WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon 15

  1. 46 CFR 193.15-20 - Carbon dioxide storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide storage. 193.15-20 Section 193.15-20... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-20 Carbon dioxide storage. (a...), consisting of not more than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide, may have cylinders located within the...

  2. 46 CFR 95.15-20 - Carbon dioxide storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide storage. 95.15-20 Section 95.15-20... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.15-20 Carbon dioxide storage. (a... of not more than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide, may have the cylinders located within the...

  3. 46 CFR 76.15-20 - Carbon dioxide storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide storage. 76.15-20 Section 76.15-20... EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 76.15-20 Carbon dioxide storage. (a) Except as... than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide, may have the cylinders located within the space protected. If...

  4. Carbon material formation on SBA-15 and Ni-SBA-15 and residue constituents during acetylene decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Hung-Lung, E-mail: hlchiang@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Department of Risk Management, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Wu, Trong-Neng [Department of Public Health, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Ho, Yung-Shou [Department of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung 831, Taiwan (China); Zeng, Li-Xuan [Department of Risk Management, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Acetylene was decomposed on SBA-15 and Ni-SBA-15 at 650–850 °C. • Carbon spheres and filaments were formed after acetylene decomposition. • PAHs were determined in tar and residues. • Exhaust constituents include CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and hydrocarbon species. - Abstract: Carbon materials including carbon spheres and nanotubes were formed from acetylene decomposition on hydrogen-reduced SBA-15 and Ni-SBA-15 at 650–850 °C. The physicochemical characteristics of SBA-15, Ni-SBA-15 and carbon materials were analyzed by field emission scanning electronic microscopy (FE-SEM), Raman spectrometry, and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). In addition, the contents of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the tar and residue and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the exhaust were determined during acetylene decomposition on SBA-15 and Ni-SBA-15. Spherical carbon materials were observed on SBA-15 during acetylene decomposition at 750 and 850 °C. Carbon filaments and ball spheres were formed on Ni-SBA-15 at 650–850 °C. Raman spectroscopy revealed peaks at 1290 (D-band, disorder mode, amorphous carbon) and 1590 (G-band, graphite sp{sup 2} structure) cm{sup −1}. Naphthalene (2 rings), pyrene (4 rings), phenanthrene (3 rings), and fluoranthene (4 rings) were major PAHs in tar and residues. Exhaust constituents of hydrocarbon (as propane), H{sub 2}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} were 3.9–2.6/2.7–1.5, 1.4–2.8/2.6–4.3, 4.2–2.4/3.2–1.7% when acetylene was decomposed on SBA-15/Ni-SBA-15, respectively, corresponding to temperatures ranging from 650 to 850 °C. The concentrations of 52 VOCs ranged from 9359 to 5658 and 2488 to 1104 ppm for SBA-15 and Ni-SBA-15 respectively, at acetylene decomposition temperatures from 650 to 850 °C, and the aromatics contributed more than 87% fraction of VOC concentrations.

  5. Characteristics of Carbon Material Formation on SBA-15 and Ni-SBA-15 Templates by Acetylene Decomposition and Their Bioactivity Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Mei Chiang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon spheres and tubes were formed from acetylene decomposition on SBA-15 and Ni-SBA-15 at 650–850 °C. At 650 °C, the decomposed carbons covered the surface of the support, and no carbon spheres and filament materials were formed. Carbon sphere formation occurred at 750 °C–850 °C; with diameters ranging from 0.8 μm–1.1 μm. For Ni-SBA-15, the diameters of the spheres and filaments were 0.8 μm and 62 nm, respectively, at 650 °C. At 750 °C, the diameter of the ball carbon materials ranged from 0.7 μm–0.8 μm, the diameter of the carbon tubes formed was 120–130 nm, and their pore diameter was 8.0 nm–11 nm. At 850 °C, the diameters of ball carbon materials and carbon tubes were similar to those of the materials at the formation temperature, 750 °C. Si, O and C were the main constituents of SBA-15; Ni-SBA-15 and carbon material formation supports. High-ring PAHs (such as BaP (five rings; IND (six rings; DBA (five rings and B[ghi]P (six rings exist in carbon materials. SBA-15 revealed insignificant cytotoxicity, but Ni-SBA-15 inhibited the proliferation of human lung cancer cells (A549. Less inhibition on cell viability and reactive oxidative species (ROS generation on A549 were determined for carbon material formation on the Ni-SBA-15 compared to the Ni-SBA-15.

  6. Green Ocean Amazon 2014/15 – Scaling Amazon Carbon Water Couplings Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubey, Manvendra [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Parket, Harrison [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Myers, Katherine [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rahn, Thom [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Christoffersson, B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wunch, Debra [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Wennberg, Paul [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Forests soak up 25% of the carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted by anthropogenic fossil energy use (10 Gt C y-1), moderating its atmospheric accumulation. How this terrestrial CO2 uptake will evolve with climate change in the 21st Century is largely unknown. Rainforests are the most active ecosystems, with the Amazon basin storing 120 Gt C as biomass and exchanging 18 Gt C y-1 of CO2 via photosynthesis and respiration and fixing carbon at 2-3 kg C m-2 y-1. Furthermore, the intense hydrologic and carbon cycles are tightly coupled in the Amazon where about half of the water is recycled by evapotranspiration and the other half imported from the ocean by Northeasterly trade winds. Climate models predict a drying in the Amazon with reduced carbon uptake while observationally guided assessments indicate sustained uptake. We set out to resolve this huge discrepancy in the size and sign of the future Amazon carbon cycle by performing the first simultaneous regional-scale high-frequency measurements of atmospheric CO2, H2O, HOD, CH4, N2O, and CO at the T3 site in Manacupuru, Brazil, as part of DOE's GoAmazon 2014/15 project. Our data will be used to inform and develop DOE's Community Land Model (CLM) on the tropical carbon-water couplings at the appropriate grid scale (10-50 km). Our measurements will also validate the CO2 data from Japan's Greenhouse gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) and NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO)-2 satellite (launched in July, 2014). Our data addresses these science questions: 1. How does ecosystem heterogeneity and climate variability influence the rainforest carbon cycle? 2. How well do current tropical ecosystem models simulate the observed regional carbon cycle? 3. Does nitrogen deposition (from the Manaus, Brazil, plume) enhance rainforest carbon uptake?

  7. Inhibition of the Cardiac Na+ Channel Nav1.5 by Carbon Monoxide*

    OpenAIRE

    Elies, J; Dallas, M.; Boyle, JP; Scragg, JL; Duke, A; Steele, DS; Peers, C

    2014-01-01

    Sublethal carbon monoxide (CO) exposure is frequently associated with myocardial arrhythmias, and our recent studies have demonstrated that these may be attributable to modulation of cardiac Na(+) channels, causing an increase in the late current and an inhibition of the peak current. Using a recombinant expression system, we demonstrate that CO inhibits peak human Nav1.5 current amplitude without activation of the late Na(+) current observed in native tissue. Inhibition was associated with a...

  8. Benzoylation of anisole catalyzed by Ga/SBA-15 supported on carbon nanofibers composite

    OpenAIRE

    EL BERRICHI, F. Z.; Pham-Huu, C.; CHERIF, L.; Louis, B; M. J.; Ledoux

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanofiber composite (C-NFC) shows several advantages compared to the conventional supports which are usually employed in catalysis such as alumina, silica or activated charcoal. In this present work we have developed a new hybrid catalyst consisting of SBA-15 supported on C-NFC for the benzoylation reaction. The structured materials allow an important improvement of the reaction hydrodynamics and favor the mass transfer between the active phase and the reactants, especially in the liqu...

  9. Comparison of amino and epoxy functionalized SBA-15 used for carbonic anhydrase immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Xiaoyao; Chen, Shaoyun; Liu, Dai; Huang, Chunjie; Zhang, Yongchun

    2016-09-01

    Two functionalized SBA-15 [amine-functionalized SBA-15 (AFS) and epoxy-functionalized SBA-15 (GFS)] with different types of functional groups were synthesized by a hydrothermal process and post functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and 3-glycidyloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS), respectively. They were used for the immobilization of carbonic anhydrase (CA). The physicochemical properties of the functionalized SBA-15 were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption-desorption, (13)C, (29)Si solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Before and after CA was immobilized on AFS and GFS, the effects of temperature and pH value on the enzyme activity, storage stability, and reusability were investigated using para-nitrophenyl acetate (p-NPA) assay. CA/GFS showed a better performance with respect to storage stability and reusability than CA/AFS. Moreover, the amount of CaCO3 precipitated over CA/AFS was less than that precipitated over CA/GFS, which was almost equal to that precipitated over the free CA. The results indicate that the epoxy group is a more suitable functional group for covalent bonding with CA than the amino group, and GFS is a promising support for CA immobilization. PMID:27215831

  10. Composition of Carbon-13 and Nitrogen-15 in Sediments of the Ha Long Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ha Long Bay with beautiful landscape and rich ecosystems is being used by human to develop the economy. The Ha Long Bay is currently affected by human activities causing the sedimentary environment to be much changed. The change of the environment in the Bay was studied using the composition of carbon-13, nitrogen-15 (δ13C, δ15N) and the C/N ratio in sediment of seven cores collected within the Ha Long Bay. In the Ha Long Bay, sedimentary environment receives many source sediment supplies. The north-east of Ha Long bay receives sources from sea, it is characterized by δ13C in sediment from -8.79 to -18.01‰, value δ15N in sediment from 4.36 to 4.73 ‰ and ratio of C/N from 13 to 41, the source organic matter in sediment shows that affected by C4 plant. The centre of Ha Long Bay receives organic source from sea, it is characterized by δ13C in sediment from -16.72 to -21.58 ‰, value δ15N in sediment ranges 4.15 - 5.20 ‰, ratio of C/N in sediment from 7 to 23. The north-west of Ha Long Bay is affected by rivers, it is characterized by δ13C in sediment range from -13.64 to -25.77 ‰, value δ15N in sediment from 2.50 to 4.38 ‰, and ratio C/N from 9 to 19. (author)

  11. Ternary liquid-liquid equilibria of dimethyl carbonate + 2-propanol + water system at 303.15 and 313.15 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginting, Rizqy Romadhona; Mustain, Asalil; Tetrisyanda, Rizki; Gunardi, Ignatius; Wibawa, Gede

    2015-12-01

    In this work, liquid-liquid equilibria data of dimethyl carbonate (DMC) + 2-propanol + water system were accurately determined at 303.15 and 313.15 K using stirred and jacketed equilibrium cell under atmospheric pressure. The reliabilities of the experimental data were confirmed using Bachman-Brown correlation giving r-squared value of 0.9993 and 0.9983 at 303.15 and 313.15 K, respectively. Experimental data obtained in this work exhibit Treybal's Type I ternary phase behavior. The selectivity and distribution coefficient of DMC increases with addition of DMC concentration in the organic phase. On the other hand, the effect of temperature to phase boundary was found to be not significant. The data were correlated well using the Non-Random Two Liquid (NRTL) and Universal Quasi-Chemical (UNIQUAC) activity coefficient models with root-mean-square deviation of 1.5% and 1.3%, respectively.

  12. Plasma 1-carbon metabolites and academic achievement in 15-yr-old adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Torbjörn K; Hurtig-Wennlöf, Anita; Sjöström, Michael; Herrmann, Wolfgang; Obeid, Rima; Owen, Jennifer R; Zeisel, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Academic achievement in adolescents is correlated with 1-carbon metabolism (1-CM), as folate intake is positively related and total plasma homocysteine (tHcy) negatively related to academic success. Because another 1-CM nutrient, choline is essential for fetal neurocognitive development, we hypothesized that choline and betaine could also be positively related to academic achievement in adolescents. In a sample of 15-yr-old children (n= 324), we measured plasma concentrations of homocysteine, choline, and betaine and genotyped them for 2 polymorphisms with effects on 1-CM, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677C>T, rs1801133, and phosphatidylethanolamineN-methyltransferase (PEMT), rs12325817 (G>C). The sum of school grades in 17 major subjects was used as an outcome measure for academic achievement. Lifestyle and family socioeconomic status (SES) data were obtained from questionnaires. Plasma choline was significantly and positively associated with academic achievement independent of SES factors (paternal education and income, maternal education and income, smoking, school) and of folate intake (P= 0.009,R(2)= 0.285). With the addition of thePEMTrs12325817 polymorphism, the association value was only marginally changed. Plasma betaine concentration, tHcy, and theMTHFR677C>T polymorphism did not affect academic achievement in any tested model involving choline. Dietary intake of choline is marginal in many adolescents and may be a public health concern.-Nilsson, T. K., Hurtig-Wennlöf, A., Sjöström, M., Herrmann, W., Obeid, R., Owen, J. R., Zeisel, S. Plasma 1-carbon metabolites and academic achievement in 15-yr-old adolescents. PMID:26728177

  13. Measurements of the viscosity of carbon dioxide at temperatures from (253.15 to 473.15) K with pressures up to 1.2 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A new rotating-body viscometer for the low-pressure region was presented. • A viscosity dependent offset was compensated by calibrating the viscometer. • The viscosity of carbon dioxide was measured at low pressures. • Measurements were carried out from T = (253.15 to 473.15) K with p ≤ 1.2 MPa. • The relative expanded combined uncertainty (k = 2) was Ur,c(η) = (0.20 to 0.41)%. - Abstract: The viscosity of carbon dioxide was measured over the temperature range T = (253.15 to 473.15) K with pressures up to 1.2 MPa utilizing a new rotating-body viscometer. The relative expanded combined uncertainty (k = 2) in viscosity (including uncertainties of temperature and pressure) was (0.20 to 0.41)%. The instrument was specifically designed for measurements at low gas densities and enables measurements of the dynamic viscosity at temperatures between T = 253.15 K and T = 473.15 K with pressures up to 2 MPa. For carbon dioxide, the fluid specific measuring range with regard to pressure was limited to 1.2 MPa due to the formation of disturbing vortices inside the measuring cell at higher pressures. The model function for the viscosity measurement was extended in such a way that the dynamic viscosity was measured relative to helium. Therefore, the influence of the geometry of the concentric cylindrical system inside the measuring cell became almost negligible. Moreover, a systematic offset resulting from a small but inevitable eccentricity of the cylindrical system was compensated for. The residual damping, usually measured in vacuum, was calibrated in the entire temperature range using viscosity values of helium, neon and argon calculated ab initio; at T = 298.15 K recommended reference values were used. A viscosity dependent offset of the measured viscosities, which was observed in previously published data, did not occur when using the calibrated residual damping. The new carbon dioxide results were compared to other experimental literature data

  14. Direct electron transfer and electrocatalysis of glucose oxidase immobilized on glassy carbon electrode modified with Nafion and mesoporous carbon FDU-15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, it was found that glucose oxidase (GOD) has been stably immobilized on glassy carbon electrode modified with mesoporous carbon FDU-15 (MC-FDU-15) and Nafion by simple technique. The sorption behavior of GOD immobilized on MC-FDU-15 matrix was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis), FTIR, respectively, which demonstrated that MC-FDU-15 could facilitate the electron exchange between the active center of GOD and electrode. The direct electrochemistry and electrocatalysis behavior of GOD on the modified electrode were characterized by cyclic voltammogram (CV) which indicated that GOD immobilized on Nafion and MC-FDU-15 matrices display direct, reversible and surface-controlled redox reaction with an enhanced electron transfer rate constant of 4.095 s-1 in 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution (PBS) (pH 7.12). Furthermore, it was also discovered that, in the presence of O2, GOD immobilized on Nafion and MC-FDU-15 matrices could produce a linear response to glucose. Thus, Nafion/GOD-MC-FDU-15/GC electrode is hopeful to be used in glucose biosensor. In addition, GOD immobilized on MC-FDU-15 and Nafion matrices possesses an excellent bioelectrocatalytic activity for the reduction of O2. So, the Nafion/GOD-MC-FDU-15/GC electrode can be utilized as the cathode in biofuel cell.

  15. Effects of carbon coating and pore corrugation on capillary condensation of nitrogen in SBA-15 mesoporous silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishige, Kunimitsu

    2013-09-24

    To examine the origin of an ink-bottle-like structure in SBA-15 formed by carbon coating and the effects of pore corrugation on capillary condensation and evaporation of a vapor in the cylindrical pores, we measured the adsorption isotherms of nitrogen at 77 K on 10 kinds of SBA-15 samples before and after a carbon coating process by the exposure to acetylene at 1073 K, as well as desorption scanning curves and subloops on the untreated samples. These SBA-15 samples were synthesized under the different conditions of initial SiO2/P123 ratio and hydrothermal treatment. SBA-15 with relatively large microporosity tends to form easily constrictions inside the main channels by the carbon coating. This strongly suggests that the rough pore walls of SBA-15 may induce the incomplete wetting of carbon layers on the pore walls to form the constrictions inside the cylindrical pores. A comparison of two subloops implies that the pores of SBA-15 synthesized with a SiO2/P123 ratio of 75 consist of an assembly of connecting domains of different diameters; that is, the pores are highly corrugated. For SBA-15 synthesized with a SiO2/P123 ratio of 60, the amplitude of the pore corrugation is significantly decreased by the prolonged hydrothermal treatment at 373 K. On the other hand, for SBA-15 synthesized with a SiO2/P123 ratio of 45, the amplitude of the corrugation is negligibly small, although the cylindrical pores are interconnected through narrow necks with each other. It is found that the smaller the amplitude of the pore corrugation, the smaller the width of the hysteresis loop. PMID:23977846

  16. Characterization of Genotoxic Response to 15 Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes with Variable Physicochemical Properties Including Surface Functionalizations in the FE1-Muta(TM) Mouse Lung Epithelial Cell Line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Petra; Kling, Kirsten; Jensen, Keld Alstrup;

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes vary greatly in physicochemical properties. We compared cytotoxic and genotoxic response to 15 multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with varying physicochemical properties to identify drivers of toxic responses. The studied MWCNT included OECD Working Party on Manufactured...

  17. Seasonal patterns in carbon dioxide in 15 mid-continent (USA) reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, John R.; Obrecht, Daniel V.; Graham, Jennifer; Balmer, Michelle B.; Filstrup, Christopher T.; Downing, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that lakes are important sites for atmospheric CO2 exchange and so play a substantial role in the global carbon budget. Previous research has 2 weaknesses: (1) most data have been collected only during the open-water or summer seasons, and (2) data are concentrated principally on natural lakes in northern latitudes. Here, we report on the full annual cycle of atmospheric CO2 exchanges of 15 oligotrophic to eutrophic reservoirs in the Glacial Till Plains of the United States. With one exception, these reservoirs showed an overall loss of CO2 during the year, with most values within the lower range reported for temperate lakes. There was a strong cross-system seasonal pattern: an average of 70% of total annual CO2 efflux occurred by the end of spring mixis; some 20% of annual flux was reabsorbed during summer stratification; and the remaining 50% of efflux was lost during autumnal mixing. Net annual flux was negatively correlated with depth and positively correlated with both water residence time and DOC, with the smallest annual CO2 efflux measured in shallow fertile impoundments. Strong correlations yield relationships allowing regional up-scaling of CO2 evasion. Understanding lacustrine CO2 uptake and evasion requires seasonal analyses across the full range of lake trophic states and morphometric attributes.

  18. Thermal and mechanical properties of novel nanocomposites from modified ordered mesoporous carbon FDU-15 and poly(methyl methacrylate)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadnezhad, Gholamhossein, E-mail: mohammadnezhad@cc.iut.ac.ir; Dinari, Mohammad, E-mail: dinari@cc.iut.ac.ir; Soltani, Roozbeh; Bozorgmehr, Zahra

    2015-08-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The surface of mesoporous carbon, FDU-15, was modified by 3-mercaptopropyl-trimethoxysilane. • Nanocomposites of PMMA and modified FDU-15 were prepared by solution polymerization. • XRD shows that modified mesoporous FDU-15 has an ordered hexagonal mesostructure. • TEM and SEM images confirm the presence of large pores and ordered mesostructure. • Mechanical data indicated improvement in the tensile strength and modulus. - Abstract: With its well-ordered pore structure, high specific surface area and tunable pore diameters, ordered mesoporous carbons are suitable for applications in many areas of modern science and technology. In the present investigation, an ultrasonic irradiation was used for the modification of the mesoporous carbon FDU-15. Three nanocomposite films of the poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and modified FDU-15 were prepared by solution polymerization technique. The surface morphology and thermal and mechanical properties of the hybrid materials were evaluated by different methods. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that modified mesoporous FDU-15 had an ordered hexagonal mesostructure. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and field emission-scanning electron microscopy images confirmed the presence of large pores and a relatively ordered mesostructure for the functionalized materials. Thermogravimetric analysis data also revealed that the onset of decomposition temperature of the nanocomposites was higher than that of pristine PMMA, shifting toward higher temperatures as the amount of modified-FDU was increased. TEM images showed the well-ordered hexagonal arrays of mesopores FDU-15. Mechanical data indicated the improvement in the tensile strength and modulus with the modified FDU-15 loading. The film containing 1 wt.% of modified FDU-15 had a tensile strength of the order of 42 MPa, relative to the 28 MPa of the pristine PMMA.

  19. Relative stability of soil carbon revealed by shifts in δ15N and C:N ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Alewell

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Life on earth drives a continuous exchange of carbon between soils and the atmosphere. Some forms of soil carbon, or organic matter, are more stable and have a longer residence time in soil than others. Relative differences in stability have often been derived from shifts in δ13C (which is bound to a vegetation change from C3 to C4 type or through 14C-dating (which is bound to small sample numbers because of high measurement costs. Here, we propose a new concept based on the increase in δ15N and the decrease in C:N ratio with increasing stability. We tested the concept on grasslands at different elevations in the Swiss Alps. Depending on elevation and soil depth, it predicted mineral-associated organic carbon to be 3 to 73 times more stable than particulate organic carbon. Analysis of 14C-ages generally endorsed these predictions.

  20. Relative stability of soil carbon revealed by shifts in δ15N and C:N ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Alewell

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Life on earth drives a continuous exchange of carbon between soils and the atmosphere. Some forms of soil carbon, or organic matter, are more stable and have a longer residence time in soil than others. Relative differences in stability have often been derived from shifts in δ13C (which is bound to a vegetation change from C3 to C4 type or through 14C-dating (which is bound to small sample numbers because of high measurement costs. Here, we propose a new concept based on the increase in δ15N and the decrease in C:N ratio with increasing stability. We tested the concept on grasslands at different elevations in the Swiss Alps. Depending on elevation and soil depth, it predicted mineral-associated organic carbon to be 3 to 73 times more stable than particulate organic carbon. Analysis of 14C-ages generally endorsed these predictions.

  1. Pharmaceutical preparation of oxygen-15 labelled molecular oxygen and carbon monoxide gasses in a hospital setting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luurtsema, Geert; Boellaard, Ronald; Greuter, Henri; Rijbroek, Abraham; Takkenkamp, Kevin; de Geest, Frank; Buijs, Fred; Hendrikse, NH; Franssen, Eric; van Lingen, Arthur; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical positron emission tomography (PET) requires safe and effective PET radiopharmaceuticals. Tracers used for measuring oxygen consumption and blood volume are [(15)O]O(2) and [(15)O]CO, respectively. In general, these oxygen-15 labelled tracers are produced using a cyclotron that a

  2. Complementary constraints from carbon (13C) and nitrogen (15N) isotopes on the glacial ocean's soft-tissue biological pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmittner, A.; Somes, C. J.

    2016-06-01

    A three-dimensional, process-based model of the ocean's carbon and nitrogen cycles, including 13C and 15N isotopes, is used to explore effects of idealized changes in the soft-tissue biological pump. Results are presented from one preindustrial control run (piCtrl) and six simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) with increasing values of the spatially constant maximum phytoplankton growth rate μmax, which accelerates biological nutrient utilization mimicking iron fertilization. The default LGM simulation, without increasing μmax and with a shallower and weaker Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation and increased sea ice cover, leads to 280 Pg more respired organic carbon (Corg) storage in the deep ocean with respect to piCtrl. Dissolved oxygen concentrations in the colder glacial thermocline increase, which reduces water column denitrification and, with delay, nitrogen fixation, thus increasing the ocean's fixed nitrogen inventory and decreasing δ15NNO3 almost everywhere. This simulation already fits sediment reconstructions of carbon and nitrogen isotopes relatively well, but it overestimates deep ocean δ13CDIC and underestimates δ15NNO3 at high latitudes. Increasing μmax enhances Corg and lowers deep ocean δ13CDIC, improving the agreement with sediment data. In the model's Antarctic and North Pacific Oceans modest increases in μmax result in higher δ15NNO3 due to enhanced local nutrient utilization, improving the agreement with reconstructions there. Models with moderately increased μmax fit both isotope data best, whereas large increases in nutrient utilization are inconsistent with nitrogen isotopes although they still fit the carbon isotopes reasonably well. The best fitting models reproduce major features of the glacial δ13CDIC, δ15N, and oxygen reconstructions while simulating increased Corg by 510-670 Pg compared with the preindustrial ocean. These results are consistent with the idea that the soft-tissue pump was more efficient

  3. Loading amorphous Asarone in mesoporous silica SBA-15 through supercritical carbon dioxide technology to enhance dissolution and bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengzan; Quan, Guilan; Wu, Qiaoli; Zhou, Chan; Li, Feng; Bai, Xuequn; Li, Ge; Pan, Xin; Wu, Chuanbin

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to load amorphous hydrophobic drug into ordered mesoporous silica (SBA-15) by supercritical carbon dioxide technology in order to improve the dissolution and bioavailability of the drug. Asarone was selected as a model drug due to its lipophilic character and poor bioavailability. In vitro dissolution and in vivo bioavailability of the obtained Asarone-SBA-15 were significantly improved as compared to the micronized crystalline drug. This study offers an effective, safe, and environmentally benign means of solving the problems relating to the solubility and bioavailability of hydrophobic molecules. PMID:25720818

  4. Oxygen electrode reaction in molten carbonate fuel cells. Final report, September 15, 1987--September 14, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appleby, A.J.; White, R.E.

    1992-07-07

    Molten carbonate fuel cell system is a leading candidate for the utility power generation because of its high efficiency for fuel to AC power conversion, capability for an internal reforming, and a very low environmental impact. However, the performance of the molten carbonate fuel cell is limited by the oxygen reduction reaction and the cell life time is limited by the stability of the cathode material. An elucidation of oxygen reduction reaction in molten alkali carbonate is essential because overpotential losses in the molten carbonate fuel cell are considerably greater at the oxygen cathode than at the fuel anode. Oxygen reduction on a fully-immersed gold electrode in a lithium carbonate melt was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry to determine electrode kinetic and mass transfer parameters. The dependences of electrode kinetic and mass transfer parameters on gas composition and temperature were examined to determine the reaction orders and the activation energies. The results showed that oxygen reduction in a pure lithium carbonate melt occurs via the peroxide mechanism. A mass transfer parameter, D{sub O}{sup 1/2}C{sub O}, estimated by the cyclic voltammetry concurred with that calculated by the EIS technique. The temperature dependence of the exchange current density and the product D{sub O}{sup 1/2}C{sub O} were examined and the apparent activation energies were determined to be about 122 and 175 kJ/ mol, respectively.

  5. Differentiation of Pigment in Eggs Using Carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and Nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) Stable Isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Feng M; Shi, Guang Y; Wang, Hui W

    2016-07-01

    Consumers prefer natural and healthy food, but artificial pigments are often abused in egg products. The study aimed at differentiating the origin of pigments in eggs by applying the technique of carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) stable isotope analysis. Five hundred sixty laying hens were randomly distributed into 14 treatments, which were divided into four groups: maize, carophyll red pigment, carophyll yellow pigment, and a mixture of carophyll red and yellow pigments. Eggs were collected and pretreated to determe the values of the Roche Yolk Color Fan (RCF), δ(13)C, and δ(15)N. With increasing maize content, the RCF and δ(13)C values of yolks increased. Moreover, the RCF values in the three pigment groups were significantly influenced by the artificial colors, but δ(13)C values were not significantly different, regardless of the existence of pigment. The δ(15)N values in all treatments did not vary as regularly as the carbon stable isotope. A strong positive correlation was found between RCF and δ(13)C in the maize group, but no such correlation was be observed in the pigment groups. It is concluded that carbon stable isotope ratio analysis (δ(13)C) of the yolk can be used to differentiate the origin of the pigment added to eggs.

  6. Differentiation of Pigment in Eggs Using Carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and Nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) Stable Isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Feng M; Shi, Guang Y; Wang, Hui W

    2016-07-01

    Consumers prefer natural and healthy food, but artificial pigments are often abused in egg products. The study aimed at differentiating the origin of pigments in eggs by applying the technique of carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) stable isotope analysis. Five hundred sixty laying hens were randomly distributed into 14 treatments, which were divided into four groups: maize, carophyll red pigment, carophyll yellow pigment, and a mixture of carophyll red and yellow pigments. Eggs were collected and pretreated to determe the values of the Roche Yolk Color Fan (RCF), δ(13)C, and δ(15)N. With increasing maize content, the RCF and δ(13)C values of yolks increased. Moreover, the RCF values in the three pigment groups were significantly influenced by the artificial colors, but δ(13)C values were not significantly different, regardless of the existence of pigment. The δ(15)N values in all treatments did not vary as regularly as the carbon stable isotope. A strong positive correlation was found between RCF and δ(13)C in the maize group, but no such correlation was be observed in the pigment groups. It is concluded that carbon stable isotope ratio analysis (δ(13)C) of the yolk can be used to differentiate the origin of the pigment added to eggs. PMID:27302905

  7. Short-term carbon and nitrogen cycling in urine patches assessed by combined carbon-13 and nitrogen-15 labelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambus, Per; Petersen, S.O.; Soussana, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    sources for C include the urine itself, increased solubility of soil C, lysis of microbial cells and leakage of C from scorched roots. The objective of this experiment was to test the hypothesis that: (i) urine deposition causes an increase in root-derived degradable C compounds in the soil, which (ii.......03), whereas HUN = HMN (P urea concentration and 0.15% for mineral N (NH4+). The N-15 isotopic data indicated that denitrification of soil NO3- was the sole source for N2O production in the urine-affected soil after 12...... of urea concentration, and 72% of the NH4+-was recovered after 6 weeks of incubation. This finding, in combination with the difference in the NO losses, emphasizes the potential to control N-emissions from urine patches through dietary control of the urine N-content. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights...

  8. Study on the Dispersion of 1.5mm & 4mm Chopped Carbon Fiber in Triethyl Phosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Rui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For the preparation of chopped CF (carbon fiber, CF composite material, it must be scattered at first. Based on the theory of “direct observation” and “crowding factor”, 1.5 mm and 4 mm short cut dispersion of CF which is done by acetone firstly in triethyl phosphate was studied in this paper, using triethyl phosphate as dispersant. Controlling the dosage of the dispersant and ultrasonic time to prepare for the dispersion of suspension, the macroscopic and microscopic structure of CF were tested before and after treatment. Test results show that to achieve good dispersibility for 4mm and 1.5mm CF with mass of 0.1g, the ultrasonic time should be controlled 2h and the amount of triethyl phosphate, the quality is 0.1 g of 4 mm and 1.5 mm of CF good dispersibility, respectively is 200 ml and 300 ml of dispersion conditions.

  9. Enhanced sensitivity for biosensors: Functionalized P1,5-diaminonaphthalene-multiwall carbon nanotube composite film-modified electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A homogeneous electroactive poly(1,5-diaminonaphthalene) (P1,5DAN) and multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) composite film-modified electrode was fabricated by cyclic voltammetry and a casting method. The dispersion and morphology of the MWNTs/P1,5DAN composite film were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The cyclic voltammograms of the electrode modified by the MWNTs/P15DAN composite film strongly depended on the film thickness and pH of the electrolyte solution. Two absolutely isolated oxidation potentials were found as the MWCNTs were immobilized onto the surface of P1,5DAN film in a pH 6.8 buffer solution containing ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA). Both peak currents linearly increased with increased concentrations. The electrochemical behavior of UA was not interrupted even in the presence of high-concentration AA given that AA had no observable electrochemical changes at the immobilized concentration. The electrocatalytic behavior of H2O2 was also investigated by steady-state amperometry for the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase on the P1,5DAN film. The plot of the response current vs. H2O2 concentration was linear over the wide concentration range of 0.015–5.37 mM.

  10. Carbon-rich presolar grains from massive stars. Subsolar 12C/13C and 14N/15N ratios and the mystery of 15N

    CERN Document Server

    Pignatari, M; Hoppe, P; Jordan, C J; Gibson, B K; Trappitsch, R; Herwig, F; Fryer, C; Hirschi, R; Timmes, F X

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-rich grains with isotopic anomalies compared to the Sun are found in primitive meteorites. They were made by stars, and carry the original stellar nucleosynthesis signature. Silicon carbide grains of Type X and C, and low-density graphites condensed in the ejecta of core-collapse supernovae. We present a new set of models for the explosive He shell and compare them with the grains showing 12C/13C and 14N/15N ratios lower than solar. In the stellar progenitor H was ingested into the He shell and not fully destroyed before the explosion. Different explosion energies and H concentrations are considered. If the SN shock hits the He-shell region with some H still present, the models can reproduce the C and N isotopic signatures in C-rich grains. Hot-CNO cycle isotopic signatures are obtained, including a large production of 13C and 15N. The short-lived radionuclides 22Na and 26Al are increased by orders of magnitude. The production of radiogenic 22Ne from the decay of 22Na in the He shell might solve the pu...

  11. Determination of biological transport of oxygen-15 and carbon-11 generated in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of induced 15O and 11C activity in live and dead rats was determined following local irradiation with a 32 MeV proton beam. Results indicate that rapid biological redistribution of some of the induced activity occurs within a minute following irradiation. Sufficient activity remains, bound in the intracellular water, to define the proton beam in tissue. Thus, mapping of the induced 15O activity proves to be a valid means of beam localization

  12. Grafting and carbonated irrigation water in transport of 15N and in the tomato production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of CO2 application through irrigation water, and of grafting in transport of 15N and in the tomato production, were studied. These treatments were arranged in a 2 x 2 factorial scheme (with and without CO2 in irrigation water and grafted and non-grafted tomato), in a completely randomized design, with four replications. The injection of CO2 into the water began at 34 days after transplant of seedlings (DAT) and continued for all irrigations. The application of the sulfate of ammonium with abundance in atoms of 15N of 3.13% in plants destined to analysis was done at 45 DAT when the plants were in the middle of fructification. After 14 days of fertilizer (15N) application the plants were harvested, washed, dried and sent for analysis of 15N in plant tissue. The results demonstrated that CO2 and the grafting did not alter the transport of 15N in the plant. The production of commercial fruits was larger when CO2 was applied in water. (author)

  13. Dehydrogenation of Isobutane with Carbon Dioxide over SBA-15-Supported Vanadium Oxide Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunling Wei

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A series of vanadia catalysts supported on SBA-15 (V/SBA with a vanadia (V content ranging from 1% to 11% were prepared by an incipient wetness method. Their catalytic behavior in the dehydrogenation of isobutane to isobutene with CO2 was examined. The catalysts were characterized by N2 adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Raman spectroscopy, and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR. It was found that these catalysts were effective for the dehydrogenation reaction, and the catalytic activity is correlated with the amount of dispersed vanadium species on the SBA-15 support. The 7% V/SBA catalyst shows the highest activity, which gives 40.8% isobutane conversion and 84.8% isobutene selectivity. The SBA-15-supported vanadia exhibits higher isobutane conversion and isobutene selectivity than the MCM-41-supported one.

  14. Application of δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures of organic matter fractions sequentially separated from adjacent arable and forest soils to identify carbon stabilization mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Kayler, Z.E.; Kaiser, M; Gessler, A.; Ellerbrock, R. H.; M. Sommer

    2011-01-01

    Identifying the chemical mechanisms behind soil carbon bound in organo-mineral complexes is necessary to determine the degree to which soil organic carbon is stabilized belowground. Analysis of δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures of stabilized OM fractions along with soil mineral characteristics may yield important information about OM-mineral associations and their processing history. We anlayzed the δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures from two organic matter (OM) fractio...

  15. Exhaustive Analysis of a Genotype Space Comprising 10(15 Central Carbon Metabolisms Reveals an Organization Conducive to Metabolic Innovation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed-Rzgar Hosseini

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available All biological evolution takes place in a space of possible genotypes and their phenotypes. The structure of this space defines the evolutionary potential and limitations of an evolving system. Metabolism is one of the most ancient and fundamental evolving systems, sustaining life by extracting energy from extracellular nutrients. Here we study metabolism's potential for innovation by analyzing an exhaustive genotype-phenotype map for a space of 10(15 metabolisms that encodes all possible subsets of 51 reactions in central carbon metabolism. Using flux balance analysis, we predict the viability of these metabolisms on 10 different carbon sources which give rise to 1024 potential metabolic phenotypes. Although viable metabolisms with any one phenotype comprise a tiny fraction of genotype space, their absolute numbers exceed 10(9 for some phenotypes. Metabolisms with any one phenotype typically form a single network of genotypes that extends far or all the way through metabolic genotype space, where any two genotypes can be reached from each other through a series of single reaction changes. The minimal distance of genotype networks associated with different phenotypes is small, such that one can reach metabolisms with novel phenotypes--viable on new carbon sources--through one or few genotypic changes. Exceptions to these principles exist for those metabolisms whose complexity (number of reactions is close to the minimum needed for viability. Increasing metabolic complexity enhances the potential for both evolutionary conservation and evolutionary innovation.

  16. Gas-Phase Synthesis of Dimethyl Carbonate from Methanol and Carbon Dioxide Over Co1.5PW12O40 Keggin-Type Heteropolyanion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Aouissi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The reactivity of Co1.5PW12O40 in the direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate (DMC from CO2 and CH3OH was investigated. The synthesized catalyst has been characterized by means of FTIR, XRD, TG, and DTA and tested in gas phase under atmospheric pressure. The effects of the reaction temperature, time on stream, and methanol weight hourly space velocity (MWHSV on the conversion and DMC selectivity were investigated. The highest conversion (7.6% and highest DMC selectivity (86.5% were obtained at the lowest temperature used (200 °C. Increasing the space velocity MWHSV increased the selectivity of DMC, but decreased the conversion. A gain of 18.4% of DMC selectivity was obtained when the MWHSV was increased from 0.65 h-1 to 3.2 h-1.

  17. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide. Progress report, December 15, 1991--December 14, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayland, B.B.

    1992-12-01

    This project is focused on developing strategies to accomplish the reduction and hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. Our approaches to this issue are based on the recognition that rhodium macrocycles have unusually favorable thermodynamic values for producing a series of intermediate implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Observations of metalloformyl complexes produced by reactions of H{sub 2} and CO, and reductive coupling of CO to form metallo {alpha}-diketone species have suggested a multiplicity of routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in constructing energy profiles for a variety of potential pathways, and these schemes are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Variation of the electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Emerging knowledge of the factors that contribute to M-H, M-C and M-O bond enthalpies is directing the search for ligand arrays that will expand the range of metal species that have favorable thermodynamic parameters to produce the primary intermediates for CO hydrogenation. Studies of rhodium complexes are being extended to non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics. Multifunctional catalyst systems designed to couple the ability of rhodium complexes to produce formyl and diketone intermediates with a second catalyst that hydrogenates these imtermediates are promising approaches to accomplish CO hydrogenation at mild conditions.

  18. Radiation dose to the respiratory airway linings from inhalation of (/sup 15/O)-carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigler, R.E.; Sgouros, G.; Zanzonico, P.B.; Cosma, M.; Leonard, R.W.; Dahl, J.R.

    1985-05-01

    Estimates of the radiation dose to the upper airways including the trachea, oropharnyx, and nasal linings from inhalation of oxygen-15 labeled CO/sub 2/ studies are provided. Three air administration procedures were examined; inhalation by nose, by mouth and by mouth through a mouthpiece. Attention is given to the inhaled radioactive gas absorbed and retained in the mucus and saliva layers lining the respiratory passages. The authors estimates from direct measurements in saliva and mucus of the highest total radiation dose is to the oropharnyx (5.2 rads, mouth; 2.8 rads, nose). The dose to the trachea was estimated to be 3.5 rads from mucus measurements from dogs. The comparative dose to lungs is 1.2 rads (Bigler and Sgouros, JNM 24:431, 1983). These doses are for steady-state measurements involving the breathing of 1 mCi/1-air for 1 hr. Single breath estimates can be obtained by dividing by the number of breaths per hr (720). Although this procedure leads to a 10% reduction in the radiation dose to the lung, the radiation dose to the lining of the vein infused is high, ranging from 70 to 430 rads for equal activity administered. The authors recommend considering the lung as the tissue at highest risk for both inhalation and IV administration procedures.

  19. Inhibition of acidic corrosion of carbon steel by some mono and bis azo dyes based on 1,5 dihydroxynaphihalene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Metwally; Moustafa, Moustafa E

    2004-01-01

    Inhibition of the corrosion of carbon steel in hydrochloric acid solution by some mono- and bis-azo dyes based on 1,5-dihydroxynaphthalene was studied in relation to the concentration of inhibitors using weight loss and potentiostatic polarization techniques. The percentage inhibition efficiency calculated from two methods is in a good agreement with each other. The inhibition mechanism of the additives was ascribed to the formation of complex compound adsorbed on the metal surface. The adsorption process follows Freundlich adsorption isotherm. The formation of the complex compound was studied by conductometric and potentiometric titrations. The stability constants of the Fe-complexes were determined using the latter technique and related to the inhibition efficiency.

  20. Two expedient ‘one-pot’ methods for synthesis of -aryl--mercaptoketones over anhydrous potassium carbonate or amberlyst-15 catalyst

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chayan Guha; Rina Mondal; Rammohan Pal; Asok K Mallik

    2013-11-01

    Two expedient one-pot methods have been developed for synthesis of -aryl--mercaptoketones using acetophenones, benzaldehydes and thiols as starting materials. The methods involve microwave irradiation (5min) of 1:1 mixtures of acetophenones and benzaldehydes over neutral alumina supported anhydrous potassium carbonate or amberlyst-15 in the first step, and that is followed by addition of thiol to the resulting material and keeping at room temperature for 1.5 h.

  1. Spatial variability of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) stable isotope ratios in an Arctic marine food web

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Joan Holst; Hedeholm, Rasmus Berg; Sünksen, Kaj;

    2012-01-01

    Stable isotopes of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) were used to examine trophic structures in an arctic marine food web at small and large spatial scales. Twelve species, from primary consumers to Greenland shark, were sampled at a large spatial scale near the west and east coasts of Greenland...

  2. Densities, excess molar volume, isothermal compressibility, and isobaric expansivity of (dimethyl carbonate + n-hexane) systems at temperatures (293.15 to 313.15) K and pressures from 0.1 MPa up to 40 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The densities of dimethyl carbonate, n-hexane and their mixtures were measured for 12 compositions at five different temperatures varying from (293.15 to 313.15) K and over the pressure range of (0.1 to 40) MPa. The densities of pure substances and their mixtures at atmospheric pressure were measured by a vibrating-tube densimeter. The densities at high pressures were measured by a variable-volume autoclave and precise analytical balance. The excess molar volume, isothermal compressibility, and isobaric expansivity were derived from the experimental densities.

  3. Chemical weathering and the role of sulfuric and nitric acids in carbonate weathering: Isotopes (13C, 15N, 34S, and 18O) and chemical constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cai; Ji, Hongbing

    2016-05-01

    Multiple isotopes (13C-DIC, 34S and 18O-SO42-, 15N and 18O-NO3-) and water chemistry were used to evaluate weathering rates and associated CO2 consumption by carbonic acid and strong acids (H2SO4 and HNO3) in a typical karst watershed (Wujiang River, Southwest China). The dual sulfate isotopes indicate that sulfate is mainly derived from sulfide oxidation in coal stratum and sulfide-containing minerals, and dual nitrate isotopes indicate that nitrate is mainly derived from soil N and nitrification. The correlation between isotopic compositions and water chemistry suggests that sulfuric and nitric acids, in addition to carbonic acid, are involved in carbonate weathering. The silicate and carbonate weathering rates are 7.2 t km-2 yr-1 and 76 t km-2 yr-1, respectively. In comparison with carbonate weathering rates (43 t km-2 yr-1) by carbonic acid alone, the subsequent increase in rates indicates significant enhancement of weathering when combined with sulfuric and nitric acids. Therefore, the role of sulfuric and nitric acids in the rock weathering should be considered in the global carbon cycle.

  4. 氧化钾/SBA-15催化合成碳酸二正丁酯%SYNTHESIS OF DIBUTYL CARBONATE BY TRANSESTERIFICATION OVER MESOPOROUS MOLECULAR SIEVE K2O/SBA-15

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔晓燕; 沈健

    2011-01-01

    以介孔分子筛SBA-15为载体,浸渍KNO3后经过焙烧,制得K2O/SBA-15固体碱催化剂.通过XRD,N2等温吸附脱附和IR等测试手段对试样进行了分析.研究了K2O/SBA-15催化碳酸二甲酯(DMC)与正丁醇(n-BuOH)酯交换合成碳酸二正丁酯(DBC)的反应.结果表明:当K2O负载量为2%,反应时间2 h,反应温度180℃,n(正丁醇)∶n(DMC)为3.0,m(催化剂)∶m(原料)为0.08时,DMC转化率最大为89.6%,DBC 收率为58%,DBC选择性为64.7%.并且K2O/SBA-15催化剂重复使用多次仍具有较好的催化效果.%K2O/SBA-15 as the solid base catalyst was synthesized bu loading potassium on mesoporous sieve SBA-15.The sample has been characterized by XRD, N2 adsorption desorption and IR.The study on the synthesis of dibutyl carbonate from dimethyl carbonate and butanol has been done.The experimental results showed that when the loaded mount of K2 O was 2 %, reaction time was 2 h, reaction temperature was 180 ℃ ,n(n-butanol): n(dimethyl carbonate) was 3 and the ratio of catalyst to raw material was 8%, the highest conversion of dimethyl carbonate was 89.6%, the yield of DBC was 58%, the selectivity to DBC was 64.7%.The results also showed that the K2O/SBA-15 could be reused with good catalytic effect.

  5. Dynamic study of carbon nanotube growth and catalyst morphology evolution during acetylene decomposition on Co/SBA-15 in an environmental TEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    s Aires, F. J. Cadete Santo; Epicier, T.; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal;

    2012-01-01

    In situ studies of micro- and nano-objects in their characteristic environment have been performed ever since the early days of electron microscopy [1]. Over several decades the in situ observation of the synthesis of filamentous carbon (nanotubes/nanofilaments) during hydrocarbon decomposition has...... been one of the most popular topics [2] for investigation in the environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM). In this work we study the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by the decomposition of acetylene on Co nanoparticles inserted into mesoporous silicas (SBA-15) using both conventional...... post mortem TEM measurements and real-time in situ ETEM observations. In situ observation of the formation of the carbon nanotubes was performed in an FEI Titan 80-300 ETEM equipped with an objective lens spherical aberration corrector [3]. Prior to acetylene decomposition, the catalyst nanoparticles...

  6. delta 15N and non-carbonate delta 13C values for two petroleum source rock reference materials and a marine sediment reference material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennen, Kristin O.; Johnson, Craig A.; Otter, Marshall L.; Silva, Steven R.; Wandless, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    Samples of United States Geological Survey (USGS) Certified Reference Materials USGS Devonian Ohio Shale (SDO-1), and USGS Eocene Green River Shale (SGR-1), and National Research Council Canada (NRCC) Certified Marine Sediment Reference Material (PACS-2), were sent for analysis to four separate analytical laboratories as blind controls for organic rich sedimentary rock samples being analyzed from the Red Dog mine area in Alaska. The samples were analyzed for stable isotopes of carbon (delta13Cncc) and nitrogen (delta15N), percent non-carbonate carbon (Wt % Cncc) and percent nitrogen (Wt % N). SDO-1, collected from the Huron Member of the Ohio Shale, near Morehead, Kentucky, and SGR-1, collected from the Mahogany zone of the Green River Formation are petroleum source rocks used as reference materials for chemical analyses of sedimentary rocks. PACS-2 is modern marine sediment collected from the Esquimalt, British Columbia harbor. The results presented in this study are, with the exceptions noted below, the first published for these reference materials. There are published information values for the elemental concentrations of 'organic' carbon (Wt % Corg measured range is 8.98 - 10.4) and nitrogen (Wt % Ntot 0.347 with SD 0.043) only for SDO-1. The suggested values presented here should be considered 'information values' as defined by the NRCC Institute for National Measurement Reference Materials and should be useful for the analysis of 13C, 15N, C and N in organic material in sedimentary rocks.

  7. Power factor improvement in hydrothermally synthesized Bi2−xSbxTe3 (x=1.5) — carbon sphere composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report fabrication of compacted Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 composites by adding 1 wt% of carbon spheres in the hydrothermal synthesis. The processing parameter of sintering temperature is investigated in order to optimize the thermoelectric power factor of pressed Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 composites. As a result, we find that the composite sintered at 360 °C shows the best power factor performance among the composites and has a largest power factor of 15.4 μW/cm K2 at 205 K and 13.5 μW/cm K2 at 290 K. When compared with the samples without addition of carbon sphere in the hydrothermal synthesis, the composites sintered at 340 °C and 360 °C both surpass the largest power factor of 12.1 μW/cm K2 at 280 K and 11.9 μW/cm K2 at 290 K for the 340 °C-sintered counterpart. - Graphical abstract: Compacted Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3−δ composites obtained by adding 1 wt% of carbon spheres in the hydrothermal synthesis. The composites sintered at 340 °C and 360 °C both surpass the largest power factor of 12.1 μW/cm K2 at 280 K and 11.9 μW/cm K2 at 290 K for the 340 °C-sintered counterpart. Highlights: ► Fabrication of Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3−δ composites. ► Addition of 1 wt% carbon spheres in the hydrothermal synthesis. ► Investigation of sintering temperature using encapsulating-and-sintering techniques. ► 360 °C-sintered composite showing the largest power factor of 15.4 μW/cm K2 at 205 K. ► 10–60% improvement over the counterpart without adding carbon spheres.

  8. Carbon dioxide reforming of methane over Ni/Mo/SBA-15-La2O3 catalyst: Its characterization and catalytic performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Huang; Renxiong Ma; Tao Huang; Anrong Zhang; Wei Huang

    2011-01-01

    The Ni/Mo/SBA-15 catalyst was modified by La2O3 in order to improve its thermal stability and carbon deposition resistance during the CO2 reforming of methane to syngas.The catalytic performance,thermal stability,structure,dispersion of nickel and carbon deposition of the modified and unmodified catalysts were comparatively investigated by many characterization techniques such as N2 adsorption,H2-TPR,CO2-TPD,XRD,FT-IR and SEM.It was found that the major role of La2O3 additive was to improve the pore structure and inhibit carbon deposition on the catalyst surface.The La2O3 modified Ni/Mo/SBA-15 catalyst possessed a mesoporous structure and high surface area.The high surface area of the La2O3 modified catalysts resulted in strong interaction between Ni and Mo-La,which improved the dispersion of Ni,and retarded the sintering of Ni during the CO2 reforming process.The reaction evaluation results also showed that the La2O3 modified Ni/Mo/SBA-15 catalysts exhibited high stability.

  9. Application of δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures of organic matter fractions sequentially separated from adjacent arable and forest soils to identify carbon stabilization mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sommer

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the chemical mechanisms behind soil carbon bound in organo-mineral complexes is necessary to determine the degree to which soil organic carbon is stabilized belowground. Analysis of δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures of stabilized OM fractions along with soil mineral characteristics may yield important information about OM-mineral associations and their processing history. We anlayzed the δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures from two organic matter (OM fractions along with soil mineral proxies to identify the likely binding mechanisms involved. We analyzed OM fractions hypothesized to contain carbon stabilized through organo-mineral complexes: (1 OM separated chemically with sodium pyrophosphate (OM(PY and (2 OM occluded in micro-structures found in the chemical extraction residue (OM(ER. Because the OM fractions were separated from five different soils with paired forest and arable land use histories, we could address the impact of land use change on carbon binding and processing mechanisms. We used partial least squares regression to analyze patterns in the isotopic signature of OM with established mineral and chemical proxies indicative for certain binding mechanisms. We found different mechanisms predominate in each land use type. For arable soils, the formation of OM(PY-Ca-mineral associations was identified as an important OM binding mechanism. Therefore, we hypothesize an increased stabilization of microbial processed OM(PY through Ca2+ interactions. In general, we found the forest soils to contain on average 10% more stabilized carbon relative to total carbon stocks, than the agricultural counter part. In forest soils, we found a positive relationship between isotopic signatures of OM(PY and the ratio of soil organic carbon content to soil surface area (SOC/SSA. This indicates that the OM(PY fractions of forest soils represent layers of slower exchange not directly attached to mineral surfaces. From the isotopic composition

  10. Application of δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures of organic matter fractions sequentially separated from adjacent arable and forest soils to identify carbon stabilization mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sommer

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the chemical mechanisms behind soil carbon bound in organo-mineral complexes is necessary to determine the degree to which soil organic carbon is stabilized belowground. We used the δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures from two organic matter (OM fractions from soil to identify the likely binding mechanisms involved. We used OM fractions hypothesized to contain carbon stabilized through organo-mineral complexes: (1 OM separated chemically with sodium pyrophosphate (OM(PY and (2 OM stabilized in microstructures found in the chemical extraction residue (OM(ER. Furthermore, because the OM fractions were separated from five different soils with paired forest and arable land use histories, we could address the impact of land use change on carbon binding and processing mechanisms within these soils. We used partial least squares regression to analyze patterns in the isotopic signature of OM with established proxies of different binding mechanisms. Parsing soil OM into different fractions is a systematic method of dissection, however, we are primarily interested in how OM is bound in soil as a whole, requiring a means of re-assembly. Thus, we implemented the recent zonal framework described by Kleber et al. (2007 to relate our findings to undisturbed soil. The δ15N signature of OM fractions served as a reliable indicator for microbial processed carbon in both arable and forest land use types. The δ13C signature of OM fractions in arable sites did not correlate well with proxies of soil mineral properties while a consistent pattern of enrichment was seen in the δ13C of OM fractions in the forest sites. We found a significant difference in δ13C of pooled OM fractions between the forest and arable land use type although it was relatively small (<1‰. We found different binding mechanisms predominate in each land use type. The isotopic signatures of OM fractions from arable soils were highly related to the clay and silt size particles

  11. Application of δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures of organic matter fractions sequentially separated from adjacent arable and forest soils to identify carbon stabilization mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayler, Z. E.; Kaiser, M.; Gessler, A.; Ellerbrock, R. H.; Sommer, M.

    2011-03-01

    Identifying the chemical mechanisms behind soil carbon bound in organo-mineral complexes is necessary to determine the degree to which soil organic carbon is stabilized belowground. We used the δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures from two organic matter (OM) fractions from soil to identify the likely binding mechanisms involved. We used OM fractions hypothesized to contain carbon stabilized through organo-mineral complexes: (1) OM separated chemically with sodium pyrophosphate (OM(PY)) and (2) OM stabilized in microstructures found in the chemical extraction residue (OM(ER)). Furthermore, because the OM fractions were separated from five different soils with paired forest and arable land use histories, we could address the impact of land use change on carbon binding and processing mechanisms within these soils. We used partial least squares regression to analyze patterns in the isotopic signature of OM with established proxies of different binding mechanisms. Parsing soil OM into different fractions is a systematic method of dissection, however, we are primarily interested in how OM is bound in soil as a whole, requiring a means of re-assembly. Thus, we implemented the recent zonal framework described by Kleber et al. (2007) to relate our findings to undisturbed soil. The δ15N signature of OM fractions served as a reliable indicator for microbial processed carbon in both arable and forest land use types. The δ13C signature of OM fractions in arable sites did not correlate well with proxies of soil mineral properties while a consistent pattern of enrichment was seen in the δ13C of OM fractions in the forest sites. We found a significant difference in δ13C of pooled OM fractions between the forest and arable land use type although it was relatively small (<1‰). We found different binding mechanisms predominate in each land use type. The isotopic signatures of OM fractions from arable soils were highly related to the clay and silt size particles amount while

  12. Surface-modified carbon nanotube coating on high-voltage LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathodes for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Taejin; Lee, Joong Kee; Mun, Junyoung; Choi, Wonchang

    2016-08-01

    Surface-modified carbon nanotubes were utilized as a coating for LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) via a mechano-fusion method as a strategy to prevent unfavorable carbothermal reduction. Two types of carbon nanotubes were investigated as coating materials: carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and oxidized carbon nanotubes (OCNTs), which were prepared by a simple re-oxidation process. The samples coated with CNTs or OCNTs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning and transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and elemental analyses. The OCNT-coated LNMO presented a highly enhanced discharge capacity retention (95.5%) and a coulombic efficiency of 99.9% after 80 cycles between 3.5 and 4.9 V (versus Li/Li+), whereas the CNT-coated LNMO exhibited poor retention of 47.2% and a coulombic efficiency of 95.3%. In addition, post-mortem XPS and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis proved that the OCNT coating improved the surface electrochemical stability and rate capability, whereas the CNT coating formed a thick resistive solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) film by accelerating the surface side reactions.

  13. The Speciation of Particulate Iron and Carbon in the East Pacific Rise 15oS Near-field Hydrothermal Plume and Underlying Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toner, B. M.; Lam, P. J.; Nicholas, S. L.; Ohnemus, D.; Hoffman, C. L.; Fitzsimmons, J. N.; Sherrell, R. M.; German, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    Particulate iron and carbon speciation were measured for water column and sediment samples collected at the East Pacific Rise ridge axis (15oS; Station 18) and approximately 80 km down-current (Station 20) during the US GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect cruise. Water column particles were collected by in situ filtration (0.2 micron, polycarbonate) from above, within, and below the hydrothermal plume. Water column samples were handled in an anaerobic chamber and stored frozen under inert gas shipboard, and protected from ambient oxygen during analysis. The flocculant, top-layer of the sediments was sampled shipboard under ambient conditions and stored frozen until analysis. Iron and carbon speciation were measured using X-ray microprobe (10.3.2) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) instruments at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA. Iron (1s and 2p) and carbon (1s) X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and imaging for particles revealed that: (1) in comparison to the above plume sample, organic carbon is abundant in particles within and below the plume, as well as in surface sediments; (2) iron sulfides are not detectable in any water column sample investigated so far; (3) the fraction of non-sulfide reduced iron is highest in the below plume samples; and (4) the below plume sample is rich in free-living microbial cells.

  14. Time course of soil carbon storage, 15N and radiocarbon signature in top- and subsoil of a 60-years agricultural field trial - indications for compensating effects of carbon input and turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifeld, Jens; Conen, Franz; Oberholzer, Hans Rudolf; Jochen, Mayer

    2014-05-01

    Soil carbon dynamics are controlled by the delicate balance between carbon inputs and outputs which both are co-regulated by land use and management (LUM) as important anthropogenic drivers. Upon land use change to cropland carbon stocks generally tend to decline but often the contribution of two opposing factors, namely changes in input and decomposition rates, to soil carbon stock changes is indistinguishable. Here we report on an ongoing cropland experiment in Zurich, Switzerland, named ZOFE (Zurich Organic Fertilization Experiment), established on former grassland in 1949. ZOFE encompasses a range of mineral and organic fertilization practices and a zero fertilizer treatment as control. The experiment has a block design with five replicates per treatment. We make use of productivity and fertilization gradients in selected treatments of the ZOFE trial to evaluate how low or high inputs (induced by differential yields and organic fertilization) may affect soil organic carbon storage and transformation. For the most recent sampling that also included subsoil down to 0.9 m, all properties were measured for every single replicate. Topsoil carbon storage declined after grassland conversion at rates of c. 0.2 t C ha-1 a-1, particularly in treatments with mineral fertilizer and high yields, and without fertilization and low yields. Organic matter amendments such as manure or compost could partially offset but not fully compensate some of the topsoil carbon loss. Over time the soil's delta 15N signature declined as well, probably due to increased atmospheric nitrogen deposition. It increased from the top- to the subsoil, indicating increasing microbial transformation, particularly with manure added. The soil's radiocarbon signature revealed distinct bomb peak patterns in all treatments but only in the topsoil. The 14C data confirmed that with higher productivity more recent organic matter was incorporated, both in top and subsoil. Because, in contrast to topsoil

  15. 15,000 years of black carbon deposition – A post-glacial fire record from maar lake sediments (Germany)

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Lehndorff; Mareike Wolf; Thomas Litt; Achim Brauer; Wulf Amelung

    2015-01-01

    Fires accompanied human development throughout the Holocene, leaving behind black carbon (BC) as residues from incomplete biomass burning. Here we used molecular fire markers, benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCAs), to reconstruct fire history in two Eifel maar lakes, Germany. We hypothesized to find indications for (i) changes in BC related to ecosystem changes, (ii) an increase in BC influx at the onset of agriculture until modern times, and (iii) a change in BC quality due to technical progr...

  16. 1.5 V battery driven reduced graphene oxide-silver nanostructure coated carbon foam (rGO-Ag-CF) for the purification of drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Surender; Ghosh, Somnath; Munichandraiah, N; Vasan, H N

    2013-06-14

    A porous carbon foam (CF) electrode modified with a reduced graphene oxide-Ag (rGO-Ag) nanocomposite has been fabricated to purify water. It can perform as an antibacterial device by killing pathogenic microbes with the aid of a 1.5 V battery, with very little power consumption. The device is recycled ten times with good performance for long term usage. It is shown that the device may be implemented as a fast water purifier to deactivate the pathogens in drinking water.

  17. δ15N, δ13C and radiocarbon in dissolved organic carbon as indicators of environmental change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decomposition, humification, and stabilization of soil organic matter are closely related to the dynamics of dissolved organic matter. Enhanced peat decomposition results in increasing aromatic structures and polycondensation of dissolved organic molecules. Although recent studies support the concept that DOM can serve as an indicator for processes driven by changing environmental processes in soils affecting the C and N cycle (like decomposition and humification) and also permit insight in former conditions some 1000 years ago, it is unknown whether dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON) have an equal response to these processes. (author)

  18. Application of nitrogen and carbon stable isotopes (δ(15N and δ(13C to quantify food chain length and trophic structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Perkins

    Full Text Available Increasingly, stable isotope ratios of nitrogen (δ(15N and carbon (δ(13C are used to quantify trophic structure, though relatively few studies have tested accuracy of isotopic structural measures. For laboratory-raised and wild-collected plant-invertebrate food chains spanning four trophic levels we estimated nitrogen range (NR using δ(15N, and carbon range (CR using δ(13C, which are used to quantify food chain length and breadth of trophic resources respectively. Across a range of known food chain lengths we examined how NR and CR changed within and between food chains. Our isotopic estimates of structure are robust because they were calculated using resampling procedures that propagate variance in sample means through to quantified uncertainty in final estimates. To identify origins of uncertainty in estimates of NR and CR, we additionally examined variation in discrimination (which is change in δ(15N or δ(13C from source to consumer between trophic levels and among food chains. δ(15N discrimination showed significant enrichment, while variation in enrichment was species and system specific, ranged broadly (1.4‰ to 3.3‰, and importantly, propagated variation to subsequent estimates of NR. However, NR proved robust to such variation and distinguished food chain length well, though some overlap between longer food chains infers a need for awareness of such limitations. δ(13C discrimination was inconsistent; generally no change or small significant enrichment was observed. Consequently, estimates of CR changed little with increasing food chain length, showing the potential utility of δ(13C as a tracer of energy pathways. This study serves as a robust test of isotopic quantification of food chain structure, and given global estimates of aquatic food chains approximate four trophic levels while many food chains include invertebrates, our use of four trophic level plant-invertebrate food chains makes our findings relevant for a majority

  19. Ab Initio Thermodynamic Study of the CO2 Capture Properties of Potassium Carbonate Sesquihydrate, K2CO3·1.5H2O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Yuhua; Luebkes,David R.; Pennline, Henry W; Li, Bingyun Li; Janik, Michael J.; Halley, Woods

    2012-01-01

    By combining density functional theory and lattice phonon dynamics, the thermodynamic properties of CO2 absorption/desorption reactions with dehydrated potassium carbonates through K2CO3·1.5H2O + CO2 = 2KHCO3 + 0.5H2O(g) are analyzed. The energy change and the chemical potential of this reaction have been calculated and used to evaluate its thermodynamic properties and phase transitions. The results indicate that the K2CO3·1.5H2O can only be applied for postcombustion CO2 capture technology at temperatures lower than its phase transition temperature, which depends on the CO2 pressure and the steam pressure with the best range being PH2O ≤ 1.0 bar. Above the phase transition temperature, the sorbent will be regenerated into anhydrous K2CO3. If the steam pressure PH2O is much greater than 1.0 bar, it is possible to use the K2CO3·1.5H2O sorbent for precombustion CO2 capture technology. Compared to anhydrous K2CO3, K2CO3·1.5H2O requires less energy for regeneration.

  20. The Radiation Enhancement of 15 nm Citrate-Capped Gold Nanoparticles Exposed to 70 keV/μm Carbon Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Liu, Xi; Jin, Xiaodong; He, Pengbo; Zheng, Xiaogang; Ye, Fei; Chen, Weiqiang; Li, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    Radiotherapy is an important modality for tumor treatment. The central goal of radiotherapy is to deliver a therapeutic dose to the tumor as much as possible whilst sparing the surrounding normal tissues. On one hand, heavy ion radiation induces maximum damage at the end of the track (called the Bragg Peak). Hadron therapy based on heavy ions is considered superior to conventional X-rays and γ-rays radiations for tumors sited in sensitive tissues, childhood cases and radioresistant cancers. On the other hand, radiation sensitizers enhanced the radiation effects in tumors by increasing the dose specifically to the tumor cells. Recently, the use of gold nanoparticles as potential tumor selective radio-sensitizers has been proposed as a breakthrough in radiotherapy with conventional radiations. The enhanced radiation effect of heavy ions in tumor by using gold nanoparticles as radio-sensitizer may provide alternative in hadron therapy. In this study, we investigated the radiosensitizing effects of carbon ions with a linear energy transfer of 70 keV/μm in the presence of 15 nm citrate-capped AuNPs. The existing of AuNPs resulted in 5.5-fold enhancement in hydroxyl radical production and 24.5% increment in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for carbon-ion-irradiated HeLa cells. The study indicated gold nanoparticles can be used as potential radio-sensitizer in carbon ions therapy. PMID:27455642

  1. Exhaustive Analysis of a Genotype Space Comprising 10(15 )Central Carbon Metabolisms Reveals an Organization Conducive to Metabolic Innovation.

    OpenAIRE

    Sayed-Rzgar Hosseini; Aditya Barve; Andreas Wagner

    2015-01-01

    All biological evolution takes place in a space of possible genotypes and their phenotypes. The structure of this space defines the evolutionary potential and limitations of an evolving system. Metabolism is one of the most ancient and fundamental evolving systems, sustaining life by extracting energy from extracellular nutrients. Here we study metabolism's potential for innovation by analyzing an exhaustive genotype-phenotype map for a space of 10(15) metabolisms that encodes all possible su...

  2. Determination of the δ15N and δ13C of total nitrogen and carbon in solids; RSIL lab code 1832

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revesz, Kinga; Qi, Haiping; Coplan, Tyler B.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab code 1832 is to determine the δ(15N/14N), abbreviated as δ15N, and the δ(13C/12C), abbreviated as δ13C, of total nitrogen and carbon in a solid sample. A Carlo Erba NC 2500 elemental analyzer (EA) is used to convert total nitrogen and carbon in a solid sample into N2 and CO2 gas. The EA is connected to a continuous flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS), which determines the relative difference in stable nitrogen isotope-amount ratio (15N/14N) of the product N2 gas and the relative difference in stable carbon isotope-amount ratio (13C/12C) of the product CO2 gas. The combustion is quantitative; no isotopic fractionation is involved. Samples are placed in tin capsules and loaded into a Costech Zero Blank Autosampler on the EA. Under computer control, samples then are dropped into a heated reaction tube that contains an oxidant, where combustion takes place in a helium atmosphere containing an excess of oxygen gas. Combustion products are transported by a helium carrier through a reduction furnace to remove excess oxygen and to convert all nitrous oxides into N2 and through a drying tube to remove water. The gas-phase products, mainly CO2 and N2, are separated by a gas chromatograph. The gas is then introduced into the IRMS through a Finnigan MAT (now Thermo Scientific) ConFlo II interface. The Finnigan MAT ConFlo II interface is used for introducing not only sample into the IRMS but also N2 and CO2 reference gases and helium for sample dilution. The flash combustion is quantitative; no isotopic fractionation is involved. The IRMS is a Thermo Scientific Delta V CF-IRMS. It has a universal triple collector, two wide cups with a narrow cup in the middle; it is capable of measuring mass/charge (m/z) 28, 29, 30 or with a magnet current change 44, 45, 46, simultaneously. The ion beams from these m/z values are as follows: m/z 28 = N2 = 14N/14N; m/z 29 = N2 = 14N/15N primarily; m/z 30 = NO = 14N/16O

  3. Elucidating the impact of nitrate and labile carbon application on spatial heterogeneity of denitrification by 15N modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Laura; Loick, Nadine; Dixon, Liz; Matthews, Peter; Gilsanz, Claudia; Bol, Roland; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Well, Reinhard

    2016-04-01

    N2O is considered to be an important GHG with soils representing its major source and accounting for approximately 6% of the current global warming and is also implicated in the depletion of stratospheric ozone. The atmospheric N2O concentration has been increasing since the Industrial Revolution making the understanding of its sources and removal processes very important for development of mitigation strategies. Bergstermann et al. (2011) found evidence of the existence of more than one pool of nitrate undergoing denitrification in a silty clay loam arable soil amended with glucose/nitrate solution. The Rayleigh type model was used to simulate d15N of N2O using process rates and associated fractionation factors, but assumptions for some of the model parameters had to be made due to lack of available data. In this study we carried out 2 incubation experiments in order to parameterise the model. To restrict the volume of soil reached by the amendment, we used blocks containing 3 soil cores that were incubated in one vessel to measure emissions of NO, N2O, N2 and CO2 from a clay grassland soil amended with KNO3 (N) and glucose (C) in three treatments: '1C' only 1 core received N and C (the other 2 received water), '3C' 3 cores received N and C, and 'Control' (received water only). The results showed changes in the d15Nbulk trends after day 6 post amendment application, coinciding with the decrease of N2O fluxes. We also report the results in the 15N site preference (SP) and d18O. We will show the results from the model validation based on this data.

  4. Research on silicon-carbon alloys and interfaces. Final subcontract report, 15 February 1991--31 July 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abelson, J.R. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States)

    1995-07-01

    This report describes work performed to develop improved p-type wide-band-gap hydrogenated amorphous silicon-carbon alloy (a-Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x:}H) thin films and interfaces for the ``top junction`` in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H)-based p-i-n solar cells. We used direct current reactive magnetron sputtering to deposit undoped a-Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x}H films with a Tauc band gap E{sub g} of 1.90 eV, a sub-band-gap absorption of 0.4 (at 1.2 eV), an Urbach energy of 55 MeV, an ambipolar diffusion length of 100 nm, an air-mass-one photoconductivity of 10{sup {minus}6}/{Omega}-cm, and a dark conductivity of 8{times} 1O{sup {minus}11}/{Omega}-cm. p{sup +}a-Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x}:H films with a Tauc band gap of 1.85 eV have a dark conductivity of 8 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}/{Omega}-cm and thermal activation energy of 0.28 eV. We used in-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry and post-growth X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to determine the relative roles of H and Si in the chemical reduction of SnO{sub 2} in the early stages of film growth. We used in-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry to show that a-Si:H can be transformed into {mu}c-Si:H in a subsurface region under appropriate growth conditions. We also determined substrate cleaning and ion bombardment conditions which improve the adhesion of a-Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x}:H films.

  5. Soil Organic Carbon Accumulation Increases Percentage of Soil Olsen-P to Total P at Two 15-Year Mono-Cropping Systems in Northern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Pu; XIAO Hou-jun; HE Xin-hua; XU Ming-gang; ZHANG Hui-min; PENG Chang; GAO Hong-jun; LIU Hua; XU Yong-mei; QIN Song

    2014-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil Olsen-P are key soil fertility indexes but information on their relationships is limited particularly under long-term fertilization. We investigated the relationships between SOC and the percentage of soil Olsen-P to total P (PSOPTP) under six different 15-yr (1990-2004) long-term fertilizations at two cropping systems in northern China. These fertilization treatments were (1) unfertilized control (control);(2) chemical nitrogen (N);(3) N plus chemical P (NP);(4) NP plus chemical potassium (NPK);(5) NPK plus animal manure (NPKM) and (6) high NPKM (hNPKM). Compared with their initial values in 1989 at both sites, during the 11th to 15th fertilization years annual mean SOC contents were signiifcantly increased by 39.4-47.0%and 58.9-93.9%at Gongzhuling, Jilin Province, and Urumqi, Xinjiang, China, under the two NPKM fertilizations, respectively, while no signiifcant changes under the no-P or chemical P fertilization. During the 11th to 15th fertilization years, annual mean PSOPTP was respectively increased by 2.6-4.2 and 5.8-14.1 times over the initial values under the two chemical P fertilizations and the two NPKM fertilizations, but was unchanged in their initial levels under the two no-P fertilizations at both sites. Over the 15-yr long-term fertilization SOC signiifcantly positively correlated with PSOPTP (r2=0.55-0.79, P<0.01). We concluded that the combination of chemical P plus manure is an effective way to promote SOC accumulation and the percentage of soil Olsen-P to total P at the two mono-cropping system sites in northern China.

  6. Carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars: a window on AGB nucleosynthesis and binary evolution. I. Detailed analysis of 15 binary stars with known orbital periods

    CERN Document Server

    Abate, C; Karakas, A I; Izzard, R G

    2015-01-01

    AGB stars are responsible for producing a variety of elements, including carbon, nitrogen, and the heavy elements produced in the slow neutron-capture process ($s$-elements). There are many uncertainties involved in modelling the evolution and nucleosynthesis of AGB stars, and this is especially the case at low metallicity, where most of the stars with high enough masses to enter the AGB have evolved to become white dwarfs and can no longer be observed. The stellar population in the Galactic halo is of low mass ($\\lesssim 0.85M_{\\odot}$) and only a few observed stars have evolved beyond the first giant branch. However, we have evidence that low-metallicity AGB stars in binary systems have interacted with their low-mass secondary companions in the past. The aim of this work is to investigate AGB nucleosynthesis at low metallicity by studying the surface abundances of chemically peculiar very metal-poor stars of the halo observed in binary systems. To this end we select a sample of 15 carbon- and $s$-element-en...

  7. Traceability of animal byproducts in quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica tissues using carbon (13C/12C and nitrogen (15N/14N stable isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Móri

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Consistent information on meat products consumed by the public is essential. The technique of stable isotopes is a powerful tool to recover consumers' confidence, as it allows the detection of animal byproduct residues in poultry meat, particularly in quail meat. This study aimed at checking the presence of poultry byproduct mixtures in quail diets by applying the technique of carbon (13C/12C and nitrogen (15N/14N stable isotopes in quail breast muscle, keel, and tibia. Sixty four one-day-old male quails were obtained from a commercial farm. Birds were housed in an experimental house from one to 42 days of age, and were randomly distributed into 8 experimental treatments, and fed diets containing poultry offal meal (POM, bovine meat and bone meal (MBM or poultry feather meal (PFM, or their mixtures. Four birds per treatment were slaughtered at 42 days of age, and breast (Pectoralis major, keel, and tibia were collected for analyses. The inclusion of animal byproducts in quail diets was detected by 13C e 15N analyses in the tissues of the birds; however, it was not possible to specify which byproducts were used. It was concluded that quail meat can be certified by the technique of stable isotopes.

  8. Pan-Arctic concentrations of mercury and stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) in marine zooplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomerleau, Corinne; Stern, Gary A; Pućko, Monika; Foster, Karen L; Macdonald, Robie W; Fortier, Louis

    2016-05-01

    Zooplankton play a central role in marine food webs, dictating the quantity and quality of energy available to upper trophic levels. They act as "keystone" species in transfer of mercury (Hg) up through the marine food chain. Here, we present the first Pan-Arctic overview of total and monomethylmercury concentrations (THg and MMHg) and stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) in selected zooplankton species by assembling data collected between 1998 and 2012 from six arctic regions (Laptev Sea, Chukchi Sea, southeastern Beaufort Sea, Canadian Arctic Archipelago, Hudson Bay and northern Baffin Bay). MMHg concentrations in Calanus spp., Themisto spp. and Paraeuchaeta spp. were found to increase with higher δ(15)N and lower δ(13)C. The southern Beaufort Sea exhibited both the highest THg and MMHg concentrations. Biomagnification of MMHg between Calanus spp. and two of its known predators, Themisto spp. and Paraeuchaeta spp., was greatest in the southern Beaufort Sea. Our results show large geographical variations in Hg concentrations and isotopic signatures for individual species related to regional ecosystem features, such as varying water masses and freshwater inputs, and highlight the increased exposure to Hg in the marine food chain of the southern Beaufort Sea. PMID:26874765

  9. Efficiency of Carbon Sequestration and Oxygen Release as well as Cooling and Humidification of 15 Precious Tree Species%15种珍贵树种固碳释氧和降温增湿功能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴培衍; 吴艺东; 林天民; 卢敏勇

    2015-01-01

    以漳州市龙海林下林场15种珍贵树种为材料,进行光合速率、叶面积指数和蒸腾速率的测定,对其固碳释氧和降温增湿功能进行量化研究。结果表明:石笔木有最大的叶面积指数,竹叶楠有最大的绿量,红叶乌桕的叶面积指数和绿量均最小。香樟、红锥、石笔木、蝴蝶树和油楠的固碳释氧能力在供试的珍贵树种中是较强的,而红叶乌桕和米老排的固碳释氧能力较弱。日降温增湿效果其从低到高的顺序为红色乌桕、米老排、火烧花、秋枫、檀香紫檀、降香黄檀、石笔木、油楠、竹叶楠、天竺桂、蝴蝶树、檀香、沉香、香樟和红锥。基于对供试15种珍贵树种固碳释氧和降温增湿能力的分析认为,红锥、香樟和蝴蝶树可作为优选树种。%Taking 1 5 precious tree species in Longhai Linxia State-Owned Forest Farm in Zhangzhou City as materi-als,photosynthetic rate,leaf area index (LAI)& transpiration rate were determined.Result shows that leaf area in-dex of Tutcheria championi are the maximum;the green biomass of Phoeba faberi are the maximum;the leaf area index and green biomass of Euphorbia cotinifolia are both minimum.The capability of carbon sequestration & oxy-gen release of Cinnamomum camphora ,Castanopsis hystrix ,Tutcheria championi ,Heritiera parvifolia and Sindo-ra glabra are stronger in these precious trees,while that of S .sebiferum and Mytilaria laosensis are weaker.The ascending order of effects of daily cooling and humidification is Euphorbia cotinifolia sebiferum ,Mytilaria laosen-sis ,Mayodendron igneum ,Bischofia j avanica ,Pterocarpus santalinus ,Dalbergia odorifera ,Tutcheria championi , Sindora glabra ,Phoebe faberi ,Cinnamomum j aponicum ,Heritiera parvifolia ,Santalum album ,Aquilaria sinen-sis ,Cinnamomum camphora and Castanopsis hystrix .Castanopsis hystrix ,Cinnamomum camphora and Heritiera parvifolia were considered to be priority tree species by

  10. Influence of metallurgical phase transformation on crack propagation of 15-5PH stainless steel and 16MND5 low carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study focuses on the effects of phase transformations on crack propagation. We want to understand the changes of fracture toughness during welding. In this work, fracture toughness is expressed by J-integral. There are many experimental methods to obtain the critical toughness JIC but they are impractical for our investigation during phase transformation. That is the reason why we have proposed a method coupling mechanical tests, digital image correlation and finite element simulation. The fracture tests are implemented on pre-cracked single edge notched plate sample which is easy for machining and heat conduct during phase transformation. The tests are conducted at different temperatures until rupture. Digital image correlation gives us the displacement information on every sample. Each test is then simulated by finite element where the fracture toughness is evaluated by the method G-Theta at the crack propagation starting moment found by potential drop method and digital image correlation technical. Two materials have been studied, 15Cr-5Ni martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steel and 16MND5 ferritic low carbon steel. For these two materials, different test temperatures were chosen before, during and after phase transformation for testing and failure characterization of the mechanical behavior. Investigation result shows that metallurgical phase transformation has an influence on fracture toughness and further crack propagation. For 15-5PH, the result of J1C shows that the as received 15-5PH has higher fracture toughness than the one at 200 C. The toughness is also higher than the original material after one cycle heat treatment probably due to some residual austenite. Meanwhile, pure austenite 15-5PH at 200 C has higher fracture toughness than pure martensitic 15-5PH at 200 C. For 16MND5, the result also proves that the phase transformation affects fracture toughness. The as received material has bigger J1C than the situation where it was heated

  11. Analysis of carbon and nitrogen co-metabolism in yeast by ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry applying {sup 13}C- and {sup 15}N-labeled substrates simultaneously

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blank, Lars M. [TU Dortmund University, Laboratory of Chemical Biotechnology, Department of Biochemical and Chemical Engineering, Dortmund (Germany); RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Applied Microbiology - iAMB, Aachen Biology and Biotechnology - ABBt, Aachen (Germany); Desphande, Rahul R. [TU Dortmund University, Laboratory of Chemical Biotechnology, Department of Biochemical and Chemical Engineering, Dortmund (Germany); Michigan State University, Department of Plant Biology, East Lansing, MI (United States); Schmid, Andreas [TU Dortmund University, Laboratory of Chemical Biotechnology, Department of Biochemical and Chemical Engineering, Dortmund (Germany); Hayen, Heiko [Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaften-ISAS-e.V, Dortmund (Germany); University of Wuppertal, Department of Food Chemistry, Wuppertal (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    Alternative metabolic pathways inside a cell can be deduced using stable isotopically labeled substrates. One prerequisite is accurate measurement of the labeling pattern of targeted metabolites. Experiments are generally limited to the use of single-element isotopes, mainly {sup 13}C. Here, we demonstrate the application of direct infusion nanospray, ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) for metabolic studies using differently labeled elemental isotopes simultaneously - i.e., {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N - in amino acids of a total protein hydrolysate. The optimized strategy for the analysis of metabolism by a hybrid linear ion trap-FTICR-MS comprises the collection of multiple adjacent selected ion monitoring scans. By limiting both the width of the mass range and the number of ions entering the ICR cell with automated gain control, sensitive measurements of isotopologue distribution were possible without compromising mass accuracy and isotope intensity mapping. The required mass-resolving power of more than 60,000 is only achievable on a routine basis by FTICR and Orbitrap mass spectrometers. Evaluation of the method was carried out by comparison of the experimental data to the natural isotope abundances of selected amino acids and by comparison to GC/MS results obtained from a labeling experiment with {sup 13}C-labeled glucose. The developed method was used to shed light on the complexity of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae carbon-nitrogen co-metabolism by administering both {sup 13}C-labeled glucose and {sup 15}N-labeled alanine. The results indicate that not only glutamate but also alanine acts as an amino donor during alanine and valine synthesis. Metabolic studies using FTICR-MS can exploit new possibilities by the use of multiple-labeled elemental isotopes. (orig.)

  12. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from time series observations using Bubble type equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the MOORINGS in the North Pacific Ocean from 2010-06-15 to 2010-06-15 (NODC Accession 0100074)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0100074 includes chemical, physical and time series data collected from MOORINGS in the North Pacific Ocean from 2010-06-15 to 2010-06-15. These data...

  13. Effect of Modification of SBA-15 by Carbon Films on Textural and Catalytic Properties of Supported Cobalt Catalysts%SBA-15的孔壁碳膜修饰对钴基催化剂结构与催化性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱海燕; 周朝华; 马兰; 程振兴; 沈俭一

    2011-01-01

    Carbon coated mesoporous SBA-15, named SBA-15C, was obtained from as-synthesized SBA-15 after graphitization in inert gas. With SBA-15 and SBA-15C as supports and cobalt nitrate aqueous solution as precursor, the supported cobalt-based catalyst samples were prepared by a wet impregnation method. The catalyst samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, N2 physisorption, temperature-programmed reduction, and NH3 microcalorimetric adsorption. The results suggested that upon doping the inner walls of SBA-15 with carbon, the hexagonal ordered mesoporous framework was retained while the surface area decreased a little and the thickness of pore wall increased. The supported cobalt-based catalyst retained the mesoporous characteristics with decreased surface area and pore volume. The average particle size of CO3O4 on SBA-15C was smaller than that on SBA-15, which suggested that the existence of carbon improved the dispersion of CO3O4 particles. However, the modification of SBA-15 with carbon films did not seem to increase the reducibility of CO3O4. Both Co/SBA-15 and Co/SBA-15C exhibited high selectivity for Cs+ hydrocarbons (-80%), but Co/SBA-15C showed higher stability in the F-T synthesis reactions.%在惰性气体中焙烧SBA-15制得孔壁被碳修饰的SBA- 15C样品,以它和SBA-15为载体,采用等量浸渍法制备了负载型Co基催化剂,并运用X射线衍射、N2物理吸附、程序升温还原、NH3吸附量热等手段对样品进行了表征.结果表明,SBA- 15C仍保持原有的六方有序的中孔结构,但其孔壁经碳修饰后发生增厚,比表面积略有下降.Co的负载使得SBA-15和SBA-15C样品的孔径基本不变,但比表面积和孔体积下降,仍保持其中孔分子筛的特征.CO3O4在SBA- 15C上的晶粒较小,但还原度较低,表明碳的存在有利于Co物种的分散.比较了Co/SBA- 15和Co/SBA-15C上的费托合成反应性能,发现两者对C5+的选择性均较高(达80%左右),但Co/SBA- 15C

  14. Cross-sections of large-angle hadron production in proton- and pion-nucleus interactions VI: carbon nuclei and beam momenta from ±3 GeV/c to ±15 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Bolshakova, A; Chelkov, G; Dedovitch, D; Elagin, A; Emelyanov, D; Gostkin, M; Guskov, A; Kroumchtein, Z; Nefedov, Yu; Nikolaev, K; Zhemchugov, A; Dydak, F; Wotschack, J; De Min, A; Ammosov, V; Gapienko, V; Koreshev, V; Semak, A; Sviridov, Yu; Usenko, E; Zaets, V

    2010-01-01

    We report on double-differential inclusive cross-sections of the production of secondary protons, charged pions, and deuterons, in the interactions with a 5% nuclear interaction length thick stationary carbon target, of proton and pion beams with momentum from ±3 GeV/c to ±15 GeV/c. Results are given for secondary particles with production angles between 20 and 125 degrees. Cross-sections on carbon nuclei are compared with cross-sections on beryllium, copper, tantalum and lead nuclei.

  15. Ecosystem partitioning of 15N-glycine after long-term climate and nutrient manipulations, plant clipping and addition of labile carbon in a subarctic heath tundra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Pernille Lærkedal; Michelsen, Anders; Jonasson, Sven Evert

    2008-01-01

    Low temperatures and high soil moisture restrict cycling of organic matter in arctic soils, but also substrate quality, i.e. labile carbon (C) availability, exerts control on microbial activity. Plant exudation of labile C may facilitate microbial growth and enhance microbial immobilization......, microorganisms and plants. There were few effects of long-term warming and fertilization on soil and plant pools. However, fertilization increased soil and plant N pools and increased pool dilution of the added 15N label. In all treatments, microbes immobilized a major part of the added 15N shortly after label...... addition. However, plants exerted control on the soil inorganic N concentrations and recovery of total dissolved 15N (TD15N), and likewise the microbes reduced these soil pools, but only when fed with labile C. Soil microbes in clipped plots were primarily C limited, and the findings of reduced N...

  16. Excess enthalpies from displacement calorimetry excess enthalpies for 1,1,1- trichloroethane+carbon tetrachloride and 2-chloro-2-methylpropane+carbon tetrachloride at 298.15 K

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miltenburg, J.C. van der; Obbink, J.H.; Meijer, E.L.

    1979-01-01

    Excess enthalpies HE are reported for the 1,1,1-trichloroethane+carbon tetrachloride and 2-chloro-2-methylpropane+carbon tetrachloride systems. The results are fitted to the formula HE = x(1−x)Σiai(1−2x)i.

  17. Magnéli phases Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7} and Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15} and their carbon nanocomposites via the thermal decomposition-precursor route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conze, S., E-mail: susan.conze@ikts.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS, Winterbergstr. 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany); Veremchuk, I. [Max-Planck-Institut für Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Nöthnitzer Straße 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Reibold, M. [Technical University of Dresden, Zum Triebenberg 50, 01328 Dresden (Zaschendorf) (Germany); Matthey, B.; Michaelis, A. [Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS, Winterbergstr. 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany); Grin, Yu. [Max-Planck-Institut für Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Nöthnitzer Straße 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Kinski, I. [Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS, Winterbergstr. 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    A new synthetic approach for producing nano-powders of the Magnéli phases Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}, Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15} and their carbon nanocomposites by thermal decomposition-precursor route is proposed. The formation mechanism of the single-phase carbon nanocomposites (Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}/C and Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15}/C) from metal–organic precursors is studied using FT-IR, elemental analysis, TG, STA-MS and others. The synthesis parameters and conditions were optimized to prepare the target oxides with the desired microstructure and physical properties. The electrical and transport properties of Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}/C and Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15}/C are investigated. These nano-materials are n-type semiconductors with relatively low thermal conductivity in contrast to the bulk species. The nanostructured carbon nanocomposites of Magnéli phases achieve a low thermal conductivity close to 1 W/m K at RT. The maximum ZT{sub 570} {sub °C} values are 0.04 for Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}/C powder nanocomposite and 0.01 for Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15}/C bulk nanocomposite. - Graphical abstract: From the precursor to the produced titanium oxide pellet and its microstructure (SEM, TEM micrographs) as well as results of phase and thermoelectric analyses. - Highlights: • Magnéli phases Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}/Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15} via thermal decomposition-precursor route is proposed. • The formation mechanism of the nanocomposites Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}/C and Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15}/C are investigated. • Microstructure of Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}/C and Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15}/C are examined. • The electrical and transport properties of Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}/C and Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15}/C are investigated. • The maximum figure of mertit ZT{sub 570} {sub °C} of Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}/C and Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15}/C are 0.01 and 0.04.

  18. Characterization and Catalytic Activity of CeO2-Ni/Mo/SBA-15 Catalysts for Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane%CeO2/Ni/Mo/SBA-15甲烷二氧化碳重整催化剂的表征和催化性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄健; 马人熊; 高志华; 沈朝峰; 黄伟

    2012-01-01

    A Ni/Mo/SBA-15 catalyst was modified with CeO2 and compared with the unmodified catalyst.The catalysts were characterized by N2 adsorption,CO2 temperature-programmed desorption,H2 temperature-programmed reduction,Fourier transform infrared spectrometer,X-ray diffraction,scanning electron microscopy,and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.Both the Ni/Mo/SBA-15 and CeO2/Ni/Mo/SBA-15 catalysts gave good catalytic activities at atmospheric pressure.The CeO2 impregnated Ni/Mo/SBA-15 catalyst exhibited excellent stability at 800 ℃ for 100 h on stream,and after the resction,carbon deposits were not formed on the catalyst.The Ni/Mo/SBA-15 and CeO2/Ni/Mo/SBA-1 5 catalysts had a regular hexagonal mesoporous structure.The nickel species and the Ce-Mo oxide components were all in the SBA-15 mesopores.This prevented carbon deposition and sintering of the nickel species in the CeO2/Ni/Mo/SBA-15 catalyst.%考察了CeO2修饰及未修饰的Ni/Mo/SBA- 15催化剂在CH4-CO2重整上的催化性能并采用N2吸脱附、CO2程序升温脱附、H2程序升温还原、傅里叶红外光谱、X射线衍射、扫描电子显微镜和X射线光电子能谱对催化剂进行了表征.结果表明,在常压,800C条件下,经过100 h在线评价后,Ni/Mo/SBA- 15和CeOz/Ni/Mo/SBA- 15催化剂仍具有高的反应活性和规整的六方介孔结构,其中CeO2修饰的CeO2/Ni/Mo/SBA-15催化剂表面没有积炭形成,表明CeO2的加入促进了Ni物种在SBA-15介孔分子筛表面的分散,从而阻止了Ce/Ni/Mo/SBA- 15催化剂上Ni的烧结和积炭.

  19. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH and other variables measured from laboratory experiment studies from an experimental carbonate exposure system from 2013-05-15 to 2013-07-12 (NODC Accession 0123316)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains the carbon chemistry measurements of a laboratory experiment study to understand the effects of ocean acidification on winter...

  20. Simulations of the global carbon cycle and anthropogenic CO{sub 2} transient. Final report, September 15, 1993--September 14, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarmiento, J.L.; Pacala, S.W.

    1998-06-01

    The primary accomplishment of this research was the development of an ocean biogeochemistry model for the carbon cycle, and the application of this model to studies of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} uptake and the global carbon cycle. The model has been used to study the oceanic uptake that would occur if future atmospheric CO{sub 2} were to be stabilized with the ocean circulation remaining constant. The authors also modeled how oceanic uptake would be affected by changes in ocean circulation that are predicted to occur due to global warming. The research resulted in 21 publications, and an additional 5 papers either in press or in preparation. The accomplishments of this research served as the foundation on which the Carbon Modeling Consortium was built. The CMC is a NOAA funded collaborative program involving principal investigators from various NOAA laboratories and universities. It has the goal of developing techniques to monitor the global carbon cycle on land as well as the ocean, and to predict its future course.

  1. The research of total organic carbon in boiler water of Taiyuan 1 st Power Plant unit 15%太原一电厂#15机组炉水中总有机碳控制探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张文斌

    2005-01-01

    通过对太原一电厂#15机组炉水中总有机碳(TOC)和离子成分检测、分析和试验研究,找到了水质异常的原因,同时确定了因TOC而引起水质异常应采取的措施和策略.

  2. Close association of carbonic anhydrase (CA2a & CA15a, Na+/H+ exchanger (Nhe3b, and ammonia transporter Rhcg1 in zebrafish ionocytes responsible for Na+ uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke eIto

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater fishes actively absorb salt from their environment to tolerate low salinities. We previously reported that vacuolar-type H+-ATPase/mitochondrion-rich cells (H-MRCs on the skin epithelium of zebrafish larvae (Danio rerio are primary sites for Na+ uptake. In this study, in an attempt to clarify the mechanism for the Na+ uptake, we performed a systematic analysis of gene expression patterns of zebrafish carbonic anhydrase (CA isoforms and found that, of 12 CA isoforms, CA2a and CA15a are highly expressed in H-MRCs at larval stages. The ca2a and ca15a mRNA expression were salinity-dependent; they were up-regulated in 0.03 mM Na+ water whereas ca15a but not ca2a was down-regulated in 70 mM Na+ water. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated cytoplasmic distribution of CA2a and apical membrane localization of CA15a. Furthermore, cell-surface immunofluorescence staining revealed external surface localization of CA15a. Depletion of either CA2a or CA15a expression by Morphorino antisense oligonucleotides resulted in a significant decrease in Na+ accumulation in H-MRCs. An in situ proximity ligation assay demonstrated a very close association of CA2a, CA15a, Na+/H+ exchanger 3b (Nhe3b, and Rhcg1 ammonia transporter in H-MRC. Our findings suggest that CA2a, CA15a, and Rhcg1 play a key role in Na+ uptake under freshwater conditions by forming a transport metabolon with Nhe3b.

  3. Synthesis and electrochemical characterization of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 by one-step precipitation method with ammonium carbonate as precipitating agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Ammonium carbonate is used as the precipitating agent of synthesizing LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 for the first time. → All the metal ions precipitated in one time, no washing process is needed. → Effect of concentration and hydrothermal on the materials are concerned. → The obtained material shows regular quasi-spherical. → The synthesized materials behave excellent electrochemical properties. - Abstract: Spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 materials are synthesized by one-step precipitation method. Ammonium carbonate is used as the precipitating agent to obtain a more precise feed ratio without recourse to traditional washing. After annealing at high temperature, the spherical particles become angular and show high levels of crystallinity. The synthesized samples are evaluated using powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and electrochemical testing. The samples synthesized with different metal ion concentrations yield different morphologies and rate performances. The sample synthesized with 0.2 mol L-1 gives the most uniform particle distribution and the best electrochemical performance. The specific discharge capacity values of the sample at 10 and 15 C are as high as 109.5 and 88.7 mAh g-1, respectively. After the high-rate cycling, its discharge capacity at 0.2 C can be reverted to 97.67% of its initial capacity.

  4. Database of normal human cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, cerebral oxygen extraction fraction and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen measured by positron emission tomography with {sup 15}O-labelled carbon dioxide or water, carbon monoxide and oxygen: a multicentre study in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Akita Research Institute of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Division of Brain Sciences, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, 4-1 Seiryo-Machi, 980-8575, Aoba-Ku, Sendai (Japan); Kanno, Iwao [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Akita Research Institute of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan); Kato, Chietsugu [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Sasaki, Toshiaki [Cyclotoron Research Center, Iwate Medical University, Morioka (Japan); Ishii, Kenji [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Tokyo (Japan); Ouchi, Yasuomi [Positron Medical Center, Hamamatsu Medical Center, Hamakita (Japan); Iida, Akihiko [Nagoya City Rehabilitation Center, Nagoya (Japan); Okazawa, Hidehiko [PET Unit, Research Institute, Shiga Medical Center, Moriyama (Japan); Hayashida, Kohei [Department of Radiology, National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Tsuyuguchi, Naohiro [Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka City University Medical School, Osaka (Japan); Ishii, Kazunari [Division of Imaging Research, Hyogo Institute for Aging Brain and Cognitive Disorders, Himeji, Hyogo (Japan); Kuwabara, Yasuo [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Senda, Michio [Department of Image-based Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan)

    2004-05-01

    Measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO{sub 2}) by positron emission tomography (PET) with oxygen-15 labelled carbon dioxide (C{sup 15}O{sub 2}) or {sup 15}O-labelled water (H{sub 2}{sup 15}O), {sup 15}O-labelled carbon monoxide (C{sup 15}O) and {sup 15}O-labelled oxygen ({sup 15}O{sub 2}) is useful for diagnosis and treatment planning in cases of cerebrovascular disease. The measured values theoretically depend on various factors, which may differ between PET centres. This study explored the applicability of a database of {sup 15}O-PET by examining between-centre and within-centre variation in values. Eleven PET centres participated in this multicentre study; seven used the steady-state inhalation method, one used build-up inhalation and three used bolus administration of C{sup 15}O{sub 2} (or H{sub 2}{sup 15}O) and {sup 15}O{sub 2}. All used C{sup 15}O for measurement of CBV. Subjects comprised 70 healthy volunteers (43 men and 27 women; mean age 51.8{+-}15.1 years). Overall mean{+-}SD values for cerebral cortical regions were: CBF=44.4{+-}6.5 ml 100 ml{sup -1} min{sup -1}; CBV=3.8{+-}0.7 ml 100 ml{sup -1}; OEF=0.44{+-}0.06; CMRO{sub 2}=3.3{+-}0.5 ml 100 ml{sup -1} min{sup -1}. Significant between-centre variation was observed in CBV, OEF and CMRO{sub 2} by one-way analysis of variance. However, the overall inter-individual variation in CBF, CBV, OEF and CMRO{sub 2} was acceptably small. Building a database of normal cerebral haemodynamics obtained by the{sup 15}O-PET methods may be practicable. (orig.)

  5. (13)Carbon and (15)nitrogen isotopes in autopsy liver tissue samples from Greenlandic Inuit and Danes: consumption of marine versus terrestrial food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milman, N.; Laursen, J.; Mulvad, G.;

    2010-01-01

    . Results: Inuit: median delta C-13 was -21.2 parts per thousand in cellular and -20.0 parts per thousand in connective tissue fractions (P = 001). Median delta N-15 was 10.6 parts per thousand in both cellular and connective tissue fractions. Body mass index was negatively correlated with delta C-13...... in the connective tissue fraction (r(s) = -0.42, P = 0.057). Danes: median delta C-13 was -27.0% in cellular and -24.3% in connective tissue fractions (P = 0.11). Median delta N-15 was 9.5 parts per thousand in cellular and 8.9 parts per thousand in connective tissue fractions (P = 0.5). Inuit had higher delta C-13...

  6. The biomarkers of 2,6,10,15,19-pentamethylicosenes and their carbon isotopic composition in the sediments from the Gulf of Mexico

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Zhiguang; WANG Cuiping

    2006-01-01

    A group of 2,6,10,15,19-pentamethylicosenes (PMI△) containing 1-5 unsaturated double bonds has been identified in the sea floor sediments from the Gulf of Mexico at the Green Canyon 238 site.These PMI△ compounds are distributed between nC22 and nC24 on the mass chromatogram of aliphatic fraction. Their δ13C values are very much depleted in 13C and in the range of -86.7‰ to -115.5‰, whereas the δ13C values of companion n-alkanes range from -28.4‰ to -34.6‰. These unsaturated PMI△ compounds are typical biomarkers derived from the anaerobic oxidation of methane mediated by methane-oxidizing archaeal bacteria and indicative of the gas seeps or even the occurrence of gas hydrates in the deep sea sediments.

  7. Enhancement of superconducting Tc (33 K) by entrapment of FeSe in carbon coated Au-Pd17Se15 nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sukhada; Song, Kai; Ghosh, Kartik C; Nath, Manashi

    2014-03-25

    FeSe has been an interesting member of the Fe-based superconductor family ever since the discovery of superconductivity in this simple binary chalcogenide. Simplicity of composition and ease of synthesis has made FeSe, in particular, very lucrative as a test system to understand the unconventional nature of superconductivity, especially in low-dimensional models. In this article we report the synthesis of composite nanoparticles containing FeSe nanoislands entrapped within an ent-FeSe-Pd16Se15-Au nanoparticle and sharing an interface with Pd17Se15. This assembly exhibits a significant enhancement in the superconducting Tc (onset at 33 K) accompanied by a noticeable lattice compression of FeSe along the and directions. The Tc in FeSe is very sensitive to application of pressure and it has been shown that with increasing external pressure Tc can be increased almost 4-fold. In these composite nanoparticles reported here, immobilization of FeSe on the Pd17Se15 surface contributes to increasing the effect of interfacial pressure, thereby enhancing the Tc. The effect of interfacial pressure is also manifested in the contraction of the FeSe lattice (up to 3.8% in direction) as observed through extensive high-resolution TEM imaging. The confined FeSe in these nanoparticles occupied a region of approximately 15-25 nm, where lattice compression was uniform over the entire FeSe region, thereby maximizing its effect in enhancing the Tc. The nanoparticles have been synthesized by a simple catalyst-aided vapor transport reaction at 800 °C where iron acetylacetonate and Se were used as precursors. Morphology and composition of these nanoparticles have been studied in details through extensive electron microscopy. PMID:24494773

  8. Improved oil recovery in Mississippian carbonate reservoirs of Kansas near term Class 2. Annual report, September 18, 1994--March 15, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, T.R.; Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.

    1998-04-01

    This annual report describes progress during the second year of the project entitled {open_quotes}Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs in Kansas{close_quotes}. This project funded under the Department of Energy`s Class 2 program targets improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs. The focus of this project is development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and the mid-continent. As part of the project, several tools and techniques for reservoir description and management were developed, modified and demonstrated. These include: (1) a new approach to subsurface visualization using electric logs ({open_quotes}Pseudoseismic{open_quotes}); (2) a low-cost easy-to-use spreadsheet log analysis software (PfEFFER); and (3) an extension of the BOAST-3 computer program for full field reservoir simulation. The world-wide-web was used to provide rapid and flexible dissemination of the project results through the Internet. Included in this report is a summary of significant project results at the demonstration site (Schaben Field, Ness County, Kansas). These results include an outline of the reservoir description based on available and newly acquired data and reservoir simulation results. Detailed information is available on-line through the Internet. Based on the reservoir simulation, three infill wells will be drilled to validate the reservoir description and demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed reservoir management strategies. The demonstration phase of the project has just begun and will be presented in the next annual report.

  9. Effects of carbon on Pr0.15Tb0.30Dy0.55Fe1.85 compound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Heyan; LI Yangxian; YU Xiao; LI Songtao; MENG Xiangxi; XU Xuewen

    2006-01-01

    The structure, Curie temperature and magnetostriction of Pr0.15Tb0.30Dy0.55Fe1.85Cx (x=0-0.1) compounds were investigated by X-ray diffraction, a vibrating sample magnetometer and a standard strain technique.All the samples show entirely MgCu2-type Laves phase structure.The lattice parameter and Curie temperature increase with C content increasing.The magnetostriction at high magnetic field shows maximum value at x=0.05.

  10. Isotopic signatures (13C/12C; 15N/14N) of blue penguin burrow soil invertebrates : carbon sources and trophic relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seabird burrows provide a soil environment for processing discards such as feathers and guano, hence constituting a primary interface between the sea and the land. This study involved collection and culturing of soil invertebrates from three blue penguin (Eudyptula minor) burrows, and examined their 13C/12C and 15N/14N isotopic composition in relation to potential burrow resources (terrestrial plant litter, burrow soil, guano, blue penguin feathers). Two taxa (cerylonid beetles and small tineid moth larvae) had a depleted 13C/12C indicative of a level of dependence on C from terrestrial soil. Tineid moth larvae (Monopis crocicapitella and (or) M. ethelella) substantially increased their 13C/12C enrichment during development, implying increasing dependence on marine C. Remaining taxa, both decomposers and predators, had 13C/12C intermediate between guano and feathers. Larval and emergent fleas had the most enriched 13C/12C , indicative of a greater dependence on feather C and the likelihood of co-processing with guano. Pseudoscorpions and histerid beetles had overlapping isotopic enrichments implying competition for prey, but were spatially separated in burrow soil. With their highly enriched 15N/14N and marine 13C/12C, larvae and protonymphs of the histiostomatid mite Myianoetus antipodus stood alone. Blue penguin burrows therefore support a diverse invertebrate fauna that incorporates terrestrial soil as well as varying proportions of the various blue penguin discards. (author). 45 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Neutral atomic-carbon QSO absorption-line systems at z>1.5: Sample selection, HI content, reddening, and 2175 A extinction feature

    CERN Document Server

    Ledoux, C; Petitjean, P; Srianand, R

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of a search for cold gas at high redshift along QSO lines-of-sight carried out without any a priori assumption on the neutral atomic-hydrogen (HI) content of the absorbers. To do this, we systematically looked for neutral-carbon (CI) 1560,1656 transition lines in low-resolution QSO spectra from the SDSS database. We built up a sample of 66 CI absorbers with redshifts 1.521 compared to systematic DLA surveys. We study empirical relations between W_r(CI), N(HI), E(B-V) and the strength of the 2175 A extinction feature, the latter being detected in about 30% of the CI absorbers. We show that the 2175 A feature is weak compared to Galactic lines-of-sight exhibiting the same amount of reddening. This is probably the consequence of current or past star formation in the vicinity of the CI systems. We also find that the strongest CI systems tend to have the largest amounts of dust and that the metallicity of the gas and its molecular fraction is likely to be high in a large number of cases.

  12. Synthesis of 15 alpha-hydroxyestrogen 15-N-acetylglucosaminides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, E; Namba, S; Kurihara, H; Goto, J; Matsuki, Y; Nambara, T

    1995-03-01

    The synthesis of 15-N-acetylglucosaminides of 15 alpha-hydroxyesterone, 15 alpha-hydroxyestradiol, and 15 alpha-hydroxyestriol (estetrol) is described. The latter two were prepared by condensation of 2-acetamido-1 alpha-chloro-1,2-dideoxy-3,4,6-trio-O-acetyl-D-glucopyranose with appropriately protected 15 alpha-hydroxyestrogens by the Koenigs-Knorr reaction employing cadmium carbonate as a catalyst. Subsequent removal of protecting groups with methanolic potassium hydroxide provided the desired conjugates. 15 alpha-Hydroxyestrone 15-N-acetylglucosaminide was synthesized from the corresponding 15 alpha-hydroxyestradiol derivative by Jones oxidation followed by brief alkaline hydrolysis. These conjugates underwent enzymatic hydrolysis with beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase from Jack beans to produce 15 alpha-hydroxyestrogens. PMID:7792832

  13. T15

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kaigorodova

    2015-11-01

    The study was conducted with financial support from the Council for Grants of the President of the Russian Federation (Russia for the state support of young philosophy doctors, agreements of SC 114.120.14.168-MD Russian Scientific Foundation (Russia, Grant No. 14-15-00318 (sample collection and Russian Foundation for Basic Research (Russia, Grant No. 15-34-20864. We acknowledge support of this work by the Tomsk State University Competitiveness Improvement Program (Russia.

  14. Diffuse Carbon Dioxide (CO2) degassing from the summit crater of Pico do Fogo during the 2014-15 eruption, Cape Verde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Fatima; Dionis, Samara; Padrón, Eleazar; Fernandes, Paulo; Melián, Gladys V.; Pérez, Nemesio M.; Hernández, Pedro A.; Silva, Sónia; Pereira, José Manuel; Cardoso, Nadir; Asensio-Ramos, María; Barrancos, José; Padilla, Germán; Calvo, David; Semedo, Helio

    2015-04-01

    On January 3, 2015, a new diffuse CO2 degassing survey at the summit crater of Pico do Fogo volcano (2,829 m above sea level) was carried out by ITER/INVOLCAN/UNICV/OVCV research team to investigate the effect of the 2014-15 Fogo eruption on the diffuse degassing through the summit crater. Before the eruption onset on November 23, 2014, these type of surveys were periodically performed by ITER/INVOLCAN/UNICV/OVCV research team since May 2007. The first published data on diffuse CO2 degassing rate from the summit crater of Pico do Fogo volcano (219 ± 36 t d-1) is related to a survey performed on February 2010 (Dionis et al., 2015). Each survey implies about 65 CO2 efflux measurements to obtain a good spatial distribution and cover homogeneously the summit crater area (0.14 km2). Because of the sudden falls of rocks of different sizes inside the summit crater during the January 3 survey, the research team aborted continues working in the summit crater without completing the survey only 32 of the 65 CO2 efflux measurements were performed covering a smaller area (0.065 km2). Observed CO2 efflux values ranged from non detectable ( 300 t d-1). This most recent survey did not cover the hydrothermal alteration zone within the crater, where the highest CO2 efflux measurements are usually recorded. Dionis et al. (2015), Bull. Volcanol., in press;

  15. Synthesis of hydrated lutetium carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Liu [South China Univ. of Technology, Dept. of Applied Chemistry, Guangdong (China); Rong-jun Ma [Changsha Research Institute of Minig and Metallurgy, Hunan (China)

    1997-09-01

    Crystalline lutetium carbonate was synthesized for the corresponding chloride using ammonium bicarbonate as precipitant. The chemical analyses suggest that the synthesized lutetium carbonate is a hydrated basic carbonate or oxycarbonate. The X-ray powder diffraction data are presented. The IR data for the compound show the presence of two different carbonate groups. There is no stable intermediate carbonate in the process of thermal decomposition of the lutetium carbonate. (au) 15 refs.

  16. Carbon Farming as a Carbon Negative Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, C.; Laird, D.; Hayes, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    producers could generate revenue at carbon price of 15 per t CO2-e and 45 per t CO2-e in the range of 415 - 475 ha-1 and 440 - 620 ha-1, respectively. As a carbon negative technology, carbon farms could provide the backbone technology for a carbon neutral transportation biofuel through reduced indirect land use change.

  17. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from Marcus G. Langseth in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2014-10-04 to 2014-10-15 (NCEI Accession 0144547)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144547 includes Surface underway data collected from Marcus G. Langseth in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2014-10-04 to 2014-10-15. These data...

  18. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from time series observations using Bubble type equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from MOORINGS in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2010-12-05 to 2013-03-15 (NODC Accession 0117060)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0117060 includes time series data collected from MOORINGS in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2010-12-05 to 2013-03-15 and retrieved during cruise...

  19. Carbon Carbon Composites: An Overview .

    OpenAIRE

    G. Rohini Devi; K. Rama Rao

    1993-01-01

    Carbon carbon composites are a new class of engineering materials that are ceramic in nature but exhibit brittle to pseudoplastic behaviour. Carbon-carbon is a unique all-carbon composite with carbon fibre embeded in carbon matrix and is known as an inverse composite. Due to their excellent thermo-structural properties, carbon-carbon composites are used in specialised application like re-entry nose-tips, leading edges, rocket nozzles, and aircraft brake discs apart from several indust...

  20. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from time series and surface observations using Moored Autonomous Dissolved Inorganic Carbon (MADIC) System, Sunburst SAMI2 pH sensor, and other instruments from Kewalo Buoy near the coast of Honolulu, Hawaii from 2013-10-31 to 2014-06-15 (NCEI Accession 0132048)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To expand the number of tools available for autonomous carbonate system observations, we have developed a robust surface ocean dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC)...

  1. Nanographene reinforced carbon/carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Dhruv

    Carbon/Carbon Composites (CCC) are made of carbon reinforcement in carbon matrix and have high thermal stability and fatigue resistance. CCC are used in nose cones, heat shields and disc brakes of aircrafts due to their exceptional mechanical properties at high temperature. The manufacturing process of CCC involves a carbonization stage in which unwanted elements, except carbon, are eliminated from the polymer precursor. Carbonization results in the formation of voids and cracks due to the thermal mismatch between the reinforcement and the matrix and expulsion of volatiles from the polymer matrix. Thermal cracks and voids decrease the density and mechanical properties of the manufactured CCC. In this work, Nanographene Platelets (NGP) were explored as nanofillers to fill the voids/cracks and reduce thermal shrinkage in CCC. They were first compared with Vapor Grown Carbon Nanofibers (VGCNF) by dispersion of different concentrations (0.5wt%, 1.5wt%, 3wt%) in resole-type phenolic resin and were characterized to explore their effect on rheology, heat of reaction and wetting behavior. The dispersions were then cured to form nanocomposites and were characterized for morphology, flexure and thermal properties. Finally, NGP were introduced into the carbon/carboncomposites in two stages, first by spraying in different concentrations (0.5wt%, 1.5wt%, 3wt%, 5wt %) during the prepreg formation and later during densification by directly mixing in the corresponding densification mix. The manufactured NGP reinforced CCC were characterized for microstructure, porosity, bulk density and mechanical properties (Flexure and ILSS) which were further cross-checked by non-destructive techniques (vibration and ultrasonic). In this study, it was further found that at low concentration (≤ 1.5 wt%) NGP were more effective in increasing the heat of reaction and in decreasing the viscosity of the phenolic resin. The decrease in viscosity led to better wetting properties of NGP / phenolic

  2. 46 CFR 193.15-10 - Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... of discharging the system should the manual release or stop valve controls fail to operate. Each... EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-10 Controls. (a) Except as noted in § 193.15-20(b), all controls and valves for the operation of the system shall be outside the...

  3. Carbon Carbon Composites: An Overview .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rohini Devi

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon carbon composites are a new class of engineering materials that are ceramic in nature but exhibit brittle to pseudoplastic behaviour. Carbon-carbon is a unique all-carbon composite with carbon fibre embeded in carbon matrix and is known as an inverse composite. Due to their excellent thermo-structural properties, carbon-carbon composites are used in specialised application like re-entry nose-tips, leading edges, rocket nozzles, and aircraft brake discs apart from several industrial and biomedical applications. The multidirectional carbon-carbon product technology is versatile and offers design flexibility. This paper describes the multidirectional preform and carbon-carbon process technology and research and development activities within the country. Carbon-carbon product experience at DRDL has also been discussed. Development of carbon-carbon brake discs process technology using the liquid impregnation process is described. Further the test results on material characterisation, thermal, mechanical and tribological properties are presented.

  4. Influence of organic carbon sources and isotope exchange processes between water and nitrate on the fractionation of the stable isotopes 15N/14N and 18O/16O in dissolved nitrate during microbial dentrification in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stable isotopes of nitrate are commonly used to determine sources and degradation of nitrate. In this study, nitrite oxidizing bacteria were found to promote an oxygen isotope exchange between water and nitrate under anoxic conditions. Also, different carbon sources were found to influence the enrichment of stable isotopes in nitrate during microbial denitrification. Both results refine the stable isotope model of nitrate in respect to nitrate source determination and microbial nitrate reduction.

  5. 15 sekund slave / 15 seconds of fame

    OpenAIRE

    Bučar, Dušan

    2015-01-01

    15 seconds of fame is an interactive installation that every 15 seconds generates a new pop-art portrait of a randomly selected viewer. The installation was inspired by Andy Warhol’s ironical statement that “in the future everybody will be famous for 15 minutes.” The installation detects human faces and crops them from the wide-angle view of people standing before the installation. Pop-art portraits are then generated by applying randomly selected filters to a randomly chosen face from the au...

  6. Baskarp Sand No. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Bødker, Lars Bødker

    The Soil Mechanics Laboratory has started performing tests with a new sand, Baskarp No 15. Baskarp No 15 is a graded sand from Sweden. The shapes of the largest grains are round, while the small grains have sharp edges. The main part of of Baskarp No 15 is quarts, but it also contains feldspar...

  7. Baskarp Sand No. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Marianne; Hedegaard, Jette

    The Soil Mechanics Laboratory has started performing tests with a new sand, Baskarp No 15. Baskarp No 15 is a graded sand from Sweden. The shapes of the largest grains are round, while the small grains have sharp edges. The main part of of Baskarp No 15 is quarts, but it also contains feldspar an...

  8. E15 and Infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriarty, K. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Yanowitz, J. [Ecoengineering, Inc.,Sharonville, OH (United States)

    2015-05-27

    This report explores the compatibility of refueling station equipment with E15--a 15% ethanol and 85% gasoline blend intended for use in conventional gasoline light duty vehicles model year 2001 or newer. The report includes background information on E15, a literature review seeking to identify issues during the nationwide deployment of E10, a diagram of all station equipment and supporting data.

  9. 15 CFR 303.15 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... requests are governed by regulations issued by the Department of Homeland Security (see 19 CFR 7.4). (c... JEWELRY PROGRAM Jewelry § 303.15 Purpose. (a) This subpart implements the responsibilities of the... 2004. (b) The amended law provides for the issuance of certificates to insular jewelry producers...

  10. 15 CFR 30.15 - Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FOREIGN TRADE REGULATIONS Export Control and Licensing Requirements § 30.15 Introduction. (a) For export shipments to foreign countries, the EEI is used both for statistical and for... concerning other agencies that exercise export control and licensing authority for particular types...

  11. Vanadium Oxide Supported on Mesoporous SBA-15 as Highly Selective Catalysts in Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Ethylbenzene with Carbon Dioxide%负载型 VOx/SBA-15 催化剂催化CO2气氛下乙苯脱氢反应的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    相彬; 余长林; 徐恒泳; 李文钊

    2008-01-01

    利用浸渍法制备了系列不同钒含量的VOx/SBA-15乙苯脱氢催化剂. 并采用BET、 UV-vis、 XRD、 TPO和O2 脉冲等物理化学表征手段对催化剂进行了表征. 二氧化碳气氛下的乙苯氧化脱氢反应结果表明, 在 550 ℃, 当V2O5 的含量为20% 时, 催化剂表现出最好的脱氢性能. 乙苯的转化率达到 74.1%, 同时也获得95.7% 的苯乙烯选择性. 20 VOx/SBA-15具有较高的比表面积、较多的酸性、较少的积碳, 这可能是该催化剂表现出较好的催化性能的原因.

  12. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from ATLANTIS in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2012-04-19 to 2012-05-15 (NODC Accession 0108160)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108160 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from ATLANTIS in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2012-04-19 to 2012-05-15. These data...

  13. Synthesis and characterization of nanocomposites based on poly(3-hexylthiophene)-graft-carbon nanotubes with LiNi$_{0.5}$Mn$_{1.5}O$_4$ and its application as potential cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    THANG VAN LE; THU ANH NGUYEN; NGUYET MINH THI NGUYEN; ANH TUAN LUU; LE-THU T NGUYEN; HA TRAN NGUYEN

    2016-09-01

    The P3HT grafted on CNTs to form the P3HT-$g$-CNTs nanocomposites was synthesized and their morphologies, structure have been characterized via the sedimentation test, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-raydiffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed that the P3HT-$g$-CNTs has a better thermal stability than that of the P3HT/CNTs blend. The nanocomposite based on P3HT-g-CNTs and doped spinel LiNi$_{0.5}$Mn$_{1.5}$O$_4$ (LNMO) have been fabricated via mixing process. The structure and morphologies of LNMO/P3HT-$g$-CNTs nanocomposites have also been performed by SEM, XRD and TEM. The electrochemical performance of LNMO/P3HT-$g$-CNTs nanocomposites as cathode materials of lithium-ion batteries were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and exhibited the high diffusion of lithium ions in the charge–discharge process.

  14. Estudio de flujos verticales de carbono y nitrógeno en ambientes acuáticos controlados en la bahía de Knebel, Dinamarca utilizando isótopos estables de nitrógeno y carbono (15N y 13C A study of the vertical flow of carbon and nitrogen in controlled aquatic environments at the Knebel Bay, Denmark, with the use of the stable isotopes of nitrogen and carbon (15N y 13C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GIOVANNI DANERI

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available En este estudio se utilizaron isótopos estables como trazadores para caracterizar y cuantificar el flujo vertical de carbono y nitrógeno. Los experimentos se llevaron a cabo en la bahía de Knebel, Dinamarca (56 08' N, 10 11' E, en dos ambientes acuáticos controlados tipo mesocosmos. La adición de nutrientes inorgánicos estimuló el afloramiento del flagelado no-tóxico Prorocentrum minimum, determinando un comportamiento similar en las mediciones de clorofila a (Clo-a, nitrógeno orgánico particulado (NOP y carbono orgánico particulado (COP en ambos mesocosmos. Bajo condiciones no limitantes de nutrientes inorgánicos existió una baja discriminación isotópica resultando en bajos valores de delta13C en el COP en suspensión y sedimentado. El desfase entre los máximos de NOP, Clo-a y COP así como la rápida asimilación del nitrato adicionado en menos de tres días y una razón C/N variable indican que P. minimum posee una gran habilidad para asimilar nitrógeno inorgánico. La razón C/N alcanzó un mínimo al inicio del experimento, para luego aumentar una vez agotado el nitrato de la columna de agua. El nitrógeno nuevo sedimentado alcanzó un 10 a 11 % del total originalmente adicionado a la columna de agua en la forma de nitrato, sin que se observara una sedimentación masiva de P. minimum durante los días de duración de este experimentoStable isotopes were used as tracers to characterize and quantify the downward flux of carbon and nitrogen. The experiments were conducted in Knebel bay, Denmark (56 08' N, 10 11' E, in two controlled aquatic environments (mesocosm type. The addition of inorganic nutrients to the mesocosms stimulated a bloom of the non-toxic flagellate Prorocentrum minimum. A similar pattern in the concentration of chlorophyll a (Chl-a, particulate organic nitrogen (PON and particulate organic carbon (POC was observed in both mesocosms. The elevated nutrient conditions resulted in low isotopic discrimination

  15. 15 seconds of fame

    OpenAIRE

    Solina, Franc

    2003-01-01

    15 seconds of fame is an interactive installation which every 15 seconds generates a new pop-art portrait of a randomly selected person from the audience. The installation was inspired by Andy Warhol's ironical statement that ``In the future everybody will be famous for 15 minutes''. The installation detects human faces to crop them from the wide-angle picture of people who are standing in front of the installation. Pop-art portraits are then generated by applying different, rand...

  16. Main: LTRECOREATCOR15 [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available LTRECOREATCOR15 S000153 8-February-2006 (last modified) kehi Core of low temperatur...e responsive element (LTRE) of cor15a gene in Arabidopsis (A.t.); A portion of repeat-C (C-repeat), TGGCCGAC..., which is repeated twice in cor15a promoter (Baker et al., 1994); ABA responsiveness; Involved in cold indu... signaling mediated by phytochrome is necessary for cold- or drought- induced gene expression through the C/...DRE in Arabidopsis; See S000152; low temperature; cold; LTRE; drought; ABA; cor15a; BN115; leaf; shoot; phytochrome; Arabidopsis thaliana; Brassica napus CCGAC ...

  17. Reference: LTRECOREATCOR15 [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available LTRECOREATCOR15 Baker SS, Wilhelm KS, Thomashow MF The 5'-region of Arabidopsis thaliana co...r15a has cis-acting elements that confer cold-, drought- and ABA-regulated gene expression. Plant Mol Biol 24:701-713 (1994) PubMed: 8193295; GenBank: U01377; ...

  18. Flexible Carbon Aerogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Schwan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon aerogels are highly porous materials with a large inner surface area. Due to their high electrical conductivity they are excellent electrode materials in supercapacitors. Their brittleness, however, imposes certain limitations in terms of applicability. In that context, novel carbon aerogels with varying degree of flexibility have been developed. These highly porous, light aerogels are characterized by a high surface area and possess pore structures in the micrometer range, allowing for a reversible deformation of the aerogel network. A high ratio of pore size to particle size was found to be crucial for high flexibility. For dynamic microstructural analysis, compression tests were performed in-situ within a scanning electron microscope allowing us to directly visualize the microstructural flexibility of an aerogel. The flexible carbon aerogels were found to withstand between 15% and 30% of uniaxial compression in a reversible fashion. These findings might stimulate further research and new application fields directed towards flexible supercapacitors and batteries.

  19. Adsorption of octadecyltrichlorosilane on mesoporous SBA-15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adsorption of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) on mesoporous SBA-15 has been studied by using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) techniques. BET surface area analysis shows decrease of surface area from 930 to 416 m2/g after OTS adsorption. SEM pictures show close attachment of SBA-15 particles. EDAX measurements show increase of carbon weight percentage and decrease of oxygen and silicon weight percentage. XPS results closely support EDAX analysis. FTIR spectra shows presence of methyl (-CH3) and methylene (-CH2) bands and oriented OTS monolayer on SBA-15. Thermo-gravimetric analysis shows that the OTS adsorbed on SBA-15 are stable up to a temperature of 230 deg. C and that the OTS monolayers decompose between 230 and 400 deg. C

  20. Adsorption of octadecyltrichlorosilane on mesoporous SBA-15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirji, S.A. [Physical Chemistry Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411008 (India)]. E-mail: mirji@dalton.ncl.res.in; Halligudi, S.B. [Inorganic and Catalysis Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411008 (India); Sawant, Dhanashri P. [Inorganic and Catalysis Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411008 (India); Jacob, Nalini E. [Inorganic and Catalysis Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411008 (India); Patil, K.R. [Center for Material Characterization, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411008 (India); Gaikwad, A.B. [Center for Material Characterization, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411008 (India); Pradhan, S.D. [Center for Material Characterization, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411008 (India)

    2006-04-15

    Adsorption of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) on mesoporous SBA-15 has been studied by using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) techniques. BET surface area analysis shows decrease of surface area from 930 to 416 m{sup 2}/g after OTS adsorption. SEM pictures show close attachment of SBA-15 particles. EDAX measurements show increase of carbon weight percentage and decrease of oxygen and silicon weight percentage. XPS results closely support EDAX analysis. FTIR spectra shows presence of methyl (-CH{sub 3}) and methylene (-CH{sub 2}) bands and oriented OTS monolayer on SBA-15. Thermo-gravimetric analysis shows that the OTS adsorbed on SBA-15 are stable up to a temperature of 230 deg. C and that the OTS monolayers decompose between 230 and 400 deg. C.

  1. Reference: LTRECOREATCOR15 [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available LTRECOREATCOR15 Kim HJ, Kim YK, Park JY, Kim J Light signalling mediated by phytoch...rome plays an important role in cold-induced gene expression through the C-repeat/dehydration responsive ele

  2. Range_Extent_15

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The GIS layer "Range_extent_15" is a simple polyline representing the geographic distribution of the southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis) in mainland...

  3. Census_sum_15

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The GIS layer "Census_sum_15" provides a standardized tool for examining spatial patterns in abundance and demographic trends of the southern sea otter (Enhydra...

  4. Legislators Urge Carbon Emissions Cuts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mohi

    2007-02-01

    Legislators from the world's largest carbon dioxide (CO2) emitting countries met on 14-15 February in Washington, D.C., to discuss the future of the global climate and strategies to mitigate temperature increases resulting from global warming. The world faces a ``double challenge-how to reduce damaging carbon emissions while still meeting the energy demand that the world's poor need to escape poverty,'' said World Bank President Paul Wolfowitz during a keynote talk.

  5. 15. European TRIGA Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmenhaara, S. (ed.)

    1999-12-15

    The 15th European TRIGA Conference was organised by the VTT Chemical Technology and held in June 15-17, 1998, in Espoo, Finland. The topics of the conference included: reactor operation and maintenance experience, developments and improvements of TRIGA components, safety aspects, licensing, radiation protection, fuel management, personnel, training programmes, and research programmes at TRIGA stations. The special topic of the conference was TRIGA reactors and the Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

  6. 15. European TRIGA Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 15th European TRIGA Conference was organised by the VTT Chemical Technology and held in June 15-17, 1998, in Espoo, Finland. The topics of the conference included: reactor operation and maintenance experience, developments and improvements of TRIGA components, safety aspects, licensing, radiation protection, fuel management, personnel, training programmes, and research programmes at TRIGA stations. The special topic of the conference was TRIGA reactors and the Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

  7. Porous carbons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Satish M Manocha

    2003-02-01

    Carbon in dense as well as porous solid form is used in a variety of applications. Activated porous carbons are made through pyrolysis and activation of carbonaceous natural as well as synthetic precursors. Pyrolysed woods replicate the structure of original wood but as such possess very low surface areas and poor adsorption capacities. On activation, these exhibit increased adsorption volumes of 0.5–0.8 cm3 /gm and surface areas of 700–1800 m2 /gm depending on activation conditions, whether physical or chemical. Former carbons possess mixed pore size distribution while chemically activated carbons predominantly possess micropores. Thus, these carbons can be used for adsorption of wide distributions of molecules from gas to liquid. The molecular adsorption within the pores is due to single layer or multilayer molecule deposition at the pore walls and hence results in different types of adsorption isotherm. On the other hand, activated carbon fibres with controlled microporous structure and surface area in the range of 2500 m2 /gm can be developed by controlled pyrolysis and physical activation of amorphous carbon fibres. Active carbon fibres with unmatchable pore structure and surface characteristics are present and futuristic porous materials for a number of applications from pollution control to energy storage.

  8. 49 CFR 15.15 - SSI disclosed by DOT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false SSI disclosed by DOT. 15.15 Section 15.15 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROTECTION OF SENSITIVE SECURITY INFORMATION § 15.15 SSI... containing SSI are not available for public inspection or copying, nor does DOT release such records...

  9. 44 CFR 15.15 - Weapons and explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Weapons and explosives. 15.15 Section 15.15 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL CONDUCT AT THE MT. WEATHER EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE CENTER AND AT THE NATIONAL EMERGENCY TRAINING CENTER § 15.15 Weapons...

  10. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... before being swallowed; do not swallow them whole. Drink a full glass of water after taking either the regular or chewable tablets or capsules. Some liquid forms of calcium carbonate must be shaken well before use.Do not ...

  11. Carbon Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T. Lloyd Evans

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, the present state of knowledge of the carbon stars is discussed. Particular attention is given to issues of classification, evolution, variability, populations in our own and other galaxies, and circumstellar material.

  12. Dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, pH, and other variables collected from surface discrete observations using flow through pump and other instruments from Explorer of the Seas (ID: 33KF) in the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic ocean during the Ocean Acidification Cruise EX1507 from 2015-02-14 to 2015-02-15 (NCEI Accession 0154385)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Increasing amounts of atmospheric carbon dioxide from human industrial activities are causing changes in global ocean carbon chemistry. Through the SOOP program we...

  13. Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System (COSRS) is a novel technology for producing large quantities of oxygen on the Moon. Oxygen yields of 15 kilograms per...

  14. The effect of diamond-like carbon coating on LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 particles for all solid-state lithium-ion batteries based on Li2S-P2S5 glass-ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visbal, Heidy; Aihara, Yuichi; Ito, Seitaro; Watanabe, Taku; Park, Youngsin; Doo, Seokgwang

    2016-05-01

    There have been several reports on improvements of the performance of all solid-state battery using lithium metal oxide coatings on the cathode active material. However, the mechanism of the performance improvement remains unclear. To better understand the effect of the surface coating, we studied the impact of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating on LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 (NCA) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The DLC coated NCA showed good cycle ability and rate performance. This result is further supported by reduction of the interfacial resistance of the cathode and electrolyte observed in impedance spectroscopy. The DLC layer was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy electron energy loss spectroscopy (TEM-EELS). After 100 cycles the sample was analyzed by X-ray photo spectroscopy (XPS), and Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). These analyses showed that the thickness of the coating layer was around 4 nm on average, acting to hinder the side reactions between the cathode particle and the solid electrolyte. The results of this study will provide useful insights for understanding the nature of the buffer layer for the cathode materials.

  15. 15 theses on power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susen Simon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article seeks to contribute to a critical understanding of the multifaceted nature of power, emphasizing its capacity to shape the development of society by permeating constitutive aspects of human reality. To this end, the article proposes an outline of a multidimensional approach to power. It does so by identifying and examining several - arguably universal - features and functions of power. On the basis of 15 theses, it is argued that, within the social world, the power of power derives from the fact that it is (1 ubiquitous, (2 productive, (3 relational, (4 intangible, (5 habitual, (6 discursive, (7 corporeal, (8 polycentric, (9 performative, (10 normative, (11 spatial, (12 temporal, (13 disciplinary, (14 circular, and (15 transcendental. By way of conclusion, the article provides a comprehensive summary of the main insights gained and challenges arising from such a multidimensional approach to power.

  16. UX-15 Reaches LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The creation of the world's largest sandstone cavern, not a small feat! At the bottom, cave-in preventing steel mesh can be seen clinging to the top of the tunnel. The digging of UX-15, the cavern that will house ATLAS, reached the upper ceiling of LEP on October 10th. The breakthrough which took place nearly 100 metres underground occurred precisely on schedule and exactly as planned. But much caution was taken beforehand to make the LEP breakthrough clean and safe. To prevent the possibility of cave-ins in the side tunnels that will eventually be attached to the completed UX-15 cavern, reinforcing steel mesh was fixed into the walls with bolts. Obviously no people were allowed in the LEP tunnels below UX-15 as the breakthrough occurred. The area was completely evacuated and fences were put into place to keep all personnel out. However, while personnel were being kept out of the tunnels below, this has been anything but the case for the work taking place up above. With the creation of the world's largest...

  17. Global deforestation: contribution to atmospheric carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodwell, G M; Hobbie, J E; Houghton, R A; Melillo, J M; Moore, B; Peterson, B J; Shaver, G R

    1983-12-01

    A study of effects of terrestrial biota on the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere suggests that the global net release of carbon due to forest clearing between 1860 and 1980 was between 135 x 10(15) and 228 x 10(15) grams. Between 1.8 x 10(15) and 4.7 x 10(15) grams of carbon were released in 1980, of which nearly 80 percent was due to deforestation, principally in the tropics. The annual release of carbon from the biota and soils exceeded the release from fossil fuels until about 1960. Because the biotic release has been and remains much larger than is commonly assumed, the airborne fraction, usually considered to be about 50 percent of the release from fossil fuels, was probably between 22 and 43 percent of the total carbon released in 1980. The increase in carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is thought by some to be increasing the storage of carbon in the earth's remaining forests sufficiently to offset the release from deforestation. The interpretation of the evidence presented here suggests no such effect; deforestation appears to be the dominant biotic effect on atmospheric carbon dioxide. If deforestation increases in proportion to population, the biotic release of carbon will reach 9 x 10(15) grams per year before forests are exhausted early in the next century. The possibilities for limiting the accumulation of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere through reduction in use of fossil fuels and through management of forests may be greater than is commonly assumed. PMID:17747369

  18. High capacity carbon dioxide sorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietz, Steven Dean; Alptekin, Gokhan; Jayaraman, Ambalavanan

    2015-09-01

    The present invention provides a sorbent for the removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams, comprising: a CO.sub.2 capacity of at least 9 weight percent when measured at 22.degree. C. and 1 atmosphere; an H.sub.2O capacity of at most 15 weight percent when measured at 25.degree. C. and 1 atmosphere; and an isosteric heat of adsorption of from 5 to 8.5 kilocalories per mole of CO.sub.2. The invention also provides a carbon sorbent in a powder, a granular or a pellet form for the removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams, comprising: a carbon content of at least 90 weight percent; a nitrogen content of at least 1 weight percent; an oxygen content of at most 3 weight percent; a BET surface area from 50 to 2600 m.sup.2/g; and a DFT micropore volume from 0.04 to 0.8 cc/g.

  19. Esterification of glycerol from biodiesel production to glycerol carbonate in non-catalytic supercritical dimethyl carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilham, Zul; Saka, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    Conversion of glycerol from biodiesel production to glycerol carbonate was studied by esterification with dimethyl carbonate in a non-catalytic supercritical condition. It was found that in a non-catalytic supercritical condition, glycerol at higher purity gave higher yield of glycerol carbonate at 98 wt% after reaction at 300 °C/20-40 MPa/15 min. The yield of glycerol carbonate was observed to increase with molar ratio, temperature, pressure and time until a certain equilibrium limit. The existence of impurities such as water and remnants of alkaline catalyst in crude glycerol will direct the reaction to produce glycidol. Although impurities might not be desirable, the non-catalytic supercritical dimethyl carbonate could be an alternative method for conversion of glycerol from biodiesel production to value-added glycerol carbonate.Graphical abstractPlausible reaction scheme for conversion of glycerol to glycerol carbonate in non-catalytic supercritical dimethyl carbonate. PMID:27386367

  20. 15th Cluster workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Laakso, Harri; Escoubet, C. Philippe; The Cluster Active Archive : Studying the Earth’s Space Plasma Environment

    2010-01-01

    Since the year 2000 the ESA Cluster mission has been investigating the small-scale structures and processes of the Earth's plasma environment, such as those involved in the interaction between the solar wind and the magnetospheric plasma, in global magnetotail dynamics, in cross-tail currents, and in the formation and dynamics of the neutral line and of plasmoids. This book contains presentations made at the 15th Cluster workshop held in March 2008. It also presents several articles about the Cluster Active Archive and its datasets, a few overview papers on the Cluster mission, and articles reporting on scientific findings on the solar wind, the magnetosheath, the magnetopause and the magnetotail.

  1. MARS15 overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhov, N.V.; Striganov, S.I.; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    MARS15 is a Monte Carlo code for inclusive and exclusive simulation of three-dimensional hadronic and electromagnetic cascades, muon, heavy-ion, and low-energy neutron transport in accelerator, detector, spacecraft, and shielding components in the energy range from a fraction of an electronvolt up to 100 TeV. Main features of the code are described in this paper with a focus on recent developments and benchmarking. Newest developments concern inclusive and exclusive nuclear event generators, extended particle list in both modes, heavy-ion capability, electromagnetic interactions, enhanced geometry, tracking, histogramming and residual dose modules, improved graphical-user interface, and other external interfaces.

  2. The Carbon Budget of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, C. S.

    2009-12-01

    The carbon budget of a region can be defined as the sum of annual fluxes of carbon dioxide and methane greenhouse gases (GHGs) into and out of the regional surface coverage area. According to the state government’s recent inventory, California's carbon budget is presently dominated by fossil fuel emissions of CO2 (at >85% of total annual GHG emissions) to meet energy and transportation requirements. Other notable (non-ecosystem) sources of carbon GHG emissions in 2004 were from cement- and lime-making industries, livestock-based agriculture, and waste treatment activities. The NASA-CASA (Carnegie Ames Stanford Approach) simulation model based on satellite observations of monthly vegetation cover (including those from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer - MODIS) has been used to estimate net ecosystem fluxes and vegetation biomass production over the period 1990-2004. California's annual NPP for all ecosystems in the early 2000s, estimated by CASA at 120 million metric tons of carbon equivalent (MMTCE) per year, was roughly equal to its annual fossil fuel emission rates for carbon. However, since natural ecosystems can accumulate only a small fraction of this annual NPP total in long-term storage pools, the net ecosystem sink flux for atmospheric carbon across the state was estimated at a maximum rate of between 15-24 MMTCE per year under favorable precipitation conditions. Under less favorable precipitation conditions, such as those experienced during the early 1990s, ecosystems statewide were estimated to have lost nearly 15 MMTCE per year to the atmosphere. Considering the large amounts of carbon stored in standing biomass of forests, shrublands, and rangelands across the state, the implications of changing climate and land use practices on ecosystems must be factored into the state’s planning to reduce overall GHG emissions.

  3. Ringberg15: Earth's Climate Sensitivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Bjorn; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Bony, Sandrine; Hegerl, Gabi; Schmidt, Gavin; Sherwood, Steven; Webb, Mark

    2015-01-01

    To assess gaps in understanding of Earth's climate sensitivities a workshop was organised under the auspices of the WCRP (World Climate Research Programme) Grand Science Challenge on Clouds, Circulation and Climate Sensitivity (Ringberg15). The workshop took place in March 2015 and gathered together over thirty experts from around the world for one week. Attendees each gave short presentations and participated in moderated discussions of specific questions related to understanding Earth's climate sensitivities. Most of the time was focused on understanding of the equilibrium climate sensitivity, defined as the equilibrium near-surface warming associated with a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide. The workshop produced nine recommendations, many of them focusing on specific research avenues that could be exploited to advance understanding of climate sensitivity. Many of these dealt, in one fashion or another, with the need to more sharply focus research on identifying and testing story lines for a high (larger than 4 degrees Kelvin) or low (less than 2 degrees Kelvin) equilibrium climate sensitivity. Additionally, a subset of model intercomparison projects (CFMIP (Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project), PMIP (Palaeoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project), PDRMIP (Precipitation Driver and Response Model Intercomparison Project), RFMIP (Radiative Forcing Model Intercomparison Project) and VolMIP (Volcanic Forcings Model Intercomparison Project)) that have been proposed for inclusion within CMIP were identified as being central to resolving important issues raised at the workshop; for this reason modelling groups were strongly encouraged to participate in these projects. Finally the workshop participants encouraged the WCRP to initiate and support an assessment process lead by the Grand Science Challenge on Clouds, Circulation and Climate Sensitivity on the topic of Earth's Climate Sensitivities, culminating in a report that will be published in 2019

  4. Counting the cost of carbon. Low carbon economy index 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-11-15

    Achieving the rates of decarbonisation needed to stay within the 2 degrees target agreed by governments in Cancun in 20101 requires a revolution in the way the world produces and uses energy. A transformation in financing will also be necessary to achieve the transition at the scale and speed needed. PwC published the first Low Carbon Economy Index ahead of the COP15 in Copenhagen, 2009. This looked at the progress of the G20 economies against a 2000-based carbon budget estimated by PwC. Carbon intensity is our preferred metric for analysing countries' movements towards a low carbon economy, as it accounts for expected economic growth, and can generate comparable targets. The carbon intensity of an economy is the emissions per unit of GDP and is affected by a country's fuel mix, energy efficiency and the proportion of industrial versus service sectors. Since COP 16 in Cancun, there has been an increasing focus on the cost of meeting the low carbon challenge and raising the capital required to finance it. This year's Low Carbon Economy Index focuses on this global financing gap and the reforms that might help to fill it. In section one we present our analysis of economic and emissions growth and ask whether we are decarbonising fast enough. The second section asks how much it will cost and can we afford it. We highlight the global financing gap, and focus on efforts to increase low carbon generation in the UK and South Africa. The report concludes by outlining some steps that could be taken to help meet the low carbon challenge.

  5. Physics Colloquium | 15 April

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    From multiferroic oxides to cosmology with electronic structure calculations, Professeur Nicola Spaldin, Materials Theory, ETH Zürich. Monday 15 April 2013, 5 pm École de Physique, Auditoire Stueckelberg 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet, 1211 Genève 4 Abstract: What happened in the early universe just after the Big Bang? This is one of the most intriguing basic questions in all of science, and is difficult to answer because of insurmountable issues associated with replaying the Big Bang in the laboratory. One route to the answer is to use condensed matter systems to test the so-called "Kibble- Zurek" scaling laws for the formation of defects such as cosmic strings that are proposed to have formed in the early universe. In this talk I will show that a popular multiferroic material -- with its coexisting magnetic, ferroelectric and structural phase transitions -- generates the crystallographic equivalent of cosmic strings. I will describe how we used electronic struc...

  6. SPAT 15 - Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartley, J.C. (Coordinator)

    1998-08-01

    In the Spring of 1997, the Department of Energy's Department Standards Committee (DSC) convened a Standards Process Action Team (SPAT-15) to evaluate assessment processes within the DOE complex. If time and resources permitted, the team was also to evaluate assessment processes used by private industry conducting similar work and activities. The specific task statement was as follows: "Define the attributes of assessment programs that effectively support organizational feedback and improvement of safety systems at all the different levels of contractor and Department organizations." The team gathered information on existing assessment programs through surveys and presentations by representatives from national laboratories, processing facilities, and remediation sites. Examples of assessment programs described in this report encompass site-wide, individual facility, and task level applications within the DOE compIex

  7. SPAT 15 - Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Spring of 1997, the Department of Energy's Department Standards Committee (DSC) convened a Standards Process Action Team (SPAT-15) to evaluate assessment processes within the DOE complex. If time and resources permitted, the team was also to evaluate assessment processes used by private industry conducting similar work and activities. The specific task statement was as follows: ''Define the attributes of assessment programs that effectively support organizational feedback and improvement of safety systems at all the different levels of contractor and Department organizations.'' The team gathered information on existing assessment programs through surveys and presentations by representatives from national laboratories, processing facilities, and remediation sites. Examples of assessment programs described in this report encompass site-wide, individual facility, and task level applications within the DOE compIex

  8. Deoxyiminoalditols from Aldonolactones - V. Preparation of the Four Stereoisomers of 1,5-Dideoxy-1,5-iminopentitols. Evaluation of these Iminopentitols and Three 1,5-Dideoxy-1,5-iminoheptitols as Glycosidase Inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godskesen, Michael Anders; Lundt, Inge; Madsen, Robert;

    1996-01-01

    The four stereoisomeric 1,5-dideoxy-1,5-iminopentitols with D-arabino - (D-lyxo-) (3), ribo- (9), L-lyxo- (L-arabino-) (13) and xylo-(18) configurations were synthesized. The corresponding aldonolactones (1, 7 and 11) or aldonic acid ester (150) having a leaving group at C-5 gave by reaction with......-substituted carbon atoms, were good inhibitors of alpha-L-fucosidase. Copyright (C) 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd...

  9. Carbon isotope effects in carbonate systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deines, Peter

    2004-06-01

    Global carbon cycle models require a complete understanding of the δ 13C variability of the Earth's C reservoirs as well as the C isotope effects in the transfer of the element among them. An assessment of δ 13C changes during CO 2 loss from degassing magmas requires knowledge of the melt-CO 2 carbon isotope fractionation. In order to examine the potential size of this effect for silicate melts of varying composition, 13C reduced partition functions were computed in the temperature range 275 to 4000 K for carbonates of varying bond strengths (Mg, Fe, Mn, Sr, Ba, Pb, Zn, Cd, Li, and Na) and the polymorphs of calcite. For a given cation and a given pressure the 13C content increases with the density of the carbonate structure. For a given structure the tendency to concentrate 13C increases with pressure. The effect of pressure (‰/10 kbar) on the size of the reduced partition function of aragonite varies with temperature; in the pressure range 1 to 10 5 bars the change is given by: Δ 13C p average=-0.01796+0.06635∗ 10 3/T+0.006875∗ 10 6/T2 For calcite III the pressure effect is on average 1.4× larger than that for aragonite at all temperatures. The nature of the cation in a given structure type has a significant effect on the carbon isotope fractionation properties. The tendency to concentrate 13C declines in the series magnesite, aragonite, dolomite, strontianite, siderite, calcite, smithonite, witherite, rhodochrosite, otavite, cerrusite. For divalent cations a general expression for an estimation of the reduced partition function (β) from the reduced mass (μ = [M Cation × M Carbonate]/[M Cation + M Carbonate]) is: 1000 lnβ=(0.032367-0.072563∗ 10 3/T-0.01073∗ 10 6/T2)∗μ-14.003+29.953∗ 10 3/T+9.4610∗ 10 6/T2 For Mg-calcite the 13C content varies with the Mg concentration. The fractionation between Mg-calcite (X = mole fraction of MgCO 3) and calcite is given by: 1000 ln(α MgCalite- Calcite)=[0.013702-0.10957× 10 3/T+1.35940× 10 6/T2

  10. Evidence for Carbonate Surface Complexation during Forsterite Carbonation in Wet Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loring, John S.; Chen, Jeffrey; Benezeth Ep Gisquet, Pascale; Qafoku, Odeta; Ilton, Eugene S.; Washton, Nancy M.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2015-07-14

    Continental flood basalts are attractive formations for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide because of their reactive divalent-cation containing silicates, such as forsterite (Mg2SiO4), suitable for long-term trapping of CO2 mineralized as metal carbonates. The goal of this study was to investigate at a molecular level the carbonation products formed during the reaction of forsterite with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) as a function of the concentration of H2O adsorbed to the forsterite surface. Experiments were performed at 50 °C and 90 bar using an in situ IR titration capability, and post-reaction samples were examined by ex situ techniques, including SEM, XPS, FIB-TEM, TGA-MS, and MAS-NMR. Carbonation products and reaction extents varied greatly with adsorbed H2O. We show for the first time evidence of Mg-carbonate surface complexation under wet scCO2 conditions. Carbonate is found to be coordinated to Mg at the forsterite surface in a predominately bidentate fashion at adsorbed H2O concentrations below 27 µmol/m2. Above this concentration and up to 76 µmol/m2, monodentate coordinated complexes become dominant. Beyond a threshold adsorbed H2O concentration of 76 µmol/m2, crystalline carbonates continuously precipitate as magnesite, and the particles that form are hundreds of times larger than the estimated thicknesses of the adsorbed water films of about 7 to 15 Å. At an applied level, these results suggest that mineral carbonation in scCO2 dominated fluids near the wellbore and adjacent to caprocks will be insignificant and limited to surface complexation, unless adsorbed H2O concentrations are high enough to promote crystalline carbonate formation. At a fundamental level, the surface complexes and their dependence on adsorbed H2O concentration give insights regarding forsterite dissolution processes and magnesite nucleation and growth.

  11. Carbonate hydrates of the heavy alkali metals: preparation and structure of Rb{sub 2}CO{sub 3} . 1.5 H{sub 2}O und Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} . 3 H{sub 2}O; Carbonat-Hydrate der schweren Alkalimetalle: Darstellung und Struktur von Rb{sub 2}CO{sub 3} . 1,5 H{sub 2}O und Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} . 3 H{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirpus, V.; Wittrock, J.; Adam, A. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische Chemie

    2001-03-01

    Rb{sub 2}CO{sub 3} . 1.5 H{sub 2}O and Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} . 3 H{sub 2}O were prepared from aqueous solution and by means of the reaction of dialkylcarbonates with RbOH and CsOH resp. in hydrous alcoholes. Based on four-circle diffractometer data, the crystal structures were determined (Rb{sub 2}CO{sub 3} . 1.5 H{sub 2}O: C2/c (no. 15), Z = 8, a = 1237.7(2) pm, b = 1385.94(7) pm, c = 747.7(4) pm, {beta} = 120.133(8) , V{sub EZ} = 1109.3(6) . 10{sup 6} pm{sup 3}; Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} . 3 H{sub 2}O: P2/c (no. 13), Z = 2, a = 654.5(2) pm, b = 679.06(6) pm, c = 886.4(2) pm, {beta} = 90.708(14) , V{sub EZ} = 393.9(2) . 10{sup 6} pm{sup 3}). Rb{sub 2}CO{sub 3} . 1.5 H{sub 2}O is isostructural with K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} . 1.5 H{sub 2}O. In case of Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} . 3 H{sub 2}O no comparable structure is known. Both structures show {sub {infinity}}{sup 1}[(CO{sub 3}{sup 2-})(H{sub 2}O)]-chains, being connected via additional H{sub 2}O forming columns (Rb{sub 2}CO{sub 3} . 1.5 H{sub 2}O) and layers (Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} . 3 H{sub 2}O), respectively. (orig.)

  12. 15 CFR 14.15 - Metric system of measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Metric system of measurement. 14.15... COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 14.15 Metric system of measurement. The Metric Conversion... system is the preferred measurement system for U.S. trade and commerce. The Act requires each...

  13. Contribution to the fight against the greenhouse effect carbon storage in the agricultural soils in France. A collective scientific expertise realized by the INRA for the Ministry of the Ecology and the sustainable development 15 january 2003; Contribution a la lutte contre l'effet de serre stocker du carbone dans les sols agricoles de France. Une expertise scientifique collective realisee par l'INRA a la demande du Ministere de l'Ecologie et du Developpement Durable 15 janvier 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The expertise realized by the INRA relatives the interest of storage carbon in agricultural soils in France: if the possibility of storage is not inconsiderable, its valorization in the framework of the Kyoto protocol is difficult. This storage should be considered in a broader framework, including all the greenhouse gases and integrated in a global plan on the sustainable agriculture and soils quality. (A.L.B.)

  14. Carbon classified?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Ingmar

    2012-01-01

    . Using an actor- network theory (ANT) framework, the aim is to investigate the actors who bring together the elements needed to classify their carbon emission sources and unpack the heterogeneous relations drawn on. Based on an ethnographic study of corporate agents of ecological modernisation over...... a period of 13 months, this paper provides an exploration of three cases of enacting classification. Drawing on ANT, we problematise the silencing of a range of possible modalities of consumption facts and point to the ontological ethics involved in such performances. In a context of global warming...

  15. Esterification of glycerol from biodiesel production to glycerol carbonate in non-catalytic supercritical dimethyl carbonate

    OpenAIRE

    Ilham, Zul; Saka, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    Conversion of glycerol from biodiesel production to glycerol carbonate was studied by esterification with dimethyl carbonate in a non-catalytic supercritical condition. It was found that in a non-catalytic supercritical condition, glycerol at higher purity gave higher yield of glycerol carbonate at 98 wt% after reaction at 300 °C/20–40 MPa/15 min. The yield of glycerol carbonate was observed to increase with molar ratio, temperature, pressure and time until a certain equilibrium limit. The ex...

  16. Carbon Nanomembranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchanin, Andrey; Gölzhäuser, Armin

    2016-08-01

    Carbon nanomembranes (CNMs) are synthetic 2D carbon sheets with tailored physical or chemical properties. These depend on the structure, molecular composition, and surroundings on either side. Due to their molecular thickness, they can be regarded as "interfaces without bulk" separating regions of different gaseous, liquid, or solid components and controlling the materials exchange between them. Here, a universal scheme for the fabrication of 1 nm-thick, mechanically stable, functional CNMs is presented. CNMs can be further modified, for example perforated by ion bombardment or chemically functionalized by the binding of other molecules onto the surfaces. The underlying physical and chemical mechanisms are described, and examples are presented for the engineering of complex surface architectures, e.g., nanopatterns of proteins, fluorescent dyes, or polymer brushes. A simple transfer procedure allows CNMs to be placed on various support structures, which makes them available for diverse applications: supports for electron and X-ray microscopy, nanolithography, nanosieves, Janus nanomembranes, polymer carpets, complex layered structures, functionalization of graphene, novel nanoelectronic and nanomechanical devices. To close, the potential of CNMs in filtration and sensorics is discussed. Based on tests for the separation of gas molecules, it is argued that ballistic membranes may play a prominent role in future efforts of materials separation. PMID:27281234

  17. Synthesis of mesoporous carbons using ordered and disordered mesoporous silica templates and polyacrylonitrile as carbon precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, Michal; Dufour, Bruno; Celer, Ewa B; Kowalewski, Tomasz; Jaroniec, Mietek; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2005-05-19

    Mesoporous carbons were synthesized from polyacrylonitrile (PAN) using ordered and disordered mesoporous silica templates and were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), powder X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption, and thermogravimetry. The pores of the silica templates were infiltrated with carbon precursor (PAN) via polymerization of acrylonitrile from initiation sites chemically bonded to the silica surface. This polymerization method is expected to allow for a uniform filling of the template with PAN and to minimize the introduction of nontemplated PAN, thus mitigating the formation of nontemplated carbon. PAN was stabilized by heating to 573 K under air and carbonized under N2 at 1073 K. The resulting carbons exhibited high total pore volumes (1.5-1.8 cm3 g(-1)), with a primary contribution of the mesopore volume and with relatively low microporosity. The carbons synthesized using mesoporous templates with a 2-dimensional hexagonal structure (SBA-15 silica) and a face-centered cubic structure (FDU-1 silica) exhibited narrow pore size distributions (PSDs), whereas the carbon synthesized using disordered silica gel template had broader PSD. TEM showed that the SBA-15-templated carbon was composed of arrays of long, straight, or curved nanorods aligned in 2-D hexagonal arrays. The carbon replica of FDU-1 silica appeared to be composed of ordered arrays of spheres. XRD provided evidence of some degree of ordering of graphene sheets in the carbon frameworks. Elemental analysis showed that the carbons contain an appreciable amount of nitrogen. The use of our novel infiltration method and PAN as a carbon precursor allowed us to obtain ordered mesoporous carbons (OMCs) with (i) very high mesopore volume, (ii) low microporosity, (iii) low secondary mesoporosity, (iv) large pore diameter (8-12 nm), and (v) semi-graphitic framework, which represent a desirable combination of features that has not been realized before for OMCs. PMID:16852101

  18. Trading forest carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nature of carbon in forests is discussed from the perspective of carbon trading. Carbon inventories, specifically in the area of land use and forestry are reviewed for the Pacific Northwest. Carbon turnover in forests is discussed as it relates to carbon sequestration. Scient...

  19. 15 CFR 700.15 - Extension of priority ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL SECURITY INDUSTRIAL BASE REGULATIONS DEFENSE PRIORITIES AND ALLOCATIONS SYSTEM Industrial Priorities § 700.15 Extension of priority ratings....

  20. Digital Mapping of Soil Organic Carbon Contents and Stocks in Denmark

    OpenAIRE

    Kabindra Adhikari; Hartemink, Alfred E.; Budiman Minasny; Rania Bou Kheir; Mette B Greve; Greve, Mogens H.

    2014-01-01

    Estimation of carbon contents and stocks are important for carbon sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions and national carbon balance inventories. For Denmark, we modeled the vertical distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) and bulk density, and mapped its spatial distribution at five standard soil depth intervals (0-5, 5-15, 15-30, 30-60 and 60-100 cm) using 18 environmental variables as predictors. SOC distribution was influenced by precipitation, land use, soil type, wetland, elevation, ...

  1. Reducing carbon-in-ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigel S. Dong [IEA Clean Coal Centre, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15

    High levels of carbon-in-ash lead to reduced power plant efficiency and higher fuel costs, degrade the performance of electrostatic precipitators and increase emissions of particulates. Increased carbon levels in the fly ash can lead to problems with ash use in cement/concrete production. This report reviews current measures and technologies that can be used to prevent excessive carbon-in-ash in pulverised coal combustion (PCC) power plants. These include coal cleaning, coal fineness improvement, reduction of distribution imbalance of coal among burners, increasing coal-air mixing rates at both burner and OFA levels and optimising excess air ratios. A plasma-assisted combustion enhancement technology can help achieve better ignition and more stable flame for coals that are normally difficult to burn. Computer-based combustion optimisation using expert systems, neural network systems and coal combustion simulation is becoming an invaluable means to tackle the carbon-in-ash issue. This report also reviews the regulations in nine major coal-consuming countries, which stipulate the maximum unburnt carbon levels permitted for fly ash for use in concrete/cement production. The Loss on Ignition (LOI) parameter is used in all national standards, although it is considered inadequate and may exclude some usable fly ash from being utilised. Performance-based regulations are more appropriate and have been adopted by Canada and USA. The EU and Canada now permit the use of fly ash produced from co-combustion of coal and biomass. China and Russia allow very high LOI levels for certain fly ash but the other countries require similar LOI limits for fly ash for use in concrete. Finally, this report discusses measures and technologies for reduction of carbon-in-ash, including classification, froth flotation, triboelectrostatic separators, thermal processes and carbon surface modification. 146 refs., 19 figs., 15 tabs.

  2. The carbon budget of California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon budget of a region can be defined as the sum of annual fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) greenhouse gases (GHGs) into and out of the regional surface coverage area. According to the state government's recent inventory, California's carbon budget is presently dominated by 115 MMTCE per year in fossil fuel emissions of CO2 (>85% of total annual GHG emissions) to meet energy and transportation requirements. Other notable (non-ecosystem) sources of carbon GHG emissions in 2004 were from cement- and lime-making industries (7%), livestock-based agriculture (5%), and waste treatment activities (2%). The NASA-CASA (Carnegie Ames Stanford Approach) simulation model based on satellite observations of monthly vegetation cover (including those from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, MODIS) was used to estimate net ecosystem fluxes and vegetation biomass production over the period 1990-2004. California's annual NPP for all ecosystems in the early 2000s (estimated by CASA at 120 MMTCE per year) was roughly equivalent to its annual fossil fuel emission rates for carbon. However, since natural ecosystems can accumulate only a small fraction of this annual NPP total in long-term storage pools, the net ecosystem sink flux for atmospheric carbon across the state was estimated at a maximum rate of about 24 MMTCE per year under favorable precipitation conditions. Under less favorable precipitation conditions, such as those experienced during the early 1990s, ecosystems statewide were estimated to have lost nearly 15 MMTCE per year to the atmosphere. Considering the large amounts of carbon estimated by CASA to be stored in forests, shrublands, and rangelands across the state, the importance of protection of the natural NPP capacity of California ecosystems cannot be overemphasized.

  3. Carbon cycling and storage in mangrove forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alongi, Daniel M

    2014-01-01

    Mangroves are ecologically and economically important forests of the tropics. They are highly productive ecosystems with rates of primary production equal to those of tropical humid evergreen forests and coral reefs. Although mangroves occupy only 0.5% of the global coastal area, they contribute 10-15% (24 Tg C y(-1)) to coastal sediment carbon storage and export 10-11% of the particulate terrestrial carbon to the ocean. Their disproportionate contribution to carbon sequestration is now perceived as a means for conservation and restoration and a way to help ameliorate greenhouse gas emissions. Of immediate concern are potential carbon losses to deforestation (90-970 Tg C y(-1)) that are greater than these ecosystems' rates of carbon storage. Large reservoirs of dissolved inorganic carbon in deep soils, pumped via subsurface pathways to adjacent waterways, are a large loss of carbon, at a potential rate up to 40% of annual primary production. Patterns of carbon allocation and rates of carbon flux in mangrove forests are nearly identical to those of other tropical forests. PMID:24405426

  4. Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux is defined as the year-over-year change in Total Ecosystem Carbon Stock, or the net rate of carbon exchange between an ecosystem and the...

  5. Carbon Monoxide (CO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IAQ) » Carbon Monoxide's Impact on Indoor Air Quality Carbon Monoxide's Impact on Indoor Air Quality On this ... length of exposure. Top of Page Sources of Carbon Monoxide Sources of CO include: unvented kerosene and ...

  6. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir What is Carbon Monoxide? Carbon monoxide, or “CO,” is an odorless, colorless gas that can kill you. Carbon monoxide detector Where is CO found? CO is ...

  7. A 15-step synthesis of (+)-ryanodol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Kangway V; Xu, Chen; Reisman, Sarah E

    2016-08-26

    (+)-Ryanodine and (+)-ryanodol are complex diterpenoids that modulate intracellular calcium-ion release at ryanodine receptors, ion channels critical for skeletal and cardiac muscle excitation-contraction coupling and synaptic transmission. Chemical derivatization of these diterpenoids has demonstrated that certain peripheral structural modifications can alter binding affinity and selectivity among ryanodine receptor isoforms. Here, we report a short chemical synthesis of (+)-ryanodol that proceeds in only 15 steps from the commercially available terpene (S)-pulegone. The efficiency of the synthesis derives from the use of a Pauson-Khand reaction to rapidly build the carbon framework and a SeO2-mediated oxidation to install three oxygen atoms in a single step. This work highlights how strategic C-O bond constructions can streamline the synthesis of polyhydroxylated terpenes by minimizing protecting group and redox adjustments. PMID:27563092

  8. [Carbon monoxide poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, K; Ruschulte, H; Heine, J; Piepenbrock, S

    2000-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a product of incomplete burning of coals and carbon compounds and is a gas without any typical taste, colour or smell. Defective radiators or gas pipes, open fireplaces, fires and explosions are sources of unintended CO production and inhalation. CO bonds with haemoglobin much more readily than oxygen does. CO toxicity causes impaired oxygen delivery and utilisation at cellular level. It affects different sites within the body, but has its most profound impact on the organs with the highest oxygen requirement. CO concentration and the intensity and duration of inhalation determine the extent of intoxication. Following basic life support, assisted or controlled ventilation with 100% oxygen is essential during emergency care. Hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) is the preferred therapeutic option for releasing CO from its binding to haemoglobin. It has been shown that CO may cause lipid peroxidation and leukocyte-mediated inflammatory changes in the brain, a process that may be inhibited by HBO. Patients with neurological symptoms including loss of consciousness and expectant mothers should undergo HBO treatment, no matter how high their CO levels are. Neonates and in-utero fetuses are more vulnerable due to the natural leftward shift of the dissociation curve of fetal haemoglobin, a lower baseline pO2 and carboxyhaemoglobin levels at equilibration that are 10-15% higher than maternal levels. Physicians need to be aware of the potential occurrence of this life threatening hazard so that appropriate emergency treatment can be administered and fatalities prevented. PMID:10920484

  9. Epidermal growth factor pathway substrate 15, Eps15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salcini, A E; Chen, H; Iannolo, G;

    1999-01-01

    multiple copies of the amino acid triplet Aspartate-Proline-Phenylalanine. A pool of Eps15 is localized at clathrin coated pits where it interacts with the clathrin assembly complex AP-2 and a novel AP-2 binding protein, Epsin. Perturbation of Eps15 and Epsin function inhibits receptor-mediated endocytosis...

  10. 33 CFR 83.15 - Crossing situation (Rule 15).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Crossing situation (Rule 15). 83... situation (Rule 15). (a) Vessel which must keep out of the other vessel's way. When two power-driven vessels... Rivers, or water specified by the Secretary, a power-driven vessel crossing a river shall keep out of...

  11. Understanding carbon regulation in aquatic systems - Bacteriophages as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmukh, Swapnil; Khairnar, Krishna; Paunikar, Waman; Lokhande, Satish

    2015-01-01

    The bacteria and their phages are the most abundant constituents of the aquatic environment, and so represent an ideal model for studying carbon regulation in an aquatic system. The microbe-mediated interconversion of bioavailable organic carbon (OC) into dissolved organic carbon (DOC) by the microbial carbon pump (MCP) has been suggested to have the potential to revolutionize our view of carbon sequestration. It is estimated that DOC is the largest pool of organic matter in the ocean and, though a major component of the global carbon cycle, its source is not yet well understood. A key element of the carbon cycle is the microbial conversion of DOC into inedible forms. The primary aim of this study is to understand the phage conversion from organic to inorganic carbon during phage-host interactions. Time studies of phage-host interactions under controlled conditions reveal their impact on the total carbon content of the samples and their interconversion of organic and inorganic carbon compared to control samples. A total organic carbon (TOC) analysis showed an increase in inorganic carbon content by 15-25 percent in samples with bacteria and phage compared to samples with bacteria alone. Compared to control samples, the increase in inorganic carbon content was 60-70-fold in samples with bacteria and phage, and 50-55-fold for samples with bacteria alone. This study indicates the potential impact of phages in regulating the carbon cycle of aquatic systems. PMID:26213615

  12. [Calculation of regional carbon emission: a case of Guangdong Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Shi-Yan; Wang, Zheng; Ma, Xiao-Zhe; Huang, Rui; Liu, Chang-Xin; Zhu, Yong-Bin

    2011-06-01

    By using IPCC carbon emission calculation formula (2006 edition), economy-carbon emission dynamic model, and cement carbon emission model, a regional carbon emission calculation framework was established, and, taking Guangdong Province as a case, its energy consumption carbon emission, cement production CO2 emission, and forest carbon sink values in 2008-2050 were predicted, based on the socio-economic statistical data, energy consumption data, cement production data, and forest carbon sink data of the Province. In 2008-2050, the cement production CO2 emission in the Province would be basically stable, with an annual carbon emission being 10-15 Mt C, the energy consumption carbon emission and the total carbon emission would be in inverse U-shape, with the peaks occurred in 2035 and 2036, respectively, and the carbon emission intensity would be decreased constantly while the forest carbon sink would have a fluctuated decline. It was feasible and reasonable to use the regional carbon emission calculation framework established in this paper to calculate the carbon emission in Guangdong Province. PMID:21941757

  13. The inv dup (15 or idic (15 syndrome (Tetrasomy 15q

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Battaglia Agatino

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The inv dup(15 or idic(15 syndrome displays distinctive clinical findings represented by early central hypotonia, developmental delay and intellectual disability, epilepsy, and autistic behaviour. Incidence at birth is estimated at 1 in 30,000 with a sex ratio of almost 1:1. Developmental delay and intellectual disability affect all individuals with inv dup(15 and are usually moderate to profound. Expressive language is absent or very poor and often echolalic. Comprehension is very limited and contextual. Intention to communicate is absent or very limited. The distinct behavioral disorder shown by children and adolescents has been widely described as autistic or autistic-like. Epilepsy with a wide variety of seizure types can occur in these individuals, with onset between 6 months and 9 years. Various EEG abnormalities have been described. Muscle hypotonia is observed in almost all individuals, associated, in most of them, with joint hyperextensibility and drooling. Facial dysmorphic features are absent or subtle, and major malformations are rare. Feeding difficulties are reported in the newborn period. Chromosome region 15q11q13, known for its instability, is highly susceptible to clinically relevant genomic rearrangements, such as supernumerary marker chromosomes formed by the inverted duplication of proximal chromosome 15. Inv dup(15 results in tetrasomy 15p and partial tetrasomy 15q. The large rearrangements, containing the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome critical region (PWS/ASCR, are responsible for the inv dup(15 or idic(15 syndrome. Diagnosis is achieved by standard cytogenetics and FISH analysis, using probes both from proximal chromosome 15 and from the PWS/ASCR. Microsatellite analysis on parental DNA or methylation analysis on the proband DNA, are also needed to detect the parent-of-origin of the inv dup(15 chromosome. Array CGH has been shown to provide a powerful approach for identifying and detecting the extent of the

  14. Integral Ring Carbon-Carbon Piston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An improved structure for a reciprocating internal combustion engine or compressor piston fabricate from carbon-carbon composite materials is disclosed. An integral ring carbon-carbon composite piston, disclosed herein, reduces the need for piston rings and for small clearances by providing a small flexible, integral component around the piston that allows for variation in clearance due to manufacturing tolerances, distortion due to pressure and thermal loads, and variations in thermal expansion differences between the piston and cylinder liner.

  15. Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation

    OpenAIRE

    Huijgen, W.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    The increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, mainly caused by fossil fuel combustion, has lead to concerns about global warming. A possible technology that can contribute to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions is CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. The basic concept behind mineral CO2 sequestration is the mimicking of natural weathering processes in which calcium or magnesium containing minerals react with gaseous CO2 and form solid calcium or magnesium carbonate...

  16. Apparatus and process for the surface treatment of carbon fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulauskas, Felix Leonard; Ozcan, Soydan; Naskar, Amit K.

    2016-05-17

    A method for surface treating a carbon-containing material in which carbon-containing material is reacted with decomposing ozone in a reactor (e.g., a hollow tube reactor), wherein a concentration of ozone is maintained throughout the reactor by appropriate selection of at least processing temperature, gas stream flow rate, reactor dimensions, ozone concentration entering the reactor, and position of one or more ozone inlets (ports) in the reactor, wherein the method produces a surface-oxidized carbon or carbon-containing material, preferably having a surface atomic oxygen content of at least 15%. The resulting surface-oxidized carbon material and solid composites made therefrom are also described.

  17. Carbon Residence Times in Pedogenic Carbonate Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monger, H.; Feng, Y.; Karnjanapiboonwang, A.

    2013-12-01

    Soil carbonate is a huge pool of terrestrial carbon that contains at least 930 to 940 Pg C and has influx rates on the order of 1 to 12 g CaCO3/m2/yr. Such large mass to flux ratios yield long mean residence times for carbon (e.g., 85,000 years)--assuming steady state. Like other global carbon pools, the soil carbonate pool has smaller sub-pools with higher influx rates and shorter mean residence times. For example, pedogenic carbonate in coppice dunes known to have formed since 1858 and carbonate formed on lithic artifacts in soils at archaeology sites suggests mean residence times can be as short as 120 years--again assuming steady state. Harder to assess are efflux rates as CO2 emissions or bicarbonate leaching. Some Bowen-ratio studies have nevertheless found evidence for CO2 emissions resulting from carbonate dissolution, and other studies have found evidence for bicarbonate leaching based on dissolution pipes through calcic horizons using soil morphology studies. Since an understanding of mean residence times are prerequisite for a better understanding of soil carbonate in the global carbon cycle, especially in a scenario of an expanding Aridosphere, more influx and efflux measurements are needed to evaluate the possibility of carbon sequestration by soil carbonate in hyperarid, arid, semiarid, or subhumid soils.

  18. Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijgen, W.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    The increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, mainly caused by fossil fuel combustion, has lead to concerns about global warming. A possible technology that can contribute to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions is CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. The basic concept beh

  19. Sulfonated mesoporous silica–carbon composites and their use as solid acid catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Valle Vigón, Patricia; Sevilla Solís, Marta; Fuertes Arias, Antonio Benito

    2012-01-01

    [EN] The synthesis of highly functionalized porous silica–carbon composites made up of sulfonic groups attached to a carbon layer coating the pores of three types of mesostructured silica (i.e. SBA-15, KIT-6 and mesocellular silica) is presented. The synthesis procedure involves the following steps: (a) removal of the surfactant, (b) impregnation of the silica pores with a carbon precursor, (c) carbonization and (d) sulfonation. The resulting silica–carbon composites contain ∼30 wt % of carbo...

  20. Method for aqueous gold thiosulfate extraction using copper-cyanide pretreated carbon adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Courtney; Melashvili, Mariam; Gow, Nicholas V

    2013-08-06

    A gold thiosulfate leaching process uses carbon to remove gold from the leach liquor. The activated carbon is pretreated with copper cyanide. A copper (on the carbon) to gold (in solution) ratio of at least 1.5 optimizes gold recovery from solution. To recover the gold from the carbon, conventional elution technology works but is dependent on the copper to gold ratio on the carbon.

  1. CCD Photometry of M15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruelas, A.; Sánchez, L. J.; Herrera, G.; Nigoche-Netro, A.

    2011-10-01

    We present CCD observations of the galactic globular cluster M15, in the B and V filters. The cluster was reasonably covered, except in its northern region where our observations present a gap. We obtained a Hertszprung-Russell (HR) diagram for each region observed, and later we produced a combined HR diagram containing more than 3000 stars. We generate a clean Colour Magnitude Diagram (CMD) and a Super Fiducial Line (SFL). Application of several methods and isochrone fitting leads us to obtain values for the metallicity [Fe/H]_{M15} ˜ -2.16±0.10, the reddening E(B-V)_{M15} ˜ 0.11±0.03, and a distance modulus of [(m-M)_0]_{M1515.03.

  2. From carbon nanotubes to carbon atomic chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas García, Gilberto; Zhang, Weijia; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2010-10-01

    Carbyne is a linear allotrope of carbon. It is formed by a linear arrangement of carbon atoms with sp-hybridization. We present a reliable and reproducible experiment to obtain these carbon atomic chains using few-layer-graphene (FLG) sheets and a HRTEM. First the FLG sheets were synthesized from worm-like exfoliated graphite and then drop-casted on a lacey-carbon copper grid. Once in the TEM, two holes are opened near each other in a FLG sheet by focusing the electron beam into a small spot. Due to the radiation, the carbon atoms rearrange themselves between the two holes and form carbon fibers. The beam is concentrated on the carbon fibers in order excite the atoms and induce a tension until multi wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) is formed. As the radiation continues the MWCNT breaks down until there is only a single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT). Then, when the SWCNT breaks, an atomic carbon chain is formed, lasts for several seconds under the radiation and finally breaks. This demonstrates the stability of this carbon structure.

  3. A remote system for the routine production of oxygen-15 radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The details of the construction and operation of a remote, automated system for the production of oxygen-15 labelled radiopharmaceuticals are described. This system routinely provides oxygen-15 labelled oxygen, carbon monoxide, and water directly to the PET imaging facility, in quantities and purities suitable for human studies. (author)

  4. Nitrogen-15 NMR characterization of the neutral form of 7-methylguanosine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbarella, G. (CNR, Bologna (Italy)); Bertoluzza, A.; Tugnoli, V. (Sezione di Chimica e Propedeutica Biochimica, Bologna (Italy))

    1988-07-25

    The commercial 7-methylguanosine used for several physico-chemical studies, and prepared by methylation of the parent guanosine, is a mixture of the neutral and the protonated forms, as shown by carbon-13 and nitrogen-15 NMR. Nitrogen-15 chemical shifts of the neutral and the protonated forms of 7-methylguanosine are shown.

  5. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  6. Mutagenicity of carbon nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallin, Håkan; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; White, Paul A;

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials such carbon nanotubes, graphene and fullerenes are some the most promising nanomaterials. Although carbon nanomaterials have been reported to possess genotoxic potential, it is imperitive to analyse the data on the genotoxicity of carbon nanomaterials in vivo and in vitro...

  7. Characterization of electrospun lignin based carbon fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of lignin fibers has been studied in order to replace the need for petroleum based precursors for carbon fiber production. In addition to its positive environmental effects, it also benefits the economics of the industries which cannot take advantage of carbon fiber properties because of their high price. A large amount of lignin is annually produced as the byproduct of paper and growing cellulosic ethanol industry. Therefore, finding high value applications for this low cost, highly available material is getting more attention. Lignin is a biopolymer making about 15 – 30 % of the plant cell walls and has a high carbon yield upon carbonization. However, its processing is challenging due to its low molecular weight and also variations based on its origin and the method of separation from cellulose. In this study, alkali solutions of organosolv lignin with less than 1 wt/v% of poly (ethylene oxide) and two types of lignin (hardwood and softwood) were electrospun followed by carbonization. Different heating programs for carbonization were tested. The carbonized fibers had a smooth surface with an average diameter of less than 5 µm and the diameter could be controlled by the carbonization process and lignin type. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to study morphology of the fibers before and after carbonization. Thermal conductivity of a sample with amorphous carbon was 2.31 W/m.K. The electrospun lignin carbon fibers potentially have a large range of application such as in energy storage devices and water or gas purification systems

  8. Characterization of electrospun lignin based carbon fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poursorkhabi, Vida; Mohanty, Amar; Misra, Manjusri [School of Engineering, Thornbrough Building, University of Guelph, Guelph, N1G 2W1, Ontario (Canada); Bioproducts Discovery and Development Centre, Department of Plant Agriculture, Crop Science Building, University of Guelph, Guelph, N1G 2W1, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-05-22

    The production of lignin fibers has been studied in order to replace the need for petroleum based precursors for carbon fiber production. In addition to its positive environmental effects, it also benefits the economics of the industries which cannot take advantage of carbon fiber properties because of their high price. A large amount of lignin is annually produced as the byproduct of paper and growing cellulosic ethanol industry. Therefore, finding high value applications for this low cost, highly available material is getting more attention. Lignin is a biopolymer making about 15 – 30 % of the plant cell walls and has a high carbon yield upon carbonization. However, its processing is challenging due to its low molecular weight and also variations based on its origin and the method of separation from cellulose. In this study, alkali solutions of organosolv lignin with less than 1 wt/v% of poly (ethylene oxide) and two types of lignin (hardwood and softwood) were electrospun followed by carbonization. Different heating programs for carbonization were tested. The carbonized fibers had a smooth surface with an average diameter of less than 5 µm and the diameter could be controlled by the carbonization process and lignin type. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to study morphology of the fibers before and after carbonization. Thermal conductivity of a sample with amorphous carbon was 2.31 W/m.K. The electrospun lignin carbon fibers potentially have a large range of application such as in energy storage devices and water or gas purification systems.

  9. Electroanalysis with carbon paste electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Svancara, Ivan; Walcarius, Alain; Vytras, Karel

    2011-01-01

    Introduction to Electrochemistry and Electroanalysis with Carbon Paste-Based ElectrodesHistorical Survey and GlossaryField in Publication Activities and LiteratureCarbon Pastes and Carbon Paste ElectrodesCarbon Paste as the Binary MixtureClassification of Carbon Pastes and Carbon Paste ElectrodesConstruction of Carbon Paste HoldersCarbon Paste as the Electrode MaterialPhysicochemical Properties of Carbon PastesElectrochemical Characteristics of Carbon PastesTesting of Unmodified CPEsIntera

  10. Mesoporous carbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng; Fulvio, Pasquale Fernando; Mayes, Richard T.; Wang, Xiqing; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Guo, Bingkun

    2014-09-09

    A conductive mesoporous carbon composite comprising conductive carbon nanoparticles contained within a mesoporous carbon matrix, wherein the conductive mesoporous carbon composite possesses at least a portion of mesopores having a pore size of at least 10 nm and up to 50 nm, and wherein the mesopores are either within the mesoporous carbon matrix, or are spacings delineated by surfaces of said conductive carbon nanoparticles when said conductive carbon nanoparticles are fused with each other, or both. Methods for producing the above-described composite, devices incorporating them (e.g., lithium batteries), and methods of using them, are also described.

  11. Pyrolyzed thin film carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Liger, Matthieu (Inventor); Harder, Theodore (Inventor); Konishi, Satoshi (Inventor); Miserendino, Scott (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method of making carbon thin films comprises depositing a catalyst on a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon in contact with the catalyst and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon. A method of controlling a carbon thin film density comprises etching a cavity into a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon into the cavity, and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon while in the cavity to form a carbon thin film. Controlling a carbon thin film density is achieved by changing the volume of the cavity. Methods of making carbon containing patterned structures are also provided. Carbon thin films and carbon containing patterned structures can be used in NEMS, MEMS, liquid chromatography, and sensor devices.

  12. Comparative Life Cycle Assessments: Carbon Neutrality and Wood Biomass Energy

    OpenAIRE

    Sedjo, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    Biomass energy is expected to play a major role in the substitution of renewable energy sources for fossil fuels over the next several decades. The US Energy Information Administration (EIA 2012) forecasts increases in the share of biomass in US energy production from 8 percent in 2009 to 15 percent by 2035. The general view has been that carbon emitted into the atmosphere from biological materials is carbon neutral—part of a closed loop whereby plant regrowth simply recaptures the carbon emi...

  13. The carbon holdings of northern Ecuador's mangrove forests

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, Stuart E.; Lovette, John; Borbor, Mercy; Millones, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Within a GIS environment, we combine field measures of mangrove diameter, mangrove species distribution, and mangrove density with remotely sensed measures of mangrove location and mangrove canopy cover to estimate the mangrove carbon holdings of northern Ecuador. We find that the four northern estuaries of Ecuador contain approximately 7,742,999 t (plus or minus 15.47 percent) of standing carbon. Of particular high carbon holdings are the Rhizophora mangle dominated mangrove stands found in-...

  14. Carbon dioxide effects research and assessment program: flux of organic carbon by rivers to the oceans. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-04-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 15 papers presented in this workshop report. The state of knowledge about the role of rivers in the transport, storage and oxidation of carbon is the subject of this report. (KRM)

  15. Design of Higher Education Teaching Models and Carbon Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caird, Sally; Lane, Andy; Swithenby, Ed; Roy, Robin; Potter, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This research aims to examine the main findings of the SusTEACH study of the carbon-based environmental impacts of 30 higher education (HE) courses in 15 UK institutions, based on an analysis of the likely energy consumption and carbon emissions of a range of face-to-face, distance, online and information and communication technology…

  16. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the KNORR in the South Pacific Ocean from 1992-09-01 to 1992-09-15 (NODC Accession 0115700)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115700 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from KNORR in the South Pacific Ocean from 1992-09-01 to 1992-09-15...

  17. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from the CHARLES DARWIN in the Indian Ocean from 2002-03-01 to 2002-04-15 (NODC Accession 0108226)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108226 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from CHARLES DARWIN in the Indian Ocean from 2002-03-01 to 2002-04-15...

  18. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean from 1998-10-30 to 1998-12-15 (NODC Accession 0112251)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112251 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean from 1998-10-30 to 1998-12-15...

  19. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the KNORR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2001-06-27 to 2001-08-15 (NODC Accession 0113568)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113568 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from KNORR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2001-06-27 to 2001-08-15...

  20. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the DARVIN in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1990-05-28 to 1990-06-15 (NODC Accession 0113523)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113523 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from DARVIN in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1990-05-28 to 1990-06-15...

  1. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the DARVIN in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2005-05-01 to 2005-06-15 (NODC Accession 0113527)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113527 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from DARVIN in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2005-05-01 to 2005-06-15...

  2. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from ROGER REVELLE in the Indian Ocean from 2009-03-20 to 2009-05-15 (NODC Accession 0108075)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108075 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from ROGER REVELLE in the Indian Ocean from 2009-03-20 to 2009-05-15. These data include...

  3. Carbon Emissions from air-Conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores electricity consumption and carbon emissions associated with air-conditioning. The total heat load of a room fitted with air conditioner of 1.5 ton capacity has been calculated by calculating conduction and ventilation losses. Solar heat gain and internal gain were taken as the other two parameters for the total heat calculation.

  4. Carbon disulphide promotes sprouting of potato minitubers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salimi, Kh.; Hosseini, M.B.; Struik, P.C.; Tavakkol Afshari, R.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effects of postharvest application of carbon disulphide (CS2) in various concentrations (0, 15, 25, 35, 45 and 55 ml m-3) and with different exposure duration (24, 48, 72 and 96 h) on breaking of dormancy and sprouting of potato (Solanum tuberosum L., cv. Marfona) minitubers of t

  5. Carbon fiber content measurement in composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiushi

    Malek methods. The activation energy (Ea) of the solid-state process is determined to be 202 kJ mol--1 in an oxidative atmosphere using Kissinger's method, which is 10-15 kJ mol--1 more than the results calculated in a nitrogen atmosphere. The value of the activation energy obtained using Ozawa-Flynn methods is in agreement with that using the Kissinger method. Different degradation mechanisms are used to compare with this value. Based on the analytical result, the actual thermal degradation mechanism of the CPPS is a Dn deceleration type. The carbonization temperature range of the CPPS is the same as pure PPS resin.

  6. Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide on Activated Carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Guo; Liping Chang; Kechang Xie

    2006-01-01

    The adsorption of CO2 on a raw activated carbon A and three modified activated carbon samples B, C, and D at temperatures ranging from 303 to 333 K and the thermodynamics of adsorption have been investigated using a vacuum adsorption apparatus in order to obtain more information about the effect of CO2 on removal of organic sulfur-containing compounds in industrial gases. The active ingredients impregnated in the carbon samples show significant influence on the adsorption for CO2 and its volumes adsorbed on modified carbon samples B, C, and D are all larger than that on the raw carbon sample A. On the other hand, the physical parameters such as surface area, pore volume, and micropore volume of carbon samples show no influence on the adsorbed amount of CO2. The Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) equation was the best model for fitting the adsorption data on carbon samples A and B, while the Freundlich equation was the best fit for the adsorption on carbon samples C and D. The isosteric heats of adsorption on carbon samples A, B, C, and D derived from the adsorption isotherms using the Clapeyron equation decreased slightly increasing surface loading. The heat of adsorption lay between 10.5 and 28.4 kJ/mol, with the carbon sample D having the highest value at all surface coverages that were studied. The observed entropy change associated with the adsorption for the carbon samples A, B, and C (above the surface coverage of 7 ml/g) was lower than the theoretical value for mobile adsorption. However, it was higher than the theoretical value for mobile adsorption but lower than the theoretical value for localized adsorption for carbon sample D.

  7. Processing of thermo-structural carbon-fiber reinforced carbon composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Cláudio Pardini

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes the processes used to obtain thermostructural Carbon/Carbon composites. The processing of these materials begins with the definition of the architecture of the carbon fiber reinforcement, in the form of stacked plies or in the form of fabrics or multidirectional reinforcement. Incorporating fiber reinforcement into the carbon matrix, by filling the voids and interstices, leads to the densification of the material and a continuous increase in density. There are two principal processing routes for obtaining these materials: liquid phase processing and gas phase processing. In both cases, thermal processes lead to the formation of a carbon matrix with specific properties related to their precursor. These processes also differ in terms of yield. With liquid phase impregnation the yield is around 45 per cent, while gas phase processing yields around 15 per cent.

  8. Ocean sequestration of crop residue carbon: recycling fossil fuel carbon back to deep sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Stuart E; Benford, Gregory

    2009-02-15

    For significant impact any method to remove CO2 from the atmosphere must process large amounts of carbon efficiently, be repeatable, sequester carbon for thousands of years, be practical, economical and be implemented soon. The only method that meets these criteria is removal of crop residues and burial in the deep ocean. We show here that this method is 92% efficient in sequestration of crop residue carbon while cellulosic ethanol production is only 32% and soil sequestration is about 14% efficient. Deep ocean sequestration can potentially capture 15% of the current global CO2 annual increase, returning that carbon backto deep sediments, confining the carbon for millennia, while using existing capital infrastructure and technology. Because of these clear advantages, we recommend enhanced research into permanent sequestration of crop residues in the deep ocean. PMID:19320149

  9. Carbon Cryogel and Carbon Paper-Based Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. 6 One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nano-foams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. 1-5 Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  10. Accelerating Mineral Carbonation Using Carbonic Anhydrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Ian M; Harrison, Anna L; Dipple, Gregory M

    2016-03-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzymes have gained considerable attention for their potential use in carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technologies because they are able to catalyze rapidly the interconversion of aqueous CO2 and bicarbonate. However, there are challenges for widespread implementation including the need to develop mineralization process routes for permanent carbon storage. Mineral carbonation of highly reactive feedstocks may be limited by the supply rate of CO2. This rate limitation can be directly addressed by incorporating enzyme-catalyzed CO2 hydration. This study examined the effects of bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA) and CO2-rich gas streams on the carbonation rate of brucite [Mg(OH)2], a highly reactive mineral. Alkaline brucite slurries were amended with BCA and supplied with 10% CO2 gas while aqueous chemistry and solids were monitored throughout the experiments (hours to days). In comparison to controls, brucite carbonation using BCA was accelerated by up to 240%. Nesquehonite [MgCO3·3H2O] precipitation limited the accumulation of hydrated CO2 species, apparently preventing BCA from catalyzing the dehydration reaction. Geochemical models reproduce observed reaction progress in all experiments, revealing a linear correlation between CO2 uptake and carbonation rate. Data demonstrates that carbonation in BCA-amended reactors remained limited by CO2 supply, implying further acceleration is possible. PMID:26829491

  11. Carbon fuel cells with carbon corrosion suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.

    2012-04-10

    An electrochemical cell apparatus that can operate as either a fuel cell or a battery includes a cathode compartment, an anode compartment operatively connected to the cathode compartment, and a carbon fuel cell section connected to the anode compartment and the cathode compartment. An effusion plate is operatively positioned adjacent the anode compartment or the cathode compartment. The effusion plate allows passage of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide exhaust channels are operatively positioned in the electrochemical cell to direct the carbon dioxide from the electrochemical cell.

  12. Carbon isotope fluctuations in Precambrian carbonate sequences of several localities in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    SIAL ALCIDES N.; FERREIRA VALDEREZ P.; DEALMEIDA AFONSO R.; ROMANO ANTONIO W.; PARENTE CLOVIS V.; DACOSTA MARCONDES L.; SANTOS VICTOR H.

    2000-01-01

    Carbon isotope fluctuations in Precambrian sedimentary carbonates between 2.8 Ga and 0.60 Ga in Brazil are examined in this study. The carbonate facies of the BIF of the 2.8 Ga-old Carajás Formation, state of Pará in northern Brazil, has rather homogeneous delta13C (-5 o/ooPDB), compatible with carbonatization of a silicate protolith by a CO2-rich fluid from mantle degassing. The Paleoproterozoic Gandarela Formation, state of Minas Gerais, displays a narrow delta13C variation (-1.5 to +0.5 o/...

  13. Global Carbon Budget 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Canadell, J. G.; Sitch, S.; Korsbakken, J. I.; Friedlingstein, P.; Peters, G. P.; Andres, R. J.; Boden, T. A.; Houghton, R. A.; House, J. I.; Keeling, R. F.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Bakker, D. C. E.; Barbero, L.; Bopp, L.; Chang, J.; Chevallier, F.; Chini, L. P.; Ciais, P.; Fader, M.; Feely, R. A.; Gkritzalis, T.; Harris, I.; Hauck, J.; Ilyina, T.; Jain, A. K.; Kato, E.; Kitidis, V.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Koven, C.; Landschützer, P.; Lauvset, S. K.; Lefèvre, N.; Lenton, A.; Lima, I. D.; Metzl, N.; Millero, F.; Munro, D. R.; Murata, A.; Nabel, J. E. M. S.; Nakaoka, S.; Nojiri, Y.; O'Brien, K.; Olsen, A.; Ono, T.; Pérez, F. F.; Pfeil, B.; Pierrot, D.; Poulter, B.; Rehder, G.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Séférian, R.; Steinhoff, T.; Stocker, B. D.; Sutton, A. J.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; van der Laan-Luijkx, I. T.; van der Werf, G. R.; van Heuven, S.; Vandemark, D.; Viovy, N.; Wiltshire, A.; Zaehle, S.; Zeng, N.

    2015-12-01

    carbon budget. For the last decade available (2005-2014), EFF was 9.0 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, ELUC was 0.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, GATM was 4.4 ± 0.1 GtC yr-1, SOCEAN was 2.6 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, and SLAND was 3.0 ± 0.8 GtC yr-1. For the year 2014 alone, EFF grew to 9.8 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, 0.6 % above 2013, continuing the growth trend in these emissions, albeit at a slower rate compared to the average growth of 2.2 % yr-1 that took place during 2005-2014. Also, for 2014, ELUC was 1.1 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, GATM was 3.9 ± 0.2 GtC yr-1, SOCEAN was 2.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, and SLAND was 4.1 ± 0.9 GtC yr-1. GATM was lower in 2014 compared to the past decade (2005-2014), reflecting a larger SLAND for that year. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration reached 397.15 ± 0.10 ppm averaged over 2014. For 2015, preliminary data indicate that the growth in EFF will be near or slightly below zero, with a projection of -0.6 [range of -1.6 to +0.5] %, based on national emissions projections for China and the USA, and projections of gross domestic product corrected for recent changes in the carbon intensity of the global economy for the rest of the world. From this projection of EFF and assumed constant ELUC for 2015, cumulative emissions of CO2 will reach about 555 ± 55 GtC (2035 ± 205 GtCO2) for 1870-2015, about 75 % from EFF and 25 % from ELUC. This living data update documents changes in the methods and data sets used in this new carbon budget compared with previous publications of this data set (Le Quéré et al., 2015, 2014, 2013). All observations presented here can be downloaded from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (doi:10.3334/CDIAC/GCP_2015).

  14. The impact of a unilateral carbon tax on carbon-intensive industries: evidence from Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golombek, R.

    1996-02-01

    This publication identifies the impact of a unilateral Norwegian carbon tax on the profitability and the exit probability in 12 carbon intensive manufacturing sectors. The study uses Norwegian panel data for manufacturing firms and focuses both on a tax on burning of fossil fuels and a tax on all emissions of carbon. It is demonstrated that for most carbon intensive sectors the impact on both profits and the exit probability of a tax on burning of fossil fuel is negligible or moderate. That is, the increase in the average sectorial exit probability is always less that one percentage point when the tax is 75 USD per tonne carbon dioxide. On the other hand, for sectors where carbon emissions are due to both burning of fossil fuels and the production process, the impact of a general tax on carbon dioxide (at 75 USD) is significant. In particular, in the manufacture of ferro alloys the average exit probability may increase by more than 15 percentage points. 15 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. Development of DMBZ-15 High-Glass-Transition-Temperature Polyimides as PMR-15 Replacements Given R&D 100 Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Kathy

    2004-01-01

    PMR-15, a high-temperature polyimide developed in the mid-1970s at the NASA Lewis Research Center,1 offers the combination of low cost, easy processing, and good high-temperature performance and stability. It has been recognized as the leading polymer matrix resin for carbon-fiber-reinforced composites used in aircraft engine components. The state-of-the-art PMR-15 polyimide composite has a glass-transition temperature (Tg) of 348 C (658 F). Since composite materials must be used at temperatures well below their glass-transition temperature, the long-term use temperatures of PMR-15 composites can be no higher than 288 C (550 F). In addition, PMR-15 is made from methylene dianiline (MDA), a known liver toxin. Concerns about the safety of workers exposed to MDA during the fabrication of PMR-15 components and about the environmental impact of PMR-15 waste disposal have led to the industry-wide implementation of special handling procedures to minimize the health risks associated with this material. These procedures have increased manufacturing and maintenance costs significantly and have limited the use of PMR-15 in commercial aircraft engine components.

  16. The ISG15 conjugation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durfee, Larissa A; Huibregtse, Jon M

    2012-01-01

    ISG15 is a ubiquitin-like modifier that is expressed in response to type 1 interferon signaling (IFN-α/β) and plays a role in antiviral responses. The core E1, E2, and E3 enzymes for ISG15 are Ube1L, UbcH8, and Herc5, respectively, and these are all also induced at the transcriptional level by IFN-α/β. We recently showed that Herc5 associates with polysomes and modifies target proteins in a cotranslational manner. Here, we describe the expression of the core conjugating enzymes in human cells, the detection of ISG15 conjugates, and the methods for fractionation of Herc5 with polysomes. PMID:22350882

  17. Cyanobacteria as Biocatalysts for Carbonate Mineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christer Jansson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Microbial carbonate mineralization is widespread in nature and among microorganisms, and of vast ecological and geological importance. However, our understanding of the mechanisms that trigger and control processes such as calcification, i.e., mineralization of CO2 to calcium carbonate (CaCO3, is limited and literature on cyanobacterial calcification is oftentimes bewildering and occasionally controversial. In cyanobacteria, calcification may be intimately associated with the carbon dioxide-(CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM, a biochemical system that allows the cells to raise the concentration of CO2 at the site of the carboxylating enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco up to 1000-fold over that in the surrounding medium. A comprehensive understanding of biologically induced carbonate mineralization is important for our ability to assess its role in past, present, and future carbon cycling, interpret paleontological data, and for evaluating the process as a means for biological carbon capture and storage (CCS. In this review we summarize and discuss the metabolic, physiological and structural features of cyanobacteria that may be involved in the reactions leading to mineral formation and precipitation, present a conceptual model of cyanobacterial calcification, and, finally, suggest practical applications for cyanobacterial carbonate mineralization.

  18. 78 FR 34340 - Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe and Tube Products From Turkey: Preliminary Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-07

    ... Order; Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe and Tube Products from Turkey, 51 FR 17784 (May 15, 1986). The... International Trade Administration Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe and Tube Products From Turkey: Preliminary... antidumping duty order on welded carbon steel standard pipe and tube products (welded pipe and tube)...

  19. Carbon isotope fluctuations in Precambrian carbonate sequences of several localities in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SIAL ALCIDES N.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon isotope fluctuations in Precambrian sedimentary carbonates between 2.8 Ga and 0.60 Ga in Brazil are examined in this study. The carbonate facies of the BIF of the 2.8 Ga-old Carajás Formation, state of Pará in northern Brazil, has rather homogeneous delta13C (-5 o/ooPDB, compatible with carbonatization of a silicate protolith by a CO2-rich fluid from mantle degassing. The Paleoproterozoic Gandarela Formation, state of Minas Gerais, displays a narrow delta13C variation (-1.5 to +0.5 o/oo compatible with carbon isotope signatures of carbonates deposited around 2.4 Ga worldwide. The Fecho do Funil Formation has probably recorded the Lomagundi delta13C positive anomaly (+6.4 to +7.1 o/ooPDB. The magnesite-bearing carbonates of the Orós mobile belt, state of Ceará, exhibit carbon isotope fluctuation within the range for carbonates deposited at 1.8 Ga. The C-isotope record of the Frecheirinha Formation, northwestern state of Ceará, shows negative delta13C values in its lower portion (-2 o/oo and positive values up section (+1 to +3 o/oo, which suggests this sequence is a cap carbonate deposited after a glacial event around 0.95 Ga. The Jacoca and Acauã sedimentary carbonate Formations, state of Sergipe, NE Brazil, show carbon isotope fluctuations very similar to each other (average around -5 o/oo, compatible with a deposition around 0.76 Ga. The younger Olho D'Água carbonate Formation, however, also in the state of Sergipe, displays negative delta13C values at the lower portion of the Formation, changing dramatically up section to positive values as high as +10 o/oo, a characteristic compatible with a Sturtian cap carbonate deposited around 0.69 Ga. On the light of the C isotope data discussed in this study, it seems that delta13C fluctuations in Paleoproterozoic carbonates in Brazil are within the range found globally for metasedimentary carbonates of this age. Carbon isotope data proved to be very useful in establishing relative

  20. Soil carbon stocks in Sarawak, Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padmanabhan, E., E-mail: Eswaran_padmanabhan@petronas.com.my [Department of Geosciences, Faculty of Geosciences and Petroleum Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, 31750, Perak (Malaysia); Eswaran, H.; Reich, P.F. [USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service, Washington, DC 20250 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The relationship between greenhouse gas emission and climate change has led to research to identify and manage the natural sources and sinks of the gases. CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2}O have an anthropic source and of these CO{sub 2} is the least effective in trapping long wave radiation. Soil carbon sequestration can best be described as a process of removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and relocating into soils in a form that is not readily released back into the atmosphere. The purpose of this study is to estimate carbon stocks available under current conditions in Sarawak, Malaysia. SOC estimates are made for a standard depth of 100 cm unless the soil by definition is less than this depth, as in the case of lithic subgroups. Among the mineral soils, Inceptisols tend to generally have the highest carbon contents (about 25 kg m{sup −2} m{sup −1}), while Oxisols and Ultisols rate second (about 10–15 kg m{sup −2} m{sup −1}). The Oxisols store a good amount of carbon because of an appreciable time-frame to sequester carbon and possibly lower decomposition rates for the organic carbon that is found at 1 m depths. Wet soils such as peatlands tend to store significant amounts of carbon. The highest values estimated for such soils are about 114 kg m{sup −2} m{sup −1}. Such appreciable amounts can also be found in the Aquepts. In conclusion, it is pertinent to recognize that degradation of the carbon pool, just like desertification, is a real process and that this irreversible process must be addressed immediately. Therefore, appropriate soil management practices should be instituted to sequester large masses of soil carbon on an annual basis. This knowledge can be used effectively to formulate strategies to prevent forest fires and clearing: two processes that can quickly release sequestered carbon to the atmosphere in an almost irreversible manner. - Highlights: • Soil carbon stocks in different soils in Sarawak • In depth discussion of

  1. 1,5-Diaminotetrazolium chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Qiao Meng

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, CH5N6+·Cl−, crystallized with two indepedent 1,5-diaminotetrazolium cations and two independent chloride anions in the asymmetric unit. In the crystal, there are a number of N—H...Cl hydrogen-bonding interactions, which generate a three-dimensional network.

  2. Trading forest carbon - OSU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issues associate with trading carbon sequestered in forests are discussed. Scientific uncertainties associated with carbon measurement are discussed with respect to proposed accounting procedures. Major issues include: (1) Establishing baselines. (2) Determining additivity from f...

  3. Soil Organic Carbon Stock

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Soil organic carbon (SOC) is the carbon held within soil organic constituents (i.e., products produced as dead plants and animals decompose and the soil microbial...

  4. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education / Safety Education Centers En Español Carbon Monoxide Information Center The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known ... Install one and check its batteries regularly. View Information About CO Alarms Other CO Topics Safety Tips ...

  5. Biomass Carbon Stock

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Biomass carbon includes carbon stored in above- and below-ground live plant components (such as leaf, branch, stem and root) as well as in standing and down dead...

  6. Carbon Monoxide Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with the Media Fire Protection Technology Carbon monoxide safety outreach materials Help inform residents in your community ... KB | Spanish PDF 645 KB Handout: carbon monoxide safety Download this handout and add your organization's logo ...

  7. Calcium carbonate overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Some products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: ... and mineral supplements Other products may also contain calcium ...

  8. Potassium carbonate poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potassium carbonate is a white powder used to make soap, glass, and other items. This article discusses poisoning from swallowing or breathing in potassium carbonate. This article is for information only. Do ...

  9. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  10. The Australian terrestrial carbon budget

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Haverd

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a study of the full carbon (C-CO2 budget of the Australian continent, focussing on 1990–2011 in the context of estimates over two centuries. The work is a contribution to the RECCAP (REgional Carbon Cycle Assessment and Processes project, as one of numerous regional studies. In constructing the budget, we estimate the following component carbon fluxes: net primary production (NPP; net ecosystem production (NEP; fire; land use change (LUC; riverine export; dust export; harvest (wood, crop and livestock and fossil fuel emissions (both territorial and non-territorial. Major biospheric fluxes were derived using BIOS2 (Haverd et al., 2012, a fine-spatial-resolution (0.05° offline modelling environment in which predictions of CABLE (Wang et al., 2011, a sophisticated land surface model with carbon cycle, are constrained by multiple observation types. The mean NEP reveals that climate variability and rising CO2 contributed 12 ± 24 (1σ error on mean and 68 ± 15 TgC yr−1, respectively. However these gains were partially offset by fire and LUC (along with other minor fluxes, which caused net losses of 26 ± 4 TgC yr−1 and 18 ± 7 TgC yr−1, respectively. The resultant net biome production (NBP is 36 ± 29 TgC yr−1, in which the largest contributions to uncertainty are NEP, fire and LUC. This NBP offset fossil fuel emissions (95 ± 6 TgC yr−1 by 38 ± 30%. The interannual variability (IAV in the Australian carbon budget exceeds Australia's total carbon emissions by fossil fuel combustion and is dominated by IAV in NEP. Territorial fossil fuel emissions are significantly smaller than the rapidly growing fossil fuel exports: in 2009–2010, Australia exported 2.5 times more carbon in fossil fuels than it emitted by burning fossil fuels.

  11. Metal filled porous carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Adam F.; Vajo, John J.; Cumberland, Robert W.; Liu, Ping; Salguero, Tina T.

    2011-03-22

    A porous carbon scaffold with a surface and pores, the porous carbon scaffold containing a primary metal and a secondary metal, where the primary metal is a metal that does not wet the surface of the pores of the carbon scaffold but wets the surface of the secondary metal, and the secondary metal is interspersed between the surface of the pores of the carbon scaffold and the primary metal.

  12. Teslaphoresis of Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornhoeft, Lindsey R; Castillo, Aida C; Smalley, Preston R; Kittrell, Carter; James, Dustin K; Brinson, Bruce E; Rybolt, Thomas R; Johnson, Bruce R; Cherukuri, Tonya K; Cherukuri, Paul

    2016-04-26

    This paper introduces Teslaphoresis, the directed motion and self-assembly of matter by a Tesla coil, and studies this electrokinetic phenomenon using single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Conventional directed self-assembly of matter using electric fields has been restricted to small scale structures, but with Teslaphoresis, we exceed this limitation by using the Tesla coil's antenna to create a gradient high-voltage force field that projects into free space. CNTs placed within the Teslaphoretic (TEP) field polarize and self-assemble into wires that span from the nanoscale to the macroscale, the longest thus far being 15 cm. We show that the TEP field not only directs the self-assembly of long nanotube wires at remote distances (>30 cm) but can also wirelessly power nanotube-based LED circuits. Furthermore, individualized CNTs self-organize to form long parallel arrays with high fidelity alignment to the TEP field. Thus, Teslaphoresis is effective for directed self-assembly from the bottom-up to the macroscale. PMID:27074626

  13. Protolytic carbon film technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renschler, C.L.; White, C.A.

    1996-04-01

    This paper presents a technique for the deposition of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) on virtually any surface allowing carbon film formation with only the caveat that the substrate must withstand carbonization temperatures of at least 600 degrees centigrade. The influence of processing conditions upon the structure and properties of the carbonized film is discussed. Electrical conductivity, microstructure, and morphology control are also described.

  14. Carbon nanotube quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapmaz, S.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature electron transport measurements on individual single wall carbon nanotubes are described in this thesis. Carbon nanotubes are small hollow cylinders made entirely out of carbon atoms. At low temperatures (below ~10 K) finite length nanotubes form quantum dots. Because of its small si

  15. Carbon Goes To…

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savasci, Funda

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this activity are to help middle school students understand the carbon cycle and realize how human activities affect the carbon cycle. This activity consists of two parts. The first part of the activity focuses on the carbon cycle, especially before the Industrial Revolution, while the second part of the activity focuses on how…

  16. Carbon/Carbon Pistons for Internal Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    Carbon/carbon piston performs same function as aluminum pistons in reciprocating internal combustion engines while reducing weight and increasing mechanical and thermal efficiencies of engine. Carbon/carbon piston concept features low piston-to-cylinder wall clearance - so low piston rings and skirts unnecessary. Advantages possible by negligible coefficient of thermal expansion of carbon/carbon.

  17. Free IL-15 Is More Abundant Than IL-15 Complexed With Soluble IL-15 Receptor-α in Murine Serum: Implications for the Mechanism of IL-15 Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Barbara G; Quinn, LeBris S

    2016-03-01

    IL-15 is a cytokine that is part of the innate immune system, as well as a proposed myokine released from skeletal muscle during physical exercise that mediates many of the positive physiological effects of exercise. Many of the immune functions of IL-15 are mediated by juxtacrine signaling via externalized IL-15 bound to membrane-associated IL-15 receptor-α (IL-15Rα). Serum and plasma samples also contain measurable concentrations of IL-15, believed to arise from proteolytic cleavage of membrane-associated IL-15/IL-15Rα complexes to generate soluble IL-15/IL-15Rα species. Here, we validate commercial assays that can distinguish the free form of IL-15 and IL-15/IL-15Rα complexes. These assays showed that most (86%) IL-15 in mouse serum resides in the free state, with a minor proportion (14%) residing in complex with IL-15Rα. Given the much shorter half-life of free IL-15 compared with IL-15/IL-15Rα complexes, these findings cast doubt on the currently accepted model for IL-15 secretion from cleavage of membrane-bound IL-15/IL-15Rα and suggest that IL-15 is released as a free molecule by an unknown mechanism. PMID:26812159

  18. Laser interaction with low-density carbon foam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Chaurasia; S Tripathi; D S Munda; G Mishra; C G Murali; N K Gupta; L J Dhareshwar; A K Rossall; G J Tallents; Rashmi Singh; D K Kohli; R K Khardekar

    2010-12-01

    Experiments were performed with a 15 J/500 ps Nd:glass laser ( = 1064 nm) focussed to an intensity > 1014 W/cm2 . X-ray emissions from carbon foam and 5 % Pt-doped carbon foam of density 150–300 mg/cc were compared with that of the solid carbon targets. The thickness of the carbon foam was 15 m on a graphite substrate. X-ray emission was measured using semiconductor X-ray diodes covered with various filters having transmissions in different X-ray spectral ranges. It covered X-ray spectrum of 0.8–8.5 keV range. The X-ray emission in the soft X-ray region was observed to increase to about 1.8 times and 2.3 times in carbon foam and Pt-doped foam, respectively with respect to solid carbon. In hard X-rays, there was no measurable difference amongst the carbon foam, Pt-doped carbon foam and solid carbon. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis demonstrates that foam targets smoothens the crater formed by the laser irradiation.

  19. 15.KIDNEY AND URINARY TRACT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    15.2.Renal failure930714 Histological classification of uremic bone dis-ease and clinical significance of bone biopsy.ZHUJianmin.Dept Med,2nd Affil Hosp,XianMed Univ,Xian,710061.Chin J Intern Med 1993;32(7):444—447.Bone biopsy was performed in 429 cases of uremicbone disease and they were classified histologically into3 groups——high turnover 129(30%),lowturnover 102(24%)and mixed type 198(46%)cases.

  20. 15th International Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Ronald G

    2009-01-01

    This is the 15th volume in the conference series. Over the years the International Cryocooler Conference has become the preeminent worldwide conference for the presentation of the latest developments and test experiences with cryocoolers. The typical applications of this technology include cooling space and terrestrial infrared focal plane arrays, space x-ray detectors, medical applications, and a growing number of high-temperature superconductor applications.

  1. Experiment R276-15 (MANIA 15). Activity calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the irradiation experiment MANIA 15 austenitic stainless steel for advanced nuclear systems will be irradiated at a temperature of 325 C up to a dpa (displacements per atom) level of 2.0 dpa. In this report the results of the activity calculations of the sample holder material and of the steel sample material are presented. The activities of the streel sample material are given for the vertical maximum of the irradiation position. A relation is given to convert these data to any vertical sample position. Also the change in chemical composition of the sample material due to nuclide transmutation, is given in this report. (orig.)

  2. Carbon-14 waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-14 occurs in nature, but is also formed in nuclear reactors. Because of its long half-life and the biological significance of carbon, releases from nuclear facilities could have a significant radiological impact. Waste management strategies for carbon-14 are therefore of current concern. Carbon-14 is present in a variety of waste streams both at reactors and at reprocessing plants. A reliable picture of the production and release of carbon-14 from various reactor systems has been built up for the purposes of this study. A possible management strategy for carbon-14 might be the reduction of nitrogen impurity levels in core materials, since the activation of 14N is usually the dominant source of carbon-14. The key problem in carbon-14 management is its retention of off-gas streams, particularly in the dissolver off-gas stream at reprocessing plants. Three alternative trapping processes that convert carbon dioxide into insoluble carbonates have been suggested. The results show that none of the options considered need be rejected on the grounds of potential radiation doses to individuals. All exposures should be as low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account. If, on these grounds, retention and disposal of carbon-14 is found to be beneficial, then, subject to the limitations noted, appropriate retention, immobilization and disposal technologies have been identified

  3. Seasonal dynamics of soil carbon dioxide flux in a restored young mangrove plantation at Gazi Bay

    OpenAIRE

    Kirui, B.; Huxham, M; Kairo, J.; Mencuccini, M.; Skov, M.W.

    2009-01-01

    One of the proposed strategies to help mitigate atmospheric carbon emissions is afforestation. This has the potential to contribute to carbon storage directly through biomass and soil carbon accumulation. The little work that has been done on the potential of mangrove forests to sequester atmospheric carbon, estimated the rate of carbon sequestered in mangrove mud to be around 1.5 t C ha-1 yr-1 or a global total of 25.5 x106 tC yr-1. Several factors are responsible for the rate of carbon sequ...

  4. Carbon activation process for increased surface accessibility in electrochemical capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Daniel H.; Eisenmann, Erhard T.

    2001-01-01

    A process for making carbon film or powder suitable for double capacitor electrodes having a capacitance of up to about 300 F/cm.sup.3 is disclosed. This is accomplished by treating in aqueous nitric acid for a period of about 5 to 15 minutes thin carbon films obtained by carbonizing carbon-containing polymeric material having a high degree of molecular directionality, such as polyimide film, then heating the treated carbon film in a non-oxidizing atmosphere at a non-graphitizing temperature of at least 350.degree. C. for about 20 minutes, and repeating alternately the nitric acid step and the heating step from 7 to 10 times. Capacitors made with this carbon may find uses ranging from electronic devices to electric vehicle applications.

  5. The carbon holdings of northern Ecuador's mangrove forests

    CERN Document Server

    Hamilton, Stuart E; Borbor, Mercy; Millones, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Within a GIS environment, we combine field measures of mangrove diameter, mangrove species distribution, and mangrove density with remotely sensed measures of mangrove location and mangrove canopy cover to estimate the mangrove carbon holdings of northern Ecuador. We find that the four northern estuaries of Ecuador contain approximately 7,742,999 t (plus or minus 15.47 percent) of standing carbon. Of particular high carbon holdings are the Rhizophora mangle dominated mangrove stands found in-and-around the Cayapas-Mataje Ecological Reserve in northern Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador and certain stands of Rhizophora mangle in-and-around the Isla Corazon y Fragata Wildlife Refuge in central Manabi Province, Ecuador. Our field driven mangrove carbon estimate is higher than all but one of the comparison models evaluated. We find that basic latitudinal mangrove carbon models performed at least as well, if not better, than the more complex species based allometric models in predicting standing carbon levels. In additi...

  6. Soil Carbon Sequestration in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With a large land area and diverse ecoregions, there is a considerable potential of terrestrial/soil carbon sequestration in India. Of the total land area of 329 million hectares (Mha), 297 Mha is the land area comprising 162 Mha of arable land, 69 Mha of forest and woodland, 11 Mha of permanent pasture, 8 Mha of permanent crops and 58 Mha is other land uses. The soil organic carbon (SOC) pool is estimated at 21 Pg (petagram = Pg = 1 x 1015 g billion ton) to 30-cm depth and 63 Pg to 150-cm depth. The soil inorganic carbon (SIC) pool is estimated at 196 Pg to 1-m depth. The SOC concentration in most cultivated soils is less than 5 g/kg compared with 15 to 20 g/kg in uncultivated soils. Low SOC concentration is attributed to plowing, removal of crop residue and other biosolids, and mining of soil fertility. Accelerated soil erosion by water leads to emission of 6 Tg C/y. Important strategies of soil C sequestration include restoration of degraded soils, and adoption of recommended management practices (RMPs) of agricultural and forestry soils. Potential of soil C sequestration in India is estimated at 7 to 10 Tg C/y for restoration of degraded soils and ecosystems, 5 to 7 Tg C/y for erosion control, 6 to 7 Tg C/y for adoption of RMPs on agricultural soils, and 22 to 26 Tg C/y for secondary carbonates. Thus, total potential of soil C sequestration is 39 to 49 (44± 5) Tg C/y

  7. Carbon isotopes in mollusk shell carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnaughey, Ted A.; Gillikin, David Paul

    2008-10-01

    Mollusk shells contain many isotopic clues about calcification physiology and environmental conditions at the time of shell formation. In this review, we use both published and unpublished data to discuss carbon isotopes in both bivalve and gastropod shell carbonates. Land snails construct their shells mainly from respired CO2, and shell δ13C reflects the local mix of C3 and C4 plants consumed. Shell δ13C is typically >10‰ heavier than diet, probably because respiratory gas exchange discards CO2, and retains the isotopically heavier HCO3 -. Respired CO2 contributes less to the shells of aquatic mollusks, because CO2/O2 ratios are usually higher in water than in air, leading to more replacement of respired CO2 by environmental CO2. Fluid exchange with the environment also brings additional dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) into the calcification site. Shell δ13C is typically a few ‰ lower than ambient DIC, and often decreases with age. Shell δ13C retains clues about processes such as ecosystem metabolism and estuarine mixing. Ca2+ ATPase-based models of calcification physiology developed for corals and algae likely apply to mollusks, too, but lower pH and carbonic anhydrase at the calcification site probably suppress kinetic isotope effects. Carbon isotopes in biogenic carbonates are clearly complex, but cautious interpretation can provide a wealth of information, especially after vital effects are better understood.

  8. Sodium-carbonate co-substituted hydroxyapatite ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltan Z. Zyman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Powders of sodium-carbonate co-substituted hydroxyapatite, having sodium content in the range of 0.25–1.5 wt.% with a 0.25 wt.% step, were prepared by a precipitation-solid state reaction route. Compacts of the powders were sintered in a CO2 flow (4 mL/min at 1100 °C for 2 h. The sintered ceramics contained sodium and carbonate ions in the ranges of 0–1.5 wt.% and 1.3–6 wt.%, respectively, which are typical impurity concentrations in biological apatite. A relationship between sodium and carbonate contents and the type of carbonate substitution was found. The total carbonate content progressively increased with the sodium content. The obtained ceramics showed an AB-type carbonate substitution. However, the substitution became more B-type as the sodium content increased. As a result, the carbonation was almost B-type (94 % for the highest sodium content (1.5 wt.%.

  9. Carbon dioxide sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Prabir K. (Worthington, OH); Lee, Inhee (Columbus, OH); Akbar, Sheikh A. (Hilliard, OH)

    2011-11-15

    The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

  10. Mechanisms of soil carbon storage in experimental grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeiss, S.; Temperton, V. M.; Gleixner, G.

    2007-10-01

    We investigated the fate of root and litter derived carbon into soil organic matter and dissolved organic matter in soil profiles, in order to explain unexpected positive effects of plant diversity on carbon storage. A time series of soil and soil solution samples was investigated at the field site of The Jena Experiment. In addition to the main biodiversity experiment with C3 plants, a C4 species (Amaranthus retroflexus L.) naturally labeled with 13C was grown on an extra plot. Changes in organic carbon concentration in soil and soil solution were combined with stable isotope measurements to follow the fate of plant carbon into the soil and soil solution. A split plot design with plant litter removal versus double litter input simulated differences in biomass input. After 2 years, the no litter and double litter treatment, respectively, showed an increase of 381 g C m-2 and 263 g C m-2 to 20 cm depth, while 71 g C m-2 and 393 g C m-2 were lost between 20 and 30 cm depth. The isotopic label in the top 5 cm indicated that 11 and 15% of soil organic carbon were derived from plant material on the no litter and the double litter treatment, respectively. Without litter, this equals the total amount of carbon newly stored in soil, whereas with double litter this corresponds to twice the amount of stored carbon. Our results indicate that litter input resulted in lower carbon storage and larger carbon losses and consequently accelerated turnover of soil organic carbon. Isotopic evidence showed that inherited soil organic carbon was replaced by fresh plant carbon near the soil surface. Our results suggest that primarily carbon released from soil organic matter, not newly introduced plant organic matter, was transported in the soil solution and contributed to the observed carbon storage in deeper horizons.

  11. PREFACE: 15th International Conference on Thin Films (ICTF-15)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Osamu; Saito, Nagahiro; Zettsu, Nobuyuki; Cho, Sung-Pyo; Terashima, Chiaki; Ueno, Tomonaga; Sakai, Osamu; Miyazaki, Seiichi; Yoshimura, Kazuki; Akamatsu, Kensuke; Ito, Takahiro; Yogo, Toshinobu; Inoue, Yasushi; Ohtake, Naoto; Yoshida, Tsukasa; Tosa, Masahiro; Takai, Madoka; Fujiwara, Yasufumi; Matsuda, Naoki; Teshima, Katsuya; Seki, Takahiro; Matsunaga, Katsuyuki; Fujita, Daisuke

    2013-03-01

    The International Conference on Thin Films is the most established conference for all researchers and persons interested in thin films and coatings. It is one of the tri-annual conference series endorsed and co-organized by the Thin Film Division of the International Union for Vacuum Science, Technique and Applications (IUVSTA), a union of national member societies whose role is to stimulate international collaboration in the fields of vacuum science, techniques and applications and related multi-disciplinary topics including solid-vacuum and other interfaces. The 15th International Conference on Thin Films (ICTF-15) is organized by The Vacuum Society of Japan (VSJ) and held at Kyoto TERRSA in Kyoto, Japan on 8-11 November 2011, following the 14th International Conference on Thin Films (ICTF-14), which was held in Ghent, Belgium in 2008. Thin films and coatings are daily becoming increasingly important in the fields of various industries. This International Conference provides a multi-disciplinary forum for recent advances in basic research, development and applications of thin films and coatings. This conference will present a unique opportunity for researchers, engineers and managers to acquire new knowledge of thin films and coatings. We hope that our understanding on thin films and coatings will be deepened through this conference. The conference site, 'Kyoto TERRSA' is located in the historical heart of the old capital Kyoto. Kyoto is an ancient city with a 1200-year history. It was established as Japan's capital under the name 'Heian-kyo' in the year 794. Although many transformations have taken place over the years, Kyoto has always embraced the most advanced standards of the times. It has greatly contributed to the nation's industrial, economic and cultural development. The dauntless spirit of leadership of Kyoto's past as a capital city is still felt here today. Kyoto also preserves the beloved examples of its culture as testimonials of time. This is shown

  12. Inferring Absorbing Organic Carbon Content from AERONET Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arola, A.; Schuster, G.; Myhre, G.; Kazadzis, S.; Dey, S.; Tripathi, S. N.

    2011-01-01

    Black carbon, light-absorbing organic carbon (often called brown carbon) and mineral dust are the major light-absorbing aerosols. Currently the sources and formation of brown carbon aerosol in particular are not well understood. In this study we estimated globally the amount of light absorbing organic carbon and black carbon from AERONET measurements. We find that the columnar absorbing organic carbon (brown carbon) levels in biomass burning regions of South-America and Africa are relatively high (about 15-20 magnesium per square meters during biomass burning season), while the concentrations are significantly lower in urban areas in US and Europe. However, we estimated significant absorbing organic carbon amounts from the data of megacities of newly industrialized countries, particularly in India and China, showing also clear seasonality with peak values up to 30-35 magnesium per square meters during the coldest season, likely caused by the coal and biofuel burning used for heating. We also compared our retrievals with the modeled organic carbon by global Oslo CTM for several sites. Model values are higher in biomass burning regions than AERONET-based retrievals, while opposite is true in urban areas in India and China.

  13. Process synthesis and optimization for the production of carbon nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A swirled fluidized bed chemical vapour deposition (SFCVD) reactor has been manufactured and optimized to produce carbon nanostructures on a continuous basis using in situ formation of floating catalyst particles by thermal decomposition of organometallic ferrocene. During the process optimization, carbon nanoballs were produced in the absence of a catalyst at temperatures higher than 1000 0C, while carbon nanofibres, single-walled carbon nanotubes, helical carbon nanotubes, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and carbon nanofibres (CNFs) were produced in the presence of a catalyst at lower temperatures of between 750 and 900 0C. The optimum conditions for producing carbon nanostructures were a temperature of 850 0C, acetylene flow rate of 100 ml min-1, and acetylene gas was used as the carbon source. All carbon nanostructures produced have morphologies and diameters ranging from 15 to 200 nm and wall thicknesses between 0.5 and 0.8 nm. In comparison to the quantity of MWCNTs produced with other methods described in the literature, the SFCVD technique was superior to floating catalytic CVD (horizontal fixed bed) and microwave CVD but inferior to rotary tube CVD.

  14. Potential Carbon Negative Commercial Aviation through Land Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    Brazilian terra preta soil and char-enhanced soil agricultural systems have demonstrated both enhanced plant biomass and crop yield and functions as a carbon sink. Similar carbon sinking has been demonstrated for both glycophyte and halophyte plants and plant roots. Within the assumption of 3.7 t-C/ha/yr soils and plant root carbon sinking, it is possible to provide carbon neutral U.S. commercial aviation using about 8.5% of U.S. arable lands. The total airline CO2 release would be offset by carbon credits for properly managed soils and plant rooting, becoming carbon neutral for carbon sequestered synjet processing. If these lands were also used to produce biomass fuel crops such as soybeans at an increased yield of 60 bu/acre (225gal/ha), they would provide over 3.15 10(exp 9) gallons biodiesel fuel. If all this fuel were refined into biojet it would provide a 16% biojet-84% synjet blend. This allows the U.S. aviation industry to become carbon negative (carbon negative commercial aviation through carbon credits). Arid land recovery could yield even greater benefits.

  15. Process synthesis and optimization for the production of carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyuke, S. E.; Mamvura, T. A.; Liu, K.; Sibanda, V.; Meyyappan, M.; Varadan, V. K.

    2009-09-01

    A swirled fluidized bed chemical vapour deposition (SFCVD) reactor has been manufactured and optimized to produce carbon nanostructures on a continuous basis using in situ formation of floating catalyst particles by thermal decomposition of organometallic ferrocene. During the process optimization, carbon nanoballs were produced in the absence of a catalyst at temperatures higher than 1000 °C, while carbon nanofibres, single-walled carbon nanotubes, helical carbon nanotubes, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and carbon nanofibres (CNFs) were produced in the presence of a catalyst at lower temperatures of between 750 and 900 °C. The optimum conditions for producing carbon nanostructures were a temperature of 850 °C, acetylene flow rate of 100 ml min-1, and acetylene gas was used as the carbon source. All carbon nanostructures produced have morphologies and diameters ranging from 15 to 200 nm and wall thicknesses between 0.5 and 0.8 nm. In comparison to the quantity of MWCNTs produced with other methods described in the literature, the SFCVD technique was superior to floating catalytic CVD (horizontal fixed bed) and microwave CVD but inferior to rotary tube CVD.

  16. The role of urbanization in the global carbon cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina eChurkina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban areas account for more than 70% of CO2 emissions from burning fossil fuels. Urban expansion in tropics is responsible for 5% of the annual emissions from land use change. Here I show that the effect of urbanization on the global carbon cycle extends beyond these emissions. I quantify the contribution of urbanization to the major carbon fluxes and pools globally and identify gaps crucial for predicting the evolution of the carbon cycle in the future. Urban residents currently control ~22 (12-40 % of the land carbon uptake (112 PgC/yr and ~24 (15-39 % of the carbon emissions (117 PgC/yr from land globally. Urbanization resulted in the creation of new carbon pools on land such as buildings (~6.7 PgC and landfills (~30 PgC. Together these pools store 1.6 (±0.3 % of the total vegetation and soil carbon pools globally. The creation and maintenance of these new pools has been associated with high emissions of CO2, which are currently better understood than the processes associated with the dynamics of these pools and accompanying uptake of carbon. Predictions of the future trajectories of the global carbon cycle will require a much better understanding of how urban development affects the carbon cycle over the long term.

  17. IEC SC15E: Report on liaison activities of CIGRÉ-SC15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Mogens

    2000-01-01

    WG’s activities under CIGRÉ SC15:WG 15.01 - Fluid impregnated systems.WG 15.02 - Dielectric Liquids.WG 15.03 - Gas Insulation.WG 15.04 - Outdoor Insulation.WG 15.05 - Capacitors.WG 15.07 - Solid Insulating Materials for Rotating Machines.WG 15/33.08 - Insulation Monitoring and Life Estimation. WG...... 15.09 - Advanced Materials.WG 15.10 - Internal Insulation and Interfaces.WG 15.11 - Service-Aged Materials.WG 15.12 - DC Insulation/Space Charge Measurements....

  18. Mitral stenosis in 15 dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitral stenosis was diagnosed in 15 young to middle-aged dogs. There were 5 Newfoundlands and 4 bull terriers affected, suggesting a breed predisposition for this disorder. Clinical signs included cough, dyspnea, exercise intolerance, and syncope. Soft left apical diastolic murmurs were heard only in 4 dogs, whereas 8 dogs had systolic murmurs characteristic of mitral regurgitation. Left atrial enlargement was the most prominent radiographic feature. Left-sided congestive heart failure was detected by radiographs in 11 dogs within 1 year of diagnosis. Electrocardiographic abnormalities varied among dogs and included atrial and ventricular enlargement, as well as atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. Abnormalities on M-mode and two-dimensional echocardiograms included abnormal diastolic motion of the mitral valve characterized by decreased leaflet separation, valve doming, concordant motion of the parietal mitral valve leaflet, and a decreased E-to-F slope. Increased mitral valve inflow velocities and prolonged pressure half-times were detected by Doppler echocardiography. Cardiac catheterization, performed in 8 dogs, documented a diastolic pressure gradient between the left atrial, pulmonary capillary wedge, or pulmonary artery diastolic pressures and the left ventricular diastolic pressure. Necropsy showed mitral stenosis caused by thickened, fused mitral valve leaflets in 5 dogs and a supramitral ring in another dog. The outcome in affected dogs was poor; 9 of 15 dogs were euthanatized or died by 2 1/2 years of age

  19. Biosynthetic uniform 13C,15N-labelling of zervamicin IIB. Complete 13C and 15N NMR assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikova, Tatyana V; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Yakimenko, Zoya A; Svishcheva, Natalia V; Tagaev, Andrey A; Skladnev, Dmitry A; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2003-01-01

    Zervamicin IIB is a member of the alpha-aminoisobutyric acid containing peptaibol antibiotics. A new procedure for the biosynthetic preparation of the uniformly 13C- and 15N-enriched peptaibol is described This compound was isolated from the biomass of the fungus-producer Emericellopsis salmosynnemata strain 336 IMI 58330 obtained upon cultivation in the totally 13C, 15N-labelled complete medium. To prepare such a medium the autolysed biomass and the exopolysaccharides of the obligate methylotrophic bacterium Methylobacillus flagellatus KT were used. This microorganism was grown in totally 13C, 15N-labelled minimal medium containing 13C-methanol and 15N-ammonium chloride as the only carbon and nitrogen sources. Preliminary NMR spectroscopic analysis indicated a high extent of isotope incorporation (> 90%) and led to the complete 13C- and 15N-NMR assignment including the stereospecific assignment of Aib residues methyl groups. The observed pattern of the structurally important secondary chemical shifts of 1H(alpha), 13C=O and 13C(alpha) agrees well with the previously determined structure of zervamicin IIB in methanol solution. PMID:14658801

  20. Carbonic acid as a reserve of carbon dioxide on icy moons: The formation of carbon dioxide (CO2) in a polar environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) has been detected on the surface of several icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn via observation of the ν3 band with the Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on board the Galileo spacecraft and the Visible-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on board the Cassini spacecraft. Interestingly, the CO2 band for several of these moons exhibits a blueshift along with a broader profile than that seen in laboratory studies and other astrophysical environments. As such, numerous attempts have been made in order to clarify this abnormal behavior; however, it currently lacks an acceptable physical or chemical explanation. We present a rather surprising result pertaining to the synthesis of carbon dioxide in a polar environment. Here, carbonic acid was synthesized in a water (H2O)-carbon dioxide (CO2) (1:5) ice mixture exposed to ionizing radiation in the form of 5 keV electrons. The irradiated ice mixture was then annealed, producing pure carbonic acid which was then subsequently irradiated, recycling water and carbon dioxide. However, the observed carbon dioxide ν3 band matches almost exactly with that observed on Callisto; subsequent temperature program desorption studies reveal that carbon dioxide synthesized under these conditions remains in solid form until 160 K, i.e., the sublimation temperature of water. Consequently, our results suggest that carbon dioxide on Callisto as well as other icy moons is indeed complexed with water rationalizing the shift in peak frequency, broad profile, and the solid state existence on these relatively warm moons.

  1. Plumbing carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chuanhong; Suenaga, Kazu; Iijima, Sumio

    2008-01-01

    Since their discovery, the possibility of connecting carbon nanotubes together like water pipes has been an intriguing prospect for these hollow nanostructures. The serial joining of carbon nanotubes in a controlled manner offers a promising approach for the bottom-up engineering of nanotube structures-from simply increasing their aspect ratio to making integrated carbon nanotube devices. To date, however, there have been few reports of the joining of two different carbon nanotubes. Here we demonstrate that a Joule heating process, and associated electro-migration effects, can be used to connect two carbon nanotubes that have the same (or similar) diameters. More generally, with the assistance of a tungsten metal particle, this technique can be used to seamlessly join any two carbon nanotubes-regardless of their diameters-to form new nanotube structures.

  2. Relationship between carbon and nitrogen mineralization in a subtropical soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qianru; Sun, Yue; Zhang, Xinyu; Xu, Xingliang; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    In most soils, more than 90% nitrogen is bonded with carbon in organic forms. This indicates that carbon mineralization should be closely coupled with nitrogen mineralization, showing a positive correlation between carbon and nitrogen mineralization. To test this hypothesis above, we conducted an incubation using a subtropical soil for 10 days at 15 °C and 25 °C. 13C-labeled glucose and 15N-labeled ammonium or nitrate was used to separate CO2 and mineral N released from mineralization of soil organic matter and added glucose or inorganic nitrogen. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and four exoenzymes (i.e. β-1,4- Glucosaminidase, chitinase, acid phosphatase, β-1,4-N- acetyl glucosamine glycosidase) were also analyzed to detect change in microbial activities during the incubation. Our results showed that CO2 release decreased with increasing nitrogen mineralization rates. Temperature did not change this relationship between carbon and nitrogen mineralization. Although some changes in PLFA and the four exoenzymes were observed, these changes did not contribute to changes in carbon and nitrogen mineralization. These findings indicates that carbon and nitrogen mineralization in soil are more complicated than as previously expected. Future investigation should focus on why carbon and nitrogen mineralization are coupled in a negative correlation not in a positive correlation in many soils for a better understanding of carbon and nitrogen transformation during their mineralization.

  3. Carbon Fiber Composite Monoliths as Catalyst Supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL; Pickel, Joseph M [ORNL; Blom, Douglas Allen [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    Carbon fiber composite monoliths are rigid bodies that can be activated to a large surface area, have tunable porosity, and proven performance in gas separation and storage. They are ideal as catalyst supports in applications where a rigid support, with open structure and easy fluid access is desired. We developed a procedure for depositing a dispersed nanoparticulate phase of molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) on carbon composite monoliths in the concentration range of 3 to 15 wt% Mo. The composition and morphology of this phase was characterized using X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy, and a mechanism was suggested for its formation. Molybdenum carbide is known for its catalytic properties that resemble those of platinum group metals, but at a lower cost. The materials obtained are expected to demonstrate catalytic activity in a series of hydrocarbon reactions involving hydrogen transfer. This project demonstrates the potential of carbon fiber composite monoliths as catalyst supports.

  4. Carbon Fiber Composite Monoliths for Catalyst Supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL; Pickel, Joseph M [ORNL; Blom, Douglas Allen [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    Carbon fiber composite monoliths are rigid bodies that can be activated to a large surface area, have tunable porosity, and proven performance in gas separation and storage. They are ideal as catalyst supports in applications where a rigid support, with open structure and easy fluid access is desired. We developed a procedure for depositing a dispersed nanoparticulate phase of molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) on carbon composite monoliths in the concentration range of 3 to 15 wt% Mo. The composition and morphology of this phase was characterized using X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy, and a mechanism was suggested for its formation. Molybdenum carbide is known for its catalytic properties that resemble those of platinum group metals, but at a lower cost. The materials obtained are expected to demonstrate catalytic activity in a series of hydrocarbon reactions involving hydrogen transfer. This project demonstrates the potential of carbon fiber composite monoliths as catalyst supports.

  5. A Brazilian network of carbon flux stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberti, Débora R.; Acevedo, Otávio C.; Moraes, Osvaldo L. L.

    2012-05-01

    First Brasflux Workshop; Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, 14-15 November 2011 Last November, 33 researchers participated in a workshop to establish Brasflux, the Brazilian network of carbon flux stations, with the objective of integrating previous efforts and planning for the future. Among the participants were those leading ongoing flux observation projects and others planning to establish flux stations in the near future. International scientists also participated to share the experiences gained with other networks. The need to properly characterize terrestrial ecosystems for their roles in the global carbon, water, and energy budgets has motivated the implementation of hundreds of micrometeorological research sites throughout the world in recent years. The eddy covariance (EC) technique for turbulent flux determination is the preferred method to provide integral information on ecosystematmosphere exchanges. Integrating the observations regionally and globally has proven to be an effective approach to maximizing the usefulness of this technique for carbon cycle studies at multiple scales.

  6. Double layer capacitance of carbon foam electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delnick, F. M.; Ingersoll, D.; Firsich, D.

    We have evaluated a wide variety of microcellular carbon foams prepared by the controlled pyrolysis and carbonization of several polymers including: polyacrylonitrile (PAN), polymethacrylonitrile (PMAN), resorcinol/formaldehyde (RF), divinylbenzene/methacrylonitrile (DVB), phenolics (furfuryl/alcohol), and cellulose polymers such as Rayon. The porosity may be established by several processes including: gelation (1-5), phase separation (1-3,5-8), emulsion (1,9,10), aerogel/xerogel formation (1,11,12,13), replication (14), and activation. In this report we present the complex impedance analysis and double layer charging characteristics of electrodes prepared from one of these materials for double layer capacitor applications, namely activated cellulose derived microcellular carbon foam.

  7. Carbon disulphide promotes sprouting of potato minitubers

    OpenAIRE

    Salimi, Kh.; Hosseini, M.B.; Struik, P.C.; Tavakkol Afshari, R.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effects of postharvest application of carbon disulphide (CS2) in various concentrations (0, 15, 25, 35, 45 and 55 ml m-3) and with different exposure duration (24, 48, 72 and 96 h) on breaking of dormancy and sprouting of potato (Solanum tuberosum L., cv. Marfona) minitubers of two ages (freshly harvested and one week after harvest) and two weight classes (1.5 and 12 g). In comparison with the control minitubers, CS2 treated minitubers showed significantly shorter dormancy...

  8. Integrated Experimental and Modeling Studies of Mineral Carbonation as a Mechanism for Permanent Carbon Sequestration in Mafic/Ultramafic Rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhengrong [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Qiu, Lin [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Zhang, Shuang [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Bolton, Edward [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Bercovici, David [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Ague, Jay [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Karato, Shun-Ichiro [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Oristaglio, Michael [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Zhu, Wen-Iu [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Lisabeth, Harry [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Johnson, Kevin [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2014-09-30

    A program of laboratory experiments, modeling and fieldwork was carried out at Yale University, University of Maryland, and University of Hawai‘i, under a DOE Award (DE-FE0004375) to study mineral carbonation as a practical method of geologic carbon sequestration. Mineral carbonation, also called carbon mineralization, is the conversion of (fluid) carbon dioxide into (solid) carbonate minerals in rocks, by way of naturally occurring chemical reactions. Mafic and ultramafic rocks, such as volcanic basalt, are natural candidates for carbonation, because the magnesium and iron silicate minerals in these rocks react with brines of dissolved carbon dioxide to form carbonate minerals. By trapping carbon dioxide (CO2) underground as a constituent of solid rock, carbonation of natural basalt formations would be a secure method of sequestering CO2 captured at power plants in efforts to mitigate climate change. Geochemical laboratory experiments at Yale, carried out in a batch reactor at 200°C and 150 bar (15 MPa), studied carbonation of the olivine mineral forsterite (Mg2SiO4) reacting with CO2 brines in the form of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) solutions. The main carbonation product in these reactions is the carbonate mineral magnesite (MgCO3). A series of 32 runs varied the reaction time, the reactive surface area of olivine grains and powders, the concentration of the reacting fluid, and the starting ratio of fluid to olivine mass. These experiments were the first to study the rate of olivine carbonation under passive conditions approaching equilibrium. The results show that, in a simple batch reaction, olivine carbonation is fastest during the first 24 hours and then slows significantly and even reverses. A natural measure of the extent of carbonation is a quantity called the carbonation fraction, which compares the amount of carbon removed from solution, during a run, to the maximum amount

  9. Physics of carbon nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon is a prominent element that appears in various structures with new promising technological applications. The physics of carbon nanostructures is one of the hot topics in modern condensed matter theory. I plan to present a brief introduction into the theory of variously shaped carbon nanostructures paying special attention to generic field-theory models. The preliminary plan is the following: (1) a brief historical excursus, (2) the most interesting experimental observations, (3) generic models for the description of electronic states in carbon nanoparticles (Dirac-type equations, defects, geometry, etc.), (4) open problems. (author)

  10. Carbon Monoxide Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniol, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    Of all fatal poisonings in the United States, an estimated half are due to carbon monoxide. The number of non-lethal poisonings due to carbon monoxide is difficult to estimate because signs and symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning cover a wide spectrum and mimic other disorders. Misdiagnosis is serious, as the patient often returns to the contaminated environment. Those not receiving proper treatment are at significant risk, as high as 10% to 12%, of developing late neurological sequelae. The diagnosis of carbon monoxide poisoning depends upon precise history taking, careful physical examination, and a high index of suspicion. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:21221282

  11. Nanoindentation of Carbon Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Singh, Karamjit; Verma, Veena; Bhatti, H S

    2016-06-01

    In the present research paper carbon nanostructures viz. single walled carbon nanotubes, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, single walled carbon nanohorns and graphene nanoplatelets have been synthesized by CVD technique, hydrothermal method, DC arc discharge method in liquid nitrogen and microwave technique respectively. After synthesis 5 mm thick pallets of given nanomaterial are prepared by making a paste in isopropyl alcohol and using polyvinylidene difluoride as a binder and then these pallets were used for nanoindentation measurements. Hardness, reduced modulus, stiffness, contact height and contact area have been measured using nanoindenter. PMID:27427726

  12. Synthesis of photoluminescent carbon nanoparticles from graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu Xiaobo; Li Dianhong; Zhang Yuanming, E-mail: tzhangymjnu@163.com [School of Life Science and Technology, Jinan University, Department of Chemistry (China)

    2013-04-15

    Photoluminescent carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) with diameters ranging from 1.5 to 6.5 nm were synthesized from raw graphite without surface passivation. The photoluminescent (PL) emission spectra illustrate that both excitation wavelength and solution pH can significantly influence the maximum emission wavelength and PL intensity of the CNP solution. As the excitation wavelength decreases and solution pH increases, a blue shift in the maximum PL emission wavelength occurs.

  13. Synthesis of photoluminescent carbon nanoparticles from graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photoluminescent carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) with diameters ranging from 1.5 to 6.5 nm were synthesized from raw graphite without surface passivation. The photoluminescent (PL) emission spectra illustrate that both excitation wavelength and solution pH can significantly influence the maximum emission wavelength and PL intensity of the CNP solution. As the excitation wavelength decreases and solution pH increases, a blue shift in the maximum PL emission wavelength occurs.

  14. 40 CFR 68.15 - Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Management. 68.15 Section 68.15... ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROVISIONS General § 68.15 Management. (a) The owner or operator of a stationary source with processes subject to Program 2 or Program 3 shall develop a management system to oversee...

  15. 7 CFR 3415.15 - Evaluation factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Evaluation factors. 3415.15 Section 3415.15... Scientific Peer Review of Research Grant Applications § 3415.15 Evaluation factors. In carrying out its review under § 3415.14, the peer review group will take into account the following factors...

  16. 46 CFR 151.15-3 - Construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Construction. 151.15-3 Section 151.15-3 Shipping COAST... LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Tanks § 151.15-3 Construction. This section lists the requirements for construction of the types of cargo tanks defined in § 151.15-1. (a) Gravity type tanks. Gravity type...

  17. Al current collector surface treatment and carbon nano tubes influences on Carbon / Carbon super-capacitors performances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portet, C.; Taberna, P.L.; Simon, P. [Universite Paul Sabatier, CIRIMAT-LCMIE, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2004-07-01

    Performances of 4 cm{sup 2} carbon/carbon super-capacitors cells using Al current collectors foils in organic electrolyte are presented; the improvement of electrode material has been investigated. In a first part, a surface treatment of the Al current collector is proposed in order to improve contact surface between the current collector and the active material leading to an internal resistance decrease. The process consists in an etching of the Al foil and is followed by a carbonaceous sol-gel deposit. Galvano-static cycling and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy measurements of super-capacitors all assembled with treated Al foil were tested over 10,000 cycles: an ESR of 0.5 {omega} cm{sup 2} and a capacitance of 95 F g{sup -1} of activated carbon are obtained and performances remain stable during cycling. The second part is devoted to the study of Carbon Nano Tubes (CNTs) adding into the active material on the performances of super-capacitors. A content of 15% of CNTs appears to be the best composition; the ESR is 0.4 {omega} cm{sup 2} (20% lowered as compared to a cell using activated carbon based electrode) and the capacitance remain high 93 F g{sup -1} of carbonaceous active material. (authors)

  18. Microbially mediated mineral carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, I. M.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral carbonation involves silicate dissolution and carbonate precipitation, which are both natural processes that microorganisms are able to mediate in near surface environments (Ferris et al., 1994; Eq. 1). (Ca,Mg)SiO3 + 2H2CO3 + H2O → (Ca,Mg)CO3 + H2O + H4SiO4 + O2 (1) Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophs with cell surface characteristics and metabolic processes involving inorganic carbon that can induce carbonate precipitation. This occurs partly by concentrating cations within their net-negative cell envelope and through the alkalinization of their microenvironment (Thompson & Ferris, 1990). Regions with mafic and ultramafic bedrock, such as near Atlin, British Columbia, Canada, represent the best potential sources of feedstocks for mineral carbonation. The hydromagnesite playas near Atlin are a natural biogeochemical model for the carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals (Power et al., 2009). Field-based studies at Atlin and corroborating laboratory experiments demonstrate the ability of a microbial consortium dominated by filamentous cyanobacteria to induce the precipitation of carbonate minerals. Phototrophic microbes, such as cyanobacteria, have been proposed as a means for producing biodiesel and other value added products because of their efficiency as solar collectors and low requirement for valuable, cultivable land in comparison to crops (Dismukes et al., 2008). Carbonate precipitation and biomass production could be facilitated using specifically designed ponds to collect waters rich in dissolved cations (e.g., Mg2+ and Ca2+), which would allow for evapoconcentration and provide an appropriate environment for growth of cyanobacteria. Microbially mediated carbonate precipitation does not require large quantities of energy or chemicals needed for industrial systems that have been proposed for rapid carbon capture and storage via mineral carbonation (e.g., Lackner et al., 1995). Therefore, this biogeochemical approach may represent a readily

  19. Novel carbon nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991 opened up a challenging new area of research, because they are expected to be ideal building blocks for nanoscale applications due to their extraordinary mechanical and electronic properties. Various production methods have been developed, however precise control of nanotube morphology (e.g. length, diameter) has yet to be realised, a fact which has delayed industrial exploitation. Thus a comprehensive understanding of nanotube growth is essential, and this thesis is concerned with this important problem, i.e. the controlled production of novel carbon nanomaterials. Chapter 1 surveys production methods for fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and other carbon-based materials, such as fibres, particles etc. The sophisticated tools required for this work, e.g. high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), etc. are reviewed in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 describes a novel approach to carbon nanotubes, using laser etching techniques, which generates aligned tubes of uniform diameter and length. The mode of catalyst preparation, as well as the nature of the precursor, play crucial roles in this process. The preparation of modified carbon nanotubes by the pyrolysis of metallocene, e.g. ferrocene in conjunction with various hydrocarbons, is discussed in Chapter 4. Superconducting interference device measurements (SQUID) show that Fe-filled carbon nanotubes exhibit enhanced coercivities in the 430-1070 Oe range, i.e. greater than those reported for Ni and Co nanowires. Carbon nanotubes can be also modified by replacing atoms of the carbon network with nitrogen, boron or both. The creation of large arrays of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes, for example CNx nanofibres, as well as the formation of BxCyNz onions is described in Chapter 5. Electron irradiation of these onions generates pure carbon onions. Finally (Chapter 6), the catalytic behaviour of metal particles in different

  20. On the quantification of atmospheric carbonate carbon by thermal/optical analysis protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Karanasiou

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbonaceous species, usually classified into two categories, organic carbon (OC and elemental carbon (EC, constitute an important component of the atmospheric aerosol. Carbonate carbon (CC, or inorganic carbon, another constituent of carbonaceous material, is often not considered in many atmospheric chemistry studies. The reason for this may be its low contribution to fine particle mass in most areas studied, along with the difficulties in its analytical determination in atmospheric aerosols. The objective of this study was the quantification of atmospheric carbonate concentrations using the thermal optical transmittance method (Sunset Laboratory, Inc.. Three different temperature protocols (two modified NIOSH protocols and the EUSAAR-2 protocol were tested on filter samples containing known amounts of CC. Moreover, the performance of the two most widely used protocols across European countries (NIOSH and EUSAAR-2 was also checked on two different instruments namely the semi-continuous OCEC analyzer and the laboratory OCEC analyzer. NIOSH-840 thermal protocol (NIOSH protocol with a maximum temperature of 840 °C in the He-mode can be used for the detection and quantification of atmospheric carbonate concentrations. CC was determined in ambient PM10 and PM2.5 samples From Athens and Barcelona by using the NIOSH-840 thermal protocol. The results confirm that in South European countries CC may constitute a significant fraction of carbonaceous aerosols (~15%, thus it should not be neglected. However, the NIOSH-840 protocol seems to overestimate the OC concentrations when compared to the EUSAAR-2 protocol. The results suggest that during dust episodes, common for the Southern Europe, the analytical laboratories could use the NIOSH-840 protocol as a suitable method for the carbonate determination and manually integrate the sharp peak that appears in the maximum temperature step in the inert mode. Afterwards, carbonate should be

  1. Method for Making a Carbon-Carbon Cylinder Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransone, Phillip O. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method for making a lightweight cylinder block composed of carbon-carbon is disclosed. The use of carbon-carbon over conventional materials. such as cast iron or aluminum, reduces the weight of the cylinder block and improves thermal efficiency of the internal combustion reciprocating engine. Due to the negligible coefficient of thermal expansion and unique strength at elevated temperatures of carbon-carbon, the piston-to-cylinder wall clearance can be small, especially when the carbon-carbon cylinder block is used in conjunction with a carbon-carbon piston. Use of the carbon-carbon cylinder block has the effect of reducing the weight of other reciprocating engine components allowing the piston to run at higher speeds and improving specific engine performance.

  2. Carbon dioxide capture using polyethylenimine-loaded mesoporous carbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jitong Wang; Huichao Chen; Huanhuan Zhou; Xiaojun Liu; Wenming Qiao; Donghui Long; Licheng Ling

    2013-01-01

    A high efficiency sorbent for CO2 capture was developed by loading polyethylenimine (PEI) on mesoporous carbons which possessed well-developed mesoporous structures and large pore volume.The physicochemical properties of the sorbent were characterized by N2 adsorption/desorption,scanning electron microscopy (SEM),thermal gravimetric analysis (TG) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) techniques followed by testing for CO2 capture.Factors that affected the sorption capacity of the sorbent were studied.The sorbent exhibited extraordinary capture capacity with CO2 concentration ranging from 5% to 80%.The optimal PEI loading was determined to be 65 wt.% with a CO2 sorption capacity of 4.82 mmol-CO2/g-sorbent in 15% CO2/N2 at 75℃,owing to low mass-transfer resistance and a high utilization ratio of the amine compound (63%).Moisture had a promoting effect on the sorption separation of CO2.In addition,the developed sorbent could be regenerated easily at 100℃,and it exhibited excellent regenerability and stability.These results indicate that this PEI-loaded mesoporous carbon sorbent should have a good potential for CO2 capture in the future.

  3. Carbon dioxide capture using polyethylenimine-loaded mesoporous carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jitong; Chen, Huichao; Zhou, Huanhuan; Liu, Xiaojun; Qiao, Wenming; Long, Donghui; Ling, Licheng

    2013-01-01

    A high efficiency sorbent for CO2 capture was developed by loading polyethylenimine (PEI) on mesoporous carbons which possessed well-developed mesoporous structures and large pore volume. The physicochemical properties of the sorbent were characterized by N2 adsorption/desorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermal gravimetric analysis (TG) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) techniques followed by testing for CO2 capture. Factors that affected the sorption capacity of the sorbent were studied. The sorbent exhibited extraordinary capture capacity with CO2 concentration ranging from 5% to 80%. The optimal PEI loading was determined to be 65 wt.% with a CO2 sorption capacity of 4.82 mmol-CO2/g-sorbent in 15% CO2/N2 at 75 degrees C, owing to low mass-transfer resistance and a high utilization ratio of the amine compound (63%). Moisture had a promoting effect on the sorption separation of CO2. In addition, the developed sorbent could be regenerated easily at 100 degrees C, and it exhibited excellent regenerability and stability. These results indicate that this PEI-loaded mesoporous carbon sorbent should have a good potential for CO2 capture in the future.

  4. 76 FR 66893 - Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From India, Thailand, and Turkey; Final...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ..., 75 FR 69626, 69627 (November 15, 2010). Thailand--Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube (A-549-502) The.... See Scope Rulings, 58 FR 27542, (May 10, 1993). Turkey--Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube (A-489-501... Tubes from India, 51 FR 17384 (May 12, 1986); Antidumping Duty Order; Circular Welded Carbon Steel...

  5. Thermokarst dynamics and soil organic matter characteristics controlling initial carbon release from permafrost soils in the Siberian Yedoma region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiss, Niels; Blok, Daan; Elberling, Bo;

    2016-01-01

    This study relates soil organic matter (SOM) characteristics to initial soil incubation carbon release from upper permafrost samples in Yedoma region soils of northeastern Siberia, Russia. Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) content, carbon to nitrogen ratios (C:N), δ13C and δ15N values show clear trends...

  6. 75 FR 48644 - Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Notice of Partial Rescission of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Notice of... antidumping duty order on certain activated carbon from the People's Republic of China (``PRC'') covering the... Reviews, 75 FR 29976-29980 (May 28, 2010) (``Initiation''). On June 15, 2010, Calgon Carbon...

  7. The investment funds in carbon actives: state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the beginning in 1999 of the first funds by the World Bank, the purchase mechanisms of carbon actives, developed and reached today more than 1,5 milliards of euros. The landscape is relatively concentrated, in spite of the numerous initiatives. The author presents the situation since 1999, the importance of the european governmental investors, the purchase mechanisms management and an inventory of the carbon actives purchases. (A.L.B.)

  8. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Consumers Businesses Contact CPSC Website Design Feedback Consumers: Español Businesses: Español , 中文 , Tiếng Việt Connect with Us : Twitter YouTube ... Safely Home / Safety Education / Safety Education Centers En Español Carbon Monoxide Information Center The Invisible Killer Carbon ...

  9. Carbon black recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process and apparatus for recovering carbon black from hot smoke which comprises passing the smoke through a cyclone separation zone following cooling, then through aggregate filter beds and regeneration of filter beds with clean off-gas which is recycled to the carbon black reaction zone as quench

  10. Carbon for sensing devices

    CERN Document Server

    Tagliaferro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    This book reveals why carbon is playing such an increasingly prominent role as a sensing material. The various steps that transform a raw material in a sensing device are thoroughly presented and critically discussed.  The authors deal with all aspects of carbon-based sensors, starting from the various hybridization and allotropes of carbon, with specific focus on micro and nanosized carbons (e.g., carbon nanotubes, graphene) and their growth processes. The discussion then moves to the role of functionalization and the different routes to achieve it. Finally, a number of sensing applications in various fields are presented, highlighting the connection with the basic properties of the various carbon allotropes.  Readers will benefit from this book’s bottom-up approach, which starts from the local bonding in carbon solids and ends with sensing applications, linking the local hybridization of carbon atoms and its modification by functionalization to specific device performance. This book is a must-have in th...

  11. Fly ash carbon passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  12. Carbon Capture and Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benson, S.M.; Bennaceur, K.; Cook, P.; Davison, J.; Coninck, H. de; Farhat, K.; Ramirez, C.A.; Simbeck, D.; Surles, T.; Verma, P.; Wright, I.

    2012-01-01

    Emissions of carbon dioxide, the most important long-lived anthropogenic greenhouse gas, can be reduced by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS). CCS involves the integration of four elements: CO 2 capture, compression of the CO2 from a gas to a liquid or a denser gas, transportation of pressurized CO 2

  13. COMMITTED TO CARBON REDUCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Chinese efforts to lower carbon emissions through environmentally friendly means begin gaining momentum Efforts to curb carbon emissions continue to take shape as China adheres to its pledge for a brighter, greener future. More importantly, as environmental measures take hold and develop

  14. Amorphous iron (II) carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sel, Ozlem; Radha, A.V.; Dideriksen, Knud;

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The synthesis, characterization and crystallization energetics of amorphous iron (II) carbonate (AFC) are reported. AFC may form as a precursor for siderite (FeCO3). The enthalpy of crystallization (DHcrys) of AFC is similar to that of amorphous magnesium carbonate (AMC) and more...

  15. Carbon Dioxide Fountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seong-Joo; Ryu, Eun-Hee

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the development of a carbon dioxide fountain. The advantages of the carbon dioxide fountain are that it is odorless and uses consumer chemicals. This experiment also is a nice visual experiment that allows students to see evidence of a gaseous reagent being consumed when a pressure sensor is available. (Contains 3 figures.)…

  16. Carbon dioxide recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recycling of carbon dioxide to methanol and dimethyl ether is seen to offer a substantial route to renewable and environmentally carbon neutral fuels. One of the authors has championed the “Methanol Economy" in articles and a book. By recycling ambient CO2, the authors argue ...

  17. De-carbonizingChina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    zhou; Xiaoyan

    2013-01-01

    Innovation in the energy sector will pave the way for the country’slow-carbon future Although its per-capita emission is roughly on par with the world’s average, China is the world’s largest carbon dioxide emitter,

  18. The Determination of the First Dissociation Constant of Carbonic Acid in Urea-Water Mixture%在298.15 K的尿素-水混合溶剂中碳酸一级解离常数的测定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨家振; 申丽; 金一; 张志恒; 张庆国

    2003-01-01

    在298.15 K、尿素的摩尔分数x=0.05的尿素-水混合溶剂中,利用电池:Pt|(1-y)H2-yCO2|NaHCO3(m1),NaCl(m2),CO2(m3),x=0.05的尿素-H2O|AgCl|Ag的准确电动势数据,在保持H2-CO2混合气中二氧化碳的质量分数y=0.2817的条件下,确定了碳酸在这个混合溶剂中的一级解离常数,pK1=5.539,与纯水中碳酸的一级解离常数相比,尿素加入水中使CO2的酸性增大,并用溶质-溶剂相互作用的观点讨论了这些结果.

  19. Earth: 15 Million Years Ago

    CERN Document Server

    Mizushima, Masataka

    2008-01-01

    In Einstein's general relativity theory the metric component gxx in the direction of motion (x-direction) of the sun deviates from unity due to a tensor potential caused by the black hole existing around the center of the galaxy. Because the solar system is orbiting around the galactic center at 200 km/s, the theory shows that the Newtonian gravitational potential due to the sun is not quite radial. At the present time, the ecliptic plane is almost perpendicular to the galactic plane, consistent with this modification of the Newtonian gravitational force. The ecliptic plane is assumed to maintain this orientation in the galactic space as it orbits around the galactic center, but the rotational angular momentum of the earth around its own axis can be assumed to be conserved. The earth is between the sun and the galactic center at the summer solstice all the time. As a consequence, the rotational axis of the earth would be parallel to the axis of the orbital rotation of the earth 15 million years ago, if the so...

  20. Mesoporous Carbon for Capacitive Deionization of Saline Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsouris, Costas [ORNL; Mayes, Richard T [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Sharma, Ms. Ketki [Georgia Institute of Technology; Yiacoumi, Sotira [Georgia Institute of Technology; DePaoli, David W [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembled mesoporous carbon (MC) materials have been synthesized and tested for application in capacitive deionization (CDI) of saline water. MC was prepared by self-assembly of a triblock copolymer with hydrogen-bonded chains via a phenolic resin, such as resorcinol or phloroglucinol in acidic conditions, followed by carbonization and, in some cases, activation by KOH. Carbon synthesized in this way was ground into powder, from which activated MC sheets were produced. In a variation of this process, after the reaction of triblock copolymer with resorcinol or phloroglucinol, the gel that was formed was used to coat a graphite plate and then carbonized. The coated graphite plate in this case was not activated and was tested to serve as current collector during the CDI process. The performance of these MC materials was compared to that of carbon aerogel for salt concentrations ranging between 1000 ppm and 35,000 ppm. Resorcinol-based MC removed up to 15.2 mg salt per gram of carbon, while carbon aerogel removed 5.8 mg salt per gram of carbon. Phloroglucinol-based MC-coated graphite exhibited the highest ion removal capacity at 21 mg of salt per gram of carbon for 35,000 ppm salt concentration.

  1. Mesoporous carbon for capacitive deionization of saline water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsouris, C; Mayes, R; Kiggans, J; Sharma, K; Yiacoumi, S; DePaoli, D; Dai, S

    2011-12-01

    Self-assembled mesoporous carbon (MC) materials have been synthesized and tested for application in capacitive deionization (CDI) of saline water. MC was prepared by self-assembly of a triblock copolymer with hydrogen-bonded chains via a phenolic resin, such as resorcinol or phloroglucinol in acidic conditions, followed by carbonization and, in some cases, activation by KOH. Carbon synthesized in this way was ground into powder, from which activated MC sheets were produced. In a variation of this process, after the reaction of triblock copolymer with resorcinol or phloroglucinol, the gel that was formed was used to coat a graphite plate and then carbonized. The coated graphite plate in this case was not activated and was tested to serve as current collector during the CDI process. The performance of these MC materials was compared to that of carbon aerogel for salt concentrations ranging between 1000 ppm and 35,000 ppm. Resorcinol-based MC removed up to 15.2 mg salt per gram of carbon, while carbon aerogel removed 5.8 mg salt per gram of carbon. Phloroglucinol-based MC-coated graphite exhibited the highest ion removal capacity at 21 mg of salt per gram of carbon for 35,000 ppm salt concentration. PMID:22032802

  2. The Adsorption Mechanism of Modified Activated Carbon on Phenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin J. Q.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modified activated carbon was prepared by thermal treatment at high temperature under nitrogen flow. The surface properties of the activated carbon were characterized by Boehm titration, BET and point of zero charge determination. The adsorption mechanism of phenol on modified activated carbon was explained and the adsorption capacity of modified activated carbon for phenol when compared to plain activated carbon was evaluated through the analysis of adsorption isotherms, thermodynamic and kinetic properties. Results shows that after modification the surface alkaline property and pHpzc value of the activated carbon increase and the surface oxygen-containing functional groups decrease. The adsorption processes of the plain and modified carbon fit with Langmuir isotherm equation well, and the maximum adsorption capacity increase from 123.46, 111.11, 103.09mg/g to 192.31, 178.57, 163,93mg/g under 15, 25 and 35°C after modification, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters show that the adsorption of phenol on activated carbon is a spontaneously exothermic process of entropy reduction, implying that the adsorption is a physical adsorption. The adsorption of phenol on activated carbon follows the pseudo-second-order kinetics (R2>0.99. The optimum pH of adsorption is 6~8.

  3. The Formation of Ethane from Carbon Dioxide under Cold Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Pulsed-corona plasma has been used as a new method for ethane dehydrogenation at low temperature and normal pressure using carbon dioxide as an oxidant in this paper. The effect of carbon dioxide content in the feed, power input, and flow rate of the reactants on the ethane dehydrogenation has been investigated. The experimental results show that the conversion of ethane increases with the increase in the amount of carbon dioxide in the feed. The yield of ethylene and acetylene decreases with the increase in the yield of carbon monoxide, indicating that the increased carbon dioxide leads to the part of ethylene and acetylene being oxidized to carbon monoxide. Power input is primarily an electrical parameter in pulsed-corona plasma, which plays an important role in reactant conversion and product formation. When the power input reaches 16 W, ethane conversion is 41.0% and carbon dioxide conversion is 26.3%. The total yield of ethylene and acetylene is 15.6%. The reduced flow rate of feed improves the conversion of ethane,carbon dioxide and the yield of acetylene, and induces carbon deposit as well.

  4. Hydrothermal carbonization and torrefaction of grape pomace: a comparative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pala, Mehmet; Kantarli, Ismail Cem; Buyukisik, Hasan Baha; Yanik, Jale

    2014-06-01

    Grape pomace was treated by hydrothermal carbonization (sub-critical water, 175-275°C) and torrefaction (nitrogen atmosphere, 250 and 300°C), with mass yield of solid product (char) ranging between 47% and 78%, and energy densification ratio to 1.42-1.15 of the original feedstock. The chars were characterised with respect to their fuel properties, morphological and structural properties and combustion characteristics. The hydrothermal carbonization produced the char with greater energy density than torrefaction. The chars from torrefaction were found to be more aromatic in nature than that from hydrothermal carbonization. Hydrothermal carbonization process produced the char having high combustion reactivity. Most interesting was the finding that aqueous phase from hydrothermal carbonization had antioxidant activity. The results obtained in this study showed that HTC appears to be promising process for a winery waste having high moisture content.

  5. Electron and phonon properties and gas storage in carbon honeycomb

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Yan; Zhong, Chengyong; Zhang, Zhongwei; Xie, Yuee; Zhang, Shengbai

    2016-01-01

    A new kind of three-dimensional carbon allotropes, termed carbon honeycomb (CHC), has recently been synthesized [PRL 116, 055501 (2016)]. Based on the experimental results, a family of graphene networks are constructed, and their electronic and phonon properties are calculated by using first principles methods. All networks are porous metal with two types of electron transport channels along the honeycomb axis and they are isolated from each other: one type of channels is originated from the orbital interactions of the carbon zigzag chains and is topologically protected, while the other type of channels is from the straight lines of the carbon atoms that link the zigzag chains and is topologically trivial. The velocity of the electrons can reach ~106 m/s. Phonon transport in these allotropes is strongly anisotropic, and the thermal conductivities can be very low when compared with graphite by at least a factor of 15. Our calculations further indicate that these porous carbon networks possess high storage capa...

  6. Major carbon industries in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, P.K.

    1982-01-01

    The history of the major carbon industries in India, their growth, present status, problems and future prospects are described. Chapters cover: raw petroleum coke, calcined petroleum coke, graphite electrodes and anodes, carbon electrode paste, calcined anthracite coal, low-ash metallurgical coke, carbon black industry, activated carbon, midget electrodes, cinema arc carbons, carbon blocks and brushes for electrical machinery, and the growth of the aluminium industry and its impact on the calcined petroleum coke industry.

  7. Composite electrodes of activated carbon derived from cassava peel and carbon nanotubes for supercapacitor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taer, E.; Iwantono, Yulita, M.; Taslim, R.; Subagio, A.; Salomo, Deraman, M.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, a composite electrode was prepared from a mixture of activated carbon derived from precarbonization of cassava peel (CP) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The activated carbon was produced by pyrolysis process using ZnCl2 as an activation agent. A N2 adsorption-desorption analysis for the sample indicated that the BET surface area of the activated carbon was 1336 m2 g-1. Difference percentage of CNTs of 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20% with 5% of PVDF binder were added into CP based activated carbon in order to fabricate the composite electrodes. The morphology and structure of the composite electrodes were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The SEM image observed that the distribution of CNTs was homogeneous between carbon particles and the XRD pattern shown the amorphous structure of the sample. The electrodes were fabricated for supercapacitor cells with 316L stainless steel as current collector and 1 M sulfuric acid as electrolyte. An electrochemical characterization was performed by using an electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) method using a Solatron 1286 instrument and the addition of CNTs revealed to improve the resistant and capacitive properties of supercapacitor cell.

  8. Effects of Carbonization Temperature and Component Ratio on Electromagnetic Interference Shielding Effectiveness of Woodceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubo Tao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Woodceramics were fabricated in a vacuum through carbonization of wood powder impregnated with phenol formaldehyde (PF resin. The effects of carbonization temperature and mass ratio of wood/resin on electromagnetic interference (EMI shielding effectiveness (SE and morphology of woodceramics were explored. The PF resin made wood cell walls have the characteristics of glassy carbon. Wood axial tracheid and ray cells were filled with more glassy carbon by increasing addition of PF resin. Moreover, the increase of carbonization temperature was beneficial to improving SE. Woodceramics (mass ratio 1:1 obtained at 1000 °C presented a medium SE level between 30 MHz and 1.5 GHz.

  9. Anthropogenic perturbation of the carbon fluxes from land to ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Regnier, Pierre

    2013-06-09

    A substantial amount of the atmospheric carbon taken up on land through photosynthesis and chemical weathering is transported laterally along the aquatic continuum from upland terrestrial ecosystems to the ocean. So far, global carbon budget estimates have implicitly assumed that the transformation and lateral transport of carbon along this aquatic continuum has remained unchanged since pre-industrial times. A synthesis of published work reveals the magnitude of present-day lateral carbon fluxes from land to ocean, and the extent to which human activities have altered these fluxes. We show that anthropogenic perturbation may have increased the flux of carbon to inland waters by as much as 1.0 Pg C yr -1 since pre-industrial times, mainly owing to enhanced carbon export from soils. Most of this additional carbon input to upstream rivers is either emitted back to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide (∼0.4 Pg C yr -1) or sequestered in sediments (∼0.5 Pg C yr -1) along the continuum of freshwater bodies, estuaries and coastal waters, leaving only a perturbation carbon input of ∼0.1 Pg C yr -1 to the open ocean. According to our analysis, terrestrial ecosystems store ∼0.9 Pg C yr -1 at present, which is in agreement with results from forest inventories but significantly differs from the figure of 1.5 Pg C yr -1 previously estimated when ignoring changes in lateral carbon fluxes. We suggest that carbon fluxes along the land-ocean aquatic continuum need to be included in global carbon dioxide budgets.

  10. Climate Constraints on the Carbon Intensity of Economic Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, S. J.; Rozenberg, J.; Hallegatte, S.; Narloch, U.

    2015-12-01

    Development and climate goals together constrain the carbon intensity of production. Using a simple and transparent model that represents committed CO2 emissions (i.e. those embedded in installed capital), we explore the carbon intensity of production related to new capital required for different temperature targets across several thousand scenarios. Future pathways consistent with the 2oC target which allow for continued GDP growth require early action to reduce carbon intensity of new production, and either (i) a short lifetime of energy and industry capital (e.g. early retrofit of coal power plants), or (ii) large negative emissions after 2050 (i.e. rapid development and dissemination of carbon capture and sequestration). To achieve the 2oC target, half of the scenarios indicate a carbon intensity of new production between 33 and 73 g CO2/ - much lower than the carbon intensities of the best performing countries today. The average lifespan of energy capital (especially power plants), and industry capital, are critical because they commit emissions far into the future and reduce the budget for new capital emissions. Each year of lifetime added to existing, carbon intensive capital, decreases the carbon intensity of new production required to meet a 2°C carbon budget by 1 to 1.5 g CO2/, and each year of delaying the start of mitigation decreases the required CO2 intensity of new production by 20 to 50 gCO2/$. Constraints on the carbon intensity of new production under a 3°C target are considerably relaxed relative to the 2°C target, but remain daunting in comparison to the carbon intensity of the global economy today. Figure Caption: The relationship between GDP per capita growth, lifetime of energy and industry capital and the required carbon intensity of new production 2013-2050 under a 2°C target.

  11. PMR-15/Layered Silicate Nanocomposites For Improved Thermal Stability And Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Sandi; Scheiman, Daniel; Faile, Michael; Papadopoulos, Demetrios; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Montmorillonite clay was organically modified by co-exchange of an aromatic diamine and a primary alkyl amine. The clay was dispersed into a PMR (Polymerization of Monomer Reactants)-15 matrix and the glass transition temperature and thermal oxidative stability of the resulting nanocomposites were evaluated. PMR-15/ silicate nanocomposites were also investigated as a matrix material for carbon fabric reinforced composites. Dispersion of the organically modified silicate into the PMR-15 matrix enhanced the thermal oxidative stability, the flexural strength, flexural modulus, and interlaminar shear strength of the polymer matrix composite.

  12. Conducting carbonized polyaniline nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentus, Slavko; Ćirić-Marjanović, Gordana; Trchová, Miroslava; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2009-06-01

    Conducting nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes were synthesized by the carbonization of self-assembled polyaniline nanotubes protonated with sulfuric acid. Carbonization was carried out in a nitrogen atmosphere at a heating rate of 10 °C min-1 up to a maximum temperature of 800 °C. The carbonized polyaniline nanotubes which have a typical outer diameter of 100-260 nm, with an inner diameter of 20-170 nm and a length extending from 0.5 to 0.8 µm, accompanied with very thin nanotubes with outer diameters of 8-14 nm, inner diameters 3.0-4.5 nm and length extending from 0.3 to 1.0 µm, were observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Elemental analysis showed 9 wt% of nitrogen in the carbonized product. Conductivity of the nanotubular PANI precursor, amounting to 0.04 S cm-1, increased to 0.7 S cm-1 upon carbonization. Molecular structure of carbonized polyaniline nanotubes has been analyzed by FTIR and Raman spectroscopies, and their paramagnetic characteristics were compared with the starting PANI nanotubes by EPR spectroscopy.

  13. Conducting carbonized polyaniline nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mentus, Slavko; Ciric-Marjanovic, Gordana [Faculty of Physical Chemistry, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 12-16, 11158 Belgrade (Serbia); Trchova, Miroslava; Stejskal, Jaroslav [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Heyrovsky Square 2, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)], E-mail: gordana@ffh.bg.ac.rs

    2009-06-17

    Conducting nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes were synthesized by the carbonization of self-assembled polyaniline nanotubes protonated with sulfuric acid. Carbonization was carried out in a nitrogen atmosphere at a heating rate of 10 deg. C min{sup -1} up to a maximum temperature of 800 deg. C. The carbonized polyaniline nanotubes which have a typical outer diameter of 100-260 nm, with an inner diameter of 20-170 nm and a length extending from 0.5 to 0.8 {mu}m, accompanied with very thin nanotubes with outer diameters of 8-14 nm, inner diameters 3.0-4.5 nm and length extending from 0.3 to 1.0 {mu}m, were observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Elemental analysis showed 9 wt% of nitrogen in the carbonized product. Conductivity of the nanotubular PANI precursor, amounting to 0.04 S cm{sup -1}, increased to 0.7 S cm{sup -1} upon carbonization. Molecular structure of carbonized polyaniline nanotubes has been analyzed by FTIR and Raman spectroscopies, and their paramagnetic characteristics were compared with the starting PANI nanotubes by EPR spectroscopy.

  14. Direct decomposition of methane over SBA-15 supported Ni, Co and Fe based bimetallic catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pudukudy, Manoj, E-mail: manojpudukudy@gmail.com [Fuel Cell Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, UKM, Bangi 43600, Selangor (Malaysia); Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, UKM, Bangi 43600, Selangor (Malaysia); Yaakob, Zahira, E-mail: zahirayaakob65@gmail.com [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, UKM, Bangi 43600, Selangor (Malaysia); Akmal, Zubair Shamsul [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, UKM, Bangi 43600, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Synthesis and characterization of Ni, Co and Fe based bimetallic catalysts supported over SBA-15. • Thermocatalytic decomposition of methane over the SBA-15 supported bimetallic catalysts. • Enhanced catalytic efficiency of the bimetallic catalysts for the production of CO{sub x} free hydrogen and nanocarbon. • Production of value added open tip hollow multi-walled carbon nanotubes. • Crystalline characterization of carbon nanotubes by XRD, Raman and thermogravimetric analysis. - Abstract: Thermocatalytic decomposition of methane is an alternative route for the production of CO{sub x}-free hydrogen and carbon nanomaterials. In this work, a set of novel Ni, Co and Fe based bimetallic catalysts supported over mesoporous SBA-15 was synthesized by a facile wet impregnation route, characterized for their structural, textural and reduction properties and were successfully used for the methane decomposition. The fine dispersion of metal oxide particles on the surface of SBA-15, without affecting its mesoporous texture was clearly shown in the low angle X-ray diffraction patterns and the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. The nitrogen sorption analysis showed the reduced specific surface area and pore volume of SBA-15, after metal loading due to the partial filling of hexagonal mesopores by metal species. The results of methane decomposition experiments indicated that all of the bimetallic catalysts were highly active and stable for the reaction at 700 °C even after 300 min of time on stream (TOS). However, a maximum hydrogen yield of ∼56% was observed for the NiCo/SBA-15 catalyst within 30 min of TOS. A high catalytic stability was shown by the CoFe/SBA-15 catalyst with 51% of hydrogen yield during the course of reaction. The catalytic stability of the bimetallic catalysts was attributed to the formation of bimetallic alloys. Moreover, the deposited carbons were found to be in the form of a new set of hollow

  15. Small diameter carbon nanopipettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Riju; Bhattacharyya, Sayan; Orynbayeva, Zulfiya; Vitol, Elina; Friedman, Gary; Gogotsi, Yury

    2010-01-01

    Nanoscale multifunctional carbon probes facilitate cellular studies due to their small size, which makes it possible to interrogate organelles within living cells in a minimally invasive fashion. However, connecting nanotubes to macroscopic devices and constructing an integrated system for the purpose of fluid and electrical signal transfer is challenging, as is often the case with nanoscale components. We describe a non-catalytic chemical vapor deposition based method for batch fabrication of integrated multifunctional carbon nanopipettes (CNPs) with tip diameters much smaller (10-30 nm) than previously reported (200 nm and above) and approaching those observed for multiwalled carbon nanotubes. This eliminates the need for complicated attachment/assembly of nanotubes into nanofluidic devices. Variable tip geometries and structures were obtained by controlled deposition of carbon inside and outside quartz pipettes. We have shown that the capillary length and gas flow rate have a marked effect on the carbon deposition. This gives us a flexible protocol, useful for growing carbon layers of different thicknesses at selective locations on a glass pipette to yield a large variety of cellular probes in bulk quantities. The CNPs possess an open channel for fluid transfer with the carbon deposited inside at 875 °C behaving like an amorphous semiconductor. Vacuum annealing of the CNP tips at temperatures up to 2000 °C yields graphitic carbon structures with an increase in conductivity of two orders of magnitude. Penetration of the integrated carbon nanoprobes into cells was shown to produce minimal Ca2+ signals, fast recovery of basal Ca2+ levels and no adverse activation of the cellular metabolism during interrogation times as long as 0.5-1 h.

  16. Small diameter carbon nanopipettes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoscale multifunctional carbon probes facilitate cellular studies due to their small size, which makes it possible to interrogate organelles within living cells in a minimally invasive fashion. However, connecting nanotubes to macroscopic devices and constructing an integrated system for the purpose of fluid and electrical signal transfer is challenging, as is often the case with nanoscale components. We describe a non-catalytic chemical vapor deposition based method for batch fabrication of integrated multifunctional carbon nanopipettes (CNPs) with tip diameters much smaller (10-30 nm) than previously reported (200 nm and above) and approaching those observed for multiwalled carbon nanotubes. This eliminates the need for complicated attachment/assembly of nanotubes into nanofluidic devices. Variable tip geometries and structures were obtained by controlled deposition of carbon inside and outside quartz pipettes. We have shown that the capillary length and gas flow rate have a marked effect on the carbon deposition. This gives us a flexible protocol, useful for growing carbon layers of different thicknesses at selective locations on a glass pipette to yield a large variety of cellular probes in bulk quantities. The CNPs possess an open channel for fluid transfer with the carbon deposited inside at 875 deg. C behaving like an amorphous semiconductor. Vacuum annealing of the CNP tips at temperatures up to 2000 deg. C yields graphitic carbon structures with an increase in conductivity of two orders of magnitude. Penetration of the integrated carbon nanoprobes into cells was shown to produce minimal Ca2+ signals, fast recovery of basal Ca2+ levels and no adverse activation of the cellular metabolism during interrogation times as long as 0.5-1 h.

  17. Highlights of Astronomy, Vol. 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Ian

    2010-11-01

    Preface; Part I. Gruber Cosmology Prize Lecture; Part II. Invited Discourses; Part III. Joint Discussions: 1. Dark matter in early-type galaxies Léon V. E. Koopmans and Tommaso Treu; 2. Diffuse light in galaxy clusters Magda Arnaboldi and Ortwin Gerhard; 3. Neutron stars - timing in extreme environments Tomaso Belloni, Mariano Méndez and Chengmin Zhang; 4. Progress in understanding the physics of Ap and related stars Margarida Cunha; 5. Modelling the Milky Way in the age of Gaia Annie C. Robin; 6. Time and astronomy Pascale Defraigne; 7. Astrophysical outflows and associated accretion phenomena Elisabete M. de Gouveia Dal Pino and Alex C. Raga; 8. Hot interstellar matter in elliptical galaxies Dong-Woo Kim and Silvia Pellegrini; 9. Are the fundamental constants varying with time? Paolo Molaro and Elisabeth Vangioni; 10. 3D views on cool stellar atmospheres - theory meets observation K. N. Nagendra, P. Bonifacio and H. G. Ludwig; 11. New advances in helio- and astero-seismology; 12. The first galaxies - theoretical predictions and observational clues; 13. Eta Carinae in the context of the most massive stars Theodore R. Gull and Augusto Damineli; 14. The ISM of galaxies in the far-infrared and sub-millimetre; 15. Magnetic fields in diffuse media Elisabete M. de Gouveia Dal Pino and Alex Lazarian; 16. IHY global campaign - whole heliosphere interval; Part IV. Special Sessions: SpS 1. IR and sub-mm spectroscopy - a new tool for studying stellar evolution Glenn Wahlgren, Hans Käufl and Florian Kerber; SpS 2. The international year of astronomy Pedro Russo, Catherine Cesarsky and Lars Lindberg Christensen; SpS 3. Astronomy in Antarctica in 2009 Michael G. Burton; SpS 4. Astronomy education between past and future J. P. De Greve; SpS 5. Accelerating the rate of astronomical discovery Ray P. Norris; SpS 6. Planetary systems as potential sites for life Régis Courtin, Alan Boss and Michel Mayor; SpS 7. Young stars, brown dwarfs, and protoplanetary disks Jane Gregorio

  18. A global predictive model of carbon in mangrove soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, Sunny L.; Siikamäki, Juha V.

    2014-10-01

    Mangroves are among the most threatened and rapidly vanishing natural environments worldwide. They provide a wide range of ecosystem services and have recently become known for their exceptional capacity to store carbon. Research shows that mangrove conservation may be a low-cost means of reducing CO2 emissions. Accordingly, there is growing interest in developing market mechanisms to credit mangrove conservation projects for associated CO2 emissions reductions. These efforts depend on robust and readily applicable, but currently unavailable, localized estimates of soil carbon. Here, we use over 900 soil carbon measurements, collected in 28 countries by 61 independent studies, to develop a global predictive model for mangrove soil carbon. Using climatological and locational data as predictors, we explore several predictive modeling alternatives, including machine-learning methods. With our predictive model, we construct a global dataset of estimated soil carbon concentrations and stocks on a high-resolution grid (5 arc min). We estimate that the global mangrove soil carbon stock is 5.00 ± 0.94 Pg C (assuming a 1 meter soil depth) and find this stock is highly variable over space. The amount of carbon per hectare in the world’s most carbon-rich mangroves (approximately 703 ± 38 Mg C ha-1) is roughly a 2.6 ± 0.14 times the amount of carbon per hectare in the world’s most carbon-poor mangroves (approximately 272 ± 49 Mg C ha-1). Considerable within country variation in mangrove soil carbon also exists. In Indonesia, the country with the largest mangrove soil carbon stock, we estimate that the most carbon-rich mangroves contain 1.5 ± 0.12 times as much carbon per hectare as the most carbon-poor mangroves. Our results can aid in evaluating benefits from mangrove conservation and designing mangrove conservation policy. Additionally, the results can be used to project changes in mangrove soil carbon stocks based on changing climatological predictors, e.g. to

  19. A global predictive model of carbon in mangrove soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangroves are among the most threatened and rapidly vanishing natural environments worldwide. They provide a wide range of ecosystem services and have recently become known for their exceptional capacity to store carbon. Research shows that mangrove conservation may be a low-cost means of reducing CO2 emissions. Accordingly, there is growing interest in developing market mechanisms to credit mangrove conservation projects for associated CO2 emissions reductions. These efforts depend on robust and readily applicable, but currently unavailable, localized estimates of soil carbon. Here, we use over 900 soil carbon measurements, collected in 28 countries by 61 independent studies, to develop a global predictive model for mangrove soil carbon. Using climatological and locational data as predictors, we explore several predictive modeling alternatives, including machine-learning methods. With our predictive model, we construct a global dataset of estimated soil carbon concentrations and stocks on a high-resolution grid (5 arc min). We estimate that the global mangrove soil carbon stock is 5.00 ± 0.94 Pg C (assuming a 1 meter soil depth) and find this stock is highly variable over space. The amount of carbon per hectare in the world’s most carbon-rich mangroves (approximately 703 ± 38 Mg C ha−1) is roughly a 2.6 ± 0.14 times the amount of carbon per hectare in the world’s most carbon-poor mangroves (approximately 272 ± 49 Mg C ha−1). Considerable within country variation in mangrove soil carbon also exists. In Indonesia, the country with the largest mangrove soil carbon stock, we estimate that the most carbon-rich mangroves contain 1.5 ± 0.12 times as much carbon per hectare as the most carbon-poor mangroves. Our results can aid in evaluating benefits from mangrove conservation and designing mangrove conservation policy. Additionally, the results can be used to project changes in mangrove soil carbon stocks based on changing climatological predictors

  20. Carbon Ion Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Hansen, David Christoffer; Herrmann, Rochus;

    On the importance of choice of target size for selective boosting of hypoxic tumor subvolumina in carbon ion therapy Purpose: Functional imaging methods in radiotherapy are maturing and can to some extent uncover radio resistant structures found within a tumour entity. Selective boost of identified...... effect. All cell lines investigated here did not reach an OER of 1, even for the smaller structures, which may indicate that the achievable dose average LET of carbon ions is too low, and heavier ions than carbon may be considered for functional LET-painting....

  1. 48 CFR 15.401 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION Contract Pricing 15.401 Definitions. As used in this... used in 15.407-2) also includes a transfer of commercial items between divisions, subsidiaries,...

  2. 46 CFR 38.15-15 - Electrical installations-TB/ALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electrical installations-TB/ALL. 38.15-15 Section 38.15... Special Requirements § 38.15-15 Electrical installations—TB/ALL. (a) All electrical installations shall comply with the requirements contained in this subchapter and in subchapter J (Electrical Engineering)...

  3. Main: BOX1PVCHS15 [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BOX1PVCHS15 S000208 11-May-2006 (last modified) kehi Box 1 of bean (P.v.) chs15 pro...moter; one of SBF-1 binding sites in chs15 promoter; Located at -318 to -305; Involved in organ-specific exp...e Villain et al. (1996); Box 1; chs; chs15; CHS; SBF-1; silencer; organ-specific; Gt; GT-1; GT; bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) TAAAAGTTAAAAAC ...

  4. The Stable and Radio- Carbon Isotopic Content of Labile and Refractory Carbon in Atmospheric Particulate Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNichol, A. P.; Rosenheim, B. E.; Gerlach, D. S.; Hayes, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    2.5) collected on quartz fiber filters as part of the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) program. The five samples were collected at two sites (Birmingham, AL and Atlanta, GA) with very different sources of atmospheric particulate matter. In all instances, the refractory carbon contained significantly less radiocarbon than the TC suggesting, not unexpectedly, a source of particulate carbon from the combustion of fossil material. We will present results from the analysis of the same filters in the flow-through system. The implication of our results for the use of radiocarbon in the quantitative apportionment of atmospheric particulate matter sources will be discussed. Gustafsson O., T. Bucheli, Z. Kukulska, M. Andersson, C. Largeau, J-N. Rouzaud, C. Reddy and T. Eglinton (2001) Evaluation of a protocol for the quantification of black carbon in sediments. GBD 15, 881-890.

  5. Polypyrrole-derived mesoporous nitrogen-doped carbons with intrinsic catalytic activity in the oxygen reduction reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Sevilla Solís, Marta; Yu, Linghui; Fellinger, Tim Patrick; Fuertes Arias, Antonio Benito; Titirici, Maria-Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    [EN] N-doped mesoporous carbons containing small amounts of graphitic carbon have been successfully prepared using the nanocasting technique. Polypyrrole was used as N-dopant carbon precursor and SBA-15 or silica xerogel as templates. Graphitic carbon domains provide a good electronic conductivity of up to 0.33 S cm−1, a necessary property for electrochemical applications, while a mesoporous structure reduces mass transport limitations. These characteristics are further combined with a high N...

  6. 46 CFR 151.50-41 - Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). 151.50-41 Section... CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-41 Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). (a) All openings shall be in the top of the tank. (b) Loading lines...

  7. 46 CFR 15.1010 - California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false California. 15.1010 Section 15.1010 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN MANNING REQUIREMENTS Vessels in Foreign Trade § 15.1010 California. The following offshore marine oil terminals located within U.S....

  8. 45 CFR 1328.15 - Nutrition services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nutrition services. 1328.15 Section 1328.15 Public... SUPPORTIVE AND NUTRITIONAL SERVICES TO OLDER HAWAIIAN NATIVES § 1328.15 Nutrition services. (a) In addition to providing nutrition services to older Hawaiian Natives, a grantee may: (1) Provide...

  9. 46 CFR 15.710 - Working hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., prescribes certain rest periods, and prohibits unnecessary work on Sundays and certain holidays when the... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Working hours. 15.710 Section 15.710 Shipping COAST... Limitations and Qualifying Factors § 15.710 Working hours. In addition to prescribing watch requirements, 46...

  10. 46 CFR 196.15-10 - Sanitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sanitation. 196.15-10 Section 196.15-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS OPERATIONS Test, Drills, and Inspections § 196.15-10 Sanitation. (a) It shall be the duty of the master and chief...

  11. 46 CFR 97.15-10 - Sanitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sanitation. 97.15-10 Section 97.15-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS OPERATIONS Tests, Drills, and Inspections § 97.15-10 Sanitation. (a) It shall be the duty of the master and chief...

  12. 42 CFR 59a.15 - Awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Awards. 59a.15 Section 59a.15 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE GRANTS Establishment of Regional Medical Libraries § 59a.15 Awards. (a) General. The Secretary, with the advice of...

  13. 14 CFR 1300.15 - Loan terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Loan terms. 1300.15 Section 1300.15....15 Loan terms. (a) A loan guaranteed under the program shall be due and payable in full no later than... collateral, other loan terms, and current average yields on outstanding obligations of the United States...

  14. 45 CFR 672.15 - Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Evidence. 672.15 Section 672.15 Public Welfare... PROCEDURES § 672.15 Evidence. (a) General. The Presiding Officer shall admit all evidence which is not.... Notwithstanding the preceding sentence, evidence relating to settlement which would be excluded in the...

  15. 7 CFR 15.117 - Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Evidence. 15.117 Section 15.117 Agriculture Office of... and Administrative Review Under the Civil Rights Act of 1964 Hearing Procedures § 15.117 Evidence. Irrelevant, immaterial, unreliable, and unduly repetitious evidence will be excluded, and technical rules...

  16. 31 CFR 15.737-21 - Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Evidence. 15.737-21 Section 15.737-21... Administrative Enforcement Proceedings § 15.737-21 Evidence. (a) In general. The rules of evidence prevailing in... exclude evidence which is irrelevant, immaterial, or unduly repetitious. (b) Depositions. The...

  17. 46 CFR 168.15-20 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment. 168.15-20 Section 168.15-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS CIVILIAN NAUTICAL SCHOOL VESSELS Accommodations § 168.15-20 Equipment. (a) Each person shall have a separate berth and not more than 1 berth...

  18. 14 CFR 47.15 - Identification number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Identification number. 47.15 Section 47.15... REGISTRATION General § 47.15 Identification number. (a) Number required. An applicant for Aircraft Registration must place a U.S. identification number (registration mark) on his Aircraft Registration...

  19. 7 CFR 15a.32 - Housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Housing. 15a.32 Section 15a.32 Agriculture Office of... § 15a.32 Housing. (a) General. A recipient shall not, on the basis of sex, apply different rules or regulations, impose different fees or requirements, or offer different services or benefits related to...

  20. 7 CFR 15b.33 - Housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Housing. 15b.33 Section 15b.33 Agriculture Office of... RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Postsecondary Education § 15b.33 Housing. (a) Housing provided by the recipient. A recipient that provides housing to its nonhandicapped students shall provide...

  1. 47 CFR 15.31 - Measurement standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ....2, 5.7, 9 and 14: ANSI C63.4-2003: “Methods of Measurement of Radio-Noise Emissions from Low-Voltage... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Measurement standards. 15.31 Section 15.31 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES General § 15.31...

  2. 31 CFR 6.15 - Agency review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Agency review. 6.15 Section 6.15... EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE ACT Procedures for Considering Applications § 6.15 Agency review. Either the applicant or agency counsel may seek review of the initial decision on the fee application, or the...

  3. 32 CFR 2400.15 - Classification guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Classification guides. 2400.15 Section 2400.15... Derivative Classification § 2400.15 Classification guides. (a) OSTP shall issue and maintain classification guides to facilitate the proper and uniform derivative classification of information. These guides...

  4. 32 CFR 2001.15 - Classification guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Classification guides. 2001.15 Section 2001.15..., NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION CLASSIFIED NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION Classification § 2001.15 Classification guides. (a) Preparation of classification guides. Originators of...

  5. 10 CFR 60.15 - Site characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Site characterization. 60.15 Section 60.15 Energy NUCLEAR... Preapplication Review § 60.15 Site characterization. (a) Prior to submittal of an application for a license to be issued under this part DOE shall conduct a program of site characterization with respect to the site...

  6. 10 CFR 63.15 - Site characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Site characterization. 63.15 Section 63.15 Energy NUCLEAR... MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.15 Site characterization. (a) DOE shall conduct a program of site characterization with respect to the Yucca Mountain site before it submits an...

  7. 49 CFR 802.15 - Fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fees. 802.15 Section 802.15 Transportation Other... PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 Fees § 802.15 Fees. No fees shall be charged for providing the first copy of a record, or any portion thereof, to individuals to whom the record pertains. The fee schedule for...

  8. 32 CFR 637.15 - Polygraph activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Polygraph activities. 637.15 Section 637.15... CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.15 Polygraph activities. MPI and DAC detectives/investigators will utilize the polygraph to the full extent authorized. Requests...

  9. 7 CFR 15a.53 - Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recruitment. 15a.53 Section 15a.53 Agriculture Office... Activities Prohibited § 15a.53 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment and hiring. A recipient shall not discriminate on the basis of sex in the recruitment and hiring of employees. Where a recipient...

  10. 7 CFR 15a.23 - Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recruitment. 15a.23 Section 15a.23 Agriculture Office... FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 15a.23 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment. A recipient to which this subpart applies...

  11. 7 CFR 275.15 - Data management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Data management. 275.15 Section 275.15 Agriculture... § 275.15 Data management. (a) Analysis. Analysis is the process of classifying data, such as by areas of... management information sources available to: (1) Identify all deficiencies in program operations and...

  12. 7 CFR 15a.59 - Advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advertising. 15a.59 Section 15a.59 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING OR BENEFITTING FROM... Activities Prohibited § 15a.59 Advertising. A recipient shall not in any advertising related to...

  13. 12 CFR 583.15 - Parent company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Parent company. 583.15 Section 583.15 Banks and... SAVINGS AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES § 583.15 Parent company. The term parent company means any company which directly or indirectly controls any other company or companies....

  14. 46 CFR 91.05-15 - Posting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Posting. 91.05-15 Section 91.05-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Permit To Proceed to Another Port for Repair § 91.05-15 Posting. (a) The permit shall be carried in...

  15. 46 CFR 71.05-15 - Posting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Posting. 71.05-15 Section 71.05-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Permit To Proceed to Another Port for Repair § 71.05-15 Posting. (a) The permit shall be carried in a manner similar...

  16. 46 CFR 71.10-15 - Posting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Posting. 71.10-15 Section 71.10-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Permit To Engage in Excursions § 71.10-15 Posting. (a) The permit when used, shall be carried in addition to...

  17. 46 CFR 189.05-15 - Posting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Posting. 189.05-15 Section 189.05-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Permit To Proceed to Another Port for Repair § 189.05-15 Posting. (a) The permit shall be...

  18. 46 CFR 168.15-50 - Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Accommodations § 168.15-50 Ventilation. (a) All quarters must be adequately ventilated in a manner suitable to the purpose of the space and route of the vessel. (b) When mechanical ventilation is provided for... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation. 168.15-50 Section 168.15-50 Shipping...

  19. 40 CFR 13.15 - Taxpayer information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Taxpayer information. 13.15 Section 13.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL CLAIMS COLLECTION STANDARDS Collection § 13.15 Taxpayer information. (a) The Administrator may obtain a debtor's current mailing...

  20. 7 CFR 1221.15 - Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.15 Market. Market... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Market. 1221.15 Section 1221.15...

  1. 29 CFR 71.15 - Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Training. 71.15 Section 71.15 Labor Office of the Secretary... § 71.15 Training. All DOL systems managers, disclosure officers, and employees with responsibilities under the Privacy Act shall periodically attend training offered by the Department on the Privacy Act....

  2. 42 CFR 73.15 - Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... provided under the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogen Standard set forth at 29 CFR 1910.1030. (b) Refresher training... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Training. 73.15 Section 73.15 Public Health PUBLIC... AND TOXINS § 73.15 Training. (a) An individual or entity required to register under this part...

  3. 9 CFR 121.15 - Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training. 121.15 Section 121.15... AGENTS AND TOXINS § 121.15 Training. (a) An individual or entity required to register under this part must provide information and training on biosafety and security to each individual with access...

  4. 7 CFR 331.15 - Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training. 331.15 Section 331.15 Agriculture..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POSSESSION, USE, AND TRANSFER OF SELECT AGENTS AND TOXINS § 331.15 Training. (a) An individual or entity required to register under this part must provide information and training...

  5. 7 CFR 927.15 - Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Process. 927.15 Section 927.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... Regulating Handling Definitions § 927.15 Process. Process means to can, concentrate, freeze, dehydrate,...

  6. 39 CFR 963.15 - Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Evidence. 963.15 Section 963.15 Postal Service... PANDERING ADVERTISEMENTS STATUTE, 39 U.S.C. 3008 § 963.15 Evidence. (a) In general, admissibility will hinge on relevancy and materiality. However, relevant evidence may be excluded if its probative value...

  7. 44 CFR 15.8 - Gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gambling. 15.8 Section 15.8... CENTER § 15.8 Gambling. We prohibit participating in games for money or other personal property, including the operation of gambling devices, the conduct of a lottery or pool, or the sale or purchase...

  8. 16 CFR 1025.15 - Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Time. 1025.15 Section 1025.15 Commercial... Pleadings, Form, Execution, Service of Documents § 1025.15 Time. (a) Computation. In computing any period of time prescribed or allowed by these rules, the day of the act, event, or default from which...

  9. 49 CFR 15.13 - Marking SSI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Sensitive Security Information that is controlled under 49 CFR parts 15 and 1520. No part of this record may be disclosed to persons without a “need to know”, as defined in 49 CFR parts 15 and 1520, except with.... government agencies, public disclosure is governed by 5 U.S.C. 552 and 49 CFR parts 15 and 1520. (d)...

  10. 40 CFR 1502.15 - Affected environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Affected environment. 1502.15 Section 1502.15 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT § 1502.15 Affected environment. The environmental impact statement shall succinctly describe...

  11. 25 CFR 286.15 - Application procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Application procedures. 286.15 Section 286.15 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES INDIAN BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM § 286.15 Application procedures. Applications are to be submitted to the Superintendent...

  12. 46 CFR 78.30-15 - Watchmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Watchmen. 78.30-15 Section 78.30-15 Shipping COAST GUARD..., Patrolmen, and Watchmen § 78.30-15 Watchmen. (a) The provisions of this section shall apply to all vessels... applicable at all times when passengers are on board. (b) During the nighttime, a suitable number of...

  13. 7 CFR 3430.15 - Stakeholder input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.15 Section 3430.15... Stakeholder input. Section 103(c)(2) of the Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998... RFAs for competitive programs. CSREES will provide instructions for submission of stakeholder input...

  14. 15 CFR 754.2 - Crude oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... as set forth in appendix C to 15 CFR part 30. (j) License Exception for exports of TAPS Crude Oil. (1... code “SS-SPR” or the equivalent code as set forth in appendix C to 15 CFR part 30. (i) License... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Crude oil. 754.2 Section...

  15. 45 CFR 304.15 - Cost allocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cost allocation. 304.15 Section 304.15 Public... FEDERAL FINANCIAL PARTICIPATION § 304.15 Cost allocation. A State agency in support of its claims under title IV-D of the Social Security Act must have an approved cost allocation plan on file with...

  16. 8 CFR 1244.15 - Travel abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Travel abroad. 1244.15 Section 1244.15... REGULATIONS TEMPORARY PROTECTED STATUS FOR NATIONALS OF DESIGNATED STATES § 1244.15 Travel abroad. (a) After... Status shall not constitute permission to travel abroad. Permission to travel may be granted by...

  17. 8 CFR 244.15 - Travel abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Travel abroad. 244.15 Section 244.15 Aliens... NATIONALS OF DESIGNATED STATES § 244.15 Travel abroad. (a) After the grant of Temporary Protected Status... to travel abroad. Permission to travel may be granted by the director pursuant to the...

  18. 50 CFR 80.15 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., see 5 CFR 1310.3.). (b) What is required to determine the allowability of costs? Source documents or... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 80.15 Section 80.15... WILDLIFE RESTORATION AND DINGELL-JOHNSON SPORT FISH RESTORATION ACTS § 80.15 Allowable costs. (a) What...

  19. 14 CFR 460.15 - Human factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Human factors. 460.15 Section 460.15... TRANSPORTATION LICENSING HUMAN SPACE FLIGHT REQUIREMENTS Launch and Reentry with Crew § 460.15 Human factors. An operator must take the precautions necessary to account for human factors that can affect a crew's...

  20. 29 CFR 15.6 - Administrative action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Administrative action. 15.6 Section 15.6 Labor Office of the... Against the Government Under the Federal Tort Claims Act § 15.6 Administrative action. (a) Investigation... such harm, it has the responsibility to fully investigate the incident and to take all...

  1. 24 CFR 206.15 - Insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Insurance. 206.15 Section 206.15... MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES HOME EQUITY CONVERSION MORTGAGE INSURANCE Eligibility; Endorsement § 206.15 Insurance. Mortgages originated under...

  2. 9 CFR 311.15 - Brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brucellosis. 311.15 Section 311.15... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.15 Brucellosis. Carcasses affected with localized lesions of brucellosis may be passed for human food after the affected parts...

  3. 14 CFR 15.109 - Settlements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Settlements. 15.109 Section 15.109... Act of 1958 § 15.109 Settlements. (a) A publisher may not settle a claim with another party, for which... publisher submits a copy of the proposed settlement, and a statement justifying the settlement, to the...

  4. 29 CFR 15.28 - Attorney fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Attorney fees. 15.28 Section 15.28 Labor Office of the... the Military Personnel and Civilian Employees' Claims Act of 1964 § 15.28 Attorney fees. No more than... subpart shall be paid or delivered to or received by any agent or attorney on account of services...

  5. 30 CFR 15.8 - Quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Quality assurance. 15.8 Section 15.8 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF... § 15.8 Quality assurance. (a) Applicants granted an approval or an extension of approval under...

  6. 46 CFR 97.15-1 - Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application. 97.15-1 Section 97.15-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS OPERATIONS Tests, Drills, and Inspections § 97.15-1 Application. (a) Except as specifically noted, the provisions of...

  7. 46 CFR 92.15-1 - Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application. 92.15-1 Section 92.15-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 92.15-1 Application. The provisions of this subpart, with the exception of §...

  8. 7 CFR 15a.56 - Fringe benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fringe benefits. 15a.56 Section 15a.56 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING OR BENEFITTING FROM... Activities Prohibited § 15a.56 Fringe benefits. (a) “Fringe benefits” defined. For purposes of this...

  9. 7 CFR 15b.37 - Auxiliary aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Auxiliary aids. 15b.37 Section 15b.37 Agriculture... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Other Aid, Benefits, or Services § 15b.37 Auxiliary aids... appropriate auxiliary aids to persons with impaired sensory, manual, or speaking skills, where necessary...

  10. 12 CFR 1408.15 - Credit report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Credit report. 1408.15 Section 1408.15 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE CORPORATION COLLECTION OF CLAIMS OWED THE UNITED STATES Administrative Collection of Claims § 1408.15 Credit report. In order to aid the Corporation in...

  11. 7 CFR 15b.3 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definitions. 15b.3 Section 15b.3 Agriculture Office of... RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE General Provisions § 15b.3 Definitions. As used in this part, the...; epilepsy; muscular dystrophy; multiple sclerosis, cancer; heart disease; diabetes; mental...

  12. 31 CFR 15.737-1 - Scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Scope. 15.737-1 Section 15.737-1 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury POST EMPLOYMENT CONFLICT OF INTEREST General Provisions § 15.737-1 Scope. This part contains rules governing discipline of a former officer...

  13. 7 CFR 15a.54 - Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compensation. 15a.54 Section 15a.54 Agriculture Office... Activities Prohibited § 15a.54 Compensation. A recipient shall not make or enforce any policy or practice which, on the basis of sex: (a) Makes distinctions in rates of pay or other compensation; (b) Results...

  14. 12 CFR 9.15 - Fiduciary compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fiduciary compensation. 9.15 Section 9.15 Banks... BANKS Regulations § 9.15 Fiduciary compensation. (a) Compensation of bank. If the amount of a national bank's compensation for acting in a fiduciary capacity is not set or governed by applicable law,...

  15. 23 CFR 751.15 - Just compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Just compensation. 751.15 Section 751.15 Highways... AND ACQUISITION § 751.15 Just compensation. (a) Just compensation shall be paid the owner for the... removed, relocated, or disposed of pursuant to 23 U.S.C. 136. (b) No rights to compensation accrue until...

  16. 7 CFR 981.15 - Almond product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Almond product. 981.15 Section 981.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Regulating Handling Definitions § 981.15 Almond product. Almond product means any edible preparation...

  17. 7 CFR 1206.15 - Person.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Person. 1206.15 Section 1206.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.15 Person. Person means...

  18. 48 CFR 15.404 - Proposal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Proposal analysis. 15.404 Section 15.404 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION Contract Pricing 15.404 Proposal analysis....

  19. 7 CFR 800.15 - Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Services. 800.15 Section 800.15 Agriculture... ADMINISTRATION (FEDERAL GRAIN INSPECTION SERVICE), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL REGULATIONS Official Inspection and Class X Or Class Y Weighing Requirements § 800.15 Services. (a) General. These...

  20. 7 CFR 15.73 - Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Service. 15.73 Section 15.73 Agriculture Office of the... Administrative Review Under the Civil Rights Act of 1964 Form, Execution, Filing and Service of Documents § 15.73 Service. Service shall be made by the Hearing Clerk by personal delivery of one copy to each person to...

  1. 43 CFR 15.7 - Fishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fishing. 15.7 Section 15.7 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior KEY LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.7 Fishing. (a) Spear fishing within the boundaries or confines of this Preserve is prohibited. (b) The use of poisons,...

  2. 48 CFR 15.406 - Documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Documentation. 15.406 Section 15.406 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION Contract Pricing 15.406 Documentation....

  3. 7 CFR 15b.27 - Extension education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Extension education. 15b.27 Section 15b.27 Agriculture... Education § 15b.27 Extension education. (a) General. A recipient to which this subpart applies that provides extension education may not, on the basis of handicap, exclude qualified handicapped persons. A...

  4. 7 CFR 15b.28 - Private education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Private education. 15b.28 Section 15b.28 Agriculture... Education § 15b.28 Private education. (a) A recipient that provides private elementary or secondary education may not, on the basis of handicap, exclude a qualified handicapped person if the person can,...

  5. 46 CFR 194.15-19 - Electrical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electrical. 194.15-19 Section 194.15-19 Shipping COAST....15-19 Electrical. (a) All electrical equipment located within 18 inches of the deck of the chemical laboratory shall be in accordance with the applicable requirements of Subchapter J (Electrical...

  6. 18 CFR 430.15 - Conservation requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Conservation requirements. 430.15 Section 430.15 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION SPECIAL REGULATIONS GROUND WATER PROTECTION AREA: PENNSYLVANIA § 430.15 Conservation requirements....

  7. 10 CFR 1008.15 - Civil remedies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Civil remedies. 1008.15 Section 1008.15 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) RECORDS MAINTAINED ON INDIVIDUALS (PRIVACY ACT) Requests for Access or Amendment § 1008.15 Civil remedies. Subsection (g) of the Act provides that an individual may bring...

  8. 7 CFR 15e.160 - Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Communications. 15e.160 Section 15e.160 Agriculture... PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE § 15e.160 Communications. (a) The agency shall take appropriate steps to ensure effective communication with...

  9. 38 CFR 15.160 - Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Communications. 15.160 Section 15.160 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ENFORCEMENT OF... § 15.160 Communications. (a) The agency shall take appropriate steps to ensure effective...

  10. 14 CFR 33.15 - Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Materials. 33.15 Section 33.15 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; General § 33.15 Materials. The suitability and durability of materials used in the engine must— (a) Be established on the basis of experience or tests;...

  11. 19 CFR 102.15 - Disregarded materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disregarded materials. 102.15 Section 102.15... TREASURY RULES OF ORIGIN Rules of Origin § 102.15 Disregarded materials. (a) The following materials shall...: (1) Packaging materials and containers in which a good is packaged for retail sale that...

  12. 12 CFR 704.15 - Audit requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... summary of the audit report to the membership at the next annual meeting. (b) Internal audit. A corporate... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Audit requirements. 704.15 Section 704.15 Banks... UNIONS § 704.15 Audit requirements. (a) External audit. The corporate credit union supervisory...

  13. 47 CFR 15.605 - Cross reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cross reference. 15.605 Section 15.605 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Access Broadband Over Power Line (Access BPL) § 15.605 Cross reference. (a) The provisions of subparts A and B of this part apply to...

  14. 47 CFR 15.613 - Measurement procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Measurement procedures. 15.613 Section 15.613 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Access Broadband Over Power Line (Access BPL) § 15.613 Measurement procedures. Compliance measurements for Access BPL shall be made...

  15. 47 CFR 15.103 - Exempted devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exempted devices. 15.103 Section 15.103 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Unintentional Radiators § 15.103 Exempted devices. The following devices are subject only to the general conditions of operation in §§...

  16. 1 CFR 15.2 - Information services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Information services. 15.2 Section 15.2 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PREPARATION, TRANSMITTAL, AND PROCESSING OF DOCUMENTS SERVICES TO FEDERAL AGENCIES General § 15.2 Information services. The Director of the...

  17. 21 CFR 1308.15 - Schedule V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Schedule V. 1308.15 Section 1308.15 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Schedules § 1308.15 Schedule V. (a) Schedule V shall consist of the drugs and other substances, by...

  18. 7 CFR 1735.15 - Civil rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Civil rights. 1735.15 Section 1735.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... Policies § 1735.15 Civil rights. Borrowers are required to comply with certain regulations...

  19. 7 CFR 916.15 - Marketing season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Marketing season. 916.15 Section 916.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Regulating Handling Definitions § 916.15 Marketing season. Marketing season means the period beginning...

  20. 46 CFR 168.15-55 - Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Screening. 168.15-55 Section 168.15-55 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS CIVILIAN NAUTICAL SCHOOL VESSELS Accommodations § 168.15-55 Screening. Provision must be made to protect the quarters against the admission...

  1. 46 CFR 72.20-15 - Construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Construction. 72.20-15 Section 72.20-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Accommodations for Officers and Crew § 72.20-15 Construction. All crew spaces are to be constructed and...

  2. 46 CFR 92.20-15 - Construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Construction. 92.20-15 Section 92.20-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Accommodations for Officers and Crew § 92.20-15 Construction. All crew spaces are to...

  3. 46 CFR 190.20-15 - Construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Construction. 190.20-15 Section 190.20-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Accomodations for Officers, Crew, and Scientific Personnel § 190.20-15 Construction. All...

  4. 46 CFR 168.15-10 - Construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Construction. 168.15-10 Section 168.15-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS CIVILIAN NAUTICAL SCHOOL VESSELS Accommodations § 168.15-10 Construction. (a) The accommodations provided must be securely constructed,...

  5. 7 CFR 15b.19 - New construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards (USAF) (appendix A to 41 CFR subpart 101-19.6) shall be deemed to... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false New construction. 15b.19 Section 15b.19 Agriculture... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Accessibility § 15b.19 New construction. (a) Design...

  6. 7 CFR 923.15 - Export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Export. 923.15 Section 923.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 923.15 Export. Export means to ship...

  7. 7 CFR 924.15 - Export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Export. 924.15 Section 924.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... WASHINGTON AND IN UMATILLA COUNTY, OREGON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 924.15 Export. Export...

  8. 7 CFR 946.15 - Export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Export. 946.15 Section 946.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... Regulating Handling Definitions § 946.15 Export. Export means shipment of potatoes beyond the boundaries...

  9. 7 CFR 922.15 - Export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Export. 922.15 Section 922.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 922.15 Export. Export means to ship apricots beyond...

  10. 10 CFR 15.1 - Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Application. 15.1 Section 15.1 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DEBT COLLECTION PROCEDURES Application and Coverage § 15.1 Application. (a) This part applies to....S.C. 5584 are covered by the provisions of 10 CFR part 16. (2) A claim against an applicant for,...

  11. 10 CFR 15.3 - Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Communications. 15.3 Section 15.3 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DEBT COLLECTION PROCEDURES Application and Coverage § 15.3 Communications. Unless... Secretary of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and sent either by mail to the U.S. Nuclear...

  12. Carbonate concretions as a significant component of ancient marine carbon cycles: Insights from paired organic and inorganic carbon isotope analyses of a Cretaceous shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyd, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate concretions often occur within fine-grained, organic-rich sedimentary rocks. This association reflects the common production of diagenetic minerals through biologic cycling of organic matter. Chemical analysis of carbonate concretions provides the rare opportunity to explore ancient shallow diagenetic environments, which are inherently transient due to progressive burial but are an integral component of the marine carbon cycle. The late Cretaceous Holz Shale (~80 Ma) contains abundant calcite concretions that exhibit textural and geochemical characteristics indicative of relatively shallow formation (i.e., near the sediment-water interface). Sampled concretions contain between 5.4 and 9.8 wt.% total inorganic carbon (TIC), or ~45 and 82 wt.% CaCO3, compared to host shale values which average ~1.5 wt.% TIC. Organic carbon isotope compositions (δ13Corg) are relatively constant in host and concretion samples ranging from ­-26.3 to -24.0‰ (VPDB). Carbonate carbon isotope compositions (δ13Ccarb) range from -22.5 to -3.4‰, indicating a significant but not entirely organic source of carbon. Concretions of the lower Holz Shale exhibit considerably elevated δ13Ccarb values averaging -4.8‰, whereas upper Holz Shale concretions express an average δ13Ccarb value of -17.0‰. If the remaining carbonate for lower Holz Shale concretions is sourced from marine fluids and/or dissolved marine carbonate minerals (e.g., shells), a simple mass balance indicates that ~28% of concretion carbon was sourced from organic matter and ~72% from late Cretaceous marine inorganic carbon (with δ13C ~ +2.5‰). Upper Holz Shale calculations indicate a ~73% contribution from organic matter and a ~27% contribution from inorganic carbon. When normalized for carbonate, organic contents within the concretions are ~2-13 wt.% enriched compared to host contents. This potentially reflects the protective nature of cementation that acts to limit permeability and chemical destruction of

  13. Myxoma virus expressing a fusion protein of interleukin-15 (IL15 and IL15 receptor alpha has enhanced antitumor activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Tosic

    Full Text Available Myxoma virus, a rabbit poxvirus, can efficiently infect various types of mouse and human cancer cells. It is a strict rabbit-specific pathogen, and is thought to be safe as a therapeutic agent in all non-rabbit hosts tested including mice and humans. Interleukin-15 (IL15 is an immuno-modulatory cytokine with significant potential for stimulating anti-tumor T lymphocytes and NK cells. Co-expression of IL15 with the α subunit of IL15 receptor (IL15Rα greatly enhances IL15 stability and bioavailability. Therefore, we engineered a new recombinant myxoma virus (vMyx-IL15Rα-tdTr, which expresses an IL15Rα-IL15 fusion protein plus tdTomato red fluorescent reporter protein. Permissive rabbit kidney epithelial (RK-13 cells infected with vMyx-IL15Rα-tdTr expressed and secreted the IL15Rα-IL15 fusion protein. Functional activity was confirmed by demonstrating that the secreted fusion protein stimulated proliferation of cytokine-dependent CTLL-2 cells. Multi-step growth curves showed that murine melanoma (B16-F10 and B16.SIY cell lines were permissive to vMyx-IL15Rα-tdTr infection. In vivo experiments in RAG1-/- mice showed that subcutaneous B16-F10 tumors treated with vMyx-IL15Rα-tdTr exhibited attenuated tumor growth and a significant survival benefit for the treated group compared to the PBS control and the control viruses (vMyx-IL15-tdTr and vMyx-tdTr. Immunohistological analysis of the subcutaneous tumors showed dramatically increased infiltration of NK cells in vMyx-IL15Rα-tdTr treated tumors compared to the controls. In vivo experiments with immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice revealed a strong infiltrate of both NK cells and CD8+ T cells in response to vMyx-IL15Rα-tdTr, and prolonged survival. We conclude that delivery of IL15Rα-IL15 in a myxoma virus vector stimulates both innate and adaptive components of the immune system.

  14. Carbon Stock and Carbon Cycle of Wetland Ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhangquan; ZENG; Canming; ZHANG; Jiao; LI; Nan; YANG; Xihao; LI; Yandong; NIU; Zijian; WU

    2014-01-01

    Wetland ecosystem is an essential ecosystem in the world. Its organic carbon stock and carbon cycle are important basis of global carbon cycle researches and also major contents of global climate change researches. Researches have shown that wetland protection and restoration can promote carbon accumulation and reduce emission of greenhouse gases. This paper discussed influence of carbon stock and carbon balance of wetland ecosystem and emission of greenhouse gases,as well as the relationship between wetland and global climate changes. Finally,it made prospect on researches about carbon cycle of Dongting Lake.

  15. A novel carbon fiber based porous carbon monolith

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, T.D.; Klett, J.W.; Weaver, C.E.

    1995-06-01

    A novel porous carbon material based on carbon fibers has been developed. The material, when activated, develops a significant micro- or mesopore volume dependent upon the carbon fiber type utilized (isotropic pitch or polyacrylonitrile). The materials will find applications in the field of fluid separations or as a catalyst support. Here, the manufacture and characterization of our porous carbon monoliths are described. A novel adsorbent carbon composite material has been developed comprising carbon fibers and a binder. The material, called carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS), was developed through a joint research program between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Kentucky, Center for Applied Energy Research (UKCAER).

  16. Authigenic Carbonate and the History of the Global Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrag, Daniel P.; Higgins, John. A.; Macdonald, Francis A.; Johnston, David T.

    2013-02-01

    We present a framework for interpreting the carbon isotopic composition of sedimentary rocks, which in turn requires a fundamental reinterpretation of the carbon cycle and redox budgets over Earth's history. We propose that authigenic carbonate, produced in sediment pore fluids during early diagenesis, has played a major role in the carbon cycle in the past. This sink constitutes a minor component of the carbon isotope mass balance under the modern, high levels of atmospheric oxygen but was much larger in times of low atmospheric O2 or widespread marine anoxia. Waxing and waning of a global authigenic carbonate sink helps to explain extreme carbon isotope variations in the Proterozoic, Paleozoic, and Triassic.

  17. Direct measurement of carbon enrichment in the incomplete bainite transformation in Mo added low carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall kinetics and carbon enrichment in austenite during the incomplete isothermal bainite transformation in Fe–0.1C–1.5Mn–(0, 0.03, 0.3, 0.5, 1)Mo (mass%) alloys were investigated with quantitative metallography and Electron Probe Microanalysis in the transformation temperature range of 773–873 K. The incomplete transformation appears at 823–873 K when Mo addition exceeds 0.3 mass%; at 773 K substantial carbide precipitation accompanies bainite transformation and no transformation stasis is observed. Transformed fractions in the stasis stage are hardly affected by prior austenite grain size. Carbon concentrations in austenite in the stasis stage are lower than T0 line and decrease with the increase of Mo addition and temperature. T0′ limit, solute drag and WBs limit theories are used to examine the experimentally measured carbon concentration limits in austenite, and their respective flaws are pointed out

  18. Selective Oxidation of Soft Grade Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zecevic, N.

    2007-12-01

    the surface area is essential. Mutual oxidizing agents are ozone, air, mixture of nitric oxide and air, and nitric acid. However, treatment with highly oxidizing agents in a gaseous phase or aqueous medium may highly increase the concentration of acid oxides on the surface area of the carbon black. Acid oxides on the surface area of carbon black decrease the pH value, which is closely connected to the vulcanization of rubber compounds. Furthermore, the afore-mentioned method has other disadvantages. In the case of nitrate acid, the major disadvantage is corrosion of plant equipment. The mixture of nitrite oxide and air demands a very complicated plant, and the same procedure is very time consuming. Ozone increases the oxygen content on the surface area of the carbon black by as much as 15 %, which creates carbon dioxide and reduces utilization. Air creates thermally unstable surface area oxides, since the process demands a temperature range between 450 and 700 °C. Due to all these reasons, an oxidation method was developed of eliminating non-reacted oil from the surface area of oil-furnace carbon black, which cannot be produced with the conventional production method. An aqueous solution of salt ammonium nitrate p.a. proved to be a very good oxidizing agent. Conventional soft grades of oil-furnace carbon blacks with very high contents of non-reacted oil on their surface area, were mixed with the appropriate mass weight of ammonium nitrate p. a. (1.25 to 10.00 g L-1 NH4NO3 p. a.. The obtained homogeneous mixture was dried at temperatures from 180 to 210 °C for a period of 30 to 120 min. Namely, oil-furnace carbon blacks are first produced in a "fluffy" form with exceptionally small mass density, which is why they are very unpractical for manipulation. The "fluffy" oil-furnace carbon black must be transformed to a greater weight density and have a smaller quantity of fines as possible. However, there are many industrial processes of transforming "fluffy" carbon black

  19. High performance carbon-carbon composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lalit M Manocha

    2003-02-01

    Carbon-carbon composites rank first among ceramic composite materials with a spectrum of properties and applications in various sectors. These composites are made of fibres in various directions and carbonaceous polymers and hydrocarbons as matrix precursors. Their density and properties depend on the type and volume fraction of reinforcement, matrix precursor used and end heat treatment temperature. Composites made with thermosetting resins as matrix precursors possess low densities (1.55–1.75 g/cm3) and well-distributed microporosity whereas those made with pitch as the matrix precursor, after densification exhibit densities of 1.8–2.0 g/cm3 with some mesopores, and those made by the CVD technique with hydrocarbon gases, possess intermediate densities and matrices with close porosities. The former (resin-based) composites exhibit high flexural strength, low toughness and low thermal conductivity, whereas the latter (pitch- and CVD-based) can be made with very high thermal conductivity (400–700 W/MK) in the fibre direction. Carbon-carbon composites are used in a variety of sectors requiring high mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, good frictional properties for brake pads in high speed vehicles or high thermal conductivity for thermal management applications. However, for extended life applications, these composites need to be protected against oxidation either through matrix modification with Si, Zr, Hf etc. or by multilayer oxidation protection coatings consisting of SiC, silica, zircon etc.

  20. Carbon aerogels; Les aerogels de carbone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthon-Fabry, S.; Achard, P

    2003-06-15

    The carbon aerogel is a nano-porous material at open porosity, electrical conductor. The aerogels morphology is variable in function of the different synthesis parameters. This characteristic offers to the aerogels a better adaptability to many applications: electrodes (super condensers, fuel cells). The author presents the materials elaboration and their applications. It provides also the research programs: fundamental research, realization of super-condenser electrodes, fuel cells electrodes, gas storage materials and opaque materials for thermal insulation. (A.L.B.)

  1. Resonance strengths in the 14N(p,gamma)15O and 15N(p,alpha gamma)12C reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Marta, Michele; Bemmerer, Daniel; Beyer, Roland; Broggini, Carlo; Caciolli, Antonio; Erhard, Martin; Fülöp, Zsolt; Grosse, Eckart; Gyürky, György; Hannaske, Roland; Junghans, Arnd R; Menegazzo, Roberto; Nair, Chithra; Schwengner, Ronald; Szücs, Tamás; Vezzú, Simone; Wagner, Andreas; Yakorev, Dmitry

    2010-01-01

    The 14N(p,gamma)15O reaction is the slowest reaction of the carbon-nitrogen-oxygen cycle of hydrogen burning in stars. As a consequence, it determines the rate of the cycle. The 15N(p,alpha gamma)12C reaction is frequently used in inverse kinematics for hydrogen depth profiling in materials. The 14N(p,gamma)15O and 15N(p,alpha gamma)12C reactions have been studied simultaneously, using titanium nitride targets of natural isotopic composition and a proton beam. The strengths of the resonances at Ep = 1058 keV in 14N(p,gamma)15O and at Ep = 897 and 430 keV in 15N(p,alpha gamma)12C have been determined with improved precision, relative to the well-known resonance at Ep = 278 keV in 14N(p,gamma)15O. The new recommended values are \\omega\\gamma = 0.352$\\pm$0.018, 362$\\pm$20, and 22.0$\\pm$0.9\\,eV for their respective strengths. In addition, the branching ratios for the decay of the Ep = 1058 keV resonance in 14N(p,gamma)15O have been redetermined. The data reported here should facilitate future studies of off-resona...

  2. Sodium carbonate poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodium carbonate is found in: Automatic dishwashing soaps Clinitest (diabetes testing) tablets Glass products Pulp and paper products Some bleaches Some bubble bath solutions Some steam iron cleaners Note: This list is not all-inclusive.

  3. Carbon monoxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heater). Many carbon monoxide poisonings occur in the winter months when furnaces, gas fireplaces, and portable heaters ... 16567227 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16567227 . Nelson LS, Hoffman RS. Inhaled toxins. In: Marx JA, ...

  4. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... United States die every year from accidental non-fire related CO poisoning. Products that can produce deadly ... Driven Generators, 2004-2014 January 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of ...

  5. FLUIDIZATION OF CARBON NANOTUBES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Wei; Cang Huang; Yao Wang

    2005-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be fluidized in the form of fluidlike agglomerates made of many three-dimensional sub-agglomerates, having a multi-stage agglomerate (MSA) structure and containing large amounts of twisting CNTs of micrometer magnitude.

  6. Carbon nanotubes: Fibrillar pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostarelos, Kostas

    2010-10-01

    The mechanisms by which chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes flow in blood and are excreted through the kidneys illustrate the unconventional behaviour of these fibrillar nanostructures, and the opportunities they offer as components for the design of advanced delivery vehicles.

  7. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics March 09, 2016 Supplemental Memos Regarding Some of the Hazards Associated with Engine-Driven Generators, 2004-2014 January 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the ...

  8. The Carbon Emission Game

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    When Chinese President Hu Jintao attended the UN climate summit on September22,he made a solemn commitment that China will cut its per GDP unit carbon emission to a significant amount in 2020 compared with that of 2005.

  9. Total Ecosystem Carbon Stock

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Total ecosystem carbon includes above- and below-ground live plant components (such as leaf, branch, stem and root), dead biomass (such as standing dead wood, down...

  10. Carbon monoxide intoxication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kales, S.N. (Cambridge Hospital, MA (United States))

    1993-11-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning usually results from inhalation of exhaust fumes from motor vehicles, smoke from fires or fumes from faulty heating systems. Carbon monoxide has a high affinity for hemoglobin, with which it forms carboxyhemoglobin. The resulting decrease in both oxygen-carrying capacity and oxygen release can lead to end-organ hypoxia. The clinical presentation is nonspecific. Headache, dizziness, fatigue and nausea are common in mild to moderate carbon monoxide poisoning. In more severe cases, tachycardia, tachypnea and central nervous system depression occur. When carbon monoxide intoxication is suspected, empiric treatment with 100 percent oxygen should be initiated immediately. The diagnosis is confirmed by documenting an elevated carboxyhemoglobin level. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is recommended in patients with neurologic dysfunction, cardiac dysfunction or a history of unconsciousness. 26 refs.

  11. Carbon partitioning in photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Anastasios

    2013-06-01

    The work seeks to raise awareness of a fundamental problem that impacts the renewable generation of fuels and chemicals via (photo)synthetic biology. At issue is regulation of the endogenous cellular carbon partitioning between different biosynthetic pathways, over which the living cell exerts stringent control. The regulation of carbon partitioning in photosynthesis is not understood. In plants, microalgae and cyanobacteria, methods need be devised to alter photosynthetic carbon partitioning between the sugar, terpenoid, and fatty acid biosynthetic pathways, to lower the prevalence of sugar biosynthesis and correspondingly upregulate terpenoid and fatty acid hydrocarbons production in the cell. Insight from unusual but naturally occurring carbon-partitioning processes can help in the design of blueprints for improved photosynthetic fuels and chemicals production.

  12. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan Capalbo

    2005-12-31

    has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts

  13. Carbon and oxygen isotope microanalysis of carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velivetskaya, Tatiana A; Ignatiev, Alexander V; Gorbarenko, Sergey A

    2009-08-30

    Technical modification of the conventional method for the delta(13)C and delta(18)O analysis of 10-30 microg carbonate samples is described. The CO(2) extraction is carried out in vacuum using 105% phosphoric acid at 95 degrees C, and the isotopic composition of CO(2) is measured in a helium flow by gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS). The feed-motion of samples to the reaction vessel provides sequential dropping of only the samples (without the sample holder) into the acid, preventing the contamination of acid and allowing us to use the same acid to carry out very large numbers of analyses. The high accuracy and high reproducibility of the delta(13)C and delta(18)O analyses were demonstrated by measurements of international standards and comparison of results obtained by our method and by the conventional method. Our method allows us to analyze 10 microg of the carbonate with a standard deviation of +/-0.05 per thousand for delta(13)C and delta(18)O. The method has been used successfully for the analyses of the oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of the planktonic and benthic foraminifera in detailed palaeotemperature reconstructions of the Okhotsk Sea. PMID:19603476

  14. States and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The climate challenge appeals to an unprecedented mutation of our societies. From north to south, all our life styles will have to be changed from dwelling, to transport and feeding. These changes will have sense only at a worldwide scale and will impact our way of development. How can we reduce our energy consumption and greenhouse impact with answering everyone's essential needs at the same time? How can we invent a carbon-free economy in the North and preserve the big socio-economical equilibria at the same time? How can we get rid of poverty in the South without compromising the well-being of the future generations with an increase of CO2 emissions? Such difficulties cannot be overcome without innovations in terms of public policies. This book takes stock of the new possible instruments and policies at the global scale and involving fiscality, standards, investments and social justice. Content: 1 - the carbon threat: a changing climate and energies becoming scarce (the climate threat, an increasing energy insecurity); carbon and modern economy (human greenhouse gas emissions, a carbon-free well-being); governments and carbon control (a global challenge requiring an international control, the experiments era from Rio to the present day, the challenge of the state in front of the carbon threat); 2 - the political instruments of environment: standards as first instruments of climate public policies (standards efficiency in some sectors, standards limitations, standards and innovation); emissions quotas and market instruments (Kyoto protocol and CO2 market, the future of 'cap and trade' and of individual and regional quotas); carbon tax, fiscal instruments and new regulations (carbon tax as an alternative or a complement, other fiscal and para-fiscal instruments, new regulation instruments); investing in climate (managing the transition, governments as transition administrators). (J.S)

  15. Geomorphic control on the δ15N of mountain forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Hilton

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Mountain forests are subject to high rates of physical erosion which can export particulate nitrogen from ecosystems. However, the impact of geomorphic processes on nitrogen budgets remains poorly constrained. We have used the elemental and isotopic composition of soil and plant organic matter to investigate nitrogen cycling in the mountain forest of Taiwan, from 24 sites with distinct geomorphic (topographic slope and climatic (precipitation, temperature characteristics. The organic carbon to nitrogen ratio of soil organic matter decreased with soil 14C age, providing constraint on average rates of nitrogen loss using a mass balance model. Model predictions suggest that present day estimates of nitrogen deposition exceed contemporary and historic nitrogen losses. We found ∼6‰ variability in the stable isotopic composition (δ15N of soil and plants which was not related to soil 14C age or climatic conditions. Instead, δ15N was significantly, negatively correlated with topographic slope. Using the mass balance model, we demonstrate that the correlation can be explained by an increase in nitrogen loss by non-fractioning pathways on steeper slopes, where physical erosion most effectively removes particulate nitrogen. Published data from forests on steep slopes are consistent with the correlation. Based on our dataset and these observations, we hypothesise that variable physical erosion rates can significantly influence soil δ15N, and suggest particulate nitrogen export is a major, yet underappreciated, loss term in the nitrogen budget of mountain forests.

  16. Inorganic carbon acquisition in red tide dinoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, Björn; Richter, Klaus-Uwe; Riebesell, Ulf; Hansen, Per Juel

    2006-05-01

    Carbon acquisition was investigated in three marine bloom-forming dinollagellates-Prorocentrum minimum, Heterocapsa triquetra and Ceratium lineatum. In vivo activities of extracellular and intracellular carbonic anhydrase (CA), photosynthetic O2 evolution, CO2 and HCO3- uptake rates were measured by membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) in cells acclimated to low pH (8.0) and high pH (8.5 or 9.1). A second approach used short-term 14C-disequilibrium incubations to estimate the carbon source utilized by the cells. All three species showed negligible extracellular CA (eCA) activity in cells acclimated to low pH and only slightly higher activity when acclimated to high pH. Intracellular CA (iCA) activity was present in all three species, but it increased only in P. minimum with increasing pH. Half-saturation concentrations (K1/2) for photosynthetic O2 evolution were low compared to ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) kinetics. Moreover, apparent affinities for inorganic carbon (Ci) increased with increasing pH in the acclimation, indicating the operation of an efficient CO2 concentration mechanism (CCM) in these dinoflagellates. Rates of CO2 uptake were comparably low and could not support the observed rates of photosynthesis. Consequently, rates of HCO3- uptake were high in the investigated species, contributing more than 80% of the photosynthetic carbon fixation. The affinity for HCO3- and maximum uptake rates increased under higher pH. The strong preference for HCO3- was also confirmed by the 14C-disequilibrium technique. Modes of carbon acquisition were consistent with the 13C-fractionation pattern observed and indicated a strong species-specific difference in leakage. These results suggest that photosynthesis in marine dinoflagellates is not limited by Ci even at high pH, which may occur during red tides in coastal waters. PMID:17087465

  17. Carbon based prosthetic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlin, D.J.; Carroll, D.W.; Barbero, R.S.; Archuleta, T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Klawitter, J.J.; Ogilvie, W.; Strzepa, P. [Ascension Orthopedics (US); Cook, S.D. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (US). School of Medicine

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to evaluate the use of carbon/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites for use in endoprosthetic devices. The application of these materials for the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joints of the hand was investigated. Issues concerning mechanical properties, bone fixation, biocompatibility, and wear are discussed. A system consisting of fiber reinforced materials with a pyrolytic carbon matrix and diamond-like, carbon-coated wear surfaces was developed. Processes were developed for the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of pyrolytic carbon into porous fiber preforms with the ability to tailor the outer porosity of the device to provide a surface for bone in-growth. A method for coating diamond-like carbon (DLC) on the articulating surface by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was developed. Preliminary results on mechanical properties of the composite system are discussed and initial biocompatibility studies were performed.

  18. The distribution in lunar soil of carbon released by pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmarais, D. J.; Hayes, J. M.; Meinschein, W. G.

    1973-01-01

    The carbon contents of various lunar soil particle types and sieve fractions of Apollo 15 and 16 samples have been determined by the pyrolysis method. The mineral, glass, and high-grade breccia fragments in the soils examined contain relatively low amounts of carbon (approximately 8, 25, and 25 microg C/g sample respectively in 149-250 micron grains). Most low-grade breccias and all agglutinates examined have high carbon contents (approximately 52 and 80 microg C/g sample respectively), and agglutinate abundance is indicative of the carbon content and maturity of a soil. The distribution of carbon with respect to particle size in mature soils generally reveals a minimum in carbon content at about 100 micron particle diameter. At smaller particle diameters, carbon content is directly proportional to particle surface area and therefore increases with the ratio (surface area)/(particle mass). A model relating the cycle of comminution and aggregation of soil particles to the redistribution of surface implanted carbon is developed.

  19. Surface State of Carbon Fibers Modified by Electrochemical Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunxia GUO; Jie LIU; Jieying LIANG

    2005-01-01

    Surface of polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers was modified by electrochemical oxidation. The modification effect on carbon fibers surface was explored using atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Results showed that on the modified surface of carbon fibers, the carbon contents decreased by 9.7% and the oxygen and nitrogen contents increased by 53.8% and 7.5 times, respectively. The surface roughness and the hydroxyl and carbonyl contents also increased. The surface orientation index was reduced by 1.5%which decreased tensile strength of carbon fibers by 8.1%, and the microcrystalline dimension also decreased which increased the active sites of carbon fiber surface by 78%. The physical and chemical properties of carbon fibers surface were modified through the electrochemical oxidative method, which improved the cohesiveness between the fibers and resin matrix and increased the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of carbon fibers reinforced epoxy composite (CFRP) over 20%.

  20. Black carbon in marine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelburg, J.J.; Nieuwenhuize, J.; Van Breugel, P.

    1999-01-01

    Concentrations of black carbon were determined for a number of marine sediments. A comparison of black carbon based on thermal oxidation and hot concentrated nitric acid pretreatments revealed that the latter significantly overestimates combustion derived carbon phases. Black carbon accounts for abo

  1. Nano-Carbons as Theranostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang Liu, Xing-Jie Liang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nano-carbons, including fullerenes, carbon nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, graphene, and nano-diamonds, are an important class of nanostructures attracting tremendous interests in the past two decades. In this special issue, seven review articles and research reports are collected, to summarize and present the latest progress in the exploration of various nano-carbons for theranostic applications.

  2. Method for synthesizing carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongyou

    2012-09-04

    A method for preparing a precursor solution for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, where a polar solvent is added to at least one block copolymer and at least one carbohydrate compound, and the precursor solution is processed using a self-assembly process and subsequent heating to form nanoporous carbon films, porous carbon nanotubes, and porous carbon nanoparticles.

  3. Excited states of {sup 15}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappuzzello, F.; Orrigo, S.E.A.; Cunsolo, A.; Allia, M.C.; Lazzaro, A.; Nociforo, C.; Winfield, J.S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lab. Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Lazzaro, A. [Catania Univ., Dipt. Fisica (Italy); Lenske, H. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Beaumel, D.; Fortier, S. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, (IN2P3/CNRS) 91 - Orsay (France); Foti, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy)

    2004-03-01

    The N{sup 15}(Li{sup 7},Be{sup 7})C{sup 15} reaction at 55 MeV incident energy was studied at forward angles in order to explore the C{sup 15} excitation energy spectrum. The C{sup 15} ground state and the states at E{sub x} = 0.77, 6.77, 7.30, 8.50 MeV excitation energies were populated. The energy resolution ({approx} 250 keV) allowed the identification of these transitions each for Be{sup 7} ground and first-excited state at E{sub x} = 0.429 MeV. Quasi-particle random phase approximation (QRPA) calculations reproduce the C{sup 15} level structure below 1.5 MeV excitation energy. The strength observed at higher excitation energies probably arises from core-excited components of C{sup 15}. (authors)

  4. The role of urbanization in the global carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churkina, Galina

    2016-04-01

    Increasing urbanization and global environmental change are two of the grand challenges of the Anthropocene. There are many important connections between these two challenges, which are still poorly understood. The role of urbanization in the global carbon cycle is one of them. Until now, the known facts about the its role encompassed only CO2 emissions. Urban areas account for more than 70% of CO2 emissions from burning fossil fuels. Urban expansion in tropics is responsible for 5% of the annual emissions from land use change. Here I show that the effect of urbanization on the global carbon cycle extends beyond these emissions. I quantify the contribution of urbanization to the major carbon fluxes and pools globally and identify gaps crucial for predicting the evolution of the carbon cycle in the future. Urban residents currently control ~22 (12-40)% of the land carbon uptake (112 PgC/yr) and ~24 (15-39)% of the carbon emissions (117 PgC/yr) from land globally. Urbanization resulted in the creation of new carbon pools on land such as buildings (~6.7 PgC) and landfills (~30 PgC). Together these pools store 1.6 (±0.3)% of the total vegetation and soil carbon pools globally. The creation and maintenance of these new pools has been associated with high emissions of CO2, which are currently better understood than the processes associated with the dynamics of these pools and accompanying uptake of carbon. Predictions of the future trajectories of the global carbon cycle will require a much better understanding of how urban development affects the carbon cycle over the long term.

  5. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Green; Thomas Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Paul Box; Weijiong Li; Raghubir P. Gupta

    2005-07-01

    This report describes research conducted between April 1, 2005 and June 30, 2005 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas from coal combustion and synthesis gas from coal gasification. Supported sodium carbonate sorbents removed up to 76% of the carbon dioxide from simulated flue gas in a downflow cocurrent flow reactor system, with an approximate 15 second gas-solid contact time. This reaction proceeds at temperatures as low as 25 C. Lithium silicate sorbents remove carbon dioxide from high temperature simulated flue gas and simulated synthesis gas. Both sorbent types can be thermally regenerated and reused. The lithium silicate sorbent was tested in a thermogravimetric analyzer and in a 1-in quartz reactor at atmospheric pressure; tests were also conducted at elevated pressure in a 2-in diameter high temperature high pressure reactor system. The lithium sorbent reacts rapidly with carbon dioxide in flue gas at 350-500 C to absorb about 10% of the sorbent weight, then continues to react at a lower rate. The sorbent can be essentially completely regenerated at temperatures above 600 C and reused. In atmospheric pressure tests with synthesis gas of 10% initial carbon dioxide content, the sorbent removed over 90% of the carbon dioxide. An economic analysis of a downflow absorption process for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas with a supported sodium carbonate sorbent suggests that a 90% efficient carbon dioxide capture system installed at a 500 MW{sub e} generating plant would have an incremental capital cost of $35 million ($91/kWe, assuming 20 percent for contingencies) and an operating cost of $0.0046/kWh. Assuming capital costs of $1,000/kW for a 500 MWe plant the capital cost of the down flow absorption process represents a less than 10% increase, thus meeting DOE goals as set forth in its Carbon Sequestration Technology Roadmap and Program Plan.

  6. A study of the oxygen and carbon dioxide requirements of thermophilic campylobacters.

    OpenAIRE

    Bolton, F J; Coates, D.

    1983-01-01

    The oxygen and carbon dioxide requirements of different biotypes of thermophilic campylobacters were investigated by means of (a) quantitative studies, and (b) total growth studies. Oxygen tolerance of the five test organisms differed markedly and varied with the carbon dioxide concentration. At most carbon dioxide concentrations tested, Campylobacter jejuni strains NCTC 11168 and NCTC 11392 tolerated 21% oxygen (growth reduced), C coli NCTC 11353 tolerated 15% oxygen (growth reduced), and C ...

  7. Aspects of carbon dioxide utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omae, Iwao [Omae Research Laboratories, 335-23 Mizuno, Sayama, Saitama 350-1317 (Japan)

    2006-06-30

    Carbon dioxide reacts with hydrogen, alcohols, acetals, epoxides, amines, carbon-carbon unsaturated compounds, etc. in supercritical carbon dioxide or in other solvents in the presence of metal compounds as catalysts. The products of these reactions are formic acid, formic acid esters, formamides, methanol, dimethyl carbonate, alkylene carbonates, carbamic acid esters, lactones, carboxylic acids, polycarbonate (bisphenol-based engineering polymer), aliphatic polycarbonates, etc. Especially, the productions of formic acid, formic acid methyl ester and dimethylformamide with a ruthenium catalyst; dimethyl carbonate and urethanes with a dialkyltin catalyst; 2-pyrone with a nickel-phosphine catalyst; diphenyl carbonate with a lead phenoxide catalyst; the alternating copolymerization of carbon dioxide and epoxides with a zinc catalyst has attracted attentions as the industrial utilizations of carbon dioxide. The further development of these production processes is expected. (author)

  8. Coordinated control of carbon and oxygen for ultra-low-carbon interstitial-free steel in a smelting process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Wang; Yan-ping Bao; Quan Yang; Li-hua Zhao; Lu Lin

    2015-01-01

    Low residual-free-oxygen before final de-oxidation was beneficial to improving the cleanness of ultra-low-carbon steel. For ul-tra-low-carbon steel production, the coordinated control of carbon and oxygen is a precondition for achieving low residual oxygen during the Ruhrstahl Heraeus (RH) decarburization process. In this work, we studied the coordinated control of carbon and oxygen for ultra-low-carbon steel during the basic oxygen furnace (BOF) endpoint and RH process using data statistics, multiple linear regressions, and thermodynamics computations. The results showed that the aluminum yield decreased linearly with increasing residual oxygen in liquid steel. When the mass ratio of free oxygen and carbon ([O]/[C]) in liquid steel before RH decarburization was maintained between 1.5 and 2.0 and the carbon range was from 0.030wt%to 0.040wt%, the residual oxygen after RH natural decarburization was low and easily controlled. To satisfy the re-quirement for RH decarburization, the carbon and free oxygen at the BOF endpoint should be controlled to be between 297 × 10−6 and 400 × 10−6 and between 574 × 10−6 and 775 × 10−6, respectively, with a temperature of 1695 to 1715°C and a furnace campaign of 1000 to 5000 heats.

  9. Uncertainities in carbon dioxide radiative forcing in atmospheric general circulation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cess, R.D.; Zhang, M.H. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)); Potter, G.L.; Gates, W.L.; Taylor, K.E. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)); Colman, R.A.; Fraser, J.R.; McAvaney, B.J. (Bureau of Meterorology Research Centre, Victoria (Australia)); Dazlich, D.A.; Randall, D.A. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)); Del Genio, A.D.; Lacis, A.A. (Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, NY (United States)); Esch, M.; Roeckner, E. (Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg (Germany)); Galin, V. (Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)); Hack, J.J.; Kiehl, J.T. (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)); Ingram, W.J. (Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Berkshire (United Kingdom)); Le Treut, H.; Lli, Z.X. (Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique, Paris (France)); Liang, X.Z.; Wang, W.C. (State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States)); Mahfouf,

    1993-11-19

    Global warming, caused by an increase in the concentrations of greenhouse gases, is the direct result of greenhouse gas-induced radiative forcing. When a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide is considered, this forcing differed substantially among 15 atmospheric general circulation models. Although there are several potential causes, the largest contributor was the carbon dioxide radiation parameterizations of the models.

  10. Platinum nanoclusters studded in the microporous nanowalls of ordered mesoporous carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, W.C.; Woo, S.I.; Jeon, M.K.; Sohn, J.M.; Kim, M.R.; Jeon, H.J. [Center for Ultramicrochemical Process Systems and Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Kusong-dong, Yusong-gu, Taejon, 305-701 (Korea)

    2005-02-23

    Methanol-tolerant cathode materials for use in direct-methanol fuel cells are composed of ordered mesoporous carbon with walls studded with ultrafine Pt nanoclusters. The material, composed of PtC regularly interconnected nanocomposite arrays, is prepared by pyrolysis of carbon and platinum precursors in silica mesoporous templates such as SBA-15. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  11. Role of Organic Matter and Carbonates in Soil Aggregation Estimated Using Laser Diffractometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I. VIRTO; N. GARTZIA-BENGOETXEA; O. FERN(A)NDEZ-UGALDE

    2011-01-01

    Aggregation in many soils in semi-arid land is affected by their high carbonate contents.The presence of lithogenic and/or primary carbonates can also influence the role of soil organic matter (SOM) in aggregation.The role of carbonates and SOM in aggregation was evaluated by comparing the grain-size distribution in two carbonate-rich soils (15% and 30% carbonates) under conventional tillage after different disaggregating treatments.We also compared the effect of no-tillage and conventional tillage on the role of these two aggregating agents in the soil with 30% of carbonates.Soil samples were treated as four different ways:shaking with water (control),adding hydrochloric acid (HCl) to remove carbonates,adding hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to remove organic matter,and consecutive removal of carbonates and organic matter (HCl +H2O2),and then analyzed by laser diffraction grain-sizing.The results showed that different contributions of carbonates and SOM to aggregate formation and stability depended not only on their natural proportion,but also on the soil type,as expressed by the major role of carbonates in aggregation in the 15carbonate-rich soil,with a greater SOC-to-SIC (soil organic C to soil inorganic C) ratio than the 30% carbonate-rich soil.The increased organic matter stocks under no-tillage could moderate the role of carbonates in aggregation in a given soil,which meant that no-tillage could affect the organic and the inorganic C cycles in the soil.In conclusion,the relative role of carbonates and SOM in aggregation could alter the aggregates hierarchy in carbonate-rich soils.

  12. Soil Organic Carbon Storage in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Xian-Li; SUN Bo; ZHOU Hui-Zhen; LI An-Bo

    2004-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) storage under different types of vegetations in China were estimated using measured data of 2 440 soil profiles to compare SOC density distribution between different estimates, to map the soil organic carbon stocks under different types of vegetation in China, and to analyze the relationships between soil organic carbon stocks and environmental variables using stepwise regression analyses. Soil organic carbon storage in China was estimated at 69.38 Gt (10 15 g). There was a big difference in SOC densities for various vegetation types, with SOC distribution closely related to climatic patterns in general. Stepwise regression analyses of SOC against environmental variables showed that SOC generally increased with increasing precipitation and elevation, while it decreased with increasing temperature.Furthermore, the important factor controlling SOC accumulation for forests was elevation, while for temperate steppes mean annual temperature dominated. The more specific the vegetation type used in the regression analysis, the greater was the effect of environmental variables on SOC. However, compared to native vegetation, cultivation activities in the croplands reduced the influence of environmental variables on SOC.

  13. Organic modification of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The organic modification of carbon nanotubes is a novel research field being developed recently. In this article, the history and newest progress of organic modification of carbon nanotubes are reviewed from two aspects:organic covalent modification and organic noncovalent modification of carbon nanotubes. The preparation and properties of organic modified carbon nanotubes are discussed in detail. In addition, the prospective development of organic modification of carbon nanotubes is suggested.

  14. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan Capalbo

    2005-12-31

    has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts

  15. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-11-01

    Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Deliverables for the 7th Quarter reporting period include (1) for the geological efforts: Reports on Technology Needs and Action Plan on the Evaluation of Geological Sinks and Pilot Project Deployment (Deliverables 2 and 3), and Report on the Feasibility of Mineralization Trapping in the Snake River Plain Basin (Deliverable 14); (2) for the terrestrial efforts: Report on the Evaluation of Terrestrial Sinks and a Report of the Best Production Practices for Soil C Sequestration (Deliverables 8 and 15). In addition, the 7th Quarter activities for the Partnership included further development of the proposed activities for the deployment and demonstration phase of the carbon sequestration pilots including geological and terrestrial pilots, expansion of the Partnership to encompass regions and institutions that are complimentary to the steps we have identified, building greater collaborations with industry and stakeholders in the region, contributed to outreach efforts that spanned all partnerships, co-authorship on the Carbon Capture and Separation report, and developed a regional basis to address future energy opportunities in the region. The deliverables and activities are discussed in the following sections and appended to this report. The education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The public website has been expanded and integrated with the GIS carbon atlas. We have made presentations to stakeholders and policy makers including two tribal sequestration workshops, and made connections to other federal and

  16. An analysis of the feasibility of carbon management policies as a mechanism to influence water conservation using optimization methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Andrew; Hudson, Darren

    2014-10-01

    Studies of how carbon reduction policies would affect agricultural production have found that there is a connection between carbon emissions and irrigation. Using county level data we develop an optimization model that accounts for the gross carbon emitted during the production process to evaluate how carbon reducing policies applied to agriculture would affect the choices of what to plant and how much to irrigate by producers on the Texas High Plains. Carbon emissions were calculated using carbon equivalent (CE) calculations developed by researchers at the University of Arkansas. Carbon reduction was achieved in the model through a constraint, a tax, or a subsidy. Reducing carbon emissions by 15% resulted in a significant reduction in the amount of water applied to a crop; however, planted acreage changed very little due to a lack of feasible alternative crops. The results show that applying carbon restrictions to agriculture may have important implications for production choices in areas that depend on groundwater resources for agricultural production.

  17. Carbon dioxide and climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global climate change is a serious environmental concern, and the US has developed ''An Action Agenda'' to deal with it. At the heart of the US effort is the US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP), which has been developed by the Committee on Earth and Environmental Sciences (CEES) of the Federal Coordinating Council for Sciences, Engineering, and Technology (FCCSET). The USGCRP will provide the scientific basis for sound policy making on the climate-change issue. The DOE contribution to the USGCRP is the Carbon Dioxide Research Program, which now places particular emphasis on the rapid improvement of the capability to predict global and regional climate change. DOE's Carbon Dioxide Research Program has been addressing the carbon dioxide-climate change connection for more than twelve years and has provided a solid scientific foundation for the USGCRP. The expansion of the DOE effort reflects the increased attention that the Department has placed on the issue and is reflected in the National Energy Strategy (NES) that was released in 1991. This Program Summary describes projects funded by the Carbon Dioxide Research Program during FY 1991 and gives a brief overview of objectives, organization, and accomplishments. The Environmental Sciences Division of the Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research supports a Carbon Dioxide Research Program to determine the scientific linkage between the rise of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, especially carbon dioxide, and climate and vegetation change. One facet is the Core CO2 Program, a pioneering program that DOE established more than 10 years ago to understand and predict the ways that fossil-fuel burning could affect atmospheric CO2 concentration, global climate, and the Earth's biosphere. Major research areas are: global carbon cycle; climate detection and models of climate change; vegetation research; resource analysis; and, information and integration

  18. Removal of dye by immobilised photo catalyst loaded activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of activated carbon to adsorb and titanium dioxide to photo degrade organic impurities from water bodies is well accepted. Combination of the two is expected to enhance the removal efficiency due to the synergistic effect. This has enabled activated carbon to adsorb more and at the same time the lifespan of activated carbon is prolonged as the workload of removing organic pollutants is shared between activated carbon and titanium dioxide. Immobilisation is selected to avoid unnecessary filtering of adsorbent and photo catalyst. In this study, mixture of activated carbon and titanium dioxide was immobilised on glass slides. Photodegradation and adsorption studies of Methylene Blue solution were conducted in the absence and presence of UV light. The removal efficiency of immobilised TiO2/ AC was found to be two times better than the removal by immobilised AC or immobilised TiO2 alone. In 4 hours and with the concentration of 10 ppm, TiO2 loaded activated carbon prepared from 1.5 g/ 15.0 mL suspension produced 99.50 % dye removal. (author)

  19. Measurement of carbon capture efficiency and stored carbon leakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Ralph F.; Dubey, Manvendra K.

    2013-01-29

    Data representative of a measured carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) concentration and of a measured oxygen (O.sub.2) concentration at a measurement location can be used to determine whether the measured carbon dioxide concentration at the measurement location is elevated relative to a baseline carbon dioxide concentration due to escape of carbon dioxide from a source associated with a carbon capture and storage process. Optionally, the data can be used to quantify a carbon dioxide concentration increase at the first location that is attributable to escape of carbon dioxide from the source and to calculate a rate of escape of carbon dioxide from the source by executing a model of gas-phase transport using at least the first carbon dioxide concentration increase. Related systems, methods, and articles of manufacture are also described.

  20. Carbon nanotube core graphitic shell hybrid fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahm, Myung Gwan; Lee, Jae-Hwang; Hart, Amelia H C; Song, Sung Moo; Nam, Jaewook; Jung, Hyun Young; Hashim, Daniel Paul; Li, Bo; Narayanan, Tharangattu N; Park, Chi-Dong; Zhao, Yao; Vajtai, Robert; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Hayashi, Takuya; Ku, Bon-Cheol; Endo, Morinobu; Barrera, Enrique; Jung, Yung Joon; Thomas, Edwin L; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2013-12-23

    A carbon nanotube yarn core graphitic shell hybrid fiber was fabricated via facile heat treatment of epoxy-based negative photoresist (SU-8) on carbon nanotube yarn. The effective encapsulation of carbon nanotube yarn in carbon fiber and a glassy carbon outer shell determines their physical properties. The higher electrical conductivity (than carbon fiber) of the carbon nanotube yarn overcomes the drawbacks of carbon fiber/glassy carbon, and the better properties (than carbon nanotubes) of the carbon fiber/glassy carbon make up for the lower thermal and mechanical properties of the carbon nanotube yarn via synergistic hybridization without any chemical doping and additional processes. PMID:24224730

  1. Scandium/carbon filters for soft x rays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Artioukov, IA; Kasyanov, YS; Kopylets, IA; Pershin, YP; Romanova, SA

    2003-01-01

    This Note deals with thin-film soft x-ray filters for operation at the wavelengths near carbon K edge (similar to4.5 nm). The filters were fabricated by magnetron sputtering deposition of thin layers of scandium (total thickness 0.1-0.2 mum) onto films of polypropylene (thickness 1.5 mum) and polyim

  2. 40 CFR 86.122-78 - Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... nitrogen. (3) Bubble a mixture of 3 percent CO2 in N2 through water at room temperature and record analyzer... monoxide analyzer shall be checked for response to water vapor and CO2: (1) Follow the manufacturer's... carbon monoxide in N2 calibration gases having nominal concentrations of 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, and...

  3. Microbial Metal Tolerance in Bermuda Carbonate Sediments †

    OpenAIRE

    Hines, Mark E.; Jones, Galen E.

    1982-01-01

    The recovery of aerobic heterotrophic bacteria from Bermuda carbonate sediments on metal-supplemented media varied as much as 44-fold over a 15-cm depth. Distributional relationships with sulfate-reducing bacteria and sediment character indicated that metal tolerance was a function of metal bioavailability.

  4. Effect of Solid Loading on Carbon Dioxide Absorptionin Bubble Column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyaa Khadhier Mageed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work experiments were conducted to study the effect of solid loading (1,5 and 9 vol.% on the enhancement of carbon dioxide absorption in bubble column at various volumetric gas flow rate (0.75, 1 and 1.5 m3/h and absorbent concentration (caustic soda( 0.1,0.5 and 1 M . Activated carbon and alumina oxide (Al2O3 are used as solid particles. The Danckwerts method was used to calculate interfacial area and individual mass transfer coefficients during absorption of carbon dioxide in a bubble column. The results show that the absorption rate was increased with increasing volumetric gas flow rate, caustic soda concentration and solid loading. Mass transfer coefficient and interfacial area were increased with increasing volumetric gas flow rate, and solid loading.

  5. Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldocchi, Dennis; Ryu, Youngryel; Keenan, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    A growing literature is reporting on how the terrestrial carbon cycle is experiencing year-to-year variability because of climate anomalies and trends caused by global change. As CO 2 concentration records in the atmosphere exceed 50 years and as satellite records reach over 30 years in length, we are becoming better able to address carbon cycle variability and trends. Here we review how variable the carbon cycle is, how large the trends in its gross and net fluxes are, and how well the signal can be separated from noise. We explore mechanisms that explain year-to-year variability and trends by deconstructing the global carbon budget. The CO 2 concentration record is detecting a significant increase in the seasonal amplitude between 1958 and now. Inferential methods provide a variety of explanations for this result, but a conclusive attribution remains elusive. Scientists have reported that this trend is a consequence of the greening of the biosphere, stronger northern latitude photosynthesis, more photosynthesis by semi-arid ecosystems, agriculture and the green revolution, tropical temperature anomalies, or increased winter respiration. At the global scale, variability in the terrestrial carbon cycle can be due to changes in constituent fluxes, gross primary productivity, plant respiration and heterotrophic (microbial) respiration, and losses due to fire, land use change, soil erosion, or harvesting. It remains controversial whether or not there is a significant trend in global primary productivity (due to rising CO 2, temperature, nitrogen deposition, changing land use, and preponderance of wet and dry regions). The degree to which year-to-year variability in temperature and precipitation anomalies affect global primary productivity also remains uncertain. For perspective, interannual variability in global gross primary productivity is relatively small (on the order of 2 Pg-C y -1) with respect to a large and uncertain background (123 +/- 4 Pg-C y -1), and

  6. New Products from 1,5-Anhydro-D-fructose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Mikkel; Lundt, Inge

    1,5-Anhydro-D-fructose 1 (AF) is now available in larger amounts by enzymatic degradation of starch, and thus the utility of AF is the basis of the NEPSA project . A review covering the chemistry and biochemistry of AF has recently been published . In our ongoing research to use AF as a chiral...... starting material, we have focused our attention on modifying the unsaturated ketone 2 which is obtained in one step from AF. In order to create C-C bonds Michael conditions were applied to the unsaturated ketone 2 using carbon nucleophiles such as cyanide and diethylmalonate. The acetylated enolone 2a...... investigation. EU-program : NEw Products from Starch derived Anhydro-D- fructose Andersen, S.; Lundt, I.; Marcussen, J.; Yu, S. Carb.Res. 2002, 337, 873-880 Andersen, S.; Isak, T.; Jensen, H. M.; Marcussen, J.; Yu, S. Anti-oxidant. PCT Int. Patent WO 0056838, 2000...

  7. Energy and transport in comparison: Immaterialisation, dematerialisation and decarbonisation in the EU15 between 1970 and 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article compares the development of transport and energy use with a focus on carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in the EU15 countries between 1960 and 2000, and separately by each individual EU country between 1970 and 2000. Based on a review on the literature, immaterialisation can be defined as the reduction of energy intensity and transport intensity; dematerialisation can be defined as the reduction in carbon intensity of energy production and the carbon intensity of transport; decarbonisation can be defined as the reduction in (total and transport) carbon intensity of the whole economy. Although there is a clear pattern of reduction in energy intensity of the economy and carbon intensity of energy production, a similar pattern cannot be found in transport. Neither the transport intensity of the economy nor the carbon intensity of transport has been reduced. In particular, freight transport intensity has grown between 1985 and 2000. Data presented by country have shown even more variation. The EU15 countries were aggregated into six groups by cluster analysis to establish the different patterns on each of the three measures. It is concluded that the EU15 countries will have problems in achieving the EU White Paper target of decoupling transport growth from economic growth and the Kyoto target of reducing total CO2 emissions by 8% from the 1990 level between 2008 and 2012. However, there are some weak signals suggesting a more sustainable passenger transport system

  8. Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Cycle Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, D.; Chaoka, S.; Kumar, P.; Quijano, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    Second generation bioenergy crops, such as miscanthus (Miscantus × giganteus) and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), are regarded as clean energy sources, and are an attractive option to mitigate the human-induced climate change. However, the global climate change and the expansion of perennial grass bioenergy crops have the power to alter the biogeochemical cycles in soil, especially, soil carbon storages, over long time scales. In order to develop a predictive understanding, this study develops a coupled hydrological-soil nutrient model to simulate soil carbon responses under different climate scenarios such as: (i) current weather condition, (ii) decreased precipitation by -15%, and (iii) increased temperature up to +3C for four different crops, namely miscanthus, switchgrass, maize, and natural prairie. We use Precision Agricultural Landscape Modeling System (PALMS), version 5.4.0, to capture biophysical and hydrological components coupled with a multilayer carbon and ¬nitrogen cycle model. We apply the model at daily time scale to the Energy Biosciences Institute study site, located in the University of Illinois Research Farms, in Urbana, Illinois. The atmospheric forcing used to run the model was generated stochastically from parameters obtained using available data recorded in Bondville Ameriflux Site. The model simulations are validated with observations of drainage and nitrate and ammonium concentrations recorded in drain tiles during 2011. The results of this study show (1) total soil carbon storage of miscanthus accumulates most noticeably due to the significant amount of aboveground plant carbon, and a relatively high carbon to nitrogen ratio and lignin content, which reduce the litter decomposition rate. Also, (2) the decreased precipitation contributes to the enhancement of total soil carbon storage and soil nitrogen concentration because of the reduced microbial biomass pool. However, (3) an opposite effect on the cycle is introduced by the increased

  9. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2012-10-09

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  10. 46 CFR 190.15-15 - Ventilation for living spaces and quarters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... mechanical system unless it can be shown that a natural system will provide adequate ventilation. By a... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation for living spaces and quarters. 190.15-15... VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 190.15-15 Ventilation for living spaces and...

  11. 15 CFR 908.15 - Times for taking action; expiration on Saturday, Sunday, or holiday.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Times for taking action; expiration on Saturday, Sunday, or holiday. 908.15 Section 908.15 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to... § 908.15 Times for taking action; expiration on Saturday, Sunday, or holiday. Whenever periods of...

  12. 46 CFR 196.15-15 - Examination of boilers and machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Examination of boilers and machinery. 196.15-15 Section... VESSELS OPERATIONS Test, Drills, and Inspections § 196.15-15 Examination of boilers and machinery. (a) It shall be the duty of the chief engineer when he assumes charge of the boilers and machinery of a...

  13. 46 CFR 97.15-15 - Examination of boilers and machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Examination of boilers and machinery. 97.15-15 Section... VESSELS OPERATIONS Tests, Drills, and Inspections § 97.15-15 Examination of boilers and machinery. It shall be the duty of the chief engineer when assuming charge of the boilers and machinery of a vessel...

  14. Solution-based carbohydrate synthesis of individual solid, hollow, and porous carbon nanospheres using spray pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengwei; Wang, Yuan; Graser, Jake; Zhao, Ran; Gao, Fei; O'Connell, Michael J

    2013-12-23

    A facile and scalable solution-based, spray pyrolysis synthesis technique was used to synthesize individual carbon nanospheres with specific surface area (SSA) up to 1106 m(2)/g using a novel metal-salt catalyzed reaction. The carbon nanosphere diameters were tunable from 10 nm to several micrometers by varying the precursor concentrations. Solid, hollow, and porous carbon nanospheres were achieved by simply varying the ratio of catalyst and carbon source without using any templates. These hollow carbon nanospheres showed adsorption of to 300 mg of dye per gram of carbon, which is more than 15 times higher than that observed for conventional carbon black particles. When evaluated as supercapacitor electrode materials, specific capacitances of up to 112 F/g at a current density of 0.1 A/g were observed, with no capacitance loss after 20,000 cycles.

  15. Preparation of Carbon Nanotubes from Methane on Ni/Cu/A1 Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Renzhong Wei; Fengyi Li; Yan Ju

    2005-01-01

    A series of Ni/Cu/Al catalyst samples were prepared by the co-precipitation method. Carbon nanotubes with large inner diameters are successfully synthesized from methane on Ni/Cu/Al catalyst by adding sodium carbonate. The effects of the copper content and amounts of sodium carbonate on the morphology and microstructures of carbon nanotubes were investigated by CO adsorption and TEM technique. The experimental results showed that copper can influence both the catalytic activity and catalyst life. Best result was obtained when the copper content was 15%. Addition of sodium carbonate favors the formation of carbon nanotubes with large inner diameters. The growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes with large inner diameter is discussed.

  16. Determination of organic milk authenticity using carbon and nitrogen natural isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ill-Min; Park, Inmyoung; Yoon, Jae-Yeon; Yang, Ye-Seul; Kim, Seung-Hyun

    2014-10-01

    Natural stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen ((12)C, (13)C, (14)N, (15)N) have abundances unique to each living creature. Therefore, measurement of the stable isotope ratio of carbon and nitrogen (δ(13)C=(13)C/(12)C, δ(15)N=(15)N/(14)N) in milk provides a reliable method to determine organic milk (OM) authenticity. In the present study, the mean δ(13)C value of OM was higher than that of conventional milk (CM), whereas the mean δ(15)N value of OM was lower than that of CM; nonetheless both δ(13)C and δ(15)N values were statistically different for the OM and CM (Pauthenticity using stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen.

  17. Pilot Neil Armstrong and X-15 #1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1960-01-01

    Dryden pilot Neil Armstrong is seen here next to the X-15 ship #1 (56-6670) after a research flight. The X-15 was a rocket-powered aircraft 50 feet long with a wingspan of 22 feet. It was a missile-shaped vehicle with an unusual wedge-shaped vertical tail, thin stubby wings, and unique side fairings that extended along the side of the fuselage. The X-15 was flown over a period of nearly 10 years, from June 1959 to October 1968. It set the world's unofficial speed and altitude records. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the development of the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo manned spaceflight programs, and also the Space Shuttle program. The X-15s made a total of 199 flights, and were manufactured by North American Aviation. X-15-1, serial number 56-6670, is now located at the National Air and Space Museum, Washington DC. North American X-15A- 2, serial number 56-6671, is at the United States Air Force Museum, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio. X-15-3, serial number 56-6672, crashed on November 15, 1967, resulting in the death of Major Michael J. Adams.

  18. Securing tropical forest carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scharlemann, Jörn P. W.; Kapos, Valerie; Campbell, Alison;

    2010-01-01

    Forest loss and degradation in the tropics contribute 6-17% of all greenhouse gas emissions. Protected areas cover 217.2 million ha (19.6%) of the world's humid tropical forests and contain c. 70.3 petagrams of carbon (Pg C) in biomass and soil to 1 m depth. Between 2000 and 2005, we estimate...... that 1.75 million ha of forest were lost from protected areas in humid tropical forests, causing the emission of 0.25-0.33 Pg C. Protected areas lost about half as much carbon as the same area of unprotected forest. We estimate that the reduction of these carbon emissions from ongoing deforestation......, although certainly not sufficient, component of an overall strategy for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD)...

  19. Pyrolyzed carbon film diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Kirstin C; Tokuhisa, Hideo; Baker, Lane A

    2013-11-13

    We have previously reported pyrolyzed parylene C (PPC) as a conductive carbon electrode material for use with micropipets, atomic force microscopy probes, and planar electrodes. Advantages of carbon electrode fabrication from PPC include conformal coating of high-aspect ratio micro/nanoscale features and the benefits afforded by chemical vapor deposition of carbon polymers. In this work, we demonstrate chemical surface doping of PPC through the use of previously reported methods. Chemically treated PPC films are characterized by multiple spectroscopic and electronic measurements. Pyrolyzed parylene C and doped PPC are used to construct diodes that are examined as both p-n heterojunction and Schottky barrier diodes. Half-wave rectification is achieved with PPC diodes and demonstrates the applicability of PPC as a conductive and semiconductive material in device fabrication. PMID:24090451

  20. Carbonic acid as a reserve of carbon dioxide on icy moons: The formation of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in a polar environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Brant M.; Kaiser, Ralf I. [W. M. Keck Research Laboratory in Astrochemistry, University of Hawai' i at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Strazzulla, Giovanni, E-mail: brantmj@hawaii.edu [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, Via S. Sofia 78, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

    2014-06-20

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) has been detected on the surface of several icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn via observation of the ν{sub 3} band with the Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on board the Galileo spacecraft and the Visible-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on board the Cassini spacecraft. Interestingly, the CO{sub 2} band for several of these moons exhibits a blueshift along with a broader profile than that seen in laboratory studies and other astrophysical environments. As such, numerous attempts have been made in order to clarify this abnormal behavior; however, it currently lacks an acceptable physical or chemical explanation. We present a rather surprising result pertaining to the synthesis of carbon dioxide in a polar environment. Here, carbonic acid was synthesized in a water (H{sub 2}O)-carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) (1:5) ice mixture exposed to ionizing radiation in the form of 5 keV electrons. The irradiated ice mixture was then annealed, producing pure carbonic acid which was then subsequently irradiated, recycling water and carbon dioxide. However, the observed carbon dioxide ν{sub 3} band matches almost exactly with that observed on Callisto; subsequent temperature program desorption studies reveal that carbon dioxide synthesized under these conditions remains in solid form until 160 K, i.e., the sublimation temperature of water. Consequently, our results suggest that carbon dioxide on Callisto as well as other icy moons is indeed complexed with water rationalizing the shift in peak frequency, broad profile, and the solid state existence on these relatively warm moons.