WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon 8

  1. SU-8 Photolithography as a Toolbox for Carbon MEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Martinez-Duarte

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of SU-8 as precursor for glass-like carbon, or glassy carbon, is presented here. SU-8 carbonizes when subject to high temperature under inert atmosphere. Although epoxy-based precursors can be patterned in a variety of ways, photolithography is chosen due to its resolution and reproducibility. Here, a number of improvements to traditional photolithography are introduced to increase the versatility of the process. The shrinkage of SU-8 during carbonization is then detailed as one of the guidelines necessary to design carbon patterns. A couple of applications—(1 carbon-electrode dielectrophoresis for bioparticle manipulation; and (2 the use of carbon structures as micro-molds are also presented.

  2. The CarbonSat Earth Explorer 8 candidate mission: Error analysis for carbon dioxide and methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwitz, Michael; Bovensmann, Heinrich; Reuter, Maximilian; Gerilowski, Konstantin; Meijer, Yasjka; Sierk, Bernd; Caron, Jerome; Loescher, Armin; Ingmann, Paul; Burrows, John P.

    2015-04-01

    CarbonSat is one of two candidate missions for ESA's Earth Explorer 8 (EE8) satellite to be launched around 2022. The main goal of CarbonSat is to advance our knowledge on the natural and man-made sources and sinks of the two most important anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs) carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) on various temporal and spatial scales (e.g., regional, city and point source scale), as well as related climate feedbacks. CarbonSat will be the first satellite mission optimised to detect emission hot spots of CO2 (e.g., cities, industrialised areas, power plants) and CH4 (e.g., oil and gas fields) and to quantify their emissions. Furthermore, CarbonSat will deliver a number of important by-products such as Vegetation Chlorophyll Fluorescence (VCF, also called Solar Induced Fluorescence (SIF)) at 755 nm. These applications require appropriate retrieval algorithms which are currently being optimized and used for error analysis. The status of this error analysis will be presented based on the latest version of the CO2 and CH4 retrieval algorithm and taking the current instrument specification into account. An overview will be presented focusing on nadir observations over land. Focus will be on specific issues such as errors of the CO2 and CH4 products due to residual polarization related errors and errors related to inhomogeneous ground scenes.

  3. CarbonSat: ESA's Earth Explorer 8 Candidate Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Y. J.; Ingmann, P.; Löscher, A.

    2012-04-01

    The CarbonSat candidate mission is part of ESA's Earth Explorer Programme. In 2010, two candidate opportunity missions had been selected for feasibility and preliminary definition studies. The missions, called FLEX and CarbonSat, are now in competition to become ESA's eighth Earth Explorer, both addressing key climate and environmental change issues. In this presentation we will provide a mission overview of CarbonSat with a focus on science. CarbonSat's primary mission objective is the quantification and monitoring of CO2 and CH4 sources and sinks from the local to the regional scale for i) a better understanding of the processes that control carbon cycle dynamics and ii) an independent estimate of local greenhouse gas emissions (fossil fuel, geological CO2 and CH4, etc.) in the context of international treaties. A second priority objective is the monitoring/derivation of CO2 and CH4 fluxes on regional to global scale. These objectives will be achieved by a unique combination of frequent, high spatial resolution (2 x 2 km2) observations of XCO2 and XCH4 coupled to inverse modelling schemes. The required random error of a single measurement at ground-pixel resolution is of the order of between 1 and 3 ppm for XCO2 and between 9 and 17 ppb for XCH4. High spatial resolution is essential in order to maximize the probability for clear-sky observations and to identify flux hot spots. Ideally, CarbonSat shall have a wide swath allowing a 6-day global repeat cycle. The CarbonSat observations will enable CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants, localized industrial complexes, cities, and other large emitters to be objectively assessed at a global scale. Similarly, the monitoring of natural gas pipelines and compressor station leakage will become feasible. The detection and quantification of the substantial geological greenhouse gas emission sources such as seeps, volcanoes and mud volcanoes will be achieved for the first time. CarbonSat's Greenhouse Gas instrument will

  4. Irreversible Change of the Pore Structure of ZIF-8 in Carbon Dioxide Capture with Water Coexistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Huang; Guo, Ping; Regueira Muñiz, Teresa;

    2016-01-01

    showed an irreversible change of its framework, which occurs during the CO2 capture process. It was found that there is an irreversible chemical reaction among ZIF-8, water, and CO2, which creates both zinc carbonate (or zinc carbonate hydroxides) and single 2-methylimidazole crystals, and therefore......The performance of zeolitic imidazolate framework 8 (ZIF-8) for CO2 capture under three different conditions (wetted ZIF-8, ZIF-8/water slurry, and ZIF-8/water-glycol slurry) was systemically investigated. This investigation included the study of the pore structure stability of ZIF-8 by using X...... the pore structure of ZIF-8 collapses. It is suggested therefore that care must be taken when using ZIF-8 or products containing ZIF-8 for gas capture, gas separation, or other applications where both water and acid gases coexist....

  5. Preparation of ZIF-8 membranes supported on macroporous carbon tubes via a dipcoating-rubbing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingyin; Zhang, Xiongfu; Liu, Haiou; Wang, Tonghua; Qiu, Jieshan

    2015-02-01

    In the present work, a new dipcoating-rubbing method (DCRM) was developed to seed the surface of a macroporous carbon tube with a mixture of graphite and ZIF-8 nanoparticles. A continuous and low-defect ZIF-8 membrane was well formed on the seeded carbon tube by solvothermal growth. The DCRM involved a two-step process including first dipcoating a thin layer of the composite of graphite and ZIF-8 nanoparticles on the carbon surface and then rubbing the layer to form a stable seed layer. The graphite in the composite acting as binding agent could have two functions: (1) anchoring the ZIF-8 seeds onto the carbon surface; (2) smoothing the coarse surface of the macroporous carbon tube, thus forming a high quality ZIF-8 membrane. The as-prepared membrane was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and single gas permeation and was proved to be continuous and low-defect. The ideal selectivity of H2/CH4 is 7.9 with a H2 permeance of 7.15×10-8 mol Pa-1 s-1 m-2, which is higher than its corresponding Knudsen diffusion value. We could therefore expect the ZIF-8 membrane supported on macroporous tubular carbon to achieve a high selectivity of H2 over CH4 through a molecular sieving effect.

  6. 40 CFR 50.8 - National primary ambient air quality standards for carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS NATIONAL PRIMARY AND SECONDARY AMBIENT AIR QUALITY STANDARDS § 50.8 National primary ambient air quality standards for carbon monoxide. (a) The national primary ambient air quality standards... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National primary ambient air...

  7. Electronic transport properties of an (8,0) carbon/silicon-carbide nanotube heterojunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Hongxia; Zhang Heming; Zhang Zhiyong

    2009-01-01

    A two-probe system of the heterojunction formed by an (8,0) carbon nanotube(CNT) and an (8,0)silicon carbide nanotube (SiCNT) was established based on its optimized structure. By using a method combining nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) with density functional theory (DFT), the transport properties of the heterojunction were investigated. Our study reveals that the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) has a higher electron density on the CNT section and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) mainly concentrates on the interface and the SiCNT section. The positive and negative threshold voltages are1.8 and-2.2 V, respectively.

  8. Negative differential resistance in an (8, 0) carbon/boron nitride nanotube heterojunction*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Jiuxu; Yang Yintang; Liu Hongxia; Guo Lixin

    2011-01-01

    Using the method combined non-equilibrium Green's function with density functional theory, the electronic transport properties of an (8, 0) carbon/boron nitride nanotube heterojunction coupled to Au electrodes were investigated. In the current voltage characteristic of the heterojunction, negative differential resistance was found under positive and negative bias, which is the variation of the localization for corresponding molecular orbital caused by the applied bias voltage These results are meaningful to modeling and simulating on related electronic devices.

  9. Pseudopotential Density-Functional Calculations for Structures of Small Carbon Clusters CN (N = 2~8)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Yu-Lin; CHEN Xiang-Rong; YANG Xiang-Dong; LU Peng-Fei

    2004-01-01

    We introduce a first-principles density-functional theory, i.e. the finite-difference pseudopotential densityfunctional theory in real space and the Langevin molecular dynamics annealing technique, to the descriptions of structures and some properties of small carbon clusters (CN, N = 2 ~ 8). It is shown that the odd-numbered clusters have linear structures and most of the even-numbered clusters prefer cyclic structures.

  10. Modelling of Carbon Monoxide Air Pollution in Larg Cities by Evaluetion of Spectral LANDSAT8 Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzelo, M.; Gharagozlou, A.; Sadeghian, S.; Baikpour, S. H.; Rajabi, A.

    2015-12-01

    Air pollution in large cities is one of the major problems that resolve and reduce it need multiple applications and environmental management. Of The main sources of this pollution is industrial activities, urban and transport that enter large amounts of contaminants into the air and reduces its quality. With Variety of pollutants and high volume manufacturing, local distribution of manufacturing centers, Testing and measuring emissions is difficult. Substances such as carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and unburned hydrocarbons and lead compounds are substances that cause air pollution and carbon monoxide is most important. Today, data exchange systems, processing, analysis and modeling is of important pillars of management system and air quality control. In this study, using the spectral signature of carbon monoxide gas as the most efficient gas pollution LANDSAT8 images in order that have better spatial resolution than appropriate spectral bands and weather meters،SAM classification algorithm and Geographic Information System (GIS ), spatial distribution of carbon monoxide gas in Tehran over a period of one year from the beginning of 2014 until the beginning of 2015 at 11 map have modeled and then to the model valuation ،created maps were compared with the map provided by the Tehran quality comparison air company. Compare involved plans did with the error matrix and results in 4 types of care; overall, producer, user and kappa coefficient was investigated. Results of average accuracy were about than 80%, which indicates the fit method and data used for modeling.

  11. MODELLING OF CARBON MONOXIDE AIR POLLUTION IN LARG CITIES BY EVALUETION OF SPECTRAL LANDSAT8 IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamzelo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution in large cities is one of the major problems that resolve and reduce it need multiple applications and environmental management. Of The main sources of this pollution is industrial activities, urban and transport that enter large amounts of contaminants into the air and reduces its quality. With Variety of pollutants and high volume manufacturing, local distribution of manufacturing centers, Testing and measuring emissions is difficult. Substances such as carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and unburned hydrocarbons and lead compounds are substances that cause air pollution and carbon monoxide is most important. Today, data exchange systems, processing, analysis and modeling is of important pillars of management system and air quality control. In this study, using the spectral signature of carbon monoxide gas as the most efficient gas pollution LANDSAT8 images in order that have better spatial resolution than appropriate spectral bands and weather meters،SAM classification algorithm and Geographic Information System (GIS , spatial distribution of carbon monoxide gas in Tehran over a period of one year from the beginning of 2014 until the beginning of 2015 at 11 map have modeled and then to the model valuation ،created maps were compared with the map provided by the Tehran quality comparison air company. Compare involved plans did with the error matrix and results in 4 types of care; overall, producer, user and kappa coefficient was investigated. Results of average accuracy were about than 80%, which indicates the fit method and data used for modeling.

  12. Structural feature and electronic property of an (8, 0)carbon-silicon carbide nanotube heterojunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Hong-Xia; Zhang He-Ming; Hu Hui-Yong; Song Jiu-Xu

    2009-01-01

    A supercell of a nanotube heterojunction formed by an (8, 0) carbon nanotube (CNT) and an (8, 0) silicon carbide nanotube (SiCNT) is established, in which 96 C atoms and 32 Si atoms are included. The geometry optimization and the electronic property of the heterojunction are implemented through the first-principles calculation based on the density functional theory (DFT). The results indicate that the structural rearrangement takes place mainly on the interface and the energy gap of the heterojunetion is 0.31 eV, which is narrower than those of the isolated CNT and the isolated SiCNT. By using the average bond energy method, the valence band offset and the conduction band offset axe obtained as 0.71 and -0.03eV, respectively.

  13. RING-OPENING POLYMERIZATION OF TRIMETHYLENE CARBONATE BY CALIX[8]ARENE-NEODYMIUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Ge; Zhi-quan Shen; Yi-feng Zhang; Qiao-hong Huang

    2000-01-01

    Ring-opening polymerization of trimethylene carbonate (TMC) with a rare earth calixarene compound as catalyst has been studied for the first time. The effect of TMC/Nd (molar ratio) and polymerization conditions were investigated in detail. It was found that calix[8]arene-neodymium is a highly effective catalyst for the bulk polymerization of TMC and gives high molecular weight (Mv = 60,000) polymer. The optimum conditions of TMC polymerization were found to be as follows:TMC/Nd (molar ratio) = 2,000, 80℃, 16 h. The polymers were characterized by NMR, GPC and DSC. Studying the mechanism by NMR showed that the polymerization of TMC catalyzed by calix[8]arene-neodymium proceeds via a cationic mechanism.

  14. Priming effects of leaves of Laurus nobilis L. and 1,8-cineole on carbon mineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burak Kocak

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Plant secondary compounds can have stimulating effect on C cycling and change its rate in soils. We examined how leaves of bay laurel (Laurus nobilis L.; Lauraceae and 1,8-cineole (CIN, one of its constituents, affect soil C mineralization and its rate. Leaves and soil samples of bay laurel were taken from Cukurova University Campus (Adana, Turkey growing naturally under Mediterranean climate conditions. Leaves and CIN were considered as the two forms of organic C sources. After determining the level of 1,8-cineole in leaves by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, soils were mixed with powdered leaves and 1,8-cineole based on their C contents at same and half doses of soil organic C level. Carbon mineralization of all soils was determined over 54 d (28 °C, 80% field capacity. While 1,8-cineole was found as a major constituent of leaves (65% of essential oil, all doses of leaves and CIN increased soil microbial activity. There were significant differences for C mineralization rate between control and all applications (P < 0.05. High C levels of all treatments decreased C mineralization rate compared to control soils. In summary, all treatments stimulated C mineralization and it is possible to conclude that soil microorganisms adapted to use CIN as an energy source.

  15. Ultrasensitive, Label Free, Chemiresistive Nanobiosensor Using Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Embedded Electrospun SU-8 Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matta Durga Prakash

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the synthesis and fabrication of aligned electrospun nanofibers derived out of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs embedded SU-8 photoresist, which are targeted towards ultrasensitive biosensor applications. The ultrasensitivity (detection in the range of fg/mL and the specificity of these biosensors were achieved by complementing the inherent advantages of MWCNTs such as high surface to volume ratio and excellent electrical and transduction properties with the ease of surface functionalization of SU-8. The electrospinning process was optimized to precisely align nanofibers in between two electrodes of a copper microelectrode array. MWCNTs not only enhance the conductivity of SU-8 nanofibers but also act as transduction elements. In this paper, MWCNTs were embedded way beyond the percolation threshold and the optimum percentage loading of MWCNTs for maximizing the conductivity of nanofibers was figured out experimentally. As a proof of concept, the detection of myoglobin, an important biomarker for on-set of Acute Myocardial Infection (AMI has been demonstrated by functionalizing the nanofibers with anti-myoglobin antibodies and carrying out detection using a chemiresistive method. This simple and robust device yielded a detection limit of 6 fg/mL.

  16. Ultrasensitive, Label Free, Chemiresistive Nanobiosensor Using Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Embedded Electrospun SU-8 Nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durga Prakash, Matta; Vanjari, Siva Rama Krishna; Sharma, Chandra Shekhar; Singh, Shiv Govind

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the synthesis and fabrication of aligned electrospun nanofibers derived out of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) embedded SU-8 photoresist, which are targeted towards ultrasensitive biosensor applications. The ultrasensitivity (detection in the range of fg/mL) and the specificity of these biosensors were achieved by complementing the inherent advantages of MWCNTs such as high surface to volume ratio and excellent electrical and transduction properties with the ease of surface functionalization of SU-8. The electrospinning process was optimized to precisely align nanofibers in between two electrodes of a copper microelectrode array. MWCNTs not only enhance the conductivity of SU-8 nanofibers but also act as transduction elements. In this paper, MWCNTs were embedded way beyond the percolation threshold and the optimum percentage loading of MWCNTs for maximizing the conductivity of nanofibers was figured out experimentally. As a proof of concept, the detection of myoglobin, an important biomarker for on-set of Acute Myocardial Infection (AMI) has been demonstrated by functionalizing the nanofibers with anti-myoglobin antibodies and carrying out detection using a chemiresistive method. This simple and robust device yielded a detection limit of 6 fg/mL. PMID:27563905

  17. Enhanced removal of 8-quinolinecarboxylic acid in an activated carbon cloth by electroadsorption in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Bernabeu, S; Ruiz-Rosas, R; Quijada, C; Montilla, F; Morallón, E

    2016-02-01

    The effect of the electrochemical treatment (potentiostatic treatment in a filter-press electrochemical cell) on the adsorption capacity of an activated carbon cloth (ACC) was analyzed in relation with the removal of 8-quinolinecarboxylic acid pollutant from water. The adsorption capacity of an ACC is quantitatively improved in the presence of an electric field (electroadsorption process) reaching values of 96% in comparison to 55% in absence of applied potential. In addition, the cathodic treatment results in higher removal efficiencies than the anodic treatment. The enhanced adsorption capacity has been proved to be irreversible, since the removed compound remains adsorbed after switching the applied potential. The kinetics of the adsorption processes is also improved by the presence of an applied potential.

  18. Scenario analysis on the global carbon emissions reduction goal proposed in the declaration of the 2009 G8 Summit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A goal of a 50% reduction in global greenhouse gases emissions by 2050, with an 80% reduction by developed countries (hereafter referred to as the G8 Goal), was proposed at the G8 Summit held in L’Aquila, Italy, in July 2009. Here we analyze the scientific and political implications of the G8 Goal and its equity and feasibility by examining four greenhouse gas emissions scenarios. Our results show that (1) the goal to keep atmospheric CO2 concentration of <450 ppmv, stated by G8 nations, can only be achieved under the scenario of a steady, linear emissions reduction by all countries and simultaneously meeting the G8 Goal during the period 2005-2050; (2) under the G8 Goal, the carbon emissions quota for developing countries would not meet their carbon emission demands even if very strict reduction regimes are followed, with a gap of up to >1/3 of emissions demand in the next 45 years; and (3) under the G8 Goal, the cumulative per capita emissions during the period of 2006-2050 for developed and developing countries will be 81 t C and 40-47 t C, respectively, with the former doubling that of the latter, implying that the historical disparity of carbon emissions between developed and developing countries would be widened. Historically, the cumulative per capita emissions from developed countries are 12 times of those from developing countries. We therefore conclude that (1) the G8 Goal seeks to impose binding reduction targets on developing countries that will impede their industrialization process and cause conflicts among developing countries in the allocation of carbon emission rights; (2) the G8 Goal will not only widen the existing disparities of historical carbon emissions between developed and developing countries, but also generate new inequalities in the rights of carbon emissions; and (3) the 450 ppmv threshold of atmospheric CO2 concentration control, which is the basis for the G8 Goal, is impractical and impossible, and should not be accepted as the

  19. Scenario analysis on the global carbon emissions reduction goal proposed in the declaration of the 2009 G8 Summit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG JingYun; WANG ShaoPeng; YUE Chao; ZHU JiangLing; GUO ZhaoDi; HE CanFei; TANG ZhiYao

    2009-01-01

    A goal of a 50% reduction in global greenhouse gases emissions by 2050,with an 80% reduction by developed countries (hereafter referred to as the G8 Goal),was proposed at the G8 Summit held in L'Aquila,Italy,in July 2009.Here we analyze the scientific and political implications of the G8 Goal and its equity and feasibility by examining four greenhouse gas emissions scenarios.Our results show that (1) the goal to keep atmospheric CO_2 concentration of <450 ppmv,stated by G8 nations,can only be achieved under the scenario of a steady,linear emissions reduction by all countries and simultaneously meeting the G8 Goal during the period 2005-2050;(2) under the G8 Goal,the carbon emissions quota for developing countries would not meet their carbon emission demands even if very strict reduction regimes are followed,with a gap of up to>1/3 of emissions demand in the next 45 years;and (3) under the G8 Goal,the cumulative per capita emissions during the period of 2006-2050 for developed and developing countries will be 81 t C and 40-47 t C,respectively,with the former doubling that of the latter,implying that the historical disparity of carbon emissions between developed and developing countries would be widened.Historically,the cumulative per capita emissions from developed countries are 12 times of those from developing countries.We therefore conclude that (1) the G8 Goal seeks to impose binding reduction targets on developing countries that will impede their industrialization process and cause conflicts among developing countries in the allocation of carbon emission rights;(2) the G8 Goal will not only widen the existing disparities of historical carbon emissions between developed and developing countries,but also generate new inequalities in the rights of carbon emissions;and (3) the 450 ppmv threshold of atmospheric CO_2 concentration control,which is the basis for the G8 climate negotiation on carbon emission reduction.In summary,the G8 Goal is clearly against the

  20. Preparation of U3O8 by calcination from ammonium uranyl carbonate in microwave fields: Process optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The U3O8 was prepared first from ammonium uranyl carbonate using microwave. • A quadratic model was developed to optimize the process conditions. - Abstract: The effects of process conditions on preparation of U3O8 by calcination from ammonium uranyl carbonate in microwave fields were assessed and optimized for maximizing the total uranium as well as calcination temperature, adopting as Central Composite Design (CCD) methodology. The process variables assessed were calcination temperature, calcination duration and mass of sample. A quadratic model relating the process variables and the total amount of uranium and U3O8 was proposed eliminating the insignificant parameters. The optimal calcination conditions were estimated to be a calcination temperature of 942.75 K, calcination duration of 8.78 min, with the corresponding total uranium and U3O8 to be 82.07% and 31.33%, respectively

  1. The histone methyltransferase SDG8 mediates the epigenetic modification of light and carbon responsive genes in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Ying LI; Mukherjee, Indrani; Thum, Karen E; Tanurdzic, Milos; Katari, Manpreet S.; Obertello, Mariana; Edwards, Molly B; McCombie, W Richard; Martienssen, Robert A.; Coruzzi, Gloria M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Histone methylation modifies the epigenetic state of target genes to regulate gene expression in the context of developmental and environmental changes. Previously, we used a positive genetic screen to identify an Arabidopsis mutant, cli186, which was impaired in carbon and light signaling. Here, we report a deletion of the Arabidopsis histone methyltransferase SDG8 in this mutant (renamed sdg8-5), which provides a unique opportunity to study the global function of a specific histo...

  2. Characterization of carbon-sulfur bond cleavage by axenic and mixed cultures of Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayser, K.J.; Bielaga, B.A.; Jackowski, K.; Oduson, O.; Kilbane, J. II

    1992-12-31

    Growth assays reveal that Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8 can utilize a wide range of organosulfur compounds as the sole source of sulfur. Compounds that are utilized include thiophenes, sulfides, disulfides, mercaptans, sulfoxides, and sulfones. None of the organosulfur compounds tested can serve as a carbon source. A convenient spectrophotometric assay (Gibbs assay) based on the chromogenic reaction of 2,6-dichloroquinone-4-chloroimide with aromatic hydroxyl groups was developed and used in conjunction with GC/MS analysis to examine the kinetics of carbon-sulfur bond cleavage by axenic and mixed cell cultures of Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8. The desulfurization trait is expressed at uniform levels during the mid-exponential phase, reaches a maximum during idiophase, and then declines in stationary-phase cells. Desulfurization rates for dibenzothiophene (DBT) range from 8 to 15 {mu}M of DBT/10{sup 12} cells/hour. Mixtures of genetically marked Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8 and an organisms incapable of cleaning carbon-sulfur bonds in relevant test compounds, Enterobacter cloacae, were prepared in ratios that varied over six orders of magnitude. Growth studies revealed that Enterobacter cloacae was able to gain access to sulfur liberated from organosulfur compounds by IGTS8; however, cell-to-cell contact was required. These data also indicate that the desulfurization activity of IGTS8 cells in mixed cultures may be as much as 200-fold higher than in axenic cultures.

  3. Cognition and Synaptic-Plasticity Related Changes in Aged Rats Supplemented with 8- and 10-Carbon Medium Chain Triglycerides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongmei; Mitchell, Ellen S.

    2016-01-01

    Brain glucose hypometabolism is a common feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Previous studies have shown that cognition is improved by providing AD patients with an alternate energy source: ketones derived from either ketogenic diet or supplementation with medium chain triglycerides (MCT). Recently, data on the neuroprotective capacity of MCT-derived medium chain fatty acids (MCFA) suggest 8-carbon and 10-carbon MCFA may have cognition-enhancing properties which are not related to ketone production. We investigated the effect of 8 week treatment with MCT8, MCT10 or sunflower oil supplementation (5% by weight of chow diet) in 21 month old Wistar rats. Both MCT diets increased ketones plasma similarly compared to control diet, but MCT diets did not increase ketones in the brain. Treatment with MCT10, but not MCT8, significantly improved novel object recognition memory compared to control diet, while social recognition increased in both MCT groups. MCT8 and MCT10 diets decreased weight compared to control diet, where MCFA plasma levels were higher in MCT10 groups than in MCT8 groups. Both MCT diets increased IRS-1 (612) phosphorylation and decreased S6K phosphorylation (240/244) but only MCT10 increased Akt phosphorylation (473). MCT8 supplementation increased synaptophysin, but not PSD-95, in contrast MCT10 had no effect on either synaptic marker. Expression of Ube3a, which controls synaptic stability, was increased by both MCT diets. Cortex transcription via qPCR showed that immediate early genes related to synaptic plasticity (arc, plk3, junb, egr2, nr4a1) were downregulated by both MCT diets while MCT8 additionally down-regulated fosb and egr1 but upregulated grin1 and gba2. These results demonstrate that treatment of 8- and 10-carbon length MCTs in aged rats have slight differential effects on synaptic stability, protein synthesis and behavior that may be independent of brain ketone levels. PMID:27517611

  4. Cognition and Synaptic-Plasticity Related Changes in Aged Rats Supplemented with 8- and 10-Carbon Medium Chain Triglycerides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongmei; Mitchell, Ellen S

    2016-01-01

    Brain glucose hypometabolism is a common feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous studies have shown that cognition is improved by providing AD patients with an alternate energy source: ketones derived from either ketogenic diet or supplementation with medium chain triglycerides (MCT). Recently, data on the neuroprotective capacity of MCT-derived medium chain fatty acids (MCFA) suggest 8-carbon and 10-carbon MCFA may have cognition-enhancing properties which are not related to ketone production. We investigated the effect of 8 week treatment with MCT8, MCT10 or sunflower oil supplementation (5% by weight of chow diet) in 21 month old Wistar rats. Both MCT diets increased ketones plasma similarly compared to control diet, but MCT diets did not increase ketones in the brain. Treatment with MCT10, but not MCT8, significantly improved novel object recognition memory compared to control diet, while social recognition increased in both MCT groups. MCT8 and MCT10 diets decreased weight compared to control diet, where MCFA plasma levels were higher in MCT10 groups than in MCT8 groups. Both MCT diets increased IRS-1 (612) phosphorylation and decreased S6K phosphorylation (240/244) but only MCT10 increased Akt phosphorylation (473). MCT8 supplementation increased synaptophysin, but not PSD-95, in contrast MCT10 had no effect on either synaptic marker. Expression of Ube3a, which controls synaptic stability, was increased by both MCT diets. Cortex transcription via qPCR showed that immediate early genes related to synaptic plasticity (arc, plk3, junb, egr2, nr4a1) were downregulated by both MCT diets while MCT8 additionally down-regulated fosb and egr1 but upregulated grin1 and gba2. These results demonstrate that treatment of 8- and 10-carbon length MCTs in aged rats have slight differential effects on synaptic stability, protein synthesis and behavior that may be independent of brain ketone levels. PMID:27517611

  5. Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide Regulation of Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin 1 Production by Staphylococcus aureus MN8

    OpenAIRE

    Jeremy M Yarwood; Patrick M Schlievert

    2000-01-01

    The production of toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) by Staphylococcus aureus MN8 exposed to a range of oxygen concentrations (0 to 21% [vol/vol]) was examined in batch and thin-film cultures. The response of S. aureus to this range of oxygen concentrations was studied in the absence and in the presence of 7% (vol/vol) carbon dioxide. In the absence of carbon dioxide, TSST-1 production in batch cultures increased from negligible levels in the presence of oxygen concentrations of 1% or less...

  6. VIIRSN Level-3 Standard Mapped Image, Particulate Organic Carbon, 8-Day, 4km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA CoastWatch distributes Particulate Organic Carbon data from the NPP-Suomi Spacecraft Measurements are gathered by the VIIRS instrument carried aboard the...

  7. VIIRSN Level-3 Standard Mapped Image, Particulate Inorganic Carbon, 8-Day, 4km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA CoastWatch distributes Particulate Inorganic Carbon data from the NPP-Suomi Spacecraft Measurements are gathered by the VIIRS instrument carried aboard the...

  8. Nanoscale High Energetic Materials: A Polymeric Nitrogen Chain N8 Confined inside a Carbon Nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Rachid, Hakima; Hu, Anguang; Timoshevskii, Vladimir; Song, Yanfeng; Lussier, Louis-Simon

    2008-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of a new hybrid material, nanostructured polymeric nitrogen, where a polymeric nitrogen chain is encapsulated in a carbon nanotube. The electronic and structural properties of the new system are studied by means of ab initio electronic structure and molecular dynamics calculations. Finite temperature simulations demonstrate the stability of this nitrogen phase at ambient pressure and room temperature using carbon nanotube confinement. This nanostructured confinement may open a new path towards stabilizing polynitrogen or polymeric nitrogen at ambient conditions.

  9. Ability of LANDSAT-8 Oli Derived Texture Metrics in Estimating Aboveground Carbon Stocks of Coppice Oak Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, A.; Sohrabi, H.

    2016-06-01

    The role of forests as a reservoir for carbon has prompted the need for timely and reliable estimation of aboveground carbon stocks. Since measurement of aboveground carbon stocks of forests is a destructive, costly and time-consuming activity, aerial and satellite remote sensing techniques have gained many attentions in this field. Despite the fact that using aerial data for predicting aboveground carbon stocks has been proved as a highly accurate method, there are challenges related to high acquisition costs, small area coverage, and limited availability of these data. These challenges are more critical for non-commercial forests located in low-income countries. Landsat program provides repetitive acquisition of high-resolution multispectral data, which are freely available. The aim of this study was to assess the potential of multispectral Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) derived texture metrics in quantifying aboveground carbon stocks of coppice Oak forests in Zagros Mountains, Iran. We used four different window sizes (3×3, 5×5, 7×7, and 9×9), and four different offsets ([0,1], [1,1], [1,0], and [1,-1]) to derive nine texture metrics (angular second moment, contrast, correlation, dissimilar, entropy, homogeneity, inverse difference, mean, and variance) from four bands (blue, green, red, and infrared). Totally, 124 sample plots in two different forests were measured and carbon was calculated using species-specific allometric models. Stepwise regression analysis was applied to estimate biomass from derived metrics. Results showed that, in general, larger size of window for deriving texture metrics resulted models with better fitting parameters. In addition, the correlation of the spectral bands for deriving texture metrics in regression models was ranked as b4>b3>b2>b5. The best offset was [1,-1]. Amongst the different metrics, mean and entropy were entered in most of the regression models. Overall, different models based on derived texture metrics

  10. ABILITY OF LANDSAT-8 OLI DERIVED TEXTURE METRICS IN ESTIMATING ABOVEGROUND CARBON STOCKS OF COPPICE OAK FORESTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Safari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of forests as a reservoir for carbon has prompted the need for timely and reliable estimation of aboveground carbon stocks. Since measurement of aboveground carbon stocks of forests is a destructive, costly and time-consuming activity, aerial and satellite remote sensing techniques have gained many attentions in this field. Despite the fact that using aerial data for predicting aboveground carbon stocks has been proved as a highly accurate method, there are challenges related to high acquisition costs, small area coverage, and limited availability of these data. These challenges are more critical for non-commercial forests located in low-income countries. Landsat program provides repetitive acquisition of high-resolution multispectral data, which are freely available. The aim of this study was to assess the potential of multispectral Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI derived texture metrics in quantifying aboveground carbon stocks of coppice Oak forests in Zagros Mountains, Iran. We used four different window sizes (3×3, 5×5, 7×7, and 9×9, and four different offsets ([0,1], [1,1], [1,0], and [1,-1] to derive nine texture metrics (angular second moment, contrast, correlation, dissimilar, entropy, homogeneity, inverse difference, mean, and variance from four bands (blue, green, red, and infrared. Totally, 124 sample plots in two different forests were measured and carbon was calculated using species-specific allometric models. Stepwise regression analysis was applied to estimate biomass from derived metrics. Results showed that, in general, larger size of window for deriving texture metrics resulted models with better fitting parameters. In addition, the correlation of the spectral bands for deriving texture metrics in regression models was ranked as b4>b3>b2>b5. The best offset was [1,-1]. Amongst the different metrics, mean and entropy were entered in most of the regression models. Overall, different models based on derived

  11. Towards Disentangling Natural and Anthropogenic GHG Fluxes from Space - The CarbonSat Earth Explorer 8 Candidate Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovensmann, Heinrich

    2015-04-01

    CarbonSat was selected by ESA as one of two candidates for the Earth Explorer Opportunity mission (EE8). Understanding and quantifying climate feedback and forcing mechanisms involving the two most important anthropogenic greenhouse gases, CO2 and CH4, requires the discrimination of natural and anthropogenic CO2 and CH4 fluxes globally, with regional to local spatial scale resolution. The objective of the CarbonSat mission is therefore to quantify natural and anthropogenic sources and sinks of CO2 and CH4. The unique feature of the CarbonSat mission concept is its 'GHG imaging capability', which is achieved by combining high spatial resolution (6 km2) and good spatial coverage (breakthrough: 240 km swath, contiguous ground sampling). This capability enables global imaging of localized strong emission source areas such as cities, power plants, methane seeps, landfills and volcanoes and better separation of natural and anthropogenic GHG sources and sinks. The latter will be further supported by CarbonSat's ability to constrain the fluxes of CO2 exchanged to and from the land biosphere by simultaneously measuring CO2 and sun induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF), a process strongly associated with Gross Primary Production (GPP). Source/sink information will be derived from the retrieved atmospheric column-averaged mole fractions of CO2 and CH4 via inverse modelling. CarbonSat aims to deliver spatially-resolved time varying global estimates of dry column mixing ratios of CO2 and CH4 with high precision (~1 to 2 ppm and ~12 ppb, respectively) and rel. accuracy (~0.5 ppm and 5 ppb, respectively). Benefiting from its imaging capabilities along and across track, CarbonSat will provide at least an order of magnitude larger number of cloud-free CO2 soundings than GOSAT and OCO-2. Recent results from the scientific studies and supporting campaigns documenting the expected data quality and potential application areas will be summarised.

  12. Paradox of the peak-PCIM (Paleocene Carbon Isotope Maxima; ~57.8Ma) and Abrupt Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, D. T.; Hoenisch, B.; Zachos, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Paleocene Carbon Isotope Maxima (PCIM; ~57.8Ma) represents a major transition in global δ13C during the late Paleocene, when the long-term positive trend in δ13C reversed from positive to negative. The peak-PCIM (~57.7Ma) has been tightly resolved in new high-resolution, astronomically-tuned benthic isotope records from IODP Sites 1209 (Pacific) and 1262 (Atlantic), which show the final phase of δ13C enrichment as abrupt (~1‰ in climate system and the carbon cycle, poses an interesting paradox as any rapid carbon release to the atmosphere should, in theory, create a negative excursion because all of the major carbon sources are isotopically light, whether volcanic outgassing, weathering/oxidation of organic carbon, or methane release [Dunkley-Jones et al., Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A 2010]. If global, there are several testable mechanisms that may explain the shift including increase in burial flux of light carbon, a reduction in heavy carbon burial flux, or a large-scale circulation change perhaps associated with the transition of a major oceanic gateway. Using trace metal (B/Ca and Mg/Ca) and stable isotope (δ11B, δ18O, and δ13C) geochemistry, here we establish the nature of the peak-PCIM at sites from 3 different ocean basins (IODP Sites 690, 1209, and 1262) and begin to test several of the possible mechanisms for change. Mg/Ca in mixed-layer planktonic foraminifera show 2-3°C of sea surface warming coinciding with, and abrupt as, the benthic carbon isotope enrichment at all sites. Bottom water ∆[CO32-], as indicated by B/Ca in benthic foraminifera, abruptly increases by 30-40µmol/kgsw. While this may indicate a change in bottom water circulation, surface B-based proxies also respond with a positive shift during the peak-PCIM indicating a slight increase in surface pH and highlighting the global nature of the event.

  13. ZIF-8 Derived, Nitrogen-Doped Porous Electrodes of Carbon Polyhedron Particles for High-Performance Electrosorption of Salt Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nei-Ling; Dutta, Saikat; Salunkhe, Rahul R; Ahamad, Tansir; Alshehri, Saad M; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Hou, Chia-Hung; Wu, Kevin C-W

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) ZIF-8 derived carbon polyhedrons with high nitrogen (N) content, (denoted as NC-800) are synthesized for their application as high-performance electrodes in electrosorption of salt ions. The results showed a high specific capacitance of 160.8 F·g(-1) in 1 M NaCl at a scan rate of 5 mV·s(-1). Notably, integration of 3-D mesopores and micropores in NC-800 achieves an excellent capacitive deionization (CDI) performance. The electrosorption of salt ions at the electrical double layer is enhanced by N-doping at the edges of a hexagonal lattice of NC-800. As evidenced, when the initial NaCl solution concentration is 1 mM, the resultant NC-800 exhibits a remarkable CDI potential with a promising salt electrosorption capacity of 8.52 mg·g(-1). PMID:27404086

  14. ZIF-8 Derived, Nitrogen-Doped Porous Electrodes of Carbon Polyhedron Particles for High-Performance Electrosorption of Salt Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nei-Ling; Dutta, Saikat; Salunkhe, Rahul R.; Ahamad, Tansir; Alshehri, Saad M.; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Hou, Chia-Hung; Wu, Kevin C.-W.

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) ZIF-8 derived carbon polyhedrons with high nitrogen (N) content, (denoted as NC-800) are synthesized for their application as high-performance electrodes in electrosorption of salt ions. The results showed a high specific capacitance of 160.8 F·g−1 in 1 M NaCl at a scan rate of 5 mV·s−1. Notably, integration of 3-D mesopores and micropores in NC-800 achieves an excellent capacitive deionization (CDI) performance. The electrosorption of salt ions at the electrical double layer is enhanced by N-doping at the edges of a hexagonal lattice of NC-800. As evidenced, when the initial NaCl solution concentration is 1 mM, the resultant NC-800 exhibits a remarkable CDI potential with a promising salt electrosorption capacity of 8.52 mg·g−1. PMID:27404086

  15. Clinical evidence for the superior efficacy of a dentifrice containing 8.0% arginine and calcium carbonate in providing instant and lasting relief of dentin hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, D

    2011-01-01

    This paper briefly discusses recent scientific and clinical research validating the effectiveness of a toothpaste containing 8.0% arginine and calcium carbonate, known as Pro-Argin technology, including clinical evidence for the superior efficacy of this toothpaste versus a potassium-based desensitizing toothpaste. It also introduces new clinical data which prove that a toothpaste containing 8.0% arginine and calcium carbonate delivers superior instant and lasting relief of dentin hypersensitivity compared to a toothpaste containing 8% strontium acetate.

  16. A parametric study of methane decomposition into carbon nanotubes over 8Co-2Mo/Al2O3 catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siang-Piao Chai; Choon-Ming Seah; Abdul Rahman Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    The effects of reaction temperature,partial pressure of methane,catalyst weight and gas hourly space velocity(GHSV)on methane decomposition were reported.The decomposition reaction was performed in a vertical fixed-bed reactor over 8Co-2Mo/Al2O3 catalyst.The experimental results show that these four process parameters studied had vital effects on carbon yield.As revealed by the electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy analyses,the reaction temperature and GHSV governed the average diameter,the diameter distribution and the degree of graphitization of the synthesized carbon nanotubes(CNTs).Also,an evidence is presented to show that higher temperatures and higher GHSV favored the formation of better-graphitized CNTs with larger diameters.

  17. Dissociative Electron Attachment to Carbon Dioxide via the 8.2 eV Feshbach resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaughter, Dan; Adaniya, Hidihito; Rescigno, Tom; Haxton, Dan; Orel, Ann; McCurdy, Bill; Belkacem, Ali

    2011-08-17

    Momentum imaging experiments on dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to CO{sub 2} are combined with the results of ab initio calculations to provide a detailed and consistent picture of the dissociation dynamics through the 8.2 eV resonance, which is the major channel for DEA in CO{sub 2}. The present study resolves several puzzling misconceptions about this system.

  18. Co9S8 nanoparticles encapsulated in nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon networks with improved lithium storage properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mujtaba, Jawayria; Sun, Hongyu; Huang, Guoyong;

    2016-01-01

    We report the designed synthesis of unique Co9S8 nanoparticles encapsulated in nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon networks (Co9S8@NMCN nanocomposites). Uniform zeolitic imidazolate framework-67 was first synthesized and then transformed into Co9S8@NMCN nanocomposites by thermal annealing with sulfu...

  19. Neutralization of ADAM8 ameliorates liver injury and accelerates liver repair in carbon tetrachloride-induced acute liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, San-Qiang; Zhu, Sha; Wan, Xue-Dong; Xu, Zheng-Shun; Ma, Zhao

    2014-04-01

    Although some studies have described the function of ADAM8 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease 8) related with rheumatoid arthritis, cancer and asthma, etc., the concrete role of ADAM8 in acute liver injury is still unknown. So mice respectively received anti-ADAM8 monoclonal antibody (mAb) of 100 μg/100 μl, 200 μg/100 μl or 300 μg/100 μl in PBS or PBS pre-injection. Then acute liver injury was induced in the mice by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of carbon tetrachloride (CCl₄). Serum AST and ALT level, Haematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining, the expression level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were detected in the mice after CCl4 administration. Our results showed that anti-ADAM8 mAb pre-injection could effectively lower AST and ALT levels (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01) and reduce liver injury (P < 0.05 or P <0.01), induce the expression of VEGF, CYP1A2 and PCNA (P <0.05 or P < 0.01) in dose-dependent manner compared with the control mice which received PBS pre-injection. In summary, our study suggested that ADAM8 might promote liver injury by inhibiting the proliferation of hepatocytes, angiogenesis and affecting the metabolism function of liver during acute liver injury induced by CCl₄. Anti-ADAM8 mAb injection might be suitable as a potential method for acute liver injury therapy. PMID:24646716

  20. Facile preparation of ZIF-8@Pd-CSS sandwich-type microspheres via in situ growth of ZIF-8 shells over Pd-loaded colloidal carbon spheres with aggregation-resistant and leach-proof properties for the Pd nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Tong; Lin, Lu [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China); Zhang, Xiongfu, E-mail: xfzhang@dlut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China); Liu, Haiou; Yan, Xinjuan [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China); Liu, Zhang; Yeung, King Lun [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2015-10-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Uniform-sized colloidal carbon spheres were synthesized from low-cost glucose. • Pd nanoparticles were loaded onto the carbon spheres via self-reduction method. • A layer of ZIF-8 shell was in situ grown over the Pd-loaded carbon spheres. • The ZIF-8@Pd-CCS showed leach-proof and aggregation-resistant properties of Pd. - Abstract: Aiming to enhance the stability of noble metal nanoparticles that are anchored on the surface of colloidal carbon spheres (CCSs), we designed and prepared a new kind of sandwich-structured ZIF-8@Pd-CCS microsphere. Typically, uniform CCSs were first synthesized by the aromatization and carbonization of glucose under hydrothermal conditions. Subsequently, noble metal nanoparticles, herein Pd nanoparticles, were attached to the surface of CCSs via self-reduction route, followed by in situ assembly of a thin layer of ZIF-8 over the Pd nanoparticles to form the sandwich-type ZIF-8@Pd-CCS microspheres. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra confirmed the presence of crystalline ZIF-8, while TEM analysis revealed that the ZIF-8 shells were closely bound to the Pd-loaded CCSs. The shell thickness could be tuned by varying the ZIF-8 assembly cycles. Further, liquid-phase hydrogenation of 1-hexene as the probe reaction was carried out over the ZIF-8@Pd-CCS microspheres and results showed that the prepared microspheres exhibited excellent agglomeration-resistant and leach-proof properties for the Pd nanoparticles, thus leading to the good reusability of the ZIF-8@Pd-CCS microspheres.

  1. MOF-Derived Hollow Co9 S8 Nanoparticles Embedded in Graphitic Carbon Nanocages with Superior Li-Ion Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Wu, Chao; Xiao, Dongdong; Kopold, Peter; Gu, Lin; van Aken, Peter A; Maier, Joachim; Yu, Yan

    2016-05-01

    Novel electrode materials consisting of hollow cobalt sulfide nanoparticles embedded in graphitic carbon nanocages (HCSP⊂GCC) are facilely synthesized by a top-down route applying room-temperature synthesized Co-based zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-67) as the template. Owing to the good mechanical flexibility and pronounced structure stability of carbon nanocages-encapsulated Co9 S8 , the as-obtained HCSP⊂GCC exhibit superior Li-ion storage. Working in the voltage of 1.0-3.0 V, they display a very high energy density (707 Wh kg(-1) ), superior rate capability (reversible capabilities of 536, 489, 438, 393, 345, and 278 mA h g(-1) at 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, and 10C, respectively), and stable cycling performance (≈26% capacity loss after long 150 cycles at 1C with a capacity retention of 365 mA h g(-1) ). When the work voltage is extended into 0.01-3.0 V, a higher stable capacity of 1600 mA h g(-1) at a current density of 100 mA g(-1) is still achieved.

  2. Black carbon record of the wildfire history of western Sichuan Province in China over the last 12.8 ka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weiwei; Zhang, Enlou; Shen, Ji; Chen, Rong; Liu, Enfeng

    2016-01-01

    Wildfire is recognized as a critical Earth system process which affects the global carbon cycle, atmospheric chemistry, and ecosystem dynamics. Estimating the potential impact of future climate change on the incidence of fire requires an understanding of the long-term interactions of fire, climate, vegetation, and human activity. Accordingly, we analyzed the black carbon content and the pollen stratigraphy of sediments spanning the past 12.8 ka from Lake Muge Co, an alpine lake in western Sichuan Province, in order to determine the main factors influencing regional fire regimes. The results demonstrate that wildfires occurred frequently and intensively during the late deglaciation and the early Holocene when the regional vegetation was dominated by deciduous forests. Wildfire occurrence decreased significantly during the Holocene climatic optimum between 9.2 and 5.6 cal ka BP. Overall, the wildfire history of western Sichuan Province is similar to that of the Chinese Loess Plateau and of East Asia as a whole, suggesting that regional-scale fires depended mainly on changes in the intensity of the Asian summer monsoon. In addition, the fire regime of western Sichuan Province may have been influenced by the establishment of human settlement and agriculture in western Sichuan Province and the southeastern Tibetan Plateau after about 5.5 cal ka BP, and by an intensification of cereal cultivation coupled with population expansion in southwestern China during the last two millennia.

  3. Pressure dependence of supercritical carbon dioxide extraction equilibrium of palladium(II)with 2-methyl-8-quinolinol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressure effect on the distribution of Pd(II) between an aqueous chloride solution and a supercritical carbon dioxide phase in the presence of 2-methyl-8-quinolinol (HMQ) as a chelating extractant has been investigated. The distribution ratio (D) of Pd(II) extracted as Pd(MQ)2 complex does not depend on the pressure in the range of 8.5 to 23 MPa, when the pH of the aqueous solution is buffered at pH 2.77∼2.96. The CO2 pressure affects the solubility of CO2 in the aqueous phase and therefore the pH of the non-buffered aqueous solution changed with the pressure, which leads to a change of D with the pressure. The extraction of Pd(II) into the supercritical CO2 using HMQ is promising for the recovery of Pd(II) in the aqueous chloride media. The HMQ forms the water-soluble protonated species, H2MQ|, which allows the coexistence of HMQ of enough high concentration in the extraction system. (author)

  4. Carbon fiber-reinforced cyanate ester/nano-ZrW2O8 composites with tailored thermal expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinarayanan, Prashanth; Rogalski, Mark K; Kessler, Michael R

    2012-02-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites are widely used in the design and fabrication of a variety of high performance aerospace components. The mismatch in coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) between the high CTE polymer matrix and low CTE fiber reinforcements in such composite systems can lead to dimensional instability and deterioration of material lifetimes due to development of residual thermal stresses. The magnitude of thermally induced residual stresses in fiber-reinforced composite systems can be minimized by replacement of conventional polymer matrices with a low CTE, polymer nanocomposite matrix. Zirconium tungstate (ZrW(2)O(8)) is a unique ceramic material that exhibits isotropic negative thermal expansion and has excellent potential as a filler for development of low CTE polymer nanocomposites. In this paper, we report the fabrication and thermal characterization of novel, multiscale, macro-nano hybrid composite laminates comprising bisphenol E cyanate ester (BECy)/ZrW(2)O(8) nanocomposite matrices reinforced with unidirectional carbon fibers. The results reveal that incorporation of nanoparticles facilitates a reduction in CTE of the composite systems, which in turn results in a reduction in panel warpage and curvature after the cure because of mitigation of thermally induced residual stresses.

  5. SEM and EDS investigation of a pyrolytic carbon covered C/C composite maxillofacial implant retrieved from the human body after 8 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebők, Béla; Kiss, Gábor; Szabó, Péter J; Rigler, Dániel; Molnár, Milán L; Dobos, Gábor; Réti, Ferenc; Szőcs, Hajnal; Joób, Arpád F; Bogdán, Sándor; Szabó, György

    2013-03-01

    The long term effect of the human body on a pyrolytic carbon covered C/C composite maxillofacial implant (CarBulat(Tm)) was investigated by comparing the structure, the surface morphology and composition of an implant retrieved after 8 years to a sterilized, but not implanted one. Although the thickness of the carbon fibres constituting the implants did not change during the 8 year period, the surface of the implant retrieved was covered with a thin surface layer not present on the unimplanted implant. The composition of this layer is identical to the composition of the underlying carbon fibres. Calcium can only be detected on the surface as a trace element implying that the new layer is not formed by bone tissue. Residual soft tissue penetrating the bulk material between the carbon fibre bunches was found on the retrieved implant indicating the importance of the surface morphology in tissue growth and adhering to implants.

  6. p-Phosphonic acid calix[8]arene assisted dispersion and stabilisation of pea-pod C60@multi-walled carbon nanotubes in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianjue; Gibson, Christopher T; Britton, Joshua; Eggers, Paul K; Wahid, M Haniff; Raston, Colin L

    2015-02-11

    A facile approach has been developed for non-covalently stabilising pristine C60 and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in water in the presence of p-phosphonic acid calix[8]arene, along with the formation of a 'pea-pod' encapsulation of the fullerene inside the MWCNTs. Aqueous dispersions of the different carbon nano-materials are readily decorated with palladium nanoparticles.

  7. How much Carbon is Stored in Deserts? AN Approach for the Chilean Atacama Desert Using LANDSAT-8 Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, H. J.; Acuña, T.; Reyes, P.; Torres, M.; Figueroa, E.

    2016-06-01

    The Atacama Desert in northern Chile is known as the driest place on Earth, with an average rainfall of about 15 mm per year. Despite these conditions, it contains a rich variety of flora with hundreds of species characterised by their extraordinary ability to adapt to this extreme environment. These biotic components have a direct link to important ecosystem services, especially those related to carbon storage and sequestration. No quantitative assessment is currently available for these services and the role of the desert in this matter remains unclear. We propose an approach to estimate above-ground biomass (AGB) using Landsat-8 data, which we tested in the Taparacá region, located in the northern section of the desert. To calibrate and validate the models, we used field data from 86 plots and several spectral indexes (NDVI, EVI and SAVI) obtained from the provisional Landsat-8 Surface-reflectance products. We applied randomised branch sampling and allometry principles (non-destructive methods) to collect biomass samples for all plant biological types: wetlands, steppes, shrubs and trees. All samples were dried in an oven until they reached constant weight and the final values were used to extrapolate dry matter content (AGB) to each plot in terms of kg m-2. We used all available scenes from September 2014 to August 2015 to calculate the maximum, minimum and average value for each index in each pixel within this period. For modeling, we used the method based on classification and regression trees called random forest (RF), available in the statistical software R-Project. The explained variance obtained by the RF algorithm was around 80-85%, and it improved when a wetland vector layer was used as the predictive factor in the model to reach the range 85-90%. The mean error was 1.45 kg m-2 of dry matter. The best model was obtained using the maximum and mean values of SAVI and EVI indexes. We were able to estimate total biomass storage of around 8 million tons

  8. N-Doped carbon coated hollow Ni(x)Co(9-x)S8 urchins for a high performance supercapacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yufei; Sun, Chencheng; Su, Haiquan; Huang, Wei; Dong, Xiaochen

    2015-02-21

    N-doped carbon coated NixCo9-xS8 (NixCo9-xS8@C) hollow urchins have been synthesized via a two-step solvothermal synthesis and an in situ polymerization in dopamine together with a post-annealing process. The characterization indicated that NixCo9-xS8@C hollow urchins have urchin-like morphology and a uniform size distribution. Furthermore, there is a complete phrase transformation from the as obtained NiCo2S4/NixCo9-xS8 hybrid to NixCo9-xS8 during the thermal annealing process. More importantly, as electrochemical materials, NixCo9-xS8@C has a high specific capacitance (1404.0 F g(-1) at 2.0 A g(-1)) and excellent cycling performance (95.8% capacitance retention of the highest value after 2000 cycles). These results can be attributed to the coating of N-doped carbon, which gives the composite good conductivity. Additionally, the phase transformation from NiCo2S4/NixCo9-xS8 to NixCo9-xS8 during the thermal annealing greatly enhanced the redox reaction of the Co and Ni species.

  9. Removal of SU-8 photoresist using buckling-driven delamination assisted with a carbon dioxide snow jet for microfluidics fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sheng-Chung; Lin, Yu-Cheng

    2007-12-01

    A new, environmentally friendly, inexpensive and non-destructive method for removing SU-8 after being an electroplating mold in microfluidic fabrication is demonstrated in this paper. A controllable thermal delaminating method assisted by an efficient high-speed aerosol jet consisting of two major steps, delamination followed by removal by lifting, is presented. Experiments with the thermal process, operated at a rising temperature ΔT of 340 °C for 30 min, were carried out. Four delaminations were observed and the critical buckling stresses were calculated to be 38.98, 35.24, 42.04 and 41.26 MPa, respectively. The results show that these delaminations occurred at a rising temperature ΔT of 290, 260.5, 314.7 and 308.5 °C, respectively. The morphology of the thermal buckling-driven delamination was edge initiated and straight sided. The effects of the carbon dioxide (CO2) snow jet at a distance of 10 mm from the nozzle exit as well as the lift force Fdp, drag force Fd and impact force Fi were determined to be 79 × 10-3 N, 0.625 × 10-3 N and (1.65-4.95) × 10-3 N, respectively. Based on the analysis of the lift, drag and impact forces, the lifting force dominates the effects of the CO2 snow jet and is tens of times larger than the others. The experiments and analyses showed that the best distance for the CO2 snow jet to the nozzle exit was 6-10 mm.

  10. A comparison of electrochemically pre-treated and spark-platinized carbon fiber microelectrode. Measurement of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine in human urine and plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartosova, Z; Riman, D; Halouzka, V; Vostalova, J; Simanek, V; Hrbac, J; Jirovsky, D

    2016-09-01

    A novel method of carbon fiber microelectrode activation using spark discharge was demonstrated and compared to conventional electrochemical pretreatment by potential cycling. The spark discharge was performed at 800 V between the microelectrode connected to positive pole of the power supply and platinum counter electrode. Spark discharge led both to trimming of the fiber tip into conical shape and to the modification of carbon fiber microelectrode with platinum, as proven by scanning electron microscopy and electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. After the characterization of electrochemical properties using ferricyanide voltammetry, the activated electrodes were used for electrochemical analysis of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine, an oxidative stress marker. Subnanomolar detection limits (0.55 nmol L(-1)) in high-performance liquid chromatography were achieved for spark platinized electrodes incorporated into the flow detection cell. PMID:27543016

  11. Thermal stability and formation barrier of a high-energetic material N8 polymer nitrogen encapsulated in (5,5) carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Wei; Timoshevskii, V.; Guo, H.; Abou-Rachid, Hakima; Lussier, Louis-Simon

    2009-07-01

    We report the density functional theory total energy calculations of thermal stability and formation barrier of polymer nitrogen confined in carbon nanotubes (CNT). The analysis suggests that N8 polymer nitrogen encapsulated in (5,5) carbon nanotube [N8@CNT(5,5)] is thermally (meta)stable at a finite temperature up to energy scale of at least 5000 K, similar to nitrogen molecule gas phase confined in CNT [N2@CNT(5,5)]. The energetic difference between these two phases of N does not significantly change with temperature. A barrier of 1.07 eV was found for the formation of N8@CNT(5,5) from N2@CNT(5,5), while the dissociation barrier was found to be 0.2 eV. Snapshots of the reaction pathway show that the transition state is composed by a N2 and a N6 inside a CNT(5,5).

  12. Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry Scoping Workshop on Terrestrial and Coastal Carbon Fluxes in the Gulf of Mexico, St. Petersburg, FL, May 6-8, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, L.L.; Coble, P.G.; Clayton, T.D.; Cai, W.J.

    2009-01-01

    Despite their relatively small surface area, ocean margins may have a significant impact on global biogeochemical cycles and, potentially, the global air-sea fluxes of carbon dioxide. Margins are characterized by intense geochemical and biological processing of carbon and other elements and exchange large amounts of matter and energy with the open ocean. The area-specific rates of productivity, biogeochemical cycling, and organic/inorganic matter sequestration are high in coastal margins, with as much as half of the global integrated new production occurring over the continental shelves and slopes (Walsh, 1991; Doney and Hood, 2002; Jahnke, in press). However, the current lack of knowledge and understanding of biogeochemical processes occurring at the ocean margins has left them largely ignored in most of the previous global assessments of the oceanic carbon cycle (Doney and Hood, 2002). A major source of North American and global uncertainty is the Gulf of Mexico, a large semi-enclosed subtropical basin bordered by the United States, Mexico, and Cuba. Like many of the marginal oceans worldwide, the Gulf of Mexico remains largely unsampled and poorly characterized in terms of its air-sea exchange of carbon dioxide and other carbon fluxes. In May 2008, the Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry Scoping Workshop on Terrestrial and Coastal Carbon Fluxes in the Gulf of Mexico was held in St. Petersburg, FL, to address the information gaps of carbon fluxes associated with the Gulf of Mexico and to offer recommendations to guide future research. The meeting was attended by over 90 participants from over 50 U.S. and Mexican institutions and agencies. The Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry program (OCB; http://www.us-ocb.org/) sponsored this workshop with support from the National Science Foundation, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the U.S. Geological Survey, and the University of South Florida. The goal of

  13. The effects of ordered carbon vacancies on stability and thermo-mechanical properties of V8C7 compared with VC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, XiaoYu; Jiang, YeHua; Zhou, Rong; Feng, Jing

    2016-01-01

    The ordered non-stoichiometric V8C7 can form in the VCy carbides by the disorder–order phase transformation. The intrusion of ordered carbon vacancies can affect their stability, mechanical, thermal and electronic properties. The relatively thermodynamic stability and mechanical properties at high temperature for the ordered stoichiometric VC and non-stoichiometric V8C7 are investigated in this paper by first-principle calculations combined with the quasi-harmonic approximation. The difference between the properties of VC and V8C7 can be obtained. We find that the V8C7 is thermodynamic more stable than VC, but has weaker elastic heat resistance than VC. Moreover, the minimum thermal conductivity of VC is a little larger than V8C7 and a simple way is proposed to characterize the anisotropy of lattice thermal conductivity based on the Cahill’s model. PMID:27659072

  14. Multiwalled carbon nanotube@a-C@Co9S8 nanocomposites: a high-capacity and long-life anode material for advanced lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanli; Yan, Dong; Xu, Huayun; Liu, Shuo; Yang, Jian; Qian, Yitai

    2015-02-01

    A one-dimensional MWCNT@a-C@Co9S8 nanocomposite has been prepared via a facile solvothermal reaction followed by a calcination process. The amorphous carbon layer between Co9S8 and MWCNT acts as a linker to increase the loading of sulfides on MWCNT. When evaluated as anode materials for lithium ion batteries, the MWCNT@a-C@Co9S8 nanocomposite shows the advantages of high capacity and long life, superior to Co9S8 nanoparticles and MWCNT@Co9S8 nanocomposites. The reversible capacity could be retained at 662 mA h g-1 after 120 cycles at 1 A g-1. The efficient synthesis and excellent performances of this nanocomposite offer numerous opportunities for other sulfides as a new anode for lithium ion batteries.A one-dimensional MWCNT@a-C@Co9S8 nanocomposite has been prepared via a facile solvothermal reaction followed by a calcination process. The amorphous carbon layer between Co9S8 and MWCNT acts as a linker to increase the loading of sulfides on MWCNT. When evaluated as anode materials for lithium ion batteries, the MWCNT@a-C@Co9S8 nanocomposite shows the advantages of high capacity and long life, superior to Co9S8 nanoparticles and MWCNT@Co9S8 nanocomposites. The reversible capacity could be retained at 662 mA h g-1 after 120 cycles at 1 A g-1. The efficient synthesis and excellent performances of this nanocomposite offer numerous opportunities for other sulfides as a new anode for lithium ion batteries. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Infrared spectrogram (IR) of glucose treated MWCNT; TEM images of MWCNT@a-C treated by different concentrations of glucose; SEM and TEM images of the intermediate product obtained from the solvothermal reaction between thiourea and Co(Ac)2; EDS spectrum of MWCNT@a-C@Co9S8 composites; SEM and TEM images of MWCNT@Co9S8 nanocomposites obtained without the hydrothermal treatment by glucose; SEM and TEM images of Co9S8 nanoparticles; Galvanostatic discharge-charge profiles and cycling performance of MWCNT@a-C; TEM images

  15. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis of an enhanced LiNi0.8Co0.2O2 cathode with single wall carbon nanotube conductive additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: · Replaced 4 wt% carbon black conductive additives with 1 wt% single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in cathode composite. · Use of SWCNT additive increased conductivity of cathode composite by over an order of magnitude. · SWCNT additive composite had triple the capacity at a 10C rate. · SWCNT additive composite reduced exothermic energy released upon delithiation by 40%. - Abstract: The replacement of traditional conductive carbon additives with single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in lithium metal oxide cathode composites has been shown to enhance thermal stability as well as power capability and electrode energy density. The dispersion of 1 wt% high purity laser-produced SWCNTs in a LiNi0.8Co0.2O2 electrode created an improved percolation network over an equivalent composite electrode using 4 wt% Super C65 carbon black; evidenced by additive connectivity in SEM images and an order of magnitude increase in electrode electrical conductivity. The cathode with 1 wt% SWCNT additives showed comparable active material capacity (185-188 mAh g-1), at a low rate, and Coulombic efficiency to the cathode composite with 4 wt% Super C65. At increased cycling rates, the cathode with SWCNT additives had higher capacity retention with more than three times the capacity at 10C (16.4 mA cm-2). The thermal stability of the electrodes was evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry after charging to 4.3 V and float charging for 12 h. A 40% reduction of the cathode exothermic energy released was measured when using 1 wt% SWCNTs as the additive. Thus, the results demonstrate that replacing traditional conductive carbon additives with a lower weight loading of SWCNTs is a simple way to improve the thermal transport, safety, power, and energy characteristics of cathode composites for lithium ion batteries.

  16. Preparation of Carbon Nanotubes with High Yield and Narrow Diameter Distribution from C2H2 over LaCu0.2Ni0.8Ox

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Xing TANG; Mei Zhen QU; Bo Lan ZHANG; Zuo Long YU

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared by decomposition of C2H2 over newly developed LaCu0.2Ni0.8Ox in the temperature range from 600 to 850℃. The effect of the reaction temperature on the yield of CNTs was investigated in detail. At 680℃,the yield of CNTs reaches 17 g/g.catal. or so. The morphology of CNTs was examined by TEM. The diameter of CNTs rangs from 9 nm to 14 nm.

  17. 8”字型无碳小车的结构设计与实现%Design and Implementation of “8” Shaped Carbon-free Car

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张金玲; 肖坤; 边普阳; 赵宏宇; 曹伟龙

    2015-01-01

    To improve manipulative ability and engineering practice ability of undergraduate and cultivate the sense of innovation and teamwork, our school organizd the competition of engineering training ability, the theme of the event is "carbon-free car". according to the projects, the text explained emphatically the design and implementation of "8" shaped carbon-free car from program selection and structural design .through the car's design、 manufacture、 installation and commissioning, the competition strengthened the students' engineering training effect and took advantage of the potential, a comprehensive reflection of mechanical creative design capabilities, manufacturing process capability, at the same time,the students also showed the practical ability、project management ability and so on.%为提高在校本科生动手能力、工程实践能力,培养学生创新意识及团队协作精神,我校特举办大学生工程训练综合能力竞赛,该赛事的主题是“无碳小车”,针对竞赛项目,在充分领悟命题要求的基础上,着重方案选择和结构设计两方面阐述了“8”字型无碳小车的设计与实现,通过小车的设计、制作、安装与调试,强化了学生的工程训练效果,发挥了学生的潜力,综合体现大学生机械创新设计能力、制造工艺能力、实际动手能力、工程管理能力和团队合作能力。

  18. Study of the hydro-isomerization of paraffins with 7 and 8 carbon atoms on bifunctional catalysts; Etude de l'hydroisomerisation des paraffines a 7 et 8 atomes de carbone sur catalyseurs bifonctionnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrigeon, A.

    2000-10-11

    Due to the suppression of lead additives and the trend to decrease the aromatic and olefinic content in gasoline, the interest for new octane enhancement processes has increased, particularly for isomerization of C{sub 7} and C{sub 8} linear paraffins into higher octane number multi-branched paraffins. Up to the present day, no industrial bifunctional catalyst exists due to the high tendency of the paraffins to be cracked limiting the amount of multi-branched products. The aim of this work is to study the possibility of isomerizing linear C{sub 7} and C{sub 8} paraffins in two steps in order to increase the amount of formed multi-branched paraffins. The first step converts linear paraffins into mono-branched paraffins (that step is supposed to be the slowest one) carried out using one bifunctional catalyst. The second step converts the formed mono-branched paraffins into multi-branched paraffins using a second bifunctional catalyst. The aim is to determine the characteristics of the two catalysts. To study the first step, Pt/zeolite or Pt/meso-porous solid catalysts, with different acidities and porosities, were tested in n-heptane and n-octane hydro-conversion. The role of solid porosity on selectivities was clearly established. Molecular modelling was utilised to explain the observed selectivities. To study the second step, the 2-methyl-hexane and 2-methyl-heptane hydro-conversion on Pt/H-beta and Pt/H-Y was carried out. This lead to maximum multi-branched yields similar to those obtained with the n-heptane and n-octane hydro-conversion. That result shows that the two steps isomerization process is not necessarily required because no more multi-branched products are formed. A kinetic study on the n-heptane hydro-conversion was performed. The decomposition of isomerization and cracking reactions into elementary steps has shown the major role of the paraffins physio-sorption step in the zeolite pores. (author)

  19. Protective Effects of Quercetin and Quercetin-5',8-Disulfonate against Carbon Tetrachloride-Caused Oxidative Liver Injury in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanmang Cui

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is one of the major factors in the pathogenesis of liver disease. Quercetin is a plant-based antioxidant traditionally used as a treatment for hepatic injury, but its poor solubility affects its bioavailability. We here report the regulative effects on hepatoprotection and absorption in mice of quercetin sulfation to form quercetin-5',8-disulfonate (QS, a novel synthetic compound. Oral administration of both QS and the parent quercetin at 100, 200 and 500 mg/kg·bw prior to acute CCl4 oxidative damage in mice, effectively attenuated serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activities and hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA levels (p < 0.05, and suppressed the CCl4-induced depletion of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px and total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD. Selective 5',8-sulfation of quercetin increased the hepatoprotective effect, and its relative absorption relative to quercetin (p < 0.05 as indicated by an improved 24-hour urinary excretion and a decreased fecal excretion determined by HPLC. These results and histopathological observations collectively demonstrate that quercetin sulfation increases its hepatoprotective effects and absorption in mice, and QS has potential as a chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent for liver diseases.

  20. Calix[8]arene functionalized single-walled carbon nanohorns for dual-signalling electrochemical sensing of aconitine based on competitive host-guest recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Long; Ran, Xin; Cai, Le; Li, Yucong; Zhao, Hui; Li, Can-Peng

    2016-09-15

    A dual-signalling electrochemical approach has been developed towards aconitine based on competitive host-guest interaction by selecting methylene blue (MB) and p-sulfonated calix[8]arene functionalized single-walled carbon nanohorns (SCX8-SWCNHs) as the "reporter pair". Upon the presence of aconitine to the performed SCX8-SWCNHs·MB complex, the MB molecules are displaced by aconitine. This results in a decreased oxidation peak current of MB and the appearance of an oxidation peak of aconitine, and the changes of these signals correlate linearly with the concentration of aconitine. A linear response range of 1.00-10.00μM for aconitine with a low detection limit of 0.18μM (S/N=3) was obtained by using the proposed method. This method could be successfully utilized to detect aconitine in serum samples. This dual-signalling sensor can provide more sensitive target recognition and will have important applications in the sensitive and selective electrochemical detection of aconitine. PMID:27135940

  1. Congener-specific organic carbon-normalized soil and sediment-water partitioning coefficients for the C1 through C8 perfluoroalkyl carboxylic and sulfonic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayne, Sierra; Forest, Kaya

    2009-11-01

    Organic carbon-normalized soil and sediment-water partitioning coefficients (K(oc)) were estimated for all C(1) through C(8) perfluoroalkyl carboxylic (PFCA) and sulfonic (PFSA) acid congeners. The limited experimental K(oc) data set for the straight chain C(7) through C(10) PFCAs and C(8) and C(10) PFSAs was correlated to SPARC and ALOGPS computationally estimated octanol-water partitioning/distribution constants and used to predict K(oc) values for both branched and linear C(1) through C(8) isomers. Branched and linear congeners in this homologue range are generally expected to have K(oc) values > 1, leading to their accumulation in organic matter on sediments and soils, retardation during ground and pore water flow, and the preferential association with dissolved organic matter in aquatic systems. Both increasing perfluoroalkyl chain length and linearity increase K(oc) values with substantial intra- and inter-homologue variation and interhomologue mixing. Variability in K(oc) values among the PFCA and PFSA congeners will likely lead to an enrichment of more linear and longer-chain isomers in organic matter fractions, resulting in aqueous phases fractionated towards shorter-chain branched congeners. The expected magnitude of fractionation will require inclusion in source apportionment models and risk assessments. A comparison of representative established quantitative structure property relationships for estimating K(oc) values from octanol-water partitioning constants suggests that these equilibrium partitioning frameworks may be applicable towards modeling PFCA and PFSA environmental fate processes. PMID:20183495

  2. Alloying elements characterization in a Ti-5.6Al-4.8Sn-2Zr-1Mo-0.35Si-1Nd titanium alloy by carbon addition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shangzhou Zhang; Huizhong Xu; Ziquan Liu; Huilu Li; Rui Yang

    2005-01-01

    The effects of carbon addition (0.01wt%-0.43wt%) on a Ti-5.6Al-4.8Sn-2Zr-1Mo-0.35Si-1Nd (wt%) alloy with a bimodal microstructure were investigated. Electron probe microanalysis was carried out to examine the partitioning behavior of carbon and the relation of carbon content to the distributions of Al and Mo in the primary α phase (αp) and β transformed structure (β). It was found that interstitial carbon is enriched in the αp phase and its content slightly reduces with the increase of the volume fraction of αp.The measurements of carbon content in the present alloy with an αp of 15vo1% showed that the carbon content in the αp phase increases with the increment of carbon addition until a maximum but keeps almost constant in the β phase. The addition of carbon reduces the solubility of Al and Mo in the αp phase and leads to the increment of Mo partitioning to the β phase. When the carbon content is over 0.17wt% (0.67at%), carbide precipitation occurs in the matrix and its volume fraction is related to the volume fraction of αp which can be explained in term of the difference of carbon solubility in the αp and β phases.

  3. 8-羟基喹啉锌/碳微球复合材料的合成表征及发光性能%Synthesis and characterization and luminescence property of bis(8-hydroxyquinoline)zinc/carbon microspheres composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨永珍; 韩艳星; 刘伟峰; 刘红艳; 刘旭光; 许并社

    2011-01-01

    The composites of bis(8-hydroxyquinoline) zinc (Znq2) and carbon microspheres (CMSs) were synthesized by rheological phase reaction. Their structure and photoluminescence property were characterized by the field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transformation infrared absorption spectrometry and fluorospectrophotometer. The results show that Znq2 is loaded on the surfaces of uniform CMSs with 300~400 nm in diameters in the form of non-covalent bond and the peak wavelength of the composite is 540 nm in photoluminescence spectra. It is expected to apply in the field of organic electroluminescence for Znq2/CMSs composite.%利用流变相反应法制备了碳微球(CMSs)负载8-羟基喹啉锌(Znq2)的复合材料.通过场发射扫描电子显微镜、X射线衍射仪、热重分析仪、X射线光电子能谱仪、傅里叶红外光谱仪和荧光分光光度计等对Znq2/CMSs复合材料结构和发光性能进行了表征和分析.结果表明:Znq2以非共价键形式负载于直径均匀的CMSs(300~400 nm)表面,形成了一种Znq2/CMSs复合材料,该复合材料在黄光(540 nm)区发光,有望应用于有机电致发光领域.

  4. Comparative study of the pharmacokinetics of carbon tetrachloride in the rat following repeated inhalation exposures of 8 and 11.5 hr/day

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate whether exposure to inhaled vapors for periods longer than 8 hr/day could affect the rates and routes of elimination, male Sprague-Dawley rats were repeatedly exposed to 100 ppm of radiolabeled carbon tetrachloride (14CCl4) in a closed-loop chamber. One group was exposed for 8 hr/day for 5 days and another group for 11.5 hr/day for 4 days. Two other groups were exposed for either 8 hr/day for 10 of 12 consecutive days or 11.5 hr/day for 7 of 10 days. The elimination of 14C activity was measured in the expired air, urine, and feces for up to 100 hr following exposure and the pharmacokinetic parameters were determined. Following 2 weeks of exposure to the 8-hr/day schedule, 14CCl4 in the breath and 14C activity in the feces comprised 45 and 48% of the total 14C excreted, respectively. Following 2 weeks of exposure to the 11.5-hr/day schedule, the values were 32 and 62%, respectively, indicating that repeated exposure to the longer schedule altered the route of elimination of CCl4. Regardless of the period of exposure, less than 8% of the inhaled 14CCl4 was excreted in the urine and less than 2% was exhaled in the breath as the 14CO2 metabolite. Approximately 97-98% of the 14C activity in the expired air was 14CCl4. The quantities of 14C noted in the feces and urine suggest that more than 60% of the inhaled CCl4 was metabolized. Elimination of 14CCl4 and 14CO2 in the breath followed a two-compartment, first-order pharmacokinetic model (r2 = 0.98). For rats exposed 8 hr/day and 11.5 hr/day for 2 weeks, the average half-lives for elimination of 14CCl4 in the breath for the fast (alpha) and slow (beta) phases averaged 96 and 455 min, and 89 and 568 min, respectively. The average alpha and beta half-lives for elimination of 14CO2 in the breath

  5. Electron spin resonance study of the La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} nanoparticle-decorated carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dowan; Lee, Kyu Won [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, E.H. [Department of Electrophysics, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Cheol Eui, E-mail: rscel@korea.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Inverse spin susceptibilities obtained by integration of the distinct ESR line components of the LSMO-CNTs system as a function of temperature. - Highlights: • Spin/charge dynamics in La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3}-decorated CNTs studied by EPR. • One spin species revealed only paramagnetic–superparamagnetic phase transition. • Another spin species manifested reflected weak localization of spin/charge carriers. • Spins participating in the magnetic phase transition and the itinerant spins well separated by EPR. - Abstract: We have studied La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LSMO) nanoparticle-decorated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by means of the electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy in view of our previous work on the magnetic and electrical properties of the system. One of the line components of the ESR spectrum reflected a paramagnetic–superparamagnetic phase transition at T{sub SP}∼200 K, which is accompanied by a concomitant metal–insulator transition (MIT) associated with charge transport taking place through the CNTs network triggered by the LSMO nanoparticles. On the other hand, another ESR line component revealed anomalies at T{sub WL}∼170 K as well, attributable to a 2D weak localization effect of the spin/charge carriers. Thus, magnetic interactions and dynamics of the distinct spin species were sensitively reflected in the LSMO-CNTs system.

  6. Epoxy/Glass and Polyimide (LaRC(TradeMark) PETI-8)/Carbon Fiber Metal Laminates Made by the VARTM Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Roberto J.; Loos, Alfred C.; Jensen, Brian J.; Britton, Sean M.; Tuncol, Goker; Long, Kai

    2010-01-01

    Recent work at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has concentrated on developing new polyimide resin systems for advanced aerospace applications that can be processed without the use of an autoclave. Polyimide composites are very attractive for applications that require a high strength to weight ratio and thermal stability. Vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) has shown the potential to reduce the manufacturing cost of composite structures. Fiber metal laminates (FML) made via this process with aluminum, glass fabric, and epoxy resins have been previously fabricated at LaRC. In this work, the VARTM process has been refined for epoxy/glass FMLs and extended to the fabrication of FM Ls with titanium/carbon fabric layers and a polyimide system developed at NASA, LARC(TradeMark) PETI-8. Resin flow pathways were introduced into the titanium foils to aid the infiltration of the polyimide resin. Injection temperatures in the range of 250-280 C were required to achieve the necessary VARTM viscosities (<10 Poise). Laminate quality and initial mechanical properties will be presented.

  7. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis of an enhanced LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} cathode with single wall carbon nanotube conductive additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganter, Matthew J., E-mail: mjg9074@rit.edu [Golisano Institute for Sustainability, Rochester Institute of Technology, 111 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); DiLeo, Roberta A., E-mail: rad0468@rit.edu [Microsystems Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology, 111 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Schauerman, Christopher M., E-mail: cms3176@rit.edu [Golisano Institute for Sustainability, Rochester Institute of Technology, 111 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Rogers, Reginald E., E-mail: rerche@rit.edu [Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology, 111 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Raffaelle, Ryne P., E-mail: ryne.raffaelle@nrel.gov [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden Colorado, CO 84041 (United States); Landi, Brian J., E-mail: bjlsps@rit.edu [Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology, 111 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States)

    2011-08-30

    Highlights: {center_dot} Replaced 4 wt% carbon black conductive additives with 1 wt% single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in cathode composite. {center_dot} Use of SWCNT additive increased conductivity of cathode composite by over an order of magnitude. {center_dot} SWCNT additive composite had triple the capacity at a 10C rate. {center_dot} SWCNT additive composite reduced exothermic energy released upon delithiation by 40%. - Abstract: The replacement of traditional conductive carbon additives with single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in lithium metal oxide cathode composites has been shown to enhance thermal stability as well as power capability and electrode energy density. The dispersion of 1 wt% high purity laser-produced SWCNTs in a LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} electrode created an improved percolation network over an equivalent composite electrode using 4 wt% Super C65 carbon black; evidenced by additive connectivity in SEM images and an order of magnitude increase in electrode electrical conductivity. The cathode with 1 wt% SWCNT additives showed comparable active material capacity (185-188 mAh g{sup -1}), at a low rate, and Coulombic efficiency to the cathode composite with 4 wt% Super C65. At increased cycling rates, the cathode with SWCNT additives had higher capacity retention with more than three times the capacity at 10C (16.4 mA cm{sup -2}). The thermal stability of the electrodes was evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry after charging to 4.3 V and float charging for 12 h. A 40% reduction of the cathode exothermic energy released was measured when using 1 wt% SWCNTs as the additive. Thus, the results demonstrate that replacing traditional conductive carbon additives with a lower weight loading of SWCNTs is a simple way to improve the thermal transport, safety, power, and energy characteristics of cathode composites for lithium ion batteries.

  8. Magnéli phases Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7} and Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15} and their carbon nanocomposites via the thermal decomposition-precursor route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conze, S., E-mail: susan.conze@ikts.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS, Winterbergstr. 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany); Veremchuk, I. [Max-Planck-Institut für Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Nöthnitzer Straße 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Reibold, M. [Technical University of Dresden, Zum Triebenberg 50, 01328 Dresden (Zaschendorf) (Germany); Matthey, B.; Michaelis, A. [Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS, Winterbergstr. 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany); Grin, Yu. [Max-Planck-Institut für Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Nöthnitzer Straße 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Kinski, I. [Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS, Winterbergstr. 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    A new synthetic approach for producing nano-powders of the Magnéli phases Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}, Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15} and their carbon nanocomposites by thermal decomposition-precursor route is proposed. The formation mechanism of the single-phase carbon nanocomposites (Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}/C and Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15}/C) from metal–organic precursors is studied using FT-IR, elemental analysis, TG, STA-MS and others. The synthesis parameters and conditions were optimized to prepare the target oxides with the desired microstructure and physical properties. The electrical and transport properties of Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}/C and Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15}/C are investigated. These nano-materials are n-type semiconductors with relatively low thermal conductivity in contrast to the bulk species. The nanostructured carbon nanocomposites of Magnéli phases achieve a low thermal conductivity close to 1 W/m K at RT. The maximum ZT{sub 570} {sub °C} values are 0.04 for Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}/C powder nanocomposite and 0.01 for Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15}/C bulk nanocomposite. - Graphical abstract: From the precursor to the produced titanium oxide pellet and its microstructure (SEM, TEM micrographs) as well as results of phase and thermoelectric analyses. - Highlights: • Magnéli phases Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}/Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15} via thermal decomposition-precursor route is proposed. • The formation mechanism of the nanocomposites Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}/C and Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15}/C are investigated. • Microstructure of Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}/C and Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15}/C are examined. • The electrical and transport properties of Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}/C and Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15}/C are investigated. • The maximum figure of mertit ZT{sub 570} {sub °C} of Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}/C and Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15}/C are 0.01 and 0.04.

  9. Porous carbons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Satish M Manocha

    2003-02-01

    Carbon in dense as well as porous solid form is used in a variety of applications. Activated porous carbons are made through pyrolysis and activation of carbonaceous natural as well as synthetic precursors. Pyrolysed woods replicate the structure of original wood but as such possess very low surface areas and poor adsorption capacities. On activation, these exhibit increased adsorption volumes of 0.5–0.8 cm3 /gm and surface areas of 700–1800 m2 /gm depending on activation conditions, whether physical or chemical. Former carbons possess mixed pore size distribution while chemically activated carbons predominantly possess micropores. Thus, these carbons can be used for adsorption of wide distributions of molecules from gas to liquid. The molecular adsorption within the pores is due to single layer or multilayer molecule deposition at the pore walls and hence results in different types of adsorption isotherm. On the other hand, activated carbon fibres with controlled microporous structure and surface area in the range of 2500 m2 /gm can be developed by controlled pyrolysis and physical activation of amorphous carbon fibres. Active carbon fibres with unmatchable pore structure and surface characteristics are present and futuristic porous materials for a number of applications from pollution control to energy storage.

  10. STUDY ON ABSORBING PROPERTIES OF COMPOSITES FILLED WITH CHOPPED CARBON FIBER AT BANDS OF 8 MM%短切碳纤维复合材料对8mm波吸收性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈国柱; 徐政; 李轶

    2006-01-01

    本文研究了不同长度和含量的短切碳纤维复合材料在8 mm波段(26.5~40GHz)的吸收性能.结果表明,长度为3mm,含量为0.2%的短切碳纤维复合材料在该波段反射率均在-10dB以下,具有优良的毫米波吸收特性;并探讨了短切碳纤维吸收毫米波的原因.

  11. Volumetric Properties of the Mixture Dimethyl carbonate C3H6O3 + C10H22O5 2,5,8,11,14-Pentaoxapentadecane (VMSD1112, LB4865_V)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibulka, I.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Sosnkowska-Kehiaian, K.; Kehiaian, H. V.

    This document is part of Subvolume C 'Binary Liquid Systems of Nonelectrolytes III' of Volume 26 'Heats of Mixing, Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium, and Volumetric Properties of Mixtures and Solutions' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV 'Physical Chemistry'. It contains the Chapter 'Volumetric Properties of the Mixture Dimethyl carbonate C3H6O3 + C10H22O5 2,5,8,11,14-Pentaoxapentadecane (VMSD1112, LB4865_V)' providing data by calculation of mass density in the single-phase region(s) from low-pressure dilatometric measurements of the molar excess volume at variable mole fraction and constant temperature.

  12. Volumetric Properties of the Mixture Dimethyl carbonate C3H6O3 + C10H22O5 2,5,8,11,14-Pentaoxapentadecane (VMSD1211, LB4862_V)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibulka, I.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Sosnkowska-Kehiaian, K.; Kehiaian, H. V.

    This document is part of Subvolume C 'Binary Liquid Systems of Nonelectrolytes III' of Volume 26 'Heats of Mixing, Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium, and Volumetric Properties of Mixtures and Solutions' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV 'Physical Chemistry'. It contains the Chapter 'Volumetric Properties of the Mixture Dimethyl carbonate C3H6O3 + C10H22O5 2,5,8,11,14-Pentaoxapentadecane (VMSD1211, LB4862_V)' providing data from direct low-pressure dilatometric measurement of molar excess volume at variable mole fraction and constant temperature.

  13. Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the Nine R/V Korr Cruises Comprising the Indian Ocean CO2Survey (WOCE Sections I8SI9S, I9N, I8NI5E, I3, I5WI4, I7N, I1, I10, and I2; December 1, 1994-January 19, 1996)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozyr, A.V.

    2003-09-15

    This document describes the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO{sub 2}) and total alkalinity (TALK) at hydrographic stations taken during the R/V Knorr Indian Ocean cruises (Sections I8SI9S, I9N, I8NI5E, I3, I5WI4, I7N, I1, I10, and I2) in 1994-1996. The measurements were conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE). The expedition began in Fremantle, Australia, on December 1, 1994, and ended in Mombasa, Kenya, on January 22, 1996. During the nine cruises, 12 WOCE sections were occupied. Total carbon dioxide was extracted from water samples and measured using single-operator multiparameter metabolic analyzers (SOMMAs) coupled to coulometers. The overall precision and accuracy of the analyses was {+-} 1.20 {micro}mol/kg. The second carbonate system parameter, TALK, was determined by potentiometric titration. The precision of the measurements determined from 962 analyses of certified reference material was {+-} 4.2 {micro}mol/kg (REFERENCE). This work was supported by grants from the National Science Foundation, the U. S. Department of Energy, and the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration. The R/V Knorr Indian Ocean data set is available as a numeric data package (NDP) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). The NDP consists of 18 oceanographic data files, two FORTRAN 77 data retrieval routine files, a readme file, and this printed documentation, which describes the contents and format of all files as well as the procedures and methods used to obtain the data. Instructions for accessing the data are provided.

  14. MNi4.8Sn0.2(M=La,Nd)-supported multi-walled carbon nanotube composites as hydrogen storase materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN JianWei; LIAO ShiJun; LIU JunMin

    2007-01-01

    Two composites LaNi4.8Sn0.2/CNTs and NdNi4.8Sn0.2/CNTs were prepared by an impregnation-reduction method.Their hydrogen storage capacity could reach up to 2.96 wt% and 2.88 wt% respectively at room temperature and 1.0 MPa pressure.These values,which might result from the synergetic effect between the alloy nanoparticles and the pretreated CNTs,were three times higher than those of the unsupported MNi4.8Sn0.2(M=La,Nd)alloys under the same conditions.XRD and TEM revealed that the alloy particles were uniformly dispersed on the CNTs and the average particle size was ca.30 nm.The composites also showed good stability and the hydrogen storage capacity decreased by less than 6% after 100 adsorption-desorption cycles.Moreover,no noticeable change in crystalline structure was bserved for the composites.

  15. Carbon nanotube core graphitic shell hybrid fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahm, Myung Gwan; Lee, Jae-Hwang; Hart, Amelia H C; Song, Sung Moo; Nam, Jaewook; Jung, Hyun Young; Hashim, Daniel Paul; Li, Bo; Narayanan, Tharangattu N; Park, Chi-Dong; Zhao, Yao; Vajtai, Robert; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Hayashi, Takuya; Ku, Bon-Cheol; Endo, Morinobu; Barrera, Enrique; Jung, Yung Joon; Thomas, Edwin L; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2013-12-23

    A carbon nanotube yarn core graphitic shell hybrid fiber was fabricated via facile heat treatment of epoxy-based negative photoresist (SU-8) on carbon nanotube yarn. The effective encapsulation of carbon nanotube yarn in carbon fiber and a glassy carbon outer shell determines their physical properties. The higher electrical conductivity (than carbon fiber) of the carbon nanotube yarn overcomes the drawbacks of carbon fiber/glassy carbon, and the better properties (than carbon nanotubes) of the carbon fiber/glassy carbon make up for the lower thermal and mechanical properties of the carbon nanotube yarn via synergistic hybridization without any chemical doping and additional processes. PMID:24224730

  16. Carbonates-based noble metal-free lean NOx trap catalysts MOx-K2CO3/K2Ti8O17 (M = Ce, Fe, Cu, Co) with superior catalytic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuxia; You, Rui; Liu, Dongsheng; Liu, Cheng; Li, Xingang; Tian, Ye; Jiang, Zheng; Zhang, Shuo; Huang, Yuying; Zha, Yuqing; Meng, Ming

    2015-12-01

    A series of base metal-based lean NOx trap (LNT) catalysts MOx-K2CO3/K2Ti8O17 (M = Ce, Fe, Cu, Co) were synthesized by successive impregnations and employed for the storage and reduction of NOx in the emissions of lean-burn engines at 350 °C. The XRD and XANES/EXAFS results reveal that the active phases in the corresponding catalysts exist as CeO2, Fe2O3, CuO and Co3O4, respectively. Among all the catalysts, CoOx-K2CO3/K2Ti8O17 exhibits the best performance, which cannot only trap the NOx quickly and completely at lean condition, giving the highest storage capacity (3.32 mmol/g) reported so far, but also reduce the NOx at rich condition, showing a NOx reduction percentage as high as 99.0%. Meanwhile, this catalyst displays an ultralow NOx to N2O selectivity (0.3%) during NOx reduction. The excellent performance of CoOx-K2CO3/K2Ti8O17 results from its largest amount of surface active oxygen species as revealed by XPS, O2-TPD and NO-TPD. HRTEM, FT-IR and CO2-TPD results illustrate that several kinds of K species such as sbnd OK groups, K2O, surface carbonates and bulk or bulk-like carbonates coexist in the catalysts. Based upon the in situ DRIFTS results, the participation of K2CO3 in NOx storage is confirmed, and the predominant NOx storage species is revealed as bidentate nitrites formed via multiple kinetic pathways. The low cost and high catalytic performance of the CoOx-based LNT catalyst make it most promising for the substitution of noble metal-based LNT catalysts.

  17. The changes of Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ perovskite oxide on heating in oxygen and carbon dioxide atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeljković Saša

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the first part of this study, the oxygen deficiency, δ, in Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3 - δ (BSCF was measured by means of thermogravimetry as a function of oxygen partial pressure, p(O2, in the range of 1.1×10−6 < p(O2/% < 41.67 at elevated temperatures ranging 873 ≤ T/K ≤ 1073. It was shown that δ becomes more pronounced with increasing T and with decreasing p(O2. The isotherms δ vs. p(O2 were determined. The second part of this study relates to the reaction of CO2 with Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.8O3-δ perovskite oxide in the absence and presence of O2 at temperatures ranging from 673 to 973 K also by thermogravimetry. The reactivity of CO2 with BSCF increased with increasing temperature and increasing exposure to CO2. Reaction of CO2 with BSCF was described by a equilibrium reaction isotherms. The results of X-ray diffractometry evidenced that the exposure to CO2 leads to the formation of carbonates.

  18. Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Meteor Cruise 28/1 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A8, March 29 - May 12, 1994)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozyr, A.

    2002-05-09

    This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO{sub 2}) and the fugacity of CO{sub 2} (fCO{sub 2}) at hydrographic stations during the R/V Meteor oceanographic cruise 28/1 in the South Atlantic Ocean (Section A8). Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the cruise began in Recife, Brazil, on March 29, 1994, and ended after 35 days at sea in Walvis Bay, Namibia, on May 12, 1994. Instructions for accessing the data are provided. TCO{sub 2} was measured using two single-operator multiparameter metabolic analyzers (SOMMA) coupled to a coulometer for extracting and detecting CO{sub 2} from seawater samples. The overall precision and accuracy of the analyses was {+-}1.17 {micro}mol/kg. For the second carbonate system parameter, the fCO{sub 2} was measured in discrete samples by equilibrating a known volume of liquid phase (seawater) with a known volume of a gas phase containing a known mixture of CO{sub 2} in gaseous nitrogen (N{sub 2}). After equilibration, the gas phase CO{sub 2} concentration was determined by flame ionization detection following the catalytic conversion of CO{sub 2} to methane (CH{sub 4}). The precision of these measurements was less than or equal to 1.0%. The R/V Meteor Cruise 28/1 data set is available free of charge as a numeric data package (NDP) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center. The NDP consists of two oceanographic data files, two FORTRAN 90 data retrieval routine files, a readme file, and this printed documentation that describes the contents and format of all files as well as the procedures and methods used to obtain the data.

  19. Microstructural Evolution of Ti-5.6Al-4.8Sn-2Zr-1Mo-0.35Si-0.7Nd Titanium Alloy with Carbon Additions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shangzhou ZHANG; Yuan GAO; Ziquan LIU; Yuyin LIU; Rui YANG

    2006-01-01

    The effect of carbon addition on microstructural evolution was studied in a near-α titanium alloy(Ti-5.6Al-4.8Sn-2Zr-1Mo-0.35Si-0.7Nd). It was found that flake and ribbon titanium carbides with a NaCl crystal structure formed in the as-cast alloys with carbon additions of over 0.17 wt pct. Flake carbide particles are the product of eutectic transformation and precipitate from the high-temperature β phase. The ribbon carbide particles are primary phases formed prior to the nucleation of any metallic phases. The as-cast alloys with carbide precipitation after heat-treatment atβt-30℃ followed by water quenching showed the spheroidization of α lamellae and partial dissolution of carbide particles. After annealing at βt+15℃, carbide particles are mostly distributed at the grain boundary and spheroidized through mixed grain boundary plus bulk diffusions.

  20. Ba(OH)/sub 2/. 8H/sub 2/O process for the removal and immobilization of carbon-14. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haag, G.L.; Holladay, D.W.; Pitt, W.W. Jr.; Young, G.C.

    1986-01-01

    The airborne release of /sup 14/C from various nuclear facilities has been identified as a potential biohazard due to the long half-life of /sup 14/C (5730 years) and the ease with which it may be assimilated into the biosphere. At ORNL, technology has been developed for the removal and immobilization of this radionuclide. Prior studies have indicated that /sup 14/C will likely exist in the oxidized form as CO/sub 2/ and will contribute slightly to the bulk CO/sub 2/ concentration of the gas stream, which is air-like in nature (approx.300 ppM/sub v/ CO/sub 2/). The technology that has been developed utilizes the CO/sub 2/-Ba(OH)/sub 2/.8H/sub 2/O gas-solid reaction with the mode of gas-solid contacting being a fixed bed. The product, BaCO/sub 3/, possesses excellent thermal and chemical stability, prerequisites for the long-term disposal of nuclear wastes. For optimal process operation, studies have indicated that an operating window of adequate size does exist. When operating within the window, high CO/sub 2/ removal efficiency (effluent concentrations <100 ppB/sub v/), high reactant utilization (>99%), and an acceptable pressure drop across the bed (3 kPa/m at a superficial velocity of 13 cm/s) are possible. Three areas of experimental investigation are reported: (1) microscale studies on 150-mg samples to provide information concerning surface properties, kinetics, and equilibrium vapor pressures; (2) macroscale studies on large fixed beds (4.2 kg of reactant) to determine the effects of humidity, temperature, and gas flow rate upon bed pressure drop and CO/sub 2/ breakthrough; and (3) design, construction, and operation of a pilot unit capable of continuously processing a 34-m/sup 3//h (20-ft/sup 3//min) air-based gas stream.

  1. Application of poly 1,8-diaminonaphthalene/multiwalled carbon nanotubes-COOH hybrid material as an efficient sorbent for trace determination of cadmium and lead ions in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabid, Mohammad Reza; Sedghi, Roya; Behbahani, Mohammad; Arvan, Behnoush; Heravi, Majid M; Oskooie, Hossein Abdi

    2014-07-01

    Poly 1,8-diaminonaphthalene/multiwalled carbon nanotubes-COOH hybrid material as an effective sorbents in solid phase extraction has been developed for the separation and preconcentration of Cd(II) and Pb(II) at trace levels in environmental water samples. The results indicate that the novel nanocomposite show a high affinity for these heavy metals due to the presence of several good extractive sites, which are introduced to the synthesized nanocomposite The maximum adsorption capacity of the synthesized sorbent for cadmium and lead ions was found to be 101.2 and 175.2 mg g(-1) , respectively. The detection limits of this method were 0.09 and 0.7 ng ml(-1) for Cd(II) and Pb(II), respectively.

  2. Carbon Farming as a Carbon Negative Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, C.; Laird, D.; Hayes, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon farms have a pivotal role in national and international efforts to mitigate and adapt to climate change. A carbon farm in its broadest sense is one that reduces greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions or captures and holds carbon in vegetation and soils. Their capacity to remove carbon from the air and store it safely and permanently, while providing additional human and ecosystem benefits, means they could contribute significantly to national efforts to stabilize or reduce GHGs. We examine carbon farms in the context of corn and soybean production agriculture. We illustrate, using Iowa data but with relevance across United States corn and soybean production, the potential for carbon farms to reduce human GHG emissions and sequester carbon permanently at a rate that has meaningful impact on global greenhouse gas concentration. Carbon has been viewed as a next generation cash crop in Iowa for over a decade. The carbon farm perspective, however, goes beyond carbon as cash crop to make carbon the center of an entire farm enterprise. The transformation is possible through slight adjustment crop practices mixed with advances in technology to sequester carbon through biochar. We examine carbon balance of Iowa agriculture given only the combination of slight reduction in fertilizer and sequestration by biochar. We find the following. Iowa carbon farms could turn Iowa agriculture into a carbon sink. The estimated range of GHG reduction by statewide implementation of carbon farms is 19.46 to 90.27 MMt CO2-equivalent (CO2-e), while the current agricultural CO2-e emission estimate is 35.38 MMt CO2-e. Iowa carbon farm GHG reduction would exceed Iowa GHG reduction by wind energy (8.7 MMt CO2-e) and could exceed combined reductions from wind energy and corn grain ethanol (10.7 MMt CO2-e; 19.4 MMt CO2-e combined). In fact, Iowa carbon farms alone could exceed GHG reduction from national corn grain ethanol production (39.6 MMt CO2-e). A carbon price accessible to agricultural

  3. Photocatalytic splitting of CS2 to S8 and a carbon-sulfur polymer catalyzed by a bimetallic ruthenium(II) compound with a tertiary amine binding site: toward photocatalytic splitting of CO2?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livanov, Konstantin; Madhu, Vedichi; Balaraman, Ekambaram; Shimon, Linda J W; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Neumann, Ronny

    2011-11-21

    The catalytic photocleavage of CS(2) to S(8) and a (C(x)S(y))(n) polymer with visible light using a dinuclear ruthenium(II) compound with a bipyridine units for photoactivity and a vicinal tertiary amine binding site for CS(2) activation was studied. The catalyst was characterized by X-ray diffraction, (1)H NMR, and (13)C NMR, ESI-MS and elemental analysis. CS(2) photocleavage was significant (240 turnovers, 20 h) to yield isolable S(8) and a (C(x)S(y))(n) polymer. A mononuclear catalyst or one without an amine binding site showed significantly less activity. XPS of the (C(x)S(y))(n) polymer showed a carbon/sulfur ratio ∼1.5-1.6 indicating that in part both C-S bonds of CS(2) had been cleaved. Catalyst was also included within the polymer. The absence of peaks in the (1)H NMR verified the (C(x)S(y))(n) nature of the polymer, while (13)C NMR and IR indicated that the polymer had multiple types of C-S and C-C bonds. PMID:22029376

  4. Photocatalytic splitting of CS2 to S8 and a carbon-sulfur polymer catalyzed by a bimetallic ruthenium(II) compound with a tertiary amine binding site: toward photocatalytic splitting of CO2?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livanov, Konstantin; Madhu, Vedichi; Balaraman, Ekambaram; Shimon, Linda J W; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Neumann, Ronny

    2011-11-21

    The catalytic photocleavage of CS(2) to S(8) and a (C(x)S(y))(n) polymer with visible light using a dinuclear ruthenium(II) compound with a bipyridine units for photoactivity and a vicinal tertiary amine binding site for CS(2) activation was studied. The catalyst was characterized by X-ray diffraction, (1)H NMR, and (13)C NMR, ESI-MS and elemental analysis. CS(2) photocleavage was significant (240 turnovers, 20 h) to yield isolable S(8) and a (C(x)S(y))(n) polymer. A mononuclear catalyst or one without an amine binding site showed significantly less activity. XPS of the (C(x)S(y))(n) polymer showed a carbon/sulfur ratio ∼1.5-1.6 indicating that in part both C-S bonds of CS(2) had been cleaved. Catalyst was also included within the polymer. The absence of peaks in the (1)H NMR verified the (C(x)S(y))(n) nature of the polymer, while (13)C NMR and IR indicated that the polymer had multiple types of C-S and C-C bonds.

  5. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from time series observations using Bubble type equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from TAO165E8S and TAO165E_8S in the South Pacific Ocean from 2009-06-22 to 2011-11-15 (NODC Accession 0117073)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0117073 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and time series data collected from TAO165E8S and TAO165E_8S in the South Pacific Ocean from...

  6. Effects of Carbon Content and B Class Porosity on Bending Strength of WC-8% Co Cemented Carbide%碳量及B类孔隙对WC-8%Co硬质合金抗弯强度的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闵召宇; 廖军; 时凯华; 蒋阳

    2013-01-01

    采用粉末冶金方法制备了WC-8%Co硬质合金试样,经氢气烧结后,利用钴磁测试仪、强度测试仪、电子显微镜和金相显微镜分别对试样的钴磁和抗弯强度进行测定、对试样断口和金相缺陷进行观察.研究了WC-8%Co硬质合金抗弯强度与碳量(相对磁饱和)、金相缺陷(B类孔隙)之间的关系.结果表明:将试样碳含量及孔隙度控制在一定的范围内,可以使试样抗弯强度保持在较高的水平,当试样相对磁饱和为88%~92%,B类孔隙为B00时,合金显微组织中WC晶粒较为均匀,无异常长大情况,WC-8%Co硬质合金抗弯强度可达3 286 N/mm2;同时,抗弯强度值的大小随孔隙度的增多而下降.另外,氢气烧结后经HIP处理可以有效消除WC-8%Co硬质合金中的孔隙缺陷,从而提高合金抗弯强度,经HIP处理的试样的强度比正常样的强度高出2.3%.%WC-8%Co cemented carbide specimens were prepared by powder metallurgy method. The cobalt magnetism and bending strength of the specimens were tested. The fracture surface and the defects in the microstructure were observed. Furthermore the effects of the carbon content (relative magnetic saturation) and the defects (B class pores) on the bending strength of the cemented carbide were studied. The results show that by means of controlling the carbon content and the porosity in the certain ranges, the bending strength of the WC-8%Co cemented carbide remains at a high level. When the relative magnetic saturation is in the range of 88%~92% and the metallographic B class porosity is BOO, the WC grain size of WC-8% Co is more uniform and the bending strength of the cemented carbide reaches its highest values at 3 286 N/mm2. Meanwhile, the bending strength value decreases with the increasing of porosity. In addition, HIP treatment after hydrogen sintering can effectively eliminate pore defects in the WC-8%Co cemented carbide, thus the bending strength is enhanced up to 2.3%.

  7. Carbon cycle: Global warming then and now

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stassen, Peter

    2016-04-01

    A rapid warming event 55.8 million years ago was caused by extensive carbon emissions. The rate of change of carbon and oxygen isotopes in marine shelf sediments suggests that carbon emission rates were much slower than anthropogenic emissions.

  8. Efecto de la arginina 8%-carbonato de calcio y del fluoruro de sodio al 5% en la reducción de la hipersensibilidad dentinaria post terapia periodontal: ensayo clínico Effect of 8% arginine, calcium carbonate and 5% sodium fluoride on the reduction of the dentine hipersensitivity post periodontal therapy: clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Márquez

    2011-04-01

    embargo, se logró una mayor reducción del dolor en aquellos pacientes que utilizaron la terapia de arginina al 8% y carbonato de calcio, con un 60% de los individuos sin dolor y con una mediana final de 0 en comparación al grupo con barniz de flúor al 5% y un dentrífico fluorado que mantuvieron en el 100% de los sujetos algún grado de dolor y presentando una mediana final en la escala VAS de 2.Aim: The aim of this clinical study was to evaluate and to compare the efficacy in reducing the dentine hypersensitivity of an 8% arginine, calcium carbonate, 1.450 ppm sodium monofluorophosphate dentifrice with topical application and twice-daily brushing, with a negative control toothpaste containing calcium carbonate and 1.450 ppm fluoride as MFP, after periodontal treatment (baseline and four weeks respectively. Methods: A four-week clinical study with 20 subjects with diagnosis of slight to moderate chronic periodontitis under mechanical periodontal treatment and presence of gingival recessions in incisors, canines or premolars, stratified based on baseline tooth sensitivity. Subjects brushed with either a 1.450 ppm fluoride dentifrice or a marketed 8% arginine calcium carbonate dentifrice twice daily for approximately one minute. At screening, baseline and weeks four, subjects' tooth sensitivity was determined through both evaporative (Schiff and Visual Analogue Scale [VAS]. The same examiner throughout the study performed subject assessments using each stimulus. Results: Both subject groups exhibited significant reductions from baseline to four weeks in dentine hypersensitivity. However, patients who received 8% arginine calcium carbonate therapy, exhibited a greater reduction, with a 60% of individuals lacking of pain and with a final median of 0 in comparison with the 5% fluoride varnish and fluoride toothpaste group in which a 100% of subjects felt some degree of pain, presenting a final medium VAS scale of 2.

  9. Carbon Carbon Composites: An Overview .

    OpenAIRE

    G. Rohini Devi; K. Rama Rao

    1993-01-01

    Carbon carbon composites are a new class of engineering materials that are ceramic in nature but exhibit brittle to pseudoplastic behaviour. Carbon-carbon is a unique all-carbon composite with carbon fibre embeded in carbon matrix and is known as an inverse composite. Due to their excellent thermo-structural properties, carbon-carbon composites are used in specialised application like re-entry nose-tips, leading edges, rocket nozzles, and aircraft brake discs apart from several indust...

  10. Carbon Carbon Composites: An Overview .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rohini Devi

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon carbon composites are a new class of engineering materials that are ceramic in nature but exhibit brittle to pseudoplastic behaviour. Carbon-carbon is a unique all-carbon composite with carbon fibre embeded in carbon matrix and is known as an inverse composite. Due to their excellent thermo-structural properties, carbon-carbon composites are used in specialised application like re-entry nose-tips, leading edges, rocket nozzles, and aircraft brake discs apart from several industrial and biomedical applications. The multidirectional carbon-carbon product technology is versatile and offers design flexibility. This paper describes the multidirectional preform and carbon-carbon process technology and research and development activities within the country. Carbon-carbon product experience at DRDL has also been discussed. Development of carbon-carbon brake discs process technology using the liquid impregnation process is described. Further the test results on material characterisation, thermal, mechanical and tribological properties are presented.

  11. MOLCAS 8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aquilante, Francesco; Autschbach, Jochen; Carlson, Rebecca K.;

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we summarize and describe the recent unique updates and additions to the Molcas quantum chemistry program suite as contained in release version 8. These updates include natural and spin orbitals for studies of magnetic properties, local and linear scaling methods for the Douglas-K...... nonadiabatic calculations, and the DQ method for diabatization is added. Finally, we report on the subject of improvements with respects to alternative file options and parallelization....

  12. The series of carbon-chain complexes {Ru(dppe)Cp*}₂{μ-(C≡C)x} (x = 4–8, 11): Synthesis, structures, properties and some reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce, Michael I. [Univ. of Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Cole, Marcus L. [Univ. of Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Ellis, Benjamin G. [Univ. of Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Gaudio, Maryka [Univ. of Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Nicholson, Brian K. [Univ. of Waikato, Hamilton (New Zealand); Parker, Christian R. [Univ. of Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Skelton, Brian W. [Univ. of Western Australia, Crawley (Western Australia); White, Allan H. [Univ. of Western Australia, Crawley (Western Australia)

    2015-01-28

    separation of the first two oxidation potentials, ΔE = E2 - E1, with increasing carbon chain length. The X-ray-determined molecular structures of Ru*-C8-Si, Ru*-C8-Ru*, Ru*-C14-Ru* (two C6H6 solvates), {Ru(PPh3)2Cp}2{μ-(Ctriple bond; length of mdashC)4}·4CHCl3Ru-C8-Ru·4CHCl3 and of Fe(C3-Ru*)2 and Fe(C3-Ru*)(C5-Ru*) are reported.

  13. 8种食用植物油碳原子当量42和44甘油三酸酯含量的测定%Comparison of triacyglycerols with equivalent carbon number 42/44 for 8 edible vegetable oils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆慧媛; 刘静; 沈伟健; 王燕舞; 吴斌; 张睿; 赵增运; 沈崇钰

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveTo evaluate the Equivalent carbon numbers’ value in adulteration of edible vegeta-ble oils.Methods The values of triacyglycerols with equivalent carbon number 42(ECN42) and 44(ECN44) for 8 edible vegetable oils were calculated and compared by gas chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography.Results Most parameters were similar between peanut and rapeseed oils, soybean, maize and sunflower oils, as well as high quality olive and camellia oils. While for olive and camellia oils, their ECN42 and ECN44 values were significantly lower(P<0.05) than those of high linoleic vegetable seed oils(soybean, corn,etc). But for camellia oils, onlyΔECN42 andΔECN44 were significantly different from olive oils. Conclusion In this paper, we firstly analyzed and summerized the values of triacyglycerols with ECN42 and ECN44 for edible vegetable oils in domestic market. The results will facilitate future adulterate authentication studies for these edible vegetable oils.%目的:了解碳原子当量在食用植物油掺伪中的应用价值。方法采用气相色谱法和高效液相色谱法分别对8种常见食用植物油的碳原子当量42(ECN42)和44(ECN44)甘油三酸酯含量进行了计算和比较。结果花生油与菜籽油各指标较接近,大豆油、玉米油和葵花籽油各指标较接近,而高品质的橄榄油与山茶油各指标较接近。但橄榄油和山茶油的ECN42和ECN44值远低于高亚油酸的大豆油、玉米油等种籽油类,且差异具有显著性(P<0.05);而山茶油与橄榄油之间,只有实际和理论甘油三酸酯含量最大差值(ΔECN42、ΔECN44)有显著性差异(P<0.001)。结论本文首次对国内市场中常见食用植物油的 ECN42和 ECN44甘油三酸酯含量进行检测和总结,此结果为进一步开展食用植物油掺伪鉴别研究奠定了基础。

  14. Main: SP8BFIBSP8BIB [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SP8BFIBSP8BIB S000184 16-Feb-2001 (last modified) seki One of SPBF binding site (SP...; SP8BF recognizes both SP8a and SP8b sequences; See also SP8BFIBSP8AIB (S000183); SP8BF activity is also fo

  15. Main: SP8BFIBSP8AIB [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SP8BFIBSP8AIB S000183 16-Feb-2001 (last modified) seki One of SPBF binding site (SP...o (I.b.); SP8BF recognizes both SP8a and SP8b sequences; See also SP8BFIBSP8BIB (S000184); SP8BF activity is

  16. A Trace Gas Sensor Using Mid-Infrared Quantum Cascaded Laser at 4.8 μm to Detect Carbon Monoxide%采用4.8μm中红外量子级联激光器的痕量一氧化碳气体检测仪

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晨; 王彪; 李春光; 李健; 王一丁

    2014-01-01

    一氧化碳是一种无色、无味、有毒、易燃的危险气体,且低浓度的该气体可以使人中毒、窒息、危及生命。因此研制一种能够检测一氧化碳气体浓度的检测仪意义重大,尤其在环境复杂(湿度和粉尘浓度都很大)的矿井下。本文所述的是一种紧凑型检测仪器,其能够灵敏、快速、连续地监测环境空气中痕量一氧化碳气体浓度。该仪器采用激发波长为4.8μm的中红外量子级联激光器(QCL )和红外碲镉汞探测器的最新半导体技术,结合中红外光程长度为76 m的多次反射herriott吸收气室,可以在4 s的采样时间内实现40 nmol · mol-1气体检测灵敏度。同时,该仪器利用差分吸收光谱检测原理,设计了双光路双通道空间光学结构,消除了电调制光源所带来的不稳定性,有效地提高了仪器浓度检测下限。实验表明,该仪器通过所集成的气体浓度反演算法,能够在无需校准的情况下,可以用于环境监测中的实地痕量气体测量,并且操作人员可以通过替换在不同波长下运行的QCL来测量其他气体。%Presented in the present paper is a compact instrument developed for rapid ,sensitive and continuous monitoring of trace gases in air ,with results shown for carbon monoxide concentration .This instrument takes advantage of recent technology in mid-infrared quantum cascaded laser (QCL ) operating at 4.8 μm and mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) mid-infrared (MIR) detector ,combing MIR multipass herriott cell with 76 m absorption path length to obtain low detection sensitivity down to 50 nmol · mol-1 level in 4 s acquisition time .Meanwhile ,in order to eliminate the instability induced by electrically modulated light source and effectively improve detection limit of the instrument ,an optical structure with dual channel path was designed which is based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy method .The

  17. 活性碳纤维耦合喹啉铁的pH-tolerant性能研究%pH-tolerant performance of activated carbon fibers coupled with 8-hydroxyquinoline ferric

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白志飞; 李代文; 姚玉元; 吕汪洋; 黄三庆; 陈文兴

    2015-01-01

    The application of Fenton reaction is restricted to a narrow pH range (2‐3 5.) ,which has long been a technological bottleneck .Therefore ,the development of a pH‐tolerant Fenton‐like catalyst is an active and chal‐lenging research front in the field of environmental catalysis .In this work ,the pH‐tolerant performance of the novel Fenton‐like catalytic fibers (QuFe@ ACFs) based on activated carbon fibers (ACFs) coupled with 8‐hydroxyquinoline ferric (QuFe) was evaluated by a simple impregnation method .The UV‐Vis spectroscopy measurements showed that the reactive brilliant red M‐3BE (RR M‐3BE) was completely degraded in 32 min . Probe compound O‐phenylenediamine combined with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and UV‐Vis spectroscopy were employed to demonstrate the catalytic stability of QuFe@ ACFs ,and the experimen‐tal results showed that QuFe@ ACFs exhibited excellent catalytic ability and recycle utilization performance across a wide pH range from 3 to 9 ,brought remarkable pH‐tolerant performance .To sum up ,the QuFe@ACFs prepared by an extremely simple impregnation method ,breaks the technological bottleneck for Fenton treatment ,providing new ideas for preparing novel pH‐tolerant Fenton‐like catalysts with excellent catalytic ac‐tivity .%pH值适应范围窄一直是制约芬顿反应发展的技术瓶颈,因此,开发pH‐tolerant类芬顿催化剂成为环境催化领域的研究热点和难点。采用活性碳纤维(ACFs)耦合喹啉铁(QuFe)制得一种新型pH‐tolerant类芬顿催化纤维(QuFe@ ACFs),该催化纤维在中性条件下可以活化双氧水有效降解活性艳红 M‐3B E。采用自由基捕获剂邻苯二胺,结合电子顺磁共振波谱、紫外‐可见光谱等对催化纤维的重复稳定性进行了重点考察。结果显示,QuFe@ ACFs在pH值为3~9范围内均具有良好的催化性能和重复使用性,表现出了

  18. Aerobic dehydrogenative α-diarylation of benzyl ketones with aromatics through carbon-carbon bond cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Nagnath Yadav; Jeganmohan, Masilamani

    2014-02-01

    Substituted benzyl ketones reacted with aromatics in the presence of K2S2O8 in CF3COOH at room temperature, yielding α-diaryl benzyl ketones through a carbon-carbon bond cleavage. In the reaction, two new carbon-carbon bonds were formed and one carbon-carbon bond was cleaved. It is very interesting that two different nucleophiles such as benzyl ketones and aromatics were coupled together without metal, which is unusual in organic synthesis.

  19. Conducting carbonized polyaniline nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentus, Slavko; Ćirić-Marjanović, Gordana; Trchová, Miroslava; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2009-06-01

    Conducting nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes were synthesized by the carbonization of self-assembled polyaniline nanotubes protonated with sulfuric acid. Carbonization was carried out in a nitrogen atmosphere at a heating rate of 10 °C min-1 up to a maximum temperature of 800 °C. The carbonized polyaniline nanotubes which have a typical outer diameter of 100-260 nm, with an inner diameter of 20-170 nm and a length extending from 0.5 to 0.8 µm, accompanied with very thin nanotubes with outer diameters of 8-14 nm, inner diameters 3.0-4.5 nm and length extending from 0.3 to 1.0 µm, were observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Elemental analysis showed 9 wt% of nitrogen in the carbonized product. Conductivity of the nanotubular PANI precursor, amounting to 0.04 S cm-1, increased to 0.7 S cm-1 upon carbonization. Molecular structure of carbonized polyaniline nanotubes has been analyzed by FTIR and Raman spectroscopies, and their paramagnetic characteristics were compared with the starting PANI nanotubes by EPR spectroscopy.

  20. Conducting carbonized polyaniline nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mentus, Slavko; Ciric-Marjanovic, Gordana [Faculty of Physical Chemistry, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 12-16, 11158 Belgrade (Serbia); Trchova, Miroslava; Stejskal, Jaroslav [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Heyrovsky Square 2, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)], E-mail: gordana@ffh.bg.ac.rs

    2009-06-17

    Conducting nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes were synthesized by the carbonization of self-assembled polyaniline nanotubes protonated with sulfuric acid. Carbonization was carried out in a nitrogen atmosphere at a heating rate of 10 deg. C min{sup -1} up to a maximum temperature of 800 deg. C. The carbonized polyaniline nanotubes which have a typical outer diameter of 100-260 nm, with an inner diameter of 20-170 nm and a length extending from 0.5 to 0.8 {mu}m, accompanied with very thin nanotubes with outer diameters of 8-14 nm, inner diameters 3.0-4.5 nm and length extending from 0.3 to 1.0 {mu}m, were observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Elemental analysis showed 9 wt% of nitrogen in the carbonized product. Conductivity of the nanotubular PANI precursor, amounting to 0.04 S cm{sup -1}, increased to 0.7 S cm{sup -1} upon carbonization. Molecular structure of carbonized polyaniline nanotubes has been analyzed by FTIR and Raman spectroscopies, and their paramagnetic characteristics were compared with the starting PANI nanotubes by EPR spectroscopy.

  1. Dynamic carbon allocation significantly changed land carbon sink and carbon pool sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J.; Yuan, W.

    2015-12-01

    The allocation of photosynthate among the plant components (e.g., leaves, stems, and roots) plays an important role in regulating plant growth, competition, and terrestrial carbon cycle. However, the carbon allocation process is still a weak part in the earth system models (ESMs). In this study, the Integrated BIosphere Simulator (IBIS) model coupled with a dynamic carbon allocation model (IBISAL) is used to explore the impact of carbon allocation on the terrestrial carbon cycle. This dynamic carbon allocation model suggests that plants should allocate the largest part of carbon to the plant components which need to capture the most limiting resources, such as light, water and nitrogen. In comparison to the results of original IBIS model using fixed allocation ratios, the net ecosystem productivity, global biomass and soil organic carbon simulated by IBISAL model decreased by13.4% , 9.9% and 20.8%, respectively . The dynamic allocation scheme tends to benefit roots allocation. Because roots had short turnover times, high roots allocation led to the decreases of global carbon sink and carbon pool sizes. The observations showed that the carbon allocation ratios changed with temperature and precipitation. The dynamic carbon allocation model could reproduce this phenomenon correctly. The results show that the dynamic carbon allocation ratios of boreal evergreen forests and C3 grasses are consistent well with the observations. However, the IBISAL, and another three ESMs (i.e., CESM1-BGC, IPSL-CM5A-MR and NorESM1-ME models) adopting dynamic allocation scheme overestimated the stems allocation of tropical forests. This study shows the substantial influences of carbon allocation on the carbon sink and carbon pool sizes. Therefore, improving estimations of carbon allocation by ESMs are an important and effective path to reduce uncertainties in the global carbon cycle simulation and climate change prediction.

  2. Carbonate and Chloride Scavenging in H2O2/S2O82-/Fe2+ Oxidation of PCE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Lars Rønn; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    2009-01-01

    Contamination of the subsurface by persistent organic contaminants remains a significant problem, even after decades of research on remediation technologies (Watts et al. 1999; Watts, Teel 2005). First, approaches focused on excavation, pump and treat via activated carbon, bioremediation, and nat......Contamination of the subsurface by persistent organic contaminants remains a significant problem, even after decades of research on remediation technologies (Watts et al. 1999; Watts, Teel 2005). First, approaches focused on excavation, pump and treat via activated carbon, bioremediation...... in the groundwater. pH is about 6. In order to evaluate the impact of the high concentration of scavengers, different batch experiments have been performed in the laboratory. Since scavenging in hydrogen peroxide systems is well documented, focus has been on persulfate oxidation of PCE with different activations...

  3. Catalytic carbon deposition on 3-dimensional carbon fibre supports

    OpenAIRE

    Thornton, Matthew James

    2005-01-01

    Catalytic carbon deposition reactions, using methane, ethane or synthetic natural gas (1.8 vol. % propane, 6.7 vol. % ethane and balance methane) as the carbon-containing gas feedstock with or without the addition of hydrogen, have been investigated over nickel, cobalt and iron catalysts supported on 3-dimensional carbon fibre supports, using both a horizontal tube furnace and an isothermal, isobaric induction furnace. The transition metal catalysts were prepared by impregnating 3-dimens...

  4. Carbon dioxide, temperature, salinity, wind speed, air temperature, and atmospheric pressure collected via surface underway survey from R/V Aegaeo in Aegean Sea from February 8, 2006 to February 13, 2006 (NODC Accession 0084543)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0084543 includes chemical, meteorological, and physical underway data collected aboard the AEGAEO in Aegean Sea, and Mediterranean Sea from 8...

  5. Carbon isotope anomalies in carbonates of the Karelian series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iudovich, Ia. E.; Makarikhin, V. V.; Medvedev, P. V.; Sukhanov, N. V.

    1990-07-01

    Results are presented on carbon isotope distributions in carbonates of the Karelian complex. A highly anomalous isotopic composition was found in carbonate rocks aged from 2.6 to 1.9 b.y. In the stromatolitic carbonates of the Onega water table, delta-(C-13) reaches a value of +18 percent, while the shungite layer of the Zaonega horizon is characterized by a wide dispersion (from +7.9 to -11.8 percent). These data are in good agreement with the known geochemical boundary (about 2.2 b.y. ago) in the history of the earth.

  6. Histidine-catalyzed synthesis of cyclic carbonates in supercritical carbon dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The coupling reaction of carbon dioxide with epoxides was investigated using naturally occurring α-amino acids as the catalyst in supercritical carbon dioxide and it was found that L-histidine is the most active catalyst.In the presence of 0.8 mol% of L-histidine at 130°C under 8 MPa of CO2,the reaction of carbon dioxide with epoxides proceeded smoothly,affording corresponding cyclic carbonates in good to excellent yields.

  7. Multiporous carbon allotropes transformed from symmetry-matched carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yingxiang; Wang, Hao; Xu, Shengliang; Hu, Yujie; Liu, Ning; Xu, Xuechun

    2016-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with homogeneous diameters have been proven to transform into new carbon allotropes under pressure but no studies on the compression of inhomogeneous CNTs have been reported. In this study, we propose to build new carbon allotropes from the bottom-up by applying pressure on symmetry-matched inhomogeneous CNTs. We find that the (3,0) CNT with point group C3v and the (6,0) CNT with point group C6v form an all sp3 hybridized hexagonal 3060-Carbon crystal, but the (4,0) CNT with point group D4h and the (8,0) CNT with point group D8h polymerize into a sp2+sp3 hybridized tetragonal 4080-Carbon structure. Their thermodynamic, mechanical and dynamic stabilities show that they are potential carbon allotropes to be experimentally synthesized. The multiporous structures, excellently mechanical properties and special electronic structures (semiconductive 3060-Carbon and semimetallic 4080-Carbon) imply their many potential applications, such as gases purification, hydrogen storage and lightweight semiconductor devices. In addition, we simulate their feature XRD patterns which are helpful for identifying the two carbon crystals in future experimental studies.

  8. Multiporous carbon allotropes transformed from symmetry-matched carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingxiang Cai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs with homogeneous diameters have been proven to transform into new carbon allotropes under pressure but no studies on the compression of inhomogeneous CNTs have been reported. In this study, we propose to build new carbon allotropes from the bottom-up by applying pressure on symmetry-matched inhomogeneous CNTs. We find that the (3,0 CNT with point group C3v and the (6,0 CNT with point group C6v form an all sp3 hybridized hexagonal 3060-Carbon crystal, but the (4,0 CNT with point group D4h and the (8,0 CNT with point group D8h polymerize into a sp2+sp3 hybridized tetragonal 4080-Carbon structure. Their thermodynamic, mechanical and dynamic stabilities show that they are potential carbon allotropes to be experimentally synthesized. The multiporous structures, excellently mechanical properties and special electronic structures (semiconductive 3060-Carbon and semimetallic 4080-Carbon imply their many potential applications, such as gases purification, hydrogen storage and lightweight semiconductor devices. In addition, we simulate their feature XRD patterns which are helpful for identifying the two carbon crystals in future experimental studies.

  9. A carbon sink pathway increases carbon productivity in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, John W K; Atsumi, Shota

    2015-05-01

    The burning of fossil reserves, and subsequent release of carbon into the atmosphere is depleting the supply of carbon-based molecules used for synthetic materials including plastics, oils, medicines, and glues. To provide for future society, innovations are needed for the conversion of waste carbon (CO2) into organic carbon useful for materials. Chemical production directly from photosynthesis is a nascent technology, with great promise for capture of CO2 using sunlight. To improve low yields, it has been proposed that photosynthetic capacity can be increased by a relaxation of bottlenecks inherent to growth. The limits of carbon partitioning away from growth within the cell and the effect of partitioning on carbon fixation are not well known. Here we show that expressing genes in a pathway between carbon fixation and pyruvate increases partitioning to 2,3-butanediol (23BD) and leads to a 1.8-fold increase in total carbon yield in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. Specific 2,3-butanediol production increases 2.4-fold. As partitioning increases beyond 30%, it leads to a steep decline in total carbon yield. The data suggests a local maximum for carbon partitioning from the Calvin Benson cycle that is scalable with light intensity.

  10. A New Process for Synthesis of Dimethyl Carbonate from Ethylene Carbonate and Methanol without any Catalyst under Supercritical Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu Juan FENG; Xiao Gang LI; Ren HE; Hui ZHOU

    2005-01-01

    Dimethyl carbonate was synthesized by transesterification reaction between ethylene carbonate and methanol under supercritical conditions without any catalyst. Experimental results showed that the residence time and the molar ratio of methanol to ethylene carbonate all can affect the conversion of ethylene carbonate. When the molar ratio of methanol to ethylene carbonate was 8:1, 81.2 % conversion can be achieved at 9.0 MPa and 250℃ after 8 h.

  11. INFLUENCE OF SINTERING TEMPERATURE ON THE POLARIZATION RESISTANCE OF LaO20.6SrO20.4CoO20.2FeO20.8O3-δ - SDC CARBONATE COMPOSITE CATHODE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Akidah Baharuddin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The effects of sintering temperature of an LSCF-samarium-doped ceria carbonate (SDCC cathode composite film on its polarization resistance (Rp were evaluated in this study. An LSCF-SDCC composite cathode was prepared for cathode film development by electrophoretic deposition (EPD. The LSCF-SDCC composite cathode was prepared at 50:50 weight percentage ratio. An EPD suspension which is based on an organic aqueous solution was used, and a mixture of ethanol and deionized water was used as medium with poly diallyl dimethyl ammonium chloride (PDADMAC as a dispersing agent. SDCC substrate was used, and EPD was performed on both sides. A symmetrical cell with cathode composite LSCF-SDCC films on both sides of the substrate was subjected to sintering at five different temperatures (from 550°C to 750°C. A symmetrical cell was painted using silver paste before undergoing electrochemical performance test (air condition, in which the impedance, Z data, was measured. The effects of sintering temperature change on element content and film porosity were first investigated by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and J-image analysis. Ceramic-based cathode LSCF-SDCC that was sintered at 600°C exhibited the lowest Rp at a value of 0.68 Ω when operated at 650°C. This study proved that EPD has potential in developing IT-LT solid oxide fuel cell cathode components with high electrochemical performance in terms of Rp values.

  12. Efecto de la arginina 8%-carbonato de calcio y del fluoruro de sodio al 5% en la reducción de la hipersensibilidad dentinaria post terapia periodontal: ensayo clínico Effect of 8% arginine, calcium carbonate and 5% sodium fluoride on the reduction of the dentine hipersensitivity post periodontal therapy: clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Márquez, M; A. Quintero; Sanz, A; Ramírez, V.; Inostroza, C.; A Chaparro

    2011-01-01

    Objetivo: El objetivo de este estudio clínico fue evaluar y comparar la eficacia en la reducción de la hipersensibilidad dentinaria de la arginina al 8%-carbonato de calcio, monofluorfosfato (1.450 ppm) en comparación con un grupo control tratado en base a un barniz de flúor (22.600 ppm) y un dentífrico fluorado (1.450 ppm), 3 veces al día durante un minuto, en pacientes con hipersensibilidad radicular en forma inmediata a la terapia periodontal mecánica (medición basal) y a las 4 semanas res...

  13. Crystal Structure of 8-Demethoxyrunanine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-Ling

    2008-01-01

    A new hasubanane-type alkaloid, 8-demethoxyrunanine, was isolated from Sino- menium acutum and characterized by melting point, HREIMS, 1H NMR, and X-ray diffraction analysis. X-ray diffraction reveals that the title compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic system, space group P212121 with a = 7.308(1), b = 21.742(5), c = 22.893(4) ?, V = 3637.5(11) ?3, Z = 8, Dx = 1.254 g/cm3, F(000) = 1472, μ(MoKα) = 0.087 mm-1, the final R = 0.0438 and wR = 0.0575 for 4497 independent reflections with Rint = 0.0192 and 2091 observed reflections with I > 2σ(I). Four rings (ring A: one benzene ring, ring B: one hexagon carbon ring in a half-chair conformation, ring C: one hexagon carbon ring with α,β-unsaturated ketone segment (-CR2=CR1-C=O) in a screw-boat conformation, and ring D: one nonplanar tetrahydropyrrole) form a hasubanane-type alkaloid.

  14. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... before being swallowed; do not swallow them whole. Drink a full glass of water after taking either the regular or chewable tablets or capsules. Some liquid forms of calcium carbonate must be shaken well before use.Do not ...

  15. Carbon Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T. Lloyd Evans

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, the present state of knowledge of the carbon stars is discussed. Particular attention is given to issues of classification, evolution, variability, populations in our own and other galaxies, and circumstellar material.

  16. High capacity carbon dioxide sorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietz, Steven Dean; Alptekin, Gokhan; Jayaraman, Ambalavanan

    2015-09-01

    The present invention provides a sorbent for the removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams, comprising: a CO.sub.2 capacity of at least 9 weight percent when measured at 22.degree. C. and 1 atmosphere; an H.sub.2O capacity of at most 15 weight percent when measured at 25.degree. C. and 1 atmosphere; and an isosteric heat of adsorption of from 5 to 8.5 kilocalories per mole of CO.sub.2. The invention also provides a carbon sorbent in a powder, a granular or a pellet form for the removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams, comprising: a carbon content of at least 90 weight percent; a nitrogen content of at least 1 weight percent; an oxygen content of at most 3 weight percent; a BET surface area from 50 to 2600 m.sup.2/g; and a DFT micropore volume from 0.04 to 0.8 cc/g.

  17. 短切碳纤维/铁氧体填充的复合材料对8mm波吸收性能研究%STUDY ON ABSORBING PROPERTIES OF COMPOSITES FILLED WITH CHOPPED CARBON FIBER AND FERRITE AT BANDS OF 8 MM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈国柱; 徐政; 李轶

    2005-01-01

    本文使用溶胶凝胶法制备了一种M型掺杂六角铁氧体,研究了该铁氧体、短切碳纤维及玻璃纤维制成的单层和双层复合材料在8mm波段(26.5~40GHz)的吸收性能.结果表明,铁氧体和短切碳纤维混合填充的复合材料在该波段反射率均在-10dB以下;而以玻璃纤维复合材料作为面层的双层结构吸波材料在该波段的吸收效果更好,-20dB以下的带宽达到2.7 GHz.

  18. Preparation and Performance of Activated Carbon Loaded S 2 O2 -8/ZrO2 Catalyst for Catalytic Oxidative Desulfurization%活性炭负载 S2O2-8/ZrO2催化剂的制备及其催化氧化脱硫性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭宁; 杨冲; 刘振学; 侯影飞; 王然; 李春虎

    2015-01-01

    采用浸渍沉淀法制备了固体超强酸S2 O2-8/ZrO2‐AC催化剂,以二苯并噻吩(DBT )的正十二烷溶液为含硫化合物模拟油(硫质量分数为400μg/g ), H2 O2为氧化剂,考察催化剂的催化氧化脱硫性能,采用 BET、XRD、FT‐IR和N H3‐T PD分析手段对其结构进行了表征。利用所制备的催化剂,考察了反应温度、反应时间、氧化剂用量、催化剂用量和乳化剂Span60用量对脱硫效果的影响。结果表明,当活性组分ZrO2负载量(质量分数)为10%,焙烧温度为650℃,所制备的S2 O2-8/ZrO2‐AC催化剂的催化氧化脱硫活性最高;其氧化20 mL模拟油的最佳操作条件为反应温度60℃、反应时间60 min、氧化剂/硫摩尔比5、乳化剂Span60用量0.1g ,催化剂用量以每1 mL模拟油添加0.04 g计。在此条件下, DBT 基本全部转化为相应的砜,采用 N , N‐二甲基甲酰胺(DM F )萃取, DM F/汽油体积比为1/4时,模拟油的脱硫率可以达到97.6%,回收率为92.5%,并且催化剂具有较好的稳定性。%The S2 O2 -8 /ZrO2‐AC solid superacid catalyst was prepared by immersion precipitation method and the oxidative deep desulfurization of model fuel with DBT as model sulfur compound and dodecane as solvent (Sulfur mass fraction of 400 μg/g) was investigated with H2O2as oxidant catalyzed by S2 O2 -8 /ZrO2‐AC .The structure of the prepared catalysts was characterized by means of BET ,XRD ,FTIR and NH3‐TPD ,respectively .The effects of oxidation temperature ,reaction time ,the amount of oxidant ,the dosage of catalyst and Span60 on the desulfurization performance were also investigated .The results showed that the S2 O2 -8 /ZrO2‐AC with ZrO2 loading amount of 10% calcined at temperature of 650℃ had a good catalytic activity in oxidative desulfurization . Under the optimal conditions of oxidation temperature 60℃ ,reaction time 60 min ,the molar ratio of

  19. Carbon dioxide sequestration in cement kiln dust through mineral carbonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntzinger, Deborah N; Gierke, John S; Kawatra, S Komar; Eisele, Timothy C; Sutter, Lawrence L

    2009-03-15

    Carbon sequestration through the formation of carbonates is a potential means to reduce CO2 emissions. Alkaline industrial solid wastes typically have high mass fractions of reactive oxides that may not require preprocessing, making them an attractive source material for mineral carbonation The degree of mineral carbonation achievable in cement kiln dust (CKD) underambienttemperatures and pressures was examined through a series of batch and column experiments. The overall extent and potential mechanisms and rate behavior of the carbonation process were assessed through a complementary set of analytical and empirical methods, including mass change, thermal analysis, and X-ray diffraction. The carbonation reactions were carried out primarily through the reaction of CO2 with Ca(OH)2, and CaCO3 was observed as the predominant carbonation product. A sequestration extent of over 60% was observed within 8 h of reaction without any modifications to the waste. Sequestration appears to follow unreacted core model theory where reaction kinetics are controlled by a first-order rate constant at early times; however, as carbonation progresses, the kinetics of the reaction are attenuated by the extent of the reaction due to diffusion control, with the extent of conversion never reaching completion. PMID:19368202

  20. High performance carbon-carbon composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lalit M Manocha

    2003-02-01

    Carbon-carbon composites rank first among ceramic composite materials with a spectrum of properties and applications in various sectors. These composites are made of fibres in various directions and carbonaceous polymers and hydrocarbons as matrix precursors. Their density and properties depend on the type and volume fraction of reinforcement, matrix precursor used and end heat treatment temperature. Composites made with thermosetting resins as matrix precursors possess low densities (1.55–1.75 g/cm3) and well-distributed microporosity whereas those made with pitch as the matrix precursor, after densification exhibit densities of 1.8–2.0 g/cm3 with some mesopores, and those made by the CVD technique with hydrocarbon gases, possess intermediate densities and matrices with close porosities. The former (resin-based) composites exhibit high flexural strength, low toughness and low thermal conductivity, whereas the latter (pitch- and CVD-based) can be made with very high thermal conductivity (400–700 W/MK) in the fibre direction. Carbon-carbon composites are used in a variety of sectors requiring high mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, good frictional properties for brake pads in high speed vehicles or high thermal conductivity for thermal management applications. However, for extended life applications, these composites need to be protected against oxidation either through matrix modification with Si, Zr, Hf etc. or by multilayer oxidation protection coatings consisting of SiC, silica, zircon etc.

  1. G-8 OPENS UP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    More outsiders still need to be let in The annual G-8 summit catches the world's attention and it is no exception this year. The G-8 summit held in St. Petersburg naturally attracted attention from the international community.

  2. Drupal 8 configuration management

    CERN Document Server

    Borchert, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Drupal 8 Configuration Management is intended for people who use Drupal 8 to build websites, whether you are a hobbyist using Drupal for the first time, a long-time Drupal site builder, or a professional web developer.

  3. High-performance LiMn{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}PO{sub 4} with hybrid conductive additives based on functionalized and etched multi-walled carbon nanotubes by self-destruction during the lithiation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Hyung Cheoul, E-mail: scafos@kimm.re.kr [Department of Nano-Mechanics, Korea Institute of Machinery & Materials (KIMM), 156 Gajeongbuk-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon, 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Bang, Sungrok [Advanced Device Team, DMC R& D Center, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., 129 Samsung-Ro, Yeongtong-Gu, Suwon-Si, Gyeonggi-Do, 443-742 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Dong-Myung [New Business Development Division, Samsung Corning Precision Materials Co., Ltd., 212 Tangjeong-Ro, Asan-Si, Chungcheongnam-Do, 336-725 (Korea, Republic of); Kong, Yongsun; Yu, Taehwan [Battery Materials R& D Center, Samsung Fine Chemicals Co., Ltd., 130 Samsung-Ro, Yeongtong-Gu, Suwon-Si, Gyeonggi-Do, 443-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    High-performance LiMn{sub 0.8}F{sub e0.2}PO{sub 4} (LMFP) was prepared with both etched and functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and ketjen blacks (KBs). The MWNTs functionalized with carboxylic groups exhibited better affinity toward cathode materials than did pristine nanotubes. The electrochemical performance of the LMFP cathode materials was also improved by using MWNTs shortened by vigorous mechanical mixing, compared with pristine long MWNT samples. Moreover, the use of MWNTs together with KB provided better electrochemical performance than when KBs or MWNTs were used separately. The modified LMFP (m-LMFP) had an excellent rate capability, with discharge capacities of 162 mAh g{sup −1} at 0.1 C and 147 mAh g{sup −1} at 1 C, the highest values reported to date for this type of electrode. The capacity retention of the m-LMFP was 94% after 50 cycles, whereas that of the pristine sample was only 82%. Transmission electron microscopy and AC impedance results confirmed that the addition of MWNTs to the cathode materials improved their networking and electrical properties. However, excessive substitution of MWNTs for KB was not favorable for maximizing electrochemical performance because of increased internal resistance. - Highlights: • A simple approach for cutting CNTs was used to prepare modified LiMn{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}PO{sub 4}. • The CNTs can be uncapped by lithiation, without further ball milling or sonication. • The shortened CNTs seemed to be favorable for Li-ion diffusion with small resistance. • The modified LiMn{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}PO{sub 4} has an enhanced capacity, rate capability and cycle ability.

  4. Carbon recycling in ophiolite-hosted carbonates, Oman-UAE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, A.; Jenkin, G. R.; Smith, D. J.; Styles, M. T.; Naden, J.; Boyce, A. J.; Bryant, C. L.

    2013-12-01

    Large-scale surface and subsurface freshwater carbonate deposits of probable Quaternary age have formed on the Oman-UAE ophiolite. Here, serpentinisation reactions in ultramafic rocks have produced calcite and magnesite. These carbonates are frequently cited as examples of natural atmospheric CO2 sequestration, but the possibility of carbon recycling has not been addressed. The aim of this study is to assess the degree of atmospheric CO2 being incorporated into carbonates versus that which has been recycled from alternative sources such as soil CO2, or limestones that underlie the ophiolite. This has been determined through δ13C/δ18O, 87Sr/86Sr and 14C analysis of all major carbonate lithofacies identified. Our analyses of modern carbonate crusts forming on the surface of stagnant hyperalkaline (pH >11) waters show highly depleted δ13C and δ18O values (-25.5‰ ×0.5 PDB and -16.8‰ ×0.5 PDB respectively). This depletion has been attributed to a kinetic isotope effect occurring during atmospheric CO2 exchange with Ca(OH)2 hyperalkaline waters [1]. By comparison, inactive travertine deposits show a large range in δ13C (-10.5 to -21.8‰ PDB) which lies on a trajectory from the composition of modern crusts towards bicarbonate fluids in equilibrium with soil CO2. We interpret this trend as being produced by the mixing of different carbon sources, either at the time of formation or during later alteration. Modern carbonates and inactive travertines also have 87Sr/86Sr ratios and Sr concentrations similar to Cretaceous and Tertiary limestones which surround the ophiolite, whilst subsurface veins also display 87Sr/86Sr ratios similar to these Cretaceous limestones. Carbon recycling can also be determined with 14C. Modern atmospheric CO2 has a global average of 105-106% modern 14C (pMC), therefore freshwater carbonates forming solely from atmospheric CO2 would be expected to contain >100 pMC. However, modern carbonates display varied results from 94.5-101.4 p

  5. From Carbon Nanotube Crystals to Carbon Nanotube Flowers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhengjun; ZHAO Ye; ZHOU Ya

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the very initial deposition stages of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with ferrocene (Fe(C5H5)2) and xylene (C8H10) for growing carbon nanotubes, and made clear that the mechanism for the self-organization behaviors of nanotubes at different growth stages by this approach. For instance, the organization of nanotubes into flower-like structures at prolonged deposition is developed from the crystal-like structures formed at early growth stages, both of which are closely related to and determined by the very initial deposition stages of this CVD approach. Based on this approach, ways have been established to build up different architectures of carbon nanotubes, by controlling the initial deposition stages of the CVD process, with which we have realized the selective growth of self-organized carbon nanotube structures. This study provides a new idea for growing carbon nanotube architectures by CVD.

  6. Four advances in carbon-carbon materials technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maahs, Howard G.; Vaughn, Wallace L.; Kowbel, Witold

    1994-01-01

    Carbon-carbon composites are a specialty class of materials having many unique properties making these composites attractive for a variety of demanding engineering applications. Chief among these properties are exceptional retention of mechanical properties at temperatures as high as 4000 F, excellent creep resistance, and low density (1.6 to 1.8 g/cu cm). Although carbon-carbon composites are currently in service in a variety of applications, much development work remains to be accomplished before these materials can be considered to be fully mature, realizing their full potential. Four recent technology advances holding particular promise for overcoming current barriers to the wide-spread commercialization of carbon-carbon composites are described. These advances are: markedly improved interlaminar strengths (more than doubled) of two dimensional composites achieved by whiskerization of the fabric reinforcing plies, simultaneously improved oxidation resistance and mechanical properties achieved by the incorporation of matrix-phase oxidation inhibitors based on carborane chemistry, improved oxidation resistance achieved by compositionally graded oxidation protective coatings, and markedly reduced processing times (hours as opposed to weeks or months) accomplished through a novel process of carbon infiltration and coatings deposition based on the use of liquid-phase precursor materials.

  7. Carbon neutron star atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Suleimanov, V F; Pavlov, G G; Werner, K

    2013-01-01

    The accuracy of measuring the basic parameters of neutron stars is limited in particular by uncertainties in chemical composition of their atmospheres. For example, atmospheres of thermally - emitting neutron stars in supernova remnants might have exotic chemical compositions, and for one of them, the neutron star in CasA, a pure carbon atmosphere has recently been suggested by Ho & Heinke (2009). To test such a composition for other similar sources, a publicly available detailed grid of carbon model atmosphere spectra is needed. We have computed such a grid using the standard LTE approximation and assuming that the magnetic field does not exceed 10^8 G. The opacities and pressure ionization effects are calculated using the Opacity Project approach. We describe the properties of our models and investigate the impact of the adopted assumptions and approximations on the emergent spectra.

  8. 8,8-Diethyl-1,4,5,8-tetrahydronaphthalene-1,4,5-trione

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramiro Araya-Maturana

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The title molecule, C14H14O3, contains two fused six-membered carbon rings with keto groups at positions 1, 4 and 5 and a gem-diethyl group at position 8. The molecule is close to planar (maximum deviation = 0.044 Å, with one ethyl group at each side of the molecular plane, with exception of the keto group at position 1 which is slightly deviated from the plane and disordered over two positions one on each side of it (occupancies 0.80/0.20. The packing of the molecule shows weak bonded chains along a through C—H...O contacts and two intramolecular C—H...O interactions are also present.

  9. Windows 8 tweaks

    CERN Document Server

    Sinchak, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Acres of Windows 8 tweaks from a Microsoft MVP and creator of Tweaks.com! From a Microsoft MVP, who is also the savvy creator of Tweaks.com, comes this ultimate collection of Windows 8 workarounds. Steve Sinchak takes you way beyond default system settings, deep under the hood of Windows 8, down to the hidden gems that let you customize your Windows 8 system like you wouldn't believe. From helping you customize the appearance to setting up home networking, sharing media, and squeezing every ounce of performance out of the OS, this book delivers. Get ready to rock and roll with Wind

  10. The effect of diamond-like carbon coating on LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 particles for all solid-state lithium-ion batteries based on Li2S-P2S5 glass-ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visbal, Heidy; Aihara, Yuichi; Ito, Seitaro; Watanabe, Taku; Park, Youngsin; Doo, Seokgwang

    2016-05-01

    There have been several reports on improvements of the performance of all solid-state battery using lithium metal oxide coatings on the cathode active material. However, the mechanism of the performance improvement remains unclear. To better understand the effect of the surface coating, we studied the impact of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating on LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 (NCA) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The DLC coated NCA showed good cycle ability and rate performance. This result is further supported by reduction of the interfacial resistance of the cathode and electrolyte observed in impedance spectroscopy. The DLC layer was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy electron energy loss spectroscopy (TEM-EELS). After 100 cycles the sample was analyzed by X-ray photo spectroscopy (XPS), and Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). These analyses showed that the thickness of the coating layer was around 4 nm on average, acting to hinder the side reactions between the cathode particle and the solid electrolyte. The results of this study will provide useful insights for understanding the nature of the buffer layer for the cathode materials.

  11. From Kelvin problem to Kelvin carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui-Yan; Wang, Jing; Ma, Qing-Min; Liu, Ying

    2013-04-28

    As children's toys, soap bubbles also underpin many important scientific questions. What is the most efficient structure for foam? - the "Kelvin problem," has been one of the most intriguing science and widely discussed over the past hundred years. Soap bubbles' frameworks have similar topology with sp(3)-bonded carbon or silicon allotropes, e.g., Weaire-Phelan foam and superconducting clathrate Na8Si46. By looking at the most efficient structure for foams, we construct a series of new carbon allotropes, named "Kelvin carbons." Unexpectedly, all 11 Kelvin carbons are structurally stable wide-bandgap semiconductors, and their densities and their intrinsic hardnesses are both about 81%-87% that of diamond. The seventh state of Kelvin carbons, K(VII), is a very low energy carbon structure after graphite, diamond, lonsdaleite, and type-II carbon clathrate. Kelvin carbons, which constitute a "bridge" between macro-foams and micro-carbons, together with recently proposed novel carbon phases can enrich the study of carbon allotropes. PMID:23635161

  12. Benchmarking the inelastic neutron scattering soil carbon method

    Science.gov (United States)

    The herein described inelastic neutron scattering (INS) method of measuring soil carbon was based on a new procedure for extracting the net carbon signal (NCS) from the measured gamma spectra and determination of the average carbon weight percent (AvgCw%) in the upper soil layer (~8 cm). The NCS ext...

  13. Basic materials in the low-carbon society transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A deep decarbonization of basic materials production fundamentally requires new process technologies. The current climate policy framework tends to preserve industrial structures and reward incremental improvements rather than prepare for a low-carbon transition. G8 countries should develop policies that shift the focus from compensating carbon cost and incremental change to developing technologies and policy strategies for zero carbon emissions by 2050.

  14. 21 CFR 868.5310 - Carbon dioxide absorber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorber. 868.5310 Section 868.5310...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5310 Carbon dioxide absorber. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorber is a device that is intended for medical purposes and that is used in...

  15. Java 8 recipes

    CERN Document Server

    Dea, Carl; Guime, Freddy; OConner, John; Juneau, Josh

    2014-01-01

    Java 8 Recipes offers solutions to common programming problems encountered while developing Java-based applications. Fully updated with the newest features and techniques available, Java 8 Recipes provides code examples involving Lambdas, embedded scripting with Nashorn, the new date-time API, stream support, functional interfaces, and much more. Especial emphasis is given to features such as lambdas that are newly introduced in Java 8. Content is presented in the popular problem-solution format: Look up the programming problem that you want to solve. Read the solution. Apply the solution dir

  16. Diazadioxa[8]circulenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hensel, Thomas; Trpcevski, Denis; Lind, Christopher;

    2013-01-01

    appears to be general, and is a one-pot transformation in which two CC bonds and two CO bonds are formed with the loss of two molecules of water. We also present a detailed characterization of the optical and electrochemical properties of this new class of stable planar cyclooctatetraenes. The...... properties of the diazadioxa[8]circulenes are compared with the properties of isoelectronic tetraoxa[8]circulenes and azatrioxa[8]circulenes. We discuss the antiaromatic nature of the planar central cyclooctatetraene moiety. The antiaromatic nature of the planar cyclooctatetraenes was studied by using...

  17. Repositioning the G-8

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Following the recent high-level Group of Eight (G-8) summit in St. Petersburg, Russia, Yuan Zongze, Vice Director of the China International Affairs Research Institute, commented on China's relations with the G-8 in an article in People's Daily. He argued that China is unlikely to join this exclusive club of industrialized nations in the short term, but may establish closer contacts with it In an earlier article, he analyzed the background against which the summit was held, contending that the G-8 has be...

  18. Carbon classified?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Ingmar

    2012-01-01

    . Using an actor- network theory (ANT) framework, the aim is to investigate the actors who bring together the elements needed to classify their carbon emission sources and unpack the heterogeneous relations drawn on. Based on an ethnographic study of corporate agents of ecological modernisation over...... a period of 13 months, this paper provides an exploration of three cases of enacting classification. Drawing on ANT, we problematise the silencing of a range of possible modalities of consumption facts and point to the ontological ethics involved in such performances. In a context of global warming...

  19. HUC 8 Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This data set is a digital hydrologic unit boundary that is at the 4-digit, 6-digit, 8-digit, and 11-digit level. The data set was developed by delineating the...

  20. Carbon Nanomembranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchanin, Andrey; Gölzhäuser, Armin

    2016-08-01

    Carbon nanomembranes (CNMs) are synthetic 2D carbon sheets with tailored physical or chemical properties. These depend on the structure, molecular composition, and surroundings on either side. Due to their molecular thickness, they can be regarded as "interfaces without bulk" separating regions of different gaseous, liquid, or solid components and controlling the materials exchange between them. Here, a universal scheme for the fabrication of 1 nm-thick, mechanically stable, functional CNMs is presented. CNMs can be further modified, for example perforated by ion bombardment or chemically functionalized by the binding of other molecules onto the surfaces. The underlying physical and chemical mechanisms are described, and examples are presented for the engineering of complex surface architectures, e.g., nanopatterns of proteins, fluorescent dyes, or polymer brushes. A simple transfer procedure allows CNMs to be placed on various support structures, which makes them available for diverse applications: supports for electron and X-ray microscopy, nanolithography, nanosieves, Janus nanomembranes, polymer carpets, complex layered structures, functionalization of graphene, novel nanoelectronic and nanomechanical devices. To close, the potential of CNMs in filtration and sensorics is discussed. Based on tests for the separation of gas molecules, it is argued that ballistic membranes may play a prominent role in future efforts of materials separation. PMID:27281234

  1. Carbon monoxide kinetics following simulated cigarette smoking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnik, A.S. (Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI); Coin, E.J.

    1980-05-01

    Carbon monoxide kinetics were measured in the blood (% carboxyhemoglobin) and alveolar phase (ppM carbon monoxide) after simulated cigarette smoking. Cigarette smoking was siumlated using the same amount of carbon monoxide that 2R1F cigarettes manufactured by the Tobacco Research Institute would contain. Ten boluses of air containing carbon monoxide equivalent to smoking one cigarette were inhaled by six healthy nonsmoker volunteers. Carbon monoxide in the air phase was measured by an Ecolyzer and carboxyhemoglobin was measured by a CO-Oximeter. The mean rise in alveolar carbon monoxide immediately and 20 min after inhaling the last bolus was 3.3 and 3.1 ppM, respectively (p<.005). The mean rise in carboxyhemoglobin immediately and 20 min after inhalation of the last bolus was 0.8 and 0.5% respectively (P<.005). The changes in carboxyhemoglobin were found to be similar to changes that occur when one cigarette is actually smoked.

  2. Proximate analysis for determination of micropores in granulated activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, Ya. G.; Nikolaev, V.B.; Shepelev, A.N.

    1987-02-01

    A method is discussed for determining the specific micropore volume of granulated activated carbon used for water treatment in Soviet coking plants. Toluene molecules with a diameter of 0.67 nm are sorbed by activated carbon with micropore diameter ranging from 0.7 to 1.4 nm. Therefore, sorptive properties of activated carbon in relation to toluene supply information on micropore volume in carbon. A formula which describes this relation is derived. The method for determining micropore volume on the basis of toluene adsorption was tested using 8 types of activated carbon produced from coal and petroleum. Types of activated carbon characterized by the highest adsorption were selected. 1 ref.

  3. Trading forest carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nature of carbon in forests is discussed from the perspective of carbon trading. Carbon inventories, specifically in the area of land use and forestry are reviewed for the Pacific Northwest. Carbon turnover in forests is discussed as it relates to carbon sequestration. Scient...

  4. Carbon storage in Amazonian podzols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Celia; Lucas, Yves; Pereira, Osvaldo; Merdy, Patricia; Santin, Roberta; Ishida, Débora; du Gardin, Beryl; Melfi, Adolpho

    2014-05-01

    It has recently been discovered that Amazonian podzols may store much larger quantities of carbon than previously thought, particularly in their deep Bh horizons (over 13.6 Pg for Brazilian Amazonia alone [1]). Similarly high carbon stocks are likely to exist in similar climate/soil areas, mainly in Africa and in Borneo. Such carbon stocks raise the problem of their stability in response to changes in land use or climate. Any significant changes in vegetation cover would significantly alter the soil water dynamics, which is likely to affect organic matter turnover in soils. The direction of the change, however, is not clear and is likely to depend on the specific conditions of carbon storage and properties of the soils. It is reasonable to assume that the drying of the Bh horizons of equatorial podzols, which are generally saturated, will lead to an increase in C mineralization, although the extent of this increase has not yet been determined. These unknowns resulted in research programs, granted by the Brazilian FAPESP and the French Région PACA-ARCUS and ANR, dedicated improving estimates of the Amazonian podzol carbon stocks and to an estimate of its mineralisability. Eight test areas were determined from the analysis of remote sensing data in the larger Amazonian podzol region located in the High Rio Negro catchment and studied in detail. Despite the extreme difficulties in carrying out the field work (difficulties in reaching the study sites and extracting the soils), more than a hundred points were sampled. In all podzols the presence of a thick deep Bh was confirmed, sometimes to depths greater than 12 m. The Bh carbon was quantified, indicating that carbon stocks in these podzols are even higher than estimated recently [1]. References 1- Montes, C.R.; Lucas, Y.; Pereira, O.J.R.; Achard, R.; Grimaldi, M.; Mefli, A.J. Deep plant?derived carbon storage in Amazonian podzols. Biogeosciences, 8, 113?120, 2011.

  5. Carbon fiber-reinforced carbon as a potential implant material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, D; Williams, D F; Hill, J

    1978-01-01

    A carbon fiber-reinforced carbon is being evaluated as a promising implant material. In a unidirectional composite, high strengths (1200 MN/m2 longitudinal flexural strength) and high modulus (140 GN/m2 flexural modulus) may be obtained with an interlaminar shear strength of 18 MN/m2. Alternatively, layers of fibers may be laid in two directions to give more isotopic properties. The compatibility of the material with bone has been studied by implanting specimens in holes drilled in rat femora. For a period of up to 8 weeks, a thin layer of fibrous tissue bridged the gap between bone and implant; but this tissue mineralizes and by 10 weeks, bone can be observed adjacent to the implant, giving firm fixation. Potential applications include endosseous dental implants where a greater strength in the neck than that provided by unreinforced carbon would be advantageous.

  6. Isotopic composition of carbon-13 and oxygen-18 from authigenic carbonates, Black Sea region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logvina, E.; Mazurenko, L.; Prasolov, E.

    2004-05-01

    Several types of authigenic carbonates related to the fluid discharge zones were sampled during the international expeditions onboard R/V "Professor Vodyanitskiy" (56th cruise) and R/V "Professor Logachev" (11th cruise of UNESCO-TTR) in the northwest part of the Black sea. These carbonates are represented as mounds, build-ups and chimney-like structures, cemented sediments, crusts and concretions. The isotope analyses of carbonates were conducted using mass-spectrometer MS-20 in the Laboratory of Isotope Geology (St.Petersburg State University). The obtained values of oxygen-18 varied from +0,6 to -1,9 per mille (up to C0.8 per mille on average). This value is corresponding to normal seawater oxygen-18 value (about 0 per mille); we suspect, that the source of oxygen for carbonate formation is the seawater. The carbonates are characterized by low carbon-13 (from -35,4 to -42,6 per mille) in comparison with normal marine carbonates (about 0 per mille). We have reason to suppose that carbonates associated with fluid venting were formed by light isotopic composition of carbon dioxide (carbon-13 -45 to -52 per mille), which forming under methane microbiologic oxidation with such isotopic composition. This is because of crossing fluid process of carbon dioxide to carbonate with 8~10 degrees temperature carbon became heaver to 10- 11 per mille. The isotopic composition study of carbonate build-ups is of interest because its association with the gas hydrate accumulations is quite often in the gas seeps. This work is financially supported by Russian Foundation for Basic Research, grant 02-05-64346.

  7. Increase of carbon cycle feedback with climate sensitivity: results from a coupled climate and carbon cycle model

    OpenAIRE

    Govindasamy, B.; Thompson, S; Mirin, A.; Wickett, M.; Caldeira, K.; C. Delire

    2011-01-01

    Coupled climate and carbon cycle modelling studies have shown that the feedback between global warming and the carbon cycle, in particular the terrestrial carbon cycle, could accelerate climate change and result in greater warming. In this paper we investigate the sensitivity of this feedback for year 2100 global warming in the range of 0 to 8 K. Differing climate sensitivities to increased CO2content are imposed on the carbon cycle models for the same emissions. Emissions from the SRES A2 sc...

  8. Windows 8 secrets

    CERN Document Server

    Thurrott, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Tips, tricks, treats, and secrets revealed on Windows 8 Microsoft is introducing a major new release of its Windows operating system, Windows 8, and what better way to learn all its ins and outs than from two internationally recognized Windows experts and Microsoft insiders, authors Paul Thurrott and Rafael Rivera? They cut through the hype to get at useful information you'll not find anywhere else, including what role this new OS plays in a mobile and tablet world. Regardless of your level of knowledge, you'll discover little-known facts about how things work, what's new and different, and h

  9. Experiment at SPring-8

    CERN Document Server

    Nakano, T; Ejiri, H; Fujiwara, M; Hotta, T; Matsuoka, N; Matsumura, T; Mibe, T; Nomachi, M; Toki, H; Wang, C W; Wang, S C; Kawai, H; Ooba, T; Iwata, T; Miyachi, Y; Toyama, T; Wakai, A; Hicks, K; Akimune, H; Asano, Y; Sugaya, Y; Daté, S; Kumagai, N; Ohashi, Y; Toyokawa, H; Imai, K; Yosoi, M; Ichikawa, A; Kishimoto, T; Sakaguchi, A; Sumihama, M; Makino, S; Shimizu, H

    2000-01-01

    The GeV photon beam at SPring-8 is produced by backward-Compton scattering of laser photons from 8 GeV electrons. The maximum energy of the photon will be above 3 GeV, and the beam intensity will be 10 sup 7 photons/sec. Polarization of the photon beam will be 100 % at the maximum energy with fully polarized laser photons. We report the outline of the quark nuclear physics project with this high-quality high-intensity beam.

  10. Beginning Windows 8

    CERN Document Server

    Halsey, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Windows 8 has been described by Microsoft as its 'boldest' Windows release ever. Beginning Windows 8 takes you through the new features and helps you get more out of the familiar to reveal the possibilities for this amazing new operating system. You will learn, with non-technical language used throughout, how to get up and running in the new Windows interface, minimize downtime, maximize productivity, and harness the features you never knew existed to take control of your computer and enjoy the peace of mind and excitement that comes with it. From tips and tweaks to easy-to-follow guides and d

  11. Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux is defined as the year-over-year change in Total Ecosystem Carbon Stock, or the net rate of carbon exchange between an ecosystem and the...

  12. Carbon Monoxide (CO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IAQ) » Carbon Monoxide's Impact on Indoor Air Quality Carbon Monoxide's Impact on Indoor Air Quality On this ... length of exposure. Top of Page Sources of Carbon Monoxide Sources of CO include: unvented kerosene and ...

  13. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir What is Carbon Monoxide? Carbon monoxide, or “CO,” is an odorless, colorless gas that can kill you. Carbon monoxide detector Where is CO found? CO is ...

  14. 8. stellarator workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical reports in this collection of papers were presented at the 8th International Workshop on Stellarators, and International Atomic Energy Agency Technical Committee Meeting. They include presentations on transport, magnetic configurations, fluctuations, equilibrium, stability, edge plasma and wall aspects, heating, diagnostics, new concepts and reactor studies. Refs, figs and tabs

  15. Integral Ring Carbon-Carbon Piston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An improved structure for a reciprocating internal combustion engine or compressor piston fabricate from carbon-carbon composite materials is disclosed. An integral ring carbon-carbon composite piston, disclosed herein, reduces the need for piston rings and for small clearances by providing a small flexible, integral component around the piston that allows for variation in clearance due to manufacturing tolerances, distortion due to pressure and thermal loads, and variations in thermal expansion differences between the piston and cylinder liner.

  16. Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation

    OpenAIRE

    Huijgen, W.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    The increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, mainly caused by fossil fuel combustion, has lead to concerns about global warming. A possible technology that can contribute to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions is CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. The basic concept behind mineral CO2 sequestration is the mimicking of natural weathering processes in which calcium or magnesium containing minerals react with gaseous CO2 and form solid calcium or magnesium carbonate...

  17. Reconstructing Late Ordovician carbon cycle variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancost, Richard D.; Freeman, Katherine H.; Herrmann, Achim D.; Patzkowsky, Mark E.; Ainsaar, Leho; Martma, Tõnu

    2013-03-01

    The role of carbon dioxide in regulating climate during the early Paleozoic, when severe glaciations occurred during a putative greenhouse world, remains unclear. Here, we present the first molecular carbon isotope proxy-based estimates for Late Ordovician (early Katian) pCO2 levels, and explore the limitations of applying this approach to the reconstruction of Paleozoic pCO2. Carbon isotope profiles from three sites in Laurentia (Iowa, Ontario and Pennsylvania) and one site in Baltica (Estonia) exhibit overall low isotope fractionation between organic and inorganic carbon during photosynthesis (ɛp) and these values declined during the early Katian carbonate carbon isotope excursion (or Guttenberg Carbon Isotope Excursion, GICE). Algal ɛp values are sensitive to changes in CO2 concentrations, algae cell morphologies, and cell growth rates. To constrain these factors, we present molecular evidence that a decrease in the relative abundance of cyanobacteria and a change in the eukaryotic algae community co-occurred with the GICE. Regardless of local biotic or oceanographic influences, a decline in ɛp values indicates photosynthesis was sensitive to carbon concentrations, and via analogy with modern taxa, constrains pCO2 to below ˜8× pre-industrial levels (PIL), or about half of previous estimates. In addition, the global, positive carbon isotope excursions expressed in a wide variety of sedimentary materials (carbonate, bulk organic matter, n-alkanes, acyclic and cyclic isoprenoid hydrocarbons), provide compelling evidence for perturbation of the global carbon cycle, and this was likely associated with a decrease in pCO2 approximately 10 million years prior to the Hirnantian glaciations. Isotopic records from deeper water settings suggest a complex interplay of carbon sources and sinks, with pCO2 increasing prior to and during the early stages of the GICE and then decreasing when organic carbon burial outpaced increased volcanic inputs.

  18. 28 CFR 8.8 - Advertisement and declaration of forfeiture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Advertisement and declaration of forfeiture. 8.8 Section 8.8 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FBI FORFEITURE AUTHORITY FOR CERTAIN STATUTES § 8.8 Advertisement and declaration of forfeiture. (a) The notice required by...

  19. 7 CFR 319.8-8 - Lint, linters, and waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lint, linters, and waste. 319.8-8 Section 319.8-8... Importation and Entry of Cotton and Covers § 319.8-8 Lint, linters, and waste. (a) Compressed to high density. (1)(i) Entry of lint, linters, and waste, compressed to high density, will be authorized subject...

  20. Carbon Residence Times in Pedogenic Carbonate Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monger, H.; Feng, Y.; Karnjanapiboonwang, A.

    2013-12-01

    Soil carbonate is a huge pool of terrestrial carbon that contains at least 930 to 940 Pg C and has influx rates on the order of 1 to 12 g CaCO3/m2/yr. Such large mass to flux ratios yield long mean residence times for carbon (e.g., 85,000 years)--assuming steady state. Like other global carbon pools, the soil carbonate pool has smaller sub-pools with higher influx rates and shorter mean residence times. For example, pedogenic carbonate in coppice dunes known to have formed since 1858 and carbonate formed on lithic artifacts in soils at archaeology sites suggests mean residence times can be as short as 120 years--again assuming steady state. Harder to assess are efflux rates as CO2 emissions or bicarbonate leaching. Some Bowen-ratio studies have nevertheless found evidence for CO2 emissions resulting from carbonate dissolution, and other studies have found evidence for bicarbonate leaching based on dissolution pipes through calcic horizons using soil morphology studies. Since an understanding of mean residence times are prerequisite for a better understanding of soil carbonate in the global carbon cycle, especially in a scenario of an expanding Aridosphere, more influx and efflux measurements are needed to evaluate the possibility of carbon sequestration by soil carbonate in hyperarid, arid, semiarid, or subhumid soils.

  1. Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijgen, W.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    The increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, mainly caused by fossil fuel combustion, has lead to concerns about global warming. A possible technology that can contribute to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions is CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. The basic concept beh

  2. Synthesis of mesoporous carbons using ordered and disordered mesoporous silica templates and polyacrylonitrile as carbon precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, Michal; Dufour, Bruno; Celer, Ewa B; Kowalewski, Tomasz; Jaroniec, Mietek; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2005-05-19

    Mesoporous carbons were synthesized from polyacrylonitrile (PAN) using ordered and disordered mesoporous silica templates and were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), powder X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption, and thermogravimetry. The pores of the silica templates were infiltrated with carbon precursor (PAN) via polymerization of acrylonitrile from initiation sites chemically bonded to the silica surface. This polymerization method is expected to allow for a uniform filling of the template with PAN and to minimize the introduction of nontemplated PAN, thus mitigating the formation of nontemplated carbon. PAN was stabilized by heating to 573 K under air and carbonized under N2 at 1073 K. The resulting carbons exhibited high total pore volumes (1.5-1.8 cm3 g(-1)), with a primary contribution of the mesopore volume and with relatively low microporosity. The carbons synthesized using mesoporous templates with a 2-dimensional hexagonal structure (SBA-15 silica) and a face-centered cubic structure (FDU-1 silica) exhibited narrow pore size distributions (PSDs), whereas the carbon synthesized using disordered silica gel template had broader PSD. TEM showed that the SBA-15-templated carbon was composed of arrays of long, straight, or curved nanorods aligned in 2-D hexagonal arrays. The carbon replica of FDU-1 silica appeared to be composed of ordered arrays of spheres. XRD provided evidence of some degree of ordering of graphene sheets in the carbon frameworks. Elemental analysis showed that the carbons contain an appreciable amount of nitrogen. The use of our novel infiltration method and PAN as a carbon precursor allowed us to obtain ordered mesoporous carbons (OMCs) with (i) very high mesopore volume, (ii) low microporosity, (iii) low secondary mesoporosity, (iv) large pore diameter (8-12 nm), and (v) semi-graphitic framework, which represent a desirable combination of features that has not been realized before for OMCs. PMID:16852101

  3. 400-Mbps, 8 times 8 ATM switch LSI. 400Mbps 8 times 8 ATM switch LSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, S.; Tanaka, S.; Noda, M. (Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-08-01

    Was developed at Toshiba, an asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) switch large scale integrated circuit (LSI), which can be used for next-generation telecommunication network systems, such as broadband-integrated services digital network (B-ISDN) For this ATM switch LSI, the common buffer method, which has a good buffer operation efficiency, was adopted as a switch architecture. The flow control and the cell incorporation sequential method were also adopted to improve the cell-loss rate. Furthermore, the BiCMOS (bipolar complimentary MOS) process was applied to the fabrication of this LSI. Consequently, a one-chip 8 input/8 output ATM switch LSI was realized. In addition, the operation speed per channel of this LSI was 400Mbps, and the throughput was 3.2Gbps. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. 8C.02

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, B L; Frederiksen-Moller, B; Jorgensen, J S;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The serine protease prostasin (PRSS8, CAP1) and its activator matriptase and inhibitor nexin-1 are necessary for normal placental development in mice. Prostasin is regulated by aldosterone in the kidney and may activate the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). Preeclampsia is characterized...... to renal EnaC activation and suppression of aldosterone in preeclampsia. Potential impact of prostasin-matriptase on placental development is likely to be at the level of activity and not protein abundance....

  5. Big Bang 8

    CERN Document Server

    Apolin, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Physik soll verständlich sein und Spaß machen! Deshalb beginnt jedes Kapitel in Big Bang mit einem motivierenden Überblick und Fragestellungen und geht dann von den Grundlagen zu den Anwendungen, vom Einfachen zum Komplizierten. Dabei bleibt die Sprache einfach, alltagsorientiert und belletristisch. Band 8 vermittelt auf verständliche Weise Relativitätstheorie, Kern- und Teilchenphysik (und deren Anwendungen in der Kosmologie und Astrophysik), Nanotechnologie sowie Bionik.

  6. Advances in microwaves 8

    CERN Document Server

    Young, Leo

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Microwaves, Volume 8 covers the developments in the study of microwaves. The book discusses the circuit forms for microwave integrated circuits; the analysis of microstrip transmission lines; and the use of lumped elements in microwave integrated circuits. The text also describes the microwave properties of ferrimagnetic materials, as well as their interaction with electromagnetic waves propagating in bounded waveguiding structures. The integration techniques useful at high frequencies; material technology for microwave integrated circuits; specific requirements on technology for d

  7. Controllable fabrication of carbon aerogels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Ya'ning; MIAO Lei; TANEMURA Sakae; TANEMURA Masaki; SUZUKI Kenzi

    2006-01-01

    Nano-pore carbon aerogels were prepared by the sol-gel polymerization of resorcinol (1,3-dihydroxybenzene)(C6H4(OH)2) with formaldehyde (HCHO) in a slightly basic aqueous solution, followed by super-critical drying under liquid carbon dioxide as super-critical media and carbonization at 700 ℃ under N2 gas atmosphere. The key of the work is to fabricate carbon aerogels with controllable nano-pore structure, which means extremely high surface area and sharp pore size distribution. Aiming to investigate the effects of preparation conditions on the gelation process, the bulk density, and the physical and chemical structure of the resultant carbon aerogels, the molar ratio of R/C (resorcinol to catalyst) and the amount of distilled water were varied, consequently two different sets of samples, with series of R/C ratio and RF/W (Resorcinol-Formaldehyde to water, or the content of reactant) ratio, were prepared. The result of N2 adsorption/desorption experiment at 77 K shows that the pore sizes decreasing from 11.4 down tO2.2 nm with the increasing of the molar ratio of R/C from 100 to 400, and/or, the pore sizes decreasing from 3.8 down to 1.6 nm with the increasing of reactant content from 0.4 to 0.6.

  8. Carbon isotope fluctuations in Precambrian carbonate sequences of several localities in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    SIAL ALCIDES N.; FERREIRA VALDEREZ P.; DEALMEIDA AFONSO R.; ROMANO ANTONIO W.; PARENTE CLOVIS V.; DACOSTA MARCONDES L.; SANTOS VICTOR H.

    2000-01-01

    Carbon isotope fluctuations in Precambrian sedimentary carbonates between 2.8 Ga and 0.60 Ga in Brazil are examined in this study. The carbonate facies of the BIF of the 2.8 Ga-old Carajás Formation, state of Pará in northern Brazil, has rather homogeneous delta13C (-5 o/ooPDB), compatible with carbonatization of a silicate protolith by a CO2-rich fluid from mantle degassing. The Paleoproterozoic Gandarela Formation, state of Minas Gerais, displays a narrow delta13C variation (-1.5 to +0.5 o/...

  9. Carbon isotope fluctuations in Precambrian carbonate sequences of several localities in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SIAL ALCIDES N.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon isotope fluctuations in Precambrian sedimentary carbonates between 2.8 Ga and 0.60 Ga in Brazil are examined in this study. The carbonate facies of the BIF of the 2.8 Ga-old Carajás Formation, state of Pará in northern Brazil, has rather homogeneous delta13C (-5 o/ooPDB, compatible with carbonatization of a silicate protolith by a CO2-rich fluid from mantle degassing. The Paleoproterozoic Gandarela Formation, state of Minas Gerais, displays a narrow delta13C variation (-1.5 to +0.5 o/oo compatible with carbon isotope signatures of carbonates deposited around 2.4 Ga worldwide. The Fecho do Funil Formation has probably recorded the Lomagundi delta13C positive anomaly (+6.4 to +7.1 o/ooPDB. The magnesite-bearing carbonates of the Orós mobile belt, state of Ceará, exhibit carbon isotope fluctuation within the range for carbonates deposited at 1.8 Ga. The C-isotope record of the Frecheirinha Formation, northwestern state of Ceará, shows negative delta13C values in its lower portion (-2 o/oo and positive values up section (+1 to +3 o/oo, which suggests this sequence is a cap carbonate deposited after a glacial event around 0.95 Ga. The Jacoca and Acauã sedimentary carbonate Formations, state of Sergipe, NE Brazil, show carbon isotope fluctuations very similar to each other (average around -5 o/oo, compatible with a deposition around 0.76 Ga. The younger Olho D'Água carbonate Formation, however, also in the state of Sergipe, displays negative delta13C values at the lower portion of the Formation, changing dramatically up section to positive values as high as +10 o/oo, a characteristic compatible with a Sturtian cap carbonate deposited around 0.69 Ga. On the light of the C isotope data discussed in this study, it seems that delta13C fluctuations in Paleoproterozoic carbonates in Brazil are within the range found globally for metasedimentary carbonates of this age. Carbon isotope data proved to be very useful in establishing relative

  10. Carbonic Acid Retreatment of Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baylor university

    2003-06-01

    This project sought to address six objectives, outlined below. The objectives were met through the completion of ten tasks. (1) Solidify the theoretical understanding of the binary CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O system at reaction temperatures and pressures. The thermodynamics of pH prediction have been improved to include a more rigorous treatment of non-ideal gas phases. However it was found that experimental attempts to confirm theoretical pH predictions were still off by a factor of about 1.8 pH units. Arrhenius experiments were carried out and the activation energy for carbonic acid appears to be substantially similar to sulfuric acid. Titration experiments have not yet confirmed or quantified the buffering or acid suppression effects of carbonic acid on biomass. (2) Modify the carbonic acid pretreatment severity function to include the effect of endogenous acid formation and carbonate buffering, if necessary. It was found that the existing severity functions serve adequately to account for endogenous acid production and carbonate effects. (3) Quantify the production of soluble carbohydrates at different reaction conditions and severity. Results show that carbonic acid has little effect on increasing soluble carbohydrate concentrations for pretreated aspen wood, compared to pretreatment with water alone. This appears to be connected to the release of endogenous acids by the substrate. A less acidic substrate such as corn stover would derive benefit from the use of carbonic acid. (4) Quantify the production of microbial inhibitors at selected reaction conditions and severity. It was found that the release of inhibitors was correlated to reaction severity and that carbonic acid did not appear to increase or decrease inhibition compared to pretreatment with water alone. (5) Assess the reactivity to enzymatic hydrolysis of material pretreated at selected reaction conditions and severity. Enzymatic hydrolysis rates increased with severity, but no advantage was detected for

  11. Carbonic Acid Pretreatment of Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Peter van Walsum; Kemantha Jayawardhana; Damon Yourchisin; Robert McWilliams; Vanessa Castleberry

    2003-05-31

    This project sought to address six objectives, outlined below. The objectives were met through the completion of ten tasks. 1) Solidify the theoretical understanding of the binary CO2/H2O system at reaction temperatures and pressures. The thermodynamics of pH prediction have been improved to include a more rigorous treatment of non-ideal gas phases. However it was found that experimental attempts to confirm theoretical pH predictions were still off by a factor of about 1.8 pH units. Arrhenius experiments were carried out and the activation energy for carbonic acid appears to be substantially similar to sulfuric acid. Titration experiments have not yet confirmed or quantified the buffering or acid suppression effects of carbonic acid on biomass. 2) Modify the carbonic acid pretreatment severity function to include the effect of endogenous acid formation and carbonate buffering, if necessary. It was found that the existing severity functions serve adequately to account for endogenous acid production and carbonate effects. 3) Quantify the production of soluble carbohydrates at different reaction conditions and severity. Results show that carbonic acid has little effect on increasing soluble carbohydrate concentrations for pretreated aspen wood, compared to pretreatment with water alone. This appears to be connected to the release of endogenous acids by the substrate. A less acidic substrate such as corn stover would derive benefit from the use of carbonic acid. 4) Quantify the production of microbial inhibitors at selected reaction conditions and severity. It was found that the release of inhibitors was correlated to reaction severity and that carbonic acid did not appear to increase or decrease inhibition compared to pretreatment with water alone. 5) Assess the reactivity to enzymatic hydrolysis of material pretreated at selected reaction conditions and severity. Enzymatic hydrolysis rates increased with severity, but no advantage was detected for the use of carbonic

  12. From carbon nanotubes to carbon atomic chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas García, Gilberto; Zhang, Weijia; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2010-10-01

    Carbyne is a linear allotrope of carbon. It is formed by a linear arrangement of carbon atoms with sp-hybridization. We present a reliable and reproducible experiment to obtain these carbon atomic chains using few-layer-graphene (FLG) sheets and a HRTEM. First the FLG sheets were synthesized from worm-like exfoliated graphite and then drop-casted on a lacey-carbon copper grid. Once in the TEM, two holes are opened near each other in a FLG sheet by focusing the electron beam into a small spot. Due to the radiation, the carbon atoms rearrange themselves between the two holes and form carbon fibers. The beam is concentrated on the carbon fibers in order excite the atoms and induce a tension until multi wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) is formed. As the radiation continues the MWCNT breaks down until there is only a single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT). Then, when the SWCNT breaks, an atomic carbon chain is formed, lasts for several seconds under the radiation and finally breaks. This demonstrates the stability of this carbon structure.

  13. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  14. Mutagenicity of carbon nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallin, Håkan; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; White, Paul A;

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials such carbon nanotubes, graphene and fullerenes are some the most promising nanomaterials. Although carbon nanomaterials have been reported to possess genotoxic potential, it is imperitive to analyse the data on the genotoxicity of carbon nanomaterials in vivo and in vitro...

  15. Ubuntu 8.10

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Ubuntu官方如期发布了8.10的正式版。新版本带来的诸多全新特性:基于去年发布的Just Enough Operating System(JeOS),自带虚拟机创建器,能在五分钟内通过命令行构建一个完整的虚拟机;完整支持Apache Tomcat6.0和OpenJDK:新的网络管理器Network Manager0.7不仅支持了PPPoE,

  16. Kanon i dansk 8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyldendals læsebog i kanonlitteratur for 8. klasse. Med tekster af Homer, Thomas Kingo, Ambrosius Stub, E.T.A. Hoffmann, St.St. Blicher, N.F.S. Grundtvig, Christian Winther, H.C. Andersen, Emil Aarestrup, Henrik Ibsen, J.P. Jacobsen, Henrik Pontoppidan, Herman Bang, Jeppe Aakjær, Johannes V. Jens......, Tom Kristensen, Oskar Hansen, Knud Sønderby, Poul Henningsen, Gustaf Munch-Petersen, Karen Blixen, Robert Storm Petersen, Frank Jæger, J.R.R. Tolkien, Tage Skou-Hansen, Klaus Rifbjerg, Inger Christensen og Dan Turèll....

  17. Telltale Animation (Sol 8)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This animation of the NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's telltale was made from five images taken by Phoenix's Stereo Surface Imager (SSI) just after 1:10 PM local Mars time on the eighth Martian day of the mission, or Sol 8 (June 2, 2008). The images were taken with a blue filter (450 nanometer, R6) that focuses at items on the deck rather than the workspace or horizon. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  18. Windows 8 simplified

    CERN Document Server

    McFedries, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The easiest way for visual learners to get started with Windows 8 The popular Simplified series makes visual learning easier than ever, and with more than 360,000 copies sold, previous Windows editions are among the bestselling Visual books. This guide goes straight to the point with easy-to-follow, two-page tutorials for each task. With full-color screen shots and step-by-step directions, it gets beginners up and running on the newest version of Windows right away. Learn to work with the new interface and improved Internet Explorer, manage files, share your computer, and much more. Perfect fo

  19. Electroanalysis with carbon paste electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Svancara, Ivan; Walcarius, Alain; Vytras, Karel

    2011-01-01

    Introduction to Electrochemistry and Electroanalysis with Carbon Paste-Based ElectrodesHistorical Survey and GlossaryField in Publication Activities and LiteratureCarbon Pastes and Carbon Paste ElectrodesCarbon Paste as the Binary MixtureClassification of Carbon Pastes and Carbon Paste ElectrodesConstruction of Carbon Paste HoldersCarbon Paste as the Electrode MaterialPhysicochemical Properties of Carbon PastesElectrochemical Characteristics of Carbon PastesTesting of Unmodified CPEsIntera

  20. Mesoporous carbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng; Fulvio, Pasquale Fernando; Mayes, Richard T.; Wang, Xiqing; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Guo, Bingkun

    2014-09-09

    A conductive mesoporous carbon composite comprising conductive carbon nanoparticles contained within a mesoporous carbon matrix, wherein the conductive mesoporous carbon composite possesses at least a portion of mesopores having a pore size of at least 10 nm and up to 50 nm, and wherein the mesopores are either within the mesoporous carbon matrix, or are spacings delineated by surfaces of said conductive carbon nanoparticles when said conductive carbon nanoparticles are fused with each other, or both. Methods for producing the above-described composite, devices incorporating them (e.g., lithium batteries), and methods of using them, are also described.

  1. Pyrolyzed thin film carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Liger, Matthieu (Inventor); Harder, Theodore (Inventor); Konishi, Satoshi (Inventor); Miserendino, Scott (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method of making carbon thin films comprises depositing a catalyst on a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon in contact with the catalyst and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon. A method of controlling a carbon thin film density comprises etching a cavity into a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon into the cavity, and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon while in the cavity to form a carbon thin film. Controlling a carbon thin film density is achieved by changing the volume of the cavity. Methods of making carbon containing patterned structures are also provided. Carbon thin films and carbon containing patterned structures can be used in NEMS, MEMS, liquid chromatography, and sensor devices.

  2. CO2 capture in different carbon materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Vicente; Ramírez-Lucas, Ana; Díaz, José Antonio; Sánchez, Paula; Romero, Amaya

    2012-07-01

    In this work, the CO(2) capture capacity of different types of carbon nanofibers (platelet, fishbone, and ribbon) and amorphous carbon have been measured at 26 °C as at different pressures. The results showed that the more graphitic carbon materials adsorbed less CO(2) than more amorphous materials. Then, the aim was to improve the CO(2) adsorption capacity of the carbon materials by increasing the porosity during the chemical activation process. After chemical activation process, the amorphous carbon and platelet CNFs increased the CO(2) adsorption capacity 1.6 times, whereas fishbone and ribbon CNFs increased their CO(2) adsorption capacity 1.1 and 8.2 times, respectively. This increase of CO(2) adsorption capacity after chemical activation was due to an increase of BET surface area and pore volume in all carbon materials. Finally, the CO(2) adsorption isotherms showed that activated amorphous carbon exhibited the best CO(2) capture capacity with 72.0 wt % of CO(2) at 26 °C and 8 bar.

  3. Global Carbon Budget 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Canadell, J. G.; Sitch, S.; Korsbakken, J. I.; Friedlingstein, P.; Peters, G. P.; Andres, R. J.; Boden, T. A.; Houghton, R. A.; House, J. I.; Keeling, R. F.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Bakker, D. C. E.; Barbero, L.; Bopp, L.; Chang, J.; Chevallier, F.; Chini, L. P.; Ciais, P.; Fader, M.; Feely, R. A.; Gkritzalis, T.; Harris, I.; Hauck, J.; Ilyina, T.; Jain, A. K.; Kato, E.; Kitidis, V.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Koven, C.; Landschützer, P.; Lauvset, S. K.; Lefèvre, N.; Lenton, A.; Lima, I. D.; Metzl, N.; Millero, F.; Munro, D. R.; Murata, A.; Nabel, J. E. M. S.; Nakaoka, S.; Nojiri, Y.; O'Brien, K.; Olsen, A.; Ono, T.; Pérez, F. F.; Pfeil, B.; Pierrot, D.; Poulter, B.; Rehder, G.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Séférian, R.; Steinhoff, T.; Stocker, B. D.; Sutton, A. J.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; van der Laan-Luijkx, I. T.; van der Werf, G. R.; van Heuven, S.; Vandemark, D.; Viovy, N.; Wiltshire, A.; Zaehle, S.; Zeng, N.

    2015-12-01

    carbon budget. For the last decade available (2005-2014), EFF was 9.0 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, ELUC was 0.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, GATM was 4.4 ± 0.1 GtC yr-1, SOCEAN was 2.6 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, and SLAND was 3.0 ± 0.8 GtC yr-1. For the year 2014 alone, EFF grew to 9.8 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, 0.6 % above 2013, continuing the growth trend in these emissions, albeit at a slower rate compared to the average growth of 2.2 % yr-1 that took place during 2005-2014. Also, for 2014, ELUC was 1.1 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, GATM was 3.9 ± 0.2 GtC yr-1, SOCEAN was 2.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, and SLAND was 4.1 ± 0.9 GtC yr-1. GATM was lower in 2014 compared to the past decade (2005-2014), reflecting a larger SLAND for that year. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration reached 397.15 ± 0.10 ppm averaged over 2014. For 2015, preliminary data indicate that the growth in EFF will be near or slightly below zero, with a projection of -0.6 [range of -1.6 to +0.5] %, based on national emissions projections for China and the USA, and projections of gross domestic product corrected for recent changes in the carbon intensity of the global economy for the rest of the world. From this projection of EFF and assumed constant ELUC for 2015, cumulative emissions of CO2 will reach about 555 ± 55 GtC (2035 ± 205 GtCO2) for 1870-2015, about 75 % from EFF and 25 % from ELUC. This living data update documents changes in the methods and data sets used in this new carbon budget compared with previous publications of this data set (Le Quéré et al., 2015, 2014, 2013). All observations presented here can be downloaded from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (doi:10.3334/CDIAC/GCP_2015).

  4. Global carbon budget 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Peters, G. P.; Ciais, P.; Friedlingstein, P.; Jones, S. D.; Sitch, S.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Boden, T. A.; Bopp, L.; Bozec, Y.; Canadell, J. G.; Chini, L. P.; Chevallier, F.; Cosca, C. E.; Harris, I.; Hoppema, M.; Houghton, R. A.; House, J. I.; Jain, A. K.; Johannessen, T.; Kato, E.; Keeling, R. F.; Kitidis, V.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Koven, C.; Landa, C. S.; Landschützer, P.; Lenton, A.; Lima, I. D.; Marland, G.; Mathis, J. T.; Metzl, N.; Nojiri, Y.; Olsen, A.; Ono, T.; Peng, S.; Peters, W.; Pfeil, B.; Poulter, B.; Raupach, M. R.; Regnier, P.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Salisbury, J. E.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Séférian, R.; Segschneider, J.; Steinhoff, T.; Stocker, B. D.; Sutton, A. J.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; van der Werf, G. R.; Viovy, N.; Wang, Y.-P.; Wanninkhof, R.; Wiltshire, A.; Zeng, N.

    2015-05-01

    component of the global carbon budget. For the last decade available (2004-2013), EFF was 8.9 ± 0.4 GtC yr-1, ELUC 0.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, GATM 4.3 ± 0.1 GtC yr-1, SOCEAN 2.6 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, and SLAND 2.9 ± 0.8 GtC yr-1. For year 2013 alone, EFF grew to 9.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, 2.3% above 2012, continuing the growth trend in these emissions, ELUC was 0.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, GATM was 5.4 ± 0.2 GtC yr-1, SOCEAN was 2.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, and SLAND was 2.5 ± 0.9 GtC yr-1. GATM was high in 2013, reflecting a steady increase in EFF and smaller and opposite changes between SOCEAN and SLAND compared to the past decade (2004-2013). The global atmospheric CO2 concentration reached 395.31 ± 0.10 ppm averaged over 2013. We estimate that EFF will increase by 2.5% (1.3-3.5%) to 10.1 ± 0.6 GtC in 2014 (37.0 ± 2.2 GtCO2 yr-1), 65% above emissions in 1990, based on projections of world gross domestic product and recent changes in the carbon intensity of the global economy. From this projection of EFF and assumed constant ELUC for 2014, cumulative emissions of CO2 will reach about 545 ± 55 GtC (2000 ± 200 GtCO2) for 1870-2014, about 75% from EFF and 25% from ELUC. This paper documents changes in the methods and data sets used in this new carbon budget compared with previous publications of this living data set (Le Quéré et al., 2013, 2014). All observations presented here can be downloaded from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (doi:10.3334/CDIAC/GCP_2014).

  5. Ultrasound-intensified mineral carbonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several aspects of ultrasound-assisted mineral carbonation were investigated in this work. The objectives were to intensify the CO2 sequestration process to improve reaction kinetics and maximal conversion. Stainless steel slags, derived from the Argon Oxygen Decarburization (AOD) and Continuous Casting/Ladle Metallurgy (CC/LM) refining steps, were used for assessing the technical feasibility of this concept, as they are potential carbon sinks and can benefit from reduction in alkalinity (pH) by mineral carbonation. Ultrasound was applied by use of an ultrasound horn into the reaction slurry, where mineral carbonation reaction took place at 50 °C for up to 4 h; comparison was made to solely mechanically mixed process. It was found that sonication increases the reaction rate after the initial stage, and permits achieving higher carbonate conversion and lower pH. AOD slag conversion increased from 30% to 49%, and pH decreased from 10.6 to 10.1; CC slag conversion increased from 61% to 73% and pH decreased from 10.8 to 9.9. The enhancement effect of ultrasound was attributed to the removal of passivating layers (precipitated calcium carbonate and depleted silica) that surround the unreacted particle core and inhibit mass transfer. Significant particle size reduction was observed for sonicated powders, compared to particle size growth in the case of stirring-only; D[4,3] values increased without sonication by 74% and 50%, and decreased with sonication by 64% and 52%, respectively for AOD and CC slags. Considerations on scale-up of this technology, particularly with regards to energy efficiency, are also discussed. Highlights: ► Ultrasound increased CaO, AOD and CC slags mineral carbonation rates and conversions. ► Enhancement effect linked to removal of mass transfer inhibiting passivating layers. ►Carbonated particle size grew with stirring-only, and decreased with sonication. ► Lower pH of slags with greater carbonation extent can reduce heavy metal leaching

  6. Experiments around I-8

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    The lithium transition-radiation detectors and the large liquid argon calorimeters of experiment R806T are shown above and below the intersection at I-8 (Brookhaven-CERN-Saclay-Syracuse-Yale Collaboration, Study of large transverse momentum phenomena by electron and photon detection). At 90 deg to the intersecting beams are the monitoring proporional chambers of experiment R805 (Measurement of real to imaginary ratio of forward scattering amplitude - Coulomb interference - by the CERN-Rome Collaboration). Left and right of the intersection one sees, symmetrically placed around the interaction region, the large scintillation counters hodoscopes used by R801 (Pisa-Stony Brook Collaboration) to measure the pp total cross section and the features of inelastic collisions.

  7. 13.8

    CERN Document Server

    Gribbin, John

    2015-01-01

    The twentieth century gave us two great theories of physics. The general theory of relativity describes the behaviour of very large things; quantum theory the behaviour of very small things. In this landmark book, John Gribbin - one of the best-known writers of popular science over the past 30 years - presents his own version of the Holy Grail of physics, the search that has been going on for decades to find a unified 'Theory of Everything' that combines these ideas into one mathematical package, a single equation that could be printed on a T-shirt, containing the answer to life, the Universe and everything. With his inimitable mixture of science, history and biography, Gribbin shows how - despite scepticism among many physicists - these two great theories are indeed very compatible, and point to a deep truth about the nature of our existence. The answer lies, intriguingly, with the age of the Universe: 13.8 billion years.

  8. A comparative study of EMI shielding properties of carbon nanofiber and multi-walled carbon nanotube filled polymer composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yonglai; Gupta, Mool C; Dudley, Kenneth L; Lawrence, Roland W

    2005-06-01

    Electromagnetic interference shielding properties of carbon nanofiber- and multi-walled carbon nanotube-filled polystyrene composites were investigated in the frequency range of 8.2-12.4 GHz (X-band). It was observed that the shielding effectiveness of composites was frequency independent, and increased with the increase of carbon nanofiber or nanotube loading. At the same filler loading, multi-walled carbon nanotube-filled polystyrene composites exhibited higher shielding effectiveness compared to those filled with carbon nanofibers. In particular, carbon nanotubes were more effective than nanofibers in providing high EMI shielding at low filler loadings. The experimental data showed that the shielding effectiveness of the composite containing 7 wt% carbon nanotubes could reach more than 26 dB, implying that such a composite can be used as a potential electromagnetic interference shielding material. The dominant shielding mechanism of carbon nanotube-filled polystyrene composites was also discussed. PMID:16060155

  9. Organic carbon inventories in natural and restored Ecuadorian mangrove forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda G. DelVecchia

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mangroves can capture and store organic carbon and their protection and therefore their restoration is a component of climate change mitigation. However, there are few empirical measurements of long-term carbon storage in mangroves or of how storage varies across environmental gradients. The context dependency of this process combined with geographically limited field sampling has made it difficult to generalize regional and global rates of mangrove carbon sequestration. This has in turn hampered the inclusion of sequestration by mangroves in carbon cycle models and in carbon offset markets. The purpose of this study was to estimate the relative carbon capture and storage potential in natural and restored mangrove forests. We measured depth profiles of soil organic carbon content in 72 cores collected from six sites (three natural, two restored, and one afforested surrounding Muisne, Ecuador. Samples up to 1 m deep were analyzed for organic matter content using loss-on-ignition and values were converted to organic carbon content using an accepted ratio of 1.72 (g/g. Results suggest that average soil carbon storage is 0.055 ± 0.002 g cm−3 (11.3 ± 0.8% carbon content by dry mass, mean ± 1 SE up to 1 m deep in natural sites, and 0.058 ± 0.002 g cm−3 (8.0 ± 0.3% in restored sites. These estimates are concordant with published global averages. Evidence of equivalent carbon stocks in restored and afforested mangrove patches emphasizes the carbon sink potential for reestablished mangrove systems. We found no relationship between sediment carbon storage and aboveground biomass, forest structure, or within-patch location. Our results demonstrate the long-term carbon storage potential of natural mangroves, high effectiveness of mangrove restoration and afforestation, a lack of predictability in carbon storage strictly based on aboveground parameters, and the need to establish standardized protocol for quantifying mangrove sediment carbon stocks.

  10. Organic carbon inventories in natural and restored Ecuadorian mangrove forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelVecchia, Amanda G; Bruno, John F; Benninger, Larry; Alperin, Marc; Banerjee, Ovik; de Dios Morales, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Mangroves can capture and store organic carbon and their protection and therefore their restoration is a component of climate change mitigation. However, there are few empirical measurements of long-term carbon storage in mangroves or of how storage varies across environmental gradients. The context dependency of this process combined with geographically limited field sampling has made it difficult to generalize regional and global rates of mangrove carbon sequestration. This has in turn hampered the inclusion of sequestration by mangroves in carbon cycle models and in carbon offset markets. The purpose of this study was to estimate the relative carbon capture and storage potential in natural and restored mangrove forests. We measured depth profiles of soil organic carbon content in 72 cores collected from six sites (three natural, two restored, and one afforested) surrounding Muisne, Ecuador. Samples up to 1 m deep were analyzed for organic matter content using loss-on-ignition and values were converted to organic carbon content using an accepted ratio of 1.72 (g/g). Results suggest that average soil carbon storage is 0.055 ± 0.002 g cm(-3) (11.3 ± 0.8% carbon content by dry mass, mean ± 1 SE) up to 1 m deep in natural sites, and 0.058 ± 0.002 g cm(-3) (8.0 ± 0.3%) in restored sites. These estimates are concordant with published global averages. Evidence of equivalent carbon stocks in restored and afforested mangrove patches emphasizes the carbon sink potential for reestablished mangrove systems. We found no relationship between sediment carbon storage and aboveground biomass, forest structure, or within-patch location. Our results demonstrate the long-term carbon storage potential of natural mangroves, high effectiveness of mangrove restoration and afforestation, a lack of predictability in carbon storage strictly based on aboveground parameters, and the need to establish standardized protocol for quantifying mangrove sediment carbon stocks. PMID:24883249

  11. Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide on Activated Carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Guo; Liping Chang; Kechang Xie

    2006-01-01

    The adsorption of CO2 on a raw activated carbon A and three modified activated carbon samples B, C, and D at temperatures ranging from 303 to 333 K and the thermodynamics of adsorption have been investigated using a vacuum adsorption apparatus in order to obtain more information about the effect of CO2 on removal of organic sulfur-containing compounds in industrial gases. The active ingredients impregnated in the carbon samples show significant influence on the adsorption for CO2 and its volumes adsorbed on modified carbon samples B, C, and D are all larger than that on the raw carbon sample A. On the other hand, the physical parameters such as surface area, pore volume, and micropore volume of carbon samples show no influence on the adsorbed amount of CO2. The Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) equation was the best model for fitting the adsorption data on carbon samples A and B, while the Freundlich equation was the best fit for the adsorption on carbon samples C and D. The isosteric heats of adsorption on carbon samples A, B, C, and D derived from the adsorption isotherms using the Clapeyron equation decreased slightly increasing surface loading. The heat of adsorption lay between 10.5 and 28.4 kJ/mol, with the carbon sample D having the highest value at all surface coverages that were studied. The observed entropy change associated with the adsorption for the carbon samples A, B, and C (above the surface coverage of 7 ml/g) was lower than the theoretical value for mobile adsorption. However, it was higher than the theoretical value for mobile adsorption but lower than the theoretical value for localized adsorption for carbon sample D.

  12. Accelerating Mineral Carbonation Using Carbonic Anhydrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Ian M; Harrison, Anna L; Dipple, Gregory M

    2016-03-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzymes have gained considerable attention for their potential use in carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technologies because they are able to catalyze rapidly the interconversion of aqueous CO2 and bicarbonate. However, there are challenges for widespread implementation including the need to develop mineralization process routes for permanent carbon storage. Mineral carbonation of highly reactive feedstocks may be limited by the supply rate of CO2. This rate limitation can be directly addressed by incorporating enzyme-catalyzed CO2 hydration. This study examined the effects of bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA) and CO2-rich gas streams on the carbonation rate of brucite [Mg(OH)2], a highly reactive mineral. Alkaline brucite slurries were amended with BCA and supplied with 10% CO2 gas while aqueous chemistry and solids were monitored throughout the experiments (hours to days). In comparison to controls, brucite carbonation using BCA was accelerated by up to 240%. Nesquehonite [MgCO3·3H2O] precipitation limited the accumulation of hydrated CO2 species, apparently preventing BCA from catalyzing the dehydration reaction. Geochemical models reproduce observed reaction progress in all experiments, revealing a linear correlation between CO2 uptake and carbonation rate. Data demonstrates that carbonation in BCA-amended reactors remained limited by CO2 supply, implying further acceleration is possible. PMID:26829491

  13. Carbon fuel cells with carbon corrosion suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.

    2012-04-10

    An electrochemical cell apparatus that can operate as either a fuel cell or a battery includes a cathode compartment, an anode compartment operatively connected to the cathode compartment, and a carbon fuel cell section connected to the anode compartment and the cathode compartment. An effusion plate is operatively positioned adjacent the anode compartment or the cathode compartment. The effusion plate allows passage of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide exhaust channels are operatively positioned in the electrochemical cell to direct the carbon dioxide from the electrochemical cell.

  14. Preparation of composite electroheat carbon film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Jin-tong; TU Chuan-jun; LI Yan; HU Li-min; DENG Jiu-hua

    2005-01-01

    A kind of conductive and heating unit, which can reach a high surface electroheat temperature at a low voltage, was developed in view of the traditional electroheat coating which has a low surface electroheat temperature and an insufficient heat resistance of its binder. The coating molded electroheat carbon film(CMECF) was prepared by carbonizing the coating which was prepared by adding modified resin into flake graphite and carbon fiber, coating molded onto the surface of the heat resisting matrix after dried, while the hot pressing molded electroheat thick carbon film(HPMETCF) was prepared by carbonizing the bodies whose powders were hot pressing molded directly.The surface and inner microstructure of the carbon film was characterized and analyzed by SEM and DSC/TG, while electroheat property was tested by voltage-current volume resistivity tester and electrical parameter tester. The results show that, close-packed carbon network configuration is formed within the composite electroheat carbon film film after anti-oxidizable treatment reaches a higher surface electroheat temperature than that of the existing electroheat coatings at a low voltage, and has excellent electroheat property, high thermal efficiency as well as stable physicochemical property. It is found that, at room temperature(19± 2 ℃) and 22 V for 5 min, the surface electroheat temperature of the self-produced CMECF (mfiller/mresin = 1. 8/1) reaches 112 ℃ while HPMETCF (mfiller/mresin = 3. 6/1) reaches 265 ℃.

  15. Carbon dioxide reducing processes; Koldioxidreducerande processer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Fredrik

    1999-12-01

    This thesis discusses different technologies to reduce or eliminate the carbon dioxide emissions, when a fossil fuel is used for energy production. Emission reduction can be accomplished by separating the carbon dioxide for storage or reuse. There are three different ways of doing the separation. The carbon dioxide can be separated before the combustion, the process can be designed so that the carbon dioxide can be separated without any energy consumption and costly systems or the carbon dioxide can be separated from the flue gas stream. Two different concepts of separating the carbon dioxide from a combined cycle are compared, from the performance and the economical point of view, with a standard natural gas fired combined cycle where no attempts are made to reduce the carbon dioxide emissions. One concept is to use absorption technologies to separate the carbon dioxide from the flue gas stream. The other concept is based on a semi-closed gas turbine cycle using carbon dioxide as working fluid and combustion with pure oxygen, generated in an air-separating unit. The calculations show that the efficiency (power) drop is smaller for the first concept than for the second, 8.7 % points compared to 13.7 % points, when power is produced. When both heat and power are produced, the relation concerning the efficiency (power) remains. Regarding the overall efficiency (heat and power) the opposite relation is present. A possible carbon dioxide tax must exceed 0.21 SEK/kg CO{sub 2} for it to be profitable to separate carbon dioxide with any of these technologies.

  16. Effect of carbon microfiber materials on sensitivity of adenosine and hydroxyadenine at carbon microfiber sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.M.M. Abou El-Nour

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the sensitivity measurements and microfiber electrodes made from different carbon microfiber materials, such as polyacrylonitrile (PAN T650 and PAN HCB and Pitch P25 was established in this work. The different microfiber electrodes were nanostructured by an electrochemical pretreatment method. Sensitivity of adenosine (ADO and 2,8-dihydroxyadenine (2,8-DHA was measured at different carbon microfiber sensors made from different carbon microfiber materials. Sensitivity of PAN microfiber electrodes for ADO and 2,8-DHA determinations measured at 500 V s−1 vs. SCE is higher than that measured at Pitch P25 microfiber electrodes due to more defects in PAN microfiber electrodes. Adsorption of ADO and 2,8-DHA is greater at PAN HCB electrodes. High conductivity of PAN fibers correlates with sensitivity determinations of the investigated analytes.

  17. Physics Colloquium | 8 April

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The echo of the Big Bang as seen by the Planck satellite, Professeur Martin Kunz, département de Physique théorique, Université de Genève. Monday 8 April 2013, 5 pm École de Physique, Auditoire Stueckelberg 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet, 1211 Genève 4 Abstract: On March 21st, ESA’s Planck space telescope released the most detailed map ever created of the cosmic microwave background – the relic radiation from the Big Bang. The map shows the Universe at a time when it was just 380 000 years old, and the tiny fluctuations that it contains represent the seeds of all future structure: the stars and galaxies of today. From this map, we can learn many things, for example that 95% of the "stuff'' in the Universe are different from anything we have encountered on Earth. The new data by the Planck satellite agree quite well with the cosmological standard model, and we will see what this implies for our understa...

  18. Paradigm Signature S8

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    不说不知道,Paradigm在北美市场可是占用率位居前列的品牌,而且产品在世界各地获奖连连.足以证明他的成功。但风光的背后,肯定离不开默默的耕耘。Paradigm工厂就在加拿大,全世界销售的Paradigm产品都出自这个地广人稀、资源丰富、风景优美的北美绿洲。Paradigm的产品线甚广,SignatureS8是其中的现役旗舰。和很多旗舰产品动不动就要价数十万的品牌相比,这个Paradigm的产品定位可是务实得多,

  19. Carbonate precipitation by the thermophilic archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus: a model of carbon flow for an ancient microorganism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ostrom

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Microbial carbonate precipitation experiments were conducted using the archaeon bacteria Archaeoglobus fulgidus to determine chemical and isotopic fractionation of organic and inorganic carbon into mineral phases. Carbonate precipitation was induced in two different experiments using A. fulgidus to determine the relative abundance of organically derived carbon incorporated into carbonate minerals as well as to define any distinct phases or patterns that could be attributed to the precipitation process. One experiment used a medium containing 13C-depleted organic carbon and 13C-enriched inorganic carbon, and the other used a 14C-labeled organic carbon source. Results indicated that 0.9–24.8% organic carbon was incorporated into carbonates precipitated by A. fulgidus and that this process was mediated primarily by pH and CO2 emission from cells. Data showed that the carbon in the CO2 produced from this microorganism is incorporated into carbonates and that the rate at which precipitation occurs and the dynamics of the carbonate precipitation process are strongly mediated by the specific steps involved in the biochemical process for lactate oxidation by A. fulgidus.

  20. [Carbon monoxide intoxications in Portugal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Márcia Christel; Rodrigues, Rui Paulo; Moura, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of carbon monoxide intoxication in the World shows that this is a common situation. In Portugal, there are no concrete data available in literature and its incidence remains unknown. Currently, the use of hyperbaric oxygen is a valid therapeutic for carbon monoxide poisoning management. However, its effectiveness and its proper handling are still controversial. The first aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of carbon monoxide intoxication in Portugal and to analyze its demographic characteristics. The second objective of this work was to evaluate the possible change in the type of treatment applied in areas near de hyperbaric chamber of Unidade Local de Saúde de Matosinhos, since its opening in June 2006. To achieve these objectives, we conducted a survey on admissions data for carbon monoxide intoxication occured between January first, 2000 and December 31, 2007. These data was collected in seven hospitals and in the Administração Central do Sistema de Saúde, I.P. Nationally, 621 hospitalizations were recorded, which represents an incidence of 5,86/100000 in 8 years. In the seven hospitals, there were 93 hospitalizations due to carbon monoxide intoxication during the same period of time. There was a peak of incidence during winter, between November and March and there was a similar distribution in men (47,3%) and women (52,7%). Since June 2006, date of opening of the hyperbaric chamber, the Unidade Local de Saúde de Matosinhos, E.P.E. recorded a sharp increase in the number of hospitalization for carbon monoxide intoxication. The number of admissions in the 19 months after the chamber opening was double the number of all cases occurred in that institution in the 65 months prior. We concluded that, in Portugal, carbon monoxide intoxication is an uncommon situation but it´s still an important cause of hospitalization. The referral of cases to the Unidade Local de Saúde de Matosinhos, E.P.E. since the opening of hyperbaric chamber

  1. Trading forest carbon - OSU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issues associate with trading carbon sequestered in forests are discussed. Scientific uncertainties associated with carbon measurement are discussed with respect to proposed accounting procedures. Major issues include: (1) Establishing baselines. (2) Determining additivity from f...

  2. Soil Organic Carbon Stock

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Soil organic carbon (SOC) is the carbon held within soil organic constituents (i.e., products produced as dead plants and animals decompose and the soil microbial...

  3. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education / Safety Education Centers En Español Carbon Monoxide Information Center The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known ... Install one and check its batteries regularly. View Information About CO Alarms Other CO Topics Safety Tips ...

  4. Biomass Carbon Stock

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Biomass carbon includes carbon stored in above- and below-ground live plant components (such as leaf, branch, stem and root) as well as in standing and down dead...

  5. Carbon Monoxide Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with the Media Fire Protection Technology Carbon monoxide safety outreach materials Help inform residents in your community ... KB | Spanish PDF 645 KB Handout: carbon monoxide safety Download this handout and add your organization's logo ...

  6. Calcium carbonate overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Some products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: ... and mineral supplements Other products may also contain calcium ...

  7. Potassium carbonate poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potassium carbonate is a white powder used to make soap, glass, and other items. This article discusses poisoning from swallowing or breathing in potassium carbonate. This article is for information only. Do ...

  8. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  9. Metal filled porous carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Adam F.; Vajo, John J.; Cumberland, Robert W.; Liu, Ping; Salguero, Tina T.

    2011-03-22

    A porous carbon scaffold with a surface and pores, the porous carbon scaffold containing a primary metal and a secondary metal, where the primary metal is a metal that does not wet the surface of the pores of the carbon scaffold but wets the surface of the secondary metal, and the secondary metal is interspersed between the surface of the pores of the carbon scaffold and the primary metal.

  10. Carbon nanotube dosimetry: from workplace exposure assessment to inhalation toxicology

    OpenAIRE

    Erdely, Aaron; Dahm, Matthew; Chen, Bean T.; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C.; Fernback, Joseph E.; Birch, M. Eileen; Evans, Douglas E.; Kashon, Michael L; Deddens, James A.; Hulderman, Tracy; Bilgesu, Suzan A; Battelli, Lori; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Leonard, Howard D.; McKinney, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Background Dosimetry for toxicology studies involving carbon nanotubes (CNT) is challenging because of a lack of detailed occupational exposure assessments. Therefore, exposure assessment findings, measuring the mass concentration of elemental carbon from personal breathing zone (PBZ) samples, from 8 U.S.-based multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) manufacturers and users were extrapolated to results of an inhalation study in mice. Results Upon analysis, an inhalable elemental carbon mass concentration ar...

  11. Comparative Life Cycle Assessments: Carbon Neutrality and Wood Biomass Energy

    OpenAIRE

    Sedjo, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    Biomass energy is expected to play a major role in the substitution of renewable energy sources for fossil fuels over the next several decades. The US Energy Information Administration (EIA 2012) forecasts increases in the share of biomass in US energy production from 8 percent in 2009 to 15 percent by 2035. The general view has been that carbon emitted into the atmosphere from biological materials is carbon neutral—part of a closed loop whereby plant regrowth simply recaptures the carbon emi...

  12. The Photochemical Stability of Carbonates on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Richard; Zent, Aaron P.; McKay, Christopher P.

    2006-08-01

    Carbonates, predominately MgCO3, have been spectroscopically identified at a level of 2-5% in martian dust. However, in spite of this observation, and a large number of climate studies that suggest 1 to several bars of CO2 should be sequestered in carbonate rocks, no outcropscale exposures of carbonate have been detected anywhere on Mars to date. To address one hypothesis for this long-standing puzzle, the effect of ultraviolet (UV) light on the stability of calcium carbonate in a simulated martian atmosphere was experimentally investigated. Using 13C-labeled calcite, we found no experimental evidence of the UV photodecomposition of calcium carbonate in a simulated martian atmosphere. Extrapolating the lower limit of detection of our experimental system to an upper limit of carbonate decomposition on Mars yields a quantum efficiency of 3.5 × 10-8 molecules/photon over the wavelength interval of 190-390 nm and a maximum UV photodecomposition rate of 1.2 × 10-13 kg m-2 s-1 from a calcite surface. The maximum loss of bulk calcite due to this process would be 2.5 nm year-1 (Mars year). However, calcite is expected to be thermodynamically stable on the surface of Mars, and potential UV photodecomposition reaction mechanisms indicate that, though calcium carbonate may decompose under vacuum, it would be stable in a CO2 atmosphere. Given the expected stability of carbonate on Mars and our inability to detect carbonate decomposition, we conclude that it is unlikely that the apparent absence of extensive carbonate deposits on the martian surface is due to UV photodecomposition in the current environment.

  13. Global deforestation: contribution to atmospheric carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodwell, G M; Hobbie, J E; Houghton, R A; Melillo, J M; Moore, B; Peterson, B J; Shaver, G R

    1983-12-01

    A study of effects of terrestrial biota on the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere suggests that the global net release of carbon due to forest clearing between 1860 and 1980 was between 135 x 10(15) and 228 x 10(15) grams. Between 1.8 x 10(15) and 4.7 x 10(15) grams of carbon were released in 1980, of which nearly 80 percent was due to deforestation, principally in the tropics. The annual release of carbon from the biota and soils exceeded the release from fossil fuels until about 1960. Because the biotic release has been and remains much larger than is commonly assumed, the airborne fraction, usually considered to be about 50 percent of the release from fossil fuels, was probably between 22 and 43 percent of the total carbon released in 1980. The increase in carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is thought by some to be increasing the storage of carbon in the earth's remaining forests sufficiently to offset the release from deforestation. The interpretation of the evidence presented here suggests no such effect; deforestation appears to be the dominant biotic effect on atmospheric carbon dioxide. If deforestation increases in proportion to population, the biotic release of carbon will reach 9 x 10(15) grams per year before forests are exhausted early in the next century. The possibilities for limiting the accumulation of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere through reduction in use of fossil fuels and through management of forests may be greater than is commonly assumed. PMID:17747369

  14. Protolytic carbon film technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renschler, C.L.; White, C.A.

    1996-04-01

    This paper presents a technique for the deposition of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) on virtually any surface allowing carbon film formation with only the caveat that the substrate must withstand carbonization temperatures of at least 600 degrees centigrade. The influence of processing conditions upon the structure and properties of the carbonized film is discussed. Electrical conductivity, microstructure, and morphology control are also described.

  15. Carbon nanotube quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapmaz, S.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature electron transport measurements on individual single wall carbon nanotubes are described in this thesis. Carbon nanotubes are small hollow cylinders made entirely out of carbon atoms. At low temperatures (below ~10 K) finite length nanotubes form quantum dots. Because of its small si

  16. Carbon Goes To…

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savasci, Funda

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this activity are to help middle school students understand the carbon cycle and realize how human activities affect the carbon cycle. This activity consists of two parts. The first part of the activity focuses on the carbon cycle, especially before the Industrial Revolution, while the second part of the activity focuses on how…

  17. Carbon/Carbon Pistons for Internal Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    Carbon/carbon piston performs same function as aluminum pistons in reciprocating internal combustion engines while reducing weight and increasing mechanical and thermal efficiencies of engine. Carbon/carbon piston concept features low piston-to-cylinder wall clearance - so low piston rings and skirts unnecessary. Advantages possible by negligible coefficient of thermal expansion of carbon/carbon.

  18. Bond strength of individual carbon nanotubes grown directly on carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung Ju; Lee, Geunsung; Kim, Sung-Dae; Kim, Seong-Il; Youk, Ji Ho; Lee, Jinyong; Kim, Young-Woon; Yu, Woong-Ryeol

    2016-10-01

    The performance of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based devices strongly depends on the adhesion of CNTs to the substrate on which they were directly grown. We report on the bond strength of CNTs grown on a carbon fiber (T700SC Toray), measured via in situ pulling of individual CNTs inside a transmission electron microscope. The bond strength of an individual CNT, obtained from the measured pulling force and CNT cross-section, was very high (˜200 MPa), 8-10 times higher than that of an adhesion model assuming only van der Waals interactions (25 MPa), presumably due to carbon-carbon interactions between the CNT (its bottom atoms) and the carbon substrate.

  19. External corrosion of tanks 8D-1 and 8D-2. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanks 8D-1 and 8D-2 at the West Valley Nuclear Services (WVNS) site, West Valley, New York, rest on layers of perlite brick contained within steel pans. The pans tend to collect water, which can contact the tanks directly and which also can be ''wicked'' to the external surfaces of the tank through the perlite brick. The presence of air in the tank vault is conducive to the formation of oxygen concentration cells, which can promote localized corrosion of the carbon steel tank wall. Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted an experiment to estimate the extent to which the external surfaces of the tanks could have corroded in the 30 years since their construction. Specimens of carbon steel, similar to that used in the tank construction, were partially embedded in an upright position in particulate perlite in closed containers. The water line in the containers.was maintained at two levels: above the perlite level (high water level tests) and below the bottoms of the specimens (low water level tests). The water used in the tests was obtained from the pan of tank 8D-1. The containers were maintained in an aerated condition. Specimens were examined after 3-, 6-, 12-, 18-, 24-, and 30-month exposures

  20. Laser interaction with low-density carbon foam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Chaurasia; S Tripathi; D S Munda; G Mishra; C G Murali; N K Gupta; L J Dhareshwar; A K Rossall; G J Tallents; Rashmi Singh; D K Kohli; R K Khardekar

    2010-12-01

    Experiments were performed with a 15 J/500 ps Nd:glass laser ( = 1064 nm) focussed to an intensity > 1014 W/cm2 . X-ray emissions from carbon foam and 5 % Pt-doped carbon foam of density 150–300 mg/cc were compared with that of the solid carbon targets. The thickness of the carbon foam was 15 m on a graphite substrate. X-ray emission was measured using semiconductor X-ray diodes covered with various filters having transmissions in different X-ray spectral ranges. It covered X-ray spectrum of 0.88.5 keV range. The X-ray emission in the soft X-ray region was observed to increase to about 1.8 times and 2.3 times in carbon foam and Pt-doped foam, respectively with respect to solid carbon. In hard X-rays, there was no measurable difference amongst the carbon foam, Pt-doped carbon foam and solid carbon. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis demonstrates that foam targets smoothens the crater formed by the laser irradiation.

  1. Carbon Footprint of Beef Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Dyer

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The carbon footprint of beef cattle is presented for Canada, The United States, The European Union, Australia and Brazil. The values ranged between 8 and 22 kg CO2e per kg of live weight (LW depending on the type of farming system, the location, the year, the type of management practices, the allocation, as well as the boundaries of the study. Substantial reductions have been observed for most of these countries in the last thirty years. For instance, in Canada the mean carbon footprint of beef cattle at the exit gate of the farm decreased from 18.2 kg CO2e per kg LW in 1981 to 9.5 kg CO2e per kg LW in 2006 mainly because of improved genetics, better diets, and more sustainable land management practices. Cattle production results in products other than meat, such as hides, offal and products for rendering plants; hence the environmental burden must be distributed between these useful products. In order to do this, the cattle carbon footprint needs to be reported in kg of CO2e per kg of product. For example, in Canada in 2006, on a mass basis, the carbon footprint of cattle by-products at the exit gate of the slaughterhouse was 12.9 kg CO2e per kg of product. Based on an economic allocation, the carbon footprints of meat (primal cuts, hide, offal and fat, bones and other products for rendering were 19.6, 12.3, 7 and 2 kg CO2e per kg of product, respectively.

  2. Global estimates of boreal forest carbon stocks and flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Corey J. A.; Warkentin, Ian G.

    2015-05-01

    The boreal ecosystem is an important global reservoir of stored carbon and a haven for diverse biological communities. The natural disturbance dynamics there have historically been driven by fire and insects, with human-mediated disturbances increasing faster than in other biomes globally. Previous research on the total boreal carbon stock and predictions of its future flux reveal high uncertainty in regional patterns. We reviewed and standardised this extensive body of quantitative literature to provide the most up-to-date and comprehensive estimates of the global carbon balance in the boreal forest. We also compiled century-scale predictions of the carbon budget flux. Our review and standardisation confirmed high uncertainty in the available data, but there is evidence that the region's total carbon stock has been underestimated. We found a total carbon store of 367.3 to 1715.8 Pg (1015 g), the mid-point of which (1095 Pg) is between 1.3 and 3.8 times larger than any previous mean estimates. Most boreal carbon resides in its soils and peatlands, although estimates are highly uncertain. We found evidence that the region might become a net carbon source following a reduction in carbon uptake rate from at least the 1980s. Given that the boreal potentially constitutes the largest terrestrial carbon source in the world, in one of the most rapidly warming parts of the globe (Walsh, 2014), how we manage these stocks will be influential on future climate dynamics.

  3. Carbon-14 waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-14 occurs in nature, but is also formed in nuclear reactors. Because of its long half-life and the biological significance of carbon, releases from nuclear facilities could have a significant radiological impact. Waste management strategies for carbon-14 are therefore of current concern. Carbon-14 is present in a variety of waste streams both at reactors and at reprocessing plants. A reliable picture of the production and release of carbon-14 from various reactor systems has been built up for the purposes of this study. A possible management strategy for carbon-14 might be the reduction of nitrogen impurity levels in core materials, since the activation of 14N is usually the dominant source of carbon-14. The key problem in carbon-14 management is its retention of off-gas streams, particularly in the dissolver off-gas stream at reprocessing plants. Three alternative trapping processes that convert carbon dioxide into insoluble carbonates have been suggested. The results show that none of the options considered need be rejected on the grounds of potential radiation doses to individuals. All exposures should be as low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account. If, on these grounds, retention and disposal of carbon-14 is found to be beneficial, then, subject to the limitations noted, appropriate retention, immobilization and disposal technologies have been identified

  4. Increase of Carbon Cycle Feedback with Climate Sensitivity: Results from a coupled Climate and Carbon Cycle Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govindasamy, B; Thompson, S; Mirin, A; Wickett, M; Caldeira, K; Delire, C

    2004-04-01

    Coupled climate and carbon cycle modeling studies have shown that the feedback between global warming and the carbon cycle, in particular the terrestrial carbon cycle, could accelerate climate change and result in larger warming. In this paper, we investigate the sensitivity of this feedback for year-2100 global warming in the range of 0 K to 8 K. Differing climate sensitivities to increased CO{sub 2} content are imposed on the carbon cycle models for the same emissions. Emissions from the SRES A2 scenario are used. We use a fully-coupled climate and carbon cycle model, the INtegrated Climate and CArbon model (INCCA) the NCAR/DOE Parallel Coupled Model coupled to the IBIS terrestrial biosphere model and a modified-OCMIP ocean biogeochemistry model. In our model, for scenarios with year-2100 global warming increasing from 0 to 8 K, land uptake decreases from 47% to 29% of total CO{sub 2} emissions. Due to competing effects, ocean uptake (16%) shows almost no change at all. Atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration increases were 48% higher in the run with 8 K global climate warming than in the case with no warming. Our results indicate that carbon cycle amplification of climate warming will be greater if there is higher climate sensitivity to increased atmospheric CO{sub 2} content; the carbon cycle feedback factor increases from 1.13 to 1.48 when global warming increases from 3.2 to 8 K.

  5. Carbon Requirement of Hendersonula Toruloidea Nattress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. C. Saxena

    1970-04-01

    Full Text Available Effect of 8 different carbon compounds on the growth of Hendersonula toruloidea Nattrass, that causes brown rot of fruits of Malus sylvestris Mill has been studied. Galactose was the best; maltose, glucose, sucrose also supported good growth. Growth was moderate with glycerol and lactose but poor with starch.

  6. 78 FR 63570 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Forms W-8BEN, W-8BEN-E, W-8ECI, W-8EXP, and W-8IMY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... (sections 1471-1474) in T.D. 9610 (78 FR 5874). The general requirements of an FFI Agreement are described... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Forms W-8BEN, W-8BEN-E, W-8ECI, W-8EXP, and W-8IMY AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request for...

  7. Airport Surveillance Radar : Model 8

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Airport Surveillance Radar Model 8 (ASR-8) is a short-range (60 nautical mile (nmi)), analog radar system used to detect and report the presence and location of...

  8. Behaviour of Structural Carbonate Stable Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Compositions in Bioapatite During Burning of Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, L. E.; Longstaffe, F. J.; White, C. D.

    2003-12-01

    Bioapatite, the principal inorganic phase comprising bone, commonly contains a small fraction of carbonate, which has been substituted into the phosphate structure during bone formation. The isotopic compositions of both the phosphate oxygen and the structural carbonate oxygen are now commonly used in palaeoclimatological and bioarchaeological investigations. The potential for post-mortem alteration of these isotopic compositions, therefore, is of interest, with the behaviour of structural carbonate being of most concern. In bioarchaeological studies, alteration of bone isotopic compositions has the potential to occur not only during low-temperature processes associated with burial but also during food preparation involving heating (burning, boiling). Here, we examine the stable isotopic behaviour of structural carbonate oxygen and carbon, and coexisting phosphate oxygen during the burning of bone. Freshly deceased (6determined using powder X-ray diffraction (pXRD), and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR). Combined differential thermal and thermogravimetric analyses (DTA/TG) were used to evaluate weight loss and associated reactions during heating. Stable carbon isotope compositions of the bioapatite remain relatively constant (+/-1‰ ) during heating to 650° C. A 4‰ increase in stable carbon isotopic composition then occurs between 650-750° C, accompanied by an increase in CI, followed by a 10‰ decline at temperatures above 800° C, as carbonate carbon is lost. Carbonate and phosphate oxygen isotopic compositions are correlated over the entire heating range, with carbonate being enriched relative to phosphate by about 8-10‰ below 500° C, 5-6‰ between 500-700° C, and 8-10‰ above 700° C. CI and oxygen isotopic compositions of carbonate and phosphate are not well correlated. Only modest CI changes are recorded from 25-675° C, compared with much larger changes in oxygen isotopic composition, especially above 300° C. On average, original

  9. Handbook of Super 8 Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telzer, Ronnie, Ed.

    This handbook is designed for anyone interested in producing super 8 films at any level of complexity and cost. Separate chapters present detailed discussions of the following topics: super 8 production systems and super 8 shooting and editing systems; budgeting; cinematography and sound recording; preparing to edit; editing; mixing sound tracks;…

  10. Partial trisomy 8 (trisomy 8q2106 leads to 8qter).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelo, D; Perl, D P; Henkle, C; Richardson, A

    1977-12-01

    A case of trisomy for part of the long arm of chromosome 8, confirmed by G-banding analysis, in a white male infant is described. The mother carried a reciprocal translocation between chromosome 8 and chromosome 13 (46,XX,t(8;13),(q21:q34). The patient had inherited the translocated chromosome 13 and was thus trisomic for the distal half of the long arm of chromosome 8. He had many of the clinical features of the full trisomy 8 syndrome. As compared with previously reported cases with trisomy of the distal end of chromosome 8, he was more dysmorphic and showed greater developmental retardation.

  11. Systemic effects of geoengineering by terrestrial carbon dioxide removal on carbon related planetary boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Vera; Donges, Jonathan; Lucht, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    The planetary boundaries framework as proposed by Rockström et al. (2009) provides guidelines for ecological boundaries, the transgression of which is likely to result in a shift of Earth system functioning away from the relatively stable Holocene state. As the climate change boundary is already close to be transgressed, several geoengineering (GE) methods are discussed, aiming at a reduction of atmospheric carbon concentrations to control the Earth's energy balance. One of the proposed GE methods is carbon extraction from the atmosphere via biological carbon sequestration. In case mitigation efforts fail to substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions, this form of GE could act as potential measure to reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. We here study the possible influences of human interactions in the Earth system on carbon related planetary boundaries in the form of geoengineering (terrestrial carbon dioxide removal). We use a conceptual model specifically designed to investigate fundamental carbon feedbacks between land, ocean and atmosphere (Anderies et al., 2013) and modify it to include an additional geoengineering component. With that we analyze the existence and stability of a safe operating space for humanity, which is here conceptualized in three of the 9 proposed dimensions, namely climate change, ocean acidification and land-use. References: J. M. Anderies et al., The topology of non-linear global carbon dynamics: from tipping points to planetary boundaries. Environ. Res. Lett., 8(4):044048 (2013) J. Rockström et al., A safe operating space for humanity. Nature 461 (7263), 472-475 (2009)

  12. Carbon isotopes in mollusk shell carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnaughey, Ted A.; Gillikin, David Paul

    2008-10-01

    Mollusk shells contain many isotopic clues about calcification physiology and environmental conditions at the time of shell formation. In this review, we use both published and unpublished data to discuss carbon isotopes in both bivalve and gastropod shell carbonates. Land snails construct their shells mainly from respired CO2, and shell δ13C reflects the local mix of C3 and C4 plants consumed. Shell δ13C is typically >10‰ heavier than diet, probably because respiratory gas exchange discards CO2, and retains the isotopically heavier HCO3 -. Respired CO2 contributes less to the shells of aquatic mollusks, because CO2/O2 ratios are usually higher in water than in air, leading to more replacement of respired CO2 by environmental CO2. Fluid exchange with the environment also brings additional dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) into the calcification site. Shell δ13C is typically a few ‰ lower than ambient DIC, and often decreases with age. Shell δ13C retains clues about processes such as ecosystem metabolism and estuarine mixing. Ca2+ ATPase-based models of calcification physiology developed for corals and algae likely apply to mollusks, too, but lower pH and carbonic anhydrase at the calcification site probably suppress kinetic isotope effects. Carbon isotopes in biogenic carbonates are clearly complex, but cautious interpretation can provide a wealth of information, especially after vital effects are better understood.

  13. Carbon dioxide sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Prabir K. (Worthington, OH); Lee, Inhee (Columbus, OH); Akbar, Sheikh A. (Hilliard, OH)

    2011-11-15

    The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

  14. Windows 8.1 bible

    CERN Document Server

    Boyce, Jim; Tidrow, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Windows 8.1 coverage that goes above and beyond all competitors? Serving as an evolutionary update to Windows 8, Windows 8.1 provides critical changes to parts of Windows 8, such as greater customization of the interface and boot operations, return of a 'start button' that reveals apps, greater integration between the two interfaces, and updates to apps. Weighing in at nearly 1000 pages, Windows 8.1 Bible provides deeper Windows insight than any other book on the market. It's valuable for both professionals needing a guide to the nooks and crannies of Windows and regular users wanting a wide

  15. Terrestrial carbon storage dynamics: Chasing a moving target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y.; Shi, Z.; Jiang, L.; Xia, J.; Wang, Y.; Kc, M.; Liang, J.; Lu, X.; Niu, S.; Ahlström, A.; Hararuk, O.; Hastings, A.; Hoffman, F. M.; Medlyn, B. E.; Rasmussen, M.; Smith, M. J.; Todd-Brown, K. E.; Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems have been estimated to absorb roughly 30% of anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Past studies have identified myriad drivers of terrestrial carbon storage changes, such as fire, climate change, and land use changes. Those drivers influence the carbon storage change via diverse mechanisms, which have not been unified into a general theory so as to identify what control the direction and rate of terrestrial carbon storage dynamics. Here we propose a theoretical framework to quantitatively determine the response of terrestrial carbon storage to different exogenous drivers. With a combination of conceptual reasoning, mathematical analysis, and numeric experiments, we demonstrated that the maximal capacity of an ecosystem to store carbon is time-dependent and equals carbon input (i.e., net primary production, NPP) multiplying by residence time. The capacity is a moving target toward which carbon storage approaches (i.e., the direction of carbon storage change) but usually does not attain. The difference between the capacity and the carbon storage at a given time t is the unrealized carbon storage potential. The rate of the storage change is proportional to the magnitude of the unrealized potential. We also demonstrated that a parameter space of NPP, residence time, and carbon storage potential can well characterize carbon storage dynamics quantified at six sites ranging from tropical forests to tundra and simulated by two versions (carbon-only and coupled carbon-nitrogen) of the Australian Community Atmosphere-Biosphere Land Ecosystem (CABLE) Model under three climate change scenarios (CO2 rising only, climate warming only, and RCP8.5). Overall this study reveals the unified mechanism unerlying terrestrial carbon storage dynamics to guide transient traceability analysis of global land models and synthesis of empirical studies.

  16. Carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of the carbonates from the Jacupiranga and Catalao I carbonatite complexes, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morikiyo, Toshiro (Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). Faculty of Science); Hirano, Hideo; Matsuhisa, Yukihiro

    1990-11-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotope compositions were measured for carbonates from the Jacupiranga and Catalao I carbonatite complexes in Brazil. The {delta}{sup 13}C values of the Jacupiranga carbonates are uniform, ranging from -6.4 to -5.6 per mille with the average of -6.07 per mille. Except for one sample, the {delta}{sup 18}O values of the carbonates are between 7.1 and 8.1 per mille, and the average value is 7.6 per mille. The isotopic compositions of the Jacupiranga carbonates represent the value of primary igneous carbonatite. The {delta}{sup 13}C values of dolomites are about 0.5 per mille higher than those of calcites. The {delta}{sup 13}C values of carbonates from the Catalao I complex range from -6.8 to -5.2 per mille with the average of -5.83 per mille. Those values are similar to the values of the Jacupiranga carbonates. However, oxygen isotopic compositions of the Catalao I carbonates show a wide range of 8.4 to 22.3 per mille. Carbonates with the lowest {delta}{sup 18}O values in the complex are considered to represent the igneous stage. Carbonates with extremely high {delta}{sup 18}O values of about 22 per mille are considered to have precipitated from low-temperature hydrothermal fluids. The group of intermediate {delta}{sup 18}O values indicates a variable degree of contamination by the {delta}{sup 18}O-rich hydrothermal carbonates. The contribution of secondary stage hydrothermal carbonates seems to be significant in the Catalao I complex as compared with the Jacupiranga complex. The development of a network structure in the Catalao I complex may have enhanced the circulation of the later stage hydrothermal fluids. (author).

  17. Carbon Dot Based Sensing of Dopamine and Ascorbic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Upama Baruah; Neelam Gogoi; Achyut Konwar; Manash Jyoti Deka; Devasish Chowdhury; Gitanjali Majumdar

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate carbon dot based sensor of catecholamine, namely, dopamine and ascorbic acid. Carbon dots (CDs) were prepared from a green source: commercially available Assam tea. The carbon dots prepared from tea had particle sizes of ∼0.8 nm and are fluorescent. Fluorescence of the carbon dots was found to be quenched in the presence of dopamine and ascorbic acid with greater sensitivity for dopamine. The minimum detectable limits were determined to be 33 μM and 98 μM for dopamine and ascor...

  18. Investigating carbonate formation in urban soils as a method for capture and storage of atmospheric carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washbourne, C-L; Renforth, P; Manning, D A C

    2012-08-01

    This paper investigates the potential for engineered urban soils to capture and store atmospheric carbon (C). Calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) bearing waste silicate minerals within the soil environment can capture and store atmospheric C through the process of weathering and secondary carbonate mineral precipitation. Anthropogenic soils, known to contain substantial quantities of Ca and Mg-rich minerals derived from demolition activity (particularly cement and concrete), were systematically sampled at the surface across a 10 ha brownfield site, Science Central, located in the urban centre of Newcastle upon Tyne, U.K. Subsequent analysis yielded average carbonate contents of 21.8±4.7% wt CaCO(3). Isotopic analysis demonstrated δ(18)O values between -9.4‰ and -13.3‰ and δ(13)C values between -7.4‰ and -13.6‰ (relative to Pee Dee Belemnite), suggesting that up to 39.4±8.8% of the carbonate C has been captured from the atmosphere through hydroxylation of dissolved CO(2) in high pH solutions. The remaining carbonate C is derived from lithogenic sources. 37.4 kg of atmospheric CO(2) has already been captured and stored as carbonate per Mg of soil across the site, representing a carbon dioxide (CO(2)) removal rate of 12.5 kg CO(2) Mg(-1) yr(-1). There is the potential for capture and storage of a further 27.3 kg CO(2) Mg(-1) in residual reactive materials, which may be exploited through increased residence time (additional in situ weathering). Overall, the Science Central site has the potential to capture and store a total of 64,800 Mg CO(2) as carbonate minerals. This study illustrates the potential for managing urban soils as tools of C capture and storage, an important ecosystem service, and demonstrates the importance of studying C storage in engineering urban anthropogenic soils. PMID:22683756

  19. 76 FR 48073 - Hazardous Waste Management System: Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste: Carbon Dioxide...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-08

    ... Clean Air Act. CCS Carbon Capture and Storage. CERCLA Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation... ``carbon capture and storage'' or CCS. CCS can be described as a three-step process, beginning with the... Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage, August 2010, p. 8. To transport the captured CO 2 stream...

  20. 21 CFR 878.3500 - Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Prosthetic Devices § 878.3500 Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material. (a) Identification. A polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material is a porous device... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon...

  1. Clausen's hypergeometric function with variable -1/8 or -8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Per W.

    1999-01-01

    Formulas for 3F2[-1/8] and 3F2[-8] are listed. They are obtained (i) from the cubic transformations by the aid of hypergeometric summation and limit theorems and (ii) from known evaluations of 2F1[1/9] and 2F1[8/9]. There is one free parameter in case (i) and two in case (ii)....

  2. Plumbing carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chuanhong; Suenaga, Kazu; Iijima, Sumio

    2008-01-01

    Since their discovery, the possibility of connecting carbon nanotubes together like water pipes has been an intriguing prospect for these hollow nanostructures. The serial joining of carbon nanotubes in a controlled manner offers a promising approach for the bottom-up engineering of nanotube structures-from simply increasing their aspect ratio to making integrated carbon nanotube devices. To date, however, there have been few reports of the joining of two different carbon nanotubes. Here we demonstrate that a Joule heating process, and associated electro-migration effects, can be used to connect two carbon nanotubes that have the same (or similar) diameters. More generally, with the assistance of a tungsten metal particle, this technique can be used to seamlessly join any two carbon nanotubes-regardless of their diameters-to form new nanotube structures.

  3. Nanographene reinforced carbon/carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Dhruv

    Carbon/Carbon Composites (CCC) are made of carbon reinforcement in carbon matrix and have high thermal stability and fatigue resistance. CCC are used in nose cones, heat shields and disc brakes of aircrafts due to their exceptional mechanical properties at high temperature. The manufacturing process of CCC involves a carbonization stage in which unwanted elements, except carbon, are eliminated from the polymer precursor. Carbonization results in the formation of voids and cracks due to the thermal mismatch between the reinforcement and the matrix and expulsion of volatiles from the polymer matrix. Thermal cracks and voids decrease the density and mechanical properties of the manufactured CCC. In this work, Nanographene Platelets (NGP) were explored as nanofillers to fill the voids/cracks and reduce thermal shrinkage in CCC. They were first compared with Vapor Grown Carbon Nanofibers (VGCNF) by dispersion of different concentrations (0.5wt%, 1.5wt%, 3wt%) in resole-type phenolic resin and were characterized to explore their effect on rheology, heat of reaction and wetting behavior. The dispersions were then cured to form nanocomposites and were characterized for morphology, flexure and thermal properties. Finally, NGP were introduced into the carbon/carboncomposites in two stages, first by spraying in different concentrations (0.5wt%, 1.5wt%, 3wt%, 5wt %) during the prepreg formation and later during densification by directly mixing in the corresponding densification mix. The manufactured NGP reinforced CCC were characterized for microstructure, porosity, bulk density and mechanical properties (Flexure and ILSS) which were further cross-checked by non-destructive techniques (vibration and ultrasonic). In this study, it was further found that at low concentration (≤ 1.5 wt%) NGP were more effective in increasing the heat of reaction and in decreasing the viscosity of the phenolic resin. The decrease in viscosity led to better wetting properties of NGP / phenolic

  4. Physics of carbon nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon is a prominent element that appears in various structures with new promising technological applications. The physics of carbon nanostructures is one of the hot topics in modern condensed matter theory. I plan to present a brief introduction into the theory of variously shaped carbon nanostructures paying special attention to generic field-theory models. The preliminary plan is the following: (1) a brief historical excursus, (2) the most interesting experimental observations, (3) generic models for the description of electronic states in carbon nanoparticles (Dirac-type equations, defects, geometry, etc.), (4) open problems. (author)

  5. Carbon Monoxide Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniol, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    Of all fatal poisonings in the United States, an estimated half are due to carbon monoxide. The number of non-lethal poisonings due to carbon monoxide is difficult to estimate because signs and symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning cover a wide spectrum and mimic other disorders. Misdiagnosis is serious, as the patient often returns to the contaminated environment. Those not receiving proper treatment are at significant risk, as high as 10% to 12%, of developing late neurological sequelae. The diagnosis of carbon monoxide poisoning depends upon precise history taking, careful physical examination, and a high index of suspicion. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:21221282

  6. Nanoindentation of Carbon Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Singh, Karamjit; Verma, Veena; Bhatti, H S

    2016-06-01

    In the present research paper carbon nanostructures viz. single walled carbon nanotubes, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, single walled carbon nanohorns and graphene nanoplatelets have been synthesized by CVD technique, hydrothermal method, DC arc discharge method in liquid nitrogen and microwave technique respectively. After synthesis 5 mm thick pallets of given nanomaterial are prepared by making a paste in isopropyl alcohol and using polyvinylidene difluoride as a binder and then these pallets were used for nanoindentation measurements. Hardness, reduced modulus, stiffness, contact height and contact area have been measured using nanoindenter. PMID:27427726

  7. Soil Carbon Sequestration in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With a large land area and diverse ecoregions, there is a considerable potential of terrestrial/soil carbon sequestration in India. Of the total land area of 329 million hectares (Mha), 297 Mha is the land area comprising 162 Mha of arable land, 69 Mha of forest and woodland, 11 Mha of permanent pasture, 8 Mha of permanent crops and 58 Mha is other land uses. The soil organic carbon (SOC) pool is estimated at 21 Pg (petagram = Pg = 1 x 1015 g billion ton) to 30-cm depth and 63 Pg to 150-cm depth. The soil inorganic carbon (SIC) pool is estimated at 196 Pg to 1-m depth. The SOC concentration in most cultivated soils is less than 5 g/kg compared with 15 to 20 g/kg in uncultivated soils. Low SOC concentration is attributed to plowing, removal of crop residue and other biosolids, and mining of soil fertility. Accelerated soil erosion by water leads to emission of 6 Tg C/y. Important strategies of soil C sequestration include restoration of degraded soils, and adoption of recommended management practices (RMPs) of agricultural and forestry soils. Potential of soil C sequestration in India is estimated at 7 to 10 Tg C/y for restoration of degraded soils and ecosystems, 5 to 7 Tg C/y for erosion control, 6 to 7 Tg C/y for adoption of RMPs on agricultural soils, and 22 to 26 Tg C/y for secondary carbonates. Thus, total potential of soil C sequestration is 39 to 49 (44± 5) Tg C/y

  8. SU-8 cantilever chip interconnection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Alicia Charlotte; Janting, Jakob; Schultz, Peter;

    2006-01-01

    the electrodes on the SU-8 chip to a printed circuit board. Here, we present two different methods of electrically connecting an SU-8 chip, which contains a microfluidic network and free-hanging mechanical parts. The tested electrical interconnection techniques are flip chip bonding using underfill or flip chip...... bonding using an anisotropic conductive film (ACF). These are both widely used in the Si industry and might also be used for the large scale interconnection of SU-8 chips. The SU-8 chip, to which the interconnections are made, has a microfluidic channel with integrated micrometer-sized cantilevers...... that can be used for label-free biochemical detection. All the bonding tests are compared with results obtained using similar Si chips. It is found that it is significantly more complicated to interconnect SU-8 than Si cantilever chips primarily due to the softness of SU-8....

  9. 41 CFR 51-8.8 - Business information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Business information. 51... AGENCY MATERIALS § 51-8.8 Business information. (a) When, in responding to an FOIA request, the Committee... business information or when a submitter has labeled information as proprietary at the time of...

  10. 4 CFR 22.8 - General Discovery Procedures [Rule 8].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General Discovery Procedures . 22.8 Section 22.8 Accounts GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE GENERAL PROCEDURES RULES OF PROCEDURE OF THE GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY..., including the existence, description, nature, custody, condition, and location of any books,...

  11. Seksuaalikasvatusta 8. luokkalaisille keminmaalaisille pojille

    OpenAIRE

    Vainio, Sanna; Hast, Salla-Mari

    2012-01-01

    Tekijä(t): Salla-Mari Hast & Sanna Vainio Opinnäytetyön nimi: Seksuaalikasvatusta keminmaalaisille 8. luokkalaisille pojille Sivuja (+liitteitä): 41 sivua ja 7 liitettä Projektityön tarkoituksena oli suunnitella ja toteuttaa seksuaalikasvatustunnit ke-minmaalaisille 8. luokkalaisille pojille. Suunnittelimme ja toteutimme seksuaalikas-vatustunnit syksyllä 2011 toteuttamamme kyselyn vastauksien pohjalta. Projektityön tavoitteena oli lisätä keminmaalaisten 8. luokkalaisten poik...

  12. Diet control on carbon isotopic composition of land snail shell carbonate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU ZongXiu; GU ZhaoYan; WU NaiQin; XU Bing

    2007-01-01

    Carbon isotope compositions for both the carbonate shells and soft bodies (organic tissue) of living land snails collected mostly from the Loess Plateau, China have been measured. The result shows that δ13C values range from -13.1‰ to -4.3‰ for the aragonite shell samples and from -26.8‰ to -18.0‰ for the soft body samples. Although the shells are enriched in 13C relative to the bodies averagely by 14.2(±0.8)‰, the shell δ13Ca values are closely correlated to the body δ13Corg values, expressed as δ13Ca = 1.021 δ13Corg + 14.38 (R = 0.965; N = 31). This relationship indicates that δ13Ca is primarily a function of the isotopic composition of the snail diets since previous studies have proved that the snail body is the same as their food in carbon isotope composition. In other words, carbon isotope compo-sition of the carbonate shell can be used as a proxy to estimate the dietary 13C abundance of the land snails. The data also support that the 13C enrichment of the carbonate shells results mainly from the equilibrium fractionations between the metabolic CO2, HCO3- in the hemolymph and shell aragonite, and partially from kinetic fractionations when snail shells form during their activity.

  13. Frontiers of graphene and carbon nanotubes devices and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on carbon nanotubes and graphene as representatives of nano-carbon materials, and describes the growth of new technology and applications of new devices. As new devices and as new materials, nano-carbon materials are expected to be world pioneers that could not have been realized with conventional semiconductor materials, and as those that extend the limits of conventional semiconductor performance. This book introduces the latest achievements of nano-carbon devices, processes, and technology growth. It is anticipated that these studies will also be pioneers in the development of future research of nano-carbon devices and materials. This book consists of 18 chapters. Chapters 1 to 8 describe new device applications and new growth methods of graphene, and Chapters 9 to 18, those of carbon nanotubes. It is expected that by increasing the advantages and overcoming the weak points of nanocarbon materials, a new world that cannot be achieved with conventional materials will be greatly expanded. W...

  14. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Thomas Nelson; Raghubir P. Gupta

    2005-01-01

    This report describes research conducted between October 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Two supported sorbents were tested in a bench scale fluidized bed reactor system. The sorbents were prepared by impregnation of sodium carbonate on to an inert support at a commercial catalyst manufacturing facility. One sorbent, tested through five cycles of carbon dioxide sorption in an atmosphere of 3% water vapor and 0.8 to 3% carbon dioxide showed consistent reactivity with sodium carbonate utilization of 7 to 14%. A second, similarly prepared material, showed comparable reactivity in one cycle of testing. Batches of 5 other materials were prepared in laboratory scale quantities (primarily by spray drying). These materials generally have significantly greater surface areas than calcined sodium bicarbonate. Small scale testing showed no significant adsorption of mercury on representative carbon dioxide sorbent materials under expected flue gas conditions.

  15. Human herpesvirus-8: beyond Kaposi's .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimar, Doron; Rimar, Yossi; Keynan, Yoav

    2006-07-01

    Today, more than 10 years and 2000 articles since human herpesvirus 8 was first described by Chang et al., novel insights into the transmission and molecular biology of HHV-8 have unveiled a new spectrum of diseases attributed to the virus. The association of HHV-8 with proliferative disorders--including Kaposi's sarcoma, multicentric Castleman disease and primary effusion lymphoma--is well established. Other aspects of HHV-8 infection are currently the subject of accelerated research. Primary HHV-8 infection may manifest as a mononucleosis-like syndrome in the immunocompetent host, or in various forms in the immunocompromised host. The association of HHV-8 with primary pulmonary hypertension was observed by Cool et al. in 2003, but six clinical trials evaluating the role of HHV-8 in pulmonary hypertension have not been able to replicate this intriguing observation. It has been speculated that HHV-8 may secondarily infect proliferating endothelium in patients with pulmonary hypertension. HHV-8 epidemiology, modes of transmission, new spectrum of disease and treatment are presented and discussed. PMID:16889165

  16. Microbially mediated mineral carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, I. M.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral carbonation involves silicate dissolution and carbonate precipitation, which are both natural processes that microorganisms are able to mediate in near surface environments (Ferris et al., 1994; Eq. 1). (Ca,Mg)SiO3 + 2H2CO3 + H2O → (Ca,Mg)CO3 + H2O + H4SiO4 + O2 (1) Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophs with cell surface characteristics and metabolic processes involving inorganic carbon that can induce carbonate precipitation. This occurs partly by concentrating cations within their net-negative cell envelope and through the alkalinization of their microenvironment (Thompson & Ferris, 1990). Regions with mafic and ultramafic bedrock, such as near Atlin, British Columbia, Canada, represent the best potential sources of feedstocks for mineral carbonation. The hydromagnesite playas near Atlin are a natural biogeochemical model for the carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals (Power et al., 2009). Field-based studies at Atlin and corroborating laboratory experiments demonstrate the ability of a microbial consortium dominated by filamentous cyanobacteria to induce the precipitation of carbonate minerals. Phototrophic microbes, such as cyanobacteria, have been proposed as a means for producing biodiesel and other value added products because of their efficiency as solar collectors and low requirement for valuable, cultivable land in comparison to crops (Dismukes et al., 2008). Carbonate precipitation and biomass production could be facilitated using specifically designed ponds to collect waters rich in dissolved cations (e.g., Mg2+ and Ca2+), which would allow for evapoconcentration and provide an appropriate environment for growth of cyanobacteria. Microbially mediated carbonate precipitation does not require large quantities of energy or chemicals needed for industrial systems that have been proposed for rapid carbon capture and storage via mineral carbonation (e.g., Lackner et al., 1995). Therefore, this biogeochemical approach may represent a readily

  17. Novel carbon nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991 opened up a challenging new area of research, because they are expected to be ideal building blocks for nanoscale applications due to their extraordinary mechanical and electronic properties. Various production methods have been developed, however precise control of nanotube morphology (e.g. length, diameter) has yet to be realised, a fact which has delayed industrial exploitation. Thus a comprehensive understanding of nanotube growth is essential, and this thesis is concerned with this important problem, i.e. the controlled production of novel carbon nanomaterials. Chapter 1 surveys production methods for fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and other carbon-based materials, such as fibres, particles etc. The sophisticated tools required for this work, e.g. high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), etc. are reviewed in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 describes a novel approach to carbon nanotubes, using laser etching techniques, which generates aligned tubes of uniform diameter and length. The mode of catalyst preparation, as well as the nature of the precursor, play crucial roles in this process. The preparation of modified carbon nanotubes by the pyrolysis of metallocene, e.g. ferrocene in conjunction with various hydrocarbons, is discussed in Chapter 4. Superconducting interference device measurements (SQUID) show that Fe-filled carbon nanotubes exhibit enhanced coercivities in the 430-1070 Oe range, i.e. greater than those reported for Ni and Co nanowires. Carbon nanotubes can be also modified by replacing atoms of the carbon network with nitrogen, boron or both. The creation of large arrays of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes, for example CNx nanofibres, as well as the formation of BxCyNz onions is described in Chapter 5. Electron irradiation of these onions generates pure carbon onions. Finally (Chapter 6), the catalytic behaviour of metal particles in different

  18. Investigating carbonate formation in urban soils as a method for capture and storage of atmospheric carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates the potential for engineered urban soils to capture and store atmospheric carbon (C). Calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) bearing waste silicate minerals within the soil environment can capture and store atmospheric C through the process of weathering and secondary carbonate mineral precipitation. Anthropogenic soils, known to contain substantial quantities of Ca and Mg-rich minerals derived from demolition activity (particularly cement and concrete), were systematically sampled at the surface across a 10 ha brownfield site, Science Central, located in the urban centre of Newcastle upon Tyne, U.K. Subsequent analysis yielded average carbonate contents of 21.8 ± 4.7% wt CaCO3. Isotopic analysis demonstrated δ18O values between − 9.4‰ and − 13.3‰ and δ13C values between − 7.4‰ and − 13.6‰ (relative to Pee Dee Belemnite), suggesting that up to 39.4 ± 8.8% of the carbonate C has been captured from the atmosphere through hydroxylation of dissolved CO2 in high pH solutions. The remaining carbonate C is derived from lithogenic sources. 37.4 kg of atmospheric CO2 has already been captured and stored as carbonate per Mg of soil across the site, representing a carbon dioxide (CO2) removal rate of 12.5 kgCO2 Mg−1 yr−1. There is the potential for capture and storage of a further 27.3 kgCO2 Mg−1 in residual reactive materials, which may be exploited through increased residence time (additional in situ weathering). Overall, the Science Central site has the potential to capture and store a total of 64,800 Mg CO2 as carbonate minerals. This study illustrates the potential for managing urban soils as tools of C capture and storage, an important ecosystem service, and demonstrates the importance of studying C storage in engineering urban anthropogenic soils. Highlights: ► Urban soils potentially capture 12.5 kgCO2 Mg−1 yr−1 (value £51,843–£77,765 ha−1). ► Formation of carbonate may be significant and exploitable storage

  19. Progressing towards post-2012 carbon markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soeren Luetken, S.; Holm Olsen, K.

    2011-11-15

    Confronting the end of the first Kyoto Commitment period in 2012 with no agreed outcome for global cooperation on future emission reductions, there is an urgent need to look for new opportunities for public and private cooperation to drive broad-based progress in living standards and keep projected future warming below the politically agreed 2 degrees Celsius. Responding jointly to these global challenges the United Nations environmental Program (UNEP) and its UNEP Risoe Centre (URC) have in cooperation with the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI) prepared the Perspectives 2011. The publication focuses on the role of carbon markets in contributing to low carbon development and new mechanisms for green growth, as one core area of action to address the challenges noted above. The publication explores in ten articles, how carbon markets at national, regional and global levels can be developed and up-scaled to sustain the involvement of the private sector in leveraging finance and innovative solutions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The titles of the ten articles are: 1) Fragmentation of international climate policy - doom or boom for carbon markets?; 2) Perspectives on the EU carbon market; 3) China carbon market; 4) The national context of U.S. state policies for a global commons problem; 5) Mind the gap - the state-of-play of Canadian greenhouse gas mitigation; 6) Role of the UN and multilateral policies in integrating an increasingly fragmented global carbon market; 7) Making CDM work for poor and rich Africa beyond 2012 - a series of dos and don'ts; 8) Voluntary market - future perspectives; 9) Sectoral approaches as a way forward for the carbon market?; 10) The Durban outcome - a post 2012 framework approach for green house gas markets. (LN)

  20. Method for Making a Carbon-Carbon Cylinder Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransone, Phillip O. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method for making a lightweight cylinder block composed of carbon-carbon is disclosed. The use of carbon-carbon over conventional materials. such as cast iron or aluminum, reduces the weight of the cylinder block and improves thermal efficiency of the internal combustion reciprocating engine. Due to the negligible coefficient of thermal expansion and unique strength at elevated temperatures of carbon-carbon, the piston-to-cylinder wall clearance can be small, especially when the carbon-carbon cylinder block is used in conjunction with a carbon-carbon piston. Use of the carbon-carbon cylinder block has the effect of reducing the weight of other reciprocating engine components allowing the piston to run at higher speeds and improving specific engine performance.

  1. Spatial patterns of ecosystem carbon residence time in Chinese forests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Capacity of carbon sequestration in forest ecosystem largely depends on the trend of net primary production (NPP) and the length of ecosystem carbon residence time. Retrieving spatial patterns of ecosystem carbon residence time is important and necessary for accurately predicting regional carbon cycles in the future. In this study, a data-model fusion method that combined a process-based regional carbon model (TECO-R) with various ground-based ecosystem observations (NPP, biomass, and soil organic carbon) and auxiliary data sets (NDVI, meteorological data, and maps of vegetation and soil texture) was applied to estimate spatial patterns of ecosystem carbon residence time in Chinese forests at steady state. In the data-model fusion, the genetic algorithm was used to estimate the optimal model parameters related with the ecosystem carbon residence time by minimizing total deviation between modeled and observed values. The results indicated that data-model fusion technology could effectively retrieve model parameters and simulate carbon cycling processes for Chinese forest ecosystems. The estimated carbon residence times were highly heterogenous over China, with most of regions having values between 24 and 70 years. The deciduous needleleaf forest and the evergreen needleleaf forest had the highest averaged carbon residence times (73.8 and 71.3 years, respectively), the mixed forest and the deciduous broadleaf forest had moderate values (38.1 and 37.3 years, respectively), and the evergreen broadleaf forest had the lowest value (31.7 years). The averaged carbon residence time of forest ecosystems in China was 57.8 years.

  2. Effect of Strength Enhancement of Soil Treated with Environment-Friendly Calcium Carbonate Powder

    OpenAIRE

    Kyungho Park; Sangju Jun; Daehyeon Kim

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of the strength improvement of soft ground (sand) by producing calcium carbonate powder through microbial reactions. To analyze the cementation effect of calcium carbonate produced through microbial reaction for different weight ratios, four different types of specimens (untreated, calcium carbonate, cement, and calcium carbonate + cement) with different weight ratios (2%, 4%, 6%, and 8%) were produced and cured for a period of 3 days, 7 days, 14 day...

  3. Facile synthesis of carbon nanofibers-bridged porous carbon nanosheets for high-performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuting; Yan, Jun; Wu, Xiaoliang; Shan, Dandan; Zhou, Qihang; Jiang, Lili; Yang, Deren; Fan, Zhuangjun

    2016-03-01

    A facile and one-step method is demonstrated to prepare carbon nanofibers (CNFs)-bridged porous carbon nanosheets (PCNs) through carbonization of the mixture of bacterial cellulose and potassium citrate. The CNFs bridge PCNs to form integrated porous carbon architecture with high specific surface area of 1037 m2 g-1, much higher than those of pure PCNs (381 m2 g-1) and CNFs (510 m2 g-1). As a consequence, the PCN/CNF composite displays high specific capacitance of 261 F g-1, excellent rate capability and outstanding cycling stability (97.6% of capacitance retention after 10000 cycles). Moreover, the assembled symmetric supercapacitor with PCN/CNF electrodes delivers an ultrahigh energy density of 20.4 Wh kg-1 and outstanding cycling life (94.8% capacitance retention after 10000 cycles) in an aqueous electrolyte.

  4. Process synthesis and optimization for the production of carbon nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A swirled fluidized bed chemical vapour deposition (SFCVD) reactor has been manufactured and optimized to produce carbon nanostructures on a continuous basis using in situ formation of floating catalyst particles by thermal decomposition of organometallic ferrocene. During the process optimization, carbon nanoballs were produced in the absence of a catalyst at temperatures higher than 1000 0C, while carbon nanofibres, single-walled carbon nanotubes, helical carbon nanotubes, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and carbon nanofibres (CNFs) were produced in the presence of a catalyst at lower temperatures of between 750 and 900 0C. The optimum conditions for producing carbon nanostructures were a temperature of 850 0C, acetylene flow rate of 100 ml min-1, and acetylene gas was used as the carbon source. All carbon nanostructures produced have morphologies and diameters ranging from 15 to 200 nm and wall thicknesses between 0.5 and 0.8 nm. In comparison to the quantity of MWCNTs produced with other methods described in the literature, the SFCVD technique was superior to floating catalytic CVD (horizontal fixed bed) and microwave CVD but inferior to rotary tube CVD.

  5. Microbially induced corrosion of carbon steel in deep groundwater environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajala, Pauliina; Carpén, Leena; Vepsäläinen, Mikko; Raulio, Mari; Sohlberg, Elina; Bomberg, Malin

    2015-01-01

    The metallic low and intermediate level radioactive waste generally consists of carbon steel and stainless steels. The corrosion rate of carbon steel in deep groundwater is typically low, unless the water is very acidic or microbial activity in the environment is high. Therefore, the assessment of microbially induced corrosion of carbon steel in deep bedrock environment has become important for evaluating the safety of disposal of radioactive waste. Here we studied the corrosion inducing ability of indigenous microbial community from a deep bedrock aquifer. Carbon steel coupons were exposed to anoxic groundwater from repository site 100 m depth (Olkiluoto, Finland) for periods of 3 and 8 months. The experiments were conducted at both in situ temperature and room temperature to investigate the response of microbial population to elevated temperature. Our results demonstrate that microorganisms from the deep bedrock aquifer benefit from carbon steel introduced to the nutrient poor anoxic deep groundwater environment. In the groundwater incubated with carbon steel the planktonic microbial community was more diverse and 100-fold more abundant compared to the environment without carbon steel. The betaproteobacteria were the most dominant bacterial class in all samples where carbon steel was present, whereas in groundwater incubated without carbon steel the microbial community had clearly less diversity. Microorganisms induced pitting corrosion and were found to cluster inside the corrosion pits. Temperature had an effect on the species composition of microbial community and also affected the corrosion deposits layer formed on the surface of carbon steel. PMID:26257707

  6. Potential Carbon Negative Commercial Aviation through Land Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    Brazilian terra preta soil and char-enhanced soil agricultural systems have demonstrated both enhanced plant biomass and crop yield and functions as a carbon sink. Similar carbon sinking has been demonstrated for both glycophyte and halophyte plants and plant roots. Within the assumption of 3.7 t-C/ha/yr soils and plant root carbon sinking, it is possible to provide carbon neutral U.S. commercial aviation using about 8.5% of U.S. arable lands. The total airline CO2 release would be offset by carbon credits for properly managed soils and plant rooting, becoming carbon neutral for carbon sequestered synjet processing. If these lands were also used to produce biomass fuel crops such as soybeans at an increased yield of 60 bu/acre (225gal/ha), they would provide over 3.15 10(exp 9) gallons biodiesel fuel. If all this fuel were refined into biojet it would provide a 16% biojet-84% synjet blend. This allows the U.S. aviation industry to become carbon negative (carbon negative commercial aviation through carbon credits). Arid land recovery could yield even greater benefits.

  7. Process synthesis and optimization for the production of carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyuke, S. E.; Mamvura, T. A.; Liu, K.; Sibanda, V.; Meyyappan, M.; Varadan, V. K.

    2009-09-01

    A swirled fluidized bed chemical vapour deposition (SFCVD) reactor has been manufactured and optimized to produce carbon nanostructures on a continuous basis using in situ formation of floating catalyst particles by thermal decomposition of organometallic ferrocene. During the process optimization, carbon nanoballs were produced in the absence of a catalyst at temperatures higher than 1000 °C, while carbon nanofibres, single-walled carbon nanotubes, helical carbon nanotubes, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and carbon nanofibres (CNFs) were produced in the presence of a catalyst at lower temperatures of between 750 and 900 °C. The optimum conditions for producing carbon nanostructures were a temperature of 850 °C, acetylene flow rate of 100 ml min-1, and acetylene gas was used as the carbon source. All carbon nanostructures produced have morphologies and diameters ranging from 15 to 200 nm and wall thicknesses between 0.5 and 0.8 nm. In comparison to the quantity of MWCNTs produced with other methods described in the literature, the SFCVD technique was superior to floating catalytic CVD (horizontal fixed bed) and microwave CVD but inferior to rotary tube CVD.

  8. The impact of a unilateral carbon tax on carbon-intensive industries: evidence from Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golombek, R.

    1996-02-01

    This publication identifies the impact of a unilateral Norwegian carbon tax on the profitability and the exit probability in 12 carbon intensive manufacturing sectors. The study uses Norwegian panel data for manufacturing firms and focuses both on a tax on burning of fossil fuels and a tax on all emissions of carbon. It is demonstrated that for most carbon intensive sectors the impact on both profits and the exit probability of a tax on burning of fossil fuel is negligible or moderate. That is, the increase in the average sectorial exit probability is always less that one percentage point when the tax is 75 USD per tonne carbon dioxide. On the other hand, for sectors where carbon emissions are due to both burning of fossil fuels and the production process, the impact of a general tax on carbon dioxide (at 75 USD) is significant. In particular, in the manufacture of ferro alloys the average exit probability may increase by more than 15 percentage points. 15 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs.

  9. Rapid Assessment of U.S. Forest and Soil Organic Carbon Storage and Forest Biomass Carbon-Sequestration Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundquist, Eric T.; Ackerman, Katherine V.; Bliss, Norman B.; Kellndorfer, Josef M.; Reeves, Matt C.; Rollins, Matthew G.

    2009-01-01

    This report provides results of a rapid assessment of biological carbon stocks and forest biomass carbon sequestration capacity in the conterminous United States. Maps available from the U.S. Department of Agriculture are used to calculate estimates of current organic carbon storage in soils (73 petagrams of carbon, or PgC) and forest biomass (17 PgC). Of these totals, 3.5 PgC of soil organic carbon and 0.8 PgC of forest biomass carbon occur on lands managed by the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI). Maps of potential vegetation are used to estimate hypothetical forest biomass carbon sequestration capacities that are 3-7 PgC higher than current forest biomass carbon storage in the conterminous United States. Most of the estimated hypothetical additional forest biomass carbon sequestration capacity is accrued in areas currently occupied by agriculture and development. Hypothetical forest biomass carbon sequestration capacities calculated for existing forests and woodlands are within +or- 1 PgC of estimated current forest biomass carbon storage. Hypothetical forest biomass sequestration capacities on lands managed by the DOI in the conterminous United States are 0-0.4 PgC higher than existing forest biomass carbon storage. Implications for forest and other land management practices are not considered in this report. Uncertainties in the values reported here are large and difficult to quantify, particularly for hypothetical carbon sequestration capacities. Nevertheless, this rapid assessment helps to frame policy and management discussion by providing estimates that can be compared to amounts necessary to reduce predicted future atmospheric carbon dioxide levels.

  10. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Consumers Businesses Contact CPSC Website Design Feedback Consumers: Español Businesses: Español , 中文 , Tiếng Việt Connect with Us : Twitter YouTube ... Safely Home / Safety Education / Safety Education Centers En Español Carbon Monoxide Information Center The Invisible Killer Carbon ...

  11. Carbon black recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process and apparatus for recovering carbon black from hot smoke which comprises passing the smoke through a cyclone separation zone following cooling, then through aggregate filter beds and regeneration of filter beds with clean off-gas which is recycled to the carbon black reaction zone as quench

  12. Carbon for sensing devices

    CERN Document Server

    Tagliaferro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    This book reveals why carbon is playing such an increasingly prominent role as a sensing material. The various steps that transform a raw material in a sensing device are thoroughly presented and critically discussed.  The authors deal with all aspects of carbon-based sensors, starting from the various hybridization and allotropes of carbon, with specific focus on micro and nanosized carbons (e.g., carbon nanotubes, graphene) and their growth processes. The discussion then moves to the role of functionalization and the different routes to achieve it. Finally, a number of sensing applications in various fields are presented, highlighting the connection with the basic properties of the various carbon allotropes.  Readers will benefit from this book’s bottom-up approach, which starts from the local bonding in carbon solids and ends with sensing applications, linking the local hybridization of carbon atoms and its modification by functionalization to specific device performance. This book is a must-have in th...

  13. Fly ash carbon passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  14. Carbon Capture and Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benson, S.M.; Bennaceur, K.; Cook, P.; Davison, J.; Coninck, H. de; Farhat, K.; Ramirez, C.A.; Simbeck, D.; Surles, T.; Verma, P.; Wright, I.

    2012-01-01

    Emissions of carbon dioxide, the most important long-lived anthropogenic greenhouse gas, can be reduced by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS). CCS involves the integration of four elements: CO 2 capture, compression of the CO2 from a gas to a liquid or a denser gas, transportation of pressurized CO 2

  15. COMMITTED TO CARBON REDUCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Chinese efforts to lower carbon emissions through environmentally friendly means begin gaining momentum Efforts to curb carbon emissions continue to take shape as China adheres to its pledge for a brighter, greener future. More importantly, as environmental measures take hold and develop

  16. Amorphous iron (II) carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sel, Ozlem; Radha, A.V.; Dideriksen, Knud;

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The synthesis, characterization and crystallization energetics of amorphous iron (II) carbonate (AFC) are reported. AFC may form as a precursor for siderite (FeCO3). The enthalpy of crystallization (DHcrys) of AFC is similar to that of amorphous magnesium carbonate (AMC) and more...

  17. Carbon Dioxide Fountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seong-Joo; Ryu, Eun-Hee

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the development of a carbon dioxide fountain. The advantages of the carbon dioxide fountain are that it is odorless and uses consumer chemicals. This experiment also is a nice visual experiment that allows students to see evidence of a gaseous reagent being consumed when a pressure sensor is available. (Contains 3 figures.)…

  18. Carbon dioxide recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recycling of carbon dioxide to methanol and dimethyl ether is seen to offer a substantial route to renewable and environmentally carbon neutral fuels. One of the authors has championed the “Methanol Economy" in articles and a book. By recycling ambient CO2, the authors argue ...

  19. De-carbonizingChina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    zhou; Xiaoyan

    2013-01-01

    Innovation in the energy sector will pave the way for the country’slow-carbon future Although its per-capita emission is roughly on par with the world’s average, China is the world’s largest carbon dioxide emitter,

  20. Determination of carbon in amorphous carbon and uranium monocarbide by oxidation with lead(IV) oxide, copper(II) oxide or barium sulfate in an inert atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxidation behavior was studied on amorphous carbon and carbon in uranium monocarbide when lead(IV) oxide, copper(II) oxide and barium sulfate were used as the oxidizing fluxes in helium. The amorphous carbon and the carbon in the carbide were completely extracted with lead oxide in 5 min at 10000C and in 8 min at 700 and 5000C, respectively. Carbon in two samples was quantitatively extracted at 10000C with copper oxide in 8 and 5 min, and with barium sulfate in 7 and 5 min, respectively. The rate of extraction of carbon with copper oxide decreased with decreasing temperature. It was found that the mixing ratio of the oxidizing flux to the amorphous carbon or carbide gave effect on the recovery of carbon. The conventional capillary-trap method which is used for the determination of carbon has a disadvantage that, when carbon dioxide is caught in a cold trap (liquid nitrogen), oxygen is also trapped. This disadvantage was eliminated when a stream of helium was used in place of oxygen. Carbon in the sample can be determined with lead oxide, copper oxide or barium sulfate by extracting carbon dioxide at 10000C for 10 min. (auth.)

  1. Hydrogen adsorption on N-decorated single wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangel, Eduardo [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, Codigo Postal 01000, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Ruiz-Chavarria, Gregorio [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, Codigo Postal 01000, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico Ciudad Universitaria, Codigo Postal 04510, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Magana, L.F., E-mail: fernando@fisica.unam.m [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, Codigo Postal 01000, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Arellano, J.S. [Departamento de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Azcapotzalco. Avenida San Pablo No. 180, Col. Reynosa Tamaulipas Codigo Postal 02200, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-07-06

    Using density functional theory and molecular dynamics we found that N-decorated single walled (8,0) carbon nanotubes are potential high capacity hydrogen storage media. This system could store up to 6.0 wt% hydrogen at 300 K and ambient pressure, with average adsorption energy of -80 meV/(H{sub 2}). Nitrogen coverage was C{sub 8}N.

  2. PREFACE: 8th International Symposium of the Digital Earth (ISDE8)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium of Digital Earth (8th ISDE) 2013 Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia, 26th-29th August, 2013 Conference logo This proceedings consists of the peer-reviewed papers from 8th International Symposium for Digital Earth (ISDE) held in Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia during 26th-29th August, 2013. The 8th ISDE was a successful event in the Symposium Series of the International Society of Digital Earth, that was previously held in China (1999), Canada (2001), Czech Republic (2003), Japan (2005), the United States (2007), China (2009), and Australia (2011). The 8th ISDE, with the theme 'Transforming Knowledge into Sustainable Practice' aims to enable digital earth scientists, experts and professionals related to the field of geospatial science and technology to provide a brand new opportunity to share their ideas and insights on how we share knowledge and act together globally. In addition, the ISDE symposium series has been providing a venue for researchers and industry practitioners to discuss new ideas, collaborate to solve complex solutions to various complex problems, and importantly, pave new ways in digital earth environment. This 8th ISDE included 20 technical sessions, workshops and student sessions in various areas of digital earth; ranging from digital earth vision & innovation; earth observation technologies; ICT technologies (including spatial data infrastructures); empowering the community and engaging society; applications and innovation of digital earth for environmental applications such as hazard, pollution, flood, air quality, disaster and health, biodiversity, sustainability, forestry, early warning and emergency management, national security, natural resource management and agriculture; mining, energy and resources development; transformation towards sustainable low carbon society; digital city and green cities: towards urban sustainability; and managing water environment for sustainable development. The success of the 8

  3. Major carbon industries in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, P.K.

    1982-01-01

    The history of the major carbon industries in India, their growth, present status, problems and future prospects are described. Chapters cover: raw petroleum coke, calcined petroleum coke, graphite electrodes and anodes, carbon electrode paste, calcined anthracite coal, low-ash metallurgical coke, carbon black industry, activated carbon, midget electrodes, cinema arc carbons, carbon blocks and brushes for electrical machinery, and the growth of the aluminium industry and its impact on the calcined petroleum coke industry.

  4. Synthesis of hydrated lutetium carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Liu [South China Univ. of Technology, Dept. of Applied Chemistry, Guangdong (China); Rong-jun Ma [Changsha Research Institute of Minig and Metallurgy, Hunan (China)

    1997-09-01

    Crystalline lutetium carbonate was synthesized for the corresponding chloride using ammonium bicarbonate as precipitant. The chemical analyses suggest that the synthesized lutetium carbonate is a hydrated basic carbonate or oxycarbonate. The X-ray powder diffraction data are presented. The IR data for the compound show the presence of two different carbonate groups. There is no stable intermediate carbonate in the process of thermal decomposition of the lutetium carbonate. (au) 15 refs.

  5. Pyrolytic 3D Carbon Microelectrodes for Electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemanth, Suhith; Caviglia, Claudia; Amato, Letizia;

    2016-01-01

    electrochemical activity, chemical stability, and ease in surface functionalization [1]. The most common carbon microfabrication techniques (i.e. screen printing) produce two-dimensional (2D) electrodes, which limit the detection sensitivity. Hence several 3D microfabrication techniques have been explored......This work presents the fabrication and characterization of multi-layered three-dimensional (3D) pyrolysed carbon microelectrodes for electrochemical applications. For this purpose, an optimized UV photolithography and pyrolysis process with the negative tone photoresist SU-8 has been developed....... The fabricated three electrode electrochemical cell is characterized with cyclic voltammetry (CV) using the standard potassium ferri-ferrocyanide redox probe. Carbon materials have several attractive characteristics as microelectrodes for electrochemical applications, such as wide potential window, good...

  6. Double layer capacitance of carbon foam electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delnick, F. M.; Ingersoll, D.; Firsich, D.

    We have evaluated a wide variety of microcellular carbon foams prepared by the controlled pyrolysis and carbonization of several polymers including: polyacrylonitrile (PAN), polymethacrylonitrile (PMAN), resorcinol/formaldehyde (RF), divinylbenzene/methacrylonitrile (DVB), phenolics (furfuryl/alcohol), and cellulose polymers such as Rayon. The porosity may be established by several processes including: gelation (1-5), phase separation (1-3,5-8), emulsion (1,9,10), aerogel/xerogel formation (1,11,12,13), replication (14), and activation. In this report we present the complex impedance analysis and double layer charging characteristics of electrodes prepared from one of these materials for double layer capacitor applications, namely activated cellulose derived microcellular carbon foam.

  7. Carbonate concretions as a significant component of ancient marine carbon cycles: Insights from paired organic and inorganic carbon isotope analyses of a Cretaceous shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyd, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate concretions often occur within fine-grained, organic-rich sedimentary rocks. This association reflects the common production of diagenetic minerals through biologic cycling of organic matter. Chemical analysis of carbonate concretions provides the rare opportunity to explore ancient shallow diagenetic environments, which are inherently transient due to progressive burial but are an integral component of the marine carbon cycle. The late Cretaceous Holz Shale (~80 Ma) contains abundant calcite concretions that exhibit textural and geochemical characteristics indicative of relatively shallow formation (i.e., near the sediment-water interface). Sampled concretions contain between 5.4 and 9.8 wt.% total inorganic carbon (TIC), or ~45 and 82 wt.% CaCO3, compared to host shale values which average ~1.5 wt.% TIC. Organic carbon isotope compositions (δ13Corg) are relatively constant in host and concretion samples ranging from ­-26.3 to -24.0‰ (VPDB). Carbonate carbon isotope compositions (δ13Ccarb) range from -22.5 to -3.4‰, indicating a significant but not entirely organic source of carbon. Concretions of the lower Holz Shale exhibit considerably elevated δ13Ccarb values averaging -4.8‰, whereas upper Holz Shale concretions express an average δ13Ccarb value of -17.0‰. If the remaining carbonate for lower Holz Shale concretions is sourced from marine fluids and/or dissolved marine carbonate minerals (e.g., shells), a simple mass balance indicates that ~28% of concretion carbon was sourced from organic matter and ~72% from late Cretaceous marine inorganic carbon (with δ13C ~ +2.5‰). Upper Holz Shale calculations indicate a ~73% contribution from organic matter and a ~27% contribution from inorganic carbon. When normalized for carbonate, organic contents within the concretions are ~2-13 wt.% enriched compared to host contents. This potentially reflects the protective nature of cementation that acts to limit permeability and chemical destruction of

  8. Enzymatic degradation of granular potato starch by Microbacterium aurum strain B8.A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarian, F.D.; Kaaij, R.M. van der; Kralj, S.; Wijbenga, D.-J.; Binnema, D.J.; Maarel, M.J.E.C. van der; Dijkhuizen, L.

    2012-01-01

    Microbacterium aurum strain B8.A was isolated from the sludge of a potato starch-processing factory on the basis of its ability to use granular starch as carbon- and energy source. Extracellular enzymes hydrolyzing granular starch were detected in the growth medium of M. aurum B8.A, while the type s

  9. Carbon Capture and Storage: Progress and Next Steps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    Two years after the G8 leaders commitment to the broad deployment of carbon capture and storage (CCS) by 2020, significant progress has been made towards commercialisation of CCS technologies. Yet the 2008 Hokkaido G8 recommendation to launch 20 large-scale CCS demonstration projects by 2010 remains a challenge and will require that governments and industry accelerate the pace toward achieving this critical goal. This is one of the main findings of a new report by the International Energy Agency (IEA), the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF), and the Global CCS Institute, to be presented to G8 leaders at their June Summit in Muskoka, Canada.

  10. Windows 8 visual quick tips

    CERN Document Server

    McFedries, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Easy-in, easy-out format covers all the bells and whistles of Windows 8 If you want to learn how to work smarter and faster in Microsoft's Windows 8 operating system, this easy-to-use, compact guide delivers the goods. Designed for visual learners, it features short explanations and full-color screen shots on almost every page, and it's packed with timesaving tips and helpful productivity tricks. From enhancing performance and managing digital content to setting up security and much more, this handy guide will help you get more out of Windows 8. Uses full-color screen shots and short, step-by-

  11. Beginning Windows 8.1

    CERN Document Server

    Halsey, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Windows 8 has been described by Microsoft as its 'boldest' Windows release ever and the 8.1 update enhances the paradigm further. Beginning Windows 8.1 takes you through the new features and helps you get more out of the familiar to reveal the fullest possibilities for this amazing new operating system. You will learn, with non-technical language used throughout, how to get up and running in the new Windows interface, minimize downtime, maximize productivity, and harness the features you never knew existed to take control of your computer and enjoy the peace of mind and excitement that comes w

  12. Surface State of Carbon Fibers Modified by Electrochemical Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunxia GUO; Jie LIU; Jieying LIANG

    2005-01-01

    Surface of polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers was modified by electrochemical oxidation. The modification effect on carbon fibers surface was explored using atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Results showed that on the modified surface of carbon fibers, the carbon contents decreased by 9.7% and the oxygen and nitrogen contents increased by 53.8% and 7.5 times, respectively. The surface roughness and the hydroxyl and carbonyl contents also increased. The surface orientation index was reduced by 1.5%which decreased tensile strength of carbon fibers by 8.1%, and the microcrystalline dimension also decreased which increased the active sites of carbon fiber surface by 78%. The physical and chemical properties of carbon fibers surface were modified through the electrochemical oxidative method, which improved the cohesiveness between the fibers and resin matrix and increased the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of carbon fibers reinforced epoxy composite (CFRP) over 20%.

  13. Variability in Carbon Monoxide Concentration in Kaduna Metropolis, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.D. Ariko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study compared Carbon Monoxide concentrations in Urban core and Control station in Kaduna Metropolis, Nigeria. USB-CO data loggers were used for data acquisition for a period of one month. 1hour mean of Carbon Monoxide concentrations for Urban core and Control station were subjected to student “t” test to determine any significant difference in Carbon Monoxide concentration between the two sampled sites. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA test was employed to test the temporal variability in Carbon Monoxide concentrations in the Urban core. The “t” test results showed a significant difference in Carbon Monoxide concentrations, between the Urban core and the Control station. The ANOVA results showed that there is a significant difference in Carbon Monoxide concentrations level between different times of the day. The 1 h mean WHO recommendation for Carbon Monoxide concentration was occasionally exceeded, while the 8 h mean was daily exceeded in the evening periods in Urban core. In the Control station, there was no time both 1 h and 8 h means WHO recommendation were exceeded. These imply that the Rural environment is relatively more livable than the Urban environment in Kaduna metropolis in terms of Carbon Monoxide concentration levels.

  14. Condensation reaction of 3-[(8Z)-8-pentadecenyl]phenol and 3-[(8Z,11Z)-8,11,14-pentadecatrienyl]phenol with several indoles and their application to whitening effects utility; 3-[(8Z)-8-pentadecenyl] phenol oyobi 3-[(8Z,11Z)-8,11,14-pentadecatrienyl] phenol to sushu no indole kagobutsu tono shukugo hanno narabini bihaku koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, M.; Sakakiyama, T.; Fujihara, Y. [Kinki University, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Tada, T.; Shimomura, K.; Iida, K.; Yamabe, Y. [Mikimoto Pharmaceutical and Co. Ltd., Mie (Japan)

    1997-08-20

    This paper reports on compounds and their whitening effects as derived from condensation reactions between two kinds of cardanols separated from oil in cashew nut shells made in Indonesia (1): 3-[(8 Z)-8- pentadecenyl] phenol and (2): 3-[(8 Z, 11Z)-8, 11, 14-pentadecatrienyl] phenol and seven kinds of indole compounds. Tyrosinase activity inhibition test, activated oxygen suppression effect test and hyaluronidase activity inhibition test were performed to discuss the effectiveness of these 14 kinds of cardanol derivatives as whitening pharmaceuticals. High hyaluronidase activity inhibition and good tyrosinase activity inhibition were recognized on three kinds of compounds synthesized from the (1) and 5-methoxyindole-2-carbonic acid, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acietic acid and 5-methoxy-2-methyl-3-indole acetic acid. 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  15. Inorganic carbon acquisition in red tide dinoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, Björn; Richter, Klaus-Uwe; Riebesell, Ulf; Hansen, Per Juel

    2006-05-01

    Carbon acquisition was investigated in three marine bloom-forming dinollagellates-Prorocentrum minimum, Heterocapsa triquetra and Ceratium lineatum. In vivo activities of extracellular and intracellular carbonic anhydrase (CA), photosynthetic O2 evolution, CO2 and HCO3- uptake rates were measured by membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) in cells acclimated to low pH (8.0) and high pH (8.5 or 9.1). A second approach used short-term 14C-disequilibrium incubations to estimate the carbon source utilized by the cells. All three species showed negligible extracellular CA (eCA) activity in cells acclimated to low pH and only slightly higher activity when acclimated to high pH. Intracellular CA (iCA) activity was present in all three species, but it increased only in P. minimum with increasing pH. Half-saturation concentrations (K1/2) for photosynthetic O2 evolution were low compared to ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) kinetics. Moreover, apparent affinities for inorganic carbon (Ci) increased with increasing pH in the acclimation, indicating the operation of an efficient CO2 concentration mechanism (CCM) in these dinoflagellates. Rates of CO2 uptake were comparably low and could not support the observed rates of photosynthesis. Consequently, rates of HCO3- uptake were high in the investigated species, contributing more than 80% of the photosynthetic carbon fixation. The affinity for HCO3- and maximum uptake rates increased under higher pH. The strong preference for HCO3- was also confirmed by the 14C-disequilibrium technique. Modes of carbon acquisition were consistent with the 13C-fractionation pattern observed and indicated a strong species-specific difference in leakage. These results suggest that photosynthesis in marine dinoflagellates is not limited by Ci even at high pH, which may occur during red tides in coastal waters. PMID:17087465

  16. Multifamily Assistance Section 8 Contracts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — he information regarding the Multifamily Assistance and Section 8 contracts, and properties is being furnished for the convenience of interested parties. The...

  17. 2002 Rose Site 8P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 8P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 29, 1999. The site was originally...

  18. 1999 Rose Site 8P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 8P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 29, 1999. The site was originally...

  19. HUC 8-11 Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This data set is a digital hydrologic unit boundary that is at the 4-digit, 6-digit, 8-digit, and 11-digit level. The data set was developed by delineating the...

  20. 2012 Rose Site 8P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 8P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 29, 1999. The site was originally...

  1. 2004 Rose Site 8P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 8P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 29, 1999. The site was originally...

  2. Small diameter carbon nanopipettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Riju; Bhattacharyya, Sayan; Orynbayeva, Zulfiya; Vitol, Elina; Friedman, Gary; Gogotsi, Yury

    2010-01-01

    Nanoscale multifunctional carbon probes facilitate cellular studies due to their small size, which makes it possible to interrogate organelles within living cells in a minimally invasive fashion. However, connecting nanotubes to macroscopic devices and constructing an integrated system for the purpose of fluid and electrical signal transfer is challenging, as is often the case with nanoscale components. We describe a non-catalytic chemical vapor deposition based method for batch fabrication of integrated multifunctional carbon nanopipettes (CNPs) with tip diameters much smaller (10-30 nm) than previously reported (200 nm and above) and approaching those observed for multiwalled carbon nanotubes. This eliminates the need for complicated attachment/assembly of nanotubes into nanofluidic devices. Variable tip geometries and structures were obtained by controlled deposition of carbon inside and outside quartz pipettes. We have shown that the capillary length and gas flow rate have a marked effect on the carbon deposition. This gives us a flexible protocol, useful for growing carbon layers of different thicknesses at selective locations on a glass pipette to yield a large variety of cellular probes in bulk quantities. The CNPs possess an open channel for fluid transfer with the carbon deposited inside at 875 °C behaving like an amorphous semiconductor. Vacuum annealing of the CNP tips at temperatures up to 2000 °C yields graphitic carbon structures with an increase in conductivity of two orders of magnitude. Penetration of the integrated carbon nanoprobes into cells was shown to produce minimal Ca2+ signals, fast recovery of basal Ca2+ levels and no adverse activation of the cellular metabolism during interrogation times as long as 0.5-1 h.

  3. Small diameter carbon nanopipettes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoscale multifunctional carbon probes facilitate cellular studies due to their small size, which makes it possible to interrogate organelles within living cells in a minimally invasive fashion. However, connecting nanotubes to macroscopic devices and constructing an integrated system for the purpose of fluid and electrical signal transfer is challenging, as is often the case with nanoscale components. We describe a non-catalytic chemical vapor deposition based method for batch fabrication of integrated multifunctional carbon nanopipettes (CNPs) with tip diameters much smaller (10-30 nm) than previously reported (200 nm and above) and approaching those observed for multiwalled carbon nanotubes. This eliminates the need for complicated attachment/assembly of nanotubes into nanofluidic devices. Variable tip geometries and structures were obtained by controlled deposition of carbon inside and outside quartz pipettes. We have shown that the capillary length and gas flow rate have a marked effect on the carbon deposition. This gives us a flexible protocol, useful for growing carbon layers of different thicknesses at selective locations on a glass pipette to yield a large variety of cellular probes in bulk quantities. The CNPs possess an open channel for fluid transfer with the carbon deposited inside at 875 deg. C behaving like an amorphous semiconductor. Vacuum annealing of the CNP tips at temperatures up to 2000 deg. C yields graphitic carbon structures with an increase in conductivity of two orders of magnitude. Penetration of the integrated carbon nanoprobes into cells was shown to produce minimal Ca2+ signals, fast recovery of basal Ca2+ levels and no adverse activation of the cellular metabolism during interrogation times as long as 0.5-1 h.

  4. RERTR-8 Irradiation Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. M. Perez; M. A. Lillo; G. S. Chang; G. A. Roth; N. E. Woolstenhulme; D. M. Wachs

    2011-12-01

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) experiment RERTR-8, was designed to test monolithic mini-fuel plates fabricated via hot isostatic pressing (HIP), the effect of molybdenum (Mo) content on the monolithic fuel behavior, and the efficiency of ternary additions to dispersion fuel particles on the interaction layer behavior at higher burnup. The following report summarizes the life of the RERTR-8 experiment through end of irradiation, including as-run neutronic analysis, thermal analysis and hydraulic testing results.

  5. More on N=8 Attractors

    CERN Document Server

    Ceresole, A; Gnecchi, A; Marrani, A

    2009-01-01

    We examine few simple extremal black hole configurations of N=8, d=4 supergravity. We first elucidate the relation between the BPS Reissner-Nordstrom black hole and the non-BPS Kaluza-Klein dyonic black hole. Their classical entropy, given by the Bekenstein-Hawking formula, can be reproduced via the attractor mechanism by suitable choices of symplectic frame. Then, we display the embedding of the axion-dilaton black hole into N=8 supergravity.

  6. 8. AAL-Longress 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Klausing, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    In this book, leading authors in the field discuss developments of Ambient Assisted Living. The contributions have been chosen and invited at the 8th AAL Congress, Frankfurt/M. The meeting presents new technological developments which support the autonomy and independence of individuals with special needs. The 8th AAL Congress focusses its attention on technical assistance systems and their applications in homecare, health and care.

  7. Potential reduction of carbon emissions from Crude Palm Oil production based on energy and carbon balances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We evaluate energy and carbon equivalence from CPO production based on a CBM. ► Energy spent and produced via carbon movement from palm oil mill was determined. ► Scenarios were formulated to evaluate the potential reduction of carbon emission. ► Utilization of biomass from palm oil mill shows the high potential of C-reduction. -- Abstract: This study aimed to evaluate energy and carbon equivalences (CE) associated with palm oil milling and to evaluate sustainability alternatives for energy consumption. Appropriate ways to reduce carbon emissions were also evaluated. A field survey was carried out to quantify the input and output of energy and materials following the conceptual framework of a carbon-balanced model (CBM), which exclude other non-CO2 greenhouse gases. Survey results indicate that the electrical energy consumption for daily mill start-up averaged 18.7 ± 5.4 kWh/ton Fresh Fruit Bunches (FFBs). This energy is equivalent to 114.4 ± 33.2 kWh/ton Crude Palm Oil (CPO) which was found to be offset by that generated in the mills using palm fiber as a solid fuel. Currently, organic residues contained in the wastewater are anaerobically converted to methane. The methane is used as fuel to generate electricity and sold to an outside grid network at a generation rate of 8.1 ± 2.1 kWh/ton FFB. Based on the CBM approach, carbon emissions observed from the use of fossil energy in palm oil milling were very small; however, total carbon emission from oil palm plantation and palm oil milling were found to be 12.3 kg CE/ton FFB, resulting in the net carbon reduction in CPO production of 2.8 kg CE/ton FFB or 53.7 kg CE/ha-y. Overall, the sum of C-reduction was found 1.2 times greater than that of C-emission. This figure can be increased up to 5.5, if all biomass by-products are used as fuel to generate electricity only. The full potential for carbon reduction from palm oil milling is estimated at 0.94 kW of electric power for every hectare of

  8. Carbon Ion Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Hansen, David Christoffer; Herrmann, Rochus;

    On the importance of choice of target size for selective boosting of hypoxic tumor subvolumina in carbon ion therapy Purpose: Functional imaging methods in radiotherapy are maturing and can to some extent uncover radio resistant structures found within a tumour entity. Selective boost of identified...... effect. All cell lines investigated here did not reach an OER of 1, even for the smaller structures, which may indicate that the achievable dose average LET of carbon ions is too low, and heavier ions than carbon may be considered for functional LET-painting....

  9. Bacterial carbon cycling in a subarctic fjord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Middelboe, Mathias; Glud, Ronnie Nøhr; Sejr, M.K.

    2012-01-01

    and BGE were positively correlated with BDOC concentration, suggesting that organic carbon availability was limiting bacterial activity and carbon conversion efficiency. Viral production was low (0.8–1.8 × 104 viruses mL−1 h−1) as compared to low-latitude environments, suggesting a relatively small effect......In this seasonal study, we examined the environmental controls and quantitative importance of bacterial carbon consumption in the water column and the sediment in the subarctic Kobbefjord, Greenland. Depth-integrated bacterial production in the photic zone varied from 5.0 ± 2.7 mg C m−2 d−1...... in February to 42 ± 28 mg C m−2 d−1 in May and 34 ± 7 mg C m−2 d−1 in September, corresponding to a bacterial production to primary production ratio of 0.34 ± 0.14, 0.07 ± 0.04, and 0.08 ± 0.06, respectively. Based on measured bacterial growth efficiencies (BGEs) of 0.09–0.10, pelagic bacterial carbon...

  10. 46 CFR 151.50-41 - Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). 151.50-41 Section... CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-41 Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). (a) All openings shall be in the top of the tank. (b) Loading lines...

  11. Modified 8×8 quantization table and Huffman encoding steganography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yongning; Sun, Shuliang

    2014-10-01

    A new secure steganography, which is based on Huffman encoding and modified quantized discrete cosine transform (DCT) coefficients, is provided in this paper. Firstly, the cover image is segmented into 8×8 blocks and modified DCT transformation is applied on each block. Huffman encoding is applied to code the secret image before embedding. DCT coefficients are quantized by modified quantization table. Inverse DCT(IDCT) is conducted on each block. All the blocks are combined together and the steg image is finally achieved. The experiment shows that the proposed method is better than DCT and Mahender Singh's in PSNR and Capacity.

  12. A Low Carbon City Action Plan for one of China’s Low Carbon Pilot Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakutyte-Walangitang D.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In Chinese cities urbanization, industrialization and a changing life style of the population are driving growing energy consumption in buildings, industries and transportation and an increase in CO2 emissions. Facing these challenges, the National Development and Reform Commission has recognised an urgent need for transformation and designated 8 Cities and 5 Provinces in China to pioneer the planning and implementation of concrete low carbon measures, aiming to decrease the CO2 intensity of the economic development, to increase the energy efficiency of urban systems and to improve the quality of life in growing urban regions. In this context, a Sino-Austrian cooperation has been initiated between the Development and Reform Commission of Nanchang, one of the 8 selected Low Carbon Pilot Cities, and the Austrian Institute of Technology to develop a comprehensive set of Low Carbon City Measures and a Low Carbon City Action Plan, proposing specific technological and non-technological measures and concrete actions, capable of introducing important impulses targeting the increase of energy efficiency and the reduction of CO2 emissions in Nanchang. A team of experts has developed an integrated Low Carbon City Action Plan, including sectors such as buildings, energy supply and consumption, industries, transportation, agriculture and urban planning.

  13. Mesoporous Carbon for Capacitive Deionization of Saline Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsouris, Costas [ORNL; Mayes, Richard T [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Sharma, Ms. Ketki [Georgia Institute of Technology; Yiacoumi, Sotira [Georgia Institute of Technology; DePaoli, David W [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembled mesoporous carbon (MC) materials have been synthesized and tested for application in capacitive deionization (CDI) of saline water. MC was prepared by self-assembly of a triblock copolymer with hydrogen-bonded chains via a phenolic resin, such as resorcinol or phloroglucinol in acidic conditions, followed by carbonization and, in some cases, activation by KOH. Carbon synthesized in this way was ground into powder, from which activated MC sheets were produced. In a variation of this process, after the reaction of triblock copolymer with resorcinol or phloroglucinol, the gel that was formed was used to coat a graphite plate and then carbonized. The coated graphite plate in this case was not activated and was tested to serve as current collector during the CDI process. The performance of these MC materials was compared to that of carbon aerogel for salt concentrations ranging between 1000 ppm and 35,000 ppm. Resorcinol-based MC removed up to 15.2 mg salt per gram of carbon, while carbon aerogel removed 5.8 mg salt per gram of carbon. Phloroglucinol-based MC-coated graphite exhibited the highest ion removal capacity at 21 mg of salt per gram of carbon for 35,000 ppm salt concentration.

  14. Mesoporous carbon for capacitive deionization of saline water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsouris, C; Mayes, R; Kiggans, J; Sharma, K; Yiacoumi, S; DePaoli, D; Dai, S

    2011-12-01

    Self-assembled mesoporous carbon (MC) materials have been synthesized and tested for application in capacitive deionization (CDI) of saline water. MC was prepared by self-assembly of a triblock copolymer with hydrogen-bonded chains via a phenolic resin, such as resorcinol or phloroglucinol in acidic conditions, followed by carbonization and, in some cases, activation by KOH. Carbon synthesized in this way was ground into powder, from which activated MC sheets were produced. In a variation of this process, after the reaction of triblock copolymer with resorcinol or phloroglucinol, the gel that was formed was used to coat a graphite plate and then carbonized. The coated graphite plate in this case was not activated and was tested to serve as current collector during the CDI process. The performance of these MC materials was compared to that of carbon aerogel for salt concentrations ranging between 1000 ppm and 35,000 ppm. Resorcinol-based MC removed up to 15.2 mg salt per gram of carbon, while carbon aerogel removed 5.8 mg salt per gram of carbon. Phloroglucinol-based MC-coated graphite exhibited the highest ion removal capacity at 21 mg of salt per gram of carbon for 35,000 ppm salt concentration. PMID:22032802

  15. Spatial dynamics of carbon storage: a case study from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivrikaya, Fatih; Baskent, Emin Zeki; Bozali, Nuri

    2013-11-01

    Forest ecosystems have an important role in carbon cycle at both regional and global scales as an important carbon sink. Forest degradation and land cover changes, caused by deforestation and conversion to non-forest area, have a strong impact on carbon storage. The carbon storage of forest biomass and its changes over time in the Hartlap planning unit of the southeastern part of Turkey have been estimated using the biomass expansion factor method based on field measurements of forests plots with forest inventory data between 1991 and 2002. The amount of carbon storage associated with land use and land cover changes were also analyzed. The results showed that the total forested area of the Hartlap planning unit slightly increased by 2.1%, from 27,978.7 ha to 28,282.6 ha during the 11-year period, and carbon storage increased by 9.6%, from 390,367.6 to 427,826.9 tons. Carbon storage of conifer and mixed forests accounted for about 70.6% of carbon storage in 1991, and 67.8% in 2002 which increased by 14,274.6 tons. Land use change and increasing forest area have a strong influence on increasing biomass and carbon storage. PMID:23771281

  16. The Adsorption Mechanism of Modified Activated Carbon on Phenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin J. Q.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modified activated carbon was prepared by thermal treatment at high temperature under nitrogen flow. The surface properties of the activated carbon were characterized by Boehm titration, BET and point of zero charge determination. The adsorption mechanism of phenol on modified activated carbon was explained and the adsorption capacity of modified activated carbon for phenol when compared to plain activated carbon was evaluated through the analysis of adsorption isotherms, thermodynamic and kinetic properties. Results shows that after modification the surface alkaline property and pHpzc value of the activated carbon increase and the surface oxygen-containing functional groups decrease. The adsorption processes of the plain and modified carbon fit with Langmuir isotherm equation well, and the maximum adsorption capacity increase from 123.46, 111.11, 103.09mg/g to 192.31, 178.57, 163,93mg/g under 15, 25 and 35°C after modification, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters show that the adsorption of phenol on activated carbon is a spontaneously exothermic process of entropy reduction, implying that the adsorption is a physical adsorption. The adsorption of phenol on activated carbon follows the pseudo-second-order kinetics (R2>0.99. The optimum pH of adsorption is 6~8.

  17. Glassy Carbon Coating Deposited on Hybrid Structure of Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Posmyk A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method of production metal matrix composites with aluminum oxide foam covered by glassy carbon layer used as reinforcement. The glassy carbon coating was formed for decreasing of friction coefficient and reducing the wear. In first step of technology liquid glassy carbon precursor is on ceramic foam deposited, subsequently cured and carbonated at elevated temperature. In this way ceramic foam is covered with glassy carbon coating with thickness of 2-8 μm. It provides desirable amount of glassy carbon in the structure of the material. In the next step, porous spheres with carbon coating are infiltrated by liquid matrix of Al-Cu-Mg alloy. Thereby, equable distribution of glassy carbon in composite volume is achieved. Moreover, typical problems for composites reinforced by particles like sedimentation, agglomeration and clustering of particles are avoided. Tribological characteristics during friction in air versus cast iron as a counterpart were made. Produced composites with glassy carbon layer are characterised by friction coefficient between 0.08-0.20, thus meeting the typical conditions for solid lubricants.

  18. Carbon Stock and Carbon Cycle of Wetland Ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhangquan; ZENG; Canming; ZHANG; Jiao; LI; Nan; YANG; Xihao; LI; Yandong; NIU; Zijian; WU

    2014-01-01

    Wetland ecosystem is an essential ecosystem in the world. Its organic carbon stock and carbon cycle are important basis of global carbon cycle researches and also major contents of global climate change researches. Researches have shown that wetland protection and restoration can promote carbon accumulation and reduce emission of greenhouse gases. This paper discussed influence of carbon stock and carbon balance of wetland ecosystem and emission of greenhouse gases,as well as the relationship between wetland and global climate changes. Finally,it made prospect on researches about carbon cycle of Dongting Lake.

  19. A novel carbon fiber based porous carbon monolith

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, T.D.; Klett, J.W.; Weaver, C.E.

    1995-06-01

    A novel porous carbon material based on carbon fibers has been developed. The material, when activated, develops a significant micro- or mesopore volume dependent upon the carbon fiber type utilized (isotropic pitch or polyacrylonitrile). The materials will find applications in the field of fluid separations or as a catalyst support. Here, the manufacture and characterization of our porous carbon monoliths are described. A novel adsorbent carbon composite material has been developed comprising carbon fibers and a binder. The material, called carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS), was developed through a joint research program between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Kentucky, Center for Applied Energy Research (UKCAER).

  20. Authigenic Carbonate and the History of the Global Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrag, Daniel P.; Higgins, John. A.; Macdonald, Francis A.; Johnston, David T.

    2013-02-01

    We present a framework for interpreting the carbon isotopic composition of sedimentary rocks, which in turn requires a fundamental reinterpretation of the carbon cycle and redox budgets over Earth's history. We propose that authigenic carbonate, produced in sediment pore fluids during early diagenesis, has played a major role in the carbon cycle in the past. This sink constitutes a minor component of the carbon isotope mass balance under the modern, high levels of atmospheric oxygen but was much larger in times of low atmospheric O2 or widespread marine anoxia. Waxing and waning of a global authigenic carbonate sink helps to explain extreme carbon isotope variations in the Proterozoic, Paleozoic, and Triassic.

  1. Energy from waste. Vol. 8; Energie aus Abfall. Bd. 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thome-Kozmiensky, Karl J.; Beckmann, Michael

    2011-07-01

    The central theme of the book under consideration is the optimization of waste incinerators. Energy efficiency, pollution abatement and availability are the focus. At the beginning, the authors report on the use of energy indicators as a basis for the exploration of optimization potentials. On the basis of current examples of plant from Germany and other European countries notable projects such as new construction, retrofitting and restoration of incineration plants are shown. In connection with the energy efficiency and availability, among other things the contributions are devoted to major thermal processes. The development and the status of pyrolysis, gasification or plasma processes for the treatment of waste are presented. Then, two practical examples pyrolysis of sewage sludge are described. In addition, specific aspects of the purification of exhaust gases are considered such as the grinding of additives and the security technology in the use of carbon-based sorbents.

  2. Carbon aerogels; Les aerogels de carbone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthon-Fabry, S.; Achard, P

    2003-06-15

    The carbon aerogel is a nano-porous material at open porosity, electrical conductor. The aerogels morphology is variable in function of the different synthesis parameters. This characteristic offers to the aerogels a better adaptability to many applications: electrodes (super condensers, fuel cells). The author presents the materials elaboration and their applications. It provides also the research programs: fundamental research, realization of super-condenser electrodes, fuel cells electrodes, gas storage materials and opaque materials for thermal insulation. (A.L.B.)

  3. A novel method for preparation of hollow and solid carbon spheres

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Boyang Liu; Dechang Jia; Jiancun Rao; Qiangchang Meng; Yingfeng Shao

    2008-10-01

    Hollow and solid carbon spheres were prepared by the reaction of ferrocene and ammonium carbonate in a sealed quartz tube at 500°C. The morphology and microstructure of the product were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The carbon spheres are amorphous and their diameters range from 0.8–2.8 m. The shell thickness of the hollow carbon spheres is not uniform and ranges from 100–180 nm. It is suggested that ammonium carbonate is crucial for the formation of carbon spheres and its amount also influences the morphology of the product. The method may be suitable for large scale preparation of carbon spheres.

  4. Sodium carbonate poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodium carbonate is found in: Automatic dishwashing soaps Clinitest (diabetes testing) tablets Glass products Pulp and paper products Some bleaches Some bubble bath solutions Some steam iron cleaners Note: This list is not all-inclusive.

  5. Carbon monoxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heater). Many carbon monoxide poisonings occur in the winter months when furnaces, gas fireplaces, and portable heaters ... 16567227 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16567227 . Nelson LS, Hoffman RS. Inhaled toxins. In: Marx JA, ...

  6. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... United States die every year from accidental non-fire related CO poisoning. Products that can produce deadly ... Driven Generators, 2004-2014 January 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of ...

  7. FLUIDIZATION OF CARBON NANOTUBES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Wei; Cang Huang; Yao Wang

    2005-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be fluidized in the form of fluidlike agglomerates made of many three-dimensional sub-agglomerates, having a multi-stage agglomerate (MSA) structure and containing large amounts of twisting CNTs of micrometer magnitude.

  8. Carbon nanotubes: Fibrillar pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostarelos, Kostas

    2010-10-01

    The mechanisms by which chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes flow in blood and are excreted through the kidneys illustrate the unconventional behaviour of these fibrillar nanostructures, and the opportunities they offer as components for the design of advanced delivery vehicles.

  9. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics March 09, 2016 Supplemental Memos Regarding Some of the Hazards Associated with Engine-Driven Generators, 2004-2014 January 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the ...

  10. The Carbon Emission Game

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    When Chinese President Hu Jintao attended the UN climate summit on September22,he made a solemn commitment that China will cut its per GDP unit carbon emission to a significant amount in 2020 compared with that of 2005.

  11. Total Ecosystem Carbon Stock

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Total ecosystem carbon includes above- and below-ground live plant components (such as leaf, branch, stem and root), dead biomass (such as standing dead wood, down...

  12. Carbon monoxide intoxication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kales, S.N. (Cambridge Hospital, MA (United States))

    1993-11-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning usually results from inhalation of exhaust fumes from motor vehicles, smoke from fires or fumes from faulty heating systems. Carbon monoxide has a high affinity for hemoglobin, with which it forms carboxyhemoglobin. The resulting decrease in both oxygen-carrying capacity and oxygen release can lead to end-organ hypoxia. The clinical presentation is nonspecific. Headache, dizziness, fatigue and nausea are common in mild to moderate carbon monoxide poisoning. In more severe cases, tachycardia, tachypnea and central nervous system depression occur. When carbon monoxide intoxication is suspected, empiric treatment with 100 percent oxygen should be initiated immediately. The diagnosis is confirmed by documenting an elevated carboxyhemoglobin level. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is recommended in patients with neurologic dysfunction, cardiac dysfunction or a history of unconsciousness. 26 refs.

  13. Carbon partitioning in photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Anastasios

    2013-06-01

    The work seeks to raise awareness of a fundamental problem that impacts the renewable generation of fuels and chemicals via (photo)synthetic biology. At issue is regulation of the endogenous cellular carbon partitioning between different biosynthetic pathways, over which the living cell exerts stringent control. The regulation of carbon partitioning in photosynthesis is not understood. In plants, microalgae and cyanobacteria, methods need be devised to alter photosynthetic carbon partitioning between the sugar, terpenoid, and fatty acid biosynthetic pathways, to lower the prevalence of sugar biosynthesis and correspondingly upregulate terpenoid and fatty acid hydrocarbons production in the cell. Insight from unusual but naturally occurring carbon-partitioning processes can help in the design of blueprints for improved photosynthetic fuels and chemicals production.

  14. Effects of Carbonate on Exchangeability and Bioavailability of Exogenous Neodymium in Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐仲均; 李德成; 杨剑虹; 彭安

    2001-01-01

    The effects of carbonate on the exchangeability and the bioavailability of exogenous neodymium in soil were studied by 147Nd isotopic tracer method. Exchangeable Nd was extracted by 1 mol*L-1 NaAc (pH8.2) in the experiment. The results indicate that whether carbonate exists in soil or not, beyond 99% of exogenous Nd is adsorbed by soil. Low-concentration carbonate (0.8~1.6 g*kg-1) can reduce exchangeable Nd concentration in soil, while high-concentration carbonate (4.0 g*kg-1) impacts little on the exchangeable Nd concentration. In addition, carbonate of 0.8~1.6 g*kg-1 in soil can inhibit wheat seedlings to absorb Nd. However, when the carbonate concentration rises to 4.0 g*kg-1, the inhibition will become indistinct.

  15. Carbon and oxygen isotope microanalysis of carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velivetskaya, Tatiana A; Ignatiev, Alexander V; Gorbarenko, Sergey A

    2009-08-30

    Technical modification of the conventional method for the delta(13)C and delta(18)O analysis of 10-30 microg carbonate samples is described. The CO(2) extraction is carried out in vacuum using 105% phosphoric acid at 95 degrees C, and the isotopic composition of CO(2) is measured in a helium flow by gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS). The feed-motion of samples to the reaction vessel provides sequential dropping of only the samples (without the sample holder) into the acid, preventing the contamination of acid and allowing us to use the same acid to carry out very large numbers of analyses. The high accuracy and high reproducibility of the delta(13)C and delta(18)O analyses were demonstrated by measurements of international standards and comparison of results obtained by our method and by the conventional method. Our method allows us to analyze 10 microg of the carbonate with a standard deviation of +/-0.05 per thousand for delta(13)C and delta(18)O. The method has been used successfully for the analyses of the oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of the planktonic and benthic foraminifera in detailed palaeotemperature reconstructions of the Okhotsk Sea. PMID:19603476

  16. States and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The climate challenge appeals to an unprecedented mutation of our societies. From north to south, all our life styles will have to be changed from dwelling, to transport and feeding. These changes will have sense only at a worldwide scale and will impact our way of development. How can we reduce our energy consumption and greenhouse impact with answering everyone's essential needs at the same time? How can we invent a carbon-free economy in the North and preserve the big socio-economical equilibria at the same time? How can we get rid of poverty in the South without compromising the well-being of the future generations with an increase of CO2 emissions? Such difficulties cannot be overcome without innovations in terms of public policies. This book takes stock of the new possible instruments and policies at the global scale and involving fiscality, standards, investments and social justice. Content: 1 - the carbon threat: a changing climate and energies becoming scarce (the climate threat, an increasing energy insecurity); carbon and modern economy (human greenhouse gas emissions, a carbon-free well-being); governments and carbon control (a global challenge requiring an international control, the experiments era from Rio to the present day, the challenge of the state in front of the carbon threat); 2 - the political instruments of environment: standards as first instruments of climate public policies (standards efficiency in some sectors, standards limitations, standards and innovation); emissions quotas and market instruments (Kyoto protocol and CO2 market, the future of 'cap and trade' and of individual and regional quotas); carbon tax, fiscal instruments and new regulations (carbon tax as an alternative or a complement, other fiscal and para-fiscal instruments, new regulation instruments); investing in climate (managing the transition, governments as transition administrators). (J.S)

  17. Bioactive Friedolanostanes and 11(10-8)-Abeolanostanes from the Bark of Garcinia speciosa

    OpenAIRE

    Vieira, Luís M. M.; Anake Kijjoa; Rujida Wilairat; Maria São José Nascimento; Luis Gales; Ana Margarida Damas; Silva, Artur M.S.; Ing-On Mondranondra; Werner Herz

    2004-01-01

    A new friedolanostane, 7, and three triterpenes, 8, 9a, and 10, possessing the new 11(10#8594;8)-abeolanostane carbon skeleton were isolated from the bark of Garcinia speciosa. Structures were elucidated by spectroscopic and spectrometric studies and the structure of 8 by X-ray crystallographic analysis, thus forcing structure revision of a triterpene from the same source previously assumed to be a friedolanostane. These and several friedo- and lanostanes earlier isolated from the same source...

  18. Regional prediction of carbon isotopes in soil carbonates for Asian dust source tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing; Cui, Xinjuan; Wang, Yaqiang

    2016-10-01

    Dust particles emitted from deserts and semi-arid lands in northern China cause particulate pollution that increases the burden of disease particularly for urban population in East Asia. The stable carbon isotopes (δ13C) of carbonates in soils and dust aerosols in northern China were investigated. We found that the δ13C of carbonates in surface soils in northern China showed clearly the negative correlation (R2 = 0.73) with Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite-derived NDVI, we predicted the regional distribution of δ13C of soil carbonates in deserts, sandy lands, and steppe areas. The predictions show the mean δ13C of -0.4 ± 0.7‰ in soil carbonates in Taklimakan Desert and Gobi Deserts, and the isotope values decrease to -3.3 ± 1.1‰ in sandy lands. The increase in vegetation coverage depletes 13C in soil carbonates, thus the steppe areas are predicted by the lowest δ13C levels (-8.1 ± 1.7‰). The measurements of atmospheric dust samples at eight sites showed that the Asian dust sources were well assigned by the 13C mapping in surface soils. Predicting 13C in large geographical areas with fine resolution offers a cost-effective tracer to monitor dust emissions from sandy lands and steppe areas which show an increasing role in Asian dust loading driven by climate change and human activities.

  19. Carbon based prosthetic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlin, D.J.; Carroll, D.W.; Barbero, R.S.; Archuleta, T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Klawitter, J.J.; Ogilvie, W.; Strzepa, P. [Ascension Orthopedics (US); Cook, S.D. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (US). School of Medicine

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to evaluate the use of carbon/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites for use in endoprosthetic devices. The application of these materials for the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joints of the hand was investigated. Issues concerning mechanical properties, bone fixation, biocompatibility, and wear are discussed. A system consisting of fiber reinforced materials with a pyrolytic carbon matrix and diamond-like, carbon-coated wear surfaces was developed. Processes were developed for the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of pyrolytic carbon into porous fiber preforms with the ability to tailor the outer porosity of the device to provide a surface for bone in-growth. A method for coating diamond-like carbon (DLC) on the articulating surface by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was developed. Preliminary results on mechanical properties of the composite system are discussed and initial biocompatibility studies were performed.

  20. Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Skull Base Chordoma

    OpenAIRE

    Mizoe, Jun–etsu; Hasegawa, Azusa; Takagi, Ryo; Bessho, Hiroki; Onda, Takeshi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To present the results of the clinical study of carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) for skull base and paracervical spine tumors at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Chiba, Japan. Methods: The study is comprised of three protocols: a pilot study, a phase I/II dose escalation study, and a phase II study. All the patients were treated by 16 fractions for 4 weeks with total doses of 48.0, 52.8, 57.6, and 60.8 Gy equivalents (GyE). Results: As a result of the dose escalatio...

  1. Epoxy based photoresist/carbon nanoparticle composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillemose, Michael; Gammelgaard, Lauge; Richter, Jacob;

    2008-01-01

    We have fabricated composites of SU-8 polymer and three different types of carbon nanoparticles (NPs) using ultrasonic mixing. Structures of composite thin films have been patterned on a characterization chip with standard UV photolithography. Using a four-point bending probe, a well defined stress...... is applied to the composite thin film and we have demonstrated that the composites are piezoresistive. Stable gauge factors of 5-9 have been measured, but we have also observed piezoresistive responses with gauge factors as high as 50. As SU-8 is much softer than silicon and the gauge factor of the composite...

  2. The M8 Power Calibration Experiment (M8CAL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, W. R.; Bauer, T. H.

    1994-05-01

    The M8 calibration experiment was a series of 23 irradiations in TREAT performed to determine the relationship between the fission power generated in the TREAT core and the fission power generated in experiment fuel located in an in-core experiment vehicle and irradiated by core neutrons. The experiment was planned to provide the essential calibration information specifically needed for planning and analysis of the M8 test (and subsequent tests similar in geometry to M8) to be performed in the post-upgrade TREAT core. Irradiations were performed in TREAT cores loaded with a full-slotted (to optimize hodoscope performance) and with a half-slotted (to maximize energy deposition). Tests included a few selected low-power irradiations of fresh IFR-type U-Zr and U-Pu-Zr fuel pins supplemented by multiple irradiations of uranium-zirconium monitor wires ranging from low steady-state power to high-power maximal transients. This report describes the M8CAL test hardware, measurements, analysis assumptions, and methods used to deduce power coupling between the reactor and experiment fuel--including both absolute magnitudes and axial distributions. Power coupling results are reported for fresh IF fuel pins under high-power transient test conditions appropriate to the planned M8 transient test. In line with previous calibration data, measured dependence of power coupling on the specifics of each irradiation is also shown to correlate well with the in-core axial locations of the TREAT control rods. Estimates are made for maximal test fuel energy deposition capabilty in controlled transients.

  3. Black carbon in marine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelburg, J.J.; Nieuwenhuize, J.; Van Breugel, P.

    1999-01-01

    Concentrations of black carbon were determined for a number of marine sediments. A comparison of black carbon based on thermal oxidation and hot concentrated nitric acid pretreatments revealed that the latter significantly overestimates combustion derived carbon phases. Black carbon accounts for abo

  4. Nano-Carbons as Theranostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang Liu, Xing-Jie Liang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nano-carbons, including fullerenes, carbon nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, graphene, and nano-diamonds, are an important class of nanostructures attracting tremendous interests in the past two decades. In this special issue, seven review articles and research reports are collected, to summarize and present the latest progress in the exploration of various nano-carbons for theranostic applications.

  5. Method for synthesizing carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongyou

    2012-09-04

    A method for preparing a precursor solution for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, where a polar solvent is added to at least one block copolymer and at least one carbohydrate compound, and the precursor solution is processed using a self-assembly process and subsequent heating to form nanoporous carbon films, porous carbon nanotubes, and porous carbon nanoparticles.

  6. Seagrass meadows as a globally significant carbonate reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Mazarrasa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There has been a growing interest in quantifying the capacity of seagrass ecosystems to act as carbon sinks as a natural way of offsetting anthropogenic carbon emissions to the atmosphere. However, most of the efforts have focused on the organic carbon (POC stocks and accumulation rates and ignored the inorganic carbon (PIC fraction, despite important carbonate pools associated with calcifying organisms inhabiting the meadows, such as epiphytes and benthic invertebrates, and despite the relevance that carbonate precipitation and dissolution processes have in the global carbon cycle. This study offers the first assessment of the global PIC stocks in seagrass sediments using a synthesis of published and unpublished data on sediment carbonate concentration from 402 vegetated and 34 adjacent un-vegetated sites. PIC stocks in the top 1 m sediments ranged between 3 and 1660 Mg PIC ha-1, with an average of 654 ± 24 Mg PIC ha-1, exceeding about 5 fold those of POC reported in previous studies. Sedimentary carbonate stocks varied across seagrass communities, with meadows dominated by Halodule, Thalassia or Cymodocea supporting the highest PIC stocks, and tended to decrease polewards at a rate of -8 ± 2 Mg PIC ha-1 degree-1 of latitude (GLM, p -2 y-1. Based on the global extent of seagrass meadows (177 000 to 600 000 km2, these ecosystems globally store between 11 and 39 Pg of PIC in the top meter of sediment and accumulate between 22 and 76 Tg PIC y-1, representing a significant contribution to the carbonate dynamics of coastal areas. Despite that these high rates of carbonate accumulation imply CO2 emissions from precipitation, seagrass meadows are still strong CO2 sinks as demonstrates the comparison of carbon (POC and POC stocks between vegetated and adjacent un-vegetated sediments.

  7. Seagrass meadows as a globally significant carbonate reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazarrasa, I.; Marbà, N.; Lovelock, C. E.; Serrano, O.; Lavery, P. S.; Fourqurean, J. W.; Kennedy, H.; Mateo, M. A.; Krause-Jensen, D.; Steven, A. D. L.; Duarte, C. M.

    2015-08-01

    There has been growing interest in quantifying the capacity of seagrass ecosystems to act as carbon sinks as a natural way of offsetting anthropogenic carbon emissions to the atmosphere. However, most of the efforts have focused on the particulate organic carbon (POC) stocks and accumulation rates and ignored the particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) fraction, despite important carbonate pools associated with calcifying organisms inhabiting the meadows, such as epiphytes and benthic invertebrates, and despite the relevance that carbonate precipitation and dissolution processes have in the global carbon cycle. This study offers the first assessment of the global PIC stocks in seagrass sediments using a synthesis of published and unpublished data on sediment carbonate concentration from 403 vegetated and 34 adjacent un-vegetated sites. PIC stocks in the top 1 m of sediment ranged between 3 and 1660 Mg PIC ha-1, with an average of 654 ± 24 Mg PIC ha-1, exceeding those of POC reported in previous studies by about a factor of 5. Sedimentary carbonate stocks varied across seagrass communities, with meadows dominated by Halodule, Thalassia or Cymodocea supporting the highest PIC stocks, and tended to decrease polewards at a rate of -8 ± 2 Mg PIC ha-1 per degree of latitude (general linear model, GLM; p seagrass meadows, the mean PIC accumulation rate in seagrass sediments is found to be 126.3 ± 31.05 g PIC m-2 yr-1. Based on the global extent of seagrass meadows (177 000 to 600 000 km2), these ecosystems globally store between 11 and 39 Pg of PIC in the top metre of sediment and accumulate between 22 and 75 Tg PIC yr-1, representing a significant contribution to the carbonate dynamics of coastal areas. Despite the fact that these high rates of carbonate accumulation imply CO2 emissions from precipitation, seagrass meadows are still strong CO2 sinks as demonstrated by the comparison of carbon (PIC and POC) stocks between vegetated and adjacent un-vegetated sediments.

  8. Seagrass meadows as a globally significant carbonate reservoir

    KAUST Repository

    Mazarrasa, I.

    2015-03-06

    There has been a growing interest in quantifying the capacity of seagrass ecosystems to act as carbon sinks as a natural way of offsetting anthropogenic carbon emissions to the atmosphere. However, most of the efforts have focused on the organic carbon (POC) stocks and accumulation rates and ignored the inorganic carbon (PIC) fraction, despite important carbonate pools associated with calcifying organisms inhabiting the meadows, such as epiphytes and benthic invertebrates, and despite the relevance that carbonate precipitation and dissolution processes have in the global carbon cycle. This study offers the first assessment of the global PIC stocks in seagrass sediments using a synthesis of published and unpublished data on sediment carbonate concentration from 402 vegetated and 34 adjacent un-vegetated sites. PIC stocks in the top 1 m sediments ranged between 3 and 1660 Mg PIC ha-1, with an average of 654 ± 24 Mg PIC ha-1, exceeding about 5 fold those of POC reported in previous studies. Sedimentary carbonate stocks varied across seagrass communities, with meadows dominated by Halodule, Thalassia or Cymodocea supporting the highest PIC stocks, and tended to decrease polewards at a rate of -8 ± 2 Mg PIC ha-1 degree-1 of latitude (GLM, p < 0.0003). Using PIC concentration and estimates of sediment accretion in seagrass meadows, mean PIC accumulation rates in seagrass sediments is 126.3 ± 0.7 g PIC m-2 y-1. Based on the global extent of seagrass meadows (177 000 to 600 000 km2), these ecosystems globally store between 11 and 39 Pg of PIC in the top meter of sediment and accumulate between 22 and 76 Tg PIC y-1, representing a significant contribution to the carbonate dynamics of coastal areas. Despite that these high rates of carbonate accumulation imply CO2 emissions from precipitation, seagrass meadows are still strong CO2 sinks as demonstrates the comparison of carbon (POC and POC) stocks between vegetated and adjacent un-vegetated sediments.

  9. Study on the electrochemical properties of cubic ordered mesoporous carbon for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Jun-Wei; Yan, Xing-Bin; Yuan, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Jie; Xue, Qun-Ji

    Highly ordered, three-dimensional (3D) cubic mesoporous carbon CMK-8 is prepared by a facile nanocasting approach using cubic mesoporous silica KIT-6 as starting template. Afterwards, in order to increase the active sites of surface electrochemical reactions and promote the wettability in aqueous electrolyte, a chemical surface modification is carried out on the CMK-8 by nitric acid treatment. Two electrodes are prepared from the CMK-8 and the acid-modified CMK-8 (H-CMK-8) and used as the active materials for supercapacitors. The unique 3D mesoporous network combined with high specific surface area makes the nano-channel surfaces of the CMK-8 carbon favorable for charging the electric double-layer, resulting in that the CMK-8 and the H-CMK-8 electrodes both show well supercapacitive properties. Furthermore, the specific capacitance of the CMK-8 can be further improved by acid treatment, so that the H-CMK-8 exhibits the largest specific capacitance of 246 F g -1 at a current density of 0.625 A g -1 in 2 M KOH electrolyte. Also, the two carbon electrodes both exhibit good cycling stability and lifetime. Therefore, based on the above investigations, such CMK-8 carbon, especially H-CMK-8 carbon can be a potential candidate for supercapacitors.

  10. Carbon isotope effects in carbonate systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deines, Peter

    2004-06-01

    Global carbon cycle models require a complete understanding of the δ 13C variability of the Earth's C reservoirs as well as the C isotope effects in the transfer of the element among them. An assessment of δ 13C changes during CO 2 loss from degassing magmas requires knowledge of the melt-CO 2 carbon isotope fractionation. In order to examine the potential size of this effect for silicate melts of varying composition, 13C reduced partition functions were computed in the temperature range 275 to 4000 K for carbonates of varying bond strengths (Mg, Fe, Mn, Sr, Ba, Pb, Zn, Cd, Li, and Na) and the polymorphs of calcite. For a given cation and a given pressure the 13C content increases with the density of the carbonate structure. For a given structure the tendency to concentrate 13C increases with pressure. The effect of pressure (‰/10 kbar) on the size of the reduced partition function of aragonite varies with temperature; in the pressure range 1 to 10 5 bars the change is given by: Δ 13C p average=-0.01796+0.06635∗ 10 3/T+0.006875∗ 10 6/T2 For calcite III the pressure effect is on average 1.4× larger than that for aragonite at all temperatures. The nature of the cation in a given structure type has a significant effect on the carbon isotope fractionation properties. The tendency to concentrate 13C declines in the series magnesite, aragonite, dolomite, strontianite, siderite, calcite, smithonite, witherite, rhodochrosite, otavite, cerrusite. For divalent cations a general expression for an estimation of the reduced partition function (β) from the reduced mass (μ = [M Cation × M Carbonate]/[M Cation + M Carbonate]) is: 1000 lnβ=(0.032367-0.072563∗ 10 3/T-0.01073∗ 10 6/T2)∗μ-14.003+29.953∗ 10 3/T+9.4610∗ 10 6/T2 For Mg-calcite the 13C content varies with the Mg concentration. The fractionation between Mg-calcite (X = mole fraction of MgCO 3) and calcite is given by: 1000 ln(α MgCalite- Calcite)=[0.013702-0.10957× 10 3/T+1.35940× 10 6/T2

  11. Hard Diffraction in Pythia 8

    CERN Document Server

    Rasmussen, Christine O

    2015-01-01

    We present an overview of the options for diffraction implemented in the general-purpose event generator Pythia 8. We review the existing model for soft diffraction and present a new model for hard diffraction. Both models use the Pomeron approach pioneered by Ingelman and Schlein, factorising the diffractive cross section into a Pomeron flux and a Pomeron PDF, with several choices for both implemented in Pythia 8. The model of hard diffraction is implemented as a part of the multiparton interactions (MPI) framework, thus introducing a dynamical gap survival probability that explicitly breaks factorisation.

  12. Elastic constants for 8-OCB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czechowski, Grzegorz; Zywucki, B.; Jadzyn, Jan

    1993-10-01

    The Frederiks transitions for the n-octyloxycyanobiphenyl (8-OCB) placed in the external magnetic and electric field as a function of the temperature have been studied. On the basis of threshold values Bc and Uc, the elastic constants for splay, bend and twist modes are determined. The magnetic anisotropy of 8-OCB as a function of temperature has been determined. The K11 and K33 elastic constants show the pretransitional nematic- smectic A effect. The values of critical exponents obtained from the temperature dependence of K11 and K33 in the vicinity of N-SA phase transition are discussed.

  13. Education Platform at ZDM8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman Gingerich, Jamie S; Pickart, Michael A; Pierret, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Interest among the zebrafish community in education and science accessibility for all ages has increased. At the 8th Annual Zebrafish Disease Models Conference (ZDM8), a specifically designed session enabled professional scientists, educators, and students to have a venue to present their science, discuss ideas in education, and partner to navigate a scientific meeting as an educational experience. This meeting report describes the format of the Platform Session as well as challenges and future plans to leverage impact of conferences on the local communities.

  14. Hard diffraction in Pythia 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overgaard Rasmussen, Christine

    2016-07-01

    We present an overview of the options for diffraction implemented in the general-purpose event generator Pythia 8 [1]. We review the existing model for soft diffraction and present a new model for hard diffraction. Both models use the Pomeron approach pioneered by Ingelman and Schlein, factorising the diffractive cross section into a Pomeron flux and a Pomeron PDF, with several choices for both implemented in Pythia 8. The model of hard diffraction is implemented as a part of the multiparton interactions (MPI) framework, thus introducing a dynamical gap survival probability that explicitly breaks factorisation.

  15. Terrestrial vegetation carbon sinks in China, 1981―2000

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Using China's ground observations, e.g., forest inventory, grassland resource, agricultural statistics, climate, and satellite data, we estimate terrestrial vegetation carbon sinks for China's major biomes between 1981 and 2000. The main results are in the following: (1) Forest area and forest biomass carbon (C) stock increased from 116.5×106 ha and 4.3 Pg C (1 Pg C = 1015 g C) in the early 1980s to 142.8×106 ha and 5.9 Pg C in the early 2000s, respectively. Forest biomass carbon density increased form 36.9 Mg C/ha (1 Mg C = 106 g C) to 41.0 Mg C/ha, with an annual carbon sequestration rate of 0.075 Pg C/a. Grassland, shrub, and crop biomass sequestrate carbon at annual rates of 0.007 Pg C/a, 0.014―0.024 Pg C/a, and 0.0125―0.0143 Pg C/a, respectively. (2) The total terrestrial vegetation C sink in China is in a range of 0.096―0.106 Pg C/a between 1981 and 2000, accounting for 14.6%―16.1% of carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted by China's industry in the same period. In addition, soil carbon sink is estimated at 0.04―0.07 Pg C/a. Accordingly, carbon sequestration by China's terrestrial ecosystems (vegetation and soil) offsets 20.8%―26.8% of its industrial CO2 emission for the study period. (3) Considerable uncertainties exist in the present study, especially in the estimation of soil carbon sinks, and need further intensive investigation in the future.

  16. Aspects of carbon dioxide utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omae, Iwao [Omae Research Laboratories, 335-23 Mizuno, Sayama, Saitama 350-1317 (Japan)

    2006-06-30

    Carbon dioxide reacts with hydrogen, alcohols, acetals, epoxides, amines, carbon-carbon unsaturated compounds, etc. in supercritical carbon dioxide or in other solvents in the presence of metal compounds as catalysts. The products of these reactions are formic acid, formic acid esters, formamides, methanol, dimethyl carbonate, alkylene carbonates, carbamic acid esters, lactones, carboxylic acids, polycarbonate (bisphenol-based engineering polymer), aliphatic polycarbonates, etc. Especially, the productions of formic acid, formic acid methyl ester and dimethylformamide with a ruthenium catalyst; dimethyl carbonate and urethanes with a dialkyltin catalyst; 2-pyrone with a nickel-phosphine catalyst; diphenyl carbonate with a lead phenoxide catalyst; the alternating copolymerization of carbon dioxide and epoxides with a zinc catalyst has attracted attentions as the industrial utilizations of carbon dioxide. The further development of these production processes is expected. (author)

  17. Organic carbon in Antarctic snow: spatial trends and possible sources

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Antony, R.; Mahalinganathan, K.; Thamban, M.; Nair, S.

    ) screw-capped glass bottles under a laminar-flow benchhousedinaC015C176Ccoldroomprocessingfacility.Carewas taken to ensure that the bottles were filled leaving no head space and were tightly sealed in order to minimize contamination from the atmosphere... addressing issues concerning global carbon dynamics. 6,7 Additionally, it has been shown that organic carbon in snow undergoes photochemical reactions, releasing reactive gas-phase species to the overlying atmosphere. 8C010 DespiteitsimportanceinairC0...

  18. Calibration of the polarimeter POMME with polarized deuterons at 1.8 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomasi-Gustafsson, E. [Laboratoire National Saturne, Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ladygin, V.P. [Laboratoire National Saturne, Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Boivin, M. [Laboratoire National Saturne, Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Boyard, J.L. [Laboratoire National Saturne, Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 -Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Jaeckle, V. [Laboratoire National Saturne, Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Morsch, P. [Laboratoire National Saturne, Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Kunne, R. [Laboratoire National Saturne, Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Plouin, F. [Laboratoire National Saturne, Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Wurzinger, R. [Laboratoire National Saturne, Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bimbot, L. [CNRS/IN2P3 IPN, 91400 Orsay (France); Djalali, C. [CNRS/IN2P3 IPN, 91400 Orsay (France); Farhi, L. [CNRS/IN2P3 IPN, 91400 Orsay (France); Hennino, T. [CNRS/IN2P3 IPN, 91400 Orsay (France); Jourdain, J.C. [CNRS/IN2P3 IPN, 91400 Orsay (France); Morlet, M. [CNRS/IN2P3 IPN, 91400 Orsay (France); Ramstein, B. [CNRS/IN2P3 IPN, 91400 Orsay (France); Rosier, L.H. [CNRS/IN2P3 IPN, 91400 Orsay (France); Roy-Stephan, M. [CNRS/IN2P3 IPN, 91400 Orsay (France); Wiele, J. van de [CNRS/IN2P3 IPN, 91400 Orsay (France); Jones, M.K. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Perdrisat, C.F. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Punjabi, V. [Norfolk State Univ., VA (United States); Glashausser, C. [Rutgers - the State Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Piskunov, N.M. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Sitnik, I.M. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Strokovsky, E.A. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    1995-11-21

    We report here the results of the calibration of the polarimeter POMME for vector polarized deuterons at an energy of 1.8 GeV. The results show that inclusive deuteron-carbon scattering has substantial vector analyzing power even at this high energy. The results obtained on two analyzers, carbon, which is generally used and a lighter material, paraffin, are found to be similar. (orig.).

  19. Organic modification of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The organic modification of carbon nanotubes is a novel research field being developed recently. In this article, the history and newest progress of organic modification of carbon nanotubes are reviewed from two aspects:organic covalent modification and organic noncovalent modification of carbon nanotubes. The preparation and properties of organic modified carbon nanotubes are discussed in detail. In addition, the prospective development of organic modification of carbon nanotubes is suggested.

  20. 4,6,8-Triarylquinoline-3-carbaldehyde Derivatives: Synthesis and Photophysical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malose Jack Mphahlele

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Palladium catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling of 6,8-dibromo-4-chloroquinoline-3-carbaldehyde with arylboronic and arylvinylboronic acid derivatives in the presence of potassium carbonate in aqueous dioxane afforded the corresponding 4,6,8-triarylquinoline-3-carbaldehydes, exclusively. These products were transformed into 4,6,8-triaryl-3-(4-fluorophenylamino-N-(quinolin-3-ylmethylenes and their 4,6,8-triaryl-quinoline-3-methanol derivatives. The absorption and emission spectra were measured for the 4,6,8-triarylquinoline-3-carbaldehydes and their derivatives in selected solvents of different polarity.

  1. Evaluation of Powdered Activated Carbon Efficiency in Removal of Dissolved Organic Carbon inWater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.R Bonyadi nejad

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available "n "nBackgrounds and Objectives: Powdered Activated$ carbon is known as a suitable absorbent for organic materials. The aim of this research is evaluation of Powdered Activated-Carbon (PAC efficiency in removal of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC in water treatment in Isfahan."nMaterials and Methods : The increase of PAC for DOC reduction has done in three paths in the Isfahan water treatment plant (WTP. These paths including: 1 Intake up to entrance of WTP 2 Intake to exit ofWTP 3 Between entrance and exit of waterworks. The paths were simulated by the Jar test system. Then DOC and UV254 absorption were analyzed and SUVA parameter for samples and activated-carbon adsorption isotherm was calculated."nResults: The injected PAC doses of 20,40,60,80 and 100 mg/l caused decreasing in DOC and UV254 absorption in every sample in all paths. The average of this decrease, from intake to WTP.s exit (second path was the greatest 69.8± 3.9%and the commonWTP process had capability of removing 35% of DOC. The first path also showed that PAC can reduce 33± 2% DOC of raw water by itself. Activated-carbon absorption results were adhered from Freundlich adsorption isotherm."nConclusion: In the third path therewas lessDOCremoval efficiency than exceptedwhen Activated- Carbon injected in rapid mixed basin with coagulant. Powdered activated carbon porosity reduction due to effect of coagulant can be the reason for this issue.Also according to different paths, the point of intake is more suitable for powdered activated carbon addition.

  2. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon produced from pomegranate seeds by ZnCl 2 activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uçar, Suat; Erdem, Murat; Tay, Turgay; Karagöz, Selhan

    2009-08-01

    In this study, pomegranate seeds, a by-product of fruit juice industry, were used as precursor for the preparation of activated carbon by chemical activation with ZnCl 2. The influence of process variables such as the carbonization temperature and the impregnation ratio on textural and chemical-surface properties of the activated carbons was studied. When using the 2.0 impregnation ratio at the carbonization temperature of 600 °C, the specific surface area of the resultant carbon is as high as 978.8 m 2 g -1. The results showed that the surface area and total pore volume of the activated carbons at the lowest impregnation ratio and the carbonization temperature were achieved as high as 709.4 m 2 g -1 and 0.329 cm 3 g -1. The surface area was strongly influenced by the impregnation ratio of activation reagent and the subsequent carbonization temperature.

  3. Chemical synthesis on SU-8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvortrup, Katrine; Taveras, Kennedy; Thastrup, Ole;

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe a highly effective surface modification of SU-8 microparticles, the attachment of appropriate linkers for solid-supported synthesis, and the successful chemical modification of these particles via controlled multi-step organic synthesis leading to molecules attached...

  4. CCL8 BASED IMMUNOLOGICAL MONITORING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to an immunological method and, more particularly, a method for measuring cell-mediated immune reactivity (CMI) in mammals based on the production of CCL8.The invention further discloses an assay and a kit for measuring CMI to an antigen using whole blood or other...

  5. The onion Merzpoem no. 8

    OpenAIRE

    Tullett, Barrie

    2012-01-01

    Part of Irvine Peacock’s Merzbox project – a series of responses to the Fairy Tales of Kurt Schwitters. The Onion Merz Poem #8 is by far the oddest of these tales, and this incomprehensible snakebook makes a perfect response to the tale.

  6. G8 Struggles for Relevance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KERRY; BROWN

    2011-01-01

    The world’s most powerful countries assess their dwindling influence The first meeting of the Group of Eight(G8)countries,then the G7,was convend by French president Valéry Giscard d’Estaingin the 1970s.

  7. SAPHIRE 8 Volume 5 - Workspaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. L. Smith; J. K. Knudsen; D. O' Neal

    2011-03-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Version 8 is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment using a personal computer running the Microsoft Windows™ operating system. SAPHIRE 8 is funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The role of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in this project is that of software developer and tester. In older versions of SAPHIRE, the model creation and analysis functions were intermingled. However, in SAPHIRE 8, the act of creating a model has been separated from the analysis of that model in order to improve the quality of both the model (e.g., by avoiding inadvertent changes) and the analysis. Consequently, in SAPHIRE 8, the analysis of models is performed by using what are called Workspaces. Currently, there are Workspaces for three types of analyses: (1) the NRC’s Accident Sequence Precursor program, where the workspace is called “Events and Condition Assessment (ECA);” (2) the NRC’s Significance Determination Process (SDP); and (3) the General Analysis (GA) workspace. Workspaces for each type are created and saved separately from the base model which keeps the original database intact. Workspaces are independent of each other and modifications or calculations made within one workspace will not affect another. In addition, each workspace has a user interface and reports tailored for their intended uses.

  8. Carbon and Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Surface-Sediment Carbonate in Bosten Lake (Xinjiang, China) and its Controlling Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chengjun; Steffen MISCHKE; ZHENG Mianping; Alexander PROKOPENKO; GUO Fangqin; FENG Zhaodong

    2009-01-01

    Bosten Lake is a mid-latitude lake with water mainly supplied by melting ice and snow in the Tianshan Mountains. The depositional environment of the lake is spatially not uniform due to the proximity of the major inlet and the single outlet in the western part of the lake. The analytical results show that the carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of recent lake sediments is related to this specific lacustrine depositional environment and to the resulting carbonate mineralogy. In the southwestern lake region between the Kaidu River inlet and the Kongqi River outlet, carbon isotope composition (δ13C) values of the carbonate sediment (-1‰ to -2‰) have no relation to the oxygen isotope composition of the carbonate (δ18O) values (-7‰ to -8‰), with both isotopes showing a low variability. The carbonate content is low (<20%). Carbonate minerals analyzed by X-ray diffraction are mainly composed of calcite, while aragonite was not recorded. The salinity of the lake water is low in the estuary region as a result of the Kaidu River inflow. In comparison, the carbon and oxygen isotope values are higher in the middle and eastern parts of the lake, with δ13C values between approximately +0.5‰ and +3‰, and δ18O values between -1‰ and -5‰. There is a moderate correlation between the stable oxygen and carbon isotopes, with a coefficient of correlation r of approximately 0.63. This implies that the lake water has a relatively short residence time. Carbonate minerals constitute calcite and aragonite in the middle and eastern region of the lake. Aragonite and Mg-calcite are formed at higher lake water salinity and temperatures, and larger evaporation effects. More saline lake water in the middle and eastern region of the lake and the enhanced isotopic equilibrium between water and atmospheric CO2 cause the correlating carbon and oxygen isotope values determined for aragonite and Mg-calcite. Evaporation and biological processes are the main reasons for the salinity

  9. Reactions of carbon cluster ions stored in an RF trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactions of carbon cluster ions with O2 were studied by using an RF ion trap in which cluster ions of specific size produced by laser ablation could be stored selectively. Reaction rate constants for positive and negative carbon cluster ions were estimated. In the case of the positive cluster ions, these were consistent with the previous experimental results using FTMS. Negative carbon cluster ions C-n (n=4-8) were much less reactive than positive cluster ions. The CnO- products were seen only in n=4 and 6. (orig.)

  10. Correlation and dimensional effects of trions in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønnow, Troels Frimodt; Pedersen, Thomas Garm; Cornean, Horia

    2010-01-01

    We study the binding energies of singlet trions, i.e., charged excitons, in carbon nanotubes. The problem is modeled, through the effective-mass model, as a three-particle complex on the surface of a cylinder, which we investigate using both one- and two-dimensional expansions of the wave function...... are used to compute physical binding energies for a wide selection of carbon nanotubes. In addition, the dependence on dielectric screening is examined. Our findings indicate that trions are detectable at room temperature in carbon nanotubes with radius below 8 Å....

  11. Carbon Stocks in Harran Plain Soils, Sanliurfa, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdal SAKIN

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Soils are an important component of the global carbon cycle and can be net sources or sinks of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2. The goals of the present study were to analyze the soil organic carbon (SOC and soil inorganic carbon (SIC content of Harran Plain soil in Sanliurfa, Turkey, part of the Southeast Anatolia region (SAR, and to estimate carbon stocks (CSs in soil series that are representative of arid and semiarid lands. To this end, soil samples were collected from 16 profiles in the Harran Plain at depths of 100, 120, and 160 cm of the genetic horizons, and the SOC stocks in the three soil depths were estimated. The carbon stock was 56.41 Tg of C in the 0-100 cm layer, 67.80 Tg of C in the 0-120 cm layer and 87.91 Tg of C in the 0-160 cm layer. For the three soil depths 100, 120, and 160 cm, the SOC content ranged from 6.33 to 11.04, 7.11 to 11.98 and 8.72 to 16.53 kg of C m-2, respectively, and the soil inorganic carbon content ranged from 8.83 to 19.26, 11.00 to 23.34 and 14.82 to 32.64 kg of C m-2, respectively.

  12. Carbon dioxide and climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global climate change is a serious environmental concern, and the US has developed ''An Action Agenda'' to deal with it. At the heart of the US effort is the US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP), which has been developed by the Committee on Earth and Environmental Sciences (CEES) of the Federal Coordinating Council for Sciences, Engineering, and Technology (FCCSET). The USGCRP will provide the scientific basis for sound policy making on the climate-change issue. The DOE contribution to the USGCRP is the Carbon Dioxide Research Program, which now places particular emphasis on the rapid improvement of the capability to predict global and regional climate change. DOE's Carbon Dioxide Research Program has been addressing the carbon dioxide-climate change connection for more than twelve years and has provided a solid scientific foundation for the USGCRP. The expansion of the DOE effort reflects the increased attention that the Department has placed on the issue and is reflected in the National Energy Strategy (NES) that was released in 1991. This Program Summary describes projects funded by the Carbon Dioxide Research Program during FY 1991 and gives a brief overview of objectives, organization, and accomplishments. The Environmental Sciences Division of the Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research supports a Carbon Dioxide Research Program to determine the scientific linkage between the rise of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, especially carbon dioxide, and climate and vegetation change. One facet is the Core CO2 Program, a pioneering program that DOE established more than 10 years ago to understand and predict the ways that fossil-fuel burning could affect atmospheric CO2 concentration, global climate, and the Earth's biosphere. Major research areas are: global carbon cycle; climate detection and models of climate change; vegetation research; resource analysis; and, information and integration

  13. Carbonate hosted gold deposit in Tasmania, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This study uses elemental and isotopic composition of carbonates associated with gold from Henty and Beaconsfield in Tasmania, Australia, to illustrate source of gold-bearing fluids, salinity, temperature and dissolution and reprecipitation of carbonate. The Beaconsfield and Henty gold mines are located in northern and western Tasmania respectively. Gold mineralisation in Beaconsfield occurs within the quartz-carbonate Tasmania Reef (Lower to Middle Palaeozoic sequence, Hills, 1998). The Henty gold mine is located at the base of the Cambrian Tyndall Group (volcano-sedimentary succession, White and McPhie, 1996) close to Henty Fault. Gold in carbonate samples from Henty ranges from 7.7 to 9360 ppm and in Beaconsfield ranges from 0.01 to 434 ppm. The amount of carbonate in samples from Henty and Beaconsfield gold mines varies from approximately 24 to 99.8%. Bivariate plot of Ca relative to total amounts of Mg, Fe and Mn illustrates that the major carbonate minerals at Beaconsfield and Henty gold mines are magnesian ankerite and calcite. The difference in carbonate mineralogy, at Henty and Beaconsfield gold mines, is attributed to the composition of fluids responsible for carbonate alteration. Gold and magnesium in Beaconsfield ankerite are derived from the leaching of Cambrian ultramafic rocks during the Devonian by the passage of meteoric fluids through tectonically affected Ordovician carbonates (Rao and Adabi, 1999). The total concentration of Fe and Mn are low (0.5 to 2%) in Henty and high (1 to 17.5%) in Beaconsfield ankerite, possibly due to oxidising conditions at Henty and reducing conditions at Beaconsfield gold mines during gold mineralisation. Variation of Sr values between Beaconsfield ankerite and Henty calcite is related to dissolution of limestone that increase Sr concentrations in gold mineralising fluids. Na values in both Beaconsfield (20 to 1100 ppm) and Henty carbonates (25 to 1650 ppm) suggest low salinity fluids responsible for gold

  14. Origin of nondisjunction in trisomy 8 and trisomy 8 mosaicism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadima, G; Bugge, M; Nicolaidis, P; Vassilopoulos, D; Avramopoulos, D; Grigoriadou, M; Albrecht, B; Passarge, E; Annerén, G; Blennow, E; Clausen, N; Galla-Voumvouraki, A; Tsezou, A; Kitsiou-Tzeli, S; Hahnemann, J M; Hertz, J M; Houge, G; Kuklík, M; Macek, M; Lacombe, D; Miller, K; Moncla, A; López Pajares, I; Patsalis, P C; Petersen, M B

    1998-01-01

    Causes of chromosomal nondisjunction is one of the remaining unanswered questions in human genetics. In order to increase our understanding of the mechanisms underlying nondisjunction we have performed a molecular study on trisomy 8 and trisomy 8 mosaicism. We report the results on analyses of 26 probands (and parents) using 19 microsatellite DNA markers mapping along the length of chromosome 8. The 26 cases represented 20 live births, four spontaneous abortions, and two prenatal diagnoses (CVS). The results of the nondisjunction studies show that 20 cases (13 maternal, 7 paternal) were probably due to mitotic (postzygotic) duplication as reduction to homozygosity of all informative markers was observed and as no third allele was ever detected. Only two cases from spontaneous abortions were due to maternal meiotic nondisjunction. In four cases we were not able to detect the extra chromosome due to a low level of mosaicism. These results are in contrast to the common autosomal trisomies (including mosaics), where the majority of cases are due to errors in maternal meiosis.

  15. Welded, sandblasted, stainless steel corrugated bars in non-carbonated and carbonated mortars: A 9-year corrosion study

    OpenAIRE

    Bautista, A.; Paredes, E. C.; Álvarez, S. M.; Velasco, F.

    2016-01-01

    Three different stainless steel corrugated grades (UNS S20430, S30403 and S32205) were similar welded to stainless steel bars with the same composition and dissimilar welded to carbon steel (CS). After cleaning the welding oxides by sandblasting, the reinforcements were embedded in mortar with chlorides and some of the samples were carbonated. Corrosion activity was monitored using corrosion potential (Ecorr) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). After 8 years of exposure, the sam...

  16. Measurement of carbon capture efficiency and stored carbon leakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Ralph F.; Dubey, Manvendra K.

    2013-01-29

    Data representative of a measured carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) concentration and of a measured oxygen (O.sub.2) concentration at a measurement location can be used to determine whether the measured carbon dioxide concentration at the measurement location is elevated relative to a baseline carbon dioxide concentration due to escape of carbon dioxide from a source associated with a carbon capture and storage process. Optionally, the data can be used to quantify a carbon dioxide concentration increase at the first location that is attributable to escape of carbon dioxide from the source and to calculate a rate of escape of carbon dioxide from the source by executing a model of gas-phase transport using at least the first carbon dioxide concentration increase. Related systems, methods, and articles of manufacture are also described.

  17. Global Uncertainty Accounting for Forest Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, R. M.; Saatchi, S. S.; Hagen, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Uncertainty in Global Forest Carbon There are 11.3 E9 global hectares of biologically productive surface, of which approximately 4E9 are forested. The terrestrial biosphere reservoir contains carbon in organic compounds in vegetation living biomass (450 to 650 PgC, IPCC AR5 ). Houghton et al (2009) give 385 - 650 GtC, of which 70 ~90% is forest. Using 80%, that gives a range of 360 ~ 520 (IPCC) or 308 ~ 520 (Houghton) GtC in Earth's forests. The IPCC values give a forest carbon global density range of 90 ~ 130 tC/ha. Assuming that 360 and 520 GtC are two independent samples from our uncertainty on the global forest carbon pool, we may ballpark this uncertainty as STD(global forest carbon pool) ~ [½(160)2 [GtC]2]½= 113 E9 [tC].If Xi,…XN have average variance s2 and average covariance c then VAR(SXi) = s2N + N(N-1)c, and: 1) 28.3 = s(2.5E-10 + r)½. where s is the root of the average variance of forest carbon in [t/ha], and r = c/s2 is the "global correlation". r is equal to the average correlation over all pairs of hectares if the variances per hectare are constant, but r £ 1 holds in any case. Uncertainty accounting.If r = 0, then (1) entails that s = 1.8 E6 tC, which is not defensible. Suppose an uncertainty requirement for carbon monitoring systems stipulates that the standard deviation per hectare should not exceed 10% of the mean. With a mean of 110 tC/ha, s = 11, and substitution in (1) would give r½ = 2.6, which is impossible. If r = 1, then s = 28.3 which is 26% of the mean. In this case it can be shown that the error in the estimate in any hectare is perfectly correlated with errors in every other hectare: removing the uncertainty in ONE hectare on the Earth would remove uncertainty in ALL hectares. Neither r = 0, r = 1 are reasonable. Uncertainty accounting requires consistent estimates of global forest carbon uncertainty, uncertainty in hectare-wise estimates and global correlation. Consistent estimates do not exist at present. This research charts

  18. Carbon isotopes as indicators of peatland growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alewell, Christine; Krüger, Jan Paul; von Sengbusch, Pascal; Szidat, Sönke; Leifeld, Jens

    2016-04-01

    As undisturbed and/or growing peatlands store considerable amounts of carbon and are unique in their biodiversity and species assemblage, the knowledge of the current status of peatlands (growing with carbon sequestration, stagnating or degrading with carbon emissions) is crucial for landscape management and nature conservation. However, monitoring of peatland status requires long term measurements and is only feasible with expert knowledge. The latter determination is increasingly impeded in a scientific world, where taxonomic expert knowledge and funding of long term monitoring is rare. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes depth profiles in peatland soils have been shown to be a useful tool to monitor the degradation of peatlands due to permafrost thawing in Northern Sweden (Alewell et al., 2011; Krüger et al., 2014), drainage in Southern Finland (Krüger et al., 2016) as well as land use intensification in Northern Germany (Krüger et al., 2015). Here, we tackle the questions if we are able to differentiate between growing and degrading peats with the use of a combination of carbon stable (δ13C) and radiogenic isotope data (14C) with peat stratification information (degree of humification and macroscopic plant remains). Results indicate that isotope data are a useful tool to approximate peatland status, but that expert taxonomic knowledge will be needed for the final conclusion on peatland growth. Thus, isotope tools might be used for landscape screening to pin point sites for detailed taxonomic monitoring. As the method remains qualitative future research at these sites will need to integrate quantitative approaches to determine carbon loss or gain (soil C balances by ash content or C accumulation methods by radiocarbon data; Krüger et al., 2016). Alewell, C., R. Giesler, J. Klaminder, J. Leifeld, and M. Rollog. 2011. Stable carbon isotopes as indicators for micro-geomorphic changes in palsa peats. Biogeosciences, 8, 1769-1778. Krüger, J. P., Leifeld, J

  19. The paper of the forests like retainers of carbon, an experience in the south of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The forests play an important paper in the global cycle of the carbon. At the moment, the deforestation is responsible for approximately 1.8GtC (gigatons of carbon), 20% of the global annual emissions of carbonic gas caused by the human activity. However, it is calculated that the reforestation could retain from 50 to 150 GtC along next 50 years. Concepts related with the retention of carbon are discussed. The necessity is commented of carrying out the regulation of an international market in retention of carbon with the purpose of being able to maintain acceptable norms in the reforestation projects that are executed under this program

  20. Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldocchi, Dennis; Ryu, Youngryel; Keenan, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    A growing literature is reporting on how the terrestrial carbon cycle is experiencing year-to-year variability because of climate anomalies and trends caused by global change. As CO 2 concentration records in the atmosphere exceed 50 years and as satellite records reach over 30 years in length, we are becoming better able to address carbon cycle variability and trends. Here we review how variable the carbon cycle is, how large the trends in its gross and net fluxes are, and how well the signal can be separated from noise. We explore mechanisms that explain year-to-year variability and trends by deconstructing the global carbon budget. The CO 2 concentration record is detecting a significant increase in the seasonal amplitude between 1958 and now. Inferential methods provide a variety of explanations for this result, but a conclusive attribution remains elusive. Scientists have reported that this trend is a consequence of the greening of the biosphere, stronger northern latitude photosynthesis, more photosynthesis by semi-arid ecosystems, agriculture and the green revolution, tropical temperature anomalies, or increased winter respiration. At the global scale, variability in the terrestrial carbon cycle can be due to changes in constituent fluxes, gross primary productivity, plant respiration and heterotrophic (microbial) respiration, and losses due to fire, land use change, soil erosion, or harvesting. It remains controversial whether or not there is a significant trend in global primary productivity (due to rising CO 2, temperature, nitrogen deposition, changing land use, and preponderance of wet and dry regions). The degree to which year-to-year variability in temperature and precipitation anomalies affect global primary productivity also remains uncertain. For perspective, interannual variability in global gross primary productivity is relatively small (on the order of 2 Pg-C y -1) with respect to a large and uncertain background (123 +/- 4 Pg-C y -1), and

  1. Designing of epoxy composites reinforced with carbon nanotubes grown carbon fiber fabric for improved electromagnetic interference shielding

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, B. P.; Veena Choudhary; Parveen Saini; Mathur, R.B.

    2012-01-01

    In this letter, we report preparation of strongly anchored multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) carbon fiber (CF) fabric preforms. These preforms were reinforced in epoxy resin to make multi scale composites for microwave absorption in the X-band (8.2-12.4GHz). The incorporation of MWCNTs on the carbon fabric produced a significant enhancement in the electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI-SE) from −29.4 dB for CF/epoxy-composite to −51.1 dB for CF-MWCNT/epoxy multiscale comp...

  2. Adsorption uptake of synthetic organic chemicals by carbon nanotubes and activated carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, A. J.; Lim, Hyung-nam; Kilduff, James E.

    2012-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great promise as high performance materials for adsorbing priority pollutants from water and wastewater. This study compared uptake of two contaminants of interest in drinking water treatment (atrazine and trichloroethylene) by nine different types of carbonaceous adsorbents: three different types of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), three different sized multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs), two granular activated carbons (GACs) and a powdered activated carbon (PAC). On a mass basis, the activated carbons exhibited the highest uptake, followed by SWNTs and MWNTs. However, metallic impurities in SWNTs and multiple walls in MWNTs contribute to adsorbent mass but do not contribute commensurate adsorption sites. Therefore, when uptake was normalized by purity (carbon content) and surface area (instead of mass), the isotherms collapsed and much of the CNT data was comparable to the activated carbons, indicating that these two characteristics drive much of the observed differences between activated carbons and CNT materials. For the limited data set here, the Raman D:G ratio as a measure of disordered non-nanotube graphitic components was not a good predictor of adsorption from solution. Uptake of atrazine by MWNTs having a range of lengths and diameters was comparable and their Freundlich isotherms were statistically similar, and we found no impact of solution pH on the adsorption of either atrazine or trichloroethylene in the range of naturally occurring surface water (pH = 5.7-8.3). Experiments were performed using a suite of model aromatic compounds having a range of π-electron energy to investigate the role of π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions on organic compound uptake by SWNTs. For the compounds studied, hydrophobic interactions were the dominant mechanism in the uptake by both SWNTs and activated carbon. However, comparing the uptake of naphthalene and phenanthrene by activated carbon and SWNTs, size exclusion effects

  3. Adsorption uptake of synthetic organic chemicals by carbon nanotubes and activated carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great promise as high performance materials for adsorbing priority pollutants from water and wastewater. This study compared uptake of two contaminants of interest in drinking water treatment (atrazine and trichloroethylene) by nine different types of carbonaceous adsorbents: three different types of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), three different sized multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs), two granular activated carbons (GACs) and a powdered activated carbon (PAC). On a mass basis, the activated carbons exhibited the highest uptake, followed by SWNTs and MWNTs. However, metallic impurities in SWNTs and multiple walls in MWNTs contribute to adsorbent mass but do not contribute commensurate adsorption sites. Therefore, when uptake was normalized by purity (carbon content) and surface area (instead of mass), the isotherms collapsed and much of the CNT data was comparable to the activated carbons, indicating that these two characteristics drive much of the observed differences between activated carbons and CNT materials. For the limited data set here, the Raman D:G ratio as a measure of disordered non-nanotube graphitic components was not a good predictor of adsorption from solution. Uptake of atrazine by MWNTs having a range of lengths and diameters was comparable and their Freundlich isotherms were statistically similar, and we found no impact of solution pH on the adsorption of either atrazine or trichloroethylene in the range of naturally occurring surface water (pH = 5.7–8.3). Experiments were performed using a suite of model aromatic compounds having a range of π-electron energy to investigate the role of π–π electron donor–acceptor interactions on organic compound uptake by SWNTs. For the compounds studied, hydrophobic interactions were the dominant mechanism in the uptake by both SWNTs and activated carbon. However, comparing the uptake of naphthalene and phenanthrene by activated carbon and SWNTs, size exclusion

  4. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2012-10-09

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  5. Mid infrared emission spectroscopy of carbon plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemes, Laszlo; Brown, Ei Ei; S-C Yang, Clayton; Hommerich, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    Mid infrared time-resolved emission spectra were recorded from laser-induced carbon plasma. These spectra constitute the first study of carbon materials LIB spectroscopy in the mid infrared range. The carbon plasma was induced using a Q-switched Nd: YAG laser. The laser beam was focused to high purity graphite pellets mounted on a translation stage. Mid infrared emission from the plasma in an atmospheric pressure background gas was detected by a cooled HgCdTe detector in the range 4.4-11.6μm, using long-pass filters. LIB spectra were taken in argon, helium and also in air. Despite a gate delay of 10μs was used there were strong backgrounds in the spectra. Superimposed on this background broad and noisy emission bands were observed, the form and position of which depended somewhat on the ambient gas. The spectra were digitally smoothed and background corrected. In argon, for instance, strong bands were observed around 4.8, 6.0 and 7.5μm. Using atomic spectral data by NIST it could be concluded that carbon, argon, helium and nitrogen lines from neutral and ionized atoms are very weak in this spectral region. The width of the infrared bands supports molecular origin. The infrared emission bands were thus compared to vibrational features of carbon molecules (excluding C2) of various sizes on the basis of previous carbon cluster infrared absorption and emission spectroscopic analyses in the literature and quantum chemical calculations. Some general considerations are given about the present results. PMID:27428600

  6. Clumped-isotope thermometry of magnesium carbonates in ultramafic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    García del Real, Pablo; Maher, Kate; Kluge, Tobias; Bird, Dennis K.; Brown, Gordon E.; John, Cédric M.

    2016-11-01

    mineralization at shallow crustal depths in the presence of meteoric water. Hydrous magnesium carbonates from a 400-km latitudinal transect along the serpentinized-peridotite bodies of the California Coast Ranges record clumped-isotope temperatures between 14.2 and 22.7 ± 2.8 °C, in agreement with historical maximum temperatures during the rainy season for California. Talc-carbonate alteration of ultramafic rocks in Greenland (Isua Supracrustal Belt) and Vermont (Ludlow) yields clumped-isotope alteration temperatures of magnesite and dolomite between 326 and 490 °C, broadly consistent with paragenesis and thermodynamic analysis for CO2 metasomatism of ultramafic rocks. These metamorphic carbonates extend the applicability of clumped-isotope thermometry to high-temperature magnesium carbonate systems and indicate equilibrium blocking temperatures for magnesite of ∼490 °C. Our study demonstrates the applicability of the clumped isotope approach to provide information on the formation of magnesium carbonates as ore resources, surface records of climate, and metamorphic assemblages.

  7. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-11-01

    Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Deliverables for the 7th Quarter reporting period include (1) for the geological efforts: Reports on Technology Needs and Action Plan on the Evaluation of Geological Sinks and Pilot Project Deployment (Deliverables 2 and 3), and Report on the Feasibility of Mineralization Trapping in the Snake River Plain Basin (Deliverable 14); (2) for the terrestrial efforts: Report on the Evaluation of Terrestrial Sinks and a Report of the Best Production Practices for Soil C Sequestration (Deliverables 8 and 15). In addition, the 7th Quarter activities for the Partnership included further development of the proposed activities for the deployment and demonstration phase of the carbon sequestration pilots including geological and terrestrial pilots, expansion of the Partnership to encompass regions and institutions that are complimentary to the steps we have identified, building greater collaborations with industry and stakeholders in the region, contributed to outreach efforts that spanned all partnerships, co-authorship on the Carbon Capture and Separation report, and developed a regional basis to address future energy opportunities in the region. The deliverables and activities are discussed in the following sections and appended to this report. The education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The public website has been expanded and integrated with the GIS carbon atlas. We have made presentations to stakeholders and policy makers including two tribal sequestration workshops, and made connections to other federal and

  8. High-Resolution Infrared Spectroscopy of Cubane, C_8H_8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudon, Vincent; Pirali, Olivier; Gruet, Sébastien; D'accolti, Lucia; Fusco, Caterina; Annese, Cosimo

    2014-06-01

    Carbon-cage molecules have generated a considerable interest from both experimental and theoretical point of views. We recently performed a high-resolution study of adamantane (C10H16), the smallest hydrocarbon cage belonging to the diamandoid family. There exist another family of hydrocarbon cages with additional interesting chemical properties: the so-called Platonic hydrocarbons that comprise dodecahedrane (C20H20) and cubane (C_8H_8). Both possess C-C bond angles that deviate from the tetrahedral angle (109.8°) of the sp^3 hybridized form of carbon. This generates a considerable strain in the molecule. Cubane itself has the highest density of all hydrocarbons (1.29 g/cm^3). This makes it able to store larges amounts of energy, although the molecule is fully stable. Up to now, only one high-resolution study of cubane has been performed on a few bands [2]. We report here a new wide-range high-resolution study of the infrared spectrum of cubane. The sample was synthesized in Bari upon decarboxylation of 1,4-cubanedicarboxylic acid thanks to the improved synthesis of literature [3]; its {}1H and 13C NMR, FTIR, and mass spectrometry agreed with reported data [4]. Several spectra have been recorded at the AILES beamline of the SOLEIL French synchrotron facility. They cover the 800 to 3100 cm-1 region. Besides the three infrared-active fundamentals (ν10, ν11 and ν12), we could record many combination bands, all of them displaying a well-resolved octahedral rotational structure. We present here a preliminary analysis of some of the recorded bands, performed thanks the SPVIEW and XTDS software, based on the tensrorial formalism developed in the Dijon group [5]. [1] O. Pirali, V. Boudon, J. Oomens, M. Vervloet, J. Chem. Phys., 136, 024310 (2012). [2] A. S. Pine, A. G. Maki, A. G. Robiette, B. J. Krohn, J. K. G. Watson, Th. Urbanek, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 106, 891-897 (1984). [3] P. E. Eaton, N. Nordari, J. Tsanaktsidis, P. S. Upadhyaya, Synthesis, 1, 501, (1995). [4] E

  9. Removal of indoor formaldehyde over CMK-8 adsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mi Jin; Kim, Ji Man; Park, Sung Hoon; Jeon, Jong-Ki; Park, Joonhong; Park, Young-Kwon

    2013-04-01

    CMK-8, a mesoporous carbon material, was activated using different methods for the adsorption of low-concentration airborne formaldehyde. KOH and ammonia treatments were used to activate CMK-8. A CMK-8 sample was treated with KOH first followed by an ammonia-treatment at 700 degrees C to determine the effect of a combination of the two treatment methods. The adsorbents prepared were characterized by X-ray diffraction, N2 adsorption-desorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The KOH treatment increased the concentration of oxygen functional groups, whereas the ammonia-treatment generated a significant amount of nitrogen functional groups. The formaldehyde adsorption efficiency was highest when both KOH- and ammonia-treatments were applied to CMK-8. The ammonia-treated CMK-8 exhibited higher formaldehyde adsorption ability than the KOH-treated one, whereas non-activated CMK-8 showed the lowest formaldehyde adsorption efficiency. The number of nitrogen functional groups and the specific surface area appeared to significantly affect the formaldehyde adsorption capability of the adsorbents, whereas oxygen functional groups played a less important role.

  10. Teach yourself visually Windows 8

    CERN Document Server

    McFedries, Paul

    2012-01-01

    A practical guide for visual learners eager to get started with Windows 8 If you learn more quickly when you can see how things are done, this Visual guide is the easiest way to get up and running on Windows 8. It covers more than 150 essential Windows tasks, using full-color screen shots and step-by-step instructions to show you just what to do. Learn your way around the interface and how to install programs, set up user accounts, play music and other media files, download photos from your digital camera, go online, set up and secure an e-mail account, and much more. The tried-and-true format

  11. Effect of biostimulation on biodegradation of dissolved organic carbon in biological granular activated carbon filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tihomirova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The addition of labile organic carbon (LOC to enhance the biodegradation rate of dissolved organic carbon (DOC in biological columns was studied. Acetate standard solution (NaAc and LB (Luria Bertrani medium were used as LOC as biostimulants in glass column system used for measurements of biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC. The addition of LOC related with the increase of total DOC in sample. The concentration of BDOC increased up to 7 and 5 times and was utilized after 24 min. contact time. The biodegradation rate constant was increased at least 8 times during adaptation-biostimulation period. There was a strong positive correlation between the biodegradation rate constant and the concentration of BDOC. Biostimulation period ranged from 24 to 53 h for NaAc biostimulant and from 20 to 168 h for LB. The study has shown that LOC could be used as stimulator to enhance the biodegradation rate of DOC during biofiltration.

  12. Multiple Interactions in Pythia 8

    CERN Document Server

    Corke, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Modelling multiple partonic interactions in hadronic events is vital for understanding minimum-bias physics, as well as the underlying event of hard processes. A brief overview of the current Pythia 8 multiple interactions (MI) model is given, before looking at two additional effects which can be included in the MI framework. With rescattering, a previously scattered parton is allowed to take part in another subsequent scattering, while with enhanced screening, the effects of varying initial-state fluctuations are modelled.

  13. Development and Characterization of a Carbonated Ginger Drink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saka Ambali ABDULKAREEM

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available There is widespread of effort in developing countries like Nigeria to develop carbonated drink from the locally source materials. To achieve this aim, ginger has been consider as an alternative material for the production of carbonated drink, this is because ginger and its by-products have a lot of applications in confectionaries, pharmaceuticals and beverages production. Apart from the applications of ginger listed above, ginger is also a very important and highly valuable crop in most part of West African, Japan, and China. In this study, ginger soft drink was developed by a combination of fresh ginger rhizome and Carbon dioxide (CO2. The CO2 gas volume was steadily increased to make three (3 samples B, C, and D, while sample A is the non-carbonated sample. All the samples were characterized according to chemical and microbiological analysis of the final product and values obtained from the analysis of the developed ginger soft drink are within the range of standard values for carbonated drink. Shelf-life analysis was carried out on the final product and it corresponds to the Shelf-life of a standard carbonated drink. Sample D with the highest gas volume of 2.8 cm3 has the best Shelf-life. Results obtained from the various analysis conducted indicates that the production of a carbonated ginger soft drink from fresh ginger rhizome is practically possible, cost effective and has numerous advantages when compared with other available carbonated drinks.

  14. The distribution in lunar soil of carbon released by pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmarais, D. J.; Hayes, J. M.; Meinschein, W. G.

    1973-01-01

    The carbon contents of various lunar soil particle types and sieve fractions of Apollo 15 and 16 samples have been determined by the pyrolysis method. The mineral, glass, and high-grade breccia fragments in the soils examined contain relatively low amounts of carbon (approximately 8, 25, and 25 microg C/g sample respectively in 149-250 micron grains). Most low-grade breccias and all agglutinates examined have high carbon contents (approximately 52 and 80 microg C/g sample respectively), and agglutinate abundance is indicative of the carbon content and maturity of a soil. The distribution of carbon with respect to particle size in mature soils generally reveals a minimum in carbon content at about 100 micron particle diameter. At smaller particle diameters, carbon content is directly proportional to particle surface area and therefore increases with the ratio (surface area)/(particle mass). A model relating the cycle of comminution and aggregation of soil particles to the redistribution of surface implanted carbon is developed.

  15. Effect of carbonation on microbial corrosion of concretes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, N.; Nonaka, T.; Noda, S.; Mori, T. [Shimane Univ., Shimane (Japan)

    1993-09-20

    Carbonation of concrete induces a decrease of surface pH of concrete and is the prerequisite to the generation of microbial corrosion of concrete. Carbonation experiments were conducted on mortar specimens for four months under three different concentrations of carbon dioxide and then, the mortar specimens were subjected to microbial corrosion experiments for eight months by immersion in raw sewage influent. The carbonation rates increased with the increase of CO2 concentration, however, the highest carbonation rate was found in the specimen exposed to 0.5% CO2 compared to 5% CO2 and control (0.03%) specimens. Microbial corrosion rates increased corresponding to the carbonation rates and were 3.0, 3.8, 2.1 mm per year for 5%, 0.5% and control specimens respectively. However, higher CO2 concentration suppresses both carbonation and microbial corrosion rates due to formation of much calcite. Results of on-site investigations show combined effect of H2S and CO2 on actual microbial corrosion. Growth of Thiobacillus thiooxidans is considered to be promoted on the reduced pH of carbonated surface. 6 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. A kind of carbon whiskers in new structure and morphology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG; Jian

    2001-01-01

    [1]Endo, M., Saito, R., Dresselhaus, M. S. et al. From carbon fibers to nanotubes, in Carbon Nanotubes Preparations and Properties (ed. Ebbesen, T. W.), New York: CRC Press Inc., 1997, 54-66.[2]Baker, R. T. K., Baker, M. A., Harris, P. S. et al., Nucleation and growth of carbon deposits from the nickel catalyzed de-composition of acetylene, J.Catal., 1972, 26(7): 51.[3]Audier, M., Coulon, M., Kinetic and microscopic aspects of catalytic carbon growth, Carbon, 1985, 23(3): 317.[4]Oberlin, A., Endo, M., Koyama, T., High resolution microscope observations of graphitized carbon fibers, Carbon, 1976, 14(1): 133.[5]Bacon, R., Growth, structure, and properties of graphite whiskers, Journal of Applied Physics, 1960, 31(2): 283.[6]Murayama, H., Maeda, M., A novel form of filamentous graphite, Nature, 1990, 345(28): 791.[7]Pimpinelli, A., Villain, J., Physics of Crystal Growth, New York: Cambridge University Press, 1998, 62-64.[8]Minkoff, I., Solidification and Cast Structure, Chichester: Wiley, 1986, 42-47.[9]Pierson, H. O., Handbook of Carbon, Graphite, Diamond, and Fullerenes: Properties, Processing, and Applications, Park Ridge: Noyes Publications, 1993, 151.[10]Bennema, P., Spiral growth and surface roughing: Developments since Burton, Cabrera and Frank, Journal of Crystal Growth, 1984, 69(2): 182.

  17. The costing of carbon credits from ocean nourishment plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocean nourishment is a process for stimulating the sequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide in the deep ocean by providing the nutrients needed to enhance the production of phytoplankton. The carbon dioxide sink thus created, can be used to generate tradeable carbon credits. The costs of sequestering carbon by the process of ocean nourishment have been estimated using as a basis, the previous experience in nitrogen fixing of Toyo Engineering Corporation. While there are uncertainties about the biological uptake efficiency, these introduce only a moderate uncertainty in our overall estimates of costs. The major determinants of the costs are the interest that must be paid on capital and the cost of the feedstock, natural gas. We have used for discussion purposes, an interest rate of 4-8% per annum and natural gas costs of US$0.5-$2 per GJ. The costs of carbon credits lie in the range US$6.70-$12.40 per tonne of carbon dioxide emissions sequestered. It should be noted that we have adopted the measure of carbon avoided by non-emission, because of the complex partitioning of anthropogenic carbon between the atmosphere, land and ocean

  18. Flexible Carbon Aerogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Schwan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon aerogels are highly porous materials with a large inner surface area. Due to their high electrical conductivity they are excellent electrode materials in supercapacitors. Their brittleness, however, imposes certain limitations in terms of applicability. In that context, novel carbon aerogels with varying degree of flexibility have been developed. These highly porous, light aerogels are characterized by a high surface area and possess pore structures in the micrometer range, allowing for a reversible deformation of the aerogel network. A high ratio of pore size to particle size was found to be crucial for high flexibility. For dynamic microstructural analysis, compression tests were performed in-situ within a scanning electron microscope allowing us to directly visualize the microstructural flexibility of an aerogel. The flexible carbon aerogels were found to withstand between 15% and 30% of uniaxial compression in a reversible fashion. These findings might stimulate further research and new application fields directed towards flexible supercapacitors and batteries.

  19. Securing tropical forest carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scharlemann, Jörn P. W.; Kapos, Valerie; Campbell, Alison;

    2010-01-01

    Forest loss and degradation in the tropics contribute 6-17% of all greenhouse gas emissions. Protected areas cover 217.2 million ha (19.6%) of the world's humid tropical forests and contain c. 70.3 petagrams of carbon (Pg C) in biomass and soil to 1 m depth. Between 2000 and 2005, we estimate...... that 1.75 million ha of forest were lost from protected areas in humid tropical forests, causing the emission of 0.25-0.33 Pg C. Protected areas lost about half as much carbon as the same area of unprotected forest. We estimate that the reduction of these carbon emissions from ongoing deforestation......, although certainly not sufficient, component of an overall strategy for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD)...

  20. Pyrolyzed carbon film diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Kirstin C; Tokuhisa, Hideo; Baker, Lane A

    2013-11-13

    We have previously reported pyrolyzed parylene C (PPC) as a conductive carbon electrode material for use with micropipets, atomic force microscopy probes, and planar electrodes. Advantages of carbon electrode fabrication from PPC include conformal coating of high-aspect ratio micro/nanoscale features and the benefits afforded by chemical vapor deposition of carbon polymers. In this work, we demonstrate chemical surface doping of PPC through the use of previously reported methods. Chemically treated PPC films are characterized by multiple spectroscopic and electronic measurements. Pyrolyzed parylene C and doped PPC are used to construct diodes that are examined as both p-n heterojunction and Schottky barrier diodes. Half-wave rectification is achieved with PPC diodes and demonstrates the applicability of PPC as a conductive and semiconductive material in device fabrication. PMID:24090451

  1. 75 FR 38179 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Forms W-8BEN, W-8ECI, W-8EXP, and W-8IMY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Forms W-8BEN, W-8ECI, W- 8EXP, and W-8IMY... 104-13 (44 U.S.C. 3506(c)(2)(A)). Currently, the IRS is soliciting comments concerning Form W-8BEN, Certificate of Foreign Status of Beneficial Owner for United States Tax Withholding, Form W-8ECI,...

  2. Polymer cantilever platform for dielectrophoretic assembly of carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Alicia; Calleja, M.; Dimaki, Maria;

    2004-01-01

    A polymer cantilever platform for dielectrophoretic assembly of carbon nanotubes has been designed and realized. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes from aqueous solution have been assembled between two metal electrodes that are separated by 2 mu m and embedded in the polymer cantilever. The entire chip......, except for the metallic electrodes and wiring, was fabricated in the photoresist SU-8. SU-8 allows for an inexpensive, flexible and fast fabrication method, and the cantilever platform provides a hydrophobic surface that should be well suited for nanotube assembly. The device can be integrated in a micro...

  3. Direct Conversion of Carbon Fuels in a Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherepy, N J; Fiet, K J; Krueger, R; Jankowski, A F; Cooper, J F

    2004-01-28

    Anodes of elemental carbon may be discharged in a galvanic cell using a molten carbonate electrolyte, a nickel-foam anode-current collector, and a porous nickel air cathode to achieve power densities of 40-100 mW/cm{sup 2}. We report cell and anode polarization, surface area, primary particle size and a crystallization index for nine particulate carbon samples derived from fuel oil, methane, coal, charred biological material and petroleum coke. At 800 C, current densities of 50-125 mA/cm{sup 2} were measured at a representative cell voltage of 0.8 V. Power densities for cells with two carbon-anode materials were found to be nearly the same on scales of 2.8- and 60 cm{sup 2} active area. Constant current operation of a small cell was accompanied by constant voltage during multiple tests of 10-30 hour duration. Cell voltage fell off after the carbon inventory was consumed. Three different cathode structures are compared, indicating that an LLNL fabricated porous nickel electrode with <10 {micro}m pores provides improved rates compared with nickel foam with 100-300 {micro}m pores. Petroleum coke containing substantial sulfur and ash discharges at a slightly lower rate than purified petroleum coke. The sulfur leads to degradation of the anode current collector over time. A conceptual model for electrochemical reactivity of carbon is presented which indicates the importance of (1) bulk lattice disorder, which continually provides surface reactive sites during anodic dissolution and (2) electrical conductivity, which lowers the ohmic component of anode polarization.

  4. Porous carbon with a large surface area and an ultrahigh carbon purity via templating carbonization coupling with KOH activation as excellent supercapacitor electrode materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; Gao, Jihui; Liu, Xin; Pi, Xinxin; Yang, Yuqi; Wu, Shaohua

    2016-11-01

    Large surface area and good structural stability, for porous carbons, are two crucial requirements to enable the constructed supercapacitors with high capacitance and long cycling lifespan. Herein, we successfully prepare porous carbon with a large surface area (3175 m2 g-1) and an ultrahigh carbon purity (carbon atom ratio of 98.25%) via templating carbonization coupling with KOH activation. As-synthesized MTC-KOH exhibits excellent performances as supercapacitor electrode materials in terms of high specific capacitance and ultrahigh cycling stability. In a three electrode system, MTC-KOH delivers a high capacitance of 275 F g-1 at 0.5 A g-1 and still 120 F g-1 at a high rate of 30 A g-1. There is almost no capacitance decay even after 10,000 cycles, demonstrating outstanding cycling stability. In comparison, pre-activated MTC with a hierarchical pore structure shows a better rate capability than microporous MTC-KOH. Moreover, the constructed symmetric supercapacitor using MTC-KOH can achieve high energy densities of 8.68 Wh kg-1 and 4.03 Wh kg-1 with the corresponding power densities of 108 W kg-1 and 6.49 kW kg-1, respectively. Our work provides a simple design strategy to prepare highly porous carbons with high carbon purity for supercapacitors application.

  5. Horizontal carbon nanotube alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Matthew T; Cientanni, Vito; Milne, William I

    2016-09-21

    The production of horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes offers a rapid means of realizing a myriad of self-assembled near-atom-scale technologies - from novel photonic crystals to nanoscale transistors. The ability to reproducibly align anisotropic nanostructures has huge technological value. Here we review the present state-of-the-art in horizontal carbon nanotube alignment. For both in and ex situ approaches, we quantitatively assess the reported linear packing densities alongside the degree of alignment possible for each of these core methodologies. PMID:27546174

  6. Nanotube composite carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, R.; Jacques, D.; Rao, A. M.; Rantell, T.; Derbyshire, F.; Chen, Y.; Chen, J.; Haddon, R. C.

    1999-08-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were dispersed in isotropic petroleum pitch matrices to form nanotube composite carbon fibers with enhanced mechanical and electrical properties. We find that the tensile strength, modulus, and electrical conductivity of a pitch composite fiber with 5 wt % loading of purified SWNTs are enhanced by ˜90%, ˜150%, and 340% respectively, as compared to the corresponding values in unmodified isotropic pitch fibers. These results serve to highlight the potential that exits for developing a spectrum of material properties through the selection of the matrix, nanotube dispersion, alignment, and interfacial bonding.

  7. Carbon Nanotube Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Klinger, Colin; Patel, Yogeshwari; Postma, Henk W. Ch.

    2012-01-01

    We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabr...

  8. Carbon cycle makeover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canfield, Donald Eugene; Kump, Lee R.

    2013-01-01

    remaining in sediments after respiration leave a residual of oxygen in the atmosphere. The source of oxygen to the atmosphere represented by organic matter burial is balanced by oxygen sinks associated with rock weathering and chemical reaction with volcanic gases. This is the long-term carbon and oxygen...... geochemical cycle. But Earth is an old planet, and oxygen levels have changed through time (2). On page 540 of this issue, Schrag et al. (3) challenge the most commonly used geochemical approach to assess long-term changes in the coupled oxygen and carbon cycles....

  9. Pitch carbon microsphere composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, H. L.; Nelson, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    Petroleum pitch carbon microspheres were prepared by flash heating emulsified pitch and carbonizing the resulting microspheres in an inert atmosphere. Microsphere composites were obtained from a mixture of microspheres and tetraester precursor pyrrone powder. Scanning electron micrographs of the composite showed that it was an aggregate of microspheres bonded together by the pyrrone at the sphere contact points, with voids in and among the microspheres. Physical, thermal, and sorption properties of the composite are described. Composite applications could include use as a honeycomb filler in elevated-temperature load-bearing sandwich boards or in patient-treatment tables for radiation treatment of tumors.

  10. Edge effects in finite elongated carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Hod, O; Scuseria, G E; Hod, Oded; Peralta, Juan E.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2006-01-01

    The importance of finite-size effects for the electronic structure of long zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes is studied. We analyze the electronic structure of capped (6,6), (8,0), and (9,0) single walled carbon nanotubes as a function of their length up to 60 nm, using a divide and conquer density functional theory approach. For the metallic nanotubes studied, most of the physical features appearing in the density of states of an infinite carbon nanotube are recovered at a length of 40 nm. The (8,0) semi-conducting nanotube studied exhibits pronounced edge effects within the energy gap that scale as the inverse of the length of the nanotube. As a result, the energy gap reduces from the value of ~1 eV calculated for the periodic system to a value of ~0.25 eV calculated for a capped 62 nm long CNT. These edge effects are expected to become negligible only at tube lengths exceeding 6 micrometers. Our results indicate that careful tailoring of the nature of the system and its capping units should be applied w...

  11. Effect of carbon nanotubes upon emissions from cutting and sanding carbon fiber-epoxy composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heitbrink, William A. [LMK OSH Consulting LLC (United States); Lo, Li-Ming, E-mail: LLo@cdc.gov [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Division of Applied Research and Technology, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being incorporated into structural composites to enhance material strength. During fabrication or repair activities, machining nanocomposites may release CNTs into the workplace air. An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the emissions generated by cutting and sanding on three types of epoxy-composite panels: Panel A containing graphite fibers, Panel B containing graphite fibers and carbon-based mat, and Panel C containing graphite fibers, carbon-based mat, and multi-walled CNTs. Aerosol sampling was conducted with direct-reading instruments, and filter samples were collected for measuring elemental carbon (EC) and fiber concentrations. Our study results showed that cutting Panel C with a band saw did not generate detectable emissions of fibers inspected by transmission electron microscopy but did increase the particle mass, number, and EC emission concentrations by 20–80 % compared to Panels A and B. Sanding operation performed on two Panel C resulted in fiber emission rates of 1.9 × 10{sup 8} and 2.8 × 10{sup 6} fibers per second (f/s), while no free aerosol fibers were detected from sanding Panels A and B containing no CNTs. These free CNT fibers may be a health concern. However, the analysis of particle and EC concentrations from these same samples cannot clearly indicate the presence of CNTs, because extraneous aerosol generation from machining the composite epoxy material increased the mass concentrations of the EC.

  12. Method for production of carbon nanofiber mat or carbon paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naskar, Amit K.

    2015-08-04

    Method for the preparation of a non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fibers, the method comprising carbonizing a non-woven mat or paper preform (precursor) comprised of a plurality of bonded sulfonated polyolefin fibers to produce said non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fibers. The preforms and resulting non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fiber, as well as articles and devices containing them, and methods for their use, are also described.

  13. Carbon fluxes in an acid rain impacted boreal headwater catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Anne; Hintze, Simone; Jankovec, Jakub; Sanda, Martin; Dusek, Jaromir; Vogel, Tomas; van Geldern, Robert; Barth, Johannes A. C.

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial carbon export via inland aquatic systems is a key process in the budget of the global carbon cycle. This includes loss of carbon to the atmosphere via gas evasion from rivers or reservoirs as well as carbon fixation in freshwater sediments. Headwater streams are the first endmembers of the transition of carbon between soils, groundwater and surface waters and the atmosphere. In order to quantify these processes the experimental catchment Uhlirska (1.78 km2) located in the northern Czech Republic was studied. Dissolved inorganic, dissolved organic and particulate organic carbon (DIC, DOC, POC) concentrations and isotopes were analyzed in ground-, soil -and stream waters between 2014 and 2015. In addition, carbon dioxide degassing was quantified via a stable isotope modelling approach. Results show a discharge-weighted total carbon export of 31.99 g C m‑2 yr‑1 of which CO2 degassing accounts 79 %. Carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) of DIC, DOC, and POC (in ‰ VPDB) ranged from -26.6 to -12.4 ‰ from -29.4 to -22.7 ‰ and from -30.6 to -26.6 ‰ respectively. The mean values for DIC are -21.8 ±3.8 ‰ -23.6 ±0.9 ‰ and -19.5 ±3.0 ‰ for soil, shallow ground and surface water compartments. For DOC, these compartments have mean values of -27.1 ±0.3 ‰ -27.0 ±0.8 ‰ and -27.4 ±0.7 ‰Ṁean POC value of shallow groundwaters and surface waters are -28.8 ±0.8 ‰ and -29.3 ±0.5 ‰ respectively. These isotope ranges indicate little turnover of organic material and predominant silicate weathering. The degassing of CO2 caused an enrichment of the δ13C-DIC values of up to 6.8 ‰ between a catchment gauge and the catchment outlet over a distance of 866 m. In addition, the Uhlirska catchment has only negligible natural sources of sulphate, yet SO42‑ accounts for 21 % of major stream water ions. This is most likely a remainder from acid rain impacts in the area.

  14. Hard Diffraction in Pythia 8

    CERN Document Server

    Rasmussen, Christine O

    2015-01-01

    We present an overview of the options for diffraction implemented in the general--purpose event generator Pythia 8. We review the existing model for low-- and high--mass soft diffraction and present a new model for hard diffraction in pp and ppbar collisions. Both models uses the Pomeron approach pioneered by Ingelman and Schlein, factorising the single diffractive cross section into a Pomeron flux and a Pomeron PDF. The model for hard diffraction is implemented as a part of the multiparton interactions framework, thereby introducing a dynamical rapidity gap survival probability that explicitly breaks factorisation.

  15. Advances in magnetic resonance 8

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 8 describes the magnetic resonance in spin polarization and saturation transfer. This book discusses the theory of chemically induced dynamic spin polarization; basic results for the radical-pair mechanism; and optical spin polarization in molecular crystals. The theory of optical electronic polarization (OEP); NMR in flowing systems; and applications of NMR in a flowing liquid are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the saturation transfer spectroscopy; studies of spin labels in the intermediate and fast motion regions; and spin-density matrix and

  16. CMB-8 material balance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the automated nondestructive assay (NDA) system installed at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) Group CMB-8 uranium recovery facility. A random driver (RD) is used to measure the 235U content of various solids while a uranium solution assay system (USAS) measures the 235U or total uranium content of solutions over a concentration range of a few ppM to 400 g/l. Both instruments are interfaced to and controlled by a single minicomputer. The measurement principles, mechanical specifications, system software description, and operational instructions are described

  17. Carbon nanofibers grafted on activated carbon as an electrode in high-power supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryglewicz, Grażyna; Śliwak, Agata; Béguin, François

    2013-08-01

    A hybrid electrode material for high-power supercapacitors was fabricated by grafting carbon nanofibers (CNFs) onto the surface of powdered activated carbon (AC) through catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). A uniform thin layer of disentangled CNFs with a herringbone structure was deposited on the carbon surface through the decomposition of propane at 450 °C over an AC-supported nickel catalyst. CNF coating was controlled by the reaction time and the nickel content. The superior CNF/AC composite displays excellent electrochemical performance in a 0.5 mol L(-1) solution of K2 SO4 due to its unique structure. At a high scan rate (100 mV s(-1) ) and current loading (20 A g(-1) ), the capacitance values were three- and fourfold higher than those for classical AC/carbon black composites. Owing to this feature, a high energy of 10 Wh kg(-1) was obtained over a wide power range in neutral medium at a voltage of 0.8 V. The significant enhancement of charge propagation is attributed to the presence of herringbone CNFs, which facilitate the diffusion of ions in the electrode and play the role of electronic bridges between AC particles. An in situ coating of AC with short CNFs (below 200 nm) is a very attractive method for producing the next generation of carbon composite materials with a high power performance in supercapacitors working in neutral medium. PMID:23794416

  18. Plumbing the global carbon cycle: Integrating inland waters into the terrestrial carbon budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, J.J.; Prairie, Y.T.; Caraco, N.F.; McDowell, W.H.; Tranvik, L.J.; Striegl, R.G.; Duarte, C.M.; Kortelainen, Pirkko; Downing, J.A.; Middelburg, J.J.; Melack, J.

    2007-01-01

    Because freshwater covers such a small fraction of the Earth's surface area, inland freshwater ecosystems (particularly lakes, rivers, and reservoirs) have rarely been considered as potentially important quantitative components of the carbon cycle at either global or regional scales. By taking published estimates of gas exchange, sediment accumulation, and carbon transport for a variety of aquatic systems, we have constructed a budget for the role of inland water ecosystems in the global carbon cycle. Our analysis conservatively estimates that inland waters annually receive, from a combination of background and anthropogenically altered sources, on the order of 1.9 Pg C y-1 from the terrestrial landscape, of which about 0.2 is buried in aquatic sediments, at least 0.8 (possibly much more) is returned to the atmosphere as gas exchange while the remaining 0.9 Pg y-1 is delivered to the oceans, roughly equally as inorganic and organic carbon. Thus, roughly twice as much C enters inland aquatic systems from land as is exported from land to the sea. Over prolonged time net carbon fluxes in aquatic systems tend to be greater per unit area than in much of the surrounding land. Although their area is small, these freshwater aquatic systems can affect regional C balances. Further, the inclusion of inland, freshwater ecosystems provides useful insight about the storage, oxidation and transport of terrestrial C, and may warrant a revision of how the modern net C sink on land is described. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  19. Carbon nanofibers grafted on activated carbon as an electrode in high-power supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryglewicz, Grażyna; Śliwak, Agata; Béguin, François

    2013-08-01

    A hybrid electrode material for high-power supercapacitors was fabricated by grafting carbon nanofibers (CNFs) onto the surface of powdered activated carbon (AC) through catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). A uniform thin layer of disentangled CNFs with a herringbone structure was deposited on the carbon surface through the decomposition of propane at 450 °C over an AC-supported nickel catalyst. CNF coating was controlled by the reaction time and the nickel content. The superior CNF/AC composite displays excellent electrochemical performance in a 0.5 mol L(-1) solution of K2 SO4 due to its unique structure. At a high scan rate (100 mV s(-1) ) and current loading (20 A g(-1) ), the capacitance values were three- and fourfold higher than those for classical AC/carbon black composites. Owing to this feature, a high energy of 10 Wh kg(-1) was obtained over a wide power range in neutral medium at a voltage of 0.8 V. The significant enhancement of charge propagation is attributed to the presence of herringbone CNFs, which facilitate the diffusion of ions in the electrode and play the role of electronic bridges between AC particles. An in situ coating of AC with short CNFs (below 200 nm) is a very attractive method for producing the next generation of carbon composite materials with a high power performance in supercapacitors working in neutral medium.

  20. Microwave absorption properties of helical carbon nanofibers-coated carbon fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Liu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Helical carbon nanofibers (HCNFs coated-carbon fibers (CFs were fabricated by catalytic chemical vapor deposition method. TEM and Raman spectroscopy characterizations indicate that the graphitic layers of the HCNFs changed from disorder to order after high temperature annealing. The electromagnetic parameters and microwave absorption properties were measured at 2–18 GHz. The maximum reflection loss is 32 dB at 9 GHz and the widest bandwidth under −10 dB is 9.8 GHz from 8.2 to 18 GHz for the unannealed HCNFs coated-CFs composite with 2.5 mm in thickness, suggesting that HCNFs coated-CFs should have potential applications in high performance microwave absorption materials.

  1. Catalytic graphitization of carbon/carbon composites by lanthanum oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Can; LU Guimin; SUN Ze; YU Jianguo

    2012-01-01

    Graphitized carbon/carbon composites were prepared by the process of catalytic graphitization with the rare-earth catalyst,lanthanum oxide (La2O3),in order to increase the degree of graphitization and reduce the electrical resistivity.The modified coal tar pitch and coal-based needle coke were used as carbon source,and a small amount of La2O3 was added to catalyze the graphitization of the disordered carbon materials.The effects of La2O3 catalyst on the graphitization degree and microstructure oftbe carbon/carbon composites were investigated by X-ray diffraction,scanning electron microscopy,and Raman spectroscopy.The results showed that La2O3 promoted the formation of more perfect and larger crystallites,and improved the electrical/mechanical properties of carbon/carbon composites.Carbon/carbon composites with a lower electrical resistivity (7.0 μΩ·m) could be prepared when adding 5 wt.% La2O3 powder with heating treatment at 2800 ℃.The catalytic effect of La2O3 for the graphitization of carbon/carbon composites was analyzed.

  2. Empirically Modeling Carbon Fluxes over the Northern Great Plains Grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Wylie, B. K.; Ji, L.; Gilmanov, T.; Tieszen, L. L.

    2007-12-01

    Grasslands cover nearly one-fifth of the global terrestrial surface and store most of their carbon below ground. The grassland ecosystem in the Great Plains occupies over 1.5 million km2 of land area and is the primary resource for livestock production in North America. However, the contributions of grasslands to local and regional carbon budgets remain uncertain due to the lack of carbon flux data for the expansive grassland ecosystems under various managements, land uses, and climate variability. A quantitative understanding of carbon fluxes across these systems is essential for developing regional, national, and global carbon budgets and providing guidance to policy makers and managers when substantial conversion to biofuels are implemented. Additionally, these estimates will provide insights into how the grassland ecosystem will respond to future climate and what systems are sustainable and offer net carbon sinks. This knowledge base and decisions support tools are needed for developing land management strategies for the region under a variety of environmental conditions and land use options. In the past, we used a remote sensing-based piecewise regression (PWR) model to estimate the grassland carbon fluxes in the northern Great Plains using the 1-km SPOT VEGETATION normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data. We estimated the carbon fluxes through integrated spatial databases and remotely sensed extrapolations of flux tower data to regional scales. The PWR model was applied to derive an empirical relationship between environmental variables and tower-based measurements. The PWR equations were then applied through time and space to estimate carbon fluxes across the study area at 1-km resolution. We now improve this modeling approach by 1) using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data with higher temporal, spatial, and spectral resolutions (8-day, 500-m, and 7-band) as input; 2) incorporating the actual vegetation evapotranspiration

  3. Alkali-metal intercalation in carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béguin, F.; Duclaux, L.; Méténier, K.; Frackowiak, E.; Salvetat, J. P.; Conard, J.; Bonnamy, S.; Lauginie, P.

    1999-09-01

    We report on successful intercalation of multiwall (MWNT) and single wall (SWNT) carbon nanotubes with alkali metals by electrochemical and vapor phase reactions. A LiC10 compound was produced by full electrochemical reduction of MWNT. KC8 and CsC8-MWNT first stage derivatives were synthesized in conditions of alkali vapor saturation. Their identity periods and the 2×2 R 0° alkali superlattice are comparable to their parent graphite compounds. The dysonian shape of KC8 EPR line and the temperature-independent Pauli susceptibility are both characteristic of a metallic behavior, which was confirmed by 13C NMR anisotropic shifts. Exposure of SWNT bundles to alkali vapor led to an increase of the pristine triangular lattice from 1.67 nm to 1.85 nm and 1.87 nm for potassium and rubidium, respectively.

  4. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Memos Regarding Some of the Hazards Associated with Engine-Driven Generators, 2004-2014 January 07, 2016 Non- ... Investigations Associated with Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide from Engine-Driven Generators and Other Engine-Driven Tools, 2004– ...

  5. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Wray, Alisa

    2016-01-01

    Audience: This oral boards case is appropriate for all emergency medicine learners (residents, interns, and medical students). Introduction: Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless and odorless gas that typically results from combustion. It binds hemoglobin, dissociating oxygen, causing headache, weakness, confusion and possible seizure or coma. Pulse oxygen levels may be falsely elevated. Practitioners should maintain a high in...

  6. Closing carbon cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patel, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Fossil fuels are used as raw materials for the manufacture of synthetic organic materials, e.g. plastics, fibres, synthetic rubber, paints, solvents, fertilisers, surfactants, lubricants and bitumen. Since fossil carbon is embodied in these products they may be particularly relevant to climate ch

  7. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Flickr SlideShare All Pages & Documents Recalls & News Releases Home Recalls CPSC Recall API Recall Lawsuits Recalls by ... CO Poster Contest Toy Recall Statistics Pool Safely Home / Safety Education / Safety Education Centers En Español Carbon ...

  8. Carbon nanotube solar cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Klinger

    Full Text Available We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabricate using a spray-paint technique. We observe that cells with a lower concentration of carbon nanotubes on the active semiconducting electrode perform better than cells with a higher concentration of nanotubes. This effect is contrary to the expectation that a larger number of nanotubes would lead to more photoconversion and therefore more power generation. We attribute this to the presence of metallic nanotubes that provide a short for photo-excited electrons, bypassing the load. We demonstrate optimization strategies that improve cell efficiency by orders of magnitude. Once it is possible to make semiconducting-only carbon nanotube films, that may provide the greatest efficiency improvement.

  9. Skallerup Klit's carbon footprint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zacho, Kristina Overgaard; Ørnstrup, Niels Holm; Zimmermann, Tine Marquard;

    by offsetting and without making actual emission reductions. Therefore the purpose of this study is to present recommendations on how Skallerup Klit can build up their business strategy using Carbon Footprint (CFP) as a tool. The CPF is calculated and assessed by using financial data in an Input-output LCA...

  10. Polyimide/carbon Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Frank W.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this product is to design and characterize well-defined conductive nanocomposite materials. The materials will be composed of a polymer matrix composed of rigid-backbone polyimides, and will be filled with modified or unmodified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). The ultimate design of this project is to create composite materials with optical clarity and a high conductivity.

  11. City Carbon Footprint Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangwu Chen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Progressive cities worldwide have demonstrated political leadership by initiating meaningful strategies and actions to tackle climate change. However, the lack of knowledge concerning embodied greenhouse gas (GHG emissions of cities has hampered effective mitigation. We analyse trans-boundary GHG emission transfers between five Australian cities and their trading partners, with embodied emission flows broken down into major economic sectors. We examine intercity carbon footprint (CF networks and disclose a hierarchy of responsibility for emissions between cities and regions. Allocations of emissions to households, businesses and government and the carbon efficiency of expenditure have been analysed to inform mitigation policies. Our findings indicate that final demand in the five largest cities in Australia accounts for more than half of the nation’s CF. City households are responsible for about two thirds of the cities’ CFs; the rest can be attributed to government and business consumption and investment. The city network flows highlight that over half of emissions embodied in imports (EEI to the five cities occur overseas. However, a hierarchy of GHG emissions reveals that overseas regions also outsource emissions to Australian cities such as Perth. We finally discuss the implications of our findings on carbon neutrality, low-carbon city concepts and strategies and allocation of subnational GHG responsibility.

  12. Bioenergy, the Carbon Cycle, and Carbon Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammen, D. M.

    2003-12-01

    The evolving energy and land-use policies across North America and Africa provide critical case studies in the relationship between regional development, the management of natural resources, and the carbon cycle. Over 50 EJ of the roughly 430 EJ total global anthropogenic energy budget is currently utilized in the form of direct biomass combustion. In North America 3 - 4 percent of total energy is derived from biomass, largely in combined heat and power (CHP) combustion applications. By contrast Africa, which is a major consumer of 'traditional' forms of biomass, uses far more total bioenergy products, but largely in smaller batches, with quantities of 0.5 - 2 tons/capita at the household level. Several African nations rely on biomass for well over 90 percent of household energy, and in some nations major portions of the industrial energy supply is also derived from biomass. In much of sub-Saharan Africa the direct combustion of biomass in rural areas is exceeded by the conversion of wood to charcoal for transport to the cities for household use there. There are major health, and environmental repercussions of these energy flows. The African, as well as Latin American and Asian charcoal trade has a noticeable signature on the global greenhouse gas cycles. In North America, and notably Scandinavia and India as well, biomass energy and emerging conversion technologies are being actively researched, and provide tremendous opportunities for the evolution of a sustainable, locally based, energy economy for many nations. This talk will examine aspects of these current energy and carbon flows, and the potential that gassification and new silvicultural practices hold for clean energy systems in the 21st century. North America and Africa will be examined in particular as both sources of innovation in this field, and areas with specific promise for application of these energy technologies and biomass/land use practices to further energy and global climate management.

  13. Realistic costs of carbon capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Juaied, Mohammed (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (US). Belfer Center for Science and International Affiaris); Whitmore, Adam (Hydrogen Energy International Ltd., Weybridge (GB))

    2009-07-01

    There is a growing interest in carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a means of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However there are substantial uncertainties about the costs of CCS. Costs for pre-combustion capture with compression (i.e. excluding costs of transport and storage and any revenue from EOR associated with storage) are examined in this discussion paper for First-of-a-Kind (FOAK) plant and for more mature technologies, or Nth-of-a-Kind plant (NOAK). For FOAK plant using solid fuels the levelised cost of electricity on a 2008 basis is approximately 10 cents/kWh higher with capture than for conventional plants (with a range of 8-12 cents/kWh). Costs of abatement are found typically to be approximately US$150/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$120-180/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants the additional cost of electricity with capture is approximately 2-5 cents/kWh, with costs of the range of US$35-70/tCO2 avoided. Costs of abatement with carbon capture for other fuels and technologies are also estimated for NOAK plants. The costs of abatement are calculated with reference to conventional SCPC plant for both emissions and costs of electricity. Estimates for both FOAK and NOAK are mainly based on cost data from 2008, which was at the end of a period of sustained escalation in the costs of power generation plant and other large capital projects. There are now indications of costs falling from these levels. This may reduce the costs of abatement and costs presented here may be 'peak of the market' estimates. If general cost levels return, for example, to those prevailing in 2005 to 2006 (by which time significant cost escalation had already occurred from previous levels), then costs of capture and compression for FOAK plants are expected to be US$110/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$90-135/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants costs are expected to be US$25-50/tCO2. Based on these considerations a likely representative range of costs of abatement from CCS

  14. Carbon nanotube macroelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jialu

    In this dissertation, I discuss the application of carbon nanotubes in macroelectronis. Due to the extraordinary electrical properties such as high intrinsic carrier mobility and current-carrying capacity, single wall carbon nanotubes are very desirable for thin-film transistor (TFT) applications such as flat panel display, transparent electronics, as well as flexible and stretchable electronics. Compared with other popular channel material for TFTs, namely amorphous silicon, polycrystalline silicon and organic materials, nanotube thin-films have the advantages of low-temperature processing compatibility, transparency, and flexibility, as well as high device performance. In order to demonstrate scalable, practical carbon nanotube macroelectroncis, I have developed a platform to fabricate high-density, uniform separated nanotube based thin-film transistors. In addition, many other essential analysis as well as technology components, such as nanotube film density control, purity and diameter dependent semiconducting nanotube electrical performance study, air-stable n-type transistor fabrication, and CMOS integration platform have also been demonstrated. On the basis of the above achievement, I have further demonstrated various kinds of applications including AMOLED display electronics, PMOS and CMOS logic circuits, flexible and transparent electronics. The dissertation is structured as follows. First, chapter 1 gives a brief introduction to the electronic properties of carbon nanotubes, which serves as the background knowledge for the following chapters. In chapter 2, I will present our approach of fabricating wafer-scale uniform semiconducting carbon nanotube thin-film transistors and demonstrate their application in display electronics and logic circuits. Following that, more detailed information about carbon nanotube thin-film transistor based active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays is discussed in chapter 3. And in chapter 4, a technology to

  15. SAPHIRE 8 Software Project Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis L.Smith; Ted S. Wood

    2010-03-01

    This project is being conducted at the request of the DOE and the NRC. The INL has been requested by the NRC to improve and maintain the Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluation (SAPHIRE) tool set concurrent with the changing needs of the user community as well as staying current with new technologies. Successful completion will be upon NRC approved release of all software and accompanying documentation in a timely fashion. This project will enhance the SAPHIRE tool set for the user community (NRC, Nuclear Power Plant operations, Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA) model developers) by providing improved Common Cause Failure (CCF), External Events, Level 2, and Significance Determination Process (SDP) analysis capabilities. The SAPHIRE development team at the Idaho National Laboratory is responsible for successful completion of this project. The project is under the supervision of Curtis L. Smith, PhD, Technical Lead for the SAPHIRE application. All current capabilities from SAPHIRE version 7 will be maintained in SAPHIRE 8. The following additional capabilities will be incorporated: • Incorporation of SPAR models for the SDP interface. • Improved quality assurance activities for PRA calculations of SAPHIRE Version 8. • Continue the current activities for code maintenance, documentation, and user support for the code.

  16. Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth J. Nemeth

    2006-08-30

    The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership's (SECARB) Phase I program focused on promoting the development of a framework and infrastructure necessary for the validation and commercial deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. The SECARB program, and its subsequent phases, directly support the Global Climate Change Initiative's goal of reducing greenhouse gas intensity by 18 percent by the year 2012. Work during the project's two-year period was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix''. The SECARB team was successful in accomplishing its tasks to define the geographic boundaries of the region; characterize the region; identify and address issues for technology deployment; develop public involvement and education mechanisms; identify the most promising capture, sequestration, and transport options; and prepare action plans for implementation and technology validation activity. Milestones accomplished during Phase I of the project are listed below: (1) Completed preliminary identification of geographic boundaries for the study (FY04, Quarter 1); (2) Completed initial inventory of major sources and sinks for the region (FY04, Quarter 2); (3) Completed initial development of plans for GIS (FY04, Quarter 3); (4) Completed preliminary action plan and assessment for overcoming public perception issues (FY04, Quarter 4); (5) Assessed safety, regulatory and permitting issues (FY05, Quarter 1); (6) Finalized inventory of major sources/sinks and refined GIS algorithms (FY05, Quarter 2); (7) Refined public involvement and education mechanisms in support of technology development options (FY05, Quarter 3); and (8) Identified the most promising capture, sequestration and transport options and prepared action plans (FY05, Quarter 4).

  17. Carbon sinks in temperate forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, P.H.; Nabuurs, G.J.; Aubinet, M.; Karjalainen, T.; Vine, E.L.; Kinsman, J.; Heath, L.S.

    2001-01-01

    In addition to being scientifically exciting, commercially important, and environmentally essential, temperate forests have also become a key diplomatic item in international climate negotiations as potential sinks for carbon. This review presents the methods used to estimate carbon sequestration, i

  18. Carbon Monoxide (CO) Poisoning Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Carbon Monoxide (CO) Poisoning Prevention Language: English Español (Spanish) ... tornadoes), using alternative sources of power can cause carbon monoxide (CO) to build up in a home ...

  19. Dewatering Peat With Activated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohatgi, N. K.

    1984-01-01

    Proposed process produces enough gas and carbon to sustain itself. In proposed process peat slurry is dewatered to approximately 40 percent moisture content by mixing slurry with activated carbon and filtering with solid/liquid separation techniques.

  20. ROE Carbon Storage - Percent Change

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This polygon dataset depicts the percentage change in the amount of carbon stored in forests in counties across the United States, based on the difference in carbon...

  1. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  2. Templated Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siochik Emilie J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of growing carbon nanotubes uses a synthesized mesoporous si lica template with approximately cylindrical pores being formed there in. The surfaces of the pores are coated with a carbon nanotube precu rsor, and the template with the surfaces of the pores so-coated is th en heated until the carbon nanotube precursor in each pore is convert ed to a carbon nanotube.

  3. Carbon balance in Mediterranean ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, Alexandra Cristina Pires

    2013-01-01

    Forests play an important role in climate change mitigation as they sequester and store carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere. The aim of this thesis was to investigate forest carbon balance in its main compartments: tress, understory and soils. We present methods to estimate carbon stock in biomass of stone pine stands in south Portugal. Allometric models, as well as conversion and expansion factors were presented allowing the quantification of stand carbon stocks irrespect...

  4. Responsibility, opportunity, and vision for higher education in urban and regional carbon management

    OpenAIRE

    Schienke Erich W; Canan Penelope

    2006-01-01

    Abstract This is a summary of the conversation among scholars attending the special session on "Responsibility, Opportunity, and Vision for Higher Education in Urban and Regional Carbon Management" at the First International Conference on Carbon Management at Urban and Regional Levels: Connecting Development Decisions to Global Issues in Mexico City Sept. 4–8, 2006. It includes The Declaration for Carbon Management Education, agreed upon by the participants. Obstacles to such a vision were di...

  5. ORGANIC CHELATING REAGENT ON REDOX ADSORPTION OF ACTIVATED CARBON FIBER TOWARDS Au3+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Organic chelating reagent influences upon the redox adsorption of activated carbon fibertowards Au3- were systematically investigated. The experimental results indicated that the presenceof organic chelating reagent on activated carbon fiber strongly affects adsorption capacity ofactivated carbon fiber towards Au3+. The reduction-adsorption amount of Au3+ increased three timesby the presence of 8-quinolinol. Furthermore, The reduction-adsorption amount of Au3+ depended onthe pH value of adsorption and temperature.

  6. Carbon Nanotube-Based Permeable Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, J K; Park, H G; Bakajin, O; Noy, A; Huser, T; Eaglesham, D

    2004-04-06

    A membrane of multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded in a silicon nitride matrix was fabricated for use in studying fluid mechanics on the nanometer scale. Characterization by fluorescent tracer diffusion and scanning electron microscopy suggests that the membrane is void-free near the silicon substrate on which it rests, implying that the hollow core of the nanotube is the only conduction path for molecular transport. Assuming Knudsen diffusion through this nanotube membrane, a maximum helium transport rate (for a pressure drop of 1 atm) of 0.25 cc/sec is predicted. Helium flow measurements of a nanoporous silicon nitride membrane, fabricated by sacrificial removal of carbon, give a flow rate greater than 1x10{sup -6} cc/sec. For viscous, laminar flow conditions, water is estimated to flow across the nanotube membrane (under a 1 atm pressure drop) at up to 2.8x10{sup -5} cc/sec (1.7 {micro}L/min).

  7. Corrosion of carbon-alloyed iron aluminides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Sen; R Balasubramaniam; A V Ramesh Kumar

    2000-10-01

    The corrosion behaviour of two carbon-alloyed intermetallics of composition Fe–28.1Al–2.1C and Fe–27.5Al–3.7C has been studied and compared with that of binary intermetallics. Potentiodynamic polarization studies indicated that the intermetallics exhibited active–passive behaviour in an acidic solution of pH = 1, whereas they exhibited stable passivity in a buffer solution of pH 8.4. Corrosion rates were also obtained by immersion testing. The variation of corrosion rate as a function of time was similar for both the intermetallics. The variation in corrosion rate as a function of time has been explained based on the observed potentiodynamic polarization behaviour. Scanning electron microscopy of corroded surfaces indicated that the carbon-alloyed intermetallics were susceptible to galvanic corrosion, due to the presence of carbides.

  8. 4,6,8-Triarylquinoline-3-carbaldehyde Derivatives: Synthesis and Photophysical Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Malose Jack Mphahlele; Adewale Olufunsho Adeloye

    2013-01-01

    Palladium catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling of 6,8-dibromo-4-chloroquinoline-3-carbaldehyde with arylboronic and arylvinylboronic acid derivatives in the presence of potassium carbonate in aqueous dioxane afforded the corresponding 4,6,8-triarylquinoline-3-carbaldehydes, exclusively. These products were transformed into 4,6,8-triaryl-3-(4-fluorophenyl)amino)-N-(quinolin-3-yl)methylenes and their 4,6,8-triaryl-quinoline-3-methanol derivatives. The absorption and emission spectra were me...

  9. [Carbon emissions and low-carbon regulation countermeasures of land use change in the city and town concentrated area of central Liaoning Province, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Feng-ming; Liang, Wen-juan; Niu, Ming-fen; Wang, Jiao-yue

    2016-02-01

    Carbon emissions due to land use change have an important impact on global climate change. Adjustment of regional land use patterns has a great scientific significance to adaptation to a changing climate. Based on carbon emission/absorption parameters suitable for Liaoning Province, this paper estimated the carbon emission of land use change in the city and town concentrated area of central Liaoning Province. The results showed that the carbon emission and absorption were separately 308.51 Tg C and 11.64 Tg C from 1997 to 2010. It meant 3.8% of carbon emission. was offset by carbon absorption. Among the 296.87 Tg C net carbon emission of land use change, carbon emission of remaining land use type was 182.24 Tg C, accounting for 61.4% of the net carbon emission, while the carbon emission of land use transformation was 114.63 Tg C, occupying the rest 38.6% of net carbon emission. Through quantifying the mapping relationship between land use change and carbon emission, it was shown that during 1997-2004 the contributions of remaining construction land (40.9%) and cropland transform ation to construction land (40.6%) to carbon emission were larger, but the greater contributions to carbon absorption came from cropland transformation to forest land (38.6%) and remaining forest land (37.5%). During 2004-2010, the land use types for carbon emission and absorption were the same to the period of 1997-2004, but the contribution of remaining construction land to carbon emission increased to 80.6%, and the contribution of remaining forest land to carbon absorption increased to 71.7%. Based on the carbon emission intensity in different land use types, we put forward the low-carbon regulation countermeasures of land use in two aspects. In carbon emission reduction, we should strict control land transformation to construction land, increase the energy efficiency of construction land, and avoid excessive development of forest land and water. In carbon sink increase, we should

  10. [Carbon emissions and low-carbon regulation countermeasures of land use change in the city and town concentrated area of central Liaoning Province, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Feng-ming; Liang, Wen-juan; Niu, Ming-fen; Wang, Jiao-yue

    2016-02-01

    Carbon emissions due to land use change have an important impact on global climate change. Adjustment of regional land use patterns has a great scientific significance to adaptation to a changing climate. Based on carbon emission/absorption parameters suitable for Liaoning Province, this paper estimated the carbon emission of land use change in the city and town concentrated area of central Liaoning Province. The results showed that the carbon emission and absorption were separately 308.51 Tg C and 11.64 Tg C from 1997 to 2010. It meant 3.8% of carbon emission. was offset by carbon absorption. Among the 296.87 Tg C net carbon emission of land use change, carbon emission of remaining land use type was 182.24 Tg C, accounting for 61.4% of the net carbon emission, while the carbon emission of land use transformation was 114.63 Tg C, occupying the rest 38.6% of net carbon emission. Through quantifying the mapping relationship between land use change and carbon emission, it was shown that during 1997-2004 the contributions of remaining construction land (40.9%) and cropland transform ation to construction land (40.6%) to carbon emission were larger, but the greater contributions to carbon absorption came from cropland transformation to forest land (38.6%) and remaining forest land (37.5%). During 2004-2010, the land use types for carbon emission and absorption were the same to the period of 1997-2004, but the contribution of remaining construction land to carbon emission increased to 80.6%, and the contribution of remaining forest land to carbon absorption increased to 71.7%. Based on the carbon emission intensity in different land use types, we put forward the low-carbon regulation countermeasures of land use in two aspects. In carbon emission reduction, we should strict control land transformation to construction land, increase the energy efficiency of construction land, and avoid excessive development of forest land and water. In carbon sink increase, we should

  11. Northern peatland carbon stocks and dynamics: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Yu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Here I review different approaches and associated uncertainties of estimates in the literature of carbon stocks and found that there is most likely 500 (± 100 range gigatons of carbon (Gt C in northern peatlands. The greatest uncertainty for all the approaches is the lack or insufficient representation of data, including depth, bulk density and carbon accumulation data, especially from the world's large peatlands. Several ways to improve estimates of peat carbon stocks were also discussed in this paper. Changes in peatland carbon stocks over time, estimated using Sphagnum (peat moss spore data and down-core peat accumulation records, show different patterns during the Holocene. Considering long-term peat decomposition using peat accumulation data allows estimates of net carbon sequestration rates by peatlands, or net ecosystem carbon balance (NECB, which indicates more than half of peat carbon (> 270 Gt C was sequestrated before 7000 yr ago during the Holocene. Contemporary carbon flux studies at 5 peatland sites show much larger NECB during the last decade (32 ± 7.8 (S.E. g C m−2 yr−1 than during the last 7000 yr (~ 11 g C m−2 yr−1 as modeled from peat records across northern peatlands. This discrepancy highlights the urgent need for carbon accumulation data and process understanding, especially at decadal and centennial timescales, that would bridge current knowledge gaps and facilitate comparisons of NECB across all timescales.

  12. Apparatus for producing carbon-coated nanoparticles and carbon nanospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, W. Lee; Weigle, John C.; Phillips, Jonathan

    2015-10-20

    An apparatus for producing carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles comprising a container for entraining particles in an aerosol gas, providing an inlet for carbon-containing gas, providing an inlet for plasma gas, a proximate torch for mixing the aerosol gas, the carbon-containing gas, and the plasma gas, bombarding the mixed gases with microwaves, and providing a collection device for gathering the resulting carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles. Also disclosed is a method and apparatus for making hollow carbon nano- or micro-scale spheres.

  13. Designing carbon markets, Part II: Carbon markets in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper analyses the design of carbon markets in space (i.e., geographically). It is part of a twin set of papers that, starting from first principles, ask what an optimal global carbon market would look like by around 2030. Our focus is on firm-level cap-and-trade systems, although much of what we say would also apply to government-level trading and carbon offset schemes. We examine the 'first principles' of spatial design to maximise flexibility and to minimise costs, including key design issues in linking national and regional carbon markets together to create a global carbon market.

  14. Green Carbon : The role of natural forests in carbon storage

    OpenAIRE

    Keith, Heather; Lindenmayer, David B; Mackey, Brendan; Berry, Sandra L.

    2008-01-01

    The colour of carbon matters. Green carbon is the carbon stored in the plants and soil of natural ecosystems and is a vital part of the global carbon cycle. This report is the first in a series that examines the role of natural forests in the storage of carbon, the impacts of human land use activities, and the implications for climate change policy nationally and internationally. REDD (“reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation”) is now part of the agenda for the “Bali Action Plan...

  15. Wool Research Makes Carbon Headway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    A collective of woolgrowers, scientists and carbon specialists the Wool Carbon Alliance (WCA) has reviewed the latest research role in the natural carbon cycle, from woolgrowing properties around the globe known as on wool's to homes around the globe .

  16. Carbon dioxide as a carbon source in organic transformation: carbon-carbon bond forming reactions by transition-metal catalysts.

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuji, Yasushi; Fujihara, Tetsuaki

    2012-01-01

    Recent carbon-carbon bond forming reactions of carbon dioxide with alkenes, alkynes, dienes, aryl zinc compounds, aryl boronic esters, aryl halides, and arenes having acidic C-H bonds are reviewed in which transition-metal catalysts play an important role.

  17. Carbon nanotube junctions and devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, H.W.Ch.

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis Postma presents transport experiments performed on individual single-wall carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes are molecules entirely made of carbon atoms. The electronic properties are determined by the exact symmetry of the nanotube lattice, resulting in either metallic or semiconduct

  18. Guideposts for Low Carbon Finance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author proposes four guideposts for efficient low carbon finance: remove subsidies for high-carbon technologies, improve the cost-effectiveness of low-carbon subsidies, encourage private sector innovation and maintain transparent public policy tools that support cost-benefit accounting

  19. CARBON IN FORESTS: QUALITY MATTERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nature of carbon in forests is discussed from the perspective of carbon sequestration and global climate change. Carbon inventories, specifically in the area of land use and forestry are reviewed for the Pacific Northwest. Areas vulnerable to climate change with respect to ca...

  20. Carbon Sequestration in Agricultural Soils

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to improve the knowledge base for facilitating investments in land management technologies that sequester soil organic carbon. While there are many studies on soil carbon sequestration, there is no single unifying volume that synthesizes knowledge on the impact of different land management practices on soil carbon sequestration rates across the world. A meta-a...

  1. Low Carbon Development of Hainan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Feng; Kun, Zhang

    With the construction of Hainan international tourism island rising to a national strategy level, the green growth pattern based on low carbon objectives will become a significant part in the development of Hainan's economy. In this paper, low carbon electric power system and differentiation service will be discussed, and some opinions were brought up to have a good impact on Hainan's low carbon development.

  2. Carbon isotope excursions across the Permian-Triassic boundary in the Meishan section, Zhejiang Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Both gradual and sharp decrease in organic and carbonate carbon isotope values were detected across the Permian-Triassic boundary in the Meishan section, Changxing, Zhejiang Province, China. The gradual decrease in organic carbon isotope values started at the bottom of Bed 23, coinciding with the strong oscillations of total organic carbon (TOC) contents, indicates increasing fluxes from carbonate to organic carbon reservoir during this interval. A 2.3‰ sharp drop of inorganic carbon isotope values occurred at the uppermost part of Bed 24e. A 3.7‰ sharp drop of organic carbon isotope values occurred in Bed 26. The dramatic drop of inorganic carbon isotope value of 8‰ reported previously is not confirmed from the unweathered carbonate samples in Bed 27. The large-scale fluctuation of organic carbon isotope values in the Yinkeng Formation reflects different extent of mixing of marine and terrestrial organic matters. The gradual depletion and subsequent sharp drop of carbon isotopes near the Permian-Triassic boundary might indicate complex causes of the end-Permian mass extinction.

  3. Inter-laboratory validation of procedures for measuring 8-oxo-7,8-dihydrooxoguanine/8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2`-deoxyguanosine in DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collins, A.R.; Gedik, C.M.; Wood, S.;

    2002-01-01

    The aim of ESCODD, a European Commission funded Concerted Action, is to improve the precision and accuracy of methods for measuring 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoGua) or the nucleoside (8-oxodG). On two occasions, participating laboratories received samples of different concentrations of 8-oxodG...

  4. Electrical transport in carbon nanotube coatings of silica fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ksenevich, Vitaly [Department of Physics, Belarus State University, Nezalezhnastsi ave. 4, 220030 Minsk (Belarus); Dauzhenka, Taras [Department of Physics, Belarus State University, Nezalezhnastsi ave. 4, 220030 Minsk (Belarus); CNRS; LNCMI, 143 Avenue de Rangueil, 31400 Toulouse (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INSA; LNCMI; 31077 Toulouse (France); Seliuta, Dalius; Kasalynas, Irmantas; Kivaras, Tomas; Valusis, Gintaras [Semiconductor Physics Institute, A. Gostauto 11, 01108 Vilnius (Lithuania); Galibert, Jean [CNRS; LNCMI, 143 Avenue de Rangueil, 31400 Toulouse (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INSA; LNCMI; 31077 Toulouse (France); Helburn, Robin [Department of Chemistry, Pace University, New York, NY 10038 (United States); Lu, Qi [Department of Physics, St. John' s University, Queens, NY 11439 (United States); Samuilov, Vladimir [Department of Physics, Belarus State University, Nezalezhnastsi ave. 4, 220030 Minsk (Belarus); Department of Physics, St. John' s University, Queens, NY 11439 (United States); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, LNCMP, 31077 Toulouse (France)

    2009-12-15

    Electrical properties and magnetoresistance (MR) of single-wall carbon nanotubes coatings of silica fibers were investigated in temperature range 1.8-300 K and magnetic fields up to 8 T. The dependence of resistance vs temperature, R (T), and MR within the range of 2{proportional_to}8 K can be explained by a 3D variable range hopping transport. In the temperature range of 8-300 K, R (T) dependencies can be interpreted by fluctuation-induced tunnelling model. The determined carrier transport features were supported by additional measurements of change in conductivity in strong 10 GHz microwave fields and measurements of THz radiation induced photocurrent at various lattice temperatures. The features of carrier transport in SWCNTs-SiO{sub 2} coatings are compared with those in free-standing single walled carbon nanotube fibers. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. Accelerated carbonation of brucite in mine tailings for carbon sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Anna L; Power, Ian M; Dipple, Gregory M

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric CO(2) is sequestered within ultramafic mine tailings via carbonation of Mg-bearing minerals. The rate of carbon sequestration at some mine sites appears to be limited by the rate of CO(2) supply. If carbonation of bulk tailings were accelerated, large mines may have the capacity to sequester millions of tonnes of CO(2) annually, offsetting mine emissions. The effect of supplying elevated partial pressures of CO(2) (pCO(2)) at 1 atm total pressure, on the carbonation rate of brucite [Mg(OH)(2)], a tailings mineral, was investigated experimentally with conditions emulating those at Mount Keith Nickel Mine (MKM), Western Australia. Brucite was carbonated to form nesquehonite [MgCO(3) · 3H(2)O] at a rate that increased linearly with pCO(2). Geochemical modeling indicated that HCO(3)(-) promoted dissolution accelerated brucite carbonation. Isotopic and aqueous chemistry data indicated that equilibrium between CO(2) in the gas and aqueous phases was not attained during carbonation, yet nesquehonite precipitation occurred at equilibrium. This implies CO(2) uptake into solution remains rate-limiting for brucite carbonation at elevated pCO(2), providing potential for further acceleration. Accelerated brucite carbonation at MKM offers the potential to offset annual mine emissions by ~22-57%. Recognition of mechanisms for brucite carbonation will guide ongoing work to accelerate Mg-silicate carbonation in tailings. PMID:22770473

  6. Carbon dioxide conversion over carbon-based nanocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavarian, Mehrnoush; Chai, Siang-Piao; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2013-07-01

    The utilization of carbon dioxide for the production of valuable chemicals via catalysts is one of the efficient ways to mitigate the greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. It is known that the carbon dioxide conversion and product yields are still low even if the reaction is operated at high pressure and temperature. The carbon dioxide utilization and conversion provides many challenges in exploring new concepts and opportunities for development of unique catalysts for the purpose of activating the carbon dioxide molecules. In this paper, the role of carbon-based nanocatalysts in the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide and direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate from carbon dioxide and methanol are reviewed. The current catalytic results obtained with different carbon-based nanocatalysts systems are presented and how these materials contribute to the carbon dioxide conversion is explained. In addition, different strategies and preparation methods of nanometallic catalysts on various carbon supports are described to optimize the dispersion of metal nanoparticles and catalytic activity. PMID:23901504

  7. Erosion of soil organic carbon: implications for carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Oost, Kristof; Van Hemelryck, Hendrik; Harden, Jennifer W.

    2009-01-01

    Agricultural activities have substantially increased rates of soil erosion and deposition, and these processes have a significant impact on carbon (C) mineralization and burial. Here, we present a synthesis of erosion effects on carbon dynamics and discuss the implications of soil erosion for carbon sequestration strategies. We demonstrate that for a range of data-based parameters from the literature, soil erosion results in increased C storage onto land, an effect that is heterogeneous on the landscape and is variable on various timescales. We argue that the magnitude of the erosion term and soil carbon residence time, both strongly influenced by soil management, largely control the strength of the erosion-induced sink. In order to evaluate fully the effects of soil management strategies that promote carbon sequestration, a full carbon account must be made that considers the impact of erosion-enhanced disequilibrium between carbon inputs and decomposition, including effects on net primary productivity and decomposition rates.

  8. Microbial Carbon Pump ---A New Mechanism for Long-Term Carbon Storage in the Global Ocean (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, N.; Azam, F.; McP Working Group; Scor Wg134

    2010-12-01

    Marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) reservoir, containing carbon equivalent to the total carbon inventory of atmospheric CO2, is an important issue in understanding the role of the ocean in climate change. The known biological mechanism for oceanic carbon sequestration is the biological pump, which depends on vertical transportation of carbon either through particulate organic matter (POM) sedimentation or DOM export by mixing and downwelling. Both the POM and the DOM are subject to microbial mineralization and most of the organic carbon will be returned to dissolved inorganic carbon within a few decades. Only a small fraction of the POM escapes mineralization and reaches the sediment where organic carbon can be buried and stored for thousands and even millions of years. The efficiency of the biological pump is currently the basic measure of the ocean’s ability to store biologically fixed carbon. However, the production and fate of the large pool of recalcitrant DOM with an averaged turnover time of 4000-6000 thousands of years in the water column has not been adequately considered to date. Marine microbes essentially monopolize the utilization of DOM. Although their diverse adaptive strategies for using newly fixed carbon are well known, major gaps exist in our knowledge on how they interact with the large pool of DOM that appears to be recalcitrant. This is an important problem, as DOM molecules that are not degraded for extended periods of time constitute carbon storage in the ocean. A newly proposed concept - the “microbial carbon pump (MCP)” (NATURE REVIEWS Microbiology 2010.8:593-599) (also see diagram below) provides a formalized focus on the significance of microbial processes in carbon storage in the recalcitrant DOM reservoir, and a framework for testing hypotheses on the sources and sinks of DOM and the underlying biogeochemical mechanisms. The MCP, through concessive processing of DOM, transforms some organic carbon from the reactive DOM pools

  9. Elaboration of a new hydrogen peroxide biosensor using microperoxidase 8 (MP8) immobilized on a polypyrrole coated electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korri-Youssoufi, H. [Institut de Chimie Moleculaire et Materiaux d' Orsay, ECBB, UMR-CNRS 8182, Batiment 420, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)], E-mail: hafsakorri@icmo.u-psud.fr; Desbenoit, N.; Ricoux, R.; Mahy, J.-P. [Institut de Chimie Moleculaire et Materiaux d' Orsay, ECBB, UMR-CNRS 8182, Batiment 420, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Lecomte, S. [LADIR, CNRS/UPMC, UMR 7075, 2 rue Henri Dunant, F-94320 Thiais (France)

    2008-07-01

    A novel strategy for elaborating a new biosensor for hydrogen peroxide has been developed by combining the known properties of microperoxidase 8 (MP8) as an oxidation catalyst, and the interesting properties of conducting polypyrrole as a supporting matrix to allow a good bioelectrochemical interface and a large dispersion of MP8 on the modified glassy carbon electrode. MP8 was immobilized into the conducting polypyrrole by entrapment during the electrochemical polymerization, and the modified electrode was characterized both by electrochemical and FT-IR measurements. We demonstrated that MP8 could be immobilized into polypyrrole and could undergo an efficient electron transfer. The obtained modified electrode showed a high catalytic activity toward H{sub 2}O{sub 2} without the need for an electron mediator. A linear calibration curve was obtained by amperometric measurement at a potential of - 0.1 V/ECS for concentrations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ranging from 1 to 10 {mu}M. The detection limit obtained was 1 nM which constituted a real improvement, by about three orders of magnitude, when compared to the values reported for other systems using an electrochemical detection.

  10. Fabrication, structure, and electron emission of single carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gongpu

    electronic properties of a single nanotube. We found that the work function of the carbon nanotube was reduced from 4.8 eV to 3.7 eV by Cs doping.

  11. Ecosystem-Level Carbon Stocks in Costa Rican Mangrove Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, M.

    2012-12-01

    represent 38 to 43% of the total ecosystem carbon stocks measured in the Indo-Pacific region, which are among the most carbon-rich ecosystems in the world. Overall, the mangrove forest in the Térraba-Sierpe National Wetland contain close to 8 Tg C, which represents approximately 40% of all carbon currently stored nationwide in mangrove stands. Although deforestation and forest degradation processes have been, for the most part, controlled in the country, available data suggest that between 1990 and 2012 Costa Rica lost almost 4000 ha (8 % of currently remaining area) of mangrove forests. This translates in historical emissions of 1.6 Tg C, which is equivalent to 1.3 times the greenhouse gas emissions from the entire land use sector in Costa Rica in the 1990s. This calculation provides an indication of the potential recovery of carbon stocks which mangrove restoration efforts may offer in the country. Expanding this research to other Central American countries, and analyzing the historical land use dynamics along coastal areas together with the potential impacts of climate change on these ecosystems would yield similar region-wide estimates of greenhouse gas emissions and mitigation potential that could be used to improve the design of climate change mitigation projects in coastal areas.

  12. 77 FR 64468 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India: Final Affirmative Countervailing Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    ...; Countervailing Duties, 62 FR 27296, 27323 (May 19, 1997), and Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From... Countervailing Duty Determination: Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From Argentina, 66 FR 37007... Concrete Steel Wire Strand From India, 68 FR 68356 (December 8, 2003). We determine the...

  13. 77 FR 50613 - Didecyl Dimethyl Ammonium Carbonate and Didecyl Dimethyl Ammonium Bicarbonate; Exemption From the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Didecyl Dimethyl Ammonium Carbonate and Didecyl Dimethyl Ammonium Bicarbonate... Didecyl Dimethyl Ammonium Carbonate and Didecyl Dimethyl Ammonium Bicarbonate, jointly referred to as.... Background and Statutory Findings In the Federal Register of December 8, 2011 (76 FR 76674) (FRL-...

  14. 75 FR 21658 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Trinidad and Tobago

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    ... amended, 67 FR 68036 (Nov. 8, 2002). In accordance with sections 201.16(c) and 207.3 of the Commission's... COMMISSION Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Trinidad and Tobago AGENCY: United States... in the antidumping duty Investigation No. 731-TA-961 concerning carbon and certain alloy steel...

  15. Carbon Dot Based Sensing of Dopamine and Ascorbic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upama Baruah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate carbon dot based sensor of catecholamine, namely, dopamine and ascorbic acid. Carbon dots (CDs were prepared from a green source: commercially available Assam tea. The carbon dots prepared from tea had particle sizes of ∼0.8 nm and are fluorescent. Fluorescence of the carbon dots was found to be quenched in the presence of dopamine and ascorbic acid with greater sensitivity for dopamine. The minimum detectable limits were determined to be 33 μM and 98 μM for dopamine and ascorbic acid, respectively. The quenching constants determined from Stern-Volmer plot were determined to be 5 × 10−4 and 1 × 10−4 for dopamine and ascorbic acid, respectively. A probable mechanism of quenching has been discussed in the paper.

  16. Surface modification of commercial tin coatings by carbon ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, L.J.; Sood, D.K.; Manory, R.R. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Commercial TiN coatings of about 2 {mu}m thickness on high speed steel substrates were implanted at room temperature with 95 keV carbon ions at nominal doses between 1 x 10{sup 17} - 8x10{sup 17} ions cm{sup -2}. Carbon ion implantation induced a significant improvement in ultramicrohardness, friction coefficient and wear properties. The surface microhardness increases monotonically by up to 115% until a critical dose is reached. Beyond this dose the hardness decreases, but remains higher than that of unimplanted sample. A lower friction coefficient and a longer transition period towards a steady state condition were obtained by carbon ion implantation. The changes in tribomechanical properties are discussed in terms of radiation damage and possible formation of a second phase rich in carbon. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Adsorption of ciprofloxacin on surface-modified carbon materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabineiro, S A C; Thavorn-Amornsri, T; Pereira, M F R; Figueiredo, J L

    2011-10-01

    The adsorption capacity of ciprofloxacin (CPX) was determined on three types of carbon-based materials: activated carbon (commercial sample), carbon nanotubes (commercial multi-walled carbon nanotubes) and carbon xerogel (prepared by the resorcinol/formaldehyde approach at pH 6.0). These materials were used as received/prepared and functionalised through oxidation with nitric acid. The oxidised materials were then heat treated under inert atmosphere (N2) at different temperatures (between 350 and 900°C). The obtained samples were characterised by adsorption of N2 at -196 °C, determination of the point of zero charge and by temperature programmed desorption. High adsorption capacities ranging from approximately 60 to 300 mgCPxgC(-1) were obtained (for oxidised carbon xerogel, and oxidised thermally treated activated carbon Norit ROX 8.0, respectively). In general, it was found that the nitric acid treatment of samples has a detrimental effect in adsorption capacity, whereas thermal treatments, especially at 900 °C after oxidation, enhance adsorption performance. This is due to the positive effect of the surface basicity. The kinetic curves obtained were fitted using 1st or 2nd order models, and the Langmuir and Freundlich models were used to describe the equilibrium isotherms obtained. The 2nd order and the Langmuir models, respectively, were shown to present the best fittings.

  18. Modelling carbon in permafrost soils from preindustrial to the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinen, T.; Brovkin, V.

    2015-12-01

    The carbon release from thawing permafrost soils constitutes one of the large uncertainties in the carbon cycle under future climate change. Analysing the problem further, this uncertainty results from an uncertainty about the total amount of C that is stored in frozen soils, combined with an uncertainty about the areas where soils might thaw under a particular climate change scenario, as well as an uncertainty about the decomposition product since some of the decomposed C might result the release of CH4 as well as CO2. We use the land surface model JSBACH, part of the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model MPI-ESM, to quantify the release of soil carbon from thawing permafrost soils. We have extended the soil carbon model YASSO by introducing carbon storages in frozen soils, with increasing fractions of C being available to decomposition as permafrost thaws. In order to quantify the amount of carbon released as CH4, as opposed to CO2, we have also implemented a TOPMODEL-based wetland scheme, as well as anaerobic C decomposition and methane transport. We initialise the soil C pools for the preindustrial climate state from the Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database to insure initial C pool sizes close to measurements. We then determine changes in soil C storage in transient model experiments following historical and future climate changes under RCP 8.5. Based on these experiments, we quantify the greenhouse gas release from permafrost C decomposition, determining both CH4 and CO2 emissions.

  19. Carbon dioxide, ground air and carbon cycling in Gibraltar karst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattey, D. P.; Atkinson, T. C.; Barker, J. A.; Fisher, R.; Latin, J.-P.; Durrell, R.; Ainsworth, M.

    2016-07-01

    We put forward a general conceptual model of CO2 behaviour in the vadose zone of karst aquifers, based on physical principles of air flow through porous media and caves, combined with a geochemical interpretation of cave monitoring data. This 'Gibraltar model' links fluxes of water, air and carbon through the soil with the porosity of the vadose zone, the circulation of ground air and the ventilation of caves. Gibraltar hosts many natural caves whose locations span the full length and vertical range of the Rock. We report results of an 8-year monitoring study of carbon in soil organic matter and bedrock carbonate, dissolved inorganic carbon in vadose waters, and gaseous CO2 in soil, cave and ground air. Results show that the regime of cave air CO2 results from the interaction of cave ventilation with a reservoir of CO2-enriched ground air held within the smaller voids of the bedrock. The pCO2 of ground air, and of vadose waters that have been in close contact with it, are determined by multiple factors that include recharge patterns, vegetation productivity and root respiration, and conversion of organic matter to CO2 within the soil, the epikarst and the whole vadose zone. Mathematical modelling and field observations show that ground air is subject to a density-driven circulation that reverses seasonally, as the difference between surface and underground temperatures reverses in sign. The Gibraltar model suggests that cave air pCO2 is not directly related to CO2 generated in the soil or the epikarstic zone, as is often assumed. Ground air CO2 formed by the decay of organic matter (OM) washed down into the deeper unsaturated zone is an important additional source of pCO2. In Gibraltar the addition of OM-derived CO2 is the dominant control on the pCO2 of ground air and the Ca-hardness of waters within the deep vadose zone. The seasonal regime of CO2 in cave air depends on the position of a cave in relation to the density-driven ground air circulation pattern which

  20. Carbon dioxide dangers demonstration model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venezky, Dina; Wessells, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is a dangerous volcanic gas. When carbon dioxide seeps from the ground, it normally mixes with the air and dissipates rapidly. However, because carbon dioxide gas is heavier than air, it can collect in snowbanks, depressions, and poorly ventilated enclosures posing a potential danger to people and other living things. In this experiment we show how carbon dioxide gas displaces oxygen as it collects in low-lying areas. When carbon dioxide, created by mixing vinegar and baking soda, is added to a bowl with candles of different heights, the flames are extinguished as if by magic.

  1. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen-Mihaela eTilmaciu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  2. Carbon Fiber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    HyComp(R), Inc. development a line of high temperature carbon fiber composite products to solve wear problems in the harsh environment of steel and aluminum mills. WearComp(R), self-lubricating composite wear liners and bushings, combines carbon graphite fibers with a polyimide binder. The binder, in conjunction with the fibers, provides the slippery surface, one that demands no lubrication, yet wears at a very slow rate. WearComp(R) typically lasts six to ten times longer than aluminum bronze. Unlike bronze, WearComp polishes the same surface and imparts a self-lube film for years of service. It is designed for continuous operation at temperatures of 550 degrees Fahrenheit and can operate under high compressive loads.

  3. Growing carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Ando

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of ‘fullerenes’ added a new dimension to the knowledge of carbon science1; and the subsequent discovery of ‘carbon nanotubes’ (CNTs, the elongated fullerene added a new dimension to the knowledge of technology2;. Today, ‘nanotechnology’ is a hot topic attracting scientists, industrialists, journalists, governments, and even the general public. Nanotechnology is the creation of functional materials, devices, and systems through control of matter on the nanometer scale and the exploitation of novel phenomena and properties of matter (physical, chemical, biological, electrical, etc. at that length scale. CNTs are supposed to be a key component of nanotechnology. Almost every week a new potential application of CNTs is identified, stimulating scientists to peep into this tiny tube with ever increasing curiosity.

  4. Carbon materials for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang

    As an important energy storage device, electrochemical supercapacitors or ultracapacitors fill the gap between conventional dielectric capacitors and batteries in terms of specific energy and power. Although supercapacitors have been used in electric vehicles, digital communication instruments, and pulsed lasers, further improvement of supercapacitor performance is highly needed to enhance the energy density without significantly losing the power density. Additionally, the conventional supercapacitors use rigid packages and liquid electrolytes, which limit applications in transparent and flexible electronics. To address these challenges, the research efforts in this dissertation mainly focused on: 1) improvement of the energy density of carbon nanoonions by chemical activation; 2) laser-assisted activation of carbon nanotubes for improved energy density; 3) fabrication of flexible solid-state supercapacitors based on nanocarbon and manganese dioxide (MnO2) hybrid electrodes; and 4) investigation of the electrochemical performance of graphene as transparent and flexible supercapacitor electrodes.

  5. Applications of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Zhou, Otto Z.

    Carbon nanotubes have attracted the fancy of many scientists worldwide. The small dimensions, strength and the remarkable physical properties of these structures make them a very unique material with a whole range of promising applications. In this review we describe some of the important materials science applications of carbon nanotubes. Specifically we discuss the electronic and electrochemical applications of nanotubes, nanotubes as mechanical reinforcements in high performance composites, nanotube-based field emitters, and their use as nanoprobes in metrology and biological and chemical investigations, and as templates for the creation of other nanostructures. Electronic properties and device applications of nanotubes are treated elsewhere in the book. The challenges that ensue in realizing some of these applications are also discussed from the point of view of manufacturing, processing, and cost considerations.

  6. Carbon Lorenz Curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groot, L. [Utrecht University, Utrecht School of Economics, Janskerkhof 12, 3512 BL Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2008-11-15

    The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, it exhibits that standard tools in the measurement of income inequality, such as the Lorenz curve and the Gini-index, can successfully be applied to the issues of inequality measurement of carbon emissions and the equity of abatement policies across countries. These tools allow policy-makers and the general public to grasp at a single glance the impact of conventional distribution rules such as equal caps or grandfathering, or more sophisticated ones, on the distribution of greenhouse gas emissions. Second, using the Samuelson rule for the optimal provision of a public good, the Pareto-optimal distribution of carbon emissions is compared with the distribution that follows if countries follow Nash-Cournot abatement strategies. It is shown that the Pareto-optimal distribution under the Samuelson rule can be approximated by the equal cap division, represented by the diagonal in the Lorenz curve diagram.

  7. Isotopic investigations of carbonate growth on concrete structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnamurthy, R.V.; Schmitt, D.; Atekwana, E.A.; Baskaran, M

    2003-03-01

    Stable C and O isotope ratios were measured in carbonate minerals, growing under concrete structures from two locations in the United States. These locations were under a bridge in Michigan and under an overpass in New York. The {delta}{sup 13}C of the carbonate samples ranged from -21.6 to -31.4 per mille (with respect to V-PDB) and clearly indicated precipitation under non-equilibrium conditions. Indeed, the values in some cases were more negative than could be accounted for by existing models that invoke 4 stages of kinetic fractionation. There have been suggestions that microbial activity involving C from gasoline and other fossil fuel sources might be responsible for the relatively low C isotope ratios measured in these carbonates. To explore this possibility, {sup 14}C measurements were made in some of the samples. All samples measured for {sup 14}C contained bomb C. The range of {sup 14}C concentrations suggested a non-uniform growth rate, although possible fossil fuel-derived carbon in the system needs future investigation. The {delta}{sup 18}O values of the carbonates analyzed from Michigan range from 12.5 to 15.7 per mille (with respect to V-SMOW), with a mean value of 13.7 per mille. The {delta}{sup 18}O values of the NY samples range from 11.8 to 15.2 per mille, with a mean value of 13.1 per mille. The nearly identical mean values at both locations favors incorporation of O from atmospheric CO{sub 2} in carbonate precipitation. Additionally, the {sup 210}Pb radiometric technique was also attempted to explore the applicability of this technique in dating concrete derived carbonates as well as recent carbonates forming in a wide variety of environments. The results gave ages between 64 and 3.8 a and are consistent when compared with the date the bridge was constructed.

  8. Microstructure and surface properties of lignocellulosic-based activated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Garcia, P., E-mail: pegonzal@quim.ucm.es [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense, E-28040, Madrid (Spain); Centeno, T.A. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon-CSIC, Apartado 73, E-33080 Oviedo (Spain); Urones-Garrote, E. [Centro Nacional de Microscopia Electronica, Universidad Complutense, E-28040, Madrid (Spain); Avila-Brande, D.; Otero-Diaz, L.C. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense, E-28040, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activated carbons were produced by KOH activation at 700 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The observed nanostructure consists of highly disordered graphene-like layers with sp{sup 2} bond content Almost-Equal-To 95%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Textural parameters show high surface area ( Almost-Equal-To 1000 m{sup 2}/g) and pore width of 1.3-1.8 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Specific capacitance reaches values as high as 161 F/g. - Abstract: Low cost activated carbons have been produced via chemical activation, by using KOH at 700 Degree-Sign C, from the bamboo species Guadua Angustifolia and Bambusa Vulgaris Striata and the residues from shells of the fruits of Castanea Sativa and Juglans Regia as carbon precursors. The scanning electron microscopy micrographs show the conservation of the precursor shape in the case of the Guadua Angustifolia and Bambusa Vulgaris Striata activated carbons. Transmission electron microscopy analyses reveal that these materials consist of carbon platelet-like particles with variable length and thickness, formed by highly disordered graphene-like layers with sp{sup 2} content Almost-Equal-To 95% and average mass density of 1.65 g/cm{sup 3} (25% below standard graphite). Textural parameters indicate a high porosity development with surface areas ranging from 850 to 1100 m{sup 2}/g and average pore width centered in the supermicropores range (1.3-1.8 nm). The electrochemical performance of the activated carbons shows specific capacitance values at low current density (1 mA/cm{sup 2}) as high as 161 F/g in the Juglans Regia activated carbon, as a result of its textural parameters and the presence of pseudocapacitance derived from surface oxygenated acidic groups (mainly quinones and ethers) identified in this activated carbon.

  9. Carbon emissions and an equitable emission reduction criterion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1995 the world-wide carbon emissions reached 5.8 billion metric tonnes per year (GTC/y). The Kyoto protocol calls for a reduction of carbon emissions from the developed countries (Annex I countries) of 6-8% below 1990 levels on the average, and unspecified commitments for the less developed (non-Annex I) countries. It is doubtful that the Kyoto agreement will be ratified by some parliaments, especially the USA Congress. Furthermore, it is shown that if the non-Annex I countries will not curtail their carbon emissions drastically, the global emissions will soar to huge levels by the middle of the next century. An equitable emission criterion is proposed which may lead to a sustainable rate of growth of carbon emissions, and be acceptable to all countries of the world. The criterion links the rate of growth of carbon emissions to the rate of growth of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP). A target criterion is proposed R = 0.15 KgC/SGDP, which is the current average for western European countries and Japan. This allows for both the growth of the GDP and carbon emissions. However, to reach the target in a reasonable time, the countries for which R≤ 0.3 would be allowed a carbon emission growth rate of 1%./y, and countries for which R≥ 0.3, 0.75%/y. It is shown that by 2050 the world-wide carbon emissions would reach about 10 GTC/y, which is about 3 times less than the Kyoto agreement would allow. (Author)

  10. Digital carbonate rock physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenger, Erik H.; Vialle, Stephanie; Lebedev, Maxim; Uribe, David; Osorno, Maria; Duda, Mandy; Steeb, Holger

    2016-08-01

    Modern estimation of rock properties combines imaging with advanced numerical simulations, an approach known as digital rock physics (DRP). In this paper we suggest a specific segmentation procedure of X-ray micro-computed tomography data with two different resolutions in the µm range for two sets of carbonate rock samples. These carbonates were already characterized in detail in a previous laboratory study which we complement with nanoindentation experiments (for local elastic properties). In a first step a non-local mean filter is applied to the raw image data. We then apply different thresholds to identify pores and solid phases. Because of a non-neglectable amount of unresolved microporosity (micritic phase) we also define intermediate threshold values for distinct phases. Based on this segmentation we determine porosity-dependent values for effective P- and S-wave velocities as well as for the intrinsic permeability. For effective velocities we confirm an observed two-phase trend reported in another study using a different carbonate data set. As an upscaling approach we use this two-phase trend as an effective medium approach to estimate the porosity-dependent elastic properties of the micritic phase for the low-resolution images. The porosity measured in the laboratory is then used to predict the effective rock properties from the observed trends for a comparison with experimental data. The two-phase trend can be regarded as an upper bound for elastic properties; the use of the two-phase trend for low-resolution images led to a good estimate for a lower bound of effective elastic properties. Anisotropy is observed for some of the considered subvolumes, but seems to be insignificant for the analysed rocks at the DRP scale. Because of the complexity of carbonates we suggest using DRP as a complementary tool for rock characterization in addition to classical experimental methods.

  11. Carbon nanotube network varactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generalov, A. A.; Anoshkin, I. V.; Erdmanis, M.; Lioubtchenko, D. V.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Nasibulin, A. G.; Räisänen, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) varactors based on a freestanding layer of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films were designed, fabricated and tested. The freestanding SWCNT film was employed as a movable upper patch in the parallel plate capacitor of the MEMS. The measurements of the SWCNT varactors show very high tunability, nearly 100%, of the capacitance with a low actuation voltage of 10 V. The functionality of the varactor is improved by implementing a flexible nanocellulose aerogel filling.

  12. CARBON DIOXIDE FIXATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FUJITA,E.

    2000-01-12

    Solar carbon dioxide fixation offers the possibility of a renewable source of chemicals and fuels in the future. Its realization rests on future advances in the efficiency of solar energy collection and development of suitable catalysts for CO{sub 2} conversion. Recent achievements in the efficiency of solar energy conversion and in catalysis suggest that this approach holds a great deal of promise for contributing to future needs for fuels and chemicals.

  13. Accounting for carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Lovell, Heather; Sales de Aguiar, Thereza; Bebbington, Jan; Larrinaga-Gonzalez, Carlos; International Emissions Trading Association

    2010-01-01

    ACCA working in partnership with IETA This report reveals how large emitters in the European Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS) are accounting for emission allowances. The diversity of emission-allowance accounting practices being used in Europe shows carbon financial accounting to be in its formative stages - rules and practices are still unsettled. With this report, ACCA, in partnership with IETA, is opening up the debate to a wider international audience. Publisher PDF

  14. Improving Carbon Fixation Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Ducat, Daniel C.; Silver, Pamela A

    2012-01-01

    A recent resurgence in basic and applied research on photosynthesis has been driven in part by recognition that fulfilling future food and energy requirements will necessitate improvements in crop carbon-fixation efficiencies. Photosynthesis in traditional terrestrial crops is being reexamined in light of molecular strategies employed by photosynthetic microbes to enhance the activity of the Calvin cycle. Synthetic biology is well-situated to provide original approaches for compartmentalizing...

  15. Amorphous carbon for photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risplendi, Francesca; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2015-03-01

    All-carbon solar cells have attracted attention as candidates for innovative photovoltaic devices. Carbon-based materials such as graphene, carbon nanotubes (CNT) and amorphous carbon (aC) have the potential to present physical properties comparable to those of silicon-based materials with advantages such as low cost and higher thermal stability.In particular a-C structures are promising systems in which both sp2 and sp3 hybridization coordination are present in different proportions depending on the specific density, providing the possibility of tuning their optoelectronic properties and achieving comparable sunlight absorption to aSi. In this work we employ density functional theory to design suitable device architectures, such as bulk heterojunctions (BHJ) or pn junctions, consisting of a-C as the active layer material.Regarding BHJ, we study interfaces between aC and C nanostructures (such as CNT and fullerene) to relate their optoelectronic properties to the stoichiometry of aC. We demonstrate that the energy alignment between the a-C mobility edges and the occupied and unoccupied states of the CNT or C60 can be widely tuned by varying the aC density to obtain a type II interface.To employ aC in pn junctions we analyze the p- and n-type doping of a-C focusingon an evaluation of the Fermi level and work function dependence on doping.Our results highlight promising features of aC as the active layer material of thin-film solar cells.

  16. Enhancing the capacitances of electric double layer capacitors based on carbon nanotube electrodes by carbon dioxide activation and acid oxidization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Polarizable electrodes of electric double layer capacitors(EDLCs) were made from carbon nanotubes(CNTs).Effect of carbon dioxide activation together with acid oxidation for the electrodes on the characteristics and performances of electrodes and EDLCs was studied.Carbon dioxide activation changed the microstructure of the electrodes,increased the effective surface area of CNTs and optimized the distribution of apertures of the electrodes.Acid oxidization modified the surface characteristics of CNTs.Based on the polarizable electrodes treated by carbon dioxide activation and acid oxidization,the performances of EDLCs were greatly enhanced.The specific capacitance of the electrodes with organic electrolyte was increased from 21.8 F/g to 60.4 F/g.

  17. Carbon stocks of intact mangroves and carbon emissions arising from their conversion in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, J Boone; Heider, Chris; Norfolk, Jennifer; Payton, Frederick

    2014-04-01

    Mangroves are recognized to possess a variety of ecosystem services including high rates of carbon sequestration and storage. Deforestation and conversion of these ecosystems continue to be high and have been predicted to result in significant carbon emissions to the atmosphere. Yet few studies have quantified the carbon stocks or losses associated with conversion of these ecosystems. In this study we quantified the ecosystem carbon stocks of three common mangrove types of the Caribbean as well as those of abandoned shrimp ponds in areas formerly occupied by mangrove-a common land-use conversion of mangroves throughout the world. In the mangroves of the Montecristi Province in Northwest Dominican Republic we found C stocks ranged from 706 to 1131 Mg/ha. The medium-statured mangroves (3-10 m in height) had the highest C stocks while the tall (> 10 m) mangroves had the lowest ecosystem carbon storage. Carbon stocks of the low mangrove (shrub) type (carbon-rich soils as deep as 2 m. Carbon stocks of abandoned shrimp ponds were 95 Mg/ha or approximately 11% that of the mangroves. Using a stock-change approach, the potential emissions from the conversion of mangroves to shrimp ponds ranged from 2244 to 3799 Mg CO2e/ha (CO2 equivalents). This is among the largest measured C emissions from land use in the tropics. The 6260 ha of mangroves and converted mangroves in the Montecristi Province are estimated to contain 3,841,490 Mg of C. Mangroves represented 76% of this area but currently store 97% of the carbon in this coastal wetland (3,696,722 Mg C). Converted lands store only 4% of the total ecosystem C (144,778 Mg C) while they comprised 24% of the area. By these metrics the replacement of mangroves with shrimp and salt ponds has resulted in estimated emissions from this region totaling 3.8 million Mg CO2e or approximately 21% of the total C prior to conversion. Given the high C stocks of mangroves, the high emissions from their conversion, and the other important

  18. Nongovernmental valorization of carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is considered the largest contributor to the greenhouse gas effect. Most attempts to manage the flow of CO2 or carbon into our environment involve reducing net emissions or sequestering the gas into long-lived sinks. Using CO2 as a chemical feedstock has a long history, but using it on scales that might impact the net emissions of CO2 into the atmosphere has not generally been considered seriously. There is also a growing interest in employing our natural biomes of carbon such as trees, vegetation, and soils as storage media. Some amelioration of the net carbon emissions into the atmosphere could be achieved by concomitant large withdrawals of carbon. This report surveys the potential and limitations in employing carbon as a resource for organic chemicals, fuels, inorganic materials, and in using the biome to manage carbon. The outlook for each of these opportunities is also described

  19. A Better Carbon Footprint Label

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, John; Nielsen, Kristian S.

    2016-01-01

    Based on insights from behavioral economics, it is suggested to extend carbon footprint labeling with information about relative performance, using the well-known “traffic light” color scheme to communicate relative performance. To test this proposition, the impact of a carbon footprint label......, participants saw the original Carbon Trust label and in the other condition they saw the same label, but with traffic light colors added to communicate the product's relative performance in terms of carbon footprint. All included attributes were found to have a significant impact on consumer choices...... to indicate relative carbon footprint significantly increases carbon label effectiveness. Hence, a carbon footprint label is more effective if it uses traffic light colors to communicate the product's relative performance....

  20. Increasing the Tensile Property of Unidirectional Carbon/Carbon Composites by Grafting Carbon Nanotubes onto Carbon Fibers by Electrophoretic Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Song; Kezhi Li; Hejun Li; Qiangang Fu

    2013-01-01

    Although in-situ growing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on carbon fibers could greatly increase the matrix-dominated mechanical properties of carbon/carbon composites (C/Cs),it always decreased the tensile strength of carbon fibers.In this work,CNTs were introduced into unidirectional carbon fiber (CF) preforms by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) and they were used to reinforce C/Cs.Effects of the content of CNTs introduced by EPD on tensile property of unidirectional C/Cs were investigated.Results demonstrated that EPD could be used as a simple and efficient method to fabricate carbon nanotube reinforced C/Cs (CNT-C/Cs) with excellent tensile strength,which pays a meaningful way to maximize the global performance of CNT-C/Cs.