WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon 21

  1. 21 CFR 184.1619 - Potassium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... solution of potassium hydroxide with excess carbon dioxide to produce potassium carbonate; (3) By treating a solution of potassium hydroxide with carbon dioxide to produce potassium bicarbonate, which is... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium carbonate. 184.1619 Section 184.1619 Food...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1742 - Sodium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium carbonate. 184.1742 Section 184.1742 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1742 Sodium carbonate. (a) Sodium carbonate (Na2CO3, CAS Reg. No... ore calcined to impure soda ash and then purified; or (3) synthesized from limestone by the Solvay...

  3. 21 CFR 582.1240 - Carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide. 582.1240 Section 582.1240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1240 Carbon dioxide. (a) Product. Carbon dioxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  4. 21 CFR 582.1742 - Sodium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium carbonate. 582.1742 Section 582.1742 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1742 Sodium carbonate. (a) Product. Sodium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1240 - Carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Carbon dioxide. 184.1240 Section 184.1240 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1240 Carbon dioxide. (a) Carbon dioxide (empirical formula CO2, CAS Reg. No.... The solid form, dry ice, sublimes under atmospheric pressure at a temperature of −78.5 °C. Carbon...

  6. 21 CFR 177.1312 - Ethylene-carbon monoxide copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ethylene-carbon monoxide copolymers. 177.1312... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1312 Ethylene-carbon monoxide copolymers. The ethylene-carbon monoxide copolymers identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely...

  7. Investing for a low carbon economy. Special issue COP21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guez, Herve; Basselier, Clotilde; Bennani, Zineb; Coeslier, Manuel; Dufour, Mathilde; Dunand-Chatellet, Lea; Guez, Herve; Lauverjat Celine; Ostiari, Emmanuelle; Smia, Ladislas; Bonnin, Marguerite; Briand, Marc; Favier, Julien; Finidori, Esther; Wigley, Chris; Dobie, Jacqueline; Mary Ellis, Susannah; Kiernan, Shannon; Lefer, Elizabeth; Perrin, Elsa; Treadwell, Christopher; Zerner, Rachel

    2015-11-01

    Mirova, an asset management firm dedicated to responsible investment, has published today Investing in a low-carbon economy, a guide for investors to become COP21 compliant. Mirova's study provides an in-depth analysis highlighting the challenges of climate change and presents methods for investors to effectively measure their carbon footprint. Mirova offers a unique range of investment solutions promoting energy transition across all asset classes. COP21: mobilising private investors is a necessity To maintain the economy in a '2 degree' trajectory, it is vital to redirect savings towards companies and projects promoting energy transition. Philippe Zaouati, Head of Mirova explains: 'The energy transition can only succeed if we manage to mobilise private investors' savings. The success of COP21 therefore also depends on the ability of asset management firms to propose solutions in response to the climate challenge, whilst delivering the returns expected by investors'. Accurately measuring your carbon footprint. In response to growing demands on investors to make greener investments, Mirova, in partnership with the leading carbon strategy specialist consultant Carbone 4, has developed an innovative methodology to measure the carbon footprint of an investment portfolio. This decision-making tool assesses a company's contribution to the reduction of global greenhouse gas emissions (GGE). Measuring the overall impact of a business on the environment is an essential step towards acting against global warming. Assessing the carbon footprint is therefore an indispensable stage in the construction of portfolios contributing to energy transition. Low-carbon investments across all asset classes In order to redirect capital towards investments promoting energy transition, Mirova is proposing solutions involving all asset classes: - Renewable energy infrastructures: 100% low carbon allocation For more than 10 years now, Mirova has provided European institutions with access to

  8. How to distribute the carbon budget at the COP21?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurent, Eloi

    2015-09-01

    This article reviews different fairness criteria for the measuring of CO 2 emissions by the main countries responsible of climate change in order to fairly distribute the carbon budget during the Paris negotiation of the COP21. It shows that it is possible to use reliable data to build up a relatively simple and fair climatic hybrid criterion which takes consumption emissions, historic responsibility, population, and economic development level into account

  9. Modeling Ne-21 NMR parameters for carbon nanosystems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kupka, T.; Nieradka, M.; Kaminský, Jakub; Stobinski, L.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 10 (2013), s. 676-681 ISSN 0749-1581 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/11/0105; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11033 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M200551205 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Ne-21 NMR * GIAO NMR * molecular modeling * carbon nanostructures Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.559, year: 2013

  10. 40 CFR 721.4880 - Methanol, trichloro-, carbonate (2:1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methanol, trichloro-, carbonate (2:1... Substances § 721.4880 Methanol, trichloro-, carbonate (2:1). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as methanol, trichloro-, carbonate (2:1) (CAS...

  11. Carbon monoxide: The 21st century poison that goes unnoticed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoskins, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    This editorial article describes the effects of carbon monoxide poisoning on human beings and the mechanisms involving carbon monoxide saturation of haemoglobin that are responsible for it. The initial research done in the mid-1800s by Claude Bernard is presented. Methods of treatment for persons poisoned by carbon monoxide are discussed and the experiments made by J.B.S. Haldane on himself by breathing in carbon monoxide are described. Acclimatisation effects observed by Haldane and his co-workers and concerning persons occupationally exposed to carbon monoxide emissions are described

  12. Carbon monoxide: The 21st century poison that goes unnoticed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoskins, J.A. [Reigate, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    1999-07-01

    This editorial article describes the effects of carbon monoxide poisoning on human beings and the mechanisms involving carbon monoxide saturation of haemoglobin that are responsible for it. The initial research done in the mid-1800s by Claude Bernard is presented. Methods of treatment for persons poisoned by carbon monoxide are discussed and the experiments made by J.B.S. Haldane on himself by breathing in carbon monoxide are described. Acclimatisation effects observed by Haldane and his co-workers and concerning persons occupationally exposed to carbon monoxide emissions are described.

  13. 21 CFR 862.1160 - Bicarbonate/carbon dioxide test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bicarbonate/carbon dioxide test system. 862.1160 Section 862.1160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1160 Bicarbonate/carbon dioxide...

  14. Tendances Carbone no. 108. COP21: and now, action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bultheel, Clement; Morel, Romain

    2015-12-01

    Among the publications of I4CE, 'Tendances Carbone' bulletin specifically studies the developments of the European market for CO 2 allowances. Beside some statistical figures about energy production/consumption and carbon markets, this issue specifically addresses the following points: - EU ETS - auctioning: publication of the auctioning calendar for 2016, overall amounting to 733 million allowances. - State of the Energy Union: the EU Commission published on 18 November, the State of the Energy Union report. - EU ETS: on 18 November, the EU Commission published the second report on the functioning of the EU ETS outlining challenges faced in 2013 and 2014 and reforms undertaken in 2015

  15. Fractionation between inorganic and organic carbon during the Lomagundi (2.22 2.1 Ga) carbon isotope excursion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker, A.; Holmden, C.; Beukes, N. J.; Kenig, F.; Eglinton, B.; Patterson, W. P.

    2008-07-01

    The Lomagundi (2.22-2.1 Ga) positive carbon isotope excursion in shallow-marine sedimentary carbonates has been associated with the rise in atmospheric oxygen, but subsequent studies have demonstrated that the carbon isotope excursion was preceded by the rise in atmospheric oxygen. The amount of oxygen released to the exosphere during the Lomagundi excursion is constrained by the average global fractionation between inorganic and organic carbon, which is poorly characterized. Because dissolved inorganic and organic carbon reservoirs were arguably larger in the Paleoproterozoic ocean, at a time of lower solar luminosity and lower ocean redox state, decoupling between these two variables might be expected. We determined carbon isotope values of carbonate and organic matter in carbonates and shales of the Silverton Formation, South Africa and in the correlative Sengoma Argillite Formation, near the border in Botswana. These units were deposited between 2.22 and 2.06 Ga along the margin of the Kaapvaal Craton in an open-marine deltaic setting and experienced lower greenschist facies metamorphism. The prodelta to offshore marine shales are overlain by a subtidal carbonate sequence. Carbonates exhibit elevated 13C values ranging from 8.3 to 11.2‰ vs. VPDB consistent with deposition during the Lomagundi positive excursion. The total organic carbon (TOC) contents range from 0.01 to 0.6% and δ13C values range from - 24.8 to - 13.9‰. Thus, the isotopic fractionation between organic and carbonate carbon was on average 30.3 ± 2.8‰ ( n = 32) in the shallow-marine environment. The underlying Sengoma shales have highly variable TOC contents (0.14 to 21.94%) and δ13C values (- 33.7 to - 20.8‰) with an average of - 27.0 ± 3.0‰ ( n = 50). Considering that the shales were also deposited during the Lomagundi excursion, and taking δ13C values of the overlying carbonates as representative of the δ13C value of dissolved inorganic carbon during shale deposition, a carbon

  16. Vulnerability of carbon storage in North American boreal forests to wildfires during the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balshi, M. S.; McGuire, Anthony David; Duffy, P.; Flannigan, M.; Kicklighter, David W.; Melillo, J.

    2009-01-01

    The boreal forest contains large reserves of carbon. Across this region, wildfires influence the temporal and spatial dynamics of carbon storage. In this study, we estimate fire emissions and changes in carbon storage for boreal North America over the 21st century. We use a gridded data set developed with a multivariate adaptive regression spline approach to determine how area burned varies each year with changing climatic and fuel moisture conditions. We apply the process-based Terrestrial Ecosystem Model to evaluate the role of future fire on the carbon dynamics of boreal North America in the context of changing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration and climate in the A2 and B2 emissions scenarios of the CGCM2 global climate model. Relative to the last decade of the 20th century, decadal total carbon emissions from fire increase by 2.5–4.4 times by 2091–2100, depending on the climate scenario and assumptions about CO2fertilization. Larger fire emissions occur with warmer climates or if CO2 fertilization is assumed to occur. Despite the increases in fire emissions, our simulations indicate that boreal North America will be a carbon sink over the 21st century if CO2 fertilization is assumed to occur in the future. In contrast, simulations excluding CO2 fertilization over the same period indicate that the region will change to a carbon source to the atmosphere, with the source being 2.1 times greater under the warmer A2 scenario than the B2 scenario. To improve estimates of wildfire on terrestrial carbon dynamics in boreal North America, future studies should incorporate the role of dynamic vegetation to represent more accurately post-fire successional processes, incorporate fire severity parameters that change in time and space, account for human influences through increased fire suppression, and integrate the role of other disturbances and their interactions with future fire regime.

  17. Field-warmed soil carbon changes imply high 21st-century modeling uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Todd-Brown

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The feedback between planetary warming and soil carbon loss has been the focus of considerable scientific attention in recent decades, due to its potential to accelerate anthropogenic climate change. The soil carbon temperature sensitivity is traditionally estimated from short-term respiration measurements – either from laboratory incubations that are artificially manipulated or from field measurements that cannot distinguish between plant and microbial respiration. To address these limitations of previous approaches, we developed a new method to estimate soil temperature sensitivity (Q10 of soil carbon directly from warming-induced changes in soil carbon stocks measured in 36 field experiments across the world. Variations in warming magnitude and control organic carbon percentage explained much of field-warmed organic carbon percentage (R2  =  0.96, revealing Q10 across sites of 2.2 [1.6, 2.7] 95 % confidence interval (CI. When these field-derived Q10 values were extrapolated over the 21st century using a post hoc correction of 20 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5 Earth system model outputs, the multi-model mean soil carbon stock changes shifted from the previous value of 88 ± 153 Pg carbon (weighted mean ± 1 SD to 19 ± 155 Pg carbon with a Q10-driven 95 % CI of 248 ± 191 to −95 ± 209 Pg carbon. On average, incorporating the field-derived Q10 values into Earth system model simulations led to reductions in the projected amount of carbon sequestered in the soil over the 21st century. However, the considerable parameter uncertainty led to extremely high variability in soil carbon stock projections within each model; intra-model uncertainty driven by the field-derived Q10 was as great as that between model variation. This study demonstrates that data integration should capture the variation of the system, as well as mean trends.

  18. Hydrogen degradation of 21-6-9 and medium carbon steel by disc pressure test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, D.H.; Zhou, W.X.; Xu, Z.L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports the method of disc pressure test and the results for 21-6-9 stainless steel and medium carbon steel in hydrogen gas with different pressures and time of storage. The results show the hydrogen induced degradation of these two kinds of steel. An attempt was made to establish an index which uses variation of area of deformed disc to determine the degradation of ductility in a hydrogen environment. (orig.)

  19. Impacts of peatland and permafrost changes on the terrestrial carbon storage over the last 21 ka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahni, Renato; Stocker, Benjamin D.; Joos, Fortunat

    2014-05-01

    Paleoclimate records and global climate-carbon cycle models suggest a net increase in land carbon (C) storage between 300 and 700 Pg C (1 Pg C = 1015 g C) during the transition from the last glacial maximum (LGM), the Holocene up to the preindustrial period. Peat accumulation rate records imply an increase in peatland C of ~600 Pg C over the course of the Holocene. In high northern latitudes mineral and organic soils are subject to permafrost formation, which is believed to have been more extensive during glacial compared to interglacial periods. Soil C in permafrost regions represents the largest inert C pool on land at present. The spatio-temporal evolution, however, of C stocks in soils and vegetation remains poorly quantified and is uncertain. Here, the Land surface Processes and eXchanges (LPX-Bern) Dynamic Global Vegetation Model is applied in transient simulations to explore the evolution of permafrost, peatland and vegetation C over the last 21'000 years. The model is forced with temperature and precipitation output from the Trace-21ka climate simulation, and dynamically simulates the formation and disappearance of peatlands and permafrost soils, vegetation distribution and C stocks. Results indicate that peatlands and permfrost areas existed further south in the LGM, in agreement with available proxy information, and that their associated C was lost during the transition into the Holocene. The simulated loss of inert C is over-compensated by vegetation regrowth. The timing of the C relocation on land is compared to observational evidence from paleoclimate archives and estimates from ocean C inventory changes.

  20. Modeling biomass burning and related carbon emissions during the 21st century in Europe

    KAUST Repository

    Migliavacca, Mirco; Dosio, Alessandro; Camia, Andrea; Hobourg, Rasmus; Houston-Durrant, Tracy; Kaiser, Johannes W.; Khabarov, Nikolay; Krasovskii, Andrey A.; Marcolla, Barbara; San Miguel-Ayanz, Jesus; Ward, Daniel S.; Cescatti, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    In this study we present an assessment of the impact of future climate change on total fire probability, burned area, and carbon (C) emissions from fires in Europe. The analysis was performed with the Community Land Model (CLM) extended with a prognostic treatment of fires that was specifically refined and optimized for application over Europe. Simulations over the 21st century are forced by five different high-resolution Regional Climate Models under the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios A1B. Both original and bias-corrected meteorological forcings is used. Results show that the simulated C emissions over the present period are improved by using bias corrected meteorological forcing, with a reduction of the intermodel variability. In the course of the 21st century, burned area and C emissions from fires are shown to increase in Europe, in particular in the Mediterranean basins, in the Balkan regions and in Eastern Europe. However, the projected increase is lower than in other studies that did not fully account for the effect of climate on ecosystem functioning. We demonstrate that the lower sensitivity of burned area and C emissions to climate change is related to the predicted reduction of the net primary productivity, which is identified as the most important determinant of fire activity in the Mediterranean region after anthropogenic interaction. This behavior, consistent with the intermediate fire-productivity hypothesis, limits the sensitivity of future burned area and C emissions from fires on climate change, providing more conservative estimates of future fire patterns, and demonstrates the importance of coupling fire simulation with a climate driven ecosystem productivity model.

  1. Modeling biomass burning and related carbon emissions during the 21st century in Europe

    KAUST Repository

    Migliavacca, Mirco

    2013-12-01

    In this study we present an assessment of the impact of future climate change on total fire probability, burned area, and carbon (C) emissions from fires in Europe. The analysis was performed with the Community Land Model (CLM) extended with a prognostic treatment of fires that was specifically refined and optimized for application over Europe. Simulations over the 21st century are forced by five different high-resolution Regional Climate Models under the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios A1B. Both original and bias-corrected meteorological forcings is used. Results show that the simulated C emissions over the present period are improved by using bias corrected meteorological forcing, with a reduction of the intermodel variability. In the course of the 21st century, burned area and C emissions from fires are shown to increase in Europe, in particular in the Mediterranean basins, in the Balkan regions and in Eastern Europe. However, the projected increase is lower than in other studies that did not fully account for the effect of climate on ecosystem functioning. We demonstrate that the lower sensitivity of burned area and C emissions to climate change is related to the predicted reduction of the net primary productivity, which is identified as the most important determinant of fire activity in the Mediterranean region after anthropogenic interaction. This behavior, consistent with the intermediate fire-productivity hypothesis, limits the sensitivity of future burned area and C emissions from fires on climate change, providing more conservative estimates of future fire patterns, and demonstrates the importance of coupling fire simulation with a climate driven ecosystem productivity model.

  2. Terrestrial carbon losses from mountaintop coal mining offset regional forest carbon sequestration in the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott Campbell, J; Fox, James F; Acton, Peter M

    2012-01-01

    Studies that quantify the spatial and temporal variability of carbon sources and sinks provide process-level information for the prediction of future levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide as well as verification of current emission agreements. Assessments of carbon sources and sinks for North America that compare top-down atmospheric constraints with bottom-up inventories find particularly large carbon sinks in the southeastern US. However, this southeastern US sink may be impacted by extreme land-use disturbance events due to mountaintop coal mining (MCM). Here we apply ecosystem modeling and field experiment data to quantify the potential impact of future mountaintop coal mining on the carbon budget of the southern Appalachian forest region. For projections based on historical mining rates, grassland reclamation, and the continued regrowth of un-mined forests, we find that the southern Appalachian forests switch from a net carbon sink to a net carbon source by year 2025–33 with a 30%–35% loss in terrestrial carbon stocks relative to a scenario with no future mining by the year 2100. Alternatively, scenarios of forest sequestration due to the effect of CO 2 fertilization result in a 15%–24% loss in terrestrial carbon stocks by the year 2100 for mining scenarios relative to scenarios with no future mining. These results suggest that while power plant stack emissions are the dominant life-cycle stage in coal-fired electricity, accounting for mountaintop coal mining in bottom-up inventories may be a critical component of regional carbon budgets. (letter)

  3. Importance of soil thermal dynamics on land carbon sequestration in Northern Eurasia during the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kicklighter, David; Monier, Erwan; Sokolov, Andrei; Zhuang, Qianlai; Melillo, Jerry

    2015-04-01

    Recent modeling studies have suggested that carbon sinks in pan-arctic ecosystems may be weakening partially as a result of warming-induced increases in soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and the exposure of previously frozen SOM to decomposition. This weakening of carbon sinks is likely to continue in the future as vast amount of carbon in permafrost soils is vulnerable to thaw. Here, we examine the importance of considering soil thermal dynamics when determining the effects of climate change and land-use change on carbon dynamics in Northern Eurasia during the 21st century. This importance is assessed by comparing results for a "business as usual" scenario between a version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model that does not consider soil thermal dynamics (TEM 4.4) and a version that does consider these dynamics (TEM 6.0). In this scenario, which is similar to the IPCC Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP) 8.5 scenario, the net area covered by food crops and pastures in Northern Eurasia is assumed to remain relatively constant over the 21st century, but the area covered by secondary forests is projected to double as a result of timber harvest and the abandonment of land associated with displacement of agricultural land. Enhanced decomposition from the newly exposed SOM from permafrost thaw also increases nitrogen availability for plant production so that the loss of carbon from the enhanced decomposition is partially compensated by enhanced uptake and storage of atmospheric carbon dioxide in vegetation. Our results indicate that consideration of soil thermal dynamics have a large influence on how simulated terrestrial carbon dynamics in Northern Eurasia respond to changes in climate, atmospheric chemistry (e.g., carbon dioxide fertilization, ozone pollution, nitrogen deposition) and disturbances.

  4. The Emissions Scenarios Portal: Visualizing Low-Carbon Pathways for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, R. J.; Friedrich, J.; Ge, M.; Mountford, H.; Fransen, T.; Altamirano, J. C.; Thanawala, Z.; Arcipowska, A.

    2017-12-01

    The Emissions Scenarios Portal (ESP) is a newly developed exploration tool for 21st century low-carbon pathways and investigation of the Nationally Determined Contributions (NDC's) that countries have put forward under the Paris Agreement. It is open to the public and aims to help achieve the goal of limiting global temperature increase to well below 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels by enhancing access to high-quality, up-to-date scenario information. It can guide users to set ambitious, realistic emission mitigation goals and understand what these goals imply for different sectors of the economy. Data will be integrated from a wide variety of economic and energy-system models with results from both national models as well as globally integrated assessment models (IAM's) and countries biennial update reports (BUR's). This information can support policy and investment decision making that will lead to a low carbon future. It is designed to help find answers to questions such as "Are the NDC's enough to put the world on a 2DC track?", "What do NDC's imply for different sectors of the economy under different assumptions?" or "What are good ways to increase ambition beyond NDC's?". The portal strives to achieve both inter-comparability across a wide range of different models and nationally reported scenarios, as well as flexibility to allow modelers to bring out the strengths and purpose of their model on the platform. Furthermore, it aims to enhance standardized and transparent reporting of emissions scenarios and relevant metadata, assumptions and results to improve understanding, accessibility and impact of the scenarios. On the data side, these rivaling objectives present interesting challenges for both the collection and communication of the data and in this presentation we will present some of our ideas for tackling these. This project will be part of Climate Watch, a new data platform developed jointly by the World Resources Institute and the NDC

  5. A simulated RTM process for fabricating polyimide (AMB-21) carbon fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avva, V. Sarma; Sadler, Robert L.; Thomas, Shanon

    1995-01-01

    An experimental polyimide matrix, AMB-21 - supplied by NASA/LeRC, was especially formulated to be non-carcinogenic. It was also expected to be amenable to a Resin Transfer Molding Process (RTM). AMB-21 is a solid at room temperature and must be heated to a very high temperature to obtain a fluid state. However, even after heating it to a realistic high temperature, it was found to be too viscous for use in a RTM process. As a result, a promising approach was experimented leading to the introduction of the resin into a solvent solution in order to obtain a viscosity suitable for RTM. A mixture of methanol and tetrahydroferone was found to be a suitable solvent mixture. The matrix solution was introduced into carbon-fiber preform using two techniques: (1) injection of matrix into a Resin Transfer Mold after positioning the preform into the 'mold cavity', and (2) infiltration of matrix into the preform using the 'autoclave through-the-thickness transfer process'. After completing the resin transfer (infiltration) process, the 'filled' preform was heated to 300 F for one hour to reduce the solvent content. The temperature was then increased to 400 F under a vacuum to complete the solvent evaporation and to remove volatile products of the polyimide imidization. The impregnated preform was removed from the mold and press-cured at 200 psi and 600 FF for two hours. The resulting panel was found to be of reasonably good quality. This observation was based on the results obtained from short beam shear strength (700-8000 psi) tests and microscopic examination of the cross-section indicating a very low level of porosity. Further, the flash around the molded panels from the compression molding was free of porosity indicating the removal of volatiles, solvents, and other imidization products. Based on these studies, a new RTM mold containing a diaphragm capable of applying 200 psi at 600 F has been designed and constructed with the expectation that it will allow the

  6. Analytically tractable climate-carbon cycle feedbacks under 21st century anthropogenic forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lade, Steven J.; Donges, Jonathan F.; Fetzer, Ingo; Anderies, John M.; Beer, Christian; Cornell, Sarah E.; Gasser, Thomas; Norberg, Jon; Richardson, Katherine; Rockström, Johan; Steffen, Will

    2018-05-01

    Changes to climate-carbon cycle feedbacks may significantly affect the Earth system's response to greenhouse gas emissions. These feedbacks are usually analysed from numerical output of complex and arguably opaque Earth system models. Here, we construct a stylised global climate-carbon cycle model, test its output against comprehensive Earth system models, and investigate the strengths of its climate-carbon cycle feedbacks analytically. The analytical expressions we obtain aid understanding of carbon cycle feedbacks and the operation of the carbon cycle. Specific results include that different feedback formalisms measure fundamentally the same climate-carbon cycle processes; temperature dependence of the solubility pump, biological pump, and CO2 solubility all contribute approximately equally to the ocean climate-carbon feedback; and concentration-carbon feedbacks may be more sensitive to future climate change than climate-carbon feedbacks. Simple models such as that developed here also provide workbenches for simple but mechanistically based explorations of Earth system processes, such as interactions and feedbacks between the planetary boundaries, that are currently too uncertain to be included in comprehensive Earth system models.

  7. 21 CFR 874.4500 - Ear, nose, and throat microsurgical carbon dioxide laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... laser. 874.4500 Section 874.4500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND..., nose, and throat microsurgical carbon dioxide laser. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat microsurgical carbon dioxide laser is a device intended for the surgical excision of tissue from the ear, nose...

  8. 21 CFR 878.3500 - Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... composite implant material. 878.3500 Section 878.3500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Prosthetic Devices § 878.3500 Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material. (a) Identification. A polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material is a porous device...

  9. Sequestering carbon dioxide in industrial polymers: Building materials for the 21st century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molton, P.M.; Nelson, D.A.

    1993-06-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the possibility of developing beneficial uses for carbon dioxide as a key component for a large-volume building product. Such a use may provide an alternative to storing the gas in oceanic sinks or clathrates as a way to slow the rate of global warming. The authors investigated the concept that carbon dioxide might be used with other chemicals to make carbon-dioxide-based polymers which would be lightweight, strong, and economical alternatives to some types of wood and silica-based building materials. As a construction-grade material, carbon dioxide would be fixed in a solid, useful form where it would not contribute to global warming. With the probable imposition of a fuel carbon tax in industrialized countries, this alternative would allow beneficial use of the carbon dioxide and could remove it from the tax basis if legislation were structured appropriately. Hence, there would be an economic driver towards the use of carbon-dioxide-based polymers which would enhance their future applications. Information was obtained through literature searches and personal contacts on carbon dioxide polymers which showed that the concept (1) is technically feasible, (2) is economically defensible, and (3) has an existing industrial infrastructure which could logically develop it. The technology exists for production of building materials which are strong enough for use by industry and which contain up to 90% by weight of carbon dioxide, both chemically and physically bound. A significant side-benefit of using this material would be that it is self-extinguishing in case of fire. This report is the first stage in the investigation. Further work being proposed will provide details on costs, specific applications and volumes, and potential impacts of this technology.

  10. Scenario analysis of China's emissions pathways in the 21st century for low carbon transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Tao; Watson, Jim

    2010-01-01

    China's growing demand for energy - and its dependence on coal - has seen its carbon emissions increase more than 50% since 2000. Within the debate about mitigating global climate change, there is mounting pressure for emerging economies like China to take more responsibility for reducing their carbon emissions within a post-2012 international climate change policy framework. For China, this leads to fundamental questions about how feasible it is for the country to shift away from its recent carbon intensive pattern of growth. This paper presents some general results of scenarios that have been developed to investigate how China might continue to develop within a cumulative carbon emissions budget. The results show how changes in the key sectors of the Chinese economy could enable China to follow four different low carbon development pathways, each of which complies with a cumulative emissions constraint. Each scenario reflects different priorities for governmental decision making, infrastructure investments and social preferences. Having compared the key features of each scenario, the paper concludes with some implications for Chinese government policy.

  11. 21st Century Carbon-Climate Change as Simulated by the Canadian Earth System Model CanESM1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, C.; Christian, J. R.; Arora, V.; Boer, G. J.; Denman, K. L.; Flato, G. M.; Scinocca, J. F.; Merryfield, W. J.; Lee, W. G.; Yang, D.

    2009-12-01

    The Canadian Earth System Model CanESM1 is a fully coupled climate/carbon-cycle model with prognostic ocean and terrestrial components. The model has been used to simulate the 1850-2000 climate using historical greenhouse gas emissions, and future climates using IPCC emission scenarios. Modelled globally averaged CO2 concentration, land and ocean carbon uptake compare well with observation-based values at year 2000, as do the annual cycle and latitudinal distribution of CO2, instilling confidence that the model is suitable for future projections of carbon cycle behaviour in a changing climate. Land use change emissions are calculated explicitly using an observation-based time series of fractional coverage of different plant functional types. A more complete description of the model may be found in Arora et al. (2009). Differences in the land-atmosphere CO2 flux from the present to the future period under the SRES A2 emissions scenario show an increase in land sinks by a factor of 7.5 globally, mostly the result of CO2 fertilization. By contrast, the magnitude of the global ocean CO2 sink increases by a factor of only 2.3 by 2100. Expressed as a fraction of total emissions, ocean carbon uptake decreases throughout the 2000-2100 period, while land carbon uptake increases until around 2050, then declines. The result is an increase in airborne CO2 fraction after the mid-21st century, reaching a value of 0.55 by 2100. The simulated decline in ocean carbon uptake over the 21st century occurs despite steadily rising atmospheric CO2. This behaviour is usually attributed to climate-induced changes in surface temperature and salinity that reduce CO2 solubility, and increasing ocean stratification that weakens the biological pump. However, ocean biological processes such as dinitrogen fixation and calcification may also play an important role. Although not well understood at present, improved parameterizations of these processes will increase confidence in projections of

  12. 21st Century drought-related fires counteract the decline of Amazon deforestation carbon emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragão, Luiz E O C; Anderson, Liana O; Fonseca, Marisa G; Rosan, Thais M; Vedovato, Laura B; Wagner, Fabien H; Silva, Camila V J; Silva Junior, Celso H L; Arai, Egidio; Aguiar, Ana P; Barlow, Jos; Berenguer, Erika; Deeter, Merritt N; Domingues, Lucas G; Gatti, Luciana; Gloor, Manuel; Malhi, Yadvinder; Marengo, Jose A; Miller, John B; Phillips, Oliver L; Saatchi, Sassan

    2018-02-13

    Tropical carbon emissions are largely derived from direct forest clearing processes. Yet, emissions from drought-induced forest fires are, usually, not included in national-level carbon emission inventories. Here we examine Brazilian Amazon drought impacts on fire incidence and associated forest fire carbon emissions over the period 2003-2015. We show that despite a 76% decline in deforestation rates over the past 13 years, fire incidence increased by 36% during the 2015 drought compared to the preceding 12 years. The 2015 drought had the largest ever ratio of active fire counts to deforestation, with active fires occurring over an area of 799,293 km 2 . Gross emissions from forest fires (989 ± 504 Tg CO 2 year -1 ) alone are more than half as great as those from old-growth forest deforestation during drought years. We conclude that carbon emission inventories intended for accounting and developing policies need to take account of substantial forest fire emissions not associated to the deforestation process.

  13. Technologies for the 21st century: carbon nano tubes as adsorbents of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alguacil, F. J.; Cerpa, A.; Lado, I.; Lopez, F. A.

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays and in the recent past when the word nano appeared in almost anything it attracted immediate attention and interest, this is why carbon nano tubes, since its discovery nearly twenty years ago, caught the interest of a wide scientific and industrial population to apply the somewhat amazing properties of these nano materials in a number of applications. Among them, the removal of toxic and sometimes profitable metals from aqueous streams appeared, due to its economical and social impact, as one of the targets for their uses. This paper reviews some recent advances (2009-2013 years) in the application of carbon nano tubes materials in the removal of a variety of metals from these aqueous streams. (Author)

  14. Simulated 21st century's increase in oceanic suboxia by CO2-enhanced biotic carbon export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oschlies, Andreas; Schulz, Kai G.; Riebesell, Ulf; Schmittner, Andreas

    2008-12-01

    The primary impacts of anthropogenic CO2 emissions on marine biogeochemical cycles predicted so far include ocean acidification, global warming induced shifts in biogeographical provinces, and a possible negative feedback on atmospheric CO2 levels by CO2-fertilized biological production. Here we report a new potentially significant impact on the oxygen-minimum zones of the tropical oceans. Using a model of global climate, ocean circulation, and biogeochemical cycling, we extrapolate mesocosm-derived experimental findings of a pCO2-sensitive increase in biotic carbon-to-nitrogen drawdown to the global ocean. For a simulation run from the onset of the industrial revolution until A.D. 2100 under a "business-as-usual" scenario for anthropogenic CO2 emissions, our model predicts a negative feedback on atmospheric CO2 levels, which amounts to 34 Gt C by the end of this century. While this represents a small alteration of the anthropogenic perturbation of the carbon cycle, the model results reveal a dramatic 50% increase in the suboxic water volume by the end of this century in response to the respiration of excess organic carbon formed at higher CO2 levels. This is a significant expansion of the marine "dead zones" with severe implications not only for all higher life forms but also for oxygen-sensitive nutrient recycling and, hence, for oceanic nutrient inventories.

  15. Forest nutrient and carbon pools at Walker Branch watershed: changes during a 21-year period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl C. Trettin; D.W. Johnson; D.E. Todd

    1999-01-01

    A 21-yr perspective on changes in nutrient and C pools on undisturbed upland forest sites is provided. Plots originally representing four cover types have been sampled three times. On each plot, forest biomass, forest floor, and soil, to a depth of 60 cm, were measured, sampled, and analyzed for Ca, Mg, C, N, and P. Exchangeable soil Ca and Mg have declined in most...

  16. Materials for the 21st Century. Can the carbon come from CO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kissling, S.; Altenbuchner, P.T.; Rieger, B. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). WACKER Lehrstuhl fuer Makromolekulare Chemie

    2012-07-01

    The major amount of synthetic polymers depend on petroleum feedstock. The topic of biodegradable plastics has drawn much attention since the discovery of poly(propylene carbonate) by Inoue, over 40 years ago. Coupling of carbon dioxide with epoxides leads to polycarbonates, which are temperature stable, biodegradable, firm, elastic and highly transparent. These properties open up a wide range of applications. The most preferable epoxide in the copolymerization is propylene oxide. Up to date, there are three different catalyst systems (zinc glutarates, zinc phenoxides and {beta}-diketiminato-zinc-complexes) containing zinc as a metal center. Due to the fact that heterogeneous zinc glutarates show low activities, our work focuses on homogenous catalyst systems. Herein it is a big challenge to avoid the formation of byproducts, namely the back-biting reaction and the consecutive insertion of epoxides. Therefore a catalyst must be designed to suppress these reactions. Furthermore, most of the zinc based catalysts are only active for the copolymerization of CO{sub 2} and cyclohexene oxide and not propylene oxide. The presentation will give a detailed insight into new catalyst structures and especially mechanistic aspects concerned with electronical and sterical influences of the polymerization catalyst. (orig.)

  17. Practical domain for ultrasonic testing of stainless steel over plain carbon steel layered components using M21 waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grewal, D.S.; Bray, D.E.

    1995-01-01

    The first higher order mode of the Rayleigh wave was discussed by Sezawa in the early part of this century in context of seismological wave studies. These Sezawa, or M 21 , or first higher order mode Rayleigh waves, have subsequently been used in the field of nondestructive testing of layered materials based on the development of the seismological model of the Sezawa waves by others. In this paper the study of the Tiersten formulation in context with slow speed over high speed materials, e.g. stainless steel overlay on plain carbon steel, the limitations and applicability of that formulation is reported. This study illustrates the practical bounds for testing such layered media, using numerical analysis of this formulation for the first higher-order mode to establish theoretical limits, and corroboration of these bounds by experimental results

  18. Technologies for the 21st century: carbon nanotubes as adsorbents of metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alguacil, Francisco José

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays and in the recent past when the word “nano” appeared in almost anything it attracted immediate attention and interest, this is why carbon nanotubes, since its discovery nearly twenty years ago, caught the interest of a wide scientific and industrial population to apply the somewhat amazing properties of these nanomaterials in a number of applications. Among them, the removal of toxic and sometimes profitable metals from aqueous streams appeared, due to its economical and social impact, as one of the targets for their uses. This paper reviews some recent advances (2009–2013 years in the application of carbon nanotubes materials in the removal of a variety of metals from these aqueous streams.Tanto en el pasado como hoy en día, cuando la palabra “nano” aparece en cualquier sitio inmediatamente suscita atención e interés; por eso y desde su descubrimiento hace cerca de veinte años, los nanotubos de carbono interesaron tanto a científicos como a industriales, que utilizaron las propiedades de estos nanomateriales en una serie de aplicaciones. Entre éstas, se incluye la eliminación de metales tóxicos, y otros con un cierto valor económico, de medios acuosos, problemática que además tiene unas implicaciones económicas y sociales importantes. Este trabajo revisa los avances más recientes (años 2009–2013 de la utilización de estos nanotubos de carbono en la eliminación de una serie de metales contenidos en distintos medios acuosos.

  19. Global and regional effects of land-use change on climate in 21. century simulations with interactive carbon cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boysen, L.R.; Brovkin, V.; Pongratz, J.; Gayler, V.; Arora, V.K.; Cadule, P.; Noblet-Ducoudre, N. de; Kato, E.

    2014-01-01

    Bio-geophysical (BGP) and biogeochemical (BGC) effects of land-use and land cover change (LULCC) are separated at the global and regional scales in new interactive CO 2 simulations for the 21. century. Results from four earth system models (ESMs) are analyzed for the future RCP8.5 scenario from simulations with and without land-use and land cover change (LULCC), contributing to the Land-Use and Climate, Identification of robust impacts (LUCID) project. Over the period 2006-2100, LULCC causes the atmospheric CO 2 concentration to increase by 12, 22, and 66 ppm in CanESM2, MIROC-ESM, and MPI-ESM-LR, respectively. Statistically significant changes in global near-surface temperature are found in three models with a BGC induced global mean annual warming between 0.07 and 0.23 K. BGP-induced responses are simulated by three models in areas of intense LULCC of varying sign and magnitude (between -0.47 and 0.10 K). Modifications of the land carbon pool by LULCC are disentangled in accordance with processes that can lead to increases and decreases in this carbon pool. Global land carbon losses due to LULCC are simulated by all models: 218, 57, 35 and 34 Gt C by MPI-ESM-LR, MIROC-ESM, IPSL-CM5A-LR and CanESM2, respectively. On the contrary, the CO 2 -fertilization effect caused by elevated atmospheric CO 2 concentrations due to LULCC leads to a land carbon gain of 39 Gt C in MPI-ESM-LR and is almost negligible in the other models. A substantial part of the spread in models' responses to LULCC is attributed to the differences in implementation of LULCC (e.g., whether pastures or crops are simulated explicitly) and the simulation of specific processes. Simple idealized experiments with clear protocols for implementing LULCC in ESMs are needed to increase the understanding of model responses and the statistical significance of results, especially when analyzing the regional-scale impacts of LULCC. (authors)

  20. Global and regional effects of land-use change on climate in 21st century simulations with interactive carbon cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. R. Boysen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Biogeophysical (BGP and biogeochemical (BGC effects of land-use and land cover change (LULCC are separated at the global and regional scales in new interactive CO2 simulations for the 21st century. Results from four earth system models (ESMs are analyzed for the future RCP8.5 scenario from simulations with and without land-use and land cover change (LULCC, contributing to the Land-Use and Climate, IDentification of robust impacts (LUCID project. Over the period 2006–2100, LULCC causes the atmospheric CO2 concentration to increase by 12, 22, and 66 ppm in CanESM2, MIROC-ESM, and MPI-ESM-LR, respectively. Statistically significant changes in global near-surface temperature are found in three models with a BGC-induced global mean annual warming between 0.07 and 0.23 K. BGP-induced responses are simulated by three models in areas of intense LULCC of varying sign and magnitude (between −0.47 and 0.10 K. Modifications of the land carbon pool by LULCC are disentangled in accordance with processes that can lead to increases and decreases in this carbon pool. Global land carbon losses due to LULCC are simulated by all models: 218, 57, 35 and 34 Gt C by MPI-ESM-LR, MIROC-ESM, IPSL-CM5A-LR and CanESM2, respectively. On the contrary, the CO2-fertilization effect caused by elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations due to LULCC leads to a land carbon gain of 39 Gt C in MPI-ESM-LR and is almost negligible in the other models. A substantial part of the spread in models' responses to LULCC is attributed to the differences in implementation of LULCC (e.g., whether pastures or crops are simulated explicitly and the simulation of specific processes. Simple idealized experiments with clear protocols for implementing LULCC in ESMs are needed to increase the understanding of model responses and the statistical significance of results, especially when analyzing the regional-scale impacts of LULCC.

  1. Soil humus and carbon popularity from 1804 (N. de Saussure) to 2015 (COP 21)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, Christian; Brevik, Eric

    2017-04-01

    The popularity of humus (or soil organic matter SOM) and later on soil organic carbon (SOC) as related to plant nutrition, soil fertility and environment varied widely from the beginning of the 19th century with the research of Nicolas de Saussure (1804) to Thaer's humus theory (1809) followed by Liebig's mineral theory (1840) until the 20th century with new perceptions of the beneficial roles of SOM. Nowadays, it is known that SOM (with SOC) participates in multiple interactions with the other Earth ecosystem compartments (hydrosphere, biosphere, atmosphere lithosphere). Very recently SOM and SOC were raised to the summit of the international challenges concerning global changes with the French initiative entitled "4 per 1000". Therefore, from the past to the present humus has received varying levels of consideration regarding its benefits for humanity. The central questions of this presentation will be: 1) What were the links between science and society at each of these epistemological steps during these last 200 years, and 2) what were the scientific theories involved?

  2. Esophageal achalasia compressing left atrium diagnosed by echocardiography using a liquid containing carbon dioxide in a 21-year-old woman with Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Man Je; Song, Bong Gun; Lee, Hyoun Soo; Kim, Ki Hoon; Ok, Hea Sung; Kim, Byeong Ki; Park, Yong Hwan; Kang, Gu Hyun; Chun, Woo Jung; Oh, Ju Hyeon

    2012-01-01

    Extrinsic compression of the left atrium by the esophagus, the stomach, or both is an uncommon but important cause of hemodynamic compromise. Achalasia is a motility disorder characterized by impaired relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter and dilatation of the distal two thirds of the esophagus. Echocardiographic imaging after oral ingestion of liquid containing carbon dioxide allowed for differentiation between a compressive vascular structure and the esophagus. We report a rare case of esophageal achalasia compressing the left atrium diagnosed by echocardiography using a liquid containing carbon dioxide in a 21-year-old woman with Turner syndrome. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Boreal and temperate snow cover variations induced by black carbon emissions in the middle of the 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ménégoz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We used a coupled climate-chemistry model to quantify the impacts of aerosols on snow cover north of 30° N both for the present-day and for the middle of the 21st century. Black carbon (BC deposition over continents induces a reduction in the mean number of days with snow at the surface (MNDWS that ranges from 0 to 10 days over large areas of Eurasia and Northern America for the present-day relative to the pre-industrial period. This is mainly due to BC deposition during the spring, a period of the year when the remaining of snow accumulated during the winter is exposed to both strong solar radiation and a large amount of aerosol deposition induced themselves by a high level of transport of particles from polluted areas. North of 30° N, this deposition flux represents 222 Gg BC month−1 on average from April to June in our simulation. A large reduction in BC emissions is expected in the future in all of the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP scenarios. In particular, considering the RCP8.5 in our simulation leads to a decrease in the spring BC deposition down to 110 Gg month−1 in the 2050s. However, despite the reduction of the aerosol impact on snow, the MNDWS is strongly reduced by 2050, with a decrease ranging from 10 to 100 days from present-day values over large parts of the Northern Hemisphere. This reduction is essentially due to temperature increase, which is quite strong in the RCP8.5 scenario in the absence of climate mitigation policies. Moreover, the projected sea-ice retreat in the next decades will open new routes for shipping in the Arctic. However, a large increase in shipping emissions in the Arctic by the mid-21st century does not lead to significant changes of BC deposition over snow-covered areas in our simulation. Therefore, the MNDWS is clearly not affected through snow darkening effects associated with these Arctic ship emissions. In an experiment without nudging toward atmospheric reanalyses, we simulated

  4. Effect of carbon activity on the creep behaviour of 21/4Cr, 1Mo steel in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordwell, J.E.; Charnock, W.; Nicholson, R.D.

    1979-02-01

    The creep endurance and creep cracking behaviour of 2 1/4Cr, 1Mo steel in sodium at 475 0 C have been studied at three different sodium carbon activities. Creep endurance was found to increase with increasing carbon activity of the sodium. Tests carried out in high carbon activity sodium were discontinued before fracture. Creep crack initiation displacement at notches decreased with increasing carbon activity, presumably as a result of notch tip carburisation. The plastic zones at the tips of blunt notches in specimens exposed in high carbon activity sodium were preferentially carburised. These observations were similar to those made previously on 9Cr, 1Mo steel. One difference detected metallographically was that in a high carburising environment uniform carburisation was obtained in the 2 1/4Cr, 1Mo steel specimens whereas carburisation gradients were observed in the 9Cr, 1Mo steel. Creep crack propagation rates for given notch opening displacement rates in low and intermediate carbon activity sodium were indistinguishable. However, the strenthening that resulted from the mild carburisation of the specimen in the intermediate carbon activity sodium caused slower notch opening displacement rates and crack propagation rates than in the low carbon activity sodium, when the rates were compared at the same crack length. (author)

  5. Carbonization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennebutte, H G; Goutal, E

    1921-07-04

    Materials such as coal, peat, or schist are subjected to a rising temperature in successive stages in apparatus in which the distillation products are withdrawn at each stage. For example in a three-stage process, the acid products of the first or low-temperature stage are fixed in a suitable reagent, the basic products from a second or higher-temperature stage are absorbed in an acid reagent, hydrocarbons being retained by solvents, while the third are subjected to a pyrogenation process carried out in a closed vessel. Wherein the material is subjected in stages to a rising temperature, the gasified products being withdrawn at each stage, and are prevented as far as possible from mixing with the carbonized products.

  6. Large increase in dissolved inorganic carbon flux from the Mississippi River to Gulf of Mexico due to climatic and anthropogenic changes over the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wei; Tian, Hanqin; Tao, Bo; Yang, Jia; Pan, Shufen; Cai, Wei-Jun; Lohrenz, Steven E; He, Ruoying; Hopkinson, Charles S

    2015-04-01

    It is recognized that anthropogenic factors have had a major impact on carbon fluxes from land to the ocean during the past two centuries. However, little is known about how future changes in climate, atmospheric CO 2 , and land use may affect riverine carbon fluxes over the 21st century. Using a coupled hydrological-biogeochemical model, the Dynamic Land Ecosystem Model, this study examines potential changes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) export from the Mississippi River basin to the Gulf of Mexico during 2010-2099 attributable to climate-related conditions (temperature and precipitation), atmospheric CO 2 , and land use change. Rates of annual DIC export are projected to increase by 65% under the high emission scenario (A2) and 35% under the low emission scenario (B1) between the 2000s and the 2090s. Climate-related changes along with rising atmospheric CO 2 together would account for over 90% of the total increase in DIC export throughout the 21st century. The predicted increase in DIC export from the Mississippi River basin would alter chemistry of the coastal ocean unless appropriate climate mitigation actions are taken in the near future.

  7. The carbon balance pivot point of southwestern U.S. semiarid ecosystems: Insights from the 21st century drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Russell L.; Biederman, Joel A.; Hamerlynck, Erik P.; Barron-Gafford, Greg A.

    2015-12-01

    Global-scale studies indicate that semiarid regions strongly regulate the terrestrial carbon sink. However, we lack understanding of how climatic shifts, such as decadal drought, impact carbon sequestration across the wide range of structural diversity in semiarid ecosystems. Therefore, we used eddy covariance measurements to quantify how net ecosystem production of carbon dioxide (NEP) differed with relative grass and woody plant abundance over the last decade of drought in four Southwest U.S. ecosystems. We identified a precipitation "pivot point" in the carbon balance for each ecosystem where annual NEP switched from negative to positive. Ecosystems with grass had pivot points closer to the drought period precipitation than the predrought average, making them more likely to be carbon sinks (and a grass-free shrubland, a carbon source) during the current drought. One reason for this is that the grassland located closest to the shrubland supported higher leaf area and photosynthesis at the same water availability. Higher leaf area was associated with a greater proportion of evapotranspiration being transpiration (T/ET), and therefore with higher ecosystem water use efficiency (gross ecosystem photosynthesis/ET). Our findings strongly show that water availability is a primary driver of both gross and net semiarid productivity and illustrate that structural differences may contribute to the speed at which ecosystem carbon cycling adjusts to climatic shifts.

  8. Reconstitution of CO2 Regulation of SLAC1 Anion Channel and Function of CO2-Permeable PIP2;1 Aquaporin as CARBONIC ANHYDRASE4 Interactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeise, Brian; Xu, Danyun; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Boron, Walter F.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2016-01-01

    Dark respiration causes an increase in leaf CO2 concentration (Ci), and the continuing increases in atmospheric [CO2] further increases Ci. Elevated leaf CO2 concentration causes stomatal pores to close. Here, we demonstrate that high intracellular CO2/HCO3− enhances currents mediated by the Arabidopsis thaliana guard cell S-type anion channel SLAC1 upon coexpression of any one of the Arabidopsis protein kinases OST1, CPK6, or CPK23 in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Split-ubiquitin screening identified the PIP2;1 aquaporin as an interactor of the βCA4 carbonic anhydrase, which was confirmed in split luciferase, bimolecular fluorescence complementation, and coimmunoprecipitation experiments. PIP2;1 exhibited CO2 permeability. Mutation of PIP2;1 in planta alone was insufficient to impair CO2- and abscisic acid-induced stomatal closing, likely due to redundancy. Interestingly, coexpression of βCA4 and PIP2;1 with OST1-SLAC1 or CPK6/23-SLAC1 in oocytes enabled extracellular CO2 enhancement of SLAC1 anion channel activity. An inactive PIP2;1 point mutation was identified that abrogated water and CO2 permeability and extracellular CO2 regulation of SLAC1 activity. These findings identify the CO2-permeable PIP2;1 as key interactor of βCA4 and demonstrate functional reconstitution of extracellular CO2 signaling to ion channel regulation upon coexpression of PIP2;1, βCA4, SLAC1, and protein kinases. These data further implicate SLAC1 as a bicarbonate-responsive protein contributing to CO2 regulation of S-type anion channels. PMID:26764375

  9. Soil temperature response to 21st century global warming: the role of and some implications for peat carbon in thawing permafrost soils in North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Wisser

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Northern peatlands contain a large terrestrial carbon pool that plays an important role in the Earth's carbon cycle. A considerable fraction of this carbon pool is currently in permafrost and is biogeochemically relatively inert; this will change with increasing soil temperatures as a result of climate warming in the 21st century. We use a geospatially explicit representation of peat areas and peat depth from a recently-compiled database and a geothermal model to estimate northern North America soil temperature responses to predicted changes in air temperature. We find that, despite a widespread decline in the areas classified as permafrost, soil temperatures in peatlands respond more slowly to increases in air temperature owing to the insulating properties of peat. We estimate that an additional 670 km3 of peat soils in North America, containing ~33 Pg C, could be seasonally thawed by the end of the century, representing ~20 % of the total peat volume in Alaska and Canada. Warming conditions result in a lengthening of the soil thaw period by ~40 days, averaged over the model domain. These changes have potentially important implications for the carbon balance of peat soils.

  10. Cleaner fossil power generation in the 21st century: a technology strategy for carbon capture and storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-04-15

    The document describes how the research, development and demonstration (RD&D) components of the United Kingdom Government's Carbon Abatement Technologies (CATs) Strategy should be developed and extended, with particular reference to a 2020 target for carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) commercialisation and the 2050 UK Committee on Climate Change (CCC) dioxide target. It sets out a strategy for RD&D through the establishment of a collaborative programme linking industry, and academia, and involving different funding sources. The proposed RD& D programme has seven strategic themes: Power plant: focus on cost, increasing efficiency, biomass co-firing; Capture technologies: focus on cost, efficiency penalty, waste heat utilisation; storage: focus on security, monitoring and verification; transport: focus on logistics and transport network; whole system: focus on risks, transient capability, economics, environmental issues; advanced and novel capture technologies; and underpinning technology support. 11 refs., 10 figs., 15 tabs.

  11. Reduced-Order Model for the Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine and Trace Metal Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Carbonate Aquifer, Version 2.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacon, Diana H.

    2013-03-31

    The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) consists of 5 U.S DOE national laboratories collaborating to develop a framework for predicting the risks associated with carbon sequestration. The approach taken by NRAP is to divide the system into components, including injection target reservoirs, wellbores, natural pathways including faults and fractures, groundwater and the atmosphere. Next, develop a detailed, physics and chemistry-based model of each component. Using the results of the detailed models, develop efficient, simplified models, termed reduced order models (ROM) for each component. Finally, integrate the component ROMs into a system model that calculates risk profiles for the site. This report details the development of the Groundwater Geochemistry ROM for the Edwards Aquifer at PNNL. The Groundwater Geochemistry ROM for the Edwards Aquifer uses a Wellbore Leakage ROM developed at LANL as input. The detailed model, using the STOMP simulator, covers a 5x8 km area of the Edwards Aquifer near San Antonio, Texas. The model includes heterogeneous hydraulic properties, and equilibrium, kinetic and sorption reactions between groundwater, leaked CO2 gas, brine, and the aquifer carbonate and clay minerals. Latin Hypercube sampling was used to generate 1024 samples of input parameters. For each of these input samples, the STOMP simulator was used to predict the flux of CO2 to the atmosphere, and the volume, length and width of the aquifer where pH was less than the MCL standard, and TDS, arsenic, cadmium and lead exceeded MCL standards. In order to decouple the Wellbore Leakage ROM from the Groundwater Geochemistry ROM, the response surface was transformed to replace Wellbore Leakage ROM input parameters with instantaneous and cumulative CO2 and brine leakage rates. The most sensitive parameters proved to be the CO2 and brine leakage rates from the well, with equilibrium coefficients for calcite and dolomite, as well as the number of illite and kaolinite

  12. Ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of microRNA-21 combining layered nanostructure of oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes and nanodiamonds by hybridization chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lingzhi; Song, Chao; Zhang, Zhang; Yang, Juan; Zhou, Lili; Zhang, Xing; Xie, Guoming

    2015-08-15

    Measurement of microRNA (miRNA) levels in body fluids is a crucial tool for the early diagnosis and prognosis of cancers. In this study, we developed an electrochemical assay to detect miRNA-21 by fabricating the electrode with layer-by-layer assembly of oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes and nanodiamonds. Tetrahedron-structured probes with free-standing probe on the top served as receptors to hybridize with target miRNA directly. The probes were immobilized on the deposited gold nanoparticles through a well-established strong Au-S bond. The electrochemical signal was mainly derived from an ultrasensitive pattern by combining hybridization chain reaction with DNA-functionalized AuNPs, which provided DNAzyme to catalyze H2O2 reduction. Differential pulse voltammetry was applied to record the electrochemical signals, which was increased linearly with the target miRNA-21, and the linear detection range was 10 fM to 1.0 nM. The limit of detection reached 1.95 fM (S/N=3), and the proposed biosensor exhibited good reproducibility and stability, as well as high sensitivity. Hence, this biosensor has a promising potential in clinical application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Changing Climates. The Role of Renewable Energy in a Carbon-Constrained World. A Paper Prepared for REN21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, J.; Denton, F.; Garg, A.; Kamel, S.; Pacudan, R.; Usher, E.

    2005-12-01

    The current paper on renewable energy and climate change is focused on the key characteristics of the climate change challenge, the intergovernmental action to address the challenge, and how current and future renewable energy projects can contribute to global carbon mitigation and adaptation efforts at the local level. The report presents the current and possible different future contributions that renewable energy can make. This is based on analysis of different authoritative global scenarios and their underlying assumptions, and is aimed at providing guidance on what would be required in terms of policy decisions and technological developments if renewable energy is going to significantly mitigate climate change. Although the focus is particularly on climate change and the opportunities for renewable energy, other issues are closely interlinked. Reducing GHG emissions by introducing more renewable energy, for example, will also have positive impacts on the security of energy supply, while potentially compounding the need for investment capital. The report begins with the current global energy demand and the contribution of renewable energy to meeting that demand. Next, different key internationally recognised energy development scenarios are presented from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the International Energy Agency (IEA), together with selected policy scenarios of very different specific options to mitigate climate change and stabilize CO2 levels in the range of 450-550 ppm. These scenarios are presented with both high and limited penetrations of renewable energy, along with discussions of underlying assumptions leading to these different results, including comparisons of projected technology costs. Existing policies worldwide to promote renewable energy are then analysed for their relative efficiency and results. Guidance is presented on the possible policy tools governments can use to move from the stipulated 'business

  14. Changing Climates. The Role of Renewable Energy in a Carbon-Constrained World. A Paper Prepared for REN21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, J.; Denton, F.; Garg, A.; Kamel, S.; Pacudan, R. [UNEP Risoe Centre on Energy, Climate and Sustainable Development URC, Roskilde (Denmark); Usher, E. [UNEP Energy Unit, Paris (France)

    2005-12-15

    The current paper on renewable energy and climate change is focused on the key characteristics of the climate change challenge, the intergovernmental action to address the challenge, and how current and future renewable energy projects can contribute to global carbon mitigation and adaptation efforts at the local level. The report presents the current and possible different future contributions that renewable energy can make. This is based on analysis of different authoritative global scenarios and their underlying assumptions, and is aimed at providing guidance on what would be required in terms of policy decisions and technological developments if renewable energy is going to significantly mitigate climate change. Although the focus is particularly on climate change and the opportunities for renewable energy, other issues are closely interlinked. Reducing GHG emissions by introducing more renewable energy, for example, will also have positive impacts on the security of energy supply, while potentially compounding the need for investment capital. The report begins with the current global energy demand and the contribution of renewable energy to meeting that demand. Next, different key internationally recognised energy development scenarios are presented from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the International Energy Agency (IEA), together with selected policy scenarios of very different specific options to mitigate climate change and stabilize CO2 levels in the range of 450-550 ppm. These scenarios are presented with both high and limited penetrations of renewable energy, along with discussions of underlying assumptions leading to these different results, including comparisons of projected technology costs. Existing policies worldwide to promote renewable energy are then analysed for their relative efficiency and results. Guidance is presented on the possible policy tools governments can use to move from the stipulated &apos

  15. Carbon, Nitrogen, and Water Response to Land Use and Management Decisions under a Changing Climate in Pennsylvania during the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felzer, B. S.; Kicklighter, D. W.

    2011-12-01

    The effects of future climate change and increases in atmospheric CO2 levels in Pennsylvania must be considered in the context of land use and management decisions. While Pennsylvania was originally completely forested at the outset of the colonial period, 19th century land clearing and subsequent regrowth has changed the forest cover of Pennsylvania from 32% to 64% of the land area. Recent trends from 1992-2005 show that developed land has increased by 131% at the expense of agricultural land and forests. Future climate projections indicate that Pennsylvania will get significantly warmer and wetter due to continued increases in greenhouse gases. Using the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model version Hydro (TEM-Hydro), this study explores the role of land use and management in carbon and water dynamics during the 20th century and for four land use scenarios in the 21st century including: 1) a potential vegetation land cover of 100% forest; 2) a current land cover comprising mature forests, crops, pasture, and developed area; 3) a current land cover with younger forests; and 4) a future land cover scenario based on expanding development at the rate of 639,284 acres per decade adjacent to existing developed lands. Common assumptions are made about land use management, but we also explore the effect of crop tilling. TEM-Hydro runs are forced by 20th century climate from the PRISM model and 21st century climate from the NCAR CCSM3.0 IPCC A2 and B1 scenarios downscaled and bias corrected to 1/8o resolution. Regrowing forests are the only ecosystem with positive Net Carbon Exchange (NCE, Net Ecosystem Productivity minus carbon losses from the conversion of natural vegetation to cultivation and decomposition of agricultural and wood products, where positive indicates ecosystem sink), and sequester about 11,000 g C m-2 over the 20th century. The highest rates of leaching of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) occur in those areas that are fertilized, which include urban turf lawns

  16. The Swiss carbon balance: methods, state of reporting and research perspectives. COST E21 Workshop. Contribution of forests and forestry to mitigate greenhouse effects. Joensuu (Finland. 28-30 Sep 2000.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bugmann H.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available For the 1990-1998 period, Switzerland reported an annual sink strength of Swiss forests of 4500-6000 Gg CO2. In its latest submission in 2000, newly available national forest inventory (NFI data were used to refine earlier estimates. The same NFI data can also be used to provide extrapolations for the near future. No carbon sequestration values have been reported to date for forest soils. The Swiss government will provide funding for a number of research activities under the umbrella of COST E21, ranging from modeling studies of carbon storage in Swiss forests to an evaluation of joint implementation methods.

  17. Soil temperature response to 21st century global warming: the role of and some implications for peat carbon in thawing permafrost soils in North America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisser, D.; Marchenko, S.; Talbot, J.; Treat, C.; Frolking, S.

    2011-01-01

    Northern peatlands contain a large terrestrial carbon pool that plays an important role in the Earth’s carbon cycle. A considerable fraction of this carbon pool is currently in permafrost and is biogeochemically relatively inert; this will change with increasing soil temperatures as a result

  18. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from time series observations using Bubble type equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from MOORING_KILO_NALU_158W_21N in the North Pacific Ocean from 2008-06-07 to 2015-01-21 (NCEI Accession 0157251)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157251 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and time series data collected from MOORING_KILO_NALU_158W_21N in the North Pacific Ocean from...

  19. Proposal for carbon prices that concord with the Paris Agreement. Mission report Pascal Canfin, Alain Grandjean, Gerard Mestrallet Commission presented to Segolene Royal, president of the COP 21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canfin, Pascal; Grandjean, Alain; Mestrallet, Gerard; Maillet, Anais; Perissin Fabert, Baptiste; Massoni, Michel; Dambrine, Fabrice; Valerian, Francois; Faraco, Benoit; Chassagnette, Anne; Casterman, Herve; Auber, Sophie

    2016-07-01

    The reported mission aimed at identifying practical modalities by which a more robust than now carbon price trajectory could be guaranteed on the European carbon market, at identifying conditions and modalities of integration of a carbon component into the energy taxation of European countries for sectors not concerned by the European carbon market, and at giving proposals for the implementation of a floor price for the production of electric power at the European scale. Thus, after a summary for policy makers, and a formulation of 10 proposals, this report addresses the implementation of a price corridor on the European market: description and limits of the European carbon market, existing or projected foreign examples, analysis of possible options, envisaged corridor levels, effects on European emissions, effect on companies concerned by the EU ETS, effect on other economic actors and households, opinion of GNOs, effect on bidding revenues, position of the European Commission and Parliament, follow-up modalities, legal aspects. It discusses the role of the arrangement for a quicker phasing out of coal in France: description of the French context in terms of emissions, existing carbon tariffing systems and objectives of emission reduction, objectives of the arrangement, implementation options, environmental, economic and political effects of the uniform tax, solutions and their impacts on European policies. The last part addresses the promotion of carbon pricing in the world

  20. Isotopically heavy carbon in C21 to C25 regular isoprenoids in halite-rich deposits from the Sdm Formation, Dead Sea, Israel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Grice, K.; Schouten, S.; Nissenbaum, A.; Charrach, J.

    1998-01-01

    A series of Miocene/Pliocene halite deposits (with extremely low organic carbon contents) from the Sdom Formation (Dead Sea Basin, Israel) have been studied. Distributions and contents of biomarkers have been determined using GC MS and irm-GCMS analyses, respectively. The hydrocarbon fractions

  1. Preparation of a lipopolysaccharide from ''Escherichia coli 0111a, 0111b, K58: H21'' bacterial wall, labeled with carbon-14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Pineda, D.; Solano, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    A brief description is made of the morphological and chemical structure of lipopolysaccharides, as well as its occurence in nature and its mechanisms of action. It is emphasized the usefulness of the labelled lipopolysaccharide for actual biochemical and biomedical research. The method for the labelling, isolation and purification of carbon-14 lipopolysaccharide is described. (auth.)

  2. BaO-Nd2O3-CuOx subsolidus equilibria under carbonate-free conditions at pO2=100 Pa and at pO2=21 kPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong-Ng, W.; Cook, L.P.; Suh, J.; Coutts, R.; Stalick, J.K.; Levin, I.; Huang, Q.

    2003-01-01

    Subsolidus phase equilibria of the BaO-Nd 2 O 3 -CuO x system at pO 2 =100 Pa (0.1% O 2 volume fraction, 810 deg. C) and at pO 2 =21 kPa (21% O 2 volume fraction, 930 deg. C) have been investigated by applying controlled-atmosphere methods to minimize the presence of carbonate and CO 2 and H 2 O contamination. Under carbonate-free conditions, the BaO-Nd 2 O 3 -CuO x phase diagrams at pO 2 =100 Pa and at pO 2 =21 kPa are similar to one another except for differences in the extent of the solid solutions. Apart from the limiting binary phases, the ternary system consists of three solid solutions and one stoichiometric ternary compound. The first solid solution is the high T c series, Ba 2-x Nd 1+x Cu 3 O 6+z (0.3≥x≥0 at pO 2 =100 Pa; 0.95≥x≥ 0 at pO 2 =21 kPa). At pO 2 =21 kPa, a compositionally dependent phase change was detected, from tetragonal (0.7>x≥0) to orthorhombic (0.95≥x≥0.7). The second solid solution series, the 'brown-phase' Ba 1+x Nd 2-x CuO z , has a narrow homogeneity region (0.10>x≥0 at pO 2 =100 Pa; 0.15>x≥0 at pO 2 =21 kPa). In the high BaO part of the phase diagram, a third solid solution (Ba 2-x Nd x )CuO 3+z (x=0 to ∼ 0.3 at pO 2 =100 Pa; x=0-0.45 at pO 2 =21 kPa) was confirmed, as well as a nominally stoichiometric phase, Ba 4 Nd 2 Cu 2 O z . The latter phase is an insulator, with a structure comprised of unusual CuO 5 linear chains. A significant difference in tie line distribution involving the Ba 2-x Nd 1+x Cu 3 O 6+z superconductor was found under carbonate-free conditions relative to literature studies completed in air. Instead of the BaCuO 2+x -Ba 2+x Nd 4-x Cu 2 O z tie line normally encountered in air, a Ba 2-x Nd 1+x Cu 3 O 6+z -(Ba,Nd) 2 CuO 3+x tie line was established. This tie line substantially expands the field of stability of the Ba 2-x Nd 1+x Cu 3 O 6+z superconductor phase into the BaO-rich region of the phase diagram. Implications for the processing of materials based on the Ba 2-x Nd 1+x Cu 3 O 6+z

  3. Synthesis of carbon-14 and tritium labeled cis-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-[2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)cyclohexyl]benzamidehydrochloride, an anticonvulsant agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsi, R.S.P.; Stolle, W.T.; Ayer, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    The title compound, U-54494A, is an anticonvulsant agent with clinical potential for treating epilepsy and a broad spectrum of seizure disorders. Structurally it is related to kappa opiod agonists and shares their anticonvulsant properties, but appears to be devoid of analgesic, sedative, and diuretic side effects. It also has been shown to inhibit neuronal damage and seizures induced by excitatory amino acids. This report describes the synthesis of the racemic U-54494A labeled with carbon-14 at the carboxamide carbon and with tritium in the pyrrolidine ring at C-3 and C-4. These radioisotope labeled versions of U-54494A were prepared for conducting drug disposition studies of this compound in test animals and human subjects

  4. Agenda 21; Agenda 21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-03-01

    In the prospect of the Johannesburg international summit in August 2002, the regional council of Midi-Pyrenees region (S France) in partnership with the French ministry of national development and environment has organized a two-days meeting in order to identify and valorize the good practices for the implementation of a sustainable development policy. The basic reference document of this meeting is the 'Agenda 21' program of actions that all governments signatories to the commitments of the Rio summit will have to implement. This document is the complete version in French language of the Agenda 21. It comprises several points dealing with: the environment protection and the abatement of pollution, the management of energy resources with the development of renewable energies, the viable management of the transportation sector, the management of wastes and radioactive wastes, etc.. (J.S.)

  5. Agenda 21; Agenda 21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-03-01

    In the prospect of the Johannesburg international summit in August 2002, the regional council of Midi-Pyrenees region (S France) in partnership with the French ministry of national development and environment has organized a two-days meeting in order to identify and valorize the good practices for the implementation of a sustainable development policy. The basic reference document of this meeting is the 'Agenda 21' program of actions that all governments signatories to the commitments of the Rio summit will have to implement. This document is the complete version in French language of the Agenda 21. It comprises several points dealing with: the environment protection and the abatement of pollution, the management of energy resources with the development of renewable energies, the viable management of the transportation sector, the management of wastes and radioactive wastes, etc.. (J.S.)

  6. Transient simulations of the carbon and nitrogen dynamics in northern peatlands: from the Last Glacial Maximum to the 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Spahni

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of northern high-latitude peatlands played an important role in the carbon (C balance of the land biosphere since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM. At present, carbon storage in northern peatlands is substantial and estimated to be 500 ± 100 Pg C (1 Pg C = 1015 g C. Here, we develop and apply a peatland module embedded in a dynamic global vegetation and land surface process model (LPX-Bern 1.0. The peatland module features a dynamic nitrogen cycle, a dynamic C transfer between peatland acrotelm (upper oxic layer and catotelm (deep anoxic layer, hydrology- and temperature-dependent respiration rates, and peatland specific plant functional types. Nitrogen limitation down-regulates average modern net primary productivity over peatlands by about half. Decadal acrotelm-to-catotelm C fluxes vary between −20 and +50 g C m−2 yr−1 over the Holocene. Key model parameters are calibrated with reconstructed peat accumulation rates from peat-core data. The model reproduces the major features of the peat core data and of the observation-based modern circumpolar soil carbon distribution. Results from a set of simulations for possible evolutions of northern peat development and areal extent show that soil C stocks in modern peatlands increased by 365–550 Pg C since the LGM, of which 175–272 Pg C accumulated between 11 and 5 kyr BP. Furthermore, our simulations suggest a persistent C sequestration rate of 35–50 Pg C per 1000 yr in present-day peatlands under current climate conditions, and that this C sink could either sustain or turn towards a source by 2100 AD depending on climate trajectories as projected for different representative greenhouse gas concentration pathways.

  7. Regularities of thermochemical characteristics of 1-1, 2-1, 3-1 electrolyte solutions in dimethyl sulfoxide-water and propylene carbonate water mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'ev, A.F.; Monaenkova, A.S.; AlekseeV, G.I.

    1987-01-01

    In an air-tight tilting calorimeter with an isothermal casing enthalpies of praseodymium chloride solution in water, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) - water mixtures, contaning 3.86 and 18.53 mol.% DMSO, and propylene carbonate (PC) - water mixtures, containing 1.85 and 3.23 mol.% PC are measured. The enthalpies of praseodymium chloride solution in the given mixtures in case of infinite solution dilution are determined. Solvation enthalpies of praseodymium and neodymium chlorides, as well as alkali earth metal and magnesium chlorides in water and DMSO - water and PC - water mixtures are calculated. Regularities in thermochemical characteristics of solutions of the given salts in DMSO - water and PC - water mixtures are discussed

  8. Impact of Glycerol as Carbon Source onto Specific Sugar and Inducer Uptake Rates and Inclusion Body Productivity in E. coli BL21(DE3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Kopp

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Gram-negative bacterium E. coli is the host of choice for a multitude of used recombinant proteins. Generally, cultivation is easy, media are cheap, and a high product titer can be obtained. However, harsh induction procedures using isopropyl β-d-1 thiogalactopyranoside as inducer are often referred to cause stress reactions, leading to a phenomenon known as “metabolic” or “product burden”. These high expressions of recombinant proteins mainly result in decreased growth rates and cell lysis at elevated induction times. Therefore, approaches tend to use “soft” or “tunable” induction with lactose and reduce the stress level of the production host. The usage of glucose as energy source in combination with lactose as induction reagent causes catabolite repression effects on lactose uptake kinetics and as a consequence reduced product titer. Glycerol—as an alternative carbon source—is already known to have positive impact on product formation when coupled with glucose and lactose in auto-induction systems, and has been referred to show no signs of repression when cultivated with lactose concomitantly. In recent research activities, the impact of different products on the lactose uptake using glucose as carbon source was highlighted, and a mechanistic model for glucose-lactose induction systems showed correlations between specific substrate uptake rate for glucose or glycerol (qs,C and the maximum specific lactose uptake rate (qs,lac,max. In this study, we investigated the mechanistic of glycerol uptake when using the inducer lactose. We were able to show that a product-producing strain has significantly higher inducer uptake rates when being compared to a non-producer strain. Additionally, it was shown that glycerol has beneficial effects on viability of cells and on productivity of the recombinant protein compared to glucose.

  9. COP21: defense stakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coldefy, Alain; Hulot, Nicolas; Aichi, Leila; Tertrais, Bruno; Paillard, Christophe-Alexandre; Piodi, Jerome; Regnier, Serge; Volpi, Jean-Luc; Descleves, Emmanuel; Garcin, Thierry; Granholm, Niklas; Wedin, Lars; Pouvreau, Ana; Henninger, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The 21. Conference of the Parties (COP21) from the UN Framework Convention took place in Paris between November 30 and December 11, 2015. The challenge is to reach a universal agreement of fight against global warming and to control the carbon footprint of human activities. This topic is in the core of the Defense Ministry preoccupations. This special dossier takes stock of the question of defense issues linked with global warming. The dossier comprises 13 papers dealing with: 1 - COP21: defense stakes (Coldefy, A.); 2 - Warfare climate, a chance for peace (Hulot, N.); 3 - COP21 and defense (Aichi, L.); 4 - A war climate? (Tertrais, B.); 5 - Challenges the World has to face in the 21. century (Paillard, C.A.); 6 - Desertification: a time bomb in the heart of Sahel (Piodi, J.); 7 - The infrastructure department of defense in the fight against climate disturbance (Regnier, S.); 8 - Fight against global warming, a chance for the forces? (Volpi, J.L.); 9 - Sea and sustainable development (Descleves, E.); 10 - Rationales of Arctic's surrounding powers (Garcin, T.); 11 - Arctic: strategic stake (Granholm, N.; Wedin, L.); 12 - Strategic impact of Turkey's new energy choices (Pouvreau, A.); 13 - Climate and war: a brief historical outlook (Henninger, L.)

  10. Carbon used in electrotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulon, M.; Reynvaan, C.; Maire, J.

    1994-01-01

    The carbon is the essential or single component of several materials. After having recalled the general properties of carbon and graphite some traditional processes of fabrication are described and some new products are studied then we tackle the applications with electric current: -electrodes in the electric piles where we use the carbon chemical inertia -coals of electric arc where we use the refractory properties and the low resistivity of graphite -Joule effect where we work on an enough wide field of material resistivity -electric fixed or sliding contacts where in addition to the refractory properties it is its unweldability which makes it indispensable particularly in the brooms for electric motors. The future is good for carbon and its compounds particularly for the new discovered fullerenes, spheric molecules of carbon, the properties of which are bad known (supraconductivity, lubrication, energy storage). 21 refs., 26 figs., 14 tab

  11. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from time series observations using Bubble type equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from MOORING_ALAWAI_158W_21N in the North Pacific Ocean from 2008-06-06 to 2014-07-28 (NCEI Accession 0157360)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157360 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and time series data collected from MOORING_ALAWAI_158W_21N in the North Pacific Ocean from...

  12. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from time series observations using Bubble type equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from MOORING CRIMP1_158W_21N in the North Pacific Ocean from 2005-12-01 to 2008-05-30 (NODC Accession 0100069)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0100069 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and time series data collected from MOORING CRIMP1_158W_21N in the North Pacific Ocean from...

  13. Agenda 21

    OpenAIRE

    Nascimento, Daniel Trento do

    2003-01-01

    Dissertação (mestrado) - Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Centro Sócio-Econômico. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Administração. Agenda 21 é o resultado mais palpável do encontro realizado no Rio de Janeiro em 1992, chamado de ECO-92 ou RIO-92. Nesse encontro, mais de 170 países assinaram um acordo de propagar e implantar um plano global visando o desenvolvimento sustentável, que foi chamado de Agenda 21. Para tanto, a efetividade desse plano está fortemente ligada a capacidade de abso...

  14. Forest carbon management in the United States: 1600-2100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard A. Birdsey; Kurt Pregitzer; Alan Lucier

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the effects of past forest management on carbon stocks in the United States, and the challenges for managing forest carbon resources in the 21st century. Forests in the United States were in approximate carbon balance with the atmosphere from 1600-1800. Utilization and land clearing caused a large pulse of forest carbon emissions during the 19th...

  15. COP21, The Force Awakens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    After four years of hard work, the COP21 has culminated in a climate agreement that was accepted by 195 countries. This agreement is the first to involve all world economies in the fight against climate change. Beyond the pledges made by the governments, the COP21 also aimed to highlight solutions that are backed by the private sector. A testimony to companies' determination to become a part of the movement, several initiatives were launched in a wide range of sectors over the course of the two conference weeks. Responding to these transformations, the financial sector also made several announcements, promising that it would divest from the most polluting energies, increase investments in clean technologies, stimulate financial innovation (green bonds, LDN) and measure carbon footprints. Investors have understood once and for all that they must adapt their investment strategies if they want to face up to the challenges of the current transition to a low carbon economy

  16. Observations of carbon dioxide in the surface waters of the Eastern North Pacific Ocean and the Bering Sea from 21 July 1968 to 03 September 1968 (NODC Accession 7100114)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Measurements of the equilibrium concentration of carbon dioxide in the air and surface waters of the North Pacific Ocean and the Bering Sea are presented....

  17. Possibilities for carbon sequestration by the forestry sector in Hungary. COST E21 Workshop. Contribution of forests and forestry to mitigate greenhouse effects. Joensuu (Finland. 28-30 Sep 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somogyi Z.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In Hungary, gross emissions of carbon amount to some 17.6 millions t C per year. Forestry, the only sector which can offset emissions, seems to be a net sink of 1.6 Mt C per year. Afforesting large areas could substantially increase the carbon fixing capacity of the Hungarian forests. To assess the possibilities of sequestering carbon by afforestation, the CASFOR model, an adaptation of the COMAP model, was developed for Hungarian conditions. The technical potential scenario showed that, by afforesting 773,000 ha of former agricultural land by 2050, some 46 millions t C could be sequestered. The specific costs of sequestering carbon by afforestation are pretty low.

  18. Carbon and carbon-14 in lunar soil 14163

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fireman, E.L.; Stoenner, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    Carbon is removed from the surface of lunar soil 14163 size fractions by combustions at 500 and 1000 0 C in an oxygen stream and the carbon contents and the carbon-14 activities are measured. The carbon contents are inversely correlated with grain size. A measured carbon content of 198 ppM for bulk 14163, obtained by combining the size fraction results, is modified to 109 +- 12 ppM by a carbon contamination correction. This value is in accord with a previous determination, 110 ppM, for bulk 14163. The small ( 53 μ) grains, 11.2 +- 2.0 dpm/kg. The combusted carbon and carbon-14 are attributed mainly to solar-wind implantation. Melt extractions of carbon-14 from the combusted soil samples gave essentially identical activities, 21.0 +- 1.5 and 19.2 +- 2.0 dpm/kg for the small and large grains, and are attributed to cosmic-ray spallation-produced carbon-14

  19. ARCHI21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunter, Moira; Chase, Scott Curland; Kligerman, Bradley

    2011-01-01

    face-to-face learning-teaching scenarios were supported by immersive 3D virtual environments together with social networking media and Web 2.0 tools. This paper uses these pilot studies to speculate on aspects of fragility and offers reflection on future project activity.......This paper offers insights into innovative practice being undertaken in higher architectural and design education, where both language and content teaching and learning are integrated as interwoven parts with joint curricular roles. Using Expansive Learning Theory as an analytical framework...... to examine potential tensions and contradictions arising from the educational approach of Content and Language Integrated Learning, reference is made to three very recent pilot studies of the EU funded project, ARCHI21. The experiential learning in these studies adopted a blended approach, where classical...

  20. Carbon/carbon composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thebault, J.; Orly, P.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon/carbon composites are singular materials from their components, their manufacturing process as well as their characteristics. This paper gives a global overview of these particularities and applications which make them now daily used composites. (authors)

  1. A TALE OF THREE MYSTERIOUS SPECTRAL FEATURES IN CARBON-RICH EVOLVED STARS: THE 21 μm, 30 μm, AND “UNIDENTIFIED INFRARED” EMISSION FEATURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Ajay; Li, Aigen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Jiang, B. W., E-mail: amishra@mail.missouri.edu, E-mail: lia@missouri.edu, E-mail: bjiang@bnu.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2015-03-20

    The mysterious “21 μm” emission feature seen almost exclusively in the short-lived protoplanetary nebula (PPN) phase of stellar evolution remains unidentified since its discovery two decades ago. This feature is always accompanied by the equally mysterious, unidentified “30 μm” feature and the so-called “unidentified infrared” (UIR) features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 μm which are generally attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. The 30 μm feature is commonly observed in all stages of stellar evolution from the asymptotic giant branch through PPN to the planetary nebula phase. We explore the interrelations among the mysterious 21, 30 μm, and UIR features of the 21 μm sources. We derive the fluxes emitted in the observed UIR, 21, and 30 μm features from published Infrared Space Observatory or Spitzer/IRS spectra. We find that none of these spectral features correlate with each other. This argues against a common carrier (e.g., thiourea) for both the 21 μm feature and the 30 μm feature. This also does not support large PAH clusters as a possible carrier for the 21 μm feature.

  2. Synthesis of carbon-11-labeled 4-(phenylamino)-pyrrolo[2,1-f][1,2,4]triazine derivatives as new potential PET tracers for imaging of p38α mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Gao, Mingzhang; Zheng, Qi-Huang

    2014-08-15

    The reference standards methyl 4-(2-methyl-5-(methoxycarbamoyl)phenylamino)-5-methylpyrrolo[2,1-f][1,2,4]triazine-6-carboxylate (10a), methyl 4-(2-methyl-5-(ethoxycarbamoyl)phenylamino)-5-methylpyrrolo[2,1-f][1,2,4]triazine-6-carboxylate (10b) and corresponding precursors 4-(2-methyl-5-(methoxycarbamoyl)phenylamino)-5-methylpyrrolo[2,1-f][1,2,4]triazine-6-carboxylic acid (11a), methyl 4-(2-methyl-5-(ethoxycarbamoyl)phenylamino)-5-methylpyrrolo[2,1-f][1,2,4]triazine-6-carboxylic acid (11b) were synthesized from methyl crotonate and 3-amino-4-methylbenzoic acid in multiple steps with moderate to excellent yields. The target tracer [(11)C]methyl 4-(2-methyl-5-(methoxycarbamoyl)phenylamino)-5-methylpyrrolo[2,1-f][1,2,4]triazine-6-carboxylate ([(11)C]10a) and [(11)C]methyl 4-(2-methyl-5-(ethoxycarbamoyl)phenylamino)-5-methylpyrrolo[2,1-f][1,2,4]triazine-6-carboxylate ([(11)C]10b) were prepared from their corresponding precursors with [(11)C]CH3OTf under basic condition through O-[(11)C]methylation and isolated by a simplified solid-phase extraction (SPE) method in 50-60% radiochemical yields at end of bombardment (EOB) with 185-555 GBq/μmol specific activity at end of synthesis (EOS). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Carbonate aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Kevin J.; Sukop, Michael; Curran, H. Allen

    2012-01-01

    Only limited hydrogeological research has been conducted using ichnology in carbonate aquifer characterization. Regardless, important applications of ichnology to carbonate aquifer characterization include its use to distinguish and delineate depositional cycles, correlate mappable biogenically altered surfaces, identify zones of preferential groundwater flow and paleogroundwater flow, and better understand the origin of ichnofabric-related karst features. Three case studies, which include Pleistocene carbonate rocks of the Biscayne aquifer in southern Florida and Cretaceous carbonate strata of the Edwards–Trinity aquifer system in central Texas, demonstrate that (1) there can be a strong relation between ichnofabrics and groundwater flow in carbonate aquifers and (2) ichnology can offer a useful methodology for carbonate aquifer characterization. In these examples, zones of extremely permeable, ichnofabric-related macroporosity are mappable stratiform geobodies and as such can be represented in groundwater flow and transport simulations.

  4. Carbon sequestration by afforestation and revegetation as a means of limiting net-CO2 emissions in Iceland. COST E21 Workshop. Contribution of forests and forestry to mitigate greenhouse effects. Joensuu (Finland. 28-30 Sep 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigurdsson B.D.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Iceland has lost about 95/ of its woodlands and 50/ of its vegetative cover during the 1,100 years of human settlement. Efforts to reclaim lost woodlands and herbaceous ecosystems have been continuing since the early 20th century. It is emphasised that for Icelandic conditions, effective carbon sequestration can be achieved by restoring (reclaiming herbaceous ecosystems on carbon-poor soils. Since 1990, about 4,000 ha per year have been afforested or revegetated. In 1995, the estimated C-sequestration of those areas was 65,100 t CO2, or 2.9/ of the national emissions for that year. In 1999, the estimated sequestration was up in 127,600 t CO2, or 4.7/ of the predicted CO2 emissions for the year 2000.

  5. Human footprint affects US carbon balance more than climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelet, Dominique; Ferschweiler, Ken; Sheehan, Tim; Baker, Barry; Sleeter, Benjamin M.; Zhu, Zhiliang

    2017-01-01

    The MC2 model projects an overall increase in carbon capture in conterminous United States during the 21st century while also simulating a rise in fire causing much carbon loss. Carbon sequestration in soils is critical to prevent carbon losses from future disturbances, and we show that natural ecosystems store more carbon belowground than managed systems do. Natural and human-caused disturbances affect soil processes that shape ecosystem recovery and competitive interactions between native, exotics, and climate refugees. Tomorrow's carbon budgets will depend on how land use, natural disturbances, and climate variability will interact and affect the balance between carbon capture and release.

  6. Carbon-On-Carbon Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungas, Gregory S. (Inventor); Buchanan, Larry (Inventor); Banzon, Jr., Jose T. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The presently disclosed technology relates to carbon-on-carbon (C/C) manufacturing techniques and the resulting C/C products. One aspect of the manufacturing techniques disclosed herein utilizes two distinct curing operations that occur at different times and/or using different temperatures. The resulting C/C products are substantially non-porous, even though the curing operation(s) substantially gasify a liquid carbon-entrained filler material that saturates a carbon fabric that makes up the C/C products.

  7. Porous carbons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Abstract. Carbon in dense as well as porous solid form is used in a variety of applications. Activated porous carbons are made through pyrolysis and activation of carbonaceous natural as well as synthetic precursors. Pyrolysed woods replicate the structure of original wood but as such possess very low surface areas and ...

  8. Carbon photonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konov, V I [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-30

    The properties of new carbon materials (single-crystal and polycrystalline CVD diamond films and wafers, single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene) and the prospects of their use as optical elements and devices are discussed. (optical elements of laser devices)

  9. 21 CFR 114.3 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definitions. 114.3 Section 114.3 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN..., “pickles” or “pickled ___.” Carbonated beverages, jams, jellies, preserves, acid foods (including such...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1643 - Potassium sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... hydroxide or potassium carbonate. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the “Food Chemicals Codex... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium sulfate. 184.1643 Section 184.1643 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1643 Potassium sulfate. (a) Potassium sulfate (K2SO4, CAS Reg...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium sulfate. 184.1443 Section 184.1443 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4·7H2O, CAS... magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate with sulfuric acid and evaporating the solution to crystallization...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium oxide. 184.1431 Section 184.1431 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Magnesium oxide (MgO, CAS Reg. No. 1309-48-4... powder (light) or a relatively dense white powder (heavy) by heating magnesium hydroxide or carbonate...

  13. 21 CFR 1403.21 - Payment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Payment. 1403.21 Section 1403.21 Food and Drugs... opportunities for minority business enterprises, grantees and subgrantees are encouraged to use minority banks (a bank which is owned at least 50 percent by minority group members). A list of minority owned banks...

  14. 21 CFR 21.3 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definitions. 21.3 Section 21.3 Food and Drugs FOOD... products regulated by the Food and Drug Administration or with which the Food and Drug Administration has business dealings. Any such business enterprise that is identified by the name of one or more individuals...

  15. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from the KNORR in the South Pacific Ocean from 2005-08-21 to 2005-10-06 (NODC Accession 0108071)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108071 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from KNORR in the South Pacific Ocean from 2005-08-21 to 2005-10-06...

  16. Carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The document identifies the main sources of carbon monoxide (CO) in the general outdoor atmosphere, describes methods of measuring and monitoring its concentration levels in the United Kingdom, and discusses the effects of carbon monoxide on human health. Following its review, the Panel has put forward a recommendation for an air quality standard for carbon monoxide in the United Kingdom of 10 ppm, measured as a running 8-hour average. The document includes tables and graphs of emissions of CO, in total and by emission source, and on the increase in blood levels of carboxyhaemoglobin with continuing exposure to CO. 11 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Calcium is needed by the body for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also ... to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in ...

  18. Infiltrated carbon foam composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Rick D. (Inventor); Danford, Harry E. (Inventor); Plucinski, Janusz W. (Inventor); Merriman, Douglas J. (Inventor); Blacker, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An infiltrated carbon foam composite and method for making the composite is described. The infiltrated carbon foam composite may include a carbonized carbon aerogel in cells of a carbon foam body and a resin is infiltrated into the carbon foam body filling the cells of the carbon foam body and spaces around the carbonized carbon aerogel. The infiltrated carbon foam composites may be useful for mid-density ablative thermal protection systems.

  19. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from time series observations using Bubble type equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from MOORING_CRIMP2_158W_21N in the Kaneohe Bay and North Pacific Ocean from 2008-06-11 to 2015-05-13 (NCEI Accession 0157415)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157415 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and time series data collected from MOORING_CRIMP2_158W_21N in the Kaneohe Bay, North Pacific...

  20. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, pH, salinity and other variables collected from time series observations using Bubble type equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from MOORING_KANEOHE_158W_21N in the North Pacific Ocean from 2011-09-30 to 2015-05-06 (NCEI Accession 0157297)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157297 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and time series data collected from MOORING_KANEOHE_158W_21N in the North Pacific Ocean from...

  1. Taxing Electricity Sector Carbon Emissions at Social Cost

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, Anthony; Beasley, Blair; Palmer, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about budget deficits, tax reform, and climate change are fueling discussions about taxing carbon emissions to generate revenue and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Imposing a carbon tax on electricity production based on the social cost of carbon (SCC) could generate between $21 and $82 billion in revenues in 2020 and would have important effects on electricity markets. The sources of emissions reductions in the sector depend on the level of the tax. A carbon tax based on lower SCC ...

  2. Carbon sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Rattan

    2008-02-27

    Developing technologies to reduce the rate of increase of atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) from annual emissions of 8.6PgCyr-1 from energy, process industry, land-use conversion and soil cultivation is an important issue of the twenty-first century. Of the three options of reducing the global energy use, developing low or no-carbon fuel and sequestering emissions, this manuscript describes processes for carbon (CO2) sequestration and discusses abiotic and biotic technologies. Carbon sequestration implies transfer of atmospheric CO2 into other long-lived global pools including oceanic, pedologic, biotic and geological strata to reduce the net rate of increase in atmospheric CO2. Engineering techniques of CO2 injection in deep ocean, geological strata, old coal mines and oil wells, and saline aquifers along with mineral carbonation of CO2 constitute abiotic techniques. These techniques have a large potential of thousands of Pg, are expensive, have leakage risks and may be available for routine use by 2025 and beyond. In comparison, biotic techniques are natural and cost-effective processes, have numerous ancillary benefits, are immediately applicable but have finite sink capacity. Biotic and abiotic C sequestration options have specific nitches, are complementary, and have potential to mitigate the climate change risks.

  3. Zero-Carbon Energy Kyoto 2011 : Special Edition of Jointed Symposium of Kyoto University Global COE “Energy Science in the Age of Global Warming” and Ajou University BK21

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear plant accident at Fukushima in the wake of the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami has had a major impact on the energy strategy of Japan and the world. From a global perspective, approach to energy is of greater and greater consequence. The Global Center of Excellence (COE) Program of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan, with the support of university faculty members, has established an international education and research platform to foster educators, researchers, and policy makers who can develop technologies and propose policies for establishing a CO2 zero-emission society no longer dependent on fossil fuels by the year 2100. Since 2008, a program called “Energy Science in the Age of Global Warming—Toward a CO2 Zero-Emission Energy System” has been in progress at Kyoto University. A third international symposium, titled “Zero-Carbon Energy, Kyoto 2011,” was held jointly with Ajou University, Korea, in August 2011, and this book is a compila...

  4. Carbon stocks and sinks in forestry for the unitéd Kingdom greenhouse gas inventory. COST E21 Workshop. Contribution of forests and forestry to mitigate greenhouse effects. Joensuu (Finland. 28-30 Sep 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milne R.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Afforestation in the UK has been significant and continuing since 1920 (up to 30,000 ha per year. Planting data is used to drive a dynamic process-based carbon accounting model (C-Flow to estimate removals of atmospheric CO2 to these forests. It is assumed that the afforestation can be represented by the characteristics of Sitka spruce for conifers and beech for broadleaves. The present area of forest considered for these estimates is 1.6 millions ha. In 1990 the uptake to trees, litter, soil and products was 2.6 terragramme C, rising to 2.8 terragramme C in 1998. Deforestation is believed to be small. Supporting measurements show that the model predicts long term uptake by conifers well but that losses from planted peat shortly after establishment need further consideration. Process modelling of beech growth suggests that it is primarily dependant on atmospheric CO2 concentration and not on stomatal control per se. UK research priorities relevant to preparation of GHG (greenhouse gas Inventories are presented.

  5. Bilan CarboneR - Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, Aurelie

    2015-01-01

    Bilan Carbone TM , a method for calculating greenhouse gas emissions, was developed to help companies and territorial authorities estimate emissions from their activities or on their territories. After validating the audit perimeter and determining the emission categories to be taken into account, activity data is collected and greenhouse gas emissions are calculated using the tool. Besides accounting greenhouse gas emissions at any given time, the inventory evaluates impact on climate and energy dependence. This helps organizations deal with their emissions by classifying them, implementing action plans to reduce emissions and starting a dynamic process taking into account carbon in their strategic decisions

  6. 21 CFR 21.32 - Personnel records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... procedures may, if necessary, be supplemented in the Food and Drug Administration Staff Manual Guide. Current...) Employee identity may be verified, if necessary, by an FDA ID card rather than in accordance with § 21.44...

  7. CARBONIZER TESTS WITH LAKELAND FEEDSTOCKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Lu; Z. Fan; R. Froehlich; A. Robertson

    2003-09-01

    Research has been conducted under United States Department of Energy Contract (USDOE) DE-AC21-86MC21023 to develop a new type of coal-fired plant for electric power generation. This new type of plant, called a Second Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion Plant (2nd Gen PFB), offers the promise of efficiencies greater than 48%, with both emissions and a cost of electricity that are significantly lower than those of conventional pulverized coal-fired (PC) plants with wet flue gas desulfurization/scrubbers. The 2nd Gen PFB plant incorporates the partial gasification of coal in a carbonizer, the combustion of carbonizer char in a pressurized circulating fluidized (PCFB) bed boiler, and the combustion of carbonizer syngas in a topping combustor to achieve gas turbine inlet temperatures of 2700 F and higher. Under the USDOE Clean Coal V Demonstration Plant Program, a nominal 260 MWe plant demonstrating 2nd Gen PFB technology has been proposed for construction at the McIntosh Power Plant of the City of Lakeland, Florida. In the September-December 1997 time period, four test runs were conducted in Foster Wheeler's 12-inch diameter carbonizer pilot plant in Livingston New Jersey to ascertain carbonizer performance characteristics with the Kentucky No. 9 coal and Florida limestone proposed for use in the Lakeland plant. The tests were of a short-term nature exploring carbonizer carbon conversions, sulfur capture efficiencies and syngas alkali levels. The tests were successful; observed carbonizer performance was in agreement with predictions and no operating problems, attributed to the planned feedstocks, were encountered. The results of the four test runs are reported herein.

  8. Difference in brain distributions of carbon 11-labeled 4-hydroxy-2(1H)-quinolones as PET radioligands for the glycine-binding site of the NMDA ion channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchigami, Takeshi [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyushu University, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Photon Medical Research Center, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Haradahira, Terushi [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: terushi@niu.ac.jp; Fujimoto, Noriko [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyushu University, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Okauchi, Takashi; Maeda, Jun; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Suhara, Tetsuya [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yamamoto, Fumihiko; Sasaki, Shigeki; Mukai, Takahiro [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyushu University, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Hiroshi [Molecular Imaging Frontier Research Center, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Ogawa, Mikako [Photon Medical Research Center, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Magata, Yasuhiro [Photon Medical Research Center, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Molecular Imaging Frontier Research Center, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Maeda, Minoru [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyushu University, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2008-02-15

    High-affinity iodine- and ethyl-C-5 substituted analogs of 4-hydroxy-3-(3-[{sup 11}C]methoxyphenyl)-2(1H)-quinolone ([{sup 11}C]4HQ) were synthesized as new positron emission tomography radioligands for the glycine-binding sites of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) ion channel. Although both radioligands showed high in vitro specific binding to rat brain slices, their binding characteristics were quite different from each other. 5-Ethyl-[{sup 11}C]4HQ (5Et-[{sup 11}C]4HQ) showed higher in vitro binding in the forebrain regions than in the cerebellum, bindings that were strongly inhibited by both glycine-site agonists and antagonists. In contrast, 5-iodo-[{sup 11}C]4HQ (5I-[{sup 11}C]4HQ) showed a homogeneous in vitro binding throughout the brain, which was inhibited by antagonists but not by agonists. This difference in in vitro binding between 5Et-[{sup 11}C]4HQ and 5I-[{sup 11}C]4HQ was quite similar to that previously observed between [{sup 11}C]L-703,717 and [{sup 11}C]4HQ, both glycine-site antagonists. In vivo brain uptakes of these {sup 11}C-labeled 4-hydroxyquinolones were examined in mice. Initial brain uptakes of 5Et- and 5I-[{sup 11}C]4HQ at 1 min after intravenous injections were comparable to that of [{sup 11}C]4HQ, but they were 1.3-2.1 times higher than that of [{sup 11}C]L-703,717. The treatment with an anticoagulant, warfarin, only slightly increased the initial uptakes of [{sup 11}C]4HQ and 5Et-[{sup 11}C]4HQ in contrast to [{sup 11}C]L-703,717. The in vivo regional brain distributions were slightly different between the two radioligands. Pretreatment with nonradioactive ligand (2 mg/kg) slightly inhibited the binding of 5Et-[{sup 11}C]4HQ (16-36% inhibition) but not that of 5I-[{sup 11}C]4HQ. In this study, it was found that a small structural change in [{sup 11}C]4HQ resulted in a major change in binding characteristics and distributions, suggesting the existence of two binding sites for [{sup 11}C]4-hydroxyquinolones on the NMDA ion channel

  9. 21 CFR 184.1210 - Calcium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium oxide. 184.1210 Section 184.1210 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1210 Calcium oxide. (a) Calcium oxide (CaO, CAS Reg. No. 1305-78-8) is also known as lime, quick lime, burnt lime, or calx. It is produced from calcium carbonate, limestone, or...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1207 - Calcium lactate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium lactate. 184.1207 Section 184.1207 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1207 Calcium lactate. (a) Calcium lactate (C6H10CaO6.xH2O, where x is any... calcium carbonate or calcium hydroxide. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1625 - Potassium citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... acid with potassium hydroxide or potassium carbonate. It occurs as transparent crystals or a white... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium citrate. 184.1625 Section 184.1625 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1625 Potassium citrate. (a) Potassium citrate (C6H5K3O7·H2O, CAS...

  12. FY 1999 Report on the technical results. Part 2-1. Development of fuel cell power generation technologies (Research and development of molten carbonate fuel cell power generation system); 1999 nendo nenryo denchi hatsuden gijutsu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. 2-1. Yoyu tansan'engata nenryo denchi (hatsuden system no kenkyu kaihatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-05-01

    This research and development project is aimed at modification and improvement of the stacking technologies, to improve service life and performance of the molten carbonate fuel cell power generation system and reduce its cost. For the cross-flow type stack, optimization of the anode firing conditions leads to controlled reduction of the fine pores, and incorporation of the cathode with MgO successfully leads to controlled elution of NiO and Ni short-cut. For the separator, the service life is extended by treatment of the material with Al and controlling its rigidity. The cell life prediction method is improved to enhance its accuracy. The cell life of -4.3mV/1,000h is achieved by these technologies. For the parallel-flow type stack, the electrodes are improved to achieve the cell life of -1.4mV/1,000h, the technologies for producing the separator for a 1m{sup 2} class unit are developed, and the basic structures of a large-capacity stack are designed. For the internal reforming type, a 200kW class reforming stack is constructed, and operated for 5,259 hours. The causes for electrolyte loss are analyzed by developing the relationships between operating temperature and electrolyte loss, electrolyte mass and sustainability of the cell characteristics, and steam partial pressure over the cathode and electrolyte loss, and also by testing the Ni short-cut. (NEDO)

  13. Mexico and the 21st Century Power Partnership (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-02-01

    The 21st Century Power Partnership's program in Mexico (21CPP Mexico) is one initiative of the Clean Energy Ministerial, carried out in cooperation with government and local stakeholders, drawing upon an international community of power system expertise. The overall goal of this program is to support Mexico's power system transformation by accelerating the transition to a reliable, financially robust, and low-carbon system. 21CPP Mexico activities focus on achieving positive outcomes for all participants, especially addressing critical questions and challenges facing policymakers, regulators, and system operators. In support of this goal, 21CPP Mexico taps into deep networks of expertise and professional connections.

  14. Carbonizing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1923-11-22

    In the downward distillation of coal, shale, lignite, or the like, the heat is generated by the combustion of liquid or gaseous fuel above the charge the zone of carbonization thus initiated travelling downwards through the charge. The combustible gases employed are preferably those resulting from the process but gases such as natural gas may be employed. The charge is in a moistened and pervious state the lower parts being maintained at a temperature not above 212/sup 0/F until influenced by contact with the carbonization zone and steam may be admitted to increase the yield of ammonia. The combustible gases may be supplied with insufficient air so as to impart to them a reducing effect.

  15. Global carbon budget 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Quere, C.; Moriarty, R.; Jones, S.D.; Boden, T.A.; Peters, G.P.; Andrew, R.M.; Andres, R.J.; Ciais, P.; Bopp, L.; Maignan, F.; Viovy, N.

    2014-01-01

    .1 GtC yr -1 , SOCEAN 2.5±0.5 GtC yr -1 , and SLAND 2.8±0.8 GtC yr -1 . For year 2012 alone, EFF grew to 9.7±0.5 GtC yr -1 , 2.2% above 2011, reflecting a continued growing trend in these emissions, GATM was 5.1±0.2 GtC yr -1 , SOCEAN was 2.9±0.5 GtC yr -1 , and assuming an ELUC of 1.0±0.5 GtC yr -1 (based on the 2001-2010 average), SLAND was 2.7±0.9 GtC yr -1 . GATM was high in 2012 compared to the 2003-2012 average, almost entirely reflecting the high EFF. The global atmospheric CO 2 concentration reached 392.520.10 ppm averaged over 2012. We estimate that EFF will increase by 2.1% (1.1- 3.1 %) to ±9.9±0.5 GtC in 2013, 61% above emissions in 1990, based on projections of world gross domestic product and recent changes in the carbon intensity of the economy. With this projection, cumulative emissions of CO 2 will reach about 535±55 GtC for 1870-2013, about 70% from EFF (390±20 GtC) and 30% from ELUC (145±50 GtC). This paper also documents any changes in the methods and data sets used in this new carbon budget from previous budgets (Le Quere et al., 2013). All observations presented here can be downloaded from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (doi:10.3334/CDIAC/GCP 2 013 V 2.3). (authors)

  16. Carbon aerogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthon-Fabry, S.; Achard, P.

    2003-06-01

    The carbon aerogel is a nano-porous material at open porosity, electrical conductor. The aerogels morphology is variable in function of the different synthesis parameters. This characteristic offers to the aerogels a better adaptability to many applications: electrodes (super condensers, fuel cells). The author presents the materials elaboration and their applications. It provides also the research programs: fundamental research, realization of super-condenser electrodes, fuel cells electrodes, gas storage materials and opaque materials for thermal insulation. (A.L.B.)

  17. CO and HCN observations of carbon stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, F; deJong, T; Loup, C

    We present CO and HCN observations of carbon stars. They consist of partly new detections in the (CO)-C-12 J = (1-0), (2-1) and HCN(1-0) lines obtained with the SEST and the IRAM telescope, and of (CO)-C-12 and (CO)-C-13 J = (1-0), (2-1) and (3-2) observations with IRAM and the JCMT of some of the

  18. Bioenergy, the Carbon Cycle, and Carbon Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammen, D. M.

    2003-12-01

    The evolving energy and land-use policies across North America and Africa provide critical case studies in the relationship between regional development, the management of natural resources, and the carbon cycle. Over 50 EJ of the roughly 430 EJ total global anthropogenic energy budget is currently utilized in the form of direct biomass combustion. In North America 3 - 4 percent of total energy is derived from biomass, largely in combined heat and power (CHP) combustion applications. By contrast Africa, which is a major consumer of 'traditional' forms of biomass, uses far more total bioenergy products, but largely in smaller batches, with quantities of 0.5 - 2 tons/capita at the household level. Several African nations rely on biomass for well over 90 percent of household energy, and in some nations major portions of the industrial energy supply is also derived from biomass. In much of sub-Saharan Africa the direct combustion of biomass in rural areas is exceeded by the conversion of wood to charcoal for transport to the cities for household use there. There are major health, and environmental repercussions of these energy flows. The African, as well as Latin American and Asian charcoal trade has a noticeable signature on the global greenhouse gas cycles. In North America, and notably Scandinavia and India as well, biomass energy and emerging conversion technologies are being actively researched, and provide tremendous opportunities for the evolution of a sustainable, locally based, energy economy for many nations. This talk will examine aspects of these current energy and carbon flows, and the potential that gassification and new silvicultural practices hold for clean energy systems in the 21st century. North America and Africa will be examined in particular as both sources of innovation in this field, and areas with specific promise for application of these energy technologies and biomass/land use practices to further energy and global climate management.

  19. Carbon cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeger, J; Halbritter, G; Neumann-Hauf, G

    1982-05-01

    This report contains a review of literature on the subjects of the carbon cycle, the increase of the atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration and the possible impacts of an increased CO/sub 2/ concentration on the climate. In addition to this survey, the report discusses the questions that are still open and the resulting research needs. During the last twenty years a continual increase of the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration by about 1-2 ppm per years has been observed. In 1958 the concentration was 315 ppm and this increased to 336 ppm in 1978. A rough estimate shows that the increase of the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration is about half of the amount of carbon dioxide added to the atmosphere by the combustion of fossil fuels. Two possible sinks for the CO/sub 2/ released into the atmosphere are known: the ocean and the biota. The role of the biota is, however, unclear, since it can act both as a sink and as a source. Most models of the carbon cycle are one-dimensional and cannot be used for accurate predictions. Calculations with climate models have shown that an increased atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration leads to a warming of the earth's surface and lower atmosphere. Calculations show that a doubling of the atmospheric CO/sub 2/-concentration would lead to a net heating of the lower atmosphere and earth's surface by a global average of about 4 W m/sup -2/. Greater uncertainties arise in estimating the change in surface temperature resulting from this change in heating rate. It is estimated that the global average annual surface temperature would change between 1.5 and 4.5 K. There are, however, latitudinal and seasonal variations of the impact of increased CO/sub 2/ concentration. Other meteorological variables (e.g. precipitation, wind speed etc.) would also be changed. It appears that the impacts of the other products of fossil fuel combustion are unlikely to counteract the impacts of CO/sub 2/ on the climate.

  20. New Routes Towards Nanoporous Carbon Materials for Electrochemical Energy Storage and Gas Adsorption

    OpenAIRE

    Oschatz, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The chemical element carbon plays a key role in the 21st century. “The new carbon age” is associated with the global warming due to increasing carbon dioxide emissions. The latter are a major consequence of the continued combustion of fossil fuels for energy generation. However, carbon is also one key component to overcome these problems. Especially porous carbon materials are highly attractive for many environmentally relevant applications. These materials provide high specific surface area,...

  1. Dwarf carbon stars are likely metal-poor binaries and unlikely hosts to carbon planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, Lewis J.; Farihi, J.; Green, P. J.; Wilson, T. G.; Subasavage, J. P.

    2018-06-01

    Dwarf carbon stars make up the largest fraction of carbon stars in the Galaxy with ≈1200 candidates known to date primarily from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. They either possess primordial carbon-enhancements, or are polluted by mass transfer from an evolved companion such that C/O is enhanced beyond unity. To directly test the binary hypothesis, a radial velocity monitoring survey has been carried out on 28 dwarf carbon stars, resulting in the detection of variations in 21 targets. Using Monte Carlo simulations,this detection fraction is found to be consistent with a 100% binary population and orbital periods on the order of hundreds of days. This result supports the post-mass transfer nature of dwarf carbon stars, and implies they are not likely hosts to carbon planets.

  2. Discharge cleaning of carbon deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozetic, M.; Vesel, A.; Drenik, A.

    2006-01-01

    Experimental results of discharge cleaning of carbon deposits are presented. Deposits were prepared by creating plasma in pure methane. The methane was cracked in RF discharge at the output power of 250 W. The resultant radicals were bonded to the wall of discharge vessel forming a thin film of hydrogenated black carbon with the thickness of about 200nm. The film was then cleaned in situ by oxygen plasma with the density of about 1x10 16 m -3 , electron temperature of 5 eV, neutral gas kinetic temperature of about 100 0 C and neutral atom density of 6x10 21 m -3 . The treatment time was 30 minutes. The efficiency of plasma cleaning was monitored by optical emission spectroscopy. As long as the wall was contaminated with carbon deposit, substantial emission of the CO molecules was detected. As the cleaning was in progress, the CO emission was decreasing and vanished after 30 minutes when the discharge vessel became free of any carbon. The results are explained by interaction of plasma radicals with carbon deposits. (author)

  3. Carbons and carbon supported catalysts in hydroprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furimsky, Edward

    2009-07-01

    This book is a comprehensive summary of recent research in the field and covers all areas of carbons and carbon materials. The potential application of carbon supports, particularly those of carbon black (CB) and activated carbon (AC) in hydroprocessing catalysis are covered. Novel carbon materials such as carbon fibers and carbon nano tubes (CNT) are also covered, including the more recent developments in the use of fullerenes in hydroprocessing applications. Although the primary focus of this book is on carbons and carbon supported catalysts, it also identifies the difference in the effect of carbon supports compared with the oxidic supports, particularly that of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The difference in catalyst activity and stability was estimated using both model compounds and real feeds under variable conditions. The conditions applied during the preparation of carbon supported catalysts are also comprehensively covered and include various methods of pretreatment of carbon supports to enhance catalyst performance. The model compounds results consistently show higher hydrodesulfurization and hydrodeoxygenation activities of carbon supported catalysts than that of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported catalysts. Also, the deactivation of the former catalysts by coke deposition was much less evident. Chapter 6.3.1.3 is on carbon-supported catalysts: coal-derived liquids.

  4. Adhered Supported Carbon Nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Dale F.; Craft, Benjamin J.; Jaffe, Stephen M.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (NTs) in excess of 200 μm long are grown by catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbon vapors. The nanotubes grow continuously without the typical extinction due to catalyst encapsulation. A woven metal mesh supports the nanotubes creating a metal supported nanotube (MSNT) structure. The 140 μm wide mesh openings are completely filled by 70 nm diameter multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs). The MWNTs are straight, uniform and highly crystalline. Their wall thickness is about 10 nm (30 graphite layers). The adherent NTs are not removed from the support in a Scotch tape pull test. A 12.5 cm 2 capacitor made from two MSNT structures immersed in 1 M KCl has a capacitance of 0.35 F and an equivalent series resistance of 0.18 Ω. Water flows through the MSNT at a flow velocity of 1 cm/min with a pressure drop of 15 inches of water. With the support removed, the MWNTs naturally form a carbon nanocomposite (CNC) paper with a specific area of 80 m 2 /gm, a bulk density of 0.21 g/cm 3 , an open pore fraction of 0.81, and a resistivity of 0.16 Ω-cm

  5. Carbon classified?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Ingmar

    2012-01-01

    . Using an actor- network theory (ANT) framework, the aim is to investigate the actors who bring together the elements needed to classify their carbon emission sources and unpack the heterogeneous relations drawn on. Based on an ethnographic study of corporate agents of ecological modernisation over...... a period of 13 months, this paper provides an exploration of three cases of enacting classification. Drawing on ANT, we problematise the silencing of a range of possible modalities of consumption facts and point to the ontological ethics involved in such performances. In a context of global warming...

  6. Carbon Footprints

    OpenAIRE

    Rahel Aichele; Gabriel Felbermayr

    2011-01-01

    Lässt sich der Beitrag eines Landes zum weltweiten Klimaschutz an der Veränderung seines CO2-Ausstoßes messen, wie es im Kyoto-Abkommen implizit unterstellt wird? Oder ist aufgrund der Bedeutung des internationalen Güterhandels der Carbon Footprint – der alle CO2-Emissionen erfasst, die durch die Absorption (d.h. Konsum und Investitionen) eines Landes entstehen – das bessere Maß? Die Autoren erstellen eine Datenbank mit den Footprints von 40 Ländern für den Zeitraum 1995–2007. Die deskriptive...

  7. SW21 Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juarez, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-02-10

    Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories hosted the tenth annual Strategic Weapons in the 21st Century Conference (SW21) on 21 January 2016 to reinforce the national commitment to leadership and institutional excellence for nuclear deterrence. The event has been successful over the years in drawing together a diverse, high-level group of policy makers and experts from multiple disciplines to engage in informed dialogue on topics related to strategic weapons in national and international security.

  8. Microstructure and mechanical properties of carbon fiber reinforced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    68

    Alumina; composites; carbon fiber reinforcement; sol; mechanical properties. 1. Introduction ... The reinforcement was 3D carbon fiber (T300 3k, ex-PAN carbon fiber ... where f(a/H) = 2.9(a/H)1/2 – 4.6(a/H)3/2 + 21.8(a/H)5/2. – 37.6(a/H)7/2 + ...

  9. Unburned carbon in combustion residues from mainly solid biofuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjurstroem H; Lind B; Lagerkvist A

    2012-02-15

    Unburned carbon in 21 combustion residues from solid biofuels is investigated using several methods of analysis (a.o. LOI and TOC), as well as micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results are used to discuss the distribution of unburned carbon in the residues from the different combustion plants and its nature (organic or elemental). The consequences of the elemental nature of carbon for environmental properties of the residue are noted

  10. South Africa and the 21st Century Power Partnership (Fact Sheet). 21st Century Power Partnership; 21st Century Power Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-04-16

    Established in 2012, the 21CPP South Africa Programme is a global initiative that connects South African stakeholders with an international community of expertise. The overall goal of this program is to support South Africa’s power system transformation by accelerating the transition to a reliable, financially robust, and low-carbon power system. 21CPP activities focus on achieving positive outcomes for all participants, especially addressing critical questions and challenges facing system planners, regulators, and operators. In support of this goal, 21CPP taps into deep networks of expertise among leading industry practitioners.

  11. Aquatic carbon cycling in the conterminous United States and implications for terrestrial carbon accounting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butman, David; Stackpoole, Sarah; Stets, Edward; McDonald, Cory P; Clow, David W; Striegl, Robert G

    2016-01-05

    Inland water ecosystems dynamically process, transport, and sequester carbon. However, the transport of carbon through aquatic environments has not been quantitatively integrated in the context of terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we present the first integrated assessment, to our knowledge, of freshwater carbon fluxes for the conterminous United States, where 106 (range: 71-149) teragrams of carbon per year (TgC⋅y(-1)) is exported downstream or emitted to the atmosphere and sedimentation stores 21 (range: 9-65) TgC⋅y(-1) in lakes and reservoirs. We show that there is significant regional variation in aquatic carbon flux, but verify that emission across stream and river surfaces represents the dominant flux at 69 (range: 36-110) TgC⋅y(-1) or 65% of the total aquatic carbon flux for the conterminous United States. Comparing our results with the output of a suite of terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs), we suggest that within the current modeling framework, calculations of net ecosystem production (NEP) defined as terrestrial only may be overestimated by as much as 27%. However, the internal production and mineralization of carbon in freshwaters remain to be quantified and would reduce the effect of including aquatic carbon fluxes within calculations of terrestrial NEP. Reconciliation of carbon mass-flux interactions between terrestrial and aquatic carbon sources and sinks will require significant additional research and modeling capacity.

  12. Aquatic carbon cycling in the conterminous United States and implications for terrestrial carbon accounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butman, David; Stackpoole, Sarah; Stets, Edward; McDonald, Cory P.; Clow, David W.; Striegl, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Inland water ecosystems dynamically process, transport, and sequester carbon. However, the transport of carbon through aquatic environments has not been quantitatively integrated in the context of terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we present the first integrated assessment, to our knowledge, of freshwater carbon fluxes for the conterminous United States, where 106 (range: 71–149) teragrams of carbon per year (TgC⋅y−1) is exported downstream or emitted to the atmosphere and sedimentation stores 21 (range: 9–65) TgC⋅y−1 in lakes and reservoirs. We show that there is significant regional variation in aquatic carbon flux, but verify that emission across stream and river surfaces represents the dominant flux at 69 (range: 36–110) TgC⋅y−1 or 65% of the total aquatic carbon flux for the conterminous United States. Comparing our results with the output of a suite of terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs), we suggest that within the current modeling framework, calculations of net ecosystem production (NEP) defined as terrestrial only may be overestimated by as much as 27%. However, the internal production and mineralization of carbon in freshwaters remain to be quantified and would reduce the effect of including aquatic carbon fluxes within calculations of terrestrial NEP. Reconciliation of carbon mass–flux interactions between terrestrial and aquatic carbon sources and sinks will require significant additional research and modeling capacity. PMID:26699473

  13. Trading forest carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nature of carbon in forests is discussed from the perspective of carbon trading. Carbon inventories, specifically in the area of land use and forestry are reviewed for the Pacific Northwest. Carbon turnover in forests is discussed as it relates to carbon sequestration. Scient...

  14. Atmospheric carbon reduction by urban trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Trees, because they sequester atmospheric carbon through their growth process and conserve energy in urban areas, have been suggested as one means to combat increasing levels of atmospheric carbon. Analysis of the urban forest in Oakland, California (21% tree cover), reveals a tree carbon storage level of 11·0 metric tons/hectare. Trees in the area of the 1991 fire in Oakland stored approximately 14,500 metric tons of carbon, 10% of the total amount stored by Oakland's urban forest. National urban forest carbon storage in the United States (28% tree cover) is estimated at between 350 and 750 million metric tons. Establishment of 10 million urban trees annually over the next 10 years is estimated to sequester and offset the production of 363 million metric tons of carbon over the next 50 years-less than 1% of the estimated carbon emissions in the United States over the same time period. Advantages and limitations of managing urban trees to reduce atmospheric carbon are discussed. 36 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, ... Install one and check its batteries regularly. View Information About CO Alarms Other CO Topics Safety Tips ...

  16. Global Carbon Budget 2017

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Quere, Corinne; Andrew, Robbie M.; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Sitch, Stephen; Pongratz, Julia; Manning, Andrew C.; Korsbakken, Jan Ivar; Peters, Glen P.; Canadell, Josep G.; Jackson, Robert B.; Boden, Thomas A.; Tans, Pieter P.; Andrews, Oliver D.; Arora, Vivek K.; Bakker, Dorothee C. E.; Barbero, Leticia; Becker, Meike; Betts, Richard A.; Bopp, Laurent; Chevallier, Frederic; Chini, Louise P.; Ciais, Philippe; Cosca, Catherine E.; Cross, Jessica; Currie, Kim; Gasser, Thomas; Harris, Ian; Hauck, Judith; Haverd, Vanessa; Houghton, Richard A.; Hunt, Christopher W.; Hurtt, George; Ilyina, Tatiana; Jain, Atul K.; Kato, Etsushi; Kautz, Markus; Keeling, Ralph F.; Goldewijk, Kees Klein; Koertzinger, Arne; Landschuetzer, Peter; Lefevre, Nathalie; Lenton, Andrew; Lienert, Sebastian; Lima, Ivan; Lombardozzi, Danica; Metzl, Nicolas; Millero, Frank; Monteiro, Pedro M. S.; Munro, David R.; Nabel, Julia E. M. S.; Nakaoka, Shin-ichiro; Nojiri, Yukihiro; Padin, X. Antonio; Peregon, Anna; Pfeil, Benjamin; Pierrot, Denis; Poulter, Benjamin; Rehder, Gregor; Reimer, Janet; Roedenbeck, Christian; Schwinger, Jorg; Seferian, Roland; Skjelvan, Ingunn; Stocker, Benjamin D.; Tian, Hanqin; Tilbrook, Bronte; Tubiello, Francesco N.; van der Laan-Luijkx, Ingrid T.; van der Werf, Guido R.; van Heuven, Steven; Viovy, Nicolas; Vuichard, Nicolas; Walker, Anthony P.; Watson, Andrew J.; Wiltshire, Andrew J.; Zaehle, Soenke; Zhu, Dan

    2018-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere - the "global carbon budget" - is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project

  17. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as CO, is called the " ...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3680 - Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vitreous carbon materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3680... the sockets in which teeth are rooted) or intended to coat metal surgical implants to be placed in the...

  19. Assessing ocean alkalinity for carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renforth, Phil; Henderson, Gideon

    2017-09-01

    Over the coming century humanity may need to find reservoirs to store several trillions of tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted from fossil fuel combustion, which would otherwise cause dangerous climate change if it were left in the atmosphere. Carbon storage in the ocean as bicarbonate ions (by increasing ocean alkalinity) has received very little attention. Yet recent work suggests sufficient capacity to sequester copious quantities of CO2. It may be possible to sequester hundreds of billions to trillions of tons of C without surpassing postindustrial average carbonate saturation states in the surface ocean. When globally distributed, the impact of elevated alkalinity is potentially small and may help ameliorate the effects of ocean acidification. However, the local impact around addition sites may be more acute but is specific to the mineral and technology. The alkalinity of the ocean increases naturally because of rock weathering in which >1.5 mol of carbon are removed from the atmosphere for every mole of magnesium or calcium dissolved from silicate minerals (e.g., wollastonite, olivine, and anorthite) and 0.5 mol for carbonate minerals (e.g., calcite and dolomite). These processes are responsible for naturally sequestering 0.5 billion tons of CO2 per year. Alkalinity is reduced in the ocean through carbonate mineral precipitation, which is almost exclusively formed from biological activity. Most of the previous work on the biological response to changes in carbonate chemistry have focused on acidifying conditions. More research is required to understand carbonate precipitation at elevated alkalinity to constrain the longevity of carbon storage. A range of technologies have been proposed to increase ocean alkalinity (accelerated weathering of limestone, enhanced weathering, electrochemical promoted weathering, and ocean liming), the cost of which may be comparable to alternative carbon sequestration proposals (e.g., $20-100 tCO2-1). There are still many

  20. Integral Ring Carbon-Carbon Piston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An improved structure for a reciprocating internal combustion engine or compressor piston fabricate from carbon-carbon composite materials is disclosed. An integral ring carbon-carbon composite piston, disclosed herein, reduces the need for piston rings and for small clearances by providing a small flexible, integral component around the piston that allows for variation in clearance due to manufacturing tolerances, distortion due to pressure and thermal loads, and variations in thermal expansion differences between the piston and cylinder liner.

  1. Photoconductivity of Activated Carbon Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriyama, K.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    1990-08-01

    The photoconductivity is measured on a high-surface-area disordered carbon material, namely activated carbon fibers, to investigate their electronic properties. Measurements of decay time, recombination kinetics and temperature dependence of the photoconductivity generally reflect the electronic properties of a material. The material studied in this paper is a highly disordered carbon derived from a phenolic precursor, having a huge specific surface area of 1000--2000m{sup 2}/g. Our preliminary thermopower measurements suggest that this carbon material is a p-type semiconductor with an amorphous-like microstructure. The intrinsic electrical conductivity, on the order of 20S/cm at room temperature, increases with increasing temperature in the range 30--290K. In contrast with the intrinsic conductivity, the photoconductivity in vacuum decreases with increasing temperature. The recombination kinetics changes from a monomolecular process at room temperature to a biomolecular process at low temperatures. The observed decay time of the photoconductivity is {approx equal}0.3sec. The magnitude of the photoconductive signal was reduced by a factor of ten when the sample was exposed to air. The intrinsic carrier density and the activation energy for conduction are estimated to be {approx equal}10{sup 21}/cm{sup 3} and {approx equal}20meV, respectively. The majority of the induced photocarriers and of the intrinsic carriers are trapped, resulting in the long decay time of the photoconductivity and the positive temperature dependence of the conductivity.

  2. Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijgen, W.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    The increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, mainly caused by fossil fuel combustion, has lead to concerns about global warming. A possible technology that can contribute to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions is CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. The basic concept

  3. Quantification of net carbon flux from plastic greenhouse vegetable cultivation: A full carbon cycle analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yan; Xu Hao; Wu Xu; Zhu Yimei; Gu Baojing; Niu Xiaoyin; Liu Anqin; Peng Changhui; Ge Ying; Chang Jie

    2011-01-01

    Plastic greenhouse vegetable cultivation (PGVC) has played a vital role in increasing incomes of farmers and expanded dramatically in last several decades. However, carbon budget after conversion from conventional vegetable cultivation (CVC) to PGVC has been poorly quantified. A full carbon cycle analysis was used to estimate the net carbon flux from PGVC systems based on the combination of data from both field observations and literatures. Carbon fixation was evaluated at two pre-selected locations in China. Results suggest that: (1) the carbon sink of PGVC is 1.21 and 1.23 Mg C ha -1 yr -1 for temperate and subtropical area, respectively; (2) the conversion from CVC to PGVC could substantially enhance carbon sink potential by 8.6 times in the temperate area and by 1.3 times in the subtropical area; (3) the expansion of PGVC usage could enhance the potential carbon sink of arable land in China overall. - Highlights: → We used full carbon (C) cycle analysis to estimate the net C flux from cultivation. → The plastic greenhouse vegetable cultivation system in China can act as a C sink. → Intensified agricultural practices can generate C sinks. → Expansion of plastic greenhouse vegetable cultivation can enhance regional C sink. - The conversion from conventional vegetable cultivation to plastic greenhouse vegetable cultivation could substantially enhance carbon sink potential by 8.6 and 1.3 times for temperate and subtropical area, respectively.

  4. Composite carbon foam electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Steven T.; Pekala, Richard W.; Kaschmitter, James L.

    1997-01-01

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivty and power to system energy.

  5. Effect of neutron irradiation on vitreous carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurolenkin, E.I.; Virgil'ev, Yu.S.; Chugunova, T.K.

    1989-01-01

    The change in mass (m), volume (V), specific electric resistance (ρ), coefficient of linear thermal expansion (α), dynamic elasticity modulus (E), and limit of bending strength (σ) of vitreous carbon are studied upon neutron irradiation. Samples for study were two forms of vitreous carbon obtained by hardening thermally reactive polymers at 900-1,000 degree K. Phenol-formaldehyde (bakelite lacquer A, Bakelite A) and furfural-phenol-formaldehyde (FM-2) resin were used. They were irradiated in the experimental water - water VVR-M reactor between 360-1,030 degree K. The maximal neutron flux was 1.65·10 21 neut/cm 2 . Neutron irradiation of vitreous carbon led to its shrinkage and accompanied weakening. Shrinkage and weakening of vitreous carbon was decreased with an increase of treatment and irradiation temperatures

  6. Bee Power 21

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lamberson, Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    .... Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) has much to offer the current Naval strategy, and in keeping with its tradition of contribution and service to the fleet, will want to align its strategic plan with the Sea Power 21 vision...

  7. Carbon Nanomembranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Polina; Gölzhäuser, Armin

    2017-03-01

    This chapter describes the formation and properties of one nanometer thick carbon nanomembranes (CNMs), made by electron induced cross-linking of aromatic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). The cross-linked SAMs are robust enough to be released from the surface and placed on solid support or over holes as free-standing membranes. Annealing at 1000K transforms CNMs into graphene accompanied by a change of mechanical stiffness and electrical resistance. The developed fabrication approach is scalable and provides molecular level control over thickness and homogeneity of the produced CNMs. The mechanisms of electron-induced cross-linking process are discussed in details. A variety of polyaromatic thiols: oligophenyls as well as small and extended condensed polycyclic hydrocarbons have been successfully employed, demonstrating that the structural and functional properties of the resulting nanomembranes are strongly determined by the structure of molecular monolayers. The mechanical properties of CNMs (Young's modulus, tensile strength and prestress) are characterized by bulge testing. The interpretation of the bulge test data relates the Young's modulus to the properties of single molecules and to the structure of the pristine SAMs. The gas transport through the CNM is measured onto polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) - thin film composite membrane. The established relationship of permeance and molecular size determines the molecular sieving mechanism of permeation through this ultrathin sheet.

  8. Carbon 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-03-01

    Carbon 14 is one of the most abundant radionuclides of natural and artificial origin in the environment. The aim of this conference day organized by the French society of radioprotection (SFRP) was to take stock of our knowledge about this radionuclide (origins, production, measurement, management, effects on health..): state-of-the-art of 14 C metrology; dating use of 14 C; 14 C management and monitoring of the Hague site environment; Electricite de France (EdF) and 14 C; radiological and sanitary impact of 14 C contamination at the Ganagobie site (Haute-Provence, France); metabolism and biological effects of 14 C; 14 C behaviour in the marine environment near Cogema-La Hague plant; distribution of 14 C activities in waters, mud and sediments of the Loire river estuary; dynamical modeling of transfers in the aquatic and terrestrial environment of 14 C released by nuclear power plants in normal operation: human dose calculation using the Calvados model and application to the Loire river; 14 C distribution in continents; modeling of 14 C transfers in the terrestrial environment from atmospheric sources. (J.S.)

  9. 21 CFR 884.4550 - Gynecologic surgical laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gynecologic surgical laser. 884.4550 Section 884....4550 Gynecologic surgical laser. (a) Identification. A gynecologic surgical laser is a continuous wave carbon dioxide laser designed to destroy tissue thermally or to remove tissue by radiant light energy...

  10. 21 CFR 173.310 - Boiler water additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-sodium acrylate resin Contains not more than 0.05 percent by weight of acrylamide monomer. Acrylic acid/2...-hydroxyethylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid (CAS Reg. No. 2809-21-4) and its sodium and potassium salts Lignosulfonic.... Potassium carbonate Potassium tripolyphosphate Sodium acetate Sodium alginate Sodium aluminate Sodium...

  11. Synthesis of [21-13C]-cholesterol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caballero, G.M.; Gros, E.G.

    1994-01-01

    The synthesis of [21- 13 C]-cholesterol from 3β-O-(t-butyldimethylsilyl)-17β-cyano-androst-5-ene is described. Labelled carbon-atom was introduced by Grignard reaction of nitrile derivative with [ 13 C]-methylmagnesium iodide. Location of label was confirmed by 13 C-NMR spectroscopy. (author)

  12. Radiation damage in carbon-carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.; Eartherly, W.P.; Nelson, G.E.

    1992-01-01

    Graphite and carbon-carbon composite materials are widely used in plasma facing applications in current Tokamak devices such as TFTR and DIIID in the USA, JET, Tore Supra and TEXTOR in Europe, and JT-60U in Japan. Carbon-carbon composites are attractive choices for Tokamak limiters and diverters because of their low atomic number, high thermal shock resistance, high melting point, and high thermal conductivity. Next generation machines such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) will utilize carbon-carbon composites in their first wall and diverter. ITER will be an ignition machine and thus will produce substantial neutron fluences from the D-T fusion reaction. The resultant high energy neutrons will cause carbon atom displacements in the plasma facing materials which will markedly affect their structure and physical properties. The effect of neutron damage on graphite has been studied for over forty years. Recently the effects of neutron irradiation on the fusion relevant graphite GraphNOL N3M was reviewed. In contrast to graphite, relatively little work has been performed to elucidate the effects of neutron irradiation on carbon-carbon composites. The results of our previous irradiation experiments have been published elsewhere. Here the irradiation induced dimensional changes in 1D, 2D, and 3D carbon-carbon composites are reported for fluences up to 4.7 dpa at an irradiation temperature of 600 degree C

  13. Agenda 21 goes electronic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, D

    1996-01-01

    The Canada Center for Remote Sensing, in collaboration with the International Development Research Center, is developing an electronic atlas of Agenda 21, the Earth Summit action plan. This initiative promises to ease access for researchers and practitioners to implement the Agenda 21-action plan, which in its pilot study will focus on biological diversity. Known as the Biodiversity Volume of the Electronic Atlas of Agenda 21 (ELADA 21), this computer software technology will contain information and data on biodiversity, genetics, species, ecosystems, and ecosystem services. Specifically, it includes several country studies, documentation, as well as interactive scenarios linking biodiversity to socioeconomic issues. ELADA 21 will empower countries and agencies to report on and better manage biodiversity and related information. The atlas can be used to develop and test various scenarios and to exchange information within the South and with industrialized countries. At present, ELADA 21 has generated interest and becomes more available in the market. The challenge confronting the project team, however, is to find the atlas a permanent home, a country or agency willing to assume responsibility for maintaining, upgrading, and updating the software.

  14. COP21: to save negotiations or to save the climate?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fremeaux, Alexis; Faure, Elisa; Guillou, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    This note proposes an overview of the main issues which could render an agreement possible at the end of the Paris COP21, and makes some proposals on principles which should be mentioned in the agreement to create a future strong foundation, as well as on tools and measures which could be implemented thereafter. The authors first discuss the content and results of the previous COPs, and comment the negotiation process between Copenhagen and Paris to outline the main challenges and stakes to reach of common agreement. They address the main issues of the COP21 negotiations: mobilisation of 100 billions dollars per year to help emerging countries in reaching a low carbon development mode and to adapt to climate change, how to urgently orient private investments towards a low carbon economy, to base on standards and transparency as two main action levers in case of absence of agreement on carbon price, and definition of needed more ambitious objectives

  15. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  16. Mutagenicity of carbon nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallin, Håkan; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; White, Paul A

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials such carbon nanotubes, graphene and fullerenes are some the most promising nanomaterials. Although carbon nanomaterials have been reported to possess genotoxic potential, it is imperitive to analyse the data on the genotoxicity of carbon nanomaterials in vivo and in vitro...

  17. Africa and the global carbon cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denning A Scott

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The African continent has a large and growing role in the global carbon cycle, with potentially important climate change implications. However, the sparse observation network in and around the African continent means that Africa is one of the weakest links in our understanding of the global carbon cycle. Here, we combine data from regional and global inventories as well as forward and inverse model analyses to appraise what is known about Africa's continental-scale carbon dynamics. With low fossil emissions and productivity that largely compensates respiration, land conversion is Africa's primary net carbon release, much of it through burning of forests. Savanna fire emissions, though large, represent a short-term source that is offset by ensuing regrowth. While current data suggest a near zero decadal-scale carbon balance, interannual climate fluctuations (especially drought induce sizeable variability in net ecosystem productivity and savanna fire emissions such that Africa is a major source of interannual variability in global atmospheric CO2. Considering the continent's sizeable carbon stocks, their seemingly high vulnerability to anticipated climate and land use change, as well as growing populations and industrialization, Africa's carbon emissions and their interannual variability are likely to undergo substantial increases through the 21st century.

  18. Mesoporous carbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng; Fulvio, Pasquale Fernando; Mayes, Richard T.; Wang, Xiqing; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Guo, Bingkun

    2014-09-09

    A conductive mesoporous carbon composite comprising conductive carbon nanoparticles contained within a mesoporous carbon matrix, wherein the conductive mesoporous carbon composite possesses at least a portion of mesopores having a pore size of at least 10 nm and up to 50 nm, and wherein the mesopores are either within the mesoporous carbon matrix, or are spacings delineated by surfaces of said conductive carbon nanoparticles when said conductive carbon nanoparticles are fused with each other, or both. Methods for producing the above-described composite, devices incorporating them (e.g., lithium batteries), and methods of using them, are also described.

  19. Pyrolyzed thin film carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Liger, Matthieu (Inventor); Harder, Theodore (Inventor); Konishi, Satoshi (Inventor); Miserendino, Scott (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method of making carbon thin films comprises depositing a catalyst on a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon in contact with the catalyst and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon. A method of controlling a carbon thin film density comprises etching a cavity into a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon into the cavity, and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon while in the cavity to form a carbon thin film. Controlling a carbon thin film density is achieved by changing the volume of the cavity. Methods of making carbon containing patterned structures are also provided. Carbon thin films and carbon containing patterned structures can be used in NEMS, MEMS, liquid chromatography, and sensor devices.

  20. COP 21: words... and acts?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combe, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    Published shortly before the Paris COP 21, this set of articles first recalls what is this Conference of Parties, and what will be the objectives in Paris: an agreement for the struggle against climate change, a reduction of greenhouse emissions, how to adapt to climate change. It also indicates some quantitative measurements and objectives regarding global warming according to the IPCC. The author outlines commitments for countries which signed the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), presents and discusses the content of the first and second Kyoto protocols, and outlines that a ratification of the second Kyoto protocol would already be a strong message. A second article notices that the objective of a maximum of a 2 degree increase of the global temperature seems difficult to be met when considering the Intended Nationally Determined Contributions or INDCs issued by a large part of the involved countries. The author discusses the issue of CO 2 budget available per inhabitant. A third article addresses the 2009 Copenhagen commitment for developed countries to give 100 billions dollars by 2020 to developing countries to finance their adaptation policy and to promote low carbon technologies. He comments the present level of these climatic financing, wanders how the still missing billions will be found, and whether these 100 billions will be enough. The fourth and last article discusses the position of the main oil and gas companies regarding climate change, and outlines that a British NGO denounced the gap between their statements and their lobbying actions

  1. Powernext, newsletter no.21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-07-01

    This newsletter provides information and statistical data on the four business unit of Powernext: Powernext Day-Ahead, Powernext Carbon, Powernext Futures and Powernext Weather. Powernext Day-Ahead provides a short term price reference to manage the volume risk. Powernext Day-Ahead counts close to 50 members among producers, suppliers, eligible consumers, etc. Powernext Carbon is a spot market of CO 2 allowances. The market model is the result of a three-fold partnership between Powernext, Caisse des Depots and Euronext. Powernext Carbon counts close to 30 active members. More than 2 Million tonnes of CO 2 have been traded since the launch of the market on 24 June. Powernext Carbon has made a name for itself as the most liquid CO 2 allowances spot market in Europe to date. Powernext Futures has made a name for itself as a price reference for the medium term market. Its market makers and members guarantee a high-quality market over a time period going up until 2008. Powernext Weather is a range of economically weather driven temperature indices provided by our partner Meteo France. These indices are decision making or hedging tools. This analysis concerns July 2004. (A.L.B.)

  2. Carbon tetrachloride desorption from activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonas, L.A.; Sansone, E.B.

    1981-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride was desorbed from a granular activated carbon subsequent to its adsorption under various vapor exposure periods. The varied conditions of exposure resulted in a range of partially saturated carbon beds which, when followed by a constant flow rate for desorption, generated different forms of the desorbing concentration versus time curve. A method of analyzing the desorption curves is presented which permits extraction of the various desorbing rates from the different desorption and to relate this to the time required for such regeneration. The Wheeler desorption kinetic equation was used to calculate the pseudo first order desorption rate constant for the carbon. The desorption rate constant was found to increase monotonically with increasing saturation of the bed, permitting the calculation of the maximum desorption rate constant for the carbon at 100% saturation. The Retentivity Index of the carbon, defined as the dimensionless ratio of the adsorption to the desorption rate constant, was found to be 681

  3. 50 CFR 21.21 - Import and export permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Import and export permits. 21.21 Section... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD PERMITS Specific Permit Provisions § 21.21 Import and export... must have a permit to import or export migratory birds, their parts, nests, or eggs. You must meet the...

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF ACTIVATED CARBONS FROM COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harold H. Schobert; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Zhe Lu

    2003-09-30

    The increasing role of coal as a source of energy in the 21st century will demand environmental and cost-effective strategies for the use of coal combustion by-products (CCBPs), mainly unburned carbon in fly ash. Unburned carbon is nowadays regarded as a waste product and its fate is mainly disposal, due to the present lack of efficient routes for its utilization. However, unburned carbon is a potential precursor for the production of adsorbent carbons, since it has gone through a devolatilization process while in the combustor, and therefore, only requires to be activated. Accordingly, the principal objective of this work was to characterize and utilize the unburned carbon in fly ash for the production of activated carbons. The unburned carbon samples were collected from different combustion systems, including pulverized utility boilers, a utility cyclone, a stoker, and a fluidized bed combustor. LOI (loss-on-ignition), proximate, ultimate, and petrographic analyses were conducted, and the surface areas of the samples were characterized by N2 adsorption isotherms at 77K. The LOIs of the unburned carbon samples varied between 21.79-84.52%. The proximate analyses showed that all the samples had very low moisture contents (0.17 to 3.39 wt %), while the volatile matter contents varied between 0.45 to 24.82 wt%. The elemental analyses show that all the unburned carbon samples consist mainly of carbon with very little hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur and oxygen In addition, the potential use of unburned carbon as precursor for activated carbon (AC) was investigated. Activated carbons with specific surface area up to 1075m{sup 2}/g were produced from the unburned carbon. The porosity of the resultant activated carbons was related to the properties of the unburned carbon feedstock and the activation conditions used. It was found that not all the unburned carbon samples are equally suited for activation, and furthermore, their potential as activated carbons precursors could be

  5. Carbon fuel cells with carbon corrosion suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F [Oakland, CA

    2012-04-10

    An electrochemical cell apparatus that can operate as either a fuel cell or a battery includes a cathode compartment, an anode compartment operatively connected to the cathode compartment, and a carbon fuel cell section connected to the anode compartment and the cathode compartment. An effusion plate is operatively positioned adjacent the anode compartment or the cathode compartment. The effusion plate allows passage of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide exhaust channels are operatively positioned in the electrochemical cell to direct the carbon dioxide from the electrochemical cell.

  6. Determining Inorganic and Organic Carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koistinen, Jaana; Sjöblom, Mervi; Spilling, Kristian

    2017-11-21

    Carbon is the element which makes up the major fraction of lipids and carbohydrates, which could be used for making biofuel. It is therefore important to provide enough carbon and also follow the flow into particulate organic carbon and potential loss to dissolved organic forms of carbon. Here we present methods for determining dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, and particulate organic carbon.

  7. [Regional and global estimates of carbon stocks and carbon sequestration capacity in forest ecosystems: A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-wei; Wang, Xiao-ke; Lu, Fei; Ouyang, Zhi-yun

    2015-09-01

    As a dominant part of terrestrial ecosystems, forest ecosystem plays an important role in absorbing atmospheric CO2 and global climate change mitigation. From the aspects of zonal climate and geographical distribution, the present carbon stocks and carbon sequestration capacity of forest ecosystem were comprehensively examined based on the review of the latest literatures. The influences of land use change on forest carbon sequestration were analyzed, and factors that leading to the uncertainty of carbon sequestration assessment in forest ecosystem were also discussed. It was estimated that the current forest carbon stock was in the range of 652 to 927 Pg C and the carbon sequestration capacity was approximately 4.02 Pg C · a(-1). In terms of zonal climate, the carbon stock and carbon sequestration capacity of tropical forest were the maximum, about 471 Pg C and 1.02-1.3 Pg C · a(-1) respectively; then the carbon stock of boreal forest was about 272 Pg C, while its carbon sequestration capacity was the minimum, approximately 0.5 Pg C · a(-1); for temperate forest, the carbon stock was minimal, around 113 to 159 Pg C and its carbon sequestration capacity was 0.8 Pg C · a(-1). From the aspect of geographical distribution, the carbon stock of forest ecosystem in South America was the largest (187.7-290 Pg C), then followed by European (162.6 Pg C), North America (106.7 Pg C), Africa (98.2 Pg C) and Asia (74.5 Pg C), and Oceania (21.7 Pg C). In addition, carbon sequestration capacity of regional forest ecosystem was summed up as listed below: Tropical South America forest was the maximum (1276 Tg C · a(-1)), then were Tropical Africa (753 Tg C · a(-1)), North America (248 Tg C · a(-1)) and European (239 Tg C · a(-1)), and East Asia (98.8-136.5 Tg C · a(-1)) was minimum. To further reduce the uncertainty in the estimations of the carbon stock and carbon sequestration capacity of forest ecosystem, comprehensive application of long-term observation, inventories

  8. Stable and radioactive carbon in Indian soils: implications to soil carbon dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskar, A.H.; Yadava, M.G.; Ramesh, R.

    2011-01-01

    Radiocarbon is a very useful tool to study soil carbon dynamic. The mean residence time of SOC in Indian soils is about a century at the top 0-15 cm, increases linearly to reach values ranging from 2000 to 4000 yrs at a depth of 100 cm. It mainly depends on the clay content indicating that the clay is the main governing factor for SOC stabilization. Stable carbon and oxygen isotopes in soil carbonates and SOC are good proxies for paleoclimate and paleovegetation reconstruction. The present day sub-humid climate in the lower Narmada valley has been established prior to ∼ 3 ka. Two comparatively arid phases around 2.1 and 1.3 ka are recorded by oxygen isotopes of soil carbonates; consistent with other proxy records showing its regional significance

  9. Effect of high surface area activated carbon on thermal degradation of jet fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gergova, K.; Eser, S.; Arumugam, R.; Schobert, H.H. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Different solid carbons added to jet fuel during thermal stressing cause substantial changes in pyrolytic degradation reactions. Activated carbons, especially high surface area activated carbons were found to be very effective in suppressing solid deposition on metal reactor walls during stressing at high temperatures (425 and 450{degrees}C). The high surface area activated carbon PX-21 prevented solid deposition on reactor walls even after 5h at 450{degrees}C. The differences seen in the liquid product composition when activated carbon is added indicated that the carbon surfaces affect the degradation reactions. Thermal stressing experiments were carried out on commercial petroleum-derived JPTS jet fuel. We also used n-octane and n-dodecane as model compounds in order to simplify the study of the chemical changes which take place upon activated carbon addition. In separate experiments, the presence of a hydrogen donor, decalin, together with PX-21 was also studied.

  10. Carbon Monoxide Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with the Media Fire Protection Technology Carbon monoxide safety outreach materials Keep your community informed about the ... KB | Spanish PDF 592 KB Handout: carbon monoxide safety Download this handout and add your organization's logo ...

  11. Trading forest carbon - OSU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issues associate with trading carbon sequestered in forests are discussed. Scientific uncertainties associated with carbon measurement are discussed with respect to proposed accounting procedures. Major issues include: (1) Establishing baselines. (2) Determining additivity from f...

  12. Geochemistry of sedimentary carbonates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morse, John W; Mackenzie, Fred T

    1990-01-01

    .... The last major section is two chapters on the global cycle of carbon and human intervention, and the role of sedimentary carbonates as indicators of stability and changes in Earth's surface environment...

  13. Calcium carbonate overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: Antacids (Tums, Chooz) Mineral supplements Hand lotions Vitamin and mineral supplements Other products may also contain ...

  14. Carbon Based Nanotechnology: Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This presentation reviews publicly available information related to carbon based nanotechnology. Topics covered include nanomechanics, carbon based electronics, nanodevice/materials applications, nanotube motors, nano-lithography and H2O storage in nanotubes.

  15. Sodium carbonate poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodium carbonate (known as washing soda or soda ash) is a chemical found in many household and industrial products. This article focuses on poisoning due to sodium carbonate. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  16. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  17. Carborane-based inhibitors of carbonic anhydrases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brynda, Jiří; Pachl, Petr; Šícha, Václav; Fábry, Milan; Grüner, Bohumír; Cígler, Petr; Řezáčová, Pavlína

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2015), s. 3 ISSN 1211-5894. [Discussions in Structural Molecular Biology. Annual Meeting of the Czech Society for Structural Biology /13./. 19.03.2015-21.03.2015, Nové Hrady] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-05677S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68378050 ; RVO:61388980 Keywords : carboranes * carbonic anhydrase Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  18. 78 FR 23524 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; North Carolina: Deferral of Carbon Dioxide (CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-19

    ... Promulgation of Implementation Plans; North Carolina: Deferral of Carbon Dioxide (CO 2 ) Emissions From... (IBR) the federal deferral of, until July 21, 2014, PSD applicability to biogenic carbon dioxide (CO 2... decomposition of biologically-based materials other than fossil fuels and mineral sources of carbon. Examples of...

  19. Graphitization in Carbon MEMS and Carbon NEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Swati

    Carbon MEMS (CMEMS) and Carbon NEMS (CNEMS) are an emerging class of miniaturized devices. Due to the numerous advantages such as scalable manufacturing processes, inexpensive and readily available precursor polymer materials, tunable surface properties and biocompatibility, carbon has become a preferred material for a wide variety of future sensing applications. Single suspended carbon nanowires (CNWs) integrated on CMEMS structures fabricated by electrospinning of SU8 photoresist on photolithographially patterned SU8 followed by pyrolysis are utilized for understanding the graphitization process in micro and nano carbon materials. These monolithic CNW-CMEMS structures enable the fabrication of very high aspect ratio CNWs of predefined length. The CNWs thus fabricated display core---shell structures having a graphitic shell with a glassy carbon core. The electrical conductivity of these CNWs is increased by about 100% compared to glassy carbon as a result of enhanced graphitization. We explore various tunable fabrication and pyrolysis parameters to improve graphitization in the resulting CNWs. We also suggest gas-sensing application of the thus fabricated single suspended CNW-CMEMS devices by using the CNW as a nano-hotplate for local chemical vapor deposition. In this thesis we also report on results from an optimization study of SU8 photoresist derived carbon electrodes. These electrodes were applied to the simultaneous detection of traces of Cd(II) and Pb(II) through anodic stripping voltammetry and detection limits as low as 0.7 and 0.8 microgL-1 were achieved. To further improve upon the electrochemical behavior of the carbon electrodes we elucidate a modified pyrolysis technique featuring an ultra-fast temperature ramp for obtaining bubbled porous carbon from lithographically patterned SU8. We conclude this dissertation by suggesting the possible future works on enhancing graphitization as well as on electrochemical applications

  20. Carbon offsetting: sustaining consumption?

    OpenAIRE

    Heather Lovell; Harriet Bulkeley; Diana Liverman

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we examine how theories of sustainable and ethical consumption help us to understand a new, rapidly expanding type of consumer product designed to mitigate climate change: carbon offsets. The voluntary carbon offset market grew by 200% between 2005 and 2006, and there are now over 150 retailers of voluntary carbon offsets worldwide. Our analysis concentrates on the production and consumption of carbon offsets, drawing on ideas from governmentality and political ecology about how...

  1. Carbon sequestration via wood burial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Ning

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To mitigate global climate change, a portfolio of strategies will be needed to keep the atmospheric CO2 concentration below a dangerous level. Here a carbon sequestration strategy is proposed in which certain dead or live trees are harvested via collection or selective cutting, then buried in trenches or stowed away in above-ground shelters. The largely anaerobic condition under a sufficiently thick layer of soil will prevent the decomposition of the buried wood. Because a large flux of CO2 is constantly being assimilated into the world's forests via photosynthesis, cutting off its return pathway to the atmosphere forms an effective carbon sink. It is estimated that a sustainable long-term carbon sequestration potential for wood burial is 10 ± 5 GtC y-1, and currently about 65 GtC is on the world's forest floors in the form of coarse woody debris suitable for burial. The potential is largest in tropical forests (4.2 GtC y-1, followed by temperate (3.7 GtC y-1 and boreal forests (2.1 GtC y-1. Burying wood has other benefits including minimizing CO2 source from deforestation, extending the lifetime of reforestation carbon sink, and reducing fire danger. There are possible environmental impacts such as nutrient lock-up which nevertheless appears manageable, but other concerns and factors will likely set a limit so that only part of the full potential can be realized. Based on data from North American logging industry, the cost for wood burial is estimated to be $14/tCO2($50/tC, lower than the typical cost for power plant CO2 capture with geological storage. The cost for carbon sequestration with wood burial is low because CO2 is removed from the atmosphere by the natural process of photosynthesis at little cost. The technique is low tech, distributed, easy to monitor, safe, and reversible, thus an attractive option for large-scale implementation in a world-wide carbon market.

  2. Carbon activity meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, P.; Krankota, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    A carbon activity meter utilizing an electrochemical carbon cell with gaseous reference electrodes having particular application for measuring carbon activity in liquid sodium for the LMFBR project is described. The electrolyte container is electroplated with a thin gold film on the inside surface thereof, and a reference electrode consisting of CO/CO 2 gas is used. (U.S.)

  3. Protolytic carbon film technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renschler, C.L.; White, C.A.

    1996-04-01

    This paper presents a technique for the deposition of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) on virtually any surface allowing carbon film formation with only the caveat that the substrate must withstand carbonization temperatures of at least 600 degrees centigrade. The influence of processing conditions upon the structure and properties of the carbonized film is discussed. Electrical conductivity, microstructure, and morphology control are also described.

  4. Carbon Goes To…

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savasci, Funda

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this activity are to help middle school students understand the carbon cycle and realize how human activities affect the carbon cycle. This activity consists of two parts. The first part of the activity focuses on the carbon cycle, especially before the Industrial Revolution, while the second part of the activity focuses on how…

  5. Global Carbon Budget 2016

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Quéré, Corinne; Andrew, Robbie M.; Canadell, Josep G.; Sitch, Stephen; Ivar Korsbakken, Jan; Peters, Glen P.; Manning, Andrew C.; Boden, Thomas A.; Tans, Pieter P.; Houghton, Richard A.; Keeling, Ralph F.; Alin, Simone; Andrews, Oliver D.; Anthoni, Peter; Barbero, Leticia; Bopp, Laurent; Chevallier, Frédéric; Chini, Louise P.; Ciais, Philippe; Currie, Kim; Delire, Christine; Doney, Scott C.; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Gkritzalis, Thanos; Harris, Ian A; Hauck, Judith; Haverd, Vanessa; Hoppema, Mario; Klein Goldewijk, Kees; Jain, Atul K.; Kato, Etsushi; Körtzinger, Arne; Landschützer, Peter; Lefèvre, Nathalie; Lenton, Andrew; Lienert, Sebastian; Lombardozzi, Danica; Melton, Joe R.; Metzl, Nicolas; Millero, Frank; Monteiro, Pedro M S; Munro, David R.; Nabel, Julia E M S; Nakaoka, Shin Ichiro; O'Brien, Kevin; Olsen, Are; Omar, Abdirahman M.; Ono, Tsuneo; Pierrot, Denis; Poulter, Benjamin; Rödenbeck, Christian; Salisbury, Joe; Schuster, Ute; Schwinger, Jörg; Séférian, Roland; Skjelvan, Ingunn; Stocker, Benjamin D.; Sutton, Adrienne J.; Takahashi, Taro; Tian, Hanqin; Tilbrook, Bronte; Van Der Laan-Luijkx, Ingrid T.; Van Der Werf, Guido R.; Viovy, Nicolas; Walker, Anthony P.; Wiltshire, Andrew J.; Zaehle, Sönke

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere-the "global carbon budget"-is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future

  6. Global Carbon Budget 2016

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quéré, Le Corinne; Andrew, Robbie M.; Canadell, Josep G.; Sitch, Stephen; Korsbakken, Jan Ivar; Peters, Glen P.; Manning, Andrew C.; Boden, Thomas A.; Tans, Pieter P.; Houghton, Richard A.; Keeling, Ralph F.; Alin, Simone; Andrews, Oliver D.; Anthoni, Peter; Barbero, Leticia; Bopp, Laurent; Chevallier, Frédéric; Chini, Louise P.; Ciais, Philippe; Currie, Kim; Delire, Christine; Doney, Scott C.; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Gkritzalis, Thanos; Harris, Ian; Hauck, Judith; Haverd, Vanessa; Hoppema, Mario; Klein Goldewijk, Kees; Jain, Atul K.; Kato, Etsushi; Körtzinger, Arne; Landschützer, Peter; Lefèvre, Nathalie; Lenton, Andrew; Lienert, Sebastian; Lombardozzi, Danica; Melton, Joe R.; Metzl, Nicolas; Millero, Frank; Monteiro, Pedro M.S.; Munro, David R.; Nabel, Julia E.M.S.; Nakaoka, S.; O'Brien, Kevin; Olsen, Are; Omar, Abdirahman M.; Ono, Tsuneo; Pierrot, Denis; Poulter, Benjamin; Rödenbeck, Christian; Salisbury, Joe; Schuster, Ute; Schwinger, Jörg; Séférian, Roland; Skjelvan, Ingunn; Stocker, Benjamin D.; Sutton, Adrienne J.; Takahashi, Taro; Tian, Hanqin; Tilbrook, Bronte; Laan-Luijkx, van der Ingrid T.; Werf, van der Guido R.; Viovy, Nicolas; Walker, Anthony P.; Wiltshire, Andrew J.; Zaehle, Sönke

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere – the “global carbon budget” – is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project

  7. PA21, a novel phosphate binder, improves renal osteodystrophy in rats with chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaguchi, Atsushi; Tatemichi, Satoshi; Takeda, Hiroo; Kobayashi, Mamoru

    2017-01-01

    The effects of PA21, a novel iron-based and non-calcium-based phosphate binder, on hyperphosphatemia and its accompanying bone abnormality in chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) were evaluated. Rats with adenine-induced chronic renal failure (CRF) were prepared by feeding them an adenine-containing diet for four weeks. They were also freely fed a diet that contained PA21 (0.5, 1.5, and 5%), sevelamer hydrochloride (0.6 and 2%) or lanthanum carbonate hydrate (0.6 and 2%) for four weeks. Blood biochemical parameters were measured and bone histomorphometry was performed for femurs, which were isolated after drug treatment. Serum phosphorus and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels were higher in the CRF rats. Administration of phosphate binders for four weeks decreased serum phosphorus and PTH levels in a dose-dependent manner and there were significant decreases in the AUC0-28 day of these parameters in 5% PA21, 2% sevelamer hydrochloride, and 2% lanthanum carbonate hydrate groups compared with that in the CRF control group. Moreover, osteoid volume improved significantly in 5% of the PA21 group, and fibrosis volume and cortical porosity were ameliorated in 5% PA21, 2% sevelamer hydrochloride, and 2% lanthanum carbonate hydrate groups. These results suggest that PA21 is effective against hyperphosphatemia, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and bone abnormalities in CKD-MBD as sevelamer hydrochloride and lanthanum carbonate hydrate are, and that PA21 is a new potential alternative to phosphate binders.

  8. Carbon/Carbon Pistons for Internal Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    Carbon/carbon piston performs same function as aluminum pistons in reciprocating internal combustion engines while reducing weight and increasing mechanical and thermal efficiencies of engine. Carbon/carbon piston concept features low piston-to-cylinder wall clearance - so low piston rings and skirts unnecessary. Advantages possible by negligible coefficient of thermal expansion of carbon/carbon.

  9. Accounting for black carbon lowers estimates of blue carbon storage services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Swee Theng; Gallagher, John B

    2018-02-07

    The canopies and roots of seagrass, mangrove, and saltmarsh protect a legacy of buried sedimentary organic carbon from resuspension and remineralisation. This legacy's value, in terms of mitigating anthropogenic emissions of CO 2 , is based on total organic carbon (TOC) inventories to a depth likely to be disturbed. However, failure to subtract allochthonous recalcitrant carbon overvalues the storage service. Simply put, burial of oxidation-resistant organics formed outside of the ecosystem provides no additional protection from remineralisation. Here, we assess whether black carbon (BC), an allochthonous and recalcitrant form of organic carbon, is contributing to a significant overestimation of blue carbon stocks. To test this supposition, BC and TOC contents were measured in different types of seagrass and mangrove sediment cores across tropical and temperate regimes, with different histories of air pollution and fire together with a reanalysis of published data from a subtropical system. The results suggest current carbon stock estimates are positively biased, particularly for low-organic-content sandy seagrass environs, by 18 ± 3% (±95% confidence interval) and 43 ± 21% (±95% CI) for the temperate and tropical regions respectively. The higher BC fractions appear to originate from atmospheric deposition and substantially enrich the relatively low TOC fraction within these environs.

  10. The carbon footprint of cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, D S; Wright, T; Somner, J E A; Connor, A

    2013-04-01

    Climate change is predicted to be one of the largest global health threats of the 21st century. Health care itself is a large contributor to carbon emissions. Determining the carbon footprint of specific health care activities such as cataract surgery allows the assessment of associated emissions and identifies opportunities for reduction. To assess the carbon footprint of a cataract pathway in a British teaching hospital. This was a component analysis study for one patient having first eye cataract surgery in the University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff. Activity data was collected from three sectors, building and energy use, travel and procurement. Published emissions factors were applied to this data to provide figures in carbon dioxide equivalents (CO2eq). The carbon footprint for one cataract operation was 181.8 kg CO2eq. On the basis that 2230 patients were treated for cataracts during 2011 in Cardiff, this has an associated carbon footprint of 405.4 tonnes CO2eq. Building and energy use was estimated to account for 36.1% of overall emissions, travel 10.1% and procurement 53.8%, with medical equipment accounting for the most emissions at 32.6%. This is the first published carbon footprint of cataract surgery and acts as a benchmark for other studies as well as identifying areas for emissions reduction. Within the procurement sector, dialogue with industry is important to reduce the overall carbon footprint. Sustainability should be considered when cataract pathways are designed as there is potential for reduction in all sectors with the possible side effects of saving costs and improving patient care.

  11. Preparation and Characterization of Impregnated Commercial Rice Husks Activated Carbon with Piperazine for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoum Raman, S. N.; Ismail, N. A.; Jamari, S. S.

    2017-06-01

    Development of effective materials for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technology is a fundamental importance to reduce CO2 emissions. This work establishes the addition of amine functional group on the surface of activated carbon to further improve the adsorption capacity of CO2. Rice husks activated carbon were modified using wet impregnation method by introducing piperazine onto the activated carbon surfaces at different concentrations and mixture ratios. These modified activated carbons were characterized by using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM). The results from XRD analysis show the presence of polyethylene butane at diffraction angles of 21.8° and 36.2° for modified activated carbon with increasing intensity corresponding to increase in piperazine concentration. BET results found the surface area and pore volume of non-impregnated activated carbon to be 126.69 m2/g and 0.081 cm3/g respectively, while the modified activated carbons with 4M of piperazine have lower surface area and pore volume which is 6.77 m2/g and 0.015 cm3/g respectively. At 10M concentration, the surface area and pore volume are the lowest which is 4.48 m2/g and 0.0065 cm3/g respectively. These results indicate the piperazine being filled inside the activated carbon pores thus, lowering the surface area and pore volume of the activated carbon. From the FTIR analysis, the presence of peaks at 3312 cm-1 and 1636 cm-1 proved the existence of reaction between carboxyl groups on the activated carbon surfaces with piperazine. The surface morphology of activated carbon can be clearly seen through FESEM analysis. The modified activated carbon contains fewer pores than non-modified activated carbon as the pores have been covered with piperazine.

  12. Latest Permian carbonate carbon isotope variability traces heterogeneous organic carbon accumulation and authigenic carbonate formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schobben, Martin; van de Velde, Sebastiaan; Gliwa, Jana; Leda, Lucyna; Korn, Dieter; Struck, Ulrich; Vinzenz Ullmann, Clemens; Hairapetian, Vachik; Ghaderi, Abbas; Korte, Christoph; Newton, Robert J.; Poulton, Simon W.; Wignall, Paul B.

    2017-11-01

    Bulk-carbonate carbon isotope ratios are a widely applied proxy for investigating the ancient biogeochemical carbon cycle. Temporal carbon isotope trends serve as a prime stratigraphic tool, with the inherent assumption that bulk micritic carbonate rock is a faithful geochemical recorder of the isotopic composition of seawater dissolved inorganic carbon. However, bulk-carbonate rock is also prone to incorporate diagenetic signals. The aim of the present study is to disentangle primary trends from diagenetic signals in carbon isotope records which traverse the Permian-Triassic boundary in the marine carbonate-bearing sequences of Iran and South China. By pooling newly produced and published carbon isotope data, we confirm that a global first-order trend towards depleted values exists. However, a large amount of scatter is superimposed on this geochemical record. In addition, we observe a temporal trend in the amplitude of this residual δ13C variability, which is reproducible for the two studied regions. We suggest that (sub-)sea-floor microbial communities and their control on calcite nucleation and ambient porewater dissolved inorganic carbon δ13C pose a viable mechanism to induce bulk-rock δ13C variability. Numerical model calculations highlight that early diagenetic carbonate rock stabilization and linked carbon isotope alteration can be controlled by organic matter supply and subsequent microbial remineralization. A major biotic decline among Late Permian bottom-dwelling organisms facilitated a spatial increase in heterogeneous organic carbon accumulation. Combined with low marine sulfate, this resulted in varying degrees of carbon isotope overprinting. A simulated time series suggests that a 50 % increase in the spatial scatter of organic carbon relative to the average, in addition to an imposed increase in the likelihood of sampling cements formed by microbial calcite nucleation to 1 out of 10 samples, is sufficient to induce the observed signal of carbon

  13. Latest Permian carbonate carbon isotope variability traces heterogeneous organic carbon accumulation and authigenic carbonate formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schobben

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Bulk-carbonate carbon isotope ratios are a widely applied proxy for investigating the ancient biogeochemical carbon cycle. Temporal carbon isotope trends serve as a prime stratigraphic tool, with the inherent assumption that bulk micritic carbonate rock is a faithful geochemical recorder of the isotopic composition of seawater dissolved inorganic carbon. However, bulk-carbonate rock is also prone to incorporate diagenetic signals. The aim of the present study is to disentangle primary trends from diagenetic signals in carbon isotope records which traverse the Permian–Triassic boundary in the marine carbonate-bearing sequences of Iran and South China. By pooling newly produced and published carbon isotope data, we confirm that a global first-order trend towards depleted values exists. However, a large amount of scatter is superimposed on this geochemical record. In addition, we observe a temporal trend in the amplitude of this residual δ13C variability, which is reproducible for the two studied regions. We suggest that (sub-sea-floor microbial communities and their control on calcite nucleation and ambient porewater dissolved inorganic carbon δ13C pose a viable mechanism to induce bulk-rock δ13C variability. Numerical model calculations highlight that early diagenetic carbonate rock stabilization and linked carbon isotope alteration can be controlled by organic matter supply and subsequent microbial remineralization. A major biotic decline among Late Permian bottom-dwelling organisms facilitated a spatial increase in heterogeneous organic carbon accumulation. Combined with low marine sulfate, this resulted in varying degrees of carbon isotope overprinting. A simulated time series suggests that a 50 % increase in the spatial scatter of organic carbon relative to the average, in addition to an imposed increase in the likelihood of sampling cements formed by microbial calcite nucleation to 1 out of 10 samples, is sufficient to induce the

  14. Activated carbons and gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDougall, G.J.; Hancock, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    The literature on activated carbon is reviewed so as to provide a general background with respect to the effect of source material and activation procedure on carbon properties, the structure and chemical nature of the surface of the activated carbon, and the nature of absorption processes on carbon. The various theories on the absorption of gold and silver from cyanide solutions are then reviewed, followed by a discussion of processes for the recovery of gold and silver from cyanide solutions using activated carbon, including a comparison with zinc precipitation

  15. 21 CFR 21.75 - Rights of legal guardians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rights of legal guardians. 21.75 Section 21.75... Individual § 21.75 Rights of legal guardians. For the purposes of this part, the parent of any individual who is a minor or the legal guardian of any individual who has been declared to be incompetent due to...

  16. Carbon-14 waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, R.P.; Smith, G.M.; White, I.F

    1984-01-01

    Carbon-14 occurs in nature, but is also formed in nuclear reactors. Because of its long half-life and the biological significance of carbon, releases from nuclear facilities could have a significant radiological impact. Waste management strategies for carbon-14 are therefore of current concern. Carbon-14 is present in a variety of waste streams both at reactors and at reprocessing plants. A reliable picture of the production and release of carbon-14 from various reactor systems has been built up for the purposes of this study. A possible management strategy for carbon-14 might be the reduction of nitrogen impurity levels in core materials, since the activation of 14 N is usually the dominant source of carbon-14. The key problem in carbon-14 management is its retention of off-gas streams, particularly in the dissolver off-gas stream at reprocessing plants. Three alternative trapping processes that convert carbon dioxide into insoluble carbonates have been suggested. The results show that none of the options considered need be rejected on the grounds of potential radiation doses to individuals. All exposures should be as low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account. If, on these grounds, retention and disposal of carbon-14 is found to be beneficial, then, subject to the limitations noted, appropriate retention, immobilization and disposal technologies have been identified

  17. 21 CFR 21.44 - Verification of identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Verification of identity. 21.44 Section 21.44 Food... Verification of identity. (a) An individual seeking access to records in a Privacy Act Record System may be... identity. The identification required shall be suitable considering the nature of the records sought. No...

  18. 48 CFR 6302.21 - Notice of hearing (Rule 21).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notice of hearing (Rule 21... CONTRACT APPEALS RULES OF PROCEDURE 6302.21 Notice of hearing (Rule 21). The parties are given at least 15... appeals without unnecessary delay. Notices of hearings shall be promptly acknowledged by the parties. ...

  19. 21 CFR 1305.21 - Requirements for electronic orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Requirements for electronic orders. 1305.21... I AND II CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Electronic Orders § 1305.21 Requirements for electronic orders. (a) To be valid, the purchaser must sign an electronic order for a Schedule I or II controlled substance...

  20. Highly stretchable carbon aerogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fan; Jiang, Yanqiu; Xu, Zhen; Xiao, Youhua; Fang, Bo; Liu, Yingjun; Gao, Weiwei; Zhao, Pei; Wang, Hongtao; Gao, Chao

    2018-02-28

    Carbon aerogels demonstrate wide applications for their ultralow density, rich porosity, and multifunctionalities. Their compressive elasticity has been achieved by different carbons. However, reversibly high stretchability of neat carbon aerogels is still a great challenge owing to their extremely dilute brittle interconnections and poorly ductile cells. Here we report highly stretchable neat carbon aerogels with a retractable 200% elongation through hierarchical synergistic assembly. The hierarchical buckled structures and synergistic reinforcement between graphene and carbon nanotubes enable a temperature-invariable, recoverable stretching elasticity with small energy dissipation (~0.1, 100% strain) and high fatigue resistance more than 10 6 cycles. The ultralight carbon aerogels with both stretchability and compressibility were designed as strain sensors for logic identification of sophisticated shape conversions. Our methodology paves the way to highly stretchable carbon and neat inorganic materials with extensive applications in aerospace, smart robots, and wearable devices.

  1. Carbon dioxide sequestration by direct mineral carbonation with carbonic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connor, William K.; Dahlin, David C.; Nilsen, David N.; Walters, Richard P.; Turner, Paul C.

    2000-01-01

    The Albany Research Center (ARC) of the U.S. Dept. of Energy (DOE) has been conducting a series of mineral carbonation tests at its Albany, Oregon, facility over the past 2 years as part of a Mineral Carbonation Study Program within the DOE. Other participants in this Program include the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Arizona State University, Science Applications International Corporation, and the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory. The ARC tests have focused on ex-situ mineral carbonation in an aqueous system. The process developed at ARC utilizes a slurry of water mixed with a magnesium silicate mineral, olivine [forsterite end member (Mg2SiO4)], or serpentine [Mg3Si2O5(OH)4]. This slurry is reacted with supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) to produce magnesite (MgCO3). The CO2 is dissolved in water to form carbonic acid (H2CO3), which dissociates to H+ and HCO3 -. The H+ reacts with the mineral, liberating Mg2+ cations which react with the bicarbonate to form the solid carbonate. The process is designed to simulate the natural serpentinization reaction of ultramafic minerals, and for this reason, these results may also be applicable to in-situ geological sequestration regimes. Results of the baseline tests, conducted on ground products of the natural minerals, have been encouraging. Tests conducted at ambient temperature (22 C) and subcritical CO2 pressures (below 73 atm) resulted in very slow conversion to the carbonate. However, when elevated temperatures and pressures are utilized, coupled with continuous stirring of the slurry and gas dispersion within the water column, significant reaction occurs within much shorter reaction times. Extent of reaction, as measured by the stoichiometric conversion of the silicate mineral (olivine) to the carbonate, is roughly 90% within 24 hours, using distilled water, and a reaction temperature of 185?C and a partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2) of 115 atm. Recent tests using a bicarbonate solution, under identical reaction

  2. Carbon dioxide sequestration by direct mineral carbonation with carbonic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connor, W.K.; Dahlin, D.C.; Nilsen, D.N.; Walters, R.P.; Turner, P.C.

    2000-07-01

    The Albany Research Center (ARC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been conducting a series of mineral carbonation tests at its Albany, Oregon, facility over the past 2 years as part of a Mineral Carbonation Study Program within the DOE. The ARC tests have focused on ex-situ mineral carbonation in an aqueous system. The process developed at ARC utilizes a slurry of water mixed with a magnesium silicate mineral, olivine [forsterite and member (mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4})], or serpentine [Mg{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 4}]. This slurry is reacted with supercritical carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) to produce magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). The CO{sub 2} is dissolved in water to form carbonic acid (H{sub 2}CO{sub 3}), which dissociates to H{sup +} and HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. The H{sup +} reacts with the mineral, liberating Mg{sup 2+} cations which react with the bicarbonate to form the solid carbonate. The process is designed to simulate the natural serpentinization reaction of ultramafic minerals, and for this reason, these results may also be applicable to in-situ geological sequestration regimes. Results of the baseline tests, conducted on ground products of the natural minerals, have been encouraging. Tests conducted at ambient temperature (22 C) and subcritical CO{sub 2} pressures (below 73 atm) resulted in very slow conversion to the carbonate. However, when elevated temperatures and pressures are utilized, coupled with continuous stirring of the slurry and gas dispersion within the water column, significant reaction occurs within much shorter reaction times. Extent of reaction, as measured by the stoichiometric conversion of the silicate mineral (olivine) to the carbonate, is roughly 90% within 24 hours, using distilled water, and a reaction temperature of 185 C and a partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (P{sub CO{sub 2}}) of 115 atm. Recent tests using a bicarbonate solution, under identical reaction conditions, have achieved roughly 83% conversion of heat treated serpentine

  3. Towards a better understanding of microbial carbon flux in the sea

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gasol, J.M.; Pinhassi, J.; Alonso-Sáez, L.; Ducklow, H.; Herndl, G. J.; Koblížek, Michal; Labrenz, M.; Luo, Y.; Morán, X. A. G.; Reinthaler, T.; Simon, M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 53, - (2008), s. 21-38 ISSN 0948-3055 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : carbon flux * microbioal ecology * ocean Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.190, year: 2008

  4. Substantial global carbon uptake by cement carbonation

    OpenAIRE

    Xi, Fengming; Davis, Steven J.; Ciais, Philippe; Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Guan, Dabo; Pade, Claus; Shi, Tiemao; Syddall, Mark; Lv, Jie; Ji, Lanzhu; Bing, Longfei; Wang, Jiaoyue; Wei, Wei; Yang, Keun-Hyeok; Lagerblad, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Calcination of carbonate rocks during the manufacture of cement produced 5% of global CO2 emissions from all industrial process and fossil-fuel combustion in 20131, 2. Considerable attention has been paid to quantifying these industrial process emissions from cement production2, 3, but the natural reversal of the process—carbonation—has received little attention in carbon cycle studies. Here, we use new and existing data on cement materials during cement service life, demolition, and secondar...

  5. Amazon River carbon dioxide outgassing fuelled by wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abril, Gwenaël; Martinez, Jean-Michel; Artigas, L Felipe; Moreira-Turcq, Patricia; Benedetti, Marc F; Vidal, Luciana; Meziane, Tarik; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Bernardes, Marcelo C; Savoye, Nicolas; Deborde, Jonathan; Souza, Edivaldo Lima; Albéric, Patrick; Landim de Souza, Marcelo F; Roland, Fabio

    2014-01-16

    River systems connect the terrestrial biosphere, the atmosphere and the ocean in the global carbon cycle. A recent estimate suggests that up to 3 petagrams of carbon per year could be emitted as carbon dioxide (CO2) from global inland waters, offsetting the carbon uptake by terrestrial ecosystems. It is generally assumed that inland waters emit carbon that has been previously fixed upstream by land plant photosynthesis, then transferred to soils, and subsequently transported downstream in run-off. But at the scale of entire drainage basins, the lateral carbon fluxes carried by small rivers upstream do not account for all of the CO2 emitted from inundated areas downstream. Three-quarters of the world's flooded land consists of temporary wetlands, but the contribution of these productive ecosystems to the inland water carbon budget has been largely overlooked. Here we show that wetlands pump large amounts of atmospheric CO2 into river waters in the floodplains of the central Amazon. Flooded forests and floating vegetation export large amounts of carbon to river waters and the dissolved CO2 can be transported dozens to hundreds of kilometres downstream before being emitted. We estimate that Amazonian wetlands export half of their gross primary production to river waters as dissolved CO2 and organic carbon, compared with only a few per cent of gross primary production exported in upland (not flooded) ecosystems. Moreover, we suggest that wetland carbon export is potentially large enough to account for at least the 0.21 petagrams of carbon emitted per year as CO2 from the central Amazon River and its floodplains. Global carbon budgets should explicitly address temporary or vegetated flooded areas, because these ecosystems combine high aerial primary production with large, fast carbon export, potentially supporting a substantial fraction of CO2 evasion from inland waters.

  6. CCL21 Cancer Immunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yuan, E-mail: yuanlin@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA Head and Neck Cancer Program, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Clinical and Translational Science Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 37-131 CHS, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Sharma, Sherven [Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Clinical and Translational Science Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 37-131 CHS, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Veterans’ Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, CA 90073 (United States); John, Maie St. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA Head and Neck Cancer Program, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Clinical and Translational Science Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2014-05-07

    Cancer, a major health problem, affects 12 million people worldwide every year. With surgery and chemo-radiation the long term survival rate for the majority of cancer patients is dismal. Thus novel treatments are urgently needed. Immunotherapy, the harnessing of the immune system to destroy cancer cells is an attractive option with potential for long term anti-tumor benefit. Cytokines are biological response modifiers that stimulate anti-tumor immune responses. In this review, we discuss the anti-tumor efficacy of the chemotactic cytokine CCL21 and its pre-clinical and clinical application in cancer.

  7. Carbon isotopes in mollusk shell carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnaughey, Ted A.; Gillikin, David Paul

    2008-10-01

    Mollusk shells contain many isotopic clues about calcification physiology and environmental conditions at the time of shell formation. In this review, we use both published and unpublished data to discuss carbon isotopes in both bivalve and gastropod shell carbonates. Land snails construct their shells mainly from respired CO2, and shell δ13C reflects the local mix of C3 and C4 plants consumed. Shell δ13C is typically >10‰ heavier than diet, probably because respiratory gas exchange discards CO2, and retains the isotopically heavier HCO3 -. Respired CO2 contributes less to the shells of aquatic mollusks, because CO2/O2 ratios are usually higher in water than in air, leading to more replacement of respired CO2 by environmental CO2. Fluid exchange with the environment also brings additional dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) into the calcification site. Shell δ13C is typically a few ‰ lower than ambient DIC, and often decreases with age. Shell δ13C retains clues about processes such as ecosystem metabolism and estuarine mixing. Ca2+ ATPase-based models of calcification physiology developed for corals and algae likely apply to mollusks, too, but lower pH and carbonic anhydrase at the calcification site probably suppress kinetic isotope effects. Carbon isotopes in biogenic carbonates are clearly complex, but cautious interpretation can provide a wealth of information, especially after vital effects are better understood.

  8. Identifying 21st Century Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Robert

    2012-01-01

    What are the capabilities necessary to meet 21st century challenges? Much of the literature on 21st century skills focuses on skills necessary to meet those challenges associated with future work in a globalised world. The result is a limited characterisation of those capabilities necessary to address 21st century social, health and particularly…

  9. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from RRS JAMES COOK in the South Atlantic Ocean from 2009-03-07 to 2009-04-21 (NODC Accession 0108214)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108214 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from RRS JAMES COOK in the South Atlantic Ocean from 2009-03-07 to 2009-04-21 and...

  10. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from MELVILLE in the South Pacific Ocean and Tasman Sea from 2009-11-21 to 2010-02-11 (NODC Accession 0109920)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0109920 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from MELVILLE in the South Pacific Ocean and Tasman Sea from 2009-11-21 to 2010-02-11 and...

  11. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the Hokusei Maru in the North Pacific Ocean from 2000-06-21 to 2000-07-05 (NODC Accession 0112244)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112244 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from Hokusei Maru in the North Pacific Ocean from 2000-06-21 to...

  12. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the POLARSTERN in the South Atlantic Ocean from 1992-05-21 to 1992-08-05 (NODC Accession 0116641)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0116641 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from POLARSTERN in the South Atlantic Ocean from 1992-05-21 to...

  13. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the HEALY in the Baffin Bay and Lincoln Sea from 2003-07-21 to 2003-08-16 (NODC Accession 0113909)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113909 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HEALY in the Baffin Bay and Lincoln Sea from 2003-07-21 to...

  14. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from MIRAI in the Beaufort Sea and Bering Sea from 2006-08-21 to 2006-09-29 (NODC Accession 0112268)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0112268 includes chemical, discrete sample, optical, physical and profile data collected from MIRAI in the Beaufort Sea and Bering Sea from 2006-08-21...

  15. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the MARION DUFRESNE in the Indian Ocean from 1998-01-21 to 1998-02-19 (NODC Accession 0113570)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113570 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MARION DUFRESNE in the Indian Ocean from 1998-01-21...

  16. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the HAKON MOSBY in the North Greenland Sea from 1996-11-21 to 1996-11-30 (NODC Accession 0113544)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113544 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HAKON MOSBY in the North Greenland Sea from 1996-11-21 to...

  17. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the SHUMPU MARU in the Philippine Sea from 2000-01-21 to 2000-01-28 (NODC Accession 0112311)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112311 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from SHUMPU MARU in the Philippine Sea from 2000-01-21 to...

  18. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the SHUMPU MARU in the Philippine Sea from 1999-01-21 to 1999-01-28 (NODC Accession 0112306)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112306 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from SHUMPU MARU in the Philippine Sea from 1999-01-21 to...

  19. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the DISCOVERY in the Indian Ocean from 2004-12-13 to 2005-01-21 (NODC Accession 0113538)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113538 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from DISCOVERY in the Indian Ocean from 2004-12-13 to 2005-01-21 and...

  20. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the SEIFU MARU in the Sea of Japan from 2008-10-21 to 2008-11-25 (NODC Accession 0112358)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112358 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from SEIFU MARU in the Sea of Japan from 2008-10-21 to...

  1. Activated carbon from biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manocha, S.; Manocha, L. M.; Joshi, Parth; Patel, Bhavesh; Dangi, Gaurav; Verma, Narendra

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon are unique and versatile adsorbents having extended surface area, micro porous structure, universal adsorption effect, high adsorption capacity and high degree of surface reactivity. Activated carbons are synthesized from variety of materials. Most commonly used on a commercial scale are cellulosic based precursors such as peat, coal, lignite wood and coconut shell. Variation occurs in precursors in terms of structure and carbon content. Coir having very low bulk density and porous structure is found to be one of the valuable raw materials for the production of highly porous activated carbon and other important factor is its high carbon content. Exploration of good low cost and non conventional adsorbent may contribute to the sustainability of the environment and offer promising benefits for the commercial purpose in future. Carbonization of biomass was carried out in a horizontal muffle furnace. Both carbonization and activation were performed in inert nitrogen atmosphere in one step to enhance the surface area and to develop interconnecting porosity. The types of biomass as well as the activation conditions determine the properties and the yield of activated carbon. Activated carbon produced from biomass is cost effective as it is easily available as a waste biomass. Activated carbon produced by combination of chemical and physical activation has higher surface area of 2442 m2/gm compared to that produced by physical activation (1365 m2/gm).

  2. Carbon dioxide sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Prabir K [Worthington, OH; Lee, Inhee [Columbus, OH; Akbar, Sheikh A [Hilliard, OH

    2011-11-15

    The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

  3. Carbon-ionogel supercapacitors for integrated microelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Greg; Smith, Leland; Lau, Jonathan; Dunn, Bruce; Chui, Chi On

    2016-01-01

    To exceed the performance limits of dielectric capacitors in microelectronic circuit applications, we design and demonstrate on-chip coplanar electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs), or supercapacitors, employing carbon-coated gold electrodes with ionogel electrolyte. The formation of carbon-coated microelectrodes is accomplished by solution processing and results in a ten-fold increase in EDLC capacitance compared to bare gold electrodes without carbon. At frequencies up to 10 Hz, an areal capacitance of 2.1 pF μm-2 is achieved for coplanar carbon-ionogel EDLCs with 10 μm electrode gaps and 0.14 mm2 electrode area. Our smallest devices, comprised of 5 μm electrode gaps and 80 μm2 of active electrode area, reach areal capacitance values of ˜0.3 pF μm-2 at frequencies up to 1 kHz, even without carbon. To our knowledge, these are the highest reported values to date for on-chip EDLCs with sub-mm2 areas. A physical EDLC model is developed through the use of computer-aided simulations for design exploration and optimization of coplanar EDLCs. Through modeling and comparison with experimental data, we highlight the importance of reducing the electrode gap and electrolyte resistance to achieve maximum performance from on-chip EDLCs.

  4. Environmental implications of carbon limits on market ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combined heat and power (CHP) is promoted as an economical, energy-efficient option for combating climate change. To fully examine the viability of CHP as a clean-technology solution, its market potential and impacts need to be analyzed as part of scenarios of the future energy system, particularly those with policies limiting greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This paper develops and analyzes scenarios using a bottom-up, technology rich optimization model of the U.S. energy system. Two distinct carbon reduction goals were set up for analysis. In Target 1, carbon emission reduction goals were only included for the electric sector. In Target 2, carbon emission reduction goals were set across the entire energy system with the target patterned after the U.S.’s commitment to reducing GHG emissions as part of the Paris Agreement reached at the COP21 summit. From a system-wide carbon reduction standpoint, Target 2 is significantly more stringent. In addition, these scenarios examine the implications of various CHP capacity expansion and contraction assumptions and energy prices. The largest CHP capacity expansion are observed in scenarios that included Target 1, but investments were scaled back in scenarios that incorporated Target 2. The latter scenario spurred rapid development of zero-emissions technologies within the electric sector, and purchased electricity increased dramatically in many end-use sectors. The results suggest that CHP may play a role in a carbon-c

  5. Soil Carbon 4 per mille

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minasny, Budiman; van Wesemael, Bas

    2017-04-01

    The '4 per mille Soils for Food Security and Climate' was launched at the COP21 aiming to increase global soil organic matter stocks by 4 per mille (or 0.4 %) per year as a compensation for the global emissions of greenhouse gases by anthropogenic sources. This paper surveyed the soil organic carbon (SOC) stock estimates and sequestration potentials from 20 regions in the world (New Zealand, Chile, South Africa, Australia, Tanzania, Indonesia, Kenya, Nigeria, India, China Taiwan, South Korea, China Mainland, United States of America, France, Canada, Belgium, England & Wales, Ireland, Scotland, and Russia) and asked whether the 4 per mille initiative is feasible. This study highlights region specific efforts and scopes for soil carbon sequestration. Reported soil C sequestration rates generally show that under best management practices, 4 per mille or even higher sequestration rates can be accomplished. High C sequestration rates (up to 10 per mille) can be achieved for soils with low initial SOC stock (topsoil less than 30 t C ha-1), and at the first twenty years after implementation of best management practices. In addition, areas that have reached equilibrium but not at their saturation level will not be able to further increase their sequestration. We found that most studies on SOC sequestration globally only consider topsoil (up to 0.3 m depth), as it is considered to be most affected by management techniques. The 4 per mille initiative was based on a blanket calculation of the whole global soil profile C stock, however the potential to increase SOC is mostly on managed agricultural lands. If we consider 4 per mille on global topsoil of agricultural land, SOC sequestration is about 3.6 Gt C per year, which effectively offset 40% of global anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. As a strategy for climate change mitigation, soil carbon sequestration buys time over the next ten to twenty years while other effective sequestration and low carbon technologies become

  6. Conformational changes of fibrinogen in dispersed carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park SJ

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Sung Jean Park,1 Dongwoo Khang21College of Pharmacy, Gachon University, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon, South Korea; 2School of Nano and Advanced Materials Science Engineering and Center for PRC and RIGET, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, South KoreaAbstract: The conformational changes of plasma protein structures in response to carbon nanotubes are critical for determining the nanotoxicity and blood coagulation effects of carbon nanotubes. In this study, we identified that the functional intensity of carboxyl groups on carbon nanotubes, which correspond to the water dispersity or hydrophilicity of carbon nanotubes, can induce conformational changes in the fibrinogen domains. Also, elevation of carbon nanotube density can alter the secondary structures (ie, helices and beta sheets of fibrinogen. Furthermore, fibrinogen that had been in contact with the nanoparticle material demonstrated a different pattern of heat denaturation compared with free fibrinogen as a result of a variation in hydrophilicity and concentration of carbon nanotubes. Considering the importance of interactions between carbon nanotubes and plasma proteins in the drug delivery system, this study elucidated the correlation between nanoscale physiochemical material properties of carbon nanotubes and associated structural changes in fibrinogen.Keywords: carbon nanotubes, fibrinogen, nanotoxicity, conformational change, denaturation

  7. Transformation of acetate carbon into carbohydrate and amino acid metabilites during decomposition in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lasse Holst; Paul, E. A.

    1971-01-01

    Carbon-14-labelled acetate was added to a heavy clay soil of pH 7.6 to study the transformation of acetate carbon into carbohydrate and amino acid metabolites during decomposition. The acetate was totally metabolized after 6 days of incubation at 25°C when 70% of the labelled carbon had been...... evolved as CO2. Maximum incorporation of trace-C into the various organic fractions was observed after 4 days when 19% of residual, labelled carbon in the soil was located in carbohydrates, 29 % in amino acids and 21 % in the insoluble residue of the soil. The curves showing the amounts of labelled carbon...... days of incubation, 2.2% of the labelled carbon originally added to the soil was located in carbohydrate metabolites, 7% in amino acid metabolites and 5% in the insoluble residue. The carbon in these fractions accounted for 77% of the total, residual, labelled carbon in the soil; 12% in carbohydrates...

  8. Creating With Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    A subsidiary of SI Diamond Technology, Inc., Applied Nanotech, of Austin, Texas, is creating a buzz among various technology firms and venture capital groups interested in the company s progressive research on carbon-related field emission devices, including carbon nanotubes, filaments of pure carbon less than one ten-thousandth the width of human hair. Since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes have gained considerable attention due to their unique physical properties. For example, a single perfect carbon nanotube can range from 10 to 100 times stronger than steel, per unit weight. Recent studies also indicate that the nanotubes may be the best heat-conducting material in existence. These properties, combined with the ease of growing thin films or nanotubes by a variety of deposition techniques, make the carbon-based material one of the most desirable for cold field emission cathodes.

  9. Carbon plasma gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendel, C.W. Jr.; Zagar, D.M.; Mills, G.S.; Humphries, S. Jr.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1980-01-01

    A family of plasma guns supplying highly ionized carbon plasma is described. The guns are simple and inexpensive to construct and are pulsed by small capacitor banks of a few hundred joules. The output consists of 10 17 --10 18 multiply ionized carbon ions traveling at about 10 7 cm/s. Neutral output is very low and arrives well after the ionized carbon. The guns and pulsers are very reliable

  10. The global carbon cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier-Reimer, E.

    1991-01-01

    Basic concepts of the global carbon cycle on earth are described; by careful analyses of isotopic ratios, emission history and oceanic ventilation rates are derived, which provide crucial tests for constraining and calibrating models. Effects of deforestation, fertilizing, fossil fuel burning, soil erosion, etc. are quantified and compared, and the oceanic carbon process is evaluated. Oceanic and terrestrial biosphere modifications are discussed and a carbon cycle model is proposed

  11. Forests and carbon storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael G. Ryan

    2008-01-01

    Forests store much carbon and their growth can be a carbon sink if disturbance or harvesting has killed or removed trees or if trees that can now regrow are planted where they did not historically occur. Forests and long-lived wood products currently offset 310 million metric tons of U.S. fossil fuel emissions of carbon--20 percent of the total (Pacala et al. 2007)....

  12. Carbon emissions in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zhu

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzes the spatial-temporal pattern and processes of China's energy-related carbon emissions. Based on extensive quantitative analysis, it outlines the character and trajectory of China's energy-related carbon emissions during the period 1995-2010, examining the distribution pattern of China's carbon emissions from regional and sectoral perspectives and revealing the driving factors of China's soaring emission increase. Further, the book investigates the supply chain carbon emissions (the carbon footprints) of China's industrial sectors. Anthropogenic climate change is one of the most serious challenges currently facing humankind. China is the world's largest developing country, top primary energy consumer and carbon emitter. Achieving both economic growth and environmental conservation is the country's twofold challenge. Understanding the status, features and driving forces of China's energy-related carbon emissions is a critical aspect of attaining global sustainability. This work, for the first time, presents both key findings on and a systematic evaluation of China's carbon emissions from energy consumption. The results have important implications for global carbon budgets and burden-sharing with regard to climate change mitigation. The book will be of great interest to readers around the world, as it addresses a topic of truly global significance.

  13. Activated carbon material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, A.G.

    1978-01-01

    Activated carbon particles for use as iodine trapping material are impregnated with a mixture of selected iodine and potassium compounds to improve the iodine retention properties of the carbon. The I/K ratio is maintained at less than about 1 and the pH is maintained at above about 8.0. The iodine retention of activated carbon previously treated with or coimpregnated with triethylenediamine can also be improved by this technique. Suitable flame retardants can be added to raise the ignition temperature of the carbon to acceptable standards

  14. Carbon emissions in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhu [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Sustainability Science Program

    2016-07-01

    This study analyzes the spatial-temporal pattern and processes of China's energy-related carbon emissions. Based on extensive quantitative analysis, it outlines the character and trajectory of China's energy-related carbon emissions during the period 1995-2010, examining the distribution pattern of China's carbon emissions from regional and sectoral perspectives and revealing the driving factors of China's soaring emission increase. Further, the book investigates the supply chain carbon emissions (the carbon footprints) of China's industrial sectors. Anthropogenic climate change is one of the most serious challenges currently facing humankind. China is the world's largest developing country, top primary energy consumer and carbon emitter. Achieving both economic growth and environmental conservation is the country's twofold challenge. Understanding the status, features and driving forces of China's energy-related carbon emissions is a critical aspect of attaining global sustainability. This work, for the first time, presents both key findings on and a systematic evaluation of China's carbon emissions from energy consumption. The results have important implications for global carbon budgets and burden-sharing with regard to climate change mitigation. The book will be of great interest to readers around the world, as it addresses a topic of truly global significance.

  15. Changing global carbon cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canadell, Pep

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide (C02) is the single largest human perturbation on the earth's radiative balance contributing to climate change. Its rate of change reflects the balance between anthropogenic carbon emissions and the dynamics of a number of terrestrial and ocean processes that remove or emit C02. It is the long term evolution of this balance that will determine to large extent the speed and magnitude of the human induced climate change and the mitigation requirements to stabilise atmospheric C02 concentrations at any given level. In this talk, we show new trends in global carbon sources and sinks, with particularly focus on major shifts occurring since 2000 when the growth rate of atmospheric C02 has reached its highest level on record. The acceleration in the C02 growth results from the combination of several changes in properties of the carbon cycle, including: acceleration of anthropogenic carbon emissions; increased carbon intensity of the global economy, and decreased efficiency of natural carbon sinks. We discuss in more detail some of the possible causes of the reduced efficiency of natural carbon sinks on land and oceans, such as the decreased net sink in the Southern Ocean and on terrestrial mid-latitudes due to world-wide occurrence of drought. All these changes reported here characterise a carbon cycle that is generating stronger than expected climate forcing, and sooner than expected

  16. Carbon Trading. Literature Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerste, M.; Weda, J.; Rosenboom, N.

    2010-12-01

    From Pigou and Coase to the Kyoto Protocol, carbon trading has resulted in pricing of the negative externalities emanating from pollution. This report highlights leading literature and empirical findings on carbon trading, amongst others addressing the relevant carbon and related markets, the (lack of) success of carbon trading so far and room for improvement as well as its impact on investments in emission reduction. This report is part of a set of SEO-reports on finance and sustainability. The other reports deal with: Financing the Transition to Sustainable Energy; Innovations in financing environmental and social sustainability; and Sustainable investment.

  17. Carbon isotope ratios of atmospheric carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Hitoshi; Kishima, Noriaki; Tsutaki, Yasuhiro.

    1982-01-01

    The delta 13 C values relative to PDB were measured for carbon dioxide in air samples collected at various parts of Japan and at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii in the periods of 1977 and 1978. The delta 13 C values of the ''clean air'' are -7.6 % at Hawaii and -8.1 per mille Oki and Hachijo-jima islands. These values are definitely lighter than the carbon isotope ratios (-6.9 per mille) obtained by Keeling for clean airs collected at Southern California in 1955 to 1956. The increase in 12 C in atmospheric carbon dioxide is attributed to the input of the anthropogenic light carbon dioxides (combustion of fossil fuels etc.) Taking -7.6 per mille to be the isotope ratio of CO 2 in the present clean air, a simple three box model predicts that the biosphere has decreased rather than increased since 1955, implying that it is acting as the doner of carbon rather than the sink. (author)

  18. Simulation and Optimization of a Carbon Nanotube Electron Source

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knápek, Alexandr; Radlička, Tomáš; Krátký, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, S4 (2015), s. 60-65 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : carbon nanotube * electron beam lithography Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2015

  19. Microbially mediated mineral carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, I. M.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral carbonation involves silicate dissolution and carbonate precipitation, which are both natural processes that microorganisms are able to mediate in near surface environments (Ferris et al., 1994; Eq. 1). (Ca,Mg)SiO3 + 2H2CO3 + H2O → (Ca,Mg)CO3 + H2O + H4SiO4 + O2 (1) Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophs with cell surface characteristics and metabolic processes involving inorganic carbon that can induce carbonate precipitation. This occurs partly by concentrating cations within their net-negative cell envelope and through the alkalinization of their microenvironment (Thompson & Ferris, 1990). Regions with mafic and ultramafic bedrock, such as near Atlin, British Columbia, Canada, represent the best potential sources of feedstocks for mineral carbonation. The hydromagnesite playas near Atlin are a natural biogeochemical model for the carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals (Power et al., 2009). Field-based studies at Atlin and corroborating laboratory experiments demonstrate the ability of a microbial consortium dominated by filamentous cyanobacteria to induce the precipitation of carbonate minerals. Phototrophic microbes, such as cyanobacteria, have been proposed as a means for producing biodiesel and other value added products because of their efficiency as solar collectors and low requirement for valuable, cultivable land in comparison to crops (Dismukes et al., 2008). Carbonate precipitation and biomass production could be facilitated using specifically designed ponds to collect waters rich in dissolved cations (e.g., Mg2+ and Ca2+), which would allow for evapoconcentration and provide an appropriate environment for growth of cyanobacteria. Microbially mediated carbonate precipitation does not require large quantities of energy or chemicals needed for industrial systems that have been proposed for rapid carbon capture and storage via mineral carbonation (e.g., Lackner et al., 1995). Therefore, this biogeochemical approach may represent a readily

  20. Organic carbon content of zooplankton from the nearshore waters of Bombay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, V.R.; Gajbhiye, S.N.; Sayed, F.Y.

    Organic carbon content of zooplankton in the Versova Creek and Thana Creek (polluted areas), off Versova and off Mahim, Bombay, India (relatively unpolluted areas) varied respectively from 21.4-30, 13.2-38.4, 21.6-30 and 25.8-39.6% dry weight...

  1. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... main content Languages 简体中文 English Bahasa Indonesia 한국어 Español ภาษาไทย Tiếng Việt Text Size: Decrease Font Increase ... Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as ...

  2. Arctic carbon cycling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christensen, Torben R; Rysgaard, SØREN; Bendtsen, JØRGEN; Else, Brent; Glud, Ronnie N; van Huissteden, J.; Parmentier, F.J.W.; Sachs, Torsten; Vonk, J.E.

    2017-01-01

    The marine Arctic is considered a net carbon sink, with large regional differences in uptake rates. More regional modelling and observational studies are required to reduce the uncertainty among current estimates. Robust projections for how the Arctic Ocean carbon sink may evolve in the future are

  3. Carbon trading: Literature overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerste, M.; Weda, J.; Rosenboom, N.

    2010-01-01

    From Pigou and Coase to the Kyoto Protocol, carbon trading has resulted in pricing of the negative externalities emanating from pollution. At the request of Duisenberg school of finance, this report highlights leading literature and empirical findings on ‘carbon trading’, amongst others addressing

  4. Amorphous iron (II) carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sel, Ozlem; Radha, A.V.; Dideriksen, Knud

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The synthesis, characterization and crystallization energetics of amorphous iron (II) carbonate (AFC) are reported. AFC may form as a precursor for siderite (FeCO3). The enthalpy of crystallization (DHcrys) of AFC is similar to that of amorphous magnesium carbonate (AMC) and more...

  5. Modeling Carbon Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Piers

    2012-01-01

    Model results will be reviewed to assess different methods for bounding the terrestrial role in the global carbon cycle. It is proposed that a series of climate model runs could be scoped that would tighten the limits on the "missing sink" of terrestrial carbon and could also direct future satellite image analyses to search for its geographical location and understand its seasonal dynamics.

  6. Carbon Capture and Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benson, S.M.; Bennaceur, K.; Cook, P.; Davison, J.; Coninck, H. de; Farhat, K.; Ramirez, C.A.; Simbeck, D.; Surles, T.; Verma, P.; Wright, I.

    2012-01-01

    Emissions of carbon dioxide, the most important long-lived anthropogenic greenhouse gas, can be reduced by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS). CCS involves the integration of four elements: CO 2 capture, compression of the CO2 from a gas to a liquid or a denser gas, transportation of pressurized CO 2

  7. Carbon monoxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Animals can also be poisoned by carbon monoxide. People who have pets at home may notice that their animals become ... or unresponsive from carbon monoxide exposure. Often the pets will ... these conditions. This can lead to a delay in getting help.

  8. Many Phases of Carbon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    According to the electronic configuration of a neutral carbon atom, there are only two unpaired .... coke. Further heating this to 2500°C - 3000°C causes an ordering .... The density of these carbon films is around 1.6-. 1.8 glee, which is less than that of graphite. The electrical conductivity of the films prepared depends on the.

  9. Carbon for sensing devices

    CERN Document Server

    Tagliaferro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    This book reveals why carbon is playing such an increasingly prominent role as a sensing material. The various steps that transform a raw material in a sensing device are thoroughly presented and critically discussed.  The authors deal with all aspects of carbon-based sensors, starting from the various hybridization and allotropes of carbon, with specific focus on micro and nanosized carbons (e.g., carbon nanotubes, graphene) and their growth processes. The discussion then moves to the role of functionalization and the different routes to achieve it. Finally, a number of sensing applications in various fields are presented, highlighting the connection with the basic properties of the various carbon allotropes.  Readers will benefit from this book’s bottom-up approach, which starts from the local bonding in carbon solids and ends with sensing applications, linking the local hybridization of carbon atoms and its modification by functionalization to specific device performance. This book is a must-have in th...

  10. Capacitance for carbon capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landskron, Kai

    2018-01-01

    Metal recycling: A sustainable, capacitance-assisted carbon capture and sequestration method (Supercapacitive Swing Adsorption) can turn scrap metal and CO 2 into metal carbonates at an attractive energy cost. (copyright 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Capacitance for carbon capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landskron, Kai [Department of Chemistry, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA (United States)

    2018-03-26

    Metal recycling: A sustainable, capacitance-assisted carbon capture and sequestration method (Supercapacitive Swing Adsorption) can turn scrap metal and CO{sub 2} into metal carbonates at an attractive energy cost. (copyright 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Fly ash carbon passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  13. Special COP 21 - Stakes and actors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauveau, Loic; Dupain, Julien; Descamps, Olivier; Blosseville, Thomas; Connors, Anne; Canto, Albane; Robischon, Christian; Boedec, Morgan; Tubiana, Fabian; Bomstein, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    A first set of article comments and discusses the various stakes and challenges of the 21. Conference of Parties (COP 21): the negotiation process which resulted in a synthesis which is to be signed by 95 States in Paris, the elaboration of an Agenda of solutions with the commitment of enterprises and local authorities, the issue of international financing as some promises remained not kept for the support to adaptation of developing countries. A second set of articles addresses the involved actors and their technological or economic challenges: the needed evolution of energy (electricity, heat, gas, fuel) producers away from fossil energies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, the strategy of the French company Engie in the field of photovoltaic, wind and more generally renewable energies, innovating trends of decentralisation of energy production (offshore wind energy, hydrogen, plasma torch, flexible photovoltaic arrays, the wind tree, the floating wind turbine, new technologies for solar arrays), the perspectives for industrial sectors concerned by energy transition (with the example of Schneider Electric), emerging technologies (oil lamp, new boilers, desalination equipment, storage of wind energy, co-generation), developments and perspectives in the transport sector (example of Renault, new technologies for hybrid propulsion, bio-refineries, reduction of fuel consumption, hybrid aircraft, and heat management in railways) and in the building sector (new standards and applications, new building materials). A last article outlines the threat that climate can be for profitability and the taking of the carbon risk into account by the insurance and financial sectors

  14. Carbon isotopes and concentrations in mid-oceanic ridge basalts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineau, F.; Javoy, M.

    1983-01-01

    In order to estimate carbon fluxes at mid-ocean ridges and carbon isotopic compositions in the convective mantle, we have studied carbon concentrations and isotopic compositions in tholeiitic glasses from the FAMOUS zone (Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 36 0 N) and East Pacific Rise from 21 0 N (RITA zone) to 20 0 S. These samples correspond essentially to the whole spectrum of spreading rates (2-16 cm/yr). The contain: -CO 2 vesicles in various quantities (3-220 ppm C) with delta 13 C between -4 and -9per mille relative to PDB, in the range of carbonatites and diamonds. - Carbonate carbon (3-100 ppm C) with delta 13 C between -2.6 and -20.0per mille relative to PDB. - Dissolved carbon at a concentration of 170+-10 ppm under 250 bar pressure with delta 13 C from -9 to -21per mille relative to PDB. This dissolved carbon, not contained in large CO 2 vesicles, corresponds to a variety of chemical forms among which part of the above carbonates, microscopic CO 2 bubbles and graphite. The lightest portions of this dissolved carbon are extracted at low temperatures (400-600 0 C) whereas the CO 2 from the vesicles is extracted near fusion temperature. These features can be explained by outgassing processes in two steps from the source region of the magma: (1) equilibrium outgassing before the second percolation threshold, where micron size bubbles are continuously reequilibrated with the magma; (2) distillation after the second percolation threshold when larger bubbles travel faster than magma concentrations to the surface. The second step may begin at different depths apparently related to the spreading rate, shallower for fast-spreading ridges than for slow-spreading ridges. (orig./WL)

  15. [Trisomy 21 in visual art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, A; Tourame, P

    2013-12-01

    In 1866, J. Langdon Down published a paper on "an ethnic classification of idiots" and noted their facial resemblance with individuals of the Mongolian people. In 1959, J. Lejeune, M. Gautier, and R. Turpin demonstrated that the children with Down syndrome had an extra copy of chromosome 21. There is now a debate within the medical literature on the age of trisomy 21 as a disease affecting mankind. Since it was not described before 1866, some authors questioned whether this disease is an old or new condition in humans. Three methods of investigation are useful for demonstrating that trisomy 21 has been present in humans for a long time: the figuration of this condition in historical paintings, figurines, and pottery; its presence in old skeletal remains; and the origin of human chromosome 21 during primate phylogeny. Figurines strongly suggestive of trisomy 21 have been found in the Greco-Roman world, in many Central and South American pre-Columbian cultures, and in Khmer temples. In Europe, during the Renaissance, Italian and Flemish artists represented trisomy 21 in paintings of religious inspiration. Studies on the origin and pathology of chromosome 21 have shown that the ancestral human chromosome 21 arose 30-50 million years ago and that trisomy 21 has existed since time immemorial. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  16. Chrysotile dissolution rates: Implications for carbon sequestration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thom, James G.M.; Dipple, Gregory M.; Power, Ian M.; Harrison, Anna L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Uncertainties in serpentine dissolution kinetics hinder carbon sequestration models. • A pH dependent, far from equilibrium dissolution rate law for chrysotile. • F chrysotile (mol/m 2 /s) = 10 −0.21pH−10.57 at 22 °C over pH 2–10. • Laboratory dissolution rates consistent with mine waste weathering observations. • Potential for carbon sequestration in mine tailings and aquifers is assessed. - Abstract: Serpentine minerals (e.g., chrysotile) are a potentially important medium for sequestration of CO 2 via carbonation reactions. The goals of this study are to report a steady-state, far from equilibrium chrysotile dissolution rate law and to better define what role serpentine dissolution kinetics will have in constraining rates of carbon sequestration via serpentine carbonation. The steady-state dissolution rate of chrysotile in 0.1 m NaCl solutions was measured at 22 °C and pH ranging from 2 to 8. Dissolution experiments were performed in a continuously stirred flow-through reactor with the input solutions pre-equilibrated with atmospheric CO 2 . Both Mg and Si steady-state fluxes from the chrysotile surface, and the overall chrysotile flux were regressed and the following empirical relationships were obtained: F Mg =-0.22pH-10.02;F Si =-0.19pH-10.37;F chrysotile =-0.21pH-10.57 where F Mg , F Si , and F chrysotile are the log 10 Mg, Si, and molar chrysotile fluxes in mol/m 2 /s, respectively. Element fluxes were used in reaction-path calculations to constrain the rate of CO 2 sequestration in two geological environments that have been proposed as potential sinks for anthropogenic CO 2 . Carbon sequestration in chrysotile tailings at 10 °C is approximately an order of magnitude faster than carbon sequestration in a serpentinite-hosted aquifer at 60 °C on a per kilogram of water basis. A serpentinite-hosted aquifer, however, provides a larger sequestration capacity. The chrysotile dissolution rate law determined in this study has

  17. 1 CFR 21.21 - General requirements: References.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General requirements: References. 21.21 Section... to test methods or consensus standards produced by a Federal agency that have replaced or preempted private or voluntary test methods or consensus standards in a subject matter area. (5) The reference is to...

  18. 21 CFR 1303.21 - Individual manufacturing quotas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... controlled substance listed in Schedule I or II, and who applies for a manufacturing quota, an individual... basic class. Any manufacturing quota fixed and issued by the Administrator shall be subject to his... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Individual manufacturing quotas. 1303.21 Section...

  19. 21 CFR 173.21 - Perfluorinated ion exchange membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Perfluorinated ion exchange membranes. 173.21... ion exchange membranes. Substances identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as ion exchange membranes intended for use in the treatment of bulk quantities of liquid food under the...

  20. Carbon Dioxide Shuttling Thermochemical Storage Using Strontium Carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, Renwei [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    2015-06-15

    Phase I concludes with significant progress made towards the SunShot ELEMENTS goals of high energy density, high power density, and high temperature by virtue of a SrO/SrCO3 based material. A detailed exploration of sintering inhibitors has been conducted and relatively stable materials supported by YSZ or SrZO3 have been identified as the leading candidates. In 15 cycle runs using a 3 hour carbonation duration, several materials demonstrated energy densities of roughly 1500 MJ/m3 or greater. The peak power density for the most productive materials consistently exceeded 40 MW/m3—an order of magnitude greater than the SOPO milestone. The team currently has a material demonstrating nearly 1000 MJ/m3 after 100 abbreviated (1 hour carbonation) cycles. A subsequent 8 hour carbonation after the 100 cycle test exhibited over 1500 MJ/m3, which is evidence that the material still has capacity for high storage albeit with slower kinetics. Kinetic carbonation experiments have shown three distinct periods: induction, kinetically-controlled, and finally a diffusion-controlled period. In contrast to thermodynamic equilibrium prediction, higher carbonation temperatures lead to greater conversions over a 1 hour periods, as diffusion of CO2 is more rapid at higher temperatures. A polynomial expression was fit to describe the temperature dependence of the linear kinetically-controlled regime, which does not obey a traditional Arrhenius relationship. Temperature and CO2 partial pressure effects on the induction period were also investigated. The CO2 partial pressure has a strong effect on the reaction progress at high temperatures but is insignificant at temperatures under 900°C. Tomography data for porous SrO/SrCO3 structures at initial stage and after multiple carbonation/decomposition cycles have been obtained. Both 2D slices and 3D reconstructed representations have

  1. The Contemporary Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, R. A.

    2003-12-01

    The global carbon cycle refers to the exchanges of carbon within and between four major reservoirs: the atmosphere, the oceans, land, and fossil fuels. Carbon may be transferred from one reservoir to another in seconds (e.g., the fixation of atmospheric CO2 into sugar through photosynthesis) or over millennia (e.g., the accumulation of fossil carbon (coal, oil, gas) through deposition and diagenesis of organic matter). This chapter emphasizes the exchanges that are important over years to decades and includes those occurring over the scale of months to a few centuries. The focus will be on the years 1980-2000 but our considerations will broadly include the years ˜1850-2100. Chapter 8.09, deals with longer-term processes that involve rates of carbon exchange that are small on an annual timescale (weathering, vulcanism, sedimentation, and diagenesis).The carbon cycle is important for at least three reasons. First, carbon forms the structure of all life on the planet, making up ˜50% of the dry weight of living things. Second, the cycling of carbon approximates the flows of energy around the Earth, the metabolism of natural, human, and industrial systems. Plants transform radiant energy into chemical energy in the form of sugars, starches, and other forms of organic matter; this energy, whether in living organisms or dead organic matter, supports food chains in natural ecosystems as well as human ecosystems, not the least of which are industrial societies habituated (addicted?) to fossil forms of energy for heating, transportation, and generation of electricity. The increased use of fossil fuels has led to a third reason for interest in the carbon cycle. Carbon, in the form of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4), forms two of the most important greenhouse gases. These gases contribute to a natural greenhouse effect that has kept the planet warm enough to evolve and support life (without the greenhouse effect the Earth's average temperature would be -33

  2. The Effect of Caramelization and Carbonization Temperatures toward Structural Properties of Mesoporous Carbon from Fructose with Zinc Borosilicate Activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tutik Setianingsih

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous carbon was prepared from fructose using zinc borosilicate (ZBS activator. The synthesis involves caramelization and carbonization processes. The effect of both process temperature toward porosity and functional group of carbon surface are investigated in this research. The caramelization was conducted hydrothermally at 85 and 100 °C, followed by thermally 130 °C. The carbonization was conducted at various temperatures (450–750 °C. The carbon-ZBS composite were washed by using HF 48% solution, 1M HCl solution, and aquadest respectively to remove ZBS from the carbon. The carbon products were characterized with nitrogen gas adsorption-desorption method, FTIR spectrophotometry, X-ray diffraction, and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The highest mesopore characteristics is achieved at 100 °C (caramelization and 450 °C (carbonization, including Vmeso about 2.21 cm3/g (pore cage and 2.32 cm3/g (pore window with pore uniformity centered at 300 Å (pore cage and 200 Å (pore window, containing the surface functional groups of C=O and OH, degree of graphitization about 57% and aromaticity fraction about 0.68.

  3. Impact of the 2015 El Niño on the Indonesian carbon balance: implications for carbon mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, K. W.; Liu, J.; Bloom, A. A.; Parazoo, N.; Lee, M.; Walker, T. W.; Menemenlis, D.; Jiang, Z.; Gierach, M.; Gurney, K. R.

    2016-12-01

    The COP21 or Paris Agreement in Dec. 2015 was a landmark step in a cooperative approach to reduce anthropogenic emissions from both fossil fuel and deforestation. During that same period, one of the strongest El Niños on record led to devastating droughts, fires, and air pollution in Indonesia. We assess the impact of this El Niño on the Indonesia carbon balance using the NASA Carbon Monitoring System Flux (CMS-Flux) pilot project, which assimilates satellite observations across the entire carbon cycle to attribute the CO2 growth rate to spatially resolved surface fluxes. We assimilate new xCO2 observations from the Orbital Carbon Observatory (OCO-2) to quantify net carbon fluxes and validate those fluxes against independent in-situ atmospheric data. The contribution of biomass burning to the carbon balance is independently determined from the assimilation of Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT). The impact of the concomitant drought on productively is assessed from the assimilation of new solar induced fluorescence (SIF) measurements. Using these multiple lines of evidence, we investigate the relative role of biomass burning and productivity in the contribution of Indonesia to the global atmospheric growth rate. The exceptionally long turnover rates of peat carbon pools lead to effectively irreversible carbon loss to the atmosphere. The implications of these losses to Indonesian Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDC) as part of the Paris agreement will be explored.

  4. Carbon dioxide conversion over carbon-based nanocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavarian, Mehrnoush; Chai, Siang-Piao; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2013-07-01

    The utilization of carbon dioxide for the production of valuable chemicals via catalysts is one of the efficient ways to mitigate the greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. It is known that the carbon dioxide conversion and product yields are still low even if the reaction is operated at high pressure and temperature. The carbon dioxide utilization and conversion provides many challenges in exploring new concepts and opportunities for development of unique catalysts for the purpose of activating the carbon dioxide molecules. In this paper, the role of carbon-based nanocatalysts in the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide and direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate from carbon dioxide and methanol are reviewed. The current catalytic results obtained with different carbon-based nanocatalysts systems are presented and how these materials contribute to the carbon dioxide conversion is explained. In addition, different strategies and preparation methods of nanometallic catalysts on various carbon supports are described to optimize the dispersion of metal nanoparticles and catalytic activity.

  5. Carbonate hosted gold deposit in Tasmania, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abadi, M.H.

    1999-01-01

    mineralisation. Oxygen isotope values of gold-bearing carbonate from Beaconsfield (-6.3 to -17.7 per mil VPDB) and Henty (20.98 to -21.49 per mil VPDB) are negative compared to modern marine calcite (+0.5 to -1 per mil VPDB). The very depleted oxygen isotope values along with elemental compositions and palaeotemperature calculation indicate the presence of hot meteoric fluids during gold mineralisation (Rao and Adabi, 1999).Carbon isotope values in both Beaconsfield and Henty carbonates are lower (-0.4 to -5.3 per mil VPDB) than modern marine calcite (0 to +4 per mil. VPDB) due to dissolution of large concentration of carbonate prior to gold mineralisation and this is likely to have increased Ph of gold-bearing fluid and promoted gold precipitation. Copyright (1999) Geological Society of Australia

  6. Carbon dioxide adsorption in graphene sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Kumar Mishra

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Control over the CO2 emission via automobiles and industrial exhaust in atmosphere, is one of the major concerns to render environmental friendly milieu. Adsorption can be considered to be one of the more promising methods, offering potential energy savings compared to absorbent systems. Different carbon nanostructures (activated carbon and carbon nanotubes have attracted attention as CO2 adsorbents due to their unique surface morphology. In the present work, we have demonstrated the CO2 adsorption capacity of graphene, prepared via hydrogen induced exfoliation of graphitic oxide at moderate temperatures. The CO2 adsorption study was performed using high pressure Sieverts apparatus and capacity was calculated by gas equation using van der Waals corrections. Physical adsorption of CO2 molecules in graphene was confirmed by FTIR study. Synthesis of graphene sheets via hydrogen exfoliation is possible at large scale and lower cost and higher adsorption capacity of as prepared graphene compared to other carbon nanostructures suggests its possible use as CO2 adsorbent for industrial application. Maximum adsorption capacity of 21.6 mmole/g was observed at 11 bar pressure and room temperature (25 ºC.

  7. Potential reduction of carbon emissions from Crude Palm Oil production based on energy and carbon balances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patthanaissaranukool, Withida; Polprasert, Chongchin; Englande, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We evaluate energy and carbon equivalence from CPO production based on a CBM. ► Energy spent and produced via carbon movement from palm oil mill was determined. ► Scenarios were formulated to evaluate the potential reduction of carbon emission. ► Utilization of biomass from palm oil mill shows the high potential of C-reduction. -- Abstract: This study aimed to evaluate energy and carbon equivalences (CE) associated with palm oil milling and to evaluate sustainability alternatives for energy consumption. Appropriate ways to reduce carbon emissions were also evaluated. A field survey was carried out to quantify the input and output of energy and materials following the conceptual framework of a carbon-balanced model (CBM), which exclude other non-CO 2 greenhouse gases. Survey results indicate that the electrical energy consumption for daily mill start-up averaged 18.7 ± 5.4 kWh/ton Fresh Fruit Bunches (FFBs). This energy is equivalent to 114.4 ± 33.2 kWh/ton Crude Palm Oil (CPO) which was found to be offset by that generated in the mills using palm fiber as a solid fuel. Currently, organic residues contained in the wastewater are anaerobically converted to methane. The methane is used as fuel to generate electricity and sold to an outside grid network at a generation rate of 8.1 ± 2.1 kWh/ton FFB. Based on the CBM approach, carbon emissions observed from the use of fossil energy in palm oil milling were very small; however, total carbon emission from oil palm plantation and palm oil milling were found to be 12.3 kg CE/ton FFB, resulting in the net carbon reduction in CPO production of 2.8 kg CE/ton FFB or 53.7 kg CE/ha-y. Overall, the sum of C-reduction was found 1.2 times greater than that of C-emission. This figure can be increased up to 5.5, if all biomass by-products are used as fuel to generate electricity only. The full potential for carbon reduction from palm oil milling is estimated at 0.94 kW of electric power for every hectare of

  8. Nondestructive Evaluation of Carbon-Carbon Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-01

    4, -4 3 2.0 17-21 15 18 21 :9." -: 4:tes: 1, Cll •easureren’. ;rown ire in Ill e::ceoI ".-ic.-ie: "-.- : .. - are hown in •iai:’l4m raw court form...scatter in the samples rather than the additional formation of cristo - balite. This was supported by later diffraction scans of material after extended...could not be avoided due to the brittle nature of the coating. , b. Coupons were then mounted in epoxy using a vacuum-oimpregnation technique. This

  9. Conducting carbonized polyaniline nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mentus, Slavko; Ciric-Marjanovic, Gordana; Trchova, Miroslava; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2009-01-01

    Conducting nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes were synthesized by the carbonization of self-assembled polyaniline nanotubes protonated with sulfuric acid. Carbonization was carried out in a nitrogen atmosphere at a heating rate of 10 deg. C min -1 up to a maximum temperature of 800 deg. C. The carbonized polyaniline nanotubes which have a typical outer diameter of 100-260 nm, with an inner diameter of 20-170 nm and a length extending from 0.5 to 0.8 μm, accompanied with very thin nanotubes with outer diameters of 8-14 nm, inner diameters 3.0-4.5 nm and length extending from 0.3 to 1.0 μm, were observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Elemental analysis showed 9 wt% of nitrogen in the carbonized product. Conductivity of the nanotubular PANI precursor, amounting to 0.04 S cm -1 , increased to 0.7 S cm -1 upon carbonization. Molecular structure of carbonized polyaniline nanotubes has been analyzed by FTIR and Raman spectroscopies, and their paramagnetic characteristics were compared with the starting PANI nanotubes by EPR spectroscopy.

  10. Conducting carbonized polyaniline nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mentus, Slavko; Ciric-Marjanovic, Gordana [Faculty of Physical Chemistry, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 12-16, 11158 Belgrade (Serbia); Trchova, Miroslava; Stejskal, Jaroslav [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Heyrovsky Square 2, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)], E-mail: gordana@ffh.bg.ac.rs

    2009-06-17

    Conducting nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes were synthesized by the carbonization of self-assembled polyaniline nanotubes protonated with sulfuric acid. Carbonization was carried out in a nitrogen atmosphere at a heating rate of 10 deg. C min{sup -1} up to a maximum temperature of 800 deg. C. The carbonized polyaniline nanotubes which have a typical outer diameter of 100-260 nm, with an inner diameter of 20-170 nm and a length extending from 0.5 to 0.8 {mu}m, accompanied with very thin nanotubes with outer diameters of 8-14 nm, inner diameters 3.0-4.5 nm and length extending from 0.3 to 1.0 {mu}m, were observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Elemental analysis showed 9 wt% of nitrogen in the carbonized product. Conductivity of the nanotubular PANI precursor, amounting to 0.04 S cm{sup -1}, increased to 0.7 S cm{sup -1} upon carbonization. Molecular structure of carbonized polyaniline nanotubes has been analyzed by FTIR and Raman spectroscopies, and their paramagnetic characteristics were compared with the starting PANI nanotubes by EPR spectroscopy.

  11. Global carbon inequality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubacek, Klaus; Baiocchi, Giovanni; Feng, Kuishuang; Munoz Castillo, Raul; Sun, Laixiang; Xue, Jinjun

    2017-01-01

    Global climate change and inequality are inescapably linked both in terms of who contributes climate change and who suffers the consequences. This fact is also partly reflected in two United Nations (UN) processes: on the one hand, the Paris Agreement of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change under which countries agreed to hold the increase in the global average temperature to below 2 C above pre-industrial levels and, on the other hand, the UN's Sustainable Development Goals aiming to end poverty. These agreements are seen as important foundation to put the world nations on a sustainable pathway. However, how these agreements can be achieved or whether they are even mutually compatible is less clear. We explore the global carbon inequality between and within countries and the carbon implications of poverty alleviation by combining detailed consumer expenditure surveys for different income categories for a wide range of countries with an environmentally extended multi-regional input-output approach to estimate carbon footprints of different household groups, globally, and assess the carbon implications of moving the poorest people out of poverty. Given the current context, increasing income leads to increasing carbon footprints and makes global targets for mitigating greenhouse gases more difficult to achieve given the pace of technological progress and current levels of fossil fuel dependence. We conclude that the huge level of carbon inequality requires a critical discussion of undifferentiated income growth. Current carbon-intensive lifestyles and consumption patterns need to enter the climate discourse to a larger extent. (orig.)

  12. Ultrahigh surface area carbon from carbonated beverages: Combining self-templating process and in situ activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Zhiyong; Chen, Jihua; Dai, Sheng

    2015-11-01

    Ultrahigh surface area carbons (USACs, e.g., >2000 m2/g) are attracting tremendous attention due to their outstanding performance in energy-related applications. The state-of-art approaches to USACs involve templating or activation methods and all these techniques show certain drawbacks. In this work, a series of USACs with specific surface areas up to 3633 m2/g were prepared in two steps: hydrothermal carbonization (200 °C) of carbonated beverages (CBs) and further thermal treatment in nitrogen (600–1000 °C). The rich inner porosity is formed by a self-templated process during which acids and polyelectrolyte sodium salts in the beverage formulas make some contribution. This strategy covers various CBs such as Coca Cola®, Pepsi Cola®, Dr. Pepper®, and Fanta® and it enables an acceptable product yield (based on sugars), for example: 21 wt% for carbon (2940 m2/g) from Coca Cola®. Being potential electrode materials for supercapacitors, those carbon materials possessed a good specific capacitance (57.2–185.7 F g-1) even at a scan rate of 1000 mV s-1. Thus, a simple and efficient strategy to USACs has been presented.

  13. Carbon Ion Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Hansen, David Christoffer; Herrmann, Rochus

    On the importance of choice of target size for selective boosting of hypoxic tumor subvolumina in carbon ion therapy Purpose: Functional imaging methods in radiotherapy are maturing and can to some extent uncover radio resistant structures found within a tumour entity. Selective boost of identified...... effect. All cell lines investigated here did not reach an OER of 1, even for the smaller structures, which may indicate that the achievable dose average LET of carbon ions is too low, and heavier ions than carbon may be considered for functional LET-painting....

  14. Radiolytic carbon gasification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shennan, J.V.

    1980-01-01

    A vast body of knowledge has been accumulated over the past thirty years related to the radiolytic oxidation of the graphite moderator in carbon dioxide cooled Reactors. In the last ten years the dominance of the internal pore structure of the graphite in controlling the rate of carbon gasification has been steadily revealed. The object of this paper is to sift the large body of evidence and show how internal gas composition and hence carbon gasification is controlled by the virgin pore structure and the changes in pore structure brought about by progressive radiolytic oxidation. (author)

  15. Carbon Composition of Particulate Organic Carbon in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, K.; Montoya, J. P.; Weber, S.; Bosman, S.; Chanton, J.

    2016-02-01

    The Deepwater Horizon blowout released 5.0x1011 g C from gaseous hydrocarbons and up to 6.0x1011g C from oil into the water column. Another carbon source, adding daily to the water column, leaks from the natural hydrocarbon seeps that pepper the seafloor of the Gulf of Mexico. How much of this carbon from the DWH and natural seeps is assimilated into particulate organic carbon (POC) in the water column? We filtered seawater collected in 2010, 2012, and 2013 from seep and non-seep sites, collecting POC on 0.7µm glass microfiber filters and analyzing the POC for stable and radiocarbon isotopes. Mixing models based on carbon isotopic endmembers of methane, oil, and modern production were used to estimate the percentage of hydrocarbon incorporated into POC. Significant differences were seen between POC from shallow and deep waters and between POC collected from seep, non-seep, and blowout sites; however yearly differences were not as evident suggesting the GOM has a consistent supply of depleted carbon. Stable carbon isotopes signatures of POC in the Gulf averaged -23.7±2.5‰ for shallow samples and -26.65±2.9‰ for deep POC samples, while radiocarbon signatures averaged -100.4±146.1‰ for shallow and -394.6±197‰ for deep samples. POC in the northern Gulf are composed of 23-91% modern carbon, 2-21% methane, and 0-71% oil. Oil plays a major role in the POC composition of the GOM, especially at the natural seep GC600.

  16. Sol-gel coatings on carbon/carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, S.M.; Krabill, R.M.; Dalzell, W.J. Jr.; Chu, P.Y.; Clark, D.E.

    1986-01-01

    The need for structural materials that can withstand severe environments up to 4000 0 F has promulgated the investigation of sol-gel derived ceramic and composite coatings on carbon/carbon composite materials. Alumina and zirconia sols have been deposited via thermophoresis on carbon/carbon substrates

  17. Temperature acclimation of photosynthesis and respiration: A key uncertainty in the carbon cycle-climate feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardozzi, Danica L.; Bonan, Gordon B.; Smith, Nicholas G.; Dukes, Jeffrey S.; Fisher, Rosie A.

    2015-10-01

    Earth System Models typically use static responses to temperature to calculate photosynthesis and respiration, but experimental evidence suggests that many plants acclimate to prevailing temperatures. We incorporated representations of photosynthetic and leaf respiratory temperature acclimation into the Community Land Model, the terrestrial component of the Community Earth System Model. These processes increased terrestrial carbon pools by 20 Pg C (22%) at the end of the 21st century under a business-as-usual (Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5) climate scenario. Including the less certain estimates of stem and root respiration acclimation increased terrestrial carbon pools by an additional 17 Pg C (~40% overall increase). High latitudes gained the most carbon with acclimation, and tropical carbon pools increased least. However, results from both of these regions remain uncertain; few relevant data exist for tropical and boreal plants or for extreme temperatures. Constraining these uncertainties will produce more realistic estimates of land carbon feedbacks throughout the 21st century.

  18. Hypervelocity technology carbon/carbon testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmo, John V.; Kretz, Lawrence O.

    The paper describes the procedures used at the Structures Test Laboratory of the Wright Laboratory's Flight Dynamics Directorate to test a carbon/carbon hot structure representing a typical hypersonic gliding body, and presents the results of tests. The forebody was heated to 1371 C over 13 test runs, using radiant quartz lamps; a vertical shear force of 5.34 kN was introduced to the nose at a stabilized temperature of 816 C. Test data were collected using prototype high-temperature strain gages, in-house-designed high-temperature extensometers, conventional strain gages, and thermocouples. Video footage was taken of all test runs. Test runs were successfully completed up to 1371 C with flight typical thermal gradients at heating rates up to 5.56 C/sec. Results showed that, overall, the termal test control systems performed as predicted and that test temperatures and thermal gradients were achieved to within about 5 percent in most cases.

  19. Porous carbons prepared by direct carbonization of MOFs for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xinlong; Li, Xuejin; Yan, Zifeng; Komarneni, Sridhar

    2014-07-01

    Three porous carbons were prepared by direct carbonization of HKUST-1, MOF-5 and Al-PCP without additional carbon precursors. The carbon samples obtained by carbonization at 1073 K were characterized by XRD, TEM and N2 physisorption techniques followed by testing for electrochemical performance. The BET surface areas of the three carbons were in the range of 50-1103 m2/g. As electrode materials for supercapacitor, the MOF-5 and Al-PCP derived carbons displayed the ideal capacitor behavior, whereas the HKUST-1 derived carbon showed poor capacitive behavior at various sweep rates and current densities. Among those carbon samples, Al-PCP derived carbons exhibited highest specific capacitance (232.8 F/g) in 30% KOH solution at the current density of 100 mA/g.

  20. Environmental change and the carbon balance of Amazonian forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aragao, Luiz E.O.C.; Poulter, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Extreme climatic events and land-use change are known to influence strongly the current carbon cycle of Amazonia, and have the potential to cause significant global climate impacts. This review intends to evaluate the effects of both climate and anthropogenic perturbations on the carbon balance of the Brazilian Amazon and to understand how they interact with each other. By analysing the outputs of the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) Assessment Report 4 (AR4) model ensemble, we demonstrate that Amazonian temperatures and water stress are both likely to increase over the 21. Century. Curbing deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon by 62% in 2010 relative to the 1990's mean decreased the Brazilian Amazon's deforestation contribution to global land use carbon emissions from 17% in the 1990's and early 2000's to 9% by 2010. Carbon sources in Amazonia are likely to be dominated by climatic impacts allied with forest fires (48.3% relative contribution) during extreme droughts. The current net carbon sink (net biome productivity, NBP) of +0.16 (ranging from +0.11 to +0.21) PgCyear-1 in the Brazilian Amazon, equivalent to 13.3% of global carbon emissions from land-use change for 2008, can be negated or reversed during drought years [NBP=-0.06 (-0.31 to +0.01) PgCyear -1 ]. Therefore, reducing forest fires, in addition to reducing deforestation, would be an important measure for minimizing future emissions. Conversely, doubling the current area of secondary forests and avoiding additional removal of primary forests would help the Amazonian gross forest sink to offset approximately 42% of global land-use change emissions. We conclude that a few strategic environmental policy measures are likely to strengthen the Amazonian net carbon sink with global implications. Moreover, these actions could increase the resilience of the net carbon sink to future increases in drought frequency. (authors)

  1. Environmental change and the carbon balance of Amazonian forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragão, Luiz E O C; Poulter, Benjamin; Barlow, Jos B; Anderson, Liana O; Malhi, Yadvinder; Saatchi, Sassan; Phillips, Oliver L; Gloor, Emanuel

    2014-11-01

    Extreme climatic events and land-use change are known to influence strongly the current carbon cycle of Amazonia, and have the potential to cause significant global climate impacts. This review intends to evaluate the effects of both climate and anthropogenic perturbations on the carbon balance of the Brazilian Amazon and to understand how they interact with each other. By analysing the outputs of the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) Assessment Report 4 (AR4) model ensemble, we demonstrate that Amazonian temperatures and water stress are both likely to increase over the 21st Century. Curbing deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon by 62% in 2010 relative to the 1990s mean decreased the Brazilian Amazon's deforestation contribution to global land use carbon emissions from 17% in the 1990s and early 2000s to 9% by 2010. Carbon sources in Amazonia are likely to be dominated by climatic impacts allied with forest fires (48.3% relative contribution) during extreme droughts. The current net carbon sink (net biome productivity, NBP) of +0.16 (ranging from +0.11 to +0.21) Pg C year(-1) in the Brazilian Amazon, equivalent to 13.3% of global carbon emissions from land-use change for 2008, can be negated or reversed during drought years [NBP = -0.06 (-0.31 to +0.01) Pg C year(-1) ]. Therefore, reducing forest fires, in addition to reducing deforestation, would be an important measure for minimizing future emissions. Conversely, doubling the current area of secondary forests and avoiding additional removal of primary forests would help the Amazonian gross forest sink to offset approximately 42% of global land-use change emissions. We conclude that a few strategic environmental policy measures are likely to strengthen the Amazonian net carbon sink with global implications. Moreover, these actions could increase the resilience of the net carbon sink to future increases in drought frequency. © 2014 The Authors. Biological Reviews © 2014 Cambridge Philosophical

  2. Carbon aerogels; Les aerogels de carbone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthon-Fabry, S.; Achard, P

    2003-06-15

    The carbon aerogel is a nano-porous material at open porosity, electrical conductor. The aerogels morphology is variable in function of the different synthesis parameters. This characteristic offers to the aerogels a better adaptability to many applications: electrodes (super condensers, fuel cells). The author presents the materials elaboration and their applications. It provides also the research programs: fundamental research, realization of super-condenser electrodes, fuel cells electrodes, gas storage materials and opaque materials for thermal insulation. (A.L.B.)

  3. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Unites States die every year from accidental non-fire related CO poisoning associated with consumer products, including ... CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of ...

  4. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... On Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide ... Related Links Recalls Safety Education Regulations, Laws & Standards Research & Statistics Business & Manufacturing Small Business Resources OnSafety Blogs ...

  5. Clean Carbon Communism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2008-05-07

    May 7, 2008 ... failure are especially dire for the downtrodden masses in the most vulnerable societies. ... that carbon trading has become exceedingly profitable for polluting .... 1 : Energy industries (renewable - / non-renewable sources).

  6. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Community Outreach Resource Center Toy Recall Statistics CO Poster Contest Pool Safely Business & Manufacturing Business & Manufacturing Business ... Featured Resources CPSC announces winners of carbon monoxide poster contest Video View the blog Clues You Can ...

  7. Carbonation of cerium oxychloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, E.J.; Onstott, E.I.; Bowman, M.G.

    1977-01-01

    Cerous carbonates can be used in thermochemical cycles for H production if the resulting ceric oxides can be converted back into cerous carbonates. One way is to reduce and hydrolyze ceric oxide with HCl to produce CeOCl and then to carbonate it. The reaction 3CeOCl + 3CO 2 + 8H 2 O → CeCl 3 (aq) + Ce 2 (CO 3 ) 3 . 8H 2 O was found to occur in aqueous medium if the final CeCl 3 content is low. Carbonation of CeOCl could also be conducted in acetone --H 2 O . CeClCO 3 . 3H 2 O was decomposed and characterized. The reactions which can be used for water splitting are discussed briefly

  8. Occult carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, J N

    1987-01-01

    A syndrome of headache, fatigue, dizziness, paresthesias, chest pain, palpitations and visual disturbances was associated with chronic occult carbon monoxide exposure in 26 patients in a primary care setting. A causal association was supported by finding a source of carbon monoxide in a patient's home, workplace or vehicle; results of screening tests that ruled out other illnesses; an abnormally high carboxyhemoglobin level in 11 of 14 patients tested, and abatement or resolution of symptoms when the source of carbon monoxide was removed. Exposed household pets provided an important clue to the diagnosis in some cases. Recurrent occult carbon monoxide poisoning may be a frequently overlooked cause of persistent or recurrent headache, fatigue, dizziness, paresthesias, abdominal pain, diarrhea and unusual spells.

  9. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Import Surveillance International Recall Guidance Civil and Criminal Penalties Federal Court Orders & ... 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2012 ...

  10. From Carbon to Buckypaper

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    hedral, connected by covalent bonds, and forms a 3-dimensional network. The rigid .... increasing number of applications in various sectors [15, 16, 17]. 1. .... [9] Bill Howard, (30 July 2013), BMW i3: Cheap, mass-produced carbon fiber.

  11. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2012 Annual Estimates OCTOBER 13, 2015 Incidents, Deaths, and In-Depth Investigations Associated with Non-Fire ...

  12. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths ... 2011 Annual Estimates View All CO-Related Injury Statistics and Technical Reports Related Links Recalls Safety Education ...

  13. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION Search CPSC Search Menu Home Recalls Recall List CPSC Recall API Recall Lawsuits ... and Bans Report an Unsafe Product Consumers Businesses Home Safety Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information ...

  14. Carbon Monoxide Nonattainment Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data layer identifies areas in the U.S. where air pollution levels have not met the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Carbon Monoxide and have...

  15. Determination of depths of traps for interstitials from thermodynamic data: a new view on carbon trapping and diffusion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, Jiří; Shan, Y. V.; Kozeschnik, E.; Fischer, F. D.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 6 (2013), Art. No. 065012 ISSN 0965-0393 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : carbon trapping * diffusion * thermodynamic modelling Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 1.492, year: 2013

  16. Making carbon sequestration a paying proposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fengxiang X.; Lindner, Jeff S.; Wang, Chuji

    2007-03-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) has increased from a preindustrial concentration of about 280 ppm to about 367 ppm at present. The increase has closely followed the increase in CO2 emissions from the use of fossil fuels. Global warming caused by increasing amounts of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere is the major environmental challenge for the 21st century. Reducing worldwide emissions of CO2 requires multiple mitigation pathways, including reductions in energy consumption, more efficient use of available energy, the application of renewable energy sources, and sequestration. Sequestration is a major tool for managing carbon emissions. In a majority of cases CO2 is viewed as waste to be disposed; however, with advanced technology, carbon sequestration can become a value-added proposition. There are a number of potential opportunities that render sequestration economically viable. In this study, we review these most economically promising opportunities and pathways of carbon sequestration, including reforestation, best agricultural production, housing and furniture, enhanced oil recovery, coalbed methane (CBM), and CO2 hydrates. Many of these terrestrial and geological sequestration opportunities are expected to provide a direct economic benefit over that obtained by merely reducing the atmospheric CO2 loading. Sequestration opportunities in 11 states of the Southeast and South Central United States are discussed. Among the most promising methods for the region include reforestation and CBM. The annual forest carbon sink in this region is estimated to be 76 Tg C/year, which would amount to an expenditure of 11.1-13.9 billion/year. Best management practices could enhance carbon sequestration by 53.9 Tg C/year, accounting for 9.3% of current total annual regional greenhouse gas emission in the next 20 years. Annual carbon storage in housing, furniture, and other wood products in 1998 was estimated to be 13.9 Tg C in the region. Other sequestration options

  17. Applications for alliform carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogotsi, Yury; Mochalin, Vadym; McDonough, IV, John Kenneth; Simon, Patrice; Taberna, Pierre Louis

    2017-02-21

    This invention relates to novel applications for alliform carbon, useful in conductors and energy storage devices, including electrical double layer capacitor devices and articles incorporating such conductors and devices. Said alliform carbon particles are in the range of 2 to about 20 percent by weight, relative to the weight of the entire electrode. Said novel applications include supercapacitors and associated electrode devices, batteries, bandages and wound healing, and thin-film devices, including display devices.

  18. Occult Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkpatrick, John N.

    1987-01-01

    A syndrome of headache, fatigue, dizziness, paresthesias, chest pain, palpitations and visual disturbances was associated with chronic occult carbon monoxide exposure in 26 patients in a primary care setting. A causal association was supported by finding a source of carbon monoxide in a patient's home, workplace or vehicle; results of screening tests that ruled out other illnesses; an abnormally high carboxyhemoglobin level in 11 of 14 patients tested, and abatement or resolution of symptoms ...

  19. States and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Criqui, Patrick; Faraco, Benoit; Grandjean, Alain

    2009-01-01

    The climate challenge appeals to an unprecedented mutation of our societies. From north to south, all our life styles will have to be changed from dwelling, to transport and feeding. These changes will have sense only at a worldwide scale and will impact our way of development. How can we reduce our energy consumption and greenhouse impact with answering everyone's essential needs at the same time? How can we invent a carbon-free economy in the North and preserve the big socio-economical equilibria at the same time? How can we get rid of poverty in the South without compromising the well-being of the future generations with an increase of CO 2 emissions? Such difficulties cannot be overcome without innovations in terms of public policies. This book takes stock of the new possible instruments and policies at the global scale and involving fiscality, standards, investments and social justice. Content: 1 - the carbon threat: a changing climate and energies becoming scarce (the climate threat, an increasing energy insecurity); carbon and modern economy (human greenhouse gas emissions, a carbon-free well-being); governments and carbon control (a global challenge requiring an international control, the experiments era from Rio to the present day, the challenge of the state in front of the carbon threat); 2 - the political instruments of environment: standards as first instruments of climate public policies (standards efficiency in some sectors, standards limitations, standards and innovation); emissions quotas and market instruments (Kyoto protocol and CO 2 market, the future of 'cap and trade' and of individual and regional quotas); carbon tax, fiscal instruments and new regulations (carbon tax as an alternative or a complement, other fiscal and para-fiscal instruments, new regulation instruments); investing in climate (managing the transition, governments as transition administrators). (J.S)

  20. Tradeable carbon permits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koutstaal, P.R.

    1995-01-01

    The research project on tradeable carbon permits has focused on three elements. First of all, the practical implications of designing a system of tradeable emission permits for reducing CO2 has been studied. In the second part, the consequences of introducing a system of tradeable carbon permits for entry barriers have been considered. Finally, the institutional requirements and welfare effects of coordination of CO2 abatement in a second-best world have been examined

  1. Review of voluntary and regulatory carbon reporting by companies around the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borie, Sylvain; Decq, Juliette; Wang, Xin; Alberola, Emilie; Afriat, Marion; Gourdon, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    What countries have instituted regulations requiring companies to measure their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions? How could these regulations be strengthened to help meet the '2 deg. C' goal adopted by all member countries at the COP21 summit? In what ways do new French regulations on reporting of significant GHG emissions constitute a major advance in carbon reporting? To complement recent news focusing on reporting of carbon emissions in France, Carbone 4 offers its readers this review to put voluntary and regulatory carbon reporting mechanisms used by companies in a global perspective

  2. Carbon pricing. A lever for energy transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    The international community has set itself the target of limiting the global temperature rise to 2 deg. C. In today's world, the challenge is to invent new ways of manufacturing goods, producing food, travelling and keeping ourselves warm, without emitting more greenhouse gases (GHG) into the atmosphere than what we are technically able to remove from it. Climate action can be considered as an insurance for our societies against unacceptable costs generated by the risk of increasingly frequent climate-triggered natural disasters, irreversible damage to ecosystems and mass population migrations. In addition to avoid climate damage there are many benefits of climate action, including greater energy autonomy, reduced atmospheric pollution, which is harmful for human health, and the economic benefits of new green growth sectors. However, the efforts needed to make the transition to economies that emit fewer greenhouse gases must not be underestimated. This transition requires the mass redirection of investments into clean transport, renewable energy sources, building insulation and the development of agro-ecology, in a highly restricted financial and budgetary context. The economic and financial tools used for explicit or implicit carbon pricing give clear messages about the benefits of emitting less carbon, or alternatively the cost of greenhouse gas emissions for society. Consequently, they make it possible to accelerate the energy transition. 74 countries and over 1,000 businesses formed a coalition for carbon pricing during the United Nations Climate Summit in September 2014, held at the invitation of the UN Secretary-General. The goal of the coalition is to promote productive dialogue between public and private decision-makers concerning opportunities to extend carbon pricing policies. It has been officially launched on November 30, 2015, on the opening day of COP21. It has been officially launched on November 30, 2015, on the opening day of COP21. Members of the

  3. Carbon based prosthetic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlin, D.J.; Carroll, D.W.; Barbero, R.S.; Archuleta, T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Klawitter, J.J.; Ogilvie, W.; Strzepa, P. [Ascension Orthopedics (US); Cook, S.D. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (US). School of Medicine

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to evaluate the use of carbon/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites for use in endoprosthetic devices. The application of these materials for the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joints of the hand was investigated. Issues concerning mechanical properties, bone fixation, biocompatibility, and wear are discussed. A system consisting of fiber reinforced materials with a pyrolytic carbon matrix and diamond-like, carbon-coated wear surfaces was developed. Processes were developed for the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of pyrolytic carbon into porous fiber preforms with the ability to tailor the outer porosity of the device to provide a surface for bone in-growth. A method for coating diamond-like carbon (DLC) on the articulating surface by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was developed. Preliminary results on mechanical properties of the composite system are discussed and initial biocompatibility studies were performed.

  4. Toxicology Testing in the 21st Century (Tox21)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tox21 researchers aim to develop better toxicity assessment methods to quickly and efficiently test whether certain chemical compounds have the potential to disrupt processes in the human body that may lead to negative health effects.

  5. Toxicology in the 21st Century (Tox21)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tox21 researchers aim to develop better toxicity assessment methods to quickly and efficiently test whether certain chemical compounds have the potential to disrupt processes in the human body that may lead to negative health effects.

  6. Recent development of carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamabe, Tokio [Div. of Molecular Engineering, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); [Inst. for Fundamental Chemistry, Kyoto (Japan)

    1995-03-15

    Recent developments of carbon nanotubes are reviewed. Analytical solutions for the electronic structure of carbon nanotube on the basis of thight-binding approximation are presented and interpreted using the concepts of crystal orbital. The electronic properties of actual carbon nanotubes are presented. The electronic structures of carbon nanotubes in the presence of magnetic fiels are also summerized. (orig.)

  7. Method for synthesizing carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongyou

    2012-09-04

    A method for preparing a precursor solution for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, where a polar solvent is added to at least one block copolymer and at least one carbohydrate compound, and the precursor solution is processed using a self-assembly process and subsequent heating to form nanoporous carbon films, porous carbon nanotubes, and porous carbon nanoparticles.

  8. Carbon allocation in forest ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creighton M. Litton; James W. Raich; Michael G. Ryan

    2007-01-01

    Carbon allocation plays a critical role in forest ecosystem carbon cycling. We reviewed existing literature and compiled annual carbon budgets for forest ecosystems to test a series of hypotheses addressing the patterns, plasticity, and limits of three components of allocation: biomass, the amount of material present; flux, the flow of carbon to a component per unit...

  9. Carbon dioxide as chemical feedstock

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aresta, M

    2010-01-01

    ... Dioxide as an Inert Solvent for Chemical Syntheses 15 Alessandro Galia and Giuseppe Filardo Introduction 15 Dense Carbon Dioxide as Solvent Medium for Chemical Processes 15 Enzymatic Catalysis in Dense Carbon Dioxide 18 Other Reactions in Dense Carbon Dioxide 19 Polymer Synthesis in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide 20 Chain Polymerizations: Synt...

  10. Ignition of a Combustible Atmosphere by Incandescent Carbon Wear Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Donald H.; Swikert, Max A.; Johnson, Robert L.

    1960-01-01

    A study was made to determine whether carbon wear particles from carbon elements in sliding contact with a metal surface were sufficiently hot to cause ignition of a combustible atmosphere. In some machinery, electric potential differences and currents may appear at the carbon-metal interface. For this reason the effect of these voltages and currents on the ability of carbon wear particles to cause ignition was evaluated. The test specimens used in the investigation were carbon vanes taken from a fuel pump and flat 21-inch-diameter 2 metal disks (440-C stainless steel) representing the pump housing. During each experiment a vane was loaded against a disk with a 0.5-pound force, and the disk was rotated to give a surface speed of 3140 feet per minute. The chamber of the apparatus that housed the vane and the disk was filled with a combustible mixture of air and propane. Various voltages and amperages were applied across the vane-disk interface. Experiments were conducted at temperatures of 75, 350, 400, and 450 F. Fires were produced by incandescent carbon wear particles obtained at conditions of electric potential as low as 106 volts and 0.3 ampere at 400 F. Ignitions were obtained only with carbon wear particles produced with an electric potential across the carbon-vane-disk interface. No ignitions were obtained with carbon wear particles produced in the absence of this potential; also, the potential difference produced no ignitions in the absence of carbon wear particles. A film supplement showing ignition by incandescent wear particles is available.

  11. Agnathia-holoprosencephaly associated with a 46,XY,-21,+t(21q;21q) karyotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niedermeyer, K.K.; McCorquodale, M.M.; Burton, B.K. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1994-09-01

    We report an unusual case of agnathia-holoprosencephaly associated with Down syndrome due to a 21/21 translocation. The patient presented prenatally at 21 wks gestation. A fetal ultrasound revealed multiple CNS anomalies including hydrocephalus, compressed cerebellum, absent septum pellucidum and possible cranial meningocele or encephalocele. High resolution ultrasound & fetal karyotype were recommended. The patient refused & elected to have a pregnancy termination. Chromosomal analysis performed on products of conception revealed a 46,XY,-21,+t(21q;21q) karyotype. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed and confirmed the 21/21 translocation chromosome. An autopsy revealed agnathia and multiple CNS anomalies including absence of the septum pellucidum, absence of the corpus callosum, arhinencephaly, an occiptal meningoencephalocele, dilation of the lateral ventricles, and extensive dysgenesis & heterotopias of the central cerebrum & mid-brain. Additional abnormalities included a persistent left superior vena cava, atrial & ventricular septal defects, irregular length of the fingers with absence of the middle phalanges of the right 2nd and 5th & left 5th digits and bilateral simian creases. Agnathia can be an isolated abnormality but often is associated with holoprosencephaly and/or situs inversus. The majority of familial case of agnathis-holoprosencephaly was caused by an inherited unbalanced translocation resulting in duplication of 6p and monosomy of 18p. Our patient had a translocation form of trisomy 21 but did not have a phenotype consistent with Down syndrome. Trisomy 21 has not been previously reported in other cases of agnathia-holoprosencephaly. Whether the chromosomal abnormality caused the phenotypic abnormalities or if it is a coincidental finding cannot be determined.

  12. THE SODIUM PREVALENCE IN CARBONATED SOFT DRINKS SOLD IN BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Fernanda Nunes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The carbonated soft drinks intake has changed the children eating habits. This factor may be directly associated with arterial hypertension due the high consumption of sodium present in foods and drinks industrialized. This study was to compare sodium levels between two different types of carbonated soft drinks, carbonated sugar drinks and diet drinks to define what type of drink has the lowest sodium content and alerting healthcare professionals about the presence of sodium in industrialized beverages. The study included labels of carbonated soft drinks n = 33 – sugar drinks (n = 21 or diet drinks (n = 12 – of five different flavors.All carbonated soft drinks evaluated have sodium in its composition. However, the sodium presence in carbonated sugar drinks was significantly lower when compared with carbonated diet drinks (69.05 ± 16.55 vs. 145.30 ± 47.36mg Na/l, respectively.Studies to identify children's eating habits related with increased consumption of foods and drinks manufactured are needed to identify, reduce and prevent high blood pressure.

  13. Carbon emission and sequestration of urban turfgrass systems in Hong Kong

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Ling [School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong (China); Shi, Zhengjun [Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Southern Subtropical Plant Diversity, Fairy Lake Botanical Garden, Shenzhen and Chinese Academy of Science, Shenzhen (China); Chu, L.M., E-mail: leemanchu@cuhk.edu.hk [School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong (China)

    2014-03-01

    Climate change is more than just a global issue. Locally released carbon dioxide may lead to a rise in global ambient temperature and influence the surrounding climate. Urban greenery may mitigate this as they can remove carbon dioxide by storing carbon in substrates and vegetation. On the other hand, urban greenery systems which are under intense management and maintenance may contribute to the emission of carbon dioxide or other greenhouse gases. The impact of urban greenery on carbon balance in major metropolitan areas thus remains controversial. We investigated the carbon footprints of urban turf operation and maintenance by conducting a research questionnaire on different Hong Kong turfs in 2012, and showed that turf maintenance contributed 0.17 to 0.63 kg Ce m{sup −2} y{sup −1} to carbon emissions. We also determined the carbon storage of turfs at 0.05 to 0.21 kg C m{sup −2} for aboveground grass biomass and 1.26 to 4.89 kg C m{sup −2} for soils (to 15 cm depth). We estimated that the carbon sink capacity of turfs could be offset by carbon emissions in 5–24 years under current management patterns, shifting from carbon sink to carbon source. Our study suggested that maintenance management played a key role in the carbon budget and footprint of urban greeneries. The environmental impact of turfgrass systems can be optimized by shifting away from empirically designed maintenance schedules towards rational ones based on carbon sink and emission principles. - Highlights: • Carbon storage capacity at 0.05 to 0.21 kg C m{sup −2} for grasses and 1.26 to 4.89 kg C m{sup −2} for soils (to 15 cm depth). • Turf maintenance contributed to carbon emissions at 0.17 to 0.63 kg Ce (carbon equivalent) m{sup −2} y{sup −1}. • Turf system respiration was negatively correlated with soil carbon capacity but only in the wet season. • Carbon stored in turfs could be offset by maintenance carbon emissions in 5–24 years.

  14. Carbon emission and sequestration of urban turfgrass systems in Hong Kong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Ling; Shi, Zhengjun; Chu, L.M.

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is more than just a global issue. Locally released carbon dioxide may lead to a rise in global ambient temperature and influence the surrounding climate. Urban greenery may mitigate this as they can remove carbon dioxide by storing carbon in substrates and vegetation. On the other hand, urban greenery systems which are under intense management and maintenance may contribute to the emission of carbon dioxide or other greenhouse gases. The impact of urban greenery on carbon balance in major metropolitan areas thus remains controversial. We investigated the carbon footprints of urban turf operation and maintenance by conducting a research questionnaire on different Hong Kong turfs in 2012, and showed that turf maintenance contributed 0.17 to 0.63 kg Ce m −2 y −1 to carbon emissions. We also determined the carbon storage of turfs at 0.05 to 0.21 kg C m −2 for aboveground grass biomass and 1.26 to 4.89 kg C m −2 for soils (to 15 cm depth). We estimated that the carbon sink capacity of turfs could be offset by carbon emissions in 5–24 years under current management patterns, shifting from carbon sink to carbon source. Our study suggested that maintenance management played a key role in the carbon budget and footprint of urban greeneries. The environmental impact of turfgrass systems can be optimized by shifting away from empirically designed maintenance schedules towards rational ones based on carbon sink and emission principles. - Highlights: • Carbon storage capacity at 0.05 to 0.21 kg C m −2 for grasses and 1.26 to 4.89 kg C m −2 for soils (to 15 cm depth). • Turf maintenance contributed to carbon emissions at 0.17 to 0.63 kg Ce (carbon equivalent) m −2 y −1 . • Turf system respiration was negatively correlated with soil carbon capacity but only in the wet season. • Carbon stored in turfs could be offset by maintenance carbon emissions in 5–24 years

  15. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Mishra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Carbon monoxide is known as the silent killer, being colorless, odourless, and tasteless. Initially non-irritating, it is very difficult for people to detect Carbon monoxide is a product of incomplete combustion of organic matter due to insufficient oxygen supply that prevents complete oxidation of carbon to C02. During World War II, Nazis used gas vans to kill an estimated over 700,000 prisoners by carbon monoxide poisoning. This method was also used in the gas chambers ofseveral death camps. The true number of incidents of carbon monoxide poisoning is unknown, since many non-lethal exposures go undetected From the available data, carbon monoxide poisoning is the most common cause of injury and death due to poisoning worldwide. Clinical features and management: The signs of carbon monoxide poisoning vary with concentration and length of exposure. Subtle cardiovascular or neurobehavioural effects occur at low concentration. The onset of chronic poisoning is usually insidious and easily mistaken for viral prodrome, depression, or gastroenteritis in children. The classic sign of carbon monoxide poisoning which is actually more often seen in the dead than the living is appearing red-cheeked and healthy. Cherry pink colour develops in nails, skin and mucosa. In acute poisoning, common abnormalities of posture and tone are cogwheel rigidity, opisthotonus, spasticity or flaccidity and seizures. Retinal haemorrhages and the classic cherry red skin colour are seldom seen. Different people andpopulations may have different carbon monoxide tolerance levels. On average, exposures at 100ppm or greater is dangerous to human health. Treatment and prevention: The mainstay of treatment is 100% oxygen administration until the COHb level is normal When the patient is stable enough to be transported, hyperbaric oxygen (HBOT should be considered This treatment is safe and well tolerated Public education about the danger of carbon monoxide, with

  16. Nanoporous metal-carbon composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Satcher, Joe; Kucheyev, Sergei; Charnvanichborikarn, Supakit; Colvin, Jeffrey; Felter, Thomas; Kim, Sangil; Merrill, Matthew; Orme, Christine

    2017-12-19

    Described here is a metal-carbon composite, comprising (a) a porous three-dimensional scaffold comprising one or more of carbon nanotubes, graphene and graphene oxide, and (b) metal nanoparticles disposed on said porous scaffold, wherein the metal-carbon composite has a density of 1 g/cm.sup.3 or less, and wherein the metal nanoparticles account for 1 wt. % or more of the metal-carbon composite. Also described are methods for making the metal-carbon composite.

  17. Impacts of urbanization on carbon balance in terrestrial ecosystems of the Southern United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chi; Tian Hanqin; Chen, Guangsheng; Chappelka, Arthur; Xu Xiaofeng; Ren Wei; Hui Dafeng; Liu Mingliang; Lu Chaoqun; Pan, Shufen; Lockaby, Graeme

    2012-01-01

    Using a process-based Dynamic Land Ecosystem Model, we assessed carbon dynamics of urbanized/developed lands in the Southern United States during 1945–2007. The results indicated that approximately 1.72 (1.69–1.77) Pg (1P = 10 15 ) carbon was stored in urban/developed lands, comparable to the storage of shrubland or cropland in the region. Urbanization resulted in a release of 0.21 Pg carbon to the atmosphere during 1945–2007. Pre-urbanization vegetation type and time since land conversion were two primary factors determining the extent of urbanization impacts on carbon dynamics. After a rapid decline of carbon storage during land conversion, an urban ecosystem gradually accumulates carbon and may compensate for the initial carbon loss in 70–100 years. The carbon sequestration rate of urban ecosystem diminishes with time, nearly disappearing in two centuries after land conversion. This study implied that it is important to take urbanization effect into account for assessing regional carbon balance. - Highlights: ► A series of spatial and temporal urban/developed land maps were generated. ► Urbanization effects on regional carbon dynamics were studied with a process-based Dynamic Land Ecosystem Model (DLEM). ► Carbon storage of urban/developed land was comparable to that stored in cropland and shrubland in the Southern United States. ► Pre-urbanization vegetation type and time since land conversion were two primary factors determining the extent of urbanization impacts on carbon dynamics. ► Urbanization resulted in carbon emission, but established urban areas may gradually accumulate carbon over time. - Urbanization has resulted in carbon release to the atmosphere, but established urban areas may gradually accumulate carbon over time.

  18. Global Tree Cover and Biomass Carbon on Agricultural Land: The contribution of agroforestry to global and national carbon budgets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zomer, Robert J; Neufeldt, Henry; Xu, Jianchu; Ahrends, Antje; Bossio, Deborah; Trabucco, Antonio; van Noordwijk, Meine; Wang, Mingcheng

    2016-07-20

    Agroforestry systems and tree cover on agricultural land make an important contribution to climate change mitigation, but are not systematically accounted for in either global carbon budgets or national carbon accounting. This paper assesses the role of trees on agricultural land and their significance for carbon sequestration at a global level, along with recent change trends. Remote sensing data show that in 2010, 43% of all agricultural land globally had at least 10% tree cover and that this has increased by 2% over the previous ten years. Combining geographically and bioclimatically stratified Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Tier 1 default estimates of carbon storage with this tree cover analysis, we estimated 45.3 PgC on agricultural land globally, with trees contributing >75%. Between 2000 and 2010 tree cover increased by 3.7%, resulting in an increase of >2 PgC (or 4.6%) of biomass carbon. On average, globally, biomass carbon increased from 20.4 to 21.4 tC ha(-1). Regional and country-level variation in stocks and trends were mapped and tabulated globally, and for all countries. Brazil, Indonesia, China and India had the largest increases in biomass carbon stored on agricultural land, while Argentina, Myanmar, and Sierra Leone had the largest decreases.

  19. Carbon isotopic record from Upper Devonian carbonates at Dongcun in Guilin, southern China, supporting the world-wide pattern of carbon isotope excursions during Frasnian-Famennian transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Two positive δ13C excursions are presented in records from the Frasnian-Famennian (F-F) marine carbonate sediments in Europe, America, Africa, and Australia, having been considered as a worldwide pattern, and attributed to enhanced organic carbon burial during the F-F biological mass extinction. However, this worldwide pattern has not been revealed from the well-deposited Late Devonian sequences in southern China. In this paper, a detailed investigation has been made on the Late Devonian section at Dongcun, Guilin, southern China to constrain perturbations in δ13C of carbonates in the F-F deposited sequence. The result from this section also indicates two positive δ13C excursions during the F-F transition. The first excursion with an amplitude of 1.5‰ occurred at the bottom of linguiformis Zone, later than the early excursion existing in the Late rhenana Zone of the Late Devonian profiles in other continents, especially, in central Europe. This difference has been expected to be a result as conodont Palmatolepis linguiformis occurred earlier in southern China than other sites. The second excursion with an amplitude of 2.1‰ is located at the F-F boundary, same as the records from other continents. This result strongly supports the view that two carbon isotope positive excursions during the F-F transition are common in carbonate sediments, resulting from worldwide increases of organic carbon burial intensity.

  20. Carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating for carbon/carbon composites: Microstructure and biocompatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Leilei, E-mail: zhangleilei1121@aliyun.com; Li, Hejun; Li, Kezhi; Zhang, Shouyang; Lu, Jinhua; Li, Wei; Cao, Sheng; Wang, Bin

    2013-12-01

    To improve the surface biocompatibility of carbon/carbon composites, a carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating was applied using a combination method of slurry procedure and ultrasound-assisted electrochemical deposition procedure. The morphology, microstructure and chemical composition of the coating were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The biocompatibility of the carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating was investigated by osteoblast-like MG63 cell culture tests. The results showed that the carbon foam could provide a large number of pores on the surface of carbon/carbon composites. The hydroxyapatite crystals could infiltrate into the pores and form the carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating. The coating covered the carbon/carbon composites fully and uniformly with slice morphology. The cell response tests showed that the MG63 cells on carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating had a better cell adhesion and cell proliferation than those on uncoated carbon/carbon composites. The carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coatings were cytocompatible and were beneficial to improve the biocompatibility. The approach presented here may be exploited for fabrication of carbon/carbon composite implant surfaces.

  1. Carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating for carbon/carbon composites: Microstructure and biocompatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Leilei; Li, Hejun; Li, Kezhi; Zhang, Shouyang; Lu, Jinhua; Li, Wei; Cao, Sheng; Wang, Bin

    2013-01-01

    To improve the surface biocompatibility of carbon/carbon composites, a carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating was applied using a combination method of slurry procedure and ultrasound-assisted electrochemical deposition procedure. The morphology, microstructure and chemical composition of the coating were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The biocompatibility of the carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating was investigated by osteoblast-like MG63 cell culture tests. The results showed that the carbon foam could provide a large number of pores on the surface of carbon/carbon composites. The hydroxyapatite crystals could infiltrate into the pores and form the carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating. The coating covered the carbon/carbon composites fully and uniformly with slice morphology. The cell response tests showed that the MG63 cells on carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating had a better cell adhesion and cell proliferation than those on uncoated carbon/carbon composites. The carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coatings were cytocompatible and were beneficial to improve the biocompatibility. The approach presented here may be exploited for fabrication of carbon/carbon composite implant surfaces.

  2. Intershell resistance in multiwall carbon nanotubes: A Coulomb drag study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde, Anders Mathias; Flensborg, Karsten; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2005-01-01

    We calculate the intershell resistance R-21 in a multiwall carbon nanotube as a function of temperature T and Fermi level epsilon(F) (e.g., a gate voltage), varying the chirality of the inner and outer tubes. This is done in a so-called Coulomb drag setup, where a current I-1 in one shell induces...... a voltage drop V-2 in another shell by the screened Coulomb interaction between the shells neglecting the intershell tunneling. We provide benchmark results for R-21 = V2/I-1 within the Fermi liquid theory using Boltzmann equations. The band structure gives rise to strongly chirality-dependent suppression...... effects for the Coulomb drag between different tubes due to selection rules combined with mismatching of wave vector and crystal angular momentum conservation near the Fermi level. This gives rise to orders of magnitude changes in R-21 and even the sign of R-21 can change depending on the chirality...

  3. Global carbon inequality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubacek, Klaus [University of Maryland, Department of Geographical Sciences, College Park, MD (United States); Masaryk University, Department of Environmental Studies, Brno (Czech Republic); Baiocchi, Giovanni [University of Maryland, Department of Geographical Sciences, College Park, MD (United States); University of Maryland, Department of Economics, College Park, MD (United States); Feng, Kuishuang [University of Maryland, Department of Geographical Sciences, College Park, MD (United States); Munoz Castillo, Raul [University of Maryland, Department of Geographical Sciences, College Park, MD (United States); Interamerican Development Bank, Washington, DC (United States); Sun, Laixiang [University of Maryland, Department of Geographical Sciences, College Park, MD (United States); SOAS, University of London, London (United Kingdom); International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), Laxenburg (Austria); Xue, Jinjun [Nagoya University, Graduate School of Economics, Nagoya (Japan); Hubei University of Economics, Wuhan (China)

    2017-12-01

    Global climate change and inequality are inescapably linked both in terms of who contributes climate change and who suffers the consequences. This fact is also partly reflected in two United Nations (UN) processes: on the one hand, the Paris Agreement of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change under which countries agreed to hold the increase in the global average temperature to below 2 C above pre-industrial levels and, on the other hand, the UN's Sustainable Development Goals aiming to end poverty. These agreements are seen as important foundation to put the world nations on a sustainable pathway. However, how these agreements can be achieved or whether they are even mutually compatible is less clear. We explore the global carbon inequality between and within countries and the carbon implications of poverty alleviation by combining detailed consumer expenditure surveys for different income categories for a wide range of countries with an environmentally extended multi-regional input-output approach to estimate carbon footprints of different household groups, globally, and assess the carbon implications of moving the poorest people out of poverty. Given the current context, increasing income leads to increasing carbon footprints and makes global targets for mitigating greenhouse gases more difficult to achieve given the pace of technological progress and current levels of fossil fuel dependence. We conclude that the huge level of carbon inequality requires a critical discussion of undifferentiated income growth. Current carbon-intensive lifestyles and consumption patterns need to enter the climate discourse to a larger extent. (orig.)

  4. Carbon-14 waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, R.P.

    1984-01-01

    As part of their research programme on Radioactive Waste Management, the Commission of the European Communities has provided financial support for a detailed study of wastes containing 14 C and the options for their management. The main results of this study are outlined. Carbon-14 is formed by neutron activation reactions in core materials and is therefore present in a variety of waste streams both at reactors and at reprocessing plants. Data on the production and release of 14 C from various reactor systems are presented. A possible management strategy for 14 C might be reduction of 14 N impurity levels in core materials, but only reductions of about a factor of five in arisings could be achieved in this way. The key problem in 14 C management is its retention in off-gas streams, particularly in the dissolver off-gas stream at reprocessing plants. In this stream the nuclide is present as carbon dioxide and is extensively isotopically diluted by the carbon dioxide content of the air. Processes for trapping 14 C from these off-gases must be integrated with the other processes in the overall off-gas treatment system, and should provide for conversion to a stable solid compound of carbon, suitable for subsequent immobilization and disposal. Three trapping processes that convert carbon dioxide into insoluble carbonates can be identified: the double alkali (NaOH/Ca(OH) 2 ) process, the direct calcium hydroxide slurry process, and the barium ocathydrate gas/solid process. Calcium or barium carbonates, produced in the above processes, could probably be incorporated into satisfactory immobilized waste forms. However, the stability of such waste forms to prolonged irradiation and to leaching remains to be investigated. (author)

  5. Carbon dioxide and climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    Global climate change is a serious environmental concern, and the US has developed ''An Action Agenda'' to deal with it. At the heart of the US effort is the US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP), which has been developed by the Committee on Earth and Environmental Sciences (CEES) of the Federal Coordinating Council for Sciences, Engineering, and Technology (FCCSET). The USGCRP will provide the scientific basis for sound policy making on the climate-change issue. The DOE contribution to the USGCRP is the Carbon Dioxide Research Program, which now places particular emphasis on the rapid improvement of the capability to predict global and regional climate change. DOE's Carbon Dioxide Research Program has been addressing the carbon dioxide-climate change connection for more than twelve years and has provided a solid scientific foundation for the USGCRP. The expansion of the DOE effort reflects the increased attention that the Department has placed on the issue and is reflected in the National Energy Strategy (NES) that was released in 1991. This Program Summary describes projects funded by the Carbon Dioxide Research Program during FY 1991 and gives a brief overview of objectives, organization, and accomplishments. The Environmental Sciences Division of the Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research supports a Carbon Dioxide Research Program to determine the scientific linkage between the rise of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, especially carbon dioxide, and climate and vegetation change. One facet is the Core CO 2 Program, a pioneering program that DOE established more than 10 years ago to understand and predict the ways that fossil-fuel burning could affect atmospheric CO 2 concentration, global climate, and the Earth's biosphere. Major research areas are: global carbon cycle; climate detection and models of climate change; vegetation research; resource analysis; and, information and integration

  6. Measurements and Factors That Influence the Carbon Capability of Urban Residents in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianwen Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the rapid growth in residential energy consumption, there is an urgent need to reduce carbon emissions from the consumer side, which requires improvements in the carbon capability of urban residents. In this study, previous investigations of carbon capability were analyzed and classified into four dimensions: carbon knowledge capability, carbon motivation capability, carbon behavior capability, and carbon management capability. According to grounded theory, a quantitative research model was constructed of the carbon capability of urban residents in Jiangsu, which was used to conduct a questionnaire survey. SPSS 19.0 and LatentGOLD were employed to process the questionnaire data and the carbon capability of the residents was evaluated. The results showed that the residents of Jiangsu Province could be divided into six groups based on their different carbon capabilities, where these six major groups accounted for 28.19%, 21.21%, 18.33%, 15.84%, 9.88%, and 6.55% of the total sample. Gender, age, occupation, and educational level had significant effects on the carbon capabilities of residents, whereas the annual household income and household population had no significant effects. According to the characteristics of each cluster based on the four carbon capability dimensions, the six clusters were designated as “balanced steady cluster”, “self-restraint cluster”, “fully backward cluster”, “comprehensive leading cluster”, “slightly cognitive cluster”, and “restrain others cluster”. Quantitative analysis showed that 61.93% of the residents of Jiangsu reached the qualified rate for the carbon capability but the excellent rate was only 15.84%. Relevant policy implications are suggested based on these conclusions.

  7. Measurement of carbon capture efficiency and stored carbon leakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Ralph F.; Dubey, Manvendra K.

    2013-01-29

    Data representative of a measured carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) concentration and of a measured oxygen (O.sub.2) concentration at a measurement location can be used to determine whether the measured carbon dioxide concentration at the measurement location is elevated relative to a baseline carbon dioxide concentration due to escape of carbon dioxide from a source associated with a carbon capture and storage process. Optionally, the data can be used to quantify a carbon dioxide concentration increase at the first location that is attributable to escape of carbon dioxide from the source and to calculate a rate of escape of carbon dioxide from the source by executing a model of gas-phase transport using at least the first carbon dioxide concentration increase. Related systems, methods, and articles of manufacture are also described.

  8. The economic impact of climate change in the 20th and 21st centuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, R.S.J.

    2013-01-01

    The national version of FUND3. 6 is used to backcast the impacts of climate change to the 20th century and extrapolate to the 21st century. Carbon dioxide fertilization of crops and reduced energy demand for heating are the main positive impacts. Climate change had a negative effect on water

  9. THE BEATLES 2.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Steen Kaargaard

    2010-01-01

    Blog-essay publiceret på følgende web-adresse: www.avlyt.dk/2010/04/the-beatles-2-1-om-emis-forvaltning-af-the-fab-fours-lydværk-og-værklyd......Blog-essay publiceret på følgende web-adresse: www.avlyt.dk/2010/04/the-beatles-2-1-om-emis-forvaltning-af-the-fab-fours-lydværk-og-værklyd...

  10. Local Agenda 21 and poverty

    OpenAIRE

    Palmans, Eva; Marysse, Stefaan

    2003-01-01

    Poverty, the increasing urbanisation of poverty and the environmental degradation are major problems facing the actual world. This is reflected in international conferences and agendas, such as Local Agenda 21. This agenda is responding to the current problems by promoting sustainable development through local action and by using participatory methods. Our major concern is to reflect on the impact of the Local Agenda 21 on the reduction of poverty in a Third World context.

  11. Synthesis and Characterization Carbon Nanotubes Doped Carbon Aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuelong; Yan, Meifang; Liu, Zhenfa

    2017-12-01

    Polycondensation of phloroglucinol, resorcinol and formaldehyde with carbon nanotube (CNT) as the additives, using sodium carbonate as the catalyst, leads to the formation of CNT - doped carbon aerogels. The structure of carbon aerogels (CAs) with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The specific surface area, pore size distribution and pore volume were measured by surface area analyzer. The results show that when the optimum doping dosage is 5%, the specific surface area of CNT - doped carbon aerogel is up to 665 m2 g-1 and exhibit plentiful mesoporous.

  12. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2012-10-09

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  13. Carbon Fuel Particles Used in Direct Carbon Conversion Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2008-10-21

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  14. Decrease in Hydrogen Embrittlement Susceptibility of 10B21 Screws by Bake Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Jen Chen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of baking on the mechanical properties and fracture characteristics of low-carbon boron (10B21 steel screws were investigated. Fracture torque tests and hydrogen content analysis were performed on baked screws to evaluate hydrogen embrittlement (HE susceptibility. The diffusible hydrogen content within 10B21 steel dominated the fracture behavior of the screws. The fracture torque of 10B21 screws baked for a long duration was affected by released hydrogen. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS result showed that hydrogen content decreased with increasing baking duration, and thus the HE susceptibility of 10B21 screws improved. Diffusible hydrogen promoted crack propagation in high-stress region. The HE of 10B21 screws can be prevented by long-duration baking.

  15. Carbon stocks of intact mangroves and carbon emissions arising from their conversion in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, J Boone; Heider, Chris; Norfolk, Jennifer; Payton, Frederick

    2014-04-01

    Mangroves are recognized to possess a variety of ecosystem services including high rates of carbon sequestration and storage. Deforestation and conversion of these ecosystems continue to be high and have been predicted to result in significant carbon emissions to the atmosphere. Yet few studies have quantified the carbon stocks or losses associated with conversion of these ecosystems. In this study we quantified the ecosystem carbon stocks of three common mangrove types of the Caribbean as well as those of abandoned shrimp ponds in areas formerly occupied by mangrove-a common land-use conversion of mangroves throughout the world. In the mangroves of the Montecristi Province in Northwest Dominican Republic we found C stocks ranged from 706 to 1131 Mg/ha. The medium-statured mangroves (3-10 m in height) had the highest C stocks while the tall (> 10 m) mangroves had the lowest ecosystem carbon storage. Carbon stocks of the low mangrove (shrub) type (carbon-rich soils as deep as 2 m. Carbon stocks of abandoned shrimp ponds were 95 Mg/ha or approximately 11% that of the mangroves. Using a stock-change approach, the potential emissions from the conversion of mangroves to shrimp ponds ranged from 2244 to 3799 Mg CO2e/ha (CO2 equivalents). This is among the largest measured C emissions from land use in the tropics. The 6260 ha of mangroves and converted mangroves in the Montecristi Province are estimated to contain 3,841,490 Mg of C. Mangroves represented 76% of this area but currently store 97% of the carbon in this coastal wetland (3,696,722 Mg C). Converted lands store only 4% of the total ecosystem C (144,778 Mg C) while they comprised 24% of the area. By these metrics the replacement of mangroves with shrimp and salt ponds has resulted in estimated emissions from this region totaling 3.8 million Mg CO2e or approximately 21% of the total C prior to conversion. Given the high C stocks of mangroves, the high emissions from their conversion, and the other important

  16. [Review of lime carbon sink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li Li; Ling, Jiang Hua; Tie, Li; Wang, Jiao Yue; Bing, Long Fei; Xi, Feng Ming

    2018-01-01

    Under the background of "missing carbon sink" mystery and carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology development, this paper summarized the lime material flow process carbon sink from the lime carbonation principles, impact factors, and lime utilization categories in chemical industry, metallurgy industry, construction industry, and lime kiln ash treatment. The results showed that the lime carbonation rate coefficients were mainly impacted by materials and ambient conditions; the lime carbon sink was mainly in chemical, metallurgy, and construction industries; and current researches focused on the mechanisms and impact factors for carbonation, but their carbon sequestration calculation methods had not been proposed. Therefore, future research should focus on following aspects: to establish a complete system of lime carbon sequestration accounting method in view of material flow; to calculate lime carbon sequestration in both China and the world and explain their offset proportion of CO 2 emission from lime industrial process; to analyze the contribution of lime carbon sequestration to missing carbon sink for clarifying part of missing carbon sinks; to promote the development of carbon capture and storage technology and provide some scientific bases for China's international negotiations on climate change.

  17. Technological learning for carbon capture and sequestration technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riahi, Keywan; Rubin, Edward S.; Taylor, Margaret R.; Schrattenholzer, Leo; Hounshell, David

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyzes potentials of carbon capture and sequestration technologies (CCT) in a set of long-term energy-economic-environmental scenarios based on alternative assumptions for technological progress of CCT. In order to get a reasonable guide to future technological progress in managing CO 2 emissions, we review past experience in controlling sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) emissions from power plants. By doing so, we quantify a 'learning curve' for CCT, which describes the relationship between the improvement of costs due to accumulation of experience in CCT construction. We incorporate the learning curve into the energy-modeling framework MESSAGE-MACRO and develop greenhouse gas emissions scenarios of economic, demographic, and energy demand development, where alternative policy cases lead to the stabilization of atmospheric CO 2 concentrations at 550 parts per million by volume (ppmv) by the end of the 21st century. We quantify three types of contributors to the carbon emissions mitigation: (1) demand reductions due to the increased price of energy, (2) fuel switching primarily away from coal, and (3) carbon capture and sequestration from fossil fuels. Due to the assumed technological learning, costs of the emissions reduction for CCT drop rapidly and in parallel with the massive introduction of CCT on the global scale. Compared to scenarios based on static cost assumptions for CCT, the contribution of carbon sequestration is about 50% higher in the case of learning, resulting in cumulative sequestration of CO 2 ranging from 150 to 250 billion (10 9 ) tons with carbon during the 21st century. Also, carbon values (tax) across scenarios (to meet the 550 ppmv carbon concentration constraint) are between 2% and 10% lower in the case of learning for CCT by 2100. The results illustrate that assumptions on technological change are a critical determinant of future characteristics of the energy system, indicating the importance of long-term technology policies in

  18. Flexible Carbon Aerogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Schwan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon aerogels are highly porous materials with a large inner surface area. Due to their high electrical conductivity they are excellent electrode materials in supercapacitors. Their brittleness, however, imposes certain limitations in terms of applicability. In that context, novel carbon aerogels with varying degree of flexibility have been developed. These highly porous, light aerogels are characterized by a high surface area and possess pore structures in the micrometer range, allowing for a reversible deformation of the aerogel network. A high ratio of pore size to particle size was found to be crucial for high flexibility. For dynamic microstructural analysis, compression tests were performed in-situ within a scanning electron microscope allowing us to directly visualize the microstructural flexibility of an aerogel. The flexible carbon aerogels were found to withstand between 15% and 30% of uniaxial compression in a reversible fashion. These findings might stimulate further research and new application fields directed towards flexible supercapacitors and batteries.

  19. The Carbon Trading Game

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouquet, Roger

    2003-12-01

    In response to the Kyoto Protocol, an international market for carbon dioxide tradable permits is likely to be created. Two of the key issues involved are explaining the concepts of tradable permits to industrialists, policy-makers and the man on the street, and anticipating how the market will evolve. A simple game of the market for carbon dioxide tradable permits has been developed and used that can help deal with both issues. As a pedagogical tool, this game benefits from simplicity (just a few pieces of paper are needed) and enables students to grasp the concepts and remember them through the intensity and fun of a trading 'pit'. The experiences also provide substantial insights into the evolution of the carbon dioxide permit market, particularly related to the evolution of trade volume, permit prices and country strategies

  20. Densities of carbon foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoner, J.O. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The densities of arc-evaporated carbon target foils have been measured by several methods. The density depends upon the method used to measure it; for the same surface density, values obtained by different measurement techniques may differ by fifty percent or more. The most reliable density measurements are by flotation, yielding a density of 2.01±0.03 g cm -3 , and interferometric step height with the surface density known from auxiliary measurements, yielding a density of 2.61±0.4 g cm -3 . The difference between these density values mayy be due in part to the compressive stresses that carbon films have while still on their substrates, uncertainties in the optical calibration of surface densities of carbon foils, and systematic errors in step-height measurements. Mechanical thickness measurements by micrometer caliper are unreliable due to nonplanarity of these foils. (orig.)

  1. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisa Wray

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This oral boards case is appropriate for all emergency medicine learners (residents, interns, and medical students. Introduction: Carbon monoxide (CO is a colorless and odorless gas that typically results from combustion. It binds hemoglobin, dissociating oxygen, causing headache, weakness, confusion and possible seizure or coma. Pulse oxygen levels may be falsely elevated. Practitioners should maintain a high index of suspicion for carbon monoxide poisoning. If caught early CO poisoning is reversible with oxygen or hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Objectives: The learner will assess a patient with altered mental status and weakness, ultimately identifying that the patient has carbon monoxide poisoning. The learner will treat the patient with oxygen and admit/transfer the patient for hyperbaric oxygenation. Method: Oral boards case

  2. New structural concept for carbonized coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzec, A. [Polish Academy of Sciences, Gliwice (Poland). Inst. of Coal Chemistry

    1997-07-01

    The aim of this study was to present a model of structure for solid products of bituminous coal carbonization carried out at end temperatures (ETCs) in the 600-750{degree}C range. The products are of interest since they are used as raw materials for production of activated carbons. Moreover a layer of such products occurring in coke ovens seems to play a crucial role in generation of excessive coking pressure in industrial coking. The experimental data used in modeling were derived from the following: carbonization studies of coals and individual aromatic hydrocarbons, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry, and electrical resistivity measurements. The final step of model preparation relied on application of computational chemistry for search of stable conformers and for calculations of molecular orbitals. According to the model, semicokes contain two structural components: (1) oligomers that form nonplanar 3D networks of aromatic clusters (an extended system of conjugated {pi}-orbitals unites clusters of the networks despite the fact they are not coplanar) and (2) planar aggregates that arise from products of dehydrocyclization reaction (the aggregates fill space between oligomeric networks). The two structural components represent optically isotropic and anisotropic phases, respectively. 21 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Purification of carbon nanotubes via selective heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, John A.; Wilson, William L.; Jin, Sung Hun; Dunham, Simon N.; Xie, Xu; Islam, Ahmad; Du, Frank; Huang, Yonggang; Song, Jizhou

    2017-11-21

    The present invention provides methods for purifying a layer of carbon nanotubes comprising providing a precursor layer of substantially aligned carbon nanotubes supported by a substrate, wherein the precursor layer comprises a mixture of first carbon nanotubes and second carbon nanotubes; selectively heating the first carbon nanotubes; and separating the first carbon nanotubes from the second carbon nanotubes, thereby generating a purified layer of carbon nanotubes. Devices benefiting from enhanced electrical properties enabled by the purified layer of carbon nanotubes are also described.

  4. Dynamic properties of interstitial carbon and carbon-carbon pair defects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leary, P.; Jones, R.; Oeberg, S.; Torres, V.J.

    1997-01-01

    Interstitial carbon, C i , defects in Si exhibit a number of unexplained features. The C i defect in the neutral charge state gives rise to two almost degenerate vibrational modes at 920 and 931 cm -1 whose 2:1 absorption intensity ratio naturally suggests a trigonal defect in conflict with uniaxial stress measurements. The dicarbon, C s -C i , defect is bistable, and the energy difference between its A and B forms is surprisingly small even though the bonding is very different. In the B form appropriate to the neutral charge state, a silicon interstitial is believed to be located near a bond-centered site between two C s atoms. This must give rise to vibrational modes which involve the motion of both C atoms in apparent conflict with the results of photoluminescence experiments. We use an ab initio local density functional cluster method, AIMPRO, to calculate the structure and vibrational modes of these defects and find that the ratio of the absorption intensities of the local modes of C i is in reasonable agreement with experiment even though the structure of the defect is not trigonal. We also show that modes in the vicinity of those detected by photoluminescence for the B form of the dicarbon center involve independent movements of the two C atoms. Finally, the trends in the relative energies of the A and B forms in three charge states are investigated. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  5. Anomalous carbon nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparian, A.P.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented from a bubble chamber experiment to search for anomalous mean free path (MFP) phenomena for secondary multicharged fragments (Zsub(f)=5 and 6) of the beam carbon nucleus at 4.2 GeV/c per nucleon. A total of 50000 primary interactions of carbon with propane (C 3 H 8 ) were created. Approximately 6000 beam tragments with charges Zsub(f)=5 and 6 were analyzed in detail to find out an anomalous decrease of MFP. The anomaly is observed only for secondary 12 C nuclei

  6. Ultrahard carbon nanocomposite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegal, M. P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Tallant, D. R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Provencio, P. N. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Overmyer, D. L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Simpson, R. L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Martinez-Miranda, L. J. [Department of Materials and Nuclear Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2000-05-22

    Modest thermal annealing to 600 degree sign C of diamondlike amorphous-carbon (a-C) films grown at room temperature results in the formation of carbon nanocomposites with hardness similar to diamond. These nanocomposite films consist of nanometer-sized regions of high density a-C embedded in an a-C matrix with a reduced density of 5%-10%. We report on the evolution of density and bonding topologies as a function of annealing temperature. Despite a decrease in density, film hardness actually increases {approx}15% due to the development of the nanocomposite structure. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  7. Ultrahard carbon nanocomposite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SIEGAL,MICHAEL P.; TALLANT,DAVID R.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P.; OVERMYER,DONALD L.; SIMPSON,REGINA L.; MARTINEZ-MIRANDA,L.J.

    2000-01-27

    Modest thermal annealing to 600 C of diamondlike amorphous-carbon (a-C) films grown at room temperature results in the formation of carbon nanocomposites with hardness similar to diamond. These nanocomposite films consist of nanometer-sized regions of high density a-C embedded in an a-C matrix with a reduced density of 5--10%. The authors report on the evolution of density and bonding topologies as a function of annealing temperature. Despite a decrease in density, film hardness actually increases {approximately} 15% due to the development of the nanocomposite structure.

  8. Effects of carbon tax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelini, M.

    1992-01-01

    At the recent United Nations Conference held in Rio de Janeiro, a proposal was made by Italy to have surcharges be applied by OECD member countries on fossil fuels (carbon tax), primarily to fund pollution abatement technology transfer to developing countries and promote pollution abatement, energy conservation and the use of renewable energy sources in industrialized countries. This paper assesses how the application of the proposed carbon tax might be successfully combined with additional fiscal policies favouring coal gasification and reforestation so as to provide energy policy strategists of oil-importing countries with a long term economically and environmentally viable alternative to petroleum imports

  9. Carbon cycle makeover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canfield, Donald Eugene; Kump, Lee R.

    2013-01-01

    remaining in sediments after respiration leave a residual of oxygen in the atmosphere. The source of oxygen to the atmosphere represented by organic matter burial is balanced by oxygen sinks associated with rock weathering and chemical reaction with volcanic gases. This is the long-term carbon and oxygen...... geochemical cycle. But Earth is an old planet, and oxygen levels have changed through time (2). On page 540 of this issue, Schrag et al. (3) challenge the most commonly used geochemical approach to assess long-term changes in the coupled oxygen and carbon cycles....

  10. Deposition of carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    In Norway, there is currently a debate about whether or not to build gas power stations. To meet the possibility of reduced emission quotas for carbon dioxide in the future, current interest focuses on the incorporation of large-scale separation and deposition of carbon dioxide when such plants are planned. A group of experts concludes that this technology will become self-financing by means of environmental taxes. From the environmental point of view, taxes upon production are to be preferred over taxes on consumption

  11. Carbon sheet pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohyabu, N.; Sagara, A.; Kawamura, T.; Motojima, O.; Ono, T.

    1993-07-01

    A new hydrogen pumping scheme has been proposed which controls recycling of the particles for significant improvement of the energy confinement in toroidal magnetic fusion devices. In this scheme, a part of the vacuum vessel surface near the divertor is covered with carbon sheets of a large surface area. Before discharge initiation, the sheets are baked up to 700 ∼ 1000degC to remove the previously trapped hydrogen atoms. After being cooled down to below ∼ 200degC, the unsaturated carbon sheets trap high energy charge exchange hydrogen atoms effectively during a discharge and overall pumping efficiency can be as high as ∼ 50 %. (author)

  12. Carbon-carbon mirrors for exoatmospheric and space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumweide, Duane E.; Wonacott, Gary D.; Woida, Patrick M.; Woida, Rigel Q.; Shih, Wei

    2007-09-01

    The cost and leadtime associated with beryllium has forced the MDA and other defense agencies to look for alternative materials with similar structural and thermal properties. The use of carbon-carbon material, specifically in optical components has been demonstrated analytically in prior SBIR work at San Diego Composites. Carbon-carbon material was chosen for its low in-plane and through-thickness CTE (athermal design), high specific stiffness, near-zero coefficient of moisture expansion, availability of material (specifically c-c honeycomb for lightweight substrates), and compatibility with silicon monoxide (SiO) and silicon dioxide (SiO II) coatings. Subsequent development work has produced shaped carbon-carbon sandwich substrates which have been ground, polished, coated and figured using traditional optical processing. Further development has also been done on machined monolithic carbon-carbon mirror substrates which have also been processed using standard optical finishing techniques.

  13. Effect of Population Structure Change on Carbon Emission in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Guo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper expanded the Logarithmic Mean Divisia Index (LMDI model through the introduction of urbanization, residents’ consumption, and other factors, and decomposed carbon emission changes in China into carbon emission factor effect, energy intensity effect, consumption inhibitory factor effect, urbanization effect, residents’ consumption effect, and population scale effect, and then explored contribution rates and action mechanisms of the above six factors on change in carbon emissions in China. Then, the effect of population structure change on carbon emission was analyzed by taking 2003–2012 as a sample period, and combining this with the panel data of 30 provinces in China. Results showed that in 2003–2012, total carbon emission increased by 4.2117 billion tons in China. The consumption inhibitory factor effect, urbanization effect, residents’ consumption effect, and population scale effect promoted the increase in carbon emissions, and their contribution ratios were 27.44%, 12.700%, 74.96%, and 5.90%, respectively. However, the influence of carbon emission factor effect (−2.54% and energy intensity effect (−18.46% on carbon emissions were negative. Population urbanization has become the main population factor which affects carbon emission in China. The “Eastern aggregation” phenomenon caused the population scale effect in the eastern area to be significantly higher than in the central and western regions, but the contribution rate of its energy intensity effect (−11.10 million tons was significantly smaller than in the central (−21.61 million tons and western regions (−13.29 million tons, and the carbon emission factor effect in the central area (−3.33 million tons was significantly higher than that in the eastern (−2.00 million tons and western regions (−1.08 million tons. During the sample period, the change in population age structure, population education structure, and population occupation structure

  14. Rio conference global environmental protection Agenda 21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinchera, G. (ENEA, Rome (Italy). Area Energia, Ambiente e Salute)

    1992-10-01

    In reviewing the work packages included in the Rio Earth's Summit Agenda 21, intended as an activities guideline for international cooperation to ensure environmental protection with sustainable growth for all nations, this paper points out the areas which present the greatest obstacles in the establishment of common accords and discusses the directions being taken to surmount these obstacles. A major obstacle concerns uncertaindes in specifying limits on carbon dioxide emissions and their effects on world climate. Another concerns suitable methods to help finance effective technology transfer to developing countries. With regard to the former problem, a 'no regret' approach has been proposed to limit current C02 reduction interventions to those levels which, in all certainty, would not incur any future regrets once scientific knowledge has advanced enough to allow more accurate assessments of greenhouse gas/climate change inter-relationships. With regard to the latter problem, attempts are being made to reduce possible negative impacts on the petroleum industry due to energy surcharges suggested as a source of funding for technology transfer/environmental protection programs.

  15. 78 FR 16252 - Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From India, Indonesia, and Thailand: Final Results...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-14

    ... Indonesia P.T. Krakatau Steel 10.21 All Others 10.21 Thailand Sahaviriya Steel Industries Public Company...] Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From India, Indonesia, and Thailand: Final Results of... products (``HR steel'') from India, Indonesia, and Thailand pursuant to section 751(c) of the Tariff Act of...

  16. CarbonSat Constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Tobehn, Carsten; Ernst, Robert; Bovensmann, Heinrich; Buchwitz, Michael; Burrows, John P.; Notholt, John

    1 Carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) are the most important manmade greenhouse gases (GHGs) which are driving global climate change. Currently, the CO2 measurements from the ground observing network are still the main sources of information but due to the limited number of measurement stations the coverage is limited. In addition, CO2 monitoring and trading is often based mainly on bottom-up calculations and an independent top down verification is limited due to the lack of global measurement data with local resolution. The first CO2 and CH4 mapping from SCIAMACHY on ENVISAT shows that satellites add important missing global information. Current GHG measurement satellites (GOSAT)are limited either in spatial or temporal resolution and coverage. These systems have to collect data over a year or even longer to produce global regional fluxes products. Conse-quently global, timely, higher spatial resolution and high accuracy measurement are required for: 1. A good understanding of the CO2 and CH4 sources and sinks for reliable climate predic-tion; and 2. Independent and transparent verification of accountable sources and sinks in supporting Kyoto and upcoming protocols The CarbonSat constellation idea comes out the trade off of resolution and swath width during CarbonSat mission definition studies. In response to the urgent need to support the Kyoto and upcoming protocols, a feasibility study has been carried out. The proposed solution is a constellation of five CarbonSat satellites in 614km LTAN 13:00, which is able to provide global, daily CO2 and CH4 measurement everywhere on the Earth with high spatial resolution 2 × 2 km and low uncertainty lt;2ppm (CO2) and lt;8ppb (CH4). The unique global daily measurement capability significantly increases the number of cloud free measurements, which enables more reliable services associated with reduced uncertainty, e.g. to 0.15ppm (CO2) per month in 10km and even more timely products. The CarbonSat Constellation in

  17. Carbon Standards and Carbon Labelling: An Emerging Trade Concern

    OpenAIRE

    Nitya Nanda; Rajan Sudesh Ratna

    2010-01-01

    The current debate on climate change and its linkages to trade is rapidly gaining global attention. Thus it is reasonable to expect that the focus on carbon leakage and border tax adjustment will only intensify in the future. Carbon leakage is said to happen when production of carbon intensive products migrates from countries which have measures to reduce emissions to countries where there are no such measures. Therefore, border tax adjustment is suggested when carbon intensive products are i...

  18. Method for production of carbon nanofiber mat or carbon paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naskar, Amit K.

    2015-08-04

    Method for the preparation of a non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fibers, the method comprising carbonizing a non-woven mat or paper preform (precursor) comprised of a plurality of bonded sulfonated polyolefin fibers to produce said non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fibers. The preforms and resulting non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fiber, as well as articles and devices containing them, and methods for their use, are also described.

  19. Carbon black vs. black carbon and other airborne materials containing elemental carbon: Physical and chemical distinctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Christopher M.; Nascarella, Marc A.; Valberg, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Airborne particles containing elemental carbon (EC) are currently at the forefront of scientific and regulatory scrutiny, including black carbon, carbon black, and engineered carbon-based nanomaterials, e.g., carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, and graphene. Scientists and regulators sometimes group these EC-containing particles together, for example, interchangeably using the terms carbon black and black carbon despite one being a manufactured product with well-controlled properties and the other being an undesired, incomplete-combustion byproduct with diverse properties. In this critical review, we synthesize information on the contrasting properties of EC-containing particles in order to highlight significant differences that can affect hazard potential. We demonstrate why carbon black should not be considered a model particle representative of either combustion soots or engineered carbon-based nanomaterials. Overall, scientific studies need to distinguish these highly different EC-containing particles with care and precision so as to forestall unwarranted extrapolation of properties, hazard potential, and study conclusions from one material to another. -- Highlights: •Major classes of elemental carbon-containing particles have distinct properties. •Despite similar names, carbon black should not be confused with black carbon. •Carbon black is distinguished by a high EC content and well-controlled properties. •Black carbon particles are characterized by their heterogenous properties. •Carbon black is not a model particle representative of engineered nanomaterials. -- This review demonstrates the significant physical and chemical distinctions between elemental carbon-containing particles e.g., carbon black, black carbon, and engineered nanomaterials

  20. The Kane Experimental Forest carbon inventory: Carbon reporting with FVS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coeli Hoover

    2008-01-01

    As the number of state and regional climate change agreements grows, so does the need to assess the carbon implications of planned forest management actions. At the operational level, producing detailed stock estimates for the primary carbon pools becomes time-consuming and cumbersome. Carbon reporting functionality has been fully integrated within the Forest...

  1. Rivers of Carbon: Carbon Fluxes in a Watershed Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, E.; Tom, B.; Hovius, N.

    2017-12-01

    Research within the past decade has identified the roles of diverse terrestrial processes in mobilizing terrestrial carbon from bedrock, soil, and vegetation and in redistributing this carbon among the atmosphere, biota, geosphere, and oceans. Rivers are central to carbon redistribution, serving as the primary initial receptor of mobilized terrestrial carbon, as well as governing the proportions of carbon sequestered within sediment, transported to oceans, or released to the atmosphere. We use a riverine carbon budget to examine how key questions regarding carbon dynamics can be addressed across diverse spatial and temporal scales from sub-meter areas over a few hours on a single gravel bar to thousands of square kilometers over millions of years across an entire large river network. The portion of the budget applying to the active channel(s) takes the form of ,in which Cs is organic carbon storage over time t. Inputs are surface and subsurface fluxes from uplands (CIupl) and the floodplain (CIfp), including fossil, soil, and biospheric organic carbon; surface and subsurface fluxes of carbon dioxide to the channel (CICO2); and net primary productivity in the channel (CINPP). Outputs occur via respiration within the channel and carbon dioxide emissions (COgas) and fluxes of dissolved and particulate organic carbon to the floodplain and downstream portions of the river network (COriver). The analogous budget for the floodplain portion of a river corridor is .

  2. Synthesis of carbon nanorods by reduction of carbon bisulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou Zhengsong; He Minglong; Zhao Dejian; Li Zhongchun; Shang Tongming

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: Our manuscript is a concise preliminary account of original and of significant research, which illuminates carbon nanorods and variously shaped Y-junction carbon nanorods are successfully fabricated on a large scale through a carbon bisulfide thermal reduction process. Various shaped Y-junction carbon nanorods can be used as studying the electronic and transport properties of the nano-meter carbon material. - Abstract: Carbon nanorods are synthesized at large scale by the reduction of carbon bisulfide at 600 o C. Moreover, novel Y-junction carbon nanorods are detected in the samples. The X-ray power diffraction pattern indicates that the products are hexagonal graphite. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and N 2 physisorption studies show that carbon nanorods predominate in the product. Based on the supercritical carbon bisulfide system, the possible growth mechanism of the carbon nanorods was discussed. This method provides a simple and cheap route to large-scale synthesis of carbon nanorods.

  3. Carbon diffusion in carbon-supersaturated ferrite and austenite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermák, Jiří; Král, Lubomír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 586, FEB (2014), s. 129-135 ISSN 0925-8388 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0148; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : carbon diffusion * Carbon supersaturation * Carbon supersaturation * Ferrite * Austenite Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 2.999, year: 2014

  4. Fixation of carbon dioxide into dimethyl carbonate over ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    A titanium-based zeolitic thiophene-benzimidazolate framework has been designed for the direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate (DMC) from methanol and carbon dioxide. The developed catalyst activates carbon dioxide and delivers over 16% yield of DMC without the use of any dehydrating agent or requirement for azeotropic distillation. Prepared for submission to Nature Scientific reports.

  5. Agenda 21 haridusprogramm / Imbi Henno

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Henno, Imbi

    2000-01-01

    1992. a Rio de Janeiros toimunud ÜRO keskkonna- ja arengukonverentsil võeti vastu "Agenda 21", määrab kindlaks riikide säästva arengu alased põhisuunad käesoleval sajandil. 1997. a. Rio jätkukonverentsil tegi ÜRO Säästva Arengu Komisjon valitsustele ettekirjutuse - viia ellu "Agenda 21" põhimõtted. ÜRO Säästva Arengu Komisjoni eestvõtmisel võeti 1998. a. vastu ka "Agenda 21" 36. peatüki "Haridus, koolitus ja avalikkuse teadlikkus" laiendatud versioon, mille eesmärk on edendada riikidevahelist koostööd ja säästva arengu alast teadlikkust

  6. Carbon pricing comes clean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Wit, Elisa

    2011-01-01

    Together with the Clean Energy Bill, the implications of the Australian Federal Government's climate change legislative package are far reaching. Norton Rose gives business a heads-up in this breakdown of the draft legislation underpinning the carbon pricing and clean energy scheme. It is a summary of Norton Rose's full analysis.

  7. Carbon Dioxide Sensor Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-01

    second gas permeable membrane separates a compartment containing the non-aqueous " solvent dimethylsulfoxide , ( DMSO ), from the aqueous solution...compartment. In DMSO carbon dioxide can be irreversibly reduced electrochemically to * non-interfering products...current due to its reduction in the DMSO solution is proportional to the partial pressure of CO2 in the gas phase. Overall, the linear response and

  8. Kinetics of resite carbonization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolář, František; Svítilová, Jaroslava

    11(120) (2001), s. 97-103 ISSN 1211-1929 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/00/1140 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3046908 Keywords : carbonization * combustion Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  9. The carbon harvest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Julia

    2018-02-01

    In 2015, the Paris climate agreement established a goal of limiting global warming to "well below" 2°C. In the most recent report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, researchers surveyed possible road maps for reaching that goal and found something unsettling: In most model scenarios, simply cutting emissions isn't enough. To limit warming, humanity also needs negative emissions technologies that, by the end of the century, would remove more carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere than humans emit. The technologies would buy time for society to rein in carbon emissions, but they also give policymakers an excuse to drag their feet on climate action in the hopes that future inventions will clean up the mess. One particular technology has quietly risen to prominence, thanks to global models. The idea is to cultivate fast-growing grasses and trees to suck CO2 out of the atmosphere and then burn them at power plants to generate energy. But instead of being released back into the atmosphere in the exhaust, the crops' carbon would be captured and pumped underground. The technique is known as bioenergy with carbon capture and storage, or—among climate wonks—simply as BECCS. Although BECCS is relatively cheap and theoretically feasible, the sheer scale at which it operates in the models alarms many researchers.

  10. Carbonizing bituminous minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1921-05-01

    A process for carbonizing bituminous minerals, like oil-shale, in a furnace with addition of air in the presence of heat-receiving material is characterized by the fact that to the feed such solid or liquid material (with the exception of oil) is added, which, through vaporization or heat-binding decomposition or conversion, hinders the establishment of excessive temperatures.

  11. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Investigations Associated with Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide from Engine-Driven Generators and Other Engine-Driven Tools, 2004–2014 JANUARY 08, 2015 Non- ... outside of the Federal Government. CPSC does not control this external site or its privacy policy and ...

  12. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as CO, is called the "Invisible Killer" because it's ... used or incorrectly-vented fuel-burning appliances such as furnaces, stoves, water heaters and fireplaces. Watch This ...

  13. Carbon Lorenz Curves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, L.F.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073642398

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, it exhibits that standard tools in the measurement of income inequality, such as the Lorenz curve and the Gini-index, can successfully be applied to the issues of inequality measurement of carbon emissions and the equity of abatement policies across

  14. City Carbon Footprint Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangwu Chen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Progressive cities worldwide have demonstrated political leadership by initiating meaningful strategies and actions to tackle climate change. However, the lack of knowledge concerning embodied greenhouse gas (GHG emissions of cities has hampered effective mitigation. We analyse trans-boundary GHG emission transfers between five Australian cities and their trading partners, with embodied emission flows broken down into major economic sectors. We examine intercity carbon footprint (CF networks and disclose a hierarchy of responsibility for emissions between cities and regions. Allocations of emissions to households, businesses and government and the carbon efficiency of expenditure have been analysed to inform mitigation policies. Our findings indicate that final demand in the five largest cities in Australia accounts for more than half of the nation’s CF. City households are responsible for about two thirds of the cities’ CFs; the rest can be attributed to government and business consumption and investment. The city network flows highlight that over half of emissions embodied in imports (EEI to the five cities occur overseas. However, a hierarchy of GHG emissions reveals that overseas regions also outsource emissions to Australian cities such as Perth. We finally discuss the implications of our findings on carbon neutrality, low-carbon city concepts and strategies and allocation of subnational GHG responsibility.

  15. Skallerup Klit's carbon footprint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zacho, Kristina Overgaard; Ørnstrup, Niels Holm; Zimmermann, Tine Marquard

    by offsetting and without making actual emission reductions. Therefore the purpose of this study is to present recommendations on how Skallerup Klit can build up their business strategy using Carbon Footprint (CFP) as a tool. The CPF is calculated and assessed by using financial data in an Input-output LCA...

  16. Closing carbon cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patel, Martin

    1999-01-01

    Fossil fuels are used as raw materials for the manufacture of synthetic organic materials, e.g. plastics, fibres, synthetic rubber, paints, solvents, fertilisers, surfactants, lubricants and bitumen. Since fossil carbon is embodied in these products they may be particularly relevant to climate

  17. Balancing atmospheric carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goreau, T.J. (Discovery Bay Marine Laboratory, Univ. of the West Indies (JM))

    1990-01-01

    Rising carbon dioxide and global temperatures are causing increasing worldwide concern, and pressure towards an international law of the atmosphere is rapidly escalating, yet widespread misconceptions about the greenhouse effect's inevitability, time scale, and causes have inhibited effective consensus and action. Observations from Antarctic ice cores, Amazonian rain forests, and Carribean coral reefs suggest that the biological effects of climate change may be more severe than climate models predict. Efforts to limit emissions from fossil-fuel combustion alone are incapable of stabilizing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Stabilizing atmospheric carbon dioxide requires coupled measures to balance sources and sinks of the gas, and will only be viable with large-scale investments in increased sustainable productivity on degraded tropical soils, and in long-term research on renewable energy and biomass product development in the developing countries. A mechanism is outlined which directly links fossil-fuel combustion sources of carbon dioxide to removal via increasing biotic productivity and storage. A preliminary cost-benefit analysis suggests that such measures are very affordable, costing far less than inaction. (With 88 refs.).

  18. Balancing atmospheric carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goreau, T J [Discovery Bay Marine Laboratory, Univ. of the West Indies (JM)

    1990-01-01

    Rising carbon dioxide and global temperatures are causing increasing worldwide concern, and pressure towards an international law of the atmosphere is rapidly escalating, yet widespread misconceptions about the greenhouse effect's inevitability, time scale, and causes have inhibited effective consensus and action. Observations from Antarctic ice cores, Amazonian rain forests, and Carribean coral reefs suggest that the biological effects of climate change may be more severe than climate models predict. Efforts to limit emissions from fossil-fuel combustion alone are incapable of stabilizing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Stabilizing atmospheric carbon dioxide requires coupled measures to balance sources and sinks of the gas, and will only be viable with large-scale investments in increased sustainable productivity on degraded tropical soils, and in long-term research on renewable energy and biomass product development in the developing countries. A mechanism is outlined which directly links fossil-fuel combustion sources of carbon dioxide to removal via increasing biotic productivity and storage. A preliminary cost-benefit analysis suggests that such measures are very affordable, costing far less than inaction. (With 88 refs.).

  19. Cloning and expression of gamma carbonic anhydrase from Serratia sp. ISTD04 for sequestration of carbon dioxide and formation of calcite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shaili; Bharti, Randhir Kumar; Verma, Praveen Kumar; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial strains isolated from marble mines rock and enriched in the chemostat culture with different concentrations of sodium bicarbonate. The enriched consortium had six bacterial isolates. One of bacterium isolate showed carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity by catalyzing the reversible hydration reaction of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate. The bacterium was identified as Serratia sp. by 16S rRNA sequence analysis. The carbonic anhydrase gene from Serratia sp. was found to be homologous with gamma carbonic anhydrase. The carbonic anhydrase gene was cloned in PET21b(+) and expressed it in recombinant Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) with His-tag at the C-terminus. The recombinant protein was purified efficiently by using one-step nickel affinity chromatography. Expected size of carbonic anhydrase was approximately 29 kDa in SDS-PAGE gel. Recombinant carbonic anhydrase enzyme was used for biomineralization-based conversion of atmospheric CO2 into valuable calcite minerals. The calcification was confirmed by using XRD, FTIR, EDX and SEM analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Particulate carbon in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surakka, J.

    1992-01-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols are emitted to the atmosphere in combustion processes. Carbon particles are very small and have a long residence time in the air. Black Carbon, a type of carbon aerosol, is a good label when transport of combustion emissions in the atmosphere is studied. It is also useful tool in air quality studies. Carbon particles absorb light 6.5 to 8 times stronger than any other particulate matter in the air. Their effect on decreasing visibility is about 50 %. Weather disturbances are also caused by carbon emissions e.g. in Kuwait. Carbon particles have big absorption surface and capacity to catalyze different heterogenous reactions in air. Due to their special chemical and physical properties particulate carbon is a significant air pollution specie, especially in urban air. Average particulate carbon concentration of 5.7 μg/m 2 have been measured in winter months in Helsinki

  1. ROE Carbon Storage - Percent Change

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This polygon dataset depicts the percentage change in the amount of carbon stored in forests in counties across the United States, based on the difference in carbon...

  2. Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-19

    Carbon capture and sequestration (or storage)known as CCShas attracted interest as a : measure for mitigating global climate change because large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) : emitted from fossil fuel use in the United States are potentiall...

  3. Microstructure and mechanical properties of carbon fibre-reinforced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-05-17

    May 17, 2018 ... was focussed on the characteristics of sol and the mechanical properties and high-temperature resistance of ... The reinforcement was 3D carbon fibre (T300 3k, ex-PAN ... where f (a/H) = 2.9(a/H)1/2−4.6(a/H)3/2+21.8(a/H)5/2.

  4. Local Gate Control of a Carbon Nanotube Double Quantum Dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-04

    describ- ing the levitation . Quantitative comparisons are made difficult by the complicated aniso- tropy of the nematic’s viscoelasticity (21). However...director fields. For example, as a straightforward extension of the levitation , a liquid crystal that twists through many periods (such as a cholesteric...Nanotube Double Quantum Dot N. Mason,*† M. J. Biercuk,* C. M. Marcus† We have measured carbon nanotube quantum dots with multiple electro- static gates and

  5. Solar hydrogen hybrid system with carbon storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zini, G.; Marazzi, R.; Pedrazzi, S.; Tartarini, P.

    2009-01-01

    A complete solar hydrogen hybrid system has been developed to convert, store and use energy from renewable energy sources. The theoretical model has been implemented in a dynamic model-based software environment and applied to real data to simulate its functioning over a one-year period. Results are used to study system design and performance. A photovoltaic sub-system directly drives a residential load and, if a surplus of energy is available, an electrolyzer to produce hydrogen which is stored in a cluster of nitrogen-cooled tanks filled with AX-21 activated carbons. When the power converted from the sun is not sufficient to cover load needs, hydrogen is desorbed from activated carbon tanks and sent to the fuel-cell sub-system so to obtain electrical energy. A set of sub-systems (bus-bar, buck- and boost-converters, inverter, control circuits), handle the electrical power according to a Programmable Logic Control unit so that the load can be driven with adequate Quality of Service. Hydrogen storage is achieved through physisorption (weak van der Waals interactions) between carbon atoms and hydrogen molecules occurring at low temperature (77 K) in carbon porous solids at relatively low pressures. Storage modeling has been developed using a Langmuir-Freundlich 1st type isotherm and experimental data available in literature. Physisorption storage provides safer operations along with good gravimetric (10.8% at 6 MPa) and volumetric (32.5 g/l at 6 MPa) storage capacities at costs that can be comparable to, or smaller than, ordinary storage techniques (compression or liquefaction). Several test runs have been performed on residential user data-sets: the system is capable of providing grid independence and can be designed to yield a surplus production of hydrogen which can be used to recharge electric car batteries or fill tanks for non-stationary uses. (author)

  6. Energies and carbon sinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedacker, A.

    2002-01-01

    The Kyoto Protocol puts a lot of emphasis on carbon sinks. This emphasis almost obliterates the other potential contributions of biomass in the fight against climatic changes and toward sustainable development. Biomass represents an infinite supply of renewable energy sources which do not increase the levels of carbon in the atmosphere, contribute to energy savings resulting from the use of wood rather than other materials, the sustainable management of soils, the fight against drought, agroforestry from which the production of foods depends, the mitigating of certain extreme climatic occurrences and the protection of dams from increased silting. The industrial revolution contributed to the increase in greenhouse gas emissions. When discussing some of the finer points of the Kyoto Protocol, the focus was placed on carbon sinks. The author indicates that the biomass cycle had to be considered, both in situ and ex situ. Details to this effect are provided, and a section dealing with greenhouse gases other than carbon must be taken into account. The rural environment must be considered globally. The author indicates that in the future, the emissions resulting from the transportation of agricultural products will have to be considered. Within the realm of the policies on sustainable development, the fight against climatic change represents only one aspect. In arid and semi-arid regions, one must take into account meeting the energy needs of the populations, the fight against drought and the preservation of biodiversity. The planting of trees offers multiple advantages apart from being a carbon sink: roughage, wood for burning, protection of soils, etc. A few examples are provided. 8 refs., 3 figs

  7. Converting biomass waste into microporous carbon with simultaneously high surface area and carbon purity as advanced electrochemical energy storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; Wang, Lijie; Peng, Yiting; Gao, Jihui; Pi, Xinxin; Qu, Zhibin; Zhao, Guangbo; Qin, Yukun

    2018-04-01

    Developing carbon materials featuring both high accessible surface area and high structure stability are desirable to boost the performance of constructed electrochemical electrodes and devices. Herein, we report a new type of microporous carbon (MPC) derived from biomass waste based on a simple high-temperature chemical activation procedure. The optimized MPC-900 possesses microporous structure, high surface area, partially graphitic structure, and particularly low impurity content, which are critical features for enhancing carbon-based electrochemical process. The constructed MPC-900 symmetric supercapacitor exhibits high performances in commercial organic electrolyte such as widened voltage window up to 3 V and thereby high energy/power densities (50.95 Wh kg-1 at 0.44 kW kg-1; 25.3 Wh kg-1 at 21.5 kW kg-1). Furthermore, a simple melt infiltration method has been employed to enclose SnO2 nanocrystals onto the carbon matrix of MPC-900 as a high-performance lithium storage material. The obtained SnO2-MPC composite with ultrafine SnO2 nanocrystals delivers high capacities (1115 mAh g-1 at 0.2 A g-1; 402 mAh g-1 at 10 A g-1) and high-rate cycling lifespan of over 2000 cycles. This work not only develops a microporous carbon with high carbon purity and high surface area, but also provides a general platform for combining electrochemically active materials.

  8. Does Carbon Dioxide Predict Temperature?

    OpenAIRE

    Mytty, Tuukka

    2013-01-01

    Does carbon dioxide predict temperature? No it does not, in the time period of 1880-2004 with the carbon dioxide and temperature data used in this thesis. According to the Inter Governmental Panel on Climate Change(IPCC) carbon dioxide is the most important factor in raising the global temperature. Therefore, it is reasonable to assume that carbon dioxide truly predicts temperature. Because this paper uses observational data it has to be kept in mind that no causality interpretation can be ma...

  9. 21st Century Water Conservation Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2013-12-01

    This is an encore presentation of what was presented at the 2012 AGU International Conference. It was entitled: 'The Importance of Water Conservation in the 21st Century.' The poster presentation, however, has been redesigned and reorganized with new, revised perspectives. The importance of water conservation principles has been emphasized. The population of United States has more than doubled over the past 50 years. The need for water however, has tripled. The EPA estimates that more than 36 states face water shortage during the forthcoming years. The EPA has prepared a plan for achieving environmental and energy performance. This will be coupled with leadership and accountability. Carbon neutrality is also of prime importance. The objective is to focus on six important, essential areas. 1. Efficient use of already available energy resources. 2. Intelligent water consumption and focusing on water conservation. 3. Expand the use of renewable energy resources. 4. Explore innovative transportation systems and methodologies. 5. Change building codes and promote high performance sustainable buildings. 6. Focus on developing creative environment management systems. Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide occur naturally in the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is also emitted to the atmosphere through a variety of natural processes and also some human activities. However, fluorinated gases are emitted to the atmosphere solely through human activities, because they are created by humans. It is very important to observe that water conservation is probably the most cost-effective way to reduce our demand for water. Furthermore, it is certainly environmentally justifiable. The Environmental Protection Agency has a plan called E2PLAN. It is EPA's plan for achieving energy and environmental performance, leadership, accountability, and carbon neutrality. In June 2011, the EPA published a comprehensive, multi-year planning document called Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan. The

  10. Designing carbon markets, Part II: Carbon markets in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fankhauser, Samuel; Hepburn, Cameron

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyses the design of carbon markets in space (i.e., geographically). It is part of a twin set of papers that, starting from first principles, ask what an optimal global carbon market would look like by around 2030. Our focus is on firm-level cap-and-trade systems, although much of what we say would also apply to government-level trading and carbon offset schemes. We examine the 'first principles' of spatial design to maximise flexibility and to minimise costs, including key design issues in linking national and regional carbon markets together to create a global carbon market.

  11. Apparatus for producing carbon-coated nanoparticles and carbon nanospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, W. Lee; Weigle, John C.; Phillips, Jonathan

    2015-10-20

    An apparatus for producing carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles comprising a container for entraining particles in an aerosol gas, providing an inlet for carbon-containing gas, providing an inlet for plasma gas, a proximate torch for mixing the aerosol gas, the carbon-containing gas, and the plasma gas, bombarding the mixed gases with microwaves, and providing a collection device for gathering the resulting carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles. Also disclosed is a method and apparatus for making hollow carbon nano- or micro-scale spheres.

  12. Dispersion toughened silicon carbon ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, G.C.

    1984-01-01

    Fracture resistant silicon carbide ceramics are provided by incorporating therein a particulate dispersoid selected from the group consisting of (a) a mixture of boron, carbon and tungsten, (b) a mixture of boron, carbon and molybdenum, (c) a mixture of boron, carbon and titanium carbide, (d) a mixture of aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide, and (e) boron nitride. 4 figures.

  13. Carbon nanotube junctions and devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, H.W.Ch.

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis Postma presents transport experiments performed on individual single-wall carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes are molecules entirely made of carbon atoms. The electronic properties are determined by the exact symmetry of the nanotube lattice, resulting in either metallic or

  14. Microprobe analysis of carbon gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamothe, M.; Convert, F.

    1987-01-01

    Problems arising in carbon analysis and how they are solved are presented: sample pollution limitation using cold trap and gas jet cleaning sample preparation, carbon content determination and calibration, automation and optimization. Examples given include concentration monitoring. Carbon homogeneity after complete cementation and decarburization by heat treatment. 6 refs, 14 figs [fr

  15. Guideposts for Low Carbon Finance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizer, Billy

    2015-01-01

    The author proposes four guideposts for efficient low carbon finance: remove subsidies for high-carbon technologies, improve the cost-effectiveness of low-carbon subsidies, encourage private sector innovation and maintain transparent public policy tools that support cost-benefit accounting

  16. Carbon Alloys-Multi-functionalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, Eiichi [MSL, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)], E-mail: yasuda.e.aa.@m.titech.ac.jp; Enami, Takashi; Hoteida, Nobuyuki [MSL, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Lanticse-Diaz, L.J. [University of the Philippines (Philippines); Tanabe, Yasuhiro [Nagoya University (Japan); Akatsu, Takashi [MSL, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2008-02-25

    Last decade after our proposal of the 'Carbon Alloys' concept, many different kinds of Carbon Alloys, such as carbon nanotubes, carbon nanofibers, graphene sheet with magnetism, semi-conducting BCN compounds, graphite intercalation compounds, exfoliated carbon fiber, etc. have been found and developed. To extend the concept further, it is important to make it into intelligent materials by incorporating multiple functions. One example of the multi-functionalization is the development of homo-atomic Carbon Alloys from glassy carbon (GC) that exhibits high electrical conductivity and low gas permeability after treatment at critical conditions. Glassy carbon underwent metamorphosis to graphite spheres at HIP condition, and improved resistance to oxidation after alloying with Ta. The other one is shape utilization of the nano-sized carbon by understanding the effect of its large surfaces or interfaces in nanotechnology treatment. Recently carbon nanofiber was produced by polymer blend technology (PB) which was proposed by Prof. A. Oya during the Carbon Alloy project and progressed into intelligent carbon nanofiber (CNF) materials. CNF is combined into the polymer composites which is a candidate material for the bipolar separator in fuel cell. The superior properties, i.e., high electrical conductivity, high modulus, high strength, etc., of the CNF is being utilized in the preparation of this polymer composite.

  17. Post-combustion carbon capture - solid sorbents and membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, R.M.

    2009-01-15

    This report follows on from that on solvent scrubbing for post-combustion carbon capture from coal-fired power plants by considering the use of solid sorbents and membranes instead of solvents. First, mesoporous and microporous adsorbents are discussed: carbon-based adsorbents, zeolites, hydrotalcites and porous crystals. Attempts have been made to improve the performance of the porous adsorbent by functionalising them with nitrogen groups and specifically, amine groups to react with CO{sub 2} and thus enhance the physical adsorption properties. Dry, regenerable solid sorbents have attracted a good deal of research. Most of the work has been on the carbonation/calcination cycle of natural limestone but there have also been studies of other calcium-based sorbents and alkali metal-based sorbents. Membranes have also been studied as potential post-combustion capture devices. Finally, techno-economic studies predicting the economic performance of solid sorbents and membranes are discussed. 340 refs., 21 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. Electronic properties of linear carbon chains: Resolving the controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Backri, Amaal; Zólyomi, Viktor; Lambert, Colin J.

    2014-01-01

    Literature values for the energy gap of long one-dimensional carbon chains vary from as little as 0.2 eV to more than 4 eV. To resolve this discrepancy, we use the GW many-body approach to calculate the band gap E g of an infinite carbon chain. We also compute the energy dependence of the attenuation coefficient β governing the decay with chain length of the electrical conductance of long chains and compare this with recent experimental measurements of the single-molecule conductance of end-capped carbon chains. For long chains, we find E g = 2.16 eV and an upper bound for β of 0.21 Å −1

  19. Electrochemical pre anodization of glassy carbon electrode and application to determine chloramphenicol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truc, Nguyen Minh; Mortensen, John; Anh, Nguyen Ba Hoai

    2008-01-01

    This paper suggested a method to enhance the performance of carbon electrodes for the determination of chloramphenicol (CAP). The sensitivity and the reproducibility of the carbon electrodes could be enhanced easily by electrochemical pretreatment. Some kinds of carbon material were studied including glassy carbon, graphite carbon and pyrolytic carbon. Numerous kinds of supporting electrolyte have been tried. For glassy carbon electrode, the acidic solution, H 2 SO 4 5 mM, resulted in best performance at pretreated voltage of +2.1V (vs. Ag/ AgCl) in duration of 250 second. However, for graphite and pyrolytic carbon electrodes, the phosphate buffer solution pH 6.0 gave the best performance at +1.7V (vs. Ag/ AgCl) in duration of 20 seconds. The detection limit could be at very low concentration of CAP: 0.8 ng/ ml for glassy carbon electrode, 3.5 ng/ ml for graphite carbon electrode. The method was successful applied to aqua-agriculture water sample and milk sample with simple extraction as well as direct ointment sample analysis. (author)

  20. Composite supercapacitor electrodes made of activated carbon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    carbon/PEDOT:PSS and activated carbon/doped PEDOT. T S SONIA, P A MINI, ... polymeric anodes for organic photovoltaics, light-emitting diodes (Pingree et al ... looked upon are carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene and activated carbon.

  1. Local Agenda 21 is not a group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Birgitte

    1999-01-01

    The article is a critical overview of the Danish approach to Local Agenda 21. It states Local Agenda 21 as a tool for the process of change.......The article is a critical overview of the Danish approach to Local Agenda 21. It states Local Agenda 21 as a tool for the process of change....

  2. 28 CFR 21.3 - Aliens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aliens. 21.3 Section 21.3 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE WITNESS FEES § 21.3 Aliens. (a) Aliens entitled to payment of $30 per day. The following aliens are entitled to witness fees and allowances provided in § 21.4: (1) Aliens...

  3. Carbon Sequestered, Carbon Displaced and the Kyoto Context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marland, G.; Schlamadinger, B.

    1999-01-01

    The integrated system that embraces forest management, forest products, and land-use change impacts the global carbon cycle - and hence the net emission of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide - in four fundamental ways. Carbon is stored in living and dead biomass, carbon is stored in wood products and landfills, forest products substitute in the market place for products made from other materials, and forest harvests can be used wholly or partially to displace fossil fuels in the energy sector. Implementation of the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change would result in the creation of international markets for carbon dioxide emissions credits, but the current Kyoto text does not treat all carbon identically. We have developed a carbon accounting model, GORCAM, to examine a variety of scenarios for land management and the production of forest products. In this paper we explore, for two simple scenarios of forest management, the carbon flows that occur and how these might be accounted for under the Kyoto text. The Kyoto protocol raises questions about what activities can result in emissions credits, which carbon reservoirs will be counted, who will receive the credits, and how much credit will be available? The Kyoto Protocol would sometimes give credits for carbon sequestered, but it would always give credits when fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions are displaced

  4. Materiales. Numbers 21-23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materiales, 1997

    1997-01-01

    These three journals of contemporary cultural, historical, and social interest contain activities designed to enhance the awareness of students of Spanish as a foreign language regarding the entire panorama of daily life in Spain. Number 21 focuses on the role of modern Spanish women; their career status; female authors; and the changing place of…

  5. Synthesis of Heteroaromatic Compounds by Oxidative Aromatization Using an Activated Carbon/Molecular Oxygen System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiko Hayashi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A variety of heteroaromatic compounds, such as substituted pyridines, pyrazoles, indoles, 2-substituted imidazoles, 2-substituted imidazoles, 2-arylbenzazoles and pyrimidin-2(1H-ones are synthesized by oxidative aromatization using the activated carbon and molecular oxygen system. Mechanistic study focused on the role of activated carbon in the synthesis of 2-arylbenzazoles is also discussed. In the final section, we will disclose the efficient synthesis of substituted 9,10-anthracenes via oxidative aromatization.

  6. An ethical assessment of low carbon vehicles using cost benefit analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Thomopoulos, Nikolas; Harrison, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    Global concerns about climate change, as confirmed at COP21, have led to lower carbon emissions environmental policies, particularly in the road transport sector. Through an empirical analysis of low carbon vehicle (LCV) policies in California, this paper contrasts the findings from diverse distribution theories between income quintiles - used as a proxy for societal groups - to address vertical equity concerns and offer an overview of impact distribution to policy makers. Thus, it contribute...

  7. Erosion of soil organic carbon: implications for carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Oost, Kristof; Van Hemelryck, Hendrik; Harden, Jennifer W.; McPherson, B.J.; Sundquist, E.T.

    2009-01-01

    Agricultural activities have substantially increased rates of soil erosion and deposition, and these processes have a significant impact on carbon (C) mineralization and burial. Here, we present a synthesis of erosion effects on carbon dynamics and discuss the implications of soil erosion for carbon sequestration strategies. We demonstrate that for a range of data-based parameters from the literature, soil erosion results in increased C storage onto land, an effect that is heterogeneous on the landscape and is variable on various timescales. We argue that the magnitude of the erosion term and soil carbon residence time, both strongly influenced by soil management, largely control the strength of the erosion-induced sink. In order to evaluate fully the effects of soil management strategies that promote carbon sequestration, a full carbon account must be made that considers the impact of erosion-enhanced disequilibrium between carbon inputs and decomposition, including effects on net primary productivity and decomposition rates.

  8. Carbon composites composites with carbon fibers, nanofibers, and nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, Deborah D L

    2017-01-01

    Carbon Composites: Composites with Carbon Fibers, Nanofibers, and Nanotubes, Second Edition, provides the reader with information on a wide range of carbon fiber composites, including polymer-matrix, metal-matrix, carbon-matrix, ceramic-matrix and cement-matrix composites. In contrast to other books on composites, this work emphasizes materials rather than mechanics. This emphasis reflects the key role of materials science and engineering in the development of composite materials. The applications focus of the book covers both the developing range of structural applications for carbon fiber composites, including military and civil aircraft, automobiles and construction, and non-structural applications, including electromagnetic shielding, sensing/monitoring, vibration damping, energy storage, energy generation, and deicing. In addition to these new application areas, new material in this updated edition includes coverage of cement-matrix composites, carbon nanofibers, carbon matrix precursors, fiber surface ...

  9. Chemically modified carbon fibers and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermolenko, I.N.; Lyubliner, I.P.; Gulko, N.V.

    1990-01-01

    This book gives a comprehensive review about chemically modified carbon fibers (e.g. by incorporation of other elements) and is structured as follows: 1. Types of carbon fibers, 2. Structure of carbon fibers, 3. Properties of carbon fibers, 4. The cellulose carbonization process, 5. Formation of element-carbon fiber materials, 6. Surface modification of carbon fibers, and 7. Applications of carbon fibers (e.g. adsorbents, catalysts, constituents of composites). (MM)

  10. Carbon dioxide dangers demonstration model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venezky, Dina; Wessells, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is a dangerous volcanic gas. When carbon dioxide seeps from the ground, it normally mixes with the air and dissipates rapidly. However, because carbon dioxide gas is heavier than air, it can collect in snowbanks, depressions, and poorly ventilated enclosures posing a potential danger to people and other living things. In this experiment we show how carbon dioxide gas displaces oxygen as it collects in low-lying areas. When carbon dioxide, created by mixing vinegar and baking soda, is added to a bowl with candles of different heights, the flames are extinguished as if by magic.

  11. Elastic Moduli of Carbon Nanohorns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotube is a special case of carbon nanohorns or carbon nanocones with zero apex angle. Research into carbon nanohorns started almost at the same time as the discovery of nanotubes in 1991. Most researchers focused on the investigation of nanotubes, and the exploration of nanohorns attracted little attention. To model the carbon nanohorns, we make use of a more reliable second-generation reactive empirical bond-order potential by Brenner and coworkers. We investigate the elastic moduli and conclude that these nanohorns are equally strong and require in-depth investigation. The values of Young's and Shear moduli decrease with apex angle.

  12. Kinetics of absorption of carbon dioxide in aqueous amine and carbonate solutions with carbonic anhydrase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penders-van Elk, Nathalie J. M. C.; Hamborg, Espen S.; Huttenhuis, Patrick J. G.; Fradette, Sylvie; Carley, Jonathan A.; Versteeg, Geert F.

    In the present work the absorption of carbon dioxide in aqueous N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and aqueous sodium carbonate with and without carbonic anhydrase (CA) was studied in a stirred cell contactor in the temperature range 298-333 K. The CA was present as free enzyme and is compared to the

  13. Carbon a support for sulfide catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, J.P.R.; Lensing, T.J.; Mercx, F.P.M.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Prins, R.

    1983-01-01

    Two types of carbon materials, carbon black composite and carbon covered alumina, were studied for-their use as support for sulfide catalysts. The following parameters were varied: type of carbon black, carbon coverage of the alumina and carbon pretreatment. Pore size distributions were determined

  14. 21 cm cosmology in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Jonathan R; Loeb, Abraham

    2012-08-01

    Imaging the Universe during the first hundreds of millions of years remains one of the exciting challenges facing modern cosmology. Observations of the redshifted 21 cm line of atomic hydrogen offer the potential of opening a new window into this epoch. This will transform our understanding of the formation of the first stars and galaxies and of the thermal history of the Universe. A new generation of radio telescopes is being constructed for this purpose with the first results starting to trickle in. In this review, we detail the physics that governs the 21 cm signal and describe what might be learnt from upcoming observations. We also generalize our discussion to intensity mapping of other atomic and molecular lines.

  15. Carbon sequestration leadership forum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF) is an international climate change initiative that will focus on development of carbon capture and storage technologies as a means of accomplishing long-term stabilisation of greenhouse gas levels in the atmosphere. This initiative is designed to improve these technologies through coordinated research and development with international partners and private industry. Three types of cooperation are currently envisioned within the framework of the Forum: data gathering, information exchange, and joint projects. Data gathered from participating countries will be aggregated, summarised, and distributed to all of the Forum's participants. Joint projects will be identified by member nations with the Forum serving as a mechanism for bringing together government and private sector representatives from member countries. The article also reports the inaugural meeting which was held 23-25 June 2003 in Washington.

  16. Carbon Lorenz Curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groot, L. [Utrecht University, Utrecht School of Economics, Janskerkhof 12, 3512 BL Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2008-11-15

    The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, it exhibits that standard tools in the measurement of income inequality, such as the Lorenz curve and the Gini-index, can successfully be applied to the issues of inequality measurement of carbon emissions and the equity of abatement policies across countries. These tools allow policy-makers and the general public to grasp at a single glance the impact of conventional distribution rules such as equal caps or grandfathering, or more sophisticated ones, on the distribution of greenhouse gas emissions. Second, using the Samuelson rule for the optimal provision of a public good, the Pareto-optimal distribution of carbon emissions is compared with the distribution that follows if countries follow Nash-Cournot abatement strategies. It is shown that the Pareto-optimal distribution under the Samuelson rule can be approximated by the equal cap division, represented by the diagonal in the Lorenz curve diagram.

  17. Global Carbon Budget 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Quéré, Corinne; Andrew, Robbie M.; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Sitch, Stephen; Pongratz, Julia; Manning, Andrew C.; Korsbakken, Jan Ivar; Peters, Glen P.; Canadell, Josep G.; Jackson, Robert B.; Boden, Thomas A.; Tans, Pieter P.; Andrews, Oliver D.; Arora, Vivek K.; Bakker, Dorothee C. E.; Barbero, Leticia; Becker, Meike; Betts, Richard A.; Bopp, Laurent; Chevallier, Frédéric; Chini, Louise P.; Ciais, Philippe; Cosca, Catherine E.; Cross, Jessica; Currie, Kim; Gasser, Thomas; Harris, Ian; Hauck, Judith; Haverd, Vanessa; Houghton, Richard A.; Hunt, Christopher W.; Hurtt, George; Ilyina, Tatiana; Jain, Atul K.; Kato, Etsushi; Kautz, Markus; Keeling, Ralph F.; Klein Goldewijk, Kees; Körtzinger, Arne; Landschützer, Peter; Lefèvre, Nathalie; Lenton, Andrew; Lienert, Sebastian; Lima, Ivan; Lombardozzi, Danica; Metzl, Nicolas; Millero, Frank; Monteiro, Pedro M. S.; Munro, David R.; Nabel, Julia E. M. S.; Nakaoka, Shin-ichiro; Nojiri, Yukihiro; Padin, X. Antonio; Peregon, Anna; Pfeil, Benjamin; Pierrot, Denis; Poulter, Benjamin; Rehder, Gregor; Reimer, Janet; Rödenbeck, Christian; Schwinger, Jörg; Séférian, Roland; Skjelvan, Ingunn; Stocker, Benjamin D.; Tian, Hanqin; Tilbrook, Bronte; Tubiello, Francesco N.; van der Laan-Luijkx, Ingrid T.; van der Werf, Guido R.; van Heuven, Steven; Viovy, Nicolas; Vuichard, Nicolas; Walker, Anthony P.; Watson, Andrew J.; Wiltshire, Andrew J.; Zaehle, Sönke; Zhu, Dan

    2018-03-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere - the global carbon budget - is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we describe data sets and methodology to quantify the five major components of the global carbon budget and their uncertainties. CO2 emissions from fossil fuels and industry (EFF) are based on energy statistics and cement production data, respectively, while emissions from land-use change (ELUC), mainly deforestation, are based on land-cover change data and bookkeeping models. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration is measured directly and its rate of growth (GATM) is computed from the annual changes in concentration. The ocean CO2 sink (SOCEAN) and terrestrial CO2 sink (SLAND) are estimated with global process models constrained by observations. The resulting carbon budget imbalance (BIM), the difference between the estimated total emissions and the estimated changes in the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere, is a measure of imperfect data and understanding of the contemporary carbon cycle. All uncertainties are reported as ±1σ. For the last decade available (2007-2016), EFF was 9.4 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, ELUC 1.3 ± 0.7 GtC yr-1, GATM 4.7 ± 0.1 GtC yr-1, SOCEAN 2.4 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, and SLAND 3.0 ± 0.8 GtC yr-1, with a budget imbalance BIM of 0.6 GtC yr-1 indicating overestimated emissions and/or underestimated sinks. For year 2016 alone, the growth in EFF was approximately zero and emissions remained at 9.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1. Also for 2016, ELUC was 1.3 ± 0.7 GtC yr-1, GATM was 6.1 ± 0.2 GtC yr-1, SOCEAN was 2.6 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, and SLAND was 2.7 ± 1.0 GtC yr-1, with a small BIM of -0.3 GtC. GATM continued to be higher in 2016 compared to the past decade (2007-2016), reflecting in part the high fossil emissions and the small SLAND

  18. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we describe their structural and physical properties, functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility, and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers. PMID:26579509

  19. Magnetism in carbon nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Hagelberg, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Magnetism in carbon nanostructures is a rapidly expanding field of current materials science. Its progress is driven by the wide range of applications for magnetic carbon nanosystems, including transmission elements in spintronics, building blocks of cutting-edge nanobiotechnology, and qubits in quantum computing. These systems also provide novel paradigms for basic phenomena of quantum physics, and are thus of great interest for fundamental research. This comprehensive survey emphasizes both the fundamental nature of the field, and its groundbreaking nanotechnological applications, providing a one-stop reference for both the principles and the practice of this emerging area. With equal relevance to physics, chemistry, engineering and materials science, senior undergraduate and graduate students in any of these subjects, as well as all those interested in novel nanomaterials, will gain an in-depth understanding of the field from this concise and self-contained volume.

  20. Bacterium oxidizing carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kistner, A

    1953-01-01

    Present-day knowledge of the microbiological oxidation of carbon monoxide is based on doubtful observations and imperfect experimental procedures. By making use of shake cultures in contact with gas mixtures containing high concentrations of CO and by employing liquid enrichment media with a low content of organic matter and solid media of the same composition with not more than 1.2% agar, it proved possible to isolate a co-oxidizing bacterium of the genus hydrogenomonas from sewage sludge. For the first time irrefutable proof has been given of the oxidation of carbon monoxide by a pure culture of a bacterium, both in growing cultures and in resting cell suspensions. 12 references.

  1. Global Carbon Budget 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Le Quéré

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere – the global carbon budget – is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we describe data sets and methodology to quantify the five major components of the global carbon budget and their uncertainties. CO2 emissions from fossil fuels and industry (EFF are based on energy statistics and cement production data, respectively, while emissions from land-use change (ELUC, mainly deforestation, are based on land-cover change data and bookkeeping models. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration is measured directly and its rate of growth (GATM is computed from the annual changes in concentration. The ocean CO2 sink (SOCEAN and terrestrial CO2 sink (SLAND are estimated with global process models constrained by observations. The resulting carbon budget imbalance (BIM, the difference between the estimated total emissions and the estimated changes in the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere, is a measure of imperfect data and understanding of the contemporary carbon cycle. All uncertainties are reported as ±1σ. For the last decade available (2007–2016, EFF was 9.4 ± 0.5 GtC yr−1, ELUC 1.3 ± 0.7 GtC yr−1, GATM 4.7 ± 0.1 GtC yr−1, SOCEAN 2.4 ± 0.5 GtC yr−1, and SLAND 3.0 ± 0.8 GtC yr−1, with a budget imbalance BIM of 0.6 GtC yr−1 indicating overestimated emissions and/or underestimated sinks. For year 2016 alone, the growth in EFF was approximately zero and emissions remained at 9.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr−1. Also for 2016, ELUC was 1.3 ± 0.7 GtC yr−1, GATM was 6.1 ± 0.2 GtC yr−1, SOCEAN was 2.6 ± 0.5 GtC yr−1, and SLAND was 2.7 ± 1.0 GtC yr−1, with a small BIM of −0.3 GtC. GATM continued to be

  2. CARBON NEUTRON STAR ATMOSPHERES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suleimanov, V. F.; Klochkov, D.; Werner, K.; Pavlov, G. G.

    2014-01-01

    The accuracy of measuring the basic parameters of neutron stars is limited in particular by uncertainties in the chemical composition of their atmospheres. For example, the atmospheres of thermally emitting neutron stars in supernova remnants might have exotic chemical compositions, and for one of them, the neutron star in Cas A, a pure carbon atmosphere has recently been suggested by Ho and Heinke. To test this composition for other similar sources, a publicly available detailed grid of the carbon model atmosphere spectra is needed. We have computed this grid using the standard local thermodynamic equilibrium approximation and assuming that the magnetic field does not exceed 10 8  G. The opacities and pressure ionization effects are calculated using the Opacity Project approach. We describe the properties of our models and investigate the impact of the adopted assumptions and approximations on the emergent spectra

  3. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen-Mihaela eTilmaciu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  4. Spectrophotometry of carbon stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oganesyan, R.K.; Karapetyan, M.S.; Nersisyan, S.E.

    1986-01-01

    The results are given of the spectrophotometric investigation of 56 carbon stars in the spectral range from 4000 to 6800 A with resolution 3 A. The observed energy distributions of these stars are determined relative to the flux at the wavelength /sub 0/ = 5556; they are presented in the form of graphs. The energy distributions have been obtained for the first time for 35 stars. Variation in the line Ba II 4554 A has been found in the spectra of St Cam, UU Aur, and RV Mon. Large changes have taken place in the spectra of RT UMa and SS Vir. It is noted that the spectra of carbon stars have a depression, this being situated in different spectral regions for individual groups of stars.

  5. Taxing carbon in fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, Rob

    2000-01-01

    It is argued that both the Climate Change Levy and the fuel duty tax are outdated even before they are implemented. Apparently, the real problems are not in the bringing of road fuels into the scope of the Climate Change Levy but in introducing reforms to improve integration of greenhouse gases and taxation. Both fuel duty and the Levy are aimed at maximising efficiency and reducing air pollution. The system as it stands does not take into account the development of a market where the management and trading of carbon and greenhouse gases may jeopardise the competitiveness of UK businesses. It is argued that an overhaul of climate and emissions-related law is necessary. The paper is presented under the sub-headings of (i) a fixation on energy; (ii) no focus on CO 2 ; (iii) carbon markets - beyond the levy and (iv) tax structure. (UK)

  6. Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01

    conducted to ascertain the effects of changing pH showed that at pH values of 6.5 and 7.5, no significant differences existed in Tc-adsorption performance for three of the carbons, but the fourth carbon performed better at pH 7.5. When the pH was increased to 8.5, a slight decline in performance was observed for all carbons. Tests conducted to ascertain the temperature effect on Tc-99 adsorption indicated that at 21 ºC, 27 ºC, and 32 ºC there were no significant differences in Tc-99 adsorption for three of the carbons. The fourth carbon showed a noticeable decline in Tc-99 adsorption performance with increasing temperature. The presence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the source water did not significantly affect Tc-99 adsorption on either of two carbons tested. Technetium-99 adsorption differed by less than 15% with or without VOCs present in the test water, indicating that Tc-99 adsorption would not be significantly affected if VOCs were removed from the water prior to contact with carbon.

  7. Low carbon development. Key issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, Frauke; Nordensvaard, Johan (eds.)

    2013-03-07

    This comprehensive textbook addresses the interface between international development and climate change in a carbon constrained world. It discusses the key conceptual, empirical and policy-related issues of low carbon development and takes an international and interdisciplinary approach to the subject by drawing on insights from across the natural sciences and social sciences whilst embedding the discussion in a global context. The first part explores the concept of low carbon development and explains the need for low carbon development in a carbon constrained world. The book then discusses the key issues of socio-economic, political and technological nature for low carbon development, exploring topics such as the political economy, social justice, financing and carbon markets, and technologies and innovation for low carbon development. This is followed by key issues for low carbon development in policy and practice, which is presented based on cross-cutting issues such as low carbon energy, forestry, agriculture and transportation. Afterwards, practical case studies are discussed from low carbon development in low income countries in Africa, middle income countries in Asia and Latin America and high income countries in Europe and North America.

  8. Mexico and the 21st Century Power Partnership: Paving the Way to a Greener, Smarter, More Flexible Grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-05-01

    The 21st Century Power Partnership's program in Mexico (21CPP Mexico) is one initiative of the Clean Energy Ministerial carried out in cooperation with government and local stakeholders, drawing upon an international community of power system expertise.The overall goal of this program is to support Mexico's power system transformation by accelerating the transition to a reliable, financially robust, and low-carbon system.

  9. South Africa and the 21st Century Power Partnership: Paving the Way to a Clean, Reliable, and Resilient Power System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-05-01

    Established in 2012, the 21CPP South Africa Programme is a global initiative that connects South African stakeholders with an international community
    of expertise. The overall goal of this program is to support South Africa's power system transformation by accelerating the transition to a reliable, financially robust, and low-carbon power system. 21CPP activities focus on achieving positive outcomes for all participants, especially addressing critical questions and challenges facing system planners, regulators, and operators.

  10. A better carbon footprint label

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, John; Nielsen, Kristian S.

    2016-01-01

    , participants saw the original Carbon Trust label and in the other condition they saw the same label, but with traffic light colors added to communicate the product’s relative performance in terms of carbon footprint. All included attributes were found to have a significant impact on consumer choices....... As expected, price and carbon footprint were negatively related to choice. Further, participants preferred organic to non-organic coffee and certification by a public authority. The effect of the carbon label is significantly stronger the more environmentally concerned the consumer is. Using colors...... to indicate relative carbon footprint significantly increases carbon label effectiveness. Hence, a carbon footprint label is more effective if it uses traffic light colors to communicate the product’s relative performance....

  11. Nongovernmental valorization of carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, Gene; Viviani, Donn; Magrini-Bair, Kim; Kelley, Stephen; Moens, Luc; Shepherd, Phil; DuBois, Dan

    2005-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is considered the largest contributor to the greenhouse gas effect. Most attempts to manage the flow of CO 2 or carbon into our environment involve reducing net emissions or sequestering the gas into long-lived sinks. Using CO 2 as a chemical feedstock has a long history, but using it on scales that might impact the net emissions of CO 2 into the atmosphere has not generally been considered seriously. There is also a growing interest in employing our natural biomes of carbon such as trees, vegetation, and soils as storage media. Some amelioration of the net carbon emissions into the atmosphere could be achieved by concomitant large withdrawals of carbon. This report surveys the potential and limitations in employing carbon as a resource for organic chemicals, fuels, inorganic materials, and in using the biome to manage carbon. The outlook for each of these opportunities is also described

  12. Are carbon credits effective?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2010-01-01

    Is it possible to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by assigning a value to CO 2 ? That's the concept behind carbon credits. Their advantage: they set targets but let companies decide how to meet them. Of all the processes that can be used to reduce air pollution, the cap and trade system is the best way to meet global targets on a national or continental scale. The system's efficiency is based on setting a ceiling for emissions: this is the cap. The emissions quotas are negotiable goods that can be traded on a market: this is the 'trade'. No company can exceed its quotas, but it can choose how to meet them: decreasing its emissions by changing its production processes, buying carbon credits sold by companies that have exceeded their targets, or using clean development mechanisms. For a carbon credit system to function correctly on an economic level, it's essential to meet one condition: don't allocate too many emissions quotas to the companies involved. If they receive too many quotas, it's not hard for them to meet their objectives without changing their production processes. The supply of carbon credits currently exceeds demand. The price per ton of CO 2 is collapsing, and companies that have exceeded their targets are not rewarded for their efforts. Efficient though it may be, the cap and trade system cannot be the only way to fight CO 2 emissions. In Europe, it presently covers 40% of the CO 2 emissions by targeting utilities and industries that consume the most fossil fuels. But it cannot be extended to some sectors where pollution is diffuse. In transportation, for example, it's not possible to impose such a requirement. For that sector, as well as for the building sector, a suitable system of taxes might be effective and incentive

  13. Carbonate fuel cell matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooque, Mohammad; Yuh, Chao-Yi

    1996-01-01

    A carbonate fuel cell matrix comprising support particles and crack attenuator particles which are made platelet in shape to increase the resistance of the matrix to through cracking. Also disclosed is a matrix having porous crack attenuator particles and a matrix whose crack attenuator particles have a thermal coefficient of expansion which is significantly different from that of the support particles, and a method of making platelet-shaped crack attenuator particles.

  14. Carbon nanotube plane fastener

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Hirahara

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a feature of carbon nanotubes (CNTs that arises when the surfaces of two vertically-aligned CNT brushes are pressed together. Adhesion between the CNTs creates a plane fastener-like device. Observations from scanning electron microscopy and measurements of adhesion properties indicate a device-dependence on CNT density and shape near the tip region. Among other applications, such fasteners have the potential to attach small components onto micron-sized electronic devices.

  15. Methanation of Carbon Dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    Goodman, Daniel Jacob

    2013-01-01

    The emission of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere has been linked to global warming. Carbon dioxide's (CO2) one of the most abundant greenhouse gases. Natural gas, mainly methane, is the cleanest fossil fuel for electricity production helping meet the United States ever growing energy needs. The methanation of CO2 has the potential to address both of these problems if a catalyst can be developed that meets the activity, economic and environmental requirements to industrialize the process. ...

  16. Carbon Nanotube Supercapacitors

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Wen; Dai, Liming

    2010-01-01

    In summary, CNTs have been explored as a new type of electrode materials for supercapacitors. Both randomly entangled and highly aligned CNTs have been investigated. The former is relatively easier to fabricate while the latter has a better capacitor performance. Combining the unique properties of CNTs with the high surface area of activated carbons or the additional pseduocapacitance of redox materials (electroactive polymers and metal oxides), high-capacitance and high-rate nanocomposites a...

  17. Accounting for carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Lovell, Heather; Sales de Aguiar, Thereza; Bebbington, Jan; Larrinaga-Gonzalez, Carlos; International Emissions Trading Association

    2010-01-01

    ACCA working in partnership with IETA This report reveals how large emitters in the European Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS) are accounting for emission allowances. The diversity of emission-allowance accounting practices being used in Europe shows carbon financial accounting to be in its formative stages - rules and practices are still unsettled. With this report, ACCA, in partnership with IETA, is opening up the debate to a wider international audience. Publisher PDF

  18. CARBON DIOXIDE FIXATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FUJITA,E.

    2000-01-12

    Solar carbon dioxide fixation offers the possibility of a renewable source of chemicals and fuels in the future. Its realization rests on future advances in the efficiency of solar energy collection and development of suitable catalysts for CO{sub 2} conversion. Recent achievements in the efficiency of solar energy conversion and in catalysis suggest that this approach holds a great deal of promise for contributing to future needs for fuels and chemicals.

  19. Carbon nanotube network varactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generalov, A A; Anoshkin, I V; Lioubtchenko, D V; Räisänen, A V; Erdmanis, M; Ovchinnikov, V; Nasibulin, A G

    2015-01-01

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) varactors based on a freestanding layer of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films were designed, fabricated and tested. The freestanding SWCNT film was employed as a movable upper patch in the parallel plate capacitor of the MEMS. The measurements of the SWCNT varactors show very high tunability, nearly 100%, of the capacitance with a low actuation voltage of 10 V. The functionality of the varactor is improved by implementing a flexible nanocellulose aerogel filling. (paper)

  20. Carbonizing bituminous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1924-03-11

    A process for carbonizing bituminous materials, like mineral coal, brown coal, oil shale, and the like, by means of hot gass is characterized in that, these (gases) flush through the feed in the temperature-state above 450/sup 0/C, while below 450/sup 0/C they are led past the feed and act on it by heat conductivity, convection, and gas radiation or only by heat conduction.

  1. Selective and Scalable Chemical Removal of Thin Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes from their Mixtures with Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Komínková, Zuzana; Valeš, Václav; Kalbáč, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 45 (2015), s. 16147 ISSN 1521-3765 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : carbon nanotubes * electrochemical doping * in-situ Raman spectroelectrochemistry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry

  2. Carbon market emerges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hordern, N.

    2001-01-01

    Last November COP6, the UN climate change conference in The Hague, failed to agree on the rules of the Kyoto Protocol, the treaty limiting developed countries' emissions of greenhouse gases ('carbon'). Many in the Australian resource and energy sector were relieved that COP6 was inconclusive. As Industry Minister Senator Nick Minchin put it: 'Better no outcome than a bad outcome.' However, the financial services sector -potentially a major beneficiary of the international carbon it hoped COP6 would endorse -received a setback. Apparently not for long. Only months later, a nascent Australian carbon trading market seems to be emerging by stealth, irrespective of COP6's fortunes. This poses both opportunities and costs for the resources and energy sectors. Whoever succeeds in influencing the design of a trading scheme, 'pilot' or not, will have a box seat when - not if - a 'mandatory' emissions trading scheme is introduced. Government policy is that there will be no mandatory emissions trading scheme until the establishment of a UN endorsed international market requires one of Australia. This, in turn, depends upon the conclusion of the negotiations that stalled in The Hague. COP6 is set to resume in Germany, probably in July

  3. Carbon-14 Graphitization Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James; Collon, Philippe; Laverne, Jay

    2014-09-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is a process that allows for the analysis of mass of certain materials. It is a powerful process because it results in the ability to separate rare isotopes with very low abundances from a large background, which was previously impossible. Another advantage of AMS is that it only requires very small amounts of material for measurements. An important application of this process is radiocarbon dating because the rare 14C isotopes can be separated from the stable 14N background that is 10 to 13 orders of magnitude larger, and only small amounts of the old and fragile organic samples are necessary for measurement. Our group focuses on this radiocarbon dating through AMS. When performing AMS, the sample needs to be loaded into a cathode at the back of an ion source in order to produce a beam from the material to be analyzed. For carbon samples, the material must first be converted into graphite in order to be loaded into the cathode. My role in the group is to convert the organic substances into graphite. In order to graphitize the samples, a sample is first combusted to form carbon dioxide gas and then purified and reduced into the graphite form. After a couple weeks of research and with the help of various Physics professors, I developed a plan and began to construct the setup necessary to perform the graphitization. Once the apparatus is fully completed, the carbon samples will be graphitized and loaded into the AMS machine for analysis.

  4. Optional carbon capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alderson, T.; Scott, S.; Griffiths, J. [Jacobs Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01

    In the case of IGCC power plants, carbon capture can be carried out before combustion. The carbon monoxide in the syngas is catalytically shifted to carbon dioxide and then captured in a standard gas absorption system. However, the insertion of a shift converter into an existing IGCC plant with no shift would mean a near total rebuild of the gasification waste heat recovery, gas treatment system and HRSG, with only the gasifier and gas turbine retaining most of their original features. To reduce the extent, cost and time taken for the revamping, the original plant could incorporate the shift, and the plant would then be operated without capture to advantage, and converted to capture mode of operation when commercially appropriate. This paper examines this concept of placing a shift converter into an IGCC plant before capture is required, and operating the same plant first without and then later with CO{sub 2} capture in a European context. The advantages and disadvantages of this 'capture ready' option are discussed. 6 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Hydropower's Biogenic Carbon Footprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Laura; Pfister, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Global warming is accelerating and the world urgently needs a shift to clean and renewable energy. Hydropower is currently the largest renewable source of electricity, but its contribution to climate change mitigation is not yet fully understood. Hydroelectric reservoirs are a source of biogenic greenhouse gases and in individual cases can reach the same emission rates as thermal power plants. Little is known about the severity of their emissions at the global scale. Here we show that the carbon footprint of hydropower is far higher than previously assumed, with a global average of 173 kg CO2 and 2.95 kg CH4 emitted per MWh of electricity produced. This results in a combined average carbon footprint of 273 kg CO2e/MWh when using the global warming potential over a time horizon of 100 years (GWP100). Nonetheless, this is still below that of fossil energy sources without the use of carbon capture and sequestration technologies. We identified the dams most promising for capturing methane for use as alternative energy source. The spread among the ~1500 hydropower plants analysed in this study is large and highlights the importance of case-by-case examinations.

  6. Securing tropical forest carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scharlemann, Jörn P. W.; Kapos, Valerie; Campbell, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Forest loss and degradation in the tropics contribute 6-17% of all greenhouse gas emissions. Protected areas cover 217.2 million ha (19.6%) of the world's humid tropical forests and contain c. 70.3 petagrams of carbon (Pg C) in biomass and soil to 1 m depth. Between 2000 and 2005, we estimate...... that 1.75 million ha of forest were lost from protected areas in humid tropical forests, causing the emission of 0.25-0.33 Pg C. Protected areas lost about half as much carbon as the same area of unprotected forest. We estimate that the reduction of these carbon emissions from ongoing deforestation...... in protected sites in humid tropical forests could be valued at USD 6,200-7,400 million depending on the land use after clearance. This is >1.5 times the estimated spending on protected area management in these regions. Improving management of protected areas to retain forest cover better may be an important...

  7. Hydropower's Biogenic Carbon Footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Global warming is accelerating and the world urgently needs a shift to clean and renewable energy. Hydropower is currently the largest renewable source of electricity, but its contribution to climate change mitigation is not yet fully understood. Hydroelectric reservoirs are a source of biogenic greenhouse gases and in individual cases can reach the same emission rates as thermal power plants. Little is known about the severity of their emissions at the global scale. Here we show that the carbon footprint of hydropower is far higher than previously assumed, with a global average of 173 kg CO2 and 2.95 kg CH4 emitted per MWh of electricity produced. This results in a combined average carbon footprint of 273 kg CO2e/MWh when using the global warming potential over a time horizon of 100 years (GWP100). Nonetheless, this is still below that of fossil energy sources without the use of carbon capture and sequestration technologies. We identified the dams most promising for capturing methane for use as alternative energy source. The spread among the ~1500 hydropower plants analysed in this study is large and highlights the importance of case-by-case examinations. PMID:27626943

  8. Carbon Structure Hazard Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Tommy; Greene, Ben; Porter, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Carbon composite structures are widely used in virtually all advanced technology industries for a multitude of applications. The high strength-to-weight ratio and resistance to aggressive service environments make them highly desirable. Automotive, aerospace, and petroleum industries extensively use, and will continue to use, this enabling technology. As a result of this broad range of use, field and test personnel are increasingly exposed to hazards associated with these structures. No single published document exists to address the hazards and make recommendations for the hazard controls required for the different exposure possibilities from damaged structures including airborne fibers, fly, and dust. The potential for personnel exposure varies depending on the application or manipulation of the structure. The effect of exposure to carbon hazards is not limited to personnel, protection of electronics and mechanical equipment must be considered as well. The various exposure opportunities defined in this document include pre-manufacturing fly and dust, the cured structure, manufacturing/machining, post-event cleanup, and post-event test and/or evaluation. Hazard control is defined as it is applicable or applied for the specific exposure opportunity. The carbon exposure hazard includes fly, dust, fiber (cured/uncured), and matrix vapor/thermal decomposition products. By using the recommendations in this document, a high level of confidence can be assured for the protection of personnel and equipment.

  9. Carbon taxes and India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher-Vanden, K.A.; Pitcher, H.M.; Edmonds, J.A.; Kim, S.H.; Shukla, P.R.

    1994-07-01

    Using the Indian module of the Second Generation Model 9SGM, we explore a reference case and three scenarios in which greenhouse gas emissions were controlled. Two alternative policy instruments (carbon taxes and tradable permits) were analyzed to determine comparative costs of stabilizing emissions at (1) 1990 levels (the 1 X case), (2) two times the 1990 levels (the 2X case), and (3) three times the 1990 levels (the 3X case). The analysis takes into account India's rapidly growing population and the abundance of coal and biomass relative to other fuels. We also explore the impacts of a global tradable permits market to stabilize global carbon emissions on the Indian economy under the following two emissions allowance allocation methods: (1) open-quotes Grandfathered emissionsclose quotes: emissions allowances are allocated based on 1990 emissions. (2) open-quotes Equal per capita emissionsclose quotes: emissions allowances are allocated based on share of global population. Tradable permits represent a lower cost method to stabilize Indian emissions than carbon taxes, i.e., global action would benefit India more than independent actions

  10. Carbon K-edge spectra of carbonate minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandes, Jay A; Wirick, Sue; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-09-01

    Carbon K-edge X-ray spectroscopy has been applied to the study of a wide range of organic samples, from polymers and coals to interstellar dust particles. Identification of carbonaceous materials within these samples is accomplished by the pattern of resonances in the 280-320 eV energy region. Carbonate minerals are often encountered in the study of natural samples, and have been identified by a distinctive resonance at 290.3 eV. Here C K-edge and Ca L-edge spectra from a range of carbonate minerals are presented. Although all carbonates exhibit a sharp 290 eV resonance, both the precise position of this resonance and the positions of other resonances vary among minerals. The relative strengths of the different carbonate resonances also vary with crystal orientation to the linearly polarized X-ray beam. Intriguingly, several carbonate minerals also exhibit a strong 288.6 eV resonance, consistent with the position of a carbonyl resonance rather than carbonate. Calcite and aragonite, although indistinguishable spectrally at the C K-edge, exhibited significantly different spectra at the Ca L-edge. The distinctive spectral fingerprints of carbonates provide an identification tool, allowing for the examination of such processes as carbon sequestration in minerals, Mn substitution in marine calcium carbonates (dolomitization) and serpentinization of basalts.

  11. Carbon K-edge Spectra of Carbonate Minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandes, J.; Wirick, S; Jacobsen, C

    2010-01-01

    Carbon K-edge X-ray spectroscopy has been applied to the study of a wide range of organic samples, from polymers and coals to interstellar dust particles. Identification of carbonaceous materials within these samples is accomplished by the pattern of resonances in the 280-320 eV energy region. Carbonate minerals are often encountered in the study of natural samples, and have been identified by a distinctive resonance at 290.3 eV. Here C K-edge and Ca L-edge spectra from a range of carbonate minerals are presented. Although all carbonates exhibit a sharp 290 eV resonance, both the precise position of this resonance and the positions of other resonances vary among minerals. The relative strengths of the different carbonate resonances also vary with crystal orientation to the linearly polarized X-ray beam. Intriguingly, several carbonate minerals also exhibit a strong 288.6 eV resonance, consistent with the position of a carbonyl resonance rather than carbonate. Calcite and aragonite, although indistinguishable spectrally at the C K-edge, exhibited significantly different spectra at the Ca L-edge. The distinctive spectral fingerprints of carbonates provide an identification tool, allowing for the examination of such processes as carbon sequestration in minerals, Mn substitution in marine calcium carbonates (dolomitization) and serpentinization of basalts.

  12. Hybrid Composites Based on Carbon Fiber/Carbon Nanofilament Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Tehrani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanofilament and nanotubes (CNTs have shown promise for enhancing the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced composites (FRPs and imparting multi-functionalities to them. While direct mixing of carbon nanofilaments with the polymer matrix in FRPs has several drawbacks, a high volume of uniform nanofilaments can be directly grown on fiber surfaces prior to composite fabrication. This study demonstrates the ability to create carbon nanofilaments on the surface of carbon fibers employing a synthesis method, graphitic structures by design (GSD, in which carbon structures are grown from fuel mixtures using nickel particles as the catalyst. The synthesis technique is proven feasible to grow nanofilament structures—from ethylene mixtures at 550 °C—on commercial polyacrylonitrile (PAN-based carbon fibers. Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy were employed to characterize the surface-grown carbon species. For comparison purposes, a catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD technique was also utilized to grow multiwall CNTs (MWCNTs on carbon fiber yarns. The mechanical characterization showed that composites using the GSD-grown carbon nanofilaments outperform those using the CCVD-grown CNTs in terms of stiffness and tensile strength. The results suggest that further optimization of the GSD growth time, patterning and thermal shield coating of the carbon fibers is required to fully materialize the potential benefits of the GSD technique.

  13. Hydrogenation of carbon to methane in reduced sponge iron, chromium, and ferrochromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qayyum, M A; Reeve, D A

    1976-01-01

    Hydrogenation of excess carbon to methane in reduced sponge iron, chromium and ferrochromium under isothermal and temperature-programmed conditions indicates that it is possible to control the residual carbon content of the metallized products which may be an advantage if further processing of the products is contemplated. Hydrogenation starts above 800/sup 0/C and a shrinking-core kinetic model fits the experimental data. The mean apparent activation energy for the hydrogenation of residual carbon to methane in sponge iron, chromium and ferrochromium is 21 kcal/mole.

  14. Reduction of single-walled carbon nanotube diameter to sub-nm via feedstock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurakitseree, T.; Zhao, Pei; Chiashi, Shohei; Maruyama, Shigeo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tokyo (Japan); Kramberger, Christian [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna (Austria); Einarsson, Erik [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tokyo (Japan); Global Center of Excellence for Mechanical Systems Innovation, University of Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    Vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube arrays were synthesized from dip-coated binary Co/Mo catalyst by no-flow chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from either pure ethanol or acetonitrile as carbon feedstock. By changing to acetonitrile the mean diameter was reduced from 2.1 nm to less than 1.0 nm despite using identically prepared catalyst. The demonstrated diameter control on flat substrates is a versatile approach towards the direct synthesis of tailored single-walled carbon nanotubes. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Soil Organic Carbon Fractions and Stocks Respond to Restoration Measures in Degraded Lands by Water Erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Xiaodong; Li, Zhongwu; Huang, Jinquan; Huang, Bin; Xiao, Haibing; Zeng, Guangming

    2017-05-01

    Assessing the degree to which degraded soils can be recovered is essential for evaluating the effects of adopted restoration measures. The objective of this study was to determine the restoration of soil organic carbon under the impact of terracing and reforestation. A small watershed with four typical restored plots (terracing and reforestation (four different local plants)) and two reference plots (slope land with natural forest (carbon-depleted) and abandoned depositional land (carbon-enriched)) in subtropical China was studied. The results showed that soil organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon concentrations in the surface soil (10 cm) of restored lands were close to that in abandoned depositional land and higher than that in natural forest land. There was no significant difference in soil organic carbon content among different topographic positions of the restored lands. Furthermore, the soil organic carbon stocks in the upper 60 cm soils of restored lands, which were varied between 50.08 and 62.21 Mg C ha -1 , were higher than 45.90 Mg C ha -1 in natural forest land. Our results indicated that the terracing and reforestation could greatly increase carbon sequestration and accumulation and decrease carbon loss induced by water erosion. And the combination measures can accelerate the restoration of degraded soils when compared to natural forest only. Forest species almost have no impact on the total amount of soil organic carbon during restoration processes, but can significantly influence the activity and stability of soil organic carbon. Combination measures which can provide suitable topography and continuous soil organic carbon supply could be considered in treating degraded soils caused by water erosion.

  16. Soil Organic Carbon Fractions and Stocks Respond to Restoration Measures in Degraded Lands by Water Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Xiaodong; Li, Zhongwu; Huang, Jinquan; Huang, Bin; Xiao, Haibing; Zeng, Guangming

    2017-05-01

    Assessing the degree to which degraded soils can be recovered is essential for evaluating the effects of adopted restoration measures. The objective of this study was to determine the restoration of soil organic carbon under the impact of terracing and reforestation. A small watershed with four typical restored plots (terracing and reforestation (four different local plants)) and two reference plots (slope land with natural forest (carbon-depleted) and abandoned depositional land (carbon-enriched)) in subtropical China was studied. The results showed that soil organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon concentrations in the surface soil (10 cm) of restored lands were close to that in abandoned depositional land and higher than that in natural forest land. There was no significant difference in soil organic carbon content among different topographic positions of the restored lands. Furthermore, the soil organic carbon stocks in the upper 60 cm soils of restored lands, which were varied between 50.08 and 62.21 Mg C ha-1, were higher than 45.90 Mg C ha-1 in natural forest land. Our results indicated that the terracing and reforestation could greatly increase carbon sequestration and accumulation and decrease carbon loss induced by water erosion. And the combination measures can accelerate the restoration of degraded soils when compared to natural forest only. Forest species almost have no impact on the total amount of soil organic carbon during restoration processes, but can significantly influence the activity and stability of soil organic carbon. Combination measures which can provide suitable topography and continuous soil organic carbon supply could be considered in treating degraded soils caused by water erosion.

  17. Influence of chemical structure on carbon isotope composition of lignite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdenetsogt, Bat-Orshikh; Lee, Insung; Ko, Yoon-Joo; Mungunchimeg, Batsaikhan

    2017-04-01

    During the last two decades, a number of studies on carbon isotopes in terrestrial organic matter (OM) have been carried out and used to determine changes in paleoatmospheric δ13C value as well as assisting in paleoclimate analysis. Coal is abundant terrestrial OM. However, application of its δ13C value is very limited, because the understanding of changes in isotopic composition during coalification is relatively insufficient. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of the chemical structure on the carbon isotope composition of lignite. Generally, lignite has more complex chemical structures than other higher rank coal because of the existence of various types of oxygen-containing functional groups that are eliminated at higher rank level. A total of sixteen Lower Cretaceous lignite samples from Baganuur mine (Mongolia) were studied by ultimate, stable carbon isotope and solid-state 13C CP/MAS NMR analyses. The carbon contents of the samples increase with increase in depth, whereas oxygen content decreases continuously. This is undoubtedly due to normal coalification process and also consistent with solid state NMR results. The δ13C values of the samples range from -23.54‰ to -21.34‰ and are enriched in 13C towards the lowermost samples. Based on the deconvolution of the NMR spectra, the ratios between carbons bonded to oxygen (60-90 ppm and 135-220 ppm) over carbons bonded to carbon and hydrogen (0-50 ppm and 90-135 ppm) were calculated for the samples. These correlate well with δ13C values (R2 0.88). The results indicate that the δ13C values of lignite are controlled by two mechanisms: (i) depletion in 13C as a result of loss of isotopically heavy oxygen-bounded carbons and (ii) enrichment in 13C caused by a loss of isotopically light methane from aliphatic and aromatic carbons. At the rank of lignite, coal is enriched in 13C because the amount of isotopically heavy CO2 and CO, released from coal as a result of changes in the chemical

  18. ICP-AES determination of trace elements in carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, Arijit; Rajeswari, B.; Kadam, R.M.; Babu, Y.; Godbole, S.V.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Carbon steel, a combination of the elements iron and carbon, can be classified into four types as mild, medium, high and very high depending on the carbon content which varies from 0.05% to 2.1%. Carbon steel of different types finds application in medical devices, razor blades, cutlery and spring. In the nuclear industry, it is used in feeder pipes in the reactor. A strict quality control measure is required to monitor the trace elements, which have deleterious effects on the mechanical properties of the carbon steel. Thus, it becomes imperative to check the purity of carbon steel as a quality control measure before it is used in feeder pipes in the reactor. Several methods have been reported in literature for trace elemental determination in high purity iron. Some of these include neutron activation analysis, atomic absorption spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) is widely recognized as a sensitive technique for the determination of trace elements in various matrices, its major advantages being good accuracy and precision, high sensitivity, multi-element capability, large linear dynamic range and relative freedom from matrix effects. The present study mainly deals with the direct determination of trace elements in carbon steel using ICP-AES. An axially viewing ICP spectrometer having a polychromator with 35 fixed analytical channels and limited sequential facility to select any analytical line within 2.2 nm of a polychromator line was used in these studies. Iron, which forms one of the main constituents of carbon steel, has a multi electronic configuration with line rich emission spectrum and, therefore, tends to interfere in the determination of trace impurities in carbon steel matrix. Spectral interference in ICP-AES can be seriously detrimental to the accuracy and reliability of trace element determinations, particularly when they are performed in the presence of high

  19. The effects of neutron irradiation on the structure of carbon-carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.; Eatherly, W.P.; Hollenberg, G. W.; Slagle, O.D.; Watson, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper irradiation behavior of carbon fibers and carbon-carbon composites are discussed in terms on simple microstructural models. Previous data are discussed in terms of these models. New data are presented for the irradiation-induced dimensional changes of selected carbon-carbon composites. The influence of fiber precursor on carbon- carbon irradiation performance is discussed

  20. Carbon sequestration in agricultural soils: a potential carbon trading opportunity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowie, Annette L.; Murphy, Brian; Rawson, Andrew; Wilson, Brian; Singh, Bhupinderpal; Young, Rick; Grange, Ian

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Emissions trading schemes emerging in Australia and internationally create a market mechanism by which release of greenhouse gases incurs a cost, and implementation of abatement measures generates a financial return. There is growing interest amongst Australian landholders in emissions trading based on sequestration of carbon in soil through modified land management practices. Intensively cropped soils have low carbon content, due to disturbance, erosion and regular periods of minimal organic matter input. Because cropping soils in Australia have lost a substantial amount of carbon there is significant potential to increase carbon stocks through improved land management practices. Evidence from long term trials and modelling indicates that modified cropping practices (direct drilling, stubble retention, controlled traffic) have limited impact on soil carbon (0 to +2 tC02e ha-' year1) whereas conversion from cropping to pasture gives greater increases. Small-increases in soil carbon over large areas can contribute significantly to mitigation of Australia's greenhouse gas emissions. Furthermore, increase in soil organic matter will improve soil health, fertility and resilience. However, the inclusion of soil carbon offsets in an emissions trading scheme cannot occur until several barriers are overcome. The first relates to credibility. Quantification of the extent to which specific land management practices can sequester carbon in different environments will provide the basis for promotion of the concept. Current research across Australia is addressing this need. Secondly, cost-effective and accepted methods of estimating soil carbon change must be available. Monitoring soil carbon to document change on a project scale is not viable due to the enormous variability in carbon stocks on micro and macro scales. Instead estimation of soil carbon change could be undertaken through a combination of baseline measurement to assess the vulnerability of soil carbon

  1. Limits on carbon sequestration in arid blue carbon ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schile, Lisa M; Kauffman, J Boone; Crooks, Stephen; Fourqurean, James W; Glavan, Jane; Megonigal, J Patrick

    2017-04-01

    Coastal ecosystems produce and sequester significant amounts of carbon ("blue carbon"), which has been well documented in humid and semi-humid regions of temperate and tropical climates but less so in arid regions where mangroves, marshes, and seagrasses exist near the limit of their tolerance for extreme temperature and salinity. To better understand these unique systems, we measured whole-ecosystem carbon stocks in 58 sites across the United Arab Emirates (UAE) in natural and planted mangroves, salt marshes, seagrass beds, microbial mats, and coastal sabkha (inter- and supratidal unvegetated salt flats). Natural mangroves held significantly more carbon in above- and belowground biomass than other vegetated ecosystems. Planted mangrove carbon stocks increased with age, but there were large differences for sites of similar age. Soil carbon varied widely across sites (2-367 Mg C/ha), with ecosystem averages that ranged from 49 to 156 Mg C/ha. For the first time, microbial mats were documented to contain soil carbon pools comparable to vascular plant-dominated ecosystems, and could arguably be recognized as a unique blue carbon ecosystem. Total ecosystem carbon stocks ranged widely from 2 to 515 Mg C/ha (seagrass bed and mangrove, respectively). Seagrass beds had the lowest carbon stock per unit area, but the largest stock per total area due to their large spatial coverage. Compared to similar ecosystems globally, mangroves and marshes in the UAE have lower plant and soil carbon stocks; however, the difference in soil stocks is far larger than with plant stocks. This incongruent difference between stocks is likely due to poor carbon preservation under conditions of weakly reduced soils (200-350 mV), coarse-grained sediments, and active shoreline migration. This work represents the first attempt to produce a country-wide coastal ecosystem carbon accounting using a uniform sampling protocol, and was motivated by specific policy goals identified by the Abu Dhabi Global

  2. 21 reports of future industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-02-01

    This book deals with 21 reports on future industry, which contain revolution of digital educations, genetic engineering, the newest medical device, environmental industry, artificial intelligence, virtual reality, bio-green revolution, energy of the future, advanced concept computer, e-commerce, digital cash, game industry, information technology for future, next DRAM, information protection industry, robot to replace manpower, medium for information display, navigation systems, a space development, design industry and, home automation.

  3. Agenda 21 interim balance, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Vuuren, D.P.; Bakkes, J.A.

    1997-10-01

    Five years after the `United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED)`, an interim balance was drawn up to see what was done to meet the ambitious challenges adopted in Agenda 21 during this conference. Such a balance is presented in this report and the complementary brochure, `Developments in Sustainability 1992-1997`, reflecting societal developments and changes in environmental quality, as well as changes in responses to environmental concerns. 24 figs., 12 tabs., 68 refs.

  4. 21st Century Security Manager

    OpenAIRE

    Stelian ARION

    2010-01-01

    We live in world of uncertainty that generates major paradigms changing that affect security risk management. Modern organization’s security risks management can’t be done without a profound knowlegde and daily practice for security governance, security risk management and resilience. 21st Century security manager need to deal with several areas of konwledge in order to succesfully manage security risks. The document presents the advantages, disadvantages and challenges for security managers ...

  5. Magneto-carbonization method for production of carbon fiber, and high performance carbon fibers made thereby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naskar, Amit K.; Ozcan, Soydan; Eberle, Claude C.; Abdallah, Mohamed Gabr; Mackiewicz, Ludtka Gail; Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Paulauskas, Felix Leonard; Rivard, John Daniel Kennedy

    2017-08-08

    Method for the preparation of carbon fiber from fiber precursor, wherein the fiber precursor is subjected to a magnetic field of at least 3 Tesla during a carbonization process. The carbonization process is generally conducted at a temperature of at least 400.degree. C. and less than 2200.degree. C., wherein, in particular embodiments, the carbonization process includes a low temperature carbonization step conducted at a temperature of at least or above 400.degree. C. or 500.degree. C. and less than or up to 1000.degree. C., 1100.degree. C., or 1200.degree. C., followed by a high temperature carbonization step conducted at a temperature of at least or above 1200.degree. C. In particular embodiments, particularly in the case of a polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fiber precursor, the resulting carbon fiber may possess a minimum tensile strength of at least 600 ksi, a tensile modulus of at least 30 Msi, and an ultimate elongation of at least 1.5%.

  6. Oxidative Attack of Carbon/Carbon Substrates through Coating Pinholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Leonhardt, Todd; Curry, Donald; Rapp, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    A critical issue with oxidation protected carbon/carbon composites used for spacecraft thermal protection is the formation of coating pinholes. In laboratory experiments, artificial pinholes were drilled through SiC-coatings on a carbon/carbon material and the material was oxidized at 600, 1000, and 1400 C at reduced pressures of air. The attack of the carbon/carbon was quantified by both weight loss and a novel cross-sectioning technique. A two-zone, one dimensional diffusion control model was adapted to analyze this problem. Agreement of the model with experiment was reasonable at 1000 and 1400 C; however results at lower temperatures show clear deviations from the theory suggesting that surface reaction control plays a role.

  7. Isopycnal mixing by mesoscale eddies significantly impacts oceanic anthropogenic carbon uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanadesikan, Anand; Pradal, Marie-Aude; Abernathey, Ryan

    2015-06-01

    Anthropogenic carbon dioxide uptake varies across Earth System Models for reasons that have remained obscure. When varied within a single model, the lateral eddy mixing coefficient ARedi produces a range of uptake similar to the modeled range. The highest uptake, resulting from a simulation with a constant ARedi of 2400 m2/s, simulates 15% more historical carbon uptake than a model with ARedi = 400 m2/s. A sudden doubling in carbon dioxide produces a 21% range in carbon uptake across the models. Two spatially dependent representations of ARedi produce uptake that lies in the middle of the range of constant values despite predicting very large values in the subtropical gyres. One-dimensional diffusive models of the type used for integrated assessments can be fit to the simulations, with ARedi accounting for a substantial fraction of the effective vertical diffusion. Such models, however, mask significant regional changes in stratification and biological carbon storage.

  8. Analysis of the Interaction of Pulsed Laser with Nanoporous Activated Carbon Cloth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.V. Kalucljerovic; M.S. Trtica; B.B. Radak; J.M. Stasic; S.S. Krstic Musovic; V.M. Dodevski

    2011-01-01

    Interaction of pulsed transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2-1aser radiation at 10.6 μm with nanoporous activated carbon cloth was investigated. Activated carbon cloth of different adsorption characteristics was used. Activated carbon cloth modifications were initiated by laser pulse intensities from 0.5 to 28 MW/cm^2, depending on the cloth adsorption characteristics. CO2 laser radiation was effectively absorbed by the used activated carbon cloth and largely converted into thermal energy. The type of modification depended on laser power density, number of pulses, but mostly on material characteristics such as specific surface area. The higher the surface area of activated carbon cloth, the higher the damage threshold.

  9. High multiplicity states in disordered carbon systems: Ab initio and semiempirical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khavryuchenko, Volodymyr D.; Khavryuchenko, Oleksiy V.; Lisnyak, Vladyslav V.

    2010-01-01

    Stability of non-zero spin projection states for disordered carbon clusters of low symmetry were examined using semiempirical and ab initio methods. The study proves previous results of V.D. Khavryuchenko, Y.A. Tarasenko, V.V. Strelko, O.V. Khavryuchenko, V.V. Lisnyak, Int. J. Mod. Phys. B 21 (2007) 4507, obtained for the large polyaromatic hydrocarbons clusters and shows that the phenomenon is intrinsic for carbon-rich systems and independent of their symmetries. The electronic properties of the carbon clusters may alter from insulating to semiconducting upon change of C/H ratio and stabilization of non-zero spin projection states. A partial collectivization of the electrons is observed in deeply carbonized carbon clusters in higher S z states.

  10. [Variation characteristics of soil carbon sequestration under long-term different fertilization in red paddy soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Zhang, Yang-zhu; Gao, Ju-sheng; Zhang, Wen-ju; Liu, Shu-jun

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to clarify the changes of soil organic carbon (SOC) content, the saturation capacity of soil carbon sequestration and its cooperation with carbon input (crop source and organic fertilizer source carbon) under long-term (1982-2012) different fertilization in red paddy soil. The results showed that fertilization could increase SOC content. The SOC content of all the fertilization treatments demonstrated a trend of stabilization after applying fertilizer for 30 years. The SOC content in the treatments applying organic manure with mineral fertilizers was between 21.02 and 21.24 g · kg(-1), and the increase rate ranged from 0.41 to 0.59 g · kg(-1) · a(-1). The SOC content in the treatments applying mineral fertilizers only was 15.48 g · kg(-1). The average soil carbon sequestration in the treatments that applied organic manure with mineral fertilizers ranged from 43.61 to 48.43 t C · hm(-2), and the average SOC storage over the years in these treatments was significantly greater than those applying mineral fertilizers only. There was an exponentially positive correlation between C sequestration efficiency and annual average organic C input. It must input exogenous organic carbon at least at 0. 12 t C · hm(-2) · a(-1) to maintain the balance of soil organic carbon under the experimental conditions.

  11. Reconciling biodiversity and carbon conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Chris D; Anderson, Barbara J; Moilanen, Atte; Eigenbrod, Felix; Heinemeyer, Andreas; Quaife, Tristan; Roy, David B; Gillings, Simon; Armsworth, Paul R; Gaston, Kevin J

    2013-05-01

    Climate change is leading to the development of land-based mitigation and adaptation strategies that are likely to have substantial impacts on global biodiversity. Of these, approaches to maintain carbon within existing natural ecosystems could have particularly large benefits for biodiversity. However, the geographical distributions of terrestrial carbon stocks and biodiversity differ. Using conservation planning analyses for the New World and Britain, we conclude that a carbon-only strategy would not be effective at conserving biodiversity, as have previous studies. Nonetheless, we find that a combined carbon-biodiversity strategy could simultaneously protect 90% of carbon stocks (relative to a carbon-only conservation strategy) and > 90% of the biodiversity (relative to a biodiversity-only strategy) in both regions. This combined approach encapsulates the principle of complementarity, whereby locations that contain different sets of species are prioritised, and hence disproportionately safeguard localised species that are not protected effectively by carbon-only strategies. It is efficient because localised species are concentrated into small parts of the terrestrial land surface, whereas carbon is somewhat more evenly distributed; and carbon stocks protected in one location are equivalent to those protected elsewhere. Efficient compromises can only be achieved when biodiversity and carbon are incorporated together within a spatial planning process. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  12. Unburned Carbon from Samlaung Coal as Environmental Friendly Sorbent Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaw Naing; Tin Tin Aye; Nyunt Wynn; Kyaw Myo Naing

    2005-09-01

    The increasing role of coal as a source of energy in the 21st century will demand enviromental and cost-effective strategies for the use of carbonaceous waste products from coal combustion. The carbonaceous in fly ash, unburned carbon (UC), is a potential precursor for the production of adsorbent carbons, since it has gone through a devolatization process while in the combustion, and therefore, only requires to be activated. This paper demonstrates the potential for converting UC from Samlaung coal to activated carbons. After heat activation at 970C, the UC sample was generated to activated carbons having microporous structure. This study concerns with adsorption behavior (decolourization and metal uptake) of UC from Samlaung coal. Batch tests and column tests were carried out. Adsorption isotherms has been obtained from these tests. Results show that the UC have equal or better adsorption capacity comparing with other activated carbons. It was found that heat treatment of Samlaung coal in the presence of air at 970C enhanced the adsorption capacity

  13. Electron diffraction from carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, L-C

    2006-01-01

    The properties of a carbon nanotube are dependent on its atomic structure. The atomic structure of a carbon nanotube can be defined by specifying its chiral indices (u, v), that specify its perimeter vector (chiral vector), with which the diameter and helicity are also determined. The fine electron beam available in a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM) offers a unique probe to reveal the atomic structure of individual nanotubes. This review covers two aspects related to the use of the electron probe in the TEM for the study of carbon nanotubes: (a) to understand the electron diffraction phenomena for inter-pretation of the electron diffraction patterns of carbon nanotubes and (b) to obtain the chiral indices (u, v), of the carbon nanotubes from the electron diffraction patterns. For a nanotube of a given structure, the electron scattering amplitude from the carbon nanotube is first described analytically in closed form using the helical diffraction theory. From a known structure as given by the chiral indices (u, v), its electron diffraction pattern can be calculated and understood. The reverse problem, i.e. assignment of the chiral indices from an electron diffraction pattern of a carbon nanotube, is approached from the relationship between the electron scattering intensity distribution and the chiral indices (u, v). We show that electron diffraction patterns can provide an accurate and unambiguous assignment of the chiral indices of carbon nanotubes. The chiral indices (u, v) can be read indiscriminately with a high accuracy from the intensity distribution on the principal layer lines in an electron diffraction pattern. The symmetry properties of electron diffraction from carbon nanotubes and the electron diffraction from deformed carbon nanotubes are also discussed in detail. It is shown that 2mm symmetry is always preserved for single-walled carbon nanotubes, but it can break down for multiwalled carbon nanotubes under some special circumstances

  14. Nuclear power and carbon dioxide free automobiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendergast, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear energy has been developed as a major source of electric power in Canada. Electricity from nuclear energy already avoids the emission of about 100 million tonnes of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere in Canada. This is a significant fraction of the 619 million tonnes of Canadian greenhouse gas emissions in 1995. However, the current scope of application of electricity to end use energy needs in Canada limits the contribution nuclear energy can make to carbon dioxide emission reduction. Nuclear energy can also contribute to carbon dioxide emissions reduction through expansion of the use of electricity to less traditional applications. Transportation, in particular contributed 165 million tonnes of carbon dioxide to the Canadian atmosphere in 1995. Canada's fleet of personal vehicles consisted of 16.9 million cars and light trucks. These vehicles were driven on average 21,000 km/year and generated 91 million tonnes of greenhouse gases expressed as a C02 equivalent. Technology to improve the efficiency of cars is under development which is expected to increase the energy efficiency from the 1995 level of about 10 litres/100 km of gasoline to under 3 litres/100km expressed as an equivalent referenced to the energy content of gasoline. The development of this technology, which may ultimately lead to the practical implementation of hydrogen as a portable source of energy for transportation is reviewed. Fuel supply life cycle greenhouse gas releases for several personal vehicle energy supply systems are then estimated. Very substantial reductions of greenhouse gas emissions are possible due to efficiency improvements and changing to less carbon intensive fuels such as natural gas. C02 emissions from on board natural gas fueled versions of hybrid electric cars would be decreased to approximately 25 million t/year from the current 91 million tonnes/year. The ultimate reduction identified is through the use of hydrogen fuel produced via electricity from CANDU power

  15. Carbonate compensation depth: relation to carbonate solubility in ocean waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Yaakov, S; Ruth, E; Kaplan, I R

    1974-05-31

    In situ calcium carbonate saturometry measurements suggest that the intermediate water masses of the central Pacific Ocean are close to saturation with resppect to both calcite and local carbonate sediment. The carbonate compensation depth, located at about 3700 meters in this area, appears to represent a depth above which waters are essentially saturated with respect to calcite and below which waters deviate toward undersaturation with respect to calcite.

  16. Evaluation of origins of CH4 carbon emitted from rice paddies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Akira; Takeda, Takuya; Kimura, Makoto

    1999-10-01

    Possible carbon sources for CH4 emitted from rice paddies are organic matter applied to the fields, such as rice straw (RS), soil organic matter (SOM), and carbon supplied from rice plants (RP), such as exudates and sloughed tissues. To estimate the contribution of each carbon source to CH4 emission, a pot experiment was conducted using 13C-enriched soil sample and 13C-enriched RS as tracers. The percentage contribution of RP carbon was estimated by subtraction. When RS was applied at a rate corresponding to 6 t ha-1, the percentage contributions of RS, SOM, and RP carbon to CH4 emission throughout the period of rice growth were 42%, 18-21%, and 37-40%, respectively. The values for SOM and RP carbon for the treatment in which RS was not applied were 15-20% and 80-85%, respectively. Seasonal variations in the percentage contribution of soil organic carbon to CH4 emission were small in the range between 13% and 30% for the pots with RS and between 15% and 24% for the pots without RS. In the RS-applied treatment, RS and SOM accounted for almost 100% of the CH4 carbon early in the period of rice growth, while 65-70% of the CH4 emission in the milky stage was derived from RP carbon.

  17. COP21 - A moment of truth for climate and sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Time is running out to act on climate change, poverty eradication and sustainable development. These challenges cannot be met independently of each other. The task of COP21 is to send strong policy signals that determined climate action is needed and will not harm the economy. In fact, these actions will trigger multiple employment, health and human development benefits by aligning strengthened short-term economic growth with long-term sustainable development goals. It is challenging but possible to trigger the transformation toward low carbon futures and to increase the affordability of advanced technologies despite the current pressures on public budgets. The world is awash in liquidity. What is needed is to redirect the savings of households, pension funds, insurance schemes, and sovereign wealth funds towards long-term and low-carbon investments. Sound regulatory frameworks and innovative financial mechanisms must be established to reduce the risks attached to potentially profitable low-carbon projects that are blocked by a combination of high up front costs and an uncertain environment, so as to attract private savings and institutional investors. COP 21 can provide critical policy hooks for step changes in economic and financial inter-mediation based on public guarantees for low carbon investments; an agreed social value of carbon mitigation activities could be incorporated into diverse low-carbon financial initiatives supporting Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs); strong and enforceable requirements for Measuring, Reporting and Verification (MRV) can ensure the environmental integrity and sustainability of the resulting investments. Such a framework can secure the transparency of voluntary commitments by countries, clubs of countries and non-state actors. If it can achieve these goals, the Paris Agreement can unleash a wave of investments into low-carbon development that responds to short-term economic and social challenges while supporting

  18. Multiporous carbon allotropes transformed from symmetry-matched carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yingxiang, E-mail: yingxiangcai@ncu.edu.cn; Wang, Hao; Xu, Shengliang; Hu, Yujie; Liu, Ning; Xu, Xuechun [Department of Physics, NanChang University, Jiangxi, Nanchang 330031 (China)

    2016-06-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with homogeneous diameters have been proven to transform into new carbon allotropes under pressure but no studies on the compression of inhomogeneous CNTs have been reported. In this study, we propose to build new carbon allotropes from the bottom-up by applying pressure on symmetry-matched inhomogeneous CNTs. We find that the (3,0) CNT with point group C{sub 3v} and the (6,0) CNT with point group C{sub 6v} form an all sp{sup 3} hybridized hexagonal 3060-Carbon crystal, but the (4,0) CNT with point group D{sub 4h} and the (8,0) CNT with point group D{sub 8h} polymerize into a sp{sup 2}+sp{sup 3} hybridized tetragonal 4080-Carbon structure. Their thermodynamic, mechanical and dynamic stabilities show that they are potential carbon allotropes to be experimentally synthesized. The multiporous structures, excellently mechanical properties and special electronic structures (semiconductive 3060-Carbon and semimetallic 4080-Carbon) imply their many potential applications, such as gases purification, hydrogen storage and lightweight semiconductor devices. In addition, we simulate their feature XRD patterns which are helpful for identifying the two carbon crystals in future experimental studies.

  19. Multiporous carbon allotropes transformed from symmetry-matched carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingxiang Cai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs with homogeneous diameters have been proven to transform into new carbon allotropes under pressure but no studies on the compression of inhomogeneous CNTs have been reported. In this study, we propose to build new carbon allotropes from the bottom-up by applying pressure on symmetry-matched inhomogeneous CNTs. We find that the (3,0 CNT with point group C3v and the (6,0 CNT with point group C6v form an all sp3 hybridized hexagonal 3060-Carbon crystal, but the (4,0 CNT with point group D4h and the (8,0 CNT with point group D8h polymerize into a sp2+sp3 hybridized tetragonal 4080-Carbon structure. Their thermodynamic, mechanical and dynamic stabilities show that they are potential carbon allotropes to be experimentally synthesized. The multiporous structures, excellently mechanical properties and special electronic structures (semiconductive 3060-Carbon and semimetallic 4080-Carbon imply their many potential applications, such as gases purification, hydrogen storage and lightweight semiconductor devices. In addition, we simulate their feature XRD patterns which are helpful for identifying the two carbon crystals in future experimental studies.

  20. Carbon Micronymphaea: Graphene on Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Won Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the morphology of carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotube (CNT, graphene, and their hybrid structure under various operating conditions during a one-step synthesis via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD. We focus on the synthetic aspects of carbon hybrid material composed of heteroepitaxially grown graphene on top of a vertical array of carbon nanotubes, called carbon micronymphaea. We characterize the structural features of this unique nanocomposite by uses of electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. We observe carbon nanofibers, poorly aligned and well-aligned vertical arrays of CNT sequentially as the growth temperature increases, while we always discover the carbon hybrids, called carbon micronymphaea, at specific cooling rate of 15°C/s, which is optimal for the carbon precipitation from the Ni nanoparticles in this study. We expect one-pot synthesized graphene-on-nanotube hybrid structure poses great potential for applications that demand ultrahigh surface-to-volume ratios with intact graphitic nature and directional electronic and thermal transports.

  1. Designing carbon markets. Part I: Carbon markets in time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fankhauser, Samuel; Hepburn, Cameron

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyses the design of carbon markets in time (i.e., intertemporally). It is part of a twin set of papers that ask, starting from first principles, what an optimal global carbon market would look like by around 2030. Our focus is on firm-level cap-and-trade systems, although much of what we say would also apply to government-level trading and carbon offset schemes. We examine the 'first principles' of temporal design that would help to maximise flexibility and to minimise costs, including banking and borrowing and other mechanisms to provide greater carbon price predictability and credibility over time.

  2. Achieving Carbon Neutrality in the Global Aluminum Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Subodh

    2012-02-01

    In the 21st century, sustainability is widely regarded as the new corporate culture, and leading manufacturing companies (Toyota, GE, and Alcoa) and service companies (Google and Federal Express) are striving towards carbon neutrality. The current carbon footprint of the global aluminum industry is estimated at 500 million metric tonnes carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2eq), representing about 1.7% of global emissions from all sources. For the global aluminum industry, carbon neutrality is defined as a state where the total "in-use" CO2eq saved from all products in current use, including incremental process efficiency improvements, recycling, and urban mining activities, equals the CO2eq expended to produce the global output of aluminum. This paper outlines an integrated and quantifiable plan for achieving "carbon neutrality" in the global aluminum industry by advocating five actionable steps: (1) increase use of "green" electrical energy grid by 8%, (2) reduce process energy needs by 16%, (3) deploy 35% of products in "in-use" energy saving applications, (4) divert 6.1 million metric tonnes/year from landfills, and (5) mine 4.5 million metric tonnes/year from aluminum-rich "urban mines." Since it takes 20 times more energy to make aluminum from bauxite ore than to recycle it from scrap, the global aluminum industry could set a reasonable, self-imposed energy/carbon neutrality goal to incrementally increase the supply of recycled aluminum by at least 1.05 metric tonnes for every tonne of incremental production via primary aluminum smelter capacity. Furthermore, the aluminum industry can and should take a global leadership position by actively developing internationally accepted and approved carbon footprint credit protocols.

  3. Speleothem records of acid sulphate deposition and organic carbon mobilisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Peter; Fairchild, Ian; Bourdin, Clement; Baldini, James; Muller, Wolfgang; Hartland, Adam; Bartlett, Rebecca

    2017-04-01

    Dramatic increases in measured surface water DOC in recent decades have been variously attributed to either temperature rise, or destabilisation of long-term soil carbon pools following sulphur peak emissions status. However, whilst both drivers of DOC dynamics are plausible, they remain difficult to test due to the restricted nature of the available records of riverine DOC flux (1978 to present), and the limited availability of SO2 emissions inventory data at the regional scale. Speleothems offer long term records of both sulphur and carbon. New techniques to extract sulphur concentrations and isotopes from speleothem calcite have enabled archives of pollution history and environmental acidification to be reconstructed. Due to the large dynamic range in sulphur isotopic values from end member sources (marine aerosol +21 ‰ to continental biogenic emissions -30 ‰) and limited environmental fractionation under oxidising conditions, sulphur isotopes form an ideal tracer of industrial pollution and environmental acidification in the palaeo-record. We couple this acidification history to the carbon record, using organic matter fluorescence and trace metals. Trace metal ratios and abundance can be used to infer the type and size of organic ligand and are therefore sensitive to changes in temperature as a driver of organic carbon processing and biodegradation. This allows fluorescent properties and ratios of trace metals in speleothem carbonate to be used to represent both the flux of organic carbon into the cave as well as the degradation pathway. Here we present some of the first results of this work, exploring sulphur acidification as a mechanistic control on carbon solubility and export throughout the twentieth century.

  4. Lifestyle and carbon print. Prospective of lifestyles in France by 2050 and carbon print. Les Cahiers du Clip nr 21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emelianoff, Cyria; Mor, Elsa; Dobre, Michelle; Cordellier, Maxime; Barbier, Carine; Blanc, Nathalie; Sander, Agnes; Castelain Meunier, Christine; Joliton, Damien; Leroy, Nicolas; Pourouchottamin, Prabodh; Beillan, Veronique; Radanne, Pierre; Authier, Jean-Yves; Chevalier, Jacques; Taburet, Aurelien; Etahiri, Nathalie; Girault, Pascal; Renaud-Hellier, Emmanuelle; Theys, Jacques; Traisnel, Jean-Pierre; Vidalenc, Eric

    2012-12-01

    A first part proposes an overview of past and possible future lifestyle evolutions, with a discussion of these evolutions from 1960, a discussion of the various aspects of the evolution of mobility, of the emergence of new lifestyles under the influence of environmental and social concerns, of the perspective of evolution towards a post-mankind under the influence of info-, nano- and bio-technologies. A second part proposes five visions of lifestyle by 2050: a green and consumerist society, a society of augmented individuals, a dual and plural society, a society based on eco-citizenship, and a society at the age of knowledge. The third part proposes a first assessment of greenhouses emissions according to these fives visions

  5. Electronics with carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avouris, P.

    2007-01-01

    From mobile phones and laptops to Xboxes and iPods, it is difficult to think of any aspect of modern life that has not been touched by developments in electronics, computing and communications over the last few decades. Many of these technological advances have arisen from our ability to create ever smaller electronic devices, in particular silicon-based field effect transistors (FETs), which has led to denser, faster and less power-hungry circuits. The problem is that this device miniaturization, or 'scaling', cannot continue forever. Fundamental scientific and technological limitations exist that will make it impossible to build better performing silicon devices below a certain size. This potential show-stopper has inspired a worldwide effort to develop alternative device technologies based on 1D materials or those that exploit the spin, as well as the charge, of electrons. One promising and, in principle, simpler approach is to maintain the operating concept of today's silicon-based FETs but to replace a key component of the device - the semiconducting silicon channel - with 1D nanostructures that have much more versatile electrical-transport properties. Among the different 1D materials that have been developed, those with the most desirable properties are 'single-walled' carbon nanotubes, which were first created in 1993 by Sumio Ijima at the NEC Fundamental Research Laboratory in Tsukuba, Japan, and by Donald Bethune of IBM's Almaden Research Center in California. These materials are hollow tubes made from rolled up sheets of carbon just one atom thick, otherwise known as graphene. In the March issue of Physics World, Phaedon Avouris discusses some of the many properties and applications of carbon nanotubes, which he describes as an 'engineer's dream' because of their exceptionally high strength and heat conduction. (U.K.)

  6. Spectrophotometry of carbon stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gow, C.E.

    1975-01-01

    Observations of over one hundred carbon stars have been made with the Indiana rapid spectral scanner in the red and, when possible, in the visual and blue regions of the spectrum. Five distinct subtypes of carbon stars (Barium, CH, R, N, and hydrogen deficient) are represented in the list of observed stars, although the emphasis was placed on the N stars when the observations were made. The rapid scanner was operated in the continuous sweep mode with the exit slit set at twenty angstroms, however, seeing fluctuations and guiding errors smear the spectrum to an effective resolution of approximately thirty angstroms. Nightly observations of Hayes standard stars yielded corrections for atmospheric extinction and instrumental response. The reduction scheme rests on two assumptions, that thin clouds are gray absorbers and the wavelength dependence of the sky transparency does not change during the course of the night. Several stars have been observed in the blue region of the spectrum with the Indiana SIT vidicon spectrometer at two angstroms resolution. It is possible to derive a color temperature for the yellow--red spectral region by fitting a black-body curve through two chosen continuum points. Photometric indices were calculated relative to the blackbody curve to measure the C 2 Swan band strength, the shape of the CN red (6,1) band to provide a measure of the 12 C/ 13 C isotope ratio, and in the hot carbon stars (Barium, CH, and R stars) the strength of an unidentified feature centered at 400 angstroms. An extensive abundance grid of model atmospheres was calculated using a modified version of the computer code ATLAS

  7. Use of supercritical carbon dioxide extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniguchi, Masayuki (Niigata Univ., Faculty of Engineering, Niigata, (Japan))

    1989-09-25

    Supercritical fluid extraction is a novel diffusion and separation technique which exploits simultaneously the increase of vapor pressure and the difference of chemical affinities of fluids near the critical point. A solvent which is used as the supercritical fluid has the following features: the critical point exists in the position of relatively ease of handling, the solvent is applicable to the extraction of a physiological active substance of thermal instability. Carbon dioxide as the solvent is non-flammable, non-corrosive, non-toxic, cheap, and readily available of high purity. The results of studies on the use of supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO{sub 2}) as a solvent for natural products in the fermentation and food industries, were collected. SC-CO{sub 2} extraction are used in many fields, examples for the application are as follows: removal of organic solvents from antibiotics; extraction of vegetable oils contained in wheat germ oil, high quality mustard seeds, rice bran and so on; brewing of sake using rice and rice-koji; use as a non-aqueous medium for the synthesis of precursors of the Aspartame; and use in sterilization. 66 refs., 17 figs., 21 tabs.

  8. Compilation of carbon-14 data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paasch, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    A review and critical analysis was made of the original sources of carbon-14 in the graphite moderator and reflector zones of the eight Hanford production reactors, the present physical and chemical state of the carbon-14, pathways (other than direct combustion) by which the carbon-14 could be released to the biosphere, and the maximum rate at which it might be released under circumstances which idealistically favor the release. Areas of uncertainty are noted and recommendations are made for obtaining additional data in three areas: (1) release rate of carbon-14 from irradiated graphite saturated with aerated water; (2) characterization of carbon-14 deposited outside the moderator and reflector zones; and (3) corrosion/release rate of carbon-14 from irradiated steel and aluminum alloys

  9. Carbon Nanomaterials as Antibacterial Colloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Maas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanomaterials like graphene, carbon nanotubes, fullerenes and the various forms of diamond have attracted great attention for their vast potential regarding applications in electrical engineering and as biomaterials. The study of the antibacterial properties of carbon nanomaterials provides fundamental information on the possible toxicity and environmental impact of these materials. Furthermore, as a result of the increasing prevalence of resistant bacteria strains, the development of novel antibacterial materials is of great importance. This article reviews current research efforts on characterizing the antibacterial activity of carbon nanomaterials from the perspective of colloid and interface science. Building on these fundamental findings, recent functionalization strategies for enhancing the antibacterial effect of carbon nanomaterials are described. The review concludes with a comprehensive outlook that summarizes the most important discoveries and trends regarding antibacterial carbon nanomaterials.

  10. Carbonate fuel cell anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donado, Rafael A.; Hrdina, Kenneth E.; Remick, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    A molten alkali metal carbonates fuel cell porous anode of lithium ferrite and a metal or metal alloy of nickel, cobalt, nickel/iron, cobalt/iron, nickel/iron/aluminum, cobalt/iron/aluminum and mixtures thereof wherein the total iron content including ferrite and iron of the composite is about 25 to about 80 percent, based upon the total anode, provided aluminum when present is less than about 5 weight percent of the anode. A process for production of the lithium ferrite containing anode by slipcasting.

  11. RTE 2008 carbon assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-05-01

    After a brief presentation of the RTE (Reseau de Transport d'Electricite, Electricity Transport Network) company, this report proposes an assessment of the various carbon emissions related to the various aspects of the activities of this company: emissions related to fuels used within the activity (industrial processes, premise heating, air conditioning, ventilation), inner emission not related to any combustion (refrigerant gas evaporations and leakages, SF 6 emissions), emissions related to the transport of materials used within the company (particularly works materials), emissions related to people mobility (personnel and visitors), emission related to wastes produced by the company, and emissions related to the company's industrial and tertiary patrimony

  12. Global Carbon Budget 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Quéré, Corinne; Andrew, Robbie M.; Canadell, Josep G.; Sitch, Stephen; Korsbakken, Jan Ivar; Peters, Glen P.; Manning, Andrew C.; Boden, Thomas A.; Tans, Pieter P.; Houghton, Richard A.; Keeling, Ralph F.; Alin, Simone; Andrews, Oliver D.; Anthoni, Peter; Barbero, Leticia; Bopp, Laurent; Chevallier, Frédéric; Chini, Louise P.; Ciais, Philippe; Currie, Kim; Delire, Christine; Doney, Scott C.; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Gkritzalis, Thanos; Harris, Ian; Hauck, Judith; Haverd, Vanessa; Hoppema, Mario; Klein Goldewijk, Kees; Jain, Atul K.; Kato, Etsushi; Körtzinger, Arne; Landschützer, Peter; Lefèvre, Nathalie; Lenton, Andrew; Lienert, Sebastian; Lombardozzi, Danica; Melton, Joe R.; Metzl, Nicolas; Millero, Frank; Monteiro, Pedro M. S.; Munro, David R.; Nabel, Julia E. M. S.; Nakaoka, Shin-ichiro; O'Brien, Kevin; Olsen, Are; Omar, Abdirahman M.; Ono, Tsuneo; Pierrot, Denis; Poulter, Benjamin; Rödenbeck, Christian; Salisbury, Joe; Schuster, Ute; Schwinger, Jörg; Séférian, Roland; Skjelvan, Ingunn; Stocker, Benjamin D.; Sutton, Adrienne J.; Takahashi, Taro; Tian, Hanqin; Tilbrook, Bronte; van der Laan-Luijkx, Ingrid T.; van der Werf, Guido R.; Viovy, Nicolas; Walker, Anthony P.; Wiltshire, Andrew J.; Zaehle, Sönke

    2016-11-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere - the "global carbon budget" - is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we describe data sets and methodology to quantify all major components of the global carbon budget, including their uncertainties, based on the combination of a range of data, algorithms, statistics, and model estimates and their interpretation by a broad scientific community. We discuss changes compared to previous estimates and consistency within and among components, alongside methodology and data limitations. CO2 emissions from fossil fuels and industry (EFF) are based on energy statistics and cement production data, respectively, while emissions from land-use change (ELUC), mainly deforestation, are based on combined evidence from land-cover change data, fire activity associated with deforestation, and models. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration is measured directly and its rate of growth (GATM) is computed from the annual changes in concentration. The mean ocean CO2 sink (SOCEAN) is based on observations from the 1990s, while the annual anomalies and trends are estimated with ocean models. The variability in SOCEAN is evaluated with data products based on surveys of ocean CO2 measurements. The global residual terrestrial CO2 sink (SLAND) is estimated by the difference of the other terms of the global carbon budget and compared to results of independent dynamic global vegetation models. We compare the mean land and ocean fluxes and their variability to estimates from three atmospheric inverse methods for three broad latitude bands. All uncertainties are reported as ±1σ, reflecting the current capacity to characterise the annual estimates of each component of the global carbon budget. For the last decade available (2006-2015), EFF was 9

  13. Global Carbon Budget 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Canadell, J. G.; Sitch, S.; Korsbakken, J. I.; Friedlingstein, P.; Peters, G. P.; Andres, R. J.; Boden, T. A.; Houghton, R. A.; House, J. I.; Keeling, R. F.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Bakker, D. C. E.; Barbero, L.; Bopp, L.; Chang, J.; Chevallier, F.; Chini, L. P.; Ciais, P.; Fader, M.; Feely, R. A.; Gkritzalis, T.; Harris, I.; Hauck, J.; Ilyina, T.; Jain, A. K.; Kato, E.; Kitidis, V.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Koven, C.; Landschützer, P.; Lauvset, S. K.; Lefèvre, N.; Lenton, A.; Lima, I. D.; Metzl, N.; Millero, F.; Munro, D. R.; Murata, A.; Nabel, J. E. M. S.; Nakaoka, S.; Nojiri, Y.; O'Brien, K.; Olsen, A.; Ono, T.; Pérez, F. F.; Pfeil, B.; Pierrot, D.; Poulter, B.; Rehder, G.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Séférian, R.; Steinhoff, T.; Stocker, B. D.; Sutton, A. J.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; van der Laan-Luijkx, I. T.; van der Werf, G. R.; van Heuven, S.; Vandemark, D.; Viovy, N.; Wiltshire, A.; Zaehle, S.; Zeng, N.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we describe data sets and a methodology to quantify all major components of the global carbon budget, including their uncertainties, based on the combination of a range of data, algorithms, statistics, and model estimates and their interpretation by a broad scientific community. We discuss changes compared to previous estimates as well as consistency within and among components, alongside methodology and data limitations. CO2 emissions from fossil fuels and industry (EFF) are based on energy statistics and cement production data, while emissions from land-use change (ELUC), mainly deforestation, are based on combined evidence from land-cover-change data, fire activity associated with deforestation, and models. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration is measured directly and its rate of growth (GATM) is computed from the annual changes in concentration. The mean ocean CO2 sink (SOCEAN) is based on observations from the 1990s, while the annual anomalies and trends are estimated with ocean models. The variability in SOCEAN is evaluated with data products based on surveys of ocean CO2 measurements. The global residual terrestrial CO2 sink (SLAND) is estimated by the difference of the other terms of the global carbon budget and compared to results of independent dynamic global vegetation models forced by observed climate, CO2, and land-cover change (some including nitrogen-carbon interactions). We compare the mean land and ocean fluxes and their variability to estimates from three atmospheric inverse methods for three broad latitude bands. All uncertainties are reported as ±1σ, reflecting the current capacity to characterise the annual estimates of each component of the global

  14. The carbon market puzzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perthuis, Ch. de

    2008-01-01

    The kyoto protocol forces the developed countries which ratify it to reduce their greenhouse effect gases emissions. The reductions cost is decreased by the clean development mechanisms: the carbon markets. That is why the protocol implementation will not have a major effect on the evolution of the greenhouse effect gases for 2012. The author presents the situation and discusses the economic tools of the Kyoto protocol, the european system of quotas, the clean development mechanisms and the impacts on a future and more ambitious climatic agreement. (A.L.B.)

  15. Carbonizing etc. , coal etc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duckham, A M; Rider, D; Watts, J S

    1924-01-17

    In drying, carbonizing, and distilling coal, shale, etc., by passage through a heated retort, the material is spread in a thin layer over the heating surface by a conveying-screw with a shallow thread. The retort is heated by a bath of molten metal, and the conveyingscrew intermeshes with a scraper screw of smaller diameter, and of a different hand; the screws are mounted on shafts geared together by wheels. The material after passing through the retort is delivered into a chute closed at the bottom by an arc-shaped water seal carried on arms and opened periodically by a lever.

  16. Carbon Impact Analytics - Designing low carbon indices based on Carbon Impact Analytics indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Investors are increasingly exposed to carbon risks and now face the challenge of managing these risks and developing climate-resilient investment strategies. Carbon Impact Analytics (CIA), an innovative methodology for analyzing the full carbon impact of a portfolio or index, equips investors and asset managers with the tools necessary to reduce their climate-related risks but also to seize the opportunities offered by the ongoing energy transition. Investors, asset managers and other financial institutions may use CIA results to: - measure and manage risks, - optimize their contribution to the energy transition, - seize opportunities associated with climate change mitigation, - report on GHG emissions and savings (for regulatory purposes or voluntarily), - engage in dialogue with companies, - reallocate investment portfolios, - and build new low-carbon indices. In this report, Carbone 4 offers a detailed look into how CIA indicators can be used to either 1) reallocate an existing portfolio or index to achieve maximal carbon performance or 2) build new low carbon indices from the ground up, drawn from Carbone 4's ever-growing database of CIA-analyzed firms. Two main levers were used to optimize CIA output: 1. Sectorial reallocation: exclusion of fossil fuel-related sectors or insertion of low carbon pure players; 2. Intra-sectorial reallocation: best-in-class approach within a sector. Sectorial and intra-sectorial methods may be applied in conjunction with one another to maximize results. For example, a best-in-class + fossil fuel-free index may be constructed by first excluding the fossil fuel sector and then applying a CIA best-in-class approach to all remaining sectors. This report offers a detailed look into how CIA indicators can be used to rework portfolios or indices to maximize carbon performance or to build low carbon indices from the ground up. These methods are illustrated via two preliminary examples of indices designed by Carbone 4: the reallocated

  17. Role of volcanic forcing on future global carbon cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Tjiputra

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Using a fully coupled global climate-carbon cycle model, we assess the potential role of volcanic eruptions on future projection of climate change and its associated carbon cycle feedback. The volcanic-like forcings are applied together with a business-as-usual IPCC-A2 carbon emissions scenario. We show that very large volcanic eruptions similar to Tambora lead to short-term substantial global cooling. However, over a long period, smaller eruptions similar to Pinatubo in amplitude, but set to occur frequently, would have a stronger impact on future climate change. In a scenario where the volcanic external forcings are prescribed with a five-year frequency, the induced cooling immediately lower the global temperature by more than one degree before it returns to the warming trend. Therefore, the climate change is approximately delayed by several decades, and by the end of the 21st century, the warming is still below two degrees when compared to the present day period. Our climate-carbon feedback analysis shows that future volcanic eruptions induce positive feedbacks (i.e., more carbon sink on both the terrestrial and oceanic carbon cycle. The feedback signal on the ocean is consistently smaller than the terrestrial counterpart and the feedback strength is proportionally related to the frequency of the volcanic eruption events. The cooler climate reduces the terrestrial heterotrophic respiration in the northern high latitude and increases net primary production in the tropics, which contributes to more than 45 % increase in accumulated carbon uptake over land. The increased solubility of CO2 gas in seawater associated with cooler SST is offset by a reduced CO2 partial pressure gradient between the ocean and the atmosphere, which results in small changes in net ocean carbon uptake. Similarly, there is nearly no change in the seawater buffer capacity simulated between the different volcanic scenarios. Our study shows that even

  18. Looking Forward. The Carbon Markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, M.

    2006-02-01

    An overview is given of possible future developments in the market for carbon dioxide emissions trading. In this presentation it is concluded that the carbon market is here and now, that the carbon market is global and China and India are major players, that global capital is on the move and delay is dangerous, that there is a world of opportunity for Australian companies and with inaction there is a risk to fall off the fringe

  19. Genetics Home Reference: 21-hydroxylase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adrenal hyperplasias that impair hormone production and disrupt sexual development. 21-hydroxylase deficiency is responsible for about 95 ... excess production of androgens leads to abnormalities of sexual development in people with 21-hydroxylase deficiency . A lack ...

  20. Tracking global carbon revenues: A survey of carbon taxes versus cap-and-trade in the real world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carl, Jeremy; Fedor, David

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the current use of public revenues which are generated through both carbon taxes and cap-and-trade systems. More than $28.3 billion in government “carbon revenues” are currently collected each year in 40 countries and another 16 states or provinces around the world. Of those revenues, 27% ($7.8 billion) are used to subsidize “green” spending in energy efficiency or renewable energy; 26% ($7.4 billion) go toward state general funds; and 36% ($10.1 billion) are returned to corporate or individual taxpayers through paired tax cuts or direct rebates. Cap-and-trade systems ($6.57 billion in total public revenue) earmark a larger share of revenues for “green” spending (70%), while carbon tax systems ($21.7 billion) more commonly refund revenues or otherwise direct them towards government general funds (72% of revenues). Drawing from an empirical dataset, we also identify various trends in systems’ use of “carbon revenues” in terms of the total revenues collected annually per capita in each jurisdiction and offer commensurate qualitative observations on carbon policy design choices. - Highlights: •We analyze public revenue generated from global carbon tax and cap-and-trade systems. •70% of cap-and-trade revenues ($4.60 billion) are earmarked for “green spending”. •72% of carbon tax revenues ($15.6 billion) are refunded or used in general funds. •Revenues per capita vary widely and are a useful qualitative explanatory variable.