WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon 9

  1. 46 CFR 97.37-9 - Carbon dioxide alarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide alarm. 97.37-9 Section 97.37-9 Shipping... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-9 Carbon dioxide alarm. (a) All carbon dioxide alarms shall be conspicuously identified: “WHEN ALARM SOUNDS—VACATE AT ONCE. CARBON DIOXIDE...

  2. 46 CFR 78.47-9 - Carbon dioxide alarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide alarm. 78.47-9 Section 78.47-9 Shipping... and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-9 Carbon dioxide alarm. (a) All carbon dioxide alarms shall be conspicuously identified: “WHEN ALARM SOUNDS—VACATE AT ONCE. CARBON DIOXIDE BEING RELEASED.” (b)...

  3. 46 CFR 196.37-9 - Carbon dioxide alarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide alarm. 196.37-9 Section 196.37-9 Shipping... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, etc. § 196.37-9 Carbon dioxide alarm. (a) All carbon dioxide alarms shall be conspicuously identified: “WHEN ALARM SOUNDS—VACATE AT ONCE. CARBON DIOXIDE...

  4. 9 CFR 313.5 - Chemical; carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Chemical; carbon dioxide. 313.5... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION HUMANE SLAUGHTER OF LIVESTOCK § 313.5 Chemical; carbon dioxide. The slaughtering of sheep, calves and swine with the use of carbon dioxide gas and the handling in...

  5. CARBON DIFFUSION IN CARBON-SUPERSATURATED 9CR-1MO STEEL: ANOMALOUS TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF CARBON DIFFUSIVITY

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermák, Jiří; Král, Lubomír

    Ostrava : Tanger Ltd, 2014. ISBN 978-80-87294-52-9. [Metal 2014. International Conference on Metallurgy and Materials /23./. Brno (CZ), 21.05.2014-23.05.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0148; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Diffusion * Carbon * phase decomposition * Carbon-supersaturation * Cr-Mo steels Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics http://www.metal2014.com/cz/zobrazit-seznam-prispevku/2498-carbon-diffusion-in-carbon-supersaturated-9cr-1mo-steel-anomalous-temperature-dependence-of-carbon-diffusivity/

  6. Electrochemical impedance of poly(9-tosyl-9H-carbazole-co-pyrrole) electrocoated carbon fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Impedance study of poly(9-tosyl-9H-carbazole-co-pyrrole) electrocoated carbon fiber. → Copolymer of 9-tosyl-9H-carbazole and pyrrole were electrocoated on carbon fiber. → Impedance spectroscopy and circuit models of poly(9-tosyl-9H-carbazole-co-pyrrole). - Abstract: In this paper, copolymer of 9-tosyl-9H-carbazole (TCz) and pyrrole (Py) comonomers were electrochemically deposited onto carbon fiber micro electrode (CFME) as an active electrode material. An electrochemical impedance study on the prepared electrodes is reported. Poly(TCz-co-Py)/CFME is characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV), Fourier transform infrared reflectance-attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR), scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Capacitive behaviors of modified CFMEs were defined via Nyquist, Bode-magnitude and Bode-phase plots. An examination is made of which equivalent circuits of R(C(R(Q(RW)))) and R(C(R(Q(RW))))(CR) used for modeling the system. The effect of monomer ratio (mole fraction, XTCz = nTCz/nTCz + nPy) on the formation of copolymer is reported in 0.1 M sodium perchlorate (NaClO4)/acetonitrile (ACN) solution. The inclusion of TCz in the copolymer structure was also confirmed by FTIR-ATR, SEM, and CV measurements. The highest low frequency capacitance (CLF = 22.7 for R(C(R(Q(RW)))) and CLF = 22.6 mF cm-2 for R(C(R(Q(RW))))(CR)) were obtained for XTCz = 0.91.

  7. Polypeptide A9K at nanoscale carbon: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Arruda, Andre; Fileti, Eudes Eterno

    2015-10-21

    The amphiphilic nature of surfactant-like peptides is responsible for their propensity to aggregate at the nanoscale. These peptides can be readily used for a non-covalent functionalization of nanoparticles and macromolecules. This work reports an observation of supramolecular ensembles consisting of ultrashort carbon nanotubes (USCNTs), graphene (GR) and A9K polypeptides formed by lysine and arginine. The potential of mean force (PMF) is used as a major descriptor of the CNT-A9K and GR-A9K binding process, supplementing structural data. The phase space sampling is performed by multiple equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations with position restraints, where applicable. Binding in all cases was found to be thermodynamically favorable. Encapsulation in the (10,10) USCNT is particularly favorable. The curvature of the external surface does not favor binding. Thus, binding of A9K at GR is stronger than its binding at the outer sidewall of USCNTs. Overall, the presented results favor non-covalent functionalization of nanoscale carbons that are considered interesting in the fields of biomaterials, biosensors, biomedical devices, and drug delivery systems. PMID:26387691

  8. US EPA Region 9 carbon monoxide designated areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Polygon Feature class of Nonattainment Areas for Carbon Monoxide. Nonattainment areas are geographic areas which have not met National Ambient Air Quality Standards...

  9. Gastric hyperplasia in mice with targeted disruption of the carbonic anhydrase gene Car9

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ortova-Gut, M.; Parkkila, S.; Vernerová, Z.; Rohde, E.; Závada, Jan; Hocker, M.; Pastorek, J.; Karttunen, T.; Gibadulinová, A.; Závadová, Zuzana; Knobeloch, K.-P.; Wiedernmann, B.; Svoboda, Jan; Horak, I.; Pastoreková, S.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 123, č. 6 (2002), s. 1889-1903. ISSN 0016-5085 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV312/96/K205 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : mouse carbonic anhydrase Car9 * gastric hyperplasia Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 13.440, year: 2002

  10. Controlled synthesis of the tricontinuous mesoporous material IBN-9 and its carbon and platinum derivatives

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Yunfeng

    2011-08-23

    Controlled synthesis of mesoporous materials with ultracomplicated pore configurations is of great importance for both fundamental research of nanostructures and the development of novel applications. IBN-9, which is the only tricontinuous mesoporous silica with three sets of interpenetrating three-dimensional channel systems, appears to be an excellent model mesophase for such study. The extensive study of synthesis space diagrams proves mesophase transition among the cylindrical MCM-41, tricontinuous IBN-9 and bicontinuous MCM-48, and also allows a more precise control of phase-pure synthesis. On the other hand, rational design of structure-directing agents offers a possibility to extend the synthesis conditions of IBN-9, as well as tailor its pore size. Moreover, an unprecedented helical structure consisting of twisted 3-fold interwoven mesoporous channels is reported here for the first time. The unique tricontinuous mesostructure of IBN-9 has been well-replicated by other functional materials (e.g., carbon and platinum) via a "hard- templating" synthesis route. The obtained carbon material possesses large surface area (∼1900 m2/g), high pore volume (1.56 cm 3/g), and remarkable gas adsorption capability at both cryogenic temperatures and room temperature. The platinum material has an ordered mesostructure composed of highly oriented nanocrystals. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  11. Functionalization of oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes with 4-benzo-9-crown-3 ether

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ardeshir Khazaei; Maryam Kiani Borazjani; Khadijeh Mansouri Moradian

    2012-09-01

    Functionalization of oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by a zwitterionic interaction (COO−NH$^{+}_{3}$) between protonated amine on crown ether and an oxyanion from a carboxylic acid group on SWCNT has been described. This ionic interaction has led to a considerable increase in the solubility of SWCNTs in both organic and aqueous solvents such as ethanol, dimethyl sulphoxide, dimethylformamide, and H2O. The highest solubility was attained in DMF and DMSO. The ionic bonded 4-benzo-9-crown-3 ether allowed the hosting of Li+. The ionic bond of crown ether (4-(benzo-9-crown-3)) to SWCNT was identified and confirmed by infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron-microscopy, atomic force microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis methods.

  12. Microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of heat affected zones for 9Cr2WVTa steels with different carbon contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The weldability of 9Cr2WVTa steel with different carbon contents was studied. • The HAZs of the 9Cr2WVTa steel include three characteristic regions. • Residual delta-ferrite significantly deteriorates the impact property of HAZs. • The twin martensite deteriorates the impact toughness as a whole. • The 9Cr2WVTa steel with 0.14–0.17 wt.% carbon content has good weldability. - Abstract: The microstructures and mechanical properties of heat affected zones (HAZs) by Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) were studied for 9Cr2WVTa steels with carbon content varying from 0.07 wt.% to 0.25 wt.%. Enlarged HAZs samples with 8 mm to 10 mm wide uniform temperature zone were prepared by the thermal–mechanical physical simulator Gleeble 1500 based on the Finite Element Method (FEM) numerical simulation and experimental measurement for the welding thermal cycle process and weld profile. The microstructures were observed by optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). In addition, the mechanical properties tests including micro-hardness test, tensile test and impact test were carried out to investigate the effects of the carbon content and the welding thermal cycle. The results show that the big blocky delta ferrite in 9Cr2WVTa steel with lower carbon content deteriorates the impact property. On the other hand, the quenched martensite, especially for the twin martensite in 9Cr2WVTa steel with higher carbon content, deteriorates the impact toughness as well. The weldability of 9Cr2WVTa steel can be improved by adjusting the carbon content between 0.14 wt.% and 0.17 wt.%

  13. The effect of carbon distribution on deformation and cracking of Ni-16Cr-9Fe-C alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constant extension rate tensile (CERT) tests and constant load tensile (CLT) tests were conducted on controlled purity Ni-16Cr-9Fe-C alloys. The amount and form of carbon were varied in order to investigate the roles of carbon in solution and as intergranular (IG) carbides in the deformation and IG cracking behavior in 360 C argon and primary water environments. Results show that the strength, ductility and creep resistance of these alloys are increased with carbon present in solid solution, while IG cracking on the fracture surface is suppressed. Alloys containing carbon in the form of IG carbides, however, exhibit reduced strength and ductility relative to carbon in solution, while maintaining high IG cracking resistance with respect to carbon-free alloys. CERT results of commercial alloy 600 and controlled purity, carbon containing alloys yield comparable failure strains and IG cracking amounts. CLT comparisons with creep tests of alloy 600 suggest that alloys containing IG carbides are more susceptible to creep than those containing all carbon in solid solution

  14. Welded, sandblasted, stainless steel corrugated bars in non-carbonated and carbonated mortars: A 9-year corrosion study

    OpenAIRE

    Bautista, A.; Paredes, E. C.; Álvarez, S. M.; Velasco, F.

    2016-01-01

    Three different stainless steel corrugated grades (UNS S20430, S30403 and S32205) were similar welded to stainless steel bars with the same composition and dissimilar welded to carbon steel (CS). After cleaning the welding oxides by sandblasting, the reinforcements were embedded in mortar with chlorides and some of the samples were carbonated. Corrosion activity was monitored using corrosion potential (Ecorr) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). After 8 years of exposure, the sam...

  15. High Critical Field Superconductivity in FeSe0.1 Te0.9 Coated Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiyan; Cornell, Nicholas; Huang, Jijie; Salamon, Myron; Zakhidov, Anvar; Anvar Zakhidov; Haiyan Wang Team; Utd; Tamu Afosr Team

    2015-03-01

    Thin films of FeSe0.1Te0.9, grown on SrTi03, have been shown to possess an increased critical temperature, field, and current relative to both bulk samples of FeSe0.1Te0.9 and thin films of the related compound FeSe0.5Te0.5. Empirical measurement of FeSe0.1Te0.9 thin films reveal a zero temperature Hc2(0) ~ 45T. Carbon nanotubes are a promising lightweight flexible material for superconducting applications and have proven a robust substrate when conformally coated by superconducting MgB2. Thin film coatings of FeSe0.1Te0.9 have been deposited via pulsed laser deposition on dry- drawn multiwall carbon nanotube sheets drawn from CVD grown forests. While true zero resistance isn't achieved due to inter-connectivity issues or junction effects in multiwall CNT case, clear superconducting transitions with R reaching zero can be seen on other single wall CNT, and non-oriented carbon nanotube substrates. Properties of these superconducting FeSe0.1Te0.9@SWCNT thin films are discussed.

  16. Design of 9-meter carbon-fiberglass prototype blades : CX-100 and TX-100 : final project report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, Derek (TPI Composites, Inc., Warren, RI)

    2007-09-01

    TPI Composites, Inc. (TPI), Global Energy Concepts, LLC (GEC), and MDZ Consulting (MDZ) have collaborated on a project to design, manufacture, and test prototype carbon-fiberglass hybrid wind turbine blades of 9-m length. The project, funded by Sandia National Laboratories, involves prototype blades in both conventional (unidirectional spar fibers running along the blade span) and ''adaptive'' (carbon fibers in off-axis orientation to achieve bend-twist-coupling) configurations. After manufacture, laboratory testing is being conducted to determine the static and fatigue strength of the prototypes, in conjunction with field testing to evaluate the performance under operational conditions.

  17. Theoretical vibrations of carbon chains C3, C4, C5, C6, C7, C8, and C9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MBPT (2) procedure with the 6-31g (asterisk) basis set was used to study nearly linear carbon chains. The theoretical vibrational frequencies of the molecules C3 through C9 are presented and, for C3 through C6, compared to experimental stretching frequencies and their (C-13)/(C-12) isotopomers. Predictions for C7, C8, and C9 stretching frequencies are calculated by directly scaling the theoretical frequencies with factors derived from experimental-to-theoretical ratios known for the smaller molecules. 28 refs

  18. Gastric Hyperplasia in Mice With Targeted Disruption of the Carbonic Anhydrase Gene Car9

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ortova Gut, M.; Parkkila, S.; Vernerová, Z.; Rohde, E.; Závada, Jan; Höcker, M.; Pastorek, J.; Karttunen, T.; Gibadulinová, G.; Závadová, Zuzana; Knobeloch, K. P.; Wiedenmann, B.; Svoboda, Jan; Horak, I.; Pastoreková, S.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 123, č. 12 (2002), s. 1889-1903. ISSN 0016-5085 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV312/96/K205 Keywords : Carbonic Anhydrases * Knock-aou * Differantiation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 13.440, year: 2002

  19. Corrugated stainless steels embedded in carbonated mortars with and without chlorides: 9-year corrosion results

    OpenAIRE

    Bautista, A.; Álvarez, S. M.; Paredes, E. C.; Velasco, F.; Guzmán, S.

    2015-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of 5 corrugated stainless steel bars was evaluated in carbonated mortars: UNS S20430, S30400, S31603, S31635 and S32205. The tests were carried out under 3 different exposure conditions: at high relative humidity (C-HRH); partially immersed in 3.5% NaCl (C-PD; and with CaCl2 added during mortar mixing and exposed to high relative humidity (C-HRHCl). Corrosion potential (Ecorr) measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used to monitor the behavio...

  20. Modeling astronomically observed interstellar infrared spectra by ionized carbon pentagon-hexagon molecules (c9h7) n+

    CERN Document Server

    Ota, Norio

    2015-01-01

    Modeling a promising carrier of the astronomically observed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), infrared (IR) spectra of ionized molecules (C9H7) n+ were calculated based on density functional theory (DFT). In a previous study, it was found that void induced coronene C23H12++ could reproduce observed spectra from 3 to 15 micron, which has carbon two pentagons connected with five hexagons. In this paper, we tried to test the simplest model, that is, one pentagon connected with one hexagon, which is indene like molecule (C9H7) n+ (n=0 to 4). DFT based harmonic frequency analysis resulted that observed spectrum could be almost reproduced by a suitable sum of ionized C9H7n+ molecules. Typical example is C9H7++. Calculated peaks were 3.2, 7.4, 7.6, 8.4, and 12.7 micron, whereas observed one 3.3, 7.6, 7.8, 8.6 and 12.7 micron. By a combination of different degree of ionized molecules, we can expect to reproduce total spectrum. For a comparison, hexagon-hexagon molecule naphthalene (C10H8) n+ was studied. Unfortu...

  1. Improved recovery demonstration for Williston Basin carbonates. Annual report, June 10, 1995--June 9, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrell, L.A.; Sippel, M.A.

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this project is to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determinations of oil-in-place, methods for improved completion efficiency and the suitability of waterflooding in Red River and Ratcliffe shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Williston Basin, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing three-dimensional and multi-component seismic are being investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterization tools are integrated with geological and engineering studies. Improved completion efficiency is being tested with extended-reach jetting lance and other ultra-short-radius lateral technologies. Improved completion efficiency, additional wells at closer spacing and better estimates of oil in place will result in additional oil recovery by primary and enhanced recovery processes.

  2. Carbon Monoxide in Comet 9P/Tempel 1 before and after the Deep Impact Encounter

    CERN Document Server

    Feldman, P D; McCandliss, S R; Weaver, H A; A'Hearn, M F; Belton, M J S; Meech, K J; Feldman, Paul D.; Lupu, Roxana E.; Candliss, Stephan R. Mc; Weaver, Harold A.; Hearn, Michael F. A'; Belton, Michael J. S.; Meech, Karen J.

    2006-01-01

    One of the goals of the Hubble Space Telescope program to observe periodic comet 9P/Tempel 1 in conjunction with NASA's Deep Impact mission was to study the generation and evolution of the gaseous coma resulting from the impact. For this purpose, the Solar Blind Channel of the Advanced Camera for Surveys was used with the F140LP filter which is sensitive primarily to the ultraviolet emission (>1400 A) from the CO Fourth Positive system. Following the impact we detected an increase in brightness, which if all due to CO corresponds to 1.5 x 10^31 molecules or a mass of 6.6 x 10^5 kg, an amount that would normally be produced by 7-10 hours of quiescent outgassing from the comet. This number is less than or equal to 10% of the number of water molecules excavated, and suggests that the volatile content of the material excavated by the impact did not differ significantly from the surface or near sub-surface material responsible for the quiescent outgassing of the comet.

  3. Effects of carbon concentration on microstructure and mechanical properties of as-cast nickel-free Co–28Cr–9W-based dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanaka, Kenta, E-mail: k_yamanaka@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Mori, Manami [Department of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Sendai National College of Technology, 48 Nodayama, Medeshima-Shiote, Natori 981-1239 (Japan); Chiba, Akihiko [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    We determined the effects of carbon concentration on the microstructures and tensile properties of the Ni-free Co–29Cr–9W–1Si–C (mass%) cast alloys used in dental applications. Alloy specimens prepared with carbon concentrations in the range 0.01–0.27 mass% were conventionally cast. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) revealed that precipitates had formed in all the alloy specimens. The σ phase, a chromium-rich intermetallic compound, had formed in the region between the dendrite arms of the low-carbon-content (e.g., 0.01C) alloys. Adding carbon to the alloys increased the amount of interdendritic precipitates that formed and changed the precipitation behavior; the precipitated phase changed from the σ phase to the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide with increasing carbon concentration. Adding a small amount of carbon (i.e., 0.04 mass%) to the alloys dramatically enhanced the 0.2% proof stress, which subsequently gradually increased with increasing content of carbon in the alloys. Elongation-to-failure, on the other hand, increased with increasing carbon content and showed a maximum at carbon concentrations of ∼ 0.1 mass%. The M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide formed at the interdendritic region may govern the tensile properties of the as-cast Co–Cr–W alloys similar to how it governed those of the hot-rolled alloys prepared in our previous study. - Highlights: • Microstructure and tensile properties of C-doped Co–Cr–W cast alloys was studied. • Adding carbon stabilized the γ matrix and changed the precipitation behavior. • Formation of carbide precipitates strengthened C-doped Co–Cr–Mo alloys. • A maximum tensile elongation was obtained at carbon concentrations of ∼0.1 mass%.

  4. Effects of adding different types of carbon on the structure and magnetic properties of SmCo6.9Hf0.1 alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙继兵; 步绍静; 杨薇; 王洪水; 崔春翔; 何辰辉

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, SmCo6.9Hf0.1 as-cast alloys and ribbons with the addition of either graphite (C) or carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared by arc melting and melt-spinning, respectively. The effects of adding carbon on the structure and magnetic properties SmCo6.9Hf0.1 were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). It was found that the micro-structure and magnetic structure of SmCo6.9Hf0.1 ribbons were changed obviously due to the introduction of C or CNTs, although their crystal structure was characterized as the same Sm(Co,Hf)7 single phase, no matter carbon was added or not. As a result, the magnetic properties of carbon-contained ribbons were enhanced in a certain degree. This was considered to be related to the refined equiaxed grains, small domain size and the pinning effect of C or CNTs-rich regions. The magnetic properties of SmCo6.9Hf0.1(CNTs)0.05 rib-bons reached Hc=12.5 kOe, Mr=57.0 emu/g and Mr/M2 T=0.788.

  5. Nitrogen-doped Co/Co9S8/partly-graphitized carbon as durable catalysts for oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Dai, Ying; Chen, Baibing; Zou, Jinlong; Jiang, BaoJiang; Fu, Honggang

    2016-03-01

    Durability of catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is the key factor for governing the performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The cobalt (Co) chelated polyaniline (PANI) is used as the nitrogen and carbon sources to prepare the N-doped Co/Co9S8/partly-graphitized carbon (Co/Co9S8/NPGC) catalysts. Structure-activity correlations for Co/Co9S8/NPGC are explored by tuning the heating temperature (600-1000 °C) to investigate how the active components (Co/Co9S8) and N-doped functionalities (N-species) influence the ORR activity. As temperature increases, the gradual crystallization of Co originating from the reduction of Co9S8 is conducted to form the Co/Co9S8 heterojunction. MFCs with Co/Co9S8/NPGC (800 °C) cathode obtain the highest power density (1156 mW m-2) and the lowest charge transfer resistance (11.1 Ω) after 75 d running, which are better than commercial Pt/C (10 wt.%). Although the sole Co9S8 plays a limited role in ORR, the resulting Co/Co9S8 is found to be indispensable to achieve high activity and durability in MFCs cathodes. The dominant ORR pathways of Co/Co9S8/NPGC (800 and 900 °C) are the four-electron O2 reduction, which are attributed to the co-existence of pyridinic N, graphitic N and Co-Nx species. These new N-doped metal sulfide/PGC composites show promise for applications in MFCs.

  6. Evidence for Mg-rich carbonates on Mars from a 3.9 μm absorption feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomba, Ernesto; Zinzi, Angelo; Cloutis, Edward A.; D'Amore, Mario; Grassi, Davide; Maturilli, Alessandro

    2009-09-01

    The origin and nature of the early atmosphere of Mars is still debated. The discovery of sulfate deposits on the surface, coupled with the evidence that there are not large abundances of carbonates detectable on Mars in the optically accessible part of the regolith, leaves open different paleoclimatic evolutionary pathways. Even if carbonates are responsible for the feature observed by TES and Mini-TES at 6.76 μm, alternative hypotheses suggest that it could be due to the presence of Hydrated Iron Sulfates (HIS). Carbonates can be discerned from HIS by investigating the spectral region in which a strong overtone carbonate band is present. The Planetary Fourier Spectrometer on board the Mars Express spacecraft has acquired several thousand martian spectra in the range 1.2-45 μm since January 2004, most of which show a weak absorption feature between 3.8 and 4 μm. A similar feature was observed previously from the Earth, but its origin could not be straightforwardly ascribed to surface materials, and specifically to carbonates. Here we show the surficial nature of this band that can be ascribed to carbonate mixed with the martian soil materials. The materials that best reproduce the detected feature are Mg-rich carbonates (huntite [CaMg 3(CO 3) 4] and/or magnesite [MgCO 3]). The presence of carbonates is demonstrated in both bright and dark martian regions. An evaluation of the likeliest abundance gives an upper limit of ˜10 wt%. The widespread distribution of carbonates supports scenarios that suggest carbonate formation occurred not by precipitation in a water-rich environment but by weathering processes.

  7. One-step preparation of carbon nanotubes doped mesoporous birnessite K2Mn4O9 achieving 77% of theoretical capacitance by a facile redox reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Litao; Li, Peiyang; Tao, Keyu; Wang, Xiaomin; Liang, Wei; Gao, Yanfeng

    2016-01-01

    A facile, scalable and cost-efficient redox reaction is developed to prepare micro-powders of a quasi-crystallised, mesoporous birnessite-type manganese oxide, K2Mn4O9. In 1 M KOH electrolyte, the K2Mn4O9 powder shows a high specific capacitance of 754 F g-1 at 1 A g-1 (calculated with the net weight of K2Mn4O9 micro-powder only). Meanwhile, the electrode retains 91% of its initial capacitance after 5000 cycles at a high current density of 5 A g-1. By simply adding carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into the reaction system, the specific capacitances of as-prepared K2Mn4O9/CNTs composites are further increased to 929 and 1055 F g-1 at 1 A g-1 in 1 and 6 M KOH electrolyte (corresponding to 69 and 77% of the theoretical capacitance of MnO2), or 600 and 674 F g-1 at 5 A g-1, respectively. Significantly, a maximum energy density of 62 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 852 W kg-1 could be achieved based on a K2Mn4O9/CNTs//activated carbon asymmetric supercapacitor (ASC). At the same time, the ASC device exhibits a decent long cycle life with 85% specific capacitance retained after 1000 cycles, suggesting its wide application potential in low-cost high energy density storage systems.

  8. Multiwalled carbon nanotube@a-C@Co9S8 nanocomposites: a high-capacity and long-life anode material for advanced lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanli; Yan, Dong; Xu, Huayun; Liu, Shuo; Yang, Jian; Qian, Yitai

    2015-02-01

    A one-dimensional MWCNT@a-C@Co9S8 nanocomposite has been prepared via a facile solvothermal reaction followed by a calcination process. The amorphous carbon layer between Co9S8 and MWCNT acts as a linker to increase the loading of sulfides on MWCNT. When evaluated as anode materials for lithium ion batteries, the MWCNT@a-C@Co9S8 nanocomposite shows the advantages of high capacity and long life, superior to Co9S8 nanoparticles and MWCNT@Co9S8 nanocomposites. The reversible capacity could be retained at 662 mA h g-1 after 120 cycles at 1 A g-1. The efficient synthesis and excellent performances of this nanocomposite offer numerous opportunities for other sulfides as a new anode for lithium ion batteries.A one-dimensional MWCNT@a-C@Co9S8 nanocomposite has been prepared via a facile solvothermal reaction followed by a calcination process. The amorphous carbon layer between Co9S8 and MWCNT acts as a linker to increase the loading of sulfides on MWCNT. When evaluated as anode materials for lithium ion batteries, the MWCNT@a-C@Co9S8 nanocomposite shows the advantages of high capacity and long life, superior to Co9S8 nanoparticles and MWCNT@Co9S8 nanocomposites. The reversible capacity could be retained at 662 mA h g-1 after 120 cycles at 1 A g-1. The efficient synthesis and excellent performances of this nanocomposite offer numerous opportunities for other sulfides as a new anode for lithium ion batteries. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Infrared spectrogram (IR) of glucose treated MWCNT; TEM images of MWCNT@a-C treated by different concentrations of glucose; SEM and TEM images of the intermediate product obtained from the solvothermal reaction between thiourea and Co(Ac)2; EDS spectrum of MWCNT@a-C@Co9S8 composites; SEM and TEM images of MWCNT@Co9S8 nanocomposites obtained without the hydrothermal treatment by glucose; SEM and TEM images of Co9S8 nanoparticles; Galvanostatic discharge-charge profiles and cycling performance of MWCNT@a-C; TEM images

  9. AIRS Map of Carbon Monoxide Draped on Globe: Time Series from 8/1/2005 to 9/30/2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of AIRS Map of Carbon Monoxide Draped on Globe Forest fires and agricultural burning create large amounts of carbon monoxide. AIRS provides daily global maps of carbon monoxide from space, allowing scientists to follow the global transport of this gas day-to-day. In this image sequence, carbon monoxide pollution from agricultural burning blooms repeatedly over the Amazonian basin. The gas is then transported across the Atlantic Ocean. Carbon monoxide pollution from fires in sub-Saharan Africa is also apparent. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Experiment, with its visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in tandem, the three instruments can make simultaneous observations all the way down to the Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, 3-D map of atmospheric temperature and humidity and provides information on clouds, greenhouse gases, and many other atmospheric phenomena. The AIRS Infrared Sounder Experiment flies onboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., under contract to NASA. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  10. Carbon Dots and 9AA as a Binary Matrix for the Detection of Small Molecules by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongli; Gao, Dan; Bai, Hangrui; Liu, Hongxia; Lin, Shuo; Jiang, Yuyang

    2016-07-01

    Application of matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) to analyze small molecules have some limitations, due to the inhomogeneous analyte/matrix co-crystallization and interference of matrix-related peaks in low m/z region. In this work, carbon dots (CDs) were for the first time applied as a binary matrix with 9-Aminoacridine (9AA) in MALDI MS for small molecules analysis. By 9AA/CDs assisted desorption/ionization (D/I) process, a wide range of small molecules, including nucleosides, amino acids, oligosaccharides, peptides, and anticancer drugs with a higher sensitivity were demonstrated in the positive ion mode. A detection limit down to 5 fmol was achieved for cytidine. 9AA/CDs matrix also exhibited excellent reproducibility compared with 9AA matrix. Moreover, by exploring the ionization mechanism of the matrix, the influence factors might be attributed to the four parts: (1) the strong UV absorption of 9AA/CDs due to their π-conjugated network; (2) the carboxyl groups modified on the CDs surface act as protonation sites for proton transfer in positive ion mode; (3) the thin layer crystal of 9AA/CDs could reach a high surface temperature more easily and lower transfer energy for LDI MS; (4) CDs could serve as a matrix additive to suppress 9AA ionization. Furthermore, this matrix was allowed for the analysis of glucose as well as nucleosides in human urine, and the level of cytidine was quantified with a linear range of 0.05-5 mM (R2 > 0.99). Therefore, the 9AA/CDs matrix was proven to be an effective MALDI matrix for the analysis of small molecules with improved sensitivity and reproducibility. This work provides an alternative solution for small molecules detection that can be further used in complex samples analysis.

  11. Carbon Dots and 9AA as a Binary Matrix for the Detection of Small Molecules by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongli; Gao, Dan; Bai, Hangrui; Liu, Hongxia; Lin, Shuo; Jiang, Yuyang

    2016-07-01

    Application of matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) to analyze small molecules have some limitations, due to the inhomogeneous analyte/matrix co-crystallization and interference of matrix-related peaks in low m/z region. In this work, carbon dots (CDs) were for the first time applied as a binary matrix with 9-Aminoacridine (9AA) in MALDI MS for small molecules analysis. By 9AA/CDs assisted desorption/ionization (D/I) process, a wide range of small molecules, including nucleosides, amino acids, oligosaccharides, peptides, and anticancer drugs with a higher sensitivity were demonstrated in the positive ion mode. A detection limit down to 5 fmol was achieved for cytidine. 9AA/CDs matrix also exhibited excellent reproducibility compared with 9AA matrix. Moreover, by exploring the ionization mechanism of the matrix, the influence factors might be attributed to the four parts: (1) the strong UV absorption of 9AA/CDs due to their π-conjugated network; (2) the carboxyl groups modified on the CDs surface act as protonation sites for proton transfer in positive ion mode; (3) the thin layer crystal of 9AA/CDs could reach a high surface temperature more easily and lower transfer energy for LDI MS; (4) CDs could serve as a matrix additive to suppress 9AA ionization. Furthermore, this matrix was allowed for the analysis of glucose as well as nucleosides in human urine, and the level of cytidine was quantified with a linear range of 0.05-5 mM (R(2) > 0.99). Therefore, the 9AA/CDs matrix was proven to be an effective MALDI matrix for the analysis of small molecules with improved sensitivity and reproducibility. This work provides an alternative solution for small molecules detection that can be further used in complex samples analysis. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27075876

  12. Carbon Dots and 9AA as a Binary Matrix for the Detection of Small Molecules by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongli; Gao, Dan; Bai, Hangrui; Liu, Hongxia; Lin, Shuo; Jiang, Yuyang

    2016-04-01

    Application of matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) to analyze small molecules have some limitations, due to the inhomogeneous analyte/matrix co-crystallization and interference of matrix-related peaks in low m/z region. In this work, carbon dots (CDs) were for the first time applied as a binary matrix with 9-Aminoacridine (9AA) in MALDI MS for small molecules analysis. By 9AA/CDs assisted desorption/ionization (D/I) process, a wide range of small molecules, including nucleosides, amino acids, oligosaccharides, peptides, and anticancer drugs with a higher sensitivity were demonstrated in the positive ion mode. A detection limit down to 5 fmol was achieved for cytidine. 9AA/CDs matrix also exhibited excellent reproducibility compared with 9AA matrix. Moreover, by exploring the ionization mechanism of the matrix, the influence factors might be attributed to the four parts: (1) the strong UV absorption of 9AA/CDs due to their π-conjugated network; (2) the carboxyl groups modified on the CDs surface act as protonation sites for proton transfer in positive ion mode; (3) the thin layer crystal of 9AA/CDs could reach a high surface temperature more easily and lower transfer energy for LDI MS; (4) CDs could serve as a matrix additive to suppress 9AA ionization. Furthermore, this matrix was allowed for the analysis of glucose as well as nucleosides in human urine, and the level of cytidine was quantified with a linear range of 0.05-5 mM (R2 > 0.99). Therefore, the 9AA/CDs matrix was proven to be an effective MALDI matrix for the analysis of small molecules with improved sensitivity and reproducibility. This work provides an alternative solution for small molecules detection that can be further used in complex samples analysis.

  13. CCRA-9 2014 update

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, T. L.; Thomason, W. E.

    2014-01-01

    This PowerPoint summarizes the research activities and findings of SANREM’s soil quality and soil carbon sequestration cross-cutting research activity. The presentation describes studies of soil carbon dioxide, GIS agroclimatology comparisons, and density fractionation of soil carbon. CCRA-9 (Soil Quality and Soil Carbon Sequestration)

  14. Effect of carbon on creep rupture strength and toughness of 9Cr-2Mo heat-resisting steels with V and Nb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of carbon on creep rupture properties and room-temperature toughness of (9--10)Cr-(1.8--2)Mo heat resisting steels with V and Nb was studied. The amount of carbon content was varied from 0.02% to 0.23% in order to improve toughness without decrease in creep rupture strength. The difference in creep rupture strength and Charpy absorbed energy between 10Cr-2Mo steels and 9Cr-1.8Mo steels was studied with respect to the ratio of delta-ferrite to martensite, the precipitates, and the microstructure. The results indicated that the 9Cr-1.8Mo-0.1V-0.05Nb steels with 0.05--0.14%C tempered at 8000C showed good toughness, and that 104h rupture strength of the steel was as high as that of SUS 316 at 5500C and SUS 304 austenitic stainless steel at 6000C. It was concluded that the optimum amount of delta-ferrite with respect to both creep rupture strength and Charpy absorbed energy was 10--20%. (author)

  15. Radiation damage to amorphous carbon thin films irradiated by multiple 46.9 nm laser shots below the single-shot damage threshold

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Juha, Libor; Hájková, Věra; Chalupský, Jaromír; Vorlíček, Vladimír; Ritucci, A.; Reale, A.; Zuppella, P.; Störmer, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 105, č. 9 (2009), 093117/1-093117/3. ISSN 0021-8979 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN300100702; GA MŠk LC510; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528; GA MŠk LA08024; GA AV ČR IAA400100701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : single- shot damage threshold * multiple- shot exposure damage * amorphous carbon * radiation erosion * capillary-discharge XUV laser Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.072, year: 2009

  16. The silicate model and carbon rich model of CoRoT-7b, Kepler-9d and Kepler-10b

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Yan-Xiang; Zhou, Ji-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Possible bulk compositions of the super-Earth exoplanets, CoRoT-7b, Kepler-9d, and Kepler-10b are investigated by applying a commonly used silicate and a non-standard carbon model. Their internal structures are deduced using the suitable equation of state of the materials. The degeneracy problems of their compositions can be partly overcome, based on the fact that all three planets are extremely close to their host stars. By analyzing the numerical results, we conclude: 1) The iron core of Co...

  17. Physisorption of Nucleobases on C(9,1) and C(6,5) Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes: A Density Functional Theory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdim, Brahim; Pachter, Ruth

    2009-03-01

    Selective enrichment of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) of a specific chirality by single-stranded DNA sequences has been shown experimentally by Zheng et al. [JACS 2007, 129, 6084], where a larger enrichment of C(6,5) as compared to C(9,1), which are SWCNTs of the same diameter but different chirality, was demonstrated with alternating guanine and thymine (GT) bases. In this work, we report density functional (DFT) calculations of (G) and (T) nucleobase adsorption on C(6,5) and C(9,1) SWCNTs, in order to gain an understanding of the selective sorting, specifically regarding adsorption characteristics, interface energetics, and electronic structures, as dependent on the tube chirality, also including specifically an empirical dispersion correction in the DFT functional.

  18. Treatability Test Report: Characterization of Vadose Zone Carbon Tetrachloride Source Strength Using Tomographic Methods at the 216-Z-9 Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Rohay, Virginia J.; Mackley, Rob D.; Parker, Kyle R.

    2012-09-28

    A treatability test was conducted in 2011 at the 216-Z-9 Trench to evaluate methods for collecting characterization information that supports refined assessment of SVE performance goals based on impact to groundwater. The characterization information can also provide input to operational strategies for continued SVE operation and decisions regarding closure of the SVE system or transition to other remedies, if necessary.

  19. 9,10-Dibromo-N-aryl-9,10-dihydro-9,10-[3,4]epipyrroloanthracene-12,14-diones: Synthesis and Investigation of Their Effects on Carbonic Anhydrase Isozymes I, II, IX, and XII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göksu, Haydar; Topal, Meryem; Keskin, Ali; Gültekin, Mehmet S; Çelik, Murat; Gülçin, İlhami; Tanc, Muhammet; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-06-01

    N-substituted maleimides were synthesized from maleic anhydride and primary amines. 1,4-Dibromo-dibenzo[e,h]bicyclo-[2,2,2]octane-2,3-dicarboximide derivatives (4a-f) were prepared by the [4+2] cycloaddition reaction of dibromoanthracenes with the N-substituted maleimide derivatives. The carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) inhibitory effects of the new derivatives were assayed against the human (h) isozymes hCA I, II, IX, and XII. All tested bicyclo dicarboximide derivatives exhibited excellent inhibitory effects in the nanomolar range, with Ki values in the range of 117.73-232.87 nM against hCA I and of 69.74-111.51 nM against hCA II, whereas they were low micromolar inhibitors against hCA IX and XII. PMID:27174792

  20. The silicate and carbon-rich models of CoRoT-7b, Kepler-9d and Kepler-10b

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Xiang Gong; Ji-Lin Zhout

    2012-01-01

    Possible bulk compositions of the super-Earth exoplanets CoRoT-7b,Kepler-9d,and Kepler-10b are investigated by applying a commonly used silicate model and a non-standard carbon model.Their internal structures are deduced using a suitable equation of state for the materials.The degeneracy problems of their compositions can be partly overcome,based on the fact that all three planets are extremely close to their host stars.By analyzing the numerical results,we conclude:1) the iron core of CoRoT-7b is not more than 27% of its total mass within lσ mass-radius error bars,so an Earth-like composition is less likely,but its carbon rich model can be compatible with an Earth-like core/mantle mass fraction; 2) Kepler-10b is more likely to have a Mercury-like composition,with its old age implying that its high iron content may be a result of strong solar wind or giant impact; 3) the transiting-only super-Earth Kepler-9d is also discussed.Combining its possible composition with the formation theory,we can place some constraints on its mass and bulk composition.

  1. Corrugated stainless steels embedded in mortar for 9 years: corrosion results of non-carbonated, chloride-contaminated samples

    OpenAIRE

    Bautista, A.; Paredes, E. C.; Velasco, F.; Álvarez, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Mortar samples reinforced with 5 different corrugated stainless steels were tested for 9 years in 2 different conditions: partial immersion (PI) in 3.5% NaCl, and chloride addition to the mortar and exposure to high relative humidity (HRH). The monitoring during the exposures was carried out with corrosion potential (E-corr) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. A year before finishing (after 8 years of exposure), the reinforced mortar samples were anodically polarise...

  2. Paired carbon stable-isotope records for the Cenomanian Stage (100.5 -93.9 Ma): correlation tool and Late Cretaceous pCO2 record?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Ian; Gröcke, Darren; Laurin, Jiří; Selby, David; Roest-Ellis, Sascha; Miles, Andrew; Lignum, John; Gale, Andrew; Kennedy, Jim

    2016-04-01

    Carbon stable-isotope stratigraphy of marine carbonates (δ13Ccarb) provides remarkable insights into past variation in the global carbon cycle, and has become firmly established as a powerful global correlation tool. Continuous δ13Ccarb time series are becoming increasingly available for much of the geological record, including the Upper Cretaceous. However, our knowledge of stratigraphic variation in the carbon isotopic composition of sedimentary organic matter (δ13Corg) is much poorer, and is generally restricted to organic-rich sedimentary successions and/or key boundary intervals. Close coupling exists between the global isotopic composition of the reduced and oxidised carbon reservoirs on geological time scales, but the stratigraphic resolution of most long-term δ13Corg Mesozoic records is inadequate to identify leads and lags in the responses of the two reservoirs to carbon cycle perturbations. Cenomanian times (100.5-93.9 Ma) represent perhaps the best documented episode of eustatic rise in sea level in Earth history and the beginning of the Late Mesozoic thermal maximum, driving global expansion of epicontinental seas and the onset of widespread pelagic and hemipelagic carbonate deposition. Significant changes occurred in global stable-isotope records, including two prominent perturbations of the carbon cycle - the Mid-Cenomanian Event I (MCEI; ~96.5-96.2 Ma) and Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 (OAE2; ~94.5-93.8 Ma). OAE2, one of two truly global Cretaceous OAEs, was marked by the widespread deposition of black shales, and a global positive carbon stable-isotope excursion of 2.0 - 2.5‰ δ13Ccarb, and up to 7‰ in the sulphur-bound phytane biomarker. MCEI, by contrast, shows a Germany and Italy. Comparison of the Vergons δ13Ccarb vs. δ13Corg profiles demonstrates similar medium-term stratigraphic variation, but significant differences in both short- and long-term trends. Potential causes of the similarities and differences are examined, and it is concluded

  3. Carbon Tetrachloride Flow and Transport in the Subsurface of the 216-Z-9 Trench at the Hanford Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostrom, M.; Rockhold, M.; Truex, M.; Thorne, P.; Last, G.; Rohay, V.

    2006-12-01

    Three-dimensional modeling was conducted with layered and heterogeneous models to enhance the conceptual model of CT distribution in the vertical and lateral direction beneath the 216-Z-9 trench and to investigate the effects of soil vapor extraction (SVE). This work supports the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) efforts to characterize the nature and distribution of CT in the 200 West Area and subsequently select an appropriate final remedy. Simulations targeted migration of dense, nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) consisting of CT and co-disposed organics in the subsurface beneath the 216-Z-9 trench as a function of the properties and distribution of subsurface sediments and of the properties and disposal history of the waste. Simulations of CT migration were conducted using the Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator. Simulation results support a conceptual model for CT distribution where CT in the DNAPL phase is expected to have migrated primarily in a vertical direction below the disposal trench. Presence of small-scale heterogeneities tends to limit the extent of vertical migration of CT DNAPL due to enhanced retention of DNAPL compared to more homogeneous conditions, but migration is still predominantly in the vertical direction. Results also show that the Cold Creek units retain more CT DNAPL within the vadose zone than other hydrologic unit during SVE. A considerable amount of the disposed CT DNAPL may have partitioned to the vapor and subsequently water and sorbed phases. Presence of small-scale heterogeneities tends to increase the amount of volatilization. Any continued migration of CT from the vadose zone to the groundwater is likely through interaction of vapor phase CT with the groundwater and not through continued DNAPL migration. The results indicated that SVE appears to be an effective technology for vadose zone remediation, but additional effort is needed to improve simulation of the SVE process.

  4. Graphitic carbon nitride C6N9H3.HCl: Characterisation by UV and near-IR FT Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The graphitic layered compound C6N9H3.HCl was prepared by reaction between melamine and cyanuric chloride under high pressure-high temperature conditions in a piston cylinder apparatus and characterised using SEM, powder X-ray diffraction, UV Raman and near-IR Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy with near-IR excitation. Theoretical calculations using density functional methods permitted evaluation of the mode of attachment of H atoms to nitrogen sites in the structure and a better understanding of the X-ray diffraction pattern. Broadening in the UV and near-IR FT Raman spectra indicate possible disordering of the void sites within the graphitic layers or it could be due to electron-phonon coupling effects. - Graphical abstract: The graphitic layered compound C6N9H3.HCl was prepared by reaction between melamine and cyanuric chloride under high pressure-high temperature conditions in a piston cylinder apparatus and characterised using SEM, powder X-ray diffraction, UV Raman and near-IR Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy using near-IR excitation. Theoretical calculations using density functional methods permitted evaluation of the mode of attachment of H atoms to nitrogen sites around the C12N12 voids within the layered structure and also led to better understanding of the X-ray diffraction pattern. Sharp peaks in the UV Raman spectra are due to C3N3 triazine ring units in the structure, that may be enhanced by resonance Raman effects. Broadening in the UV and near-IR FT Raman spectra indicate possible disordering within the graphitic layers or electron-phonon coupling effects.

  5. The charge state distributions of 0.5-2.9 MeV Be, Al, Cl, Ti and Ni ions measured after carbon foil stripping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Equilibrium charge state distributions have been measured for Be, Al, Cl, Ti and Ni ions stripped in the high-voltage terminal of an electrostatic tandem accelerator using a 2 μg/cm2 carbon foil. The series of measurements were made with a terminal voltage ranging from typically 1.5 to 2.9 MV. The charge state distributions were measured on the high-energy side of the accelerator, just in front of the analysing magnet, in order to take charge state-dependent transmission through the high-energy side of the accelerator into account. The obtained charge state distributions will be used for accelerator mass spectrometry measurements to find the optimum terminal voltage of the accelerator. (orig.)

  6. The Distribution of Radioactivity in the Mouse Following Administration of Dibenzanthracene Labeled in the 9 and 10 Positions with Carbon Fourteen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidelberger, Charles; Jones, Hardin, B.

    1948-01-30

    Dibenzanthracene, labeled in the 9 and 10 positions with carbon fourteen has been administered to mice intravenously and by stomach tube as an aqueous colloid, and intraperitoneally, subcutaneously, and by stomach tube in tricaprylin solution. The distribution of radioactivity in the mice at various time intervals after administration of the carcinogen has been determined. The radioactivity is rapidly eliminated, largely through the feces, and ordinarily very little is absorbed. The distribution and rate of elimination depends upon the mode of administration. There is an appreciable quantity of radioactivity in tumors produced several months after a single subcutaneous injection of dibenzanthracene. There appear to be no detectable effects from the radiation of the labeled carcinogen.

  7. Differential cross sections on fragment (2 ≤ Z ≤ 9) production for carbon, aluminum and silicon induced by tens-of-MeV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The double-differential cross sections (DDXs) for the inclusive reactions producing heavy nuclei with Z = 2-9 (fragments) from carbon, aluminum, and silicon targets induced by 50 and 70 MeV protons are systematically measured at several angles (30deg, 60deg, 90deg, and 135deg) using a specially developed Bragg curve counter and the energy-time-of-flight method. The DDXs of a silicon target for the proton-induced reaction producing fragments heavier than lithium were measured for the first time. The present results are compared with past experimental data, the LA150 evaluated data by the Los Alamos group and several intranuclear cascade models (Bertini and ISOBAR), and the JAEA-version quantum molecular dynamics model (JQMD) coupled with the Generalized Evaporation Model (GEM), which are implemented in the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS). The present results agree well with the past experimental data and LA150 data for α-particle production. For the fragments heavier than lithium, the present results show forward-peak angular distributions rather than isotropic ones stored in LA150. Calculations with the ISOBAR and GEM models well reproduced our experimental results except for light fragments especially in the high-energy region. (author)

  8. Radiation damage to amorphous carbon thin films irradiated by multiple 46.9 nm laser shots below the single-shot damage threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-surface-quality amorphous carbon (a-C) optical coatings with a thickness of 45 nm, deposited by magnetron sputtering on a silicon substrate, were irradiated by the focused beam of capillary-discharge Ne-like Ar extreme ultraviolet laser (CDL=capillary-discharge laser; XUV=extreme ultraviolet, i.e., wavelengths below 100 nm). The laser wavelength and pulse duration were 46.9 nm and 1.7 ns, respectively. The laser beam was focused onto the sample surface by a spherical Sc/Si multilayer mirror with a total reflectivity of about 30%. The laser pulse energy was varied from 0.4 to 40 μJ on the sample surface. The irradiation was carried out at five fluence levels between 0.1 and 10 J/cm2, accumulating five different series of shots, i.e., 1, 5, 10, 20, and 40. The damage to the a-C thin layer was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Nomarski differential interference contrast (DIC) optical microscopy. The dependence of the single-shot-damaged area on pulse energy makes it possible to determine a beam spot diameter in the focus. Its value was found to be equal to 23.3±3.0 μm using AFM data, assuming the beam to have a Gaussian profile. Such a plot can also be used for a determination of single-shot damage threshold in a-C. A single-shot threshold value of 1.1 J/cm2 was found. Investigating the consequences of the multiple-shot exposure, it has been found that an accumulation of 10, 20, and 40 shots at a fluence of 0.5 J/cm2, i.e., below the single-shot damage threshold, causes irreversible changes of thin a-C layers, which can be registered by both the AFM and the DIC microscopy. In the center of the damaged area, AFM shows a-C removal to a maximum depth of 0.3, 1.2, and 1.5 nm for 10-, 20- and 40-shot exposure, respectively. Raman microprobe analysis does not indicate any change in the structure of the remaining a-C material. The erosive behavior reported here contrasts with the material expansion observed earlier [L. Juha et al., Proc. SPIE 5917, 91

  9. Measurement of the tensor (Ayy) and vector (Ay) analyzing powers in the fragmentation of a 9-GeV/c deuteron on hydrogen and carbon nuclei at high proton transverse momenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on the tensor and vector analyzing powers (Ayy and Ay, respectively) in the fragmentation of a 9-GeV/c deuteron on hydrogen and carbon nuclei at high proton transverse momenta are presented. These data are compared with the results of relevant calculations performed within light-front dynamics by using various deuteron wave functions. The best description of the data is attained with the relativistic deuteron wave function derived within field-theory light-front dynamics

  10. Carbon stars near the open clusters at the galactic lattitudes 4deg,59deg,5 and between the longitudes 68deg and 184deg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By visual inspection of spectral photographs of two bands along the Milky Way of a general area more than 1000 sq. degrees 302 carbon stars have been identified, including 142 stars discovered at the Radioastrophysical observatory of the Academy of Sciences of the Latvian SSR and about 50 scattered clusters. Nine of the carbon stars occur less than three radii from seven scattered stars clusters

  11. Zur Reaktion von Pyroglutaminsäure-Derivaten mit Phosphorpentachlorid - Darstellung chlorierter Pyrrol-2-carbonsäure-Derivate (Aminosäuren ; 9)

    OpenAIRE

    Effenberger, Franz; Müller, Wolfgang; Isak, Heinz

    1987-01-01

    N-Benzyl-5-oxoprolinester 5 werden mit PCl5 über verschiedene chlorierte Zwischenstufen zu N-Benzyl-4,5-dichlor-1H-pyrrol-2-carbonsäureestern 6 chloriert, während N-Benzhydryl- L-3 und N-Acyl-5-oxoprolinester L-4 mit PCl5 unter Abspaltung des N-Substituenten L-4,4,5-Trichlor-3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrrol-2-carbon-säureester 18 bilden, die mit Base in die 4,5-Dichlor-1H-pyrrol-2-carbonsäureester 20 übergehen. Diese Umsetzungen stellen die beste Methode zur Herstellung von 4,5-Dichlor-1H-pyrrol-2-carbo...

  12. Cobalt(III) complexes of [3(5)]adamanzane, 1,5,9,13-tetraazabicyclo[7.7.3]nonadecane. Report of an inert, chelate hydrogen carbonate ion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broge, Louise; Søtofte, Inger; Olsen, Carl Erik; Springborg, Johan

    2001-01-01

    .H2O (3a). The coordination geometry around the cobalt(III) ion is a distorted octahedron with the inorganic ligands at cis-positions. Complex 2 is the second example of a cobalt(III) complex for which the X-ray structure,sfiows a chelate binding mode of the hydrogen carbonate entity. The pK(a) value...

  13. Towards a representation of priming on soil carbon decomposition in the global land biosphere model ORCHIDEE (version 1.9.5.2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenet, Bertrand; Esteban Moyano, Fernando; Peylin, Philippe; Ciais, Philippe; Janssens, Ivan A.

    2016-03-01

    Priming of soil carbon decomposition encompasses different processes through which the decomposition of native (already present) soil organic matter is amplified through the addition of new organic matter, with new inputs typically being more labile than the native soil organic matter. Evidence for priming comes from laboratory and field experiments, but to date there is no estimate of its impact at global scale and under the current anthropogenic perturbation of the carbon cycle. Current soil carbon decomposition models do not include priming mechanisms, thereby introducing uncertainty when extrapolating short-term local observations to ecosystem and regional to global scale. In this study we present a simple conceptual model of decomposition priming, called PRIM, able to reproduce laboratory (incubation) and field (litter manipulation) priming experiments. Parameters for this model were first optimized against data from 20 soil incubation experiments using a Bayesian framework. The optimized parameter values were evaluated against another set of soil incubation data independent from the ones used for calibration and the PRIM model reproduced the soil incubations data better than the original, CENTURY-type soil decomposition model, whose decomposition equations are based only on first-order kinetics. We then compared the PRIM model and the standard first-order decay model incorporated into the global land biosphere model ORCHIDEE (Organising Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic Ecosystems). A test of both models was performed at ecosystem scale using litter manipulation experiments from five sites. Although both versions were equally able to reproduce observed decay rates of litter, only ORCHIDEE-PRIM could simulate the observed priming (R2 = 0.54) in cases where litter was added or removed. This result suggests that a conceptually simple and numerically tractable representation of priming adapted to global models is able to capture the sign and magnitude of the

  14. 纯牛奶中18碳TFA及9c,11 t-CLA含量的测定研究%Study on 18-carbon trans fatty acid and 9c,11t-conjugated linoleic acid contents in milk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章萍萍; 赵培城

    2010-01-01

    为了精确测量出纯牛奶中18碳TFA及9c,11t-CLA的含量,本实验通过毛细管气相色谱法,并采用内标法,对纯牛奶进行了检测,结果显示,纯牛奶中18碳脂肪酸的质量百分比约为35.43% ,18碳TFA的质量百分比约为2.27%,而其中C18:1-llt的质量百分比达到1.28%,占所有18碳TFA的一半以上,约为56.36%,同时,牛奶中C18:2 -9c,11t的质量百分比只为0.11%,其含量远少于TFA.

  15. Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the Nine R/V Korr Cruises Comprising the Indian Ocean CO2Survey (WOCE Sections I8SI9S, I9N, I8NI5E, I3, I5WI4, I7N, I1, I10, and I2; December 1, 1994-January 19, 1996)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozyr, A.V.

    2003-09-15

    This document describes the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO{sub 2}) and total alkalinity (TALK) at hydrographic stations taken during the R/V Knorr Indian Ocean cruises (Sections I8SI9S, I9N, I8NI5E, I3, I5WI4, I7N, I1, I10, and I2) in 1994-1996. The measurements were conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE). The expedition began in Fremantle, Australia, on December 1, 1994, and ended in Mombasa, Kenya, on January 22, 1996. During the nine cruises, 12 WOCE sections were occupied. Total carbon dioxide was extracted from water samples and measured using single-operator multiparameter metabolic analyzers (SOMMAs) coupled to coulometers. The overall precision and accuracy of the analyses was {+-} 1.20 {micro}mol/kg. The second carbonate system parameter, TALK, was determined by potentiometric titration. The precision of the measurements determined from 962 analyses of certified reference material was {+-} 4.2 {micro}mol/kg (REFERENCE). This work was supported by grants from the National Science Foundation, the U. S. Department of Energy, and the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration. The R/V Knorr Indian Ocean data set is available as a numeric data package (NDP) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). The NDP consists of 18 oceanographic data files, two FORTRAN 77 data retrieval routine files, a readme file, and this printed documentation, which describes the contents and format of all files as well as the procedures and methods used to obtain the data. Instructions for accessing the data are provided.

  16. Co9S8 nanoparticles encapsulated in nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon networks with improved lithium storage properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mujtaba, Jawayria; Sun, Hongyu; Huang, Guoyong; Zhao, Yanyan; Arandiyan, Hamidreza; Sun, Guoxing; Xu, Shengming; Zhu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    powders in an Ar atmosphere. The structural and compositional analysis were conducted by employing X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), which show that each Co9S8 nanoparticle is well encapsulated...

  17. 广州白云山9种林分光合固碳放氧价值核算%Valuation of Photosynthetic Carbon Sequestration and Oxygen Production of the 9 Forest Stands in Baiyunshan Scenic Spot, Guangzhou, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾小容; 曾曙才; 苏志尧

    2006-01-01

    采用收获法计算了广州白云山林分改造后9种新建林分的生物量,并在此基础上评估了这些林分的光合固碳和放氧价值.各种林分的光合固碳和放氧的总价值分别为:木荷851 477.17 USD/hm2,石栎244 597.27 USD/hm2,大叶相思603 695.00 USD/hm2,马占相思372 768.99 USD/hm2,藜蒴289 537.77USD/hm2,中华锥437 500.48 USD/hm2,降真香109 758.10 USD/hm2,尖叶杜英146 324.94 USD/hm2,加勒比松138 039.68 USD/hm2.以木荷和大叶相思的光合固碳和放氧价值最高.

  18. Cobalt(III) complexes of [3(5)]adamanzane, 1,5,9,13-tetraazabicyclo[7.7.3]nonadecane. Report of an inert, chelate hydrogen carbonate ion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broge, Louise; Søtofte, Inger; Olsen, Carl Erik;

    2001-01-01

    Three cobalt(III) complexes of themacrocyclic tetraamine [3(5)]adamanzane (1,5,9,13-tetraazabicyclo[7.7.3]-nonadecane) were isolated as salts. The X-ray crystal structures were solved for the compounds [Co([3(5)]adz)-(CO3)AsF6 (1b), [Co([3(5)]adz)(HCO3)]znBr(4).H2O (2a), and [Co([35]adz)(SO4)]AsF...

  19. Graphitic carbon nitride C 6N 9H 3·HCl: Characterisation by UV and near-IR FT Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Paul F.; Lees, Victoria; Quirico, Eric; Montagnac, Gilles; Sella, Andrea; Reynard, Bruno; Simon, Patrick; Bailey, Edward; Deifallah, Malek; Corà, Furio

    2009-10-01

    The graphitic layered compound C 6N 9H 3·HCl was prepared by reaction between melamine and cyanuric chloride under high pressure-high temperature conditions in a piston cylinder apparatus and characterised using SEM, powder X-ray diffraction, UV Raman and near-IR Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy with near-IR excitation. Theoretical calculations using density functional methods permitted evaluation of the mode of attachment of H atoms to nitrogen sites in the structure and a better understanding of the X-ray diffraction pattern. Broadening in the UV and near-IR FT Raman spectra indicate possible disordering of the void sites within the graphitic layers or it could be due to electron-phonon coupling effects.

  20. 9-(Dimethoxymethylanthracene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Yao

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C17H16O2, a dimethyl acetal of 9-anthraldehyde, the anthracene skeleton is planar and the two methoxy groups attached to the C atom at position 9 of the aromatic ring system are located above and below the ring system.

  1. Sox9

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seymour, Philip A

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, it has been discovered that the transcription factor Sox9 plays several critical roles in governing the development of the embryonic pancreas and the homeostasis of the mature organ. While analysis of pancreata from patients affected by the Sox9 haploinsufficiency syndrome c...

  2. The potential protective effect of Physalis peruviana L. against carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity in rats is mediated by suppression of oxidative stress and downregulation of MMP-9 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Olayan, Ebtisam M; El-Khadragy, Manal F; Aref, Ahmed M; Othman, Mohamed S; Kassab, Rami B; Abdel Moneim, Ahmed E

    2014-01-01

    The active constituent profile in Cape gooseberry (Physalis peruviana L.) juice was determined by GC-MS. Quercetin and kaempferol were active components in the juice. In this study we have evaluated its potential protective effect on hepatic injury and fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). Twenty-eight rats divided into 4 groups: Group I served as control group, and Group II received weekly i.p. injection of 2 mL CCl4/kg bwt for 12 weeks. Group III were supplemented with Physalis juice via the drinking water. The animals of Group IV received Physalis juice as Group III and also were intraperitoneally injected weekly with 2 mL CCl4/kg bwt for 12 weeks. Hepatoprotective effect was evaluated by improvement in liver enzymes serum levels, reduction in collagen areas, downregulation in expression of the fibrotic marker MMP-9, reduction in the peroxidative marker malonaldehyde and the inflammatory marker nitric oxide, and restoration of the activity of antioxidant enzymatic and nonenzymatic systems, namely, glutathione content, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase activities. The results show that the potential hepatoprotective effects of Physalis peruviana may be due to physalis acts by promotion of processes that restore hepatolobular architecture and through the inhibition of oxidative stress pathway. PMID:24876910

  3. The Potential Protective Effect of Physalis peruviana L. against Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats Is Mediated by Suppression of Oxidative Stress and Downregulation of MMP-9 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebtisam M. Al-Olayan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The active constituent profile in Cape gooseberry (Physalis peruviana L. juice was determined by GC-MS. Quercetin and kaempferol were active components in the juice. In this study we have evaluated its potential protective effect on hepatic injury and fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4. Twenty-eight rats divided into 4 groups: Group I served as control group, and Group II received weekly i.p. injection of 2 mL CCl4/kg bwt for 12 weeks. Group III were supplemented with Physalis juice via the drinking water. The animals of Group IV received Physalis juice as Group III and also were intraperitoneally injected weekly with 2 mL CCl4/kg bwt for 12 weeks. Hepatoprotective effect was evaluated by improvement in liver enzymes serum levels, reduction in collagen areas, downregulation in expression of the fibrotic marker MMP-9, reduction in the peroxidative marker malonaldehyde and the inflammatory marker nitric oxide, and restoration of the activity of antioxidant enzymatic and nonenzymatic systems, namely, glutathione content, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase activities. The results show that the potential hepatoprotective effects of Physalis peruviana may be due to physalis acts by promotion of processes that restore hepatolobular architecture and through the inhibition of oxidative stress pathway.

  4. Thermal Infrared Imaging and Atmospheric Modeling of VHS J125601.92-125723.9 b: Evidence for Moderately Thick Clouds and Equilibrium Carbon Chemistry in a Hierarchical Triple System

    CERN Document Server

    Rich, Evan A; Wisniewski, John P; Hashimoto, Jun; Brandt, Timothy D; Carson, Joseph C; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Uyama, Taichi

    2016-01-01

    We present and analyze Subaru/IRCS L' and M' images of the nearby M dwarf VHS J125601.92-125723.9 (VHS 1256), which was recently claimed to have a ~11 M_Jup companion (VHS 1256 b) at ~102 au separation. Our AO images partially resolve the central star into a binary, whose components are nearly equal in brightness and separated by 0.106" +/- 0.001". VHS 1256 b occupies nearly the same near-IR color-magnitude diagram position as HR 8799 bcde and has a comparable L' brightness. However, it has a substantially redder H - M' color, implying a relatively brighter M' flux density than for the HR 8799 planets and suggesting that non-equilibrium carbon chemistry may be less significant in VHS 1256 b. We successfully match the entire SED (optical through thermal infrared) for VHS 1256 b to atmospheric models assuming chemical equilibrium, models which failed to reproduce HR 8799 b at 5 microns. Our modeling favors slightly thick clouds in the companion's atmosphere, although perhaps not quite as thick as those favored ...

  5. Carbon Carbon Composites: An Overview .

    OpenAIRE

    G. Rohini Devi; K. Rama Rao

    1993-01-01

    Carbon carbon composites are a new class of engineering materials that are ceramic in nature but exhibit brittle to pseudoplastic behaviour. Carbon-carbon is a unique all-carbon composite with carbon fibre embeded in carbon matrix and is known as an inverse composite. Due to their excellent thermo-structural properties, carbon-carbon composites are used in specialised application like re-entry nose-tips, leading edges, rocket nozzles, and aircraft brake discs apart from several indust...

  6. Global Carbon Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Probst, Jean-Luc; Faure, Hugues; Veizer, Jan

    1999-01-01

    The European Union of Geosciences held its 9th biannual meeting in Strasbourg, March 23–27, 1997. During this meeting, Symposium N8 18, Global carbon Cycle, was held under the sponsorship of the IGCP 1 n8404 on the «Terrestrial Carbon in the past 125 Ka», the INQUA 2 Carbon Commission and the ESCOBA-Biosphere 3 project of the EC Environment and Climate Programme. The «Global Carbon Cycle» Symposium attracted 28 oral and poster presentations and about one hundred par...

  7. Kepler-9

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holman...[], Matthew J.; Fabrycky, D. C.; Ragozzine, D.;

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler spacecraft is monitoring more than 150,000 stars for evidence of planets transiting those stars. We report the detection of two Saturn-size planets that transit the same Sun-like star, based on 7 months of Kepler observations. Their 19.2- and 38.9-day periods are presently increasing and...... decreasing at respective average rates of 4 and 39 minutes per orbit; in addition, the transit times of the inner body display an alternating variation of smaller amplitude. These signatures are characteristic of gravitational interaction of two planets near a 2:1 orbital resonance. Six radial......-velocity observations show that these two planets are the most massive objects orbiting close to the star and substantially improve the estimates of their masses. After removing the signal of the two confirmed giant planets, we identified an additional transiting super-Earth–size planet candidate with a period of 1...

  8. 15 CFR 9.9 - Consumer education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Consumer education. 9.9 Section 9.9 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce PROCEDURES FOR A VOLUNTARY LABELING PROGRAM FOR HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES AND EQUIPMENT TO EFFECT ENERGY CONSERVATION § 9.9 Consumer education....

  9. n型掺杂PTCDA复合材料对有机发光二极管性能的提高%Lithium Carbonate Doped 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic Dianhydride for Enhanced Performance in Organic Light Emitting Diode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程翠然; 陈玉焕; 秦大山; 全威; 刘金锁

    2011-01-01

    采用碳酸锂(Li2CO3)为n型掺杂剂,苝四甲酸二酐(3,4,9,10 perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride,PTCDA)为母体材料,通过真空热蒸发方式制备了n型掺杂的PTCDA复合材料,将其作为电子注入材料应用到NPB/Alq3异质结有机电致发光器件中.研究发现,同LI2CO3:BCP(1:4)/Al结构和LiF/Al结构相比,Li2CO3:PTCDA(1:1)/Al结构能显著提高发光器件的亮度,器件功率效率也有所增加.发光器件性能的提高可以归因于两点:一是Li2CO3:PTCDA(1:1)的电导率显著高于Li2CO3:BCP(1:4)和本征Alq3,能够有效降低电流传导过程中的欧姆损失;二是阴极Al原子的渗透使Alq3/Li2CO3:PTCDA界面变成欧姆接触.%Lithium carbonate doped 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride ( Li2CO3∶ PTCDA) was fabricated as electron injection layer in NPB/AIq3 heterojunction based organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). It was found that the current of OLED using Li2CO3∶ PTCDA was strongly dependent on the Li2CO3 doping concentration. The OLED using Li2CO3∶ PTCDA( 1∶1 ) with A1 as the cathode exhibits an improved power etficiency and significantly increased luminance, comparing with the one using Li2CO3∶ BCP(1∶4) with Al as the cathode and the one using the regular LiF/Al cathode. It is because the electron conductivity for Li2CO3∶ PTCDA/( 1∶1 ) is much higher than that Li2CO3∶ BCP(1∶4) and neat Alq3. In addition, it is found that there exist a Schottky barrier at the intrinsic interface of Alq3 and Li2CO3∶ PTCDA( 1∶1 ), which suppress the electron transfer from Li2CO3∶ PTCDA( 1∶1 ) into Alq3. However, the release of Li atoms upon the Al deposition onto 1∶1 Li2CO3∶ PTCDA could turn the interface into an ohmic contact, thereby delivering efficient electron injection from Li2CO3∶ PTCDA( 1∶1 ) into Alq3. We provided a class of high-function, low-cost, and easily fabricated n-doped material for the performance enhancement of OLEDs.

  10. Carbon isotope anomalies in carbonates of the Karelian series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iudovich, Ia. E.; Makarikhin, V. V.; Medvedev, P. V.; Sukhanov, N. V.

    1990-07-01

    Results are presented on carbon isotope distributions in carbonates of the Karelian complex. A highly anomalous isotopic composition was found in carbonate rocks aged from 2.6 to 1.9 b.y. In the stromatolitic carbonates of the Onega water table, delta-(C-13) reaches a value of +18 percent, while the shungite layer of the Zaonega horizon is characterized by a wide dispersion (from +7.9 to -11.8 percent). These data are in good agreement with the known geochemical boundary (about 2.2 b.y. ago) in the history of the earth.

  11. Dynamic carbon allocation significantly changed land carbon sink and carbon pool sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J.; Yuan, W.

    2015-12-01

    The allocation of photosynthate among the plant components (e.g., leaves, stems, and roots) plays an important role in regulating plant growth, competition, and terrestrial carbon cycle. However, the carbon allocation process is still a weak part in the earth system models (ESMs). In this study, the Integrated BIosphere Simulator (IBIS) model coupled with a dynamic carbon allocation model (IBISAL) is used to explore the impact of carbon allocation on the terrestrial carbon cycle. This dynamic carbon allocation model suggests that plants should allocate the largest part of carbon to the plant components which need to capture the most limiting resources, such as light, water and nitrogen. In comparison to the results of original IBIS model using fixed allocation ratios, the net ecosystem productivity, global biomass and soil organic carbon simulated by IBISAL model decreased by13.4% , 9.9% and 20.8%, respectively . The dynamic allocation scheme tends to benefit roots allocation. Because roots had short turnover times, high roots allocation led to the decreases of global carbon sink and carbon pool sizes. The observations showed that the carbon allocation ratios changed with temperature and precipitation. The dynamic carbon allocation model could reproduce this phenomenon correctly. The results show that the dynamic carbon allocation ratios of boreal evergreen forests and C3 grasses are consistent well with the observations. However, the IBISAL, and another three ESMs (i.e., CESM1-BGC, IPSL-CM5A-MR and NorESM1-ME models) adopting dynamic allocation scheme overestimated the stems allocation of tropical forests. This study shows the substantial influences of carbon allocation on the carbon sink and carbon pool sizes. Therefore, improving estimations of carbon allocation by ESMs are an important and effective path to reduce uncertainties in the global carbon cycle simulation and climate change prediction.

  12. Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained during the R/V Meteor cruise 15/3 in the South Atlantic Ocean. WOCE Section A9, February--March 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, K.M.; Wallace, D.W.R.; Wilke, R.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Goyet, C. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst., Woods Hole, MA (United States); Kozyr, A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-06-01

    The increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) concentrations (as well as in other radiatively active trace gases) because of human activity has produced serious concern regarding the heat balance of the global atmosphere (Moore and Braswell 1994). The increasing concentrations of these gases may intensify the earth`s natural greenhouse effect, and force the global climate system in ways that are not well understood. The oceans play a major role in global carbon cycle processes. Carbon in the oceans is unevenly distributed because of complex circulation patterns and biogeochemical cycles, neither of which are completely understood. To better understand the ocean`s role in climate and climatic changes, several large experiments have been conducted in the past, and others are currently under way. The World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) is a major component of the World Climate Research Program. Although total carbon dioxide (TC0{sub 2}) is not an official WOCE measurement, a coordinated effort, supported in the United States by the US Department of Energy (DOE), is being made on WOCE cruises (through 1998) to measure the global, spatial, and temporal distributions of TC0{sub 2} and other carbon-related parameters. The CO{sub 2} survey goals include estimation of the meridional transport of inorganic carbon in a manner analogous to the oceanic heat transport (Bryden and Hall 1980; Brewer et al. 1989; Roemmich and Wunsch 1985), evaluation of the exchange of CO{sub 2} between the atmosphere and the ocean, and preparation of a database suitable for carbon-cycle modeling and the subsequent assessment of the anthropogenic C0{sub 2} increase in the oceans. The C0{sub 2} survey is taking advantage of the sampling opportunities provided by the WOCE cruises during this period. The final data set is expected to cover {approx_gt}23,000 stations.

  13. 9 CFR 329.9 - Criminal offenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Criminal offenses. 329.9 Section 329.9... CERTIFICATION DETENTION; SEIZURE AND CONDEMNATION; CRIMINAL OFFENSES § 329.9 Criminal offenses. The Act contains criminal provisions with respect to numerous offenses specified in the Act, including but not limited...

  14. 9 CFR 166.9 - Recordkeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recordkeeping. 166.9 Section 166.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION General Provisions § 166.9 Recordkeeping. (a) Each...

  15. Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained during the R/Vs Roger Revelle and Thomas Thompson repeat hydrography cruises in the Pacific Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 sections P16S-2005 (9 January - 19 February, 2005) and P16N-2006 (13 February - 30 March, 2006)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozyr, Alex [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Feely, R. A. [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, NOAA, Seattle, WA (United States); Sabine, C. L. [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, NOAA, Seattle, WA (United States); Millero, F. J. [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States). Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science; Langdon, C. [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States). Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science; Dickson, A. G. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Scripps Institution of Oceanography; Fine, R. A. [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States). Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science; Bullister, J. L. [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, NOAA, Seattle, WA (United States); Hansell, D. A. [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States). Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science; Carlson, C. A. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Sloyan, B. M. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA (United States); McNichol, A. P. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA (United States); Key, R. M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Byrne, R. H. [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Wanninkhof, R. [Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, NOAA, Miami, FL (United States)

    2009-05-01

    This report presents methods, and analytical and quality control procedures for salinity, oxygen, nutrients, total carbon dioxide (TCO2), total alkalinity (TALK), pH, discrete CO2 partial pressure (pCO2), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), radiocarbon, δ13C, and underway carbon measurements performed during the P16S-2005 (9 January - 19 February 2005) and P16N-2006 (13 February - 30 March, 2006) cruises in the Pacific Ocean. The research vessel (R/V) Roger Revelle departed Papeete, Tahiti, on January 9, 2005 for the Repeat Section P16S, nominally along 150°W, ending in Wellington, New Zealand, on February 19. During this cruise, samples were taken from 36 depths at 111 CTD stations between 16°S and 71°S. The Repeat Section P16N, nominally along 152°W, consisted of two legs. Leg 1 started on February 13, 2006 in Papeete, Tahiti, and finished on March 3, in Honolulu, Hawaii. The R/V Thomas G. Thompson departed Honolulu for Leg 2 on March 10, 2006 and arrived in Kodiak, Alaska, on March 30. During the P16N cruises, samples were taken from 34 or 36 depths at 84 stations between 17°S and 56.28°N. The research conducted on these cruises was part of a series of repeat hydrography sections jointly funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) as part of the Climate Variability Program (CLIVAR)/CO2 Repeat Hydrography Program. The P16S and P16N data sets are available free of charge as a numeric data package (NDP) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). The NDP consists of the oceanographic data files and this printed documentation, which describes the procedures and methods used to obtain the data.

  16. Conducting carbonized polyaniline nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentus, Slavko; Ćirić-Marjanović, Gordana; Trchová, Miroslava; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2009-06-01

    Conducting nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes were synthesized by the carbonization of self-assembled polyaniline nanotubes protonated with sulfuric acid. Carbonization was carried out in a nitrogen atmosphere at a heating rate of 10 °C min-1 up to a maximum temperature of 800 °C. The carbonized polyaniline nanotubes which have a typical outer diameter of 100-260 nm, with an inner diameter of 20-170 nm and a length extending from 0.5 to 0.8 µm, accompanied with very thin nanotubes with outer diameters of 8-14 nm, inner diameters 3.0-4.5 nm and length extending from 0.3 to 1.0 µm, were observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Elemental analysis showed 9 wt% of nitrogen in the carbonized product. Conductivity of the nanotubular PANI precursor, amounting to 0.04 S cm-1, increased to 0.7 S cm-1 upon carbonization. Molecular structure of carbonized polyaniline nanotubes has been analyzed by FTIR and Raman spectroscopies, and their paramagnetic characteristics were compared with the starting PANI nanotubes by EPR spectroscopy.

  17. Conducting carbonized polyaniline nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mentus, Slavko; Ciric-Marjanovic, Gordana [Faculty of Physical Chemistry, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 12-16, 11158 Belgrade (Serbia); Trchova, Miroslava; Stejskal, Jaroslav [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Heyrovsky Square 2, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)], E-mail: gordana@ffh.bg.ac.rs

    2009-06-17

    Conducting nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes were synthesized by the carbonization of self-assembled polyaniline nanotubes protonated with sulfuric acid. Carbonization was carried out in a nitrogen atmosphere at a heating rate of 10 deg. C min{sup -1} up to a maximum temperature of 800 deg. C. The carbonized polyaniline nanotubes which have a typical outer diameter of 100-260 nm, with an inner diameter of 20-170 nm and a length extending from 0.5 to 0.8 {mu}m, accompanied with very thin nanotubes with outer diameters of 8-14 nm, inner diameters 3.0-4.5 nm and length extending from 0.3 to 1.0 {mu}m, were observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Elemental analysis showed 9 wt% of nitrogen in the carbonized product. Conductivity of the nanotubular PANI precursor, amounting to 0.04 S cm{sup -1}, increased to 0.7 S cm{sup -1} upon carbonization. Molecular structure of carbonized polyaniline nanotubes has been analyzed by FTIR and Raman spectroscopies, and their paramagnetic characteristics were compared with the starting PANI nanotubes by EPR spectroscopy.

  18. The Potential Protective Effect of Physalis peruviana L. against Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats Is Mediated by Suppression of Oxidative Stress and Downregulation of MMP-9 Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Olayan, Ebtisam M.; El-Khadragy, Manal F.; Aref, Ahmed M.; Othman, Mohamed S.; Kassab, Rami B.; Ahmed E. Abdel Moneim

    2014-01-01

    The active constituent profile in Cape gooseberry (Physalis peruviana L.) juice was determined by GC-MS. Quercetin and kaempferol were active components in the juice. In this study we have evaluated its potential protective effect on hepatic injury and fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). Twenty-eight rats divided into 4 groups: Group I served as control group, and Group II received weekly i.p. injection of 2 mL CCl4/kg bwt for 12 weeks. Group III were supplemented with Physalis j...

  19. Isotopic fractionation between organic carbon and carbonate carbon in Precambrian banded ironstone series from Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    37 delta13Csub(org) and 9 delta13Csub(carb) values furnished by argillaceous and carbonate sediments from the Rio das Velhas and Minas Series (Minas Gerais, Brazil) have yielded means of -24.3 +- 3.9 promille [PDB] and -0.9 +- 1.4 promille [PDB], respectively. These results, obtained from a major sedimentary banded ironstone province with an age between 2 and 3 x 109 yr, support previous assumptions that isotopic fractionation between inorganic and organic carbon in Precambrian sediments is about the same as in Phanerozoic rocks. This is consistent with a theoretically expected constancy of the kinetic fractionation factor governing biological carbon fixation and, likewise, with a photosynthetic pedigree of the reduced carbon fraction of Precambrian rocks. (orig.)

  20. 38 CFR 9.9 - Conversion privilege.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... LIFE INSURANCE AND VETERANS' GROUP LIFE INSURANCE § 9.9 Conversion privilege. (a) With respect to a... disability incurred or aggravated during such a period of duty. (b) The individual policy of life insurance... loss due to such excess mortality among the reinsurers and converters....

  1. New generation of hybrid carbon/Ni(OH)2 electrochemical capacitor using functionalized carbon electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Comte, Annaïg; Brousse, Thierry; Bélanger, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Tailoring carbon based negative electrode by grafting electroactive 9,10-phenanthrenequinone molecules on porous carbon drastically improves the performance of a carbon/Ni(OH)2 hybrid electrochemical capacitor. The grafted-quinone moieties add a Faradaic contribution to the double layer capacitance of carbon leading to a significant increase of the charge stored by the full devices. Good cyclability is ensured due to the strong bond between 9,10-phenanthrenequinone molecules and the carbon surface. More importantly, by increasing the total capacity, the grafting improves the energy density of the full hybrid device while maintaining fast charge/discharge kinetics and thus without affecting the power density.

  2. Porous carbons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Satish M Manocha

    2003-02-01

    Carbon in dense as well as porous solid form is used in a variety of applications. Activated porous carbons are made through pyrolysis and activation of carbonaceous natural as well as synthetic precursors. Pyrolysed woods replicate the structure of original wood but as such possess very low surface areas and poor adsorption capacities. On activation, these exhibit increased adsorption volumes of 0.5–0.8 cm3 /gm and surface areas of 700–1800 m2 /gm depending on activation conditions, whether physical or chemical. Former carbons possess mixed pore size distribution while chemically activated carbons predominantly possess micropores. Thus, these carbons can be used for adsorption of wide distributions of molecules from gas to liquid. The molecular adsorption within the pores is due to single layer or multilayer molecule deposition at the pore walls and hence results in different types of adsorption isotherm. On the other hand, activated carbon fibres with controlled microporous structure and surface area in the range of 2500 m2 /gm can be developed by controlled pyrolysis and physical activation of amorphous carbon fibres. Active carbon fibres with unmatchable pore structure and surface characteristics are present and futuristic porous materials for a number of applications from pollution control to energy storage.

  3. Two isomers of C6H6F9O9Tb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two isomeric forms of terbium tetrahydrate trifluoroacetate, featuring the composition C6H6F9O9Tb, were prepared as a result of interaction between terbium hydroxide or carbonate and trifluoroacetic acid. The compounds were characterized by the methods of elementary analysis, IR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. It has been ascertained that isomerism of the compounds stems from different positions of protons. Crystals of both forms are isostructural, forming a continuous series of solid solutions with C6H6F9O9Eu

  4. Synthesis, Characterization of 9, 9'-Bianthracene and Fabrication of 9, 9'-Bianthracene Field-Effect Transistors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jian-Feng; CHANG Wen-Li; TAO Chun-Lan; OU Gu-Ping; ZHANG Fu-Jia

    2008-01-01

    @@ We synthesize and purify 9, 9'-bianthracene with the purity up to 96.4%.The electronic and crystallographic structures of 9, 9'-bianthracene are studied. The results of a joint experimental investigation based on a combina-tion of x-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra, hydrogen nuclear magnetic (HNMR) spectra, infrared absorption (FT-IR) spectra, and mass spectra (MS) of 9, 9'-bianthracene are obtained.The uniform compact film is observed by an atomic-force microscope (AFM).Organic field effect transistors (OFETs) with an active layer based on the syn-thesized 9, 9'-bianthracene are fabricated for the first time. Its field-effect mobility is as large as 0.067 cm2 /(V.s) and the on/off ratio is above 5 × 104. The result demonstrates that the oligomerization of a small semiconductor molecule is an effective method to develop high-mobility organic semiconductors.

  5. HEASARC SAOImage DS9

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SAOImage DS9 is an astronomical imaging and data visualization application. DS9 supports FITS images and binary tables, multiple frame buffers, region manipulation,...

  6. Measurement of carbon thermodynamic activity in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents the brief outline on system of carbon activity detecting system in sodium (SCD), operating on the carbon-permeable membrane, of the methods and the results of testing it under the experimental circulating loop conditions. The results of carbon activity sensor calibration with the use of equilibrium samples of XI8H9, Fe -8Ni, Fe -12Mn materials are listed. The behaviour of carbon activity sensor signals in sodium under various transitional conditions and hydrodynamic perturbation in the circulating loop, containing carbon bearing impurities in the sodium flow and their deposits on the surfaces flushed by sodium, are described. (author)

  7. Fresh carbon input differentially impacts soil carbon decomposition across natural and managed systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhongkui; Wang, Enli; Smith, Chris

    2015-10-01

    The amount of fresh carbon input into soil is experiencing substantial changes under global change. It is unclear what will be the consequences of such input changes on native soil carbon decomposition across ecosystems. By synthesizing data from 143 experimental comparisons, we show that, on average, fresh carbon input stimulates soil carbon decomposition by 14%. The response was lower in forest soils (1%) compared with soils from other ecosystems (> 24%), and higher following inputs of plant residue-like substrates (31%) compared to root exudate-like substrates (9%). The responses decrease with the baseline soil carbon decomposition rate under no additional carbon input, but increase with the fresh carbon input rate. The rates of these changes vary significantly across ecosystems and with the carbon substrates being added. These findings can be applied to provide robust estimates of soil carbon balance across ecosystems under changing aboveground and belowground inputs as consequence of climate and land management changes. PMID:26649400

  8. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... before being swallowed; do not swallow them whole. Drink a full glass of water after taking either the regular or chewable tablets or capsules. Some liquid forms of calcium carbonate must be shaken well before use.Do not ...

  9. Carbon Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T. Lloyd Evans

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, the present state of knowledge of the carbon stars is discussed. Particular attention is given to issues of classification, evolution, variability, populations in our own and other galaxies, and circumstellar material.

  10. A New Process for Synthesis of Dimethyl Carbonate from Ethylene Carbonate and Methanol without any Catalyst under Supercritical Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu Juan FENG; Xiao Gang LI; Ren HE; Hui ZHOU

    2005-01-01

    Dimethyl carbonate was synthesized by transesterification reaction between ethylene carbonate and methanol under supercritical conditions without any catalyst. Experimental results showed that the residence time and the molar ratio of methanol to ethylene carbonate all can affect the conversion of ethylene carbonate. When the molar ratio of methanol to ethylene carbonate was 8:1, 81.2 % conversion can be achieved at 9.0 MPa and 250℃ after 8 h.

  11. Carbon isotope effects in carbonate systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deines, Peter

    2004-06-01

    Global carbon cycle models require a complete understanding of the δ 13C variability of the Earth's C reservoirs as well as the C isotope effects in the transfer of the element among them. An assessment of δ 13C changes during CO 2 loss from degassing magmas requires knowledge of the melt-CO 2 carbon isotope fractionation. In order to examine the potential size of this effect for silicate melts of varying composition, 13C reduced partition functions were computed in the temperature range 275 to 4000 K for carbonates of varying bond strengths (Mg, Fe, Mn, Sr, Ba, Pb, Zn, Cd, Li, and Na) and the polymorphs of calcite. For a given cation and a given pressure the 13C content increases with the density of the carbonate structure. For a given structure the tendency to concentrate 13C increases with pressure. The effect of pressure (‰/10 kbar) on the size of the reduced partition function of aragonite varies with temperature; in the pressure range 1 to 10 5 bars the change is given by: Δ 13C p average=-0.01796+0.06635∗ 10 3/T+0.006875∗ 10 6/T2 For calcite III the pressure effect is on average 1.4× larger than that for aragonite at all temperatures. The nature of the cation in a given structure type has a significant effect on the carbon isotope fractionation properties. The tendency to concentrate 13C declines in the series magnesite, aragonite, dolomite, strontianite, siderite, calcite, smithonite, witherite, rhodochrosite, otavite, cerrusite. For divalent cations a general expression for an estimation of the reduced partition function (β) from the reduced mass (μ = [M Cation × M Carbonate]/[M Cation + M Carbonate]) is: 1000 lnβ=(0.032367-0.072563∗ 10 3/T-0.01073∗ 10 6/T2)∗μ-14.003+29.953∗ 10 3/T+9.4610∗ 10 6/T2 For Mg-calcite the 13C content varies with the Mg concentration. The fractionation between Mg-calcite (X = mole fraction of MgCO 3) and calcite is given by: 1000 ln(α MgCalite- Calcite)=[0.013702-0.10957× 10 3/T+1.35940× 10 6/T2

  12. Electrochemical Approach to Carbon Nanostructures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kavan, Ladislav; Hlavatý, Jaromír; Janda, Pavel

    Barcelona : Universitat de Barcelona, 2004 - (Brillas, E.; Cabot, P.), s. 77-101 ISBN 84-475-2639-9 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4040306; GA AV ČR KSK4040110 Keywords : carbon nanotubes * fullerenes * spectroelectrochemistry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry

  13. 我国9省(市)3~18岁儿童青少年碳酸饮料消费现状分析%Analysis on status of carbonated beverage consumption among children and adolescents aged 3 -18 years in ;nine provinces of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘飒娜; 陶婉亭; 毛伟峰; 刘爱东; 刘兆平; 张兵

    2015-01-01

    Objective To learn status of carbonated beverage consumption among children and adolescents aged 3 -18 years in nine provinces of China and provide scientific evidence for instruction on soft drinks consumption of children and youth .Methods Multi-stage stratified random sampling method was used and 2585 children of youth aged 3 -18 years among 9 provinces were selected in 2013.Consumption data were collected by using consecutive 3 day 24h recalls and one month food frequency survey.Results Differences of consumption were found among 3 -18 years old children and youth regarding to both amout and frequency in nine provinces.Subjectives in urban areas have higher consumption ratio of 45.1%than those in rural area (χ2 =19.529,P <0.01).Children aged 7 -13 years have the highest consumption frequency of 1 -3 times per week in view of soda drinks,which is around 45.4%.Children and youth in urban area consumed higher amount of carbonated beverage than those in rural area (P < 0.05 ), which is 31.4mL/d and 15.1mL/d respectively.Meanwhile,male subjectives drank more carbonated beverage than female subjectives (P <0.05),which is 28.8 mL/d and 19.5 mL/d respectively.The average amount of consumption was highest in subjectives from families at mid-dle income level,followed by that of families at high and low income levels,which were 19.7 mL/d,28.5 mL/d and 19.2 mL/d respectively.Conclusion The consumption of carbonated beverage manifested an increasing trend among children and youth in China .Subsequently,effective intervention measures should be applied to instruct children and youth to select and consume carbonated beverage wisely.%目的:了解我国9省(市)3~18岁儿童青少年碳酸饮料消费现状,为指导我国儿童青少年饮料合理消费提供科学依据。方法采用多阶段分层随机整群抽样方法,2013年在我国9个省(市)选取了2585名3~18岁儿童青少年;消费量数据采用非连续3d 24h 回顾法和

  14. Carbon particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

  15. IGSF9 Family Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maria; Walmod, Peter Schledermann

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila protein Turtle and the vertebrate proteins immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF), member 9 (IGSF9/Dasm1) and IGSF9B are members of an evolutionarily ancient protein family. A bioinformatics analysis of the protein family revealed that invertebrates contain only a single IGSF9 family gene......, whereas vertebrates contain two to four genes. In cnidarians, the gene appears to encode a secreted protein, but transmembrane isoforms of the protein have also evolved, and in many species, alternative splicing facilitates the expression of both transmembrane and secreted isoforms. In most species, the...... longest isoforms of the proteins have the same general organization as the neural cell adhesion molecule family of cell adhesion molecule proteins, and like this family of proteins, IGSF9 family members are expressed in the nervous system. A review of the literature revealed that Drosophila Turtle...

  16. Carbon classified?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Ingmar

    2012-01-01

    . Using an actor- network theory (ANT) framework, the aim is to investigate the actors who bring together the elements needed to classify their carbon emission sources and unpack the heterogeneous relations drawn on. Based on an ethnographic study of corporate agents of ecological modernisation over a...... corporations construing themselves as able and suitable to manage their emissions, and, additionally, given that the construction of carbon emissions has performative consequences, the underlying practices need to be declassified, i.e. opened for public scrutiny. Hence the paper concludes by arguing for a...

  17. High capacity carbon dioxide sorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietz, Steven Dean; Alptekin, Gokhan; Jayaraman, Ambalavanan

    2015-09-01

    The present invention provides a sorbent for the removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams, comprising: a CO.sub.2 capacity of at least 9 weight percent when measured at 22.degree. C. and 1 atmosphere; an H.sub.2O capacity of at most 15 weight percent when measured at 25.degree. C. and 1 atmosphere; and an isosteric heat of adsorption of from 5 to 8.5 kilocalories per mole of CO.sub.2. The invention also provides a carbon sorbent in a powder, a granular or a pellet form for the removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams, comprising: a carbon content of at least 90 weight percent; a nitrogen content of at least 1 weight percent; an oxygen content of at most 3 weight percent; a BET surface area from 50 to 2600 m.sup.2/g; and a DFT micropore volume from 0.04 to 0.8 cc/g.

  18. Voltammetric Response of Epinephrine at Carbon Nanotube Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode and Activated Glassy Carbon Electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Juan; TANG Ping; ZHAO Fa-qiong; ZENG Bai-zhao

    2005-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of epinephrine at activated glassy carbon electrode and carbon nanotube-coated glassy carbon electrode was studied. Epinephrine could exhibit an anodic peak at about 0.2 V (vs. SCE) at bare glassy carbon electrode, but it was very small.However, when the electrode was activated at certain potential (i. e. 1.9V) or modified with carbon nanotube, the peak became more sensitive,resulting from the increase in electrode area in addition to the electrostatic attraction. Under the selected conditions, the anodic peak current was linear to epinephrine concentration in the range of 3.3 × 10-7-1.1 × 10-5mol/L at activated glassy carbon electrode and in the range of 1.0 × 10-6-5.0 × 10-5 mol/L at carbon nanotube-coated electrode. The correlation coefficients were 0. 998 and 0. 997, respectively. The determination limit was 1.0 × 10-7 mol/L. The two electrodes have been successfully applied for the determination of epinephrine in adrenaline hydrochloride injection with recovery of 95%-104%.

  19. R9 Air Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Region 9 Air Districts layer is a compilation of polygons representing the California Air Pollution Control and Air Quality Management Districts, Arizona Air...

  20. Region 9 Tribal Lands

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Dataset of all Indian Reservations in US EPA Region 9 (California, Arizona and Nevada) with some reservation border areas of adjacent states included (adjacent...

  1. Global carbon budget 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Peters, G. P.; Ciais, P.; Friedlingstein, P.; Jones, S. D.; Sitch, S.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Boden, T. A.; Bopp, L.; Bozec, Y.; Canadell, J. G.; Chini, L. P.; Chevallier, F.; Cosca, C. E.; Harris, I.; Hoppema, M.; Houghton, R. A.; House, J. I.; Jain, A. K.; Johannessen, T.; Kato, E.; Keeling, R. F.; Kitidis, V.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Koven, C.; Landa, C. S.; Landschützer, P.; Lenton, A.; Lima, I. D.; Marland, G.; Mathis, J. T.; Metzl, N.; Nojiri, Y.; Olsen, A.; Ono, T.; Peng, S.; Peters, W.; Pfeil, B.; Poulter, B.; Raupach, M. R.; Regnier, P.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Salisbury, J. E.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Séférian, R.; Segschneider, J.; Steinhoff, T.; Stocker, B. D.; Sutton, A. J.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; van der Werf, G. R.; Viovy, N.; Wang, Y.-P.; Wanninkhof, R.; Wiltshire, A.; Zeng, N.

    2015-05-01

    component of the global carbon budget. For the last decade available (2004-2013), EFF was 8.9 ± 0.4 GtC yr-1, ELUC 0.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, GATM 4.3 ± 0.1 GtC yr-1, SOCEAN 2.6 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, and SLAND 2.9 ± 0.8 GtC yr-1. For year 2013 alone, EFF grew to 9.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, 2.3% above 2012, continuing the growth trend in these emissions, ELUC was 0.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, GATM was 5.4 ± 0.2 GtC yr-1, SOCEAN was 2.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, and SLAND was 2.5 ± 0.9 GtC yr-1. GATM was high in 2013, reflecting a steady increase in EFF and smaller and opposite changes between SOCEAN and SLAND compared to the past decade (2004-2013). The global atmospheric CO2 concentration reached 395.31 ± 0.10 ppm averaged over 2013. We estimate that EFF will increase by 2.5% (1.3-3.5%) to 10.1 ± 0.6 GtC in 2014 (37.0 ± 2.2 GtCO2 yr-1), 65% above emissions in 1990, based on projections of world gross domestic product and recent changes in the carbon intensity of the global economy. From this projection of EFF and assumed constant ELUC for 2014, cumulative emissions of CO2 will reach about 545 ± 55 GtC (2000 ± 200 GtCO2) for 1870-2014, about 75% from EFF and 25% from ELUC. This paper documents changes in the methods and data sets used in this new carbon budget compared with previous publications of this living data set (Le Quéré et al., 2013, 2014). All observations presented here can be downloaded from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (doi:10.3334/CDIAC/GCP_2014).

  2. CANDU 9 - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU 9 plants are single unit versions of the very successful four unit Bruce B design, incorporating relevant technical advances made in the CANDU 6 and the newer Dalington and CANDU 3 designs. The CANDU 9 plant described in this paper is the CANDU 9 480/SEU with a net electrical output in the range of 1050 MW. In this designation 480 refers to the number of fuel channels, and SEU refers to slightly enriched uranium. Emphasis is placed on evolutionary design and the use of well-proven design features to ensure minimum financial risk to utilities choosing a CANDU 9 plant by assuring regulatory licensability and reliable operation. In addition, the CANDU 9 power plants reflect the important lessons learned by utilities in the construction and operation of CANDU units and, indeed, relevant experience gained by the world nuclear community in its operation of over 400 reactors of a variety of types. As a results, the CANDU 9 plants offer a high level of investment security to the owner, together with relatively low energy costs. The latter results from reduced specific capital cost, reduced operation and maintenance cost, and reduced radiation exposure to plant staff. A high level of standardization has always been a feature of CANDU reactors. This theme is emphasized in the CANDU 9 plants; all key components (steam generators, heat transport pumps, pressure tubes, fuelling machines, etc.) are of the same design as those proven in-service on operating CANDU power stations. The CANDU 9 power plants are readily adaptable to the individual requirements of different utilities and are suitable for a range of site conditions. (author). 12 figs

  3. 46 CFR 9.9 - Two hours between broken periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Two hours between broken periods. 9.9 Section 9.9... COMPENSATION FOR OVERTIME SERVICES § 9.9 Two hours between broken periods. Where 2 hours or more intervene between broken periods, one-half day's extra pay will be allowed for each distinct 2-hour period or...

  4. Carbon taxes and India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher-Vanden, K.A.; Pitcher, H.M.; Edmonds, J.A.; Kim, S.H. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Shukla, P.R. [Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad (India)

    1994-07-01

    Using the Indian module of the Second Generation Model 9SGM, we explore a reference case and three scenarios in which greenhouse gas emissions were controlled. Two alternative policy instruments (carbon taxes and tradable permits) were analyzed to determine comparative costs of stabilizing emissions at (1) 1990 levels (the 1 X case), (2) two times the 1990 levels (the 2X case), and (3) three times the 1990 levels (the 3X case). The analysis takes into account India`s rapidly growing population and the abundance of coal and biomass relative to other fuels. We also explore the impacts of a global tradable permits market to stabilize global carbon emissions on the Indian economy under the following two emissions allowance allocation methods: (1) {open_quotes}Grandfathered emissions{close_quotes}: emissions allowances are allocated based on 1990 emissions. (2) {open_quotes}Equal per capita emissions{close_quotes}: emissions allowances are allocated based on share of global population. Tradable permits represent a lower cost method to stabilize Indian emissions than carbon taxes, i.e., global action would benefit India more than independent actions.

  5. Carbon taxes and India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the Indian module of the Second Generation Model 9SGM, we explore a reference case and three scenarios in which greenhouse gas emissions were controlled. Two alternative policy instruments (carbon taxes and tradable permits) were analyzed to determine comparative costs of stabilizing emissions at (1) 1990 levels (the 1 X case), (2) two times the 1990 levels (the 2X case), and (3) three times the 1990 levels (the 3X case). The analysis takes into account India's rapidly growing population and the abundance of coal and biomass relative to other fuels. We also explore the impacts of a global tradable permits market to stabilize global carbon emissions on the Indian economy under the following two emissions allowance allocation methods: (1) open-quotes Grandfathered emissionsclose quotes: emissions allowances are allocated based on 1990 emissions. (2) open-quotes Equal per capita emissionsclose quotes: emissions allowances are allocated based on share of global population. Tradable permits represent a lower cost method to stabilize Indian emissions than carbon taxes, i.e., global action would benefit India more than independent actions

  6. Mariner 9 navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil, W. J.; Jordan, J. F.; Zielenbach, J. W.; Wong, S. K.; Mitchell, R. T.; Webb, W. A.; Koskela, P. E.

    1973-01-01

    A final, comprehensive description of the navigation of Mariner 9-the first U.S. spacecraft to orbit another planet is provided. The Mariner 9 navigation function included not only precision flight path control but also pointing of the spacecraft's scientific instruments mounted on a two degree of freedom scan platform. To the extent appropriate, each section describes the perflight analyses on which the operational strategies and performance predictions were based. Inflight results are then discussed and compared with the preflight predictions. Postflight analyses, which were primarily concerned with developing a thorough understanding of unexpected in-flight results, are also presented.

  7. Global Carbon Budget 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Canadell, J. G.; Sitch, S.; Korsbakken, J. I.; Friedlingstein, P.; Peters, G. P.; Andres, R. J.; Boden, T. A.; Houghton, R. A.; House, J. I.; Keeling, R. F.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Bakker, D. C. E.; Barbero, L.; Bopp, L.; Chang, J.; Chevallier, F.; Chini, L. P.; Ciais, P.; Fader, M.; Feely, R. A.; Gkritzalis, T.; Harris, I.; Hauck, J.; Ilyina, T.; Jain, A. K.; Kato, E.; Kitidis, V.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Koven, C.; Landschützer, P.; Lauvset, S. K.; Lefèvre, N.; Lenton, A.; Lima, I. D.; Metzl, N.; Millero, F.; Munro, D. R.; Murata, A.; Nabel, J. E. M. S.; Nakaoka, S.; Nojiri, Y.; O'Brien, K.; Olsen, A.; Ono, T.; Pérez, F. F.; Pfeil, B.; Pierrot, D.; Poulter, B.; Rehder, G.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Séférian, R.; Steinhoff, T.; Stocker, B. D.; Sutton, A. J.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; van der Laan-Luijkx, I. T.; van der Werf, G. R.; van Heuven, S.; Vandemark, D.; Viovy, N.; Wiltshire, A.; Zaehle, S.; Zeng, N.

    2015-12-01

    carbon budget. For the last decade available (2005-2014), EFF was 9.0 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, ELUC was 0.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, GATM was 4.4 ± 0.1 GtC yr-1, SOCEAN was 2.6 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, and SLAND was 3.0 ± 0.8 GtC yr-1. For the year 2014 alone, EFF grew to 9.8 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, 0.6 % above 2013, continuing the growth trend in these emissions, albeit at a slower rate compared to the average growth of 2.2 % yr-1 that took place during 2005-2014. Also, for 2014, ELUC was 1.1 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, GATM was 3.9 ± 0.2 GtC yr-1, SOCEAN was 2.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, and SLAND was 4.1 ± 0.9 GtC yr-1. GATM was lower in 2014 compared to the past decade (2005-2014), reflecting a larger SLAND for that year. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration reached 397.15 ± 0.10 ppm averaged over 2014. For 2015, preliminary data indicate that the growth in EFF will be near or slightly below zero, with a projection of -0.6 [range of -1.6 to +0.5] %, based on national emissions projections for China and the USA, and projections of gross domestic product corrected for recent changes in the carbon intensity of the global economy for the rest of the world. From this projection of EFF and assumed constant ELUC for 2015, cumulative emissions of CO2 will reach about 555 ± 55 GtC (2035 ± 205 GtCO2) for 1870-2015, about 75 % from EFF and 25 % from ELUC. This living data update documents changes in the methods and data sets used in this new carbon budget compared with previous publications of this data set (Le Quéré et al., 2015, 2014, 2013). All observations presented here can be downloaded from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (doi:10.3334/CDIAC/GCP_2015).

  8. UPS9: Hardware Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The UPS9 printed circuit board is a power pulsed supply controlled by voltage that allow multiple output modes. Isolated output pulses of up to 200 V amplitude can be generated with either positive or negative polarity from a single 24 VDC power source. This circuit was designed and optimized for driving both solenoid and piezoelectric type gas valves. (Author)

  9. CANDU 9 design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL has made significant design improvements in the latest CANDU nuclear power plant (NPP) - the CANDU 9. The CANDU 9 operates with the energy efficient heavy water moderated reactor and natural uranium fuel and utilizes proven technology. The CANDU 9 NPP design is similar to the world leading CANDU 6 but is based upon the single unit adaptation of the 900 MWe class reactors currently operating in Canada as in integrated four-unit configurations. The evolution of the CANDU family of heavy water reactors (HAIR) is based on a continuous product improvement approach. Proven equipment and systems from operating stations are standardized and used in new products. As a result of the flexibility of the technology, evolution of the current design will ensure that any new requirements can be met, and there is no need to change the basic concept. This paper will provide an overview for some of the key features of the CANDU 9 NPP such as nuclear systems and equipment, advanced control and computer systems, safety design and protection features, and plant layout. The safety enhancements and operability improvements implemented in this design are described and some of the advantages that can be expected by the operating utility are highlighted. (author)

  10. 9th ISAAC Congress

    CERN Document Server

    Ruzhansky, Michael; Analytic Methods in Interdisciplinary Applications

    2015-01-01

    The book includes lectures given by the plenary and key speakers at the 9th International ISAAC Congress held 2013 in Krakow, Poland. The contributions treat recent developments in analysis and surrounding areas, concerning topics from the theory of partial differential equations, function spaces, scattering, probability theory, and others, as well as applications to biomathematics, queueing models, fractured porous media and geomechanics.

  11. CANDU 9 safety improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU 9 is a family of single-unit Nuclear Power Plant designs based on proven CANDU concepts and equipment from operating CANDU plants capable of generating 900 MWe to 1300 MWe depending on the number of fuel channel used and the type of fuel, either natural uranium fuel or slightly enriched uranium fuel. The basic design, the CANDU 9 480/NU, uses the 480 fuel channel Darlington reactor and employs Natural Uranium (NU) fuel Darlington, the latest of the 900 MWe Class CANDU plants, consists of four integrated units with a total output of approximately 3740 MWe located in Ontario, Canada. AECL has completed the concept definition engineering for this design, and will be completing the design integration engineering by the end of 1996. AECL's design philosophy is to build-in product improvements in evolutionary from the initial prototype plants, NPD and Douglas Point, to today's operating CANDU's construction projects and advanced designs. CANDU 9 safety design follows the evolutionary path, including simple improvements based on existing well-proven CANDU safety concepts. The CANDU 9 builds on the experience base for the Darlington reference plant, and on AECL's extensive safety design experience with single unit CANDU 6 power plants. The latest CANDU 6 plants are being built in Korea by KEPCO at Wolsong 2,3 and 4. The Safety improvements for the CANDU 9 power plant are intended to provide the owner-operator with increased assurance of reliable, trouble-free operation, with greater safety margin, with improved public acceptance, and with ease of licensibility

  12. Carbon Footprints

    OpenAIRE

    Rahel Aichele; Gabriel Felbermayr

    2011-01-01

    Lässt sich der Beitrag eines Landes zum weltweiten Klimaschutz an der Veränderung seines CO2-Ausstoßes messen, wie es im Kyoto-Abkommen implizit unterstellt wird? Oder ist aufgrund der Bedeutung des internationalen Güterhandels der Carbon Footprint – der alle CO2-Emissionen erfasst, die durch die Absorption (d.h. Konsum und Investitionen) eines Landes entstehen – das bessere Maß? Die Autoren erstellen eine Datenbank mit den Footprints von 40 Ländern für den Zeitraum 1995–2007. Die deskriptive...

  13. Carbon Nanomembranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchanin, Andrey; Gölzhäuser, Armin

    2016-08-01

    Carbon nanomembranes (CNMs) are synthetic 2D carbon sheets with tailored physical or chemical properties. These depend on the structure, molecular composition, and surroundings on either side. Due to their molecular thickness, they can be regarded as "interfaces without bulk" separating regions of different gaseous, liquid, or solid components and controlling the materials exchange between them. Here, a universal scheme for the fabrication of 1 nm-thick, mechanically stable, functional CNMs is presented. CNMs can be further modified, for example perforated by ion bombardment or chemically functionalized by the binding of other molecules onto the surfaces. The underlying physical and chemical mechanisms are described, and examples are presented for the engineering of complex surface architectures, e.g., nanopatterns of proteins, fluorescent dyes, or polymer brushes. A simple transfer procedure allows CNMs to be placed on various support structures, which makes them available for diverse applications: supports for electron and X-ray microscopy, nanolithography, nanosieves, Janus nanomembranes, polymer carpets, complex layered structures, functionalization of graphene, novel nanoelectronic and nanomechanical devices. To close, the potential of CNMs in filtration and sensorics is discussed. Based on tests for the separation of gas molecules, it is argued that ballistic membranes may play a prominent role in future efforts of materials separation. PMID:27281234

  14. Synthesis of carbon nanofibers on impregnated powdered activated carbon as cheap substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Mamun, A. A.; Y.M. Ahmed; S.A. Muyibi; M.F.R. Al-Khatib; A.T. Jameel; M.A. AlSaadi

    2016-01-01

    The catalysis and characterization of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) composite are reported in this work. Carbon nanofibers were produced on oil palm shell powdered activated carbon (PAC), which was impregnated with nickel. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) of C2H2 was used in the presence of hydrogen at ∼650 °C. The flow rates of carbon source and hydrogen were fixed. The CNFs formed directly on the surface of the impregnated PAC. Variable weight percentages (1%, 3%, 5%, 7% and 9%) of the catalyst s...

  15. IDEA papers no. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Information network on the Economic Development in Aquitaine (IDEA) aims to collect and spread the environmental information concerning the Aquitaine, in order to implement an observatory of the regional environment and of the sustainable development. The IDEA paper no. 9 is devoted to the air quality: atmospheric pollution effects on health, nitrogen oxide pollution, air quality monitoring in buildings, the regulations and the atmospheric pollution, emissions land registry objectives and the greenhouse gases. (A.L.B.)

  16. Trading forest carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nature of carbon in forests is discussed from the perspective of carbon trading. Carbon inventories, specifically in the area of land use and forestry are reviewed for the Pacific Northwest. Carbon turnover in forests is discussed as it relates to carbon sequestration. Scient...

  17. Ultrasound-intensified mineral carbonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several aspects of ultrasound-assisted mineral carbonation were investigated in this work. The objectives were to intensify the CO2 sequestration process to improve reaction kinetics and maximal conversion. Stainless steel slags, derived from the Argon Oxygen Decarburization (AOD) and Continuous Casting/Ladle Metallurgy (CC/LM) refining steps, were used for assessing the technical feasibility of this concept, as they are potential carbon sinks and can benefit from reduction in alkalinity (pH) by mineral carbonation. Ultrasound was applied by use of an ultrasound horn into the reaction slurry, where mineral carbonation reaction took place at 50 °C for up to 4 h; comparison was made to solely mechanically mixed process. It was found that sonication increases the reaction rate after the initial stage, and permits achieving higher carbonate conversion and lower pH. AOD slag conversion increased from 30% to 49%, and pH decreased from 10.6 to 10.1; CC slag conversion increased from 61% to 73% and pH decreased from 10.8 to 9.9. The enhancement effect of ultrasound was attributed to the removal of passivating layers (precipitated calcium carbonate and depleted silica) that surround the unreacted particle core and inhibit mass transfer. Significant particle size reduction was observed for sonicated powders, compared to particle size growth in the case of stirring-only; D[4,3] values increased without sonication by 74% and 50%, and decreased with sonication by 64% and 52%, respectively for AOD and CC slags. Considerations on scale-up of this technology, particularly with regards to energy efficiency, are also discussed. Highlights: ► Ultrasound increased CaO, AOD and CC slags mineral carbonation rates and conversions. ► Enhancement effect linked to removal of mass transfer inhibiting passivating layers. ►Carbonated particle size grew with stirring-only, and decreased with sonication. ► Lower pH of slags with greater carbonation extent can reduce heavy metal leaching

  18. Supercapacitors based on carbon foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaschmitter, J.L.; Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.

    1993-11-09

    A high energy density capacitor incorporating a variety of carbon foam electrodes is described. The foams, derived from the pyrolysis of resorcinol-formaldehyde and related polymers, are high density (0.1 g/cc-1.0 g/cc) electrically conductive and have high surface areas (400 m[sup 2]/g-1000 m[sup 2]/g). Capacitances on the order of several tens of farad per gram of electrode are achieved. 9 figures.

  19. Carbon Farming as a Carbon Negative Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, C.; Laird, D.; Hayes, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon farms have a pivotal role in national and international efforts to mitigate and adapt to climate change. A carbon farm in its broadest sense is one that reduces greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions or captures and holds carbon in vegetation and soils. Their capacity to remove carbon from the air and store it safely and permanently, while providing additional human and ecosystem benefits, means they could contribute significantly to national efforts to stabilize or reduce GHGs. We examine carbon farms in the context of corn and soybean production agriculture. We illustrate, using Iowa data but with relevance across United States corn and soybean production, the potential for carbon farms to reduce human GHG emissions and sequester carbon permanently at a rate that has meaningful impact on global greenhouse gas concentration. Carbon has been viewed as a next generation cash crop in Iowa for over a decade. The carbon farm perspective, however, goes beyond carbon as cash crop to make carbon the center of an entire farm enterprise. The transformation is possible through slight adjustment crop practices mixed with advances in technology to sequester carbon through biochar. We examine carbon balance of Iowa agriculture given only the combination of slight reduction in fertilizer and sequestration by biochar. We find the following. Iowa carbon farms could turn Iowa agriculture into a carbon sink. The estimated range of GHG reduction by statewide implementation of carbon farms is 19.46 to 90.27 MMt CO2-equivalent (CO2-e), while the current agricultural CO2-e emission estimate is 35.38 MMt CO2-e. Iowa carbon farm GHG reduction would exceed Iowa GHG reduction by wind energy (8.7 MMt CO2-e) and could exceed combined reductions from wind energy and corn grain ethanol (10.7 MMt CO2-e; 19.4 MMt CO2-e combined). In fact, Iowa carbon farms alone could exceed GHG reduction from national corn grain ethanol production (39.6 MMt CO2-e). A carbon price accessible to agricultural

  20. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir What is Carbon Monoxide? Carbon monoxide, or “CO,” is an odorless, colorless gas that can kill you. Carbon monoxide detector Where is CO found? CO is ...

  1. Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux is defined as the year-over-year change in Total Ecosystem Carbon Stock, or the net rate of carbon exchange between an ecosystem and the...

  2. Carbon Monoxide (CO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IAQ) » Carbon Monoxide's Impact on Indoor Air Quality Carbon Monoxide's Impact on Indoor Air Quality On this ... length of exposure. Top of Page Sources of Carbon Monoxide Sources of CO include: unvented kerosene and ...

  3. TOGAF version 9

    CERN Document Server

    Group, The Open

    2010-01-01

    This is the official Open Group Pocket Guide for TOGAF Version 9 Enterprise Edition. This pocket guide is published by Van Haren Publishing on behalf of The Open Group.TOGAF, The Open Group Architectural Framework is a fast growing, worldwide accepted standard that can help organisations build their own Enterprise Architecture in a standardised way. This book explains why the in?s and out?s of TOGAF in a concise manner.This book explains how TOGAF can help to make an Enterprise Architecture. Enterprise Architecture is an approach that can help management to understand this growing complexity.

  4. 9/11 Art

    OpenAIRE

    Nadja Bering Ovesen, Maj Winther Møller; Ida Løwenstein Holmen, Julie Stigsen; Irina Postelnicu, Michael Schulz

    2013-01-01

    This project aims to investigate the reasons behind the censoring of five art pieces inspired by the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center in 2001. The key issue in this project is to determine which psychological aspects came into play when the nation was struck by the traumatic event. This is done with the use of psychodynamic psychotherapy and the analysis of group trauma. Furthermore by examining the aesthetics and sociology of art, as well as the media’s coverage of events, it is discus...

  5. Telltale Animation (Sol 9)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This animation of the NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's telltale was made from five images taken by Phoenix's Stereo Surface Imager (SSI) just after 4:37 PM local Mars time on the ninth Martian day of the mission, or Sol 9 (June 3, 2008). The images were taken with a blue filter (450 nanometer, R6) that focuses at items on the deck rather than the workspace or horizon. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  6. 9 CFR 53.9 - Mortgage against animals or materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mortgage against animals or materials. 53.9 Section 53.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT....9 Mortgage against animals or materials. When animals or materials have been destroyed pursuant...

  7. Integral Ring Carbon-Carbon Piston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An improved structure for a reciprocating internal combustion engine or compressor piston fabricate from carbon-carbon composite materials is disclosed. An integral ring carbon-carbon composite piston, disclosed herein, reduces the need for piston rings and for small clearances by providing a small flexible, integral component around the piston that allows for variation in clearance due to manufacturing tolerances, distortion due to pressure and thermal loads, and variations in thermal expansion differences between the piston and cylinder liner.

  8. Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation

    OpenAIRE

    Huijgen, W.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    The increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, mainly caused by fossil fuel combustion, has lead to concerns about global warming. A possible technology that can contribute to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions is CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. The basic concept behind mineral CO2 sequestration is the mimicking of natural weathering processes in which calcium or magnesium containing minerals react with gaseous CO2 and form solid calcium or magnesium carbonate...

  9. MAD Version 9

    CERN Document Server

    Iselin, F Christoph; Pancin, J; Adelmann, A

    2000-01-01

    The program MAD is widely used for accelerator design and beam dynamics studies. For many years, its input language has been the nearest thing to a world-wide standard for describing accelerator structures. The new Version 9 is a complete rewrite using a systematic object-oriented methodology based on the CLASSIC classes [2] for accelerator physics. It provides many improvements over the previous MAD Version 8. These include: (i) support for multiple beam-lines simultaneously, facilitating, for example, matching constraints that couple the two rings of a two-ring collider, (ii) much improved Lie-algebraic map calculations, (iii) a uniform method and format for exchanging many kinds of structured data with other programs, (iv) an improved and more consistent input language. In addition, we report on a parallel 3D Poisson field solver for space charge calculations in high intensity particle beams. Applied to the PSI injector cyclotron, this shows the general nature of MAD Version 9 as a state-of- the-art proble...

  10. Carbon Segregation of Bearing Steel Concasting Billet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The formation mechanism of “white band” and central carbon segregation of high-carbon Cr bearing steel concasting billets are discussed in this paper. The maximum oxygen content in the steel produced by concasting process was 13x10-6 with an average oxygen content of 9.3x 10-6.Comparison of metallurgical quality and fatigue property between the concasting steel (CC) andingot casting steel (IC) showed that the carbon segregation (C/C0) in former steel was 0.92~1.10and its fatigue life was equal to that of the latter steel.

  11. Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijgen, W.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    The increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, mainly caused by fossil fuel combustion, has lead to concerns about global warming. A possible technology that can contribute to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions is CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. The basic concept beh

  12. Composite carbon foam electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1997-05-06

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granulated materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

  13. IFRS9 - rahoitusinstrumentit

    OpenAIRE

    Ojanen, Valtteri

    2012-01-01

    Työssäni on tarkoitus tutkia, miten IFRS9 tulee vaikuttamaan tilinpäätöksen laadintaan ja sitä kautta finanssialan yrityksen tilinpäätöksen lukuihin. Työssä on myös tarkoitus tuoda esiin esimerkiksi finanssivalvonnan ja tilintarkastajien näkökannat, jolloin pystytään tuomaan erilaisten toimijoiden näkökulmia. Lähtökohtana ovat pohjatiedot omasta IFRS opinnäytetyöstä ja se päälle sitten tiedot, jotka olen kerännyt työtä tehdessä. Työn tutkimusosio toteutetaan haastattelemalla yksittäisiä ...

  14. Fluoren-9-one oxime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Bugenhagen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the title molecule, C13H9NO, the fluorene system and the oxime group non-H atoms are essentially coplanar, with a maximum deviation from the fluorene mean plane of 0.079 (2 Å for the oxime O atom. A short intramolecular C—H...O generates an S(6 ring. In the crystal, molecules related by a twofold screw axis are connected by O—H...N hydrogen bonds, forming [100] chains Within these chains, molecules related by a unit translation along [100] show π–π stacking interactions between their fluorene ring systems with an interplanar distance of 3.347 (2 Å. The dihedral angle between the fluorene units of adjacent molecules along the helix is 88.40 (2°. There is a short C—H...π contact between the fluorene groups belonging to neighbouring chains.

  15. Fluoren-9-one oxime

    OpenAIRE

    Bernhard Bugenhagen; Yosef Al Jasem; Mariam Al-Azani; Thies Thiemann

    2014-01-01

    In the title mol­ecule, C13H9NO, the fluorene system and the oxime group non-H atoms are essentially coplanar, with a maximum deviation from the fluorene mean plane of 0.079 (2) Å for the oxime O atom. A short intra­molecular C—H⋯O generates an S(6) ring. In the crystal, mol­ecules related by a twofold screw axis are connected by O—H⋯N hydrogen bonds, forming [100] chains Within these chains, mol­ecules related by a unit translation along [100] show π–π stacking inter­actions between their fl...

  16. Sequestration of Soil Carbon as Secondary Carbonates (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, R.

    2013-12-01

    Rattan Lal Carbon Management and Sequestration Center The Ohio State University Columbus, OH 43210 USA Abstract World soils, the major carbon (C) reservoir among the terrestrial pools, contain soil organic C (SOC) and soil inorganic C (SIC). The SIC pool is predominant in soils of arid and semi-arid regions. These regions cover a land area of about 4.9x109 ha. The SIC pool in soils containing calcic and petrocalcic horizons is estimated at about 695-748 Pg (Pg = 1015 g = 1 gigaton) to 1-m depth. There are two types of carbonates. Lithogenic or primary carbonates are formed from weathering of carbonaceous rocks. Pedogenic or secondary carbonates are formed by dissolution of CO2 in the soil air to form carbonic acid and precipitation as carbonates of Ca+2 or Mg+2. It is the availability of Ca+2 or Mg+2 from outside the ecosystem that is essential to sequester atmospheric CO2. Common among outside sources of Ca+2 or Mg+2 are irrigation water, aerial deposition, sea breeze, fertilizers, manure and other amendments. The decomposition of SOC and root respiration may increase the partial pressure of CO2 in the soil air and lead to the formation of HCO_3^- upon dissolution in H20. Precipitation of secondary carbonates may result from decreased partial pressure of CO2 in the sub-soil, increased concentration of Ca+2, Mg+2 and HCO_3^- in soil solution, and decreased soil moisture content by evapotranspiration. Transport of bicarbonates in irrigated soils and subsequent precipitation above the ground water (calcrete), activity of termites and other soil fauna, and management of urban soils lead to formation of secondary carbonates. On a geologic time scale, weathering of silicate minerals and transport of the by-products into the ocean is a geological process of sequestration of atmospheric CO2. Factors affecting formation of secondary carbonates include land use, and soil and crop management including application of biosolids, irrigation and the quality of irrigation water

  17. Aquatic carbon cycling in the conterminous United States and implications for terrestrial carbon accounting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butman, David; Stackpoole, Sarah; Stets, Edward; McDonald, Cory P; Clow, David W; Striegl, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    Inland water ecosystems dynamically process, transport, and sequester carbon. However, the transport of carbon through aquatic environments has not been quantitatively integrated in the context of terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we present the first integrated assessment, to our knowledge, of freshwater carbon fluxes for the conterminous United States, where 106 (range: 71-149) teragrams of carbon per year (TgC⋅y(-1)) is exported downstream or emitted to the atmosphere and sedimentation stores 21 (range: 9-65) TgC⋅y(-1) in lakes and reservoirs. We show that there is significant regional variation in aquatic carbon flux, but verify that emission across stream and river surfaces represents the dominant flux at 69 (range: 36-110) TgC⋅y(-1) or 65% of the total aquatic carbon flux for the conterminous United States. Comparing our results with the output of a suite of terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs), we suggest that within the current modeling framework, calculations of net ecosystem production (NEP) defined as terrestrial only may be overestimated by as much as 27%. However, the internal production and mineralization of carbon in freshwaters remain to be quantified and would reduce the effect of including aquatic carbon fluxes within calculations of terrestrial NEP. Reconciliation of carbon mass-flux interactions between terrestrial and aquatic carbon sources and sinks will require significant additional research and modeling capacity. PMID:26699473

  18. Mutagenicity of carbon nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallin, Håkan; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; White, Paul A;

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials such carbon nanotubes, graphene and fullerenes are some the most promising nanomaterials. Although carbon nanomaterials have been reported to possess genotoxic potential, it is imperitive to analyse the data on the genotoxicity of carbon nanomaterials in vivo and in vitro and...

  19. Radiation polymerization of vinylene carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation-induced polymerization of vinylene carbonate of 99,97% purity has been investigated. The relationship between conversion and irradiation time is strictly linear, even at the lowest conversions, thus proving that the normal induction period observed for the polymerization of lower-purity vinylene carbonate indeed results from the presence of an inhibitor. Although the identity of the inhibitor has not been established, it has been shown that it is not dichlorovinylene carbonate. An activation energy of 15,1 kJ/mole was calculated for the homopolymerization process. The radiation-induced copolymerization of vinylene carbonate (M1) with isobutyl vinyl ether (M2) has been investigated over the temperature range of 40-80 degrees Celcius. The monomer reactivity ratios r1 and r2 were determined to be 0,118 and 0,148 respectively, and an activation energy of 31,8kJ/mole was calculated for the copolymerization process. The radiation-induced telomerization of vinylene carbonate with carbon tetrachloride has been investigated over a telogen to monomer concentration ratio range of 4 to 20. The rate of formation of the n=1 adduct was found to be independent of monomer concentration, directly proportional to the telogen concentration, and exhibiting a 0,38 order power dependence on the radiation intensity, in general agreement with the derived rate equations. The rate of formation of the n=2 telomer was found to be independent of both monomer and telogen concentrations and radiation intensity, which is not in agreement with the derived rate equations. The first and second chain-transfer coefficients C1 and C2 were determined to be 0,116 and 0,34 respectively, and the activation energies for the formation of the n=1 adduct and n=2 telomer were calculated to be 17,6 and 64,9 kJ/mole respectively

  20. Electroanalysis with carbon paste electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Svancara, Ivan; Walcarius, Alain; Vytras, Karel

    2011-01-01

    Introduction to Electrochemistry and Electroanalysis with Carbon Paste-Based ElectrodesHistorical Survey and GlossaryField in Publication Activities and LiteratureCarbon Pastes and Carbon Paste ElectrodesCarbon Paste as the Binary MixtureClassification of Carbon Pastes and Carbon Paste ElectrodesConstruction of Carbon Paste HoldersCarbon Paste as the Electrode MaterialPhysicochemical Properties of Carbon PastesElectrochemical Characteristics of Carbon PastesTesting of Unmodified CPEsIntera

  1. Pyrolyzed thin film carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Liger, Matthieu (Inventor); Harder, Theodore (Inventor); Konishi, Satoshi (Inventor); Miserendino, Scott (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method of making carbon thin films comprises depositing a catalyst on a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon in contact with the catalyst and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon. A method of controlling a carbon thin film density comprises etching a cavity into a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon into the cavity, and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon while in the cavity to form a carbon thin film. Controlling a carbon thin film density is achieved by changing the volume of the cavity. Methods of making carbon containing patterned structures are also provided. Carbon thin films and carbon containing patterned structures can be used in NEMS, MEMS, liquid chromatography, and sensor devices.

  2. M4C9 +(M = Ti, V): New gas phase clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Selvan; L Gowrishankar; T Pradeep

    2001-10-01

    New metal-carbon clusters, M4C9 +(M = Ti, V), generated using a combined thermal arc discharge evaporation set-up, have been studied with quadrupole mass spectrometry. Reactivities of these clusters have been investigated by means of association reactions with H2O. Metal-carbon clusters of other compositions have also been studied. We speculate on the mechanism of formation of larger metal-carbon clusters.

  3. Fluoren-9-one oxime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugenhagen, Bernhard; Al Jasem, Yosef; Al-Azani, Mariam; Thiemann, Thies

    2014-01-01

    In the title mol­ecule, C13H9NO, the fluorene system and the oxime group non-H atoms are essentially coplanar, with a maximum deviation from the fluorene mean plane of 0.079 (2) Å for the oxime O atom. A short intra­molecular C—H⋯O generates an S(6) ring. In the crystal, mol­ecules related by a twofold screw axis are connected by O—H⋯N hydrogen bonds, forming [100] chains Within these chains, mol­ecules related by a unit translation along [100] show π–π stacking inter­actions between their fluorene ring systems with an inter­planar distance of 3.347 (2) Å. The dihedral angle between the fluorene units of adjacent mol­ecules along the helix is 88.40 (2)°. There is a short C—H⋯π contact between the fluorene groups belonging to neighbouring chains. PMID:24764980

  4. Progress report. P9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    China Evaluated Nuclear Data Library, version 3 (CENDL-3) was accomplished in 2000. CENDL-3 contains about 206 nuclides. Among them, the data of 161 nuclei will be newly or reevaluated: Fissile nuclei 15 ( 233-239 U, 237 Np, 238-242 Pu, 241Am , 242 Am); Structure material nuclei 34 (Natural elements Ni, Cu, Zr, Hf, Pb and their isotopes, 23 Na, Nat Si); Light nuclei 3 ( 6Li, 7 Li, 9Be); Fission product nuclei 109. The benchmark testing for CENDL-3 is being carried out. Several problems in physics and format have been found on major fissile nuclides, and are being improved. CINDA activities comprised compilation od 118 entries from the works in communication of Nuclear Data Progress in 1999-2000. Two young staff members of CNDC have started the EXFOR compilation, and fished 16 entries measured in China. 'Communication of Nuclear Data Progress' (CNDP) has been published for 24 issues by CNDC and Atomic Energy Press science 1989, and it has been distributed by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section as an NDC document

  5. Studies on the Simultaneous Synthesis of Dimethyl Carbonate and Poly(ethylene terephthalate):Ⅰ. Catalytic Activity of Metal Acetate in Transesterification of Ethylene Carbonate with Dimethyl Terephthalate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan ZHANG; Shu Yong JIA; Yue WANG; Jie YAO; Yi ZENG; Gong Ying WANG

    2006-01-01

    A novel direct method for preparation of dimethyl carbonate and poly(ethylene terephthalate) from ethylene carbonate and dimethyl terephthalate has been demonstrated in the presence of metal acetate catalysts, lithium acetate dihydrate showed highest catalytic activity with 47.9% yield of dimethyl carbonate. This method was a green chemical process.

  6. Carbon allocation, sequestration and carbon dioxide mitigation under plantation forests of north western Himalaya, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandana Devi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The organic carbon and soils of the world comprise bulk of the terrestrial carbon and serve as a major sink and source of atmospheric carbon. Increasing atmospheric concentrations of green house gases may be mitigated by increasing carbon sequestration in vegetation and soil. The study attempted to estimate biomass production and carbon sequestration potential of different plantation ecosystems in north western Himalaya, India. Biomass, carbon density of biomass, soil, detritus, carbon sequestration and CO2 mitigation potential were studied under different plantation forest ecosystems comprising of eight different tree species: Quercus leucotrichophora, Pinus roxburghii, Acacia catechu, Acacia mollissima, Albizia procera, Alnusnitida, Eucalyptus tereticornis and Ulmus villosa. Above (185.57±48.99tha-1 and below ground (42.47±10.38 tha-1 biomass was maximum in Ulmus villosa. The vegetation carbon density was maxium in Albizia procera(118.37±1.49 tha-1 and minimum (36.50±9.87 tha-1 in Acacia catechu. Soil carbon density was maximum (219.86±10.34 tha-1 in Alnus nitida, and minimum (170.83±20.60 tha-1 in Pinus roxburghii. Detritus was higher in Pinus roxburghii (6.79±2.0 tha-1. Carbon sequestration (7.91±3.4 tha-1 and CO2 mitigation potential (29.09±12.78 tha-1 was maximum in Ulmus villosa. Pearson correlation matrix revealed significant positive relationship of ecosystem carbon with plantation biomass, soil carbon and CO2 mitigation potential. With the emerging threat of climate change, such assessment of forest and soil carbon inventory would allow to devise best land management and policy decisions for sustainable management of fragile hilly ecosystem.

  7. Carbon allocation, sequestration and carbon dioxide mitigation under plantation forests of north western Himalaya, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandana Devi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The organic carbon and soils of the world comprise bulk of the terrestrial carbon and serve as amajorsink and source of atmospheric carbon. Increasing atmospheric concentrations of green house gases may be mitigated by increasing carbon sequestration in vegetation and soil. The study attempted to estimate biomass production and carbon sequestration potential of different plantation ecosystems in north western Himalaya, India. Biomass, carbon density of biomass, soil, detritus, carbon sequestration and CO2 mitigation potential were studied underdifferent plantation forest ecosystems comprising of eight different tree species viz. Quercus leucotrichophora, Pinus roxburghii, Acacia catechu, Acacia mollissima, Albizia procera, Alnus nitida, Eucalyptus tereticornis and Ulmus villosa. Above (185.57 ą 48.99 tha-1 and below ground (42.47 ą 10.38 tha-1 biomass was maximum in Ulmus villosa. The vegetation carbon density was maxium in Albizia procera (118.37 ą 1.49 tha-1 and minimum (36.50 ą 9.87 tha-1 in Acacia catechu. Soil carbon density was maximum (219.86ą 10.34 tha-1 in Alnus nitida, and minimum (170.83ą 20.60 tha-1in Pinus roxburghii. Detritus was higher in Pinus roxburghii (6.79 ą 2.0 tha-1. Carbon sequestration (7.91ą 3.4 tha-1 and CO2 mitigation potential (29.09 ą 12.78 tha-1 was maximum in Ulmus villosa. Pearson correlation matrix revealed significant positive relationship of ecosystem carbon with plantation biomass, soil carbon and CO2 mitigation potential. With the emerging threat of climate change, such assessment of forest and soil carbon inventory would allow to devise best land management and policy decisions forsustainable management of fragile hilly ecosystem. 

  8. Wood - a carbon depot

    OpenAIRE

    Lipušček, Igor; Tišler, Vesna

    2003-01-01

    The article examines the global movement of carbon dioxide, the most important greenhouse gas due to its large quantities. We studied the carbon cycle with possibilities of its extension, and analysed the mechanisms that remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and bind it into solid substances for a longer period of time. The focus was on carbon dioxide sink into biomass and carbon deposit in wood. On the basis of wood component data and chemical analysis of the components, we calculated th...

  9. TOGAF 9 certified study guide

    CERN Document Server

    Group, The Open

    2010-01-01

    The TOGAF 9 certification program is a knowledge-based certification program. It has two levels, leading to certification for TOGAF 9 Foundation and TOGAF 9 Certified, respectively. The purpose of certification to TOGAF 9 Certified is to provide validation that, in addition to the knowledge and comprehension of TOGAF 9 Foundation level, the Candidate is able to analyze and apply this knowledge. The learning objectives at this level therefore focus on application and analysis in addition to knowledge and comprehension.This Study Guide supports students in preparation for the TOGAF 9 Part 2 Exam

  10. 2,6-Bis(9-ethyl-9H-carbazolylmethylenecyclohexanone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M. Asiri

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, 2,6-bis(ethyl-9-ethyl-9H-carbazolylmethylenecyclohexanone has been synthesized by condensation of 9-ethylcarbazole-3-aldehyde and cyclohexanone in ethanol in the presence of pyridine. The structure of this new compound was confirmed by elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and EI-MS spectral analysis.

  11. 9 CFR 317.9 - Labeling of equine products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Labeling of equine products. 317.9... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION LABELING, MARKING DEVICES, AND CONTAINERS General § 317.9 Labeling of equine products. The immediate containers of any equine products shall be labeled to show the kinds of...

  12. Carbonate precipitation by the thermophilic archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus: a model of carbon flow for an ancient microorganism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ostrom

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Microbial carbonate precipitation experiments were conducted using the archaeon bacteria Archaeoglobus fulgidus to determine chemical and isotopic fractionation of organic and inorganic carbon into mineral phases. Carbonate precipitation was induced in two different experiments using A. fulgidus to determine the relative abundance of organically derived carbon incorporated into carbonate minerals as well as to define any distinct phases or patterns that could be attributed to the precipitation process. One experiment used a medium containing 13C-depleted organic carbon and 13C-enriched inorganic carbon, and the other used a 14C-labeled organic carbon source. Results indicated that 0.9–24.8% organic carbon was incorporated into carbonates precipitated by A. fulgidus and that this process was mediated primarily by pH and CO2 emission from cells. Data showed that the carbon in the CO2 produced from this microorganism is incorporated into carbonates and that the rate at which precipitation occurs and the dynamics of the carbonate precipitation process are strongly mediated by the specific steps involved in the biochemical process for lactate oxidation by A. fulgidus.

  13. Evaluation report n.9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The researches on radioactive waste management carried out in France according to the three ways of the 1991 law (separation and transmutation, deep geologic disposal, long lasting conditioning and storage), aim at offering a set of solutions than can be used partially or as a whole for the long living radioactive waste of high or medium activity. This 9. issue of the annual evaluation report of National Commission of Evaluation (CNE) makes a status of the advances of the researches in this domain. It is shared in 7 chapters dealing with: 1 - the activities of the CNE (scientific hearings and reports, meetings); 2 - the strategic trends and the researches (global strategic trends of nuclear energy development in France, 2003-2006 research strategies and programs, working groups, analysis of radionuclides hierarchization, studies of nuclear system scenarios, development of the Alliances common simulation tool, national inventory of radioactive wastes, containers, sanitary problems); 3 - researches on separation and transmutation (general framework, deep separation, transmutation fuels and targets, transmutation and hybrid systems, future reactors, Gedepeon working group); 4 - researches on deep geologic disposal (researches strategy and program, concept, modeling, status of 2001 studies and works, building of the Bure underground laboratory and program of researches, Forpro working group, Granite 2002 dossier, Andra's international collaborations); 5 - researches on wastes conditioning and long lasting storage of wastes and spent fuels (strategy and programs, glass matrices, new conditioning matrices for separate elements, containers and interfaces between disposal and storage, long-lasting storage); 6 - transverse working groups: Nomade, Practis and Momas; 7 - status of foreign researches and realizations (OECD coordinated researches, SAFIR 2 report (Belgium), international institutions). Five appendixes and a glossary complete the document. (J.S.)

  14. Solid State Structure of Poly(9,9-dinonylfluorene)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torkkeli, Mika; Galbrecht, Frank; Scherf, Ullrich; Knaapila, Matti

    2015-01-01

    We report on X-ray diffraction and grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction data of poly(9,9-dinonylfluorene) (PF9) in bulk, thin films and in the 1% methylcyclohexane gel. We denote the main crystalline phase as alpha phase and propose that the unit cell is monoclinic (a = 29.31 angstrom, b = 23.......1 angstrom, and c = 16.7 angstrom). Structural analogues to other 9,9-di-n-alkyl-substituted polyfluorenes are discussed in terms of unit cell parameters and backbone geometry....

  15. Mechanical Properties of Low-Density SiC-Coated Carbon-Bonded Carbon Fiber Composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ahmed, A. S.; Chlup, Zdeněk; Dlouhý, Ivo; Rawlings, R. D.; Boccaccini, A. R.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 2 (2012), s. 401-412. ISSN 1546-542X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1821 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : SiC coating * Carbon bonded * Carbon Fiber Composites * Fracture Toughness Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.153, year: 2012

  16. Performance of 9 x 9 demonstration assemblies in Dresden-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Electric Power Research Institute, Empire State Electric energy Research Corporation and Siemens Nuclear Power corporation jointly sponsored a program to monitor the in-reactor performance of 9x9 BWR fuel. The program was conducted in Dresden-2, with four 9x9 lead assemblies and one 8x8 reference assembly. These assemblies were loaded at the beginning of reactor Cycle 9 and completed four cycles of operation. All five assemblies were discharged after reactor Cycle 12 (EOC12) in September 1990. the 9x9 assemblies reached an average exposure of 35.7 GWd/MTU and the 8x8 reference assembly reached a burnup of 34.2 GWd/MTU. This final program report evaluates the performance of the 9x9 and 8x8 fuel assemblies, based on results from all four poolside examinations, analysis of the operating histories, and ramp tests conducted on rod segments under another program. Overall, both 9x9 and 8x assemblies performed well during the four cycles of irradiation

  17. Cas9 Functionally Opens Chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Barkal, Amira A.; Srinivasan, Sharanya; Hashimoto, Tatsunori; Gifford, David K.; Sherwood, Richard I.

    2016-01-01

    Using a nuclease-dead Cas9 mutant, we show that Cas9 reproducibly induces chromatin accessibility at previously inaccessible genomic loci. Cas9 chromatin opening is sufficient to enable adjacent binding and transcriptional activation by the settler transcription factor retinoic acid receptor at previously unbound motifs. Thus, we demonstrate a new use for Cas9 in increasing surrounding chromatin accessibility to alter local transcription factor binding.

  18. Cas9 Functionally Opens Chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Barkal, Amira A.; Srinivasan, Sharanya; Gifford, David K.; Sherwood, Richard I.; Hashimoto, Tatsunori Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Using a nuclease-dead Cas9 mutant, we show that Cas9 reproducibly induces chromatin accessibility at previously inaccessible genomic loci. Cas9 chromatin opening is sufficient to enable adjacent binding and transcriptional activation by the settler transcription factor retinoic acid receptor at previously unbound motifs. Thus, we demonstrate a new use for Cas9 in increasing surrounding chromatin accessibility to alter local transcription factor binding.

  19. Cas9 Functionally Opens Chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira A Barkal

    Full Text Available Using a nuclease-dead Cas9 mutant, we show that Cas9 reproducibly induces chromatin accessibility at previously inaccessible genomic loci. Cas9 chromatin opening is sufficient to enable adjacent binding and transcriptional activation by the settler transcription factor retinoic acid receptor at previously unbound motifs. Thus, we demonstrate a new use for Cas9 in increasing surrounding chromatin accessibility to alter local transcription factor binding.

  20. Cas9 Functionally Opens Chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkal, Amira A.; Srinivasan, Sharanya; Hashimoto, Tatsunori; Gifford, David K.; Sherwood, Richard I.

    2016-01-01

    Using a nuclease-dead Cas9 mutant, we show that Cas9 reproducibly induces chromatin accessibility at previously inaccessible genomic loci. Cas9 chromatin opening is sufficient to enable adjacent binding and transcriptional activation by the settler transcription factor retinoic acid receptor at previously unbound motifs. Thus, we demonstrate a new use for Cas9 in increasing surrounding chromatin accessibility to alter local transcription factor binding. PMID:27031353

  1. Accelerating Mineral Carbonation Using Carbonic Anhydrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Ian M; Harrison, Anna L; Dipple, Gregory M

    2016-03-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzymes have gained considerable attention for their potential use in carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technologies because they are able to catalyze rapidly the interconversion of aqueous CO2 and bicarbonate. However, there are challenges for widespread implementation including the need to develop mineralization process routes for permanent carbon storage. Mineral carbonation of highly reactive feedstocks may be limited by the supply rate of CO2. This rate limitation can be directly addressed by incorporating enzyme-catalyzed CO2 hydration. This study examined the effects of bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA) and CO2-rich gas streams on the carbonation rate of brucite [Mg(OH)2], a highly reactive mineral. Alkaline brucite slurries were amended with BCA and supplied with 10% CO2 gas while aqueous chemistry and solids were monitored throughout the experiments (hours to days). In comparison to controls, brucite carbonation using BCA was accelerated by up to 240%. Nesquehonite [MgCO3·3H2O] precipitation limited the accumulation of hydrated CO2 species, apparently preventing BCA from catalyzing the dehydration reaction. Geochemical models reproduce observed reaction progress in all experiments, revealing a linear correlation between CO2 uptake and carbonation rate. Data demonstrates that carbonation in BCA-amended reactors remained limited by CO2 supply, implying further acceleration is possible. PMID:26829491

  2. Carbon fuel cells with carbon corrosion suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.

    2012-04-10

    An electrochemical cell apparatus that can operate as either a fuel cell or a battery includes a cathode compartment, an anode compartment operatively connected to the cathode compartment, and a carbon fuel cell section connected to the anode compartment and the cathode compartment. An effusion plate is operatively positioned adjacent the anode compartment or the cathode compartment. The effusion plate allows passage of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide exhaust channels are operatively positioned in the electrochemical cell to direct the carbon dioxide from the electrochemical cell.

  3. The Properties and Application of Carbon Nanostructures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slepička, P.; Hubáček, T.; Kolská, Z.; Trostová, S.; Kasálková-Slepičková, N.; Bačáková, Lucie; Švorčík, V.

    Rijeka: InTech, 2013 - (Yilmaz, F.), s. 175-199 ISBN 978-953-51-0941-9 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/10/1106; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/12/1168 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : carbon nanostructures * properties * tissue engineering Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials

  4. Enzymatic coproduction of biodiesel and glycerol carbonate from soybean oil and dimethyl carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Pil-Je; Jeon, Byoung Wook; Lee, Myunggu; Cho, Dae Haeng; Kim, Duk-Ki; Jung, Kwang S; Kim, Seung Wook; Han, Sung Ok; Kim, Yong Hwan; Park, Chulhwan

    2011-05-01

    The enzymatic coproduction of biodiesel and glycerol carbonate by the transesterification of soybean oil was studied using lipase as catalyst in organic solvent. To produce biodiesel and glycerol carbonate simultaneously, experiments were designed sequentially. Enzyme screening, the molar ratio of dimethyl carbonate (DMC) to soybean oil, reaction temperature and solvent effects were investigated. The results of enzyme screening, at 100 g/L Novozym 435 (immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B), biodiesel and glycerol carbonate showed conversions of 58.7% and 50.7%, respectively. The optimal conditions were 60 °C, 100 g/L Novozym 435, 6.0:1 molar ratio with tert-butanol as solvent: 84.9% biodiesel and 92.0% glycerol carbonate production was achieved. PMID:22113023

  5. The Carbon-Rich Dust Sequence: Infrared Spectral Classification of Carbon Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solan, G. C.; Little-Marenin, I. R.; Price, S. D.; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a classification system for the infrared spectral emission from carbon stars, using a sample of 96 bright carbon-rich variables associated with the asymptotic giant branch. In addition to the stellar contribution, most spectra include the 11.2 micron emission feature from SiC and either a smooth cool continuum from amorphous carbon or a secondary emission feature at 9.0 microns. We have identified a carbon-rich dust sequence along which the amorphous carbon component grows while the 9.0 micron feature declines in strength. Along this spectral sequence, the fraction of Miras increases, as does the period of variability, the mass-loss rate, and the thickness of the circumstellar shell. Thus the carbon-rich dust sequence appears to be an evolutionary sequence. One class of spectra shows a particularly strong 9.0 micron feature, Enhanced C/O ratio, and several other unusual properties that suggest a different sequence, perhaps related to J stars.

  6. Fluid phase equilibria during propylene carbonate synthesis from propylene oxide in carbon dioxide medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gharnati, Loubna; Musko, Nikolai; Jensen, Anker Degn;

    2013-01-01

    In the present study the influence of the amount of carbon dioxide on the catalytic performance during the propylene carbonate synthesis from propylene oxide and CO2 was investigated. The reaction was performed in high-pressure batch autoclaves using immobilized 1-hydroxyethyl-9-propyl......-phase region where a CO2-expanded reactant/product phase (larger volume due to the dissolution of carbon dioxide in the liquid phase) is present. Optimal conditions for performing the reaction have been derived which requires consideration not only of the phase behavior of the starting phase but also of the...

  7. Opportunities and Challenges for Being a Carbon Black Great Power

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    1. The "Uth Five-year Plan" Lay- ing the Foundation for Carbon Black Great Power 1.1 Rapid growth of carbon black output and production capacity During the "llth Five-year Plan" Period, China carbon black output was increased by 1.1 times and realized doubling; and the production capacity of carbon black realized an average annu- al growth of 16.9%. In 2011, the carbon black output was 3.853 million tons, increased by 14.2% compared with that of the last year, and the pro- portion of carbon black output in the world carbon black output was increased from 16% to 36%. The carbon black production capacity was 5.345 mil- lion tons, increased by 6% compared with that of the last year, and the proportion of carbon black production capacity in the world carbon black out- put reached 38%. Chinese carbon black output has been ranking the 1st place throughout the world for 6 years successively, and China has become a great power of carbon black production in the world.

  8. Calculating Young's modulus for a carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzubi, Feras; Cosby, Ronald

    2008-10-01

    Young's modulus for an armchair single-wall carbon nanotube was calculated using an atomistic approach and density functional theory (DFT). Atomic forces and total energies for strained carbon nanotube segments were computed using Atomistix's Virtual NanoLab (VNL) and ToolKit (ATK) software. For a maximum strain of one percent, elastic moduli were calculated using both force-strain and energy-strain data. The average values found for Young's modulus were in the range 1.2 to 3.9 TPa depending on the cross-sectional area taken for the carbon nanotube, consideration of Poisson's ratio, and the calculation method used. Three possible choices of cross-sectional area for the carbon nanotube are discussed and parameter and convergence tests for the DFT computations are described.

  9. Global deforestation: contribution to atmospheric carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodwell, G M; Hobbie, J E; Houghton, R A; Melillo, J M; Moore, B; Peterson, B J; Shaver, G R

    1983-12-01

    A study of effects of terrestrial biota on the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere suggests that the global net release of carbon due to forest clearing between 1860 and 1980 was between 135 x 10(15) and 228 x 10(15) grams. Between 1.8 x 10(15) and 4.7 x 10(15) grams of carbon were released in 1980, of which nearly 80 percent was due to deforestation, principally in the tropics. The annual release of carbon from the biota and soils exceeded the release from fossil fuels until about 1960. Because the biotic release has been and remains much larger than is commonly assumed, the airborne fraction, usually considered to be about 50 percent of the release from fossil fuels, was probably between 22 and 43 percent of the total carbon released in 1980. The increase in carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is thought by some to be increasing the storage of carbon in the earth's remaining forests sufficiently to offset the release from deforestation. The interpretation of the evidence presented here suggests no such effect; deforestation appears to be the dominant biotic effect on atmospheric carbon dioxide. If deforestation increases in proportion to population, the biotic release of carbon will reach 9 x 10(15) grams per year before forests are exhausted early in the next century. The possibilities for limiting the accumulation of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere through reduction in use of fossil fuels and through management of forests may be greater than is commonly assumed. PMID:17747369

  10. Deglacial climate, carbon cycle and ocean chemistry changes in response to a terrestrial carbon release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, C. T.; Matthews, H. D.; Mysak, L. A.

    2016-02-01

    Researchers have proposed that a significant portion of the post-glacial rise in atmospheric CO2 could be due to the respiration of permafrost carbon stocks that formed over the course of glaciation. In this paper, we used the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model v. 2.9 to simulate the deglacial and interglacial carbon cycle from the last glacial maximum to the present. The model's sensitivity to mid and high latitude terrestrial carbon storage is evaluated by including a 600 Pg C carbon pool parameterized to respire in concert with decreases in ice sheet surface area. The respiration of this stored carbon during the early stages of deglaciation had a large effect on the carbon cycle in these simulations, allowing atmospheric CO2 to increase by 40 ppmv in the model, with an additional 20 ppmv increase occurring in the case of a more realistic, prescribed CO2 radiative warming. These increases occurred prior to large-scale carbon uptake due to the reestablishment of boreal forests and peatlands in the proxy record (beginning in the early Holocene). Surprisingly, the large external carbon input to the atmosphere and oceans did not increase sediment dissolution and mean ocean alkalinity relative to a control simulation without the high latitude carbon reservoir. In addition, our simulations suggest that an early deglacial terrestrial carbon release may come closer to explaining some observed deglacial changes in deep-ocean carbonate concentrations than simulations without such a release. We conclude that the respiration of glacial soil carbon stores may have been an important contributor to the deglacial CO2 rise, particularly in the early stages of deglaciation.

  11. Study of the potential of low carbon energy development and its contribution to realize the reduction target of carbon intensity in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appraising low carbon energy potential in China and studying its contribution to China's target of cutting CO2 emissions by 40–45% per unit of GDP by 2020 is crucial for taking countermeasures against climate change and identifying low carbon energy development strategies. This paper presents two scenarios and evaluates the development potential for low carbon energy and its various sources. Based on the evaluation, we analyze how low carbon energy contributes to achieving China's national target of carbon intensity reduction. We draw several conclusions from the analysis. First, low carbon energy will contribute 9.74% (minimum) to 24.42% (maximum) toward the 2020 carbon intensity target under three economic development schemes. Second, the contribution will decrease when the GDP growth rate increases. Third, to maintain the same contribution with high GDP growth rates, China should not only strengthen its investment and policy stimulation for low carbon energy but also simultaneously optimize economic structures and improve carbon productivity. - Highlights: ► Low carbon energy can substitute at least 659.5 Mtce of fossil energy in 2020. ► Potential of hydropower ranks first among all low carbon energy sources in 2020. ► Low carbon energy will contribute at least 9.47% to reach carbon target in 2020. ► China should formulate and implement comprehensive measures to cut carbon emission.

  12. Conductive Carbon Coatings for Electrode Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple method for optimizing the carbon coatings on non-conductive battery cathode material powders has been developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The enhancement of the electronic conductivity of carbon coating enables minimization of the amount of carbon in the composites, allowing improvements in battery rate capability without compromising energy density. The invention is applicable to LiFePO4 and other cathode materials used in lithium ion or lithium metal batteries for high power applications such as power tools and hybrid or plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. The market for lithium ion batteries in consumer applications is currently $5 billion/year. Additionally, lithium ion battery sales for vehicular applications are projected to capture 5% of the hybrid and electric vehicle market by 2010, and 36% by 2015 (http://www.greencarcongress.com). LiFePO4 suffers from low intrinsic rate capability, which has been ascribed to the low electronic conductivity (10-9 S cm-1). One of the most promising approaches to overcome this problem is the addition of conductive carbon. Co-synthesis methods are generally the most practical route for carbon coating particles. At the relatively low temperatures (4, however, only poorly conductive disordered carbons are produced from organic precursors. Thus, the carbon content has to be high to produce the desired enhancement in rate capability, which decreases the cathode energy density

  13. Carbon nanotube cathode with capping carbon nanosheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zhao, Dengchao; Pang, Kaige; Pang, Junchao; Liu, Weihua; Liu, Hongzhong; Wang, Xiaoli

    2013-10-01

    Here, we report a vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) film capped with a few layer of carbon nanosheet (FLCN) synthesized by chemical vapor deposition using a carbon source from iron phthalocyanine pyrolysis. The square resistance of the VACNT film is significantly reduced from 1500 Ω/□ to 300 Ω/□ when it is capped with carbon nanosheet. The VACNT capped with carbon nanosheet was transferred to an ITO glass substrate in an inverted configuration so that the carbon nanosheet served as a flexible transparent electrode at the bottom and the VACNT roots served as emission tips. Because all of the VACNTs start growing from a flat silicon substrate, the VACNT roots are very neat and uniform in height. A field emission test of the carbon nanosheet-capped VACNT film proved that the CNT roots show better uniformity in field emission and the carbon nanosheet cap could also potentially serve as a flexible transparent electrode, which is highly desired in photo-assisted field emission.

  14. Studies on the sublimation of tungsten single crystal (110) face and the influence of carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaporation of tungsten single crystals face (110) is studied in ultrahigh vacuum (better than 1x10-9 torr) by Langmuir method. Small admixtures of carbon are shown to markedly influence the process. Carbon hinders the evaporation and increases the sublimation energy by 25 kcal. The data obtained show that the reported parametres of tungsten evaporation refer to a carbon-containing material

  15. 76 FR 25236 - Carbon Dioxide; Exemption From the Requirement of a Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-04

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Carbon Dioxide; Exemption From the Requirement of a Tolerance AGENCY... from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of carbon dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 124-38-9) when used as... permissible level for residues of carbon dioxide. DATES: This regulation is effective May 4, 2011....

  16. Discovery of indole inhibitors of chemokine receptor 9 (CCR9).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Bhaumik A; Baber, Christian; Chan, Audrey; Chamberlain, Brian; Chandonnet, Haoqun; Goss, Jennifer; Hopper, Timothy; Lippa, Blaise; Poutsiaka, Katherine; Romero, Jan; Stucka, Sabrina; Varoglu, Mustafa; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Xin

    2016-07-15

    Irritable bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are serious chronic diseases affecting millions of patients worldwide. Studies of human chemokine biology has suggested C-C chemokine receptor 9 (CCR9) may be a key mediator of pro-inflammatory signaling. Discovery of agents that inhibit CCR9 may lead to new therapies for CD and UC patients. Herein we describe the evolution of a high content screening hit (1) into potent inhibitors of CCR9, such as azaindole 12. PMID:27256913

  17. Trading forest carbon - OSU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issues associate with trading carbon sequestered in forests are discussed. Scientific uncertainties associated with carbon measurement are discussed with respect to proposed accounting procedures. Major issues include: (1) Establishing baselines. (2) Determining additivity from f...

  18. Potassium carbonate poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potassium carbonate is a white powder used to make soap, glass, and other items. This article discusses poisoning from swallowing or breathing in potassium carbonate. This article is for information only. Do ...

  19. Sodium carbonate poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodium carbonate (known as washing soda or soda ash) is a chemical found in many household and ... products. This article focuses on poisoning due to sodium carbonate. This article is for information only. Do ...

  20. Biomass Carbon Stock

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Biomass carbon includes carbon stored in above- and below-ground live plant components (such as leaf, branch, stem and root) as well as in standing and down dead...

  1. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home / Safety Education / Safety Education Centers En Español Carbon Monoxide Information Center The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as CO, is called the "Invisible ...

  2. Carbon Monoxide Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with the Media Fire Protection Technology Carbon monoxide safety outreach materials Help inform residents in your community ... KB | Spanish PDF 645 KB Handout: carbon monoxide safety Download this handout and add your organization's logo ...

  3. Soil Organic Carbon Stock

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Soil organic carbon (SOC) is the carbon held within soil organic constituents (i.e., products produced as dead plants and animals decompose and the soil microbial...

  4. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education / Safety Education Centers En Español Carbon Monoxide Information Center The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known ... Install one and check its batteries regularly. View Information About CO Alarms Other CO Topics Safety Tips ...

  5. Calcium carbonate overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Some products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: ... and mineral supplements Other products may also contain calcium ...

  6. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  7. Metal filled porous carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Adam F.; Vajo, John J.; Cumberland, Robert W.; Liu, Ping; Salguero, Tina T.

    2011-03-22

    A porous carbon scaffold with a surface and pores, the porous carbon scaffold containing a primary metal and a secondary metal, where the primary metal is a metal that does not wet the surface of the pores of the carbon scaffold but wets the surface of the secondary metal, and the secondary metal is interspersed between the surface of the pores of the carbon scaffold and the primary metal.

  8. A novel synthesis of 4-toluene 9H-carbazole-9-carbodithioate, electropolymerization and impedance study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ates

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel synthesis of 4-toluene 9H-carbazole-9-carbodithioate (TCzC was chemically synthesized and characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR, and carbon nuclear magnetic resonance (13C-NMR spectroscopies. Specific (Csp and double layer capacitances (Cdl of the electro-coated poly(carbazole and poly(TCzC films were obtained on glassy carbon electrode (GCE by impedimetric method with DC potential from –0.1 to +1.0 V by increasing potential of 0.2 V. The polymers were characterized by Cyclic voltammetry (CV, Fourier transform infrared reflectance-attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR, Atomic force microscopy (AFM, and Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. The use of additional variable (DC potential helped to disambiguate the equivalent circuit model of R(C(R(Q(RW(CR. Simulation results were compared with experimental data. In this study, substituted group effects of CS2 and tosyl on carbazole polymer were investigated by EIS technique. CS2 group together with tosyl group in the structure of carbazole decreased the specific capacitance value (Csp = 0.43 mF•cm–2 compared to PCz (Csp = 1.44 mF•cm–2. Electropolymerization formation was seriously affected by substituted groups of CS2 and tosyl on conjugation system because of the electron donor and acceptor ability.

  9. Chapter 4: Geological Carbon Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedmann, J; Herzog, H

    2006-06-14

    Carbon sequestration is the long term isolation of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through physical, chemical, biological, or engineered processes. The largest potential reservoirs for storing carbon are the deep oceans and geological reservoirs in the earth's upper crust. This chapter focuses on geological sequestration because it appears to be the most promising large-scale approach for the 2050 timeframe. It does not discuss ocean or terrestrial sequestration. In order to achieve substantial GHG reductions, geological storage needs to be deployed at a large scale. For example, 1 Gt C/yr (3.6 Gt CO{sub 2}/yr) abatement, requires carbon capture and storage (CCS) from 600 large pulverized coal plants ({approx}1000 MW each) or 3600 injection projects at the scale of Statoil's Sleipner project. At present, global carbon emissions from coal approximate 2.5 Gt C. However, given reasonable economic and demand growth projections in a business-as-usual context, global coal emissions could account for 9 Gt C. These volumes highlight the need to develop rapidly an understanding of typical crustal response to such large projects, and the magnitude of the effort prompts certain concerns regarding implementation, efficiency, and risk of the enterprise. The key questions of subsurface engineering and surface safety associated with carbon sequestration are: (1) Subsurface issues: (a) Is there enough capacity to store CO{sub 2} where needed? (b) Do we understand storage mechanisms well enough? (c) Could we establish a process to certify injection sites with our current level of understanding? (d) Once injected, can we monitor and verify the movement of subsurface CO{sub 2}? (2) Near surface issues: (a) How might the siting of new coal plants be influenced by the distribution of storage sites? (b) What is the probability of CO{sub 2} escaping from injection sites? What are the attendant risks? Can we detect leakage if it occurs? (3) Will surface leakage negate or

  10. Protolytic carbon film technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renschler, C.L.; White, C.A.

    1996-04-01

    This paper presents a technique for the deposition of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) on virtually any surface allowing carbon film formation with only the caveat that the substrate must withstand carbonization temperatures of at least 600 degrees centigrade. The influence of processing conditions upon the structure and properties of the carbonized film is discussed. Electrical conductivity, microstructure, and morphology control are also described.

  11. Carbon Goes To…

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savasci, Funda

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this activity are to help middle school students understand the carbon cycle and realize how human activities affect the carbon cycle. This activity consists of two parts. The first part of the activity focuses on the carbon cycle, especially before the Industrial Revolution, while the second part of the activity focuses on how…

  12. Carbon/Carbon Pistons for Internal Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    Carbon/carbon piston performs same function as aluminum pistons in reciprocating internal combustion engines while reducing weight and increasing mechanical and thermal efficiencies of engine. Carbon/carbon piston concept features low piston-to-cylinder wall clearance - so low piston rings and skirts unnecessary. Advantages possible by negligible coefficient of thermal expansion of carbon/carbon.

  13. 9 CFR 327.9 - Burlap wrapping for foreign meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Burlap wrapping for foreign meat. 327... AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION IMPORTED PRODUCTS § 327.9 Burlap wrapping for foreign meat. Burlap shall not...

  14. Improvement in char formability of phenolic resin for development of Carbon/Carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the processing of carbon/carbon composites using polymer resin as the matrix precursor, it is inevitable that a porous structure was formed after carbonization. As a result, densification by liquid phase impregnation followed by recarbonization is required to obtain a densified composite. Consequently, the char formability of resin is an important factor in reducing the number of densification cycles and hence the processing cost. In this study, a novel approach is adopted to improve the densification of carbon/carbon composites by using a new phenolic resin modified by pitch. For this purpose, soluble part of pitch was extracted and dispersed in resol type phenolic resin. The polymerization reaction was performed in presence of para-formaldehyde and a resol-pitch compound was obtained. The second compound was prepared by mixing novolac-furfural in 55:45 weight ratio containing 9% by weight hexamethylene tetramine. This compound was added to resol-pitch compound in 10,20,50 and 80 w %. The microstructure of carbonized resin was investigated by X-ray diffraction and char yield, and the linear and volumetric shrinkage were obtained. Results show that in 80:20 ratio of resol-pitch to novolac-furfural , the char yield would be maximized by 71% and volumetric shrinkage would be minimized at 16.4%. At the same time, XRD results indicate that the resin has a strong ability to graphitize carbon/carbon composites matrix as a necessary step for its processing

  15. Systemic effects of geoengineering by terrestrial carbon dioxide removal on carbon related planetary boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Vera; Donges, Jonathan; Lucht, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    The planetary boundaries framework as proposed by Rockström et al. (2009) provides guidelines for ecological boundaries, the transgression of which is likely to result in a shift of Earth system functioning away from the relatively stable Holocene state. As the climate change boundary is already close to be transgressed, several geoengineering (GE) methods are discussed, aiming at a reduction of atmospheric carbon concentrations to control the Earth's energy balance. One of the proposed GE methods is carbon extraction from the atmosphere via biological carbon sequestration. In case mitigation efforts fail to substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions, this form of GE could act as potential measure to reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. We here study the possible influences of human interactions in the Earth system on carbon related planetary boundaries in the form of geoengineering (terrestrial carbon dioxide removal). We use a conceptual model specifically designed to investigate fundamental carbon feedbacks between land, ocean and atmosphere (Anderies et al., 2013) and modify it to include an additional geoengineering component. With that we analyze the existence and stability of a safe operating space for humanity, which is here conceptualized in three of the 9 proposed dimensions, namely climate change, ocean acidification and land-use. References: J. M. Anderies et al., The topology of non-linear global carbon dynamics: from tipping points to planetary boundaries. Environ. Res. Lett., 8(4):044048 (2013) J. Rockström et al., A safe operating space for humanity. Nature 461 (7263), 472-475 (2009)

  16. Photophysics of polymer-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, J; Loi, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are successfully dispersed in two conjugated polymer poly(9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl) (PFO) and poly[2-methoxy-5-(2’-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MEHPPV) solutions. Steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy in the near-infrare

  17. Accounting methods for carbon credits: Impacts on the minimum area of CDM forestry projects

    OpenAIRE

    Locatelli, Bruno; Pedroni, Lucio

    2004-01-01

    International audience The Ninth Conference of the Parties (COP-9) decided to adopt an accounting system based on expiring carbon credits to address the problem of non-permanent carbon storage in forests established under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM). This article reviews and discusses carbon accounting methods that were under consideration before COP-9 and presents a model which calculates the minimum area that forest plantation projects should reach to be able to compensate CDM ...

  18. Spatial dynamics of carbon storage: a case study from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivrikaya, Fatih; Baskent, Emin Zeki; Bozali, Nuri

    2013-11-01

    Forest ecosystems have an important role in carbon cycle at both regional and global scales as an important carbon sink. Forest degradation and land cover changes, caused by deforestation and conversion to non-forest area, have a strong impact on carbon storage. The carbon storage of forest biomass and its changes over time in the Hartlap planning unit of the southeastern part of Turkey have been estimated using the biomass expansion factor method based on field measurements of forests plots with forest inventory data between 1991 and 2002. The amount of carbon storage associated with land use and land cover changes were also analyzed. The results showed that the total forested area of the Hartlap planning unit slightly increased by 2.1%, from 27,978.7 ha to 28,282.6 ha during the 11-year period, and carbon storage increased by 9.6%, from 390,367.6 to 427,826.9 tons. Carbon storage of conifer and mixed forests accounted for about 70.6% of carbon storage in 1991, and 67.8% in 2002 which increased by 14,274.6 tons. Land use change and increasing forest area have a strong influence on increasing biomass and carbon storage. PMID:23771281

  19. Activated carbons and gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The literature on activated carbon is reviewed so as to provide a general background with respect to the effect of source material and activation procedure on carbon properties, the structure and chemical nature of the surface of the activated carbon, and the nature of absorption processes on carbon. The various theories on the absorption of gold and silver from cyanide solutions are then reviewed, followed by a discussion of processes for the recovery of gold and silver from cyanide solutions using activated carbon, including a comparison with zinc precipitation

  20. Characterization of Biochar from Switchgrass Carbonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samy Sadaka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Switchgrass is a high yielding, low-input intensive, native perennial grass that has been promoted as a major second-generation bioenergy crop. Raw switchgrass is not a readily acceptable feedstock in existing power plants that were built to accommodate coal and peat. The objective of this research was to elucidate some of the characteristics of switchgrass biochar produced via carbonization and to explore its potential use as a solid fuel. Samples were carbonized in a batch reactor under reactor temperatures of 300, 350 and 400 °C for 1, 2 and 3 h residence times. Biochar mass yield and volatile solids decreased from 82.6% to 35.2% and from 72.1% to 43.9%, respectively, by increasing carbonization temperatures from 300 °C to 400 °C and residence times from 1 h to 3 h. Conversely, biochar heating value (HV and fixed carbon content increased from 17.6 MJ kg−1 to 21.9 MJ kg−1 and from 22.5% to 44.9%, respectively, under the same conditions. A biomass discoloration index (BDI was created to quantify changes in biochar colors as affected by the two tested parameters. The maximum BDI of 77% was achieved at a carbonization temperature of 400 °C and a residence time of 3 h. The use of this index could be expanded to quantify biochar characteristics as affected by thermochemical treatments. Carbonized biochar could be considered a high quality solid fuel based on its energy content.

  1. Carbon-14 waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-14 occurs in nature, but is also formed in nuclear reactors. Because of its long half-life and the biological significance of carbon, releases from nuclear facilities could have a significant radiological impact. Waste management strategies for carbon-14 are therefore of current concern. Carbon-14 is present in a variety of waste streams both at reactors and at reprocessing plants. A reliable picture of the production and release of carbon-14 from various reactor systems has been built up for the purposes of this study. A possible management strategy for carbon-14 might be the reduction of nitrogen impurity levels in core materials, since the activation of 14N is usually the dominant source of carbon-14. The key problem in carbon-14 management is its retention of off-gas streams, particularly in the dissolver off-gas stream at reprocessing plants. Three alternative trapping processes that convert carbon dioxide into insoluble carbonates have been suggested. The results show that none of the options considered need be rejected on the grounds of potential radiation doses to individuals. All exposures should be as low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account. If, on these grounds, retention and disposal of carbon-14 is found to be beneficial, then, subject to the limitations noted, appropriate retention, immobilization and disposal technologies have been identified

  2. Dynamic polarization effects on the angular distributions of protons channeled through carbon nanotubes in dielectric media

    OpenAIRE

    Borka, D.; Mowbray, D. J.; Mišković, Z. L.; Petrović, S.; Nešković, N.

    2008-01-01

    The best level of ordering and straightening of carbon nanotube arrays is often achieved when they are grown in a dielectric matrix, so such structures present the most suitable candidates for future channeling experiments with carbon nanotubes. Consequently, we investigate here how the dynamic polarization of carbon valence electrons in the presence of various surrounding dielectric media affects the angular distributions of protons channeled through (11,~9) single-wall carbon nanotubes. Pro...

  3. Frontiers of graphene and carbon nanotubes devices and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on carbon nanotubes and graphene as representatives of nano-carbon materials, and describes the growth of new technology and applications of new devices. As new devices and as new materials, nano-carbon materials are expected to be world pioneers that could not have been realized with conventional semiconductor materials, and as those that extend the limits of conventional semiconductor performance. This book introduces the latest achievements of nano-carbon devices, processes, and technology growth. It is anticipated that these studies will also be pioneers in the development of future research of nano-carbon devices and materials. This book consists of 18 chapters. Chapters 1 to 8 describe new device applications and new growth methods of graphene, and Chapters 9 to 18, those of carbon nanotubes. It is expected that by increasing the advantages and overcoming the weak points of nanocarbon materials, a new world that cannot be achieved with conventional materials will be greatly expanded. W...

  4. The Uncertain Carbon Emissions in China (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Guan, D.

    2013-12-01

    Anthropogenic fossil fuel emissions are considered as being well understood with a low uncertainty (9.1 × 0.5Gt C yr-1). By using full transparency emission inventory which the energy consumption, fuel heating values, carbon content and oxidation rate reported separately in sectoal level, here we found new 2.1 Gt C yr-1 (23% of global total) uncertainties of carbon emission inventory, which mainly contributed by the mass energy use and consumption coal quality in China and by misunderstanding of fuel quality in international fossil fuel trade. Increment of coal's carbon emission in China and India are equivalent to 130 % of global total coal's emission growth during 2008-2010, by using macro energy statistics and bottom up coal mine datasets, the difference carbon emission estimates from China and India can up to 1.32 C yr-1. Emissions from international trade of coal could produce another 0.08 Gt C yr-1 uncertainty. These new emerging 1.4 Gt C yr-1 uncertainties implies a significant mis-estimation of human induced carbon emissions and a new dominating factor in contributing the global carbon budget residual.

  5. Organic carbon biostimulates rapid rhizodegradation of perchlorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yifru, Dawit D; Nzengung, Valentine A

    2008-12-01

    Previous hydroponics and field studies identified phytodegradation and rhizodegradation as the two main mechanisms by which plants metabolize perchlorate. Plant uptake and phytodegradation of perchlorate is a slower and undesired process that poses ecological risks resulting from phytoaccumulation of some fraction of the perchlorate. Meanwhile, rhizodegradation is a more rapid and favored process involving perchlorate-degrading bacteria utilizing dissolved organic carbon (DOC) as a carbon and energy (electron) source to rapidly degrade perchlorate to innocuous chloride. In the present study, rhizodegradation of perchlorate by willow trees (Salix nigra) was biostimulated using electron sources obtained from natural and artificial carbon sources. In bioreactors provided with carbon sources as 500 mg/L DOC, 25 to 40 mg/L of initial perchlorate concentrations were removed to below the ion chromatography method detection limit of 2 microg/L in approximately 9 d. For planted controls provided with no electron donors, the time required for the complete removal of the same doses of perchlorate was up to 70 d. Enhancement of rhizodegradation by organic carbon reduced the phytoaccumulated fraction of perchlorate by an order of magnitude from approximately 430 to 20 mg/kg. The implication of the present study is that the high fraction uptake and phytoaccumulation of perchlorate in agricultural products and the recycling of perchlorate into the ecosystem can be significantly curtailed by supplying electron donors derived from organic carbon sources to the root zone of plants. PMID:18593217

  6. Ultrafast excited state dynamics in 9,9'-bifluorenylidene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conyard, Jamie; Heisler, Ismael A; Browne, Wesley R; Feringa, Ben L; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Buma, Wybren Jan; Woutersen, Sander; Meech, Stephen R

    2014-08-01

    9,9'-Bifluorenylidene has been proposed as an alternative and flexible electron acceptor in organic photovoltaic cells. Here we characterize its excited state properties and photokinetics, combining ultrafast fluorescence and transient IR measurements with quantum chemical calculations. The fluorescence decay is ultrafast (sub-100 fs) and remarkably independent of viscosity. This suggests that large scale structure change is not the primary relaxation mode. The ultrafast decay populates a dark state characterized by distinct vibrational and electronic spectra. This state decays with a 6 ps time constant to a hot ground state that ultimately populates the initial state with a 20 ps time constant; these times are also insensitive to solvent viscosity. No metastable intermediate structures are resolved in the photocycle after population of the dark state. The implications of these results for the operation of 9,9'-bifluorenylidene as an electron acceptor and as a potential molecular switch are discussed. PMID:25025227

  7. 9 CFR 149.9 - Pilot program sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT VOLUNTARY TRICHINAE CERTIFICATION PROGRAM § 149.9 Pilot program sites. Pork production... anniversary date for purposes of completing a site audit and submitting the completed audit form and payment....

  8. Carbon isotopes in mollusk shell carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnaughey, Ted A.; Gillikin, David Paul

    2008-10-01

    Mollusk shells contain many isotopic clues about calcification physiology and environmental conditions at the time of shell formation. In this review, we use both published and unpublished data to discuss carbon isotopes in both bivalve and gastropod shell carbonates. Land snails construct their shells mainly from respired CO2, and shell δ13C reflects the local mix of C3 and C4 plants consumed. Shell δ13C is typically >10‰ heavier than diet, probably because respiratory gas exchange discards CO2, and retains the isotopically heavier HCO3 -. Respired CO2 contributes less to the shells of aquatic mollusks, because CO2/O2 ratios are usually higher in water than in air, leading to more replacement of respired CO2 by environmental CO2. Fluid exchange with the environment also brings additional dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) into the calcification site. Shell δ13C is typically a few ‰ lower than ambient DIC, and often decreases with age. Shell δ13C retains clues about processes such as ecosystem metabolism and estuarine mixing. Ca2+ ATPase-based models of calcification physiology developed for corals and algae likely apply to mollusks, too, but lower pH and carbonic anhydrase at the calcification site probably suppress kinetic isotope effects. Carbon isotopes in biogenic carbonates are clearly complex, but cautious interpretation can provide a wealth of information, especially after vital effects are better understood.

  9. The Spreading Layer of GX 9+9

    CERN Document Server

    Vilhu, Osmi; Hannikainen, Diana; Schultz, Juho; Beckmann, Volker

    2007-01-01

    The spreading layer (SL) on neutron star surface of GX 9+9 during the upper banana state was studied using INTEGRAL and RXTE observations. The SL-area becomes larger with increasing accretion rate while the SL-temperature remains close to the critical Eddington value, confirming predictions by Inogamov and Sunyaev (1999) and Suleimanov and Poutanen (2006). However, at low accretion rate the observed temperature is higher and SL-belt shallower than those predicted, requiring confirmation and theoretical explananation.

  10. BDKRB2 GENE -9/+9 POLYMORPHISM AND SWIMMING PERFORMANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Grenda, A.; Leońska-Duniec, A.; Cięszczyk, P; P. Zmijewski

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the association between swimming performance and the -9/+9 (rs5810761) polymorphism within the BDKRB2 gene in successful competitive swimmers. Best individual swimming results expressed in FINA points achieved at short, middle and long distance events of 157 well-trained Polish swimmers were incorporated into an analysis. Athletes’ genotype and allele distributions were analysed in comparison to 230 unrelated sedentary subjects who served as controls with ...

  11. Erosion of organic carbon in the Arctic as a geological carbon dioxide sink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Robert G; Galy, Valier; Gaillardet, Jérôme; Dellinger, Mathieu; Bryant, Charlotte; O'Regan, Matt; Gröcke, Darren R; Coxall, Helen; Bouchez, Julien; Calmels, Damien

    2015-08-01

    Soils of the northern high latitudes store carbon over millennial timescales (thousands of years) and contain approximately double the carbon stock of the atmosphere. Warming and associated permafrost thaw can expose soil organic carbon and result in mineralization and carbon dioxide (CO2) release. However, some of this soil organic carbon may be eroded and transferred to rivers. If it escapes degradation during river transport and is buried in marine sediments, then it can contribute to a longer-term (more than ten thousand years), geological CO2 sink. Despite this recognition, the erosional flux and fate of particulate organic carbon (POC) in large rivers at high latitudes remains poorly constrained. Here, we quantify the source of POC in the Mackenzie River, the main sediment supplier to the Arctic Ocean, and assess its flux and fate. We combine measurements of radiocarbon, stable carbon isotopes and element ratios to correct for rock-derived POC. Our samples reveal that the eroded biospheric POC has resided in the basin for millennia, with a mean radiocarbon age of 5,800 ± 800 years, much older than the POC in large tropical rivers. From the measured biospheric POC content and variability in annual sediment yield, we calculate a biospheric POC flux of 2.2(+1.3)(-0.9) teragrams of carbon per year from the Mackenzie River, which is three times the CO2 drawdown by silicate weathering in this basin. Offshore, we find evidence for efficient terrestrial organic carbon burial over the Holocene period, suggesting that erosion of organic carbon-rich, high-latitude soils may result in an important geological CO2 sink. PMID:26245581

  12. Multicomponent-Multiphase Equation of State for Carbon; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The unique properties of carbon have made it both a fascinating and an important subject of experimental and theoretical studies for many years[1]-[4]. The contrast between its best-known elemental forms, graphite and diamond, is particularly striking. Graphite is black, has a rather low density and high compressibility (close to that of magnesium), and is greasy enough to be useful as a lubricant and in pencil leads. Diamond is brilliantly translucent, 60% more dense than graphite, less compressible than either tungsten or corundum, and its hardness makes it useful for polishing and cutting. This variability in properties, as well as that observed among the many classes of carbon compounds, arises because of profound differences in electronic structure of the carbon bonds[5]. A number of other solid forms of carbon are known. Pyrolytic graphite[6] is a polycrystalline material in which the individual crystallites have a structure quite similar to that of natural graphite. Fullerite (solid C 60), discovered only ten years ago[7], consists of giant molecules in which the atoms are arranged into pentagons and hexagons on the surface of a spherical cage. Amorphous carbon[8][9], including carbon black and ordinary soot, is a disordered form of graphite in which the hexagonally bonded layers are randomly oriented. Glassy carbons[9][10], on the other hand, have more random structures. Many other structures have been discussed[1][9

  13. Progressing towards post-2012 carbon markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soeren Luetken, S.; Holm Olsen, K.

    2011-11-15

    Confronting the end of the first Kyoto Commitment period in 2012 with no agreed outcome for global cooperation on future emission reductions, there is an urgent need to look for new opportunities for public and private cooperation to drive broad-based progress in living standards and keep projected future warming below the politically agreed 2 degrees Celsius. Responding jointly to these global challenges the United Nations environmental Program (UNEP) and its UNEP Risoe Centre (URC) have in cooperation with the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI) prepared the Perspectives 2011. The publication focuses on the role of carbon markets in contributing to low carbon development and new mechanisms for green growth, as one core area of action to address the challenges noted above. The publication explores in ten articles, how carbon markets at national, regional and global levels can be developed and up-scaled to sustain the involvement of the private sector in leveraging finance and innovative solutions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The titles of the ten articles are: 1) Fragmentation of international climate policy - doom or boom for carbon markets?; 2) Perspectives on the EU carbon market; 3) China carbon market; 4) The national context of U.S. state policies for a global commons problem; 5) Mind the gap - the state-of-play of Canadian greenhouse gas mitigation; 6) Role of the UN and multilateral policies in integrating an increasingly fragmented global carbon market; 7) Making CDM work for poor and rich Africa beyond 2012 - a series of dos and don'ts; 8) Voluntary market - future perspectives; 9) Sectoral approaches as a way forward for the carbon market?; 10) The Durban outcome - a post 2012 framework approach for green house gas markets. (LN)

  14. Direct carbon emissions from Canadian forest fires, 1959-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fire is recognised as driving most of the boreal forest carbon balance in North America, therefore fires not only impact on carbon sequestration by forests, but emit greenhouse gases that have the potential to affect the environment. In this paper direct emissions of carbon from Canadian forest fires were estimated for all of Canada and for each ecozone for the period 1959 to 1999. Estimates were based on large fires ; fuel consumption for each fire was calculated using the Canadian Forest Fire Behaviour Prediction System. There were about 11,400 forest fires, averaging 2 x 106 hectare per year during this period. Boreal and taiga areas experienced the greatest area burned, releasing most of the carbon. The mean area-weighted fuel consumption for all fires was 2.6 kg of dry fuel per m2 (1.3 kg carbon per m2) varying from 1.8 kg to 3.9 kg per m2 among ecozones. The mean annual direct carbon emission was estimated at 27 + or - 6 Tg carbon per year, or about 18 per cent of current carbon dioxide emissions from the Canadian energy sector, on average. This excludes post-fire effects, which cause an additional loss of carbon; changes to the forest also affect the strength of the forest carbon sink. Fire emissions have shown an increase over the past two decades and are likely to remain high due to anticipated changes in fire weather resulting from climate warming. 48 refs., 3 tabs., 6 figs

  15. Potential Carbon Negative Commercial Aviation through Land Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Robert C.

    2007-01-01

    Brazilian terra preta soil and char-enhanced soil agricultural systems have demonstrated both enhanced plant biomass and crop yield and functions as a carbon sink. Similar carbon sinking has been demonstrated for both glycophyte and halophyte plants and plant roots. Within the assumption of 3.7 t-C/ha/yr soils and plant root carbon sinking, it is possible to provide carbon neutral U.S. commercial aviation using about 8.5% of U.S. arable lands. The total airline CO2 release would be offset by carbon credits for properly managed soils and plant rooting, becoming carbon neutral for carbon sequestered synjet processing. If these lands were also used to produce biomass fuel crops such as soybeans at an increased yield of 60 bu/acre (225gal/ha), they would provide over 3.15 10(exp 9) gallons biodiesel fuel. If all this fuel were refined into biojet it would provide a 16% biojet-84% synjet blend. This allows the U.S. aviation industry to become carbon negative (carbon negative commercial aviation through carbon credits). Arid land recovery could yield even greater benefits.

  16. 2006 Rose Site 9P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 9P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 31, 1999. The site was originally...

  17. Region 9 NPL Sites - 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — NPL site point locations for the US EPA Region 9. NPL (National Priorities List) sites are hazardous waste sites that are eligible for extensive long-term cleanup...

  18. 2004 Rose Site 9P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 9P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 31, 1999. The site was originally...

  19. 2002 Rose Site 9P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 9P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 31, 1999. The site was originally...

  20. 2012 Rose Site 9P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 9P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 31, 1999. The site was originally...

  1. 1999 Rose Site 9P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 9P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 31, 1999. The site was originally...

  2. Incorrect interpretation of carbon mass balance biases global vegetation fire emission estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surawski, N C; Sullivan, A L; Roxburgh, S H; Meyer, C P Mick; Polglase, P J

    2016-01-01

    Vegetation fires are a complex phenomenon in the Earth system with many global impacts, including influences on global climate. Estimating carbon emissions from vegetation fires relies on a carbon mass balance technique that has evolved with two different interpretations. Databases of global vegetation fire emissions use an approach based on 'consumed biomass', which is an approximation to the biogeochemically correct 'burnt carbon' approach. Here we show that applying the 'consumed biomass' approach to global emissions from vegetation fires leads to annual overestimates of carbon emitted to the atmosphere by 4.0% or 100 Tg compared with the 'burnt carbon' approach. The required correction is significant and represents ∼9% of the net global forest carbon sink estimated annually. Vegetation fire emission studies should use the 'burnt carbon' approach to quantify and understand the role of this burnt carbon, which is not emitted to the atmosphere, as a sink enriched in carbon. PMID:27146785

  3. Plumbing carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chuanhong; Suenaga, Kazu; Iijima, Sumio

    2008-01-01

    Since their discovery, the possibility of connecting carbon nanotubes together like water pipes has been an intriguing prospect for these hollow nanostructures. The serial joining of carbon nanotubes in a controlled manner offers a promising approach for the bottom-up engineering of nanotube structures-from simply increasing their aspect ratio to making integrated carbon nanotube devices. To date, however, there have been few reports of the joining of two different carbon nanotubes. Here we demonstrate that a Joule heating process, and associated electro-migration effects, can be used to connect two carbon nanotubes that have the same (or similar) diameters. More generally, with the assistance of a tungsten metal particle, this technique can be used to seamlessly join any two carbon nanotubes-regardless of their diameters-to form new nanotube structures.

  4. Carbon-negative biofuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current Kyoto-based approaches to reducing the earth's greenhouse gas problem involve looking for ways to reduce emissions. But these are palliative at best, and at worst will allow the problem to get out of hand. It is only through sequestration of atmospheric carbon that the problem can be solved. Carbon-negative biofuels represent the first potentially huge assault on the problem, in ways that are already technically feasible and practicable. The key to carbon negativity is to see it not as technically determined but as an issue of strategic choice, whereby farmers and fuel producers can decide how much carbon to return to the soil. Biochar amendment to the soil not only sequesters carbon but also enhances the fertility and vitality of the soil. The time is approaching when biofuels will be carbon negative by definition, and, as such, they will sweep away existing debates over their contribution to the solution of global warming. (author)

  5. Life Cycle Analysis of Carbon Flow and Carbon Footprint of Harvested Wood Products of Larix principis-rupprechtii in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Lun

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Larix principis-rupprechtii is a native tree species in North China with a large distribution; and its harvested timbers can be used for producing wood products. This study focused on estimating and comparing carbon flows and carbon footprints of different harvested wood products (HWPs from Larix principis-ruppechtii based on the life cycle analysis (from seedling cultivation to HWP final disposal. Based on our interviews and surveys, the system boundary in this study was divided into three processes: the forestry process, the manufacturing process, and the use and disposal process. By tracking carbon flows of HWPs along the entire life cycle, we found that, for one forest rotation period, a total of 26.81 tC/ha sequestered carbon was transferred into these HWPs, 66.2% of which were still stored in the HWP when the rotation period had ended; however, the HWP carbon storage decreased to 0.25 tC/ha (only 0.9% left in the 100th year after forest plantation. The manufacturing process contributed more than 90% of the total HWP carbon footprint, but it was still smaller than the HWP carbon storage. In terms of the carbon storage and the carbon footprint, construction products had the largest net positive carbon balance compared to furniture and panel products. In addition, HWP are known to have a positive impact on global carbon mitigation because they can store parts of the sequestered carbon for a certain period of time and they have a substitution effect on carbon mitigation. Furthermore, there still exist great opportunities for carbon mitigation from HWPs through the use of cleaner energy and increasing the utilization efficiency of wood fuel.

  6. THESIS9, Version Oct85

    OpenAIRE

    Frazier, Larry; Carlsen, David D.

    1985-01-01

    This example of a thesis explains how to effectively use the THESIS9 thesis preparation package. This example includes an index to improve its usefulness as documentation. However, an index is not part of accepted thesis format. It is intended that the THESIS9 commands produce all requirements of the NPS Thesis Manual dated 5/85. In addition they provide some features that simplify thesis preparation. All headings, the table of contents, figures, tables and references ...

  7. Duplication 9q34 syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allderdice, P W; Eales, B; Onyett, H; Sprague, W; Henderson, K; Lefeuvre, P A; Pal, G

    1983-09-01

    Phenotypic, karyotypic, and developmental homology between affected children of carriers of an inverted insertion (9) (q22.1q34.3q34.1) led to recognition of a new chromosome syndrome: dup 9q34. Individuals with dup 9q34 have slight psychomotor retardation, understand simple directions, and acquire a limited vocabulary. In childhood, many are hyperactive. Clinical features include low birth weight, normal birth length, and initial poor feeding and thriving. Musculo-skeletal systems are affected: there are joint contractures, long thin limbs, and striking arachnodactyly. There is abnormal implantation of the thumb, increased space between the first and second fingers, and excess digital creases. Marfan syndrome was a provisional diagnosis for several cases prior to cytogenetic analysis. Cardiovascular and ocular systems are minimally affected, erythema and heart murmurs occur, and ptosis and strabismus are frequent, but lens dislocation is not observed. Features at birth include: dolichocephaly, facial asymmetry, narrow horizontal palpebral fissures, microphthalmia, prominent nasal bridge, small mouth, thin upper lip with down-turned corners, and slight retrognathia. In older children, retrognathia is diminished and the nose becomes long and narrow. The new culture and chromosome banding techniques enable sorting of cases with the distal dup 9q phenotype into two groups. The cases with a longer dup 9q are more likely to develop with life-threatening congenital anomalies. The cases with the shorter dup 9q34 have a less severe long-term prognosis and will benefit, together with their parents, from special education. Female carriers of the inv ins(9) (q22.1q34.3q34.1) have about a 31% risk in each pregnancy to conceive a fetus affected by the dup 9q34 syndrome. A comparable figure is not yet available for male carriers. PMID:6613995

  8. Carbon monoxide poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Dolan, Michael C.

    1985-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is a significant cause of illness and death. Its protean symptoms probably lead to a gross underestimation of its true incidence. Low levels of carbon monoxide aggravate chronic cardiopulmonary problems, and high levels are associated with cardiac arrhythmias and cerebral edema. Patients who survive acute poisoning are at risk of delayed neurologic sequelae. The measurement of carboxyhemoglobin levels does not reveal the tissue levels of carbon monoxide but is useful...

  9. The carbon dioxide cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, P.B.; Hansen, G.B.; Titus, T.N.

    2005-01-01

    The seasonal CO2 cycle on Mars refers to the exchange of carbon dioxide between dry ice in the seasonal polar caps and gaseous carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This review focuses on breakthroughs in understanding the process involving seasonal carbon dioxide phase changes that have occurred as a result of observations by Mars Global Surveyor. ?? 2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Carbon monoxide poisoning (acute)

    OpenAIRE

    Olson, Kent; Smollin, Craig

    2010-01-01

    The main symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are non-specific in nature and relate to effects on the brain and heart. The symptoms correlate poorly with serum carboxyhaemoglobin levels. People with comorbidity, elderly or very young people, and pregnant women are most susceptible.Carbon monoxide is produced by the incomplete combustion of carbon fuels, including inadequately ventilated heaters and car exhausts, or from chemicals such as methylene chloride paint stripper.Poisoning is cons...

  11. Carbon nanotubes decorating methods

    OpenAIRE

    A.D. Dobrzańska-Danikiewicz; D. Łukowiec; D. Cichock; W. Wolany

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The work is to present and characterise various methods of depositing carbon nanotubes with nanoparticles of precious metals, and also to present the results of own works concerning carbon nanotubes coated with platinum nanoparticles.Design/methodology/approach: Electron transmission and scanning microscopy has been used for imaging the structure and morphology of the nanocomposites obtained and the distribution of nanoparticles on the surface of carbon nanotubes.Findings: The studie...

  12. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham, Jürgen

    2005-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have an enormous potential due to their outstanding electronic, optical, and mechanical properties. However, any technological application is still hindered due to problems regarding the processibility of the pristine carbon nanotubes. In the past few years, it has been shown that the chemical modification of the carbon nanotubes is an inevitable step prior to their application. The first part of this work (chapter 3.1) was focused on the purification of pristine laser ablati...

  13. The synthesis of mono- and diacetyl-9H-fluorenes. Reactivity and selectivity in the Lewis acid catalyzed Friedel-Crafts acetylation of 9H-fluorene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Titinchi, Salam J.J.; Kamounah, Fadhil S.; Abbo, Hanna S.;

    2008-01-01

    Friedel-Crafts acetylation of 9H-fluorene is an effective route for the preparation of mono- and diacetyl-9H-fluorenes. Using acetylchloride as the reagent and aluminum chloride as the Lewis acid catalyst the effect of the solvent polarity, the temperature, the reaction time and the mode of......-fluorene was obtained in 5-11 % yield when carbon disulfide was used as the solvent. Acetylation of 9H-fluorene in dichloroethane and carbon disulfide, using an excess of acetyl chloride and aluminum chloride at reflux temperature, gives 2,7-diacetyl-9H-fluorene exclusively in high yields (> 97%). Attempts to...

  14. Brain MRI findings of carbon disulfide poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the findings of brain MRI in patients with carbon disulfide poisoning. Ninety-one patients who had suffered carbon disulfide poisoning [male:female=87:4; age, 32-74 (mean 53.3) years] were included in this study. To determine the extent of white matter hyperintensity (Grade 0-V) and lacunar infarction, T2-weighted MR imaging of the brain was performed. T2-weighted images depicted white matter hyperintensity in 70 patients (76.9%) and lacunar infarcts in 27 (29.7%). In these patients, the prevalent findings at T2-weighted MR imaging of the brain were white matter hyperintensity and lacunar infarcts. Disturbance of the cardiovascular system by carbon disulfide might account for these results

  15. Double layer capacitance of carbon foam electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delnick, F. M.; Ingersoll, D.; Firsich, D.

    We have evaluated a wide variety of microcellular carbon foams prepared by the controlled pyrolysis and carbonization of several polymers including: polyacrylonitrile (PAN), polymethacrylonitrile (PMAN), resorcinol/formaldehyde (RF), divinylbenzene/methacrylonitrile (DVB), phenolics (furfuryl/alcohol), and cellulose polymers such as Rayon. The porosity may be established by several processes including: gelation (1-5), phase separation (1-3,5-8), emulsion (1,9,10), aerogel/xerogel formation (1,11,12,13), replication (14), and activation. In this report we present the complex impedance analysis and double layer charging characteristics of electrodes prepared from one of these materials for double layer capacitor applications, namely activated cellulose derived microcellular carbon foam.

  16. Physics of carbon nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon is a prominent element that appears in various structures with new promising technological applications. The physics of carbon nanostructures is one of the hot topics in modern condensed matter theory. I plan to present a brief introduction into the theory of variously shaped carbon nanostructures paying special attention to generic field-theory models. The preliminary plan is the following: (1) a brief historical excursus, (2) the most interesting experimental observations, (3) generic models for the description of electronic states in carbon nanoparticles (Dirac-type equations, defects, geometry, etc.), (4) open problems. (author)

  17. Carbon Trading. Literature Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From Pigou and Coase to the Kyoto Protocol, carbon trading has resulted in pricing of the negative externalities emanating from pollution. This report highlights leading literature and empirical findings on carbon trading, amongst others addressing the relevant carbon and related markets, the (lack of) success of carbon trading so far and room for improvement as well as its impact on investments in emission reduction. This report is part of a set of SEO-reports on finance and sustainability. The other reports deal with: Financing the Transition to Sustainable Energy; Innovations in financing environmental and social sustainability; and Sustainable investment.

  18. Nanoindentation of Carbon Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Singh, Karamjit; Verma, Veena; Bhatti, H S

    2016-06-01

    In the present research paper carbon nanostructures viz. single walled carbon nanotubes, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, single walled carbon nanohorns and graphene nanoplatelets have been synthesized by CVD technique, hydrothermal method, DC arc discharge method in liquid nitrogen and microwave technique respectively. After synthesis 5 mm thick pallets of given nanomaterial are prepared by making a paste in isopropyl alcohol and using polyvinylidene difluoride as a binder and then these pallets were used for nanoindentation measurements. Hardness, reduced modulus, stiffness, contact height and contact area have been measured using nanoindenter. PMID:27427726

  19. Carbon Monoxide Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniol, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    Of all fatal poisonings in the United States, an estimated half are due to carbon monoxide. The number of non-lethal poisonings due to carbon monoxide is difficult to estimate because signs and symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning cover a wide spectrum and mimic other disorders. Misdiagnosis is serious, as the patient often returns to the contaminated environment. Those not receiving proper treatment are at significant risk, as high as 10% to 12%, of developing late neurological sequelae. The diagnosis of carbon monoxide poisoning depends upon precise history taking, careful physical examination, and a high index of suspicion. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:21221282

  20. Changing global carbon cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide (C02) is the single largest human perturbation on the earth's radiative balance contributing to climate change. Its rate of change reflects the balance between anthropogenic carbon emissions and the dynamics of a number of terrestrial and ocean processes that remove or emit C02. It is the long term evolution of this balance that will determine to large extent the speed and magnitude of the human induced climate change and the mitigation requirements to stabilise atmospheric C02 concentrations at any given level. In this talk, we show new trends in global carbon sources and sinks, with particularly focus on major shifts occurring since 2000 when the growth rate of atmospheric C02 has reached its highest level on record. The acceleration in the C02 growth results from the combination of several changes in properties of the carbon cycle, including: acceleration of anthropogenic carbon emissions; increased carbon intensity of the global economy, and decreased efficiency of natural carbon sinks. We discuss in more detail some of the possible causes of the reduced efficiency of natural carbon sinks on land and oceans, such as the decreased net sink in the Southern Ocean and on terrestrial mid-latitudes due to world-wide occurrence of drought. All these changes reported here characterise a carbon cycle that is generating stronger than expected climate forcing, and sooner than expected

  1. Maximally aligned states in sup 9 sup 9 Ag

    CERN Document Server

    Sohler, D; Bednarczyk, P; Blomqvist, J M; Cederkäll, J; De Angelis, G; De Poli, M; Dombrádi, Z; Fahlander, C; Foltescu, D; Grawe, H; Huijnen, J; Jerrestam, D; Johnson, A; Juutinen, S; Klamra, W; Kownacki, J P; Kérek, A; Likar, A; Lipoglavsek, M; Maekelae, E; Norlin, L O; Nyberg, J; Palacz, M; Persson, J; Roth, H A; Seweryniak, D; Shizuma, T; Skeppstedt, Ö; Sletten, G; Timar, J; Toermaenen, S; Weiszflog, M

    2003-01-01

    Excited states of sup 9 sup 9 Ag were populated via the sup 5 sup 0 Cr+ sup 5 sup 8 Ni (261 MeV) reaction using the NORDBALL detector array equipped with charged-particle and neutron detector systems for reaction channel separation. On the basis of the measured gamma gamma-coincidence relations and angular distribution ratios a significantly extended level scheme has been constructed up to E sub x propor to 7.8 MeV and I=35/2. The experimental results were described within the framework of the shell model. Candidates for states fully aligned in the pi g sub 9 sub / sub 2 sup - sup 3 nu(d sub 5 sub / sub 2 , g sub 7 sub / sub 2) sup 2 valence configuration space were found at 4109 and 6265 keV. (orig.)

  2. Atomic resolution studies of carbonic anhydrase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure of human carbonic anhydrase II has been solved with a sulfonamide inhibitor at 0.9 Å resolution. Structural variation and flexibility is seen on the surface of the protein and is consistent with the anisotropic ADPs obtained from refinement. Comparison with 13 other atomic resolution carbonic anhydrase structures shows that surface variation exists even in these highly ordered isomorphous crystals. Carbonic anhydrase has been well studied structurally and functionally owing to its importance in respiration. A large number of X-ray crystallographic structures of carbonic anhydrase and its inhibitor complexes have been determined, some at atomic resolution. Structure determination of a sulfonamide-containing inhibitor complex has been carried out and the structure was refined at 0.9 Å resolution with anisotropic atomic displacement parameters to an R value of 0.141. The structure is similar to those of other carbonic anhydrase complexes, with the inhibitor providing a fourth nonprotein ligand to the active-site zinc. Comparison of this structure with 13 other atomic resolution (higher than 1.25 Å) isomorphous carbonic anhydrase structures provides a view of the structural similarity and variability in a series of crystal structures. At the center of the protein the structures superpose very well. The metal complexes superpose (with only two exceptions) with standard deviations of 0.01 Å in some zinc–protein and zinc–ligand bond lengths. In contrast, regions of structural variability are found on the protein surface, possibly owing to flexibility and disorder in the individual structures, differences in the chemical and crystalline environments or the different approaches used by different investigators to model weak or complicated electron-density maps. These findings suggest that care must be taken in interpreting structural details on protein surfaces on the basis of individual X-ray structures, even if atomic resolution data are available

  3. Mineral Carbonation Employing Ultramafic Mine Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southam, G.; McCutcheon, J.; Power, I. M.; Harrison, A. L.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate minerals are an important, stable carbon sink being investigated as a strategy to sequester CO2 produced by human activity. A natural playa (Atlin, BC, CAN) that has demonstrated the ability to microbially-accelerate hydromagnesite formation was used as an experimental model. Growth of microbial mats from Atlin, in a 10 m long flow-through bioreactor catalysed hydromagnesite precipitation under 'natural' conditions. To enhance mineral carbonation, chrysotile from the Clinton Creek Asbestos Mine (YT, CAN) was used as a target substrate for sulphuric acid leaching, releasing as much as 94% of the magnesium into solution via chemical weathering. This magnesium-rich 'feedstock' was used to examine the ability of the microbialites to enhance carbonate mineral precipitation using only atmospheric CO2 as the carbon source. The phototrophic consortium catalysed the precipitation of platy hydromagnesite [Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2·4H2O] accompanied by magnesite [MgCO3], aragonite [CaCO3], and minor dypingite [Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2·5H2O]. Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy indicated that cell exteriors and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) served as nucleation sites for carbonate precipitation. In many cases, entire cyanobacteria filaments were entombed in magnesium carbonate coatings, which appeared to contain a framework of EPS. Cell coatings were composed of small crystals, which intuitively resulted from rapid crystal nucleation. Excess nutrient addition generated eutrophic conditions in the bioreactor, resulting in the growth of a pellicle that sealed the bioreactor contents from the atmosphere. The resulting anaerobic conditions induced fermentation and subsequent acid generation, which in turn caused a drop in pH to circumneutral values and a reduction in carbonate precipitation. Monitoring of the water chemistry conditions indicated that a high pH (> 9.4), and relatively high concentrations of magnesium (> 3000 ppm), compared with the natural

  4. Chirality dependent spin polarization of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Jiang, Wanrun; Wang, Bo; Gao, Yang; Wang, Zhigang; Zhang, Rui-Qin

    2016-02-01

    The spin polarization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) offers a tunable building block for spintronic devices and is also crucial for realizing carbon-based electronics. However, the effect of chiral CNTs is still unclear. In this paper, we use the density functional theory (DFT) method to investigate the spin polarization of a series of typical finite-length chiral CNTs (9, m). The results show that the spin density of chiral CNTs (9, m) decreases gradually with the increase in m and vanishes altogether when m is larger than or equal to 6. The armchair edge units on both ends of the (9, m) CNTs exhibit a clear inhibition of spin polarization, allowing control of the spin density of (9, m) CNTs by adjusting the number of armchair edge units on the tube end. Furthermore, analysis of the orbitals shows that the spin of the ground state for (9, m) CNTs mainly comes from the contributions of the frontier molecular orbitals (MOs), and the energy gap decreases gradually with the spin density for chiral CNTs. Our work further develops the study of the spin polarization of CNTs and provides a strategy for controlling the spin polarization of functional molecular devices through chiral vector adjustment.

  5. Evaluation of carburization and decarburization behavior of Fe-9Cr-Mo ferritic steels in sodium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carburization and decarburization behavior in sodium have been examined for Fe-9Cr-Mo ferritic steels exposure to flowing sodium with containing 0.0049, 0.016 and 0.16 wppm carbon at temperature between 723 and 873 K. The Fe-9Cr-Mo ferritic steels were more resistant to carbon transfer than 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel. The carbon transfer and its gradient in Fe-9Cr-Mo ferritic steels was closely related with carbon concentration in sodium, and carburization and decarburization behavior depended on the sodium conditions. In the case of the application of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel to heat transfer tubes of steam generator of LMFBR, carburization behavior was observed on the conditions that sodium inlet temperature was 778K and carbon concentration in sodium was 0.01∼0.10 wppm. The mean carbon contents of heat transfer tubes after the operation of the steam generator for 200,000 h were estimated to be about 0.103∼0.148 wt% comparing with initial carbon contents of 0.10 wt%. Consequently it is expected that high-temperature strength of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel would retain sufficient strength and ductility for such operating conditions. (author)

  6. Microbially mediated mineral carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, I. M.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral carbonation involves silicate dissolution and carbonate precipitation, which are both natural processes that microorganisms are able to mediate in near surface environments (Ferris et al., 1994; Eq. 1). (Ca,Mg)SiO3 + 2H2CO3 + H2O → (Ca,Mg)CO3 + H2O + H4SiO4 + O2 (1) Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophs with cell surface characteristics and metabolic processes involving inorganic carbon that can induce carbonate precipitation. This occurs partly by concentrating cations within their net-negative cell envelope and through the alkalinization of their microenvironment (Thompson & Ferris, 1990). Regions with mafic and ultramafic bedrock, such as near Atlin, British Columbia, Canada, represent the best potential sources of feedstocks for mineral carbonation. The hydromagnesite playas near Atlin are a natural biogeochemical model for the carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals (Power et al., 2009). Field-based studies at Atlin and corroborating laboratory experiments demonstrate the ability of a microbial consortium dominated by filamentous cyanobacteria to induce the precipitation of carbonate minerals. Phototrophic microbes, such as cyanobacteria, have been proposed as a means for producing biodiesel and other value added products because of their efficiency as solar collectors and low requirement for valuable, cultivable land in comparison to crops (Dismukes et al., 2008). Carbonate precipitation and biomass production could be facilitated using specifically designed ponds to collect waters rich in dissolved cations (e.g., Mg2+ and Ca2+), which would allow for evapoconcentration and provide an appropriate environment for growth of cyanobacteria. Microbially mediated carbonate precipitation does not require large quantities of energy or chemicals needed for industrial systems that have been proposed for rapid carbon capture and storage via mineral carbonation (e.g., Lackner et al., 1995). Therefore, this biogeochemical approach may represent a readily

  7. Novel carbon nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991 opened up a challenging new area of research, because they are expected to be ideal building blocks for nanoscale applications due to their extraordinary mechanical and electronic properties. Various production methods have been developed, however precise control of nanotube morphology (e.g. length, diameter) has yet to be realised, a fact which has delayed industrial exploitation. Thus a comprehensive understanding of nanotube growth is essential, and this thesis is concerned with this important problem, i.e. the controlled production of novel carbon nanomaterials. Chapter 1 surveys production methods for fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and other carbon-based materials, such as fibres, particles etc. The sophisticated tools required for this work, e.g. high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), etc. are reviewed in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 describes a novel approach to carbon nanotubes, using laser etching techniques, which generates aligned tubes of uniform diameter and length. The mode of catalyst preparation, as well as the nature of the precursor, play crucial roles in this process. The preparation of modified carbon nanotubes by the pyrolysis of metallocene, e.g. ferrocene in conjunction with various hydrocarbons, is discussed in Chapter 4. Superconducting interference device measurements (SQUID) show that Fe-filled carbon nanotubes exhibit enhanced coercivities in the 430-1070 Oe range, i.e. greater than those reported for Ni and Co nanowires. Carbon nanotubes can be also modified by replacing atoms of the carbon network with nitrogen, boron or both. The creation of large arrays of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes, for example CNx nanofibres, as well as the formation of BxCyNz onions is described in Chapter 5. Electron irradiation of these onions generates pure carbon onions. Finally (Chapter 6), the catalytic behaviour of metal particles in different

  8. Carbon foams for energy storage devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaschmitter, J.L.; Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.

    1996-06-25

    A high energy density capacitor incorporating a variety of carbon foam electrodes is described. The foams, derived from the pyrolysis of resorcinol-formaldehyde and related polymers, are high density (0.1 g/cc--1.0 g/cc) electrically conductive and have high surface areas (400 m{sup 2}/g-1000 m{sup 2}/g). Capacitances on the order of several tens of farad per gram of electrode are achieved. 9 figs.

  9. Method for Making a Carbon-Carbon Cylinder Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransone, Phillip O. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method for making a lightweight cylinder block composed of carbon-carbon is disclosed. The use of carbon-carbon over conventional materials. such as cast iron or aluminum, reduces the weight of the cylinder block and improves thermal efficiency of the internal combustion reciprocating engine. Due to the negligible coefficient of thermal expansion and unique strength at elevated temperatures of carbon-carbon, the piston-to-cylinder wall clearance can be small, especially when the carbon-carbon cylinder block is used in conjunction with a carbon-carbon piston. Use of the carbon-carbon cylinder block has the effect of reducing the weight of other reciprocating engine components allowing the piston to run at higher speeds and improving specific engine performance.

  10. Plumbing the global carbon cycle: Integrating inland waters into the terrestrial carbon budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, J.J.; Prairie, Y.T.; Caraco, N.F.; McDowell, W.H.; Tranvik, L.J.; Striegl, R.G.; Duarte, C.M.; Kortelainen, Pirkko; Downing, J.A.; Middelburg, J.J.; Melack, J.

    2007-01-01

    Because freshwater covers such a small fraction of the Earth's surface area, inland freshwater ecosystems (particularly lakes, rivers, and reservoirs) have rarely been considered as potentially important quantitative components of the carbon cycle at either global or regional scales. By taking published estimates of gas exchange, sediment accumulation, and carbon transport for a variety of aquatic systems, we have constructed a budget for the role of inland water ecosystems in the global carbon cycle. Our analysis conservatively estimates that inland waters annually receive, from a combination of background and anthropogenically altered sources, on the order of 1.9 Pg C y-1 from the terrestrial landscape, of which about 0.2 is buried in aquatic sediments, at least 0.8 (possibly much more) is returned to the atmosphere as gas exchange while the remaining 0.9 Pg y-1 is delivered to the oceans, roughly equally as inorganic and organic carbon. Thus, roughly twice as much C enters inland aquatic systems from land as is exported from land to the sea. Over prolonged time net carbon fluxes in aquatic systems tend to be greater per unit area than in much of the surrounding land. Although their area is small, these freshwater aquatic systems can affect regional C balances. Further, the inclusion of inland, freshwater ecosystems provides useful insight about the storage, oxidation and transport of terrestrial C, and may warrant a revision of how the modern net C sink on land is described. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  11. CA 19-9 (Cancer Antigen 19-9)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as a tumor marker : To help differentiate between cancer of the pancreas and other conditions, such as pancreatitis To monitor ... levels of CA 19-9 are seen in cancer of the exocrine pancreas. This cancer arises in the tissues that produce ...

  12. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan Capalbo

    2005-12-31

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework; (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts) and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated

  13. Carbon Stock and Carbon Cycle of Wetland Ecosystem

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Zhangquan; Zhang, Canming; LI, JIAO; Yang, Nan; Li, Xiquan; Niu, Yandong; Wu, Zijian

    2014-01-01

    Wetland ecosystem is an essential ecosystem in the world. Its organic carbon stock and carbon cycle are important basis of global carbon cycle researches and also major contents of global climate change researches. Researches have shown that wetland protection and restoration can promote carbon accumulation and reduce emission of greenhouse gases. This paper discussed influence of carbon stock and carbon balance of wetland ecosystem and emission of greenhouse gases, as well as the relationshi...

  14. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Consumers Businesses Contact CPSC Website Design Feedback Consumers: Español Businesses: Español , 中文 , Tiếng Việt Connect with Us : Twitter YouTube ... Safely Home / Safety Education / Safety Education Centers En Español Carbon Monoxide Information Center The Invisible Killer Carbon ...

  15. Carbon dioxide recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recycling of carbon dioxide to methanol and dimethyl ether is seen to offer a substantial route to renewable and environmentally carbon neutral fuels. One of the authors has championed the “Methanol Economy" in articles and a book. By recycling ambient CO2, the authors argue ...

  16. Carbon Capture and Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benson, S.M.; Bennaceur, K.; Cook, P.; Davison, J.; Coninck, H. de; Farhat, K.; Ramirez, C.A.; Simbeck, D.; Surles, T.; Verma, P.; Wright, I.

    2012-01-01

    Emissions of carbon dioxide, the most important long-lived anthropogenic greenhouse gas, can be reduced by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS). CCS involves the integration of four elements: CO 2 capture, compression of the CO2 from a gas to a liquid or a denser gas, transportation of pressurized CO 2

  17. Carbon black recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process and apparatus for recovering carbon black from hot smoke which comprises passing the smoke through a cyclone separation zone following cooling, then through aggregate filter beds and regeneration of filter beds with clean off-gas which is recycled to the carbon black reaction zone as quench

  18. Seeing the Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouin, Pamela; Welty, David J.; Repeta, Daniel; Engle-Belknap, Cheryl A.; Cramer, Catherine; Frashure, Kim; Chen, Robert

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a classroom experiment that was developed to introduce middle school learners to the carbon cycle. The experiment deals with transfer of CO[subscript 2] between liquid reservoirs and the effect CO[subscript 2] has on algae growth. It allows students to observe the influence of the carbon cycle on algae growth,…

  19. The carbon cycle revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolin, Bert; Fung, Inez

    1992-01-01

    Discussions during the Global Change Institute indicated a need to present, in some detail and as accurately as possible, our present knowledge about the carbon cycle, the uncertainties in this knowledge, and the reasons for these uncertainties. We discuss basic issues of internal consistency within the carbon cycle, and end by summarizing the key unknowns.

  20. Amorphous iron (II) carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sel, Ozlem; Radha, A.V.; Dideriksen, Knud;

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The synthesis, characterization and crystallization energetics of amorphous iron (II) carbonate (AFC) are reported. AFC may form as a precursor for siderite (FeCO3). The enthalpy of crystallization (DHcrys) of AFC is similar to that of amorphous magnesium carbonate (AMC) and more...

  1. Fly ash carbon passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  2. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... natural gas, propane, oil, and methane) burn incompletely. ** Carbon Monoxide can have different effects on people based on its concentration in the air that people breathe, and the person’s health condition.**** Each year, carbon monoxide poisoning claims approximately 480 lives and sends another ...

  3. Carbon for sensing devices

    CERN Document Server

    Tagliaferro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    This book reveals why carbon is playing such an increasingly prominent role as a sensing material. The various steps that transform a raw material in a sensing device are thoroughly presented and critically discussed.  The authors deal with all aspects of carbon-based sensors, starting from the various hybridization and allotropes of carbon, with specific focus on micro and nanosized carbons (e.g., carbon nanotubes, graphene) and their growth processes. The discussion then moves to the role of functionalization and the different routes to achieve it. Finally, a number of sensing applications in various fields are presented, highlighting the connection with the basic properties of the various carbon allotropes.  Readers will benefit from this book’s bottom-up approach, which starts from the local bonding in carbon solids and ends with sensing applications, linking the local hybridization of carbon atoms and its modification by functionalization to specific device performance. This book is a must-have in th...

  4. Carbon Dioxide Fountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seong-Joo; Ryu, Eun-Hee

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the development of a carbon dioxide fountain. The advantages of the carbon dioxide fountain are that it is odorless and uses consumer chemicals. This experiment also is a nice visual experiment that allows students to see evidence of a gaseous reagent being consumed when a pressure sensor is available. (Contains 3 figures.)…

  5. De-carbonizingChina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    zhou; Xiaoyan

    2013-01-01

    Innovation in the energy sector will pave the way for the country’slow-carbon future Although its per-capita emission is roughly on par with the world’s average, China is the world’s largest carbon dioxide emitter,

  6. COMMITTED TO CARBON REDUCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Chinese efforts to lower carbon emissions through environmentally friendly means begin gaining momentum Efforts to curb carbon emissions continue to take shape as China adheres to its pledge for a brighter, greener future. More importantly, as environmental measures take hold and develop

  7. CANDU 9 enhancements and licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU 9 design has followed the evolutionary product development approach that has characterized the CANDU family of nuclear power plants. In addition to utilizing proven equipment and systems from operating stations, the CANDU 9 design has looked ahead to incorporate design and safety enhancements necessary to meet evolving utility and licensing requirements. With the requirement that the CANDU 9 design should be licensable for both domestic and foreign potential users, the pre-project Basic Design Engineering program included a two year formal extensive review by the Canadian Regulatory Agency, the Atomic Energy Control Board . Documentation submitted for the licensing review included the licensing basis, safety requirements and safety analyses necessary to demonstrate compliance with regulations and to assess system design and performance

  8. Informatica发布Informatica 9

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    近日,Informatica正式发布了全球首个支持数据驱动型企业的数据平台Inforrnatica9。据悉,Informatica9是目前业内唯一的全面、统一且开放式数据集成平台,可以轻松部署在预装系统或”云”网络中。通过Inforamtica9,企业可以从容应对数据集成、数据质量、B2B数据交换、应用信息生命周期管理、复杂事件处理和“云”数据集成,从而最大化数据的商业价值。

  9. FileMaker Pro 9

    CERN Document Server

    Coffey, Geoff

    2007-01-01

    FileMaker Pro 9: The Missing Manual is the clear, thorough and accessible guide to the latest version of this popular desktop database program. FileMaker Pro lets you do almost anything with the information you give it. You can print corporate reports, plan your retirement, or run a small country -- if you know what you're doing. This book helps non-technical folks like you get in, get your database built, and get the results you need. Pronto.The new edition gives novices and experienced users the scoop on versions 8.5 and 9. It offers complete coverage of timesaving new features such as the Q

  10. Climate policy and dependence on traded carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Robbie M.; Davis, Steven J.; Peters, Glen P.

    2013-09-01

    A growing number of countries regulate carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions occurring within their borders, but due to rapid growth in international trade, the products consumed in many of the same countries increasingly rely on coal, oil and gas extracted and burned in other countries where CO2 is not regulated. As a consequence, existing national and regional climate policies may be growing less effective every year. Furthermore, countries that are dependent on imported products or fossil fuels are more exposed to energy and climate policies in other countries. We show that the combined international trade in carbon (as fossil fuels and also embodied in products) increased from 12.3 GtCO2 (55% of global emissions) in 1997 to 17.6 GtCO2 (60%) in 2007 (growing at 3.7% yr-1). Within this, trade in fossil fuels was larger (10.8 GtCO2 in 2007) than trade in embodied carbon (6.9 GtCO2), but the latter grew faster (4.6% yr-1 compared with 3.1% yr-1 for fuels). Most major economies demonstrate increased dependence on traded carbon, either as exports or as imports. Because energy is increasingly embodied in internationally traded products, both as fossil fuels and as products, energy and climate policies in other countries may weaken domestic climate policy via carbon leakage and mask energy security issues.

  11. Production of activated carbons from almond shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabais, Joao M. Valente; Laginhas, Carlos Eduardo C.; Carrott, P.J.M.; Ribeiro Carrott, M.M.L. [Evora Univ. (Portugal). Centro de Quimica de Evora

    2011-02-15

    The production of activated carbons from almond shell, using physical activation by CO{sub 2} is reported in this work. The used method has produced activated carbons with apparent BET surface areas and micropore volume as high as 1138 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} and 0.49 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1}, respectively. The activated carbons produced have essentially primary micropores and only a small volume of wider micropores. By FTIR analysis it was possible to identify, in the surface of the activated carbons, several functional groups, namely hydroxyls (free and phenol), ethers, esters, lactones, pyrones and Si-H bonds. By the analysis of the XRD patterns it was possible to calculate the microcrystallites dimensions with height between 1.178 and 1.881 nm and width between 3.106 and 5.917 nm. From the XRD it was also possible to identify the presence of traces of inorganic heteroatoms such as Si, Pb, K, Fe and P. All activated carbons showed basic characteristics with point of zero charge between 9.42 and 10.43. (author)

  12. Climate change, fire and the carbon balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On average, forest fires have burned 2 to 3 million hectares annually in Canada over the last twenty years. Over the last 40 years, this amounts to 20 per cent of the amount of carbon released through fossil fuel emissions in Canada. This paper analyses the extent to which climate change may contribute to a disturbance in the carbon balance due to increased fire activity. In addition, data from FLUXNET-Canada was examined, indicating that carbon fluxes from younger forests show dramatic changes in diurnal carbon flux patterns, caused by reduced photosynthetic uptake during the day and less root respiration at night. Increases in fire are expected throughout much of the boreal forest towards the end of this century, with a lengthening of the fire season and increases in severity and intensity. It was concluded that there is the possibility of a positive feedback, where climate change could cause more fires, resulting in a greater release of carbon and thereby increasing greenhouse gas concentrations. Evidence that smoke promoted positive lightning strikes while reducing precipitation was also presented. It was suggested that certain self-limiting factors may prevent a run-away scenario. Changes to human and lightning ignition patterns, for example, may have an impact. It was also suggested that research efforts should focus on refining climate change estimates that account for landscape change and other aspects that control fire in Canada. 9 refs., 2 figs

  13. Carbon monoxide and exercise tolerance in chronic bronchitis and emphysema.

    OpenAIRE

    Calverley, P. M.; Leggett, R J; Flenley, D C

    1981-01-01

    The effects of carbon monoxide on exercise tolerance as assessed by the distance walked in 12 minutes were studied in 15 patients with severe chronic bronchitis and emphysema (mean forced expiratory volume in one second 0.56 1, mean forced vital capacity 1.54 1). Each subject walked breathing air and oxygen before and after exposure to sufficient carbon monoxide to raise their venous carboxyhaemoglobin concentration by 9%. There was a significant reduction in the walking distance when the pat...

  14. Improved Dispersion of Carbon Nanotubes in Polymers at High Concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Chao-Xuan Liu; Jin-Woo Choi

    2012-01-01

    The polymer nanocomposite used in this work comprises elastomer poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) as a polymer matrix and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as a conductive nanofiller. To achieve uniform distribution of carbon nanotubes within the polymer, an optimized dispersion process was developed, featuring a strong organic solvent—chloroform, which dissolved PDMS base polymer easily and allowed high quality dispersion of MWCNTs. At concentrations as high as 9 wt.%, MWCNTs were...

  15. Analysis of trace amounts of carbon dioxide, oxygen and carbon monoxide in nitrogen using dual capillary columns and a pulsed discharge helium ionisation detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janse van Rensburg, M; Botha, A; Rohwer, E

    2007-10-01

    Gas mixtures of trace amounts of carbon dioxide (CO(2)), dioxygen (O(2)), and carbon monoxide (CO) in dinitrogen (N(2)) were separated and quantified using parallel dual capillary columns and pulsed discharge helium ionisation detection (PDHID). The detection limits (9 x 10(-9) mol mol(-1) for CO(2), 7 x 10(-9) mol mol(-1) for O(2) and 37 x 10(-9) mol mol(-1) for CO) were lower than those reported previously for similar methods. Uncertainties were calculated and results were validated by comparison of the CO and CO(2) results with those obtained using conventional methods. The method was also used to analyse nitrogen, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide in oxygen. PMID:17765907

  16. Structure and magnetic properties of Cd9-nSe9Mnn and Cd9-nSe9Fen clusters (n = 0-9)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutsev, L. G.; Dalal, N. S.; Maroulis, G.; Gutsev, G. L.

    2016-05-01

    Electronic, geometric, and magnetic structures of doped semiconductor clusters Cd9-nSe9Mnn and Cd9-nSe9Fen (n = 0-9) are studied using density functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation. Polarizability, band gap widths, and density of states are obtained for the lowest total energy states in both series. The polarizability behavior is quite unexpected since the successive Mn and Fe substitutions lead to decreasing polarizability of the substituted clusters despite the metal atoms possessing substantially higher polarizabilities than the substituted Cd atoms. The band gap behavior is different for the two substitution types; namely, Fe substitutions resulted in a drastic decrease in the band gap width after the first substitution whereas the Mn substitutions produced a nearly monotonic decrease in the band gap width as the number of substituting atoms increased. It is found that the band gap of Cd9-nSe9Fen becomes smaller than that of the free-standing Fe9 cluster even at moderate amounts of Fe substitutions. It was also shown that in both series the metal atoms segregate as the number of substitutions increases and produce metallic clusters with Se atoms acting as ligands.

  17. Synthesis of (9Z, 12E-, (9E, 12Z-[1-14C]-linoleic acid, (9Z, 12Z, 15E-, (9E, 12Z, 15Z-[1-14C]-linolenic acid and (5Z, 8Z, 11Z, 14E-[1-14C]-arachidonic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enard, Thierry

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Trans polyunsaturated fatty acids are produced in vegetable oils during heat treatment (240-250 °C.ln order to study the metabolic pathway of 9c, 12t and 9t, 12c linoleic acid and 9c, 12c, 15t and 9t, 12c, 15c linolenic acid, these products were prepared labelled with carbon 14 in the carboxylic position. 5c, 8c, 11c, 14t-Arachidonic acid was also labelled on the carboxylic position with carbon 14 in order to study its physiological effects. To introduce the labelling (E-bromo precursors with a 17 carbons chain or a 19 carbon chain were needed. The different syntheses were done by elongation steps and creation of cis double bonds via highly stereospecific Wittig reactions. The radioactive carbon atom was introduced from [14C]-potassium cyanide. The final radioactive fatty acids had a specific activity greater than 50 mCi/mmol and a radioactive purity better than 99 % for linoleic and linolenic and better than 98.6 % for arachidonic acid.

  18. Carbon Cryogel Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. 10 One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nano-foams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. 1-4,9 Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  19. Carbon deposition and deuterium inventory in ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon erosion and deposition in the ASDEX Upgrade divertor was investigated using a poloidal section of marked divertor tiles and silicon samples below the divertor structure. The whole inner divertor is a net carbon deposition area, while a large fraction of the outer divertor is erosion dominated and the roof baffle tiles show a complicated distribution of erosion and deposition areas. In total, 43.7 g B+C were redeposited, of which 88% were deposited on tiles and 9% in remote areas (below roof baffle, on vessel wall structures). Identified carbon sources in the main chamber are too low by a factor of ten to explain the observed carbon divertor deposition, but carbon erosion is observed at the outer divertor tiles. Deuterium is trapped mainly on the surfaces of the inner divertor tiles. The long term retention in codeposited hydrocarbon layers is about 3% of the total deuterium fuel input. (author)

  20. CANDU 9 Control Centre Mockup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides a summary of the design process being followed, the benefits of applying a systematic design using human factors engineering, presents an overview of the CANDU 9 control centre mockup facility, illustrates the control centre mockup with photographs of the 3D CADD model and the full scale mockup, and provides an update on the current status of the project. (author)

  1. Evolutionary CANDU 9 plant improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU 9 is a 935 MW(e) nuclear power plant (NPP) based on the multi-unit Darlington and Bruce B designs with additional enhancements from our ongoing engineering and research programs. Added to the advantages of using proven systems and components, CANDU 9 offers improvement features with enhanced safety, improved operability and maintenance including a control centre with advanced man-machine interface, and improved project delivery in both engineering and construction. The CANDU 9 NPP design incorporated safety enhancements through careful attention to emerging licensing and safety issues. The designers assessed, revised and evolved such systems as the moderator, end shield, containment and emergency core cooling (ECC) systems while providing an integrated final design that is more passive and severe-accident-immune. AECL uses a feedback process to incorporate lessons learned from operating plants, from current projects experiences and from the implementation or construction phase of previous projects. Most of the requirements for design improvements are based on a systematic review of current operating CANDU stations in the areas of design and reliability, operability, and maintainability. The CANDU 9 Control Centre provides plant staff with improved operability and maintainability capabilities due to the combination of systematic design with human factors engineering and enhanced operating and diagnostics features. The use of advanced engineering tools and modem construction methods will reduce project implementation risk on project costs and schedules. (author)

  2. Adhesion, differentiation and immune activation of human osteogenic cells in cultures on carbon-fibre reinforced carbon composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bačáková, Lucie; Starý, V.; Glogar, Petr; Lisá, Věra

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 6, - (2003), s. 8-9. ISSN 1429-7248. [Konferencja Naukowa "Biomaterialy w medycynie i weterynarii" /13./. Rytro, 09.10.2003-12.10.2003] R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 527.130 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3046908; CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : carbon-carbon composites * surface properties * bone tissue engineering Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials

  3. Carbon cycle uncertainty in the Alaskan Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Fisher

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is leading to a disproportionately large warming in the high northern latitudes, but the magnitude and sign of the future carbon balance of the Arctic are highly uncertain. Using 40 terrestrial biosphere models for Alaska, we provide a baseline of terrestrial carbon cycle structural and parametric uncertainty, defined as the multi-model standard deviation (σ against the mean (x for each quantity. Mean annual uncertainty (σ/x was largest for net ecosystem exchange (NEE (−0.01± 0.19 kg C m−2 yr−1, then net primary production (NPP (0.14 ± 0.33 kg C m−2 yr−1, autotrophic respiration (Ra (0.09 ± 0.20 kg C m−2 yr−1, gross primary production (GPP (0.22 ± 0.50 kg C m−2 yr−1, ecosystem respiration (Re (0.23 ± 0.38 kg C m−2 yr−1, CH4 flux (2.52 ± 4.02 g CH4 m−2 yr−1, heterotrophic respiration (Rh (0.14 ± 0.20 kg C m−2 yr−1, and soil carbon (14.0± 9.2 kg C m−2. The spatial patterns in regional carbon stocks and fluxes varied widely with some models showing NEE for Alaska as a strong carbon sink, others as a strong carbon source, while still others as carbon neutral. Additionally, a feedback (i.e., sensitivity analysis was conducted of 20th century NEE to CO2 fertilization (β and climate (γ, which showed that uncertainty in γ was 2x larger than that of β, with neither indicating that the Alaskan Arctic is shifting towards a certain net carbon sink or source. Finally, AmeriFlux data are used at two sites in the Alaskan Arctic to evaluate the regional patterns; observed seasonal NEE was captured within multi-model uncertainty. This assessment of carbon cycle uncertainties may be used as a baseline for the improvement of experimental and modeling activities, as well as a reference for future trajectories in carbon cycling with climate change in the Alaskan Arctic.

  4. Carbon footprint of electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloma, Marcin

    2013-07-01

    Paper assesses the greenhouse gas emissions related to the electronic sectors including information and communication technology and media sectors. While media often presents the carbon emission problem of other industries like petroleum industry, the airlines and automobile sectors, plastics and steel manufacturers, the electronics industry must include the increasing carbon footprints caused from their applications like media and entertainment, computers and cooling devices, complex telecommunications networks, cloud computing and powerful mobile phones. In that sense greenhouse gas emission of electronics should be studied in a life cycle perspective, including regular operational electricity use. Paper presents which product groups or processes are major contributors in emission. From available data and extrapolation of existing information we know that the information and communication technology sector produced 1.3% and media sector 1.7% of global gas emissions within production cycle, using the data from 2007.In the same time global electricity use of that sectors was 3.9% and 3.2% respectively. The results indicate that for both sectors operation leads to more gas emissions than manufacture, although impacts from the manufacture is significant, especially in the supply chain. Media electronics led to more emissions than PCs (manufacture and operation). Examining the role of electronics in climate change, including disposal of its waste, will enable the industry to take internal actions, leading to lowering the impact on the climate change within the sector itself.

  5. Acridin-9-ylmethoxycarbonyl (Amoc): A New Photochemically Removable Protecting Group for Alcohols

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hong-Bo; TANG Wen-Jian; YU Jing-Yu; SONG Qin-Hua

    2006-01-01

    Synthesis and photochemistry of acridin-9-ylmethoxycarbonyl (Amoc) as a new photochemically removable protecting group for alcohols were described. Three carbonates of alcohols 1-3 were synthesized through condensation of 9-hydroxymethylacridine and chloroformates of alcohols, including benzyl alcohol, phenethyl alcohol and one galactose derivative. The photolysis of protected alcohols can efficiently release the corresponding alcohol in the efficiencies (Qu1ε) of 100-200 (quantum yield Qu1=0.011-0.023, and molar absorptivity ε=9.1 × 103-9.8 × 103 mol-1·L·cm-1) under 360 nm light.

  6. An Extremely Oligotrophic Bacterium, Rhodococcus erythropolis N9T-4, Isolated from Crude Oil▿

    OpenAIRE

    Ohhata, Naoko; Yoshida, Nobuyuki; Egami, Hiroshi; Katsuragi, Tohoru; Tani, Yoshiki; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis N9T-4, which was isolated from crude oil, showed extremely oligotrophic growth and formed its colonies on a minimal salt medium solidified using agar or silica gel without any additional carbon source. N9T-4 did not grow under CO2-limiting conditions but could grow on a medium containing NaHCO3 under the same conditions, suggesting that the oligotrophic growth of N9T-4 depends on CO2. Proteomic analysis of N9T-4 revealed that two proteins, with molecular masses of 45 ...

  7. Stable Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes of Pedogenic Carbonates in Ustic Vertisols: Implications for Paleoenvironmental Change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Cheng-Min; WANG Cheng-Shan; TANG Ya

    2005-01-01

    Pedogenic carbonates, found extensively in arid and semiarid regions, are important in revealing regional climatic and environmental changes as well as the carbon cycle. In addition, stable carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of pedogenic carbonates have been used to rebuild paleoecology (biomass and vegetation) and to estimate paleotemperature and paleoprecipitation during past geological time. By utilizing the stable carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions (δ13C and δ18O) of secondary nodules in Ustic Vertisols, this study looked into the climatic and environmental changes in the dry valleys of the Yuanmou Basin, Yunnan Province, in southwestern China. The results showed that during the early Holocene, a warm-humid or hot-humid climate existed in the Yuanmou Basin, but since then fluctuations in climate have occurred, with a dry climate prevailing. A highly significant correlation (r = 0.92, n= 9) between δ13C and δ18O values of carbonates illustrated that there had been a continual shifting between cold-humid and warm-dry climates in southwestern China including the Yuanmou Basin since the early Holocene.

  8. Oxygen reduction on teflon-bonded carbon electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周德璧; 黄可龙; 张世民

    2004-01-01

    Oxygen reduction on Teflon-bonded carbon gas diffusion electrode without catalyst in 6 mol/L KOH solution was investigated with acimpedance spectroscopy and other electrochemical techniques. The kinetic parameters were measured with an exchange current density of J0= 3.44 × 10-9 and a Tafel slope of 46 mV/dec in low overpotential range (-0.05 --0.14 V vs SCE), which are comparable with those reported on carbon supported platinum electrode. The reaction mechanism of OR and the active effect of carbon black were examined.

  9. Dense carbon monoliths for supercapacitors with outstanding volumetric capacitances

    OpenAIRE

    Kunowsky, Mirko; García Gómez, Alejandra; Barranco, V.; Rojo, José M.; Ibáñez Ulargui, Joaquín; Carruthers, James Donald; Linares Solano, Ángel

    2014-01-01

    A commercially available dense carbon monolith (CM) and four carbon monoliths obtained from it have been studied as electrochemical capacitor electrodes in a two-electrode cell. CM has: (i) very high density (1.17 g cm−3), (ii) high electrical conductivity (9.3 S cm−1), (iii) well-compacted and interconnected carbon spheres, (iv) homogeneous microporous structure and (v) apparent BET surface area of 957 m2g−1. It presents interesting electrochemical behaviors (e.g., excellent gravimetric capa...

  10. Behavior of carbon-14 in the Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-14 released from the nuclear facilities is an important radionuclide for the safety assessment, because it tends to accumulate in environment through food chain and has a significant impact to personal dose. Carbon-14 has been monitored routinely as one of the main gaseous radionuclides exhausted from the Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP) since October of 1991. Furthermore, behavior of carbon-14 in TRP has been investigated through the reprocessing operation and the literature survey. This report describes the result of investigation about the behavior of carbon-14 in TRP as followings. 1. Only a very small amount of carbon-14 in the fuel was liberated into the shear off-gas and most of it was liberated into the dissolver off-gas. Part of the carbon-14 was trapped at the caustic scrubber installed in the off-gas treatment process, and untrapped carbon-14 was released into the environment from the main stack. Amount of carbon-14 released from the main stack was about 4.1∼6.5 GBq every ton of uranium reprocessed. 2. Carbon-14 trapped at the caustic scrubbers installed in the dissolver off-gas and in the vessel off-gas treatment process is transferred to the low active waste vessel. Amount of carbon-14 transferred to the low active waste vessel was about 5.4∼9.6 GBq every ton of uranium reprocessed. 3. The total amount of carbon-14 input to TRP was summed up to about 11.9∼15.5 GBq every ton of uranium reprocessed considering the released amount from the main stack and the trapped amount in the off-gas treatment devices. The amount of nitrogen impurity in the initial fuel was calculated about 15∼22ppm of uranium metal based on the measured carbon-14. 4. The solution in the low active waste vessel is concentrated at the evaporator. Most of the carbon-14 in the solution was transferred into concentrated solution. 5. Total Vitrification Demonstration Facility (TVF) started to operate in 1994. Since then, carbon-14 has been measured in the second sub stack

  11. Anthropogenic perturbation of the carbon fluxes from land to ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Regnier, Pierre

    2013-06-09

    A substantial amount of the atmospheric carbon taken up on land through photosynthesis and chemical weathering is transported laterally along the aquatic continuum from upland terrestrial ecosystems to the ocean. So far, global carbon budget estimates have implicitly assumed that the transformation and lateral transport of carbon along this aquatic continuum has remained unchanged since pre-industrial times. A synthesis of published work reveals the magnitude of present-day lateral carbon fluxes from land to ocean, and the extent to which human activities have altered these fluxes. We show that anthropogenic perturbation may have increased the flux of carbon to inland waters by as much as 1.0 Pg C yr -1 since pre-industrial times, mainly owing to enhanced carbon export from soils. Most of this additional carbon input to upstream rivers is either emitted back to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide (∼0.4 Pg C yr -1) or sequestered in sediments (∼0.5 Pg C yr -1) along the continuum of freshwater bodies, estuaries and coastal waters, leaving only a perturbation carbon input of ∼0.1 Pg C yr -1 to the open ocean. According to our analysis, terrestrial ecosystems store ∼0.9 Pg C yr -1 at present, which is in agreement with results from forest inventories but significantly differs from the figure of 1.5 Pg C yr -1 previously estimated when ignoring changes in lateral carbon fluxes. We suggest that carbon fluxes along the land-ocean aquatic continuum need to be included in global carbon dioxide budgets.

  12. Small diameter carbon nanopipettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Riju; Bhattacharyya, Sayan; Orynbayeva, Zulfiya; Vitol, Elina; Friedman, Gary; Gogotsi, Yury

    2010-01-01

    Nanoscale multifunctional carbon probes facilitate cellular studies due to their small size, which makes it possible to interrogate organelles within living cells in a minimally invasive fashion. However, connecting nanotubes to macroscopic devices and constructing an integrated system for the purpose of fluid and electrical signal transfer is challenging, as is often the case with nanoscale components. We describe a non-catalytic chemical vapor deposition based method for batch fabrication of integrated multifunctional carbon nanopipettes (CNPs) with tip diameters much smaller (10-30 nm) than previously reported (200 nm and above) and approaching those observed for multiwalled carbon nanotubes. This eliminates the need for complicated attachment/assembly of nanotubes into nanofluidic devices. Variable tip geometries and structures were obtained by controlled deposition of carbon inside and outside quartz pipettes. We have shown that the capillary length and gas flow rate have a marked effect on the carbon deposition. This gives us a flexible protocol, useful for growing carbon layers of different thicknesses at selective locations on a glass pipette to yield a large variety of cellular probes in bulk quantities. The CNPs possess an open channel for fluid transfer with the carbon deposited inside at 875 °C behaving like an amorphous semiconductor. Vacuum annealing of the CNP tips at temperatures up to 2000 °C yields graphitic carbon structures with an increase in conductivity of two orders of magnitude. Penetration of the integrated carbon nanoprobes into cells was shown to produce minimal Ca2+ signals, fast recovery of basal Ca2+ levels and no adverse activation of the cellular metabolism during interrogation times as long as 0.5-1 h.

  13. Small diameter carbon nanopipettes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoscale multifunctional carbon probes facilitate cellular studies due to their small size, which makes it possible to interrogate organelles within living cells in a minimally invasive fashion. However, connecting nanotubes to macroscopic devices and constructing an integrated system for the purpose of fluid and electrical signal transfer is challenging, as is often the case with nanoscale components. We describe a non-catalytic chemical vapor deposition based method for batch fabrication of integrated multifunctional carbon nanopipettes (CNPs) with tip diameters much smaller (10-30 nm) than previously reported (200 nm and above) and approaching those observed for multiwalled carbon nanotubes. This eliminates the need for complicated attachment/assembly of nanotubes into nanofluidic devices. Variable tip geometries and structures were obtained by controlled deposition of carbon inside and outside quartz pipettes. We have shown that the capillary length and gas flow rate have a marked effect on the carbon deposition. This gives us a flexible protocol, useful for growing carbon layers of different thicknesses at selective locations on a glass pipette to yield a large variety of cellular probes in bulk quantities. The CNPs possess an open channel for fluid transfer with the carbon deposited inside at 875 deg. C behaving like an amorphous semiconductor. Vacuum annealing of the CNP tips at temperatures up to 2000 deg. C yields graphitic carbon structures with an increase in conductivity of two orders of magnitude. Penetration of the integrated carbon nanoprobes into cells was shown to produce minimal Ca2+ signals, fast recovery of basal Ca2+ levels and no adverse activation of the cellular metabolism during interrogation times as long as 0.5-1 h.

  14. The Importance of Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis in Process-based Models of Carbon and Nitrogen Cycling in Terrestrial Ecosystems with Particular Emphasis on Forest Ecosystems — Selected Papers from a Workshop Organized by the International Society for Ecological Modelling (ISEM) at the Third Biennal Meeting of the International Environmental Modelling and Software Society (IEMSS) in Burlington, Vermont, USA, August 9-13, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larocque, Guy R.; Bhatti, Jagtar S.; Liu, Jinxun; Ascough, James C., II; Gordon, Andrew M.

    2008-01-01

    Many process-based models of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles have been developed for terrestrial ecosystems, including forest ecosystems. They address many basic issues of ecosystems structure and functioning, such as the role of internal feedback in ecosystem dynamics. The critical factor in these phenomena is scale, as these processes operate at scales from the minute (e.g. particulate pollution impacts on trees and other organisms) to the global (e.g. climate change). Research efforts remain important to improve the capability of such models to better represent the dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems, including the C, nutrient, (e.g. N) and water cycles. Existing models are sufficiently well advanced to help decision makers develop sustainable management policies and planning of terrestrial ecosystems, as they make realistic predictions when used appropriately. However, decision makers must be aware of their limitations by having the opportunity to evaluate the uncertainty associated with process-based models (Smith and Heath, 2001 and Allen et al., 2004). The variation in scale of issues currently being addressed by modelling efforts makes the evaluation of uncertainty a daunting task.

  15. Photophysics of polymer-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, J.; Loi, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are successfully dispersed in two conjugated polymer poly(9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl) (PFO) and poly[2-methoxy-5-(2’-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MEHPPV) solutions. Steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy in the near-infrared and visible spectral regions are used to study the interaction of the dispersed carbon nanotube and the wrapped polymer in the nano-hybrids. The SWNTs infrared emission is the signatures of the s...

  16. Carbon isotope techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is a hands-on introduction to using carbon isotope tracers in experimental biology and ecology. It is a bench-top reference with protocols for the study of plants, animals, and soils. The 11C, 12C, 13C, and 14C carbon isotopes are considered and standard techniques are described by established authors. The compilation includes the following features: specific, well-established, user-oriented techniques; carbon cycles in plants, animals, soils, air, and water; isotopes in ecological research; examples and sample calculations

  17. Hydrogen adsorption in doped porous carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: Hydrogen is a clean fuel that will be used in automotive transport when the problem of storage will be solved. The difficulties of H2 storage (available space, security and performance, etc...) require a material that can store 5 weight % of hydrogen. Research is focused on new materials that can assume the constraints imposed by the automotive applications. Among these materials, the nano-structured carbons (nano-fibers and single walled carbon nano-tubes) were claimed to be promising by numerous authors [1-3]. The more promising carbon materials for hydrogen adsorption are those having micropores (i. e. single walled carbon nano-tubes and activated carbon), for which the energy of sorption of hydrogen molecules is theoretically higher [7- 8]. Presently, the best performance of hydrogen adsorption was found in super-activated micro-porous carbons sorbing 5 weight % at 77 K, and almost 0.5 % at room temperature and 6 MPa [9]. Up to now, the performance of these materials can still be improved as the known mechanism of sorption in these carbon materials: physisorption controlled by Van der Waals attractive forces through London interaction is efficient at cryogenic temperatures (77 K) where the interaction between adsorbent and adsorbate becomes stronger. One way to improve the attractive interaction between adsorbent and molecule is to increase the forces due to the interaction of electrical field and induced dipole of the molecule. This can be theoretically tailored in carbon materials through the electron charge transfer by electron donors who can provide an increase in the electrical field al the surface of the adsorbent. Then, the doping of carbon substrates, appearing to be a promising method to increase the energy of adsorption has been proposed in recent papers as a solution to obtain good hydrogen adsorption properties at appropriate temperatures close to room temperatures [10-12]. Thus, we have studied the adsorption

  18. Hydrogen adsorption in doped porous carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: Hydrogen is a clean fuel that will be used in automotive transport when the problem of storage will be solved. The difficulties of H2 storage (available space, security and performance, etc...) require a material that can store 5 weight % of hydrogen. Research is focused on new materials that can assume the constraints imposed by the automotive applications. Among these materials, the nano-structured carbons (nano-fibers and single walled carbon nano-tubes) were claimed to be promising by numerous authors [1-3]. The more promising carbon materials for hydrogen adsorption are those having micropores (i. e. single walled carbon nano-tubes and activated carbon), for which the energy of sorption of hydrogen molecules is theoretically higher [7-8]. Presently, the best performance of hydrogen adsorption was found in super-activated microporous carbons sorbing 5 weight % at 77 K, and almost 0.5 % at room temperature and 6 MPa [9]. Up to now, the performance of these materials can still be improved as the known mechanism of sorption in these carbon materials: physi-sorption controlled by Van der Waals attractive forces through London interaction is efficient at cryogenic temperatures (77 K) where the interaction between adsorbent and adsorbate becomes stronger. One way to improve the attractive interaction between adsorbent and molecule is to increase the forces due to the interaction of electrical field and induced dipole of the molecule. This can be theoretically tailored in carbon materials through the electron charge transfer by electron donors who can provide an increase in the electrical field at the surface of the adsorbent. Then, the doping of carbon substrates, appearing to be a promising method to increase the energy of adsorption has been proposed in recent papers as a solution to obtain good hydrogen adsorption properties at appropriate temperatures close to room temperatures [10-12]. Thus, we have studied the adsorption

  19. Carbon fluxes from an urban tropical grassland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turfgrass covers a large fraction of the urbanized landscape, but the carbon exchange of urban lawns is poorly understood. We used eddy covariance and flux chambers in a grassland field manipulative experiment to quantify the carbon mass balance in a Singapore tropical turfgrass. We also assessed how management and variations in environmental factors influenced CO2 respiration. Standing aboveground turfgrass biomass was 80 gC m−2, with a mean ecosystem respiration of 7.9 ± 1.1 μmol m−2 s−1. The contribution of autotrophic respiration was 49–76% of total ecosystem respiration. Both chamber and eddy covariance measurements suggest the system was in approximate carbon balance. While we did not observe a significant relationship between the respiration rates and soil temperature or moisture, daytime fluxes increased during the rainy interval, indicating strong overall moisture sensitivity. Turfgrass biomass is small, but given its abundance across the urban landscape, it significantly influences diurnal CO2 concentrations. - Highlights: • We measured urban turfgrass CO2 respiration rates and soil characteristics. • Mean observed ecosystem respiration was 7.9 ± 1.1 μmol m−2 s−1. • Soil temperature and moisture were largely insignificant drivers of observed flux. - We found a Singapore urban turfgrass to be approximately carbon neutral, with a mean ecosystem respiration of 7.9 ± 1.1 μmol m−2 s−1

  20. Investigating carbonate formation in urban soils as a method for capture and storage of atmospheric carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washbourne, C-L; Renforth, P; Manning, D A C

    2012-08-01

    This paper investigates the potential for engineered urban soils to capture and store atmospheric carbon (C). Calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) bearing waste silicate minerals within the soil environment can capture and store atmospheric C through the process of weathering and secondary carbonate mineral precipitation. Anthropogenic soils, known to contain substantial quantities of Ca and Mg-rich minerals derived from demolition activity (particularly cement and concrete), were systematically sampled at the surface across a 10 ha brownfield site, Science Central, located in the urban centre of Newcastle upon Tyne, U.K. Subsequent analysis yielded average carbonate contents of 21.8±4.7% wt CaCO(3). Isotopic analysis demonstrated δ(18)O values between -9.4‰ and -13.3‰ and δ(13)C values between -7.4‰ and -13.6‰ (relative to Pee Dee Belemnite), suggesting that up to 39.4±8.8% of the carbonate C has been captured from the atmosphere through hydroxylation of dissolved CO(2) in high pH solutions. The remaining carbonate C is derived from lithogenic sources. 37.4 kg of atmospheric CO(2) has already been captured and stored as carbonate per Mg of soil across the site, representing a carbon dioxide (CO(2)) removal rate of 12.5 kg CO(2) Mg(-1) yr(-1). There is the potential for capture and storage of a further 27.3 kg CO(2) Mg(-1) in residual reactive materials, which may be exploited through increased residence time (additional in situ weathering). Overall, the Science Central site has the potential to capture and store a total of 64,800 Mg CO(2) as carbonate minerals. This study illustrates the potential for managing urban soils as tools of C capture and storage, an important ecosystem service, and demonstrates the importance of studying C storage in engineering urban anthropogenic soils. PMID:22683756

  1. Evaluation of Powdered Activated Carbon Efficiency in Removal of Dissolved Organic Carbon inWater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.R Bonyadi nejad

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available "n "nBackgrounds and Objectives: Powdered Activated$ carbon is known as a suitable absorbent for organic materials. The aim of this research is evaluation of Powdered Activated-Carbon (PAC efficiency in removal of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC in water treatment in Isfahan."nMaterials and Methods : The increase of PAC for DOC reduction has done in three paths in the Isfahan water treatment plant (WTP. These paths including: 1 Intake up to entrance of WTP 2 Intake to exit ofWTP 3 Between entrance and exit of waterworks. The paths were simulated by the Jar test system. Then DOC and UV254 absorption were analyzed and SUVA parameter for samples and activated-carbon adsorption isotherm was calculated."nResults: The injected PAC doses of 20,40,60,80 and 100 mg/l caused decreasing in DOC and UV254 absorption in every sample in all paths. The average of this decrease, from intake to WTP.s exit (second path was the greatest 69.8± 3.9%and the commonWTP process had capability of removing 35% of DOC. The first path also showed that PAC can reduce 33± 2% DOC of raw water by itself. Activated-carbon absorption results were adhered from Freundlich adsorption isotherm."nConclusion: In the third path therewas lessDOCremoval efficiency than exceptedwhen Activated- Carbon injected in rapid mixed basin with coagulant. Powdered activated carbon porosity reduction due to effect of coagulant can be the reason for this issue.Also according to different paths, the point of intake is more suitable for powdered activated carbon addition.

  2. A novel carbon fiber based porous carbon monolith

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, T.D.; Klett, J.W.; Weaver, C.E.

    1995-07-01

    A novel porous carbon material based on carbon fibers has been developed. The material, when activated, develops a significant micro- or mesopore volume dependent upon the carbon fiber type utilized (isotropic pitch or polyacrylonitrile). The materials will find applications in the field of fluid separations or as a catalyst support. Here, the manufacture and characterization of our porous carbon monoliths are described.

  3. 46 CFR 151.50-41 - Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). 151.50-41 Section... CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-41 Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). (a) All openings shall be in the top of the tank. (b) Loading lines...

  4. Design features of Candu 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-two nuclear generating units with an aggregate installed capacity of 19,119 MWe worldwide are equipped with heavy water moderated and cooled pressure tube reactors of the Canadian Candu line. The list includes nine reactors of the 700 MWe category, and twelve reactors of the 900 MWe category in the Candu 6 series. On the basis of the 900 MWe units, Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) developed the advanced Candu 9 series by evolution. This series has been designed for a service life of sixty years. The use of modular, simplified units and systems in the Candu 9 design is to shorten the planning and construction phase, increase safety, and improve plant operation. AECL will offer this reactor on the world market, first to its customers in (South) Korea, which is one of the reasons why the safety parameters have been chosen especially under the aspect of seismic characteristics. (orig.)

  5. CANDU 9 fuelling machine carriage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continuous, on-power refuelling is a key feature of all CANDU reactor designs and is essential to maintaining high station capacity factors. The concept of a fuelling machine carriage can be traced to the early CANDU designs, such as the Douglas Point Nuclear Generating Station. In the CANDU 9 480NU unit, the combination of a mobile carriage and a proven fuelling machine head design comprises an effective means of transporting fuel between the reactor and the fuel transfer ports. It is a suitable alternative to the fuelling machine bridge system that has been utilized in the CANDU 6 reactor units. The CANDU 9 480NU fuel handling system successfully combines features that meet the project requirements with respect to fuelling performance, functionality, seismic qualification and the use of proven components. The design incorporates improvements based on experience and applicable current technologies. (author). 4 figs

  6. IMC9 Edinburgh Nomenclature Sessions

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The proceedings of the 3–5 August 2010, IMC9 Edinburgh Nomenclature Sessions are briefly summarized. The final resolution approved by the General Assembly endorses the recommendations by the Nomenclature Sessions regarding transfer of the governance of fungal nomenclature from botanical to mycological congresses, mandatory pre-publication deposit of nomenclatural information for valid publication of new fungal names, and the acceptability of English as an alternative to Latin in the valid pub...

  7. Carbon Stock and Carbon Cycle of Wetland Ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhangquan; ZENG; Canming; ZHANG; Jiao; LI; Nan; YANG; Xihao; LI; Yandong; NIU; Zijian; WU

    2014-01-01

    Wetland ecosystem is an essential ecosystem in the world. Its organic carbon stock and carbon cycle are important basis of global carbon cycle researches and also major contents of global climate change researches. Researches have shown that wetland protection and restoration can promote carbon accumulation and reduce emission of greenhouse gases. This paper discussed influence of carbon stock and carbon balance of wetland ecosystem and emission of greenhouse gases,as well as the relationship between wetland and global climate changes. Finally,it made prospect on researches about carbon cycle of Dongting Lake.

  8. A novel carbon fiber based porous carbon monolith

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, T.D.; Klett, J.W.; Weaver, C.E.

    1995-06-01

    A novel porous carbon material based on carbon fibers has been developed. The material, when activated, develops a significant micro- or mesopore volume dependent upon the carbon fiber type utilized (isotropic pitch or polyacrylonitrile). The materials will find applications in the field of fluid separations or as a catalyst support. Here, the manufacture and characterization of our porous carbon monoliths are described. A novel adsorbent carbon composite material has been developed comprising carbon fibers and a binder. The material, called carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS), was developed through a joint research program between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Kentucky, Center for Applied Energy Research (UKCAER).

  9. Carbonate concretions as a significant component of ancient marine carbon cycles: Insights from paired organic and inorganic carbon isotope analyses of a Cretaceous shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyd, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate concretions often occur within fine-grained, organic-rich sedimentary rocks. This association reflects the common production of diagenetic minerals through biologic cycling of organic matter. Chemical analysis of carbonate concretions provides the rare opportunity to explore ancient shallow diagenetic environments, which are inherently transient due to progressive burial but are an integral component of the marine carbon cycle. The late Cretaceous Holz Shale (~80 Ma) contains abundant calcite concretions that exhibit textural and geochemical characteristics indicative of relatively shallow formation (i.e., near the sediment-water interface). Sampled concretions contain between 5.4 and 9.8 wt.% total inorganic carbon (TIC), or ~45 and 82 wt.% CaCO3, compared to host shale values which average ~1.5 wt.% TIC. Organic carbon isotope compositions (δ13Corg) are relatively constant in host and concretion samples ranging from ­-26.3 to -24.0‰ (VPDB). Carbonate carbon isotope compositions (δ13Ccarb) range from -22.5 to -3.4‰, indicating a significant but not entirely organic source of carbon. Concretions of the lower Holz Shale exhibit considerably elevated δ13Ccarb values averaging -4.8‰, whereas upper Holz Shale concretions express an average δ13Ccarb value of -17.0‰. If the remaining carbonate for lower Holz Shale concretions is sourced from marine fluids and/or dissolved marine carbonate minerals (e.g., shells), a simple mass balance indicates that ~28% of concretion carbon was sourced from organic matter and ~72% from late Cretaceous marine inorganic carbon (with δ13C ~ +2.5‰). Upper Holz Shale calculations indicate a ~73% contribution from organic matter and a ~27% contribution from inorganic carbon. When normalized for carbonate, organic contents within the concretions are ~2-13 wt.% enriched compared to host contents. This potentially reflects the protective nature of cementation that acts to limit permeability and chemical destruction of

  10. 22 CFR 9a.4 - Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... State shall follow the standards in E.O. 11652 and the provisions of 22 CFR 9.5 through 9.8. ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Classification. 9a.4 Section 9a.4 Foreign... ENERGY PROGRAMS; RELATED MATERIAL § 9a.4 Classification. (a) Section 1 of E.O. 11932, August 4,...

  11. Draw out Carbon Nanotube from Liquid Carbon

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG, SHUANG; Hoshi, Takeo; Fujiwara, Takeo

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) is expected for much more important and broader applications in the future, because of its amazing electrical and mechanical properties. However, today, the prospect is detained by the fact that the growth of CNTs cannot be well controlled. In particular, controlling the chirality of CNTs seems formidable to any existing growth method. In addition, a systematic method for a designed interconnected network has not been established yet, which is focused particularly in nan...

  12. High performance carbon-carbon composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lalit M Manocha

    2003-02-01

    Carbon-carbon composites rank first among ceramic composite materials with a spectrum of properties and applications in various sectors. These composites are made of fibres in various directions and carbonaceous polymers and hydrocarbons as matrix precursors. Their density and properties depend on the type and volume fraction of reinforcement, matrix precursor used and end heat treatment temperature. Composites made with thermosetting resins as matrix precursors possess low densities (1.55–1.75 g/cm3) and well-distributed microporosity whereas those made with pitch as the matrix precursor, after densification exhibit densities of 1.8–2.0 g/cm3 with some mesopores, and those made by the CVD technique with hydrocarbon gases, possess intermediate densities and matrices with close porosities. The former (resin-based) composites exhibit high flexural strength, low toughness and low thermal conductivity, whereas the latter (pitch- and CVD-based) can be made with very high thermal conductivity (400–700 W/MK) in the fibre direction. Carbon-carbon composites are used in a variety of sectors requiring high mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, good frictional properties for brake pads in high speed vehicles or high thermal conductivity for thermal management applications. However, for extended life applications, these composites need to be protected against oxidation either through matrix modification with Si, Zr, Hf etc. or by multilayer oxidation protection coatings consisting of SiC, silica, zircon etc.

  13. Carbon aerogels; Les aerogels de carbone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthon-Fabry, S.; Achard, P

    2003-06-15

    The carbon aerogel is a nano-porous material at open porosity, electrical conductor. The aerogels morphology is variable in function of the different synthesis parameters. This characteristic offers to the aerogels a better adaptability to many applications: electrodes (super condensers, fuel cells). The author presents the materials elaboration and their applications. It provides also the research programs: fundamental research, realization of super-condenser electrodes, fuel cells electrodes, gas storage materials and opaque materials for thermal insulation. (A.L.B.)

  14. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... United States die every year from accidental non-fire related CO poisoning. Products that can produce deadly ... Driven Generators, 2004-2014 January 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of ...

  15. Carbon diffusion in niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt is made to find out the reasons for deviations in the literary data on carbon diffusion in niobium. Methods of layer-by-layer radiometric analysis and measuring the internal friction are applied for this purpose. It is shown that penetration curves can be presented as a sum of two exponents which describe the distribution of active carbon in the surface and depth layers. Carbon diffusion parameters calculated in the above two regions are noticeably different, which can be the reason for deviations in the literary data. The temperature dependence of carbon diffusion coefficients in niobium at 677-1300 deg C in found which corresponds to the interstitial diffusion coe icient

  16. Carbon monoxide intoxication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kales, S.N. (Cambridge Hospital, MA (United States))

    1993-11-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning usually results from inhalation of exhaust fumes from motor vehicles, smoke from fires or fumes from faulty heating systems. Carbon monoxide has a high affinity for hemoglobin, with which it forms carboxyhemoglobin. The resulting decrease in both oxygen-carrying capacity and oxygen release can lead to end-organ hypoxia. The clinical presentation is nonspecific. Headache, dizziness, fatigue and nausea are common in mild to moderate carbon monoxide poisoning. In more severe cases, tachycardia, tachypnea and central nervous system depression occur. When carbon monoxide intoxication is suspected, empiric treatment with 100 percent oxygen should be initiated immediately. The diagnosis is confirmed by documenting an elevated carboxyhemoglobin level. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is recommended in patients with neurologic dysfunction, cardiac dysfunction or a history of unconsciousness. 26 refs.

  17. The Carbon Emission Game

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    When Chinese President Hu Jintao attended the UN climate summit on September22,he made a solemn commitment that China will cut its per GDP unit carbon emission to a significant amount in 2020 compared with that of 2005.

  18. Carbon monoxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heater). Many carbon monoxide poisonings occur in the winter months when furnaces, gas fireplaces, and portable heaters ... 16567227 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16567227 . Nelson LS, Hoffman RS. Inhaled toxins. In: Marx JA, ...

  19. Total Ecosystem Carbon Stock

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Total ecosystem carbon includes above- and below-ground live plant components (such as leaf, branch, stem and root), dead biomass (such as standing dead wood, down...

  20. FLUIDIZATION OF CARBON NANOTUBES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Wei; Cang Huang; Yao Wang

    2005-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be fluidized in the form of fluidlike agglomerates made of many three-dimensional sub-agglomerates, having a multi-stage agglomerate (MSA) structure and containing large amounts of twisting CNTs of micrometer magnitude.

  1. Carbon nanotubes: Fibrillar pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostarelos, Kostas

    2010-10-01

    The mechanisms by which chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes flow in blood and are excreted through the kidneys illustrate the unconventional behaviour of these fibrillar nanostructures, and the opportunities they offer as components for the design of advanced delivery vehicles.

  2. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety Network Community Outreach Resource Center CO Poster Contest Toy Recall Statistics Pool Safely Home / Safety Education / ... VIDEO CPSC announces winners of carbon monoxide poster contest View the blog SAFETY GUIDE Clues You Can ...

  3. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... United States die every year from accidental non-fire related CO poisoning. Products that can produce deadly ... CO Blogs Research & Statistics January 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of ...

  4. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics March 09, 2016 Supplemental Memos Regarding Some of the Hazards Associated with Engine-Driven Generators, 2004-2014 January 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the ...

  5. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Other CO Topics Safety Tips Recalls and News Questions and Answers Charcoal Portable Heaters & Camping Equipment Home Heating Equipment On Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics January 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide ...

  6. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Import Safety International Recall Guidance Civil and Criminal Penalties Federal Court Orders ... 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2012 ...

  7. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... On Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics January 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide ... Inside CPSC: Recalls Safety Education Regulations, Laws & Standards Research & Statistics Business & Manufacturing Small Business Resources International Newsroom ...

  8. Understanding carbon compensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today, everyone can compensate its carbon emissions on the Internet in few mouse clicks. But what is the meaning of this compensation? What are the mechanisms of voluntary compensation in the framework of the Kyoto protocol? How to participate to this system and to what organisation a company or an individual can call in to reduce his carbon footprint? Carbon compensation is one of the numerous instruments invented to fight against global warming. When it is not possible to reduce our own emissions, we can compensate them by financing projects allowing to reduce the emissions of another company or collectivity. In this book, the authors answer the questions regarding the mechanisms, implementation and efficiency of carbon compensation. (J.S.)

  9. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Statistics January 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2012 Annual Estimates October 13, 2015 Incidents, Deaths, and In-Depth Investigations Associated with Non-Fire ...

  10. Stocks of organic carbon in Estonian soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kõlli, Raimo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The soil organic carbon (SOC stocks (Mg ha–1 ofautomorphic mineral (9 soil groups, hydromorphic mineral (7, and lowland organic soils (4 are given for the soil cover or solum layer as a whole and also for its epipedon (topsoil layer. The SOC stocks for forest, arable lands, and grasslands and for the entire Estonian soil cover were calculated on the basis of the mean SOC stock and distribution area of the respective soil type. In the Estonian soil cover (42 400 km2, a total of 593.8 ± 36.9 Tg of SOC is retained, with 64.9% (385.3 ± 27.5 Tg in the epipedon layer (O, H, and A horizons and 35.1% in the subsoil (B and E horizons. The pedo-ecological regularities of SOC retention in soils are analysed against the background of the Estonian soil ordination net.

  11. Carbon and oxygen isotope microanalysis of carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velivetskaya, Tatiana A; Ignatiev, Alexander V; Gorbarenko, Sergey A

    2009-08-30

    Technical modification of the conventional method for the delta(13)C and delta(18)O analysis of 10-30 microg carbonate samples is described. The CO(2) extraction is carried out in vacuum using 105% phosphoric acid at 95 degrees C, and the isotopic composition of CO(2) is measured in a helium flow by gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS). The feed-motion of samples to the reaction vessel provides sequential dropping of only the samples (without the sample holder) into the acid, preventing the contamination of acid and allowing us to use the same acid to carry out very large numbers of analyses. The high accuracy and high reproducibility of the delta(13)C and delta(18)O analyses were demonstrated by measurements of international standards and comparison of results obtained by our method and by the conventional method. Our method allows us to analyze 10 microg of the carbonate with a standard deviation of +/-0.05 per thousand for delta(13)C and delta(18)O. The method has been used successfully for the analyses of the oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of the planktonic and benthic foraminifera in detailed palaeotemperature reconstructions of the Okhotsk Sea. PMID:19603476

  12. Carbon Footprint of Thermowood

    OpenAIRE

    Nordlund, Teemu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of this Bachelor’s Thesis was to evaluate the carbon footprint of thermally modified wood and its manufacturing process and transportation cycle for several different ThermoWood producer. Research included the whole production cycle from harvesting raw wood to ThermoWood transportation in destination area. Carbon dioxide emissions from these areas were determined and calculated for every ThermoWood producer at first hand. Calculations were based on the PAS 2050:2011, which is ...

  13. States and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The climate challenge appeals to an unprecedented mutation of our societies. From north to south, all our life styles will have to be changed from dwelling, to transport and feeding. These changes will have sense only at a worldwide scale and will impact our way of development. How can we reduce our energy consumption and greenhouse impact with answering everyone's essential needs at the same time? How can we invent a carbon-free economy in the North and preserve the big socio-economical equilibria at the same time? How can we get rid of poverty in the South without compromising the well-being of the future generations with an increase of CO2 emissions? Such difficulties cannot be overcome without innovations in terms of public policies. This book takes stock of the new possible instruments and policies at the global scale and involving fiscality, standards, investments and social justice. Content: 1 - the carbon threat: a changing climate and energies becoming scarce (the climate threat, an increasing energy insecurity); carbon and modern economy (human greenhouse gas emissions, a carbon-free well-being); governments and carbon control (a global challenge requiring an international control, the experiments era from Rio to the present day, the challenge of the state in front of the carbon threat); 2 - the political instruments of environment: standards as first instruments of climate public policies (standards efficiency in some sectors, standards limitations, standards and innovation); emissions quotas and market instruments (Kyoto protocol and CO2 market, the future of 'cap and trade' and of individual and regional quotas); carbon tax, fiscal instruments and new regulations (carbon tax as an alternative or a complement, other fiscal and para-fiscal instruments, new regulation instruments); investing in climate (managing the transition, governments as transition administrators). (J.S)

  14. 40 CFR Table 9 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... . . . 1. Subject to the NSPS for carbon monoxide (CO) in 40 CFR 60.103 Continuous emission monitoring system. Not applicable Not applicable. 2. Not subject to the NSPS for CO in 40 CFR 60.103 a. Continuous... Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 9 Table 9 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of...

  15. Characterization of the tank 51 alternate reductant sludge batch 9 slurry sample (HTF-51-15-130)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reboul, S. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-02-01

    Tank 51 slurry sample HTF-51-15-130 was collected following sludge washing at the Tank Farm. The sample was received at SRNL and then characterized in preparation for qualification of the alternate reductant Sludge Batch 9 (SB9) flowsheet. In this characterization, densities, solids distribution, elemental constituents, anionic constituents, carbon content, and select radioisotopes were quantified.

  16. Carbon based prosthetic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlin, D.J.; Carroll, D.W.; Barbero, R.S.; Archuleta, T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Klawitter, J.J.; Ogilvie, W.; Strzepa, P. [Ascension Orthopedics (US); Cook, S.D. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (US). School of Medicine

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to evaluate the use of carbon/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites for use in endoprosthetic devices. The application of these materials for the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joints of the hand was investigated. Issues concerning mechanical properties, bone fixation, biocompatibility, and wear are discussed. A system consisting of fiber reinforced materials with a pyrolytic carbon matrix and diamond-like, carbon-coated wear surfaces was developed. Processes were developed for the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of pyrolytic carbon into porous fiber preforms with the ability to tailor the outer porosity of the device to provide a surface for bone in-growth. A method for coating diamond-like carbon (DLC) on the articulating surface by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was developed. Preliminary results on mechanical properties of the composite system are discussed and initial biocompatibility studies were performed.

  17. Black carbon in marine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelburg, J.J.; Nieuwenhuize, J.; Van Breugel, P.

    1999-01-01

    Concentrations of black carbon were determined for a number of marine sediments. A comparison of black carbon based on thermal oxidation and hot concentrated nitric acid pretreatments revealed that the latter significantly overestimates combustion derived carbon phases. Black carbon accounts for abo

  18. Nano-Carbons as Theranostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang Liu, Xing-Jie Liang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nano-carbons, including fullerenes, carbon nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, graphene, and nano-diamonds, are an important class of nanostructures attracting tremendous interests in the past two decades. In this special issue, seven review articles and research reports are collected, to summarize and present the latest progress in the exploration of various nano-carbons for theranostic applications.

  19. Biodistribution of 9{sup 9M}o in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Raphael Sancho Sisley de; Ribeiro, Bianca da Silva; Dantas, Ana Leticia Almeida; Dantas, Bernardo Maranhao, E-mail: raphael@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Bernardo Filho, Mario [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes. Dept. de Biofisica e Biometria

    2009-07-01

    The modification of {sup 99}Mo standard metabolism in the presence of MDP would alter the dosimetry of this radionuclide in nuclear medicine patients. Therefore, the objective of this work is to evaluate the influence of MDP in the biodistribution of {sup 99}Mo. Wistar rats were divided in two groups of six animals, being inoculated respectively {sup 99}Molibdate and {sup 99}Mo+MDP via plex ocular. The biodistribution study was carried out after 10 and 120 minutes respectively. The organs were counted with a NaI(Tl) detector. The uptake values did not present significant differences among the groups. An in vitro study through planar chromatography was carried out to determine the affinity between molybdenum and MDP. The results show that {sup 99}Mo has low affinity both to propanone and NaCl-0.9% solution. However, {sup 99}Mo in the presence of MDP presented affinity to NaCl-0.9% solution and low affinity to propanone suggesting that {sup 99}Mo was bound to MDP under the conditions of the experiment. (author)

  20. Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) Gene Polymorphism in Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buraczynska, Kinga; Kurzepa, Jacek; Ksiazek, Andrzej; Buraczynska, Monika; Rejdak, Konrad

    2015-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), endopeptidases degrading extracellular matrix, play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and vascular disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between the C(-1562)T functional polymorphism in the MMP-9 gene and risk of stroke. We examined 322 patients with stroke and 410 controls. In the patient group, 52 % had type 2 diabetes. All subjects were genotyped for the C(-1562)T polymorphism by polymerase chain reaction and restriction analysis. A significant increase in T allele and CT + TT genotype frequencies was observed in patients compared with controls (OR 1.73, 95 % CI 1.34-2.23 and 1.89, 95 % CI 1.39-2.56, respectively). The T allele carriers were younger at the onset of stroke (63.5 ± 11.7 years) than patients with CC genotype (71 ± 14.1 years) (p = 0.0002). The comparison between patients with T2DM and without it showed that the T allele and CT + TT genotype were more frequent in T2DM patients (OR 1.48, 95 % CI 1.03-2.12 for T allele and 1.44, 95 % CI 1.93-2.24 for CT + TT genotype). In conclusion, our findings suggest that MMP-9 C(-1562)T polymorphism is significantly associated with risk of stroke in patients with and without T2DM. PMID:26330106

  1. The global carbon budget 1959–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Le Quéré

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the climate policy process, and project future climate change. Present-day analysis requires the combination of a range of data, algorithms, statistics and model estimates and their interpretation by a broad scientific community. Here we describe datasets and a methodology developed by the global carbon cycle science community to quantify all major components of the global carbon budget, including their uncertainties. We discuss changes compared to previous estimates, consistency within and among components, and methodology and data limitations. Based on energy statistics, we estimate that the global emissions of CO2 from fossil fuel combustion and cement production were 9.5 ± 0.5 PgC yr−1 in 2011, 3.0 percent above 2010 levels. We project these emissions will increase by 2.6% (1.9–3.5% in 2012 based on projections of Gross World Product and recent changes in the carbon intensity of the economy. Global net CO2 emissions from Land-Use Change, including deforestation, are more difficult to update annually because of data availability, but combined evidence from land cover change data, fire activity in regions undergoing deforestation and models suggests those net emissions were 0.9 ± 0.5 PgC yr−1 in 2011. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration is measured directly and reached 391.38 ± 0.13 ppm at the end of year 2011, increasing 1.70 ± 0.09 ppm yr−1 or 3.6 ± 0.2 PgC yr−1 in 2011. Estimates from four ocean models suggest that the ocean CO2 sink was 2.6 ± 0.5 PgC yr−1 in 2011, implying a global residual terrestrial CO2 sink of 4.1 ± 0.9 PgC yr−1. All uncertainties are reported as ±1

  2. Inorganic carbon acquisition in red tide dinoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, Björn; Richter, Klaus-Uwe; Riebesell, Ulf; Hansen, Per Juel

    2006-05-01

    Carbon acquisition was investigated in three marine bloom-forming dinollagellates-Prorocentrum minimum, Heterocapsa triquetra and Ceratium lineatum. In vivo activities of extracellular and intracellular carbonic anhydrase (CA), photosynthetic O2 evolution, CO2 and HCO3- uptake rates were measured by membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) in cells acclimated to low pH (8.0) and high pH (8.5 or 9.1). A second approach used short-term 14C-disequilibrium incubations to estimate the carbon source utilized by the cells. All three species showed negligible extracellular CA (eCA) activity in cells acclimated to low pH and only slightly higher activity when acclimated to high pH. Intracellular CA (iCA) activity was present in all three species, but it increased only in P. minimum with increasing pH. Half-saturation concentrations (K1/2) for photosynthetic O2 evolution were low compared to ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) kinetics. Moreover, apparent affinities for inorganic carbon (Ci) increased with increasing pH in the acclimation, indicating the operation of an efficient CO2 concentration mechanism (CCM) in these dinoflagellates. Rates of CO2 uptake were comparably low and could not support the observed rates of photosynthesis. Consequently, rates of HCO3- uptake were high in the investigated species, contributing more than 80% of the photosynthetic carbon fixation. The affinity for HCO3- and maximum uptake rates increased under higher pH. The strong preference for HCO3- was also confirmed by the 14C-disequilibrium technique. Modes of carbon acquisition were consistent with the 13C-fractionation pattern observed and indicated a strong species-specific difference in leakage. These results suggest that photosynthesis in marine dinoflagellates is not limited by Ci even at high pH, which may occur during red tides in coastal waters. PMID:17087465

  3. Microwave absorption properties of helical carbon nanofibers-coated carbon fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Liu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Helical carbon nanofibers (HCNFs coated-carbon fibers (CFs were fabricated by catalytic chemical vapor deposition method. TEM and Raman spectroscopy characterizations indicate that the graphitic layers of the HCNFs changed from disorder to order after high temperature annealing. The electromagnetic parameters and microwave absorption properties were measured at 2–18 GHz. The maximum reflection loss is 32 dB at 9 GHz and the widest bandwidth under −10 dB is 9.8 GHz from 8.2 to 18 GHz for the unannealed HCNFs coated-CFs composite with 2.5 mm in thickness, suggesting that HCNFs coated-CFs should have potential applications in high performance microwave absorption materials.

  4. The Origin of Magnetite Crystals in ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Wentworth, S. J.; McKay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks believed to have formed approx 3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these magnetites are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of magnetite and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compositional and structural relationships between the carbonate disks, their associated magnetites and the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded. Comparison of these results with experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates conducted under a range of heating scenarios suggests that the magnetite nanocrystals in the ALH84001 carbonate disks are not the products of thermal decomposition.

  5. Surface State of Carbon Fibers Modified by Electrochemical Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunxia GUO; Jie LIU; Jieying LIANG

    2005-01-01

    Surface of polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers was modified by electrochemical oxidation. The modification effect on carbon fibers surface was explored using atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Results showed that on the modified surface of carbon fibers, the carbon contents decreased by 9.7% and the oxygen and nitrogen contents increased by 53.8% and 7.5 times, respectively. The surface roughness and the hydroxyl and carbonyl contents also increased. The surface orientation index was reduced by 1.5%which decreased tensile strength of carbon fibers by 8.1%, and the microcrystalline dimension also decreased which increased the active sites of carbon fiber surface by 78%. The physical and chemical properties of carbon fibers surface were modified through the electrochemical oxidative method, which improved the cohesiveness between the fibers and resin matrix and increased the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of carbon fibers reinforced epoxy composite (CFRP) over 20%.

  6. A kind of carbon whiskers in new structure and morphology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG; Jian

    2001-01-01

    [1]Endo, M., Saito, R., Dresselhaus, M. S. et al. From carbon fibers to nanotubes, in Carbon Nanotubes Preparations and Properties (ed. Ebbesen, T. W.), New York: CRC Press Inc., 1997, 54-66.[2]Baker, R. T. K., Baker, M. A., Harris, P. S. et al., Nucleation and growth of carbon deposits from the nickel catalyzed de-composition of acetylene, J.Catal., 1972, 26(7): 51.[3]Audier, M., Coulon, M., Kinetic and microscopic aspects of catalytic carbon growth, Carbon, 1985, 23(3): 317.[4]Oberlin, A., Endo, M., Koyama, T., High resolution microscope observations of graphitized carbon fibers, Carbon, 1976, 14(1): 133.[5]Bacon, R., Growth, structure, and properties of graphite whiskers, Journal of Applied Physics, 1960, 31(2): 283.[6]Murayama, H., Maeda, M., A novel form of filamentous graphite, Nature, 1990, 345(28): 791.[7]Pimpinelli, A., Villain, J., Physics of Crystal Growth, New York: Cambridge University Press, 1998, 62-64.[8]Minkoff, I., Solidification and Cast Structure, Chichester: Wiley, 1986, 42-47.[9]Pierson, H. O., Handbook of Carbon, Graphite, Diamond, and Fullerenes: Properties, Processing, and Applications, Park Ridge: Noyes Publications, 1993, 151.[10]Bennema, P., Spiral growth and surface roughing: Developments since Burton, Cabrera and Frank, Journal of Crystal Growth, 1984, 69(2): 182.

  7. The synthesis of mono- and diacetyl-9H-fluorenes. Reactivity and selectivity in the Lewis acid catalyzed Friedel-Crafts acetylation of 9H-fluorene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Titinchi, Salam J. J.; Kamounah, Fadhil S.; Abbo, Hanna S.; Hammerich, Ole

    addition (Perrier or Bouveault) on the reactivity-selectivity pattern was investigated. The results showed that monoacetylation of 9H-fluorene in chloroalkanes and nitromethane gives mixtures of 2-acetyl-9H-fluorene and 4-acetyl-9H-fluorene with the former dominating. In addition to these two isomers, 2......,7-diacetyl-9H-fluorene was obtained in 5-11 % yield when carbon disulfide was used as the solvent. Acetylation of 9H-fluorene in dichloroethane and carbon disulfide, using an excess of acetyl chloride and aluminum chloride at reflux temperature, gives 2,7-diacetyl-9H-fluorene exclusively in high yields (> 97...... reactivity-selectivity pattern observed and it is concluded that the distribution of products is partly kinetically controlled....

  8. Investigating carbonate formation in urban soils as a method for capture and storage of atmospheric carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates the potential for engineered urban soils to capture and store atmospheric carbon (C). Calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) bearing waste silicate minerals within the soil environment can capture and store atmospheric C through the process of weathering and secondary carbonate mineral precipitation. Anthropogenic soils, known to contain substantial quantities of Ca and Mg-rich minerals derived from demolition activity (particularly cement and concrete), were systematically sampled at the surface across a 10 ha brownfield site, Science Central, located in the urban centre of Newcastle upon Tyne, U.K. Subsequent analysis yielded average carbonate contents of 21.8 ± 4.7% wt CaCO3. Isotopic analysis demonstrated δ18O values between − 9.4‰ and − 13.3‰ and δ13C values between − 7.4‰ and − 13.6‰ (relative to Pee Dee Belemnite), suggesting that up to 39.4 ± 8.8% of the carbonate C has been captured from the atmosphere through hydroxylation of dissolved CO2 in high pH solutions. The remaining carbonate C is derived from lithogenic sources. 37.4 kg of atmospheric CO2 has already been captured and stored as carbonate per Mg of soil across the site, representing a carbon dioxide (CO2) removal rate of 12.5 kgCO2 Mg−1 yr−1. There is the potential for capture and storage of a further 27.3 kgCO2 Mg−1 in residual reactive materials, which may be exploited through increased residence time (additional in situ weathering). Overall, the Science Central site has the potential to capture and store a total of 64,800 Mg CO2 as carbonate minerals. This study illustrates the potential for managing urban soils as tools of C capture and storage, an important ecosystem service, and demonstrates the importance of studying C storage in engineering urban anthropogenic soils. Highlights: ► Urban soils potentially capture 12.5 kgCO2 Mg−1 yr−1 (value £51,843–£77,765 ha−1). ► Formation of carbonate may be significant and exploitable storage

  9. Erosion of Organic Carbon from Permafrost Zones in the Arctic as a Geological Carbon Dioxide Sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, R. G.; Galy, V.; Gaillardet, J.; Dellinger, M.; Bryant, C.; O'Regan, M.; Gröcke, D. R.; Coxall, H.; Bouchez, J.; Calmels, D.

    2015-12-01

    Soils of the northern high latitudes store carbon over millennial timescales and contain almost double the carbon stock of the atmosphere. The exposure and decomposition of aged organic matter in these soils is a carbon dioxide (CO2) source to the atmosphere. Permafrost thaw over the coming century may result in a significant CO2 release. However, some of this soil organic carbon in permafrost zones can be eroded and input to rivers. If it escapes degradation during river transport and is buried in ocean sediments, it instead contributes to a longer-term (>104 yr), geological CO2sink. Despite this recognition, the erosional flux and fate of particulate organic carbon (POC) in large rivers draining permafrost zones remains poorly constrained. We quantify POC source, flux and fate in the Mackenzie River Basin, the main sediment supplier to the Arctic Ocean, using radiocarbon, stable carbon isotopes and element ratios to correct for rock-derived POC. The eroded biospheric POC has resided in the basin for millennia, with a mean radiocarbon age of 5800±800 yr. Rivers eroding continuous permafrost zones contribute the oldest biospheric POC. Based on the measured biospheric POC content and annual sediment flux, we calculate a biospheric POC flux of 2.2 (+1.3/-0.9) TgC yr-1 from the Mackenzie River to the Arctic Ocean, three times the CO2 drawdown by silicate weathering. Offshore we find evidence for efficient terrestrial carbon burial over the Holocene period. Our findings demonstrate how erosion of organic carbon-rich, high latitude soils can result in a significant geological CO2sink. We postulate that this geological CO2 sink is sensitive to climate conditions in the Arctic. The transfer can operate when high latitudes host carbon stocks in soil, and while rivers can erode and transfer sediments to the Arctic Ocean. Over the last 1Ma, the erosional transfer was likely to have been enhanced during interglacials. We propose that erosion of biospheric carbon by large

  10. Yttrium and lanthanum recovery from low cerium carbonate, yttrium carbonate and yttrium concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, separation, enrichment and purification of lanthanum and yttrium were performed using as raw material a commercial low cerium rare earth concentrate named LCC (low cerium carbonate), an yttrium concentrate named 'yttrium carbonate', and a third concentrated known as 'yttrium earths oxide. The first two were industrially produced by the late NUCLEMON - NUCLEBRAS de Monazita e Associados Ltda, using Brazilian monazite. The 'yttrium earths oxide' come from a process for preparation of lanthanum during the course of the experimental work for the present thesis. The following techniques were used: fractional precipitation with urea; fractional leaching of the LCC using ammonium carbonate; precipitation of rare earth peroxycarbonates starting from the rare earth complex carbonates. Once prepared the enriched rare earth fractions the same were refined using the ion exchange chromatography with strong cationic resin without the use of retention ion and elution using the ammonium salt of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. With the association of the above mentioned techniques were obtained pure oxides of yttrium (>97,7%), lanthanum (99,9%), gadolinium (96,6%) and samarium (99,9%). The process here developed has technical and economic viability for the installation of a large scale unity. (author)

  11. Organic modification of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The organic modification of carbon nanotubes is a novel research field being developed recently. In this article, the history and newest progress of organic modification of carbon nanotubes are reviewed from two aspects:organic covalent modification and organic noncovalent modification of carbon nanotubes. The preparation and properties of organic modified carbon nanotubes are discussed in detail. In addition, the prospective development of organic modification of carbon nanotubes is suggested.

  12. Organic carbon in the sediments of the lower reaches of Periar River

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Devi, K.S.; Venugopal, P.; Sankaranarayanan, V.N.

    Sediments are indicators of the quality of water overlying them and hence, useful in the assessment of environmental pollution. Temporal and spatial variations in sediment characteristics and organic carbon content from 9 stations in the lower...

  13. Terrestrial vegetation carbon sinks in China, 1981―2000

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG; JingYun; GUO; ZhaoDi; PIAO; ShiLong; CHEN; AnPing

    2007-01-01

    Using China's ground observations, e.g., forest inventory, grassland resource, agricultural statistics, climate, and satellite data, we estimate terrestrial vegetation carbon sinks for China's major biomes between 1981 and 2000. The main results are in the following: (1) Forest area and forest biomass carbon (C) stock increased from 116.5×106 ha and 4.3 Pg C (1 Pg C = 1015 g C) in the early 1980s to 142.8×106 ha and 5.9 Pg C in the early 2000s, respectively. Forest biomass carbon density increased form 36.9 Mg C/ha (1 Mg C = 106 g C) to 41.0 Mg C/ha, with an annual carbon sequestration rate of 0.075 Pg C/a. Grassland, shrub, and crop biomass sequestrate carbon at annual rates of 0.007 Pg C/a, 0.014―0.024 Pg C/a, and 0.0125―0.0143 Pg C/a, respectively. (2) The total terrestrial vegetation C sink in China is in a range of 0.096―0.106 Pg C/a between 1981 and 2000, accounting for 14.6%―16.1% of carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted by China's industry in the same period. In addition, soil carbon sink is estimated at 0.04―0.07 Pg C/a. Accordingly, carbon sequestration by China's terrestrial ecosystems (vegetation and soil) offsets 20.8%―26.8% of its industrial CO2 emission for the study period. (3) Considerable uncertainties exist in the present study, especially in the estimation of soil carbon sinks, and need further intensive investigation in the future.

  14. Or CAD 9.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book gives descriptions of Or CAD 9.1 with before drawing plan such as gaining Or CAD Demo CD, capture tools, making new design file, drawing structure, and setting design template, Drawings like making new drawing, finding parts, drawing lines, connecting line among the pages, and connecting parts using drawing structure, unstable multivibrator circle such as management of design file, power and ground connection, utility, beginning layout, single drawing, flat drawing, latch circuit, making a library, making a footprint, smart route and flash window.

  15. β-Thioxoketones. Part 9

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ulf; Sandström, Jan; Carlsen, Lars; Duus, Fritz

    Thioacetylacetone (I), 2-acetylcyclohexanethione (II), and 2-thioacetylcyclohexanone (III) have been studied by dynamic 1H n.m.r. spectroscopy from ambient temperature down to ca. 130 K. The general co-existence of two tautomeric constituents has been established, and the constituents, in the cas...... of (I) and (III), directly observed. These were identified as the strongly chelated (Z)-enol form and the weakly chelated (Z)-enethiol form. Band-shape analysis provided ΔG‡(enol → enethiol) 8.9 ± 0.1 kcal mol–1 for (I) and 7.6 ± 0.1 kcal mol–1 for (III)....

  16. DB2 9 for Developers

    CERN Document Server

    Gunning, Philip K

    2008-01-01

    Written by an "in-the-trenches" consultant, this guide hails the newest version of DB2 as a major release, highlighting the large number of totally new features, most notably the addition of XML capabilities. Packed with the information DB2 developers and administrators need to know when implementing version 9, the discussion covers upgrading from prior releases of DB2, converting relational data to XML data, and how DB2 supports industry standard schemas. With detailed examples and useful scripts, users learn how to develop DB2 XML applications, design an XML database, and tune the

  17. Spectators After 9/11

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz Gandasegui, Vicente

    2009-01-01

    The (un)reality of films was superseded by reality on 9/11 and therefore cinema required a different kind of perception to offer to the spectators as the boundaries of imagination became altered. The events that followed the devastation which occurred on the 11th September 2001 in New York affected the way in which we perceive films, transforming our symbolic and epistemological system. This episode was beyond our imagination, beyond our words and, in Lacanian terms, we can say that it was ne...

  18. Advances in magnetic resonance 9

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 9 describes the magnetic resonance in split constants and dipolar relaxation. This book discusses the temperature-dependent splitting constants in the ESR spectra of organic free radicals; temperature-dependent splittings in ion pairs; and magnetic resonance induced by electrons. The electron impact excitation of atoms and molecules; intramolecular dipolar relaxation in multi-spin systems; and dipolar cross-correlation problem are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the NMR studies of molecules oriented in thermotropic liquid crystals and diffusion

  19. Highly stable perovskite solar cells with an all-carbon hole transport layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feijiu; Endo, Masaru; Mouri, Shinichiro; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Ohno, Yutaka; Wakamiya, Atsushi; Murata, Yasujiro; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2016-06-01

    Nano-carbon materials (carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphene oxide) have potential application for photovoltaics because of their excellent optical and electronic properties. Here, we demonstrate that a single-walled carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer greatly improves the photovoltaic performance of organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cells. The carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer works as an efficient hole transport/electron blocking layer. The photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.3% was achieved in the organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cell due to the complementary properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide. Furthermore, the great improvement of photovoltaic performance stability in the perovskite solar cells using carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide/polymethyl methacrylate was demonstrated in comparison with that using a typical organic hole transport layer of 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-4-methoxyphenylamino)-9,9'-spirobifluorene.Nano-carbon materials (carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphene oxide) have potential application for photovoltaics because of their excellent optical and electronic properties. Here, we demonstrate that a single-walled carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer greatly improves the photovoltaic performance of organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cells. The carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer works as an efficient hole transport/electron blocking layer. The photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.3% was achieved in the organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cell due to the complementary properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide. Furthermore, the great improvement of photovoltaic performance stability in the perovskite solar cells using carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide/polymethyl methacrylate was demonstrated in comparison with that using a typical organic hole transport layer of 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-4-methoxyphenylamino)-9,9'-spirobifluorene. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  20. Studies in sublimation of tungsten single crystal (110) face and the influence of carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dekhtyar, I.Ya.; Kolesnik, V.M.; Patoka, V.I.; Silant' ev, V.I.

    1975-12-01

    Evaporation of the tungsten single crystal (110) face was studied in ultrahigh vacuum (better than 1.10/sup -9/ Torr) using the Langmuir method. The influence of carbon impurities on the evaporation parameters was found out and carbon is shown to increase the sublimation energy by 25 kcal. The data obtained show that the parameters of tungsten evaporation available in literature should be related to carbon-containing materials.

  1. Economic effects of using carbon taxes to reduce carbon dioxide emissions in major OECD countries. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tax on fossil fuels designed to obtain a 20 percent reduction in emissions of carbon dioxide by the year 2020 would lower output among major OECD nations by 1 to 3 1/2 percent. The tax required to achieve a 20% reduction in emissions of carbon dioxide by 2020 ranged from $489.4 (Sweden) per metric ton of carbon to $2,427.9 (Japan) per ton of carbon. The tax required for the U.S. was $720.6 per ton. In the U.S., a tax per $100 per ton of carbon would equate to a tax of $70.68 per short ton of coal, $11.42 per barrel of oil, $1.66 per MCF of natural gas and 0.27 per gallon of gasoline. The study is part of a multi-phase effort to gauge the economic consequences of various measures being discussed by the international community to mitigate the possibility of global climate change by limiting emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel use. The study assumed that the carbon tax program would be revenue neutral in that increased revenues from the carbon tax would be offset by reductions in personal income taxes

  2. Implications of carbon dust emission for terrestrail carbon cycling and carbon accounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind erosion preferentially removes the finest carbon- and nutrient-rich soil fractions, and consequently its role may be significant within terrestrial carbon (C) cycles. However, the impacts of wind erosion on soil organic carbon (SOC) redistribution are not considered in most carbon cycle models,...

  3. Carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating for carbon/carbon composites: Microstructure and biocompatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To improve the surface biocompatibility of carbon/carbon composites, a carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating was applied using a combination method of slurry procedure and ultrasound-assisted electrochemical deposition procedure. The morphology, microstructure and chemical composition of the coating were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The biocompatibility of the carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating was investigated by osteoblast-like MG63 cell culture tests. The results showed that the carbon foam could provide a large number of pores on the surface of carbon/carbon composites. The hydroxyapatite crystals could infiltrate into the pores and form the carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating. The coating covered the carbon/carbon composites fully and uniformly with slice morphology. The cell response tests showed that the MG63 cells on carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating had a better cell adhesion and cell proliferation than those on uncoated carbon/carbon composites. The carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coatings were cytocompatible and were beneficial to improve the biocompatibility. The approach presented here may be exploited for fabrication of carbon/carbon composite implant surfaces.

  4. Carbon Nanotubes Synthesis Through Gamma Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirado, Pablo; Garcia, Rafael; Montes, Jorge; Melendrez, Rodrigo; Barboza, Marcelino; Contreras, Oscar

    2015-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes show a great potential of applications since there discovery by Iijima in 1991[1] due to their numerous physical-chemical properties such as their high weight to strength relationship, which make them ideal to use in high resistance compound materials, and in many other applications[2] In this work, a novel method for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes is presented, starting from an ultra-thin sheet of graphite synthesized by the chemical vapor decomposition technique (CVD), using ultra high purity methane and hydrogen at 1200°C in a horizontal quartz reactor. For the synthesis of carbon nanotubes, the graphite sheets were exposed to different doses of radiation, with the objective of breaking the graphite bonds and form carbon nanotubes; a Gammacell equipment model 220 Excel was used for the purpose, which counts with a radiation source of cobalt 60, and a current radiation rate of 0.9 Gy/seconds. The time of exposure to radiation was varied in each sample, according to the desired dose of radiation in each case, afterwards the samples were characterized using the Raman spectroscopy and TEM microscopy techniques with the objective of observing the kind of nanotubes formed, their morphology and their number of defects. Results will be shown during the poster session.

  5. Bioethanol from different Finnish agricultural carbon sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kautola, H.; Kymaelaeinen, M.; Tokeensuu, L.; Alatalo, T. (HAMK University of Applied Sciences, Degree Programme in Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Haemeenlinna (Finland)); Caerdenas, R. (Universidad Central del Ecuador, Facultad Ciencias Quimicas, Escuela de Quimica, Av. America. Ciudadela Universitaria, Quito (Ecuador)); Siukola, K.; Naesi, J. (Suomen Biojalostus Oy, Renko (Finland))

    2007-07-01

    Bioethanol in fuel and its domestic production has become a great issue in Finland during the last few years. There has been discussion about what kind of raw materials should be used and are there any local priorities. In the years 2004-2007 local farmers in Haem e , in southern part of Finland, started to find alternative use for sugar beet due to drastic reduction of domestic sugar production in the near future. This was also the start of the experimental studies on bi oethanol production. The aim of the study was to find out how the change of carbon source will effect on bi oethanol yield. The bioethanol production was studied in laboratory scale using carbon sources of saccharose, glucose, sugar beet juice, sugar beet mash and barley hydrolysates pretreated with amylases, (beta-glucanase and xylanase). The yeast used was Saccharomyces sp. The pre experiments were performed in 250 mL flasks to optimize carbon, nitrogen and salts contents in production medium, also comparing different carbon sources and mixtures. The production was then studied in a 30 liter fermenter running for 36 hours. The preliminary studies showed that barley hydrolysate gave the best result 2,4% in bioethanol concentration during the performed fermentations, and saccharose was the best substrate in shake flask fermentations with a 9,6% bioethanol concentration. (orig.)

  6. Carbon nanotubes decorating methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.D. Dobrzańska-Danikiewicz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The work is to present and characterise various methods of depositing carbon nanotubes with nanoparticles of precious metals, and also to present the results of own works concerning carbon nanotubes coated with platinum nanoparticles.Design/methodology/approach: Electron transmission and scanning microscopy has been used for imaging the structure and morphology of the nanocomposites obtained and the distribution of nanoparticles on the surface of carbon nanotubes.Findings: The studies carried out with the HRTEM and SEM techniques have confirmed differences in morphology, homogeneity and density of depositing platinum nanoparticles on the surface of carbon nanotubes and its structure.Research limitations/implications: The studies conducted pertained to the process of decorating carbon nanotubes with platinum nanoparticles. Further works are planned aimed at extending the application scope of the newly developed methodology to include the methods of nanotubes decorating with the nanoparticles of other precious metals (mainly palladium and rhodium.Practical implications: CNTs-NPs (Carbon NanoTube-NanoParticles composites can be used as the active elements of sensors featuring high sensitivity, fast action, high selectivity and accuracy, in particular in medicine as cholesterol and glucoses sensors; in the automotive industry for the precision monitoring of working parameters in individual engine components; in environmental conservation to examine CO2, NOx, and CH4 concentrations and for checking leak-tightness and detecting hazardous substances in household and industrial gas installations.Originality/value: The comprehensive characterisation of the methods employed for fabricating nanocomposites consisting of carbon nanotubes deposited with Pt, Pd, Rh, Au, Ag nanoparticles with special consideration to the colloidal process.

  7. Carbon dioxide and climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global climate change is a serious environmental concern, and the US has developed ''An Action Agenda'' to deal with it. At the heart of the US effort is the US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP), which has been developed by the Committee on Earth and Environmental Sciences (CEES) of the Federal Coordinating Council for Sciences, Engineering, and Technology (FCCSET). The USGCRP will provide the scientific basis for sound policy making on the climate-change issue. The DOE contribution to the USGCRP is the Carbon Dioxide Research Program, which now places particular emphasis on the rapid improvement of the capability to predict global and regional climate change. DOE's Carbon Dioxide Research Program has been addressing the carbon dioxide-climate change connection for more than twelve years and has provided a solid scientific foundation for the USGCRP. The expansion of the DOE effort reflects the increased attention that the Department has placed on the issue and is reflected in the National Energy Strategy (NES) that was released in 1991. This Program Summary describes projects funded by the Carbon Dioxide Research Program during FY 1991 and gives a brief overview of objectives, organization, and accomplishments. The Environmental Sciences Division of the Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research supports a Carbon Dioxide Research Program to determine the scientific linkage between the rise of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, especially carbon dioxide, and climate and vegetation change. One facet is the Core CO2 Program, a pioneering program that DOE established more than 10 years ago to understand and predict the ways that fossil-fuel burning could affect atmospheric CO2 concentration, global climate, and the Earth's biosphere. Major research areas are: global carbon cycle; climate detection and models of climate change; vegetation research; resource analysis; and, information and integration

  8. Measurement of carbon capture efficiency and stored carbon leakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Ralph F.; Dubey, Manvendra K.

    2013-01-29

    Data representative of a measured carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) concentration and of a measured oxygen (O.sub.2) concentration at a measurement location can be used to determine whether the measured carbon dioxide concentration at the measurement location is elevated relative to a baseline carbon dioxide concentration due to escape of carbon dioxide from a source associated with a carbon capture and storage process. Optionally, the data can be used to quantify a carbon dioxide concentration increase at the first location that is attributable to escape of carbon dioxide from the source and to calculate a rate of escape of carbon dioxide from the source by executing a model of gas-phase transport using at least the first carbon dioxide concentration increase. Related systems, methods, and articles of manufacture are also described.

  9. Microbially mediated carbon mineralization: Geoengineering a carbon-neutral mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, I. M.; McCutcheon, J.; Harrison, A. L.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2013-12-01

    Ultramafic and mafic mine tailings are a potentially valuable feedstock for carbon mineralization, affording the mining industry an opportunity to completely offset their carbon emissions. Passive carbon mineralization has previously been documented at the abandoned Clinton Creek asbestos mine, and the active Diavik diamond mine and Mount Keith nickel mine, yet the majority of tailings remain unreacted. Examples of microbe-carbonate interactions at each mine suggest that biological pathways could be harnessed to promote carbon mineralization. In suitable environmental conditions, microbes can mediate geochemical processes to accelerate mineral dissolution, increase the supply of carbon dioxide (CO2), and induce carbonate precipitation, all of which may accelerate carbon mineralization. Tailings mineralogy and the availability of a CO2 point source are key considerations in designing tailings storage facilities (TSF) for optimizing carbon mineralization. We evaluate the efficacy of acceleration strategies including bioleaching, biologically induced carbonate precipitation, and heterotrophic oxidation of waste organics, as well as abiotic strategies including enhancing passive carbonation through modifying tailings management practices and use of CO2 point sources (Fig. 1). With the aim of developing carbon-neutral mines, implementation of carbon mineralization strategies into TSF design will be driven by economic incentives and public pressure for environmental sustainability in the mining industry. Figure 1. Schematic illustrating geoengineered scenarios for carbon mineralization of ultramafic mine tailings. Scenarios A and B are based on non-point and point sources of CO2, respectively.

  10. Carbon nanotube core graphitic shell hybrid fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahm, Myung Gwan; Lee, Jae-Hwang; Hart, Amelia H C; Song, Sung Moo; Nam, Jaewook; Jung, Hyun Young; Hashim, Daniel Paul; Li, Bo; Narayanan, Tharangattu N; Park, Chi-Dong; Zhao, Yao; Vajtai, Robert; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Hayashi, Takuya; Ku, Bon-Cheol; Endo, Morinobu; Barrera, Enrique; Jung, Yung Joon; Thomas, Edwin L; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2013-12-23

    A carbon nanotube yarn core graphitic shell hybrid fiber was fabricated via facile heat treatment of epoxy-based negative photoresist (SU-8) on carbon nanotube yarn. The effective encapsulation of carbon nanotube yarn in carbon fiber and a glassy carbon outer shell determines their physical properties. The higher electrical conductivity (than carbon fiber) of the carbon nanotube yarn overcomes the drawbacks of carbon fiber/glassy carbon, and the better properties (than carbon nanotubes) of the carbon fiber/glassy carbon make up for the lower thermal and mechanical properties of the carbon nanotube yarn via synergistic hybridization without any chemical doping and additional processes. PMID:24224730

  11. Synthesis of carbon nanofibers on impregnated powdered activated carbon as cheap substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Mamun

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The catalysis and characterization of carbon nanofibers (CNFs composite are reported in this work. Carbon nanofibers were produced on oil palm shell powdered activated carbon (PAC, which was impregnated with nickel. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD of C2H2 was used in the presence of hydrogen at ∼650 °C. The flow rates of carbon source and hydrogen were fixed. The CNFs formed directly on the surface of the impregnated PAC. Variable weight percentages (1%, 3%, 5%, 7% and 9% of the catalyst salt (Ni+2 were used for the impregnation. However, the best catalysis was observed on the substrate with 3% Ni+2. The product displayed a relatively high surface area, essentially constituted by the external surface. New functional groups also appeared compared to those in the PAC. Field Emission Scanning Microscopy (FESEM, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR, BET surface area analysis and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX were used for the characterization of the new carbon nano product, which was produced through a clean novel process.

  12. Anodes for glucose fuel cells made of carbonized nanofibers with embedded carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prilutsky, Sabina; Cohen, Yachin; Zussman, Eyal; Makarov, Vadim; Bubis, Eugenia; Schechner, Pinchas

    2010-03-01

    Electrodes made of carbonized polyacrylonitryle nanofibers, with and without embedded multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) were fabricated by the electrospinning (ES) process and evaluated as anodes in a glucose fuel cell (FC). The effect of several processing and structural characteristics, such as the presence of MWCNTs, polymer concentration in the ES solution and silver electroless plating, on FC performance were measured The carbon electrodes were successful as anodes showing significant activity even without additional silver catalyst, with noticeable improvement by incorporation of MWCNTs. The orientation of graphitic layers along the fiber axis and the coherence of layer packing were shown to be important for enhanced electrode activity. The maximal values of open circuit voltage (OCV) and peak of power density (PPD) of unmetallized electrodes, 0.4 V and 30 μW/cm^2, were found for composite carbon nanofiber electrode. Electroless silver metallization leads to enhanced performance. Maximal values of OCV and PPD of silvered electrodes were measured to be about 0.9 V and 400 μW/cm^2. Thus, carbonized nanofibers with embedded MWCNTs may form a good basis for glucose FC anodes, but better metallization and cell-configuration allowing proper mixing are required.

  13. Carbon-13 NMR characterization of actinyl(VI) carbonate complexes in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, D.L.; Hobart, D.E.; Palmer, P.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Sullivan, J.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Stout, B.E. [Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1992-07-01

    The uranyl(VI) carbonate system has been re-examined using {sup 13}C NMR of 99.9% {sup 13}C-enriched U{sup VI}O{sub 2} ({sup 13}CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} in millimolar concentrations. By careful control of carbonate ion concentration, we have confirmed the existence of the trimer, and observed dynamic equilibrium between the monomer and the timer. In addition, the ligand exchange reaction between free and coordinated carbonate on Pu{sup VI}O{sub 2}({sup 13}CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} and Am{sup VI}O{sub 2}({sup 13}CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} systems has been examined by variable temperature {sup 13}C NMR line-broadening techniques {sup 13}C NMR line-broadening techniques. A modified Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill NMR pulse sequence was written to allow for experimental determination of ligand exchange parameters for paramagnetic actinide complexes. Preliminary Eyring analysis has provided activation parameters of {Delta}G{sup {double_dagger}}{sub 295} = 56 kJ/M, {Delta}H{sup {double_dagger}} = 38 kJ/M, and {Delta}S{sup {double_dagger}} = {minus}60 J/M-K for the plutonyl triscarbonate system, suggesting an associative transition state for the plutonyl (VI) carbonate complex self-exchange reaction. Experiments for determination of the activation parameters for the americium (VI) carbonate system are in progress.

  14. Impacts of CA9 Gene Polymorphisms and Environmental Factors on Oral-Cancer Susceptibility and Clinicopathologic Characteristics in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Chien, Ming-Hsien; Yang, Jia-Sin; Chu, Yin-Hung; Lin, Chien-huang; Wei, Lin-Hung; Yang, Shun-Fa; Lin, Chiao-Wen

    2012-01-01

    Background In Taiwan, oral cancer has causally been associated with environmental carcinogens. Carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9) is reportedly overexpressed in several types of carcinomas and is generally considered a marker of malignancy. The current study explored the combined effect of CA9 gene polymorphisms and exposure to environmental carcinogens on the susceptibility of developing oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and the clinicopathological characteristics of the tumors. Methodology and Pr...

  15. Asphalt-derived high surface area activated porous carbons for carbon dioxide capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilov, Almaz S; Ruan, Gedeng; Hwang, Chih-Chau; Schipper, Desmond E; Tour, Josiah J; Li, Yilun; Fei, Huilong; Samuel, Errol L G; Tour, James M

    2015-01-21

    Research activity toward the development of new sorbents for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture have been increasing quickly. Despite the variety of existing materials with high surface areas and high CO2 uptake performances, the cost of the materials remains a dominant factor in slowing their industrial applications. Here we report preparation and CO2 uptake performance of microporous carbon materials synthesized from asphalt, a very inexpensive carbon source. Carbonization of asphalt with potassium hydroxide (KOH) at high temperatures (>600 °C) yields porous carbon materials (A-PC) with high surface areas of up to 2780 m(2) g(-1) and high CO2 uptake performance of 21 mmol g(-1) or 93 wt % at 30 bar and 25 °C. Furthermore, nitrogen doping and reduction with hydrogen yields active N-doped materials (A-NPC and A-rNPC) containing up to 9.3% nitrogen, making them nucleophilic porous carbons with further increase in the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas up to 2860 m(2) g(-1) for A-NPC and CO2 uptake to 26 mmol g(-1) or 114 wt % at 30 bar and 25 °C for A-rNPC. This is the highest reported CO2 uptake among the family of the activated porous carbonaceous materials. Thus, the porous carbon materials from asphalt have excellent properties for reversibly capturing CO2 at the well-head during the extraction of natural gas, a naturally occurring high pressure source of CO2. Through a pressure swing sorption process, when the asphalt-derived material is returned to 1 bar, the CO2 is released, thereby rendering a reversible capture medium that is highly efficient yet very inexpensive. PMID:25531980

  16. Carbon Concentration of Austenite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Ławrynowicz

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The investigation was carried out to examine the influence of temperature and times of austempering process on the maximum extend towhich the bainite reaction can proceed and the carbon content in retained austenite. It should be noted that a small percentage change in theaustenite carbon content can have a significant effect on the subsequent austempering reaction changing the volume fraction of the phasespresent and hence, the resulting mechanical properties. Specimens were prepared from an unalloyed ductile cast iron, austenitised at 950oCfor 60 minutes and austempered by the conventional single-step austempering process at four temperatures between BS and MS, eg., 250,300, 350 and 400oC. The samples were austempered at these temperatures for 15, 30, 60, 120 and 240 minutes and finally quenched toambient temperature. Volume fractions of retained austenite and carbon concentration in the residual austenite have been observed byusing X-ray diffraction. Additionally, carbon concentration in the residual austenite was calculated using volume fraction data of austeniteand a model developed by Bhadeshia based on the McLellan and Dunn quasi-chemical thermodynamic model. The comparison ofexperimental data with the T0, T0' and Ae3' phase boundaries suggests the likely mechanism of bainite reaction in cast iron is displacive rather than diffusional. The carbon concentration in retained austenite demonstrates that at the end of bainite reaction the microstructure must consist of not only ausferrite but additionally precipitated carbides.

  17. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2012-10-09

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  18. The global carbon budget 1959–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Le Quéré

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Accurate assessments of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the climate policy process, and project future climate change. Present-day analysis requires the combination of a range of data, algorithms, statistics and model estimates and their interpretation by a broad scientific community. Here we describe datasets and a methodology developed by the global carbon cycle science community to quantify all major components of the global carbon budget, including their uncertainties. We discuss changes compared to previous estimates, consistency within and among components, and methodology and data limitations. CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and cement production (EFF are based on energy statistics, while emissions from Land-Use Change (ELUC, including deforestation, are based on combined evidence from land cover change data, fire activity in regions undergoing deforestation, and models. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration is measured directly and its rate of growth (GATM is computed from the concentration. The mean ocean CO2 sink (SOCEAN is based on observations from the 1990s, while the annual anomalies and trends are estimated with ocean models. Finally, the global residual terrestrial CO2 sink (SLAND is estimated by the difference of the other terms. For the last decade available (2002–2011, EFF was 8.3 ± 0.4 PgC yr−1, ELUC 1.0 ± 0.5 PgC yr−1, GATM 4.3 ± 0.1PgC yr−1, SOCEAN 2.5 ± 0.5 PgC yr−1, and SLAND 2.6 ± 0.8 PgC yr−1. For year 2011 alone, EFF was 9.5 ± 0.5 PgC yr−1, 3.0 percent above 2010, reflecting a continued trend in these emissions; ELUC was 0.9 ± 0.5 PgC yr−1, approximately constant throughout the decade; GATM was 3.6 ± 0.2 PgC yr−1, SOCEAN was 2.7 ± 0.5 PgC yr−1, and SLAND was 4.1 ± 0.9 PgC yr−1. GATM was low in 2011

  19. Flotation separation of uranium from carbonate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presented are the results of experiments on finding the main peculiarities of flotation separation of uranium from diluted carbonate solutions of means of alkyl amides of nicotine acid, containing in the alkyl chain from 8 to 18 of carbon atoms. Interaction of the collectors with complex uranium containing anions, present in the solution, passes rapidly, and it is followed by formation of sublate colloid solutions. Flotation separation of uranium by means of alkyl amides is the best when pH constitutes 6-9. Suggested is a mechanism of the collector interaction with uranium containing complex anions. It is shown, that practically full separation of uranium takes place at 70-80% excess of the collector as compared with stoichiometrically necessary one for the formation of [UO2(CO3)3](RN2C6H7O)4 compound

  20. Epoxy based photoresist/carbon nanoparticle composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillemose, Michael; Gammelgaard, Lauge; Richter, Jacob;

    2008-01-01

    We have fabricated composites of SU-8 polymer and three different types of carbon nanoparticles (NPs) using ultrasonic mixing. Structures of composite thin films have been patterned on a characterization chip with standard UV photolithography. Using a four-point bending probe, a well defined stress...... is applied to the composite thin film and we have demonstrated that the composites are piezoresistive. Stable gauge factors of 5-9 have been measured, but we have also observed piezoresistive responses with gauge factors as high as 50. As SU-8 is much softer than silicon and the gauge factor of the...... composite material is relatively high, carbon nanoparticle doped SU-8 is a valid candidate for the piezoresistive readout in polymer based cantilever sensors, with potentially higher sensitivity than silicon based cantilevers....

  1. Remnant evolution after a carbon-oxygen white dwarf merger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. Yoon; P. Podsiadlowski; S. Rosswog

    2007-01-01

    We systematically explore the evolution of the merger of two carbon-oxygen (CO) white dwarfs. The dynamical evolution of a 0.9Msolar + 0.6Msolar CO white dwarf merger is followed by a 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulation. The calculation uses a state-of-the-art e

  2. Design and simulation of a carbon nanotube electron source

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knápek, Alexandr; Radlička, Tomáš; Krátký, Stanislav

    Brno: Institute of Scientific Instruments AS CR, v. v. i, 2014. s. 62. ISBN 978-80-87441-11-4. [International Conference on Charged Parrticle Optics /9./. 31.08.2014-05.09.2014, Brno] Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : field emission * carbon nanotube s * Monte-Carlo simulation s * finite element method Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  3. Hydrological restoration of Indonesian peatlands to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wösten, H.; Jaenicke, J.; Budiman, A.; Siegert, F.

    2010-01-01

    Delta Session DS 9: The lowland deltas of Indonesia. Hydrological restoration of Indonesian peatlands to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions, Henk Wösten (2010). Presented at the international conference Deltas in Times of Climate Change, 29 September - 1 October, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

  4. 29 CFR 4010.9 - Financial information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Financial information. 4010.9 Section 4010.9 Labor... DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS ANNUAL FINANCIAL AND ACTUARIAL INFORMATION REPORTING § 4010.9 Financial information... with the instructions on PBGC's Web site, http://www.pbgc.gov, the following financial information...

  5. Templateless Infrared Heating Process for Fabricating Carbon Nitride Nanorods with Efficient Photocatalytic H2 Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui-Jun; Qian, Dong-Jin; Chen, Meng

    2015-11-18

    The bottom-up fabrication of carbon nitride nanorods is realized through the direct infrared heating of dicyandiamide. The approach requires no templates or extra organics. The controlled infrared heating has a major influence on the morphology of the obtained carbon nitrides. The precursors assemble into carbon nitride nanorods at low power levels, and they grow into nanoplates at high power levels. The formation mechanism of the carbon nitride nanorods is proposed to be a kinetically driven process, and the photocatalytic activity of the carbon nitride nanorods prepared at 50% power for hydrogen evolution is about 2.9 times that of carbon nitride nanoplates at 100% power. Structural, optical, and electronic analysis demonstrates that the enhancement is primarily attributed to the elimination of structural defects and the improved charge-carrier separation in highly condensed and oriented carbon nitride nanorods. PMID:26501184

  6. STRING v9.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franceschini, A.; Simonovic, M.; Roth, A.;

    2013-01-01

    networks covering >1100 organisms. Here, we describe the update to version 9.1 of STRING, introducing several improvements: (i) we extend the automated mining of scientific texts for interaction information, to now also include full-text articles; (ii) we entirely re-designed the algorithm for transferring...... data is desirable, including lower-quality data and/or computational predictions. The STRING database (http://string-db.org/) aims to provide such a global perspective for as many organisms as feasible. Known and predicted associations are scored and integrated, resulting in comprehensive protein...... interactions from one model organism to the other; and (iii) we provide users with statistical information on any functional enrichment observed in their networks. © The Author(s) 2012....

  7. f. 8, 9

    OpenAIRE

    Fau, Guillaume; Leriche, Françoise; Mauriac Dyer, Nathalie; Wise, Pyra

    2015-01-01

    f. 8 Fac-similé / Transcription diplomatique f. 8 Fac-similé de l’Agenda 1906, BNF, Manuscrits, NAF 28274 Transcription linéarisée place des portes 1contraire du cinématographe 2 en exhalant un gd souffle 4.tuteur de rosier 5peut-on dire bourgeois au temps de St Simon 6.liste d’imposition 7statique 8voiture armoriée d’une couronne fermée 9Aristée. (dans les Géorgiques ?) 10Comme d’un acte de l’état civil ou d’un testament 11Maulevrier 12 Notes critiques 1. place des portes Not......

  8. Conclusiones de la Mesa 9

    OpenAIRE

    Torregrosa Maciá, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    En la Mesa 9 de las XIII Jornadas de Redes de Investigación en Docencia Universitaria, celebradas el 2 y el 3 de julio de 2015 en la Universidad de Alicante, se han presentado ocho comunicaciones realizadas en diferentes campos de la formación académica como ingeniería, ciencias, educación, economía, nutrición, enfermería o psicología. Estos proyectos están centrados, fundamentalmente, en dos de las líneas planteadas para estas jornadas: “Desarrollo, elaboración y/o revisión de metodologías d...

  9. 9th International ISAAC Congress

    CERN Document Server

    Ruzhansky, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This book is a collection of papers from the 9th International ISAAC Congress held in 2013 in Kraków, Poland. The papers are devoted to recent results in mathematics, focused on analysis and a wide range of its applications. These include up-to-date findings of  the following topics: - Differential Equations: Complex and Functional Analytic Methods - Nonlinear PDE - Qualitative Properties of Evolution Models - Differential and Difference Equations - Toeplitz Operators - Wavelet Theory - Topological and Geometrical Methods of Analysis - Queueing Theory and Performance Evaluation of Computer Networks - Clifford and Quaternion Analysis - Fixed Point Theory - M-Frame Constructions - Spaces of Differentiable Functions of Several Real Variables Generalized Functions - Analytic Methods in Complex Geometry - Topological and Geometrical Methods of Analysis - Integral Transforms and Reproducing Kernels - Didactical Approaches to Mathematical Thinking Their wide applications in biomathematics, mechanics, queueing mode...

  10. Climate change increases riverine carbon outgassing while export to the ocean remains uncertain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langerwisch, F.; Walz, A.; Rammig, A.; Tietjen, B.; Thonicke, K.; Cramer, W.

    2015-08-01

    Carbon fluxes in the Amazon Basin are considerably influenced by annual flooding during which terrigenous organic material is imported to the river. This regular interaction affects carbon pools within the riverine system, terrestrial carbon, and carbon exported to the ocean and released to the atmosphere. The processes of generation, conversion, and transport of organic carbon in this coupled terrigenous-riverine system strongly interact and are climate-sensitive, yet their response to climate change is still largely unknown. To quantify climate change effects on carbon pools and on carbon fluxes within the river and to the ocean and the atmosphere, we developed the riverine carbon model RivCM, which is directly coupled to the well-established dynamic vegetation and hydrology model LPJmL. We show here that RivCM successfully reproduces observed values in exported carbon and riverine carbon concentration. We evaluate future changes in riverine carbon by applying RivCM for climate forcing from five climate models and three CO2 emission scenarios (SRES). We find that climate change causes a doubling of riverine organic carbon in the Southern and Western basin while reducing it by 20 % in the eastern and northern parts. In contrast, the amount of riverine inorganic carbon shows a 2- to 3-fold increase in the entire basin, independent of the SRES scenario. The export of carbon to the atmosphere increases as well with an average of about 30 %. In contrast, changes in future export of organic carbon to the Atlantic Ocean depend on the SRES scenario and are projected to either decrease by about 8.9 % (SRES A1B) or increase by about 9.1 % (SRES A2). Such changes in the terrigenous-riverine system could have local and regional impacts on the carbon budget of the whole Amazon Basin and parts of the Atlantic Ocean. Changes in the riverine carbon could lead to a shift in the riverine nutrient supply and pH, while changes in the exported carbon to the ocean leads to changes in

  11. Climate change increases riverine carbon outgassing while export to the ocean remains uncertain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Langerwisch

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fluxes in the Amazon Basin are considerably influenced by annual flooding during which terrigenous organic material is imported to the river. This regular interaction affects carbon pools within the riverine system, terrestrial carbon, and carbon exported to the ocean and released to the atmosphere. The processes of generation, conversion, and transport of organic carbon in this coupled terrigenous–riverine system strongly interact and are climate-sensitive, yet their response to climate change is still largely unknown. To quantify climate change effects on carbon pools and on carbon fluxes within the river and to the ocean and the atmosphere, we developed the riverine carbon model RivCM, which is directly coupled to the well-established dynamic vegetation and hydrology model LPJmL. We show here that RivCM successfully reproduces observed values in exported carbon and riverine carbon concentration. We evaluate future changes in riverine carbon by applying RivCM for climate forcing from five climate models and three CO2 emission scenarios (SRES. We find that climate change causes a doubling of riverine organic carbon in the Southern and Western basin while reducing it by 20 % in the eastern and northern parts. In contrast, the amount of riverine inorganic carbon shows a 2- to 3-fold increase in the entire basin, independent of the SRES scenario. The export of carbon to the atmosphere increases as well with an average of about 30 %. In contrast, changes in future export of organic carbon to the Atlantic Ocean depend on the SRES scenario and are projected to either decrease by about 8.9 % (SRES A1B or increase by about 9.1 % (SRES A2. Such changes in the terrigenous–riverine system could have local and regional impacts on the carbon budget of the whole Amazon Basin and parts of the Atlantic Ocean. Changes in the riverine carbon could lead to a shift in the riverine nutrient supply and pH, while changes in the exported carbon to the ocean

  12. The Carbon Trading Game

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In response to the Kyoto Protocol, an international market for carbon dioxide tradable permits is likely to be created. Two of the key issues involved are explaining the concepts of tradable permits to industrialists, policy-makers and the man on the street, and anticipating how the market will evolve. A simple game of the market for carbon dioxide tradable permits has been developed and used that can help deal with both issues. As a pedagogical tool, this game benefits from simplicity (just a few pieces of paper are needed) and enables students to grasp the concepts and remember them through the intensity and fun of a trading 'pit'. The experiences also provide substantial insights into the evolution of the carbon dioxide permit market, particularly related to the evolution of trade volume, permit prices and country strategies

  13. Pyrolyzed carbon film diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Kirstin C; Tokuhisa, Hideo; Baker, Lane A

    2013-11-13

    We have previously reported pyrolyzed parylene C (PPC) as a conductive carbon electrode material for use with micropipets, atomic force microscopy probes, and planar electrodes. Advantages of carbon electrode fabrication from PPC include conformal coating of high-aspect ratio micro/nanoscale features and the benefits afforded by chemical vapor deposition of carbon polymers. In this work, we demonstrate chemical surface doping of PPC through the use of previously reported methods. Chemically treated PPC films are characterized by multiple spectroscopic and electronic measurements. Pyrolyzed parylene C and doped PPC are used to construct diodes that are examined as both p-n heterojunction and Schottky barrier diodes. Half-wave rectification is achieved with PPC diodes and demonstrates the applicability of PPC as a conductive and semiconductive material in device fabrication. PMID:24090451

  14. Carbon Ion Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Hansen, David Christoffer; Herrmann, Rochus;

    On the importance of choice of target size for selective boosting of hypoxic tumor subvolumina in carbon ion therapy Purpose: Functional imaging methods in radiotherapy are maturing and can to some extent uncover radio resistant structures found within a tumour entity. Selective boost of identified...... to the surface where the beam enters) are examined. For each plan the minimum,  maximum and the dose averaged LET of the PTV is calculated. The numbers are translated to OER using several sets of data found in literature for various cell lines. Results: We find a strong dependence of the dose average LET and OER...... effect. All cell lines investigated here did not reach an OER of 1, even for the smaller structures, which may indicate that the achievable dose average LET of carbon ions is too low, and heavier ions than carbon may be considered for functional LET-painting....

  15. Carbon Nanotubes for Supercapacitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jianyi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage.

  16. 49 CFR 9.9 - Legal proceedings between private litigants: General rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Legal proceedings between private litigants: General rules. 9.9 Section 9.9 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TESTIMONY OF EMPLOYEES OF THE DEPARTMENT AND PRODUCTION OF RECORDS IN LEGAL PROCEEDINGS § 9.9 Legal proceedings...

  17. Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, November 9, 1991--November 9, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE Order 5400.1, ''General Environmental Protection Program,'' established environmental protection program requirements, authorities, and responsibilities to assure that the Department of Energy (DOE) operations are in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental protection laws and regulations, executive orders, and internal department policies. Chapter 3 of DOE Order 5400.1 required that each field organization prepare a plan for implementing the requirements of this order by no later than November 9, 1989, and update the plan annually. Therefore, the Department of Energy/Field Office, Nevada (DOE/NV) has prepared this second annual update of its Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP). The Order and corresponding guidances also require estimated budgetary resources necessary for implementation of the Order be identified in the Environmental Protection Implementation Plan. To satisfy this requirement, the estimated costs to effectuate necessary changes in existing programs or processes and to institute new programs or processes for compliance with the Order are provided in the following sections of this plan. The DOE/NV Assistant Manager for Operations (AMO), in consultation with other organizations responsible for line management of plan implementation, is responsible for annual plan revisions. 7 figs

  18. NANOTR9: 9th Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The conference series NanoTR is the major conference on nanoscience and nanotechnology in Turkey. It brings together leading scientists and engineers in nanotechnology to exchange information on their latest research progress. An exhibition of the companies working in the related field is also organized as a part of the event. With intensive international participation, NanoTR conference series has spread outside the national border and has become an international event in this field. Among international contributions, a wide interest from the countries around Turkey should be emphasized. 9th in the series was organized by Atatürk University in Erzurum-Turkey on June 24-28, 2013 with more than 900 scientists, researchers, private sector representatives from around the world. Conference program included 6 plenary speakers, 35 invited speakers (18 of them were from outside the country), 116 oral presentations, and 340 poster presentations. In addition to 6 plenary sessions, 17 oral and 4 poster sessions created very lively discussion forums covering a vast range of current and emerging sciences from nano-materials, nanoscience, nanofabrication, nano-engineering, nano-electronics, nano-biotechnology, to ethical and social issues of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Also, panel discussions about industrial applications, tutorial sessions have been organized for students, new-comers and company employees.

  19. Quantitative Estimation of the Climatic Effects of Carbon Transferred by International Trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ting; Dong, Wenjie; Moore, John; Yan, Qing; Song, Yi; Yang, Zhiyong; Yuan, Wenping; Chou, Jieming; Cui, Xuefeng; Yan, Xiaodong; Wei, Zhigang; Guo, Yan; Yang, Shili; Tian, Di; Lin, Pengfei; Yang, Song; Wen, Zhiping; Lin, Hui; Chen, Min; Feng, Guolin; Jiang, Yundi; Zhu, Xian; Chen, Juan; Wei, Xin; Shi, Wen; Zhang, Zhiguo; Dong, Juan; Li, Yexin; Chen, Deliang

    2016-01-01

    Carbon transfer via international trade affects the spatial pattern of global carbon emissions by redistributing emissions related to production of goods and services. It has potential impacts on attribution of the responsibility of various countries for climate change and formulation of carbon-reduction policies. However, the effect of carbon transfer on climate change has not been quantified. Here, we present a quantitative estimate of climatic impacts of carbon transfer based on a simple CO2 Impulse Response Function and three Earth System Models. The results suggest that carbon transfer leads to a migration of CO2 by 0.1-3.9 ppm or 3-9% of the rise in the global atmospheric concentrations from developed countries to developing countries during 1990-2005 and potentially reduces the effectiveness of the Kyoto Protocol by up to 5.3%. However, the induced atmospheric CO2 concentration and climate changes (e.g., in temperature, ocean heat content, and sea-ice) are very small and lie within observed interannual variability. Given continuous growth of transferred carbon emissions and their proportion in global total carbon emissions, the climatic effect of traded carbon is likely to become more significant in the future, highlighting the need to consider carbon transfer in future climate negotiations. PMID:27329411

  20. Quantitative Estimation of the Climatic Effects of Carbon Transferred by International Trade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ting; Dong, Wenjie; Moore, John; Yan, Qing; Song, Yi; Yang, Zhiyong; Yuan, Wenping; Chou, Jieming; Cui, Xuefeng; Yan, Xiaodong; Wei, Zhigang; Guo, Yan; Yang, Shili; Tian, Di; Lin, Pengfei; Yang, Song; Wen, Zhiping; Lin, Hui; Chen, Min; Feng, Guolin; Jiang, Yundi; Zhu, Xian; Chen, Juan; Wei, Xin; Shi, Wen; Zhang, Zhiguo; Dong, Juan; Li, Yexin; Chen, Deliang

    2016-06-01

    Carbon transfer via international trade affects the spatial pattern of global carbon emissions by redistributing emissions related to production of goods and services. It has potential impacts on attribution of the responsibility of various countries for climate change and formulation of carbon-reduction policies. However, the effect of carbon transfer on climate change has not been quantified. Here, we present a quantitative estimate of climatic impacts of carbon transfer based on a simple CO2 Impulse Response Function and three Earth System Models. The results suggest that carbon transfer leads to a migration of CO2 by 0.1–3.9 ppm or 3–9% of the rise in the global atmospheric concentrations from developed countries to developing countries during 1990–2005 and potentially reduces the effectiveness of the Kyoto Protocol by up to 5.3%. However, the induced atmospheric CO2 concentration and climate changes (e.g., in temperature, ocean heat content, and sea-ice) are very small and lie within observed interannual variability. Given continuous growth of transferred carbon emissions and their proportion in global total carbon emissions, the climatic effect of traded carbon is likely to become more significant in the future, highlighting the need to consider carbon transfer in future climate negotiations.

  1. Quantitative Estimation of the Climatic Effects of Carbon Transferred by International Trade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ting; Dong, Wenjie; Moore, John; Yan, Qing; Song, Yi; Yang, Zhiyong; Yuan, Wenping; Chou, Jieming; Cui, Xuefeng; Yan, Xiaodong; Wei, Zhigang; Guo, Yan; Yang, Shili; Tian, Di; Lin, Pengfei; Yang, Song; Wen, Zhiping; Lin, Hui; Chen, Min; Feng, Guolin; Jiang, Yundi; Zhu, Xian; Chen, Juan; Wei, Xin; Shi, Wen; Zhang, Zhiguo; Dong, Juan; Li, Yexin; Chen, Deliang

    2016-01-01

    Carbon transfer via international trade affects the spatial pattern of global carbon emissions by redistributing emissions related to production of goods and services. It has potential impacts on attribution of the responsibility of various countries for climate change and formulation of carbon-reduction policies. However, the effect of carbon transfer on climate change has not been quantified. Here, we present a quantitative estimate of climatic impacts of carbon transfer based on a simple CO2 Impulse Response Function and three Earth System Models. The results suggest that carbon transfer leads to a migration of CO2 by 0.1–3.9 ppm or 3–9% of the rise in the global atmospheric concentrations from developed countries to developing countries during 1990–2005 and potentially reduces the effectiveness of the Kyoto Protocol by up to 5.3%. However, the induced atmospheric CO2 concentration and climate changes (e.g., in temperature, ocean heat content, and sea-ice) are very small and lie within observed interannual variability. Given continuous growth of transferred carbon emissions and their proportion in global total carbon emissions, the climatic effect of traded carbon is likely to become more significant in the future, highlighting the need to consider carbon transfer in future climate negotiations. PMID:27329411

  2. Horizontal carbon nanotube alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Matthew T; Cientanni, Vito; Milne, William I

    2016-09-21

    The production of horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes offers a rapid means of realizing a myriad of self-assembled near-atom-scale technologies - from novel photonic crystals to nanoscale transistors. The ability to reproducibly align anisotropic nanostructures has huge technological value. Here we review the present state-of-the-art in horizontal carbon nanotube alignment. For both in and ex situ approaches, we quantitatively assess the reported linear packing densities alongside the degree of alignment possible for each of these core methodologies. PMID:27546174

  3. Carbon Nanotube Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Klinger, Colin; Patel, Yogeshwari; Postma, Henk W. Ch.

    2012-01-01

    We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabr...

  4. Deposition of carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Norway, there is currently a debate about whether or not to build gas power stations. To meet the possibility of reduced emission quotas for carbon dioxide in the future, current interest focuses on the incorporation of large-scale separation and deposition of carbon dioxide when such plants are planned. A group of experts concludes that this technology will become self-financing by means of environmental taxes. From the environmental point of view, taxes upon production are to be preferred over taxes on consumption

  5. Nanotube composite carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, R.; Jacques, D.; Rao, A. M.; Rantell, T.; Derbyshire, F.; Chen, Y.; Chen, J.; Haddon, R. C.

    1999-08-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were dispersed in isotropic petroleum pitch matrices to form nanotube composite carbon fibers with enhanced mechanical and electrical properties. We find that the tensile strength, modulus, and electrical conductivity of a pitch composite fiber with 5 wt % loading of purified SWNTs are enhanced by ˜90%, ˜150%, and 340% respectively, as compared to the corresponding values in unmodified isotropic pitch fibers. These results serve to highlight the potential that exits for developing a spectrum of material properties through the selection of the matrix, nanotube dispersion, alignment, and interfacial bonding.

  6. Pitch carbon microsphere composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, H. L.; Nelson, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    Petroleum pitch carbon microspheres were prepared by flash heating emulsified pitch and carbonizing the resulting microspheres in an inert atmosphere. Microsphere composites were obtained from a mixture of microspheres and tetraester precursor pyrrone powder. Scanning electron micrographs of the composite showed that it was an aggregate of microspheres bonded together by the pyrrone at the sphere contact points, with voids in and among the microspheres. Physical, thermal, and sorption properties of the composite are described. Composite applications could include use as a honeycomb filler in elevated-temperature load-bearing sandwich boards or in patient-treatment tables for radiation treatment of tumors.

  7. Carbon cycle makeover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canfield, Donald Eugene; Kump, Lee R.

    2013-01-01

    remaining in sediments after respiration leave a residual of oxygen in the atmosphere. The source of oxygen to the atmosphere represented by organic matter burial is balanced by oxygen sinks associated with rock weathering and chemical reaction with volcanic gases. This is the long-term carbon and oxygen...... geochemical cycle. But Earth is an old planet, and oxygen levels have changed through time (2). On page 540 of this issue, Schrag et al. (3) challenge the most commonly used geochemical approach to assess long-term changes in the coupled oxygen and carbon cycles....

  8. Atomic and electronic structure of divacancies in carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berber, Savas; Oshiyama, Atsushi

    2008-04-01

    We present atomic and electronic structure of divacancies in carbon nanotubes, which is calculated using the density functional theory. Divacancies in carbon nanotubes self-heal by spontaneous reconstructions, which consist of concerted bond formations. Divacancy formation energies EDV , which strongly depend on the divacancy orientation with respect to the tube axis, are in the range of 2.8 4.3 eV for favorable orientations in the nanotubes of 4 9Å diameter, making divacancies more probable than monovacancies in carbon nanotubes. Defect related states lead to a higher density of states around the Fermi level. Semiconducting nanotubes develop midgap levels that may adversely affect the functionality of carbon nanotube based devices. Our spin polarized density functional calculations show that the exchange splitting of defect-related bands in nonsemiconducting defective nanotubes leads to net spin polarizations of ρ↑-ρ↓≤0.5μB per divacancy for some divacancy orientations.

  9. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrobalance studies of calcination and carbonation of sodium bicarbonate materials were conducted at Louisiana State University. Calcination in an inert atmosphere was rapid and complete at 120 C. Carbonation was temperature dependent, and both the initial rate and the extent of reaction were found to decrease as temperature was increased between 60 and 80 C. A fluidization test apparatus was constructed at RTI and two sodium bicarbonate materials were fluidized in dry nitrogen at 22 C. The bed was completely fluidized at between 9 and 11 in. of water pressure drop. Kinetic rate expression derivations and thermodynamic calculations were conducted at RTI. Based on literature data, a simple reaction rate expression, which is zero order in carbon dioxide and water, was found to provide the best fit against reciprocal temperature. Simulations based on process thermodynamics suggested that approximately 26 percent of the carbon dioxide in flue gas could be recovered using waste heat available at 240 C

  10. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Carbon Nanotubes in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, J. H.; Jaffe, R.; Halicioglu, T.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2000-01-01

    We study the hydrophobic/hydrophilic behavior of carbon nanotubes using molecular dynamics simulations. The energetics of the carbon-water interface are mainly dispersive but in the present study augmented with a carbon quadrupole term acting on the charge sites of the water. The simulations indicate that this contribution is negligible in terms of modifying the structural properties of water at the interface. Simulations of two carbon nanotubes in water display a wetting and drying of the interface between the nanotubes depending on their initial spacing. Thus, initial tube spacings of 7 and 8 A resulted in a drying of the interface whereas spacing of > 9 A remain wet during the course of the simulation. Finally, we present a novel particle-particle-particle-mesh algorithm for long range potentials which allows for general (curvilinear) meshes and "black-box" fast solvers by adopting an influence matrix technique.

  11. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; Alejandro Lopez-Ortiz; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

    2001-05-01

    Electrobalance studies of calcination and carbonation of sodium bicarbonate materials were conducted at Louisiana State University. Calcination in an inert atmosphere was rapid and complete at 120 C. Carbonation was temperature dependent, and both the initial rate and the extent of reaction were found to decrease as temperature was increased between 60 and 80 C. A fluidization test apparatus was constructed at RTI and two sodium bicarbonate materials were fluidized in dry nitrogen at 22 C. The bed was completely fluidized at between 9 and 11 in. of water pressure drop. Kinetic rate expression derivations and thermodynamic calculations were conducted at RTI. Based on literature data, a simple reaction rate expression, which is zero order in carbon dioxide and water, was found to provide the best fit against reciprocal temperature. Simulations based on process thermodynamics suggested that approximately 26 percent of the carbon dioxide in flue gas could be recovered using waste heat available at 240 C.

  12. The response of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and the ecosystem carbon balance to experimental drought in a temperate shrubland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sowerby, A.; Emmett, B.A.; Williams, D.; Beier, Claus; Evans, C.D.

    2010-01-01

    drainage of water from the drought-treated soils resulted in an overall decrease of 9% in total DOC export. Calculating the carbon (C) balance for the below-ground component of the ecosystem reveals that DOC represents 3% of gross C export. Previous studies at the site have demonstrated large increases in...

  13. [Carbon emissions and low-carbon regulation countermeasures of land use change in the city and town concentrated area of central Liaoning Province, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Feng-ming; Liang, Wen-juan; Niu, Ming-fen; Wang, Jiao-yue

    2016-02-01

    Carbon emissions due to land use change have an important impact on global climate change. Adjustment of regional land use patterns has a great scientific significance to adaptation to a changing climate. Based on carbon emission/absorption parameters suitable for Liaoning Province, this paper estimated the carbon emission of land use change in the city and town concentrated area of central Liaoning Province. The results showed that the carbon emission and absorption were separately 308.51 Tg C and 11.64 Tg C from 1997 to 2010. It meant 3.8% of carbon emission. was offset by carbon absorption. Among the 296.87 Tg C net carbon emission of land use change, carbon emission of remaining land use type was 182.24 Tg C, accounting for 61.4% of the net carbon emission, while the carbon emission of land use transformation was 114.63 Tg C, occupying the rest 38.6% of net carbon emission. Through quantifying the mapping relationship between land use change and carbon emission, it was shown that during 1997-2004 the contributions of remaining construction land (40.9%) and cropland transform ation to construction land (40.6%) to carbon emission were larger, but the greater contributions to carbon absorption came from cropland transformation to forest land (38.6%) and remaining forest land (37.5%). During 2004-2010, the land use types for carbon emission and absorption were the same to the period of 1997-2004, but the contribution of remaining construction land to carbon emission increased to 80.6%, and the contribution of remaining forest land to carbon absorption increased to 71.7%. Based on the carbon emission intensity in different land use types, we put forward the low-carbon regulation countermeasures of land use in two aspects. In carbon emission reduction, we should strict control land transformation to construction land, increase the energy efficiency of construction land, and avoid excessive development of forest land and water. In carbon sink increase, we should

  14. CarbonSat Constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Tobehn, Carsten; Ernst, Robert; Bovensmann, Heinrich; Buchwitz, Michael; Burrows, John P.; Notholt, John

    1 Carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) are the most important manmade greenhouse gases (GHGs) which are driving global climate change. Currently, the CO2 measurements from the ground observing network are still the main sources of information but due to the limited number of measurement stations the coverage is limited. In addition, CO2 monitoring and trading is often based mainly on bottom-up calculations and an independent top down verification is limited due to the lack of global measurement data with local resolution. The first CO2 and CH4 mapping from SCIAMACHY on ENVISAT shows that satellites add important missing global information. Current GHG measurement satellites (GOSAT)are limited either in spatial or temporal resolution and coverage. These systems have to collect data over a year or even longer to produce global regional fluxes products. Conse-quently global, timely, higher spatial resolution and high accuracy measurement are required for: 1. A good understanding of the CO2 and CH4 sources and sinks for reliable climate predic-tion; and 2. Independent and transparent verification of accountable sources and sinks in supporting Kyoto and upcoming protocols The CarbonSat constellation idea comes out the trade off of resolution and swath width during CarbonSat mission definition studies. In response to the urgent need to support the Kyoto and upcoming protocols, a feasibility study has been carried out. The proposed solution is a constellation of five CarbonSat satellites in 614km LTAN 13:00, which is able to provide global, daily CO2 and CH4 measurement everywhere on the Earth with high spatial resolution 2 × 2 km and low uncertainty lt;2ppm (CO2) and lt;8ppb (CH4). The unique global daily measurement capability significantly increases the number of cloud free measurements, which enables more reliable services associated with reduced uncertainty, e.g. to 0.15ppm (CO2) per month in 10km and even more timely products. The CarbonSat Constellation in

  15. Kinetics of Aqueous Leaching and Carbonization of Steelmaking Slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekakh, S. N.; Rawlins, C. H.; Robertson, D. G. C.; Richards, V. L.; Peaslee, K. D.

    2008-02-01

    Sequestration of carbon dioxide by steelmaking slag was studied in an atmospheric three-phase system containing industrial slag particles, water, and CO2 gas. Batch-type reactors were used to measure the rate of aqueous alkaline leaching and slag particle carbonization independently. Four sizes of slag particles were tested for the Ca leaching rate in deionized water at a constant 7.5 pH in an argon atmosphere and for carbonate conversion with CO2 bubbled through an aqueous suspension. Conversion data (fraction of Ca leached or converted to carbonate) were evaluated to determine the rate-limiting step based on the shrinking core model. For Ca leaching, the chemical reaction is the controlling mechanism during the initial period of time, which then switches to diffusion through the developed porous layer as the rate-limiting step. Carbonate conversion proceeded much slower than leaching conversion and was found to be limited by diffusion through the product calcium carbonate layer. The calculated value of diffusivity was found to be 5 × 10-9 cm2/s, which decreased by an order of magnitude with increasing carbonization conversion as a result of changing density of the product layer. The experimental data fit the shrinking core model well after correction for the particle specific surface area.

  16. Method for production of carbon nanofiber mat or carbon paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naskar, Amit K.

    2015-08-04

    Method for the preparation of a non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fibers, the method comprising carbonizing a non-woven mat or paper preform (precursor) comprised of a plurality of bonded sulfonated polyolefin fibers to produce said non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fibers. The preforms and resulting non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fiber, as well as articles and devices containing them, and methods for their use, are also described.

  17. Hybrid Composites Based on Carbon Fiber/Carbon Nanofilament Reinforcement

    OpenAIRE

    Mehran Tehrani; Ayoub Yari Boroujeni; Claudia Luhrs; Jonathan Phillips; Al-Haik, Marwan S.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanofilament and nanotubes (CNTs) have shown promise for enhancing the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced composites (FRPs) and imparting multi-functionalities to them. While direct mixing of carbon nanofilaments with the polymer matrix in FRPs has several drawbacks, a high volume of uniform nanofilaments can be directly grown on fiber surfaces prior to composite fabrication. This study demonstrates the ability to create carbon nanofilaments on the surface of carbon fibers emplo...

  18. Carbon black vs. black carbon and other airborne materials containing elemental carbon: Physical and chemical distinctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airborne particles containing elemental carbon (EC) are currently at the forefront of scientific and regulatory scrutiny, including black carbon, carbon black, and engineered carbon-based nanomaterials, e.g., carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, and graphene. Scientists and regulators sometimes group these EC-containing particles together, for example, interchangeably using the terms carbon black and black carbon despite one being a manufactured product with well-controlled properties and the other being an undesired, incomplete-combustion byproduct with diverse properties. In this critical review, we synthesize information on the contrasting properties of EC-containing particles in order to highlight significant differences that can affect hazard potential. We demonstrate why carbon black should not be considered a model particle representative of either combustion soots or engineered carbon-based nanomaterials. Overall, scientific studies need to distinguish these highly different EC-containing particles with care and precision so as to forestall unwarranted extrapolation of properties, hazard potential, and study conclusions from one material to another. -- Highlights: •Major classes of elemental carbon-containing particles have distinct properties. •Despite similar names, carbon black should not be confused with black carbon. •Carbon black is distinguished by a high EC content and well-controlled properties. •Black carbon particles are characterized by their heterogenous properties. •Carbon black is not a model particle representative of engineered nanomaterials. -- This review demonstrates the significant physical and chemical distinctions between elemental carbon-containing particles e.g., carbon black, black carbon, and engineered nanomaterials

  19. Soil carbon dynamics inferred from carbon isotope compositions of soil organic matter and soil respiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To better understand 14C cycling in terrestrial ecosystems, 14C abundances were evaluated for fractionated soil organic matter (SOM) and soil respiration in an urban forest. In 2001 soil profile, Δ 14C values of litter and bulk SOM increased rapidly from litter surface (62.7 per mille) to uppermost mineral soil layer (244.9 per mille), and then decreased sharply to 6 cm depth of mineral soil (125.0 per mille). Carbon enriched in 14C by atmospheric nuclear weapons testing had penetrated to at least 16 cm depth of mineral soil. The average Δ 14C in atmospheric CO2 was 58.8 per mille in August 2001, suggesting recent carbon input to the topmost litter layer. Although a similar depth distribution was observed for Δ 14C values of residual SOM after acid hydrolysis, the Δ 14C values were slightly lower than those in bulk SOM. This indicates input of 'bomb' C into this organic fraction and higher 14C abundance in acid-soluble SOM. The most of CO2 may be derived from the microbial decomposition of the acid-soluble, or labile, SOM. Therefore, the labile SOM may become most influential pool for soil carbon cycling. In contrast, carbon in base-insoluble SOM remained considerably low in 14C abundance at all depths, suggesting no or little incorporation of 'bomb' C to this fraction. Values of Δ 14C in soil respiration ranged from 91.9 to 146.4 per mille in August 2001, showing a significant contribution from decomposition of SOM fixed over past 2-40 years. These results indicate that the use of bulk SOM as a representative of soil carbon pool would lead to severe misunderstand of the soil C dynamics on decadal and shorter time scales. (author)

  20. Influence of carbon source on the stable carbon isotopic composition of the seagrass Thalassia testudinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of isotopically distinct organic carbon sources in sediments and CO2 enrichment on the stable carbon isotope composition of Thalassia testudinum (turtle grass) seedlings were investigated. Seedling leaves became increasingly 13C depleted in all treatments with time. In the CO2 enriched treatment, δ13C values for seedlings declined from -9.1 to -57.1 per mille over the nine month culture period; the latter value is the lightest stable carbon isotope composition ever reported for a higher plant. In all non-CO2-enriched treatments, δ13C values declined from -9.1 per mille at T=0 to between -18.3 and -22.2 per mille after nine months. The lack of treatment effect in the non-CO2-enriched cultures was probably due to the release and exchange of isotopically light CO2 from the CO2 enriched treatment within the relatively closed environment of the culture room. This exchange was reflected in media dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) δ13C values that indicated increasing 13C depletion relative to the initial compositions of the synthetic seawater salts. Depletion of 13C in leaf tissue of seedlings in the non-CO2-enriched treatments occurred faster than did media DIC 13C depletion, suggesting an increase in isotopic fractionation as seedlings grew. The reasons for this increasing fractionation are unclear, but they may reflect a decreasing contribution of isotopically heavy seed research and/or increasing availability of exogenous carbon. 18 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs

  1. Arabidopsis ECERIFERUM9 involvement in cuticle formation and maintenance of plant water status

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Shiyou

    2012-05-25

    Mutation of the ECERIFERUM9 (CER9) gene in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) causes elevated amounts of 18-carbon-length cutin monomers and a dramatic shift in the cuticular wax profile (especially on leaves) toward the very-long-chain free fatty acids tetracosanoic acid (C24) and hexacosanoic acid (C26). Relative to the wild type, cer9 mutants exhibit elevated cuticle membrane thickness over epidermal cells and cuticular ledges with increased occlusion of the stomatal pore. The cuticular phenotypes of cer9 are associated with delayed onset of wilting in plants experiencing water deficit, lower transpiration rates, and improved water use efficiency measured as carbon isotope discrimination. The CER9 protein thus encodes a novel determinant of plant drought tolerance-associated traits, one whose deficiency elevates cutin synthesis, redistributes wax composition, and suppresses transpiration. Map-based cloning identified CER9, and sequence analysis predicted that it encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase homologous to yeast Doa10 (previously shown to target endoplasmic reticulum proteins for proteasomal degradation). To further elucidate CER9 function, the impact of CER9 deficiency on interactions with other genes was examined using double mutant and transcriptome analyses. For both wax and cutin, cer9 showed mostly additive effects with cer6, long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase1 (lacs1), and lacs2 and revealed its role in early steps of both wax and cutin synthetic pathways. Transcriptome analysis revealed that the cer9 mutation affected diverse cellular processes, with primary impact on genes associated with diverse stress responses. The discovery of CER9 lays new groundwork for developing novel cuticle-based strategies for improving the drought tolerance and water use efficiency of crop plants. © 2012 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Carbon diffusion in carbon-supersaturated ferrite and austenite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermák, Jiří; Král, Lubomír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 586, FEB (2014), s. 129-135. ISSN 0925-8388 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0148; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : carbon diffusion * Carbon supersaturation * Carbon supersaturation * Ferrite * Austenite Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 2.999, year: 2014

  3. 9%Cr heat resistant steels: Alloy design, microstructure evolution and creep response at 650 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → 9Cr alloys with varying Ti and C contents were designed, produced and crept at 650 deg. C. → Sub-grain and precipitate distribution and evolution investigated by STEM-HAADF. → Correlations between microstructure evolution and mechanical properties were studied. → Coarsening of sub-grain size was larger for Ti-containing 9Cr alloys. → 9Cr alloy with low C and no Ti showed the highest creep strength of all studied alloys. - Abstract: In this work 9%Cr alloys were designed supported by computational thermodynamic methods. Two sets of alloys were produced: 9%Cr alloys with 0.1%C and 0.05%C and 9%Cr alloys containing ∼0.03% Ti with 0.1%C and 0.05%C (always wt%). Microstructure investigations showed good agreement with the predicted phases of the thermodynamic modeling. The volume fraction of precipitated M23C6 carbides is directly related to the carbon content of the alloys. For Ti-containing alloys the precipitation of nano-sized Ti-rich MX carbonitrides was observed. The microstructure evolution (sub-grain and particle size) during creep at 650 deg. C/100 MPa was investigated by STEM-HAADF. The sub-grain size evolution and the coarsening of precipitates (MX carbonitrides, M23C6 and Laves phase) were more pronounced for Ti-containing alloys. 9Cr alloys without Ti and with low carbon content presented the highest creep strength of all investigated alloys.

  4. Formation of methane-related authigenic carbonates in a highly dynamic biogeochemical system in the Krishna–Godavari Basin, Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kocherla, M.; Teichert, B.M.A.; Pillai, S.; Satyanarayan, M.; Ramamurty, P.B.; Patil, D.J.; Rao, A.N.

    composition. The stable carbon isotopic composition of 46 out of 88 measured carbonate samples are around -50‰ which allows the differentiation into methane-related carbonates (HMC), especially at Sites 8 and 15, but also in low abundance at Sites 1, 5, 9...

  5. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2013-04-09

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  6. Carbon dioxide laser guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupa Shankar D

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The carbon dioxide (CO 2 laser is a versatile tool that has applications in ablative lasing and caters to the needs of routine dermatological practice as well as the aesthetic, cosmetic and rejuvenation segments. This article details the basics of the laser physics as applicable to the CO 2 laser and offers guidelines for use in many of the above indications.

  7. Kinetics of resite carbonization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolář, František; Svítilová, Jaroslava

    11(120) (2001), s. 97-103. ISSN 1211-1929 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/00/1140 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3046908 Keywords : carbonization * combustion Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  8. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Flickr SlideShare All Pages & Documents Recalls & News Releases Home Recalls CPSC Recall API Recall Lawsuits Recalls by ... CO Poster Contest Toy Recall Statistics Pool Safely Home / Safety Education / Safety Education Centers En Español Carbon ...

  9. Mass carbon monoxide poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    McGuffie, C; Wyatt, J.; Kerr, G; Hislop, W

    2000-01-01

    The largest occurrence of carbon monoxide poisoning in Britain demonstrates the potential for mass accidental poisoning. It emphasises the need for strict public health controls and the importance of good liaison between emergency services to ensure that such events are quickly recognised and that the necessary resources are organised.

  10. Carbon monoxide poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of acute carbon monoxide poisoning with 1-year computed tomographic follow-up is presented. The typical initial bilateral symmetrical low-density areas in the basal ganglia were found to have decreased markedly in size in the latter scan. These appearances coincided with the initial early oedematous phase of infarction ending in the late permanent necrotic stage

  11. Carbon nanotube solar cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Klinger

    Full Text Available We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabricate using a spray-paint technique. We observe that cells with a lower concentration of carbon nanotubes on the active semiconducting electrode perform better than cells with a higher concentration of nanotubes. This effect is contrary to the expectation that a larger number of nanotubes would lead to more photoconversion and therefore more power generation. We attribute this to the presence of metallic nanotubes that provide a short for photo-excited electrons, bypassing the load. We demonstrate optimization strategies that improve cell efficiency by orders of magnitude. Once it is possible to make semiconducting-only carbon nanotube films, that may provide the greatest efficiency improvement.

  12. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Wray, Alisa

    2016-01-01

    Audience: This oral boards case is appropriate for all emergency medicine learners (residents, interns, and medical students). Introduction: Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless and odorless gas that typically results from combustion. It binds hemoglobin, dissociating oxygen, causing headache, weakness, confusion and possible seizure or coma. Pulse oxygen levels may be falsely elevated. Practitioners should maintain a high in...

  13. Conducting carbonized polyaniline nanotubes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mentus, S.; Ciric-Marjanovic, G.; Trchová, Miroslava; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 24 (2009), 245601/1-245601/10. ISSN 0957-4484 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0686; GA AV ČR IAA400500905 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : conducting polymers * polyaniline * carbonization Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.137, year: 2009

  14. City Carbon Footprint Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangwu Chen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Progressive cities worldwide have demonstrated political leadership by initiating meaningful strategies and actions to tackle climate change. However, the lack of knowledge concerning embodied greenhouse gas (GHG emissions of cities has hampered effective mitigation. We analyse trans-boundary GHG emission transfers between five Australian cities and their trading partners, with embodied emission flows broken down into major economic sectors. We examine intercity carbon footprint (CF networks and disclose a hierarchy of responsibility for emissions between cities and regions. Allocations of emissions to households, businesses and government and the carbon efficiency of expenditure have been analysed to inform mitigation policies. Our findings indicate that final demand in the five largest cities in Australia accounts for more than half of the nation’s CF. City households are responsible for about two thirds of the cities’ CFs; the rest can be attributed to government and business consumption and investment. The city network flows highlight that over half of emissions embodied in imports (EEI to the five cities occur overseas. However, a hierarchy of GHG emissions reveals that overseas regions also outsource emissions to Australian cities such as Perth. We finally discuss the implications of our findings on carbon neutrality, low-carbon city concepts and strategies and allocation of subnational GHG responsibility.

  15. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Memos Regarding Some of the Hazards Associated with Engine-Driven Generators, 2004-2014 January 07, 2016 Non- ... Investigations Associated with Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide from Engine-Driven Generators and Other Engine-Driven Tools, 2004– ...

  16. Global carbon footprint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The designated culprit of global warming, carbon dioxide (CO2), is primarily given off by the burning of fossil fuels. Whether by a specific technology, a sector, an economy or from one country to another, the quantities emitted are not the same. But the necessity of lowering these emissions is nonetheless urgent for all

  17. Skallerup Klit's carbon footprint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zacho, Kristina Overgaard; Ørnstrup, Niels Holm; Zimmermann, Tine Marquard;

    offsetting and without making actual emission reductions. Therefore the purpose of this study is to present recommendations on how Skallerup Klit can build up their business strategy using Carbon Footprint (CFP) as a tool. The CPF is calculated and assessed by using financial data in an Input-output LCA. For...

  18. Carbon nanotube macroelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jialu

    In this dissertation, I discuss the application of carbon nanotubes in macroelectronis. Due to the extraordinary electrical properties such as high intrinsic carrier mobility and current-carrying capacity, single wall carbon nanotubes are very desirable for thin-film transistor (TFT) applications such as flat panel display, transparent electronics, as well as flexible and stretchable electronics. Compared with other popular channel material for TFTs, namely amorphous silicon, polycrystalline silicon and organic materials, nanotube thin-films have the advantages of low-temperature processing compatibility, transparency, and flexibility, as well as high device performance. In order to demonstrate scalable, practical carbon nanotube macroelectroncis, I have developed a platform to fabricate high-density, uniform separated nanotube based thin-film transistors. In addition, many other essential analysis as well as technology components, such as nanotube film density control, purity and diameter dependent semiconducting nanotube electrical performance study, air-stable n-type transistor fabrication, and CMOS integration platform have also been demonstrated. On the basis of the above achievement, I have further demonstrated various kinds of applications including AMOLED display electronics, PMOS and CMOS logic circuits, flexible and transparent electronics. The dissertation is structured as follows. First, chapter 1 gives a brief introduction to the electronic properties of carbon nanotubes, which serves as the background knowledge for the following chapters. In chapter 2, I will present our approach of fabricating wafer-scale uniform semiconducting carbon nanotube thin-film transistors and demonstrate their application in display electronics and logic circuits. Following that, more detailed information about carbon nanotube thin-film transistor based active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays is discussed in chapter 3. And in chapter 4, a technology to

  19. Carbon sinks in temperate forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, P.H.; Nabuurs, G.J.; Aubinet, M.; Karjalainen, T.; Vine, E.L.; Kinsman, J.; Heath, L.S.

    2001-01-01

    In addition to being scientifically exciting, commercially important, and environmentally essential, temperate forests have also become a key diplomatic item in international climate negotiations as potential sinks for carbon. This review presents the methods used to estimate carbon sequestration, i

  20. ROE Carbon Storage - Percent Change

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This polygon dataset depicts the percentage change in the amount of carbon stored in forests in counties across the United States, based on the difference in carbon...

  1. Dewatering Peat With Activated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohatgi, N. K.

    1984-01-01

    Proposed process produces enough gas and carbon to sustain itself. In proposed process peat slurry is dewatered to approximately 40 percent moisture content by mixing slurry with activated carbon and filtering with solid/liquid separation techniques.

  2. Carbon Monoxide (CO) Poisoning Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Carbon Monoxide (CO) Poisoning Prevention Language: English Español (Spanish) ... tornadoes), using alternative sources of power can cause carbon monoxide (CO) to build up in a home ...

  3. Fabrication of carbon/SiO2 composites from the hydrothermal carbonization process of polysaccharide and their adsorption performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinhui; Li, Kunyu; Su, Min; Ren, Yanmei; Li, Ying; Chen, Jianxin; Li, Liang

    2016-11-20

    In this work, carbon/SiO2 composites, using amylose and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as raw materials, were successfully prepared by a facial hydrothermal carbonization process. The carbon/SiO2 composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), N2 adsorption and Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. The composites, which were made up of amorphous SiO2 and amorphous carbon, were found to have hierarchical porous structures. The mass ratios of amylose and SiO2 and the hydrothermal carbonization time had significant effects on the morphology of the composites, which had three shapes including monodispersed spheres, porous pieces and the nano-fibers combined with nano-spheres structures. The adsorption performance of the composites was studied using Pb(2+) as simulated contaminants from water. When the mass ratio of amylose and SiO2 was 9/1, the hydrothermal time was 30h and the hydrothermal temperature was 180°C, the adsorption capacity of the composites achieved to 52mg/g. Experimental data show that adsorption kinetics of the carbon/SiO2 composites can be fitted well by the Elovich model, while the isothermal data can be perfectly described by the Langmuir adsorption model and Freundlich adsorption model. The maximum adsorption capacity of the carbon/SiO2 composites is 56.18mgg(-1). PMID:27561502

  4. In situ functionalisation of mesoporous carbon electrodes with carbon nanotubes for proton exchange membrane fuel-cell application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the work presented here, an attempt is made to study the effect of different carbon supports on the mesostructural properties as well as electrochemical behaviour of Pt/carbon supports. In this respect, the functionalised samples have been synthesised by using CMK-3, nickelocene as nickel source and the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process for growth of carbon nanotubes. The platinum catalysts (Pt 20 wt.%) were obtained through a conventional wet impregnation method. All the materials have been characterised by XRD (small- and high-) angle, N2 adsorption–desorption isotherms, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and high-resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that the mesostructural structure had been partially destroyed by functionalisation of CMK-3 with NiO and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Moreover, wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXRD) studies revealed the formation of smaller platinum crystallite sizes compared to Vulcan-supported samples. Furthermore, electrochemical evaluation indicates that CMK-3–CNT–20Pt gives a specific surface area of 58.9 m2 g−1. Finally, the polarisation curves for the fabricated membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) with Pt loading of 0.5 mg cm−2 demonstrated that the CMK-3–CNT–20Pt catalyst shows better performance than industrial catalysts and even Vulcan–40% Pt. - Highlights: • In situ functionalisation of ordered mesoporous carbon with carbon nanotubes. • Novel electrocatalytic activity of functionalised mesostructured carbon. • Simultaneous effect of surface area and reactivity on electrocatalytic activity

  5. Energies and carbon sinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kyoto Protocol puts a lot of emphasis on carbon sinks. This emphasis almost obliterates the other potential contributions of biomass in the fight against climatic changes and toward sustainable development. Biomass represents an infinite supply of renewable energy sources which do not increase the levels of carbon in the atmosphere, contribute to energy savings resulting from the use of wood rather than other materials, the sustainable management of soils, the fight against drought, agroforestry from which the production of foods depends, the mitigating of certain extreme climatic occurrences and the protection of dams from increased silting. The industrial revolution contributed to the increase in greenhouse gas emissions. When discussing some of the finer points of the Kyoto Protocol, the focus was placed on carbon sinks. The author indicates that the biomass cycle had to be considered, both in situ and ex situ. Details to this effect are provided, and a section dealing with greenhouse gases other than carbon must be taken into account. The rural environment must be considered globally. The author indicates that in the future, the emissions resulting from the transportation of agricultural products will have to be considered. Within the realm of the policies on sustainable development, the fight against climatic change represents only one aspect. In arid and semi-arid regions, one must take into account meeting the energy needs of the populations, the fight against drought and the preservation of biodiversity. The planting of trees offers multiple advantages apart from being a carbon sink: roughage, wood for burning, protection of soils, etc. A few examples are provided. 8 refs., 3 figs

  6. Synthesis of colchicine and isocolchicine labelled with carbon-11 or carbon-13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kothari, P.J.; Finn, R.D.; Larson, S.M. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    1995-06-01

    The syntheses of isotopically labelled (-)-10-[{sup 11}C/{sup 13}C]-colchicine and (-)-9-[{sup 11}C/{sup 13}C]-isocolchicine have been achieved from the reaction of (-)desmethylcolchicine with [{sup 11}C/{sup 13}C]-iodomethane. The radiolabelled compounds, (-)-10-[{sup 11}C]-colchicine ({sup 11}C-n-colchicine) and (-)-9-[{sup 11}C]-isocolchicine ({sup 11}C-i-colchicine), were isolated by reversed phase HPLC. The total synthesis time was approximately 60 minutes for both radiolabelled compounds with an average specific activity of 240 mCi/{mu}mol calculated to EOB. Utilizing a similar synthetic strategy, we also reported the synthesis of milligram quantities of the carbon-13 enriched compounds and the magnetic resonance signal assignment for (-)-9-[{sup 13}C] isocolchicine. (Author).

  7. Conformational studies of poly(9,9-dialkylfluorene)s in solution using NMR spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justino, Licínia L G; Ramos, M Luísa; Abreu, Paulo E; Carvalho, Rui A; Sobral, Abilio J F N; Scherf, Ullrich; Burrows, Hugh D

    2009-09-01

    Relationships have been obtained between intermonomer torsional angle and NMR chemical shifts ((1)H and (13)C) for isolated chains of two of the most important poly(9,9-dialkylfluorenes), poly[9,9-bis(2-ethylhexyl)fluorene-2,7-diyl] (PF2/6) and the copolymer poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-[2,1,3]benzothiadiazole-4,7-diyl) (F8BT), using DFT calculations. The correlations provide a model for NMR spectral data interpretation and the basis for analysis of conformational changes in poly(9,9-dialkylfluorene-2,7-diyl)s. The correlations obtained for PF2/6 indicate that the (13)C chemical shifts of the aromatic carbons close to the intermonomer connection (C1, C2, and C3) have minimum values at planar conformations (0 degrees and 180 degrees ) and maximum values at 90 degrees conformations. In contrast, the (1)H chemical shifts of the corresponding aromatic ortho protons (Ha and Hb) are greatest for planar conformations, and the minimum values are seen for 90 degrees conformations. For the F8BT copolymer, similar relationships are observed for the (1)H (Ha, Hb, and Hc) aromatic shifts. Considering the aromatic carbons of F8BT, the behavior of C2, C4, C5, and C6 is similar to that found for the PF2/6 carbons. However, C1 and C3 of the fluorene moiety behave differently with varying torsion angle. These are in close proximity to the fluorene-benzothiadiazole linkage and are markedly affected by interactions with the thiadiazole unit such that delta(C1) is a maximum for 180 degrees and a minimum for 0 degrees , whereas delta(C3) is a maximum for 0 degrees and minimum for 180 degrees. We have studied the (1)H and (13)C spectra of the two polymers at temperatures between -50 degrees C and +65 degrees C. The observed changes to higher or lower frequency in the aromatic resonances were analyzed using these theoretical relationships. Fluorescence studies on PF2/6 in chloroform solution suggest there are no significant interchain interactions under these conditions. This is supported

  8. Templated Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siochik Emilie J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of growing carbon nanotubes uses a synthesized mesoporous si lica template with approximately cylindrical pores being formed there in. The surfaces of the pores are coated with a carbon nanotube precu rsor, and the template with the surfaces of the pores so-coated is th en heated until the carbon nanotube precursor in each pore is convert ed to a carbon nanotube.

  9. New Relationship in Carbon Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksei Naumov

    2012-01-01

    The problem of carbon dioxide accumulation in the atmosphere is closely related to the biological carbon cycle processes insufficiently studied from the global viewpoint. Based on data obtained from the literature on net primary production (NPP) and soil respiration (SR) of world ecosystems, a quantitative analysis of the relationship between these basic parameters of the production/destruction phase of the carbon cycle is offered in this paper. A direct correspondence (equality in carbon equ...

  10. Carbon balance in Mediterranean ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, Alexandra Cristina Pires

    2013-01-01

    Forests play an important role in climate change mitigation as they sequester and store carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere. The aim of this thesis was to investigate forest carbon balance in its main compartments: tress, understory and soils. We present methods to estimate carbon stock in biomass of stone pine stands in south Portugal. Allometric models, as well as conversion and expansion factors were presented allowing the quantification of stand carbon stocks irrespect...

  11. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  12. Production of High Purity Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes from Catalytic Decomposition of Methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kong Bee Hong; Aidawati Azlin Binti Ismail; Mohamed Ezzaham Bin Mohd Mahayuddin; Abdul Rahman Mohamed; Sharif Hussein Sharif Zein

    2006-01-01

    Acid-based purification process of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) produced via catalytic decomposition of methane with NiO/TiO2 as a catalyst is described. By combining the oxidation in air and the acid refluxes, the impurities, such as amorphous carbon, carbon nanoparticles, and the NiO/TiO2 catalyst, are eliminated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images confirm the removal of the impurities. The percentage of the carbon nanotubes purity was analyzed using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Using this process, 99.9 wt% purity of MWNTs was obtained.

  13. Designing carbon markets, Part II: Carbon markets in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper analyses the design of carbon markets in space (i.e., geographically). It is part of a twin set of papers that, starting from first principles, ask what an optimal global carbon market would look like by around 2030. Our focus is on firm-level cap-and-trade systems, although much of what we say would also apply to government-level trading and carbon offset schemes. We examine the 'first principles' of spatial design to maximise flexibility and to minimise costs, including key design issues in linking national and regional carbon markets together to create a global carbon market.

  14. Green Carbon : The role of natural forests in carbon storage

    OpenAIRE

    Keith, Heather; Lindenmayer, David B; Mackey, Brendan; Berry, Sandra L.

    2008-01-01

    The colour of carbon matters. Green carbon is the carbon stored in the plants and soil of natural ecosystems and is a vital part of the global carbon cycle. This report is the first in a series that examines the role of natural forests in the storage of carbon, the impacts of human land use activities, and the implications for climate change policy nationally and internationally. REDD (“reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation”) is now part of the agenda for the “Bali Action Plan...

  15. Apparatus for producing carbon-coated nanoparticles and carbon nanospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, W. Lee; Weigle, John C.; Phillips, Jonathan

    2015-10-20

    An apparatus for producing carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles comprising a container for entraining particles in an aerosol gas, providing an inlet for carbon-containing gas, providing an inlet for plasma gas, a proximate torch for mixing the aerosol gas, the carbon-containing gas, and the plasma gas, bombarding the mixed gases with microwaves, and providing a collection device for gathering the resulting carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles. Also disclosed is a method and apparatus for making hollow carbon nano- or micro-scale spheres.

  16. Carbon Alloys-Multi-functionalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, Eiichi [MSL, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)], E-mail: yasuda.e.aa.@m.titech.ac.jp; Enami, Takashi; Hoteida, Nobuyuki [MSL, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Lanticse-Diaz, L.J. [University of the Philippines (Philippines); Tanabe, Yasuhiro [Nagoya University (Japan); Akatsu, Takashi [MSL, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2008-02-25

    Last decade after our proposal of the 'Carbon Alloys' concept, many different kinds of Carbon Alloys, such as carbon nanotubes, carbon nanofibers, graphene sheet with magnetism, semi-conducting BCN compounds, graphite intercalation compounds, exfoliated carbon fiber, etc. have been found and developed. To extend the concept further, it is important to make it into intelligent materials by incorporating multiple functions. One example of the multi-functionalization is the development of homo-atomic Carbon Alloys from glassy carbon (GC) that exhibits high electrical conductivity and low gas permeability after treatment at critical conditions. Glassy carbon underwent metamorphosis to graphite spheres at HIP condition, and improved resistance to oxidation after alloying with Ta. The other one is shape utilization of the nano-sized carbon by understanding the effect of its large surfaces or interfaces in nanotechnology treatment. Recently carbon nanofiber was produced by polymer blend technology (PB) which was proposed by Prof. A. Oya during the Carbon Alloy project and progressed into intelligent carbon nanofiber (CNF) materials. CNF is combined into the polymer composites which is a candidate material for the bipolar separator in fuel cell. The superior properties, i.e., high electrical conductivity, high modulus, high strength, etc., of the CNF is being utilized in the preparation of this polymer composite.

  17. Wool Research Makes Carbon Headway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    A collective of woolgrowers, scientists and carbon specialists the Wool Carbon Alliance (WCA) has reviewed the latest research role in the natural carbon cycle, from woolgrowing properties around the globe known as on wool's to homes around the globe .

  18. Carbon Sequestration in Agricultural Soils

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to improve the knowledge base for facilitating investments in land management technologies that sequester soil organic carbon. While there are many studies on soil carbon sequestration, there is no single unifying volume that synthesizes knowledge on the impact of different land management practices on soil carbon sequestration rates across the world. A meta-a...

  19. Guideposts for Low Carbon Finance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author proposes four guideposts for efficient low carbon finance: remove subsidies for high-carbon technologies, improve the cost-effectiveness of low-carbon subsidies, encourage private sector innovation and maintain transparent public policy tools that support cost-benefit accounting

  20. Studies of iron carbon alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precipitation of carbon in α iron during a thermal treatment was followed using the magnetic after effect. A study was made of the influence of different parameters such as quenching speed, annealing rate, carbon concentration with or without impurity, irradiation effects. A transient sur-saturation occurs during dissolution of carbon in iron at 500 C. (author)

  1. CARBON IN FORESTS: QUALITY MATTERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nature of carbon in forests is discussed from the perspective of carbon sequestration and global climate change. Carbon inventories, specifically in the area of land use and forestry are reviewed for the Pacific Northwest. Areas vulnerable to climate change with respect to ca...

  2. Carbon dioxide as a carbon source in organic transformation: carbon-carbon bond forming reactions by transition-metal catalysts.

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuji, Yasushi; Fujihara, Tetsuaki

    2012-01-01

    Recent carbon-carbon bond forming reactions of carbon dioxide with alkenes, alkynes, dienes, aryl zinc compounds, aryl boronic esters, aryl halides, and arenes having acidic C-H bonds are reviewed in which transition-metal catalysts play an important role.

  3. Carbon dynamics of Oregon and Northern California forests and potential land-based carbon storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudiburg, Tara; Law, Beverly; Turner, David P; Campbell, John; Donato, Dan; Duane, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    Net uptake of carbon from the atmosphere (net ecosystem production, NEP) is dependent on climate, disturbance history, management practices, forest age, and forest type. To improve understanding of the influence of these factors on forest carbon stocks and flux in the western United States, federal inventory data and supplemental field measurements at additional plots were used to estimate several important components of the carbon balance in forests in Oregon and Northern California during the 1990s. Species- and ecoregion-specific allometric equations were used to estimate live and dead biomass stores, net primary productivity (NPP), and mortality. In the semiarid East Cascades and mesic Coast Range, mean total biomass was 8 and 24 kg C/m2, and mean NPP was 0.30 and 0.78 kg C.m(-2).yr(-1), respectively. Maximum NPP and dead biomass stores were most influenced by climate, whereas maximum live biomass stores and mortality were most influenced by forest type. Within ecoregions, mean live and dead biomass were usually higher on public lands, primarily because of the younger age class distribution on private lands. Decrease in NPP with age was not general across ecoregions, with no marked decline in old stands (>200 years old) in some ecoregions. In the absence of stand-replacing disturbance, total landscape carbon stocks could theoretically increase from 3.2 +/- 0.34 Pg C to 5.9 +/- 1.34 Pg C (a 46% increase) if forests were managed for maximum carbon storage. Although the theoretical limit is probably unattainable, given the timber-based economy and fire regimes in some ecoregions, there is still potential to significantly increase the land-based carbon storage by increasing rotation age and reducing harvest rates. PMID:19323181

  4. Carbon dioxide conversion over carbon-based nanocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavarian, Mehrnoush; Chai, Siang-Piao; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2013-07-01

    The utilization of carbon dioxide for the production of valuable chemicals via catalysts is one of the efficient ways to mitigate the greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. It is known that the carbon dioxide conversion and product yields are still low even if the reaction is operated at high pressure and temperature. The carbon dioxide utilization and conversion provides many challenges in exploring new concepts and opportunities for development of unique catalysts for the purpose of activating the carbon dioxide molecules. In this paper, the role of carbon-based nanocatalysts in the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide and direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate from carbon dioxide and methanol are reviewed. The current catalytic results obtained with different carbon-based nanocatalysts systems are presented and how these materials contribute to the carbon dioxide conversion is explained. In addition, different strategies and preparation methods of nanometallic catalysts on various carbon supports are described to optimize the dispersion of metal nanoparticles and catalytic activity. PMID:23901504

  5. Accelerated carbonation of brucite in mine tailings for carbon sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Anna L; Power, Ian M; Dipple, Gregory M

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric CO(2) is sequestered within ultramafic mine tailings via carbonation of Mg-bearing minerals. The rate of carbon sequestration at some mine sites appears to be limited by the rate of CO(2) supply. If carbonation of bulk tailings were accelerated, large mines may have the capacity to sequester millions of tonnes of CO(2) annually, offsetting mine emissions. The effect of supplying elevated partial pressures of CO(2) (pCO(2)) at 1 atm total pressure, on the carbonation rate of brucite [Mg(OH)(2)], a tailings mineral, was investigated experimentally with conditions emulating those at Mount Keith Nickel Mine (MKM), Western Australia. Brucite was carbonated to form nesquehonite [MgCO(3) · 3H(2)O] at a rate that increased linearly with pCO(2). Geochemical modeling indicated that HCO(3)(-) promoted dissolution accelerated brucite carbonation. Isotopic and aqueous chemistry data indicated that equilibrium between CO(2) in the gas and aqueous phases was not attained during carbonation, yet nesquehonite precipitation occurred at equilibrium. This implies CO(2) uptake into solution remains rate-limiting for brucite carbonation at elevated pCO(2), providing potential for further acceleration. Accelerated brucite carbonation at MKM offers the potential to offset annual mine emissions by ~22-57%. Recognition of mechanisms for brucite carbonation will guide ongoing work to accelerate Mg-silicate carbonation in tailings. PMID:22770473

  6. Carbon sequestration and its role in the global carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Brian J.; Sundquist, Eric T.

    2009-01-01

    For carbon sequestration the issues of monitoring, risk assessment, and verification of carbon content and storage efficacy are perhaps the most uncertain. Yet these issues are also the most critical challenges facing the broader context of carbon sequestration as a means for addressing climate change. In response to these challenges, Carbon Sequestration and Its Role in the Global Carbon Cycle presents current perspectives and research that combine five major areas: • The global carbon cycle and verification and assessment of global carbon sources and sinks • Potential capacity and temporal/spatial scales of terrestrial, oceanic, and geologic carbon storage • Assessing risks and benefits associated with terrestrial, oceanic, and geologic carbon storage • Predicting, monitoring, and verifying effectiveness of different forms of carbon storage • Suggested new CO2 sequestration research and management paradigms for the future. The volume is based on a Chapman Conference and will appeal to the rapidly growing group of scientists and engineers examining methods for deliberate carbon sequestration through storage in plants, soils, the oceans, and geological repositories.

  7. A metallic carbon consisting of helical carbon triangle chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon is the basis of life on Earth and many technological applications. We computationally report an sp3-hybridization-assembled carbon allotrope constructed by helical triangle chains through the evolutionary structure prediction method. Different from the previous metallic carbon K4, this carbon, called Tri-carbon, is mechanically and dynamically stable at ambient pressure. High ring strain in the carbon triangle blocks forces the C–C bond in Tri-carbon to be a ‘bent bond’, rather than the common single bond in diamond or the π bond in graphite. Unlike the unstrained sp3-hybridization in semiconductive diamond, valence electrons in the ‘bent bond’ are recombined to form extremely anisotropic sp3-hybridized bonds, thus conferring metallicity to Tri-carbon. Under nonhydrostatic conditions, Tri-carbon shows significantly anisotropic ideal tensile and compressive strength. Tri-carbon is expected to be achieved through chemical methods, such as the synthesis of cyclopropane derivatives (e.g. triangulane and tetrahedrane). These methods eliminate the restriction of ultra-high pressure to obtain metallic carbons. (paper)

  8. Graphene oxide assisted hydrothermal carbonization of carbon hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Deepti; Raidongia, Kalyan; Shao, Jiaojing; Huang, Jiaxing

    2014-01-28

    Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) of biomass such as glucose and cellulose typically produces micrometer-sized carbon spheres that are insulating. Adding a very small amount of Graphene oxide (GO) to glucose (e.g., 1:800 weight ratio) can significantly alter the morphology of its HTC product, resulting in more conductive carbon materials with higher degree of carbonization. At low mass loading level of GO, HTC treatment results in dispersed carbon platelets of tens of nanometers in thickness, while at high mass loading levels, free-standing carbon monoliths are obtained. Control experiments with other carbon materials such as graphite, carbon nanotubes, carbon black, and reduced GO show that only GO has significant effect in promoting HTC conversion, likely due to its good water processability, amphiphilicity, and two-dimensional structure that may help to template the initially carbonized materials. GO offers an additional advantage in that its graphene product can act as an in situ heating element to enable further carbonization of the HTC products very rapidly upon microwave irradiation. Similar effect of GO is also observed for the HTC treatment of cellulose. PMID:24298909

  9. Erosion of soil organic carbon: implications for carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Oost, Kristof; Van Hemelryck, Hendrik; Harden, Jennifer W.

    2009-01-01

    Agricultural activities have substantially increased rates of soil erosion and deposition, and these processes have a significant impact on carbon (C) mineralization and burial. Here, we present a synthesis of erosion effects on carbon dynamics and discuss the implications of soil erosion for carbon sequestration strategies. We demonstrate that for a range of data-based parameters from the literature, soil erosion results in increased C storage onto land, an effect that is heterogeneous on the landscape and is variable on various timescales. We argue that the magnitude of the erosion term and soil carbon residence time, both strongly influenced by soil management, largely control the strength of the erosion-induced sink. In order to evaluate fully the effects of soil management strategies that promote carbon sequestration, a full carbon account must be made that considers the impact of erosion-enhanced disequilibrium between carbon inputs and decomposition, including effects on net primary productivity and decomposition rates.

  10. Organic Carbon Isotope Geochemistry of the Neoproterozoic Doushantuo Formation, South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Qingjun; LIU Congqiang; Harald STRAUSS; Tatiana GOLDBERG; ZHU Maoyan; PI Daohui; WANG Jian

    2006-01-01

    The Neoproterozoic Doushantuo Formation on the Yangtze Platform, South China,documents a sedimentary succession with different sedimentary facies from carbonate platform to slope and to deep sea basin, and hosts one of the world-class phosphorite deposits. In these strata,exquisitely preserved fossils have been discovered: the Weng'an biota. This study presents carbon isotope geochemistry which is associated paired carbonate and organic matter from the Weng'an section of a carbonate platform (shelf of the Yangtze Platform, Guizhou Province) from the Songtao section and Nanming section of a transition belt (slope of the Yangtze Platform, Guizhou Province) and from the Yanwutan section (basin area of the Yangtze Platform, Hunan Province). Environmental variations and bio-events on the Yangtze Platform during the Late Neoproterozoic and their causal relationship are discussed. Negative carbon isotope values for carbonate and organic carbon (mean δ13Corg = -35.0%) from the uppermost Nantuo Formation are followed by an overall increase in δ13C up-section. Carbon isotope values vary between -9.9% and 3.6% for carbonate and between -35.6% and -21.5% for organic carbon, respectively. Heavier δ13Ccarb values suggest an increase in organic carbon burial, possibly related to increasing productivity (such as the Weng'an biota). The δ13C values of the sediments from the Doushantuo Formation decreased from the platform via the slope to basin,reflecting a reduced environment with minor dissolved inorganic carbon possibly due to a lower primary productivity. It is deduced that the classical upwelling process, the stratification structure and the hydrothermal eruption are principally important mechanisms to interpret the carbon isotopic compositions of the sediments from the Doushantuo Formation.

  11. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine (Gardasil-9)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vaccinated?Gardasil-9 prevents many cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infections, including:cervical cancer in females ... 9) Information Statement. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National ...

  12. Main: 1JB9 [RPSD[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1JB9 トウモロコシ Corn Zea mays L. Ferredoxin-Nadp Reductase Precursor Zea Mays Molecule:...SLLYDEEFTSYLKQYPDNFRYDKALSREQKNRSGGKMYVQDKIEEYSDEIFKLLDGGAHIYFCGLKGMMPGIQDTLKKVAERRGESWDQKLAQLKKNKQWHVEVY corn_1JB9.jpg ...

  13. Main: 1AW9 [RPSD[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1AW9 トウモロコシ Corn Zea mays L. Glutathione Transferase Iii Name=Gst3a; Zea Mays Molec...LVRPLLGGAPDAAVVDKHAEQLAKVLDVYEAHLARNKYLAGDEFTLADANHASYLLYLSKTPKAGLVAARPHVKAWWEAIVARPAFQKTVAAIPLPPPPSSSA corn_1AW9.jpg ...

  14. Springtime carbon emission episodes at the Gosan background site revealed by total carbon, stable carbon isotopic composition, and thermal characteristics of carbonaceous particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jung

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the emission of carbonaceous aerosols at the Gosan background super-site (33.17° N, 126.10° E in East Asia, total suspended particles (TSP were collected during spring of 2007 and 2008 and analyzed for particulate organic carbon, elemental carbon, total carbon (TC, total nitrogen (TN, and stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C of TC. The stable carbon isotopic composition of TC (δ13CTC was found to be lowest during pollen emission episodes (range: −26.2‰ to −23.5‰, avg. −25.2 ± 0.9‰, approaching those of the airborne pollen (−28.0‰ collected at the Gosan site. Based on a carbon isotope mass balance equation, we found that ~42% of TC in the TSP samples during the pollen episodes was attributed to airborne pollen from Japanese cedar trees planted around tangerine farms in Jeju Island. A negative correlation between the citric acid-carbon/TC ratios and δ13CTC was obtained during the pollen episodes. These results suggest that citric acid emitted from tangerine fruit may be adsorbed on the airborne pollen and then transported to the Gosan site. Thermal evolution patterns of organic carbon during the pollen episodes were characterized by high OC evolution in the OC2 temperature step (450 °C. Since thermal evolution patterns of organic aerosols are highly influenced by their molecular weight, they can be used as additional information on the formation of secondary organic aerosols and the effect of aging of organic aerosols during the long-range atmospheric transport and sources of organic aerosols.

  15. V18P9C2. A complex phosphide carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    V18P9C2 crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pmma with the lattice parameters a = 17.044(3), b = 3.2219(7), and c = 13.030(2) Aa, Z = 2. The crystal structure is composed of 19 symmetry-independent atoms. The crystal structure is considered as a network formed by the transition metal atoms exhibiting cubic, trigonal prismatic, and octahedral voids centered by V, P, and C atoms, respectively. Vice versa, the V and P atoms form a three-dimensional network. The two CV6 octahedra are edge- and corner-connected to chains running parallel to [010]. The five unique P atoms are trigonal prismatically coordinated by V atoms with one to three faces capped again by a V atom. The V atoms have mainly cubic environments formed solely by V or by V and P atoms. V18P9C2 exhibits some structural relations to other compounds of the ternary system V-P-C as well as to other intermetallic phases. Despite the low carbon content, V18P9C2 is considered as a ternary compound rather than an interstitially stabilized (binary) phosphide in view of its special structural features.

  16. Calcium carbonate as a possible dosimeter for high irradiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to analyze the interactions of 5 MeV electron beam radiation and a 290 MeV/u Carbon beam with calcium carbonate (powder) at 298 K and at different irradiation doses, for the potential use of calcium carbonate as a high-dose dosimeter. The irradiation doses with the electron beam were from 0.015 to 9 MGy, and with Carbon beam from 1.5 kGy to 8 kGy. High-energy radiation induces the formation of free radicals in solid calcium carbonate that can be detected and measured by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). An increase of the EPR response for some of the free radicals produced in the sample was observed as a function of the irradiation dose. These measurements are reproducible; the preparation of the sample is simple and inexpensive; and the signal is stable for several months. The response curves show that the dosimeter tends to saturate at 10 MGy. Based on these properties, we propose this chemical compound as a high-dose dosimeter, mainly for electron irradiation. - Highlights: • This work analyzed the interactions of 5 MeV electron beam radiation and a 290 MeV/u Carbon beam with calcium carbonate (powder) at 298 K and at different irradiation doses. • The main goal is to search the potential use of calcium carbonate as a high-dose dosimeter. • High-energy radiation induces the formation of free radicals in solid calcium carbonate that can be detected and measured by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). • An increase of the EPR response for some of the free radicals produced in the sample was observed as a function of the irradiation dose. • We propose this chemical compound as a high-dose dosimeter, mainly for electron irradiation

  17. Selective Wrapping and Supramolecular Structures of Polyfluorene-Carbon Nanotube Hybrids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, Jia; Loi, Maria Antonietta; Figueiredo de Carvalho, Elton Jose; dos Santos, Maria Cristina

    2011-01-01

    We report on the photophysical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) suspensions In toluene solutions of poly[9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl](PFO). Steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy in the near-infrared and visible spectral regions are used to study the intera

  18. The 9-th INS scientific computational programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twelve groups were accepted as the 9-th INS Scientific Computational Programs (ISCP). This ISCP can use full resources of the INS central computer without an operational limitation. The 9-th ISCP started at June/1/92 and ended at March/30/93. Some results were already published in journals or appeared in physical meetings. This is a sum of the used statistics of the 9-th ISCP and reports presented by groups performed the 9-th ISCP. (author)

  19. Create a Consortium and Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank Rusinko; John Andresen; Jennifer E. Hill; Harold H. Schobert; Bruce G. Miller

    2006-01-01

    The objective of these projects was to investigate alternative technologies for non-fuel uses of coal. Special emphasis was placed on developing premium carbon products from coal-derived feedstocks. A total of 14 projects, which are the 2003 Research Projects, are reported herein. These projects were categorized into three overall objectives. They are: (1) To explore new applications for the use of anthracite in order to improve its marketability; (2) To effectively minimize environmental damage caused by mercury emissions, CO{sub 2} emissions, and coal impounds; and (3) To continue to increase our understanding of coal properties and establish coal usage in non-fuel industries. Research was completed in laboratories throughout the United States. Most research was performed on a bench-scale level with the intent of scaling up if preliminary tests proved successful. These projects resulted in many potential applications for coal-derived feedstocks. These include: (1) Use of anthracite as a sorbent to capture CO{sub 2} emissions; (2) Use of anthracite-based carbon as a catalyst; (3) Use of processed anthracite in carbon electrodes and carbon black; (4) Use of raw coal refuse for producing activated carbon; (5) Reusable PACs to recycle captured mercury; (6) Use of combustion and gasification chars to capture mercury from coal-fired power plants; (7) Development of a synthetic coal tar enamel; (8) Use of alternative binder pitches in aluminum anodes; (9) Use of Solvent Extracted Carbon Ore (SECO) to fuel a carbon fuel cell; (10) Production of a low cost coal-derived turbostratic carbon powder for structural applications; (11) Production of high-value carbon fibers and foams via the co-processing of a low-cost coal extract pitch with well-dispersed carbon nanotubes; (12) Use of carbon from fly ash as metallurgical carbon; (13) Production of bulk carbon fiber for concrete reinforcement; and (14) Characterizing coal solvent extraction processes. Although some of the

  20. Carbon reduction potentials of China's industrial parks: A case study of Suzhou Industry Park

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Industrial parks are the economic engines for many China regions, but they also consume a great deal of energy and emit greenhouse gases. However, few empirical studies have examined these special communities. We selected SIP (Suzhou Industrial Park) as a case study. Carbon emissions from SIP were accounted from the consumption perspective to analyze their characteristics. Results showed total carbon emissions grew 85.2% from 2005 to 2010, and carbon intensity (carbon emissions per unit of GDP (gross domestic product)) decreased by 9%. Scenario analysis was then used to depict emissions trajectories under three different pathways. The total carbon emissions and per capita carbon emissions for SIP will undoubtedly increase in the near future under a business-as-usual scenario, improved-policy scenario, and low-carbon scenario; the carbon intensity will decrease by 38% under low-carbon scenario, but it will still be difficult to reach the national mitigation target. In addition, geographic-boundary-based accounting methodology was applied for comparison analysis, carbon emissions show a large gap of 42.4–65.1% from 2005 to 2010, due to failure to account for cross-boundary emissions from imported electricity. Therefore, comprehensive analysis from a consumption perspective is necessary to provide a fair and comprehensive tool for China's local decision-makers to evaluate carbon mitigation potentials. - Highlights: ► Carbon reduction potentials of industrial parks, which are important communities in China, were analyzed. ► Comprehensive carbon emission inventories were developed for a China's industrial park. ► Policies were recommended for industrial parks to achieve low-carbon development target. ► Consumption-based emission inventory is necessary for local government to evaluate carbon reduction potentials

  1. A shift of thermokarst lakes from carbon sources to sinks during the Holocene epoch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter Anthony, K. M.; Zimov, S. A.; Grosse, G.; Jones, Miriam C.; Anthony, P.; Chapin, F. S., III; Finlay, J. C.; Mack, M. C.; Davydov, S.; Frenzel, P.F.; Frolking, S.

    2014-01-01

    Thermokarst lakes formed across vast regions of Siberia and Alaska during the last deglaciation and are thought to be a net source of atmospheric methane and carbon dioxide during the Holocene epoch1,2,3,4. However, the same thermokarst lakes can also sequester carbon5, and it remains uncertain whether carbon uptake by thermokarst lakes can offset their greenhouse gas emissions. Here we use field observations of Siberian permafrost exposures, radiocarbon dating and spatial analyses to quantify Holocene carbon stocks and fluxes in lake sediments overlying thawed Pleistocene-aged permafrost. We find that carbon accumulation in deep thermokarst-lake sediments since the last deglaciation is about 1.6 times larger than the mass of Pleistocene-aged permafrost carbon released as greenhouse gases when the lakes first formed. Although methane and carbon dioxide emissions following thaw lead to immediate radiative warming, carbon uptake in peat-rich sediments occurs over millennial timescales. We assess thermokarst-lake carbon feedbacks to climate with an atmospheric perturbation model and find that thermokarst basins switched from a net radiative warming to a net cooling climate effect about 5,000 years ago. High rates of Holocene carbon accumulation in 20 lake sediments (47±10 grams of carbon per square metre per year; mean±standard error) were driven by thermokarst erosion and deposition of terrestrial organic matter, by nutrient release from thawing permafrost that stimulated lake productivity and by slow decomposition in cold, anoxic lake bottoms. When lakes eventually drained, permafrost formation rapidly sequestered sediment carbon. Our estimate of about 160petagrams of Holocene organic carbon in deep lake basins of Siberia and Alaska increases the circumpolar peat carbon pool estimate for permafrost regions by over 50 per cent (ref. 6). The carbon in perennially frozen drained lake sediments may become vulnerable to mineralization as permafrost disappears7,8,9

  2. Prospective life cycle carbon abatement for pyrolysis biochar systems in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) of slow pyrolysis biochar systems (PBS) in the UK for small, medium and large scale process chains and ten feedstocks was performed, assessing carbon abatement and electricity production. Pyrolysis biochar systems appear to offer greater carbon abatement than other bioenergy systems. Carbon abatement of 0.7-1.3 t CO2 equivalent per oven dry tonne of feedstock processed was found. In terms of delivered energy, medium to large scale PBS abates 1.4-1.9 t CO2e/MWh, which compares to average carbon emissions of 0.05-0.30 t CO2e/MWh for other bioenergy systems. The largest contribution to PBS carbon abatement is from the feedstock carbon stabilised in biochar (40-50%), followed by the less certain indirect effects of biochar in the soil (25-40%)-mainly due to increase in soil organic carbon levels. Change in soil organic carbon levels was found to be a key sensitivity. Electricity production off-setting emissions from fossil fuels accounted for 10-25% of carbon abatement. The LCA suggests that provided 43% of the carbon in the biochar remains stable, PBS will out-perform direct combustion of biomass at 33% efficiency in terms of carbon abatement, even if there is no beneficial effect upon soil organic carbon levels from biochar application. - Research highlights: → Biochar systems offer greater carbon abatement than combustion or gasification. → Carbon abatement of 0.7-1.4t CO2e/dry tonne of feedstock processed was found. → Change in soil organic carbon stocks induced by biochar is the key sensitivity. → Biochar systems produce less electricity then combustion or gasification.

  3. Carbon and Nitrogen Contents in Typical Plants and Soil Profiles in Yanqi Basin of Northwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Juan; WANG Xiu-jun; WANG Jia-ping; WANG Wei-xia

    2014-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen are the most important elements in the terrestrial ecosystem. Studying carbon and nitrogen distributions in plant and soil is important for our understanding of the ecosystem dynamics and carbon cycle on arid lands. A study was conducted in a typical arid area, the Yanqi Basin, Northwest China. Carbon and nitrogen distributions in plant tissues and soil proifles were determined at 21 sites with typical native plants and crops. Our results indicated that carbon content was similar between crops and native plants, and the average carbon contents in aboveground (42.4%) and belowground (42.8%) tissues were almost the same. Average nitrogen contents in crops were nearly the same (~0.7%) in aboveground and belowground tissues whereas mean nitrogen content was approximately 100% higher in aboveground (2.2%) than in belowground (1.2%) tissues for native species. Soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) in cropland (9.4 and 0.9 g kg-1) were signiifcantly higher than those in native land (6.2 and 0.7 g kg-1). Multiple regression analyses indicated that carbon content in belowground tissue and nitrogen content in aboveground tissue were key factors connecting plant and soil in native land. However, there was no signiifcant relationship for carbon or nitrogen between soil and crop, which might relfect human disturbance, such as plowing and applications of various organic materials.

  4. Carbon isotopic studies of individual lipids in organisms from the Nansha sea area, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN; Yi; SONG; Jinming; ZHANG; Hui

    2004-01-01

    Carbon isotopes of individual lipids in typical organisms from the Nansha sea area were measured by the GC-IRMS analytical technique. δ13C values of saturated fatty acids in different organisms examined are from -25.6‰ to -29.7‰ with the average values ranging from -26.4‰ to -28.2‰ and the variance range of 1.8‰ between different organisms is also observed.Unsaturated fatty acids have heavy carbon isotopic compositions and the mean differences of 2.9‰-6.8‰ compared to the same carbon number saturated fatty acids. δ13C values of n-alkanes range from -27.5‰ to -29.7‰ and their mean values, ranging from -28.6‰ to -28.9‰, are very close in different organisms. The mean difference in δ13C between the saturated fatty acids and n-alkanes is only 1.5‰, indicating that they have similar biosynthetic pathways. The carbon isotopic variations between the different carbon-number lipids are mostly within ±2.0‰, reflecting that they experienced a biosynthetic process of the carbon chain elongation. At the same time, the carbon isotopic genetic relationships between the biological and sedimentary lipids are established by comparative studies of carbon isotopic compositions of individual lipids in organisms and sediments from the Nansha sea area, which provides scientific basis for carbon isotopic applied research of individual lipids.

  5. Carbon dioxide dangers demonstration model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venezky, Dina; Wessells, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is a dangerous volcanic gas. When carbon dioxide seeps from the ground, it normally mixes with the air and dissipates rapidly. However, because carbon dioxide gas is heavier than air, it can collect in snowbanks, depressions, and poorly ventilated enclosures posing a potential danger to people and other living things. In this experiment we show how carbon dioxide gas displaces oxygen as it collects in low-lying areas. When carbon dioxide, created by mixing vinegar and baking soda, is added to a bowl with candles of different heights, the flames are extinguished as if by magic.

  6. 27 CFR 9.83 - Lake Erie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lake Erie. 9.83 Section 9... TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.83 Lake Erie. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Lake Erie.” (b) Approved...

  7. 27 CFR 9.99 - Clear Lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Clear Lake. 9.99 Section 9... TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.99 Clear Lake. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Clear Lake.” (b) Approved...

  8. 46 CFR 30.30-9 - Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Evaluation. 30.30-9 Section 30.30-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Interim Procedures for Evaluating Vessel Personnel Licensing and Certification Programs of Foreign Countries § 30.30-9 Evaluation....

  9. 46 CFR 9.10 - Waiting time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Waiting time. 9.10 Section 9.10 Shipping COAST GUARD... § 9.10 Waiting time. The same construction should be given the act when charging for waiting time as... for duty the waiting time amounts to at least one hour....

  10. 48 CFR 9.303 - Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Use. 9.303 Section 9.303 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS First Article Testing and Approval 9.303 Use. Testing and approval may be appropriate when—...

  11. 32 CFR 518.9 - Reading room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Reading room. 518.9 Section 518.9 National... RELATIONS THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM FOIA Reading Rooms § 518.9 Reading room. (a) Reading room... the records described, DA may elect to place other records in their reading room, and also make...

  12. 43 CFR 402.9 - Contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contracts. 402.9 Section 402.9 Public... SALE OF LANDS IN FEDERAL RECLAMATION PROJECTS Public Lands § 402.9 Contracts. A contract in form... the United States by the Commissioner. A copy of the contract shall be furnished to the...

  13. 32 CFR 766.9 - Insurance requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Insurance requirements. 766.9 Section 766.9... DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY AVIATION FACILITIES BY CIVIL AIRCRAFT § 766.9 Insurance requirements. (a) Control of insurance. The Commander, Naval Facilities Engineering Command, or his designee, shall be responsible...

  14. 9 CFR 77.20 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... any reason other than because of a disease regulated under 9 CFR chapter I (such as tuberculosis, brucellosis, or any other livestock disease for which movement of animals is restricted under 9 CFR chapter I... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definitions. 77.20 Section...

  15. 25 CFR 515.9 - Fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fees. 515.9 Section 515.9 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS PRIVACY ACT PROCEDURES § 515.9 Fees. The Commission... Commission may charge a fee sufficient to cover the cost of duplication....

  16. 10 CFR 9.85 - Fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fees. 9.85 Section 9.85 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PUBLIC RECORDS Privacy Act Regulations Fees § 9.85 Fees. Fees shall not be charged for search or... available for review, although fees may be charged for additional copies. Fees established under 31...

  17. 22 CFR 1304.9 - Fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Fees. 1304.9 Section 1304.9 Foreign Relations MILLENNIUM CHALLENGE CORPORATION FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROCEDURES § 1304.9 Fees. (a) General. Fees... for services rendered by MCC in response to requests for records under this part. MCC's fee...

  18. 45 CFR 503.9 - Fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fees. 503.9 Section 503.9 Public Welfare... Regulations § 503.9 Fees. Fees to be charged, if any, to any individual for making copies of that individual's... or because those services are required by some other law, the question of charging fees for...

  19. 41 CFR 51-9.304 - Fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Fees. 51-9.304 Section 51-9.304 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public Contracts... Access to Records § 51-9.304 Fees....

  20. 25 CFR 517.9 - Fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fees. 517.9 Section 517.9 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROCEDURES § 517.9 Fees. (a) In general. Fees pursuant to the FOIA shall be assessed according to the schedule contained...