on the second part. Solving it, was somewhat cumbersome, mainly due to the different computing models employed by AliEn and ARC. AliEN uses an Agent based pull model while ARC handles jobs through the more 'traditional' push model. The solution comes as a modu...

  17. Radiography of Co-60 in the lead cube castings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djoli Soembogo; Harun Al Rasyid R; Namad Sianta

    2016-01-01

    Radiography Co-60 on Carbon steel or Stainless steel has been widely applied, but for metal Lead has not yet been applied and has not yet widely known. Lead has a greater density than Carbon steel or Stainless steel and could muffle gamma radiation so it takes a longer exposure time. The result of its film radiography are also not as good as compared to radiography applications on carbon steel or Stainless steel. The study also applied digital radiography using isotope Co-60 sources and used Epson V700 scanner positive film for digitization results of conventional radiographic films. These radiographs using film AGFA D7 to get the contrast medium, medium sensitivity and good image quality. The purpose of radiography Co-60 on the cube castings Lead is to find indications of defective castings cube Lead and digitizing the results using conventional radiographic film with a positive film media scanner to process the data transfer and storage of digital data. Radiographic testing has been carried out using the isotope Co-60 on metal castings Lead with a single thickness of a single shadow method using positive film scanner media and isotope Co-60 with disabilities observation parameter Lead metal castings on radiographic film. Co-60 radiation time exposure is 3,500 hours for the thickness of the metal cube castings Lead 100 mm with the activity of 29 Ci and perpendicular SFD of 840 mm. Radiographic testing on metal cube castings Lead by the method of a single thickness of single image defects produce a parameter indicative for a cube of metal castings Lead of porosity level 2. The density mean of radiographic film was 2.051 and 2.046 for 5 minutes in a developer solution. The result of scanning positive film is in the form of digital radiography which allows for the transfer of digital data or computerized storage of digital data. This status is still within limits acceptable under the standards referred. (author)

  18. Cast dielectric composite linear accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, David M [Livermore, CA; Sampayan, Stephen [Manteca, CA; Slenes, Kirk [Albuquerque, NM; Stoller, H M [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-11-10

    A linear accelerator having cast dielectric composite layers integrally formed with conductor electrodes in a solventless fabrication process, with the cast dielectric composite preferably having a nanoparticle filler in an organic polymer such as a thermosetting resin. By incorporating this cast dielectric composite the dielectric constant of critical insulating layers of the transmission lines of the accelerator are increased while simultaneously maintaining high dielectric strengths for the accelerator.

  19. Arc jet testing of a Dynasil dome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrell, Jack O.; Strobel, Forrest A.

    1999-07-01

    Arc jet testing of the Hera modified ballistic reentry vehicle - 1E (MBRV-1E) nosetip was conducted in June of 1998. The tests were conducted in the Air Force's Arnold Engineering Development Center HEAT-H1 arc plasma test facility in Tullahoma, Tennessee. The MBRV-1 vehicle is a separating short- to medium-range target. The MBRV-1E nosetip incorporates a custom designed quartz dome that is integrated into the nosetip stagnation region. The dome was bonded to the baseline nosetip material, a well characterized carbon-carbon composite material, using a silica based ceramic bond materials. The objectives of the test were to demonstrate the thermal performance and structural integrity of the nosetip design by exposing tip to arc plasma-heated flow simulating the reentry flight environment. Pre-test analysis of the Dynasil dome performed using finite element analysis predicted the dome would survive the test conditions with no failures. Post-test inspection of the dome revealed a hard, opaque coating on the outer surface of the dome. Once removed, the dome was shown to have numerous surface cracks near the stagnation region. In addition to the surface cracks, significant pitting on the surface was observed through both an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope. Post-test analyses were performed to determine the cause of these surface cracks. It was concluded that the cracks occurred during cooldown, and were a result of significant strength degradation which was caused by the surface pitting.

  20. Corrosion of cast and non equilibrium magnesium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathieu, S.; Rapin, C.; Steinmetz, P.; Hazan, J.

    1999-01-01

    Due to their low density, magnesium alloys arc very promising as regards applications in the automotive or aeronautical industry. Their corrosion resistance has however to be increased, particularly for cast alloys which are very often two-phased and thus suffer from internal galvanic corrosion. With use of sputtering methods of elaboration, homogeneous magnesium alloys containing far from equilibrium Al, Zr or valve metals contents can be prepared. Corrosion data for Mg-Al-Zn-Sn alloys and MgZr alloys obtained by sputtering, have been determined and compared to those of cast and thixocast AZ91 alloy. Electrochemical tests have evidenced a significantly better behaviour of non equilibrium alloys which, thanks to XPS measurements, could be correlated to the composition of the superficial oxide scale formed on these alloys. (author)

  1. Application of welding technology TIG to cast iron repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Rcpnir nT cnst imn clcrncnts rcaEi7c in ordcr to cut out a sltpcrficial casting dcfcc~s, Dcrccis clccrcasc ;z usahiliny nt ca~rings torconsin~ciionaal pplication m d incrcasc a manufacturing costs. Thc pnpcr prcsclrls rcscarch rcsufts or itsc o r '1'IG - Tun~stcnI ncn Gas alsokncwn RS GTA - Gas Tunpstcn Arc surfacin: hy wclding on colt1 and half-hot to rcpnls chrninil~m cnsr iron EN-GJN-XCrlS withcliro~niurnc ontcnt nhout 3 5% and nodular ({vi~hF crritic-pcarli~ic matrix cast iron EN-GJS-500-7. Thc rcsttl~o r invcsiigations showpossibility of cns~ings rcpais hy put on derccts a good quality padding wclds, which havc compamhlc nr hcricr propcrtlcs than hnsc~naicrial.

  2. Advanced Casting Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-01

    Anodic Films for the Protection of Magnesium Alloys". G.R. Kotler, D.L. Hawke and E.N. Agua . Proc. International Magnesium Association, Montreal, May...HCF testing, impellers were bench tested to assess the in situ fatigue capabilities of 250-C28 impeller airfoils. In this testing, the airfoils...64 at 204oC (400oF), 13- T to a> o >-, o r- i—l CD -*—• Cast Wrought TE-2222 Ficure 11. In situ HCF results for Ti-64 Model 250

  3. Degradation of stainless castings. A literature study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norring, K.

    1995-10-01

    Duplex cast stainless steels, containing mainly austenite and some ferrite, is used for different components in light water reactors. These alloys have good mechanical properties, good weldability, and they are resistant to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). Examples of components where cast duplex stainless steel is used are pump housings, valves and pipe elbows. A model for the aging/embrittlement of these materials when used in light water reactors has been developed. The model is based on regression of a large data matrix. It is mainly the impact energy (Charpy V) that has been regarded. The model only requires knowledge of the chemical composition of the material but the prediction can be improved if additional data like initial impact properties and measured ferrite content are available. The model is also capable of predicting fracture toughness. The susceptibility to IGSCC in BWR environment is primarily determined by the amount of ferrite and the carbon content of the material. When the amount of ferrite exceeds 12%, IGSCC has not been observed regardless of the carbon content. At carbon contents lower than 0.035% in weld-sensitized material IGSCC was not observed regardless of the ferrite content. Data for corrosion fatigue in primary PWR and BWR environment are available. Under BWR conditions the crack propagation rate is decreased with decreasing corrosion potential, consequently also with decreasing oxygen content of the water. Some areas have been identified where additional work is needed. In all cases the efforts should focus on characterizing cast duplex stainless steel components removed from Swedish reactors. The characterization should include: Microstructure and chemical analysis, susceptibility to IGSCC, and a comparison with existing models for embrittlement. 24 refs, 12 figs

  4. Flaw evaluation of thermally aged cast stainless steel in light-water reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.; Kuo, P.T.; Wichman, K.; Chopra, O.

    1997-01-01

    Cast stainless steel may be used in the fabrication of the primary loop piping, fittings, valve bodies, and pump casings in light-water reactors. However, this material is subject to embrittlement due to thermal aging at the reactor temperature, that is 290 o C (550 o F). The Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) recently completed a research program and the results indicate that the lower-bound fracture toughness of thermally aged cast stainless steel is similar to that of submerged arc welds (SAWs). Thus, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has accepted the use of SAW flaw evaluation procedures in IWB-3640 of Section XI of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code to evaluate flaws in thermally aged cast stainless steel for a license renewal evaluation. Alternatively, utilities may estimate component-specific fracture toughness of thermally aged cast stainless steel using procedures developed at ANL for a case-by-case flaw evaluation. (Author)

  5. Mechanical properties of as-cast microalloyed steels produced via investment casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najafi, H.; Rassizadehghani, J.; Norouzi, S.

    2011-01-01

    Tensile and room temperature Charpy V-notch impact tests were used to evaluate the variations in the as-cast mechanical properties of a low-carbon steel produced via shell mould investment casting and containing combinations of vanadium, niobium and titanium. Tensile results indicate that the yield strength and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) have increased up to respectively 615 MPa and 770 MPa due to the fine-scale microalloy precipitates in the microalloyed samples. Room temperature impact test results show that while addition of vanadium individually has not changed the impact energy, Nb has decreased it considerably. However, examination of fracture surfaces reveals that all microalloyed samples have failed by transgranular cleavage. Based on the transmission electron microscope (TEM) studies, it seems that carbonitrides being greater than 50 nm in size and formed along prior austenite grain boundaries before γ transformation are responsible for the observed reduction in impact energies and brittle fracture. In comparison to sand mould casting, the yield and UTS obtained from investment casting are superior. Furthermore, although the impact energies of Nb-containing alloys are approximately the same as those obtained from sand moulds, the impact energy of the alloy containing only vanadium has improved considerably.

  6. Review of the continuous casting of steel by strip casting technology. Twin roll method system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibarrondo, I.

    2008-01-01

    In order to compete in the future steel market and to maintain market share, the steel makers will need to use new efficient technologies capable of supplying steel strip products of high quality at low cost. In this way, the strip casting technology by twin rol method is one of the most important research are in the iron and steel industry today. This review makes a general description of the strip casting technology as well as its different steps, such us; metal delivery and casting, solidification process, hot rolling reduction step, etc. Through mathematical and physical models, the influence on microstructure texture surface quality and mechanical properties of the materials obtained by this method are described as a function of processing parameters, specially the roughness of the rolls. the manufacturing of carbon, stainless and electrical steels involves smaller capital and operating cost, lower gas emissions, and an opportunity to create new grades due to a faster solidification rate that leads to a different solidification structures. In sight of all this it is likely that Strip Casting technology will make a profound impact on the manufacturing landscape of the 21 s t century. (Author) 177 refs

  7. Back-arc with frontal-arc component origin of Triassic Karmutsen basalt, British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, F.; Sutherland, Brown A.; Budahn, J.R.; Plafker, G.

    1989-01-01

    The largely basaltic, ???4.5-6.2-km-thick, Middle to Upper Triassic Karmutsen Formation is a prominent part of the Wrangellian sequence. Twelve analyses of major and minor elements of representative samples of pillowed and massive basalt flows and sills from Queen Charlotte and Vancouver Islands are ferrotholeiites that show a range of 10.2-3.8% MgO (as normalized, H2O- and CO2-free) and related increases in TiO2 (1.0-2.5%), Zr (43-147 ppm) and Nb (5-16 ppm). Other elemental abundances are not related simply to MgO: distinct groupings are evident in Al2O3, Na2O and Cr, but considerable scatter is present in FeO* (FeO + 0.9Fe2O3) and CaO. Some of the variation is attributed to alteration during low-rank metamorphism or by seawater - including variation of Ba, Rb, Sr and Cu, but high-field-strength elements (Sc, Ti, Y, Zr and Nb) as well as Cr, Ni, Cu and rare-earth elements (REE's) were relatively immobile. REE's show chondrite-normalized patterns ranging from light-REE depleted to moderately light-REE enriched. On eleven discriminant plots these analyses fall largely into or across fields of within-plate basalt (WIP), normal or enriched mid-ocean-ridge tholeiite (MORB) and island-arc tholeiite (IAT). Karmutsen basalts are chemically identical to the stratigraphically equivalent Nikolai Greenstone of southern Alaska and Yukon Territory. These data and the fact that the Karmutsen rests on Sicker Group island-arc rocks of Paleozoic age suggest to us that: 1. (1) the basal arc, after minor carbonate-shale deposition, underwent near-axial back-arc rifting (as, e.g., the Mariana arc rifted at different times); 2. (2) the Karmutsen basalts were erupted along this rift or basin as "arc-rift" tholeiitite; and 3. (3) after subsequent deposition of carbonates and other rocks, and Jurassic magmatism, a large fragment of this basalt-sediment-covered island arc was accreted to North America as Wrangellia. The major- and minor-elemental abundances of Karmutsen basalt is modeled

  8. Repair of Precision Castings Made of the Inconel 713C Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łyczkowska K.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Inconel 713C precision castings are used as aircraft engine components exposed to high temperatures and the aggressive exhaust gas environment. Industrial experience has shown that precision-cast components of such complexity contain casting defects like microshrinkage, porosity, and cracks. This necessitates the development of repair technologies for castings of this type. This paper presents the results of metallographic examinations of melted areas and clad welds on the Inconel 713C nickel-based superalloy, made by TIG, plasma arc, and laser. The cladding process was carried out on model test plates in order to determine the technological and material-related problems connected with the weldability of Inconel 713C. The studies included analyses of the macro- and microstructure of the clad welds, the base materials, and the heat-affected zones. The results of the structural analyses of the clad welds indicate that Inconel 713C should be classified as a low-weldability material. In the clad welds made by laser, cracks were identified mainly in the heat-affected zone and at the melted zone interface, crystals were formed on partially-melted grains. Cracks of this type were not identified in the clad welds made using the plasma-arc method. It has been concluded that due to the possibility of manual cladding and the absence of welding imperfections, the technology having the greatest potential for application is plasma-arc cladding.

  9. Approximate entropy—a new statistic to quantify arc and welding process stability in short-circuiting gas metal arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Biao; Xiang Yuanpeng; Lü Xiaoqing; Zeng Min; Huang Shisheng

    2008-01-01

    Based on the phase state reconstruction of welding current in short-circuiting gas metal arc welding using carbon dioxide as shielding gas, the approximate entropy of welding current as well as its standard deviation has been calculated and analysed to investigate their relation with the stability of electric arc and welding process. The extensive experimental and calculated results show that the approximate entropy of welding current is significantly and positively correlated with arc and welding process stability, whereas its standard deviation is correlated with them negatively. A larger approximate entropy and a smaller standard deviation imply a more stable arc and welding process, and vice versa. As a result, the approximate entropy of welding current promises well in assessing and quantifying the stability of electric arc and welding process in short-circuiting gas metal arc welding

  10. Underwater plasma arc cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leautier, R.; Pilot, G.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the work done to develop underwater plasma arc cutting techniques, to characterise aerosols from cutting operations on radioactive and non-radioactive work-pieces, and to develop suitable ventilation and filtration techniques. The work has been carried out in the framework of a contract between CEA-CEN Cadarache and the Commission of European Communities. Furthermore, this work has been carried out in close cooperation with CEA-CEN Saclay mainly for secondary emissions and radioactive analysis. The contract started in May 1986 and was completed in December 1988 by a supplementary agreement. This report has been compiled from several progress reports submitted during the work period, contains the main findings of the work and encloses the results of comparative tests on plasma arc cutting

  11. Investigation of the tensile properties of continuous steel wire-reinforced gray cast iron composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akdemir, Ahmet; Kus, Recai; Simsir, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Metal matrix composite (MMC) is an important structural material. → Gray cast irons as a matrix material in MMC have more advantages than other cast irons. → Interface greatly determines the mechanical properties of MMC. → Interface formed by diffusion of carbon atoms. → While decarburizing takes place in gray cast iron, carburiszing takes place in steel near the interface. - Abstract: The aim of the present study was to improve the tensile properties of gray cast iron by reinforcing the material with a steel wire. The composite was produced by sand mold casting, and the specimens were normalized by applying heat treatments at 800 deg. C, 850 deg. C, and 900 deg. C. Tension tests were conducted on gray cast iron and composite specimens, and the microstructure of the specimens was examined with an optical microscope. The fracture surface of the tension test specimens was examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and graphite-free transition regions with high degrees of hardness were observed due to the diffusion of carbon from the cast iron to the steel wire. The microstructure of the transition region (fine pearlitic phase with partially dissolved graphite flakes) and the bond quality in the transition region increased the tensile properties of cast iron composites. Also, it is concluded that the tensile properties of gray cast iron increased with an increase in the normalization temperature.

  12. Investigation of the tensile properties of continuous steel wire-reinforced gray cast iron composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akdemir, Ahmet [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey); Kus, Recai [Department of Mechanical Education, Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey); Simsir, Mehmet, E-mail: msimsir@cumhuriyet.edu.tr [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Cumhuriyet University, Kayseri Yolu 7. Km, 58140 Sivas (Turkey)

    2011-04-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Metal matrix composite (MMC) is an important structural material. {yields} Gray cast irons as a matrix material in MMC have more advantages than other cast irons. {yields} Interface greatly determines the mechanical properties of MMC. {yields} Interface formed by diffusion of carbon atoms. {yields} While decarburizing takes place in gray cast iron, carburiszing takes place in steel near the interface. - Abstract: The aim of the present study was to improve the tensile properties of gray cast iron by reinforcing the material with a steel wire. The composite was produced by sand mold casting, and the specimens were normalized by applying heat treatments at 800 deg. C, 850 deg. C, and 900 deg. C. Tension tests were conducted on gray cast iron and composite specimens, and the microstructure of the specimens was examined with an optical microscope. The fracture surface of the tension test specimens was examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and graphite-free transition regions with high degrees of hardness were observed due to the diffusion of carbon from the cast iron to the steel wire. The microstructure of the transition region (fine pearlitic phase with partially dissolved graphite flakes) and the bond quality in the transition region increased the tensile properties of cast iron composites. Also, it is concluded that the tensile properties of gray cast iron increased with an increase in the normalization temperature.

  13. Arc cathode spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrade, H.O.

    1989-01-01

    Arc spots are usually highly unstable and jump statistically over the cathode surface. In a magnetic field parallel to the surface, preferably they move in the retrograde direction; i.e., opposite to the Lorentzian rule. If the field is inclined with respect to the surface, the spots drift away at a certain angle with respect to the proper retrograde direction (Robson drift motion). These well-known phenomena are explained by one stability theory

  14. Aperture modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crooks, S M; Wu, Xiaodong; Takita, C; Watzich, M; Xing Lei

    2003-01-01

    We show that it is possible to translate an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plan and deliver it as a single arc. This technique is referred to in this paper as aperture modulation arc therapy (AMAT). During this arc, the MLC leaves do not conform to the projection of the target PTV and the machine output of the accelerator has a constant value. Dose was calculated using the CORVUS 4.0 IMRT system, which uses a pencil beam dose algorithm, and treatments were delivered using a Varian 2100C/D Clinac. Results are presented for a head and neck and a prostate case, showing the equivalence of the IMRT and the translated AMAT delivery. For a prostate AMAT delivery, coronal plane film dose for the IMRT and AMAT deliveries agreed within 7.19 ± 6.62%. For a meningioma the coronal plane dose distributions were similar to a value of 4.6 ± 6.62%. Dose to the isocentre was measured as being within 2% of the planned value in both cases

  15. Circular arc structures

    KAUST Repository

    Bo, Pengbo

    2011-07-01

    The most important guiding principle in computational methods for freeform architecture is the balance between cost efficiency on the one hand, and adherence to the design intent on the other. Key issues are the simplicity of supporting and connecting elements as well as repetition of costly parts. This paper proposes so-called circular arc structures as a means to faithfully realize freeform designs without giving up smooth appearance. In contrast to non-smooth meshes with straight edges where geometric complexity is concentrated in the nodes, we stay with smooth surfaces and rather distribute complexity in a uniform way by allowing edges in the shape of circular arcs. We are able to achieve the simplest possible shape of nodes without interfering with known panel optimization algorithms. We study remarkable special cases of circular arc structures which possess simple supporting elements or repetitive edges, we present the first global approximation method for principal patches, and we show an extension to volumetric structures for truly threedimensional designs. © 2011 ACM.

  16. Education and Caste in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Chandra Pal Singh

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyses the policy of reservation for lower castes in India. This policy is similar to that of affirmative action in the United States. The paper provides a brief overview of the caste system and discusses the types of groups that are eligible for reservation, based on data from government reports. The stance of this paper is that…

  17. Unusually well preserved casts of halite crystals: A case from the Upper Frasnian of northern Lithuania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychliński, Tomasz; Jaglarz, Piotr; Uchman, Alfred; Vainorius, Julius

    2014-07-01

    Upper Frasnian carbonate-siliciclastics of the Stipinai Formation (northern Lithuania) comprise a bed of calcareous silty arenite with casts of halite crystals, including hopper crystals. Unusually well-preserved casts occur on the lower surface of the bed, while poorly-preserved casts are present on the upper bedding surface. The casts originated as the result of the dissolution of halite crystals which grew in the sediment. The dissolution took place during early stages of diagenesis, when host sediment was soft. Unstable cavities after crystal dissolution were filled by overlying sediment forming their casts. The collapsing sediment form sink-hole deformation structures which disturb wave-ripple cross lamination from the upper part of the bed. Dewatering pipe structures are also present. The casts and accompanying sink-hole and dewatering pipes are classified as the postdepositional deformation structures caused by haloturbation.

  18. Friction welding of ductile cast iron using interlayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winiczenko, Radoslaw; Kaczorowski, Mieczyslaw

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → The results of the study of the friction welding of ductile cast iron using interlayers are presented. → The results of the analysis shows that the joint has the tensile strength compared to that of basic material. → In case of ductile cast iron, it is possible to reach the tensile strength equals even 700 MPa. → The process of friction welding was accompanied with diffusion of Cr, Ni and C atoms across the interface. -- Abstract: In this paper, ductile cast iron-austenitic stainless steel, ductile cast iron-pure Armco iron and ductile cast iron-low carbon steel interlayers were welded, using the friction welding method. The tensile strength of the joints was determined, using a conventional tensile test machine. Moreover, the hardness across the interface of materials was measured on metallographic specimens. The fracture surface and microstructure of the joints was examined using either light stereoscope microscopy as well as electron microscopy. In this case, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were applied. The results of the analysis shows that the joint has the tensile strength compared to that of basic material. In case of ductile cast iron, it is possible to reach the tensile strength equals even 700 MPa. It was concluded that the process of friction welding was accompanied with diffusion of Cr, Ni and C atoms across the ductile cast iron-stainless steel interface. This leads to increase in carbon concentration in stainless steel where chromium carbides were formed, the size and distribution of which was dependent on the distance from the interface.

  19. Cast iron for reactor technology - special structural and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janakiev, N.

    The graphitic phase, its formation and the effect on the mechanical properties of cast iron used for reactor shielding are described. Tensile strength, bending strength and Brinell hardness were studied. With the specimen wall thickness of 400 mm the average measured tensile strength was 180 N/mm 2 , which satisfies the given requirements as do the values of bending strength and material hardness. As against materials 200 mm in thickness, graphite was found by metallographic tests to be of a significantly coarser structure, which may be explained by slower cooling. Tensile strength was also tested for nodular cast irons and lamellar graphite cast irons. It was shown that compression increased with decreasing specimen diameter at constant pressure, at a constant diameter compression increased nearly in proportion to compressive stress. No significant differences were found if compressive stress was 80% of fracture stress. The modulus of elasticity was found to decrease with increasing graphite content while it was found to increase with fine graphite lamellae at the same carbon concentration. It also decreased with increasing straining. A Mo-alloyed cast iron was found to show slower creep rates at a compressive stress of up to 90 N/mm 2 (calculated to the same initial strengths) than Cu-alloyed cast iron. Upon increasing compressive stress to 140 N/mm 2 and creep time to more than 2000 hours, the creep behaviour of Cu-alloyed cast iron was better. Coarser perlite is likely to be more creep resistant than fine perlite. In neutron irradiation of cast iron a clear trend towards hardening was found due to the effect of neutrons on the cast iron structure. (J.B.)

  20. Interface Structure and Elements Diffusion of As-Cast and Annealed Ductile Iron/Stainless Steel Bimetal Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ramadan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Bimetal casting is considered to a promising technique for the production of high performance function materials. Heat treatment process for bimetal castings became an essential tool for improving interface structure and metallurgical diffusion bond. Molten iron alloy with carbon equivalent of 4.40 is poured into sand mold cavities containing solid 304 stainless steel strips insert. Specimens are heated to 7200C in an electrical heating furnace and holded at 720 0C for 60min and 180min. For as-cast specimens, a good coherent interface structure of ductile cast iron/304 stainless bimetal with four layers interfacial microstructure are obtained. Low temperature annealing at 720oC has a significat effect on the interface layers structure, where, three layers of interface structure are obtained after 180min annealing time because of the complete dissolving of thin layer of ferrite and multi carbides (Layer 2. Low temperature annealing shows a significant effect on the diffusion of C and otherwise shows slightly effect on the diffusion of Cr and Ni. Plearlite phase of Layer 3 is trsformed to spheroidal shape instead of lamallar shape in as-cast bimetals by low tempeature annealing at 720oC. The percent of the performed spheroidal cementit increases by increasing anneaaling time. Hardness of interface layers is changed by low temperauture annealing due to the significant carbon deffussion.

  1. Contrasting sedimentary processes along a convergent margin: the Lesser Antilles arc system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Michel; Schneider, Jean-Luc; Boudon, Georges

    2006-12-01

    Sedimentation processes occurring in an active convergent setting are well illustrated in the Lesser Antilles island arc. The margin is related to westward subduction of the North and/or the South America plates beneath the Caribbean plate. From east to west, the arc can be subdivided into several tectono-sedimentary depositional domains: the accretionary prism, the fore-arc basin, the arc platform and inter-arc basin, and the Grenada back-arc basin. The Grenada back-arc basin, the fore-arc basin (Tobago Trough) and the accretionary prism on the east side of the volcanic arc constitute traps for particles derived from the arc platform and the South American continent. The arc is volcanically active, and provides large volumes of volcaniclastic sediments which accumulate mainly in the Grenada basin by volcaniclastic gravity flows (volcanic debris avalanches, debris flows, turbiditic flows) and minor amounts by fallout. By contrast, the eastern side of the margin is fed by ash fallout and minor volcaniclastic turbidites. In this area, the dominant component of the sediments is pelagic in origin, or derived from South America (siliciclastic turbidites). Insular shelves are the locations of carbonate sedimentation, such as large platforms which develop in the Limestone Caribbees in the northern part of the margin. Reworking of carbonate material by turbidity currents also delivers lesser amounts to eastern basins of the margin. This contrasting sedimentation on both sides of the arc platform along the margin is controlled by several interacting factors including basin morphology, volcanic productivity, wind and deep-sea current patterns, and sea-level changes. Basin morphology appears to be the most dominant factor. The western slopes of the arc platform are steeper than the eastern ones, thus favouring gravity flow processes.

  2. Development of Nanostructured Austempered Ductile Cast Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panneerselvam, Saranya

    Austempered Ductile Cast Iron is emerging as an important engineering materials in recent years because of its excellent combination of mechanical properties such as high strength with good ductility, good fatigue strength and fracture toughness together with excellent wear resistance. These combinations of properties are achieved by the microstructure consisting of acicular ferrite and high carbon austenite. Refining of the ausferritic microstructure will further enhance the mechanical properties of ADI and the presence of proeutectoid ferrite in the microstructure will considerably improve the ductility of the material. Thus, the focus of this investigation was to develop nanostructured austempered ductile cast iron (ADI) consisting of proeutectoid ferrite, bainitic ferrite and high carbon austenite and to determine its microstructure-property relationships. Compact tension and cylindrical tensile test samples were prepared as per ASTM standards, subjected to various heat treatments and the mechanical tests including the tensile tests, plane strain fracture toughness tests, hardness tests were performed as per ASTM standards. Microstructures were characterized by optical metallography, X-ray diffraction, SEM and TEM. Nanostructured ADI was achieved by a unique heat treatment consisting of austenitization at a high temperature and subsequent plastic deformation at the same austenitizing temperature followed by austempering. The investigation also examined the effect of cryogenic treatment, effect of intercritical austenitizing followed by single and two step austempering, effect of high temperature plastic deformation on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the low alloyed ductile cast iron. The mechanical and thermal stability of the austenite was also investigated. An analytical model has been developed to understand the crack growth process associated with the stress induced transformation of retained austenite to martensite.

  3. Hybrid laser-arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) is a combination of laser welding with arc welding that overcomes many of the shortfalls of both processes. This important book gives a comprehensive account of hybrid laser-arc welding technology and applications. The first part of the book reviews...... the characteristics of the process, including the properties of joints produced by hybrid laser-arc welding and ways of assessing weld quality. Part II discusses applications of the process to such metals as magnesium alloys, aluminium and steel as well as the use of hybrid laser-arc welding in such sectors as ship...... building and the automotive industry. With its distinguished editor and international team of contributors, Hybrid laser-arc welding, will be a valuable source of reference for all those using this important welding technology. Professor Flemming Ove Olsen works in the Department of Manufacturing...

  4. Correlation methods in cutting arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prevosto, L; Kelly, H, E-mail: prevosto@waycom.com.ar [Grupo de Descargas Electricas, Departamento Ing. Electromecanica, Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Regional Venado Tuerto, Laprida 651, Venado Tuerto (2600), Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2011-05-01

    The present work applies similarity theory to the plasma emanating from transferred arc, gas-vortex stabilized plasma cutting torches, to analyze the existing correlation between the arc temperature and the physical parameters of such torches. It has been found that the enthalpy number significantly influence the temperature of the electric arc. The obtained correlation shows an average deviation of 3% from the temperature data points. Such correlation can be used, for instance, to predict changes in the peak value of the arc temperature at the nozzle exit of a geometrically similar cutting torch due to changes in its operation parameters.

  5. Correlation methods in cutting arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevosto, L; Kelly, H

    2011-01-01

    The present work applies similarity theory to the plasma emanating from transferred arc, gas-vortex stabilized plasma cutting torches, to analyze the existing correlation between the arc temperature and the physical parameters of such torches. It has been found that the enthalpy number significantly influence the temperature of the electric arc. The obtained correlation shows an average deviation of 3% from the temperature data points. Such correlation can be used, for instance, to predict changes in the peak value of the arc temperature at the nozzle exit of a geometrically similar cutting torch due to changes in its operation parameters.

  6. Gas tungsten arc welder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    1984-01-01

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable grinder, co-axial with the electrode, is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds. The specification also discloses means for loading of the cladding with fuel pellets and for placement of reflectors, gas capsules and end caps. Gravity feed conveyor and inerting means are also described. (author)

  7. Strip casting apparatus and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R.S.; Baker, D.F.

    1988-09-20

    Strip casting apparatus including a molten-metal-holding container and a nozzle to deposit molten metal onto a moving chill drum to directly cast continuous metallic strip. The nozzle body includes a slot bounded between a back and a front lip. The slot width exceeds about 20 times the gap distance between the nozzle and the chill drum surface. Preferably, the slot width exceeds 0.5 inch. This method of strip casting minimizes pressure drop, insuring better metal-to-chill-drum contact which promotes heat transfer and results in a better quality metallic strip. 6 figs.

  8. NUMERICAL MODELING OF HARDENING OF UNINTERRUPTEDLY-CASTED BRONZE CASTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Marukovich

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The three-dimensional numerical model for calculation of thermal fields during solidification of continuously casted bronze casting is developed. Coefficients of heat transfer on borders of calculation areas on the basis of the solution of inverse heat transfer conduction problem are determined. The analysis of thermal fields, depending on loop variables of drawing and the sizes of not cooled zone of crystallizer is curried out.

  9. Arc-textured metal surfaces for high thermal emittance space radiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banks, B.A.; Rutledge, S.K.; Mirtich, M.J.; Behrend, T.; Hotes, D.; Kussmaul, M.; Barry, J.; Stidham, C.; Stueber, T.; DiFilippo, F.

    1994-01-01

    Carbon arc electrical discharges struck across the surfaces of metals such as Nb-1% Zr, alter the morphology to produce a high thermal emittance surface. Metal from the surface and carbon from the arc electrode vaporize during arcing, and then condense on the metal surface to produce a microscopically rough surface having a high thermal emittance. Quantitative spectral reflectance measurements from 0.33 to 15 μm were made on metal surfaces which were carbon arc treated in an inert gas environment. The resulting spectral reflectance data were then used to calculate thermal emittance as a function of temperature for various methods of arc treatment. The results of arc treatment on various metals are presented for both ac and dc arcs. Surface characterization data, including thermal emittance as a function of temperature, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic oxygen durability, are also presented. Ac arc texturing was found to increase the thermal emittance at 800 K from 0.05. to 0.70

  10. Anode sheath transition in an anodic arc for synthesis of nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemchinsky, V. A.; Raitses, Y.

    2016-06-01

    The arc discharge with ablating anode or so-called anodic arc is widely used for synthesis of nanomaterials, including carbon nanotubes and fullerens, metal nanoparticles etc. We present the model of this arc, which confirms the existence of the two different modes of the arc operation with two different anode sheath regimes, namely, with negative anode sheath and with positive anode sheath. It was previously suggested that these regimes are associated with two different anode ablating modes—low ablation mode with constant ablation rate and the enhanced ablation mode (Fetterman et al 2008 Carbon 46 1322). The transition of the arc operation from low ablation mode to high ablation mode is determined by the current density at the anode. The model can be used to self-consistently determine the distribution of the electric field, electron density and electron temperature in the near-anode region of the arc discharge. Simulations of the carbon arc predict that for low arc ablating modes, the current is driven mainly by the electron diffusion to the anode. For positive anode sheath, the anode voltage is close to the ionization potential of anode material, while for negative anode sheath, the anode voltage is an order of magnitude smaller. It is also shown that the near-anode plasma, is far from the ionization equilibrium.

  11. Anode sheath transition in an anodic arc for synthesis of nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemchinsky, V A; Raitses, Y

    2016-01-01

    The arc discharge with ablating anode or so-called anodic arc is widely used for synthesis of nanomaterials, including carbon nanotubes and fullerens, metal nanoparticles etc. We present the model of this arc, which confirms the existence of the two different modes of the arc operation with two different anode sheath regimes, namely, with negative anode sheath and with positive anode sheath. It was previously suggested that these regimes are associated with two different anode ablating modes—low ablation mode with constant ablation rate and the enhanced ablation mode (Fetterman et al 2008 Carbon 46 1322). The transition of the arc operation from low ablation mode to high ablation mode is determined by the current density at the anode. The model can be used to self-consistently determine the distribution of the electric field, electron density and electron temperature in the near-anode region of the arc discharge. Simulations of the carbon arc predict that for low arc ablating modes, the current is driven mainly by the electron diffusion to the anode. For positive anode sheath, the anode voltage is close to the ionization potential of anode material, while for negative anode sheath, the anode voltage is an order of magnitude smaller. It is also shown that the near-anode plasma, is far from the ionization equilibrium. (paper)

  12. Anodization of cast aluminium alloys produced by different casting methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Labisz

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the usability of two casting methods, of sand and high pressure cast for the anodization of AlSi12 and AlSi9Cu3 aluminium cast alloys was investigated. With defined anodization parameters like electrolyte composition and temperature, current type and value a anodic alumina surface layer was produced. The quality, size and properties of the anodic layer was investigated after the anodization of the chosen aluminium cast alloys. The Alumina layer was observed used light microscope, also the mechanical properties were measured as well the abrasive wear test was made with using ABR-8251 equipment. The researches included analyze of the influence of chemical composition, geometry and roughness of anodic layer obtained on aluminum casts. Conducted investigations shows the areas of later researches, especially in the direction of the possible, next optimization anodization process of aluminum casting alloys, for example in the range of raising resistance on corrosion to achieve a suitable anodic surface layer on elements for increasing applications in the aggressive environment for example as materials on working building constructions, elements in electronics and construction parts in air and automotive industry.

  13. Electric arc welding gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttrell, Edward; Turner, Paul W.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to improved apparatus for arc welding an interior joint formed by intersecting tubular members. As an example, the invention is well suited for applications where many similar small-diameter vertical lines are to be welded to a long horizontal header. The improved apparatus includes an arc welding gun having a specially designed welding head which is not only very compact but also produces welds that are essentially free from rolled-over solidified metal. The welding head consists of the upper end of the barrel and a reversely extending electrode holder, or tip, which defines an acute angle with the barrel. As used in the above-mentioned example, the gun is positioned to extend upwardly through the vertical member and the joint to be welded, with its welding head disposed within the horizontal header. Depending on the design of the welding head, the barrel then is either rotated or revolved about the axis of the vertical member to cause the electrode to track the joint.

  14. The CAST Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Autiero, D.; Carmona, J.M.; Cebrian, S.; Chesi, E.; Davenport, M.; Delattre, M.; Di Lella, L.; Formenti, F.; Irastorza, I.G.; Gomez, H.; Hasinoff, M.; Lakic, B.; Luzon, G.; Morales, J.; Musa, L.; Ortiz, A.; Placci, A.; Rodriguez, A.; Ruz, J.; Villar, J.A.; Zioutas, K.

    2007-01-01

    One of the three X-ray detectors of the CAST experiment searching for solar axions is a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with a multi-wire proportional counter (MWPC) as a readout structure. Its design has been optimized to provide high sensitivity to the detection of the low intensity X-ray signal expected in the CAST experiment. A low hardware threshold of 0.8 keV is safely set during normal data taking periods, and the overall efficiency for the detection of photons coming from conversion of solar axions is 62 %. Shielding has been installed around the detector, lowering the background level to 4.10 x 10^-5 counts/cm^2/s/keV between 1 and 10 keV. During phase I of the CAST experiment the TPC has provided robust and stable operation, thus contributing with a competitive result to the overall CAST limit on axion-photon coupling and mass.

  15. Niobium in gray cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castello Branco, C.H.; Beckert, E.A.

    1984-03-01

    The potential for utilization of niobium in gray cast iron is appraised and reviewed. Experiments described in literature indicate that niobium provides structural refinement of the eutectic cells and also promotes pearlite formation. (Author) [pt

  16. Some Theoretical Considerations on Caste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudan Subedi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Caste as a system of social stratification was an encompassing system in the past. There was reciprocal system of exchange goods and services. With time, occupation and mode of generation of livelihood of various caste groups changed, and the traditional form of jajmani system fizzled out. This paper provides an account of changing perspectives of caste relations in social science writing and political discourse. The discourse of caste has been shifted from ritual hierarchy and social discrimination to an instrument to mobilize people for economic and political gain. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/dsaj.v7i0.10437 Dhaulagiri Journal of Sociology and Anthropology Vol. 7, 2013; 51-86

  17. 14 CFR 23.621 - Casting factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Casting factors. 23.621 Section 23.621... Casting factors. (a) General. The factors, tests, and inspections specified in paragraphs (b) through (d... structural castings except castings that are pressure tested as parts of hydraulic or other fluid systems and...

  18. Modelling of flow phenomena during DC casting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, J.

    2005-01-01

    Modelling of Flow Phenomena during DC Casting Jan Zuidema The production of aluminium ingots, by semi-continuous casting, is a complex process. DC Casting stands for direct chill casting. During this process liquid aluminium transforms to solid aluminium while cooling down. This is not an

  19. Increase in the efficiency of electric melting of pellets in an arc furnace with allowance for the energy effect of afterburning of carbon oxide in slag using fuel-oxygen burners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, V. A.; Krakht, L. N.; Merker, E. E.; Sazonov, A. V.; Chermenev, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    The problems of increasing the efficiency of electric steelmaking using fuel-oxygen burners to supply oxygen for the afterburning of effluent gases in an arc furnace are considered. The application of a new energy-saving regime based on a proposed technology of electric melting is shown to intensify the processes of slag formation, heating, and metal decarburization.

  20. Macrovoid Defect Growth during Evaporative Casting of Polymeric Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, A. R.; Khare, V. P.; Zartman, J.; Krantz, W. B.; Todd, P.

    2003-01-01

    Macrovoid (MV) formation is a significant problem in evaporatively cast polymeric membranes. MVs are large, elongated or teardrop-shaped pores (10-50 micron) that can impair membrane structural integrity. Although MVs have been extensively studied, there is no general agreement on the mechanisms governing MV growth. Recently, our research group has formulated the solutocapillary convection (SC) hypothesis, which contends that MV growth involves three principal forces: a Marangoni force generated by surface tension gradients within the MV interface, a viscous drag force, and a gravitationally induced body force. Two sets of complementary experiments were conducted to test the SC hypothesis. Ground-based videomicroscopy flow-visualization (VMFV) was utilized to measure the flow velocities at the MV-casting solution interface and deep within the casting solution. The measurements were performed with casting solutions containing 10 wt% cellulose acetate (CA), 30 wt% H2O, 60 wt% acetone, and 200- ppm TiO2 particles for flow visualization, and the surface tension was controlled by surfactant addition. Qualitatively, the experiments indicated that MV growth occurs in three distinct phases: (1) a very rapid initial growth period, (2) a much slower growth phase, and (3) absorption of selected MVs into the expanding demixed region. The presence of tracer particles inside the MVs suggests the presence of a convective flow, which transfers the particles from the bulk solution to the MV interior. Although the VMFV experiments did not establish any surfactant effect on the interfacial velocities, a statistically significant effect on the MV number density was observed. In the second set of experiments, membranes were cast aboard a KC-135 aircraft under 0-g and 2-g conditions. Despite careful attention to the design and fabrication of the membrane casting apparatus (MCA), several problems were encountered, the most significant of which was the contamination of the casting

  1. Control of chilling tendency in grey cast iron reuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saliu Ojo Seidu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In grey cast iron remelt and recycling, white iron can result in the cast product if careful control of the chilling tendency is not ensured. Many jobbing foundries are constrained in furnace types and available foundry additives that the operation always results in white irons. This study is towards ensuring grey iron is reproduced from cast iron scrap auto engine blocks, when using a diesel fired rotary furnace and a FeSi alloy for structural modification (inoculation. With varying addition rate of the FeSi alloy to the tapped molten metal, chill wedge tests were performed on two different wedge samples of type W (according to ASTM A367- wedge test with cooling modulus of 0.45 cm (W3½ and 0.54 cm (W4. The carbon equivalents for the test casts were within hypoeutectic range (3.85 wt. (% to 4.11 wt. (%. In the W4 wedge sample, at 2.0 wt. (% addition rate of the FeSi alloy, the relative clear chill was totally reduced to zero from 19.76%, while the relative mottled chill was brought down to 9.59% from 33.71%. The microstructure from the cast at this level of addition was free of carbidic phases; it shows randomly oriented graphite flakes evenly distributed in the iron matrix. Hardness assessment shows that increasing rate of FeSi addition results in decreasing hardness, with maximum effect at 2.0 wt. (% addition. With equivalent aspect ratio (cooling modulus in a target cast product, this addition rate for this FeSi alloy under this furnace condition will attain graphitized microstructure in the cast product.

  2. Control of chilling tendency in grey cast iron reuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saliu Ojo Seidu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In grey cast iron remelt and recycling, white iron can result in the cast product if careful control of the chilling tendency is not ensured. Many jobbing foundries are constrained in furnace types and available foundry additives that the operation always results in white irons. This study is towards ensuring grey iron is reproduced from cast iron scrap auto engine blocks, when using a diesel fired rotary furnace and a FeSi alloy for structural modification (inoculation. With varying addition rate of the FeSi alloy to the tapped molten metal, chill wedge tests were performed on two different wedge samples of type W (according to ASTM A367- wedge test with cooling modulus of 0.45 cm (W3½ and 0.54 cm (W4. The carbon equivalents for the test casts were within hypoeutectic range (3.85 wt. (% to 4.11 wt. (%. In the W4 wedge sample, at 2.0 wt. (% addition rate of the FeSi alloy, the relative clear chill was totally reduced to zero from 19.76%, while the relative mottled chill was brought down to 9.59% from 33.71%. The microstructure from the cast at this level of addition was free of carbidic phases; it shows randomly oriented graphite flakes evenly distributed in the iron matrix. Hardness assessment shows that increasing rate of FeSi addition results in decreasing hardness, with maximum effect at 2.0 wt. (% addition. With equivalent aspect ratio (cooling modulus in a target cast product, this addition rate for this FeSi alloy under this furnace condition will attain graphitized microstructure in the cast product.

  3. Optimizing the Gating System for Steel Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Jezierski

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the attempt to optimize a gating system to produce cast steel castings. It is based on John Campbell’s theory and presents the original results of computer modelling of typical and optimized gating systems for cast steel castings. The current state-of-the-art in cast steel casting foundry was compared with several proposals of optimization. The aim was to find a compromise between the best, theoretically proven gating system version, and a version that would be affordable in industrial conditions. The results show that it is possible to achieve a uniform and slow pouring process even for heavy castings to preserve their internal quality.

  4. Development in corrosion resistance by microstructural refinement in Zr-16 SS 304 alloy using suction casting technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, N., E-mail: nirupamd@barc.gov.in; Sengupta, P.; Abraham, G.; Arya, A.; Kain, V.; Dey, G.K.

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Grain refinement was made in Zr–16 wt.% SS alloy while prepared by suction casting process. • Distribution of Laves phase, e.g., Zr{sub 2}(Fe, Cr) was raised in suction cast (SC) Zr–16 wt.% SS. • Corrosion resistance was improved in SC alloy compared to that of arc-melt-cast alloy. • Grain refinement in SC alloy assisted for an increase in its corrosion resistance. - Abstract: Zirconium (Zr)-stainless steel (SS) hybrid alloys are being considered as baseline alloys for developing metallic-waste-form (MWF) with the motivation of disposing of Zr and SS base nuclear metallic wastes. Zr–16 wt.% SS, a MWF alloy optimized from previous studies, exhibit significant grain refinement and changes in phase assemblages (soft phase: Zr{sub 2}(Fe, Cr)/α-Zr vs. hard phase: Zr{sub 3}(Fe, Ni)) when prepared by suction casting (SC) technique in comparison to arc-cast-melt (AMC) route. Variation in Cr-distribution among different phases are found to be low in suction cast alloy, which along with grain refinement restricted Cr-depletion at the Zr{sub 2}(Fe, Cr)/Zr interfaces, prone to localized attack. Hence, SC alloy, compared to AMC alloy, showed lower current density, higher potential at the breakdown of passivity and higher corrosion potential during polarization experiments (carried out under possible geological repository environments, viz., pH 8, 5 and 1) indicating its superior corrosion resistance.

  5. Arc-weld pool interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glickstein, S.S.

    1978-08-01

    The mechanisms involved in arc-weld pool interactions are extremely complex and no complete theory is presently available to describe much of the phenomena observed during welding. For the past several years, experimental and analytical studies have been undertaken at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory to increase basic understanding of the gas tungsten arc welding process. These studies have included experimental spectral analysis of the arc in order to determine arc temperature and analytical modeling of the arc and weld puddle. The investigations have been directed toward determining the cause and effects of variations in the energy distribution incident upon the weldment. In addition, the effect of weld puddle distortion on weld penetration was investigated, and experimental and analytical studies of weld process variables have been undertaken to determine the effects of the variables upon weld penetration and configuration. A review of the results and analysis of these studies are presented

  6. Aging degradation of cast stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.

    1986-10-01

    A program is being conducted to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels under light-water reactor operating conditions. Microstructures of cast materials subjected to long-term aging either in reactor service or in the laboratory have been characterized by TEM, SANS, and APFIM techniques. Two precipitate phases, i.e., the Cr-rich α' and Ni- and Si-rich G phase, have been identified in the ferrite matrix of the aged steels. The results indicate that the low-temperature embrittlement is primarily caused by α' precipitates which form by spinodal decomposition. The relative contribution of G phase to loss of toughness is now known. Microstructural data also indicate that weakening of ferrite/austenite phase boundary by carbide precipitates has a significant effect on the onset and extent of embrittlement of the high-carbon CF-8 and CF-8M grades of stainless steels, particularly after aging at 400 or 450 0 C. Data from Charpy-impact, tensile, and J-R curve tests for several heats of cast stainless steel aged up to 10,000 h at 350, 400, and 450 0 C are presented and correlated with the microstructural results. Thermal aging of the steels results in an increase in tensile strength and a decrease in impact energy, J/sub IC/, and tearing modulus. The fracture toughness results show good agreement with the Charpy-impact data. The effects of compositional and metallurgical variables on loss of toughness are discussed

  7. Influence of the casting processing route on the corrosion behavior of dental alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galo, Rodrigo; Rocha, Luis Augusto; Faria, Adriana Claudia; Silveira, Renata Rodrigues; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; de Mattos, Maria da Gloria Chiarello

    2014-12-01

    Casting in the presence of oxygen may result in an improvement of the corrosion performance of most alloys. However, the effect of corrosion on the casting without oxygen for dental materials remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the casting technique and atmosphere (argon or oxygen) on the corrosion behavior response of six different dental casting alloys. The corrosion behavior was evaluated by electrochemical measurements performed in artificial saliva for the different alloys cast in two different conditions: arc melting in argon and oxygen-gas flame centrifugal casting. A slight decrease in open-circuit potential for most alloys was observed during immersion, meaning that the corrosion tendency of the materials increases due to the contact with the solution. Exceptions were the Co-based alloys prepared by plasma, and the Co-Cr-Mo and Ni-Cr-4Ti alloys processed by oxidized flame, in which an increase in potential was observed. The amount of metallic ions released into the artificial saliva solution during immersion was similar for all specimens. Considering the pitting potential, a parameter of high importance when considering the fluctuating conditions of the oral environment, Co-based alloys show the best performance in comparison with the Ni-based alloys, independent of the processing route. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Titan Casts Revealing Shadow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-05-01

    A rare celestial event was captured by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory as Titan -- Saturn's largest moon and the only moon in the Solar System with a thick atmosphere -- crossed in front of the X-ray bright Crab Nebula. The X-ray shadow cast by Titan allowed astronomers to make the first X-ray measurement of the extent of its atmosphere. On January 5, 2003, Titan transited the Crab Nebula, the remnant of a supernova explosion that was observed to occur in the year 1054. Although Saturn and Titan pass within a few degrees of the Crab Nebula every 30 years, they rarely pass directly in front of it. "This may have been the first transit of the Crab Nebula by Titan since the birth of the Crab Nebula," said Koji Mori of Pennsylvania State University in University Park, and lead author on an Astrophysical Journal paper describing these results. "The next similar conjunction will take place in the year 2267, so this was truly a once in a lifetime event." Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Chandra's observation revealed that the diameter of the X-ray shadow cast by Titan was larger than the diameter of its solid surface. The difference in diameters gives a measurement of about 550 miles (880 kilometers) for the height of the X-ray absorbing region of Titan's atmosphere. The extent of the upper atmosphere is consistent with, or slightly (10-15%) larger, than that implied by Voyager I observations made at radio, infrared, and ultraviolet wavelengths in 1980. "Saturn was about 5% closer to the Sun in 2003, so increased solar heating of Titan may account for some of this atmospheric expansion," said Hiroshi Tsunemi of Osaka University in Japan, one of the coauthors on the paper. The X-ray brightness and extent of the Crab Nebula made it possible to study the tiny X-ray shadow cast by Titan during its transit. By using Chandra to precisely track Titan's position, astronomers were able to measure a shadow one arcsecond in

  9. Arc fault detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, K.N.

    1999-05-18

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard. 1 fig.

  10. Arc fault detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Kamal N.

    1999-01-01

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard.

  11. The ARCS radial collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, M.B.; Abernathy, D.L.; Niedziela, J.L.; Overbay, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    We have designed, installed, and commissioned a scattered beam radial collimator for use at the ARCS Wide Angular Range Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source. The collimator has been designed to work effectively for thermal and epithermal neutrons and with a range of sample environments. Other design considerations include the accommodation of working within a high vacuum environment and having the ability to quickly install and remove the collimator from the scattered beam. The collimator is composed of collimating blades (or septa). The septa are 12 micron thick Kapton foils coated on each side with 39 microns of enriched boron carbide ( 10 B 4 C with 10 B > 96%) in an ultra-high vacuum compatible binder. The collimator blades represent an additional 22 m 2 of surface area. In the article we present collimator's design and performance and methodologies for its effective use

  12. The Cracking Mechanism of Ferritic-Austenitic Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stradomski G.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the high-alloy, ferritic - austenitic (duplex stainless steels high tendency to cracking, mainly hot-is induced by micro segregation processes and change of crystallization mechanism in its final stage. The article is a continuation of the problems presented in earlier papers [1 - 4]. In the range of high temperature cracking appear one mechanism a decohesion - intergranular however, depending on the chemical composition of the steel, various structural factors decide of the occurrence of hot cracking. The low-carbon and low-alloy cast steel casting hot cracking cause are type II sulphide, in high carbon tool cast steel secondary cementite mesh and / or ledeburite segregated at the grain solidified grains boundaries, in the case of Hadfield steel phosphorus - carbide eutectic, which carrier is iron-manganese and low solubility of phosphorus in high manganese matrix. In duplex cast steel the additional factor increasing the risk of cracking it is very “rich” chemical composition and related with it processes of precipitation of many secondary phases.

  13. Arc Interference Behavior during Twin Wire Gas Metal Arc Welding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dingjian Ye

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study arc interference behavior during twin wire gas metal arc welding process, the synchronous acquisition system has been established to acquire instantaneous information of arc profile including dynamic arc length variation as well as relative voltage and current signals. The results show that after trailing arc (T-arc is added to the middle arc (M-arc in a stable welding process, the current of M arc remains unchanged while the agitation increases; the voltage of M arc has an obvious increase; the shape of M arc changes, with increasing width, length, and area; the transfer frequency of M arc droplet increases and the droplet itself becomes smaller. The wire extension length of twin arc turns out to be shorter than that of single arc welding.

  14. Fiber laser cladding of nickel-based alloy on cast iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arias-González, F., E-mail: felipeag@uvigo.es [Applied Physics Dpt., University of Vigo, EEI, Lagoas-Marcosende, Vigo E-36310 (Spain); Val, J. del [Applied Physics Dpt., University of Vigo, EEI, Lagoas-Marcosende, Vigo E-36310 (Spain); Comesaña, R. [Materials Engineering, Applied Mechanics and Construction Dpt., University of Vigo, EEI, Lagoas-Marcosende, Vigo E-36310 (Spain); Penide, J.; Lusquiños, F.; Quintero, F.; Riveiro, A.; Boutinguiza, M.; Pou, J. [Applied Physics Dpt., University of Vigo, EEI, Lagoas-Marcosende, Vigo E-36310 (Spain)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • Fiber laser cladding of Ni-based alloy on cast iron was experimentally studied. • Two different types of cast iron have been analyzed: gray and ductile cast iron. • Suitable processing parameters to generate a Ni-based coating were determined. • Dilution is higher in gray cast iron samples than in ductile cast iron. • Ni-based coating presents higher hardness than cast iron but similar Young's modulus. - Abstract: Gray cast iron is a ferrous alloy characterized by a carbon-rich phase in form of lamellar graphite in an iron matrix while ductile cast iron presents a carbon-rich phase in form of spheroidal graphite. Graphite presents a higher laser beam absorption than iron matrix and its morphology has also a strong influence on thermal conductivity of the material. The laser cladding process of cast iron is complicated by its heterogeneous microstructure which generates non-homogeneous thermal fields. In this research work, a comparison between different types of cast iron substrates (with different graphite morphology) has been carried out to analyze its impact on the process results. A fiber laser was used to generate a NiCrBSi coating over flat substrates of gray cast iron (EN-GJL-250) and nodular cast iron (EN-GJS-400-15). The relationship between processing parameters (laser irradiance and scanning speed) and geometry of a single laser track was examined. Moreover, microstructure and composition were studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The hardness and elastic modulus were analyzed by means of micro- and nanoindentation. A hardfacing coating was generated by fiber laser cladding. Suitable processing parameters to generate the Ni-based alloy coating were determined. For the same processing parameters, gray cast iron samples present higher dilution than cast iron samples. The elastic modulus is similar for the coating and the substrate, while the Ni

  15. Carbon nanotube: the inside story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Yoshinori

    2010-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were serendipitously discovered as a byproduct of fullerenes by direct current (DC) arc discharge; and today this is the most-wanted material in the nanotechnology research. In this brief review, I begin with the history of the discovery of CNTs and focus on CNTs produced by arc discharge in hydrogen atmosphere, which is little explored outside my laboratory. DC arc discharge evaporation of pure graphite rod in pure hydrogen gas results in multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) of high crystallinity in the cathode deposit. As-grown MWCNTs have very narrow inner diameter. Raman spectra of these MWCNTs show high-intensity G-band, unusual high-frequency radial breathing mode at 570 cm(-1), and a new characteristic peak near 1850 cm(-1). Exciting carbon nanowires (CNWs), consisting of a linear carbon chain in the center of MWCNTs are also produced. Arc evaporation of graphite rod containing metal catalysts results in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in the whole chamber like macroscopic webs. Two kinds of arc method have been developed to produce SWCNTs: Arc plasma jet (APJ) and Ferrum-Hydrogen (FH) arc methods. Some new purification methods for as-produced SWCNTs are reviewed. Finally, double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) are also described.

  16. Research on investment casting of TiAl alloy agitator treated by HIP and HT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Zhen-xi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Using TiAl alloy to substitute superalloy is a hot topic in aeroengine industry because of its low density,high elevated temperature strength, and anti-oxidization ability. In this research, Ti-47.5AL-2Cr-2Nb-0.2B alloy was used as the test material. By applying a combination process of ceramic shell mold and core making, vacuum arc melting and centrifugal pouring, and heat isostatic pressing (HIP and heat treatment (HT etc., the TiAl vortex agitator casting for aeroengine was successfully made. This paper introduced key techniques in making the TiAl vortex agitator with investment casting process, provided some experimental results including mechanical properties and machinability, and explained some concerns that could affect applications of TiAl castings.

  17. Use of pulsed arc welding for butt joint fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkulov, B.A.

    1977-01-01

    A technology of pulsed-arc butt welding with periodic wire feed to the welding zone has been developed. The pulsed arc is suitable both for submerged and gas-shielded weldings. The technology proposed has some advantages over the stationary-arc welding. Control of the amplitude-frequency characteristics of the process enables one to affect melting and crystallization conditions of the welding crater, weld shape, relation between melting and deposited metal section areas, etc., as well as to reduce heat contribution to the base metal. The new process is shown to be applicable in power engineering. Automatic submerged welding conditions are given for low-carbon and pearlitic heat-resistant steels

  18. Electron arc therapy: chest wall irradiation of breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeely, L.K.; Jacobson, G.M.; Leavitt, D.D.; Stewart, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    From 1980 to October 1985 we treated 45 breast cancer patients with electron arc therapy. This technique was used in situations where optimal treatment with fixed photon or electron beams was technically difficult: long scars, recurrent tumor extending across midline or to the posterior thorax, or marked variation in depth of target tissue. Forty-four patients were treated following mastectomy: 35 electively because of high risk of local failure, and 9 following local recurrence. One patient with advanced local regional disease was treated primarily. The target volume boundaries on the chest wall were defined by a foam lined cerrobend cast which rested on the patient during treatment, functioning as a tertiary collimator. A variable width secondary collimator was used to account for changes in the radius of the thorax from superior to inferior border. All patients had computerized tomography performed to determine Internal Mammary Chain depth and chest wall thickness. Electron energies were selected based on these thicknesses and often variable energies over different segments of the arc were used. The chest wall and regional node areas were irradiated to 45 Gy-50 Gy in 5-6 weeks by this technique. The supraclavicular and upper axillary nodes were treated by a direct anterior photon field abutted to the superior edge of the electron arc field. Follow-up is from 10-73 months with a median of 50 months. No major complications were observed. Acute and late effects and local control are comparable to standard chest wall irradiation. The disadvantages of this technique are that the preparation of the tertiary field defining cast and CT treatment planning are labor intensive and expensive. The advantage is that for specific clinical situations large areas of chest wall with marked topographical variation can be optimally, homogeneously irradiated while sparing normal uninvolved tissues

  19. On arc efficiency in gas tungsten arc welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Stenbacka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to review the literature on published arc efficiency values for GTAW and, if possible, propose a narrower band. Articles between the years 1955 - 2011 have been found. Published arc efficiency values for GTAW DCEN show to lie on a wide range, between 0.36 to 0.90. Only a few studies covered DCEP - direct current electrode positive and AC current. Specific information about the reproducibility in calorimetric studies as well as in modeling and simulation studies (considering that both random and systematic errors are small was scarce. An estimate of the average arc efficiency value for GTAW DCEN indicates that it should be about 0.77. It indicates anyway that the GTAW process with DCEN is an efficient welding method. The arc efficiency is reduced when the arc length is increased. On the other hand, there are conflicting results in the literature as to the influence of arc current and travel speed.

  20. Fabricating Superior NiAl Bronze Components through Wire Arc Additive Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghong Ding

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cast nickel aluminum bronze (NAB alloy is widely used for large engineering components in marine applications due to its excellent mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Casting porosity, as well as coarse microstructure, however, are accompanied by a decrease in mechanical properties of cast NAB components. Although heat treatment, friction stir processing, and fusion welding were implemented to eliminate porosity, improve mechanical properties, and refine the microstructure of as-cast metal, their applications are limited to either surface modification or component repair. Instead of traditional casting techniques, this study focuses on developing NAB components using recently expanded wire arc additive manufacturing (WAAM. Consumable welding wire is melted and deposited layer-by-layer on substrates producing near-net shaped NAB components. Additively-manufactured NAB components without post-processing are fully dense, and exhibit fine microstructure, as well as comparable mechanical properties, to as-cast NAB alloy. The effects of heat input from the welding process and post-weld-heat-treatment (PWHT are shown to give uniform NAB alloys with superior mechanical properties revealing potential marine applications of the WAAM technique in NAB production.

  1. CAST Physics Proposal to SPSC

    CERN Document Server

    CAST, Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The CAST experiment has the potential to search for solar axions (dark matter particle candidates) or other particles with similar coupling. E.g., paraphtons (Hidden Sector), chameleons (dark energy), while considering the possibility whether CAST could be transformed to an antenna for relic axions with rest mass up to 0.1 to 1meV. While axion searches suggest detectors with lower background, paraphoton and chameleon searches require detectors with sub-keV threshold energy and the use of transparent windows in front of the Micromegas detectors, which cover 3 out of the 4 CAST magnet exits. Ongoing theoretical estimates and experimental investigations will define the priorities of the suggested 4 physics items of this proposal for the period 2012-2014.

  2. Titanium Aluminide Casting Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bünck, Matthias; Stoyanov, Todor; Schievenbusch, Jan; Michels, Heiner; Gußfeld, Alexander

    2017-12-01

    Titanium aluminide alloys have been successfully introduced into civil aircraft engine technology in recent years, and a significant order volume increase is expected in the near future. Due to its beneficial buy-to-fly ratio, investment casting bears the highest potential for cost reduction of all competing production technologies for TiAl-LPTB. However, highest mechanical properties can be achieved by TiAl forging. In view of this, Access e.V. has developed technologies for the production of TiAl investment cast parts and TiAl die cast billets for forging purposes. While these parts meet the highest requirements, establishing series production and further optimizing resource and economic efficiency are present challenges. In order to meet these goals, Access has recently been certified according to aircraft standards, aiming at qualifying parts for production on technology readiness level 6. The present work gives an overview of the phases of development and certification.

  3. Electric arc radius and characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, T.M.

    1980-01-01

    The heat transfer equation of an arc discharge has been solved. The arc is assumed to be a cylinder with negligible axial variation and the dominant heat transfer process is conduction radially inside the column and radiation/convection at the outside edge. The symmetric consideration allows a simple one-dimensional formulation. By taking into account proper variation of the electrical conductivity as function of temperature, the heat balance equation has been solved analytically. The radius of the arc and its current-field characteristics have also been obtained. The conventional results that E approx. I 0 5385 and R approx. I 0 7693 with E being the applied field, I the current, and R the radius of the cylindrical arc, have been proved to be simply limiting cases of our more general characteristics. The results can be applied quite widely including, among others, the neutral beam injection project in nuclear fusion and MHD energy conversion

  4. Numerical modelling of solidification of thin walled hypereutectic ductile cast iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl Martin; Hattel, Jesper; Tiedje, Niels

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulation of solidification of ductile cast iron is normally based on a model where graphite nodules are surrounded by an austenite shell. The two phases are then growing as two concentric spheres governed by diffusion of carbon through the austenite shell. Experiments have however shown...... simulation of thin-walled ductile iron castings. Simulations have been performed with a 1-D numerical solidi¬fication model that includes the precipitation of non-eutectic austenite during the eutectic stage. Results from the simulations have been compared with experimental castings with wall thick...

  5. Kinetics of steel heavy ingot formation in dies of semicontinuous-casting machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukerman, V.Ya.; Marchenko, I.K.

    1986-01-01

    Formation kinetics of round section ingot of up to 0.67 m in diameter was analyzed in dies of semicontinuous-casting machines on casting of the most usable assortment steels: medium-carbon low-alloyed and chromium-nickel stainless steels. It is established that solidification coefficient decreases in direct proportion to ingot diameter. Value of different-thickness ingot skin at die outlet is in direct proportion to a casted steel overheating temperature, ingot diameter and inversely proportional to the number and diameter of holes in a ladder nozzle and square root of ingot drawing rate

  6. PC-based arc ignition and arc length control system for gas tungsten arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.; Cook, G.E.; Barnett, R.J.; Springfield, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, a PC-based digital control system for gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) is presented. This system controls the arc ignition process, the arc length, and the process of welding termination. A DT2818 made by Data Translation is used for interface and A/D and D/A conversions. The digital I/O ports of the DT2818 are used for control of wirefeed, shield gas, cooling water, welding power supply, etc. The DT2818 is housed in a PC. The welding signals and status are displayed on the screen for in-process monitoring. A user can control the welding process by the keyboard

  7. Atmospheric pressure arc discharge with ablating graphite anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemchinsky, V A; Raitses, Y

    2015-01-01

    The anodic carbon arc discharge is used to produce carbon nanoparticles. Recent experiments with the carbon arc at atmospheric pressure helium demonstrated the enhanced ablation rate for narrow graphite anodes resulting in high deposition rates of carbonaceous products on the copper cathode (Fetterman et al 2008 Carbon 46 1322–6). The proposed model explains these results with interconnected steady-state models of the cathode and the anode processes. When considering cathode functioning, the model predicts circulation of the particles in the near-cathode region: evaporation of the cathode material, ionization of evaporated atoms and molecules in the near-cathode plasma, return of the resulting ions to the cathode, surface recombination of ions and electrons followed again by cathode evaporation etc. In the case of the low anode ablation rate, the ion acceleration in the cathode sheath provides the major cathode heating mechanism. In the case of an intensive anode ablation, an additional cathode heating is due to latent fusion heat of the atomic species evaporated from the anode and depositing at the cathode. Using the experimental arc voltage as the only input discharge parameter, the model allows us to calculate the anode ablation rate. A comparison of the results of calculations with the available experimental data shows reasonable agreement. (paper)

  8. Atmospheric pressure arc discharge with ablating graphite anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemchinsky, V. A.; Raitses, Y.

    2015-06-01

    The anodic carbon arc discharge is used to produce carbon nanoparticles. Recent experiments with the carbon arc at atmospheric pressure helium demonstrated the enhanced ablation rate for narrow graphite anodes resulting in high deposition rates of carbonaceous products on the copper cathode (Fetterman et al 2008 Carbon 46 1322-6). The proposed model explains these results with interconnected steady-state models of the cathode and the anode processes. When considering cathode functioning, the model predicts circulation of the particles in the near-cathode region: evaporation of the cathode material, ionization of evaporated atoms and molecules in the near-cathode plasma, return of the resulting ions to the cathode, surface recombination of ions and electrons followed again by cathode evaporation etc. In the case of the low anode ablation rate, the ion acceleration in the cathode sheath provides the major cathode heating mechanism. In the case of an intensive anode ablation, an additional cathode heating is due to latent fusion heat of the atomic species evaporated from the anode and depositing at the cathode. Using the experimental arc voltage as the only input discharge parameter, the model allows us to calculate the anode ablation rate. A comparison of the results of calculations with the available experimental data shows reasonable agreement.

  9. Arc modeling for welding analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glickstein, S.S.

    1978-04-01

    A one-dimensional model of the welding arc that considers heat generation by the Joule effect and heat losses by radiation and conduction has been used to study the effects of various gases and gas mixtures currently employed for welding applications. Minor additions of low ionization potential impurities to these gases are shown to significantly perturb the electrical properties of the parent gas causing gross changes in the radial temperature distribution of the arc discharge. Such changes are reflected in the current density distribution and ultimately in the input energy distribution to the weldment. The result is observed as a variation in weld penetration. Recently published experiments and analyses of welding arcs are also evaluated and shown to contain erroneous data and results. Contrary to previous beliefs, the inclusion of a radiation loss term in the basic energy balance equation is important and cannot be considered as negligible in an argon arc at temperatures as low as 10,000 0 K. The one-dimensional analysis of the welding arc as well as the evaluation of these earlier published reports helps to explain the effects of various gases used for welding, improves our understanding of the physics of the welding arc, and provides a stepping stone for a more elaborate model which can be applied to help optimize welding parameters

  10. Carbonization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennebutte, H G; Goutal, E

    1921-07-04

    Materials such as coal, peat, or schist are subjected to a rising temperature in successive stages in apparatus in which the distillation products are withdrawn at each stage. For example in a three-stage process, the acid products of the first or low-temperature stage are fixed in a suitable reagent, the basic products from a second or higher-temperature stage are absorbed in an acid reagent, hydrocarbons being retained by solvents, while the third are subjected to a pyrogenation process carried out in a closed vessel. Wherein the material is subjected in stages to a rising temperature, the gasified products being withdrawn at each stage, and are prevented as far as possible from mixing with the carbonized products.

  11. Cast Care: Do's and Don'ts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... al. Cast care. In: Instructions for Sports Medicine Patients. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2012. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Jan. 25, 2018. Pfenninger JL, et al. Casts immobilization and upper extremity splinting. In: Pfenninger and Fowler's ...

  12. Experiment and modeling of an atmospheric pressure arc in an applied oscillating magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasik, Max; Roquemore, A. L.; Zweben, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    A set of experiments are carried out to measure and understand the response of a free-burning atmospheric pressure carbon arc to applied transverse dc and ac magnetic fields. The arc is found to deflect parabolically for the dc field and assumes a growing sinusoidal structure for the ac field. A simple analytic two-parameter fluid model of the arc dynamics is derived, in which the arc response is governed by the arc jet originating at the cathode, with the applied JxB force balanced by inertia. Time variation of the applied field allows evaluation of the parameters individually. A fit of the model to the experimental data gives a value for the average jet speed an order of magnitude below Maecker's estimate of the maximum jet speed [H. Maecker, Z. Phys. 141, 198 (1955)]. An example industrial application of the model is considered. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  13. The CAST time projection chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autiero, D; Beltran, B; Carmona, J M; Cebrian, S; Chesi, E; Davenport, M; Delattre, M; Di Lella, L; Formenti, F; Irastorza, I G; Gomez, H; Hasinoff, M; Lakic, B; Luzon, G; Morales, J; Musa, L; Ortiz, A; Placci, A; Rodrigurez, A; Ruz, J; Villar, J A; Zioutas, K

    2007-01-01

    One of the three x-ray detectors of the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) experiment searching for solar axions is a time projection chamber (TPC) with a multi-wire proportional counter (MWPC) as a readout structure. Its design has been optimized to provide high sensitivity to the detection of the low intensity x-ray signal expected in the CAST experiment. A low hardware threshold of 0.8 keV is set to a safe level during normal data taking periods, and the overall efficiency for the detection of photons coming from conversion of solar axions is 62%. Shielding has been installed around the detector, lowering the background level to 4.10 x 10 -5 counts cm -2 s -1 keV -1 between 1 and 10 keV. During phase I of the CAST experiment the TPC has provided robust and stable operation, thus contributing with a competitive result to the overall CAST limit on axion-photon coupling and mass

  14. Casting Freedom, 1860-1862

    Science.gov (United States)

    Social Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Thomas Crawford, an American Sculptor, created the full-size figure of Freedom in clay. Molds were made, from which a full-size positive plaster model was cast in five main sections. This model is on view today in the basement rotunda of the Russell Senate Office Building. Clark Mills was a self-taught American sculptor with experience in casting…

  15. Shadows Cast on the Screen?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sisse Siggaard

    cast on the screen. This understanding is questioned with reference to a semiotic understanding of avatars if seen as triadic relationships of sign processes—that is, as something that stands for something for someone. This understanding is exemplified by the case of Thomas and his businessman avatar...

  16. Inoculation Effects of Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Fraś

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a solidification sequence of graphite eutectic cells of A and D types, as well as globular and cementite eutectics. The morphology of eutectic cells in cast iron, the equations for their growth and the distances between the graphite precipitations in A and D eutectic types were analyzed. It is observed a critical eutectic growth rate at which one type of eutectic transformed into another. A mathematical formula was derived that combined the maximum degree of undercooling, the cooling rate of cast iron, eutectic cell count and the eutectic growth rate. One type of eutectic structure turned smoothly into the other at a particular transition rate, transformation temperature and transformational eutectic cell count. Inoculation of cast iron increased the number of eutectic cells with flake graphite and the graphite nodule count in ductile iron, while reducing the undercooling. An increase in intensity of inoculation caused a smooth transition from a cementite eutectic structure to a mixture of cementite and D type eutectic structure, then to a mixture of D and A types of eutectics up to the presence of only the A type of eutectic structure. Moreover, the mechanism of inoculation of cast iron was studied.

  17. Cure shrinkage in casting resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J. Brock [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-01

    A method is described whereby the shrinkage of a casting resin can be determined. Values for the shrinkage of several resin systems in frequent use by Sandia have been measured. A discussion of possible methods for determining the stresses generated by cure shrinkage and thermal contraction is also included.

  18. Developing technological process of obtaining giality casts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Issagulov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the process of manufacturing castings using sand-resin forms and alloying furnace. Were the optimal technological parameters of manufacturing shell molds for the manufacture of castings of heating equipment. Using the same upon receipt of castings by casting in shell molds furnace alloying and deoxidation of the metal will provide consumers with quality products and have a positive impact on the economy in general engineering.

  19. Reducing the Incidence of Cast-related Skin Complications in Children Treated With Cast Immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Difazio, Rachel L; Harris, Marie; Feldman, Lanna; Mahan, Susan T

    2017-12-01

    Cast immobilization remains the mainstay of pediatric orthopaedic care, yet little is known about the incidence of cast-related skin complications in children treated with cast immobilization. The purposes of this quality improvement project were to: (1) establish a baseline rate of cast-related skin complications in children treated with cast immobilization, (2) identify trends in children who experienced cast-related skin complications, (3) design an intervention aimed at decreasing the rate of cast-related skin complications, and (4) determine the effectiveness of the intervention. A prospective interrupted time-series design was used to determine the incidence of cast-related skin complications overtime and compare the rates of skin complications before and after an intervention designed to decrease the incidence of cast-related heel complications. All consecutive patients who were treated with cast immobilization from September 2012 to September 2014 were included. A cast-related skin complications data collection tool was used to capture all cast-related skin complications. A high rate of heel events was noted in our preliminary analysis and an intervention was designed to decrease the rate of cast-related skin complications, including the addition of padding during casting and respective provider education. The estimated cast-related skin events rate for all patients was 8.9 per 1000 casts applied. The rate for the total preintervention sample was 13.6 per 1000 casts which decreased to 6.6 in the postintervention sample. When examining the heel-only group, the rate was 17.1 per 1000 lower extremity casts applied in the preintervention group and 6.8 in the postintervention group. Incorporating padding to the heel of lower extremity cast was an effective intervention in decreasing the incidence of cast-related skin complications in patients treated with cast immobilization. Level II.

  20. 14 CFR 29.621 - Casting factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Casting factors. 29.621 Section 29.621... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction General § 29.621 Casting factors. (a... approved specifications. Paragraphs (c) and (d) of this section apply to structural castings except...

  1. High quality steel casting for energy technics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, F.; Koefler, G.

    1982-01-01

    The casting of several chromium-molybdenum steels for steam and hydraulic turbines is discussed. Non-destructive testing of the castings is performed demonstrating the safety for use in nuclear technology. The effect of metallurgical parameters on steel casting quality, the heat treatment, and the effect of construction design on costs for fettling and repair weldings are considered. (Auth.)

  2. 14 CFR 25.621 - Casting factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Casting factors. 25.621 Section 25.621... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction General § 25.621 Casting factors. (a... meet approved specifications. Paragraphs (c) and (d) of this section apply to any structural castings...

  3. 14 CFR 27.621 - Casting factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Casting factors. 27.621 Section 27.621... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction General § 27.621 Casting factors. (a) General... approved specifications. Paragraphs (c) and (d) of this section apply to structural castings except...

  4. Pressure distribution in centrifugal dental casting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, J P

    1978-02-01

    Equations are developed for liquid metal pressure in centrifugal dental casting, given the instantaneous rotational velocity, density, and certain dimensions of the casting machine and casting pattern. A "reference parabola" is introduced making the fluid pressure concept more understandable. A specially designed specimen demonstrates experimentally the reference parabola at freezing.

  5. Composite carbon foam electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Steven T.; Pekala, Richard W.; Kaschmitter, James L.

    1997-01-01

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivty and power to system energy.

  6. Boron solubility in Fe-Cr-B cast irons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Changqing; Kelly, P.M.

    2003-01-01

    Boron solubility in the as-cast and solution treated martensite of Fe-Cr-B cast irons, containing approximately 1.35 wt.% of boron, 12 wt.% of chromium, as well as other alloying elements, has been investigated using conventional microanalysis. The significant microstructural variations after tempering at 750 deg. C for 0.5-4 h, compared with the original as-cast and solution treated microstructures, indicated that the matrix consisted of boron and carbon supersaturated solid solutions. The boron solubility detected by electron microprobe was between 0.185-0.515 wt.% for the as-cast martensite and 0.015-0.0589 wt.% for the solution treated martensite, much higher than the accepted value of 0.005 wt.% in pure iron. These remarkable increases are thought to be associated with some metallic alloying element addition, such as chromium, vanadium and molybdenum, which have atomic diameters larger than iron, and expand the iron lattice to sufficiently allow boron atoms to occupy the interstitial sites in iron lattice

  7. Decontamination of radioactive metal surfaces by plasma arc gouging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osamu, K.; Makoto, K.; Takao, K.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out to develop a new decontamination method that applies plasma arc gouging for removal of a thin surface layer from radioactively contaminated metallic wastes. Plasma arc gouging has been carried out on stainless steel and carbon steel pipes. The torch nozzle and gouging angle have been optimized to increase the decontamination rate. A water film is formed on the pipe surface to reduce both dust concentration in the off-gas and prevent slag particles, which are splashed up by the plasma gas, from adhering to the gouged surface. Using chromium-electroplated carbon steel pipes as samples, a decontamination factor of >10 3 is obtained after gouging to a depth of about0.5 mm in combination with ultrasonic cleaning

  8. Effects of thermomechanical processing on titanium aluminide strip cast by the melt overflow process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaspar, T.A. (Ribbon Technology Corporation, PO Box 30758, Columbus, OH 43230 (United States)); Hackman, L.E. (Ribbon Technology Corporation, PO Box 30758, Columbus, OH 43230 (United States)); Batawi, E. (Sulzer-Innotec, Division 1511, PO Box 65, Winterthur 8404 (Switzerland)); Peters, J.A. (Sulzer-Innotec, Division 1511, PO Box 65, Winterthur 8404 (Switzerland))

    1994-05-01

    The objective of this research project was to investigate the feasibility of producing titanium aluminide foils from direct cast strip using ribbon technology''s plasma melt overflow process. Niobium-modified Ti[sub 3]Al alloys were melted in a cold copper crucible using a transferred plasma arc and then direct cast into strip on a rotating chill roll.Samples cut from the as-cast Ti[sub 3]Al-Nb ([alpha][sub 2]) titanium aluminide strip were encapsulated into a pack. The packs were heated to the rolling temperature and then hot rolled at low strain rates. Foils 70 [mu]m (0.003 in) thick, having a uniform [alpha][sub 2]-B2 microstructure with oxygen contents as low as 900 wt.ppm were obtained after pack rolling. The strips and foils were characterized in terms of microstructure and chemical composition in the as-received, heat-treated and pack-rolled conditions.The results indicated that it was technically feasible to produce foils from direct cast titanium aluminide strip using pack-rolling technology. The advantage of this technology lies in its cost-effectiveness, since the relatively low cost direct-cast titanium aluminide strip was thermomechanically processed into foil with the desired microstructure without any intermediate processing steps. ((orig.))

  9. Estimation of fracture toughness of cast stainless steels in LWR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.

    1990-01-01

    A program is being conducted to investigate the low-temperature embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels under light water reactor (LWR) operating conditions and to evaluate possible remedies for the embrittlement problem in existing and future plants. The scope of the investigation includes the following goals: develop a methodology and correlations for predicting the toughness loss suffered by cast stainless steel components during normal and extended life of LWRs, validate the simulation of in-reactor degradation by accelerated aging, and establish the effects of key compositional and metallurgical variables on the kinetics and extent of embrittlement. Microstructural and mechanical property data are being obtained on 25 experimental heats (static-cast keel blocks and slabs) and 6 commercial heats (centrifugally cast pipes and a static-cast pump impeller and pump casing ring), as well as on reactor-aged material of CF-3, CF-8, and CF-8M grades of cast stainless steel. The ferrite content of the cast materials ranges from 3 to 30%. Charpy-impact, tensile, and J-R curve tests have been conducted on several experimental and commercial heats of cast stainless steel that were aged up to 30,000 h at temperatures of 290 to 400 degrees C. The results indicate that thermal aging at these temperatures increases the tensile strength and decreases the impact energy and fracture toughness of the steels. In general, the low-carbon CF-3 steels are the most resistant to embrittlement, and the molybdenum-containing high-carbon CF-8M steels are the least resistant. Ferrite morphology has a strong effect on the degree or extent of embrittlement, and the kinetics of embrittlement can vary significantly with small changes in the constituent elements of the cast material

  10. Temperature, salinity, and other profile data collected from CTD and bottle casts from the CLIVAR and Carbon Hydrographic Data Office (CCHDO) from 1972-07-24 to present (NODC Accession 0038589)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0038589 contains all the data the CLIVAR and Carbon Hydrographic Data Office (CCHDO) assembled and processed through 2017-07-05. This Accession...

  11. Geological constraints on continental arc activity since 720 Ma: implications for the link between long-term climate variability and episodicity of continental arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, W.; Lee, C. T.

    2016-12-01

    Continental arc volcanoes have been suggested to release more CO2 than island arc volcanoes due to decarbonation of wallrock carbonates in the continental upper plate through which the magmas traverse (Lee et al., 2013). Continental arcs may thus play an important role in long-term climate. To test this hypothesis, we compiled geological maps to reconstruct the surface distribution of granitoid plutons and the lengths of ancient continental arcs. These results were then compiled into a GIS framework and incorporated into GPlates plate reconstructions. Our results show an episodic nature of global continental arc activity since 720 Ma. The lengths of continental arcs were at minimums during most of the Cryogenian ( 720-670 Ma), the middle Paleozoic ( 460-300 Ma) and the Cenozoic ( 50-0 Ma). Arc lengths were highest during the Ediacaran ( 640-570 Ma), the early Paleozoic ( 550-430 Ma) and the entire Mesozoic with peaks in the Early Triassic ( 250-240 Ma), Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous ( 160-130 Ma), and Late Cretaceous ( 90-65 Ma). The extensive continental arcs in the Ediacaran and early Paleozoic reflect the Pan-African events and circum-Gondwana subduction during the assembly of the Gondwana supercontinent. The Early Triassic peak is coincident with the final closure of the paleo-Asian oceans and the onset of circum-Pacific subduction associated with the assembly of the Pangea supercontinent. The Jurassic-Cretaceous peaks reflect the extensive continental arcs established in the western Pacific, North and South American Cordillera, coincident with the initial dispersal of the Pangea. Continental arcs are favored during the final assembly and the early-stage dispersal of a supercontinent. Our compilation shows a temporal match between continental arc activity and long-term climate at least since 720 Ma. For example, continental arc activity was reduced during the Cryogenian icehouse event, and enhanced during the Early Paleozoic and Jurassic-Cretaceous greenhouse

  12. Physically based arc-circuit interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong-Lie, L.

    1984-01-01

    An integral arc model is extended to study the interaction of the gas blast arc with the test circuit in this paper. The deformation in the waveshapes of arc current and voltage around the current zero has been formulated to first approximation by using a simple model of arc voltage based on the arc core energy conservation. By supplementing with the time scale for the radiation, the time rates of arc processes were amended. Both the contributions of various arc processes and the influence of circuit parameters to the arc-circuit interaction have been estimated by this theory. Analysis generated a new method of calculating test circuit parameters which improves the accurate simulation of arc-circuit interaction. The new method agrees with the published experimental results

  13. Sputtering and emission intensity of cast irons with different metallurgical structures in a Grimm glow lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, M.; Kashima, J.; Naganuma, K.

    1981-01-01

    The cathodic sputtering and emission intensities for the white, gray and malleable cast irons in the Grimm glow lamp are discussed. The intensities of the Fe 247.98-nm line for the samples of the three types depend linearly on the electrical power but the slopes of the plots differ. The intensity of the carbon line at 247.86 nm for malleable cast iron is weaker than those for the others. Sputtering is influenced by the form of the graphite, which can lead to distortion of the electrical field. Graphite on malleable cast iron is sputtered not only as atomic carbon but also as moieties containing several carbon atoms. The higher the supplied voltage, the shorter the time for the intensities of the Fe I and C I lines to reach constant values. (Auth.)

  14. Synthesis method for ultrananocrystalline diamond in powder employing a coaxial arc plasma gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naragino, Hiroshi; Tominaga, Aki; Hanada, Kenji; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2015-07-01

    A new method that enables us to synthesize ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) in powder is proposed. Highly energetic carbon species ejected from a graphite cathode of a coaxial arc plasma gun were provided on a quartz plate at a high density by repeated arc discharge in a compact vacuum chamber, and resultant films automatically peeled from the plate were aggregated and powdered. The grain size was easily controlled from 2.4 to 15.0 nm by changing the arc discharge energy. It was experimentally demonstrated that the proposed method is a new and promising method that enables us to synthesize UNCD in powder easily and controllably.

  15. Synthesis method for ultrananocrystalline diamond in powder employing a coaxial arc plasma gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naragino, Hiroshi; Tominaga, Aki; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi; Hanada, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    A new method that enables us to synthesize ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) in powder is proposed. Highly energetic carbon species ejected from a graphite cathode of a coaxial arc plasma gun were provided on a quartz plate at a high density by repeated arc discharge in a compact vacuum chamber, and resultant films automatically peeled from the plate were aggregated and powdered. The grain size was easily controlled from 2.4 to 15.0 nm by changing the arc discharge energy. It was experimentally demonstrated that the proposed method is a new and promising method that enables us to synthesize UNCD in powder easily and controllably. (author)

  16. A new method for decontamination of radioactive waste using low-pressure arc discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Kazutoshi; Furukawa, Shizue; Adachi, Kazuo; Amakawa, Tadashi; Kanbe, Hiromi

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the decontamination features of the low-pressure arc-discharge method for radioactive waste generated in the operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants were examined. The low-pressure arc-discharge method was applied to type 304 stainless-steel, type 316L stainless-steel, alloy 600 and carbon-steel covered with radioactive corrosion products. Approximately, 80% of the radioactivity build up on stainless-steels could be removed by the low-pressure arc discharge

  17. Automatic production of fullerenes by a JxB arc jet discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mieno, Tetsu

    1995-01-01

    Effective production of many kinds of fullerenes including higher fullerenes and endohedral metallo-fullerenes are necessary to advance fullerene science and technology. Currently, the DC arc discharge method is the most effective method to produce fullerenes. However, carbon atoms evaporated from the anode tend to deposit on the cathode, which grow towards the anode, and obstruct the control of the arc discharge. Furthermore, deposited carbon should be removed to maintain continuous fullerene production. Here, to reduce the deposition of carbon on the cathode, a new discharge method is introduced and the experiment performed. When steady magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the DC current of the arc, ions and electrons are accelerated by JxB force as a plasma jet in the vertical direction. This plasma flow also accelerates helium convection due to the viscosity effect. Therefore, the carbon atoms and carbon neutrals are both blown up by the arc jet before arriving at the cathode. The arc flame in the experiment is actually observed to extend upwards, which dearly indicates the effect of the JxB force

  18. Determining casting defects in near-net shape casting aluminum parts by computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiehua; Oberdorfer, Bernd; Habe, Daniel; Schumacher, Peter

    2018-03-01

    Three types of near-net shape casting aluminum parts were investigated by computed tomography to determine casting defects and evaluate quality. The first, second, and third parts were produced by low-pressure die casting (Al-12Si-0.8Cu-0.5Fe-0.9Mg-0.7Ni-0.2Zn alloy), die casting (A356, Al-7Si-0.3Mg), and semi-solid casting (A356, Al-7Si-0.3Mg), respectively. Unlike die casting (second part), low-pressure die casting (first part) significantly reduced the formation of casting defects (i.e., porosity) due to its smooth filling and solidification under pressure. No significant casting defect was observed in the third part, and this absence of defects indicates that semi-solid casting could produce high-quality near-net shape casting aluminum parts. Moreover, casting defects were mostly distributed along the eutectic grain boundaries. This finding reveals that refinement of eutectic grains is necessary to optimize the distribution of casting defects and reduce their size. This investigation demonstrated that computed tomography is an efficient method to determine casting defects in near-net shape casting aluminum parts.

  19. Arcing phenomena in fusion devices workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausing, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    The workshop on arcing phenomena in fusion devices was organized (1) to review the pesent status of our understanding of arcing as it relates to confinement devices, (2) to determine what informaion is needed to suppress arcing and (3) to define both laboratory and in-situ experiments which can ultimately lead to reduction of impurities in the plasma caused by arcing. The workshop was attended by experts in the area of vacuum arc electrode phenomena and ion source technology, materials scientists, and both theoreticians and experimentalists engaged in assessing the importance of unipolar arcing in today's tokamaks. Abstracts for papers presented at the workshop are included

  20. Equilibrium motion of quict auroral arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyatskij, V.B.; Leont'ev, S.V.

    1981-01-01

    Ionospheric plasma convection across auroral arc is investigated. It is shown that the existence of plasma area of increased concentration adjoining arc results not only from the arc but also is a factor supporting its existence. Under stable conditions the arc and plasma zone connected to it will move at a velocity different from a velocity of plasma convection. Arc velocity will be higher or lower as compared with convection velocity depending on arc orientation relative to an external electric field. At that the plasma zone is located either in front of or behind aurora polaris [ru

  1. The effects of casting speed on steel continuous casting process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadat, Mohammad; Honarvar Gheysari, Ali; Sadat, Saeid [Islamic Azad University, Department of Mechanics, Mashhad Branch, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    A three dimensional simulation of molten steel flow, heat transfer and solidification in mold and ''secondary cooling zone'' of Continuous Casting machine was performed with consideration of standard k-{epsilon} model. For this purpose, computational fluid dynamics software, FLUENT was utilized. From the simulation standpoint, the main distinction between this work and preceding ones is that, the phase change process (solidification) and flow (turbulent in mold section and laminar in secondary cooling zone) have been coupled and solved jointly instead of dividing it into ''transient heat conduction'' and ''steady fluid flow'' that can lead to more realistic simulation. Determining the appropriate boundary conditions in secondary cooling zone is very complicated because of various forms of heat transfer involved, including natural and forced convection and simultaneous radiation heat transfer. The main objective of this work is to have better understanding of heat transfer and solidification in the continuous casting process. Also, effects of casting speed on heat flux and shell thickness and role of radiation in total heat transfer is discussed. (orig.)

  2. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction (E-SMARRT): Precision Casting of Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Von L. Richards

    2011-09-30

    This project addresses improvements in metal casting processes by reducing scrap and reducing the cost of production, due to scrap reduction from investment casting and yield improvement offered by lost foam casting as compared to no-bake or green sand molding. The objectives for the investment casting portion of the subtask are to improve knowledge of fracture toughness of mold shells and the sources of strength limiting flaws and to understand the effects of wax reclamation procedures on wax properties. Applying 'clean steel' approaches to pouring technology and cleanliness in investment casting of steel are anticipated to improve incoming materials inspection procedures as they affect the microstructure and toughness of the shell. This project focused on two areas of study in the production of steel castings to reduce scrap and save energy: (1) Reducing the amount of shell cracking in investment cast steel production; (2) Investigate the potential of lost foam steel casting The basic findings regarding investment casting shell cracking were: (1) In the case of post pouring cracking, this could be related to phase changes in silica upon cooling and could be delayed by pouring arrangement strategies that maintained the shell surface at temperature for longer time. Employing this delay resulted in less adherent oxidation of castings since the casting was cooler at the time o fair exposure. (2) A model for heat transfer through water saturated shell materials under steam pressure was developed. (3) Initial modeling result of autoclave de-waxing indicated the higher pressure and temperature in the autoclave would impose a steeper temperature gradient on the wax pattern, causing some melt flow prior to bulk expansion and decreasing the stress on the green shell. Basic findings regarding lost foam casting of steel at atmospheric pressure: (1) EPS foam generally decomposes by the collapse mode in steel casting. (2) There is an accumulation of carbon pick-up at

  3. Influence of the chemical composition on steel casting performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roney Eduardo Lino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving the quality of steel and the steelmaking process has been a matter of routine for metallurgical engineers and steelmaking companies in a demanding market for quality products at highly competitive price. The chemical and temperature adjustment are made during the secondary refining process, as well as the inclusion modification required to product quality, and also the demand for castability accuracy. Continuous casting process is the most used solidification casting process, in which the flow of pouring liquid metal through the submerged entry nozzle is assured by the correct temperature and the formation of liquid inclusion in the casting temperature. Thermocalc and CEQCSI were the software used in this work to assess the effect of carbon, silicon and sulphur in the castability window of the aluminium vs calcium phase diagrams. They have proved to be highly suitable and effective and the results showed that the chemical elements used directly affected the position of the castability window of carbon steel. An analysis of a 0.2%C billet sample using Scanning Electron Microscopy showed that there is a great heterogeneity of inclusions in aluminium-killed and calcium-treated steel.

  4. Principles of arc flash protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirschmann, R. B.

    2003-04-01

    Recent developments in NFPA 70E, the electrical safety standards in the United States and Canada, designed to provide for a safe industrial work environment, are discussed. The emphasis in this instance is on arc explosions. Development of an arc flash protective program is discussed under various major components of an electrical safety program. These are: appropriate qualifications and training for workers, safe work practices, appropriate hazard assessment practices for any task exceeding 50V where there is the potential of an arc flash accident, flash protection equipment commensurate with the hazard associated with the task to be performed, layering in protective clothing over all body surfaces, and strict adherence to rules regarding use of safety garments and equipment.

  5. Magnetically enhanced vacuum arc thruster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keidar, Michael; Schein, Jochen; Wilson, Kristi; Gerhan, Andrew; Au, Michael; Tang, Benjamin; Idzkowski, Luke; Krishnan, Mahadevan; Beilis, Isak I

    2005-01-01

    A hydrodynamic model of the vacuum arc thruster and its plume is described. Primarily an effect of the magnetic field on the plume expansion and plasma generation is considered. Two particular examples are investigated, namely the magnetically enhanced co-axial vacuum arc thruster (MVAT) and the vacuum arc thruster with ring electrodes (RVAT). It is found that the magnetic field significantly decreases the plasma plume radial expansion under typical conditions. Predicted plasma density profiles in the plume of the MVAT are compared with experimental profiles, and generally a good agreement is found. In the case of the RVAT the influence of the magnetic field leads to plasma jet deceleration, which explains the non-monotonic dependence of the ion current density, on an axial magnetic field observed experimentally

  6. Magnetically enhanced vacuum arc thruster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keidar, Michael [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109 MI (United States); Schein, Jochen [Alameda Applied Science Corporation, San Leandro, CA 94577 (United States); Wilson, Kristi [Alameda Applied Science Corporation, San Leandro, CA 94577 (United States); Gerhan, Andrew [Alameda Applied Science Corporation, San Leandro, CA 94577 (United States); Au, Michael [Alameda Applied Science Corporation, San Leandro, CA 94577 (United States); Tang, Benjamin [Alameda Applied Science Corporation, San Leandro, CA 94577 (United States); Idzkowski, Luke [Alameda Applied Science Corporation, San Leandro, CA 94577 (United States); Krishnan, Mahadevan [Alameda Applied Science Corporation, San Leandro, CA 94577 (United States); Beilis, Isak I [Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2005-11-01

    A hydrodynamic model of the vacuum arc thruster and its plume is described. Primarily an effect of the magnetic field on the plume expansion and plasma generation is considered. Two particular examples are investigated, namely the magnetically enhanced co-axial vacuum arc thruster (MVAT) and the vacuum arc thruster with ring electrodes (RVAT). It is found that the magnetic field significantly decreases the plasma plume radial expansion under typical conditions. Predicted plasma density profiles in the plume of the MVAT are compared with experimental profiles, and generally a good agreement is found. In the case of the RVAT the influence of the magnetic field leads to plasma jet deceleration, which explains the non-monotonic dependence of the ion current density, on an axial magnetic field observed experimentally.

  7. Unzipping of the volcano arc, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, R.J.; Smoot, N.C.; Rubin, M.

    1984-01-01

    A working hypothesis for the recent evolution of the southern Volcano Arc, Japan, is presented which calls upon a northward-progressing sundering of the arc in response to a northward-propagating back-arc basin extensional regime. This model appears to explain several localized and recent changes in the tectonic and magrnatic evolution of the Volcano Arc. Most important among these changes is the unusual composition of Iwo Jima volcanic rocks. This contrasts with normal arc tholeiites typical of the rest of the Izu-Volcano-Mariana and other primitive arcs in having alkaline tendencies, high concentrations of light REE and other incompatible elements, and relatively high silica contents. In spite of such fractionated characteristics, these lavas appear to be very early manifestations of a new volcanic and tectonic cycle in the southern Volcano Arc. These alkaline characteristics and indications of strong regional uplift are consistent with the recent development of an early stage of inter-arc basin rifting in the southern Volcano Arc. New bathymetric data are presented in support of this model which indicate: 1. (1) structural elements of the Mariana Trough extend north to the southern Volcano Arc. 2. (2) both the Mariana Trough and frontal arc shoal rapidly northwards as the Volcano Arc is approached. 3. (3) rugged bathymetry associated with the rifted Mariana Trough is replaced just south of Iwo Jima by the development of a huge dome (50-75 km diameter) centered around Iwo Jima. Such uplifted domes are the immediate precursors of rifts in other environments, and it appears that a similar situation may now exist in the southern Volcano Arc. The present distribution of unrifted Volcano Arc to the north and rifted Mariana Arc to the south is interpreted not as a stable tectonic configuration but as representing a tectonic "snapshot" of an arc in the process of being rifted to form a back-arc basin. ?? 1984.

  8. Search for chameleons with CAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Anastassopoulos

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present a search for (solar chameleons with the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST. This novel experimental technique, in the field of dark energy research, exploits both the chameleon coupling to matter (βm and to photons (βγ via the Primakoff effect. By reducing the X-ray detection energy threshold used for axions from 1 keV to 400 eV CAST became sensitive to the converted solar chameleon spectrum which peaks around 600 eV. Even though we have not observed any excess above background, we can provide a 95% C.L. limit for the coupling strength of chameleons to photons of βγ≲1011 for 1<βm<106.

  9. Search for chameleons with CAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anastassopoulos, V.; Arik, M.; Aune, S.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present a search for (solar) chameleons with the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST). This novel experimental technique, in the field of dark energy research, exploits both the chameleon coupling to matter (βm) and to photons (βΥ) via the Primako eect. By reducing the X-ray detection...... energy threshold used for axions from 1 keV to 400 eV CAST became sensitive to the converted solar chameleon spectrum which peaks around 600 eV. Even though we have not observed any excess above background, we can provide a 95% C.L. limit for the coupling strength of chameleons to photons of βΥ≤1011...

  10. Search for chameleons with CAST

    CERN Document Server

    Anastassopoulos, V; Aune, S; Barth, K; Belov, A; Bräuninger, H; Cantatore, G; Carmona, J M; Cetin, S A; Christensen, F; Collar, J I; Dafni, T; Davenport, M; Desch, K; Dermenev, A; Eleftheriadis, C; Fanourakis, G; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Friedrich, P; Galán, J; García, J A; Gardikiotis, A; Garza, J G; Gazis, E N; Geralis, T; Giomataris, I; Hailey, C; Haug, F; Hasinoff, M D; Hofmann, D H H; Iguaz, F J; Irastorza, I G; Jacoby, J; Jakobsen, A; Jakovčić, K; Kaminski, J; Karuza, M; Kavuk, M; Krčmar, M; Krieger, C; Krüger, A; Lakić, B; Laurent, J M; Liolios, A; Ljubičić, A; Luzón, G; Neff, S; Ortega, I; Papaevangelou, T; Pivovarov, M J; Raffelt, G; Riege, H; Rosu, M; Ruz, J; Savvidis, I; Solanki, S K; Vafeiadis, T; Villar, J A; Vogel, J K; Yildiz, S C; Zioutas, K; Brax, P; Lavrentyev, I; Upadhye, A

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present a search for (solar) chameleons with the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST). This novel experimental technique, in the field of dark energy research, exploits both the chameleon coupling to matter ($\\beta_{\\rm m}$) and to photons ($\\beta_{\\gamma}$) via the Primakoff effect. By reducing the X-ray detection energy threshold used for axions from 1$\\,$keV to 400$\\,$eV CAST became sensitive to the converted solar chameleon spectrum which peaks around 600$\\,$eV. Even though we have not observed any excess above background, we can provide a 95% C.L. limit for the coupling strength of chameleons to photons of $\\beta_{\\gamma}\\!\\lesssim\\!10^{11}$ for $1<\\beta_{\\rm m}<10^6$.

  11. Isotopic composition of carbon in dacitic gases from Usu volcano (Japan). Relationship between the 13C/12C ratio of volatiles and the 87Sr/86Sr ratio of silicates in arc volcanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allard, Patrick

    1981-01-01

    CO 2 emitted at 568 deg C by the new dacitic intrusion in Usu volcano (Japan) has a 13 C/ 12 C ratio of -4.4 per mill vs PDB. Such a value, together with previous isotopic data from other volcanoes in Japan, Indonesia, Central America, Lesser Antilles and New Zealand, enhance that the carbon released by magmas in subduction zones is systematically 13 C-enriched with respect to the primary carbon from rift areas. Such a 13 C enrichment in volatiles is explained in terms of crustal contamination by sedimentary carbon, and can be sowewhat related to a simultaneous increase of 87 Sr in the magma [fr

  12. Methods of improvement in hardness of composite surface layer on cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a method of usable properties of surface layers improvement of cast carbon steel 200–450, by put directly in founding process a composite surface layer on the basis of Fe-Cr-C alloy and next its remelting with use of welding technology TIG – Tungsten Inert Gas. Technology of composite surface layer guarantee mainly increase in hardness and abrasive wear resistance of cast steel castings on machine elements. This technology can be competition for generally applied welding technology (surfacing by welding and thermal spraying. However the results of studies show, that is possible to connection of both methods founding and welding of surface hardening of cast steel castings. In range of experimental plan was made test castings with composite surface layer, which next were remelted with energy 0,8 and 1,6 kJ/cm. Usability for industrial applications of test castings was estimated by criterion of hardness and abrasive wear resistance of type metal-mineral.

  13. Modeling of solidification of MMC composites during gravity casting process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Zagórski

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with computer simulation of gravity casting of the metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramics (MMC into sand mold. The subject of our interest is aluminum matrix composite (AlMMC reinforced with ceramic particles i.e. silicon carbide SiC and glass carbon Cg. The created model describes the process taking into account solidification and its influence on the distribution of reinforcement particles. The computer calculation has been carried out in 2D system with the use of Navier-Stokes equations using ANSYS FLUENT 13. The Volume of Fluid approach (VOF and enthalpy method have been used to model the air-fluid free surface (and also volume fraction of particular continuous phases and the solidification of the cast, respectively.

  14. Architectural Surfaces and Structures from Circular Arcs

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Ling

    2013-01-01

    the most attention from geometry researchers. In this thesis, we aim to realize this process with simple geometric primitives, circular arcs. We investigate architectural surfaces and structures consisting of circular arcs. Our focus is lying on how

  15. Cast thermally stable high temperature nickel-base alloys and casting made therefrom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acuncius, D.A.; Herchenroeder, R.B.; Kirchner, R.W.; Silence, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    A cast thermally stable high temperature nickel-base alloy characterized by superior oxidation resistance, sustainable hot strength and retention of ductility on aging is provided by maintaining the alloy chemistry within the composition molybdenum 13.7% to 15.5%; chromium 14.7% to 16.5%; carbon up to 0.1%, lanthanum in an effective amount to provide oxidation resistance up to 0.08%; boron up to 0.015%; manganese 0.3% to 1.0%; silicon 0.2% to 0.8%; cobalt up to 2.0%; iron up to 3.0%; tungsten up to 1.0%; copper up to 0.4%; phosphorous up to 0.02%; sulfur up to 0.015%; aluminum 0.1% to 0.5% and the balance nickel while maintaining the Nv number less than 2.31

  16. A novel approach for the fabrication of carbon nanofibre/ceramic porous structures

    KAUST Repository

    Walter, Claudia; Barg, Suelen; Ni, Na; Maher, Robert C.; Garcίa-Tuñ ó n, Esther; Zaiviji Ismail, Muhammad Muzzafar; Babot, Flora; Saiz, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the fabrication of hybrid ceramic/carbon scaffolds in which carbon nanofibres and multi-walled carbon nanotubes fully cover the internal walls of a microporous ceramic structure that provides mechanical stability. Freeze casting

  17. A rotating arc plasma invertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reusch, M.F.; Jayaram, K.

    1987-02-01

    A device is described for the inversion of direct current to alternating current. The main feature is the use of a rotating plasma arc in crossed electric and magnetic fields as a switch. This device may provide an economic alternative to other inversion methods in some circumstances

  18. Study of gliding arc discharge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Chi; Lin Lie; Wu Bin

    2006-01-01

    The electric parameters change during discharge is studied and the relationship between non-equilibrium degree and parameters is discussed for gliding arc discharges. Using two-channel model, the rules of arc moving due to effect of the airflow is simulated. The numerical simulation results can help analyzing the generation mechanism of gliding arc non-equilibrium plasma. (authors)

  19. Rapid arc - clinical rationale and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozzi, Lucca

    2008-01-01

    The presentation will focus on the background of Intensity modulation volumetric arc therapy Rapid Arc from Varian Medical Systems aiming to highlight the technical and clinical rational also from an historical perspective to the founding pillars of fast delivery with a minimum number of arcs and a minimum number of monitor units

  20. STRUVE arc and EUPOS® stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasmane, Ieva; Kaminskis, Janis; Balodis, Janis; Haritonova, Diana

    2013-04-01

    The Struve Geodetic Arc was developed in Years 1816 to 1855, 200 years ago. Historic information on the points of the Struve Geodetic Arc are included in the UNESCO World Heritage list in 2005. Nevertheless, the sites of many points are still not identified nor included in the data bases nowadays. Originally STRUVE arc consisted of 258 main triangles with 265 triangulation points. Currently 34 of the original station points are identified and included in the in the UNESCO World Heritage list. identified original measurement points of the Meridian Arc are located in Sweden (7 points), Norway (15), Finland (83), Russia (1), Estonia (22), Latvia (16), Lithuania (18), Belorussia (28), Ukraine (59) and Moldova (27). In Year 2002 was initiated another large coverage project - European Position Determination System "EUPOS®". Currently there are about 400 continuously operating GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite Systems) stations covering EU countries Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Bulgaria, Romania and East European countries Ukraine and Moldavia. EUPOS® network is a ground based GNSS augmentation system widely used for geodesy, land surveying, geophysics and navigation. It gives the opportunity for fast and accurate position determination never available before. It is an honorable task to use the EUPOS® system for research of the Struve triangulation former sites. Projects with Struve arc can popularize geodesy, geo-information and its meaning in nowadays GIS and GNSS systems. Struve Arc and its points is unique cooperation cross-border object which deserve special attention because of their natural beauty and historical value for mankind. GNSS in geodesy discovers a powerful tool for the verification and validation of the height values of geodetic leveling benchmarks established historically almost 200 years ago. The differential GNSS and RTK methods appear very useful to identify vertical displacement of landscape by means of

  1. A new method for making long-lived carbon stripper foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugai, Isao; Ishii, Sabro; Hattori, Toshiyuki; Muto, Hideshi; Takahashi, Yohsuke; Kato, Hajime; Yamazaki, Kuniaki.

    1989-01-01

    We have developed a new method for preparation of long-lived carbon stripper foils, based on the modification of our 'controlled DC arc-discharge method'. The carbon foils consist of multi-layers, and carbon particles in each layer are emitted from the electrode in AC arc-discharge or from the cathode electrode in DC arc-discharge. The lifetimes of the carbon foils made by the new method are equal to or longer than those prepared by the controlled DC arc-discharge method. The new method is simple and powerful to make long-lived carbon stripper foils with higher reliability and reproducibility than the previous method. (author)

  2. Marginal Accuracy of Castings Fabricated with Ringless Casting Investment System and Metal Ring Casting Investment System: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalavathi, M; Sachin, Bhuvana; Prasanna, B G; Shreeharsha, T V; Praveen, B; Ragher, Mallikarjuna

    2016-02-01

    The thermal expansion of the investment can be restricted by the metal casting ring because the thermal expansion of the ring is less than that of the investment. The ringless casting procedure is in use in clinical dentistry, though there is little scientific data to support its use in fixed partial dentures. In this study, marginal discrepancy of castings produced with the ringless casting technique and the conventional technique using the metal rings were compared. A total of 30 wax patterns were fabricated directly on a metal die. Optical stereomicroscope was used to measure the marginal discrepancy between the metal die and wax patterns. A total of 15 castings were invested using Bellavest T phosphate-bonded investment with the ringless technique and 15 were invested with the same investment with a metal ring; 30 castings were produced using a nickel-chromium ceramo-metal alloy. The internal surface of the castings was not modified and seated with finger pressure. The vertical marginal discrepancy was measured using an optical stereomicroscope at a magnification of 100x. The data obtained were statistically analyzed using students t-test (paired t-test and unpaired t-test). The castings of the ringless technique provided less vertical marginal discrepancy (240.56 ± 45.81 μ) than the castings produced with the conventional metal ring technique (281.98± 53.05 μ). The difference was statistically significant. The ringless casting technique had produced better marginal accuracy compared with conventional casting technique. Ringless casting system can be used routinely for clinical purpose.

  3. Influence of arc current and pressure on non-chemical equilibrium air arc behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, WU; Yufei, CUI; Jiawei, DUAN; Hao, SUN; Chunlin, WANG; Chunping, NIU

    2018-01-01

    The influence of arc current and pressure on the non-chemical equilibrium (non-CE) air arc behavior of a nozzle structure was investigated based on the self-consistent non-chemical equilibrium model. The arc behavior during both the arc burning and arc decay phases were discussed at different currents and different pressures. We also devised the concept of a non-equilibrium parameter for a better understanding of non-CE effects. During the arc burning phase, the increasing current leads to a decrease of the non-equilibrium parameter of the particles in the arc core, while the increasing pressure leads to an increase of the non-equilibrium parameter of the particles in the arc core. During the arc decay phase, the non-CE effect will decrease by increasing the arc burning current and the nozzle pressure. Three factors together—convection, diffusion and chemical reactions—influence non-CE behavior.

  4. High-Temperature Creep Behaviour and Positive Effect on Straightening Deformation of Q345c Continuous Casting Slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Long; Zhang, Xingzhong

    2018-03-01

    Mechanical and creep properties of Q345c continuous casting slab subjected to uniaxial tensile tests at high temperature were considered in this paper. The minimum creep strain rate and creep rupture life equations whose parameters are calculated by inverse-estimation using the regression analysis were derived based on experimental data. The minimum creep strain rate under constant stress increases with the increase of the temperature from 1000 °C to 1200 °C. A new casting machine curve with the aim of fully using high-temperature creep behaviour is proposed in this paper. The basic arc segment is cancelled in the new curve so that length of the straightening area can be extended and time of creep behaviour can be increased significantly. For the new casting machine curve, the maximum straightening strain rate at the slab surface is less than the minimum creep strain rate. So slab straightening deformation based on the steel creep behaviour at high temperature can be carried out in the process of Q345c steel continuous casting. The effect of creep property at high temperature on slab straightening deformation is positive. It is helpful for the design of new casting machine and improvement of old casting machine.

  5. THE INFLUENCE OF PRE-HEAT TREATMENT ON WHITE CAST IRONS PLASTICITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Myronova

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The development of heat treatment modes of white cast irons for structure changes in their eutectic constituent, namely in disturbing the monolithic structure of ledeburite colonies cementite structure and eutectic net continuity. Also the mentioned heat treatment modes are targeted to the eutectic net shift for the most suitable position from the point of plastic deforming. Methodology. The hypoeutectic white cast irons with 2.92…3.35 % carbon content and additionally alloyed by 3.18 % vanadium have been used as the research materials. The mentioned alloys have been pre-heat treated and hot twist tested. Findings. The research results showed that the carbide net breaking by plastic deforming leads to cast irons mechanical properties increasing but has difficulties in implementation due to the white cast irons low plasticity. The influence of different pre-heat treatment modes on structure and plasticity of white hypoeutectic cast irons have been investigated. They include the isotherm soaking under the different temperatures as well as multiply soakings and thermo-cycling. The influence of eutectic level, as well as pre heat treatment modes on different composition white cast irons hot plasticity have been investigated. Originality. It was determined that the heat treatment, which leads to double α→γ recrystallization under 860 – 950 °С and reperlitization under 720-680 °С results in significant increase of plasticity, as well as in un-alloyed and alloyed by vanadium white cast irons. It takes place due to carbide matrix phase separation in ledeburite colonies by new phase boundaries forming especially due to carbide transformations under vanadium alloying. Practical value. The implementation of pre-heat treatment with phase recrystallization resulted in hypoeutectic white cast irons plasticity increasing. The obtained level of cast iron plasticity corresponds to the one of carbide class steels, which ensures the successful

  6. The evaluation of working casts prepared from digital impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Y C; Park, Y S; Kim, H K; Hong, Y S; Ahn, J S; Ryu, J J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the reproducibility of working casts of a digital impression system by comparing them with the original, virtual, and rapid prototyping casts. A total of 54 cast sets in clinically stable occlusion were used. They were scanned by an iTero intraoral scanner and converted into STL format virtual casts. Rapid prototyping casts and polyurethane casts were fabricated from the iTero milling system based on the virtual casts. Several horizontal and vertical measurements were performed from the four types of casts, that is, original stone casts, virtual casts, rapid prototyping casts, and polyurethane casts of iTero. Measurement error, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and differences among the casts were calculated and compared. Casts from iTero milling machines exhibited greater dimensional differences and lower ICC values than did other casts. In addition, many of the measurements of the iTero working casts showed statistically significant differences in comparison to the three other types of casts. In contrast, there were no statistically significant differences between the virtual and original casts. Virtual casts made by the iTero intraoral scanner exhibited excellent reproducibility. However, the casts from the iTero milling machine showed greater dimensional differences and lower reproducibility compared to other types of casts.

  7. Investigation on carbon nanomaterials: Coaxial CNT-cylinders and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    carbon cylinders of CNT stacks have been formed directly inside the quartz tube. Another study is ... producing CNTs have been devised including electric arc evaporation ... process of coaxial carbon cylinder have already been de- scribed by ...

  8. Delamination wear mechanism in gray cast irons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehi, M.

    2000-01-01

    An investigation of the friction and sliding wear of gray cast iron against chromium plated cast irons was carried out on a newly constructed reciprocating friction and wear tester. The tests were the first to be done on the test rig under dry conditions and at the speed of 170 cm/min, and variable loads of 20-260 N for a duration of 15 min. to 3 hours. The gray cast iron surfaces worn by a process of plastic deformation at the subsurface, crack nucleation, and crack growth leading to formation of plate like debris and therefore the delamination theory applies. No evidence of adhesion was observed. This could be due to formation of oxides on the wear surface which prevent adhesion. channel type chromium plating ''picked'' up cast iron from the counter-body surfaces by mechanically trapping cast iron debris on and within the cracks. The removal of the plated chromium left a pitted surface on the cast iron

  9. Method for casting thin metal objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehrson, Brandon P; Moore, Alan F

    2015-04-14

    Provided herein are various embodiments of systems for casting thin metal plates and sheets. Typical embodiments include layers of mold cavities that are oriented vertically for casting the metal plates. In some embodiments, the mold cavities include a beveled edge such that the plates that are cast have a beveled edge. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled with a molten metal through an open horizontal edge of the cavity. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled through one or more vertical feed orifices. Further disclosed are methods for forming a thin cast metal plate or sheet where the thickness of the cast part is in a range from 0.005 inches to 0.2 inches, and the surface area of the cast part is in a range from 16 square inches to 144 square inches.

  10. Clean Cast Steel Technology, Phase IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles E. Bates

    2003-02-24

    The objective of the Clean Cast Steel Technology Program was to improve casting product quality by removing or minimizing oxide defects and to allow the production of higher integrity castings for high speed machining lines. Previous research has concentrated on macro-inclusions that break, chip, or crack machine tool cutters and drills and cause immediate shutdown of the machining lines. The overall goal of the project is to reduce the amount of surface macro-inclusions and improve the machinability of steel castings. Macro-inclusions and improve the machinability of steel castings. Macro-inclusions have been identified by industrial sponsors as a major barrier to improving the quality and marketability of steel castings.

  11. Phase transformation and hardness of SS 316 L steel cast alloy after heat treatment at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidayat, S.; Prayitno, D. H.

    2000-01-01

    Heat treatment Study of SS 316 L cast alloy at high temperature was conducted. The alloy of SS 316 L was melted by arc melting furnace in argon atmosphere. Heat treatment of SS 316 L casting alloy was carried out in tube furnace at 1400 o C for period of 1/2, 1, and 2 hours. The optical microscopic characterization showed that SS 316 L cast has got dendritic micro structure with ferrite as the primary phase. After the heat treatment, the ferrite phase underwent gradual decrease followed by an increase of the austenite phase. The heat treatment process also resulted in the formation of the new grain boundary. The hardness examination revealed that for longer period of the heat treatment, the hardness of SS 316 L increased. (author)

  12. Applications of a single carbon electrode | Skelskey | SINET ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. A single carbon electrode used with a common arc welder has been successfully used on steel to weld, to surface harden, to spot weld sheet, to pierce holes and to do simple brazing. Key words/phrases: Arc, carbon, dry cell, plasma, welding. SINET: Ethiopian Journal of Science Vol.26(2) 2003: 173-176 ...

  13. Microstructural Study on Oxygen Permeated Arc Beads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Heng Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We simulated short circuit of loaded copper wire at ambient atmosphere and successfully identified various phases of the arc bead. A cuprous oxide flake was formed on the surface of the arc bead in the rapid solidification process, and there were two microstructural constituents, namely, Cu-κ eutectic structure and solutal dendrites. Due to the arc bead formed at atmosphere during the local equilibrium solidification process, the phase of arc bead has segregated to the cuprous oxide flake, Cu-κ eutectic, and Cu phase solutal dendrites, which are the fingerprints of the arc bead permeated by oxygen.

  14. Theory of uniqueness of Indian Caste System

    OpenAIRE

    Ashwin Kumar

    2006-01-01

    Classical studies on pre-modern Indian social structure have suggested apparent differences between the Indian caste system and social stratification as one can discern in other parts of the world. However, one needs to question such dogmatic assertions that such vast differences really existed. An endeavor is made in this research paper to reflect on the nature of caste hierarchy in pre-modern India. The caste system forms the significant basis of pre-modern Indian social structure. Early wr...

  15. New progresses of Chinese art casting

    OpenAIRE

    Tan Derui

    2007-01-01

    The Chinese art casting with 5 000 years history has been rapidly developed in recent ten years. This benefits from the great development of Chinese economy, the large-scale urban construction and transformation, the increasing demands for the cultural work of art, the loose religious environment and the expanding international market. The Art Casting Technical Committee of China Foundry Association has been established for 10 years. Almost 90 art casting enterprises joined in the organizatio...

  16. Aluminide protective coatings on high–temperature creep resistant cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kubicki

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of research on aluminide protective coatings manufactured on high–temperature creep resistant cast steel. The main purpose of these coatings is protection against the high temperature corrosion, especially at high carburizing potential atmosphere. Coatings were obtained on cast steel type G–XNiCrSi36–18 with the following methods: pack cementation, paste method, cast method and slurry cementation. The phase composition, thickness and morphology of coatings were determined. Coatings capacity of carbon diffusion inhibition and thermal shocks resistance of coatings were determined with different methods. It was found, that all of the coatings reduce carbon diffusion in different degree and all coatings liable to degradation in consequence cracking and oxidation. Coating life time is mainly dependent on morphology, phase composition and service condition (thermal shocks first of all.

  17. Application of cast nickel alloys for parts of electronics characterised by special magnetic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. UhI

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Thc thcorctical part of the study highlights thc origin of thc idca 10 start investigations on alloys of high ~nngnctic pcrmcability.manufactured mainly by cornpanics in ~ h Uc S A and Japan.'Phc said materials arc applicd for various pans of ctcctronics uscd by thc military industry. c.g. sntctlitc antcnnas Tor globalcommunication with suhmarincs. and for rcscarch instmrncnts, c,g. fcrromagnctic corcs. Thcy arc chnr:~clcriscd by vcry high lnnpncticpcrrncability. resistivity and corrosion rcsistancc which makc thcm suitablc for opcrat ion undcr cxtrn-~ryingc onditions.Nickel alloys of high magnctic propcrtics arc usuall y manufactured as roZlcd products. The amhition of t hc authors or this srlldy is Inmanufacture !hem as cast prnducts.Thc pmgram of rcscarch incIudcd characteristic of nickcl alloys wirh ddi t i ons of molybdcnum slid iron sn~isryingt hc ahnvc mc~iito ncdrcquircmcnu. with attcn~ionf ocusscd on thcir application for magnctic parts of satcllitc antcnnns and fcrromngnctic corcs.Moulding and casting tcchnologics wcrc proposcd to bcst suit ~ h pcr occss OF maaufacturc of r hcsc clcmcnrs.Thc rangc of chcmicaI cornpostion was sclcctcd 20 cnsurc thc rcquircd magnctic. mcchnnicnl and anti-corrosive pmpcrtics.A scrics of melts was prcparcd and castings of thc abovc mcnlioncd clclncn1s wcrc mndc. Thc chclnicnl composi~ioii of IEIC alloys wasanalyscd along with thc stnlcturc cxarninations nnd quality asscssmcnt rnadc by ~ h cno n-dcsrructi vc rncthods, Casrings wcrc sitbjcctcd tothc finishing trcatmcnt, followed by tests and cxamina~ionsto cnablc thcir practical application.

  18. [The surface roughness analysis of the titanium casting founding by a new titanium casting investment material].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qin-ye; Wu, Xia-yi; Lin, Xue-feng

    2012-04-01

    To investigate the surface roughness property of the titanium castings cast in a new investment for titanium casting. Six wax patterns (20 mm × 20 mm × 0.5 mm) were invested using two investments: three in a new titanium investment material and three in the control material (Rematitan Plus). Six titanium specimens were obtained by conventional casting. After casting, surface roughness of the specimens were evaluated with a surface profilometer. The surface roughness of the specimens cast in new titanium investment material was (1.72 ± 0.08) µm, which was much smaller than that from Rematitan Plus [(1.91 ± 0.15) µm, P cast using these two investment materials are both smooth enough to fulfill the demand of the titanium precision-casting for prosthodontic clinical use.

  19. Spray casting project final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churnetski, S.R.; Thompson, J.E.

    1996-08-01

    Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), along with other participating organizations, has been exploring the feasibility of spray casting depleted uranium (DU) to near-net shape as a waste minimization effort. Although this technology would be useful in a variety of applications where DU was the material of choice, this effort was aimed primarily at gamma-shielding components for use in storage and transportation canisters for high-level radioactive waste, particularly in the Multipurpose Canister (MPC) application. In addition to the waste-minimization benefits, spray casting would simplify the manufacturing process by allowing the shielding components for MPC to be produced as a single component, as opposed to multiple components with many fabrication and assembly steps. In earlier experiments, surrogate materials were used to simulate the properties (specifically reactivity and density) of DU. Based on the positive results from those studies, the project participants decided that further evaluation of the issues and concerns that would accompany spraying DU was warranted. That evaluation occupied substantially all of Fiscal Year 1995, yielding conceptual designs for both an intermediate facility and a production facility and their associated engineering estimates. An intermediate facility was included in this study to allow further technology development in spraying DU. Although spraying DU to near-net shape seems to be feasible, a number of technical, engineering, and safety issues would need to be evaluated before proceeding with a production facility. This report is intended to document the results from the spray-casting project and to provide information needed by anyone interested in proceeding to the next step

  20. Technical aspects of casting and their effect on the quality of Remanium CSe dental alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Klimecka-Tatar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The study concerns on investigation of Remanium CSE alloy, one of the dental alloys used in metal-ceramic connection preparation. The alloys based on Ni-Cr-Mo are widely used in dental engineering because of their high mechanical, tribological properties as well as high corrosion resistance. The tested alloy has been processed in three ways – it has been remelted and then casted using three technologiescommonly used in dental laboratories, i.e. with: oxy-acetylene burner (1, induction furnace (2 and Volts arc (3. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of the melting and casting techniques on the mechanical strength and stereometric surface properties. The results revealed that the quality of Remanium CSe dental alloys significantly depend on the method of the material processing.

  1. New progresses of Chinese art casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Derui

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The Chinese art casting with 5 000 years history has been rapidly developed in recent ten years. This benefits from the great development of Chinese economy, the large-scale urban construction and transformation, the increasing demands for the cultural work of art, the loose religious environment and the expanding international market. The Art Casting Technical Committee of China Foundry Association has been established for 10 years. Almost 90 art casting enterprises joined in the organization, not including nearly thousand enterprises of foreign capital and massive domestic workshop type. It is estimated that the scale and the output of art castings in mainland China have situated the world front row.

  2. Microstructured metal molds fabricated via investment casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, Andrew H; King, William P

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an investment casting process to produce aluminum molds having integrated microstructures. Unlike conventional micromolding tools, the aluminum mold was large and had complex curved surfaces. The aluminum was cast from curved microstructured ceramic molds which were themselves cast from curved microstructured rubber. The aluminum microstructures had an aspect ratio of 1:1 and sizes ranging from 25 to 50 µm. Many structures were successfully cast into the aluminum with excellent replication fidelity, including circular, square and triangular holes. We demonstrate molding of large, curved surfaces having surface microstructures using the aluminum mold.

  3. Technological Aspects of Low-Alloyed Cast Steel Massive Casting Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szajnara J.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper authors have undertaken the attempt of explaining the causes of cracks net occurrence on a massive 3-ton cast steel casting with complex geometry. Material used for casting manufacturing was the low-alloyed cast steel with increased wear resistance modified with vanadium and titanium. The studies included the primary and secondary crystallization analysis with use of TDA and the qualitative and quantitative analysis of non-metallic inclusions.

  4. Accuracy of stereolithography additive casts used in a digital workflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Imam, Hiba; Gram, Mia; Benetti, Ana R

    2018-01-01

    additive (SLA) casts from 2 manufacturers: 9 Dreve SLA casts and 9 Scanbiz SLA casts. All casts were then scanned 9 times with an extraoral scanner to produce the reference data set. Trueness was evaluated by superimposing the data sets obtained by scanning the casts with the reference data set. Precision...

  5. The temperature gradient on section of casting in process of primary crystallization of chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Studnicki

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The methodology of defining in article was introduced the temperature gradient in process of primary crystallization during cooling the casting from chromium cast iron on basis of measurements of thermal field in test DTA-K3. Insert also the preliminary results of investigations of influence temperature gradient on structure of studied wear resistance chromium cast iron.

  6. TECHNOLOGICAL PARAMETERS OF SLUGS CASTING OF GREY CAST IRON BY FROSTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Marukovich

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The relation of geometrical parametres of casting with technological ones is shown. The monogram for definition of basic technological parametres of obtaining of castings by the method of continuously-cyclic iterative casting by freezing-up is presented.

  7. The Tendencies of Piece Casting from Modified Irons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinca Ionel Lupinca

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we have presented the metalographic studies made on the grey cast irons treated with complex modifying substances, type FeSiMgRE (Mg alloy and their influence on the compactness degree of graphite separations. For research and experiments, a melt of grey iron was produced in an induction furnace of a capacity of 5to, starting with a metallic charge made from 100% synthetic pig iron. We realized eight practical charge made modification, by using different combinations of modifying substance and in different concentrations. The addition of carbon to the melt was performed using electrode graphite powder in the metallic charge.

  8. A review of electrohydrodynamic casting energy conversion polymer composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong X. Gan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a brief review on manufacturing polymer composite materials through the nontraditional electrohydrodynamic (EHD casting approach. First, the EHD technology will be introduced. Then, typical functional polymer composite materials including thermoelectric and photoelectric energy conversion polymers and their composites will be presented. Specifically, how to make composite materials containing functional nanoparticles will be discussed. Converting polymeric fibers into partially carbonized fiber composites will also be shown. The latest research results of polymeric composite materials with energy conversion and sensing functions will be given.

  9. Tribological and Wear Performance of Nanocomposite PVD Hard Coatings Deposited on Aluminum Die Casting Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Mario Paiva

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In the aluminum die casting process, erosion, corrosion, soldering, and die sticking have a significant influence on tool life and product quality. A number of coatings such as TiN, CrN, and (Cr,AlN deposited by physical vapor deposition (PVD have been employed to act as protective coatings due to their high hardness and chemical stability. In this study, the wear performance of two nanocomposite AlTiN and AlCrN coatings with different structures were evaluated. These coatings were deposited on aluminum die casting mold tool substrates (AISI H13 hot work steel by PVD using pulsed cathodic arc evaporation, equipped with three lateral arc-rotating cathodes (LARC and one central rotating cathode (CERC. The research was performed in two stages: in the first stage, the outlined coatings were characterized regarding their chemical composition, morphology, and structure using glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and X-ray diffraction (XRD, respectively. Surface morphology and mechanical properties were evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM and nanoindentation. The coating adhesion was studied using Mersedes test and scratch testing. During the second stage, industrial tests were carried out for coated die casting molds. In parallel, tribological tests were also performed in order to determine if a correlation between laboratory and industrial tests can be drawn. All of the results were compared with a benchmark monolayer AlCrN coating. The data obtained show that the best performance was achieved for the AlCrN/Si3N4 nanocomposite coating that displays an optimum combination of hardness, adhesion, soldering behavior, oxidation resistance, and stress state. These characteristics are essential for improving the die mold service life. Therefore, this coating emerges as a novelty to be used to protect aluminum die casting molds.

  10. Tribological and Wear Performance of Nanocomposite PVD Hard Coatings Deposited on Aluminum Die Casting Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Jose Mario; Fox-Rabinovich, German; Locks Junior, Edinei; Stolf, Pietro; Seid Ahmed, Yassmin; Matos Martins, Marcelo; Bork, Carlos; Veldhuis, Stephen

    2018-02-28

    In the aluminum die casting process, erosion, corrosion, soldering, and die sticking have a significant influence on tool life and product quality. A number of coatings such as TiN, CrN, and (Cr,Al)N deposited by physical vapor deposition (PVD) have been employed to act as protective coatings due to their high hardness and chemical stability. In this study, the wear performance of two nanocomposite AlTiN and AlCrN coatings with different structures were evaluated. These coatings were deposited on aluminum die casting mold tool substrates (AISI H13 hot work steel) by PVD using pulsed cathodic arc evaporation, equipped with three lateral arc-rotating cathodes (LARC) and one central rotating cathode (CERC). The research was performed in two stages: in the first stage, the outlined coatings were characterized regarding their chemical composition, morphology, and structure using glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. Surface morphology and mechanical properties were evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nanoindentation. The coating adhesion was studied using Mersedes test and scratch testing. During the second stage, industrial tests were carried out for coated die casting molds. In parallel, tribological tests were also performed in order to determine if a correlation between laboratory and industrial tests can be drawn. All of the results were compared with a benchmark monolayer AlCrN coating. The data obtained show that the best performance was achieved for the AlCrN/Si₃N₄ nanocomposite coating that displays an optimum combination of hardness, adhesion, soldering behavior, oxidation resistance, and stress state. These characteristics are essential for improving the die mold service life. Therefore, this coating emerges as a novelty to be used to protect aluminum die casting molds.

  11. Direct strip casting of steel - historical perspective and future direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manohar, P.A.; Hunter, A.; Ferry, M.

    2000-01-01

    The commercialisation of direct strip casting (DSC) of steel represents the realisation of a dream cherished by engineers for over one hundred and fifty years. The story of the global competition for DSC of steel, that has ingredients of romanticism of chasing of a dream, adventure and intrigue, is being played out across continents over dozens of decades with an interplay of setbacks and successes. At this stage, DSC is set to make a profound impact on the steelmaking landscape. This paper reviews the important milestones in this compelling story, presents the current status and then gazes into the crystal ball in an attempt to predict which turn the story may take in the near future. The constraints and critical challenges for the successful commercialisation of DSC are highlighted. Recent results are discussed relating the production process to quality control and properties of unalloyed, low carbon strip-cast steels. future metallurgical challenges include a better understanding of solidification mechanism during high-speed casting and secondary processing variables affecting the final microstructure of austenitic grains

  12. ATLAS DDM integration in ARC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrmann, Gerd; Cameron, David; Ellert, Mattias

    2008-01-01

    The Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF) consists of Grid resources running ARC middleware in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. These resources serve many virtual organisations and contribute a large fraction of total worldwide resources for the ATLAS experiment, whose data is distributed and mana......The Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF) consists of Grid resources running ARC middleware in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. These resources serve many virtual organisations and contribute a large fraction of total worldwide resources for the ATLAS experiment, whose data is distributed...... and managed by the DQ2 software. Managing ATLAS data within NDGF and between NDGF and other Grids used by ATLAS (the Enabling Grids for E-sciencE Grid and the Open Science Grid) presents a unique challenge for several reasons. Firstly, the entry point for data, the Tier 1 centre, is physically distributed...

  13. Causes of Cracking in Quenching of the Parts Made of Steels and Cast Iron and Recommendations for Their Removal: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, A. A.; Rudnev, V. I.

    2017-12-01

    The domestic and foreign experience on revealing the causes of quenching cracking and its prevention is generalized. We consider the works performed on the machine parts made of carbon and alloyed pearlitic steel and quenchable cast irons.

  14. Erosion properties of unipolar arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekalin, Eh.K.

    1982-01-01

    Processes modelling the formation of unipolar arcs on the elements of the first wall in limiters of the vacuum chamber and on active elements of tokamak divertor, are experimentally investigated. Erosion, processes that take place at two types of non-stationary cathode spots are considered. Experimental data prove the possibility of reducing erosion intensity by coating the surface of electrodes by oxide films, reduction of the temperature of electrode and discharge current

  15. Low Loss Advanced Metallic Fuel Casting Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kihwan; Ko, Youngmo; Kim, Jonghwan; Song, Hoon; Lee Chanbock

    2014-01-01

    The fabrication process for SFR fuel is composed of fuel slug casting, loading and fabrication of the fuel rods, and the fabrication of the final fuel assemblies. Fuel slug casting is the dominant source of fuel losses and recycles streams in the fabrication process. Recycle streams include fuel slug reworks, returned scraps, and fuel casting heels, which are a special concern in the counter gravity injection casting process because of the large masses involved. Large recycle and waste streams result in lowering the productivity and the economic efficiency of fuel production. To increase efficiency the fuel losses in the furnace chamber, crucible, and the mold, after casting a considerable amount of fuel alloy in the casting furnace, will be quantitatively evaluated. After evaluation the losses will be identified and minimized. It is expected that this study will contribute to the minimization of fuel losses and the wastes streams in the fabrication process of the fuel slugs. Also through this study the technical readiness level of the metallic fuel fabrication process will be further enhanced. In this study, U-Zr alloy system fuel slugs were fabricated by a gravity casting method. Metallic fuel slugs were successfully fabricated with 19 slugs/batch with diameter of 5mm and length of 300mm. Fuel losses was quantitatively evaluated in casting process for the fuel slugs. Fuel losses of the fuel slugs were so low, 0.1∼1.0%. Injection casting experiments have been performed to reduce the fuel loss and improve the casting method. U-Zr fuel slug having φ5.4-L250mm was soundly fabricated with 0.1% in fuel loss. The fuel losses could be minimized to 0.1%, which showed that casting technology of fuel slugs can be a feasible approach to reach the goal of the fuel losses of 0.1% or less in commercial scale

  16. Effect of Microstructures on Working Properties of Nickel-Manganese-Copper Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Medyński

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, the effects, on basic usable properties (abrasive wear and corrosion resistance, of solidification (acc. to the stable and non-stable equilibrium system and transformations occurring in the matrix during the cooling of castings of Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron were determined. Abrasive wear resistance was mainly determined by the types and arrangements of high-carbon phases (indicated by eutectic saturation degree, and the kinds of matrices (indicated by the nickel equivalent value, calculated from chemical composition. The highest abrasive wear resistance was found for white cast iron, with the highest degree of austenite to martensite transformation occurring in its matrix. Irrespective of solidification, a decrease of the equivalent value below a limit value resulted in increased austenite transformation, and thus, to a significant rise in hardness and abrasive wear resistance for the castings. At the same time, corrosion resistance of the alloy was slightly reduced. The examinations showed that corrosion resistance of Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron is, too a much lesser degree, decided by the means of solidification of the castings, rather than transformations occurring in the matrix, as controlled by nickel equivalent value (especially elements with high electrochemical potential.

  17. Bifurcation theory of ac electric arcing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christen, Thomas; Peinke, Emanuel

    2012-01-01

    The performance of alternating current (ac) electric arcing devices is related to arc extinction or its re-ignition at zero crossings of the current (so-called ‘current zero’, CZ). Theoretical investigations thus usually focus on the transient behaviour of arcs near CZ, e.g. by solving the modelling differential equations in the vicinity of CZ. This paper proposes as an alternative approach to investigate global mathematical properties of the underlying periodically driven dynamic system describing the electric circuit containing the arcing device. For instance, the uniqueness of the trivial solution associated with the insulating state indicates the extinction of any arc. The existence of non-trivial attractors (typically a time-periodic state) points to a re-ignition of certain arcs. The performance regions of arcing devices, such as circuit breakers and arc torches, can thus be identified with the regions of absence and existence, respectively, of non-trivial attractors. Most important for applications, the boundary of a performance region in the model parameter space is then associated with the bifurcation of the non-trivial attractors. The concept is illustrated for simple black-box arc models, such as the Mayr and the Cassie model, by calculating for various cases the performance boundaries associated with the bifurcation of ac arcs. (paper)

  18. Physical characteristics of welding arc ignition process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Linan; Song, Yonglun; Xiao, Tianjiao; Ran, Guowei

    2012-07-01

    The existing research of welding arc mainly focuses on the stable combustion state and the research on the mechanism of welding arc ignition process is quite lack. The tungsten inert gas(TIG) touch arc ignition process is observed via a high speed camera and the high time resolution spectral diagnosis system. The changing phenomenon of main ionized element provided the electrons in the arc ignition is found. The metallic element is the main contributor to provide the electrons at the beginning of the discharging, and then the excitated shielding gas element replaces the function of the metallic element. The electron density during the period of the arc ignition is calculated by the Stark-broadened lines of Hα. Through the discussion with the repeatability in relaxation phenomenon, the statistical regularity in the arc ignition process is analyzed. The similar rules as above are observed through the comparison with the laser-assisted arc ignition experiments and the metal inert gas(MIG) arc ignition experiments. This research is helpful to further understanding on the generation mechanism of welding arc ignition and also has a certain academic and practical significance on enriching the welding physical theoretical foundation and improving the precise monitoring on automatic arc welding process.

  19. A Removable Long-arm Soft Cast to Treat Nondisplaced Pediatric Elbow Fractures: A Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Mauricio; Sadlik, Gal; Avoian, Tigran; Ebramzadeh, Edward

    2018-04-01

    The ideal type of immobilization for nondisplaced pediatric elbow fractures has not been established. We hypothesized that the use of a long-arm cylinder made of soft cast material will result in similar outcomes to those obtained with a traditional long-arm hard cast. We randomly assigned 100 consecutive children who presented with a closed, nondisplaced, type I supracondylar humeral fracture or an occult, closed, acute elbow injury, to 1 of 2 groups: group A (n=50) received a long-arm, traditional fiberglass (hard) cast. Group B (n=50) received a long-arm, soft fiberglass cast. After 4 weeks, the cast was removed in group A by a member of our staff using a cast saw, and in group B by one of the patient's parents by rolling back the soft fiberglass material. We compared the amount of fracture displacement and/or angulation, recovery of range of motion, elbow pain, and patient satisfaction. There were no instances of unplanned removal of the cast by the patient or parent. No evidence of fracture displacement or angulation was seen in either group. The final carrying angle of the affected elbow was nearly identical of that of the normal, contralateral elbow in both groups (P=0.64). At the latest follow-up appointment, elbows in groups A and B had a similar mean arc of motion (156 vs. 154 degrees; P=0.45), and had achieved identical relative arc of motion of 99.6% and 99.5% of that of the normal, contralateral side, respectively (P=0.94). Main pain scores were low and comparable over the study period. All patients in both groups reported the highest rate of satisfaction at the eighth week of follow-up. The results indicate that children with nondisplaced supracondylar humeral fractures can be successfully managed with the use of a removable long-arm soft cast, maintaining fracture alignment and resulting in comparable rates of range of motion, pain, and patient satisfaction. The use of a removable immobilization that can reliably maintain fracture alignment and

  20. Synthesis and structural evaluation of freeze-cast porous alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Douglas F., E-mail: souzadf@outlook.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Federal University of Minas Gerais — UFMG, Avenida Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6627, Campus UFMG, Belo Horizonte, MG CEP: 31270-901, Escola de Engenharia, bloco 2, sala 2230 (Brazil); Nunes, Eduardo H.M., E-mail: eduardohmn@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Federal University of Minas Gerais — UFMG, Avenida Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6627, Campus UFMG, Belo Horizonte, MG CEP: 31270-901, Escola de Engenharia, bloco 2, sala 2230 (Brazil); Pimenta, Daiana S.; Vasconcelos, Daniela C.L. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Federal University of Minas Gerais — UFMG, Avenida Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6627, Campus UFMG, Belo Horizonte, MG CEP: 31270-901, Escola de Engenharia, bloco 2, sala 2230 (Brazil); Nascimento, Jailton F.; Grava, Wilson [Petrobras/CENPES, Avenida Horácio Macedo 950, Cidade Universitária, Ilha do Fundão, Rio de Janeiro, RJ CEP:21941-915 (Brazil); Houmard, Manuel [Department of Materials Engineering and Civil Construction, Federal University of Minas Gerais — UFMG, Avenida Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6627, Campus UFMG, Belo Horizonte, MG CEP: 31270-901, Escola de Engenharia, bloco 1, sala 3304 (Brazil); Vasconcelos, Wander L., E-mail: wlv@demet.ufmg.br [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Federal University of Minas Gerais — UFMG, Avenida Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6627, Campus UFMG, Belo Horizonte, MG CEP: 31270-901, Escola de Engenharia, bloco 2, sala 2230 (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    In this work we fabricated alumina samples by the freeze-casting technique using tert-butanol as the solvent. The prepared materials were examined by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microtomography. Next, they were coated with sol–gel silica films by dip-coating. Permeability tests were carried out in order to assess the permeation behavior of the materials processed in this study. We observed that the sintering time and alumina loading showed a remarkable effect on both the structural properties and flexural strength of the freeze-cast samples. Nitrogen adsorption tests revealed that the silica prepared in this study exhibited a microporous structure. It was observed that the presence of silica coatings on the alumina surface decreased the CO{sub 2} permeance by about one order of magnitude. Because of the similar kinetic diameters of nitrogen and carbon dioxide, the CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} system showed a separation efficiency that was lower than that observed for the He/CO{sub 2} and He/N{sub 2} systems. We noticed that increasing the feed pressure improved the separation capacity of the obtained materials. - Highlights: • Porous alumina samples obtained by the freeze-casting technique • Microporous silica coating prepared by a simple sol–gel dip-coating methodology • Samples examined by SEM, μ-CT, and nitrogen sorption tests • Mechanical tests were carried out in the freeze-cast samples. • The presence of silica coatings on the alumina surface decreased the CO{sub 2} permeance.

  1. Melting of Grey Cast Iron Based on Steel Scrap Using Silicon Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojczew A.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the issue of synthetic cast iron production in the electric induction furnace exclusively on the steel scrap base. Silicon carbide and synthetic graphite were used as carburizers. The carburizers were introduced with solid charge or added on the liquid metal surface. The chemical analysis of the produced cast iron, the carburization efficiency and microstructure features were presented in the paper. It was stated that ferrosilicon can be replaced by silicon carbide during the synthetic cast iron melting process. However, due to its chemical composition (30% C and 70% Si which causes significant silicon content in iron increase, the carbon deficit can be partly compensated by the carburizer introduction. Moreover it was shown that the best carbon and silicon assimilation rate is obtained where the silicon carbide is being introduced together with solid charge. When it is thrown onto liquid alloy surface the efficiency of the process is almost two times less and the melting process lasts dozen minutes long. The microstructure of the cast iron produced with the silicon carbide shows more bulky graphite flakes than inside the microstructure of cast iron produced on the pig iron base.

  2. design, construction and performance evaluation of multiple casting

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    time taken for solidification, plays an important role in the casting. There should not ... Keywords: Design, Construction, Multiple casting machine, Compo Casting operation. 1. Introduction .... metal and pathway channel pipe with heater is used.

  3. Energy use in selected metal casting facilities - 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eppich, Robert E. [Eppich Technologies, Syracuse, IN (United States)

    2004-05-01

    This report represents an energy benchmark for various metal casting processes. It describes process flows and energy use by fuel type and processes for selected casting operations. It also provides recommendations for improving energy efficiency in casting.

  4. Undercooling and nodule count in thin walled ductile iron castings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl Martin; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2007-01-01

    Casting experiments have been performed with eutectic and hypereutectic castings with plate thicknesses from 2 to 8 mm involving both temperature measurements during solidification and microstructural examination afterwards. The nodule count was the same for the eutectic and hypereutectic casting...

  5. Casting of Titanium and its Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    R. L. Saha; K. T. Jacob

    1986-01-01

    Titaniuni and its alloys have many applications in aerospace, marine and other engineering industries. Titanium requires special melting techniques because of its high reactivity at elevated temperatures and needs special mould materials and methods for castings. This paper reviews the development of titanium casting technology.

  6. Detection of Cast Shadows in Surveillance Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erbou, Søren G.; Sørensen, Helge Bjarne Dissing; Stage, Bjarne

    2005-01-01

    Cast shadows from moving objects reduce the general ability of robust classification and tracking of these objects, in outdoor surveillance applications. A method for segmentation of cast shadows is proposed, combining statistical features with a new similarity feature, derived from a physics...

  7. Engineering design of centrifugal casting machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusnowo, Roni; Gunara, Sophiadi

    2017-06-01

    Centrifugal casting is a metal casting process in which metal liquid is poured into a rotating mold at a specific temperature. Given round will generate a centrifugal force that will affect the outcome of the casting. Casting method is suitable in the manufacture of the casting cylinder to obtain better results. This research was performed to design a prototype machine by using the concept of centrifugal casting. The design method was a step-by-step systematic approach in the process of thinking to achieve the desired goal of realizing the idea and build bridges between idea and the product. Design process was commenced by the conceptual design phase and followed by the embodiment design stage and detailed design stage. With an engineering design process based on the method developed by G. E. Dieter, draft prototype of centrifugal casting machine with dimension of 550×450×400 mm, ¼ HP motor power, pulley and belt mechanism, diameter of 120-150mm, simultaneously with the characteristics of simple casting product, easy manufacture and maintenance, and relatively inexpensive, was generated.

  8. Combined testing of castings having rough surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, Yu.O.; Zav'yalkin, F.M.; Moskvin, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    Mathematical models of a flaw detector for complex testing of castings, containing radiometric and pneumatic converters, are developed and investigated. The efficiency of compensation of casting thickness fluctuation effect on the results of testing in combined information processing obtained by various methods is estimated

  9. Spatial Bimetallic Castings Manufactured from Iron Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cholewa

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a conception for manufacturing method of skeleton castings with composite features was shown. Main application of such castings are the working organs of machines subjected to intensive abrasive and erosive wear. Skeleton geometry was based on three-dimensional cubic net consisting of circular connectors and nodes joining 6 connectors according to Cartesian co-ordinate system. Dimension of an elementary cell was equal to 10 mm and diameter of single connector was equal to 5 mm. For bimetallic castings preparation two Fe based alloys were used: L25SHMN cast steel for skeleton substrate and ZlCr15NiMo cast iron for working part of the casting. In presented work obtained structure was analyzed with indication of characteristic regions. Authors described phenomena occurring at the alloys interface and phases in transition zone. A thesis was formulated concerning localization of transition zone at the cast iron matrix – cast steel reinforcement interface. Direction of further studies were indicated.

  10. Identification of the steel viscosity and dynamic yield stress for the numerical modelling of casting simulations in the semi-solid state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solek K.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Conditions of some casting processes cause flow of both liquid and semi-liquid metal alloys inside the die cavity. Generally, the continuous casting, squeeze casting or thixoforming could be classified as such processes. Design or optimisation of casting technology using numerical simulations requires knowledge of the rheological properties. The main objective of the experimental work, presented in this publication, is an analysis of the viscosity of 1.2080 (X210Cr12 high carbon steel in liquid and semisolid state. The secondary purpose of the experimental work was a development of the viscosity models used in continuous casting and thixoforming simulations. The significant achievement of this particular study was identification of thixotropy phenomenon which occurs not only during thixoforming, but also during magnetohydrodynamic stirring in continuous casting processes.

  11. A contribution to the study of arc melting in inert gas atmospheres of zirconium sponge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julio Junior, O.

    1990-01-01

    Mettalic zirconium is a material of great interest in the nuclear industry due to its low thermal neutron cross section, high strength and corrosion resistance. The latter permits its use in the chemical industry. In this study, a critical bibliographic revision of the industrial processes used for the melting and consolidation of zirconium sponge has been carried out. A procedure for the melting of zirconium on a laboratory scale, has been established. An nonconsumable-electrode arc furnace have been used. The effect of process variables like atmosphere, melting current and getter, have been showed. The influence of sponge characteristics on the qualities of cast zirconium buttons have been studied. The present study is a contribution towards future investigations to obtain high purity cast zirconium and its alloys commercially known as zircaloy. (author)

  12. Cast iron repair method of stitching pin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, In Sik; Yu, Yeong Chul; Kim, Steve S.; Reed, Gary J.

    2003-01-01

    Many cast iron parts are welded and suffer from improper pre-heating and poor welding skills which destroy the castings due to new cracks, deformations etc. This is due mainly to the lack of understanding of the properties of cast iron. Welding, however impractical, was the only alternative for many years. Locks are used to add strength across a crack. Special drilling jigs are used to create a precise hole pattern that locks are driven into. Our locks have a unique ability to pull the sides of a crack together. Bottom locks are stacked or laminated to a depth of 80% of the casting thickness. Thicker surface locks finish off lock installation, allowing repairs in irregular shapes and contours. Installing products can be done quickly with pneumatic tools. Up to one inch of repair can be done in 5 minutes in 1/4 inch thick cast iron.

  13. INDIAN CASTE SYSTEM: HISTORICAL AND PSYCHOANALYTIC VIEWS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallabhaneni, Madhusudana Rao

    2015-12-01

    This paper elucidates the historical origins and transformations of India's caste system. Surveying the complex developments over many centuries, it points out that three positions have been taken in this regard. One suggests that the caste one is born into can be transcended within one's lifetime by performing good deeds. The other declares caste to be immutable forever. And, the third says that one can be reborn into a higher caste if one lives a virtuous life. Moving on to the sociopolitical realm, the paper notes how these positions have been used and exploited. The paper then attempts to anchor the existence and purpose of the Hindu caste system in Freud's ideas about group psychology and Klein's proposals of splitting and projective identification. The paper also deploys the large group psychology concepts of Volkan and the culturally nuanced psychoanalytic anthropology of Roland and Kakar. It concludes with delineating some ameliorative strategies for this tragic problem in the otherwise robust democratic society of India.

  14. Microsegregation in Nodular Cast Iron with Carbides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper results of microsegregation in the newly developed nodular cast iron with carbides are presented. To investigate the pearlitic and bainitic cast iron with carbides obtained by Inmold method were chosen. The distribution of linear elements on the eutectic cell radius was examined. To investigate the microsegregation pearlitic and bainitic cast iron with carbides obtained by Inmold method were chosen.The linear distribution of elements on the eutectic cell radius was examined. Testing of the chemical composition of cast iron metal matrix components, including carbides were carried out. The change of graphitizing and anti-graphitizing element concentrations within eutectic cell was determined. It was found, that in cast iron containing Mo carbides crystallizing after austenite + graphite eutectic are Si enriched.

  15. Microsegregation in Nodular Cast Iron with Carbides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietrowski S.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper results of microsegregation in the newly developed nodular cast iron with carbides are presented. To investigate the pearlitic and bainitic cast iron with carbides obtained by Inmold method were chosen. The distribution of linear elements on the eutectic cell radius was examined. To investigate the microsegregation pearlitic and bainitic cast iron with carbides obtained by Inmold method were chosen. The linear distribution of elements on the eutectic cell radius was examined. Testing of the chemical composition of cast iron metal matrix components, including carbides were carried out. The change of graphitizing and anti-graphitizing element concentrations within eutectic cell was determined. It was found, that in cast iron containing Mo carbides crystallizing after austenite + graphite eutectic are Si enriched.

  16. Standard digital reference images for titanium castings

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 The digital reference images provided in the adjunct to this standard illustrate various types and degrees of discontinuities occurring in titanium castings. Use of this standard for the specification or grading of castings requires procurement of the adjunct digital reference images, which illustrate the discontinuity types and severity levels. They are intended to provide the following: 1.1.1 A guide enabling recognition of titanium casting discontinuities and their differentiation both as to type and degree through digital radiographic examination. 1.1.2 Example digital radiographic illustrations of discontinuities and a nomenclature for reference in acceptance standards, specifications and drawings. 1.2 The digital reference images consist of seventeen digital files each illustrating eight grades of increasing severity. The files illustrate seven common discontinuity types representing casting sections up to 1-in. (25.4-mm). 1.3 The reference radiographs were developed for casting sections up to 1...

  17. The role of water in slip casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccauley, R. A.; Phelps, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    Slips and casting are considered in terms of physical and colloidal chemistry. Casting slips are polydisperse suspensions of lyophobic particles in water, whose degree of coagulation is controlled by interaction of flocculating and deflocculating agents. Slip casting rate and viscosity are functions of temperature. Slip rheology and response to deflocculating agents varies significantly as the kinds and amounts of colloid modifiers change. Water is considered as a raw material. Various concepts of water/clay interactions and structures are discussed. Casting is a de-watering operation in which water moves from slip to cast to mold in response to a potential energy termed moisture stress. Drying is an evaporative process from a free water surface.

  18. Casting fine grained, fully dense, strong inorganic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sam W.; Spencer, Larry S.; Phillips, Michael R.

    2015-11-24

    Methods and apparatuses for casting inorganic materials are provided. The inorganic materials include metals, metal alloys, metal hydrides and other materials. Thermal control zones may be established to control the propagation of a freeze front through the casting. Agitation from a mechanical blade or ultrasonic energy may be used to reduce porosity and shrinkage in the casting. After solidification of the casting, the casting apparatus may be used to anneal the cast part.

  19. Arc Shape Characteristics with Ultra-High-Frequency Pulsed Arc Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxuan Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Arc plasma possesses a constriction phenomenon with a pulsed current. The constriction is created by the Lorentz force, the radial electromagnetic force during arc welding, which determines the energy distribution of the arc plasma. Welding experiments were carried out with ultra-high-frequency pulsed arc welding (UHFP-AW. Ultra-high-speed camera observations were produced for arc surveillance. Hue-saturation-intensity (HSI image analysis was used to distinguish the regions of the arc plasma that represented the heat energy distribution. The measurement of arc regions indicated that, with an ultra-high-frequency pulsed arc, the constriction was not only within the decreased arc geometry, but also within the constricted arc core region. This can be checked by the ratio of the core region to the total area. The arc core region expanded significantly at 40 kHz at 60 A. A current level of 80 A caused a decrease in the total region of the arc. Meanwhile, the ratio of the core region to the total increased. It can be concluded that arc constriction depends on the increased area of the core region with the pulsed current (>20 kHz.

  20. Auroral arc classification scheme based on the observed arc-associated electric field pattern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marklund, G.

    1983-06-01

    Radar and rocket electric field observations of auroral arcs have earlier been used to identify essentially four different arc types, namely anticorrelation and correlation arcs (with, respectively, decreased and increased arc-assocaited field) and asymmetric and reversal arcs. In this paper rocket double probe and supplementary observations from the literature, obtained under various geophysical conditions, are used to organize the different arc types on a physical rather than morphological basis. This classification is based on the relative influence on the arc electric field pattern from the two current continuity mechanisms, polarisation electric fields and Birkeland currents. In this context the tangential electric field plays an essential role and it is thus important that it can be obtained with both high accuracy and resolution. In situ observations by sounding rockets are shown to be better suited for this specific task than monostatic radar observations. Depending on the dominating mechanism, estimated quantitatively for a number of arc-crossings, the different arc types have been grouped into the following main categories: Polarisation arcs, Birkeland current arcs and combination arcs. Finally the high altitude potential distributions corresponding to some of the different arc types are presented. (author)

  1. Clustering of arc volcanoes caused by temperature perturbations in the back-arc mantle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changyeol; Wada, Ikuko

    2017-06-29

    Clustering of arc volcanoes in subduction zones indicates along-arc variation in the physical condition of the underlying mantle where majority of arc magmas are generated. The sub-arc mantle is brought in from the back-arc largely by slab-driven mantle wedge flow. Dynamic processes in the back-arc, such as small-scale mantle convection, are likely to cause lateral variations in the back-arc mantle temperature. Here we use a simple three-dimensional numerical model to quantify the effects of back-arc temperature perturbations on the mantle wedge flow pattern and sub-arc mantle temperature. Our model calculations show that relatively small temperature perturbations in the back-arc result in vigorous inflow of hotter mantle and subdued inflow of colder mantle beneath the arc due to the temperature dependence of the mantle viscosity. This causes a three-dimensional mantle flow pattern that amplifies the along-arc variations in the sub-arc mantle temperature, providing a simple mechanism for volcano clustering.

  2. Bioinspired Design: Magnetic Freeze Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Michael Martin

    Nature is the ultimate experimental scientist, having billions of years of evolution to design, test, and adapt a variety of multifunctional systems for a plethora of diverse applications. Next-generation materials that draw inspiration from the structure-property-function relationships of natural biological materials have led to many high-performance structural materials with hybrid, hierarchical architectures that fit form to function. In this dissertation, a novel materials processing method, magnetic freeze casting, is introduced to develop porous scaffolds and hybrid composites with micro-architectures that emulate bone, abalone nacre, and other hard biological materials. This method uses ice as a template to form ceramic-based materials with continuously, interconnected microstructures and magnetic fields to control the alignment of these structures in multiple directions. The resulting materials have anisotropic properties with enhanced mechanical performance that have potential applications as bone implants or lightweight structural composites, among others.

  3. Hybrid-type long-lived carbon stripper foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugai, Isao; Kato, Hajime

    1989-01-01

    A new method for the preparation of hybrid-type long-lived carbon stripper foils was developed. The new procedure is based on a modification of our controlled dc arc-discharge method. The carbon foils are of the multilayer type and the layers are composed of carbon particles emitted from the electrodes in the ac arc-discharge and from the cathode in the dc arc-discharge. With this simple and powerful method long lived carbon stripper foils can be prepared with higher reliability and reproducibility than with the previous procedure. (orig.)

  4. Prototype arc saw design and cutting trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, G.S.

    1980-09-01

    A program was initiated to develop the arc saw as a tool capable of removing the end fittings from spent nuclear fuel bundles. A special arc saw for this purpose was designed, installed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and satisfactorily operated to remove end fittings from simulated, nonradioactive fuel bundles. The design of the arc saw included consideration of the cutting environment, power supply size, control equipment, and work piece size. Several simulated fuel bundles were cut to demonstrate that the arc saw met design specifications. Although the arc saw development program was curtailed before significant performance data could be collected, tests indicate that the arc saw is a good means of cropping spent fuel bundles and is well suited to remote operation and maintenance

  5. Numerical modelling of stresses and deformations in casting processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri

    1997-01-01

    Keywords: Stresses and deformations, casting, governing equations, thermal strain, control volume method......Keywords: Stresses and deformations, casting, governing equations, thermal strain, control volume method...

  6. On the formation of auroral arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stasiewicz, K.

    1984-04-01

    A new mechanism for auroral arc formation is presented. The characteristic linear shape of auroral arcs is determined by magnetically connected plasma clouds in the distant equatorial magnetosphere. These clouds originate as high speed plasma beams in the magnetotail and in the solar wind. It is found that the free energy for driving an auroral arc is provided by the difference of pressure between the cloud and the ambient plasma. (author)

  7. Programming ArcGIS with Python cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Pimpler, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Programming ArcGIS with Python Cookbook, Second Edition, is written for GIS professionals who wish to revolutionize their ArcGIS workflow with Python. Whether you are new to ArcGIS or a seasoned professional, you almost certainly spend time each day performing various geoprocessing tasks. This book will teach you how to use the Python programming language to automate these geoprocessing tasks and make you a more efficient and effective GIS professional.

  8. Arc saw and its application to decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deichelbohrer, P.R.

    1982-01-01

    The arc saw is a toothless, circular saw that cuts by arc erosion. A model was built to study the arc saw's usefulness in cutting up radioactively contaminated metal scrap. It was chosen because it cuts with very little contact to the work piece and because cutting is not affected by material hardness. After installation of several improvements it was found it could cut almost any combination of metals and that clamping or fixturing requirements were minimum. Cutting proceeds rapidly and efficiently

  9. Nomenclature of SLC Arc beamline components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, J.; Weng, W.T.

    1986-01-01

    This note defines I and C formal names for beamline components in the Arc as specified in the TRANSPORT decks ARCN FINAL and ARCS FINAL of June 5, 1985. The formal name consists of three fields: the primary name, the zone and the unit number. The general principles and guidelines are explained in Reference 1. The rationale and the final resolutions of the naming conventions for the Arc are explained

  10. Diffuse and spot mode of cathode arc attachments in an atmospheric magnetically rotating argon arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Tang; Wang, Cheng; Liao, Meng-Ran; Xia, Wei-Dong

    2016-01-01

    A model including the cathode, near-cathode region, and arc column was constructed. Specifically, a thermal perturbation layer at the arc fringe was calculated in order to couple sheath/presheath modelling with typical arc column modelling. Comparative investigation of two modes of attachment of a dc (100, 150, 200 A) atmospheric-pressure arc in argon to a thermionic cathode made of pure tungsten was conducted. Computational data revealed that there exists two modes of arc discharge: the spot mode, which has an obvious cathode surface temperature peak in the arc attachment centre; and the diffuse mode, which has a flat cathode surface temperature distribution and a larger arc attachment area. The modelling results of the arc attachment agree with previous experimental observations for the diffuse mode. A further 3D simulation is obviously needed to investigate the non-axisymmetrical features, especially for the spot mode. (paper)

  11. Calculation of gas release from DC and AC arc furnaces in a foundry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutyanskii, M. M.; Nekhamin, S. M.; Rebikov, E. M.

    2016-12-01

    A procedure for the calculation of gas release from arc furnaces is presented. The procedure is based on the stoichiometric ratios of the oxidation of carbon in liquid iron during the oxidation heat period and the oxidation of iron from a steel charge by oxygen in the period of solid charge melting during the gas exchange of the furnace cavity with the external atmosphere.

  12. Peculiarities of the coolant of large ingots in crystallizators of semicontinuous casting machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukerman, V.Ya.; Marchenko, I.K.; Rimen, V.Kh.

    1983-01-01

    Peculiarities of heat transfer in crystallizator of semicontinuous blank casting machine were investigated, taking carbon and chromium-nickel steels as an example. The effect of crystallizator cross-section and decrease of the rate of metal casting on ingot cooling was considered at that. It was established that nonuniformity of deformation of ingot skin as well as the state of crystallizator operating walls affect on heat transfer in crystallizator. Crystallizator structure with ribs in upper part and without ribs in lower cone part is optimal. It provides more uniform skin growth in initial period of solidification and compensation of gap, which appears due to shrinkage

  13. Automatic Control Of Length Of Welding Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iceland, William F.

    1991-01-01

    Nonlinear relationships among current, voltage, and length stored in electronic memory. Conceptual microprocessor-based control subsystem maintains constant length of welding arc in gas/tungsten arc-welding system, even when welding current varied. Uses feedback of current and voltage from welding arc. Directs motor to set position of torch according to previously measured relationships among current, voltage, and length of arc. Signal paths marked "calibration" or "welding" used during those processes only. Other signal paths used during both processes. Control subsystem added to existing manual or automatic welding system equipped with automatic voltage control.

  14. Investigations Of A Pulsed Cathodic Vacuum Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, T. W. H.; Pigott, J.; Denniss, P.; Mckenzie, D. R.; Bilek, M. M. M.

    2003-06-01

    Cathodic vacuum arcs are well established as a method for producing thin films for coatings and as a source of metal ions. Research into DC vacuum arcs has been going on for over ten years in the School of Physics at the University of Sydney. Recently a project was undertaken in the school to design and build a pulsed CVA for use in the investigation of plasma sheaths and plasma immersion ion implantation. Pulsed cathodic vacuum arcs generally have a higher current and plasma density and also provide a more stable and reproducible plasma density than their DC counterparts. Additionally it has been shown that if a high repetition frequency can be established the deposition rate of pulsed arcs is equal to or greater than that of DC arcs with a concomitant reduction in the rate of macro-particle formation. We present here results of our investigations into the building of a center-triggered pulsed cathodic vacuum arc. The design of the power supply and trigger mechanism and the geometry of the anode and cathode are examined. Observations of type I and II arc spots using a CCD camera, and cathode spot velocity dependence on arc current will be presented. The role of retrograde motion in a high current pulsed arc is discussed.

  15. The Abundance of Large Arcs From CLASH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bingxiao; Postman, Marc; Meneghetti, Massimo; Coe, Dan A.; Clash Team

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an automated arc-finding algorithm to perform a rigorous comparison of the observed and simulated abundance of large lensed background galaxies (a.k.a arcs). We use images from the CLASH program to derive our observed arc abundance. Simulated CLASH images are created by performing ray tracing through mock clusters generated by the N-body simulation calibrated tool -- MOKA, and N-body/hydrodynamic simulations -- MUSIC, over the same mass and redshift range as the CLASH X-ray selected sample. We derive a lensing efficiency of 15 ± 3 arcs per cluster for the X-ray selected CLASH sample and 4 ± 2 arcs per cluster for the simulated sample. The marginally significant difference (3.0 σ) between the results for the observations and the simulations can be explained by the systematically smaller area with magnification larger than 3 (by a factor of ˜4) in both MOKA and MUSIC mass models relative to those derived from the CLASH data. Accounting for this difference brings the observed and simulated arc statistics into full agreement. We find that the source redshift distribution does not have big impact on the arc abundance but the arc abundance is very sensitive to the concentration of the dark matter halos. Our results suggest that the solution to the "arc statistics problem" lies primarily in matching the cluster dark matter distribution.

  16. Teaching with ArcGIS Pro

    OpenAIRE

    Theller, Larry

    2016-01-01

    For Fall semester 2016 the ABE department moved the course ASM 540 Basic GIS from ArcGIS Desktop 10.2 to ArcGIS Pro 1.3. This software from ESRI has a completely new look and feel, (ribbon-based rather than cascading menus) and is a true 64 bit application, capable of multi-threading, and built on Python 3. After ArcGIS Desktop 10.5 is released, desktop ends and the future release will be ArcGIS Pro; so it makes sense to switch sooner rather than later. This talk will discuss some issues and...

  17. Investigations Of A Pulsed Cathodic Vacuum Arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oates, T.W.H.; Pigott, J.; Denniss, P.; Mckenzie, D.R.; Bilek, M.M.M.

    2003-01-01

    Cathodic vacuum arcs are well established as a method for producing thin films for coatings and as a source of metal ions. Research into DC vacuum arcs has been going on for over ten years in the School of Physics at the University of Sydney. Recently a project was undertaken in the school to design and build a pulsed CVA for use in the investigation of plasma sheaths and plasma immersion ion implantation. Pulsed cathodic vacuum arcs generally have a higher current and plasma density and also provide a more stable and reproducible plasma density than their DC counterparts. Additionally it has been shown that if a high repetition frequency can be established the deposition rate of pulsed arcs is equal to or greater than that of DC arcs with a concomitant reduction in the rate of macro-particle formation. We present here results of our investigations into the building of a center-triggered pulsed cathodic vacuum arc. The design of the power supply and trigger mechanism and the geometry of the anode and cathode are examined. Observations of type I and II arc spots using a CCD camera, and cathode spot velocity dependence on arc current will be presented. The role of retrograde motion in a high current pulsed arc is discussed

  18. The dual-electrode DC arc furnace-modelling brush arc conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, Q.G.

    2012-01-01

    The dual-electrode DC arc furnace, an alternative design using an anode and cathode electrode instead of a hearth anode, was studied at small scale using computational modelling methods. Particular attention was paid to the effect of two key design variables, the arc length and the electrode separation, on the furnace behaviour. It was found that reducing the arc length to brush arc conditions was a valid means of overcoming several of the limitations of the dual-electrode design, namely high...

  19. Advancements and applications of plasma arc centrifugal treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschenbach, R.C.; Leland, L.B.; Chen, W.M.

    1997-01-01

    A process using a transferred arc plasma to heat material charged into a spinning tube inside a sealed, water-cooled container has been applied to radioactive and hazardous waste treatment in several countries. Inorganic material in the feed is melted into a leach-resistant slag, while organic material is vaporized and reacted to form carbon dioxide and water vapor. Any acid gases formed plus particulates are removed in a gas cleanup system. Design features and their relations to design objectives are described. Current and near-future applications are reported for treating nuclear power plant wastes and for remediating contamination from past nuclear weapons activities

  20. Experiments with background gas in a vacuum arc centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallaqua, R.S.; Simpson, S.W.; Del Bosco, E.

    1996-01-01

    Since promising isotope separation results were first reported by Krishnan et al. in 1981, a range of vacuum arc centrifuge experiments have been conducted in laboratories around the world. The PCEN (Plasma CENtrifuge) vacuum arc centrifuge at the Brazilian National Institute for Space Research has been used for isotope separation studies with cathode materials of carbon and magnesium and also to investigate the performance in terms of the rotational velocity attained for different cathode materials. Here, a vacuum arc centrifuge has been operated with an initial filling gas of either argon or hydrogen for pressures ranging from 10 -3 to 10 -1 Pa. The angular velocity ω of the plasma has been determined by cross-correlating the signals from potential probes, and the electron temperature T has been deduced from Langmuir probe data. At high gas pressures and early times during the 14 ms plasma lifetime, high-frequency nonuniformities frequently observed in the vacuum discharge disappear, suggesting that the associated instability is suppressed. Under the same conditions, nonuniformities rotating with much lower angular velocities are observed in the plasma. Temperatures are reduced in the presence of the background gas, and the theoretical figure of merit for separation proportional to ω 2 /T is increased compared to its value in the vacuum discharge for both argon and hydrogen gas fillings

  1. Synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles by dc arc dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senthilkumar, K., E-mail: akskumar.phy@gmail.com; Senthilkumar, O. [Shimane University, Research Project Promotion Institute (Japan); Morito, S.; Ohba, T.; Fujita, Y. [Shimane University, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering (Japan)

    2012-10-15

    Optical emission signals of a dc arc plasma system that was used for generating ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) have been investigated in gas phase as a function of chamber pressure and arc current. In this technique, a commercially available zinc 4N rod is used as a zinc source, as well as anode in the dc circuit and ambient air as an oxygen source. A carbon rod acts as the cathode. The optical transitions of Zn(I) and O(I) in addition, excitation of high energy states of N{sub 2}, CN, and atomic nitrogen lines were observed in OES due to increase of electron temperature than gas temperature (T{sub e} > T{sub g}) by reducing the chamber pressure from 760 torr to lower pressures. The as-prepared NPs show good crystalline quality with hexagonal wurtzite structure and the particle size was ranging from few nm to 100 nm in the form of rod and spherical morphologies. The impurity nature and structural properties of as-prepared NPs by dc arc plasma experiments were correlated with OES and Raman spectroscopy.

  2. Synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles by dc arc dusty plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senthilkumar, K.; Senthilkumar, O.; Morito, S.; Ohba, T.; Fujita, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Optical emission signals of a dc arc plasma system that was used for generating ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) have been investigated in gas phase as a function of chamber pressure and arc current. In this technique, a commercially available zinc 4N rod is used as a zinc source, as well as anode in the dc circuit and ambient air as an oxygen source. A carbon rod acts as the cathode. The optical transitions of Zn(I) and O(I) in addition, excitation of high energy states of N 2 , CN, and atomic nitrogen lines were observed in OES due to increase of electron temperature than gas temperature (T e > T g ) by reducing the chamber pressure from 760 torr to lower pressures. The as-prepared NPs show good crystalline quality with hexagonal wurtzite structure and the particle size was ranging from few nm to 100 nm in the form of rod and spherical morphologies. The impurity nature and structural properties of as-prepared NPs by dc arc plasma experiments were correlated with OES and Raman spectroscopy.

  3. Fibreglass Total Contact Casting, Removable Cast Walkers, and Irremovable Cast Walkers to Treat Diabetic Neuropathic Foot Ulcers: A Health Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Vania; Tu, Hong Anh; Wells, David; Weir, Mark; Holubowich, Corinne; Walter, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Background Diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers are a risk factor for lower leg amputation. Many experts recommend offloading with fibreglass total contact casting, removable cast walkers, and irremovable cast walkers as a way to treat these ulcers. Methods We completed a health technology assessment, which included an evaluation of clinical benefits and harms, value for money, and patient preferences for offloading devices. We performed a systematic literature search on August 17, 2016, to identify randomized controlled trials that compared fibreglass total contact casting, removable cast walkers, and irremovable cast walkers with other treatments (offloading or non-offloading) in patients with diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers. We developed a decision-analytic model to assess the cost-effectiveness of fibreglass total contact casting, removable cast walkers, and irremovable cast walkers, and we conducted a 5-year budget impact analysis. Finally, we interviewed people with diabetes who had lived experience with foot ulcers, asking them about the different offloading devices and the factors that influenced their treatment choices. Results We identified 13 randomized controlled trials. The evidence suggests that total contact casting, removable cast walkers, and irremovable cast walkers are beneficial in the treatment of neuropathic, noninfected foot ulcers in patients with diabetes but without severe peripheral arterial disease. Compared to removable cast walkers, ulcer healing was improved with total contact casting (moderate quality evidence; risk difference 0.17 [95% confidence interval 0.00–0.33]) and irremovable cast walkers (low quality evidence; risk difference 0.21 [95% confidence interval 0.01–0.40]). We found no difference in ulcer healing between total contact casting and irremovable cast walkers (low quality evidence; risk difference 0.02 [95% confidence interval −0.11–0.14]). The economic analysis showed that total contact casting and irremovable

  4. NWIS Measurements for uranium metal annular castings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattingly, J.K.; Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes measurements performed with annular uranium metal castings of different enrichments to investigate the use of 252 Cf-source-driven noise analysis measurements as a means to quantify the amount of special nuclear material (SNM) in the casting. This work in FY 97 was sponsored by the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and the DOE Office of Technology Development Programs. Previous measurements and calculational studies have shown that many of the signatures obtained from the source-driven measurement are very sensitive to fissile mass. Measurements were performed to assess the applicability of this method to standard annular uranium metal castings at the Oak Ridge Y-12 plant under verification by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) using the Nuclear Weapons Identification System (NWIS) processor. Before the measurements with different enrichments, a limited study of source-detector-casting moderator configurations was performed to enhance the correlated information. These configurations consisted of a casting with no reflector and with various thicknesses of polyethylene reflectors up to 10.16 cm in 2.54 cm steps. The polyethylene moderator thickness of 7.62 cm was used for measurements with castings of different enrichments reported here. The sensitivity of the measured parameters to fissile mass was investigated using four castings each with a different enrichment. The high sensitivity of this measurement method to fissile mass and to other material and configurations provides some advantages over existing safeguards methods

  5. Analogue modeling of arc and backarc deformation in the New Hebrides arc and North Fiji Basin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, W. P.; Lister, G. S.; Jessell, M. W.

    In most backarc basins, extension is perpendicular to the arc. Thus individual spreading ridges extend approximately parallel to the arc. In the North Fiji Basin, however, several ancient and active spreading ridges strike 70°-90° to the New Hebrides arc. These high-angle spreading ridges relocated

  6. Ponseti casting: a new soft option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewster, M B S; Gupta, M; Pattison, G T R; Dunn-van der Ploeg, I D

    2008-11-01

    We have modified the Ponseti casting technique by using a below-knee Softcast instead of an above-knee plaster of Paris cast. Treatment was initiated as soon as possible after birth and the Pirani score was recorded at each visit. Following the manipulation techniques of Ponseti, a below-knee Softcast was applied directly over a stockinette for a snug fit and particular attention was paid to creating a deep groove above the heel to prevent slippage. If necessary, a percutaneous Achilles tenotomy was performed and casting continued until the child was fitted with Denis Browne abduction boots. Between April 2003 and May 2007 we treated 51 consecutive babies with 80 idiopathic club feet with a mean age at presentation of 4.5 weeks (4 days to 62 weeks). The initial mean Pirani score was 5.5 (3 to 6). It took a mean of 8.5 weeks (4 to 53) of weekly manipulation and casting to reach the stage of percutaneous Achilles tenotomy. A total of 20 feet (25%) did not require a tenotomy and for the 60 that did, the mean Pirani score at time of operation was 2.5 (0.5 to 3). Denis Browne boots were applied at a mean of 10 weeks (4 to 56) after presentation. The mean time from tenotomy to boots was 3.3 weeks (2 to 10). We experienced one case of cast-slippage during a period of non-attendance, which prolonged the casting process. One case of prolonged casting required repeated tenotomy, and three feet required repeated tenotomy and casting after relapsing while in Denis Browne boots. We believe the use of a below-knee Softcast in conjunction with Ponseti manipulation techniques shows promising initial results which are comparable to those using above-knee plaster of Paris casts.

  7. Modern Cast Irons in Chemical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    1934-11-09

    fl’ceew. T I SOCIETY OF CHEMICAL INDUSTRY CHEMICAL ENGINEERING GROUP MODERN CAST IRONS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING By J. G. PEARCE, M.Sc., F.Inst.P...CAST IRONS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING By J. G. PEARCE, M.Sc., F.Inst.P., M.I.E.E.* INTRODUCTION to chemical or thermal resistance. Small blow-holes Any...consideration of modern cast irons in chemical seldom appear to reduce the mechanical strength of engineering should strictly be prefaced by a definition

  8. Perspectives of single cast nanowires technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioisher, Anatolii; Badinter, Efim; Postolache, Vitalie; Leporda, Nicolae; Tiginyanu, Ion; Monaico, Eduard

    2011-01-01

    The paper is dedicated to production potential of glass-coated cast nanowire with metal-, semimetal- and semiconductor-based cores by means of Taylor-Ulitovsky method. Criteria of melted core-formative material penetration into a drawing capillary were analyzed. Theoretical preconditions of the reduction of cast microwire diameter up to nano-dimensions of core are reviewed and an improved method of cast nanowire manufacturing is proposed. Correctness of conclusions was experimentally proved and laboratory samples of micro- and nano-wires with core diameter of about 200-300 nanometers were produced, even in case of materials with poor adhesion.

  9. CAST with its micromegas detector installed.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) uses a prototype LHC dipole magnet to search for very weakly interacting neutral particles called axions, which should originate in the core of the Sun. The magnet converts the solar axions to photons which are then detected by an X-ray detector based on Micromegas technology. CAST's Micromegas detector has now been installed. Photos 01 02: General view of the CAST experiment with the Micromegas detector in place. Photo 03: Close-up of the micromegas set-up.

  10. Direct-current cathodic vacuum arc system with magnetic-field mechanism for plasma stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H-S; Komvopoulos, K

    2008-07-01

    Filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) deposition is characterized by plasma beam directionality, plasma energy adjustment via substrate biasing, macroparticle filtering, and independent substrate temperature control. Between the two modes of FCVA deposition, namely, direct current (dc) and pulsed arc, the dc mode yields higher deposition rates than the pulsed mode. However, maintaining the dc arc discharge is challenging because of its inherent plasma instabilities. A system generating a special configuration of magnetic field that stabilizes the dc arc discharge during film deposition is presented. This magnetic field is also part of the out-of-plane magnetic filter used to focus the plasma beam and prevent macroparticle film contamination. The efficiency of the plasma-stabilizing magnetic-field mechanism is demonstrated by the deposition of amorphous carbon (a-C) films exhibiting significantly high hardness and tetrahedral carbon hybridization (sp3) contents higher than 70%. Such high-quality films cannot be produced by dc arc deposition without the plasma-stabilizing mechanism presented in this study.

  11. Direct-current cathodic vacuum arc system with magnetic-field mechanism for plasma stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, H.-S.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2008-01-01

    Filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) deposition is characterized by plasma beam directionality, plasma energy adjustment via substrate biasing, macroparticle filtering, and independent substrate temperature control. Between the two modes of FCVA deposition, namely, direct current (dc) and pulsed arc, the dc mode yields higher deposition rates than the pulsed mode. However, maintaining the dc arc discharge is challenging because of its inherent plasma instabilities. A system generating a special configuration of magnetic field that stabilizes the dc arc discharge during film deposition is presented. This magnetic field is also part of the out-of-plane magnetic filter used to focus the plasma beam and prevent macroparticle film contamination. The efficiency of the plasma-stabilizing magnetic-field mechanism is demonstrated by the deposition of amorphous carbon (a-C) films exhibiting significantly high hardness and tetrahedral carbon hybridization (sp 3 ) contents higher than 70%. Such high-quality films cannot be produced by dc arc deposition without the plasma-stabilizing mechanism presented in this study

  12. Evaluating optical hazards from plasma arc cutting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassford, Eric; Burr, Gregory

    2018-01-01

    The Health Hazard Evaluation Program of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health evaluated a steel building materials manufacturer. The employer requested the evaluation because of concerns about optical radiation hazards from a plasma arc cutting system and the need to clarify eye protection requirements for plasma operators, other employees, and visitors. The strength of the ultraviolet radiation, visible radiation (light), and infrared radiation generated by the plasma arc cutter was measured at various distances from the source and at different operating amperages. Investigators also observed employees performing the plasma arc cutting. Optical radiation above safe levels for the unprotected eyes in the ultraviolet-C, ultraviolet-B, and visible light ranges were found during plasma arc cutting. In contrast, infrared and ultraviolet-A radiation levels during plasma arc cutting were similar to background levels. The highest non-ionizing radiation exposures occurred when no welding curtains were used. A plasma arc welding curtain in place did not eliminate optical radiation hazards to the plasma arc operator or to nearby employees. In most instances, the measured intensities for visible light, UV-C, and UV-B resulted in welding shade lens numbers that were lower than those stipulated in the OSHA Filter Lenses for Protection Against Radiant Energy table in 29 CFR 1910.133(a)(5). [1] Investigators recommended using a welding curtain that enclosed the plasma arc, posting optical radiation warning signs in the plasma arc cutter area, installing audible or visual warning cues when the plasma arc cutter was operating, and using welding shades that covered the plasma arc cutter operator's face to protect skin from ultraviolet radiation hazards.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF SOFTWARE “PRODSP-1.0” FOR OPTIMIZATION OF THE DEPHOSPHORIZATION PROCESSES IN ARC STEEL-FURNACES FOR TECHNOLOGICAL LINE-UP OF RUP “BMZ”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Chichko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The software “ProDSP-1,0” allowing to forecast the dynamics of the dephosphorizaiton process at casting course in arc steel-furnace, is worked out. The examples of working of different program operating regimes, showing the possibilities of phosphorus control in steel-furnace of RUP ‘'BMZ'' are given.

  14. Volumetric modulated arc therapy: IMRT in a single gantry arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, Karl

    2008-01-01

    In this work a novel plan optimization platform is presented where treatment is delivered efficiently and accurately in a single dynamically modulated arc. Improvements in patient care achieved through image-guided positioning and plan adaptation have resulted in an increase in overall treatment times. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has also increased treatment time by requiring a larger number of beam directions, increased monitor units (MU), and, in the case of tomotherapy, a slice-by-slice delivery. In order to maintain a similar level of patient throughput it will be necessary to increase the efficiency of treatment delivery. The solution proposed here is a novel aperture-based algorithm for treatment plan optimization where dose is delivered during a single gantry arc of up to 360 deg. The technique is similar to tomotherapy in that a full 360 deg. of beam directions are available for optimization but is fundamentally different in that the entire dose volume is delivered in a single source rotation. The new technique is referred to as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf motion and number of MU per degree of gantry rotation is restricted during the optimization so that gantry rotation speed, leaf translation speed, and dose rate maxima do not excessively limit the delivery efficiency. During planning, investigators model continuous gantry motion by a coarse sampling of static gantry positions and fluence maps or MLC aperture shapes. The technique presented here is unique in that gantry and MLC position sampling is progressively increased throughout the optimization. Using the full gantry range will theoretically provide increased flexibility in generating highly conformal treatment plans. In practice, the additional flexibility is somewhat negated by the additional constraints placed on the amount of MLC leaf motion between gantry samples. A series of studies are performed that characterize the relationship

  15. Nickel deposition effects on the growth of carbon nanofibers on carbon paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Celebi, S.; Schaaf, van der J.; Nijhuis, T.A.; Bruijn, de F.A.; Schouten, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanofiber (CNF) growth has been achieved on carbon paper fibers via two nickel deposition routes: i. nickel nanoparticle-ethanol suspension casting, and ii. homogenous deposition precipitation (HDP) of nickel onto carbon paper. Nickel nanoparticles created regular tubular CNF whereas HDP of

  16. Directed graph based carbon flow tracing for demand side carbon obligation allocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Tao; Feng, Donghan; Ding, Teng

    2016-01-01

    In order to achieve carbon emission abatement, some researchers and policy makers have cast their focus on demand side carbon abatement potentials. This paper addresses the problem of carbon flow calculation in power systems and carbon obligation allocation at demand side. A directed graph based...... method for tracing carbon flow is proposed. In a lossy network, matrices such as carbon losses, net carbon intensity (NCI) and footprint carbon intensity (FCI) are obtained with the proposed method and used to allocate carbon obligation at demand side. Case studies based on realistic distribution...... and transmission systems are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method....

  17. The structure of abrasion-resisting castings made of chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kopyciński

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study presents the analyse of chrome iron cast structure (as-cast condition which are used in rugged conditions abrasion-percussive and high temperature. While producing the casts of chrome iron major influence has been preserve the structure of technologi cal process parameters. The addition to Fe-C-Cr alloy Ni, Mo or Cu and then proper heat treatment leads to the improvement of functional and mechanical cast qualities. Then it is possible to develop high mechanical properties which are recommended by PN-EN12513. As can it be seen from the above research silicon is an adverse chemical element in this kind of alloy cast iron. However, the reason of cracksappearing in chrome iron casts are phosphorus eutectic microareas. When the compound of Si and P reach the critical point, described inPN-88/H-83144 outdated standard, the microareas might appear.

  18. Direct Cast U-6Nb – 2017 Progress on Cylindrical Castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aikin, Jr., Robert M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-04

    This report describes work to further develop a sound technical basis and best practices for mold design and process parameters for the Direct Casting of U-6wt%Nb components. One major challenge to the production of U-6Nb components is the propensity for niobium segregation during casting and solidification. This is especially true for cylindrical castings where the vertical side walls allow flotation of Nb resulting in severe inverse macrosegregation. In this work, a small (120 mm diameter by 180 mm tall) and large cylinder (250 mm diameter by 310 mm tall) are examined with a focus on reducing, or eliminating, niobium segregation. It is demonstrated that counter gravity casting (top-to-bottom solidification) can be used to minimize segregation in the small cylinder. Attempts to counter gravity cast the large cylinder were unsuccessful, in large part due to size limitations of the current furnace. A path forward for casting of the large cylinders is discussed.

  19. production of manual arc welding electrodes with local raw materials

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CHUKSSUCCESS 4 LOVE

    Manual arc welding using flux coated electrodes is carried out by producing an electric arc between ... major objectives: to form fusible slags, to stabilize the arc and to produce an inert gas shielding ... Current fusion welding techniques rely.

  20. Interactions between laser and arc plasma during laser-arc hybrid welding of magnesium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liming; Chen, Minghua

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents the results of the investigation on the interactions between laser and arc plasma during laser-arc hybrid welding on magnesium alloy AZ31B using the spectral diagnose technique. By comparably analyzing the variation in plasma information (the shape, the electron temperature and density) of single tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding with the laser-arc hybrid welding, it is found that the laser affects the arc plasma through the keyhole forming on the workpiece. Depending on the welding parameters there are three kinds of interactions taking place between laser and arc plasma.