WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon 18

  1. Adsorption of Acid Red 18 (AR18 by Activated Carbon from Poplar Wood- A Kinetic and Equilibrium Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Shokoohi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption process by activated carbon is widely used for removal of dyes. Because of economical limits, activated carbon derived from low cost materials seem to be economical. The aim of this work is preparation of activated carbon from poplar wood and investigation of its ability to removal of (AR18 dye. In this work, we prepared the activated carbon by chemical activation method in electric furnace. In addition we have investigated effect of various parameters such as pH, contact time, dye concentration and adsorbent dosage on dye removal. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models have been investigated. Pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and modified pseudo-first order kinetic models have been used for experimental data. The results showed that removal efficiency was increased with increasing of adsorbent dosage, contact time and decreasing of pH, but with increasing of dye concentration, the removal efficiency was decreased. Adsorption isotherm models showed that Langmuir isotherm model was best fitted onto collected data (r2>0.978. In addition, kinetic models showed that sorption of AR18 onto activated carbon prepared from poplar wood follows the pseudo-first order model (r2>0.9758.

  2. Production of fluorine-18 from eithium carbonate in a research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasiglia, H.T.

    1978-01-01

    A method for the production of fluorine-18 in a research reactor, from irradiated lithium carbonate, is described. Fluorine-18 is separated from impurities in a alumina column, which is an appropriate procedure for its production as a carrier-free radioisotope for oral administration. Characteristics of the product, when fluorine is separated from irradiated target in an usual alumina column, are compared with those when fluorine is separated in a previously calcined(1000 0 C) alumina column: Yields of chemical separation and chemical forms of radioisotope obtained are studied. Fluorine elution is investigated for several eluant concentrations and the use of a lower concentrated eluant is emphasized. Purity degree of fluorine-18 solutions separated. A routine production procedure is determined by irradiating enriched lithium carbonate (95% 6 Li). Theoretical yields are compared with fluorine-18 production yields obtained in several irradiations [pt

  3. Preparation of 18F in a research reactor, from irradiated lithium carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gariglia, H.T.; Silva, C.P.G. da.

    1978-01-01

    A procedure for preparation of carrier - free fluorine-18 is described. The 18 F is produced by neutron irradiation of lithium carbonate and is separated by passing the dissolved material through a 1000 0 C calcinated aluminium oxyde column. The yield is about 90%, the tritium content 2%; other radioactive impurities are not found. The radiochemical purity is about 93% and the lithium content of the solution is [pt

  4. Dibenzodiazepines (clozapine) and analogues were labelled with carrier-free carbon-11 and fluorine-18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, D.

    1993-12-01

    Pharmacologically active dibenzodiazepines were labelled with carbon-11 and fluorine-18, in particular the atypical neuroleptic clozapine (8-Cl-11-(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl)-5H-dibenzo[b,e]-[1,4]-diazepine) for pharmakokinetic studies with positron emission tomography (PET). (orig./EF)

  5. Synthesis of carbon-11, fluorine-18, and nitrogen-13 labeled radiotracers for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.

    1981-01-01

    A number of reviews, many of them recent, have appeared on various aspects of /sup 11/C, /sup 18/F and /sup 13/N-labeled radiotracers. This monograph treats the topic principally from the standpoint of synthetic organic chemistry while keeping in perspective the necessity of integrating the organic chemistry with the design and ultimate application of the radiotracer. Where possible, recent examples from the literature of organic synthesis are introduced to suggest potentially new routes which may be applied to problems in labeling organic molecules with the short-lived positron emitters, carbon-11, fluorine-18, and nitrogen-13. The literature survey of carbon-11, fluorine-18 and nitrogen-13 labeled compounds presented are of particular value to scientists working in this field. Two appendices are also included to provide supplementary general references. A subject index concludes this volume.

  6. Synthesis of carbon-11, fluorine-18, and nitrogen-13 labeled radiotracers for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.

    1981-01-01

    A number of reviews, many of them recent, have appeared on various aspects of 11 C, 18 F and 13 N-labeled radiotracers. This monograph treats the topic principally from the standpoint of synthetic organic chemistry while keeping in perspective the necessity of integrating the organic chemistry with the design and ultimate application of the radiotracer. Where possible, recent examples from the literature of organic synthesis are introduced to suggest potentially new routes which may be applied to problems in labeling organic molecules with the short-lived positron emitters, carbon-11, fluorine-18, and nitrogen-13. The literature survey of carbon-11, fluorine-18 and nitrogen-13 labeled compounds presented are of particular value to scientists working in this field. Two appendices are also included to provide supplementary general references. A subject index concludes this volume

  7. Neutron induced alpha production from carbon between 18 and 22 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, A.P.

    1976-10-01

    Cross sections for neutron induced alpha production in carbon were measured at seventeen energies between 18 and 22 MeV, using a deuterated anthracene crystal as both target and detector. Pulse shape discrimination was employed to separate the alphas and elastically scattered deuterons from the other reaction products. Published (n,d) elastic scattering data were used as a standard to obtain the alpha production cross sections. Comparison with available measurements shows good agreement

  8. W18O49 nanowires assembled on carbon felt for application to supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jinjoo; Kim, Do Hyung

    2018-03-01

    For supercapacitor applications, W18O49 nanowires have been extensively grown on graphitic carbon felt using a facile solvothermal method. The diameter and length of the nanowires are about 7 and 300 nm, respectively. The nanowires consist of monoclinic W18O49 grown along the [010] direction, as shown by TEM and XRD analyses. The W18O49 nanowires, assembled on carbon felt, exhibit a high capacity of 588.33 F/g at a current density of 1 A/g together with an excellent cycle performance, and a low internal resistance during the electrochemical tests. This outstanding performance may originate from the three-dimensional porous nanostructure of these W18O49 nanowires, which leads to a reduction in the resistance and fast reaction kinetics due to the high specific surface area and electrolyte accessibility. Furthermore, sufficient oxygen deficiencies of the substoichiometric tungsten oxide can also contribute to the electrochemical activity, which can be confirmed by comparison of CV and EIS data with WO3 nanowires.

  9. Carbon 13 and oxygen 18 isotope record of the early eocene nammal formation, salt range, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghazi, S.; Sajid, Z.

    2014-01-01

    The Nammal Formation is the lowermost unit of the Early Eocene succession in the Salt Range, Pakistan. It is well exposed throughout the Salt Range. The Nammal Formation having 30 to 35 meters thickness is predominantly composed of nodular limestone interbedded with marl and shale. The present study was focussed on stable carbon 13 and oxygen 18 isotopic analysis based on data from two stratigraphically important sections. The samples from the Nilawahan section provided with the delta 13C values varied between 1.34 to -1.56 (VPDB) and values of delta 18O fluctuated between -4.47 to -6.59 (VPDB). Likewise the sample analysis of BadshahPur section exhibited that the delta 13C values changes from 1.09 to -1.65 (VPDB) and delta 18O values range from -4.17 to -6.85 (VPDB). The isotopic records of carbon 13 and oxygen 18 indicated the shallow marine deposition of the Nammal Formation under tropical conditions. It highlighted the palaeo climatic and diagenetic conditions of the Nammal Formation at the time of deposition in the Salt Range region. (author)

  10. Thermometric characteristics of some 1/8W carbon resistors in the millikelvin range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radebaugh, R.; Holste, J.C.; Siegwarth, J.D.

    1974-01-01

    Gotch and Awano (Cryogenic Engineering (Tokyo); 8:18 (1973)) have reported on the useful characteristics of 1/8W 100Ω Matsushita carbon resistors (grade ERC-18GK) as thermometers for the region 0.4K and 4.2K. Measurements on the resistance characteristics of this grade of resistors from 11mK to 1K are reported here. Nominal resistances of 56Ω, 68Ω, 82Ω, 100Ω, and 220Ω have been measured. It is found that the 56Ω, 68Ω and 82 Ω resistors make useful thermometers down to at least 11mK. A comparison of the resistance behaviour of units immersed in dilute He 3 -He 4 with those outside the liquid is also made. (author)

  11. Carbon-11 and Fluorine-18 Labeled Amino Acid Tracers for Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Aixia; Liu, Xiang; Tang, Ganghua

    2017-12-01

    Tumor cells have an increased nutritional demand for amino acids(AAs) to satisfy their rapid proliferation. Positron-emitting nuclide labeled AAs are interesting probes and are of great importance for imaging tumors using positron emission tomography (PET). Carbon-11 and fluorine-18 labeled AAs include the [1-11C] amino acids, labeling alpha-C- amino acids, the branched-chain of amino acids and N-substituted carbon-11 labeled amino acids. These tracers target protein synthesis or amino acid(AA) transport, and their uptake mechanism mainly involves AA transport. AA PET tracers have been widely used in clinical settings to image brain tumors, neuroendocrine tumors, prostate cancer, breast cancer, non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and hepatocellular carcinoma. This review focuses on the fundamental concepts and the uptake mechanism of AAs, AA PET tracers and their clinical applications.

  12. Adsorption of Acid Red 18 by Activated Carbon Prepared from Cedar Tree: Kinetic and Equilibrium Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Samarghandi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Textile effluents are one of the main environmental pollution sources and contain toxic compounds which threat the environment. For that reason, the activated carbon prepared from Cedar Tree was used for removal of Acid Red 18 as an Azo Dye. Material and Methods: Activated carbon was prepared by chemical activation and was used in batch system for dye removal. Effect of various experimental parameters such as pH (3 to11, initial dye concentration (50, 75 and 100 mg/L, contact time (1 to 120 min and adsorbent dosage (2 to 10 g/L were investigated. Equilibrium data was fitted onto Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm model. In addition, pseudo first order and pseudo second order models were used to investigate the kinetic of adsorption process. Results: Results shows that dye removal was increase with increase in adsorbent dosage, contact time and initial dye concentration. In addition, higher removal efficiency was observed in low pH (pH=3. At 120 min contact time, pH=3, 6 g/L adsorbent dosage and 100 mg/L of initial dye concentration, more than 95% of dye was removed. Equilibrium data was best fitted onto Freundlich isotherm model. According to Langmuir constant, maximum sorption capacity was observed to be 51/28 mg/L. in addition pseudo second order model best describe the kinetic of adsorption of Acid Red 18 onto present adsorbent. Conclusion: The results of present work well demonstrate that prepare activated carbon from Pine Tree has higher adsorption capacity toward Acid Red 18 Azo dye and can be used for removal of dyes from textile effluents.

  13. Mapping of carbonic anhydrase and estrone sulphatase in rat brain using 16-α-[18F]fluoroestradiol-3,17-β-disulphamate ([18F]FESDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodig, H.; Brust, P.; Bergmann, R.; Roemer, J.; Fuechtner, F.; Steinbach, J.; Kasch, H.

    2002-01-01

    16α-[ 18 F]Fluoroestradiol-3,17β-disulphamate ([ 18 F]FESDS) was recently found to display affinities to carbonic anhydrase (CA) and estrone sulphatase (ES), enzymes which are expressed in the CNS and probably play a regulatory role in various brain diseases. In this study the radioligand was used to provide quantitative data on the regional distribution of these enzymes in the rat brain. (orig.)

  14. Preclinical evaluation of carbon-11 and fluorine-18 sulfonamide derivatives for in vivo radiolabeling of erythrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Gheysens, Olivier; Akurathi, Vamsidhar; Chekol, Rufael; Dresselaers, Tom; Celen, Sofie; Koole, Michel; Dauwe, Dieter; Cleynhens, Bernard J; Claus, Piet; Janssens, Stefan; Verbruggen, Alfons M; Nuyts, Johan; Himmelreich, Uwe; Bormans, Guy M

    2013-01-01

    Background To date, few PET tracers for in vivo labeling of red blood cells (RBCs) are available. In this study, we report the radiosynthesis and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of 11C and 18F sulfonamide derivatives targeting carbonic anhydrase II (CA II), a metallo-enzyme expressed in RBCs, as potential blood pool tracers. A proof-of-concept in vivo imaging study was performed to demonstrate the feasibility to assess cardiac function and volumes using electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated positron ...

  15. Priming effects of leaves of Laurus nobilis L. and 1,8-cineole on carbon mineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burak Kocak

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Plant secondary compounds can have stimulating effect on C cycling and change its rate in soils. We examined how leaves of bay laurel (Laurus nobilis L.; Lauraceae and 1,8-cineole (CIN, one of its constituents, affect soil C mineralization and its rate. Leaves and soil samples of bay laurel were taken from Cukurova University Campus (Adana, Turkey growing naturally under Mediterranean climate conditions. Leaves and CIN were considered as the two forms of organic C sources. After determining the level of 1,8-cineole in leaves by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, soils were mixed with powdered leaves and 1,8-cineole based on their C contents at same and half doses of soil organic C level. Carbon mineralization of all soils was determined over 54 d (28 °C, 80% field capacity. While 1,8-cineole was found as a major constituent of leaves (65% of essential oil, all doses of leaves and CIN increased soil microbial activity. There were significant differences for C mineralization rate between control and all applications (P < 0.05. High C levels of all treatments decreased C mineralization rate compared to control soils. In summary, all treatments stimulated C mineralization and it is possible to conclude that soil microorganisms adapted to use CIN as an energy source.

  16. Stable isotopes of pedogenic carbonates from the Somma-Vesuvius area, southern Italy, over the past 18 kyr: palaeoclimatic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchetta, G.; di Vito, M.; Fallick, A. E.; Sulpizio, R.

    2000-12-01

    Stable isotopes were measured in the carbonate and organic matter of palaeosols in the Somma-Vesuvius area, southern Italy in order to test whether they are suitable proxy records for climatic and ecological changes in this area during the past 18000 yr. The ages of the soils span from ca. 18 to ca. 3 kyr BP. Surprisingly, the Last Glacial to Holocene climate transition was not accompanied by significant change in 18O of pedogenic carbonate. This could be explained by changes in evaporation rate and in isotope fractionation between water and precipitated carbonate with temperature, which counterbalanced the expected change in isotope composition of meteoric water. Because of the rise in temperature and humidity and the progressive increase in tree cover during the Holocene, the Holocene soil carbonates closely reflect the isotopic composition of meteoric water. A cooling of about 2°C after the Avellino eruption (3.8 ka) accounts for a sudden decrease of about 1 in 18O of pedogenic carbonate recorded after this eruption. The 13C values of organic matter and pedogenic carbonate covary, indicating an effective isotope equilibrium between the organic matter, as the source of CO2, and the pedogenic carbonate. Carbon isotopes suggest prevailing C3 vegetation and negligible mixing with volcanogenic or atmospheric CO2.

  17. In folio study of carbonic anhydrase and Rubisco activities in higher C3 plants using 18O and mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peltier, G.; Despax, V.; Dimon, B.; Rumeau, D.; Tourneux, C.

    1994-01-01

    This document studies the effects of a mild water stress and carbonic anhydrase activity by ethoxyzolamide (EZA) on the diffusion of CO 2 in leaves, by 18 O labelling of O 2 and of CO 2 associated to mass spectrometry. (A.B.). 5 refs., 2 figs

  18. Utilization of activated carbon produced from fruit juice industry solid waste for the adsorption of Yellow 18 from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angin, Dilek

    2014-09-01

    The use of activated carbon obtained from sour cherry (Prunus cerasus L.) stones for the removal of a basic textile dye, which is Yellow 18, from aqueous solutions at different contact times, pH values and solution temperatures was investigated. The surface area and micropore volume of chemically modified activated carbon were 1704 m(2) g(-1) and 0.984 cm(3) g(-1), respectively. The experimental data indicated that the adsorption isotherms were well described by the Langmuir equilibrium isotherm equation and the calculated adsorption capacity was 75.76 mg g(-1) at 318 K. The adsorption kinetic of Yellow 18 obeys the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The thermodynamic parameters were calculated to estimate the nature of adsorption. The activation energy of the system was calculated as 0.71-2.36 kJ/mol. According to these results, prepared activated carbon could be used as a low-cost adsorbent to compare with the commercial activated carbon for the removal of Yellow 18 from wastewater. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The potential of carbon-11 and fluorine-18 chemistry: illustration through the development of positron emission tomography radioligands targeting the translocator protein 18 kDa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damont, Annelaure; Roeda, Dirk; Dolle, Frederic

    2013-01-01

    The TSPO (translocator protein), also known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, is up-regulated in the brain of subjects suffering from neuro-degenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's disease. Moreover, this overexpression has been proved to be linked to micro-glia activation making thus the TSPO a marker of choice of neuro-inflammatory processes and therefore a potential target for the development of radioligands for positron emission tomography imaging. The discovery of selective TSPO ligands and their labelling with the short-lived positron-emitter isotopes carbon-11 and fluorine-18 emerged in the mid-1980's with the preparation of the 3-iso-quinolinecarboxamide [ 11 C]PK11195. To date, an impressive number of promising compounds - [ 11 C]PK11195-challengers - have been developed; some radioligands - for example, [ 11 C]PBR28, [ 11 C]DPA-713, [ 18 F]FEDAA1106 and [ 18 F]DPA-714 - are currently used in clinical trials. As illustrated in this review, the methodologies applied for the preparation of these compounds remain mainly [ 11 C]methylations using [ 11 C]MeI or [ 11 C]MeOTf and SN2- type nucleophilic aliphatic [ 18 F]fluorinations - two processes illustrating the state-of-the-art arsenal of reactions that involves these two short-lived radioisotopes - but alternative processes, such as [ 11 C]carbonylations using [ 11 C]CO and [ 11 C]COCl 2 as well as SNAr-type nucleophilic [ 18 F]fluorinations, have also been reported and as such, reviewed herein. (authors)

  20. Influence of Plio-Pleistocene basin hydrology on the Turkana hominin enamel carbonate δ(18)O values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Rhonda L

    2015-09-01

    Stable oxygen isotopes of hominin enamel carbonate (δ(18)OEC) provide a window into aspects of past drinking behavior and diet, body size, breastfeeding and weaning, mobility, and paleoclimate. It is tempting to compare all hominins across time and space in order to gauge species-level adaptations to changing environments and niche separation between those living sympatrically. Basinal, sub-basinal, and micro-environmental differences, however, may exert an influence on variation in enamel carbonate isotopic values that must be reconciled before hominin species across Africa can be meaningfully compared. Plio-Pleistocene Turkana hominin δ(18)OEC values show a considerable spread, potentially revealing many intrinsic and extrinsic contributing factors operating on different scales. In this study, I examine Turkana hominin δ(18)OEC values relative to identity (taxon, tooth type and number, body size of taxon), dietary (δ(13)C value, Turkana coeval and modern mammalian δ(18)OEC values), and contextual (time, depositional environment) information of each specimen and collection locality and discuss various potential influences. Turkana hominin δ(18)OEC values may primarily reflect differences in imbibed water sources (lake vs. river) as a function of evolving basin hydrology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. δ13C and δ18O measurements of carbonate rocks using Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucic, G.; Kim-Hak, D.; Curtis, J. H.

    2017-12-01

    We present a novel, user friendly and cost effective method for the analysis of δ13C and δ18O in CO2 gas obtained from acid digestion of carbonate rocks. 2 to 3 milligrams of pure carbonate, ground to a powder, is digested in a pre-evacuated glass vial using 100% phosphoric acid at 70° C. Vials with the reacted samples are then loaded onto an automated carousel sampler where produced CO2 gas in the headspace is extracted and sent to a Picarro CRDS isotopic C and O analyzer. Once loaded onto the carousel, 49 samples may be analyzed automatically at a rate of one sample every 15 minutes. δ13C and δ18O of the sample are reported in real time with a precision of 0.2 and 0.4 per mil, respectively. The portability and simplicity of the autosampler and CRDS setup opens up potential for permanent and mobile deployments, enabling near-realtime sampling feedback in the lab or on the go in the field. Consumable and operating costs are small when compared to other technology in use, making the CRDS-Carbonate system suitable for large and small research labs. Finally, we present a summary results from a series of validation tests in which standards and natural carbonate rock samples were analyzed and compared to traditional Kiel-IRMS results.

  2. Carbon-13 and oxygen-18 isotope effects in the decarboxylation of nicotinic acid of natural isotopic composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, M.; Zielinska, A.; Papiernik-Zielinska, H.; McKenzie, J.A.; Bernasconi, S.; Paul, H.

    1998-01-01

    Carbon-13 and oxygen-18 isotope effects in the decarboxylation of nicotinic acid of natural isotopic composition above and below its melting temperature have been studied and compared with the primary (PKIE) and secondary kinetic isotope effects (SKIE) of 13 C and 18 O, respectively, in the decarboxylation of other heterocyclic acids. The temperature dependence of the secondary oxygen-18 isotope effects is negative in the total 221-255 deg C temperature interval investigated initially. The 13 C KIE measured above melting point of N.A. (temperature interval 235-270 deg C) are located in the range 1.007-1.009. Below melting point of nicotinic acid the 13 C KIE are larger and reveal the negative temperature dependence ( 13 C KIE decreases with decreasing the reaction temperature from 1.013/at 230 deg C to 1.0114/at 221 deg C). A discussion of the above isotopic results is presented. (author)

  3. High precision measurement by mass spectrometry of isotopic ratios δ13C and δ18O of carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourg, Chr.; Ciais, Ph.

    1998-02-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is the second natural greenhouse gas in the Earth's atmosphere, after vapor water. Its concentration levels have been increasing by 25% due to human activities over the past 200 years, thus increasing the radiative forcing at the surface and potentially including major climate change for the next centuries. It is of primary importance to better quantify the role of carbon contained into the oceans and the land biota in moderating the anthropic perturbation. To do so, 13 C and 18 O isotopes are unique tools which allow to estimate indirectly the terrestrial CO 2 fluxes based on atmospheric measurements. The present reports describes the experimental set-up used at the CFR-LMCE laboratory to measure the 13 C and 18 O natural abundance in atmospheric carbon dioxide. This technique requires high levels of both precision and accuracy because the geochemical signal nevertheless consists of very small changes in isotopic composition (on the order of 0.01 permits). Also, given the large number of samples to analyses routinely, it must be run in an automatic mode. Our experiment design consists of 'extraction line' where CO 2 is separated cryogenically from the air, which is coupled to a (Finnigan MAT 252) mass spectrometer. (authors)

  4. Carbon-11 and fluorine-18 chemistry devoted to molecular probes for imaging the brain with positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollé, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Exploration of the living human brain in real-time and in a noninvasive way was for centuries only a dream, made, however, possible today with the remarkable development during the four last decades of powerful molecular imaging techniques, and especially positron emission tomography (PET). Molecular PET imaging relies, from a chemical point of view, on the use and preparation of a positron-emitting radiolabelled probe or radiotracer, notably compounds incorporating one of two short-lived radionuclides fluorine-18 (T1/2 : 109.8 min) and carbon-11 (T1/2 : 20.38 min). The growing availability and interest for the radiohalogen fluorine-18 in radiopharmaceutical chemistry undoubtedly results from its convenient half-life and the successful use in clinical oncology of 2-[(18) F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose ([(18) F]FDG). The special interest of carbon-11 is not only that carbon is present in virtually all biomolecules and drugs allowing therefore for isotopic labelling of their chemical structures but also that a given molecule could be radiolabelled at different functions or sites, permitting to explore (or to take advantage of) in vivo metabolic pathways. PET chemistry includes production of these short-lived radioactive isotopes via nuclear transmutation reactions using a cyclotron, and is directed towards the development of rapid synthetic methods, at the trace level, for the introduction of these nuclides into a molecule, as well as the use of fast purification, analysis and formulation techniques. PET chemistry is the driving force in molecular PET imaging, and this special issue of the Journal of Labelled Compounds and Radiopharmaceuticals, which is strongly chemistry and radiochemistry-oriented, aims at illustrating, be it in part only, the state-of-the-art arsenal of reactions currently available and its potential for the research and development of specific molecular probes labelled with the positron emitters carbon-11 and fluorine-18, with optimal imaging

  5. The Reactions of Hot Fluorine-18 with Gaseous Carbon Tetrafluoride; Reactions des Atomes {sup 18}F Chauds avec le Tetrafluorure de Carbone en Phase Gazeuse; Reaktsii goryachikh atomov ftora-18 s gazovoj fazoj tetraftormetana; Reacciones de Atomos Calientes de Fluor-18 con Tetrafluoruro de Carbono Gaseoso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colebourne, N.; Todd, J. F.J.; Wolfgang, R. [Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States)

    1965-04-15

    Studies on the reactions of hot Fie atoms with carbon tetrafluoride are reported. Gaseous samples were exposed to the 40-60 MeV (maximum) bremsstrahlung beam of the Yale University Electron Accelerator. The F{sup 19} ({gamma}, n) F{sup 18} process produces F{sup 18} with a kinetic energy of the order of 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} eV. These species lose energy by collision and are expected to reach the ''chemical'' energy range (< 100 eV) as ground state atoms. Ethylene was found to be a good scavenger for thermal F{sup 18} atoms. Analysis of products was made using standard radio-gas chromatography techniques. The system was found to be quite sensitive to extraneous radiation damage effects and appropriate precautions were taken. Hot displacement reactions, similar to those observed for hot hydrogen, but much less efficient, were found: F{sup 18} + CF{sup 4} --> CF{sub 3}F{sup 18} + F, F{sup 18} +CF{sub 4} --> CF{sub 2}F{sup 18} + (F + F), It was impossible to study the abstraction reaction F{sup 18} + CF{sub 4} --> CF{sub 3} + FF{sup 18} directly. However, indirect evidence suggests that it also has a low efficiency. Detailed studies of the effect of moderator on the F{sup 18} + CF{sub 4} system have been made. The data obtained were analysed by means of the kinetic theory of hot reactions. The system was found to be in accord with this formalism, providing quantitative confirmation of the present interpretation of the results. The carbon tetrafluoride and methane systems provide a basis for some tentative conclusions on the mechanisms of hot fluorine atom reactions. At present it appears that with certain important, but natural, modifications the model first developed for hot hydrogen atoms is applicable [French] Le memoire est consacre a des etudes sur les reactions des atomes {sup 18}F chauds avec le tetrafluorure de carbone. Des echantillons gazeux ont ete exposes a un faisceau de rayonnements de freinage de 40 a 60 MeV (maximum) emis par l'accelerateur d

  6. Ostracod calcite records the 18O/16O ratio of the bicarbonate and carbonate ions in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devriendt, Laurent S.; McGregor, Helen V.; Chivas, Allan R.

    2017-10-01

    The δ18O of ostracod valves is widely used to infer water δ18O and temperature. However, ostracod δ18O appears sensitive to other environmental variables. In addition, there is species-dependent ostracod calcite 18O enrichment, relative to slowly precipitated inorganic calcite under the same conditions. Together these uncertainties complicate ostracod paleoclimate reconstructions. This study presents a new understanding of the causes of ostracod δ18O variations based on a global database of published ostracod δ18O values in lake, marine and coastal environments, and from culture experiments. The database includes associated field/experiment host water parameters including temperature (-1 to 32 °C), water δ18O (-13.2‰ to 4.3‰ VSMOW), pH (6.9-10.4), salinity (0-72 g/kg), calcite saturation states (0.6-26), and dissolved inorganic carbon concentration [DIC] (0.9-54.3 mmol/kg). The data show that: (1) the δ18O of marine and non-marine ostracods reflects the 18O/16O of the sum of host water CO32- and HCO3- ions. For example, at a given temperature, the δ18O of non-marine ostracods decreases by 4‰ to 6‰ as [CO32-]/[DIC] reaches 70%, depending on the ostracod species. In low [CO32-]/[DIC] settings (i.e. high HCO3-/CO32-), ostracod 18O/16O is close to the 18O/16O of HCO3- ions, which explains why on average ostracod δ18O is higher than the δ18O of inorganic calcite precipitated slowly under the same conditions. (2) Taxonomic offsets in ostracod δ18O vary with the host water [CO32-]/[DIC]. In environments where HCO3- ≫ CO32- (i.e. most freshwater lakes), the 18O/16O of Candonids is indistinguishable from the 18O/16O of HCO3- ions (difference of 0.10 ± 0.16‰) while the 18O/16O of Cyprids is lower than the 18O/16O of HCO3- ions by -0.77‰ to -0.32‰, Cytherids by -0.88 ± 0.29‰, and Limnocytherids by -1.12 ± 0.05‰. (3) The sensitivity of ostracod δ18O to [CO32-]/[DIC] also varies with taxonomy. For each percent increase in [CO32-]/[DIC

  7. Carbon 14, carbon 13 and oxygen 18 in carbonate sediments from lake Titicaca. Preliminary estimates of sedimentation rate and paleoclimatological attempt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontes, J.-C.; Boulange, Bruno; Rodrigo, L.-A.

    1981-01-01

    Stable isotope and radiocarbon measurements in carbonates from Titicaca lake indicate equilibrium with lake water and atmospheric CO 2 . Average sedimentation rate is close to 0,5 mm.yr -1 for the last millenium which was marked by large fluctuations of the hydrologic balance and lake level [fr

  8. Carbon 14, carbon 13 and oxygen 18 in carbonate sediments from Lake Titicaca. Preliminary estimates of sedimentation rate and paleoclimatological attempt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontes, J.C. (Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)); Boulange, B. (Orstom, 75 - Paris (France)); Rodrigo, L.A. (Universidad Mayor de San Andres, La Paz (Bolivia). Lab. de Fisica Cosmica de Chacaltaya)

    1981-07-06

    Stable isotope and radiocarbon measurements in carbonates from Lake Titicaca indicate equilibrium with lake water and atmospheric CO/sub 2/. Average sedimentation rate is close to 0,5 mm.yr/sup -1/ for the last millenium which was marked by large fluctuations of the hydrologic balance and lake level.

  9. Thermometry using 1/8 W carbon resistors in a temperature region around 10 mK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayasi, S.; Shinohara, M.; Ono, K.

    1976-01-01

    The resistance-temperature characteristics of 1/8 W carbon resistors of grade ERC-18SG, manufactured by Matsushita, with the nominal values of 48, 82, 100, 220 and 330 Ω have been measured in the region 4.2 K to 25 mK and their application as thermometers in this region is confirmed. For the 82 Ω resistor, measurements were taken at temperatures below 10mK. The temperature dependence of the resistance was found to be linear on the log-log plot over a wide range below 50 mK. The sensitivity remains finite even at 6 mK, but below 10 mK rapid measurements were prevented by a considerable increase in the thermal relaxation time. Measurement of the characteristics of several 100 Ω resistors from two different sets showed that resistors from the same set separate into two groups with different characteristics. This become appreciable at temperatures below 4.2 K, so it is difficult to predict the behaviour of Matsushite resistors below 4.2 K from the characteristics at higher temperatures. (author)

  10. In folio study of carbonic anhydrase and Rubisco activities in higher C{sub 3} plants using {sup 18}O and mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltier, G.; Despax, V.; Dimon, B.; Rumeau, D.; Tourneux, C.

    1994-12-31

    This document studies the effects of a mild water stress and carbonic anhydrase activity by ethoxyzolamide (EZA) on the diffusion of CO{sub 2} in leaves, by {sup 18}O labelling of O{sub 2} and of CO{sub 2} associated to mass spectrometry. (A.B.). 5 refs., 2 figs.

  11. 87Sr/86Sr and 18O/16O ratios, interstitial water chemistry and diagenesis in deep-sea carbonate sediments of the Ontong Java Plateau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elderfield, H.; Oldfield, R.K.; Hawkesworth, C.J.

    1982-01-01

    Interstitial waters and sediments from DSDP sites 288 and 289 contain information on the chemistry and diagenesis of carbonate in deep-sea sediments and on the role of volcanic matter alteration processes. Sr/Ca ratios are species dependent in unaltered foraminifera from site 289 and atom ratios exceed those predicted by distribution coefficient data. During diagenesis Sr/Ca ratios of carbonates decrease and reach the theoretical distribution at a depth which is identical to the depth of Sr isotopic equilibration, where 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios of interstitial waters and carbonates converge. Mg/Ca ratios in the carbonates do not increase with depth as found in some other DSDP sites, possibly because of diagenetic re-equilibration with interstitial waters showing decreasing Mg 2+ /Ca 2+ ratios with depth due to Ca input and Mg removal by alteration of volcanic matter. Interstitial 18 O/ 16 O ratios increase with depth at site 289 to delta 18 O = 0.67 per thousand (SMOW), reflecting carbonate recrystallization at elevated temperatures, the first recorded evidence of this effect in interstitial waters. Interstitial Sr 2+ concentrations reach high levels, up to 1 mM, chiefly because of carbonate recrystallization. However, 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios decrease from 0.7092 to less than 0.7078, lower than for contemporaneous sea water, showing that there is a volcanic input of strontium at depth. (author)

  12. Long-term biobarriers to plant and animal intrusions of uranium tailings. [24% trifluralin, 18% carbon black, and 58% polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, J.F.; Burton, F.G.; Cataldo, D.A.; Skiens, W.E.; Gano, K.A.

    1982-09-01

    The objective of this project was to develop and evaluate the effectiveness of physical and chemical barriers designed to prevent plant and animal breachment of uranium mill tailings containment systems for an extended period of time. A polymeric carrier/biocide delivery system was developed and tested in the laboratory, greenhouse and field. A continuous flow technique was established to determine the release rates of the biocides from the PCD systems; polymeric carrier specifications were established. Studies were conducted to determine effective biocide concentrations required to produce a phytotoxic response and the relative rates of phytotoxin degradation resulting from chemical and biological breakdown in soils. The final PCD system developed was a pelletized system containing 24% trifluralin, 18% carbon black and 58% polymer. Pellets were placed in the soil at the Grand Junction U-tailings site at one in. and two in. intervals. Data obtained in the field determined that the pellets released enough herbicide to the soil layer to stop root elongation past the barrier. Physical barriers to subsurface movement of burrowing animals were investigated. Small crushed stone (1 to 1 1/2 in. diameter) placed over asphalt emulsion and multilayer soil seals proved effective as barriers to a small mammal (ground squirrels) but were not of sufficient size to stop a larger animal (the prairie dog). No penetrations were made through the asphalt emulsion or the clay layer of the multilayer soil seals by either of the two mammals tested. A literature survey was prepared and published on the burrowing habits of the animals that may be found at U-tailings sites.

  13. Evaluation of the use of activated carbon for the filtration of gaseous effluents generated in the production of the radiopharmaceutical FDG-18F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, R.S.; Goulart, A.S.; Flores, M.R.; Saibt, M.

    2017-01-01

    Gaseous rejects generated in the production of FDG- 18 F are produced mainly during the irradiation of the enriched water (H2O 18 ) within the niobium / target body at the cyclotron accelerator and during the process of FDG- 18 F synthesis in the synthesizer modules within the cell hot. In order to reduce the levels of gaseous effluents emitted, activated carbon filters are used in the exhaust system. These have the ability to adsorb the 18 F gaseous molecules generated in the synthesis. This work aims to quantify the efficiency of the activated carbon filters in relation to the dose rate before and after the passage of the gases through the filtration system. To quantify the values in the exhaust system, two radiation detectors were used, in the equivalent dose rate mode in μSv/h. To evaluate the values obtained, graphs of the levels before and after the filtration system were generated. These graphs were compared to each other, relating the values found. The generated graphs showed a high efficiency in the filtration of gaseous effluents. Several dose rate peaks are presented in the exhaust system during FDG- 18 F synthesis, however after the passage of the gases through the filters these peaks become values very close to the Background values

  14. Paleoenvironments, δ13C and δ18O signatures in the Neoproterozoic carbonates of the Comba Basin, Republic of Congo: Implications for regional correlations and Marinoan event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Préat, Alain; Delpomdor, Franck; Ackouala Mfere, Anna Perla; Callec, Yannick

    2018-01-01

    The Ediacaran Schisto-Calcaire Group is a ∼1300 m-thick succession belonging to the West Congo Supergroup in Central Africa. In the Comba Basin, it consists of three carbonate-dominated units defined as formations (SCI to SCIII) that are unconformably overlain by clastic deposits (Mpioka Group) interpreted as a molassic formation associated with the Panafrican Orogen. The underlying Upper Tillite and Cap Carbonate (SCIa) units, considered as markers of the Snowball Earth event were studied in three sections. We investigated the carbonates of the Schisto-Calcaire Group by defining new microfacies (MF1-MF7) and we performed C and O isotopic analyses in order to constraint the depositional and diagenetic events directly after the Marinoan interval. Stratigraphic variations of the stable isotopes are important in the series with lighter δ18O values (>1.5‰) than those of the Neoproterozoic ocean in the SCIc unit. According to regional stratigraphy a temperature effect can be dismissed and a freshwater surface layer is the origin of such negative δ18O values in this unit. The negative δ13C anomaly (-3.5‰ on average) of the Cap Carbonate is similarly to the δ18O values (-6.4‰ on average) in the range of the marine domain during postglacial sea level rise. The sample suite as a whole (SCII and SCIII formations) displays heavier δ18O and δ13C than those of the lower part (SCI unit) of the Schisto-Calcaire Group. The comparison with the Lower Congo (Democratic Republic of Congo) and Nyanga (Gabon) basins shows that the meteoric flushing in SCIc unit of the Schisto-Calcaire Group was regional and not local, and could be derived from a climatic evolution. Although an overall overprint is present, our isotopic relationships argue against overall diagenetic resetting of primary compositions and suggest that with careful examination combined with detailed petrographic analysis general depositional and diagenetic controls can be discerned in oxygen and carbon

  15. Measured neutron carbon kerma factors from 14.1 MeV to 18 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deluca, P.M.; Barschall, H.H.; McDonald, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    For A-150 tissue-equivalent plastic, the total neutron kerma is dominated by the hydrogen kerma. Tissue kerma is inferred with reasonable accuracy by normalization to the kerma factor ratio between tissue and A-150 plastic. Because of the close match in the hydrogen abundance in these materials, the principal uncertainty is due to the kerma factors of carbon and oxygen. We have measured carbon kerma factor values of 0.183+-0.015 10 -8 cGy cm 2 and 0.210+-0.016 10 -8 cGy cm 2 at 14.1-MeV and 15-MeV neutron energy, respectively. A preliminary value of 0.297+-0.03 10 -8 cGy cm 2 has been determined at 17.9 MeV. A recent microscopic cross section measurement of the (n,n'3α) reaction in carbon at 14.1-MeV energy gives a kerma factor of 0.184+-0.019 10 -8 cGy cm 2 in agreement with the present result

  16. Measured neutron carbon kerma factors from 14.1 MeV to 18 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deluca, P.M. Jr.; Barschall, H.H.; Haight, R.C.; McDonald, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    For A-150 tissue-equivalent plastic, the total neutron kerma is dominated by the hydrogen kerma. Tissue kerma is inferred with reasonable accuracy by normalization to the kerma factor ratio between tissue and A-150 plastic. Because of the close match in the hydrogen abundance in these materials, the principal uncertainty is due to the kerma factors of carbon and oxygen. We have measured carbon kerma factor values of 0.183 +- 0.015 10 -8 cGy cm 2 and 0.210 +- 0.16 10 -8 cGy cm 2 at 14.1-MeV and 15-MeV neutron energy, respectively. A preliminary value of 0.297 +- 0.03 10 -8 cGy cm 2 has been determined at 17.9 MeV. A recent microscopic cross section measurement of the (n,n'3α) reaction in carbon at 14.1-MeV energy gives a kerma factor of 0.184 +- 0.019 10 8 cGy cm 2 in agreement with the present result. 9 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Synthesis and biological evaluation of carbon-11- and fluorine-18-labeled 2-oxoquinoline derivatives for type 2 cannabinoid receptor positron emission tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evens, Nele; Muccioli, Giulio G.; Houbrechts, Nele; Lambert, Didier M.; Verbruggen, Alfons M.; Van Laere, Koen; Bormans, Guy M.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The type 2 cannabinoid (CB 2 ) receptor is part of the endocannabinoid system and has been suggested as a mediator of several central and peripheral inflammatory processes. Imaging of the CB 2 receptor has been unsuccessful so far. We synthesized and evaluated a carbon-11- and a fluorine-18-labeled 2-oxoquinoline derivative as new PET tracers with high specificity and affinity for the CB 2 receptor. Methods: Two 2-oxoquinoline derivatives were synthesized and radiolabeled with either carbon-11 or fluorine-18. Their affinity and selectivity for the human CB 2 receptor were determined. Biological evaluation was done by biodistribution, radiometabolite and autoradiography studies in mice. Results: In vitro studies showed that both compounds are high affinity CB 2 -specific inverse agonists. Biodistribution study of the tracers in mice showed a high in vivo initial brain uptake and fast brain washout, in accordance with the low CB 2 receptor expression levels in normal brain. A persistently high in vivo binding to the spleen was observed, which was inhibited by pretreatment with two structurally unrelated CB 2 selective inverse agonists. In vitro autoradiography studies with the radioligands confirmed CB 2 -specific binding to the mouse spleen. Conclusion: We synthesized two novel CB 2 receptor PET tracers that show high affinity/selectivity for CB 2 receptors. Both tracers show favourable characteristics as radioligands for central and peripheral in vivo visualization of the CB 2 receptor and are promising candidates for primate and human CB 2 PET imaging.

  18. Stable isotope composition of inorganic carbonates from Lake Abiyata (Ethiopia): Attempt of reconstructing δ18O palaeohydrological changes during the Holocene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibert, E.; Massault, M.; Travi, Y.; Chernet, T.

    2002-01-01

    Due to the sensitivity of its regional climate to the African monsoon seasonal shifting, Ethiopia has been designated as a key site for palaeoenvironmental reconstructions mainly within the IGBP-PAGES-PEPIII programme. Under the French-Ethiopian ERICA project, we focused on Lake Abiyata located in the Ziway-Shala basin (Central Ethiopia) which has experienced several lacustrine highstands during the Late Pleistocene and Holocene. At present, Lake Abiyata is a closed lake with a very flat catchment area, and corresponds to a half, deep graben infilled by 600-m of sedimentary deposits. In 1995, a 12.6-m-long sequence ABII was cored in Lake Abiyata. A reliable 14 C-AMS chronology was defined on both organic matter and inorganic carbonates. Both the modern hydrologeological and geochemical balances of the 'groundwater-lake' system indicate that (i) carbonate cristallization mainly occurs at the water-sediment interface via the mixing of lake water and 14 C-depleted groundwaters, and that (ii) modern algae form in equilibrium with the atmospheric reservoir. Phytoplankton is thus considered as an authigenic material, and Core ABII has registered 13,500 cal. yr B.P. of environmental history. The evidence of calcite precipitation at the water-sediment interface calls into question the direct palaeoclimatic reconstruction based on inorganic carbonates. Since the evolution of isotopic contents of carbonates might be linked to the variable proportion of the 'lake/groundwater' end-members in the mixing, calculations based on isotopic mass balance models may allow for the reconstruction of δ 18 O composition of the lake water. Two major changes can be highlighted: (i) the ∼12,000-5500 cal. yr B.P. period is associated to low 18 O contents of lake water, and corresponds to an open hydrological system, with a high lacustrine phytoplanktonic productivity, and (ii) from ∼5500 cal. yr B.P. to Present, regressive conditions are suggested by the δ 18 O enrichment of the lake

  19. The effect of carbonic anhydrase on the kinetics and equilibrium of the oxygen isotope exchange in the CO2-H2O system: Implications for δ18O vital effects in biogenic carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikawa, Joji; Zeebe, Richard E.

    2012-10-01

    Interpretations of the primary paleoceanographic information recorded in stable oxygen isotope values (δ18O) of biogenic CaCO3 can be obscured by disequilibrium effects. CaCO3 is often depleted in 18O relative to the δ18O values expected for precipitation in thermodynamic equilibrium with ambient seawater as a result of vital effects. Vital effects in δ18O have been explained in terms of the influence of fluid pH on the overall δ18O of the sum of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) species (often referred to as "pH model") and in terms of 18O depletion as a result of the kinetic effects associated with CO2 hydration (CO2 + H2O ↔ H2CO3 ↔ HCO3- + H+) and CO2 hydroxylation (CO2 + OH- ↔ HCO3-) in the calcification sites (so-called "kinetic model"). This study addresses the potential role of an enzyme, carbonic anhydrase (CA), that catalyzes inter-conversion of CO2 and HCO3- in relation to the underlying mechanism of vital effects. We performed quantitative inorganic carbonate precipitation experiments in order to examine the changes in 18O equilibration rate as a function of CA concentration. Experiments were performed at pH 8.3 and 8.9. These pH values are comparable to the average surface ocean pH and elevated pH levels observed in the calcification sites of some coral and foraminiferal species, respectively. The rate of uncatalyzed 18O exchange in the CO2-H2O system is governed by the pH-dependent DIC speciation and the kinetic rate constant for CO2 hydration and hydroxylation, which can be summarized by a simple mathematical expression. The results from control experiments (no CA addition) are in agreement with this expression. The results from control experiments also suggest that the most recently published kinetic rate constant for CO2 hydroxylation has been overestimated. When CA is present, the 18O equilibration process is greatly enhanced at both pH levels due to the catalysis of CO2 hydration by the enzyme. For example, the time required for 18O

  20. Late Glacial temperature and precipitation changes in the lowland Neotropics by tandem measurement of δ 18O in biogenic carbonate and gypsum hydration water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodell, David A.; Turchyn, Alexandra V.; Wiseman, Camilla J.; Escobar, Jaime; Curtis, Jason H.; Brenner, Mark; Gilli, Adrian; Mueller, Andreas D.; Anselmetti, Flavio; Ariztegui, Daniel; Brown, Erik T.

    2012-01-01

    We applied a new method to reconstruct paleotemperature in the tropics during the last deglaciation by measuring oxygen isotopes of co-occurring gypsum hydration water and biogenic carbonate in sediment cores from two lakes on the Yucatan Peninsula. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope values of interstitial and gypsum hydration water indicate that the crystallization water preserves the isotopic signal of the lake water, and has not undergone post-depositional isotopic exchange with sediment pore water. The estimated lake water δ18O is combined with carbonate δ18O to calculate paleotemperature. Three paired measurements of 1200-yr-old gypsum and gastropod aragonite from Lake Chichancanab, Mexico, yielded a mean temperature of 26 °C (range 23-29.5 °C), which is consistent with the mean and range of mean annual temperatures (MAT) in the region today. Paired measurements of ostracods, gastropods, and gypsum hydration water samples were measured in cores from Lake Petén Itzá, Guatemala, spanning the Late Glacial and early Holocene period (18.5-10.4 ka). The lowest recorded temperatures occurred at the start of Heinrich Stadial (HS) 1 at 18.5 ka. Inferred temperatures from benthic ostracods ranged from 16 to 20 °C during HS 1, which is 6-10 °C cooler than MAT in the region today, whereas temperatures derived from shallow-water gastropods were generally warmer (20-25 °C), reflecting epilimnetic temperatures. The derived temperatures support previous findings of greater tropical cooling on land in Central America during the Late Glacial than indicated by nearby marine records. Temperature increased in two steps during the last deglaciation. The first occurred during the Bolling-Allerod (B-A; from 14.7 to 13 ka) when temperature rose to 20-24 °C towards the end of this period. The second step occurred at 10.4 ka near the beginning of the Holocene when ostracod-inferred temperature rose to 26 °C, reflecting modern hypolimnetic temperature set during winter, whereas

  1. Measurement and modelling of the solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous 1,8-p-menthane-diamine solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jie; Lin, Xiao; Ning, Peng-Ge; Cao, Hong-Bin; Zhang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Solubility of CO 2 was measured in aqueous MDA up to 1.97 CO 2 loading. • KE model was used to correlate VLE data in α 1 regions separately. • Four chemical equilibrium constants were determined. • Sterically hindering effect for MDA in CO 2 absorption was demonstrated. • MDA absorption efficiency was compared with MEA, MDEA and PZ. -- Abstract: The solubility of CO 2 in aqueous 1,8-p-menthane-diamine (MDA) solution with substance concentrations of 0.625 and 1.25 mol · L −1 was measured at temperatures (313.15, 333.15 and 353.15) K with CO 2 partial pressures ranging from (0.55 to 776.0) kPa and CO 2 loading ranging from (0.120 to 1.97) mol CO 2 per mol MDA. The gas solubility results are expressed as the partial pressure of CO 2 (P CO 2 ) against its mole ratio, i.e.α CO 2 (mol CO 2 per mol MDA). The chemical absorption reaction and thermodynamic model have been proposed. The physicochemical Kent–Eisenberg model was used to correlate all the experimental results of the solubility of CO 2 in the aqueous MDA solutions under investigation. The chemical equilibrium constants and model parameters were determined by fitting the VLE data

  2. Recharge areas and hydrochemistry of carbonate springs issuing from Semmering Massif, Austria, based on long-term oxygen-18 and hydrochemical data evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehdegho, Beyene; Reichl, Peter

    2002-10-01

    Résumé. Les teneurs en oxygène-18 et l'hydrochimie des sources émergeant du massif de Semmering ont été suivies de manière intensive dans le but de caractériser les zones de recharge et l'évolution hydrochimique. L'effet d'altitude sur le δ18O a été déterminé grâce aux données isotopiques et hydrogéologiques de petites sources de référence, principalement en terrains cristallins; cet effet est d'environ -0,27 et -0,21‰ par 100 m pour les versants respectivement nord et sud du massif. En appliquant ces valeurs, l'altitude moyenne de recharge des sources a été calculée. Pour les sources à fort débit issues des carbonates, elle est comprise entre 1,100 et 1,400 m, compatible avec le cadre topographique et hydrogéologique des calcaires et des dolomies de l'Austro-alpin inférieur alimentant ces sources. La composition chimique des sources des carbonates est dominée par les ions Ca2+, Mg2+, HCO3- et SO42-. Les sources sont presque toutes proches de la saturation par rapport à la calcite, mais sont sous-saturées en dolomite (sauf quelques sources proches de la saturation). Comme cela est habituel en ce qui concerne le dioxyde de carbone fourni par les sols en régions montagneuses, la pCO2 équilibrante moyenne est faible, comprise entre 10-3.0 et 10-2.5 atm (0,1 à 0,3% en volume). En ce qui concerne les variations à long terme, le pH, SIc, Sid et la pCO2 équilibrante sont soumis à des variations saisonnières, alors que les concentrations en Ca2+, Mg2+ et HCO3- ne varient pratiquement pas. En intégrant les résultats de δ18O et les données hydrochimiques, la variabilité altitudinale du chimisme des eaux souterraines des carbonates est démontrée. Reflétant les variations d'activité biologique et des conditions de recharge dans les zones d'alimentation, une covariation négative résulte de l'altitude de recharge et de la pCO2 et la concentration en HCO3- n'est pas modifiée par aucun des termes source ou puits, ce qui fait varier

  3. Carbonization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennebutte, H G; Goutal, E

    1921-07-04

    Materials such as coal, peat, or schist are subjected to a rising temperature in successive stages in apparatus in which the distillation products are withdrawn at each stage. For example in a three-stage process, the acid products of the first or low-temperature stage are fixed in a suitable reagent, the basic products from a second or higher-temperature stage are absorbed in an acid reagent, hydrocarbons being retained by solvents, while the third are subjected to a pyrogenation process carried out in a closed vessel. Wherein the material is subjected in stages to a rising temperature, the gasified products being withdrawn at each stage, and are prevented as far as possible from mixing with the carbonized products.

  4. Effects of carbon nanomaterials fullerene C60 and fullerol C60(OH)18–22 on gills of fish Cyprinus carpio (Cyprinidae) exposed to ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Socoowski Britto, Roberta; Longaray Garcia, Márcia; Martins da Rocha, Alessandra; Artigas Flores, Juliana; Pinheiro, Maurício V. Brant; Monserrat, José María; Ribas Ferreira, Josencler L.

    2012-01-01

    In consequence of their growing use and demand, the inevitable environmental presence of nanomaterials (NMs) has raised concerns about their potential deleterious effects to aquatic environments. The carbon NM fullerene (C 60 ), which forms colloidal aggregates in water, and its water-soluble derivative fullerol (C 60 (OH) 18–22 ), which possesses antioxidant properties, are known to be photo-excited by ultraviolet (UV) or visible light. To investigate their potential hazards to aquatic organisms upon exposure to UV sunlight, this study analyzed (a) the in vitro behavior of fullerene and fullerol against peroxyl radicals (ROO·) under UV-A radiation and (b) the effects of these photo-excited NMs on oxidative stress parameters in functional gills extracted from the fish Cyprinus carpio (Cyprinidae). The variables measured were the total antioxidant capacity, lipid peroxidation (TBARS), the activities of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione reductase (GR) and glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL), and the levels of the non-enzymatic antioxidant glutathione (GSH). The obtained results revealed the following: (1) both NMs behaved in vitro as antioxidants against ROO· in the dark and as pro-oxidants in presence of UV-A, the latter effect being reversed by the addition of sodium azide, which is a singlet oxygen ( 1 O 2 ) quencher; (2) fullerene induced toxicity with or without UV-A incidence, with a significant (p 1 O 2 generation; and (3) fullerol also decreased GCL activity and GSH formation (p 1 O 2 formation.

  5. Stable Isotope (delta OXYGEN-18, Delta Deuterium, Delta CARBON-13) Dendroclimatological Studies in the Waterloo Region of Southern Ontario, Canada, Between AD 1610 and 1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhay, William Mark

    Oxygen (delta^{18} O), hydrogen (delta^2H) and carbon (delta^{13}C) isotopes were measured in wood cellulose from elm, white pine and maple trees that grew in southwestern Ontario, Canada. The measured oxygen and hydrogen isotopic data were used for model-based reconstructions of delta^{18}{O}_{meteoric water}, mean annual temperature (MAT) and relative humidity for a period, AD 1610 to 1880, that precedes instrumental records of climate. The carbon isotope measurements were compared with the Cellulose Model inferred climate data to reveal additional environmental information. Modifications made to the Cellulose Model focused on the dynamics of oxygen and hydrogen isotopic fractionation in plants during evapotranspiration and photosynthetic assimilation. For instance, kinetic fractionation of ^{18}O was found to be predictable from theoretical considerations of leaf energy balance and boundary layer dynamics. Kinetic fractionation during evapotranspiration is sensitive to the nature of the boundary layer, which is controlled by leaf size and morphology. Generally, plants with small segmented leaves have a lower component of turbidity in the leaf boundary layer, which results in higher kinetic fractionation values, than do plants having large simple leaves and more turbulent boundary layers. Kinetic ^2H enrichment in plant leaf water can also be rationalized in terms of leaf size and morphology when an apparent temperature-dependent isotope effect, acting in opposition to evaporative enrichment, is taken into account. Accounting for this temperature -dependent isotope effect helps to: (1) reconcile hydrogen kinetic fractionation inconsistencies for different leaves; (2) explain a temperature effect previously attributed to variable biochemical fractionation during cellulose synthesis, and; (3) verify hydrogen biochemical effects in plants. This improved characterization of the oxygen and hydrogen isotopic effects in plants, using the modified Cellulose Model, helped

  6. Integrated management of carbon sequestration and biomass utilization opportunities in a changing climate: Proceedings of the 2009 National Silviculture Workshop; 2009 June 15-18; Boise, ID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theresa B. Jain; Russell T. Graham; Jonathan Sandquist

    2010-01-01

    Forests are important for carbon sequestration and how they are manipulated either through natural or human induced disturbances can have an effect on CO2 emissions and carbon sequestration. The 2009 National Silviculture Workshop presented scientific information and management strategies to meet a variety of objectives while simultaneously addressing carbon...

  7. Dispersive micro-solid phase extraction of aromatic amines based on an efficient sorbent made from poly(1,8-diaminonaphtalen) and magnetic multiwalled carbon nanotubes composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian, Niloofar; Ebrahimzadeh, Homeira; Asgharinezhad, Ali Akbar

    2017-05-26

    In this work, the extraction of aromatic amines with an efficient magnetic multiwalled carbon nanotubes/Fe 3 O 4 @Poly(1,8-diaminonaphtalen) (MWCNTs/Fe 3 O 4 @PDAN) composite followed by HPLC-DAD was presented. Imprimis, the comparison among different magnetic nanosorbents including Fe 3 O 4 , MWCNTs/Fe 3 O 4 , Fe 3 O 4 @PDAN and MWCNTs/Fe 3 O 4 @PDAN was conducted. The obtained results, exhibited that the MWCNTs/Fe 3 O 4 @PDAN composite has the highest extraction efficiency for target analytes (3-nitroaniline, 4-chloroaniline, 4-bromoaniline and 3,4-dichloroaniline). This sorbent was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray dispersive spectroscopy, thermogravimetry analysis, scanning electron microscopy, transition electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry and X-ray diffraction. Design of experiment approach was applied to find out the optimal experimental conditions. The optimal extraction conditions were: pH of the sample, 10; sorbent amount, 10mg; sorption time, 15min; salt concentration, 10% w/w; type and volume of the eluent, 0.01molL -1 HCl in acetonitrile, 145μL; elution time; 2min. Under the optimal extraction conditions detection limits and linear dynamic ranges were achieved in the range of 0.1-0.25μgL -1 and 0.25-500μgL -1 , respectively. The percent of extraction recovery and relative standard deviations (n=5) were in the range of 31.2-82.8% and 3.4-5.6%, respectively. Finally, the applicability of the method was successfully confirmed by the extraction and determination of target analytes in various water samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Re-sampling of carbon stocks in forest soils and afforestation areas after 18 years – results from the 7x7 km Kvadratnet in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Ingeborg; Vesterdal, Lars; Stupak, Inge

    drainage regime of soils that were frequently water saturated in previous centuries. It was also hypothesized that carbon gains in soils with a low or intermediate carbon stock, typical of well-drained soils, reflected the favorable, high precipitation conditions during the monitoring period, allowing...

  9. Evaluation of the use of activated carbon for the filtration of gaseous effluents generated in the production of the radiopharmaceutical FDG-{sup 18}F; Avaliação do uso de carvão ativado para filtração de efluentes gasosos gerados na produção do radiofármaco FDG-{sup 18}F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, R.S.; Goulart, A.S.; Flores, M.R.; Saibt, M., E-mail: rafael@nucleorad.com.br [NUCLEORAD Soluções em Proteção Radiológica, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Gaseous rejects generated in the production of FDG-{sup 18}F are produced mainly during the irradiation of the enriched water (H2O{sup 18}) within the niobium / target body at the cyclotron accelerator and during the process of FDG-{sup 18}F synthesis in the synthesizer modules within the cell hot. In order to reduce the levels of gaseous effluents emitted, activated carbon filters are used in the exhaust system. These have the ability to adsorb the {sup 18}F gaseous molecules generated in the synthesis. This work aims to quantify the efficiency of the activated carbon filters in relation to the dose rate before and after the passage of the gases through the filtration system. To quantify the values in the exhaust system, two radiation detectors were used, in the equivalent dose rate mode in μSv/h. To evaluate the values obtained, graphs of the levels before and after the filtration system were generated. These graphs were compared to each other, relating the values found. The generated graphs showed a high efficiency in the filtration of gaseous effluents. Several dose rate peaks are presented in the exhaust system during FDG-{sup 18}F synthesis, however after the passage of the gases through the filters these peaks become values very close to the Background values.

  10. Water circulation control on carbonate18O records in a low permeability clay formation and surrounding limestones: The Upper Dogger-Oxfordian sequence from the eastern Paris basin, France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavastre, Veronique; Ader, Magali; Buschaert, Stephane; Petit, Eddy; Javoy, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Up. Dog./Oxf. sequence is investigated for radioactive waste disposal feasibilities. → Marine carbonates suffered isotopic exchanges with meteoric water. → Modelling shows that very low W/R ratio can explain isotopic changes in clay layer. → Higher W/R ratio are needed to reach isotopic changes in carbonated layers. → Confirmed barrier property of clay layer was probably reached during early burial. - Abstract: Upper Dogger to Oxfordian Formations in the eastern part of the Paris basin (France) are currently being investigated by the French nuclear waste management agency (Andra), testing the feasibility of long-term deep nuclear waste disposal in the Callovo-Oxfordian claystones. Characterising the hydrogeological behaviour of the Callovo-Oxfordian claystones is, therefore, essential in evaluating its potential as a geological barrier. In order to evaluate and quantify water/rock interactions experienced over geological time by these Formations, bulk carbonate δ 13 C and δ 18 O were measured and calculations of water-rock ratios were used to explain carbonate18 O changes. Meteoric porewater and a maximum temperature reached of about 40 deg. C were considered. The Jurassic marine carbonate δ 13 C was preserved in the Callovo-Oxfordian claystones and in the overlying limestones (-0.28 per mille to 3.39 per mille/PDB), while the δ 18 O values are lower by 0-5 per mille (-6.25 per mille to -1.32 per mille/PDB). Calculations show that Upper Dogger and Oxfordian Limestone δ 18 O data: (i)have random-like distribution through theoretical δ 18 O-W/R curves and (ii)suggest that water/rock ratios (0.08-0.4) needed to explain δ 18 O changes are higher by a factor of about 2-20 compared to the present-day water/rock ratio. These features indicate advection in both aquifers. According to the history of the Paris basin, this hydrogeological behaviour could have been effective since Jurassic/Cretaceous transition times. Inversely, the

  11. Water circulation control on carbonate-{delta}{sup 18}O records in a low permeability clay formation and surrounding limestones: The Upper Dogger-Oxfordian sequence from the eastern Paris basin, France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavastre, Veronique, E-mail: veronique.lavastre@univ-st-etienne.fr [Universite de Lyon, Universite Jean Monnet, F-42023 Saint Etienne (France)] [CNRS, UMR 6524, LMV, F-42023 Saint Etienne (France)] [Laboratoire de Geochimie des Isotopes Stables, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris and Universite Paris 7 - UMR CNRS 7154, 4, place Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05 (France); Ader, Magali [Laboratoire de Geochimie des Isotopes Stables, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris and Universite Paris 7 - UMR CNRS 7154, 4, place Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05 (France); Buschaert, Stephane [Andra, Parc de la Croix Blanche, 7-8 rue Jean Monnet, 92 298 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Petit, Eddy; Javoy, Marc [Laboratoire de Geochimie des Isotopes Stables, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris and Universite Paris 7 - UMR CNRS 7154, 4, place Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05 (France)

    2011-05-15

    Research Highlights: > Up. Dog./Oxf. sequence is investigated for radioactive waste disposal feasibilities. > Marine carbonates suffered isotopic exchanges with meteoric water. > Modelling shows that very low W/R ratio can explain isotopic changes in clay layer. > Higher W/R ratio are needed to reach isotopic changes in carbonated layers. > Confirmed barrier property of clay layer was probably reached during early burial. - Abstract: Upper Dogger to Oxfordian Formations in the eastern part of the Paris basin (France) are currently being investigated by the French nuclear waste management agency (Andra), testing the feasibility of long-term deep nuclear waste disposal in the Callovo-Oxfordian claystones. Characterising the hydrogeological behaviour of the Callovo-Oxfordian claystones is, therefore, essential in evaluating its potential as a geological barrier. In order to evaluate and quantify water/rock interactions experienced over geological time by these Formations, bulk carbonate {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O were measured and calculations of water-rock ratios were used to explain carbonate-{delta}{sup 18}O changes. Meteoric porewater and a maximum temperature reached of about 40 deg. C were considered. The Jurassic marine carbonate {delta}{sup 13}C was preserved in the Callovo-Oxfordian claystones and in the overlying limestones (-0.28 per mille to 3.39 per mille/PDB), while the {delta}{sup 18}O values are lower by 0-5 per mille (-6.25 per mille to -1.32 per mille/PDB). Calculations show that Upper Dogger and Oxfordian Limestone {delta}{sup 18}O data: (i)have random-like distribution through theoretical {delta}{sup 18}O-W/R curves and (ii)suggest that water/rock ratios (0.08-0.4) needed to explain {delta}{sup 18}O changes are higher by a factor of about 2-20 compared to the present-day water/rock ratio. These features indicate advection in both aquifers. According to the history of the Paris basin, this hydrogeological behaviour could have been

  12. In vitro response to EPA, DPA, and DHA: Comparison of effects on ruminal fermentation and biohydrogenation of 18-carbon fatty acids in cows and ewes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toral, P G; Hervás, G; Carreño, D; Leskinen, H; Belenguer, A; Shingfield, K J; Frutos, P

    2017-08-01

    The modulation of milk fat nutritional quality through fish oil supplementation seems to be largely explained by the action of n-3 very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on ruminal biohydrogenation (BH) of C18 fatty acids (FA). However, relationships among this action, disappearance of those PUFA in the rumen, and potential detrimental consequences on ruminal fermentation remain uncertain. This study compared the effect of 20:5n-3 (eicosapentaenoic acid; EPA), 22:5n-3 (docosapentaenoic acid; DPA), and 22:6n-3 (docosahexaenoic acid; DHA) on rumen fermentation and BH of C18 FA and was conducted simultaneously in cows and sheep to provide novel insights into interspecies differences. The trial was performed in vitro using batch cultures of rumen microorganisms with inocula collected from cannulated cows and ewes. The PUFA were added at a dose of 2% incubated dry matter, and treatment effects on ruminal C18 FA concentrations, PUFA disappearances, and fermentation parameters (gas production, ammonia and volatile FA concentrations, and dry matter and neutral detergent fiber disappearances) were examined after 24 h of incubation. A principal component analysis suggested that responses to PUFA treatments explained most of the variability; those of ruminant species were of lower relevance. Overall, EPA and DHA were equally effective for inhibiting the saturation of trans-11 18:1 to 18:0 and had a similar influence on ruminal fermentation in cows and sheep (e.g., reductions in gas production and acetate:propionate ratio). Nevertheless, DHA further promoted alternative BH pathways that lead to trans-10 18:1 accumulation, and EPA seemed to have specific effects on 18:3n-3 metabolism. Only minor variations attributable to DPA were observed in the studied parameters, suggesting a low contribution of this FA to the action of marine lipids. Although most changes due to the added PUFA were comparable in bovine and ovine, there were also relevant specificities, such as a

  13. Synthesis and carbon-11-labeling of p-MeO-SSR180575, a novel indoleacetamide-based candidate for PET imaging of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (TSPO 18 kDa)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damont, A.L.; Le Helleix, St.; Kuhnast, B.; Boisgard, R.; Tavitian, B.; Dolle, F.; Marguet, F.; Puech, F.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows: Objectives: The 3-iso-quinolinecarboxamide [ 11 C]PK11195, despite its low brain uptake and high level of nonspecific binding, is still the most widely used PET-radioligand for the in vivo imaging of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR or TSPO 18 kDa). Several new PBR radioligands are currently developed to replace [ 11 C]PK11195 [1], e.g the pyrazolo[1, 5-a]pyrimidine-acetamides [ 11 C]DPA-713 and [ 18 F]DPA-714, the imidazo[1, 2-a]pyridine-acetamides [ 11 C]CLINME and [ 18 F]PBR111 and the N-benzyl-N-(2-phenoxy-aryl)- acetamides [ 11 C]PBR28 and [ 18 F]FEDAA1106. Another attractive newly identified chemical class of structures are the indole-acetamides and notably compounds derived from the lead compound SSR180575 [2]. Herein are reported the synthesis and the labelling with the positron-emitter carbon-11 (half-life: 20.38 min) of a novel derivative of SSR180575, bearing a para methoxy function on its phenyl ring. Methods: p-MeO-SSR180575 (1) was synthesized from commercially available 4-chloro-2-nitrotoluene in 10 steps. O-demethylation, performed with a boron tribromide solution in dichloromethane at low temperature, afforded the free phenol derivative 2. Carbon-11 labeling of p-MeO-SSR180575 (1) was performed using a TRACERLab FX-C Pro synthesizer (GEMS) and comprised (1) trapping of [ 11 C]MeOTf at -10 C in acetone (0.3 mL) containing the nor-derivative 2 (O-demethylated, 0.6-0.9 mg) and aq. 3N NaOH (8 μL); (2) heating at 110 C for 2 min; (3) concentration to dryness and taking up the residue in 1.0 mL of the HPLC mobile phase; (4) purification using semi-preparative reversed-phase HPLC (Waters Symmetry R C-18 - eluent: CH 3 CN / H 2 O / TFA: 50 / 50 / 0.1 (v:v:v) - flow rate: 5 mL/min - detection at 254 nm) and (5) SepPak Plus R C-18-based formulation for i.v. injection approach was the pyridazine ring formation reaction that proceeded partially: the maximum conversion of the intermediate diester-indole reacting

  14. Synthesis and carbon-11-labeling of p-MeO-SSR180575, a novel indoleacetamide-based candidate for PET imaging of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (TSPO 18 kDa)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damont, A.; Le Helleix, St.; Kuhnast, B.; Boisgard, R.; Tavitian, B.; Dolle, F.; Marguet, F.; Puech, F.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows: Objectives: The 3-iso-quinolinecarboxamide [ 11 C]PK11195, despite its low brain uptake and high level of nonspecific binding, is still the most widely used PET-radioligand for the in vivo imaging of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR or TSPO 18 kDa). Several new PBR radioligands are currently developed to replace [ 11 C]PK11195, e.g the pyrazolo[1, 5-a]pyrimidine-acetamides [ 11 C]DPA-713 and [ 18 F]DPA-714, the imidazo[1, 2-a]pyridine-acetamides [ 11 C]CLINME and [ 18 F]PBR111 and the N-benzyl-N-(2-phenoxy-aryl)- acetamides [ 11 C]PBR28 and [ 18 F]FEDAA1106. Another attractive newly identified chemical class of structures are the indole-acetamides and notably compounds derived from the lead compound SSR180575. Herein are reported the synthesis and the labelling with the positron-emitter carbon-11 (half-life: 20.38 min) of a novel derivative of SSR180575, bearing a para methoxy function on its phenyl ring. Methods: p-MeO-SSR180575 (1) was synthesized from commercially available 4-chloro-2-nitrotoluene in 10 steps. O-demethylation, performed with a boron tribromide solution in dichloromethane at low temperature, afforded the free phenol derivative 2. Carbon-11 labeling of p-MeO-SSR180575 (1) was performed using a TRACERLab FX-C Pro synthesizer (GEMS) and comprised (1) trapping of [ 11 C]MeOTf at -10 C in acetone (0.3 mL) containing the nor-derivative 2 (O-demethylated, 0.6-0.9 mg) and aq. 3N NaOH (8 μL); (2) heating at 110 C for 2 min; (3) concentration to dryness and taking up the residue in 1.0 mL of the HPLC mobile phase; (4) purification using semi-preparative reversed-phase HPLC (Waters Symmetry C-18 - eluent: CH 3 CN / H 2 O / TFA: 50 / 50 / 0.1 (v:v:v) - flow rate: 5 mL/min - detection at 254 nm) and (5) SepPak R Plus C-18-based formulation for i.v. injection. Results: p-MeO-SSR180575 (1) was obtained in 10% overall yield. The tricky and low-yielding step in our approach was the pyridazine ring formation

  15. Laser Spectroscopy Monitoring of 13C18O16O and 12C17O16O of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorter, J. H.; Nelson, D. D.; Ono, S.; McManus, J. B.; Zahniser, M. S.

    2017-12-01

    One of the main challenges to making accurate predictions of future changes in CO2 concentration is the capability to determine what fraction of human produced CO2 remains in the atmosphere. We present our progress in the application of Tunable Infrared Laser Direct Absorption Spectroscopy (TILDAS) to the measurement of the primary clumped (13C18O16O) as well as 17O (12C17O16O) isotopologues of atmospheric CO2, as a tracer of its sources and sinks. We expect unique isotopologue signals in CO2 from high-temperature combustion sources, plants, soils, and air-sea exchange processes. High sampling frequency (a few minutes for each sample vs. reference cycle) achieved by a TILDAS instrument is expected to enable us to document local heterogeneous sources and temporal variations. The TILDAS is equipped with a newly developed 400-meter absorption cell. We designed a dual pressure measurement technique in which the clumped isotopologue, 13C18O16O, and 13C16O16O are first measured at 30 torr cell pressure. This is followed by measurement of 12C17O16O, 12C18O16O and 12C16O16O at lower ( 5 torr) cell pressure. Isotopologue ratios are compared between reference and sample gases. Preliminary tests demonstrated a precision approaching 0.03 ‰ for the ratio 13C18O16O/13C16O16O and 0.08‰ for Δ13C18O16O value (1σ repeatability for 4 min sample vs. reference cycle). Sample size for a single analysis is approximately 100 mL of air (1.6μmol of CO2). Given the previously observed range of variations for Δ13C18O16O and Δ17O values as large as 0.6 to 0.3 ‰, respectively, TILDAS offers a novel approach for real time monitoring of atmospheric CO2 isotopologues. It was found that achieving better than 0.1‰ requires careful matching of CO2 mixing ratios between reference and sample air. A primary cause of pressure and mixing ratio dependence is inaccurate baseline fitting (analogous to abundance sensitivity or pressure baseline for IRMS). Given that mixing ratios of atmospheric

  16. WA18

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    Front view. The target plates are cut from marble (3x3 m slabs surrounded by magnetized iron) and allow the use of the calorimeter as a muon polarimeter. WA18 was CHARM, the experiment of the CERN-Hamburg-Amsterdam-Rome(INFN)-Moskow(ITEP) Collaboration

  17. Stress corrosion inhibitors for type 18-10 stainless steels with low carbon content in hot and concentrated solutions of MgCl2. Study of some inorganic iodides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinard, J.-L.

    1974-01-01

    Stress corrosion inhibitors for type Z2CN18-10 austenitic stainless steels with low carbon content in a solution of Cl 2 Mg at 105 deg C were investigated. It was established that iodides are the most adequate corrosion inhibitors because they react simultaneously upon the three main components of the alloy (Fe, Ni, Cr). A difference of behavior between I 2 Mg and the other iodides was observed (in electrochemistry and in simple stress corrosion experiments) and the influence of the metallic cation associated to I - was studied. The formation of the superficial film and the phenomena liable to occur at the interface film-corrosive solution were examined: film growth in MgCl 2 ; influence of certain substances added to the solution. A mechanism of inhibition by I - is suggested. It is similar to the mechanism proposed by BERGEN for the stress corrosion cracking by Cl - [fr

  18. Scientific study of 13C/12C carbon and 18O/16O oxygen stable isotopes biological fractionation in grapes in the Black Sea, Don Basin and the Western Caspian regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolesnov Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The report presents the results of a study of carbon and oxygen stable isotopes in carbohydrates and intracellular water of red and white grapes of 2016 wine-growing season in the Crimean peninsula areas, South-west coast of the Greater Caucasus, the Don basin and the Western Caspian region. The mass concentration of reducing sugars in the studied grape samples has been from 17.5 to 25.0 g/100 ml, titrated acids concentration (based on tartaric acid – from 6.0 to 9.1 g/l, the buffer capacity 34.1–63.2 mg-Eq/l. Red and white wine made from respective grapes contained from 0.5 to 3.6 g/l of residual sugar; from 11.1 to 14.5% ethanol by volume; buffer capacity was 35.2–52.6 mg-Eq/l. It has been found that the δ13CVPDB values for carbohydrates of red and white grape varieties as a result of biological fractionation of carbon isotopes in the agro-climatic conditions of plant growth for the studied geographical areas are ranging from − 26.74 to − 20.74‰ (the Crimean peninsula; from − 27.31 to − 21.58‰ (South West Coast of the Greater Caucasus, from − 27.33 to − 24.73‰ (Don Basin and from − 26.64 to − 23.17‰ (West Caspian. The δ13CVPDB values for ethanol of the red and white dry wines range from − 28.52 to − 24.26‰ (the Crimean peninsula; from − 29.23 to − 24.52‰ (South West Coast of the Greater Caucasus; from − 28.97 to − 26.22‰ (Don Basin; from − 29.14 to − 25.22‰ (Western Caspian. Compared with the surface water and groundwater (averages from δ18OVSMOW− 13.90 to − 6.38‰ and with precipitation (averages from δ18OVSMOW − 10.30 to − 9.04‰ the δ18OVSMOW values in intracellular water of grapes are the following: for the Crimean peninsula grapes, from 0.40 to 4.97‰; the South West Coast of the Greater Caucasus, from -2.11 to 6.29‰; the Don Basin, from − 2.21 to 6.26‰; the Western Caspian, from − 0.24 to 1.44‰. It has been noted that in conditions of

  19. Interleukin-18 and interleukin-18 Binding Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles eDinarello

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-18 (IL 18 is a member of the IL 1 family of cytokines. Increasing reports have expanded the role of IL 18 in mediating inflammation in animal models of disease using IL 18 deficient mice, neutralization of IL 18 or deficiency in the IL 18 receptor alpha chain. Similar to IL 1β, IL 18 is synthesized as an inactive precursor requiering processing by caspase 1 into an active cytokine but unlike IL 1β, the IL 18 precursor is constitutively present in nearly all cells in healthy humans and animals. The activity of IL 18 is balanced by the presence of a high-affinity naturally occuring IL 18 binding protein (IL 18BP. In humans, disease increased disease severity can be associated with an imbalance of IL 18 to IL 18BP such that the levels of free IL 18 are elevated in the circulation. A role for IL 18 has been implicated in several autoimmune diseases, myocardial function, emphysema, metabolic syndromes, psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, hemophagocytic syndromes, macrophage activation syndrome, sepsis and acute kidney injury, although in some diseases, IL 18 is protective. IL 18 plays a major role in the production of interferon-g from natural killer cells. The IL 18BP has been used safely in humans and clinical trials of IL 18BP as well as neutralizing anti-IL 18 antibodies are in clinical trials. This review updates the biology of IL 18 as well as its role in human disease

  20. Carbon dioxide as chemical feedstock

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aresta, M

    2010-01-01

    ... Dioxide as an Inert Solvent for Chemical Syntheses 15 Alessandro Galia and Giuseppe Filardo Introduction 15 Dense Carbon Dioxide as Solvent Medium for Chemical Processes 15 Enzymatic Catalysis in Dense Carbon Dioxide 18 Other Reactions in Dense Carbon Dioxide 19 Polymer Synthesis in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide 20 Chain Polymerizations: Synt...

  1. Effects of carbon nanomaterials fullerene C{sub 60} and fullerol C{sub 60}(OH){sub 18-22} on gills of fish Cyprinus carpio (Cyprinidae) exposed to ultraviolet radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Socoowski Britto, Roberta; Longaray Garcia, Marcia; Martins da Rocha, Alessandra [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande - FURG, Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas, Campus Carreiros, Av. Italia km 8 s/n, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Programa de Pos Graduacao em Fisiologia Animal Comparada - Fisiologia Animal Comparada, FURG (Brazil); Artigas Flores, Juliana [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande - FURG, Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas, Campus Carreiros, Av. Italia km 8 s/n, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Pinheiro, Mauricio V. Brant [Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, MG (Brazil); Monserrat, Jose Maria [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande - FURG, Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas, Campus Carreiros, Av. Italia km 8 s/n, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Programa de Pos Graduacao em Fisiologia Animal Comparada - Fisiologia Animal Comparada, FURG (Brazil); Ribas Ferreira, Josencler L., E-mail: josenclerf@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande - FURG, Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas, Campus Carreiros, Av. Italia km 8 s/n, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Programa de Pos Graduacao em Fisiologia Animal Comparada - Fisiologia Animal Comparada, FURG (Brazil)

    2012-06-15

    In consequence of their growing use and demand, the inevitable environmental presence of nanomaterials (NMs) has raised concerns about their potential deleterious effects to aquatic environments. The carbon NM fullerene (C{sub 60}), which forms colloidal aggregates in water, and its water-soluble derivative fullerol (C{sub 60}(OH){sub 18-22}), which possesses antioxidant properties, are known to be photo-excited by ultraviolet (UV) or visible light. To investigate their potential hazards to aquatic organisms upon exposure to UV sunlight, this study analyzed (a) the in vitro behavior of fullerene and fullerol against peroxyl radicals (ROO{center_dot}) under UV-A radiation and (b) the effects of these photo-excited NMs on oxidative stress parameters in functional gills extracted from the fish Cyprinus carpio (Cyprinidae). The variables measured were the total antioxidant capacity, lipid peroxidation (TBARS), the activities of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione reductase (GR) and glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL), and the levels of the non-enzymatic antioxidant glutathione (GSH). The obtained results revealed the following: (1) both NMs behaved in vitro as antioxidants against ROO{center_dot} in the dark and as pro-oxidants in presence of UV-A, the latter effect being reversed by the addition of sodium azide, which is a singlet oxygen ({sup 1}O{sub 2}) quencher; (2) fullerene induced toxicity with or without UV-A incidence, with a significant (p < 0.05) increase in lipid peroxidation (with greater damage under illumination), a decrease in GCL activity, and the depletion of GSH stocks (under illumination), all of which were attributed to {sup 1}O{sub 2} generation; and (3) fullerol also decreased GCL activity and GSH formation (p < 0.05) but without lipid damage. The overall results show that fullerene can be toxic with or without light incidence, whereas UV radiation seems to play a key role in the environmental toxicity of carbon NMs through {sup 1}O{sub 2} formation.

  2. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity and salinity collected from surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from ARMORIQUE in the English Channel from 2014-03-18 to 2014-10-09 (NCEI Accession 0163193)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0163193 includes chemical, physical and surface underway data collected from ARMORIQUE in the English Channel from 2014-03-18 to 2014-10-09. These...

  3. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from time series observations using Bubble type equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from MOORING_La_Parguera_67W_18N in the Caribbean Sea from 2009-01-16 to 2015-12-15 (NODC Accession 0117354)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0117354 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and time series data collected from MOORING_La_Parguera_67W_18N in the Caribbean Sea from...

  4. Carbon plasma gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendel, C.W. Jr.; Zagar, D.M.; Mills, G.S.; Humphries, S. Jr.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1980-01-01

    A family of plasma guns supplying highly ionized carbon plasma is described. The guns are simple and inexpensive to construct and are pulsed by small capacitor banks of a few hundred joules. The output consists of 10 17 --10 18 multiply ionized carbon ions traveling at about 10 7 cm/s. Neutral output is very low and arrives well after the ionized carbon. The guns and pulsers are very reliable

  5. Many Phases of Carbon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    According to the electronic configuration of a neutral carbon atom, there are only two unpaired .... coke. Further heating this to 2500°C - 3000°C causes an ordering .... The density of these carbon films is around 1.6-. 1.8 glee, which is less than that of graphite. The electrical conductivity of the films prepared depends on the.

  6. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the Hokusei Maru in the North Pacific Ocean from 1998-07-18 to 1998-08-18 (NODC Accession 0112239)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112239 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from Hokusei Maru in the North Pacific Ocean from 1998-07-18 to...

  7. A novel method of 18F radiolabeling for PET.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McBride, W.J.; Sharkey, R.M.; Karacay, H.; D'Souza, C.A.; Rossi, E.A.; Laverman, P.; Chang, C.H.; Boerman, O.C.; Goldenberg, D.M.

    2009-01-01

    Small biomolecules are typically radiolabeled with (18)F by binding it to a carbon atom, a process that usually is designed uniquely for each new molecule and requires several steps and hours to produce. We report a facile method wherein (18)F is first attached to aluminum as Al(18)F, which is then

  8. Influence of organic carbon sources and isotope exchange processes between water and nitrate on the fractionation of the stable isotopes 15N/14N and 18O/16O in dissolved nitrate during microbial dentrification in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunderlich, Anja A.L.

    2012-01-01

    Stable isotopes of nitrate are commonly used to determine sources and degradation of nitrate. In this study, nitrite oxidizing bacteria were found to promote an oxygen isotope exchange between water and nitrate under anoxic conditions. Also, different carbon sources were found to influence the enrichment of stable isotopes in nitrate during microbial denitrification. Both results refine the stable isotope model of nitrate in respect to nitrate source determination and microbial nitrate reduction.

  9. F-18 labelling agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikecz, P.

    2001-01-01

    In this presentation the production of fluorine-18, separation of [ 18 F]fluoride, converting fluoride into fluorine as well as fluorine incorporation into organic molecules are reviewed. Reaction schemes and technology schemes are included. Towards organic reactions, with help of small molecules of the 18 F can be introduced into a wide variety of radiopharmaceuticals. (author)

  10. F-18 Radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-12-01

    This document includes 8 presentations delivered at the symposium. The topics discussed include: optimization of accelerator production of 18 F- and 18 F 2 -fluorodeoxyglucose; radiopharmaceuticals synthesis, synthesis modules, pharmacopoeia and GLP; quality control; radiation safety of production and application; PET imaging in human medicine. Each presentation has been indexed separately

  11. Liver conversion of docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acids from their 18-carbon precursors in rats on a DHA-free but α-LNA-containing n-3 PUFA adequate diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Kim, Hyung-Wook; Igarashi, Miki; Kiesewetter, Dale; Chang, Lisa; Ma, Kaizong; Rapoport, Stanley I

    2011-01-01

    The long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3), and arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6), are critical for health. These PUFAs can be synthesized in liver from their plant-derived precursors, α-linolenic acid (α-LNA, 18:3n-3) and linoleic acid (LA, 18:2n-6). Vegetarians and vegans may have suboptimal long-chain n-3 PUFA status, and the extent of the conversion of α-LNA to EPA and DHA by the liver is debatable. We quantified liver conversion of DHA and other n-3 PUFAs from α-LNA in rats fed a DHA-free but α-LNA (n-3 PUFA) adequate diet, and compared results to conversion of LA to AA. [U-(13)C]LA or [U-(13)C]α-LNA was infused intravenously for 2h at a constant rate into unanesthetized rats fed a DHA-free α-LNA adequate diet, and published equations were used to calculate kinetic parameters. The conversion coefficient k(⁎) of DHA from α-LNA was much higher than for AA from LA (97.2×10(-3) vs. 10.6×10(-3)min(-1)), suggesting that liver elongation-desaturation is more selective for n-3 PUFA biosynthesis on a per molecule basis. The net daily secretion rate of DHA, 20.3μmol/day, exceeded the reported brain DHA consumption rate by 50-fold, suggesting that the liver can maintain brain DHA metabolism with an adequate dietary supply solely of α-LNA. This infusion method could be used in vegetarians or vegans to determine minimal daily requirements of EPA and DHA in humans. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Fluorine-18 labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleijn, J.P. de

    1978-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis deals with the problems involved in the adaption of reactor-produced fluorine-18 to the synthesis of 18 F-labelled organic fluorine compounds. Several 18 F-labelling reagents were prepared and successfully applied. The limitations to the synthetic possibilities of reactor-produced fluoride- 18 become manifest in the last part of the thesis. An application to the synthesis of labelled aliphatic fluoro amino acids has appeared to be unsuccessful as yet, although some other synthetic approaches can be indicated. Seven journal articles (for which see the availability note) are used to compose the four chapters and three appendices. The connecting text gives a survey of known 18 F-compounds and methods for preparing such compounds. (Auth.)

  13. Internal Dosimetry. Chapter 18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindorf, C. [Department of Radiation Physics, Skåne University Hospital, Lund (Sweden)

    2014-12-15

    The Committee on Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) is a committee within the Society of Nuclear Medicine. The MIRD Committee was formed in 1965 with the mission to standardize internal dosimetry calculations, improve the published emission data for radionuclides and enhance the data on pharmacokinetics for radiopharmaceuticals [18.1]. A unified approach to internal dosimetry was published by the MIRD Committee in 1968, MIRD Pamphlet No. 1 [18.2], which was updated several times thereafter. Currently, the most well known version is the MIRD Primer from 1991 [18.3]. The latest publication on the formalism was published in 2009 in MIRD Pamphlet No. 21 [18.4], which provides a notation meant to bridge the differences in the formalism used by the MIRD Committee and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) [18.5]. The formalism presented in MIRD Pamphlet No. 21 [18.4] will be used here, although some references to the quantities and parameters used in the MIRD primer [18.3] will be made. All symbols, quantities and units are presented.

  14. Thermal 18F atom addition to olefins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, P.J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The addition of thermal 18 F atoms to olefins was investigated using various substrate molecules. The 18 F atoms were produced by the 19 F(n,2n) 18 F nuclear reaction with >10 5 eV of energy which is removed by multiple collisions with SF 6 molecules before reaction occurs with an olefin. By varying the SF 6 /substrate mole ratio it was demonstrated that the fraction of non-thermal reactions is dependent upon the frequency of non-reactive energy reducing collisions with SF 6 . The rate constants for addition and abstraction reactions with propene, cis-1-chloropropene and trans-1-chloropropene were determined. The substitution of a C1 atom for the olefinic H atom in the C 1 position does not affect the rate of 18 F bond formation but it changes the orientation of attack. The 18 F atom prefers the terminal carbon-in propene and propene-d 6 by a factor of 1.35 while the preference is less than 0.5 for the terminal carbon in cis-1-chloropropene and trans-1-chloropropene. The addition of 18 F atoms to olefins creates vibrationally excited fluoroalkyl radicals which can either decompose or stabilize by collision with another molecule. The rate constants for decomposition of excited CH 3 CHCHC1F radicals formed by 18 F addition to cis-1-chloropropene and trans-1-chloropropene are competitive with C 1 -C 2 bond rotation. The 18 F atoms add to the parent molecule with retention of geometry and a memory of the geometry persists as demonstrated by the cis-1-fluoropropene/trans-1-fluoropropene decomposition product ratio

  15. Microbially mediated mineral carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, I. M.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2010-12-01

    implemented and economically efficient alternative to other technologies currently under development for mineral sequestration. Dismukes GC, Carrieri D, Bennette N, Ananyev GM, Posewitz MC (2008) Aquatic phototrophs: efficient alternatives to land-based crops for biofuels. Current Opinion in Biotechnology, 19, 235-240. Ferris FG, Wiese RG, Fyfe WS (1994) Precipitation of carbonate minerals by microorganisms: Implications of silicate weathering and the global carbon dioxide budget. Geomicrobiology Journal, 12, 1-13. Lackner KS, Wendt CH, Butt DP, Joyce EL, Jr., Sharp DH (1995) Carbon dioxide disposal in carbonate minerals. Energy, 20, 1153-1170. Power IM, Wilson SA, Thom JM, Dipple GM, Gabites JE, Southam G (2009) The hydromagnesite playas of Atlin, British Columbia, Canada: A biogeochemical model for CO2 sequestration. Chemical Geology, 206, 302-316. Thompson JB, Ferris FG (1990) Cyanobacterial precipitation of gypsum, calcite, and magnesite from natural alkaline lake water. Geology, 18, 995-998.

  16. Kinetics of the exchange of oxygen between carbon dioxide and carbonate in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, C.K.; Silverman, D.N.

    1975-01-01

    A kinetic analysis of the exchange of oxygen between carbon dioxide and carbonate ion in alkaline, aqueous solutions is presented. The exchange was observed by placing 18 O-labeled carbonate, not enriched in 13 C, into solution with 13 C-enriched carbonate, not enriched in 18 O. The rate of depletion of 18 O from the 12 C-containing species and the rate of appearance of 18 O in the 13 C-containing species was measured by mass spectrometry. From these data, the second-order rate constant for the reaction between carbon dioxide and carbonate which results in the exchange of oxygen at 25 0 is 114 +- 11 M -1 sec -1 . It is emphasized that this exchange of oxygen between species of CO 2 in solution must be recognized in studies using 18 O labels to determine the fate of CO 2 in biochemical and physiological processes. (auth)

  17. Powernext, newsletter no.18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-03-01

    This newsletter provides information and statistical data on the four business unit of Powernext: Powernext Day-Ahead, Powernext Carbon, Powernext Futures and Powernext Weather. Powernext Day-Ahead provides a short term price reference to manage the volume risk. Powernext Day-Ahead counts close to 50 members among producers, suppliers, eligible consumers, etc. Powernext Carbon is a spot market of CO 2 allowances. The market model is the result of a three-fold partnership between Powernext, Caisse des Depots and Euronext. Powernext Carbon counts close to 30 active members. More than 2 Million tonnes of CO 2 have been traded since the launch of the market on 24 June. Powernext Carbon has made a name for itself as the most liquid CO 2 allowances spot market in Europe to date. Powernext Futures has made a name for itself as a price reference for the medium term market. Its market makers and members guarantee a high-quality market over a time period going up until 2008. Powernext Weather is a range of economically weather driven temperature indices provided by our partner Meteo France. These indices are decision making or hedging tools. This analysis concerns February and March 2004. (A.L.B.)

  18. O(18) revived

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagger, J.; Dimopoulos, S.; Masso, E.

    1984-08-01

    We present an O(18) theory which is pertubatively unifiable and which accounts for the absence of right-handed families in the low-energy world. The model gives rise to dramatic predictions for proton decay and for the Z 0 width

  19. Carbon/carbon composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thebault, J.; Orly, P.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon/carbon composites are singular materials from their components, their manufacturing process as well as their characteristics. This paper gives a global overview of these particularities and applications which make them now daily used composites. (authors)

  20. Chilean experience in production of 18F-FDG from 18F in a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandia, M.; Godoy, N.; Errazu, X.; Hernandez; Figols, M.; Firnau, G.; Tronsoco, F.

    2000-01-01

    18 F-FDG (fluorine-deoxy-D-glucose) is an important and useful radiopharmaceutical for imaging and study of myocardial viability. Usually cyclotron-produced 18 F is used to label 18 F-FDG. The availability of a 5 MW Nuclear Reactor in Chile and the absence of a quality cyclotron to produce 18 F required that we developed a method in order to obtain suitable 18 F to label 18 F-FDG using the facilities we have at the Nuclear Center of La Reina, Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission. The nuclear reactions involved are: 6 Li(n,aα) 3 H and 16 O( 3 H,n) 18 F. Enriched Li 2 CO 3 ( 6 Li = 95 %) was irradiated in a 5 MW swimming pool type nuclear reactor with a neutron flux of 5. 7 x 10 13 n cm -2 s -1 for 4 hours. The irradiated Li 2 CO 3 was dissolved in H 2 SO 4 (1:1) and distilled as trimethylsilyl( 18 F)fluoride ( 18 F-TMS). The labelling of the sugar was carried out using the method described by Hamacker. The 18 F-TMS was trapped in a solution of acetonitrile, water, potassium carbonate, and kriptofix and hydrolysed to form 18 F fluoride. The nucleophilic complex reacts with 1,3,4,6, tetra-O-acetyl- 2-O-trifluoromethanesulfonyl-bβ-D-mannopyranose. The acetylated carbohydrate by acid hydrolysis produces 18 F-FDG. The final product was purified using an ion retarding resin (AG11-A8) and a system two Sep Pak Plus: Alumina and C-18 cartridge and sterilised by Millipore 0.22 μm filter. The 18 F-FDG was obtained in an apyrogenic and sterile solution. The 18 F radionuclide purity was higher than 99.9% and the radiochemical purity ofthe 18 F-FDG obtained was over than 99%. Residual 3 H content was as low as 20 (Bq 3 H/MBq 18 F-FDG.). The yield of the process 18 F-FDG was 13.2 %. (authors)

  1. Automated simultaneous measurement of the δ(13) C and δ(2) H values of methane and the δ(13) C and δ(18) O values of carbon dioxide in flask air samples using a new multi cryo-trap/gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Willi A; Rothe, Michael; Sperlich, Peter; Strube, Martin; Wendeberg, Magnus

    2016-07-15

    The isotopic composition of greenhouse gases helps to constrain global budgets and to study sink and source processes. We present a new system for high-precision stable isotope measurements of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen in atmospheric methane and carbon dioxide. The design is intended for analyzing flask air samples from existing sampling programs without the need for extra sample air for methane analysis. CO2 and CH4 isotopes are measured simultaneously using two isotope ratio mass spectrometers, one for the analysis of δ(13) C and δ(18) O values and the second one for δ(2) H values. The inlet carousel delivers air from 16 sample positions (glass flasks 1-5 L and high-pressure cylinders). Three 10-port valves take aliquots from the sample stream. CH4 from 100-mL air aliquots is preconcentrated in 0.8-mL sample loops using a new cryo-trap system. A precisely calibrated working reference air is used in parallel with the sample according to the Principle of Identical Treatment. It takes about 36 hours for a fully calibrated analysis of a complete carousel including extractions of four working reference and one quality control reference air. Long-term precision values, as obtained from the quality control reference gas since 2012, account for 0.04 ‰ (δ(13) C values of CO2 ), 0.07 ‰ (δ(18) O values of CO2 ), 0.11 ‰ (δ(13) C values of CH4 ) and 1.0 ‰ (δ(2) H values of CH4 ). Within a single day, the system exhibits a typical methane δ(13) C standard deviation (1σ) of 0.06 ‰ for 10 repeated measurements. The system has been in routine operation at the MPI-BGC since 2012. Consistency of the data and compatibility with results from other laboratories at a high precision level are of utmost importance. A high sample throughput and reliability of operation are important achievements of the presented system to cope with the large number of air samples to be analyzed. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Carbon transport in sodium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Espigares, M.; Lapena, J.; La Torre, M. de

    1983-01-01

    Carbon activities in dynamic non isothermal sodium system are determined using an equilibratium method. Foils of Fe-18 w% Cr-8 W% Ni alloy with low carbon content (in the as received condition) are exposed to dynamic liquid sodium in the temperature range between 450 0 C and 700 0 C. The analysis was used to evaluate the carburization-decarburization behaviour of type 304 stainless steel exposed to sodium. (author)

  3. Carbonate aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Kevin J.; Sukop, Michael; Curran, H. Allen

    2012-01-01

    Only limited hydrogeological research has been conducted using ichnology in carbonate aquifer characterization. Regardless, important applications of ichnology to carbonate aquifer characterization include its use to distinguish and delineate depositional cycles, correlate mappable biogenically altered surfaces, identify zones of preferential groundwater flow and paleogroundwater flow, and better understand the origin of ichnofabric-related karst features. Three case studies, which include Pleistocene carbonate rocks of the Biscayne aquifer in southern Florida and Cretaceous carbonate strata of the Edwards–Trinity aquifer system in central Texas, demonstrate that (1) there can be a strong relation between ichnofabrics and groundwater flow in carbonate aquifers and (2) ichnology can offer a useful methodology for carbonate aquifer characterization. In these examples, zones of extremely permeable, ichnofabric-related macroporosity are mappable stratiform geobodies and as such can be represented in groundwater flow and transport simulations.

  4. Powernext Carbon rises in power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conil-Lacoste, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    Powernext Carbon, the French CO 2 stock exchange, allows industrialists to trade CO 2 emission quotas. Those who have exhausted their allocated quotas can purchase new ones to other industrialists who have emitted less CO 2 than expected. Thanks to Powernext Carbon, the 'polluter pays principle' finally finds a concrete implementation. This article is an interview of J.F. Conil-Lacoste, general director of Powernext, who clarifies some points of the carbon trading system: lessons learnt after 18 months of activity of Powernext Carbon, measures to be implemented to encourage the development of Powernext Carbon, changes made in the 2008-2012 quotas allocation plan of the French government, mechanism of credits for emissions abatement and their role in CO 2 abatement, relevance of a quotas system for individuals. (J.S.)

  5. Carbon-On-Carbon Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungas, Gregory S. (Inventor); Buchanan, Larry (Inventor); Banzon, Jr., Jose T. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The presently disclosed technology relates to carbon-on-carbon (C/C) manufacturing techniques and the resulting C/C products. One aspect of the manufacturing techniques disclosed herein utilizes two distinct curing operations that occur at different times and/or using different temperatures. The resulting C/C products are substantially non-porous, even though the curing operation(s) substantially gasify a liquid carbon-entrained filler material that saturates a carbon fabric that makes up the C/C products.

  6. EUROTHERM Seminar No. 18

    CERN Document Server

    Heggs, Peter; Butterworth, David

    1992-01-01

    The Eurotherm Committee was created in 1986 from member countries of the European Community. It has the purpose of organising and coordinating scientific events such as seminars and conferences in the thermal sciences. The series of Eurotherm Seminars established by the Committee has become a popular forum for high-level scientific and technical interchange of ideas in a wide range of specialist topics. While the presentation and publication of papers at the Seminars are encouraged, the primary aim is to stimulate discussion and liaison between specialist groups. The present Chairman of Eurotherm is Professor C.J. Hoogendoorn of the Technical University, Delft (Fax [NL] 15, 783251). Information on Mure Seminars is available from the Secretary, Keith Cornwell, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh (Fax [UK] 31, 451, 3129). This particular Seminar No. 18 on the Design and Operation of Heat Exchangers was the first one on this topic and was held at the Universitat der Bundeswehr Hamburg (University of the Federal Ar...

  7. Porous carbons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Abstract. Carbon in dense as well as porous solid form is used in a variety of applications. Activated porous carbons are made through pyrolysis and activation of carbonaceous natural as well as synthetic precursors. Pyrolysed woods replicate the structure of original wood but as such possess very low surface areas and ...

  8. Carbon photonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konov, V I [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-30

    The properties of new carbon materials (single-crystal and polycrystalline CVD diamond films and wafers, single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene) and the prospects of their use as optical elements and devices are discussed. (optical elements of laser devices)

  9. Carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The document identifies the main sources of carbon monoxide (CO) in the general outdoor atmosphere, describes methods of measuring and monitoring its concentration levels in the United Kingdom, and discusses the effects of carbon monoxide on human health. Following its review, the Panel has put forward a recommendation for an air quality standard for carbon monoxide in the United Kingdom of 10 ppm, measured as a running 8-hour average. The document includes tables and graphs of emissions of CO, in total and by emission source, and on the increase in blood levels of carboxyhaemoglobin with continuing exposure to CO. 11 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Calcium is needed by the body for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also ... to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in ...

  11. Infiltrated carbon foam composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Rick D. (Inventor); Danford, Harry E. (Inventor); Plucinski, Janusz W. (Inventor); Merriman, Douglas J. (Inventor); Blacker, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An infiltrated carbon foam composite and method for making the composite is described. The infiltrated carbon foam composite may include a carbonized carbon aerogel in cells of a carbon foam body and a resin is infiltrated into the carbon foam body filling the cells of the carbon foam body and spaces around the carbonized carbon aerogel. The infiltrated carbon foam composites may be useful for mid-density ablative thermal protection systems.

  12. Isotopes of carbon and oxygen in the carbonate impurities of coal have potential as palaeoenvironmental indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhagen, B.T.; Falcon, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    The nature and systematics of impurities such as carbonates need to be established in order to understand their provenance in coal seams with reference to mining, beneficiation and ultimately their elimination or reduction. To this end, mineralogical and carbon-13 and oxygen-18 isotopic studies were undertaken on carbonate occurrences in coal from the eastern Transvaal highveld. Isotopic variations of considerable amplitude and individual values of extreme ''lightness'' are to be found in the carbonates in coal of the Witbank and adjacent basins. The observed isotopic ratios have a clear bearing on the nature and origins of the carbonates. 1 tab., 1 fig

  13. Fluorine-18 labeling of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilbourn, M.R.; Dence, C.S.; Welch, M.J.; Mathias, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    Two fluorine-18-labeled reagents, methyl 3-[ 18 F]fluoro-5-nitrobenzimidate and 4-[ 18 F]fluorophenacyl bromide, have been prepared for covalent attachment of fluorine-18 to proteins. Both reagents can be prepared in moderate yields (30-50%, EOB) in synthesis times of 50-70 min. Reaction of these reagents with proteins (human serum albumin, human fibrinogen, and human immunoglobulin A) is pH independent, protein concentration dependent, and takes 5-60 min at mild pH (8.0) and temperature (25-37 degrees C), in yields up to 95% (corrected). The 18 F-labeled proteins are purified by size exclusion chromatography

  14. Analysis of the radiochemical purity of 18F-FDG by HPLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Liguang; Tang Anwu; He Shanzhen; Chen Yulong

    2001-01-01

    The radiochemical purity (RCP) of 18 F-FDG is analyzed by HPLC. Eighty-five percent acetonitrile is used as the eluting solution. Carbon hydrate column is used as separation column. The t R of 18 F - is 6.50 min and 18 F-FDG is 9.00 min. HPLC take less time and has higher sensitivity than TLC for the same sample at the same time. So HPLC excels TLC in analyzing RCP of 18 F-FDG

  15. A three-dimensional synthesis study of delta O-18 in atmospheric CO2 .1. Surface fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciais, P; Denning, AS; Tans, PP; Berry, JA; Randall, DA; Collatz, GJ; Sellers, PJ; White, JWC; Trolier, M; Meijer, HAJ; Francey, RJ; Monfray, P; Heimann, M

    1997-01-01

    The isotope O-18 in CO2 is of particular interest in studying the global carbon cycle because it is sensitive to the processes by which the global land biosphere absorbs and respires CO2. Carbon dioxide and water exchange isotopically both in leaves and in soils, and the O-18 character of

  16. Carbon sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Rattan

    2008-02-27

    Developing technologies to reduce the rate of increase of atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) from annual emissions of 8.6PgCyr-1 from energy, process industry, land-use conversion and soil cultivation is an important issue of the twenty-first century. Of the three options of reducing the global energy use, developing low or no-carbon fuel and sequestering emissions, this manuscript describes processes for carbon (CO2) sequestration and discusses abiotic and biotic technologies. Carbon sequestration implies transfer of atmospheric CO2 into other long-lived global pools including oceanic, pedologic, biotic and geological strata to reduce the net rate of increase in atmospheric CO2. Engineering techniques of CO2 injection in deep ocean, geological strata, old coal mines and oil wells, and saline aquifers along with mineral carbonation of CO2 constitute abiotic techniques. These techniques have a large potential of thousands of Pg, are expensive, have leakage risks and may be available for routine use by 2025 and beyond. In comparison, biotic techniques are natural and cost-effective processes, have numerous ancillary benefits, are immediately applicable but have finite sink capacity. Biotic and abiotic C sequestration options have specific nitches, are complementary, and have potential to mitigate the climate change risks.

  17. SM18 Visits and Access

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

      VISITS The rules and conditions to be followed for visits in the SM18 Hall are laid out in the EDMS 1205328 document. No visit is allowed without prior reservation.   ACCESS Special access right is needed ONLY from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. and during week-ends. From 1 December, the current SM18 access database will be closed and a new one “SM18-OWH outside normal hours” started from scratch. Requests, via EDH SM18-OWH, will have to be duly justified.   For further information, please contact Evelyne Delucinge.

  18. Carbon Dissolution Using Waste Biomass—A Sustainable Approach for Iron-Carbon Alloy Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad Mansuri

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper details the characterisation of char obtained by high-temperature pyrolysis of waste macadamia shell biomass and its application as carbon source in iron-carbon alloy production. The obtained char was characterised by ultimate and proximate analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET surface area via N2 isothermal adsorption and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results indicated that obtained char is less porous, low in ash content, and high in carbon content. Investigation of iron-carbon alloy formation through carbon dissolution at 1550 °C was carried out using sessile drop method by using obtained char as a carbon source. Rapid carbon pickup by iron was observed during first two minutes of contact and reached a saturation value of ~5.18 wt % of carbon after 30 min. The carbon dissolution rate using macadamia char as a source of carbon was comparatively higher using than other carbonaceous materials such as metallurgical coke, coal chars, and waste compact discs, due to its high percentage of carbon and low ash content. This research shows that macadamia shell waste, which has a low content of ash, is a valuable supplementary carbon source for iron-carbon alloy industries.

  19. Organic Carbon Storage in China's Urban Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shuqing; Zhu, Chao; Zhou, Decheng; Huang, Dian; Werner, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    China has been experiencing rapid urbanization in parallel with its economic boom over the past three decades. To date, the organic carbon storage in China's urban areas has not been quantified. Here, using data compiled from literature review and statistical yearbooks, we estimated that total carbon storage in China's urban areas was 577±60 Tg C (1 Tg  = 1012 g) in 2006. Soil was the largest contributor to total carbon storage (56%), followed by buildings (36%), and vegetation (7%), while carbon storage in humans was relatively small (1%). The carbon density in China's urban areas was 17.1±1.8 kg C m−2, about two times the national average of all lands. The most sensitive variable in estimating urban carbon storage was urban area. Examining urban carbon storages over a wide range of spatial extents in China and in the United States, we found a strong linear relationship between total urban carbon storage and total urban area, with a specific urban carbon storage of 16 Tg C for every 1,000 km2 urban area. This value might be useful for estimating urban carbon storage at regional to global scales. Our results also showed that the fraction of carbon storage in urban green spaces was still much lower in China relative to western countries, suggesting a great potential to mitigate climate change through urban greening and green spaces management in China. PMID:23991014

  20. Bilan CarboneR - Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, Aurelie

    2015-01-01

    Bilan Carbone TM , a method for calculating greenhouse gas emissions, was developed to help companies and territorial authorities estimate emissions from their activities or on their territories. After validating the audit perimeter and determining the emission categories to be taken into account, activity data is collected and greenhouse gas emissions are calculated using the tool. Besides accounting greenhouse gas emissions at any given time, the inventory evaluates impact on climate and energy dependence. This helps organizations deal with their emissions by classifying them, implementing action plans to reduce emissions and starting a dynamic process taking into account carbon in their strategic decisions

  1. Latent Heat Characteristics of Biobased Oleochemical Carbonates as Novel Phase Change Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleochemical carbonates are biobased materials that were readily prepared through a carbonate interchange reaction between renewable C10-C18 fatty alcohols and dimethyl or diethyl carbonate in the presence of a catalyst. These carbonates have various commercial uses in cosmetic, fuel additive and l...

  2. Dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, pH, dissolved oxygen, and nutrients collected from profile, discrete sampling, and time series observations using CTD, Niskin bottle, and other instruments from R/V Gulf Challenger near a buoy off the coast of New Hampshire, U.S. in the Gulf of Maine from 2011-01-11 to 2015-11-18 (NCEI Accession 0142327)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains discrete measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, pH, dissolved oxygen, and nutrients collected at the buoy off...

  3. Carbonizing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1923-11-22

    In the downward distillation of coal, shale, lignite, or the like, the heat is generated by the combustion of liquid or gaseous fuel above the charge the zone of carbonization thus initiated travelling downwards through the charge. The combustible gases employed are preferably those resulting from the process but gases such as natural gas may be employed. The charge is in a moistened and pervious state the lower parts being maintained at a temperature not above 212/sup 0/F until influenced by contact with the carbonization zone and steam may be admitted to increase the yield of ammonia. The combustible gases may be supplied with insufficient air so as to impart to them a reducing effect.

  4. Carbon aerogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthon-Fabry, S.; Achard, P.

    2003-06-01

    The carbon aerogel is a nano-porous material at open porosity, electrical conductor. The aerogels morphology is variable in function of the different synthesis parameters. This characteristic offers to the aerogels a better adaptability to many applications: electrodes (super condensers, fuel cells). The author presents the materials elaboration and their applications. It provides also the research programs: fundamental research, realization of super-condenser electrodes, fuel cells electrodes, gas storage materials and opaque materials for thermal insulation. (A.L.B.)

  5. Carbon cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeger, J; Halbritter, G; Neumann-Hauf, G

    1982-05-01

    This report contains a review of literature on the subjects of the carbon cycle, the increase of the atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration and the possible impacts of an increased CO/sub 2/ concentration on the climate. In addition to this survey, the report discusses the questions that are still open and the resulting research needs. During the last twenty years a continual increase of the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration by about 1-2 ppm per years has been observed. In 1958 the concentration was 315 ppm and this increased to 336 ppm in 1978. A rough estimate shows that the increase of the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration is about half of the amount of carbon dioxide added to the atmosphere by the combustion of fossil fuels. Two possible sinks for the CO/sub 2/ released into the atmosphere are known: the ocean and the biota. The role of the biota is, however, unclear, since it can act both as a sink and as a source. Most models of the carbon cycle are one-dimensional and cannot be used for accurate predictions. Calculations with climate models have shown that an increased atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration leads to a warming of the earth's surface and lower atmosphere. Calculations show that a doubling of the atmospheric CO/sub 2/-concentration would lead to a net heating of the lower atmosphere and earth's surface by a global average of about 4 W m/sup -2/. Greater uncertainties arise in estimating the change in surface temperature resulting from this change in heating rate. It is estimated that the global average annual surface temperature would change between 1.5 and 4.5 K. There are, however, latitudinal and seasonal variations of the impact of increased CO/sub 2/ concentration. Other meteorological variables (e.g. precipitation, wind speed etc.) would also be changed. It appears that the impacts of the other products of fossil fuel combustion are unlikely to counteract the impacts of CO/sub 2/ on the climate.

  6. Developmental milestones record - 18 months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The typical 18-month-old: Shows affection Has separation anxiety Listens to a story or looks at pictures Can say 10 or more words when asked Kisses parents with lips puckered Identifies one or more parts ...

  7. Carbons and carbon supported catalysts in hydroprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furimsky, Edward

    2009-07-01

    This book is a comprehensive summary of recent research in the field and covers all areas of carbons and carbon materials. The potential application of carbon supports, particularly those of carbon black (CB) and activated carbon (AC) in hydroprocessing catalysis are covered. Novel carbon materials such as carbon fibers and carbon nano tubes (CNT) are also covered, including the more recent developments in the use of fullerenes in hydroprocessing applications. Although the primary focus of this book is on carbons and carbon supported catalysts, it also identifies the difference in the effect of carbon supports compared with the oxidic supports, particularly that of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The difference in catalyst activity and stability was estimated using both model compounds and real feeds under variable conditions. The conditions applied during the preparation of carbon supported catalysts are also comprehensively covered and include various methods of pretreatment of carbon supports to enhance catalyst performance. The model compounds results consistently show higher hydrodesulfurization and hydrodeoxygenation activities of carbon supported catalysts than that of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported catalysts. Also, the deactivation of the former catalysts by coke deposition was much less evident. Chapter 6.3.1.3 is on carbon-supported catalysts: coal-derived liquids.

  8. Carbon classified?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Ingmar

    2012-01-01

    . Using an actor- network theory (ANT) framework, the aim is to investigate the actors who bring together the elements needed to classify their carbon emission sources and unpack the heterogeneous relations drawn on. Based on an ethnographic study of corporate agents of ecological modernisation over...... a period of 13 months, this paper provides an exploration of three cases of enacting classification. Drawing on ANT, we problematise the silencing of a range of possible modalities of consumption facts and point to the ontological ethics involved in such performances. In a context of global warming...

  9. Carbon Footprints

    OpenAIRE

    Rahel Aichele; Gabriel Felbermayr

    2011-01-01

    Lässt sich der Beitrag eines Landes zum weltweiten Klimaschutz an der Veränderung seines CO2-Ausstoßes messen, wie es im Kyoto-Abkommen implizit unterstellt wird? Oder ist aufgrund der Bedeutung des internationalen Güterhandels der Carbon Footprint – der alle CO2-Emissionen erfasst, die durch die Absorption (d.h. Konsum und Investitionen) eines Landes entstehen – das bessere Maß? Die Autoren erstellen eine Datenbank mit den Footprints von 40 Ländern für den Zeitraum 1995–2007. Die deskriptive...

  10. 18th International Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Ronald G

    2014-01-01

    Cryocoolers 18 Cryocoolers 18 archives developments and performance measurements in the field of cryocoolers based on the contributions of leading international experts at the 18th International Cryocooler Conference that was held in Syracuse, New York, on June 9-12, 2014. The program of this conference lead to the 76 peer-reviewed papers that are published here. Over the years the International Cryocoolers Conference has become the preeminent worldwide conference for the presentation of the latest developments and test experiences with cryocoolers. The typical applications of this technology include cooling space and terrestrial infrared focal plane arrays, space x-ray detectors, medical applications, and a growing number of high-temperature superconductor applications.

  11. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from DISCOVERY in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2010-01-06 to 2010-02-18 (NODC Accession 0112761)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0112761 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from DISCOVERY in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2010-01-06 to 2010-02-18 and retrieved...

  12. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean from 2006-05-26 to 2006-06-18 (NODC Accession 0112266)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112266 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean from 2006-05-26 to 2006-06-18...

  13. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the MARION DUFRESNE in the Indian Ocean from 1998-08-18 to 1998-09-09 (NODC Accession 0113573)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113573 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MARION DUFRESNE in the Indian Ocean from 1998-08-18...

  14. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean from 2001-06-04 to 2001-07-18 (NODC Accession 0112256)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112256 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean from 2001-06-04 to 2001-07-18...

  15. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the SEWARD JOHNSON in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2003-04-18 to 2003-05-22 (NODC Accession 0113596)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113596 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from SEWARD JOHNSON in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2003-04-18 to...

  16. Trading forest carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nature of carbon in forests is discussed from the perspective of carbon trading. Carbon inventories, specifically in the area of land use and forestry are reviewed for the Pacific Northwest. Carbon turnover in forests is discussed as it relates to carbon sequestration. Scient...

  17. Adhered Supported Carbon Nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Dale F.; Craft, Benjamin J.; Jaffe, Stephen M.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (NTs) in excess of 200 μm long are grown by catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbon vapors. The nanotubes grow continuously without the typical extinction due to catalyst encapsulation. A woven metal mesh supports the nanotubes creating a metal supported nanotube (MSNT) structure. The 140 μm wide mesh openings are completely filled by 70 nm diameter multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs). The MWNTs are straight, uniform and highly crystalline. Their wall thickness is about 10 nm (30 graphite layers). The adherent NTs are not removed from the support in a Scotch tape pull test. A 12.5 cm 2 capacitor made from two MSNT structures immersed in 1 M KCl has a capacitance of 0.35 F and an equivalent series resistance of 0.18 Ω. Water flows through the MSNT at a flow velocity of 1 cm/min with a pressure drop of 15 inches of water. With the support removed, the MWNTs naturally form a carbon nanocomposite (CNC) paper with a specific area of 80 m 2 /gm, a bulk density of 0.21 g/cm 3 , an open pore fraction of 0.81, and a resistivity of 0.16 Ω-cm

  18. Fixation Of Mo In Uranium Leach Liquor By Activated Carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mainar, S.; Guswita, A.; Erni, R.A.; Susilaningtyas

    1996-01-01

    The use of activated carbon for Mo fixation by bulk system is reported. Several factors influencing the fixation process were examined, including contact time, carbon particle size, carbon porosity and the effect of other elements present in Mo containing solutions. Experimental data showed that an adsorption equilibrium of Mo on of activated carbon and 0,85 to 1,18 mm of carbon particle size under forced-convection mass transfer in 100 ml solution that contains + 0,56 m mol of Mo and +. 0,25 m mol Of U was reached after 6 hours period. Under those conditions, about 0,50 m mol of Mo and 0,026 m mol of U were adsorbed into carbon. High concentration of rare earth elements decreased Mo adsorption, hence, the use of activated carbon was not effective to separate Mo from the digestion liquor of Rirang are where Mo was adsorbed, into the carbon + 34,5 %

  19. ICFTU 18. kongress / Harri Taliga

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Taliga, Harri, 1957-

    2004-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: EAKL Teataja : Narodnaja Gazeta, nr. 11, dets. 2004, lk. 1. 5.-10. detsembrini 2004 Jaapanis toimunud Rahvusvahelisest Vabade Ametiühingute Konföderatsiooni (ICFTU) 18. maailmakongressist, mille läbivaks teemaks oli globaalne solidaarsus

  20. Fluorine-18-labelled molecules: synthesis and application in medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolle, F.; Perrio, C.; Barre, L.; Lasne, M.C.; Le Bars, D.

    2006-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is one of the more powerful available techniques for medical imaging. It relies on the use of molecules labelled with a positron emitter (β + ). Among those emitters, fluorine-18, available from a cyclotron, is a radionuclide of choice because of its relatively long-half-life (109.8 min) and the relatively low energy of the emitted-positron. The electrophilic form of fluorine-18 ([ 18 F]F 2 or reagents derived from [ 18 F]F 2 ) is mainly used for hydrogen or metal substitutions on aromatic or vinylic carbons. The presence of the stable isotope (fluorine-19) in the radiotracers limits their use in medical imaging. The nucleophilic form of fluorine-18 (alkaline mono-fluoride, K[ 18 F]F, the most used), obtained from irradiation of enriched water, is widely used in aliphatic and (hetero)aromatic substitutions for the synthesis of radiotracers with high specific radioactivity. Some examples of radio-fluorinated tracers used in PET are presented, as well as some of their in vivo applications in human. (authors)

  1. Special issue : transport in a post-carbon society

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    This special issue of World Transport Policy & Practice is an outcome of the conference Planning for the Carbon Neutral World: Challenges for Cities and Regions, held 15-18 May 2008 in Salzburg, Austria. The conference, organised by SCUPAD Salzbu...

  2. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, ... Install one and check its batteries regularly. View Information About CO Alarms Other CO Topics Safety Tips ...

  3. Global Carbon Budget 2017

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Quere, Corinne; Andrew, Robbie M.; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Sitch, Stephen; Pongratz, Julia; Manning, Andrew C.; Korsbakken, Jan Ivar; Peters, Glen P.; Canadell, Josep G.; Jackson, Robert B.; Boden, Thomas A.; Tans, Pieter P.; Andrews, Oliver D.; Arora, Vivek K.; Bakker, Dorothee C. E.; Barbero, Leticia; Becker, Meike; Betts, Richard A.; Bopp, Laurent; Chevallier, Frederic; Chini, Louise P.; Ciais, Philippe; Cosca, Catherine E.; Cross, Jessica; Currie, Kim; Gasser, Thomas; Harris, Ian; Hauck, Judith; Haverd, Vanessa; Houghton, Richard A.; Hunt, Christopher W.; Hurtt, George; Ilyina, Tatiana; Jain, Atul K.; Kato, Etsushi; Kautz, Markus; Keeling, Ralph F.; Goldewijk, Kees Klein; Koertzinger, Arne; Landschuetzer, Peter; Lefevre, Nathalie; Lenton, Andrew; Lienert, Sebastian; Lima, Ivan; Lombardozzi, Danica; Metzl, Nicolas; Millero, Frank; Monteiro, Pedro M. S.; Munro, David R.; Nabel, Julia E. M. S.; Nakaoka, Shin-ichiro; Nojiri, Yukihiro; Padin, X. Antonio; Peregon, Anna; Pfeil, Benjamin; Pierrot, Denis; Poulter, Benjamin; Rehder, Gregor; Reimer, Janet; Roedenbeck, Christian; Schwinger, Jorg; Seferian, Roland; Skjelvan, Ingunn; Stocker, Benjamin D.; Tian, Hanqin; Tilbrook, Bronte; Tubiello, Francesco N.; van der Laan-Luijkx, Ingrid T.; van der Werf, Guido R.; van Heuven, Steven; Viovy, Nicolas; Vuichard, Nicolas; Walker, Anthony P.; Watson, Andrew J.; Wiltshire, Andrew J.; Zaehle, Soenke; Zhu, Dan

    2018-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere - the "global carbon budget" - is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project

  4. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as CO, is called the " ...

  5. Frontiers of graphene and carbon nanotubes devices and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on carbon nanotubes and graphene as representatives of nano-carbon materials, and describes the growth of new technology and applications of new devices. As new devices and as new materials, nano-carbon materials are expected to be world pioneers that could not have been realized with conventional semiconductor materials, and as those that extend the limits of conventional semiconductor performance. This book introduces the latest achievements of nano-carbon devices, processes, and technology growth. It is anticipated that these studies will also be pioneers in the development of future research of nano-carbon devices and materials. This book consists of 18 chapters. Chapters 1 to 8 describe new device applications and new growth methods of graphene, and Chapters 9 to 18, those of carbon nanotubes. It is expected that by increasing the advantages and overcoming the weak points of nanocarbon materials, a new world that cannot be achieved with conventional materials will be greatly expanded. W...

  6. Potential of ikaite to record the evolution of oceanic δ18O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickaby, R. E. M.; Shaw, S.; Bennitt, G.; Kennedy, H.; Zabel, M.; Lennie, A.

    2006-06-01

    A challenge in the quest to understand the sensitivity of the climate system is the separation of the competing effects of ice volume or sea level, salinity, and temperature on foraminiferal δ18O. We present precipitation experiments on the mineral ikaite, a hydrated form of calcium carbonate found in organic carbon rich deep-marine sediments, that show that the hydration waters within the ikaite crystal capture the δ18O of seawater (δ18Osw) with a fractionation factor of 1.0029 (±0.0002). The δ18Osw measures the volume of continental ice, with an overprint of local salinity. Isolation of δ18Osw by analysis of the hydration waters of sedimentary ikaite preserved at temperatures ikaite at the Last Glacial Maximum agree with estimates from modeling of pore waters that Antarctic Bottom Water was +1.4‰ ± 0.2‰ heavier.

  7. Toward explaining the Holocene carbon dioxide and carbon isotope records: Results from transient ocean carbon cycle-climate simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menviel, L.; Joos, F.

    2012-03-01

    The Bern3D model was applied to quantify the mechanisms of carbon cycle changes during the Holocene (last 11,000 years). We rely on scenarios from the literature to prescribe the evolution of shallow water carbonate deposition and of land carbon inventory changes over the glacial termination (18,000 to 11,000 years ago) and the Holocene and modify these scenarios within uncertainties. Model results are consistent with Holocene records of atmospheric CO2 and δ13C as well as the spatiotemporal evolution of δ13C and carbonate ion concentration in the deep sea. Deposition of shallow water carbonate, carbonate compensation of land uptake during the glacial termination, land carbon uptake and release during the Holocene, and the response of the ocean-sediment system to marine changes during the termination contribute roughly equally to the reconstructed late Holocene pCO2 rise of 20 ppmv. The 5 ppmv early Holocene pCO2 decrease reflects terrestrial uptake largely compensated by carbonate deposition and ocean sediment responses. Additional small contributions arise from Holocene changes in sea surface temperature, ocean circulation, and export productivity. The Holocene pCO2 variations result from the subtle balance of forcings and processes acting on different timescales and partly in opposite direction as well as from memory effects associated with changes occurring during the termination. Different interglacial periods with different forcing histories are thus expected to yield different pCO2 evolutions as documented by ice cores.

  8. Integral Ring Carbon-Carbon Piston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An improved structure for a reciprocating internal combustion engine or compressor piston fabricate from carbon-carbon composite materials is disclosed. An integral ring carbon-carbon composite piston, disclosed herein, reduces the need for piston rings and for small clearances by providing a small flexible, integral component around the piston that allows for variation in clearance due to manufacturing tolerances, distortion due to pressure and thermal loads, and variations in thermal expansion differences between the piston and cylinder liner.

  9. Influence of organic carbon sources and isotope exchange processes between water and nitrate on the fractionation of the stable isotopes {sup 15}N/{sup 14}N and {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O in dissolved nitrate during microbial dentrification in groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunderlich, Anja A.L.

    2012-11-02

    Stable isotopes of nitrate are commonly used to determine sources and degradation of nitrate. In this study, nitrite oxidizing bacteria were found to promote an oxygen isotope exchange between water and nitrate under anoxic conditions. Also, different carbon sources were found to influence the enrichment of stable isotopes in nitrate during microbial denitrification. Both results refine the stable isotope model of nitrate in respect to nitrate source determination and microbial nitrate reduction.

  10. Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijgen, W.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    The increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, mainly caused by fossil fuel combustion, has lead to concerns about global warming. A possible technology that can contribute to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions is CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. The basic concept

  11. Acidity controls on dissolved organic carbon mobility in organic soils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Evans, Ch. D.; Jones, T.; Burden, A.; Ostle, N.; Zielinski, P.; Cooper, M.; Peacock, M.; Clark, J.; Oulehle, Filip; Cooper, D.; Freeman, Ch.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 11 (2012), s. 3317-3331 ISSN 1354-1013 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : acidity * dissolved organic carbon * organic soil * peat * podzol * soil carbon * sulphur Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 6.910, year: 2012

  12. intercritical heat treatments effects on low carbon steels quenched

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR B. A. EZEKOYE

    Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nigeria, Nsukka. 2. E-mail: benjamin.ezekoye@unn.edu.ng; bezekoye@yahoo.com. ABSTRACT. Six low carbon steels containing carbon in the range 0.13-0.18wt%C were studied after intercritical quenching, intercritical quenching with low temperature tempering, ...

  13. Composite carbon foam electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Steven T.; Pekala, Richard W.; Kaschmitter, James L.

    1997-01-01

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivty and power to system energy.

  14. Global Carbon Budget 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Quéré, Corinne; Andrew, Robbie M.; Canadell, Josep G.; Sitch, Stephen; Korsbakken, Jan Ivar; Peters, Glen P.; Manning, Andrew C.; Boden, Thomas A.; Tans, Pieter P.; Houghton, Richard A.; Keeling, Ralph F.; Alin, Simone; Andrews, Oliver D.; Anthoni, Peter; Barbero, Leticia; Bopp, Laurent; Chevallier, Frédéric; Chini, Louise P.; Ciais, Philippe; Currie, Kim; Delire, Christine; Doney, Scott C.; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Gkritzalis, Thanos; Harris, Ian; Hauck, Judith; Haverd, Vanessa; Hoppema, Mario; Klein Goldewijk, Kees; Jain, Atul K.; Kato, Etsushi; Körtzinger, Arne; Landschützer, Peter; Lefèvre, Nathalie; Lenton, Andrew; Lienert, Sebastian; Lombardozzi, Danica; Melton, Joe R.; Metzl, Nicolas; Millero, Frank; Monteiro, Pedro M. S.; Munro, David R.; Nabel, Julia E. M. S.; Nakaoka, Shin-ichiro; O'Brien, Kevin; Olsen, Are; Omar, Abdirahman M.; Ono, Tsuneo; Pierrot, Denis; Poulter, Benjamin; Rödenbeck, Christian; Salisbury, Joe; Schuster, Ute; Schwinger, Jörg; Séférian, Roland; Skjelvan, Ingunn; Stocker, Benjamin D.; Sutton, Adrienne J.; Takahashi, Taro; Tian, Hanqin; Tilbrook, Bronte; van der Laan-Luijkx, Ingrid T.; van der Werf, Guido R.; Viovy, Nicolas; Walker, Anthony P.; Wiltshire, Andrew J.; Zaehle, Sönke

    2016-11-01

    .3 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, ELUC 1.0 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, GATM 4.5 ± 0.1 GtC yr-1, SOCEAN 2.6 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, and SLAND 3.1 ± 0.9 GtC yr-1. For year 2015 alone, the growth in EFF was approximately zero and emissions remained at 9.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, showing a slowdown in growth of these emissions compared to the average growth of 1.8 % yr-1 that took place during 2006-2015. Also, for 2015, ELUC was 1.3 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, GATM was 6.3 ± 0.2 GtC yr-1, SOCEAN was 3.0 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, and SLAND was 1.9 ± 0.9 GtC yr-1. GATM was higher in 2015 compared to the past decade (2006-2015), reflecting a smaller SLAND for that year. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration reached 399.4 ± 0.1 ppm averaged over 2015. For 2016, preliminary data indicate the continuation of low growth in EFF with +0.2 % (range of -1.0 to +1.8 %) based on national emissions projections for China and USA, and projections of gross domestic product corrected for recent changes in the carbon intensity of the economy for the rest of the world. In spite of the low growth of EFF in 2016, the growth rate in atmospheric CO2 concentration is expected to be relatively high because of the persistence of the smaller residual terrestrial sink (SLAND) in response to El Niño conditions of 2015-2016. From this projection of EFF and assumed constant ELUC for 2016, cumulative emissions of CO2 will reach 565 ± 55 GtC (2075 ± 205 GtCO2) for 1870-2016, about 75 % from EFF and 25 % from ELUC. This living data update documents changes in the methods and data sets used in this new carbon budget compared with previous publications of this data set (Le Quéré et al., 2015b, a, 2014, 2013). All observations presented here can be downloaded from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (doi:10.3334/CDIAC/GCP_2016).

  15. Preparation And Characterization Of Cr/Activated Carbon Catalyst From Palm Empty Fruit Bunch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainal Fanani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Preparation and characterization of Cr/activated carbon catalyst from palm empty fruit bunch had been done. The research were to determine the effect of carbonization temperature towards adsorption of ammonia, iodine number, metilen blue number, and porosity of activated carbon and Cr/activated carbon catalyst. The determination of porosity include surface area, micropore volume and total pore volume. The results showed the best carbonization temperature activated carbon and Cr/activated carbon catalyst at 700°C. The adsorption ammonia of activated carbon and Cr/activated carbon catalyst as 6.379 mmol/g and 8.1624 mmol/g. The iodine number of activated carbon and Cr/activated carbon catalyst as 1520.16 mg/g and 1535.67 mg/g. The metilen blue number of activated carbon and Cr/activated carbon catalyst as 281.71 mg/g and 319.18 mg/g. The surface area of activated carbon and Cr/activated carbon catalyst as 1527.80 m2/g and 1652.58 m2/g. The micropore volume of activated carbon and Cr/activated carbon catalyst as 0.7460 cm3/g and 0.8670 cm3/g. The total pore volume of activated carbon and Cr/activated carbon catalyst as 0.8243 cm3/g and 0.8970 cm3/g.

  16. Carbon Cycling in Wetland Forest Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl C. Trettin; Martin F. Jurgensen

    2003-01-01

    Wetlands comprise a small proportion (i.e., 2 to 3%) of earth's terrestrial surface, yet they contain a significant proportion of the terrestrial carbon (C) pool. Soils comprise the largest terrestrial C pool (ca. 1550 Pg C in upper 100 cm; Eswaran et al., 1993; Batjes, 1996), and wetlands contain the single largest component, with estimates ranging between 18...

  17. Carbon Nanomembranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Polina; Gölzhäuser, Armin

    2017-03-01

    This chapter describes the formation and properties of one nanometer thick carbon nanomembranes (CNMs), made by electron induced cross-linking of aromatic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). The cross-linked SAMs are robust enough to be released from the surface and placed on solid support or over holes as free-standing membranes. Annealing at 1000K transforms CNMs into graphene accompanied by a change of mechanical stiffness and electrical resistance. The developed fabrication approach is scalable and provides molecular level control over thickness and homogeneity of the produced CNMs. The mechanisms of electron-induced cross-linking process are discussed in details. A variety of polyaromatic thiols: oligophenyls as well as small and extended condensed polycyclic hydrocarbons have been successfully employed, demonstrating that the structural and functional properties of the resulting nanomembranes are strongly determined by the structure of molecular monolayers. The mechanical properties of CNMs (Young's modulus, tensile strength and prestress) are characterized by bulge testing. The interpretation of the bulge test data relates the Young's modulus to the properties of single molecules and to the structure of the pristine SAMs. The gas transport through the CNM is measured onto polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) - thin film composite membrane. The established relationship of permeance and molecular size determines the molecular sieving mechanism of permeation through this ultrathin sheet.

  18. Carbon 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-03-01

    Carbon 14 is one of the most abundant radionuclides of natural and artificial origin in the environment. The aim of this conference day organized by the French society of radioprotection (SFRP) was to take stock of our knowledge about this radionuclide (origins, production, measurement, management, effects on health..): state-of-the-art of 14 C metrology; dating use of 14 C; 14 C management and monitoring of the Hague site environment; Electricite de France (EdF) and 14 C; radiological and sanitary impact of 14 C contamination at the Ganagobie site (Haute-Provence, France); metabolism and biological effects of 14 C; 14 C behaviour in the marine environment near Cogema-La Hague plant; distribution of 14 C activities in waters, mud and sediments of the Loire river estuary; dynamical modeling of transfers in the aquatic and terrestrial environment of 14 C released by nuclear power plants in normal operation: human dose calculation using the Calvados model and application to the Loire river; 14 C distribution in continents; modeling of 14 C transfers in the terrestrial environment from atmospheric sources. (J.S.)

  19. Radiation damage in carbon-carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.; Eartherly, W.P.; Nelson, G.E.

    1992-01-01

    Graphite and carbon-carbon composite materials are widely used in plasma facing applications in current Tokamak devices such as TFTR and DIIID in the USA, JET, Tore Supra and TEXTOR in Europe, and JT-60U in Japan. Carbon-carbon composites are attractive choices for Tokamak limiters and diverters because of their low atomic number, high thermal shock resistance, high melting point, and high thermal conductivity. Next generation machines such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) will utilize carbon-carbon composites in their first wall and diverter. ITER will be an ignition machine and thus will produce substantial neutron fluences from the D-T fusion reaction. The resultant high energy neutrons will cause carbon atom displacements in the plasma facing materials which will markedly affect their structure and physical properties. The effect of neutron damage on graphite has been studied for over forty years. Recently the effects of neutron irradiation on the fusion relevant graphite GraphNOL N3M was reviewed. In contrast to graphite, relatively little work has been performed to elucidate the effects of neutron irradiation on carbon-carbon composites. The results of our previous irradiation experiments have been published elsewhere. Here the irradiation induced dimensional changes in 1D, 2D, and 3D carbon-carbon composites are reported for fluences up to 4.7 dpa at an irradiation temperature of 600 degree C

  20. Carbon compound used in hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iturbe G, J.L.; Lopez M, B.E.

    2004-01-01

    In the present work it is studied the activated carbon of mineral origin for the sorption of hydrogen. The carbon decreased of particle size by means of the one alloyed mechanical. The time of mill was of 10 hours. The characterization one carries out by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The hydrogen sipped in the carbon material it was determined using the Thermal gravimetric method (TGA). The conditions of hydrogenation went at 10 atm of pressure and ambient temperature during 18 hours. They were also carried out absorption/desorption cycles of hydrogen in the same one system of thermal gravimetric analysis. The results showed percentages of sorption of 2% approximately in the cycles carried out in the system TGA and of 4.5% in weight of hydrogen at pressure of 10 atmospheres and ambient temperature during 18 hours. (Author)

  1. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  2. Mutagenicity of carbon nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallin, Håkan; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; White, Paul A

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials such carbon nanotubes, graphene and fullerenes are some the most promising nanomaterials. Although carbon nanomaterials have been reported to possess genotoxic potential, it is imperitive to analyse the data on the genotoxicity of carbon nanomaterials in vivo and in vitro...

  3. Mesoporous carbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng; Fulvio, Pasquale Fernando; Mayes, Richard T.; Wang, Xiqing; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Guo, Bingkun

    2014-09-09

    A conductive mesoporous carbon composite comprising conductive carbon nanoparticles contained within a mesoporous carbon matrix, wherein the conductive mesoporous carbon composite possesses at least a portion of mesopores having a pore size of at least 10 nm and up to 50 nm, and wherein the mesopores are either within the mesoporous carbon matrix, or are spacings delineated by surfaces of said conductive carbon nanoparticles when said conductive carbon nanoparticles are fused with each other, or both. Methods for producing the above-described composite, devices incorporating them (e.g., lithium batteries), and methods of using them, are also described.

  4. Pyrolyzed thin film carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Liger, Matthieu (Inventor); Harder, Theodore (Inventor); Konishi, Satoshi (Inventor); Miserendino, Scott (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method of making carbon thin films comprises depositing a catalyst on a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon in contact with the catalyst and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon. A method of controlling a carbon thin film density comprises etching a cavity into a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon into the cavity, and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon while in the cavity to form a carbon thin film. Controlling a carbon thin film density is achieved by changing the volume of the cavity. Methods of making carbon containing patterned structures are also provided. Carbon thin films and carbon containing patterned structures can be used in NEMS, MEMS, liquid chromatography, and sensor devices.

  5. Global Carbon Budget 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quéré, Corinne Le; Andrew, Robbie M.; Canadell, Josep G.; Sitch, Stephen; Korsbakken, Jan Ivar; Peters, Glen P.; Manning, Andrew C.; Boden, Thomas A.; Tans, Pieter P.; Houghton, Richard A.; hide

    2016-01-01

    .3+/-0.5 GtC/yr, ELUC 1.0+/-0.5 GtC/yr,GATM 4.5+/-0.1 GtC/yr, SOCEAN 2.6+/-0.5 GtC/yr, and SLAND 3.1+/-0.9 GtC/yr. For year 2015 alone, the growth in EFF was approximately zero and emissions remained at 9.9+/-0.5 GtC/yr, showing a slowdown in growth of these emissions compared to the average growth of 1.8/yr that took place during 2006-2015.Also, for 2015, ELUC was 1.3+/-0.5 GtC/yr, GATM was 6.3+/-0.2 GtC/yr, SOCEAN was 3.0+/-0.5 GtC/yr, and SLAND was 1.9+/-0.9 GtC/yr. GATM was higher in 2015 compared to the past decade (2006-2015), reflecting a smaller SLAND for that year. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration reached 399.4+/-0.1 ppm averaged over 2015. For 2016, preliminary data indicate the continuation of low growth in EFF with +0.2% (range of -1.0 to +1.8% ) based on national emissions projections for China and USA, and projections of gross domestic product corrected for recent changes in the carbon intensity of the economy for the rest of the world. In spite of the low growth of EFF in 2016, the growth rate in atmospheric CO2 concentration is expected to be relatively high because of the persistence of the smaller residual terrestrial sink (SLAND) in response to El Nino conditions of 2015-2016. From this projection of EFF and assumed constant ELUC for 2016, cumulative emissions of CO2 will reach 565+/-55 GtC (2075+/-205 GtCO2) for 1870-2016, about 75% from EFF and 25% from ELUC. This living data update documents changes in the methods and data sets used in this new carbon budget compared with previous publications of this data set.

  6. Direct carbon emissions from Canadian forest fires, 1959-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiro, B. D.; Todd, J. B.; Flannigan, M. D.; Hirsch, K. G.; Wotton, B. M.; Logan, K. A.; Stocks, B. J.; Mason, J. A.; Martell, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    Fire is recognised as driving most of the boreal forest carbon balance in North America, therefore fires not only impact on carbon sequestration by forests, but emit greenhouse gases that have the potential to affect the environment. In this paper direct emissions of carbon from Canadian forest fires were estimated for all of Canada and for each ecozone for the period 1959 to 1999. Estimates were based on large fires ; fuel consumption for each fire was calculated using the Canadian Forest Fire Behaviour Prediction System. There were about 11,400 forest fires, averaging 2 x 10 6 hectare per year during this period. Boreal and taiga areas experienced the greatest area burned, releasing most of the carbon. The mean area-weighted fuel consumption for all fires was 2.6 kg of dry fuel per m 2 (1.3 kg carbon per m 2 ) varying from 1.8 kg to 3.9 kg per m 2 among ecozones. The mean annual direct carbon emission was estimated at 27 + or - 6 Tg carbon per year, or about 18 per cent of current carbon dioxide emissions from the Canadian energy sector, on average. This excludes post-fire effects, which cause an additional loss of carbon; changes to the forest also affect the strength of the forest carbon sink. Fire emissions have shown an increase over the past two decades and are likely to remain high due to anticipated changes in fire weather resulting from climate warming. 48 refs., 3 tabs., 6 figs

  7. Use of Carbon Nano-Fiber Foams as Strain Gauges to Detect Crack Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    capacitors [18]. Another example are recent attempts to use carbon fibers and carbon nanotubes to develop sensor devices. Sida Luo created aligned... Sida Luo, “Structure-property-processing relationships of single-wall carbon nanotube thin film piezoresistive sensors,” SciVerse ScienceDirect, pp

  8. Tritium in [18O]water containing [18F]fluoride for [18F]FDG synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Shigeki; Saze, Takuya; Sakane, Hitoshi; Ito, Satoshi; Ito, Shinichi; Nishizawa, Kunihide

    2004-01-01

    The presence of tritium in enriched [ 18 O]water irradiated with 9.6 MeV protons used to produce [ 18 F]fluoride by the 18 O(p, n) 18 F reaction was inferred from the cross sections and threshold energies of the 18 O(p, t) 16 O reaction, and the existence of tritium was confirmed experimentally. Tritium was also detected in both [ 18 O]water recovered for recycling and waste acetonitrile solutions. The purified [ 18 F]FDG was not contaminated with 3 H. The amount of 3 H discharged into the air was far less than the International Basic Safety Standard Level

  9. Carbon tetrachloride desorption from activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonas, L.A.; Sansone, E.B.

    1981-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride was desorbed from a granular activated carbon subsequent to its adsorption under various vapor exposure periods. The varied conditions of exposure resulted in a range of partially saturated carbon beds which, when followed by a constant flow rate for desorption, generated different forms of the desorbing concentration versus time curve. A method of analyzing the desorption curves is presented which permits extraction of the various desorbing rates from the different desorption and to relate this to the time required for such regeneration. The Wheeler desorption kinetic equation was used to calculate the pseudo first order desorption rate constant for the carbon. The desorption rate constant was found to increase monotonically with increasing saturation of the bed, permitting the calculation of the maximum desorption rate constant for the carbon at 100% saturation. The Retentivity Index of the carbon, defined as the dimensionless ratio of the adsorption to the desorption rate constant, was found to be 681

  10. 47 CFR 18.203 - Equipment authorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... information already on file with the Commission. (2) A technical report pursuant to §§ 18.207 and 18.311. (b... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment authorization. 18.203 Section 18.203 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INDUSTRIAL, SCIENTIFIC, AND MEDICAL EQUIPMENT...

  11. Carbon fuel cells with carbon corrosion suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F [Oakland, CA

    2012-04-10

    An electrochemical cell apparatus that can operate as either a fuel cell or a battery includes a cathode compartment, an anode compartment operatively connected to the cathode compartment, and a carbon fuel cell section connected to the anode compartment and the cathode compartment. An effusion plate is operatively positioned adjacent the anode compartment or the cathode compartment. The effusion plate allows passage of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide exhaust channels are operatively positioned in the electrochemical cell to direct the carbon dioxide from the electrochemical cell.

  12. Identification of carbonate pedofeatures of different ages in modern chernozems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovda, I. V.; Morgun, E. G.; Lebedeva, M. P.; Oleinik, S. A.; Shishkov, V. A.

    2016-07-01

    Carbonate pedofeatures of three chernozemic soils developed from loesslike loams in the foreststeppe zone of Lipetsk oblast under fallow plot (Luvic Chernozem (Clayic, Pachic)) and under forest (Calcic Chernozem (Clayic, Pachic)) and in the steppe zone of Dnepropetrovsk oblast (Calcic Chernozem (Episiltic, Endoclayic, Pachic)) were studied in the field and laboratory with the use of a set of methods, including the radiocarbon method, mass spectrometry, and micro- and submicromorphology. The morphological diversity of carbonate pedofeatures in these soils was represented by carbonate veins, coatings, disperse carbonates (carbonate impregnations), soft masses (beloglazka), and concretions. In the forest-steppe soils, disperse carbonates and soft masses were absent. The radiocarbon age of carbonate pedofeatures in the forest-steppe soils varied within a relatively narrow range of 3-4.3 ka cal BP with a tendency for a younger age of carbonate concretions subjected to destruction (geodes). In the steppe chernozem, this range was larger, and the 14C ages of different forms of carbonate pedofeatures were different. Thus, soft masses (beloglazka) had the age of 5.5-6 ka cal BP; disperse carbonates, 17.5-18.5 ka cal BP; and hard carbonate concretions, 26-27 ka cal BP. Data on δ13C demonstrated that the isotopic composition of carbon in virtually all the "nonlabile" carbonate pedofeatures does not correspond to the isotopic composition of carbon of the modern soil organic matter. It was shown that the studied chernozemic soils are polygenetic formations containing carbonate pedofeatures of different ages: (a) recent (currently growing), (b) relict, and (c) inherited pedofeatures. The latter group represents complex pedofeatures that include ancient fragments integrated in younger pedofeatures, e.g., the Holocene soft carbonate nodules with inclusions of fragments of the ancient microcodium.

  13. Determining Inorganic and Organic Carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koistinen, Jaana; Sjöblom, Mervi; Spilling, Kristian

    2017-11-21

    Carbon is the element which makes up the major fraction of lipids and carbohydrates, which could be used for making biofuel. It is therefore important to provide enough carbon and also follow the flow into particulate organic carbon and potential loss to dissolved organic forms of carbon. Here we present methods for determining dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, and particulate organic carbon.

  14. The Australian terrestrial carbon budget

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Haverd

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a study of the full carbon (C-CO2 budget of the Australian continent, focussing on 1990–2011 in the context of estimates over two centuries. The work is a contribution to the RECCAP (REgional Carbon Cycle Assessment and Processes project, as one of numerous regional studies. In constructing the budget, we estimate the following component carbon fluxes: net primary production (NPP; net ecosystem production (NEP; fire; land use change (LUC; riverine export; dust export; harvest (wood, crop and livestock and fossil fuel emissions (both territorial and non-territorial. Major biospheric fluxes were derived using BIOS2 (Haverd et al., 2012, a fine-spatial-resolution (0.05° offline modelling environment in which predictions of CABLE (Wang et al., 2011, a sophisticated land surface model with carbon cycle, are constrained by multiple observation types. The mean NEP reveals that climate variability and rising CO2 contributed 12 ± 24 (1σ error on mean and 68 ± 15 TgC yr−1, respectively. However these gains were partially offset by fire and LUC (along with other minor fluxes, which caused net losses of 26 ± 4 TgC yr−1 and 18 ± 7 TgC yr−1, respectively. The resultant net biome production (NBP is 36 ± 29 TgC yr−1, in which the largest contributions to uncertainty are NEP, fire and LUC. This NBP offset fossil fuel emissions (95 ± 6 TgC yr−1 by 38 ± 30%. The interannual variability (IAV in the Australian carbon budget exceeds Australia's total carbon emissions by fossil fuel combustion and is dominated by IAV in NEP. Territorial fossil fuel emissions are significantly smaller than the rapidly growing fossil fuel exports: in 2009–2010, Australia exported 2.5 times more carbon in fossil fuels than it emitted by burning fossil fuels.

  15. Evaluation of 4-[18F]fluoro-1-butyne as a radiolabeled synthon for click chemistry with azido compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Choe, Yearn Seong; Kim, Byung-Tae

    2010-01-01

    Click chemistry is a useful approach for the preparation of novel radiopharmaceuticals. In this study, we evaluated 4-[ 18 F]fluoro-1-butyne as a radiolabeled synthon for click chemistry with azido compounds. Our results showed that nucleophilic substitution of 4-tosyloxy-1-butyne with K[ 18 F]F produces vinyl acetylene as well as 4-[ 18 F]fluoro-1-butyne, while the same reaction using 5-tosyloxy-1-pentyne gives exclusively 5-[ 18 F]fluoro-1-pentyne. Thus, ω-[ 18 F]fluoro-1-alkynes with chain lengths longer than four carbons may be better radiolabeled synthons for use in click chemistry.

  16. Low-temperature carbonization plant for lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiotsuki, Y

    1949-01-01

    The design and operational data of a low-temperature carbonization plant for Japanese lignite are described. The retort had a vertical cylinder with a capacity of about 10 tons per day. By continuous operation, in which a part of the gas produced was circulated and burned in the lignite zone, about 40 percent semicoke and 3 to 4 percent tar were obtained. From the tar the following products were separated: Low-temperature carbonization cresol, 18.3; motor fuel, 1.00; solvent, 9.97; cresol for medical uses, 11.85; and creosote oil, 32 percent.

  17. Carbon Monoxide Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with the Media Fire Protection Technology Carbon monoxide safety outreach materials Keep your community informed about the ... KB | Spanish PDF 592 KB Handout: carbon monoxide safety Download this handout and add your organization's logo ...

  18. Trading forest carbon - OSU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issues associate with trading carbon sequestered in forests are discussed. Scientific uncertainties associated with carbon measurement are discussed with respect to proposed accounting procedures. Major issues include: (1) Establishing baselines. (2) Determining additivity from f...

  19. Geochemistry of sedimentary carbonates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morse, John W; Mackenzie, Fred T

    1990-01-01

    .... The last major section is two chapters on the global cycle of carbon and human intervention, and the role of sedimentary carbonates as indicators of stability and changes in Earth's surface environment...

  20. Calcium carbonate overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: Antacids (Tums, Chooz) Mineral supplements Hand lotions Vitamin and mineral supplements Other products may also contain ...

  1. Carbon Based Nanotechnology: Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This presentation reviews publicly available information related to carbon based nanotechnology. Topics covered include nanomechanics, carbon based electronics, nanodevice/materials applications, nanotube motors, nano-lithography and H2O storage in nanotubes.

  2. Sodium carbonate poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodium carbonate (known as washing soda or soda ash) is a chemical found in many household and industrial products. This article focuses on poisoning due to sodium carbonate. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  3. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  4. Carbon compound used in hydrogen storage; Compuesto de carbon utilizado en almacenamiento de hidrogeno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iturbe G, J L; Lopez M, B E [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    In the present work it is studied the activated carbon of mineral origin for the sorption of hydrogen. The carbon decreased of particle size by means of the one alloyed mechanical. The time of mill was of 10 hours. The characterization one carries out by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The hydrogen sipped in the carbon material it was determined using the Thermal gravimetric method (TGA). The conditions of hydrogenation went at 10 atm of pressure and ambient temperature during 18 hours. They were also carried out absorption/desorption cycles of hydrogen in the same one system of thermal gravimetric analysis. The results showed percentages of sorption of 2% approximately in the cycles carried out in the system TGA and of 4.5% in weight of hydrogen at pressure of 10 atmospheres and ambient temperature during 18 hours. (Author)

  5. Drought sensitivity of Amazonian carbon balance revealed by atmospheric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, L. V.; Gloor, M.; Miller, J. B.; Doughty, C. E.; Malhi, Y.; Domingues, L. G.; Basso, L. S.; Martinewski, A.; Correia, C. S. C.; Borges, V. F.; Freitas, S.; Braz, R.; Anderson, L. O.; Rocha, H.; Grace, J.; Phillips, O. L.; Lloyd, J.

    2014-02-01

    Feedbacks between land carbon pools and climate provide one of the largest sources of uncertainty in our predictions of global climate. Estimates of the sensitivity of the terrestrial carbon budget to climate anomalies in the tropics and the identification of the mechanisms responsible for feedback effects remain uncertain. The Amazon basin stores a vast amount of carbon, and has experienced increasingly higher temperatures and more frequent floods and droughts over the past two decades. Here we report seasonal and annual carbon balances across the Amazon basin, based on carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide measurements for the anomalously dry and wet years 2010 and 2011, respectively. We find that the Amazon basin lost 0.48+/-0.18 petagrams of carbon per year (PgCyr-1) during the dry year but was carbon neutral (0.06+/-0.1PgCyr-1) during the wet year. Taking into account carbon losses from fire by using carbon monoxide measurements, we derived the basin net biome exchange (that is, the carbon flux between the non-burned forest and the atmosphere) revealing that during the dry year, vegetation was carbon neutral. During the wet year, vegetation was a net carbon sink of 0.25+/-0.14PgCyr-1, which is roughly consistent with the mean long-term intact-forest biomass sink of 0.39+/-0.10PgCyr-1 previously estimated from forest censuses. Observations from Amazonian forest plots suggest the suppression of photosynthesis during drought as the primary cause for the 2010 sink neutralization. Overall, our results suggest that moisture has an important role in determining the Amazonian carbon balance. If the recent trend of increasing precipitation extremes persists, the Amazon may become an increasing carbon source as a result of both emissions from fires and the suppression of net biome exchange by drought.

  6. Graphitization in Carbon MEMS and Carbon NEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Swati

    Carbon MEMS (CMEMS) and Carbon NEMS (CNEMS) are an emerging class of miniaturized devices. Due to the numerous advantages such as scalable manufacturing processes, inexpensive and readily available precursor polymer materials, tunable surface properties and biocompatibility, carbon has become a preferred material for a wide variety of future sensing applications. Single suspended carbon nanowires (CNWs) integrated on CMEMS structures fabricated by electrospinning of SU8 photoresist on photolithographially patterned SU8 followed by pyrolysis are utilized for understanding the graphitization process in micro and nano carbon materials. These monolithic CNW-CMEMS structures enable the fabrication of very high aspect ratio CNWs of predefined length. The CNWs thus fabricated display core---shell structures having a graphitic shell with a glassy carbon core. The electrical conductivity of these CNWs is increased by about 100% compared to glassy carbon as a result of enhanced graphitization. We explore various tunable fabrication and pyrolysis parameters to improve graphitization in the resulting CNWs. We also suggest gas-sensing application of the thus fabricated single suspended CNW-CMEMS devices by using the CNW as a nano-hotplate for local chemical vapor deposition. In this thesis we also report on results from an optimization study of SU8 photoresist derived carbon electrodes. These electrodes were applied to the simultaneous detection of traces of Cd(II) and Pb(II) through anodic stripping voltammetry and detection limits as low as 0.7 and 0.8 microgL-1 were achieved. To further improve upon the electrochemical behavior of the carbon electrodes we elucidate a modified pyrolysis technique featuring an ultra-fast temperature ramp for obtaining bubbled porous carbon from lithographically patterned SU8. We conclude this dissertation by suggesting the possible future works on enhancing graphitization as well as on electrochemical applications

  7. Carbon offsetting: sustaining consumption?

    OpenAIRE

    Heather Lovell; Harriet Bulkeley; Diana Liverman

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we examine how theories of sustainable and ethical consumption help us to understand a new, rapidly expanding type of consumer product designed to mitigate climate change: carbon offsets. The voluntary carbon offset market grew by 200% between 2005 and 2006, and there are now over 150 retailers of voluntary carbon offsets worldwide. Our analysis concentrates on the production and consumption of carbon offsets, drawing on ideas from governmentality and political ecology about how...

  8. Organic carbon input in shallow groundwater at Aspo, southeastern Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallin, B.

    1993-01-01

    The variation in carbon and oxygen isotopes in calcite fissure fillings and dissolved carbonate from shallow groundwaters has been examined at Aspo, southeastern Sweden. The shallow water lens is refilled by meteoric water and is considered as an open system. The σ 13 C-signatures of the dissolved carbonate fall within a narrow range of -15.8 to -17.4 per-thousand, indicative of organic an organic carbon source. The low σ 13 C-values suggest that input of soil-CO 2 is the dominating carbon source for the system. σ 13 C and σ 18 O-values in the calcite fissure fillings show a wide range in values with a possible two end-member mixing of early post glacial atmospheric CO 2 dominated system to a present day soil-CO 2 dominating carbon source

  9. Modeling of the global carbon cycle - isotopic data requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciais, P.

    1994-01-01

    Isotopes are powerful tools to constrain carbon cycle models. For example, the combinations of the CO 2 and the 13 C budget allows to calculate the net-carbon fluxes between atmosphere, ocean, and biosphere. Observations of natural and bomb-produced radiocarbon allow to estimate gross carbon exchange fluxes between different reservoirs and to deduce time scales of carbon overturning in important reservoirs. 18 O in CO 2 is potentially a tool to make the deconvolution of C fluxes within the land biosphere (assimilation vs respirations). The scope of this article is to identify gaps in our present knowledge about isotopes in the light of their use as constraint for the global carbon cycle. In the following we will present a list of some future data requirements for carbon cycle models. (authors)

  10. Carbon activity meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, P.; Krankota, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    A carbon activity meter utilizing an electrochemical carbon cell with gaseous reference electrodes having particular application for measuring carbon activity in liquid sodium for the LMFBR project is described. The electrolyte container is electroplated with a thin gold film on the inside surface thereof, and a reference electrode consisting of CO/CO 2 gas is used. (U.S.)

  11. Protolytic carbon film technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renschler, C.L.; White, C.A.

    1996-04-01

    This paper presents a technique for the deposition of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) on virtually any surface allowing carbon film formation with only the caveat that the substrate must withstand carbonization temperatures of at least 600 degrees centigrade. The influence of processing conditions upon the structure and properties of the carbonized film is discussed. Electrical conductivity, microstructure, and morphology control are also described.

  12. Carbon Goes To…

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savasci, Funda

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this activity are to help middle school students understand the carbon cycle and realize how human activities affect the carbon cycle. This activity consists of two parts. The first part of the activity focuses on the carbon cycle, especially before the Industrial Revolution, while the second part of the activity focuses on how…

  13. Global Carbon Budget 2016

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Quéré, Corinne; Andrew, Robbie M.; Canadell, Josep G.; Sitch, Stephen; Ivar Korsbakken, Jan; Peters, Glen P.; Manning, Andrew C.; Boden, Thomas A.; Tans, Pieter P.; Houghton, Richard A.; Keeling, Ralph F.; Alin, Simone; Andrews, Oliver D.; Anthoni, Peter; Barbero, Leticia; Bopp, Laurent; Chevallier, Frédéric; Chini, Louise P.; Ciais, Philippe; Currie, Kim; Delire, Christine; Doney, Scott C.; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Gkritzalis, Thanos; Harris, Ian A; Hauck, Judith; Haverd, Vanessa; Hoppema, Mario; Klein Goldewijk, Kees; Jain, Atul K.; Kato, Etsushi; Körtzinger, Arne; Landschützer, Peter; Lefèvre, Nathalie; Lenton, Andrew; Lienert, Sebastian; Lombardozzi, Danica; Melton, Joe R.; Metzl, Nicolas; Millero, Frank; Monteiro, Pedro M S; Munro, David R.; Nabel, Julia E M S; Nakaoka, Shin Ichiro; O'Brien, Kevin; Olsen, Are; Omar, Abdirahman M.; Ono, Tsuneo; Pierrot, Denis; Poulter, Benjamin; Rödenbeck, Christian; Salisbury, Joe; Schuster, Ute; Schwinger, Jörg; Séférian, Roland; Skjelvan, Ingunn; Stocker, Benjamin D.; Sutton, Adrienne J.; Takahashi, Taro; Tian, Hanqin; Tilbrook, Bronte; Van Der Laan-Luijkx, Ingrid T.; Van Der Werf, Guido R.; Viovy, Nicolas; Walker, Anthony P.; Wiltshire, Andrew J.; Zaehle, Sönke

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere-the "global carbon budget"-is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future

  14. Global Carbon Budget 2016

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quéré, Le Corinne; Andrew, Robbie M.; Canadell, Josep G.; Sitch, Stephen; Korsbakken, Jan Ivar; Peters, Glen P.; Manning, Andrew C.; Boden, Thomas A.; Tans, Pieter P.; Houghton, Richard A.; Keeling, Ralph F.; Alin, Simone; Andrews, Oliver D.; Anthoni, Peter; Barbero, Leticia; Bopp, Laurent; Chevallier, Frédéric; Chini, Louise P.; Ciais, Philippe; Currie, Kim; Delire, Christine; Doney, Scott C.; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Gkritzalis, Thanos; Harris, Ian; Hauck, Judith; Haverd, Vanessa; Hoppema, Mario; Klein Goldewijk, Kees; Jain, Atul K.; Kato, Etsushi; Körtzinger, Arne; Landschützer, Peter; Lefèvre, Nathalie; Lenton, Andrew; Lienert, Sebastian; Lombardozzi, Danica; Melton, Joe R.; Metzl, Nicolas; Millero, Frank; Monteiro, Pedro M.S.; Munro, David R.; Nabel, Julia E.M.S.; Nakaoka, S.; O'Brien, Kevin; Olsen, Are; Omar, Abdirahman M.; Ono, Tsuneo; Pierrot, Denis; Poulter, Benjamin; Rödenbeck, Christian; Salisbury, Joe; Schuster, Ute; Schwinger, Jörg; Séférian, Roland; Skjelvan, Ingunn; Stocker, Benjamin D.; Sutton, Adrienne J.; Takahashi, Taro; Tian, Hanqin; Tilbrook, Bronte; Laan-Luijkx, van der Ingrid T.; Werf, van der Guido R.; Viovy, Nicolas; Walker, Anthony P.; Wiltshire, Andrew J.; Zaehle, Sönke

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere – the “global carbon budget” – is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project

  15. Carbon/Carbon Pistons for Internal Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    Carbon/carbon piston performs same function as aluminum pistons in reciprocating internal combustion engines while reducing weight and increasing mechanical and thermal efficiencies of engine. Carbon/carbon piston concept features low piston-to-cylinder wall clearance - so low piston rings and skirts unnecessary. Advantages possible by negligible coefficient of thermal expansion of carbon/carbon.

  16. Carbon dioxide effects research and assessment program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacoby, G.

    1980-12-01

    Information about the past and present concentrations of CO 2 in the atmosphere and variations in climate can be obtained from measurements of stable isotopes in tree rings; specifically carbon-13, oxygen-18 and deuterium. The analysis of these stable isotopes in tree rings is a relatively new and rapidly developing field. This proceedings volume contains most of the papers presented at the meeting. The first paper gives an overview of the status of carbon-13 research. Papers relating to carbon-13 are in section I and grouped separately from the contributions on carbon-14. Although the meeting was primarily concerned with stable isotopes, all carbon isotopic analysis may be helpful in understanding the carbon-13 record in tree rings. The papers on hydrogen and oxygen isotope studies are in sections II and III respectively. The remaining sections contain papers that consider more than one isotope at a time, general topics related to isotopes, atmospheric changes and tree growth, and methods of isotopic analysis

  17. 28 CFR 18.2 - Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Application. 18.2 Section 18.2 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE OFFICE OF JUSTICE PROGRAMS HEARING AND APPEAL PROCEDURES § 18.2 Application. (a) These procedures apply to all appeals and hearings of State formula or block grant applicants or...

  18. 29 CFR 525.18 - Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Review. 525.18 Section 525.18 Labor Regulations Relating to... DISABILITIES UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATES § 525.18 Review. Any person aggrieved by any action of the... allow, file with the Administrator a petition for review. Such review, if granted, shall be made by the...

  19. 31 CFR 92.18 - Judicial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Judicial review. 92.18 Section 92.18... States Mint § 92.18 Judicial review. A Final Notice of Assessment issued under the procedures in this subpart may be subject to judicial review pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 701 et seq. ...

  20. 46 CFR Sec. 18 - Group classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Group classification. Sec. 18 Section 18 Shipping... Sec. 18 Group classification. In the preparation of specifications, Job Orders, Supplemental Job... inserted thereon: Number Classification 41 Maintenance Repairs (deck, engine and stewards department...

  1. 15 CFR 18.19 - Settlement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Settlement. 18.19 Section 18.19... Procedures for Considering Applications § 18.19 Settlement. The applicant and agency counsel may agree on a proposed settlement of the award before final action on the application, either in connection with a...

  2. 15 CFR 766.18 - Settlement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Settlement. 766.18 Section 766.18... PROCEEDINGS § 766.18 Settlement. (a) Cases may be settled before service of a charging letter. In cases in which settlement is reached before service of a charging letter, a proposed charging letter will be...

  3. 32 CFR 651.18 - Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Introduction. 651.18 Section 651.18 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Records and Documents § 651.18 Introduction. NEPA...

  4. 32 CFR 147.18 - Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Introduction. 147.18 Section 147.18 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN... Standards § 147.18 Introduction. The following investigative standards are established for all United States...

  5. 38 CFR 18b.93 - Expeditious treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Expeditious treatment. 18b.93 Section 18b.93 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Judicial Standards of Practice § 18b.93 Expeditious treatment. Requests for expeditious treatment of...

  6. 45 CFR 16.18 - Mediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mediation. 16.18 Section 16.18 Public Welfare... BOARD § 16.18 Mediation. (a) In cases pending before the Board. If the Board decides that mediation... mediation techniques and will provide or assist in selecting a mediator. The mediator may take any steps...

  7. 12 CFR 18.2 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definitions. 18.2 Section 18.2 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY DISCLOSURE OF FINANCIAL AND OTHER INFORMATION BY NATIONAL BANKS § 18.2 Definitions. Unless otherwise defined in this part, the terms used have...

  8. 7 CFR 1218.18 - Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Research. 1218.18 Section 1218.18 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.18 Research...

  9. 7 CFR 1206.18 - Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Research. 1206.18 Section 1206.18 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.18 Research. Research means...

  10. 9 CFR 3.18 - Terminal facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Terminal facilities. 3.18 Section 3.18... Cats 1 Transportation Standards § 3.18 Terminal facilities. (a) Placement. Any person subject to the... inanimate cargo in animal holding areas of terminal facilities. (b) Cleaning, sanitization, and pest control...

  11. 29 CFR 401.18 - Office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Office. 401.18 Section 401.18 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor OFFICE OF LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS MEANING OF TERMS USED IN THIS SUBCHAPTER § 401.18 Office. Office means the Office of Labor-Management Standards...

  12. 27 CFR 18.19 - Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Security. 18.19 Section 18.19 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Provisions Document Requirements § 18.19 Security. The concentrate plant and equipment will be so constructed...

  13. 10 CFR 605.18 - National security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false National security. 605.18 Section 605.18 Energy DEPARTMENT... PROGRAM § 605.18 National security. Activities under ER's Financial Assistance Program shall not involve classified information (i.e., Restricted Data, formerly Restricted Data, National Security Information...

  14. 12 CFR 583.18 - Registrant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Registrant. 583.18 Section 583.18 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY DEFINITIONS FOR REGULATIONS AFFECTING SAVINGS AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES § 583.18 Registrant. The term registrant means a savings and loan...

  15. 47 CFR 18.307 - Conduction limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conduction limits. 18.307 Section 18.307 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INDUSTRIAL, SCIENTIFIC, AND MEDICAL EQUIPMENT Technical... outside of the frequency bands specified in § 18.301. (f) For ultrasonic equipment, compliance with the...

  16. 42 CFR 61.18 - Publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Publications. 61.18 Section 61.18 Public Health... FELLOWSHIPS Regular Fellowships § 61.18 Publications. Publication, distribution, and disposition of all..., that fellows shall furnish copies of such publications or other materials as may be requested by the...

  17. 42 CFR 86.18 - Grantee accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Grantee accountability. 86.18 Section 86.18 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... Occupational Safety and Health Training Grants § 86.18 Grantee accountability. (a) Accounting for grant award...

  18. 32 CFR 18.5 - Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Relationships. 18.5 Section 18.5 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MILITARY COMMISSIONS APPOINTING AUTHORITY FOR MILITARY COMMISSIONS § 18.5 Relationships. (a) In the performance of assigned functions and...

  19. 19 CFR 210.18 - Summary determinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Summary determinations. 210.18 Section 210.18 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION INVESTIGATIONS OF UNFAIR PRACTICES IN IMPORT TRADE ADJUDICATION AND ENFORCEMENT Motions § 210.18 Summary determinations. (a) Motions for summary...

  20. 32 CFR 18.3 - Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Organization. 18.3 Section 18.3 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MILITARY COMMISSIONS APPOINTING AUTHORITY FOR MILITARY COMMISSIONS § 18.3 Organization. (a) The Appointing Authority for Military Commissions is...

  1. 1 CFR 18.7 - Signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Signature. 18.7 Section 18.7 General Provisions... PREPARATION AND TRANSMITTAL OF DOCUMENTS GENERALLY § 18.7 Signature. The original and each duplicate original... stamped beneath the signature. Initialed or impressed signatures will not be accepted. Documents submitted...

  2. 7 CFR 1709.18 - Civil rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Civil rights. 1709.18 Section 1709.18 Agriculture... ASSISTANCE TO HIGH ENERGY COST COMMUNITIES General Requirements § 1709.18 Civil rights. This program will be administered in accordance with applicable Federal Civil Rights Law. All grants made under this subpart are...

  3. 38 CFR 18.438 - Adult education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adult education. 18.438 Section 18.438 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED... Adult Education § 18.438 Adult education. A recipient that provides adult education may not, on the...

  4. 7 CFR 247.18 - Nutrition education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nutrition education. 247.18 Section 247.18 Agriculture... CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.18 Nutrition education. (a) What are the State agency's responsibilities in ensuring that nutrition education is provided? The State agency...

  5. Small volume target for F-18 production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicioli, M.; Schuler, J.; Marchand, P.; Brasse, D.

    2017-05-01

    In order to reduce the volume of O-18 enriched water used for each F-18 production for research a small volume target of 1 ml has been designed at IPHC. The designed is derived from ACSI 3.8ml F-18 target and uses both water and Helium cooling. After one year of use production yield is reported.

  6. 7 CFR 632.18 - Special projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special projects. 632.18 Section 632.18 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL ABANDONED MINE PROGRAM Qualifications § 632.18 Special projects. (a) The NRCS State conservationist may approve the following types of special projects subject to the...

  7. 7 CFR 1215.18 - Secretary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Secretary. 1215.18 Section 1215.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... CONSUMER INFORMATION Popcorn Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Definitions § 1215.18...

  8. 28 CFR 100.18 - Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Audit. 100.18 Section 100.18 Judicial... ENFORCEMENT ACT OF 1994 § 100.18 Audit. (a) General. In order to evaluate the accuracy, completeness, and... examine and audit all of the carrier's supporting materials. (1) These materials include, but are not...

  9. 7 CFR 75.18 - Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sampling. 75.18 Section 75.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections... CERTIFICATION OF QUALITY OF AGRICULTURAL AND VEGETABLE SEEDS Inspection § 75.18 Sampling. Sampling, when...

  10. 24 CFR 26.18 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discovery. 26.18 Section 26.18... PROCEDURES Hearings Before Hearing Officers Discovery § 26.18 Discovery. (a) General. The parties are encouraged to engage in voluntary discovery procedures, which may commence at any time after an answer has...

  11. 28 CFR 18.7 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Discovery. 18.7 Section 18.7 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE OFFICE OF JUSTICE PROGRAMS HEARING AND APPEAL PROCEDURES § 18.7 Discovery.... Such order may be entered upon a showing that the deposition is necessary for discovery purposes, and...

  12. 29 CFR 18.2 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Definitions. 18.2 Section 18.2 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE FOR ADMINISTRATIVE HEARINGS BEFORE THE OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES General § 18.2 Definitions. For purposes of these rules: (a) Adjudicatory proceeding...

  13. 29 CFR 18.13 - Discovery methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Discovery methods. 18.13 Section 18.13 Labor Office of the... ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES General § 18.13 Discovery methods. Parties may obtain discovery by one or more of the following methods: Depositions upon oral examination or written questions; written interrogatories...

  14. 27 CFR 18.55 - Label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Label. 18.55 Section 18.55... TREASURY LIQUORS PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FRUIT-FLAVOR CONCENTRATE Operations § 18.55 Label. Each container of concentrate will have affixed thereto, before transfer, a label identifying the product and...

  15. 19 CFR 12.18 - Labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labels. 12.18 Section 12.18 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Viruses, Serums, and Toxins for Treatment of Domestic Animals § 12.18 Labels. Each...

  16. 48 CFR 18.118 - Trade agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Trade agreements. 18.118 Section 18.118 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES EMERGENCY ACQUISITIONS Available Acquisition Flexibilities 18.118 Trade agreements...

  17. 50 CFR 14.18 - Marine mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Marine mammals. 14.18 Section 14.18....18 Marine mammals. Any person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States who has lawfully taken a marine mammal on the high seas and who is authorized to import such marine mammal in accordance...

  18. 7 CFR 946.18 - Container.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Container. 946.18 Section 946.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 946.18 Container. Container means a sack, box, bag, crate...

  19. 12 CFR 18.8 - Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Delivery. 18.8 Section 18.8 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY DISCLOSURE OF FINANCIAL AND OTHER INFORMATION BY NATIONAL BANKS § 18.8 Delivery. Each national bank shall, after receiving a request for an annual...

  20. 7 CFR 959.18 - Export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Export. 959.18 Section 959.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... Handling Definitions § 959.18 Export. Export means to ship onions to any destination which is not within...

  1. 7 CFR 966.18 - Export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Export. 966.18 Section 966.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... Handling Definitions § 966.18 Export. Export means shipment of tomatoes beyond the boundaries of the 48...

  2. 49 CFR 18.41 - Financial reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Financial reporting. 18.41 Section 18.41... Enforcement § 18.41 Financial reporting. (a) General. (1) Except as provided in paragraphs (a) (2) and (5) of...) Submitting financial reports to Federal agencies, or (ii) Requesting advances or reimbursements when letters...

  3. 12 CFR 1.8 - Nonconforming investments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nonconforming investments. 1.8 Section 1.8 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INVESTMENT SECURITIES § 1.8 Nonconforming investments. (a) A national bank's investment in securities that no longer conform to this part...

  4. Possible Roles of Fluoride and Carbonate in Biochemical Carbonated Apatite Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meouch, Orysia; Omelon, Sidney

    2016-04-01

    Marine phosphorites are predominantly composed of carbonated fluorapatite (CFA = Ca10-a-b-cNaaMgb(PO4)6-x(CO3)x-y-z(CO3.F)y(SO4)zF2, where x=y+a+2c, and c represents the number of Ca vacancies, with a P2O5 content that ranges from 18-40 %. Sulphur-oxidizing bacteria of the Beggiatoa genus concentration phosphorous as intracellular polyphosphate ((PO3-)n) which is depolymerized into inorganic orthophosphate (Pi). Consequently, an increase in pore water Pi concentration favours carbonated apatite precipitation. The carbonate and fluoride that is characteristic of phosphorite CFA is also located in the vertebrate skeleton. This similarity suggests a biochemical pathway for CFA precipitation. Preliminary Raman spectroscopy and powder x-ray diffraction results that suggest a role for fluoride, and possibly carbonate, in the biochemical depolymerisation of polyphosphates with alkaline phosphatase will be presented.

  5. Latest Permian carbonate carbon isotope variability traces heterogeneous organic carbon accumulation and authigenic carbonate formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schobben, Martin; van de Velde, Sebastiaan; Gliwa, Jana; Leda, Lucyna; Korn, Dieter; Struck, Ulrich; Vinzenz Ullmann, Clemens; Hairapetian, Vachik; Ghaderi, Abbas; Korte, Christoph; Newton, Robert J.; Poulton, Simon W.; Wignall, Paul B.

    2017-11-01

    Bulk-carbonate carbon isotope ratios are a widely applied proxy for investigating the ancient biogeochemical carbon cycle. Temporal carbon isotope trends serve as a prime stratigraphic tool, with the inherent assumption that bulk micritic carbonate rock is a faithful geochemical recorder of the isotopic composition of seawater dissolved inorganic carbon. However, bulk-carbonate rock is also prone to incorporate diagenetic signals. The aim of the present study is to disentangle primary trends from diagenetic signals in carbon isotope records which traverse the Permian-Triassic boundary in the marine carbonate-bearing sequences of Iran and South China. By pooling newly produced and published carbon isotope data, we confirm that a global first-order trend towards depleted values exists. However, a large amount of scatter is superimposed on this geochemical record. In addition, we observe a temporal trend in the amplitude of this residual δ13C variability, which is reproducible for the two studied regions. We suggest that (sub-)sea-floor microbial communities and their control on calcite nucleation and ambient porewater dissolved inorganic carbon δ13C pose a viable mechanism to induce bulk-rock δ13C variability. Numerical model calculations highlight that early diagenetic carbonate rock stabilization and linked carbon isotope alteration can be controlled by organic matter supply and subsequent microbial remineralization. A major biotic decline among Late Permian bottom-dwelling organisms facilitated a spatial increase in heterogeneous organic carbon accumulation. Combined with low marine sulfate, this resulted in varying degrees of carbon isotope overprinting. A simulated time series suggests that a 50 % increase in the spatial scatter of organic carbon relative to the average, in addition to an imposed increase in the likelihood of sampling cements formed by microbial calcite nucleation to 1 out of 10 samples, is sufficient to induce the observed signal of carbon

  6. Latest Permian carbonate carbon isotope variability traces heterogeneous organic carbon accumulation and authigenic carbonate formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schobben

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Bulk-carbonate carbon isotope ratios are a widely applied proxy for investigating the ancient biogeochemical carbon cycle. Temporal carbon isotope trends serve as a prime stratigraphic tool, with the inherent assumption that bulk micritic carbonate rock is a faithful geochemical recorder of the isotopic composition of seawater dissolved inorganic carbon. However, bulk-carbonate rock is also prone to incorporate diagenetic signals. The aim of the present study is to disentangle primary trends from diagenetic signals in carbon isotope records which traverse the Permian–Triassic boundary in the marine carbonate-bearing sequences of Iran and South China. By pooling newly produced and published carbon isotope data, we confirm that a global first-order trend towards depleted values exists. However, a large amount of scatter is superimposed on this geochemical record. In addition, we observe a temporal trend in the amplitude of this residual δ13C variability, which is reproducible for the two studied regions. We suggest that (sub-sea-floor microbial communities and their control on calcite nucleation and ambient porewater dissolved inorganic carbon δ13C pose a viable mechanism to induce bulk-rock δ13C variability. Numerical model calculations highlight that early diagenetic carbonate rock stabilization and linked carbon isotope alteration can be controlled by organic matter supply and subsequent microbial remineralization. A major biotic decline among Late Permian bottom-dwelling organisms facilitated a spatial increase in heterogeneous organic carbon accumulation. Combined with low marine sulfate, this resulted in varying degrees of carbon isotope overprinting. A simulated time series suggests that a 50 % increase in the spatial scatter of organic carbon relative to the average, in addition to an imposed increase in the likelihood of sampling cements formed by microbial calcite nucleation to 1 out of 10 samples, is sufficient to induce the

  7. Activated carbons and gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDougall, G.J.; Hancock, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    The literature on activated carbon is reviewed so as to provide a general background with respect to the effect of source material and activation procedure on carbon properties, the structure and chemical nature of the surface of the activated carbon, and the nature of absorption processes on carbon. The various theories on the absorption of gold and silver from cyanide solutions are then reviewed, followed by a discussion of processes for the recovery of gold and silver from cyanide solutions using activated carbon, including a comparison with zinc precipitation

  8. Carbon-14 waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, R.P.; Smith, G.M.; White, I.F

    1984-01-01

    Carbon-14 occurs in nature, but is also formed in nuclear reactors. Because of its long half-life and the biological significance of carbon, releases from nuclear facilities could have a significant radiological impact. Waste management strategies for carbon-14 are therefore of current concern. Carbon-14 is present in a variety of waste streams both at reactors and at reprocessing plants. A reliable picture of the production and release of carbon-14 from various reactor systems has been built up for the purposes of this study. A possible management strategy for carbon-14 might be the reduction of nitrogen impurity levels in core materials, since the activation of 14 N is usually the dominant source of carbon-14. The key problem in carbon-14 management is its retention of off-gas streams, particularly in the dissolver off-gas stream at reprocessing plants. Three alternative trapping processes that convert carbon dioxide into insoluble carbonates have been suggested. The results show that none of the options considered need be rejected on the grounds of potential radiation doses to individuals. All exposures should be as low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account. If, on these grounds, retention and disposal of carbon-14 is found to be beneficial, then, subject to the limitations noted, appropriate retention, immobilization and disposal technologies have been identified

  9. Highly stretchable carbon aerogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fan; Jiang, Yanqiu; Xu, Zhen; Xiao, Youhua; Fang, Bo; Liu, Yingjun; Gao, Weiwei; Zhao, Pei; Wang, Hongtao; Gao, Chao

    2018-02-28

    Carbon aerogels demonstrate wide applications for their ultralow density, rich porosity, and multifunctionalities. Their compressive elasticity has been achieved by different carbons. However, reversibly high stretchability of neat carbon aerogels is still a great challenge owing to their extremely dilute brittle interconnections and poorly ductile cells. Here we report highly stretchable neat carbon aerogels with a retractable 200% elongation through hierarchical synergistic assembly. The hierarchical buckled structures and synergistic reinforcement between graphene and carbon nanotubes enable a temperature-invariable, recoverable stretching elasticity with small energy dissipation (~0.1, 100% strain) and high fatigue resistance more than 10 6 cycles. The ultralight carbon aerogels with both stretchability and compressibility were designed as strain sensors for logic identification of sophisticated shape conversions. Our methodology paves the way to highly stretchable carbon and neat inorganic materials with extensive applications in aerospace, smart robots, and wearable devices.

  10. Carbon dioxide sequestration by direct mineral carbonation with carbonic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connor, William K.; Dahlin, David C.; Nilsen, David N.; Walters, Richard P.; Turner, Paul C.

    2000-01-01

    The Albany Research Center (ARC) of the U.S. Dept. of Energy (DOE) has been conducting a series of mineral carbonation tests at its Albany, Oregon, facility over the past 2 years as part of a Mineral Carbonation Study Program within the DOE. Other participants in this Program include the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Arizona State University, Science Applications International Corporation, and the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory. The ARC tests have focused on ex-situ mineral carbonation in an aqueous system. The process developed at ARC utilizes a slurry of water mixed with a magnesium silicate mineral, olivine [forsterite end member (Mg2SiO4)], or serpentine [Mg3Si2O5(OH)4]. This slurry is reacted with supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) to produce magnesite (MgCO3). The CO2 is dissolved in water to form carbonic acid (H2CO3), which dissociates to H+ and HCO3 -. The H+ reacts with the mineral, liberating Mg2+ cations which react with the bicarbonate to form the solid carbonate. The process is designed to simulate the natural serpentinization reaction of ultramafic minerals, and for this reason, these results may also be applicable to in-situ geological sequestration regimes. Results of the baseline tests, conducted on ground products of the natural minerals, have been encouraging. Tests conducted at ambient temperature (22 C) and subcritical CO2 pressures (below 73 atm) resulted in very slow conversion to the carbonate. However, when elevated temperatures and pressures are utilized, coupled with continuous stirring of the slurry and gas dispersion within the water column, significant reaction occurs within much shorter reaction times. Extent of reaction, as measured by the stoichiometric conversion of the silicate mineral (olivine) to the carbonate, is roughly 90% within 24 hours, using distilled water, and a reaction temperature of 185?C and a partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2) of 115 atm. Recent tests using a bicarbonate solution, under identical reaction

  11. Carbon dioxide sequestration by direct mineral carbonation with carbonic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connor, W.K.; Dahlin, D.C.; Nilsen, D.N.; Walters, R.P.; Turner, P.C.

    2000-07-01

    The Albany Research Center (ARC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been conducting a series of mineral carbonation tests at its Albany, Oregon, facility over the past 2 years as part of a Mineral Carbonation Study Program within the DOE. The ARC tests have focused on ex-situ mineral carbonation in an aqueous system. The process developed at ARC utilizes a slurry of water mixed with a magnesium silicate mineral, olivine [forsterite and member (mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4})], or serpentine [Mg{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 4}]. This slurry is reacted with supercritical carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) to produce magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). The CO{sub 2} is dissolved in water to form carbonic acid (H{sub 2}CO{sub 3}), which dissociates to H{sup +} and HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. The H{sup +} reacts with the mineral, liberating Mg{sup 2+} cations which react with the bicarbonate to form the solid carbonate. The process is designed to simulate the natural serpentinization reaction of ultramafic minerals, and for this reason, these results may also be applicable to in-situ geological sequestration regimes. Results of the baseline tests, conducted on ground products of the natural minerals, have been encouraging. Tests conducted at ambient temperature (22 C) and subcritical CO{sub 2} pressures (below 73 atm) resulted in very slow conversion to the carbonate. However, when elevated temperatures and pressures are utilized, coupled with continuous stirring of the slurry and gas dispersion within the water column, significant reaction occurs within much shorter reaction times. Extent of reaction, as measured by the stoichiometric conversion of the silicate mineral (olivine) to the carbonate, is roughly 90% within 24 hours, using distilled water, and a reaction temperature of 185 C and a partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (P{sub CO{sub 2}}) of 115 atm. Recent tests using a bicarbonate solution, under identical reaction conditions, have achieved roughly 83% conversion of heat treated serpentine

  12. Accounting for black carbon lowers estimates of blue carbon storage services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Swee Theng; Gallagher, John B

    2018-02-07

    The canopies and roots of seagrass, mangrove, and saltmarsh protect a legacy of buried sedimentary organic carbon from resuspension and remineralisation. This legacy's value, in terms of mitigating anthropogenic emissions of CO 2 , is based on total organic carbon (TOC) inventories to a depth likely to be disturbed. However, failure to subtract allochthonous recalcitrant carbon overvalues the storage service. Simply put, burial of oxidation-resistant organics formed outside of the ecosystem provides no additional protection from remineralisation. Here, we assess whether black carbon (BC), an allochthonous and recalcitrant form of organic carbon, is contributing to a significant overestimation of blue carbon stocks. To test this supposition, BC and TOC contents were measured in different types of seagrass and mangrove sediment cores across tropical and temperate regimes, with different histories of air pollution and fire together with a reanalysis of published data from a subtropical system. The results suggest current carbon stock estimates are positively biased, particularly for low-organic-content sandy seagrass environs, by 18 ± 3% (±95% confidence interval) and 43 ± 21% (±95% CI) for the temperate and tropical regions respectively. The higher BC fractions appear to originate from atmospheric deposition and substantially enrich the relatively low TOC fraction within these environs.

  13. SOUTHWEST REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP ON CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian McPherson; Rick Allis; Barry Biediger; Joel Brown; Jim Cappa; George Guthrie; Richard Hughes; Eugene Kim; Robert Lee; Dennis Leppin; Charles Mankin; Orman Paananen; Rajesh Pawar; Tarla Peterson; Steve Rauzi; Jerry Stuth; Genevieve Young

    2004-11-01

    The Southwest Partnership Region includes six whole states, including Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Utah, roughly one-third of Texas, and significant portions of adjacent states. The Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership project is to achieve an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. The Partnership made great progress in this first year. Action plans for possible Phase II carbon sequestration pilot tests in the region are almost finished, including both technical and non-technical aspects necessary for developing and carrying out these pilot tests. All partners in the Partnership are taking an active role in evaluating and ranking optimum sites and technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region. We are identifying potential gaps in all aspects of potential sequestration deployment issues.

  14. Substantial global carbon uptake by cement carbonation

    OpenAIRE

    Xi, Fengming; Davis, Steven J.; Ciais, Philippe; Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Guan, Dabo; Pade, Claus; Shi, Tiemao; Syddall, Mark; Lv, Jie; Ji, Lanzhu; Bing, Longfei; Wang, Jiaoyue; Wei, Wei; Yang, Keun-Hyeok; Lagerblad, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Calcination of carbonate rocks during the manufacture of cement produced 5% of global CO2 emissions from all industrial process and fossil-fuel combustion in 20131, 2. Considerable attention has been paid to quantifying these industrial process emissions from cement production2, 3, but the natural reversal of the process—carbonation—has received little attention in carbon cycle studies. Here, we use new and existing data on cement materials during cement service life, demolition, and secondar...

  15. Carbon isotopes in mollusk shell carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnaughey, Ted A.; Gillikin, David Paul

    2008-10-01

    Mollusk shells contain many isotopic clues about calcification physiology and environmental conditions at the time of shell formation. In this review, we use both published and unpublished data to discuss carbon isotopes in both bivalve and gastropod shell carbonates. Land snails construct their shells mainly from respired CO2, and shell δ13C reflects the local mix of C3 and C4 plants consumed. Shell δ13C is typically >10‰ heavier than diet, probably because respiratory gas exchange discards CO2, and retains the isotopically heavier HCO3 -. Respired CO2 contributes less to the shells of aquatic mollusks, because CO2/O2 ratios are usually higher in water than in air, leading to more replacement of respired CO2 by environmental CO2. Fluid exchange with the environment also brings additional dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) into the calcification site. Shell δ13C is typically a few ‰ lower than ambient DIC, and often decreases with age. Shell δ13C retains clues about processes such as ecosystem metabolism and estuarine mixing. Ca2+ ATPase-based models of calcification physiology developed for corals and algae likely apply to mollusks, too, but lower pH and carbonic anhydrase at the calcification site probably suppress kinetic isotope effects. Carbon isotopes in biogenic carbonates are clearly complex, but cautious interpretation can provide a wealth of information, especially after vital effects are better understood.

  16. Metrology for stable isotope reference materials: 13C/12C and 18O/16O isotope ratio value assignment of pure carbon dioxide gas samples on the Vienna PeeDee Belemnite-CO2 scale using dual-inlet mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Abneesh; Michael Verkouteren, R

    2018-05-25

    Isotope ratio measurements have been conducted on a series of isotopically distinct pure CO 2 gas samples using the technique of dual-inlet isotope ratio mass spectrometry (DI-IRMS). The influence of instrumental parameters, data normalization schemes on the metrological traceability and uncertainty of the sample isotope composition have been characterized. Traceability to the Vienna PeeDee Belemnite(VPDB)-CO 2 scale was realized using the pure CO 2 isotope reference materials(IRMs) 8562, 8563, and 8564. The uncertainty analyses include contributions associated with the values of iRMs and the repeatability and reproducibility of our measurements. Our DI-IRMS measurement system is demonstrated to have high long-term stability, approaching a precision of 0.001 parts-per-thousand for the 45/44 and 46/44 ion signal ratios. The single- and two-point normalization bias for the iRMs were found to be within their published standard uncertainty values. The values of 13 C/ 12 C and 18 O/ 16 O isotope ratios are expressed relative to VPDB-CO 2 using the [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] notation, respectively, in parts-per-thousand (‰ or per mil). For the samples, value assignments between (-25 to +2) ‰ and (-33 to -1) ‰ with nominal combined standard uncertainties of (0.05, 0.3) ‰ for [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], respectively were obtained. These samples are used as laboratory reference to provide anchor points for value assignment of isotope ratios (with VPDB traceability) to pure CO 2 samples. Additionally, they serve as potential parent isotopic source material required for the development of gravimetric based iRMs of CO 2 in CO 2 -free dry air in high pressure gas cylinder packages at desired abundance levels and isotopic composition values. Graphical abstract CO 2 gas isotope ratio metrology.

  17. Activated carbon from biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manocha, S.; Manocha, L. M.; Joshi, Parth; Patel, Bhavesh; Dangi, Gaurav; Verma, Narendra

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon are unique and versatile adsorbents having extended surface area, micro porous structure, universal adsorption effect, high adsorption capacity and high degree of surface reactivity. Activated carbons are synthesized from variety of materials. Most commonly used on a commercial scale are cellulosic based precursors such as peat, coal, lignite wood and coconut shell. Variation occurs in precursors in terms of structure and carbon content. Coir having very low bulk density and porous structure is found to be one of the valuable raw materials for the production of highly porous activated carbon and other important factor is its high carbon content. Exploration of good low cost and non conventional adsorbent may contribute to the sustainability of the environment and offer promising benefits for the commercial purpose in future. Carbonization of biomass was carried out in a horizontal muffle furnace. Both carbonization and activation were performed in inert nitrogen atmosphere in one step to enhance the surface area and to develop interconnecting porosity. The types of biomass as well as the activation conditions determine the properties and the yield of activated carbon. Activated carbon produced from biomass is cost effective as it is easily available as a waste biomass. Activated carbon produced by combination of chemical and physical activation has higher surface area of 2442 m2/gm compared to that produced by physical activation (1365 m2/gm).

  18. Carbon dioxide sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Prabir K [Worthington, OH; Lee, Inhee [Columbus, OH; Akbar, Sheikh A [Hilliard, OH

    2011-11-15

    The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

  19. Structural basis for antagonism of human interleukin 18 by poxvirus interleukin 18-binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumm, Brian; Meng, Xiangzhi; Li, Yongchao; Xiang, Yan; Deng, Junpeng (Texas-HSC); (OKLU)

    2009-07-10

    Human interleukin-18 (hIL-18) is a cytokine that plays an important role in inflammation and host defense against microbes. Its activity is regulated in vivo by a naturally occurring antagonist, the human IL-18-binding protein (IL-18BP). Functional homologs of human IL-18BP are encoded by all orthopoxviruses, including variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox. They contribute to virulence by suppressing IL-18-mediated immune responses. Here, we describe the 2.0-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of an orthopoxvirus IL-18BP, ectromelia virus IL-18BP (ectvIL-18BP), in complex with hIL-18. The hIL-18 structure in the complex shows significant conformational change at the binding interface compared with the structure of ligand-free hIL-18, indicating that the binding is mediated by an induced-fit mechanism. EctvIL-18BP adopts a canonical Ig fold and interacts via one edge of its {beta}-sandwich with 3 cavities on the hIL-18 surface through extensive hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding interactions. Most of the ectvIL-18BP residues that participate in these interactions are conserved in both human and viral homologs, explaining their functional equivalence despite limited sequence homology. EctvIL-18BP blocks a putative receptor-binding site on IL-18, thus preventing IL-18 from engaging its receptor. Our structure provides insights into how IL-18BPs modulate hIL-18 activity. The revealed binding interface provides the basis for rational design of inhibitors against orthopoxvirus IL-18BP (for treating orthopoxvirus infection) or hIL-18 (for treating certain inflammatory and autoimmune diseases).

  20. An experimental study on the effect of carbonic anhydrase on the oxygen isotope exchange kinetics and equilibrium in the carbonic acid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikawa, J.; Zeebe, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Stable oxygen isotopes of marine biogenic carbonates are often depleted in 18O relative to the values expected for thermodynamic equilibrium with ambient seawater. One possibility is that 18O-depletion in carbonates is kinetically controlled. The kinetic isotope effect associated with the hydration of CO2 results in 18O-depleted HCO3-. If the HCO3- is utilized before re-establishing equilibrium with ambient water under rapid calcification, the 18O-depletion will be recorded in carbonates. But one caveat in this kinetic model is the fact that many marine calcifiers posses carbonic anhydrase, a zinc-bearing enzyme that catalyzes the CO2 hydration reaction. It is expected that this enzyme accelerates 18O-equilibration in the carbonic acid system by facilitating direct oxygen isotope exchange between HCO3- and H2O via CO2 hydration. Clearly this argues against the conceptual framework of the kinetic model. Yet the critical variable here is the effectiveness of the carbonic anhydrase, which is likely to depend on its concentration and the carbonate chemistry of the aqueous medium. It is also hitherto unknown whether the presence of carbonic anhydrase alters the equilibrium oxygen isotope fractionations between dissolved carbonate species and water. We performed a series of quantitative inorganic carbonate precipitation experiments to examine the changes in the oxygen isotope equilibration time as a function of carbonic anhydrase concentrations. We conducted experiments at pH 8.3 and 8.9. These pH values are similar to the average surface ocean pH and the elevated pH levels observed within calcification microenvironments of certain corals and planktonic foraminifera. A summary of our new experimental results will be presented.

  1. Creating With Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    A subsidiary of SI Diamond Technology, Inc., Applied Nanotech, of Austin, Texas, is creating a buzz among various technology firms and venture capital groups interested in the company s progressive research on carbon-related field emission devices, including carbon nanotubes, filaments of pure carbon less than one ten-thousandth the width of human hair. Since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes have gained considerable attention due to their unique physical properties. For example, a single perfect carbon nanotube can range from 10 to 100 times stronger than steel, per unit weight. Recent studies also indicate that the nanotubes may be the best heat-conducting material in existence. These properties, combined with the ease of growing thin films or nanotubes by a variety of deposition techniques, make the carbon-based material one of the most desirable for cold field emission cathodes.

  2. The global carbon cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier-Reimer, E.

    1991-01-01

    Basic concepts of the global carbon cycle on earth are described; by careful analyses of isotopic ratios, emission history and oceanic ventilation rates are derived, which provide crucial tests for constraining and calibrating models. Effects of deforestation, fertilizing, fossil fuel burning, soil erosion, etc. are quantified and compared, and the oceanic carbon process is evaluated. Oceanic and terrestrial biosphere modifications are discussed and a carbon cycle model is proposed

  3. Forests and carbon storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael G. Ryan

    2008-01-01

    Forests store much carbon and their growth can be a carbon sink if disturbance or harvesting has killed or removed trees or if trees that can now regrow are planted where they did not historically occur. Forests and long-lived wood products currently offset 310 million metric tons of U.S. fossil fuel emissions of carbon--20 percent of the total (Pacala et al. 2007)....

  4. Reef coral δ18O thermometer in Hainan island waters, south China sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Xuexian; Peng Zicheng; Wang Zhaorong; Huo Weiguo; Tan Jun; Nie Baofu; Chen Tegu; Zhong Jinliang

    2000-01-01

    An 18-year-long (1981-1998) study was conducted in Hainan Island waters (22 degree 22'N, 110 degree 39'E) to determine the relationship between δ 18 O in skeletal aragonite carbonate and sea surface temperature (SST) in porites lutea of reef-building corals. δ 18 O values in skeletal aragonite carbonate were measured by means of mass spectrometry. Coral samples grew at 5 m depth at Longwan Bay. Monthly measurements of the SST from 1960 to 1998 were taken at Qinglan Bay adjacent to the place of the collected samples. The thermometer shows that SST = -4.16 δ 18 O PDB + 4.9 (r = 0.80) and dδ 18 O/dT = -0.24 per mil/degree C. The δ 18 O thermometer is strongly influenced by the rainfall and runoff. Using the thermometer, the SST in the past hundred years with monthly resolution will be reconstructed and the climatic change in the northern area of South China Sea will be hind cast

  5. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2003-12-18

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration benefits for two forest types used to convert abandoned grasslands for carbon sequestration. Annual mixed hardwood benefits, based on total stand carbon volume present at the end of a given year, range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $5.26/ton of carbon (low prices). White pine benefits based on carbon volume range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $18.61/ton of carbon (high prices). The higher maximum white pine carbon payment can primarily be attributed to the fact that the shorter rotation means that payments for white pine carbon are being made on far less cumulative carbon tonnage than for that of the long-rotation hardwoods. Therefore, the payment per ton of white pine carbon needs to be higher than that of the hardwoods in order to render the conversion to white pine profitable by the end of a rotation. These carbon payments may seem appealingly low to the incentive provider. However, payments (not discounted) made over a full rotation may add up to approximately $17,493/ha for white pine (30-year rotation), and $18,820/ha for mixed hardwoods (60-year rotation). The literature suggests a range of carbon sequestration costs, from $0/ton of carbon to $120/ton of carbon, although the majority of studies suggest a cost below $50/ ton of carbon, with van Kooten et al. (2000) suggesting a cutoff cost of $20/ton of carbon sequestered. Thus, the ranges of carbon payments estimated for this study fall well within the ranges of carbon sequestration costs estimated in previous studies.

  6. Carbon emissions in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zhu

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzes the spatial-temporal pattern and processes of China's energy-related carbon emissions. Based on extensive quantitative analysis, it outlines the character and trajectory of China's energy-related carbon emissions during the period 1995-2010, examining the distribution pattern of China's carbon emissions from regional and sectoral perspectives and revealing the driving factors of China's soaring emission increase. Further, the book investigates the supply chain carbon emissions (the carbon footprints) of China's industrial sectors. Anthropogenic climate change is one of the most serious challenges currently facing humankind. China is the world's largest developing country, top primary energy consumer and carbon emitter. Achieving both economic growth and environmental conservation is the country's twofold challenge. Understanding the status, features and driving forces of China's energy-related carbon emissions is a critical aspect of attaining global sustainability. This work, for the first time, presents both key findings on and a systematic evaluation of China's carbon emissions from energy consumption. The results have important implications for global carbon budgets and burden-sharing with regard to climate change mitigation. The book will be of great interest to readers around the world, as it addresses a topic of truly global significance.

  7. Activated carbon material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, A.G.

    1978-01-01

    Activated carbon particles for use as iodine trapping material are impregnated with a mixture of selected iodine and potassium compounds to improve the iodine retention properties of the carbon. The I/K ratio is maintained at less than about 1 and the pH is maintained at above about 8.0. The iodine retention of activated carbon previously treated with or coimpregnated with triethylenediamine can also be improved by this technique. Suitable flame retardants can be added to raise the ignition temperature of the carbon to acceptable standards

  8. Carbon emissions in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhu [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Sustainability Science Program

    2016-07-01

    This study analyzes the spatial-temporal pattern and processes of China's energy-related carbon emissions. Based on extensive quantitative analysis, it outlines the character and trajectory of China's energy-related carbon emissions during the period 1995-2010, examining the distribution pattern of China's carbon emissions from regional and sectoral perspectives and revealing the driving factors of China's soaring emission increase. Further, the book investigates the supply chain carbon emissions (the carbon footprints) of China's industrial sectors. Anthropogenic climate change is one of the most serious challenges currently facing humankind. China is the world's largest developing country, top primary energy consumer and carbon emitter. Achieving both economic growth and environmental conservation is the country's twofold challenge. Understanding the status, features and driving forces of China's energy-related carbon emissions is a critical aspect of attaining global sustainability. This work, for the first time, presents both key findings on and a systematic evaluation of China's carbon emissions from energy consumption. The results have important implications for global carbon budgets and burden-sharing with regard to climate change mitigation. The book will be of great interest to readers around the world, as it addresses a topic of truly global significance.

  9. Changing global carbon cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canadell, Pep

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide (C02) is the single largest human perturbation on the earth's radiative balance contributing to climate change. Its rate of change reflects the balance between anthropogenic carbon emissions and the dynamics of a number of terrestrial and ocean processes that remove or emit C02. It is the long term evolution of this balance that will determine to large extent the speed and magnitude of the human induced climate change and the mitigation requirements to stabilise atmospheric C02 concentrations at any given level. In this talk, we show new trends in global carbon sources and sinks, with particularly focus on major shifts occurring since 2000 when the growth rate of atmospheric C02 has reached its highest level on record. The acceleration in the C02 growth results from the combination of several changes in properties of the carbon cycle, including: acceleration of anthropogenic carbon emissions; increased carbon intensity of the global economy, and decreased efficiency of natural carbon sinks. We discuss in more detail some of the possible causes of the reduced efficiency of natural carbon sinks on land and oceans, such as the decreased net sink in the Southern Ocean and on terrestrial mid-latitudes due to world-wide occurrence of drought. All these changes reported here characterise a carbon cycle that is generating stronger than expected climate forcing, and sooner than expected

  10. Carbon Trading. Literature Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerste, M.; Weda, J.; Rosenboom, N.

    2010-12-01

    From Pigou and Coase to the Kyoto Protocol, carbon trading has resulted in pricing of the negative externalities emanating from pollution. This report highlights leading literature and empirical findings on carbon trading, amongst others addressing the relevant carbon and related markets, the (lack of) success of carbon trading so far and room for improvement as well as its impact on investments in emission reduction. This report is part of a set of SEO-reports on finance and sustainability. The other reports deal with: Financing the Transition to Sustainable Energy; Innovations in financing environmental and social sustainability; and Sustainable investment.

  11. Tendances Carbone no. 108. COP21: and now, action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bultheel, Clement; Morel, Romain

    2015-12-01

    Among the publications of I4CE, 'Tendances Carbone' bulletin specifically studies the developments of the European market for CO 2 allowances. Beside some statistical figures about energy production/consumption and carbon markets, this issue specifically addresses the following points: - EU ETS - auctioning: publication of the auctioning calendar for 2016, overall amounting to 733 million allowances. - State of the Energy Union: the EU Commission published on 18 November, the State of the Energy Union report. - EU ETS: on 18 November, the EU Commission published the second report on the functioning of the EU ETS outlining challenges faced in 2013 and 2014 and reforms undertaken in 2015

  12. Carbon isotope ratios of atmospheric carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Hitoshi; Kishima, Noriaki; Tsutaki, Yasuhiro.

    1982-01-01

    The delta 13 C values relative to PDB were measured for carbon dioxide in air samples collected at various parts of Japan and at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii in the periods of 1977 and 1978. The delta 13 C values of the ''clean air'' are -7.6 % at Hawaii and -8.1 per mille Oki and Hachijo-jima islands. These values are definitely lighter than the carbon isotope ratios (-6.9 per mille) obtained by Keeling for clean airs collected at Southern California in 1955 to 1956. The increase in 12 C in atmospheric carbon dioxide is attributed to the input of the anthropogenic light carbon dioxides (combustion of fossil fuels etc.) Taking -7.6 per mille to be the isotope ratio of CO 2 in the present clean air, a simple three box model predicts that the biosphere has decreased rather than increased since 1955, implying that it is acting as the doner of carbon rather than the sink. (author)

  13. Detecting Extracellular Carbonic Anhydrase Activity Using Membrane Inlet Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delacruz, Joannalyn; Mikulski, Rose; Tu, Chingkuang; Li, Ying; Wang, Hai; Shiverick, Kathleen T.; Frost, Susan C.; Horenstein, Nicole A.; Silverman, David N.

    2010-01-01

    Current research into the function of carbonic anhydrases in cell physiology emphasizes the role of membrane-bound carbonic anhydrases, such as carbonic anhydrase IX that has been identified in malignant tumors and is associated with extracellular acidification as a response to hypoxia. We present here a mass spectrometric method to determine the extent to which total carbonic anhydrase activity is due to extracellular carbonic anhydrase in whole cell preparations. The method is based on the biphasic rate of depletion of 18O from CO2 measured by membrane inlet mass spectrometry. The slopes of the biphasic depletion are a sensitive measure of the presence of carbonic anhydrase outside and inside of the cells. This property is demonstrated here using suspensions of human red cells in which external carbonic anhydrase was added to the suspending solution. It is also applied to breast and prostate cancer cells which both express exofacial carbonic anhydrase IX. Inhibition of external carbonic anhydrase is achieved by use of a membrane impermeant inhibitor that was synthesized for this purpose, p-aminomethylbenzenesulfonamide attached to a polyethyleneglycol polymer. PMID:20417171

  14. Authigenic carbonates in sediments from the Gulf of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botz, R.; Brooks, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of diagenetic dolomite and calcite in some sediments of the Gulf of Mexico varies between 'normal-marine' (δ 13 C ca. 0per mille) and - 14.6per mille which suggests that biogenic CO 2 contributed to the carbonate formations. The δ 18 O values of dolomite and coexisting calcite are very similar but variable down-core. Dolomite and calcite precipitated early from pore water where SO 4 2- was not reduced. However, during (and after?) SO 4 2- reduction dolomite and calcite still formed and there are at least two generations of carbonate minerals present. (orig.)

  15. US carbon emissions, technological progress and economic growth since 1870

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huntington, H.G.

    2005-01-01

    The long-term US experience emphasises the importance of controlling for electrification and other major technology transformations when evaluating the growth of carbon emissions at different stages of development. Prior to World War I, carbon emissions grew faster than economic growth by 2.3% per year. As electricity use expanded and steam engines became much larger, carbon emissions began to grow slower than economic growth by 1.6% per year. Adjusting to this technological shift, an expanding economy continues to increase carbon emissions by about 9% for each 10% faster growth. There is little evidence of a decline in this elasticity as the income level rises. These results suggest that the USA today will need to find additional policies to curb carbon emissions if it wishes to prevent any further increase in its per capita emissions, and if its per capita economy grows by more than 1.8% per year. (Author)

  16. Difficult colonoscopy: air, carbon dioxide, or water insufflation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaubal, Alisha; Pandey, Vikas; Patel, Ruchir; Poddar, Prateik; Phadke, Aniruddha; Ingle, Meghraj; Sawant, Prabha

    2018-04-01

    This study aimed to compare tolerance to air, carbon dioxide, or water insufflation in patients with anticipated difficult colonoscopy (young, thin, obese individuals, and patients with prior abdominal surgery or irradiation). Patients with body mass index (BMI) less than 18 kg/m 2 or more than 30 kg/m 2 , or who had undergone previous abdominal or pelvic surgeries were randomized to air, carbon dioxide, or water insufflation during colonoscopy. The primary endpoint was cecal intubation with mild pain (less than 5 on visual analogue scale [VAS]), without use of sedation. The primary end point was achieved in 32.7%, 43.8%, and 84.9% of cases with air, carbon dioxide and water insufflation ( P carbon dioxide, and water insufflation ( P carbon dioxide for pain tolerance. This was seen in the subgroups with BMI 30 kg/m 2 .

  17. Methodology for tritium recovery as a by-product in the fluorine 18 production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores Rea, H.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper previous studies for the recuperation of waste tritium proceeding from the process used to produce F-18 using natural and 95% enriched lithium carbonate in lithium-6 are presented; the nuclear reaction took place in the Triga Mark III Nuclear reactor of the Nuclear Centre of Mexico. Previous studies proved the importance of the quantity of remanent tritium in the solutions where F-18 was produced in oxygenated compounds of natural lithium. The recuperation methodology consisted in production of F-18 in the established manner, purification by chromatography in an alumina and ion exchange resins column and of waste solutions; these were put together and distilled at normal pressure until dry. The distilled products were concentrated using an electrochemical method, and a final treatment system of the sample based on one reported in the literature but adapted to concentrate smaller volumes (approximately 15 ml.). The samples coming from the enriched lithium carbonate contained 3 to 6 times more tritium than those of natural lithium carbonate. Approximately 30% of the initial considered quantity of lithium was recuperated. A modification to the proposed methodology will allow the recuperation of tritium in waste solutions of F-18 in a percentage higher than 80%. (Author)

  18. Study of the decarburization of 18-8 stainless steel by oxygen at low pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armand, G.; Lapujoulade, J.

    1964-01-01

    The kinetic of the decarburization of a 18-8 stainless-steel by oxygen at low pressure has been studied between 1050 and 1200 C. The measurement of the carbon content of the sample is carried out by chemical analysis. Three mechanisms take place in that decarburization: diffusion of carbon in the steel; velocity at the superficial reaction C + 1/2 O 2 ↔ CO; pumping out of CO. The second mechanism seems to govern the overall kinetic. The activation energy of the phenomenon is 108 ± 24 Kcal/mole. (authors) [fr

  19. The paper of the forests like retainers of carbon, an experience in the south of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jong, Ben H; Soto Pinto, Lorena; Montoya Gomez, Guillermo; Nelson, Kristen; Taylor John; Tipper, Richard

    1999-01-01

    The forests play an important paper in the global cycle of the carbon. At the moment, the deforestation is responsible for approximately 1.8GtC (gigatons of carbon), 20% of the global annual emissions of carbonic gas caused by the human activity. However, it is calculated that the reforestation could retain from 50 to 150 GtC along next 50 years. Concepts related with the retention of carbon are discussed. The necessity is commented of carrying out the regulation of an international market in retention of carbon with the purpose of being able to maintain acceptable norms in the reforestation projects that are executed under this program

  20. The improved syntheses of 5-substituted 2'-[18F]fluoro-2'-deoxy-arabinofuranosyluracil derivatives ([18F]FAU, [18F]FEAU, [18F]FFAU, [18F]FCAU, [18F]FBAU and [18F]FIAU) using a multistep one-pot strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Hancheng; Li Zibo; Conti, Peter S.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: We and others have previously reported a four-step radiosynthesis of a series of 2'-deoxy-2'-[ 18 F]fluoro-5-substituted-1-β-D-arabinofuranosyluracil derivatives including [ 18 F]FAU, [ 18 F]FEAU, [ 18 F]FFAU, [ 18 F]FCAU, [ 18 F]FBAU and [ 18 F]FIAU as thymidine derivatives for tumor proliferation and/or reporter gene expression imaging with positron emission tomography (PET). Although the radiosynthesis has been proven to be reproducible and efficient, this complicated multistep reaction is difficult to incorporate into an automated cGMP-compliant radiosynthesis module for routine production. Recently, we have developed a simple and efficient one-pot method for routine production of [ 18 F]FMAU. In this study, we studied the feasibility of radiosynthesizing [ 18 F]FAU, [ 18 F]FEAU, [ 18 F]FFAU, [ 18 F]FCAU, [ 18 F]FBAU and [ 18 F]FIAU using this newly developed method. Methods: Similar to the radiosynthesis of [ 18 F]FMAU, 5-substituted 2'-[ 18 F]fluoro-2'-deoxy-arabinofuranosyluracil derivatives ([ 18 F]FAU, [ 18 F]FEAU, [ 18 F]FFAU, [ 18 F]FCAU, [ 18 F]FBAU and [ 18 F]FIAU) were synthesized in one-pot radiosynthesis module in the presence of Friedel-Crafts catalyst TMSOTf and HMDS. Results: This one-pot radiosynthesis method could be used to produce [ 18 F]FAU, [ 18 F]FEAU, [ 18 F]FFAU, [ 18 F]FCAU, [ 18 F]FBAU and [ 18 F]FIAU. The overall radiochemical yields of these tracers varied from 4.1%±0.8% to 10.1%±1.9% (decay-corrected, n=4). The overall reaction time was reduced from 210 min to 150 min from the end of bombardment, and the radiochemical purity was >99%. Conclusions: The improved radiosyntheses of [ 18 F]FAU, [ 18 F]FEAU, [ 18 F]FFAU, [ 18 F]FCAU, [ 18 F]FBAU and [ 18 F]FIAU have been achieved with reasonable yields and high purity using a multistep one-pot method. The synthetic time has been reduced, and the reaction procedures have been significantly simplified. The success of this approach may make PET tracers [ 18 F]FAU, [ 18 F

  1. 16 CFR 1502.18 - Presiding officer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Presiding officer. 1502.18 Section 1502.18 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS... officer in a hearing will be an administrative law judge qualified under 5 U.S.C. 3105. ...

  2. 50 CFR 18.91 - Director's decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Director's decision. 18.91 Section 18.91...) TAKING, POSSESSION, TRANSPORTATION, SALE, PURCHASE, BARTER, EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND... decision. (a) Upon receipt of the recommended decision and transcript and after the thirty-day period for...

  3. 38 CFR 18.543 - Mediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mediation. 18.543 Section... Enforcement Procedures § 18.543 Mediation. (a) Referral of complaints for mediation. VA will refer to the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service all complaints that: (1) Fall within the jurisdiction of the...

  4. 48 CFR 18.201 - Contingency operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contingency operation. 18... METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES EMERGENCY ACQUISITIONS Emergency Acquisition Flexibilities 18.201 Contingency operation. (a) Contingency operation is defined in 2.101. (b) Micro-purchase threshold. The threshold...

  5. 21 CFR 610.18 - Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cultures. 610.18 Section 610.18 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL... biological products shall be: (i) Identified by history; (ii) Described with respect to cytogenetic...

  6. 10 CFR 440.18 - Allowable expenditures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... part for labor, weatherization materials, and related matters for a renewable energy system, shall not... beginning in calendar year 2010 and the $3,000 average for renewable energy systems will be adjusted... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Allowable expenditures. 440.18 Section 440.18 Energy...

  7. 16 CFR 18.0 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definitions. 18.0 Section 18.0 Commercial... Definitions. Industry products. As used in this part, the term industry products includes all types of trees... greenhouse plants solely for inside culture or use and annual vegetable plants. Industry members. Any person...

  8. 38 CFR 18.439 - Private education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Private education. 18.439... Adult Education § 18.439 Private education. (a) A recipient that provides private elementary or secondary education may not on the basis of handicap, exclude a qualified handicapped person if the person...

  9. 7 CFR 1209.18 - Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Region. 1209.18 Section 1209.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... CONSUMER INFORMATION ORDER Mushroom Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Definitions § 1209...

  10. 32 CFR 174.18 - Historic preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Historic preservation. 174.18 Section 174.18... Historic preservation. (a) The transfer, lease, or sale of National Register-eligible historic property to... the regulations implementing the National Historic Preservation Act (36 CFR 800.5(a)(2)(vii)). One way...

  11. 49 CFR 18.25 - Program income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Program income. 18.25 Section 18.25 Transportation... income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the use or rental of real or personal property...

  12. 33 CFR 161.18 - Reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting requirements. 161.18 Section 161.18 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... call. H HOTEL Date, time and point of entry system Entry time expressed as in (B) and into the entry...

  13. 13 CFR 117.18 - Judicial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Judicial review. 117.18 Section 117.18 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION IN FEDERALLY... reasonable attorney's fees, but that the complainant must demand these costs in the complaint; (iii) That...

  14. 17 CFR 31.18 - Margin calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... transaction merchant is unable to effect personal contact with a leverage customer, a telegram sent to the....18 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION LEVERAGE TRANSACTIONS § 31.18 Margin calls. (a) No leverage transaction merchant shall liquidate a leverage contract because of...

  15. 40 CFR 227.18 - Factors considered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Factors considered. 227.18 Section 227.18 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING CRITERIA FOR... in the material of any constituents which might significantly affect living marine resources of...

  16. 7 CFR 1485.18 - Advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... operates MAP and EIP/MAP on a reimbursable basis. CCC will not advance funds to an EIP/MAP participant or... generic activity budget. However, CCC will not make any advance to an MAP participant where an advance is... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advances. 1485.18 Section 1485.18 Agriculture...

  17. 15 CFR 8b.18 - New construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false New construction. 8b.18 Section 8b.18... construction. (a) Design and construction. Each facility or part of a facility constructed by, on behalf of, or... construction was commenced after the effective date of this part. (b) Alteration. Each facility or part of a...

  18. 41 CFR 50-203.18 - Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Evidence. 50-203.18 Section 50-203.18 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public Contracts PUBLIC CONTRACTS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR 203-RULES OF PRACTICE Minimum Wage Determinations Under the Walsh...

  19. 44 CFR 18.105 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... services in the private sector. (o) Recipient includes all contractors, subcontractors at any tier, and... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Definitions. 18.105 Section... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING General § 18.105 Definitions. For purposes of this...

  20. 48 CFR 18.001 - Definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... CONTRACT TYPES EMERGENCY ACQUISITIONS 18.001 Definition. Emergency acquisition flexibilities, as used in... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Definition. 18.001 Section... President issues an emergency declaration, or a major disaster declaration. [71 FR 38248, July 5, 2006, as...

  1. 7 CFR 1230.18 - Porcine animal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.18 Section 1230.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... animal. Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised as (a) a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold to...

  2. 30 CFR 18.45 - Cable reels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and locomotives shall maintain positive tension on the portable cable during reeling and unreeling. Such tension shall only be high enough to prevent a machine from running over its own cable(s). (e... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cable reels. 18.45 Section 18.45 Mineral...

  3. 49 CFR 18.33 - Supplies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... supplies exceeding $5,000 in total aggregate fair market value upon termination or completion of the award... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Supplies. 18.33 Section 18.33 Transportation... Supplies. (a) Title. Title to supplies acquired under a grant or subgrant will vest, upon acquisition, in...

  4. 12 CFR 703.18 - Grandfathered investments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Grandfathered investments. 703.18 Section 703... INVESTMENT AND DEPOSIT ACTIVITIES § 703.18 Grandfathered investments. (a) Subject to safety and soundness... zero coupon security with a maturity greater than 10 years, if it purchased the investment: (1) Before...

  5. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... main content Languages 简体中文 English Bahasa Indonesia 한국어 Español ภาษาไทย Tiếng Việt Text Size: Decrease Font Increase ... Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as ...

  6. Arctic carbon cycling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christensen, Torben R; Rysgaard, SØREN; Bendtsen, JØRGEN; Else, Brent; Glud, Ronnie N; van Huissteden, J.; Parmentier, F.J.W.; Sachs, Torsten; Vonk, J.E.

    2017-01-01

    The marine Arctic is considered a net carbon sink, with large regional differences in uptake rates. More regional modelling and observational studies are required to reduce the uncertainty among current estimates. Robust projections for how the Arctic Ocean carbon sink may evolve in the future are

  7. Carbon trading: Literature overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerste, M.; Weda, J.; Rosenboom, N.

    2010-01-01

    From Pigou and Coase to the Kyoto Protocol, carbon trading has resulted in pricing of the negative externalities emanating from pollution. At the request of Duisenberg school of finance, this report highlights leading literature and empirical findings on ‘carbon trading’, amongst others addressing

  8. Amorphous iron (II) carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sel, Ozlem; Radha, A.V.; Dideriksen, Knud

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The synthesis, characterization and crystallization energetics of amorphous iron (II) carbonate (AFC) are reported. AFC may form as a precursor for siderite (FeCO3). The enthalpy of crystallization (DHcrys) of AFC is similar to that of amorphous magnesium carbonate (AMC) and more...

  9. Modeling Carbon Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Piers

    2012-01-01

    Model results will be reviewed to assess different methods for bounding the terrestrial role in the global carbon cycle. It is proposed that a series of climate model runs could be scoped that would tighten the limits on the "missing sink" of terrestrial carbon and could also direct future satellite image analyses to search for its geographical location and understand its seasonal dynamics.

  10. Carbon Capture and Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benson, S.M.; Bennaceur, K.; Cook, P.; Davison, J.; Coninck, H. de; Farhat, K.; Ramirez, C.A.; Simbeck, D.; Surles, T.; Verma, P.; Wright, I.

    2012-01-01

    Emissions of carbon dioxide, the most important long-lived anthropogenic greenhouse gas, can be reduced by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS). CCS involves the integration of four elements: CO 2 capture, compression of the CO2 from a gas to a liquid or a denser gas, transportation of pressurized CO 2

  11. Carbon monoxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Animals can also be poisoned by carbon monoxide. People who have pets at home may notice that their animals become ... or unresponsive from carbon monoxide exposure. Often the pets will ... these conditions. This can lead to a delay in getting help.

  12. Carbon for sensing devices

    CERN Document Server

    Tagliaferro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    This book reveals why carbon is playing such an increasingly prominent role as a sensing material. The various steps that transform a raw material in a sensing device are thoroughly presented and critically discussed.  The authors deal with all aspects of carbon-based sensors, starting from the various hybridization and allotropes of carbon, with specific focus on micro and nanosized carbons (e.g., carbon nanotubes, graphene) and their growth processes. The discussion then moves to the role of functionalization and the different routes to achieve it. Finally, a number of sensing applications in various fields are presented, highlighting the connection with the basic properties of the various carbon allotropes.  Readers will benefit from this book’s bottom-up approach, which starts from the local bonding in carbon solids and ends with sensing applications, linking the local hybridization of carbon atoms and its modification by functionalization to specific device performance. This book is a must-have in th...

  13. Capacitance for carbon capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landskron, Kai

    2018-01-01

    Metal recycling: A sustainable, capacitance-assisted carbon capture and sequestration method (Supercapacitive Swing Adsorption) can turn scrap metal and CO 2 into metal carbonates at an attractive energy cost. (copyright 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Capacitance for carbon capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landskron, Kai [Department of Chemistry, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA (United States)

    2018-03-26

    Metal recycling: A sustainable, capacitance-assisted carbon capture and sequestration method (Supercapacitive Swing Adsorption) can turn scrap metal and CO{sub 2} into metal carbonates at an attractive energy cost. (copyright 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Fly ash carbon passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  16. Synthesis, radiofluorination, and preliminary evaluation of the potential 5-HT2A receptor agonists [18 F]Cimbi-92 and [18 F]Cimbi-150

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgar, Fraser Graeme; Hansen, Hanne D; Leth-Petersen, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    An agonist PET tracer is of key interest for the imaging of the 5-HT2A receptor, as exemplified by the previously reported success of [11 C]Cimbi-36. Fluorine-18 holds several advantages over carbon-11, making it the radionuclide of choice for clinical purposes. In this respect, an 18 F-labelled ......An agonist PET tracer is of key interest for the imaging of the 5-HT2A receptor, as exemplified by the previously reported success of [11 C]Cimbi-36. Fluorine-18 holds several advantages over carbon-11, making it the radionuclide of choice for clinical purposes. In this respect, an 18 F......-labelled agonist 5-HT2A receptor (5-HT2A R) tracer is highly sought after. Herein, we report a 2-step, 1-pot labelling methodology of 2 tracer candidates. Both ligands display high in vitro affinities for the 5-HT2A R. The compounds were synthesised from easily accessible labelling precursors, and radiolabelled...

  17. Carbon and oxygen isotopes in carbonatites from Puna, Jujuy and Salta, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zappettini, Eduardo O.; Rubiolo, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    δ 13 and δ 18 O data from carbonatites indicate that bodies formed by crystallization of carbonate magma with subsequent formation of metasomatic and hydrothermal carbonatitic veins. The isotopic data are consistent with the available geochemical and petrologic information. (author)

  18. Carbon used in electrotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulon, M.; Reynvaan, C.; Maire, J.

    1994-01-01

    The carbon is the essential or single component of several materials. After having recalled the general properties of carbon and graphite some traditional processes of fabrication are described and some new products are studied then we tackle the applications with electric current: -electrodes in the electric piles where we use the carbon chemical inertia -coals of electric arc where we use the refractory properties and the low resistivity of graphite -Joule effect where we work on an enough wide field of material resistivity -electric fixed or sliding contacts where in addition to the refractory properties it is its unweldability which makes it indispensable particularly in the brooms for electric motors. The future is good for carbon and its compounds particularly for the new discovered fullerenes, spheric molecules of carbon, the properties of which are bad known (supraconductivity, lubrication, energy storage). 21 refs., 26 figs., 14 tab

  19. Development of a technique for mass spectrometric measurement of δ18O of aqueous sulphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, U.P.; Sharma, Suman

    2003-01-01

    Application of stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen as tracers in hydrology for studying the origin of water is well established. δ 18 O of water molecule itself is used for identifying the source of water whereas δ 18 O of dissolved oxy anions (such as carbonate, phosphate, sulphate, nitrate and silicate) present in the same water reveal their source of origin. δ 18 O of SO 4 finds applications in identifying the origin of sulfate i.e. marine, marine evaporite or non-marine in nature and as a geothermometer in determining subsurface temperature of geothermal waters. A vacuum line of glass was fabricated to measure δ 18 O of aqueous sulfate. This paper deals with the technique and results of a trial with NBS-127, Sea water barium sulfate

  20. Ozone adsorption on carbon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassard, Guillaume; Gosselin, Sylvie; Visez, Nicolas; Petitprez, Denis

    2014-05-01

    (or O2) and were chosen because it is believed to form the same reactive oxygen intermediates than ozone. A weak water physisorption on soot was observed revealing hydrophobic properties of particles. Oxygen atoms were found to be strongly reactive. A Langmuir behavior was observed for oxygen atoms adsorption on carbon particles and we were able to determine an initial uptake coefficient of approximately 2.10-2. [1] Fenidel, W., et al., Interaction between carbon or iron aerosol particles and ozone. Atmospheric Environment, 1995. 29(9): p. 967-973. [2] Smith, D. and A. Chughtai, Reaction kinetics of ozone at low concentrations with n-hexane soot. Journal of geophysical research, 1996. 101(D14): p. 19607-19,620. [3] Kamm, S., et al., The heterogeneous reaction of ozone with soot aerosol. Atmospheric Environment, 1999. 33(28): p. 4651-4661. [4] Stephens, S., M.J. Rossi, and D.M. Golden, The heterogeneous reaction of ozone on carbonaceous surfaces. International journal of chemical kinetics, 1986. 18(10): p. 1133-1149. [5] Pöschl, U., et al., Interaction of ozone and water vapor with spark discharge soot aerosol particles coated with benzo [a] pyrene: O3 and H2O adsorption, benzo [a] pyrene degradation, and atmospheric implications. The Journal of Physical Chemistry A, 2001. 105(16): p. 4029-4041.

  1. The Contemporary Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, R. A.

    2003-12-01

    The global carbon cycle refers to the exchanges of carbon within and between four major reservoirs: the atmosphere, the oceans, land, and fossil fuels. Carbon may be transferred from one reservoir to another in seconds (e.g., the fixation of atmospheric CO2 into sugar through photosynthesis) or over millennia (e.g., the accumulation of fossil carbon (coal, oil, gas) through deposition and diagenesis of organic matter). This chapter emphasizes the exchanges that are important over years to decades and includes those occurring over the scale of months to a few centuries. The focus will be on the years 1980-2000 but our considerations will broadly include the years ˜1850-2100. Chapter 8.09, deals with longer-term processes that involve rates of carbon exchange that are small on an annual timescale (weathering, vulcanism, sedimentation, and diagenesis).The carbon cycle is important for at least three reasons. First, carbon forms the structure of all life on the planet, making up ˜50% of the dry weight of living things. Second, the cycling of carbon approximates the flows of energy around the Earth, the metabolism of natural, human, and industrial systems. Plants transform radiant energy into chemical energy in the form of sugars, starches, and other forms of organic matter; this energy, whether in living organisms or dead organic matter, supports food chains in natural ecosystems as well as human ecosystems, not the least of which are industrial societies habituated (addicted?) to fossil forms of energy for heating, transportation, and generation of electricity. The increased use of fossil fuels has led to a third reason for interest in the carbon cycle. Carbon, in the form of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4), forms two of the most important greenhouse gases. These gases contribute to a natural greenhouse effect that has kept the planet warm enough to evolve and support life (without the greenhouse effect the Earth's average temperature would be -33

  2. Microwave absorption properties of helical carbon nanofibers-coated carbon fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Liu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Helical carbon nanofibers (HCNFs coated-carbon fibers (CFs were fabricated by catalytic chemical vapor deposition method. TEM and Raman spectroscopy characterizations indicate that the graphitic layers of the HCNFs changed from disorder to order after high temperature annealing. The electromagnetic parameters and microwave absorption properties were measured at 2–18 GHz. The maximum reflection loss is 32 dB at 9 GHz and the widest bandwidth under −10 dB is 9.8 GHz from 8.2 to 18 GHz for the unannealed HCNFs coated-CFs composite with 2.5 mm in thickness, suggesting that HCNFs coated-CFs should have potential applications in high performance microwave absorption materials.

  3. An increased 18F radionuclide production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panico, M.; Salvadore, M.; Randazzo, G.; Roma, R.; Green, A.; Calicchio, G.F.

    1999-01-01

    In the 18 F daily preparation a diminished yield of radioisotopic production is often found. This fact, most times, is connected to the altered internal surface of the PEE and teflon lines for the 18 F transferring to the hot cells because of radiations. This anomaly is due to an H 2 18 O insufficient filling into the target. In fact a target foils bombardment causing the release of radioactive Ag+ ions sets in. These ions passing through the transferring line damage it. This problem has been solved by an increased H 2 18 O filling, from 0.7 to 1.3 mL. A further steady increasing in the 18 F production is due to the features of the new target: back plane : integrated in the silver flange; water cooling surface: enlarged with fins; target connections: high pressure fittings. In conclusion a careful filling of the new target has increased the fluorine-18 average daily production from 7.4 GBq to 18.5 GBq, using recovered water (time: thirty minutes; beam: 15 mA) and allows to replace teflon lines every year instead of every three months. (authors)

  4. Hydrogen adsorption in doped porous carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L Balan; L Duclaux; S Los

    2005-01-01

    properties of doped microporous carbons (SWNTs and activated carbons). The raw nano-structured carbon materials are microporous activated carbons (BET specific surface area: 1600 m 2 /g), electric-arc closed-end single-walled carbon nano-tubes (SWNTs), and HiPCO SWNTs. They have been doped in the vapour phase by K, and Li (in order to obtain KC 7 , KC 10 , LiC 18 SWNTs and LiC 6 , LiC 18 , KC 24 activated carbons). The hydrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms of the doped activated carbons were obtained at room temperature and at 77 K, up to 3 MPa, by a volumetric method. The adsorption of D 2 was studied in situ on doped nano-tubes and nano-filaments by neutron diffraction on D1B experiment (ILL), at λ=2.52 Angstroms, as a function of temperature [300 - 20 K] and pressure. Simultaneously the adsorption isotherms were recorded in the range 0 - 0.1 MPa [13]. Doping of microporous carbon by Li or K leads to an increase in the energy of adsorption of H 2 or D 2 Molecules. Thus, the room temperature sorption capacities (al P≤3 MPa) can be higher than that of the raw materials after slight doping. However, the maximum H 2 (or D 2 ) storage measured at T ≤ 77 K is lower than the one of pristine Materials as the sites of adsorption are occupied by alkali ions inserted in the micropores [14]. The microporous adsorption sites of doped single-walled carbon nano-tubes, identified by neutron diffraction, are both the interstitial voids (in electric-arc or HiPCO tubes) in between the tubes and the central canals of the tubes (only in HiPCO tubes) [15]. We have also prepared nano-structured porous doped carbons by ball-milling carbon host materials with some dopant, such as alkali or alkaline earth metal. The new nano-porous carbons obtained by this method have been characterised and tested for their hydrogen-adsorption properties. References: [1]A. Chambers et al, J. Phys. Chem. B, 102, 4253,1998. [2]A. C. Dillon et al, Nature, 386, 377,1997. [3]J. Conard, Ann. Chim. Sci. Mat 26

  5. Hydrogen adsorption in doped porous carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balan, L.; Duchaux, L.; Los, S.

    2005-01-01

    properties of doped microporous carbons (SWNTs and activated carbons). The raw nano-structured carbon materials are microporous activated carbons (BET specific surface area: 1600 m 2 /g), electric-arc closed-end single-walled carbon nano-tubes (SWNTs), and HiPCO SWNTs. They have been doped in the vapor phase by K, and Li (in order to obtain KC 7 , KC 10 , LiC 18 SWNTs and LiC 6 , LiC 18 , KC 24 activated carbons). The hydrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms of the doped activated carbons were obtained at room temperature and at 77 K, up to 3 MPa, by a volumetric method. The adsorption of D 2 was studied in situ on doped nano-tubes and filaments by neutron diffraction on DIB experiment (ILL), at λ = 2.52 Angstroms, as a function of temperature [300-20 K] and pressure. Simultaneously the adsorption isotherms were recorded in the range 0-0.1 MPa [13]. Doping of microporous carbon by Li or K leads to an increase in the energy of adsorption of H 2 or D 2 molecules. Thus, the room temperature sorption capacities (at P≤3 MPa) can be higher than that of the raw materials after slight doping. However, the maximum H 2 (or D 2 ) storage measured at T≤ 77 K is lower than the one of pristine materials as the sites of adsorption are occupied by alkali ions inserted in the micropores [14]. The microporous adsorption sites of doped single-walled carbon nano-tubes, identified by neutron diffraction, are both the interstitial voids (in electric-arc or HiPCO tubes) in between the tubes and the central canals of the tubes (only in HiPCO tubes) [15]. We have also prepared nano-structured porous doped carbons by ball-milling carbon host materials with some dopant, such as alkali or alkaline earth metal. The new nano-porous carbons obtained by this method have been characterised and tested for their hydrogen-adsorption properties. [1] A. Chambers et al, J. Phys. Chem. B, 102, 4253, 1998; [2] A. C. Dillon et al, Nature, 386, 377, 1997; [3] J. Conard, Ann. Chim. Sci. Mat 26, 107, 2001; [4] A

  6. A unique research partnership investigating the fundamental principles of subsurface carbon dioxide behaviour and carbonate reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, I.; Blunt, M. J.; Maitland, G. C.

    2017-12-01

    Carbonate reservoirs hold the majority of CO2 sequestration potential, however, they are also more complicated than sandstone reservoirs in terms of heterogeneity and potential reactivity impact on operations. There are both significant carbonate reservoir CO2 sinks and CO2 point sources around Qatar making carbon capture and storage a potential decarbonisation pathway. The Qatar Carbonates and Carbon Storage Research Centre (QCCSRC) was formed in 2009 to address the gaps in our current knowledge of both local carbonate reservoir platforms and how CO2 would behave post sequestration. Our work spans 35 graduated PhD students, 10 still studying, 29 post-doctoral researchers, 18 faculty members all aided by 5 support staff and more than 100 MSc and summer students from 30 different countries, the centre has published over 150 papers in over 40 different journals. Our research is based within the Department of Chemical Engineering and the Department of Earth Science and Engineering. Our team annually attends over 20 conferences world-wide to disseminate our findings and activity engage in outreach events (UNFCCC, science festivals, social media, science bars, school visits, etc.). QCCSRC is a research framework agreement over 10 years and valued at $70 million between Qatar Petroleum, Shell, the Qatar Science and Technology Park and Imperial College London bringing together each organisation's unique capabilities. This novel quadruple helix management structure is responsible for the largest single industrially funded research programme conducted at Imperial College London. Our research has focused on data to create and/or improve predictive models for CO2 storage in carbonate reservoirs. Our three broad thematic areas include: Rocks : Rock-fluid interactions : Fluid-fluid interactions and are supported by 5 laboratories. Overall this unique programme is an example of how to approach grand challenges in the energy-carbon dilemma through long-term and multidisciplinary

  7. Carbon dioxide conversion over carbon-based nanocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavarian, Mehrnoush; Chai, Siang-Piao; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2013-07-01

    The utilization of carbon dioxide for the production of valuable chemicals via catalysts is one of the efficient ways to mitigate the greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. It is known that the carbon dioxide conversion and product yields are still low even if the reaction is operated at high pressure and temperature. The carbon dioxide utilization and conversion provides many challenges in exploring new concepts and opportunities for development of unique catalysts for the purpose of activating the carbon dioxide molecules. In this paper, the role of carbon-based nanocatalysts in the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide and direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate from carbon dioxide and methanol are reviewed. The current catalytic results obtained with different carbon-based nanocatalysts systems are presented and how these materials contribute to the carbon dioxide conversion is explained. In addition, different strategies and preparation methods of nanometallic catalysts on various carbon supports are described to optimize the dispersion of metal nanoparticles and catalytic activity.

  8. Amorphous and crystalline calcium carbonate phases during carbonation of nanolimes: implications in heritage conservation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rodriguez-Navarro, C.; Elert, K.; Ševčík, Radek

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 35 (2016), s. 6594-6607 ISSN 1466-8033 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP14-20374P; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : carbonation * nanolime * kinetics * CaCO3 polymorphs Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage Impact factor: 3.474, year: 2016 http://pubs.rsc.org/en/Content/ArticleLanding/2016/CE/c6ce01202g#!divAbstract

  9. Carbon accumulation by macrophytes of aqatic and wetland habitats with standing water

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Květ, Jan; Pokorný, Jan; Čížková, Hana

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 78, - (2008), s. 91-98 ISSN 0369-8211 R&D Projects: GA MŽP(CZ) SM/640/18/03 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Climate change * plant biomass * net primary production * decomposition * organic carbon * carbonate encrustations Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  10. Length Dependent Foam-Like Mechanical Response of Axially Indented Vertically Oriented Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Sands T, Xu X, Fisher T. Dendrimer -assisted controlled growth of carbon nanotubes for enhanced thermal interface conductance. Nanotechnology 2007;18...surfaces. Rev Sci Instrum 2006;77(9):095105-1–3. [11] Allaoui A, Hoa S, Evesque P, Bai J. Electronic transport in carbon nanotube tangles under compression

  11. Study on the Microwave Permittivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaolai; Zhao, Donglin

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we studied the microwave permittivity of the complex of the single-walled carbon nanotube and paraffin in 2-18GHz. In the range, the dielectric loss of single-walled carbon nanotube is higher, and the real part and the imaginary part of the dielectric constant decrease with the increase of frequency, and the dielectric constant…

  12. Medical Isotope Program: O-18, C-13, and Xe-129 Final Report CRADA No. TC-2043-02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheibner, K. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fought, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-27

    This was a collaborative effort between the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Spectra Gases, Inc., to develop new and cheaper sources of Oxgyen-18 (O-18), Carbon-13 (C-13), and Xenon-129 (Xe-129), and to develop new applications of these stable medical isotopes in medicine resulting in a substantial increase in stable isotopes that are important to human health sciences.

  13. Conducting carbonized polyaniline nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mentus, Slavko; Ciric-Marjanovic, Gordana; Trchova, Miroslava; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2009-01-01

    Conducting nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes were synthesized by the carbonization of self-assembled polyaniline nanotubes protonated with sulfuric acid. Carbonization was carried out in a nitrogen atmosphere at a heating rate of 10 deg. C min -1 up to a maximum temperature of 800 deg. C. The carbonized polyaniline nanotubes which have a typical outer diameter of 100-260 nm, with an inner diameter of 20-170 nm and a length extending from 0.5 to 0.8 μm, accompanied with very thin nanotubes with outer diameters of 8-14 nm, inner diameters 3.0-4.5 nm and length extending from 0.3 to 1.0 μm, were observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Elemental analysis showed 9 wt% of nitrogen in the carbonized product. Conductivity of the nanotubular PANI precursor, amounting to 0.04 S cm -1 , increased to 0.7 S cm -1 upon carbonization. Molecular structure of carbonized polyaniline nanotubes has been analyzed by FTIR and Raman spectroscopies, and their paramagnetic characteristics were compared with the starting PANI nanotubes by EPR spectroscopy.

  14. Conducting carbonized polyaniline nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mentus, Slavko; Ciric-Marjanovic, Gordana [Faculty of Physical Chemistry, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 12-16, 11158 Belgrade (Serbia); Trchova, Miroslava; Stejskal, Jaroslav [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Heyrovsky Square 2, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)], E-mail: gordana@ffh.bg.ac.rs

    2009-06-17

    Conducting nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes were synthesized by the carbonization of self-assembled polyaniline nanotubes protonated with sulfuric acid. Carbonization was carried out in a nitrogen atmosphere at a heating rate of 10 deg. C min{sup -1} up to a maximum temperature of 800 deg. C. The carbonized polyaniline nanotubes which have a typical outer diameter of 100-260 nm, with an inner diameter of 20-170 nm and a length extending from 0.5 to 0.8 {mu}m, accompanied with very thin nanotubes with outer diameters of 8-14 nm, inner diameters 3.0-4.5 nm and length extending from 0.3 to 1.0 {mu}m, were observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Elemental analysis showed 9 wt% of nitrogen in the carbonized product. Conductivity of the nanotubular PANI precursor, amounting to 0.04 S cm{sup -1}, increased to 0.7 S cm{sup -1} upon carbonization. Molecular structure of carbonized polyaniline nanotubes has been analyzed by FTIR and Raman spectroscopies, and their paramagnetic characteristics were compared with the starting PANI nanotubes by EPR spectroscopy.

  15. Global carbon inequality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubacek, Klaus; Baiocchi, Giovanni; Feng, Kuishuang; Munoz Castillo, Raul; Sun, Laixiang; Xue, Jinjun

    2017-01-01

    Global climate change and inequality are inescapably linked both in terms of who contributes climate change and who suffers the consequences. This fact is also partly reflected in two United Nations (UN) processes: on the one hand, the Paris Agreement of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change under which countries agreed to hold the increase in the global average temperature to below 2 C above pre-industrial levels and, on the other hand, the UN's Sustainable Development Goals aiming to end poverty. These agreements are seen as important foundation to put the world nations on a sustainable pathway. However, how these agreements can be achieved or whether they are even mutually compatible is less clear. We explore the global carbon inequality between and within countries and the carbon implications of poverty alleviation by combining detailed consumer expenditure surveys for different income categories for a wide range of countries with an environmentally extended multi-regional input-output approach to estimate carbon footprints of different household groups, globally, and assess the carbon implications of moving the poorest people out of poverty. Given the current context, increasing income leads to increasing carbon footprints and makes global targets for mitigating greenhouse gases more difficult to achieve given the pace of technological progress and current levels of fossil fuel dependence. We conclude that the huge level of carbon inequality requires a critical discussion of undifferentiated income growth. Current carbon-intensive lifestyles and consumption patterns need to enter the climate discourse to a larger extent. (orig.)

  16. 18q- and 18q+ mosaicism in a mentally retarded boy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ausems, M. G.; Bhola, S. L.; Post-Blok, C. A.; Hennekam, R. C.; de France, H. F.

    1994-01-01

    A mentally retarded boy was found to have an unusual chromosomal mosaicism [46,XY, del(18) (q22)/46,XY,iso psu dic(18)(q23)]. The clinical manifestations are compatible with the 18q- syndrome. The chromosome alteration was defined by high resolution banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization

  17. Tritium contamination in [18O] water containing 18F produced by a cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, S.; Saze, T.; Sakane, H.; Nishizawa, K.

    2003-01-01

    Tritium in the target [ 18 O] water irradiated with 9.6 MeV protons for producing [ 18 F] fluoride by 18 O(p, n) 18 F reaction was predicted from the consideration on the Q value of the 18 O(p, t) 16 O reaction. A tritium beta ray spectrum was measured by a liquid scintillation counter equipped with a multichannel analyzer. The ratio of the 3 H activity to the 18 F activity in the [ 18 O] target water was 2.4x10 -6 at the beam current of 25μA. Tritium also was detected in the [ 18 O] water for recycling and the wasted acetonitrile [ 18 O] water. The purified [ 18 F]-FDG solution was not contaminated by 3 H. The 40% 3 H out of the produced activity was lost in the course of the [ 18 F]-FDG synthesis. It was suggested that 3 H evaporated into the air during [ 18 F]-FDG synthesis and caused contamination of the workroom. The radiation workers should be prevented from environmental 3 H contamination. (author)

  18. 48 CFR 53.301-18 - SF 18 (Rev. 6/95), Request for Quotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false SF 18 (Rev. 6/95), Request for Quotations. 53.301-18 Section 53.301-18 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION... for Quotations. EC01MY91.002 [60 FR 34763, July 3, 1995] ...

  19. 22 CFR 18.1 - Scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... § 18.1 Scope. This part contains rules governing disciplinary action against a former officer or... employment conflict of interest prohibitions. Such disciplinary action may include prohibition from practice...

  20. 49 CFR 392.18 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS DRIVING OF COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES Driving of Commercial Motor Vehicles § 392.18 [Reserved] ...

  1. Biochemical and kinetic characterization of geranylgeraniol 18 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Suchart

    2015-07-22

    Jul 22, 2015 ... biochemical characterization of GGOH 18-hydroxylase activity in the microsomal fraction from C. .... method as previously described (Chanama et al., 2009). Briefly, 30 g of frozen ..... Catalytic properties of the plant cytochrome.

  2. Hurricane Isabel Poster (September 18, 2003)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hurricane Isabel poster. Multi-spectral image from NOAA-17 shows Hurricane Isabel making landfall on the North Carolina Outer Banks on September 18, 2003. Poster...

  3. 18F fluorination using macrocyclic polyethers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klatte, B.; Knoechel, A.

    The aim of this work is the nucleophilic substitution labelling with 18 F with high selectivity and yield for a short reaction time. Labelling with little or no carrier presumes that 18 F is obtained in anhydrons form. Starting with the production via the nuclear reaction 20 Ne(d,α) 18 F, the 18 F formed is to be continuously converted into an alkali polyether complex whose purpose is to increase the reactivity of the fluoride (compared to the non-complexed anion form), so that nucleophilic substitution reactions can be carried out faster and more carefully. A report is given on the working program and on first results to optimize the carrier-poor synthesis with polyethers as synthesis agent. (RB) [de

  4. 49 CFR 572.18 - Thorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 3-Year-Old Child § 572.18 Thorax. (a) The... attaches the top of the ribcage sternum to the thoracic spine box. (3) Adjust the dummy so that the tangent...

  5. 7 CFR 4284.18 - Audit requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Grant Programs § 4284.18 Audit requirements. Grantees must comply with the audit requirements of 7 CFR part 3052. The audit requirements apply to the years in which grant funds are received and years in...

  6. Non-disjunction of chromosome 18

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bugge, M; Collins, A; Petersen, M B

    1998-01-01

    A sample of 100 trisomy 18 conceptuses analysed separately and together with a published sample of 61 conceptuses confirms that an error in maternal meiosis II (MII) is the most frequent cause of non-disjunction for chromosome 18. This is unlike all other human trisomies that have been studied......, which show a higher frequency in maternal meiosis I (MI). Maternal MI trisomy 18 shows a low frequency of recombination in proximal p and medial q, but not the reduction in proximal q observed in chromosome 21 MI non-disjunction. Maternal MII non-disjunction does not fit the entanglement model...... that predicts increased recombination, especially near the centromere. Whereas recent data on MII trisomy 21 show the predicted increase in recombination proximally, maternal MII trisomy 18 has non-significantly reduced recombination. Therefore, chromosome-specific factors must complicate the simple model...

  7. 12 CFR 725.18 - Creditworthiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... UNION ADMINISTRATION CENTRAL LIQUIDITY FACILITY § 725.18 Creditworthiness. (a) Prior to Facility... advances for its liquidity needs. [44 FR 49437, Aug. 23, 1979, as amended at 69 FR 27829, May 17, 2004] ...

  8. Electron Transfer Strategies Regulate Carbonate Mineral and Micropore Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhirui; Tice, Michael M

    2018-01-01

    Some microbial carbonates are robust biosignatures due to their distinct morphologies and compositions. However, whether carbonates induced by microbial iron reduction have such features is unknown. Iron-reducing bacteria use various strategies to transfer electrons to iron oxide minerals (e.g., membrane-bound enzymes, soluble electron shuttles, nanowires, as well as different mechanisms for moving over or attaching to mineral surfaces). This diversity has the potential to create mineral biosignatures through manipulating the microenvironments in which carbonate precipitation occurs. We used Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Geothrix fermentans, and Geobacter metallireducens GS-15, representing three different strategies, to reduce solid ferric hydroxide in order to evaluate their influence on carbonate and micropore formation (micro-size porosity in mineral rocks). Our results indicate that electron transfer strategies determined the morphology (rhombohedral, spherical, or long-chained) of precipitated calcium-rich siderite by controlling the level of carbonate saturation and the location of carbonate formation. Remarkably, electron transfer strategies also produced distinctive cell-shaped micropores in both carbonate and hydroxide minerals, thus producing suites of features that could potentially serve as biosignatures recording information about the sizes, shapes, and physiologies of iron-reducing organisms. Key Words: Microbial iron reduction-Micropore-Electron transfer strategies-Microbial carbonate. Astrobiology 18, 28-36.

  9. Evaluation of Production and Carbon Benefit of Different Vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HU Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed environmental and economic benefits of 8 types of vegetables in 4 different farms over 3 years. The specific results were as follows:(1The input-output ratio and carbon footprint of organic production mode was 18.5% and 87.4% of that of pollution-free mode, respectively; (2Fertilizer and power consumption was the main source of carbon emissions, accounting for 58.76% and 16.67% of total carbon emissions, respectively; (3There were positive correlations between N fertilizer and both carbon emissions and carbon footprint. In other words, higher use of N fertilizer resulted in higher carbon emissions and carbon footprint; (4 When organic fertilizers use reached 122 352 kg·hm-2, the crop production could reach the maximum under organic mode. Under the mode of pollution-free production, when agricultural chemicals input reached 20 103 yuan·hm-2, leafy vegetable production could reach the maximum. Therefore, to increase production and reduce carbon emissions in the process of vegetable production, the main approach was to use organic mode, increase the quantity of organic fertilizer, instead of the use of inorganic N fertilizer and other agricultural chemicals and establish water-saving irrigation system for electricity efficiency.

  10. Carbon Ion Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Hansen, David Christoffer; Herrmann, Rochus

    On the importance of choice of target size for selective boosting of hypoxic tumor subvolumina in carbon ion therapy Purpose: Functional imaging methods in radiotherapy are maturing and can to some extent uncover radio resistant structures found within a tumour entity. Selective boost of identified...... effect. All cell lines investigated here did not reach an OER of 1, even for the smaller structures, which may indicate that the achievable dose average LET of carbon ions is too low, and heavier ions than carbon may be considered for functional LET-painting....

  11. Radiolytic carbon gasification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shennan, J.V.

    1980-01-01

    A vast body of knowledge has been accumulated over the past thirty years related to the radiolytic oxidation of the graphite moderator in carbon dioxide cooled Reactors. In the last ten years the dominance of the internal pore structure of the graphite in controlling the rate of carbon gasification has been steadily revealed. The object of this paper is to sift the large body of evidence and show how internal gas composition and hence carbon gasification is controlled by the virgin pore structure and the changes in pore structure brought about by progressive radiolytic oxidation. (author)

  12. Novel one-pot one-step synthesis of 2'-[(18)F]fluoroflumazenil (FFMZ) for benzodiazepine receptor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Young Hyun; Jeong, Jae Min; Kim, Hyung Woo; Hong, Sung Hyun; Lee, Yun-Sang; Kil, Hee Sup; Chi, Dae Yoon; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Myung Chul

    2003-07-01

    We describe the synthesis of 2'-[(18)F]fluoroflumazenil (FFMZ), which differs from the typically used [(18)F]fluoroethylflumazenil (FEFMZ) for benzodiazepine receptor imaging. For one-pot one-step labeling, the precursors, 2'-tosyloxyflumazenil (TFMZ) and 2'-mesyloxyflumazenil (MFMZ), were synthesized in three steps. The precursors were successfully labeled with no-carrier-added (18)F-fluoride which was activated by repeated azeotropic distillation with Kryptofix 2.2.2./potassium carbonate in MeCN. An automated system for labeling and purification of [(18)F]FFMZ was developed. Labeling efficiency and radiochemical purity of [(18)F]FFMZ after synthesis by the automated system were 68% and 98%, respectively. Specific binding of [(18)F]FFMZ to central benzodiazepine receptor of rats was demonstrated by phosphoimaging.

  13. Novel one-pot one-step synthesis of 2'-[18F]fluoroflumazenil (FFMZ) for benzodiazepine receptor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Hyun Yoon; Jae, Min Jeong; Hyung, Woo Kim; Sung, Hyun Hong; Lee, Yun-Sang; Hee, Sup Kil; Dae, Yoon Chi; Dong, Soo Lee; Chung, June-Key; Myung, Chul Lee

    2003-01-01

    We describe the synthesis of 2'-[ 18 F]fluoroflumazenil (FFMZ), which differs from the typically used [ 18 F]fluoroethylflumazenil (FEFMZ) for benzodiazepine receptor imaging. For one-pot one-step labeling, the precursors, 2'-tosyloxyflumazenil (TFMZ) and 2'-mesyloxyflumazenil (MFMZ), were synthesized in three steps. The precursors were successfully labeled with no-carrier-added 18 F-fluoride which was activated by repeated azeotropic distillation with Kryptofix 2.2.2./potassium carbonate in MeCN. An automated system for labeling and purification of [ 18 F]FFMZ was developed. Labeling efficiency and radiochemical purity of [ 18 F]FFMZ after synthesis by the automated system were 68% and 98%, respectively. Specific binding of [ 18 F]FFMZ to central benzodiazepine receptor of rats was demonstrated by phosphoimaging

  14. Analysis of low-carbon industrial symbiosis technology for carbon mitigation in a Chinese iron/steel industrial park: A case study with carbon flow analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hui; Dong, Liang; Li, Huiquan; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Ohnishi, Satoshi; Tang, Qing

    2013-01-01

    CO 2 mitigation strategies in industrial parks are a significant component of the Chinese climate change mitigation policy, and industrial symbiosis can provide specific CO 2 mitigation opportunity. Technology is important to support symbiosis, but few studies in China have focused on this topic at the industrial park level. This research presented a case study in a national iron and steel industrial park in China. Focus was given onto carbon mitigation through industrial symbiosis technology using substance flow analysis (SFA). Three typical iron and steel industry technologies, including coke dry quenching (CDQ), combined cycle power plant (CCPP), and CO 2 capture by slag carbonization (CCSC) were evaluated with SFA. Technology assessment was further conducted in terms of carbon mitigation potential and unit reduction cost. Compared with the Business as usual (BAU) scenario, application with CDQ, CCPP, and CCSC reduced the net carbon emissions by 56.18, 134.43, and 222.89 kg CO 2 per ton crude steel inside the industrial parks, respectively, including both direct and indirect emissions. Economic assessment revealed that the unit costs for the three technologies were also high, thereby necessitating national financial support. Finally, relevant policy suggestions and future concerns were proposed and discussed. - Highlights: • A typical carbon mitigation case study on China iron/steel industrial park. • Using carbon SFA to investigate mitigation effects of industrial symbiosis technology. • CCPP greatly reduced the indirect carbon emission embodied in power purchase. • CCSC reduced the carbon emission by distributing fixed carbon into by-product. • Specific low carbon-tech promotion policies fit to China was discussed and proposed

  15. Studying Antarctic Ordinary Chondrite (OC) and Miller Range (MIL) Nakhlite Meteorites to Assess Carbonate Formation on Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Michael Ellis

    Carbonates are found in meteorites collected from Antarctica. The stable isotope composition of these carbonates records their formation environment on either Earth or Mars. The first research objective of this dissertation is to characterize the delta18O and delta 13C values of terrestrial carbonates formed on Ordinary Chondrites (OCs) collected in regions near known martian meteorites. The second objective is to characterize the delta18O and delta13C values of martian carbonates from Nakhlites collected from the Miller Range (MIL). The third objective is to assess environmental changes on Mars since the Noachian period. The OCs selected had no pre-terrestrial carbonates so any carbonates detected are presumed terrestrial in origin. The study methodology is stepped extraction of CO2 created from phosphoric acid reaction with meteorite carbonate. Stable isotope results show that two distinct terrestrial carbonate species (Ca-rich and Fe/Mg-rich) formed in Antarctica on OCs from a thin-film of meltwater containing dissolved CO2. Carbon isotope data suggests the terrestrial carbonates formed in equilibrium with atmospheric CO2 delta 13C = -7.5‰ at >15°C. The wide variation in delta 18O suggests the carbonates did not form in equilibrium with meteoric water alone, but possibly formed from an exchange of oxygen isotopes in both water and dissolved CO2. Antarctica provides a model for carbonate formation in a low water/rock ratio, near 0°C environment like modern Mars. Nakhlite parent basalt formed on Mars 1.3 billion years ago and the meteorites were ejected by a single impact approximately 11 million years ago. They traveled thru space before eventually falling to the Earth surface 10,000-40,000 years ago. Nakhlite samples for this research were all collected from the Miller Range (MIL) in Antarctica. The Nakhlite stable isotope results show two carbonate species (Ca-rich and Fe/Mg-rich) with a range of delta18O values that are similar to the terrestrial OC

  16. Comparison tests, in a pilot plant, of the performance of a coal-derived granular activated carbon: a comparison with coconut husk derived activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, S.; Kasahara, A.; Tsuruzono, Y.; Gotoh, M.

    1986-01-01

    A 160 m/sup 3//d pilot plant has been used in a series of comparison tests of the performance of coal-derived and coconut husk derived activated carbons. Activated carbons are used to remove trihalomethane precursors and malodorous substances from city water. A higher mean removal of coloration and COD/sub M//sub n/ was achieved with the coal-derived carbon (by factors of 1.5 and 1.8, respectively). The two activated carbons gave similar performances as regards turbidity, alkalinity, total iron and total manganese. 4 figures, 5 tables.

  17. The enhancement in wear resistance of W18Cr4V steel by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Ping; Xu Peiguang

    1987-01-01

    Two new methods of ion implantation were adopted in comparison with nitrogen implantation: carbon monoxide was implanted directly into W18Cr4V steel, and nitrogen was implanted into a deposited titanium film about 1000 A thick. It is shown that higher surface hardness and wear resistance have been achieved. The composition and phase structure of the implanted layer was determined in detail. The wear mechanisms were discussed

  18. UNUSUAL ENERGY-DEPENDENCE OF THE TOTAL NUCLEAR-REACTION CROSS-SECTION FOR A SECONDARY ISOMERIC NUCLEAR BEAM (F-18(M), J(PI)=5(+), E(X)=1.1 MEV)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ROBERTS, DA; BECCHETTI, FD; BROWN, JA; JANECKE, J; PHAM, K; ODONNELL, TW; WARNER, RE; RONNINGEN, RM; WILSCHUT, HW

    1995-01-01

    A primary O-17 beam has been used to produce a 22.3 MeV/nucleon F-18(m) isomeric secondary beam via a single nucleon transfer reaction on a carbon target. The total nuclear reaction cross sections for F-18(m) and F-18(g.s.) in silicon were measured in a stack of seven silicon solid-state detectors.

  19. Recoil 18F-chemistry in fluoroalkanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linde, K.D. van der.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis describes the study of the chemical reactions of recoil 18 F-atoms in gaseous fluoromethanes and fluoroethanes. A brief survey of the organic hot atom chemistry is given in Chapter I. Chapter II deals with the experimental procedures used in this investigation. The irradiation facilities, the vapour phase radio-chromatography and the identification, including the synthesis of some fluorocarbons, are described in detail. Chapter III consists of a study on the applicability of perfluoropropene, C 3 F 6 , as scavenger for thermal 18 F-atoms and radicals. Chapters IV, V, VI and VII deal with 18 F-recoil chemistry in gaseous fluoroethanes, using H 2 S as scavenger. Chapter VIII is a short discussion on the hot 18 F-atom based production of 18 F-labeled organic compounds via decay of the intermediate 18 Ne. A target system is proposed for production of this isotope in high energy and ultra high flux particle beams, which possibly would become available in fast breeders and fusion reactors. (Auth.)

  20. Sol-gel coatings on carbon/carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, S.M.; Krabill, R.M.; Dalzell, W.J. Jr.; Chu, P.Y.; Clark, D.E.

    1986-01-01

    The need for structural materials that can withstand severe environments up to 4000 0 F has promulgated the investigation of sol-gel derived ceramic and composite coatings on carbon/carbon composite materials. Alumina and zirconia sols have been deposited via thermophoresis on carbon/carbon substrates

  1. Effects of vegetation's degradation on carbon stock, morphological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to assess the capacity of mangroves soils to stock carbon and how degradation can influence its various properties. Transect method was performed. So, two transects of 100 m length and 10 m wide were established according to the degradation level. Total of 18 Soil samples were taken to be ...

  2. Effects of vegetation's degradation on carbon stock, morphological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ndema

    This study was conducted to assess the capacity of mangroves soils to stock carbon and how degradation can influence its various properties. Transect method was performed. So, two transects of. 100 m length and 10 m wide were established according to the degradation level. Total of 18 Soil samples were taken to be ...

  3. The effect of soil fauna on carbon sequestration in soil

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frouz, Jan; Pižl, Václav; Kaneda, Satoshi; Šimek, Miloslav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 10, - (2008) ISSN 1029-7006. [EGU General Assembly 2008. 13.04.2008-18.04.2008, Vienna] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : soil fauna * carbon sequestration * soil Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  4. Synthesis of Nitrogen-doped Carbon Nanotubes with Layered ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (CNx) were synthesized by the catalytic chemical vapour deposition ... dispersed metal nanoparticles over oxide matrices can be obtained ..... 18 S.Y. Kim, J. Lee, C.W. Na, J. Park, K. Seo and B. Kim, Chem.

  5. Multiscale Mass-Spring Models of Carbon Nanotube Foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-06

    Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Graphical abstract (movie) Axial strain localization in a mesoscopic chain of five bistable springs. The...line). Graphical Abstract Research highlights • Axial strain localization in microscopic bistable spring chains mimics kink- ing of compressed carbon

  6. Permeation of supercritical carbon dioxide through polymeric hollow fiber membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patil, V.E.; Broeke, van den L.J.P.; Vercauteren, F.F.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.

    2006-01-01

    Permeation of carbon dioxide was measured for two types of composite polymeric hollow fiber membranes for feed pressures up to 18 MPa at a temp. of 313 K. support membrane. The membranes consist of a polyamide copolymer (IPC) layer or a poly(vinyl alc.) (PVA) layer on top of a polyethersulfone

  7. Nanolubes of carbon: materials for the 3th millennium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Leon, N.

    1999-01-01

    Fullerenes and nanotubes represent a new allotropic form of the carbon element which have attracted the interest of scientists of different disciplines along the last recent years. A general overview on nanotubes is presented with special stress on the structure, properties and future applications of these fascinating new materials. (Author) 18 refs

  8. Potential reduction of carbon emissions from Crude Palm Oil production based on energy and carbon balances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patthanaissaranukool, Withida; Polprasert, Chongchin; Englande, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We evaluate energy and carbon equivalence from CPO production based on a CBM. ► Energy spent and produced via carbon movement from palm oil mill was determined. ► Scenarios were formulated to evaluate the potential reduction of carbon emission. ► Utilization of biomass from palm oil mill shows the high potential of C-reduction. -- Abstract: This study aimed to evaluate energy and carbon equivalences (CE) associated with palm oil milling and to evaluate sustainability alternatives for energy consumption. Appropriate ways to reduce carbon emissions were also evaluated. A field survey was carried out to quantify the input and output of energy and materials following the conceptual framework of a carbon-balanced model (CBM), which exclude other non-CO 2 greenhouse gases. Survey results indicate that the electrical energy consumption for daily mill start-up averaged 18.7 ± 5.4 kWh/ton Fresh Fruit Bunches (FFBs). This energy is equivalent to 114.4 ± 33.2 kWh/ton Crude Palm Oil (CPO) which was found to be offset by that generated in the mills using palm fiber as a solid fuel. Currently, organic residues contained in the wastewater are anaerobically converted to methane. The methane is used as fuel to generate electricity and sold to an outside grid network at a generation rate of 8.1 ± 2.1 kWh/ton FFB. Based on the CBM approach, carbon emissions observed from the use of fossil energy in palm oil milling were very small; however, total carbon emission from oil palm plantation and palm oil milling were found to be 12.3 kg CE/ton FFB, resulting in the net carbon reduction in CPO production of 2.8 kg CE/ton FFB or 53.7 kg CE/ha-y. Overall, the sum of C-reduction was found 1.2 times greater than that of C-emission. This figure can be increased up to 5.5, if all biomass by-products are used as fuel to generate electricity only. The full potential for carbon reduction from palm oil milling is estimated at 0.94 kW of electric power for every hectare of

  9. Carbon deposition thresholds on nickel-based solid oxide fuel cell anodes II. Steam:carbon ratio and current density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, J.; Kesler, O.

    2015-03-01

    For the second part of a two part publication, coking thresholds with respect to molar steam:carbon ratio (SC) and current density in nickel-based solid oxide fuel cells were determined. Anode-supported button cell samples were exposed to 2-component and 5-component gas mixtures with 1 ≤ SC ≤ 2 and zero fuel utilization for 10 h, followed by measurement of the resulting carbon mass. The effect of current density was explored by measuring carbon mass under conditions known to be prone to coking while increasing the current density until the cell was carbon-free. The SC coking thresholds were measured to be ∼1.04 and ∼1.18 at 600 and 700 °C, respectively. Current density experiments validated the thresholds measured with respect to fuel utilization and steam:carbon ratio. Coking thresholds at 600 °C could be predicted with thermodynamic equilibrium calculations when the Gibbs free energy of carbon was appropriately modified. Here, the Gibbs free energy of carbon on nickel-based anode support cermets was measured to be -6.91 ± 0.08 kJ mol-1. The results of this two part publication show that thermodynamic equilibrium calculations with appropriate modification to the Gibbs free energy of solid-phase carbon can be used to predict coking thresholds on nickel-based anodes at 600-700 °C.

  10. Hypervelocity technology carbon/carbon testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmo, John V.; Kretz, Lawrence O.

    The paper describes the procedures used at the Structures Test Laboratory of the Wright Laboratory's Flight Dynamics Directorate to test a carbon/carbon hot structure representing a typical hypersonic gliding body, and presents the results of tests. The forebody was heated to 1371 C over 13 test runs, using radiant quartz lamps; a vertical shear force of 5.34 kN was introduced to the nose at a stabilized temperature of 816 C. Test data were collected using prototype high-temperature strain gages, in-house-designed high-temperature extensometers, conventional strain gages, and thermocouples. Video footage was taken of all test runs. Test runs were successfully completed up to 1371 C with flight typical thermal gradients at heating rates up to 5.56 C/sec. Results showed that, overall, the termal test control systems performed as predicted and that test temperatures and thermal gradients were achieved to within about 5 percent in most cases.

  11. Porous carbons prepared by direct carbonization of MOFs for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xinlong; Li, Xuejin; Yan, Zifeng; Komarneni, Sridhar

    2014-07-01

    Three porous carbons were prepared by direct carbonization of HKUST-1, MOF-5 and Al-PCP without additional carbon precursors. The carbon samples obtained by carbonization at 1073 K were characterized by XRD, TEM and N2 physisorption techniques followed by testing for electrochemical performance. The BET surface areas of the three carbons were in the range of 50-1103 m2/g. As electrode materials for supercapacitor, the MOF-5 and Al-PCP derived carbons displayed the ideal capacitor behavior, whereas the HKUST-1 derived carbon showed poor capacitive behavior at various sweep rates and current densities. Among those carbon samples, Al-PCP derived carbons exhibited highest specific capacitance (232.8 F/g) in 30% KOH solution at the current density of 100 mA/g.

  12. Carbon aerogels; Les aerogels de carbone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthon-Fabry, S.; Achard, P

    2003-06-15

    The carbon aerogel is a nano-porous material at open porosity, electrical conductor. The aerogels morphology is variable in function of the different synthesis parameters. This characteristic offers to the aerogels a better adaptability to many applications: electrodes (super condensers, fuel cells). The author presents the materials elaboration and their applications. It provides also the research programs: fundamental research, realization of super-condenser electrodes, fuel cells electrodes, gas storage materials and opaque materials for thermal insulation. (A.L.B.)

  13. Carbon emission from global hydroelectric reservoirs revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Siyue; Zhang, Quanfa

    2014-12-01

    Substantial greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from hydropower reservoirs have been of great concerns recently, yet the significant carbon emitters of drawdown area and reservoir downstream (including spillways and turbines as well as river reaches below dams) have not been included in global carbon budget. Here, we revisit GHG emission from hydropower reservoirs by considering reservoir surface area, drawdown zone and reservoir downstream. Our estimates demonstrate around 301.3 Tg carbon dioxide (CO2)/year and 18.7 Tg methane (CH4)/year from global hydroelectric reservoirs, which are much higher than recent observations. The sum of drawdown and downstream emission, which is generally overlooked, represents 42 % CO2 and 67 % CH4 of the total emissions from hydropower reservoirs. Accordingly, the global average emissions from hydropower are estimated to be 92 g CO2/kWh and 5.7 g CH4/kWh. Nonetheless, global hydroelectricity could currently reduce approximate 2,351 Tg CO2eq/year with respect to fuel fossil plant alternative. The new findings show a substantial revision of carbon emission from the global hydropower reservoirs.

  14. Low-carbon infrastructure strategies for cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, C. A.; Ibrahim, N.; Hoornweg, D.

    2014-05-01

    Reducing greenhouse gas emissions to avert potentially disastrous global climate change requires substantial redevelopment of infrastructure systems. Cities are recognized as key actors for leading such climate change mitigation efforts. We have studied the greenhouse gas inventories and underlying characteristics of 22 global cities. These cities differ in terms of their climates, income, levels of industrial activity, urban form and existing carbon intensity of electricity supply. Here we show how these differences in city characteristics lead to wide variations in the type of strategies that can be used for reducing emissions. Cities experiencing greater than ~1,500 heating degree days (below an 18 °C base), for example, will review building construction and retrofitting for cold climates. Electrification of infrastructure technologies is effective for cities where the carbon intensity of the grid is lower than ~600 tCO2e GWh-1 whereas transportation strategies will differ between low urban density (~6,000 persons km-2) cities. As nation states negotiate targets and develop policies for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, attention to the specific characteristics of their cities will broaden and improve their suite of options. Beyond carbon pricing, markets and taxation, governments may develop policies and target spending towards low-carbon urban infrastructure.

  15. Multifunctional Stiff Carbon Foam Derived from Bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ye; Ding, Yujie; Wang, Chunhui; Xu, Fan; Lin, Zaishan; Qin, Yuyang; Li, Ying; Yang, Minglong; He, Xiaodong; Peng, Qingyu; Li, Yibin

    2016-07-06

    The creation of stiff yet multifunctional three-dimensional porous carbon architecture at very low cost is still challenging. In this work, lightweight and stiff carbon foam (CF) with adjustable pore structure was prepared by using flour as the basic element via a simple fermentation and carbonization process. The compressive strength of CF exhibits a high value of 3.6 MPa whereas its density is 0.29 g/cm(3) (compressive modulus can be 121 MPa). The electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness measurements (specific EMI shielding effectiveness can be 78.18 dB·cm(3)·g(-1)) indicate that CF can be used as lightweight, effective shielding material. Unlike ordinary foam structure materials, the low thermal conductivity (lowest is 0.06 W/m·K) with high resistance to fire makes CF a good candidate for commercial thermal insulation material. These results demonstrate a promising method to fabricate an economical, robust carbon material for applications in industry as well as topics regarding environmental protection and improvement of energy efficiency.

  16. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Unites States die every year from accidental non-fire related CO poisoning associated with consumer products, including ... CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of ...

  17. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... On Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide ... Related Links Recalls Safety Education Regulations, Laws & Standards Research & Statistics Business & Manufacturing Small Business Resources OnSafety Blogs ...

  18. Clean Carbon Communism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2008-05-07

    May 7, 2008 ... failure are especially dire for the downtrodden masses in the most vulnerable societies. ... that carbon trading has become exceedingly profitable for polluting .... 1 : Energy industries (renewable - / non-renewable sources).

  19. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Community Outreach Resource Center Toy Recall Statistics CO Poster Contest Pool Safely Business & Manufacturing Business & Manufacturing Business ... Featured Resources CPSC announces winners of carbon monoxide poster contest Video View the blog Clues You Can ...

  20. Carbonation of cerium oxychloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, E.J.; Onstott, E.I.; Bowman, M.G.

    1977-01-01

    Cerous carbonates can be used in thermochemical cycles for H production if the resulting ceric oxides can be converted back into cerous carbonates. One way is to reduce and hydrolyze ceric oxide with HCl to produce CeOCl and then to carbonate it. The reaction 3CeOCl + 3CO 2 + 8H 2 O → CeCl 3 (aq) + Ce 2 (CO 3 ) 3 . 8H 2 O was found to occur in aqueous medium if the final CeCl 3 content is low. Carbonation of CeOCl could also be conducted in acetone --H 2 O . CeClCO 3 . 3H 2 O was decomposed and characterized. The reactions which can be used for water splitting are discussed briefly

  1. Occult carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, J N

    1987-01-01

    A syndrome of headache, fatigue, dizziness, paresthesias, chest pain, palpitations and visual disturbances was associated with chronic occult carbon monoxide exposure in 26 patients in a primary care setting. A causal association was supported by finding a source of carbon monoxide in a patient's home, workplace or vehicle; results of screening tests that ruled out other illnesses; an abnormally high carboxyhemoglobin level in 11 of 14 patients tested, and abatement or resolution of symptoms when the source of carbon monoxide was removed. Exposed household pets provided an important clue to the diagnosis in some cases. Recurrent occult carbon monoxide poisoning may be a frequently overlooked cause of persistent or recurrent headache, fatigue, dizziness, paresthesias, abdominal pain, diarrhea and unusual spells.

  2. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Import Surveillance International Recall Guidance Civil and Criminal Penalties Federal Court Orders & ... 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2012 ...

  3. From Carbon to Buckypaper

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    hedral, connected by covalent bonds, and forms a 3-dimensional network. The rigid .... increasing number of applications in various sectors [15, 16, 17]. 1. .... [9] Bill Howard, (30 July 2013), BMW i3: Cheap, mass-produced carbon fiber.

  4. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2012 Annual Estimates OCTOBER 13, 2015 Incidents, Deaths, and In-Depth Investigations Associated with Non-Fire ...

  5. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths ... 2011 Annual Estimates View All CO-Related Injury Statistics and Technical Reports Related Links Recalls Safety Education ...

  6. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION Search CPSC Search Menu Home Recalls Recall List CPSC Recall API Recall Lawsuits ... and Bans Report an Unsafe Product Consumers Businesses Home Safety Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information ...

  7. Carbon Monoxide Nonattainment Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data layer identifies areas in the U.S. where air pollution levels have not met the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Carbon Monoxide and have...

  8. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors: Design, synthesis and structural characterization of new heteroaryl-N-carbonylbenzenesulfonamides targeting druggable human carbonic anhydrase isoforms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buemi, M. R.; De Luca, L.; Ferro, S.; Bruno, E.; Ceruso, M.; Supuran, C. T.; Pospíšilová, K.; Brynda, Jiří; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Gitto, R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 102, Sep 18 (2015), s. 223-232 ISSN 0223-5234 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : human carbonic anhydrase * isoquinoline * quinoline * X-ray * molecular docking Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.902, year: 2015

  9. Applications for alliform carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogotsi, Yury; Mochalin, Vadym; McDonough, IV, John Kenneth; Simon, Patrice; Taberna, Pierre Louis

    2017-02-21

    This invention relates to novel applications for alliform carbon, useful in conductors and energy storage devices, including electrical double layer capacitor devices and articles incorporating such conductors and devices. Said alliform carbon particles are in the range of 2 to about 20 percent by weight, relative to the weight of the entire electrode. Said novel applications include supercapacitors and associated electrode devices, batteries, bandages and wound healing, and thin-film devices, including display devices.

  10. Occult Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkpatrick, John N.

    1987-01-01

    A syndrome of headache, fatigue, dizziness, paresthesias, chest pain, palpitations and visual disturbances was associated with chronic occult carbon monoxide exposure in 26 patients in a primary care setting. A causal association was supported by finding a source of carbon monoxide in a patient's home, workplace or vehicle; results of screening tests that ruled out other illnesses; an abnormally high carboxyhemoglobin level in 11 of 14 patients tested, and abatement or resolution of symptoms ...

  11. States and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Criqui, Patrick; Faraco, Benoit; Grandjean, Alain

    2009-01-01

    The climate challenge appeals to an unprecedented mutation of our societies. From north to south, all our life styles will have to be changed from dwelling, to transport and feeding. These changes will have sense only at a worldwide scale and will impact our way of development. How can we reduce our energy consumption and greenhouse impact with answering everyone's essential needs at the same time? How can we invent a carbon-free economy in the North and preserve the big socio-economical equilibria at the same time? How can we get rid of poverty in the South without compromising the well-being of the future generations with an increase of CO 2 emissions? Such difficulties cannot be overcome without innovations in terms of public policies. This book takes stock of the new possible instruments and policies at the global scale and involving fiscality, standards, investments and social justice. Content: 1 - the carbon threat: a changing climate and energies becoming scarce (the climate threat, an increasing energy insecurity); carbon and modern economy (human greenhouse gas emissions, a carbon-free well-being); governments and carbon control (a global challenge requiring an international control, the experiments era from Rio to the present day, the challenge of the state in front of the carbon threat); 2 - the political instruments of environment: standards as first instruments of climate public policies (standards efficiency in some sectors, standards limitations, standards and innovation); emissions quotas and market instruments (Kyoto protocol and CO 2 market, the future of 'cap and trade' and of individual and regional quotas); carbon tax, fiscal instruments and new regulations (carbon tax as an alternative or a complement, other fiscal and para-fiscal instruments, new regulation instruments); investing in climate (managing the transition, governments as transition administrators). (J.S)

  12. Tradeable carbon permits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koutstaal, P.R.

    1995-01-01

    The research project on tradeable carbon permits has focused on three elements. First of all, the practical implications of designing a system of tradeable emission permits for reducing CO2 has been studied. In the second part, the consequences of introducing a system of tradeable carbon permits for entry barriers have been considered. Finally, the institutional requirements and welfare effects of coordination of CO2 abatement in a second-best world have been examined

  13. Enantiomeric separation of triacylglycerols containing polyunsaturated fatty acids with 18 carbon atoms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezanka, Tomáš; Nedbalová, L.; Sigler, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 1467, October (2016), s. 261-269 ISSN 0021-9673 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-00227S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Chiral triacylglycerols * Enantiomers * Regioisomers Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.981, year: 2016

  14. Production and application of synthetic precursors labeled with carbon-11 and fluorine-18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrieri, R.A.

    2001-04-02

    It is evident from this chapter that there is enormous flexibility both in the selection of the nature of the radioisotope and ways to generate it, as well as in the selection of the labeling precursor to appropriately attach that radioisotope to some larger biomolecule of interest. The arsenal of radiolabeling precursors now available to the chemist is quite extensive, and without a doubt will continue to grow as chemists develop new ones. However, the upcoming years will perhaps reflect a greater effort in refining existing methods for preparing some of those precursors that are already available to us. For example, the use of solid-phase reactions to accomplish in a single step what would normally take several using conventional solvent-based reactions has already been shown to work in many occasions. The obvious advantage here is that processes become more amenable to system automation thus affording greater reliability in day-to-day operations. There are perhaps other technologies in science that have yet to be realized by the chemist in the PET laboratory that could provide a similar or even a greater benefit. One only needs to be open to new ideas, and imaginative enough to apply them to the problems at hand.

  15. Production and application of synthetic precursors labeled with carbon-11 and fluorine-18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrieri, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    It is evident from this chapter that there is enormous flexibility both in the selection of the nature of the radioisotope and ways to generate it, as well as in the selection of the labeling precursor to appropriately attach that radioisotope to some larger biomolecule of interest. The arsenal of radiolabeling precursors now available to the chemist is quite extensive, and without a doubt will continue to grow as chemists develop new ones. However, the upcoming years will perhaps reflect a greater effort in refining existing methods for preparing some of those precursors that are already available to us. For example, the use of solid-phase reactions to accomplish in a single step what would normally take several using conventional solvent-based reactions has already been shown to work in many occasions. The obvious advantage here is that processes become more amenable to system automation thus affording greater reliability in day-to-day operations. There are perhaps other technologies in science that have yet to be realized by the chemist in the PET laboratory that could provide a similar or even a greater benefit. One only needs to be open to new ideas, and imaginative enough to apply them to the problems at hand

  16. Fluorine 18 in tritium generator ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez-Becerril, J.; Bosch, P.; Bulbulian, S.

    1992-01-01

    At present time, the ceramic materials generators of tritium are very interesting mainly by the necessity of to found an adequate product for its application as fusion reactor shielding. The important element that must contain the ceramic material is the lithium and especially the isotope with mass=6. The tritium in these materials is generated by neutron irradiation, however, when the ceramic material contains oxygen, then is generated too fluorine 18 by the action of energetic atoms of tritium in recoil on the 16 O, as it is showed in the next reactions: 1) 6 Li (n, α) 3 H ; 2) 16 O( 3 H, n) 18 F . In the present work was studied the LiAlO 2 and the Li 2 O. The first was prepared in the laboratory and the second was used such as it is commercially expended. In particular the interest of this work is to study the chemical behavior of fluorine-18, since if it would be mixed with tritium it could be contaminate the fusion reactor fuel. The ceramic materials were irradiated with neutrons and also the chemical form of fluorine-18 produced was studied. It was determined the amount of fluorine-18 liberated by the irradiated materials when they were submitted to extraction with helium currents and argon-hydrogen mixtures and also it was investigated the possibility about the fluorine-18 was volatilized then it was mixed so with the tritium. Finally it was founded that the liberated amount of fluorine-18 depends widely of the experimental conditions, such as the temperature and the hydrogen amount in the mixture of dragging gas. (Author)

  17. Carbon based prosthetic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlin, D.J.; Carroll, D.W.; Barbero, R.S.; Archuleta, T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Klawitter, J.J.; Ogilvie, W.; Strzepa, P. [Ascension Orthopedics (US); Cook, S.D. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (US). School of Medicine

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to evaluate the use of carbon/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites for use in endoprosthetic devices. The application of these materials for the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joints of the hand was investigated. Issues concerning mechanical properties, bone fixation, biocompatibility, and wear are discussed. A system consisting of fiber reinforced materials with a pyrolytic carbon matrix and diamond-like, carbon-coated wear surfaces was developed. Processes were developed for the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of pyrolytic carbon into porous fiber preforms with the ability to tailor the outer porosity of the device to provide a surface for bone in-growth. A method for coating diamond-like carbon (DLC) on the articulating surface by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was developed. Preliminary results on mechanical properties of the composite system are discussed and initial biocompatibility studies were performed.

  18. Recent development of carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamabe, Tokio [Div. of Molecular Engineering, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); [Inst. for Fundamental Chemistry, Kyoto (Japan)

    1995-03-15

    Recent developments of carbon nanotubes are reviewed. Analytical solutions for the electronic structure of carbon nanotube on the basis of thight-binding approximation are presented and interpreted using the concepts of crystal orbital. The electronic properties of actual carbon nanotubes are presented. The electronic structures of carbon nanotubes in the presence of magnetic fiels are also summerized. (orig.)

  19. Method for synthesizing carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongyou

    2012-09-04

    A method for preparing a precursor solution for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, where a polar solvent is added to at least one block copolymer and at least one carbohydrate compound, and the precursor solution is processed using a self-assembly process and subsequent heating to form nanoporous carbon films, porous carbon nanotubes, and porous carbon nanoparticles.

  20. Carbon allocation in forest ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creighton M. Litton; James W. Raich; Michael G. Ryan

    2007-01-01

    Carbon allocation plays a critical role in forest ecosystem carbon cycling. We reviewed existing literature and compiled annual carbon budgets for forest ecosystems to test a series of hypotheses addressing the patterns, plasticity, and limits of three components of allocation: biomass, the amount of material present; flux, the flow of carbon to a component per unit...

  1. Health screenings for women ages 18 to 39

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health maintenance visit - women - ages 18 to 39; Physical exam - women - ages 18 to 39; Yearly exam - ... 39; Checkup - women - ages 18 to 39; Women's health - ages 18 to 39; Preventive care - women - ages ...

  2. Health screenings for men ages 18 to 39

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health maintenance visit - men - ages 18 to 39; Physical exam - men - ages 18 to 39; Yearly exam - ... 39; Checkup - men - ages 18 to 39; Men's health - ages 18 to 39; Preventive care exam - men - ...

  3. Measurement of the activity coefficient of carbon in steels in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surville, G.

    1983-06-01

    In sodium cooled fast reactors carbon is both a carbon impurity and element of structural materials. Carbon transfert through liquid sodium can produce carburization or decarburization of structural materials. Carbon content in sodium is determined with thin foils of austenitic alloys, when equilibrium is reached thermodynamic activity of carbon in sodium is deduced from carbon activity in alloys. Studied alloys are FeMn 20%, FeNi 30%, Z2CN 18-10 and Z3CND17-13. Carbon activity of alloys in sodium was between 5.10 -3 and 10 -1 at 600 and 650 0 C. Calibration was obtained with the alloys FeNi 30% in gaseous mixtures He-CO-CO 2 of known activity [fr

  4. Carbon isotope fractionation between amorphous calcium carbonate and calcite in earthworm-produced calcium carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Versteegh, E.A.A.; Black, S.; Hodson, M.E.

    2017-01-01

    In this study we investigate carbon isotope fractionation during the crystallization of biogenic calcium carbonate. Several species of earthworm including Lumbricus terrestris secrete CaCO_3. Initially a milky fluid comprising micro-spherules of amorphous CaCO_3 (ACC) is secreted into pouches of the earthworm calciferous gland. The micro-spherules coalesce and crystalize to form millimetre scale granules, largely comprising calcite. These are secreted into the earthworm intestine and from there into the soil. L. terrestris were cultured for 28 days in two different soils, moistened with three different mineral waters at 10, 16 and 20 °C. The milky fluid in the calciferous glands, granules in the pouches of the calciferous glands and granules excreted into the soil were collected and analysed by FTIR spectroscopy to determine the form of CaCO_3 present and by IRMS to determine δ"1"3C values. The milky fluid was ACC. Granules removed from the pouches and soil were largely calcite; the granules removed from the pouches contained more residual ACC than those recovered from the soil. The δ"1"3C values of milky fluid and pouch granules became significantly more negative with increasing temperature (p ≤ 0.001). For samples from each temperature treatment, δ"1"3C values became significantly (p ≤ 0.001) more negative from the milky fluid to the pouch granules to the soil granules (−13.77, −14.69 and −15.00 respectively at 10 °C; −14.37, −15.07 and −15.18 respectively at 16 °C and −14.89, −15.41 and −15.65 respectively at 20 °C). Fractionation of C isotopes occurred as the ACC recrystallized to form calcite with the fractionation factor ε_c_a_l_c_i_t_e_-_A_C_C = −1.20 ± 0.52‰. This is consistent with the crystallization involving dissolution and reprecipitation rather than a solid state rearrangement. Although C isotopic fractionation has previously been described between different species of dissolved inorganic carbon

  5. Long-circulating liposomes radiolabeled with [18F]fluorodipalmitin ([18F]FDP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marik, Jan; Tartis, Michaelann S.; Zhang, Hua; Fung, Jennifer Y.; Kheirolomoom, Azadeh; Sutcliffe, Julie L.; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2007-01-01

    Synthesis of a radiolabeled diglyceride, 3-[ 18 F]fluoro-1,2-dipalmitoylglycerol [[ 18 F]fluorodipalmitin ([ 18 F]FDP)], and its potential as a reagent for radiolabeling long-circulating liposomes were investigated. The incorporation of 18 F into the lipid molecule was accomplished by nucleophilic substitution of the p-toluenesulfonyl moiety with a decay-corrected yield of 43±10% (n=12). Radiolabeled, long-circulating polyethylene-glycol-coated liposomes were prepared using a mixture of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, cholesterol, 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N- [methoxy(polyethyleneglycol)-2000] ammonium salt (61:30:9) and [ 18 F]FDP with a decay-corrected yield of 70±8% (n=4). PET imaging and biodistribution studies were performed with free [ 18 F]FDP and liposome-incorporated [ 18 F]FDP. Freely injected [ 18 F]FDP had the highest uptake in the liver, spleen and lungs. Liposomal [ 18 F]FDP remained in blood circulation at near-constant levels for at least 90 min, with a peak concentration near 2.5%ID/cc. Since [ 18 F]FDP was incorporated into the phospholipid bilayer, it could potentially be used for radiolabeling a variety of lipid-based drug carriers

  6. Effect of sulfur and Nano- carbon black on the mechanical properties of hard rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Hamza Al-Maamori

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve the properties of hard rubber(Ebonite from natural rubber, added Nano-Carbon black, where measured the properties of tensile, density, hardness and the properties of the vulcanization of a group of samples with different amount of sulfur from 18-36 pphr and different of carbon black (18-26-30 pphr. The results showed that the best carbon black ratio is 30 pphr, where it gives a balance between tensile properties of hand and toughness and flexibility of on the other hand and reduce brittleness in hard rubber.

  7. Elevated levels of circulating IL-18BP and perturbed regulation of IL-18 in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palladino Ilaria

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pleiotropic pro-inflammatory cytokine Interleukin (IL-18 has been proposed to play a role in schizophrenia, since elevated circulating levels of its protein and altered frequencies of genetic variants in its molecular system are reported in schizophrenic patients. Methods We analyzed 77 patients with schizophrenia diagnosis (SCZ and 77 healthy control subjects (HC for serum concentration of both IL-18 and its natural inhibitor, the IL-18 binding protein (IL-18BP. Results We confirmed that serum levels of total IL-18 are significantly increased in SCZ, as compared to HC. However, due to a highly significant increase in levels of circulating IL-18BP in SCZ, as compared to HC, the levels of free, bioactive IL-18 are not significantly different between the two groups. In addition, the relationships between the levels of IL-18 and its inhibitor, as well as between the two molecules and age appear dissimilar for SCZ and HC. In particular, the elevated levels of IL-18BP, likely a consequence of the body’s attempt to counteract the early prominent inflammation which characterizes schizophrenia, are maintained in earlier and later stages of the disease. However, the IL-18BP elevation appears ineffective to balance the IL-18 system in younger SCZ patients, while in older patients the levels of circulating bioactive IL-18 are comparable to those of HC, if not lower. Conclusions In conclusion, these findings indicate that the IL-18 system is perturbed in schizophrenia, supporting the idea that this pro-inflammatory cytokine might be part of a pathway of genetic and environmental components for vulnerability to the disease.

  8. Sickly slaves, soldiers and sailors. Contextualising the Cape's 18th–19th century Green Point burials through isotope investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mbeki, Linda; Kootker, Lisette M.; Kars, Henk; Davies, Gareth R.

    2017-01-01

    Strontium isotope data of multiple dental enamel samples, and carbon and nitrogen isotope data of dentine and bone collagen samples from 27 individuals excavated from the mid-18th to mid-19th century Victoria & Albert Marina Residence paupers burial ground in the vicinity of Green Point, Cape Town,

  9. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Mishra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Carbon monoxide is known as the silent killer, being colorless, odourless, and tasteless. Initially non-irritating, it is very difficult for people to detect Carbon monoxide is a product of incomplete combustion of organic matter due to insufficient oxygen supply that prevents complete oxidation of carbon to C02. During World War II, Nazis used gas vans to kill an estimated over 700,000 prisoners by carbon monoxide poisoning. This method was also used in the gas chambers ofseveral death camps. The true number of incidents of carbon monoxide poisoning is unknown, since many non-lethal exposures go undetected From the available data, carbon monoxide poisoning is the most common cause of injury and death due to poisoning worldwide. Clinical features and management: The signs of carbon monoxide poisoning vary with concentration and length of exposure. Subtle cardiovascular or neurobehavioural effects occur at low concentration. The onset of chronic poisoning is usually insidious and easily mistaken for viral prodrome, depression, or gastroenteritis in children. The classic sign of carbon monoxide poisoning which is actually more often seen in the dead than the living is appearing red-cheeked and healthy. Cherry pink colour develops in nails, skin and mucosa. In acute poisoning, common abnormalities of posture and tone are cogwheel rigidity, opisthotonus, spasticity or flaccidity and seizures. Retinal haemorrhages and the classic cherry red skin colour are seldom seen. Different people andpopulations may have different carbon monoxide tolerance levels. On average, exposures at 100ppm or greater is dangerous to human health. Treatment and prevention: The mainstay of treatment is 100% oxygen administration until the COHb level is normal When the patient is stable enough to be transported, hyperbaric oxygen (HBOT should be considered This treatment is safe and well tolerated Public education about the danger of carbon monoxide, with

  10. Interleukin-18 impairs the pulmonary host response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultz, Marc J.; Knapp, Sylvia; Florquin, Sandrine; Pater, Jennie; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Akira, Shizuo; van der Poll, Tom

    2003-01-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a potent cytokine with many different proinflammatory activities. To study the role of IL-18 in the pathogenesis of Pseudomonas pneumonia, IL-18-deficient (IL-18(-/-)) and wild-type mice were intranasally inoculated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. IL-18 deficiency was

  11. Genetics Home Reference: distal 18q deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 18q deletion syndrome chromosome 18q monosomy chromosome 18q- syndrome De Grouchy syndrome del(18q) syndrome monosomy 18q Related Information How ... MS, Tienari PJ, Wirtavuori KO, Valanne LK. 18q-syndrome: brain MRI shows poor differentiation of gray and white matter on ... RL, Hale DE, Rose SR, Leach RJ, Cody JD. The spectrum ...

  12. Nanoporous metal-carbon composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Satcher, Joe; Kucheyev, Sergei; Charnvanichborikarn, Supakit; Colvin, Jeffrey; Felter, Thomas; Kim, Sangil; Merrill, Matthew; Orme, Christine

    2017-12-19

    Described here is a metal-carbon composite, comprising (a) a porous three-dimensional scaffold comprising one or more of carbon nanotubes, graphene and graphene oxide, and (b) metal nanoparticles disposed on said porous scaffold, wherein the metal-carbon composite has a density of 1 g/cm.sup.3 or less, and wherein the metal nanoparticles account for 1 wt. % or more of the metal-carbon composite. Also described are methods for making the metal-carbon composite.

  13. Carbon-cluster mass calibration at SHIPTRAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhuri, Ankur

    2007-01-01

    A carbon-cluster ion source has been installed and tested at SHIPTRAP, the Penning-trap mass spectrometer for mass measurements of heavy elements at GSI/Darmstadt, Germany. A precision mass determination is carried out by measuring the ion cyclotron frequency ω c =qB=m, where q/m is the charge-to-mass ratio of the ion and B is the magnetic field. The mass of the ion of interest is obtained from the comparison of its cyclotron frequency ω c with that of a well-known reference ion. Carbon clusters are the mass reference of choice since the unified atomic mass unit is defined as 1/12 of the mass of the 12 C atom. Thus the masses of carbon clusters 12 C n , n=1,2,3,.. are multiples of the unified atomic mass unit. Carbon-cluster ions 12 C n + , 5≤n≤23, were produced by laser-induced desorption and ionization from a carbon sample. Carbon clusters of various sizes ( 12 C 7 + , 12 C 9 + , 12 C 10 + , 12 C 11 + , 12 C 12 + , 12 C 15 + , 12 C 18 + , 12 C 19 + , 12 C 20 + ) were used for an investigation of the accuracy of SHIPTRAP covering a mass range from 84 u to 240 u. To this end the clusters were used both as ions of interest and reference ions. Hence the true values of the frequency ratios are exactly known. The mass-dependent uncertainty was found to be negligible for the case of (m-m ref ) -8 was revealed. In addition, carbon clusters were employed for the first time as reference ions in an on-line studies of short-lived nuclei. Absolute mass measurements of the radionuclides 144 Dy, 146 Dy and 147 Ho were performed using 12 C 11 + as reference ion. The results agree with measurements during the same run using 85 Rb + as reference ion. The investigated radionuclides were produced in the fusion-evaporation reaction 92 Mo( 58 Ni,xpyn) at SHIP (Separator for Heavy Ion reaction Products) at GSI. Among the measured nuclei 147 Ho has the lowest half life (5.8 s). A relative mass uncertainty of 5 x 10 -8 was obtained from the mass measurements using carbon clusters

  14. Stable Oxygen-18 and Deuterium Isotopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Sascha

    The application of stable Oxygen-18 (18O) and Deuterium (2H) isotopes, as a tracer for fluxes between different compartments of the water cycle was subject of the present PhD-thesis. During a three year period, temporal data from a wide range of water cycle constituents was collected from...... the Skjern River catchment, Denmark. The presented applications focused on studying the isotopic 'input signal' to the hydrosphere in the form of precipitation, the isotopic 'output signal' with its related dynamic processes at a coastal saltwater-freshwater interface (groundwater isotopes) and the temporal...... development within a given lowland headwater catchment (stream water isotopes). Based on our investigations on the precipitation isotopic composition a local meteoric water line (LMWL) was constructed and expressed as: δ2H=7.4 δ18O + 5.36‰. Moreover, we showed that under maritime temperature climate influence...

  15. Carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating for carbon/carbon composites: Microstructure and biocompatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Leilei, E-mail: zhangleilei1121@aliyun.com; Li, Hejun; Li, Kezhi; Zhang, Shouyang; Lu, Jinhua; Li, Wei; Cao, Sheng; Wang, Bin

    2013-12-01

    To improve the surface biocompatibility of carbon/carbon composites, a carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating was applied using a combination method of slurry procedure and ultrasound-assisted electrochemical deposition procedure. The morphology, microstructure and chemical composition of the coating were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The biocompatibility of the carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating was investigated by osteoblast-like MG63 cell culture tests. The results showed that the carbon foam could provide a large number of pores on the surface of carbon/carbon composites. The hydroxyapatite crystals could infiltrate into the pores and form the carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating. The coating covered the carbon/carbon composites fully and uniformly with slice morphology. The cell response tests showed that the MG63 cells on carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating had a better cell adhesion and cell proliferation than those on uncoated carbon/carbon composites. The carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coatings were cytocompatible and were beneficial to improve the biocompatibility. The approach presented here may be exploited for fabrication of carbon/carbon composite implant surfaces.

  16. Carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating for carbon/carbon composites: Microstructure and biocompatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Leilei; Li, Hejun; Li, Kezhi; Zhang, Shouyang; Lu, Jinhua; Li, Wei; Cao, Sheng; Wang, Bin

    2013-01-01

    To improve the surface biocompatibility of carbon/carbon composites, a carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating was applied using a combination method of slurry procedure and ultrasound-assisted electrochemical deposition procedure. The morphology, microstructure and chemical composition of the coating were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The biocompatibility of the carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating was investigated by osteoblast-like MG63 cell culture tests. The results showed that the carbon foam could provide a large number of pores on the surface of carbon/carbon composites. The hydroxyapatite crystals could infiltrate into the pores and form the carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating. The coating covered the carbon/carbon composites fully and uniformly with slice morphology. The cell response tests showed that the MG63 cells on carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating had a better cell adhesion and cell proliferation than those on uncoated carbon/carbon composites. The carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coatings were cytocompatible and were beneficial to improve the biocompatibility. The approach presented here may be exploited for fabrication of carbon/carbon composite implant surfaces.

  17. Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth J. Nemeth

    2006-08-30

    The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership's (SECARB) Phase I program focused on promoting the development of a framework and infrastructure necessary for the validation and commercial deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. The SECARB program, and its subsequent phases, directly support the Global Climate Change Initiative's goal of reducing greenhouse gas intensity by 18 percent by the year 2012. Work during the project's two-year period was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix''. The SECARB team was successful in accomplishing its tasks to define the geographic boundaries of the region; characterize the region; identify and address issues for technology deployment; develop public involvement and education mechanisms; identify the most promising capture, sequestration, and transport options; and prepare action plans for implementation and technology validation activity. Milestones accomplished during Phase I of the project are listed below: (1) Completed preliminary identification of geographic boundaries for the study (FY04, Quarter 1); (2) Completed initial inventory of major sources and sinks for the region (FY04, Quarter 2); (3) Completed initial development of plans for GIS (FY04, Quarter 3); (4) Completed preliminary action plan and assessment for overcoming public perception issues (FY04, Quarter 4); (5) Assessed safety, regulatory and permitting issues (FY05, Quarter 1); (6) Finalized inventory of major sources/sinks and refined GIS algorithms (FY05, Quarter 2); (7) Refined public involvement and education mechanisms in support of technology development options (FY05, Quarter 3); and (8) Identified the most promising capture, sequestration and transport options and prepared action plans (FY05, Quarter 4).

  18. Global carbon inequality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubacek, Klaus [University of Maryland, Department of Geographical Sciences, College Park, MD (United States); Masaryk University, Department of Environmental Studies, Brno (Czech Republic); Baiocchi, Giovanni [University of Maryland, Department of Geographical Sciences, College Park, MD (United States); University of Maryland, Department of Economics, College Park, MD (United States); Feng, Kuishuang [University of Maryland, Department of Geographical Sciences, College Park, MD (United States); Munoz Castillo, Raul [University of Maryland, Department of Geographical Sciences, College Park, MD (United States); Interamerican Development Bank, Washington, DC (United States); Sun, Laixiang [University of Maryland, Department of Geographical Sciences, College Park, MD (United States); SOAS, University of London, London (United Kingdom); International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), Laxenburg (Austria); Xue, Jinjun [Nagoya University, Graduate School of Economics, Nagoya (Japan); Hubei University of Economics, Wuhan (China)

    2017-12-01

    Global climate change and inequality are inescapably linked both in terms of who contributes climate change and who suffers the consequences. This fact is also partly reflected in two United Nations (UN) processes: on the one hand, the Paris Agreement of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change under which countries agreed to hold the increase in the global average temperature to below 2 C above pre-industrial levels and, on the other hand, the UN's Sustainable Development Goals aiming to end poverty. These agreements are seen as important foundation to put the world nations on a sustainable pathway. However, how these agreements can be achieved or whether they are even mutually compatible is less clear. We explore the global carbon inequality between and within countries and the carbon implications of poverty alleviation by combining detailed consumer expenditure surveys for different income categories for a wide range of countries with an environmentally extended multi-regional input-output approach to estimate carbon footprints of different household groups, globally, and assess the carbon implications of moving the poorest people out of poverty. Given the current context, increasing income leads to increasing carbon footprints and makes global targets for mitigating greenhouse gases more difficult to achieve given the pace of technological progress and current levels of fossil fuel dependence. We conclude that the huge level of carbon inequality requires a critical discussion of undifferentiated income growth. Current carbon-intensive lifestyles and consumption patterns need to enter the climate discourse to a larger extent. (orig.)

  19. Carbon-14 waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, R.P.

    1984-01-01

    As part of their research programme on Radioactive Waste Management, the Commission of the European Communities has provided financial support for a detailed study of wastes containing 14 C and the options for their management. The main results of this study are outlined. Carbon-14 is formed by neutron activation reactions in core materials and is therefore present in a variety of waste streams both at reactors and at reprocessing plants. Data on the production and release of 14 C from various reactor systems are presented. A possible management strategy for 14 C might be reduction of 14 N impurity levels in core materials, but only reductions of about a factor of five in arisings could be achieved in this way. The key problem in 14 C management is its retention in off-gas streams, particularly in the dissolver off-gas stream at reprocessing plants. In this stream the nuclide is present as carbon dioxide and is extensively isotopically diluted by the carbon dioxide content of the air. Processes for trapping 14 C from these off-gases must be integrated with the other processes in the overall off-gas treatment system, and should provide for conversion to a stable solid compound of carbon, suitable for subsequent immobilization and disposal. Three trapping processes that convert carbon dioxide into insoluble carbonates can be identified: the double alkali (NaOH/Ca(OH) 2 ) process, the direct calcium hydroxide slurry process, and the barium ocathydrate gas/solid process. Calcium or barium carbonates, produced in the above processes, could probably be incorporated into satisfactory immobilized waste forms. However, the stability of such waste forms to prolonged irradiation and to leaching remains to be investigated. (author)

  20. Carbon dioxide and climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    Global climate change is a serious environmental concern, and the US has developed ''An Action Agenda'' to deal with it. At the heart of the US effort is the US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP), which has been developed by the Committee on Earth and Environmental Sciences (CEES) of the Federal Coordinating Council for Sciences, Engineering, and Technology (FCCSET). The USGCRP will provide the scientific basis for sound policy making on the climate-change issue. The DOE contribution to the USGCRP is the Carbon Dioxide Research Program, which now places particular emphasis on the rapid improvement of the capability to predict global and regional climate change. DOE's Carbon Dioxide Research Program has been addressing the carbon dioxide-climate change connection for more than twelve years and has provided a solid scientific foundation for the USGCRP. The expansion of the DOE effort reflects the increased attention that the Department has placed on the issue and is reflected in the National Energy Strategy (NES) that was released in 1991. This Program Summary describes projects funded by the Carbon Dioxide Research Program during FY 1991 and gives a brief overview of objectives, organization, and accomplishments. The Environmental Sciences Division of the Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research supports a Carbon Dioxide Research Program to determine the scientific linkage between the rise of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, especially carbon dioxide, and climate and vegetation change. One facet is the Core CO 2 Program, a pioneering program that DOE established more than 10 years ago to understand and predict the ways that fossil-fuel burning could affect atmospheric CO 2 concentration, global climate, and the Earth's biosphere. Major research areas are: global carbon cycle; climate detection and models of climate change; vegetation research; resource analysis; and, information and integration

  1. Enriched Water-H2 18O Purification to be Used in Routine 18FDG Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Rayyes, A.H.

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen-18 enriched water has been recovered from IBA (Ion Beam Applications) recovery system followed by purification and then used in the production of 18 F-. The purification process has been carried out by irradiation with UV followed by a distillation under vacuum. After purification, 95% of water is recovered and organic compounds, radioisotopes, trace metals and gases are eliminated efficiently. Results show that there are no significant differences in (2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoro-D-glucose ([ 18 F]FDG) production yield using purified water by the proposed method and new enriched water. Tritium was detected in the irradiated enriched water. Contamination precautions during purification should be considered. Tritium was not present in 18 FDG or Na- 18 F final products. (author)

  2. Measurement of carbon capture efficiency and stored carbon leakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Ralph F.; Dubey, Manvendra K.

    2013-01-29

    Data representative of a measured carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) concentration and of a measured oxygen (O.sub.2) concentration at a measurement location can be used to determine whether the measured carbon dioxide concentration at the measurement location is elevated relative to a baseline carbon dioxide concentration due to escape of carbon dioxide from a source associated with a carbon capture and storage process. Optionally, the data can be used to quantify a carbon dioxide concentration increase at the first location that is attributable to escape of carbon dioxide from the source and to calculate a rate of escape of carbon dioxide from the source by executing a model of gas-phase transport using at least the first carbon dioxide concentration increase. Related systems, methods, and articles of manufacture are also described.

  3. Prenatal Exposure to Carbon Black (Printex 90)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Petra; Vogel, Ulla; Wallin, Håkan

    2011-01-01

    Maternal pulmonary exposure to ultrafine particles during pregnancy may affect the health of the child. Developmental toxicity of carbon black (Printex 90) nanoparticles was evaluated in a mouse model. Time-mated mice were intratracheally instilled with Printex 90 dispersed in Millipore water on ...... on gestation days (GD) 7, 10, 15 and 18, with total doses of 11, 54 and 268 mu g Printex 90/animal. The female offspring prenatally exposed to 268 mu g Printex 90/animal displayed altered habituation pattern during the Open field test....

  4. Syntheses of F-18 Labeled Fluoroalkyltyrosine Derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Byung Seok; Lee, Kyo Chul; Yang, Seung Dae; Chun, Kwon Soo [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chi, Dae Yoon [Inha Univ., Inchon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) offers the highest resolution of all nuclear medicine imaging modalities and allows quantitation of tracer concentration in tissues. For more than 60 years, some of C-11 or F-18 labeled amino acids have been synthesized and evaluated for potential use in oncology, neurology and psychiatric disorders. Besides, a variety of radioisotope labeled amino acids have proven to be useful for imaging tumors, especially for brain tumor, lung tumor and breast tumor. These amino acids can be subdivided into two categories. The first category is represented by radiolabled naturally occurring amino acids and structurally similar analogues. Although these radiolabeled amino acids have proven useful in detecting brain and systemic tumors, it is susceptible to in vivo metabolism through multiple pathways that give rise to numerous radiolabled metabolites. On the other side, structurally similar amino acid analogues have some significant advantages over the natural amino acids. These nonnatural amino acids are not metabolized, which simplifieds the kinetic analysis of their uptake. On the basis of the promising results obtained with these nonnatural amino acids in preclinical studies, recent efforts have focused on the development of new F-18 labeled nonnatural amino acids. Recently, O-(2-[{sup 18}F]Fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET), O-(3-[{sup 18}F]Fluoropropyl)-L-tyrosine (FPT) were developed and evaluated among structurally similar to a new amino acid analogue. FET has shown high uptake in activated inflammatory cells using an experimental acute abscess model and in inflammation within lymph nodes. FPT was superior to FDG and had a slight advantage over FET in the differentiation of tumor from inflammation, and, like FET, it appeared to be a potential amino acid tracer for tumor imaging with PET. In this paper, we elected to introduce fluoroethyl and fluoropropyl groups at the R{sub 1} positions and OCH{sub 3} at R{sub 2} position to the same effect

  5. Syntheses of F-18 Labeled Fluoroalkyltyrosine Derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Byung Seok; Lee, Kyo Chul; Yang, Seung Dae; Chun, Kwon Soo; Chi, Dae Yoon

    2005-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) offers the highest resolution of all nuclear medicine imaging modalities and allows quantitation of tracer concentration in tissues. For more than 60 years, some of C-11 or F-18 labeled amino acids have been synthesized and evaluated for potential use in oncology, neurology and psychiatric disorders. Besides, a variety of radioisotope labeled amino acids have proven to be useful for imaging tumors, especially for brain tumor, lung tumor and breast tumor. These amino acids can be subdivided into two categories. The first category is represented by radiolabled naturally occurring amino acids and structurally similar analogues. Although these radiolabeled amino acids have proven useful in detecting brain and systemic tumors, it is susceptible to in vivo metabolism through multiple pathways that give rise to numerous radiolabled metabolites. On the other side, structurally similar amino acid analogues have some significant advantages over the natural amino acids. These nonnatural amino acids are not metabolized, which simplifieds the kinetic analysis of their uptake. On the basis of the promising results obtained with these nonnatural amino acids in preclinical studies, recent efforts have focused on the development of new F-18 labeled nonnatural amino acids. Recently, O-(2-[ 18 F]Fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET), O-(3-[ 18 F]Fluoropropyl)-L-tyrosine (FPT) were developed and evaluated among structurally similar to a new amino acid analogue. FET has shown high uptake in activated inflammatory cells using an experimental acute abscess model and in inflammation within lymph nodes. FPT was superior to FDG and had a slight advantage over FET in the differentiation of tumor from inflammation, and, like FET, it appeared to be a potential amino acid tracer for tumor imaging with PET. In this paper, we elected to introduce fluoroethyl and fluoropropyl groups at the R 1 positions and OCH 3 at R 2 position to the same effect of FET. Herein, we wish

  6. Synthesis and evaluation of [[sup 18]F]fluoroprogestins and [[sup 18]F]fluorometoprolol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Groot, T J

    1993-05-01

    The author investigated if specific radioactively labelled compounds could be applied to gain insight into particular psychic diseases, f.e. Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia, by means of Positron Emission Tomography (PET). No appropriate compounds were found. In this thesis the syntheses of fluorine-18 labelled progestins and [beta][sub 1]-adrenergic ligands are described. Three approaches towards [[sup 18]F]fluorination are investigated. The first method concerns direct S[sub N]2-substitution, the second approach is the opening of an epoxide, and the third approach is [[sup 18]F]fluoroalkylation. The positron emitting radionuclide fluorine-18 was used because of its relatively long decay time and the possibility to produce it in high yields and with high specific activity. The target systems which were applied for the production of fluorine-18 are described in chapter two. Important chemical and physical aspects of [[sup 18]F]fluoride are reviewed in the same chapter. In chapter three the synthesis of 21-[[sup 18]F]fluorinated progestins is discussed. The synthesis of four 21-[[sup 18]F]fluoroprogesterone derivatives is described and the results of an in vivo evaluation of two of these ligands are discussed. Possible routes leading to 6[alpha]-[[sup 18]F]fluoroprogestins are presented in chapter four. The radiochemical approaches towards the synthesis of these ligands are discussed. In chapter five the proposed routes to the fluorine-18 labelled [beta][sub 1]-adrenergic ligands are described and evaluated in the synthesis of two model compounds. 1-[[sup 18]F]fluorometoprolol, the [[sup 18]F]fluorinated analogue of a potent beta-blocker, is prepared using one of the investigated methods. The biological effect of fluorine substitution of a [beta][sub 1]-adrenergic ligand is discussed on the basis of an in vitro and in vivo evaluation. 21 figs., 28 schemes, 19 tabs., 182 refs.

  7. Gridding Global δ 18Owater and Interpreting Core Top δ 18Oforam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrande, A. N.; Schmidt, G.

    2004-05-01

    Estimations of the oxygen isotope ratio in seawater (δ 18O water) traditionally have relied on regional δ 18O water to salinity relationships to convert seawater salinity into δ 18O water. This indirect method of determining δ 18O water is necessary since ?18Owater measurements are relatively sparse. We improve upon this process by constructing local δ 18O water to salinity curves using the Schmidt et al. (1999) global database of δ 18O water and salinity. We calculate local δ 18O water to salinity relationship on a 1x1 grid based on the closest database points to each grid box. Each ocean basin is analyzed separately, and each curve is processed to exclude outliers. These local relationships in combination with seawater salinity (Levitus, 1994) allow us to construct a global map of δ 18O water on a 1x1 grid. We combine seawater temperature (Levitus, 1994) with this dataset to predict δ 18O calcite on a 1x1 grid. These predicted values are then compared to previous compilations of core top δ 18O foram data for individual species of foraminifera. This comparison provides insight into the calcification habitats (as inferred by seawater temperature and salinity) of these species. Additionally, we compare the 1x1 grid of δ 18O water to preliminary output from the latest GISS coupled Atmosphere/Ocean GCM that tracks water isotopes through the hydrologic cycle. This comparison provides insight into possible model applications as a tool to aid in interpreting paleo-isotope data.

  8. Microstructure and surface properties of lignocellulosic-based activated carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    González-García, P.; Centeno, T.A.; Urones-Garrote, E.; Ávila-Brande, D.; Otero-Díaz, L.C.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Activated carbons were produced by KOH activation at 700 °C. ► The observed nanostructure consists of highly disordered graphene–like layers with sp 2 bond content ≈ 95%. ► Textural parameters show high surface area (≈ 1000 m 2 /g) and pore width of 1.3–1.8 nm. ► Specific capacitance reaches values as high as 161 F/g. - Abstract: Low cost activated carbons have been produced via chemical activation, by using KOH at 700 °C, from the bamboo species Guadua Angustifolia and Bambusa Vulgaris Striata and the residues from shells of the fruits of Castanea Sativa and Juglans Regia as carbon precursors. The scanning electron microscopy micrographs show the conservation of the precursor shape in the case of the Guadua Angustifolia and Bambusa Vulgaris Striata activated carbons. Transmission electron microscopy analyses reveal that these materials consist of carbon platelet–like particles with variable length and thickness, formed by highly disordered graphene–like layers with sp 2 content ≈ 95% and average mass density of 1.65 g/cm 3 (25% below standard graphite). Textural parameters indicate a high porosity development with surface areas ranging from 850 to 1100 m 2 /g and average pore width centered in the supermicropores range (1.3–1.8 nm). The electrochemical performance of the activated carbons shows specific capacitance values at low current density (1 mA/cm 2 ) as high as 161 F/g in the Juglans Regia activated carbon, as a result of its textural parameters and the presence of pseudocapacitance derived from surface oxygenated acidic groups (mainly quinones and ethers) identified in this activated carbon.

  9. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE PARTIALLY PURIFIED PLANTARCIN SR18 PRODUCED BY LACTOBACILLUS PLANTARUM SR18

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagih El-Shouny

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The bacteriocin bound to the cells and that secreted into the culture filtrate of Lactobacillus plantarum SR18 were precipitated by 75% ammomium sulphate, dialysed and further purified by Gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. Bacteriocins were purified from proteins bound to the cell of L. plantarum SR18 (plantarcin SR18 a and culture filtrate proteins (plantarcin SR18 b, respectively. The SDS-PAGE of partially purified Plantarcin SR18a showed a molecular weight of 3.5 KDa. While, plantarcin SR18 b had a molecular weight of 10.3 KDa. The antibacterial activity of the tested plantarcin SR18 preparations suffered no measurable loss after 45 min at 80ºC. Whereas, At 100ºC, significant decrease in the activity of bacteriocin preparations (60- 80 % took place by the end of 45 min. At pH ranged from 5-8, the activity of the plantarcin SR18 preparations suffered no measurable loss. Dissociating agents significantly affected the bacteriocin activity. Thus, tween 80 and mercaptoethanol increased the activity of bacteriocin preparations to 1.2-1.4 fold. Sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS increased the activity of the tested bacteriocin preparations by about 20%.The lowest residual activity (60% was recorded after treatment with Triton X100 for 45 min. Protease completely inhibited the activities of all forms of plantarcin SR18 after 45 min at 37ºC.

  10. Adipose tissue interleukin-18 mRNA and plasma interleukin-18: effect of obesity and exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leick, Lotte; Lindegaard, Birgitte; Stensvold, Dorthe

    2007-01-01

    resistance was tested. Furthermore, we speculated that acute exercise and exercise training would regulate AT IL-18 mRNA expression. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: Non-obese subjects with BMI women: n = 18; men; n = 11) and obese subjects with BMI >30 kg/m(2) (women: n = 6; men: n = 7...... of regular physical activity with improved insulin sensitivity.......OBJECTIVES: Obesity and a physically inactive lifestyle are associated with increased risk of developing insulin resistance. The hypothesis that obesity is associated with increased adipose tissue (AT) interleukin (IL)-18 mRNA expression and that AT IL-18 mRNA expression is related to insulin...

  11. [Plasma IL-18 levels are related to insulin and are modulated by IL-18 gene polymorphisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Hervas, Sergio; Martínez-Barquero, Vanesa; Nuñez Savall, Ester; Lendínez, Verónica; Olivares, Laura; Benito, Esther; Real, Jose T; Chaves, F Javier; Ascaso, Juan F

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory chronic disease influenced by multiple factors. Different prospective studies have shown that plasmatic levels of inflammatory markers were related to atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. To evaluate whether plasmatic levels of interleukin 18 (IL-18) are modulated by SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) of the IL 18 gene and its possible association with insulin levels and other cardiovascular risk factors. 746 individuals were studied for a period of two years by opportunistic selection in the metropolitan area of Valencia. Parameters of lipid and glucose metabolism were analyzed by standard methodology. IL-18 was measured by ELISA. Individuals with insulin resistance showed significant higher levels of IL-18. IL 18 was significantly correlated with insulin levels and other cardiovascular risk factors. The CC genotype of the rs1834481 SNP was significantly associated with lower levels of IL-18. However, the GG genotype of the rs7559479 was associated with significant higher levels of IL-18. IL-18 is associated with insulin resistance and other cardiovascular risk factors, being those levels genetically regulated. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  12. Elemental and isotopic (C, O, Sr, Nd) compositions of Late Paleozoic carbonated eclogite and marble from the SW Tianshan UHP belt, NW China: Implications for deep carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianjiang; Zhang, Lifei; Lü, Zeng; Bader, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    Subduction zones are important for understanding of the global carbon cycle from the surface to deep part of the mantle. The processes involved the metamorphism of carbonate-bearing rocks largely control the fate of carbon and contribute to local carbon isotopic heterogeneities of the mantle. In this study, we present petrological and geochemical results for marbles and carbonated eclogites in the Southwestern Tianshan UHP belt, NW China. Marbles are interlayered with coesite-bearing pelitic schists, and have Sr-Nd isotopic values (εNd (T=320Ma) = -3.7 to -8.9, 87Sr/86Sr (i) = 0.7084-0.7089), typical of marine carbonates. The marbles have dispersed low δ18OVSMOW values (ranging from 14 to 29‰) and unaffected carbon isotope (δ13CVPDB = -0.2-3.6‰), possibly due to infiltration of external H2O-rich fluids. Recycling of these marbles into mantle may play a key role in the carbon budget and contributed to the mantle carbon isotope heterogeneity. The carbonated eclogites have high Sr isotopic compositions (87Sr/86Sr (i) = 0.7077-0.7082) and positive εNd (T = 320 Ma) values (from 7.6 to 8.2), indicative of strong seafloor alteration of their protolith. The carbonates in the carbonated eclogites are mainly dolomite (Fe# = 12-43, Fe# = Fe2+/(Fe2+ + Mg)) that were added into oceanic basalts during seafloor alteration and experienced calcite - dolomite - magnesite transformation during the subduction metamorphic process. The uniformly low δ18O values (∼11.44‰) of carbonates in the carbontaed eclogites can be explained by closed-system equilibrium between carbonate and silicate minerals. The low δ13C values (from -3.3 to -7.7‰) of the carbonated eclogites most likely reflect contribution from organic carbon. Recycling of these carbonated eclogites with C isotope similar to typical mantle reservoirs into mantle may have little effect on the mantle carbon isotope heterogeneity.

  13. Synthesis and Characterization Carbon Nanotubes Doped Carbon Aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuelong; Yan, Meifang; Liu, Zhenfa

    2017-12-01

    Polycondensation of phloroglucinol, resorcinol and formaldehyde with carbon nanotube (CNT) as the additives, using sodium carbonate as the catalyst, leads to the formation of CNT - doped carbon aerogels. The structure of carbon aerogels (CAs) with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The specific surface area, pore size distribution and pore volume were measured by surface area analyzer. The results show that when the optimum doping dosage is 5%, the specific surface area of CNT - doped carbon aerogel is up to 665 m2 g-1 and exhibit plentiful mesoporous.

  14. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2012-10-09

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  15. Carbon Fuel Particles Used in Direct Carbon Conversion Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2008-10-21

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  16. Carbon footprint estimation of municipal water cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshi, Ali A.

    2009-11-01

    planners; (2) Improved energy use reporting and conservation planning; (3) Establishment of a benchmark for GHG emissions attributed to the water and wastewater industry; (4) Ability to quantify relative impacts of building design options using carbon emission equivalents. The GIS based model was applied to the Dulles South and Brambelton regions in Loudoun County, Virginia. The GIS revealed the customer's embodied energy to be in the range of 4.41MWh/Mgal to 8.0 MWh/Mgal. The customer's carbon footprint is between 0.008 and18.0 Tons of CO2 for year 2008. The results of this study contributed to development of a standardized approach to estimate the GHG impact of a total water cycle, and provided a viable GIS tool resulting in visual maps as a decision support. It also showed the use of derived empirical formulas in predication of GHG impact for end users in a specific geographical area. The embodied energy in delivered water can be estimated using the devised model and be considered by the building sustainability ranking programs such as the USGBC LEED rating system. KEYWORDS. Water Life Cycle, Embodied Energy, Global Warming Potential, Energy Intensity, Energy Intensity Matrix, Emission Intensity, Emission Coefficient, Carbon Dioxide Emission, Water and Wastewater, Collection, Treatment and Distribution, Carbon Footprint, Topography, Municipality, Environmental Indicator, ArcGIS, LEED, GHG, ESI, LCA, LCEA, LCI, Sustainability, End Use, Potable Water

  17. Functional Traits for Carbon Access in Macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepien, Courtney C; Pfister, Catherine A; Wootton, J Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding functional trait distributions among organisms can inform impacts on and responses to environmental change. In marine systems, only 1% of dissolved inorganic carbon in seawater exists as CO2. Thus the majority of marine macrophytes not only passively access CO2 for photosynthesis, but also actively transport CO2 and the more common bicarbonate (HCO3-, 92% of seawater dissolved inorganic carbon) into their cells. Because species with these carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) are non-randomly distributed in ecosystems, we ask whether there is a phylogenetic pattern to the distribution of CCMs among algal species. To determine macrophyte traits that influence carbon uptake, we assessed 40 common macrophyte species from the rocky intertidal community of the Northeast Pacific Ocean to a) query whether macrophytes have a CCM and b) determine the evolutionary history of CCMs, using ancestral state reconstructions and stochastic character mapping based on previously published data. Thirty-two species not only depleted CO2, but also concentrated and depleted HCO3-, indicative of a CCM. While analysis of CCMs as a continuous trait in 30 families within Phylum Rhodophyta showed a significant phylogenetic signal under a Brownian motion model, analysis of CCMs as a discrete trait (presence or absence) indicated that red algal families are more divergent than expected in their CCM presence or absence; CCMs are a labile trait within the Rhodophyta. In contrast, CCMs were present in each of 18 Ochrophyta families surveyed, indicating that CCMs are highly conserved in the brown algae. The trait of CCM presence or absence was largely conserved within Families. Fifteen of 23 species tested also changed the seawater buffering capacity, or Total Alkalinity (TA), shifting DIC composition towards increasing concentrations of HCO3- and CO2 for photosynthesis. Manipulating the external TA of the local environment may influence carbon availability in boundary layers and

  18. Functional Traits for Carbon Access in Macrophytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Catherine A.; Wootton, J. Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding functional trait distributions among organisms can inform impacts on and responses to environmental change. In marine systems, only 1% of dissolved inorganic carbon in seawater exists as CO2. Thus the majority of marine macrophytes not only passively access CO2 for photosynthesis, but also actively transport CO2 and the more common bicarbonate (HCO3-, 92% of seawater dissolved inorganic carbon) into their cells. Because species with these carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) are non-randomly distributed in ecosystems, we ask whether there is a phylogenetic pattern to the distribution of CCMs among algal species. To determine macrophyte traits that influence carbon uptake, we assessed 40 common macrophyte species from the rocky intertidal community of the Northeast Pacific Ocean to a) query whether macrophytes have a CCM and b) determine the evolutionary history of CCMs, using ancestral state reconstructions and stochastic character mapping based on previously published data. Thirty-two species not only depleted CO2, but also concentrated and depleted HCO3-, indicative of a CCM. While analysis of CCMs as a continuous trait in 30 families within Phylum Rhodophyta showed a significant phylogenetic signal under a Brownian motion model, analysis of CCMs as a discrete trait (presence or absence) indicated that red algal families are more divergent than expected in their CCM presence or absence; CCMs are a labile trait within the Rhodophyta. In contrast, CCMs were present in each of 18 Ochrophyta families surveyed, indicating that CCMs are highly conserved in the brown algae. The trait of CCM presence or absence was largely conserved within Families. Fifteen of 23 species tested also changed the seawater buffering capacity, or Total Alkalinity (TA), shifting DIC composition towards increasing concentrations of HCO3- and CO2 for photosynthesis. Manipulating the external TA of the local environment may influence carbon availability in boundary layers and

  19. Yucca Mountain Area Saturated Zone Dissolved Organic Carbon Isotopic Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, James; Decker, David; Patterson, Gary; Peterman, Zell; Mihevc, Todd; Larsen, Jessica; Hershey, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Groundwater samples in the Yucca Mountain area were collected for chemical and isotopic analyses and measurements of water temperature, pH, specific conductivity, and alkalinity were obtained at the well or spring at the time of sampling. For this project, groundwater samples were analyzed for major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) performed all the fieldwork on this project including measurement of water chemistry field parameters and sample collection. The major ions dissolved in the groundwater, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were analyzed by the USGS. All preparation and processing of samples for DOC carbon isotopic analyses and geochemical modeling were performed by the Desert Research Institute (DRI). Analysis of the DOC carbon dioxide gas produced at DRI to obtain carbon-13 and carbon-14 values was conducted at the University of Arizona Accelerator Facility (a NSHE Yucca Mountain project QA qualified contract facility). The major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of DIC were used in geochemical modeling (NETPATH) to determine groundwater sources, f ow paths, mixing, and ages. The carbon isotopes of DOC were used to calculate groundwater ages that are independent of DIC model corrected carbon-14 ages. The DIC model corrected carbon-14 calculated ages were used to evaluate groundwater travel times for mixtures of water including water beneath Yucca Mountain. When possible, groundwater travel times were calculated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient sample sites. DOC carbon-14 groundwater ages were also calculated for groundwaters in the Yucca Mountain area. When possible, groundwater travel times were estimated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient groundwater sample sites using the DOC calculated

  20. 18 CFR 801.9 - Watershed management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Watershed management... GENERAL POLICIES § 801.9 Watershed management. (a) The character, extent, and quality of water resources... management including soil and water conservation measures, land restoration and rehabilitation, erosion...

  1. 18 CFR 367.5 - Accounting period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Accounting period. 367.5 Section 367.5 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... Instructions § 367.5 Accounting period. Each service company must keep its books on a monthly basis so that for...

  2. 18 CFR 367.20 - Depreciation accounting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Depreciation accounting. 367.20 Section 367.20 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... Instructions § 367.20 Depreciation accounting. (a) Method. Service companies must use a method of depreciation...

  3. 18 CFR 1312.19 - Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Report. 1312.19 Section... ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESOURCES: UNIFORM REGULATIONS § 1312.19 Report. (a) Each Federal land manager, when requested by... comply with section 13 of the Act and comprehensively report on activities carried out under provisions...

  4. 16 CFR 460.18 - Insulation ads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF HOME INSULATION § 460.18 Insulation ads. (a) If your ad gives an R-value, you must give the type of insulation and... your ad gives a price, you must give the type of insulation, the R-value at a specific thickness, the...

  5. 18 CFR 4.101 - Applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... PROJECT COSTS Exemption of Small Hydroelectric Power Projects of 5 Megawatts or Less § 4.101 Applicability... the Federal Power Act (Act), including licensing, for small hydroelectric power projects as defined in... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applicability. 4.101...

  6. Germany unveils €18bn research plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Michael

    2009-07-01

    The German government has unveiled an ambitious plan to inject a total of €18bn into teaching and research over the next decade. The German chancellor Angela Merkel, who has a degree in physics, announced that she was releasing the funds despite concerns from her social-democrat coalition partners that financing the package could be difficult in the economic downturn.

  7. SPITZER SECONDARY ECLIPSES OF WASP-18b

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nymeyer, Sarah; Harrington, Joseph; Hardy, Ryan A.; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Campo, Christopher J.; Blecic, Jasmina; Bowman, William C.; Britt, Christopher B. T.; Cubillos, Patricio; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Collier-Cameron, Andrew; Maxted, Pierre F. L.; Loredo, Thomas J.; Hellier, Coel; Anderson, David R.; Gillon, Michael; Hebb, Leslie; Wheatley, Peter J.; Pollacco, Don

    2011-01-01

    The transiting exoplanet WASP-18b was discovered in 2008 by the Wide Angle Search for Planets project. The Spitzer Exoplanet Target of Opportunity Program observed secondary eclipses of WASP-18b using Spitzer's Infrared Array Camera in the 3.6 μm and 5.8 μm bands on 2008 December 20, and in the 4.5 μm and 8.0 μm bands on 2008 December 24. We report eclipse depths of 0.30% ± 0.02%, 0.39% ± 0.02%, 0.37% ± 0.03%, 0.41% ± 0.02%, and brightness temperatures of 3100 ± 90, 3310 ± 130, 3080 ± 140, and 3120 ± 110 K in order of increasing wavelength. WASP-18b is one of the hottest planets yet discovered—as hot as an M-class star. The planet's pressure-temperature profile most likely features a thermal inversion. The observations also require WASP-18b to have near-zero albedo and almost no redistribution of energy from the day side to the night side of the planet.

  8. 18 CFR 157.37 - Project design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Project design. 157.37... Seasons for Alaska Natural Gas Transportation Projects § 157.37 Project design. In reviewing any... proposed project has been designed to accommodate the needs of shippers who have made conforming bids...

  9. 18 CFR 367.26 - Departmental classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Departmental classification. 367.26 Section 367.26 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... ACT General Instructions § 367.26 Departmental classification. Salaries and wages and all other costs...

  10. 18 CFR 401.0 - Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Introduction. 401.0 Section 401.0 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE § 401.0 Introduction. (a) The Delaware River Basin Compact...

  11. 18 CFR 806.30 - Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monitoring. 806.30... APPROVAL OF PROJECTS Terms and Conditions of Approval § 806.30 Monitoring. The Commission, as part of the project review, shall evaluate the proposed methodology for monitoring consumptive uses, water withdrawals...

  12. 18 CFR 39.11 - Reliability reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Electric Reliability Organization shall conduct assessments of the adequacy of the Bulk-Power System in... assessments as determined by the Commission of the reliability of the Bulk-Power System in North America and... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reliability reports. 39...

  13. Familial deletion 18p syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemyre Emmanuelle

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deletion 18p is a frequent deletion syndrome characterized by dysmorphic features, growth deficiencies, and mental retardation with a poorer verbal performance. Until now, five families have been described with limited clinical description. We report transmission of deletion 18p from a mother to her two daughters and review the previous cases. Case presentation The proband is 12 years old and has short stature, dysmorphic features and moderate mental retardation. Her sister is 9 years old and also has short stature and similar dysmorphic features. Her cognitive performance is within the borderline to mild mental retardation range. The mother also presents short stature. Psychological evaluation showed moderate mental retardation. Chromosome analysis from the sisters and their mother revealed the same chromosomal deletion: 46, XX, del(18(p11.2. Previous familial cases were consistent regarding the transmission of mental retardation. Our family differs in this regard with variable cognitive impairment and does not display poorer verbal than non-verbal abilities. An exclusive maternal transmission is observed throughout those families. Women with del(18p are fertile and seem to have a normal miscarriage rate. Conclusion Genetic counseling for these patients should take into account a greater range of cognitive outcome than previously reported.

  14. 5 CFR 1315.18 - Inquiries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET OMB DIRECTIVES PROMPT PAYMENT § 1315.18 Inquiries. (a..., Financial Management Service (FMS), Cash Management Policy and Planning Division, 401 14th Street, SW... Management Service (FMS) at 1-800-266-9667. This information is also available at the FMS Prompt Payment Web...

  15. 18 CFR 284.401 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Certain Sales for Resale by Non-interstate Pipelines § 284.401 Definitions. Affiliated marketer. For purposes of this subpart, an “affiliated marketer” is a person engaged in the “marketing” of natural gas... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definitions. 284.401...

  16. 18 CFR 154.307 - Joint facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Joint facilities. 154... Changes § 154.307 Joint facilities. The Statements required by § 154.312 must show all costs (investment... in the subject rate change and are associated with joint facilities. The methods used in making such...

  17. 18 CFR 1317.410 - Comparable facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Comparable facilities... facilities. A recipient may provide separate toilet, locker room, and shower facilities on the basis of sex, but such facilities provided for students of one sex shall be comparable to such facilities provided...

  18. 18 CFR 284.261 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Emergency Natural Gas Sale, Transportation, and Exchange Transactions § 284.261 Purpose. This subpart... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose. 284.261 Section 284.261 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT...

  19. 18 CFR 284.271 - Waiver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Emergency Natural Gas Sale, Transportation, and Exchange Transactions § 284.271 Waiver. The Commission may... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Waiver. 284.271 Section 284.271 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  20. 18 CFR 358.3 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...; and natural gas transportation, storage, exchange, backhaul, or displacement service provided pursuant... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definitions. 358.3 Section 358.3 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT...

  1. 7 CFR 926.18 - Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DATA COLLECTION, REPORTING AND RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.18 Records. Each...

  2. 18 CFR 301.1 - Applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applicability. 301.1 Section 301.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS FOR FEDERAL POWER MARKETING ADMINISTRATIONS AVERAGE SYSTEM COST METHODOLOGY FOR...

  3. 18 CFR 292.306 - Interconnection costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Interconnection costs... § 292.306 Interconnection costs. (a) Obligation to pay. Each qualifying facility shall be obligated to pay any interconnection costs which the State regulatory authority (with respect to any electric...

  4. 18 CFR 801.11 - Public values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Public values. 801.11... POLICIES § 801.11 Public values. (a) The basin has many points of archeological and historic interest, and... value of these areas cannot be measured simply in economic terms and will strive to preserve and promote...

  5. 18 CFR 270.506 - Confidentiality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Confidentiality. 270.506 Section 270.506 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION...) through (9) of 5 U.S.C. 552(b). (b) Upon receipt of a request for disclosure of information treated as...

  6. 18 CFR 1b.21 - Enforcement hotline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enforcement hotline. 1b.21 Section 1b.21 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... shall be treated as non-public by the Commission and its staff, consistent with the provisions of...

  7. 18 CFR 358.7 - Transparency rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transparency rule. 358.7 Section 358.7 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... Transparency rule. (a) Contemporaneous disclosure. (1) If a transmission provider discloses non-public...

  8. 18 CFR 41.6 - Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determination. 41.6 Section 41.6 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF....6 Determination. If no formal hearing is had the matter in issue will be determined by the...

  9. 18 CFR 286.108 - Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determination. 286.108 Section 286.108 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT... Contested Audit Findings and Proposed Remedies § 286.108 Determination. If no formal hearing is had the...

  10. 18 CFR 158.6 - Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determination. 158.6 Section 158.6 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT....6 Determination. If no formal hearing is had the matter in issue will be determined by the...

  11. 18 CFR 349.6 - Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determination. 349.6 Section 349.6 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT... PROPOSED REMEDIES § 349.6 Determination. If no formal hearing is had the matter in issue will be determined...

  12. Penurunan Kadar Interleukin-18 Cairan Peritoneal

    OpenAIRE

    Astuti, Yoni

    2004-01-01

    Penelitian ini dilakukan dengan tujuan untuk menentukan konsentrasi interleukin- 15 (IL-18) pada cairan peritoneal dan serum penderita endometriosis yang -bandingkan dengan kelompok control( tidak menderita endometriosis). Metode penelitian yang digunakan adalah kajian analitik prospektif. Subyek yang terlibat sebanyak 44 penderita yang melakukan bedah laparoscopic pada penyakit ginekologi ringan. Pengambilan cairan peritoneal dan serum sebagai specimen ulakukan sebelum dan sesudah tindakan b...

  13. 47 CFR 18.301 - Operating frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INDUSTRIAL, SCIENTIFIC, AND MEDICAL EQUIPMENT Technical... as indicated in § 18.303. The following frequency bands, in accordance with § 2.106 of the rules, are... ±15 kHz frequency band is subject to the conditions of footnote 524 of the Table of Allocations. See...

  14. Association between Interleukin-18 promoter polymorphisms and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Noha M. Bakr

    the study. Genotypic analysis of IL-18 promoter polymorphisms were performed using sequence- .... diabetes mellitus, heart disease, previous stroke, cigarette smok- ing. Included .... of the mutated AA genotype and A allele was observed in IS ..... factor for ischemic stroke in the Chinese population: a meta-analysis. Meta.

  15. 18 CFR 801.5 - Comprehensive plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Comprehensive plan. 801... POLICIES § 801.5 Comprehensive plan. (a) The Compact requires that the Commission formulate and adopt a comprehensive plan for the immediate and long-range development and use of the water resources of the basin. (1...

  16. 18 CFR 701.5 - Organization pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Organization pattern... ORGANIZATION Introduction § 701.5 Organization pattern. (a) The Office of the Water Resources Council is... Council Staff headed by a Director, and Field Organizations within its jurisdiction. (b) The Water...

  17. 18 CFR 376.102 - Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Organization. 376.102... OF ENERGY REVISED GENERAL RULES ORGANIZATION, MISSION, AND FUNCTIONS; OPERATIONS DURING EMERGENCY CONDITIONS Organization, Mission, and Functions § 376.102 Organization. The Commission is established as an...

  18. 18 CFR 415.1 - Short title.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Short title. 415.1 Section 415.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Generally § 415.1 Short title. This part shall be known...

  19. Discovery and Innovation - Vol 18 (2006)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of successive paintings in oil-polluted soil on the growth of pawpaw (Carica papaya L.) in the humid forest zone of Nigeria · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. LA Daniel-Kalio, AP Tih, 53-57. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/dai.v18i1.15726 ...

  20. 49 CFR 18.22 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply with cost principles acceptable to the Federal... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 18.22... cost principles. For each kind of organization, there is a set of Federal principles for determining...

  1. 18 CFR 367.12 - Payroll distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Payroll distribution. 367.12 Section 367.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... Instructions § 367.12 Payroll distribution. Underlying accounting data must be maintained so that the...

  2. Síndrome 18 q -heredado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Herrera Martínez

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el hallazgo de una monosomía 18q-heredada por translocación materna (3q, 18q, en un niño de 4 años de edad con las características clínicas típicas, que presenta retraso mental y patrón dismórfico facial. Se realizó la correlación fenotipo-cariotipo, y el árbol genealógico de la familia. Se comparan los hallazgos del paciente con otros informados en la literatura médica y se enfatiza en el interés genético del estudio clínico y citogenético de los padres.It is presented the finding of an 18q-monosomy inherited by maternal translocation (3q, 18q in a 4-year-old boy with the typical clinical characteristics, that is, mental retardation and facial dysmorphia pattern. The phenotype-karyotype correlation and the pedigree were made. The patient's findings are compared with others reported in the medical literature, and the genetical interest of the clinical and cytogenetic study of the parents is emphasized.

  3. 18 CFR 358.2 - General principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false General principles. 358... principles. (a) As more fully described and implemented in subsequent sections of this part, a transmission... independently from its marketing function employees, except as permitted in this part or otherwise permitted by...

  4. Clean Cities Now, Vol. 18, No. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-01-19

    This is version 18.2 of Clean Cities Now, the official biannual newsletter of the Clean Cities program. Clean Cities is an initiative designed to reduce petroleum consumption in the transportation sector by advancing the use of alternative and renewable fuels, fuel economy improvements, idle-reduction measures, and new technologies, as they emerge.

  5. 50 CFR 80.18 - Responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS, PITTMAN-ROBERTSON WILDLIFE RESTORATION AND DINGELL-JOHNSON SPORT FISH RESTORATION ACTS § 80.18 Responsibilities. In the... applicable Federal, State, and local laws. (e) The settlement and satisfaction of all contractual and...

  6. 18 CFR 1300.104 - Sexual harassment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... CONDUCT FOR EMPLOYEES OF TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY § 1300.104 Sexual harassment. It is TVA policy that all TVA employees are responsible for assuring that the workplace is free from sexual harassment... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sexual harassment. 1300...

  7. 18 CFR 704.39 - Discount rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discount rate. 704.39... STANDARDS AND PROCEDURES Standards for Plan Formulation and Evaluation § 704.39 Discount rate. (a) The interest rate to be used in plan formulation and evaluation for discounting future benefits and computing...

  8. 38 CFR 18.411 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Discrimination prohibited... Practices § 18.411 Discrimination prohibited. (a) General. (1) No qualified handicapped person shall, on the basis of handicap, be subjected to discrimination in employment under any program or activity to which...

  9. 18 CFR 8.3 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discrimination prohibited. 8.3 Section 8.3 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... LICENSED PROJECTS § 8.3 Discrimination prohibited. Every licensee maintaining recreation facilities for the...

  10. 18 CFR 705.4 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discrimination... Discrimination prohibited. (a) General. No person in the United States shall, on the grounds of race, color, or... discrimination under, any program to which this part applies. (b) Specific discriminatory actions prohibited. (1...

  11. 38 CFR 18.404 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Discrimination prohibited... Provisions § 18.404 Discrimination prohibited. (a) General. No qualified handicapped person shall, on the... subjected to discrimination under any program or activity which receives Federal financial assistance. (b...

  12. 18 CFR 1307.4 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discrimination... NONDISCRIMINATION WITH RESPECT TO HANDICAP § 1307.4 Discrimination prohibited. (a) General. No qualified handicapped... otherwise be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity to which this part applies. (b...

  13. 38 CFR 18.421 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Discrimination prohibited... Accessibility § 18.421 Discrimination prohibited. No qualified handicapped person shall, because a recipient's... from participation in, or otherwise be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity to...

  14. 38 CFR 18.3 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Discrimination prohibited... THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 General § 18.3 Discrimination prohibited. (a) General. No person in the..., be denied the benefits of, or be otherwise subjected to discrimination under any program to which...

  15. 18 CFR 284.1 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definitions. 284.1 Section 284.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT... charges on a cost-of-service basis. (c) Market center means an area where gas purchases and sales occur at...

  16. 18 CFR 35.38 - Mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mitigation. 35.38 Section 35.38 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT... Sales of Electric Energy, Capacity and Ancillary Services at Market-Based Rates § 35.38 Mitigation. (a...

  17. 18 CFR 35.40 - Ancillary services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ancillary services. 35.40 Section 35.40 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... Sales of Electric Energy, Capacity and Ancillary Services at Market-Based Rates § 35.40 Ancillary...

  18. 18 CFR 33.10 - Additional information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Additional information. 33.10 Section 33.10 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... § 33.10 Additional information. The Director of the Office of Energy Market Regulation, or his designee...

  19. 18 CFR 35.36 - Generally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Generally. 35.36 Section 35.36 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT... Sales of Electric Energy, Capacity and Ancillary Services at Market-Based Rates § 35.36 Generally. (a...

  20. 18 CFR 348.2 - Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedures. 348.2 Section 348.2 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE INTERSTATE COMMERCE ACT OIL PIPELINE APPLICATIONS FOR MARKET POWER...

  1. 18 CFR 35.39 - Affiliate restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Affiliate restrictions. 35.39 Section 35.39 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... Sales of Electric Energy, Capacity and Ancillary Services at Market-Based Rates § 35.39 Affiliate...

  2. 18 CFR 284.501 - Applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applicability. 284.501 Section 284.501 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT... Applications for Market-Based Rates for Storage § 284.501 Applicability. Any pipeline or storage service...

  3. The Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxy IZw18

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Musella, I.; Marconi, M.; Fiorentino, G.; Clementini, G.; Aloisi, A.; Annibali, F.; Contreras, R.; Saha, A.; Tosi, M.; van der Marel, R. P.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results obtained for the Blue compact galaxy IZw18 on the basis of ACS HST data obtained from our group. In particular, we discuss the stellar population and the variable stars content of this galaxy to get information about its star formation history and distance.

  4. 38 CFR 18.422 - Existing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Handicap Accessibility § 18.422 Existing facilities. (a) Accessibility. A recipient shall operate each program or activity to which this... visits, delivery of health, or other social services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of...

  5. 18 CFR 1312.2 - Authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Authority. 1312.2 Section 1312.2 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY PROTECTION OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESOURCES: UNIFORM REGULATIONS § 1312.2 Authority. (a) The regulations in this part are...

  6. 18 CFR 725.1 - Authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Authority. 725.1 Section 725.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL IMPLEMENTATION OF... Authority. This rule is being promulgated pursuant to the Water Resources Planning Act of 1965, section 402...

  7. 18 CFR 3a.2 - Authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Authority. 3a.2 Section 3a.2 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION General § 3a.2 Authority. Official information or...

  8. Digging Movie from Phoenix's Sol 18

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander recorded the images combined into this movie of the lander's Robotic Arm enlarging and combining the two trenches informally named 'Dodo' (left) and 'Goldilocks.' The 21 images in this sequence were taken over a period of about 2 hours during Phoenix's Sol 18 (June 13, 2008), or the 18th Martian day since landing. The main purpose of the Sol 18 dig was to dig deeper for learning the depth of a hard underlying layer. A bright layer, possibly ice, was increasingly exposed as the digging progressed. Further digging and scraping in the combined Dodo-Goldilocks trench was planned for subsequent sols. The combined trench is about 20 centimeters (about 8 inches) wide. The depth at the end of the Sol 18 digging is 5 to 6 centimeters (about 2 inches). The Goldilocks trench was the source of soil samples 'Baby Bear' and 'Mama Bear,' which were collected on earlier sols and delivered to instruments on the lander deck. The Dodo trench was originally dug for practice in collecting and depositing soil samples. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  9. Search Results | Page 18 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Results 171 - 180 of 1814 ... The North Africa region is home to marginal ecosystems with a large rural population which depends on rain-fed farming systems for their livelihoods. ... 18.2 million cattle, 16.3 million sheep, and 24.6 million goats.

  10. 16 CFR 1025.18 - Class actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... PROCEEDINGS Pleadings, Form, Execution, Service of Documents § 1025.18 Class actions. (a) Prerequisites to a..., the extent and nature of any proceedings concerning the controversy already commenced against members... that the pleadings be amended to eliminate allegations concerning the representation of absent persons...

  11. 18 CFR 1317.510 - Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recruitment. 1317.510... Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment and hiring. A recipient shall not discriminate on the basis of sex in the recruitment and hiring of employees. Where a recipient has been found to be presently...

  12. 18 CFR 1317.310 - Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recruitment. 1317.310... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 1317.310 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment. A recipient to which §§ 1317.300 through 1317.310 apply shall not discriminate on the...

  13. 38 CFR 18.434 - Education setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... not handicapped to the maximum extent appropriate to the needs of the handicapped person. A recipient shall place a handicapped person in the regular educational environment operated by the recipient unless... Adult Education § 18.434 Education setting. (a) Academic setting. A recipient shall educate, or shall...

  14. 18 CFR 1308.3 - Exclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exclusions. 1308.3... General Matters § 1308.3 Exclusions. (a) This part does not apply to any TVA contract which does not contain a disputes clause. (b) Except as otherwise specifically provided, this part does not apply to any...

  15. 18 CFR 154.502 - Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reports. 154.502... OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER NATURAL GAS ACT RATE SCHEDULES AND TARIFFS Refunds and Reports § 154.502 Reports. (a) When the natural gas company is required, either by a Commission order or as a part of a...

  16. Biochemical and Kinetic Characterization of Geranylgeraniol 18 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This enzyme and its gene are an attractive target for development of plaunotol production and its detailed biochemical properties need to be understood. Recently, even though the gene (CYP97C27) coding for GGOH 18-hydroxylase has been identified, cloned, and expressed in Escherichia coli system, the enzyme activity ...

  17. 18 CFR 34.10 - Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reports. 34.10 Section 34.10 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF... SECURITIES OR THE ASSUMPTION OF LIABILITIES § 34.10 Reports. The applicant must file reports under § 131.43...

  18. 18 CFR 4.21 - Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reports. 4.21 Section 4... Reports. Representatives of the Commission will inspect the project works, engineering reports, and other..., records, and accounts of the licensee relating to the property under license, and prepare a report of...

  19. 18 CFR 4.11 - Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reports. 4.11 Section 4... Reports. Representatives of the Commission will inspect the project works, engineering reports, and other... report of their findings with respect to the inventory, appraisal, original cost, accrued depreciation...

  20. 18 CFR 801.6 - Water supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Water supply. 801.6... POLICIES § 801.6 Water supply. (a) The Susquehanna River Basin is rich in water resources. With proper... forth in the comprehensive plan. (c) The Commission shall study the basin's water supply needs, the...