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Sample records for carbon 14

  1. Carbon 14 dating; La datation par le carbone 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laj, C.; Mazaud, A.; Duplessy, J.C. [CEA Saclay, Lab. des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2004-03-01

    In this article time dating based on carbon 14 method is reviewed, its limits are explained and recent improvements are presented. Carbon 14 is a by-product of the interactions of cosmic protons with air molecules. The fluctuations of the quantity of carbon 14 present in the atmosphere are responsible for the shift observed between the result given by the method and the real age. This shift appears for ages greater than 2000 years and is estimated to 1000 years for an age of 10.000 years. As a consequence carbon 14 dating method requires calibration by comparing with other methods like dendrochronology (till 11.000 years) and time dating of fossil corals (till 26.000 years and soon till 50.000 years). It is assumed that the fluctuations of carbon 14 in the atmosphere are due to: - the changes in the intensity and composition of cosmic radiations itself (due to the motion of the sun system through the galaxy or due to the explosion of a super-novae in the surroundings of the sun system); - the changes of the earth magnetic field that diverts cosmic rays; and - the changes in the interactions between the atmosphere and the oceans knowing that 40 tons of carbon 14 are dissolved in seas while only 1 ton belongs to the atmosphere. (A.C.)

  2. Carbon-14 Bomb-Pulse Dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, B A

    2007-12-16

    Atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons during the 1950s and early 1960s doubled the concentration of carbon-14 atmosphere and created a pulse that labeled everything alive in the past 50 years as carbon moved up the food chain. The variation in carbon-14 concentration in time is well-documented and can be used to chronologically date all biological materials since the mid-1950s.

  3. Synthesis of carbon-13 and carbon-14 labelled triazolo-1,4-benzodiazepines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, W.R.; Hawi, A.A.; Digenis, G.A. (Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (USA). College of Pharmacy)

    1989-04-01

    An efficient two-step synthesis of 8-chloro-1-methyl-6-phenyl-(3H)-S-triazolo-(4,3-a)(1,4)-benzodiazepine (alprazolam) and 8-chloro-6-(2-chlorophenyl)-1-methyl-(3H)-S-triazolo-(4,3-a)(1,4)-benzodiazepine (triazolam) labelled with carbon-13 or carbon-14 from their corresponding hydrazines is reported. The method involved acylation of the appropriate hydrazine using the mixed carbonic anhydride of sodium ({sup 13}C) or ({sup 14}C) acetate and isobutylchloroformate under mild conditions. Thermolysis of the resulting acetylhydrazides gave the target carbon-14 and carbon-13 labelled compounds in good yields. (author).

  4. The carbon 14 and environment; Le carbone 14 et l'environnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This article resume the history and the properties of the carbon 14 ({sup 14}C). We also find the different origins and the produced quantities. The carbon transfers in environment are explained and so the {sup 14}C. The biological effects and the sanitary aspects are clarified. The measurements of carbon 14 are given as well its application through the dating. The waste management is tackled. (N.C.)

  5. MODIFYING V-14 RUBBER WITH CARBON FIBERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadrinov N. V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of carbon fibers and modified carbon fibers on properties of industrially produced V-14 rubber is examined. The dependences of physical and mechanical properties, hardness, abrasion resistance and resistance in aggressive environment on few amount of filled fiber are established. Structural properties of reinforced elastomeric composites are studied by scanning electron microscopy. Elastomeric layer on the surface of modified carbon fiber, confirmed with high adhesion is identified

  6. Synthesis of carbon-14 labeled vigabatrin. [Antieplileptic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, A.J.; Wagner, E.R. (Marion Merrell Dow Inc, Indianapolis, IN (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Carbon-14 labeled vigabatrin was synthesized in 5 steps from 5-hydroxymethyl-2-pyrrolidone tosylate and NaCN-[[sup 14]C]. A key step involved reduction of the resulting nitrile in the presence of excess dimethylamine to give the dimethylamino-ethyl 2-pyrrolidone derivative in one step. This afforded an overall radiochemical yield of 22% and radiochemical purity greater than 98%. (Author).

  7. Synthesis of carbon-14 labeled doxylamine succinate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, P.N.; Damodaran, K.M.

    1986-05-01

    Doxylamine succinate, N,N-dimethyl-2-(1-phenyl-1-(2-pyridinyl)-ethoxy)ethanamine succinate is an antihistamine used primarily as a sedative. Carbon-14 labeled doxylamine succinate, required for toxicological studies, was synthesized in two steps starting from 2-benzoyl pyridine.

  8. Removal of carbon-14 from irradiated graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunzik-Gougar, Mary Lou; Smith, Tara E.

    2014-08-01

    Approximately 250,000 tonnes of irradiated graphite waste exists worldwide and that quantity is expected to increase with decommissioning of Generation II reactors and deployment of Generation IV gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. This situation indicates the need for a graphite waste management strategy. On of the isotopes of great concern for long-term disposal of irradiated graphite is carbon-14 (14C), with a half-life of 5730 years. Study of irradiated graphite from some nuclear reactors indicates 14C is concentrated on the outer 5 mm of the graphite structure. The aim of the research presented here is to develop a practical method by which 14C can be removed. In parallel with these efforts, the same irradiated graphite material is being characterized to identify the chemical form of 14C in irradiated graphite. A nuclear-grade graphite, NBG-18, and a high-surface-area graphite foam, POCOFoam®, were exposed to liquid nitrogen (to increase the quantity of 14C precursor) and neutron-irradiated (1013 neutrons/cm2/s). During post-irradiation thermal treatment, graphite samples were heated in the presence of an inert carrier gas (with or without the addition of an oxidant gas), which carries off gaseous products released during treatment. Graphite gasification occurs via interaction with adsorbed oxygen complexes. Experiments in argon only were performed at 900 °C and 1400 °C to evaluate the selective removal of 14C. Thermal treatment also was performed with the addition of 3 and 5 vol% oxygen at temperatures 700 °C and 1400 °C. Thermal treatment experiments were evaluated for the effective selective removal of 14C. Lower temperatures and oxygen levels correlated to more efficient 14C removal.

  9. LDEO Carbon 14 Data from Selected Sea floor Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Carbon-14 data in this file were compiled by W.F. Ruddiman and staff at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University. Data include 974 carbon-14 dates...

  10. The lichens, tritium and carbon 14 integrators; Les lichens, integrateurs de tritium et de carbone 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daillant, O

    2007-07-01

    The present report concerns a research for the tritium and for the carbon 14 in lichens in a spirit of bio-indication: the first results appear in Daillant and al (2004 ) and additional results were presented to the congress B.I.O.M.A.P. in Slovenia, organized collectively by the institute Josef Stefan from Ljubljana and the international atomic energy agency from Vienna (Daillant and al 2003). (N.C.)

  11. Quantifying Carbon-14 for Biology Using Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    McCartt, A. Daniel; Ognibene, Ted J.; Bench, Graham; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.

    2016-01-01

    A cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) instrument was developed using mature, robust hardware for the measurement of carbon-14 in biological studies. The system was characterized using carbon-14 elevated glucose samples and returned a linear response up to 387 times contemporary carbon-14 concentrations. Carbon-14 free and contemporary carbon-14 samples with varying carbon-13 concentrations were used to assess the method detection limit of approximately one-third contemporary carbon-14 levels...

  12. Photoluminescent carbon dots from 1,4-addition polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhiqiang; Nolan, Andrew; Walton, Jeffrey G A; Lilienkampf, Annamaria; Zhang, Rong; Bradley, Mark

    2014-08-25

    Photoluminescent carbon dots were synthesised directly by thermopyrolysis of 1,4-addition polymers, allowing precise control of their properties. The effect of polymer composition on the properties of the carbon dots was investigated by TEM, IR, XPS, elemental analysis and fluorescence analysis, with carbon dots synthesised from nitrogen-containing polymers showing the highest fluorescence. The carbon dots with high nitrogen content were observed to have strong fluorescence in the visible region, and culture with cells showed that the carbon dots were non-cytotoxic and readily taken up by three different cell lines.

  13. Carbon-14 production in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheele, R.D.; Burger, L.L.

    1976-09-01

    Calculations based on existing composition data were performed to estimate the order of magnitude and the final location of /sup 14/C in fusion reactors. These calculations indicate that approximately 8 Ci/day, formed principally by /sup 14/N activation, will be produced in the UWMAK-II reference reactor (5,000 MWth). If Nb-1 percent Zr is used as the structural material instead of stainless steel 316 this quantity will be more than doubled. No information is available on the form of the /sup 14/C produced, but reduced forms such as carbides, hydrocarbons and perhaps CO may be produced. Most of the /sup 14/C may remain fixed in structural and other reactor materials until the material is reclaimed. Activation of air in the plasma chamber would be an immediate concern.

  14. National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series. Volume 3, Carbon-14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudin, M.J.; Garcia, R.S.

    1992-02-01

    This report, Volume 3 of the National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series, discusses the radiological and chemical characteristics of carbon-14. The report also discusses waste streams that contain carbon-14, waste forms that contain carbon-14, and carbon-14 behavior in the environment and in the human body.

  15. Carbon-14 background, pathway, and dose optimization analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caffrey, E.; Higley, K. [Oregon State University (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Carbon-14 is radiologically relevant due to its long half-life coupled with its ease of incorporation into the global carbon cycle. The majority of carbon-14 releases from nuclear power plants in the United States are gaseous, and terrestrial samples constitute the primary indicator of increased environmental levels, and thus represent an important pathway for the incorporation of the radionuclide into both human and nonhuman populations. This project was broken into three phases: In phase one, information was summarized on background quantities and production mechanisms of carbon-14 in the general environment and adjacent to nuclear power plants. The second phase involved the review and analysis of nuclear power plant carbon-14 pathways to humans as compared to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Regulatory Guide 1.109 methodologies (based on ICRP 2), and identified areas where dose calculations could be optimized. Alternative models for calculating plant uptake from atmosphere and transfer in the food chain were investigated, with particular emphasis on models used by countries in the European Union. In phase three, collard green samples grown at three different locations relative to a nuclear power plant (one control garden and two downwind gardens) were evaluated using a Perkin Elmer TriCarb 3180 TR/SL Liquid Scintillation Counter (LSC). Samples were first oven dried and combusted using a Perkin Elmer Model 307 Oxidizer, and activity concentrations were calculated based on the LSC count data. These data were compared to samples analyzed using accelerator mass spectrometry. There was no statistically significant difference in carbon-14 concentrations at the two downwind gardens as compared to the control garden. This research is based on work supported, in part, by the Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI). The opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed herein are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent

  16. Quantifying Carbon-14 for Biology Using Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartt, A Daniel; Ognibene, Ted J; Bench, Graham; Turteltaub, Kenneth W

    2016-09-06

    A cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) instrument was developed using mature, robust hardware for the measurement of carbon-14 in biological studies. The system was characterized using carbon-14 elevated glucose samples and returned a linear response up to 387 times contemporary carbon-14 concentrations. Carbon-14 free and contemporary carbon-14 samples with varying carbon-13 concentrations were used to assess the method detection limit of approximately one-third contemporary carbon-14 levels. Sources of inaccuracies are presented and discussed, and the capability to measure carbon-14 in biological samples is demonstrated by comparing pharmacokinetics from carbon-14 dosed guinea pigs analyzed by both CRDS and accelerator mass spectrometry. The CRDS approach presented affords easy access to powerful carbon-14 tracer techniques that can characterize complex biochemical systems.

  17. Carbon-14 as a tracer of groundwater discharge to streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Sarah; Harrington, Glenn; Cook, Peter; Post, Vincent; Dogramaci, Shawan

    2014-05-01

    The provenance of groundwater discharge to a stream can be determined by measuring the response of multiple groundwater age tracers within the stream across the discharge zone. The sampling interval required to detect groundwater discharge is limited by the rate of equilibration with the atmosphere downstream of the discharge zone, which is determined by the gas transfer velocity. Carbon-14 (14C) equilibration is driven by CO2 exchange, which is a small component of the dissolved inorganic carbon in most stream systems, and therefore the rate of equilibration is slower than for other gaseous age tracers. In this paper we use a step-wise approach to develop and demonstrate the use of 14C as a tracer in streams receiving groundwater discharge. Excess carbon dioxide (CO2) in the emerging groundwater degasses until equilibrium with atmospheric CO2 is reached; increasing pH and enriching the residual 14C by fractionation. In addition, the 14C gradient between groundwater and the atmosphere drives a slower process of isotopic equilibration. We have measured the rates of this chemical and isotopic equilibration experimentally by exposing 250 L of old groundwater to the atmosphere in an evaporation pan. Chemical equilibrium was achieved within 2 days, during which the 14C increased from 6 to 16 pMC. The influence of fractionation during the initial CO2 degassing on isotopic equilibrium rates was negligible. Isotopic equilibrium took over 2 months, with 14C in the evaporation pan increasing to 108 pMC over 71 days. This increase in 14C was simulated using a mass balance model with an effective 14C gas transfer velocity of 0.013 m d-1. Field testing of the method was conducted at two sites. Firstly, we measured the evolution of 14C in dewatering discharge as it flows along an ephemeral creek channel in the Pilbara, Western Australia. Measured 14C increased from 11 to 31 pMC along the 10km reach, which corresponds to a travel time of about 2 days. The measured increase was

  18. Carbon 14 dating method; Methode de datation par le carbone 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortin, Ph

    2000-07-01

    This document gives a first introduction to {sup 14}C dating as it is put into practice at the radiocarbon dating centre of Claude-Bernard university (Lyon-1 univ., Villeurbanne, France): general considerations and recalls of nuclear physics; the {sup 14}C dating method; the initial standard activity; the isotopic fractioning; the measurement of samples activity; the liquid-scintillation counters; the calibration and correction of {sup 14}C dates; the preparation of samples; the benzene synthesis; the current applications of the method. (J.S.)

  19. Synthesis of pentamidine labelled with tritium and carbon-14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesk, D.; Jones, J.R. (Surrey Univ., Guildford (UK). Dept. of Chemistry); Lockley, W.J.S.; Wilkinson, D.J. (Fisons plc, Loughborough (UK). Pharmaceutical Div.)

    1990-11-01

    Tritium labelled pentamidine has been prepared with a specific activity of 90 mCi mmol{sup -1} using a one-step exchange reaction between the unlabelled drug and tritiated water. The labelling utilised a homogeneous rhodium trichloride catalyst and yielded pentamidine regiospecifically labelled in the positions ortho to the amidine groups. Carbon-14 labelled pentamidine was prepared via a seven-step procedure in which the isotope was introduced via a nucleophilic substitution of 4-bromo-phenol with copper(I) ({sup 14}C)cyanide. (author).

  20. Measurements of carbon-14 with cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartt, A. D.; Ognibene, T.; Bench, G.; Turteltaub, K.

    2015-10-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is the most sensitive method for quantitation of 14C in biological samples. This technology has been used in a variety of low dose, human health related studies over the last 20 years when very high sensitivity was needed. AMS helped pioneer these scientific methods, but its expensive facilities and requirements for highly trained technical staff have limited their proliferation. Quantification of 14C by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) offers an approach that eliminates many of the shortcomings of an accelerator-based system and would supplement the use of AMS in biomedical research. Our initial prototype, using a non-ideal wavelength laser and under suboptimal experimental conditions, has a 3.5-modern, 1- σ precision for detection of milligram-sized, carbon-14-elevated samples. These results demonstrate proof of principle and provided a starting point for the development of a spectrometer capable of biologically relevant sensitivities.

  1. Carbon-14 activities in recently fallen meteorites and Antarctic meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jull, A. J. T.; Donahue, D. J.; Linick, T. W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports C-14 measurements in meteorites using an extraction method which employs RF melting of samples as small as 0.1 g. A study of extraction of cosmic-ray-produced C-14 in samples of Bruderheim gave C-14 levels between 38 and 60 dpm/kg for samples which had been preheated in air between 250 and 700 C, with a mean value of 46.8 + or - 1.4 dpm/kg. A range of values between 35 and 59 dpm/kg was found for other falls of saturated meteorites preheated to 500 C. The preheating step is shown to be effective in removing terrestrial carbon contamination. A series of samples previously dated by Kr-81 as having ages of 120-310 kyr gave C-14 levels of between less than 0.16 and 0.37 + or - 0.10 dpm/kg. These levels are consistent with levels of in situ production by cosmic rays at the earth's surface.

  2. Synthesis of carbon-14 analogue of 1,5 diaryl-5-[{sup 14}C]-1,2,3-triazoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matloubi, Hojatollah E-mail: hmatloubi@aeoi.org.ir; Shafiee, Abbas; Saemian, Nader; Shirvani, Gholamhossein; Daha, Fariba Johari

    2004-05-01

    Two 1,2,3-triazole anticonvulsants, 1-(4-methylsulfone-phenyl)-5-(4-methyl-phenyl)-1,2,3-triazole and 1-(4-methylsulfone-phenyl)-5-phenyl-1,2,3-triazole, both labeled with carbon-14 in the 5-position were prepared from para-tolunitrile-[cyano-{sup 14}C] and benzonitrile-[cyano-{sup 14}C], respectively.

  3. Biobased carbon content of resin extracted from polyethylene composite by carbon-14 concentration measurements using accelerator mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Taguchi, Kazuhiro; Kunioka, Masao; Funabashi, Masahiro; Ninomiya, Fumi

    2014-01-01

    An estimation procedure for biobased carbon content of polyethylene composite was studied using carbon-14 (14C) concentration ratios as measured by accelerated mass spectrometry (AMS). Prior to the measurement, additives and fillers in composites should be removed because they often contain a large amount of biobased carbon and may shift the estimation. Samples of resin with purity suitable for measurement were isolated from composites with a Soxhlet extractor using heated cyclohexanone. Afte...

  4. The preparation of glucose uniformly labelled with carbon-14; Preparacion de glucosa uniformemente marcada con carbono-14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, M. D.; Suarez, C.; Rodrigo, M. E.

    1978-07-01

    The plant, (Zea mais, L) and culture conditions for an optimum production of glucose has been chosen. To achieve the labelling of glucose, photosynthesis and carboxylation are carried on, under an artificial atmosphere of 14CO{sub 2} produced from 14{sup C}-barium carbonate. Following photosynthesis the sugars are extracted, and then the extract purified by several methods. The purified glucose is finally, degraded and the specific radioactivity is determined in each of its carbon atoms. (Author) 37 refs.

  5. Effect of dead carbon on the 14C dating of the speleothem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Yanjun; Warren Beck; PENG Zicheng; ZHANG Zhaofeng

    2005-01-01

    Based on the comparison of dating results among high-precision TIMS U-series and AMS 14C as well as the published 14C dating results and their band counting ages (i.e. calendar ages), this paper discusses the effect of dead carbon on the speleothem 14C dating. The result shows that the fraction of incorporated dead carbon during the formation of speleothem varies. The change in the fraction of dead carbon would result in big deviation in the 14C age of the speleothem. It is indispensable to take the dead carbon into consideration when dating the speleothem using the 14C method or studying the atmospheric 14C concentration during the past with the speleothem.

  6. Laboratory Experiments to Evaluate Matrix Diffusion of Dissolved Organic Carbon Carbon-14 in Southern Nevada Fractured-rock Aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershey, Ronald L. [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Institute; Fereday, Wyatt [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Institute

    2016-05-01

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) carbon-14 (14C) is used to estimate groundwater ages by comparing the DIC 14C content in groundwater in the recharge area to the DIC 14C content in the downgradient sampling point. However, because of chemical reactions and physical processes between groundwater and aquifer rocks, the amount of DIC 14C in groundwater can change and result in 14C loss that is not because of radioactive decay. This loss of DIC 14C results in groundwater ages that are older than the actual groundwater ages. Alternatively, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) 14C in groundwater does not react chemically with aquifer rocks, so DOC 14C ages are generally younger than DIC 14C ages. In addition to chemical reactions, 14C ages may also be altered by the physical process of matrix diffusion. The net effect of a continuous loss of 14C to the aquifer matrix by matrix diffusion and then radioactive decay is that groundwater appears to be older than it actually is. Laboratory experiments were conducted to measure matrix diffusion coefficients for DOC 14C in volcanic and carbonate aquifer rocks from southern Nevada. Experiments were conducted using bromide (Br-) as a conservative tracer and 14C-labeled trimesic acid (TMA) as a surrogate for groundwater DOC. Outcrop samples from six volcanic aquifers and five carbonate aquifers in southern Nevada were used. The average DOC 14C matrix diffusion coefficient for volcanic rocks was 2.9 x 10-7 cm2/s, whereas the average for carbonate rocks was approximately the same at 1.7 x 10-7 cm2/s. The average Br- matrix diffusion coefficient for volcanic rocks was 10.4 x 10-7 cm2/s, whereas the average for carbonate rocks was less at 6.5 x 10-7 cm2/s. Carbonate rocks exhibited greater variability in

  7. An efficient synthesis of carbon-14 labelled vigabatrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, H.S. [Marion Merrell Dow Research Inst., Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Vigabatrin-[6-{sup 14}C] ((R,S)-4-amino-5-hexenoic-[6-{sup 14}C] acid) was synthesized by employing Wittig condensation of 1-(1-butenyl) -2-oxo-5-pyrrolidinecarboxaldehyde with methyl-[{sup 14}C]-triphenyl-phosphonium iodide as the key step. The synthetic sequence involved 3 steps and produced the title compound in 70% overall yield with a radiochemical purity of 100%. (author).

  8. Tracing terrestrial carbon: a novel application of ∆14C in a humic lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keaveney, Evelyn; Reimer, Paula J.; Foy, Robert H.

    2016-04-01

    Lakes play an important yet underrated role in global carbon cycles. Terrestrial carbon (C) is buried and/or remineralised in significant quantities, and lake function may also be affected by catchment inputs with potential feedbacks for regional and global C cycling. Changing deposition chemistry, land use and climate induced impacts on hydrology will affect soil biogeochemistry, terrestrial C export, and hence lake ecology. Autochthonous production in lakes is based on dissolved inorganic C (DIC). DIC in alkaline lakes is partially derived from weathering of carbonaceous bedrock, a proportion of which is 14C-free. The low 14C activity yields an artificial age offset leading samples to appear hundreds to thousands of years older than their actual age. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) can contain terrestrial inputs. The terrestrial inputs can be labile or detrital and their age depends to a first order on their depth in catchment soil/peat stocks. We present a pilot study that uses the radiocarbon (∆14C) method to determine the source of carbon buried in the surface sediment of Lower Lough Erne, a humic, alkaline lake in northwest Ireland. ∆14C, δ13C and δ15N values were measured from phytoplankton and other biota, dissolved inorganic, dissolved organic and particulate organic carbon. A novel radiocarbon method, Stepped Combustion1 was used to estimate the degree of the burial of terrestrial carbon in surface sediment, collected in 2011. The ∆14C values of the low temperature fractions were comparable to algal ∆14C, while the high temperature fractions were 14C-depleted (older than bulk sediment). The ∆14C end-member model indicated that ~64% of carbon in surface sediment was derived from detrital terrestrial carbon. The same proportion of detrital/labile carbon was found in surface sediment of Upper Lough Erne in 2014, despite the differences in lake type and collection date. The use of ∆14C in conjunction with

  9. Determination of tritium and carbon-14 in accelerator waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argentini, M.; Weinreich, R. [Lab. of Radio- and Environmental Chemistry, Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen-PSI (Switzerland)

    2003-07-01

    In dismounted parts of the accelerator facilities of paul scherrer institute, tritium and {sup 14}C were determined by low-level counting after chemical separation. In graphite targets used for the production of {pi}-mesons, tritium amounts from 1.7.10{sup 8} to 6.10{sup 8} Bq/g were found; the corresponding {sup 14}C data were 6 and 9 Ci/g, respectively. In the dismantled copper beam dump of Target E, the tritium content extended up to 2.8.10{sup 6} Bq/g, but no {sup 14}C could be detected. In mechanical parts of the beam dump, consisting of iron and stainless steel, respectively, the tritium amount ranged up to 5.3.10{sup 3} Bq/g, the {sup 14}C amount from 1 to 800 Bq/g. The separation procedures are described in detail. (orig.)

  10. [Quantifying soil autotrophic microbes-assimilated carbon input into soil organic carbon pools following continuous 14C labeling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ran; Chen, Xiao-Juan; Wu, Xiao-Hong; Jian, Yan; Yuan, Hong-Zhao; Ge, Ti-Da; Sui, Fang-Gong; Tong, Cheng-Li; Wu, Jin-Shui

    2013-07-01

    Soil autotrophic microbe has been found numerous and widespread. However, roles of microbial autotrophic processes and the mechanisms of that in the soil carbon sequestration remain poorly understood. Here, we used soils incubated for 110 days in a closed, continuously labeled 14C-CO2 atmosphere to measure the amount of labeled C incorporated into the microbial biomass. The allocation of 14C-labeled assimilated carbon in variable soil C pools such as dissolved organic C (DOC) and microbial biomass C (MBC) were also examined over the 14C labeling span. The results showed that significant amounts of 14C-SOC were measured in paddy soils, which ranged from 69.06-133.81 mg x kg(-1), accounting for 0.58% to 0.92% of the total soil organic carbon (SOC). The amounts of 14C in the dissolved organic C (14C-DOC) and in the microbial biomass C (14C-MBC) were dependent on the soils, ranged from 2.54 to 8.10 mg x kg(-1), 19.50 to 49.16 mg x kg(-1), respectively. There was a significantly positive linear relationship between concentrations of 14C-SOC and 14C-MBC (R2 = 0.957**, P < 0.01). The 14C-DOC and 14C-MBC as proportions of total DOC, MBC, were 5.65%-24.91% and 4.23%-20.02%, respectively. Moreover, the distribution and transformation of microbes-assimilated-derived C had a greater influence on the dynamics of DOC and MBC than that on the dynamics of SOC. These data provide new insights into the importance of microorganisms in the fixation of atmospheric CO2 and of the potentially significant contributions made by microbial autotrophy to terrestrial C cycling.

  11. Determination of Carbon-14 in environmental samples by mixing 14CO{sub 2} with a liquid scintillator; Determinacion de carbono-14 en muestras ambientales por incorporacion de 14CO{sub 2} a un centelleador liquido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, M. R.; Gomez, V.; Heras, M. C.; Beltran, M. A.

    1990-07-01

    A method for the determination of Carbon-14 (14CO2) in environmental samples has been developed. The method use the direct absorption of the carbon dioxide into Carbosorb, followed with incorporation of the mixture (Carbosorb-CO2) to the liquid scintillator. The results obtained to apply this method and the benzene synthesis, usual in our laboratory, are discussed and compared. The method of collection of atmospheric samples is also described. (Author) 10 refs.

  12. Characteristics of 14C and 13C of carbonate aerosols in dust storm events in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing; Jie, Dongmei; Shi, Meinan; Gao, Pan; Shen, Zhenxing; Uchida, Masao; Zhou, Liping; Liu, Kexin; Hu, Ke; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-10-01

    In contrast with its decrease in western China deserts, the dust storm event in eastern China, Korea, and Japan shows an increase in frequency. Although the drylands in northeastern China have been recognized as an important dust source, the relative contributions of dust transport from the drylands and deserts are inconclusive, thus the quantification of dust storm sources in downwind area remains a challenge. We measured the 14C and 13C contents in carbonates of dust samples from six sites in China, which were collected for the duration of dust storm events in drylands, deserts, and urban areas. The δ13C of the dryland dust samples considerably varied in a range of - 9.7 to - 5.0‰, which partly overlapped the desert dust carbonate δ13C ranges. The 14C content of the dryland dust carbonates showed a narrow range of 60.9 ± 4.0 (as an average and 1 SD of five samples) percent modern carbon (pMC), indicating the enrichment of modern carbonate. Dust samples in desert regions contained relatively aged carbonates with the depleting 14C showing of 28.8 ± 3.3 pMC. After the long-range transport of the western China desert dust plume, the carbonates collected at the southern China remained the depletion of 14C (33.5 ± 5.3 pMC) as in the desert regions. On the other hand, the samples of dust storm events at the urban areas of eastern China showed an enrichment of 14C contents (46.2 ± 5.0 pMC, n = 7), which might be explained by the stronger contribution of modern-carbonate-rich dryland dust.

  13. Source and age of carbon in peatland surface waters: new insights from 14C analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billett, Michael; Garnett, Mark; Dinsmore, Kerry; Leith, Fraser

    2013-04-01

    Peatlands are a significant source of carbon to the aquatic environment which is increasingly being recognised as an important flux pathway (both lateral and vertical) in total landscape carbon budgets. Determining the source and age of the carbon (in its various forms) is a key step to understanding the stability of peatland systems as well as the connectivity between the soil carbon pool and the freshwater environment. Novel analytical and sampling methods using molecular sieves have been developed for (1) within-stream, in situ sampling of CO2 in the field and (2) for the removal/separation of CO2 in the laboratory prior to 14C analysis of CH4. Here we present dual isotope (δ13C and 14C) data from freshwater systems in UK and Finnish peatlands to show that significant differences exist in the source and age of CO2, DOC (dissolved organic carbon) and POC (particulate organic carbon). Individual peatlands clearly differ in terms of their isotopic freshwater signature, suggesting that carbon cycling may be "tighter" in some systems compared to others. We have also measured the isotopic signature of different C species in peatland pipes, which appear to be able to tap carbon from different peat depths. This suggests that carbon cycling and transport within "piped-peatlands" may be more complex than previously thought. Some of our most recent work has focussed on the development of a method to measure the 14C component of CH4 in freshwaters. Initial results suggest that CH4 in peatland streams is significantly older than CO2 and derived from a much deeper source. We have also shown that the age (but not the source) of dissolved CO2 changes over the hydrological year in response to seasonal changes in discharge and temperature. Radiocarbon measurements in the peat-riparian-stream system suggest that a significant degree of connectivity exists in terms of C transport and cycling, although the degree of connectivity differs for individual C species. In summary, 14C

  14. Study of a method of detection for natural carbon-14 using a liquid scintillator, recent variations in the natural radio-activity due to artificial carbon-14 (1963); Etude d'une methode de detection du carrons 14 naturel, utilisant un scintillateur liquide - variations recentes de l'activite naturelle dues au carbone 14 artificiel (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leger, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-06-15

    Among the various natural isotopes of carbon, a radioactive isotope, carbon-14, is formed by the action of secondary neutrons from cosmic rays on nitrogen in the air. Until 1950, the concentration of this isotope in ordinary carbon underwent weak fluctuations of about 2-3 per cent. The exact measurement of this concentration 6 X 10{sup 12} Ci/gm of carbon, and of its fluctuations, are difficult and in the first part of this report a highly sensitive method is given using a liquid scintillator. Since 1950 this natural activity has shown large fluctuations because of the carbon-14 formed during nuclear explosions, and in the second part, the evolution in France of this specific activity of carbon in the atmosphere and biosphere is examined. In the last part is studied the local increase in carbon activity in the atmosphere around the Saclay site, an increase caused by the carbon-14 given off as C{sup 14}O{sub 2}, by the reactors cooled partially with exterior air. (author) [French] Parmi les differents isotopes naturels du carbone, un isotope radioactif, le carbone 14, est forme par l'action de neutrons secondaires due aux rayons cosmiques sir l'azote de l'air. Jusqu'en 1950, la concentration de cet isotope dans le carbone ordinaire est soumise a des fluctuations de faible amplitude, de l'ordre de 2 a 3 pour cent. Les mesures precises de cette concentration, 6. 10{sup -12} Ci/g de carbone, et de ses fluctuations sont delicates, et dans la premiere partie de ce rapport, on decrit une methode de detection a grande sensibilite utilisant un scintillateur liquide. Depuis 1950, cette activite naturelle subit des fluctuations importantes dues au carbone 14 forme lors des explosions nucleaires, et dans la seconde partie, on examine l'evolution en France de l'activite specifique du carbone de l'atmosphere et ce la biosphere. Dans la derniere partie, on etudie l'accroissement local de l'activite du carbone de l'air aux

  15. Biobased carbon content of resin extracted from polyethylene composite by carbon-14 concentration measurements using accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Kazuhiro; Kunioka, Masao; Funabashi, Masahiro; Ninomiya, Fumi

    2014-01-01

    An estimation procedure for biobased carbon content of polyethylene composite was studied using carbon-14 ((14)C) concentration ratios as measured by accelerated mass spectrometry (AMS). Prior to the measurement, additives and fillers in composites should be removed because they often contain a large amount of biobased carbon and may shift the estimation. Samples of resin with purity suitable for measurement were isolated from composites with a Soxhlet extractor using heated cyclohexanone. After cooling of extraction solutions, the resin was recovered as a fine semi-crystalline precipitate, which was easily filtered. Recovery rates were almost identical (99%), even for low-density polyethylene and linear low-density polyethylene, which may have lower crystallinity. This procedure could provide a suitable approach for estimation of biobased carbon content by AMS on the basis of the standard ASTM D 6866. The biobased carbon content for resin extracted from polyethylene composites allow for the calculation of biosynthetic polymer content, which is an indicator of mass percentage of the biobased plastic resin in the composite.

  16. Dissolved Organic Carbon 14C in Southern Nevada Groundwater and Implications for Groundwater Travel Times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershey, Ronald L. [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Institute; Fereday, Wyall [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Institute; Thomas, James M [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Institute

    2016-08-01

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) carbon-14 (14C) ages must be corrected for complex chemical and physical reactions and processes that change the amount of 14C in groundwater as it flows from recharge to downgradient areas. Because of these reactions, DIC 14C can produce unrealistically old ages and long groundwater travel times that may, or may not, agree with travel times estimated by other methods. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) 14C ages are often younger than DIC 14C ages because there are few chemical reactions or physical processes that change the amount of DOC 14C in groundwater. However, there are several issues that create uncertainty in DOC 14C groundwater ages including limited knowledge of the initial (A0) DOC 14C in groundwater recharge and potential changes in DOC composition as water moves through an aquifer. This study examines these issues by quantifying A0 DOC 14C in recharge areas of southern Nevada groundwater flow systems and by evaluating changes in DOC composition as water flows from recharge areas to downgradient areas. The effect of these processes on DOC 14C groundwater ages is evaluated and DOC and DIC 14C ages are then compared along several southern Nevada groundwater flow paths. Twenty-seven groundwater samples were collected from springs and wells in southern Nevada in upgradient, midgradient, and downgradient locations. DOC 14C for upgradient samples ranged from 96 to 120 percent modern carbon (pmc) with an average of 106 pmc, verifying modern DOC 14C ages in recharge areas, which decreases uncertainty in DOC 14C A0 values, groundwater ages, and travel times. The HPLC spectra of groundwater along a flow path in the Spring Mountains show the same general pattern indicating that the DOC compound composition does not change along this flow path

  17. The leachability of carbon-14-labelled 3,4-benzopyrene from coal ash into aqueous systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besemer, A.C.; Kanij, J.

    1984-01-01

    The leachability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from coal ash into aqueous systems was studied. Carbon-14-labeled 3,4-Benzopyrene (BaP) was deposited on coal fly ash by adsorption from the liquid phase in quantities of about 10 ??g/g ash. After a thermal treatment in air at 120??C for 2 hours t

  18. Recharge in northern clime calcareous sandy soils: soil water chemical and carbon-14 evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, E. J.; Mozeto, A. A.; Fritz, P.

    1980-11-01

    Chemical analyses were performed on soil water extracted from two cores taken from a sandy calcareous soil near Delhi, Ontario. Calcite saturation is attained within the unsaturated zone over short distances and short periods of time, whereas dolomite undersaturation persists to the groundwater table. The progressive dissolution of dolomite by soil water, within the unsaturated zone, after calcite saturation is reached results in calcite supersaturation. Deposition of iron and manganese oxyhydroxide phases occurs at the carbonate leached/unleached zone boundary. This is a result of soil water neutralization due to carbonate dissolution during infiltration but may also reflect the increased rate of oxidation of dissolved ferrous and manganous ions at higher pH's. The role of bacteria in this process has not been investigated. The depth of the carbonate leached/unleached zone boundary in a calcareous soil has important implications for 14C groundwater dating. The depth of this interface at the study site (-2 m) does not appear to limit 14C diffusion from the root zone to the depth at which carbonate dissolution occurs. Thus, soil water achieves open system isotopic equilibrium with the soil CO 2 gas phase. It is calculated that in soils with similar physical properties to the study soil but with depths of leaching of 5 m or more, complete 14C isotopic equilibration of soil water with soil gas would not occur. Soil water, under these conditions would recharge to the groundwater exhibiting some degree of closed system 14C isotopic evolution.

  19. A Brief Review of the Application of 14C in Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilderson, T; Mcfarlane, K

    2009-10-22

    An over-arching goal of the DOE TCP program is to understand the mechanistic controls over the fate, transport, and residence time of carbon in the terrestrial biosphere. Many of the modern process and modeling studies focus on seasonal to interannual variability. However, much of the carbon on the landscape and in soils is in separate reservoirs with turnover times that are multi-decadal to millennial. It is the controls on these longer term pools or reservoirs that is a critical unknown in the face of rising GHGs and climate change and uncertainties of the terrestrial biosphere as a future global sink or source of atmospheric CO{sub 2} [eg., Friedlingstein et al., 2006; Govindasamy et al., 2005; Thompson et al., 2004]. Radiocarbon measurements, in combination with other data, can provide insight into, and constraints on, terrestrial carbon cycling. Radiocarbon (t{sub 1/2} 5730yrs) is produced naturally in the stratosphere when secondary neutrons generated by cosmic rays collide with {sup 14}N atoms [Libby 1946; Arnold and Libby, 1949]. Upon formation, {sup 14}C is rapidly oxidized to CO and then to CO{sub 2}, and is incorporated into the carbon cycle. Due to anthropogenic activities, the amount of {sup 14}C in the atmosphere doubled in the mid/late 1950s and early 1960s from its preindustrial value of {sup 14}C/{sup 12}C ratio of 1.18 x 10{sup -12} [eg., Nydal and Lovseth, 1983]. Following the atmospheric weapons test ban in 1963, the {sup 14}C/{sup 12}C ratio, has decreased due to the net isotopic exchange between the ocean and terrestrial biosphere [eg., Levin and Hessheimer, 2000] and a dilution effect due to the burning of {sup 14}C-free fossil fuel carbon, the 'Suess Effect' [Suess, 1955]. In the carbon cycle literature, radiocarbon measurements are generally reported as {Delta}{sup 14}C, which includes a correction for mass dependent fractionation [Stuiver and Polach, 1977]. In the context of carbon cycle studies radiocarbon measurements can be

  20. Combustion method for assay of biological materials labeled with carbon-14 or tritium, or double-labeled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, L. G.; Kisieleski, W. E.

    1969-01-01

    Dry catalytic combustion at high temperatures is used for assaying biological materials labeled carbon-14 and tritium, or double-labeled. A modified oxygen-flask technique is combined with standard vacuum-line techniques and includes convenience of direct in-vial collection of final combustion products, giving quantitative recovery of tritium and carbon-14.

  1. Multiphase Carbon-14 Transport in a Near-Field-Scale Unsaturated Column of Natural Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. T. Fox; Mitchell A. Plummer; Larry C. Hull; D. Craig Cooper

    2004-03-01

    Wastes buried at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory include activated metals that release radioactive carbon-14 (14C) as they corrode. To better understand 14C phase partitioning and transport in the SDA sediments, we conducted a series of transport experiments using 14C (radio-labeled sodium carbonate) and nonreactive gas (sulfur hexafluoride) and aqueous (bromide and tritiated water) tracers in a large (2.6-m high by 0.9-m diameter) column of sediments similar to those used as cover material at the SDA. We established steady-state unsaturated flow prior to injecting tracers into the column. Tracer migration was monitored using pore-water and pore-gas samples taken from co-located suction lysimeters and gas ports inserted at ~0.3-m intervals along the column’s length. Measurements of 14C discharged from the sediment to the atmosphere (i.e., 14CO2 flux) indicate a positive correlation between CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) in the column and changes in 14CO2 flux. Though 14CO2 diffusion is expected to be independent of pCO2, changes of pCO2 affect pore water chemistry sufficiently to affect aqueous/gas phase 14C partitioning and consequently 14C2 flux. Pore-water and -gas 14C activity measurements provide an average aqueous/gas partitioning ratio, Kag, of 4.5 (±0.3). This value is consistent with that calculated using standard carbonate equilibrium expressions with measured pH, suggesting the ability to estimate Kag from carbonate equilibrium. One year after the 14C injection, the column was cored and solid-phase 14C activity was measured. The average aqueous/solid partition coefficient, Kd, (1.6 L kg-1) was consistent with those derived from small-scale and short-term batch and column experiments using SDA sediments, suggesting that bench-scale measurements are a valid means of estimating aqueous/solid partitioning at the much larger spatial scale considered in these meso-scale experiments. However

  2. Measurement of pion double charge exchange on carbon-13, carbon-14, magnesium-26, and iron-56

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidl, P.A.

    1985-02-01

    Cross sections for the /sup 13,14/C,/sup 26/Mg,/sup 56/Fe(..pi../sup +/,..pi../sup -/)/sup 13,14/O,/sup 26/Si,/sup 56/Ni reactions were measured with the Energetic Pion Channel and Spectrometer at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility for 120 less than or equal to T/sub ..pi../ less than or equal to 292 MeV and 0 less than or equal to theta less than or equal to 50. The double isobaric analog states (DIAS) are of primary interest. In addition, cross sections for transitions to /sup 14/O(0/sup +/, 5.92 MeV), /sup 14/O(2/sup +/, 7.77 MeV), /sup 56/Ni(gs), /sup 13/O(gs), and /sup 13/O(4.21 MeV) are presented. The /sup 13/O(4.21 MeV) state is postulated to have J/sup ..pi../ = 1/2/sup -/. The data are compared to previously measured double-charge-exchange cross sections on other nuclei, and the systematics of double charge exchange on T greater than or equal to 1 target nuclei leading to the DIAS are studied. Near the ..delta../sub 33/ resonance, cross sections for the DIAS transitions are in disagreement with calculations in which the reaction is treated as sequential charge exchange through the free pion-nucleon amplitude, while for T/sub ..pi../ > 200 MeV the anomalous features of the 164 MeV data are not apparent. This is evidence for significant higher order contributions to the double-charge-exchange amplitude near the reasonable energy. Two theoretical approaches that include two nucleon processes are applied to the DIAS data. 64 references.

  3. Carbon-14 in neutron-irradiated graphite for graphite-moderated reactors. Joint research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Kimio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Matsuo, Hideto [Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Technology Center, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    The graphite moderated gas cooled reactor operated by the Japan Atomic Power Company was stopped its commercial operation on March 1998, and the decommissioning process has been started. Graphite material is often used as the moderator and the reflector materials in the core of the gas cooled reactor. During the operation, a long life nuclide of {sup 14}C is generated in the graphite by several transmutation reactions. Separation of {sup 14}C isotope and the development of the separation method have been recognized to be critical issues for the decommissioning of the reactor core. To understand the current methodologies for the carbon isotope separation, literature on the subject was surveyed. Also, those on the physical and chemical behavior of {sup 14}C were surveyed. This is because the larger part of the nuclides in the graphite is produced from {sup 14}N by (n,p) reaction, and the location of them in the material tends to be different from those of the other carbon atoms. This report summarizes the result of survey on the open literature about the behavior of {sup 14}C and the separation methods, including the list of the literature on these subjects. (author)

  4. Impact of carbon nanomaterials on the behaviour of {sup 14}C-phenanthrene and {sup 14}C-benzo-[a] pyrene in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Towell, Marcie G.; Browne, Lesley A. [Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom); Paton, Graeme I. [Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UU (United Kingdom); Semple, Kirk T., E-mail: k.semple@lancaster.ac.uk [Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-15

    The impact of fullerene soot (FS), single-walled (SWCNTs) and multi-walled (MWCNTs) carbon nanotubes on the behaviour of two {sup 14}C-PAHs in sterile soil was investigated. Different concentrations of carbon nanomaterials (0, 0.05, 0.1 and 0.5%) were added to soil, and {sup 14}C-phenanthrene and {sup 14}C-benzo[a]pyrene extractability assessed over 80 d through dichloromethane (DCM) and hydroxypropyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin (HPCD) shake extractions. Total {sup 14}C-PAH activity in soils was determined by combustion, and mineralisation of {sup 14}C-phenanthrene was monitored over 14 d, using a catabolically active pseudomonad inoculum. No significant loss of {sup 14}C-PAH-associated activity from CNM-amended soils was observed over the 'aging' period. CNMs had a significant impact on HPCD-extractability of {sup 14}C-PAHS; extractability decreased with increasing CNM concentration. Additionally, {sup 14}C-phenanthrene mineralisation was inhibited by the presence of CNMs at concentrations of {>=}0.05%. Differences in overall extents of {sup 14}C-mineralisation were also apparent between CNM types. It is suggested the addition of CNMs to soil can reduce PAH extractability and bioaccessibility, with PAH sorption to CNMs influenced by CNM type and concentration. - Research highlights: > Carbon nanoparticles reduce the extractability of PAHs in soil. > Carbon nanoparticles reduce the bioaccessibility of PAHs in soil. > Nanoparticle type is important in controlling the behaviour of PAHs in soil. > Nanoparticle concentration is important in controlling the behaviour of PAHs in soil - Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) can alter the extractability, bioaccessibility and microbial mineralisation of PAHs in soil.

  5. Modelling of dead carbon fraction in speleothems: a step towards reliable speleothem 14C-chronologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechleitner, Franziska A.; Jamieson, Robert A.; McIntyre, Cameron; Baldini, Lisa M.; Baldini, James U. L.; Eglinton, Timothy I.

    2015-04-01

    Over the past two decades, speleothems have become one of the most versatile and promising archives for the study of past continental climate. Very precise absolute dating is often possible using the U-Th method, resulting in paleoclimate records of exceptional resolution and accuracy. However, not all speleothems are amenable to this dating method for a variety of reasons (e.g. low U concentrations, high detrital Th etc). This has lead researchers to exclude many otherwise suitable speleothems and cave sites from further investigation. 14C-dating of speleothems has so far not been applicable, due to the 'dead carbon' problem. As drip water percolates through the karst, dissolving CaCO3, a variable amount of 14C-dead carbon is added to the solution. This results in a temporally variable and site-specific reservoir effect, ultimately undermining the development of speleothem 14C -chronologies. However, a number of recent studies have shown a clear link between karst hydrology and associated proxies (e.g., Mg/Ca and δ13C) and this 'dead carbon fraction' (DCF). We take advantage of this relationship to model DCF and its changes using Mg/Ca, δ13C and 14C data from published speleothem records. Using one record for calibration purposes, we build a transfer function for the DCF in relation to δ13C and Mg/Ca, which we then apply to other 14C records. Initial model results are promising; we are able to reconstruct general long-term average DCF within uncertainties of the calculated DCF from the U-Th chronology. Large shifts in DCF related to hydrology are also often detected. In a second step, we apply the model to a speleothem from southern Poland, which so far could not be dated, due to very low U-concentrations. To construct a 14C chronology, the stalagmite was sampled at 5 mm intervals. CaCO3 powders were graphitized and measured by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (MICADAS) at ETH Zurich. Additional high-resolution (0.1 mm/sample) 14C measurements were performed on

  6. LIMITED OXIDATION OF IRRADIATED GRAPHITE WASTE TO REMOVE SURFACE CARBON-14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TARA E. SMITH

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Large quantities of irradiated graphite waste from graphite-moderated nuclear reactors exist and are expected to increase in the case of High Temperature Reactor (HTR deployment [1,2]. This situation indicates the need for a graphite waste management strategy. Of greatest concern for long-term disposal of irradiated graphite is carbon-14 (14C, with a half-life of 5730 years. Fachinger et al. [2] have demonstrated that thermal treatment of irradiated graphite removes a significant fraction of the 14C, which tends to be concentrated on the graphite surface. During thermal treatment, graphite surface carbon atoms interact with naturally adsorbed oxygen complexes to create COx gases, i.e. “gasify” graphite. The effectiveness of this process is highly dependent on the availability of adsorbed oxygen compounds. The quantity and form of adsorbed oxygen complexes in pre- and post-irradiated graphite were studied using Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS in an effort to better understand the gasification process and to apply that understanding to process optimization. Adsorbed oxygen fragments were detected on both irradiated and unirradiated graphite; however, carbon-oxygen bonds were identified only on the irradiated material. This difference is likely due to a large number of carbon active sites associated with the higher lattice disorder resulting from irradiation. Results of XPS analysis also indicated the potential bonding structures of the oxygen fragments removed during surface impingement. Ester- and carboxyl- like structures were predominant among the identified oxygen-containing fragments. The indicated structures are consistent with those characterized by Fanning and Vannice [3] and later incorporated into an oxidation kinetics model by El-Genk and Tournier [4]. Based on the predicted desorption mechanisms of carbon oxides from the identified compounds, it is expected that a

  7. Analytical Validation of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Pharmaceutical Development: the Measurement of Carbon-14 Isotope Ratio.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keck, B D; Ognibene, T; Vogel, J S

    2010-02-05

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an isotope based measurement technology that utilizes carbon-14 labeled compounds in the pharmaceutical development process to measure compounds at very low concentrations, empowers microdosing as an investigational tool, and extends the utility of {sup 14}C labeled compounds to dramatically lower levels. It is a form of isotope ratio mass spectrometry that can provide either measurements of total compound equivalents or, when coupled to separation technology such as chromatography, quantitation of specific compounds. The properties of AMS as a measurement technique are investigated here, and the parameters of method validation are shown. AMS, independent of any separation technique to which it may be coupled, is shown to be accurate, linear, precise, and robust. As the sensitivity and universality of AMS is constantly being explored and expanded, this work underpins many areas of pharmaceutical development including drug metabolism as well as absorption, distribution and excretion of pharmaceutical compounds as a fundamental step in drug development. The validation parameters for pharmaceutical analyses were examined for the accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of {sup 14}C/C ratio, independent of chemical separation procedures. The isotope ratio measurement was specific (owing to the {sup 14}C label), stable across samples storage conditions for at least one year, linear over 4 orders of magnitude with an analytical range from one tenth Modern to at least 2000 Modern (instrument specific). Further, accuracy was excellent between 1 and 3 percent while precision expressed as coefficient of variation is between 1 and 6% determined primarily by radiocarbon content and the time spent analyzing a sample. Sensitivity, expressed as LOD and LLOQ was 1 and 10 attomoles of carbon-14 (which can be expressed as compound equivalents) and for a typical small molecule labeled at 10% incorporated with {sup 14}C corresponds to 30 fg

  8. Synthesis of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon marked with carbon-14: (b, d e f) dibenzo-chrysene {sup 14}C-7,14; Synthese d'un hydrocarbure aromatique polycyclique marque au carbone 14: le dibenzo (b, d e f) chrysene {sup 14}C-7,14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatelain, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    (b, d e f) dibenzo-chrysene C-7,14 has been synthesized from radioactive carbon dioxide and the organic magnesium compound derived from 1,5 dibromo naphthalene. The product has been purified by a very precise series of fractionated chromatographs on alumina having a chromatographic activity. This has necessitated the development of a special technique. (author) [French] Le dibenzo (b, d e f) chrysene 14C-7,14 a ete synthetise au depart de gaz carbonique radioactif et de bis-organomagnesien derive du dibromo-1,5 naphtalene. Le produit a ete purifie par une serie de chromatographies fractionnees sur alumine d'activite chromatographique tres precise. Ceci a fait l'objet d'une mise au point de technique. (auteur)

  9. Multimolecular tracers of terrestrial carbon transfer across the pan-Arctic : 14C characteristics of sedimentary carbon components and their environmental controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feng, Xiaojuan; Gustafsson, Örjan; Holmes, R. Max; Vonk, Jorien E.; Van Dongen, Bart E.; Semiletov, Igor P.; Dudarev, Oleg V.; Yunker, Mark B.; Macdonald, Robie W.; Wacker, Lukas; Montluçon, Daniel B.; Eglinton, Timothy I.

    2015-01-01

    Distinguishing the sources, ages, and fate of various terrestrial organic carbon (OC) pools mobilized from heterogeneous Arctic landscapes is key to assessing climatic impacts on the fluvial release of carbon from permafrost. Through molecular 14C measurements, including novel analyses of suberin- a

  10. Synthesis of {delta}-aminolevulic acid. Application to the introduction of carbon-14 and of tritium; Syntheses de l'acide {delta} aminolevulique. Application a l'introduction de carbone 14 et de tritium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loheac, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-06-01

    Several new syntheses of {delta} aminolevulic acid ({delta} A.L.A.) have been studied. {sup 14}C-4 {delta} - aminolevulic acid has been obtained from {sup 14}C allylacetic carboxylic acid with a yield of 30 per cent with respect to barium carbonate and with a specific activity of 32 mCi/mM. The {sup 14}C-1 or {sup 14}C-2 {delta}-A.L.A. has been prepared from the {sup 14}C-1 or {sup 14}C-2 acetate with a yield of 55 per cent with respect to the acetate. Finally the tritiated {delta}-A.L.A. has been obtained for the first time by tritiation of ethyl phthalimidodehydrolevulate. (author) [French] Plusieurs syntheses nouvelles de l'acide {delta}-aminolevulique ont ete etudiees. L'acide {delta}-aminolevulique {sup 14}C-4 a ete obtenu a partir d'acide allylacetique carboxylique {sup 14}C, avec un rendement global de 30 pour cent par rapport au carbonate de baryum a une activite specifique de 32 mCi/M. Le {delta}-A.A.L. {sup 14}C-1 ou {sup 14}C-2 a ete obtenu a partir d'acetate {sup 14}C-1 ou {sup 14}C-2 avec un rendement de 55 pour cent par rapport a l'acetate. Enfin le {delta}-A.A.L. tritie a ete obtenu pour la premiere fois par tritiation du phtalimidodehydrolevulate d'ethyle. (auteur)

  11. Synthesis, Characterization, and Biodegradation Studies of Poly(1,4-cyclohexanedimethylene-adipate-carbonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay S. Chandure

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aliphatic/alicyclic poly(1,4-cyclohexanedimethylene-adipate-carbonates (PCACs were synthesized by a transesterification from 1,4-cyclohexamethylendimethanol (1,4-CHDM, adipic acid (AA, diethyl carbonate (DEC, and titanium butoxide Ti(OBu4 as a transesterification catalyst. The synthesized PCACs were characterized by the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD, solubility, solution viscosity, gel permeation chromatography (GPC, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and scanning electron microscope (SEM for their structural, physical, thermal, and morphological investigation. The structure of synthesized PCACs was confirmed by FTIR. All TGA curves of PCACs shows 10% weight loss above 270°C, and they reveal good thermal stability. Biodegradability of PCACs was investigated by hydrolytic degradation at (pH 7.2 and 11.5, enzymatic degradation using Rhizopus delemar lips at 37°C in phosphate buffer solution (PBS, and soil burial degradation at 30°C. The hydrolytic degradation shows the greater rate of weight loss in PBS at pH-11.5 than pH-7.2. The hydrolytic and soil burial degradation shows faster rate of weight loss as compared to enzymatic degradation. Biodegradation rate of PCACs follows the order: PCAC-20 > PCAC-40 > PCAC-60. SEM images show that degradation occurred all over the film surface, creating holes and cracks. These biodegradable PCACs may be able to replace conventional polymer in the fabrication of packaging film in near future.

  12. A study of the carbon dynamics of Japanese grassland and forest using 14C and 13C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuno, Kazumi; Miyairi, Yosuke; Tamura, Kenji; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Kenji

    2010-04-01

    We quantified the carbon contents of grassland and forest soil using conventional methods and studied the changes in their dynamics by measuring δ 13C and Δ 14C. Soil samples were taken from a neighboring Miscanthus sinensis grassland and Pinus densiflora forest in central Japan. Both had been maintained as grassland until the 1960s, when the latter was abandoned and became a pine forest by natural succession. The soil carbon content of the forest was much lower than that of the grassland, implying that the soil carbon decreased as the grassland became forest. The δ 13C values were very similar in the grassland and forest, at approximately -20‰, suggesting that M. sinensis (a C4 plant) contributed to carbon storage, whereas there was little carbon accumulation from P. densiflora (a C3 plant) in forest soil. The Δ 14C values and calculated soil carbon mean residence time (MRT) showed that the soil carbon in the upper A horizon was older, and that in the lower A horizon was younger in forest than in grassland. From these results, we conclude that young, fast-MRT soil carbon is decomposed in the upper A horizon, and old, stable soil carbon was decomposed in the lower A horizon after the pine invasion.

  13. A study of the carbon dynamics of Japanese grassland and forest using {sup 14}C and {sup 13}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsuno, Kazumi, E-mail: katsuno@nenv.k.u-tokyo.ac.j [University of Tokyo, Department of Natural Environmental Studies, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, 5-1-5, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Miyairi, Yosuke [University of Tokyo, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Tamura, Kenji [University of Tsukuba, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, 1-1-1 Tennnodai, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki [University of Tokyo, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Fukuda, Kenji [University of Tokyo, Department of Natural Environmental Studies, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, 5-1-5, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    We quantified the carbon contents of grassland and forest soil using conventional methods and studied the changes in their dynamics by measuring delta{sup 13}C and DELTA{sup 14}C. Soil samples were taken from a neighboring Miscanthus sinensis grassland and Pinus densiflora forest in central Japan. Both had been maintained as grassland until the 1960s, when the latter was abandoned and became a pine forest by natural succession. The soil carbon content of the forest was much lower than that of the grassland, implying that the soil carbon decreased as the grassland became forest. The delta{sup 13}C values were very similar in the grassland and forest, at approximately -20 per mille , suggesting that M. sinensis (a C4 plant) contributed to carbon storage, whereas there was little carbon accumulation from P. densiflora (a C3 plant) in forest soil. The DELTA{sup 14}C values and calculated soil carbon mean residence time (MRT) showed that the soil carbon in the upper A horizon was older, and that in the lower A horizon was younger in forest than in grassland. From these results, we conclude that young, fast-MRT soil carbon is decomposed in the upper A horizon, and old, stable soil carbon was decomposed in the lower A horizon after the pine invasion.

  14. SCP06F6: A carbon-rich extragalactic transient at redshift z~0.14

    CERN Document Server

    Gänsicke, B T; Marsh, T R; Wheatley, P J

    2008-01-01

    We show that the spectrum of the unusual transient SCP06F6 is consistent with emission from a cool, carbon-rich atmosphere at a redshift of z~0.14. The extragalactic nature of the transient rules out novae, shell flashes, and V838 Mon-like events as cause of the observed brightening. The distance to SCP 06F6 implies a peak magnitude of M_I~-18, in the regime of supernovae. The morphology of the light curve of SCP 06F6 around the peak in brightness resembles the slowly evolving TypeII supernovae SN 1994Y and SN 2006 gy. We further report the detection of an X-ray source co-incident with SCP 06F6 in a target of opportunity XMM-Newton observation made during the declining phase of the transient. The X-ray luminosity of L_X~(5+-1)x10^42 erg/s is two orders of magnitude higher than observed to date from supernovae. If related to a supernova event, SCP 06F6 would define a new class. An alternative, though less likely, scenario is the tidal disruption of a carbon-rich star.

  15. The application of carbon-14 analyses to the source apportionment of atmospheric carbonaceous particulate matter: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heal, Mathew R

    2014-01-01

    Organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) together constitute a substantial proportion of airborne particulate matter (PM). Insight into the sources of this major contributor to PM is important for policies to mitigate the impact of PM on human health and climate change. In recent years measurement of the abundance of the radioisotope of carbon ((14)C) in samples of PM by accelerator mass spectrometry has been used to help quantify the relative contributions from sources of fossil carbon and contemporary carbon. This review provides an introduction to the different sources of carbon within PM and the role of (14)C measurements, a description of the preparation of PM samples and of the instrumentation used to quantify (14)C, and a summary of the results and source apportionment methods reported in published studies since 2004. All studies report a sizable fraction of the carbonaceous PM as of non-fossil origin. Even for PM collected in urban locations, the proportions of non-fossil carbon generally exceed 30%; typically the proportion in urban background locations is around 40-60% depending on the local influence of biomass burning. Where values have been measured directly, proportions of non-fossil carbon in EC are lower than in OC, reflecting the greater contribution of fossil-fuel combustion to EC and the generally small sources of contemporary EC. Detailed source apportionment studies point to important contributions from biogenic-derived secondary OC, consistent with other evidence of a ubiquitous presence of heavily oxidized background secondary OC. The review concludes with some comments on current issues and future prospects, including progress towards compound-class and individual-compound-specific (14)C analyses.

  16. Towards a global understanding of vertical soil carbon dynamics: meta-analysis of soil 14C data

    Science.gov (United States)

    hatte, C.; Balesdent, J.; Guiot, J.

    2012-12-01

    Soil represents the largest terrestrial storage mechanism for atmospheric carbon from photosynthesis, with estimates ranging from 1600 Pg C within the top 1 meter to 2350 Pg C for the top 3 meters. These values are at least 2.5 times greater than atmospheric C pools. Small changes in soil organic carbon storage could result in feedback to atmospheric CO2 and the sensitivity of soil organic matter to changes in temperature, and precipitation remains a critical area of research with respect to the global carbon cycle. As an intermediate storage mechanism for organic material through time, the vertical profile of carbon generally shows an age continuum with depth. Radiocarbon provides critical information for understanding carbon exchanges between soils and atmosphere, and within soil layers. Natural and "bomb" radiocarbon has been used to demonstrate the importance and nature of the soil carbon response to climatic and human impacts on decadal to millennial timescales. Radiocarbon signatures of bulk, or chemically or physically fractionated soil, or even of specific organic compounds, offer one of the only ways to infer terrestrial carbon turnover times or test ecosystem carbon models. We compiled data from the literature on radiocarbon distribution on soil profiles and characterized each study according to the following categories: soil type, analyzed organic fraction, location (latitude, longitude, elevation), climate (temperature, precipitation), land use and sampling year. Based on the compiled data, soil carbon 14C profiles were reconstructed for each of the 226 sites. We report here partial results obtained by statistical analyses of portion of this database, i.e. bulk and bulk-like organic matter and sampling year posterior to 1980. We highlight here 14C vertical pattern in relationship with external parameters (climate, location and land use).

  17. Multimolecular tracers of terrestrial carbon transfer across the pan-Arctic: 14C characteristics of sedimentary carbon components and their environmental controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaojuan; Gustafsson, Örjan; Holmes, R. Max; Vonk, Jorien E.; Dongen, Bart E.; Semiletov, Igor P.; Dudarev, Oleg V.; Yunker, Mark B.; Macdonald, Robie W.; Wacker, Lukas; Montluçon, Daniel B.; Eglinton, Timothy I.

    2015-11-01

    Distinguishing the sources, ages, and fate of various terrestrial organic carbon (OC) pools mobilized from heterogeneous Arctic landscapes is key to assessing climatic impacts on the fluvial release of carbon from permafrost. Through molecular 14C measurements, including novel analyses of suberin- and/or cutin-derived diacids (DAs) and hydroxy fatty acids (FAs), we compared the radiocarbon characteristics of a comprehensive suite of terrestrial markers (including plant wax lipids, cutin, suberin, lignin, and hydroxy phenols) in the sedimentary particles from nine major arctic and subarctic rivers in order to establish a benchmark assessment of the mobilization patterns of terrestrial OC pools across the pan-Arctic. Terrestrial lipids, including suberin-derived longer-chain DAs (C24,26,28), plant wax FAs (C24,26,28), and n-alkanes (C27,29,31), incorporated significant inputs of aged carbon, presumably from deeper soil horizons. Mobilization and translocation of these "old" terrestrial carbon components was dependent on nonlinear processes associated with permafrost distributions. By contrast, shorter-chain (C16,18) DAs and lignin phenols (as well as hydroxy phenols in rivers outside eastern Eurasian Arctic) were much more enriched in 14C, suggesting incorporation of relatively young carbon supplied by runoff processes from recent vegetation debris and surface layers. Furthermore, the radiocarbon content of terrestrial markers is heavily influenced by specific OC sources and degradation status. Overall, multitracer molecular 14C analysis sheds new light on the mobilization of terrestrial OC from arctic watersheds. Our findings of distinct ages for various terrestrial carbon components may aid in elucidating fate of different terrestrial OC pools in the face of increasing arctic permafrost thaw.

  18. Distribution and Biomarker of Carbon-14 Labeled Fullerene C60 ([14C(U)]C60) in Pregnant and Lactating Rats and their Offspring after Maternal Intravenous Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Rodney W.; Fennell, Timothy R.; Wingard, Christopher J.; Mortensen, Ninell P.; Holland, Nathan A.; Shannahan, Jonathan H.; Pathmasiri, Wimal; Lewin, Anita H.; Sumner, Susan C. J.

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive distribution study was conducted in pregnant and lactating rats exposed to a suspension of uniformly carbon-14 labeled C60 ([14C(U)]C60). Rats were administered [14C(U)]C60 (~0.2 mg [14C(U)]C60/kg body weight) or 5% polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-saline vehicle via a single tail vein injection. Pregnant rats were injected on gestation day (GD) 11 (terminated with fetuses after either 24h or 8d), GD15 (terminated after 24h or 4d), or GD18 (terminated after 24h). Lactating rats were injected on postnatal day 8 and terminated after 24h, 3d or 11d. The distribution of radioactivity in pregnant dams was influenced by both the state of pregnancy and time of termination after exposure. The percentage of recovered radioactivity in pregnant and lactating rats was highest in liver and lungs. Radioactivity was quantitated in over 20 tissues. Radioactivity was found in placenta and in fetuses of pregnant dams, and in the milk of lactating rats and in pups. Elimination of radioactivity was <2% in urine and feces at each time point. Radioactivity remained in blood circulation up to 11 days after [14C(U)]C60 exposure. Biomarkers of inflammation, cardiovascular injury and oxidative stress were measured to study the biological impacts of [14C(U)]C60 exposure. Oxidative stress were elevated in female pups of exposed dams. Metabolomics analysis of urine showed that [14C(U)]C60 exposure to pregnant rats impacted the pathways of vitamin B, regulation of lipid and sugar metabolism and aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis. This study demonstrated that [14C(U)]C60 crosses the placenta at all stages of pregnancy examined, and is transferred to pups via milk. PMID:26081520

  19. Preparation of {sup 14}C-Labeled Multi-walled Carbon Nano-tubes for Biodistribution Investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgin, D.; Czarny, B.; Botquin, M.; Mayne-L' Hermite, M.; Pinault, M.; Bouchet-Fabre, B.; Carriere, M.; Poncy, J.L.; Chau, Q.; Maximilien, R.; Dive, V.; Taran, F. [CEA, IBITECS, SCBM, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); CEA, IBITECS, SIMOPRO, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (FR); CEA, IRAMIS, SPAM, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (FR); CEA, IRAMIS, SCM, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (FR); CEA, IRCM, SREIT, 91680 Bruyeres le Chatel (FR)

    2009-07-01

    A new method allowing the {sup 14}C-labeling of carboxylic acid functions of carbon nano-tubes is described. The key step of the labeling process is a de-carbonylation reaction that has been developed and optimized with the help of a screening method. The optimized process has been successfully applied to multi-walled carbon nano-tubes (MWNTs), and the corresponding {sup 14}C-labeled nano-tubes were used to investigate their in vivo behavior. Preliminary results obtained after i.v. contamination of rats revealed liver as the main target organ. Radiolabeling of NTs with a long-life radioactive nucleus like {sup 14}C, coupled to a highly sensitive autoradiographic method, that provides a unique detection threshold, will make it possible to determine for a long time period whether or not NTs remain in any organs after animal exposure. (authors)

  20. Carbon 14 dating: recent progress and limits of the method; Le carbone 14: progres recents et limitations de la methode de datation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duplessy, J.C.; Arnold, M.; Cortijo, E.; Labeyrie, L.; Laj, C.; Lehman, B.; Mazaud, A.; Paterne, M.; Tisnerat, N.; Vidal, L. [Centre des Faibles Radioactivites, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Laboratoire mixte CNRS-CEA; Bard, E. [Aix-Marseille-3 Univ., 13 - Marseille (France). Cerese

    1998-12-31

    Significant progress has been made in calibrating the radiocarbon time scale. The increasing number and accuracy of {sup 14}C measurements has documented inconsistencies between the calendar age f an object and its {sup 14}C age. These inconsistencies are best explained by changes in {sup 14}C production due to variations of solar activity and/or changes of the geomagnetic field intensity. In this paper, we illustrate some recent results derived from the high resolution results of marine paleo-climatologists. Special emphasis will be made on two topics, abrupt climatic change and preliminary results of the extension of the radiocarbon time scale to 30,000 years before present, both of which open new research ways for the future. (author) 35 refs.

  1. Validation of a simplified carbon-14-urea breath test for routine use for detecting Helicobacter pylori noninvasively

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henze, E.; Malfertheiner, P.; Clausen, M.; Burkhardt, H.; Adam, W.E. (Univ. of Ulm (West Germany))

    1990-12-01

    A carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) urea breath test for detecting Helicobacter pylori with multiple breath sampling was developed. Carbon-14-urea (110 kBq) administered orally to 18 normal subjects and to 82 patients with Helicobacter infection. The exhaled {sup 14}C-labeled CO{sub 2} was trapped at 10-min intervals for 90 min. The total {sup 14}C activity exhaled over 90 min was integrated and expressed in %activity of the total dose given. In normals, a mean of 0.59% +/- 0.24% was measured, resulting in an upper limit of normal of 1.07%. In 82 patients, a sensitivity of 90.2%, a specificity of 83.8%, and a positive predictive value of 90.2% was found. The single probes at intervals of 40-60 min correlated best with the integrated result, with r ranging from 0.986 to 0.990. The test's diagnostic accuracy did not change at all when reevaluated with the 40-, 50-, or 60-min sample data alone. Thus, the {sup 14}C-urea breath test can be applied routinely as a noninvasive, low-cost and one-sample test with high diagnostic accuracy in detecting Helicobacter pylori colonization.

  2. Evaluation of two decomposition schemes in Earth System Models against LIDET, C14 observations and global soil carbon maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciuto, D. M.; Yang, X.; Thornton, P. E.

    2015-12-01

    Soils contain the largest pool of carbon in terrestrial ecosystems. Soil carbon dynamics and associated nutrient dynamics play significant roles in regulating global carbon cycle and atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Our capability to predict future climate change depends to a large extent on a well-constrained representation of soil carbon dynamics in ESMs. Here we evaluate two decomposition schemes - converging trophic cascade (CTC) and Century - in CLM4.5/ACME V0 using data from the long-term intersite decomposition experiment team (LIDET), radiocarbon (14C) observations, and Harmonized World Soil Database (HWSD). For the evaluation against LIDET, We exercise the full CLM4.5/ ACME V0 land model, including seasonal variability in nitrogen limitation and environmental scalars (temperature, moisture, O2), in order to represent LIDET experiment in a realistic way. We show that the proper design of model experiments is crucial to model evaluation using data from field experiments such as LIDET. We also use 14C profile data at 10 sites to evaluate the performance of CTC and CENTURY decomposition scheme. We find that the 14C profiles at these sites are most sensitive to the depth dependent decomposition parameters, consistent with previous studies.

  3. Coprecipitation of {sup 14}C and Sr with carbonate precipitates: The importance of reaction kinetics and recrystallization pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodkin, David J. [School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Stewart, Douglas I. [School of Civil Engineering, University of Leeds (United Kingdom); Graham, James T. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Sellafield, Cumbria (United Kingdom); Burke, Ian T., E-mail: I.T.Burke@leeds.ac.uk [School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    This study investigated the simultaneous removal of Sr{sup 2+} and {sup 14}CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} from pH > 12 Ca(OH){sub 2} solution by the precipitation of calcium carbonate. Initial Ca{sup 2+}:CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} ratios ranged from 10:1 to 10:100 (mM:mM). Maximum removal of {sup 14}C and Sr{sup 2+} both occurred in the system containing 10 mM Ca{sup 2+} and 1 mM CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} (99.7% and 98.6% removal respectively). A kinetic model is provided that describes {sup 14}C and Sr removal in terms of mineral dissolution and precipitation reactions. The removal of {sup 14}C was achieved during the depletion of the initial TIC in solution, and was subsequently significantly affected by recrystallization of the calcite precipitate from an elongate to isotropic morphology. This liberated > 46% of the {sup 14}C back to solution. Sr{sup 2+} removal occurred as Ca{sup 2+} became depleted in solution and was not significantly affected by the recrystallization process. The proposed reaction could form the basis for low cost remediation scheme for {sup 90}Sr and {sup 14}C in radioactively contaminated waters (<$0.25 reagent cost per m{sup 3} treated). - Highlights: • 99.7% of {sup 14}C and 98.6% of Sr removed from aqueous solution by CaCO{sub 3} precipitation. • Remobilization of {sup 14}C observed during calcium carbonate recrystallization. • Sr displayed variable distribution coefficient (possibly affected by Ca:Sr ratio). • Reagent cost of $0.22/m{sup 3} of treated groundwater.

  4. Biochar, activated carbon, and carbon nanotubes have different effects on fate of 14C-catechol and microbial community in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Jun; Ji, Rong; Yu, Yongjie; Xie, Zubin; Yan, Xiaoyuan

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of biochar, activated carbon (AC)-, and single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs) in various concentrations (0, 0.2, 20, and 2,000 mg/kg dry soil) on the fate of 14C-catechol and microbial community in soil. The results showed that biochar had no effect on the mineralization of 14C-catechol, whereas AC at all amendment rates and SWCNTs at 2,000 mg/kg significantly reduced mineralization. Particularly, MWCNTs at 0.2 mg/kg significantly stimulated mineralization compared with the control soil. The inhibitory effects of AC and SWCNTs on the mineralization were attributed to the inhibited soil microbial activities and the shifts in microbial communities, as suggested by the reduced microbial biomass C and the separated phylogenetic distance. In contrast, the stimulatory effects of MWCNTs on the mineralization were attributed to the selective stimulation of specific catechol-degraders by MWCNTs at 0.2 mg/kg. Only MWCNTs amendments and AC at 2,000 mg/kg significantly changed the distribution of 14C residues within the fractions of humic substances. Our findings suggest biochar, AC, SWCNTs and MWCNTs have different effects on the fate of 14C-catechol and microbial community in soil.

  5. Biochar, activated carbon, and carbon nanotubes have different effects on fate of (14)C-catechol and microbial community in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Jun; Ji, Rong; Yu, Yongjie; Xie, Zubin; Yan, Xiaoyuan

    2015-10-30

    This study investigated the effects of biochar, activated carbon (AC)-, and single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs) in various concentrations (0, 0.2, 20, and 2,000 mg/kg dry soil) on the fate of (14)C-catechol and microbial community in soil. The results showed that biochar had no effect on the mineralization of (14)C-catechol, whereas AC at all amendment rates and SWCNTs at 2,000 mg/kg significantly reduced mineralization. Particularly, MWCNTs at 0.2 mg/kg significantly stimulated mineralization compared with the control soil. The inhibitory effects of AC and SWCNTs on the mineralization were attributed to the inhibited soil microbial activities and the shifts in microbial communities, as suggested by the reduced microbial biomass C and the separated phylogenetic distance. In contrast, the stimulatory effects of MWCNTs on the mineralization were attributed to the selective stimulation of specific catechol-degraders by MWCNTs at 0.2 mg/kg. Only MWCNTs amendments and AC at 2,000 mg/kg significantly changed the distribution of (14)C residues within the fractions of humic substances. Our findings suggest biochar, AC, SWCNTs and MWCNTs have different effects on the fate of (14)C-catechol and microbial community in soil.

  6. Validation of ten-minute single sample carbon-14 urea breath test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabakaran, K.; Fernandes, V.; McDonald, J. [Illawarra Regional Hospital, Wollongong, NSW (Australia). Depts of Nuclear Medicine and Gastroenterology

    1996-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is traditionally diagnosed by endoscopy followed by gastric biopsy and histologic demonstration of organisms, rapid urease test and culture. The non-invasive carbon-14-urea breath test has been widely accepted now for the diagnosis of this bacterium. This study was aimed to establish and validate normal and abnormal values for an Australian population, for a single sample carbon-14-urea breath test at ten minutes. A dose of 185 kBq was used in order to achieve reasonable counting statistics. The derived values were validated with the results of the rapid urease test. This method has a high sensitivity, specificity and greater patient acceptance, and could be used in many clinical settings as the first modality for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection and for documenting response or cure after antibiotic therapy for eradication. 11 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  7. Spatiotemporal transfer of carbon-14-labelled photosynthate from ectomycorrhizal Pinus densiflora seedlings to extraradical mycelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bingyun; Nara, Kazuhide; Hogetsu, Taizo

    2002-04-01

    Seedlings of Pinus densiflora colonized by an unidentified ectomycorrhizal fungus (T01) were labelled photosynthetically with 14C. Movement of 14C-labelled photosynthates within the underground part of the seedlings was investigated by temporal autoradiography using an imaging plate. Within 1 day, 14C was transferred from the shoot to the underground part that included roots, mycorrhizae, and the extraradical mycelium; within 3 days, the 14C in the underground part reached its maximum density. Mycorrhizae and actively growing root tips were large C sinks. Three days after 14C labelling, counts of 14C radioactivity in the underground part of the mycorrhizal seedlings were 2.6 times those of nonmycorrhizal seedlings. The mycorrhizae of mycorrhizal plants accumulated 5.2 times the 14C counts in the short-root tips of nonmycorrhizal plants. 14C counts in various areas of the extraradical mycelium demonstrated that all 14C-photosynthate transfer from the host root to the extraradical mycelium occurred within 3 days after 14C labelling, and that there was only a short lag of < 1 day between 14C accumulation in the basal and distal parts of the mycelium. Although more 14C accumulated in the distal than in the basal parts, 14C counts per unit hyphal biomass were similar between the two. These results suggest that 14C spread rapidly throughout the entire mycelium. Thirteen days after 14C labelling, we estimated 14C allocation to extraradical mycelia by taking autoradiographs after removing host roots. About 24% of 14C counts in the underground part of the mycorrhizal seedlings had been allocated to extraradical mycelia in this system, indicating that the fugal mycelium is an important sink for photosynthates.

  8. Year-round probing of soot carbon and secondary organic carbon contributions and sources to the South Asian Atmospheric Brown Cloud using radiocarbon (14C) measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirillova, Elena; Sheesley, Rebecca J.; Andersson, August; Krusâ, Martin; Safai, P. D.; Budhavant, Krishnakant; Rao, P. S. P.; Praveen, P. S.; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2010-05-01

    South Asia is one region of vital importance for assessing human impact on radiative forcing by atmospheric aerosols. Previous research in the region has indicated that black carbon is a significant component of the regional aerosol load. In contrast, there is more ambiguous information regarding the contribution of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) to the total carbonaceous (TC) aerosol composition. Here we primarily address the SOA component of the South Asian Atmospheric Brown Cloud (ABC) by a combination of measurements of SOA concentrations and the 14C signature of TC. Atmospheric particulate matter was collected during fourteen-month continuous sampling campaigns Jan 2008 - March 2009 at both the Maldives Climate Observatory at Hannimaadho (MCO-H) and at the Sinhagad hilltop sampling site of the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (SIN) in central-western India. The radiocarbon method is an ideal approach to identify fossil sources (14C "dead") compared to biogenic and biomass combustion products (with a contemporary 14C signal). The radiocarbon source apportionment of TC revealed very similar contribution from biogenic/biomass combustion (60-70%) for Indian SIN site and the MCOH receptor regions for much of the year. However, during the summer monsoon season biomass contribution to TC at the Indian Ocean site increases to 70-80%, while it decreases to 40-50% at the Indian site. Source apportionment of a soot carbon (SC) isolate (CTO-375 method; a tracer of black carbon) shows a similar trend. According to preliminary data in summer biomass contribution is higher at the MCOH receptor site (70%) compared to the SIN background site (45%). These unique year-round 14C data will be interpreted in view of the SOA concentration and the varying origin of the air masses.

  9. Coprecipitation of (14)C and Sr with carbonate precipitates: The importance of reaction kinetics and recrystallization pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodkin, David J; Stewart, Douglas I; Graham, James T; Burke, Ian T

    2016-08-15

    This study investigated the simultaneous removal of Sr(2+) and (14)CO3(2-) from pH>12 Ca(OH)2 solution by the precipitation of calcium carbonate. Initial Ca(2+):CO3(2-) ratios ranged from 10:1 to 10:100 (mM:mM). Maximum removal of (14)C and Sr(2+) both occurred in the system containing 10mM Ca(2+) and 1mM CO3(2-) (99.7% and 98.6% removal respectively). A kinetic model is provided that describes (14)C and Sr removal in terms of mineral dissolution and precipitation reactions. The removal of (14)C was achieved during the depletion of the initial TIC in solution, and was subsequently significantly affected by recrystallization of the calcite precipitate from an elongate to isotropic morphology. This liberated >46% of the (14)C back to solution. Sr(2+) removal occurred as Ca(2+) became depleted in solution and was not significantly affected by the recrystallization process. The proposed reaction could form the basis for low cost remediation scheme for (90)Sr and (14)C in radioactively contaminated waters (<$0.25 reagent cost per m(3) treated).

  10. Estimation of groundwater residence time using environmental radioisotopes (14C,T) in carbonate aquifers, southern Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samborska, Katarzyna; Różkowski, Andrzej; Małoszewski, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Triassic carbonate aquifers in the Upper Silesia region, affected by intense withdrawal, have been investigated by means of isotopic analyses of (14)C, δ(13)C, δ(2)H, δ(18)O and (3)H. The isotopic examinations were carried out in the 1970s and in the early 1980s, and it was the first application of tracers to estimate age and vulnerability for the contamination of groundwater in this region. Similar isotopic analyses were conducted in 2007 and 2008 with the same Triassic carbonate formation. The isotopic examinations were performed within the confined part of the carbonate formation, wherein aquifers are covered by semi-permeable deposits. The direct recharge of the aquifer occurs in the outcrop areas, but it mainly takes place due to percolation of the water through aquitards and erosional windows. The Triassic aquifer has been intensively drained by wells and by lead-zinc mines. Nowadays, the declining water demand and closure of some mines have induced a significant increase in the water table level. The detailed analysis of the results, including the radiocarbon age corrections and the comparison of radioisotope activities, has made it possible to estimate the range of residence time within the carbonate Triassic aquifer. This range from several tens to several tens of thousands indicates that the recharge of aquifers might have occurred between modern times and the Pleistocene. The apparent age of the water estimated on the basis of (14)C activity was corrected considering the carbon isotope exchange and the diffusion between mobile water in fractures and stagnant water in micropores. The obtained corrected period of recharge corresponds to the result of investigations of noble gases, which were carried out in the 1990s. In almost half of the cases, groundwater is a mixture of young and old water. The mixing processes occur mainly in areas of heavy exploitation of the aquifer.

  11. Biokinetics and radiation doses for carbon-14 urea in adults and children undergoing the Helicobacter pylori breath test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leide-Svegborn, S.; Olofsson, M.; Mattsson, S.; Nosslin, B.; Pau, K. [Department of Radiation Physics, Lund University, Malmoe University Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden); Stenstroem, K.; Erlandsson, B.; Hellborg, R. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Lund University, Lund (Sweden); Nilsson, L. [Department of Clinical Physiology, Lund University, Malmoe University Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden); Johansson, L. [Department of Radiation Physics, Umeaa University, Umeaa University Hospital, Umeaa (Sweden); Skog, G. [Radiocarbon Dating Laboratory, Department of Quaternary Geology, Lund University, Lund (Sweden)

    1999-06-01

    The long-term biokinetics and dosimetry of carbon-14 were studied in nine adults and eight children undergoing carbon-14 urea breath test for Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection. The elimination of {sup 14}C via exhaled air and urine was measured with the liquid scintillation counting technique and with accelerator mass spectrometry. After the subjects had been given 110 kBq {sup 14}C-urea (children: 55 kBq) orally, samples of exhaled air were taken up to 180 days after administration and samples of urine were collected up to 40 days. Sixteen of the subjects were found to be HP-negative. In these subjects a total of 91.1%{+-}3.9% (mean of adults and children {+-} standard error of the mean) of the administered {sup 14}C activity was recovered. The majority of the administered activity, 88.3%{+-}6.2% in adults and 87.7%{+-}5.0% in children, was excreted via the urine within 72 h after administration. A smaller fraction was exhaled. In adults 4.6%{+-}0.6% of the activity was exhaled within 20 days and in children 2.6%{+-}0.3%. Uncertainties in the biokinetic results are mainly due to assumptions concerning endogenous CO{sub 2} production and urinary excretion rate and are estimated to be less than 30%. The absorbed dose to various organs and the effective dose were calculated using the ICRP model for urea and CO{sub 2}. The urinary bladder received the highest absorbed dose: in adults, 0.15{+-}0.01 mGy/MBq and in children of various ages (7-14 years), 0.14-0.36 mGy/MBq. The findings indicate that an investigation with {sup 14}C-urea gives an effective dose to adults of 2.1{+-}0.1 {mu}Sv (for 110 kBq) and to children of 0.9-2.5 {mu}Sv (for 55 kBq). From a radiation protection point of view, there is thus no reason for restrictions on even repeated screening investigations with {sup 14}C-urea in whole families, including children. (orig.) With 5 figs., 4 tabs., 32 refs.

  12. Cambrian-lower Middle Ordovician passive carbonate margin, southern Appalachians: Chapter 14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, J. Fred; Repetski, John E.

    2012-01-01

    The southern Appalachian part of the Cambrian–Ordovician passive margin succession of the great American carbonate bank extends from the Lower Cambrian to the lower Middle Ordovician, is as much as 3.5 km (2.2 mi) thick, and has long-term subsidence rates exceeding 5 cm (2 in.)/k.y. Subsiding depocenters separated by arches controlled sediment thickness. The succession consists of five supersequences, each of which contains several third-order sequences, and numerous meter-scale parasequences. Siliciclastic-prone supersequence 1 (Lower Cambrian Chilhowee Group fluvial rift clastics grading up into shelf siliciclastics) underlies the passive margin carbonates. Supersequence 2 consists of the Lower Cambrian Shady Dolomite–Rome-Waynesboro Formations. This is a shallowing-upward ramp succession of thinly bedded to nodular lime mudstones up into carbonate mud-mound facies, overlain by lowstand quartzose carbonates, and then a rimmed shelf succession capped by highly cyclic regressive carbonates and red beds (Rome-Waynesboro Formations). Foreslope facies include megabreccias, grainstone, and thin-bedded carbonate turbidites and deep-water rhythmites. Supersequence 3 rests on a major unconformity and consists of a Middle Cambrian differentiated rimmed shelf carbonate with highly cyclic facies (Elbrook Formation) extending in from the rim and passing via an oolitic ramp into a large structurally controlled intrashelf basin (Conasauga Shale). Filling of the intrashelf basin caused widespread deposition of thin quartz sandstones at the base of supersequence 4, overlain by widespread cyclic carbonates (Upper Cambrian lower Knox Group Copper Ridge Dolomite in the south; Conococheague Formation in the north). Supersequence 5 (Lower Ordovician upper Knox in the south; Lower to Middle Ordovician Beekmantown Group in the north) has a basal quartz sandstone-prone unit, overlain by cyclic ramp carbonates, that grade downdip into thrombolite grainstone and then storm

  13. Measurement of low level carbon-14 in biologic specimens by wet ashing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucks, D.; Maibach, H.

    1981-10-01

    Pharmacokinetic studies of animal and human skin are often advantageously performed with low levels of C-14. We detail an efficient wet ashing mehtod capable of detecting 20 dpm per sample, equivalent to twice the background level, thus permitting complete kinetic assays with 1 ..mu..Ci or less of C-14 per subject.

  14. Differentiation of Pigment in Eggs Using Carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and Nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) Stable Isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Feng M; Shi, Guang Y; Wang, Hui W

    2016-07-01

    Consumers prefer natural and healthy food, but artificial pigments are often abused in egg products. The study aimed at differentiating the origin of pigments in eggs by applying the technique of carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) stable isotope analysis. Five hundred sixty laying hens were randomly distributed into 14 treatments, which were divided into four groups: maize, carophyll red pigment, carophyll yellow pigment, and a mixture of carophyll red and yellow pigments. Eggs were collected and pretreated to determe the values of the Roche Yolk Color Fan (RCF), δ(13)C, and δ(15)N. With increasing maize content, the RCF and δ(13)C values of yolks increased. Moreover, the RCF values in the three pigment groups were significantly influenced by the artificial colors, but δ(13)C values were not significantly different, regardless of the existence of pigment. The δ(15)N values in all treatments did not vary as regularly as the carbon stable isotope. A strong positive correlation was found between RCF and δ(13)C in the maize group, but no such correlation was be observed in the pigment groups. It is concluded that carbon stable isotope ratio analysis (δ(13)C) of the yolk can be used to differentiate the origin of the pigment added to eggs.

  15. Quantification of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastritis and ulcer disease using a simple and rapid carbon-14-urea breath test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debongnie, J.C.; Pauwels, S.; Raat, A.; de Meeus, Y.; Haot, J.; Mainguet, P. (Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Louvain Medical School, Brussels (Belgium))

    1991-06-01

    Gastric urease was studied isotopically in 230 patients with biopsy-proven normal mucosa or chronic gastritis, including 59 patients with ulcer disease. Carbon-14-urea was given in 25 ml of water without substrate carrier or nutrient-dense meal, and breath samples were collected over a 60-min period. The amount of 14CO2 excreted at 10 min was independent of the rate of gastric emptying and was not quantitatively influenced by the buccal urease activity. The 10-min 14CO2 values discriminated well between Helicobacter pylori positive and negative patients (94% sensitivity, 89% specificity) and correlated with the number of organisms assessed by histology. The test was a good predictor of chronic gastritis (95% sensitivity and 96% specificity), and a quantitative relationship was observed between 14CO2 values and the severity and activity of the gastritis. In H. pylori positive patients, breath 14CO2 was found to be similar in patients with and without ulcer disease, suggesting that the number of bacteria is not a determining factor for the onset of ulceration.

  16. Spatial Distribution and Dynamics of Carbon-14 in a Wetland Ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yankovich, Tamara L. [International Atomic Energy Agency, P.O. Box 100, 1400 Vienna (Austria); Carr, James; King-Sharp, K.; Doug Killey, R.W. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada); Robertson, Erin [201 21st Street East, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0B8 (Canada); Beresford, Nicholas A. [NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Center, Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA14AP (United Kingdom); School of Environment and Life Sciences, University of Salford, Manchester, M44WT (United Kingdom); Wood, Michael D. [School of Environment and Life Sciences, University of Salford, Manchester, M44WT (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    There is significant interest in assessing the impact of {sup 14}C releases from nuclear facilities, radioactive waste management areas, and geologic disposal facilities. As a result, there is a general need to gain understanding of {sup 14}C dynamics, especially in complex interface ecosystems, such as wetlands. This paper summarizes the key findings of two studies undertaken in Duke Swamp, a circa 0.1 km{sup 2} area of wetland consisting of marsh, fen and swamp habitats, on the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL)'s Chalk River Laboratories Site. The swamp receives radionuclides, such as {sup 14}C and tritium, from an up-gradient waste management area. The first study was an extensive field sampling campaign, involving collection of surface vegetation at 69 locations on a 50 m x 50 m grid, to evaluate the spatial distribution of {sup 14}C in Duke Swamp. Representative receptor plants and animals, and corresponding environmental media (including air, soil, and plant) samples were then collected, as part of a second study, at a subset of six locations with {sup 14}C specific activities that spanned the range present in Duke Swamp and also represented the different wetland habitats occurring there. The highest specific activity concentrations in surface vegetation were highly localized, representing a surface area of only about 150 m{sup 2}. The spatial distribution of {sup 14}C in the swamp seemed to be at least partly accounted for by the physical attributes of the Duke Swamp habitat. In general, it was found that specific activities of {sup 14}C in biota tissues reflected those measured in surface vegetation collected from the same sampling location. Such information provides needed insight for biosphere assessments, as well as for the development of monitoring programs that demonstrate protection of biota in areas where exposure to {sup 14}C is elevated. (authors)

  17. [Tritium- and carbon-14-contents of wines of different vintage from the northern and southern hemisphere (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, E; Möller, H; Rapp, A; Steffan, H

    1980-10-01

    The carbon-14 and tritium radioactivity contents of up to 19 vintages of German and South African wines were compared. A similar large dependence of the 14C- and of the 3H-activity in the German wine on the nuclear weapon tests of the years 1962/63 was found out. The radioactivity level is also 1977/78 still essential higher than before 1950. The South African wines have been influenced considerably smaller by nuclear explosions. The highest 3H-values were found in the vintage 1963 of the German wine with 5910 pCi/litre and in the vintage 1964 of the South African wine with 510 pCi/litre.

  18. Concentration and 14C Content of Total Organic Carbon and Black Carbon in Small (<100 ug C) Samples from Low-Latitude Alpine Ice Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehrwald, N. M.; Czimczik, C. I.; Santos, G. M.; Thompson, L. G.; Ziolkowski, L.

    2008-12-01

    Many low latitude glaciers are receding with consequences for the regional energy budget and hydrology. Ice loss has been linked to climate change and the deposition of organic aerosols such as black carbon (BC) which is formed during incomplete combustion. Little is known about how the contents of BC and total organic carbon (TOC) in aerosols change over time and how anthropogenic activities (e.g. land-use change) impact this variability. Low-latitude ice cores are located closer to population centers than polar ice caps and can provide a regional synthesis of TOC and BC variability. Radiocarbon (14C) may be used to partition BC aerosols into fossil (>50 kyrs) and modern sources (e.g. fossil-fuels vs. wildfires). We quantified TOC, BC, and their 14C content in three low-latitude ice cores: Naimona'nyi (30°27'N, 81°91'E) and Dasuopu (28°23'N, 85°43'E), Tibet, and Quelccaya (13°56'S; 70°50'W), Peru. Aerosols (52-256 g ice on filters) were separated into TOC and BC using thermal oxidation (CTO- 375). 14C was measured by AMS. TOC contents were 0.11-0.87, 0.05-0.43, and 0.06-0.19 μg C (g ice) -1 for Naimona'nyi, Dasuopu, and Quelccaya, respectively. BC contents were 18±8, 27±4, and 29±12 %TOC. Procedural blanks were 0.8 ± 0.4 μg C (TOC) and 1.2 ± 0.6 μg C (BC). In ice cores well dated through annual layer counting and/or independent ages (e.g. volcanic horizons) such as Quelccaya, the ability to separate BC from TOC, as well as partition BC into fossil and modern contributions has potential for reconstructing pre- and post-industrial changes in aerosol composition and their impact on the energy budget.

  19. Evaluation of carbon-14 (C{sup 14}) levels of terrestrial and marine food products of the environment of the site of Cogema La Hague; Evaluation des niveaux de carbone-14 ({sup 14}C) des denrees alimentaires terrestres et marines de l'environnement du site de COGEMA - La Hague

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-04-15

    This evaluation has for object to inform about the levels in carbon 14 in the environment of the factories of La Hague. Two sectors were differentiated on one hand the terrestrial environment, and on the other hand the marine environment. The investigations concerned first and foremost food products stemming as the vegetable culture (vegetables) or individual breeding (milk, eggs) but also foodstuffs stemming from the local agriculture (cereal). In touch with the second sector, the marine environment, the sampling concerned the accessible products of the sea by all and those locally marketed (fishes, molluscs, shellfishes). The different results are presented in tables. (N.C.)

  20. Carbon and 14C distribution in tropical and subtropical agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prastowo, Erwin; Grootes, Pieter; Nadeau, Marie

    2016-04-01

    Paddy soil management affects, through the alternating anoxic and oxic conditions it creates, the transport and stabilisation of soil organic matter (SOM). Irrigation water may percolate more organic materials - dissolved (DOM) and colloidal - into the subsoil during anoxic conditions. Yet a developed ploughpan tends to prevent C from going deeper in the subsoil and partly decouple C distribution in top and sub soil. We investigate the influence of different soil type and environment. We observed the C and 14C distribution in paddy and non-paddy soil profiles in three different soil types from four different climatic regions of tropical Indonesia, and subtropical China. Locations were Sukabumi (Andosol, ca. 850 m a.s.l), Bogor (clayey Alisol, ca. 240 m a.s.l), and Ngawi (Vertisol, ca. 70 m a.s.l) in Jawa, Indonesia, and Cixi (Alisol(sandy), ca. 4 - 6 m a.s.l) in Zhejiang Province, China. We compared rice paddies with selected neighbouring non-paddy fields and employed AMS 14C as a tool to study C dynamics from bulk, alkali soluble-humic, and insoluble humin samples, and macrofossils (plant remains, charcoal). Our data suggest that vegetation type determines the quantity and quality of biomass introduced as litter and root material in top and subsoil, and thus contributes to the soil C content and profile, which fits the 14C signal distribution, as well as 13C in Ngawi with C4 sugar cane as upland crop. 14C concentrations for the mobile humic acid fraction were generally higher than for bulk samples from the same depth, except when recent plant and root debris led to high 14C levels in near-surface samples. The difference in sampling, - averaged layer for bulk sample and 1-cm layer thickness for point sample - shows gradients in C and 14C across the layers, which could be a reason for discrepancies between the two. High 14C concentrations - in Andosol Sukabumi up to 111 pMC - exceed the atmospheric 14CO2concentration in the sampling year in 2012 (˜ 103 pMC) and

  1. Evaluation of excess carbon 14 and strontium 90 data for suitability to test two-dimensional stratospheric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Harold

    1989-12-01

    From reports by the Atomic Energy Commission concerning the atmospheric distribution of radionucleides following the nuclear bomb tests of 1958-1959 and 1961-1962, excess carbon 14 data from the period 1959-1970 and strontium 90 data from 1963-1967 are reviewed for possible use as inert tracers to test two-dimensional stratospheric-tropospheric models. Contrary to some views expressed in the literature, it is concluded that the carbon 14 data are suitable to test (1) the altitude (at 4 latitudes) of the transition region between troposphere and stratosphere with respect to transport of an inert tracer, (2) some aspects of transport between the northern and southern hemispheres, (3) horizontal and vertical transport as the vertical profile between 4.5 and 33 km and at 31°N evolves from a skewed Gaussian in 1963 to an almost stair-step profile in 1966, and (4) the long-term one-dimensional aspect of a two-dimensional model over the period 1966-1970. More tentatively, it is concluded that the strontium 90 data may be used as a model for the distribution and gross settling rate of the natural stratospheric aerosol layer between 15 and 25 km. Data from difficultly obtained laboratory reports and suggested initial conditions and boundary conditions are included as a microfiche supplement to this paper.

  2. Carbon-14 based determination of the biogenic fraction of industrial CO2 emissions : Application and validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palstra, S. W. L.; Meijer, H. A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The C-14 method is a very reliable and sensitive method for industrial plants, emission authorities and emission inventories to verify data estimations of biogenic fractions of CO2 emissions. The applicability of the method is shown for flue gas CO2 samples that have been sampled in I-h intervals at

  3. Algal C-14 and total carbon metabolisms 2. Experimental observations with the diatom Skeletonema costatum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, P.J.L.; Robinson, C.; Søndergaard, M.

    1996-01-01

    of 2-3), C-14 uptake into the particulate plus the dissolved fractions approximated to net photosynthesis. Rate constants derived from the chemically determined changes were used to parameterize models that accounted for the respiration of photosynthetic products and for the recycling of respiratory CO...

  4. Interactive effects between carbon allotropes on the mechanical reinforcement of nanocomposites based on poly(1,4-cis-isoprene)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musto, Sara; Cipolletti, Valeria; Barbera, Vincenzina; Agnelli, Silvia; Pandini, Stefano; Galimberti, Maurizio

    2014-05-01

    Interactive effects of carbon allotropes on the mechanical reinforcement of polymer nanocomposites were investigated by using, as the polymer matrix, poly(1,4-cis-isoprene) (PI) samples from industrial synthesis and from natural sources. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and nano-graphite with high shape anisotropy (nanoG) were melt blended with PI, as the only fillers or in combination with carbon black (CB), measuring the shear modulus at low strain amplitudes. The nanofiller was found to increase the low amplitude storage modulus of the matrix, with or without CB, by a factor depending on nanofiller type and content. The filler-polymer interfacial area was able to correlate modulus data of composites with CNT, CB and with the hybrid filler system, leading to the construction of a common master curve. The filler networking phenomenon was found to be affected by type and amount of low molecular mass products of PI from natural sources. The correlation between chemical composition, dynamic mechanical and ultimate properties of nanocomposites was investigated. In particular, it was found that low molecular mass components control the ability of elastomeric nano-composites to store or dissipate energy.

  5. A synthetic approach to carbon-14 labeled anti-bacterial naphthyridine and quinolone carboxylic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekhato, I.V.; Huang, C.C. (Parke, Davis and Co., Ann Arbor, MI (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Labeled versions of (S)-clinafloxacin (1) and two napththyridine carboxylic acid anti-bacterial compounds 2 and 3 which are currently in development were synthesized. Preparations started from hitherto unknown bromo compounds 22 and 10, from which the corresponding [sup 14]C-labeled aromatic carboxylic acids 23 and 12 were generated by metal-halogen exchange followed by carboxylation reaction. Details of these preparations are given. (author).

  6. Carbon-14 urea breath test for the diagnosis of Campylobacter pylori associated gastritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, B.J.; Surveyor, I.

    1988-01-01

    Urease in the human gastric mucosa is a marker for infection with Campylobacter pylori (CP), an organism suspected of causing chronic gastritis and peptic ulceration. To detect gastric urease, we examined 32 patients who were being evaluated for possible peptic ulcer disease. Fasting patients were given 10 microCi (370 kBq) of /sup 14/C-labeled urea. Breath samples were collected in hyamine at intervals between 1 and 30 min. The amount of /sup 14/C collected at these times was expressed as: body weight X (% of administered dose of /sup 14/C in sample)/(mmol of CO/sub 2/ collected). The presence of C. pylori colonization was also determined by examination of multiple endoscopic gastric biopsy specimens. On average, patients who were proven to have C. pylori infection exhaled 20 times more labeled CO/sub 2/ than patients who were not infected. The difference between infected patients and C. pylori negative control patients was highly significant at all time points between 2 and 30 min after ingestion of the radionuclide (p less than 0.0001). The noninvasive urea breath is less expensive than endoscopic biopsy of the stomach and more accurate than serology as a means of detecting Campylobacter pylori infection. Because the test detects actual viable CP organisms, it can be used to confirm eradication of the bacterium after antibacterial therapy.

  7. Accidental Drop of a Carbon Steel/Lead Shipping Cask (HFEF 14) at Low Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian D. Hawkes; Michael E. Nitzel

    2007-08-01

    A shielded cask is used to transport radioactive materials between facilities at the Idaho National Laboratory. The cask was fabricated with an outer and inner shell of A36 carbon steel with lead poured in the annular space between the shells to provide radiation shielding. Carbon steel is known to be susceptible to low-temperature brittle fracture under impact loading. This paper will present the analysis results representing postulated transportation accidents during on-site transfers of the cask at subzero temperatures. The accident scenarios were based on a series of cask drops onto a rigid surface from a height of 1.83m (6 ft.) Finite element models of the cask and its contents were solved and post processed using the ABAQUS software. Each model was examined for failure to contain radioactive materials and/or significant loss of radiation shielding. Results of these analyses show that the body of the cask exhibits considerable ruggedness and will remain largely intact after the impact. There will be deformation of the main cask body with localized brittle failure of the cask outer shell and door structure. The cask payload outer waste can remains in the cask but will experience some permanent plastic deformation in each drop. It will not be deformed to the point where it will rupture, thus maintaining confinement of the can contents.

  8. Synthesis of organic substances labelled with {sup 14}C and {sup 35}S; Syntheses de molecules organiques marquees par le carbone-14 et le soufre-35

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichat, L. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    After a brief history of the development of the Section des Molecules marquees of the Frenchmic Energy Commission, the author gives an outline of the synthesis of the following labelled compounds: benzene {sup 14}C-6; phenyl-p-fluorophenyl, thienyl-2 {beta} alanines {beta} {sup 14}C; noradrenaline {beta} {sup 14}C (arterenol {beta} {sup 14}C), dotriacontane {sup 14}C-16-17, aminoethane sulfinic acid (hypotaurine {sup 35}S). (author)Fren. [French] Apres un bref historique du developpement de la Section des Molecules marquees du Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique fran is, l'auteur donne un resume des syntheses des composes marques suivants: benzene {sup 14}C-6; phenyl-p-fluorophenyl, thienyl-2 {beta} alamines {beta} {sup 14}C; noradrenaline {beta} {sup 14}C (arterenol {beta} {sup 14}C), dotriacontane {sup 14}C-16-17, acide aminoethane sulfinique (hypotaurine {sup 35}S). (auteur)

  9. Metabolism of carbon-14-labeled benzene and toluene in avocado fruit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, E.F.; Olson, A.C.

    1969-01-01

    The method of exposing avocado fruit to /sup 14/C labeled benzene or toluene was as follows. Fuerte variety avocado fruit was used. It was exposed to the vapor of the hydrocarbons which were circulated in a container. Three mature preclimacteric fruit were used in each experiment. The nonvolatile metabolites from both hydrocarbons were separated into classes of compounds by their solution in water, separation of lipids, and passage of the aqueous solution through ion exchange columns. The results indicate that in avocados the relatively inert hydrocarbons benzene and toluene are metabolized to a series of compounds, toluene to a greater extent than benzene. Both are metabolized to a small but significant extent to CO/sub 2/. 7 references, 2 tables.

  10. Promotion of Water Channels for Enhanced Ion Transport in 14-nm-diameter Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jiadong; Zhu, Qi; Zeng, Xian; Yang, Zhaohui; Zhang, Xiaohua

    2017-03-06

    Ion transport plays an important role in solar-to-electricity conversion, drug delivery and a variety of biological processes. Carbon nanotube (CNT) is a promising material as an ion transporter in the applications of the mimicking of natural ion channels, desalination and energy harvesting. Here, we demonstrate a unique, enhanced ion transport through a vertically aligned multiwall CNT membrane after the application of an electric potential across CNT membranes. Interestingly, electrowetting arising from the application of an electric potential is critical for the enhancement of overall ion transport rate through CNT membranes. The wettability of a liquid with high surface tension on the interior channel walls of CNTs increases during an electric potential treatment and promotes the formation of water channels in CNTs. The formation of water channels in CNTs induces an increase in overall ion diffusion through CNT membranes. This phenomenon is also related to a decrease in the charge transfer resistance of CNTs (Rct) after applying an electric potential. Correspondingly, the enhanced ion flow rate gives rise to an enhancement in the capacitive performance of CNT based membranes. Our observations might have profound impact on the development of CNT based energy storage devices as well as artificial ion channels.

  11. Carbon isotopic composition (δ(13)C and (14)C activity) of plant samples in the vicinity of the Slovene nuclear power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Martina; Vreča, Polona; Krajcar Bronić, Ines

    2012-08-01

    δ(13)C values of various plants (apples, wheat, and maize) collected in the vicinity of the Krško Nuclear Power Plant (Slovenia) during 2008 and 2009 were determined. By measuring dried samples and their carbonized counterparts we showed that no significant isotopic fractionation occurs during the carbonization phase of the sample preparation process in the laboratory. The measured δ(13)C values of the plants were used for δ(13)C correction of their measured (14)C activities.

  12. Light-driven increase in carbon yield is linked to maintenance in the proteorhodopsin-containing Photobacterium angustum S14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia eCourties

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A type of photoheterotrophic bacteria contain a transmembrane light-driven proton pump called proteorhodopsins (PRs. Due to the prevalence of these organisms in the upper water column of the World’s Ocean, and their potential for light driven ATP generation, they have been suggested to significantly influence energy and matter flows in the biosphere. To date, evidence for the significance of the light-driven metabolism of PR-containing prokaryotes has been obtained by comparing growth in batch culture, under light versus dark conditions, and it appears that responses to light are linked to unfavorable conditions, which so far have not been well parameterized. We studied light responses to carbon yields of the PR-containing Photobacterium angustum S14 using continuous culture conditions and light-dark cycles. We observed significant effects of light-dark cycles compared to dark controls, as well as significant differences between samples after 12 h illumination versus 12 h darkness. However these effects were only observed under higher cell counts and lower pH associated with higher substrate concentrations. Under these substrate levels Pirt’s maintenance coefficient was higher when compared to lower substrate dark controls, and decreased under light-dark cycles. It appears that light responses by Photobacterium angustum S14 are induced by the energetic status of the cells rather than by low substrate concentrations.

  13. Soil aggregate fraction-based 14C analysis and its application in the study of soil organic carbon turnover under forests of different ages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN WenBing; ZHOU LiPing; LIU KeXin

    2013-01-01

    There still exist uncertainties in the trend,magnitude and efficiency of carbon sequestration with regard to the changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) pools after afforestation.In this study,SOC turnover times of the meadow steppe and planted forests at Saihanba Forest Station of Hebei Province,China are estimated by means of the radiocarbon (14C) method.Our results show that the SOC turnover times can be as long as from 70 to 250 years.After planting the Pinus sylvestri var.mongolica in the Leymus chinensis meadow steppe,the turnover times of organic carbon in both bulk samples and soil aggregate fractions of the topsoils are decreased with an increase of the stand age.Such a lowering of the turnover time would cause an increase in soil CO2 flux,implying that afforestation of grassland may reduce the capacity of topsoil to sequestrate organic carbon.Combined stable isotope and 14C analyses on soil aggregate fractions suggest that there are different responses to afforestation of grassland between young and old carbon pools in topsoils.In the young and middle-age planted forests,the proportion of CO2 emission from the older soil carbon pool shows an increasing trend.But in the mature planted forest,its proportion tends to decline,indicating that the stand age may influence the soil carbon sequestration mechanism.The CO2 emission from the topsoils estimated using the 14C method is relatively low compared to those by other methods and may be caused by the partial isolation of the young carbon component from the soil aggregates.For more accurate estimation of CO2 flux,future studies should therefore employ improved methodology for more effective separation of different soil carbon components before isotope analyses.

  14. Using Carbon-14 Isotope Tracing to Investigate Molecular Structure Effects of the Oxygenate Dibutyl Maleate on Soot Emissions from a DI Diesel Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, B A; Mueller, C J; Upatnieks, A; Martin, G C; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2004-01-07

    The effect of oxygenate molecular structure on soot emissions from a DI diesel engine was examined using carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) isotope tracing. Carbon atoms in three distinct chemical structures within the diesel oxygenate dibutyl maleate (DBM) were labeled with {sup 14}C. The {sup 14}C from the labeled DBM was then detected in engine-out particulate matter (PM), in-cylinder deposits, and CO{sub 2} emissions using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The results indicate that molecular structure plays an important role in determining whether a specific carbon atom either does or does not form soot. Chemical-kinetic modeling results indicate that structures that produce CO{sub 2} directly from the fuel are less effective at reducing soot than structures that produce CO before producing CO{sub 2}. Because they can follow individual carbon atoms through a real combustion process, {sup 14}C isotope tracing studies help strengthen the connection between actual engine emissions and chemical-kinetic models of combustion and soot formation/oxidation processes.

  15. Carbon cycling in primary production bottle incubations: inferences from grazing experiments and photosynthetic studies using 14C and 18O in the Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Edward A.; Landry, Michael R.; Barber, Richard T.; Campbell, Lisa; Dickson, Mary-Lynn; Marra, John

    Estimates of photosynthesis based on the incorporation of 14C-labeled inorganic carbon into particulate carbon were compared to estimates of gross photosynthesis based on net O 2 production and the production of 18O2 from H218O during the US Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (US JGOFS) Arabian Sea process cruises. For samples incubated below the surface and at optical depthsphotorespiration, dark respiration, excretion, and grazing effects on the two estimates of photosynthesis. The 14C uptake : gross photosynthesis ratio was distinctly higher (0.62) for samples incubated at the surface. This result is likely due to UV light effects, since the O 2 and 14C incubations were done in quartz and polysulfone bottles, respectively. The 14C uptake : gross photosynthesis ratio was lower (0.31) for bottles incubated at optical depths>3. This result probably reflects an increase in the ratio of dark respiration to net photosynthesis in the vicinity of the compensation light level.

  16. Study of the behaviour of organic carbon in the soil, and carbon 14 study of podzols; Contribution a l'etude du comportement du carbone organique dans le sol et etude des podzols a l'aide du carbone 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakhla Shawki, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    Using the penetration into soil of carbon 14 of thermo-nuclear origin, the behaviour and renewal rate were studied on different organic fractions of the soil. It was established that 18% of the total organic matter is renewed in about 400 years. In addition the formation of podzol-type fossil soils in France was dated from the first millenary B.C., i.e. the end of the sub-boreal period and the beginning of the atlantic period. (author) [French] En utilisant la penetration dans le sol du carbone 14 d'origine thermonucleaire, on a etudie le comportement et la vitesse de renouvellement des differentes fractions de la matiere organique du sol. On a pu preciser que 18% de la matiere organique globale se renouvelait en 400 ans environ. Par ailleurs, la formation en France des sols fossiles du type podzol a ete datee du premier millenaire avant J.C. c'est a dire a la fin de la periode subboreale et au debut de la periode atlantique. (auteur)

  17. On the isolation of elemental carbon for micro-molar 14C accelerator mass spectrometry; evaluation of alternative isolation procedures, and accuracy assurance using a hybrid isotopic particulate carbon reference material

    OpenAIRE

    Currie, L A; Kessler,J.D.

    2005-01-01

    International audience; The primary objective of the research reported here has been the development of an hybrid reference material (RM) to serve as a test of accuracy for elemental carbon (EC) isotopic (14C) speciation measurements. Such measurements are critically important for the quantitative apportionment of fossil and biomass sources of ''soot'' (EC), the tracer of fire that has profound effects on health, atmospheric visibility, and climate. Previous studies of 14C-EC measurement qual...

  18. Distribution and biomarkers of Carbon-14 labeled fullerene C60 ([14C(U)]C60) in female rats and mice for up to 30 days after intravenous exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Susan C. J.; Snyder, Rodney W.; Wingard, Christopher; Mortensen, Ninell P.; Holland, Nathan A.; Shannahan, Jonathan H.; Dhungana, Suraj; Pathmasiri, Wimal; Han, Li; Lewin, Anita H.; Fennell, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive distribution study was conducted in female rats and mice exposed to a suspension of uniformly carbon-14 labeled C60 ([14C(U)]C60). Rodents were administered [14C(U)]C60 (~0.9 mg /kg body weight) or 5% PVP-saline vehicle alone via a single tail vein injection. Tissues were collected at 1 hour, 1, 7, 14 and 30 days after administration. A separate group of rodents received 5 daily injections of suspensions of either [14C(U)]C60 or vehicle with tissue collection 14 days post exposure. Radioactivity was detected in over 20 tissues at all time period. The highest concentration of radioactivity in rodents at each time point was in liver, lungs and spleen. Elimination of [14C(U)]C60 was <2% in urine and feces at any 24 hour time points. [14C(U)]C60 and [14C(U)]C60-retinol were detected in liver of rats and together accounted for ~99% and ~56% of the total recovered at 1 and 30 days post exposure, respectively. The blood radioactivity at 1 hour after [14C(U)]C60 exposure was four-fold higher in rats than in mice; blood radioactivity was still in circulation at 30 days post [14C(U)]C60 exposure in both species (<1%). Levels of oxidative stress markers increased by 5 days after exposure and remained elevated, while levels of inflammation markers initially increased and then returned to control values. The level of cardiovascular marker vWF, increased in rats, but remained at control levels in mice. This study demonstrates that [14C(U)]C60 is retained in female rodents with little elimination by 30 days after i.v. exposure, and leads to systemic oxidative stress. PMID:25727383

  19. Accuracy and precision of 14C-based source apportionment of organic and elemental carbon in aerosols using the Swiss_4S protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. O. Mouteva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol source apportionment remains a critical challenge for understanding the transport and aging of aerosols, as well as for developing successful air pollution mitigation strategies. The contributions of fossil and non-fossil sources to organic carbon (OC and elemental carbon (EC in carbonaceous aerosols can be quantified by measuring the radiocarbon (14C content of each carbon fraction. However, the use of 14C in studying OC and EC has been limited by technical challenges related to the physical separation of the two fractions and small sample sizes. There is no common procedure for OC/EC 14C analysis, and uncertainty studies have largely focused on the precision of yields. Here, we quantified the uncertainty in 14C measurement of aerosols associated with the isolation and analysis of each carbon fraction with the Swiss_4S thermal-optical analysis (TOA protocol. We used an OC/EC analyzer (Sunset Laboratory Inc., OR, USA coupled to vacuum line to separate the two components. Each fraction was thermally desorbed and converted to carbon dioxide (CO2 in pure oxygen (O2. On average 91% of the evolving CO2 was then cryogenically trapped on the vacuum line, reduced to filamentous graphite, and measured for its 14C content via accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS. To test the accuracy of our set-up, we quantified the total amount of extraneous carbon introduced during the TOA sample processing and graphitization as the sum of modern and fossil (14C-depleted carbon introduced during the analysis of fossil reference materials (adipic acid for OC and coal for EC and contemporary standards (oxalic acid for OC and rice char for EC as a function of sample size. We further tested our methodology by analyzing five ambient airborne particulate matter (PM2.5 samples with a range of OC and EC concentrations and 14C contents in an interlaboratory comparison. The total modern and fossil carbon blanks of our set-up were 0.8 ± 0.4 and 0.67 ± 0.34 μg C

  20. Accuracy and precision of 14C-based source apportionment of organic and elemental carbon in aerosols using the Swiss_4S protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouteva, G. O.; Fahrni, S. M.; Santos, G. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Zhang, Y.-L.; Szidat, S.; Czimczik, C. I.

    2015-09-01

    Aerosol source apportionment remains a critical challenge for understanding the transport and aging of aerosols, as well as for developing successful air pollution mitigation strategies. The contributions of fossil and non-fossil sources to organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) in carbonaceous aerosols can be quantified by measuring the radiocarbon (14C) content of each carbon fraction. However, the use of 14C in studying OC and EC has been limited by technical challenges related to the physical separation of the two fractions and small sample sizes. There is no common procedure for OC/EC 14C analysis, and uncertainty studies have largely focused on the precision of yields. Here, we quantified the uncertainty in 14C measurement of aerosols associated with the isolation and analysis of each carbon fraction with the Swiss_4S thermal-optical analysis (TOA) protocol. We used an OC/EC analyzer (Sunset Laboratory Inc., OR, USA) coupled to a vacuum line to separate the two components. Each fraction was thermally desorbed and converted to carbon dioxide (CO2) in pure oxygen (O2). On average, 91 % of the evolving CO2 was then cryogenically trapped on the vacuum line, reduced to filamentous graphite, and measured for its 14C content via accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). To test the accuracy of our setup, we quantified the total amount of extraneous carbon introduced during the TOA sample processing and graphitization as the sum of modern and fossil (14C-depleted) carbon introduced during the analysis of fossil reference materials (adipic acid for OC and coal for EC) and contemporary standards (oxalic acid for OC and rice char for EC) as a function of sample size. We further tested our methodology by analyzing five ambient airborne particulate matter (PM2.5) samples with a range of OC and EC concentrations and 14C contents in an interlaboratory comparison. The total modern and fossil carbon blanks of our setup were 0.8 ± 0.4 and 0.67 ± 0.34 μg C, respectively

  1. Test of the suitability of ECOPATH/ECOSIM modelling software as a compliment to estimate flows of carbon, C-14 and radionuclides in the Oeregrundsgrepen area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandberg, Johannes [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Systems Ecology

    2004-04-01

    In this study it was evaluated whether the ECOPATH with ECOSIM software could be used as a standard platform to facilitate for radioecologists to construct and study transport and accumulation of radionuclides in aquatic food webs. The evaluation was based upon: 1) a previously published food web model of carbon/carbon-14 flow for the Oeregrundsgrepen area, Baltic Sea, 2) a generic model, 3) an ECOSIM model and 4) an ECOTRACE model. The results presented clearly shows that there is great potential for a successful development of this scientific approach in the future. The original carbon flows and assumptions was easily incorporated into the ECOPATH with ECOSIM modelling environment. The carbon flows differed only negligible between the two models, except for the benthic flows, which was more accurately described in this study. Further, by using ECOPATH it was easily discovered that the growth efficiencies used in the original model was quite high, being 47% for most of the heterotrophs, which are high from an ecological point of view. However, that is probably due to differences in how the carbon flows have been estimated in the original versus the present study. It is likely, however that the carbon demand has been underestimated in the original model. The generic model was parameterised from data available through the software as well from the diets and assumptions used in the original carbon model. The use of these parameters resulted in carbon flows, which was between 0.7 to 11 times the flows estimated by the ECOPATH model. The difference was greatest for primary producers being 3.7 to 11 times the original flows. Thus, depending on the question one is addressing it was suggested that the use of generic parameters is best for making test models of carbon and radionuclide flows in ecosystems, where the data set for validation is limited. Finally, the ECOPATH and ECOSIM model was well suited to drive a C-14 flow model, such as ECOTRACER for each of the

  2. {sup 14}C chronology of the oldest Scandinavian church in use. An AMS/PIXE study of lime lump carbonate in the mortar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindroos, Alf, E-mail: alf.lindroos@abo.fi [Geology and Mineralogy, Department of Natural Sciences, Åbo Akademi University (Finland); Art History, Faculty of Art, Åbo Akademi University (Finland); Ranta, Heikki [Diocese of Lund, Church of Sweden (Sweden); Heinemeier, Jan [AMS " 1" 4C Dating Laboratory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus (Denmark); Lill, Jan-Olof [Accelerator Laboratory, Turku PET Centre, Åbo Akademi University (Finland)

    2014-07-15

    Mortar dating was applied to newly revealed, original mortar in the church of Dalby in Scania, southern Sweden which is considered to be the oldest still standing church in Scandinavia. Small white lime lumps were sampled by chipping from the supporting pillars in the interior of the church. Special emphasis was in sampling lime lumps because the church is situated in the Scania limestone area and aggregate limestone contamination was anticipated in the bulk mortars. Earlier studies have, however, shown that lime lumps do not contain aggregate material but only possible limestone rests from incomplete calcination. The sampled material was prepared for radiocarbon AMS dating. The carbonate in the lime lumps was hydrolyzed according to the sequential leaching technique developed for the Århus {sup 14}C laboratory in Denmark. Prior to the hydrolysis the lime lumps were examined for dead-carbon contamination using a stereo microscope and cathodoluminescence. The lime lumps displayed heterogeneous carbonate luminescence. This is, however, common and it was not considered a problem because carbonate growth in changing pH/Eh conditions often leads to changing luminescence colors. Two lumps had little dead carbon contamination and an early second millennium {sup 14}C signature. One lump, however, seemed to be heavily contaminated with dead carbon. Since the sample passed the microscopic screening, the leftovers of the lump was subjected to PIXE analysis and compared with the other two lumps. The well-defined, early 2nd millennium {sup 14}C age of the lime lumps of this particular church is an important contribution to the discussion on stone church chronology in Scandinavia.

  3. Phosphorylation of Arabidopsis ubiquitin ligase ATL31 is critical for plant carbon/nitrogen nutrient balance response and controls the stability of 14-3-3 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Shigetaka; Sato, Takeo; Maekawa, Shugo; Aoyama, Shoki; Fukao, Yoichiro; Yamaguchi, Junji

    2014-05-30

    Ubiquitin ligase plays a fundamental role in regulating multiple cellular events in eukaryotes by fine-tuning the stability and activity of specific target proteins. We have previously shown that ubiquitin ligase ATL31 regulates plant growth in response to nutrient balance between carbon and nitrogen (C/N) in Arabidopsis. Subsequent study demonstrated that ATL31 targets 14-3-3 proteins for ubiquitination and modulates the protein abundance in response to C/N-nutrient status. However, the underlying mechanism for the targeting of ATL31 to 14-3-3 proteins remains unclear. Here, we show that ATL31 interacts with 14-3-3 proteins in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. We identified Thr(209), Ser(247), Ser(270), and Ser(303) as putative 14-3-3 binding sites on ATL31 by motif analysis. Mutation of these Ser/Thr residues to Ala in ATL31 inhibited the interaction with 14-3-3 proteins, as demonstrated by yeast two-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation analyses. Additionally, we identified in vivo phosphorylation of Thr(209) and Ser(247) on ATL31 by MS analysis. A peptide competition assay showed that the application of synthetic phospho-Thr(209) peptide, but not the corresponding unphosphorylated peptide, suppresses the interaction between ATL31 and 14-3-3 proteins. Moreover, Arabidopsis plants overexpressing mutated ATL31, which could not bind to 14-3-3 proteins, showed accumulation of 14-3-3 proteins and growth arrest in disrupted C/N-nutrient conditions similar to wild-type plants, although overexpression of intact ATL31 resulted in repression of 14-3-3 accumulation and tolerance to the conditions. Together, these results demonstrate that the physiological role of phosphorylation at 14-3-3 binding sites on ATL31 is to modulate the binding ability and stability of 14-3-3 proteins to control plant C/N-nutrient response.

  4. AMS-{sup 14}C measurements for the carbonate platform of the offshore Campos Basin, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coimbra, Melayne M. E-mail: melayne@onda.com.br; Barbosa, Catia F.; Soares-Gomes, Abilio; Silva, Cleverson G.; Rios-Netto, Aristoteles; Mueller, Ken A

    2000-10-01

    As part of our accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) program in Brazil we prepared and measured some red algae carbonate crust samples from Campos Basin, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The measurements were performed at Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab), Purdue University, IN, USA. This carbonate material is interlaminated with foraminiferal lime mud reflecting recurrent intervals of carbonate development, which might be linked to outer-shelf oceanographic circulation.

  5. Nature and Origin of Variations in Late-Glacial and Holocene Atmospheric CARBON-14 as Revealed by Global Carbon Cycle Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braziunas, Thomas Frank

    1990-01-01

    Simulations with a global box-diffusion ^{14}C model indicate that the millennium- and century-scale atmospheric Delta ^{14}C variations during the Holocene are more likely explained by fluctuations in ^ {14}C production rate (Q) than by changes in air-sea CO_2 exchange rate (F) or internal ocean mixing (parameterized as an "eddy diffusivity" K_{rm z}. The ^{14}C reservoir model deconvolves histories for each of these three processes that are compatible with a 96-yr bi-decadal atmospheric (tree-ring)Delta^{14}C record assuming alternative pre-Holocene ^ {14}C conditions. Holocene microparticle concentrations in ice cores and dust grain sizes in marine sediment cores disagree with the model-derived global wind speeds necessary to explain (through F variations) the millennium-scale trends in atmospheric Delta ^{14}C. Alternately, foram ^{14}C data do not support the history in the oceanic ventilation index generated by millennium -scale K_{rm z} variations. Coral ^{14}C data for recent centuries conflict with the marine Delta ^{14}C history associated with century-scale variations in F or K_{ rm z} but are consistent with changes in ^{14}C production rate. The ^{14}C production rates derived theoretically from an 11,000-yr record of averaged global dipole moments strongly correlate with the Q history required to explain tree-ring Delta ^{14}C. Several pre-Holocene Q histories were calculated from limited dipole moment data available for the past 30,000 yrs and do not contradict ^{234}U/^ {230}Th-calibrated coral ^ {14}C measurements. Relative variations in Greenland ice-core ^{10}Be concentrations (reflecting changes in ^ {10}Be production) over the past 9000 yrs also correlate strongly with tree-ring Q fluctuations except for a 4500-3500 BC discrepancy. Simulations of transient variations in Q, F, and K_{rm z} supplement previous studies of alternative steady-state ^ {14}C situations. The modeling of combined climate and production rate scenarios (i.e. F + K _{rm z

  6. On 14C-based methods for measuring the biogenic carbon fraction in fuels and flue gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palstra, Sanne Waltje Lieze

    2016-01-01

    Several international regulations distinguish between carbon from biomass and carbon from fossil raw materials for different materials and CO2 emissions. Due to these regulations it can be financially beneficial for companies to claim for instance their products to originate from 100% biomass, that

  7. Bio-Carbon Accounting for Bio-Oil Co-Processing: 14C and 13C/12C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora, Claudia I. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Li, Zhenghua [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vance, Zachary [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-21

    This is a powerpoint presentation on bio-carbon accounting for bio-oil co-processing. Because of the overlapping range in the stable C isotope compositions of fossil oils and biooils from C3-type feedstocks, it is widely thought that stable isotopes are not useful to track renewable carbon during co-production. In contrast, our study demonstrates the utility of stable isotopes to: • capture a record of renewable carbon allocation between FCC products of co-processing • record changes in carbon apportionments due to changes in reactor or feed temperature Stable isotope trends as a function of percent bio-oil in the feed are more pronounced when the δ13C of the bio-oil endmember differs greatly from the VGO (i.e., it has a C4 biomass source–corn stover, switch grass, Miscanthus, sugarcane– versus a C3 biomass source– pine, wheat, rice, potato), but trends on the latter case are significant for endmember differences of just a few permil. The correlation between measured 14C and δ13C may be useful as an alternative to carbon accounting, but the relationship must first be established for different bio-oil sources.

  8. Synthesizing the Use of Carbon Isotope (14C and 13C) Approaches to Understand Rates and Pathways for Permafrost C Mobilization and Mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estop-Aragones, C.; Olefeldt, D.; Schuur, E.

    2015-12-01

    To better understand the permafrost carbon (C) feedback it is important to synthesize our current knowledge, and knowledge gaps, of how permafrost thaw can cause in situ mineralization or downstream mobilization of aged soil organic carbon (SOC) and the rate of this release. This potential loss of old SOC may occur via gaseous flux of CO2 and CH4 exchanged between soil and the atmosphere and via waterborne flux as DOC, POC (and their subsequent decomposition and release to the atmosphere). Carbon isotope (14C and 13C) approaches have been used to estimate both rates and pathways for permafrost C mobilization and mineralization. Radiocarbon (14C) has been used to estimate the contribution of aged C to overall respiration or waterborne C export. We aim to contrast results from radiocarbon studies, in order to assess differences between ecosystems (contrasting wet and dry ecosystems), thaw histories (active layer deepening or thermokarst landforms), greenhouse gas considered (CO2 and CH4) and seasons. We propose to also contrast methodologies used for assessing the contribution of aged C to overall C balance, and include studies using 13C data. Biological fractionation of 13C during both uptake and decomposition has been taken advantage of both in order to aid the interpretation of 14C data and on its own to assess sources and mineralization pathways. For example, 13C data has been used to differentiate between CH4 production pathways, and the relative contribution of anaerobic CO2 production to overall respiration. Overall, carbon isotope research is proving highly valuable for our understanding of permafrost C dynamics following thaw, and there is a current need to synthesize the available literature.

  9. Relocation of carbon from decomposition of {sup 14}C-labelled needle and fine root litter in peat soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domish, T.; Laine, J.; Laiho, R. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Forest Ecology; Finer, L. [Finnish Forest Research Inst. (Finland). Joensuu Research Station; Karsisto, M. [Finnish Forest Research Inst. (Finland). Dept. of Forest Ecology

    1996-12-31

    Drainage of peatlands promotes a shift of biomass and production from the ground vegetation to the trees. Thus, the above-ground (e.g. needles) and below-ground (roots) litter production of trees increases. Fine roots in particular are an important factor in the carbon and nutrient cycle in forest ecosystems. A major part of the annual net primary production of trees may be allocated below ground, the relative proportion being smaller on fertile sites than on less fertile ones. For modelling the carbon balance of drained peatlands, it is important to know the fate of carbon from newly introduced and decomposing litter. Newly added and fertilised tree litter material may be decomposed at a rate different than litter from the ground vegetation. The objectives of this study are to study the pathways of decomposing litter carbon in peat soil and to evaluate the use of the litterbag method in a controlled environment. (9 refs.)

  10. On the isolation of elemental carbon for micro-molar 14C accelerator mass spectrometry; evaluation of alternative isolation procedures, and accuracy assurance using a hybrid isotopic particulate carbon reference material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Currie

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of the research reported here has been the development of an hybrid reference material (RM to serve as a test of accuracy for elemental carbon (EC isotopic (14C speciation measurements. Such measurements are critically important for the quantitative apportionment of fossil and biomass sources of ''soot'' (EC, the tracer of fire that has profound effects on health, atmospheric visibility, and climate. Previous studies of 14C-EC measurement quality, carried out with NIST SRM 1649a (Urban Dust, showed a range of results, but since the ''truth'' was not known for this natural matrix RM, one had to rely on isotopic-chemical consistency evidence (14C in PAH, EC of measurement validity (Currie et al., 2002. Components of the new Hybrid RM (DiesApple, however, have known 14C and EC composition, and they are nearly orthogonal (isotopically and chemically. NIST SRM 2975 (Forklift Diesel Soot has little or no 14C, and its major compositional component is EC. SRM 1515 (Apple Leaves has the 14C content of biomass-C, and it has little or no EC. Thus, the hybrid RM can serve as an absolute isotopic test for the absence of EC-mimicking pyrolysis-C from SRM 1515 in the EC isolate of the hybrid RM, together with testing for conservation of its dominant soot fraction through the isolation procedure.

  11. Carbon isotopes profiles of human whole blood, plasma, red blood cells, urine and feces for biological/biomedical 14C-accelerator mass spectrometry applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Hyun; Chuang, Jennifer C; Kelly, Peter B; Clifford, Andrew J

    2011-05-01

    Radiocarbon ((14)C) is an ideal tracer for in vivo human ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination) and PBPK (physiological-based pharmacokinetic) studies. Living plants peferentially incorporate atmospheric (14)CO(2) versus (13)CO(2) versus (12)CO(2), which result in unique signature. Furthermore, plants and the food chains they support also have unique carbon isotope signatures. Humans, at the top of the food chain, consequently acquire isotopic concentrations in the tissues and body fluids depending on their dietary habits. In preparation of ADME and PBPK studies, 12 healthy subjects were recruited. The human baseline (specific to each individual and their diet) total carbon (TC) and carbon isotope (13)C (δ(13)C) and (14)C (F(m)) were quantified in whole blood (WB), plasma, washed red blood cell (RBC), urine, and feces. TC (mg of C/100 μL) in WB, plasma, RBC, urine, and feces were 11.0, 4.37, 7.57, 0.53, and 1.90, respectively. TC in WB, RBC, and feces was higher in men over women, P < 0.05. Mean δ(13)C were ranked low to high as follows: feces < WB = plasma = RBC = urine, P < 0.0001. δ(13)C was not affected by gender. Our analytic method shifted δ(13)C by only ±1.0 ‰ ensuring our F(m) measurements were accurate and precise. Mean F(m) were ranked low to high as follows: plasma = urine < WB = RBC = feces, P < 0.05. F(m) in feces was higher for men over women, P < 0.05. Only in WB, (14)C levels (F(m)) and TC were correlated with one another (r = 0.746, P < 0.01). Considering the lag time to incorporate atmospheric (14)C into plant foods (vegetarian) and or then into animal foods (nonvegetarian), the measured F(m) of WB in our population (recruited April 2009) was 1.0468 ± 0.0022 (mean ± SD), and the F(m) of WB matched the (extrapolated) atmospheric F(m) of 1.0477 in 2008. This study is important in presenting a procedure to determine a baseline for a study group for human ADME and PBPK studies using (14)C as a tracer.

  12. Relationships between Δ14C and the molecular quality of dissolved organic carbon in rivers draining to the coast from the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butman, David; Raymond, Peter A.; Butler, Kenna; Aiken, George R.

    2012-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in natural waters possesses chemical and molecular qualities indicative of its source and age. The apportionment of DOC by age into millennial and decadal pools is necessary to understand the temporal connection between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems in the global carbon cycle. We measured Δ14C-DOC and chemical composition indices (specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA254), fluorescence index (FI), hydrophobic organic acid fraction (HPOA) content) for 15 large river basins in the conterminous United States. Across all rivers the average proportion of HPOA in DOC correlated strongly with SUVA254 (r2 = 0.93 p Modern) in the Altamaha River for the year 2009. When adjusted by total discharge, these U.S. Rivers export modern carbon at between 34 and 46‰, a signal dominated by the Mississippi River. The variation in Δ14C correlates to indices of the aromaticity of the DOC measured by the SUVA254 (r2 = 0.87, p phenology estimated from the Enhanced Vegetation Index derived from the NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS). We show that basins with high discharge, high proportions of vegetation cover, and low human population densities export DOC enriched in aromatic material that corresponds to recently fixed atmospheric CO2. Conversely old DOC is exported from low discharge watersheds draining arid regions, and watersheds more strongly impacted by humans. The potential influence from fossil carbon from human inputs to aquatic systems may be important and requires more research.

  13. The applicability of C-14 measurements in the soil gas for the assessment of leakage out of underground carbon dioxide reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chałupnik Stanisław

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Poland, due to the ratification of the Kioto Protocol, is obliged to diminish the emission of greenhouse gases. One of the possible solutions of this problem is CO2 sequestration (CCS - carbon capture and storage. Such an option is a priority in the European Union. On the other hand, CO2 sequestration may be potentially risky in the case of gas leakage from underground reservoirs. The most dangerous event may be a sudden release of the gas onto the surface. Therefore, it is very important to know if there is any escape of CO2 from underground gas reservoirs, created as a result of sequestration. Such information is crucial to ensure safety of the population in areas located above geological reservoirs. It is possible to assess the origin of carbon dioxide, if the measurement of radiocarbon 14C concentration in this gas is done. If CO2 contains no 14C, it means, that the origin of the gas is either geological or the gas has been produced as a result of combustion of fossil fuels, like coal. A lot of efforts are focused on the development of monitoring methods to ensure safety of CO2 sequestration in geological formations. A radiometric method has been tested for such a purpose. The main goal of the investigations was to check the application possibility of such a method. The technique is based on the liquid scintillation counting of samples. The gas sample is at first bubbled through the carbon dioxide adsorbent, afterwards the adsorbent is mixed with a dedicated cocktail and measured in a low-background liquid scintillation spectrometer Quantulus. The described method enables measurements of 14C in mine and soil gas samples.

  14. BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLE OF RIVERINE CARBON IN THE GUIJIANG RIVER: TRACING WITH 14C AND 13C%桂江河流碳的生物地球化学循环:14C和13C示踪

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶贞; 高全洲; 黄夏坤; 刘克新; 丁杏芳; 付东坡

    2012-01-01

    基于一个水文年度的月周期性采样分析,用河流悬浮颗粒物的有机碳(POC)和溶解无机碳(DIC)的同位素信号探讨了桂江径流中碳的生物地球化学循环.桂江悬浮颗粒物中POC含量多介于1.70%~14.27%之间,平均为(4.54±2.94)%;河流POC的Δ14C值介于-235.8‰~ -26.7%之间,平均为(-135.38±57.27)‰,没有检出“核爆14C”信号,揭示了较为强烈的流域地表扰动和土壤侵蚀状况.桂江POC的稳定同位素组成(δ13C)变化于-29.92% - -24.71‰之间,平均为(-26.86± 1.29)‰,这与以C3植物为主的流域生态系统的碳同位素组成一致.桂江颗粒有机质的C/N比多介于5.54 11.53之间,平均为7.97,低于全球河流的平均状况.一方面,土壤有机碳、岩石来源的地质碳及藻类生物量的混合比例决定了桂江河流颗粒有机质的C/N比和Δ14C值;另一方面,微生物群落对水体有机质的代谢分解作用也在一定程度上改变了有机质的元素和同位素比值.桂江河流DIC的δ13C值变化于-17.22‰~-10.65‰之间,平均为(- 12.95±1.94)‰.冬半年河流DIC(δ13C值平均为-11.47‰)几乎全部来自碳酸盐矿物的化学风化,夏半年土壤硅酸盐矿物的化学风化对DIC(δ13C值平均为- 14.73%)的贡献达28%.%The Guijiang River(GJR) is the first order tributary of the Xijiang River system, with the length of its main stream as 438km and drainage basin area as 18790km2. The GJR drainage basin is mostly mountainous and hilly. Carbonate rock (mainly of limestone) outcrops account for about 51% of the GJR drainage basin, most of which occur in the upper and middle parts of the drainage basin. Modern karst geomorphologic processes have been developed both on the surface and underground, and a deep layer of limestone red earth is distributed on the karst plain. The GJR drainage basin has a typical subtropical monsoon climate,with the average annual temperatures ranging from 19t to 21 °C ,and the

  15. Synthesis of carbon C-14 labelled 2-phenyl-4-alpha-alkylaminomethyl-quinolinemethanol: a potential anti-leishmaniasis agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, T.S.T.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Heertum, R.L.van [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Coll. of Physicians and Surgeons

    1995-07-01

    Using sodium acetate, [1-{sup 14}C] as a starting material, a total of seven steps were required to synthesize the title compound. This involved acylation of ortho-dichlorobenzene to form dichloroacetophenone, [2-{sup 14}C] (I). The 2-phenyl-4-quinoline carboxylic acid, [2-{sup 14}C] (II) was prepared by the Pfitzinger reaction from (1) and dichloroisatin. Compound 11 was converted to the acid chloride (III) by reaction with SOCl{sub 2} in benzene. Grignard condensation reaction of (III) yielded 4-quinolylmethylketone, [2-{sup 14}C] (IV) which was then converted to the bromomethylketone (V). Compound V was reacted with NaBH{sub 4} to form the ethylene oxide (VI). Alkylation of the oxide yielded the title compound (VII). The overall radiochemical yield was 10.1% and the specific activity was 3.0 mCi/mmol, with a radiochemical purity of >99.5%. (author).

  16. Carbon-14 in tree rings and other terrestrial samples in the vicinity of Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant, Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazeika, Jonas; Petrosius, Rimantas; Pukiene, Rutile

    2008-02-01

    The results of (14)C measurements in the annual tree rings from the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP) surroundings, Lithuania, for the period of its operation from 1984 to 2002 are presented. The terrestrial samples, mainly moss and related soil, are studied in places as well. The tree rings have shown slightly enhanced (14)C activity due to operation of the nuclear power plant. The maximal calculated normalized (14)C release of 11TBqGW(e)(-1)year(-1) and the maximal effective dose of 2.0x10(-3)mSvyear(-1) resulting from the (14)C were estimated for 1999. For other years of INPP operation these values are lower. The excess of (14)C specific activity measured in the moss and soil samples from moss-covered sites near the nuclear power plant (up to 0.5km) showed highly elevated (14)C contents (up to 813pMC), probably indicating releases of particulate material.

  17. Syntheses of {gamma}-aminobutyric-1-{sup 14}C and of {alpha}-aminoadipic-6-{sup 14}C acid from methoxy-3 chloropropyl-magnesium and marked carbon dioxide; Syntheses de l'acide {gamma}-aminobutyrique{sup 14}C-1 et de l'acide {alpha}-aminoadipique {sup 14}C-6 a partir de methoxy-3 chloropropylmagnesium et d'anhydride carbonique marque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phung Nhu Liem [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires, Departement des radioelements, Service des molecules marquees

    1967-04-01

    Carbonation of {gamma}-methoxypropyl-magnesium chloride by CO{sub 2} gives {gamma}-methoxy-butyric carboxylic-{sup 14}C acid with a yield of about 95 per cent. When the latter is treated successively with anhydrous HBr and with diazomethane, methyl carboxylic {gamma}-bromobutyrate-{sup 14}C is formed. This in turn gives {gamma}-amino-butyric carboxylic-{sup 14}C acid with an overall yield of 66 per cent with respect to Ba{sup 14}CO{sub 3}, when it is condensed with potassium phthalimide and hydrolyzed by acid. By reacting methyl-{gamma}-bromobutyrate-{sup 14}C with the sodium derivative of ethyl cyanacetamido-acetate in ethanol, followed by an acid hydrolysis, {alpha}-aminoadipic-6-{sup 14}C acid is obtained with an overall yield of 46 per cent with respect to Ba{sup 14}CO{sub 3}. (author) [French] La carbonatation du chlorure de {gamma}-methoxypropylmagnesium par {sup 14}CO{sub 2} donne l'acide {gamma}-methoxybutyrique carboxyle {sup 14}C avec un rendement d'environ 95 pour cent. Ce dernier traite successivement par HBr anhydre et par le diazomethane conduit au {gamma}-bromobutyrate de methyle carboxyle {sup 14}C. Celui-ci condense avec le phtalimide de potassium suivi d'une hydrolyse acide fournit l'acide {gamma}-aminobutyrique carboxyle {sup 14}C avec un rendement global de 66 pour cent par rapport a Ba{sup 14}CO{sub 3}. L'action du {gamma}-bromobutyrate de methyle {sup 14}C sur le derive sode du cyanacetamidoacetate d'ethyle dans l'ethanol suivie d'hydrolyse acide donne l'acide {alpha}-aminoadipique {sup 14}C-6 avec un rendement global de 46 pour cent par rapport a Ba{sup 14}CO{sub 3}. (auteur)

  18. Strong degassing at ridge crests: The behaviour of dissolved carbon and water in basalt glasses at 14°N, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineau, F.; Javoy, M.

    1994-05-01

    The popping rock 2πD43 dredged at 14°N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge contains the largest gas content so far reported in MORB [11], with most of the gas preserved in vesicles (17 vol%). This gas has chemical ( CO 2/H 2O , C/He, C/N, He/Ar) and isotopic ( δ13C) characteristics that are remarkably constant throughout the dredge. We have taken this opportunity to study the behaviour and variability of dissolved species (carbon and water) against such a well-defined fluid. Sixteen new crushing experiments, carried out in steps and on much smaller (38-170 mg) fragments than in our previous study [11], have been conducted to investigate small-scale variations in vesicle carbon composition. The results confirm the overall constancy of δ13C ( -3.62 ± 0.05‰ vs. -3.68 ± 0.07‰ for the large fragments). However, variations of 0.5-3.5‰ occur in about one-third of the aliquots analyzed, reflecting outgassing effects on the smaller vesicles and a slight chemical evolution. δ18O variations from 9.29 to 20.89‰ are associated with the δ13C variations, and correspond to variations in H 2O concentrations in vesicles ranging from ˜ 5 ± 2 vol% for most of the aliquots to high values of 40-85 vol% for small vesicles. The amount of carbon extracted below 900°C decreases with decreasing grain size, and its isotopic composition can be modelled as a variable mixture of CO 2 from small vesicles, precipitated carbonate and amorphous carbon deposits. On samples crushed down to complete exhaustion of vesicle CO 2, carbon deposits on vesicles walls and cracks have been shown to be about 40 ppm C ( ˜ 1% of vesicle CO 2) at δ 13C = -16 ± 4‰ . The carbon recovered on fusion, which corresponds to carbon dissolved in the glass, is constant within a given batch of samples but varies from 57 to 94 ppm C from batch to batch, with the corresponding δ13C values varying from -5.6 to -11.8‰. Water contents vary from 4160 to 5300 ppm, with a δD of -64 ± 2‰, except for an atypical

  19. Assessment Of A Groundwater Flow Model Of The Bangkok Basin, Thailand, Using Carbon-14-Based Ages And Paleohydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Ward E.; Buapeng, Somkid

    1996-04-01

    A study was undertaken to understand the groundwater flow conditions in the Bangkok Basin, Thailand, by comparing 14C-based and simulated groundwater ages. 14C measurements were made on about 50 water samples taken from wells throughout the basin. Simulated ages were obtained using 1) backward-pathline tracking based on the well locations, and 2) results from a three-dimensional groundwater flow model. Comparisons of ages at these locations reveal a large difference between 14C-based ages and ages predicted by the steady-state groundwater flow model. Mainly, 14C and 13C analyses indicate that groundwater in the Bangkok area is about 20,000 years old, whereas steady-state flow and transport simulations imply that groundwater in the Bangkok area is 50,000-100,000 years old. One potential reason for the discrepancy between simulated and 14C-based ages is the assumption in the model of steady-state flow. Groundwater velocities were probably greater in the region before about 10,000 years ago, during the last glacial maximum, because of the lower position of sea level and the absence of the surficial Bangkok Clay. Paleoflow conditions were estimated and then incorporated into a second set of simulations. The new assumption was that current steady-state flow conditions existed for the last 8,000 years but were preceded by steady-state conditions representative of flow during the last glacial maximum. This "transient" paleohydrologic simulation yielded a mean simulated age that more closely agrees with the mean 14C-based age, especially if the 14C-based age corrected for diffusion into clay layers. Although the uncertainties in both the simulated and 14C-based ages are nontrivial, the magnitude of the improved match in the mean age using a paleohydrologic simulation instead of a steady-state simulation suggests that flow conditions in the basin have changed significantly over the last 10,000-20,000 years. Given that the valid age range of 14C-dating methods and the timing

  20. Carbon isotope (δ13C) excursions suggest times of major methane release during the last 14 ka in Fram Strait, the deep-water gateway to the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolaro, C.; Rasmussen, T. L.; Panieri, G.; Mienert, J.; Bünz, S.; Sztybor, K.

    2014-10-01

    We present results from a sediment core collected from a pockmark field on the Vestnesa Ridge (∼80° N) in the eastern Fram Strait. This is the only deep-water gateway to the Arctic, and one of the northernmost marine gas hydrate provinces in the world. Eight 14C AMS dating reveals a detailed chronology for the last 14 ka BP. The δ13C record measured on the benthic foraminiferal species Cassidulina neoteretis shows two distinct intervals with negative values, as low as -4.37‰ in the Bølling-Allerød interstadials and as low as -3.41‰ in the early Holocene. After cleaning procedure designed to remove all authigenic carbonate coatings on benthic foraminiferal tests, the 13C values are still negative (as low as -2.75‰). We have interpreted these negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) to record past methane release events, resulting from the incorporation of 13C-depleted carbon from methane emissions into the benthic foraminiferal shells. The CIEs during the Bølling-Allerød interstadials and the early Holocene relate to periods of ocean warming, sea level rise and increased concentrations of methane (CH4) in the atmosphere. CIEs with similar timing have been reported from other areas in the North Atlantic suggesting a regional event. The trigger mechanisms for such regional events remain to be determined. We speculate that sea-level rise and seabed loading due to high sediment supply in combination with increased seismic activity as a result of rapid deglaciation may have triggered the escape of significant amounts of methane to the seafloor and the water column above.

  1. Carbon-14-ochratoxin A distribution in the Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) monitored by whole body autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, R.; Appelgren, L.E.; Hagelberg, S.; Hult, K.

    1988-05-01

    Tissue distribution of the nephrotoxic mycotoxin ochratoxin A was characterized in laying Japanese quail by whole body autoradiography and scintillation counting using /sup 14/C-labelled toxin. Periodically for 8 days after one intravenous injection of 14 microCi/bird, corresponding to 70 ng/g body weight, birds were killed, frozen, and sagittal sections of the whole body were placed on X-ray film. In general, the ochratoxin disappeared from the avian body rapidly. Specific retention of radioactivity was seen as a ring-like distribution in yolks and growing follicles. After sectioning, organs and intestinal contents were removed from carcasses in a frozen condition, homogenized, extracted, chromatographed, and the radioactivity in fractions was measured by scintillation spectroscopy. High concentrations of ochratoxin A were found in gastric intestinal contents, probably originating from toxin excreted in the bile.

  2. Constraints on emissions of carbon monoxide, methane, and a suite of hydrocarbons in the Colorado Front Range using observations of 14CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. P. Tans

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric radiocarbon (14CO represents an important observational constraint on emissions of fossil-fuel derived carbon into the atmosphere due to the absence of 14CO in fossil fuel reservoirs. The high sensitivity and precision that accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS affords in atmospheric 14CO analysis has greatly increased the potential for using such measurements to evaluate bottom-up emissions inventories of fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff, as well as those for other co-emitted species. Here we use observations of 14CO2 and a series of hydrocarbons and combustion tracers from discrete air samples collected between June 2009 and September 2010 at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO; Lat: 40.050° N, Lon: 105.004° W to derive emission ratios of each species to CO2ff. From these emission ratios, we estimate emissions of these species by using the Vulcan CO2ff high resolution data product as a reference. The species considered in this analysis are carbon monoxide (CO, methane (CH4, acetylene (C2H2, benzene (C6H6, and C3–C5 alkanes. Comparisons of top-down emissions estimates are made to existing inventories of these species for Denver and adjacent counties, as well as to previous efforts to estimate emissions from atmospheric observations over the same area. We find that CO is overestimated in the 2008 National Emissions Inventory (NEI, 2008 by a factor of ~2. A close evaluation of the inventory suggests that the ratio of CO emitted per unit fuel burned from on-road gasoline vehicles is likely over-estimated by a factor of 2.5. The results also suggest that while the oil and gas sector is the largest contributor to the CH4 signal in air arriving from the north and east, it is very likely that other sources, including agricultural sources, contribute to this signal and must be accounted for when attributing these signals to oil and gas industry activity from a top-down perspective. Our results are

  3. Electrocatalytic activity of 2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-1,4-benzoquinone/multi-walled carbon nanotubes immobilized on edge plane pyrolytic graphite electrode for NADH oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassia Silva Luz, Rita de [Institute of Chemistry, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6154, 13084-971, Campinas, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: rcsluz@iqm.unicamp.br; Damos, Flavio Santos [Institute of Chemistry, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6154, 13084-971, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Tanaka, Auro Atsushi [Center of Science and Technology, UFMA, Avenida dos Portugueses s/n, 65085-040, Sao Luis, MA (Brazil); Kubota, Lauro Tatsuo; Gushikem, Yoshitaka [Institute of Chemistry, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6154, 13084-971, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2008-05-30

    This work reports the electrocatalytic activity of 2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-1,4-benzoquinone (TCBQ)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) immobilized on an edge plane pyrolytic graphite electrode for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) oxidation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) were used to confirms the presence of chloro after the nanotube modification with 2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-1,4-benzoquinone. The surface charge transfer constant, k{sub s}, and the charge transfer coefficient for the modified electrode, {alpha}, were estimated as 98.5 ({+-}0.6) s{sup -1} and 0.5, respectively. With this modified electrode the oxidation potential of the NADH was shifted about 300 mV toward a less positive value, presenting a peak current much higher than those measured on an unmodified edge plane pyrolytic graphite electrode (EPPG). Cyclic voltammetry and rotating disk electrode (RDE) experiments indicated that the NADH oxidation reaction involves 2 electrons and a heterogenous rate constant (k{sub obs}) of 3.1 x 10{sup 5} mol{sup -1} l s{sup -1}. The detection limit, repeatability, long-term stability, time of response and linear response range were also investigated.

  4. Configuration- and conformation-dependent electronic-structure variations in 1,4-disubstituted cyclohexanes enabled by a carbon-to-silicon exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuelsson, Rikard; Löfås, Henrik; Wallner, Andreas; Nauroozi, Djawed; Baumgartner, Judith; Marschner, Christoph; Ahuja, Rajeev; Ott, Sascha; Grigoriev, Anton; Ottosson, Henrik

    2014-07-21

    Cyclohexane, with its well-defined conformers, could be an ideal force-controlled molecular switch if it were to display substantial differences in electronic and optical properties between its conformers. We utilize σ conjugation in heavier analogues of cyclohexanes (i.e. cyclohexasilanes) and show that 1,4-disubstituted cyclohexasilanes display configuration- and conformation-dependent variations in these properties. Cis- and trans-1,4-bis(trimethylsilylethynyl)cyclohexasilanes display a 0.11 V difference in their oxidation potentials (computed 0.11 V) and a 0.34 eV difference in their lowest UV absorption (computed difference between first excitations 0.07 eV). This is in stark contrast to differences in the corresponding properties of analogous all-carbon cyclohexanes (computed 0.02 V and 0.03 eV, respectively). Moreover, the two chair conformers of the cyclohexasilane trans isomer display large differences in electronic-structure-related properties. This enables computational design of a mechanically force-controlled conductance switch with a calculated single-molecule ON/OFF ratio of 213 at zero-bias voltage.

  5. Near Surface Leakage Monitoring for the Verification and Accounting of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Using a Field Ready {sup 14}C Isotopic Analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marino, Bruno

    2014-04-14

    Results for the development of a field ready multi-isotopic analyzer for {sup 12}CO{sub 2}, {sup 13}CO{sub 2} and {sup 14}CO{sub 2} and applications for carbon capture and storage (CCS) containment performance are described. A design goal of the field platform was to provide isotopic data with a high data rate, a standardized reference baseline and acceptable precision (e.g., ~ ±50 per mil D{sup 14}CO{sub 2}) for detection and quantification of fossil-fuel CO{sub 2} CCS leakage scenarios. The instrument platform was not designed to replace high precision accelerator mass spectrometry. An additional goal was to combine project scale isotopic data and associated fluxes with unique financial instruments linking CCS containment performance to a publicly traded security providing project revenue to stakeholders. While the primary goals of the project were attained additional work is needed for the instrument platform and deployment within a full scale CCS site that was not available during the project timeframe.

  6. Microdosing of a Carbon-14 Labeled Protein in Healthy Volunteers Accurately Predicts Its Pharmacokinetics at Therapeutic Dosages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaming, M L H; van Duijn, E; Dillingh, M R; Brands, R; Windhorst, A D; Hendrikse, N H; Bosgra, S; Burggraaf, J; de Koning, M C; Fidder, A; Mocking, J A J; Sandman, H; de Ligt, R A F; Fabriek, B O; Pasman, W J; Seinen, W; Alves, T; Carrondo, M; Peixoto, C; Peeters, P A M; Vaes, W H J

    2015-08-01

    Preclinical development of new biological entities (NBEs), such as human protein therapeutics, requires considerable expenditure of time and costs. Poor prediction of pharmacokinetics in humans further reduces net efficiency. In this study, we show for the first time that pharmacokinetic data of NBEs in humans can be successfully obtained early in the drug development process by the use of microdosing in a small group of healthy subjects combined with ultrasensitive accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). After only minimal preclinical testing, we performed a first-in-human phase 0/phase 1 trial with a human recombinant therapeutic protein (RESCuing Alkaline Phosphatase, human recombinant placental alkaline phosphatase [hRESCAP]) to assess its safety and kinetics. Pharmacokinetic analysis showed dose linearity from microdose (53 μg) [(14) C]-hRESCAP to therapeutic doses (up to 5.3 mg) of the protein in healthy volunteers. This study demonstrates the value of a microdosing approach in a very small cohort for accelerating the clinical development of NBEs.

  7. Carbon transitions from either Calvin cycle or transitory starch to heteroglycans as revealed by (14) C-labeling experiments using protoplasts from Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinova, Irina; Steup, Martin; Fettke, Joerg

    2013-09-01

    Plants metabolize transitory starch by precisely coordinated plastidial and cytosolic processes. The latter appear to include the action of water-soluble heteroglycans (SHGin ) whose monosaccharide pattern is similar to that of apoplastic glycans (SHGex ) but, unlike SHGex , SHGin strongly interacts with glucosyl transferases. In this study, we analyzed starch metabolism using mesophyll protoplasts from wild-type plants and two knock-out mutants [deficient in the cytosolic transglucosidase, disproportionating isoenzyme 2 (DPE2) or the plastidial phosphoglucomutase (PGM1)] from Arabidopsis thaliana. Protoplasts prelabeled by photosynthetic (14) CO2 fixation were transferred to an unlabeled medium and were darkened or illuminated. Carbon transitions from the Calvin cycle or from starch to both SHGin and SHGex were analyzed. In illuminated protoplasts, starch turn-over was undetectable but darkened protoplasts continuously degraded starch. During illumination, neither the total (14) C content nor the labeling patterns of the sugar residues of SHGin were significantly altered but both the total amount and the labeling of the constituents of SHGex increased with time. In darkened protoplasts, the (14) C-content of most of the sugar residues of SHGin transiently and strongly increased and then declined. This effect was not observed in any SHGex constituent. In darkened DPE2-deficient protoplasts, none of the SHGin constituents exhibited an essential transient increase in labeling. In contrast, some residues of SHGin from the PGM1 mutant exhibited a transient increase in label but this effect significantly differed from that of the wild type. Two conclusions are reached: first, SHGin and SHGex exert different metabolic functions and second, SHGin is directly involved in starch degradation.

  8. Accuracy of a rapid 10-minute carbon-14 urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori-associated peptic ulcer disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao Chiahung (Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Wang Shyhjen (Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Hsu Chungyuan (Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Lin Wanyu (Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Huang Chihkua (Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Gastroenterology); Chen Granhum (Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Gastroenterology)

    1993-08-01

    Urease in the human gastric mucosa is a marker for infection with Helicobacter pylori (HP), an organism which is associated with peptic ulcer disease. To detect gastric urease, we examined 184 patients (144 males, 40 females; mean age: 49.8[+-]15.6 years) with suspected peptic ulcer disease. Fasting patients were given orally 5 [mu]Ci of carbon-14 labelled urea. For each patient only one breath sample was collected in hyamine at 10 min. The amount of [sup 14]C collected at 10 min was expressed as follows: (DPM/mmol CO[sub 2] collected)/(DPM administered)x100xbody weight (kg). The presence of HP colonization was determined by examination of multiple endoscopic prepyloric antral biopsy specimens subjected to culture or a rapid urease test. For the purpose of this study, HP-positive patients were defined as those with characteristic bacteria as indicated by a positive result of either the culture or the rapid urease test; HP-negative patients were defined as those with negative findings on both the culture and the rapid urease test. Of the 184 cases, 99 (53.8%) were positive for HP infection, and 85 (46.2%), negative. The sensitivity and specificity of the rapid 10 min [sup 14]C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of HP-associated peptic ulcer disease were evaluated by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve with a variable cut-off value from 1.5 to 4.5. When a cut-off value of 1.5 was selected, the sensitivity was 100% and the specificity, 83.5%; when a cut-off value of 4.5 was selected, the sensitivity was 54.5% and the specificity, 97.6%. (orig.)

  9. Synthesis of carbon-13 labelled carbonaceous deposits and their evaluation for potential use as surrogates to better understand the behaviour of the carbon-14-containing deposit present in irradiated PGA graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, L.; Walker, S.; Bond, G.; Eccles, H.; Heard, P. J.; Scott, T. B.; Williams, S. J.

    2016-03-01

    The present work has used microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition to generate suitable isotopically labelled carbonaceous deposits on the surface of Pile Grade A graphite for use as surrogates for studying the behaviour of the deposits observed on irradiated graphite extracted from UK Magnox reactors. These deposits have been shown elsewhere to contain an enhanced concentration of 14C compared to the bulk graphite. A combination of Raman spectroscopy, ion beam milling with scanning electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry were used to determine topography and internal morphology in the formed deposits. Direct comparison was made against deposits found on irradiated graphite samples trepanned from a Magnox reactor core and showed a good similarity in appearance. This work suggests that the microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition technique is of value in producing simulant carbon deposits, being of sufficiently representative morphology for use in non-radioactive surrogate studies of post-disposal behaviour of 14C-containing deposits on some irradiated Magnox reactor graphite.

  10. Enzymatic synthesis and characterization of novel biodegradable copolymers of 5-benzyloxy-trimethylene carbonate with 1,4-dioxan-2-one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Feng; Jia, Hua-Li; Liu, Gang; Wang, Yan-Ping; Feng, Jun; Zhuo, Ren-Xi

    2006-08-01

    Enzymatic ring-opening copolymerization of 5-benzyloxy-trimethylene carbonate (BTMC) and 1,4-dioxan-2-one (DON) was investigated for the first time. Immobilized porcine pancreas lipase (IPPL) on silica particles was selected to perform the copolymerization. A series of novel biodegradable copolymers with different compositions were characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, and GPC. The influences of reaction conditions such as polymerization time and catalyst concentration on the yield and molecular weight of the copolymers were also studied. The copolymerizations of different monomer feed ratios were carried out in bulk at 150 degrees C with 4.5 wt per thousand IPPL as a catalyst for 24 h. With the increase of the BTMC molar feed ratio from 20% to 79%, the M(n) of the resulting copolymers increased from 5600 to 63400. Water uptake and static contact angle experiments showed that the hydrophilicity of copolymers could be improved with increasing DON content in the copolymers. Moreover, the in vitro drug release rate (ibuprofen as the model drug) of the resulting copolymers also increased along with the DON content in the copolymers.

  11. Carbon-rich presolar grains from massive stars. Subsolar 12C/13C and 14N/15N ratios and the mystery of 15N

    CERN Document Server

    Pignatari, M; Hoppe, P; Jordan, C J; Gibson, B K; Trappitsch, R; Herwig, F; Fryer, C; Hirschi, R; Timmes, F X

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-rich grains with isotopic anomalies compared to the Sun are found in primitive meteorites. They were made by stars, and carry the original stellar nucleosynthesis signature. Silicon carbide grains of Type X and C, and low-density graphites condensed in the ejecta of core-collapse supernovae. We present a new set of models for the explosive He shell and compare them with the grains showing 12C/13C and 14N/15N ratios lower than solar. In the stellar progenitor H was ingested into the He shell and not fully destroyed before the explosion. Different explosion energies and H concentrations are considered. If the SN shock hits the He-shell region with some H still present, the models can reproduce the C and N isotopic signatures in C-rich grains. Hot-CNO cycle isotopic signatures are obtained, including a large production of 13C and 15N. The short-lived radionuclides 22Na and 26Al are increased by orders of magnitude. The production of radiogenic 22Ne from the decay of 22Na in the He shell might solve the pu...

  12. Down-regulation of KORRIGAN-like endo-β-1,4-glucanase genes impacts carbon partitioning, mycorrhizal colonization and biomass production in Populus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udaya C Kalluri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A greater understanding of the genetic regulation of plant cell wall remodeling and the impact of modified cell walls on plant performance is important for the development of sustainable biofuel crops. Here, we studied the impact of down-regulating KORRIGAN-like cell wall biosynthesis genes, belonging to the endo-β-1,4-glucanase gene family, on Populus growth, metabolism and the ability to interact with symbiotic microbes. The reductions in cellulose content and lignin syringyl-to-guaiacyl unit ratio, and increase in cellulose crystallinity of cell walls of PdKOR RNAi plants corroborated the functional role of PdKOR in cell wall biosynthesis. Altered metabolism and reduced growth characteristics of RNAi plants revealed new implications on carbon allocation and partitioning. The distinctive metabolome phenotype comprised of a higher phenolic and salicylic acid content, and reduced lignin, shikimic acid and maleic acid content relative to control. Plant sustainability implications of modified cell walls on beneficial plant-microbe interactions were explored via co-culture with an ectomycorrhizal fungus, Laccaria bicolor. A significant increase in the mycorrhization rate was observed in transgenic plants, leading to measurable beneficial growth effects. These findings present new evidence for functional interconnectedness of cellulose biosynthesis pathway, metabolism and mycorrhizal association in plants, and further emphasize the consideration of the sustainability implications of plant trait improvement efforts.

  13. Down-Regulation of KORRIGAN-Like Endo-β-1,4-Glucanase Genes Impacts Carbon Partitioning, Mycorrhizal Colonization and Biomass Production in Populus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalluri, Udaya C.; Payyavula, Raja S.; Labbé, Jessy L.; Engle, Nancy; Bali, Garima; Jawdy, Sara S.; Sykes, Robert W.; Davis, Mark; Ragauskas, Arthur; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    A greater understanding of the genetic regulation of plant cell wall remodeling and the impact of modified cell walls on plant performance is important for the development of sustainable biofuel crops. Here, we studied the impact of down-regulating KORRIGAN-like cell wall biosynthesis genes, belonging to the endo-β-1,4-glucanase gene family, on Populus growth, metabolism and the ability to interact with symbiotic microbes. The reductions in cellulose content and lignin syringyl-to-guaiacyl unit ratio, and increase in cellulose crystallinity of cell walls of PdKOR RNAi plants corroborated the functional role of PdKOR in cell wall biosynthesis. Altered metabolism and reduced growth characteristics of RNAi plants revealed new implications on carbon allocation and partitioning. The distinctive metabolome phenotype comprised of a higher phenolic and salicylic acid content, and reduced lignin, shikimic acid and maleic acid content relative to control. Plant sustainability implications of modified cell walls on beneficial plant-microbe interactions were explored via co-culture with an ectomycorrhizal fungus, Laccaria bicolor. A significant increase in the mycorrhization rate was observed in transgenic plants, leading to measurable beneficial growth effects. These findings present new evidence for functional interconnectedness of cellulose biosynthesis pathway, metabolism and mycorrhizal association in plants, and further emphasize the consideration of the sustainability implications of plant trait improvement efforts. PMID:27757116

  14. Traceability of animal byproducts in quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica tissues using carbon (13C/12C and nitrogen (15N/14N stable isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Móri

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Consistent information on meat products consumed by the public is essential. The technique of stable isotopes is a powerful tool to recover consumers' confidence, as it allows the detection of animal byproduct residues in poultry meat, particularly in quail meat. This study aimed at checking the presence of poultry byproduct mixtures in quail diets by applying the technique of carbon (13C/12C and nitrogen (15N/14N stable isotopes in quail breast muscle, keel, and tibia. Sixty four one-day-old male quails were obtained from a commercial farm. Birds were housed in an experimental house from one to 42 days of age, and were randomly distributed into 8 experimental treatments, and fed diets containing poultry offal meal (POM, bovine meat and bone meal (MBM or poultry feather meal (PFM, or their mixtures. Four birds per treatment were slaughtered at 42 days of age, and breast (Pectoralis major, keel, and tibia were collected for analyses. The inclusion of animal byproducts in quail diets was detected by 13C e 15N analyses in the tissues of the birds; however, it was not possible to specify which byproducts were used. It was concluded that quail meat can be certified by the technique of stable isotopes.

  15. Interfacial Microstructure and Enhanced Mechanical Properties of Carbon Fiber Composites Caused by Growing Generation 1-4 Dendritic Poly(amidoamine) on a Fiber Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bo; Zhang, Ruliang; Gao, Fucheng; He, Maoshuai; Wang, Chengguo; Liu, Lei; Zhao, Lifen; Cui, Hongzhi

    2016-08-23

    In an attempt to improve the mechanical properties of carbon fiber composites, propagation of poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers by in situ polymerization on a carbon fiber surface was performed. During polymerization processes, PAMAM was grafted on carbon fiber by repeated Michael addition and amidation reactions. The changes in surface microstructure and the chemical composition of carbon fibers before and after modification were investigated by atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. All the results indicated that PAMAM was successfully grown on the carbon fiber surface. Such propagation could significantly increase the surface roughness and introduce sufficient polar groups onto the carbon fiber surface, enhancing the surface wettability of carbon fiber. The fractured surface of carbon fiber-reinforced composites showed a great enhancement of interfacial adhesion. Compared with those of desized fiber composites, the interlaminar shear strength and interfacial shear strength of PAMAM/fiber-reinforced composites showed increases of 55.49 and 110.94%, respectively.

  16. Thermodynamic and kinetic studies of the equilibration reaction between the sulfur and carbon bonded forms of a cobalt(III) complex with the ligands 1,4,7-triazycyclononane and 1,4-diaza-7-thiacyclodecane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Y.S.; Becker, J.; Kofod, Pauli

    1996-01-01

    -sulfur complex to form the alkyl complex gave 100% loss of deuterium. It is concluded that the labile methylene proton is bound to the carbon atom which in the alkyl complex is bound to cobalt(III). From the kinetic data it is estd. that the carbanion reacts with water 270 times faster than it is captured......The new cyclic thioether 1,4-diaza-7-thiacyclodecane, dathicd, has been synthesized and used for the prepn. of the sulfur- and carbon-bonded cobalt(III) complexes: [Co(tacn)(S-dathicd)]Cl3.5H2O and [Co(tacn)(C-dathicd)](ClO4)2 (tacn, 1,4,7-triazacyclononane; C-dathicd, 1,4-diamino-7-thiacyclodecan...

  17. The fate of river organic carbon in coastal areas: A study in the Rhône River delta using multiple isotopic (δ13C, Δ14C) and organic tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathalot, C.; Rabouille, C.; Tisnérat-Laborde, N.; Toussaint, F.; Kerhervé, P.; Buscail, R.; Loftis, K.; Sun, M.-Y.; Tronczynski, J.; Azoury, S.; Lansard, B.; Treignier, C.; Pastor, L.; Tesi, T.

    2013-10-01

    A significant fraction of the global carbon flux to the ocean occurs in River-dominated Ocean Margins (RiOMar) although large uncertainties remain in the cycle of organic matter (OM) in these systems. In particular, the OM sources and residence time have not been well clarified. Surface (0-1 cm) and sub-surface (3-4 cm) sediments and water column particles (bottom and intermediate depth) from the Rhône River delta system were collected in June 2005 and in April 2007 for a multi-proxy study. Lignin phenols, black carbon (BC), proto-kerogen/BC mixture, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), carbon stable isotope (δ13COC), and radiocarbon measurements (Δ14COC) were carried out to characterize the source of sedimentary organic material and to address degradation and transport processes. The bulk OM in the prodelta sediment appears to have a predominantly modern terrigenous origin with a significant contribution of modern vascular C3 plant detritus (Δ14COC = 27.9‰, δ13COC = -27.4‰). In contrast, the adjacent continental shelf, below the river plume, seems to be dominated by aged OM (Δ14COC = -400‰, δ13COC = -24.2‰), and shows no evidence of dilution and/or replacement by freshly produced marine carbon. Our data suggest an important contribution of black carbon (50% of OC) in the continental shelf sediments. Selective degradation processes occur along the main dispersal sediment system, promoting the loss of a modern terrestrial OM but also proto-kerogen-like OM. In addition, we hypothesize that during the transport across the shelf, a long term resuspension/deposition loop induces efficient long term degradation processes able to rework such refractory-like material until the OC is protected by the mineral matrix of particles.

  18. On the isolation of elemental carbon (EC for micro-molar 14C accelerator mass spectrometry: development of a hybrid reference material for 14C-EC accuracy assurance, and a critical evaluation of the thermal optical kinetic (TOK EC isolation procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Currie

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of the research reported here has been the development of a hybrid reference material (RM to serve as a test of accuracy for elemental carbon (EC isotopic (14C speciation measurements. Such measurements are vital for the quantitative apportionment of fossil and biomass sources of 'soot' (EC, the tracer of fire that has profound effects on health, atmospheric visibility, and climate. Previous studies of 14C-EC measurement quality, carried out with NIST SRM 1649a (Urban Dust, showed a range of results, but since the 'truth' was not known for this natural matrix RM, one had to rely on isotopic-chemical consistency evidence (14C in PAH, EC of measurement validity (Currie et al., 2002. Components of the new Hybrid RM (DiesApple, however, have known 14C and EC composition, and they are nearly orthogonal (isotopically and chemically. NIST SRM 2975 (Forklift Diesel Soot has little or no 14C, and its major compositional component is EC; SRM 1515 (Apple Leaves has the 14C content of biomass-C, and it has little or no EC. Thus, the Hybrid RM can serve as an absolute isotopic test for the absence of EC-mimicking pyrolysis-C (char from SRM 1515 in the EC isolate of the Hybrid RM, as well as a test for conservation of its dominant soot fraction throughout the isolation procedure. The secondary objective was to employ the Hybrid RM for the comparative evaluation of the thermal optical kinetic (TOK and thermal optical transmission (TOT methods for the isolation of EC for micro-molar carbon accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS. As part of this process, the relatively new TOK method was subjected to a critical evaluation and significant development. Key findings of our study are: (1 both methods exhibited biomass-C 'leakage'; for TOT, the EC fraction isolated for AMS contained about 8% of the original biomass-C; for TOK, the refractory carbon (RC isolated contained about 3% of the original biomass-C.; (2 the initial isothermal oxidation stage

  19. The preparation of nucleotides uniformly labelled with carbon-14 by biosynthetic methods. Isolation of adenylic, uridylic, cytidylic,and guanylic acids, from the alkaline hydrolysate of escherichia coli RNA; Preparacion de nucleiotidos uniformemente marcados con 14{sup C}, por via biosintetica. Aislamiento de los acidos adenilico, uridilico, citidilico y guanilico, procedentes de la hidrolisis alcalina de RNA de escherichia Coli.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Pineda, M. D.; Pacheco Lopez, J.

    1978-07-01

    A method is described for the preparation and analysis of adenylic, uri dilic, cytidi- 11c and guanylic acids, labelled with 14{sup C}. Escherichia coli cells have been labelled by growing them in a medi dia containing glucose-14{sup C} as their only source of carbon. RNA is isolated from the cells, and after hydrolysis of the molecule the resulting nucleotides are separated by gel filtration and exchange chromatography. Chemical and radiochemical purity of the Isolated nucleotides is determined, and also its specific radioactivity. (Author) 30 refs.

  20. Seasonal and snowmelt-driven changes in the water-extractable organic carbon dynamics in a cool-temperate Japanese forest soil, estimated using the bomb-(14)C tracer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Takahiro; Atarashi-Andoh, Mariko; Koarashi, Jun; Saito-Kokubu, Yoko; Hirai, Keizo

    2014-02-01

    Water-extractable organic carbon (WEOC) in soil consists of a mobile and bioavailable portion of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool. WEOC plays an important role in dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) and transport of radionuclides in forest soils. Although considerable research has been conducted on the importance of recent litter versus older soil organic matter as WEOC sources in forest soil, a more thorough evaluation of the temporal pattern of WEOC is necessary. We investigated the seasonal variation in WEOC in a Japanese cool-temperate beech forest soil by using the carbon isotopic composition ((14)C and (13)C) of WEOC as a tracer for the carbon sources. Our observations demonstrated that fresh leaf litter DOC significantly contributed to WEOC in May (35-52%) when the spring snowmelt occurred because of the high water flux and low temperature. In the rainy season, increases in the concentration of WEOC and the proportion of hydrophobic compounds were caused by high microbial activity under wetter conditions. From summer to autumn, the WEOC in the mineral soil horizons was also dominated by microbial release from SOC (>90%). These results indicate that the origin and dynamics of WEOC are strongly controlled by seasonal events such as the spring snowmelt and the rainy season's intense rainfall.

  1. Carbon-14 activity of fallout in Araucaria angustifolia annual growth rings, from Arapoti, Parana State, Brazil; Atividade de {sup 14} C do 'fallout' em aneis anuais de crescimento de Araucaria angustifolia, de Arapoti - PR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisi, Claudio Sergio; Pessenda, Luiz Carlos Ruiz [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de 14 C; Tomazello Filho, Mario [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Florestais. Lab. de Dendrocronologia

    2000-07-01

    During the period of nuclear tests between 1950 and 1960, an input of artificial {sup 14} C (fallout effect) occurred in the natural reservoirs. {sup 14} C determinations in the Northern Hemisphere showed values of {delta}{sup 14} C up to 960 in the year of 1964. To determine the fallout {sup 14} C activity in Brazil, wood samples from Araucaria angustifolia (Bert.) O. Kuntze, Araucariaceae, were collected in Arapoti-PR (24 deg 11{sup S}, 49 deg 58{sup O}). The annual tree rings were selected by dendrochronology. The cellulose was extracted and its {sup 14} C activity determined by liquid scintillation method. The results showed a significant increase of the {delta} {sup 14} C up to 590 in 1965, about 60% higher than the natural activity, gradually decreasing after the end of nuclear tests. These results were correlated with those obtained in the Northen Hemisphere and will be used in the studies of CO{sub 2} mechanisms distribuition to the atmosphere and other natural reservoirs. (author)

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL BIODEGRADABILITY OF [14C] SINGLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBESBY TRAMETES VERSICOLOR AND NATURAL MICROBIAL CULTURES FOUND IN NEWBEDFORD HARBOR SEDIMENT AND AERATED WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT SLUDGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known about environmental biodegradability or biotransformations of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Because of their strong association with aquatic organic matter, detailed knowledge of the ultimate fate and persistence of SWNT requires investigation of possible...

  3. Applications of radiocarbon in the terrestrial carbon cycle and related research advances%14C在陆地生态系统碳循环研究中的应用及进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊晓虎; 周卫健; 杜花; 程鹏; 吴书刚; 牛振川; 卢雪峰

    2016-01-01

    深刻理解陆地生态系统碳循环有助于提高未来气候预测的准确性。14C是陆地生态系统碳循环研究中广泛应用的重要工具,本文对14C在土壤有机碳周转时间和平均停留时间的评估、陆地生态系统释放CO2的源解析、河流有机碳的源解析及陆地生态系统碳循环对气候变化和土地利用的响应等四个方面的应用及进展进行了细致的介绍,最后展望了14C应用于陆地碳循环研究发展趋势,并对国内相关研究的开展提出了几点建议。%Background, aim, and scope Terrestrial ecosystems are one of the main sources and sinks of atmospheric CO2 now, however, it is not clear whether it will become a net source or sink in the future under the inlfuence of climate change and human activities. Radiocarbon is an important and widely used tool in the research of terrestrial carbon cycle. In this paper, the research progress in recent years were reviewed and divided in four parts: the calculation of turnover time and mean residence time of soil organic carbon, partitioning sources of CO2 derived from terrestrial ecosystem, partitioning sources of lfuvial organic carbon and the response of terrestrial carbon cycle to climate change and land use. The expanded applications of radiocarbon in terrestrial carbon cycle in future and the deifciencies of related research in China were also discussed.Materials and methods We mainly reviewed the literature those use radiocarbon with alternative method (model) to evaluate the turnover of soil organic carbon, partition sources of different types of C in terrestrial ecosystem or catch the response of terrestrial carbon cycle to climate change and land use, then, we made comparisons between these methods (models).Results The turnover time of soil organic carbon (SOC) is a measuring of its mixing or refresh rate, and is the time it would take for the reservoir to completely empty if there were no further inputs. And the mean

  4. Biodegradation of poly(butylene succinate) powder in a controlled compost at 58°C evaluated by naturally-occurring carbon 14 amounts in evolved CO(2) based on the ISO 14855-2 method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunioka, Masao; Ninomiya, Fumi; Funabashi, Masahiro

    2009-11-20

    The biodegradabilities of poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) powders in a controlled compost at 58 degrees C have been studied using a Microbial Oxidative Degradation Analyzer (MODA) based on the ISO 14855-2 method, entitled "Determination of the ultimate aerobic biodegradability of plastic materials under controlled composting conditions-Method by analysis of evolved carbon dioxide-Part 2: Gravimetric measurement of carbon dioxide evolved in a laboratory-scale test". The evolved CO(2) was trapped by an additional aqueous Ba(OH)(2) solution. The trapped BaCO(3) was transformed into graphite via a serial vaporization and reduction reaction using a gas-tight tube and vacuum manifold system. This graphite was analyzed by accelerated mass spectrometry (AMS) to determine the percent modern carbon [pMC (sample)] based on the (14)C radiocarbon concentration. By using the theory that pMC (sample) was the sum of the pMC (compost) (109.87%) and pMC (PBS) (0%) as the respective ratio in the determined period, the CO(2) (respiration) was calculated from only one reaction vessel. It was found that the biodegradabilities determined by the CO(2) amount from PBS in the sample vessel were about 30% lower than those based on the ISO method. These differences between the ISO and AMS methods are caused by the fact that part of the carbons from PBS are changed into metabolites by the microorganisms in the compost, and not changed into CO(2).

  5. A model-based interpretation of low frequency changes in the carbon cycle during the last 120,000 years and its implications for the reconstrucion of atmospheric D14C and the 14C production rates estimates

    OpenAIRE

    Köhler, Peter; R. Muscheler; Fischer, Hubertus

    2006-01-01

    We use the ocean/atmosphere/biosphere box model of the global carbon cycle BICYCLE (Köhler et al., 2005) to reproduce low frequency changes in atmospheric CO2 as seen in Antarctic ice cores during the last glacial cycle (120,000 years) (Köhler et al., 2006). We force the model forward in time by various paleo-climatic records derived from ice and sediment cores. The simulation results of our proposed scenario match a compiled CO2 record from various ice cores with high accuracy (r2 = 0.89). T...

  6. Biomarker and carbon isotope constraints (δ{sup 13}C, Δ{sup 14}C) on sources and cycling of particulate organic matter discharged by large Siberian rivers draining permafrost areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winterfeld, Maria

    2014-08-15

    Circumpolar permafrost soils store about half of the global soil organic carbon pool. These huge amounts of organic matter (OM) could accumulate due to low temperatures and water saturated soil conditions over the course of millennia. Currently most of this OM remains frozen and therefore does not take part in the active carbon cycle, making permafrost soils a globally important carbon sink. Over the last decades mean annual air temperatures in the Arctic increased stronger than the global mean and this trend is projected to continue. As a result the permafrost carbon pool is under climate pressure possibly creating a positive climate feedback due to the thaw-induced release of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. Arctic warming will lead to increased annual permafrost thaw depths and Arctic river runoff likely resulting in enhanced mobilization and export of old, previously frozen soil-derived OM. Consequently, the great arctic rivers play an important role in global biogeochemical cycles by connecting the large permafrost carbon pool of their hinterlands with the arctic shelf seas and the Arctic Ocean. The first part of this thesis deals with particulate organic matter (POM) from the Lena Delta and adjacent Buor Khaya Bay. The Lena River in central Siberia is one of the major pathways translocating terrestrial OM from its southernmost reaches near Lake Baikal to the coastal zone of the Laptev Sea. The permafrost soils from the Lena catchment area store huge amounts of pre-aged OM, which is expected to be remobilized due to climate warming. To characterize the composition and vegetation sources of OM discharged by the Lena River, the lignin phenol and carbon isotopic composition (δ{sup 13}C and Δ{sup 14}C) in total suspended matter (TSM) from surface waters, surface sediments from the Buor Khaya Bay along with soils from the Lena Delta's first (Holocene) and third terraces (Pleistocene ice complex) were analyzed. The lignin compositions of these samples are

  7. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis XIII. pH Effects in C{sup 14}O{sub 2} Fixation by Scenedesmus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellet, C.; Benson, A. A.

    1951-10-23

    The rates of photosynthesis and dark fixation of C{sup 14}O{sub 2} in Scenedesmus have been compared in dilute phosphate buffers of 1.6 to 11.4 pH; determination of C{sup 14} incorporation into the various products shows enhancement of uptake in an acid medium into sucrose, polysaccharides, alanine and serine, in an alkaline medium into malic asparctic acids. kinetic experiments at extreme pH values suggest that several paths are available for CO{sub 2} assimilation. A tentative correlation of the results with the pH optima of some enzymes and resultant effects upon concentrations of intermediates is presented.

  8. Biodegradation of Poly(butylene succinate Powder in a Controlled Compost at 58 °C Evaluated by Naturally-Occurring Carbon 14 Amounts in Evolved CO2 Based on the ISO 14855-2 Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Funabashi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The biodegradabilities of poly(butylene succinate (PBS powders in a controlled compost at 58 °C have been studied using a Microbial Oxidative Degradation Analyzer (MODA based on the ISO 14855-2 method, entitled “Determination of the ultimate aerobic biodegradability of plastic materials under controlled composting conditions—Method by analysis of evolved carbon dioxide—Part 2: Gravimetric measurement of carbon dioxide evolved in a laboratory-scale test”. The evolved CO2 was trapped by an additional aqueous Ba(OH2 solution. The trapped BaCO3 was transformed into graphite via a serial vaporization and reduction reaction using a gas-tight tube and vacuum manifold system. This graphite was analyzed by accelerated mass spectrometry (AMS to determine the percent modern carbon [pMC (sample] based on the 14C radiocarbon concentration. By using the theory that pMC (sample was the sum of the pMC (compost (109.87% and pMC (PBS (0% as the respective ratio in the determined period, the CO2 (respiration was calculated from only one reaction vessel. It was found that the biodegradabilities determined by the CO2 amount from PBS in the sample vessel were about 30% lower than those based on the ISO method. These differences between the ISO and AMS methods are caused by the fact that part of the carbons from PBS are changed into metabolites by the microorganisms in the compost, and not changed into CO2.

  9. Down-Regulation of KORRIGAN-Like Endo-β-1,4-Glucanase Genes Impacts Carbon Partitioning, Mycorrhizal Colonization and Biomass Production in Populus

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    A greater understanding of the genetic regulation of plant cell wall remodeling and the impact of modified cell walls on plant performance is important for the development of sustainable biofuel crops. Here, we studied the impact of down-regulating KORRIGAN-like cell wall biosynthesis genes, belonging to the endo-β-1,4-glucanase gene family, on Populus growth, metabolism and the ability to interact with symbiotic microbes. The reductions in cellulose content and lignin syringyl-to-guaiacyl un...

  10. Down-regulation of KORRIGAN-like endo-β-1,4-glucanase genes impacts carbon partitioning, mycorrhizal colonization and biomass production in Populus

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    A greater understanding of the genetic regulation of plant cell wall remodeling and the impact of modified cell walls on plant performance is important for the development of sustainable biofuel crops. Here, we studied the impact of down-regulating KORRIGAN-like cell wall biosynthesis genes, belonging to the endo-β-1,4-glucanase gene family, on Populus growth, metabolism and the ability to interact with symbiotic microbes. The reductions in cellulose content and lignin syringyl-to-guaiacyl un...

  11. Ba(OH)/sub 2/. 8H/sub 2/O process for the removal and immobilization of carbon-14. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haag, G.L.; Holladay, D.W.; Pitt, W.W. Jr.; Young, G.C.

    1986-01-01

    The airborne release of /sup 14/C from various nuclear facilities has been identified as a potential biohazard due to the long half-life of /sup 14/C (5730 years) and the ease with which it may be assimilated into the biosphere. At ORNL, technology has been developed for the removal and immobilization of this radionuclide. Prior studies have indicated that /sup 14/C will likely exist in the oxidized form as CO/sub 2/ and will contribute slightly to the bulk CO/sub 2/ concentration of the gas stream, which is air-like in nature (approx.300 ppM/sub v/ CO/sub 2/). The technology that has been developed utilizes the CO/sub 2/-Ba(OH)/sub 2/.8H/sub 2/O gas-solid reaction with the mode of gas-solid contacting being a fixed bed. The product, BaCO/sub 3/, possesses excellent thermal and chemical stability, prerequisites for the long-term disposal of nuclear wastes. For optimal process operation, studies have indicated that an operating window of adequate size does exist. When operating within the window, high CO/sub 2/ removal efficiency (effluent concentrations <100 ppB/sub v/), high reactant utilization (>99%), and an acceptable pressure drop across the bed (3 kPa/m at a superficial velocity of 13 cm/s) are possible. Three areas of experimental investigation are reported: (1) microscale studies on 150-mg samples to provide information concerning surface properties, kinetics, and equilibrium vapor pressures; (2) macroscale studies on large fixed beds (4.2 kg of reactant) to determine the effects of humidity, temperature, and gas flow rate upon bed pressure drop and CO/sub 2/ breakthrough; and (3) design, construction, and operation of a pilot unit capable of continuously processing a 34-m/sup 3//h (20-ft/sup 3//min) air-based gas stream.

  12. CARBON-RICH PRESOLAR GRAINS FROM MASSIVE STARS: SUBSOLAR {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C AND {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N RATIOS AND THE MYSTERY OF {sup 15}N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pignatari, M. [Konkoly Observatory, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 15-17, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Zinner, E. [Laboratory for Space Sciences and Physics Department, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Hoppe, P. [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Jordan, C. J.; Gibson, B. K. [E.A. Milne Centre for Astrophysics, Dept of Physics and Mathematics, University of Hull, HU6 7RX (United Kingdom); Trappitsch, R. [Department of the Geophysical Sciences and Chicago Center for Cosmochemistry, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Herwig, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8P5C2 (Canada); Fryer, C. [Computational Physics and Methods (CCS-2), LANL, Los Alamos, NM, 87545 (United States); Hirschi, R. [Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Timmes, F. X. [The Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Carbon-rich grains with isotopic anomalies compared to the Sun are found in primitive meteorites. They were made by stars, and carry the original stellar nucleosynthesis signature. Silicon carbide grains of Type X and C and low-density (LD) graphites condensed in the ejecta of core-collapse supernovae. We present a new set of models for the explosive He shell and compare them with the grains showing {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C and {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratios lower than solar. In the stellar progenitor H was ingested into the He shell and not fully destroyed before the explosion. Different explosion energies and H concentrations are considered. If the supernova shock hits the He-shell region with some H still present, the models can reproduce the C and N isotopic signatures in C-rich grains. Hot-CNO cycle isotopic signatures are obtained, including a large production of {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N. The short-lived radionuclides {sup 22}Na and {sup 26}Al are increased by orders of magnitude. The production of radiogenic {sup 22}Ne from the decay of {sup 22}Na in the He shell might solve the puzzle of the Ne-E(L) component in LD graphite grains. This scenario is attractive for the SiC grains of type AB with {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratios lower than solar, and provides an alternative solution for SiC grains originally classified as nova grains. Finally, this process may contribute to the production of {sup 14}N and {sup 15}N in the Galaxy, helping to produce the {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratio in the solar system.

  13. 含Zn2+的金属有机骨架材料对碳酸二苯酯与1,4-丁二醇酯交换反应的催化性能%Transesterification Between Diphenyl Carbonate and 1,4-Butanediol Catalyzed by Metal-Organic Framework Based on Zn2 +

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽苹; 王公应; 汪帆; 刘品华; 徐晓林; 贺池先

    2013-01-01

    采用溶剂热法制备了Zn2+和对苯二甲酸组合形成的金属有机骨架材料(MOF),并用X射线衍射(XRD)和红外光谱(FT-IR)对其进行了表征.研究了MOF对碳酸二苯酯(DPC)与1,4-丁二醇(1,4-BD)酯交换反应合成聚碳酸酯二醇(PCDL)的催化活性,并与乙酰丙酮氧钛(TiO(acac)2)、乙酰丙酮锌(Zn(acac)2)和锌铝类水滑石(Zn-Al-CO3 LDH)等催化剂进行了比较.结果显示,MOF是该酯交换反应的良好催化剂.在优化的反应条件下,获得了数均分子量为3470,羟基值为35.2mg KOH/g的PCDL.%Metal-organic framework (MOF) based on Zn2+ and terephthalic acid was prepared and characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The catalytic activity of MOF for the transesterification between diphenyl carbonate (DPC) and 1,4-butanediol (1,4-BD) to polycarbonate diol (PCDL) was investigated, and was compared with that of catalysts such as titaniumoxide acetylacetonate (TiO(acac)2), zinc acetylacetonate (Zn(acac)2) and Zn-Al-CO3 layered double hydroxides (Zn-Al-CO3 LDH). The results show that MOF is an efficient catalyst for the transesterification. Under optimal reaction conditions, PCDL with number average molecular weight (-Mn) of 3470 and hydroxyl value of 35.2 mg KOH/g was synthesized.

  14. The risk of leukaemia in young children from exposure to tritium and carbon-14 in the discharges of German nuclear power stations and in the fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeford, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Towards the end of 2007, the results were published from a case-control study (the "KiKK Study") of cancer in young children, diagnosed nuclear power stations in western Germany. The study found a tendency for cases of leukaemia to live closer to the nearest nuclear power station than their matched controls, producing an odds ratio that was raised to a statistically significant extent for residence within 5 km of a nuclear power station. The findings of the study received much publicity, but a detailed radiological risk assessment demonstrated that the radiation doses received by young children from discharges of radioactive material from the nuclear reactors were much lower than those received from natural background radiation and far too small to be responsible for the statistical association reported in the KiKK Study. This has led to speculation that conventional radiological risk assessments have grossly underestimated the risk of leukaemia in young children posed by exposure to man-made radionuclides, and particular attention has been drawn to the possible role of tritium and carbon-14 discharges in this supposedly severe underestimation of risk. Both (3)H and (14)C are generated naturally in the upper atmosphere, and substantial increases in these radionuclides in the environment occurred as a result of their production by atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons during the late 1950s and early 1960s. If the leukaemogenic effect of these radionuclides has been seriously underestimated to the degree necessary to explain the KiKK Study findings, then a pronounced increase in the worldwide incidence of leukaemia among young children should have followed the notably elevated exposure to (3)H and (14)C from nuclear weapons testing fallout. To investigate this hypothesis, the time series of incidence rates of leukaemia among young children risk of leukaemia in young children following the peak of above-ground nuclear weapons testing, or that incidence rates are

  15. Radiocarbon dating of terrestrial carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigati, Jeffrey S.; Rink, W. Jack; Thompson, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial carbonates encompass a wide range of materials that potentially could be used for radiocarbon (14C) dating. Biogenic carbonates, including shells and tests of terrestrial and aquatic gastropods, bivalves, ostracodes, and foraminifera, are preserved in a variety of late Quaternary deposits and may be suitable for 14C dating. Primary calcareous deposits (marls, tufa, speleothems) and secondary carbonates (rhizoliths, fracture fill, soil carbonate) may also be targeted for dating when conditions are favorable. This chapter discusses issues that are commonly encountered in 14C dating of terrestrial carbonates, including isotopic disequilibrium and open-system behavior, as well as methods used to determine the reliability of ages derived from these materials. Recent methodological advancements that may improve the accuracy and precision of 14C ages of terrestrial carbonates are also highlighted.

  16. Etude de la migration des interstitiels dans des austenites Fe, Cr (18), Ni (14) pures et industrielles par irradiation dans un microscope a tres haute tension: Role du carbone et du titane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housseau, N.; Pelissier, J.

    1983-12-01

    Nous avons étudié le rôle des impurtés (C ou Ti) dans la condensation et la migration des défauts interstitiels. Les échantillons étudiés sont des aciers austénitiques: (a) acier de synthèse de haute pureté (Cr 18, Ni 14, Fe) avec ou sans carbone; (b) acier industriel avec C (800 ppm) ou Ti (0,45%). Les échantillons ont été irradiés dans un microscope à très haute tension aux doses allant de 10 -4 jusqu'à 10 -1 dpa aux températures de 300°C à 400°C. Dans de telles conditions les défauts observés sont des boucles interstitielles. L'étude de la variation de l'épaisseur de la zone dénudée près du bord de la lame mince en fonction de la température nous a permis d'évaluer l'énergie de migration effective de l'interstitiel dans ces alliages. Dans l'austénite de synthèse carburée ou non sa valeur est de 0.8 eV. Dans l'acier industriel au titane carburé ou non on obtient 2.0 eV. Nous n'avons pas observé d'effet lié au carbone. L'examen de la densité de boucles à saturation dans les divers aciers suggère une forte énergie de liaison interstitiel-titane. Cette énergie de liaison, si l'ont admet que le titane est la seule impureté agissante du système, peut être estimée à 1.2 eV.

  17. The synthesis of 14 C-labelled carbon dots and their accumulation in marine phytoplankton%14C-标记碳点的合成及其在海洋浮游植物体内的 生物富集应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李家梦; 杨柳燕; 缪爱军

    2016-01-01

    为了探究光敏性碳基纳米材料的生物富集过程,通过一步微波热解反应合成14 C标记的碳点,并以海洋原甲藻(Prorocentrummicans)和东海原甲藻(Prorocentrumdonghaiense)作为受试生物,定量分析了这两种生物对碳点(C-dots)的吸收动力学差异.由于生物细胞的遮挡效应可能会影响胞内标记碳点的测定,实验中首先比较了生物样品三种处理方法(对生物样品分别直接测定,超清洗,超声破碎)的效果差异,发现对生物细胞样品进行超声破碎的处理效果最好,并且在超声5 min的条件下测定效果最佳.随后,开展实验进一步探究了短时间内碳点在生物细胞内的富集过程.结果表明,碳点在这两种生物体内的富集量都随时间呈现线性增加的趋势.当我们以三种生物富集量表示方法作图(pg·cell-1,pg·μm-2和pg·μm-3)时,发现采用以单位体积的生物富集量作图最科学,并且发现这两种原甲藻对碳点的生物富集量随时间的变化趋势极为接近,克服了藻细胞大小带来的差异,更为科学地阐述了水生生物体内碳点的富集量的变化.%To investigate the bioaccumulation of carbon-based nanomaterial,we synthesized the14 C-labeled carbon dots (C-dots)by one-way microwave pyrolysis.Two marine algae,Prorocentrum micans and Prorocentrum donghaiense were used as the objective organisms,and their accumulation of C-dots was compared.As the 14 C signal from the C-dots may be quenched inside the cells,the results of the different ultrasonicating methods were compared,and the counting number was the highest when the cells were ultrasonicated for 5 minutes.After the optimization of the cell processing methods,we further explored the bioaccumulation kinetics of C-dots by both algae and the accumulation results with different units(pg·cell-1 ,pg·μm-2 ,and pg·μm-3 )were compared.As expected,cellular concentration of C-dots increased linearly with exposure time regardless of

  18. 14 CFR 34.60 - Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... designed to measure concentrations of hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and oxides of nitrogen... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Introduction. 34.60 Section 34.60 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT FUEL VENTING...

  19. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from time series observations using Bubble type equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the MOORINGS in the North Pacific Ocean from 1997-11-14 to 2010-08-25 (NODC Accession 0100084)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0100084 includes chemical, physical, and time series data collected from MOORINGS in the North Pacific Ocean from 1997-11-14 to 2010-08-25. These data...

  20. Carbon Carbon Composites: An Overview .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rohini Devi

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon carbon composites are a new class of engineering materials that are ceramic in nature but exhibit brittle to pseudoplastic behaviour. Carbon-carbon is a unique all-carbon composite with carbon fibre embeded in carbon matrix and is known as an inverse composite. Due to their excellent thermo-structural properties, carbon-carbon composites are used in specialised application like re-entry nose-tips, leading edges, rocket nozzles, and aircraft brake discs apart from several industrial and biomedical applications. The multidirectional carbon-carbon product technology is versatile and offers design flexibility. This paper describes the multidirectional preform and carbon-carbon process technology and research and development activities within the country. Carbon-carbon product experience at DRDL has also been discussed. Development of carbon-carbon brake discs process technology using the liquid impregnation process is described. Further the test results on material characterisation, thermal, mechanical and tribological properties are presented.

  1. Catalytic activity of carbon-based solid acids in the esterification synthesis of 1,4-butanediol disuccinate diisooctyl%碳基固体酸在1,4-丁二醇双琥珀酸二异辛酯合成中的催化性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    华平; 喻红梅; 李建华; 方略韬; 戴宝江; 张海滨; 朱国华

    2016-01-01

    采用对甲苯磺酸和可溶性淀粉混合物部分炭化制备新型碳基固体酸催化剂,研究了m(对甲苯磺酸):m(可溶性淀粉)、炭化温度和炭化时间对催化剂催化合成1,4-丁二醇双琥珀酸二异辛酯的影响,用SEM、XRD、红外光谱、元素分析等对催化剂进行了表征。结果表明,在m(对甲苯磺酸):m(可溶性淀粉)=1.0:2.0、炭化温度200℃、炭化时间8 h的条件下,得到碳基固体酸的催化活性最高,在180℃下反应1.5 h可达到规定的酯化率,催化剂重复使用5次后,酯化率仍能达到93%以上,另外该催化剂具有良好的热稳定性。%Carbon-based solid acids were prepared by coking mixtures of p-toluene sulfonic acid and soluble starch with different ratios at different temperatures. The effects of the p-toluene sulfonic acid/soluble starch mass ratio, coking temperature and time on their catalytic activities in the esterification reaction of maleic anhydride with ethylene glycol were investigated. Results indicated that the activity of the acid was the highest when amixture with the mass ratio of 0. 5 was coked at 200℃ for 8 h. The activity remained high after the solid acid had been used 5 times.

  2. Reporting C-14 activities and concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mook, WG; van der Plicht, J

    1999-01-01

    Three modes of reporting C-14 activities are in use, in part analogous to the internationally accepted (IAEA) conventions for stable isotopes: (1) absolute activity, the specific activity of C-14 or the activity per gram of carbon; (2) activity ratio, the ratio between the absolute activities of a s

  3. Synthesis of carbon-14 labelled cis-malonato [(4R,5R)-4,5-bis(aminomethyl)-2-isopropyl-1,3-dioxolane] platinum(II) (SKI 2053R)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae-Kee; Kim, Youngseok; Rim, Jonggill; Kim, Ganghyeok; Gam, Jongsik; Song, Sungkun; Yoo, Kwanghee; Kim, Key H. (Sunkyong Industries, Kyungki-Do (Korea, Republic of). Life Science Research Center)

    1994-02-01

    The synthesis of [sup 14]C-labelled cis-malonato[(4R,5R)-4,5-bis(aminomethyl)-2-isopropyl-1,3-dioxolan e]platinum(II) from [1,4-[sup 14]C] D-tartaric acid is described. The overall radiochemical yield of the product in a eight-step sequence was 23.8% and radiochemical purity was 98.5%. (author).

  4. DISSOLVED INORGANIC CARBON and TOTAL ALKALINITY collected from NEW HORIZON in Gulf of California and NE Pacific (limit-180) from 2004-07-14 to 2008-08-06 (NCEI Accession 0130921)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Dissolved Inorganic Carbon (DIC) and Total Alkalinity (TA) samples collected via Niskin bottle and analysed on shore from the Gulf of California in the summers of...

  5. 14 CFR 31.14 - Weight limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Weight limits. 31.14 Section 31.14 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Flight Requirements § 31.14 Weight limits. (a) The range of weights...

  6. 14 CFR 380.14 - Unused space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Unused space. 380.14 Section 380.14 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) SPECIAL REGULATIONS PUBLIC CHARTERS Conditions and Limitations § 380.14 Unused space. Noting contained in this...

  7. 6,12,18,24-Tetra-meth-oxy-4,10,16,22-tetra-kis-[(meth-oxy-carbon-yl)meth-oxy]-2,8,14,20-tetra-kis-(2-phenyl-eth-yl)resorcin[4]arene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pansuriya, Pramod B; Friedrich, Holger B; Maguire, Glenn E M

    2012-01-01

    The title compound, C(76)H(80)O(16), is a macrocyclic structure. This novel resorcin[4]arene derivative has (meth-oxy-carbon-yl)meth-oxy 'head' groups on the upper rim. The compound has a C(2v) 'boat' geometry and there are a range of C-H⋯O contacts in the crystal structure.

  8. 14 CFR 14.26 - Further proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Further proceedings. 14.26 Section 14.26... proceedings. (a) Ordinarily the determination of an award will be made on the basis of the written record... adjudicative officer assigned to the matter may order further proceedings, such as an informal conference,...

  9. Black carbon in deep-Sea sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiello; Druffel

    1998-06-19

    Black carbon (BC) enters the ocean through aerosol and river deposition. BC makes up 12 to 31 percent of the sedimentary organic carbon (SOC) at two deep ocean sites, and it is 2400 to 13,900 carbon-14 years older than non-BC SOC deposited concurrently. BC is likely older because it is stored in an intermediate reservoir before sedimentary deposition. Possible intermediate pools are oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and terrestrial soils. If DOC is the intermediate reservoir, then BC is 4 to 22 percent of the DOC pool. If soils are the intermediate reservoir, then the importance of riverine carbon in the ocean carbon cycle has been underestimated.

  10. Carbonized asphaltene-based carbon-carbon fiber composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohnert, George; Lula, James; Bowen, III, Daniel E.

    2016-12-27

    A method of making a carbon binder-reinforced carbon fiber composite is provided using carbonized asphaltenes as the carbon binder. Combinations of carbon fiber and asphaltenes are also provided, along with the resulting composites and articles of manufacture.

  11. Vapor-liquid equilibrium data for the carbon dioxide and oxygen (CO2 + O2) system at the temperatures 218, 233, 253, 273, 288 and 298 K and pressures up to 14 MPa

    OpenAIRE

    Westman, Snorre Foss; Stang, Hans Georg Jacob; Løvseth, Sigurd W.; Austegard, Anders; Snustad, Ingrid; Ertesvåg, Ivar S.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate thermophysical data for the CO2-rich mixtures relevant for carbon capture, transport and storage (CCS) are essential for the development of the accurate equations of state (EOS) and models needed for the design and operation of the processes within CCS. Vapor-liquid equilibrium measurements for the binary system CO2+O2 are reported at 218, 233, 253, 273, 288 and 298 K, with estimated standard uncertainties of maximum 8 mK in temperature, maximum 3 kPa in pressure, and max...

  12. Possible incorporation of petroleum-based carbons in biochemicals produced by bioprocess--biomass carbon ratio measured by accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunioka, Masao

    2010-06-01

    The biomass carbon ratios of biochemicals related to biomass have been reviewed. Commercial products from biomass were explained. The biomass carbon ratios of biochemical compounds were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) based on the (14)C concentration of carbons in the compounds. This measuring method uses the mechanism that biomass carbons include a very low level of (14)C and petroleum carbons do not include (14)C similar to the carbon dating measuring method. It was confirmed that there were some biochemicals synthesized from petroleum-based carbons. This AMS method has a high accuracy with a small standard deviation and can be applied to plastic products.

  13. As-Fabricated Reinforced Carbon/Carbon Characterized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Calomino, Anthony M.; Webster, Neal

    2004-01-01

    Reinforced carbon/carbon (RCC) is a critical material for the space shuttle orbiter. It is used on the wing leading edge and the nose cap, where maximum temperatures are reached on reentry. The existing leading-edge system is a single-plate RCC composite construction with a wall thickness of approximately 1/4 in., making it a prime reliant protection scheme for vehicle operation.

  14. Effect of HF leaching on 14C dates of pottery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goslar, Tomasz; Kozłowski, Janusz; Szmyt, Marzena; Czernik, Justyna

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the experiments with 14C dating of two potsherds, which contained carbon dispersed rather homogeneously in their clay fabric. After AAA treatment, the potsherds still appeared to be contaminated with young carbon, presumably connected with humic acids. To make removal of humic acids more effective, we treated the sherds with HF acid of different concentration. The 14C results obtained demonstrate that HF treatment indeed helps to remove humic contaminants, but it also mobilizes carbon bound to raw clay, which may make 14C dates too old. We conclude therefore, that using a simple combination of HF and AAA treatment seems insufficient in reliable 14C dating of carbon homogeneously dispersed in the volume of potsherds.

  15. Preparation of a Lipopolysaccharide from Escherichia coli 01lla, 01llb, k58: h21 bacterial wall, labeled with carbon-14; Preparacion de un lipopolisacarido de la pared baceteriana de escherichia coli 01lla, 01llb, K58: H21, marcado con carbono-14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solano Aunon, M. L.; Pacheco Lopez, J.; Garcia Pineda, M. D.; Roca, M.; Bayon, A.

    1981-07-01

    A brief description of the morphological and chemical structure of Li po polysaccharides is given, as well as its occurrence in nature and its mechanisms of action. It is emphasized the usefulness for actual biochemical and biomedical research of the labeled Lipopolysaccharide. The method for the labelling, isolation and purification of 14''C-Lipopolysacchari de is described. (Author) 23 refs.

  16. Legislators Urge Carbon Emissions Cuts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mohi

    2007-02-01

    Legislators from the world's largest carbon dioxide (CO2) emitting countries met on 14-15 February in Washington, D.C., to discuss the future of the global climate and strategies to mitigate temperature increases resulting from global warming. The world faces a ``double challenge-how to reduce damaging carbon emissions while still meeting the energy demand that the world's poor need to escape poverty,'' said World Bank President Paul Wolfowitz during a keynote talk.

  17. Carbonate aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Kevin J.; Sukop, Michael; Curran, H. Allen

    2012-01-01

    Only limited hydrogeological research has been conducted using ichnology in carbonate aquifer characterization. Regardless, important applications of ichnology to carbonate aquifer characterization include its use to distinguish and delineate depositional cycles, correlate mappable biogenically altered surfaces, identify zones of preferential groundwater flow and paleogroundwater flow, and better understand the origin of ichnofabric-related karst features. Three case studies, which include Pleistocene carbonate rocks of the Biscayne aquifer in southern Florida and Cretaceous carbonate strata of the Edwards–Trinity aquifer system in central Texas, demonstrate that (1) there can be a strong relation between ichnofabrics and groundwater flow in carbonate aquifers and (2) ichnology can offer a useful methodology for carbonate aquifer characterization. In these examples, zones of extremely permeable, ichnofabric-related macroporosity are mappable stratiform geobodies and as such can be represented in groundwater flow and transport simulations.

  18. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the AKADEMIK IOFFE in the South Pacific Ocean from 1992-02-14 to 1992-04-06 (NODC Accession 0115013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115013 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from AKADEMIK IOFFE in the South Pacific Ocean from 1992-02-14 to...

  19. {sup 14}C. The future of the past; {sup 14}C. De toekomst van het verleden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mook, W.G.; Van der Plicht, J.; Leijenaar, D. [comps.

    1994-12-31

    In this catalogue an overview is given of the impact that {sup 14}C surveys had and still have on a broad spectrum of disciplines, e.g. archaeology, geology, paleobotany, hydrology and oceanography, in particular on the basis of results from the authors` laboratory. Next to the uses of carbon 14 attention is paid to the advantages of the new Accelerator Mass Spectrometer (AMS). 28 figs.

  20. 14C Analysis of protein extracts from Bacillus spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappuccio, Jenny A; Falso, Miranda J Sarachine; Kashgarian, Michaele; Buchholz, Bruce A

    2014-07-01

    Investigators of bioagent incidents or interdicted materials need validated, independent analytical methods that will allow them to distinguish between recently made bioagent samples versus material drawn from the archives of a historical program. Heterotrophic bacteria convert the carbon in their food sources, growth substrate or culture media, into the biomolecules they need. The F(14)C (fraction modern radiocarbon) of a variety of media, Bacillus spores, and separated proteins from Bacillus spores was measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). AMS precisely measures F(14)C values of biological materials and has been used to date the synthesis of biomaterials over the bomb pulse era (1955 to present). The F(14)C of Bacillus spores reflects the radiocarbon content of the media in which they were grown. In a survey of commercial media we found that the F(14)C value indicated that carbon sources for the media were alive within about a year of the date of manufacture and generally of terrestrial origin. Hence, bacteria and their products can be dated using their (14)C signature. Bacillus spore samples were generated onsite with defined media and carbon free purification and also obtained from archived material. Using mechanical lysis and a variety of washes with carbon free acids and bases, contaminant carbon was removed from soluble proteins to enable accurate (14)C bomb-pulse dating. Since media is contemporary, (14)C bomb-pulse dating of isolated soluble proteins can be used to distinguish between historical archives of bioagents and those produced from recent media.

  1. Low Carbon: Do the Green Thing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Ting

    2010-01-01

    @@ Apparently,till the end of the year 2009,the words related with climate change,Copenhagen,as well as low-carbon almost spread all over the world.Just click the web,only 0.14 seconds,nearly 27,600,000 low-carbon related results were showcasing obviously.Low carbon economy,low carbon life...the things that related with the 'low-carbon' has become a trend or a focus,gradually changing our daily life;or,the whole world cares more about their living condition and makes effort to avoid suffering the crack of doom that the '2012' told us.

  2. Irradiation Scheme Design of 14C Production on CARR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN; Zheng; LIU; Xing-min; XU; Zhi-long; DING; Li

    2012-01-01

    <正>14C is a radioisotope of carbon. It is widely used in pharmacy, medical treatment, agriculture, reconnoiter and archaeology. China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR) is a research reactor of high capability, the applications of which includes the radio nuclides production. Therefore, the technical scheme on 14C irradiation in CARR should be prepared elaborately.

  3. Carbon classified?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Ingmar

    2012-01-01

    How does a corporation know it emits carbon? Acquiring such knowledge starts with the classification of environmentally relevant consumption information. This paper visits the corporate location at which this underlying element for their knowledge is assembled to give rise to carbon emissions. Us...

  4. Porous carbons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Satish M Manocha

    2003-02-01

    Carbon in dense as well as porous solid form is used in a variety of applications. Activated porous carbons are made through pyrolysis and activation of carbonaceous natural as well as synthetic precursors. Pyrolysed woods replicate the structure of original wood but as such possess very low surface areas and poor adsorption capacities. On activation, these exhibit increased adsorption volumes of 0.5–0.8 cm3 /gm and surface areas of 700–1800 m2 /gm depending on activation conditions, whether physical or chemical. Former carbons possess mixed pore size distribution while chemically activated carbons predominantly possess micropores. Thus, these carbons can be used for adsorption of wide distributions of molecules from gas to liquid. The molecular adsorption within the pores is due to single layer or multilayer molecule deposition at the pore walls and hence results in different types of adsorption isotherm. On the other hand, activated carbon fibres with controlled microporous structure and surface area in the range of 2500 m2 /gm can be developed by controlled pyrolysis and physical activation of amorphous carbon fibres. Active carbon fibres with unmatchable pore structure and surface characteristics are present and futuristic porous materials for a number of applications from pollution control to energy storage.

  5. Carbon photonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konov, V I [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-30

    The properties of new carbon materials (single-crystal and polycrystalline CVD diamond films and wafers, single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene) and the prospects of their use as optical elements and devices are discussed. (optical elements of laser devices)

  6. Carbon-Carbon Piston Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Schwind, Francis A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An improved structure for carbon-carbon composite piston architectures is disclosed. The improvement consists of replacing the knitted fiber, three-dimensional piston preform architecture described in U.S. Pat.No. 4,909,133 (Taylor et al.) with a two-dimensional lay-up or molding of carbon fiber fabric or tape. Initially, the carbon fabric of tape layers are prepregged with carbonaceous organic resins and/or pitches and are laid up or molded about a mandrel, to form a carbon-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite part shaped like a "U" channel, a "T"-bar, or a combination of the two. The molded carbon-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite part is then pyrolized in an inert atmosphere, to convert the organic matrix materials to carbon. At this point, cylindrical piston blanks are cored from the "U"-channel, "T"-bar, or combination part. These blanks are then densified by reimpregnation with resins or pitches which are subsequently carbonized. Densification is also accomplished by direct infiltration with carbon by vapor deposition processes. Once the desired density has been achieved, the piston billets are machined to final piston dimensions; coated with oxidation sealants; and/or coated with a catalyst. When compared to conventional steel or aluminum alloy pistons, the use of carbon-carbon composite pistons reduces the overall weight of the engine; allows for operation at higher temperatures without a loss of strength; allows for quieter operation; reduces the heat loss; and reduces the level of hydrocarbon emissions.

  7. 基于四(5,6-二氢-1,4-二噻英)四氮杂卟啉修饰玻碳电极对多巴胺的选择性检测%(Iron( II )-Tetra(5,6-dihydro-1,4-dithijn) Porphyrazine)-Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode for Elective Determination of Dopamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    帅颖; 王佳; 郭晓利; 刘昌华

    2012-01-01

    将四(5,6-二氢-1,4-二噻英)四氮杂卟啉(FePz(dtn)4)通过电沉积的方式固载在玻碳电极上,该电极在抗坏血酸(AA)和尿酸(UA)等干扰物存在下,可选择性地检测多巴胺(DA).对比裸电极,在循环伏安测量中修饰过后的电极在氧化电位处对DA表现出良好的电催化活性.并且出现一对可逆的氧化还原峰,阳极和阴极的电位值分别为0.182V和0.142V.在电解质溶液中氧化峰电流随着DA的浓度线性增加.两个线性范围分别是1~10和10~200μg/mL,相关系数分别为0.996 7和0.998 8.检出限为0.3μg/mL.%Glassy carbon (GC) electrode was modified with an electropolymerized film of (iron( II )-tetra (5,6-dihydro-1,4-dithijn) porphyrazine) (FePz(dtn)4). The polymer film-modified electrode was used to electrochemically detect dopamine (DA) in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA). In cyclic voltammetrie measurements, the polymer film showed an excellent eleetrocatalytic activity as the oxi- dation potential for DA was positively shifted compared to that at the bare electrode. A couple of reversible redox peaks were detected, the potential value of the anodic and the cathodic peaks being 0. 182 and 0. 142 V, respectively. The oxidation peak current increased linearly with the concentration of DA in the electrolytic solution, with a linear range of 1--10 and 10--200ug/mL and a correlation coefficient of 0. 996 7 and 0. 998 8, respectively. The detection limit was 0.3 ug/mL.

  8. Carbon cyclist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    A satellite launched in early August as part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth could dramatically increase understanding of how carbon cycles through the Earth's biosphere and living organisms and how this process influences global climate. The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) will measure the color of the oceans with a radiometer to determine the concentration of chlorophyll found in oceanic phytoplankton. The single-celled plants, at the base of food chains around the world, remove carbon dioxide from seawater through photosynthesis, which allows oceans to absorb more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

  9. Carbon Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T. Lloyd Evans

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, the present state of knowledge of the carbon stars is discussed. Particular attention is given to issues of classification, evolution, variability, populations in our own and other galaxies, and circumstellar material.

  10. Carbon Nanoelectronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cory D. Cress

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Initiated by the first single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT transistors [1,2], and reinvigorated with the isolation of graphene [3], the field of carbon-based nanoscale electronic devices and components (Carbon Nanoelectronics for short has developed at a blistering pace [4]. Comprising a vast number of scientists and engineers that span materials science, physics, chemistry, and electronics, this field seeks to provide an evolutionary transition path to address the fundamental scaling limitations of silicon CMOS [5]. Concurrently, researchers are actively investigating the use of carbon nanomaterials in applications including back-end interconnects, high-speed optoelectronic applications [6], spin-transport [7], spin tunnel barrier [8], flexible electronics, and many more.

  11. Infiltrated carbon foam composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Rick D. (Inventor); Danford, Harry E. (Inventor); Plucinski, Janusz W. (Inventor); Merriman, Douglas J. (Inventor); Blacker, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An infiltrated carbon foam composite and method for making the composite is described. The infiltrated carbon foam composite may include a carbonized carbon aerogel in cells of a carbon foam body and a resin is infiltrated into the carbon foam body filling the cells of the carbon foam body and spaces around the carbonized carbon aerogel. The infiltrated carbon foam composites may be useful for mid-density ablative thermal protection systems.

  12. RIVERINE INORGANIC CARBON DYNAMICS: OVERVIEW AND PERSPECTIVE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Guan-rong; GAO Quan-zhou

    2006-01-01

    Inorganic carbon, the great part of the riverine carbon exported to the ocean, plays an important role in the global carbon cycle and ultimately impacts the coupled carbon-climate system. An overview was made on both methods and results of the riverine inorganic carbon researches. In addition to routine in situ survey, measurement and calculation,the direct precipitation method and the gas evolution technique were commonly used to analyze dissolved inorganic carbon in natural water samples. Soil CO2, carbonate minerals and atmospheric CO2 incorporated into riverine inorganic carbon pool via different means, with bicarbonate ion being the dominant component. The concentration of inorganic carbon, the composition of carbon isotopes (δ13C and △14C), and their temporal or spatial variations in the streams were controlled by carbon input, output and changes of carbon biogeochemistry within the riverine system. More accurate flux estimation, better understanding of different influential processes, and quantitative determination of various inputs or outputs need to be well researched in future.

  13. Low Carbon:Do the Green Thing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Apparently, till the end of the year 2009, the words related with climate change, Copenhagen, as well as low-carbon almost spread all over the world. Just click the web, only 0.14 seconds, nearly 27,600,000 low-carbon related results were showcasing obviously. Low carbon economy, low carbon life…the things that related with the ’low-carbon’ has become a trend or a focus, gradually changing our daily life; or, the whole world cares more about their living condition and makes effort to avoid suffering the crack of doom that the ’2012’ told us.

  14. Black carbon in deep-sea sediments

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) enters the ocean through aerosol and river deposition. BC makes up 12 to 31 percent of the sedimentary organic carbon (SOC) at two deep ocean sites, and it is 2400 to 13,900 carbon-14 years older than non-BC SOC deposited concurrently. BC is likely older because it is stored in an intermediate reservoir before sedimentary deposition. Possible intermediate pools are oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and terrestrial soils. If DOC is the intermediate reservoir, then BC is ...

  15. A supercritical oxidation system for the determination of carbon isotope ratios in marine dissolved organic carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Clercq, Martijn; Van der Plicht, Johannes; Meijer, Harro A.J.

    1998-01-01

    An analytical oxidation system employing supercritical oxidation has been developed. It is designed to measure concentration and the natural carbon isotope ratios (C-13, C-14) Of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and is especially suited for marine samples. The oxidation takes place in a ceramic tube a

  16. Carbon-carbon bond cleavage in activation of the prodrug nabumetone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varfaj, Fatbardha; Zulkifli, Siti N A; Park, Hyoung-Goo;

    2014-01-01

    Carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions are catalyzed by, among others, lanosterol 14-demethylase (CYP51), cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11), sterol 17β-lyase (CYP17), and aromatase (CYP19). Because of the high substrate specificities of these enzymes and the complex nature of their su...

  17. Carbon turnover and sequestration potential of fodder radish cover crop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mutegi, James; Petersen, Bjørn Molt; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2013-01-01

    We studied fodder radish carbon turnover as affected by soil tillage in Foulum, Denmark. Actively growing fodder radish monoliths from direct-drilled (DD) and conventionally tilled (CT) plots were extracted and labelled regularly with 14C isotope across their entire growth period. At the end......- to 45-cm-depth increments for determination of 14C distribution and retention. Carbon-14 declined significantly with increasing soil depth at each sampling for the two tillage practices (P

  18. Proximate analysis for determination of micropores in granulated activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, Ya. G.; Nikolaev, V.B.; Shepelev, A.N.

    1987-02-01

    A method is discussed for determining the specific micropore volume of granulated activated carbon used for water treatment in Soviet coking plants. Toluene molecules with a diameter of 0.67 nm are sorbed by activated carbon with micropore diameter ranging from 0.7 to 1.4 nm. Therefore, sorptive properties of activated carbon in relation to toluene supply information on micropore volume in carbon. A formula which describes this relation is derived. The method for determining micropore volume on the basis of toluene adsorption was tested using 8 types of activated carbon produced from coal and petroleum. Types of activated carbon characterized by the highest adsorption were selected. 1 ref.

  19. Synthesis of /sup 14/C-propoxur (o-isopropoxyphenyl N-methylcarbamate-/sup 14/C) insecticide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossaini, M.A.; Zareh, Z. (Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, Teheran. Nuclear Research Centre)

    1984-08-01

    /sup 14/C-propoxur (Baygonsub(circled R)) is an insecticide with a broad spectrum of activity and a very low order of mammalian toxicity. Radiosynthesis of propoxur was performed by the reaction of acetyl-1-/sup 14/C chloride and sodium azide to produce methyl isocyanate which then reacted with o-isopropoxyphenol at 100 degC. A two-compartment reaction tube with a break seal was utilized. Chromatograhic procedures for isolating the N-methylcarbamates from their reaction mixtures are reported. Acetyl-1-/sup 14/C chloride was prepared from thionyl chloride and sodium acetate-1-/sup 14/C. Grignard reaction between methyl iodide and carbon-14 dioxide yielded acetic acid-/sup 14/C which was neutralized by sodium hydroxide solution to give sodium acetate-1-/sup 14/C. 9 refs.

  20. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doctor if you have or have ever had kidney disease or stomach conditions.tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking calcium carbonate, call your doctor.

  1. Dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, pH, and other variables collected from surface discrete observations using flow through pump and other instruments from Explorer of the Seas (ID: 33KF) in the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic ocean during the Ocean Acidification Cruise EX1507 from 2015-02-14 to 2015-02-15 (NCEI Accession 0154385)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Increasing amounts of atmospheric carbon dioxide from human industrial activities are causing changes in global ocean carbon chemistry. Through the SOOP program we...

  2. Effect of clipping, benomyl, and genet on [sup 14]C transfer between mycorrhiz plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, J.R.; Borowicz, V.A. (Dept. of Biological Sciences, Ecology Group, Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States))

    1994-11-01

    We examined how simulated herbivore, fungicide, and genet affect the magnitude and direction of net carbon transfer between paired mycrrhizal Lotus corniculatus. One plant in each pair was labeled with [sup 14]C, and [sup 14]C levels in the unlabeled plant were quantified. Without fungicide, the roots of unlabeled plants received significantly more [sup 14]C when the labeled partner was clipped than when the unlabeled plant was clipped, indicating that net carbon flow was away from clipped plants and toward unclipped plants. Because the specific activity of donor roots was unaffected by simulated herbivore, fungicide, and genet, significant differences in net carbon flow were not affect carbon transfer between plants in trays treated with the fungicide benomyl, which probably reduced but did not eliminate VAM colonization. The three genets did not differ. The median [sup 14]C levels of unlabeled root samples were only 1.2% the [sup 14]C levels of labeled plants' roots and thus constituted a very small portion of their carbon budget. [sup 14]C levels in stems of unlabeled plants were never above background, suggesting that the fungal symbiont retained most of the transferred carbon. Although clipping can affect net carbon flow, we failed to detect significant differences in the amount of [sup 14]C leaking from the roots of clipped vs unclipped plants. This study suggests that grazed mycorrhizal plants are unlikely to gain significant amounts of carbohydrates from neighbors and may actually experience a net loss. (au).

  3. 14C Analysis of Protein Extracts from Bacillus Spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappucio, Jenny A.; Sarachine Falso, Miranda J.; Kashgarian, Michaele; Buchholz, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Investigators of bioagent incidents or interdicted materials need validated, independent analytical methods that will allow them to distinguish between recently made bioagent samples versus material drawn from the archives of a historical program. Heterotrophic bacteria convert the carbon in their food sources, growth substrate or culture media, into the biomolecules they need. The F14C (fraction modern radiocarbon) of a variety of media, Bacillus spores, and separated proteins from Bacillus spores was measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). AMS precisely measures F14C values of biological materials and has been used to date the synthesis of biomaterials over the bomb pulse era (1955 to present). The F14C of Bacillus spores reflects the radiocarbon content of the media in which they were grown. In a survey of commercial media we found that the F14C value indicated that carbon sources for the media were alive within about a year of the date of manufacture and generally of terrestrial origin. Hence, bacteria and their products can be dated using their 14C signature. Bacillus spore samples were generated onsite with defined media and carbon free purification and also obtained from archived material. Using mechanical lysis and a variety of washes with carbon free acids and bases, contaminant carbon was removed from soluble proteins to enable accurate 14C bomb-pulse dating. Since media is contemporary, 14C bomb-pulse dating of isolated soluble proteins can be used to distinguish between historical archives of bioagents and those produced from recent media. PMID:24814329

  4. Fish as major carbonate mud producers and missing components of the tropical carbonate factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Chris T; Salter, Michael A; Harborne, Alastair R; Crowley, Stephen F; Jelks, Howard L; Wilson, Rod W

    2011-03-01

    Carbonate mud is a major constituent of recent marine carbonate sediments and of ancient limestones, which contain unique records of changes in ocean chemistry and climate shifts in the geological past. However, the origin of carbonate mud is controversial and often problematic to resolve. Here we show that tropical marine fish produce and excrete various forms of precipitated (nonskeletal) calcium carbonate from their guts ("low" and "high" Mg-calcite and aragonite), but that very fine-grained (mostly 4 mole % MgCO(3)) are their dominant excretory product. Crystallites from fish are morphologically diverse and species-specific, but all are unique relative to previously known biogenic and abiotic sources of carbonate within open marine systems. Using site specific fish biomass and carbonate excretion rate data we estimate that fish produce ∼6.1 × 10(6) kg CaCO(3)/year across the Bahamian archipelago, all as mud-grade (the fish to total carbonate mud production average ∼14% overall, and exceed 70% in specific habitats. Critically, we also document the widespread presence of these distinctive fish-derived carbonates in the finest sediment fractions from all habitat types in the Bahamas, demonstrating that these carbonates have direct relevance to contemporary carbonate sediment budgets. Fish thus represent a hitherto unrecognized but significant source of fine-grained carbonate sediment, the discovery of which has direct application to the conceptual ideas of how marine carbonate factories function both today and in the past.

  5. Preparation of hollow spherical carbon nanocages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, C.-K.; Kang, H. Y.; Hong, C.-I; Huang, C.-H.; Chang, F.-C.; Wang, H. Paul, E-mail: wanghp@mail.ncku.edu.tw [National Cheng Kung University, Department of Environmental Engineering, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-15

    This study presents a new and simple method for the synthesis of hollow carbon spheres possessing nanocage sizes of 7.1, 14, and 20 nm in diameter. The core-shell (i.e., Cu-C) nanoparticles prepared by carbonization of the Cu{sup 2+}-cyclodextrin (CD) complexes at 573 K for 2 h was etched with HCl (6N) to yield the hollow carbon spheres. The carbon-shell of the hollow carbon nanospheres, which consisted of mainly diamond-like and graphite carbons, is not perturbed during etching. In addition to the nanocages, the hollow carbon nanospheres also possess micropores with an opening of 0.45 nm, allowing small molecules to diffuse in and out through the carbon-shell. Many elements (such as Zn{sup 2+} or Cu{sup 2+}) can therefore be filled into the nanocages of the hollow carbon nanospheres. With these unique properties, for instance, designable active species such as Cu and ZnO encapsulated in the carbon-shell can act as Cu-ZnO-C yolk-shell nanoreactors which are found very effective in the catalytic decomposition of methanol.

  6. Study of the C-14-contamination potential of C-impurities in CuO and Fe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandeputte, K; Moens, L; Dams, R; van der Plicht, Johannes

    1998-01-01

    The carbon concentration in CuO and iron was determined by isolating C. The values were in agreement with results reported in other studies. Contaminating carbon from CuO and Fe was transformed to AMS targets and measured for C-14. C-traces in CuO were shown to be the major contribution to the C-14

  7. The Enhancement of Composite Scarf Joint Interface Strength Through Carbon Nanotube Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    13 Figure 6. Complete Sheet (Prior to Vacuum Curing ) ..........13 Figure 7. Complete Sheet (Following Vacuum Curing ) .........14 Figure 8...Figure 6. Complete Sheet (Prior to Vacuum Curing ) 14 Figure 7. Complete Sheet (Following Vacuum Curing ) B. CARBON NANOTUBE

  8. VAM programme 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngman, Michael [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom)

    1995-05-01

    Since 1988, the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) has supported a Valid Analytical Measurement (VAM) initiative. VAM programming 14 is concerned with sampling and measurement of aerosols and particulates in the gas phase. The programme of work is summarised here. (author).

  9. Applications of 14C-AMS in biomedical sciences (Bio-14C-AMS)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an ultrasensitive measure for tracing 14C labeled molecules in vivo or detecting the biomarker for assessment of carcinogenesis. In this review, basic principles, wide applications and new progresses of 14C-bio-AMS are presented. It has been a new advanced tool for measuring the adduction of biologcial molecules with xenobiotics, including carcinogens, drugs, agrochemicals, nicotine, etc. The successful applications have proven the effectiveness of AMS to assessing cancer risk, screening drug toxicity and studying nutrients uptake. In particular, AMS is characterized by measuring xenobiotics at very low dose levels relevant to human environmental exposure. It is sensitive and precise to an attomole (10-18 mole) or less of 14C per mg carbon. Although it has some shortcomings, undoubtedly, AMS possesses an evident merit of high sensitivity and will have widespread applications in the biomedical sciences.

  10. Cycling of black carbon in the ocean

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a byproduct of combustion from wildfires and fossil fuels and is a slow-cycling component of the carbon cycle. Whether BC accumulates and ages on millennial timescales in the world oceans has remained unknown. Here, we quantified dissolved BC (DBC) in marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) isolated by solid phase extraction (SPE) at several sites in the world ocean. We find that DBC in the Atlantic, Pacific and Arctic oceans ranges from 1.4 to 2.6 μM in the surface and is ...

  11. Carbonic inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Kerkhof, Alfons; Thiéry, Régis

    2001-01-01

    The paper gives an overview of the phase relations in carbonic fluid inclusions with pure, binary and ternary mixtures of the system CO 2-CH 4-N 2, compositions, which are frequently found in geological materials. Phase transitions involving liquid, gas and solid phases in the temperature range between -192°C and 31°C are discussed and presented in phase diagrams ( PT, TX and VX projections). These diagrams can be applied for the interpretation of microthermometry data in order to determine fluid composition and molar volume (or density).

  12. 14 CFR 314.14 - Show-cause order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Show-cause order. 314.14 Section 314.14... REGULATIONS EMPLOYEE PROTECTION PROGRAM Determination of Qualifying Dislocation § 314.14 Show-cause order. When the Department makes a preliminary determination of whether the major cause of the bankruptcy...

  13. Root-uptake of {sup 14}C derived from acetic acid and {sup 14}C transfer to rice edible parts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogiyama, Shinichi [Office of Biospheric Assessment for Waste Disposal, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi 263-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: ogiyama@nirs.go.jp; Suzuki, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi 263-5522 (Japan); Inubushi, Kazuyuki [Graduate School of Horticulture, Chiba University, 648 Matsudo, Matsudo-shi 271-8510 (Japan); Takeda, Hiroshi; Uchida, Shigeo [Office of Biospheric Assessment for Waste Disposal, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi 263-8555 (Japan)

    2010-02-15

    Three types of culture experiments using paddy rice (Oryza sativa L.) were performed to examine root-uptake of {sup 14}C in the form of acetic acid: double pot experiment (hydroponics), wet culture experiment (submerged sand medium), and chamber experiment (hydroponics and submerged sand medium). The {sup 14}C radioactivity in the plant, mediums, and atmospheric carbon dioxide ({sup 14}CO{sub 2}) in the chamber were determined, and the distribution of {sup 14}C in the plant was visualized using autoradiography. In the double pot experiment, the shoot of the plant and the lower root which was soaked in the culture solution had {sup 14}C radioactivity, but the upper root which did not have contact with the solution had none. There were also {sup 14}C radioactivity in the grains and roots in the wet culture experiment. Results of the chamber experiment showed that {sup 14}CO{sub 2} gas was released from the culture solution in both types of cultures. Results indicated that the {sup 14}C-acetic acid absorbed by rice plant through its root would be very small. Most of the {sup 14}C-acetic acid was transformed into gaseous forms either in the culture solution or rhizosphere. A relatively longer time would be needed to assimilate {sup 14}C derived from acetic acid to grain parts after it was once absorbed by the shoot through the root. Availability of {sup 14}C for the plant in sand culture was considered to be decreased compared with that for the plant in the hydroponics experiment. It was suggested that rice plant absorbed and assimilated {sup 14}C through the plant roots not because of uptake of {sup 14}C-acetic acid but because of uptake of {sup 14}C in gaseous forms such as {sup 14}CO{sub 2}.

  14. Effect of HF leaching on {sup 14}C dates of pottery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goslar, Tomasz, E-mail: goslar@radiocarbon.pl [Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, ul. Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland); Poznan Radiocarbon Laboratory, ul. Rubiez 46, 61-612 Poznan (Poland); Kozlowski, Janusz [Institute of Archaeology, Jagiellonian University, ul. Golebia 11, 30-007 Krakow (Poland); Szmyt, Marzena [Institute for Eastern Studies, Adam Mickiewicz University, ul. 28 Czerwca 1956 nr 198, 61-486 Poznan (Poland); Czernik, Justyna [Poznan Radiocarbon Laboratory, ul. Rubiez 46, 61-612 Poznan (Poland)

    2013-01-15

    This paper presents the experiments with {sup 14}C dating of two potsherds, which contained carbon dispersed rather homogeneously in their clay fabric. After AAA treatment, the potsherds still appeared to be contaminated with young carbon, presumably connected with humic acids. To make removal of humic acids more effective, we treated the sherds with HF acid of different concentration. The {sup 14}C results obtained demonstrate that HF treatment indeed helps to remove humic contaminants, but it also mobilizes carbon bound to raw clay, which may make {sup 14}C dates too old. We conclude therefore, that using a simple combination of HF and AAA treatment seems insufficient in reliable {sup 14}C dating of carbon homogeneously dispersed in the volume of potsherds.

  15. 14-plex Feasibility Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotongan, Victoria Hazel [Native Village of Unalakleet

    2013-06-21

    The Native Village of Unalakleet project was a feasibility study for a retrofit of a “tribally owned” three story, 14 apartment complex located in Unalakleet, Alaska. The program objective and overall goal was to create a plan for retrofitting to include current appraised value and comparable costs of new construction to determine genuine feasibility as low-income multi-family housing for tribal members.

  16. Carbon-carbon bond cleavage in activation of the prodrug nabumetone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varfaj, Fatbardha; Zulkifli, Siti N A; Park, Hyoung-Goo; Challinor, Victoria L; De Voss, James J; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2014-05-01

    Carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions are catalyzed by, among others, lanosterol 14-demethylase (CYP51), cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11), sterol 17β-lyase (CYP17), and aromatase (CYP19). Because of the high substrate specificities of these enzymes and the complex nature of their substrates, these reactions have been difficult to characterize. A CYP1A2-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction is required for conversion of the prodrug nabumetone to its active form, 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA). Despite worldwide use of nabumetone as an anti-inflammatory agent, the mechanism of its carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction remains obscure. With the help of authentic synthetic standards, we report here that the reaction involves 3-hydroxylation, carbon-carbon cleavage to the aldehyde, and oxidation of the aldehyde to the acid, all catalyzed by CYP1A2 or, less effectively, by other P450 enzymes. The data indicate that the carbon-carbon bond cleavage is mediated by the ferric peroxo anion rather than the ferryl species in the P450 catalytic cycle. CYP1A2 also catalyzes O-demethylation and alcohol to ketone transformations of nabumetone and its analogs.

  17. Production of an accelerated oxygen-14 beam

    CERN Document Server

    Powell, J; Cerny, J

    2003-01-01

    BEARS is an ongoing project to provide a light-ion radioactive-beam capability at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL. Light radioactive isotopes are produced at a 10 MeV proton medical cyclotron, transported 350 m via a high-speed gas transport capillary, cryogenically separated, and injected into the 88-Inch Cyclotron's ion source. The first radioactive beam successfully accelerated was carbon-11 and beams of intensity more than 10 sup 8 ions/s have been utilized for experiments. Development of oxygen-14 as the second BEARS beam presented considerable technical challenges, both due to its short half-life of 71 s and the radiation chemistry of oxygen in the target. The usual techniques developed for medical uses of oxygen-15 involve the addition of significant amounts of carrier oxygen, something that would overload the ion source. As a solution, oxygen-14 is produced as water in a carrier-free form, and is chemically converted in two steps to carbon dioxide, a form readily usable by the BEARS. This system has bee...

  18. Carbon monoxide : A quantitative tracer for fossil fuel CO2?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gamnitzer, Ulrike; Karstens, Ute; Kromer, Bernd; Neubert, Rolf E. M.; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Schroeder, Hartwig; Levin, Ingeborg

    2006-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and radiocarbon ((CO2)-C-14) measurements have been made in Heidelberg from 2001 to 2004 in order to determine the regional fossil fuel CO2 component and to investigate the application of CO as a quantitative tracer for fossil fuel CO2 (CO2(foss)). The obs

  19. Carbon Farming as a Carbon Negative Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, C.; Laird, D.; Hayes, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon farms have a pivotal role in national and international efforts to mitigate and adapt to climate change. A carbon farm in its broadest sense is one that reduces greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions or captures and holds carbon in vegetation and soils. Their capacity to remove carbon from the air and store it safely and permanently, while providing additional human and ecosystem benefits, means they could contribute significantly to national efforts to stabilize or reduce GHGs. We examine carbon farms in the context of corn and soybean production agriculture. We illustrate, using Iowa data but with relevance across United States corn and soybean production, the potential for carbon farms to reduce human GHG emissions and sequester carbon permanently at a rate that has meaningful impact on global greenhouse gas concentration. Carbon has been viewed as a next generation cash crop in Iowa for over a decade. The carbon farm perspective, however, goes beyond carbon as cash crop to make carbon the center of an entire farm enterprise. The transformation is possible through slight adjustment crop practices mixed with advances in technology to sequester carbon through biochar. We examine carbon balance of Iowa agriculture given only the combination of slight reduction in fertilizer and sequestration by biochar. We find the following. Iowa carbon farms could turn Iowa agriculture into a carbon sink. The estimated range of GHG reduction by statewide implementation of carbon farms is 19.46 to 90.27 MMt CO2-equivalent (CO2-e), while the current agricultural CO2-e emission estimate is 35.38 MMt CO2-e. Iowa carbon farm GHG reduction would exceed Iowa GHG reduction by wind energy (8.7 MMt CO2-e) and could exceed combined reductions from wind energy and corn grain ethanol (10.7 MMt CO2-e; 19.4 MMt CO2-e combined). In fact, Iowa carbon farms alone could exceed GHG reduction from national corn grain ethanol production (39.6 MMt CO2-e). A carbon price accessible to agricultural

  20. Carbon Monoxide Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Materials Working with the Media Fire Protection Technology Carbon monoxide safety outreach materials Help inform residents in ... with these messages and free materials. What is carbon monoxide? Carbon monoxide, also known as CO, is ...

  1. Carbon monoxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and smokers. Carbon monoxide can harm a fetus (unborn baby still in the womb). Symptoms of carbon ... symptoms Outlook (Prognosis) Carbon monoxide poisoning can cause death. For those who survive, recovery is slow. How ...

  2. Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux is defined as the year-over-year change in Total Ecosystem Carbon Stock, or the net rate of carbon exchange between an ecosystem and the...

  3. Dissolved Organic Carbon Cycling in Forested Watersheds: A Carbon Isotope Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, S. L.; Aravena, R.; Trumbore, S. E.; Dillon, P. J.

    1990-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is important in the acid-base chemistry of acid-sensitive freshwater systems; in the complexation, mobility, persistence, and toxicity of metals and other pollutants; and in lake carbon metabolism. Carbon isotopes (13C and 14C) are used to study the origin, transport, and fate of DOC in a softwater catchment in central Ontario. Precipitation, soil percolates, groundwaters, stream, beaver pond, and lake waters, and lake sediment pore water were characterized chemically and isotopically. In addition to total DOC, isotopic measurements were made on the humic and fulvic DOC fractions. The lake is a net sink for DOC. Δ14C results indicate that the turnover time of most of the DOC in streams, lakes, and wetlands is fast, less than 40 years, and on the same time scale as changes in acidic deposition. DOC in groundwaters is composed of older carbon than surface waters, indicating extensive cycling of DOC in the upper soil zone or aquifer.

  4. Separation of lipoproteins for quantitative analysis of 14C-labeled lipid soluble compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon-14 tracer studies using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) have provided novel insights into nutrient metabolism and whole body metabolite flux. In addition to a baseline separation of analytes, a critical requirement specific to the AMS analysis was a stable carbon baseline within the anal...

  5. The Degradation of 14C-Glutamic Acid by L-Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Charles M; Dayan, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Describes procedures and semi-micro reaction apparatus (carbon dioxide trap) to demonstrate how a particular enzyme (L-Glutamic acid decarboxylase) may be used to determine the site or sites of labeling in its substrate (carbon-14 labeled glutamic acid). Includes calculations, solutions, and reagents used. (Author/SK)

  6. [Effects of different fertilizer application on soil active organic carbon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Gui-Long; Ji, Yan-Yan; Li, Gang; Chang, Hong; Yang, Dian-Lin

    2013-01-01

    The variation characteristics of the content and components of soil active organic carbon under different fertilizer application were investigated in samples of calcareous fluvo-aquic soil from a field experiment growing winter wheat and summer maize in rotation in the North China Plain. The results showed that RF (recommended fertilization), CF (conventional fertilization) and NPK (mineral fertilizer alone) significantly increased the content of soil dissolved organic carbon and easily oxidized organic carbon by 24.92-38.63 mg x kg(-1) and 0.94-0.58 mg x kg(-1) respectively compared to CK (unfertilized control). The soil dissolved organic carbon content under OM (organic manure) increased greater than those under NPK and single fertilization, soil easily oxidized organic carbon content under OM and NPK increased greater than that under single chemical fertilization. OM and NPK showed no significant role in promoting the soil microbial biomass carbon, but combined application of OM and NPK significantly increased the soil microbial biomass carbon content by 36.06% and 20.69%, respectively. Soil easily oxidized organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon accounted for 8.41% - 14.83%, 0.47% - 0.70% and 0.89% - 1.20% of the total organic carbon (TOC), respectively. According to the results, the fertilizer application significantly increased the proportion of soil dissolved organic carbon and easily oxidized organic carbon, but there was no significant difference in the increasing extent of dissolved organic carbon. The RF and CF increased the proportion of soil easily oxidized organic carbon greater than OM or NPK, and significantly increased the proportion of microbial biomass carbon. OM or RF had no significant effect on the proportion of microbial biomass carbon. Therefore, in the field experiment, appropriate application of organic manure and chemical fertilizers played an important role for the increase of soil active organic carbon

  7. Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijgen, W.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    The increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, mainly caused by fossil fuel combustion, has lead to concerns about global warming. A possible technology that can contribute to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions is CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. The basic concept beh

  8. Carbon Residence Times in Pedogenic Carbonate Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monger, H.; Feng, Y.; Karnjanapiboonwang, A.

    2013-12-01

    Soil carbonate is a huge pool of terrestrial carbon that contains at least 930 to 940 Pg C and has influx rates on the order of 1 to 12 g CaCO3/m2/yr. Such large mass to flux ratios yield long mean residence times for carbon (e.g., 85,000 years)--assuming steady state. Like other global carbon pools, the soil carbonate pool has smaller sub-pools with higher influx rates and shorter mean residence times. For example, pedogenic carbonate in coppice dunes known to have formed since 1858 and carbonate formed on lithic artifacts in soils at archaeology sites suggests mean residence times can be as short as 120 years--again assuming steady state. Harder to assess are efflux rates as CO2 emissions or bicarbonate leaching. Some Bowen-ratio studies have nevertheless found evidence for CO2 emissions resulting from carbonate dissolution, and other studies have found evidence for bicarbonate leaching based on dissolution pipes through calcic horizons using soil morphology studies. Since an understanding of mean residence times are prerequisite for a better understanding of soil carbonate in the global carbon cycle, especially in a scenario of an expanding Aridosphere, more influx and efflux measurements are needed to evaluate the possibility of carbon sequestration by soil carbonate in hyperarid, arid, semiarid, or subhumid soils.

  9. Poly(urethane–carbonate)s from Carbon Dioxide

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Zuliang

    2017-03-09

    A one-pot, two-step protocol for the direct synthesis of polyurethanes containing few carbonate linkages through polycondensation of diamines, dihalides, and CO2 in the presence of Cs2CO3 and tetrabutylammonium bromide is described. The conditions were optimized by studying the polycondensation of CO2 with 1,6-hexanediamine and 1,4-dibromobutane as model monomers. Then, various diamines and dihalides were tested under optimal conditions. Miscellaneous samples of such carbonate-containing polyurethanes exhibiting molar masses from 6000 to 22 000 g/mol (GPC) and yields higher than 85% were obtained. The thermal properties of such polyurethanes were unveiled by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA): they were found very similar to those of traditional polyurethanes obtained by diisocyanates + diols polycondensation.

  10. Carbonate precipitation by the thermophilic archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus: A model of carbon flow for an ancient microorganism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, L.L.; Van Cleave, K. A.; Ostrom, P.

    2008-01-01

    Microbial carbonate precipitation experiments were conducted using the archaeon bacteria Archaeoglobus fulgidus to determine chemical and isotopic fractionation of organic and inorganic carbon into mineral phases. Carbonate precipitation was induced in two different experiments using A. fulgidus to determine the relative abundance of organically derived carbon incorporated into carbonate minerals as well as to define any distinct phases or patterns that could be attributed to the precipitation process. One experiment used a medium containing 13C-depleted organic carbon and 13C-enriched inorganic carbon, and the other used a 14C-labeled organic carbon source. Results indicated that 0.9 - 24.8% organic carbon was incorporated into carbonates precipitated by A. fulgidus and that this process was mediated primarily by pH and CO2 emission from cells. Data showed that the carbon in the CO2 produced from this microorganism is incorporated into carbonates and that the rate at which precipitation occurs and the dynamics of the carbonate precipitation process are strongly mediated by the specific steps involved in the biochemical process for lactate oxidation by A. fulgidus.

  11. Carbonate precipitation by the thermophilic archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus: a model of carbon flow for an ancient microorganism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ostrom

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Microbial carbonate precipitation experiments were conducted using the archaeon bacteria Archaeoglobus fulgidus to determine chemical and isotopic fractionation of organic and inorganic carbon into mineral phases. Carbonate precipitation was induced in two different experiments using A. fulgidus to determine the relative abundance of organically derived carbon incorporated into carbonate minerals as well as to define any distinct phases or patterns that could be attributed to the precipitation process. One experiment used a medium containing 13C-depleted organic carbon and 13C-enriched inorganic carbon, and the other used a 14C-labeled organic carbon source. Results indicated that 0.9–24.8% organic carbon was incorporated into carbonates precipitated by A. fulgidus and that this process was mediated primarily by pH and CO2 emission from cells. Data showed that the carbon in the CO2 produced from this microorganism is incorporated into carbonates and that the rate at which precipitation occurs and the dynamics of the carbonate precipitation process are strongly mediated by the specific steps involved in the biochemical process for lactate oxidation by A. fulgidus.

  12. Composite carbon foam electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1997-05-06

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granulated materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

  13. Composite carbon foam electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1997-01-01

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivty and power to system energy.

  14. {sup 14}C content in aerosols in Mexico City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez, V.; Solís, C.; Chávez, E.; Andrade, E.; Ortiz, M.E.; Huerta, A.; Aragón, J.; Rodríguez-Ceja, M. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 20-364, México, D.F. 01000 (Mexico); Martínez, M.A. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (Mexico); Ortiz, E. [Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Azcapotzalco, Av. San Pablo 180, C. P. 02200 México, D.F. (Mexico)

    2016-03-15

    {sup 14}C-AMS of total carbon was determined in aerosols (PM{sub 10} fraction), collected in Mexico City during two weeks from 21 November to 3 December 2012. Other tracers such as total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC) and trace element contents were also determined. F{sup 14}C values varied from 0.39 to 0.48 with an average of 0.43. These values are slightly lower than those previously obtained for PM{sub 2.5} in 2003 and 2006 and reflect a high contribution of fossil CO{sub 2} to the carbonaceous matter in aerosols from Mexico City. In contrast, from 2006 to 2012 PM{sub 10} increased; EC, Ca, Ti and Fe concentrations remained constant, while OC, TC and K concentrations decreased. The use of potassium as an indicator of biomass burning showed that this source was negligible during this campaign. Combined analytical approaches allowed us to distinguish temporal variations of anthropogenic and natural inputs to the F{sup 14}C.

  15. Synthesis of 14-Bromo and 14-Hydroxy Baccatin III Derviatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Several 14a- and 14b-bromo baccatin III derivatives were synthesized by direct bromination and from silyl enol ether of 13-oxo-7-TES-baccatin III. 14b-Hyroxy baccatin III derivative was also obtained from the same silyl enol ether.

  16. Cycling of black carbon in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Alysha I.; Druffel, Ellen R. M.

    2016-05-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a by-product of combustion from wildfires and fossil fuels and is a slow-cycling component of the carbon cycle. Whether BC accumulates and ages on millennial time scales in the world oceans has remained unknown. Here we quantified dissolved BC (DBC) in marine dissolved organic carbon isolated by solid phase extraction at several sites in the world ocean. We find that DBC in the Atlantic, Pacific, and Arctic oceans ranges from 1.4 to 2.6 μM in the surface and is 1.2 ± 0.1 μM in the deep Atlantic. The average 14C age of surface DBC is 4800 ± 620 14C years and much older in a deep water sample (23,000 ± 3000 14C years). The range of DBC structures and 14C ages indicates that DBC is not homogeneous in the ocean. We show that there are at least two distinct pools of marine DBC, a younger pool that cycles on centennial time scales and an ancient pool that cycles on >105 year time scales.

  17. Carbon Nanomembranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Polina; Gölzhäuser, Armin

    2017-03-01

    This chapter describes the formation and properties of one nanometer thick carbon nanomembranes (CNMs), made by electron induced cross-linking of aromatic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). The cross-linked SAMs are robust enough to be released from the surface and placed on solid support or over holes as free-standing membranes. Annealing at 1000K transforms CNMs into graphene accompanied by a change of mechanical stiffness and electrical resistance. The developed fabrication approach is scalable and provides molecular level control over thickness and homogeneity of the produced CNMs. The mechanisms of electron-induced cross-linking process are discussed in details. A variety of polyaromatic thiols: oligophenyls as well as small and extended condensed polycyclic hydrocarbons have been successfully employed, demonstrating that the structural and functional properties of the resulting nanomembranes are strongly determined by the structure of molecular monolayers. The mechanical properties of CNMs (Young's modulus, tensile strength and prestress) are characterized by bulge testing. The interpretation of the bulge test data relates the Young's modulus to the properties of single molecules and to the structure of the pristine SAMs. The gas transport through the CNM is measured onto polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) - thin film composite membrane. The established relationship of permeance and molecular size determines the molecular sieving mechanism of permeation through this ultrathin sheet.

  18. {sup 1}4C Accelerator mass spectrometry in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macario, K.D.; Gomes, P.R.S.; Anjos, Roberto M.; Linares, R.; Queiroz, E.A.; Oliveira, F.M.; Cardozo, L. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Carvalho, C.R.A. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2011-07-01

    Radiocarbon Accelerator Mass Spectrometry is an ultra-sensitive technique that enables the direct measurement of carbon isotopes in samples as small as a few milligrams. The possibility of dating or tracing rare or even compound specific carbon samples has application in many fields of science such as Archaeology, Geosciences and Biomedicine. Several kinds of material such as wood, charcoal, carbonate and bone can be chemically treated and converted to graphite to be measured in the accelerator system. The Physics Institute of Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), in Brazil will soon be able to perform the complete {sup 14}C-AMS measurement of samples. At the Nuclear Chronology Laboratory (LACRON) samples are prepared and converted to carbon dioxide. A stainless steel vacuum system was constructed for carbon dioxide purification and graphitization is performed in sealed tubes in a muffle oven. Graphite samples will be analyzed in a 250 kV Single Stage Accelerator produced by National Electrostatic Corporation which will be installed in the beginning of 2012. With the sample preparation laboratory at LACRON and the SSAMS system, the Physics Institute of UFF will be the first {sup 14}C-AMS facility in Latin America. (author)

  19. (CH4)-C-14 Measurements in Greenland Ice: Investigating Last Glacial Termination CH4 Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrenko, V. V.; Smith, A. M.; Brook, E. J.;

    2009-01-01

    The cause of a large increase of atmospheric methane concentration during the Younger Dryas-Preboreal abrupt climatic transition (similar to 11,600 years ago) has been the subject of much debate. The carbon-14 (C-14) content of methane ((CH4)-C-14) should distinguish between wetland and clathrate...... contributions to this increase. We present measurements of (CH4)-C-14 in glacial ice, targeting this transition, performed by using ice samples obtained from an ablation site in west Greenland. Measured (CH4)-C-14 values were higher than predicted under any scenario. Sample (CH4)-C-14 appears to be elevated...... by direct cosmogenic C-14 production in ice. C-14 of CO was measured to better understand this process and correct the sample (CH4)-C-14. Corrected results suggest that wetland sources were likely responsible for the majority of the Younger Dryas-Preboreal CH4 rise....

  20. From carbon nanotubes to carbon atomic chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas García, Gilberto; Zhang, Weijia; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2010-10-01

    Carbyne is a linear allotrope of carbon. It is formed by a linear arrangement of carbon atoms with sp-hybridization. We present a reliable and reproducible experiment to obtain these carbon atomic chains using few-layer-graphene (FLG) sheets and a HRTEM. First the FLG sheets were synthesized from worm-like exfoliated graphite and then drop-casted on a lacey-carbon copper grid. Once in the TEM, two holes are opened near each other in a FLG sheet by focusing the electron beam into a small spot. Due to the radiation, the carbon atoms rearrange themselves between the two holes and form carbon fibers. The beam is concentrated on the carbon fibers in order excite the atoms and induce a tension until multi wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) is formed. As the radiation continues the MWCNT breaks down until there is only a single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT). Then, when the SWCNT breaks, an atomic carbon chain is formed, lasts for several seconds under the radiation and finally breaks. This demonstrates the stability of this carbon structure.

  1. Ocean sequestration of crop residue carbon: recycling fossil fuel carbon back to deep sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Stuart E; Benford, Gregory

    2009-02-15

    For significant impact any method to remove CO2 from the atmosphere must process large amounts of carbon efficiently, be repeatable, sequester carbon for thousands of years, be practical, economical and be implemented soon. The only method that meets these criteria is removal of crop residues and burial in the deep ocean. We show here that this method is 92% efficient in sequestration of crop residue carbon while cellulosic ethanol production is only 32% and soil sequestration is about 14% efficient. Deep ocean sequestration can potentially capture 15% of the current global CO2 annual increase, returning that carbon backto deep sediments, confining the carbon for millennia, while using existing capital infrastructure and technology. Because of these clear advantages, we recommend enhanced research into permanent sequestration of crop residues in the deep ocean.

  2. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  3. Mutagenicity of carbon nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallin, Håkan; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; White, Paul A;

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials such carbon nanotubes, graphene and fullerenes are some the most promising nanomaterials. Although carbon nanomaterials have been reported to possess genotoxic potential, it is imperitive to analyse the data on the genotoxicity of carbon nanomaterials in vivo and in vitro...

  4. Inorganic carbon and fossil organic carbon are source of bias for quantification of sequestered carbon in mine spoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vindušková, Olga; Frouz, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Carbon sequestration in mine soils has been studied as a possibility to mitigate the rising atmospheric CO2 levels and to improve mine soil quality (Vindu\\vsková and Frouz, 2013). Moreover, these soils offer an unique opportunity to study soil carbon dynamics using the chronosequence approach (using a set of sites of different age on similar parent material). However, quantification of sequestered carbon in mine soils is often complicated by fossil organic carbon (e.g., from coal or kerogen) or inorganic carbon present in the spoil. We present a methodology for quantification of both of these common constituents of mine soils. Our recommendations are based on experiments done on post-mining soils in Sokolov basin, Czech Republic. Here, fossil organic carbon is present mainly as kerogen Type I and II and represents 2-6 wt.% C in these soils. Inorganic carbon in these soils is present mainly as siderite (FeCO3), calcite (CaCO3), and dolomite (CaMg(CO3)2). All of these carbonates are often found in the overburden of coal seams thus being a common constituent of post-mining soils in the world. Vindu\\vsková O, Frouz J, 2013. Soil carbon accumulation after open-cast coal and oil shale mining in Northern Hemisphere: a quantitative review. ENVIRONMENTAL EARTH SCIENCES, 69: 1685-1698. Vindu\\vsková O, Dvořáček V, Prohasková A, Frouz J. 2014. Distinguishing recent and fossil organic matter - A critical step in evaluation of post-mining soil development - using near infrared spectroscopy. ECOLOGICAL ENGINEERING. 73: 643-648. Vindu\\vsková O, Sebag D, Cailleau G, Brus J, Frouz J. 2015. Methodological comparison for quantitative analysis of fossil and recently derived carbon in mine soils with high content of aliphatic kerogen. ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY, 89-90:14-22.

  5. Electroanalysis with carbon paste electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Svancara, Ivan; Walcarius, Alain; Vytras, Karel

    2011-01-01

    Introduction to Electrochemistry and Electroanalysis with Carbon Paste-Based ElectrodesHistorical Survey and GlossaryField in Publication Activities and LiteratureCarbon Pastes and Carbon Paste ElectrodesCarbon Paste as the Binary MixtureClassification of Carbon Pastes and Carbon Paste ElectrodesConstruction of Carbon Paste HoldersCarbon Paste as the Electrode MaterialPhysicochemical Properties of Carbon PastesElectrochemical Characteristics of Carbon PastesTesting of Unmodified CPEsIntera

  6. Mesoporous carbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng; Fulvio, Pasquale Fernando; Mayes, Richard T.; Wang, Xiqing; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Guo, Bingkun

    2014-09-09

    A conductive mesoporous carbon composite comprising conductive carbon nanoparticles contained within a mesoporous carbon matrix, wherein the conductive mesoporous carbon composite possesses at least a portion of mesopores having a pore size of at least 10 nm and up to 50 nm, and wherein the mesopores are either within the mesoporous carbon matrix, or are spacings delineated by surfaces of said conductive carbon nanoparticles when said conductive carbon nanoparticles are fused with each other, or both. Methods for producing the above-described composite, devices incorporating them (e.g., lithium batteries), and methods of using them, are also described.

  7. Pyrolyzed thin film carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Liger, Matthieu (Inventor); Harder, Theodore (Inventor); Konishi, Satoshi (Inventor); Miserendino, Scott (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method of making carbon thin films comprises depositing a catalyst on a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon in contact with the catalyst and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon. A method of controlling a carbon thin film density comprises etching a cavity into a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon into the cavity, and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon while in the cavity to form a carbon thin film. Controlling a carbon thin film density is achieved by changing the volume of the cavity. Methods of making carbon containing patterned structures are also provided. Carbon thin films and carbon containing patterned structures can be used in NEMS, MEMS, liquid chromatography, and sensor devices.

  8. Opportunities and Challenges for Being a Carbon Black Great Power

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    1. The "Uth Five-year Plan" Lay- ing the Foundation for Carbon Black Great Power 1.1 Rapid growth of carbon black output and production capacity During the "llth Five-year Plan" Period, China carbon black output was increased by 1.1 times and realized doubling; and the production capacity of carbon black realized an average annu- al growth of 16.9%. In 2011, the carbon black output was 3.853 million tons, increased by 14.2% compared with that of the last year, and the pro- portion of carbon black output in the world carbon black output was increased from 16% to 36%. The carbon black production capacity was 5.345 mil- lion tons, increased by 6% compared with that of the last year, and the proportion of carbon black production capacity in the world carbon black out- put reached 38%. Chinese carbon black output has been ranking the 1st place throughout the world for 6 years successively, and China has become a great power of carbon black production in the world.

  9. Weathering controls on mechanisms of carbon storage in grassland soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masiello, C.A.; Chadwick, O.A.; Southon, J.; Torn, M.S.; Harden, J.W.

    2004-09-01

    On a sequence of soils developed under similar vegetation, temperature, and precipitation conditions, but with variations in mineralogical properties, we use organic carbon and 14C inventories to examine mineral protection of soil organic carbon. In these soils, 14C data indicate that the creation of slow-cycling carbon can be modeled as occurring through reaction of organic ligands with Al3+ and Fe3+ cations in the upper horizons, followed by sorption to amorphous inorganic Al compounds at depth. Only one of these processes, the chelation of Al3+ and Fe3+ by organic ligands, is linked to large carbon stocks. Organic ligands stabilized by this process traverse the soil column as dissolved organic carbon (both from surface horizons and root exudates). At our moist grassland site, this chelation and transport process is very strongly correlated with the storage and long-term stabilization of soil organic carbon. Our 14C results show that the mechanisms of organic carbon transport and storage at this site follow a classic model previously believed to only be significant in a single soil order (Spodosols), and closely related to the presence of forests. The presence of this process in the grassland Alfisol, Inceptisol, and Mollisol soils of this chronosequence suggests that this process is a more significant control on organic carbon storage than previously thought.

  10. Making Activated Carbon by Wet Pressurized Pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John W.; Pisharody, Suresh; Wignarajah, K.; Moran, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A wet pressurized pyrolysis (wet carbonization) process has been invented as a means of producing activated carbon from a wide variety of inedible biomass consisting principally of plant wastes. The principal intended use of this activated carbon is room-temperature adsorption of pollutant gases from cooled incinerator exhaust streams. Activated carbon is highly porous and has a large surface area. The surface area depends strongly on the raw material and the production process. Coconut shells and bituminous coal are the primary raw materials that, until now, were converted into activated carbon of commercially acceptable quality by use of traditional production processes that involve activation by use of steam or carbon dioxide. In the wet pressurized pyrolysis process, the plant material is subjected to high pressure and temperature in an aqueous medium in the absence of oxygen for a specified amount of time to break carbon-oxygen bonds in the organic material and modify the structure of the material to obtain large surface area. Plant materials that have been used in demonstrations of the process include inedible parts of wheat, rice, potato, soybean, and tomato plants. The raw plant material is ground and mixed with a specified proportion of water. The mixture is placed in a stirred autoclave, wherein it is pyrolized at a temperature between 450 and 590 F (approximately between 230 and 310 C) and a pressure between 1 and 1.4 kpsi (approximately between 7 and 10 MPa) for a time between 5 minutes and 1 hour. The solid fraction remaining after wet carbonization is dried, then activated at a temperature of 500 F (260 C) in nitrogen gas. The activated carbon thus produced is comparable to commercial activated carbon. It can be used to adsorb oxides of sulfur, oxides of nitrogen, and trace amounts of hydrocarbons, any or all of which can be present in flue gas. Alternatively, the dried solid fraction can be used, even without the activation treatment, to absorb

  11. Quality of Graphite Target for Biological/Biomedical/Environmental Applications of 14C-Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Seung-Hyun; Kelly, Peter B.; Ortalan, Volkan; Browning, Nigel D.; Clifford, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic graphitization for 14C-accelerator mass spectrometry (14C-AMS) produced various forms of elemental carbon. Our high-throughput Zn reduction method (C/Fe = 1:5, 500 °C, 3 h) produced the AMS target of graphite-coated iron powder (GCIP), a mix of nongraphitic carbon and Fe3C. Crystallinity of the AMS targets of GCIP (nongraphitic carbon) was increased to turbostratic carbon by raising the C/Fe ratio from 1:5 to 1:1 and the graphitization temperature from 500 to 585 °C. The AMS target ...

  12. Study on Utilization of Carboxyl Group Decorated Carbon Nanotubes and Carbonation Reaction for Improving Strengths and Microstructures of Cement Paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiantong Yan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have excellent mechanical properties and can be used to reinforce cement-based materials. On the other hand, the reaction product of carbonation with hydroxides in hydrated cement paste can reduce the porosity of cement-based materials. In this study, a novel method to improve the strength of cement paste was developed through a synergy of carbon nanotubes decorated with carboxyl group and carbonation reactions. The experimental results showed that the carboxyl group (–COOH of decorated carbon nanotubes and the surfactant can control the morphology of the calcium carbonate crystal of carbonation products in hydrated cement paste. The spindle-like calcium carbonate crystals showed great morphological differences from those observed in the conventional carbonation of cement paste. The spindle-like calcium carbonate crystals can serve as fiber-like reinforcements to reinforce the cement paste. By the synergy of the carbon nanotubes and carbonation reactions, the compressive and flexural strengths of cement paste were significantly improved and increased by 14% and 55%, respectively, when compared to those of plain cement paste.

  13. An analytical method for 14C in environmental water based on a wet-oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan-Jun; Guo, Gui-Yin; Wu, Lian-Sheng; Zhang, Bing; Chen, Chao-Feng; Zhang, Hai-Ying; Qin, Hong-Juan; Shang-Guan, Zhi-Hong

    2015-04-01

    An analytical method for (14)C in environmental water based on a wet-oxidation process was developed. The method can be used to determine the activity concentrations of organic and inorganic (14)C in environmental water, or total (14)C, including in drinking water, surface water, rainwater and seawater. The wet-oxidation of the organic component allows the conversion of organic carbon to an inorganic form, and the extraction of the inorganic (14)C can be achieved by acidification and nitrogen purging. Environmental water with a volume of 20 L can be used for the wet-oxidation and extraction, and a detection limit of about 0.02 Bq/g(C) can be achieved for water with carbon content above 15 mg(C)/L, obviously lower than the natural level of (14)C in the environment. The collected carbon is sufficient for measurement with a low level liquid scintillation counter (LSC) for typical samples. Extraction or recovery experiments for inorganic carbon and organic carbon from typical materials, including analytical reagents of organic benzoquinone, sucrose, glutamic acid, nicotinic acid, humic acid, ethane diol, et cetera., were conducted with excellent results based on measurement on a total organic carbon analyzer and LSC. The recovery rate for inorganic carbon ranged tween 98.7%-99.0% with a mean of 98.9(± 0.1)%, for organic carbon recovery ranged between 93.8% and 100.0% with a mean of 97.1(± 2.6)%. Verification and an uncertainty budget of the method are also presented for a representative environmental water. The method is appropriate for (14)C analysis in environmental water, and can be applied also to the analysis of liquid effluent from nuclear facilities.

  14. Carbon cycle uncertainty in the Alaskan Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Fisher

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is leading to a disproportionately large warming in the high northern latitudes, but the magnitude and sign of the future carbon balance of the Arctic are highly uncertain. Using 40 terrestrial biosphere models for Alaska, we provide a baseline of terrestrial carbon cycle structural and parametric uncertainty, defined as the multi-model standard deviation (σ against the mean (x for each quantity. Mean annual uncertainty (σ/x was largest for net ecosystem exchange (NEE (−0.01± 0.19 kg C m−2 yr−1, then net primary production (NPP (0.14 ± 0.33 kg C m−2 yr−1, autotrophic respiration (Ra (0.09 ± 0.20 kg C m−2 yr−1, gross primary production (GPP (0.22 ± 0.50 kg C m−2 yr−1, ecosystem respiration (Re (0.23 ± 0.38 kg C m−2 yr−1, CH4 flux (2.52 ± 4.02 g CH4 m−2 yr−1, heterotrophic respiration (Rh (0.14 ± 0.20 kg C m−2 yr−1, and soil carbon (14.0± 9.2 kg C m−2. The spatial patterns in regional carbon stocks and fluxes varied widely with some models showing NEE for Alaska as a strong carbon sink, others as a strong carbon source, while still others as carbon neutral. Additionally, a feedback (i.e., sensitivity analysis was conducted of 20th century NEE to CO2 fertilization (β and climate (γ, which showed that uncertainty in γ was 2x larger than that of β, with neither indicating that the Alaskan Arctic is shifting towards a certain net carbon sink or source. Finally, AmeriFlux data are used at two sites in the Alaskan Arctic to evaluate the regional patterns; observed seasonal NEE was captured within multi-model uncertainty. This assessment of carbon cycle uncertainties may be used as a baseline for the improvement of experimental and modeling activities, as well as a reference for future trajectories in carbon cycling with climate change in the Alaskan Arctic.

  15. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis IX. Photosynthesis, Photoreduction, and the Hydrogen-Oxygen-Carbon Dioxide Dark Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badin, E. J.; Calvin, M.

    1950-02-01

    A comparison of the rates of fixation of Carbon 14 dioxide in algae for the processes of photosynthesis, photoreduction and the hydrogen-oxygen-carbon dioxide dark reaction has been made. For the same series of experiments, rates of incorporation of tracer carbon into the separate soluble components using the radiogram method have been determined. The mechanism of carbon dioxide uptake has been shown to occur via two distinct paths. In all cases studied, essentially the same compounds appear radioactive. The distribution with time, however, differs markedly.

  16. Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide on Activated Carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Guo; Liping Chang; Kechang Xie

    2006-01-01

    The adsorption of CO2 on a raw activated carbon A and three modified activated carbon samples B, C, and D at temperatures ranging from 303 to 333 K and the thermodynamics of adsorption have been investigated using a vacuum adsorption apparatus in order to obtain more information about the effect of CO2 on removal of organic sulfur-containing compounds in industrial gases. The active ingredients impregnated in the carbon samples show significant influence on the adsorption for CO2 and its volumes adsorbed on modified carbon samples B, C, and D are all larger than that on the raw carbon sample A. On the other hand, the physical parameters such as surface area, pore volume, and micropore volume of carbon samples show no influence on the adsorbed amount of CO2. The Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) equation was the best model for fitting the adsorption data on carbon samples A and B, while the Freundlich equation was the best fit for the adsorption on carbon samples C and D. The isosteric heats of adsorption on carbon samples A, B, C, and D derived from the adsorption isotherms using the Clapeyron equation decreased slightly increasing surface loading. The heat of adsorption lay between 10.5 and 28.4 kJ/mol, with the carbon sample D having the highest value at all surface coverages that were studied. The observed entropy change associated with the adsorption for the carbon samples A, B, and C (above the surface coverage of 7 ml/g) was lower than the theoretical value for mobile adsorption. However, it was higher than the theoretical value for mobile adsorption but lower than the theoretical value for localized adsorption for carbon sample D.

  17. Carbon fuel cells with carbon corrosion suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F [Oakland, CA

    2012-04-10

    An electrochemical cell apparatus that can operate as either a fuel cell or a battery includes a cathode compartment, an anode compartment operatively connected to the cathode compartment, and a carbon fuel cell section connected to the anode compartment and the cathode compartment. An effusion plate is operatively positioned adjacent the anode compartment or the cathode compartment. The effusion plate allows passage of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide exhaust channels are operatively positioned in the electrochemical cell to direct the carbon dioxide from the electrochemical cell.

  18. Mass transfer and carbon isotope evolution in natural water systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigley, T.M.L.; Plummer, L.N.; Pearson, F.J.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical treatment of the evolution of the carbon isotopes C13 and C14 in natural waters and in precipitates which derive from such waters. The effects of an arbitrary number of sources (such as dissolution of carbonate minerals and oxidation of organic material) and sinks (such as mineral precipitation, CO2 degassing and production of methane), and of equilibrium fractionation between solid, gas and aqueous phases are considered. The results are expressed as equations relating changes in isotopic composition to changes in conventional carbonate chemistry. One implication of the equations is that the isotopic composition of an aqueous phase may approach a limiting value whenever there are simultaneous inputs and outputs of carbonate. In order to unambiguously interpret isotopic data from carbonate precipitates and identify reactants and products in reacting natural waters, it is essential that isotopic changes are determined chiefly by reactant and product stoichiometry, independent of reaction path. We demonstrate that this is so by means of quantitative examples. The evolution equations are applied to: 1. (1) carbon-14 dating of groundwaters; 2. (2) interpretation of the isotopic composition of carbonate precipitates, carbonate cements and diagenetically altered carbonates; and 3. (3) the identification of chemical reaction stoichiometry. These applications are illustrated by examples which show the variation of ??C13 in solutions and in precipitates formed under a variety of conditions involving incongruent dissolution, CO2 degassing, methane production and mineral precipitation. ?? 1978.

  19. Simulation of 14C in IAP/LASG L30T63 Ocean Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qingquan; SHI Guangyu

    2005-01-01

    14C plays an important role in the study of ocean circulation and anthropogenic CO2. Radioactive 14C is usually used in ocean carbon circulation model to test the physical performance of model. In the present paper, a 14C model is established and coupled with the IAP/LASG L30T63 global ocean circulation model to simulate the distribution of natural 14C in oceans and the penetration and uptake of 14C in oceans after industrial revolution and nuclear bomb test. The simulation of natural 14C reveals the basic characteristics of oceanic ventilation. However, simulation value is "younger" than observation in the Pacific and Indian Oceans, and "older" than observation in the Atlantic deep ocean. The simulation of bomb 14C agrees well with GEOSECS observation, but the volume inventory and averaged penetration depth of bomb 14C in oceans are smaller than observation. The probable reasons for these discrepancies are analyzed.

  20. THE PATH OF CARBON IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS. X. CARBON DIOXIDEASSIMILATION IN PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvin, M.; Bassham, J .A.; Benson, A.A.; Lynch, V.; Ouellet, C.; Schou, L.; Stepka, W.; Tolbert, N.E.

    1950-04-01

    The conclusions which have been drawn from the results of C{sup 14}O{sub 2} fixation experiments with a variety of plants are developed in this paper. The evidence for thermochemical reduction of carbon dioxide fixation intermediates is presented and the results are interpreted from such a viewpoint.

  1. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis X. Carbon Dioxide Assimilation in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvin, M.; Bassham, J. A.; Benson, A. A.; Lynch, V.; Ouellet, C.; Schou, L.; Stepka, W.; Tolbert, N. E.

    1950-04-01

    The conclusions which have been drawn from the results of C{sup 14}O{sub 2} fixation experiments with a variety of plants are developed in this paper. The evidence for thermochemical reduction of carbon dioxide fixation intermediates is presented and the results are interpreted from such a viewpoint.

  2. Metallic carbon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, M.L.; Crespi, V.H.; Louie, S.G.S.; Zettl, A.K.

    1999-11-30

    Novel metallic forms of planar carbon are described, as well as methods of designing and making them. Nonhexagonal arrangements of carbon are introduced into a graphite carbon network essentially without destroying the planar structure. Specifically a form of carbon comprising primarily pentagons and heptagons, and having a large density of states at the Fermi level is described. Other arrangements of pentagons and heptagons that include some hexagons, and structures incorporating squares and octagons are additionally disclosed. Reducing the bond angle symmetry associated with a hexagonal arrangement of carbons increases the likelihood that the carbon material will have a metallic electron structure.

  3. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Kalpana; Srivastava, Anchal; Srivastava, O N

    2005-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes play a fundamental role in the rapidly developing field of nanoscience and nanotechnology because of their unique properties and high potential for applications. In this article, the different synthesis methods of carbon nanotubes (both multi-walled and single-walled) are reviewed. From the industrial point of view, the chemical vapor deposition method has shown advantages over laser vaporization and electric arc discharge methods. This article also presents recent work in the controlled synthesis of carbon nanotubes with ordered architectures. Special carbon nanotube configurations, such as nanocoils, nanohorns, bamboo-shaped and carbon cylinder made up from carbon nanotubes are also discussed.

  4. Carbon Dioxide in Arable Soil Profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chirinda, Ngoni; Plauborg, Finn; Heckrath, Goswin Johann

    2014-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in arable soil profiles are influenced by autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration as well as soil physical properties that regulate gas transport. Whereas different methods have been used to assess dynamics of soil CO2 concentrations, our understanding......). In a winter wheat field in Denmark, soil CO2 concentrations were measured from 29 November 2011 to 14 June 2012 at upslope and footslope positions of a short catena (25 m). Carbon dioxide was measured at 20 and 40 cm soil depths (i.e., within and below the nominal plough layer) using the two measurement...

  5. Diet control on carbon isotopic composition of land snail shell carbonate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU ZongXiu; GU ZhaoYan; WU NaiQin; XU Bing

    2007-01-01

    Carbon isotope compositions for both the carbonate shells and soft bodies (organic tissue) of living land snails collected mostly from the Loess Plateau, China have been measured. The result shows that δ13C values range from -13.1‰ to -4.3‰ for the aragonite shell samples and from -26.8‰ to -18.0‰ for the soft body samples. Although the shells are enriched in 13C relative to the bodies averagely by 14.2(±0.8)‰, the shell δ13Ca values are closely correlated to the body δ13Corg values, expressed as δ13Ca = 1.021 δ13Corg + 14.38 (R = 0.965; N = 31). This relationship indicates that δ13Ca is primarily a function of the isotopic composition of the snail diets since previous studies have proved that the snail body is the same as their food in carbon isotope composition. In other words, carbon isotope compo-sition of the carbonate shell can be used as a proxy to estimate the dietary 13C abundance of the land snails. The data also support that the 13C enrichment of the carbonate shells results mainly from the equilibrium fractionations between the metabolic CO2, HCO3- in the hemolymph and shell aragonite, and partially from kinetic fractionations when snail shells form during their activity.

  6. CARBOOCEAN -marine carbon sources and sinks assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volbers, A.; Heinze, C.; de Baar, H.; CARBOOCEAN Consortium

    2009-04-01

    CARBOOCEAN is the European contribution to the global observation and modelling network on marine carbon. It is an FP6 Integrated Project funded over a five year period (2005-2009) with 14.5 million € and combines the key European experts of 35 contracting partners from 14 countries, including the USA. The project provides a description and quantification of the CO2 air-sea exchange ranging from a seasonal to interannual time scale up to a decadal to centennial time scale for the Atlantic Ocean and the Southern Ocean, involving also the sub-surface and deep waters. Special focus is given to the quantification of carbon sources and sinks at a regional scale and the identification and understanding of biogeochemical feedback mechanisms which control marine carbon uptake and release. The new data and knowledge is integrated into the prognostic modeling framework. One of the project highlights is the North Atlantic Observing Network which employs voluntary observing ships (VOS). The Air-sea fluxes of CO2 show a high temporal and spatial variation as a result of variability in climate, biological activity and ocean circulation. Latest data indicate that the North Atlantic and Southern Ocean both show at least transient decrease in uptake strength for CO2. The anthropogenic carbon uptake by the oceans is dominated by physical-chemical buffering but biological and biogeochemical effects cannot be neglected. Findings from data analysis, forward and inverse modeling indicate that the oceanic water column burden of anthropogenic carbon has a maximum in the northern North Atlantic close to the areas of deep convection but also the Southern Ocean carries significant amounts of anthropogenic carbon. These carbon sink areas of vertical water mass transfer are vulnerable to climate change.

  7. Drought sensitivity of Amazonian carbon balance revealed by atmospheric measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, L V; Gloor, M; Miller, J B; Doughty, C E; Malhi, Y; Domingues, L G; Basso, L S; Martinewski, A; Correia, C S C; Borges, V F; Freitas, S; Braz, R; Anderson, L O; Rocha, H; Grace, J; Phillips, O L; Lloyd, J

    2014-02-06

    Feedbacks between land carbon pools and climate provide one of the largest sources of uncertainty in our predictions of global climate. Estimates of the sensitivity of the terrestrial carbon budget to climate anomalies in the tropics and the identification of the mechanisms responsible for feedback effects remain uncertain. The Amazon basin stores a vast amount of carbon, and has experienced increasingly higher temperatures and more frequent floods and droughts over the past two decades. Here we report seasonal and annual carbon balances across the Amazon basin, based on carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide measurements for the anomalously dry and wet years 2010 and 2011, respectively. We find that the Amazon basin lost 0.48 ± 0.18 petagrams of carbon per year (Pg C yr(-1)) during the dry year but was carbon neutral (0.06 ± 0.1 Pg C yr(-1)) during the wet year. Taking into account carbon losses from fire by using carbon monoxide measurements, we derived the basin net biome exchange (that is, the carbon flux between the non-burned forest and the atmosphere) revealing that during the dry year, vegetation was carbon neutral. During the wet year, vegetation was a net carbon sink of 0.25 ± 0.14 Pg C yr(-1), which is roughly consistent with the mean long-term intact-forest biomass sink of 0.39 ± 0.10 Pg C yr(-1) previously estimated from forest censuses. Observations from Amazonian forest plots suggest the suppression of photosynthesis during drought as the primary cause for the 2010 sink neutralization. Overall, our results suggest that moisture has an important role in determining the Amazonian carbon balance. If the recent trend of increasing precipitation extremes persists, the Amazon may become an increasing carbon source as a result of both emissions from fires and the suppression of net biome exchange by drought.

  8. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the Soyo Maru in the North Pacific Ocean from 1998-04-14 to 1998-04-29 (NODC Accession 0112301)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112301 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from Soyo Maru in the North Pacific Ocean from 1998-04-14 to...

  9. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the HUDSON in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1993-04-05 to 1993-05-14 (NODC Accession 0113551)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113551 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1993-04-05 to 1993-05-14...

  10. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from the MARION DUFRESNE in the Indian Ocean from 2011-01-14 to 2011-02-20 (NODC Accession 0108369)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108369 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MARION DUFRESNE in the Indian Ocean from 2011-01-14 to 2011-02-20...

  11. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the TYRO in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1990-07-14 to 1990-07-29 (NODC Accession 0113603)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113603 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from TYRO in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1990-07-14 to 1990-07-29...

  12. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1996-06-13 to 1996-07-14 (NODC Accession 0113911)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113911 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1996-06-13 to 1996-07-14...

  13. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the HESPERIDES in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1992-06-14 to 1992-08-15 (NODC Accession 0115227)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115227 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HESPERIDES in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1992-06-14 to...

  14. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the STENA ARCTICA in the South Atlantic Ocean from 1989-02-14 to 1989-03-17 (NODC Accession 0113893)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113893 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from STENA ARCTICA in the South Atlantic Ocean from 1989-02-14 to...

  15. One-carbon metabolism in acetogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.

    2015-01-01

    14.2pt;">ABSTRACT

    14.2pt;">One-carbon metabolism in acetogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    14.2pt;">Life on earth is sustained by the constant cycling of six essential elements: oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorous, an

  16. The decrease of carbonation efficiency of CaO along calcination-carbonation cycles: Experiments and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouquet, E.; Leyssens, G.; Schonnenbeck, C.; Gilot, P. [Laboratoire de Gestion des Risques et Environnement, Mulhouse (France)

    2009-05-15

    Successive calcination-carbonation cycles, using CaO as sorbent, have been performed either in a classical fixed bed reactor or using a thermogravimetric analyser. Significant differences in carbonation efficiencies were obtained, possibly due to different conditions prevailing for CaO sintering during the calcination stage. The effect of the presence of CO{sub 2} on sintering was confirmed. A simple model of the decay of the carbonation capacity along cycles based on the specific surface area of non-sintered micrograins of CaO is able to predict the decrease of the extent of conversion obtained after 40 carbonations along calcination-carbonation cycles. The asymptotic extent of conversion is obtained when all the micrograins present within a grain are sintered. A detailed model of the carbonation shows that the voids present between the micrograins are filled up by carbonate when a critical thickness of the carbonate layer around each micrograin reaches 43 nm. Then, carbonation becomes controlled by diffusion at the scale of the whole grain, with the CO{sub 2} diffusion coefficient decreasing (at 650 {sup o}C) from 2 x 10{sup -12} to 6.5 x 10{sup -14} m{sup 2}/s as carbonation proceeds from 50% conversion to 76% (first cycle). This scale change for diffusion is responsible for the drastic decrease of the carbonation rate after the voids between micrograins are filled up.

  17. Substantial global carbon uptake by cement carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Fengming; Davis, Steven J.; Ciais, Philippe; Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Guan, Dabo; Pade, Claus; Shi, Tiemao; Syddall, Mark; Lv, Jie; Ji, Lanzhu; Bing, Longfei; Wang, Jiaoyue; Wei, Wei; Yang, Keun-Hyeok; Lagerblad, Björn; Galan, Isabel; Andrade, Carmen; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Zhu

    2016-12-01

    Calcination of carbonate rocks during the manufacture of cement produced 5% of global CO2 emissions from all industrial process and fossil-fuel combustion in 2013. Considerable attention has been paid to quantifying these industrial process emissions from cement production, but the natural reversal of the process--carbonation--has received little attention in carbon cycle studies. Here, we use new and existing data on cement materials during cement service life, demolition, and secondary use of concrete waste to estimate regional and global CO2 uptake between 1930 and 2013 using an analytical model describing carbonation chemistry. We find that carbonation of cement materials over their life cycle represents a large and growing net sink of CO2, increasing from 0.10 GtC yr-1 in 1998 to 0.25 GtC yr-1 in 2013. In total, we estimate that a cumulative amount of 4.5 GtC has been sequestered in carbonating cement materials from 1930 to 2013, offsetting 43% of the CO2 emissions from production of cement over the same period, not including emissions associated with fossil use during cement production. We conclude that carbonation of cement products represents a substantial carbon sink that is not currently considered in emissions inventories.

  18. Potassium carbonate poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potassium carbonate is a white powder used to make soap, glass, and other items. This article discusses poisoning from swallowing or breathing in potassium carbonate. This article is for information only. Do ...

  19. Sodium carbonate poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodium carbonate (known as washing soda or soda ash) is a chemical found in many household and ... products. This article focuses on poisoning due to sodium carbonate. This article is for information only. Do ...

  20. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  1. Carbon Monoxide (CO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IAQ) Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Carbon Monoxide's Impact on Indoor Air Quality On this ... length of exposure. Top of Page Sources of Carbon Monoxide Sources of CO include: unvented kerosene and ...

  2. Soil Organic Carbon Stock

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Soil organic carbon (SOC) is the carbon held within soil organic constituents (i.e., products produced as dead plants and animals decompose and the soil microbial...

  3. Biomass Carbon Stock

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Biomass carbon includes carbon stored in above- and below-ground live plant components (such as leaf, branch, stem and root) as well as in standing and down dead...

  4. Trading forest carbon - OSU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issues associate with trading carbon sequestered in forests are discussed. Scientific uncertainties associated with carbon measurement are discussed with respect to proposed accounting procedures. Major issues include: (1) Establishing baselines. (2) Determining additivity from f...

  5. Intracavity optogalvanic spectroscopy. An analytical technique for 14C analysis with subattomole sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murnick, Daniel E; Dogru, Ozgur; Ilkmen, Erhan

    2008-07-01

    We show a new ultrasensitive laser-based analytical technique, intracavity optogalvanic spectroscopy, allowing extremely high sensitivity for detection of (14)C-labeled carbon dioxide. Capable of replacing large accelerator mass spectrometers, the technique quantifies attomoles of (14)C in submicrogram samples. Based on the specificity of narrow laser resonances coupled with the sensitivity provided by standing waves in an optical cavity and detection via impedance variations, limits of detection near 10(-15) (14)C/(12)C ratios are obtained. Using a 15-W (14)CO2 laser, a linear calibration with samples from 10(-15) to >1.5 x 10(-12) in (14)C/(12)C ratios, as determined by accelerator mass spectrometry, is demonstrated. Possible applications include microdosing studies in drug development, individualized subtherapeutic tests of drug metabolism, carbon dating and real time monitoring of atmospheric radiocarbon. The method can also be applied to detection of other trace entities.

  6. SILICA SURFACED CARBON FIBERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    carbon fibers . Several economical and simple processes were developed for obtaining research quantities of silica surfaced carbon filaments. Vat dipping processes were utilized to deposit an oxide such as silica onto the surface and into the micropores of available carbon or graphite base fibers. High performance composite materials were prepared with the surface treated carbon fibers and various resin matrices. The ablative characteristics of these composites were very promising and exhibited fewer limitations than either silica or...treated

  7. Protolytic carbon film technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renschler, C.L.; White, C.A.

    1996-04-01

    This paper presents a technique for the deposition of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) on virtually any surface allowing carbon film formation with only the caveat that the substrate must withstand carbonization temperatures of at least 600 degrees centigrade. The influence of processing conditions upon the structure and properties of the carbonized film is discussed. Electrical conductivity, microstructure, and morphology control are also described.

  8. Carbon Goes To…

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savasci, Funda

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this activity are to help middle school students understand the carbon cycle and realize how human activities affect the carbon cycle. This activity consists of two parts. The first part of the activity focuses on the carbon cycle, especially before the Industrial Revolution, while the second part of the activity focuses on how…

  9. Carbon nanotube quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapmaz, S.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature electron transport measurements on individual single wall carbon nanotubes are described in this thesis. Carbon nanotubes are small hollow cylinders made entirely out of carbon atoms. At low temperatures (below ~10 K) finite length nanotubes form quantum dots. Because of its small si

  10. Carbon sequestration on Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Christopher S.; Ehlmann, Bethany L.

    2015-01-01

    On Earth, carbon sequestration in geologic units plays an important role in the carbon cycle, scrubbing CO_2 from the atmosphere for long-term storage. While carbonate is identified in low abundances within the dust and soils of Mars, at

  11. Global Carbon Budget 2016

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quéré, Le Corinne; Andrew, Robbie M.; Canadell, Josep G.; Sitch, Stephen; Korsbakken, Jan Ivar; Peters, Glen P.; Manning, Andrew C.; Boden, Thomas A.; Tans, Pieter P.; Houghton, Richard A.; Keeling, Ralph F.; Alin, Simone; Andrews, Oliver D.; Anthoni, Peter; Barbero, Leticia; Bopp, Laurent; Chevallier, Frédéric; Chini, Louise P.; Ciais, Philippe; Currie, Kim; Delire, Christine; Doney, Scott C.; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Gkritzalis, Thanos; Harris, Ian; Hauck, Judith; Haverd, Vanessa; Hoppema, Mario; Klein Goldewijk, Kees; Jain, Atul K.; Kato, Etsushi; Körtzinger, Arne; Landschützer, Peter; Lefèvre, Nathalie; Lenton, Andrew; Lienert, Sebastian; Lombardozzi, Danica; Melton, Joe R.; Metzl, Nicolas; Millero, Frank; Monteiro, Pedro M.S.; Munro, David R.; Nabel, Julia E.M.S.; Nakaoka, S.; O'Brien, Kevin; Olsen, Are; Omar, Abdirahman M.; Ono, Tsuneo; Pierrot, Denis; Poulter, Benjamin; Rödenbeck, Christian; Salisbury, Joe; Schuster, Ute; Schwinger, Jörg; Séférian, Roland; Skjelvan, Ingunn; Stocker, Benjamin D.; Sutton, Adrienne J.; Takahashi, Taro; Tian, Hanqin; Tilbrook, Bronte; Laan-Luijkx, van der Ingrid T.; Werf, van der Guido R.; Viovy, Nicolas; Walker, Anthony P.; Wiltshire, Andrew J.; Zaehle, Sönke

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere – the “global carbon budget” – is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project futur

  12. Black Carbon in Marine Dissolved Organic Carbon: Abundance and Radiocarbon Measurements in the Global Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, A. I.; Walker, B. D.; Druffel, E. R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Compound specific radiocarbon analysis is a powerful tool for understanding the cycling of individual components, such as black carbon (BC) produced from biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion, within bulk pools, like the marine dissolved organic carbon pool. Here, we use a solid phase extraction method and a wide range of solvent polarities to concentrate dissolved organic carbon from seawater. Then we isolate BC in sufficient quantities for radiocarbon analysis. We report the radiocarbon age of BC, concentrations and its relative structure, from coastal and open ocean surface samples. We will discuss our progress towards measuring these quantities in dissolved organic carbon collected from the Pacific and Atlantic oceans to understand the fate, transformation and cycling of BC in the world ocean. These measurements are paired with bulk DOC Δ14C profiles, providing insight into the role of BC as a missing sink in the ultra-refractory DOC pool.

  13. Forensic applications of 14C at CIRCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzaioli, F.; Fiumano, V.; Capano, M.; Passariello, I.; Cesare, N. De.; Terrasi, F.

    2011-12-01

    The decreasing trend of the radiocarbon pulse produced during the atmospheric tests of nuclear weapons (bomb-carbon) coupled with high sensitivity accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements, drastically increased the precision of radiocarbon age determinations since the second part of the sixties, allowing the application of radiocarbon AMS to a wide range of studies previously not directly involving conventional radiocarbon dating (i.e. food authenticity, forensic, biochemistry). In the framework of authenticity evaluation of artworks, high precision radiocarbon ( 14C) AMS measurements (Δ R/ R < 0.3%) reduce the conventional uncertainty of the dating to few decades, allowing precise age estimation of materials containing carbon (C). The Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental heritage (CIRCE) during its activity on AMS 14C dating achieved high precision measurements opening the opportunity to these kinds of applications. This paper presents the main results obtained from radiocarbon measurements on a set of bone samples analyzed for the determination of the post-mortem interval in the framework of an unsolved case investigated by the Rome prosecutor office. The chronological characterization of the wooden support of the "Acerenza portrait" is also presented with the aim to evaluate its age and to further investigate the possibility to attribute this artwork to Leonardo da Vinci. Bomb- 14C dating on the lipid and collagen fractions of bones allows the evaluation of the year of the death of the individuals by means of ad hoc calibration data sheet with the typical few years precision and difference between collagen apparent age and the year of death appeared in agreement with the age of one individual estimated by dating of tooth collagen. Conventional radiocarbon dating on both wood and wood extracted cellulose leads to an estimation of the portrait wood board age (2σ) of 1459-1524 AD (57% relative probability), 1571-1631 AD interval (42

  14. Main: 14BPATERD1 [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14BPATERD1 S000412 03-Jun-2003 (last modified) kehi 14 bp region (from -599 to -566...) necessary for expression of erd1 (early responsive to dehydration) in dehydrated Arabidopsis; water-stress; erd; Arabidopsis thaliana CACTAAATTGTCAC ...

  15. Developing inorganic carbon-based radiocarbon chronologies for Holocene lake sediments in arid NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiawu; Ma, Xueyang; Qiang, Mingrui; Huang, Xiaozhong; Li, Shuang; Guo, Xiaoyan; Henderson, Andrew C. G.; Holmes, Jonathan A.; Chen, Fahu

    2016-07-01

    Inorganic carbonates are often used to establish radiocarbon (14C) chronologies for lake sediments when terrestrial plant remains (TPR) are rare or when bulk organic matter is insufficient for dating, a problem that is common for many lakes in arid regions. However, the reservoir effect (RE), as well as old carbon contributed from the lakes catchment make it difficult to establish reliable chronologies. Here we present a systematic study of inorganic 14C ages of two lake-sediment sequences, one from a small-enclosed saline lake - Lake Gahai in Qaidam Basin, and the other from a large freshwater lake - Lake Bosten in Xinjiang. Modern dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of the lakes, paleo-lake sediments exposed in the catchment, and mollusk shells in core sediments from Lake Gahai were dated to assess the RE and the contribution of pre-aged carbon to the old ages in the cores. We propose a statistical regression to assess more than one RE for the 14C carbonate ages within our sedimentary sequences. Old radiocarbon ages contributed by detrital carbonates were assessed by comparing the ages of mollusk shells with those of carbonates at the same sediment depths. We established the RE of the authigenic component and assessed detrital old carbon contributions to our two sites, and this was used to correct the 14C ages. Based on this approach, we developed age models for both cores, and tested them using 210Pb ages in both cores and TPR-based 14C-ages recovered from Lake Bosten. We further tested our age models by comparing carbonate-based oxygen isotope (δ18O) records from both lakes to an independently-dated regional speleothem δ18O record. Our results suggest if sedimentary sequences are densely dated and the RE and the contribution of old carbon from detrital carbonates can be ascertained, robust chronological frameworks based on carbonate-based 14C determinations can be established.

  16. Ozone adsorption on carbon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassard, Guillaume; Gosselin, Sylvie; Visez, Nicolas; Petitprez, Denis

    2014-05-01

    Carbonaceous particles produced by incomplete combustion or thermal decomposition of hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. On these particles are adsorbed hundreds of chemical species. Those of great concern to health are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). During atmospheric transport, particulate PAHs react with gaseous oxidants. The induced chemical transformations may change toxicity and hygroscopicity of these potentially inhalable particles. The interaction between ozone and carbon particles has been extensively investigated in literature. However ozone adsorption and surface reaction mechanisms are still ambiguous. Some studies described a fast catalytic decomposition of ozone initiated by an atomic oxygen chemisorption followed by a molecular oxygen release [1-3]. Others suggested a reversible ozone adsorption according to Langmuir-type behaviour [4,5]. The aim of this present study is a better understanding of ozone interaction with carbon surfaces. An aerosol of carbon nanoparticles was generated by flowing synthetic air in a glass tube containing pure carbon (primary particles p. 967-973. [2] Smith, D. and A. Chughtai, Reaction kinetics of ozone at low concentrations with n-hexane soot. Journal of geophysical research, 1996. 101(D14): p. 19607-19,620. [3] Kamm, S., et al., The heterogeneous reaction of ozone with soot aerosol. Atmospheric Environment, 1999. 33(28): p. 4651-4661. [4] Stephens, S., M.J. Rossi, and D.M. Golden, The heterogeneous reaction of ozone on carbonaceous surfaces. International journal of chemical kinetics, 1986. 18(10): p. 1133-1149. [5] Pöschl, U., et al., Interaction of ozone and water vapor with spark discharge soot aerosol particles coated with benzo [a] pyrene: O3 and H2O adsorption, benzo [a] pyrene degradation, and atmospheric implications. The Journal of Physical Chemistry A, 2001. 105(16): p. 4029-4041.

  17. A Semi-Empirical Two Step Carbon Corrosion Reaction Model in PEM Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Alan; Colbow, Vesna; Harvey, David; Rogers, Erin; Wessel, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    The cathode CL of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was exposed to high potentials, 1.0 to 1.4 V versus a reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), that are typically encountered during start up/shut down operation. While both platinum dissolution and carbon corrosion occurred, the carbon corrosion effects were isolated and modeled. The presented model separates the carbon corrosion process into two reaction steps; (1) oxidation of the carbon surface to carbon-oxygen groups, and (2) further corrosion of the oxidized surface to carbon dioxide/monoxide. To oxidize and corrode the cathode catalyst carbon support, the CL was subjected to an accelerated stress test cycled the potential from 0.6 VRHE to an upper potential limit (UPL) ranging from 0.9 to 1.4 VRHE at varying dwell times. The reaction rate constants and specific capacitances of carbon and platinum were fitted by evaluating the double layer capacitance (Cdl) trends. Carbon surface oxidation increased the Cdl due to increased specific capacitance for carbon surfaces with carbon-oxygen groups, while the second corrosion reaction decreased the Cdl due to loss of the overall carbon surface area. The first oxidation step differed between carbon types, while both reaction rate constants were found to have a dependency on UPL, temperature, and gas relative humidity.

  18. Carbon sequestration via wood burial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ning

    2008-01-03

    To mitigate global climate change, a portfolio of strategies will be needed to keep the atmospheric CO2 concentration below a dangerous level. Here a carbon sequestration strategy is proposed in which certain dead or live trees are harvested via collection or selective cutting, then buried in trenches or stowed away in above-ground shelters. The largely anaerobic condition under a sufficiently thick layer of soil will prevent the decomposition of the buried wood. Because a large flux of CO2 is constantly being assimilated into the world's forests via photosynthesis, cutting off its return pathway to the atmosphere forms an effective carbon sink.It is estimated that a sustainable long-term carbon sequestration potential for wood burial is 10 +/- 5 GtC y-1, and currently about 65 GtC is on the world's forest floors in the form of coarse woody debris suitable for burial. The potential is largest in tropical forests (4.2 GtC y-1), followed by temperate (3.7 GtC y-1) and boreal forests (2.1 GtC y-1). Burying wood has other benefits including minimizing CO2 source from deforestation, extending the lifetime of reforestation carbon sink, and reducing fire danger. There are possible environmental impacts such as nutrient lock-up which nevertheless appears manageable, but other concerns and factors will likely set a limit so that only part of the full potential can be realized.Based on data from North American logging industry, the cost for wood burial is estimated to be $14/tCO2($50/tC), lower than the typical cost for power plant CO2 capture with geological storage. The cost for carbon sequestration with wood burial is low because CO2 is removed from the atmosphere by the natural process of photosynthesis at little cost. The technique is low tech, distributed, easy to monitor, safe, and reversible, thus an attractive option for large-scale implementation in a world-wide carbon market.

  19. Carbon sequestration via wood burial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Ning

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To mitigate global climate change, a portfolio of strategies will be needed to keep the atmospheric CO2 concentration below a dangerous level. Here a carbon sequestration strategy is proposed in which certain dead or live trees are harvested via collection or selective cutting, then buried in trenches or stowed away in above-ground shelters. The largely anaerobic condition under a sufficiently thick layer of soil will prevent the decomposition of the buried wood. Because a large flux of CO2 is constantly being assimilated into the world's forests via photosynthesis, cutting off its return pathway to the atmosphere forms an effective carbon sink. It is estimated that a sustainable long-term carbon sequestration potential for wood burial is 10 ± 5 GtC y-1, and currently about 65 GtC is on the world's forest floors in the form of coarse woody debris suitable for burial. The potential is largest in tropical forests (4.2 GtC y-1, followed by temperate (3.7 GtC y-1 and boreal forests (2.1 GtC y-1. Burying wood has other benefits including minimizing CO2 source from deforestation, extending the lifetime of reforestation carbon sink, and reducing fire danger. There are possible environmental impacts such as nutrient lock-up which nevertheless appears manageable, but other concerns and factors will likely set a limit so that only part of the full potential can be realized. Based on data from North American logging industry, the cost for wood burial is estimated to be $14/tCO2($50/tC, lower than the typical cost for power plant CO2 capture with geological storage. The cost for carbon sequestration with wood burial is low because CO2 is removed from the atmosphere by the natural process of photosynthesis at little cost. The technique is low tech, distributed, easy to monitor, safe, and reversible, thus an attractive option for large-scale implementation in a world-wide carbon market.

  20. Amorphous iron (II) carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sel, Ozlem; Radha, A.V.; Dideriksen, Knud;

    2012-01-01

    exothermic than that of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC). This suggests that enthalpy of crystallization in carbonate systems is ionic-size controlled, which may have significant implications in a wide variety of conditions, including geological sequestration of anthropogenic carbon dioxide.......Abstract The synthesis, characterization and crystallization energetics of amorphous iron (II) carbonate (AFC) are reported. AFC may form as a precursor for siderite (FeCO3). The enthalpy of crystallization (DHcrys) of AFC is similar to that of amorphous magnesium carbonate (AMC) and more...

  1. Quality of graphite target for biological/biomedical/environmental applications of 14C-accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Hyun; Kelly, Peter B; Ortalan, Volkan; Browning, Nigel D; Clifford, Andrew J

    2010-03-15

    Catalytic graphitization for (14)C-accelerator mass spectrometry ((14)C-AMS) produced various forms of elemental carbon. Our high-throughput Zn reduction method (C/Fe = 1:5, 500 degrees C, 3 h) produced the AMS target of graphite-coated iron powder (GCIP), a mix of nongraphitic carbon and Fe(3)C. Crystallinity of the AMS targets of GCIP (nongraphitic carbon) was increased to turbostratic carbon by raising the C/Fe ratio from 1:5 to 1:1 and the graphitization temperature from 500 to 585 degrees C. The AMS target of GCIP containing turbostratic carbon had a large isotopic fractionation and a low AMS ion current. The AMS target of GCIP containing turbostratic carbon also yielded less accurate/precise (14)C-AMS measurements because of the lower graphitization yield and lower thermal conductivity that were caused by the higher C/Fe ratio of 1:1. On the other hand, the AMS target of GCIP containing nongraphitic carbon had higher graphitization yield and better thermal conductivity over the AMS target of GCIP containing turbostratic carbon due to optimal surface area provided by the iron powder. Finally, graphitization yield and thermal conductivity were stronger determinants (over graphite crystallinity) for accurate/precise/high-throughput biological, biomedical, and environmental (14)C-AMS applications such as absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination (ADME), and physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) of nutrients, drugs, phytochemicals, and environmental chemicals.

  2. Density distribution of {sup 14}Be from reaction cross-section measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriguchi, T. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Ozawa, A., E-mail: ozawa@tac.tsukuba.ac.jp [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Ishimoto, S. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Abe, Y. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Fukuda, M. [Department of Physics, Osaka University, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Hachiuma, I. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Ishibashi, Y.; Ito, Y. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Kuboki, T. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Lantz, M. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Nagae, D. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Namihira, K. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Nishimura, D. [Department of Physics, Osaka University, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Ohtsubo, T. [Department of Physics, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Ooishi, H. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Suda, T. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Suzuki, H. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Suzuki, T. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Takechi, M.; Tanaka, K. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); and others

    2014-09-15

    We measured the reaction cross sections of the two-neutron halo nucleus {sup 14}Be with proton and carbon targets at about 41 and 76 MeV/nucleon. Based on a Glauber model calculation, we deduced the matter density distribution of {sup 14}Be in which previously measured interaction cross sections at relativistic energies were also included. An s-wave dominance in {sup 14}Be has been confirmed, although the halo tail of {sup 14}Be is not distributed as much as that of {sup 11}Li. Significant mixing of the p-wave in addition to the s- and d-wave is also suggested.

  3. A Brazilian network of carbon flux stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberti, Débora R.; Acevedo, Otávio C.; Moraes, Osvaldo L. L.

    2012-05-01

    First Brasflux Workshop; Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, 14-15 November 2011 Last November, 33 researchers participated in a workshop to establish Brasflux, the Brazilian network of carbon flux stations, with the objective of integrating previous efforts and planning for the future. Among the participants were those leading ongoing flux observation projects and others planning to establish flux stations in the near future. International scientists also participated to share the experiences gained with other networks. The need to properly characterize terrestrial ecosystems for their roles in the global carbon, water, and energy budgets has motivated the implementation of hundreds of micrometeorological research sites throughout the world in recent years. The eddy covariance (EC) technique for turbulent flux determination is the preferred method to provide integral information on ecosystematmosphere exchanges. Integrating the observations regionally and globally has proven to be an effective approach to maximizing the usefulness of this technique for carbon cycle studies at multiple scales.

  4. Metal-Organic Frameworks to Metal/Metal Oxide Embedded Carbon Matrix: Synthesis, Characterization and Gas Sorption Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiun-Jen Chen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Three isostructural metal-organic frameworks, (MOFs, [Fe(OH(1,4-NDC] (1, [Al(OH(1,4-NDC] (2, and [In(OH(1,4-NDC] (3 have been synthesized hydrothermally by using 1,4-naphthalene dicarboxylate (1,4-NDC as a linker. The MOFs were characterized using various techniques and further used as precursor materials for the synthesis of metal/metal oxide nanoparticles inserted in a carbon matrix through a simple thermal conversion method. The newly synthesized carbon materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis, powder X-ray diffraction and BET analysis. The results showed that the MOF-derived carbon composite materials maintained the morphology of the original MOF upon carbonization, and confirmed the insertion of metal/metal oxide particles in the carbon matrix.

  5. Evaluation of microbial fuel cell operation using algae as an oxygen supplier: carbon paper cathode vs. carbon brush cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakarla, Ramesh; Min, Booki

    2014-12-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) and its cathode performances were compared with use of carbon fiber brush and plain carbon paper cathode electrodes in algae aeration. The MFC having carbon fiber brush cathode exhibited a voltage of 0.21 ± 0.01 V (1,000 Ω) with a cathode potential of around -0.14 ± 0.01 V in algal aeration, whereas MFC with plain carbon paper cathode resulted in a voltage of 0.06 ± 0.005 V with a cathode potential of -0.39 ± 0.01 V. During polarizations, MFC equipped with carbon fiber brush cathode showed a maximum power density of 30 mW/m(2), whereas the MFC equipped with plain carbon paper showed a power density of 4.6 mW/m(2). In algae aeration, the internal resistance with carbon fiber brush cathode was 804 Ω and with plain carbon paper it was 1,210 Ω. The peak currents of MFC operation with carbon fiber brush and plain carbon paper cathodes were -31 mA and -850 µA, respectively.

  6. Are there carbon stars in the Bulge?

    CERN Document Server

    Ng, Y K

    1998-01-01

    The bulge carbon stars have been a mystery since their discovery, because they are about 2.5mag too faint to be regarded as genuine AGB stars, if located inside the metal-rich bulge (m-M=14.5mag). Part of the mystery can be solved if these carbon stars are related to the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (SDG; m-M=17.0mag). They are in that case not old and metal-rich, but young, ~0.1 Gyr, with SMC-like metallicity. The sigma_RV=113+/-14 km/s radial velocity dispersion of the stars appears to be consistent with bulge membership. On the other hand, a similar velocity dispersion could be the result from an induced star formation event when the SDG crosses the galactic midplane. It is suggested that the carbon stars are tracers of such an event and that they therefore are located at distances related to the SDG. However, the majority of the carbon stars are not member of the SDG, nor are they similar to the C-stars which are member of the SDG. The radial velocities can be used to determine a possible membership to the SD...

  7. Young organic matter as a source of carbon dioxide outgassing from Amazonian rivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayorga, E; Aufdenkampe, A K; Masiello, C A; Krusche, A V; Hedges, J I; Quay, P D; Richey, J E; Brown, T A

    2005-06-23

    Rivers are generally supersaturated with respect to carbon dioxide, resulting in large gas evasion fluxes that can be a significant component of regional net carbon budgets. Amazonian rivers were recently shown to outgas more than ten times the amount of carbon exported to the ocean in the form of total organic carbon or dissolved inorganic carbon. High carbon dioxide concentrations in rivers originate largely from in situ respiration of organic carbon, but little agreement exists about the sources or turnover times of this carbon. Here we present results of an extensive survey of the carbon isotope composition ({sup 13}C and {sup 14}C) of dissolved inorganic carbon and three size-fractions of organic carbon across the Amazonian river system. We find that respiration of contemporary organic matter (less than 5 years old) originating on land and near rivers is the dominant source of excess carbon dioxide that drives outgassing in mid-size to large rivers, although we find that bulk organic carbon fractions transported by these rivers range from tens to thousands of years in age. We therefore suggest that a small, rapidly cycling pool of organic carbon is responsible for the large carbon fluxes from land to water to atmosphere in the humid tropics.

  8. Catalysts in syntheses of carbon and carbon precursors

    OpenAIRE

    Mochida, Isao; Yoon, Seong-Ho; Qiao, Wenming

    2006-01-01

    Carbon materials have been applied in different fields because of their unique performances. Naturally, the physical and chemical structures of carbon precursors and carbon materials decide their properties and applications. Catalysts play a very important role in the synthesis of carbon precursors and carbon materials by controlling the molecular and compositional chemistry at the transformation of organic substrates into carbon through carbonaceous intermediates. Carbon materials of high pe...

  9. Evidence for the assimilation of ancient glacier organic carbon in a proglacial stream food web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellman, Jason; Hood, Eran; Raymond, Peter A.; Hudson, J.H.; Bozeman, Maura; Arimitsu, Mayumi L.

    2015-01-01

    We used natural abundance δ13C, δ15N, and Δ14C to compare trophic linkages between potential carbon sources (leaf litter, epilithic biofilm, and particulate organic matter) and consumers (aquatic macroinvertebrates and fish) in a nonglacial stream and two reaches of the heavily glaciated Herbert River. We tested the hypothesis that proglacial stream food webs are sustained by organic carbon released from glacial ecosystems. Carbon sources and consumers in the nonglacial stream had carbon isotope values that ranged from -30‰ to -25‰ for δ13C and from -14‰ to 53‰ for Δ14C reflecting a food web sustained mainly on contemporary primary production. In contrast, biofilm in the two glacial stream sites was highly Δ14C-depleted (-215‰ to 175‰) relative to the nonglacial stream consistent with the assimilation of ancient glacier organic carbon. IsoSource modeling showed that in upper Herbert River, macroinvertebrates (Δ14C = -171‰ to 22‰) and juvenile salmonids (Δ14C = −102‰ to 17‰) reflected a feeding history of both biofilm (~ 56%) and leaf litter (~ 40%). We estimate that in upper Herbert River on average 36% of the carbon incorporated into consumer biomass is derived from the glacier ecosystem. Thus, 14C-depleted glacial organic carbon was likely transferred to higher trophic levels through a feeding history of bacterial uptake of dissolved organic carbon and subsequent consumption of 14C-depleted biofilm by invertebrates and ultimately fish. Our findings show that the metazoan food web is sustained in part by glacial organic carbon such that future changes in glacial runoff could influence the stability and trophic structure of proglacial aquatic ecosystems.

  10. An expedient synthesis of functionalized 1,4-diketone-derived compounds via silyloxyallyl cation intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepherson, Jacob R; Fronczek, Frank R; Kartika, Rendy

    2016-02-07

    Herein we describe a new method, enabling the synthesis of highly functionalized 1,4-diketones that are readily differentiated as monosilylenol ethers under Brønsted acid catalysis. This synthetically useful chemistry exploited an intermediacy of unsymmetrical silyloxyallyl cations, which were directly captured by silyl enolates to create the targeted α,α carbon-carbon linkages in a regioselective manner. Our reaction conditions proved to be mild, rendering the silylenol ether functionalities intact.

  11. Palladium-catalyzed 1,4-difunctionalization of butadiene to form skipped polyenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCammant, Matthew S; Liao, Longyan; Sigman, Matthew S

    2013-03-20

    A palladium-catalyzed 1,4-addition across the commodity chemical 1,3-butadiene to afford skipped polyene products is reported. Through a palladium σ → π → σ allyl isomerization, two new carbon-carbon bonds are formed with high regioselectivity and trans stereoselectivity of the newly formed alkene. The utility of this method is highlighted by the successful synthesis of the ripostatin A skipped triene core.

  12. Exodus 3 : 1-14

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anonymous, [No Value

    2006-01-01

    Seow hoofdtuk 19. Dit bestand bevat de tekst van Exodus 3:1-14. De tekst wordt tweemaal gelezen, de eerste maal in een normaal voorleestempo, de tweede maal met tussenpozen tussen twee of drie woorden

  13. 2004 Rose Site 14P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 14P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on February 25, 2002. With a start point...

  14. 2012 Rose Site 14P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 14P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on February 25, 2002. With a start point...

  15. Carbon dioxide sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Prabir K. (Worthington, OH); Lee, Inhee (Columbus, OH); Akbar, Sheikh A. (Hilliard, OH)

    2011-11-15

    The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

  16. Benzene Synthesis for ''14C Measurements and Evaluation of Uncertainty in Mollusk Shells; Sintesis de Benceno para la Determinacion de C''14 y Evaluacion de su Incertidumbre en Conchas de Moluscos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero del Hombrebueno, B.; Simon, M. A.; Larena, P.

    2002-07-01

    This work describes the method and instrumentation used by Environmental Isotopes laboratory of the CIEMAT Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (DIAE) for the synthesis of benzene from carbonates of mollusk shells and the liquid scintillation counting of ''14C for radiocarbon dating in these samples. The usefulness of mollusk shells for ''14 C dating are considered. (Author)

  17. Synthesis of (9Z, 12E-, (9E, 12Z-[1-14C]-linoleic acid, (9Z, 12Z, 15E-, (9E, 12Z, 15Z-[1-14C]-linolenic acid and (5Z, 8Z, 11Z, 14E-[1-14C]-arachidonic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enard, Thierry

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Trans polyunsaturated fatty acids are produced in vegetable oils during heat treatment (240-250 °C.ln order to study the metabolic pathway of 9c, 12t and 9t, 12c linoleic acid and 9c, 12c, 15t and 9t, 12c, 15c linolenic acid, these products were prepared labelled with carbon 14 in the carboxylic position. 5c, 8c, 11c, 14t-Arachidonic acid was also labelled on the carboxylic position with carbon 14 in order to study its physiological effects. To introduce the labelling (E-bromo precursors with a 17 carbons chain or a 19 carbon chain were needed. The different syntheses were done by elongation steps and creation of cis double bonds via highly stereospecific Wittig reactions. The radioactive carbon atom was introduced from [14C]-potassium cyanide. The final radioactive fatty acids had a specific activity greater than 50 mCi/mmol and a radioactive purity better than 99 % for linoleic and linolenic and better than 98.6 % for arachidonic acid.

  18. Comparative absorption of calcium from carbonate tablets, lactogluconate/carbonate effervescent tablet, and chloride solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, M; Reizenstein, P; Teigen, S W; Rønneberg, R

    1991-01-01

    Intestinal absorption of calcium from three different labelled calcium preparations (all containing 500 mg elemental calcium) was determined using the whole body retention and urinary excretion of 47Ca in 14 normal subjects. Chewable calcium carbonate tablets showed a significantly (p less than 0.05) better mean minimum absorption of calcium (25.6% in exp. I, 22.8% in exp. II) than calcium given in the form of a lactogluconate/carbonate effervescent tablet, (17%), but similar to calcium in a chloride solution (24.7%). The minimum calcium absorption varied from 85 to 128 mg. All the preparations were taken with standardized low calcium test meals.

  19. Carbon sequestration rate and aboveground biomass carbon potential of three young species in lower Gangetic plain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Bipal K; Biswas, Soumyajit; Majumder, Mrinmoy; Roy, Pankaj K; Mazumdar, Asis

    2011-07-01

    Carbon is sequestered by the plant photosynthesis and stored as biomass in different parts of the tree. Carbon sequestration rate has been measured for young species (6 years age) of Shorea robusta at Chadra forest in Paschim Medinipur district, Albizzia lebbek in Indian Botanic Garden in Howrah district and Artocarpus integrifolia at Banobitan within Kolkata in the lower Gangetic plain of West Bengal in India by Automated Vaisala Made Instrument GMP343 and aboveground biomass carbon has been analyzed by CHN analyzer. The specific objective of this paper is to measure carbon sequestration rate and aboveground biomass carbon potential of three young species of Shorea robusta, Albizzia lebbek and Artocarpus integrifolia. The carbon sequestration rate (mean) from the ambient air during winter season as obtained by Shorea robusta, Albizzia lebbek and Artocarpus integrifolia were 11.13 g/h, 14.86 g/h and 4.22g/h, respectively. The annual carbon sequestration rate from ambient air were estimated at 8.97 t C ha(-1) by Shorea robusta, 11.97 t C ha(-1) by Albizzia lebbek and 3.33 t C ha(-1) by Artocarpus integrifolia. The percentage of carbon content (except root) in the aboveground biomass of Shorea robusta, Albizzia lebbek and Artocarpus integrifolia were 47.45, 47.12 and 43.33, respectively. The total aboveground biomass carbon stock per hectare as estimated for Shorea robusta, Albizzia lebbek and Artocarpus integrifolia were 5.22 t C ha(-1) , 6.26 t C ha(-1) and 7.28 t C ha(-1), respectively in these forest stands.

  20. Synthesis of [sup 14]C-labelled sodium pariprazole (E3810). [Anti-ulcer agent; ATPase inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagami, Katsuya; Chiku, Shigeru; Sohda, Shigeru (Eisai Co., Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan). Tsukuba Research Labs.)

    1993-09-01

    Sodium pariprazole (E3810), an inhibitor of H[sup +],K[sup +]-ATPase, was synthesized labelled with carbon-14, starting from 2-mercapto[2-[sup 14]C]-benzimidazole with a specific activity of 888 MBq/mmol. It was obtained in 49.3% radiochemical yield with a radiochemical purity of more than 98%. (author).

  1. Proton production cross sections of {sup 14}C from silicon and oxygen: Implications for cosmic-ray studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisterson, J.M. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Cyclotron Lab.; Jull, A.J.T. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). NSF Arizona Accelerator Mass Spectrometer Facility; Beverding, A. [San Jose State Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry] [and others

    1993-12-31

    The production rates of {sup 14}C from proton spallation of silicon, and oxygen have been measured over a wide range of energies from 31 to 450 MeV. {sup 14}C was measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) after extraction of carbon from the samples by melting in a flow of oxygen.

  2. Oxygen reduction on teflon-bonded carbon electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周德璧; 黄可龙; 张世民

    2004-01-01

    Oxygen reduction on Teflon-bonded carbon gas diffusion electrode without catalyst in 6 mol/L KOH solution was investigated with acimpedance spectroscopy and other electrochemical techniques. The kinetic parameters were measured with an exchange current density of J0= 3.44 × 10-9 and a Tafel slope of 46 mV/dec in low overpotential range (-0.05 --0.14 V vs SCE), which are comparable with those reported on carbon supported platinum electrode. The reaction mechanism of OR and the active effect of carbon black were examined.

  3. Carbon-ionogel supercapacitors for integrated microelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Greg; Smith, Leland; Lau, Jonathan; Dunn, Bruce; Chui, Chi On

    2016-01-22

    To exceed the performance limits of dielectric capacitors in microelectronic circuit applications, we design and demonstrate on-chip coplanar electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs), or supercapacitors, employing carbon-coated gold electrodes with ionogel electrolyte. The formation of carbon-coated microelectrodes is accomplished by solution processing and results in a ten-fold increase in EDLC capacitance compared to bare gold electrodes without carbon. At frequencies up to 10 Hz, an areal capacitance of 2.1 pF μm(-2) is achieved for coplanar carbon-ionogel EDLCs with 10 μm electrode gaps and 0.14 mm(2) electrode area. Our smallest devices, comprised of 5 μm electrode gaps and 80 μm(2) of active electrode area, reach areal capacitance values of ∼0.3 pF μm(-2) at frequencies up to 1 kHz, even without carbon. To our knowledge, these are the highest reported values to date for on-chip EDLCs with sub-mm(2) areas. A physical EDLC model is developed through the use of computer-aided simulations for design exploration and optimization of coplanar EDLCs. Through modeling and comparison with experimental data, we highlight the importance of reducing the electrode gap and electrolyte resistance to achieve maximum performance from on-chip EDLCs.

  4. Graphitic Carbons and Biosignatures

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard, S.; Papineau, D

    2014-01-01

    The unambiguous identification of graphitic carbons as remains of life in ancient rocks is challenging because fossilized biogenic molecules are inevitably altered and degraded during diagenesis and metamorphism of the host rocks. Yet, recent studies have highlighted the possible preservation of biosignatures carried by some of the oldest graphitic carbons. Laboratory simulations are increasingly being used to better constrain the transformations of organic molecules into graphitic carbons in...

  5. Carbon Dioxide Absorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    1950-05-17

    carbondioxide content of the solution was then determined. A gas mixture containing 2.6% carbon dioxide and 97.4% nitrogen was prepared in the...which carbon dioxide is removed by heat0 Since this step is usually carried out by "steam stripping ", that is, contacting the solution at its boiling...required to produce the steam required for stripping the carbon dioxide from the s olution. The method ueed in this investigation for determining the

  6. Carbon emissions Inventory Games

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Emadi, Eiman Ali

    2016-01-01

    Carbon emissions reduction has been the center of attention in many organizations during the past few decades. Many international entities developed rules and regulations to monitor and control carbon emissions especially under supply chain context. Furthermore, researchers investigated techniques and methods on how reduce carbon emissions under operational adjustment which can be done by cooperation or coordination. The main contribution of this thesis is to measure to what extend cooperatio...

  7. Animating the Carbon Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the biogeochemical processes reg- ulating carbon cycling is central to mitigating atmospheric CO2 emissions. The role of living organisms has been accounted for, but the focus has traditionally been on contributions of plants and microbes. We develop the case that fully ‘‘animating’’ the carbon cycle requires broader consideration of the functional role of animals in mediating biogeochemical processes and quanti- fication of their effects on carbon storage and exchange among ter...

  8. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-11-01

    Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Deliverables for the 7th Quarter reporting period include (1) for the geological efforts: Reports on Technology Needs and Action Plan on the Evaluation of Geological Sinks and Pilot Project Deployment (Deliverables 2 and 3), and Report on the Feasibility of Mineralization Trapping in the Snake River Plain Basin (Deliverable 14); (2) for the terrestrial efforts: Report on the Evaluation of Terrestrial Sinks and a Report of the Best Production Practices for Soil C Sequestration (Deliverables 8 and 15). In addition, the 7th Quarter activities for the Partnership included further development of the proposed activities for the deployment and demonstration phase of the carbon sequestration pilots including geological and terrestrial pilots, expansion of the Partnership to encompass regions and institutions that are complimentary to the steps we have identified, building greater collaborations with industry and stakeholders in the region, contributed to outreach efforts that spanned all partnerships, co-authorship on the Carbon Capture and Separation report, and developed a regional basis to address future energy opportunities in the region. The deliverables and activities are discussed in the following sections and appended to this report. The education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The public website has been expanded and integrated with the GIS carbon atlas. We have made presentations to stakeholders and policy makers including two tribal sequestration workshops, and made connections to other federal and

  9. Contrasting modes of inorganic carbon acquisition amongst Symbiodinium (Dinophyceae) phylotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brading, Patrick; Warner, Mark E; Smith, David J; Suggett, David J

    2013-10-01

    Growing concerns over ocean acidification have highlighted the need to critically understand inorganic carbon acquisition and utilization in marine microalgae. Here, we contrast these characteristics for the first time between two genetically distinct dinoflagellate species of the genus Symbiodinium (phylotypes A13 and A20) that live in symbiosis with reef-forming corals. Both phylotypes were grown in continuous cultures under identical environmental conditions. Rubisco was measured using quantitative Western blots, and radioisotopic (14) C uptake was used to characterize light- and total carbon dioxide (TCO2 )-dependent carbon fixation, as well as inorganic carbon species preference and external carbonic anhydrase activity. A13 and A20 exhibited similar rates of carbon fixation despite cellular concentrations of Rubisco being approximately four-fold greater in A13. The uptake of CO2 over HCO3 - was found to support the majority of carbon fixation in both phylotypes. However, A20 was also able to indirectly utilize HCO3 - by first converting it to CO2 via external carbonic anhydrase. These results show that adaptive differences in inorganic carbon acquisition have evolved within the Symbiodinium genus, which thus carries fundamental implications as to how this functionally key genus will respond to ocean acidification, but could also represent a key trait factor that influences their productivity when in hospite of their coral hosts.

  10. Nanographene reinforced carbon/carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Dhruv

    Carbon/Carbon Composites (CCC) are made of carbon reinforcement in carbon matrix and have high thermal stability and fatigue resistance. CCC are used in nose cones, heat shields and disc brakes of aircrafts due to their exceptional mechanical properties at high temperature. The manufacturing process of CCC involves a carbonization stage in which unwanted elements, except carbon, are eliminated from the polymer precursor. Carbonization results in the formation of voids and cracks due to the thermal mismatch between the reinforcement and the matrix and expulsion of volatiles from the polymer matrix. Thermal cracks and voids decrease the density and mechanical properties of the manufactured CCC. In this work, Nanographene Platelets (NGP) were explored as nanofillers to fill the voids/cracks and reduce thermal shrinkage in CCC. They were first compared with Vapor Grown Carbon Nanofibers (VGCNF) by dispersion of different concentrations (0.5wt%, 1.5wt%, 3wt%) in resole-type phenolic resin and were characterized to explore their effect on rheology, heat of reaction and wetting behavior. The dispersions were then cured to form nanocomposites and were characterized for morphology, flexure and thermal properties. Finally, NGP were introduced into the carbon/carboncomposites in two stages, first by spraying in different concentrations (0.5wt%, 1.5wt%, 3wt%, 5wt %) during the prepreg formation and later during densification by directly mixing in the corresponding densification mix. The manufactured NGP reinforced CCC were characterized for microstructure, porosity, bulk density and mechanical properties (Flexure and ILSS) which were further cross-checked by non-destructive techniques (vibration and ultrasonic). In this study, it was further found that at low concentration (≤ 1.5 wt%) NGP were more effective in increasing the heat of reaction and in decreasing the viscosity of the phenolic resin. The decrease in viscosity led to better wetting properties of NGP / phenolic

  11. CARBON DIOXIDE REDUCTION SYSTEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CARBON DIOXIDE , *SPACE FLIGHT, RESPIRATION, REDUCTION(CHEMISTRY), RESPIRATION, AEROSPACE MEDICINE, ELECTROLYSIS, INSTRUMENTATION, ELECTROLYTES, VOLTAGE, MANNED, YTTRIUM COMPOUNDS, ZIRCONIUM COMPOUNDS, NICKEL.

  12. Solid phase extraction method for the study of black carbon cycling in dissolved organic carbon using radiocarbon

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V.. Radiocarbon analysis is a powerful tool for understanding the cycling of individual components within carbon pools, such as black carbon (BC) in dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Radiocarbon (δ14C) measurements of BC in DOC provide insight into one source of aged, recalcitrant DOC. We report a modified solid phase extraction (SPE) method to concentrate 43±6% of DOC (SPE-DOC) from seawater. We used the Benzene Polycarboxylic Acid (BPCA) method to isolate BC from SPE-DOC (SP...

  13. Pyrolysis-combustion 14C dating of soil organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Hackley, Keith C.; Panno, Samuel V.; Coleman, Dennis D.; Liu, Jack Chao-li; Brown, Johnie

    2003-11-01

    Radiocarbon ( 14C) dating of total soil organic matter (SOM) often yields results inconsistent with the stratigraphic sequence. The onerous chemical extractions for SOM fractions do not always produce satisfactory 14C dates. In an effort to develop an alternative method, the pyrolysis-combustion technique was investigated to partition SOM into pyrolysis volatile (Py-V) and pyrolysis residue (Py-R) fractions. The Py-V fractions obtained from a thick glacigenic loess succession in Illinois yielded 14C dates much younger but more reasonable than the counterpart Py-R fractions for the soil residence time. Carbon isotopic composition (δ 13C) was heavier in the Py-V fractions, suggesting a greater abundance of carbohydrate- and protein-related constituents, and δ 13C was lighter in the Py-R fractions, suggesting more lignin- and lipid-related constituents. The combination of 14C dates and δ 13C values indicates that the Py-V fractions are less biodegradation resistant and the Py-R fractions are more biodegradation resistant. The pyrolysis-combustion method provides a less cumbersome approach for 14C dating of SOM fractions. With further study, this method may become a useful tool for analyzing unlithified terrestrial sediments when macrofossils are absent.

  14. Interactions between carbon sequestration and shade tree diversity in a smallholder coffee cooperative in El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Meryl Breton; Méndez, V Ernesto

    2014-04-01

    Agroforestry systems have substantial potential to conserve native biodiversity and provide ecosystem services. In particular, agroforestry systems have the potential to conserve native tree diversity and sequester carbon for climate change mitigation. However, little research has been conducted on the temporal stability of species diversity and aboveground carbon stocks in these systems or the relation between species diversity and aboveground carbon sequestration. We measured changes in shade-tree diversity and shade-tree carbon stocks in 14 plots of a 35-ha coffee cooperative over 9 years and analyzed relations between species diversity and carbon sequestration. Carbon sequestration was positively correlated with initial species richness of shade trees. Species diversity of shade trees did not change significantly over the study period, but carbon stocks increased due to tree growth. Our results show a potential for carbon sequestration and long-term biodiversity conservation in smallholder coffee agroforestry systems and illustrate the opportunity for synergies between biodiversity conservation and climate change mitigation.

  15. Microbial Substrate Usage Indicated by C-14 Contents of Phospholipid Fatty Acids From Soil Organic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rethemeyer, J.; Nadeau, M. J.; Grootes, P. M.; Kramer, C.; Gleixner, G.

    2004-05-01

    Phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA's) are generally associated with viable (bacterial) cell membranes. They are thought to be short-lived under normal soil conditions. We compare the C-14 levels in PLFA's obtained from soil samples from the,clean" experimental site at Rotthalmünster (Germany) with those from the agricultural research station at Halle (Germany), where the soil is contaminated with,old" carbon from lignite mining and industry. The most abundant PLFA's were isolated via preparative capillary gas chromatography of their methyl-esters at the Max-Planck Institute, Jena, and their C-14 concentration was determined via accelerator mass spectrometry at the Leibniz-Labor, Kiel. The C-14 levels of three mono-unsaturated fatty acids (n-C17:1, n-C18:1 (and n-C16:1)) are not statistically significant different from those of the contemporaneous atmosphere, indicating these fatty acids were derived from fresh plant material. C-14 levels significantly above those of the atmosphere in three saturated fatty acids (i/a-C15:0, n-C16:0 and cy-C18:0) from the surface soil of Rotthalmünster must derive from carbon fixed from the atmosphere several years earlier, when levels of bomb-C-14, remaining from the atmospheric nuclear weapons tests, especially of the early 1960's, were still higher. Lower C-14 levels in the same compounds from the Halle surface soil indicate the incorporation of "old" contaminant carbon. A below- atmospheric C-14 concentration in n-C18:0 in Rotthalmünster surface soil may reflect the partial incorporation of carbon from older, pre-bomb times. The C-14 concentrations show these PLFA's were synthesized predominantly from recent to sub-recent photosynthetic compounds, while the significant differences in C-14 concentration, observed between the PLFA's, indicate their production from soil organic matter fractions of different (recent) age and C-14 content. The Halle results show "old" carbon may be incorporated into PLFA's and thus reenter the soil

  16. Irradiation Scheme Design of 14C Production on 49-2 Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN; Zheng; LIU; Xing-min; XU; Zhi-long; ZHANG; Ya-dong

    2012-01-01

    <正>14C is a radioisotope of carbon, it is widely used in pharmacy, medical treatment, agriculture, reconnoiter and archaeology. 49-2 research reactor is a swimming pool style reactor which has operated for more than 40 years. The application of 49-2 reactor includes the radio nuclides production. Therefore, the technical scheme on 14C irradiation in 49-2 reactor should be prepared elaborately.

  17. Proteomic analysis of carbon concentrating chemolithotrophic bacteria Serratia sp. for sequestration of carbon dioxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randhir K Bharti

    Full Text Available A chemolithotrophic bacterium enriched in the chemostat in presence of sodium bicarbonate as sole carbon source was identified as Serratia sp. by 16S rRNA sequencing. Carbon dioxide sequestering capacity of bacterium was detected by carbonic anhydrase enzyme and ribulose-1, 5- bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO. The purified carbonic anhydrase showed molecular weight of 29 kDa. Molecular weight of RuBisCO was 550 kDa as determined by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC, however, sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE showed presence of two subunits whose molecular weights were 56 and 14 kDa. The Western blot analysis of the crude protein and purified sample cross reacted with RuBisCO large-subunit polypeptides antibodies showed strong band pattern at molecular weight around 56 kDa regions. Whole cell soluble proteins of Serratia sp. grown under autotrophic and heterotrophic conditions were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/MS for differential expression of proteins. In proteomic analysis of 63 protein spots, 48 spots were significantly up-regulated in the autotrophically grown cells; seven enzymes showed its utilization in autotrophic carbon fixation pathways and other metabolic activities of bacterium including lipid metabolisms indicated sequestration potency of carbon dioxide and production of biomaterials.

  18. Proteomic analysis of carbon concentrating chemolithotrophic bacteria Serratia sp. for sequestration of carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Randhir K; Srivastava, Shaili; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2014-01-01

    A chemolithotrophic bacterium enriched in the chemostat in presence of sodium bicarbonate as sole carbon source was identified as Serratia sp. by 16S rRNA sequencing. Carbon dioxide sequestering capacity of bacterium was detected by carbonic anhydrase enzyme and ribulose-1, 5- bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO). The purified carbonic anhydrase showed molecular weight of 29 kDa. Molecular weight of RuBisCO was 550 kDa as determined by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC), however, sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed presence of two subunits whose molecular weights were 56 and 14 kDa. The Western blot analysis of the crude protein and purified sample cross reacted with RuBisCO large-subunit polypeptides antibodies showed strong band pattern at molecular weight around 56 kDa regions. Whole cell soluble proteins of Serratia sp. grown under autotrophic and heterotrophic conditions were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/MS for differential expression of proteins. In proteomic analysis of 63 protein spots, 48 spots were significantly up-regulated in the autotrophically grown cells; seven enzymes showed its utilization in autotrophic carbon fixation pathways and other metabolic activities of bacterium including lipid metabolisms indicated sequestration potency of carbon dioxide and production of biomaterials.

  19. Microbially mediated mineral carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, I. M.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral carbonation involves silicate dissolution and carbonate precipitation, which are both natural processes that microorganisms are able to mediate in near surface environments (Ferris et al., 1994; Eq. 1). (Ca,Mg)SiO3 + 2H2CO3 + H2O → (Ca,Mg)CO3 + H2O + H4SiO4 + O2 (1) Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophs with cell surface characteristics and metabolic processes involving inorganic carbon that can induce carbonate precipitation. This occurs partly by concentrating cations within their net-negative cell envelope and through the alkalinization of their microenvironment (Thompson & Ferris, 1990). Regions with mafic and ultramafic bedrock, such as near Atlin, British Columbia, Canada, represent the best potential sources of feedstocks for mineral carbonation. The hydromagnesite playas near Atlin are a natural biogeochemical model for the carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals (Power et al., 2009). Field-based studies at Atlin and corroborating laboratory experiments demonstrate the ability of a microbial consortium dominated by filamentous cyanobacteria to induce the precipitation of carbonate minerals. Phototrophic microbes, such as cyanobacteria, have been proposed as a means for producing biodiesel and other value added products because of their efficiency as solar collectors and low requirement for valuable, cultivable land in comparison to crops (Dismukes et al., 2008). Carbonate precipitation and biomass production could be facilitated using specifically designed ponds to collect waters rich in dissolved cations (e.g., Mg2+ and Ca2+), which would allow for evapoconcentration and provide an appropriate environment for growth of cyanobacteria. Microbially mediated carbonate precipitation does not require large quantities of energy or chemicals needed for industrial systems that have been proposed for rapid carbon capture and storage via mineral carbonation (e.g., Lackner et al., 1995). Therefore, this biogeochemical approach may represent a readily

  20. 1,4-Diferrocenylbutane-1,4-dione

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orhan Büyükgüngör

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In the crystal structure of the title compound, [Fe2(C5H52(C14H12O2], each carbonyl group is coplanar with the adjacent cyclopentadienyl ring, thus maximizing the π-orbital overlap and electronic interactions between the groups. In the crystal structure, there are inter- and intramolecular C—H...O contacts.

  1. 14 CFR Sec. 1-4 - System of accounts coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... General Accounting Provisions Sec. 1-4 System of accounts coding. (a) A four digit control number is... digit code assigned to each profit and loss account denote a detailed area of financial activity or... sequentially within blocks, designating more general classifications of financial activity and...

  2. Catalytic acceleration of graphitisation of amorphous carbon during synthesis of tungsten carbide from tungsten and excess amorphous carbon in a solar furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shohoji, N. [Inst. Nacional de Engenharia e Tecnologia Industrial, Lisbon (Portugal); Guerra Rosa, L.; Cruz Fernandes, J. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001, Lisbon (Portugal); Martinez, D.; Rodriguez, J. [Plataforma Solar de Almeria, Centro Europeo de Ensayos de Energia Solar, Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, P.O. Box 22, 04200, Tabernas (Spain)

    1999-03-25

    Amorphous carbon is one of the allotropes of carbon possessing carbon activity a(C) higher than that of graphite (standard state with a(C) = 1). Amorphous carbon is in a metastable state but, under normal circumstances, it takes several hours to be graphitised to an extent detectable by X-ray diffraction even at temperature higher than 1500 C. In the present work, we report the accelerated graphitisation of amorphous carbon induced apparently by the catalytic action of tungsten (W) or tungsten carbide (WC) during synthesis of WC started from W and active carbon in solar furnace under controlled atmosphere (Ar or N{sub 2}). This degree of graphitisation of amorphous carbon did not proceed by the similar reaction undertaken in the traditional laboratory furnace under the comparable conditions. (orig.) 14 refs.

  3. Identification of Biodegradation Pathways in a Multi-Process Phytoremediation System (MPPS) Using Natural Abundance 14C Analysis of PLFA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, B. R.; Greenberg, B. M.; Slater, G. F.

    2008-12-01

    Optimizing remediation of petroleum-contaminated soils requires thorough understanding of the mechanisms and pathways involved in a proposed remediation system. In many engineered and natural attenuation systems, multiple degradation pathways may contribute to observed contaminant mass losses. In this study, biodegradation in the soil microbial community was identified as a major pathway for petroleum hydrocarbon removal in a Multi-Process Phytoremediation System (MPPS) using natural abundance 14C analysis of Phospholipid Fatty Acids (PLFA). In contaminated soils, PLFA were depleted in Δ14C to less than -800‰, directly demonstrating microbial uptake and utilization of petroleum derived carbon14C = -992‰) during bioremediation. Mass balance indicated that more than 80% of microbial carbon was derived from petroleum hydrocarbons and a maximum of 20% was produced from metabolism of modern carbon sources. In contrast, in a nearby uncontaminated control soil, the microbial community maintained a nearly modern 14C signature, suggesting preferential degradation of more labile, recent carbon. Mass balance using δ13C and Δ14C of soil CO2 demonstrated that mineralization of petroleum carbon contributed 60-65% of soil CO2 at the contaminated site. The remainder was derived from atmospheric (27-30%) and decomposition of non- petroleum natural organic carbon (5-10%). The clean control exhibited substantially lower CO2 concentrations that were derived from atmospheric (55%) and natural organic carbon (45%) sources. This study highlights the value of using multiple carbon isotopes to identify degradation pathways in petroleum- contaminated soils undergoing phytoremediation and the power of natural abundance 14C to detect petroleum metabolism in natural microbial communities.

  4. Measuring priming using 14C of respired CO2: effects on respiration source pools and interactions with warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, F. M.; Trumbore, S.

    2011-12-01

    The role of substrate availability on soil carbon turnover is a critical unknown in predicting future soil carbon stocks. Substrate composition and availability can be altered by land cover change, warming, and nitrogen deposition, which can in turn affect soil carbon stocks through the priming effect. In particular, little is understood about the interaction between warming and changing substrate concentration. We examined the interactions between global change factors and the priming effect using sucrose addition to incubations of soils from two forest Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) sites (Duke and Aspen). In addition to the in situ global change manipulations conducted at these sites, the CO2 fertilization procedure over the decade-long experiment labeled soil carbon pools with fossil-derived carbon (depleted in 14C relative to the background isotope content of soil carbon), allowing us to determine the effect of priming on respiration of soil carbon substrates of different ages. Thus, we used the carbon-13 signature of sucrose-derived CO2 to account for losses of substrate C, and the carbon-14 signature to partition fluxes of soil-derived CO2 between pre-FACE (> 10 y) and FACE derived (positive priming effect-an increase in the rate of soil carbon derived respiration due to sucrose addition. However, the effect of substrate addition on respiratory source pools, as measured by 14C of respiration, varied greatly. At Duke FACE, we observed an increase in 14C content of CO2 of primed soil carbon, whereas at Aspen, we observed no difference. The amount of CO2 released by priming increased with temperature, but was proportionally similar to the amount of increase in basal respiration rates (no differences in Q10). At Duke, both warming and priming served to increase the 14C of respiration, whereas only warming changed 14C of respiration at Aspen. Despite similar overall carbon stocks, differences in the source of the priming effect between the two sites may be due to

  5. Carbon Dioxide Fountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seong-Joo; Ryu, Eun-Hee

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the development of a carbon dioxide fountain. The advantages of the carbon dioxide fountain are that it is odorless and uses consumer chemicals. This experiment also is a nice visual experiment that allows students to see evidence of a gaseous reagent being consumed when a pressure sensor is available. (Contains 3 figures.)…

  6. De-carbonizingChina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    zhou; Xiaoyan

    2013-01-01

    Innovation in the energy sector will pave the way for the country’slow-carbon future Although its per-capita emission is roughly on par with the world’s average, China is the world’s largest carbon dioxide emitter,

  7. Carbon for sensing devices

    CERN Document Server

    Tagliaferro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    This book reveals why carbon is playing such an increasingly prominent role as a sensing material. The various steps that transform a raw material in a sensing device are thoroughly presented and critically discussed.  The authors deal with all aspects of carbon-based sensors, starting from the various hybridization and allotropes of carbon, with specific focus on micro and nanosized carbons (e.g., carbon nanotubes, graphene) and their growth processes. The discussion then moves to the role of functionalization and the different routes to achieve it. Finally, a number of sensing applications in various fields are presented, highlighting the connection with the basic properties of the various carbon allotropes.  Readers will benefit from this book’s bottom-up approach, which starts from the local bonding in carbon solids and ends with sensing applications, linking the local hybridization of carbon atoms and its modification by functionalization to specific device performance. This book is a must-have in th...

  8. China's carbon conundrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ye; Wu, Tong; He, Jiankun; King, David A.

    2013-07-01

    China's carbon dioxide emissions are rising fast. Yet, per capita, gross domestic product and energy use are only a fraction of their United States equivalents. With a growing urban middle class, the trend will continue, but there is progress on the path to a low-carbon economy.

  9. Global carbon budget 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Peters, G. P.; Ciais, P.; Friedlingstein, P.; Jones, S. D.; Sitch, S.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Boden, T. A.; Bopp, L.; Bozec, Y.; Canadell, J. G.; Chevallier, F.; Cosca, C. E.; Harris, I.; Hoppema, M.; Houghton, R. A.; House, J. I.; Jain, A.; Johannessen, T.; Kato, E.; Keeling, R. F.; Kitidis, V.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Koven, C.; Landa, C. S.; Landschützer, P.; Lenton, A.; Lima, I. D.; Marland, G.; Mathis, J. T.; Metzl, N.; Nojiri, Y.; Olsen, A.; Ono, T.; Peters, W.; Pfeil, B.; Poulter, B.; Raupach, M. R.; Regnier, P.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Salisbury, J. E.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Séférian, R.; Segschneider, J.; Steinhoff, T.; Stocker, B. D.; Sutton, A. J.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; van der Werf, G. R.; Viovy, N.; Wang, Y.-P.; Wanninkhof, R.; Wiltshire, A.; Zeng, N.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we descr

  10. Global Carbon Budget 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quéré, Le C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R.M.; Canadell, J.G.; Sitch, S.; Korsbakken, J.I.; Friedlingstein, P.; Peters, G.P.; Andres, R.J.; Boden, T.A.; Houghton, R.A.; House, J.I.; Keeling, R.F.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Bakker, D.C.E.; Barbero, L.; Bopp, L.; Chang, J.; Chevallier, F.; Chini, L.P.; Ciais, P.; Fader, M.; Feely, R.A.; Gkritzalis, T.; Harris, I.; Hauck, J.; Ilyina, T.; Jain, A.K.; Kato, E.; Kitidis, V.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Koven, C.; Landschützer, P.; Lauvset, S.K.; Lefèvre, N.; Lenton, A.; Lima, I.D.; Metzl, N.; Millero, F.; Munro, D.R.; Murata, A.; Nabel, J.E.M.S.; Nakaoka, S.; Nojiri, Y.; O'Brien, K.; Olsen, A.; Ono, T.; Pérez, F.F.; Pfeil, B.; Pierrot, D.; Poulter, B.; Rehder, G.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Séférian, R.; Steinhoff, T.; Stocker, B.D.; Sutton, A.J.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; Laan-Luijkx, Van Der I.T.; Werf, Van Der G.R.; Heuven, Van S.; Vandemark, D.; Viovy, N.; Wiltshire, A.; Zaehle, S.; Zeng, N.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we de

  11. Global carbon budget 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Quéré, C.; Peters, G. P.; Andres, R. J.; Andrew, R. M.; Boden, T. A.; Ciais, P.; Friedlingstein, P.; Houghton, R. A.; Marland, G.; Moriarty, R.; Sitch, S.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Arvanitis, A.; Bakker, D. C E; Bopp, L.; Canadell, J. G.; Chini, L. P.; Doney, S. C.; Harper, A.; Harris, I.; House, J. I.; Jain, A. K.; Jones, S. D.; Kato, E.; Keeling, R. F.; Klein Goldewijk, Kees; Körtzinger, A.; Koven, C.; Lefèvre, N.; Maignan, F.; Omar, A.; Ono, T.; Park, G. H.; Pfeil, B.; Poulter, B.; Raupach, M. R.; Regnier, Piere; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Schwinger, J.; Segschneider, J.; Stocker, B. D.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; Van Heuven, S.; Viovy, N.; Wanninkhof, R.; Wiltshire, A.; Zaehle, S.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we descr

  12. Global Carbon Budget 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Canadell, J. G.; Sitch, S.; Korsbakken, J. I.; Friedlingstein, P.; Peters, G. P.; Andres, R. J.; Boden, T. A.; Houghton, R. A.; House, J. I.; Keeling, R. F.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Bakker, D. C. E.; Barbero, L.; Bopp, L.; Chang, J.; Chevallier, F.; Chini, L. P.; Ciais, P.; Fader, M.; Feely, R. A.; Gkritzalis, T.; Harris, I.; Hauck, J.; Ilyina, T.; Jain, A. K.; Kato, E.; Kitidis, V.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Koven, C.; Landschützer, P.; Lauvset, S. K.; Lefèvre, N.; Lenton, A.; Lima, I. D.; Metzl, N.; Millero, F.; Munro, D. R.; Murata, A.; Nabel, J. E. M. S.; Nakaoka, S.; Nojiri, Y.; O'Brien, K.; Olsen, A.; Ono, T.; Pérez, F. F.; Pfeil, B.; Pierrot, D.; Poulter, B.; Rehder, G.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Séférian, R.; Steinhoff, T.; Stocker, B. D.; Sutton, A. J.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; van der Laan-Luijkx, I. T.; van der Werf, G. R.; van Heuven, S.; Vandemark, D.; Viovy, N.; Wiltshire, A.; Zaehle, S.; Zeng, N.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we descr

  13. Fly ash carbon passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  14. Carbon Dioxide and Climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Peter G.

    1978-01-01

    The amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is increasing at a rate that could cause significant warming of the Earth's climate in the not too distant future. Oceanographers are studying the role of the ocean as a source of carbon dioxide and as a sink for the gas. (Author/BB)

  15. COMMITTED TO CARBON REDUCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Chinese efforts to lower carbon emissions through environmentally friendly means begin gaining momentum Efforts to curb carbon emissions continue to take shape as China adheres to its pledge for a brighter, greener future. More importantly, as environmental measures take hold and develop

  16. Global carbon budget 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quéré, Le C.; Peters, W.; Moriarty, R.; Friedlingstein, P.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we descr

  17. Carbon Capture and Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benson, S.M.; Bennaceur, K.; Cook, P.; Davison, J.; Coninck, H. de; Farhat, K.; Ramirez, C.A.; Simbeck, D.; Surles, T.; Verma, P.; Wright, I.

    2012-01-01

    Emissions of carbon dioxide, the most important long-lived anthropogenic greenhouse gas, can be reduced by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS). CCS involves the integration of four elements: CO 2 capture, compression of the CO2 from a gas to a liquid or a denser gas, transportation of pressurized CO 2

  18. Fractionation between inorganic and organic carbon during the Lomagundi (2.22 2.1 Ga) carbon isotope excursion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker, A.; Holmden, C.; Beukes, N. J.; Kenig, F.; Eglinton, B.; Patterson, W. P.

    2008-07-01

    The Lomagundi (2.22-2.1 Ga) positive carbon isotope excursion in shallow-marine sedimentary carbonates has been associated with the rise in atmospheric oxygen, but subsequent studies have demonstrated that the carbon isotope excursion was preceded by the rise in atmospheric oxygen. The amount of oxygen released to the exosphere during the Lomagundi excursion is constrained by the average global fractionation between inorganic and organic carbon, which is poorly characterized. Because dissolved inorganic and organic carbon reservoirs were arguably larger in the Paleoproterozoic ocean, at a time of lower solar luminosity and lower ocean redox state, decoupling between these two variables might be expected. We determined carbon isotope values of carbonate and organic matter in carbonates and shales of the Silverton Formation, South Africa and in the correlative Sengoma Argillite Formation, near the border in Botswana. These units were deposited between 2.22 and 2.06 Ga along the margin of the Kaapvaal Craton in an open-marine deltaic setting and experienced lower greenschist facies metamorphism. The prodelta to offshore marine shales are overlain by a subtidal carbonate sequence. Carbonates exhibit elevated 13C values ranging from 8.3 to 11.2‰ vs. VPDB consistent with deposition during the Lomagundi positive excursion. The total organic carbon (TOC) contents range from 0.01 to 0.6% and δ13C values range from - 24.8 to - 13.9‰. Thus, the isotopic fractionation between organic and carbonate carbon was on average 30.3 ± 2.8‰ ( n = 32) in the shallow-marine environment. The underlying Sengoma shales have highly variable TOC contents (0.14 to 21.94%) and δ13C values (- 33.7 to - 20.8‰) with an average of - 27.0 ± 3.0‰ ( n = 50). Considering that the shales were also deposited during the Lomagundi excursion, and taking δ13C values of the overlying carbonates as representative of the δ13C value of dissolved inorganic carbon during shale deposition, a carbon

  19. Dense high-aspect ratio 3D carbon pillars on interdigitated microelectrode arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amato, Letizia; Heiskanen, Arto; Hansen, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present high-aspect ratio carbon pillars (1.4 μm in diameter and ∼11 μm in height) on top of interdigitated electrode arrays to be used for electrochemical applications. For this purpose, different types of 2D and 3D pyrolysed carbon structures were fabricated and characterised...

  20. The production of a homogeneous and well-attached layer of carbon nanofibers on metal foils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pacheco Benito, S.; Lefferts, L.

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were deposited on metal foils including nickel (Ni), iron (Fe), cobalt (Co), stainless steel (Fe:Ni; 70:11 wt.%) and mumetal (Ni:Fe; 77:14 wt.%) by the decomposition of C2H4 at 600 °C. The effect of pretreatment and the addition of H2 on the rate of carbon formation, as well

  1. A global predictive model of carbon in mangrove soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, Sunny L.; Siikamäki, Juha V.

    2014-10-01

    Mangroves are among the most threatened and rapidly vanishing natural environments worldwide. They provide a wide range of ecosystem services and have recently become known for their exceptional capacity to store carbon. Research shows that mangrove conservation may be a low-cost means of reducing CO2 emissions. Accordingly, there is growing interest in developing market mechanisms to credit mangrove conservation projects for associated CO2 emissions reductions. These efforts depend on robust and readily applicable, but currently unavailable, localized estimates of soil carbon. Here, we use over 900 soil carbon measurements, collected in 28 countries by 61 independent studies, to develop a global predictive model for mangrove soil carbon. Using climatological and locational data as predictors, we explore several predictive modeling alternatives, including machine-learning methods. With our predictive model, we construct a global dataset of estimated soil carbon concentrations and stocks on a high-resolution grid (5 arc min). We estimate that the global mangrove soil carbon stock is 5.00 ± 0.94 Pg C (assuming a 1 meter soil depth) and find this stock is highly variable over space. The amount of carbon per hectare in the world’s most carbon-rich mangroves (approximately 703 ± 38 Mg C ha-1) is roughly a 2.6 ± 0.14 times the amount of carbon per hectare in the world’s most carbon-poor mangroves (approximately 272 ± 49 Mg C ha-1). Considerable within country variation in mangrove soil carbon also exists. In Indonesia, the country with the largest mangrove soil carbon stock, we estimate that the most carbon-rich mangroves contain 1.5 ± 0.12 times as much carbon per hectare as the most carbon-poor mangroves. Our results can aid in evaluating benefits from mangrove conservation and designing mangrove conservation policy. Additionally, the results can be used to project changes in mangrove soil carbon stocks based on changing climatological predictors, e.g. to

  2. Reference: 14BPATERD1 [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14BPATERD1 Simpson SD, Nakashima K, Narusaka Y, Seki M, Shinozaki K, Yamaguchi-Shin...ozaki K. Two different novel cis-acting elements of erd1, a clpA homologous Arabidopsis gene function in ind

  3. Biological and physical influences on soil 14CO2 seasonal dynamics in a temperate hardwood forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Phillips

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available While radiocarbon (14C abundance in standing stocks of soil carbon has been used to evaluate rates of soil carbon turnover on timescales of several years to centuries, soil-respired 14CO2 measurements are an important tool for identifying more immediate responses to disturbance and climate change. Soil 14CO2 data are often temporally sparse, however, and could be interpreted better with more context for typical seasonal ranges and trends. We report on a semi-high-frequency sampling campaign to distinguish physical and biological drivers of soil 14CO2 at a temperate forest site in Northern Wisconsin, USA. We sampled 14CO2 profiles every three weeks during snow-free months through 2012, in three intact plots and one trenched plot that excluded roots. Respired 14CO2 declined through the summer in intact plots, shifting from an older C composition that contained more bomb 14C, to a younger composition more closely resembling present 14C levels in the atmosphere. In the trenched plot respired 14C was variable but remained comparatively higher than in intact plots, reflecting older bomb-enriched 14C sources. Although respired 14CO2 from intact plots correlated with soil moisture, related analyses did not support a clear cause-and-effect relationship with moisture. The initial decrease in 14CO2 from spring to midsummer could be explained by increases in 14C-deplete root respiration; however, 14CO2 continued to decline in late summer after root activity decreased. We also investigated whether soil moisture impacted vertical partitioning of CO2 production, but found this had little effect on respired 14CO2 because CO2 contained modern bomb-C at depth, even in the trenched plot. This surprising result contrasted with decades to centuries-old pre-bomb CO2 produced in lab incubations of the same soils. Our results suggest that root-derived C and other recent C sources had dominant impacts on 14CO2 in situ, even at depth. We propose that 14CO2 may have

  4. Synthesis of hydrated lutetium carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Liu [South China Univ. of Technology, Dept. of Applied Chemistry, Guangdong (China); Rong-jun Ma [Changsha Research Institute of Minig and Metallurgy, Hunan (China)

    1997-09-01

    Crystalline lutetium carbonate was synthesized for the corresponding chloride using ammonium bicarbonate as precipitant. The chemical analyses suggest that the synthesized lutetium carbonate is a hydrated basic carbonate or oxycarbonate. The X-ray powder diffraction data are presented. The IR data for the compound show the presence of two different carbonate groups. There is no stable intermediate carbonate in the process of thermal decomposition of the lutetium carbonate. (au) 15 refs.

  5. Carbon sequestration by Australian tidal marshes

    KAUST Repository

    Macreadie, Peter I.

    2017-03-10

    Australia\\'s tidal marshes have suffered significant losses but their recently recognised importance in CO2 sequestration is creating opportunities for their protection and restoration. We compiled all available data on soil organic carbon (OC) storage in Australia\\'s tidal marshes (323 cores). OC stocks in the surface 1 m averaged 165.41 (SE 6.96) Mg OC ha-1 (range 14-963 Mg OC ha-1). The mean OC accumulation rate was 0.55 ± 0.02 Mg OC ha-1 yr-1. Geomorphology was the most important predictor of OC stocks, with fluvial sites having twice the stock of OC as seaward sites. Australia\\'s 1.4 million hectares of tidal marshes contain an estimated 212 million tonnes of OC in the surface 1 m, with a potential CO2-equivalent value of $USD7.19 billion. Annual sequestration is 0.75 Tg OC yr-1, with a CO2-equivalent value of $USD28.02 million per annum. This study provides the most comprehensive estimates of tidal marsh blue carbon in Australia, and illustrates their importance in climate change mitigation and adaptation, acting as CO2 sinks and buffering the impacts of rising sea level. We outline potential further development of carbon offset schemes to restore the sequestration capacity and other ecosystem services provided by Australia tidal marshes.

  6. Aged Riverine Particulate Organic Carbon in Four UK Catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jessica; Tipping, Edward; Bryant, Charlotte; Helliwell, Rachel; Toberman, Hannah; Quinton, John

    2016-04-01

    The riverine transport of particulate organic matter (POM) is a significant flux in the carbon cycle, and affects macronutrients and contaminants. We used radiocarbon to characterise POM at 9 riverine sites of four UK catchments (Avon, Conwy, Dee, Ribble) over a one-year period. High-discharge samples were collected on three or four occasions at each site. Suspended particulate matter (SPM) was obtained by centrifugation, and the samples were analysed for carbon isotopes. Concentrations of SPM and SPM organic carbon (OC) contents were also determined, and were found to have a significant negative correlation. For the 7 rivers draining predominantly rural catchments, PO14C values, expressed as percent modern carbon absolute (pMC), varied little among samplings at each site, and there was no significant difference in the average values among the sites. The overall average PO14C value for the 7 sites of 91.2 pMC corresponded to an average age of 680 14C years, but this value arises from the mixing of differently-aged components, and therefore significant amounts of organic matter older than the average value are present in the samples. Although topsoil erosion is probably the major source of the riverine POM, the average PO14C value is appreciably lower than topsoil values (which are typically 100 pMC). This is most likely explained by inputs of older subsoil OC from bank erosion, or the preferential loss of high-14C topsoil organic matter by mineralisation during riverine transport. The significantly lower average PO14C of samples from the River Calder (76.6 pMC), can be ascribed to components containing little or no radiocarbon, derived either from industrial sources or historical coal mining, and this effect is also seen in the River Ribble, downstream of its confluence with the Calder. At the global scale, the results significantly expand available information for PO14C in rivers draining catchments with low erosion rates.

  7. Carbon dioxide conversion over carbon-based nanocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavarian, Mehrnoush; Chai, Siang-Piao; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2013-07-01

    The utilization of carbon dioxide for the production of valuable chemicals via catalysts is one of the efficient ways to mitigate the greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. It is known that the carbon dioxide conversion and product yields are still low even if the reaction is operated at high pressure and temperature. The carbon dioxide utilization and conversion provides many challenges in exploring new concepts and opportunities for development of unique catalysts for the purpose of activating the carbon dioxide molecules. In this paper, the role of carbon-based nanocatalysts in the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide and direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate from carbon dioxide and methanol are reviewed. The current catalytic results obtained with different carbon-based nanocatalysts systems are presented and how these materials contribute to the carbon dioxide conversion is explained. In addition, different strategies and preparation methods of nanometallic catalysts on various carbon supports are described to optimize the dispersion of metal nanoparticles and catalytic activity.

  8. Impact of suppression of tumorigenicity 14 (ST14)/serine protease 14 (Prss14) expression analysis on the prognosis and management of estrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sauryang; Yang, Jae Woong; Kim, Chungho; Kim, Moon Gyo

    2016-06-01

    To elucidate the role of a type II transmembrane serine protease, ST14/Prss14, during breast cancer progression, we utilized publically accessible databases including TCGA, GEO, NCI-60, and CCLE. Survival of breast cancer patients with high ST14/Prss14 expression is significantly poor in estrogen receptor (ER) negative populations regardless of the ratios of ST14/Prss14 to its inhibitors, SPINT1 or SPINT2. In a clustering of 1085 selected EMT signature genes, ST14/Prss14 is located in the same cluster with CDH3, and closer to post-EMT markers, CDH2, VIM, and FN1 than to the pre-EMT marker, CDH1. Coexpression analyses of known ST14/Prss14 substrates and transcription factors revealed context dependent action. In cell lines, paradoxically, ST14/Prss14 expression is higher in the ER positive group and located closer to CDH1 in clustering. This apparent contradiction is not likely due to ST14/Prss14 expression in a cancer microenvironment, nor due to negative regulation by ER. Genes consistently coexpressed with ST14/Prss14 include transcription factors, ELF5, GRHL1, VGLL1, suggesting currently unknown mechanisms for regulation. Here, we report that ST14/Prss14 is an emerging therapeutic target for breast cancer where HER2 is not applicable. In addition we suggest that careful conclusions should be drawn not exclusively from the cell line studies for target development.

  9. Radioimmunoassay of human placental protein 14 (PP14)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolton, A.E.; Stoker, R.J. (North East London Polytechnic (UK)); Chapman, M.G.; Wass, D. (Queen Charlotte' s Maternity Hospital, London (UK)); Andrew, C.E. (Edgware General Hospital (UK)); Bohn, H. (Behringwerke AG, Marburg/Lahn (Germany, F.R.). Research Labs.)

    1983-12-30

    The development and validation of a radioimmunoassay for the measurement of human placental protein 14 in maternal serum is described. The mean concentration of this protein in serum from 22 normal pregnant women showed a decline during the third trimester from 120 ..mu..g/l at 27 weeks gestation to 65 ..mu..g/l at term. Serum samples from 16 patients with intra-uterine growth retardation tended to contain lower concentrations of placental protein 14, these results reaching significance at weeks 36-38 of gestation. Of seven patients with pre-eclampsia from whom two or more blood samples were taken, four showed increases in concentration of this protein as pregnancy proceeded, compared with the normal pattern of decreasing values.

  10. Photophysics of polymer-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, J; Loi, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are successfully dispersed in two conjugated polymer poly(9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl) (PFO) and poly[2-methoxy-5-(2’-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MEHPPV) solutions. Steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy in the near-infrare

  11. Chernobyl, 14 years later; Tchernobyl, 14 ans apres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This report draws an account of the consequences of Chernobyl accident 14 years after the disaster. It is made up of 8 chapters whose titles are: (1) Some figures about Chernobyl accident, (2) Chernobyl nuclear power plant, (3)Sanitary consequences of Chernobyl accident, (4) The management of contaminated lands, (5) The impact in France of Chernobyl fallout, (6) International cooperation, (7) More information about Chernobyl and (8) Glossary.

  12. A kind of carbon whiskers in new structure and morphology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG; Jian

    2001-01-01

    [1]Endo, M., Saito, R., Dresselhaus, M. S. et al. From carbon fibers to nanotubes, in Carbon Nanotubes Preparations and Properties (ed. Ebbesen, T. W.), New York: CRC Press Inc., 1997, 54-66.[2]Baker, R. T. K., Baker, M. A., Harris, P. S. et al., Nucleation and growth of carbon deposits from the nickel catalyzed de-composition of acetylene, J.Catal., 1972, 26(7): 51.[3]Audier, M., Coulon, M., Kinetic and microscopic aspects of catalytic carbon growth, Carbon, 1985, 23(3): 317.[4]Oberlin, A., Endo, M., Koyama, T., High resolution microscope observations of graphitized carbon fibers, Carbon, 1976, 14(1): 133.[5]Bacon, R., Growth, structure, and properties of graphite whiskers, Journal of Applied Physics, 1960, 31(2): 283.[6]Murayama, H., Maeda, M., A novel form of filamentous graphite, Nature, 1990, 345(28): 791.[7]Pimpinelli, A., Villain, J., Physics of Crystal Growth, New York: Cambridge University Press, 1998, 62-64.[8]Minkoff, I., Solidification and Cast Structure, Chichester: Wiley, 1986, 42-47.[9]Pierson, H. O., Handbook of Carbon, Graphite, Diamond, and Fullerenes: Properties, Processing, and Applications, Park Ridge: Noyes Publications, 1993, 151.[10]Bennema, P., Spiral growth and surface roughing: Developments since Burton, Cabrera and Frank, Journal of Crystal Growth, 1984, 69(2): 182.

  13. Controllable-nitrogen doped carbon layer surrounding carbon nanotubes as novel carbon support for oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, P.L.; Hsu, C.H.; Wu, H.M.; Hsu, W.S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan (China); Kuo, D. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Novel nitrogen-doped carbon layer surrounding carbon nanotubes composite (NC-CNT) (N/C ratio 3.3-14.3 wt.%) as catalyst support has been prepared using aniline as a dispersant to carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and as a source for both carbon and nitrogen coated on the surface of the CNTs, where the amount of doped nitrogen is controllable. The NC-CNT so obtained were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms. A uniform dispersion of Pt nanoparticles (ca. 1.5-2.0 nm) was then anchored on the surface of NC-CNT by using aromatic amine as a stabilizer. For these Pt/NC-CNTs, cyclic voltammogram measurements show a high electrochemical activity surface area (up to 103.7 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}) compared to the commercial E-TEK catalyst (55.3 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}). In single cell test, Pt/NC-CNT catalyst has greatly enhanced catalytic activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction, resulting in an enhancement of ca. 37% in mass activity compared with that of E-TEK. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Carbon isotopes as indicators of peatland growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alewell, Christine; Krüger, Jan Paul; von Sengbusch, Pascal; Szidat, Sönke; Leifeld, Jens

    2016-04-01

    As undisturbed and/or growing peatlands store considerable amounts of carbon and are unique in their biodiversity and species assemblage, the knowledge of the current status of peatlands (growing with carbon sequestration, stagnating or degrading with carbon emissions) is crucial for landscape management and nature conservation. However, monitoring of peatland status requires long term measurements and is only feasible with expert knowledge. The latter determination is increasingly impeded in a scientific world, where taxonomic expert knowledge and funding of long term monitoring is rare. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes depth profiles in peatland soils have been shown to be a useful tool to monitor the degradation of peatlands due to permafrost thawing in Northern Sweden (Alewell et al., 2011; Krüger et al., 2014), drainage in Southern Finland (Krüger et al., 2016) as well as land use intensification in Northern Germany (Krüger et al., 2015). Here, we tackle the questions if we are able to differentiate between growing and degrading peats with the use of a combination of carbon stable (δ13C) and radiogenic isotope data (14C) with peat stratification information (degree of humification and macroscopic plant remains). Results indicate that isotope data are a useful tool to approximate peatland status, but that expert taxonomic knowledge will be needed for the final conclusion on peatland growth. Thus, isotope tools might be used for landscape screening to pin point sites for detailed taxonomic monitoring. As the method remains qualitative future research at these sites will need to integrate quantitative approaches to determine carbon loss or gain (soil C balances by ash content or C accumulation methods by radiocarbon data; Krüger et al., 2016). Alewell, C., R. Giesler, J. Klaminder, J. Leifeld, and M. Rollog. 2011. Stable carbon isotopes as indicators for micro-geomorphic changes in palsa peats. Biogeosciences, 8, 1769-1778. Krüger, J. P., Leifeld, J

  15. Observations and modelling of the global distribution and long-term trend of atmospheric 14CO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, Ingeborg; Naegler, Tobias; Kromer, Bernd; Wagenbach, Dietmar (Inst. fuer Umweltphysik, Univ. of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)). e-mail: Ingeborg.Levin@iup.uni-heidelberg.de; Diehl, Moritz (Interdisziplinaeres Zentrum fuer wissenschaftliches Rechnen (IWR), Univ. of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)); Francey, Roger J.; Steele, L. Paul (CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research (CMAR), Aspendale, Victoria (Australia)); Gomez-Pelaez, Angel J. (Izana Atmospheric Research Center, Meteorological State Agency of Spain (AEMET), Santa Cruz de Tenerife (Spain)); Weller, Rolf (Alfred Wegener Inst. for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven (Germany)); Worthy, Douglas E. (Environment Canada, Climate Research Div., Toronto, ON (Canada))

    2009-07-01

    Global high-precision atmospheric DELTA14CO{sub 2} records covering the last two decades are presented, and evaluated in terms of changing (radio)carbon sources and sinks, using the coarse-grid carbon cycle model GRACE. Dedicated simulations of global trends and interhemispheric differences with respect to atmospheric CO{sub 2} as well as delta13CO{sub 2} and DELTA14CO{sub 2}, are shown to be in good agreement with the available observations (1940-2008). While until the 1990s the decreasing trend of DELTA14CO{sub 2} was governed by equilibration of the atmospheric bomb 14C perturbation with the oceans and terrestrial biosphere, the largest perturbation today are emissions of 14C-free fossil fuel CO{sub 2}. This source presently depletes global atmospheric DELTA14CO{sub 2} by 1.2-1.4%/yr, which is partially compensated by 14CO{sub 2} release from the biosphere, industrial 14C emissions and natural 14C production. Fossil fuel emissions also drive the changing north-south gradient, showing lower DELTA14C in the northern hemisphere only since 2002. The fossil fuel-induced north/south (and also troposphere-stratosphere) DELTA14CO{sub 2} gradient today also drives the tropospheric DELTA14CO{sub 2} seasonality through variations of air mass exchange between these atmospheric compartments. Neither the observed temporal trend nor the DELTA14CO{sub 2} north-south gradient may constrain global fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions to better than 25%, due to large uncertainties in other components of the (radio)carbon cycle

  16. Small diameter carbon nanopipettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Riju; Bhattacharyya, Sayan; Orynbayeva, Zulfiya; Vitol, Elina; Friedman, Gary; Gogotsi, Yury

    2010-01-01

    Nanoscale multifunctional carbon probes facilitate cellular studies due to their small size, which makes it possible to interrogate organelles within living cells in a minimally invasive fashion. However, connecting nanotubes to macroscopic devices and constructing an integrated system for the purpose of fluid and electrical signal transfer is challenging, as is often the case with nanoscale components. We describe a non-catalytic chemical vapor deposition based method for batch fabrication of integrated multifunctional carbon nanopipettes (CNPs) with tip diameters much smaller (10-30 nm) than previously reported (200 nm and above) and approaching those observed for multiwalled carbon nanotubes. This eliminates the need for complicated attachment/assembly of nanotubes into nanofluidic devices. Variable tip geometries and structures were obtained by controlled deposition of carbon inside and outside quartz pipettes. We have shown that the capillary length and gas flow rate have a marked effect on the carbon deposition. This gives us a flexible protocol, useful for growing carbon layers of different thicknesses at selective locations on a glass pipette to yield a large variety of cellular probes in bulk quantities. The CNPs possess an open channel for fluid transfer with the carbon deposited inside at 875 °C behaving like an amorphous semiconductor. Vacuum annealing of the CNP tips at temperatures up to 2000 °C yields graphitic carbon structures with an increase in conductivity of two orders of magnitude. Penetration of the integrated carbon nanoprobes into cells was shown to produce minimal Ca2+ signals, fast recovery of basal Ca2+ levels and no adverse activation of the cellular metabolism during interrogation times as long as 0.5-1 h.

  17. Evidence of old soil carbon in grass biosilica particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. E. Reyerson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Plant biosilica particles (phytoliths contain small amounts of carbon called phytC. Based on the assumptions that phytC is of photosynthetic origin and a closed system, claims were recently made that phytoliths from grasslands play a significant role in atmospheric CO2 sequestration. However, anomalous phytC radiocarbon (14C dates suggested contributions from a non-photosynthetic source to phytC. Here we address this non-photosynthetic source hypothesis using comparative isotopic measurements (14C and δ13C of phytC, plant tissues, atmospheric CO2, and soil organic matter. State-of-the-art methods assured phytolith purity, while sequential stepwise-combustion revealed complex chemical–thermal decomposability properties of phytC. Although photosynthesis is the main source of carbon in plant tissue, it is found that phytC is partially derived from soil carbon that can be several thousand years old. The accumulation of old soil organic matter derived carbon in plant biosilica suggests that Si absorption and phytolith production promote old soil organic carbon mobilization. Although the magnitude of this mechanism still needs to be properly assessed at plant and ecosystem scales, its confirmation alone argues against attempts to use phytC as a proxy of plant carbon and call for the reexamination of phytolith atmospheric CO2 biosequestration estimates.

  18. Clumped-isotope thermometry of magnesium carbonates in ultramafic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    García del Real, Pablo; Maher, Kate; Kluge, Tobias; Bird, Dennis K.; Brown, Gordon E.; John, Cédric M.

    2016-11-01

    mineralization at shallow crustal depths in the presence of meteoric water. Hydrous magnesium carbonates from a 400-km latitudinal transect along the serpentinized-peridotite bodies of the California Coast Ranges record clumped-isotope temperatures between 14.2 and 22.7 ± 2.8 °C, in agreement with historical maximum temperatures during the rainy season for California. Talc-carbonate alteration of ultramafic rocks in Greenland (Isua Supracrustal Belt) and Vermont (Ludlow) yields clumped-isotope alteration temperatures of magnesite and dolomite between 326 and 490 °C, broadly consistent with paragenesis and thermodynamic analysis for CO2 metasomatism of ultramafic rocks. These metamorphic carbonates extend the applicability of clumped-isotope thermometry to high-temperature magnesium carbonate systems and indicate equilibrium blocking temperatures for magnesite of ∼490 °C. Our study demonstrates the applicability of the clumped isotope approach to provide information on the formation of magnesium carbonates as ore resources, surface records of climate, and metamorphic assemblages.

  19. Carbon Superatom Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canning, A. [Cray Research, PSE, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Canning, A.; Galli, G. [Institut Romand de Recherche Numerique en Physique des Materiaux (IRRMA), IN-Ecublens, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Kim, J. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    1997-06-01

    We report on quantum molecular dynamics simulations of C{sub 28} deposition on a semiconducting surface. Our results show that under certain deposition conditions C{sub 28} {close_quote}s act as building blocks on a nanometer scale to form a thin film of nearly defect-free molecules. The C{sub 28} {close_quote}s behave as carbon superatoms, with the majority of them being threefold or fourfold coordinated, similar to carbon atoms in amorphous systems. The microscopic structure of the deposited film supports recent suggestions about the stability of a new form of carbon, the hyperdiamond solid. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Production of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journet, C.; Bernier, P.

    Carbon nanostructures such as single-walled and multi-walled nanotubes (SWNTs and MWNTs) or graphitic polyhedral nanoparticles can be produced using various methods. Most of them are based on the sublimation of carbon under an inert atmosphere, such as the electric arc discharge process, the laser ablation method, or the solar technique. But chemical methods can also be used to synthesize these kinds of carbon materials: the catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbons, the production by electrolysis, the heat treatment of a polymer, the low temperature solid pyrolysis, or the in situ catalysis.

  1. Determining novel functions of Arabidopsis 14-3-3 proteins in central metabolic processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaz Celine

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 14-3-3 proteins are considered master regulators of many signal transduction cascades in eukaryotes. In plants, 14-3-3 proteins have major roles as regulators of nitrogen and carbon metabolism, conclusions based on the studies of a few specific 14-3-3 targets. Results In this study, extensive novel roles of 14-3-3 proteins in plant metabolism were determined through combining the parallel analyses of metabolites and enzyme activities in 14-3-3 overexpression and knockout plants with studies of protein-protein interactions. Decreases in the levels of sugars and nitrogen-containing-compounds and in the activities of known 14-3-3-interacting-enzymes were observed in 14-3-3 overexpression plants. Plants overexpressing 14-3-3 proteins also contained decreased levels of malate and citrate, which are intermediate compounds of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle. These modifications were related to the reduced activities of isocitrate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase, which are key enzymes of TCA cycle. In addition, we demonstrated that 14-3-3 proteins interacted with one isocitrate dehydrogenase and two malate dehydrogenases. There were also changes in the levels of aromatic compounds and the activities of shikimate dehydrogenase, which participates in the biosynthesis of aromatic compounds. Conclusion Taken together, our findings indicate that 14-3-3 proteins play roles as crucial tuners of multiple primary metabolic processes including TCA cycle and the shikimate pathway.

  2. 14th International Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Ronald G

    2007-01-01

    This is the 14th volume in the conference series. Over the years the International Cryocoolers Conference has become the preeminent worldwide conference for the presentation of the latest developments and test experiences with cryocoolers. The typical applications of this technology include cooling space and terrestrial infrared focal plane arrays, space x-ray detectors, medical applications, and a growing number of high-temperature superconductor applications.

  3. Variable effects of labile carbon on the carbon use of different microbial groups in black slate degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Anne-Gret; Trumbore, Susan; Xu, Xiaomei; Zhang, Dachung; Kothe, Erika; Gleixner, Gerd

    2011-05-01

    Weathering of ancient organic matter contributes significantly to biogeochemical carbon cycles over geological times. The principle role of microorganisms in this process is well recognized. However, information is lacking on the contribution of individual groups of microorganisms and on the effect of labile carbon sources to the degradation process. Therefore, we investigated the contribution of fungi, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in the degradation process using a column experiment. Investigations were performed on low metamorphic black slates. All columns contained freshly crushed, sieved (0.63-2 mm), not autoclaved black slates. Two columns were inoculated with the lignite-degrading fungus Schizophyllum commune and received a culture medium containing 13C labeled glucose, two columns received only this culture medium and two control columns received only water. The total mass balance was calculated from all carbon added to the slate and the CO 2 and DOC losses. Phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) were extracted to investigate microbial communities. We used both the compound specific 14C and 13C signal of the PLFA to quantify carbon uptake from black slates and the glucose of the culture medium, respectively. The total carbon loss in these columns exceeded the amount of added carbon by approximately 60%, indicating that black slate carbon has been used. PLFA associated with Gram-positive bacteria dominated the indigenous community and took up 22% of carbon from black slate carbon, whereas PLFA of Gram-negative bacteria used only 8% of carbon from the slates. PLFA of Gram-negative bacteria and fungi were both mostly activated by the glucose addition. The added Schizophyllum did not establish well in the columns and was overgrown by the indigenous microbial community. Our results suggest that especially Gram-positive bacteria are able to live on and degrade black slate material. They also benefit from easy degradable carbon from the nutrient broth. In

  4. Create a Consortium and Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank Rusinko; John Andresen; Jennifer E. Hill; Harold H. Schobert; Bruce G. Miller

    2006-01-01

    The objective of these projects was to investigate alternative technologies for non-fuel uses of coal. Special emphasis was placed on developing premium carbon products from coal-derived feedstocks. A total of 14 projects, which are the 2003 Research Projects, are reported herein. These projects were categorized into three overall objectives. They are: (1) To explore new applications for the use of anthracite in order to improve its marketability; (2) To effectively minimize environmental damage caused by mercury emissions, CO{sub 2} emissions, and coal impounds; and (3) To continue to increase our understanding of coal properties and establish coal usage in non-fuel industries. Research was completed in laboratories throughout the United States. Most research was performed on a bench-scale level with the intent of scaling up if preliminary tests proved successful. These projects resulted in many potential applications for coal-derived feedstocks. These include: (1) Use of anthracite as a sorbent to capture CO{sub 2} emissions; (2) Use of anthracite-based carbon as a catalyst; (3) Use of processed anthracite in carbon electrodes and carbon black; (4) Use of raw coal refuse for producing activated carbon; (5) Reusable PACs to recycle captured mercury; (6) Use of combustion and gasification chars to capture mercury from coal-fired power plants; (7) Development of a synthetic coal tar enamel; (8) Use of alternative binder pitches in aluminum anodes; (9) Use of Solvent Extracted Carbon Ore (SECO) to fuel a carbon fuel cell; (10) Production of a low cost coal-derived turbostratic carbon powder for structural applications; (11) Production of high-value carbon fibers and foams via the co-processing of a low-cost coal extract pitch with well-dispersed carbon nanotubes; (12) Use of carbon from fly ash as metallurgical carbon; (13) Production of bulk carbon fiber for concrete reinforcement; and (14) Characterizing coal solvent extraction processes. Although some of the

  5. A critical review of atmospheric 14 C activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krajcar Bronic, I.; Horvatincic, N.; Baresic, J.; Obelic, B. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Vreca, P. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, (Slovenia)

    2006-07-01

    14 C activity of atmospheric CO{sub 2} has been measured at the Rudjer Boskovi Institute as a part of environmental monitoring in order to determine possible differences between clean-air sites, industrialized city and sites in the vicinity of nuclear power plant. Samples of Cfrom the atmosphere have been collected by absorption of CO{sub 2} on the saturated carbonate-free NaOH solution for a period of 1 month under stationary conditions. The obtained Na{sub 2} CO{sub 3} has been dissolved in HCl and the produced CO{sub 2} used for CH{sub 4} preparation by catalytic reaction with H{sub 2} at 450 degrees Celsius. A gas proportional counter filled with CH{sub 4} has been used for 14 C activity measurement. The method of collection of CO{sub 2} does not require any power source and can be therefore used for sampling at the remote sites, such as mountains or forests. However,due to the lack of mixing of the Na OH solution, the absorption process is limited on the surface of the solution, and there exists the possibility of fractionation of carbon isotopes due to different reaction rate constants of 12 C and 13 C. A continuous record of atmospheric 14 CO{sub 2} activity exists for the city of Zagreb (1986 to 2005), while shorter records (1-2 years) exist for several other sites of various characteristics: two clean-air sites (Mt. Medvednica, altitude about 1000 m a.s.l., for period 1995 to 1996, and the Plitvice National Park for period 2003 to 2005), and a site close to the Nuclear Power Plant Krsko (1984 to 1986).Within the bilateral Croatian-Slovene project we have recently measured also the stable isotope composition ({delta}13 C) of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} collected at two different sampling sites in order to determine seasonal fluctuations in both 14 C and 13 C isotope composition. Unexpectedly low {delta}13 C values have been obtained about (-25{+-}2)0/00 instead of expected (-7{+-}1)0/00. Such low values have been attributed to the carbon isotope fractionation during

  6. Authigenic Carbonate and the History of the Global Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrag, Daniel P.; Higgins, John. A.; Macdonald, Francis A.; Johnston, David T.

    2013-02-01

    We present a framework for interpreting the carbon isotopic composition of sedimentary rocks, which in turn requires a fundamental reinterpretation of the carbon cycle and redox budgets over Earth's history. We propose that authigenic carbonate, produced in sediment pore fluids during early diagenesis, has played a major role in the carbon cycle in the past. This sink constitutes a minor component of the carbon isotope mass balance under the modern, high levels of atmospheric oxygen but was much larger in times of low atmospheric O2 or widespread marine anoxia. Waxing and waning of a global authigenic carbonate sink helps to explain extreme carbon isotope variations in the Proterozoic, Paleozoic, and Triassic.

  7. Carbon Stock and Carbon Cycle of Wetland Ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhangquan; ZENG; Canming; ZHANG; Jiao; LI; Nan; YANG; Xihao; LI; Yandong; NIU; Zijian; WU

    2014-01-01

    Wetland ecosystem is an essential ecosystem in the world. Its organic carbon stock and carbon cycle are important basis of global carbon cycle researches and also major contents of global climate change researches. Researches have shown that wetland protection and restoration can promote carbon accumulation and reduce emission of greenhouse gases. This paper discussed influence of carbon stock and carbon balance of wetland ecosystem and emission of greenhouse gases,as well as the relationship between wetland and global climate changes. Finally,it made prospect on researches about carbon cycle of Dongting Lake.

  8. A novel carbon fiber based porous carbon monolith

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, T.D.; Klett, J.W.; Weaver, C.E.

    1995-06-01

    A novel porous carbon material based on carbon fibers has been developed. The material, when activated, develops a significant micro- or mesopore volume dependent upon the carbon fiber type utilized (isotropic pitch or polyacrylonitrile). The materials will find applications in the field of fluid separations or as a catalyst support. Here, the manufacture and characterization of our porous carbon monoliths are described. A novel adsorbent carbon composite material has been developed comprising carbon fibers and a binder. The material, called carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS), was developed through a joint research program between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Kentucky, Center for Applied Energy Research (UKCAER).

  9. Carbon, cesium and iodine isotopes in Japanese cedar leaves from Iwaki, Fukushima

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Sheng; Cook, Gordon T.; Cresswell, Alan J.;

    2016-01-01

    Japanese cedar leaves from Iwaki, Fukushima were analyzed for carbon, cesium and iodine isotopic compositions before and after the 2011 nuclear accident. The Δ14C values reflect ambient atmospheric 14C concentrations during the year the leaves were sampled/defoliated, and also previous year...

  10. Dissolved carbon leaching from soil is a crucial component of the net ecosystem carbon balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kindler, Reimo; Siemens, Jan; Kaiser, Klaus;

    2011-01-01

    Estimates of carbon leaching losses from different land use systems are few and their contribution to the net ecosystem carbon balance is uncertain. We investigated leaching of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and dissolved methane (CH4), at forests, grasslands......, and croplands across Europe. Biogenic contributions to DIC were estimated by means of its d13C signature. Leaching of biogenic DIC was 8.34.9 gm2 yr1 for forests, 24.17.2 gm2 yr1 for grasslands, and 14.64.8 gm2 yr1 for croplands. DOC leaching equalled 3.51.3 gm2 yr1 for forests, 5.32.0 gm2 yr1 for grasslands...... (hydr)oxides. Partial pressures of CO2 in soil air and soil pH determined DIC concentrations and fluxes, but soil solutions were often supersaturated with DIC relative to soil air CO2. Leaching losses of biogenic carbon (DOC plus biogenic DIC) from grasslands equalled 5–98% (median: 22%) of net...

  11. Radiocarbon constraints imply reduced carbon uptake by soils during the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yujie; Trumbore, Susan E.; Torn, Margaret S.; Harden, Jennifer W.; Vaughn, Lydia J.S.; Allison, Steven D.; Randerson, J.T.

    2016-01-01

    Soil is the largest terrestrial carbon reservoir and may influence the sign and magnitude of carbon cycle-climate feedbacks. Many Earth system models (ESMs) estimate a significant soil carbon sink by 2100, yet the underlying carbon dynamics determining this response have not been systematically tested against observations. We used 14C data from 157 globally distributed soil profiles sampled to 1 m depth to show that ESMs underestimated the mean age of soil carbon by more than six-fold (430±50 years vs. 3100±1800 years). Consequently, ESMs overestimated the carbon sequestration potential of soils by nearly two-fold (40±27%). These biases suggest that ESMs must better represent carbon stabilization processes and the turnover time of slow and passive reservoirs when simulating future atmospheric CO2 dynamics.

  12. 7 CFR 14.3 - Objective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Objective. 14.3 Section 14.3 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture DETERMINING THE PRIMARY PURPOSE OF CERTAIN PAYMENTS FOR FEDERAL TAX PURPOSES § 14.3 Objective. The objective of the determinations made under part 14 is to provide maximum...

  13. High performance carbon-carbon composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lalit M Manocha

    2003-02-01

    Carbon-carbon composites rank first among ceramic composite materials with a spectrum of properties and applications in various sectors. These composites are made of fibres in various directions and carbonaceous polymers and hydrocarbons as matrix precursors. Their density and properties depend on the type and volume fraction of reinforcement, matrix precursor used and end heat treatment temperature. Composites made with thermosetting resins as matrix precursors possess low densities (1.55–1.75 g/cm3) and well-distributed microporosity whereas those made with pitch as the matrix precursor, after densification exhibit densities of 1.8–2.0 g/cm3 with some mesopores, and those made by the CVD technique with hydrocarbon gases, possess intermediate densities and matrices with close porosities. The former (resin-based) composites exhibit high flexural strength, low toughness and low thermal conductivity, whereas the latter (pitch- and CVD-based) can be made with very high thermal conductivity (400–700 W/MK) in the fibre direction. Carbon-carbon composites are used in a variety of sectors requiring high mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, good frictional properties for brake pads in high speed vehicles or high thermal conductivity for thermal management applications. However, for extended life applications, these composites need to be protected against oxidation either through matrix modification with Si, Zr, Hf etc. or by multilayer oxidation protection coatings consisting of SiC, silica, zircon etc.

  14. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2012 Annual Estimates OCTOBER 13, 2015 Incidents, Deaths, and In-Depth Investigations Associated with Non-Fire ...

  15. [Particle therapy: carbon ions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommier, Pascal; Hu, Yi; Baron, Marie-Hélène; Chapet, Olivier; Balosso, Jacques

    2010-07-01

    Carbon ion therapy is an innovative radiation therapy. It has been first proposed in the forties by Robert Wilson, however the first dedicated centres for human care have been build up only recently in Japan and Germany. The interest of carbon ion is twofold: 1) the very sharp targeting of the tumour with the so called spread out Bragg peak that delivers most of the beam energy in the tumour and nothing beyond it, sparing very efficiently the healthy tissues; 2) the higher relative biological efficiency compared to X rays or protons, able to kill radioresistant tumour cells. Both properties make carbon ions the elective therapy for non resectable radioresistant tumours loco-regionally threatening. The technical and clinical experience accumulated during the recent decades is summarized in this paper along with a detailed presentation of the elective indications. A short comparison between conventional radiotherapy and hadrontherapy is proposed for the indications which are considered as priority for carbon ions.

  16. Global carbon budget 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Peters, G. P.; Ciais, P.; Friedlingstein, P.; Jones, S. D.; Sitch, S.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Boden, T. A.; Bopp, L.; Bozec, Y.; Canadell, J. G.; Chevallier, F.; Cosca, C. E.; Harris, I.; Hoppema, M.; Houghton, R. A.; House, J. I.; Jain, A.; Johannessen, T.; Kato, E.; Keeling, R. F.; Kitidis, V.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Koven, C.; Landa, C. S.; Landschützer, P.; Lenton, A.; Lima, I. D.; Marland, G.; Mathis, J. T.; Metzl, N.; Nojiri, Y.; Olsen, A.; Ono, T.; Peters, W.; Pfeil, B.; Poulter, B.; Raupach, M. R.; Regnier, P.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Salisbury, J. E.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Séférian, R.; Segschneider, J.; Steinhoff, T.; Stocker, B. D.; Sutton, A. J.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; van der Werf, G. R.; Viovy, N.; Wang, Y.-P.; Wanninkhof, R.; Wiltshire, A.; Zeng, N.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2)emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, andterrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the globalcarbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and projectfuture climate change. Here we describe

  17. Total Ecosystem Carbon Stock

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Total ecosystem carbon includes above- and below-ground live plant components (such as leaf, branch, stem and root), dead biomass (such as standing dead wood, down...

  18. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Community Outreach Resource Center Toy Recall Statistics CO Poster Contest Pool Safely Business & Manufacturing Business & Manufacturing Business ... Featured Resources CPSC announces winners of carbon monoxide poster contest Video View the blog Clues You Can ...

  19. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Unites States die every year from accidental non-fire related CO poisoning associated with consumer products, including ... CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of ...

  20. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Criminal Penalties Federal Court Orders & Decisions Research & Statistics Research & Statistics Technical Reports Injury Statistics NEISS Injury Data ... On Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths ...

  1. Carbon partitioning in photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Anastasios

    2013-06-01

    The work seeks to raise awareness of a fundamental problem that impacts the renewable generation of fuels and chemicals via (photo)synthetic biology. At issue is regulation of the endogenous cellular carbon partitioning between different biosynthetic pathways, over which the living cell exerts stringent control. The regulation of carbon partitioning in photosynthesis is not understood. In plants, microalgae and cyanobacteria, methods need be devised to alter photosynthetic carbon partitioning between the sugar, terpenoid, and fatty acid biosynthetic pathways, to lower the prevalence of sugar biosynthesis and correspondingly upregulate terpenoid and fatty acid hydrocarbons production in the cell. Insight from unusual but naturally occurring carbon-partitioning processes can help in the design of blueprints for improved photosynthetic fuels and chemicals production.

  2. Carbon Monoxide Nonattainment Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data layer identifies areas in the U.S. where air pollution levels have not met the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Carbon Monoxide and have...

  3. Assimilation of aged organic carbon in a glacial river food web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellman, J.; Hood, E. W.; Raymond, P. A.; Bozeman, M.; Hudson, J.; Arimitsu, M.

    2013-12-01

    Identifying the key sources of organic carbon supporting fish and invertebrate consumers is fundamental to our understanding of stream ecosystems. Recent laboratory bioassays highlight that aged organic carbon from glacier environments is highly bioavailable to stream bacteria relative to carbon originating from ice-free areas. However, there is little evidence suggesting that this aged, bioavailable organic carbon is also a key basal carbon source for stream metazoa. We used natural abundance of Δ14C, δ13C, and δ15N to determine if fish and invertebrate consumers are subsidized by aged organic carbon in a glacial river in southeast Alaska. We collected biofilm, leaf litter, three different species of macroinvertebrates, and resident juvenile salmonids from a reference stream and two sites (one site is directly downstream of the glacial outflow and one site is upstream of the tidal estuary) on the heavily glaciated Herbert River. Key producers, fish, and invertebrate consumers in the reference stream had carbon isotope values that ranged from -26 to -30‰ for δ13C and from -12 to 53‰ for Δ14C, reflecting a food web sustained mainly on contemporary primary production. In contrast, biofilm in the two glacial sites was highly Δ14C depleted (-203 to -215‰) relative to the reference site. Although biofilm may consist of both bacteria and benthic algae utilizing carbon depleted in Δ14C, δ13C values for biofilm (-24.1‰), dissolved inorganic carbon (-5.9‰), and dissolved organic carbon (-24.0‰) suggest that biofilm consist of bacteria sustained in part by glacier-derived, aged organic carbon. Invertebrate consumers (mean Δ14C of -80.5, mean δ13C of -26.5) and fish (mean Δ14C of -63.3, mean δ13C of -25.7) in the two glacial sites had carbon isotope values similar to biofilm. These results similarly show that aged organic carbon is incorporated into the metazoan food web. Overall, our findings indicate that continued watershed deglaciation and

  4. Java2 Enterprise Edition 14 (J2EE 14) Bible

    CERN Document Server

    McGovern, James; Fain, Yakov; Gordon, Jason; Henry, Ethan; Hurst, Walter; Jain, Ashish; Little, Mark; Nagarajan, Vaidyanathan; Oak, Harshad; Phillips, Lee Anne

    2011-01-01

    Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) is the specification that all enterprise Java developers need to build multi-tier applications, and also the basis for BEA's WebLogic Application Server and IBM's WebSphereRevised to be current with the significant J2EE 1.4 update that will drive substantial developer interestWritten by a top-selling team of eleven experts who provide unique and substantial business examples in a vendor-neutral format, making the information applicable to various application serversCovers patterns, J2EE application servers, frameworks, Ant, and continuous availabilityIncludes e

  5. Applications for alliform carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogotsi, Yury; Mochalin, Vadym; McDonough, IV, John Kenneth; Simon, Patrice; Taberna, Pierre Louis

    2017-02-21

    This invention relates to novel applications for alliform carbon, useful in conductors and energy storage devices, including electrical double layer capacitor devices and articles incorporating such conductors and devices. Said alliform carbon particles are in the range of 2 to about 20 percent by weight, relative to the weight of the entire electrode. Said novel applications include supercapacitors and associated electrode devices, batteries, bandages and wound healing, and thin-film devices, including display devices.

  6. Carbon footprint of thermowood

    OpenAIRE

    Nordlund, Teemu

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of this Bachelor’s Thesis was to evaluate the carbon footprint of thermally modified wood and its manufacturing process and transportation cycle for several different ThermoWood producer. Research included the whole production cycle from harvesting raw wood to ThermoWood transportation in destination area. Carbon dioxide emissions from these areas were determined and calculated for every ThermoWood producer at first hand. Calculations were based on the PAS 2050:2011, which is ...

  7. Method for synthesizing carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongyou

    2012-09-04

    A method for preparing a precursor solution for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, where a polar solvent is added to at least one block copolymer and at least one carbohydrate compound, and the precursor solution is processed using a self-assembly process and subsequent heating to form nanoporous carbon films, porous carbon nanotubes, and porous carbon nanoparticles.

  8. Nano-Carbons as Theranostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang Liu, Xing-Jie Liang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nano-carbons, including fullerenes, carbon nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, graphene, and nano-diamonds, are an important class of nanostructures attracting tremendous interests in the past two decades. In this special issue, seven review articles and research reports are collected, to summarize and present the latest progress in the exploration of various nano-carbons for theranostic applications.

  9. Carbon based prosthetic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlin, D.J.; Carroll, D.W.; Barbero, R.S.; Archuleta, T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Klawitter, J.J.; Ogilvie, W.; Strzepa, P. [Ascension Orthopedics (US); Cook, S.D. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (US). School of Medicine

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to evaluate the use of carbon/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites for use in endoprosthetic devices. The application of these materials for the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joints of the hand was investigated. Issues concerning mechanical properties, bone fixation, biocompatibility, and wear are discussed. A system consisting of fiber reinforced materials with a pyrolytic carbon matrix and diamond-like, carbon-coated wear surfaces was developed. Processes were developed for the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of pyrolytic carbon into porous fiber preforms with the ability to tailor the outer porosity of the device to provide a surface for bone in-growth. A method for coating diamond-like carbon (DLC) on the articulating surface by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was developed. Preliminary results on mechanical properties of the composite system are discussed and initial biocompatibility studies were performed.

  10. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-11-01

    Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Deliverables for the 7th Quarter reporting period include (1) for the geological efforts: Reports on Technology Needs and Action Plan on the Evaluation of Geological Sinks and Pilot Project Deployment (Deliverables 2 and 3), and Report on the Feasibility of Mineralization Trapping in the Snake River Plain Basin (Deliverable 14); (2) for the terrestrial efforts: Report on the Evaluation of Terrestrial Sinks and a Report of the Best Production Practices for Soil C Sequestration (Deliverables 8 and 15). In addition, the 7th Quarter activities for the Partnership included further development of the proposed activities for the deployment and demonstration phase of the carbon sequestration pilots including geological and terrestrial pilots, expansion of the Partnership to encompass regions and institutions that are complimentary to the steps we have identified, building greater collaborations with industry and stakeholders in the region, contributed to outreach efforts that spanned all partnerships, co-authorship on the Carbon Capture and Separation report, and developed a regional basis to address future energy opportunities in the region. The deliverables and activities are discussed in the following sections and appended to this report. The education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The public website has been expanded and integrated with the GIS carbon atlas. We have made presentations to stakeholders and policy makers including two tribal sequestration workshops, and made connections to other federal and

  11. Anomalous carbon-isotope ratios in nonvolatile organic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, I R; Nissenbaum, A

    1966-08-12

    Organic mats are associated with sulfur deposits in Upper Pleistocene sand ridges of the coastal plain of southern Israel; black, brittle, and non-volatile, they show parallel layering but no other apparent cellular structure. Two independent carbon-14 determinations yielded ages of 27,750+/-500 and 31,370+/-1400 years. Four carbon-13:carbon-12 determinations fell within the range deltaC(13) =-82.5 to -89.3 per mille relative to the PDB standard; these appear to be the lowest values yet reported for naturally occurring high-molecular-weight organic material. The origin of the carbon is probably complex; it must have passed through at least one biologic cycle before final deposition.

  12. The carbon budget of South Asia

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patra, P.K.; Canadell, J.G.; Houghton, R.A.; Piao, S.L.; Oh, N.-H.; Ciais, P.; Manjunath, K.R.; Chhabra, A.; Wang, T.; Bhattacharya, T.; Bousquet, P.; Hartman, J.; Ito, A.; Mayorga, E.; Niwa, Y.; Raymond, P.; Sarma, V.V.S.S.; Lasco, R.

    , K. R. Manjunath7, A. Chhabra7, T. Wang6, T. Bhattacharya8, P. Bousquet6, J. Hartman9, A. Ito10, E. Mayorga11, Y. Niwa12, P. A. Raymond13, V. V. S. S. Sarma14, and R. Lasco15 1Research Institute for Global Change, JAMSTEC, Yokohama 236 0001, Japan 2... Global Carbon Project, CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia 3Woods Hole Research Center, 149 Woods Hole Road, Falmouth, MA 02540, USA 4Peeking University, Beijing 100871, China 5Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak...

  13. TAMARIND SEEDS CARBON: PREPRARTION AND METHANE UPTAKE

    OpenAIRE

    K. Munusamy; Rajesh S. Somani; Hari C. Bajaj

    2011-01-01

    Tamarind seeds carbon (TSC) from tamarind (Tamarindus indica) seeds, an agro-byproduct and waste that is available abundantly in the southern states of India, was prepared by chemical activation with KOH. The influence of tamarind seeds char to KOH weight ratio (1:1 to 1:4) and activation temperature (400 to 800 °C) were investigated. TSC having micro-pore volume as high as 1.0 cm3/g with surface area 2673 m2/g was obtained. TSC was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, powder X-ray ...

  14. Aspects of carbon dioxide utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omae, Iwao [Omae Research Laboratories, 335-23 Mizuno, Sayama, Saitama 350-1317 (Japan)

    2006-06-30

    Carbon dioxide reacts with hydrogen, alcohols, acetals, epoxides, amines, carbon-carbon unsaturated compounds, etc. in supercritical carbon dioxide or in other solvents in the presence of metal compounds as catalysts. The products of these reactions are formic acid, formic acid esters, formamides, methanol, dimethyl carbonate, alkylene carbonates, carbamic acid esters, lactones, carboxylic acids, polycarbonate (bisphenol-based engineering polymer), aliphatic polycarbonates, etc. Especially, the productions of formic acid, formic acid methyl ester and dimethylformamide with a ruthenium catalyst; dimethyl carbonate and urethanes with a dialkyltin catalyst; 2-pyrone with a nickel-phosphine catalyst; diphenyl carbonate with a lead phenoxide catalyst; the alternating copolymerization of carbon dioxide and epoxides with a zinc catalyst has attracted attentions as the industrial utilizations of carbon dioxide. The further development of these production processes is expected. (author)

  15. Carbon Dioxide Photodissociation on Iapetus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Eric; Brown, R. H.

    2009-09-01

    Carbon dioxide has been detected on Iapetus (Buratti et al., 2005) and is correlated with the dark material, mostly at mid-latitudes on the leading face of Iapetus (Palmer and Brown, in preparation). The average absorption feature of CO2 in the dark region is 24.7%; if it were a thin veneer of CO2 ice, it would be 14 um thick. Estimating the surface area of dark material and extrapolating gives a total CO2 budget of 8 x 107 kg on the surface of Iapetus. Volatile studies indicate that the surface of Iapetus is too hot to have CO2 ice remain on the surface for more than a few hundred years (Palmer and Brown, 2008). It has been suggested that complexing of volatiles, such as in clathrates, fluid or gas inclusions, or adsorption, would increase the stability on the Jovian and Saturnian satellites, increasing their residence times (McCord; et al., 1998; Hibbitts et al., 2001, 2002, 2007). While complexing would increase carbon dioxide's thermal stability, the resident time of CO2 on Iapetus would remain short due to the effect of UV radiation. We calculated the photodissociation rate for CO2 and found that the entire budget of CO2 on Iapetus would be destroyed in less than one Earth year. If we assume a steady-state system on Iapetus (photodissociation equal to photo-generation) approx. 108 kg will be destroyed and produced every Earth year. Unless the complexing mechanism provides some shielding from UV radiation while still allowing the detection of the 4.26-micron CO2 band, then a source of CO2 is required. We suggest that the source of CO2 is photolytic production from water ice and carbonaceous material.

  16. Thermolytic carbonates for potential 5'-hydroxyl protection of deoxyribonucleosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Marcin K; Marchán, Vicente; Cieślak, Jacek; Grajkowski, Andrzej; Livengood, Victor; Münch, Ursula; Wilk, Andrzej; Beaucage, Serge L

    2003-12-26

    Thermolytic groups structurally related to well-studied heat-sensitive phosphate/thiophosphate protecting groups have been evaluated for 5'-hydroxyl protection of deoxyribonucleosides as carbonates and for potential use in solid-phase oligonucleotide synthesis. The spatial arrangement of selected functional groups forming an asymmetric nucleosidic 5'-O-carbonic acid ester has been designed to enable heat-induced cyclodecarbonation reactions, which would result in the release of carbon dioxide and the generation of a nucleosidic 5'-hydroxyl group. The nucleosidic 5'-O-carbonates 3-8, 10-15, and 19-21 were prepared and were isolated in yields ranging from 45 to 83%. Thermolytic deprotection of these carbonates is preferably performed in aqueous organic solvent at 90 degrees C under near neutral conditions. The rates of carbonate deprotection are dependent on the nucleophilicity of the functional group involved in the postulated cyclodecarbonation reaction and on solvent polarity. Deprotection kinetics increase according to the following order: 4 < 5 < 10 < 6 < 12 < 7 < 13 < 8 < 14 congruent with 19-21 and CCl4 < dioxane < MeCN < t-BuOH < MeCN:phosphate buffer (3:1 v/v, pH 7.0) < EtOH:phosphate buffer (1:1 v/v, pH 7.0). Complete thermolytic deprotection of carbonates 7, 8, 13, and 14 is achieved within 20 min to 2 h under optimal conditions in phosphate buffer-MeCN. The 2-(2-pyridyl)amino-1-phenylethyl and 2-[N-methyl-N-(2-pyridyl)]aminoethyl groups are particularly promising for 5'-hydroxyl protection of deoxyribonucleosides as thermolytic carbonates.

  17. Dynamic replacement and loss of soil carbon on eroding cropland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, J.W.; Sharpe, J.M.; Parton, W.J.; Ojima, D.S.; Fries, T.L.; Huntington, T.G.; Dabney, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    Links between erosion/sedimentation history and soil carbon cycling were examined in a highly erosive setting in Mississippi loess soils. We sampled soils on (relatively) undisturbed and cropped hillslopes and measured C, N, 14C, and CO2 flux to characterize carbon storage and dynamics and to parameterize Century and spreadsheet 14C models for different erosion and tillage histories. For this site, where 100 years of intensive cotton cropping were followed by fertilization and contour plowing, there was an initial and dramatic decline in soil carbon content from 1870 to 1950, followed by a dramatic increase in soil carbon. Soil erosion amplifies C loss and recovery: About 100% of the original, prehistoric soil carbon was likely lost over 127 years of intensive land use, but about 30% of that carbon was replaced after 1950. The eroded cropland was therefore a local sink for CO2 since the 1950s. However, a net CO2 sink requires a full accounting of eroded carbon, which in turn requires that decomposition rates in lower slopes or wetlands be reduced to about 20% of the upland value. As a result, erosion may induce unaccounted sinks or sources of CO2, depending on the fate of eroded carbon and its protection from decomposition. For erosion rates typical of the United States, the sink terms may be large enough (1 Gt yr-1, back-of-the-envelope) to warrant a careful accounting of site management, cropping, and fertilization histories, as well as burial rates, for a more meaningful global assessment.

  18. Ubiquitous Gammaproteobacteria dominate dark carbon fixation in coastal sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyksma, Stefan; Bischof, Kerstin; Fuchs, Bernhard M; Hoffmann, Katy; Meier, Dimitri; Meyerdierks, Anke; Pjevac, Petra; Probandt, David; Richter, Michael; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Mußmann, Marc

    2016-08-01

    Marine sediments are the largest carbon sink on earth. Nearly half of dark carbon fixation in the oceans occurs in coastal sediments, but the microorganisms responsible are largely unknown. By integrating the 16S rRNA approach, single-cell genomics, metagenomics and transcriptomics with (14)C-carbon assimilation experiments, we show that uncultured Gammaproteobacteria account for 70-86% of dark carbon fixation in coastal sediments. First, we surveyed the bacterial 16S rRNA gene diversity of 13 tidal and sublittoral sediments across Europe and Australia to identify ubiquitous core groups of Gammaproteobacteria mainly affiliating with sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. These also accounted for a substantial fraction of the microbial community in anoxic, 490-cm-deep subsurface sediments. We then quantified dark carbon fixation by scintillography of specific microbial populations extracted and flow-sorted from sediments that were short-term incubated with (14)C-bicarbonate. We identified three distinct gammaproteobacterial clades covering diversity ranges on family to order level (the Acidiferrobacter, JTB255 and SSr clades) that made up >50% of dark carbon fixation in a tidal sediment. Consistent with these activity measurements, environmental transcripts of sulfur oxidation and carbon fixation genes mainly affiliated with those of sulfur-oxidizing Gammaproteobacteria. The co-localization of key genes of sulfur and hydrogen oxidation pathways and their expression in genomes of uncultured Gammaproteobacteria illustrates an unknown metabolic plasticity for sulfur oxidizers in marine sediments. Given their global distribution and high abundance, we propose that a stable assemblage of metabolically flexible Gammaproteobacteria drives important parts of marine carbon and sulfur cycles.

  19. Organic modification of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The organic modification of carbon nanotubes is a novel research field being developed recently. In this article, the history and newest progress of organic modification of carbon nanotubes are reviewed from two aspects:organic covalent modification and organic noncovalent modification of carbon nanotubes. The preparation and properties of organic modified carbon nanotubes are discussed in detail. In addition, the prospective development of organic modification of carbon nanotubes is suggested.

  20. Changes in photosynthetic carbon metabolism in senescent leaves of chickpea, Cicer arietinum L.

    OpenAIRE

    Chandrashekhar V. Murumkar; Prakash D Chavan

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic processes in mature and senescent leaves of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) have been compared. With age, leaf photosynthetic pigments viz. chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and carotenoids, and rate of 14°C fixation were considerably affected. Analysis of δ13C, and short term photosynthetic products showed no major change in the path of photosynthetic carbon fixation. Study of long term photosynthetic 14C assimilation revealed that in old senescent leaves, 14C incorporation into orga...

  1. Vascular plants promote ancient peatland carbon loss with climate warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Tom N; Garnett, Mark H; Ward, Susan E; Oakley, Simon; Bardgett, Richard D; Ostle, Nicholas J

    2016-05-01

    Northern peatlands have accumulated one third of the Earth's soil carbon stock since the last Ice Age. Rapid warming across northern biomes threatens to accelerate rates of peatland ecosystem respiration. Despite compensatory increases in net primary production, greater ecosystem respiration could signal the release of ancient, century- to millennia-old carbon from the peatland organic matter stock. Warming has already been shown to promote ancient peatland carbon release, but, despite the key role of vegetation in carbon dynamics, little is known about how plants influence the source of peatland ecosystem respiration. Here, we address this issue using in situ (14)C measurements of ecosystem respiration on an established peatland warming and vegetation manipulation experiment. Results show that warming of approximately 1 °C promotes respiration of ancient peatland carbon (up to 2100 years old) when dwarf-shrubs or graminoids are present, an effect not observed when only bryophytes are present. We demonstrate that warming likely promotes ancient peatland carbon release via its control over organic inputs from vascular plants. Our findings suggest that dwarf-shrubs and graminoids prime microbial decomposition of previously 'locked-up' organic matter from potentially deep in the peat profile, facilitating liberation of ancient carbon as CO2. Furthermore, such plant-induced peat respiration could contribute up to 40% of ecosystem CO2 emissions. If consistent across other subarctic and arctic ecosystems, this represents a considerable fraction of ecosystem respiration that is currently not acknowledged by global carbon cycle models. Ultimately, greater contribution of ancient carbon to ecosystem respiration may signal the loss of a previously stable peatland carbon pool, creating potential feedbacks to future climate change.

  2. Quantification of extraneous carbon during compound specific radiocarbon analysis of black carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziolkowski, Lori A; Druffel, Ellen R M

    2009-12-15

    Radiocarbon ((14)C) is a radioactive isotope that is useful for determining the age and cycling of carbon-based materials in the Earth system. Compound specific radiocarbon analysis (CSRA) provides powerful insight into the turnover of individual components that make up the carbon cycle. Extraneous or nonspecific background carbon (C(ex)) is added during sample processing and subsequent isolation of CSRA samples. Here, we evaluate the quantity and radiocarbon signature of C(ex) added from two sources: preparative capillary gas chromatography (PCGC, C(PCGC)) and chemical preparation of CSRA of black carbon samples (C(chemistry)). We evaluated the blank directly using process blanks and indirectly by quantifying the difference in the isotopic composition between processed and unprocessed samples for a range of sample sizes. The direct and indirect assessment of C(chemistry+PCGC) agree, both in magnitude and radiocarbon value (1.1 +/- 0.5 microg of C, fraction modern = 0.2). Half of the C(ex) is introduced before PCGC isolation, likely from coeluting compounds in solvents used in the extraction method. The magnitude of propagated uncertainties of CSRA samples are a function of sample size and collection duration. Small samples collected for a brief amount of time have a smaller propagated (14)C uncertainty than larger samples collected for a longer period of time. CSRA users are cautioned to consider the magnitude of uncertainty they require for their system of interest, to frequently evaluate the magnitude of C(ex) added during sampling processing, and to avoid isolating samples < or = 5 microg of carbon.

  3. Implications of carbon dust emission for terrestrail carbon cycling and carbon accounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind erosion preferentially removes the finest carbon- and nutrient-rich soil fractions, and consequently its role may be significant within terrestrial carbon (C) cycles. However, the impacts of wind erosion on soil organic carbon (SOC) redistribution are not considered in most carbon cycle models,...

  4. Aged riverine particulate organic carbon in four UK catchments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Jessica L., E-mail: jesams@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster, LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Tipping, Edward, E-mail: et@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster, LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Bryant, Charlotte L., E-mail: charlotte.bryant@glasgow.ac.uk [NERC Radiocarbon Facility, East Kilbride G75 0QF, Scotland (United Kingdom); Helliwell, Rachel C., E-mail: rachel.helliwell@hutton.ac.uk [The James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH Scotland (United Kingdom); Toberman, Hannah, E-mail: hannahtoberman@hotmail.com [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster, LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); School of Environmental Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GP (United Kingdom); Quinton, John, E-mail: j.quinton@lancaster.ac.uk [Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-01

    The riverine transport of particulate organic matter (POM) is a significant flux in the carbon cycle, and affects macronutrients and contaminants. We used radiocarbon to characterise POM at 9 riverine sites of four UK catchments (Avon, Conwy, Dee, Ribble) over a one-year period. High-discharge samples were collected on three or four occasions at each site. Suspended particulate matter (SPM) was obtained by centrifugation, and the samples were analysed for carbon isotopes. Concentrations of SPM and SPM organic carbon (OC) contents were also determined, and were found to have a significant negative correlation. For the 7 rivers draining predominantly rural catchments, PO{sup 14}C values, expressed as percent modern carbon absolute (pMC), varied little among samplings at each site, and there was no significant difference in the average values among the sites. The overall average PO{sup 14}C value for the 7 sites of 91.2 pMC corresponded to an average age of 680 {sup 14}C years, but this value arises from the mixing of differently-aged components, and therefore significant amounts of organic matter older than the average value are present in the samples. Although topsoil erosion is probably the major source of the riverine POM, the average PO{sup 14}C value is appreciably lower than topsoil values (which are typically 100 pMC). This is most likely explained by inputs of older subsoil OC from bank erosion, or the preferential loss of high-{sup 14}C topsoil organic matter by mineralisation during riverine transport. The significantly lower average PO{sup 14}C of samples from the River Calder (76.6 pMC), can be ascribed to components containing little or no radiocarbon, derived either from industrial sources or historical coal mining, and this effect is also seen in the River Ribble, downstream of its confluence with the Calder. At the global scale, the results significantly expand available information for PO{sup 14}C in rivers draining catchments with low erosion rates

  5. Characterization of activated carbon produced from urban organic waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Gani Haji

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The difficulties to decompose organic waste can be handled naturally by pyrolisis so it can  decomposes quickly that produces charcoal as the product. This study aims to investigate the characteristics of activated carbon from urban organic waste. Charcoal results of pyrolysis of organic waste activated with KOH 1.0 M at a temperature of 700 and 800oC for 60 to 120 minutes. Characteristics of activated carbon were identified by Furrier Transform Infra Red (FTIR, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD. However, their quality is determined yield, moisture content, ash, fly substances, fixed carbon, and the power of adsorption of iodine and benzene. The identified functional groups on activated carbon, such as OH (3448,5-3436,9 cm-1, and C=O (1639,4 cm-1. In general, the degree and distance between the layers of active carbon crystallites produced activation in all treatments showed no significant difference. The pattern of activated carbon surface topography structure shows that the greater the pore formation in accordance with the temperature increase the more activation time needed. The yield of activated carbon obtained ranged from 72.04 to 82.75%. The results of characterization properties of activated carbon was obtained from 1.11 to 5.41% water, 13.68 to 17.27% substance fly, 20.36 to 26.59% ash, and 56.14 to 62.31% of fixed carbon . Absorption of activated carbon was good enough at 800oC and 120 minutes of activation time, that was equal to 409.52 mg/g of iodine and 14.03% of benzene. Activated carbon produced has less good quality, because only the water content and flying substances that meet the standards.Doi: 10.12777/ijse.5.2.89-94 [How to cite this article: Haji, A.G., Pari, G., Nazar, M., and Habibati.  (2013. Characterization of activated carbon produced from urban organic waste . International Journal of Science and Engineering, 5(2,89-94. Doi: 10.12777/ijse.5.2.89-94

  6. Intramolecular carbon isotope distribution of acetic acid in vinegar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Ryota; Yamada, Keita; Kikuchi, Makiko; Hirano, Satoshi; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2011-09-14

    Compound-specific carbon isotope analysis of acetic acid is useful for origin discrimination and quality control of vinegar. Intramolecular carbon isotope distributions, which are each carbon isotope ratios of the methyl and carboxyl carbons in the acetic acid molecule, may be required to obtain more detailed information to discriminate such origin. In this study, improved gas chromatography-pyrolysis-gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-Py-GC-C-IRMS) combined with headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) was used to measure the intramolecular carbon isotope distributions of acetic acid in 14 Japanese vinegars. The results demonstrated that the methyl carbons of acetic acid molecules in vinegars produced from plants were mostly isotopically depleted in (13)C relative to the carboxyl carbon. Moreover, isotopic differences (δ(13)C(carboxyl) - δ(13)C(methyl)) had a wide range from -0.3 to 18.2‰, and these values differed among botanical origins, C3, C4, and CAM plants.

  7. Measurement of carbon capture efficiency and stored carbon leakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Ralph F.; Dubey, Manvendra K.

    2013-01-29

    Data representative of a measured carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) concentration and of a measured oxygen (O.sub.2) concentration at a measurement location can be used to determine whether the measured carbon dioxide concentration at the measurement location is elevated relative to a baseline carbon dioxide concentration due to escape of carbon dioxide from a source associated with a carbon capture and storage process. Optionally, the data can be used to quantify a carbon dioxide concentration increase at the first location that is attributable to escape of carbon dioxide from the source and to calculate a rate of escape of carbon dioxide from the source by executing a model of gas-phase transport using at least the first carbon dioxide concentration increase. Related systems, methods, and articles of manufacture are also described.

  8. Radiocarbon-based source apportionment of black carbon (BC) in PM 10 aerosols from residential area of suburban Tokyo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Masao; Kumata, Hidetoshi; Koike, Yasuyo; Tsuzuki, Mikio; Uchida, Tatsuya; Fujiwara, Kitao; Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2010-04-01

    The AMS technique was applied to analyse black carbon (BC), total organic carbon (TOC), and previously reported polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in PM 10 aerosols from a residential area, suburban Tokyo, to determine natural abundance of radiocarbon ( 14C), an ideal tracer to distinguish fossil fuel ( 14C-free) from modern biomass combustion sources of pyrolytic products. The 14C concentrations in BC, isolated using the CTO-375 method, were 42% and 30% pMC (in terms of percent Modern Carbon: pMC) in summer and winter, respectively. The 14C concentrations in BC were also compared with those of compound-class specific 14C content of PAHs previously reported for the same samples: they were 45% and 33% pMC in summer and winter, respectively. The 14C signals of BC were identical to those of high molecular weight (MW ⩾ 226, 5-6 rings) PAHs. The resemblance between 14C signals of BC and PAHs can be referred as a 'certificate' for the validity of the BC isolation method employed in this study. Also, it suggests that 14C-BC approach can be a surrogate for PAHs specific 14C analyses to monitor seasonal source variation of combustion-derived pyrolytic products. On the other hand, 14C contents of total organic carbon in 2004 were 61% and 42% pMC in summer and winter, respectively. This is likely attributed to higher contribution of plant activity in summer.

  9. Microbially mediated carbon mineralization: Geoengineering a carbon-neutral mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, I. M.; McCutcheon, J.; Harrison, A. L.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2013-12-01

    Ultramafic and mafic mine tailings are a potentially valuable feedstock for carbon mineralization, affording the mining industry an opportunity to completely offset their carbon emissions. Passive carbon mineralization has previously been documented at the abandoned Clinton Creek asbestos mine, and the active Diavik diamond mine and Mount Keith nickel mine, yet the majority of tailings remain unreacted. Examples of microbe-carbonate interactions at each mine suggest that biological pathways could be harnessed to promote carbon mineralization. In suitable environmental conditions, microbes can mediate geochemical processes to accelerate mineral dissolution, increase the supply of carbon dioxide (CO2), and induce carbonate precipitation, all of which may accelerate carbon mineralization. Tailings mineralogy and the availability of a CO2 point source are key considerations in designing tailings storage facilities (TSF) for optimizing carbon mineralization. We evaluate the efficacy of acceleration strategies including bioleaching, biologically induced carbonate precipitation, and heterotrophic oxidation of waste organics, as well as abiotic strategies including enhancing passive carbonation through modifying tailings management practices and use of CO2 point sources (Fig. 1). With the aim of developing carbon-neutral mines, implementation of carbon mineralization strategies into TSF design will be driven by economic incentives and public pressure for environmental sustainability in the mining industry. Figure 1. Schematic illustrating geoengineered scenarios for carbon mineralization of ultramafic mine tailings. Scenarios A and B are based on non-point and point sources of CO2, respectively.

  10. Properties and degradability of hydrothermal carbonization products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibisch, Nina; Helfrich, Mirjam; Don, Axel; Mikutta, Robert; Kruse, Andrea; Ellerbrock, Ruth; Flessa, Heinz

    2013-09-01

    Biomass carbonized via hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) yields a liquid and a carbon (C)-rich solid called hydrochar. In soil, hydrochars may act as fertilizers and promote C sequestration. We assumed that the chemical composition of the raw material (woodchips, straw, grass cuttings, or digestate) determines the properties of the liquid and solid HTC products, including their degradability. Additionally, we investigated whether easily mineralizable organic components adsorbed on the hydrochar surface influence the degradability of the hydrochars and could be removed by repetitive washing. Carbon mineralization was measured as CO production over 30 d in aerobic incubation experiments with loamy sand. Chemical analysis revealed that most nutrients were preferably enriched in the liquid phase. The C mineralization of hydrochars from woodchips (2% of total C added), straw (3%), grass (6%), and digestate (14%) were dependent on the raw material carbonized and were significantly lower (by 60-92%; < 0.05) than the mineralization of the corresponding raw materials. Washing of the hydrochars significantly decreased mineralization of digestate-hydrochar (up to 40%) but had no effect on mineralization rates of the other three hydrochars. Variations in C mineralization between different hydrochars could be explained by multiple factors, including differences in the O/C-H/C ratios, C/N ratios, lignin content, amount of oxygen-containing functional groups, and pH. In contrast to the solids, the liquid products were highly degradable, with 61 to 89% of their dissolved organic C being mineralized within 30 d. The liquids may be treated aerobically (e.g., for nutrient recovery).

  11. Radiative Transfer Modeling of MESSENGER VIR Spectra of Mercury: Detection and Mapping of Submicroscopic Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trang, D.; Lucey, P. G.; Izenberg, N.

    2015-12-01

    The composition of Mercury is elusive because the planet is optically dark and exhibits a relatively featureless red visible and near-infrared spectrum. Studies have invoked opaque minerals and space weathering to explain these characteristics. In this study we used radiative transfer modeling of MESSENGER VIRS data to show that carbon is required to explain the detailed shape of the spectrum of Mercury from 0.3-1.5 µm. In this model, we assume the regolith comprises a high albedo host mineral, which contains nanophase and microphase iron and carbon. We varied the abundance of nanophase and microphase iron and carbon to fit the observed spectra. We found that the nanophase and microphase iron alone inadequately fits the visible portion of the observed spectra. By adding carbon, we find that nanophase and microphase iron and nanophase amorphous carbon fit the VIRS spectra consistently. We produced a global nanophase amorphous carbon map as well as nanophase and microphase iron maps. From the carbon map (see figure), we find that nanophase amorphous carbon is sensitive to geologic features associated with space weathering, such as fresh crater rays. Thus, amorphous carbon is a new indicator for regolith maturity. We also observe that the global average submicroscopic carbon content is 1.4±0.3 wt.% C, which is consistent with MESSENGER Gamma-Ray Spectrometer measurements. Using this abundance, we can constrain the source of water and carbon on Mercury. Assuming the water ice in the poles is derived from wet impactors, both asteroids and comets, and knowing C/H ratios of those sources, the surface nanophase carbon layer can be no thicker than 10 m if all carbon is derived from an exogenous source. It is almost certain the space weathered regolith on Mercury is thicker than 10 m, so the majority of carbon on Mercury must be endogenous. Figure: Nanophase amorphous carbon map. In this map, fresh craters and their rays are distinguishable by the lower proportion of

  12. The influence of preparation method on measured carbon fractions in tree tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dryw A; O'Hara, Kevin L

    2016-09-01

    Carbon fractions of tree tissues are a key component of forest carbon mass estimation. Several methods have been used to measure carbon fractions, yet no comprehensive comparison between methods has been performed. We found significant differences between carbon fractions derived from four sample preparation methods: oven-drying, vacuum desiccation, freeze-drying, and a new method that consisted of (i) not drying samples, (ii) cutting samples instead of grinding them, (iii) measuring carbon content of samples, (iv) oven-drying remaining sample material and (v) using mass measurements of remaining sample material before and after oven-drying to adjust measured carbon fraction values to an oven-dry basis (minimize the loss of carbon (MLC) method). Oven-drying, freeze-drying and vacuum desiccation resulted in lower average carbon fraction estimates than the MLC method, suggesting that they do not capture as much of the carbon present in tree tissues. Further analysis showed significant, though small, differences in carbon fractions between powdered samples and samples excised from tree core segments with a razor blade. Powdered samples were found to have lower carbon fractions than the excised samples, indicating that some carbon is lost when samples are powdered instead of cut. Utilization of the MLC method captured an average of 1.4% more carbon on an oven-drying basis than freeze-drying, the next best method. Additionally, when applied to different tree tissue types, these methods measured different volatile carbon fractions, indicating that studies attempting to quantify volatile carbon and total carbon fraction in trees should measure all tissue types present.

  13. 1-(4-Bromophenyl-1-(4-nitrobenzoylthiourea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohail Saeed

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C14H10BrN3O3S, crystallizes as two concomitant polymorphs that differ in colour (one yellow and one colourless. Only the structure of the colourless form could be determined. The molecule exists in the thioamide form with an intramolecular N—H...O=C hydrogen bond across the thiourea system. Molecules are linked into layers parallel to (120 by Br...Onitro contacts [3.103 (1 Å], classical hydrogen bonds from the other NH function to the S atom and Nnitro...O=C contacts. The layers are linked by weak C—H...Onitro hydrogen bonds to produce the observed three-dimensional network.

  14. Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldocchi, Dennis; Ryu, Youngryel; Keenan, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    A growing literature is reporting on how the terrestrial carbon cycle is experiencing year-to-year variability because of climate anomalies and trends caused by global change. As CO 2 concentration records in the atmosphere exceed 50 years and as satellite records reach over 30 years in length, we are becoming better able to address carbon cycle variability and trends. Here we review how variable the carbon cycle is, how large the trends in its gross and net fluxes are, and how well the signal can be separated from noise. We explore mechanisms that explain year-to-year variability and trends by deconstructing the global carbon budget. The CO 2 concentration record is detecting a significant increase in the seasonal amplitude between 1958 and now. Inferential methods provide a variety of explanations for this result, but a conclusive attribution remains elusive. Scientists have reported that this trend is a consequence of the greening of the biosphere, stronger northern latitude photosynthesis, more photosynthesis by semi-arid ecosystems, agriculture and the green revolution, tropical temperature anomalies, or increased winter respiration. At the global scale, variability in the terrestrial carbon cycle can be due to changes in constituent fluxes, gross primary productivity, plant respiration and heterotrophic (microbial) respiration, and losses due to fire, land use change, soil erosion, or harvesting. It remains controversial whether or not there is a significant trend in global primary productivity (due to rising CO 2, temperature, nitrogen deposition, changing land use, and preponderance of wet and dry regions). The degree to which year-to-year variability in temperature and precipitation anomalies affect global primary productivity also remains uncertain. For perspective, interannual variability in global gross primary productivity is relatively small (on the order of 2 Pg-C y -1) with respect to a large and uncertain background (123 +/- 4 Pg-C y -1), and

  15. {sup 14}C emission from Swedish nuclear power plants and its effect on the {sup 14}C levels in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenstroem, K.; Erlandsson, Bengt; Hellborg, R.; Kiisk, M.; Persson, Per [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear Physics; Mattsson, Soeren; Thornberg, C. [Lund Univ., Malmoe (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics; Skog, G. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Quaternary Geology

    2000-02-15

    The radionuclide {sup 14}C is produced in all types of nuclear reactors mainly by neutron induced reactions in oxygen ({sup 17}O), nitrogen ({sup 14}N) and carbon ({sup 13}C). Part of the {sup 14}C created is continuously released during normal operation as airborne effluents in various chemical forms (such as CO{sub 2}, CO and hydrocarbons) to the surroundings. Because of the biological importance of carbon and the long physical half-life of {sup 14}C, it is of interest to measure the releases and their incorporation into living material. The {sup 14}C activity concentrations in annual tree rings and air around two Swedish nuclear power plants (Barsebaeck and Forsmark) as well as the background {sup 14}C activity levels from two reference sites in southern Sweden during 1973-1996 are presented in this report. In order to verify the reliability of the method some investigations have been conducted at two foreign nuclear sites, Sellafield fuel reprocessing plant in England, and Pickering nuclear generating station in Canada, where the releases of {sup 14}C are known to be substantial. Furthermore, results from some measurements in the vicinity of Paldiski submarine training centre in Estonia are presented. The results of the {sup 14}C measurements of air, vegetation and annual tree rings around the two Swedish nuclear power plants show very low enhancements of {sup 14}C, if at all above the uncertainty of the measurements. Even if the accuracy of the measurements of the annual tree rings is rather good (1-2%) the contribution of {sup 14}C from the reactors to the environment is so small that it is difficult to separate it from the prevailing background levels of {sup 14}C . This is the case for all sampling procedures: in air and vegetation as well as in annual tree rings. Only on a few occasions an actual increase is observed. However, although the calculations suffer from rather large uncertainties, the calculated release rate from Barsebaeck is in fair agreement

  16. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2012-10-09

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  17. Carbon Concentration of Austenite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Ławrynowicz

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The investigation was carried out to examine the influence of temperature and times of austempering process on the maximum extend towhich the bainite reaction can proceed and the carbon content in retained austenite. It should be noted that a small percentage change in theaustenite carbon content can have a significant effect on the subsequent austempering reaction changing the volume fraction of the phasespresent and hence, the resulting mechanical properties. Specimens were prepared from an unalloyed ductile cast iron, austenitised at 950oCfor 60 minutes and austempered by the conventional single-step austempering process at four temperatures between BS and MS, eg., 250,300, 350 and 400oC. The samples were austempered at these temperatures for 15, 30, 60, 120 and 240 minutes and finally quenched toambient temperature. Volume fractions of retained austenite and carbon concentration in the residual austenite have been observed byusing X-ray diffraction. Additionally, carbon concentration in the residual austenite was calculated using volume fraction data of austeniteand a model developed by Bhadeshia based on the McLellan and Dunn quasi-chemical thermodynamic model. The comparison ofexperimental data with the T0, T0' and Ae3' phase boundaries suggests the likely mechanism of bainite reaction in cast iron is displacive rather than diffusional. The carbon concentration in retained austenite demonstrates that at the end of bainite reaction the microstructure must consist of not only ausferrite but additionally precipitated carbides.

  18. High temperature carbon-carbon supercapacitor using ionic liquid as electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balducci, A.; Dugas, R.; Taberna, P.L.; Simon, P. [Universite Paul Sabatier, CIRIMAT, UMR CNRS 5085, 118 Route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France); Plee, D. [ARKEMA, GRL, RN 117, 64170 Lacq (France); Mastragostino, M. [Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Scienza dei Metalli, Elettrochimica e Tecniche Chimiche, Sede Amministrativa, via San Donato 15, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Passerini, S. [ENEA (Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Environment), IDROCOMB, Casaccia Research Center, Via Anguillarese 301, 00060 Rome (Italy)

    2007-03-20

    This paper presents results about the electrochemical and cycling characterizations of a supercapacitor cell using a microporous activated carbon as the active material and N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (PYR{sub 14}TFSI) ionic liquid as the electrolyte. The microporous activated carbon exhibited a specific capacitance of 60 F g{sup -1} measured from the three-electrode cyclic voltammetry experiments at 20 mV s{sup -1} scan rate, with a maximum operating potential range of 4.5 V at 60 C. A coin cell assembled with this microporous activated carbon and PYR{sub 14}TFSI as the electrolyte was cycled for 40,000 cycles without any change of cell resistance (9 {omega} cm{sup 2}), at a voltage up to 3.5 V at 60 C, demonstrating a high cycling stability as well as a high stable specific capacitance in this ionic liquid electrolyte. These high performances make now this type of supercapacitor suitable for high temperature applications ({>=}60 C). (author)

  19. Preparation and properties of pitch carbon based supercapacitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Using the mesophase pitch as precursor, KOH and CO2 as activated agents, the activated carbon electrode material was fabricated by physical-chemical combined activated technique for supercapacitor. The influence of activated process on the pore structure of activated carbon was analyzed and 14 F supercapacitor with working voltage of 2.5 V was prepared. The charge and discharge behaviors, the properties of cyclic voltammetry, specific capacitance, equivalent serials resistance (ESR), cycle properties, and temperature properties of prepared supercapacitor were examined. The cyclic voltammetry curve results indicate that the carbon based supercapacitor using the self-made activated carbon as electrode materials shows the desired capacitance properties. In 1 mol/L Et4NBFVAN electrolyte, the capacitance and ESR of the supercapacitor are 14.7 F and 60 mΩ, respectively. The specific capacitance of activated carbon electrode materials is 99.6 F/g; its energy density can reach 2.96 W·h/kg under the large current discharge condition. There is no obvious capacitance decay that can be observed after 5000 cycles. The leakage current is below 0.2 mA after keeping the voltage at 2.5 V for 1 h. Meanwhile, the supercapacitor shows desired temperature property; it can be operated normally in the temperature ranging from -40 ℃ to 70 ℃.

  20. Maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 14 in a boy with t(14q14q) associated with a paternal t(13q14q)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomkins, D.J.; Waye, J.S.; Whelan, D.T. [McMaster Univ., Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    An 11-year-old boy was referred for chromosomal analysis because of precocious development and behavioral problems suggestive of the fragile X syndrome. The cytogenetic fragile X studies were normal, but a routine GTG-banded karyotype revealed an abnormal male karyotype with a Robertsonian translocation between the two chromosome 14`s: 46,XY,t(14q14q). Paternal karyotyping revealed another abnormal karyotype: 46,XY,t(13q14q). A brother had the same karyotype as the father; the mother was deceased. In order to determine if the apparently balanced t(14q14q) in the proband might be the cause of the clinical findings, molecular analysis of the origin of the chromosome 14`s was initiated. Southern blotting and hybridization with D4S13 showed that the proband had two copies of one maternal allele which was shared by his brother. The brother`s second allele corresponded to one of the paternal alleles; the proband had no alleles from the father. Analysis of four other VNTRs demonstrated the probability of paternity to be greater than 99%. Thus, the t(14q14q) was most likely composed of two maternal chromosome 14`s. Further characterization of the t(14q14q) by dinucleotide repeat polymorphic markers is in progress to determine whether it has arisen from maternal isodisomy or heterodisomy. Several cases of uniparental disomy for chromosome 14 have been reported recently. Paternal disomy appears to be associated with more severe congenital anomalies and mental retardation, whereas maternal disomy may be associated with premature puberty and minimal intellectual impairment. The origin of the t(14q14q) in the present case may be related to the paternal translocation, as the segregation of the t(13q14q) in meiosis could lead to sperm that are nullisomic for chromosome 14.

  1. Flexible Carbon Aerogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Schwan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon aerogels are highly porous materials with a large inner surface area. Due to their high electrical conductivity they are excellent electrode materials in supercapacitors. Their brittleness, however, imposes certain limitations in terms of applicability. In that context, novel carbon aerogels with varying degree of flexibility have been developed. These highly porous, light aerogels are characterized by a high surface area and possess pore structures in the micrometer range, allowing for a reversible deformation of the aerogel network. A high ratio of pore size to particle size was found to be crucial for high flexibility. For dynamic microstructural analysis, compression tests were performed in-situ within a scanning electron microscope allowing us to directly visualize the microstructural flexibility of an aerogel. The flexible carbon aerogels were found to withstand between 15% and 30% of uniaxial compression in a reversible fashion. These findings might stimulate further research and new application fields directed towards flexible supercapacitors and batteries.

  2. Carbon nanotubes for supercapacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hui; Li, Jianyi; Feng, Yuanping

    2010-01-05

    As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage.

  3. Carbon Nanotubes for Supercapacitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jianyi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage.

  4. Superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlugon, Katarzyna

    The purpose of this thesis is to explain the phenomenon of superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. In the introductory chapter, there is a description of superconductivity and how it occurs at critical temperature (Tc) that is characteristic and different to every superconducting material. The discovery of superconductivity in mercury in 1911 by Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes is also mentioned. Different types of superconductors, type I and type II, low and high temperatures superconductors, as well as the BCS theory that was developed in 1957 by Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer, are also described in detail. The BCS theory explains how Cooper's pairs are formed and how they are responsible for the superconducting properties of many materials. The following chapters explain superconductivity in doped fullerenes, graphene and carbon nanotubes, respectively. There is a thorough explanation followed by many examples of different types of carbon nanomaterials in which small changes in chemical structure cause significant changes in superconducting properties. The goal of this research was not only to take into consideration well known carbon based superconductors but also to search for the newest available materials such as the fullerene nanowhiskers discovered quite recently. There is also a presentation of fairly new ideas about inducing superconductivity in a monolayer of graphene which is more challenging than inducing superconductivity in graphite by simply intercalating metal atoms between its graphene sheets. An effort has been taken to look for any available information about carbon nanomaterials that have the potential to superconduct at room temperature, mainly because discovery of such materials would be a real revolution in the modern world, although no such materials have been discovered yet.

  5. Porosity destruction in carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrenberg, S.N. [Statoil, Stavanger (Norway)

    2006-01-15

    The important thing to understand about carbonate diagenesis is not how porosity is created, but how it is destroyed. Detailed core observations from two deeply-buried carbonate platform successions (the Finnmark platform, offshore north Norway; and the Khuff Formation, offshore Iran) show that in both cases most vertical porosity variation can be accounted for by only two or three factors, namely: (1) stylolite frequency, (2) proportion of argillaceous beds, and (3) anhydrite cement. The spatial distribution of these factors is determined by the depositional distribution of clay minerals (important for localizing chemical compaction) and the occurrence of hypersaline depositional conditions and associated brine reflux (important for localizing anhydrite precipitation and dolomitisation). However, the intensity of chemical compaction and consequent porosity loss in adjacent beds by carbonate cementation also depend upon thermal exposure (temperature as a function of time). Evidence from the Finnmark platform and other examples indicate that the stratigraphic distribution of early-formed dolomite is also important for porosity preservation during burial, but this factor is not apparent in the Khuff dataset. Insofar as the Finnmark and Khuff platforms can be regarded as representative of carbonate reservoirs in general, recognition of the above porosity-controlling factors may provide the basis for general models predicting carbonate reservoir potential both locally (reservoir-model scale) and regionally (exploration-scale). Distributions of clay, anhydrite, and dolomitization should be predictable from stratigraphic architecture, whereas variations in thermal exposure can be mapped from basin analysis. In the present examples at least, factors that do not need to be considered include eogenetic carbonate cementation and dissolution, depositional facies (other than aspects related to clay and anhydrite content), and mesogenetic leaching to create late secondary

  6. 14th International Probabilistic Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Taerwe, Luc; Proske, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the 14th International Probabilistic Workshop that was held in Ghent, Belgium in December 2016. Probabilistic methods are currently of crucial importance for research and developments in the field of engineering, which face challenges presented by new materials and technologies and rapidly changing societal needs and values. Contemporary needs related to, for example, performance-based design, service-life design, life-cycle analysis, product optimization, assessment of existing structures and structural robustness give rise to new developments as well as accurate and practically applicable probabilistic and statistical engineering methods to support these developments. These proceedings are a valuable resource for anyone interested in contemporary developments in the field of probabilistic engineering applications.

  7. Inkjet Printing of Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P. Tortorich

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to give a brief introduction to carbon nanotube inkjet printing, this review paper discusses the issues that come along with preparing and printing carbon nanotube ink. Carbon nanotube inkjet printing is relatively new, but it has great potential for broad applications in flexible and printable electronics, transparent electrodes, electronic sensors, and so on due to its low cost and the extraordinary properties of carbon nanotubes. In addition to the formulation of carbon nanotube ink and its printing technologies, recent progress and achievements of carbon nanotube inkjet printing are reviewed in detail with brief discussion on the future outlook of the technology.

  8. Nanomechanics of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Andras; Zettl, Alex

    2008-05-13

    Some of the most important potential applications of carbon nanotubes are related to their mechanical properties. Stiff sp2 bonds result in a Young's modulus close to that of diamond, while the relatively weak van der Waals interaction between the graphitic shells acts as a form of lubrication. Previous characterization of the mechanical properties of nanotubes includes a rich variety of experiments involving mechanical deformation of nanotubes using scanning probe microscopes. These results have led to promising prototypes of nanoelectromechanical devices such as high-performance nanomotors, switches and oscillators based on carbon nanotubes.

  9. Ultrahard carbon nanocomposite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SIEGAL,MICHAEL P.; TALLANT,DAVID R.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P.; OVERMYER,DONALD L.; SIMPSON,REGINA L.; MARTINEZ-MIRANDA,L.J.

    2000-01-27

    Modest thermal annealing to 600 C of diamondlike amorphous-carbon (a-C) films grown at room temperature results in the formation of carbon nanocomposites with hardness similar to diamond. These nanocomposite films consist of nanometer-sized regions of high density a-C embedded in an a-C matrix with a reduced density of 5--10%. The authors report on the evolution of density and bonding topologies as a function of annealing temperature. Despite a decrease in density, film hardness actually increases {approximately} 15% due to the development of the nanocomposite structure.

  10. Ultrahard carbon nanocomposite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegal, M. P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Tallant, D. R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Provencio, P. N. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Overmyer, D. L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Simpson, R. L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Martinez-Miranda, L. J. [Department of Materials and Nuclear Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2000-05-22

    Modest thermal annealing to 600 degree sign C of diamondlike amorphous-carbon (a-C) films grown at room temperature results in the formation of carbon nanocomposites with hardness similar to diamond. These nanocomposite films consist of nanometer-sized regions of high density a-C embedded in an a-C matrix with a reduced density of 5%-10%. We report on the evolution of density and bonding topologies as a function of annealing temperature. Despite a decrease in density, film hardness actually increases {approx}15% due to the development of the nanocomposite structure. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  11. The effect of carbon credits on savanna land management and priorities for biodiversity conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, Lucinda L; Possingham, Hugh P; Carwardine, Josie; Klein, Carissa J; Roxburgh, Stephen H; Russell-Smith, Jeremy; Wilson, Kerrie A

    2011-01-01

    Carbon finance offers the potential to change land management and conservation planning priorities. We develop a novel approach to planning for improved land management to conserve biodiversity while utilizing potential revenue from carbon biosequestration. We apply our approach in northern Australia's tropical savanna, a region of global significance for biodiversity and carbon storage, both of which are threatened by current fire and grazing regimes. Our approach aims to identify priority locations for protecting species and vegetation communities by retaining existing vegetation and managing fire and grazing regimes at a minimum cost. We explore the impact of accounting for potential carbon revenue (using a carbon price of US$14 per tonne of carbon dioxide equivalent) on priority areas for conservation and the impact of explicitly protecting carbon stocks in addition to biodiversity. Our results show that improved management can potentially raise approximately US$5 per hectare per year in carbon revenue and prevent the release of 1-2 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent over approximately 90 years. This revenue could be used to reduce the costs of improved land management by three quarters or double the number of biodiversity targets achieved and meet carbon storage targets for the same cost. These results are based on generalised cost and carbon data; more comprehensive applications will rely on fine scale, site-specific data and a supportive policy environment. Our research illustrates that the duel objective of conserving biodiversity and reducing the release of greenhouse gases offers important opportunities for cost-effective land management investments.

  12. Squaroglitter: A 3,4-Connected Carbon Net

    KAUST Repository

    Prasad, Dasari L. V. K.

    2013-08-13

    Theoretical calculations are presented on a new hypothetical 3,4-connected carbon net (called squaroglitter) incorporating 1,4 cyclohexadiene units. The structure has tetragonal space group P4/mmm (No. 123) symmetry. The optimized geometry shows normal distances, except for some elongated bonds in the cyclobutane ring substructures in the network. Squaroglitter has an indirect bandgap of about 1.0 eV. The hypothetical lattice, whose density is close to graphite, is more stable than other 3,4-connected carbon nets. A relationship to a (4,4)nanotube is explored, as is a potential threading of the lattice with metal needles. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  13. Carbon-carbon mirrors for exoatmospheric and space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumweide, Duane E.; Wonacott, Gary D.; Woida, Patrick M.; Woida, Rigel Q.; Shih, Wei

    2007-09-01

    The cost and leadtime associated with beryllium has forced the MDA and other defense agencies to look for alternative materials with similar structural and thermal properties. The use of carbon-carbon material, specifically in optical components has been demonstrated analytically in prior SBIR work at San Diego Composites. Carbon-carbon material was chosen for its low in-plane and through-thickness CTE (athermal design), high specific stiffness, near-zero coefficient of moisture expansion, availability of material (specifically c-c honeycomb for lightweight substrates), and compatibility with silicon monoxide (SiO) and silicon dioxide (SiO II) coatings. Subsequent development work has produced shaped carbon-carbon sandwich substrates which have been ground, polished, coated and figured using traditional optical processing. Further development has also been done on machined monolithic carbon-carbon mirror substrates which have also been processed using standard optical finishing techniques.

  14. Terrestrial vegetation carbon sinks in China, 1981―2000

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Using China's ground observations, e.g., forest inventory, grassland resource, agricultural statistics, climate, and satellite data, we estimate terrestrial vegetation carbon sinks for China's major biomes between 1981 and 2000. The main results are in the following: (1) Forest area and forest biomass carbon (C) stock increased from 116.5×106 ha and 4.3 Pg C (1 Pg C = 1015 g C) in the early 1980s to 142.8×106 ha and 5.9 Pg C in the early 2000s, respectively. Forest biomass carbon density increased form 36.9 Mg C/ha (1 Mg C = 106 g C) to 41.0 Mg C/ha, with an annual carbon sequestration rate of 0.075 Pg C/a. Grassland, shrub, and crop biomass sequestrate carbon at annual rates of 0.007 Pg C/a, 0.014―0.024 Pg C/a, and 0.0125―0.0143 Pg C/a, respectively. (2) The total terrestrial vegetation C sink in China is in a range of 0.096―0.106 Pg C/a between 1981 and 2000, accounting for 14.6%―16.1% of carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted by China's industry in the same period. In addition, soil carbon sink is estimated at 0.04―0.07 Pg C/a. Accordingly, carbon sequestration by China's terrestrial ecosystems (vegetation and soil) offsets 20.8%―26.8% of its industrial CO2 emission for the study period. (3) Considerable uncertainties exist in the present study, especially in the estimation of soil carbon sinks, and need further intensive investigation in the future.

  15. Simulations of phenol adsorption on activated carbon and carbon black

    OpenAIRE

    Prosenjak, Claudia; Valente Nabais, Joao; Laginhas, Carlos; Carrott, Peter; Carrott, Manuela

    2010-01-01

    We use grand canonical Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations to study the adsorption of phenol on carbon materials. Activated carbon is modelled by pore size distributions based on DFT methods; carbon black is represented by a single carbon slab with varying percentages of surface atoms removed. GCMC results for the adsorption from the corresponding gas phase gave reasonable agreement with experimental adsorption results. MD simulations, that studied the influence of the presence of ...

  16. Method for production of carbon nanofiber mat or carbon paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naskar, Amit K.

    2015-08-04

    Method for the preparation of a non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fibers, the method comprising carbonizing a non-woven mat or paper preform (precursor) comprised of a plurality of bonded sulfonated polyolefin fibers to produce said non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fibers. The preforms and resulting non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fiber, as well as articles and devices containing them, and methods for their use, are also described.

  17. 22 CFR 120.14 - Person.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Person. 120.14 Section 120.14 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS § 120.14 Person. Person means a natural person as well as a corporation, business association, partnership, society, trust,...

  18. 7 CFR 982.14 - Restricted hazelnuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restricted hazelnuts. 982.14 Section 982.14... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 982.14 Restricted hazelnuts. Restricted hazelnuts...

  19. 10 CFR 51.14 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... FUNCTIONS National Environmental Policy Act-Regulations Implementing Section 102(2) § 51.14 Definitions. (a... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definitions. 51.14 Section 51.14 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY.... Environmental Impact Statement means a detailed written statement as required by section 102(2)(C) of...

  20. 31 CFR 14.5 - Certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certification. 14.5 Section 14.5 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury RIGHT TO FINANCIAL PRIVACY ACT § 14.5 Certification. Prior to obtaining the requested records pursuant to a formal written request,...

  1. 22 CFR 230.14 - Arbitration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arbitration. 230.14 Section 230.14 Foreign... SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS ACT OF 2003, PUB. L. 108-11-STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS § 230.14 Arbitration. Any... arbitration to be held in Washington, DC in accordance with the then prevailing rules of the...

  2. 22 CFR 231.14 - Arbitration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arbitration. 231.14 Section 231.14 Foreign... § 231.14 Arbitration. Any controversy or claim between USAID and any noteholder arising out of this Guarantee shall be settled by arbitration to be held in Washington, DC in accordance with the...

  3. 7 CFR 1221.14 - Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Information. 1221.14 Section 1221.14 Agriculture... INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.14 Information. Information means information and programs that are designed to develop new markets and marketing...

  4. 7 CFR 29.14 - Secretary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Secretary. 29.14 Section 29.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Regulations Definitions § 29.14 Secretary. Secretary means the Secretary of Agriculture of...

  5. 21 CFR 610.14 - Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Identity. 610.14 Section 610.14 Food and Drugs... BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS General Provisions § 610.14 Identity. The contents of a final container of each filling of each lot shall be tested for identity after all labeling operations shall have been...

  6. 45 CFR 1232.14 - Existing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Existing facilities. 1232.14 Section 1232.14... ASSISTANCE Accessibility § 1232.14 Existing facilities. (a) A recipient shall operate each program or... existing facilities or every part of a facility accessible to and usable by handicapped persons. (b)...

  7. 9 CFR 355.14 - Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Facilities. 355.14 Section 355.14... IDENTIFICATION AS TO CLASS, QUALITY, QUANTITY, AND CONDITION Sanitation and Facilities § 355.14 Facilities. Adequate facilities for the preparation and inspection of the products to be certified shall be...

  8. 9 CFR 72.14 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false 72.14 Section 72.14 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.14...

  9. 30 CFR 14.23 - New technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false New technology. 14.23 Section 14.23 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF... § 14.23 New technology. MSHA may approve a conveyor belt that incorporates technology for which...

  10. 15 CFR 14.46 - Procurement records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procurement records. 14.46 Section 14... COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Procurement Standards § 14.46 Procurement records. Procurement records and files for purchases in excess of the simplified acquisition threshold shall...

  11. 15 CFR 14.52 - Financial reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... analysis of the documentation on hand. (iii) The DoC shall determine the frequency of the Financial Status... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Financial reporting. 14.52 Section 14... COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Reports and Records § 14.52 Financial reporting. (a)...

  12. 10 CFR 503.14 - Fuels search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuels search. 503.14 Section 503.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES General Requirements for Exemptions § 503.14 Fuels search. Prior to submitting a petition for a permanent exemption for lack of alternate fuel supply,...

  13. 15 CFR 16.14 - Annual report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Annual report. 16.14 Section 16.14 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce PROCEDURES FOR A VOLUNTARY CONSUMER PRODUCT INFORMATION LABELING PROGRAM § 16.14 Annual report. The Secretary will prepare an annual report of...

  14. November 14, 2014 CDC Ebola Response Update

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-11-14

    This podcast provides an update on the Ebola response, as of November 14, 2014.  Created: 11/14/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 11/14/2014.

  15. 16 CFR 1031.14 - Observation criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Observation criteria. 1031.14 Section 1031.14 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION PARTICIPATION AND COMMISSION EMPLOYEE INVOLVEMENT IN VOLUNTARY STANDARDS ACTIVITIES Employee Involvement § 1031.14...

  16. 7 CFR 210.14 - Resource management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Resource management. 210.14 Section 210.14 Agriculture... Participation § 210.14 Resource management. (a) Nonprofit school food service. School food authorities shall.... Expenditures of nonprofit school food service revenues shall be in accordance with the financial...

  17. 16 CFR 240.14 - Meeting competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Meeting competition. 240.14 Section 240.14 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION GUIDES AND TRADE PRACTICE RULES GUIDES FOR ADVERTISING ALLOWANCES AND OTHER MERCHANDISING PAYMENTS AND SERVICES § 240.14 Meeting competition. A seller charged...

  18. 36 CFR 292.14 - Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Introduction. 292.14 Section 292.14 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Sawtooth National Recreation Area-Private Lands § 292.14 Introduction. (a) Purpose....

  19. 10 CFR 14.27 - Time limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Time limit. 14.27 Section 14.27 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS UNDER FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT Filing Procedures and Requirements § 14.27 Time limit. The claimant shall furnish evidence and information of the types described in 10 CFR...

  20. 15 CFR 14.43 - Competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Competition. 14.43 Section 14.43... ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Procurement Standards § 14.43 Competition. All procurement transactions shall be conducted in a manner to provide, to the maximum extent practical, open and free...

  1. 40 CFR 1508.14 - Human environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Human environment. 1508.14 Section 1508.14 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY TERMINOLOGY AND INDEX § 1508.14 Human environment. Human environment shall be interpreted comprehensively to include the natural...

  2. 7 CFR 945.14 - Export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Export. 945.14 Section 945.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... COUNTIES IN IDAHO, AND MALHEUR COUNTY, OREGON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 945.14 Export....

  3. 7 CFR 958.14 - Export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Export. 958.14 Section 958.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... IN IDAHO, AND MALHEUR COUNTY, OREGON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 958.14 Export....

  4. 7 CFR 1780.14 - Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Security. 1780.14 Section 1780.14 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) WATER AND WASTE LOANS AND GRANTS General Policies and Requirements § 1780.14 Security. Loans will be secured by the best security position practicable in a manner which will adequately protect...

  5. 25 CFR 502.14 - Key employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Key employee. 502.14 Section 502.14 Indians NATIONAL....14 Key employee. Key employee means: (a) A person who performs one or more of the following functions... gaming operation. (d) Any other person designated by the tribe as a key employee....

  6. 16 CFR 1702.14 - Marketing history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Marketing history. 1702.14 Section 1702.14... REQUIREMENTS § 1702.14 Marketing history. Each petition for an exemption under this part shall include a statement of the marketing history of the substance for which an exemption is requested. The...

  7. 45 CFR 98.14 - Plan process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plan process. 98.14 Section 98.14 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND General Application Procedures § 98.14 Plan process. In the development of each Plan, as required pursuant to §...

  8. 5 CFR 1630.14 - Appeals process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appeals process. 1630.14 Section 1630.14 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL RETIREMENT THRIFT INVESTMENT BOARD PRIVACY ACT REGULATIONS § 1630.14 Appeals process. (a) Within 20 work days of receiving the request for review, the Executive Director,...

  9. 7 CFR 932.14 - Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Process. 932.14 Section 932.14 Agriculture Regulations... Handling Definitions § 932.14 Process. Process means to change olives in any way from their natural condition by any commercial process....

  10. 31 CFR 700.14 - Smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Smoking. 700.14 Section 700.14 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FEDERAL LAW ENFORCEMENT... ENFORCEMENT TRAINING CENTER (FLETC) BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS § 700.14 Smoking. Smoking of cigarettes, cigars...

  11. 5 CFR 1205.14 - Granting access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Granting access. 1205.14 Section 1205.14... Procedures for Obtaining Records § 1205.14 Granting access. (a) The Board may allow a requester to inspect... access to records may be accompanied by another individual of the requester's choice. Under...

  12. 5 CFR 1320.14 - Public access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Public access. 1320.14 Section 1320.14 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET OMB DIRECTIVES CONTROLLING PAPERWORK BURDENS ON THE PUBLIC § 1320.14 Public access. (a) In order to enable the public to participate in and provide...

  13. 7 CFR 2902.14 - Penetrating lubricants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Penetrating lubricants. 2902.14 Section 2902.14... Items § 2902.14 Penetrating lubricants. (a) Definition. Products formulated to provide light lubrication..., will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased penetrating lubricants. By that...

  14. 7 CFR 1205.14 - Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Department. 1205.14 Section 1205.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... Procedures for Conduct of Sign-up Period Definitions § 1205.14 Department. The term Department means the...

  15. 7 CFR 1216.14 - Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Market. 1216.14 Section 1216.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.14 Market. Market...

  16. 49 CFR 221.14 - Marking devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Marking devices. 221.14 Section 221.14..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REAR END MARKING DEVICE-PASSENGER, COMMUTER AND FREIGHT TRAINS Marking Devices § 221.14 Marking devices. (a) As prescribed in § 221.13, passenger, commuter and freight trains shall...

  17. 30 CFR 14.20 - Flame resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Flame resistance. 14.20 Section 14.20 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF... § 14.20 Flame resistance. Conveyor belts for use in underground coal mines must be flame-resistant...

  18. 7 CFR 920.14 - Container.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Container. 920.14 Section 920.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Definitions § 920.14 Container. Container means a box, bag, crate, lug, basket, carton, package, or any...

  19. 7 CFR 916.14 - Container.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Container. 916.14 Section 916.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Regulating Handling Definitions § 916.14 Container. Container means a box, bag, crate, lug, basket,...

  20. 7 CFR 948.14 - Container.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Container. 948.14 Section 948.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 948.14 Container. Container means a sack, bag, crate,...